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Full text of "Graduate course catalog (Florida International University). [2003-2004]"

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FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 

Member of the State University System 
Miami, Florida 



2003-2004 UNIVERSITY GRADUATE CATALOG 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



3 Academic Calendar 

9 Message from President Maidique 

9 Message from Dean Wartzok 

10 University Information 
10 State Board of Education 
10 Florida Board of Governors 
10 FIU Board of Trustees 

10 Executive Council 

10 University Mission 

10 University Values Statement 

1 1 The University 

12 University Park Campus 

13 Biscayne Bay Campus 

13 FIU Broward— Pines Center 

14 Accreditations 

1 5 University Graduate School 
17 Academic Programs 

2 1 Graduate Admissions 

24 Tuition and Fees 

28 Financial Aid 

30 University Graduate School Rules and Regulations 

30 Classification of Students 

30 Academic Degree Requirements 

32 Registration 



33 Grading 

34 Student Records 

35 Class Attendance 
35 Religious Holy Days 

35 Veterans Information 

36 Enrollment Certification 

36 Florida Residency Information 

38 General Information 

49 Administration and StaflF 

54 Florida's Statewide Course Numbering System 

56 Academic Units 

58 Centers and Institutes 

60 Support Services 

62 School of Architecture 

71 College of Arts and Sciences 

183 College of Business Administration 

215 College of Education 

281 College of Engineering 

337 College of Health and Urban Affairs 

401 School of Hospitality and Tourism Management 

409 School of Journalism and Mass Communication 

416 Index 

Campus Maps (inside front and back covers) 



FIU and Florida International University are registered marks. Florida International University believes in equal opportunity practices which 
conform to all laws against discrimination and is committed to nondiscrimination with respect to race, color, creed, age, handicap, sex, 
marital status, religion or national origin. Additionally, the University is committed to the principle of taking the positive steps necessary, to 
achieve the equalization of educational and employment opportunities. 

Note: The programs, policies, requirements, regulations published in this catalog are continually subject to review in order to serve the needs 
of the University's various constituencies and to respond to the mandates of the State Board of Education and the Florida Legislature. 
Changes in programs, policies, requirements, and regulations may be made without advance notice. The ultimate responsibility for 
knowing degree requirements imposed upon students by State law rests with students. 



Fees given in this catalog are tentative pending legislative action. 

MAILING ADDRESS GRADUATE ADMISSIONS 

Florida International University 
Graduate Admissions Office 
EO- Box 659004 
Miami, FL 33265-9004 



MAILING ADDRESS UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Florida International University 
University Graduate School 
University Park, PC 236 
Miami, FL 33199 



EMAIL ADDRESS: ugs@fiu.edu 

UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL WEBSITE: http://www.fiu.edu/ugs 
GRADUATE ADMISSIONS OFFICE WEBSITE: http://www.fiu.edu/gTadadin 
ONLINE APPLICATIONS: http://www.fiu.edu/gTadadm 



2 Graduate Catalog 



FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 



UNIVERSITY PARK CAMPUS 

1 1200 SW 8th Street 
Miami, Florida 33199 
305-348-2000 



BISCAYNE BAY CAMPUS 

3000 NE 151st Street 
North Miami, Florida 33181 
305-919-5500 



FlU BROWARD - PINES CENTER 

17195 Sheridan Street 
Pembroke Pines, Florida 33331 
954-438-8600 



ENGINEERING CENTER 

10555 W. Flagler Street 
Miami, Florida 33174 
305-348-3034 



EMERGENCY - DIAL 591 1 
AREA CODES: 

University Park phone numbers begin with area code 305 
Biscayne Bay phone numbers begin with area code 305 
FlU Broward-Pines Center phone numbers begin with area code 954 
Engineering Center numbers begin with area code 305 

From any FIU campus, dial FlU numbers direct: 

All University Park phone numbers 7-xxxx 

All Biscayne Bay phone numbers 6-xxxx 

All FIU Broward— Pines Center phone numbers 6-xxxx 

All Engineering Center numbers 7-xxxx 




Academic Calendar 2003 ' 2004 3 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2003 • 2004 



FALL 



AUGUST 25 - DECEMBER 4 

Final Exams: December 8-13 



June 2 First day to apply for Fall 2003 term graduation. 

July 18 Last day to submit FORM C (Doctoral students planning to graduate in Summer 2004 and master's students 

planning to graduate in Fall 2003). 
July 28 Registration Information and Access Codes available for Fall 2003 term. 

July 30 - August 8 OfHcial Registration (Degiee-Seeking Students) oidy by appointment time and day. 

August 11 - 20 Short Term Tuition Loan Applications available. 

August 11 - 20 Open Registration All Students. Web and Kiosk Registration Continuous. 

August 20 Last day (by 7 p.m.) for students to apply for a Short Term Tuition Loan. 

Last day (by 7 p.m.) to pay tuition and fees to avoid cancellation of enrollment. 

Last day to register (by 7 p.m.) without incurring a $100.00 late registration fee. 
August 20 Graduate Orientation (University Park Campus) 

(Early Housing Check-in available 8/19 from 9a.m. - 5p.m. Early Housing Check-in is available ONLY for 

residents registered for these Orientations and who live outside Dade and Broward Counties. Early Housing 

Check-in is subject to a daily fee charge) 
August 21 - 24 Official Housing Check-in 9 a.m. - 8 p.m. 

August 22 International Student Orientation (University Park and Biscayne Bay Campus) 

August 25 Classes begin. 

August 30 Last day (by 1 p.m.) to complete late registration. 

Drop/Add Period ends at 1 p.m. 

Last day to change a grading option. 

Last day (by 1 p.m.) to drop courses or withdraw from the University without incurring 

a financial liability. 
September 1 Labor Day Holiday (University Closed). 

September 19 Last day (by 5 p.m.) to apply for graduation at the end of Fall 2003 term. 

September 20 Last day (by 1 p.m.) to withdraw from the University with a 25% refund of tuition. 

September 29 - Oaober 3 Faculty Convocation Week. 
October 3 Faculty Convocation. 

October 4 - December 3 Fall 2003 Mini- Term. 
October 18 Deadline (by 1 p.m.) to drop a course with a DR grade. 

Deadline (by 1 p.m.) to withdraw from the University with a WI grade. 
November 7 Last day to submit FORM D: Request for Thesis/Dissertation Defense. 

November 1 1 Veterans' Day Holiday (University Closed). 

November 14 Last day to submit FORM C (Doctoral students planning to graduate in Fall 2004 and 

master's students planning to graduate in Spring 2004). 
November 21 Last day to hold thesis/dissertation defense. 

November 27 - 28 Thanksgiving Holiday (University Closed). 

November 29 No Saturday Classes. 

December 4 Classes end. 

December 5-6 Exam Study Days (No exams given on these days) 

(Exam Study Daysxio not apply to labs, clinical placements, or internships. Friday only classes are exempted 

from Exam Study Days.) 



4 Graduate Catalog 



December 8-13 Official Examination Period. 

December 12 Last day to submit final copy and FORM F: Thesis/Dissertation Memorandum of Approval. 

December 13-16 Commencement Exercises. 

December 17 Grades due at the Registrar's Office. 

December 19 Grades available to students by web and at kiosks. 

December 25 Christmas Holiday (University Closed). 



SPRING 



JANUARY 5 -APRIL 14 

Final Exams: April 17-23 



September 2 
October 6 
November 10 
November 1 1 
November 14 

November 15-21 
Nov. 24 - Dec 29 
November 27 - 28 

December 25 
December 22 - 29 
December 29 
December 29 

January 1 
January 2-4 
January 2 
January 5 
January 10 



January 19 
January 20 
January 23 
January 31 
February 2 
February 14 -April 14 



February 28 



March 19 

March 22 - 
March 29 



27 



Last day for International Students to submit applications for Spring term admission. 

First day to apply for Spring 2004 term graduation. 

Registration Information and Access Codes available for Spring 2004 term. 

Veterans' Day Holiday (University Closed). 

Last day to submit FORM C (Doctoral students planning to graduate in Fall 2004 and master's 

students planning to graduate in Spring 2004). 

Official Registration (Degree-Seeking Students only) by appointment time and day. 

Open Registration All Students. Web and Kiosk Registration Continuous. 

Thanksgiving Holiday (University Closed). Web and Kiosk Registration Continuous. 

Christmas Holiday (University Closed). 

Short Term Tuition Loan Applications available. 

Last day (by 5 p.m.) for students to apply for a Short Term Tuition Loan. 

Last day (by 5 p.m.) to pay tuition and fees to avoid cancellation of enrollment. 

Last day to register (by 5 p.m.) without incurring a $100.00 late registration fee. 

New Year's Day (University Closed). 

Housing check-in 9 a.m. - 8 p.m. 

International Student Orientation (University Park and Biscayne Bay Campus). 

Classes Begin. 

Last day (by 1 p.m.) to complete late registration. 

Drop/Add Period ends at 1 p.m. 

Last day to change grading option. 

Last day (by 1 p.m.) to drop courses or withdraw from the University without incurring 

a financial liability. 

Martin Luther King Holiday (University Closed). 

Financial Aid Applications available for 2004-2005. 

Last day (by 5 p.m.) to apply for Spring 2004 term graduation. 

Last day (by 1 p.m.) to withdraw fi-om the University with a 25% refiind of tuition. 

Last day for International Students to submit applications for Summer term admission 

Spring 2004 Mini-Term. 

Last day (by 1 p.m.) to drop a course with a DR grade. 

Last day (by 1 p.m.) to withdraw from the University with a WI grade. 

Last day to submit FORM D: Request for Thesis/Dissertation Defense. 

Spring Break. 

Last day to submit FORM C (Doctoral students planning to graduate in Spring 2005 

and master's students planning to graduate in Summer 2004. 



Academic Calendar 2003 ♦ 2004 5 



April I Last day for International Students to submit applications for Fall 2003 term admission 

April 2 Last day to hold thesis/dissertation defense. 

April 14 Classes end. 

April 15 - 16 Exam Study Days (No exams given on these days). 

(Exam Study Days do not apply to labs, clinical placements, or internships. 

Friday only classes are exempted from Exam Study Days.) 
April 17 - 23 Official Examination Period. 

April 23 Last day to submit final copy and FORM F: Thesis/Dissertation Memorandum of Approval. 

April 26 - 27 Commencement Exercises. 

April 27 Grades due at the Registrar's Office. 

April 29 Grades available to students by web and at kiosks. 



SUMMER 




MAY 10 -AUGUST 14 



MAYI0-JUNE25 

February 2 First day to apply for Summer 2004 term graduation. 

March 29 Last day to submit FORM C (Doctoral students planning to graduate in Spring 2005 and 

master's students planning to graduate in Summer 2004). 
April 5 Registration Information and Access Codes available for Summer 2004 term 

April 10 - 16 Official Registration (Degree Seeking Students only) by appointment time and day 

April 17 - May 4 Open Registration All Students. Web and Kiosk Registration Continuous. 

April 26 - May 4 Short Term Tuition Loan Applications available. 

May 4 Last day (by 7 p.m.) for students to apply for a Short Term Tuition Loan. 

May 4 Last day (by 7 p.m.) to pay tuition and fees to avoid cancellation of enrollment. 

Last day to register (by 7 p.m.) without incurring $100.00 late registration fee. 
May 7 International Student Orientation (University Park/Biscayne Bay Campus) 

May 7-9 Housing check-in 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. for Summer Term A. 

May 10 Classes begin. 

May 15 Last day (by 1 p.m.) to complete late registration. 

Drop/Add Period ends at 1 p.m. 

Last day to change grading option. 

Last day (by 1 p.m.) to drop courses or withdraw from the University without incurring 

a financial liability. 
May 28 Last day (by 5 p.m.) to apply for Summer 2004 graduation. 

May 31 Memorial Day Holiday (University Closed). 

June 5 Last day (by 1 p.m.) to drop a course with a DR grade. 

Last day (by 1 p.m.) to withdraw from the University with a WI grade. 

Last day (by 1 p.m.) to withdraw from the University with a 25% refiind of tuition. 
June 25 Classes end 

(Grades will be posted on transcripts. However, graduation will not be processed until the end of the 

Complete Summer Term.) 
June 29 Grades due at the Registrar's Office. 

July 1 Summer Term A grades available to students via the web and at kiosks. 

August 19 Final grades and GPA calculation available by web and at kiosks. 



6 Graduate Catalog 



mM3sm 

JULY 6 -AUGUST 14 
March 29 Last day to submit FORM C (Doctoral students planning to graduate in Spring 2005 and master's 

students planning to graduate in Summer 2004). 
June 7-29 Summer Term B registration resumes. 

June 28 Last day (by 5 p.m.) to pay tuition and fees to avoid cancellation of enrollment. 

Last day to register (by 5 p.m.) without incurring $100.00 late registration fee. 
June 30 - July 1-2 Housing Check-in 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. for Summer Term B. 

July 1 International Student Orientation (University Park and Biscayne Bay Campus) 

July 4-5 Independence Day (University Closed). 

July 6 Classes begin. 

July 9 Last day to submit FORM D: Request for Thesis/Dissertation Defense. 

July 10 Last day (by 1 p.m.) to complete late registration. 

Drop/Add Period ends at 1 p.m. 

Last day to change grading option. 

Last day (by 1 p.m.) to drop courses or withdraw from the University without incurring 

a financial liability. 
July 16 Last day to submit FORM C (Doctoral students planning to graduate in Summer 2005 and Master's 

students planning to graduate in Fall 2004). 
July 23 Last day to hold thesis/dissertation defense. 

July 31 Last day (by 1 p.m.) to drop a course with a DR grade. 

Last day (by 1 p.m.) to withdraw from the University with a WI grade. 

Last day (by 1 p.m.) to withdraw from the University with a 25% refund of tuition. 
August 13 Last day to submit final copy and FORM F: Thesis/Dissertation Memorandum of Approval. 

August 14 Classes end. 

August 1 7 Grades due at the Registrar's Office. 

August 19 Grades available to students by web and at kiosks. 



nnEia 



MAY 10 -AUGUST 14 

February 2 First day to apply for Summer 2004 graduation. 

March 29 Last day to submit FORM C (Doctoral students planning to graduate in Spring 2005 and master's 

students planning to graduate in Summer 2004). 
April 5 Registration Information and Access Codes available for Summer 2004 term 

April 10 - 16 Official Registration (Degree-Seeking Students only) by appointment time and day. 

April 17 - May 4 Open Registration All Students. Web and Kiosk Registration Continuous. 

April 26 - May 4 Short Term Tuition Loan Applications available. 

May 4 Last day (by 1 p.m.) for students to apply for a Short Term Tuition Loan. 

May 4 Last day (by 1 p.m.) to pay tuition and fees to avoid cancellation of enrollment. 

Last day to register without incurring a $100.00 late registration fee. 
May 7 International Student Orientation (University Park/Biscayne Bay Campus). 

May 7-9 Housing check-in 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. for Summer Term C. 

May 10 Classes begin. 



Academic Calendar 2003 ' 2004 7 



May 15 Last day (by 1 p.m.) to complete late registration. 

Drop/Add Period ends at 1 p.m. 

Last day to change grading option. 

Last day (by 1 p.m.) to drop courses or withdraw from the University without incurring 

a financial liability. 
May 28 Last day (by 5 p.m.) to apply for Summer 2004 graduation. 

May 31 Memorial Day Holiday (University Closed). 

June 5 Last day (by 1 p.m.) to withdraw from the University with a 25% refund of tuition. 

June 26 Last day (by 1 p.m.) to drop a course with a DR grade. 

Last day (by 1 p.m.) to withdraw from the University with a WI grade. 
July 4-5 Independence Day Observed (University Closed). 

July 9 Last day to submit FORM D: Request for Thesis/Dissertation Defense. 

July 16 Last day to submit FORM C (Doctoral students planning to graduate in Summer 2005 and 

master's students planning to graduate in Pall 2004). 
July 23 Last day to hold thesis/dissertation defense. 

August 13 Last day to submit final copy and FORM F: Thesis/Dissertation Memorandum of Approval. 

August 14 Classes end. 

August 17 Grades due at the Registrar's Office. 

August 19 Grades available to students by web and at kiosks. 

August 30 Fall semester classes begin. 



Calendar dates are subject to change. Please contact appropriate offices for verification and updates. This calendar includes official University 
holidays. Faculty are encouraged to make accommodations for students who wish to observe religious holidays. For a listing of religious 
holidays you may visit http://www.interfaithcalendar.org. Students should make their requests known at the beginning of the semester. 



8 Graduate Catalog 




Message from President Maidique and Dean Warizok 9 




PRESIDENT 

MODESTO A. MAIDIQUE 

Dear Graduate Students: 

Welcome to Florida International University. In this Course 
Catalog we provide a broad overview of our institution, including 
a great deal of useRil information to guide you through your 
academic experience. 

As a leading public research university located in one of the 
nation's most exciting international cities, FIU offers a rare 
combination of vast resources, personal attention and 
affordability. With more than 180 baccalauteate, master's and 
doctoral degree programs — as well as a nationally renowned 
faculty and an intimate learning environment — we prepare our 
students for the leading job markets and the latest technologies. 
Committed to both quality and access, FIU meets the 
educational needs of traditional students, as well as the 
increasing numbers of part-time students and lifelong learners. 

FIU has a nationally renowned full-time feculty, known for their 
outstanding teaching and cutting-edge research. U.S. News and 
World Report his ranked FIU among the top 100 public national 
universities in its annual survey of "America's Best Colleges. " FIU 
has been recognized as one of the top 10 public commuter 
universities in the nation by Money magazine. Kiplinger's Personal 
Finance Magazine ranked FIU as the country's 1 8th best value in 
public higher education. The University is a member of Phi Beta 
Kappa, the nation's oldest and most distinguished academic honor 
society. Our students and faculty continually receive 
national and international recognition for their achievements. 

Graduate education is central to the research cote of FIU's 
mission. Our graduate students, under the expert guidance of our 
faculty, are making major contributions to the intellectual 
discourse in many disciplines. Graduates from our professional 
schools and colleges have become leaders in corporate, non-profit 
and governmental sectors throughout the world. Whatever your 
intellectual desires and career objectives may be, you will find the 
resources and opportunity to fulfill your personal and 
professional goals at FIU. 




DEAN 

DOUGLAS WARTZOK 

Dear Graduate Students: 

Florida International University has developed nationally 
recognized graduate piograms in a very short period of time. 
Graduate ptograms are only as good as the faculty involved in the 
programs. Our graduate programs have attained their recognition 
because of the high quality faculty FIU has hired and kept in the 
very competitive environment of higher education in the United 
States. A rich graduate experience needs more than excellent 
faculty. Much of the learning in graduate education comes from 
the intetaaion of peers. Because FIU has been able to attract a 
very talented group of students to its graduate programs, you have 
the assurance that you will be stimulated through interactions 
with your peers at all stages of your graduate program. 

The infrastructure from the new laboratories to the computing 
resources to the libraries mean that you will have the facilities 
required to condua your tesearch intensely and expeditiously. It 
is our intention to provide graduate students with the necessary 
opportunities so that they can move through their programs in a 
timely manner, complete as excellent a thesis or dissenation as 
they are capable of doing, secure the best post-graduate 
appointments, and succeed in satisfying and rewarding careers. 

This University Graduate School catalog provides you with a 
comprehensive overview of the degrees, programs, and courses 
offered at Florida International University. It is also a guide to the 
suppon services available to help assure your success. Welcome to 
graduate education at one of the most exciting and dynamic 
universities in the world. 



1 Graduate Catalog 



UNIVERSITY INFORMATION 



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Jim Home Commissioner of Education 

Phil Handy Chair 

Sally Bradshaw 
Linda Eads 
T. William Fair 
Chatles Garcia 
Julia Johnson 
Bill Proctor 

FLORIDA BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

Carolyn K. Roberts Chair 

John Oasburg Vice Chair 

Pamela "Pam" Bilbrey 

Castell V. Bryant, Ed.D. 

Miguel De Grandy 

Rolland Heiser 

Commissioner Jim Home 

Gerri Moll 

Joan Wellhouse Newton 

Ava L. Parker 

Howard Rock, Ph.D. 

Peter S. Rummell 

Chris Sullivan 

Patrick Sullivan 

John W. Temple 

Steven Uhlfelder 

Zachariah P. Zachariah, M.D. 



FlU BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Adolfo Henriques 
Betsy Atkins 
Rafael Calderon 
Albert Dotson Sr. 
Patricia Frost 
Miriam Lopez 
Clayton Solomon 
David Parker 
Sergio Pino 
Claudia Puig 
Marcel Escoffier 
Rosa Sugranes 
Herbert Wertheim 



Chaii 



EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 

Modesto A. Maidique 
Mark B. Rosenberg 



Paul D. Gallagher 

Thomas A. Breslin 
Rosa L. Jones 

Howard R. Lipman 
John P. McGowan 

Patricia Teiles-Irvin 



President 

Provost and Executive Vice President, 

Academic Affairs 

Executive Vice President, 

Business and Finance 

Vice President, Research 

Vice President, Academic Affairs and 

Undergraduate Studies 

Vice President, University Advancement 

Vice President, InformationTechnology 

and Chief Information Offtcer 

Vice President, Student Affairs 

and Human Resources 



UNIVERSITY MISSION 

Florida International University is an urban, multicampus, research university serving southeast Florida, 
the state, the nation, and the international community. Our mission is to impart knowledge through 
excellent teaching, promote public service, discover new knowledge, solve problems through research, and 
foster creativity. 

UNIVERSITYVALUES STATEMENT 



As an institution of higher learning, Florida International University is committed to: 

• Freedom of thought and expression 

• Excellence in teaching and in the pursuit, generation, dissemination, and application of knowledge 

• Respect for the dignity of the individual 

• Respect for the environment 

• Honesty, integrity and truth 

• Diversity 

• Strategic, operational and service excellence 



University Informaiion 1 1 




THE UNIVERSITY 



Florida International University — Miami's public research university — 
is one of America's most dynamic institutions of higher learning. 
Since opening in 1972, FIU has achieved many benchmarks of 
excellence that have taken other universities more than a century to 
reach. FIU, a member institution of the State University System of 
Florida, was established by the Florida Legislature in 1965. Classes 
began in September 1972, with 5,667 students enrolled in upper 
division and graduate programs — the largest opening day 
enrollment in the history of American higher education. In 1984, 
FIU received the authority to begin offering degree programs at the 
doctoral level, and in 1994, the Carnegie Foundation for the 
Advancement of Teaching classified FIU as a Doctoral I Universit)'. 
This classification was changed in 2000, when FIU became a 
Doaoral/Research University-Extensive, the highest ranking in the 
prestigious Carnegie Foundation classification system. The 
University encourages research experiences for undergraduate 
students as well as for graduate students. 

Modesto A. (Mitch) Maidique is FIU's fourth president. Appointed 
in 1986, the former Harvard Business School professor and 
high-tech entrepreneur received his PhD. in Electrical Engineering 
from the Massachusens Institute of Technology and was associated 
with MIT, Harvard, and Stanford for 20 years. President Maidique 
has built on the sound foundation laid by his predecessors - Charles 
E. Perry, FIU's first president, appointed in July 1969; Harold B. 
Crosby, who succeeded in June 1976; and Gregory B. Wolfe, named 
the third president in Febtuary 1979. 

FIU has nationally and internationally renowned faculry known for 
their outstanding teaching and cutting-edge research; students from 
throughout the United States and more than 130 foreign countries; 
and alumni who have risen to prominence in every field and are a 
testament to the University's academic excellence. The University is 
a member of Phi Beta Kappa, the nation's oldest and most 
distinguished academic honor society. FIU offers more than 180 
baccalaureate, masters and doctoral degree programs in 1 8 colleges 
and schools: Accounting, Architeaure, Arts and Sciences, Business 
Administration, Computer Science, Education, Engineering, 
Health, Health and Urban Affairs, Honors, Hospitality 



Management, Journalism and Mass Communication, Music, 
Nursing, Policy and Management, Social Work and the University 
Graduate School. The FIU College of Law welcomed its first class 
in Fall 2002. 

FIU has more than 33,000 students, 1,100 full-time feculty, and 
90,000 alumni, making it the largest university in South Florida and 
placing it among the nation's largest colleges and universities. The 
University has two campuses - University Park in western Miami- 
Dade County and the Biscayne Bay Campus in northeast Miami- 
Dade County — and an educational facility at the Pines Educational 
Center in nearby Broward County. Numerous programs are offered 
at off-campus locations and onhne. U.S. News anj World Report has 
ranked FIU among the top 100 public national universities in its 
annual survey of "America's Best Colleges." FIU has been recognized 
as one of the top 10 public commuter universities in the nation by 
Money magazine. Kiplinger's Personal Finance Magazine has ranked 
FIU as the country's 1 8th best value in public higher education. 

Florida International University emphasizes research as a major 
component of its mission. It anained Doctoral/Research University- 
Extensive status, the top Carnegie classification in 2000. In fiscal 
year 2000, Florida International University ranked 59th nationally 
in federal research and development (RandD) expenditures for the 
Social Sciences, 69th in Environmental Sciences, 70th in Computer 
Sciences, and 72nd in Engineering. 

During fiscal year 2002-03, sponsored research funding from 
outside sources grew for the ninth consecutive year and reached 
$75.5 million. This was more than two times what it had been five 
years before and four times what it had been a decade before. These 
funds, secured through contracts and grants mostly from federal 
agencies and also from state agencies, private foundations, and cor- 
porations, are used to conduct research, provide stipends for gradu- 
ate students, and improve research facilities. 



12 Graduate Catalog 



UNIVERSITY PARK CAMPUS 



The University Park Campus (UP) is a 344 acre site on the western 
edge of Miami, the center of a metropohtan area of almost four 
million people. Apartment-style residence halls, the Golden Panther 
Arena, a nationally certified environmental preserve, and athletic 
facilities all contribute to a pleasant collegiate atmosphere on the 
University Park campus, which is also Florida International 
University's (FIU) largest campus. FIU's University Park Campus 
has an impressive campus architecture, lush tropical landscaping, the 
Martin Z. Margulies Sculpture Park recognized nationally as one of 
the world's most important collections of sculpture and the largest 
on a university campus. There is also a state-of-the-art performing 
arts center, a new fitness center, an expanded university center, a 
4,500 seat Golden Panther Sports Arena and a 17,500 seat Football 
Stadium. University Park also has laboratories, auditoriums, music 
and art studios, an art museum, an experimental theater and many 
student organizations including the prestigious Phi Beta Kappa 
Honor Society. There is a wide variety of clubs on campus to meet 
the professional, service, athletic, social, and cultural needs of the 
FIU community. 



institutional archives, and curriculum materials. In addition to its 
own holdings, the library has the resources to locate and access 
holdings at other major universities throughout the state and 
county. Its on-line computer catalog WebLuis (Library User 
Information Service) provides information on the collections of all 
libraries in the State University System of Florida. 

Recent additions to the University Park Campus include University 
House, Everglades Hall, the Paul L. Cejas School of Architecture 
building designed by Bernard Tschumi, a 100,000 square-foot 
Health and Life Sciences building, and an 83,000 square-foot 
Management and Advancement Research Center (MARC). The 
Graham University Center, currently approximately 222,000 square 
feet with the recent addition of a Barnes and Noble bookstore, will 
be enlarged by approximately 31,000 square feet in a $5.2 million 
expansion. Plans for the renovation of the Graham Center include 
the addition of a new food court and the move of the Campus Life 
offices to a second floor area that will include a balcony overlooking 
the food court. 



The Green Library occupying an eight-story, $30 million building at 
University Park is the largest in South Florida. FIU's libraries 
contain more than 1 .6 million bound volumes, and more than 9,000 
journal subscriptions, including over 2,000 journals in electronic full 
text, which are complemented by substantial holdings of federal, 
state, local, and international documents, maps, microforms. 



University housing available at University Park includes the Panther 
Hall, Everglades Hall, UP Towers, and the University Apartments. 
Housing staff will assist students in selecting living accommodations 
that meet their particular requirements. Housing for married 
students is available on a limited basis. Graduate housing is also 
limited and applications should be submitted as early as possible. 




University Information 13 



BISCAYNE BAY CAMPUS 



FlU BROWARD-PINES CENTER 




The Biscayne Bay Campus of Florida International University is 
located on 200 acres on the waterfront of Biscayne Bay and has an 
enrollment in excess of 8,000 students. The campus is headquarters 
for academic programs in Hospitality Management, Journalism and 
Mass Communication, Nursing, and Creative Writing. Cenain other 
programs in Arts and Sciences, Business Administration, Education, 
and Health and Urban Affairs are also offered (for specific degree 
programs please refer to Academic Progtams in this catalog). 

The Biscayne Bay Campus serves as host to the Institute for Life 
Long Learning, the HRS-Children and Families Professional 
Development Center, the Institute of Government, the Institute for 
Public Opinion Research, Center on Aging, and the Roz and Cal 
Kovens Conference Center. The Kovens Conference Center is a 
high-tech, state-of-the-art conference facility located on the 
waterfront of Biscayne Bay. 

Apartment style residential housing on the Biscayne Bay Campus 
accommodates 276 students. Student life is enhanced through the 
provision of programs and services offered in the Wolfe University 
Center through Student Affairs, which is the focal point of social 
and cultural activity outside of the classroom. The campus also 
provides a Student Health Care and Wellness Center. 

The Campus is administered from the Office of the Vice Provost of 
Biscayne Bay Campus. This office includes represenratives from the 
Divisions of Academic Affairs, Business and Finance, Student 
Affairs, Human Resources, and University Relations. 



Florida International University has brought higher education 
closer to home for thousands of South Broward residents through its 
Pines Center at the Academic Village in Pembroke Pines. Classes are 
held in a state-of-the-art 90,000 square foot facility that includes 
spacious classrooms, computer labs, case study rooms, a student 
lounge and a 450-seat auditorium. Sharing the Academic Village 
with Broward Community College, the City of Pembroke Pines 
Charter High School and Southwest Regional Library, the FIU 
Broward-Pines Center is pan of an innovative educational complex. 

Presendy, select programs at the bachelor's, master's and doctoral level 
are being offered by the College of Arts and Sciences, College of 
Business Administration, College of Education, College of 
Engineering, and the College of Health and Urban Affairs. For 
specific degree programs, please refer to the "Broward Programs" link 
on the University home page, as well as the relevant pages in this 
catalog. In addition to degree-seeking programs, the College of 
Continuing and Professional Studies offers several non-credit courses. 

Students attending the FIU Broward-Pines Center benefit from 
state-of-the-art computer labs and access to the resources of both the 
FIU libraries and the Broward County Southwest Regional Library. 
The Student Government provides many afternoon and evening 
opportunities for students of all ages to sociahze and network. Career 
development services are also provided. For additional informtion 
on the FIU Broward-Pines Center, visit www.fiu.edu/-broward ot 
call 954-438-8600. 




14 Graduate Catalog 



ACCREDITATIONS 



All academic progiams of Florida International University are approved by the State Board of Education and the FIU Board of Trustees. The 
University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) (1866 Southern Lane, 
Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097; 404-679-4501) to award the baccalaureate, masters, and doctoral degrees. SACS reaffirmed FIU's accreditation 
on December 5, 2000. Degree programs at FIU are accredited or approved by the appropriate specialized accreditation agency, or are 
pursuing full accreditation or approval. To obtain information about the specialized accreditation agencies, their criteria and review? process, 
contact the Chairperson/Director of the respective degree program. The FIU degree programs and the respective professional accrediting 
agencies are listed in alphabetical order below. 



ACCOUNTING 

Association to Advance Collegiate Schools 
of Business (AACSB) International 



JOURNALISM AND MASS COMMUNICATION 

Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass 
Communication 



ARCHITECTURE 

National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Landscape Architectural Accreditation Board (LAAB) 



ART AND ART HISTORT 

National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD) 



MUSIC 

National Association of Schools of Music 



ART MUSEUM 

American Association of Museums 

BUSINESS 

Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) 
International 



NURSING 

Florida Board of Nursing 

National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) 

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 

Council for Occupational Therapy Education 



CHEMISTRY 

American Chemical Society (ACS) (Certified) 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Conunission of the Computing Science Accreditation Board (CSAB) 

CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT 

American Council for Construction Education (ACCE) 

DIETETICS AND NUTRITION 

Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education (CADE) 



PARKS AND RECREATION 

National Recreation and Parks Association/American Association 
For Leisure and Recreation (NRPA/AALR) 

PHYSICALTHERAPY 

Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education 

(CAPTE) 

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and 
Administration (NASPAA) 



EDUCATION 

National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) 



PUBLIC HEALTH 

Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH) 



ENGINEERING 

Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) 



SOCIAL WORK 

Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) 



HEALTH INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

American Health Information iManagement Association (AHIMA) 



THEATRE AND DANCE 

National Association of Schools of Theatre (NAST) 



HEALTH SERVICES ADMINISTRATION 

Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education 
Programs (CAAHEP) 



University Graduate School 15 




16 Graduate Catalog 



UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Douglas Wartzok 
Ruben D. Jaen 
M.O. Thirunarayanan 



Dean 
Associate Dean 
Associate Dean 



The University Graduate School has oversight of post-baccalaureate 
programs in all colleges and schools with the exception of rhe J.D. 
program in the College of Law. Working with the Graduate Faculty 
and the Graduate Council of the FaciJty Senate, the University 
Graduate School develops and implements the policies and proce- 
dures that guide graduate education at the University. 

Graduate Admissions is usually the first point of contact entering 
graduate students have with the University Graduate School. 
Students are admitted to the University Graduate School upon 
recommendation of the graduate program to which they have applied. 

The University Graduate School oversees the university-wide 
fellowship programs: Presidential Fellowships, Presidential Enhanced 
Assistantships, and Dissertation Year Fellowships. The University 
Graduate School also works with the graduate programs to provide 
support to Graduate Assistants. The stipend for Graduate Assistants 
is provided by the graduate program, within guidelines set by the 
University Graduate School, and the accompanying tuition waivers 
are provided by the University Graduate School. 



Graduate students completing non-thesis master's degrees typically have 
little contact with the University Graduate School between 
admission and the certification of completion of degree requirements 
unless they need to request an exception to one of the rules or regulations 
governing graduate education. However, students completing thesis 
master's degrees and all students in doaoral programs have more 
contact with the University Graduate School as they obtain University 
Graduate School approval for their thesis or dissertation committee, 
thesis or dissertation proposal, thesis or dissertation defense announce- 
ment, and final thesis or dissertation. 

The University Graduate School works with the Graduate Students 
Association to help enrich the total graduate student experience: 
academically, socially and culturally. The University Graduate School 
serves as an ombudsman for graduate students. 

All graduate students are encouraged to visit the University Graduate 
School (PC 236), or call 305-348-2455, or log on to the website, 
www.fiu.edu/ugs, to learn the answers to questions regarding any 
phase of their graduate education. 



Academic Programs 1 7 



PMiliiSiffil:«ii««M 



SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 

www.fiu.edu/soa 

Master of Architecture 

Master of Landscape Architecture 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

www.fiu.edu/orgs/-casdean 

Master in the Art of Teaching Music 
MASTER OF ARTS IN: 

African-New World Studies 

Comparative Sociology 

Economics 

English 

History 

International Studies 

Latin American and Caribbean Studies 

Liberal Studies 

Linguistics 

Political Science 

Religious Studies 

Spanish 
MASTER OF FINE ARTS IN: 

Creative Writing 
Visual Arts 
Master in Music 
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN: 
Biology 
Chemistry 
Computer Science 
Earth Sciences 
Environmental Studies 
Environmental and Urban Systems 
Forensic Science 
Mathematical Sciences 
Psychology 
Physics 
Statistics 
)OCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN: 
Biology 
Chemistry 
Computer Science 
Earth Sciences 
Economics 
History 

International Relations 
Physics 

Political Science 
Psychology 

Comparative Sociology 
Spanish 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

cba.fiu.edu 

Master of Accounting 
Master of Business Administration 
Master of International Business 
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN: 

Finance 

Management Information Systems 

Taxation 
Doctor of Philosophy in Business Administration 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

coeweb.fiu.edu 

MASTER IN THE ART OF TEACHING: 

An Education (K-12) 

Biology Education (6-12) 

Chemistry Education (6-12) 

Elementary Education 

English Education (6-12) 

French Education (K-12) 

Mathematics Education (6-12) 

Physics Education (6-12) 

Social Studies Education (6-12) 

Spanish Education (K-12) 

Special Education/Varying Exceptionalities (K-12) 
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN: 

Administration and Supervision of Vocational Education 

Adult Education 

Art Education (K-12) 

Counselor Education 

Early Childhood Education 

Educational Leadership 

Elementary Education 

English Education (6-12) 

Exercise and Sports Sciences 

Home Economics Education 

Human Resource Development 

International Development Education 
Mathematics Education (K-12) 
Modern Language Education (K-12) 
Parks and Recreation Management 
Physical Education 
Reading Education (K-12) 
Science Education (6- 1 2) 
Social Studies Education (6-12) 
Special Education 

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) 
Technology Education 
Urban Education 
Vocational Industrial Education 
EDUCATIONAL SPECIALIST IN: 
Curriculum and Instruaion 
Educational Leadership 
School Psychology 



18 Graduate Catalog 



DOCTOR OF EDUCATION IN: 

Adult Education and Human Resource Development 

Cufticulum and Instruction 

Educational Administration and Supervision 

Exceptional Student Education 

Higher Education 
Doaor of Philosophy in Curriculum and Instruction 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

www.eng.fiu.edu 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN; 

Biomedical Engineering 

Civil Engineering 

Computer Engineering 

Construction Management 

Electrical Engineering 

Engineering Management 

Environmental Engineering 

Environmental and Urban Systems 

Industrial and Systems Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering 
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN: 

Civil Engineering 

Electrical Engineering 

Industrial and Systems Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering 

COLLEGE OF HEALTH 
AND URBAN AFFAIRS 

chua.fiu.edu 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN: 

Criminal Justice 

Dietetics and Nutrition 

Nursing 

Occupational Therapy 

Physical Therapy 
Master of Health Services Administration 
Master of Public Administration 
Master of Public Health 
Master of Social Work 
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN: 

Dietetics and Nutrition 

Public Administration 

Social Welfare 



BISCATNE BAY PROGRAMS 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

www.fiu.edu/orgs/ca$deanA>bcas 

Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing 
MASTER OF ARTS IN: 

African-New World Studies 

English 
Master of Science in Psychology 
Doctor of Philosophy in Psychology 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

coeweb.fiu.edu 

Master of Science in Urban Education 

COLLEGE OF HEALTH 
AND URBAN AFFAIRS 

chua.fiu.edu 

Master of Science in Nursing 

Master of Health Services Administration 

Master of Public Administration 

Master of Public Health 

Master of Social Work 

Doctor of Philosophy in Public Administration 

SCHOOL OF HOSPITALITY 
AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT 

hospitality.fiu.edu 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN: 

Hospitality Management 
Tourism Studies 

SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AND 
MASS COMMUNICATION 

www.fiu.edu/%7Ejournal 

Master of Science in Mass Communication 



M "^ ! S SI H tf ilVi*/''! ;4 fS' 



liiiiiBiNiiiii 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 

cba.fiu.edu 

Master of Business Administration 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

coe^veb. fiu.edu 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN: 

Adult Education 

Educational Leadership 

Human Resource Development 

Reading 
DOCTOR OF EDUCATION IN: 

Adult Education and Human Resource Development 

Curriculum and Instruction 

Higher Education 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

www.eng.fiu.edu 

Master of Science in Construction Management 



Academic Programs 19 



COLLEGE OF HEALTH 
AND URBAN AFFAIRS 

chua.iiu.eclu 

Master of Science in Nursing 

Master of Health Services Administration 

Master of Social Work 

Primary Location for all Broward County Programs: 

FIU Broward-Pines Center Programs are located at the 
Pines Center in Pembroke Pines 



EVENING AND WEEKEND 
DEGREE PROGRAMS 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

www.fiu.edu/orgs/casdean 
MASTER OF ARTS IN: 

African-New World Studies 

Economics 

Liberal Studies 

Political Science 

Religious Studies 

Spanish 
Master in the Art of Teaching Music 
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN: 

Chemistry 

Earth Sciences 

Environmental Studies 

Forensic Science 

Mathematics 
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN: 

History 

Spanish 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

cba.fiu.edu 

Executive Master of Business Administration 
Master of Accounting 
Master of Business Administration 
Master of International Business 
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN: 

Finance 

Information Systems 

Taxation 
Doctor of Philosophy in Business Administration 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

www.eng.fiu.edu 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN: 
Civil Engineering 
Computer Engineering 
Construction Management 
Electrical Engineering 



Engineering Management 
Industrial and Systems Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering 

COLLEGE OF HEALTH 
AND URBAN AFFAIRS 

chua.fiu.edu 

Master of Health Services Administration 
Master of Public Administration 
Master of PubUc Health 
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN: 

Criminal Justice 

Dietetics and Nutrition 

Nursing 

Occupational Therapy 
Master of Social Work 

SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AND 
MASS COMMUNICATION 

www.fiu.edu/%7EjournaI 

Master of Science in Mass Communication 



:PRO-iiMMillii5 



Graduate Certificates are offered to students with bachelor's degrees 
who wish to obtain advanced education in a particular area of 
concentration, but do not necessarily want to commit to a master's 
degree. Successfial completion of a Graduate Certificate is entered on 
the student's transcript. Some or all of the courses taken in a 
Graduate Certificate can often be applied to a master's degree. In 
addition to the Graduate Certificates offered through the University 
Graduate School, non-credit Professional Certificates are offered 
through the College of Continuing and Professional Studies. 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

www.fiu.edu/orgs/casdean 

GRADUATE CERTIFICATES IN: 
African-New World Studies 
Geographic Information Systems 
Latin American and Caribbean Studies 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

coeweb.fiu.edu 

GRADUATE CERTIFICATES IN: 
Educational Leadership 
Emotional Disturbance 
Health Occupations Education 
Mental Retardation 
Reading and Language Arts 
School Guidance and Counseling 
Specific Learning Disabilities 



20 Graduate Catalog 



COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND 
URBAN AFFAIRS 

chua.fiu.e(lu 

GRADUATE CERTIFICATES IN: 

Clinical Practice (Post-MSW) 

Environmental Health 

Gerontology 

Health Promotion 

Health Services Administration 

Human Resource Policy and Management 

Justice Administration and Policy Making 

Law and Criminal Justice 



Nurse Practitioner Certificate 
Nursing Administration 
Occupational Therapy 
Public Management 

SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AND 
MASS COMMUNICATION 

www.fiu.edu/%7Ejoumal 

GRADUATE CERTIFICATES IN: 

Integrated Communications: Advertising and Public Relations 
Spanish Language Journalism: Investigative Reporting 
Student Media Advising 




Graduate Admissions 21 



GRADUATE 
ADMISSIONS 

Florida International University encourages and accepts applications 
from qualified applicants without regard to sex, physical handicap, 
national origin, cultural, racial, religious or ethnic bacl^round 
or association. 

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS 
FOR ADMISSION INTO 
GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

Applicants to a graduate program of the University must meet the 
minimum standards set forth by the University, and when applicable, 
additional requirements set by each department for admission to a 
graduate program. Applicants must check the individual 
departmental requirements before submitting their applications. 

A student seeking admission into a graduate program offered by the 
University must have a bachelor's degree or equivalent from a 
regionally accredited institution or, in the case of foreign students, 
from a well established institution of higher learning that is authorized 
to grant degrees by appropriate authorities in that country. The 
applicant must submit official copies of all transcripts and test scores 
to P.O. Box 659004, Miami, FL. 33265-9004. 

The applicant should have a minimum of a "B" average in upper 
level work, or a graduate degree from an accredited institution. 

Appropriate nationally-normed examinations are required for all 
Ph.D. programs. Scores must be at or above the 60th percentile (e.g., 
II 20 combined Verbal and Quantitative on the GRE or 570 
composite on the GMAT). 

Master's degree programs and professional doctoral degree programs 
individually determine admission requirements with respect to 
requiring nationally-normed examinations and the required scores 
with the proviso that if nationally-normed examinations are 
required, scores must be at or above the 40th percentile (e.g. 1 000 
combined Verbal and Quantitative on the GRE or 500 composite 
on the GMAT). Individual units may place greater weight on either 
the verbal or quantitative portion of the examination and are 
encouraged to set higher requirements than University minimums. 

Admissions at the graduate level are competitive and meeting 
minimum program requirements does not guarantee admission. 

An applicant who fails to meet these criteria may seek admission via 
an exception to the admissions standards. 

APPLICATION PROCESS 

Students interested in applying for admission into a graduate degree 
program can currently submit their applications either online or via 
conventional mail. The option to submit applications via 
conventional mail will be phased out and will no longer be available 
after January 2004. 



SUBMITTING ONLINE APPLICATIONS 
FOR GRADUATE ADMISSION 

Students with Internet access can apply online by visiting FIU's 
website at www.fiu.edu/gradadm for applications and instructions. 

A valid credit card is required for submitting online applications. A 
$25.00 non-refundable fee (U.S. Dollars) will be charged for each 
online application. 

SUBMITTING APPLICATIONS FOR GRADUATE 
ADMISSION VIA CONVENTIONAL MAIL 

FIU uses a common institutional application form for all graduate pro- 
grams. This application can be downloaded from http://www.fiu.edu/ 
gradadm or requested from Florida International University, Graduate 
Admissions Office, RO. Box 659004, Miami, FL 33265-9004. A 
$30.00 non-reflindable application fee (U.S. Dollars) made payable to 
Florida International University must accompany applications 
submitted via conventional mail. 

All credentials and documents submitted to the Graduate 
Admissions Office become the property of Florida International 
University. Originals will not be returned to the applicant or 
forwarded to another institution. 

READMISSION 

A previously admitted degree-seeking student who has not enrolled 
in any course at the University for one full academic year or more is 
ehgible for readmission. The student must meet the University and 
program regulations in effect at the time of application for readmission. 
Students must contact the Graduate Admissions Office to apply 
for readmission. 

Application Deadlines for Domestic Students 



SEMESTER ADMISSION IS SOUGHT 

Fall 

Spring 

Summer 



APPLICATION DEADLINE 

June 1st 
October 1st 
March 1st 



If the application and supporting documents are not received by the 
appropriate deadline, the application will be considered for 
admission for the following term. 

Note: Individual programs may have deadlines earlier than the 
University deadlines. Applicants should check with the program to 
which they are seeking admission to determine the application deadline. 

TRANSFER OF GRADUATE CREDIT 
FROM OTHER INSTITUTIONS 

Doctoral programs may accept a maximum of 36 semester hours 
earned elsewhere as part of an earned graduate degree. A maximum 
of six semester hours of graduate credit earned from another institution 
in a non-degree-seeking status may be transferred. A maximum of 
six thesis credit hours may be transferred to a doctoral program only 
if they are part of an earned degree. 



22 Graduate Catalog 



Master's programs may accept a maximum of six semester hours of gradu- 
ate credit earned from another institution beyond a bachelor's degree. 

Acceptance of transfer credits for a course is dependent upon the 
following provisions: 

a) the student received a grade of 3.0 or better on a 4.0 scale 

b) the course was taken at an accredited institution 

c) the course was relevant, as judged by the admissions committee 
of the department or program, to the graduate program in which 
the student is accepted 

d) the course is listed on an official transcript received by the 
Graduate Admissions Office 

e) the course will not be older than six years at the time of receipt 
of a master's degree or nine years at the time of receipt of a doc- 
toral degree (does not apply to credits earned as part of a com- 
pleted graduate degree program) 

Note: Students are advised to verify this information with the 
appropriate Graduate Program Director 

ACADEMIC RECORDS 

Official transcripts, diplomas and/or certificates must be sent directly 
from each previous institution to the Graduate Admissions Office. 
Documents in a language other than English must be translated by an 
official translation agency. Notarized translations are not acceptable. 

ADMISSION OF 
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 

Foreign graduate applicants ate accepted subject to space and fiscal 
limitations. In addition to the general University admissions 
requirements, foreign applicants must be academically eligible for 
further study in their own country and must demonstrate proficiency 
in the English language by presenting a minimum score of 550 on the 
paper-based version, or a minimum score of 213 on the computer- 
based version, of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). 
However, some departments may require higher TOEFL scores. 
Applicants who hold an undergraduate or graduate degree from an 
institution within the United States or other English speaking 
countries are not required to submit TOEFL scores. The applicant 
musr check the individual departmental requirements. For TOEFL 
information, visit the following URL: http://www.toefl.org/. 

International student applicants must meet all the admission 
requirements of the University as described in the previous sections 
and also comply with the following: 

Application Deadlines for International Students 

Due to the additional processing time needed, international students 
should submit their applications and supporting documents much 
earlier than students who are U.S. Citizens or residents. It is recom- 
mend that all international students comply with the following 
application deadlines: 



SEMESTER ADMISSION IS SOUGHT 

Fall 

Spring 

Summer 



APPLICATION DEADLINE 

May 1st 
September 1st 
February 1st 



Note: Individual programs may have deadlines earlier than the 
University deadlines. Applicants should check with the program to 
which they are seeking admission to determine the application deadline. 

Tuition for International Students 

An international student is considered a non-resident and is assessed 
non-resident fees. 



ANNUAL ESTIMATE OF COSTS 

FOR INTERNATIONAL 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Single Student (18 semester hrs) 



Tuition and Fees' 


$ 14,098 


Maintenance' 


$ 13,524 


Bool(s and Supplies 


$ 792 


Medical Insurance' 


$ 766 



TOTAL 



$29,180 



' Tuition and fees are subject to change. 

Fees inclueU the StutUnt Health Fee ($54 per semester), the Athletic Fee ($10.00 per 

semester) and the Transporation Access Fee ($47.90 per semester). Amounts shown reflect 

9 graduate credit hours during Fall and Spring terms only. 

^Maintenance is estimated at $1,127.00 per month to cover room, board, clothings 

transportation, and incidentals. This cost is for twelve months. 

^AU international students are required to carry medical j 



Declaration and Certification of Finances 

Upon receipt of the application for admission, the Declaration and 
Certification of Finances will be mailed to the applicant. It must be 
completed and returned to the Graduate Admissions Office. A 
Certificate of Eligibility (Form I-20A) will be issued once the 
applicant has been found admissible to the University. 

The University is required by immigration authorities to check 
carefully the financial resources of each applicant prior to issuing the 
Form I-20A. Therefore, it is important that applicants are aware of 
the cost of attending the University and have the necessary support 
funds for the period of enrollment. Applicants should refer to the 
Annual Estimate of Cost Chart. 

The total funds available for the student for the first or second 
academic year, or both, must equal the total estimate of institutional 
costs and living expenses. All items in the Declaration and 
Certification of Finances must be accurately answered to avoid 
unnecessary delay in processing. This document must be received by 
the Graduate Admissions Office two months prior to the a 
nticipated entry date. 

A married student should plan on an additional $6,000 in costs to 
cover the living expenses of a spouse. 



Graduate Admissions 23 



A couple with children should anticipate flirther yearly additional 
costs of no less than $4,000 for each child. 

MEDICAL INSURANCE 

The State of Florida requires that all international students maintain 
health insurance coverage to help defray the costs in case of 
catastrophic medical emergency. The policy must provide specific 
levels of coverage which have been established to ensure that the 
policy is adequate to provide for costs at U.S. hospitals, usually 
much higher than costs in many other parts of the world. In 
addition, a policy must have a claims agent in the United States who 
may be contacted by medical providers and who facilitates prompt 
payment of claims. The University has approved a plan which meets 
the state requirements and which meets the needs of most students; 
however, a student may select alternate coverage provided it meets 
the state requirements for minimal coverage. A copy of these 
requirements is available from the Office of International Student 
and Scholar Services. Students are advised not to purchase insurance 
policies prior to arrival without verifying that the policies meet 
FIU/SUS requirements. Compliance with the insurance regidation 
is required prior to registration. 

FULL-TIME ENROLLMENT 

Non-immigrant alien students in F-1 visa status are required by 
United States immigration regulations to be enrolled fiill-time, 
except for the Summer Terms, and to make satisfactory progress 
toward the degree program in each term; otherwise the student's 
immigration status will be jeopardized. Full-time graduate 
enrollment is defined as a minimum of nine semester hours during 
Fall and Spring terms and six credits during Summer terms. Doaoral 
students who have reached candidacy or master's students who have 
completed all requirements except for the thesis, and have an 
approved thesis proposal on file in the University Graduate School, 
are considered full-time when registered for three credits per term. 

It is the student's responsibility to comply with all non-immigrant 
alien requirements as stated under the United States laws Section 
101(a)(15)(0(i) of the Immigration and Nationality Act and the 
provisions of the USA PATRIOT Act. 

EMPLOYMENT 

The legal regulations governing F-1 student employment are complex, 
and advisors are available in the Office of International Student and 
Scholar Services to explain these regulations. In general, however, 
employment is available only to students who maintain their legal 
status in the U.S. and is regulated under three categories: 
1) on-campus employment: F-1 students may be employed on the 
FIU campuses for a maximum of 20 hours per week during fall 
and spring semesters while school is in session, and full time dur- 
ing holidays, vacations, and sammer. On-campus employment 
includes teaching and research J^sistantships for graduate students 
and hourly part time work. Students must contact individual 
campus departments to inquire about employment opportunities. 



2) off-campus employment: F-1 students may request off-campus 
employment under very limited conditions and only after 
maintaining F-1 status for at least one full academic year. 
Off-campus employment opportunities are not readily available, 
and students should not rely on off-campus employment as a 
source of income to finance their studies. 

3) Practical training: F-1 students may request optional practical 
training employment to accept jobs related to their studies. 
Students usually pursue practical training employment after com- 
pletion of degree requirements, although in some cases practical 
training may be authorized prior to completion of studies. Since 
practical training employment is limited to one year of full-time 
employment for each degree level, students cannot rely on it as a 
source of income to finance their studies. 

Note: An international student will not be granted admission to the 
University until all academic and non-academic requirements have 
been met. Under no circumstances should a student come to the 
University without having received the official Letter of Admission and 
the SEVIS Form 1-20. 

All correspondence and document submissions should be directed 
to: Graduate Admissions Office, Florida International University, 
P.O. Box 659004, Miami, Florida 33265-9004 

CREDIT FOR NON-COLLEGE LEARNING 

Graduate credit will not be awarded for life experiences. 

In cases where a student's learning experience would appear to have 
been sufficient to develop the understanding and skills associated 
with a course that would otherwise be included in his or her graduate 
program of study, he or she will be allowed to register for 
Independent Study credits and demonstrate competency through 
development of an appropriate project acceptable to the faculty 
member who represents that specific area of specialization. 

Not more than 10 semester hours of a 30 semester hour master's 
degree, nor 1 5 semester hours of a 60 semester hour master's degree, 
may be so earned. 

TRAVELING SCHOLAR PROGRAM 

The University participates in a traveling scholar program which 
enables a graduate student to take advantage of special resources, 
special course offerings, research opportunities, unique laboratories 
and library collections available on another campus but not available 
on his or her own campus. Further information may be obtained 
from the Graduate Program Director of the program in which the 
student is enrolled. 



24 Graduate Catalog 




Tuition and Fees 25 



TUITION AND FEES 

FEES 

Registration and tuition fees are established by the Board of Trustees 
as required by the Florida Legislature. These fees are subject to change 
without notice. The currently authorized fees for academic year 
2003-2004 are: 



PER CREDIT HOUR 




TUITION AND FEES 




Per Credit Tuition and Fees 






Florida Non-Florida | 




Resident 


Resident 


Graduate 


$201.51 


$770.58 


Per Semester Fees 






Intercollegiate Athletics 


$10.00 


$10.00 


Student Health Services 


$54.00 


$54.00 


Transportation Access 


$47.90 


$47.90 



R^istration fees for course audits are the same as the above fees, 
except that no assessment will be made for the out-of-state portion. 

A schedule of registration and tuition fees for all programs is published 
prior to each semester and can be obtained at the Office of the 
Registrar. Since fees often change in the Fall semester the above fees 
should be used for information purposes only. The schedule of classes 
will contain the most accurate fee information. 

FEE WAIVERS 

Students using a fee waiver for pan of the fee payment must pay their 
portion on or before the last day to pay fees. Students who are responsible 
for a portion of their fees in addition to the fee waiver will be required 
to pay their portion before the fee waiver is applied. 

State employees using the State employee fee waiver to pay their fees 
must register on or after the day established in the official University 
calendar for State employee registration. The State Employee Fee 
Waiver pays up to six hours of tuition and fees per term. Summer 
sessions A, B, and C are considered one term for the purposes of the 
State Employee Fee Waiver. If the employee registers for more than six 
hours, he or she will be required to pay for the additional credit hours 
plus all per student related fees. A properly completed and approved 
waiver form must be presented at ilie Cashier's Office by the date 
published for the last day to pay fees. Fee Waivers will be processed 
only for those courses shown on the approved fee waiver request form 
presented at the time of registration. A course over-ride card will not 
be accepted with the tuition waiver program. Only one fee waiver 
form per employee will be accepted each semester. The State employee 
fee waiver will not be accepted as payment for course registrations 
prior to the announced date for state employee r^istration. State 



Employee Fee Waivers do not cover Thesis, Dissertation, Internships, 
Directed Individual Study, Non Credit Courses, Sponsored Credit 
Programs, Field Experience, Practicum, closed courses, or courses 
taken for audit grades. 

Senior citizens fee waivers are available to persons 60 years of age or 
older who meet the requirements of Florida residency as defined in 
this catalog. The fee waiver allows qualified individuals to attend credit 
classes on an audit basis. Senior citizens using the fee waiver must 
register during the first week of classes. Senior citizens using the fee 
waiver must pay the photo id fee during their first term in attendance. 

Florida law requires that State employee fee waivers and senior citizen 
fee waivers be granted on a space available basis only; therefore, 
individuals using these waivers must comply vnth the procedures 
outlined in the schedule of classes for each semester. 

Note: Refunds will not he processed for employees who have registered 
and paid prior to the state employee registration day and wish to use the 
fee waiver. 

FEE PAYMENT 

Fees may be paid at the Cashier's Office at University Park, PC 1 20, 
or at Biscayne Bay Campus ACl 140. Broward students may pay by 
mail or at the Cashier's Office at University Park or Biscayne Bay 
Campus. Night drop boxes outside the Cashier's Offices are available 
24 hours a day for fee payments by check or money order through the 
last day to pay fees. Payment is also accepted by mail. The University 
is not responsible for cash left in the night drop or sent through the 
mail. Failure to pay fees by the established deadlines will result in stu- 
dents being dropped from all courses. See Fee Liability below. 

Fees may also be paid by credit card through the telephone or the web 
through Phone Charge Inc. Simply call 1-877-348-7297 or go to the 
web at www.paybyintemet.com. Please note that a service fee of $28 
will added to credit card charge by Phone Charge. 

Late Registration Fee 

Students who register after the established deadline for registration will 
be subject to $100 late registration fee. 

Late Payment Fee 

Students who pay fees after the established deadline for payments will 
be subject to a $100 late payment fee. If applicable, this fee may be 
assessed in addition to the late registration fee described in the 
preceding section. 

Financial Aid Students 

All financial aid recipients must go to the Cashier's Office and pay the 
difference between their financial aid or fellowship awards less FederaJ 
Work Study and their final fee assessment. The student's schedule will 
then be automatically validated. Acceptance of a financial aid pack- 
age constitutes acceptance of the above validation process. 

Fee Liability 

Students are liable for all fees associated with all courses in which they 
are registered at the end of the drop/add period. The fee payment 



26 Graduate Catalog 



deadline is published in the official University calendar. If fees are not 
paid in full by the published dates, students will be dropped from all 
classes and any money paid will be lost. 

Note: Registration is not complete until all fees are paid infitll. 

Reinstatement of Classes 

Appeals for reinstatement of registration for classes dropped for fis- 
cal reasons must be filed in writing on the prescribed form with the 
Cashier's Office by the time specified on the cancellation notice. 
Reinstatement will be considered for all classes on the class schedule 
at the end of the drop/add period. Reinstatement cannot be request- 
ed selectively for certain classes. All reinstatement activity, including 
fee payment, must be completed by the date on the cancellation 
notice. All students whose registrations have been reinstated will be 
assessed a late payment fee. If the late registration fee is applicable it 
will also be assessed. 

Application Fee 

A non-refundable fee of $30 shall accompany each paper-based 
application for admission to the University. A non-tefundable fee of 
$25 will be charged for all online applications. 

PARKING RULES AND REGULATIONS 

All persons who park vehicles on the university's campuses shall register 
their vehicle(s) viith the department of Parking and Traffic, obtain a 



decal or permit, and display the decal or permit, as prescribed by the 
Parking Rules and Regulations. The University assumes no liability for 
vehicles parked or operated on University property. The issuance of a 
decal or permit does not guarantee a place to park. 

Transportation Access Fee 

All enrolled students will pay a Transportation Access Fee each semester. 

The fee will appear on the Student Fee Schedule. This fee will be 

assessed as follows: 

Fall Semester $47.90 + tax 

Spring Semester $47.90 + tax 

Summer A, B, or C $43.60 + tax 

Students must provide the following information to die Department 
of Parking and Traffic to obtain a parking decal: social security number, 
proof of current class registration, and current vehicle registration. All 
decals must be permanently affixed to the outside of the vehicle, either 
on the left side of the rear bumper or lower left corner, on the outside 
of the rear window. All decals are valid until the expiration date 
indicated on the decal or permit. A duplicate hang tag will be issued 
upon request for an additional charge of $10.00 + tax. This hang tag 
is valid only for the vehicle under which it is registered. Hang tags are 
available to petsons who have purchased an original decal for the 
current semester or year. The hang tags are for additionally owned 
vehicles and for situations whete the original decal must be replaced 
due to an accident, maintenance, etc. 




Tuition and Fees 27 



Housing 

All students in university housing complexes need to obtain a current 
semester housing sticker from the Department of Parking and Traffic. 
This sticker allows the vehicle to be parked legally in student housing 
areas. This sticker is valid for the current semester only. This housing 
sticker should be affixed to the left or right side of their current 
student decal. 

Disabled 

Any person who has been certified in accordance with Sections 
320.084, 320.0848, or 320.0842, Florida Statutes, and has been 
issued a Disabled placard by the Department of Motor Vehicle Bureau 
shall obtain and display a university parking decal in the classification 
which would otherwise be appropriate. 

Towing and Impoundment 

The university may tow and impound any vehicle, which is found to 
be parked illegally or in violation of these rules. 

Rules and Regulations Pamphlets 

A copy of the University Parking Rules and Regulations is available at 
the department of Parking and Traffic located at University Park, 
Parking Garage One or Biscayne Bay Campus, Wolfe University 
Center, Room 131. It is the responsibility of each student to become 
familiar and comply with the University's parking and traffic rules and 
regulations. 



LIBRARY FINES 

Per book per library hour 
Maximum fine per book 
Lost book fine 



$.25 
$5.00 
$51.15 



Notr. All fees are subject to change as permitted by law. Additional fees 
may be added and special purpose fees may be assessed in some 



CHECKS 

The University will accept personal checks for amounts due to the 
University. These checks must be in the exact amount due only. The 
Cashier's Office will not accept checks above the amount due, third 
party checks or checks for cash. State law requires that a service fee be 
assessed on a check returned unpaid by the bank for any reason. 
Service fees are based on the amount of the unpaid check. Checks for 
$0.01 - $50.00 are charged a $25.00 fee; $50.01 - $300.00, a $30.00 
fee; $300.01 - $800.00, a $40.00 fee; and a fee of 5% of the amount 
of the check for all checks greater than $800.00. Checks returned 
by the bank can be redeemed only by cash, cashier's checks, or 
money orders. A personal check will not be accepted to replace a 
dishonored check. 

Returned checks will be assigned to an agency for collection if not 
promptly paid. When an account has been assigned, the collection 
agency fee will be added to the University charges for collection at the 
current contract rate. Returned checks on student accounts will result 
in cancellation of classes and will require petition for reinstatement. 
See reinstatement of classes above. 



The Cashier's Office will not accept a check on any student's account 
which has had two previous dishonored checks. 

REFUNDS 

Refijnds will be processed and mailed to the address shown on the 
Registrar's files to all students whose fee accounts show an overpayment 
after the last day to pay fees. Students due a reftind will not be required 
to submit a refiind application to receive their refund, it will 
automatically be calculated. If there is an amount due to the university 
in the accounts receivable system, that amount will be deducted from 
any refiind due. 

Students who have completed registration and have paid all fees due 
and have completely withdrawn from the University prior to the end 
of the fourth week of classes are eligible for a refimd of 25% of total 
fees paid. 

In the following exceptional circumstances, a fijll refiind of total fees 
paid will be made upon presentation of the proper documentation; 

• Death of a student or immediate family member (parent, spouse, 
child or sibling). Death certificate required. 

• Involuntary call to military service. Copy of orders required. 

• Illness of student of such severity or duration to preclude completion 
of courses. Confirmation by a physician required. 

Processing of refiinds will begin after the end of the last day to pay fees. 

Appeals for tuition refiinds must be submitted in vmting to the Office 
of the Registrar within one year after the end of the term for wdiich the 
refiind is requested. There are no exceptions to this policy. 

PAST DUE ACCOUNTS 

DeUnquent accounts are sufficient cause to prohibit registration, 
graduation, release of transcripts, or release of diplomas. 

The University is not able to grant credit or time payments for any 
fees. Financial aid is available to those qualifying through the Financial 
Aid Office. A limited number of short term loans are available to full 
time enrolled students who may experience problems in meeting fee 
payment due dates. 

The University reserves the right to assign any past due account to an 
agency for collection. When an account has been assigned, the 
collection agency fee will be added to the University charges for 
coUeaion at the current contract rate. 

DEADLINES 

Students are reminded that deadlines are stricdy enforced. The 
University is not able to grant credit or to extend llie fee payment 
period beyond the time set in its official calendar. The University does 
not have the authority to waive late fees unless it has been determined 
that the University is primarily responsible for the delinquency or that 
extraordinary circumstances warrant such waiver The University has 
no authority to extend deadlines for individual students beyond those 
set by the official calendar. 



28 Graduate Catalog 




FINANCIAL AID 



Financial Aid 29 



WHAT IS FINANCIAL AID? 

Financial aid is a source of financial suppon provided by various 
agencies (federal, state and local governments, universities, community 
organizations, and private corporations or individuals) to help students 
meet the cost of attending college. It includes gift- aid (grants and 
fellowships) and self-help aid (loans and student employment). 

• Grants are awards based on financial need which do not have to 
be tepaid. 

• Fellowships are non-repayable awards based either on merit, 
special talent and/ot financial need. 

• Student loans are available to students and/or their parents at low 
interest lates (5 to 1 1%). 

• Student employment allows students to eatn money toward their 
education by wotking part time while attending school. 

APPLYING FOR ASSISTANCE 

Applications for financial assistance are available in January for the 
following academic year which begins in August. The Ftee 
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is the form used to 
apply for most types of financial assistance. FIU's school code 
009635 is lequited when completing the FAFSA. The FAFSA is 
available in two fotms: elearonic and paper. To complete the FAFSA 
electronically via the Internet the web site address is: 
www.fafsa.ed.gov and the paper form is available from FIU's 
Financial Aid Office. Financial Aid applications ate not reviewed 
until ALL documents required to complete the file are received in 
the Financial Aid OflSce. 

Students whose files ate completed accuiately by the piiority deadline 
of March 1 st will receive priority consideration for the following year 
for limited Federal, State and institutional fiinds. Files completed after 
this deadhne will be processed in order of completion date. Most 
required documents for file completion are available thtough the 
Financial Aid Office web page: www.fiu.edu/orgs/finaid. 

ADMISSION 

To be eligible for most financial aid programs, students must be 
admitted to a degree program. However, students should not wait 
until they ate admitted to apply for financial assistance. Students 
who enroll in qualified Certificate Programs are only eligible for 
student loans. 

SUMMER ASSISTANCE 

Student loans are the ptimary source of assistance for summer 
enrollment. Request forms for summer assistance are available in 
February each year. 

ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA 

To qualify for most need-based financial assistance, students must 
meet the following basic eligibility requirements: 

• demonstrate financial need; 

• be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen; 

• be tegistered with Selective Service, if required; 

• not be in default on a loan, or owe a repayment on Title IV aid 
received at any institution; 



• be entoUed at least half-time m an eligible program of study; 

• maintain satisfactory academic piogress. 

Additional lequitements may apply depending on the aid programs 
for which a student is applying. 

DETERMINING FINANCIAL NEED 

Financial need is defined as the diffetence between the estimated 
cost of attendance and the amount students and theit families can 
reasonably be expected to contribute towaids theit educational 
expenses. Need analysis is a federally mandated formula which measures, 
in an equitable and systematic way, how much students and their 
families can afford towards theit highet education. Income, assets 
(excluding theit ptimaiy tesidence), family size, numbet of family 
members attending college, and other factots ate evaluated to give a 
complete assessment of a family's financial sttength. 

AWARDING PROCEDURES 

Award decisions fot new students who complete their financial aid 
application by the priority deadline will be made by April 15- 

A financial aid package may consist of a combination of grants, 
loans, and wotk opportunities. Other sources of assistance such as 
merit awatds and private and institutional scholarships will be taken 
into consideiation when preparing the award. The Financial Aid 
Office makes a limited numbet of awards to gtaduate students who 
have demonsttated financial need thtough the Free Application for 
Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). 

SOURCES OF ASSISTANCE 

The University patticipates in all Federal and State funded 
piograms. Institutional assistance is available for students with 
academic promise and financial need. 

Graduate Assistantships 

Graduate students pursuing a master's or doctoral degree may 
qualify for assistantships/fellowships and other awards offered 
through individual graduate academic units. Applicants should con- 
tact the Graduate Program Directot in the apptopriate department. 

Financial Aid Services 

• Financial Aid Counseling: A Financial Aid Administtator is 
available on a walk-in basis to assist students with special 
problems, technical questions, exceptions, etc. 

• Web and Voice System Access: Students may obtain information on 
the status of theit application through the Financial Aid Office 
webpage at www.fiu.edu/ofgs/finaid ot by calling the Financial 
Aid Office Voice Response System fVRS), 305-348-1500. The 
student's FIU PIN# is required to access personal information. 

• E-Mail Access: Students may also communicate with the 
Financial Aid Office elacttonically at the following e-mail: 
fmaid@>fiu.edu 

For additional information and application materials contact the 
Financial Aid Office at: University Park, PC 125, Miami, FL 33199. 



30 Graduate Catalog 



UNIVERSITY GRADUATE 
SCHOOL RULES AND 
REGULATIONS 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Students are classified as degree-seeking students and non-degree- 
seeldng students. 

Degree-Seeking Students 

Degree-seeking students are students who have been admitted into a 
degree program, but have not completed the requirements for the degree. 

Non-Degree-Seeking Students 

Non-degree-seeking students may be either afFiliated with a College 
or School, or be unaffiliated. Students who are unaffiliated are 
limited to taking one semester of courses at the University. Affiliated 
students must be approved by a College or School and may take up 
to 12hoursof coursework as a non-degree-seeking student. Higher 
allowable course hours apply to students accepted in Graduate 
Certificate or Advanced Diploma programs. 

The following regulations apply to non-degree-seeking students: 

1) Non-degree-seeking students are not required to meet the usual 
admission requirements and are not officially admitted as regular 
students. Enrollment as a non-degree-seeking student does not 
imply a right to be admitted in the future as a regular, degree- 
seeking student. Credits earned as a non-degree-seeking student 
will not be counted toward a degree at the University unless such 
a student subsequently applies for regular admission and is 
accepted as a degree-seeking student. 

2) Registration is permitted only on a space-available basis and is 
determined at the time of registration. Non-degree-seeking 
students may not register during the official registration week 
when degree-seeking students generally register for classes. 

3) No more than 12 graduate level semester hours earned as a non- 
degree-seeking student may be counted tovrard a d^ee. The acceptance 
of such credit must be recommended by the graduate program direc- 
tor and approved by the Dean of the University Graduate School 

4) Non-degree-seeking students will not be allowed to register for 
more than one term without obtaining admission into a degree 
program at the University, obtaining admission into a formal 
certificate program, or acquiring affiliated status from the 
department in which they are registering for courses. 

5) Applicants who are denied admission to the University will not 
be allowed to register for courses as non-degree-seeking students 
for a period of one year without obtaining admission into a 
formal certificate program. 

6) Immigration regulations prevent most foreign nationals from 
enrolling in courses without being admitted into a formal degree 
or certificate program, depending on the type of visa that they 
hold. International students should contact the Office of 
International Student and Scholar Services for further 
information (www.fiu.edu/'-isss). 



Affiliated Students 

Students applying for affiliated status as non-degree-seeking students 
must be approved by the appropriate Dean's Office in accordance 
with criteria approved by that College or School's Faculty 
Curriculum Committee. 

Graduate Certificate Students 

This category includes students who have been accepted into a 
specific Graduate Certificate program. Cerrificate programs are 
subject to all university regulations. 

ACADEMIC DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 
MASTER'S DEGREE 

Course Requirements 

Programs leading to a master's degree will normally require at least 
30 credit hours of non-thesis course work. Masters programs 
normally include courses at the 5000 and 6000 levels. A 
maximum of 6 credits of advanced undergraduate courses (4000 
level) may be included in a masters degree program if they are 
needed in order to fiilfill program requirements. No course counted 
toward a student's undergraduate degree may be included in that 
student's masters degree program. 

Thesis Requirements 

Thesis committees must have a minimum ot three members, at least 
two of whom are from the unit offering the degree. All FlU faculty 
who are members of the thesis committee must be membets of the 
Graduate Faculty. All committees appointments must be approved 
by the Dean of the University Graduate School. 

A thesis proposal must be approved by the University Graduate 
School at least one semester prior to the date of graduation. 



Once enrollment in thesis credits is initiated, continuous registration 
for at least 1 credit thesis hour each semester (including the summer 
term) is required until the thesis requirement is fulfilled. During the 
academic year, international students must maintain fiill-time 
enrollment. 

Time Limits 

All requirements, including the successfiil defense of a thesis where 
required, must be completed within six years of first enrollment in 
the masters program. 

Graduation Requirements 

The University will confer the master's degree when the following 
conditions have been met: 

1) Earned an overall average GPA of 3.0 in all courses in the 
graduate degree program. 

2) Recommended by the faculty of the College or the School. 

3) Certified by the Dean of the University Graduate School that all 
requirements for the degree being sought have been completed. 

Masters students who have been approved by rheir school or college 
may participate in the commencement ceremonies 



University Graduate School Rules and Regulations 3 1 



DOCTORAL DEGREE 

Course Requirements 

Programs leading to a doctoral degree require at least 90 credit hours 
beyond the bachelor's degree. These shall include a minimum ofi 

1) 30 credit hours earned in academic courses which are part of the 
doctoral program. Doctoral programs normally include courses 
at the 6000 level and above. Courses at the 5000 
level may be included in a doctoral degree program in 
appropriate cases. 

2) 24 dissertation credit hours taken at this University. A student 
may enroll for dissertation credits after completing all 
coursework, passing the candidacy examination and being 
advanced to candidacy. Dissertation credits taken before 
advancement to candidacy will not be counted toward the 24 
dissertation credit minimum required for the degree. 

Dissertation Requirements 

CANDIDACY 

A student is admitted to candidacy upon successfiilly completing all 
required coursework and passing the candidacy examination. The 
student's written request for candidacy must be approved by his or 
her major professor and forwarded ro the program director, the unit 
dean, and then to the Dean of the University Graduate School. 

Each candidacy examination must be prepared and graded by a 
committee consisting of a minimum of three faculty of the academic 
unit offering the degree. Admission to candidacy tequires that a 
majotity of the committee members agree that the student passed 
the examination. A candidacy examination may not be passed 
conditionally. A "Pass" on the examination cannot be made contingent 
upon other factors such as the completion of additional coursework 
or the preparation of extra research projects. 

Students must be informed in writing of the results of their 
performance on the examinations within 30 days of the examination 
date. If the student fails the candidacy examination the committee, 
at its discretion, may provide for reexamination at a mutually 
satisfactory time but no more than one year from the original date 
of the examination. Passing the candidacy examination is requisite to 
continuing in the graduate program. Students who fail the candidacy 
examination twice will be dismissed from the doctoral program. 

After a doctoral smdent is admitted to candidacy, continuous registrarion 
for at least 3 credit hours each semester (including the summer tetm) 
is required until the dissertation requirement is fulfilled. 

DISSERTATION COMMITTEE 

Dissertation committees must have a minimum of four members: at 
least three of whom are from the unit offering the degree and one of 
whom is from another academic unit at FIU. All FIU faculty who 
are members of the dissertation committee must be members of the 
Graduate Faculty and the chair of the dissertation committee must 
hold Dissertation Advisor Status. All committees appointments 
must be approved by the Dean of the University Graduate School. 



DISSERTATION PROPOSAL 

A disserration proposal must be approved by the University 
Graduate School at least one year prior to the date of graduation. 

Time Limits 

All requirements, including the successful defense of a dissettation, 
must be completed within nine years of first enrollment in the 
doctoral program. 

Graduation Requirements 

The Universiry will confer the doctoral degree when the following 
conditions have been met: 

1) Earned an overall average GPA of 3.0 in all courses in the 
graduate degree program. 

2) Completed and defended successfiilly a doctoral dissertation. 

3) Recommended by the faculty of the College or the School. 

4) Submitted to the library two final, approved copies of the 
dissertation and paid tequired microfilming costs. 

5) Certified by the Dean of the University Graduate School that all 
requirements of the degree being sought have been completed. 

Doctoral students must have completed all requirements for the 
degree in order to participate in the commencement ceremonies. 

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 

Graduate Certificates require 1 5 to 1 8 hours of graduate credit. At 
least six of the hours must be in core courses taken by all 
individuals obtaining a given Graduate Certificate. 

All the credits earned in a Graduate Certificate Program may be used 
in a master's degree program provided the student is admitted to the 
master's degree program prior to the completion of no more than 1 2 
Graduate Certificate credits. 

At the discretion of the departmental graduate committee, or 
equivalent, students holding a bachelor's degree who have completed 
12 Graduate Certificate credits with a 3.25 or better GPA may be 
admitted to a master's degree program without taking the GRE or 
GMAT examinarion even if the student has an undergraduate GPA 
between 2.75 and 3.0. These students need to apply and be 
admitted before completing any additional hours in order to have 
those additional hours counted both for their Graduate Certificate 
and for their master's degree. 

In all cases the Graduate Program Director will evaluate whether or 
not the Graduate Certificate credits are acceptable in that patticular 
graduate program. 

CHANGE OF GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAM 

A fujly admitted student may apply to change graduate degree 
programs without paying an additional application fee. In all other 
respects a change of a graduate degree program is handled as a new 
application and is evaluated as such by the department into which 
the student wishes to transfer. A "Request for Graduate Degree 
Program Change" form and instructions are available in the 
University Graduate School. 



32 Graduate Catalog 



REGISTRATION 

All degree-seeking and non-degree-seeking students registering for 
more than 1 8 credits in any given semester must obtain the approval 
of the Dean of the University Graduate School. Registration for 
courses is as follows: 

Official Registration is held during the preceding semester (check 
the Academic Calendar for the dates). Degree-seeking students are 
given an appointment day and time based on their classification, 
GPA, and credit hours completed. Students may also add/drop at 
this time. 

Open Registration is held following Official Registration. There is 
no appointment day and time and registration is on a first-come, 
first-served basis. All students who have not yet registered are 
encouraged to do so at this time. Students who have already 
registered may also add or drop courses during this period. 

Web/Kiosk Registration 

All students are able to retrieve their grades, registration appointment 
day and time, classroom assignments, registration holds (if any) and 
register/drop/add courses using on campus kiosks or the World Wide 
Web (http://sis.fiu.edu). Students must obtain their Personal 
Identification Number (PIN) in order to utilize these systems. 

Immunization 

To register for courses, students born afi:er January 1, 1957, must 
provide documentation of immunization against measles and rubella. 
Documentation may be submitted to the University Health Care 
and Wellness Center at University Park, or to HM 110 at 
the Biscayne Bay Campus. Students should contact the Health 
Care and Wellness Center for more information at 305-348-5620 or 
305-919-5307. 

Dropping and Adding Courses 

The Official Drop/Add period ends on the last day of the first week 
of classes (check the Academic Calendar for specific dares). During 
this period a student already registered may drop or add courses 
without financial penalty. A student not registered may initiate reg- 
istration upon payment of the late registration fee. Students may also 
drop courses or withdraw fi-om the University with no record of 
enrollment and without a tuition fee liability. If the tuition fee has 
already been paid, a refiind will be issued by the Cashier's Office to 
the local address on file. 

Late Adds 

Students may add courses with appropriate authorization until the 
end of the third week of classes. No course may be added aft:er 
this deadline. 

Late Drops 

Courses officially dropped after the Drop/Add period and through 
the eighth week of the term (summer terms have different deadlines; 
check the Academic Calendar for specific dates) are recorded on the 
student's transcript with a symbol of DR' (dropped). The student is 
financially liable for all dropped courses 



Note: Non-attendance or non-payment of courses will not 
constitute a drop. 

A student may appeal the deadline for a late drop by submitting the 
"Appeal to Drop/Withdraw Without Refund" form, available in the 
Office of the Registrar. A drop after the deadline will be approved 
only in cases where circumstances beyond the student's control make 
it impossible for the student to continue. The student must provide 
appropriate documentation. Upon approval of the appeal, the course 
instructor will designate whether the student was passing or failing 
the course at the time of the appeal to drop form was submitted. A 
'DP' grade indicates the student dropped the class with a passing 
grade. A DF' grade indicates the student dropped the class with a 
failing grade. The 'DF' grade is calculated in the student's term and 
cumulative GPA. The deadline to submit appeals is one year after 
the end of the term in which the course was taken. 




Withdrawal from the University 

A currently registered student may withdraw from the university 
only during the first eight weeks of the semester. In the Summer 
semester, withdrawal deadlines will be adjusted accordingly. A 
Withdrawal Form must be completed and submitted to the Office 
of the Registrar. Non-attendance or non-payment of tuition and fees 
will not constitute a withdrawal. 

The transcript of a student who withdraws before or during the first 
week of classes will contain no record of enrollment and no tuition 
fee will be assessed. If the tuition has already been paid, a refiind will 
be issued by the Cashier's Office to the local address on file. If a 
student withdraws from the University prior to the end of the fourth 
week of classes, a 25 percent refiind will be issued. 

The Transcript of a student who officially withdraws after the 
Drop/Add period and before the end of the eighth week of the term 
will receive a 'Wl' for each course. 



Universiry Graduate School Rules and Regulations 33 



The transcript of a student who stops attending the University 
without officially withdrawing from the University will receive an 'F' 
grade for each course. 



GRADING 




Grade 


Points Per Credit Hour 


A 




4.00 


A- 




3.67 


B+ 




3.33 


B 




3.00 


B- 




2.67 


C+ 




2.33 


c 




2.00 


c- 




1.67 


D+ 




1.33 


D 




1.00 


D- 




0.67 


F 


Failure 


0.00 


P 


Satisfactory (Pass) 


N/A 


IP 


Thesis/Dissertation in Progress 


N/A 


IN 


Incomplete' 


N/A 


W 


Withdrew by appeal 


N/A 


Wl 


Withdrew from University 


N/A 


WP 


Withdrew from University after 






deadline with passing grade 


N/A 


WF 


Withdrew from University after 






deadline with faiUng grade 


0.00 


AU 


Audit 


N/A 


DR 


Dropped Course 


N/A 


DP 


Dropped after deadline 






with passing grade 


N/A 


DF 


Dropped after deadline 






with failing grade 


0.00 


NR 


Grade Not Reponed or Invalid- 


N/A 


EM 


Examination 


N/A 



'IN is only a temporary symbol. After two terms, it will revert to either 
a grade of"F"or the letter ^ade earned in the course. 
^NR is only a temporary symbol. It will default to an 'F' after two terms 
if it is not changed by the instructor. 

Note: All courses for which a student is officially registered at the end of 
the Drop/Add Period and for which a Letter Grade, a 'DF', or a 'WF' 
is received are calculated in the GPA. 

Grading Options 

The Colleges and the Schools make the determination of the grading 
option of each course. A course may be offered for a lerter grade as list- 
ed above or Pass/Fail; or for an optional grade in which the 
student has a choice of either receiving a letter grade or Pass/Fail; or the 
student may choose to audit a course and an 'AIT grade will be recorded 
on the students record. The grading option must be indicated at the time 
of registration. The grading option cannot be changed after the first week 
of classes. There are no exceptions to this deadline. 
To register for an audit, the smdent must obtain the permission and 
signamre of the instruaor of the course audited. Once the student is 
registered in the course as "Audit", the grading option cannot be changed. 



Incomplete Grade 

An incomplete grade is a temporary symbol given at the discretion 
of the instructor for work not completed because of serious 
interruption not caused by the student's own negligence. An 
incomplete must be made up as quickly as possible but no later than 
two semesters or it will automatically default to an "F" or the grade 
that the student earned in the course. There is no extension of the 
two semester deadline. The student must not register again for the 
course to make up the incomplete. 

Students who have incomplete grades on their records must remove 
the incomplete by the end of the fourth week of the term in which 
they plan to graduate. 

Forgiveness Policy 

The forgiveness policy allows students to repeat a limited number of 
courses to improve their grade point average (GPA). Only the grade 
received on the last repeat is used in the GPA calculation. Under the 
University's forgiveness policy, students must file a "Repeated 
Course" form with the Office of the Registrar. There is no time limit 
on the use of the forgiveness policy for grades; however, the 
forgiveness policy cannot be used once a degree has been posted. All 
courses taken with the grades earned will be recorded on the 
student's transcript. The "Repeated Course" form will not be 
processed if the fitst grade received is 'DR', 'DP', 'IF', 'W', 'WI', 
'WP', 'AU', 'NR', or 'EM'. Repeated courses will be appropriately 
designated (T: attempted; R: last repeat). 

A course taken on a letter grade basis must be repeated on the same 
basis. Students will not be allowed additional credit or quality points 
for a repeated course unless the course is specifically designated as 
repeatable (independent study, studio courses, etc.). Students may 
repeat no more than two courses under this policy with no course 
being repeated more than once. Students not using the forgiveness 
policy may still repeat a course. All attempts will apply to 
computation of the GPA but credit for only one attempt will apply 
toward graduation. Students must check with the appropriate 
academic department to determine whether there are additional 
restrictions on repeating courses. 

The forgiveness policy cannot be used to change the grade in a 
course in which the grade was determined as the result of either a 
formal or informal resolution of a charge of academic misconduct. 

Departmental Credit by Examination 

Departmental credit by examination is available for certain courses. 
A student who has already gained knowledge of a subject offered at 
the university and wishes to take an examination in lieu of taking the 
course should discuss the matter with hii or her academic advisor 
and with the department offering the course. 

Awarding departmental credit by examination is the prerogative of 
each academic unit. To receive credit by examination, a student must 
be a regular degree-seeking student. Once the student is awarded the 
departmental credit by examination, an 'EM' grade will be recorded 
on the transcript. 



34 Graduate Catalog 



Change or Correction of Grades 

Once submitted, end-of-semester grades (except Incompletes and 
NR's, which default at the end of two terms) are final. They are 
subject to change only through a Change of Grade form to correct 
an error in computation or transcribing, or where part of the 
student's work has been unintentionally overlooked. 

Final Examinations 

Final examinations will be given during the week following the last 
day of classes each semester. The summer semesters do not have final 
examination periods and course examinations may be given at the 
discretion of the faculty member teaching the course. 

Final Grades 

Final grades are available over the Telephone Registration System 
(303-348-1500), through the on-campus kiosks, or on the World 
Wide Web (http://sis.fiu.edu). 

TERM COURSES ARE OFFERED 

Listed next to certain courses in this catalog are the designations 'F', 
'S', and 'SS'. These designations indicate that the academic department 
normally offers these courses during the T' (Fall), 'S' (Spring), 'SS' 
(Summer) terms. Students should be awate that there are circumstances 
beyond the University's control (low enrollments, financial 
constraints, or other extenuating situations) which may result, in the 
courses not being offered as indicated. The University is not tesponsible 
for failure to offer a course as indicated. 

APPLICATION FOR GRADUATION 

Students who plan to graduate are required to submit to the Office 
of the Registrar an "Application for Graduation" form. This form 
must be submitted by the date specified in the Academic Calendar 
for graduation application in that semester. Students turning in the 
"Application for Graduation" after the deadline will graduate the fol- 
lowing semester. There is no charge for applying for graduation. 

Students who do not graduate in the term for which they applied for 
graduation must re-apply for graduation and complete the remain- 
ing requirements needed for graduation. 

Students must be enrolled during the term in which they graduate. 

ACADEMIC WARNING. 
PROBATION.AND DISMISSAL 

Warning 

A graduate student whose cumulative graduate GPA falls below a 3.0 
will be p4aced on warning, indicating academic difficulty. 

Probation 

A graduate student on warning whose cumulative graduate GPA 
remains below 3.0 in the following semester will be placed on 
probation, indicating serious academic dilTiculty. The College or 
School of the student on probation may indicate the conditions 
which must be met in ordet to continue enrollment. 



Dismissal 

A graduate student on probation whose cumulative and semester 
GPA's fall below a 3.0 will be automatically dismissed from his or her 
program and the University. A graduate student will not be 
dismissed prior to attempting a minimum of 12 hours of coursework 
as a graduate student. The student has ten working days to appeal 
the dismissal decision. This appeal must be made in writing to the 
Dean of the University Graduate School. The dismissal from the 
University is for a minimum of one year. After one year, the student 
may apply for readmission to the University in the same or a 
different program, or register as a non-degree-seeking student. 

Dismissed students who subsequently register as non-degree-seeking 
students are placed on academic probation. 

STUDENT RECORDS 

Florida International University assures the confidentiality of 
student educational records in accordance with State University 
System rules. State, and Federal Laws including the Family 
Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended and the 
U.S.A. PATRIOT Act. Student academic records are maintained in 
the Office of the Registrar and in the academic department of the 
student's program. As a rule, all currently enrolled and former 
students have the right to review their records to determine their 
content and accuracy. Parents of dependent students, as defined by 
the Internal Revenue Code, and who provide evidence of the 
dependent status, have the same rights. For the cost of photocopying, 
students may generally have copies of any documents in their file, 
except for other institutions' transcripts. 

RELEASE OF STUDENT INFORMATION 
FROM EDUCATION RECORDS 

The disclosure or publication of student information is governed by 
policies of Florida International University and the State Board of 
Education within the framework of State and Federal Laws, including 
the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended 
and the U.S.A. PATRIOT Act. 

A student's consent is required for the disclosure or publication of 
any information which is a) personally identifiable and b) a part of 
the educational record. However, certain exceptions to that general- 
ity, both in types of information which can be disclosed and in access 
to that information, are allowed. These exceptions are: 

A. Faculty, administrators, staff and consultants employed by the 
University or the State Board of Education whose work involves: 

1) Performance of administiative tasks which relate to students; 

2) Performance of supervisory or instructional tasks which 
relate to students; or 

3) Performance of services which benefit students. 

B. A student's prior consent is not required for disclosure of por- 
tions of the educational record defined by the institution as 
Directory Information. The following Directory Information 
may be released by the University: 

1 ) Name, local and permanent address and 
telephone number(s); 



University Graduate School Rules and Regulations 35 



2) Date and place of birth, and sex; 

3) Classification and degree program; 

4) Participation in officially recognized activities and sports; 

5) Weight and height of members of athletic teams; 

6) Dates of attendance, degrees and awards received; 

7) The most recent previous educational agency or 
institution attended by the student; and 

8) Photographic image. 

The information above, designated by the University as Directory 
Information, may be released or published by the University without 
a student's prior written consent unless exception is made in writing 
by the student or the parents of a dependent student. 

In order to prevent access to, or release of. Directory Information, 
students or the parents of dependent students, must notify the 
Registrar (PC 130), in writing prior to the first class meeting day of 
the semester. Access to, or release of. Directory Information will be 
withheld until further written instruaion is received from a student, 
or the parents of a dependent student. 

Students have a right to challenge the accuracy of their educational 
records and may file written requests to amend these records. The 
Office of the Registrar (PC 130) may be contacted for further 
information r^arding the procedure to follow for questions or probleins. 

Information required by current laws and INS rules and regulations 
will be reported for all international graduate students. 

For complete information regarding the policies outlined above, 
please contact: 

University Registrar 

Florida International University 

University Park - PC 130 

Miami, Florida 33199 

E-mail: register^fiu.edu 

Telephone: 305-348-2320 

STUDENT SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBERS 

FIU expects all U.S. students and resident aliens to have a valid 
Social Security Number. Enrolled students who do not have one will 
have three months to provide the Registrar's Office with proof of a 

valid Social Security Number. Foreign students are encouraged to 
apply for a Social Security Number if they plan on working on 
campus. However, it is not required for enrollment purposes. 

TRANSCRIPTS 

The transcript is the complete student record of courses taken at the 
Uttiversity and the number of transfer credits accepted. The GPA is 
calculated for all courses taken at the University aft:er Fall Term 
1975. Once a baccalaureate, master's, or doctoral degree is earned, 
the GPA recalculation starts again. 

Students must request their transcript in writing. There is a 48 hour 
processing period. The tran,script will not be released if the student 




has a University financial liability and/or a defaulted student loan. 
There is a $5.00 charge per transcript. 

CLASS ATTENDANCE 

The University does not have an attendance policy. However, 
individual faculty may establish attendance criteria in classes where 
deemed necessary. Academic units may establish their own 
attendance policies with the approval of the Provost. 

RELIGIOUS HOLY DAYS 

A faculty member who wishes to observe a religious holy day shall 
make arrangements to have another instructor teach the class in his 
or her absence, if possible, or shall reschedule the class. 

Because there are some classes and other functions where attendance 
may be considered essential, the following policy is in effect: 

1) Each student shall, upon notifying his or her instructor at the 
beginning of the semester, be excused from class to observe a 
religious holy day of his or her faith. 

2) While the student will be held responsible for the material 
covered in his or her absence, each student shall be permitted a 
reasonable amount of time to make up any work missed. 

3) No major test, major class event, or major University activity will 
be scheduled on a major religious holy day. 

4) Professors and University administrators shall not arbitrarily 
penalize students who are absent from academic or social 
activities because of religious observances. 

VETERANS INFORMATION 

The Office of Veterans Affairs assists all veterans and their dependents 
who wish to receive VA educational benefits. The Office also 
provides personal counseling, fee deferments, tutorial assistance, and 
work-study jobs. 



36 Graduate Catalog 



Veterans who are planning to attend the University should contact 
the Office of Veterans Affairs two months prior to the date of entry. 
Such time is required to expedite the processing of paperwork for 
educational allowances from the Veterans Administration. 



TRAINING STATUS 

Full time 

3/4 time 

Half time 

Less than lialf time 



CREDIT HOURS 

9 Credits 
7 Credits 
5 Credits 
4 Credits 



For rate of monthly payment of educational allowances for veterans 
and dependents, please contact the Office of Veterans Affairs. 

For additional information regarding other Veterans Educational 
Programs, contact the Office of Veterans Affairs located in PC156, 
University Park, 305-348-2838; and ACI 100, Biscayne Bay 
Campus, 305-919-5750. 

ENROLLMENT CERTIFICATION 

The Office of the Registrar is responsible for certification of 
students' enrollment. Certifications cannot be processed if the 
student has a financial liability. 



Enrollment Status - Graduate: 

Fall and Spring Semesters 



Full time: 

Half time: 

Less than half time: 

Summer Semester 

Full time: 



9 credits or more 

5 - 8 credits 

4 credits or fewer 

6 credits 



Doctoral students who have reached candidacy or masters students 
who have completed all requirements except for the thesis, and have 
an approved thesis proposal on file in the University Graduate School, 
are considered full-time when registered for three credits per term. 

Enrollment status is for continuous enrollment for the semester in 
which the student is in attendance. Reduction of course load may 
change the student's status. Contact the Office of the Registrar for 
further details. 

FLORIDA RESIDENCY INFORMATION - 

FLORIDA STUDENT DEFINITION 

For the purpose of assessing registration and tuition fees, a student 
shall be classified as a Florida or non-Florida Resident. 

To qualify as a Florida Resident, the student must: 

1) Be a U.S. Citizen, Resident Alien, parolee, Cuban National, 
Vietnamese Refugee, or other legal alien so designated by the 
U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. 

2) Have established a legal residence in this State and have maintained 
that legal residence for 1 2 months immediately prior to the start 
of the term in which the student is seeking Florida resident 
classification. The student's residence in Florida must be as a 
bona fide domiciliary rather than for the purpose of maintaining 
a mere temporary residence or abode incident to enrollment in 
an institution of higher education, and should be demonstrated 
as indicated below (for dependent students as defined by IRS 
regulations, a parent or guardian must qualify), 

3) Submit the following documentation (or in the case of a dependent 
student, the parent must submit documentation), prior to the 
last day of registration for the term for which resident status 
is sought: 




University Graduate School Rules and Regulations 37 



A) Documentation establishing legal residence in Florida (this 
document must be dated at least one year prior to the first 
day of classes of the term for which Florida 
resident status is sought). The following documents will be 
considered in determining legal residence: 

i Declaration of Domicile. 

ii Proof of purchase of a home in Florida which the stu- 
dent occupies as his or her residence. 

iii Proof that the smdent has maintained residence in the 
state for the preceding year (e.g., rent receipts, 
employment record). 

B) Documentation establishing bona fide domicile in Florida 
which is not temporary or merely incident to entollment in 
a Florida institution of higher education. The following 
documents will be considered evidence of domicile even 
though no one of these criteria, if taken alone, will be 
considered conclusive evidence of domicile (these documents 
must be dated at least one year prior to the first day of classes 
of the term for which resident status is sought); 

i Declaration of Domicile. 

ii Florida Voter's registration. 

iii Florida Driver's license. 

iv Proof of real property ownership in Florida (e.g., deed, 

tax receipts). 
V Employment records or other employment related 

documentation (e.g., W-2, paycheck receipts), other 

than for employment normally provided on a temporary 

basis to students or other temporary employment, 
vi Proof of membership in or affiliation with community 

or state organizations or significant connections to 

the State, 
vii Proof of continuous presence in Florida during the 

period when not enrolled as a student. 



viii Proof of former domicile in Florida and maintenance 
of significant connections while absent. 

ix Proof of reliance upon Florida sources of support. 

X Proof of domicile in Florida of family. 

xi Proof of admission to a licensed practicing profession 
in Florida. 

xii Proof of acceptance of permanent employment 
in Florida. 

xiii Proof of graduation from a high school located in 
Florida within the last 12 months. 

xiv Any other factors peculiar to the individual which tend 
to establish the necessary intent to make Florida a 
permanent home and that the individual is a bona fide 
Florida resident, including the age and general 
circustances of the individual. 

C) No contrary evidence establishing residence elsewhere. 

D) Documentation of dependent/independent status (IRS 
return or affidavit) . 

A student can also qualify for Florida residency by one or more of the 
following criteria: 

1) Become a legal resident and be married to a person who has been 
a legal resident for the required 12-month period, or, 

2) Be a member of the Armed Forces on active duty stationed in 
Florida, or a spouse or dependent, or, 

3) Be a member of the fiill-time instructional or adminis-trative 
staff of a state public school, state community college or state 
university in Florida, a spouse or dependent, or, 

4) Be a dependent and have lived five years with an adult relative 
who has established legal residence in Florida, or, 

5) Be a former student at a public institution of higher education 
who was properly classified as a resident who re-establishes 
domiciliary status and re-enrolls within a period of 12 months, or, 

6) Make a statement as to the length of residence in Florida and 
qualification under the above criteria. 



38 Graduate Catalog 



» ^ 





i^^K.^ 



.^- % 




n 



GENERAL 
INFORMATION 



General Information 39 



AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) 

The Director for Equal Opponunity Programs is the University's 
ADA Coordinator, and has responsibility for ensuring access to 
employment, academic and public programs for persons with 
disabilities. The Office of Disabilit)' Services for Students administers 
a central budget used to fund the costs of reasonable accommodations 
for University employees and applicants for employment. These 
accommodations include the provision of auxiliary aids and services 
to ensure access to academic programs and University public events. 

THE ART MUSEUM 

The Art Museum at Florida International University has served the 
South Floiida community for over 20 years presenting free exhibitions 
and art lectures of local, national and international importance. 
Exhibiuons include student shows, self-curated exhibitions from both 
the University's collections and from institutions and organizations 
outside the University, and national traveling shows. The An Museimi 
is accredited by the American Association of Museums and is an affiliate 
of the Smithsonian Instiwrion. It has also been recognized for its excellence 
by the grants it has received, most recendy from the National 
Endowment for the Arts; The Insutute for Museum and Library 
Services; The Florida Humanities Council; Miami-Dade County 
Cultural Affairs Council; and the Florida Department of State, 
Division of Cultural Afl^airs. The An Museum is designated as a major 
culture institution by the State of Florida. 



Susan Sontag, Robert Hughes, Hilton Kramer, Michael Graves, 
Peter Plagens, Tom Wolfe, Germaine Greer, Dore Ashton, Carlos 
Fuentes, Michael Brenson, Frank Stella, Richard Serra, Helen 
Frankenthaler, Kirk Varnedoe, Lowery Sims, Michael Kimmelman, 
and Anne d'Harnoncourt. 

The Museum is located in PC 110. For further information on the 
Museum and its programs contact the museum at 305-348-2890 or 
visit the website www.aTtmuseumadiu.org. 

CAMPUS LIFE 

Campus Life is your gateway to entertainment, involvement and 
leadership on campus. As a department within the Division of 
Students Affairs, we are creating experiences for life by providing 
opportunities for students to participate actively, grow personally, 
and explore new ideas and interests through a variety of entertainment 
and involvement experiences. Our staff, and the students with 
whom we work, are committed to creating a vibrant campus 
community filled with diverse activities for all students. 

Programs within the Department of Campus Life include, 
Fraternities and Sotorities, Graduate Students Association, 
Homecoming, Honors Council, Panther Rage, Student 
Government Association, Student Organizations Council and the 
Student Programming Council. 



The Art Museum serves Miami's mulricultural community year-round, 
free of charge. The Museum is home to Coral Gables' Metropolitan 
Museum and Art Center Collection, the Oscar B. Cintas Fellows 
Collection of Contemporary Hispanic Art, a permanent collection 
of works by North and South American and Florida arrists, and the 
site of the Martin Z. Margulies Sculpture Park, one of the world's 
most important international outdoor sculpture collections that 
includes works by Calder, De Kooning, Ricky, Nevelson, Serra, and 
other well-known artists. 

The Art Museum, which occupies a 5,000 square foot area on the 
University Park campus, opened with an internationally acclaimed 
exhibition. Contemporary Latin American Drawings, in April, 1977. 
Since then, many important exhibitions have been presented, 
including: Alberto Giacometti, Draftsman and Sculptor; Mira. Mira, 
Mira: Los Cuhanos de Miami; Adolph Gottlieb: Painting and Works 
on Paper: Marcel Duchamp; Louise Bourgeois; The Phillips Collection 
in the Making: 1920 - 1930; Imagenes Liricas: New Spanish Visions; 
CUBA-USA: The First Generation; Jose Bedia; Agustin Fernandez: A 
Retrospective: Miro/Noguchi; and most recently, Modernism and 
Abstraction: Treasures from the Smithsonian American Art Museum. 
The annual American Art Today series has featured contemporary 
anists exploring traditional themes including Still Lift, The Figure in 
the Landscape, The Portrait, Narrative Painting, The City Surface 
Tension, Clothing us Metaphor Images from Abroad and the Garden, 
and Fantasies and Curiosities. 

The Art Museum has continued to enhance its exhibitions with the 
Critics' Lecture Series, which has included many of the exhibiting 
artists, scholars, museum curators and an historians, including: 



Membership recruitment timelines and requirements vary; please 
contact the department for specific involvement information. 
Students do not need to have previous experience to become 
involved on campus. 

Campus Life is located in GC 340, University Park, 305-348-2138; 
and WUC 141, Biscayne Bay Campus, 305-919-5804. 

CAREER SERVICES 

Career Services answers the student's question "where are you head- 
ed? " The Office assists registered students at all campus locations 
with career plans and employment needs across all 
academic disciplines. Career Services' "high-tech/high-touch" 
philosophy offers 24/7 services plus individualized attention. 

Career Services encourages students to register with the office 
immediately after enrolling in classes. Services include: 

• Career Development - Offers activities for those desiring to 
identify their next career/educational path. Career interest tools, 
group sessions, on-line resources, and individualized 
appointments are available. 

• Internships — Provides students with practical work experience in 
their chosen career. Assignments include part-time as well as 
(ull-time work. Internships may provide a salary and academic 
credit with assignments possible at local, national or international 
levels. Internships may also lead to a friU-time career opportunity 
upon graduation. 

• Employment upon graduation - Offers networking opportimities, 
career fairs (face to face and virtual) on-campus interviewing 
(face to face and virtual), on-line job vacancies, resume referrals, 
and employer sponsored information sessions. 



40 Graduate Catalog 



Career Services also provides specialized workshops for "soft skill 
development" (e.g. business etiquette dinners and dress for success 
seminars) and other job search sessions (e.g. behavioral interviewing, 
resume critiques, mock interviews with employers, and development of 
scannabie resumes). The Office has video-conferencing capabilities 
for workshops and interviewing. For more information, click on 
www.fiu.edu/-career. 

Career Services is located in GC-230, University Park. 
305-348-2423; WUC-225, Biscayne Bay Campus, 305-919-5770; 
and CAES-2780, Engineering, 305-348-1281. 

The Alvah Chapman Graduate School of Business also provides 
services for all Business graduate students, in MARC 224, 
305-348-7395. 




"J^^^'ii'sfC^S: 



CHILDREN'S CREATIVE LEARNING CENTER 

The Children's Creative Learning Center at FIU is an Educational 
Research Center for Child Development. The Center is a 
department of the Division of Student Affairs. 

The Center offers an educational preschool program to children 
between the ages of two years and six months (toilet trained) 
through five years. The program is designed to meet the needs of 
children Monday through Friday, from 7:45 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., with 
pick-up at 12:00 p.m., 12:30 p.m., or after 3:30 p.m. 



Children are viewed as individuals. Each child is encouraged to 
develop socially, emotionally, physically, cognitively, and intelleaually 
at his/her own rate of growth. Working toward their maximum 
potential, the children are nurtured by being exposed to the many 
content areas the teachers offer such as: art, music, movement, 
science, cooking, dramatic play, and outdoor play. Language and 
literacy, pre-math, and developmental tasks along with hands on 
experiences of educational concepts to convey awareness of the 
world around us are included. A creative atmosphere exists where 
educational concepts are introduced as hands on experiences and 
through different areas in the classroom. Through these real life 
experiences, the children make sense of their world. 

Parent involvement is a Jiigh priority at the Center. Parents are an 
integral part of the community by making a commitment to engage 
in meaningful experiences with their children. This enriches the 
children's experiences and supports family relationships. Parent 
workshops are offered as well as family gatherings. 

Students who are eligible may receive a partial subsidy to cover their 
child's registration fee, supply fee, and tuition. 

For more information or to receive a copy of the Center's brochure 
and request for admission, please call 305-348-2143, website: 
www.fiu.edu/'-children. 

COUNSELING AND 
PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES 

The Counseling and Psychological Services Center offers a spectrum 
of mental health services which enhance the emotional and cognitive 
well-being of students. Individual, couple, and group counseling 
are offered. 

Biofeedback services and neuropsychological testing are also 
available. Programs available to the University community include 
psychoeducational workshops and seminars related to marriage, 
parenting, and mental health issues. Consultation services can be 
utilized by faculty or staff regarding student concerns. All services for 
students are free and confidential. 

The Counseling and Psychological Services Center is located in GC 
21 1, University Park, 305- 348-2434; and NXOJC 320, Biscayne Bay 
Campus, 305-919-5305. 

DISABILITY SERVICES FOR STUDENTS 

Disability Services for Students provides information and assistance 
to students with disabilities who are in need of special accommodations. 
Individual services are available to students with visual, hearing, 
speech, physical, and learning disabilities. Services include counseling, 
classroom accommodations, issistive technology, note-takers, readers, 
ASL interpreters, adapted testing, priority registration, and referrals. 



Since its inception in 1975, this model program has become well Support and assistance in oveicoming architectuial, academic, 

known for providing appropriate hands on experiences for children attitudinal, and other barriers encountered are provided. Requests 

of students, faculty, staff, alumni, and the neighboring community. for services must be made prior to the beginning of each semester and 

Enrollment priority is given to children of students. current documentation of disability is required to receive services. 



General Information 4 1 



Disability Services for Students is located in GC 190, University 
Park, 305-348-3532; and WUC 139, Biscayne Bay Campus, 
305- 919-5345. TTY 348-3490. 

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY PROGRAMS 

This office provides leadership and direction in the administration 
of the University's equalization programs for women and minorities 
in several ways. It prepares the University's annual Affirmative 
Action Plan and the State Equity Accountability Plan, assists 
University units in implementing and monitoring affirmative action 
procedures; provides oversight to the University Diversity Program; 
provides a channel for employee and student grievances regarding 
discrimination, or issues indicating a need for additional affirmative 
actions; administers implementation of the Policy to Prohibit Sexual 
Harassment; coordinates University compliance with the Americans 
with Disabilities Act and with Title IX of the Education 
Amendments of 1 972, and piomotes effective relationships between 
the University and community oiganizations. Equal Opportunity 
Programs also administers the State Univetsity System's scholarship 
programs funded for the purpose of increasing minority enrollment. 
In addition, the Office maintains a liaison relationship with State 
and Federal agencies dealing with EEO and affirmative action. The 
Office is located in PC 511, University Park, 305-348-2785. 




GRADUATE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION 

The aim of the Gtaduate Students Association (GSA) is to facilitate 
and enhance the graduate student experience, to advance the 
reputation of, and assist in the expansion of graduate programs, and 
to promote quality teaching and research at Florida 
International University. 
To accomplish these goals, the Graduate Students Association: 

• Provides services to the individual graduate student by subsidizing 
travel for students who present papets at ptofessional meetings 
and conferences and by funding research as part of a thesis on 
dissertation such as to improve the quality of gtaduate research 
at FIU. 

• Fosters and supports Graduate Student Organizations (GSOs) 
through financial and technical resources. 

• Provides services such as workshops and seminars in order to 
enhance gtaduate culture, awareness, and knowledge in areas of 
interest to graduate students. 

• Wotks in conjunction with other organizations, departments, 
and/ oi individual graduate students to coordinate conferences 
and promote events of interest to graduate students. 

The Gtaduate Students Association office is located in GC 315, 
University Park, 305-348-4112. More information is available at 
www.fiu.edu/-gsa. 

HEALTH CARE AND WELLNESS 

The Health Care and Wellness Center (HCWC) provides quality, 
cost-effective, confidential, and professional primary medical care 
for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of non-emergency 
illness and injury. The Center also promotes healthy lifestyle choices 
and provides health education to enable students to achieve their 
optimal wellness potential, working in concert with the mission of 
the University. 

The following free services are offered at the Health Care Center: 
routine office visits with registered nurses and primary care nurse 
practitioners and physicians; health screening; family planning 
counseling; and podiatry (at UP campus). The following services are 
offered at the Health Care Center for a nominal charge: Pap smears; 
laboratory tests (blood, urine, and cultures); EKGs; vision and hearing 
tests; physical examinations; HIV counseling and testing; tespiratory 
therapy; immunizations; allergy injections; and certain over-the- 
counter and piescription medications. Students must present a valid 
FIU photo ID at the time of the office visit. The Health Care Center 
is open Monday through Friday and appointments ate strongly rec- 
ommended. Payment is requited at the time of service. The student 
health fee does not cover diagnostic and therapeutic medical visits to 
outside physicians, medical and surgical specialists, dentists, outpatient 
clinics, emeigency rooms, or hospitals. Students are strongly encouraged 
to purchase supplemental health insurance. A health insurance policy 
is available at a low group rate for students who take six or more 
credit hours a semester. 

In case of emergency on campus. Public Safety - Campus Police 
Department should be called, 24 hours a day, at 305-348-5911 
(Univetsity Park Campus) or 305-919-591 1 (Biscayne Bay Campus). 



42 Graduate Catalog 



The Wellness Center advocates healthy lifestyle choices by providing 
a variety of health promotion activities and workshops for students 
and employees. The Wellness Resource Library has textbooks, 
brochures, videos, audiotapes, and computer interactive programs 
"Dine Healthy" personal diet assessment and "Alcohol 101." 
Personal health consultations are available for a variety of topics: 
nutrition, TriFit/Microfit computerized fitness assessments, stress 
management, and smoking cessation. The Wellness Center also 
sponsors several student organizations, including peer health educator 
programs and student clubs. Professional staff is available to conduct 
workshops and lectures on a variety of health topics for departments, 
student groups, and academic classes. 

The Health Care and Wellness Center is located on the University 
Park Campus in the HCWC building. Phone: Health Care Center: 
305-348-2401, Wellness Center 305-348-4020; and on the 
Biscayne Bay Campus in two locations: the clinic in the Health Care 
Center (located by parking lot 1-C), and the Wellness Center (locared 
across from the Campus Support Complex), Phone: 305-919-5620, 
Health Care Center; 305-919-5307, Wellness Center. Website: 
www.fiu.edu/'health. 

HIV/AIDS POLICY 

Students and employees of the University who may become infected 
with the HIV/AIDS virus will not be excluded from enrollment or 
employment or restricted in their access to University services or 
facilities, unless individual medically-based judgments establish that 
exclusion or restriction is necessary for the welfare of the individual 
or for other members of the University community. The University 
has established an HfV/AIDS Committee which includes representatives 
from major University divisions and other staff as appropriate. The 
Committee, which meets regularly, is responsible for monitoring 
developments with regard to HIV/AIDS, acting upon and 
administering the University "s Policy on HIV/ AIDS in specific cases, 
and coordinating the University's efforts in educating the University 
community on the nature of the disease. In addition, the Committee 
will meet as needed to consider individual occurrences of the disease 
which require Universiry action. 

Persons who know or suspect they are sero-positive are expected to 
seek expert medical advice and are obligated, ethically and legally, to 
conduct themselves responsibly for the protection of others. 

The University has designated HIV/AIDS counselors on both 
campuses who are available to provide ftjrther information on this 
subject. The entire HIV/AIDS policy is located on the FIU Health 
Care and Wellness Center web site: www.fiu.edu/'health/clini- 
calservices/HIYpolicy.htm. Contact the Health Care and Wellness 
Center for more information at 305-348-3080. 

HOUSING AND RESIDENTIAL LIFE 

Housing and Residential Life provides housing for students at both 
the University Park and Biscayne Bay campuses. There are four 
housing complexes located at the University Park Campus. They 
include three new state of the art housing facilities that have been 



opened in the last six years providing on campus housing for an 
additional 1 ,300 students. Total housing capacity on the University 
Park Campus is 1 ,900 bed spaces. At the Biscayne Bay campus, the 
newly renovated Bay Vista housing facility serves approximately 300 
students. There are multiple room types providing a variety of 
different levels of accommodations to meet housing needs. 

All of the housing facilities have fast Ethernet connections, unlimited 
access to the web, basic cable television, local telephone service, and 
utilities included in the room rental rate. Each of the residence halls 
is staffed with both professional and paraprofessional personnel to 
insure the facilities are safe and well maintained. For more information 
regarding services and accommodations please visit our web page at 
www.fiu.edu/^housing. 

All housing agreements are issued for the academic year with summer 
assignments available. A $150.00 deposit is required at the time of 
application, of which $50.00 is a non-refijndable processing fee. 

The Housing Office is located in University Park Towers (UPT) 
121, Phone:305-348-4190, Fax: 305-348-4295; E-mail: 
hou5ing@fiu.edu. Office of Residential Life, Panther Hall (PH) 
126, Phone: 305-348-3684. 

HUMAN RESOURCES 

The Division of Human Resources provides comprehensive human 
resource services for staff members and employees of all academic 
and administrative departments including student employees, 
research or graduate assistants, college work study and temporary 
employees on all campuses. All services provided by the office are in 
compliance with applicable federal and state regulations, and include 
six major human resources areas — Staffing/Recruitment, 
Compensation/ Classification, Organizational Development and 
Learning, Employee Benefits and Workers' Compensation, 
Employee and Labor Relations, Employee Records, and Equal 
Opportunity Programs. 

Human Resources is located in PC 224, University Park, 305-348-2190; 
and 322-A Library Building, Biscayne Bay Campus 305 -919-5548. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 
AND CAMPUS RECREATION 

FIU is a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association 
(NCAA), and the Sun Belt Conference for men and women. The 
University has competed at the Division I-AAA level since 
September of 1987 prior to that competed successfully at the 
Division II level since 1972. Programs and services in Intercollegiate 
Athletics provide an opportunity for student-athletes to develop as 
skilled performers in an educational setting. Much emphasis is 
placed on the student as a student-athlete to ensure intellectual, 
emotional and social well being. 

Athletic Facilities 

TTie Golden Panther Athletic Facilities encompasses seven facilities that 
serve as the sites for athletic, educational and recreational activities. 



General Information 43 



The Golden Panther Arena is a multi-purpose facility. There is a 
seating capacity for special events of 5,150. The main floor can hold 
four volleyball courts and two basketball courts. The two auxiliar>' 
gyms can each hold one fiill basketball court or a volleyball court. 
Also housed in the arena are three racquetball courts, five classrooms 
and six locker rooms. The arena is open to students, facility, staff and 
alumni with a valid Recreational Pass. 

The FIU Soccer and FIU Softball stadiums are the home of our 
intercollegiate men's and women's programs. Both stadiums are 
lighted. The soccer stadium seats 1,500 and the Softball stadium 
seats 300. 

The FIU Tennis Center has twelve lighted courts and is home to 
the Women's tennis program. The courts are also open for daily 
recreational play. 

The FIU Community Stadium is a Football and Track facility. The 
stadium is the home of our intercollegiate football program, and is 
also the home of our men's and women's track and field programs. 
In the fall, the facihty is used to host many Miami-Dade County 
Schools high school football games. 

The University Park Baseball Stadium is the home to our intercolle- 
giate baseball team. The newly renovated stadium has a seating 
capacity of 1 ,600. 

FIU students are admitted to all regular season intercollegiate ath- 
letic home events free of charge. Presentation of a valid University 
identification card is required. 

For additional information please call; FIU Athletic Facilities 
348-3258; Golden Panther Box Office 348-4263 (FlU-GAME). 




Campus Recreation 

Campus Recreation at Univetsity Park offers recreational sports and 
fitness programs and facilities to Florida International University 
students. Funding for Campus Recreation is primarily through 
student fees allocated by the FIU Student Government Association 
(SGA). Faculty, staff, alumni and spouses of students are eligible 
to purchase memberships. Currently-enrolled students are 
automatically members. 

The Student Fitness Center (SFC) is equipped with a variety of 
modem exercise and cardiovascular fitness equipment. In addition to 
free weights and dimibbells, quahty brand-name resistance equipment, 
stair climbeis, upright and recumbent bicycles, treadmills, towers, 
and ellipticals are featured. The SFC is located adjacent to the 
Golden Panther Arena (GPA). The new Recreation Center, with 
over 12,000 sq. feet of fitness space, a gymnasium, and larger group 
fitness and locket room areas, will open in Fall 2004. 

Low or no-cost Aerobics classes, including spinning, kick boxing and 
step, are offered thtoughout the year, as are specialty classes such as 
yoga and belly dancing. Fitness orientations, body composition 
evaluations, and personal training are services featured at the 
Student Fitness Center. 

A variety of Intramural Sports are offered, including men's, women's 
and co-rec leagues in sports such as flag football, basketball, volley- 
ball, Softball and soccer, and tournaments fot racquetball, 
tennis and golf Individuals looking for a team are encouraged to 
register as "free agents". Registration for all Intramural Sports can be 
completed on the Campus Recreation website. 

Golden Panther Arena provides recreational basketball, volleyball and 
badminton courts for limited drop-in use, and three indoor racquetball 
courts available on a reservation basis. The Tennis and Racquetball 
Center offers six recreational tennis courts and two 3-wall racquetball 
courts (all seasonally lighted for evening play). Tennis lessons are 
available. On-campus swimming is available at Panther Hall Pool, and 
students have free access to nearby Tamiami Pool during lap swim 
hours. A current, aaivated Golden Panther photo ID is required for 
access to all recreation facilities and programs. 

Special programs include Adventure Recreation (low-cost trips and 
classes offered through community partnerships in aaivities such as 
rock climbing, kayaking, mountain biking), and INTRO 2 Sport 
Skills Series (where participants get a quick introduction to a new 
sport or activity). Campus Recreation also serves as a liaison for the 
univetsity's Sport Clubs, such as rugby, table tennis, scuba and 
ice hockey. 

Campus Recreation provides student employment opportunities as 
spons oflScials, fitness center anendants and supervisors, lifeguards, 
aerobics instructors, office assistants and more. 

For additional information, call Campus Recreation at 305-348-295 1 . 
Additional phone numbers: Student Fitness Center (305-348- 
2575); Panther Hall Pool (305-348-1895); Golden Panther Arena 



44 Graduate Catalog 



(305-348-2900); IM Sports (348-1054); Tennis Center (305-348- 
6327). Website: www.fiu.eduZ-'cainprec. 

Biscayne Bay Campus Recreational Sports 

Biscayne Bay Recreational Sports provides a variety of recreational, 
aquatic, and educational experiences. It contributes to the personal 
development of students and others by providing a variety of 
activities designed to enhance physical health while fostering an 
appreciation of competition, social skills, and cultural diversity. 

The program includes intramurals, aerobics (including step and 
boxing), nautilus and weight training, swimming classes, lifeguard 
training, tennis clinics, swim/sports camps, fitness center, aquatic 
center, tennis facility and GMAC water polo tournaments. Special 
events include deep sea fishing, golf, turkey trot, an two bench 
press competitions. 

For additional information, call Biscayne Bay Campus Recreational 
Sports at 305-919-4571. Website: www.fiu.edu/-bbcrec. 

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT AND 
SCHOLAR SERVICES 

The International Student and Scholar Services (ISSS) office 
provides assistance to international students, faculty and researchers 
in non-immigrant status (F or J visas). The staff provides advising 
services on immigration, cultural, personal, social and financial 
concerns, as well as, maintains the Student Exchange Visitor 
Information System (SEVIS), the Department of Homeland 
Security tracking system. 

All new and/or transfer students MUST anend a MANDATORY 
orientation program before the start of their first semester and 
MUST report to the ISSS office within the first week of the start of 
classes. The ISSS also offers social and cultural programs to assist 
students in adapting more effectively to the University community 
and to living in Miami. An active International Student Club on 
each campus collaborates with the ISSS in organizing various social 
activities. Club programs enable students to participate in the 
international dimension of the University and provide opportunities 
for involvement in the greater Miami community. 

ISSS is located in GC 242, University Park, 305-348-2421; and 
WUC 363, Biscayne Bay Campus, 305-919-5813. 

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT 
EXCHANGE PROGRAM 

The International Student Exchange (ISE) Program provides 
students with the opportunity to study abroad (during one or tv/o 
semesters) at one of the various universities that have an agreement 
with Florida International University. Full credit is given for work 
satisfactorily completed during the exchange program as long as it 
has been pre-approved by an advisor. Grades are not transferred. 
International Student Exchange Program offers the opportunity to 
live abroad, explore other languages and cultures, and become 
acquainted with new friends from all over the world. Students will 
be required to pay FIU tuition, insurance, housing, and travel 



arrangements. In order to participate in ISE, a student must be 
enrolled at FIU and have a 3.0 cumulative GPA. 

For more information, please contact the Office of International 
Studies located in Tower Trailer (TT), 305-348-1913, email: 
ois@fiu.edu, or website: ois.fiu.edu. 




MULTI FAITH COUNCIL 

The Multifaith Council is a unit within the Department of Campus 
Life. It is a coalition of various faith groups seeking to serve students 
through interfaith programs, leadership, and community service 
opportunities. The Multifaith Council includes Baptist Collegiate 
Ministries, Chatholic Campus Ministry, Campus Outreach, Hillel 
Jewish Student Center, Intervarsity Christian Fellowship, and Youth 
For Christ. The individual faith groups sponsor studies, retreats, and 
special workship services. Professional representatives are available 
for personal appointments. 

The Multifaith Council is located in GC 358, University Park, 
305-348-3902; and TRM-09, Biscayne Bay Campus, 305-919-5247. 

OFFICE OF THE OMBUDSMAN 

The Ombudsman Office acts as an impartial and confidential forum 
to assist students who have encountered problems or conflicts at the 
University, particularly problems or concerns not adequately 
addressed through normal channels. This may include correcting 
processes or procedures, which are incapable of resolving the issue, 
or are causing an inordinate delay. The Ombudsman may resolve 
problems through various methods, including investigation, mediation, 
or making referrals to the appropriate University department for 
review. The Ombudsman should be utilized in situations where all 
areas of appeal have been exhausted or proven unsuccessftrl. 
For more information or services, please contact the Office of the 
Ombudsman in GC 219, 305-348-2797; or WUC 325, Biscayne 
Bay Campus, 305-919-5800. 



General Information 45 



ORIENTATION AND COMMUTER 
STUDENT SERVICES 

The Office of Orientation and Commuter Student Services provides 
resources, services, and programs to new students and the 
University's commuter student population. 

The Commuter Center, located at University Park, assists students with 
obtaining information that may aid them in making a smooth transition 
to the Univeisit): A varietv' of services are av'ailable at the Center induding: 
off-campus housmg mformation, campus maps. Student Handbooks, 
parking information, local telephone access, and child care iivformation. 
In addition to a variety of Uimetsity resources, the Center also provides 
a variety of programs and brochures for ITU's commuter students, as 
well as extended hours of operation. 

Orientation and Commuter Student Services is located in GC 1 12A, 
University Park, 305-348-3828; and WUC 363, Biscayne Bay 
Campus, 305-919-5804. 

SEXUAL HARASSMENT, 
NONDISCRIMINATION, 
EDUCATIONAL EQUITY 

All members of the Universit)- Community are entided to study and 
work in an atmosphere free from illegal discrimination. Florida 
International Universit)''s equal opportunit)- policy ptohibits 
discrimination against students and employees on the basis of their 
race, color, creed, age, disabilit)', sex (including sexual harassment), 
religion, marital status, or national origin. Under the policy, it does 
not matter whether the discrimination was intended or not; the 
focus is on whether students or employees have been treated 
differently or subjeaed to intimidation, or a hostile or offensive 
envirorunent as a result of their belonging to a protected class or having 
a protected status. Illegal sexual harassment includes unwelcome 
physical contact of a sexual nattue, overt or imphed threats to induce 
performance of sexual favors, verbal harassment, use of sexually 
suggestive terms, or display or posting of sexually offensive pictures. 

Any employee, applicant, or student who believes that he or she may 
be a victim of unlawfiil discrimination may file a complaint with the 
Office of Equal Opportunity Programs, PC 511, University Park 
(348-2785). 

STUDENT CONDUCT AND 
CONFLICT RESOLUTION 

The mission of the Office of Student Condua and Conflict 
Resolution is to promote concepts of respect, civility, fairness, and 
conflict resolution on campus by enforcing community standards 
(FPU pohcies, federal, state, and local laws) and holding students 
accountable for their behavior in a fair, yet developmental maimer, 
through the involvement of the campus community' and educational 
development of students. 

Infringements of an academic nature should be .directed to the 
Office of the Provost. Complaints that are non-academic should be 
directed to the Office of Student Condua and Conflict Resolution. 



The Office of Student Conduct and Conflia Resolution also 
provides the following: 

• Mediation as an avenue to foster mutual respect and 
undeistanding when differences arise. Mediation through the 
Office of Smdent Conduct and Conflict Resolution is an informal, 
voluntary and confidential process to lesolve minor conflicts, 
disputes 01 disagreements whithout going through formal 
charges or judicial proceedings. 

• Background checks for various agencies (Secret Service, FBI, CL\, 
State Department, DEA, Federal Marshals, Law Enforcement 
Agencies, Military, Graduate Schools, Law Schools, Dean 
CeniScations, Florida Bar Examiners). 

• Selection and training of judicial board members and 
hearing offices. 

• Admissions clearances — The Universit)' reserves the right to 
re%iew the case of any student ■who has been involved in misconduct 
prior to admission to determine eligibihty for admission. 

• Educational programs for facultv", staff and smdents tegarding the 
smdent judicial process; ethics and integrit)- and conflia resolution. 

Please refer to the Student Code of Condua section in the Student 
Handbook for more information regarding Student Condua and 
Coiiflia Resolution processes and procedures.Student Condua and 
Conflia Resolution is located in GC 331, University Park, 
305-348-3939. www.fiu.eda/-jms. 

STUDENT MEDIA 

Smdent media at FlU include The Beacon neNvspaper and ^TIGP radio. 

The Beacon is an editorially independent publication pro-duced by 
students and distributed free. The purpose of The Beacon is to keep 
the University community informed about campus ne\vs e\ents and 
activiries; to serve as a forum for opinion and commentary concerning 
campus relared topics; and to piotea the interests of the entire 
Universit)' communit)'. It is published each Tuesday during the Fall 
and Spring terms, except during holiday breaks. It is also published 
eight times during the Summer rerm. Students can work on the staff 
in news and features, photography, and/or advertising. No priot 
experience is required. 

WRGP is FILTs radio station located at 88.1 FM. Its programming 
is an eclectic mix of the latest music on the cutting edge of the 
alternative scene, FIU sports play-by-play, and news. Programming 
also includes weekly specialt)- shows that cover the music spearum 
of metal to reggae, and in between is Caribbean, hip-hop, rap, Latin 
rock, and jazz. The station operates from 7 a.m. to past midnight 
seven days a week. The station pro\ides a means for students to 
acquire experience in various disciplines related to the btoadcast 
industr)', including hands-on experience in a realistic, business-like 
setting encompassing teamwork and professional standards. Students 
can work iit areas such as broadcasting, business, promotions, and/or 
engineering. Prior experience is not required. 

The Beacon is located in GC 210, University Park 305-348-1580; 
and '«TJC 124, Biscayne Bay Campus, 305-919-4722. WRGP is 
located in GC 319, Universit)- Park, 305-348-2709. 



46 Graduate Catalog 



STUDY ABROAD PROGRAM 

Each year FIU offers a number of Study Abroad Programs in 
coordination with different academic units, the Office of 
International Studies, and University Outreach. These programs are 
under the direction of FIU faculty members who accompany the 
students abroad. Students receive credit for these programs. Program 
locations include: Brazil, China, Spain, England, Ireland, Czech 
Republic, Germany, Italy, Japan, and others. The Honors College 
also offers programs in Italy and Spain. 

For more information, please contact the Office of International 
Studies located in Tower Trailer (TT), 305-348-1913, email; 
ois@iiu.edu, or website: ois.fiu.edu. 




UNIVERSITY CENTERS 

The University Center on each campus provides direct services to 
students and the University community. The Graham University 
Center (GC) at University Park and the Wolfe University Center 
(WUC) at Biscayne Bay Campus are the focal points for the 
University community to meet and interact in a non-classroom, 
educational environment. Staff in the centers coordinate the 
scheduling of space and assist with the production of student and 
University-sponsored events. 

s the hubs of University life, the buildings house the offices of 
Student Government Association; Graduate Students Association 
(GSA); The Beacon student newspaper. Radio Station; Faculty 
Club, and departments of the Division of Student Affairs that 
provide services to students: Career Services, Counseling and 



Psychological Services, Office of Disability Services for Students, 
International Student and Scholar Services, Victim Advocacy 
Center, Leadership Development, Kaplan Centers, Office of 
Multicultural Programs and Services, Campus Life, TicketMaster, 
Women's Center, Volunteer Action Center, and Student Conduct 
and Conflict Resolution. 

The University Centers also offer the services of computer labs, 
bookstores, cafeterias, grills, vending machines, credit unions, copy 
centers, automatic banking facilities, auditoriums, lounges, meeting 
rooms, ballrooms, movie theaters, art galleries and game rooms. 
Other services include; Lost and Found, locker rentals, vending 
refunds, test preparation courses, and Photo I.D. card. 

The Graham Center houses the Office of the Vice President for 
Student Affairs and Human Resources, classrooms, an art gallery, the 
Radio Station (WRGP), TicketMaster, a satellite cashiering office, a 
food court offering Polio Tropical, Subway, Grade's Grill, Edy's Ice 
Cream, Smoothie Time Health Food, and a coffee shop. The 
mini-mall offer a credit union, Panther Stop store, copy center, 
bookstore, hair and nail salon, and travel agency. 

The Wolfe University Center at the Biscayne Bay Campus houses 
a theater, parking services, credit union, fitness center, and a 
post office. 

The administrative offices of the University Centers are located in 
GC 104, University Park 305-348-2297; and WUC 325, Biscayne 
Bay Campus 305-919-5800. 

UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 

The University Libraries are housed in the Steven and Dorothea 
Green Library (GL) at University Park and in the Library Building 
(LIB) at Biscayne Bay Campus. In addition, there is a Library 
Service Center offering a variety of services on the Engineering 
Campus; a specialized legal collection that is part of the College of 
Law; and a library supporting the FIU Wolfsonian Museum. 
Collectively, these libraries make available over 1.6 million volumes; 
provide access to a broad range of electronic resources via more than 
four hundred public work stations; and offer the latest in electronic 
library services combined with efficient access to print material. 

Library users have access to ILLiad, the latest in automated interlibrary 
loan systems with journal articles delivered to the desktop; to chat 
reference service in English and in Spanish; and to a broad range of 
Information Literacy instructional offerings. Most on-line sources 
are available 24 hours a day. Most collections are in open stacks and 
directly available to the public. 

%>ecial resources and services include: a Geographic Information 
Systems (GIS) Center; the Everglades Digital Library; and a Virtual 
Library Tour, all accessible from the library home page 
(libraiy.fiu.edu). 

The principal libraries maintain an extensive schedule of service 
hours staying open Sunday-Thursday during the fall and spring 



General Information 47 



semesters until 1 a.m., with mote extensive access available during 
final exams. A number of research carrels are available for assignment 
to doctoral students. 

Currently-registered students may use the libraries of any other 
institution in the State University System. For access to libraries in 
the southeast Florida Region, check at the circulation desk concerning 
SEFLIN library privileges that enable you to borrow books from 
other academic libraries in the region. 

VICTIM ADVOCACY CENTER 

The Victim Advocacy Center provides support services to victims 
and survivors of crime and abuse for FIU students, faculty, staff, and 
university visitors. Services are confidential and free of charge, and 
address such issues as sexual violence, relationship/dating abuse, 
stalking, assault and battery, hate crimes, harassment, and survivors 
of homicide and/or child abuse. The Center also provides awareness 
and prevention educational programs for the community, and 
volunteer training for FIU students. In addition, the Center engages 
in research regarding effective intervention and receives funding to 
make national policy recommendations. A resource library is available 
for student use at the University Park office. Persons who have 
experienced victimization are encouraged to seek services from the 
Victim Advocacy Center. 

The Victim Advocacy Center is located in GC 195A, University 
Park, 305-348-121 5; and by appointment in WUC 257E, Biscayne 
Bay Campus. 



VOLUNTEER ACTION CENTER 

The Volunteer Action Center (VAC) is the central office for student 
volunteer activities on campus. The Center encourages students to 
realize their potential to impact their communities and effect social 
changes through the power of service learning, advocacy, and 
volunteerism. The VAC has two central focuses: first, it coordinates 
and directs service-learning activities, and second, it acts as a 
clearinghouse and resource center for volunteer opportunities and 
advocacy. Additionally, the VAC sponsors two student-run 
programs. Altetnative Spring Break organizes and sends students to 
perform community service projects in different cities across the 
country during the University's Spring Break. The second program 
is Dance Marathon, an annual fundraiser where students raise 
money for the Children's Miracle Netwotk. The VAC is committed 
to helping students turn their caring into daring, their ideas into 
action, and their time into change. 

The Volunteer Action Center is located in GC 340, University 
Park, 305-348-2149; and WUC 257, Biscayne Bay Campus, 
305-919-5360, www.fiu.edu/-vac. 

WOMEN'S CENTER 

The Women's Center offers various programs and services related to 
the intellectual, social, and ptofessional growth of women. Through 
collective efforts, the Center advocates for systemic changes that will 
improve the lives of women and men. Center programming focuses 
on the particular needs of women students, and encoutages women 
to learn more about themselves, other women, and the environment 
in which they live. The Mentoring Partnership Program, a joint 




48 Graduate Catalog 



efFon with the Office of Alumni Relations, promotes the professional 
and leadership success of FIU students. All programs are open to the 
entire community. Services provided by the Center focus on women, 
and include, confidential referrals, scholarship information, library 
and resource files, and opportunities for volunteers. 

The Women's Center is located in GC 318, University Park, 
305-348-3692; and WUC 256, Biscayne Bay Campus, 305-91 9-5359. 




THE WOLFSONIAN-FIU 

Located in the heart of Miami Beach's Art Deco District, The 
Wblfsonian-Florida International University is a museum and 
research center that serves local, national, and intetnational audiences 
by ptomoting the examination, understanding, and appreciation of 
the ways that design has served as a reflection of societal values and 
as an active force in the shaping of human experience. The 
Wolfsonian is accredited by the American Association of Museums. 
Through thought-provoking exhibi-tions, publications, research, 
academic, and public programs. The Wolfsonian-FlU focuses on the 
meaning of objects and the effect that the Industrial Revolution had 
on the creation of the modern world. The Wolfsonian became part 



of FIU in July 1997. Its founder, Mitchell Wolfson Jr., donated to 
FIU his extraordinary collection of the period 1885-1945 

The Wolfsonian holds more than 70,000 objects predominantly 
from North America and Europe, providing rich evidence of the 
cultural, political, and technological changes that swept the world in 
the century preceding the end of World War II. The collection 
features furniture, decorative arts, industrial design, paintings, .sculpture, 
atchitectural models, works on paper, rare books, and ephemera. 
Notable among these are Depression era prints and mural studies by 
WPA artists, items from the British Arts and Crafts movement 
and the German Werkstatten and Werkbund, and artifacts of 
political propaganda. 

Permanent, temporary, and traveling shows address broad themes of 
the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, such as nationalism, political 
persuasion, industrialization, architecture and urbanism, 
consumerism and advertising, transportation, and, world's fairs. 
Although drawing primarily on its own holdings. The Wolfsonian 
also features exhibitions and objects on loan from other collections. 

Days, evenings, and weekends. The Wolfsonian offers a range of 
lectures, films, symposia, tours, and workshops geared to visitors of 
all ages. It has paired with Miami-Dade County public schools to 
develop activities and interpretive materials for students and teachers 
in the arts and social sciences. To inquire about an exhibition 
(present, past, upcoming), program, or the general calendar, or to 
learn more about the collection and how it can be\ised for research, 
please visit www.woHsonian.org or call 305-53 1- 1 00 1 . 

The Wolfsonian publishes catalogues to document its exhibitions 
and collection. It also produces the award-winning Journal of 
Decorative and Propaganda Arts, a scholarly annual dedicated to 
exploring the role of art and design in the modern world. 

Free admission to exhibitions is provided to all Florida state 
university faculty, students, and staff with valid ID. In addition. The 
Wolfsonian is open to the general public on Thursday evenings from 
6:00 pm-9:00 pm. Most educational programs are free to the FIU 
community, however, occasional fees apply. 



Administration and Staff 49 




50 Graduate Catalog 



ADMINISTRATION 
AND STAFF 



OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 

President Modesto A. Maidique 

Inspector General Ted Guba 

Chief of Stajf Sebastian Arcos 

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

Provost and Executive Vice President Mark B. Rosenberg 
Vice President, Academic Affairs and 



Undergraduate Studies 



Rosa L. Jones 



Vice President, Information Technology 
and Chief Information Officer John P. McGowan 

Vice Provost for Academic 
Budget and Operations A. Kyle Perkins 

Vice Provost and Director, Planning and 
Institutional Effectiveness Marie E. Zeglen 

Vice Provost, Academic Affairs and Dean, 
University Graduate School Douglas Waitzok 

Vice Provost, International Studies A. Douglas Kincaid 

Susan McKinnon 
Lidia V. Tuttle 
Kenneth Johnson 



Senior Associate Vice President, 
Enrollment Services 



Assistant Vice President, 
Academic Affairs 

Assistant Vice President, 
Academic Affairs 



UNIT DEANS 

Dean, School of Architecture 

Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 

Executive Dean, College of 
Business Administration 

Dean, College of Education 

Dean, College ofEnpneering 

Dean, College of Health 
and Urban Affairs 

Dean, Honors College 

Dean, School of Hospitality 
and Tourism Management 



Juan A. Bueno 
R. Bruce Dunlap 

Joyce Elam 

Linda P. Blanton 

Vish Prasad 

Ronald M. Berkman 
Ivelaw L. Griffith 

Joseph West 



Dean (Interim), School of Journalism 
and Mass Communication Lillian Lodge Kopenhaver 

Dean, College of Law 



Dean, Continuing and 
Professional Studies 

LIBRARIES 

Executive Director 
Executive Associate Director 



Leonard P. Strickman 
David Grossman 



Laurence A. Miller 
Antonie B. Downs 



Assistant Director for 
Collection Development Tony "Charles" Schwartz 



Assistant Director, Reader Services 



Sherry Carrillo 



MUSEUMS, CENTERS AND INSTITUTES 

Director, Center for Accounting, 
Auditing, and Tax Studies Dana Forgione 

Director, Center for 
Administration of Justice Luis Salas 

Director, Center for Advancement of 
Engineering and Pre-CoUege Education Gustavo Roig 

Executive Director, Center on Aging Max B. Rothman 

Director, Art Museum Dahlia Morgan 

Director, Institute for Asian Studies Steven Heine 

Director, Biomedical 
Engineering Institute Richard T. Schoephoerster 

Director, Center for Advanced 
Distributed Systems Engineering 



Xudong He 

Director, Cardiovascular 
Engineering Center Richard T. Schoephoerster 

Director, Center for 
Advanced Technology Education Malek Adjouadi 

Director, Center for International 
Business Education and Research Mary Ann Von Glinow 

Director, Children's 
Creative Learning Center 



Nancy Ponn 

Director, Institute for 
Children and Families at Risk Barbara Thomlinson 



Director, Cuban 
Research Institute 

Director, High Performance 
Database Research Center 



Lisandro Perez 



Naphtali Rishe 



Administration and Staff 51 



Dincur, Center for Econon 
and Education 



• Research 



Director, Intercultural 
Institute fir Educational Initiatives 

Director, Florida Center for 
Analytical Electron Microscopy 

Director, English Language Institute 

Director, Knight Bidder Center 
for Excellence in Management 

Director, Future Aerospace 
Science and Technology 
Center for Cryoelectronics 

Director, Florida - 
Caribbean Linkage Institute 

Director, Florida - 
Mexico Linkage Institute 

Director, International 
Forensic Research Institute 

Director, The Hemispheric Center for 
Environmental Technology 



Jorge Salazar-Carrillo 

Lynn Hon 

Gautam Sen 
Luis Sanchez 

H. Paul Root 

Grover Larkins Jr. 

Eduardo A. Gamarra 

Eduaido A. Gamarra 

Kenneth Furton 

M. Ali Ebadian 



Co-Directors, Manufacturing 
Research Center 



Director, Institute for 
Hospitality and Tourism Education 

Director, International 
Hurricane Center 

Director, FIU Florida 
Institute of Government 

Director, International 
Media Center 

Director, Institute for 
Public Opinion Research 

Director, FAU-FIU Joint Center for 
Environmental and Urban Problem 



Joan S. Remington 
Stephen P. Leatherman 



Director, Institute for 
Judaic Studies 

Director, Center for 
Labor Research and Studies 

Director, Latin American 
and Caribbean Center 

Director, The Lifo Course 
and Health Research Center 

Director, Center fir 
Management Development 



Howard A. Frank 

Charles H. Green 

Hugh Gladwin 

Edward P. Murray 

Steven Heine 

Guillermo J. Grenier 

Eduardo A. Gamarra 

R. Jay Turner 

Grisell Sotolongo 



Ching-Sheng Chen 
W. Kinzy Jones 

Dario Moreno 



Director, Metropolitan Center 

Director, National Policy 
and Resource Center 
on Nutrition and Aging Nancy S. Wellman 

Director, Profissional 
Development Center Debra Danker Sandler 

Director, Child and Family 
Psychosocial Research Center Wendy K. Silverman 

Director, Institute for Public Management 
and Community Services Allan Rosenbaum 

Director, Jack D. Gordon 
Institute for Public Policy 
and Citizenship Studies 



Director, Jerome Bain 
Real Estate Institute 



John F. Stack 
John S. Zdanowicz 




Director, Southeast 
Environmental Research Center 

Director, Center for the Study 
of Matter at Extreme Conditions 

Director, Summit of the 
Americas Center 

Director, Center for Transnational 
and Comparative Studies 



Ronald Jones 



Surendra K. Saxena 



Carl Cita 



Ralph S. Clem 



52 Graduate Catalog 



Director, Lehman Transportation 
Research Center 

Director, Center for 
Tourism and Technology 

Executive Director, Centet 
for Urban Education 
and Innovation 

Director, Wolfsonian Museum 

Director, Women's Studies Center 

Director, Institute for 
Workforce Competiveness 

Director, Center for 
Youth Development 

COLLEGE OF CONTINUING AND 
PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 

Dean, College of Continuing and 
Professional Studies 



L. David Shen 
Alan J. Parker 

Lisa Delpit 

Cathy Leff 

Suzanna Rose 

Frank T. Hammons 

Lilly M. Langer 

David Grossman 



Director, Environmental 
Health and Safety 



Jennifer Mwaisela 



Director, Biscayne Bay Campus Business 
and Auxiliary Services Nicholas DiCiacco 



Acting Associate Dean, College of 
Continuing and Professional Studies Gwen Weinberger 

Director, Distance Learning and Center 
for Online Teaching Jeffrey Miller 

Acting Director, 
Kovens Conference Center Christian Partner 

BISCAYNE BAY CAMPUS 

Vice Provost Raul Moncarz 

Assistant to the 
Vice Provost for Development Pauline Winick 

FlU BROWARD-PINES CENTER 

Director Diana Little 

Assistant Director Isabel Morales 

BUSINESS AND FINANCE 

Executive Vice President Paul D. Gallagher 

Associate Vice President, 
Budget/Planning Charles Tinder 

Assistant Vice President, 
Facilities Operations Victor Citarella 

Assistant Vice President, 
Business and Finance Alexander Zyne 

Acting Director, Facilities Management Robert Griffith 

Director, Equal Opportunity Programs Bennie Osborne 

Director, Controller's Office Andy Fornaguera 



Director, Public Safety 
Director, Purchasing Services 
Director, Intercollegiate Athletics 

GOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS 

Vice Provost, Governmental Affairs 
Director, Governmental Relations 
Washington Representative 



Jesse Campbell 
Judy Weech 
Rick Mello 



Steve Sauls 

Anitere Flores 

Susan Moya 



INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS AND CAMPUS RECREATION 

Director of Athletics 

Head Baseball Coach 

Head Men's Basketball Coach 



Head Women's Basketball Coach 

Head Cross Country/ Track Coach 

Head Women's Diving Coach 

Head Women's Golf Coach 

Head Men's Soccer Coach 

Head Women's Soccer Coach 

Head Softball Coach 

Head Women's Swimming Coach 

Head Women's Tennis Coach 

Head Volleyball Coach 

Associate Athletic Director, 
External Affairs 

Associate Athletic Director, 
Internal Affairs 

Assistant Athletic Director, 
Campus Recreation 

Director, Academic 
Support Services 

Assistant Athletic Director, 
Media Relations 

Assistant Athletic Director, 
Facilities and Operations 



Rick Mello 

Danny Price 

Donnie Marsh 

Cindy Russo 

Jessica Caner 

Kongzheng "KZ" Li 

David Pezzino 

Karl Kremser 

Everton Edwards 

Kim Gwydir 

Noemi Zaharia 

Ronnie Bernstein 

Dulcie "Cookie" Stevens 

Jan Allen 

Julie Berg 

Rob Frye 

Mike Becker 

Rich Kelch 

Barton Mondell 



Adminisiration and Staff 53 



STUDENT AFFAIRS 

Vice President 

Associate Vice President, 

Assistant Vice President 

Assistant Vice President and 
University Ombudsman 

Assistant Vice President, 
Human Resources 

Senior Director, Career Services 

Director, Children's 
Learning Center 

Director, Campus Life 

Director, Disability Services 

Executive Director, Graham 
University Center 

Director, Grants and Research 

Executive Director, Health Cat 
Wellness Center 

Senior Director, Housing 

Director, International 
Student and Scholar Services 

Senior Director, Multicultural 
Program and Services 

Senior Director, Recreational 
Sports, Biscayne Bay Campus 



Patricia Telles-Irvin 

Helen Ellison 

John A. Bonanno 

Larry Lunsford 

Paul Michaud 
Olga Magnusen 

Nancy J. Ponn 

Charlie Andrews 

Julio Garcia 

Ruth A. Hamilton 
E. George Simms 



t and 



Robert Dollinger, M.D. 
James Wassenaar, Jr. 

Ana Sippin 

Robert Coatie 

Gregory A. Olson 



Director, Counseling and 
Psychological Services Center 

Director, Student Conduct and 
Conflict Resolution 

Director, Women's Center 

Director, Office of Employee Assistance 

Senior Director, Residential Life 

Director, Student Media 



Cheryl Nowell 

Karen Dlhosh 

Karen Garner 

Nancy Petenbrink 

Cathy Akens 

Robert Jaross 



UNIVERSITY ADVANCEMENT 



Vice President, Advancement 

Associate Vice President 
and Executive Director, 
Alumni Relations 

Assistant Vice President, 
Advertising and Brand 
Management 

Director, Advancement Service 

Director, Communications 

Director, Community Relations 

Director, Festivals 



Howard R. Lipman 

Bill Draughon 

Terry WithereU 

Zully Dorr 

Todd Ellenberg 

Josefina Cagigal 

Dale C. Webb 



Acting Director, Media Relations Maydel Santana Bravo 
Director, Publications Bill Stahl 



Associate Director, 
Interactive Design 



Eddie Leon 




54 Graduate Catalog 



FLORIDA'S STATEWIDE 
COURSE NUMBERING 
SYSTEM 

Courses in this catalog are identified by prefixes and numbers chat were 
assigned by Florida's Statewide Course Numbering System. This 
common numbering system is used by all public postsecondary instimtions 
in Florida and by fourteen participating private institutions. The major 
purpose of this system is to facilitate the transfer of courses between 
participating institutions. 

Each participating institution controls the title, credit, and content of 
its own courses and assigns the first digit of the course number to indicate 
the level at which students normally take the course. Course prefixes and 
the last three digits of the course numbers are assigned by members of 
faculty discipline committees appointed for that purpose by the Florida 
Department of Education in Tallahassee. Individuals nominated to serve 
on these committees are selected to maintain a representative 
balance as to type of institution and discipline field or specialization. 

The course prefix and each digit in the course number have meaning 
in the Statewide Course Numbering System (SCNS). The list of course 
prefixes and numbers, along with their generic tides, is referred to as the 
"SCNS taxonomy. " Description of the content of courses are referred to 
as "course equivalency profiles." 

THE COURSE PREFIX 

The course prefix is a three-letter designator for a major division of an 
academic discipline, subject matter area, or sub-category of knowledge. 
The prefix is not intended to identify the department in which a course 
is offered. Rather, the content of a course determines the assigned prefix 
used to identify the course. 

GENERAL RULE FOR COURSE 
EQUIVALENCIES 

Equivalent courses at different insritutions are identified by the same pre- 
fixes and same last three digits of the course number and are guaranteed 
to be transferable between the participating institutions that offer the 
course, with a few exceptions. (Exceptions are listed below). 

For example, a survey course in social problems is offered by 31 
different postsecondary institutions. Each institution uses "SYG 1 " to 
■identify its social ptoblems course. The level code is the first digit and 
represents that year in which students normally take this course at a 
specific institution. In the SCNS taxonomy, "SYG" means "Sociology, 
General," the century digit "0" represents "Entry-Level General 
Sociology," the decade digit "1 ' represents "Survey Course," and the imit 
digit "0" represents "Social Problems." 

In science and other areas, a "C" or "L" after the course number is 
known as a lab indirrator. The "C" represents a combined lecture and 
laboratory course thit meets in the same place at the same time. The "L" 
represents a laboratory course or the laboratory part of a course, having 
the same prefix and course number without a lab indicator, which meets 
at a different time or place. 

Transfer of any successfiilly completed course from one participating 
instiwtion to another is guaranteed in cases where the course to be 
transferred is offered by the receiving instimtion and is identified by the 
same prefix and last three digits at both instimtions. For example, SYG 
1010 is offered at a community college. The same course is offered at a 



state university as SYG 20 1 0. A student who has successfiilly completed 
SYG 1010 at the community college is guaranteed to receive ttansfer 
credit for SYG 2010 at the state university if the smdent transfers. The 
student carmot be required to take SYG 2010 again since SYG 1010 is 
equivalent to SYG 2010. Transfer credit must be awarded for successfiilly 
completed equivalent courses and used by the receiving institution to 
determine satisfeaion of requirements by transfer students on the same 
basis as credit awarded to native smdents. It is the prerogative of the 
receiving institution, however, to offer transfer credit for courses 
successfully completed which have not been designated as equivalent. 

Sometimes, as in Chemistry, a sequence of one or more courses must 
be completed at the same instimtion in order for the courses to be 
transferable to another instimtion, even if the course prefix and numbers 
are the same. This information is contained in the' individual SCNS 
course equivalency profiles for each course in the sequence. 

AUTHORITY FOR ACCEPTANCE OF 
EQUIVALENT COURSES 

State Board of Education Rule 6A-10.024(17), Floiida Administrative 

Code, reads: 

When a student transfers among institutions that partici- 
pate in the common course designation and numbering 
system, the receiving institution shall award credit for 
courses satisfactotily completed at the previous participat- 
ing institutions when the courses are judged by the appro- 
priate common course designation and numbering system 
faculty task forces to be equivalent to courses offered at the 
receiving institution and are entered in the course number- 
ing system. Ctedit so awarded can be used by transfer stu- 
dents to satisfy requirements in these institutions on the 
same basis as native students. 

EXCEPTIONS TO THE GENERAL RULE 
FOR EQUIVALENCY 

The following courses are exceptions to the general rule for course 
equivalencies and may not be transferable. Transfer-ability is at the 
discretion of the receiving institution: 

1) Courses in the _990-_999 series. 

2) Internships, practical, clinical experiences, and study abroad 
courses. 

3) Performance or studio courses in Art, Dance, Theater, 
and Music. 

4) Skills courses in Criminal Justice. 

5) Graduate courses. 

College preparatory and vocational preparatory courses may not be 
used to meet degree requirements and are not transferable. 

Questions about the Statewide Course Numbering System and 
appeals regarding course credit transfer decisions should be direrted to 
Donna E Yff in the Registrar's Office at 305-348-2320, or the Florida 
Department of Education, Office of Postsecondary Education 
Coordination, 1101 Florida Education Center, Tallahassee, Florida 
32399-0400. Special reports and technical information may be requested 
by calling telephone number 904-488-6402 or Suncom 278-6402. 



Florida's Statewide Course Numbering System 55 



^ g: 



ifS 




36 Graduate Catalog 



ACADEMIC UNITS 



SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 

UP 305-348-3181 

Email: <lelauzs@fiu.edu 

Website: www.fiu.edu/-soa/index.htm 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



UP 


305-348-2864 


BBC 


305-919-5859 


Pines 


954-438-8602 


Email: 


casdean@fiu.edu 


Website: 


www.fiu.edu/orgs/casdean 


of Computer Science 


UP 


305-348-2744 


BBC 


305-919-5859 


Email: 


info-undergTad@>cs.fiu.edu 


Website: 


www.cs.fiu.edu 



School of Music 

UP 305-348-2896 

BBC 305-919-5859 

Email: music@fiu.edu 

Website: www.fiu.edu/-music 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 

UP 305-348-2751 

BBC 305-919-5870 

Pines 954-438-8601 

Website: cba.fiu.edu 

Alvah H. Chapman, Jr. Graduate 
School of Business 

UP 305-348-2751 



School of Accounting 



UP 
BBC 



305-348-2581 
305-919-5362 




COLLEGE OF CONTINUING AND 
PROFESSIONAL STUDIES (CAPS) 



UP 


305-348-5669 


BBC 


305-919-5669 


Pines 


954-438-8617 


Email: 


caps@fiu.edu 


Website: 


fiu.edu/-caps 


F EDUCATION 


UP 


305-348-3202 


Pines 


954-438-8602 


Email: 


lejarzal@fiu.edu 


Website: 


coeweb.fiu.edu/ 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

UP 305-348-2522 

Pines 954-438-8601 

Email: all@eng.fiu.edu 

Website: www.eng.fiu.edu/ 



COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND 
URBAN AFFAIRS 

UP 305-348-5840 

BBC 305-919-5840 

Pines 954-438-8602 

Website: chua.fiu.edu 



Academic Units 57 



School of Health 



UP 


305-348-3446 


Website: 


schoolofhealth.fiu.edu 


of Nursing 


BBC 


305-919-5915 or 5971 


Pines 


954-438-8601 


Website: 


chiia2.fiu.edu/nursing 



School of Policy and Management 

UP 305-348-5890 

BBC 305-919-5890 
Website: chua2.fiu.edu/spm 



School of Social Work 

UP 305-348-5880 

BBC 305-919-5880 

Pines 954-438-8601 

Website: chua2.fiu.edu/socialwork 



HONORS COLLEGE 



SCHOOL OF HOSPITALITY AND 
TOURISM MANAGEMENT 

BBC 919-4500 

Email: hospitality@fiu.edu 

Website: hospitality.fiu.edu 

SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AND 
MASS COMMUNICATION 

BBC 305-919-5625 
Email: sjnic@fiu.edu 
Website: jmc.fiu.edu/sjmc 

COLLEGE OF LAW 

UP 305-348-8006 

Email: lawadmit@fiu.edu 
Website: www.fiu.edu/law 

UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL 

UP 305-348-2455 

Email: ugs@fiu.edu 
Website: www.fiu.edu/ugs 



UP 305-348-4100 

BBC 305-919-5864 

Email: honors@fiu.edu 

Website: www.fiu.edu/^honors 




58 Graduate Catalog 



CENTERS AND 
INSTITUTES 



CENTER FOR ACCOUNTING, AUDITING, 
AND TAX STUDIES 
cba.fiu.edu/p01tal/e2ttemal/caats 

CENTER FOR ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE 
caj.fiu.edu/main. html 

CENTER FOR ADVANCED 
DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS ENGINEERING 
cadse.cs.fiu.edu 

CENTER FOR ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY 

AND EDUCATION 

www.cate.fiu.edu 

CENTER ON AGING 

www.fiu.edu/-coa 

ART MUSEUM 
www.fiu.edu/'museuin/home.html 

INSTITUTE FOR ASIAN STUDIES 

www.fiu.edu/-'asian 

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING INSTITUTE 
www.eng.fiu.edu/bmei 

CARDIOVASCULAR ENGINEERING CENTER 
www.eng.fiu.edu/cvec/main.htm 

CHILD AND FAMILY PSYCHOSOCIAL RESEARCH CENTER 
www.fiu.edu/-capp 

INSTITUTE FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES AT RISK 
www.fiu.edu/-icfT 

CUBAN RESEARCH INSTITUTE 
lacc.fiu.edu/cri 

CENTER FOR DIVERSITY IN ENGINEERING 
eng.fiu.edu/-cde 

CENTER FOR ECONOMIC RESEARCH AND EDUCATION 

CENTER FOR ENERGY ANDTECHNOLOGY 

OF THE AMERICAS 

ceta.fiu>edu 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE INSTITUTE 
www.eli.fiu.edu 

FLORIDA - CARIBBEAN INSTITUTE 
lacc.fiu.edu/fci 



FLORIDA CENTER FOR ANALYTICAL 
ELECTRON MICROSCOPY 
www.fiu.edu/-emlab 

FLORIDA - MEXICO INSTITUTE 
lacc.fiu.edu/fini 

FUTURE AEROSPACE SCIENCE AND 
TECHNOLOGY CENTER 
www.eng.fiu.edu/FAST 

CENTER FOR HEALTH RESEARCH AND POLICY 

HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR 

ENVIRONMENTALTECHNOLOGY 

www.hcet.fiu.edu 

HIGH PERFORMANCE DATABASE RESEARCH CENTER 
hpdrc.cs.fiu.edu 

INSTITUTE FOR HOSPITALITY AND 
TOURISM EDUCATION AND RESEARCH 
hospitality.fiu.edu/ihter 

INSTITUTE OF GOVERNMENT 

www.fiu.edu/-iog 

INTERCULTURAL DANCE AND MUSIC INSTITUTE 
Iacc.fiu.edu/indami 

CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS EDUCATION 
AND RESEARCH 

www.fiu.edu/-ciber 

INTERNATIONAL FORENSIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE 

www.fiu.edu/-ifri 

INTERNATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER 
www.ihc.fiu.edu/index_ihc.htm 

INTERCULTURAL INSTITUTE FOR EDUCATIONAL 

INITIATIVES 

www.fiu.edu/-iied 

INTERNATIONAL MEDIA CENTER 
www.fiu.edu/-imc 

JEROME BAIN REAL ESTATE INSTITUTE 
cba.fiu.edu/portal/estemal/bba/realestate.htni 

JOINT CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL 
AND URBAN PROBLEMS 
www.fiu.edu/-jcenter 

INSTITUTE FOR JUDAIC AND NEAR EASTERN STUDIES 
www.fiu.edu/-jewstudi/index.html 

KNIGHT RIDDER CENTER FOR 
EXCELLENCE IN MANAGEMENT 
cba.fiu.edu/portal/extemal/kr 



Centers and Institutes 59 



CENTER FOR LABOR RESEARCH AND STUDIES 

www.fiu.edo/'-clrs 

LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN CENTER 
laccfiu.edu 

LEHMAN CENTER FORTRANSPORTATION RESEARCH 
www.eng.fiu. edu/LCTR 

CENTER FOR MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT 
www.fiu.edu/'Ope 

MANUFACTURING RESEARCH CENTER 
www.eng.fiu.edu/MRC 

METROPOLITAN CENTER 
www.fiu.eduy^metcntr 

NATIONAL POLICY AND RESOURCE CENTER 
ON NUTRITION AND AGING 
www.fiu.edu/'-nutreldr 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CENTER 

www.fiu.edu/-pdc 

INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC MANAGEMENT AND 
COMMUNITY SERVICES 
www.fiu.edu/-ipmcs 

INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC OPINION RESEARCH 

www.fiu.edu/orgs/ipor 

JACK D.GORDON INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC POLICY AND 

CITIZENSHIP STUDIES 

www.fiu.edu/-ippcs 

SOUTHEAST ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH CENTER 
www.serc.fiu.edu 

CENTER FORTHE STUDY OF MATTER 
AT EXTREME CONDITIONS 
www.fiu.edu/-saxenas 

SUMMIT OF THE AMERICAS CENTER 
www.americasnet.net 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND INFORMATION 

TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTE 

www.it2.fiu.edu 

CENTER FORTOURISM AND TECHNOLOGY 
www.fiu.edu/-touTtech 

CENTER FORTRANSNATIONALAND 
COMPARATIVE STUDIES 
www.fiu.edu/-tcs 

CENTER FOR URBAN EDUCATION AND INNOVATION 

coeweb.fiu.edu/urbaned 



THE WOLFSONIAN-FIU 
www.wolf50nian.fiu.edu 



WOMEN'S STUDIES CENTER 
wTvw.fiu.edu/-^vstudies 



INSTITUTE FORV^ORKFORCE COMPETIVENESS 
wTvw.fiu.edu/-xi"wc 



CENTER FOR YOUTH DEVELOPMENT 




60 Graduate Catalog 



SUPPORT SERVICES 



ACADEMIC ADVISING 

UP 305-348-2892 

BBC 305-919-5754 
Website www.fiu.edu/-advising 



ADMISSIONS - UNDERGRADUATE 

UP 305-348-2363 

BBC 305-919-5760 
Pines 954-438-8600 
Website www.fiu.edu/orgs/admiss 

ADMISSIONS - GRADUATE 

UP 305-348-7442 

Website www.fiu.edu/gtadadm 

ART MUSUEM 

UP 305-348-2890 

Website www.fiu.edu/'-museum 



ATHLETICS 




UP 


305-348-2756 


Website 




BOOKSTORE 




UP 


305-348-2691 


BBC 


305-919-5580 


Website 


(iu.bkstore.com 



COUNSELING AND PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES CENTER 

UP 305-348-2434 

BBC 305-919-5305 

Website www.fiu.edu/-psychser 

CREDIT UNION 

UP 305-348-1772 

BBC 305-919-4820 

Website www.ucumiami.org 

FINANCIAL AID 

UP 305-348-2489 

BBC 305-919-5765 

Website www.fiu.edu/orgs/finaid 

FITNESS CENTER 

UP 305-348-2575 

BBC 305-919-5678 

Website www.fiu.edu/-camprec/SFCl.htin 
www.fiu.edu/-bbcrec/fitness.htm 

GRADUATION 

UP 305-348-2341 

BBC 305-919-5750 

Website www.fiu.edu/orgs/registrar/comm.html 



HEALTH CLINIC (STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES) 

UP 305-348- 2401 

BBC 305-919-5620 
Website www.fiu.edu/-health 



BURSAR /CASHIERS 

UP 305-348-2126 

BBC 305-919-5540 

Website sis.fiu.edu 

CAMPUS LIFE 

UP 305-348-2138 

BBC 305-919-5814 

Website www.fiu.edu/-camplife 

CAMPUS RECREATION 

UP 305-348-2900 

BBC 305-919-4549 

Website www.fiu.edu/-camprec 

CAREER SERVICES 

UP 305-348-2423 

BBC 305-919-5770 

Website www.fiu.edu/-career 

COPY CENTER 

UP 305-348-6565 

BBC 305-919-5660 

Website obs.fiu.edu/copy_center.htin 



HOUSING 

UP 305-348-4190 

Website www.fiu.edu/orgs/housing 

LIBRARY 

UP 305-348-2454 

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,- Graduate Catalog 

62 ^ ~ 



„ , School of Architecture 63 
Graduate Catalog ^ ^ 



School of 
Architecture 



64 School of Architecture 



Graduate Catalog 



School of Architecture 



Juan Antonio Bueno, Associate 

Professor and Dean 
David F. Bergwall, Associate 

Professor and Associate Dean 
Nathaniel Q. Belclier, Associate 

Professor and Assistant Dean 

Alfredo Andia, Assistant Professor 
Ted Baker, Associate Professor 
Jaime Canaves, Associate Professor 
Marta Canaves, Associate in Design 
Jason R. Chandler, Visiting Assistant 

Professor 
Gisela L6pez-Mata, Associate 

Professor 
William G. McMinn, Professor 
Marilys R. Nepomechie, Assistant 

Professor 
Nicolis Quintana, Scholar in 

Architecture and Urbanism 
Gray Read, Assistant Professor 
Camilo Rosales, Associate Professor, 
Kevin Smith, Assistant Professor 
John Stuart, Associate Professor 

The School of Architecture is dedicated 
to advancing the professions of 
architecture, interior design and 
landscape architecture. In keeping with 
the nature of these professions, the 
programs are taught in an interdis- 
cipMnary manner, taking full advantage 
of the resources and areas of expertise 
offered by each. The school offers two 
undergraduate degree programs, a 
Bachelor of Design in Architectural 
Studies and a Bachelor of Science in 
Interior Design (see undergraduate 
catalog for descriptions), and two 
graduate degree programs, a Master of 
Architecture and a Master of 
Landscape Architecture. 

Students applying to the School 
should plan for the financial aspects of 
a design education. This includes the 
costs of computers, software, travel 
and field trips, tools and equipment, 
and building and modeling supplies. 
All students must have continuing 
access to a personal computer through 
purchase, lease or other arrangements. 
For further information contact the 
School. 

Ownership of Student Work 

Student work, submitted to the School 
in satisfaction of course or degree 
requirements, becomes the physical 
property of the School. However, 
students retain all rights to the 
intellectual property of such work. This 
work may include papers, drawings. 



models, and other materials. The 
School assumes no responsibility for 
safeguarding such materials. At its 
discretion, the School may retain, 
return, or discard such materials. The 
School will not normally discard the 
materials of currently enrolled students 
without giving the student a chance to 
reclaim them. 

Master of Architecture 

The Graduate Program in Architecture 
prepares students for research and 
practice in the field of architecture. It 
includes the study of design, advanced 
technologies in architectural practice, 
and the history and theory of 
architecture. 

The Program offers three tracks to 
students from various academic 
backgrounds. Students with no 
previous experience in architecture 
follow the Professional Track 3, 
consisting of 105 credit hours to be 
completed in approximately three 
years. S-tudents with a four-year 
undergraduate degree in pre 
architecture follow the Professional 
Track 2, consisting of 60 credit hours 
to be completed in approximately two 
years. Students with a professional 
five-year undergraduate degree in 
architecture from a program accredited 
by National Architectural Accrediting 
Board (NAAB) follow the Post- 
Professional Track 1 , consisting of 36 
credit hours to be completed in one 
year. All students in the program are 
required to undertake a thesis project as 
the culmination of their course of study 
at the School of Architecture. Students 
may have no more than one 
outstanding elective by the time they 
begin their thesis semester. 

Admission to the Master of 
Architecture Program is determined by 
an extensive portfolio review that 
examines evidence of creative work, 
academic success, and professional 
achievement. Students who have 
successfully completed the portfolio 
review process must also meet the 
minimum requirements of an 
undergraduate grade point average 
(GPA) of 3.0 on a 4.0 point scale or a 
Graduate Record Examination (GRE) 
score of 1000 (or better) or hold a 
graduate degree from an accredited 
institution to be fully admitted in the 
graduate program. 



The course of study leading to the 
first professional Master of 
Architecture degree is accredited by the 
National Architectural Accrediting 
Board (NAAB). In the United States, 
most state registration boards require a 
degree from an accredited professional 
degree program as a prerequisite for 
licensure. The National Architectural 
Accrediting Board, which is the sole 
agency authorized to accredit US 
professional degree programs in 
architecture, recognizes two types of 
degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture 
and the Master of Architecture. A 
program may be granted a five-year, 
three-year, or two-year term of 
accreditation, depending on its degree 
of conformance with established 
educational standards. 

Masters degree programs may 
consist of a pre-professional under- 
graduate degree and a professional 
graduate degree, which, when earned 
sequentially, comprise an accredited 
professional education. However, the 
pre-professional degree is not, by itself 
recognized as an accredited degree. 

Graduate Program in 
Architecture Tracks 

TRACK 1 - 36 Credits 

A post professional degree for students 
with a 5-year professional Bachelor of 
Architecture degree from a program 
accredited by NAAB. (Track 1 - is not 
eligible for or accredited by NAAB.) 

First Year (Fall Semester) 

ARC 5361 Graduate Design I 6 

ARC 6947 Research Methods 3 

Elective 3 

First Year (Spring Semester) 

ARC 5362 Graduate Design II 6 

ARC 6910 Thesis Seminar 3 

Elective 3 

First Year (Summer Semester) 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 

Second Year (Fall Semester) 

ARC 6971 Thesis 6 

TRACK 2-60 Credits 

A professional degree for students with 
a 4-year pre-professional Bachelor of 
Architectural Studies degree. (Accred- 
ited by NAAB) 

First Year (Fall Semester) 

ARC 5361 Graduate Design I 6 

ARC 6947 Research Methods 3 

ARC 5483L Innovations in BIdg 



Graduate Catalog 



School of Architecture 65 



Tech Lab 



Elective 



First Year (Spring Semester) 

ARC 5362 Graduate Design II 6 

ARC 5205 Adv. Design Theories 3 

ARC 5 1 76C Computer Practice II 3 

Elective 3 
First Year (Summer Semester) 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 

Second Year (Fall Semester) 

ARC 6356 Graduate Design III 6 

ARC 6910 Thesis Seminar 3 
BUL 6810 Legal Environment of 

Business 3 

Elective 3 

Second Year (Spring Semester) 

ARC 6971 Thesis 1-6 

Elective 3 

TRACK 3-105 Credits 

A professional degree for students with 
a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of 
Science, or equivalent, from an 
accredited institution. (Accredited by 
NAAB) 

Prerequisites 

PHY 2053 Physics w/o Calculus 4 
MAC 2147 Pre-Calculus 3 

ARC 4058 Computer Applications 

in Architecture 3 

First Year (Fall Semester) 
ARC 5075 Fonnative Studio I 3 

ARC 1461 Methods and Materials 1 3 
ARC 3243 Design Theories 3 

ARC 270 1 History of Design from 
Antiquity to Middle 
Ages 3 

First Year (Spring Semester) 
ARC 5076 Formative Studio 2 6 
ARC 2702 History of Design from 
the Renaissance to the 
XIX Century 3 

BCN 2402C Structures I 3 

BCN 4561 Environmental Controls 

1 3 
First Year (Summer Semester) 

ARC 5077 Formative Studio 3 6 
BCN 4564 Environmental Controls 

2 3 
ARC 4783 History of Design from 

the XIX Century to 

Present 3 

ARC 4553 Structural Design 3 

Second Year (Fall Semester) 
ARC 5361 Graduate Design 1 6- 

ARC 6947 Research Methods 3 

ARC 5483 Innovations in Bldg 

Tech 3 

ARC 5483 L Innovations in Bldg 

Tech Lab 1 

Elective 3 



Second Year (Spring Semester) 

ARC 5362 Graduate Design 2 6 

ARC 5205 Adv. Design Theories 3 

ARC 5 1 76C Computer Practice II 3 

Elective 3 

Second Year (Summer Semester) 

ARC 4270C Prof Office Practice 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 

Third Year (Fall Semester) 

ARC 6356 Graduate Design 3 6 

ARC 6910 Thesis Seminar 3 

BUL 68 10 Legal En vir of Business 3 
Elective 3 

Third Year (Spring Semester) 

ARC 6971 Thesis l-( 

Master of Landscape 
Architecture 

The Graduate Program in Landscape 
Architecture prepares students for 
research and practice while focusing on 
the design, planning, and management 
of tropical and subtropical landscapes. 
The unique natural and cultural 
environments of South Florida, tropical 
America, the Bahamas, and the Antilles 
provide firsthand experience of a wide 
range of landscapes; the study, 
enrichment, and preservation of which 
are emphasized through relevant course 
work, field trips, and service activities. 
The Everglades and Biscayne National 
Parks, Fairchild Tropical Garden, and 
Vizcaya Palace and Gardens are among 
the many regional resources readily 
available to students enrolled in the 
Program. The School of Architecture 
also offers study and research 
opportunities in cooperation with 
institutions in tropical America and 
mediterranean Europe. 

A flexible curriculum accommodates 
individual research interests within a 
rigorous academic framework. The 
School offers two options within the 
Program. The Professional Degree 
Option is intended for individuals 
without a degree in Landscape 
Architecture. This course of study 
leading to the first professional Master 
of Landscape Architecture degree is 
accredited by the Landscape 
Architectural Accreditation Board, an 
autonomous committee of the 
American Society of Landscape 
Architects. The Post-Professional 
Degree Option is intended for 
individuals with an undergraduate 
degree in landscape architecture who 
wish to pursue advanced professional 
study. 



Professional Degree Option 

Individuals with a Bachelor of Arts or a 
Bachelor of Science, or equivalent, 
from an accredited institution are 
eligible for admission to the Program 
provided University requirements are 
met. Applicants must also submit a 
portfolio of creative work for School 
review in the admission process. Three 
years of full-time study in residence are 
normally required. However, a part- 
time study option is available subject to 
the review of the Program. Satisfactory 
completion of 84 credits in the 
following course of study is required. 
Landscapes 6 

History and theory 6 

Methods 12 

Studio 30 

Construction 9 

Practice 6 

Thesis and concentration 1 5 

Individuals with an undergraduate 
degree in planning, urban design, or 
architecture from an accredited 
professional program, or with a pre- 
professional undergraduate degree in 
planning, landscape architecture, urban 
design, or architecture may be granted 
advanced standing, not to exceed 24 
credits for undergraduate courses with 
a grade of 3.0 or better on a 4.0 point 
scale. 

Individuals with a graduate degree in 
planning, urban design, or architecture 
from an accredited professional 
program may be granted advanced 
standing, not to exceed 48 credits for 
graduate courses with a grade of 3.0 or 
better on a 4.0 point scale. 

Typical Curriculum 

First Year (Fall Semester) 

LAA5716 History of Landscape 

Architecture 3 

LAA5371 Computer Practices in 
Landscape Architecture 

1 3 
LAA 5652 Fonnative Studio 6 

First Year (Spring Semester) 

LAA 6541 South FL Landscapes 3 
LAA 5371 Computer Practices in 
Landscape Architecture 

2 3 
LAA 5653 Site Studio 6 

First Year (Summer Semester) 

LAA 6916 Research Methods 3 

LAA 6382 Analysis Methods 3 

Second Year (Fall Semester) 

LAA 5422 Landscape Development 3 
LAA 5521 Tropical Landscapes 3 
LAA 6654 Community Studio 6 

Second Year (Spring Semester) 



66 School of Architecture 



Graduate Catalog 



LAA5235 Theory of Lscp Arch 3 

LAA 5423 Landscape Construction 3 

LAA 6655 Regional Studio 6 
Second Year (Summer Semester) 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 
Third Year (Fall Semester) 

LAA 5427 Landscape Structures 3 

LAA 6835 Urban Studio 6 

Third Year (Fall Semester) 

LAA 5425 Landscape Construction 
Documentation 3 

LAA 621 5 Professional Practice in 
Landscape Architecture 3 

LAA 6971 Thesis 6 

Post-Professional Degree 
Option 

Individuals with an undergraduate 
degree in landscape architecture from 
an accredited professional program are 
eligible for admission to the Program 
provided University requirements are 
met. Two years of full-time study in 
residency are normally required. 
However, a part-time study option is 
available subject to the review of the 
Program. Satisfactory completion of 60 
credits in the following course of study 
is required. 

Studio 18 

Thesis and concentration 42 

Typical Curriculum 

(If 24 credits of advanced standing are 
granted. Typical for holders of 
Bachelors of Science in Architectural 
Studies.) 

First Year (Fall Semester) 

LAA 5716 History of Landscape 

Architecture 3 

LAA 5521 Tropical Landscapes 3 
LAA 6654 Community Studio 6 

First Year (Spring Semester) 

LAA 5235 Theory of Lscp Arch 3 

LAA 6541 South PL Landscapes 3 

LAA 6655 Regional Studio 6 

First Year (Summer Semester) 

LAA 6916 Research Methods 6 

LAA 6382 Analysis Methods 3 

Second Year (Fall Semester) 

LAA 5422 Landscape Development 3 
LAA 6835 Urban Studio 6 

Second Year (Spring Semester) 

LAA 5425 Landscape Construction 
Documentation 3 

LAA 62 1 5 Professional Practice in 
Landscape Architecture 3 

LAA 6971 Thesis 6 



Certificate in Landscape 
Architecture 

The School of Architecture has 
identified a significant need for balance 
amongst our academic disciplines and a 
corresponding need for variable options 
for our graduate student body. The 
certificate will require 18 semester 
credit hours chosen from the following 
course areas: History of Landscape 
Architecture, South Florida Land- 
scapes, Landscape Development, 
Tropical Landscapes, Landscape Cons- 
truction, Theory of Landscape 
Architecture, Landscape Structures, 
and Landscape Construction Documen- 
tation. 

While this option would be most 
accessible to students currently 
enrolled in the School of Architecture, 
motivated graduate students in related 
areas of study throughout the university 
would be permitted to pursue this 
certificate. This program is largely a 
value-added certificate, for architecture 
graduate students within the School of 
Architecture and related fields such as 
Environmental Science and Biology 
who would like to seek to expand their 
academic experience. This certificate 
creates an opportunity to attract 
students into landscape architecture 
profession. 

Certificate Requirements 

Participants must fulfill the 
requirements outlined for the 
Certificate in Landscape Architecture 
and complete each course with a 
satisfactory grade. 

Program Requirements 

LAA 5716 History of Landscape 

Architecture 
LAA 5541 South Florida 

Landscapes 
LAA 5422 Landscape Development 
LAA 6521 Tropical Landscapes 
LAA 5423 Landscape Construction 
LAA 5235 Theory of Landscape 

Architecture 
LAA 5427 Landscape Structures 
LAA 5425 Landscape Construction 

Documentation 
Awards and Scholarships 

The following scholarships and awards 
are presented to students fully admitted 
to the Graduate Program in Landscape 
Architecture who have demonstrated 
outstanding achievements in their 
studies. 

American Society of Landscape 
Architects Awards. On nomination by 
the Program faculty, the American 



Society of Landscape Architects awards 
a Certificate of Honor and a Certificate 
of Merit to the two students who have 
demonstrated a high degree of 
academic scholarship and of 
accomplishments in skills related to the 
art and technology of landscape 
architecture. 

Sigma Lambda Alpha Honor Society. 
Each year, upon nomination by the 
Program faculty, the Alpha Chi Chapter 
of the Sigma Lambda Alpha Honor 
Society inducts the outstanding 
students in the Program. 
The Ernest and Virginia Makemson 
Memorial Endowed Scholarship 
Fund. This fund provides support for 
students who have demonstrated 
interest and experience in restoring and 
preserving Florida's natural and 
cultural environment through the 
practice of landscape architecture. 

Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

ARC-Architecture; IND-Interior 
Design; LAA-Landscape Architecture 
F-Fall semester offering; S-Spring 
semester offering; SS-Summer semester 
offering. 

ARC 5035 Film and the Architecture 
of Modern Life (3). Critical overview 
of social and spatial implications of 
film on architecture and design over the 
course of the 20''' century. 

ARC 5075 Formative Studio (6). 

Introduction to concept development, 
spatial expression, and representational 
techniques in architecture. (F) 

ARC 5076 Formative Studio 2 (6). A 

continuation of Architectural Design 
investigations begun in Formative 
Studio. Prerequisite: ARC 5075. (S) 

ARC 5077 Formative Studio 3 (6). An 

Architectural Design Studio that builds 
upon concepts and approaches 
presented in Formative Studio and 
Formative Studio 2. Prerequisite: ARC 
5076. (SS) 

ARC 5175 3D Computer Modeling in 
Architecture (3). This advanced course 
will explore computer modeling in 
Architecture. Prerequisite: Program 
approval. 

ARC 5176C Computer Practices in 
Design II (3). Advanced study in 
concepts, issues and methods in com- 
puter-aided architectural design. 
Prerequisite: ARC 4058 or equivalent. 



Graduate Catalog 



School of Architecture 67 



ARC 5177 Computer Rendering in 
Architecture (3). This advanced course 
will explore 3D rendering in 
Architecture. Prerequisites: Program 
approval. 

ARC 5205 Advanced Design Theor- 
ies (3). This seminar analyzes western 
and non-western examples of critical 
ideology through the investigation of 
key historical moments and current 
architectural theory and practice. (S) 

ARC 5361 Graduate Design 1 (6). 

Exploration of highly articulated 
projects of small scale utilizing 
innovative research methods to 
strengthen and clarify design concepts 
taken to a detailed resolution. 
Corequisite: ARC 5483. (F) 

ARC 5362 Graduate Design 2 (6). 

This course explores architectural 
projects of medium to large scale 
applying innovative building 

technologies to a highly resolved 
spatial organization. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing and ARC 5316. (S) 

ARC 5396 Case Studies in 
Architecture (3). The course explores 
the vast array of decisions that create 
the architectural experience of 
outstanding built works. 

ARC 5483 Innovations In Building 
Technology (3). Experimental 
approach to new materials and methods 
applicable to the field of construction. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. Corequisite: ARC 5361. (F) 

ARC 5483L Innovations in Building 
Technology Lab (1). Field and 
laboratory exercises in the evaluation 
of technical support assemblies for 
buildings. Corequisites: ARC 5361. 

ARC 5750 Architectural History of 
the Americas (3). Historical analysis of 
the development of built forms and 
styles in tropical and subtropical 
Americas, investigating its socio- 
political and artistic context. Prereq- 
uisite: Penmission of the instructor. 

ARC 5786 Urbanism: Social History 
of the Built Form (3). This course 
introduces students to historical 
analysis, theories, techniques and 
aesthetics as they relate to urban 
design. 

ARC 5803 Preservation Architec- 
ture: Issues and Practices (3). This 
course explores issues and practices of 
architectural preservation as an integral 
concern of architecture. 



ARC 5933 Special Topics (1-6). 

Coursework on a particular aspect of 
architecture under the direction of 
faculty in a classroom format. 
Prerequisite: Program approval. 

ARC 5XXX Legal Aspects of Design 
Practice (3). Special obligations and 
privileges of a design professional, 
common contract forms, issues of 
liability, copyright, insurances and 
general organization and supervision. 
Ethics and legal responsibilities. 

ARC 5XXX Building Systems (3). 

Conceptual framework for design of 
building assemblies, understanding of 
construction technologies and prop- 
erties of building materials. Building 
systems and pre engineered com- 
ponents are presented and analyzed. 

ARC 5XXX Site Development in 
Architecture (3). Issues, controls and 
methods pertinent to the physiographic, 
topographical, and cultural determin- 
ants of site design in architecture. 

ARC 5XXX Environmental Systems 
in Architecture (3). Development of 
an understanding of environmentally 
sensitive design. Climate and region as 
a major determinant of building design; 
sustainability, energy conservation, 
passive solar design, daylight and 
natural ventilation will be examined. 

ARC 5XXX Alternative Studio (6). 

Topical studies in architecture, on 
issues of current interest, with the 
participation of visiting lecturers, or 
abroad. (SS) 

ARC 6296 Professional Development 

(3). In-depth exploration of current 
legal, administrative and financial 
aspects of architectural practice. 

ARC 6356 Graduate Design 3 (6). 

Architectural project emphasizing 
design development preparation of 
details and design documents for 
buildings of intermediate complexity. 
(F) 

ARC 6906 Independent Study (1-6). 

Coursework on a particular aspect of 
Architecture under the direction of 
faculty in an individual study format. 
Prerequisite: Program approval. 

ARC 6910 Thesis Seminar (3). 

Coursework under the direction of 
faculty in preparation for a master's 
thesis in architecture in a classroom 
format. Prerequisite: ARC 6947. 

ARC 6947 Research Methods (3). 

Methods of data acquisition, analysis. 



amd interpretation used in architecture 
research. 

ARC 6971 Thesis (1-6). Coursework 
under the direction of faculty for the 
completion of thesis by candidate for 
the degree of Master of Architecture. 
Prerequisite: ARC 6910. 

LAA 5233 Theory of Planting Design 

(3). Study of principles and methods 
related to the ecological, functional, 
and aesthetic use of vegetation in 
landscape architecture. Prerequisite: 
Program approval. (SS) 

LAA 5235 Theory of Landscape 
Architecture (3). Critical review of the 
environmental parameters, morphologi- 
cal concepts and ideological principles 
that generate form and meaning in 
landscape architecture. Prerequisite: 
LAA 5716. (S) 

LAA 5243 Regional Landscape Issues 

(3). Exploration of the landscape as 
cultural construct of social, economic, 
and scientific values relevant to 
regional issues of land use and 
management. Prerequisite: Program 
approval. (SS) 

LAA 5371 Computer Practices in 
Landscape Architecture (3). Com- 
puter applications of graphics, model- 
ing, and animation techniques used in 
landscape architecture. Prerequisites: 
Program approval. (S) 

LAA 5374 Introduction to Computer 
Practices in Landscape Architecture 
(3). Computer application of drafting 
and design techniques used in 
landscape architecture. Prerequisite: 
Program approval. 

LAA 5378 GIS Applications in 
Landscape Modeling (3). Introduction 
to modeling capabilities of GIS in the 
environmental planning process 
addressing the natural and cultural 
characteristics of the landscape. 
Prerequisite: Program Approval. 

LAA 5422 Landscape Development 

(3). Technical aspects of the design and 
specification of earthwork, including 
materials, products, and methods of 
installation used in landscape 
development. Prerequisite: LAA 5371. 
(F) 

LAA 5423 Landscape Construction 
(3). Technical aspects of the design and 
specification of sitework, including 
materials, products, and methods of 
installation used in landscape 
construction. Prerequisite: LAA 5422. 
(S) 



68 School of Architecture 



Graduate Catalog 



LAA 5425 Landscape Construction 
Documentation (3). Production of 
landscape construction documents, 
including drawings and project manual 
with bidding documents, contract 
documents and technical specifications 
on the computer. Prerequisite: LAA 
5423. (S) 

LAA 5427 Landscape Structures (3). 

Production of Landscape construction 
details for structures and systems used 
in Landscape architecture. 

Prerequisite; LAA 5423. (F) 

LAA 5540 Landscape Horticulture 

(3). Overview of horticultural manage- 
ment practices related to the growth, 
transport, installation, and maintenance 
of vegetative materials used in 
landscape architecture. Prerequisite: 
Program approval. (SS) 

LAA 5541 South Florida Landscapes 
(3). Study of the structure, function, 
and change in the natural and cultural 
landscapes of tropical and subtropical 
Florida. Prerequisite: Program 
approval. (S) 

LAA 5652 Formative Studio (6). 

Introduction to concept development, 
spatial expression, and representational 
techniques in landscape architecture. 
Prerequisite: Program approval. (F) 

LAA 5653 Site Studio (6). Application 
of landscape architecture principles and 
methods to site design in tropical and 
subtropical contexts. Prerequisite: LAA 
5652. (S) 

LAA 5715 History and Theory of 
Architecture (3). Overview of the 
history and theory of architecture and 
urban design from antiquity to the 
present. Prerequisite: Program ap- 
proval. (SS) 

LAA 5716 History of Landscape 
Architecture (3). Historical survey of 
the principal sites and traditions 
manifested in the evolution of 
landscape architecture and urban 
design from antiquity to the present. 
Prerequisite: Program approval. (F) 

LAA 6215 Professional Practice in 
Landscape Architecture (3). Study of 
the ethical, legal, financial, and 
managerial aspects of professional 
practice in landscape architecture. 
Prerequisite: Program approval. (S) 

LAA 6222 Communications in Land- 
scape Architecture (3). Methods of 
verbal and graphic presentations, work- 
shops, and publications used in 



landscape architecture. Prerequisite: 
Program approval. (SS) 

LAA 6245 Theory of Urban Design 

(3). Critical review of the principal 
theories of urbanism that have 
influenced the fabric and image of the 
city in Western history. Prerequisite: 
LAA 5235 and LAA 5716. (SS) 

LAA 6246 Typology of Landscape 
Architecture (3). Critical examination 
of the origin, development and 
fransformation of form and meaning in 
modem and postmodern landscape 
architecture and urban design. 
Prerequisite: LAA 5235 and LAA 
5716. (SS) 

LAA 6247 Modern Landscape 
Architecture (3). Critical review of the 
origins and development of modem and 
post modem expressions in landscape 
architecture. Prerequisites: LAA 5235 
and LAA 5716. (SS) 

LAA 6342 Landscape Aesthetics (3). 
Critical review of the assessment 
models used to evaluate the aesthetic 
quality of the landscape. Prerequisites: 
LAA 5235 and LAA 5716. (SS) 

LAA 6373 Sound in Landscape 
Architecture (3). An examination of 
the ecological, acoustic, aesthetic, and 
historical aspects of the sonic 
environment. Prerequisites: LAA 5235 
and LAA 5716. (SS) 

LAA 6382 Analysis Methods (3). 

Theories and methods of the 
organization, analysis, and interpre- 
tation of cartographic data using 
geographic information systems. 
Prerequisites: Program approval. (SS) 

LAA 6521 Tropical Landscapes (3). 

Study of the structure, function, and 
change in the natural and cultural 
landscapes of tropical and subtropical 
regions. Prerequisite: Program ap- 
proval. (F) 

LAA 6551 Sustainable Landscapes 

(3). Study of the principles that sustain 
a balance between natural resources 
and human aspirations in the 
landscapes of tropical and subtropical 
regions. Prerequisite: LAA 6541. (SS) 

LAA 6654 Community Studio (6). 

Application of landscape architecture 
principles and methods to community 
planning and design in tropical and 
subtropical contexts. Prerequisite: LAA 
5653. (F) 

LAA 6655 Regional Studio (6). 
Application of landscape architecture 



principles and methods to regional 
management, planning, and design in 
tropical and subfropical contexts. 
Prerequisite: LAA 6654. (S) 

LAA 6745 Preservation of Land- 
scape Architecture (3). Critical 
examination of the formation and pre- 
servation of historic sites with em- 
phasis on interpretation, analysis and 
evaluation of cultural landscapes and 
urban places. Prerequisite: LAA 5235 
and LAA 5716. (SS) 

LAA 6835 Urban Studio (6). Applica- 
tion of interdisciplinary principles and 
methods to urban planning and design 
in tropical and subtropical contexts. 
Prerequisite: LAA 6655. (F) 

LAA 6905 Independent Study (1-6). 

Coursework on a particular spect of 
landscape architecture under the 
direction of faculty in an individual 
study format. Prerequisite: Program 
approval. (F,S) 

LAA 6916 Research Methods (3). 

Methods of data acquisition, analysis, 
and interpretation used in landscape 
architecture research. Prerequisite: 
Program approval. (SS) 

LAA 6936 Special Topics (1-3). 

Coursework on a particular aspect of 
landscape architecture under the 
direction of faculty in a classroom 
format. Prerequisite: Program approval. 
(F,S,SS) 

LAA 6937 Thesis Seminar (3). 

Coursework under the direction of 
faculty in preparation for a master's 
thesis in Landscape Architecture. 
Prerequisites: LAA 6382, LAA 6916. 

LAA 6971 Thesis (1-6). Coursework 
under the direction of faculty for the 
completion of thesis by candidate for 
the degree of Master of Landscape 
Architecture. Prerequisite: LAA 

6XXX (Thesis Semiar). (S) 



Graduate Catalog School of Architecture 69 

School of Architecture 

Dean Juan Antonio Bueno 

Associate Dean David F. Bergwall 

Faculty 

Andia, Alfredo, MDes, PhD 

(University of California-Berkeley), 

Assistant Professor, Architecture 
Baker, Ted, MLA, MDes, FASLA 

(Harvard University), Associate 

Professor, Landscape Architecture 
Belcher, Nathaniel Q., MArch, AIA 

(Harvard University), Associate 

Professor, Assistant Dean, 

Architecture 
Bergwall, David F., MBA, DBA 

(George Washington University), 

Associate Professor, Associate Dean 
Bueno, J.A., MLA, ASLA, PE 

(Harvard University), Associate 

Professor, Dean 
Canavis, Jaime, MArch, FAIA, IIDA 

(University of Florida), Associate 

Professor, Architecture 
Canavis, Marta, MLA, IIDA 

(Florida International University), 

Associate in Design 
Chandler, Jason R., MArch, AIA 

(Harvard University), l^isiting 

Assistant Professor, Architecture 
Ldpez-Mata, Gisela, MS (Pratt 

Institute), Associate Professor, 

Interior Design 
McMinn, William G., MArch, FAU 

(University of Texas), Professor, 

Architecture 
Nepomechie, Marilys, MArch, AIA 

(Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology), Associate Professor, 

Architecture 
Quintana, Nicol4s, NCARB 

(University of Havana), Scholar in 

Architecture and Urbanism 
Read, Gray, MArch, PhD, RA 

(University of Pennsylvania) , 

Assistant Professor), Architecture 
Resales, Camilo, MArch, RA 

(Harvard University), Associate 

Professor, Architecture 
Smith, Kevin, MArch, (Virginia 

Polytechnic and State University), 

Assistant Professor, Architecture 
Stuart, John A., MArch, AIA 

(Columbia University), Associate 

Professor, Architecture 



70 Graduate Catalog 



Graduate Catalog College of Arts and Sciences 71 



College of Arts 
and Sciences 



72 College of Arts and Sciences 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



The College of Arts and Sciences 
furthers the study of fundamental 
intellectual disciplines, and serves the 
University's other Colleges and 
Schools. The College grants Bach- 
elor's, Master's, and Ph.D. degrees. In 
addition, the College serves students 
who need to complete general 
education and core curticulum require- 
ments, and other requirements, in order 
to enroll in specific disciplines or 
professional programs. 

The College is composed of 19 
departments, in addition to the School 
of Computer Science, the School of 
Music and several interdisciplinary 
programs. 

Graduate Programs 
The College has academic programs 
leading to Master's degrees in African- 
New World Studies, biology, 
chemistry, comparative sociology, 
computer science, creative writing, 
economics, English, environmental 
studies, environmental and urban 
systems (offered jointly with the 
College of Engineering and Design), 
forensic science, geology, history, 
international studies, Latin American 
and Caribbean studies, linguistics, 
mathematical sciences, music, music 
education, music education-modified 
master's, physics, political science, 
psychology, religious studies, Spanish, 
statistics, and visual arts. 

The College offers academic 
programs leading to the Ph.D. in 
biology, chemistry, computer science, 
economics, geology, history, interna- 
tional relations, physics, political 
science, psychology, comparative 
sociology and Spanish. 
Graduate Admission Requirements 
The following requirements are in 
addition to the University's Graduate 
Admission Requirements. These are 
minimal requirements. Please consult 
the specific graduate program, which 
may have higher requirements. 

1. A 3.0 or higher GPA during the 
last two years as an upper division 
student or a minimum total score 
(quantitative plus verbal) of 1,000 on 
the ORE for the Master's degree. A 3.0 
or higher GPA or a GRE verbal and 
quantitative of 1100 or higher are 
required for the Ph.D. degree. Foreign 
students whose native language is not 
English must take the Test of English 
as a Foreign Language (the TOEFL 



examination) and obtain a 500 score of 
higher. 

2. The GRE or GPA stated above are 
only minimum requirements. All 
applications are reviewed by the 
Graduate Studies Admission Com- 
mittee, which makes the final 
admissions decisions. Since admission 
to the program is competitive, the 
comnuttee's requirements are normally 
higher than the minimum aforemen- 
tioned standards. 

Note: The programs, policies, require- 
ments, and regulations listed in this 
catalog are continually subject to 
review in order to serve the needs of 
the University's various publics and to 
respond to the mandates of the Florida 
Board of Regents and the Florida 
Legislature. Changes may be made 
without advance notice. Please refer to 
the General Information section for the 
University's policies, requirements, and 
regulations. 

Interdisciplinary Courses 

The College of Arts and Sciences has 
serveral interdisciplinary programs 
which are not based in a specific 
academic department. The courses 
offered by these programs therefore are 
not found in the departmental listings 
in the Catalog. For this reason, they 
are included here. 

Social Science 
Interdisciplinary 

ISS 5237 Latin American and 
Caribbean Cultural Expressions (3). 

This interdisciplinary course develops 
an interdisciplinary approach to the 
study of national, cultural, and racial 
identities, as expressed in cultural 
productions of the Latin America and 
the Caribbean. 

ISS 5238 The Imaged Body: Tlie 
Case of the Americas (3). With a 
team-taught interdisciplinary approach 
this course explores how identity, 
power and hierarchy are invoked and 
represented through the human body 
and body movement in the region of 
the Americas. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciennes 73 



African-New World 
Studies 

Core ANWS Graduate Faculty 
Carole Boyce Davies, Director of 
African-New World Studies 
Program, Professor of English & 
African-New World Studies 
Linda Spears-Bunton, Associate 
Professor, Education & African-New 
World Studies, Director of Graduate 
Studies 

Faculty: 

Heather Andrade, Assistant 

Professor, English 
Pascale Becel, Associate Professor, 

Modern Languages 
Ken Boodhoo, Associate Professor, 

International Relations 
Jean-Robert Cadely, Assistant 
Professor, Modern Languages & 
African-New World Studies 
John Clark, Associate Professor, 

International Relations 
Lisa Delpit, Eminent Professor, Urban 

Education 
Marvin Dunn, Associate Professor, 

Psychology 
Mohamed Farouk, Associate 

Professor, College of Education 
Nadine Fernandez, Assistant 

Professor, Sociology/Anthropology 
Steve Fjellman, Professor, Sociology 

& Anthropology 
Ivelaw L. Gniiith, Professor, Political 

Science 
Tometro Hopkins, Associate 

Professor, English 
Alexander Lichtenstein, Associate 

Professor, History 
Marcia Magnus, Associate Professor, 

Dietetics & Nutrition 
Anthony Maingot, Professor, 

Sociology /Anthropology 
Andrea Mantell-Seidel, Associate 

Professor, Theater & Dance 
Roderick Paul Neumann, Associate 
Professor, International Relations 
Akin Ogundiran, Assistant Professor, 

History 
Valerie Patterson, Assistant Professor, 

College of Urban & Public Affairs 
Jean Rahier, Associate Professor, 
Sociology/ Anthropology and 
African-New World Studies, 
Terry Rey, Assistant Professor, 

Religious Studies 
Robin Sherriff, Assistant Professor, 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Vicky Silvera. Library 
Alex Stepick HI, Professor, Sociology 

/Anthropology 
James Sweet, Assistant Professor, 
History, African New World Studies 



Clarence Taylor, Professor of History 
and African-New World Studies 

Juan Torres-Pou, Assistant Professor, 
Modern Languages 

Donna Weir-Soley, Assistant. 
Professor, English 

Other faculty not identified above will 
be considered CORE ANWS Faculty 
based on research, identified interest, 
and publications. Students can take 
courses for credit from other ANWS 
Affiliated Faculty after approval of 
syllabus by graduate director. 

Master of Arts in African- 
New World Studies 

The M.A. in African-New World 
Studies provides interdisciplinary, 
graduate level training with three areas 
of emphasis: 1. Pedagogy of the 
African Diaspora, 2. National and 
Transnational Policy Analysis, and 3. 
Cultural Studies. This MA. develops 
scholars with specific skills, research 
methodologies, principles, and 
knowledge which will lead to 
professional positions in a range of 
fields as it simultaneously prepares 
them for further study at the doctoral 
level. The MA. in African-New World 
Studies is international in orientation, 
as such, its geographic reach is Africa, 
the Caribbean, North and South 
America, Europe and Asia. Tlierefore, 
conceptually, it embraces the African 
Diaspora. FlU provides one of the few 
truly international, multi-disciplinary 
M.A. models among Africana Studies 
programs, departments and centers 
nationally. As such, the M. A. in 
African-New World Studies is 
organized to develop research interests 
and models, advance knowledge, and 
develop interactive and comparative 
relationships with similar programs 
which pursue the life, cultural and 
social formations, economics, 

education, language, expressive and 
performing arts, govemmental and 
other institutional systems, of peoples 
of African descent wherever they exist. 
The M.A. in African-New World 
Studies provides students with some 
specific skills, knowledge and 
resources to: 

1. Work in specific programs and 
units related to African 
communities in Africa, Latin 
America, the Caribbean, the 
United States, Europe, Asia; 
international organizations; multi- 
cultural curriculum development 
and teaching and other educational 
contexts; race and social and 



public policy; journalism and 
other diverse fields. 

2. Prepare students to use and 
develop theoretical, analytical, and 
methodological approaches to 
critical issues such as those 
pertaining to race and ethnicity in 
all their manifestations; develop- 
ment and underdevelopment; 
technology; relations of 
domination and power; environ- 
mental policies; health and 
wellness; issues of self- 
determination and mutual 
cooperation, and all aspects of 
aesthetic / creative expression. 

3. Create new knowledge through 
research and close study of 
relevant communities and 
disseminate this knowledge to the 
various communities we serve. 

4. Understand and confront the 
unique socioeconomic problems 
facing communities of Africa and 
the African Diaspora; Incorporate 
into an intellectual and research 
agenda theoretical and analytical 
frameworks that focus on a) 
"Resistance and Struggle," b) 
"Nationalities and National/Post 
National Identities," C) "Migration 
and Identity/Geographical Repo- 
sitioning," d) "History, Culture, 
Performative and Expressive 
Modes," and e) "Schooling, 
Pedagogical Exigencies, Instruc- 
tional Practices, and Educational 
Policies." 

Admission Requirements 

Each applicant to the African-New 
World Graduate Program must 
complete a graduate application form 
and arrange to send transcripts of all 
prior college (undergraduate and 
graduate) work and official reports of 
the Graduate Records Exam (GRE) and 
TOEFL (if applicable) to the FIU's 
Office of Admissions. Each applicant 
should also send a separate letter of 
application to the director of the 
African-New World Graduate Program, 
along with copies of the above 
material. The letter of application 
should include a statement expressing 
the applicant's academic and 
professional objectives and the choice 
of the applicant for enrolling in either 
one of the three areas of specialization. 
Applicants are sfrongly encouraged to 
include examples of academic or other 
relevant professional work that may 
support their application. Applicants 
must request two letters of 
recommendation from professors able 
to comment on their academic ability. 



74 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



The letters of recommendation should 
be sent directly to the Director of the 
African-New World Graduate Program. 
The application file must be 
complete before the African-New 
World Studies Graduate Committee 
will consider the applicant for 
admission. The deadline for receipt of 
application—including all supporting 
materials and letters of 

recommendation—is March IS"" To be 
admitted into the African-New World 
Studies Graduate Program a student 
must meet the University's graduate 
admission requirements, which can be 
found in Florida International 
University's Graduate Catalog and the 
following minimum standards: 
Applicants must have a baccalaureate 
degree from an accredited college or 
university. 

A. Applicants must have a 
baccalaureate degree from an 
accredited college or university. 

B. Applicants must have an 
undergraduate grade point average 
(GPA) of 3.0 or higher and a 
combined score of 1000 or higher 
on the verbal and quantitative 
sections of the Graduate Record 
Examination (GRE). Applicants 
must submit both grade transcripts 
and GRE scores for consideration. 
The student must also have a GPA 
of 3.5 on any previous graduate 
work. 

C. Applicants should request that two 
letters of recommendation from 
individuals able to judge a 
student's academic potential be 
sent directly to the Director of the 
African-New World Studies 
Graduate Program; African-New 
World Studies, Florida 
International University, 
Academic One- 1 62, 3000 North 

• East ISl^* Street, North Miami, 
Florida 33181. 

D. Applicants are encouraged to 
submit examples of written work 
and other supporting materials. 

E. Applicants whose native language 
is not English must take the 
TOEFL (Test of English as a 
Foreign Language) and obtain a 
score of 550 or higher. 

Financial Aid 

Each academic year a limited number 
of graduate students are hired as 
teaching assistants. Teaching 

assistantships are allocated on a 
competitive basis and typically pay a 
substantial portion of tuition expenses 
and provide a stipend. To be 
considered for an assistantship the 



applicant must make such a request in 
writing to the Graduate Program 
Director. The Graduate Program 
Committee will make the awarding of 
teaching assistantships. Students 

receiving an assistantship are required 
to perform approximately 20 hours of 
teaching related duties per week and 
are required to participate in a one-hour 
seminar related to teaching. 

Graduation Requirements 

Candidates must obtain a grade of B or 
higher in all courses and achieve a 
cumulative average of at least 3.0 
(based on a 4.0 scale) and present a 
satisfactory internship (with research 
paper) or thesis. A Thesis committee 
or an Internship Research Project . 
committee composed of at least two 
FlU faculties will guide the student 
through successful completion of the 
thesis or internship (with research 
paper). 

The FIU faculty eligible to serve in a 
Thesis, Internship Research Project 
committee is the faculty members 
whose names appear in the list of 
"African-New World Studies Core MA 
Faculty" .presented above. Other 
faculty not identified in that list will be 
considered "Core Faculty" based on 
research, identified interest, and 
publications (see the Graduate 
Director). 

Before the end of a student's first 
year in the program, he/she should 
form a thesis or intemship research 
project committee. This committee 
will consist of a Committee 
Chairperson and two additional 
committee members. The Committee 
Chairperson and one other committee 
member must be "Core Faculty" of the 
African-New World Studies Program. 
The remaining committee member will 
generally be a faculty member at FIU, 
although with the approval of the 
Committee Chairperson and the 
Graduate Program Director, the third 
member may come from outside the 
ANWS Program ("Core Faculty") or 
University. 

Intemship Research projects as well 
as thesis research are usually performed 
during the first summer of enrollment 
in the program. Internships Research 
Projects are options available only to 
students who specialize either in 
Pedagogy of the African Diaspora or in 
National and Transnational Policy 
Analysis. Students enrolled in the 
specialization in Cultural Studies must 
write a thesis. Internships projects are 
ALWAYS accompanied by a research 
paper. 



The thesis will be between 70 and 
100 pages. The research paper linked 
to an intemship generally will be 
between 25 and 50 pages. The student 
may use original data if she or he and 
the Committee Chairperson consider it 
appropriate. 

However, a thesis or research paper 
may be based on secondary sources or 
on library research. In any case it will 
be based on scholarly sources defined 
by particular disciplines. While thesis 
and research papers need not be based 
on original data collected by the 
student, they must be rigorous and 
original. By rigorous, we mean that the 
thesis/research paper must be tightly 
argued and logical, well-written and 
well-organized. By original, we mean 
that the thesis cannot simply 
summarize the arguments or work of 
others. It must have the student's 
unique interpretation, which should be 
cogent-given the data under 
consideration. 

Required Credits (for all 
Specializations) 

Three (3) credits [core course], six (6) 
credits of thesis/research project or 
community project or intemship and 
twenty-seven (27) credits selected 
according to one's specialization. (See 
below for specifics for specialization 
requirements). 
Total: 36 credit hours. 

Core Course (For all specializa- 
tions) 

AFA 5002 African-New World 
Studies: Theory and 
Methods Graduate 
Seminar 
(offered every Fall semester) 

Language Requirement (For all 
specializations) 

Students will be asked to demonstrate 
proficiency in a language according to 
the nature of their intemship or 
thesis/research project or community 
project, and professional interests. 
Credit hours earned in meeting 
language requirement will not count 
towards the 36 credit hours required for 
the degree. 

AFA 6920 Graduate Colloquium 1 
(students must register for one credit for 
three consecutive semesters) 

Specializations 

I. Pedagogy of tlie African 

Diaspora 
(Liaison - Linda Spears-Bunton, 
College of Education) 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 75 



This specialization addresses the need 
for multi-cultural education with a 
specific emphasis on training personnel 
to be knowledgeable about Africa 
Diaspora materials. The national and 
international rise of multi-cultural 
studies and interests in the area of 
education makes this program 
marketable to a range of educational 
interests. Targeted as well to meet the 
needs of teacher training in light of the 
Florida State Legislation (s233.061) 
which mandates the teaching of African 
American history across the 
curriculum, our students will be 
prepared to play leadership roles in the 
development of an international 
consciousness - of educational 
contexts, facilities, curricula, inside and 
outside of the United States. This 
specialization will help students teach 
and develop instructional materials in 
the area of urban education as well as 
for other students of different 
ethnicities; facilitate transmission of 
pedagogical materials on the African 
Diaspora; and develop cross and intra- 
cultural methodologies. Students must 
display cultural and linguistic fluency. 
Students in this specialization may 
participate in an Internship with an 
appropriate institution/organization that 
will culminate in a Research Project for 
6 credit hours. 

Thesis or Internship (6 credit 

hours) 

Required Courses (6 credit hours) 

AFA 5 1 07 Teachers' Institute 
AFA 6325 Pedagogy of the African 

Diaspora: Literacy, 

Culture, Race & Gender 

Issues 
Students must take three courses (9 
credit hours) from the list below. 
Students should consult with the 
graduate program director since new 
courses are frequently added and 
special topic courses sometimes 
concern the African Diaspora. 
EDF 5820 Latin American 

Education 
EDF 5821 African Educational 

Systems: A Comparative 

Approach 
EDF 5881 Foundations of Bilingual 

Education 
LAE 5465 Adolescent Literature 
LAE 5466 Multicultural 

Perspectives in 

Language & Literature 
LIN 5603 Language Planning: 

Linguistic Minority 

Issues 
SSE 6394 Social Studies in 



Other Nations 
SSE 6925 Workshop in Social 

Studies Education 
From the list below, students must take 
three courses (9 credit hours). Students 
may take no more than one course in 
one given discipline. 
LIT 5359 African Diaspora Women 

Writers 
LIT 5358 Black Literature and 

Literacy/Cultural 

Theory 
LIN 5934 Pidgins and Creoles 
LIT 5487 Major African-American 

Writers 
LIT 6934 Black Literature & 

Cultural Theory 
AFH 5905 Readings in African 

History 
AFH 5935 Topics in African 

History 
INR 5086 Islam in International 

Relations 
INR 5255 Seminar in African 

Development 
INR 6936 Seminar in Inter- 
American Politics 
FRE 5508 La Francophonie 
HAI 5235 Haitian Creole Seminar 
HAI 5xxx Haiti, Language and 

Culture 
SPW 6368 1 9'" Century Spanish- 
Caribbean Literature 
SPN 5536 Afro-Cuban Culture 
MUH 5025 History of Popular 

Music in the United 

States 
MUH5067 Music of the Caribbean 
CPO 6206 Seminar in African 

Politics 
REL5122 African- American 

Religion 
REL 5372 African Spirituality 
REL 5384 Rasta, Voodoo, Santeria 
REL 5488 Theology and Liberation 

Movements 
ANT 5xxx Advanced African 

Diaspora Cultures and 

Performativity 
ANT5XXX Representation of Africa 

and Africans in Films 
ANT 6319 The African Diaspora: 

Anthropological 

Perspectives 
SYD 6705 Race and Ethnicity 
SYP 6734 Seminar: Ethnic Minority 

Aging in U.S. 
WOH 5236 The Transatlantic Slave 

Trade and the Making of 

the African Diaspora, 

1441-1807 
WOH 5237 The African Diaspora 

Since the End of the Slave 

Trade 



II. National and Transnational 

Policy Analysis 
(Coordinator - Valerie Patterson, 
College of Health and Urban Affairs) 

Courses will focus on the examination 
and analysis of National and 
Transnational Policies relevant to 
African people in Black urban and rural 
communities, national and international 
contexts. Emphasis will be placed on 
a) leadership training for governmental 
and non-govemmental agencies; b) the 
development of economic policies, 
competencies, structures, and strategies 
for economic development; c) the 
examination of environmental issues, 
health policies, wellness and a variety 
of community practices; and d) the 
evaluation of current policies that affect 
black communities internationally. 
Students in this specialization may 
participate in an Internship with an 
appropriate institution/organization 
that will culminate in a Research 
Project for 6 credit hours. 

Thesis or Internship (6 credit 

hours) 

Required Courses (12 credits) 

AFA 5600 National and 

Transnational Policy 

Analysis: Africa and the 

Diaspora 

(must be taken in the 

fall of the 2"'^ year of 

enrollment after PAD 

5256 and URS 6028) 

SYA 6305 Research Methods I 

PAD 6053 Political, Social & 

Economic Context of 
Public Administration 

URS 6028 Policy Analysis & 
Program Planning 
(Prerequisite: PAD 
5256) 

Students must take two courses (6 
credit hours) from the list below: 

CPO 5325 Politics of the 

Caribbean 
CPO 6206 Seminar in African 

Politics 
INR 5087 Ethnicity and the 

Politics of Development 
INR 5255 Seminar in African 

Development 
INR 5607 International Relations 

and Development 
INR 6056 Environment and 

Development 
INR 6089 International Relations 

and Human Rights 
SYD 6705 Comparative Analysis 

of Ethnicity and Race 
SYD 6236 Intemational Migration 



76 College of Arts and Sciences 

and Refugees 
SYP 5447 Sociology of Inter- 
national Development 
SYP 6306 Comparative Social 

Movements 
INR 5315 Foreign Policy Analysis 
Students must take two courses (6 
credit hours) from the list below. 
Students should consult the graduate 
program director since new courses 
are frequently added, and special 
topic courses sometimes concern the 
African Diaspora. 
LIT 5 3 59 African Diaspora Women 

Writers 

LIT 5 3 5 8 Black Literature and 

Literacy/Cultural 

Theory 

LfN 5934 Pidgins and Creoles 

LIT 5487 Major African-American 

Writers 
LIT 6934 Black Literature & 

Cultural Theory 
AFH 5905 Readings in African 

History 
AFH 5935 Topics in African 

History 
INR 5086 Islam in International 

Relations 
INR 6936 Seminar in Inter- 
American Politics 
FRE 5508 La Francophonie 
HAI 5235 Haitian Creole Seminar 
HAI 5 XXX Haiti, Language and 

Culture 
SPW 6368 1 9"" Century Spanish- 
Caribbean Literature 
SPN 5536 Afro-Cuban Culture 
MUH 5025 History of Popular 
Music in the United 
States 
MUH 5067 Music of the Caribbean 
CPO 6206 Seminar in African 

Politics 
REL5I22 African- American 

Religion 
REL 5372 African Spirituality 
REL 5384 Rasta, Voodoo, Santeria 
REL 5488 Theology and Liberation 

Movements 
ANT 5xxx Advanced African 

Diaspora Cultures and 
Performativity 
ANT5XXX Representation of Africa 

in Films 
ANT 63 1 9 The African Diaspora: 
Anthropological 
Perspectives 
SYD 6705 Race and Ethnicity 
SYP 6734 Seminar: Ethnic Minority 

Aging in U.S. 
WOH 5236 The Transatlantic Slave 
Trade and the Making of 
the African Diaspora, 
1441-1807 



WOH 5237 The African Diaspora 

Since the End of the Slave 
Trade 

III. Cultural Studies 

(Liaison - James Sweet, Dept. of 
History, African New World Studies) 

Students working in this area will be 
exposed to the study, research, practice 
and performance, and analysis of 
cultural formations in the African 
Diaspora. Interdisciplinary in structure, 
fields such as dance, music, literature, 
art, cinema studies, language, science, 
and other related areas will be studied. 
Students will critically analyze issues 
of a) colonialism, global imperialism, 
and capitalism and their effects on 
Africans and peoples of African 
descent internationally, and b) 
sfrategies, fraditions and methods of 
resistance to the same. Courses will 
involve comparative studies of African 
communities in Africa, the United 
States, the Caribbean, Latin America, 
and Europe, and other areas of the 
African Diaspora will be examined; 
critical reading of cultural 
manifestations, identities, and 

practices;, analysis of dynamics 
between traditions and social 
transformations. 
Thesis (6 credit hours) 
Required Courses (15 credit hours) 
ANT 63 1 9 The African Diaspora; 
Anthropological 
Perspectives 
LIT 5487 Black Literature and 

Cultural Theory 
REL 5384 Rasta, Voodoo, Santeria 
LIN 5934 Pidgins and Creoles 
WOH 5236 The Transatlantic Slave 
Trade and the Making of 
the African Diaspora, 
1441-1807 
From the list below, students must 
take three courses (9 credit hours). 
Students may take no more than one 
course in one given discipline. 
Students should consult with the 
graduate program director since new 
courses are frequently added, and 
special topic courses sometimes 
concern the African Diaspora. 
LIT5359 African Diaspora Women 

Writers 
LIT 5487 Major African-American 

Writers 
LIT 6934 Black Literature & 

Cultural Theory 
AFH 5905 Readings in African 

History 
AFH 5935 Topics in African 
History 





Graduate Catalog 


INR 5086 


Islam in International 




Relations 


INR 6936 


Seminar in Inter- 




American Politics 


FRE 5508 


La Francophonie 


HAI 5235 


Haitian Creole Seminar 


HAI 5xxx 


Haiti, Language and 




Culture 


SPW 6368 


19* Century Spanish- 




Caribbean Literature 


SPN 5536 


Afro-Cuban Culture 


MUH5067 


Music of the Caribbean 


CPO 6206 


Seminar in African 




Politics 


REL 5 122 


African-American 




Religion 


REL 5372 


African Spirituality 


REL 5488 


Theology and Liberation 




Movements 


ANT 5xxx 


Advanced African 




Diaspora Cultures and 




Performativity 


ANT 5xxx 


Representation of Africa 




in Films 


SYD 6705 


Race and Ethnicity 


SYP 6734 


Seminar: Ethic Minority 




Aging in U.S. 


WOH 5237 


The African Diaspora 




Since the End of the Slave 




Trade 



Course Descriptions 

Deflnition of Prefixes 

AFA-African-New World Studies 

AFA 5002 African-New World 
Studies: Theory and Methods (3). A 

study of the major ideas, thinkers, 
theories, and communities of African 
Diaspora scholarship. Research 
methodology in African Diaspora 
Studies. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing or ANWS Certificate. 

AFA 5107 Teaching the African- 
American Experience. (3). Teachers 
Institute on Literature, culture, history, 
politics designed to meet Florida State 
Teachers Certification requirements. 
Includes instruction on pedagogy, 
practical teaching methods, and FCAT. 

AFA 5600 National and Trans- 
national Policy Analysis: The 
African Diaspora (3). Analysis of 
national and transnational policies as 
they directly relate and impact the 
African Diaspora. Prerequisite: 

Graduate Standing. 

AFA 5932 Special Topics in African- 
New World Studies (3). An 
examination of different features of 
African-New World Studies not 
normally offered in the basic 
curriculum or otherwise offered. May 



College of Arts and Sciences 77 



Graduate Catalog 



be repeated. Prerequisites: Graduate 
Standing. 

AFA 5934 Special Topics in Black 
Transnationalism (3). A course 
designed to give groups of students 
special studies in the black experience 
transnationally. Prerequisites: Grad- 
uate Standing. 

AFA 6920 African-New World 
Studies Graduate Colloquium (1). 

Colloquiums presented by faculty, 
visiting scholars, and graduate students 
on topics of current research interest. 
May be repeated with departmental 
approval. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing, graduate advisor approval. 

AFA 6940 Community 

Project/Internship Research in 
African-New World Studies (1-6). 

Qualitative and quantitative research 
using a variety of sources. Research 
projects conducted in the field by 
students under faculty supervision. 
May be repeated with departmental 
approval. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing, graduate advisor approval. 

AFA 6971 Thesis Research in 
African-New World Studies (1-6). 

Quantitative and qualitative research 
using a variety of sources, e.g. primary 
and secondary documents, filed 
research under faculty supervision. 
May be repeated with departmental 
approval. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing, graduate advisor approval. 



78 Pnlle pe of Arts and Sciences 

Art and Art History 

Carol Damian, Associate Professor 

and Chair 
Tori Arpad, Assistant Professor, 

Ceramics 
Pip Brant, Assistant Professor, 

Painting/Drawing 
Ralph F. Buckley, Professor, 

Sculpture 
William Burke, Professor, Ceramics 
James M. Couper III, Professor. 

Painting 
Eduardo Del Valle, Professor, 

Photography 
Richard Duncan, Associate Professor, 

Drawing/Printmaking 
Mirta Gomez, Professor, Photography 
Daniel Guernsey, Assistant Professor 
Clive King, Professor, Drawing and 

Director, Graduate 
Kate Kretz, Associate Professor, 

Painting/Drawing 
William Maguire, Professor, 

Photography 
Juan Martinez, Associate Professor, 

Art History 
Dahlia Morgan, Professor and Art 

Museum Director 
Geoffrey Olsen, Associate Professor, 

Graduate Director 
Manuel Torres, Professor, 

Art History 
Barbara Watts, Associate Professor, 
Art History 

Master of Fine Arts in 
Visual Arts 

The M.F.A. in Visual Arts is an 
intense, production-oriented program 
directed toward individual develop- 
ment. The curriculum is designed for 
maximum flexibility to accommodate 
both those seeking advanced training in 
a particular studio area and those 
whose interests may involve more 
media cross-over. Graduates of the 
program will be prepared for careers as 
professional artists. 
Graduate Admission 
Requirements 

1. Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of 
Arts, or an equivalent degree. 

2. A grade point average of 3.0 or 
higher at the undergraduate level 
and/or a score of 1000 on the verbal 
and quantitative sections of the 
Graduate Record Examination (GRE). 

3. A score of a least 550 on the Test 
of English as a Foreign Language 
(TOEFL) and a score of 50 on a Test of 
spoken English (TSE) for international 
students. 



(traduate Catalog 



4. Graduate Admission Application 
Applicants must submit the following 
to the Graduate Secretary, Department 
of Art and Art History, University Park 
Campus, Miami, Florida 33199 

1 . Department copy of the Admis- 
sion application submitted to the 
Admissions Office. 

2. A statement of intent (stating area 
of concentration and if seeking 
financial assistance). 

3. Three letters of recommendation, 
preferably from previous instructors 
and/or person's familiar with applicants 
academic and artistic background. 

4. 20 slides of recent work 

5. SASE for return of slides. 
Deadline date for Application is 
February 15 for Fall admission. 
Degree Requirements 

The M.F.A. requires 60 semester hours 
of course work at the graduate level to 
be distributed as follows: 
Tutorial Instruction in Studio Area 
Concentration ^^ 

Intro to Graduate Study 

in Visual Arts 3 

Art History '^ 

Studio Art Seminar ^ 

Written Account of Work 6 

Electives ^ 

Research for the written account of 
work will be directed by a faculty 
committee composed of the 
candidates's major professor, a member 
of the studio faculty, and an art 
historian. The Committee will be 
fomied during the first semester of 
enrollment and will meet periodically 
to supervise the candidate's progress 
during the entire period of study. 

Upon completion of twenty hours of 
course work and prior to the 
completion of thirty hours, the 
candidate must submit his/her work to 
the faculty committee, which will 
determine the student's progress and 
capability for continued enrollment m 
the MFA program. This review will 
focus on issues such as growth of the 
student's work, the consistency of 
production at the graduate level, and 
the demonstrated ability to fulfill the 
expectations of a graduate degree. All 
of the student's work completed by this 
time will be assembled and reviewed, 
and the student will be questioned 
about specific issues related to his/her 
work. Successful completion of this 
examination is prerequisite for 
continuing as a candidate for the 
degree. 



In the last semester of enrollment, 
the candidate will present a graduate 
exhibition to be displayed in the Art 
Museum at F.l.U. or at an appropriate 
alternative space. The exhibition will 
be curated by the MFA candidate and 
the members of his/her committee. At 
the same time, the committee will 
conduct an oral examination with the 
candidate. This will take place in the 
exhibition space during the display of 
the candidate's graduate exhibition. It 
will focus on the exhibition and the 
development of the candidate's work. 
This examination must be completed 
successfiilly in order for the candidate 
to be awarded his/her degree. ^^^^ 

Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 
ARH-Art History; ART-Art; PGY- 
Photography. 

ARH 5465 Modern Art (3). Offers a 
history of modem art from ca 1880 to 
1940. It concentrates on the study of 
European and American Avantgarde 
visual art movements with emphasis 
between their art and modem society. 
ARH 5654 Graduate Art of Spain 
and her Colonies (3). Course explores 
art of Spain from 1492 through early 
ig"" century, the encounter between 
Spain and the Americas after the 
conquest, and the art of the colonies. 
Graduate level readings. Prerequisites: 
Permission of Instructor. 
ARH 5671 Seminar in lO'" Century 
Latin American Art (3). This course 
will examine the art of the 20* century, 
through seminar focusing on painting 
and sculpture in Europe and America 
from the end of the 19* century to the 
1940. 

ARH 5715 History of Photography 
(3). A chronological examination of the 
work of the world's most significant 
photographers from photographic 
works and ideas from invention to the 
present. 

ARH 5716 History of Photography 
Since 1945 (3). An examination of the 
most significant photographic works, 
critical concepts, and new trends which 
have arisen since WWII. Prerequisite: 
ARH 4710. 

ARH 5796 Critical Studies in the 
Visual Arts (3). Introduction to the 
methods and concerns of recent art 
history. Discussion of students' work m 
context of the contemporary art worid. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Alts and Sciences 79 



Prerequisite: ARH 4450 and .-VRH 
4470 or graduate level equivalents. 

ARH 5850 Introduction to Museum 
Studies: Historj and Philosophy of 
Museums (3). Introduces the wide 
range of topics and issues associated 
with different t>pes of Amencan 
museums. Museums are examined as 
cultural, political, and educational 
institutions. Prerequisite: Graduate 
Standing. 

ARH 5851 Museum Ethics, Policies 
and Procedures (3). The legal, ethical 
status of museums and the obligation to 
the public regarding their governance, 
policvmakmg and financial planning. 
Includes theoretical and practical 
discussions v.ith attention to museums. 
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing or 
permission of instructor. 

ARH 5852 Museum Registration 
Methods (3). A course in Musuem 
Registration is designed to provide 
Museum Studies students with 
competency in all areas of object care, 
registration and information 

management. Prerequisite: Graduate 
Standing. 

ARH 5853 Visual Arts Marketing 
and Market (3). Students seeking a 
degree in studio art will be able to 
appraise and present a profolio to an 
appropnate organization. Prerequisite: 
Graduate Standing. 

ARH 5872 Histor>- of Women Artists 

(3). Surveys the history of women 
artists with some discussion of the 
history of images of women. 

-ARH 5897 Special Topics in Art 
History (3). Rotating special topics on 
the graduate lesel in art history. May be 
repeated with change of topic. 
Prerequisite: ARH 4450 and ARH 
4470 or graduate level equivalents. 

ARH 5907 Directed Studies (1-6). A 

group of students, with the approval of 
the art faculty, may select a master 
teacher of theory, research or cnticism 
in selected areas as film, painting, 
sculpture, architecture, crafts, art his- 
tory, multi-media art, etc. Arrange- 
ments must b€ made at least a semester 
before course is offered. May be 
repeated. 

ARH 5913 Research (1-6). Art 

history, cnticism, and theory in areas 
not covered by the present program and 
which the student wishes to study. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instruc- 
tor. May be repeated. 



.ARH 5940 Internship Experience (3). 
Supervised work experience in 
approved institution. Prerequisite: 
Permit required. May be repeated. 

.ART S159C Jewelry and Metals (3). 

Advanced jewelry and metal work. 
May be repeated. Prerequisites: ART 
4156C or equivalent or permssion of 
the instructor. 

ART 5XXXC Time Based Media (3). 
Graduate work with art forms that are 
primarily dependent on the passage of 
time in their construction, documen- 
tation, and exhibition. This includes, 
but is not limited to, live and recorded 
performance art, public or mixed-media 
installation, video and computer 
generated art. 

ART 5XXXC Issues of Contemp- 
orary Art Seminar (3). Students will 
attend scheduled seminars led by 
appropnate faculty. Discussions will 
examine issues relating to art being 
currently produced. Exhibitions and 
publications will be referenced, and 
professional artists will participate. 

ART 5390C Drawing (3). Advanced 
drawing. May be repeated. Prereq- 
uisites: ART 4304C, or equivalent, or 
Permission of the instructor. 

ART 5391C Figure Drawing (3). 
Advanced figure drawing. May be 
repeated. Prerequisites: ART 4333C, or 
equivalent, or Permission of the 
instructor. 

ART 5408C Printmaking (3). 

Advanced printmaking. May be 
repeated. Prerequisites: ART 4404C, or 
equivalent or Permission of the 
instructor. 

ART 5580C Painting (3). Advanced 
painting. May be repeated. Prereq- 
uisites: ART 4513 or equivalent, or 
Permission of the instructor. 

ART 5685C Advanced Time Art (3). 

Advanced course to refine students' 
skills in electronic and digital media 
production. Students are required to 
produce a multidisciplinary project. 
Prerequisite: ART 3681 or permission 
of the instructor. 

ART 5740C Sculpture (3). Advanced 
sculpture. May be repeated. Prereq- 
uisites: ART 4705C or equivalent, or 
Permission of the instructor. 

ART 5790C Ceramics (3). The 

advanced student will explore all 
aspects of expression in clay and glaze. 
Students will be expected to be mostly 



self-directed. Prerequisite: ART 31 1 IC, 
or permission of the instructor. May be 
repeated. 

ART 5792C Figure Sculpture (3). 
Advanced Figure Sculpture. May be 
repeated. Prerequisites: Figure Sculp- 
ture IV or Permission of the instructor. 

ART 5813C Graduate Installation 
Art (3). This topic course will explore 
the genre of installation and site- 
specific art through history and in 
terms of its ongoing influence on 
contemporary visual culture. MF.A. 
students will be required to develop 
slide lectures in conjunction with 
installation. Prerequisites: Permission 
of Instructor. 

ART 5907C Directed Study fVAR). 

A group of students, with the approval 
of the Visual Arts Department faculty, 
may select a master artist teacher and 
pursue a course of art study in selected 
areas such as graphic design, film, 
multi-media, environmental design, 
sound, etc. Arrangements must be made 
at least one semester before course is 
offered. May be repeated. 

ART 5910C Research (1-6). Students 
may study or research an individual art 
project with an art faculty member. 
Complexity and amount of work will 
determine the number of credit hours 
granted. May be repeated. 

ART 5930C Special Topics in Studio 

Art (3). Rotating special topics in 
Studio Arts. May be repeated with 
change of content. 

ART 5938C Studio Art Pedagogy (1). 

Instruction in the principles and 
methods of teaching in the area of 
visual arts; specifically the application 
of these principles to the studio situa- 
tion. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

ART S939C Studio Art Seminar (3). 
Students will locate and discuss their 
own work within the context of the 
contemporary art world. Also, issues 
and practical concems for the 
professional artist will be addressed, 
such as dealing with guidelines, grant 
writing and business procedures. 
Prerequisite: Issues of Contemporary 
Art Seminar. 

ART 6971 Graduate Prospectus and 
Exhibition Preparation (3). Final 
preparation of work for museum 
exhibition accompanied by a written 
discussion of work. Required for MFA 
students. Prerequisites: Completion of 
graduate program courses. 



80 College of Arts and Sciences Graduate Catalog 

PGY 5116C Color Photography (3). 

Advanced color photography. (See 
PGY 41 13). Prerequisite: PGY 41 130. 

PGY S425C Photography (3). 

Advanced photography. May be 
repeated. Prerequisite: PGY 4003C, or 
equivalent, or Permission of the 
instructor. 



Gradiiate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 81 



Biological Sciences 

James Fourqurean, Associate 

Professor and Chairperson 
Victor Apanius, Assistant Professor 
Brad Bennett, Associate Professor 
Charles Bigger, Associate Professor 
Christopher Brown, Professor, 

Associate Chairperson and Marine 

Biology Program Director 
Richard Campbell, Research Scientist 
Chun-fan Chen, Associate Professor 
Dan Childers, Associate Professor 
Tim Collins, Associate Professor 
Maureen Donnelly, Associate 

Professor 
Kelsey Downum, Professor and 

Associate Dean for Research 
Javier Francisco-Ortega, Assistant 

Professor 
Evelyn Gaiser, Assistant Professor 
Robert M. George, Lecturer 
Walter M. Goldberg, Professor and 

Associate Chairperson 
Gerald Guala, Research Scientist 
Jack B. Fisher, Research Scientist 
Rene J. Herrera, Associate Professor 
Frank Jochem, Assistant Professor 
Ronald D. Jones, Professor 
Christopher Keman, Research 

Scientist 
Suzanne Koptur, Professor 
Julia Komegay, Research Scientist 
Lidia Kos, Assistant Professor 
David N. Kuhn, Associate Professor 
David W. Lee, Professor 
Carl Lewis, Research Scientist 
John Makemson, Professor 
Joyce Maschinski, Research Scientist 
Kalai Mathee, Assistant Professor 
Mike Maunder, Research Scientist 
Steven F. Oberbauer, Professor 
Case K. Okubo, Associate Professor 

and Undergraduate Program 

Director 
Tom Philippi, Assistant Professor 
John Pipoly, Research Scientist 
Thomas R. Pitzer, Instructor and 

Teaching Assistant Coordinator 
Thomas E. Pliske, Lecturer 
Jennifer Richards, Professor 
Laurie L. Richardson, Associate 

Professor 
Barbra A. Roller, Lecturer 
Philip Stoddard, Associate Professor 
Martin L. Tracey, Professor 
Joel Trexler, Professor and Graduate 

Program Director 
Ophelia I. Weeks, Associate Professor 
Scott Zona, Research Scientist 



Master of Science in 
Biology 

To be admitted into the Master's 
degree program in Biology, a student 
must: 

1. Hold a Bachelor's degree in a 
relevant discipline from an accredited 
college or university. 

2. Have a 3.0 average or higher 
during the last two years of the 
undergraduate program and a combined 
score (verbal and quantitative) of 1000 
or higher on the Graduate Record 
Exam. 

3. Two letters of recommendation of 
the student's academic potential. 

4. Be accepted by a faculty sponsor. 

5. Receive approval from the Depart- 
mental Graduate Committee. 

6. Foreign students whose native 
language is not English must take the 
TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign 
Language) and obtain a score of 550 or 
higher (220 on computer-based 
TOEFL). 

Degree Requirements 

The Master of Science in Biology 
consists of a minimum 36 credits, 
including a thesis based upon the 
student's original research. A 
maximum of six credits of post- 
baccalaureate course work may be 
transferred from other institutions, 
subject to the approval of the Graduate 
Committee. 

Required Courses 

BSC 6457 Introduction to 

Biological Research 3 
BSC 593 1 Thesis Proposal Seminar 1 
BSC 5975 Thesis Defense Seminar 1 

Workshops and 

Laboratories 4 

BSC 6971 Master's Thesis^ 6 

Electives' 
Foreign language competency 

Following graduate committee 
approval, students may fulfill this 
requirement with any combination of 
graduate workshops, graduate 
laboratories, and graduate techniques 
courses (minimum of three separate 
courses). 

^ To be taken after qualifying exam is 
passed. 

^ These must include at least 16 credits 
of courses in the Department of 
Biological Sciences. No more than six 
credits can be transferred from another 
graduate program, subject to the 
approval of the Graduate Committee. 
At least six credits must be at the 5000- 



or 6000-level (excluding thesis credits). 
Credits taken at the 4000-level beyond 
six, or at a lower levels, will not count 
towards graduation. 
Competency will be determined by 
examination consisting of a clear 
translation of technical material in a 
foreign language. Credits taken to gain 
such proficiency will not count toward 
graduation. As an alternative, students 
may substitute either six credits of 
computer programming or mathematics 
beyond Calculus II. 

Graduation Requirements 

A grade of 'C or higher must be ob- 
tained in all courses with a cumulative 
average of 3.0 or higher in the 36 
credits, and a thesis must be completed 
and accepted after presentation to an ad 
hoc Thesis Committee chosen by the 
student's Major professor. 

Doctor of Philosophy in 
Biology 

To be admitted into the Ph.D program 
in Biology, a student must: 

1. Hold a Bachelor's degree in a 
relevant discipline from an accredited 
college or university; 

2. Have a 3.0 grade point average 
during the last two years of the under- 
graduate program or a Master's degree 
in a relevant discipline; 

3. Have a combined score (verbal 
and quantitative) of 1 1 20 on the gen- 
eral Graduate Record Exam (GRE). 

4. Be sponsored by a Biology 
faculty member. 

5. Arrange to have three letters of re- 
commendation sent to the Biology 
Graduate Program Director evaluating 
the applicant's potential for graduate 
work. 

6. Receive approval from the De- 
partmental Graduate Committee. 

7. Foreign students whose native 
language is not English must take the 
TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign 
Language) and obtain a score of 550 or 
higher (220 on computer-based 
TOEFL). 

Degree Requirements 

The PhD in Biology is conferred on 
individuals in recognition of their 
demonstrated ability to master a 
specific field of knowledge and to 
conduct significant independent, orig- 
inal research. A minimum of 90 sem- 
ester credits of graduate work beyond 
the baccalaureate are required, in- 
cluding a dissertation based upon the 
student's original research. A max- 



82 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



imum of 36 credits may be transferred 
from another graduate program with 
the approval of the Advisory Com- 
mittee. 

Required Courses 

BSC 7981 Dissertation Proposal 

Seminar 1 

BSC 7982 Dissertation Defense 

Seminar 1 

BSC 5945 Supervised Teaching in 

Biology 2 

Workshops and Laboratories 4 

BSC 7980 Ph.D. Dissertation 24 
Electives^ 8 

Foreign Language Competency 

Recommended course 

BSC 6457 Intro to Biological 

Research 3 

'Following graduate committee 
approval, students may fulfill this 
requirement with any combination of 
graduate workshops, graduate lab- 
oratories, and graduate courses (min- 
imum of three separate courses). 
^No more than 36 credits may be 
transferred from another graduate 
program, subject to the approval of the 
Graduate Committee. 
^Competency will be determined by 
examination consisting of a clear tran- 
slation of technical material in a foreign 
language. Credits taken to gain such 
proficiency will not count toward 
graduation. As an alternative, students 
may substitute either six credits of 
computer programming or mathematics 
beyond Calculus II. 

Graduation Requirements 

A grade of 'C or higher must be 
obtained in all courses with a 
cumulative average of 3.0 or higher in 
the 90 credits; demonstration of foreign 
language competency, and a 
dissertation completed and accepted by 
the University. 

Course Descriptions 

Note: Laboratories should be taken 
concurrently with or subsequent to 
lectures. Students should register for 
each separately. 
Definition of Prefixes 
APB - Applied Biology; BCH - 
Biochemistry; BOT - Botany; BSC - 
Infroductory Biology; MCB - Micro- 
biology; OCB - Oceanography 
(Biological); PCB - Process Cell 
Biology; ZOO - Zoology. 

BCH S134C Worlishop in Clironi- 
atograpliy Tecliniques (1). Workshop 
covers the theory and practice of 



chromatographic techniques to separate 
complex mixtures of biomolecules, 
including absorption, ion exchange, 
size exclusion and affinity chromato- 
graphy. Prerequisite: Graduate status. 

BCH 541 IC Techniques in Mole- 
cular Evolution Research (5). 
Ribosomal genes from related 
organisms are amplified by polymerase 
chain reaction (PCR) and sequenced. 
Phylogenetic maps are made by com- 
puter from sequence data. Students may 
use material from their own research. 
Prerequisites: General Biochemistry 
BCH 3033 and Lab BCH 3033L, 
Molecular Biology PCB 4524 and Lab 
PCB 4524L or Graduate status. 

BCH 6130C Workshop in DNA Syn- 
thesis and Amplification (1). Work- 
shop in the chemical synthesis of DNA 
and the amplification of specific genes 
by the polymerase chain reaction 
(PCR). Students may synthesize DNA 
oligonucleotides for use in their own 
research. Prerequisite: Graduate status 
and Permission of the instructor. 

BCH 6131C Worlcshop in Radio- 
isotope Use and Safety (1). Workshop 
in the safe use of radioisotopes in 
biological and biochemical experi- 
mentation, labelling of biochemical 
compounds, purification of labelled 
compounds, and instrumentation 
involved in detection of radiosiotopes. 
Prerequisite; Graduate status and Per- 
mission of the instructor. 

BCH 6132C Workshop in Electro- 
phoresis (1). Workshop in the applica- 
tion of electrophoresis to biochemical 
and genetic experimentation. Students 
may use material from their own re- 
search in the laboratory section. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate status and Permission 
of the instructor. 

BCH 6133C Workshop in DNA 
Sequencing (1). Workshop in the 
manual and automated sequencing of 
DNA. Students may sequence DNA 
from their own research. Prerequisite: 
Graduate status and Permission of the 
insfructor. 

BCH 6507C Workshop in Radio- 
metry and Spectrophotometry (1). 

Interaction of light with matter (absorp- 
-tion, fluorescence, light scattering) and 
emission (chemi-and biolumine- 
scence); analysis of spectra and enzyme 
kinetics. Prerequisite: Graduate status. 

BOT 5159C Florida Plant Comm- 
unities (3). Two-week field trip to 
many diverse plant communities of the 



state. Ecological and environmental 
factors influencing plant distribution 
will be examined, contrasting vegeta- 
tion among sites. Prerequisites: 
Ecology PCB 3043 or Permission of 
the instructor 

BOT 5406 Algal Physiology (3). 
Physiology and metabolism of eukary- 
otic algae, including ecological aspects 
of the aquatic environment and algal 
roles in aquatic biogeochemical cyc- 
ling. Prerequisites: Phycology BOT 
4404 and one year of chemistry or 
instructor consent. 

BOT 5515 Biochemistry of Plant 
Natural Products (3). Aspects of 
primary and secondary plant meta- 
bolism will be covered including bio- 
synthesis and degradation of natural 
products as well as their biological/ 
pharmacological activity. Prerequisite: 
Organic Chemistry 11 CHM 2211 or 
General Biochemistry BCH 3033. 

BOT 5575 Photobiology (3) BOT 
5575L Photobiology Lab (1). The 

study of basic photochemical mechan- 
isms as they occur in molecular biolog- 
ical processes such as photosynthesis, 
plant growth, animal vision, biolumine- 
scence, and radiation damage. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of the instructor. 

BOT 5602 The Functional Ecology of 
Tropical Plants (3) BOT 5602L The 
Functional Ecology of Tropical 
Plants Lab (1). The relationship of 
climate and soils to the distribution and 
function of the major plant groups of 
the fropical regions. Prerequisites: Two 
courses in botany or Permission of the 
instructor. 

BOT 5605 Plant Ecology (3) BOT 
5605L Plant Ecology Labora-tory 
(1). In-depth study of plant ecology at 
three levels: individual, population, and 
community. Laboratory and field 
exercises will examine lecture topics. 
Prerequisites: Ecology PCB 3043 or 
Permission of the instructor. Coreq- 
uisite: Concurrent registration of 
lecture in lab course. 

BOT 5615 Workshop: Seed 
Conservation (1). Covers practical 
issues of seed conservation of tropical 
plants: longevity curves, seed 
germination protocols and seed 
conservation procedures. Prerequisites: 
Graduate students or permission of 
instructor. 

BOT 5647 Ecology of Marine 
Vascular Plants (3). Biology and 
ecology of seagrasses and mangroves. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 83 



with an emphasis on South Florida and 
Caribbean species. Physiological 
ecology, population and community 
ecology, and ecosystem processes. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

BOX 5648 Workshop on Aquatic 
Plants (1). Biology and identification 
of aquatic plants. Prerequisites: Grad- 
uate status or Permission of the in- 
structor. 

BOX 5682C Florida Plant Commun- 
ities (3). Two-week field trip to many 
diverse plant communities of the state. 
Ecological and environmental factors 
influencing plant distribution will be 
examined, contrasting vegetation 
among sites. Prerequisites: Ecology 
PCB 3043 or Permission of the 
instructor. 

BOX 5704 Botanical Xermlnology, 
Latin and Nomenclature (2). Course 
is divided into 3 parts: 1) Botanical 
Latin and its use; 2) Plant description 
terminology, and current descriptive 
standards; and 3) Botanical 
nomeclature, the ICBN, Phylocode, 
and others. Prerequisites: Plants 
Systematics (BOT 5725C) or 
Systematic Biology (BSC 5606), or 
approval of the Advisor. 

BOX 5725C Plant Systematics (3). 

Theory and methods of classification of 
vascular plants using phylogenetic 
principles. Covers the integration of 
morphological and molecular 

characters. Prerequisites: Graduate 
students or permission of instructor. 

BOX 5727 Plant Genetics (3). Topics 
related to higher plants, including 
polyploid inheritance, self- 

incompatibility, cytoplasmic 

inheritance, mutable alleles, complex 
loci, genome analysis, recombination 
and mutagesis. Prerequisites: General 
Biology I (BSC 1010) and General 
Biology II (BSC 1011) and Genetics 
(PCB3063). 

BOX 5728 Plant Molecular Sys- 
tematics (2). DNA markers for 
phylogenetic analysis of vascular 
plants, including description of 
laboatory methods, computerized 
analytical techniques and evolutionary 
interpretation. Prerequisites: Graduate 
status or permission of instructor. 

BOX 5728L Plant Molecular 
Systematics Laboratory (2). DNA 
markers for phylogenetic analysis of 
vascular plants, including description 
of laboratory methods, computerized 



analytical techniques and evolutionary 
interpretation. Prerequisites: Graduate 
status or permission of instructor. 

BOX 5816 Ethnobotany (3). Review 
the use and management of plants by 
indigenous people. Discuss emerging 
theories in ethnobotany, examine the 
role of ethnobotany in conservation and 
resource utilization. Prerequisites: 
Economic Botany BOT 3810, Tropical 
Botany BOT 3663, or Cultural Ecology 
ANT 3403, or Permission of the 
instructor. 

BOT 5816L Ethnobotany Workshop 
(1). Field methods in the study of plant 
use by traditional and modem societies. 
Examines botanical documentation, 
ethnological description and experi- 
mental design. Prerequisite: Permission 
of the instructor. 

BOX 5817 Field Ethnobotany (1-4). 

A 4-week field course that introduces 
students to tropical vegetation and its 
use by traditional cultures. Topics 
include tropical botany, diversity, 
ecology, and the relationship between 
plants and people. Course may be 
repeated. Prerequisites: BOT 5816 and 
BOT 5816L or permission of 
instructor. 

BOX 5852 Medical Botany (3). An 

examination of medicinal plants 
including the biology, chemistry, and 
pharmacology of botanical remedies, 
and their effects on human health. 
Prerequisites: Economic Botany or 
BOT 58 1 6 or permission of instructor. 

BOX 5924 Workshop in Xropical 
Plant Families (3). An introduction to 
important spermatophyte families, in- 
cluding systematics, ecology, and con- 
servation. Includes laboratory and field 
experience. Prerequisite: Permission of 
the instructor. 

BOX 5925 Workshop in the Biology 
of Southern Florida's Native Xrees 
(3). Distribution, floristic relationships, 
morphology, reproductive biology, 
taxonomy, and conservation of trees 
native to southern Florida. Prereq- 
uisites: Local Flora BOT 3153, 
Tropical Botany BOT 3663, or 
permission of the instructor. 

BOX 5928 Workshop on Grasses and 
Sedges of Southern Florida (1). The 

systematics, ecology, and identification 
of South Florida grasses and sedges. 
Prerequisite: Graduate status or 
permission of the instructor. 



BOX 6275 Plant Breeding Systems 

(3). Ecology, evolution, genetics and 
development of plant breeding systems. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

BOX 6585C Plant Structure and 
Function (4). A quantitative assess- 
ment of plant architecture, morphology 
and anatomy in relationship to physi- 
ology, including the measurement of 
water relations, energy and gas ex- 
change. Prerequisites: Permission of 
the instructor and graduate status. 

BOX 6645 Workshop in Field and 
Laboratory Xechniques for Seagrass 
Ecology (1). Field and laboratory 
methods used in the study of seagrass 
communities. The course emphasizes 
ecological and physiological measure- 
ment methods. Prerequisite: Permission 
of the instructor. 

BOT 6724 Readings in Pollination 
Biology (1). Current literature on 
pollination, including natural history, 
theory, expenmental studies, and 
reviews. Prerequisite: Graduate status 
or permission of the instructor. 

BOX 6818 Readings in Ethnobotany 

(1). An examination of 3 or 4 recent 
books in the ethnobotany or related 
disciplines, especially those dealing 
with theoretical issues. Prerequisites: 
BOT 5816, Graduate Standing, or 
permission of instructor. 

BOT 6901 Readings in Plant Mating 

Systems (1). Current literature on 
theory, biology, and evolution of plant 
mating systems. Prerequisites: Grad- 
uate standing or Permission of the in- 
structor. 

BOX 6920 Workshop in Field 
Xechniques in Natural History of 
Insect/Plant Interactions (1). A 

workshop in the techniques for 
collecting and preserving plants and 
insects for biological and taxonomic 
research. 

BOX 6921 Workshop in Field 
Xechniques in Pollination Biology (1). 

Techniques to do a thorough study of 
the pollination biology of any 
flowering plant; basic methods and 
simple instruments for field obser- 
vations, measurements and manipula- 
tions. Prerequisite: Graduate status. 

BOX 6922 Workshop: Video Image 
Analysis in Biology (1). Workshop in 
the use of video image analysis in 
biological research. Prerequisites: 



84 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



Graduate status and Permission of the 
instructor. 

BOT 6923 Workshop: Techniques in 
Plant Reproductive Biology (I). 

Workshop in techniques for research 
on pollination and fertilization in 
plants. Histological and microscopic 
examination emphasized. Prerequisites: 
Graduate status and Permission of the 
instructor. 

BOT 6926C Worluhop in Plant 
Nutrient Analysis (1). Field and 
laboratory methods used in the 
assessment of nutrient availability for 
primary producers. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

BOT 6928 Workshop on Plant Gas 
Exchange and Fluorescence (1). Field 
and laboratory methods used for 
measurement of plant photosynthetic 
production and transportation. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of the instructor. 

BOT 6935 Advanced Topics in 
Botany (3). An intensive study of 
particular plant topics not otherwise 
offered in the curriculum. May be 
repeated for credit with different 
subject content. Prerequisite: Graduate 
status. 

BOT 6936 Readings in Plant/Animal 
Interactions (1). Current literature on 
coevolution of plants and animals, 
theory, experimental studies, and 
reviews. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

BSC 5215 Introduction to the 
Mechanics of Biological Systems (3). 
Mechanical principles are used to 
analyze the structure and function of 
plants and animals; especially the 
statics of bone systems, and support 
structures of plants. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

BSC 5302 Ecosystems of the Past (3). 
Analysis of local to global change in 
environments through time using 
faunal distributions, biodiversity, 
biogeography, physical and chemical 
properties of sediments, and stable 
isotopes. Prerequisite: Permission of 
the instructor. 

BSC 5345 Techniques in Scientiflc 
Diving (4). Planning and conducting 
safe scientific diving operations and 
research. Prerequisite: Civilian Diving 
Certificate (NAUI/PADl) or equivalent. 

BSC 5405C Environmental Instru- 
mentation (3). Theory and techniques 
for measurement of environmental 



parameters of interest to field biologist. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

BSC 5406 Forensic Biology (3). 
Forensic applications of molecular 
biology including PCR, STR 
techniques and other laboratory 
methods and data interpretation. 
Prerequisite: Graduate status. 

BSC 5409C Biology Laboratory 
Instrumentation for Secondary 
Teachers I (3). Principles and practice 
of selected instrumental techniques. 
Spectrophotometry, electrical measure- 
ments and separatory techniques. Not 
for BSC majors. Prerequisites: Three 
undergraduate credits in physics, three 
in chemistry, and six in biology. 

BSC 5416C Workshop in Cell 
Culture Methods and Applications 
(1). Utilization of primary and 
established cells to study growth cell 
cycle, chromosomes, cell differentian. 
Special applications to basic problems 
in cell molecular biology. Prereq- 
uisites; Permission of the instructor and 
graduate status. 

BSC 5606 Biological Systematics (3). 
Systems of nomenclature and contem- 
porary topics in classification, 
including molecular evidence, numer- 
ical methods and cladistics. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of the instructor. 

BSC 5926 Graduate Bioresource 
Workshop (1). This workshop is 
designed to introduce Biology graduate 
students to the various resources 
available for graduate teaching and 
research. Prerequisite: Graduate status. 

BSC 5927 Workshop: Hyper-spectral 
Remote Sensing in Biology (1). Basic 
understanding of principles, techniques 
and application of hyperspectral remote 
sensing of the Earth's natural 
environments. Prerequisites: Graduate 
Status or permission of Instructor. 

BSC 5928 Workshop: Vertebrate 
Animal Research (1). Reviews the 
ethical, legal and practical guidelines 
for conducting research with live 
vertebrate animals. Required for 
students capturing, handling or 
collecting vertebrate animals in the 
course of research or teaching. 
Prerequisite: Graduate status or 
permission of the instructor. 

BSC 5929 Workshop: Ecology of 
Shelled Protists (1). Sampling, 
preparation, and identification of 
diatoms and foraminifera from a 



freshwater to marine transect, and 
application of ecology to interpreting 
past ecosystems. Prerequisites: 

Permission of Instructor. 

BSC 5931 Thesis Proposal Seminar 

(1). Presentation of thesis proposal 
seminar. Permission of major professor 
required. 

BSC 5933 Current Topics in Tropical 
Biology (3). An intensive snidy of 
particular tropical biology topics not 
otherwise offered in the curriculum. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

BSC 5935, 6936 Topics in Biology 

(1-3). An intensive study of a particular 
topic or limited number of topics not 
otherwise offered in the curriculum. 
May be repeated for credit with 
different subject content. Prerequisite: 
Senior or graduate status. 

BSC 5936 Glaser Seminar: The 
Biology of Tomorrow (1). A series of 
lectures by an invited, internationally 
recognized authority in biological 
topics of current and future concern. 

BSC 5945 Supervised Teaching in 
Biology (1-2). Teaching in a biological 
discipline, under the supervision of 
departmental faculty. Prerequisite: 
Graduate status. 

BSC 5975 Thesis Defense Seminar 
(1). Presentation of thesis defense 
seminar. Permission of major professor 
required. Prerequisite: Thesis proposal 
seminar. 

BSC 6415 Animal Cells in Culture 
(3) BSC 6415L Animal Cells in 
Culture Lab (2). Biology of animal 
cells cultured in semi-synthetic media: 
cell nutrition growth, cell cycle 
analysis, cellular transformation and 
differentiation, heterokaryons and 
somatic cell genetics. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

BSC 6456C Microcomputer Use in 
Biology (1). Introduction to 
microcomputer operating environ- 
ments, the utility of microcomputers in 
biology, and computer interfacing to 
biological instrumentation. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of the instructor. 

BSC 6457 Introduction to Biological 
Research (3). Analysis of existing 
biological data and experimental 
design. Prerequisite: Graduate status. 

BSC 6926 Workshop in Biology (1- 

2). A short intensive treatment of a 
specialized research topic or technique. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 85 



Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

BSC 6948 Laboratory Visitation (1- 

2). Student visits to tliree laboratories 
to learn techniques and concepts 
applicable to M.S. or Ph.D. research. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

BSC 6971 Master's Thesis (1-12). 

Completion of thesis. Prerequisite: 
Permission of Major professor. 

BSC 7961 Dissertation Proposal 
Seminar (1). Presentation of doctoral 
dissertation proposal seminar. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of Major 
Professor required. 

BSC 7980 Ph.D. Dissertation (1-12). 

Completion of dissertation. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of Major Professor 
and Doctoral Candidacy. 

BSC 7982 Dissertation Defense 
Seminar (1). Presentation of doctoral 
dissertation defense seminar. Permis- 
sion of Major Professor required. 
Prerequisite: Dissertation Proposal 
Seminar. 

MCB 5114 Microbial Diversity (3) 
MCB 5114L Microbial Diversity 
Laboratory (1). Analysis of metabolic 
and morphological diversity in bacteria 
in the context of bacterial systematics. 
Prerequisites: General Microbiology 
MCB 3010 and Lab MCB 3010L and 
an additional course in microbiology or 
biochemistry. Corequisite: Concurrent 
registration of both lecture and lab 
courses. 

MCB 5315C Workshop: Prokaryotic 
Cloning (2). Description of molecular 
genetic methods for manipulation of 
prokaryotic DNA. Prerequisites: 

Genetics PCB 3513 and Biochemistry 
BCH 3033 or permission of instructor. 

MCB 5405 Biology of Photosynthetic 
Bacteria (3). MCB 5405L Biology of 
Photosynthetic Bacteria Lab (1). 

Study of the physiology and ecology of 
photosynthetic bacteria, including 
Blue-green algae (cyanobacteria), pur- 
ple and green bacteria, and Halo- 
bacteria. 

MCB S453L Workshop: Prokaryotic 
Cell Signaling (1). Covers chemical 
signals used by prokaryotes for cell-to- 
cell communications. Prerequisites: 
General Microbiology MCB 3010 or 
permission of instructor. 

MCB 5505 Virology (3) MCB 5505L 
Virology Lab (1). Principles and 



methods of study of bacterial, plant, 
and animal viruses. Molecular aspects 
of viral development, virus pathogens, 
and carcinogens. Prerequisites: General 
Biochemistry PCB 3033, Genetics PCB 
3063, and Organic Chemistry I CHM 
2210. 

MCB 5605 Microbial Ecology (3). 

Principles and applications of microbial 
interactions with the environment. 
Current research areas are emphasized. 
Prerequisite: Graduate Level Standing. 

MCB 6418 Bacterial Mineral Cyc- 
ling (3). Energy and metabolic pro- 
cesses; detrital food chains; carbon, ni- 
trogen, sulfiir and trace mineral cyc- 
ling; chemoautotrophy; global element 
cycles. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

MCB 6445 Microbial Biolumines- 

cence (3). Molecular mechanisms, 
physiology, genetics and ecology of 
bioluminescence in micro-organisms, 
particularly bacteria. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

MCB 6635 Marine Microbiology (3) 
MCB 6635L Marine Microbiology 
Lab (1). Physiological-ecological study 
of the distribution and biology of 
marine bacteria; diseases of marine 
animals; bacterial role in oceanic 
mineral cycling. Prerequisites: General 
Microbiology MCB 3010 & Lab MCB 
3010L and General Biochemistry BCH 
3033 & Lab BCH 3033L or Microbial 
Physiology MCB 4404 and Lab MCB 
4404L. 

MCB 6920 Luminescence Workshop 

(2). Bioluminescence and chemilum- 
inescent theory and methods applied to 
luminous bacteria and molecular 
biology. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
insructor. 

MCB 6935 Advanced Topics in 
Microbiology (3). An intensive study 
of particular microbiological topics not 
otherwise offered in the curriculum. 
May be repeated for credit with 
different subject content. Prerequisite: 
Graduate status. 

OCB 5575L Workshop: Aquatic 
Flow Cytometry (1). A practical 
introduction to theories and 
applications of flow cytometry in the 
analyses of aquatic microorganisms 
(bacteria, phytoplankton) and their 
physiology. Prerequisite: Instructor's 
permission. 

OCB 5634 Marine Ecology (3) OCB 
5634L Marine Ecology Lab (1). 



Review processes determining species 
distribution and abundance in marine 
ecosystems. Energy flow and trophic 
relationships examined. Prerequisite; 
Ecology PCB 3043. Corequisite: 
Concurrent registration of lecture with 
lab course. 

OCB 5670L Techniques in Biological 
Oceanography (1). A laboratory 
course designed to acquaint the student 
with biological sampling techniques at 
sea. Shipboard experience will be re- 
quired as part of the course. Prereq- 
uisites: Previous course in marine bio- 
logy and Permission of the instructor. 

PCB 5025L Molecular Biology 
Techniques Laboratory (3). Covers 
DNA and RNA extraction, digestion, 
electrophoresis, Southern analysis, 
RFLP analysis, PCR amplification, 
cloning and automated sequencing. 
Prerequisites: Graduate status or 
permission of instructor. 

PCB 5184 Workshop in Micro- 
technique (1). Laboratory techniques 
required for preparation of tissues for 
light microscopy/histological study. 
Prerequisite: Graduate status. 

PCB 5195 Histochemlstry/Micro- 
technique (3) PCB 519SL Histo- 
chemistry/ Microtechnique Lab (1). 

Chemistry and use of fixatives and 
dyes; histochemistry emphasizes proce- 
dures used in research and pathology 
labs including techniques for enzymes, 
protein, carbohydrate, nucleic acids and 
lipids. Prerequisite: General 

Biochemistry BCH 3033 or Cell 
Physiology PCB 3203. 

PCB 5215 Workshop in Histo— and 
Immunocyto — Chemistry (1). Labor- 
atory techniques for preparation of 
paraffin-embedded and frozen sections; 
selected procedures to demonstrate the 
fundamentals of histochemical and 
immunocytochem-ical labeling meth- 
ods. Prerequisite: Graduate status or 
permission of the instructor. 

PCB 5235 Current Topics in 
Comparative Immunology (1). A 

weekly seminar/discussion course 
consisting of research presentations by 
students, faculty and visiting scientists 
in the area of comparative 
immunology. It is recommended for 
students with a research interest in the 
comparative study of mamalian and 
nonmamalian species or using 
alternative animal models. Prereq- 
uisites: Permission of Instructor. 



86 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



PCB 5236 Immune Assessment (3). A 
review of the genetics and biochemistry 
of immune dysfunction with a focus on 
the methods used to evaluate adaptive 
and innate immunological function. 
Prerequisites: PCB 4233 or Permission 
of Instrcutor. 

PCB 5238 Marine Comparative Im- 
munology Worlcsliop (1). A workshop 
at the Keys Marine Lab to present 
general and unique research method- 
ologies associated with the immunol- 
ogy of marine animals. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

PCB 5259 Topics In Developmental 
Biology (3). Molecular and cellular 
mechanisms in the development of 
plants and animals. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

PCB 5307 Limnology (3) PCB 5307L 
Limnology (1). Chemical and physical 
properties of standing and flowing 
freshwater systems; ecophysiology and 
interactions of the fresh water flora and 
fauna in relation to abiotic factors; 
oligotrophic to eutrophic conditions. 

PCB 5327 Coastal Ecosystems and 
Modeling (3). Basics of ecology for 
coastal and wetland ecosystems. The 
theory and mechanisms of simulation 
modeling. Hands-on creation and 
application of computer models in 
ecological research. Prerequisites: 
Ecology PCB 3043 and Calculus 1 
MAC 23 1 1 or Permission of the 
instructor. 

PCB 5328 Spatial and Landscape 
Ecology (3). Ecological processes with 
spatial components, including 

neighborhood intercations, foraging, 
metapopulations, infectious diseases, 
invasive species, and habitat 
associations. Prerequisites: PCB 5423 
Advanced Ecology - Population and 
Community. Corequisite: PCB 5454 
Advanced Ecology - Community 
Ecosystems; MAC 23 1 1 Calculus. 

PCB 5356L Tropical Ecology Field 

Lab (3). Field course in Costa Rica 
with fieldwork in two or more diverse 
habitats (rainforest, and dry forest). 
Emphasis on diversity and interactions 
between species. Visits to selected sites 
of deforestation, conservation and 
restoration. 

PCB 5358 Everglades Research and 
Resources Management (3). Ap- 
plication of basic skills in ecology to 
contemporary issues in the Everglades 
area, with emphasis on the relation 
between research and management of 



wilderness, wildlife, vegetation, water 
and fire. Prerequisite: Ecology PCB 
3043 or Permission of the instructor. 

PCB 5376 Animal Physiological 
Ecology (3) PCB 5376L Animal 
Physiological Ecology Laboratory 
(1). Evolution-oriented approach to 
physiological adaptations of animals 
living in diverse environments. 
Considers the inter relationship 
between behavior, energetics, and 
integrative regulation of metabolism. 
Prerequisite: Ecology PCB 3043 and 
Biochemistry BCH 3033. Corequisite: 
Concurrent registration of lecture with 
lab course. 

PCB 5405 Biochemical Ecology (3). 

Principles of chemical communication 
between diverse organisms and the 
importance of a variety of allelocherri- 
icals in community structure. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of the instructor. 

PCB 5407 Workshop: Microelec- 
trodes in Microbial Ecology (1). Use 

of microelectrodes to measure chemical 
microenvironments and biological 
processes in natural samples. Hands-on 
experience with O2 and pH electrodes. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

PCB 5423 Advanced Ecology: 
Populations and Communities (3). 

Advanced analysis of population and 
community ecology. Prerequisites: 
Ecology PCB 3043 or Permission of 
the instructor or graduate status. 

PCB 5454 Advanced Ecology: 
Communities and Ecosystems (3). 

Advanced analysis of ecological 
principles pertaining to communities, 
ecosystems, and landscapes, with 
special emphasis on the South Florida 
and Caribbean region. Prerequisites: 
Ecology PCB 3043 or permission of 
the instructor or graduate status. 

PCB 5596 Workshop: In Situ 
Hybridization (1). Analysis of gene 
expression by in situ hybridization 
techniques using whole mount and 
crysectioned tissues. Prerequisite: 
Graduate status or permission of the 
instructor. 

PCB 5615 Molecular and Organ- 
ismal Evolution (3). The evolutionary 
relationships among nucleotides and 
proteins as well as the processes which 
yield these relationships. The possible 
molecular events leading to speciation. 
Prerequisites: Genetics PCB 3063 and 
General Biochemistry BCH 3033. 



PCB 5616 Applied Phylogenetics (3). 

Methods of phylogenetic analysis with 
a focus on pragmatic applications to 
ecological and evolutionary studies. 
Hands-on experience with current 
computer programs for phylogenetic 
analysis. Prerequisite: Graduate status 
or permission of the mstructor 

PCB 5665 Human Genetics (3) PCB 
5665L Human Genetics Lab (2). 

Principles and techniques in the 
analysis of humans and primates. 
Prerequisites: Genetics PCB 3063 and 
Lab PCB 3063L, or permission of the 
instructor. Corequisite: Concurrent 
registration of lecture with lab course. 

PCB 5676 Evolution and Develop- 
ment of Sex (3). The evolutionary 
explanations for the evolution of sexual 
reproduction and models of sexual 
differentiation. Prerequisites: Genetics 
PCB 3063 and Evolution PCB 4674 or 
Permission of the instructor. 

PCB 5677 Evolution and Develop- 
ment (3). The models and evidence for 
the interaction of development and 
evolution, using both plant and animal 
systems. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

PCB 5685 Population Genetics (3). 

Advanced analysis of gene and 
genotype frequencies in theoretical 
populations and analysis of real data. 
Linkage equilibrium, drift, migration 
and selection are a few of the topics 
covered. Prerequisite: Genetics (PCB 
3063). 

PCB 5686 Population Biology (3). 
PCB 5686L Population Biology Lab 

(1). Intrinsic properties of natural and 
theoretical populations and their dy- 
namics and interactions, and responses 
to disturbance. Includes field problems 
and computer exercises. Prerequisite: A 
course in genetics and evolution, or 
Permission of the instructor. Core- 
quisite: Concurrent registration of 
lecture with lab course. 

PCB 5687 Evolutionary Ecology (3). 
PCB 5687L Evolutionary Ecology 

Lab (1). Adaptations and interactions 
of plants and animals in natural and 
disturbed habitats. Prerequisite: 
Ecology PCB 3043. 

PCB 5785 Membrane Signal Trans- 
duction (3). Hormones and neuro- 
transmitters as extracellular mes- 
sengers. Membrane receptors and 
mechanisms of signal transduction: 
membrane channels and enzymes, 
direct linkage and G-protein linkage. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 87 



Second messengers. Prerequisites: 
General Biochemistry BCH 3033 or 
Cell Physiolog>PCB 3203. 

PCB 5786 Membrane Physiology- (3). 
Chemical and ph>-sical properties of the 
plasma membrane, its biosvuthesis and 
fiinctions in transport and signal 
transduction. Prerequisites: General 
PhN-sics I PHY 3048, General Phv^ics 
II PHY 3049 and General Biochemistr>- 
BCH 3033 or Cell PhysiologN- PCB 
3203. 

PCB 5835 Neurophysiolog\ (3) PCB 
5835L Neurophysiology (1). Com- 
parative neurophysiology; physico- 
chemical mechanisms of resting and 
action potentials; synaptic trans- 
mission; neural coding and integration; 
sensory-motor function and neuro- 
physiological basis of beha\ior. Pre- 
requisites: Biochemistry BCH 3033 or 
Cell Physiology PCB 3203, and 
Calculus i MAC 2311. 

PCB 5902 Readings in Stable Isotope 
Studies (1). Discussion of scientific 
papers published in the fields of 
isotope ecology and isotope biogeo- 
chemistrN'. Prerequisites: Graduate 
status or permission of the instructor. 

PCB 5934 Topics in Skeletal Muscle 
Physiologj' (4). Advanced discussion 
of some aspects of the biophysics, bio- 
chemistry and physiology of skeletal 
muscle contraction. Topics may vary 
fi-om year to year. Based on re\iew 
articles and research papers. Prereq- 
uisite: Human Systemic Ph>siolog>- I 
PCB 4733 or Human Physiology PCB 
3703 and Cell Physiology PCB 3203 or 
General Biochemisty BCH 3033. 

PCB 5938 Ecosystem Studies 
Seminar (3). Theor>' and practice of 
ecosystem analysis, based on discus- 
sion of current articles and books. 
Emphasis on using different approach- 
es to understand natural complexity, 
with case studies researched by stu- 
dents. Prerequisites: Ecology PCB 
3043 or permission of the instructor. 

PCB 6025 Molecular and Cellular 
Biologj' I (3). Protein structure, 
catalysis, kinetics, and molecular 
conformation, intermolecular forces; 
Prokaryotic recombination, 

transcription and translation, gene 
regulation and genome organization. 
Prerequisites: Graduate status. 

PCB 6027 Molecular and Cellular 
Biologj' II (3). Eukaryotic recom- 
bination, transcription, translation, 
gene regulation and genome organ- 



ization; Cellular components, cell 
structure, cell division, cell signaling, 
development, immonology and cancer. 
Prerequisites: Graduate status. 

PCB 6176C Biological Electron 
Microscopy (5). Pnnciples and tech- 
niques of transmission and scanning 
electron microscopy as applied to bio- 
logical materials. Lecture-laboratory 
combination, enrollment limited. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of the instructor. 

PCB 6236 Comparative Immunology 

(3). An analysis of the immune s>'steras 
and mechanisms of invertebrate and 
vertebrate animals. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of the instructor. 

PCB 6237 Immunogenetics (3). The 
impact of classical and molecular 
genetic analyses on our understanding 
of the immune response. Prerequisite: 
A course in Immunology and Genetics. 

PCB 6318 Readings in Marine 
Ecosystems Ecology (1). .\nal\-sis of 
current literature on theory, data and 
case studies of marine ecosystem 
ecology. Prerequisite: Graduate status 
or permission of the instructor. 

PCB 6345C Quantitative Field 
Ecologj' (6). Methodology in the 
description and analysis of populations 
and communities. Prerequisites: Per- 
mission of the instructor and 
Introductor>' Statistics II STA 3123. 

PCB 6526 Advanced Molecular 
Biolog\' (3). .Molecular genetics, 
controlling mechanisms, recombinant 
DNA, gene splicing and gene vector 
construction of viral, bacterial, plant 
and animal systems. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

PCB 6566 Chromosome Structure 
and Function (3). Smictural 
organization and function of the 
prokar>otic and eukarv'Otic chro- 
mosome: euchromatinlieterochroma- 
tin, replication, repair, DNA sequence 
organization and changes during 
differentiation and development Pre- 
requisite: Permission of the instructor. 

PCB 6617 Advanced Phylogenetics 
(3). Curtent Issues and methods in 
phylogenetics for adsanced students. 
Prerequisites: Applied phylogenetics 
PCB 5616 or Permission of Insnrictor. 

PCB 6786 Membrane Biophysics (3). 
The structure and function of cell 
membranes: ionic transport, passi^'e 
electrical properties, and excitation. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 



PCB 6926 Workshop Biology- 
Spatial .Analysis and CIS (1-2). 
Introduction to interpretation and 
quantitative analv-sis of spatial data, use 
of computer-based image processing 
and Geographic Information Systems 
as tools for research, application to 
South Florida landscapes. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

PCB 6933 Trends in Neurobiology 

(2). Cntical anal\"ses and discussions of 
selected research articles of current 
interests. Seminar format. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

PCB 6935 Advanced Topics in 
Genetics (3). .An intensive study of 
particular genetical topics not other- 
wise offered m the cumculum. May be 
repeated for credit with different 
subject content. Prerequisite: Graduate 
status. 

PCB 7235 Reproductive Immun- 
ology (3). Molecular and cellular 
interactions in early development, 
ontogenetics, and mother and fetus. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

PCB 7676 Evolution and Develop- 
ment of Sex (3). Models of sexual 
differentiation and reproduction treated 
in an evolutionary context. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

PCB 7689 .Advanced Topics in 
Population and Evolutionarv' Gene- 
tics (3). Companson of the synthetic 
and mutational dnft hvpotheses; 
relationships between molecular and 
phenotvpic evolutionary rates and the 
phenotypic effects of various forms of 
mutation. Prerequisite: Permission of 
the instructor. 

ZOO 5265 Biologj of Crustaceans 
(3). ZOO 5265L Biology of Crusta- 
ceans Laboratorv' (1). Morphologv', 
physiology, svstematics and evolution 
in crustaceans. 

ZOO 5371 Clinical Anatomy of the 
Trunk and Limbs (3). ZOO 5371L 
Clinical .\natomy of the Trunk and 
Limbs Lab (1). A detailed analv-sis of 
the anatomical foundations of 
kinesologv- and physical rehabilitation. 
Special emphasis will be placed on the 
functional anatomy of the trunk, 
pectoral and pelvic limbs with clinical 
cortelations to the major disorders 
commonly treated by phvsical and 
occupational therapists. Prerequisites: 
ZOO 3731 or ZOO 3734. Corequisite: 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



Clinical Anatomy of the Trunk and 
Limbs Lab. 

ZOO 5376 Animal Design and 
Movement (4). Basic biomechanical 
and behavioral theories of how animals 
feed and move. Prerequisites: General 
Biology I BSC 1010, and II BSC 
1011, Physics I PHY 2053 and II PHY 
2054. [D] 

ZOO 5424 Herpetology (3) ZOO 
5424L Herpetology Laboratory (1). 

Biology of amphibians and reptiles 
from a systematic perspective. The 
three orders of living amphibians and 
the six living orders of reptiles are 
covered in detail. Prerequisite: General 
Biology I BSC 1010 and General 
Biology II BSC 1011, Ecology PCB 
3043, or per-mission of the instructor. 
Corequisite: Concurrent registration of 
lecture with lab course. 

ZOO 5456 Ichthyology (3) ZOO 
5456L Ichthyology Lab (1). Sys- 
tematics, structure, function, ecology, 
and evolution of fishes. Prerequisites: 
General Biology I BSC 1010, General 
Biology II BSC 101 1 and Ecology PCB 
3043. Corequisite: Concurrent 
registration of lecture with lab course. 

ZOO 5479 Workshop in Field 
Ornithology: Mark and Recapture 
Methods (1). Instruction in techniques 
of banding wild birds, including their 
capture with mist nets, identificaiton in 
the hand, and maintenance of federally 
required records. Prerequisites: Orni- 
thology ZOO 4472 and Lab ZOO 
4472L or permission of the instructor. 

ZOO 5732 Advanced Anatomy 
Demonstration (1-4). Dissection and 
demonstration of the human body with 
the emphasis on structure and function. 
May be repeated to a maximum of eight 
credits. Prerequisite: Human Gross 
Anatonmy I ZOO 3733 and Lab ZOO 
3733L, Human Gross Anatomy II ZOO 
3734 and Lab ZOO 3734L or 
permission of the instructor. 

ZOO 5745 Advanced Neuroanatomy 
(3). In-depth knowledge of the 
embryonic development, structilre, and 
function of the human nervous system 
with a great deal of clinical 
consideration. Prerequisite: Neuro- 
science ZOO 4743 or permission of the 
instructor. 

ZOO 5746 Comparative Neurobiol- 
ogy (4). Structure and function of 
neural systems at many levels includ- 
ing biophysical and cellular mechan- 
isms, molecular processes, neural 



circuits, development, and anatomy. 
Prerequisite: Graduate status or permis- 
sion of the instructor. 

ZOO 6460 Workshop on Reptile and 
Amphibian Sampling (1). Biology and 
sampling methods for reptiles and 
amphibians. Prerequisite: Graduate 
status. 

ZOO 6935 Advanced Topics in 
Zoology (3). An intensive study of 
particular topics not otherwise offered 
in the curriculum. May be repeated for 
credit with different subject content. 
Prerequisite: Graduate status. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 89 



Chemistry 



Stanislaw F. Wnuk, Associate 

Professor and Chairperson 
Jose Almirall, Assistant Professor 
David Becker, Associate Professor 
Yong Cai, Assistant Professor 
David Cbatfield, Associate 

Professor 
Kenneth G. Furton, Professor and 

Associate Dean 
Piero R. Gardinali, Assistant 

Professor 
Arthur W. Herriott, Professor 

and Dean 
Rudolf Jaffe, Professor 
Jeffrey A. Joens, Professor 
Konstantinos Kavallieratos, Assistant 

Professor 
Leonard S. Keller, Professor, 

Undergraduate Program Director 

and Coordinator of Organic 

Chemistry Laboratories 
John T. Landrum, Professor 
Fenfei Leng, Assistant Professor 
Janet Lineback, Professor 
Ramon Lopez de la Vega, 

Associate Professor 
Kevin E. O'Shea, Associate 

Professor, Graduate Program 

Director 
J. Martin Quirke, Professor 
Kathleen Rein, Assistant Professor 
Stephen Winkle, Associate 

Professor 

Graduate Admission 
Requirements: 

A minimum undergraduate grade point 
average of 3.0/4.0 in chemistry and 
cognate science and GRE score of 1 000 
(verbal + quantitative) or greater are 
required except by special permission 
of the graduate committee. Students are 
also encouraged to take the GRE 
chemistry subject exam. Students 
whose native language is not English 
must score 550 or higher on the Test of 
English as a Foreign Language 
(TOEFL). 

Students whose undergraduate 
degree is not equivalent to the 
American Chemical Society certified 
Bachelor of Science degree in 
chemistry shall make up any 
deficiencies prior to taking graduate 
courses in the areas where such 
deficiencies exist. For example, 
students who have not completed 
quantum mechanics or instrumental 
analysis must complete Graduate 
Physical Chemistry (CHM 5425) and 
Graduate Analytical Methods (CHM 
5150). Students are required to make 



up deficiencies before they can be 
admitted into the Ph.D. program. 

Every student entering the graduate 
program in chemistry will be required 
to take two entrance/proficiency 
examinations covering standard 
undergraduate-level material in organic 
chemistry and physcial chemistry 
(thermodynamics and kinetics). The 
proficiency exams will be administered 
to incoming graduate students in the 
week preceding the fall and spring 
semesters. If a student does not receive 
a grade of "pass" on the organic 
chemistry proficiency exam, the student 
must show proficiency by completing 
Graduate Organic Chemistry (CHM 
5225) with a grade of "B" (3.0/4.0) or 
higher. If a student does not receive a 
grade of "pass" on the physical 
chemistry proficiency exam, the student 
must show proficiency by completing 
Graduate Physical Chemistry (CHM 
5425) with a grade of "B" (3.0/4.0) or 
higher. Students must show proficiency 
in these two areas by the end of their 
first semester, or they will be dismissed 
from the program. 

Full-time graduate students 
generally serve as a Teaching Assistant 
(TA) in the Department of Chemistry 
for their first semester. Ph.D. 
candidates must serve for not less than 
one year as a teaching assistant. This 
requirement will be waived only when, 
in the opinion of the department, 
unusual circumstances justify such 
action. TA's are awarded on a 
competitive basis, require a minimum 
cumulative GPA of 3.0, and are 
continued for up to two years for M.S. 
students and four years for Ph.D. 
students who maintain acceptable 
academic performance. Graduate 
students must maintain a 3.0/4.0 GPA 
(only courses required by the graduate 
program will be counted in the GPA). 
If the GPA drops below a 3.0 for one 
semester, the student will be placed on 
academic probation. A student who 
fails to raise his/her GPA to 3.0 or 
higher in two semesters will be 
dismissed from the program. 

A limited number of Graduate 
Research Assistantships (RA's) are 
available after the student's first 
semester and are awarded on a 
competitive basis by the individual 
faculty members who have externally 
fijnded research projects. 

Formal admission to the M.S. and 
Ph.D. programs and awards of teaching 
assistantships are granted by the 
Graduate Program Director based on a 



ranking of graduate applicants by the 
Graduate Committee. 

Master of Science in 
Chemistry 

The requirements for completion of the 
Master of Science degree are: 

1 . A minimum of 32 credits of 
course work, a grade of 'C or 
higher must be obtained in all 
courses with a cumulative grade 
point average of 3.0 or higher 
which must include: 
a) At least 9 credits of chemistry 
in at least three of the five 
major areas of chemistry 
(Analytical, Bio-chemistry, 
Inorganic, Organic, and 
Physical) as listed below: 
Analytical 
CHM 5156 Advanced 

Chromatography 
CHM 6157 Advanced Analytical 

Chemistry 
Biochemistry 

CHM 5506 Physical Biochemistry 
Inorganic 

CHM 5440 Kinetics and Catalysis 
CHM 5540 Group Theory in 

Chemistry 
CHM 5650 Physical Inorganic 

Chemistry 
Organic 

CHM 5250 Organic Synthesis 
CHM 5236 Spectroscopic 
Techniques and 
Structure Elucidation 
CHM 5260 Physical Organic 

Chemistry 
Physical 

CHM 5490 Physical Spectroscopy 
CHM 5540 Group Theory in 

Chemistry 
CHM 6430 Advanced 

Thermodynamics 
CHM 6461 Statistical 

Thermodynamics 
CHM 6480 Quantum Mechanics 
CHM 5423 Atmospheric Chemistry 
Courses not listed above may be 
counted as courses in one of the five 
areas with prior departmental approval, 
a) At least 9 credits of additional 
graduate-level chemistry courses 
(excluding research and seminar) 
approved by the thesis committee in 
consultation with the Graduate 
Program Director with the following 
guidelines: 
(1) The courses must be 5000 or 
6000 level chemistry courses 
(CHM prefixes) or approved 
cognates (up to a maximum of 
six credits) and 



90 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



(2) The following courses cannot 
count towards the 18 credits: 
Graduate Analytical Methods 
(CHM 5150); Graduate Organic 
Chemistry (CHM 5225) and 
Graduate Physical Chemistry 
(CHM 5425). 

c) Full time graduate students are 
required to register for one credit of 
CHM 6940 (Supervised Teaching) 
each semester they serve as teaching 
assistants. 

d) Full time graduate students are 
required to register for one credit of 
CHM 6935 (Graduate Seminar) or 
one credit of CHM 6936 (Chemistry 
Colloquium) each fall and spring 
semester. 

e) At least one credit of CHM 6936 
(Chemistry Colloquium) is required. 
Each student must give a seminar at 
the colloquium for a letter grade in 
their second semester of graduate 
study. 

f) At least nine credits of CHM 6970 
(Thesis Research) involving 
independent thesis research under 
the direction of a faculty member in 
the department. 

g) At least two credits of CHM 6971 
(Thesis) taken in the semester in 
which the MS thesis is to be 
defended. 

2. Submission and public presentation of 

a satisfactory research thesis as 

determined by the student's thesis 

committee. 

The thesis committee will consist of the 

research advisor, a randomly-chosen 

committee member chosen by the graduate 

program director, and at least one additional 

committee member who has some expertise 

in the graduate student's research area. 

Doctor of Philosophy in Chemistry 

The requirements for completion of the 
Doctor of Philosophy degree in chemistry 
are: 
1 . A minimum of ninety (90) credits of 
course work. A grade of "C" or higher 
must be obtained in all courses with a 
cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher. The 
courses must include: 

a) At least nine credits of chemistry 
courses in at least two of the five major 
areas of chemistry (Analytical, 
Biochemistry, Inorganic, Organic, and 
Physical) as listed below: 

Analytical 

CHM 5 1 56 Advanced Chromatograhy 
CHM 6157 Advanced Analytical 

Chemistry 
Biochemistry 
CHM 5506 Physical Biochemistry 



Inorgaaic 

CHM 5440 Kinetics and Catalysis 
CHM 5650 Physical Inorganic 

Chemistry 
Organic 

CHM 5250 Organic Synthesis 
CHM 5236 Spectroscopic 

Techniques & Structure 
Elucidation 
CHM 5260 Physical Organic 

Chemistry 
Physical 

CHM 5490 Physical Spectroscopy 
CHM 6430 Advanced 

Thermodynamics 
CHM 6461 Statistical Thermodynamics 
CHM 6480 Quantum Mechanics 
CHM 5423 Atmospheric Chemistry 
Courses not listed above may be 
counted in one of the five areas with 
prior departmental approval, 
b) At least nine credits of 
additional graduate-level chemistry 
courses (excluding research and 
seminar) approved by the thesis 
committee in consultation with the 
Graduate Program Director with the 
following guidelines: 

(1) The courses must be 5000 or 
6000 level chemistry courses (CHM 
prefixes) or approved cognates (up to 
a maximum of six credits) and 

(2) The following courses cannot 
count towards the eighteen credits 
(a) and (b): Graduate Analytical 
Methods (CHM 5150); Graduate 
Organic Chemistry (CHM 5225), 
and Graduate Physical Chemistry 
(CHM 5425). 

c) Full time graduate students 
are required to register for one credit 
of CHM 6940 (Supervised Teaching) 
each semester they serve as teaching 
assistants. 

d) Full time graduate students are 
required to register for one credit of 
CHM 6935 (Graduate Seminar) or 
one credit of CHM 6936 (Chemistry 
Colloquium) each fall and spring 
semester. 

e) At least two credits of CHM 
6936 (Chemistry Colloquium) is 
required. Each student must give a 
seminar at the colloquium for a 
letter grade in his/her second and 
fifth semester of graduate study. 

f) At least eight credits of CHM 
7910 (Dissertation Research) 
involving independent thesis 
research under the direction of a 
faculty member in the department. 

g) CHM 7980 (Ph.D. Dissertation) 
is taken in the semester in which 
the Ph.D. dissertation is to be 



defended. Prerequisite: Admission 
to candidacy. 

2. Satisfactory completion of a series 
of 3-hour cumulative examinations. 
The student will begin taking the 
cumulative examinations after complet- 
ing the proficiency requirements but no 
later than the beginning of the student's 
second semester. Five examinations 
will be given per year. The student 
must pass 4 out of 10 consecutively- 
offered exams for admission to 
candidacy. 

3. Submission, presentation, and 
satisfactory defense of an orginal 
research proposal and completion of a 
'PreOral' examination before the end 
of the fourth semester (excluding 
summers). The examination will be 
conducted by the dissertation 
committee and is based on the student's 
doctoral research and includes 
questions from the student's major field 
as well as minor and cognate fields. 

4. Submission and public 
presentation and defense of a 
satisfactory research disseration as 
determined by the dissertation 
committee. 

The requirements for an incoming 
student having either a Master's Degree 
or a Bachelor of Science degree are the 
same. Students having a M.S. in 
chemistry may transfer as many as 36 
credits towards their Ph.D. degree, 
however only 6 of those credits will 
count to fulfill requirement (1) (formal 
course work requirement). Students 
may transfer more than 6 course work 
credits with special permission of the 
graduate committee. The number of 
additional course work credits required 
by the graduate committee will depend 
on, among other things, the student's 
performance in course work, the date 
course work was completed, and the 
area of Ph.D. concentration chosen by 
the student. The graduate student's 
Ph.D. thesis committee will consist of 
the research advisor, a member from 
outside the department, a randomly- 
chosen committee member chosen by 
the graduate program director from the 
departmental research faculty, and at 
least two additional committee 
members who have some expertise in 
the graduate students research area. At 
least two members of the student's 
Ph.D. dissertation committee must be 
tenured in the Department of 
Chemistry. FlU courte'^y professors 
may serve as research supervisors and 
co-major professors on a student's 
dissertation committee. It is expected 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 91 



that a meaningful collaboration will be 
established between courtesy faculty 
serving as co-major professors and the 
major professor from within the 
department. The degree of 
collaboration and expectations 
including co-authorship on 

publications resulting from such 
collaborations must be agreed upon in 
the semester in which a graduate 
student chooses an advisor(s). 

Financial Support 

Full-time graduate students who are in 
good academic standing are eligible for 
financial support. Teaching and 
research assistantships are available on 
a competitive basis. Students may also 
apply for a waiver of both in-state and 
out-of-state tuition. Inquiries concern- 
ing application to the program and 
availability of financial support should 
be directed to the Chemistry Graduate 
Director. 

Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

CHM-Chemistry; CHS-Chemistry- 

Specialized; ISC-Interdisciplinary 

Natural Sciences; OCC-Oceanography- 

Chemical. 

F-Fall semester offering; S-Spring 

semester offering; SS-Summer semester 

offering. 

CHM 5138 Advanced Mass 
Spectrometry (3). Intensive 

examination of the processes and 
techniques involved in creating, 
controlling and measuring ionic species 
by mass spectrometry. Theory of mass 
spectrometry, methods of ionization, 
instrumental designs, quantitative mass 
spectrometry, meta-stable ions, and 
tandem mass spectrometry. 

Prerequisites: CHM 4130, CHM 4130L 
or Permission of Instructor. 

CHM 5150 Graduate Analytical 
Methods (3). Analysis of analytical 
data, electrochemistry, spectro-analyti- 
cal techniques, chromatography, survey 
of new analytical methods. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing or permission 
of the instructor. (S) 

CHM 5156 Advanced Chromatog- 
raphy (3). Intensive examination of the 
contemporary practice of chroma- 
tography including available chroma- 
tographic techniques, their selection 
and application. Prerequisite: CHM 
4130 or permission of the instructor. 

CHM 5165 Chemometrics and 
Sampling (3). Methods of evaluating 



analytical chemistry data. Plaiuiing 
sampling design for water, air and 
solids. Sample preparation and 
extraction techniques. Prerequisite: 
CHM 4130. 

CHM 5181 Special Topics in 
Analytical Chemistry (VAR). An 

intensive examination of one or more 
areas selected by instructor and 
students. Core course Prerequisite: 
CHM 4130 or permission of the 
instructor. 

CHM 5225 Graduate Organic 
Chemistry (3). Advanced topics in 
organic chemistry. Structure of organic 
molecules, reaction mechanisms, 
organic synthesis, and natural product 
chemistry. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or permission of the 
instructor. (F) 

CHM 5236 Spectroscopic Techni- 
ques and Structures Elucidation (3). 

Advanced techniques for the spectro- 
scopic identification of organic com- 
pounds. Interpretation of spectral 
information for determination of 
structures of various classes of organic 
compounds. Prerequisites: CHM 4220 
and CHM 4230L. 

CHM 5250 Organic Synthesis (3). 

Use of classical and modem reactions 
in the design and construction of 
complex organic molecules including 
natural products. Some topics covered 
will be construction reactions, 
refunctionalization, stereochemistry 
and conformational analysis. Prereq- 
uisite: CHM 4220 or permission of the 
instructor. 

CHM 5260 Physical Organic Chem- 
istry (3). A series of topics will be 
discussed including molecular orbital 
theory as it pertains to organic 
molecules, kinetic and thermodynamic 
approaches to the study of reaction 
mechanisms, quantitative approaches to 
conformational analysis, etc. Prereq- 
uisite: CHM 4220 and physical 
chemistry or permission of the 
instructor. 

CHM 5280 Natural Products Chem- 
istry and Biosynthesis (3). Studies of 
the chemical origins (biosynthesis), 
properties, and synthesis of the various 
classes of naturally occurring com- 
pounds: terpenes, steroids, alkaloids, 
acetogenins. Prerequisite: CHM 4220 
or permission of the instructor. 

CHM 5302 Organic Chemistry of 
Nucleic Acids (3). Organic chemistry 
of ribose sugars, nucleoside hetero- 



cyclic bases, mechanism-based inhibi- 
tors of enzymes involve in nucleic acid 
metabolism, and chemical synthesis of 
DNA. Prerequisite: CHM 4220 or per- 
mission of the instructor. 

CHM 5306 Special Topics in 
Biological Chemistry (3). Investiga- 
tion of one or more areas of 
biologically related chemistry. Prereq- 
uisites: CHM 4305 or permission of the 
instructor. 

CHM 5325 Physical Chemistry of 
Proteins (3). Protein structures, 
dynamics and functions. Use of 
spectroscopic methods. Thermo- 

dynamics of protein folding and Hgand 
binding. Enzyme Kinetics. Prereq- 
uisites: Biological Chemistry and 
Physical Chemistry or permission of 
instructor. 

CHM 5351 Computer Modeling of 
Biological Molecules (3). Introduces 
use of computers in studying biological 
macromolecules. Simulations, visual- 
ization methods, software, databases. 
Prerequisite: CHM 3411, Biochemistry 
recommended. 

CHM 5380 Special Topics in Organic 
Chemistry (VAR). An intensive 
examination of one or more areas 
selected by instructor and students. 
Prerequisite: CHM 4220 and physical 
chemistry or permission of the 
instructor. 

CHM 5423 Atmospheric Chemistry 

(3). Chemical processes in atmo- 
spheres. Photochemistry, chemical 
kinetics, tropospheric and stratospheric 
chemical reactions, anthropogenic 
effects on the earth's atmosphere and 
chemistry of planetary atmospheres. 
Prerequisite: CHM 3412, CHM 3411, 
or permission of the instructor. 

CHM 5425 Graduate Physical 
Chemistry (4). Prequantum physics, 
the Schrodinger equation and its 
solutions, atoms and molecules, 
rotational, vibrational, and electronic 
spectroscopy. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

CHM 5426 Graduate Physical 
Chemistry H (4). Gas laws; 
thermodynamics and equilibrium, 
electrochemistry, and chemical 
kinetics. Prerequisite: Graduate 

standing or permission of instructor. 

CHM 5440 Kinetics and Catalysis 
(3). Theory of elementary reactions, 
activated complex theory, mechanisms 



92 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



of complex reactions. Prerequisites: 
CHM 3411, MAP 3302. 

CHM 5490 Physical Spectroscopy 

(3). Introduction to atomic and 
molecular quantum states, selection 
rules, and fundamental principles of 
spectroscopy. Introduction to group 
theory and to the theory of UV/visible, 
infrared, Raman, microwave, nmr, 
photo-electron, and mass spectro- 
scopies, and the applications of these 
methods to the determination of 
fundamental physical properties and 
the structure of organic and inorganic 
molecules. Prerequisite: Physical 
Chemistry. 

CHM 5490L Physical Spectroscopy 

Lab (1). The theory of spectroscopy 
and the use of modem instrumentation 
to investigate molecular structure. 
Prerequisites: CHM 2211, 2211L. 
Corequisite: PHY 4604 or CHM 5490. 

CHM 5503 Physical Chemistry of 
Nucleic Acids (3). Physical chemistry 
of nucleic acids including spec- 
troscopic determination of structures of 
DNAs, RNAs, and DNA-protein 
complexes anf thermodynamic and 
kinetic studies of nucleic acid-ligand 
complexes and nucleic acid structures. 
Prerequisite; CHM 4305 or permission 
of the instructor. 

CHM 5506 Physical Biochemistry 

(3). Physical properties of bio- 
molecules, molecular conformation; 
thermodynamic, kinetic, and spectro- 
scopic properties of biomolecules. 
Prerequisites: CHM 4305 or 
permission of the instructor. 

CHM 5517 Solid State (3). Crystalline 
form of solids, lattice dynamics, metals, 
insulators, semiconductors, and 
dielectric materials. Prerequisite: CHM 
5490 or PHY 4604. 

CHM 5540 Group Theory In 
Chemistry (3). The fundamental 
Theory is developed with emphasis 
given to Representations. Specific 
applications covered, with emphasis on 
molecular orbital theory and 
spectroscopy. Prerequisite: Under- 
graduate Physical Chemistry. 

CHM 5581 Special Topics in Physical 
Chemistry (VAR). An intensive 
examination of one or more areas 
selected by instructor and students. 
Prerequisite: CHM 3411 or permission 
of the instructor. 

CHM 5650 Physical Inorganic 
Chemistry (3). Introduction to use of 



physical methods to determine the 
structure of inorganic compounds. 
Prerequisite: CHM 4610 or permission 
of the instructor. 

CHM 5681 Special Topics in 
Inorganic Chemistry (VAR). An 
intensive examination of one or more 
areas selected by instructor and 
students. Prerequisite: CHM 4610 or 
permission of the instructor. 

CHM 5765 Aquatic Chemistry (3). 

Redox chemistry, chemistry of 
sediments, organic biogeochemistry, 
chemodynamics, and fates or organic 
pollutants in aqueous environments. 
Prerequisites: CHM 2211, CHM 4130, 
or permission of the instructor. 

CHM 5931 Special Topics (3). A 

course covering selected special topics 
in chemistry. 

CHM 5932 Special Topics (3). A 

course covering selected special topics 
in chemistry. 

CHM 5936 Special Topics in 
Environmental Chemistry (3). An 
intensive examination of one or more 
areas selected by the instructor and 
students. Prerequisite: Permission of 
the instructor. 

CHM 5XXX Asymmetric Synthesis 

(3). Recent advances in asymmetric 
synthesis for the selective design and 
construction of tetrahedral stereo- 
centers. Focus on principles of 
configuration in transition state 
assemblies. Prerequisite: CHM 4220. 

CHM 5XXX Organometallic 

Chemistry (3). Fundamentals and 
applications of organometallic 
chemistry. Structures and bonding, 
ligans types, organometallic reactions, 
physical methods of characterization. 
Prerequisites: CHM 4610, CHM 3411 . 

CHM 6157 Advanced Analytical 
Chemistry (3). Modem analytical 
methods, applications, and instru- 
mentation. Topics include spectro- 
scopy, chromatography, electrochem- 
istry, optimization theory, and com- 
puterized instrumentation. Prerequisite: 
CHM 4130 or permission of the 
instructor. 

CHM 6166 Hyphenated Analytical 
Techniques (3). Covers hyphenated 
analytical techniques required for the 
analysis of trace elements and organic 
compounds in environmental and 
biomedical sciences. Prerequisite: 
CHM 41 30 or equivalent. 



CHM 6281 Environmental Organic 
Chemistry (3). Characteristics, origin, 
fate and transformation of organic 
compounds in air, water, sediments and 
biota. Prerequisites: CHM 2211, CHM 
34 1 1 , or permission of the instructor. 

CHM 6340 Organic Geochemistry 

(3). Organic geochemistry of recent and 
ancient environments. Characteristics, 
origin, and transformation of organic 
matter in the geosphere, including 
formation of crude oil. Prerequisites: 
CHM 2211, CHM 3411, CHM 4130, 
GLY 1010, or permission of the 
instructor. 

CHM 6382 Advanced Biological 
Chemistry (3). In depth exploration of 
one or more biological chemistry areas, 
for example, use of multinuclear NMR 
in examining nuclear acids and 
proteins; biosynthesis of toxins, roles 
of porphyrins. Topics covered vary 
with instructor. Prerequisites: 

Biological Chemistry and Physical 
Chemistry or permission of instructor. 

CHM 6430 Advanced Thermo- 
dynamics (3). The laws of classical 
thermodynamics and their application. 
Open and closed systems, irreversible 
processes, high and low temperature 
systems, solids, liquids, and gases. 
Core course. Prerequisite: CHM 3411 
or permission of the instructor. 

CHM 6449 Photochemistry (3). 
Fundamentals of photochemistry. 
Excited states, energy, and electron 
transfer processes, photo-oxidation, 
reactive species, and environmental 
photochemistry. Prerequisites: CHM 
4220 or permission of the instructor. 

CHM 6461 Statistical Thermo 
dynamics (3). Principles of statistical 
thermodynamics. Ensembles, classical 
and quantum statistics, ideal and non- 
ideal gases, equilibrium, crystals, 
liquids, and polymers. Prerequisite: 
CHM 3411 or permission of the 
instructor. 

CHM 6480 Quantum Mechanics (3). 

Introduction to quantum mechanics. 
The Schrodinger equation and its 
solutions, approximation methods, 
spin, symmetry, structure of atoms and 
molecules. Prerequisite: CHM 3411 or 
permission of the instructor. 

CHM 651 1 Polymer Chemistry (3). A 

quantitative study of polymers. 
Mechanism of formation, configuration 
of polymer chains, and the relationship 
between physical properties and 
chemical constitution. Prerequisite: 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 93 



CHM 3411 or permission of the 
instructor. 

CHM 6621 Inorganic Reaction 
Mechanisms (3). Review of kinetics 
and determination of mechanism. Study 
of mechanism of reactions of 
coordination complexes including, 
electron transfer reactions, ligand 
substitution reactions, coordinated 
ligand reactions of importance in 
homogeneous catalysis. Prerequisite: 
Physical Chemistry I (Kinetics). 

CHM 6624 Coordination Chemistry 
(3). Electronic structure of metals and 
transition metal complexes; redox 
reactions; introduction to organo- 
metallic and Bioinorganic Chemistry. 
Symmetry and group theory applied to 
Transition Metal Complexes. Physical 
methods in Inorganic Chemistry. 
Prerequisite: CHM 3410 Physical 
Chemistry (Kinetics), CHM 3411 
Physical Chemistry II (Quantum 
Mechanics). 

CHM 6905 Independent Study in 
Chemistry (1-6). Independent study 
and problems in an area of chemistry, 
under faculty supervision. May be 
repeated. Prerequisite: Permission of 
the instructor. 

CHM 691 OL Graduate Research in 
Chemistry (VAR). The student works 
directly with a professor on a research 
project. Credit is assigned on the basis 
of four hr/wk per credit hour. Results to 
be presented as a seminar. Permission 
of the instructor. 

CHM 6935 Graduate Seminar (1). 

An examination of various current 
research topics in chemistry. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

CHM 6936 Chemistry Colloquium 
(1). Analysis of current developments 
and topics presented by faculty 
members and registered students. 
Prerequisite: Admission to graduate 
program in chemistry. 

CHM 6940 Supervised Teaching (1- 

3). Graduate student serves as lecturer 
and demonstrator in undergraduate 
laboratories coordinated and supervised 
by a faculty member. May be repeated. 
A maximum of three hours may apply 
to the Master's degree. Prerequisite: 
Full graduate standing. 

CHM 6949 Industrial Internship (3). 
A semester of supervised work in an 
outside laboratory. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of the instructor. 



CHM 6970 Thesis Research (1-10). 

Research toward completion of 
Master's Thesis. Repeatable. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of Department. 

CHM 6971 Master's Thesis (1-6). 

Completion of thesis. Prerequisite: 
Permission of major professor. 

CHM 7910 Dissertation Research (1- 
10). Research towards the completion 
of a doctoral dissertation. Repeatable. 
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. 

CHM 7980 Ph.D. Dissertation (1-12) 

Completion of doctoral dissertation. 
Prerequisite: Permission of Major 
Professor and Doctoral Candidacy. 
May be repeated. 

CHS 5502 Forensic Chemistry for 
Teachers (3). Incorporates concepts 
and techniques from the application of 
analytical chemistry, molecular 
biology, biochemistry, toxicology, and 
microscopy to forensic casework. 
Exposure to teaching resources in these 
areas and case study format of 
presentation. Open to education majors 
only. Prerequisites: CHM 3120, CHM 
3120L, CHM 2211, and CHM 221 IL 
or permission of instructor. 

CHS 5531 Forensic Analysis (3). 

Advanced topics on the role that 
physical evidence plays in their 
criminal justice system. Topics include 
crime scene methods, laboratory 
management and the legal framework 
as it relates towards physical evidence. 
Prerequisites: CHM 3120, CHM 
3I20L, CHM 2211, CHM 221 IL, or 
permission of the instructor. (Does not 
count towards chemistry elective 
requirement). 

CHS 553 IL Forensic Analysis Lab 
(1). Laboratory to accompany Forensic 
Analysis CHS 5531. Prerequisites: 
CHM 3120, CHM 3120L, CHM 2211, 
CHM 221 1 L or permission of the 
instructor. 

CHS 5538C Chemistry and Analysis 
of Drugs (3). Introduction to the 
chemistry of drugs of abuse, including 
reactivity, synthesis and the principles 
of analysis from solid doses and from 
body fluids. Laboratory analysis 
through the determination of unknown 
samples. Prerequisites: Instrumental 
Analysis, Biological Chemistry I. 

CHS 5539 Forensic Toxicology (3). 

Provides the basic concepts of forensic 
toxicology as it applies to drug and 
body fluid analysis. Prerequisites: 
CHM 221 1 +L, CHM 3120+L, CHM 



4305+L (BCH 3033+L) or permission 
of instructor. 

CHS 5542 Forensic Chemistry (3). 

Advanced Analytical methods in 
Forensic Chemistry for application to 
the analysis of controlled substances, 
materials (ie., paint, glass, and fibers), 
flammable and explosives residues with 
an emphasis on new methods and 
method development. 

CHS 5545 Chemistry and Analysis of 
Explosives (3). Chemistry and 
reactivity, including thermochemistry, 
of modem industrial and military 
explosives with an emphasis on the 
analysis of explosives residues from 
post-blast debris and from samples of 
environmental interest. Prerequisite: 
Instrumental Analysis. 

CHS 6946 Graduate Forensic 
Internship (1-6). Internship in an 
operational forensic laboratory, 
confributing in a specific manner on an 
assigned research project. Six hours a 
week minimum residence time per 
credit in the lab under the supervision 
of a host lab scientist and a faculty 
member is required. A final written 
report and presentation required. 
Prerequisites: Core courses in Forensic 
M.S. Program. 

CHS 6XXX Independent Study in 
Forensic Science (1-6). Independent 
study and problems in an area of 
forensic science under faculty 
supervision. Prerequisite: Permission 
of instructor. 



94 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



School of Computer 
Science 

Yi Deng, Associate Professor and 
Director 

Bill Kraynek, Associate Professor and 
Associate Director 

Walid Akache, Instructor 

David Barton, Professor 

Toby S. Berk, Professor 

Shu-Ching Chen, Assistant Professor 

Timothy Downey, Instructor 

Raimund Ege, Associate Professor 
and Graduate Program Director 

Mbola Fanomezantsoa, Instructor 

Xudong He, Associate Professor 

Kip Irvine, Instructor 

Masoud Milani, Associate Professor 
and Director of the Information 
Technology Program 

Giri Narasimhan, Associate Professor 

Jainendra K. Navlakha, Professor 

Ana Pasztor, Professor 

Alexander Pelin, Associate Professor 

Norman Pestaina, Instructor 

Nagarajan Prabakar, Associate 
Professor 

Naphtali Rishe, Professor 

Greg Shaw, Instructor 

Geoffrey Smith, Associate Professor 

Joslyn Smith, Instructor 
Wei Sun, Associate Professor 
Mark A. Weiss, Professor 
The School of Computer Science offers 
both a Masters of Science degree and a 
Doctor of Philosophy degree. The 
Master of Science degree provides 
study in state-of-the-art computer 
applications as well as an introduction 
to the theoretical foundations of 
computer science. The Doctor of 
Philosophy in Computer Science is 
designed to provide study in all major 
areas of computer science while leading 
to the frontiers of knowledge in a 
chosen field of concentration. 

Master of Science in 
Computer Science 

Admission 

The following are in addition to the 
University's graduate admission 
requirements. 

1. A Bachelor's Degree in Computer 
Science or equivalent degree in a 
related field from an accredited 
university or college as judged by the 
School's Graduate Committee. 

2. 'B' average or better in all course 
work attempted while registered as an 
upper-division student in the 
Bachelor's degree. 



3. Acceptable courses in Calculus 
and Statistics. 

4. ORE (general test), scores of at 
least 1650 combined on the verbal, 
quantitative, and analytical portions. 
The TOEFL scores must be at least 
550. Both ORE and TOEFL must have 
been taken within the past five years. 

5. Three letters of recommendation 
from persons in a position to judge the 
applicant's potential success in 
graduate study. 

6. Approval of the Graduate 
Committee. 

Required Courses 

The following 4 courses are required 
and must be completed with a grade of 
"B" or higher: 

CEN5011 Software Engineering 3 
COP 66 1 1 Advanced Operating 

Systems 3 

COT 5420 Theory of 

Computation I 3 

COT 6405 Analysis of Algorithms 3 
In addition, the student must take 
four graduate courses (12 credit hours) 
in the School of Computer Science. 
The program requires a "B" average or 
higher and a grade of "C" or higher in 
each course. A maximum of two 
courses may be fransferred into the 
program from outside the University, 
subject to the approval of the Graduate 
Committee. 

In addition, the student must satisfy 
one of the following two options: 

Thesis Option 

CIS 6970 Thesis 6 

After completion of the other 
required courses, the student must 
conduct a research thesis. The topic 
must first be approved by the faculty 
member who will supervise the 
research and then by the Thesis 
Committee. The thesis will be accepted 
only after being read and approved by a 
Thesis Committee. An oral defense is 
required before the Thesis Committee. 
Non-Thesis Option 

Additional Course Work 6 

The student is required to take two 
more graduate courses (6 credit hours) 
in the School of Computer Science. 

Doctor of Philosophy in 
Computer Science 

The requirements for admission to the 
doctoral program in Computer Science 
are: 

1. A baccalaureate or master's 
degree in Computer Science, or 
equivalent degree in a related field as 



judged by the School's Graduate 
Committee. 

2. Present a minimum of a 'B' 
average on all upper division work and 
acceptable courses in Calculus and 
Statistics. 

3. GRE scores of at least 1650 
combined on the verbal, quantitative 
and analytical portions. The TOEFL 
must be at least 550. The GRE and 
TOEFL must have been taken within 
the past five years. 

4. Three letters of recommendation 
from persons in a position to judge the 
applicant's potential for advanced 
graduate study in computer science. 

5. Approval of the School of Com- 
puter Science Graduate Committee. 

A maximum of 36 computer science 
related graduate semester hours earned 
elsewhere as a graduate degree seeking 
student may be fransferred to FIU. 

Required Courses 

All students must complete the 
following courses and receive a grade 
of 'B' or higher in each. 
CEN 501 1 Software Engineering 3 
CEN6501 Distributed Processing 3 
COP 5621 Compiler 

Construction 3 

COP 6545 Advanced Topics in 

Database Management 3 
COP 6611 Advanced Operating 

Systems 3 

COT 5420 Theory of 

Computation I 3 

COT 6405 Analysis of 

Algorithms 3 

COT 6421 Theory of 

Computation II 3 

In addition, all students: 

1. Must successfiilly pass a 
Qualifying Examination based on the 
student's course work. 

2. Must take at least 18 hours of 
graduate elective courses approved by 
the Graduate Committee. 

3. Must write a dissertation on their 
research and successfiilly defend it 
orally. 

4. Must take, in total, 90 credits 
beyond the B.S. This includes at least 
24 dissertation credits at FIU. 

5. Must spend at least one academic 
year in full-time residence. Normally, 
this will be after passing the Qualifying 
Examination. 

For additional information and for 
specific rules and regulations relating 
to the graduate program, please refer to 
the web site, 

(http://www.cs.fiu.edu/grad) or write 
to: 

Graduate Program Director 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 95 



School of Computer Science 
Florida International University 
University Park 
Miami, Florida 33 199 

Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

CAP-Computer Applications; CDA- 
Computer Design;' Architecture; CIS- 
Computer Information Systems; CGS- 
Computer General Studies; COC- 
Computer Concepts; COP-Computer 
Programming; COT-Compuring 
Theory; 

F-Fall semester offering; S-Spnng 
semester offenng; SS-Summer semester 
offering. 

CAP 5602 Introduction to Artificial 
Intelligence (3). Presents the basic 
concepts of Al and their applications to 
game playing, problem sohnng. 
automated reasoning, natural language 
processing and expert systems. 
Prerequisite: COP 3530. (F) 

CDA 6939 Special Topics: Advanced 
Topics in Computer Architecture (3). 

This course deals with selected special 
topics in computer architecture. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. (F, odd years) 

CEN 5011 Soft\^are Engineering (3). 

This course deals with the design of 
large scale computer programs. 
Included are topics dealing with plan- 
ning design, implementation, valida- 
tion, metrics, and the management of 
such software projects. Prerequisite: 
CEN4010. (F, S) 

CEN 5120 Expert Systems (3). 

Introduction to expert systems, knowl- 
edge representation techniques and 
construction of expert systems. A 
project such as the implementation of 
an expert system m a high level AI- 
language is required. Prerequisite: COP 
3530 or Permission of the instructor. 
(S) 

CEN 6501 Distributed Processing (3). 
Study of distnbuted systems and 
equipment using data communications 
facilities. Analysis of system archi- 
tecture, hardware, and software for 
system design. System integrity and 
performance issues and techniques are 
examined. Prerequisites: COP 6611, 
CEN 4500 and STA 6807. (F) 

CEN 6502 Advanced Topics in 
Concurrent and Distributed Systems 
(3). Study of the major aspects of 
concurrent and distributed systems. 
Topics include foundations of con- 



current computation, languages and 
tools for concurrent systems, distrib- 
uted real-rime systems, distributed 
multimedia systems, and concurrent 
object-onented systems. (S, even years) 

CGS 6834 Programming for the Web 
(3). Installation and maintenance of 
servers. Techniques for building 
secure multimedia interacti\e web 
pages. A hands-on project to develop 
an educational interactive multimedia 
web site is required. Not acceptable for 
Computer Science majors. 

CIS 5900 Independent Study (1-10). 

Individual conferences, assigned read- 
ings, and reports on independent inves- 
tigations. Prerequisite: Permission of 
Department. 

CIS 5910 Project Research (1-6). 

Advanced undergraduate or master's 
level research for particular projects. 
Repeatable. Prerequisite: Permission of 
Department. 

CIS 5931 Special Topics (V'AR). A 
course designed to give groups of 
students an opportunity to pursue 
special studies not otherwise offered. 

CIS 6612 Special Topics: Advanced 
Topics in Software Engineering (3). 

This course deals with selected topics 
in software engineering. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. (S, odd 
years) 

CIS 6931 Special Topics: Advanced 
Topics in Information Processing (3). 
This course deals with selected special 
topics in information processing. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of the instructor. 
(S, odd years) 

CIS 6970 Thesis (1-10). Prerequisite: 
Completion of all other requirements 
for the M.S. Degree in Computer 
Science. 

CIS 7910 Graduate Research (1-25). 

Doctoral research pnor to candidacy. 
Repeatable. Prerequisite: Permission of 
Department. 

CIS 7980 Ph.D. Dissertation (1-10). 

Prerequisite: Permission of Major 
Professor and Doctoral Candidacy. 

COP 5621 Compiler Construction 

(3). Basic techniques of compilation; 
scanning; grammars and LL and LR 
parsing, code generation; symbol table 
management; optimization. Prerequi- 
sites: MAD 3512 and CEN 4010. (F) 

COP 5949 Cooperative Education in 
Computer Science (1-3). One semester 
of fiill-time work, or equivalent, in an 



outside organization, limited to 
students admitted to the CO-OP 
program. A written report and 
supervision evaluation is required of 
each student. Prerequisite: Graduate 
Standing. 

COP 6007 Computer Programming 
Concepts (3). For non-computer 
science graduate students. Concepts of 
object oriented programming, intro- 
duction to an object oriented 
programming language; internet 
programming; applications of program- 
ming to learning technologies. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

COP 6545 Advanced Topics in 
Database Management (3). Archi- 
tecture and implementadon aspects of 
DBMS; Distributed databases; Sem- 
antic models; advanced database 
languages, including Prolog-like lang- 
uages; Semantic aspects of databases; 
Database machines. Prerequisite: COP 
4540. (F,S) 

COP 6556 Semantics of Program- 
ming Languages (3). This course 
provides an overview of systematic and 
effective approaches to programming. 
Abstraction; formal specification tech- 
niques; program verification and; 
semantics of programming languages. 
Prerequisite: COT 5420. (S, even 
years) 

COP 6611 Advanced Operating 
Systems (3). Topics in operating 
system design: concurrent scheduling, 
secunty and protection, virtualizable 
architectures and monitors. Prerequi- 
site: COP 4610. (F, S) 

COT 5420 Theory of Computation I 

(3). Abstract models of computation; 
including finite automata, regular 
expressions, context-free grammars, 
pushdown automata, Turing machines. 
Decidability and undecidability of 
computational problems. Prerequisite: 
MAD3512. (F, S) 

COT 6405 Analysis of Algorithms 

(3). Complexity behavior of algorithms 
IS described for Set Manipulation, 
Graph Theory, and Matnx Manipula- 
tion problems, among others. P and NP 
classes of problems reveal an inherent 
difficulty in designing efficient 
algorithms. Prerequisite: COP 3530. (F, 
S) 

COT 6421 Theory of Computation II 
(3). Venfication of program correct- 
ness; program schemes; fixed-point 
theory of programs; resolution and 



96 College of Arts and Sciences ^ Graduate Catalog 

theorem proving. Prerequisite: COT 
5420. (S) 

COT 6930 Special Topics: Advanced 
Topics in Theory (3). This course 
deals with selected special topics in 
computing theory. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of the instructor. (S, even 
years) 

COT 6931 Topics in Cognitive 
Science (3). A "top-down" view of 
Computer Science, in particular 
artificial intelligence, by studying the 
computational aspects of human 
cognition. Prerequisites: COT 5420, 
COT 6421 or Permission of the 
instructor. (S, odd years) 

COT 6936 Topics in Algorithms (3). 

Advanced data structures, pattern 
matching algorithms, file compression, 
cryptography, computational geometry, 
numerical algorithms, combinational 
optimization algorithms and additional 
topics. Prerequisite: COP 3530. (F, 
even years) 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 97 



Crearive Writing 

Donald Watson, Professor and 

Chairperson 
Les Standiford, Professor and 

Director. Creative Writing 
Lynne Barrett, Professor 
John Dufresne, Professor 
Denise Duhamel, Assistant Professor 
James W. Hall, Professor 
Campbell McGrath, Professor 
Dan Wakefield, Writer in Residence 

Master of Fine Arts in 
Creative Writing 

The Master of Fine Arts in Creative 
Writing is the terminal degree for the 
practicing writer, designed to qualify 
the recipient to teach creative writing 
on the collegiate and university level. 
The program is housed at the Biscayne 
Bay Campus. Writers enjoy the 
opportunity for editorial experience 
with Gulf Stream magazine, the annual 
FIU literary Awards competition, the 
FIU Writers Workshop at Seaside, the 
Miami Book Fair, and the Writers on 
the Bay Senes, which has included 
residencies by such writers as Gay 
Talese, Robert Pinsky, Carolyn Forche, 
Louis Simpson, John Wideman, 
Elmore Leonard, James Crumley, Luisa 
Valenzuela, Tony Hillerman, and 
Henry Taylor. Such major writers as 
Maxine Kumin, James Jones, Pete 
Hamill and George Garrett have served 
on the regular faculty. 

Admission Requirements 

Applicants must have a baccalaureate 
degree, a 3.0 GPA or a 1000 combined 
score on the GRE, and a minimum of 
nine semester hours of undergraduate 
work in creative writing. However, 
admission is based primarily on the 
s&ength of the applicant's submitted 
writing sample. Deadline is January 15. 

Degree Requirements 

Forty eight semester hours are required 
in studio/academic curriculum, with a 
minimum in each area as follows: 
Literature 1 5 

Writing Workshop (both poetr>' and 
fiction required) 1 8 

Form and Theory 3 

Thesis 6 

There is no foreign language 
requirement. Graduate workshops 
include short fiction, the novel, popular 
fiction, screenwnting, crearive non- 
fiction, and poetry. The program places 
emphasis on the preparation and com- 
pletion of a book-length creative thesis. 



Candidates must pass a final 
defense/examination. 

Fellowships, teaching assistantships, 
and tuition remission scholarships are 
available on a competiti\'e basis. 

Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

CRW-Creative Wnring; ENG-English. 
CRW 5130 Advanced Fiction Work- 
shop (5). Practice in the techniques and 
analysis of fiction through the reading, 
discussion, and revision of student 
manuscripts in a workshop setting. May 
be repeated. Prerequisite: 9 hours 
undergraduate CRW course work. 

CRW 5331 Advanced Poetry 
Workshop (5). Practice in the tech- 
niques and analysis of poetry through 
the reading, discussion, and re\ision of 
student manuscripts in a workshop 
setting. May be repeated. Prerequisite: 
9 hours undergraduate CRW course 
work. 

CRW 5620 Advanced Screenwnting 
Workshop (5). Practice in the tech- 
niques and analysis of screen-writing 
through the reading, discussion, and 
revision of student manuscripts in a 
workshop setting. May be repeated. 
Prerequisite: 9 hours undergraduate 
CRW course work. 

CRW 5934 Special Topics in Crea- 
tive Writing (1-5). A course designed 
to give students an opportunity to 
pursue special studies in aspects of 
creative writing not otherwise offered. 
May be repeated. Prerequisites: CRW 
2001 and three hours of CRW on the 
3000/4000 level. 

CRW 5935 Special Topics in Crea- 
tive Writing (1-5). Gives students an 
opportunity to pursue special studies in 
aspects of creative writing not 
otherwise offered. May be repeated. 
Prerequisites: CRW 2001 and three 
hours of CRW on the 3000/4000 level. 

CRW 5940 Advanced Independent 
Study in Creative Writing (1-5). 
Development and completion of a 
graduate le\el independent project in 
creative wnting undertaken with the 
consent of the insttnactor. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing and instructor 
permission. 

CRW 6806 Teaching Creative 
Writing (3). The course will prepare 
graduate students (and teachers from 
secondary schools and community 
colleges) to teach inttoductory classes 
and workshops in Creative Writing. 



Students will observe and participate in 
the departtnent's CRW 2001 courses. 
Prerequisites: CRW 3111, 3311, or 
graduate standing, or permission of 

instructor. 

CRW 6971 Creative Writing Thesis 

(3). Research and writing for the 
crearive writing thesis. May be 
repeated. Prerequisite: 12 hours gradu- 
ate CRW course work. 

CRW 6972 Creati\e Thesis Contin- 
uance (1). Further guidance and 
direction for creative writing MFA 
candidates who have completed the two 
semester intensive sequence in CRW 
6971. May be repeated. 

ENG 5058 Form and Theory of 
Contemporan.' Literature (3). Vari- 
ous approaches and theones of practice 
in the major genres of imaginative 
writing, including development and 
articulation of the crearive aesthetic. 
May be repeated. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of the instructor. 



98 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



Earth Sciences 

Rosemary Hickey- Vargas, Professor 

and Chairperson 
William Anderson, Assistant 

Professor 
Bradford Clement, Professor 
Laurel Collins, Associate Professor 
Granville Draper, Professor 
Michael Gross, Associate Professor 
Stephen Haggerty, Visiting Professor 
Jose Longoria, Professor 
Andrew Macfarlane, Associate 

Professor 
Florentin Maurrasse, Professor 
Ren6 Price, Assistant Professor 
Edward Robinson, Research 

Associate 
Surendra Saxena, Professor 
Gautam Sen, Professor 
Neptune Srimal, Visiting Assistant 

Professor 
Dean Whitman, Associate Professor 
The department offers the Master of 
Science Degree and Doctor of 
Philosophy Degree in Geology with 
opportunities for concentrated studies 
in structural geology/tectonics, igneous 
petrology/geochemistry/economic 
geology, hydrogeology and environ- 
mental geology, stratigraphy/sedi- 
mentology, paleobiology, paleoecology 
and geophysics/paieomagnetics. In 
addition, students may select a 
concentration in the regional geology 
of Southern Florida, the Caribbean, and 
Latin America, including problems 
related to the above-mentioned fields. 
Overall, the graduate program empha- 
sizes a multidisciplinary approach to 
solving geologic and environmental 
problems, and stresses the importance 
of field observation complemented by 
laboratory analysis. 

The department is well-equipped 
with advanced and basic geological 
instrumentation. Major on-site 
analytical facilities are an electron 
microprobe and scanning electron 
microscope housed in the Florida 
Center for Analytical Electron 
Microscopy (FCAEM), a thermal 
ionization mass spectrometer (VG- 
354), inductively coupled plasma 
emission spectro-analyzer, and the 
paleomagnetism laboratory with 
cryogenic magnetometer. In addition 
the department owns a complete array 
of instruments for field geophysics and 
for field hydrologic studies, and two 
vehicles for transportation to local field 
sites. The department has facilities for 
micropaleontological studies, research 
in high pressure experimental petrology 



and experimental structural geology, a 
class 100 clean laboratory for 
processing isotopic samples, and a 
microscopy lab with heating/freezing 
stage for fluid inclusion studies. 
Excellent facilities for chemical 
analysis such as the stable isotope mass 
spectrometry lab, are available through 
formal connections with the Southeast 
Environmental Research Center. 

Application Procedures 

Admission decisions to the Program 
will be made by the Department's 
Graduate Admission Committee. 
To be considered for admission 
applicants must submit the following 
documents prior to the admission 
deadlines. 

1 . FIU Graduate Application Form. 

2. Certified transcripts of all college 
level work. When applicable, a 
certified English translation must 
accompany the original. 

3. Graduate Record Examination 
scores taken within the previous two 
years, sent from the Education Testing 
Service. 

4. Scores of English proficiency, 
when applicable, sent from the 
Education Testing Service. 

5. Curriculum vitae or resume with 
pertinent information regarding 
applicant's previous experience and 
achievements. 

6. A statement of intent, including a 
brief discussion (not to exceed 2000 
words) of educational goals and career 
projections. The applicant may also 
include a copy of previous written 
scientific work. 

7. Three letters of recommendation 
from former professors or academic 
advisors. 

The Graduate Application Form, 
official transcripts, official GRE and 
TOEFL scores should be sent directly 
to the Office of Admissions, Florida 
International University, Miami, FL 
33199, with the application fee. A copy 
of the application form, together with 
the curriculum vitae or resume, 
statement of intent and letters of 
recommendation should be sent to the 
Graduate Coordinator, Department of 
Earth Sciences, Florida International 
University, Miami, FL 33199. 

Admission 

To be admitted to the Graduate 
Program in Geology, a student must 
meet the following minimum 
requirements: 

1. Hold a Bachelor's or Master's 
degree from an accredited college or 



university in a relevant discipline of 
science, engineering or mathematics. 

2. Have a grade point average (GPA) 
of 3.0 or higher (or equivalent) during 
the last two years of undergraduate 
program, and 3.0 or higher during the 
Master's degree program. 

3. Have a minimum combined score 
on the verbal and quantitative sections 
of the Graduate Record Examination 
(GRE) of 1000 for the M.S. program or 
1 120 for the PhD program. 

4. Provide at least three letters of 
recommendation fi-om persons 
qualified to evaluate the applicant's 
potential for graduate work. 

5. Students whose native language is 
not English must demonstrate an 
adequate level of proficiency in English 
as a foreign language. A score above 
550 (213 computerized) on the TOEFL 
(Test of English as a Foreign 
Language) of thfe Educational Testing 
Service is required. 

6. Meet the University's general 
requirements for admission to graduate 
programs. 

Financial Aid 

The Earth Sciences Department offers a 
number of graduate teaching and 
research assistantships which are 
awarded each semester on a com- 
petitive basis. The assistantships 
provide a stipend and waiver of tuition, 
and are usually not awarded to students 
pursuing the Non-Thesis Track M.S. 
degree. Applicants interested in an 
assistantship should indicate this on the 
FIU Graduate Application form. In 
order to be considered for an 
assistantship the application should be 
submitted by February 15 for the Fall 
semester admission and by September 1 
for Spring semester admission. 
Applicants seeking research assistant- 
ships should contact individual faculty 
members in their area of research 
interest. 

Master of Science in 
Geology 

The Master of Science degree is 
conferred upon successful completion 
of the requirements (listed below) of 
either the Thesis Track or Non-Thesis 
Track option of the degree program. 

Thesis Track: Course Requirements: 

36 credits, including: 

GLY593I/GLY6931, 

Graduate Seminars 2 

Courses in field of specialization 1 8 

GLY 6971, Thesis 6 

Electives 1 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 99 



Courses in the field of specialization 
and electives are chosen by the student 
in close consultation with a faculty 
advisor. These courses are selected to 
fit the student's particular professional 
goals and to ensure sufficient depth and 
breadth of geological knowledge. 

Thesis Track: Graduation 
Requirements 

1. A minimum GPA of 3.0 in all 
coursework counted toward the 36 
credits required for the Master's 



2. Satisfactory completion and 
defense of a thesis proposal and an 
original research thesis. 
Non-Thesis Track: Course Require- 
ments: 

36 credits, including: 
Courses in field of specialization 1 8 
Electives 1 8 

Electives may include at most 3 credits 
of Supervised Research (GLY 6910) 
leading to a research paper. 
Non-Thesis Track: Graduation 
Requirements: 

A minimum GPA of 3.0 in all course 
work counted toward the 36 credits 
required for the Master's degree. 

Doctor of Philosophy in 
Geology 

The Doctor of Philosophy in Geology 
is conferred based on satisfactory 
completion of required course work, a 
demonstrated mastery of a broad field 
of knowledge, and the ability to 
conduct original and independent 
research. A minimum of 90 credit 
hours beyond the Bachelor's degree is 
required for the Ph.D. A minimum of 
24 credit hours are devoted to research 
toward the Ph.D. Dissertation. A 
maximum of 30 credit hours may be 
transferred fi'om other graduate 
programs with the approval of the 
Departmental Graduate Committee. 

Course Requirements 

GLY 5931 /GLY 6931, 
Graduate Seminars 2 

Formal graduate level courses (non- 
research courses chosen in consultation 
with the major advisor) 30 

GLY 7980, Ph.D. Dissertation 24 

The remaining 34 credits may be either 
formal graduate level courses or 
independent study and special projects, 
selected in consultation with the major 
advisor. 



Graduation Requirements 

1. A minimum GPA of 3.0 in all 
course work required for the Ph.D. 
degree. 

2. Satisfactory performance on qual- 
ifying examinations on general geo- 
logic knowledge and the field of 
subspecialization. Failure to pass this 
examination will terminate the stu- 
dent's enrollment in the program. 

3. Completion and successful de- 
fense of a dissertation. Members of the 
dissertation committee will be jointly 
determined by the student's advisor and 
the Graduate Admission Committee. 

Fields of Concentration 

Geophysics/Paleomagnetism 

Geophysical investigative techniques 
using gravity, magnetism, seismic 
reflection and refraction, earthquake 
seismology, and thermal properties. 
Land-based geophysical studies of the 
Caribbean and South American 
seismicity and crustal structure. 

Hydrogeology /Environmental 
Geology 

Field and modeling approaches to 
groundwater flow and solute fluxes in 
subsurface and near subsurface 
environments. Interaction of surface 
water and groundwater, solute trans- 
port, chemical and isotopic tracing 
techniques, watershed hydrology in 
south Florida, other U.S. locations, and 
Central America. 

Igneous Petrology/Geocliemistry/ 
Economic Geology 

Research problems in petrology/geo- 
chemistry of igneous and metamorphic 
rocks with reference to their origin, and 
relationships in time and space. Origin 
of hydrothermal and other economic 
deposits. Field occurrence, geochemis- 
try and petrogenesis of crystalline 
rocks, especially those of the Caribbean 
region and South America. Generation 
of associated (often, economically 
significant) hydrothermal deposits. 
Application of trace element and 
isotope geochemistry to the study of 
these petrogenetic associations. 

Paleobiology /Paleoecology 

Research applied to taxonomy, 
phylogeny, evolutionary processes, 
paleoecology, taphonomy, and bio- 
stratigraphy as applied to select fossil 
groups. Zonal distribution, facies 
analysis, and paleoecology of different 
groups of fossils. Specialization maybe 
in macrofossils or microfossils, applied 



to several aspects of the paleobiology 
of particular fossil groups, including 
biodiversity, paleocology, response to 
global climatic changes, oceanographic 
or environmental and time relationships 
of selected organisms. 

Regional Geology 

Multidisciplinary geologic research 
applied to a specific geographic area. 

Stratigraphy/Sedimentology 

Sedimentary petrology, sedimentary 
environments, paleo-oceanography, 
sequence stratigraphy, cyclic stratig- 
raphy, microfacies analysis, and basin 
analysis. Field and laboratory tech- 
niques applied to solution of problems 
in these topics, especially as applied to 
sedimentary rock sequences of south 
Florida, the Caribbean, and Meso- 
America. Evolution of the sedimentary 
basins of these regions and their 
relationships to global and regional 
tectonics. 

Structural Geology - Tectonics 

Field oriented research on methods of 
structural analysis. Analysis of geologic 
deformations based upon the principles 
of mechanics and utilizing research 
data from laboratory and field 
investigations of folding, fabrics, 
fracture, and faulting. Strictural 
geology of the Caribbean and South 
America. 

Course Descriptions 

Note: Laboratories may not be taken 
prior to the corresponding lecture 
course. Laboratories must be taken 
concurrently where noted, but students 
must register for the laboratory 
separately. 

Deflnition of Prefixes 

EVS-Environmental Science; GEO- 
Geography/Systematic; GLY-Geology, 
MET-Meteorology; OCE- 
Oceanography; OCG-Oceanography- 
Geological; OCP- 
Oceanography/Physical . 
F-Fall semester offering; S-Spring 
semester offering; SS-Summer semester 
offering. 

ESC 5162 Workshop: Microfossil 
Paleoenvironments (3). Recent 
foraminifera and diatons are sampled, 
prepared and identified from marine to 
freshwater facies. Taxon distributions 
are used to interpret paleo- 
environments. Prerequisite; Permission 
of Instructor. 

GLY 5021 Earth Sciences for 
Teachers (3). Study of geological 



100 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



materials and processes, as covered in 
Physical Geology, but at a higher level 
and with additional assignments. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instruc- 
tor. Corequisite: GLY 502 IL. (F,S,SS) 

GLY 502 IL Earth Sciences for 
Teachers Laboratory (1). Study of the 
properties of minerals and rocks; 
interpretation of topographic and 
geologic maps; study of the geology of 
Florida, including field trips. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of the instructor. 
Corequisite: GLY 5021. (F,S,SS) 

GLY 5106 Paleoecology and Paleo- 
environments (3). Paleoecology of 
fossils, paleobiodiversity, sedimentary 
facies, and environments, skeletal 
mineralogy, paleoecological gradients, 
chronologic scales and paleobio- 
geography and global patterns. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of the instructor. 

GLY 5158 Florida Geology (3). 

Detailed lithostratigraphic and bio- 
stratigraphic analyses of Southeast 
Florida and their relationship to 
tectonics, paleoclimates. Prerequisite: 
GLY 3511 and GLY 3511L. (S in 
altemate years) 

GLY 5245 Water-Rock Interaction 
(3). Survey of geochemical processes at 
the water-rock interface. Topics include 
absorption of inorganic and organic 
ions, colloid stability in groundwater, 
mineral dissolution and precipitation. 
Prerequisites: CHM 1046, MAC 3312, 
GLY 43 1 1 or Permission of the 
instructor. 

GLY 5246 Geochemistry (3). GLY 
5246L Geochemistry Lab (1). Origin 
of chemical elements and principles 
affecting their distribution in the solar 
system, solid earth and hydrosphere. 
Use of chemical data to solve geologic 
problems. Prerequisites: Physical 
Geology and General Chemistry. (S in 
altemate years) 

GLY 5266 Stable Isotope 
Biogeocbemistry (3). Application and 
theory of stable isotope approaches to 
biogeocbemistry. Topics: Introduction 
to IRMS machines, C/N/0/H/S 
(biogeochem. processes), sampling/lab. 
prep., and recent advances. 
Prerequisites: One year of chemistry or 
consent of instructor. 

GLY 5283C Application of ICPES in 
Geochemistry (3). Determination of 
elemental abundances in rocks, soils, 
natural water using inductively coupled 
plasma emission spectroscopy (ICPES). 
Instrumental principles, sample 



selection and preparation methods and 
application of results to research. 
Prerequisites: CHM 1045, CHM 1046 
or permission of the instructor. (S or 
SS) 

GLY 5286 Research Instrumentation 
and Techniques in Geology (3). 

Survey of techniques and instru- 
mentation used in geological research, 
including computing and data handling. 
Prerequisite: Graduate stand-ing or 
Permission of the instructor. 
Corequisite: GLY 5286L. (F) 

GLY 5286L Research Instrumenta- 
tion and Techniques in Geology Lab 
(1). Introduction to advanced instru- 
mentation and analytical techniques in 
Geology, including computing and data 
processing. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or Permission of the 
instructor. Corequisite: GLY 5286. (F) 

GLY 5287C Scanning Electron 
Microscopy with EDS Analysis (3). 
Imaging and microanalysis of materials 
using SEM including EDS. 
Prerequisite: Permission of Instrcutor. 

GLY 5288C Electron Microprobe 
Microanalysis with EDS Analysis (3). 

Imaging and analysiss or geological 
and other materials using electron 
microprobe with EDS analysis. 
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. 

GLY 5298 Topics in Geochemistry 

(3). Seminar covering current research 
in selected areas of low-temperature 
geochemistry: oceans and oceanic 
sediments; continental waters and 
sediments; hydrothermal systems. 
Prerequisite: GLY 5246 or Permission 
of the instructor. (F) 

GLY 5322 Igneous Petrology and 
Geochemistry (3). Presentation and 
discussion of current topics in igneous 
petrology and geochemistry in a 
seminar format. Prerequisite: 

Permission of the instructor. (S) 

GLY 5335 Metamorphic Geology (3). 
Metamorphic mineralogy; character- 
istics of low, medium and high pressure 
metamorphic rocks; pressure- 

temperature determinations; meta- 
morphic textures; modeling and 
determination of P-T-t paths. (F) 

GLY 5335L Metamorphic Geology 

Lab (1). Petrographic examination of 
metamorphic rocks. (F) 

GLY 5346 Sedimentary Petrology 

(3). Systematic study of sedimentary 
rocks. Special emphasis on genetical 
aspects, geochemistry, paleontology. 



mineralogy, and microfacies. Em- 
phasizes microscopic study. Prereq- 
uisite: GLY 4551. Corequisite: GLY 
5346L. (F in altemate years) 

GLY 5346L Sedimentary Petrology 

Lab (1). Laboratory studies of 
sediments and sedimentary rocks with 
emphasis on microscopic analyses and 
geochemical techniques. Prerequisite: 
GLY 4551 and GLY 455 IL. 
Corequisite: GLY 5346. (F in altemate 
years) 

GLY 5408 Advanced Structural 
Geology (3). Advanced treatment of 
the theory of rock mechanics to solve 
problems of natural rock deformation. 
Prerequisites: GLY 4400, MAC 3413, 
or Permission of the instmctor. 
Corequisite: GLY 5408L. (S) 

GLY 5408L Advanced Structural 
Geology Lab (1). Problem solving in 
theory of rock deformation. 
Experimental procedures in rock 
mechanics. Corequisite: GLY 5408. (S) 

GLY 5415 Caribbean Geology and 
Tectonics (3). Integration of geologic 
and geophysical data to understand the 
evolution and present tectonic config- 
uration of the Caribbean area. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of the instructor. 

GLY 5425 Tectonics (3). Properties of 
the lithosphere; plate kinematics and 
continental drift; characteristics of plate 
boundaries; mountain belts; formation 
of sedimentary basins. Prerequisites: 
GLY 1010, 1100, 4400, 4310, 3200 or 
Permission of the instmctor. (S) 

GLY 5455 Physical Volcanology (3). 

Description of volcanoes and their 
products, geophysical and tectonic 
constraints on volcanic processes, and 
modeling and forecasting of volcanic 
eraptions. Prerequisite: GLY 4450, 
GLY 4310 or Permission of the 
instmctor. (F in altemate years) 

GLY 5457 Geophysical Data 
Analysis (3). Computer analysis and 
modeling of geophysical data and 
digital images. Statistical description 
of data, linear inverse theory, digital 
signal and image processing. 
Computer exercises with MATLAB. 
Prerequisites: GLY 4450, MAP 2302, 
MAS 3105, PHY 2048, PHY 2049 or 
consent of instmctor. Corequisite: GLY 
545 7L. (F) 

GLY 5457L Analysis of Geophysical 
Data Lab (1). Field and laboratory 
applications of geophysical techniques. 
Computer aided analysis and three- 



Graduate Catalog 

dimensional modeling of gravity and 
magnetic data. Prerequisites- GLY 
4450, PHY 3048, PHY 3049, MAC 
3311, MAC 3312, MAP 3302. 
Corequisite: GLY 5457. (F) 

GLY 5495 Seminar in Geopliysics 

(3). Detailed investigation of current 
geophysical techniques, including 
topics on instrument design. Prereq- 
uisite: GLY 5457 or Permission of the 
instructor. (S) 

GLY 5497 Topics in Structural 
Geology and Tectonics (3). Selected 
advanced topics in structural geology 
and rock deformation. Latest advances 
in crustal tectonics. Prerequisite- GLY 
5408. (S) 

GLY 5599 Seminar in Stratigrapliy 
(3). Discussion of research projects 
and/or current literature in stratigraphic 
correlation as derived from sediment- 
ologic principles and biozonation. 
Prerequisite: GLY 5346. (F,S) 

GLY 5608 Advanced Paleontology I 

(3). Discussion of current literature and 
research projects on evolution, system- 
atics functional morphology, with 
reports by members of the seminar. 
Prerequisites: GLY 4650, GLY 5609, 
or Permission of the instructor. (F) 

GLY 5621 Caribbean Stratigraphic 
Micropaleontology (3). Microscopic 
study of biostratigraphic type sections 
from the Caribbean area. Emphasis on 
planktonic foraminifera and radiolaria, 
paleoecologic and paleoclimatic inter- 
pretations. Prerequisite: GLY 4650 or 
Permission of the instructor. (F) 

GLY 5710 Watershed Hydrology (3). 

Hydrologic processes on watershed, 
water budgets, effects on water quality' 
field investigative methods using 
tracers and hydrometric measurements, 
hydrologic and hydrochemical models. ' 
GLY 5754 Applied Remote Sensing 
in the Earth Sciences (3). Application 
of remote sensing and image analysis in 
the earth sciences; qualitative and 
quantitative satellite image and air 
photo interpretation. Emphasis is on 
use of computer processing packages. 
Prerequisites: GLY 1010 or consent of 
instructor. 

GLY 5758 GIS and Spatial analysis 
for Earth Scientists (3). Application of 
GIS technology to spatial problems in 
the Earth Sciences. Topics include: 
spatial statistics, samplmg theory, 
surface estimation, map algebra, and 
suitability modeling. 



GLY 5785 Caribbean Shallow- 
Marine Environments (3). Field study 
of multiple fropical environments in the 
Caribbean area. Dynamic processes and 
coastal evolution in response to natural 
and human-induced changes. 

GLY 5786 Advanced Field Excur- 
sion (3). A study of the geology of a 
selected region of the worid followed 
by 10-12 day field trip in order to study 
the field relationships of the geologic 
features. Special emphasis is given to 
stratigraphic, structural and tectonic 
relationships of lithic package. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. (SS) 

GLY 5808 Mining Geology (3). Ap- 
plication of theoretical models of ore 
formaiton to exploration and the use of 
geochemical and geophysical techni- 
ques in the search for ore deposits. 
Prerequisites: GLY 4311 and CHM 
1046. (F) 

GLY 5816 Economic Geology (3). 

Economically important metal deposits 
of sedimentary, igneous and hydro- 
thermal origins and their geologic 
settings and characteristics. Prereq- 
uisites: GLY 1010, GLY 4300, CHM 
1045, CHM 1046. (S) 

GLY 5826 Hydrogeologic Modeling 

(3). Techniques used in modeling 
groundwater fiow and solute transport 
in geologic systems. Case studies of 
significant aquifers. Prerequisites: GLY 
5827, MAP 2302, or Permission of the 
instructor. (S,SS) 

GLY 5827 Hydrogeology (3). Physics 
of flow in geological media. Saturated 
and unsaturated flow, groundwater and 
the hydrologic cycle, estimating 
hydraulic parameters of aquifers, 
introduction to chemical transport.' 
Prerequisite: GLY 1010, MAC 2312 
and PHY 2053, or Permission of the 
instructor. (F) 

GLY 5827L Hydrogeology Lab (1). 

Laboratory, field, and computer 
exercises to complement GLY 5827 
(F) 

GLY 5828 Chemical Hydrogeology 
and Solute Transport (3). Quantita- 
tive analysis of hydrologic, geologic, 
and chemical factors controlling water 
quality and the fransport and fate of 
organic and inorganic solutes in the 
subsurface. Prerequisites: GLY 5827 
(S) 

GLY 5889 Geology for Environ- 
mental Scientists and Engineers (3). 



College of Arts and Srienrp^ loi 



Characterization of rocks and rock 
masses; geological maps; seismic 
hazards; weathering of rocks; 
hydrologic cycle; slope stability- 
coastal processes; geophysical tech- 
niques. Course includes field trips in 
the South Florida region. Prerequisites- 
CHM 1045, GLY 1010 or Permission 
of the instructor. (S) 

GLY 5931 Graduate Seminar (1). 

Presentation or critical examination of 
current research problems in geology. 
A selection of topics is considered each 
term. Topics may also include 
individual research in the student's 
field of investigation. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or Permission of the 
insfructor. (F,S,SS) 

GLY 5XXX Radiogenic Isotope 
Methods (3). Theory and practice of 
radiogenic isotope ration measuring 
techniques. Use of class- 1 00 clean 
room facilities, and introduction to 
thermal ionization mass spectrometry. 
Prerequisite: General Chemistry. 

GLY 6159 Stratigraphy of the 
Circum Caribbean Region (4). De- 
tailed lithostratigraphic and biosfrati- 
graphic analyses of Canbbean islands. 
Central America, northern South' 
America and Caribbean basin. Pre- 
requisite: GLY 5621 or Permission of 
the instructor. (SS) 

GLY 6247 Trace Element and 
Isotope Geochemistry (3). Principles 
of trace element and isotope 
fractionation and radioactive decay, 
and their application to the interpreta- 
tion of igneous rocks and the chemical 
evolution of the earth. Prerequisite: 
GLY 5246 or Permission of the 
insfructor. Corequisite: GLY 6247L 
(S) 

GLY 6328 Advanced Igneous Petrol- 
ogy (3). Interpretation of igneous 
rocks; chemistry and physics of magma 
generation and crystallization; origin of 
major igneous rock series with 
emphasis on tectonic confrols. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of the instructor. 
Corequisite: GLY 6328L. (S) 

GLY 6328L Advanced Igneous 
Petrology Lab (1). Identification of 
rocks using microscopic and micro- 
probe techniques. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of the instructor. Corequisite- 
GLY 6328. (S) 

GLY 6337 Metamorphic Phase 
Equilibria (3). Theory and methods of 
calculation of metamorphic phase 
equilibria and P-T paths using 



102 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



appropriate analysis of composition 
space, activity models, geothermo- 
metry, geobarometry. Origin and 
interpretation of zoning in metamorph- 
ic minerals. Prerequisites: GLY 5335 
or Permission of the instructor. (F) 

GLY 6345 Sedimentary Petrography 
(3). Comparative study and funda- 
mental observations of sedimentary 
rocks in hand specimens and under the 
petrographic microscope; their classifi- 
cation, theoretical and practical impli- 
cations. Prerequisites: GLY 4551 or 
Permission of the instructor. (F) 

GLY 634SL Sedimentary Petro- 
graphy Laboratory (1). Laboratory 
studies of sedimentary rocks in thin 
section. Prerequisites: GLY 4555 or 
permission of the instructor. 
Corequisite: GLY 6345. (F) 

GLY 6353 Microfacies Analysis (3) 
GLY 63S3L Microfacies Analysis 
Laboratory (1). Identification and 
interpretation of the fossil and 
mineralogical constituents of sediment- 
ary rocks in thin section. Emphasis is 
placed on the paleoecological signif- 
icance of fossil remains in carbonates. 
Prerequisites: GLY 4551 or Permission 
of the instructor. (S) 

GLY 6392 Topics in Igneous 
Petrology and Geochemistry (3). 
Research seminar in contemporary 
petrology and geochemistry. Student 
presentation on thesis research. 
Prerequisite: GLY 5322 or Permission 
of the instructor. (F,S) 

GLY 6427 Quantitative Geotectonics 
(3). Application of continuum mech- 
anics and heat transfer to problems in 
geology. Observational constraints on 
earth properties. Em-phasis is on 
problems relating to the earth's 
iithosphere. Prerequisites: GLY 4450, 
GLY 4400, GLY 5425 and MAP 3302 
or Permission of the instructor. (F in 
alternate years) 

GLY 6444 Quantitative Analysis of 
Joints and Faults (3). Application of 
fracture mechanics to geologic 
problems, including the analysis of 
local and regional stress fields, bedrock 
fi-acture systems, estimation of fracture 
related strain, and the influence of 
mechanical properties on rock failure. 
Prerequisites: GLY 4400, GLY 4450, 
GLY 5425 or Permission of the 
instructor. (F in alternate years) 

GLY 6447 Advanced Topics in 
Structural Geology and Tectonics (3). 
Detailed exploration of selected 



research topics in structural geology 
and tectonics. Prerequisites: GLY 5446 
or Permission of the instructor. {F,S) 

GLY 6448 Stress in the Earth's 
Crust (3). The distribution and 
magnitude of stress in the earth's crust, 
laboratory derived values for earth 
stress, in situ stress measurements, 
regional stress patterns and sources of 
stress in the Iithosphere. Prerequisites: 
GLY 4400, GLY 4450, GLY 5425 or 
Permission of the instructor. (S) 

GLY 6468 Paleomagnetism (3). 
Physics of rock and mineral 
magnetism, geomagnetism and paleo- 
magnetism; field and laboratory 
methods, geomagnetic field behavior, 
magnetostratigraphy, apparent polar 
wander. Prerequisite: GLY 4400, GLY 
3202 or Permission of the instructor. 
Corequisite: GLY 6468L. (F) 

GLY 6468L Paleomagnetism Lab- 
oratory (1). Physics of rock and 
minerals magnetism, geomagnetism 
and paleomagnatism; field and 
laboratory methods, geomagnetic field 
behavior, magneostratigraphy, apparent 
polar wander. Prerequisite: GLY 4400, 
GLY 3202 or Permission of the 
instructor. Corequisite: GLY 6468. (F) 

GLY 6485 Physics of the Earth (3). 

Properties and dynamics of the Earth's 
interior studied from a physical 
perspective. Topics include heat flow, 
fluid flow, earthquake seismology. 
Prerequisites: GLY 4450 and MAC 
3313. (F) 

GLY 6496 Advanced Topics in 
Geophysics (3). Discussion of research 
projects and current literature in 
geophysics. Prerequisite: GLY 5495. 
(S) 

GLY 6517 Basin Analysis (3). Analy- 
sis of sedimentary basins based on their 
origin, paleogeographic evolution and 
tectonic setting. Emphasis is placed on 
the tectonic evolution and economic 
potential of sedimentary basins. (S in 
alternate years) 

GLY 6S17L Basin Analysis Lab (1). 

Analysis of different types of 
sedimentary basins using a case history 
approach. Corequisite: GLY 6517. (S 
in alternate years) 

GLY 6595 Topics in Sedimentology 

(3). Oral presentation by students of 
research projects and survey of relevant 
literature with reports by members of 
the seminar. Prerequisite: GLY 5346. 
(S in alternate years) 



GLY 6626 Stratigraphic Micropale- 
ontology: Foraminifera (3). 

Nomenclature, taxonomy, and bio- 
stratigraphy of Cretaceous and Ceno- 
zoic planktonic foraminifera. Studies of 
stratigraphically important taxa from 
Caribbean land sections, piston cores, 
and DSDP/ODP sites. Prerequisites: 
GLY 5621 or Permission of the 
instructor. (F in alternate years) 

GLY 6627 Stratigraphic Micropale- 
ontology: Radiolaria (3). Nomencla- 
ture, taxonomy and biostratigraphy of 
Cretaceous and Cenozoic radiolaria. 
Studies of stratigraphically important 
taxa using Caribbean land sections, 
piston cores, and DSDP/ODP sites. 
Prerequisites: GLY 5621 or Permission 
of the instructor. (S in alternate years) 

GLY 6628 Stratigraphic Micro- 
paleontology: Calcareous Nan- 
nofossils (3). ■ Nomenclature, tax- 
onomy, and biostratigraphy of Triassic 
to Recent nannofossils. Intensive 
training of identification of marker taxa 
using land and DSDP/ODP sites. 
Prerequisites: GLY 5621 or Permission 
of the instructor. (S in alternate years) 

GLY 6690 Topics in Paleontology (3). 

Oral presentation and discussion of 
current research projects and relevant 
literature, with reports by members of 
the seminar. Prerequisite: GLY 5608 or 
Permission of the instructor. (F) 

GLY 6809 Hydrothermal Geochem- 
istry (3). The mineralogy, thermody- 
namics, chemistry and isotope chemis- 
try of hydrothermal and geothermal 
systems, with an emphasis on the 
transport of solutes in hydrothermal 
solutions and ore-forming processes. 
Prerequisites: GLY 5246, CHM 3400 
or Permission of the instructor. (S in 
alternate years) 

GLY 6862 Numerical Methods in the 
Earth Sciences (3). Numerical 
techniques used by geoscientists, with 
emphasis on finite-difference and 
finite-element techniques to solve 
equations governing fluid flow and 
mass transport in geological systems. 
Prerequisites: MAP 3302, GLY 5827 
and knowledge of one programming 
language or Permission of the 
instructor. 

GLY 6896 Advanced Topics in 
Hydrology (1-3). Research-oriented 
seminar course involving analysis of 
several contemporary topics chosen 
fi-om the current literature in hydrology. 
Specific topics vary. May be repeated. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 103 



Prerequisites: GLY 5827 and one other 
graduate level hydrology/hydrogeology 
course, or Permission of the instructor. 
(S in alternate years) 

GLY 6910 Supervised Research (1- 
12). Research apprenticeship under the 
direction of a professor or a thesis 
advisor. Prerequisites: Full graduate 
admission and permission of the 
instructor. 

GLY 6931 Advanced Graduate 
Seminar (1). Oral presentation and 
discussion by students of an assigned 
literature survey, with reports by 
members of the seminar. Prerequisite: 
GLY 5931 or permission of the 
instructor. (F,S) 

GLY 6941 Supervised Teaching in 
the Geosciences (1). Teaching a 
geological discipline under the 
supervision of departmental faculty. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

GLY 6945 Proposal Writing (1). A 

graduate course aimed at introducing 
students to grant proposal writing. 

GLY 6949 Professional Internship in 
Earth Science (1-3). Semester or 
summer term of supervised work at an 
approved government or industry 
laboratory or field station. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 

GLY 6966 Master's Comprehensive 
Examination (0). Oral and written 
examinations on knowledge in general 
geology and the student's field of 
concentration. Schedule to be selected 
in consultation with the Graduate 
Committee. Prerequisite: Advanced 
graduate standing. (F,S,SS) 

GLY 6971 Master's Thesis (1-12). 

Field and/or laboratory research project 
toward thesis. Selected in consultation 
with major professor. Prerequisite: 
Permission of major professor. (F,S,SS) 

GLY 6XXX Topics in Economic 
Geology (3). Current research 
directions in Economic Geology and 
Geochemistry, including ore formation 
processes, exploration and remediation. 

GLY 7980 Ph.D. Dissertation (1-12). 

Field and/or laboratory research 
directed towards completion of the 
doctoral dissertation. Selected in 
consultation with major professor. 
Prerequisite: Permission of Major 
Professor and Doctoral Candidacy. 
(F,S,SS) 

OCG 6105 Advanced Marine 
Geology (3). OCG 6105L Advanced 



Marine Geology Lab (1). Application 
of geophysical and geological data to 
the interpretation of the earth's crust 
under the oceans, including the data 
provided by the Deep-Sea Drilling 
Project, dredging, piston-coring, grav- 
ity magnetism, and seismicity. Special 
emphasis will be given to the genesis 
and evolution of the Atlantic and 
Caribbean margins, and their potential 
for oil resources. Prerequisite: GLY 
4730 or Permission of the instructor. (F 
in alternate years) 

OCG 6664 Paleoceanography (3). 

Mesozoic/Cenozoic development of the 
major ocean basins, their circulation 
and sedimentation history. Use of 
micropaleontologic and stable isotopic 
techniques in paleoceanographic 
analysis. Prerequisite: GLY 4730 or 
Permission of the instructor. (F in 
alternate years) 



104 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



Economics 

John H. Boyd III, Associate Professor 

and Chairperson 
Nejat M. Anbarci, Associate 

Professor 
Harvey Averch, Professor, Courtesy 

Appointment, College of Public and 

Urban Affairs 
Mahadev Bhat, Assistant Professor 

(joint appointment with 

Environmental Studies) 
Prasad V. Bidarkota, Assistant 

Professor 
Manuel J. Carvajal, Professor 
Richard A. Chisik, Assistant 

Professor 
Irma de Alonso, Professor 
Alan Gummerson, Lecturer 
Jonathan Hill, Assistant Professor 
Antonio Jorge, Professor of Political 

Economy, (joint appointment with 

International Relations) 
AH Cem Karayalcin, Associate 

Professor 
Panagis Liossatos, Professor 
J. Kenneth Lipner, Associate 

Professor 
Jorge Salazar-Carrillo, Professor and 

Director, Center for Economic 

Research and Education 
Constantinos Syropoulos, Associate 

Professor 
Dimitrios Thomal<os, Assistant 

Professor 
Tao Wang, Assistant Professor 
Mira Wilkins, Professor 
Maria Willumsen, Associate 

Professor 

The Department of Economics has a 
group of faculty who are interested in a 
variety of applied and theoretical topics. 
The graduate programs in Economics 
place strong emphasis on exploiting 
synergies between fields such as 
international economics, industrial 
organization, political economy, and 
development economics (including Latin 
American and Caribbean studies as well 
as regional development problems). 
Issues are analyzed using modem 
economic tools from fields such as 
econometrics, game theory, and 
economic dynamics. While these are the 
department's areas of greatest emphasis, 
graduate course work in other fields can 
also be undertaken. The department's 
graduate programs are further enhanced 
by the presence of complementary 
graduate programs in the College of Arts 
and Sciences, College of Business 
Administration, the School of Policy and 
Management, and the Latin American 
and Caribbean Center. 



The Master's Program provides 
additional training in economics beyond 
the undergraduate degree. It provides a 
degree of expertise that would not be 
obtained in an undergraduate education. 
This additional expertise enhances your 
prospects for a successful career in the 
private sector, and in governmental or 
international agencies. 

The objective of the Doctoral Program 
is to offer advanced training in economic 
analysis. It provides an excellent 
background for a professional career at 
academic institutions, in the private 
sector, or in governmental and 
international agencies. 

Master of Arts in Economics 

To be admitted into the Master's degree 
program in Economics, a student must 
meet the University's graduate admission 
requirements and: 

1. Have a Bachelor's Degree from an 
accredited insitution. 

2. Have a 'B' average (3.0) or higher 
during the last two years of 
undergraduate studies, or a minimum 
combined score (verbal + quantitative) of 
1,000 or higher on the Graduate Record 
Examination (ORE), which every 
candidate must take. Foreign students 
whose native language is not English 
must take the TOEFL and obtain a 
minimum score of 550. 

3. Receive approval of the depart- 
mental graduate committee. 

4. Have taken as prerequisites 
statistics, and calculus. A student who 
has not fulfilled all these prerequisites 
may be admitted on a provisional basis. 
Unless specifically exempted, the student 
must take these courses as required, 
obtaining no credit for them in the 
program. 

Master's Tracks 

The Department of Economics offers two 
tracks: A general economics track, and a 
track specializing in applied economics. 
Although the general requirements are 
the same for both tracks, students opting 
to follow the applied economics track 
must write a Master's Thesis, take a 
fourth core course, and include four of 
the applied track courses listed below 
among their electives. The applied track 
courses are also open to students 
following the general economics track. 

Degree Requirements 

The Master's degree program will consist 
of 30 semester hours of course work, at a 
graduate level (course numbers 5000 or 
above). A maximum of six semester 
hours may be transferred into the 



program subject to the approval of the 
graduate committee. All courses listed 
below carry 3 credits, except the thesis (6 
credits). The specific requirements are: 

Core Courses 

All Master's students must take the 

following three courses 

ECO 6112 Fundamentals of 

Graduate 

Microeconomics 3 

ECO 6204 Fundamentals 

of Graduate 

Macroeconomics 3 

ECO 7424 Econometric Methods I 3 

Research Requirements: (3-6 credits) 
Students following the general 
economics track must either write a 
thesis for 6 credits (ECO 6971), or take 
an advanced course in applied economics 
(7000-level or approved by the Graduate 
Director) which involves writing a 
research paper (3 credits). Students 
taking the applied economics track must 
write a thesis for 6 credits (ECO 6971). 

Electives: (15-18 credits) 
A student must take at least four electives 
in economics. The additional one or two 
courses required to complete the 
Master's program may be taken in 
Mathematics, International Studies, the 
College of Business Administration, the 
College of Urban and Public Affairs or in 
the other college or schools of the 
University. The graduate director must 
approve courses taken outside the 
department. ECP 6705 and ECP 67 1 5 do 
not count as electives. 

Additional Applied Track Courses 

An M.A. student wishing to follow the 
applied economics track will be required 
to take, in addition to the three core 
courses above, a fourth core course: 
ECO 64 1 6 Appl ied Quantitative 

Methods in Economics 3 
Applied track students must choose their 
remaining four electives from the 
following courses: 
ECP 6305 Advanced Environmental 

Economics 3 

ECS 5027 Economics of Emerging 

Nations 3 

ECP 5704 International Economic 

Problems and Policy 3 
ECO 6225 Economics of Asset 

Markets 3 

ECO 7236 Money, Banking and 

Monetary Policy 3 

Graduation Requirements 

To receive the Master's degree in 
Economics, the student must complete 
30 hours of course work with a 'B' (3.0) 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 105 



average or higher; must receive a least a 
'B' (3.0) in the core courses; and must 
receive a grade of 'C or higher in each 
course. If the student decides to write a 
thesis, he/she must receive the grade of 
'P'(pass) for ECO 6971. 

Doctor of Philosophy in 
Economics 

The admission requirements to the Ph.D. 
program in Economics are: 

1. Have a Bachelor's Degree from an 
accredited institution. 

2. A minimum GPA of 3.0 for the last 
two years of undergraduate education or 
a minimum combined score (verbal + 
quantitative) of 1000 on the Graduate 
Record Examination (ORE), which every 
candidate must take. Foreign students 
whose native language is not English 
must take the TOEFL and obtain a 
minimum score of 550. 

3. Three letters of recommendation, 
using the form provided by the 
Department, from people in a position to 
judge the applicant's suitability for 
graduate studies in economics. 

4. Receive approval of the depart- 
mental graduate committee. 

5. Completion of the following 
courses at the undergraduate level: 
statistics, two semesters of calculus, and 
a semester of linear algebra. Unless 
exempted, the student must take these 
courses as required, obtaining no 
graduate credit for them in the program. 

The ORE and GPA stated above are 
minimum requirements. All applications 
are reviewed by the Graduate Studies 
Committee, which makes the final 
admission decisions. Since admission to 
the program is competitive, the 
committee's requirements are normally 
higher than the minimum standards. 
Meeting the minimum requirements does 
not guarantee admission. 

Degree Requirements 

To obtain the Ph.D. in Economics, 
students must complete the required 
course work and fulfill dissertation 
requirements. 

Course work Requirements 

Students must complete 48 hours (16 
courses) of graduate level course work. 
Supervised research, independent study, 
seminars, and dissertation credit do not 
count towards this objective. 

This required minimum of 16 courses 
consists of ten courses in the Core, four 
courses in two Fields of Specialization 
(at least two courses per field, some 
fields may have special requirements), 
and two electives as approved by the 



student's advisor (normally either the 
Graduate Director or the student's 
dissertation advisor). 

No credit toward a graduate degree is 
given for any course in which a grade of 
'C or less is obtained. A graduate 
student who receives a grade lower than 
'B-' in a course must retake that course; 
if a retake also results in a grade lower 
than 'B-', the student will not be 
permitted to continue in the Ph.D. 
Program. A graduate student who 
receives a grade lower than 'B-' in more 
than two courses will not be allowed to 
stay in the Economics Ph.D. Program. 

Students are required to maintain a 
minimum GPA of 3.0 (of 4) in their 
coursework. 
Core Courses 
ECO 6112 Fundamentals of 
Graduate Micro- 
economics 3 
ECO 7115 Microeconomic 

Theory I 3 

ECO 7116 Microeconomic 

Theory II 3 

ECO 6204 Fundamentals of 
Graduate Macro- 
economics 3 
ECO 7206 Macroeconomic 

Theory I 3 

ECO 7207 Macroeconomic 

Theory II 3 

ECO 7405 Mathematical Methods in 
Economic Analysis 3 
ECO 7424 Econometric Methods I 3 
ECO 7425 Econometric Methods II 3 
ECO 7305 History of Economic 

Thought 3 

Core Study 

During the first three semesters, students 
are required to take courses which 
include the first nine core courses listed 
above. Following the third semester, 
students are required to pass a 
comprehensive qualifying examination 
on core theory — the first six core courses 
listed above. A student who fails twice 
will not be allowed to remain in the 
program. A student must receive at least 
a 'B' (3.0) average in the first seven 
courses in order to participate in the 
comprehensive core theory qualifying 
examination. 

Field Study 

During the fourth and fifth semesters, 
students will complete course work in 
two Fields of Specialization. Students 
must pass the field examination in one of 
the major fields at the end of the fifth 
semester. In the other field, students 
must write a field paper. The field paper 
must be completed, presented in a 



workshop, and accepted by the student's 
field paper committee by the end of the 
third year. Students who fail twice any of 
their field requirements will not be 
allowed to continue in that field. History 
of Economic Thought should also be 
completed by the end of the third year. 

Dissertation Work 

Upon completion of field examination 
requirements, students will be required to 
choose a specific area of doctoral 
research. During this phase, which will 
normally have a total length of two years, 
the student will: 

a. Conduct research and complete a 
dissertation 

b. Continue taking courses to com- 
plete a minimum of 12 credits of 
Advanced Workshop and 18 credits of 
dissertation. 

c. Attend Advanced Workshops by 
enrolling in ECO 7925 in the dissertation 
area and present at least one paper a year 
on the work in that workshop. 

Students will normally be required to 
be enrolled as full-time students at the 
University for at least a year during the 
dissertation period. Except under ab- 
normal circumstances, the maximum 
number of years during which a student 
may do dissertation work is five years. 

Graduation Requirements 

To graduate, students must complete all 
course requirements; fulfill workshop 
presentation requirements, pass the 
comprehensive and field examinations, 
and complete the oral defense and 
acceptance of the Ph.D. dissertation. 

Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prerixes 

ECO-Economics; ECP-Economic 
Problems and Policy; ECS-Economic 
Systems and Development. 
F-Fall semester offering; S-Spring 
semester offering; SS-Summer semester 
offering. 

ECO 5709 The World Economy (3). 
Designed to give an overview of the 
crucial issues in the world economy. The 
course covers trade, capital, labor, and 
technology fiows; transnational 
economic organizations; current eco- 
nomic crisis; global economic interde- 
pendence; and the nature and charac- 
teristics of international economic order. 
Required for MIB Program. (S) 

ECO 5735 Multinational Corpora- 
tions (3). Economic theory and 
multinational corporations. Economic 
effects. Consequences of nationaliza- 



106 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



tion. Spread of the multinational form. 
State-owned multinational corporations. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 
for undergraduates. (S) 

ECO 5906 Advanced Individual Study 
(1-6). Supervised readings, individual 
tutorial, and preparation of report. 
Requires consent of faculty supervisor 
and Department Chairperson. Open to 
seniors and graduate students. 

ECO 5945 Internship (3). Directed 
individual study which assists the student 
in using economic analysis in his 
employment. Prerequisite: Permission of 
the chair. 

ECO 6076 Teaching Economics (I). 

This course, required of all graduate 
assistants, is designed to introduce stu- 
dents to the pedagogical and practical 
aspects of leaching economics. It is 
coordinated with the Academy for the 
Art of Teaching. 

ECO 6112 Fundamentals of Graduate 
Microeconomics (3). Consumer choice 
and theory of firm using calculus and 
diagrams with standard applications; 
Introduction to choice under uncertainty; 
Introduction Game Theory (nash 
Equilibrium); Partial Equilibrium; 
Market Structures: Perfect Competition, 
Monopoly and Oligopoly; Market 
failures. Prerequisites: One semester of 
Calculus and Statistics. 

ECO 6204 Fundamentals of Graduate 
Macroeconomics (3). Consumption, 
investment and growth; equity premium 
puzzle; taxation and social security; 
monetary policy rules, currency and 
inflation; the IS-LM model; real business 
cycles and models with nominal 
regidities. Prerequisites: Calculus and 
Statistics. 

ECO 6225 Economics of Asset 
Markets (3). Economic analysis of the 
asset markets; risk, return and 
intertemporal choice; mean variance 
analysis; asset pricing models and 
properties of asset returns; market 
efficiency and market anomalies. 
Prerequisites: Calculus or permission of 
the instructor. 

ECO 6416 Applied Quantitative 
Methods in Economics (3). Types of 
economic data; the WWW as a tool for 
data collection; database construction 
and maintenance; use of statistical 
software for graphical and descriptive 
methods; large sample inference for one 
population mean vector; introduction to 
economic time series and regression 
models. Prerequisites: One semester of 



Calculus and Statistics or permission of 
the instructor. 

ECO 6936 Special Topics (3). A course 
designed to give students a particular 
topic or a limited number of topics not 
otherwise offered in the curriculum. 

ECO 6938 Individual Graduate Study 
(6-9). Supervised readings, tutorial, and 
preparation of report. Open only to 
graduate students. Requires consent of 
supervisor and approval of Department 
Chairperson. 

ECO 6939 Advanced Seminar in 
Applied Economics (3). Variable-topic 
study group in application of economic 
analysis to specific problems. Open to 
seniors and graduate students. (S) 

ECO 6971 Thesis (6). Writing and 
completion of thesis by candidate for a 
Master of Arts. Prerequisites: Student 
must be a Master's degree candidate, 
have had at least 15 hours of graduate 
work in economics; have a thesis topic 
approved by the Department's Graduate 
Committee and permission from the 
instructor. 

ECO 7115 Microeconomic Theory I 

(3). Models of consumer and producer 
behavior, partial equilibrium analysis of 
product and factor markets, two/sector 
models of general equilibrium and 
welfare economics. Prerequisites: ECO 
3101 or equivalent, Calculus I; Calculus 
II recommended. (F) 

ECO 7116 Microeconomic Theory II 

(3). The Hicks/Samuelson and 
Arrow/Debreu models of general 
equilibrium. Activity analysis and 
competitive equilibrium. Capital theory. 
Leontief/Sraffra/Marx Systems. 

Temporary equilibrium and money. 
Prerequisites: ECO 71 15 and ECO 7405. 
(S) 

ECO 7118 Graduate Seminar in 
Economic Theory (3). Variable-topic 
graduate study group in theoretical 
problems. Open only to students with 
graduate standing. 

ECO 7135 Growth, Distribution and 
Prices (3). Alternative theories of 
growth, indome distribution and prices. 
Basic growth models; neoclassical 
capital theory and Cambridge contro- 
versies; neo/Marxian, neo/Keynesian and 
other approaches. Prerequisites: ECO 
7116, ECO 7207, ECO 7405. 

ECO 7136 Classical and Marxian 
Economic Theory (3). Classical and 
Marxian theories of value and capital in a 
mathematical mode. The Transformation 



Problem. Simple and expanded 
reproduction. The falling rate of profit 
and other Marxian crises. Prerequisites: 
ECO 7115, ECO 7206, ECO 7405, ECO 
7116. 

ECO 7206 Macroeconomic Theory I 

(3). Analysis of macroeconomic models 
of income determination and the price 
level, microeconomic foundations of 
macro-behavior, macroeconometric 

models, and basic open economy 
macroeconomics. Prerequisites: ECO 
3203, ECO 4410, or equivalents; 
Calculus I; Calculus II recommended. 
(F) 

ECO 7207 Macroeconomic Theory II 

(3). Alternative approaches to macro- 
economic theory. Business cycle theories 
and theories of growth and income 
distribution. Prerequisites: ECO 7115, 
ECO 7206, ECO 7405. 

ECO 7216 Monetary Theory and 
Policy (3). Relationship of money supply 
and interest rate to economic 
stabilization. Consideration of federal 
reserve system, money market, and 
factors determining money supply and 
demand. Neo-Keynesian, Chicago, and 
radical policy views. 

ECO 7236 Money, Banking, and 
Monetary Policy (3). Monetary theory 
and its application. Consideration of 
central banking in the U.S. and its 
relation to the international economy, 
money markets, and financial 
intermediaries. Survey of current policy 
views. 

ECO 7305 History of Economic 
Thought (3). Exploration of the 
evolution of economic thought and 
analysis in the changing socio/historical, 
institutional and political setting in 
which it takes place. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. (S) 

ECO 7405 Mathematical Methods in 
Economic Analysis (3). Application of 
mathematical methods to economics. The 
topics and tools of mathematical 
economics are presented in a rigorous 
fashion within an economic context. 
Prerequisites: Calculus I, ECO 3101 and 
ECO 3203, or equivalents. (F) 

ECO 7424 Econometric Methods I (3). 

Practical and theoretical foundations of 
empirical economics. Knowledge in 
formulation, estimation, and evaluation 
of econometric models. Prerequisites: 
ECO 4410 or equivalent; ECO 7423, 
Calculus I; Calculus II recommended. 
(S) 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 107 



ECO 7425 Econometric Methods II 
(3). A continuation of ECO 7424. 
Advanced single equation estimation, 
estimation of distributed lags, simultan- 
eous equations, time series and models of 
qualitative choice. Prerequisites: ECO 
7424 and MAS 3103 or equivalent. (F) 

ECO 7429 Topics in Econometrics (3). 

Selected topics in econometrics. 
Intended to acquaint students with 
current research in the field. Material 
covered will vary from year to year with 
instructor. Prerequisites: ECO 7424 and 
ECO 7425. 

ECO 7505 Public Finance (3). Partial 
and general equilibrium analysis of tax 
incidence efficiency, public goods, 
public pricing problems, the social rate 
of discount, and non-market decision 
making. 

ECO 7617 Seminar in Economic 
History (3). Topics in economic history, 
exploration of the economic history 
literature on a selected theme, student 
presentations. Prerequisite: Permission of 
the instructor for undergraduates. 

ECO 7705 International Trade (3). 
Positive and normative aspects of 
international trade. Theories of 
comparative advantage, commercial 
policy, trade and income distribution. 
Prerequisites: Advanced Micro- 
economic Theory; Calculus. (F) 

ECO 7716 International Money (3). 
Theory of international monetary 
equilibrium. Problems of international 
payments and exchange rate control; 
their effect on international monetary 
problems. Analysis of short and long 
term monetary flows and macro- 
economic adjustment. Prerequisites: 
Advanced Macroeconomics and 
Calculus. (S) 

ECO 7925 Advanced Workshop (3). 
Enables students to attend advanced 
workshop presentations and to present 
the results of their own research. 
Prerequisite: Completion of field exam- 
ination requirements. (F,S) 

ECO 7980 Ph.D. Dissertation (1-12). 

To be taken every semester for research 
on, and writing of Ph.D. dissertation by 
candidates for the Ph.D. Prerequisite: 
Permission of Major Professor and 
Doctoral Candidacy. 

ECP 5707 International Economic 
Problems & Policy (3). International 
trade and comparative advantage; 
commercial policy; foreign exchange 
markets; balance of payments; issues in 



trade & development. Prerequisite: ECO 
2013 or ECO 3011, and ECO 2023 or 
ECO 3021. 

ECP 6305 Advanced Environmental 
Economics (3). Economics of environ- 
mental pollution; theories of exhaustible 
and renewable resource extraction; issues 
in environmental valuation and policies. 
Prerequisite: ECP 3101 and ECP 3302 or 
ECP 4314 or Permission of the 
instructor. 

ECP 6434 Macroeconomic Forecast- 
ing for Management (3). Basic 
macroeconomics concepts as they apply 
to decision making within the firm. 
Traditional models of income 
determination and forecasting analysis. 
Prerequisite: ECP 6705. (F,S,SS) 

ECP 6605 Urban and Regional 
Analysis (3). Application of economic 
analysis to urban growth and the urban- 
regional environment. Consideration of 
public services, transportation, ghetto 
problems, and urban organization. 
Analysis of environmental protection 
problems and policies. Recommended 
preparation: ECO 3101, ECO 3203 and 
ECP 3303. 

ECP 6705 Managerial Economics (3). 

Basic microeconomic concepts as they 
apply to decision making within the 
organization; supply and demand; market 
structure and market behavior in specific 
industnes. Prerequisites: ECO 3021 and 
ECO30ll.(F,S,SS) 

ECP 7035 Cost-Benefit Analysis (3). 

This course covers benefit-cost analysis, 
cost-effectiveness analysis, benefit-risk 
analysis, risk-risk analysis, and systems 
analysis. All of these techniques are 
designed to provide guidance to decision 
makers, particularly in the government 
sector. Prerequisite: ECO 3101. 

ECP 7205 Labor and Human Re- 
sources (3). Empirical and theoretical 
analysis of the factors determining 
employment and earnings, recent 
developments in the theory of labor 
supply, critiques of neoclassical theor>', 
and current issues in public policy. 
Prerequisite: Calculus. 

ECP 7405 Industrial Organization (3). 

The organization of the industrial 
economy with particular emphasis as to 
the type of competition, the bases of 
monopoly power and the extent of 
monopoly power. Prerequisites: 
Advanced Micro and Calculus. 

ECP 7606 Urban and Regional 
Economics (3). The economics of 



urbanization processes, internal organ- 
ization of cities, and regional senlement. 
Spatial growth models and spatial 
development planning. Prerequisites: 
ECO 7115, ECO 5205, ECS 4013 or 
equivalent; and ECO 6636. (F) 

ECP 7636 Location Theory (3). 

Systematic exposition of urban and 
industrial location theory. Spatial price 
theory and spatial competition. Prereq- 
uisites: ECO 3101 or equivalent; Cal- 
culus I; Calculus II and ECO 7115 
recommended. (S) 

ECP 7706 Managerial Economics (3). 
Analysis of the economic decisions of 
firm managers, emphasizing the practical 
application of concepts to economic 
problem solving by managers, public 
administrators and other decision 
makers. Prerequisites: Ph.D. or advanced 
Masters. 

ECS 5005 Comparative Economic 
Systems (3). A critical evaluation of the 
design, goals, and achievements of 
economic policies in capitalist and 
socialist economies. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of the instructor for undergrad- 
uates. 

ECS 5025 Economic Planning (3). 

Analysis of planning methods in 
capitalist and socialist economies. 
Evaluation of macro and micro economic 
planning tools (input-output) and 
programming techniques. Theory and 
practice of economic development 
planning of agriculture, industrial- 
ization, foreign trade, and manpower. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or 
permission of the instructor. 

ECS 5027 Economic Development of 
Emerging Nations (3). Specific 
economic problems of emerging nations 
and national groupings. Basic 
approaches to economic development; 
major proposals for accelerating 
development. Role of planning. Trade, 
aid, and economic integration. (F) 

ECS 5406 Latin American Economies 
(3). Economic theory and its applications 
to current economic issues of Latin 
America. Examines aggregate demand 
and supply, fiscal and monetary policies, 
international trade trends, and economic 
development. Taught m Spanish. May 
not be takenfor credit towards a degree in 
Economics. 

ECS 6436 The Economics of Carib- 
bean Migration (3). The course ex- 
amines the economic causes and con- 
sequences of Caribbean immigration to 
the United States. Special emphasis on 



. „ . Graduate Catalog 
108 College of Arts and Sciences ■ ^ 

the effects of Caribbean migration on the 
United States economy. 

ECS 7015 Development Economics: 
Theory (3). Analytical approaches to 
economic development. Analysis of 
macro models, specific resources and 
sectors, and trade and income distri- 
butional problems in relation to devel- 
oping countries. Prerequisites: ECO 
7 1 1 5 and ECO 7 1 1 6 or equivalents. (F) 

ECS 7026 Development Economics: 
Planning and Policy (3). Planning and 
policy making in developing economies. 
Economy/wide planning models; project 
appraisal; financial, stabilization and 
trade policies. Prerequisites: ECO 7115, 
ECO 71 16, and ECO 7405. (S) 

ECS 7405 Economics of Latin America 
(3). Dependence, population explosion, 
urban migration, agricultural reform, 
industrialization and import substitution, 
common markets. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor for 
undergraduates. 

ECS 7435 Economics of the Carib- 
bean (3). Macroeconomic assessment; 
income distribution, employment and 
migration; industrial and agricultural 
development; international trade, 
multinational and integration attempts. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instruc- 
tor. 

ECS 7445 Economics of Central 
America (3). Recent economic events in 
the region dealing with institutional 
background and structure of current 
economic activities. Special emphasis on 
problems of growth, social trans- 
formation and economic integration. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instruc- 
tor. (F) 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 109 



English 

Carmela Pinto Mclntire, Associate 

Professor and Chairperson 
St. George Tucker Arnold, Associate 

Professor 
Joan L. Baker, Associate Professor 

and Director of the Master of Arts 

in English Program 
Lynne Barrett, Professor 
Lynn M. Berk, Professor 
Greg Bowe, Assistant Professor and 

Director of Undergraduate Writing 
Gisela Casines, Associate Professor 

and Associate Dean 
Maneck Daruwala, Associate 

Professor 
Carole Boyce Davies, Professor 
John Dufresne, Professor 
Denise Duhamel, Assistant Professor 
Peggy Endel, Associate Professor 
Mary Free, Associate Professor and 

Associate Chairperson 
James Hall, Professor 
Kimberly Harrison, Assistant 

Professor 
Bruce Harvey, Associate Professor 
Marilyn Hoder-Salmon, Associate 

Professor 
Tometro Hopkins, Associate 

Professor 
Kenneth Johnson, Associate Professor 

and Assistant Vice President of 

Academic Affairs 
Kathleen McCormack, Associate 

Professor 
Campbell McGrath, Associate 

Professor 
Kathryn McKinley, Associate 

Professor 
Phil Marcus, Professor 
Asher Z. Milbauer, Associate 

Professor 
Meri-Jane Rochelson, Associate 

Professor 
Richard Schwartz Professor 
Kate Capshaw-Smith, Assistant 

Professor 
Lester Standiford, Professor and 

Director of Creative Writing 

Program 
Richard Sugg, Professor 
James Sutton, Associate Professor 
Ellen Thompson, Assistant Professor 
Dan Wakefield, Writer in Residence 

and Lecturer 
Donald Watson, Professor 
Butler H. Waugh, Professor 
Donna Weir, Assistant Professor 
Feryal Yavas, Lecturer and Director 

of the Linguistics Program 
Mehmet Yavas, Professor 



The English Department offers three 
graduate degree programs: Creative 
Writing, Linguistics and Literature. The 
descriptions of the Creative Writing 
and the Linguistics programs can be 
found under their respective headings 
in this catalog. 

Master of Arts in English 

To be admitted into the Master's 
program in English, a student must 
meet the University's graduate 
admission requirements and have: 

1. A bachelor's degree in English or 
a related field; 

2. A minimum 3.0 undergraduate 
grade point average; 

3. A combination of 1000 (verbal 
and quantitative) on the ORE; 

4. Two letters of recommendation 
from undergraduate or graduate 
professors; 

5. A personal essay; 

6. Those who might be chosen for 
teaching assistantships will be 
interviewed by at least one member of 
the committee. 

Degree Requirements 

The Master's degree program consists 
of 30 semester hours of course work at 
a graduate level (course numbers 5000 
or above) and a thesis (6 credits). A 
maximum of six semester hours may be 
transferred into the program subject to 
the approval of the graduate committee. 

Required Courses 

ENG 5048 Literary Theory 3 

LIT 5405 Literature, Language 

and Society 3 

Electives: A maximum of 24 semester 
hours (5000 or 6000) level may be 
taken at either campus. 
Thesis: LIT 6970 Master's Thesis 6 

The student must complete a 
research thesis. The topic must be 
approved by the faculty member who 
will supervise the research and then by 
the Graduate Committee. The thesis 
will be accepted only after being read 
and approved by a Reading Committee. 
An oral defense is required before the 
Reading Committee. 

Below is a list of graduate courses 
that are offered by the English 
Department in addition to those offered 
in the Creative Writing and Linguistics 
programs. 



Course Descriptions 

Deflnition of Prefixes 

AML - American Literature; CRW- 
Creative Writing; ENG-English- 
General; ENL-English Literature; LIN - 
Linguistics; LIT-Literature. 
AML 5305 Major American Literary 
Figures (3). Each section will consider 
the lifework of several authors such as 
Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, Twain, 
James, Faulkner, Mailer, Wright, 
Baldwin. May be repeated. 

AML 5505 Periods in American 
Literature (3). The literature and 
criticism of one specified period of 
American literature, such as Colonial, 
Federal, Transcendental, Antebellum, 
and Twentieth Century. May be 
repeated with change of period. 

CRW 6806 Teaching Creative 
Writing (3). The course will prepare 
graduate students (and teachers from 
secondary schools and community 
colleges) to teach introductory classes 
and workshops in Creatice Writing. 
Students will observe and participate in 
the depaartment's CRW 2001 courses. 
Prerequisites: CRW 3111, 3311, or 
graduate standing, or permission of 
instructor. 

ENG 5009 Literary Criticism and 
Scholarship (3). Techniques and goals 
of humanistic research, bibliography, 
and critical commentary. 

ENG 5018 Practical Criticism (3). 

Applies various critical theories - e.g. 
the formalistic, historical, structural, 
archetypal, sociological, etc. - to spe- 
cific literary productions. 

ENG 5026 Advanced Textual 
Reading (3). The study of selected 
texts for interpretation from different 
critical and theoretical perspectives. 
May be repeated. Prerequisite: Admis- 
sion to the graduate program in English 
or by Permission of the instructor. 

ENG 5048 Literary Theory (3). An 
introduction to issues in the nature of 
literature, the philosophy of criticism, 
and methods of interpretation. The 
theoretical foundations for literary 
study. Prerequisites: Admission to the 
graduate program in English or by 
permission of the instructor. 

ENG 5058 Form and Theory of Con- 
temporary Literature (3). Various 
approaches and theories of practice in 
the major genres of imaginative 
writing, including development and 
articulation of the creative esthetic. 



110 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



May be repeated. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of the instructor. 

ENG 5907 Independent Study 
(VAR). Individual conferences, as- 
signed readings, reports on inde- 
pendent investigations, with the 
consent of the chairperson. 

ENG 5950 Special Project in English 
(1-3). Pursuit of projects involving 
relationship of profession to university 
and/or community and/or research 
issues in pedagogy, literature, or other 
areas. Prerequisites: Consent of 
Graduate Director or Department 
Chair. Corequisite: Consent of project 
supervisor. 

ENG 5971 Thesis and Dissertation 
Workshop (3). A workshop providing 
practice in the type of writing, research, 
and analytical skills required for 
successful graduate study. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 

ENG 6909 Independent Study 
(VAR). Individual conferences, as- 
signed readings, reports on independent 
investigations, with the consent of the 
Chairperson. 

ENG 6935 Special Topics in College 
Pedagogy (3). The pedagogy of 
teaching a designated area of college 
and university English, such as 
Shakespeare, American literature, film 
studies, creative writing, or linguistics. 
Course content and organization to be 
determined by the individual professor. 
Course does not meet certification 
requirements. 

ENG 6937 Teaching College Compo- 
sition (3). A seminar-workshop intro- 
ducing the pedagogy of academic and 
professional writing courses at the 
university and college level, to include 
traditional rhetoric, writing as process, 
the modes of discourse, and post- 
structuralist theory. Course does not 
meet certification requirements. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing. Corequisite: 
College composition practicum. 

ENG 6942 College Composition 
Practicum (1). Practical experience in 
the teaching of English at the university 
and college level through supervised 
activities to include tutorials, 
evaluating, and commenting on student 
essays, supervised classroom 

discussion and teaching. Course does 
not meet certification requirements. 

ENL 5220 Major British Literary 
Figures (3). Each section will consider 
the lifework of an author such as 



Chaucer, Spenser, Milton, Pope, 
Wordsworth, Dickens, Browning, 
Joyce, or others. May be repeated. 

ENL 5505 Periods in English 
Literature (3). The literature and 
criticism regarding one specified period 
of English Literature, such as 
Medieval, Renaissance, Victorian, 
Twentieth Century, and Contemporary. 
May be repeated with change of period. 

LIN 5019 Metaphor, Language, and 
Literature (3). Examines nature of 
metaphor as a cognitive phenomenon; 
how we use metaphor to conceptualize 
basic physical and cultural notions; role 
of cognitive metaphor in literature. 
Prerequisites: LIN 3013 or LIN 5018. 

LIN 5211 Applied Phonetics (3). 

Study of sounds and suprasegmentals 
of English. Comparison of phonetic 
features of English with those of other 
languages. Universal constraints and 
markedness in learning second/foreign 
language pronunciation. Prerequisites: 
LIN 3010, LIN 3013, or LIN 5018 or 
the equivalent. 

LIT 5358 Black Literature and 
Literary/Cultural Theory (3). 

Examines 20C. black literary critical 
thought. Students interrogate cultural 
theories and literary texts from African, 
Caribbean, African-American, Black 
British and Afro-Brazilian 

communities. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing. 

LIT 5359 African Diaspora Women 
Writers (3). Study of black women 
writers from throughout the Diaspora 
from the early 19"' century to present. 
Prerequisites: Graduate standing. 

LIT 5363 Literary Movements (3). 

Individual sections will study the 
authors, works, and audiences involved 
in such phenomena as Humanism, 
Mannerism, Romanticism, Symbolism, 
the Harlem Renaissance, and others. 
May be repeated. 

LIT 5405 Literature, Society, and 
Language (3). This seminar explores 
language's relationship to social 
formation, specifically as it applies to 
the relationship between literature and 
social groups and institutions. 
Prerequisites: Admission to the 
graduate program in English or by 
permission of the instructor. 

LIT 5426 Authors in their Times (3). 

A focus on one or more designated 
authors and the biographical, political 
and historical context in which they 



wrote, using current critical and 
historical approaches. May be repeated. 
Prerequisites: Admission to the 
graduate program in English or by 
permission of the instructor. 

LIT 5486 Literature: Continuity and 
Change (3). Explores the development 
of a particular literary genre, 
ideological concept, or cultural tradi- 
tion over a broad period of time. May 
be repeated. Prerequisites: Admission 
to the graduate program in English or 
by Permission of the instructor. 

LIT 5487 Texts and Culture (3). The 

study of the relationship between 
specified texts and an historically, 
socially, or conceptually defined 
culture, such as Viemam War 
Narratives, Jewish Literature, or 
Postmodernism. May be repeated. 
Prerequisites: Admission to the 
graduate program in English or by 
Permission of the instructor. 

LIT 5934 Special Topics (3). A course 
designed to give groups of students an 
opportunity to pursue special studies 
not otherwise offered. May be repeated. 

LIT 6934 Special Topics (3). A course 
designed to give groups of students an 
opportunity to pursue special studies 
not otherwise offered. May be repeated. 

LIT 6935 Master's Colloquium (3). 

Individual sections study a specific 
literary topic, selected and presented 
jointly by several faculty members. 
May be repeated. Prerequisites: 
Admission to the graduate program in 
English or by permission of the 
instructor. 

LIT 6970 Master's Thesis (1-6). A 

thesis is required of all graduate 
students of English, to be written in the 
final semester done under the 
supervision of a faculty member. 
Prerequisites: Admission to the grad- 
uate program in English and by per- 
mission of the supervising faculty. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 111 



Environmental Studies 

Joel Heinen, Associate Professor and 

Chairperson 
Bradley Bennett, Associate Professor 
Mahadev Bhat, Associate Professor 
David Bray, Associate Professor 
Anne Hartley, Assistant Professor 
Krishnaswamy Jayacbandran, 

Associate Professor 
Stephen P. Leatherman, Professor 

(International Hurricane Center) 
Michael McClain, Assistant Professor 
Jack Meeder, Research Scientist 

(Southeast Environmental Research 

Center) 
John Parker, Professor 
Tom Pliske, Instructor 
Gary Rand, Associate Professor 
Mike Ross, Research Scientist 

(Southeast Environmental Research 

Center) 
Keqi Zhang, Research Scientist 

(International Hurricane 

Center) 

Affiliated Faculty 

Jerry Brown, Sociology/Anthropology 

Yong Cai, Chemistry 

Janet Chemela, 

Sociology/A n th ropology 
Jim Fourqurean, Biological Sciences 
Piero R. Gardinali, Chemistry 
Kevin Hill, Political Science 
James Huchingson, Religious Studies 
Rudolf Jaffe, Chemistry 
Jeff Joens, Chemistry 
Suzanne Koptur, Biological Sciences 
Rod Neumann, International 

Relations 
Steve Oberbauer, Biological Sciences 
George O'Brien, Education 
Betsy Smith, Social Work 
Berrin Tansel, Civil and 

Environmental Engineering 
Joel Trexler, Biological Sciences 
Bill Vickers, Sociology/Anthropology 

Master of Science in 
Environmental Studies 

The Environmental Studies Department 
offers the Master of Science (M.S.) in 
Environmental Studies degree to train 
students for work in the areas of 
environmental policy, natural resource 
science and management, and 
sustainable development, with 
particular focus on the South Florida 
region, the Caribbean Basin, and Latin 
America. An emphasis of the program 
is the cultural and political milieu in 
which environmental issues of the 
region are embedded. The program is 
interdisciplinary in nature, and students 



-will be encouraged to take advantage of 
University-wide resources, programs, 
and courses m environmental issues, 
such as those in Public Administration, 
International Relations, Biology, 
Chemistry, Earth Sciences, Political 
Science, Economics, and 

Sociology/ Anthropology. 

The M.S. degree program offers two 
options: thesis track and non-thesis 
track. The thesis track involves 
rigorous, solutions-oriented scientific 
research into the functioning of 
environmental systems. This track is 
highly recommended for students who 
are coming directly from undergraduate 
programs and who are interested in 
doctoral research in the fiiture. The 
non-thesis track is primarily designed 
for employed professionals who may 
want to enhance their careers and skills 
through additional academic training 
beyond their bachelor's degree and 
practical training through internships 
with agencies, corporations, non-profit 
organizations or academic institutions. 
It is not recommended for students who 
do not have job experience. 

Admission Requirement 

To be admitted into the master's 
program in Environmental Studies, a 
student must meet the University's 
graduate admission requirements and: 

1. Have a "B" average in upper level 
work, or a combined score of 1000 
(quantitative and verbal) on the GRE, 
which every candidate must take, or 
graduate degree from an accredited 
institution. Foreign students whose 
native language is not English must 
take TOEFL and score a minimum of 
550. 

2. Have submined three letters of 
recommendation, a one-page statement 
of research interests, a copy of all 
transcripts, and a copy of the university 
graduate application to the Graduate 
Program Director on or before March 1 
for the Fall admissions and October 1 
for the Spring admissions. 

3. Have received approval of the 
departmental graduate program 
committee. 

Degree Requirements 

The Master of Science in 
Environmental Studies requires 36 
credits, including the specific 
requirements (listed below) of either 
thesis track or non-thesis track option 
of the degree program. A maximum of 
six credits of post-baccalaureate 
graduate course work may be 
transferred from other institutions, 



subject to approval of the graduate 
committee. Particular courses will be 
determined by the student in 
consultation with the thesis advisory 
committee, faculty advisor, or the 
Graduate Program Director. 
Thesis Track: Course Requirements 
EVR 5320 Environmental Resource 

Management 3 

EVR 5355 Environmental Resource 

Policy 3 

EVR 6950 Graduate Seminar 3 

EVR 6971 Master's Thesis 6 

Research Methods or Analysis Course 3 
Electives 1 8 

Total Credits 36 

The research methods course and 
electives are selected in consultation 
with student's thesis advisor. Elective 
courses are chosen in one of the three 
graduate concentrations (see below) 
and fit the student's thesis Research. 
Additional thesis or research credit, 
above the 6-credit minimum, may also 
be applied as elective credit. A 
maximum of six credit hours may be 
taken at the 4000 level, and a minimum 
of six credit hours must be taken in 
Environmental Studies. Students must 
demonstrate a competency in Statistics 
(equivalent to two courses of 
undergraduate statistics, taken pnor to 
the admission into the program, with a 
"B" or better grade in both courses, or 
two courses of graduate statistics with a 
"C" or better grade in both courses). 
Additional course work may be 
recommended by the advisory 
committee. A maximum of 5 credit 
hours of independent study credit 
(EVR 5907 Graduate Independent 
Study) may be applied toward 
graduation. 

Thesis Track: Graduation 

Requirements 

A grade of 'B' or higher must be 
obtained in all core courses. A grade of 
'C or higher must be obtained in all 
courses, with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 
or higher in the 36 credits. Students 
must pass a comprehensive oral and/or 
written qualifying examination. The 
format of the examination will be 
decided by the thesis advisor and the 
committee. A thesis must be completed 
and defended in consultation with the 
student's graduate thesis committee. 
Non-Thesis Track: Course 

Requirements 

EVR 5320 Environmental Resource 
Management 3 



112 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



EVR 5355 Environmental Resource 

Policy 3 

EVR 5907 Research and Independent 
Study 3 

EVR 6950 Graduate Seminar 3 

Quantitative Methods Course 3 

Electives 21 

Total Credits 36 

The quantitative methods course and 
electives are selected in consultation 
with faculty advisor. Elective courses 
are chosen in one of the three graduate 
concentrations (see below), and to fit 
the student's particular professional 
interest and to ensure sufficient breadth 
and depth of environmental studies 
knowledge. Students carrying out 
research, internship or independent 
study for their non-thesis project 
should sign up for EVR 5907, but may 
not exceed six credits total. EVR 6970 
and EVR 6971 will not count toward 
electives. A maximum of six credit 
hours may be taken at the 4000 level. 
A minimum of twelve elective credits 
must be taken in Environmental 
Studies. All courses except EVR 6950 
must be taken for letter grades. 
Non-Thesis Track: Graduation 
Requirements 

A grade of "B" or higher must be 
obtained in all core courses. A grade of 
"C" or higher must be obtained in other 
courses, with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 
of higher in the 36 credits. A project 
(EVR 5907) must be completed under 
faculty supervision, and the project 
report must be presented as a part of 
the Graduate Seminar class. This work 
may be based on a specific field 
research, internship of current 
occupation. A project is defined as a 
substantial analysis and proposal for 
change of real-world environmental 
problem. 

Graduate Concentrations 
for the Master of Science in 
Environmental Studies 

The Department of Environmental 
Studies currently offers graduate-level 
concentrations in three different areas. 
These are 1) energy management, and 
2) biological management, and 3) 
pollution management. A list of 
electives for each of these 
concentrations can be obtained from 
the Department's Office. 



Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

EVR-Environmental Studies. 
F-Fall semester offering; S-Spring 
semester offering; SS-Summer semester 
offering. 

EVR 5061 South Florida Ecology: 
Field Studies (3). Introduction to 
ecology of South Florida. Series of 
field trips to unique ecosystems 
(Everglades, hardwood hammocks, 
coastal regions). No science back- 
ground required. Intended for teachers. 
Not intended for Environmental 
Studies graduate students. 

EVR 5065 Ecology of Costa Rican 
Rainforest (3). Intensive study of 
Central American tropical forest 
ecosystems conducted for two weeks in 
Costa Rica in sites ranging from 
lowland to high mountains. Primarily 
for teachers. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing or Permission of the 
instructor. (SS) 

EVR 5066 Ecology of the Amazon 
Flooded Forest (3). Study of the 
ecology of the flooded forest with 
emphasis on the relationships between 
plants and animals and the annual 
flooding cycle. The course includes a 
two-week field study at river camp in 
Peru. Prerequisites: Graduate standing 
or Permission of the instructor. (SS) 

EVR 5067 Tropical Forest Conserva- 
tion and Utilization (3). Distribution 
and classification of tropical forest 
ecosystems, their description and the 
ecological principles governing their 
function. Factors influencing tropical 
forest utilization and destruction, and 
strategies for sustainable use and 
conservation. Prerequisites: EVR 5355 
or Permission of the instructor. 

EVR 5236 Air Pollution Dynamics 

(3). A course designed to give an 
understanding of the fates of 
atmospheric pollutants. Scavenging 
processes in the atmosphere; radiation, 
residence times, chemical reactions, 
global transport process, point source 
dispersion and modeling calculations. 
Prerequisite: EVS 3360 or EVR 4231. 

EVR 5300 Topics in Urban Ecology 

(3). Topics include urban and suburban 
ecosystems emphasizing energy 
relations, ecological functions of urban 
landscapes, urban wildlife, urban 
forestry and ecological issues relevant 
to human health and well-being. 
Prerequisites: PCB 3043 or Permission 
of the instructor. 



EVR 5313 Renewable Energy 
Sources (3). An analysis of renewable 
energy sources and energy efficiency 
including wind, biomass, geothermal, 
hydroelectric, solid waste, solar 
heating, solar cooling, and solar 
electricity. Prerequisite: Permission of 
the instructor. 

EVR 5315 Energy Resources and 
Systems Analysis (3). Detailed 
analysis of energy flows in natural and 
man-made systems. Energy systems 
analysis. Energy use patterns. Conven- 
tional and alternate sources of energy. 

EVR 5320 Environmental Resource 
Management (3). The scientific and 
philosophical basis for the management 
of renewable and non-renewable 
energy, mineral, air, water, and biotic 
resources. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing or Permission of the instructor. (F) 

EVR 5330 Tropical Ecosystems 
Management (3). Analyzes the 
dimensions of tropical ecosystems 
management. Organizational and 
institutional dynamics of the 
management of tropical forests, 
agroecosystems, and coastal areas are 
covered. Prerequisites: Permission of 
Instructor. 

EVR 5350 International Organiza- 
tions & Environmental Politics (3). 

The role of international organizations 
in environmental politics and the 
process of their formation and change 
in response to environmental problems. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or 
permission of the instructor. 

EVR 5353 International Energy 
Policy (3). Focuses on the distribution 
of global energy resources and related 
issues. A comparison of the energy 
policies of various countries serves as 
the basis for exploring alternative 
energy policy approaches. Prereq- 
uisites: EVR 5355 or Permission of the 
instructor. 

EVR 5355 Environmental Resource 
Policy (3). A survey of international 
and national environmental policy and 
the legal, economic, and administrative 
dimensions of international accords and 
selected U.S. law. Prerequisites: EVR 
5320 or Permission of the instructor. 
(S) 

EVR 5360 Protected Area Manage- 
ment (3). Interdisciplinary examination 
of ecological, administrative, and 
socio-economic aspects of managing 
protected natural areas. Case studies 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 113 



from developed and developing 
nations. 

EVR 5405 International Biological 
Conservation Accords (3). Survey of 
international biological conservation 
agreements. Topics include bilateral 
migratory wildlife agreements, the 
Beme Convention on Migratory 
Wildlife, CITES, Ramsar, the UNCED 
Biodiversity Treaty and the Statement 
of Principles on Forests. Prerequisites: 
EVR 5355 or Permission of the 



EVR 5406 U.S. Endangered Species 
Management (3). History and imple- 
mentation of the U.S. Endangered 
Species Act. Topics include legal and 
administrative aspects, reauthorization, 
procedures for recovery planning and 
conflict resolution, and biological 
measures of success. Prerequisites: 
EVR 5355 or Permission of the 
instructor. 

EVR 5410 The Human Population 
and Earth's Ecosjstems (3). Explores 
the impact of the human population of 
Earth's ecosystems. Reviews current 
population data at global, regional, and 
local scales. Includes study of specific 
South Florida carrying capacity issues. 

EVR 5907 Research and Indepen- 
dent Study (VAR). The student works 
with a professor on a research project. 
Variable credit. 

EVR 5935 Special Topics (VAR). A 

graduate-level course dealing with 
selected environmental topics. The 
content will not necessarily be the same 
each time the course is offered. 

EVR 5936 Topics in Environmental 
Studies (3). An analysis of several 
current environmental topics. Recom- 
mended for primary and secondary 
school teachers. 

EVR 6322 Methods of Sustainable 
Resource Management (3) A study of 
methods and policies for achieving a 
sustainable environment. Covers 
project appraisal, resource modeling 
and national accounts in the context of 
resource sustainability. Prerequisite. 
Graduate standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

EVR 6329 Watershed Analysis and 
Management (3). An examination of 
the watershed approach to managing 
water and land resources. Integrating 
fimdamental physical, chemical, and 
biological processes with human 



systems at the landscape scale using 
CIS. 

EVR 6950 Graduate Seminar (1) A 

weekly seminar that features guest 
speakers, student presentations, and 
discussions among graduate students 
and faculty. Environmental Studies 
graduate students are required to 
register during three semesters of their 
program. Prerequisite: Permission of 
the instructor. 

EVR 6970 Thesis Research (1-12) 

Supervised research towards 

completion of Master's Thesis. Re- 
peatable. Prerequisite: Permission of 
Major Professor. 

EVR 6971 Master's Thesis (1-12) 

Completion of Master's Thesis. 
Repeatable. Prerequisite: Permission of 
Major Professor. 

EVS 5145 Ecotoxicology (3). Fate of 
chemicals and their acute and chronic 
toxicological effects on aquatic and 
wildlife systems. Dose-response 
relationships, bioavailability, biocon- 
centration, microbial degradation, and 
biomonitoring. Prerequisite: One year 
of biology and one year of chemistry 
and CHM 2200 and lab or permission 
of the instructor. 

EVS 5194 Applied Soil Biology (3). 

Examines biology of soil organisms 
and biologically-mediated chemical 
transformations occurring in soil 
ecosystems. Prerequisite: BSC 1011 

EVS 5637 Ecological Risk Assess- 
ment (3). Evaluation of risks of foreign 
chemicals to aquatic and terrestrial 
systems. Concepts and methodology 
used in the hazard and risk assessment 
of toxic effluents, chemical/oil spills, 
and contaminated sediments. Prerequi- 
site: One year of biology and one year 
of chemistry and CHM 2200 and lab or 
permission of the instructor. 



114 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



Forensic Science 

Jose R. Almirall, Assistant Professor 

and Graduate Program Director 
Kenneth Furton, Associate Professor 

and Director, IFRI 
Administered by the International 
Forensic Research Insititue (IFRI) the 
Master of Science in Forensic Science 
is an interdisciphnary program 
designed to prepare students for careers 
in local, state and national forensic 
science laboratories. The program may 
also be suitable preparation for doctoral 
instruction in several disciplines. 

Admission Requirements 

To be admitted into the Master's 
degree program in Forensic Science, a 
student must: 

1. Hold a Bachelor's degree in a 
relevant discipline from an 
accredited college or university.* 

2. Have a 3.0 GPA in upper-level 
course work and a combined score 
(verbal and quantitative) of 1000 
or higher on the Graduate Record 
Exam. 

3. Two letters of recommendation of 
the student's academic potential. 

4. Be accepted by a faculty sponsor. 

5. Receive approval from the 
Graduate Committee. 

6. Foreign students whose native 
language is not English must take 
the TOEFL (Test of English as a 
Foreign Language) and obtain a 
score of 550 or higher. 

■•Minimum requirement is the 
equivalent of a bachelor's degree in 
biology, chemistry or related science 
approved by the graduate committee. It 
is recommended that students have the 
equivalent of a minor in chemistry 
before taking the required courses. 

Degree Requirements 

The Master of Science in Forensic 
Science consists of a minimum of 32 
credits, including a thesis based upon 
the student's original research or 
completion of an independent study 
report option.* 

A maximum of six credits of post- 
baccalaureate coursework may be 
transferred from other institutions, 
subject to the approval of the Graduate 
Committee. The graduate committee 
will consist of the Graduate Program 
Director and a member from each of 
the following departments: Chemistry, 
Biology, Criminal Justice and 
Psychology. The thesis committee shall 
consist of the research advisor 
(normally the faculty sponsor), and at 



least two additional committee 
members who have some expertise in 
the graduate student's research area. 

Required Courses: 

esc 5406 Forensic Biology 3 

CHS 5xxx Forensic Chemistry 3 
CHS 5531 Forensic Analysis 3_ 



BSC 593 1 Thesis Proposal 1 

or 
CHM 6935 Thesis Proposal I 

or 

approved cognate' 



BSC 5975 


Thesis Defense 




Seminar 1 




or 


CHM 6971 


Thesis Defense 




Seminar 1 




or 




approved cognate' 



BSC 6971 


Thesis 
or 


6 


CHM 6970 


Thesis 
or 

approved cognate' 


6 



Electives 



15 



'Equivalent courses in the student's area(s) 
of thesis concentration may be substituted 
upon approval by the thesis committee in 
consultation with the Graduate Program 
Director (i.e.,CCJ, GLY, PHY, PSY). ^At 
least fifteen credits of additional graduate- 
level courses, workshops and laboratories 
(excluding research and seminar) from 
participating departments approved by the 
thesis committee in consultation with the 
Graduate Program Director. [Consult the 
Director for a selected list of Chemistry, 
Biology, Earth Sciences, Criminal Justice, 
and Legal Psychology courses]. 
*A report option is available for 
students with at least one year of 
forensic science lab work experience. 
Students approved for this option can 
replace "Thesis" with "Independent 
Study in Forensic Science (CHS6905)" 
and the two additional required courses 
"Analytical Toxicology (CHS5XXX)" 
and "Advnaced Quality Control 
(STA5664)". 

Graduation Requirements 

A grade of "C" or higher must be 
obtained in all courses with a 
cumulative average of 3.0/4.0 or 
higher, and presentation and 
submission of a satisfactory research 
thesis to the Thesis Committee. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 115 



History 

Kenneth Lipartito, Professor and 

Chairperson 
Nina Caputo, Assistant Professor 
Daniel A. Colien, Associate Professor 
N. David Cook, Professor 
John C. Coombs, Assistant Professor 
Hugh Elton, Assistant Professor 
Rebecca Friedman, Assistant 

Professor 
Mitchell Hart, Associate Professor 
Sherry Johnson, Associate Professor 
Alan Kahan, Associate Professor 
Howard Kaminsky, Professor 

Emeritus 
Lara Kriegel, Assistant Professor 
Felice Lifsbitz, Associate Professor 
Akin Ogundiran, Assistant Professor 
Joseph F. Patrouch, Associate 

Professor and Director of Graduate 

Studies 
Brian Peterson, Associate Professor 
Joyce S. Peterson, Associate Professor 

and Associate Dean 
Darden Asbury Pyron, Professor 
Howard B. Rock, Professor 
James Sweet, Assistant Professor 
Mark D. Szuchman, Professor and 

Associate Dean 
Clarence Taylor, Professor 
Victor M. Uribe, Associate Professor 
William O. Walker HI, Professor 
Kirsten Wood, Assistant Professor 

Master of Arts in History 

The Department of History offers the 
M.A. degree, with concentration in one 
of four culture areas: United States, 
Africa, Europe, and Latin America. 
Students will choose a Thesis, Report, 
or Internship in Public History option, 
in consultation with the Department's 
Graduate Advisor. Students must make 
their selection either prior to registering 
for their first Research Seminar or 
before completing the first twelve (12) 
semester-hours toward the degree, 
whichever comes first. The degree 
requirements for the M.A. vary 
somewhat, according to the option 
taken. 

Entrance Requirements 

Requirements for admission into the 
M.A. degree program in History are the 
same regardless of the option selected. 
Applicants must also satisfy any 
additional requirements the University 
sets for admission to graduate work. 
Applications should include transcripts 
from any postsecondary institutions 
attended, and two (2) letters of 
recommendation. 



Applicants seeking entrance for the 
Fall Term should prepare all applica- 
tion materials in time for the Depart- 
ment of History to receive them no later 
than February 15. Applicants will be 
notified of the Department's 
recommendation regarding their 
application no later than March 15. 

Application materials from individ- 
uals seeking entrance for the Spring 
Term must be received by the Depart- 
ment of History no later than October 
15. Applicants will be notified of the 
Department's recommendation no later 
than November 15. 

1 . An applicant who feels the earned 
GPA is not indicative of his or her 
ability to be successfijl in a graduate 
degree program may also submit scores 
on the Graduate Record Examination 
which will be taken into consideration 
by the admissions committee in its 
evaluation of the application. The GRE 
must be taken within three years prior 
to the application. 

2. Two letters of recommendation. 
Applicants should ensure that each 
letter on their behalf is signed by the 
author along the sealed flap of the 
envelope. Letters should be mailed 
directly to the Graduate Program 
Director, together with the waiver form 
available from the Department of 
History. 

3. Applicants must have completed 
12 semester-hours of credit (on the 
basis of 3-hour courses) in undergrad- 
uate courses in History. 

Any applicant with fewer than 
twelve (12) semester-hours of under- 
graduate courses in History may be 
accepted provisionally and take a 
maximum of nine (9) semester-hour 
credits by registering for courses under 
the category of Special Student (consult 
the University Catalog and the Office 
of Graduate Admissions). After 
completing nine semester-hours of 
undergraduate course work in History 
(3000-4000 level) with no grade lower 
than a "B" (3.0), the student may apply 
for regular admission. The application 
will be reviewed by the Department's 
Graduate Program Director, in 
consultation with the Department's 
faculty. The above admissions criteria 
are only minimum requirements. All 
applications are reviewed by the 
Graduate Studies Committee which 
makes the final admissions 
recommendation to the University 
Graduate School. 



Degree Requirements 

Thesis Option 

1 . A minimum of 30 semester-hours 
for the degree, including the maximum 
of six semester-hours of Thesis 
Research. All course work must be 
taken at FIU. 

2. A minimum of 24 semester-hours 
of course work. 

3. Two Research Seminars (6 
semester hours). 

4. Reading competence in a foreign 
language. Language competency is 
assessed by the faculty of the 
Department of History, as appropriate. 
Courses required to meet the language 
competency requirement do not count 
towards the degree. The Latin Ameri- 
can concentration requires proficiency 
in Spanish or Portuguese; the modem 
European concentration requires 
proficiency in Spanish, French or 
German; the United States concen- 
tration requires proficiency in any of 
the above, and the medieval or ancient 
concentration in at least one of those 
languages in addition to Hebrew, Latin, 
Greek or another ancient language as 
deemed appropriate by the student's 
advisor. 

5. All students are required to take 
HIS 6059 (Historical Methods). Stu- 
dents may not transfer credits from 
other programs to fiilfill this require- 
ment. 

6. The following limits are placed in 
accumulating credits toward the M.A. 
degree: 

a. No more than three semester-hou- 
rs of HIS 5908 (Independent Study) are 
permitted. 

b. Students must receive the grade of 
"B" (3.0) or better in order for any 
course to count toward the degree. 

c. A maximum of six semester-hours 
of HIS 5930 (Special Topics). 

d. Students are prohibited from 
taking more than one Research Seminar 
per semester. 

e. Students are prohibited from tak- 
ing graduate-level cross-listed courses 
that diey have already taken at the 
undergraduate level. 

7. Core Area. Students will select 
one core area for concentration in 
United States History, European 
History, African History or Latin 
American and Caribbean History, in 
consultation with the Graduate 
Advisor. Twelve semester-hours of 
course work will be taken within the 
core area. 

8. Breadth Areas. Students will take 
six semester-hours in breadth areas. 



116 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



These may be courses taken within the 
Department of History that are outside 
the culture area of concentration, or in 
associated disciplines outside of the 
Department (with the approval of the 
Graduate Advisor), or a combination of 
the two. 

9. Students will register for up to six 
semester-hours of HIS 6970 (Thesis 
Research). 

10. The thesis must be successfully 
defended and formally approved by a 
Supervisory Committee composed of 
three members of the Department of 
History. The Supervisory Committee is 
convened and headed by the thesis 
supervisor. In cases of cross-disciplin- 
ary research, an external reader from a 
different department may form part of 
the Supervisory Committee, substitut- 
ing for one member from the Depart- 
ment of History. 

11. The degree candidate will pre- 
pare the thesis in accordance with the 
regulations stipulated in the Univer- 
sity's Graduate Policies Manual. The 
degree will be conferred after the 
approval of the final version of the 
thesis by the Offices of the Dean of the 
College of Arts and Sciences and the 
University Graduate School. 

Report Option 

1 . A minimum of 30 semester-hours 
of course work are needed for the M.A. 
degree. The report option does not set 
requirements of the Core/Breadth area 
distribution. Students will design their 
distribution needs in consultation with 
the Graduate Advisor and the relevant 
faculty. All courses must be taken in 
the Department of History at FIU. 

2. A minimum of two Research Sem- 
inars (6 semester-hours) must be taken. 
Only Research Seminar papers (2) that 
secure relevant faculty approval may be 
submitted to the Graduate Advisor for 
process of final approval. 

3. The following limits are placed on 
accumulating credits towards the 
Master's degree: 

a. Students must receive the grade of 
"B" (3.0) or better for the course to 
count toward the degree. 

b. HIS 5908 (Independent Study) is 
limited to three semester-hours. 

c. HIS 5930 (Special Topics) is 
limited to six semester-hours. 

d. HIS 6059 (Historical Methods) is 
required of all students. 

Internship in Public History 
Option 

1. A minumum of 30 semester hours 
for the degree, including a 



maximum of 6 semester hours of 
Independent Study tied to an 
internship in the fields of Museum 
Studies or Public History. Six 
credit hours equal to a minimum 
of 520 hours of work that is to be 
documented by the project 
supervisor or musuem director. 
The internship must be approved 
by the Graduate Program Director 
and supervised by a regular 
member of the department's 
faculty. 

2. A minimum of 24 semester hours 
of course work, of which 6 credit 
hours must be taken from the 
following list of courses: 5067 
(Public History), 5084 (Museum 
History), ARHxxxx (Introduction 
to Museum Studies). 

3. A minimum of two Research 
Seminars (6 semester hours). 

4. Reading competency in a language 
other than English. The 
appropriate language is to be 
determined in consultation with 
the Graduate Program Director. 
Language competency is assessed 
by the faculty of the Department 
of History or by a specialist 
designated by the Graduate 
Program Director. 

5. HIS 6059: Historical Methods 

6. The following limits are placed on 
accumulating credits toward the 
Internship in Public History 
Option of the MA degree: 

a) Students must receive 
the grade of 'B' or 
better. 

b) Students may not take 
more than one Research 
Seminar per semester. 

c) Students may not take 
graudate-level cross- 
listed courses which 
they have already taken 
as an undergraduate. 

Students must submit a written report 
following departmental regulations of 
their intemship activities to the 
Graduate Committee before the degree 
can be awarded. 

Core Courses 

The following courses count for all 

options: 

AFH 5905 Readings in African 

History 
AFH 5935 Topics in African 

History 
AFH 69 1 5 Research in African 

History 
AMH 5905 Readings in American 

History 



AMH 5935 Topics in American 

History 
AMH 6915 Research in American 

History 
EUH 5905 Readings in European 

History 
EUH 5935 Topics in European 

History 
EUH 69 1 5 Research in European 

History 
LAH 5905 Readings in Latin 

American History 
LAH 5935 Topics in Latin 

American History 
LAH 6915 Research in Latin 

American History 
HIS 5289 Comparative History 
HIS 5930 Special Topics 
HIS 5908 Independent Study 
HIS 59 1 Advanced Research 

Seminar 
Consultation with the Graduate 
Advisor is required before registering 
for the following courses: 
HIS 6059 Historical Methods 
HIS 6970 Thesis Research 

Doctor of Philosophy in 
History 

The doctoral program in History offers 
students opportunities to concentrate 
on the areas of Latin America, Africa, 
the United States, or Europe. The 
program contains an underiying 
comparative framework based on the 
civilizations of the Atlantic, which 
allows students to explore the many 
dimensions of crosscultural exchanges. 
The curriculum thus emphasizes the 
comparative framework around the 
Atlantic experience, and reflects the 
vitality of a cross-disciplinary 
approach. 

Admission to the Program 

Every applicant must complete an 
application form, and submit college 
transcripts, GRE scores and the 
application fee to the Office of 
Graduate Admissions. A curriculum 
vitae, writing sample, statement of 
research interests, and at least two 
letters of recommendation together 
with the waiver form available from the 
Department of History should be 
submitted to the Graduate Program 
Director. For those transferring into 
the program who already hold the 
M.A., the thesis, when available, 
should be submitted as the sample. 
Admission requires a GRE score 
meeting University standards and a 
minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0. 
Applicants with M.A. degree are 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 117 



required to have a graduate GPA of at 
least 3.25. For students whose native 
language is not English, the TOEFL 
exam is required, with a score of a least 
575 in the paper-based text and 232 in 
the computer-based test. 

Applicants seeking entrance for the 
Fall Term should prepare all applica- 
tion materials in time for the 
Department of History to receive them 
no later than February 15. Applicants 
will be notified of the Department's 
recommendation regarding their 
application no later than March 15. 

Application materials from 

individuals seeking entrance for the 
Spring Term must be received no later 
than October 15. Applicants will be 
notified of the Department's 
recommendation no later than 
November 15. 

Degree Requirements 

Number of Credits and Nature of 
Required Courses 

A minimum of 60 semester-hours of 
credit are required beyond the Master 
of Arts degree of which 9 credits will 
be taken as a common core consisting 
of historical methods, an introductory 
reading seminar in Atlantic Civilization 
and a research seminar in Atlantic 
Civilization. A further 18 credits are 
required in the student's core culture 
area to be chosen from the United 
States, Latin America and the 
Caribbean, Africa, or Europe. An 
additional 12 credits are required in 
geographical/topical areas outside the 
culture area of concentration. These 
out-of-area distribution courses may be 
taken in either History or a cognate 
discipline. A maximum of 24 hours of 
dissertation credit is required. Students 
entering the Ph.D. program without a 
MA should follow the requirements of 
the MA Report Option in structuring 
their first 30 credits of graduate work. 
After completion of these 30 credit 
hours, students' progress and standing 
in the program will be reviewed by the 
Graduate Committee before they are 
allowed to take additional work. 

Language Requirements 

The language requirement may be 
fulfilled in one of two ways: 1) 
thorough knowledge of one foreign 
language and reading knowledge of 
another are required of all students; or 
2) students may demonstrate knowl- 
edge of one language and competency 
in social science quantitative skills. 
Language requirements vary, according 



to the concentration fields. In cases 
where the dissertation will be in the 
history of US or English-speaking 
countries, one language plus the 
quantitative skill is sufficient. In Latin 
American history, Spanish and Portu- 
guese are expected. Language exams 
will be graded on a High Pass, Pass, 
and Fail basis; a High pass is required 
in the student's primary language. 
Students should check with the Depart- 
ment's Director of Graduate Studies to 
determine which languages are appro- 
priate for their program of studies. 

Composition of Course Work 

A minimum of 60 semester-hours of 
work after completion of the Master's 
degree in History are required, of 
which a maximum of 24 hours are 
permitted for the doctoral dissertation. 
The courses form part of the student's 
development in the field, factual and 
interpretive, in preparation for the 
comprehensive written and oral exam- 
inations to qualify for doctoral candid- 
acy. A minimum of 27 hours of resi- 
dency (e.g., three semesters for full- 
time students) is expected prior to 
filing for the qualifying examinations. 
The student may, in consultation with 
the faculty, decide that more work is 
necessary before the exams are at- 
tempted. The standard course load of 
nine hours per semester means that the 
qualifying examinations will usually be 
administered near the end of the second 
year of residency, or at the beginning of 
the third year. 

Course Requirements beyond 
the Master's degree 

Common Core 9 

Culture Area Concentration 1 8 

Out-of-Area Distribution 12 

Dissertation 24 

Total 63 

Common Core Courses: (9) 

Historical Methods * 
Advanced Readings in Atlantic 

Civilization 
Research in Atlantic Civilization 
'('Historical Methods' may not be 
transferred from a Master of Arts 
Program.) 

Culture Area Concentration 
Courses: (18 credits minimum from 
either AFH, AMH, EUH, LAH, or 
WOH core below). 
Readings in African History 
Readings in American History 
Readings in European History 
Readings in Latin American History 



Advanced Readings in American 

History 
Advanced Readings in European 

History 
Advanced Readings in Latin American 

History 
Research in African History 
Research in American History 
Research in European History 
Research in Latin American History 

Out-of-Area Distribution Courses: 

(12 credits outside general field con- 
centration or in other departments). 

Dissertation Research: (18-24 credits) 
The time needed for the research and 
writing of dissertations in History is 
variable, although doctoral candidates 
normally spend one year engaged in 
continuous field research and a second 
year in full-time writing. The program 
expects students to devote a minimum 
of 18 hours to activities related to the 
dissertation subsequent to candidacy, 
that is, after passing the Compre- 
hensive Examinations. 

Comprehensive Examinations 
and the Dissertation. 

Following completion of all course 
work, satisfaction of language 
requirements, the constitution of a 
dissertation committee, and the 
approval of a dissertation proposal by 
that committee, students will be 
required to pass a written and an oral 
comprehensive examination, and to 
write a dissertation. Exams will be 
administered, as needed, no more than 
two times each year. Students should 
consult the Graduate Program Director 
for the date of the exams. The exams 
will cover knowledge in four fields: 1) 
a general field; 2) a 

period/geographical subfield; 3) a 
comparative field; 4) a methodological 
and/or interdisciplinary field. 

Restrictions 

1. The grade of "B" or better is 
required for graduate credit. 

2. At the end of the second semester 
of residence, or upon completion of the 
first 18 credit-hours of work, the 
Graduate Committee will examine and 
evaluate the student's progress and 
prospects. Professors will provide 
detailed written evaluations of the work 
of all first-year Ph.D. students they 
have taught. Students whose progress is 
deemed insufficient will be advised to 
withdraw from the program. 

3. No more than 6 semester-hours of 
Topics (5935) courses toward meeting 
the degree requirements, without 



118 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



permission of the Director of Graduate 
Studies. 

4. No more than 6 semester-hours of 
HIS 5908 (Independent Study) toward 
meeting the degree requirements, 
without permission of the Director of 
Graduate Studies. 

Course Descriptions 

Deflnition of Preflxes 

AFH-African History; AMH-American 
History; EUH- European History; HIS- 
General; LAH-Latin American History; 
WOH- World History. 

AFH 5905 Readings in African 
History (3). An examination of 
historiographical traditions within 
African history. Topics will vary; with 
a change in theme, the course may be 
repeated. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

AFH 5935 Topics in African History 

(3). An examination of specific themes 
in African history. Topics will vary. 
With a change in theme, the course 
may be repeated. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 

AFH 6915 Research in African 
History (3). Research in primary and 
secondary sources on African History. 
Subjects may vary. May be repeated 
with departmental approval. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing. 

AMH 5905 Readings in American 
History (3). Students read books from 
different historiographical traditions 
and with conflicting interpretations 
about an important subject in American 
history. Subjects will vary according to 
professor. Course may be repeated with 
departmental approval. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 

AMH 5935 Topics in American 
History (3). An examination of specific 
themes or topics in American history. 
The theme will vary from semester to 
semester. With a change in theme, the 
course may be repeated. (The theme 
will be announced in the yearly 
schedule). Prerequisite: Grad-uate 
standing. 

AMH 6906 Advanced Readings in 
American History (3). Detailed analy- 
sis of a selected topic in American 
History. May be repeated as topics 
vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

AMH 6915 Researcli in American 
History (3). Students conduct research 
in primary and secondary sources on 
aspects of important subjects in 



American History. Subjects will vary 
according to professor. Course may be 
repeated with departmental approval. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

EUH 5905 Readings in European 
History (3). Students read books from 
different historiographical traditions 
and with conflicting interpretations 
about an important subject in European 
history. Subjects will vary according to 
professor. Course may be repeated with 
departmental approval. Prereq-uisite: 
Graduate standing. 

EUH 5935 Topics in European 
History (3). An examination of specific 
themes or topics in European history. 
The theme will vary from semester to 
semester. With a change in theme, the 
course may be repeated. (The theme 
will be announced in the yearly 
schedule). Prerequisite: Grad-uate 
standing. 

EUH 6906 Advanced Readings in 
European History (3). Detailed 
analysis of a selected topic in European 
history. May be repeated as topics vary. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

EUH 6915 Researcli in European 
History (3). Students conduct research 
in primary and secondary sources on 
aspects of important subjects in 
European History. Subjects will vary 
according to professor. Course may be 
repeated with departmental approval. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

HIS 5067 Public History (3). The 
theory, methods and practice of history 
in non-academic settings, including 
museums, national parks, governmental 
agencies, corporations, and community 
organizations. Prerequisite: Graduate 
Standing. 

HIS 5084 Museum History (3). 

Examines key texts in the history of 
museums in modem Europe and the 
United States. Among issues it 
addresses are nationalism, imperialism, 
memory, and identity politics. 
Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. 

HIS 5289 Comparative History (3). A 

study of specific topics in history that 
cut across regional, national, and 
chronological lines. The topics will 
change from semester to semester, and 
with a change in content, the course 
may be repeated. (The topic of the 
course will be announced in the yearly 
schedule). Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 



HIS 5908 Independent Study (VAR). 
Individual conferences, assigned 
readings and reports on independent 
investigations, with the consent of the 
instructor. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

HIS 5910 Advanced Research 
Seminar (3). Small group sessions will 
analyze particular subject areas in 
history, with the consent of the 
instructor. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

HIS 5930 Special Topics (3). An 
examination of specific themes or 
topics in history. The theme will vary 
from semester to semester, and with a 
change in content, the course may be 
repeated. (The theme will be 
announced in the yearly schedule). 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

HIS 5940 Supervised Teaching (1-3). 

The students will work under the close 
supervision of a regular member of the 
faculty in a mentorial fashion. The 
supervision will cover various aspects 
of course design and delivery in 
history. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing. 

HIS 6059 Historical Methods (3). A 
seminar designed to introduce the 
beginning graduate student to the 
technical aspects of the study of 
history. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing. 

HIS 6159 Historiography (3). An 
introduction to the discipline of history, 
with primary and secondary readings 
allowing exploration of the evolution 
of historical schools of thought over 
several generations. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 

HIS 6906 Advanced Readings in 
Atlantic Civilization (3). A team- 
taught, comparative course dealing 
with the interactions between at least 
two of the geographical fields of 
concentration. May focus on one or 
more topics. Required of all Ph.D. 
students during their first term of study 
in the program. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

HIS 6918 Research in Atlantic 
Civilization (3). A research seminar on 
cross-cultural topics, involving the 
comparative method. Required of all 
Ph.D. students in the program, during 
second term of residence. Topics will 
vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

HIS 6970 Thesis Research (1-10). 

Research toward completion of 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 1 19 



Master's Thesis. May be 
Prerequisite: Permission of Depart- 
ment. 

HIS 7980 Ph.D. Dissertation (1-12). 

Completion of Doctoral Dissertation. 
Prerequisite: Permission of Major 
Professor and Doctoral Candidacy. 

LAH 5905 Readings in Latin 
American History (3). Students read 
books from different historiographical 
traditions and with conflicting interpre- 
tations about an important subject in 
Latin American history. Subjects will 
vary according to professor. Course 
may be repeated with departmental 
approval. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

LAH 5935 Topics in Latin American 
History (3). An examination of specific 
themes or topics in Latin American 
history. The theme will vary from 
semester to semester. With a change in 
theme, the course may be repeated. 
(The theme will be an-nounced in the 
yearly schedule). Pre-requisite: 
Graduate standing. 

LAH 6906 Advanced Readings in 
Latin American History (3). Detailed 
analysis of a selected topic in Latin 
American history. May be repeated as 
topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

LAH 6915 Research in Latin 
American History (3). Students 
conduct research in primary and 
secondary sources on aspects of 
important subjects in Latin Amencan 
history. Subjects will vary according to 
professor. Course may be repeated with 
departmental approval. Prereq-uisite: 
Graduate standing. 

WOH 5236 The Transatlantic Slave 
Trade and the Making of African 
Diaspora, 1441-1807 (3). Topics 
include slavery and economy in Africa 
and the Diaspora, as well as Diasporic 
religion, kinship, gender, sexuality, 
language, oral tradition, resistance, and 
creolization. 

WOH 5237 The African Diaspora 
Since the End of the Slave Trade (3). 
Primary emphasis on history of social 
and intellectual movements. Topics 
include slave resistance, black 
nationalism, socialism, anti- 

colonialism, gender, art and literature, 
and afrocentrism. 



120 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



International Relations 

John F. Clark, Associate Professor 

and Chairperson 
Clair Apodaca, Assistant Professor 
Ken I. Boodhoo, Associate Professor 
Thomas A. Breslin, Associate 

Professor 
Ralph S. Clem, Professor 
Peter R. Craumer, Associate 

Professor 
Francois Debrix, Assistant Professor 
Damian J. Fernandez, Professor 
Jennifer Gebelein, Assistant Professor 
Harry D. Gould, Visiting Lecturer 
Gail M. Hollander, Assistant 

Professor 
Antonio Jorge, Professor 
Paul Kowert, Associate Professor 
Charles G. MacDonald, Professor 
Felix Martin, Assistant Professor 
Mohiaddin Mesbahi, Associate 

Professor 
Rod Neumann, Associate Professor 
Nicholas G. Onuf, Professor 
Patricia L. Price, Assistant Professor 
Elisabeth Prugl, Associate Professor 
William O. Walker HI, Professor 
Gregory B. Wolfe, Emeritus Professor 

The Department of Intemationai 
Relations offers two advanced degrees: 
a Master of Arts in Intemationai 
Studies and a Doctor of Philosophy in 
Intemationai Relations. The Depart- 
ment emphasizes a multidisciplinary 
approach to graduate education. This 
emphasis reflects the many disciplines 
and perspectives represented in the 
Department, and it results in a vital and 
challenging exchange of ideas among 
students and faculty members. Together 
they investigate a stimulating range of 
topics, from the traditional concems of 
foreign policy and national security to 
contemporary global issues such as 
democratization, the environment, 
human rights, refugees, and social 
movements. These scholarly inquiries 
are generally informed by an 
engagement with social and political 
theory, to which students are exposed 
through a closely coordinated set of 
graduate reading seminars. Many 
members of the Department have 
longstanding regional interests, as do 
many other members of the University 
faculty. The program boasts of 
strengths in Africa, Central Asia, Latin 
America and the Caribbean, the Middle 
East, and Russia. 

The Department of Intemationai 
Relations is an affiliate member of the 



Association of Professional Schools of 
Intemationai Affairs. 

Master of Arts in 
International Studies 

The MA program draws on the 
curricular resources of all the 
University's social science depart- 
ments. It is designed to prepare 
students for careers in government, the 
private sector, or intemationai agen- 
cies, or for doctoral studies. 
The College of Arts and Sciences offers 
certificate programs in African-New 
World Studies and in Latin American 
and Caribbean Studies. Other regional 
certificate programs are planned. The 
graduate program encourages its MA 
students to pursue regional certification 
in conjunction with their work in the 
MA program. 

Admission Requirements 

To be considered for admission to the 
MA program, applicants must have a 
3.0 in upper-level work, or its 
equivalent, from a recognized institu- 
tion, and a combined score of 1000 on 
the first two sections of the Graduate 
Record Examination. For applicants 
who are not native speakers of English, 
a minimum of 550 on the TOEFL is 
required. Admissions requirements are 
minimums and even if the minimums 
are met, admission is not assured. 
Scholarships and renewable assistant- 
ships are available. 

Degree Requirements 

The MA program requires a minimum 
of 36 semester hours of credit at the 
graduate level. Undergraduate courses 
taken to satisfy prerequisites for 
graduate courses will not count toward 
the 36 hour minimum requirement. The 
Graduate. Advisory Committee may 
approve the transfer of a maximum of 
six graduate credits earned in an other 
recognized institution of higher 
education. 

Core Sequence (15 credits) 

All MA students must complete a core 
sequence of five courses (15 credits), 
each of which reflects a distinctive 
disciplinary point of view. These 
courses are: 
GEO 6473 Space, Place and 

Identity 
INK 6706 Politcal Economy of 

Intemationai Relations 
INR5615 Research Design in 

Intemationai Relations 



INR 6609 Dynamics of 

Intemationai Relations 
in the 20"" Century 

INR 6017 Comparative Approach- 
es to Area Studies and 
Global Issues 

Major Field (9 credits) 

MA students also must select a major 
field of study in ( I ) Global Institutions 
and Issues, or (2) Intemationai 
Relations and Foreign Policy, by taking 
three courses (9 credits) from an 
extensive list of approved courses in 
the social sciences. Students must take 
at least two courses offered by the 
Department of Intemationai Relations 
to satisfy the field requirement. 

Electives: (6 credits) 

To satisfy the program's elective 
requirement, students may take two 
additional courses (6 credits) from the 
field lists. Students wishing to elect 
other graduate-level courses offered by 
the University may do so with 
permission of the Graduate Director. 

Tliesis and Alternatives (6 credits) 

To complete degree requirements, MA 
students have the option of (a) writing 
a thesis or (b) taking a comprehensive 
examination. Before electing any of 
these options, students must 
demonsfrate competence in the use of a 
foreign language other than English. 
Any student electing (a) to write a 
thesis will normally take 6 credit hours 
of thesis supervision and prepare a 
thesis proposal subject to the approval 
of three members of the University 
faculty. A member of the Department 
of Intemationai Relations must chair 
any thesis committee thus constituted. 
No thesis may be approved until the 
writer has defended it in a public 
examination. Any student electing (b) 
to take a comprehensive examination 
must have 6 semester hours of course 
work (including independent study 
courses), instead of thesis supervision, 
for a total of 36 semester hours. One 
half of the comprehensive examination 
will cover the core sequence of courses, 
and the other half will cover the 
student's major field. 

Doctor of Philosophy in 
International Relations 

The Ph.D. program is designed to 
prepare students for careers as scholars 
and teachers. It provides students with 
a solid theoretical foundation while 
allowing individual latitude for 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 121 



rigorous research on a wide range of 
subjects. Students work closely with 
dedicated, internationally recognized 
scholars. 

Admission Requirements 

To be considered for admission to the 
Ph.D. program, all applicants must 
have a bachelor's degree, or its 
equivalent, from a recognized institu- 
tion of higher education, or have 
received a bachelor's degree before 
they matriculate in the program. 
Applicants should have a minimum 
undergraduate grade point average of 
3.2, or its equivalent, a minimum grade 
point average of 3.5 for all combined 
graduate work, or a combined score of 
1100 on the first two sections of the 
Graduate Record Examination. For 
applicants who are not native speakers 
of English, a minimum of 575 on the 
TOEFL is required. Scholarships and 
renewable assistantships are available. 
Applications will be reviewed only in 
the spring term for fall admission. 

Degree Requirements 

The Ph.D. requires a minimum of 90 
semester hours of credit at the graduate 
level. 

Undergraduate courses taken to satisfy 
prerequisites for graduate courses will 
not count toward the 90 hour minimum 
requirement. Students earning a MA 
degree within the last five years may 
count 36 credits toward the 90 hour 
minimum requirement. The Graduate 
Advisory committee may approve the 
transfer of a maximum of 12 graduate 
credits earned in a non-degree capacity 
from the Department of International 
Relations, and a maximum of 24 sem- 
ester hours of graduate credit earned in 
other units of the University or other 
recognized institutions of higher 
education. 

Core Sequence (18 credits) 

All Ph.D. students must complete a 
core sequence of six courses (18 
credits). These courses are: 
GEO 6473 Space, Place, and 

Identity 
rNR5615 Research in 

International Relations 
INR 6604 International Relations 

Theory I 
INR 6608 International Relations 

Theory II 
INR 6609 Dynamics of 

International Relations 

in the 20"" Century 
INR 6706 Political Economy of 

International Relations 



Major and Minor Fields (21 credits) 

Students must select a major field of 
study in (1) Global Institutions and 
Issues (2) Comparative Area Studies 
(3) Foreign Policy and Security 
Studies, or (4) International Law by 
taking four courses (12 credits) from a 
list of approved courses. Students must 
also offer a minor field of study 
consisting of at least three courses (9 
credits), (a) by choosing a second field 
from the above list, (b) by taking a 
Ph.D. field in some other teaching unit 
of the University, or (c) by creating a 
field in consultation with the Graduate 
Director and three members of the 
University faculty. 

Electives (27 credits) 

To satisfy the Ph.D. program's elective 
requirement, students must take 27 
credits of additional course work, 
including independent study courses. 
Students wishing to elect a course or 
courses offered in the University may 
do so with permission of the Graduate 
Director. Students must demonsfrate an 
ability to use a foreign language other 
than English for scholarly purposes. 

Comprehensive Exams 

Within 6 months of completing the 
foreign language requirement and 66 
hours of course work, students must sit 
for written comprehensive examina- 
tions on the core sequence in both of 
their fields. Students may sit for their 
comprehensive examination during the 
term in which they complete these 
requirements. After passing all three 
parts, students are examined orally on 
all parts. 

Dissertation 

Within 3 months of passing written and 
oral examinations, students should 
publicly present a dissertation proposal 
that is acceptable to a committee of at 
least three qualified scholars. Two 
members of the committee, including 
the dissertation supervisor, must be 
members of the Department of Inter- 
national Relations. Other members 
must be approved by the Graduate 
Director. 

Students advance to candidacy when all 
members of their dissertation 
committees accept their proposals. 
To complete program requirements, 
Ph.D. degree candidiates must enroll 
for 24 dissertation credits and therefore 
maintain mafriculation until they 
defend their dissertations in public. 



Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

GEA-Geography-Regional (Area); 

GEO-Geography-Systemic; INR- 

Intemational Relations; PUP-Public 

Policy. 

F-Fall semester offering; S-Spring 

semester offering; SS-Summer semester 

offering. 

GEA 6409 Landscapes of Violence 
and Healing in the Americas (3). 

Nation building in the Americas cycles 
between violence (political, economic, 
cultural) and healing (through magic, 
rituals, religion or the arts). 
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. 

GEO 5415 Topics in Social Geo- 
graphy (3). Topics discussed include 
geographic aspects of population and 
ethnicity, with emphasis on sources and 
analysis of data and pertinent concepts. 
Prerequisite: GEA 2000 or Permission 
of the instructor. 

GEO 5557 Globalization (3). 

Examines the transformation of the 
world economy and of global finance, 
the changing significance of 
sovereignty and territoriality, the 
effects of space-time compression on 
everyday life, and associated shifts in 
culture and identity. 

GEO 6473 Space, Place and Identity 

(3). Explores space, place and identity 
in international relations. Focus is on 
the importance of the spatial relations 
in structing the politics of nationalisms, 
ethnicities, and genders. 

INR 5036 Politics of Globalization 

(3). Intensive examination of state and 
global institutions that have shaped 
process of economic globalization. 
Topics include impact on sovereignty, 
human rights, labor and agenda-setting 
of large and small nation-states. 

INR 5086 Islam in International 
Relations (3). Analysis of the role of 
Islam in shaping the dynamics of 
contemporary international relations. 
Emphasis on the ideological, cultural, 
and political role of Islamic movements 
and states, and their relations with the 
West. 

INR 5087 Ethnicity and the Politics 
of Development (3). This course 
examines the conceptual and 
substantive dimensions of ethnicity in 
the context of world politics and 
political development. The course will 
highlight ethnicity and ethnic groups as 
critical factors in North-South politics. 



122 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



INR S255 Seminar in African 
Development (3). Examines political, 
economic and social development in 
Sub-Saharan Africa in an international 
context. Introduces students to sources 
for research in African international 
development. Prerequisites; Under- 
graduate course on Africa or graduate 
standing. 

INR 5315 Foreign Policy Analysis 
(3). Comparative examination of 
theories of foreign policy making, 
emphasizing the international, do- 
mestic, and organizational contexts in 
which national policies are formulated 
and enacted. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing or Permission of the 
instructor. 

INR 5409 International Law I (3). 
Role of international law in the 
relations of states; nature, development, 
theory, sources of law; international 
personality; jurisdiction, including 
territory and nationality; dispute 
settlement. 

INR 5507 International Organiza- 
tions I (3). Study of international 
organizations and their role in 
international relations. Emphasis on 
their legal status, rule-making 
capacities and role in dispute settlement 
and maintenance of peace. 

INR 5607 International Relations 
and Development (3). An analysis and 
conceptualization of the process of 
development as it takes place in the 
international context. Special attention 
given to the role of international 
organizations in promoting develop- 
ment and the manner in which differ- 
ences in developmental levels condi- 
tions international relations. 

INR 5615 Research Design in 
International Relations (3). 

Introduces graduate students to the 
principles of formulating and defending 
a compelling research design, gathering 
and analyzing evidence, and producing 
scholarship. 

INR 5906 Independent Study (VAR). 

Directed independent research. Re- 
quires prior approval by instructor. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

INR 5935 Topics in International 
Relations (3). Varies according to the 
instructor. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

INR 5943 Internship in International 
Relations (1-6). Permits student to gain 
direct experience with analysis and 



conduct of international affairs. Work 
required for intemship must be 
determined in consultation with 
instructor. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing and permission of the 
instructor. 

INR 5945 Graduate Pedagogy (1). 

The development of teaching skills 
required by graduate assistants, 
including classroom skills, designing 
examinations, etc. Prerequisite: Grad- 
uate Assistants. 

INR 6008 Colloquium in Interna- 
tional Studies (3). A systemic and 
International Relations theory supple- 
mented with a consideration of legal, 
institutional and developmental issues. 
Prerequisite for MIB students: INR 
6603 (World Politics). 

INR 6017 Comparative Approaches 
to Area Studies and Global Issues (3). 
Provides students the necessary tools to 
approach global issues from the 
comparative perspective of how they 
play out in different regions of the 
world. 

INR 6019 Seminar in Comparative 
Area Studies (3). Examines contem- 
porary issues in area studies, with 
focused attention on the interplay 
between domestic and international 
forces and the conditioning effects of 
global structures. Topics vary by 
instructor. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

INR 6056 Environment and Develop- 
ment (3). Examines the relationship of 
development and the environment from 
a social theory perspective. Emphasizes 
Third World problems such as 
deforestation and soil erosion. 

INR 6089 International Relations 
and Human Rights (3). Examination 
of national and international factors 
affecting respect for human rights. 
Special emphasis on intemational 
human rights groups, foreign policy, 
and politics of policy implementation. 

INR 6107 U.S. Foreign Policy (3). 

Examines the structures and processes 
that shape U.S. policy toward other 
nations. Topics include: systemic 
constraints, state/society relations, 
interest groups, bureaucracy, and 
leadership. 

INR 6209 Comparative Foreign 
Policy of Latin America (3). Theories, 
history, and political-economic 
dynamics of Latin American foreign 
policies and intemational relations. (S) 



INR 6266 Seminar in Russian 
Foreign Policy (3). Close analysis of 
the theoretical foundation and policy 
evolution of Soviet/Russian role in 
intemational affairs of the 20th century. 

INR 6338 Seminar in Strategic 
Studies (3). Close analysis of key 
traditional and non-traditional concepts 
of the field of Strategic Studies, i.e. the 
genesis of power, war and peace, 
security and their relevance to and 
impact on Intemational Relations. 

INR 6406 International Law II (3). 

The course, which is the second of a 
two course graduate sequence, focuses 
on special topics, e.g., treaties, state 
responsibility, force and jurisdiction. 
Prerequisite: Intemational Law I. 

INR 6604 International Relations 
Theory I (3). An analysis of the 
traditional approaches to intemational 
relations theory, beginning with the 
classic works in the field. Emphasizes 
the philosophical and normative 
underpinnings of realism, idealism, 
liberalism and radicalism. 

INR 6605 Contemporary Interna- 
tional System (3). Study of synthetic 
review of theories of development and 
approaches to the study of development 
as a process of social, political, and 
economic change. Prerequisites: CPO 
5036 and ESC 5025. 

INR 6606 Political Psychology of 
International Relations (3). Study of 
psychological explanations for political 
behavior in intemational relations. 
Topics include: cognitive, motiva- 
tional, and bureaucratic decision 
theories; leadership; and public 
opinion. 

INR 6608 International Relations 
Theory II (3). Surveys contemporary 
theories of Intemational Relations, 
including neo-realism, theories of 
cooperation among states, approaches 
to intemational political economy, and 
critical theories. 

INR 6609 Dynamics of International 
Relations in the 20th Century (3). 

Surveys the 20th century's large events 
and important tendencies decade by 
decade, as registered by intellectual and 
policy elites at the time. 

INR 6706 Political Economy of 
International Relations (3). Examines 
contempory theoretical and policy 
debates in the area of intemational 
political economy. Reviews key 
concepts, theories and approaches used 



College of Arts and Sciences 123 



Graduate Catalog 



in the study of IPE. Prerequisites: INR 
Theory I or Permission of the 
instructor. 

INR 6975 Thesis (1-6). Registration 
for students working on their thesis. 
Prerequisites: All other course worlc for 
the Master's in International Studies. 

INR 7980 Ph.D. Dissertation (1-12). 

Supervised research on an original 
research project to be submitted in 
partial fulfillment of doctoral degree 
requirements. Prerequisite: Permission 
of Major Professor and Doctoral 
Candidacy. 



124 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



Latin American and 
Caribbean Studies 

Eduardo A. Gamarra, LACC, 

Director 
Michael W. Collier, LACC, Graduate 

Program Director 
LACC Academic Advisory Committee 
Irma Alonso, (Economics) 
David Bray, (Environmental Studies) 
Victor Uribe, (History) 
William Vickers, (Sociology/ 

Anthropology) 
The Master of Arts in Latin American 
and Caribbean studies (MALACS) is a 
multidisciplinary program that requires 
students to concentrate half their 
courses in one disciplinary or topical 
area. The program's objective is to 
prepare graduates for careers as 
analysts for the public and private 
sectors. Many graduates also continue 
on to doctoral-level studies in several 
academic disciplines. While the 
program is strongest in the social 
sciences, opportunities are available for 
students to also concentrate their study 
in the areas of cultural studies, 
environmental studies, history, 
international business, and modem 
languages. Full-time students can 
expect to complete the program in 12- 
24 months. The program stresses a 
close faculty-student advising 
relationship and includes the 
participation of visiting scholars from 
Latin America, the Caribbean, and 
other regions. 

MALACS is administered by the 
FIU Latin American and Caribbean 
Center (LACC), one of the largest area 
and language studies centers in the US 
that specializes in the region. In 
addition to the MALACS degree, 
LACC also administers a joint 
JD/MALACS degree program with the 
FIU College of Law that allows the 
student to receive both degrees in 
substantially less time that would be 
required to pursue each degree 
individually. LACC also administers a 
partnership degree program with the 
Joint Forces Staff College. More 
information on joint and parmership 
degrees is found at the end of this 
section. 

For further information please 
contact LACC Graduate Program 
Director, Latin American and 
Caribbean Center, Florida International 
University, University Park DM 353, 
Miami, Florida 33199. Phone: (305) 
348-2894; Fax: (305) 348-3593; email: 



the 



at 



MALACS(QJfiu.edu . or see 
MALACS web site 

http://lacc.fiu.edu/academic programs/ 
masleis arts frm.htm . 

Admission Requirements 

Applicants must meet the following 
minimum admissions requirements: 

1. Completed FIU graduate 
application. 

2. A baccalaureate degree from an 
accredited institution for higher 
education, or equivalent. 

3. A grade-point average of at 
least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale (or 
equivalent) for the last two 
years of undergraduate study 
and for any post-baccalaureate 
study. 

4. A combined verbal and 
quantitative score of at least 
1000 on the ORE. 

5. A statement of purpose 
consistent with the goals of the 
program. 

6. Three letters of 
recommendation. 

7. For foreign applicants whose 
native language is not English, 
a TOEFL score of at least 550. 

8. Application for M.A. 
assistantship or fellowship (if 
applicable). 

9. Approval by the program 
admissions committee. 

Note: The above admission 
requirements are minimums and not all 
students meeting them are assured 
admission. Students with either a 
grade-point average or ORE score 
below the above minimums may still 
apply and request admissions 
consideration under waiver of normal 
minimum standards. The student must 
provide an explanation of why the 
waiver is being requested. 

Degree Requirements 

The MALACS program requires 36 
graduate credits. Nine credits consist 
of the program's multidisciplinary 
gateway course (3 credits) and two 
research methods courses (6 credits). 
Twelve credits are taken in one of the 
MALACS concentrations (Caribbean 
Studies, Cultural Studies, Economics, 
Environmental Studies, History, 
Intemational Business, International 
and Comparative Law, Intemational 
Relations, Modem Languages, Political 
Science, Security Studies or 
Sociology/ Anthropology). Nine credits 
of breadth requirements are taken from 
at least two other areas of MALACS 



concentration or from courses outside 
the concentrations with Latin American 
and Caribbean content. MALACS 
offers four graduation exit options: 

1. Completion of thesis project (6 
credits), 

2. Participation in one semester 
internship and preparation of a 
major research paper (6 credits), 

3. Completing two directed research 
projects (6 credits), 

or 

4. Taking six (6) additional credits of 
Latin American and Caribbean 
courses and passing a 
comprehensive examination. 

As a non-credit requirement, students 
must demonstrate reading proficiency 
in either Spanish or Portuguese or, 
when approved, another foreign 
language from Latin America or the 
Caribbean. 

Note: The Interiiational and Compara- 
tive Law concenfration is only 
available to students in the joint 
JD/MALACS degree program 
described below. 

MALACS Course Work 

A minimum of thirty credits of course 
work, to be selected from the approved 
list of MALACS graduate courses, is 
required. Courses must be passed with 
a grade of 'B' or better and disfributed 
as follows: 

1) The gateway course, LAS 6003 
Survey of Latin America and the 
Caribbean (3 credits). 

2) The student's MALACS concen- 
fration graduate course in research 
methods (3 credits) and LAS 6930 
Latin American and Caribbean 
Data Analysis (3 credits). 

3) MALACS concenfration: twelve 
credits (four courses) selected 
from the graduate offerings of the 
student's concenfration 
(Caribbean Studies Cultural 
Studies, Economics, Environ- 
mental Studies, History, 
Intemational Business, Inter- 
national and Comparative Law, 
Intemational Relations, Modem 
Languages, Political Science, 
Security Studies, or 
Sociology/Anthropology). The 
introductory theory or the gateway 
course in the concentration are 
recommended. 

4) Breadth requirement: nine credits 
(three courses) selecced from the 
graduate offerings of at least two 
MALACS concenfrations other 
than those of the student's primary 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 125 



concentration. Subject to 

approval of the LACC Graduate 
Program Director, up to six credits 
(two courses) may be selected 
from the graduate offerings of FIU 
programs outside those of the 
MALACS concentrations, pro- 
vided the courses have substantial 
Latin American and Caribbean 
content. 
FIU policy also allows the transfer of 6 
graduate credits from other universities 
or between FIU graduate programs, 
provided the courses meet program 
subject matter requirements. 

Foreign Language 

Each student is required to demonstrate 
reading proficiency in either Spanish or 
Portuguese, or in another language 
such as French, Haitian Creole, or 
Dutch when justified by research 
interests. Proficiency is demonstrated 
by scoring at least 'intermediate high' 
on the ACTFL/ETM exam for Spanish, 
Portuguese, or French. For other 
languages, corresponding tests of 
proficiency and levels of achievement 
will be required. 

Intermediate-high on the 

ACTFL/ETS exam (1-plus on the US 
government scale) can normally be 
attained by students with two 
undergraduate semesters of basic 
langauge instruction and at least one 
undergraduate semester of intermediate 
(3000/4000 level) instruction. 

Attainment of the required language 
proficiency is the responsibility of the 
student and extra instruction to achieve 
the required proficiency level must be 
taken outside the MALACS 
curriculum. Fellowships and scholar- 
ships to study Portuguese and Haitian 
Creole are available to selected 
MALACS students. Opportunities for 
students to improve their language 
proficiency is provided in courses 
offered by the FIU Modem Languages 
Department, through special summer 
institute language programs, and by 
taking designated Foreign Language 
Across Curriculum (FLAC) courses. 
Completion of a FLAC course meets 
the MALACS language proficiency 
requirement. 

Research Methods 

A minimum of six credits (two courses) 
in research methods must be fulfilled 
by taking the student's MALACS 
concentration graduate course in 
research methods and LAS 6930 Latin 
American and Caribbean Data 
Analysis. When a concentration area 



does not have a specific graduate 
course in research methods, then the 
student should take SYA 6305 
Research Methods I to meet this 
requirement. The LACC Graduate 
Program Director may approve 
substitute research methods courses 
depending on the student's previous 
research methods background and 
research interests. 

MALACS Graduation 
Exit Options 
Thesis Option 

Students pursuing careers in the public 
or private sectors requiring strong 
research and analytic skills, or students 
planning to continue with Ph.D. 
studies, are encouraged to select the 
MALACS thesis exit option. The 
thesis is publicly defended and 
approved by a committee of three 
faculty members. The committee chair 
and at least one other member must be 
from FIU departments offering courses 
in the MALACS concentrations. The 
committee as a whole must be drawn 
from at least two concentration 
departments. During the thesis period, 
students register for thesis credits (six 
credits minimum required) with their 
thesis committee chair. 
Internship Option 

As a substitute for the thesis option, 
students may select an internship exit 
option. The internship exit option 
entails a one semester resident 
internship in either the public or private 
sectors. Internships are related to the 
student's MALACS concentration. A 
major professor from a department 
offering MALACS concentration 
courses supervises the internship. 
Internships may be arranged through 
LACC or by the student. Upon 
completion of the resident internship, 
the student prepares and publicly 
defends a major research paper related 
to the internship. During the internship 
period, students register for internship 
credits (six credits minimum required) 
with their major professor. 
Directed Research Option 
Another substitute for the thesis option 
is a directed research exit option. 
Students selecting this option will 
prepare and publicly defend two major 
research papers during this option. 
One research paper will address a topic 
in the student's MALACS 
concenfration and the second paper an 
interdisciplinary topic of more general 
interest to- the region. Students will 



register for two directed research 
courses (3 credits each) with thier 
major professor(s). 

Comprehensive Examination Option 

A comprehensive examination exit 
option is available for mid-career 
professionals who already possess 
strong research and analytic skills or 
for those whose educational interests 
do not encompass a thesis or internship 
option. Students selecting the 

comprehensive examination option 
complete two additional courses in 
Latin American and Caribbean studies 
(6 credits required). The LACC 
Graduate Program Director arranges for 
the student to take comprehensive 
examinations covering the student's 
MALACS concentration and 

multidisciplinary Latin American and 
Caribbean issues. 

Course Descriptions 

Deflnitions of Prefixes 

FLAC - Foreign Language Across 

Curriculums; 

LAS - Latin American and Caribbean 

Studies; 

SSI - Interdisciplinary Courses. 

F - Fall semester offering; S - Spring 

semester offering; SS - Summer 

semester offering. 

LAS 5907 Independent Study (1-3). 

Supervised readings or field research 
and fraining. Prerequisite: Permission 
of instructor. (F,S,SS) 

LAS 5920 Teaching Latin American 
Studies (1). Fundamentals in the 
teaching of Latin American Studies. 
Relevance and effectiveness of various 
methods and strategies, as well as 
pedagogy-related exercies. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing. (F) 

LAS 5933 Graduate Seminar in 
Latin American Studies (1). Exposes 
graduate students to interdisciplinary 
issues for students pursuing the MA in 
Latin American and Caribbean Studies. 
May be repeated for credit up to 3 
times. Prerequisites: Graduate Stand- 
ing. (F,S,SS) 

LAS 6003 Survey of Latin America 
(3). Seminar is a multidisciplinary, 
multimedia survey of the history, 
politics, societies and cultures of the 
countries of Latin America and the 
Caribbean. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. (F) 

LAS 6025 Seminar: The Humanities 
in Cuba (3). Interdisciplinary graduate 
seminar on the development of the 



126 College of Arts and Sciences 

humanities in Cuba, focusing on the 
major movements, artists and works in 
architecture, visual arts, literature, 
music and dance. (F) 

LAS 6905 Directed Research in Latin 
American and Caribbean Studies (3). 
Directed research under a major 
professor conducted to meet MALACS 
graduation requirements instead of a 
thesis. Two directed research courses 
are required. Prerequisite: Completion 
of all MALACS courses. (F,S,SS) 

LAS 6930 Latin American and 
Caribbean Data Analysis (3). This 
course introduces students to basic 
empirical data analysis techniques 
while they complete an empirical 
research project in a Latin American or 
Caribbean topic. Prerequisite: 

Recommend a graduate research design 
course. (S) 

LAS 6934 Research Seminar in Latin 
American and Caribbean Studies (3). 
Introduces students to intermediate 
level research methods while they 
complete a directed research project in 
Latin American and Caribbean studies. 
Prerequisites: LAS 6930 or equivalent. 
(F) 

LAS 6942 Internship in Latin 
American and Caribbean Studies (1- 

6). Supervised internship leading to a 
major research paper in Latin American 
and Caribbean Studies. Prerequisites: 
All MALACS Course Work completed. 
(F,S,SS) 

LAS 6970 Thesis (1-6). Requires 
students to enroll for thesis research for 
at least one credit hour every semester 
until thesis is completed. Prerequisite: 
Completion of all MALACS courses. 
(F,S,SS) 

MALACS Approved Courses 

A sample of courses approved for each 
MALACS concentration is provided on 
the MALACS web site at 
http://lacc.fiu.edu/academic programs/ 
masters arts fhn.htm . 

Courses approved for the MALACS 
program are posted each semester on 
the FIU Class Schedule at 
http://sis2.fiu.edu/classschedule . 
Under Special Programs and Certificate 
Programs select Latin American & 
Caribbean Studies. All courses listed 
from 5000 through 7000 series may be 
applied to the certificate. Approved 
courses are also posted each semester 
outside LACC (DM 353) or are 
available from the Graduate Program 
Director. 



Graduate Catalog 



MALACS Joint and Partnership 

Degree Programs 

Joint JD/MALACS Degree Program 

An agreement between the FIU College 
of Law and the College of Arts and 
Sciences approved by the University 
Graduate School allows students to 
pursue simultaneously the Juris Doctor 
(JD) and MALACS degrees, thereby 
saving considerable time over pursuing 
each degree separately. Students must 
meet the entrance requirements for both 
the JD and MALACS programs. 
Fifteen credits from the law school 
curriculum will be allowed toward the 
MALACS program and will constitute 
a MALACS concentration in 
International and Comparative Law. 
Nine credits from the MALACS 
program will also count toward the law 
school curriculum requirements. All 
other requirements to receive either the 
JD or MALACS degree must be met. 
Additional information on the joint 
degree program is available on the 
College of Law and MALACS web 
sites. 

MALACS Partnership Degree with 
the Joint Forces Staff College 
An agreement between FIU and the 
Joint Forces Staff College (JFSC) of 
the National Defense University, allows 
JFCS graduates to transfer 15 JFSC 
credits toward the MALACS degree 
completion requirements, which 
constitute a MALACS concentration in 
Security Studies. Students wishing to 
take advantage of this partnership must 
be accepted into the MALACS 
program through normal application 
procedures. Once accepted, students 
are required to take 15 credit hours of 
MALACS courses, including LAS 
6003, LAS 6930, and three breadth 
courses in at least two MALACS 
concentrations other than Security 
Studies. JFSC students must also 
complete a MALACS exit option (6 
credit hours) and meet MALACS 
language proficiency requirements. 
Additional information on the JFSC 
partnership degree program is available 
on the MALACS web site. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 127 



Liberal Studies 

Paul Draper, Professor and Graduate 

Program Director 
Sean Allen-Hermanson, Assistant 

Professor 
Michelle Beer, Associate Professor 
Bongkil Chung, Professor 
Christopher Grau, Assistant 

Professor 
Bruce Hauptii, Professor 
Kenneth Henley, Professor 
George Kovacs, Professor 
Kenneth Rogerson, Professor 
Paul Warren, Associate Professor 

Master of Arts in Liberal 
Studies 

The Master of Arts in Liberal Studies 
(MALS) program is designed for 
students who possess a strong desire 
for intellectual growth and challenge 
and an interest in interdisciplinary 
research. It offers students 

individualized programs of graduate 
study that transcend traditional 
disciplinary boundaries and yet lie 
squarely within the venerable tradition 
of liberal education. 

The MALS curriculum includes 
three sets of activities: 

1. Students take a least three 
Great Ideas Seminars, in 
which they study the books, 
theories, and discovenes that 
have had the greatest impact on 
the humanities, the natural 
sciences, and the social 
sciences. 

2. Students undertake an 
Interdisciplinary Concentra- 
tion consisting of at least six 
courses spanning three different 
disciplines unified by a theme 
chosen by the student in 
consultation with an advisor. 

3. Students complete a Capstone 
Project - either a Master's 
Thesis or a shorter Master's 
Essay - on a topic related to the 
unifying theme of their 
Interdisciplinary Concentration. 

Unlike many graduate programs in 
Liberal Studies, which have no 
departmental "home," the MALS 
program at FlU is housed in the 
Department of Philosophy, whose 
members (listed above) have 
responsibility for coordinating the 
program, teaching and arranging guest 
lectures for the Great Ideas Seminars, 
helping students develop their 
Interdisciplinary Concentrations, and 



ensuring that Capstone Projects are 
supervised by appropriate experts. 

Degree Requirements 

Thirty-three semester credit hours of 
course work and a cumulative GPA of 
3.0 are required for the MALS degree. 
Great Ideas Seminars* 9 

Interdisciplinary Concentration* 1 8 

Master's Essay or Master's Thesis 3 or 6 
*Since 33 hours are required of all 
MALS students. Students who receive 
3 hours for a Master's Essay instead of 
6 hours for a Master's Thesis must 
complete either four Great Ideas 
Seminars (12 hours) or a 21 hour 
Interdisciplinary Concentration. 

A prospective MALS student may 
have already completed some graduate 
level courses either at FIU or 
elsewhere. Such graduate work may 
count towards the MALS degree and in 
particular towards the student's 
Interdisciplinary Concentration if the 
following conditions are satisfied. 

1 . The student received a grade of 
"B" or better in those courses. 

2. Those courses are approved by 
the student's advisor and the 
Graduate Program Director. To 
obtain such approval, the 
courses must be appropriately 
related to the theme unifying 
the student's Interdisciplinary 
Concentration. 

3. No more than six semester 
hours can be transferred from 
another university. 

Admission Requirements 

To be admitted into the MALS 
program, a student must: 

1. Hold a bachelor's degree from 
an accredited college or 
university; 

2. Have a grade point average of 
3.0 or better in upper-level 
work; 

3. Obtain a combined score 
(verbal and quantitative) of 
1000 or higher on the Graduate 
Record Exam (GRE); 

4. Obtain a score of 550 or higher 
on the Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL) if 
the student is not a native 
speaker of English; and 

5. Submit a substantial writing 
sample that is judged by the 
MALS admissions committee to 
be of satisfactory quality. 



Course Descriptions 

Deflnition of Prefixes 

IDS - Interdisciplinary Studies. 
F-Fall semester offering; S-Spring 
semester offering 

IDS 6931 Great Ideas Seminar: The 
Age of Science (3). Great ideas from 
the natural sciences. Study of the 
historical development, the evidential 
basis, and the broader implications of 
those ideas. Reflection on the nature 
and methods of modem science. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

IDS 6937 Great Ideas Seminar: 
Special Topics (3). Intensive 
interdisciplinary investigation of a 
single great idea such as natural 
selection or infinity. Study of that 
idea's cross-disciplinary development, 
its impact, and its uses and misuses. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

IDS 6938 Great Ideas Seminar: 
Human Nature (3). Great religious, 
philosophical, and scientific ideas 
about human nature. Discussion of the 
view that human beings have no nature. 
Study of such thinkers as Confucius, 
Plato, Darwin, Freud, Skinner, and 
Sartre. Prerequisite: Graduate 

standing. 

IDS 6939 Great Ideas Seminar: 
Politics and Society (3). Great ideas in 
political and social thought from Plato 
to the present. Topics include political 
obligation, the nature of the state, 
social and economic justice, social 
contract, liberty, the rule of law, and 
community. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

IDS 6972 Master's Essay (3). For 
students working on a master's essay. 
Oral presentation required. Prereq- 
uisite: All other coursework for the 
Master of Arts in Liberal Studies 
Degree. 

IDS 6973 Master's Thesis (1-6). For 

students working on a master's thesis. 
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and 
permission of the instructor. 



128 College of Axts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



Linguistics 

Feryal Yavas, Lecturer and Director, 

English 
Lynn M. Berk, Professor, English 
Jean-Robert Cadely, Assistant Professor, 

Modern Languages 
Isabel Castellanos, Professor, Modern 

Languages 
Tometro Hopkins, Associate 

Professor, English 
John B. Jensen, Professor, Modern 

Languages 
Peter A. Machonis, Associate 

Professor, Modern Languages 
Ana Roca, Professor, Modern 

Languages 
Ellen Thompson, Assistant Professor, 

English 
Mehmet Yavas, Professor, English 

Master of Arts in 

Linguistics 

Admission Requirements 

Applicants must meet the University's 
Graduate genera! admissions require- 
ments; GPA of minimum 3.0, two 
letters of recommendation, and an 
essay on the reasons of pursuing an 
M.A. in linguistics. In addition, non- 
native speakers of English must submit 
a TOEFL score of 600. 

Degree Requirements 

The Master of Arts in Linguistics 
requires 36 graduate hours in 
Linguistics. Twenty-one of the 36 
hours are in required courses, the 
remainder in electives. Beside main- 
taining an overall 3.0 average in all 
courses, students must also obtain a 
minimum of a 'B' in each of the 
required courses ('B-' is not acceptable 
in these courses) and a minimum of a 
'C in each elective course a ('C-' is 
not acceptable). Course work will be as 
follows: 

Required Courses (All Students): (15) 
LIN 5018 Introduction to 

Linguistics 3 

LIN 5206 Phonetics 3 

LIN 6323 Phonology 3 

LIN 6510 Syntax I 3 

LIN 6805 Semantics 3 

A minimum of one course from each 
of the following groups: 
Structure Course (3) 
LIN 5501 English Syntax 
LIN 5341 Morphology 
SPN 5 705 Structure of Spanish 
FRE5855 Structure of French 
LIN 6572 Structure of a Non Indo- 
European Language 



History Course (3) 

LIN 5 1 07 History of the English 

Language 
LIN 5146 Historical and 

Comparative Linguistics 
SPN 5 845 H istory of the Language 
FRE5845 History of the Language 
The remaining hours must be selected 
from other Linguistics (LIN) graduate 
offerings. Certain non-linguistics 
courses can be accepted with the 
approval of the Lingusitics Committee. 

Foreign Language Requirement 

Students with no background in foreign 
languages will be required to take LIN 
6572 "Structure of a Non-Indo- 
European Language" as a part of their . 
36-hour program. 

Examination Requirement 

Students will be required to take a 
written comprehensive exam in 
Linguistics. For most students, this will 
be a written exam. For any student who 
is writing a thesis and has a GPA of 3.7 
or above, the thesis defense will 
constitute the comprehensive exam. 

Thesis/Non-Thesis Options 

Students may elect to follow a thesis or 
a non-thesis option. Those electing to 
write a thesis will take up to six credit 
hours in thesis research as part of their 
required 36 hours. When completed, 
the thesis will be defended orally 
before a committee made up of three 
faculty members, including the thesis 
director. Those electing to follow the 
non-thesis option will take all 36 hours 
in non-thesis courses. 

Course Descriptions 

Definition of Preflxes 

LIN - Linguistics. 

F-Fall semester offering; S-Spring 

semester offering 

LIN 5017 Cognitive Linguistics (3). 

Explores the nature of human reason 
and categorization as revealed by 
language. Examines the role of 
metaphor, imagination, and bodily 
experience in human thought proces- 
ses. Prerequisite; LIN 3010, LIN 3013, 
LIN 5018 or the equivalent. 

LIN 5018 Introduction to Linguistics 

(3). Introduction to Linguistic theory 
and analysis, with special emphasis on 
the major components of languages and 
modem approaches to their analysis. 
(F) 

LIN 5019 Metaphor, Language, and 
Literature (3). Examines nature of 



metaphor as a cognitive phenomenon; 
how we use metaphor to conceptualize 
basic physical and cultural notions; role 
of cognitive metaphor in literature. 
Prerequisite: LIN 3013 or LIN 5018. 

LIN 5107 History of the English 
Language (3). Study of the 
development of the grammar and 
vocabulary represented in samples of 
the English language from the 8th 
century to modem times. Prerequisite: 
LIN 3010, LIN 3013, LIN 5018 or the 
equivalent. (F) 

LIN 5108 Language Universals (3). 

Universal properties of language from 
two major perspectives: those of 
Typologists and of Universal Gram- 
marians. A viriety of linguistic 
structures and theoretical explanations 
are examined. Prerequisite: LIN 3013, 
or LIN 3010, or LIN 5018, or the 
equivalent. 

LIN 5146 Historical and Comp- 
arative Linguistics (3). The study of 
linguistic methodology for determining 
historical and genetic relationships 
among languages. Diachronic syntax 
and its methodology will be included. 
The relevance of historical and 
comparative linguistics to similar 
processes found in language acqui- 
sition and to socio-linguistics will be 
studied. Prerequisite: LIN 5206. 

LIN 5206 Phonetics (3). The study of 
the articulatory mechanisms used in 
producing speech sounds and of their 
acoustic properties. Ear training in the 
phonetic franscription of speech sounds 
used in the world's languages. (F) 

LIN 5207 Acoustic Phonetics (3). 
Infroduction to principles of acoustic 
and instrumental phonetics, including 
the physics of speech sounds and use of 
the sound specfrograph and other 
insfruments. Prerequisites: LIN 3010, 
LIN 3013, LIN 5018 or the equivalent, 
plus one additional course in phonetics 
or phonology. Corequisite: One of the 
prerequisites may be counted as a 
corequisite. 

LIN 5211 Applied Phonetics (3). 
Study of sounds and suprasegmentals 
of English. Comparison of phonetic 
features of English with those of other 
languages. Universal constraints and 
markedness in learning second/foreign 
language pronunciation. Prerequisites: 
LIN 3010, LIN 3013, or LIN 5018 or 
the equivalent. 

LIN 5431 Morphology (3). The study 
of linguistic methodology for 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 129 



determining the morphological and 
syntactic structures of languages. 
Distinct theoretical approaches to 
analysis will be emphasized. Recent 
developments in linguistics that bear on 
language-universal and language- 
specific aspects of morphology. 
Prerequisite: LIN 6323. 

LIN 5501 English Syntax (3). This 
course will focus on syntactic analysis 
of English. Although the course itself is 
non-theoretical, it uses a variety of 
underlying theoretical approaches to 
train students in syntactic analysis. 
(F,S) 

LIN 5574 Languages of the World 
(3). Introduces the student to the 
richness of human linguistic diversity 
while demonstrating concurrently the 
underlying universality of human 
language. Prerequisite: LIN 3010, LIN 
3013, or LFN 5018 or the equivalent. 

LIN 5601 Sociolinguistics (3). 

Principles and theories of linguistic 
variation with special attention to 
correspondences between social and 
linguistic variables. Prerequisite; LIN 
3010, LIN 3013, LIN 5018 or the 
equivalent. 

LIN 5603 Language Planning: 
Linguistic Minority Issues (3). 

Introduction to the field of language 
planning. Minority linguistic issues in 
developing and developed nations: 
official languages, endangered 
languages, and language as problem 
and/or resource. Prerequisite: LIN 
3010, LIN 3013, LIN 5018 or the 
equivalent. 

LIN 5604 Spanish in the United 
States (3). An examination of the 
sociolinguistic research into Spanish in 
the U.S.: varieties of Spanish, language 
attitudes, language contact and change, 
and aspects of language use. 
Prerequisite: LIN 3010, LIN 3013, LIN 
5018 or the equivalent. 

LIN 5613 Dialectology (3). The 

geography of language variation: 
linguistic geography, atlases, national 
and regional studies. Dialectology 
within a modem sociolinguistic 
framework; research approaches. 
Prerequisite: LIN 3010, LFN 3013, LfN 
501 8 or the equivalent. 

LIN 5625 Studies in Bilingualism (3). 

Readings and analysis of bilingual 
programs and binational goals. 
Prerequisite: LIN 3010, LIN 3013, LIN 
5018 or the equivalent. 



LIN 5715 Language Acquisition (3). 

The study of the processes underlying 
normal first-language acquisition. The 
focus is on the development of the 
subsystems of language (i.e., the 
phonological, morphological, syntactic, 
and semantic subsystems) in the child's 
growing command of his or her native 
language. 

LIN 5720 Second Language Acquisi- 
tion (3). Research, theories, and issues 
in second language acquisition. Topics 
include the Monitor Model, the role of 
the first language, motivation, age, 
individual differences, code-switching, 
and the environment; affective 
variables and attitudes. 

LIN 5732 Speech Errors and 
Linguistic Knowledge (3). This course 
focuses on the nature of linguistic 
errors produced by speakers in their 
native languages. Students will read 
research on errors produced by adult 
native speakers of a language, on first- 
language errors of children, and on 
errors made by persons acquiring a 
second language. 

LIN 5733 Methods of Teaching 
Accent Reduction (3). Theory and 
methods regarding the teaching of 
pronunciation to non-native speakers of 
a language. Hands-on practice in 
helping non-native speakers improve 
their pronunciation. Prerequisite: LIN 
3010, LIN 3013, LIN 5018 or the 
equivalent. 

LIN 5734 Teaching Linguistics (1). 

Introduces graduate students to 
pedagogical issues and strategies in the 
teaching of linguistics. Topics include 
textbook selection, writing syllabi, 
student assessment, and professional 
ethics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

LIN 5748 Survey of Applied 
Linguistics (3). Application of 
linguistics to problems in many fields, 
such as literature, translation, criminal 
justice, speech pathology, computer 
science, communications, public 
policy, and language instruction. 
Prerequisite: LFN 3010 or LIN 3013 or 
LFN 50 1 8 or the equivalent. 

LIN 5760 Research Methods in 
Language Variation (3). Research in 
sociolinguistics, dialectology, 

bilingualism: problem definition, 
instrument design, data collection and 
analysis, including sampling techniques 
and statistical procedures. Prerequisite: 
LIN 5601, LIN 5625, LIN 5613 or 
other course in variation. 



LIN 5825 Pragmatics (3). Study of the 
relationships between language form, 
meaning, and use. Special emphasis on 
speech act theory. Prerequisite: LIN 
3010, LIN 3013, LIN 5018 or the 
equivalent. 

LIN 5934 Special Topics in 
Linguistics (3). Content to be 
determined by instructor. May be 
repeated for credit when content 
changes. Prerequisite: LIN 3010, LIN 
3013, or LIN 5018. 

LIN 6323 Phonology (3). The study of 
phonological processes in languages 
and linguistic methodology for 
phonological analysis. Emphasis will 
be placed on recent theoretical 
questions concerning such issues as the 
abstractness of underlying forms, the 
naturalness of processes, and the 
relevance of markedness to a 
phonological description. Prerequisite: 
LIN 5206, Phonetics. (S) 

LIN 6510 Syntax I (3). This course 
will expose students to the theoretical 
models on which much contemporary 
work in English grammar is based. 
Students will read works on selected 
topics such as structural linguistics, 
transformational grammar, and case 
grammar. Specific content may change 
from semester to semester. May be re- 
taken for credit when content changes. 
Prerequisites: LIN 3010, LIN 3013, 
LFN 5018 or the equivalent. (S) 

LIN 6520 Syntax II (3). In-depth 
analysis of contemporary theories of 
syntax. May be repeated for credit with 
content changes. Prerequisite: LFN 
6510. (F) 

LIN 6562 Discourse Analysis (3). The 

study of the organization of language 
above the sentence level, such as 
conversational interactions and written 
texts. Prerequisite: LIN 3010, LIN 
3013, LIN 5018 or the equivalent. 

LIN 6572 Structure of a Non-Indo- 
European Language (3). An in-depth 
study of the structure of a non-Indo- 
European language. The particular 
language to be studied will be varied 
from semester to semester. Course may 
be repeated. Prerequisites: LFN 5018, 
LIN 5206, LFN 5222, and a course in 
syntax. 

LIN 6602 Language Contact (3). A 

study of the language changes that 
occur when two or more languages 
come into contact with one another. 
The course will also examine the 



130 College of Arts and Sciences Graduate Catalog 

characteristics of the individuals and 
communities involved in such contact. 

LIN 6706 Current Research Methods 
in Psycholinguistics (3). Review of 
current research in psycholinguistics, 
including adult production and 
comprehension, first and second 
language acquisition, and language 
disorders. Students conduct original 
research in one of these areas. 
Prerequisite; LIN 3010, LIN 3013, or 
LIN 501 8 or the equivalent. 

LIN 6805 Semantics (3). The study of 
linguistic semantics. Language-uni- 
versal and language-specific properties 
of the semantic structure of words and 
sentences will be considered. Students 
will be exposed to a variety of 
approaches to the study of meaning. 
Prerequisite: Introductory course in 
Linguistics or Permission of the 
instructor. (S) 

LIN 6905 Independent Study (VAR). 

This course is designed for students 
who wish to pursue specialized topics 
in advanced Linguistics: phonetics, 
phonology, morphology, syntax, se- 
mantics, psycholinguistics, historical 
linguistics, or language contact. Prereq- 
uisite: Introductory course in Linguis- 
tics or Permission of the instructor. 

LIN 6934 Special Topics in 
Linguistics (3). Content to be 
determined by students and instructor. 
(Approval of the Department required.) 

LIN 6937 Seminar in Linguistics (3). 

Topics vary each semester. 
Prerequisite: A previous course in the 
same sub-area of Linguistics. 

LIN 6971 Thesis (1-6). Prerequisite: 
Completion of all other requirements 
for the M.A. degree in Linguistics. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 131 



Mathematics 

Enrique Villamor, Professor and 

Chairperson 

Gerardo Aladro, Associate Professor 

Laura DeCarIi, Assistant Professor 

Tedi Draghici, Assistant Professor 

Julian Edward, Associate Professor 

Domitila Fox, Instructor 

Susan Gorman, Instructor 

Gueo Grantcbarov, Assistant 

Professor 
Steven M. Hudson, Associate 

Professor 
George Kafkoulis, Associate 

Professor 
Mark Leckband, Associate Professor 
Tbomas Leness, Associate Professor 
Bao Qin Li, Associate Professor 
Diana McCoy, Instructor 
Abdelhamid Meziani, Professor 
Ricbard Nadel, Instructor 
Taje Ramsamujb, Associate Professor 
David Ritter, Associate Professor 
Micbael Rosenthal, Instructor 
Dev K. Roy, Associate Professor 
Ricbard L. Rubin, Associate 

Professor 
Philippe Rukimbira, Associate 

Professor 
Anthony C. Shershin, Associate 

Professor 
Minna Shore, Instructor 
Theodore Tacbim Medjo, Assistant 

Professor 
Louis Roder Tcbeugoue Tebou, 

Assistant Professor 
John Zweibel, Associate Professor 

Master of Science in 

Mathematical Sciences 

Admission 

The following are in addition to the 
University's graduate admission 
requirements: 

1 . Bachelor's degree in mathematics, 
applied mathematics or mathematical 
sciences from an accredited university 
or college. 

2. A 'B' average or higher in upper 
division mathematics courses. 

3. Graduate Record Examination 
taken within the past five years, with at 
least 650 on the quantitative portion 
and 500 on each of the other two parts. 

4. Three letters of recommendation 
concerning the candidate's achieve- 
ment and potential, from persons 
familiar with the candidate's previous 
academic performance. 

5. Approval of the Graduate 
Committee. 



Core Courses 

The student must complete a minimum 
of 24 semester hours of graduate course 
work. This course work must include 5 
courses from the following two lists, 
with at least 2 from each list. 



List A: 






MAA 5406 


Complex Analysis 


3 


MAA5616 


Introduction to Real 






Analysis 


3 


MAP 5316 


Ordinary Differential 






Equations 


3 


MAS 5311 


Graduate Algebra 


3 


MAS 5312 


Galois Theory 


3 


MHF5107 


Graduate Set Theory 


3 


MHF 5306 


Graduate Mathematical 






Logic 


3 


MTG 5326 


Introduction to 






Algebraic Topology 


3 


List B: 






MAD 5405 


Numerical Methods 


3 


MAP 5236 


Mathematical 
Techniques of 






Operations Research 


3 


MAP 5326 


Partial Differential 






Equations 


3 


MAP 5407 


Methods of Applied 






Analysis 


3 


MAS 5145 


Applied Linear Algebra 3 



The remaining 9 hours of course work 
will be used to fashion a coherent 
program of study best suited to the 
student's needs and interest. This 
requires the prior approval of the 
Graduate Committee and may be done 
in one or a combination of the 
following ways: a) Further work from 
lists A and B. b) A maximum of 2 
courses of independent study, taken 
with Mathematical Sciences faculty, c) 
Graduate level course work in 
Engineering, Physics or Statistics. 

Master's Project 

The student will complete his or her 
graduation requirements by writing an 
expository paper under the direction of 
a faculty member. The student may 
earn six credit hours (MAT 5970 
Master's Research) in preparing the 
project. Successful completion of the 
Master's project requires a grade of 'B' 
or higher, as well as approval of a 
committee consisting of three 
mathematics faculty (including the 
director). 

Remarks: The course work must be 
completed with a 3.0 GPA average or 
higher and a grade of 'C or higher in 
each course. A maximum of two 
courses may be transferred into the 
program from outside the University, 



subject to the approval of the Graduate 
Committee. A total of 30 credit hours is 
required for graduation. 

Course Descriptions 

Definition of Preflxes 

MAA-Mathematics, Analysis; MAD- 
Mathematics, Discrete; MAP- 
Mathematics, Applied. 
COT 5420 Theory of Computation I 
(3). Abstract models of computation; 
halting problem; decidability and 
undecidability; recursive function 
theory. Prerequisite: MAD 3512. 

COT 6400 Analysis of Algorithms 

(3). Complexity behavior of algorithms 
is described for Set Manipulation, 
Graph Theory, and Matrix Manip- 
ulation problems, among others. P and 
NP classes of problems reveal an 
inherent difficulty in designing efficient 
algorithms. Prerequisite: COP 3530. 

MAA 5406 Complex Analysis (3). 

Harmonic functions, normal families, 
Riemann mapping theorem, univalent 
functions, infinite products and entire 
flinctions, elliptic functions, analytic 
continuation. Prerequisites: MAA 4211 
and MAA 4402. 

MAA 5616 Introduction to Real 

Analysis (3). Lebesgue Measure and 
Integral with applications to Integral 
Transforms. Prerequisite: MAS 3105, 
MAA 4211, MAP 4401 or MAA 4212. 

MAD 5405 Numerical Methods (3). 

Advanced ideas and techniques of 
numerical analysis for digital computa- 
tion. Topics include: linear and non- 
linear systems, ordinary differential 
equations, continuous system modeling 
techniques, and languages. Prereq- 
uisites: MAS 3105 and MAP 2302. 

MAP 5236 Mathematical Techniques 
of Operations Research (3). This 
course surveys the mathematical 
methods used in operations research. 
Topics will be chosen from linear 
programming, dynamic programming, 
integer programming, network analy- 
sis, classical optimization techniques, 
and applications such as inventory 
theory. Prerequisite: MAP 5117 and 
MAS 3105 and either CGS 3420 or 
COP 2210. 

MAP 5316 Ordinary Differential 
Equations (3). Existence and Uniq- 
ueness theorem, matrix formulation, 
physical applications, regular singular 
points, autonomous systems, Laplace 
transform, special topics. Prerequisites: 



132 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



MAA 3200, MAA 4402 and MAS 
3105. 

MAP 5317 Advanced Differential 
Equations for Engineers (3). Topics 
may include Bessel Functions and other 
special functions arising from classical 
differential equations, Sturm-Liouville 
problems, partial differential equations, 
transform techniques. Credit may not 
be counted for both MAP 4401 and 
MAP 5317. Credit for MAP 5317 may 
not be applied toward the Master's 
degree in Mathematical Sciences. 
Prerequisites: MAC 2313 and MAP 
2302. 

MAP 5326 Partial Differential 
Equations (3). Basic concepts of first 
and second order PDE's, application to 
optics and wave fronts, Cauchy 
problem, Laplace equation. Green's 
function, Dirichlet problem, heat 
equation. Prerequisite: MAA 421 1. 

MAP 5407 Methods of Applied 
Analysis (3). Convergence, fixed point 
theorems, application to finding roots 
of equations, normed function spaces, 
linear operators, applications to 
numerical integration, differential and 
integral equations. Prerequisites: MAA 
421 1, MAP 2302, and MAS 3105. 

MAP 5467 Stochastic Differential 
Equations and Applications (3). 

Review of measure theory, stochastic 
processes, Ito Integral and its 
properties, martingales and their 
generalisations, stochastic differential 
equations, diffusions. Applications to 
boundary value problems and finance. 
Prerequisites: MAS 3105, MAP 4401, 
MAA 421 1, MAA 5616 or permission 
of instructor. 

MAS 5145 Applied Linear Algebra 

(3). Concepts of finite dimensional 
vector spaces. Theorems that have 
infinite dimensional analogues and 
those with important applications are 
emphasized. Prerequisites: MAS 3105 
and MAA 3200. 

MAS 5311 Graduate Algebra (3). A 

study of the basic material on groups, 
rings and vector spaces. Topics include 
the Jordan-Holder theorem, structure of 
modules over Euclidean domains and 
canonical forms of matrices. Prereq- 
uisites: MAS 4301 or equivalent. 

MAS 5312 Galois Theory (3). 

Extension fields, ruler and compass 
constructions, fundamental theorem of 
Galois Theory, cyclotomic and cyclic 
extensions, solutions of equations by 
radicals, selected topics. Prerequisites: 



MAS 5311 or Permission of the in- 
structor. 

MAT 5907 Independent Study 
(VAR). Individual conferences, as- 
signed reading, and reports on inde- 
pendent investigations. 

MAT 5921 Training in Mathematical 
Exposition (1). Students prepare and 
present supervised lectures on under- 
graduate mathematical topics to fellow 
students. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing. 

MAT 5970 Master's Research (1-6). 

Research toward preparation of 
master's project. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of graduate committee. 

MHF 5106 Graduate Set Theory (3). 
Zermelo-Frankel axioms, ordinals and 
cardinals, Godel's constructible uni- 
verse, large cardinals, forcing and the 
independence of the Continuum Hypo- 
thesis and the Axiom of Choice. Pre- 
requisites: MHF 4102 or MAA 421 1 or 
Permission of the instructor. 

MHF 5306 Graduate Mathematical 
Logic (3). First order languages, con- 
struction of models from constants, ad- 
vanced construction of models, non- 
standard models, recursion theory, RE 
sets, Turing degrees, oracle con- 
struction. Prerequisites: MHF 4302 or 
Permission of the insfructor. 

MHF 5325 Theory of Recursive 
Functions (3). Turing machines, 
decision problems, coding, s-m-n 
theorem. Rice's and Myhill's theorems, 
oracles, degrees, finite and infinite 
injury constructions. Prerequisite: 
MHF 4302 or COT 5420. 

MTG 5326 Introduction to Algebraic 
Topology (3). Classification of sur- 
faces, fundamental group, homotopy 
type, Van Kampen theorem, simplicial 
complexes, infroduction to homology 
theory. Prerequisites: MAS 4301 and 
MTG 4302. 

STA 5446-STA 5447 Probability 
Theory I and II (3-3). This course is 
designed to acquaint the student with 
the basic fundamentals of probability 
theory. It reviews the basic foundations 
of probability theory, covering such 
topics as discrete probability spaces, 
random walk, Markov Chains (transi- 
tion matrix and ergodic properties), 
sfrong laws of probability, convergence 
theorems, and law of iterated 
logarithm. Prerequisite: MAC 2313. 

STA 6807 Queueing and Statistical 
Models (3). Review of probability 



concepts, basic probability distribu- 
tions, Poisson process, queuing mod- 
els, statistical models. Prerequisites: 
Permission of the instructor, MAC 
2312 and either STA 3033 or STA 
4321. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 133 



Modern Languages 

Isabel Castellanos, Professor and 

Chairperson 
Aurelio Baldor, Instructor 
Pascale Becel, Associate Professor 
Jean-Robert Cadely, Associate 

Professor 
Eric Camayd-Freixas, Assistant 

Professor 
Ricardo Castclls, Associate Professor 
James O. Crosby, Professor Emeritus 
Leonel A. de la Cuesta, Professor 
Asuncion Gomez, Assistant Professor 
Yvonne Guers-Villate, Professor 

Emeritus 
Danielle Johnson-Cousin, Associate 

Professor 
Santiago Juan-Navarro, Associate 

Professor 
John B. Jensen, Professor 
Peter A. Machonis, Associate 

Professor 
Ramon Mendoza, Professor (Biscayne 

Bay Campus) 
Marian Montero-Demos, Associate 

Professor 
Ana Roca, Professor 
Reinaldo Sanchez, Professor 
Juan Torres-Pou, Assistant Professor 
Maida Watson, Professor 
Marcelle Welch, Professor 
Theodore Young, Associate Professor 
Florence Yudin, Professor 

Master of Arts in Spanish 

Admission Requirements: To be 
admitted into the Master's degree 
program, a student must: 

1. Hold a Bachelor's degree in 
Spanish from an accredited university 
or college. Special cases, such as 
holders of a degree in a related field, 
will be evaluated individually by the 
Department. 

2. Take the Graduate Record 
Examination (GRE) quantitative and 
verbal sections. Foreign students must 
also take the TOEFL and attain a 
minimum score of 550. 

3. Have attained a minimum 3.0 
grade-point average (B average), 
during the last two years of her/his 
undergraduate program as determined 
by the FlU Admissions Office, or attain 
a score of at least 1,000 on the GRE. 

4. Demonstrate the ability to speak 
Spanish with near-native fluency and to 
write in Spanish. Demonstrate the 
ability to read English with excellent 
proficiency. An examination may be 
necessary. Contact the Director of 
Graduate Study (305-348-2851; 
Modem Languages, FIU, Miami, FL, 



33199). Students with deficiencies will 
be required to complete certain course 
work before beginning graduate study. 

5. Submit two letters of 
recommendation, preferably from 
persons in the academic community 
who are in a position to comment on 
the applicant's suitability for graduate 
work, a resume, and a writing sample in 
Spanish, preferably a term paper or 
thesis, of analytical nature, on a literary 
subject. 

6. Receive approval of the 
departmental graduate committee. 
Admission is competitive and meeting 
all minimum requirements does not 
guarantee automatic entrance into 
the program. 

Degree Requirements 
The Master's degree program consists 
of 33 semester hours of graduate level 
work. A maximum of six credits of 
graduate course work may be 
transferred into the program from other 
institutions, subject to the approval of 
the departmental graduate committee. 
Six core courses and three elective 
courses are required at the 5000-and 
6000-level. Some courses have 
prerequisites which do not count 
toward the degree. All core courses in 
literature must be taken with or after 
SPW 5806. Courses taken before SPW 
5806 are considered to be electives. 

Core Courses (18 credits) 

SPW 5 806 Methods of Literary 

Research (must be taken 
in the first year 
of study) 3 

SPN 5705 The Structure of 

Spanish 3 

One course in peninsular Spanish 
Literature ofthe 19* or 20* 
centuries. 3 

One course in either Medieval Spanish 
Literature or Literature of the 
Golden Age. 3 

Two courses in Spanish American 
Literature. (Colonial or 20* century) 6 

Electives 

A student must take at least nine 
graduate credits of electives, as 
follows: three in Spanish or Latin 
American literature, and six from one 
or more of the following areas: Spanish 
or Spanish American literature. 
Linguistics, Translation/Interpretation, 
or Culture of Spain, Latin America or 
Hispanics in the United States. 

Graduation Requirements 

To receive the MA. degree in Spanish, 
a student must complete all the course 



work with a 3.0 GPA or higher, and 
receive a minimum grade of 'B' in 
every course. Upon completion of 27 
graduate credits (core and elective 
courses), students will have the option 
of writing a thesis (equivalent to six 
credits), or taking two elective courses 
and writing a research paper. The thesis 
will be presented to an ad hoc 
committee chosen by the student and 
his or her advisor. The research paper 
must be submitted to a committee of 
two professors of the Department. 
Upon completion of 33 credits, the 
student will be required to take 
Comprehensive Examinations, based 
on course work and on the 
Department's Graduate Reading List 
(the exams must be passed with a 
minimum grade of 'B'; they may be 
taken no more than twice). 
Doctor of Philosophy in Spanish 
The doctoral program in Spanish offers 
students the opportunity to specialize in 
one of two major fields: Peninsular 
Spanish Literature or Spanish 
American Literature. Minors are 
available in Peninsular Spanish 
Literature, Spanish American 

Literature, and Hispanic Linguistics. 

Admission Requirements 

To be admitted to the doctoral program, 
a student must: 

1. Hold a Bachelor's degree in 
Spanish from an accredited college or 
university. Special cases, such as 
holders of a degree in a related field, 
will be evaluated individually by the 
Department. 

2. Take the Graduate Record 
Examination. 

3. Demonstrate the ability to speak, 
understand, read, and write in Spanish 
with near-native fluency. Demonstrate 
the ability to speak and read in English 
with excellent proficiency. For students 
whose native language in not English, 
the TOEFL is required, and they must 
obtain a score of 550 or higher. 

4. Have attained a minimum grade 
point average of 3.0 (B average) during 
the last two years of her/his 
undergraduate studies or attain a 
combined (verbal and quantitative) 
score of at least 1000 in the GRE. 
Applicants with Master's degrees are 
required to have a graduate GPA of 3.5. 
A GPA of 3.5 in graduate Spanish 
courses is expected in such cases. 

5. Apply for graduate admission to 
the Admissions Office and submit to 
the Department of Modem Languages 
the following documentation: a) two 



134 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



letters of recommendation from former 
professors in the format required by the 
Graduate Studies Committee, b) a 
resume, c) a statement of purpose in 
English or Spanish, addressing the 
candidate's goals and objectives in 
pursuing a doctorate in Spanish, and d) 
a writing sample in Spanish, preferably 
a term paper or thesis, of analytical 
nature, on a literary subject. 

6. Receive approval of the 
departmental Graduate Studies 
Committee. Admission is competi- 
tive, and meeting all minimum 
requirements does not guarantee 
automatic entrance to the program. 

Degree Requirements 

The doctoral program consists of 90 
semester hours of graduate level work 
beyond the Bachelor's degree, 
distributed as follows: 66 graduate 
credits of courses and 24 credits of 
dissertation. Students holding Master 
of Arts degrees in Spanish or Hispanic 
Studies will be considered for 
admission and some or all of their 
graduate credits may be counted toward 
the doctoral degree after being 
evaluated and approved by the 
Graduate Studies Committee. Students 
will be able to transfer a maximum of 
36 graduate credits from other 
universities. 

Core Courses (12 credits) 

All core courses must be taken as 
graduate courses offered by the 
university and may not be taken as 
independent studies: 

1. SPW 5806 Methods of Literary 
Research 

2. SPN 5705 The Structure of Spanish 

3. SPW 6718 Historiography of 
Literature 

4. SPW 6825 Literary Theory and 
Criticism 

Distribution Requirement (15 
credits) 

All students must take: 

One course in Medieval or Golden Age 

Peninsular Spanish Literature 
One course in Peninsular Spanish 

LiteraUire of the 18th, 19th or 20th 

century 
One course in Colonial/ 19th century 

Spanish American Literature 
One course in 20th century Spanish 

American Literature 
One additional course in Spanish 

American Literature 



Major Field (18 credits) 

All students must take at least 18 
credits of electives in their elected field 
of specialization. 

Minor Field (12 credits) 

Twelve credits of electives in the stu- 
dent's chosen field (Peninsular Spanish 
Literature, Spanish American Litera- 
ture, or Hispanic Linguistics). 

Electives (9 credits) 

Students may choose from graduate 
courses in literature, linguistics, cul- 
ture, and translation/interpretation. 

Dissertation (24 credits) 

Graduation Requirements 

To receive a Ph.D. in Spanish, a 
student must complete all courses with 
a GPA of 3.0 or higher, and receive a 
minimum grade of 'B' in every course. 
Before graduation the student must 
demonstrate a reading knowledge of a 
language other than English or 
Spanish, chosen by the student in 
consultation with her/his adviser. Upon 
completion of 33 graduate credits 
beyond tlie Bachelor's degree, students 
must take qualifying written and oral 
examinations which will determine 
whether they are permitted to continue 
their studies toward the doctorate or 
whether they should be terminated, 
with or without a master's degree. In 
the case of students registered for the 
master's degree, the M.A. compre- 
hensives will also serve as a qualifying 
examination for the Ph.D. Following 
completion of most of the course work, 
students are required to take written 
and oral doctoral comprehensive 
examinations. They must be passed 
with a minimum grade of 'B' and may 
not be taken more than twice. A student 
is formally considered a doctoral 
candidate upon successful completion 
of the comprehensive examinations and 
the acceptance of a dissertation 
proposal. Students must write and 
successfully defend a doctoral 
dissertation before a committee of three 
faculty members, two of whom must be 
from the graduate program faculty. 

Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

FOL-Foreign Languages; FOT-Foreign 
Languages in Translation; FOW- 
Foreign Languages, Comparative 
Literature; FRE-French Language; 
FRT-French Translation; FRW-French 
Literature (Writings); GER-German 
Language; LIN-Linguistics; POR- 



Portuguese Language; SPN-Spanish 
Language; SPT-Spanish Translation; 
SPW-Spanish Literature (Writings). 
(See English listing for additional 
Linguistics courses.) Application of 
basic language skills. 
FIL 5526 Spanish Film (3). The 
history of film in Spain and discussions 
of films by the most important 20th 
Century directors. 

FIL 5527 Latin American Film (3). 

The study of 20th Century films and 
documentaries produced by leading 
Latin American directors. Films are 
examined in relation to Latin American 
Sociefy and its literary creations. 

FOL 5735 Romance Linguistics (3). 
The common and distinctive Romance 
features. Survey of linguistic geogra- 
phy and internal/external influences. 

FOL 5906 Independent Study (1-3). 

Project, field experience, readings, or 
research. 

FOL 5945 Foreign Exchange Intern- 
ship (0). Foreign exchange students 
perform graduate rersearch in the 
Department of Modem Languages and 
English as a corequisite to their 
assistantship in the Modem Languages 
Department. 

FOX 5125 Literature in Translation 

(3). Masterpieces of world literature. 
Open to students who are proficient in 
more than one language. 

FOX 5805 Translation/Interpretation 
Arts (3). The language barrier and 
translation and interpretation. Types, 
modes, and qualify of T/I: philological, 
linguistic, and socio-linguistic theories. 
History of T/I from Rome to date. The 
impact of T/I on Inter- American devel- 
opments. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing or permission of the instructor. 

FOW 5395 Genre Studies (3). Exam- 
ination of a single literary form (e.g. 
short story, poetry), or the study of 
interaction between literary types (e.g. 
novel and drama). 

FOW 5545 Bicultural Writings (3). 
Experiment in linguistic pluralism. 
Content and focus to be determined by 
the international community. 

FOW 5587 Comparative Studies (3). 

Cross-over and distinctiveness in a 
multi-language problem, period, or 
aesthetic. 

FOW 5934 Special Topics in 
Language/Literature (3). Content and 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 135 



objectives to be determined by students 
and teacher. 

FOW 5938 Graduate Seminar (3). 

Topic and approacli to be determined 
by students and instructor. (Approval 
of the Department required.) 

FRE 5060 Language for Reading 
Knowledge I (3). Designed primarily 
for graduate students who wish to 
attain proficiency for M.A. and Ph.D. 
requirements. Open to any student who 
has no prior knowledge of the 
language. 

FRE 5061 Language for Reading 
Knowledge II (3). Emphasis on 
translation of materials from the 
student's field of specialization. Pre- 
requisite: FRE 5060 or equivalent. 

FRE 5508 La Francopbonie (3). 

Analysis of the different varieties of 
French spoken outside of France. 
Includes Quebec French, African 
French, and French Creoles. Also 
examines the political alliance of 
Francophone countries. Credit will not 
be given for both FRE 4503 and FRE 
5508. Prerequisites: FRE 3780 or LIN 
3010 or LIN 3013. 

FRE 5735 Special Topics in Linguis- 
tics (3). Content to be determined by 
students and instructor. (Approval of 
Department required.) 

FRE 5755 Old French Language (3). 
Introduction to the phonology, mor- 
phology, and syntax of the Old French 
language. Reading and analysis of the 
12th and 13th century texts in their 
original. Comparison of major medi- 
eval dialects. Prerequisite: FRE 4840 
or FRE 5845. 

FRE 5845 History of the Language I 
(3). The internal and external history of 
the French language from Latin to Old 
French. Examination of some of the 
first texts written in French. Credit will 
not be given for both FRE 4840 and 
FRE 5845. Prerequisite: FRE 3780. 

FRE 5846 History of the Language II 
(3). External and internal history of the 
French language from 1400 to the pre- 
sent. Examination of first dictionaries 
and grammars of French. Survey of 
recent linguistic legislation concerning 
the French language. Credit will not be 
given for both FRE 4841 and FRE 
5846. 

FRE 5855 Structure of Modem 
French (3). Systematic study of the 
phonology, morphology, syntax, and 
lexicon of Modem French. Taught in 



English. Credit will not be given for 
both FRE 4850 and FRE 5855. 

FRE 5908 Independent Study (1-3). 

Project, field experience, readings, or 
research. 

FRT 5805 Translation/Interpretation 
Arts (3). Techniques of professional 
franslation and interpretation. Prerequi- 
site: FRT 4801. 

FRW 5395 Genre Studies (3). Exam- 
ination of a single literary form (e.g. 
short story, poetry), or the study of 
interaction between literary types (e.g. 
novel and drama). 

FRW 5934 Special Topics in Lan- 
guage Literature (3). Content and 
objectives to be determined by student 
and instructor. 

FRW 5938 Graduate Seminar (3). 

Topic and approach to be determined 
by students and instructor. (Approval 
of the Department required.) 

GER 5060 German for Reading 
Knowledge (3). Designed primarily for 
graduate students who wish to attain 
proficiency for M.A. or Ph.D. require- 
ments. Open to any student who has no 
prior knowledge of the language. 

GER 5061 German for Reading 
Knowledge (3). Emphasis on transla- 
tion of materials from the student's 
field of specialization. Prerequisite: 
GER 5060 or the equivalent. 

HAT 5235 Haitian Creole Seminar 
(3). A study of the phonological and 
morpho-syntactic structures of Haitian 
Creole. Pattems of language usage and 
attitude. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing. 

LIN 5207C Acoustic Phonetics (3). 

Introduction to principles of acoustic 
and instrumental phonetics, including 
the physics of speech sounds and use of 
the sound spectrograph and other 
instruments. Prerequisites: LIN 3010, 
LIN 3013, LIN 5018 or the equivalent, 
plus one additional course in phonetics 
or phonology. Corequisite: One of the 
prerequisites may be counted as a 
corequisite. 

LIN 5601 Sociolinguistics (3). 

Principles and theories of linguistic 
variation with special attention to 
correspondences between social and 
linguistic variables. Prerequisite: LIN 
3010, LIN 3013, LIN 5018 or the 
equivalent. 



LIN 5603 Language Planning: 
Linguistic Minority Issues (3). 
Infroduction to the field of language 
planning. Minority linguistic issues in 
developing and developed nations: 
official languages, endangered 
languages, and language as problem 
and/or resource. Prerequisites: LIN 
3010, LIN 3013, LIN 5018 or the 
equivalent. 

LIN 5604 Spanish in the United 
States (3). An examination of the 
sociolinguistic research into Spanish in 
the U.S.: varieties of Spanish, language 
attitudes, language contact and change, 
and aspects of language use. 
Prerequisites: LIN 3010, LIN 3013, 
LIN 5018 or the equivalent. 

LIN 5613 Dialectology (3). The 

geography of language vanation: 
linguistic geography, atlases, national 
and regional studies. Dialectology 
within a modem sociolinguistic frame 
work; research approaches. Prerequi- 
sites: LIN 3010, LIN 3013, LIN 5018 
or the equivalent. 

LIN 5625 Studies in Bilingualism (3). 

Readings and analysis of bilingual 
programs and binational goals. Prereq- 
uisite: LIN 3010, LIN 3013, LIN 5018 
or the equivalent. 

LIN 5720 Second Language Acquisi- 
tion (3). Research, theories, and issues 
in second language acquisition. Topics 
include the Monitor Model, the role of 
the first language, motivation, age, 
individual differences, code-switching, 
and the environment; affective vari- 
ables and attitudes. 

LIN 5760 Research Methods in 
Language Variation (3). Research in 
sociolinguistics, dialectology, biling- 
ualism: problem definition, instrument 
design, data collection and analysis, 
including sampling techniques and 
statistical procedures. Prerequisite: LIN 
5601, LIN 5625, LIN 5613 or other 
course in vanation. 

LIN 5825 Pragmatics (3). Study of the 
relationships between language form, 
meaning, and use. Special emphasis on 
speech act theory. Prerequisites: LIN 
3010, LIN 3013, or SPN 3733. 

LIN 6571 Discourse Analysis (3). The 

study of the organization of language 
above the sentence level, such as 
conversational interactions and written 
texts. Prerequisite: LIN 3010, LIN 
3013, or the equivalent. 



136 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



LIN 6934 Special Topics in Linguis- 
tics (3). Content to be determined by 
students and instructor. (Approval of 
the Department required.) 
(See English listing for additional 
Linguistics courses.) 

SPN 5060 Language for Reading 
Knowledge (3). Designed primarily for 
graduate students who wish to attain 
proficiency for M.A. or Ph.D. 
requirements. Open to any student who 
has no prior knowledge of the 
language. 

SPN 5061 Language for Reading 
Knowledge (3). Emphasis on transla- 
tion of materials from the student's 
field of specialization. Prerequisite: 
SPN 5060 or the equivalent. 

SPN 5525 Spanish American Culture 
(3). A graduate survey of the major 
artistic phenomena in Latin America. 
Art, music, film, and literature will be 
discussed in their cultural context. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 
permission of the instructor. 

SPN 5536 Afro-Cuban Culture (3). 
Explores the role played by blacks in 
Cuban culture. Issues studied include: 
Airo-Cuban religions, languages, and 
music, as well as the Afi-o-Cuban 
presence in literature and the arts. 

SPN 5537 Special Topics in Afro- 
Hispanic Culture (3). Close examin- 
ation of various topics related to the 
culture of Afiican diaspora groups in 
the Hispanic world. 

SPN 5705 The Structure of Spanish 
(3). An introduction to Spanish linguis- 
tics. Topics include Spanish phonetics, 
phonology, morphology, and syntax. 
Students who have previously taken 
Syntactic Structures of Spanish and/or 
Sound Structure of Spanish will not 
receive credit for this course. 
Prerequisites: LIN 3010, LIN 3013, or 
SPN 3733. 

SPN 5725 Syntactic Structures of 
Spanish and English (3). An in-depth 
study of syntactic structures in Spanish 
and English, with an emphasis on how 
linguistic theory can account for the 
similarities and differences between the 
two languages. Prerequisites: LIN 
3010, LIN 3013, or SPN 3733. 

SPN 5805 Morphological Structures 
of Spanish and English (3). A survey 
of the morphologies of Spanish and 
English. Topics include the difference 
between isolating and synthetic lan- 
guages, rich vs. impoverished agree- 



ment, and syntactic ramifications of 
morphology. Prerequisites: LIN 3010, 
LIN 3013, or SPN 3733. 

SPN 5807 Syntactic Structures of 
Spanish (3). The study of syntactic 
structures in Spanish, topics include 
different syntactic approaches to 
current issues in Spanish syntax. 
Prerequisites: LIN 3010, LIN 3013, or 
SPN 3733. 

SPN 5824 Dialectology of the Spanish 
Caribbean (3). Study of varieties of 
Spanish used in the Caribbean area, 
including Miami-Cuban Spanish. The 
course will take historical and 
contemporary perspectives and will 
involve research among informants in 
South Florida. Pre-requisites: LIN 
3010, LIN 3013, or SPN 3733. 

SPN 5845 History of the Language 
(3). Historical development of the 
Spanish language, primarily from the 
point of view of internal linguistic 
change. Spanish as an example of 
general processes of language develop- 
ment. Prerequisites: LIN 3010, LIN 
3013, or SPN 3733. 

SPN 5908 Independent Study (1-3). 

Project, field experience, readings, or 
research. 

SPN 6505 Spanish Culture (3). 
Selected development in language, lit- 
erature, art, music, film, and the social 
institutions of Spain. Prerequisites: 
Graduate standing and permission of 
the instructor. 

SPN 6535 Hispanic Culture in the 
U.S. (3). Readings in literature, culture, 
and language to illustrate the experi- 
ence of the major Hispanic groups in 
the United States. Prerequisites: Gradu- 
ate standing and permission of the 
instructor. 

SPN 6795 Phonological Structure of 
Spanish (3). Approaches to current 
issues in Spanish phonology. Linguis- 
tic methodology for the analysis of 
phonological processes in Spanish. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

SPN 6825 Hispanic Dialectology (3). 
A study of the principal varieties of the 
Spanish language in the Spanish-speak- 
ing world, with special emphasis on 
Latin American Spanish. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 

SPN 6930 Special Topics in Linguis- 
tics (3). Content to be determined by 
students and instructor. (Approval of 
the Department required.) 



SPN 6970 Thesis Research (1-10). 

Research toward completion of 
Master's Thesis. Repeatable. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of Department. 

SPN 7980 Ph.D. Dissertation (1-12). 

Research toward the completion of a 
doctoral dissertation. Repeatable. 
Prerequisite: Permission of Major 
Professor and Doctoral Candidacy. 

SPT 5118 Literature in Translation 
(3). Masterpieces of world literature. 
Open to students who are proficient in 
more than one language. 

SPT 5715 Hispanic Women Writers 
in Translation (3). Readings and 
analysis of Spanish and Spanish 
American women writers in translation. 
Emphasis on cultural and linguistic 
considerations involved in the transla- 
tion of literary texts. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

SPW 5135 Spanish American 
Literature for Teachers (3). Overview 
of major trends in Spanish American 
literature. Especially designed for 
school teachers and majors in modem 
language education. Not for M.A. or 
Ph.D. Spanish majors. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

SPW 5155 Comparative Studies (3). 
Cross-over and distinctiveness in a 
multilanguage problem, period, or 
aesthetic. 

SPW 5225 Textual Reading and 
Analysis (3). Studies how texts are 
constructed, the role played by Poetics 
and Rhetoric in their formulation, and 
the context in which they were 
produced. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing. 

SPW 5237 The Traditional Spanish 
American Novel (3). Study and 
analysis of the traditional Spanish 
novel as a form of art, from 19th 
century Lizardi's "El periquillo 
samiento", to 1950. The novels and 
authors studied are representative of 
'costumbrismo', 'romanticismo', 

' natural ismo', 'modemismo', and 
'criollismo'. 

SPW 5277 Twentieth Century Span- 
ish Narrative (3). Analysis of the 
Spanish novel from Ferlosio's "El 
Jarama" to the present. The perspective 
will be focused within historical, social, 
and artistic context. Representative 
authors such as Cela, Martin Santos, 
Umbral, Delibes, Benet, Goytisolo, and 
others will be included. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 137 



SPW 5286 Contemporary Spanish 
American Novel (3). A study of the 
Spanish American Novel from 1950. 
The course will intensively and exten- 
sively focus on the novelists who are 
best known for their innovations, 
defining and analyzing the qualities 
which give originality and newness 
both in themes and language. 

SPW 5346 Poetry of Jorge Guillen 

(3). Selected readings from the five 
volumes of "Aire nuestro". Emphasis 
on the techniques of close reading and 
explication. Related selections from 
Guillen's literary criticism. 

SPW 5358 Graduate Seminar: Prose 
and Poetry of Jorge Luis Borges (3). 

Close readings of short stories and 
poetry. Emphasis on Borge's linguistic 
and cultural pluralism and the interplay 
of philosophy with fabulation. 

SPW 5359 Graduate Seminar: Poetry 
of Pablo-Neruda (3). Chronological 
examination of the major works of 
Chile's Nobel Laureate. Related 
readings from Neruda's Memories. 
Emphasis on the poet's linguistic and 
aesthetic innovations. 

SPW 5387 Women and Poetry (3). 

Women as poets and the poeticized. 
Close reading of Peninsular and Latin 
American texts, 16th - 20th Century. 
Students examine the contributions of 
women and how they have been repre- 
sented in poetry. Prerequisite: 4000 or 
5000 level course in Hispanic poetry. 

SPW 5405 Medieval Spanish Liter- 
ature (3). Readings in Medieval litera- 
ture of Spain including the epic, the 
learned poetry of the Xlllth and XlVth 
Centuries, and the literature of Juan II's 
court. Prerequisites: Graduate standing 
and permission of the instructor. 

SPW 5407 The Renaissance in Spain 
(3). Readings in the literature and 
cultural experssions of the Spanish 
Renaissance. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing and permission of the 
instructor. 

SPW 5425 Quevedo: Poetry (3). 

Close reading of selected poems by 
Spain's greatest baroque poet and 
creator of modem Spanish satire, 
including poems on love, death, and 
metaphysical concerns, and a wide 
range of humorous poems. 

SPW 5426 Quevedo: Prose Satire (3). 

Close reading of selected satires in 
prose by Spain's greatest baroque 
satirist and creator of modem Spanish 



satire. Includes Quevedo's picaresque 
novel "El Buscon", and his "Suenos", 
or "Visions of Hell". 

SPW 5428 Theatre in Calderon and 
Lope (3). The creation of verbal 
theatrical technique in the Baroque 
masters Calderon de la Barca and Lope 
de Vega. 

SPW 5436 Poetry Writing in Spanish 
(3). Readings from Spanish and Latin 
American texts; description and recrea- 
tion of fraditional and experimental 
metrics. Students will exchange cri- 
tiques of original poems. Prerequisites: 
sample of unpublished poems; word- 
processing literacy; permission of the 
instructor. 

SPW 5475 19th Century Latin 
American Literature (3). A study of 
the main literary works of Spanish 
speaking 19th Century Latin America: 
Romanticism, Realism, Naturalism and 
Modernism. Prerequisites: Upper level 
and graduate standing. 

SPW 5486 Modem Spanish Women 
Writers (3). Analysis of narrative 
works by Spain's most representative 
women writers from the 1 9th century to 
the present. Emphasis on the novel. 
Includes works by Pardo Bazan, 
Matute, Laforet, Martin Gaite. 
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or 
permission of the instructor. 

SPW 5515 Advanced Studies in His- 
panic Folklore (3). Studies the oral 
literary and linguistic tradition of the 
Hispanic world. Prerequisites: Grad- 
uate standing and permission of the 
instructor. 

SPW 5535 Spanish Romanticism (3). 
Study of Spanish Romanticism through 
the analysis of major literary figures of 
the movement: Larra, Zorrilla, 
Espronceda, Casfro and Becquer. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

SPW 5546 Hispanic Neoclassicism 

(3). Study of major Spanish and 
Spanish-American Neoclassic writers: 
Cadalso, Moratin, Jovellanos, Carrio de 
la Vandera, mier and Lizardi. 
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. 

SPW 5556 Spanish Realism and 
Naturalism (3). Readings in Spanish 
XlXth Century Novel of Realism and 
Naturalism including Alarcon, Perez 
Galdos, Pardo Bazan, Clarin and 
Blasco Ibanez. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing and permission of the 
instructor. 



SPW 5575 Spanish American 
Modernism (3). An in-depth study of 
prose and poetry of one of the most 
important periods of Spanish American 
literature, focusing on Marti, Dario, 
Najera, Casals, Silva, Valencia, 
Lugones, and Herrera y Reissig. 

SPW 5585 Learning Technology in 
Spanish Pedagogy and Research (3). 

Exploration of the role of technology in 
today's language and literature learning 
environment. Overview of the WWW, 
Network-based communication, and 
electronic databases related to Hispanic 
language and literature. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or advanced 
undergraduate with permission of the 
instructor. 

SPW 5595 Magical Realism and 
Typologies of Non-Realist Fiction (3). 

Theories of magical realism, fantastic 
and non-realist fiction, focusing on 
narrative technique. Authors may 
include Onetti, Borges, Cortazar, 
Asturias, Carpentier, Rulfo, Mirquez, 
Allende or others. Prerequisite: Gradu- 
ate standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

SPW 5606 Cervantes (3). A compre- 
hensive infroduction to the master- 
pieces of Cervantes as the creator of the 
modem novel, and to critical theories 
about his art. 

SPW 5729 Major Writers of the 
Generation of '98 (3). Study of the 
social and political circumstances of 
Spain at the turn of the XIX Century, 
and analysis of the work of Ganivet, 
Azorin, Baroja. Machado, Maeztu, 
Unamuno and Valle-Inclan. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing or permission 
of the instructor. 

SPW 5735 Hispanic Literature of the 
United States (3). Readings in the 
literature of Hispanics in the United 
States. Prerequisites: Graduate standing 
and permission of the instructor. 

SPW 5756 Mexico in Poetry (3). 

Close reading of modem poets; 
discussion of essays on Theory and 
Practice. Students examine national 
representation in myth, symbol and 
metaphor. Prerequisites: 4,000 or 5,000 
level course in Culture of Literature. 

SPW 5776 Black Literature in Latin 
America (3). An examination of the 
different genres in Latin American 
literature focusing on the life of Afro- 
Hispanics, from the beginning of this 
literary tradition to the present time. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 



138 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



SPW 5781 The Representation of 
women in Spanisli Literature and 
Film (3). Study of cinematographic 
adaptations of Spanisli novels, plays 
and short stories. Analyzes the 
representation of the female subject in 
both literary and filmic works. Pre- 
requisite; Graduate standing or 
permission of the instructor. 

SPW 5786 Spanish American Wo- 
men Writers (3). Through a selection 
of poems, plays and novels, this course 
studies Spanish American women 
production from Independence to the 
present times. Prerequisite: Graduate 
students only. 

SPW 5806 Methods of Literary 
Research (3). Introduction to bibliog- 
raphy, methods of research, the compo- 
sition of essays, rhetoric, and the pre- 
sentation of documentation. Theory of 
literary criticism, and its practical 
application to texts in Spanish. 

SPW 5934 Special Topics in 
Language/Literature (3). Content and 
objectives to be determined by student 
and instructor. 

SPW 6238 Spanish American 
Historical Novel (3). The evolution of 
the historical novel in Spanish America 
from the Romantic period to the pre- 
sent. Stylistic, literary, and theoretical 
analyses of selected traditional and 
recent historical novels. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 

SPW 6216 Golden Age Prose (3). 

Analysis of representative prose works 
from 16th and 17th century Spain. 
Emphasis will be on the picaresque 
novel, the pastoral novel, autobiog- 
raphy, and the short story. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 

SPW 6335 Golden Age Poetry (3). An 

examination of major poetics (1450- 
1650); emphasis on historical/cultural 
contexts. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing. 

SPW 6345 Twentieth Century 
Spanish Poetry (3). Close reading of 
two of the greatest poets of the 20th 
century (Jorge Guillen; F. Garcia 
Lorca) and of major voices from the 
Generation of 1927 and from post- 
Franco Spain. Emphasis on cultural 
contexts. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing. 

SPW 6366 Studies in the Spanish 
American Essay (3). Stylistics of the 
essay, neoclassic to postmodern, as 
reflecting the intellectual spirit of the 



times. Analysis of arguments and 
methods of cultural epistemology in 
Bolivar, Marti, Paz and others. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

SPW 6367 Prose and Poetry of Jose 
Marti (3). Study of Jose Marti's prose 
and poetry within the aesthetic and 
ideological contexts which characterize 
the discourse of Spanish American 
Modernism. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

SPW 6368 19"" Century Spanish- 
Caribbean Narrative(3). Studies the 
most popular literary trends of 19"" 
century literature through the works of 
various Spanish-Caribbean writers. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

SPW 6389 Cuban Novel and Short 
Story (3). Critical reading of repre- 
sentative texts of the Cuban novel and 
short story from XIX century to 
contemporary narrative expressions, 
within historical, social and artistic 
context. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing. 

SPW 6395 Genre Studies (3). 

Examination of a single literary form 
(e.g. short story, poetry,) or the study of 
interaction between literary types (e.g. 
novel and drama). 

SPW 6495 The Latin American 
Experience Literature and Film (3). 
Literary and cinematic representations 
of significant periods in the formation 
of Latin American politics, culture, and 
identity. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing. 

SPW 6716 Seminar in Gald6s (3). An 
in-depth study of the novels by Benito 
Perez Galdos. Stylistic and theorectical 
analysis of a selection of Galdos' 
works, expecially his novelas espafiolas 
contemporaneas (contemporary Span- 
ish novels). Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

SPW 6775 Literature of the Spanish 
Caribbean (3). Close readings of 
representative texts of the literature of 
the Dominican Republic, Cuba and 
Puerto Rico. Emphasis on the charac- 
teristics of the literary discourse within 
the context of a regional literature. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

SPW 6825 Literary Theory and 
Criticism (3). Study of the theoretical 
foundation of literature and contem- 
porary systems of critical approach to 
literary discourse. Prerequisite: Gradu- 
ate standing. 



SPW 6826 The Historiography of 
Literature (3). Methodology and 
theory in the writing of literary history: 
periodization, continuity and change, 
literature in intellectual history. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing. 

SPW 6936 Graduate Seminar (3). 

Topic and approach to be determined 
by students and instructor. Prerequisite: 
Approval of the Department. 

SPW 7910 Pre-Disseration Research 
(1-9). Enables students to concentrate 
on completion of their dissertation 
prospectus during the term in which 
they take Ph.D. comprehensive exams. 
Prerequisite: Completion of all other 
Ph.D. coursework. 



Graduate Catalog 



Collepe of Arts and Sciences 139 



School of Music 

Fredrick Kaufman, Professor and 
Director of School of Music 
(composition) 
John Augenblick, Associate Professor 
and Director of Choral Studies 
(choral) 
Kristine Burns, Associate Professor 
and Director of Music Technology 
(composition/electronic music) 
Gary Campbell, Associate Professor 

(saxophone/jazz studies) 
John Cuciurean, Assistant Professor 

(theory/history) 
Robert Davidovici, Professor/Artist- 

in-Residence (violin) 
Robert B. Dundas, Assistant Professor 
and Director qf Voice/Opera Studies 
(voice/opera) 
Karen Fuller, Assistant Professor and 
Director of Performing Arts 
Production 
Carolyn Fulton, Assistant Professor 

(music education/world music) 

Orlando J. Garcia, Professor and 

Director, Graduate Programs 

(music composition) 

Kemal Gekic, Professor/Artist-in- 

Residence (piano) 
Roby George, Assistant Professor and 

Director of Wind Performance 
Sam Lussier, Assistant Professor and 

Director of Jazz Bands 
Mark Gregory Martin, Lecturer and 

Director of Marching Bands 
Clair McElfresb, Professor Emeritus 

(choral) 
Michael Orta, Assistant Professor and 
Director of Jazz Performance 
(jazz piano) 
Stewart Robertson, Professor/Artist in 
Residence and Director of 
Orchestral Studies 
(orchestra/conducting) 
Joseph Rohm, Associate Professor 
and Director of Undergraduate 
Studies (theory) 
Miguel Salvador, Associate Professor 
and Director ofKeyboad 
Performance (piano/keyboard 
performance) 
Arturo Sandoval, Professor/ Artist-in- 

Residence (trumpet) 
Michael Wagner, Professor and 
Director of Music Education (music 
education) 
Miami String Quartet (Artists in 

Residence) 
Ivan Chan, (violin/chamber music) 
Chauncey Patterson, (viola/chamber 

music) 
Cathy Meng Robinson, (violin/ 
chamber music) 



Keith Robinson, (cello/chamber 
music) 

Adjunct Instructors: 

Keith Aleo, percussion 

Scott Baker, accompanist and music 
appreciation 

Sara Barton, accompanist and opera 
workshop coach 

Jay Bertolet, tuba 

Lindsey hlair, jazz guitar 

Chia-Chun Chen, midi-technology 

Deborah Conquest, voice 

Linda Considine, voice 

Robert Craft, distinguished professor 
of music 

John Dee, oboe 

Jodie DeSalvo, accompanist 

Loretta Dranoff, piano 

Clark Ellision, sound reinforcement 

Carlos Fernandex, saxophone 

Deborah Fleisher, harp 

Nicole Fortier, business of music 

Felix Gomez, jazz piano 

Luis Gomez-Imbert, string bass/new 
music ensemble/music appreciation 

Alexander Gonzalez, midi technology 

Robert Grabowski,ya2z history/sound 
engineer, evolution of Jazz 

Paul Green, clarinet/chamber music 

James Hacker, trumpet/chamber 
music 

Geoffrey Hale, bassoon 

Michelle Hemmings, voice 

Mark Hetzler, trombone 

George Hobbs, university chorale 
Jonathan Joseph,7'azz drums 

Suzanne Kirton,y7i<te 

Michael Launius, percussion 

techniques/percussion ensemble 
Jose Lopez, piano/accompanying 
Sam Lussier,yazz arranging/jazz lab 

band 
Nancy Luzko, keyboard 
Dennis Marks,yazz bass 
Gregory Miller, French horn 
Francisco Muller, accompanist 
Hector Neciosup, Latin percussion 
Mark Nerenhausen, live music 

operations 
Alan Ngim, accompanist 
Nicky Orii, jazz electric bass 
Adela Peeva, accompanist 
Edward Pierson, voice 
Nobleza Pilar, voice 
Leonid Rabinovich, music education 
Errol Rackipov,y'azz vibes 
Kathryn Rhyne, voice 
Hugo Rodriguez, voice 
John Sadak, clarinet 
Henry Skolnick, bassoon/chamber 

music 
Angela Space, saxophone 
Eric Swanson, classical guitar 



Leo Walz, music education 
Jacqueline Yost, organ 

Master of Music 

The FIU School of Music offers an 
M.M. degree with specialization in the 
following areas: music composition, 
jazz studies, applied (winds/per- 
cussion, strings, voice, piano, piano 
accompanying), and conducting 
(choral, orchestral, wind) and 
performing arts production. For more 
information please contact the FIU 
School of Music. 

Admissions Requirements 

All students entering the graduate 
programs at the School of Music must 
possess an undergraduate Bachelor of 
Music degree from an accredited 
institution or the equivalent with a 3.0 
GPA in the last 60 credits of study. 
The only exception to this requirement 
is found in the Performing Arts 
Production area where students with 
undergraduate Bachelors degrees in 
other related areas may be accepted. In 
addition, students entering the MS in 
Music Education must also have 
teacher certification in music. 

An applicant who feels the earned 
GPA is not indicative of his or her 
ability to be successful in a graduate 
degree program may also submit scores 
on the Graduate Record Examination 
which will be taken into consideration 
by the admission committee in its 
evaluation of the application. 

To enter the School of Music all 
students must pass an audition and/or 
interview depending upon the area. 
The following is a breakdown of the 
requirements by areas: 

• Wind/Percussion Performance: 
audition on instrument (an inter- 
view when feasible) - recordings 
acceptable 

• String/Guitar Performance: audit- 
ion on instrument (and interview 
when feasible) - recordings accep- 
table 

• Keyboard/Organ Performance: 
audition on instrument (and 
interview when feasible) 
recordings acceptable 

• Vocal Performance: audition on 
voice (and interview when 
feasible) - recordings acceptable 

• Conducting (choral, wind, 
orchestral): conducting audition 
(and interview when feasible) - 
video acceptable 



140 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



• Jazz: audition on instrument (and 
interview when feasible) - 
recordings acceptable 

• Composition: review of portfolio 
of scores (and interview when 
feasible) 

• Performing Arts Production: inter- 
view required 

• Music Education: audition on 
instrument or conducting audition 
and interview required 

• Music Technology: interview 
required 

Required Areas 

Music Theory (Analytical Techniques 
course required in all areas except jazz 
and performing arts production) 3 

'Music History/Literature 3 

Ensembles/applied/conducting 2 

The above eight credits are included in 
the 36 credits required for each area of 
concentration. 

'a placement exam is required before 
students are allowed into these courses. 
Remedial work may be required before 
these courses may be taken. A required 
History course is selected in 
consultation with area advisor. All 
students, except jazz majors, must take 
Analytical Techniques as the required 
theory course. 

Requirements for jazz majors are in 
the jazz area. 

A jazz placements exam is required. 
Analytical Techniques is not required 
for jazz majors. 

Areas of Concentration 

I. Composition (36 credit hours) 

Composition (3 semesters - 2 credits 
each) 6 

Composers Forum/Workshop (4 
semesters credits each) 

Electronic Music (2 semesters pending 
placement) 6 

Analytical Techniques 3 

Theory Elective: (3 courses to be 
selected from: Comprehensive Theory, 
Special Topics Seminar, Set Theory, 
Schenkerian Analysis, Experimental 
Arts, Strict Composition Modal 
Counterpoint, Advanced Orchestration 
(3 credits each) 9 

Graduate Music Electives 2 

Music History/Literature Elective 3 

Thesis/Recital (includes private 
lessons and 45 minute recital of 
student's compositions during last 
semester) 6 

MUH 5xxx Bibliography 1 

II. Performance - Piano, 
Applied Piano (36 credit hours) 
Applied Piano (3 semesters - 2 credits 
each) 6 



Accompanying (2 semesters - 1 credit 
each) 2 

Chamber Music (2 semesters - 1 credit 
each) 2 

Thesis/Recital (includes private 
lessons and recital during last 
semester) 6 

Analytical Techniques 3 

Keyboard Literature 3 

Large Ensemble (2 semesters - 1 credit 
each) 2 

Graduate Music Electives 1 2 

Piano Accompanying (36 credit hours) 
Applied Piano (3 semesters - 2 credits 
each) 6 

Instrumental Accompanying 2 

Vocal Accompanying 2 

Chamber Music (2 semesters - 1 credit 
each) 2 

Thesis/Recital (includes private 
lessons and recital during last 
semester) 6 

Analytical Techniques 3 

Keyboard Literature 3 

Italian Diction 1 

German Diction 1 

French Diction 1 

Large Ensemble (2 semesters - 1 credit 
each) ' 2 

Graduate Music Electives 7 

Applied Woodwinds, Brass, 
Percussion (36 credit hours) 
Applied Instruction (3 semesters - 2 
credits each) 6 

Chamber Music (2 semesters - 1 credit 
each) 2 

Thesis/Recital (includes private 
lessons and recital during last 
semester) 6 

Symphonic Literature or Wind 
Literature 3 

Analytical Techniques 3 

Elective Ensembles (orchestra/ wind 
ensemble) (6 ensembles - I credit each) 6 
Graduate Music Electives 1 

Applied Strings (36 credit hours) 
Applied Strings (3 semesters - 2 credits 
each) 6 

Chamber Music Elective (4 semesters - 
1 credit each) 4 

Thesis/Recital (includes private 
lessons and recital during last 
semester) 6 

Symphonic Literature 3 

Analytical Techniques 3 

Orchestra (4 semesters - 1 credit each) 
Music History/Literature Elective 3 

Graduate Music Electives 7 

Applied Voice (36 credit hours) 

Applied Voice (3 semesters - 2 credits 
each) 6 

Opera Workshop (3 semesters, 1 credit 
each) 3 



Elective Ensembles (4 semesters - 1 

credit each) 4 

Vocal Pedagogy 1 & II 4 

Opera Literature 3 

Vocal Literature 3 

Analytical Techniques 3 

Graduate Music Electives 8 
Thesis/Recital (includes private 
lessons and recital during last 

semester) 6 

III. Conducting 

Choral (conducting) (36 credit hours) 

Analytical Techniques 3 

Choral Literature 3 

Graduate Choral Conducting (3 
semesters - 2 credits each) 6 

Conducting Seminar/Score Reading (4 
semesters - 1 credit each) 4 

Thesis/Recital (includes private 
conducting and recital during last 
semester) 6 

Music History/Literature Electives 6 
Elective Ensembles (Choirs, 4 
semesters - 1 credit each) 4 

Graduate Music Electives 4 

Instrumental (conducting) 
(36 credit hours) 

Analytical Techniques 3 

Wind Literature 3 

Graduate Wind Conducting (3 
semesters - 2 credits each) 6 

Conducting Seminar/Score Reading (4 
semesters - 1 credit hour each 4 

Thesis/Recital (includes private 
conducting and recital during last 
semester) 6 

Music History/Literature Electives 6 
Elective Ensembles (4 semesters - 1 
credit each) 4 

Graduate Music Electives 4 

Orchestral (conducting) 
(36 semester hours) 
Analytical Techniques 3 

Orchestral Literature 3 

Graduate Orchestral Conducting (3 
semesters - 2 credits each) 6 

Conducting Seminar/Score Reading (4 
semesters - 1 credit each) 4 

Thesis/Recital (includes private 
conducting and recital during last 
semester) 6 

Music History/Literature Electives 6 
Elective Ensembles (4 semesters - 1 
credit each) 4 

Graduate Music Electives 4 

rv. Jazz Performance (36 credit 
hours) 

Applied Music (major instrument) (3 
semesters - 2 credits each) 6 

Studio Jazz Band (4 semesters - 1 
credit each) 4 

Graduate Jazz Combo (2 semesters - 1 
credit each) 2 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 141 



Graduate Jazz Piano (not required of 
Jazz Piano pnncipals) 1 

Business of Music 1 
Advanced Jazz Techniques I and II 4 
Advanced Jazz Rehearsal Techniques 1 
Jazz Pedagogy 2 

Jazz Histor>': The Innovators 3 

Jazz Arranging/Composition Elective, 
Arr for Big Band, Arr for Combo, 
Private Jazz Comp (students may take 
4 semesters of these courses in Heu of 
8 hours of applied music) 2 

All students must take Jazz 
arranging/composing 3 

Thesis/Recital (includes private 
lessons and recital during last 
semester) 6 

Music Technology Elective (from 
Electronic Music I-lIf) 2 

The FIU School of Music offers a 
Master of Science in Music Education. 

V. Performing Arts Production 
(39 credit hours) 

MUS5715 Performing Arts 

Production I 2 

MUS 5725 Live Music Operations 1 2 
TPA 5025 Performance Lighting 2 
MUS 5655 Expanding Artistic 

Expression 2 

MUS 5795 Music Production Lab 1 
MUS 5726 Live Music 

Operations II 3 

MUS 5512 Sound Reinforcement 2 
COS 5993 Computer Literacy 

for Performing Arts 

Production 3 

MUS 5796 Music Production Lab II 1 
MUS 5705 Advanced Business of 

Music* 3 

TPA 5213 Performing Arts 

Technology 2 

MUS 5906 Thesis " 3 

MUS 5797 Music Production 

Ub 111 1 

MUS 5905 Performing Arts 

Internship 9 

•prerequisite MUM 4301 or equivalent\ 

Music Education 
Degree hours: (36) 

Professional Education (9) 

EDF 6608 Social, Philosophical 

and Historical 

Foundations of 

Education 3 

EDF 6211 Psychological 

Foundations of 

Education 3 

EDF 5481 Foundations of 

Educational Research 3 
Music Education (12) 
MUE 6345 Methodology of Music 3 
MUE 6938 Seminar in Music 

Education 3 



MUE 6815 Psychological 

Foundations of Music 
Behavior 3 

MUE 6785 Research in Music 

Education 3 

Music Courses (15) 

Music Literature 3 

(Cliosen with ad\1sor approval) 
Music Education Thesis 6* 

Cognate Area 6* 

Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

HUM-Humanities; MUC-Music: 
Composition; MUE-Music: Education; 
MUG-Music: Conducting; MUH- 
Music: History/Musicology; MUL- 
Music; Literature; MUM-Music: 
Commercial; MUN-Music: Ensembles; 
MUS-Music; MUT-Music: Theory; 
MVB-Applied Music/Brass; MVK- 
Applied Music-Keyboard; MVJ- 
Applied Music Jazz; MVP -Applied 
Music/Percussion; MVS-Applied 
Music'Stnngs; MVV-Applied 
Music/Voice; MVW-Applied 
MusicAVoodwinds. 

MUC 5406 Electronic Music W (2). 

An advanced course in computer music 
providing students hands-on experience 
with recently developed hardware and 
software for the creation of music. 
Prerequisite: MUC 4400. 

MUC 5407 Electronic Music V (2). 
Students develop new hardware and/or 
software for uses related to musical 
composition. Prerequisite: MUC 5406. 

MUC 5635 Computer Music Seminar 
I (3). Introduces students to the 
historical contributions of computer 
music composers and engineers. 
Prerequisites: MUC 6305, MUC 6306. 
Corequisite: MUC 6405. 

MUC 5636 Computer Music Seminar 

n (3). Introduces students to the 
compositional procedures used by 
computer music composers. 

Prerequisites; MUC 6305, MUC 6306, 
MUC 6405. Corequisite: MUC 5406. 

MUC 5637 Computer Music Seminar 
III (3). Introduces students to the 
research technologies for making 
interactive sound projects including 
installations and exhibits. 

Prerequisites: MUC 6305, MUC 6306, 
MUC 6405, MUC 5406. 

MUC 5935 Composition Forum (0). 

Student composers present their work 
for critique by faculty and topics 
relevant to composition are presented 
by faculty and guests. Prerequisite: 



Admission into the graduate 
composition program. 

MUC 6251 Graduate Music 
Composition (1-3). The writing of 
evolved musical compositions with 
regard to each student's strengths and 
aesthetic development. Graduate 
standing in Music Education and or 
permission of the instructor. 

MUC 6305 Electronic Music Lab I 

(2). Exploration of the electronic 
medium including the history of 
elecn-onic music, digital studio 
techniques, analog studio techniques, 
digital synthesis and analog synthesis. 
Prerequisites: MUC 1342 or 
Permission of the instructor. 

MUC 6306 Electronic Music Lab II 

(2). Continuation of Electronic Music 
Lab 1 with an emphasis on advanced 
MIDI applications including sampling, 
digital sequencing, digital signal 
processing and interactive MIDI 
software. Includes one large composi- 
tion project. Prerequisite: MUC 6401. 

MUC 6405 Electronic Music Lab III 

(2). Special projects in advanced 
electronic music programming environ- 
ments including Csound, MAX, 
Interactor, HMSL and CHANT. 
Includes one large composition project. 
Can be repeated 4 times. Prerequisite: 
MUC 6402. 

MUE 5485 Marching Band Tech- 
niques (3). A study of show design and 
concepts; marching band management 
and organizational procedures 
including booster organizations, 
inventory, handbooks, grading 
procedures, rehearsal techniques. 
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. 

MUE 5921 Choral Conducting 
Workshop (3). The study of various 
topics related to choral literature, 
conducting and techniques. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of the instructor. 

MUE 5922 String Workshop (3). The 

study of various topics related to string 
literature, conducting and techniques. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

MUE 5923 Instrumental Conducting 
Workshop (3). The study of various 
topics related to instrumental ensemble 
literature, conducting and techniques. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

MUE 5924 Jazz Workshop (3). The 
study of various topics related to jazz 
literature, conducting and techniques. 



142 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

MUE 5928 Workshop in Music (3). 
AppHcations of materials and 
techniques in music in a laboratory or 
field setting. 

MUE 6971 Thesis in Music 
Education (1-3). Research and paper 
for Masters Candidates in Music 
Education. Prerequisites: MUE 6785 
and permission of Graduate Advisor in 
Music Education. 

MUG 5105 Advanced Conducting 
Techniques (1). An extension of form 
and analysis, with interpretation both in 
instrumental and choral conducting. 
Twentieth century scoring and symbol 
interpretation wall be studied in depth, 
with actual conducting experience 
required. 

MUG 5205 Graduate Applied Choral 
Conducting (2). Advanced study of 
choral conducting, including gesture, 
rehearsal techniques, and repertoire. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 
permission of the instructor. 

MUG 5307 Graduate Applied 
Instrumental Conducting (2). 
Advanced study of wind conducting, 
including gesture, rehearsal techniques, 
and repertoire. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing and permission of the 
instructor. 

MUG 5935 Conducting Seminar (1). 
An examination of the principle issues 
of conducting, emphasizing score 
reading and study, rehearsal, inter- 
pretation, and contemporary tech- 
niques. Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
and/or permission of the instructor. 

MUH 5025 History of Popular Music 
in the U.S. (3). Overview of Afro- 
American and Euro-American popular 
music and its historical development. 
Examination of musical style and social 
context in lecture-discussion format 
with film and video. 

MUH 5057 Music of the World (3). 
Survey of folk, popular and classical 
musical traditions from around the 
world. Examination of musical style 
and social context with film and 
performance demonstrations. 

MUH 5065 Latino Music in the 
United States (3). Survey of Latin 
American musical traditions brought 
through immigration. Examination of 
musical style and social context in 
lecture-discussion format with film and 
performance demonstrations. 



MUH 5066 Music of Mexico and 
Central America (3). A survey of folk, 
popular and classical musical traditions 
in the region. Examination of musical 
style and social context in lecture- 
discussion format with film and 
performance demonstrations. 

MUH 5067 Music of the Caribbean 
(3). Survey of folk, popular and 
classical musical traditions and their 
ongoing connection with Caribbean 
populations in the U.S.. Class includes 
film and performance demonstrations. 

MUH 5375 Twentieth Century 
Music: 'New Dimensions' (3). A 
technical study of music since 1900. 
Lectures on style plus demonstrations 
and practical application will be 
supplemented with recordings and 
analysis. Prerequisite: Graduate 

standing in Music or permission of 
instructor. 

MUH 5546 Music of the Americas 
(3). An exporation of the folk, popular, 
and art music of Latin America. 

MUH 5575 Survey of Asian Music 
(3). Examines the major Asian musical 
traditions within the cultural framework 
of history, arts and traditions. 

MUH 5685 History of Music Seminar 

I (1-3). Examination of music history 
achievements from Antiquity, 
Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque 
periods. Music structures and 
composers are examined throughout 
these periods, works and styles. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

MUH 5686 History of Music Seminar 

II (1-3). Examination of music history 
achievements from Pre-Classical, 
Classical, Romantic to the 20* century. 
Evolution of music through the works 
of major composer's individual styles. 

MUH 5815 Jazz History: The 
Innovators (3). The work of four 
artists whose innovations have 
profoundly defined the jazz idiom from 
its beginning through the present day- 
Duke Ellington, Charlie Parker, Miles 
Davis, and John Coltrane. 

MUL 5405 Keyboard Literature (3). 

Survey of keyboard literature from 
antiquity through the twentieth century. 
Emphasis on the evolving role of the 
keyboard in music history. 

MUL 5456 Wind Instrument 
Literature (3). The history and 
development of Wind Instrument 
Literature from ca. 1650 to the present 
day. Music appropriate for all levels of 



instruction from middle school through 
college level is included. Prerequisite: 
Advanced/graduate standing. 

MUL 5495 Survey of Organ 
Literature (3). Survey of organ 
literature, history, performance practice 
and organ design. Includes historic 
sound recordings and in-class 
performance. Prerequisites: Permission 
of Instructor. 

MUL 5505 Symphonic Literature (3). 

The study of the symphony and the 
symphonic tone poem from its origin in 
the Baroque period to the twentieth 
century. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

MUL 5607 Vocal Literature I (2). A 

survey of solo vocal literature from the 
17"^ century to the late 18* century. 
Emphasis will be placed on a 
discussion of ornamentation and 
performance-practice and comparisons 
of editions. 

MUL 5626 Vocal Literature FV (2). 

Twentieth-century art song. Emphasis 
will be placed on the rise of the 
nationalist schools, the development of 
atonalism and other modem schools of 
thought. 

MUL 5645 Choral Literature (3) A 

survey of sacred and secular choral 
literature from the Middle Ages to the 
present. Emphasis on stylistic analysis 
and performance practice for each style 
period. Includes score study, aural 
analysis of recorded performances and 
in-class performances. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

MUL 5671 Opera Literature (3). A 

chronological survey of operatic 
literature from the 17th century to the 
present day. Emphasis placed on the 
historical milieu in which the operatic 
form evolved through the ages. 

MUL 5XXX Vocal Literature 11 (2). 

The German Lied and it's poetry. 
Emphasis will be placed on a study of 
the poets and their poetry, important 
facts of the composers' lives and times 
and other musical and cultural 
developments. 

MUL 5XXX Vocal Literature III (2). 

The French Melodic and it's poetry. 
Emphasis will be placed on a study of 
the poets and their poetry, their styles 
and schools, the composers' lives and 
times and other musical and cultural 
developments. 

MUM 5705 Advanced Business of 
Music (3). Topics include strategic 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 143 



planning, employee development, and 
decision malting. Also includes a study 
of publishing, collection agencies, 
creative unions, and contracts with 
composers and publishers. Prerequiste; 
MUM 4301 and permission of graduate 
advisor. 

MUM 5715 Performing Arts Produc- 
tion I (2). Focus on the various aspects 
of performing arts production. Students 
attend performances of every possible 
genre of performing arts and critique 
the production and the venue. 
Prerequisite: Permission of graduate 
advisor. 

MUM 5725 Live Music Operations I 

(2). How promoters and producers 
project a profit margin and the ability 
to oversee a profit; considering 
overhead, scheduling, accommoda- 
tions, concessions, sound and light. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the 
graduate advisor. 

MUM 5726 Live Music Operations II 
(3). Continuation of MUM 5725, Live 
Music Operations 1. Emphasis on 
promoters', producers', and managers' 
ability to project a profit margin. An 
on-campus production is required as 
the final project. Prerequisite: MUM 
5725 and permission of the graduate 
advisor. 

MUM 5795 Music Production Lab- 
oratory I (1). Students are assigned to 
work in the production of 10-15 
individual concert productions. The 
productions are varied and provide the 
students the opportunity to put in 
practice work learned in the classroom. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the grad- 
uate advisor. 

MUM 5796 Music Production Lab- 
oratory 11 (1). A continuation of Music 
Production Lab 1. Students are assigned 
to work in the production of 10-15 
individual concert productions. 
Prerequisite: MUM 5795 and permis- 
sion of the graduate advisor. 

MUM 5797 Music Production Lab- 
oratory III (1). A continuation of 
Music Production Lab II. Students are 
assigned to work in the production of 
10-15 individual concert productions. 
Prerequsite: MUM 5796 and 
permission of the graduate advisor. 

MUM 5946 Performance Arts In- 
ternsliip (9). Interns assist and/or 
observe in all job functions and duties 
at an entertainment venue. Areas 
include: production management; 
design services; technical production; 



talent booking and casting; and creative 
show development. Prerequisite: 
Permission of graduate advisor. 

MUS 5345 MIDI Technology (2). 
Introduction to MIDI technology 
including sequencing, notation, patch 
editing and a variety of other 
applications. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

MUS 5512 Sound Reinforcement (2). 

Exploration of live music on location, 
dealing with commonly encountered 
acoustical problems and how to 
overcome them. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of the graduate advisor. 

MUS 5655 Expanding Artisitc 
Expression (2). Focuses on expanding 
the horizons of the artistic vision of the 
student. Accomplished through a series 
of projects. Prerequisite: Permission of 
the graduate advisor. 

MUS 5711 Music Bibliography (1). 

Library research methods and 
materials; documentation of research 
results in bibliographic style. Develops 
critical thinking and evaluative skills 
regarding sources of information, print 
and online. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing at the School of Music. 

MUS 5906 Thesis/Recital (1-6). For 

students working on a thesis or recital 
for MM in Music. To be completed 
under the supervision of a faculty 
member. Prerequisite: Graduate stu- 
dent. 

MUS 5971 Tliesis (1-6). Research 
and/or performances towards comple- 
tion of master's thesis work. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of graduate area 
advisor. 

MUT 5051 Graduate Theory Survey 
(1-3). Analytical, theoretical and aural 
skills required for successful graduate 
studies in music. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing in the School of Music or 
Permission of the instructor. 

MUT 5152 Comprehensive Musical 
Systems (3). Examination of various 
comprehensive theoretical systems 
utilized in the analysis of music. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the 
School of Music or Permission of the 
instructor. 

MUT 5316 Advanced Orchestration 

(3). Examination of orchestrational 
techniques utilized by composers from 
the Baroque era through current times. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the 
School of Music or permission of the 
instructor. 



MUT 5355 Advanced Jazz Arranging 
and Composition (3). Scores and 
recordings of various sized jazz 
ensembles are studied for technique 
and style. Student's compositions and 
arrangements are performed. Topics 
include: forms, voicing techniques, 
instrumentation-live performance vs. 
recording session. Prerequisite: MUT 
4353; MUT 4663; MUT 4664. 

MUT 5381 Arranging (3). A course in 
practical arranging for the public 
school teacher, including choral, band, 
and popular arranging. Prerequisites: 
MUT 21 17 and MUT 2227. 

MUT 5411 Modal Counterpoint (3). 

Develop skills necessary to write in the 
Renaissance style and to analyze the 
masterworks of Palestrina, Lassus, 
Victoria, and others. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing in the School of 
Music or Permission of the instructor. 

MUT 5486 Advanced Jazz Rehearsal 
Techniques (2). Study and practical 
application of complete preparation, 
programming, and rehearshing of small 
and large jazz ensembles. Students 
study scores and recordings of various 
jazz styles and rehearse school's 
ensembles. Prerequisite: MUN 4784; 
MUT 4643; MUT 4663; MUT 4664. 

MUT 5585 Musical Styles Through 
Strict Composition (3). This course is 
designed to develop basic composi- 
tional skills for writing works in all 
forms. Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
in the School of Music or Permission 
of the instructor. 

MUT 5627 Schenkerian Analysis (3). 

Advanced studies in Schenkerian 
analysis of tonal music. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing in the School of 
Music or Permission of the instructor. 

MUT 5628 Atonal Analysis (3). 

Advanced studies in set theory and 
serial techniques of twentieth-century 
music. Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
in the School of Music or Permission 
of the instructor. 

MUT 5629 Analytical Techniques 

(3). Examination and practice of 
various techniques utilized in the 
analysis of art music from the common 
practice period through the 20th 
century. Prerequisite: Placement exam 
or Permission of the instructor. 

MUT 5646 Advanced Jazz 
Techniques I (2). A comprehensive, 
theoretical study of topics related to 
jazz performance. Includes the nature 



144 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



of improvisation, advanced jazz 
harmony, theory of jazz improvisation, 
transcribing and analyzing solos of jazz 
masters. Prerequisite: MUX 4643. 

MUX 5647 Advanced Jazz 
Techniques II (2). A continuing study 
of topics related to jazz performance. 
Includes analyzing solos of jazz 
masters, development of repertoire, 
style, and aesthetic concepts. 
Prerequisite: Advanced Jazz Tech- 
niques I. 

MUT 5746 Jazz Pedagogy (2). 
Materials, techniques, and philosophies 
related to teaching jazz. Includes 
preparation of courses, course outline 
and syllabi, lesson plans, lectures. 
Texts and other resources such as 
videos, recordings, periodicals, are 
examined. Prerequisite: MUT 4663; 
MUT 5355. 

MUT 5930 Special Topics (3). 

Examination of composers, 

compositional schools, or other areas of 
specialization and/or interest to the 
theory/composition faculty. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing in the School 
of Music or Permission of the 
instructor. 

MVJ 5150 Jazz Piano Techniques 
(1). Performance of basic jazz 
standards. Includes basic techniques of 
the instrument, chord voicing, 
comping, lead sheet realization for non- 
pianists. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

MVJ 5350 Principle Applied Jazz: 
Keyboard (2). Individual advanced 
instruction on major instrument. An in- 
depth study of overall instrumental 
technique, eminent jazz styles, and 
other performance practices that are 
particularly relevant to jazz. 

MVJ 5354 Principle Applied Jazz: 

Bass (2). Individual advanced 
instruction on major instrument. An in- 
depth study of overall instrumental 
technique, eminent jazz styles, and 
other performance practices that are 
particularly relevant to jazz. 
Prerequisite: MVJ 4344. 

MVJ 5355 Principle Applied Jazz: 
Flute (2) Individual advanced 
instruction on major instrument. An in- 
depth study of overall instrumental 
technique, eminent jazz styles, and 
other performance practices that are 
particularly relevant to jazz. 



MVJ 5356 Principle Applied Jazz: 
Saxophone (2). Individual advanced 
instruction on major instrument. An in- 
depth study of overall instrumental 
technique, eminent jazz styles, and 
other performance practices that are 
particularly relevant to jazz. 

MVJ 5357 Principle Applied Jazz: 
Trumpet (2). Individual advanced 
instruction on major instrument. An in- 
depth study of overall instrumental 
technique, eminent jazz styles, and 
other performance practices that are 
particularly relevant to jazz. 

MVJ 5358 Principle Applied Jazz: 
Trombone (2). Individual advanced 
instruction on major instrument. An in- 
depth study of overall instrumental 
technique, eminent jazz styles, and 
other performance practices that are 
particularly relevant to jazz. 

MVJ 5359 Principle Applied Jazz: 
Percussion (2). Individual advanced 
instruction on major instrument. An in- 
depth study of overall instrumental 
technique, eminent jazz styles, and 
other performance practices that are 
particularly relevant to jazz. 

MVJ 5453 Principle Applied Jazz: 
Guitar (2).Individual advanced 
instruction on major instrument. An in- 
depth study of overall instrumental 
technique, eminent jazz styles, and 
other performance practices that are 
particularly relevant to jazz. 
Prerequisite: MVJ 4343. 

MVJ 5456 Major Applied Jazz 
Saxophone (1-2). Individual ins- 
truction on major instrument. An in- 
depth study of overall instrumental 
technique, styles, and other 
performance practices particularly 
relevant to jazz. Prerequisites: 
Audition. 

MVJ 5XXX Secondary Jazz Drums 

(1). Individual instruction in applied 
jazz music on drums. Prerequisites: 
Preceding course in sequence or 
permission of the instructor. 

MVJ 5XXX Principal Jazz Acoustic 
Bass (2). Individual instruction in 
applied music on jazz acoustic bass as a 
principal instrument. Prerequisite: 
Music majors only. 

MVJ 5XXX Principal Jazz Drums 

(2). Individual instruction in applied 
music on jazz drums at a principal 
level. Prerequisite: Music majors only. 

MVJ 5XXX Major Jazz Saxophone 

(2). Individual instruction in applied 



music on jazz saxophone at a major 
level. Prerequisite: Music majors only. 

MVJ 5XXX Major Jazz Trombone 

(2). Individual instruction in applied 
music on jazz trombone at a major 
level. Prerequisite: Music majors only. 

MVJ 5XXX Major Jazz Trumpet (2). 

Individual instruction in applied music 
on jazz trumpet at a major level. 
Prerequisite: Music majors only. 

MVJ 5XXX Major Jazz Drums (2). 

Individual instruction in applied music 
on jazz drums at a major level. 
Prerequisite: Music majors only. 

MVJ 5XXX Major Jazz Acoustic 
Bass (2). Individual instruction in 
applied music on jazz acoustic bass at a 
major level. Prerequisite: Music 
majors only. 

MVK 5651 Piano Pedagogy (2). 
Survey of current piano teaching 
methods. 

MW 5651 Vocal Pedagogy (3). A 

survey of the literature of teaching 
methods for the mature voice derived 
from historical and modem sources. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. Corequisites: Applied voice 
lesson. 

MW 5652 Graduate Vocal Pedagogy 
II (2). Practical application of the 
principles of vocal technique in the 
studio. Emphasis will be placed on the 
psychological factors which apply to 
singing and the teaching of singing. 
Prerequisite: Graduate Vocal Pedagogy 
I. 

MW 5XXX Graduate Vocal 
Pedagogy I (2). An introduction to the 
history and development of vocal 
pedagogy for the graduate voice major. 
Emphasis will be placed on a study of 
the anatomy and acoustics of the 
human voice. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 145 



Physics 



Stephan L. Mintz, Professor and 

Chairperson 
Werner Boeglin, Associate Professor 
Richard A. Bone, Professor 
Yesim Darici, Associate Professor 
Rudolf Flebig, Professor 
Bernard Gerstman, Professor 
Kenneth Hardy, Professor 
Laird H. Kramer, Associate Professor 
Pete C. Markowitz, Associate 

Professor 
Oren Maxwell, Professor 
Brian A. Raue, Associate Professor 
Joerg Reinhold, Assistant Professor 
Misalc Sargsian, Assistant Professor 
John W. Sheldon, Professor 
Caroline E. Simpson, Associate 

Professor 
Walter Van Hamme, Professor 
Xnewen Wang, Associate Professor 
James R. Webb, Associate Professor 
Jiandi Zhang, Assistant Professor 
Yifu Zhu, Associate Professor 

Master of Science in Pliysics 

The Master of Science in Physics is a 
45 semester hour program consisting of 
course work at the 5000 and 6000 level 
and research with one of the 
departmental research groups 

culminating in a master's thesis. 
Saidents entering the program must 
have a bachelor's degree or equivalent 
course work in Physics. 

Graduate Admission 
Requirements 

For admission to the graduate 
programs, a Bachelor's degree in 
physics is required with a minimum 
undergraduate GPA of 3.0. The GRE 
is required. The minimum acceptable 
score is 1000 points for verbal and 
quantitative combined. The GRE 
advanced is recommended. Students 
from a non-English speaking countries 
are required to demonstrate proficiency 
in English via the TOEFL exam. 
Minimum acceptable score for 
admission is 550. 

Required Courses: 

PHY 51 15 Mathematical Physics I 3 

PHY 5116 Mathematical 

Physics 11 3 

PHY 5240 Advanced Classical 

Mechanics 3 

PHY 5346 Advanced 

Electromagnetic 

Theory I 3 

PHY 5347 Advanced 

Electromagnetic 

Theory II 3 



PHY 6645 Advanced Quannim 

Mechanics I 3 

PHY 6646 Advanced Quantum 

Mechanics II 3 

PHY 6524 Statistical Physics 3 

PHY 6935 Graduate Research 

Seminar 4-6 

In addition, three semester hours of 
specialized course work are required in 
the student's area of specialization and 
12-14 hours of thesis work for a total of 
45 hours. 

Doctor of Philosophy in Physics 

The Doctor of Philosophy in Physics 
program requires 90 credit hours at the 
graduate level, including a minimum of 
24 credit hours of dissertation research. 
A maximum of 36 credits may be 
transferred from another graduate pro- 
gram with the approval of the Graduate 
Committee. 

Graduate Admission 
Requirements 

For admission to the graduate 
programs, a Bachelor's degree in 
physics is required with a minimum 
undergraduate GPA of 3.0. The GRE 
is required. The minimum acceptable 
score is 1000 points for verbal and 
quantitative combined. The GRE 
advanced is recommended. Students 
from a non-English speaking countries 
are required to demonstrate proficiency 
in English via the TOEFL exam. 
Minimum acceptable score for 
admission is 550. 

Required Courses: 

1. All Required Courses for the 
Master of Science in Physcis pro- 
gram listed above. 

2. Four additional graduate level 
(5000 or higher) courses. 

All doctoral candidates must take a 
Ph.D. comprehensive exam. This exam 
is designed to test general knowledge 
of physics at the advanced under- 
graduate and first-year graduate level 
and must be passed not later than the 
beginning of the third year enrolled in 
the program. Within two years of 
entering the program, students must 
submit to the Graduate Committee their 
choices of research and advisor. Course 
work and research programs shall be 
planned with the advice and approval 
of the advisor. After passing the 
comprehensive exam and pnor to or 
during the first semester of the fourth 
year enrolled in the program, a student 
must also take a candidacy exam which 
tests the ability to conduct research in a 



particular field, as well as the ability to 
present the results of that research in an 
organized and coherent manner. 

Course Descriptions 

Deflnition of Prefixes 

AST-Astronomy; PHS- 
Physics'Specialized; PHY-Physics; 
PHZ-Physics; PSC-Physical Sciences; 
ENU-Nuclear Engineering. 
F-Fall semester offering; S-Spring 
semester offering; SS-Summer semester 
offering. 

AST 5215 Stellar Astrophysics (3) 

Topics in Stellar Astrophysics, in 
greater detail and depth than similar 
topics in AST 3213. Emphasis on 
current stellar structure, evolution 
models and the underiying 
observational data. Prerequisites: PHY 
3124, PHY 3503, PHY 4324, PHY 
4222 or equivalent. (F or S) 

AST 5405 Extragalactic Astrophysics 
(3). Topics in extragalactic astro- 
physics, in greater detail and depth than 
similar topics in AST 3213. Emphasis 
on galactic structure and evolution, 
quasars and cosmology. Prerequisites: 
PHY 3124, PHY 3503, PHY 4324, 
PHY 4222 or equivalent. (F or S) 

AST 5507 Celestial Mechanics (3). 

Principles of classical Newlonian 
mechanics applied to the motions of 
planets, satellites, and interplanetary 
space probes. Prerequisites: PHY 4222 
or equivalent. (F or S) 

PHY 5115 Mathematical Physics I 

(3). Methods of solution for problems 
in mathematical physics: Variational 
pnnciples, complex variables, partial 
differential equarions, integral equa- 
tions, and transforms. Prerequisites: 
MAC3313, MAP 3302. (F) 

PHY 5116 Mathematical Physics n 

(3). Additional solution methods in 
mathematical physics; Perturbation 
methods, Laplace's and Poisson's 
Equations, waves, special functions, 
vector fields, vector waves. Prereq- 
uisite: PHY 51 15. (S) 

PHY 5140 Atomic Particle 
Interactions and Detection (3). 

Preparation for research utilizing 
particle detectors. Covers particle 
interactions with matter in scintillation, 
ionization, and semiconductor detectors 
for changed particles, neutrons, and 
photons. Prerequisites: PHY 3124 or 
Permission of Instructor. 



146 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



PHY 5141 Intermediate Modern 
Physics I (3). Prepares advanced 
undergraduate and beginning graduate 
student research preparation in atomic, 
molecular, or optical physics. Topics 
may be adapted to students' research 
interests. Prerequisites: Permission of 
Instructor. 

PHY 5142 Intermediate Modem 
Physics II (3). Continnuation of 
advanced undergraduate and beginning 
graduate student research preparation 
in atomic, molecular, optical or nuclear 
physics. Topics may be adapted to 
students' research interests. 

Prerequisite: Intermediate Modem 
Physics I. 

PHY 5235 Nonlinear Dynamics and 
Chaos (3). Introduction to the universal 
behavior of classical systems described 
by nonlinear equations. Prerequisites: 
PHY4222, MAA42n. (F or S) 

PHY 5240 Advanced Classical 
Mechanics (3). Advanced formulations 
of the equations of motion and their 
applications: the central field problem, 
rigid body dynamics, oscillations and 
continuous systems. Prerequisite: PHY 
4222. (F) 

PHY 5346 Advanced Electromag- 
netic Theory I (3). Advanced 
treatment of classical electro-magnet- 
ism: Electrostatics, Green's function, 
Laplace's equation, multipole expan- 
sion, magneto-statics. Maxwell's equa- 
tions, waves. Prerequisite: PHY 4324. 
(F) 

PHY 5347 Advanced Electro- 
magnetic Theory II (3). Additional 
topics in classical electromagnetism: 
Wave guides, radiating and diffracting 
systems, KirchoflPs integral for 
diffraction, covariant formulation of 
field equations. Prerequisite: PHY 
5346. (S) 

PHY 5446 Laser Physics (3). 

Principles of lasers and laser 
applications, including atom-field 
interactions, stimulated emission and 
dipole oscillators, optical resonators 
and electromagnetic modes, semi- 
classical laser theory, and specific laser 
systems. Prerequisite: PHY 4605. (F or 
S) 

PHY 5466 The Physics of Music (3). 

Provides music technology majors a 
physical understanding of sound, sound 
generation and reprodcution. 

Concentrates mainly on physical 
principles and less on calculation. 
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. 



PHY 5667 Nonperturbative Quant- 
um Field Theory (3). Euclidean QFT, 
renormalization group, local gauge 
symetry, lattice regularization, Wilson 
action, fermion fields, expansion 
schemes, numerical algorithms, hadron 
properties, recent developments. 
Prerequisites: PHY 4605. 

PHY 5930 Seminar in Physics (1-3). 

A series of specialized lectures/sem- 
inars on selected topics in Phys- 
ics/Astro-Physics. Prerequisites: Per- 
mission of Department. 

PHY 5936 Special Topics Research 
(1-10). Participation in an original 
investigation in theoretical or 
experimental physics/astro-physics 
under direct faculty supervision. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

PHY 5937, PHY 5938 Seminar in 
Special Topics (3). Seminar work 
under the supervision of a faculty 
member on subject material of mutual 
interest. 

PHY 5940 Physics Graduate 
Teaching Worlishop (1). The teaching 
of physics laboratories. Includes 
practice of lab experiments, use and 
adjustment of lab equipment and 
explanation of departmental grading 
policy. Supplemented by outside 
lectures on university policies. (F) 

PHY 6524 Statistical Physics (3). 
Fundamental principles of statistical 
mechanics; fluctuations, noise and 
irreversible thermodynamics; kinetic 
methods and transport theory. 
Prerequisites: PHY 3503 and PHY 
4222. (S) 

PHY 6645 Advanced Quantum 
Mechanics I (3). Advanced topics in 
quantum mechanics: Quantized sys- 
tems, relativistic quantum mechanics, 
potential scattering. Prerequisite: PHY 
4605. (F) 

PHY 6646 Advanced Quantum 
Mechanics II (3). Additional topics in 
advanced quantum mechanics: 
Collision theory, symmetry trans- 
formations, conservation laws, group 
theory. Prerequisite: PHY 6645. (S) 

PHY 6651 Quantum Scattering 
Theory I (3). The investigation of 
atomic and electronic scattering pro- 
cesses: Potential scattering, long range 
potentials, electronatom collisions. 
Prerequisite: PHY 6645. 

PHY 6652 Quantum Scattering 
Theory II (3). The mathematical 



investigation of scattering processes: 
Auto-ionization, fast vs. slow 
collisions, Regge poles, S and T 
matrices. Prerequisite: PHY 6651. 

PHY 6668 Relativistic Quantum 
Field Theory I (3). Introduction to 
relativistic quantum fields: General 
formalism, Klein-Gordon field, Dirac 
field, vector fields, interacting fields, 
CPT theorem, reduction formulae, 
gauge theory. Prerequisite: PHY 6646. 

PHY 6669 Relativistic Quantum 
Field II (3). Additional topics in 
relativistic quantum fields: perturbation 
theory, U matrix, Wick's theorem, 
dispersion relations, renormalization. 
Ward identity, renormalization group, 
path integral formalism. Prerequisite: 
PHY 6668. 

PHY 6675 Quantum Theory of Many 
Particle Systems I (3). An intro- 
duction to the physics of many particle 
systems: Second quantization, Fock 
spaces, Boson and Fermion symmetry, 
Gell-Mann-Low theorem, diagram- 
matic expansions, Goldstone theorem. 
Prerequisite: PHY 6646. 

PHY 6676 Quantum Theory of Many 
Particle Systems II (3). Additional 
topics in the physics of many particle 
systems: Fermi gas, Bose condensation, 
Hartree-Fock approximation, random 
phase approximation, finite temper- 
ature formalism, hadrons. Prerequisite: 
PHY 6675. 

PHY 6935 Graduate Research Sem- 
inar (1-2). Seminars presented by 
students, faculty, and visitors on a 
variety of topics of current research 
interest. Repeatable. Required every 
semester. (F and S) 

PHY 6936 Graduate Research (1-10). 

Research at the graduate level in 
theoretical or experimental physics 
under faculty supervision, repeatable. 
Prerequisites: Permission from 
supervising faculty. 

PHY 6970 Thesis Research (1-10). 

Research toward completion of 
Master's Thesis. Repeatable. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of Department. (F,S) 

PHY 6971 Master's Thesis (3). 

Theoretical and/or experimental 
research leading to thesis. Prerequisite: 
Permission of major professor. (F,S) 

PHY 7910 Dissertation Research (1- 

9). Students conduct dissertation 
research at the doctoral level in 
theoretical or experimental physics 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 147 



under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. (F, S) 

PHY 7981 Ph.D. Dissertation (1-12). 

Original research work towards 
completion of dissertation and presen- 
tation and defense of dissertation. 
Prerequisite: Permission of Major Pro- 
fessor and Doctoral Candidacy. 

PHZ 5130 Theoretical Treatment of 
Experimental Data (3). Statistical 
analysis of physical processes and 
statistical tests, with particular 
emphasis on instrumentation-related 
problems. Mathematical modeling and 
computer simulation. Prerequisite: 
Undergraduate statistics course, or 
equivalent, or Permission of the 
instructor. 

PHZ 5156 Computational Physics I 

(3). Physical systems by means of 
computer simulation. Monte Carlo, 
molecular dynamics, percolation, ran- 
dom systems, chaos, criticality, guage 
fields. Prerequisite: PHY 51 15 and 
PHY 51 16. 

PHZ 5157C Computational Physics 
H (3). Advanced computer simulation 
methods of physical systems. 
Application in chaos, nonlinear and 
random systems, criticality, field theory 
and practices. Prerequisites: PHZ 
5156. Corequisites: PHY 5115 and 
PHY 51 16. 

PHZ 5234 Atomic and Molecular 
Collision Phenomena (3). Investi- 
gation of atomic and molecular col- 
lision phenomena: Kinetic theory, 
elastic scattering, inelastic scattering, 
excitation and ionization, heavy 
particle collisions. Prerequisites: PHY 
4605 and PHY 4222. (F or S) 

PHZ 5304 Advanced Nuclear Physics 
(3). The fundamental properties of 
nuclei, nuclear forces, nuclear models, 
radioactivity, weak processes, and 
nuclear reactions. Prerequisite: PHY 
4604. Corequisite: PHY 4605. (F or S) 

PHZ 5405 Solid State Physics (3). 

Crystalline form of solids, lattice 
dynamics, metals, insulators, semi- 
conductors, crystalline surfaces, and 
amorphous materials. Prerequisites: 
PHY 3124 or CHM 3411. 

PHZ 5505 Low Energy Plasma 
Physics (3). The investigation of the 
kinetics of rarefied gases and thermal 
plasmas: Phase space, random currents, 
orbit theory, plasma sheaths, radiation, 
the pinch effect. Prerequisites: PHY 
3503, PHY 4324, and PHY 4222. 



PHZ 5506 Plasma Physics (3). An 

introduction to plasma fundamentals, 
the Boltzmann equation, the hydro- 
dynamic equations, orbit theory, the 
interaction of electromagnetic waves 
with plasmas, the pinch effect and 
instabilities. Prerequisite: PHY 3049. 
(F or S) 

PHZ 5606 Special Relativity (3). A 

detailed study of special relativity: 
Lorentz transformations, relativistic 
electrodynamics. Prerequisite: PHY 
3124. 

PHZ 5607 General Relativity (3). 

General relativity using differential 
geometry and tensor analysis. Topics 
include Einstein's field equations and 
their solutions, applications and 
observational tests. Black Holes and 
cosmology are also discussed. 
Prerequisite: PHY 4222 and PHY 
4605. 

PHZ 6255 Molecular Biophysics (3). 

The use of theoretical physics 
techniques to investigate biological 
systems: Protein structure and 
dynamics, electron tunneling, nuclear 
tunneling, hemoglobin, photosynthesis, 
vision. Prerequisite: PHY 4605. (F or 
S) 

PHZ 6326 Low Energy Nuclear 
Physics I (3). Introduction to the 
physics of nuclei and nuclear 
processes: Nuclear forces, scattering 
processes and nuclear models. 
Prerequisite: PHY 4605. 

PHZ 6327 Low Energy Nuclear 
Physics H (3). Additional topics in 
nuclear physics: The shell and 
collective models, nuclear reactions 
and applications, scattering theory, 
entrance channel phenomena, 
rearrangement collision and breakup 
reactions. Prerequisite: PHZ 6326. 

PHZ 6354 Introduction to Particle 
Physics (3). An introduction to modem 
particle theory: Elementary field 
theory, symmetries, quantum electro- 
dynamics, quark-parton model, 
quantum chromodynamics, Weinberg- 
Salam model. Prerequisite: PHY 6646. 

PHZ 6355 High Energy Hadronlc 
Physics (3). Physics of quark-gluon 
structure of strongly interacting matter. 
Introduces the basic methods of high 
energy hadronic and nuclear physics, 
the quark model of hadrons, and the 
partonic model of deep-inelastic 
scattering. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 



PHZ 6359 Quantum Gauge Field 
Theories (3). Basics in field 
quantization, nonabelian symmetries, 
the standard SU(3)xSU(2)xU(l) model, 
non-perturbative features, lattice 
regularization and numerical simula- 
tion. Prerequisites: PHY 4605, PHY 
5346. (F or S) 

PHZ 6426 Advanced Solid State 
Physics (3). Electronic structures of 
solids and surfaces, electron-electron 
interaction, superconductivity, magnet- 
ism in solids, amorphous systems, 
glasses, polymers, percolation, local- 
ization, phase transition, fi^ctals. 
Prerequisites: PHY 4324 and PHY 
4605. (F or S) 

PHZ 6437C Surface Physics (3). An 
introduction to theoretical and experi- 
mental techniques AES (Auger Elect- 
ron Spectroscopy), LEED (Low Energy 
Electron Diffraction), XPS (X-ray 
Photoelectron Spectroscopy), AFM 
(Atomic Force Microscopy) and STM 
(Scanning Tunneling Microscopy). 
Prerequisite: PHZ 5405 or permission 
of the instructor. 



148 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



Political Science 

Nicol Rae, Professor and Chairperson 
Astrid Arraras, Assistant Professor 
Colton Campbell, Associate Professor 
Ronald Cox, Associate Professor 
Eduardo Gamarra, Professor and 

Director, Latin American and 

Carribean Center 
Ivelaw Griffith, Professor and 

Dean, Honors College 
Kevin Hill, Associate Professor 
Antonio Jorge, Professor 
Joseph Jupille, Assistant Professor 
Jeanne Kates, Instructor 
Mary Beth Melchior, Assistant 

Professor 
Dario Moreno, Associate Professor 

and Director, Metropolitan Center 
Paul Mullen, Assistant Professor 
Brian Nelson, Associate Professor 
Richard Olson, Professor 
Timothy Power, Associate Professor, 

Graduate Program Director 
Mark Rosenberg, Professor and 

Provost 
Rebecca Salokar, Associate Professor 
John Stack, Professor and Director, 

Institute for Public Policy and 

Citizenship Studies 
Judith H. Stiehm, Professor 
Christopher Warren, Associate 

Professor, and Head Undergraduate 

Advisor 

The Master of Arts and the Doctor of 
Philosophy Degrees in Political 
Science at Florida International 
University are designed to provide 
students with a comprehensive 
knowledge of political science. The 
graduate program in political science 
builds on faculty strengths and 
distinguishes itself by stressing a 
comparative approach to the study of 
politics. The program is designed to 
equip its graduates with a solid 
foundation in the basic theories and 
methods of political science, in 
conjunction with an in-depth education 
in selected traditional subfields. The 
program has a particular focus on 
Comparative Politics and American 
Politics. 

Admission Procedures 

Applicants seeking admission for the 
Fall semester should have application 
materials submitted by March 15th. 
Incomplete applications cannot be 
considered by the Graduate Admissions 
Committee. Admission decisions will 
be announced no later than April 1 5th. 
Applicants must also send copies of the 
following materials directly to the 



Department's Admissions Committee 
at the following address: Department of 
Political Science, DM 480, University 
Park Campus, Miami, Florida 33199. 
Telephone: (305) 348-2226; Fax: (305) 
348-3765. 

The following application materials 
must be submitted to the University's 
Admissions Office. 

1. A completed FIU Graduate 
Application form with requisite 
application fees. 

2. Official transcripts of all 
university-level work, including 
undergraduate or professional school 
courses. 

3. An official report of Graduate 
Record Examination (GRE) scores. 

4. All foreign students whose native 
language is not English must submit 
official reports of Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL) and Test 
of Spoken English (TSE). 

Applicants must send the following 
materials directly to the department's 
admissions committee. 

1. Two letters of reference from 
former instructors who are able to 
evaluate the applicant's potential for 
graduate study. Applicants should 
ensure that each letter is signed by the 
author along the sealed flap of the 
envelope. 

2. A personal statement of intent, 
including a discussion of education and 
career objectives and the specific 
relationship of a Master's or Doctoral 
degree in political science to the 
achievement of those objectives. The 
personal statement should not exceed 
three typewritten, double-spaced pages. 

Master of Arts 

Admission Requirements 

Admission to the Master's program is 
competitive. Meeting the minimum 
requirements does not guarantee 
acceptance. 

The minimum requirements for admis- 
sion to the M.A. program include: 

1. A baccalaureate degree from an 
accredited college or university. 

2. A minimum 3.2 grade point 
average (on a 4.0 scale) during the last 
two years of a student's undergraduate 
program (students with graduate or 
professional course work will be evalu- 
ated individually). 

3. A minimum combined score of 
1000 on the verbal and quantitative 
sections of the GRE. 

4. Foreign students whose native 
language is not English must have a 



TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign 
Language) score of 550 or higher. 

Degree Requirements 

The course of study for the M.A. in 
Political Science requires 30 credit 
hours. A final research project and 
research seminar are required 
components: 

Required Courses (9 credits) 

POS 5716 Foundations of Political 

Science 3 

POS 5706 Research Methodology 3 
POS 6976 Research Seminar 3 

Core Courses (9 credits) 

Each student is required to take three of 
the following four core courses: 
POS 5045 Seminar in American 

Politics 3 

CPO5091 Seminar in Comparative 

Politics 3 

INR 5007 Seminar in International 

Politics 3 

POT 5007 Seminar in Political 

Theory 3 

Electives (12 credits) 

Students are required to take four 
elective courses. A student may take a 
maximum of six credit hours in a 
cognate field or in an approved cognate 
program. 

Doctor of Philosophy 
Admission Requirements 

Admission to the Ph.D. program is 
competitive. Meeting minimum re- 
quirements does not guarantee accep- 
tance. 

The minimum requirements for admis- 
sion to the Ph.D. program include: 

1. A baccalaureate degree from an 
accredited college or university; 

2. An undergraduate GPA of 3.2 
and/or a graduate GPA of 3.25; 

3. A minimum combined score of 
1120 on the verbal and quan- 
titative sections of the GRE. The 
GRE Political Science examin- 
ation is not required. 

4. Foreign students whose native 
language is not English must have 
a TOEFL (Test of English as a 
Foreign Language) score of 550 or 
higher. 

Degree Requirements 

The Ph.D. program requires a 
minimum 90 credit hours beyond the 
Bachelor's degree. 

The Doctor of Philosophy in Political 
Science is conferred based on satis- 
factory completion of required course 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 149 



work, a demonstrated mastery of a 
broad field of knowledge, and 
successful completion and defense of 
the dissertation. The degree provides 
graduates with a solid foundation in the 
basic theories and methodologies of 
political science in conjunction with 
specialization in traditional sub-fields. 
Students will, in consultation with their 
faculty advisors, determine the contents 
of their course work. Students will 
specialize in three examination fields. 
Four of the possible fields are based on 
the traditional substanfive areas of 
Political Science (American Politics, 
Comparative Polifics, Intemational 
Politics, and Political Theory). A fifth 
field (Area Studies) allows students to 
concentrate on either a regional area or 
substantive issue. Normally, all 
students will take 12 credit hours in 
disciplines outside the Political Science 
department. 

Students' proposed programs must 
be approved by their advisors and the 
Graduate Studies Committee. 

Required Courses (10 credits) 

POS 5702 Teaching Polifical 

Science 1 

POS 5706 Research Methodology 3 

POS 5716 Foundahons of Political 
Science 3 

POS 6918 Seminar in Political 

Science Methodology 3 

Common Core Courses (12 credits) 

CPO5091 Seminar in Comparative 

Politics 3 

INR 5007 Seminar in Intemational 

Politics 3 

POS 5045 Seminar in American 

Politics 3 

POT 5007 Seminar in Political 

Theory 3 

Fields (24-45 credits in 3 fields): 

Comparative Politics 
Intemational Politics 
American Politics 
Political Theory 

Language Requirement 

The Political Science Ph.D. Program 
requires competency in one foreign 
language or demonstrated competency 
in computer and methodological 
techniques when considered more 
appropriate. Language competency 
must be demonstrated prior to taking 
the comprehensive examinarions. 

Comprehensive Examination 

After satisfactory completion of course 
work, students will take compre- 
hensive exams before starting work on 
the dissertation and being admitted to 



candidacy. The comprehensive exams 
will cover core courses and fimctional 
fields. They will be written and oral. 

Dissertation (24-45 credits) 

After passing the comprehensive 
exams, students are admitted to 
candidacy and enroll for dissertation 
credits under the supervision of their 
dissertation advisors. Candidates will 
prepare and defend a dissertation 
proposal. Upon completion of the 
work, a public defense of the 
dissertation will be scheduled in 
accordance with university policy. 

Financial Aid 

The program has a limited number of 
graduate assistantships available for 
qualified students. Assistantships are 
awarded on a competitive basis only to 
fiiU-time students. Students applying 
for fiiU-time status are considered 
automatically for these awards. 
Assistantships are renewable each year 
for up to four years based on 
satisfactory progress and performance. 

The University also grants 'need 
based' financial aid. For information 
on these awards call the Financial Aid 
Office at (305) 348-2431. 

Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

CPO-Comparative Politics; INR- 
Intemational Relations; POS-Political 
Science; POT-Political Theory; PUP- 
Public Policy. 

CPO 5036 Politics of Development 
(3). This course examines divergent 
explanations for development and 
underdevelopment. Of central impor- 
tance are the concepts and theories that 
emphasize the political dimensions of 
development processes of develop- 
ment, and actors in the development 
process. 

CPO 5091 Seminar in Comparative 
Politics (3). A foundation in the devel- 
opment of the field of comparative 
politics and in the major schools of 
thought that have molded perspectives 
on comparative political analysis. 

CPO 5325 Politics of the Caribbean 

(3). Examines the stmctural and 
institutional aspects of the politics of 
the Caribbean in both domestic and 
intemational contexts. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 

CPO 5934 Topics in Comparative 
Politics (3). A rigorous examination of 
a topic in comparative politics. Subject 



matter varies according to instructor. 
Topic will be announced in advance. 

CPO 5936 Seminar in Comparative 
Political Parties (3). Students read and 
discuss major works on parties by 
conservafive, liberal, and Marxist 
authors. 

CPO 6062 Seminar in Comparative 
Judicial Politics (3). An examination 
of judicial stmctures, legal traditions, 
judicial behavior and judicial power 
cross culturally. 

CPO 6066 Comparative Constitu- 
tional Law (3). An examination of 
constitutionalism in both established 
and developing democracies. Particular 
emphasis on the role of courts, judicial 
review and judicial remedies using 
doctrinal, contextual and theoretical 
analysis. 

CPO 6084 War, Peace and the 

Military (3). Examines theories of the 
relationship between societies, govern- 
ments and their militaries. Emphasis on 
relationship between militaries and a 
nation's experience with peace and 
participation in war. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 

CPO 6105 Politics of the European 
Union (3). Examines the development 
and operation of the world's most 
successful experiment in regional 
cooperation, the European Union (EXT), 
including political economy, 

institutions, and policy-making. 
Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. 

CPO 6106 Seminar on European 
Politics (3). Advanced discussion of 
major themes in European politics. 
Topics include corporatism, post- 
materialism, democratization, and 
European integration. 

CPO 6206 Seminar in African 
Politics (3). Studies the crisis of 
African development. Topics include 
colonialism, internal cleavages, and 
impact of the global economy. 

CPO 6307 Seminar on South Ameri- 
can Politics (3). Explores the realities 
and myths of the democratization 
experience of South America. 

CPO 6350 Seminar in Brazilian 
Politics (3). The political development 
of Brazil, focusing on alternation 
between authoritarianism and democ- 
racy. Emphasis on clientelism, patri- 
monialism, civil-military relations, and 
political institutions. 



150 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



CPO 6376 Seminar in Central Amer- 
ican Politics (3). Central America's 
socio-political evolution. Attention is 
given to both the national and 
international politics of the region. 

CPO 6407 Seminar in Politics of the 
Middle East (3). In depth analysis of 
comparative theoretical perspectives of 
political processes in the Middle East. 

CPO 6771 Politics of Disaster (3). 

Examines disaster and other extreme 
events as political system shocks. 
Analyzes disasters as crises of values, 
legitimacy, and agenda control. 
Evaluates policy alternatives in 
prevention, mitigation, and response. 
Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. 

INR 5007 Seminar in International 
Politics (3). An advanced graduate 
course designed to give students a 
specialized knowledge of the classics in 
international politics. The course traces 
the development of international 
politics from Thucydides to the present. 

INR 5036 Politics of Globalization 

(3). Intensive examination of state and 
global institutions that have shaped the 
process of economic globalization. 
Topics include impact on sovereignty, 
human rights, labor and agenda-setting 
of large and small nation-states. 

INR 5087 Ethnicity and the Politics 
of Development (3). This course 
examines the conceptual and substan- 
tive dimensions of ethnicity in the 
context of world politics and political 
development. The course will highlight 
ethnicity and ethnic groups as critical 
factors in North-South politics. 

INR 5105 American Foreign Policy 

(3). Compares different perspectives in 
foreign policy analysis. Provides a 
comprehensive understanding of major 
issues in U.S. policy. 

INR 5414 Topics in International 
Law (3). An intensive examination of 
the political dimensions of interna- 
tional law in the context of rapidly 
changing global political relations. 

INR 5934 Topics in International 
Politics (3). A rigorous examination of 
a topic in international politics. Subject 
matter varies according to instructor. 
Topic to be announced in advance. 

INR 6080 Seminar on Non-State 
Actors (3). Explores the nature of non- 
state actors in international politics, 
including cities, interest groups, multi- 
nationals, and individuals. 



INR 6205 World Politics (3). This 
course provides graduate students with 
an understanding of the major con- 
ceptual approaches to world politics. It 
emphasizes the analysis of significant 
actors, institutions, and processes at 
work in the contemporary global 
system as well as possible future 
alternatives. 

INR 6705 Seminar in International 
Political Economy (3). Theories of 
economic cooperation and conflict 
among nation-states. Liberal, economic 
nationalists and Marxist theoretical 
paradigms are explored in an examina- 
tion of the internationalization of 
capital, trade and investment and the 
role of the State in the global economy. 

INR 6936 Seminar in Inter-American 
Politics (3). Focus on U.S. -Latin 
American relations. Attempts to link 
the theoretical literature on U.S. 
foreign policy with empirical develop- 
ments. 

INR 6939 Seminar in International 

Law (3). Allows for specialized and 
topical offerings by regular and visiting 
faculty. Also permits experimental 
courses. 

POS 5045 Seminar in American 
Politics (3). The advanced study of 
U.S. politics. Students read and discuss 
the major works and theories 
concerning American politics and 
government. 

POS 5146 Seminar in Urban Politics 
(3). Examination of processes by which 
urban areas are governed. Emphasis is 
on conflicts over structures, power, 
policy and the politics of ethnicity and 
class. 

POS 5158 Topics in Politics (3). 
Subject matter varies according to 
instructor. 

POS 5208 Seminar in Political 
Behavior (3). Analyzes the literature in 
political behavior. Special emphasis is 
on voting, socialization, attitudes, 
partisanship, campaigning, the media, 
and political participation in the 
developed democracies. Prerequisite: 
POS 5706. 

POS 5447 Seminar in U.S. Political 
Parties (3). Students read and discuss 
the major works and theories on U.S. 
political parties. 

POS 5638 Topics in Public Law (3). 

A rigorous examination of a topic in 
public law. Subject matter varies 



according to instructor. Topic will be 
announced in advance. 

POS 5702 Teaching Political Science 
(1). Introduces graduate students to the 
pedagogical and practical aspects of 
teaching political science. Topics will 
include selecting books, writing a 
syllabus, lecturing, running discussion 
groups, and testing and grading. Covers 
professional ethics, and student rights 
and responsibilities. 

POS 5706 Research Methodology (3). 

This course is an introduction to the 
principal concepts and techniques of 
quantitative and non-quantitative 
methodology in the social sciences. It is 
designed to familiarize the student with 
the language and format of quantitative 
and non-quantitative applications in 
order to permit students to deal 
effectively with the literature of their 
field. 

POS 5716 Foundations of Political 
Science (3). Prepares students for the 
advanced study of politics. Areas of 
study include history of political 
science as a discipline, comparison of 
classical and modem sciences of 
politics and realpolitik, epistemological 
foundations. 

POS 5909 Independent Study (1-6). 

Designed for advanced students who 
wish to pursue specialized topics in 
political science. Arrangements must be 
made with instructor during prior 
semester. 

POS 5932 Topics in Urban Politics 
(VAR). An extensive examination of 
the processes by which social conflicts 
in American urban areas are 
represented and regulated. Emphasis is 
on the ways in which urban problems 
are identified and proposed solutions 
formulated, legitimatized, and 

administered by urban policy-making 
processes. Includes a discussion of 
urban political culture. 

POS 6072 Seminar in U.S. Political 
Economy (3). Examines core issues 
related to the U.S. political-economic 
system, and the challenge of business 
to democracy. Students study the 
major problems confronting 

communities in urban areas. 

POS 6266 Community Power Theory 

(3). Studies the concept of power in the 
U.S. and classics of community power 

literature. 

POS 6286 Judicial Research (3). 
Examination of the methodological 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 151 



approaches used to study courts in a 
political context. Special attention to 
seminal works that focus on individual, 
small group and institutional behavior, 
and extra-legal influences. 

POS 6415 Seminar on the U.S. 
Presidency (3). Examines the most 
important works on the U.S. 
Presidency, and the evolution of the 
office since 1789. 

POS 6427 Seminar on the U.S. 
Congress (3). Discussion of the 
scholarly literature on Congress. 
Students analyze trends in 
congressional power and possible 
reforms. 

POS 6612 Seminar on U.S. Supreme 
Court (3). Seminar covers literature, 
both current and classic, on U.S. 
Supreme Court. Topics covered 
typically include the major paradigms, 
appointment, access, agenda setting, 
decision making and impact. 

POS 6639 Seminar in Public Law 
(VAR). Graduate seminar on special 
topic in public law. Topic to be 
announced in advance. 

POS 6725 Formal Political Modeling 
(3). Introduces students to the 
foundations of public choice. Particular 
topics may include decision theory, 
social choice, spatial voting models, 
and game theory, amoung others. 

POS 6918 Seminar in Political 
Science Research Methods (3). 

Examines the methods used to design, 
execute, and critique empirical research 
in political science, addressing a variety 
of methodological issues. Pre- 
requisites: POS 5706 and POS 5716. 

POS 6937 Seminar in Politics (VAR). 

Subject matter varies according to 
instructor. 

POS 6971 Thesis (1-6). Requires 
students to enroll for thesis or 
dissertation research for at least one 
credit hour every semester in which 
they are engaged in such research. 
Prerequisites: All other course work for 
the Master's. 

POS 6976 Research Seminar (3). 

Required course for all MA candidates 
during completion of their major 
research project. Also required for 
second-year Ph.D. students. The 
course guides student research while in 
progress. Prerequisite: POS 5706. 

POS 7910 Pre-Dissertation Research 
(1-9). During the term in which 
students take Ph.D. comprehensive 



exams, this course enables them to 

concentrate on completion of their 

dissertation prospective. Prerequisite: 

Completion of all other Ph.D. 
coursework. 

POS 7980 Ph.D. Dissertation (1-12). 

Supervised research and writing of an 
original research project. Prerequisites: 
Permission of Major Professor and 
Doctoral Candidacy. 

POT 5007 Seminar in Political 
Theory (3). An examination of 
writings from a diverse list of some of 
the major political theorists in the 
western tradition from antiquity to the 
present. 

POT 5307 Feminist Political Theory 

(3). Examines feminist political theory 
in the second half of the twentieth 
century with the focus on the work of 
U.S. scholars. 

POT 5326 Graduate Seminar in 
Class Analysis (3). The theoretical and 
empirical issues associated with class 
divisions in contemporary societies. 
Theoretical debates regarding defini- 
tional problems of class identity and 
empirical case studies highlighting 
class conflict and stratification. 

POT 5934 Topics in PoUtical Theory 

(3). An intensive examination of 
selected topics dealing with political 
theory. Subjects will vary, depending 
upon the desires of students and 
faculty. Allows the student to choose 
topics of particular interest to him or 
her. 

POT 6015 Seminar in Classical 
Political Thought (3). Examination of 
key elements of classical political 
thought from the Hellenic to early 
Christian periods. 

POT 6056 Seminar in Modern 
Political Thought (3). Examines 
important works and theories or 
political thought from the renaissance 
to the early 1 9th century. 

POT 6067 Seminar in Contemporary 
Political Thought (3). Examines 
political theories of the 1 9th and 20th 
centuries. Special emphasis on the 
tension between modem and post- 
modem theory. 

POT 6208 Seminar in American 
Political Thought (3). Students read 
and discuss classic and contemporary 
interpretations of U.S. political 
thought, and apply those ideas to 
modem U.S. politics. 



POT 6303 Seminar on Self and Polity 

(3). Focuses on conceptions of self that 
are reinforced by different political 
regimes. Examines humanities and 
social science works that address self 
and polity issues. 

POT 6416 Seminar in Mamisra (3). 

Analysis of the evolution of Marxism 
from Marx to the present. Particular 
attention is given to contemporary 
Marxist debates. 

POT 6603 Political Theory of the 
Modem State (3). Analyzes evolution 
and theories of the modem state from 
the high middle ages to the present. 
Pre-state formations, classical states, 
and social science theories of the state 
are also discussed. 

PUP 5934 Topics in Public Policy (1- 

6). A rigorous examination of a topic in 
public policy. Subject matter varies 
according to instructor. Topic will be 
announced in advance. 

PUP 6007 Seminar in Public Policy 

(1-6). Graduate seminar on special 
topic dealing with public policy 
analysis. Subject matter varies accord- 
ing to instructor. Topic to be an- 
nounced in advance. 



152 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



Psychology 

Marvin Dunn, Associate Professor 

and Chairperson 
Ram Aditya, Associate Professor 
Lori Andrew, Technical Support 

Specialist 
Lorraine Bahrick, Professor 
Robert Beneckson, Instructor 
Margaret Bull-Kovera, Associate 

Professor 
Leslie DeCburch, Assistant Professor 
Joan Erber, Professor 
Maria Felix-Ortiz, Assistant Professor 
Gordon Finley, Professor 
Ronald Fisher, Professor 
Arthur Flexser, Associate Professor 
Leslie Frazier, Associate Professor 
Jacob Gewirtz, Professor 
Fernando Gonzalez-Reigosa, 

Associate Professor 
Margaret Kovera, Associate 

Professor 
William Kurtines, Professor 
Mary Levitt, Professor 
Robert Lickliter, Professor 
Christian Meissner, Assistant 

Professor 
Marilyn Montgomery, Assistant 

Professor 
Gary Moran, Professor 
Kevin O'Neil, Assistant Professor 
Janat Parlier, Professor 
Suzanna Rose, Professor 
James Rotton, Associate Professor 
Bennett Schwartz, Associate 

Professor 
Wendy Silverman, Professor 
Jonathan Tubman, Associate 

Professor, and Graduate Chair 
Chockalingam Viswesvaran, 

Associate Professor 

Master of Science in 
Psychology 

The Masters of Science in Psychology 
program at the University is designed 
to train practitioners and researchers 
who can function in a variety of applied 
settings. The core curriculum and 
admission prerequisites are intended to 
provide students with a base of 
knowledge in psychology. A distinctive 
feature of the program is its emphasis 
on a close working relationship 
between student and faculty. Under 
faculty supervision, students are 
encouraged to develop individually 
tailored programs of study that reflect 
both student interests and program 
strengths. 

The curriculum consists of 36 
semester hours of graduate study in 
which the exposures focus specifically 



on training the student to perform the 
skills mentioned above. Students are 
expected to select electives, 
project/thesis topics, and supervised 
field experiences that meet not only the 
degree requirements, but also their 
academic interest and particular 
professional objectives. Six of the 36 
semester credit hours consist of 
Master's thesis credits. 

The Mental Health Counselor 
Master's program allows students to 
meet university requirements plus the 
requirements for a Mental Health 
Counseling license. 

Doctor of Philosopliy in 
Psycliology 

The doctorate program in psychology 
has a two-fold focus: (1) life-span 
development (2) applied psychology. 
The program emphasizes normal 
development as well as cross-cultural 
and urban perspectives on the life span 
and legal and industrial/organizational 
applied psychology. The emphasis is on 
academic quality and the curriculum is 
designed to foster a commitment both 
to basic research and to application as 
an integral part of the individual 
student's specialty area development. 
The curriculum offers a broad 
background in life-span development 
and applied psychology while 
encouraging the development of an 
area of specialization early in graduate 
training. 

Students are expected to master a 
series of core-course requirements 
designed to facilitate a thorough 
grounding in theory, methodology, and 
content both in basic and applied 
research. In addition, a number of 
seminars reflecting specialized foci are 
offered. Students are also required to 
pursue specific areas of interest through 
independent study with individual 
faculty members and through 
apprenticeship with a primary advisor 
for the purpose of acquiring direct 
research experience. 

Graduate Admission 
Requirements 

The following are in addition to the 
University's Graduate Admission 
Requirements: 

1. A 3.0 or higher GPA during the 
last two years as an upper division 
student and a total score (quantitative 
plus verbal) of 1 ,000 or higher on the 
ORE for the Master's degree. A 3.0 or 
higher GPA and a GRE verbal and 
quantitative of 1100 or higher are 



required for the Ph.D. degree. Foreign 
students whose native language is not 
English must take the Test of English 
as a Foreign Language (the TOEFL 
examination) and obtain a 580 score of 
higher. 

2. The GRE and GPA stated above 
are only minimum requirements. All 
applications are reviewed by the 
Program Area Admission Committee, 
which makes the final admissions 
decisions. Since admission to the 
program is competitive, the 
coinmittee's requirements are normally 
higher than the minimum aforemen- 
tioned standards. 

Graduate Admissions Procedures 

Applicants must submit the following 
to the Graduate Studies Admission 
Committee, Department of Psychology, 
Florida International University, 
Miami, Florida 33199: 

1. A photocopy of the admission 
application submitted to the Admis- 
sions Office. 

2. A brief essay stating the reasons 
for the interest in the program and 
career goals. 

3. Three letters of recommendation, 
preferably from previous instructors 
and/or persons familiar with applicant's 
academic background. 

Applicants to the program who are 
not psychology majors may be accepted 
conditionally until they meet the 
category requirements, listed below, 
early in their graduate career. A 
maximum of nine semester hours credit 
earned in the non-degree seeking 
student category exclusive of 
prerequisite undergraduate courses may 
be applied to graduate degree require- 
ments. The undergraduate course 
requirements are designed to make 
certain that students accepted into the 
graduate program have a broad base of 
dependable psychological knowledge 
and acquaintance with the basic 
methodologies upon which the 
discipline is founded. 

Category A. Satisfactory completion 
of one psychology laboratory or 
research methods course. 

Category B. Satisfactory completion 
of introductory upper division 
statistics. 

Deadline for review of completed 
applications is January 15 for fall 
admission. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 153 



Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

CLP-Clinical Psychology; CYP- 
Community Psychology; DEP- 
Developmental Psychology; EAB- 
Experimental Analysis of Behavior; 
EDP-Educational Psychology; EXP- 
Experimental Psychology; INP- 
Industrial and Applied Psychology; 
LIN-Linguistics; PCO-Psychology for 
Counseling; PPE-Psychology of 
Personality; PSB-Psychobiology; PSY- 
Psychology; SOC-Sociology; SOP- 
Social Psychology; SPA-Speech 
Pathology and Audiology. 
CLP 5166 Advanced Abnormal 
Psychology (3). Advanced study of the 
causes, psychopathology manifesta- 
tions, and social and personal 
consequences of behavior disturbance. 
Emphasis is placed on the critical 
examination of current research on the 
biological, psychological, and social 
aspects of these disorders. Clinical 
approaches to diagnosis, course, and 
prognosis in the contemporary mental 
health context (including 'practicum' 
assignments if feasible) are covered. 

CLP 5169 Proseminar in 
Developmental Psychopathology (3). 

A comprehensive review of topics in 
developmental psychopathology in- 
cluding history, scope, methods, 
individual and contextual influences, 
developmental course, long-term 
outcomes, and resilience. Prerequisites: 
Graduate standing or Permission of the 
instructor. 

CLP 5175 Personality Dynamics (3). 
A review of different approaches to the 
study of personality. Prerequisites: 
Successful completion of a course in 
theories of personality, or equivalent. 
Permission of the instructor. 

CLP 5185 Current Issues in Mental 
Health (3). A critical, intensive 
examination of selected, important 
issues in mental health. Emphasis is 
given to the empirical study of 
contemporary problems related to the 
making of mental patients; planning, 
programming, and administering 
mental health services; political, 
ethical, and legal constraints on the 
operation of mental health facilities; 
interdisciplinary cooperation among 
helping and human service profes- 
sionals; and evaluation of preventive 
care and treatment services. Prereq- 
uisite: Abnormal Psychology or 
permission of the instructor. 



CLP 5931 Ethical Code in 
Psychological Practice (3). Ethical 
principles, rules, procedures of 
Psychologists. Clinical appliation and 
incorporation of the principles into 
professional interactions. Ethical 
reasoning is emphasized. 

CLP 6168 Psychopathology Across 
the Life-Span (3). Exploration of the 
causes of psychopathology from a life- 
span developmental orientation and 
implications for theories of personality. 
Prerequisites: CLP 5166 and 
Permission of the instructor. 

CLP 6375 Clinical Psychology (3). 

Introduction to the science-profession 
of clinical psychology, as it is applied 
to preventing, diagnosing and treating 
maladaptive or deviant human behavior 
and relationships. Prerequisites: 
Admission to the Graduate Program in 
Psychology or Education and 
Permission of the instructor. 

CLP 6395 Forensic Psychology.(3). 

This course surveys the practical and 
ethical issues surrounding the interface 
between clinical psychology and the 
law. Prerequisite: CLP 4144, CLP 
6168 or equivalent of either. 

CLP 6436 Introduction to 
Psychological Assessment (3). This 
course provides instruction in the 
principles and methods underlying the 
administration, construction and 
evaluation of psychological tests and 
measures. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

CLP 6437 Behavioral Assessment in 
Childhood (3). Standardized tests and 
inventories for the behavior assessment 
of infants, children, and adolescents 
will be surveyed. Prerequisites: 
Proseminar courses and second year 
graduate standing. 

CLP 6438 Psychological Assessment 

(3). Theory, research, and applications 
of psychological assessment in areas 
such as interviewing, intellectual and 
cognitive functioning, and personality 
testing. May be repeated for credit with 
different subject matter. Prerequisite: 
STA 3122 and Permission of the 
instructor. 

CLP 6498 Diagnosis and Treatment 
of Sexual Disorders (3). Clinical 
examination of sexual functioning, 
emphasizing disorders of gender 
identity, paraphilias and other 
dysfunctions and intimacy problems. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or 



Permission of the instructor. Coreq- 
uisites: SOP 3772 or equivalent. 

CLP 6945 Clinical Practicum in 
Psychology (1-3). Supervised 

experience in clinical techniques and 
methods. Prerequisites: Graduate stand- 
ing & Permission of the instructor. 

CLP 6948 Clinical Internship (1-3). 

Clinical Internship in Psychology for 
Ph.D. candidates who have completed 
the Clinical Practicum and at least 45 
graduate credit hours. Prerequisites: 
Graduate standing and Permission of 
the instructor, CLP 6945. 

CYP 5534 Groups as Agents of 
Change (3). Theory and practice in 
utilizing groups as agents of change or 
development in communities and 
organizations. Didactic presentation 
and structured exercises focus on 
relevant issues. Students design and 
implement problem-focused interven- 
tions, using class as client system. 

CYP 5954 Community Psychology 
Field Experiences II (5). Same 
orientation and description as Field 
Experience I. Students in this course 
will be able to pursue their work with 
community institutions in more depth. 
Prerequisite: Students enrolled in this 
course must have completed Com- 
munity Psychology Field Experiences 
1. 

CYP 6526 Psychological Methods of 
Program Evaluation (3). Develop- 
ment of skills for the psychological 
assessment monitoring and evaluation 
of human service programs with 
emphasis on the application of basic 
principles of behavioral science 
research in the field, exclusive of 
public school settings. 

CYP 6536 Principles and Methods of 
Psychological Consultation (3). An 
analysis of the basic psychological 
approaches underlying consultation, 
with special emphasis on the practical 
application of the processes of learning, 
cognition, and interpersonal relations to 
techniques of consulting with various 
'target' agencies, individual clients, 
and other professionals in community 
settings. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing at FlU or Permission of the 
instructor. 

CYP 6766 The Psychology of 
Crosscultural Sensitization in a 
Multicultural Context (3). A series of 
weekly seminars to increase student 
sensitivity to working with clients from 
different cultural backgrounds. The 



154 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



objectives of the course are: (1) 
facilitating student awareness of 
cultural differences and their impact on 
social and human services delivery 
systems, (2) identifying the student's 
own personal cultural biases and values 
when interacting with culturally 
different persons, and (3) teaching 
students to develop culturally appro- 
priate intervention skills. 

CYP 6936 Current Issues in 
Community Psychology (3). An 

intensive analysis of contemporary 
theoretical, practical, and professional 
aspects of the field of Community 
Psychology. Topics discussed may lead 
to the graduate project required of each 
student. Prerequisite: Admission to 
graduate study in psychology (other 
graduate students admitted by 
Permission of the instructor). 

DEP 5056 Issues in Life-Span 
Developmental Psychology: Infancy 
through Old Age (3). A survey in 
depth of theories, issues, methods, and 
data in life-span developmental 
psychology through the entire age 
range. Prerequisites: DEP 3001 or DEP 
4464, or their equivalents, are 
recommended. 

DEP 5058 Biological Basis of 
Behavior Development (3). Intro- 
duction to theory and research under- 
lying behavioral development. Covers 
such pre-and post-natal determinants as 
evolution, genetics, neuroendocrines, 
as well as social development, 
behavioral ecology, and sociobiology. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or 
Permission of the instructor. Coreq- 
uisite: Proseminar courses. 

DEP 5068 Applied Life Span 
Developmental Psychology (3). This 
course is designed to acquaint the 
student with various applications in 
life-span developmental psychology. 
An overview of general issues and 
areas of application is offered, and 
specific applications are considered. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or 
Permission of the instructor. 

DEP 5099 Proseminar In Infancy, 
Childhood, and Adolescence (3). 

Provides a comprehensive review of 
issues in perceptual, cognitive, social, 
emotional, and personality devel- 
opment fi-om infancy through 
adolescence. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or Permission of the 
instructor. Corequisite: Pro-seminars. 



DEP 5118 Current Issues in 
Cognitive and Perceptual 

Development in Infancy (3). Provides 
an in-depth analysis of current issues, 
methods, research and theory of 
cognitive and perceptual development 
during the first year of life. Special 
emphasis on object and event 
perception, memory, and imitation. 
Prerequisites: Two courses in 
developmental psychology - any level 
recommended. 

DEP 5185 Emotional Learning and 
its Reversal (3). Theoretical analyses 
and methodological issues in the study 
of emotional learning. Prerequisites: 
Graduate standing or Permission of the 
instructor. 

DEP 5315 Proseminar in Parent- 
Child Relations (3). Provides an 
overview of key issues in parent-child 
relations including culture, socializa- 
tion/genetics, fatherhood, timing, 
adoption, work, effects of children on 
parents, and parent training. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing or Permission 
of the instructor. 

DEP 5344 Psychology of Moral 
Development (3) An introduction to 
the literature on moral development. 
Review and discussion of recent 
developments in this area. Prereq- 
uisites: Graduate standing or Permis- 
sion of the instructor. 

DEP 5405 Proseminar in Psychology 
of Adulthood and Aging (3). A 

comprehensive review of topics in 
adulthood and aging including: 
biological changes, social processes, 
work, family, cognition, memory, 
personality, and psychopathology. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or 
Permission of the instructor. 

DEP 5608 Theoretical Perspectives in 
Developmental Psychology (3). The 
focus of this course is on the major 
paradigms, models, and theories that 
have been influential in developmental 
psychology, both historically and 
contemporaneously. Meta-theoretical 
issues, paradigmatic influences, and 
specific theories are considered. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or 
Permission of the instructor. 

DEP 5725 Seminar in Psychosocial 
Development (1). This course is 
designed to develop research skills and 
competencies in the area of 
psychosocial development. The 
emphasis of the course is on 
involvement in original research. 



Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. Corequisite: Senior under- 
graduate or graduate standing. 

DEP 5796 Methods of Develop- 
mental Research (3). Survey of issues 
and methods at all stages of life-span 
developmental research including 
theory, methods, design, and data 
reduction. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing or Permission of the instructor. 
Corequisite: Proseminars. 

DEP 6117 Psychology of Caregiving 

(3). An advanced seminar focusing on 
one or more topics in depth and 
requiring literature reviews and 
research design. Topics may include 
timing of parenthood, adoption, and 
fatherhood. 

DEP 6145 Psychology of Culture and 
Childhood (3). Extensive cross- 
cultural readings will serve as the focus 
for seminar discussion of cultural 
influences on children's biological, 
motor, perceptual, cognitive, social, 
and personality development. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing or Permission 
of the instructor. 

DEP 6186 Social Development and 
Learning (3). Theories and facts of 
socio-emotional development, learning, 
and the acquisition and maintenance of 
social relationships in early life are 
examined critically. Prerequisites: DEP 
3000 or DEP 3001 or equivalent. 

DEP 6465 Psychology of Culture and 
Aging (3). An intensive examination of 
cultural influences on social and 
psychological aging processes includ- 
ing minority aging and involving 
seminar discussion and independent 
projects. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

DEP 6466 Cognitive Processes in 
Aging (3). An intensive analysis of the 
background and recent developments in 
the area of age changes and age 
differences in intellectual functioning 
and learning memory processes. 
Prerequisite: DEP 5405. 

DEP 6477 Psychology of Social 
Processes in Aging (3). An intensive 
analysis of the background and recent 
developments in theoretical models of 
social development, personality 
processes, and social processes in the 
older adult. Prerequisite: DEP 5405. 

DEP 6645 Cognition and Language 
(3). Course covers the acquisition of 
cognitive processes and language, and 
their interdependence. Theory and 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 155 



research focusing on innate vs. learned 
aspects are discussed. Prerequisite; 
Graduate standing or Permission of the 
instructor. 

DEP 6936 Current Literature in the 
Psychology of Infancy, Childhood, 
and Adolescence (3). This seminar will 
present and evaluate current research 
articles in the major journals in infant, 
child, and adolescence psychology. 
Prerequisite: Second year graduate 
standing. 

DEP 6937 Current Literature in the 
Psychology of Adulthood and Aging 
(3). This seminar will present and 
evaluate current research articles in the 
major journals in the psychology of 
adulthood and aging. Prerequisite: 
Second year graduate standing. 

DEP 6945 Life-span Developmental 
Psychology Practicum (3). This is an 
individually tailored program where 
students will work in an agency on a 
specific problem or project, culmin- 
ating in a final written report. 
Prerequisite; Second year graduate 
standing. 

DEP 7069 Seminar in Life-Span 
Cognitive Developmental (3). This 
graduate seminar will examine, through 
intensive reading and seminar discus- 
sion, the major theories, issues and 
empirical research on cognitive growth, 
change and decline from infancy 
through old age. Prerequisites; Two 
courses in Developmental Psychology 
(any level). 

DEP 7096 Seminar in Psychology of 
Life-Span Social Development (3). 

This course includes a consideration of 
general issues and discussion of the 
application of life-span models to 
selected topics development. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing or Permission 
of the instructor. 

EAB 5098 Proseminar in the 
Experimental Analysis of Behavior 
(3). An advanced survey of the 
principles of respondent and operant 
conditioning and the bases of action in 
both social and non-social settings. 
Prerequisites: EAB 3002, EAB, 4034, 
or equivalents. 

EAB 5655 Advanced Methods of 
Behavior Change (3). An intensive 
study of selected methods of modifying 
human behavior, emphasizing the 
applications of the principles of 
respondent and operant conditioning, 
as well as those derived fi-om modem 
social learning theories. Practice and 



role playing opportunities are provided 
in behavior therapy, relaxation therapy, 
behavior modification, biofeedback or 
similar behavioral approaches. 
Prerequisites: EAB 4794, CLP 4374, 
CYP 4144; enrollment in an authorized 
program; equivalent background; or 
Permission of the instructor. 

EAB 5797 Single-Case Research 
Methods (3). Intensive study of 
designs, strategies, and methods of 
single-case behavioral research. 
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or 
Permission of the instructor. 

EAB 6707 Developmental Behavior 
Analysis (3). A survey of the 
application of the pnnciples, methods, 
and applications of experimental 
behavior analysis to various life-span 
segments and developmental themes. 
Prerequisites: Proseminar in Behavioral 
Analysis or an undergraduate EAB 
course (EAB 3002, EAB 4034, or EAB 
4794). 

EDP 6935 Special Topics in 
Educational Psychology (VAR). An 

intensive analysis of a particular topic 
in educarional psychology. Students 
must have topics approved by the 
instructor prior to registration. Open 
only to advanced and graduate students 
in the College of Education. 

EXP 5099 Proseminar in Experi- 
mental Psychology (3). Provides a 
comprehensive review of current 
research and theory in areas such as 
learning, memory, cognition, sensation, 
and perception. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or Permission of the 
instructor. 

EXP 5406 Theories of Learning (3). 

The major theoretical systems of 
learning are covered, with the intent of 
determining how well each accounts 
for the phenomena of learning. 
Emphasis is placed on exploring the 
controversial issues raised by extant 
theories, and the experimental resolu- 
tion of these theoretical controversies. 
The impact of theory on current 
thinking about learning is considered. 

EXP 5508 Applied Cognitive 
Psychology (3). Covers the basic 
theories of cognitive psychology 
perception, attention, memory, learn- 
ing, knowledge, with emphasis on 
application to real-world problems. 
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. 

EXP 5524 Cognitive Neuroscience 
(3). Investigation of the relation 
between mind and brain. Discuss 



literature from both patient studies and 
from the growing research in 
neuroimaging. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

EXP 5527 Memory and Conscious- 
ness (3). The relation of memory and 
consciousness is explored with em- 
phasis on issues of current research and 
theoretical work from both a cognitive 
and a neuropsychological perspective. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

EXP 7747 Practicum in Causal 
Modeling (3). Introduction to linear 
structural relations models, empha- 
sizing logical and practical problems in 
inferring causation for experimental 
and correlational research designs. 

CVP 5095 Proseminar in Industrial 
Psychology (3). Provides coverage of 
industrial and personnel psychology 
topics such as job analysis, personnel 
recruitment and selection, legal aspects 
of employment, performance appraisal, 
and training design and evaluation. 
Prerequisites; Acceptance to Master's 
or Ph.D. program in Psychology. 

INP 5136 Psychology of Legal 
Consultation (3). Practice in basic 
non-clinical areas in which psycholo- 
gists assist attomeys, including jury 
selection, surveys, and simulations. 
Prerequisite; SOP 6098 or equivalent. 

INP 6216 Personnel Selection (3). 

Characteristics of Personnel Selection 
systems used in organizations. Validity 
generalization, utility, applicant 
reactions, and legal cases pertaining to 
employee selection. Prerequisites: 
Proseminar in 1/0 and graduate level 
statistics course. 

INP 6235 Applied Psychology of 
Training and Development (3). In- 
depth study of principles of behavior 
and attitude change in organizations. 
Topics include organization analysis, 
program design and implementation, 
and evaluation of results. Prerequisites: 
Acceptance to M.S. or Ph.D. program 
in Psychology and SOP 5616. 

INP 6611 Organizational Stress (3). 

This seminar examines conceptual- 
izations, causes, consequences, and 
correlates, of stress, strain, and coping 
in the workplace. 

INP 6940 Strategies and Methods of 
Applied Psychological Research (3). 
A practicum course in the 
psychological research strategies and 

the application of computers in the 
analyses of psychological data. 



156 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



LIN S701 Psychology of Language 
(3). An overview of the psychology of 
language and the psychological 
'reality' of linguistic structure. Behav- 
ioristic vs. cognitive views of psycho- 
linguistics are examined. Consideration 
is given to the biological bases of 
language and thought, language 
acquisition, and language pathology. 

PCO 6206 Principles & Practices of 
Counseling & Psychotherapy (3). 

Examination of the principles & 
practices of counseling and psycho- 
therapy derived chiefly from cognitive 
behavioral psychology. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 

PSB 6247 Biological Bases of 
Behavior (3). Advanced survey of 
biological bases of behavior. Topics 
include neuroanatomy, functional 
organization and electrochemical 
processes of the nervous system, and 
neural bases of learning and memory. 
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or 
Permission of the instructor. 

PSY 5206C Fundamentals of Design 
of Experiments (3). CRD and RCB 
designs. Latin square designs. 
Factorial, nested and nested-factorial 
experiments. Fixed, random and mixed 
models. Split-plot designs. Covariance 
analysis. Prerequisites: STA 3122 and 
3 123, or their equivalents. 

PSY 5216 Proseminar: History and 
Systems of Psychology (3). An 
examination of the historical 
foundations of modem psychology and 
survey of current systems and schools 
of psychology. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing or Permission of the 
instructor. 

PSY S246C Multivariate Analysis in 
Applied Psychological Research (3). 

Covers basic techniques of multivariate 
analysis, emphasizing the rationale and 
applications to psychological research. 
Includes multiple regression, Hotell- 
ings T#, MANOVA, principle com- 
ponent analysis, and factor analysis. 
Prerequisite: STA 3123 or equivalent; 
linear algebra recommended. 

PSY 5605 Proseminar: History and 
Systems of Psychology (3). An 
examination of the historical founda- 
tions of modem psychology and survey 
of current systems and schools of 
psychology. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or Permission of the instruc- 
tor. 

PSY 5908 Directed Individual Study 
(VAR). Under the supervision of an 



instructor in the graduate degree 
program, the graduate student delves 
individually into a topic of mutual 
interest which requires intensive and 
profound analysis and which is not 
available in a formal offering. May be 
repeated once. Prerequisite: Permission 
of the instructor. 

PSY 5918 Supervised Research 
(VAR). Research apprenticeship under 
the direction of a research professor or 
a thesis advisor. Prerequisite: Full 
graduate admission. 

PSY 5930 Qualitative Research 
Methods in Development Psychology 
(3). Review recent developments in 
qualitative research methods. The 
focus will be on the application of 
these methods to research on huinan 
development. The interpretation of 
qualitative and quantitative methods 
will be stressed. 

PSY 5939 Special Topics in 
Psychology (3). Special topics will be 
announced in advance. 

PSY 6945 Teaching of Psychology 

(1). An introduction to the art of 
college teaching and specifically the art 
of teaching psychology. It is designed 
for first-year graduate students to 
provide instruction and support for 
teaching college classes. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 

PSY 6956 Psychology Field Experi- 
ence (VAR). Placement of students in 
applied settings for the purpose of 
developing community-based experi- 
ence in the application of theoretical 
and methodological approaches. Pre- 
requisite: Graduate standing. 

PSY 6971 Master's Thesis in 
Psychology (3-6). Supervised research 
on an original research project 
submitted in partial fulfillment of 
Master's degree requirement. 

PSY 7940 Supervised Teaching in 
Psychology (1). Supervised teaching 
under the guidance of faculty advisor. 
May be repeated only three times. 
Prerequisite: Doctoral graduate study. 

PSY 7980 Ph.D. Dissertation (1-12). 

Supervised research on an original 
research project submitted in partial 
fulfillment of doctoral degree 
requirements. Prereq-uisite: Permission 
of Major Professor and Doctoral 
Candidacy. 

SOP 5058 Proseminar in Social 
Psychology (3). An in-depth examin- 
ation of the role of social psychology in 



the social sciences and the major 
substantive problems as they relate to 
contemporary societal issues. Mini- 
mum Prerequisite: An introductory 
course in social psychology or its 
equivalent. 

SOP 5081 Psychological Influences 
on Health and Illness (3). Provides a 
comprehensive review of theory, 
research, and interventions in the field 
of health psychology. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

SOP 5316 Theories and Methods of 
Cross-Cultural Research (3). An 

intensive analysis of contemporary 
theories and methods of cross-cultural 
research in psychology including topics 
such as: culture as a research treatment, 
differential incidence of personality 
traits, the use of ethnographies, 'etic' 
vs. 'emic' distinction. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or Permission of the 
instructor. 

SOP 5616 Social Psychology of 
Organizations (3). The application of 
concepts and theories from social 
psychology and sociology to the 
organizational setting. Emphasis would 
be on role theory, value formation and 
the operation of norms, including their 
development and enforcement. Formal 
and informal organization structure, 
power and authority concepts, and 
leadership theories will be covered. 
Communication processes and net- 
works and their effects on task 
accomplishment and satisfaction will 
be included. 

SOP 6098 Proseminar in Legal 
Psychology (3). The application of 
psychological research methods and 
psychological knowledge to contempo- 
rary issues in criminal and civil 
litigations. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

SOP 6441 Seminar in Social Cog- 
nition (3). Provides a critical review of 
current theory and research on social 
cognition and its relationship to 
stereotyping, persuasion, attribution, 
and social perception. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 

SOP 6752 Psychology of Juries (3). A 

review of psychological research on 
juries and jury decision-making. 
Emphasis is placed on the critical 
analysis of jury research and relevant 
case law. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 157 



Religious Studies 

Nathan Katz, Professor and 

Chairperson 
Daniel Alvarez, Visiting Instructor 
Christine Gudorf, Professor and 

Graduate Program Director 
Steven Heine, Professor 
James Huchingson, Associate 

Professor and Uruiergraduate 

Program Director 
Erik Larson, Associate Professor 
Lesley Northup, Associate Professor 
Terrv' E. Rev, Associate Professor 
Oren B. Stier, Assistant Professor 
Zion Zobar, Visiting Assistant 

Professor 

Affiliated Faculty- 
Thorns A. Breslin 
Bongkii Chung 
Paul Draper 
Da\id L. Lee 
Kathrvn L. McKinley 
Mohiaddin Messbahi 
Joseph F. Patrouch 
Meri-Jane Rochelson 
Dennis Wiedman 

Master of Arts in Religious 
Studies 

FlU's Master of Arts in Religious 
Studies is designed to give students 
maximum flexibility in pursuing their 
research interests, while pro\iding a 
firm foundation in both the general 
academic study of religion and the 
student's area of specialization. 

The M.A. is a 36-credit hour 
program: 6 hours of core seminars, 12 
hours of 'track' counes, and either 12 
hours of elecrives and 6 hours of thesis 
work, or 1 8 hours of elecrives. 

Requirements for Admission 

Applicarion to the Master of Arts 
program in Religious Studies is made 
through FlU's Office of Admissions. 
The usual minimum requirements for 
admission include a baccalaureate 
degree from an accredited college or 
university' and: 

1. A graduate degree in the 
humaniries or social sciences from an 
accredited college or universit>' 

or 

2. A score of 550 or higher on the 
verbal portion of the Graduate Record 
Examinarion (GRE) 

or 

3. An undergraduate GPA of 3.5, 
earned no more than 7 years prior to 
applicarion. 

A student who does not meet any of 
these three requirements may qualify 



for admission by fulfilling the 
following condirions: 

1. Wnring an acceptable essay on a 
topic assigned by the department 
in a monitored and rimed session. 

and one of the following: 

2. A GPA of at least 3.5 in 9 or more 
hours of graduate study in 
departmental courses (as a special 
student) 

or 

3. A score of at least 475 on the 
verbal portion of the GRE. 

or 

4. An undergraduate GPA of at least 
3.0. 

Applicarions for admission are 

available from the FlU Office of 

Graduate Admissions and are e\aluated 

by the Departmental Graduate Studies 

Committee. 

Degree Requirements 

1. Prerequisite: undergraduate course 
REL 3308, to be completed by the 
end of the first semester of 
graduate work. 

2. Two core seminars. The first, the 
"Seminar on Sacred Texts," will 
be offered e\'ery fall. The second 
core seminar, "Modem Analysis 
of Religion," will be offered every 
spring. 

3. A track of four related courses 
chosen in consultarion with the 
Graduate Program Director. 

4. Either 12 hours of elecrive courses 
and a thesis (involving either 6 
hours of thesis credit or 3 of thesis 
and 3 of independent research), or 
18 hours of elecrives and no 
thesis. Students must register with 
the Department's Graduate 
Committee for thesis track or non- 
thesis track dunng the semester in 
which they will complete 24 hours 
of credit in the prograra 
Registrarion in the thesis track will 
require secunng the agreement of 
a member of the Graduate Faculty 
to ser\'e as Thesis Advisor 

The Department of Religious Studies 
does not regard the non-thesis track as 
appropriate prepararion for further 
graduate study in Religious Studies. 

Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

GRE-Ancient Greek; HBR-Biblical 
Hebrew, REL-Religion. 

REL 5023 Religious Ritual (3). 

Examines the crirical relationship of 
ritual, religious practice and belief, and 



culture, while introducing the 
principles and methods of ritual 
studies. Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
or permission of the instructor 

REL 5025 M\1h and Religion (3). 

Investigates the role, function, and 
meaning of myth in religious 
experience and practice through an 
examinarion of specific myths, mNthic 
patterns, and crirical theories. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or 
permission of the instructor 

REL 5122 African-American Relig- 
ion (3). Sun'ey of development of 
.Afiican-American Religions with 
emphasis on North American 
expenence during slavery, Jim Crow 
and contemporary eras. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

REL 5125 Religion and Public Life 
(3). Examines the relarionship of 
religion and government in the United 
States, with focus on the First 
Amendment and issues of separarion of 
church and state. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

REL 5137 North American Religion 

(3). Histoncal examination of religious 
groups and influences in North 
America, focusing on their 
contributions and cultural impact. 
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or 
permission of the instructor 

REL 5138 Sects, Cults, and New 
Religions (3). Explores and crirically 
analyzes the multiplicity of new 
Amencan religious movements and the 
unique combination of factors that has 
encouraged them. Prerequisites: 
Graduate standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

REL 5144 Women and Religion (3). 

Examines the influence of religion on 
social construction of gender and the 
definition of woman's nature and role, 
with a focus on Western developments. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or 
permission of the instructor 

REL 5149 Religion, Violence, and 
Conflict (3). Is religion peacefiil or 
violent? Theoretical analysis of the role 
of religion in violent, social and 
politcal conflicts, such as the Crusades, 
the Arab-Israeli conflict, and the 
Haitian Revolution. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or permission of the 
instructor. 



158 Colleee of Arts and Sciences 

REL SI 65 Science and Religion (3). 
Surveys the interaction between science 
and religion from conflict models to 
integration; special attention to specific 
natural sciences including cosmology 
and biology. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

REL 5182 Religion and Ethics (3). 
Investigation of methods, resources for 
ethics in world religions, and some 
examples of issues. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

REL 5183 Ethics and Environment 
(3). A study of cultural and religious 
sources of contemporary ethical 
attitudes and values about the 
environment. Also includes consequen- 
ces of these for specific environmental 
issues. Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
or permission of the instructor. 

REL 5184 Sex, Ethics, and Religion 
(3). Religious treatment of sexual 
activity, desire and procreation in 
major religions, with special focus on 
contemporary scientific research on 
sexuality and spirituality. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

REL 5192 Seminar in Mysticism (3). 
The issues of consciousness, language, 
and morality in mystical tradition of the 
east and west, including Kabbalah, 
Neoplatonism, Sufism, Yoga, Taoism, 
and Zen. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

REL 5208 Studies of the Dead Sea 
Scrolls (3). Overview of the Dead Sea 
Scrolls explores the new techniques 
being used in their study. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

REL 5211 Bible I: The Hebrew 
Scriptures (3). Extensive reading in 
the Hebrew Scriptures how the various 
texts of the Hebrew Scriptures came to 
be written, and how they can be 
interpreted - both within the context of 
faith communities and within the 
cultural contexts out of which the texts 
were written. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

REL 5232 Hebrew Exegesis I (3). 
Provides a comprehensive survey of the 
fiindamentals of the language of the 
Hebrew Bible designed to equip the 
student for the task of exegesis. 



Graduate Catalog 



Prerequisite: Graduate standing or 
permission of the instructor. 

REL 5233 Hebrew Exegesis II (3). A 
continuation of Hebrew Exegesis I 
emphasizing the reading of select 
passages of the Hebrew Bible to 
develop skills in translation and 
interpretation. Prerequisite: REL 5232 
and graduate standing. 
REL 5242 New Testament and 
Qumran (3). Detailed investigation of 
the possible contacts between the New 
Testament and Qumran in such areas as 
Biblical Exegesis, Apocalypticism, 
Eschatology, and Messianism. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing. 
REL 5244 Bible II: The New 
Testament (3). History, theology, and 
interpretation methods of the New 
Testament. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

REL 5262 New Testament Greek 
Exegesis 1 (3). A detailed overview of 
the principles of Greek grammar that 
shows the student how to use Greek in 
the study of the New Testament. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 
REL 5263 New Testament Greek 
Exegesis H (3). Careful reading of 
selected passages of the New 
Testament and early Christian literature 
designed or selected to develop skills in 
translation and interpretation. 
Prerequisite: REL 5262 and graduate 
standing. 

REL 5331 Religions of India (3). 
Topics include: religion in prehistoric 
and ancient India, classical Hindu texts 
and schismatic movements, medieval 
theism, the acculturation of extrinsic 
religions, Hindu-Muslim-Sikh syncret- 
ism, and the modem period. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing or permission 
of the instructor. 

REL 5346 Seminar on Buddhism (3). 

The central doctrines and rituals of the 
Buddhist tradition, including the views 
on causality, mindfulness, monastic- 
ism, salvation, purity, and ethics in the 
Theravada, Tantric, and Zen schools. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or 
permission of the instructor. 

REL 5352 Religions of East Asia (3). 

The history, philosophy, and cultural 
impact of the major religious traditions 
of East Asia, including Confucianism, 
Taoism, Buddhism, Shinto, and 
syncretic folk religions. Prerequisite: 



Graduate standing or permission of the 

instructor. 

REL 5372 African Spirituality (3). 

Intensive investigation of select forms 
of traditional spirituality in sub- 
Saharan Africa, including ritual, 
sacrifice, and spirit possession, and 
Africanized Christian and Islamic 
devotion. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

REL 5384 Rasta, Vodou, Santeria (3) 

Critical, sociological and phenomen- 
ological analysis of the history, beliefs, 
rituals, and social significance of 
Rastsfarianism, Vodou, and Santeria on 
the Caribbean and the United States. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
permission of the instructor. 

REL 5385 Native American Reli- 
gions (3). An advanced study of Native 
American religions and the methods 
employed to investigate them. 
Attention will be given to traditional 
and contemporary expressions. 
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or 
permission of the instructor. 
REL 5394 Jewish Mystical Texts (3). 
A study of the major movements and 
figures in the development of Jewish 
mysticism through its significant texts, 
from biblical times up to the present. 
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or 
permission of the instructor. 

REL 5462 Religion and Philosophy 
(3). Examines the use of philosophical 
reasoning to justify religious belief or 
its rejection. Such topics as natural 
theology, atheism and fideism will be 
examined. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

REL 5488 Theology and Liberation 
Movements (3). Comparison of Latin 
American, feminist, and African 
American theologies of liberation, 
including methods, social analysis, 
social location, interlocutor, 

ecclesiology, theology, eschatology and 
use of scripture. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

REL 5495 Interrellglous Dialogue 
(3). The intellectual basis, the classical 
formulations, and the contemporary 
practice of interreligious dialogue in a 
variety of cultural settings. 
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or 
permission of the instructor. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 159 



REL 5501 History of Christianity I 

(3). Christianity from its origins to the 
Middle Ages. Doctrinal and 
organizational development of the 
church and characteristic aspects of its 
spiritual life. Prerequisite; Graduate 
standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

REL 5502 Saints, Witches and 
Missionaries (3). Survey of 
movements, reforms, divisions, and 
major ideas within institutional 
Christianity, 1400 to present. 
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or 
permission of the instructor. 

REL 5515 History of Early 
Christianity (3). Origin and growth of 
Christianity from the first to the fifth 
century, and the adaptation of its 
message to the Greco-Roman world. 
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or 
permission of the instructor. 

REL 5565 Modern Catholicism (3). 

Theology and liturgical practice in the 
Roman Catholic Church from Trent 
(16 c) to the present, with primary and 
secondary sources. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

REL 5605 Studies in Judaism (3). 
Historical overview of Jewish belief 
and practice, with special consideration 
of Jewish ritual life. Prerequisites: 
Graduate standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

REL 5606 Rabbinic Judaism (3). The 

theology and ideologies of the 1700- 
year period in the history of Judaism 
known as Rabbinic Judaism. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing or permission 
of the instructor. 

REL 5614 Ancient Judaism (3). The 
history, literature and characteristic 
institutions of Judaism from the Persian 
period to Amoraic times. Attention 
given to developments in the land of 
Israel and the diaspora. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or permission of the 
insfructor. 

REL 5615 Medieval Judaism (3). The 
works of major thinkers in Medieval 
Judaism, including Maimonides, 
Nahmanides, Halevi, Luzatto, and such 
topics as Jewish mysticism (Kabalah) 
and Hasidism. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

REL 5618 Modernization of Judaism 

(3). Explores the ways in which 
religious beliefs and fraditional 



concepts of Jewish self identity have 
changed as a result of emancipation 
and participation of Jews in the modem 
Western world. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

REL 5619 Holocaust Represen- 
tations: Religion and Remembrance 

(3). Examines the symbolic and cultural 
representations of the Holocaust 
through its religious/theolo-gical 
discourse and its remembrance. 
Implications for Jewish life and thought 
are also explored. Prereq-uisites: 
Graduate standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

REL 5XXX Studies in Native 
American Religions (3). Topics 
include: Cosmologies, mythologies, 
concepts of the supernatural, relations 
with nature, shamans, vision quests, 
tribal ceremonies, syncretism, and 
contemporary issues. 

REL 5XXX Religion, Literature, and 
Critical Theory (3). Examines 
intersections between world religions 
and contemporary literature in light of 
modem theories of interpretation. 
Themes explored include scriptural re- 
readings and spiritual journeys. 
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or 
permission of the instructor. 

REL 6013 Modern Analysis of 
Religion: Classic Texts in Religious 
Studies (3). Critical reflection upon the 
nature and function of religion, as 
found in classics of the field. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or 
permission of the instructor. 

REL 6195 Sociological Approaches 
to Religion (3). Sociological 
Method/Theory in religious studies 
scholarship on religious ritual around 
life cycle events. Individual and group 
projects. Prerequisites: Graduate 

standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

REL 6322 Seminar in Western 
Religions (3). Similarities and 
differences in the three Westem 
monotheistic religions of Judaism, 
Christianity and Islam during their 
historical development. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

REL 6395 Seminar in Asian Relig- 
ions (3). Asian religious traditions 
texts, rituals, or artifacts. May be 
repeated with change in content. 
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or 
permission of the instructor. 



REL 6442 Religion in the 
Contemporary World (3). Society and 
religion in processes of secularization 
and pluralism. Attention to religious 
interpretations of socio-cultural 
processes. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

REL 6921 Colloquium (1). Students 
attend a minimum of three lectures, 
conferences, or professional presenta- 
tions, with seminar report and 
discussion. May be repeated. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

REL 6930 Pedagogy Workshop (1). 

Two-day teaching workshop offered by 
the Academy for the Art of Teaching. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

REL 6931 Pedagogy Seminar (1). 

Provide Teaching Assistants with 
pedagogical skills, such as lecture 
prepartion, exam preparation and 
grading, advising and small group 
work. Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

REL 6935 Seminar in Sacred Texts 

(3). Sacred texts with a common theme 
from several religions. Problems of 
interpretation are a cenfral concern. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or 
permission of the intructor. 

REL 6938 Pedagogy Forum (1). 

Students attend at least six (6) teaching 
forums for certificate offered by the 
Academy for the Art of Teaching. 
Prerequisites: AAT Summer Teaching 
Workshop. 

REL 6940 Teaching Religious 
Studies (3). Assist the instructor in an 
infroductory course and attend seminar 
meetings. Topics: 'faith' vs 
'objectivity' in the classroom; student 
diversity; religious studies as a 
profession; designing an infroductory 
course. Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
or permission of the instructor. 

REL 6971 Thesis (1-6). For students 
working on the thesis for the M.A. in 
Religious Studies. Prerequisites: 
Graduate standing and permission of 
the instructor. 

REL 6972 Thesis Proposal 
Development (3). Elements of thesis 
construction, including thesis 
statement, feasibility research, 
bibliography, methodology. Initial 3 
credits of thesis may be required for 
some students by GPD and thesis 
advisor. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. 



Graduate Catalog 

160 College of Arts and Sciences 

REL 6XXX Biblical Archaeology (3). 

Introduces the methods used in 
archaeological excavations. Finds from 
the Bronze Age to the Greco-Roman 
period are examined for the ways they 
bring new understanding to the texts of 
the Bible. Prerequisites: Graduate 
standing or permission of the 
instructor. 

REL 6XXX Teacliing Internsliip (1- 

3). Advanced work in Religions 
Studies pedagogy, including classroom 
teaching, assignment development and 
grading, and seminar discussion of 
pedagogical issues. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 



Graduate Catalog 



Sociology and 
Anthropology 

Richard Tardanico, Associate 

Professor, Chair 
Jerald B. Brown, Associate Professor 
Janet M. Chemela, Professor 
Nadine Fernandez, Assistant 

Professor 
Stephen M. Fjellman, Professor and 

Associate Dean, Honors College 
Chris Girard, Associate Professor and 

Director, Graduate Program 
Hugh Gladwin, Associate Professor 

and Director, Institute for Public 

Opinion Research 
Guillermo J. Grenier, Professor 
Antonio Jorge, Professor 
A. Douglas Kincaid, Associate 

Professor and Vice Provost, 

International Studies 
Lilly M. Langer, Associate Professor, 

and Director, Center for Youth 

Development 
Abraham D. Lavender, Professor 
Barry B. Levine, Professor 
Sbearon A. Lowery, Associate 

Professor 
Sarah Mahler, Associate Professor 
Anthony P. Maingot, Professor 
Kathleen Martin, Associate Professor 
James A. Mau, Professor 
Betty Hearn Morrow, Professor and 

Director, Laboratory for Social 
Vulnerability. International 

Hurricane Center 
Lisandro Perez, Professor and 

Director, Cuban Research 

Institute 
Jean M. Rabier, Associate Professor 
Robin Sheriff, Assistant Professor 
Alex Stepicl(, Professor and Director, 

Immigration and Ethnicity Institute 
William T. Vickers, Professor 
Lois West, Associate Professor 

Affiliated Faculty 

William W. Darrow, Professor, 

Public Health 
James Rivers, Associate Director, 

Laboratory of Social and Behavioral 

Research, International Hurricane 

Center 
Dennis Weidman, Adjunct Professor 

and Assistant to the Provost 
The Comparative Sociology Graduate 
Program at Florida International 
University provides a unique 
opportunity to integrate the traditional 
strengths of sociology and 
anthropology by combining theory and 
empirical research with qualitative 
methods. The Program's faculty is 



College of Arts and Sciences 161 



especially noted for studying ethnic 
minorities, international development, 
gender, human ecology, labor, 
migration, theory, medical sociology 
and anthropology, and the sociology of 
disasters. 

The Comparative Sociology Program 
provides professional training in social 
science research and theory for careers 
in higher education, government 
service, and the private sector. 
Requirements for the graduate program 
allow students to construct an 
individualized program that meets their 
specific interests. The graduate 
program is designed to facilitate the 
process of obtaining a doctorate in 
Comparative Sociology. Students may 
decide to obtain only a M.A. while 
working toward their Ph.D. 

Admission Requirements 

Each applicant to the Graduate 
Program in Comparative Sociology 
must complete a graduate application 
form and arrange to send transcripts of 
all prior college (undergraduate and 
graduate) work and official reports to 
the Graduate Records Exam (GRE) and 
TOEFL (if applicable) to the FlU's 
Office of Admissions. Each applicant 
should also send a separate letter of 
application to the director of the 
Comparative Sociology Graduate 
Program, along with copies of the 
above material. The letter of 
application should include a statement 
expressing the applicant's academic 
and professional objectives. Applicants 
are strongly encouraged to include 
examples of academic or other relevant 
professional work that may support 
their application. Applicants must 
request three letters of recommendation 
from individuals able to comment on 
their academic ability. The letters of 
recommendation should be sent 
directly to the Director of the 
Comparative Sociology Graduate 
Program. 

The application file must be 
complete before the Comparative 
Sociology Graduate Program 

Committee will consider the applicant 
for admission. For those seeking 
admission in the Fall, the first deadline 
for receipt of application - including all 
supporting materials and letters of 
recommendation - is FEBRUARY 
15th if the applicant desires an early 
decision. The deadline for ALL 
applicants seeking assistantships is 
APRIL 1. Applicants will be 

considered for Fall, Spring, and 
Summer admissions as long as 



applications are completed and 
received by the following dates: 

• Fall - February 1 5 

(Early acceptance) 
April 1 

(Assistantship 
consideration) 
Julyl 
(Final deadline) 

• Spring - October 1 5 

• Summer-April 1 

To be admitted into the Comparative 
Sociology Graduate Program a student 
must meet the University's graduate 
admission requirements which can be 
found in Florida International 
University's Graduate Catalog and the 
following minimum standards: 

1. Applicants must have a 
baccalaureate degree from an 
accredited college or university. 
Students pursuing a Ph.D. and who do 
not have a Masters in Anthropology, 
Sociology, Comparative Sociology, or 
a closely related field which includes a 
written thesis must obtain the Masters 
in Comparative Sociology at FIU on 
their way to completing the 
requirements of the Ph.D. 

2. Applicants must have an 
undergraduate grade point average 
(GPA) of 3.25 or higher and a 
combined score of 1000 or higher on 
the verbal and quantitative sections of 
the Graduate Record Examination 
(GRE). Applicants must submit both 
grade transcripts and GRE scores for 
consideration. The student must also 
have a GPA of 3.5 on any previous 
graduate work. 

3. Applicants should request that 
three letters of recommendation from 
individuals able to judge a student's 
academic potential be sent directly to 
the Director of the Comparative 
Sociology Graduate Program, 
Department of Sociology and 
Anthropology, Florida International 
University, Miami, FL 33199. 

4. Applicants are encouraged to 
submit examples of written work and 
other supporting materials. 

5. Applicants whose native language 
is not English must take the TOEFL 
(Test of English as a Foreign 
Language) and obtain a score of 550 or 
higher. 

While a baccalaureate major in 
sociology or anthropology is helpful, it 
is not required for admission to the 
program. However, newly admitted 
graduate students who have no prior 
course work in sociology, 
anthropology, or statistics may be 



162 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



required to take one or more 
undergraduate courses as prerequisites 
for graduate-level courses. This 
decision is based on the evaluation of 
the student's undergraduate record by 
the Graduate Program Committee. 

Financial Aid 

Each academic year a limited number 
of graduate students are hired as 
teaching assistants. Teaching 

assistantships are allocated on a 
competitive basis and typically pay a 
substantial portion of tuition expenses 
and provide a stipend. To be 
considered for an assistantship the 
applicant must make such a request in 
writing to the Graduate Program 
Director. The awarding of teaching 
assistantships will be made by the 
Graduate Program Committee. Students 
receiving an assistantship. are required 
to perform approximately 20 hours of 
teaching related duties per week and 
are required to participate in a one hour 
seminar related to teaching. 

The Masters Program 

The M.A. in Comparative Sociology is 
designed to provide the student with a 
strong foundation in theory and 
research skills. While a baccalaureate 
major in sociology or anthropology is 
helpful, it is not equired for admission 
to the program. 

M.A. Degree Requirements 

The Department of Sociology and 
Anthroplogy offers two Masters 
program options. The regular Masters 
Program option is designed for those 
students seeking advanced training in 
Comparative Sociology who are likely 
to pursue a Doctorate or professional 
degree here or elsewhere and therefore 
need to complete a thesis. The 
alternative program option, termed a 
Professional Masters, is designed for 
those students who are seeking 
advanced training in Comparative 
Sociology, but do not wish to complete 
a thesis and are unlikely to seek further 
advanced training at the Doctorate 
level. Completion of the thesis is 
required for those wishing to pursue 
Ph.D. degree in our graduate program. 
A. Regular M.A. Option: 
ANG 5496 Social Research and 

Analysis 3 

SYA 6 1 25 Classical Social 

Theories 3 

SYA 6305 Research Methods I 3 
SYA 6 1 26 Contemporary Social 

Theories 3 

SYA 6306 Research Methods II 3 



Five (5) elective graduate courses 
(must be at the 5000-level or higher) 1 5 
SYA 6975 Thesis 6 

B. Professional Masters Options: 

The professional option for an M.A. in 
Comparative Sociology requires a total 
of 36 semester hours of credits 
including 9 credits in core courses and 
27 credits in electives. The three core 
courses, which must be taken within 
the Department of Sociology and 
Anthropology, are as follows: 
Research Methods I, one graduate-level 
course in Theory, and one additional 
graduate-level course in either Theory 
or Research Methods. (The last two 
core courses must be selected from the 
lists below). 

NOTE: For fulltime students (nine 
credits or more), the three core courses 
MUST be taken during the first year in 
the program during the semester 
indicated. 

Three Core Courses: 

SYA 6305 Research Methods I 
One (1) course from Theory [list 
below] 3 

One (1) additional course from either 
Theory or Methods: [list below] 3 

Course List for Research Methods: 
ANG 5496 Social Research and 

Analysis 
SYA 6306 Research Methods II 
ANT 6497 Qualitative Methods 
Course List for Theory: 
SYA 6125 Classical Social 

Theories 
SYA 6126 Contemporary Social 

Theories 

Electives: 

Nine (9) elective graduate courses at the 

5000 level or higher. 27 

Graduation Requirements 

To remain in good standing and to 
qualify for graduation, students must 
maintain a graduate GPA of 3.0 or 
higher. A grade of "B" or higher 
MUST be received for all CORE 
COURSES. All M.A. course 

requirements MUST be met and for 
those students pursuing the regular 
M.A. option, a Thesis must be 
completed and accepted after defending 
before their thesis committee. All 
requirements for the M.A. in 
Comparative Sociology, including the 
successful defense of the Thesis, 
MUST be completed within SIX (6) 
years of enrollment in the graduate 
program. 



The program will provide student 
access to a wide range of support 
facilities including research library, 
cultural events, and other occsisions for 
intellectual growth associated with 
campus life, significant faculty/student 
interaction, opportunities for student 
exposure to and engagement with 
cognate disciplines and research 
scholars working in those disciplines, 
and significant peer interaction among 
graduate students. Students will be 
provided with the opportunity for a 
mentoring apprentice relationship with 
faculty and students as well as aequate 
time for in-depth evaluation on the 
student. See SACS Criteria for 
Accreditation 4.3 and 4.18. 

The Ph.D. Degree Requirements 

The Ph.D. program in Comparative 
Sociology incorporates and builds on 
the M.A. program. The Ph.D. program 
consists of 90 semester hours of course 
work that includes the 36 hours 
necessary to obtain the M.A. degree in 
comparative sociology at FIU. The 90 
hours of course work are divided into 
three major areas: core courses, 
substantive area courses, and 
specialty/elective courses. The 
remaining course work will be made up 
of thesis/dissertation hours. In addition 
to course work, students are required to 
meet successfully the following: a 
thesis requirement; a written general 
examination; a post-thesis review, write 
and defend a dissertation proposal, and 
write and defend a dissertation. 

Thesis Requirement 

As part of the Doctoral Program in 
Comparative Sociology, students are 
expected to complete the requirements 
of a Masters Degree in Comparative 
Sociology, students are expected to 
complete the requirements of a Masters 
Degree in Comparative Sociology, 
including the writing and defense of a 
thesis, and the completion of the post- 
thesis review process. The process of 
writing and defending a thesis is an 
integral and essential part of the Ph.D. 
program. Students who have obtained a 
Masters and written a thesis in 
Anthropology, Sociology, Comparative 
Sociology, or related field may petition 
the Graduate Program Committee for 
exemption from the thesis requirement. 
After meeting the thesis requirement 
and completing masters related course 
work, a student must undergo a Post- 
Thesis Review and be approved to 
continue in the Ph.D. program 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 163 



Course Work 

The Ph.D. curriculum in Comparative 
Sociology consists of a total of 90 
semester hours. In addition to a 
minimum of 30 thesis and dissertation 
hours, students must successfully 
complete 60 hours of course work 
divided into three areas: Core Courses 
(21 hours): Substantive Area Courses 
(12 hours); and Specialty/Elective 
Courses (27 hours). 

Core Courses 

The foundation of the core curriculum 
includes five required courses: SYA 

6125 (Classical Social Theories). SYA 

6126 (Contemporary Social Theories), 
ANT 5496 (Social Research and 
Analysis), SYA 6305 (Research 
Methods I), and SYA 6306 (Research 
Methods II). These courses are 
designed to provide a foundation in 
general theory and methods. The 
methods courses will provide the 
student with a survey of qualitative and 
quantitative methods including 
computer-based statistical analysis. All 
students are expected to become 
thoroughly familiar with the use of 
computers for work in comparative 
sociology. 

In addition, students are required to 
complete two additional core courses, 
one in methods and the other in theory, 
which are designed to provide them 
with an understanding of more 
advanced theory and methods, while 
meeting individual professional goals. 
Students may select the courses most 
consistent with their goals. However, 
they are encouraged to seek the advice 
of the Graduate Director and their 
advisor when making this decision. 

Substantive Area Courses 

Students will choose two substantive 
areas, from among those offered by the 
department. Each student will be 
required to take a minimum of two 
courses within each of their chosen 
areas. Current areas reflect the 
substantive specialties in which the 
faculty of Comparative Sociology have 
particular expertise: Cultural Analysis; 
Development and Social Change; 
Gender/Family; Medical; and Ethnicity, 
Race, and Migration. The required load 
of two courses in each substantive area 
is designed to provide added breadth to 
students' general knowledge. 

Specialty /Elective Courses 

In order to facilitate the creation of an 
individually tailored area of specialty, 
students may select 27 hours of 
graduate course work at Florida 



International University as special- 
ty/elective courses. The specialty area 
course work should be developed by 
students with guidance from their 
major professor and research com- 
mittee. At least two — but no more than 
four — elective courses must be from 
outside the department. 

Ph.D. General Examination 

After successfully completing the Post- 
Thesis Review and subsequent core and 
substantive course work, each student 
will take a written Ph.D. General 
Examination. This examina-tion will be 
conducted in accordance with the FIU 
Graduate Policies and Procedures 
Manual and the Department's General 
Examination guidelines. The General 
Examination will include questions in 
four areas: theory, methods, and the 
two substantive areas selected by the 
student. (See Comparative Sociology 
Graduate handbook for details). 

Dissertation Proposal and 
Defense 

After passing the General Examination, 
students will develop a dissertation 
proposal. Upon completing the 
proposal and elective/specialty course 
work, the student must orally defend 
the dissertation proposal before their 
Research Committee. The Proposal 
defense will consist of a comprehensive 
oral defense of the dissertation 
proposal and relevant literature as 
determined by the student's research 
committee. The proposal defense serves 
as the candidacy examination for the 
Comparative Sociology Graduate 
Program. A copy of the approved 
proposal must be filed with the Dean of 
Graduate Studies at least one full 
semester prior to defense of the 
dissertation. The student will generally 
defend the proposal during the semester 
that required course work is completed. 
Upon passing the Dissertation defense, 
the student is admitted to candidacy 
status. Only after successfully 

defending the dissertation proposal 
may a student register for dissertation 
credits (SYA 7980). 

The Dissertation Defense 

After successfully defending the 
dissertation proposal, students will 
conduct research and complete their 
dissertations. Upon completion of their 
dissertation and authorization of the 
research committee, the student will 
then defend their dissertations before 
their research committee. 



Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes 

ANG-Anthropology Graduate; ANT- 
Anthropology; SYA-Sociological 
Analysis; SYD-Sociology of 
Demography and Area Studies; SYG- 
Sociology, General; SYO-Social 
Organization; SYP-Social Processes. 
F-Fall semester offering; S-Spring 
semester offering; SS-Summer semester 
offering. 

ANG 5403 Ecological Anthropology 

(3). Theories of human adaptation, 
including environmental determinism, 
possibilism, cultural ecology, 
materialism, and evolutionary ecology. 
Credit for both ANT 3403 and ANT 
5548 will not be granted. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or Permission of the 
instructor. (SS) 

ANG 5496 Social Research and 
Analysis (3). A graduate overview of 
the scientific methods used in 
intercultural studies. Includes the 
philosophical basis of science, research 
design, and hypothesis testing using 
both secondary and original data. 
Students will conduct a research 
project in this course. Prerequisite: 
Graduate status or permission of the 
instructor. (F) 

ANG 5905 Directed Individual Study 

(1-20). Supervised readings and/or 
field research and training. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. (F,S,SS) 

ANG 5915 Directed Field Research 
(1-20). Permission of the instructor 
required. 

ANG 6303 Comparative Feminisms 

(3). Course examines feminisms and 
feminist movements in a global 
context. Taking several geocultural 
areas as examples, the course analyzes 
the discourse of cultures, feminisms, 
and feminist movements. Prerequisites: 
One graduate level course on gender or 
permission of the instructor. (S) 

ANG 6339 Seminar on Latin 
America (3). Analysis of Latin 
American cultures and classes using 
case studies. Students read a series of 
anthropological or sociological works 
and discuss them in a seminar format. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or 
Permission of the instructor. (F) 

ANG 6497 Qualitative Research 
Methods (3). Qualitative research 
methods in anthropology and sociol- 
ogy. Includes participant-observation, 



164 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



field work, key informants and in-depth 
interviewing, visual techniques, ethical 
issues, and reflexivity. (F) 

ANG 6932 Seminar in Human 
Ecology (3). Analysis of human 
ecology using case studies. Students 
read a series of works on human 
adaptations and discuss them in a 
seminar format. Prerequisite; ANT 
3403 or ANT 6548 or equivalent. 

ANT 5318 American Culture and 
Society (3). Anthropological analysis 
of the cultures and subcultures of the 
United States, focusing on the social, 
ethnic, and regional organizations and 
their corresponding value and symbolic 
systems. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or Permission of the 
instructor. (F) 

ANT SXXX Advanced African 
Diaspora Cultures and Perform- 
ativity (3). Examines different 
approaches adopted by African 
diaspora studies scholars in social and 
cultural anthropology, and recent 
theoretical texts and debates in 
Performance Studies. Prerequisites: 
Permission of Instructor. 

ANT SXXX Representations of 
Africa and Africans in Films (3). 

Analyzes representations of Sub- 
Saharan Africa and Africans in various 
cinematic traditions (including 
documentaries) and examines these 
representations in socioeconomic and 
political contexts. Prerequisites: 

Permission of Instructor. 

ANT 6302 Gender Identity in Com- 
parative Perspective (3). Comparative 
examination of cultural and socio- 
economic factors defining gender 
identities and relations in western and 
non-westem societies. Includes 
selected cross-cultural case studies. 
Prerequisites: Graduate Standing or 
Permission of the instructor. (S) 

ANT 6319 The African Diaspora: 
Anthropological Perspectives (3). 

History and cultures of Africans 
outside of Africa, with a special 
emphasis on the African experience in 
the Americas. Topics covered include 
slavery, class, gender, ethnicity, and 
religion. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 

ANT 6469 Graduate Medical 
Anthropology (3). Concepts and 
methods in the field of medical 
anthropology. Importance of culture in 
goveming the type and frequency of 
disease in a population, the way people 



explain and treat disease, and responses 
to the delivery of modem medicine. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (S) 

ANT 7491 Contemporary Theory in 
Social Anthropology (3). Graduate 
seminar examining current theoretical 
issues in social anthropology. 
Prerequisite: SYA 6125 and SYA 6126 
or permission of the instructor. 

SYA 5135 Sociology of Knowledge 

(3). The study of the theoretical basis 
of knowledge and the inter-relatedness 
of knowledge and social factors, 
particularly as knowledge relates to 
institutional forms of behavior. (F) 

SYA 5909 Directed Individual Study 
(VAR). Supervised readings and/ot 
field research and training. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of the instructor. 
(F,S,SS) 

SYA 5941 Directed Field Research 

(VAR). Permission of the instructor 
required. (F,S,SS) 

SYA 6125 Classical Social Theories 

(3). Classical social theories of the 19th 
and early 20th centuries. Includes the 
ideas of such thinkers as Spencer, 
Comte, Durkheim, Marx, Weber, 
Simmel, Pareto, Morgan, Tylor, and 
Boas. Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
or Permission of the instructor. (F) 

SYA 6126 Contemporary Social 
Theories (3). The major currents and 
trends in contemporary sociological 
theory. Emphasis on the application of 
theories to specific research issues and 
practices. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing or Permission of the instructor. (S) 

SYA 6305 Research Methods I (3). 

The first in a two course sequence on 
research methods in comparative 
sociology. Includes research design and 
hypothesis testing, participant observa- 
tion, interviewing techniques and 
survey research. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing or Permission of the 
instructor. (F) 

SYA 6306 Research Methods II (3). 
The second in a two-course sequence 
on research methods in comparative 
sociology. Includes the quantitative 
analysis of sociological research data, 
and the preparation of written reports 
and articles. Prerequisite: SYA 6305 
and ANG 5496 or equivalent. (S) 

SYA 6307 Research Methods III (3). 

Advanced quatitative analysis of 
sociological research stressing 
problems in measurement, data 
collection and quality, and analysis 



techniques. Prerequisites: SYA 6306, 
ANG 5496 or equivalent and STA 
3112 or STA 6167 or STA 5236 or 
Permission of the instructor. 

SYA 6925 Graduate Colloquium in 
Comparative Sociology (1). 

Colloquiums presented by faculty, 
visiting scholars, and graduate students 
on topics of current research interest. 
Repeatable. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. (F,S) 

SYA 6941 Internship in Applied 
Sociology (1-9). Practical application 
in a supervised setting outside of the 
classroom of knowledge acquired in the 
classroom. Hours may vary. 

SYA 6943 South Florida Area Study 

(3). Current issues in South Florida 
Studied through large-scale survey 
research conducted by class members. 
Provides experience in research 
techniques and the development and 
testing of theory. Prerequisites: SYD 
6625 and SYA 6305. (S) 

SYA 6959 Writing Research Pro- 
posals (3). Development of skills in 
writing research proposals. Prereq- 
uisite: Three completed semesters of 
graduate work. 

SYA 6975 Thesis (1-6). Registration 
for students working on the thesis for 
the MA. in Comparative Sociology or 
the M.A. in International Studies. 
Prerequisite: All other course work for 
the M.A. in Comparative Sociology or 
International Studies. (F,S,SS) 

SYA 7651 Foundations of Social 
Theory Construction (3). Seminar 
exams assumptions of social theory. 
Topics include objectivity in the social 
sciences, social science concepts and 
explanations, reductionism, and the 
bases of social theory construction. (S) 

SYA 7930 Special Topic in 
Comparative Sociological Research 
(3). A detailed exploration into 
particular research methodologies, 
approaches and techniques relevant to 
Comparative Sociology. Topic will 
vary depending upon the instructor. 
Course may be repeated. Prerequisites: 
SYA 6305 and SYA 6306 or 
Permission of the instructor. 

SYA 7940 Practicum Supervised 
Teaching (1-9). Practical application in 
a supervised setting of knowledge 
acquired in the classroom. Hours may 
vary. (F,S,SS) 

SYA 7941 Field Research (1-9). 

Research projects or certain aspects of 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 165 



research in a field situation carried out 
by one or more students under the 
direction of a faculty member. Topics 
vary. Usually selected on an individual 
basis. Hours may vary. (F,S,SS) 

SYA 7967 Preparation: Preliminary 
Doctoral Exam (1-9). Preparation for 
the preliminary doctoral exam under 
the direction of a faculty member. 
Hours may vary. (F,S) 

SYA 7979 Advanced Research (1-9). 

Research projects or certain aspects of 
research carried out by one or more 
students under the direction of a faculty 
member. Topics vary; selected on an 
individual basis. Hours may vary. 
(F,S,SS) 

SYA 7980 Ph.D. Dissertation (1-12). 

Hours taken by students to work on the 
dissertation under the supervision of a 
major professor and the doctoral 
committee. Hours may vary. Prereq- 
uisites: Permission of Major Professor 
and Doctoral Candidacy. (F,S) 

SYD 5045 Population and Society (3). 
The study of the processes that 
determine the size and composition of 
human populations. Emphasis on 
demographic transition theory and the 
antecedents and consequences of 
differential growth rates throughout the 
world. Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
or permission of the instructor. 

SYD 6236 International Migration 
and Refugees (3). Comparative 
analysis of the causes, consequences, 
and policies concerning population 
movements across national borders. 
Includes review of various theories of 
labor migration. Students will conduct 
research on a migration or refugee 
topic. Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
or Permission of the instructor. (F) 

SYD 6325 Seminar in the 
Comparative Sociology of Gender 
(3). The examination of women's and 
men's roles, status's, and life 
opportunities from a historical and 
comparative perspective. Current 
theoretical developments in the study 
of gender are emphasized. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or Permission of the 
instructor. (S) 

SYD 6427 Seminar in Comparative 
Urban Issues (3). Current theoretical 
developments in the study of urbanism, 
including the evolution and growth of 
cities, spatial and social structures, 
migration, and the critical problems of 
social life in cities. Prerequisite: 



Graduate standing or Permission of the 
instructor. (F) 

SYD 6615 Seminar In Comparative 
Analysis of Selected Regions (3). 

Comparative social analysis using 
studies from two or more world 
regions! Students read a series of works 
on issues such as bureaucracy, 
modernization, and development, and 
discuss them in a seminar format. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or 
Permission of the instructor. (S) 

SYD 6616 Comparative StratiHca- 
tion Seminar (3). Comparative analysis 
of causes and consequences of 
contemporary inequality in an inter- 
national context. Emphasizes theoreti- 
cal and methodological approaches to 
comparative case studies. Prerequisites: 
Graduate standing or Permission of the 
instructor. (S) 

SYD 6625 South Florida Socio- 
cultural Systems (3). The sociological 
and anthropological analysis of South 
Florida. Presents tools for regional 
study including demography, cultural 
ecology, and ethnic group-centered 
symbolic systems. Prerequisite: Grad- 
uate standing or permission of the 
instructor. (F) 

SYD 6655 Seminar on Social Change 

in Asia (3). An examination of social 
change in contemporary Asia, 
including the relationships between 
states, the changing political 
economies, and the role of social 
movements and cultural institutions in 
change. Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
or Permission of the instructor. 

SYD 6705 Comparative Analysis of 
Ethnicity and Race (3). Consideration 
of major theories of ethnicity and race 
and analysis of selected ethnic groups 
in various world regions. Includes the 
study of race and ethnic issues in 
Miami and the South Florida region. 
(S) 

SYD 6715 Comparative Adolescent 
Cultures (3). Examines the adolescent 
cultures of different ethnic, class, and 
national groups from an 
anthropological and sociological 
perspective. The primary focus is on 
how adolescents construct their own 
social groups and what meaning they 
attribute to these constructions. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

SYD 6816 Advanced Sociological 
Theories of Gender (3). Examines 
sociological theory as it deals with 



gender from a feminist perspective. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (S) 

SYD 6901 Special Topics in 
Sociology (3). An examination of 
specific themes and topics in sociology. 
The theme amy vary from semester to 
semester. With a change in content, the 
course may be repeated. Prerequisite: 
SYA 6125 and SYA 6126 or 
permission of the instructor. 

SYD 7903 Directed Readings (1-9). 

Readings under the direction of a 
faculty member focusing on one of the 
tracks in the Ph.D. program. Hours may 
vary. (F,S,SS) 

SYG 5XXX Advanced World Jewish 
Communities (3). Overview of Jewish 
communities throughout the world. 
Analyzes their origins, migrations, 
demographic and social characteristics. 
Covers Ashkenazi, Sephardi, and 
Oriental communities. Prerequisite: 
Graduate Standing. 

SYG 6932 Special Topics in Disaster 
Studies (3). Case studies of major 
disasters used to explore topics such as 
impact of gender, class, ethnicity, and 
age on vulnerability, response, and 
outcome; effects of larger political and 
economic systems; and relationship to 
social change. May be repeated with 
change of topic. 

SYG 6135 Families and Social 
Change (3). Comparative study of the 
family as an institution adapting to 
social and economic conditions. 
Cultural variation in marriage, 
parenthood and gender roles. Historical 
influences on the pluralistic American 
family. Credit for both SYO 4130 and 
SYO 6135 will not be granted. 
Prerequisite: Graduate stand-ing or 
permission of the instructor. (F) 

SYO 6306 Political Sociology (3). 

Examines social relations of power in 
groups, organizations, and national and 
global structures; also pattems of state 
formation, state-society relations, and 
sources of political change. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (S) 

SYO 6405 Graduate Medical Sociol- 
ogy (3). Examination of the social 
significance of health, illness, and 
medicine in the U.S. as compared to 
other societies. Includes disease type 
and distribution as well as a critique of 
health care professions, organizations, 
and policies. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. (F) 



166 College of Arts and Sciences . Graduate Catalog 



SYO 6415 Sociology of Mental 
Health (3). Examination of the social 
and social psychological processes that 
influence mental health and illness. 
Analysis of the social consequences of 
mental illness including issues 
associated with social mobility and 
stigma. Prerequisites: Graduate 

standing. 

SYP 5447 Sociology of International 
Development (3). To introduce the 
basic concepts and questions of the 
field as applied to the international 
arena. To illustrate the common areas 
of social science analysis in dealing 
with questions of international 
development. (S) 

SYP 6306 Comparative Social Move- 
ments (3). Comparative analysis of 
social movements and social change, 
including peasant movements, environ- 
mentalism, civil rights, feminism, and 
nationalism. Competing theories of 
social movements are examined. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or 
permission of the instructor. (F) 

SYP 6739 Seminar: Ethnic Minority 
Aging in U.S. (3). Sociological 
perspective on aging among 
racial/ethnic minority groups in U.S. 
Includes social, demographic, and 
cultural influences on the status of 
minority elders in the areas of family 
and community. 

SYP 6907 Seminar in Comparative 
Social Change (3). The cross-cultural 
and comparative analysis of contem- 
porary social change, including 
processes of social action such as 
terrorism, reformism, revolution, and 
the use of electoral systems and 
democratic processes. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing or permission of the 
instructor. (F) 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 167 



Statistics 

Jie Ml, Professor and Chairperson 
Carlos W. Brain, Associate Professor 

and Graduate Program Director 
Ling Chen, Associate Professor 
Zhenmin Chen, Associate Professor 
Gauri L. Ghai, Associate Professor 
Ramon Gomez, Instructor 
Sneh Gulati, Associate Professor 
Ina Parks Howell, Lecturer 
Golam Kibria, Assistant Professor 
Laura Reisert Instructor 
Samuel S. Shapiro, Professor 
Hassan Zahedi-Jasbi, Associate 

Professor 

Master of Science in 
Statistics 

The Master of Science in Statistics at 
Florida International University- is 
primarily an applied statistics program. 
It offers a balance of statistical theory-, 
statistical methodology, and optionally, 
an area application concentration. The 
program offers a thesis option and a 
non-thesis option. Regardless of the 
concentration or thesis option, the 
program requires a total of 36 credit- 
hours as follows: six core courses (18 
hours), four elective courses or an area 
of concentration (12 hours), and either 
a thesis (6 hours) or two additional 
elective courses (6 hours) and a 
comprehensive examination. 

Admission Requirements 

To be admined into the program, 
applicants must meet the universirs's 
graduate admission requirements (see 
Office of Admissions in this catalog) 
and the following departmental 
requirements: 

1. Bachelor's degree in statistics, 
mathematics, or in a related field 
from an accredited university or 
college. A bachelor's degree in 
some other discipline is also 
acceptable pro\-ided the applicant 
has a suitable mathemarics 
background. 

2. A 3.0 or higher (on a 4-point 
scale) G?.\ m mathematics and 
statistics courses. 

3. Three letters of recommendation 
from persons familiar with the 
applicant's academic qualifica- 
tions. 

4. Approval of the departmental 
graduate committee. 

Core Courses: (18) 

STA 6244 Data .Analysis I 
STA 6246 Linear Models 
STA 6247 Data .Anah^is II 



STA 6326 Mathematical Statistics I 
STA 6327 Mathematical 

Statistics II 
STA 5206 Design of Experiments 

Elective Courses: (12) 

A student may select four courses from 
Lists A, B, and C or may opt for an 
area of concentration (see below). 

Concentration Area: (12) 

Students interested in a concentration 
in BiostatisticsEn\ironmetrics must 
select two courses from List A and two 
track-related electives. Ax least one of 
these electives must be from outside the 
department. 

Students interested in a concentra- 
tion in Reliability Analysis/Quality 
Control must select rv^-o courses from 
List B and two track-related electives. 
At least one of these electives must be 
from outside the department. 

All electives must be approved by 
the Graduate Program Director. 

List A: Biostatistics/En\-iron- 
metrics 

STA 6176 Biostatistics 
STA 6678 Environmental 

Statistics 
STA 5826 Stochastic Processes 

List B: Reliability .Analysis/ 
Quality Control 

STA 5676 Reliability Engineering 
STA 5666 Advanced Quality 

Control 
STA 5826 Stochastic. Processes 

ListC: Elective Statistics 
Courses 

STA 5207 Topics in Design of 

Experiments 
STA 5236 Regression AnalN-sis 
STA 5507 Nonparametric Methods 
STA 5906 Independent Study 
STA 6505 Analysis of Categorical 

Data 
STA 6807 Queueing and Statistical 

Models 
STA 6940 Super.-ised Statistical 

Consulting 
ST.A 7707 Multivariate Methods 1 
ST.A 7708 Multivanate Methods II 

Elective Courses from Outside of 
the Department: 

Elective courses from outside of the 
department must be approved by the 
Graduate Program Director. 

Thesis Option: (6) 

Students opting to write a thesis must 
enroll in STA 6971, Thesis Research 
and STA 6972, Master's Thesis (6 
credit-hours total). 



Non-Thesis Option: (6) 

Students who opt not to write a thesis 
must take two additional elective 
courses selected from List C or from 
outside of the department. These 
courses must be approved by the 
Graduate Program Director. 

Graduation Requirements 

1. Grade and GPA requirements: a) 
cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher 
in all courses, b) a grade of 'B' or 
higher in each core course, and c) 
a grade of 'C or higher in each 
concentration or elective course. 

2. A candidate who opts to write a 
thesis must successfijUy defend 
the thesis orally and have the 
written thesis approved by his/her 
thesis committee. 

3. A candidate who chooses the non- 
thesis option must take and pass a 
comprehensive examination. 

Students must follow all regulations of 
the Uni\ersity's Di\'ision of Graduate 
Studies. 

Course Description 

Definition of Prefixes 

STA - Statisncs. MAP - 
Mathematics- Applied . 

MAP 5117 Mathematical and 
Statistical Modeling (3). Study of 
ecological, probabilistic, and various 
statistical models. Prerequisites: MAC 
2313, COP 2210, MAS 3105; and STA 
4322 or STA 3 164 or STA 3033. 

STA 5105L SPSS Data Analysis Lab 
(1). Topics include: Entering data from 
various sources, data checking, 
descriptive statistics, graphing data, 
crosstabulations, t-tests, correlation and 
regression, ANOVA, and reliability. 
Prerequisite: A statistics course or 
concurrent enrollment in a statistics 
course, and graduate standing or 
permission of the msructor. 

STA 5106 Intermediate Statistics I 

(3). Power, measures of assoc, 
measurement, ANOVA: one-way and 
factonal, between and within subjects 
expected mean squares, planned 
comparisons, apriori contrasts, fixed, 
random, mixed models. This course 
may be of particular interest to 
behavioral sciences. Prerequisites: STA 
3111 and graduate standing. (F) 

STA 5107 Intermediate Statistics II 

(3). Correlation and regression both 
simple and multiple, general linear 
model, analysis of covanance, analysis 
of nominal data, analysis of categoncal 



168 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



data. This course may be of particular 
interest to behavioral sciences. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instruc- 
tor. (S) 

STA 5126/PSY 5206 Fundamentals 
of Design of Experiments (3). CRD 
and RCB designs. Latin square designs. 
Factorial, nested and nested-factorial 
experiments. Fixed, random and mixed 
models. Split-plot designs. Covariance 
analysis. Prerequisites: STA 3123 or 
STA 31 12 or equivalent. 

STA 5206 Design of Experiments I 

(3). Design and analysis of completely 
randomized, randomized block, Latin 
square, factorial, nested and related 
experiments. Multiple comparisons. 
Credit for both STA 4202 and STA 
5206 will not be granted. Prerequisite: 
STA 4322 or STA 3164 or STA 3033 
or (STA 3163 and STA 4321). 

STA 5207 Topics in Design of 
Experiments (3). This applied course 
in design of experiments covers topics 
such as split-plot design, confounding, 
fractional replication, incomplete block 
designs, and response surface designs. 
Prerequisite: STA 5206. 

STA 5236 Regression Analysis (3). 
Simple, multiple and polynomial 
regression, analysis of residuals, model 
building and other related topics. 
Credit for both STA 4234 and STA 
5236 will not be granted. Prerequisites: 
STA 3164 or STA 3123 or STA 3112, 
or STA 6167. 

STA 5446-STA 5447 Probability 
Theory I and II (3-3). This course is 
designed to acquaint the student with 
the basic fundamentals of probability 
theory. It reviews the basic foundations 
of probability theory, covering such 
topics as discrete probability spaces, 
random walk, Markov Chains (transi- 
tion matrix and ergodic properties), 
strong laws of probability, convergence 
theorems, and law of iterated 
logarithm. Prerequisite: MAC 2313. 

STA 5507 Nonparametric Methods 
(3). Distribution-free tests: sign, Mann- 
Whitney U, Wilcoxon signed rank, 
Kruskal-Wallis, Friedman, etc. Rank 
correlation, contingency tables and 
other related topics. Credit for both 
STA 4502 and STA 5507 will not be 
granted. Prerequisite: First course in 
statistics. 

STA 5666 Advanced Statistical 
Quality Control (3). Review of 
statistical methods useful in quality 
improvement. Statistical process 



control. Taguchi's and Deming's 
philosophies. Control charts. Process 
capability analysis. Acceptance 
sampling plans. Prerequisities: STA 
3033 or STA 3163 or STA 4321 or 
equivalent. 

STA 5676 Reliability Engineering 

(3). The course material is designed to 
give the student a basic understanding 
of the statistical and mathematical 
techniques which are used in 
engineering reliability analysis. A 
review will be made of the basic 
fundamental statistical techniques 
required. Subjects covered include: 
distributions used in reliability 
(exponential, binomial, extreme value, 
etc.); tests of hypotheses of failure 
rates; prediction of component 
reliability; system reliability prediction; 
and reliability apportionment. Prereq- 
uisite: STA 4322. 

STA 5800 Stochastic Processes for 
Engineers (3). Probability and 
conditional probability distributions of 
a random variable, bivariate probability 
distributions, multiple random 
variables, stationary processes, Poisson 
and normal processes. Prerequisites; 
STA 3033; MAC 2313, MAP 2302. 

STA 5826 Stochastic Processes (3). 
This course is intended to provide the 
student with the basic concepts of 
stochastic processes, and the use of 
such techniques in the analysis of 
systems. Subjects include: Markov 
Processes, queueing theory, renewal 
processes, birth and death processes, 
Poisson and Normal processes. 
Applications to system reliability 
analysis, behavioral science, and 
natural sciences will be stressed. 
Prerequisite: STA 5447. 

STA 5906 Independent Study (1-6). 

Individual conferences, assigned 
reading, and reports on independent 
investigation. 

STA 6166 - STA 6167 Statistical 
Methods in Research I and II (3-3). 

For non-mathematical sciences 
graduate students. A non-calculus 
exposition of methods and applications 
of statistical techniques for the analysis 
of data. Statistical packages will be 
used. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 
(F,S) 

STA 6176 Biostatistics (3). Statistical 
analysis of data encountered in medical 
sciences. Analysis of count data, 
Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, Cox 
proportional hazards model, analysis of 



covariance, logistic regression, etc. 
Prerequisite: STA 3 1 63 or equivalent. 

STA 6244 Data Analysis I (3). 

Exploratory data analysis; testing of 
distributional assumptions; Chi-square 
tests, tests for means, variances, and 
proportions. Prerequisites: STA 3033, 
STA 4322, or STA 6327. 

STA 6246 Linear Models (3). 

Introduction to the theory of linear 
models. Distribution of linear and 
quadratic functions of normal vectors. 
Development of inferential procedures 
for simple and other more complex 
linear models Prerequisites: MAS 
3105, STA 6247, and STA 6327. 

STA 6247 Data Analysis II (3). 

Analysis of variance, regression 
analysis. Analysis of covariance, 
quality control, correlation, empirical 
distributions. Prerequisites: STA 6244 
and MAS 3105. 

STA 6326 Mathematical Statistics I 

(3). An introduction to the theories 
underlying statistical analysis. Basic 
concepts of probability theory, 
combinatorial analysis, random 
variables, and expectation. Prereq- 
uisite: MAC 2313. 

STA 6327 Mathematical Statistics II 

(3). Estimation of parameters, tests of 
hypotheses, regression, non-parametric 
methods, analysis of variance, and 
multivariate concepts. Prerequisite: 
STA 6326. 

STA 6505 Analysis of Categorical 
Data (3). Analysis of contingency 
tables, measures of association, logit 
and loglinear models. Prerequisites: 
STA 6167 or STA 5 107 or STA 5236. 

STA 6678 Environmental Stastistics 
(3). Review of probability theory and 
probability processes. Bernoulli, 
Poisson, and normal processes. 
Dilution of pollutants. Lognormal 
processes. Prerequisites: STA 3164 and 
MAC 2312. 

STA 6807 Queueing and Statistical 
Models (3). Review of probability 
concepts, basic probability 

distributions, Poisson process, 
queueing models, statistical models. 
Prerequisites: Permission of the 
instructor, MAC 2312 and either STA 
3033 or STA 4321, 

STA 6940 Supervised Statistical 
Consulting (3). Formulation of 
statistical problems from client infor- 
mation, consulting session manage- 
ment, interpersonal aspects of consult- 



College of Arts and Sciences 169 



Gradxiate Catalog 



ing, problem solving techniques. Pre- 
requisites: Permission of the instructor, 
STA 4102, STA 6247, and STA 6327. 

STA 6971 Thesis Research (1-6). 

Supervised research on theoretical or 
applied statistics leading to a thesis. 
Repeatable. Prerequisite: Permission of 
student's program committee. 

STA 6972 Master's Thesis (1-6). 

Thesis completion and submission in 
partial fiilfillment of Master's degree 
requirements. Prerequisite: Permission 
of student's program comminee. 

STA 7707 Multivariate Methods I 

(3). Multivariate normal, Wishart and 
Hotelling's distributions. Inferences for 
one and two mean vectors. Profile 
analysis. One- and two-way 
MANOVA. Multivariate multiple 
regression. Prerequisite: STA 3123 or 
STA 31 12. (F) 

STA 7708 Multivariate Methods 11 

(3). Principal components analysis. 
Factor analysis. Canonical correlation 
analysis. Discriminant analysis. Cluster 
analysis. Multidimensional scaling. 
Prerequisite: STA 7707. (S) 



170 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



Certificate Programs 

African-New World Studies 
Graduate Certificate 
Program 

Carole Boyce Davies, Director of 

African-New World Studies 

Program, Professor of English & 

African-New World Studies 
Linda Spears-Bunton, Associate 

Professor, Education & African- 
New World Studies, Director 

of the Graduate Studies 
Advisory/Coordinating Committee 
Heather Andrade, Assistant 

Professor, English 
Pascale Becel, Associate Professor, 

Modern Languages 
Ken Boodhoo, Associate Professor, 

International Relations 
Jean-Robert Cadely, Assistant 

Professor, Modern Languages & 

African-New World Studies 
John Clark, Associate Professor, 

International Relations 
Lisa Delpit, Eminent Professor, Urban 

Education 
Marvin Dunn, Associate Professor, 

Psychology 
Mohamed Farouk, Associate 

Professor, College of Education 
Nadine Fernandez, Assistant 

Professor, Sociology/Anthropology 
Steve Fjellman, Professor, Sociology 

& Anthropology 
Ivelaw L. Griffith, Professor, 

Political Science 
Tometro Hopkins, Associate 

Professor, English 
Alexander Lichtenstein, Associate 

Professor, History 
Marcia Magnus, Associate Professor, 

Dietetics & Nutrition 
Anthony Maingot, Professor, 

Sociology / Anthropology 
Andrea Mantell-Seidel, Associate 

Professor, Theater & Dance 
Roderick Paul Neumann, Associate 

Professor, International Relations 
Akin Ogundiran, Assistant Professor, 

History 
Valerie Patterson, Assistant Professor, 

College of Urban & Public Affairs 
Jean Rahier, Associate Professor, 

Sociology/ Anthropology and 

African-New World Studies, 
Terry Rey, Assistant Professor, 

Religious Studies 
Robin Sherriff, Assistant Professor, 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Vicky Silvera, Library 
Alex Stepick HI, Professor, Sociology 



/Anthropology 
James Sweet, Assistant Professor, 

History, African New World Studies 
Clarence Taylor, Professor, History 

and African-New World Studies 
Juan Torres-Pou, Assistant Professor, 

Modern Languages 
Donna Weir-Soley, Assistant. 

Professor, English 

The African-New World Studies 
Certificate Program seeks to provide 
graduate-level instruction in the diverse 
field of Africana Studies. 
Specifically, the African-New World 
Studies Certificate program seeks to : 

1. Provide an excellent university 
education, while both challenging and 
stimulating students/participants to 
contribute to the development of their 
communities; 

2. Generate new knowledge and 
research opportunities within the field 
of Alricana Studies. 

3. Serve the university's external 
community with special programming 
to meet educational needs; 

4. Foster greater understanding of the 
global nature of African peoples. 

General Requirements (18) 

Required Course: 

AFA 5002 Afiican-New World 
Studies Theory and 
Methods. 

(Offered every fall semester). 

The 15 remaining credit hours may be 
drawn from a variety of courses. The 
following list represents examples of 
elective courses appropriate for the 
completion of the certificate program. 
Students should consult with advisors 
since new courses are frequently added, 
and special topic courses sometimes 
concern the African Diaspora. 

AFA 6325 Pedagogy in the African 
Diaspora: Literacy, 
Culture, and Gender 3 

AFH 5905 Readings in African 

History 3 

AFH 5935 Topics in African 

History 3 

ANT 5xxx Advanced African 

Diaspora Cultures 3 

ANT 5xxx Representations of 

Africa and Africans in 
Films 3 

ANT 63 1 9 The African Diaspora: 
Anthropological 
Perspectives 3 

CPO 6206 Seminar in African 

Politics 3 

FRE 5508 La Francophonie 3 

HAT 5235 Haitian Creole Seminar 3 



INR 5255 
INR 6936 
LIT 5359 
LIT 5358 

MUH 5025 

MUH 5067 
REL5122 

REL 5372 
REL5384 
REL 5488 

SPW6368 

SYD 6705 

SYP 6734 
WOH 5237 

WOH 5236 



Seminar in African 
Development 3 

Seminar in Inter- 
American Politics 3 
African Diaspora 
Women Writers 3 
Black Literature and 
Literacy/Cultural 
Theory 3 
History of Popular 
Music in the United 
States 3 
Music of the Caribbean 3 
African- American 
Religion 3 
African Spirituality 3 
Rasta, Vodou, Santeria 3 
Theology and Liberation 
Movements 3 
19* Century Spanish- 
Caribbean 3 
Comparative Analysis of 
Ethnicity and 
Race 3 
Seminar: Ethnic 
Minority Aging in U.S. 3 
The African Diaspora 
Since the End Of the 
Slave Trade 3 
The Transatlantic Slave 
Trade and the Making of 
the African Diaspora, 
1441-1807 3 



Certificate in Geographic 
Information Systems 

Zhaohui Jennifer Fu, Director, 

(Library GISRSAL) 
Coordinating Committee 
Michael McClain, (Environmental 

Studies) 
Dean Whitman, (Earth Sciences) 
Fang Zhao, (Civil and Environmental 

Engineering) 
Esra Ozdenerol, (Landscape 

Architecture) 
Jennifer Gebelein, (International 

Relations) 
Tom Philippi, (Biology) 

The Graduate Certificate in Geographic 
Information Systems provides students 
with an interdisciplinary background in 
GIS. The program consists primarily of 
graduate level courses in Geographic 
Information Systems with electives in 
related disciplines such as Biology, 
Earth Sciences, Civil Engineering, 
Environmental Studies, International 
Relations, Landscape Architecture, 
Public Health, and Urban Planning. 

A Geographic Information System 
(GIS) is a set of computer hardware 
and software used to organize, 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 171 



manipulate, and analyze maps and 
spatial data. GIS is a rapidly 
developing technology that can be 
applied to many areas of the natural 
and social sciences. Applications areas 
include: Architecture, Engineering, 
Earth and Environmental Sciences, 
Economics, Sociology, Political 
Science, Public Health, and Urban 
Planning. 

There is an increasing demand for GIS 
specialists in the job marker as a result 
of advancements in information 
technology, and the development of 
spatial/geographic database manage- 
ment programs. Currently, many 
faculty at FIU in a variety of disciplines 
are actively engaged in teaching and 
research in GIS. 

For more information on the Certificate 
in Geographic Information Systems, 
contact the FIU GIS Coordinator, 
Zhaohui Jennifer Fu, at the GIS Lab 
room GL 275D or call (305) 348-3138 
or email: fujentaifiu.edu . or visit: 
http://gislab.fiu.edu . 

Prescribed Courses and Other 
Requirements 

The certificate program will require 18 
credits (6 courses) distributed as 
follows: 

Required Courses: (9 credits out 
of the following) 

EVR 5935 Introduction to GIS and 
Data Analysis 3 

CGN 5320 GIS Applications 

for Civil and Environ- 
mental Engineering 3 
or 

GEO 4XXX Applications of 

Geographic 3 

IRN 4XXX Information Systems 3 3 
and 

GLY 5758 GIS and Spatial 
Analysis for Earth 
Scientists 3 

GLY 5734 Remote Sensing in the 

Earth Sciences 3 

Electives: (9 credits out of the 
following) 

CGN 6930 Applied GIS Projects 3 
CGN 6325 Advanced GIS for Civil 

and Environmental 

Engineering 3 

EVR 6329 Watershed Analysis and 

Management 3 

LAA 5XXX GIS Applications in 

Landscaping Modeling 3 
PCB 5XXX Spatial Ecology 3 

or 
Up to 3 approved graduate level credits 
for courses in the departments or 



schools of Architecture, Biology, Civil 
and Environmental Engineering, 
Computer Science, Earth Sciences, 
Economics, Environmental Studies, 
International Relations, Sociology, 
Statistics, or Public Health. 

Latin American and 
Caribbean Studies 
Certificate Program 

Eduardo A. Gamarra, LACC Director 
Michael W. Collier, UCC Graduate 
Program Director 

LACC Academic Advisory 

Committee 
Irma T. Alonso, (Economics) 
David B. Bray, (Environmental 
Studies) 

Victor M. Uribe, (History) 
William T. Vickers, (Sociology/ 

Anthropology) 

Offered through the Latin American 
and Caribbean Center (LACC), this 
certificate encourages students to take a 
multidisciplinary approach to the study 
of Latin America and the Caribbean. 
The certificate may be awarded to both 
degree and non-degree seeking students 
who complete the require-ments. For 
students pursuing a degree, the 
certificate is a complement to the 
student's discipline or major area of 
studies. For non-degree seeking 
snidents, the certificate provides a 
means for understanding more about 
Latin America and the Caribbean 
without pursuing a longer degree 
program. 
Certificate Requirements 

1. A total of 15 credit hours of 
graduate course work with a grade of 
'B' or higher. Courses must come from 
the approved Latin American and 
Caribbean Studies course listing 
available in the Latin American and 
Caribbean Center or otherwise be 
approved by the certificate program 
faculty advisor. 

2. Courses must be selected from at 
least two disciplines. 

3. An area of concentration may be 
declared for the graduate certificate. At 
least three courses with significant 
Latin American or Caribbean content 
must be completed to obtain a 
concentration. Concentrations include: 
Brazilian Studies, Caribbean Studies, 
Central American Studies, Cultural 
Studies, International Business, 
International Development, Inter- 
national Trade, Mexican Studies, 
Security Studies, and South American 



Studies. Students may also petition to 
create their own concentration, 
provided there are sufficient courses. 

4. Each student is required to 
demonstrate reading proficiency in 
either Spanish or Portuguese, or in 
another regional language such as 
French, Haitian Creole, or Dutch when 
justified by research interests. 
Proficiency is demonstrated by scoring 
at least 'intermediate-high' on the 
ACTFL/ETS exam for Spanish, 
Portuguese, or French. For other 
languages, corresponding tests of 
proficiency and levels of achievement 
will be required. 

NOTE: Intermediate-high on the 
ACTFL/ETS exam (1-plus on the US 
govenrment scale) can normally be 
attained by students with two 
undergraduate semesters of basic 
language instruction and at least one 
undergraduate semester of intermediate 
(3000/4000 level) instruction. 
Attainment of the required language 
proficiency is the responsibility of the 
student and extra courses to achieve the 
required proficiency level must be 
taken outside the certificate curriculum. 

Courses approved for the Latin 
American and Caribbean Studies 
Certificate are posted each semester on 
the FIU Class Schedule at 
http://sis2.fiu.edu/classschedule . 
Under Special Programs and Certificate 
Programs select Latin American & 
Caribbean Studies. All courses listed 
from 5000 through 7000 series may be 
applied to the certificate. Approved 
courses are also posted each semester 
outside LACC (DM 353) or are 
available from the certificate advisor. 

Students interested in pursuing a 
Latin American and Caibbean Studies 
Certificate should contact the certificate 
advisor at (305) 348-2894 for an 
appointment or email 

MALACS(5)fiu.edu . 

Graduate Certificate in 
Museum Studies 

Carol Damian, Chairperson, 

Department of Art and Art History 
Florida International University 
Graduate Certificate in Museum Studies 
is an 18 credit program intended to 
prepare students for professional 
employment in historic preservation, 
systematic biology, collection manage- 
ment, museum work, educational 
programming, park interpretation and 
public policy planning. The program 
offers graduate level courses cross-listed 



172 College of Arts and Sciences 



Oraduate Catalog 



from associated academic disciplines 
and special project courses appropriate 
for specific museum work. Courses are 
most appropriate for people interested in 
museum careers and are designed to 
give a broad overview of museum 
history as well as a solid grounding in 
museological theory and practice. In 
accordance with the mission of FIU, 
attention is given to issues of diversity 
and multiculturalism; the relationship of 
museums to changing populations and 
interdisciplinary trends in a variety of 
different collecting environments 
ranging from the Arts to History, 
Anthropology, Archaeology, and the 
Sciences. 

In addition to Core requirements, an 
internship is required and students are 
encouraged to pursue a variety of 
courses of study to address diverse 
Museum situations. Internships for 6 
credits may be done at associated and 
approved institutions. Several tracks 
offered through associated departments 
include a majority of courses online. 

Graduate Credits may be applied to 
an MA in Museum Studies and/or Art 
History. 

Program Requirements (18 
credits): 

Required Courses: (6 credits) 
ART 5xxx Introduction to Museum 
Ethics, Policies and 
Procedures 3 

ART 5xxx Introduction to Museum 
Studies: History and 
Philosophy of 
Museums 3 



Electives: (6 

ART 5xxx 



ART 5xxx 

ART 5xxx 
ART 5xxx 

ART 5xxx 

ARTSxxx 

ARTSxxx 

HIS 5067 



HIS 5084 
HIS 5xxx 



MUS 5xxx 



credits) 

Collection and 
Conservation 
Management and 
Practices 

Non-Profit Business 
Practices 

Museum Education 
Curatorial Methods and 
Practices 

Museum Exhibitions: 
Theory and Practice 
Special Topics in 
Museum Studies 
Managing Museum 
Technology 
Public History 
Theoretical and 
Practical Issues 
Museum History 
Archeology and 
Museum Practices 
Grant Writing for the 
Arts 



MUM 5946 Performance Arts 

Internship 3 

MUM 57 1 5 Performing Arts 

Production 3 

MUM 5705 Advanced Business of 

Music 3 

ACG 5507 Issues and Problems in 
Accounting for Non- 
Profit Entitles 3 
ARH 5xxx Internships 6 

or 
Students may include approved courses 
available from associated departments 
of History, Environmental Science, Art 
History; Biology, Architecture, 
Anthropology. With permission of 
Chairperson. 

Graduate Certificate 
Program in Religious 
Studies 

The purpose of the Graduate Certificate 
Program is to offer an alternative to the 
MA degree program for students who 
wish to pursue an organized program of 
study at the graduate level, but have no 
need of a degree and wish a shorter term 
project. Many of these will be older 
adults seeking to pursue a stimulating 
course of study for personal satisfaction. 
Having this certificate program will 
allow the Department to steer such 
persons, who frequently now enter the 
degree program but do not complete the 
degree, away from the MA and into the 
Certificate Program. 

Requirements 

1 . Students must either have taken the 
undergraduate course REL 3308 
World Religions as a prerequisite 
before entering the certificate 
program, or must complete it 
within the program, usually in the 
first semester of coursework. 

2. Students must complete 18 credit 
hours of graduate level courses in 
the general area of religion. 

3. Students must have a minimum 
GPA of 3.0 in their graduate 
religion courses. 

4. Earned grades in the 18 hours of 
graduate religion courses must be 
"B" or better; grades of "B-" or 
below will not be counted toward 
the 18. 

5. Students in the Graduate 
Certificate Program in Religion 
who wish to transfer into the MA 
program must meet the 
requirements for matriculation. 



Graduate Certificate in 
Transnational and Regional 
Studies 

Ralph S. Clem, Director. Center for 
Transnational and Comparative 
Studies 
Coordinating Committee 
Steven Heine, Associate Director, 
Center for Transnational and 
Comparative Studies, Religious 
Studies and History 
Nathan Katz, Religious Studies 
A. Douglas Kincaid, Sociology 
Elisabeth Prugl, International 

Relations 
Terry Rey, Religious Studies 
William Walker III, History 

The objective is to provide 
interdisciplinary graduate instruction in 
international/global studies that require 
specialization in one of the following 
main world regions, including Asia, 
Europe, Middle East, Russia or Cenfral 
Asia. (Students interested in Latin 
America or Africa may wish to consult 
those programs). For more information 
on the graduate degree, contact the 
Center for Transnational and 
Comparative Studies, DM 368, 
telephone (305) 348-6561, fax (305) 
348-6562, email: tcsra'fiu.edu or visit 
our website: vvww.fui.edu/~tcs . 

The Program requires 15 graduate- 
level credit hours (5 courses). Students 
will be advised by the Program Director 
and by the committee member with 
expertise in the region of specialization. 
Courses must be passed with "B" or 
better (B- is not acceptable). 
Course Requirements: 15 credits 
Core Course in Global Studies (3 
credits): 

A course in comparative or global 
studies, such as: 
CPO5091 Seminar in Comparative 

Politics 
ECO 5709 The World Economy 
ECP 5704 International Economic 

Problems and Policy 
FOW5587 Comparative Studies 
HIS 5289 Comparative History 
INR 60 1 7 Comparative Approaches 
to Area Studies and 
Global Issues 
MUH5057 Music of the World 
REL 5 1 3 5 Sects, Cults, and New 

Religions 
SYP 5447 Sociology of 
International 
Development 



College of Arts and Sciences 173 



Graduate Catalog 



Regional Studies Courses (9 credits): 

Courses in studies of the speciality 
region-Asia, Europe, Middle East, 
Russia, or Central Asia. The courses 
can be taken in any relevant discipline, 
but must come from at least two 
different departments or disciplines. 
Directed Research (3 credits): 
Supervision of an intensive research 
paper, fieldwork studies, or a 
comparable in-depth specialized project 
in studies of the region. 
Language Requirements (credits 
cannot be applied to the certificate): 
One year of study, or equivalent, in a 
language appropriate to the speciality 
region (such as Chinese or Japanese for 
Asian Studies, Hebrew or Arabic for 
Middle Eastern Studies). 



174 CoUe pe of Arts and Sciences 

College of Arts and 
Sciences 

Dean R- Bruce Dunlap 

Associate Dean, 

College Relations Gisela Casines 
Associate Dean, 
Research Kelsey Downum 

Associate Dean, 
Budget and 

Planning Kenneth Furton 

Associate Dean, 
Biscayne Bay 

Campus. Joyce Peterson 

Associate Dean, 
Faculty and 

Graduate Studies Mark Szuchman 
Director, 
School of Computer 
Science YiDeng 

Director, 
School of Music Fredrick Kaufman 

Chairpersons and Program 
Directors: 

African-New World 

Studies Carole Boyce Davies 

Art and Art History Carol Damian 
Biological 

Sciences James Fourqurean 

Chemistry Stanislaw Wnuk 

Earth 

Sciences Rosemary Hickey-Vargas 
Economics Panagis Liossatos 

English Carmela Pinto-Mclntire 
Environmental Studies Joel Heinen 
History Kenneth Lipartito 

Humanities Kenneth Rogerson 

International 

Relations John Clark 

Latin American 
and Caribbean 

Studies Eduardo Gamarra 

Liberal Studies Janat Parker 

Mathematics Enrique ViUamor 

Modern 

Languages Maida Watson 

Philosophy Paul Draper 

Physics Stephan Mintz 

Political Science NicolRae 

Psychology Marvin Dunn 

Religious Studies Nathan Katz 

Sociology and 
Anthropology Richard Tardanico 

Statistics ■"«'^; 

neatre and Dance Leroy Ciark 
Women 's 

Studies SuzannaRose 



Faculty 

Aditya, Ram, Ph.D. (Temple 
University), Associate Professor, 
Psychology 
Akache, Walid, M.S. (University of 
Miami), Instructor, School of 
Computer Science 
Aladro, Gerardo, Ph.D. 

(Pennsylvania State University), 
Associate Professor, Mathematics 
Allen-Hermanson, Sean, Ph.D. 
(University of Toronto), Assistant 
Professor, Philosophy 
Almiral, Jose, Ph.D. (University of 
Strathclyde, Scotland), Assistant 
Professor, Chemistry 
Anbarci, Nejat, Ph.D. (The University 
of Iowa), Associate Professor, 
Economics 
Anderson, William, Ph.D. (Swiss 
Federal Institute of Technology- 
Zurich), Assistant Professor, Earth 
Sciences and Southeast 
Environmental Research Center 
Andrade, Heather, Ph.D. (Rutgers 
State University). Assistant 
Professor, English 
Apanius, Victor, Ph.D. (University of 
Pennsylvania), Assistant Professor, 
Biological Sciences 
Apodaca, Claire, Ph.D. (Purdue 
University). Assistant Professor, 
International Relations 
Arnold, St. George Tucker, Jr., Ph.D. 
(Stanford University), Associate 
Professor, English 
Arpad, Tori, M.F.A. (University of 
Arizona), Assistant Professor, Art 
and Art History 
Arraras, Astrid, Ph.D. (Princeton 
University), Assistant Professor, 
Political Science 
Augenblick, John, D.M.A. (University 
of Miami), Associate Professor, 
School of Music 
Bahrick, Lorraine, Ph.D. (Cornell 

University), Professor, Psychology 
Baker, Joan L., Ph.D. (University of 
Washington), Associate Professor, 
English 
Baldor, Aurelio, M.A. (Florida 
International University), Instructor, 
Modern Languages 
Barrett, Lynn, M.F.A. (University of 
North Carolina-Greensboro), 
Professor, English 
Barton, David, Ph.D. (University of 
Cambridge), Professor, School of 
Computer Science 
Bayazit, Osman, M.S. (Texas A&M 
University), Instructor, School of 
Computer Science 



r.radiiate Catalog 

Becel, Pascale, Ph.D. (University of 
California-Davis), Associate 
Professor, Modern Languages 
Becker, David, Ph.D. (Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology), Associate 
Professor, Chemistry 
Beer, Michelle, Ph.D. (University of 
Pittsburgh), Associate Professor, 
Philosophy 
Bennett, Bradley C, Ph.D. 
(University of North Carolina- 
Chapel Hill), Associate Professor, 
Biological Sciences and 
Environmental Studies 
Berk, Lynn, Ph.D. (Purdue 

University), Professor, English 
Berk, Toby, Ph.D. (Purdue 
University), Professor Emeritus. 
School of Computer Science 
Bhat, Mahadev, Ph.D. (University of 
Tennessee-Knoxville), Associate 
Professor, Environmental Studies 
Bidarkota, Prasad, Ph.D. (Ohio State 
University), Assistant Professor, 
Economics 
Bigger, Charies, Ph.D. (Florida State 
University), Associate Professor, 
Biological Sciences 
Boeglin, Werner, Ph.D. (University of 
Basle, Switzerland), Associate 
Professor, Physics 
Bone, Richard, Ph.D. (University of 
West Indies, Jamaica), Professor. 
Physics 
Boodhoo, Ken, Ph.D. (University of 
the West Indies, Jamaica), Associate 
Professor, International Relations 
Bowe, Gregory, M.A. (University of 
New Hampshire), Assistant 
Professor, English 
Boyce Davies, Carole, Ph.D. 
(University oflbadan, Nigeria), 
Professor, English and Director, 
African-New World Studies Program 
Boyd III, John H., Ph.D. (Indiana 
University), Associate Professor, 
Economics 
Brain, Carios W., Ph.D. (West 
Virginia University), Associate 
Professor, Statistics 
Brant, Sharon, M.F.A. (University of 
Wyoming), Assistant Professor, 
Art and Art History 
Bray, David, Ph.D. (Brown 

University), Associate Professor, 
Environmental Studies 
Breslin, Thomas A., Ph.D. (University 
of Virginia), Associate Professor. 
International Relations and Vice 
President, Research and Graduate 
Studies 
Brown, Christopher, Ph.D. 

(University of Delaware), Professor, 
Biological Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 175 



Brown, Jerry, Ph.D. (Cornell 

University), Associate Professor, 

Sociology/A nthropology 
Brown, Joann, M.A. (Lfniversity of 

Miami), Instructor, Theatre and 

Dance-Speech Communication 

Program 
Buckley, Ralph, M.F.A. (Maryland 

Institute), Professor, Art and Art 

History 
Bull, Jesse, Ph.D. (University of 

California-San Diego), Assistant 

Professor, Economics 
Burke, William, M.F.A. (State 

University of New York at New 

Paltz). Professor, Art and Art 

History 
Burns, Kristine, Ph.D. (Ball State 

University), Associate Professor, 

School of Music 
Cadely, Jean-Robert, Ph.D. 

(Universite du Quebec-Montreal), 

Associate Professor, Modern 

Languages 
Cai, Yong, Ph.D. (Nankai University, 

China), Assistant Professor, 

Chemistry 
Camayd-Freixas, Erik, Ph.D. 

(Harvard University), Assistant 

Professor, Modem Languages 
Campbell, Colton, Ph.D. (University 

of California-Santa Barbara), 

Associate Professor, Politcal Science 
Campbell, Gary, M.A. (University of 

Miami), Assistant Professor, School 

of Music 
Caputo, Nina, Ph.D. (University of 

California-Berkeley), Assistant 

Professor, History 
Carson, Jamie, Ph.D. (Michigan State 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Political Science 
Carvajal, Manuel, Ph.D. (University 

of Florida), Professor, Economics 
Casines, Gisela, Ph.D. (University of 

Florida), Associate Professor, 

English and Associate Dean, College 

of Arts and Sciences 
Castells, Ricardo, Ph.D. (Duke 

University), Associate Professor, 

Modem Languages 
Chapnik, Jill, M.S. (Barry 

University), Instructor, School of 

Computer Science 
Chan, Ivan, B.M. (The Curtis Institute 

of Music), The Miami String 

Quartet-in-Residence, School of 

Music 
Chatfield, David, Ph.D. (University of 

Minnesota), Associate Professor, 

Chemistry 
Chen, Chun-Fan, Ph.D. (University of 

Michigan), Associate Professor, 

Biological Sciences 



Chen, Ling, Ph.D. (American 

University), Associate Professor, 

Statistics 
Chen, Shu-Ching, Ph.D., (Purdue 

University), Assistant Professor, 

School of Computer Science 
Chen, Z. Sherman, Ph.D. (University 

of Texas-Dallas), Associate 

Professor, Statistics 
Chemela, Janet, Ph.D. (Columbia 

University), Professor, 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Childers, Daniel, Ph.D. (Louisiana 

State University), Associate 

Professor, Biological Sciences and 

Southeast Environmental Research 

Center 
Chinelly, Cynthia, M.F.A (University 

of Arkansas), Lecturer, English 
Chisik, Richard, Ph.D. (Northwestern 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Economics 
Chung, Bongkil, Ph.D. (Michigan 

State University), Professor, 

Philosophy 
Church, Phillip, M.F.A. (University of 

California-Irvine), Associate 

Professor, Theatre and Dance 
Cicbon, Elaine, M.A. (University of 

Miami), Instructor, Theatre and 

Dance-Speech Communication 

Program 
Clark, John, Ph.D. (University of 

Virginia), Associate Professor and 

Chairperson, International Relations 
Clark, Leroy, Ph.D. (Kent State 

University), Professor and 

Chairperson, Theatre and Dance 
Clark, Peter, M.S. (State University of 

New York-Binghamton), Instructor, 

School of Computer Science 
Clem, Ralph, Ph.D. (Columbia 

University), Professor, International 

Relations and Director, Center for 

Transnational and Comparative 

Studies 
Clement, Bradford, Ph.D. (Columbia 

University), Professor, Earth 

Sciences 
Cohen, Daniel, Ph.D. (Brandeis 

University), Associate Professor, 

History 
Collins, Laurel, Ph.D. (Yale 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Earth Sciences and Biological 

Sciences 
Collins, Timothy, Ph.D. (Yale 

University), Associate Professor, 

Biological Sciences 
Cook, N. David, Ph.D. (University of 

Texas-Austin), Professor, Hisotry 
Coombs, John, B.A. (Arizona State 

University), Instructor, History 



Comejo, Abel, M.F.A., (Brooklyn 

College, City University of New 

York), Instructor, Theatre and 

Dance 
Couper, James, M.A. (Florida State 

University), Professor, Art and An 

History 
Cox, Ronald W., Ph.D. (University of 

Wisconsin-Madison), Associate 

Professor, Political Science 
Craumer, Peter, Ph.D. (Columbia 

University), Associate Professor, 

International Relations 
Crosby, James, Ph.D. (Yale 

University), Professor Emeritus, 

Modem Languages 
Cuciurean, John, Ph.D. (State 

University of New York at Buffalo), 

Assistant Professor, School of Music 
Damian, Carol Ph.D. (University of 

Miami), Associate Professor and 

Chairperson, Art and Art History 
Darici, Yesim, Ph.D. (University of 

Missouri), Associate Professor, 

Physics 
Daruwala, Maneck, Ph.D. (University 

of Rochester), Associate Professor, 

English 
Davidovici, Robert, Postgraduate 

Diploma in Violin (The Juilliard 

School), Professor, School of Music 
Debrix, Francois, Ph.D. (Purdue 

University), Assistant Professor, 

International Relations 
DeCarli, Laura, Ph.D. (University of 

California-Los Angles), Assistant 

Professor, Mathematics 
DeChurch, Leslie, Ph.D. (Florida 

International University), Assistant 

Professor, Psychology 
At Alonso, Irma, Ph.D. (University of 

York, England), Professor, 

Economics 
de la Cuesta, Leonel A., Ph.D. (The 

Johns Hopkins University), 

Professor, Modem Languages 
del Valle, Eduardo, M.F.A. (Brooklyn 

College, City University of New 

York), Professor, Art and Art History 
Delgado, Milagros, Ph.D. (University 

of Miami), Lecturer, Chemistry 
Demos, Marian, Ph.D. (Harvard 

University), Associate Professor, 

Humanities and Modem Languages 
Deng, Yi, Ph.D. (University of 

Pittsburgh), Associate Professor and 

Director, School of Computer 

Science 
Donnelly, Maureen, Ph.D. (University 

of Miami), Associate Professor, 

Biological Sciences 
Downey, Timothy, M.S. (State 

University of New York at Albany), 

Instructor, School of Computer 



176 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



Science 
Downum, Kelsey, Ph.D. (University of 

British Columbia), Professor, 

Biological Sciences and Associate 

Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 
Draghici, Tedi, Ph.D., (Michigan 

State University), Assistant Professor, 

Mathematics 
Draper, Grenville, Ph.D. (University 

of the West Indies), Professor, 

Earth Sciences 
Draper, Paul, Ph.D. (University of 

California-Irvine), Professor and 

Chairperson, Philosophy 
Dufresne, John, M.F.A. (University of 

Arkansas), Professor, English 
Duhamel, Denise, M.F.A. (Sarah 

Lawrence College), Assistant 

Professor, English 
Duncan, Richard, M.F.A. (Southern 

Illinois University), Associate 

Professor, Art and Art History 
Dundas, Robert, M.F.A. (University 

of Iowa), Assistant Professor, School 

of Music 
Dunlap, R. Bruce, Ph.D. (Indiana 

University in Bloomington), 

Professor, Chemistry and Dean, 

College of Arts and Sciences 
Dunn, Marvin, Ph.D. (University of 

Tennessee), Associate Professor and 

Chairperson, Psychology 
Edward, Julian, Ph.D. (Massachusetts 

Institute of Technology), Associate 

Professor, Mathematics 
Ege, Raimund, Ph.D. (Oregon 

Graduate Center), Associate 

Professor, School of Computer 

Science 
Elton, Hugh, Ph.D. (Oxford 

University), Assistant Professor, 

History 
Endel, Peggy, Ph.D. (Cornell 

University), Associate Professor, 

English 
Erber, Joan, Ph.D. (St. Louis 

University), Professor, Psychology 
Fanomezantsoa, Mbola, M.S. (State 

University of New York-Institute of 

Technology), Instructor, School of 

Computer Science 
Fernandez, Damian J., Ph.D. 

(University of Miami), Professor, 

International Relations 
Fernandez, Nadine, Ph.D. (University 

of California-Berkeley), Assistant 

Professor, Sociology/Anthropology 
Fiebig, Rudolf, Ph.D. (University of 

Munster), Professor, Physics 
Finley, Gordon, Ph.D. (Harvard 

University), Professor, Psychology 
Fisher, Jack B., Ph.D. (University of 

California-Davis), Research 

Scientist, Biological Sciences 



Fisher, Ronald, Ph.D. (Ohio State 
University), Professor, Psychology 

Fjellman, Stephen, Ph.D. (Stanford 
University), Professor, Sociology/ 
Anthropology and Associate 
Dean, Honors College 

Flexser, Arthur, Ph.D. (Stanford 
University), Associate Professor, 
Psychology 

Fourqurean, James, Ph.D. 

(University of Virginia), Associate 
Professor and Chairperson, 
Biological Sciences and Southeast 
Environmental Research Center 

Fox, Domitila, M.S. (University of 
Miami), Instructor, Mathematics 

Francisco-Ortega, Javier, Ph.D. 
(University of Birmingham, Great 
Britain), Assistant Professor, 
Biological Sciences 

Frazier, Leslie, Ph.D. (Syracuse 
University), Associate Professor, 
Psychology 

Free, Mary, Ph.D. (University of 
Georgia), Associate Professor and 
Associate Chairperson, English 

Friedman, Rebecca, M.A. (University 
of Michigan), Assistant Professor, 
History 

Fuller, Karen, M.F.A. (Florida 
International University), 
Instructor and Director of 
Performing Arts Production, 
School of Music 

Fulton, Carolyn, Ph.D. (Florida State 
University), Assistant Professor, 
Music Education, School of Music 

Furton, Kenneth, Ph.D. (Wayne State 
University), Professor, Chemistry 
and Associate Dean, College of Arts 
and Sciences 

Gaiser, Evelyn, Ph.D. (University of 
Georgia), Assistant Professor, 
Biological Sciences 

Gamarra, Eduardo, Ph.D. (University 
of Pittsburgh), Professor, Political 
Science and Director, Latin 
American and Caribbean Center 

Garcia, Orlando, D.M.A. (University 
of Miami), Professor, School of 
Music 

Gardinali, Piero, Ph.D. (Texas A&M 
University), Assistant Professor, 
Chemistry and Southeast 
Environmental Research Center 

Gebelein, Jennifer, Ph.D. (University 
of California-Santa Barbara), 
Assistant Professor, International 
Relations 

Gekic, Kemal, M.A. (University of 
Novi Sad, Yugoslavia), 
Professor/Artist-in-Residence, 
School of Music 



George, Robert, Ph.D. (University of 

Washington), Lecturer, Biological 

Sciences 
George, Jr., Roby, Ph.D. (University 

of Cincinnati), Assistant Professor, 

School of Music 
Gerstman, Bernard, Ph.D. (Princeton 

University), Professor, Physics 
Gewirtz, Jacob, Ph.D. (State 

University of Iowa), Professor, 

Psychology 
Ghai, Gauri, Ph.D. (Iowa State 

University), Associate Professor, 

Statistics 
Girard, Chris, Ph.D. (University of 

Wisconsin-Madison), Associate 

Professor, Sociology/Anthropology 
Gladwin, Hugh, Ph.D. (Stanford 

University), Associate Professor, 

Sociology/A n thropology 
Goldberg, Walter, Ph.D. (University 

of Miami), Professor, Biological 

Sciences 
Gomez, Maria Asuncion, Ph.D. 

(Rutgers University), Assistant 

Professor, Modern Languages 
Gomez, Mirta, M.F.A. (Brooklyn 

College, City University of New 

York), Professor, Art and Art History 
Gomez, Ramon, M.S. (University of 

Miami), Instructor, Statistics 
Gonzalez-Reigosa, Fernando, Ph.D. 

(Florida State University), 

Associate Professor, Psychology 
Gorman, Susan, Ph.D. (University of 

Maryland), Instructor, Mathematics 
Grantcharov, Gueo, Ph.D. (Sofia 

University, Bulgaria), Assistant 

Professor, Mathematics 
Grau, Christopher, Ph.D. (The John 

Hopkins University), Assistant 

Professor, Philosophy 
Graves, A. Palmer, Ph.D. (University 

of Oklahoma), Lecturer, Chemistry 
Grenier, Guillermo, Ph.D. (University 

of New Mexico), Professor, 

Sociology 
Griffith, Ivelaw L., Ph.D. (City 

University of New York), Professor, 

Political Science and Dean, Honors 

College 
Gross, Michael, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania 

State University), Associate 

Professor, Earth Sciences 
Gudorf, Christine, Ph.D. (Columbia 

University), Professor, Religious 

Studies 
Guernsey, Daniel, Ph.D. (University 

of Wisconsin-Madison), Assistant 

Professor, Art and Art History and 

Humanities 
Gulati, Sneh, Ph.D. (University of 

South Carolina), Associate 

Professor, Statistics 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 177 



Gummerson, Alan, Ph.D. (University 

of Wisconsin-Madison), Instructor, 

Economics 
Hagood, Thomas, Ph.D. (University 

of Wisconsin-Madison), Associate 

Professor, Theatre and Dance and 

Director, Dance Program 
Hall, James, Ph.D. (University of 

Utah), Professor, English 
Haraguchi, Asuka, M.A. (Florida 

State University), Instructor, Modern 

Languages 
Hardy, Kenneth, Ph.D. (Tulane 

University), Professor, Physics 
Hargitai, Peter, M.F.A. (University of 

Massachusetts), Lecturer, English 
Harrison, Kimberly, Ph.D. 

(Louisanna State University), 

Assistant Professor, English 
Hart, Mitchell, Ph.D. (University of 

California-Los Angeles), Associate 

Professor, History 
Hartley, Anne, Ph.D. (Duke 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Environmental Studies 
Harvey, Bruce, Ph.D. (Stanford 

University), Associate Professor, 

English 
Hauptii, Bruce, Ph.D. (Washington 

University), Professor. Philosophy 
He, Xudong, Ph.D., (Virginia 

Polytechnic University), 

Associate Professor, School of 

Computer Science 
Heine, Steven, Ph.D. (Temple 

University), Professor, Religious 

Studies and Director, Asian Studies 

Program 
Heinen, Joel, Ph.D. (University of 

Michigan), Associate Professor and 

Chairperson, Environmental Studies 
Henley, Kenneth, Ph.D. (University of 

Virginia), Professor, Philosophy 
Herrera, Rene, Ph.D. (Fordham 

University), Associate Professor, 

Biological Sciences 
Herriott, Arthur, Ph.D. (University of 

Florida), Professor, Chemistry 
Hickey- Vargas, Rosemary, Ph.D. 

(Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology) Professor, and 

Chairperson, Earth Sciences 
Hill, Jonathan, Ph.D. (University of 

Colorado-Boulder), Assistant 

Professor, Economics 
Hill, Kevin, Ph.D. (University of 

Florida), Associate Professor, 

Political Science 
Hoder-Salmon, Marilyn, Ph.D. 

(University of New Mexico), 

Associate Professor, English 
Hollander, Gail, Ph.D. (University of 

Iowa), Assistant Professor, 

International Relations 



Hopkins, Tometro, Ph.D. (Indiana 

University), Associate Professor, 

English 
Houghton, William, M.S. (University 

of Georgia), Research Scientist, 

Biological Sciences 
Howell, Ina Parks, Ph.D. (University 

of South Florida), Lecturer, 

Statistics 
Huchingson, James, Ph.D. (Emory 

University), Associate Professor, 

Religious Studies 
Hudson, Steven, Ph.D. (University of 

Chicago), Associate Professor, 

Mathematics 
Irvine, Kip, M.S. (University of 

Miami), Instructor, School of 

Computer Science 
Jaffe, Rudolf, Ph.D. (Indiana 

University), Professor, Chemistry 

and Associate Director, Southeast 

Environmental Research Center 
Jayachandran, Krishnaswamy, 

Ph.D. (Kansas State University), 

Assistant Professor, Environmental 

Studies and Southeast 

Environmental Research Program 
Jensen, John, Ph.D. (Harvard 

University), Professor, Modern 

Languages 
Jochem, Frank, Ph.D. (University of 

Kiel, Germany), Assistant Professor, 

Biological Sciences 
Joens, Jeffrey, Ph.D. (Indiana 

University), Professor, Chemistry 
Johnson, Kenneth, Ph.D. (Brown 

University), Associate Professor, 

English and Assistant Vice 

President, Academic Affairs 
Johnson, Paulette, Ph.D. (Kansas 

State University), Lecturer, Statistics 

and Director of Statistical 

Consulting 
Johnson, Sherry, Ph.D. (University of 

Florida), Associate Professor, 

History 
Jones, Ronald, Ph.D. (Oregon State 

University), Professor, Biological 

Sciences 
Jorge, Antonio, Ph.D. (Villanova 

Universidad), Professor, Economics, 

International Relations, Political 

Science and Sociology/Anthropology 
Juan-Navarro, Santiago, Ph.D. 

(Columbia University), Associate 

Professor, Modern Languages 
Jupille, Joseph, Ph.D. (University of 

Washington), Assistant Professor, 

Political Science 
Kafkoulis, George, Ph.D. (California 

Institute of Technology), Associate 

Professor, Mathematics 
Kaban, Alan, Ph.D. (University of 

Chicago), Associate Professor, 



History 
Kaminsky, Howard, Ph.D. 

(University of Chicago), Professor 

Emeritus, History 
Karayalcin, Ali Cem, Ph.D. 

(Columbia University), Associate 

Professor, Economics 
Karsh, Ellen, M.A. (Florida 

International University), 

Instructor, Theatre and Dance- 
Speech Communication Program 
Kates, Jeanne, M.A. (Florida 

International University), Instructor, 

Political Science 
Katz, Nathan, Ph.D. (Temple 

University), Professor and 

Chairperson, Religious Studies 
Kaufman, Fredrick, M.M. 

(Manhattan School of Music), 

Professor and Director, School 

of Music 
Kavallieratos, Konstantinos, Ph.D. 

(Yale University), Assistant 

Professor, Chemistry 
Keller, Leonard, Ph.D. (Yale 

University), Professor, Chemistry 
Kibria, Golam, Ph.D. (University of 

Western Ontario), Assistant 

Professor, Statistics 
Kincaid, A. Douglas, Ph.D. (The 

Johns Hopkins University), 

Associate Professor, Sociology/ 

Anthropology and Vice Provost, 

International Studies 
King, Cllve, A.T.C., Ph.D. (University 

of London), Professor, Art and Art 

History 
Knapp, Jeffrey, M.A. (University of 

Miami), Instructor, English and 

Director, Freshman Interest Groups 
Koptur, Suzanne, Ph.D. (University of 

California-Berkeley), Professor, 

Biological Sciences 
Kos, Lidia, Ph.D. (University of 

California-Berkeley), Assistant 

Professor, Biological Sciences 
Kovacs, George, Ph.D. (University of 

Louvain), Professor, Philosophy 
Kovera, Margaret, Ph.D. (University 

of Minnesota), Associate Professor, 

Psychology 
Kowert, Paul, Ph.D. (Cornell 

University), Associate Professor, 

International Relations 
Kramer, Laird, Ph.D. (Duke 

University), Associate Professor, 

Physics 
Kraynek, William, Ph.D. (Carnegie- 
Mellon University), Associate 

Professor, School of Computer 

Science 
Kretz, Kathleen, M.F.A. (University 

of Georgia), Associate Professor, 

Art and Art History 



178 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



Kriegel, Lara, Ph.D. (The Johns 

Hopkins University), Assistant 

Professor, History 
Kuhn, David N., Ph.D. (University of 

California-Davis), Associate 

Professor, Biological Sciences 
Kurtines, William, Ph.D. (The Johns 

Hopkins University), Professor, 

Psychology 
Landnim, John, Ph.D. (University of 

Southern California), Professor, 

Chemistry 
Langer, Lilly, Ph.D. (University of 

Miami), Associate Professor, 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Larson, Erik, Ph.D. (New York 

University), Associate Professor, 

Religious Studies 
Lavender, Abraham, Ph.D. 

(University of Maryland), Professor, 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Leatherman, Stephen P., Ph.D 

(University of Virginia), Professor, 

Environmental Studies and Director, 

International Hurricane Center 
Leckband, Mark, Ph.D. (Purdue 

University) Associate Professor, 

Mathematics 
Lee, David, Ph.D. (Rutgers 

University), Professor, Biological 

Sciences 
Lees, Watson, Ph.D. (Harvard 

University), Associate Professor, 

Chemistry 
Leness, Thomas, Ph.D. (Columbia 

University), Associate Professor, 

Mathematics 
Leng, Fenfei, Ph.D. (University of 

Mississippi), Assistant Professor, 

Chemistry 
Levine, Barry, Ph.D. (New School for 

Social Research), Professor, 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Levitt, Mary, Ph.D. (Syracuse 

University), Professor, Psychology 
Li, Bao Qin, Ph.D. (University of 

Maryland), Associate Professor, 

Mathematics 
Lickliter, Robert, Ph.D. (University of 

California-Davis), Professor, 

Psychology 
Lifshitz, Felice, Ph.D. (Columbia 

University), Associate Professor, 

History 
Liossatos, Panagis, Ph.D. (University 

of Pennsylvania), Professor and 

Chairperson, Economics 
Lipartito, Kenneth, Ph.D. (The Johns 

Hopkins University), Professor, and 

Chairperson, History 
Lipner, Kenneth, Ph.D. (Rutgers 

University), Associate Professor, 

Economics 



Longoria, Jose, Ph.D. (University of 

Texas-Dallas), Professor, Earth 

Sciences 
Lopez de la Vega, Ramon, Ph.D. 

(University of Miami), Associate 

Professor, Chemistry 
Lowery, Shearon, Ph.D. (Washington 

State University), Associate 

Professor, Sociology/ Anthropology 
Lund, Gary, B.F.A. (Florida 

International University), Instructor, 

Theatre and Dance 
MacDonald, Charles, Ph.D. 

(University of Virginia), Professor, 

International Relations 
MacFarlane, Andrew W., Ph.D. 

(Harvard University), Associate 

Professor, Earth Sciences 
Machonis, Peter A., Ph.D. 

(Pennsylvania State University), 

Associate Professor, Modern 

Languages 
Maguire, William, M.S. (Illinois 

Institute of Technology), Professor, 

Art and Art History 
Mahler, Sarah, Ph.D. (Columbia 

University), Associate Professor, 

Sociology/A nthropology 
Maingot, Anthony, Ph.D. (University 

of Florida), Professor, 

Sociology/A nthropology 
Makemson, John, Ph.D. (Washington 

State University), Professor, 

Biological Sciences 
Marcus, Phillip, Ph.D. (Harvard 

Unversity), Professor, English 
Markowitz, Peter, Ph.D. (College of 

William and Mary), Associate 

Professor, Physics 
Martin, Felix, Ph.D. (Columbia 

University), Assistant Professor, 

International Relations 
Martin, Kathleen, Ph.D. (Bryn Mawr 

College), Associate Professor, 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Martin, M. Gregory, M.M. (James 

Madison University), Instructor, 

School of Music 
Martinez, Juan A., Ph.D. (Florida 

State University), Associate 

Professor, Art and Art History 
Mathee, Kalai, Ph.D. (University of 

Tennessee-Memphis), Assistant 

Professor, Biological Sciences 
Mau, James A., Ph.D. (University of 

California-Los Angeles), Professor, 

Sociology/ Anthropology 
Maurrasse, Florentin, Ph.D. 

(Columbia University), Professor, 

Earth Sciences 
Maxwell, Oren, Ph.D. (State 

University of New York at Stony 

Brook), Professor, Physics 



McClain, Michael, Ph.D. (University 

of Washington), Assistant Professor, 

Environmental Studies 
McCormack, Kathleen, Ph.D. 

(University of Miami), Associate 

Professor, English 
McCoy, Diana, M.A. (Case Western 

Reserve University), Instructor, 

Mathematics 
McElfresh, Clair, D.M.A. (Case 

Western Reserve University), 

Professor Emeritus, School of Music 
McGrath, Campbell, M.F.A. 

(Columbia University), Patricia and 

Phillip Frost Professor in English 
Mclntire, Carmela Pinto, Ph.D. 

(Michigan State University), 

Associate Professor and 

Chairperson, English 
McKinley, Kathryn, Ph.D. 

(University of Delaware), Associate 

Professor, English 
Meissner, Christian, Ph. D. (Florida 

State University), Assistant 

Professor, Psychology 
Melchior, Mary Beth, Ph.D. 

(University of Maryland-College 

Park), Assistant Professor, Potitcal 

Science 
Meng Robinson, Cathy, M.M. (San 

Francisco Conservatory of Music), 

Miami String Quartet-in-Residence, 

School of Music 
Mesbahi, Mohiaddin, Ph.D. 

(University of Miami), Associate 

Professor, International Relations 
Meziani, Abdelhamid, Ph.D. (Rutgers 

University), Professor, Mathematics 
Mi, Jie, Ph.D. (University of 

Pittsburgh), Professor and 

Chairperson, Statistics 
Milani, Masoud, Ph.D. (University of 

Central Florida), Associate 

Professor, School of Computer 

Science 
Milbauer, Asher, Ph.D. (University of 

Washington-Seattle), Associate 

Professor, English 
Mintz, Stephan, Ph.D. (The Johns 

Hopkins University), Professor and 

Chairperson, Physics 
Montgomery, Marilyn, Ph.D. 

(Texas Tech University), Assistant 

Professor, Psychology 
Morcillo, Aurora, Ph.D. (University 

of New Mexico), Associate 

Professor, History and Women 's 

Studies 
Morgan, Dahlia, Diplomate of 

C^oUege Teaching (University of 

Florida), Professor, Art and Art 

History, Director of The Art 

Museum 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 179 



Moran, Gary, Ph.D. (Katholieke 

University, Nijmegan, Netherlands, 

Professor, Psychology 
Moreno, Dario, Ph.D. (University of 

Southern California), Associate 

Professor, Political Science 
Morrow, Betty, Ph.D. (University of 

Miami), Professor Emeritus, 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Mullen, Paul, Ph.D. (University of 

Pittsburgh), Assistant Professor, 

Political Science 
Nadel, Richard, M.S. (Northwestern 

University), Instructor, Mathematics 
Narasimhan, Giri, Ph.D. (University 

of Wisconsin-Madison), Associate 

Professor, School of Computer 

Science 
Narayanan, Rajamani, Ph.D. 

(University of California-Davis), 

Assistant Professor, Physics 
Navlakha, Jainendra, Ph.D. (Case 

Western Reserve University), 

Professor, School of Computer 

Science 
Neal, Leslie, M.A. (Florida State 

University), Associate Professor, 

Theatre and Dance 
Nelson, Brian, Ph.D. (University of 

California-Riverside), Associate 

Professor, Political Science 
Neumann, Roderick P., Ph.D. 

(University of California-Berkeley), 

Associate Professor, International 

Relations 
Northup, Lesley, Ph.D. (Catholic 

University), Associate Professor, 

Religious Studies 
Oberbauer, Steven, Ph.D. (Duke 

University), Professor, Biological 

Sciences 
Ogundiran, Akin, Ph.D. (Boston 

University), Assistant Professor, 

History 
Okubo, Case, Ph.D. (University of 

Guelph), Associate Professor, 

Biological Sciences 
Olsen, Geoffrey, Art Teacher's 

Diploma, (University of Wales, 

U.K.), Associate Professor, Art and 

Art History 
Olson, Richard, Ph.D. (University of 

Oregon), Professor, Political 

Science 
Onuf, Nicholas, Ph.D. (The Johns 

Hopkins University), Professor, 

International Relations 
Orta, Michael, M.A. (University of 

Miami), Assistant Professor, School 

of Music 
O'Nell, Kevin, Ph.D. (University of 

Nebraska), Assistant Professor, 

Psychology 



O'Shea, Kevin E., Ph.D. (University 

of California-Los Angeles), 

Associate Professor, Chemistry 
Parker, Janat, Ph;D. (University of 

California-Berkeley), Professor, 

Psychology and Director of Liberal 

Studies 
Parker, John, Ph.D. (University of 

California-Berkeley), Professor, 

Environmental Studies and 

Chemistry 
Pasztor, Ana, DRN (Darmstadt 

University, West Germany), 

Professor, School of Computer 

Science 
Patrouch, Joseph F., Ph.D. 

(University of California-Berkeley), 

Associate Professor, History 
Patterson, Chauncey, B.M. (The 

Curtis Institute of Music), Miami 

String Quartet-in-Residence, School 

of Music 
Pelin, AJexandru, Ph.D. (University of 

Pennsylvania), Associate Professor, 

School of Computer Science 
Perez, Lisandro, Ph.D. (University of 

Florida), Professor, Sociology/ 

Anthropology, and Director of 

Cuban Research Institute 
Perez-Stable, Marifeli, Ph.D. (State 

University of New York-Stony 

Brook), Professor, 

Sociology/Anthropology 
Pestaina, Norman, M.S. 

(Pennsylvania State University), 

Instructor, School of (Computer 

Science 
Peterson, Brian, Ph.D. (University of 

Wisconsin-Madison), Associate 

Professor, History 
Peterson, Joyce, Ph.D. (University of 

Wisconsin-Madison), Associate 

Professor, History and Associate 

Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 
Phillipi, Thomas, Ph.D. (University of 

Utah), Assistant Professor, 

Biological Sciences 
Pitzer, Thomas, M.S. (Auburn 

University), Instructor, Biological 

Sciences 
Pliske, Thomas, Ph.D. (Cornell 

University), Lecturer, Biological 

Sciences and Environmental Studies 
Power, Timothy, Ph.D. (University of 

Norte Dame), Associate Professor, 

Political Science 
Prabhakaran, Nagarajan, Ph.D. 

(University ofQueenland). 

Associate Professor, School of 

Computer Science 
Price, Patricia, Ph.D. (University of 

Washington), Assistant Professor, 

International Relations 



Price, Rene Mari, Ph.D. (University of 

Miami), Assistant Professor, Earth 

Sciences and Southeast 

Environmental Research Center 
Prugl, Elizabeth, Ph.D. (The 

American University), Associate 

Professor, International Relations 
Pyron, Darden, Ph.D. (University of 

Virginia), Professor, History 
Quirke, Martin, Ph.D. (University of 

Liverpool), Professor, Chemistry 
Rae, Nicol, D.Phil. (Oxford 

University), Professor and 

Chairperson, Political Science 
Rahier, Jean, Ph.D. (University of 

Paris X-Nanterre), Associate 

Professor, Sociology/Anthropology 
Ramsamujh, Taje, Ph.D. (California 

Institute of Technology), Associate 

Professor, Mathematics 
Rand, Gary, Ph.D. (Texas A&M 

University), Associate Professor, 

Environmental Studies and 

Southeast Environmental Research 

Center 
Ratner, Robert, M.A. (University of 

Miami), Instructor, English 
Raue, Brian, Ph.D. (Indiana 

University), Associate Professor, 

Physics 
Rein, Kathleen, Ph.D. (University of 

Miami), Assistant Professor, 

Chemistry 
Reinhold, Jorg, Ph.D., (Technische 

Universitaet Munchen), Assistant 

Professor, Physics 
Reisert, Laura, M.S. (University of 

Florida), Instructor, Statistics 
Rey, Terry, Ph.D. (Temple 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Religious Studies 
Richards, Jennifer, Ph.D. (University 

of California-Berkeley), Professor, 

Biological Sciences 
Richardson, Laurie, Ph.D. 

(University of Oregon), Associate 

Professor, Biological Sciences 
Rishe, Naphtali, Ph.D. (Tel Aviv 

University, Israel), Professor, School 

of Computer Science 
Ritter, David, Ph.D. (Louisiana State 

University), Associate Professor, ■ 

Mathematics 
Robertson, Stewart, Director of Music 

Education (Royal Scottish 

Academy), Professor and Artist-in- 

Residence, School of Music 
Robinson, Keith, B.M. (The Curtis 

Institute of Music), Miami String 

Quartet-in-Residence, School of 

Music 
Robinson, Wayne, M.F.A. (National 

Theatre Conservatory), Associate 

Professor, Theatre and Dance 



180 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Catalog 



Roca, Ana, D.A. (University of 

Miami), Professor, Modern 

Languages 
Rochelson, Meri-Jane, Ph.D. 

(University of Chicago), Associate 

Professor. English 
Rock, Howard, Ph.D. (New York 

University), Professor, History 
Rogerson, Kenneth, Ph.D. (University 

of California-San Diego), Professor, 

Philosophy and Director of 

Humanities 
Rohm, Joseph, Ph.D. (Florida State 

University), Associate Professor, 

School of Music 
Roller, Barbra, Ph.D. (University of 

Pennsylvania), Lecturer, Biological 

Sciences 
Rose, Suzanna, Ph.D. (University of 

Pittsburgh, Professor, Psychology 

and Director of Women 's Studies 
Rosenberg, Gene, Ph.D. (Yale 

University), Associate Chairperson, 

Biological Sciences 
Rosenberg, Mark, Ph.D. (University 

of Pittsburgh), Professor, Political 

Science, and University Provost, 
Rosenthal, Michael, M.S. (University 

of Miami), Instructor, Mathematics 
Rotton, James, Ph.D. (Purdue 

University), Associate Professor, 

Psychology 
Roy, Dev, Ph.D. (University of 

Rochester), Associate Professor, 

Mathematics 
Rubin, Richard, Ph.D. (Washington 

University), Associate Professor, 

Mathematics 
Rukimbira, Philippe, Ph.D. 

(Pennsylvania State University), 

Associate Professor, Mathematics 
Sabucedo, Alberto, Ph.D. (Florida 

International University), Lecturer, 

Forensic Science Programs, 

Chemistry 
Salazar-Carrillo, Jorge, Ph.D. 

(University of California-Berkeley), 

Professor, Economics and Director, 

Center of Economic Research 
Salokar, Rebecca, Ph.D. (Syracuse 

University), Associate Professor, 

Political Science 
Salvador, Miguel, D.M.A. (University 

of Miami), Associate Professor, 

School of Music 
Sanders, Roger, Ph.D. (University of 

Texas- Austin), Research Scientist, 

Biological Sciences 
Sandoval, Arturo, Superior Level 

(National School of Art, Havana, 

Cuba), Professor, School of Music 
Sargsian, Misak, Ph.D. (Yerevan 

Physics Institute), Assistant 

Professor, Physics 



Saxena, Surenda, Ph.D. (University of 

Uppsala, Sweden), Professor, Earth 

Sciences and Director, Center for 

the Study of Matter Under Extreme 

Conditions 
Scattone, Raymond, Ph.D. 

(University of Delaware), Assistant 

Professor, Environmental Studies 
Schriner, Brian, M.A. (University of 

Miami), Instructor, Theatre and 

Dance-Speech Communcation 

Program 
Schwartz, Bennett, Ph.D. (Dartmouth 

College), Associate Professor, 

Psychology 
Schwartz, Richard, Ph.D. (University 

of Chicago), Professor.English 
Seidel, Andrea, D.A. (New York 

University), Associate Professor, 

Theatre and Dance 
Sen, Gautam, Ph.D. (University of 

Texas-Dallas), Professor, Earth 

Sciences and Director, Florida 

Center for Analitical Electron 

Microscopy 
Shapiro, Samuel S., Ph.D. (Rutgers 

University), Professor, Statistics 
Shaw, Gregory, M.S. (Barry 

University), Instructor, School of 

Computer Science 
Sheldon, John, Ph.D. (Texas A&M 

University), Professor, Physics 
Sheriff, Robin, Ph.D. (City University 

of New York), Assistant Professor, 

Sociology/Anthroplogy 
Shershin, Anthony, Ph.D. (University 

of Florida), Associate Professor, 

Mathematics 
Shore, Minna, Ph.D. (Leningrad 

Technical Institute), Instructor, 

Mathematics 
Silverman, Wendy, Ph.D. (Case 

Western Reserve University), 

Professor, Psychology and 

Director, Child and Family 

Psychosocial Research Center 
Silverstein, Ronn, M.A. (Sir George 

Williams University, Montreal), 

Instructor, English 
Simpson, Caroline, Ph.D. (University 

of Florida), Associate Professor, 

Physics 
Skow, Marilyn, M.Ph. (Columbia 

University), Associate Professor, 

Theatre and Dance 
Smith Geoffrey, Ph.D., (Cornell 

University), Associate Professor, 

School of Computer Science 
Smith, Joslyn, M.S. (University of 

New Brunswick), Instructor, School 

of Computer Science 
Smith, Katherine, Ph.D. (University 

of Connecticut), Assistant Professor, 

English 



Smith, Sylvia, Ph.D. (University of 

Miami), Professor, Biological 

Sciences 
Sprechman, Ellen, Ph.D. (University 

of Miami), Lecturer, English 
Stack, John, Jr., Ph.D. (University of 

Denver), Professor, Political 

Science and Director, Institute for 

Public Policy and Citizenship 

Studies 
Standiford, Lester, Ph.D. (University 

of Utah), Professor, English and 

Director, Creative Writing Program 
Stepick, Alex, Ph.D. (University of 

California-Irvine), Professor, 

Sociology/Anthropology and 

Director, Ethnicity and Immigration 

Institute 
Stiebm, Judith, Ph.D. (Columbia 

University), Professor, Political 

Science 
Stier, Oren, Ph.D. (University of 

California-Santa Barbara), 

Assistant Professor, Religious 

Studies 
Stoddard, Philip D., Ph.D. (University 

of Washington), Associate Professor, 

Biological Sciences 
Sugg, Richard, Ph.D. (University of 

Florida). Professor, English 
Sukop, Michael, Ph.D. (University of 

Kentucky), Assistant Professor, 

Earth Sciences 
Sun, Wei, Ph.D. (University of 

Illinois-Chicago Circle), Associate 

Professor, School of Computer 

Science 
Sutton, James M., Ph.D (Yale 

University), Associate Professor, 

English 
Sweet, James, Ph.D. (City University 

of New York), Assistant Professor, 

History 
Syropoulos, Constantinos, Ph.D. 

(Yale University), Associate 

Professor, Economics 
Szuchman, Mark, Ph.D. (University 

of Texas- Austin), Professor, History 

and Associate Dean, College of Arts 

and Sciences 
Tachim Medjo, Tbeordore, Ph.D. 

(University of Paris), Assistant 

Professor, Mathematics 
Tardanico, Richard, Ph.D. (The 

Johns Hopkins University), 

Associate Professor and 

Chariperson, Sociology/ 

Anthropology 
Taylpr, Clarence, Ph.D. (Syracuse 

University), Professor, History 
Tcheugoue Tebou, Louis, Ph.D. (University 

ofMetz, France), Assistant Professor, 

Mathematics 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Arts and Sciences 181 



Thomakos, Dimitrios, Ph. D., (Columbia 

University), Assistant Professor, Economics 
Thompson, Ellen, Ph.D. (University of 

Maryland), Assistant Professor, 

English 
Timlick, Lesley-Ann, M.F.A. 

(University of California-Davis), 

Associate Professor, Theatre and 

Dance 
Torres, Manuel, Ph.D. (University of 

New Mexico), Professor, Art and 

Art History 
Torres-Pou, Juan, Ph.D. (Rutgers 

University), Associate Professor, 

Modern Languages 
Tracey, Martin, Ph.D. (Brown 

University), Professor, Biological 

Sciences 
Trexler, Joel C, Ph.D. (Florida State 

University), Associate Professor, 

Biological Sciences 
Tubman, Jonathan, Ph.D. 

(Pennsylvania State University), 

Associate Professor, Psychology 
Uribe, Victor, Ph.D. (University of 

Pittsburgh), Assistant Professor, 

History 
Van Hamme, Walter, Ph.D. 

(University of Ghent, Belgium), 

Professor, Physics 
Vickers, William, Ph.D. (University of 

Florida), Professor, Sociology/ 

Anthropology 
Villamor, Enrique, Ph.D. 

(Washington University), Professor 

and Chairperson, Mathematics 
Viswesvaran, Chockalingam, Ph.D. 

(University of Iowa), Associate 

Professor, Psychology 
Wagner, Michael J., Ph.D. (Florida 
State University), Professor, Music 

Education, School of Music 
Wakefield, Daniel, B.A. (Columbia 

College), Lecturer and Writer-in- 

Residence, English 
Walker, Charlyne, Ph.D. (Barry 

University), Instructor, School of 

Computer Science and Director of 

Educational Technology, Dean 's 

Office 
Walker III, William, Ph.D. 

(University of California-Santa 

Barbara), Professor, History 
Wang, Tao, Ph.D. (The Johns 

Hopkins University), Assistant 

Professor, Economics 
Wang, Xuewen, Ph.D. (Iowa State 
University), Associate Professor, 

Physics 
Warren, Christopher, D.A. (Lehigh 
University), Associate Professor, 

Political Science 
Warren, Paul, Ph.D. (University of 
Wisconsin-Madison), Associate 



Professor, Philosophy 
Watson, Donald, Ph.D. (University of 

Virginia), Professor, English 
Watson-Espener, Maida, Ph.D. 

(University of Florida), Professor 

and Chairperson, Modern 

Languages 
Watts, Barbara, Ph.D. (University of 

Virginia), Associate Professor, 

Art and Art History 
Webb, James, Ph.D. (University of 

Florida), Associate Professor, 

Physics 
Weeks, Ophelia, Ph.D. (Howard 

University), Associate Professor, 

Biological Sciences 
Weir, Donna, Ph.D. (University of 

California-Berkeley), Assistant 

Professor, English 
Weiss, Mark, Ph.D. (Princeton), 

Professor, School of Computer 

Science 
Weitz, Barbara, M.S. (Florida 

International University), Instructor, 

English 
Welch, Marcelle, Ph.D. (University of 

Michigan), Professor, Modern 

Languages and Associate Director 

of Liberal Studies 
West, Lois, Ph.D. University of 

California-Berkeley), Associate 

Professor, Sociology/ Anthropology 
Whitman, Dean, Ph.D. (Cornell 

University), Associate Professor, 

Earth Sciences 
Wilkins, Mira, Ph.D. (University of 

Cambridge), Professor, Economics 
Willumsen, Maria, Ph.D. (Cornell 

University), Associate Professor, 

Economics 
Winkle, Stephen, Ph.D. (University of 

California-Berkeley), Associate 

Professor, Chemistry 
Wnuk, Stanislaw, Ph.D. (Adam 

Michiewicz University, Poland), 

Associate Professor and 

Chairperson, Chemistry 
Wolfe, Gregory Baker, Ph.D. (The 

Fletcher School of Law and 

Diplomacy), Professor Emeritus, 

International Relations 
Wood, Kirsten, Ph.D. (University of 

Pennsylvania), Assistant Professor, 

History 
Yavas, Feryal, Ph.D. (University of 

Kansas), Lecturer, English and 

Director, Linguistics 
Yavas, Mehmet, Ph.D. (University of 

Kansas), Professor, English 
Young, Craig, M.F.A. (Virginia 

Technological University), Assistant 

Professor, Department of Theatre 

and Dance 



Yudin, Florence, Ph.D. (University of 

Illinois), Professor, Modem 

Languages 
Zahedi-Jasbi, Hassan, Ph.D. 

(University of California- Riverside), 

Associate Professor, Statistics 
Zaikikar, Jyoti N., Ph.D. (University 

of California-Santa Barbara). 

Associate Professor, Statistics 
Zarger, Rebecca, Ph.D. (University of 

Georgia), Assistant Professor, 

Environmental Studies 
Zhang, Chi, M.S. (Northeastern 

University), Instructor, School of 

Computer Science 
Zhang, Jiandi, Ph.D. (Syracuse 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Physics 
Zhu, Yifu, Ph.D. (University of 

Virginia), Associate Professor, 

Physics 
Zweibel, John, Ph.D. (Columbia 

University), Associate Professor, 

Mathematics 



182 Graduate Catalog 



Oraduate Catalog College of Business Administration 183 



College of 

Business 

Administration 



184 College of Business Administrarion 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Business Administration 
Alvah H. Chapman, Jr., Graduate School of Business 



Mission Statement 

The Chapman School in the College 
of Business Administration exists to 
create enduring educational value for 
our students, for our alumni, and for 
the business, professional, and 
academic communities we serve. 
For our students — whom we prepare to 
succeed in a rapidly changing, tech- 
nology-driven global business environ- 
ment; 

For our alumni — to whom we provide 
opportunities for continuing profes- 
sional development and a legacy that 
appreciates as our excellence grows; 
For the business and professional 
communities— to whom we offer 
knowledgeable graduates, educational 
programs, research, and collaborative 
projects; 

For the academic community — to 
whom we bring new knowledge 
through high-quality research and the 
development of future scholars. 

The Alvah H. Chapman Jr., 
Graduate Business School is a school 
distinguished among urban public 
business schools as a center for global 
business education, technology, and 
research. Our most noteworthy 
teaching and research expertise lies in 
the business arenas linking South 
Florida, Latin America, and the world 
economy. 

The College itself offers 
undergraduate, graduate, professional 
education, customized training, and 
several certification programs to 
traditional and nontraditional students 
and to enterprises around the world. 
While continuing to meet the needs of 
students in the South Florida com- 
munity, we are intensifying our 
educational service delivery to interna- 
tional students and enterprises, 
especially those in Latin America. 

In all of our programs, we strive to 
instill in students a profound 
understanding of the changing nature 
of international business in an 
integrated and digital global economy. 
We ensure they are well versed in the 
impact information technology is 
having on how enterprises are 
organized and managed and on how 
products and services are created and 
marketed. We provide them with a 
solid grasp of business processes, the 



ability to think critically and to solve 
problems ethically, and the sense to 
conduct themselves with integrity and 
within the context of social and 
environmental responsibility. We foster 
their commitment to life-long learning 
in a dynamic, complex, and competitive 
world. 

Our faculty engage in basic and 
applied research and in instructional 
development to contribute not only to 
the general knowledge base in the field 
of business but also to the ways in 
which this knowledge is created and 
shared. The College boasts a state-of- 
the-art information technology infra- 
structure that enables us to provide 
leading edge instruction and research, 
including online course delivery. At the 
same time, our IT investment supports 
our ongoing curricular innovation in 
related fields like enterprise-wide 
computing and logistics. 

Organization 

The College is organized into the 
Alvah H. Chapman, Jr., Graduate 
School of Business, the School of 
Accounting and the Departments of 
Decision Sciences and Information 
Systems, Finance, Management and 
International Business, and Marketing. 

The College also houses several 
centers of excellence dedicated to 
teaching, research, and service. These 
include the Jerome Bain Real Estate 
Institute, the Ryder Center for Supply 
Chain Systems, the Knight Ridder 
Center for Excellence in Management, 
the Center for Management 
Development/Office of Professional 
Education, and the Center for 
International Business Education and 
Research. 
Degree Programs 

The College of Business Administra- 
tion (CBA) offers academic programs 
leading to the undergraduate degrees of 
Bachelor of Business Administration 
(BBA) and Bachelor of Accounting 
(BAcc) and to the graduate degrees of 
Master of Accounting (MAcc), Master 
of International Business (MIB) Master 
of Business Administration (MBA), 
Master of Science in Finance (MSF), 
Master of Science in Management with 
a track in Information Systems 
(MSMIS), Master of Science in 



Taxation (MST), Executive Master of 
Science in Taxation (EMST), Master of 
Science in Management with a Human 
Resources Track (MSM-HR), and 
Doctor of Philosophy in Business 
Administration (Ph.D.). 

Master's Degree Programs 

Admission Requirements 

To be eligible for admission to a 
Master's degree program in the 
Chapman School, students must: 

1. Meet the general University re- 
quirements for admission to a graduate 
degree program; 

2. Hold a Bachelor's degree fi-om an 
accredited college or university; 

3. Show high promise of success in 
graduate studies as determined by the 
faculty based upon a combination of 
the Graduate Management Admission 
Test (GMAT) score or the Graduate 
Record Exam (GRE) score and the 
upper-division grade point average 
(GPA); 

4. If applicant is an international 
student whose native language is not 
English, he/she must have a minimum 
score of 550 on the paper-based 
TOEFL, 213 on the computer-based 
TOEFL, or an equivalent score on a 
comparable examination. [Students 
should study the "General Admission" 
requirements for foreign students in the 
"Admissions" section of this catalog]; 

5. Be in good standing with all 
previously-attended colleges and 
universities. 

Additional requirements vary by the 
degree program. 
Application Procedures 

To apply for admission to graduate 
study in the Chapman School, 
prospective students must: 

1 . Submit a Graduate Application for 
Admission to the University's Graduate 
Admissions Office. Application forms 
will be mailed upon request or can be 
downloaded fi-om the Internet at 
( www. fiu.edu/gTadadm) . The on-line 
application can also be accessed 
through this address. The admission 
process may take as long as two months 
after the University receives a student's 
application, depending upon the time 
involved in obtaining transcripts and 
test scores. Students are encouraged to 
apply early. 



Graduate Catalog 



2. Have a copy of the official 
transcripts of all previously-earned 
college or university credits sent from 
the formeriy-attended institution(s) to 
the University's Graduate Admissions 
Office. Copies submitted directly by 
student applicants will not be accepted. 

3. Submit scores on the Graduate 
Management Admissions Test (GMAT) 
or Graduate Record Examin-ation 
(ORE), administered by the 
Educational Testing Service (ETS), 
Box 966, Princeton, New Jersey 08540. 
Scores must be submitted by the ETS. 
Registration forms will be mailed upon 
request. Have the ETS submit TOEFL 
scores as well, if applicable. 

For additional requirements, consult 
individual program offices listed 
below. 

Readmission 

Students who are pursuing a 
graduate degree in the Chapman School 
but who have not completed any course 
at the University for three consecutive 
semesters (including summer) must 
apply for readmission. If readmitted, 
such students must comply with the 
University's and Chapman School's 
degree program requirements in effect 
at the time of readmission. 

Transfer Credit 

A student may receive permission to 
transfer up to a maximum of six 
semester hours of graduate credit 
towards his/her degree program, if: 

1) The courses were taken at the 
graduate level at an accredited 
college or university; 

2) The courses were not introductory 
or survey in nature; 

3) The student earned grades of "B" 
or higher in the courses; 

4) The courses are judged by the 
Department Chair, College Dean, 
Graduate School Dean, and 
program manager to be relevant to 
the student's graduate program; 

5) The credits were not used toward 
another degree; and 

6) The credits were completed within 
six years immediately preceding 
the College's awarding of the 
degree. 

Credits are not transferable until the 
student has eamed 1 5 semester hours in 
a Chapman School graduate degree 
program. 

Change of Program 

The graduate student who wishes to 
change his or her graduate program of 
study must submit a "Graduate Change 



College of Business Administration 185 



of Program" request to the Graduate 
Admissions Office and meet the 
admission and degree program 
requirements in effect at the time of the 
change. 

Degree Requirements 

To be eligible for a Master's degree, 
a student must: 

1. Satisfy all University require- 
ments for a Master's degree; 

2. Satisfy required prerequisites; 

3. Meet the requirements of his or 
her graduate "Course of Study." This 
"Course of Study" is developed by the 
student and his or her graduate advisor 
or degree program director following 
his or her admission to a program and 
is approved by the appropriate 
Department Chair, Academic Advisor, 
or Program Director. 

4. Complete the required courses in 
the specific graduate program in which 
he/she is enrolled. 

5. Earn a minimum average of "B" 
(3.0) in all approved courses in the 
student's approved course of graduate 
study. 

No courses in which a graduate 
student earns a grade below"C" may be 
counted towards any Master's degree 
program in the Chapman School. 
However, all approved undergraduate 
and graduate course work a graduate 
student takes will be counted in 
computing his or her grade point 
average, including courses in which he 
or she has eamed a "D" or "F" grade. 
To improve a grade, please refer to the 
University Forgiveness Policy under 
General Information. 

Faculty have the discretion to 
administratively drop students who do 
not attend the first class of a course. 

Time Limit 

All work applicable to a Master's 
degree, including transfer credit, must 
be completed within six years 
immediately preceding the awarding of 
the degree. 

Study Abroad Programs 

Graduate students in the College may 
earn a maximum of three (3) credit- 
hours for study abroad programs unless 
otherwise prescribed by their degree 
program. 

Scholarships 

The Chapman Graduate School of 
Business has set aside funds from 
operations and donations to the School 
to support a limited program of partial 
scholarships destined to cover tuition 



and fees for our Intemational MBA, 
Master of Intemational Business, and 
other value-added Master's degree 
programs. These scholarships are 
highly selective and intended to further 
academic achievements. Interested 
students and candidates should address 
a letter indicating their circumstances 
to EUie Browner, Director of 
Admissions and Student Services, 
Chapman Graduate School of Business, 
University Park, Miami, FL 33199. 
Priority will be given to students who 
are admitted to one of our programs 
and who exhibited extraordinary 
academic merit in addition to financial 
hardship. 

Master of Business 
Administration (MBA) 

The College offers four programs 
leading to the MBA degree. Each 
program is designed to meet different 
student needs. TTie MBA programs are: 
the Evening MBA, the Executive 
MBA, the Intemational MBA, and the 
Global (E)M.B.A. for Managers in the 
Americas. 

An overview of each of these 
programs is provided below. For 
specific degree requirements in each 
program, please contact the program 
office or director. 

Evening Master of Business 
Administration (EVEMBA) 

The Evening Master of Business 
Administration (EVEMBA) program is 
designed to give students a general 
management education and to help 
them prepare for advancement in their 
business careers. Since it is an evening 
program, it is especially valuable for 
those students who work fiill-time 
during the daytime hours. 

The Evening MBA program offers 
courses four evenings — Monday 
through Thursday — per week. Classes 
are held on the College's University 
Park campus. The Professional 
Development Seminars are offered on 
Saturdays in the Fall and Spring terms. 

Students may take up to four regular 
courses and a Professional Develop- 
ment Seminar per semester, though the 
majority of students opt to take two 
courses and a Professional Develop- 
ment Seminar per semester and 
generally earn their MBA degree in 
about three years. Students also must 
own or have access to a laptop or 
desktop computer with a specified 
configuration. 



186 College of Business Administration 



Graduate Catalog 



For additional information about the 
Evening MBA program, please contact 
the program manager, at (305) 348- 
3256 or address your inquiry to 
eveniba(a)fiu.edu 

Executive Master of Business 
Administration (EMBA) 

The Executive Master of Business 
Administration (EMBA) degree 
program, designed for working bus- 
iness professionals, delivers a total 
graduate education experience prepar- 
ing students for new and expanding 
responsibilities as senior-level funct- 
ional or general managers. It is a 
rigorous, tuition-plus-fees program that 
is limited to a select number of 
qualified students. 

Program participants earn their MBA 
degree without interrupting their 
careers. Structured so that all require- 
ments can be completed in twenty-one 
months, the program is offered on three 
Saturdays and one Friday per month at 
two South Florida locations the Roz 
and Cal Kovens Conference Center on 
the Biscayne Bay Campus and at FIU- 
Pembroke Pines. 

For additional information about this 
value-added program, call the EMBA 
office at (305) 348-1036 or email 
emba(a)fiu.edu 

International Master of 
Business Administration 
(IMBA) 

The IMBA (International MBA) 
degree program features an MBA 
curriculum with an international busi- 
ness focus. This value-added program 
has been especially designed for 
students/working professionals inter- 
ested in pursuing their international 
business careers. For students from 
outside the U.S., it represents an 
opportunity to prepare for executive 
positions in the U.S. as well as in other 
parts of the world. For students in the 
U.S. who would like to assume busi- 
ness leadership in international busi- 
nesses, it provides an integrated per- 
spective of international business issues 
and the knowledge they need to suc- 
ceed in a rapidly evolving, global eco- 
nomy. 

Given the Chapman School's Miami 
location and expertise in Latin 
American and Caribbean business, the 
program is particularly valuable for 
those who want to secure executive 
positions in The Americas. 



The IMBA program incorporates 
these unique features: 

• An intensive MBA curriculum that 
can be completed in 12 months 

• Day-time classes five days per 
week 

• Global and multicultural perspec- 
tive throughout 

• Language classes in Spanish, 
Portuguese, and French 

• Personal assistance in securing 
internships and full-time positions 
upon graduation 

• Opportunity to participate in study 
abroad programs and attend 
university seminars on global 
business issues 

• Frequent interaction with senior 
executives involved in interna- 
tional business 

For more detailed information about 
the IMBA program, please contact the 
program manager, at (305) 348-6880 or 
by email imbafeifiu.edu 

Global Executive MBA 
(GEMBA) for Managers in 
The Americas 

The Global (E)MBA is designed to 
give experienced business profession- 
als a focused, convenient, and intensive 
MBA experience that provides a 
thorough and in-depth understanding of 
what it will take for business 
enterprises to succeed in the highly- 
competitive, technology-enabled and 
fast-paced global economy of the 2P' 
century. It is structured specifically to 
meet the needs of managers who now 
work full-time in companies in Latin 
America or in the Latin American 
offices of multinational corporations. 
Because it combines brief residency 
sessions in Miami with Internet- 
facilitated instruction, it offers a con- 
venient way for participants to earn 
their MBA while continuing to fulfill 
their ongoing work and travel commit- 
ments throughout The Americas. 

The Global (E)MBA builds on those 
features of our Executive MBA 
program which have proven to be 
particularly valuable to managers in 
The Americas, emphasizing the 
strategic and tactical issues facing Latin 
American business operations within a 
global context and the ways recent 
developments like e-commerce, global 
supply chain management, and strategic 
alliances can be used for competitive 
advantage. Faculty in the program offer 
their own unique perspectives based on 
their international educational and 



consulting experiences, their work with 
the many multinationals whose Latin 
American headquarters are in Miami, 
and their familiarity with the largely 
Latin and international student body at 
the university itself 

A top-notch curriculum, expert 
faculty, and the diversity of the 
participants themselves help ensure that 
the program creates a rich learning 
environment for everyone involved. 
Key features of the program include — 

♦ It's an intensive, thirteen-month 
program of study. 

♦ It capitalizes on faculty and 
participants' varying perspec- 
tives, backgrounds, and busi- 
ness experiences globally and in 
Latin America. 

♦ It combines five residency 
sessions in Miami with Internet- 
based coursework and team 
projects. 

♦ Its capstone, entrepreneurial 
strategy simulation, exclusively 
designed for the MBA program, 
culminates in the presentation 
of business proposals to venture 
capitalists. 

♦ It provides a high level of per- 
sonal service, including individ- 
ual instruction and leadership 
development 

For more information, prospective 
applicants should contact the program 
manager at (305) 348-3131 or email 
gemba(i7)fiu.edu . 

Master of International 
Business (MIB) 

The Master of Intemational Business 
(MIB) degree is designed for students 
who want to pursue a career in the 
dynamic global business environment. 
Specifically, it is tailored to meet the 
needs of business professionals who 
want to participate in a U.S. -based 
graduate business program that 
provides a global, supply-chain-system 
perspective; who have an 
undergraduate business degree and are 
in the early stages of their professional 
careers; who have good English 
language skills but want to improve 
their fluency in a business context; and 
who expect to assume progressively 
higher levels of management 
responsibility in their firms. 

The global character of the MIB 
program is inherent in its curriculum 
and in the multinatior.ality of the 
students enrolled in it. Because they 
move through the program as a group. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Business Administration 187 



students continually share and ieam 
from their diverse perspectives and 
experiences. In addition to the 
international business expertise of its 
faculty, the program features lectures 
and seminars by multinational, foreign, 
and U.S.-based corporate business 
leaders. Its key features include — 

♦ Day part-time, full-time and 
evening program options 

♦ A focus on the emerging global 
system and its multinational 
business implications 

♦ An emphasis on supply chain 
management 

♦ Information technology and e- 
commerce 

♦ Workshop in accounting review 

♦ Includes participation in 
seminars, conferences and field 
trips conducted by the Knight 
Ridder Center for Excellence in 
Management and the Ryder 
Center for Supply Chain 
Systems 

♦ Incorporates participation in 
projects that bring the best 
minds from industry, govern- 
ment, and academia together to 
focus on hemispheric and 
global supply-chain systems 
efficiencies 

♦ A high level of personal service 
and support 

MIB students also benefit from 
studying in South Florida, particularly 
since Miami is a major center for 
international trade and finance and a 
gateway linking the Americas to the 
world. 

For more information about this 
program, please contact the program 
director at (305) 348-3279 or by email 
mib(fl! fiu.edu 

Other Master's Programs 

The professional master's degree 
programs are described in the 
^propriate departmental pages. 
Master of Accounting; Executive 
Master of Science in Taxation; Master 
of Science in Finance; Master of 
Science in Management Information 
Systems and Master of Science in 
Management with a Human Resources 
Track. 

Ph.D. Program 

The Chapman School offers a Ph.D. 
in Business Administration. The 
objective of this degree program is to 
prepare students for a career in 
academia by building their 
understanding of the substantive 



domains and literature within their 
selected areas of concentration. It 
provides them with the methodological 
and analytical tools required for 
executing research and creating 
knowledge. It develops their skills in 
formulating, conducting, and commun- 
icating quality research. In the process, 
it also fosters their ability to teach 
effectively. 

The Ph.D. program typically requires 
four years of fijil-time study: two-and- 
a-half years of coursework and summer 
projects and a year-and-a-half of 
dissertation research. Students will take 
a minimum of 16 courses (with a 
minimum of six courses in their chosen 
area of concentration). Students also 
will complete summer research projects 
under faculty supervision. 

Areas of Concentration 

Information Systems 

Marketing 

Finance 

Admission Requirements 

All qualified students are encouraged 
to apply to the program, regardless of 
their sex, age, race, color, creed, 
handicap, marital status, or national or 
ethnic origin. Applications are accepted 
from prospective students with a broad 
variety of educational backgrounds, 
including areas like business, liberal 
arts, and the sciences. Those students 
selected for the Ph.D. program must 
demonsfrate sfrong evidence of ability, 
scholarly interest, and success. Appli- 
cants should submit the following: 

1. A completed application form and 
processing fee. 

2. Three letters of recommendation. 

3. Official transcripts from all 
institutions in which the applicant has 
completed any undergraduate and 
graduate course work. Applicants are 
expected to have at least a 3.0 GPA in 
their coursework. 

4. A report from the Educational 
Testing Service giving the applicant's 
score on the Graduate Management 
Admissions Test (GMAT). Entering 
students are expected to score a 
minimum of 570 on the GMAT. 

5. A formal statement of purpose for 
seeking the doctoral degree and 
specific reasons for applying to Florida 
International University. 

6. If applicant is an international 
student whose native language is one 
other than English, an official report of 
his or her score on the TOEFL from the 
Educational Testing Service. A 
minimum score of 570 (230 on 



computer-based test) is expected. Such 
applicants also should review the 
"General Admission Requirements for 
Foreign Students" in the "Admission" 
section of this catalog. 

The College admits a new class of 
doctoral students every other year 
during the Fall semester. 
Complete applications must be received 
by March 1. Acceptance decisions 
typically will be made in April. 

Applicants are considered once all 
the required documents have been 
received. 

Degree Requirements 

General degree requirements for all 
candidates for a Ph.D. in Business 
Administration include: 

1. Successful completion of all re- 
quired coursework. 

2. Successful completion of a com- 
prehensive examination at the end of 
this coursework. 

3. Successfiil completion of a doc- 
toral dissertation. 

Financial Aid 

Applicants to the doctoral program 
may request financial aid by com- 
pleting the appropriate form. Stipends 
requiring a mixture of research and 
teaching are available. These stipends 
may include both a cash award and a 
tuition waiver, depending upon the 
applicant's qualifications. 

Note: The programs, policies, require- 
ments, and regulations listed in this 
catalog are subject to continual review 
in order to meet the needs of the 
University's various publics and to 
respond to the mandates of the State 
Board of Education and the Florida 
Legislature. Changes may be made 
without advance notice. Please refer to 
the "General Information" section of 
this catalog for the University'? 
policies, requirements, and regulations. 



188 College of Business Ad ministration 

School of Accounting 

Dana A. Forgione, Professor 

and Director 
Rolf Auster, Professor 
Delano H. Berry, Lecturer 
Lucia Chang, Professor Emeritus 
Lewis F. Davidson, Professor 
Manuel Dieguez, Lecturer and 

Associate Director 
Mort DIttenhoffer, Professor 

Emeritus 
Donald W. Fair, Lecturer and 

Associate Dean 
Gcorgina Garcia, Lecturer 
Wendy Gelman, Lecturer 
C. Delano Gray, Lecturer and 
Program Manager, EMSTand 
MACC 
Rosalie C. Hallbauer, Associate 

Professor 
Kenneth Henry, Visiting Lecturer 
David Lavin, Associate Professor 
Chlh-Chen Lee, Assistant Professor 
Peter Manheimer, Lecturer 
Kenneth S. Most, Professor Emeritus 
Robert R. Oliva, Professor 
Michael J. Prietula, Ryder Systems 

Eminent Scholar Chair 
Kannan Raghunandan, Professor 
Dasaratha V. Rama, Professor 
Leonardo Rodriguez, Pro/eirar 
Ena Rose-Green, Visiting Assistant 

Professor 
Krishnamurthy Surysekar, Assistant 

Professor 
Clark Wheatley, Associate Professor 
John Wrieden, Distinguished Senior 

Lecturer 
Harold Wyman, Professor Emeritus 

Purpose 

The mission of the School of 
Accounting is: 

• To provide students with an up-to- 
date education in professional 
accounting with due attention to 
its quality and timeliness in light 
of a marketing and regulatory 
environment continually being 
affected by rapid changes in 
technology. 

• To provide the professional com- 
munity in government, industry, 
and public accounting with 
graduates who are exceptionally 
well qualified professionals at 
various levels and who will have 
mastered the techniques necessary 
to manage in a climate of dynamic 
change. 

• To create a positive climate for 
students to develop their ethical 



Graduate Catalog 



value system and a commitment to 
life-long learning. 

• To promote pure, applied, and 
instructional research which 
expands the boundaries of 
knowledge, supports the work of 
practitioners, and welds the latest 
research results to the latest 
teaching techniques. 

• To support and recognize the 
development of the faculty 
regarding their teaching, research 
and service responsibilities. 

• To support the accounting and 
other professions in South Florida 
and elsewhere with life-long 
learning via short courses, confer- 
ences, and published materials 
designed to hone practitioners' 
skills in the latest technical and 
professional developments and in 
recognizing environmental trends 
that may affect fiiture practices. 

• To provide meaningful knowledge 
of professional accounting con- 
cepts and information to other 
academic and professional disci- 
plines. 

• To support the mission and 
objectives established by the 
College of Business Administra- 
tion and to foster the design and 
implementation of the Univer- 
sity's strategic and tactical plans. 

Master's Degree Programs 

The School of Accounting offers 
three graduate degree programs: Master 
of Accounting, Master of Science in 
Taxation, and Executive Master of 
Science in Taxation. The programs are 
designed for students who have 
completed an undergraduate degree in 
accounting, or the equivalent, from a 
regionally accredited college or 
university. The Director of the School 
of Accounting will determine the 
equivalency of students' undergraduate 
degrees. 

Students whose undergraduate 
degress are in majors other than 
accounting will be required to make up 
for any business and/or accounting 
deficiencies. The Director of the 
School must approve programs of study 
for students seeking to correct such 
deficiencies. 

All students taking graduate 
accounting and tax courses must be 
fiiUy admitted to one of the graduate 
accounting programs or have written 
permission from the Director of the 
School. Registration for all such course 
work must be made through the 



appropriate College advisor, whose 
signature, along with the School's 
stamp, must be attached to the 
registration packet. 
Special Program Requirements 

A student with a degree in business 
who is admitted into the Master of 
Accounting (MACC) program may be 
required to complete up to 8 
accounting pre-core courses (24 credit 
hours), to be selected from the 
following three credit-hour courses: 
ACQ 4 1 1 Financial Accounting 1 
ACQ 4111 Financial Accounting 11 
ACQ 4201 Financial Accounting 111 
ACG 465 1 Auditing 
ACQ 4401 Accounting Information 

Systems 
ACG 4341 Management 

Accounting and Control 
BUL 4320 Business Law 1 
BUL4321 Business Law II 
TAX 400 1 Income Tax Accounting 
TAX 4011 Taxation of 

Corporations and 
Partnerships 
A student with a non-business degree 
who is admitted to this program will be 
required to complete, in addition to the 
pre-core courses listed above, the core 
courses for the Evening M.B.A. 
program or equivalent undergraduate 
courses. MAN 6726 (Sfrategic 
Management) must be taken under 
either option. 

Master of Accounting 
(MACC) 

The Master of Accounting degree 
program prepares students for a career 
in accounting. For those already 
pursuing such a career or who are 
seeking to change careers to one in 
accounting, the program offers 
excellent preparation as well. The 
program satisfies the 30 semester hours 
beyond a Bachelor's degree required 
for the CPA examination. 

Depending on a student's interests, 
he or she will prepare for a variety of 
careers: 

Careers 

Financial Independent 

Accounting/ Accountant 

Auditing in public 

accounting 



Systems 



Accounting systems, 
consultant, auditor, 
corporate officer, or 
public accountant 



Graduate Catalog 

Internal Auditing Internal auditor, industry 
or government 

Corporate Internal accountant 

Management or corporate officer 

Accounting 

Students interested in sitting for the 
CPA examination must include law and 
36 hours of accounting as required by 
the Florida Statute. 

Degree Requirements 

Students pursuing a MACC with any 
of the concentrations listed above must 
complete the following requirements: 

Accounting Core 

ACG 6135 Seminar in Financial 

Accounting Theory I 
ACG 6657 Environment of 

Accounting and 

Auditing 
ACG 6437 Advanced Accounting 

Information Systems 
Unless approved in advance by the 
Director of the School, these required 
courses cannot be transferred. 

Electives 

Eiectives (seven courses) must be 
selected from the following two groups 
of courses: 

1 . No more than two courses from 
this list: 

TAX 6065 Tax Research Practice 

and Procedure 
TAX 6105 Taxation of 

Corporations I 
TAX 6205 Partnership Taxation 

2. Additional 6000-level courses, 
approved by the Director, School of 
Accounting, with a minimum of four 
courses (12 credit hours) in a single 
concentration selected from a) financial 
accounting/auditing; b) systems; c) 
internal auditing; or d) corporate/man- 
agement accounting 

Curriculum is currently under revision. 
Please contact the School of 
Accounting for further information. 

Master of Science in 
Taxation (MST) 

The Master of Science in Taxation 
program prepares students for entry and 
advancement in the specialized area of 
taxation. The program satisfies the 30 
semester hours beyond a Bachelor's 
degree required for the CPA 
examination. 

The Director of the School of 
Accounting must approve students' 
programs of study. 



College of Business Administration IS 



Degree Requirements 

Tax Core 12 hours 

Electives 1 8 hours 

Tax Core 

TAX 6065 Tax Research Practice 

and Procedure 
TAX 6105 Taxation of 

Corporations I 
TAX 6405 Estate and Gift Taxation 
TAX 6875 Current Developments 

in Taxation 

Electives 

Six additional 6000-level courses ap- 
proved by the Director, School of 
Accounting, three of which must be tax 
courses (excluding TAX 6005, and 
TAX 6935). 

Note: Students admitted to the MST 
program who wish to sit for the CPA 
exam and who are required to complete 
deficiencies in undergraduate account- 
ing by completing the accounting pre- 
core courses are not required to take 
TAX 4001, Income Tax, as part of the 
Accounting Pre-Core. 
For additional information about the 
program, contact Robert R. Oliva, 
program manager, (305) 348-2582 or 
email olivartfljfiu.edu . 

Florida CPA Requirement 

Completing a Bachelor of Business 
Administration with a concentration in 
Accounting does not alone meet the 
Florida State Board of Accountancy re- 
quirements for the CPA exam. With a 
carefully-planned program of study, a 
student who earns either a MACC or an 
MST will be qualified to sit for the 
CPA exam and, upon completing it 
successfiilly, will be certified in the 
State of Florida. There is no additional 
experience requirement. 

New Master of Accounting 
(MACC), value-added 
track 

New Master of Accounting (MACC), 
value-added track, is a special 10- 
month, 10-course program tailored to 
address the needs of working 
professionals who wish to obtain the 
degree in an accelerated time span. 
The program is also designed to satisfy 
the additional 30 semester hours 
beyond the bachelor's degree for the 
CPA examination. For additional 
information about the program, contact 
the program manager at (305) 348- 
4208. 



Executive Master of Science 
in Taxation (EMST) 

The Executive Master of Science in 
Taxation (EMST) degree program is a 
special, 10-course, two-year program 
tailored to address the needs of 
working professionals who wish to 
obtain the degree in a flexible time 
span. The program, which is a tuition- 
plus-fee offering, is also designed to 
satisfy the additional 30 semester hours 
beyond the Bachelor's degree for the 
CPA examination. 

For additional information about this 
program, contact the program manager, 
at (305) 348-4208. 



190 College of Business Administration 



Graduate Catalog 



Decision Sciences and 
Information Systems 

Christos P. Koulamas, Professor and 

Chair 
Dinesh Batra, Associate Professor 
Stylianos Drakatos, Visiting Lecturer 
Joyce J. Elam, Professor, James L. 

Knight Eminent Scholar, and 

Executive Dean 
S. Christopher Ellis, Instructor 
Irma Becerra Fernandez, Assistant 

Professor 
Sushil K. Gupta, Professor 
Faisal Kaleem, Instructor 
Gerard Klonarides, Visiting 

Instructor 
Kuldeep Kumar, Professor and 

Ryder Eminent Scholar 
George J. Kyparisis, Professor 
Yair Levy, Instructor and Online 
Learning Project Manager 
Cherie Long, Assistant Professor 
Tomislav Mandakovic, Professor 
Ligia Mintchev, Instructor 
Kenneth E. Murphy, Assistant 

Professor 
Jose Noguera, Assistant Professor 
Manoel Oliveira, Instructor and 

Director of Technology 
Larry A. Smith, Associate Professor 
Duane Truex, Assistant Professor 
Tei-Wei Wang, Assistant Professor 
Nicole Wishart, Instructor 
Ann Xia, Visiting Professor 
Steve H. Zanakis, Professor 
Peter J. Zegan, Instructor 

Purpose 

With the rapid decrease in informa- 
tion technology cost/benefit ratios, the 
advancement of graphical user inter- 
faces, and the development of the 
Internet, information systems have 
become ubiquitous and strategic. 

Students in the information systems 
concentrations use new or existing 
research methods to help understand 
the ways in which contemporary 
organizations design, employ, and 
manage information systems. 

Students in our graduate programs 
learn the intellectual frameworks and 
methods used in areas like systems 
analysis and design (including object- 
oriented applications), database man- 
agement, decision support systems 
(including data warehousing), global 
electronic commerce, enterprise-wide 
information systems, and information 
systems management. 

The Department of Decision 
Sciences and Information Systems 



offers a Master of Science in 
Management-Information Systems 
(MSMIS) and a concentration in the 
Ph.D. program. 

Master of Science in 
Management Information 
Systems (MSMIS) 

The Master of Science in 
Management Information Systems 
(MSMIS) program is a selective, 
limited-access, value-added program in 
which students proceed as a cohort 
through a lock-step curriculum 
designed to maximize their learning 
experience. 

The program is structured in six 
"blocks" or sessions, with each session 
consisting of two courses and lasting 
about eight weeks. Classes meet on 
Saturdays for a full day. To complete 
this 36 credit-hour program success- 
fully, students must maintain a B 
average (3.0 GPA). 

For additional information, please 
contact the program manager at (305) 
348-6452 or visit www.fiu.edu/~msis 

MIS Concentration in the 
Ph.D. Program 

The Department of Decision 
Sciences and Information Systems 
offers a Management Information 
Systems (MIS) concentration in the 
doctoral program in Business 
Administration. The concentration 
requires completion of the following 
six courses (18 credit-hours): 
ISM 7935 Foundations of IS 

Research 
ISM 7306 Seminar on Strategy and 

Information Resource 
COP 7545 File and Database 

Systems 
ISM 7 1 26 Seminar on Systems 

Analysis 
ISM 7406 Decision Support 

Systems 
ISM 7xxx Enterprise Information 

Systems 
Please contact the Department Chair 
for further requirements and details. 



Graduate Catalog 



Finance 

William Welch, Associate Professor 

and Chair 
Gary Anderson, Associate Professor 
Joel Barber, Associate Professor 
Robert Bear, Professor 
Gerald O. Bierwag, Ryder 

Professor 
Chun-Hao Chang, Associate 

Professor 
Robert T. Daigler, Professor 
Krisbnan Dandapani, Professor 
Brice Dupoyet, Assistant Professor 
Shahid Hamid, Associate Professor 

and Faculty Director, MSF 

Program 
James Keys, Instructor 
Suchismata Mishra, Assistant 

Professor 
Raul Moncarz, Professor and Vice 

Provost, Academic Affairs 
All M. Parhizgari, Professor 
Anin Prakash, Professor 
John S. Zdanowicz, Professor and 

Director, Center for Banking and 

Financial Institutions, and Director, 

Jerome Bain Real Estate Institute 

Purpose 

The Department of Finance's 
graduate program seeks to extend and 
deepen students' understanding of 
finance in both its theoretical and 
practical dimensions. It primarily 
serves students with an undergraduate 
business degree who wish to secure 
additional expertise in the discipline. 

The Department offers a Master of 
Science in Finance (MSF) degree that 
prepares graduates to analyze and solve 
problems related to obtaining and using 
real and financial assets and liabilities. 
The curriculum grounds students in the 
areas of banking, corporate finance, 
investment, portfolio management, 
financial risk management, financial 
engineering, financial markets, institu- 
tions, and intemational finance. It pro- 
vides them with concepts and applica- 
tions framed within the most current 
developments in these fields. 

The Department also offers a 
Finance Concentration m the MBA 
program. Contact the Graduate 
Advising Office for details. 

Master of Science in Finance 
(MSF) 

To earn a Master of Science in 
Finance degree, students must complete 
a minimum of 33 semester hours (11 
courses) 



The 33 credit-hour requirement may 
be reduced to 30 hours for students 
who have an accredited Master's 
degree in Business Administration 
(MBA). In addition, students may be 
allowed to transfer one graduate course 
from an accredited university even if 
they did not secure an advanced degree. 
The following courses are required 
for the MSF degree: 
FIN 6246 Financial Markets and 

Institutions 
FIN 6326 Commercial Banking 
FIN 6426 Financial Management 

Policies 
FIN 6428 Corporate Finance 
FIN 6436 Capital Budgeting and 
Long Term Resource 
Allocation 
FIN 6456 Quantitative Methods in 

Financial Analysis 
FIN 6487 Financial Risk 

Management 
FIN 65 1 5 Security Analysis 
FIN 6525 Portfolio Management 
FIN 6538 Financial Futures and 
Fixed Income Invest 
FIN 6644 Global Financial 
Strategy 
The minimum passing grade for any 
FIN 6000 level course is "B-." MSF 
students must maintain an overall grade 
point average (GPA) of 3.0. 

For more information, contact the 
program manager (305) 348-4198. 

Finance Concentration in the 
Ph.D. Program 

All students are required to complete a 
minimum of 16 course^. Those 
concentrating in Finance must take six 
courses or seminars in Finance (as 
described below), a two-course 
sequence in advanced economic theory, 
and a two-course sequence in either 
advanced econometrics or an 
equivalent sequence of courses in 
advanced statistics. With the advice 
and consent of the departmental Ph.D. 
committee, students also select other 
supporting coursework. The first year 
of study is regarded as "Tier I" in the 
Ph.D. program, and successful 
completion of this year of study is a 
prerequisite for enrollment in some of 
the more advanced courses. 

Students are expected to maintain a 
GPA of 3.5 or better in the six 
departmental courses that comprise the 
Finance concentration. In addition, 
students are expected to maintain a 
GPA of 3.3 or better in all of their 
coursework. 



College of Business Administration 191 

A Sample Course of Study 

The sample program of study below 
describes the schedule for a typical 
student. Variations may be allowed for 
some students, and, of course, the 
requirements may be changed at the 
discretion of the Ph.D. Committee. 
Year I - Fall Semester 
FfN 7855 Financial Economics 

I" 3 

FIN 7845 Statistical Methods in 

Finance I*** 3 

FIN 7808 Financial Theory I 3 

Year I - Spring Semester 
FIN 7856 Financial Economics 

II" 3 

FIN 7846 Statistical Methods in 

Finance II*** 3 

FIN 7809 Financial Theory II 3 

Year I - Summer Semester 

GEB7916 Empirical Project 6 

Year II - Fall Semester 

FIN 7819 Financial Theory III 3 

Finance Elective 3 

Finance Elective 3 
Year II - Spring Semester 

Finance Elective 3 

Finance Elective 3 

Finance Elective 3 
Year II - Summer Semester 

GEB7916 Empirical Project 6 

Year III - Fall Semester 

Finance Elective 3 

Finance Elective 3 

GEB 798 1 Dissertation Preparation 3 

Year III - Spring Semester 

GEB 7980 Ph.D. Dissertation 6 

Finance Elective 3 

Year III - Summer Semester 
FIN 7980 Ph.D. Dissertation 6 

Year IV - Fall Semester 

FIN 7980 Ph.D. Dissertation 9 

Year IV - Spring Semester 

FFN 7980 Ph.D. Dissertation 9 

** Tne sequence in Micro-Economic 
Theory, ECO 7115 and ECO 7116, 
may be substituted for this sequence in 
Financial Economics. 
***The sequence in Econometrics, 
ECO 7424 and ECO 7425, may be 
substituted for this sequence in 
Statistical Methods in Finance. 

Research Projects 

Students are required to complete 
research projects during the summer 
semesters following their first and 
second years in the program. One 
faculty member will serve as an advisor 
for all research projects in a given 
summer. 



Graduate Catalog 
192 College of Business Adin inistration 

The primary objective of the first 
summer research project is to enhance 
the student's skills in using computer 
programs for research. Students are 
expected to undertake a research 
project that will require them to use 
computers in order to complete it. To 
this end, they are expected to replicate 
some previously-tested hypothesis 
using new data or to engage in some 
other meaningful computer-based 
project. 
The second summer research project, 

in contrast, requires the student to 

develop an original research 

hypothesis. This hypothesis should be 

developed well in advance of the 

second summer semester so the student 

will have enough time to execute the 

project during the summer semester. 
For both summer projects, students 

must submit a written paper and make a 

presentation to the faculty. Ideally, 

these papers should be of sufficient 

quality to merit their submission to a 

conference or a journal. 

Students must satisfy all university 

and college dissertation requirements. 



Graduate Catalog 

Management and 
International Business 

K. Galen Kroeck, Professor and 

Chair 
Constance S. Bates, Associate 

Professor and Barsky-Greenstein 

Professor 
Gary Dessler, Professor 
Herman Dorsett, Associate Professor 
Dana L. Farrow, Professor 
Earnest Friday, Assistant Professor 
Ronald Gilbert, Associate Professor 
Carolina Gomez, Assistant Professor 
Robert Hogner, Associate Professor 
Laura Kozloski, Lecturer 
Karl O. Magnusen, Professor 
Modesto A. Maidique, Professor and 

University President 
3. Randall Martin, Lecturer 
Andrew McCosh, Chapman Eminent 
Scholar in Management and Ethics 
Sherry Moss, Associate Professor and 

Faculty Coordinator, Executive 

MBA Program 
Karen Paul, Professor 
Clifford Perry, Distinguished 

Executive Professor and Associate 
Dean, Research Fellow, Knight 

Ridder Center 
Leonardo Rodriguez, Professor 
Donald Roomes, Instructor and 

Director, Weekend BBA Program 
Juan Sanchez, Associate Professor, 

Faculty Advisor, MSM, HR Track 
Philip Shepherd, Associate Professor 
Ronnie Silverblatt, Associate 

Professor 
Deborah Vidaver-Cohen, Associate 

Professor 
Mary Ann Von Glinow, Professor 

and Director, CIBER 

The Management and International 
Business Department includes an 
internationally oriented and dedicated 
faculty with expertise in strategic 
management, human resource 

management, organizational behavior 
and intemational business. 

Our curriculum is designed to 
prepare students for successful 
management careers in the global 
business arena and in a variety of 
organizations. Our graduates are armed 
with an understanding of the 
management discipline, a broad 
intellectual framework for managing in 
an ever-evolving marketplace, the 
ability to lead and work within teams, 
computer literacy, and solid 
communication skills. 



College of Business Administration 193 



Master of Science in 
Management with a Human 
Resources Track 

The Master of Science in Management 
with a Human Resources Track is 
designed for professionals and 
executives in the field of human 
resource management, as well as for 
college graduates interested in a career 
in the field. The MSM is a value- 
added program where students proceed 
through courses in a lock-step process 
designed to maximize the value of the 
program. This twelve-course (37-hour) 
program is designed to be completed in 
16 months, with classes meeting only 
on Saturdays. The students will also 
have extensive interaction with an 
Advisory Board, which is made up of 
leading HR professionals from the 
South Florida area. 

For further information, please 
contact the program director at (305) 
348-2791, or visit our web site at 
www.tlu.edu/'-mshrm. 



194 College of Business Administrarion 



Graduate Catalog 



Marketing 



J.A.F. Nicholls, Professor and Chair 
Peter R. Dickson, Eminent Scholar in 

Marketing, Knight Ridder Center for 

Excellence in Management 
Timothy Dugan, Visiting Instructor 
Sally Gallion, Assistant Dean 
Jonatliaii N. Goodrich, Professor 
Bamett A. Greenberg, Professor 
Walfried Lassar, SunTrust Professor 
Tiger Li, Associate Professor 
Paul Miniard, B MI Professor of 

Marketing, Director of Ph.D. 

Program 
Anthony Miyazaki, Assistant 

Professor 
Michael S. Munro, Instructor 
Marta Ortiz, Associate Professor 
Lynda Raheem, Instructor and 

Assistant Dean 
Raymond Rody, Assistant Professor 
Bruce Seaton, Associate Professor 
Kimberly Taylor, Associate and 

Barsky-Greenstein Professor 
John Tsalikis, Associate Professor 

The Department of Marketing offers 
concentration in Marketing in both the 
M.B.A. and the Ph.D. programs. 
Contact the Department Chair for 
additional information. 

The Department of Marketing boasts 
an internationally diverse, experienced, 
widely published, and highly involved 
faculty. Our faculty includes 

recognized experts in consumer 
decision-making and behavior, 
business ethics, and corporate social 
responsibility. Our programs and 
courses represent leading-edge thinking 
and practice. Many of our graduates, in 
fact, have become successful 
entrepreneurs in a variety of business 
arenas - from high tech to motor sport 
marketing. 

The study of marketing involves 
learning about how best to make a host 
of key decisions and implement them in 
an organization. A few of these 
decisions include: 

• What products and services to 
offer 

• Who customers should be 

• How to position products/ 
services relative to those of 
competitors 

• How to design and package the 
products/services 

• Where and how to distribute the 
products/services 

• How to price products/services 

• How to advertise and promote 
products and services 



You can study topics like marketing 
management, market research, 
consumer behavior, marketing the 
small business, export marketing, 
international marketing, marketing 
channels, retailing management, 
advertising management, promotional 
strategy, personal selling, sales 
management, strategic marketing, 
management and advanced studies of 
international marketing, market 
research, consumer behavior, 

promotional strategy, and sales 
management. 

Marketing Concentration in 
the Ph.D. Program 

All students are required to complete a 
minimum of 15 courses in addition to 
the College Colloquium series. 
Students concentrating in Marketing 
must take all seven of the seminars 
offered by the Marketing Department; 
these seminars are listed below. In 
addition, students are required to take a 
two-course sequence in research 
methods and between two to four 
courses in statistics (the number of 
required courses in statistics depends 
upon the student's level of statistical 
knowledge upon entering the program). 
Other coursework will be selected by 
the student with the advice and consent 
of the Department's Ph.D. Committee. 
To remain in the program, students are 
expected to maintain a GPA of 3.5 or 
better in the seven courses comprising 
the Marketing concentration. In 
addition, students are expected to 
maintain a GPA of 3.3 or better in all 
of their other coursework. 

Required Marketing Seminars 

MAR 7667 Seminar in Marketing 

Management 
MAR 7507 Seminar in Consumer 

Behavior 
MAR 7623 Seminar in Marketing 

Environment 
MAR 7246 Seminar in International 

Marketing 
MAR 7652 Seminar in Advertising 

and Persuasion 
MAR 7205 Seminar in Channels of 

Distribution 
MAR 7665 Seminar in Marketing 

Models 

Research Projects 

Students are required to complete 
research projects during the summer 
semesters following their first and 
second years in the program. These 
projects will be supervised by a faculty 
member. 



Because the primary objective of the 
first summer research project is to 
enhance a student's skills in executing 
research, they are not expected to 
develop new research hypothesis for 
this first project. Rather, they may 
simply select an existing hypothesis 
that has been tested previously and 
develop and implement a study for 
testing it that offers a meaningful 
methodological contribution to the 
existing literature. 

The second summer research project, 
however, requires the development of 
an original research hypothesis. This 
hypothesis should be formulated well 
in advance of the summer semester so 
that students have sufficient time to 
execute the actual studies during the 
summer term. 

For both summer projects, students 
must submit a written paper and make a 
presentation to the faculty. Ideally, 
these papers should be of sufficient 
quality to merit their submission to a 
conference and/or academic journal. 

At the end of their coursework, 
students must pass a comprehensive 
examination designed to assess their 
level of preparation for dissertation 
research. This examination will consist 
of the student preparing a typed 
proposal that develops an original 
hypothesis or hypotheses in an area of 
substantive importance. The proposal 
also must describe a methodology for 
testing the hypothesis. The proposal 
will be evaluated by the Department's 
Ph.D. Committee. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Business Administration 195 



Course Descriptions 

Definition of Prefixes: 

ACG-Accounting; BAN-Banking; 
BUL-Business Law; CGS-Computer 
and Information Systems; ECO- 
Economics; FIN-Finance; GEB- 
General Business; ISM-Information 
Systems Management; MAN- 
Management; MAR-Marketing; QMB- 
Quantitative Methods in Business; 
REE-Real Estate; SPC-Speech; TAX- 
Taxation; TRA-Transportation. 
F-Fall semester offering; S-Spring 
semester offering; SS-Summer semester 
offering. 

Departmental or School/College 
Designation: 

AC - School of Accounting 
AS - College of Arts & Sciences 
BA - College of Business Administra- 
tion 

DS - Decision Sciences and Informa- 
tion Systems 
EC - Economics 
FI - Finance 

MA - Management and International 
Business 
ME - Marketing 
MS - Mathematical Sciences 
TD - Theatre and Dance 
ACG 5137 Standards and Principles 
of Financial Accounting (AC) (3). A 
survey of official pronouncements on 
accounting standards and principles. 
Prerequisite: Permission of Accounting 
certificate program advisor. 

ACG 5256 International Dimensions 
of Accounting and Auditing (AC) (3). 
Review of and reasons for variations in 
accounting and auditing practices 
throughout the world; explore initia- 
tives undertaken to promote trans- 
parency, harmonization, and standard- 
ization to facilitate understanding of 
financial statements prepared under 
various conventions. Prerequisite: 
Permission of Accounting certificate 
program advisor. 

ACG 5307 Advanced Managerial 
Accounting (AC) (3). In depth study of 
determination and control of 
production costs; budgetary control; 
CVP analysis; and alternative methods 
of performance measurement and 
analysis. Prerequisite: Permission of 
Accounting certificate program advisor. 

ACG 5386 Controllership (AC) (3). 
Study of controllership function; role 
of controller in planning, accounting 
for, and evaluating company perform- 
ance; relationship with internal audit- 



ing. Prerequisite: Permission of Ac- 
counting certificate program advisor. 

ACG 5395 Seminar in Managerial 
Accounting (AC) (3). An in-depth 
study of selected areas of managerial 
accounting. Prerequisite: ACG 4341 or 
equivalent and Permission of Account- 
ing certificate program advisor. 

ACG 5507 Issues and Problems in 
Accounting for Non-Profit Entities 
(AC) (3). Study and analysis of 
accounting, reporting, and control 
standards and practices of non-profit 
organizafion - including accounfing for 
governments, hospitals, universities, 
churches, and others. Prerequisite: 
Permission of Accounting certificate 
program advisor. 

ACG 5516 The Environment of 
Government Accounting (AC) (3). 

Basic public administration emphasiz- 
ing governmental processes with which 
governmental accountants and auditors 
come into contact. Includes legislative 
and administrative activities and 
operating functions having high 
accounting and auditing involvement. 
Prerequisite: Permission of accounting 
certificate program advisor. 

ACG 5518 Historical and Compara- 
tive Government Accounting (AC) 
(3). Research and reporting on subjects 
in the history of or on comparative 
aspects of government accounting. 
Prerequisite: Permission of accounting 
certificate program advisor. 

ACG 5519 Contemporary Issues in 
Government Accounting (AC) (3). 
Research and reporting on current 
issues related to govemment account- 
ing. Prerequisite: Permission of 
accounting certificate program advisor. 

ACG 5545 Analysis of Governmental 
Financial Reports (AC) (3). Describes 
content of govemment financial reports 
and analytical methods employed by 
internal and external users; covers 
concepts of disclosure, budget/actual 
analysis, credit evaluations, operational 
evaluations, measures of fiscal capacity 
and signs of fiscal stress Prerequisites: 
Permission of accounting certificate 
program advisor. 

ACG 5546 Governmental Planning 
and Budgetary Accounting with 
Cases (AC) (3). Budgeting in 
governments emphasizing formulation 
based on accounting and auditing 
input. Budget execution and analysis of 
deviations of actual from budgets; 
study of ZBB, PPBS, and MBO 



systems and their behavioral and 
accounting bases. Prerequisites: Per- 
mission of accounting certificate 
program advisor. 

ACG 5596 Accounting for Special- 
ized Governmental and Nonprofit 
Entities (AC) (3). Survey course by 
guest lecturers covering detailed 
accounfing concepts, procedures, and 
reporting for enterprise fiind entities, 
educational entities, and unique types 
of internal service fiinds. Prerequisites: 
Permission of accounting certificate 
program advisor. 

ACG 5627 Systems Auditing (AC) 

(3). Principles and procedures of 
auditing systems of information, 
including the fiinction, approach, and 
techniques of systems auditing and the 
evaluation of systems controls. 
Emphasis on auditing computerized 
systems. Prerequisite: Permission of 
Accounting certificate program ad- 
visor. 

ACG 5696 Seminar in Auditing (AC) 

(3). An in-depth study of recent 
developments in auditing. Prerequisite: 
ACG 4651 or equivalent and permis- 
sion of Accounting certificate program 
' advisor. 

ACG 5806 Seminar in Financial 
Accounting (AC) (3). An in-depth 
study of recent developments in 
financial accounting. Prerequisite: 
ACG 4111 and permission of Ac- 
counting certificate program advisor. 

ACG 5846 Statistical Methods in 
Accounting and Auditing (AQ (3). 

Formulation, analysis and implementa- 
tion on a microcomputer of mathe- 
matical models in financial and man- 
agerial accounting and auditing. 
Prerequisite: Permission of Accounting 
certificate advisor. 

ACG 5905 Independent Study in 
Accounting and Auditing (1-3). 

Individual conferences, supervised 
readings, and reports on personal 
investigations. Prerequisites: Written 
Permission of the instructor, account- 
ing certificate program advisor. School 
Director, and Dean. 

ACG 5936 Special Topics in 
Accounting and Auditing (AQ (3). 

For groups of students who wish an 
intensive study of a particular topic or a 
limited number of topics not otherwise 
offered in the curriculum. Prerequisite: 
Written Permission of the instructor, 
accounting certificate program advisor, 
School Director, and Dean. 



196 College of Business Administration 



Graduate Catalog 



ACG 6026 Accounting for Managers 
(AC) (3). Presentation of the nature, 
techniques and uses of accounting from 
the perspective of people who manage 
businesses and investments in busi- 
nesses. Covers both financial and 
management accounting. Not open to 
EMST or MACC students. 

ACG 6135 Seminar in Financial 
Accounting Theory I (AC) (3). A 
study of the theoretical structure of 
accounting, with special attention to 
asset and income definition, recogni- 
tion, and measurement; and an 
appraisal of pronouncements of profes- 
sional accounting organizations. Pre- 
requisite: Baccalaureate in accounting 
or equivalent and admission to a 
graduate program in the School of 
Accounting or permission of the 
School Director. 

ACG 6145 Seminar in Financial 
Accounting Theory II (AC) (3). A 
continuation of ACG 6135, with 
emphasis on the problems of 
accounting for price-level changes and 
other current issues. Prerequisite: ACG 
6135 and admission to a graduate 
program in the School of Accounting 
or permission of the School Director. 

ACG 6175 Financial Reporting and 
Analysis (AC) (3). Comprehensive 
treatment of analysis of financial 
statements as aid for decision making; 
looks at current state of financial 
reporting practices and impact of 
published statements on economic 
systems. Prerequisites: ACG 6026, FIN 
6428 or equivalent. Not open to EMST 
or MACC students. 

ACG 6176 Evaluation of Financial 
Reports, Business Analysis and 
Valuation (3). Seminar examining 
quality of financial reports and 
adjusting for investment decisions. 
Valuation models are used to value 
firms given economic and industry 
characteristics and alternative business 
strategies. Prerequisite: Permission of 
School of Accounting. 

ACG 6225 Value Added Accounting 
Practices in Strategic Business 
Decisions (3). Seminar examining role 
and inputs of accounting/finance in 
strategic decisions. Mergers/acquis- 
itions/corporate restructuring frame- 
work is used to bring into focus 
analysis necessary for all phases of 
business. Prerequisites: Master of 
Accounting students only; must be in 
final semester of program. 



ACG 6245 Accounting and Auditing 
Compliance Issues (AC) (3). 
Corporate, government and public 
accounting compliance with response 
to institutional and political regulation; 
attention to compliance in specialized 
industries such as health care, trans- 
portation, financial institutions real 
estate and construction. Prereq-uisites: 
ACG 4111 or equivalent, ACG 4651 
and admission to a graduate program in 
the School of Accounting or permis- 
sion of the School Director. 

ACG 6255 International Accounting 

(AC) (3). Comparative analysis of 
accounting concepts and practices in 
different countries; international • 
accounting standards; problems of 
accounting for multinational corpora- 
tions, including transfers of fiinds and 
income measurements; the role of 
accounting in national economic devel- 
opment. Prerequisite: ACG 6026 or 
equivalent, not open to MACC 
students. 

ACG 6257 Global Accounting, 
Auditing and Financial Strategy (3). 
Evaluation of U.S. GAAP and 
International Accounting Standards an 
the international dimensions of 
auditing. Consideration is given to 
geopolitical issues, intemational 
organizations, and role of regulators. 
Prerequisite: Permission of School of 
Accounting. 

ACG 6295 Financial Accounting IV 

(AC) (3). The application of 
accounting principles in the production 
of information for selected topics in 
financial statements with extensive 
examination and evaluation of FASB 
and intemational standards of 
accounting. Prerequisite: Admission to 
a graduate program in the School of 
Accounting or the permission of the 
Director. 

ACG 6345 Management Accounting 
and Control (AC) (3). Accounting 
concepts and techniques usefiil in 
evaluation, planning, organization and 
control of a business enterprise, with 
attention to methods of accounting for 
production activities; ethics in 
management accounting. Prerequisites: 
ACG 4111 and admission to a graduate 
program in the School of Accounting 
or permission of the School Director. 
Not open to those with undergraduate 
accounting degrees. 

ACG 6346 Seminar in Managerial 
Accounting I (AC) (3). Analysis of 
transfer pricing; product pricing; 



incremental profit analysis; decision 
models; alternative performance 
measurement techniques; and other 
advanced topics. Prerequisite: ACG 
4341 or ACG 6026, and admission to a 
graduate program in the School of 
Accounting or permission of the 
School Director. 

ACG 6356 Seminar in Managerial 
Accounting II (AC) (3). A study of the 
controUership function in corporate 
organizations; an appraisal of the 
controller's role in planning, accoun- 
ting for, and evaluating company 
performance; and relationship to 
internal audit fianction. Prerequisite: 
ACG 4341 and admission to a graduate 
program in the School of Accoiinting 
or permission of the School Director. 

ACG 6385 Managerial Control and 
ControUership (AC) (3). Confrol 
methods for management; control 
structure, planning and forecasting for 
budgets; the functions of controller- 
ship, including cash management, risk 
management, investments, tax 
administration and records manage- 
ment. Prerequisite: Admission to a 
graduate program in the School of 
Accounting or permission of the 
School Director. 

ACG 6405 Seminar in Accounting 
Information Systems I (AC) (3). 
Accounting information systems 
security and control and legal and 
ethical compliance; control of 
computer failure and abuse and 
compliance with laws, regulations, and 
standards. Computer usage required. 
Prerequisite: Admission to a graduate 
program in the School of Accounting 
or permission of the School Director. 

ACG 6406 Accounting Data 
Warehousing and Analysis (3). 

Framework for enterprises to provide 
comprehensive access to organization- 
wide accounting data and to develop 
information systems capable of 
collecting, processing and arranging 
accounting data in comprehensive data 
bases. Prerequisite: Permission of 
School of Accounting. 

ACG 6415 Seminar in Accounting 
Information Systems II (AC) (3). 
Accounting information systems for 
strategic use in the management of 
competitive enterprises; budgeting, 
performance measurement, and cost 
accounting for generating strategic 
information. Computer usage required. 
Prerequisite: Admission to a graduate 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Business Administration 197 



program in the School of Accounting 
or permission of the School Director. 

ACG 6437 Advanced Accounting 
Information Systems (AC) (3). 
Development and control of 
information systems for accounting, 
emphasis on new microcomputer 
technology, software engineering, 
methods of data pro-cessing and 
database management systems. 
Prerequisites: ACG 4401 or equivalent 
and admission to a graduate program in 
the School of Accounting or 
permission of the School Director. 

ACG 6445 Accounting Information 
Systems Analysis and Design (AC) 
(3). Accounting applications of 
information systems analysis and 
design concepts, methods, and tools; 
requirements, design, control, and 
prototyping of accounting information 
systems. Computer usage required. 
Prerequisites: Admission to a graduate 
program in the School of Accounting 
or permission of the School Director. 

ACG 6455 Accounting Information 
Systems Technology, Control and 
Audit I (AC) (3). Accounting 
applications, control, and audit of large 
computer systems; technology, control 
concepts and procedures, audit testing 
and documentation, and control and 
audit software. Computer usage 
required. Prerequisites: Admission to a 
graduate program in the School of 
Accounting or permission of the 
School Director. 

ACG 6456 Accounting Information 
Systems Technology, Control and 
Audit II (AC) (3). Accounting 
applications, control, and audit of small 
computer systems; technology, control 
concepts and procedures, audit testing 
and documentation, and control and 
audit software. Computer usage 
required. 

ACG 6466 Accounting Enterprise 
Resource Planning (3). Course intends 
to provide students with an overview of 
ERP in accounting including history, 
concepts of ERP and role of ERP in 
accounting. It also provides students 
hands on experience with accounting 
application of ERP package, SAP/R3. 
Prerequisite: Permission of School of 
Accounting. 

ACG 6515 Advanced Governmental 
Accounting (AC) (3). Treats the 
developing concept of consolidated 
financial statements for governments. 
Also covers advanced areas of 



accounting, e.g., concepts, investment 
accounting, grant accounting, and 
pension accounting. Prerequisites: 
ACG 6505, ACG 6584, admission to 
graduate program in School of 
Accounting or permission of School 
Director. 

ACG 6517 Audit of Governmental 
Entities (AC) (3). Covers methods of 
audits of governments by independent 
public accountants, coordination with 
internal audit staffs; describes audits of 
governments by internal auditors 
(audits of fidelity, efficiency and 
effectiveness); covers current single 
audit concept. Prerequisites: ACG 
6505, admission to the graduate 
program in the School of Accounting, 
or permission of School Director. 

ACG 6625 Information Technology 
Auditing (AC) (3). Understanding and 
application of concepts and procedures 
of auditing computer information 
systems; analysis, testing, and 
documentation of computer security 
and controls for management and 
financial statement reports. 

Prerequisites: Admission to a graduate 
program in the School of Accounting 
or permission of the School Director. 

ACG 6655 Auditing and Accounting 
Systems (AC) (4) Standards and 
procedures of auditing, ethics and 
responsibilities of auditors, audit 
evidence, reporting, international 
standards; design and control of 
accounting information systems. 
Prerequisites: ACG 4111 with a grade 
of 'C or higher and admission to a 
graduate program in the School of 
Accounting or permission of the 
School Director. Not open to those 
with a undergraduate accounting 
degrees. 

ACG 6657 Environment of 
Accounting and Auditing (AC) (3). 
Economics and scope of accounting 
practice in context of self-regulated 
profession, public policy constraints, 
complex business structures and 
innovative transactions, and rapidly 
changing information technology with 
extensive reference to business 
periodicals and on-line databases. 
Prerequisite: Admission to a graduate 
program in the School of Accounting 
or permission of the School Director. 

ACG 6675 Internal Auditing (AC) 
(3). This course examines auditing in 
depth as a professionalized discipline 
for reviewing testing, and evaluating 
the financial and the operational 



activities and controls of an economic 
entity. Focus will be directed to private 
sector profit seeking entities as well as 
governmental and other nonprofit 
organizations. Prerequisite: Admission 
to a graduate program in the School of 
Accounting or permission of the 
School Director. 

ACG 6676 Advanced Internal 
Auditing (AC) (3). Special topics in 
internal auditing such as forensic 
auditing, analytical auditing, manage- 
ment consulting, work with external 
auditors, ethics, multinational aspects, 
evaluation methods, quality control, 
new technologies and recent research. 
Prerequisite: Admission to a graduate 
program in the School of Accounting 
or permission of the School Director. 

ACG 6677 Applied Internal Auditing 

(AC) (3). The expansion of the internal 
audit process into such areas as 
administrative and support fiinctions; 
line functions such as research, sales, 
and production; and special areas such 
as compliance, budgeting and controls. 
Course is taught by outside lecturers. 
Prerequisite: Admission to a graduate 
program in the School of Accounting 
or permission of the School Director. 

ACG 6686 Fraud Examination (3). 

Use of technology for the prevention of 
financial fraud, examination of 
emerging practices and regulatory 
trends as reflected in court decisions. 
Prerequisite: Permission of School of 
Accounting. 

ACG 6696 Current Issues in 
Auditing (AC) (3). Professional and 
technical aspects of auditing practice; 
infroduction to SEC; ethics and legal 
responsibilities; emergence of non- 
public practice; public expectations and 
professional reality; the impact of 
technology; international auditing; 
recent auditing developments. Prereq- 
uisite: ACG 4651 and admission to a 
graduate program in the School of 
Accounting or permission of the 
School Director. 

ACG 6835 Behavioral Accounting 

(AC) (3). Smdy of the effect of the 
process and products of accounting and 
of the relation of changes in the process 
and products to individual and group 
behavior; consideration of ways in 
which accounting can aid individuals 
and organizations to attain their goals. 
Prerequisites: ACG 4111 and 4341 or 
equivalents, and admission to a 
graduate program in the School of 



198 College of Business Administration 



Graduate Catalog 



Accounting or permission of the 
School Director. 

ACG 6845 Accounting and Quantita- 
tive Methods (AC) (3). Study of 
statistical and management science 
techniques that are or may be utilized 
in financial and managerial accounting. 
Prerequisites: QMB 3150 and ACG 
4401, or equivalents, and admission to 
a graduate program in the School of 
Accounting or permission of the 
School Director. 

ACG 6866 Accounting for Health 
Care Organizations (3). Study of 
financial reporting and analysis applied 
to for-profit and NFP healthcare 
organizations emphasizing accounting 
issues related to strategic decision- 
making. Prerequisite: Permission of 
School of Accounting. 

ACG 6867 Seminar in Medicare 
Regulation (3). Principles of Medicare 
payment systems emphasizing changing 
role of medicare in Amercia healthcare 
system and developing technical skills 
to understand, identify and research 
problems in Medicare payments. 
Prerequisite: Permission of School of 
Accounting. 

ACG 6875 Evolution of Accounting 
Thought (AC) (3). The cultural origins 
of accounting and its traditional 
controversies, from pre-historic time 
onward, and in an international context. 
Prerequisites: Admission to graduate 
program in School of Accounting or 
permission of School Director. 

ACG 6885 Accounting Research and 
Reporting (AC) (3). Examine the 
projects relating to historical and 
current problems in public accounting 
practice, and preparation of appropriate 
reports in oral and written formats, 
under a variety of professional settings. 
Prerequisite: Admission to a graduate 
program in the School of Accounting 
or permission of the School Director. 

ACG 6905 Independent Study in 
Accounting (AC) (1-3). Individual 
conferences; supervised readings; 
reports on personal investigations. 
Prerequisite: Admission to a graduate 
program in the School of Accounting 
or permission of the School Director. 

ACG 6935 Special Topics in 
Accounting (AC) (1-3). Intensive 
study for groups of students of a 
particular topic or a limited number of 
topics not otherwise offered in the 
curriculum. Prerequisite: Admission to 
a graduate program in the School of 



Accounting or permission of the 
School Director. 

ACG 7157 Seminar: Theory and 
Contemporary Research in Financial 
Accounting (AC) (3). An evaluative 
overview of the classical literature in 
financial accounting and the contem- 
porary empirical research published in 
the leading scholarly journals. 
Examined are income determination 
theories, normative accounting princi- 
ples, accounting information and stock 
prices, and principal-agent relation- 
ships. Prerequisite: Permission of 
Doctoral advisor in Accounting. 

ACG 7177 Seminar: Accounting 
Information and Security Prices (AC) 
(3). An in-depth examination of 
accounting information and security 
prices within capital markets theory, 
including a thorough examination of 
the cross-sectional properties and time- 
series properties of accounting numbers 
and the importance of research findings 
and new developments in research 
methodology. Prerequisite: Permission 
of Doctoral advisor in Accounting. 

ACG 7436 Seminar: Information 
Value and Agency Research Ac- 
counting (AC) (3). An in-depth ex- 
amination of the research paradigm and 
the associated empirical research in 
accounting and auditing. Examined are 
the issues of information value, risk 
aversion, risk sharing contracts, as well 
as accountability from the standpoint of 
monitoring contracts. Prerequisite: 
Permission of Doctoral advisor in 
Accounting. 

ACG 7695 Seminar: Contemporary 
Research in Management Account- 
ing and Auditing (AC) (3). A broad 
overview of classical and contemporary 
empirical research in managerial 
accounting and auditing including 
budget and performance review, 
decision making, information analysis, 
professional judgment, sampling prob- 
lems, audit risk, etc. Prerequisite: 
Permission of Doctoral advisor in 
Accounting. 

ACG 7836 Seminar: Behavioral 
Research in Accounting-Individual 
Behavior (AC) (3). An in-depth 
examination of the relationship of 
cognitive psychology, cognitive models 
of human judgment, decision theory 
and accounting information. Emphasis 
is placed upon the human processing of 
accounting information, the decision 
value of information, and the 
development of decision aids or 



heuristics. Prerequisite: Permission of 
Doctoral advisor in Accounting. 

ACG 7837 Seminar: Behavioral 
Research in Accounting-Human 
Groups and Systems (AC) (3). The 
multifarious behavioral relationships of 
groups within the formal and informal 
organizational structure are examined 
with respect to performance measure- 
ment (efficiency and effectiveness), 
accountability, planning and control of 
the development of decision support 
systems. Prerequisite: Permis-sion of 
Doctoral advisor in Accounting. 

ACG 7886 Seminar: Empirical 
Research Methodology and Para- 
digms in Accounting (AC) (3). Study 
of research design, methods of data 
collection and analysis and problems of 
measurement in accounting research. 
Empirical reseafch studies in account- 
ing are integrated throughout to 
illustrate and analyze the structural 
problems of research design as well as 
the strengths and weaknesses of various 
acceptable paradigms. Prereq-uisite: 
Permission of Doctoral advisor in 
Accounfing. 

ACG 7887 Research Forum and 
Workshop (AC) (1). Regularly 
scheduled workshop at which visiting 
scholars as well as faculty and doctoral 
candidates present and evaluate 
research papers. Candidates are ex- 
pected to participate in discussions, act 
as discussants and present their own 
research for critique. Sessions are held 
for structuring and brainstorming 
research projects in the formative 
stages as well as for presenting 
completed efforts. Prerequisite: 
Permission of doctoral advisor in 
Accounting. 

ACG 7888 Seminar: The Philosophy 
of Science, Theory Construction, and 
Verification in Accounting (AC) (3). 

An examinafion of knowledge, 
theories, scientific explanation and 
prediction as related to the social 
sciences. Various theories of account- 
ing are critically examined from the 
standpoint of theory construction and 
verification in the philosophy of 
science. Prerequisite: Permission of 
Doctoral advisor in Accounting. 

ACG 7889 Seminar: Positive Theory 
Research in Accounting (AC) (3). 
Construction of theory to explain 
accounting and auditing practices in an 
environment of regulation using 
empirical research findings from a 
growing body of economic-based 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Business Administration 199 



research in accounting and finance. 
Prerequisite: Permission of doctoral 
advisor in Accounting. 

ACG 7896 Accounting Research 
Methods on Capital Markets. (AC) 
(3). An advanced accounting graduate 
course in current time series methods 
used to analyze capitals and other time- 
related financial markets. This course is 
designed for Ph.D. students in 
accounting and business who already 
have advanced statistical and financial 
training, and serves as an introduction 
to other doctoral courses. Prerequisite: 
Permission of Ph.D. advisor. 

ACG 7938 Seminar: Special Topics 
in Accounting Research (AC) (3). 

Topics vary according to instructor and 
student interest in problems and issues 
on the frontier issues of accounting. 
Prerequisite: Permission of doctoral 
advisor in Accounting. 

BUL 5661 Law for Accountants (AC) 
(3). A survey of select topics of direct 
interest to accounting students, include- 
ing contracts, sales, agencies, partner- 
ships, corporations. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of Accounting certificate pro- 
gram advisor. 

BUL 5662 Accountant's Liability 

(AC) (3). Overview of accountant 
exposure to private and public sector 
liability suits, independent in auditor 
engagements, securities regulations and 
other state and federal laws of chief 
concern to accountants. Prerequisite: 
Permission of Accounting certificate 
program advisor. 

BUL 6810 Legal Environment of 
Business (AC) (3). Studies the 
importance of law and legal institutions 
on commerce workings of administra- 
ive law; various aspects of employment 
legislation and other areas of legal 
environment of business. Prerequisite: 
Permission of accounting certificate 
program advisor. 

BUL 6821 Cyber Law (3). Cutting 
edge issues of relationship between 
business/society and legal issues 
impacting internet usage in e- 
commerce and topics include 
intellectual property, business and 
finance, privacy and social issues. 
Prerequisites: BUL 4310 or BUL 4320 
and graduate standing. 

BUL 6830 Survey of Business Law 
(AC) (3). Overview of substantive and 
procedural aspects of contract law, 
U.C.C, partnerships and corporations, 
accountant's liability, and other aspects 



of government regulation of business. 
Prerequisite: Admission to a graduate 
program in the School of Accounting, 
or permission of the School Director. 
Not open to those with undergraduate 
accounting degrees. 

BUL 6850 International Business 

Law (AC) (3). Analysis of legal 
problems facing the U.S. international 
and multinational businesses. Topics 
include the transnafional research of 
economic regulation, international 
trade and investment, antitrust law, 
technology transfers, and securities 
law. 

BUL 6890 Special Topics in Business 

Law (AC) (1-6). Intensive study for 
groups of students of a particular topic, 
or a limited number of topics, not 
otherwise offered in the curriculum. 
Prerequisite: Admission to a graduate 
program in the School of Accounting 
or permission of the School Director. 

BUL 6906 Independent Study in 
Business Law (AC) (1-6). Individual 
conferences; supervised readings; 
reports on personal investigations. 
Prerequisite: Admission to a graduate 
program in the School of Accounting 
or permission of the School Director. 

COP 7545 File and Database 
Management Systems (DS) (3). 

Fundamentals of database concepts and 
methodologies, including data 
representation, data modeling, and file 
organization. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing, (on demand) 

EC? 6705 Managerial Economics 
(EC) (3). Basic microeconomic 
concepts as they apply to decision 
making within the organization; supply 
and demand; market structure and 
market behavior in specific industries. 
Prerequisites: ECO 3021 and ECO 
3011. 

ECP 6715 Macroeconomic Forecast- 
ing for Management (EC) (3). 
Business macroeconomic concepts as 
they apply to decision making within 
the firm. Traditional models of income 
determination and forecasting analysis. 
Prerequisite: ECP 6705. 

FIN 5495 Leasing and Mergers (FI) 
(3). Discussion-oriented course; will 
provide an analytical foundation to 
corporate development, strategies, and 
resource allocation decisions. Merger 
activity and leasing decisions will be 
viewed as strategic decisions by the 
firm to enable them to achieve 



corporate objectives. Prerequisite: FIN 
3424 or FIN 6428, or equivalent. 

FIN 6246 Financial Markets and 
Institutions (FI) (3). Analysis of the 
characteristics and efficiency of the 
money markets and capital markets. 
Types of money market and capital 
market instruments, and the role of 
financial institutions in these markets. 
Prerequisite: FIN 6428 

FIN 6325 Current Issues in Com- 
mercial Banking (FI) (3). Main policy 
issues in commercial banking and the 
role of regulatory authorities. Pre- 
sentation includes bank mergers and 
holding companies; national bank 
branching; and the present structure 
and prospects of the financial sector. 
Prerequisite: FIN 6326 or equivalent, 
(on demand) 

FIN 6326 Commercial Banking (FI) 

(3). The objectives, constraints, and 
policies applicable to the management 
of commercial banks. Emphasis will be 
given to asset and liability manage- 
ment, marketing of services and other 
banking functions. Prerequisite: FFN 
6428. 

FIN 6346 Credit Analysis (FI) (3). 

This course examines how the 
accounting framework is integrated 
with tools and techniques for the 
analysis and interpretation of financial 
statements. Evaluation of risk in 
domestic and foreign loans and the 
pricing of credit facilities. Prerequisite: 
FIN 6428. 

FIN 6418 Working Capital Man- 
agement (FI) (3). Intermediate theories 
and techniques of cash, accounts 
receivable, inventory, and accounts 
payable management. Prerequisite: FIN 
6428. 

FIN 6426 Financial Management 
Policies (FI) (3). Advanced theories 
and applications underlying financial 
decision making. Case studies and 
model building. Topics may include 
valuation, capital structure, dividend 
policy, restructuring, mergers and 
acquisition, corporate bankruptcy, 
agency theory, and initial public 
offerings. Prerequisite: FIN 6428. 

FIN 6428 Corporate Finance (FI) (3). 

In-depth examination of asset, liability 
and capital structure management, with 
emphasis on valuafion capital 
budgeting techniques; risk evaluation; 
working capital management; and 
methods of short-term, intermediate 



200 College of Business Administrarion 



Graduate Catalog 



and long-term financing. Prerequisite: 
ACG 6026 or equivalent. 

FIN 6436 Capital Budgeting and 
Long Term Resource Allocation (FI) 
(3). The theory of capital allocation at 
the level of the firm, and empirical 
findings. Decision models and their 
application. The pattern of capital 
expenditure of industries and of the 
economy as a whole. Investment 
determinants. Prerequisite; FFN 6428. 

FIN 6446 Competitive Strategy (FI) 
(3). Provision of tools for managerial 
decision-making in a variety of 
competitive environments including 
demand analysis, short- and long-run 
costs of production, demand for factors, 
market structure and com-petitive 
strategy. 

FIN 6455 Financial Modeling and 
Forecasting (FI) (3). An introduction 
to Financial Modeling and Forecasting. 
Emphasis is on computer models and 
forecasting the financial variables. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor and FIN 6428. 

FIN 6456 Quantitative Methods in 
Financial Analysis (FI) (3). Intro- 
duction to mathematical and statistical 
methods used in finance. The applica- 
tions of computer techniques to finan- 
cial management. Prerequisite: FFN 
6428 or equivalent. 

FIN 6487 Financial Risk Manage- 
ment - Financial Engineering (FI) (3). 
A survey of financial instruments used 
for financial risk management, 
including forwards, futures, options 
and swaps. Emphasis is on identifica- 
tion of financial risks and designing 
optimal risk management program. 
Prerequisite: FfN 6426 or FIN 6515. 

FIN 6515 Securities Analysis (FI) (3). 
An analysis of securities and the 
organization and operation of their 
markets. The determination of the risk 
reward structure of equity and debt 
securities and their valuation. Special 
emphasis on common stocks. Other 
topics include options, mutual funds 
and technical analysis. Prerequisite: 
FIN 6428. 

FIN 6525 Portfolio Management (FI) 
(3). Practical and theoretical problems 
associated with the techniques of 
optimal portfolio selection, construc- 
tion, and revision. The portfolio 
objectives of individuals, corporations 
and fijnds. Measurement of portfolio 
performance and related empirical 
evidence. The role of computers in 



portfolio management. Prerequisite: 
FIN 6515. 

FIN 6538 Financial Futures and 
Fixed Income Investments (FI) (3). 

An examination of the structure, uses, 
and strategies associated with financial 
futures markets. Valuation, hedging, 
speculative activity, and other futures 
related risk management issues are 
discussed. The varieties of fixed 
income securities and their default risk. 
The valuation of fixed income 
securitites and their use in the 
investment and risk management. 
Prerequisite: FIN 6246 or FIN 6515. 

FIN 6550 Behavioral Finance and 
Market Microstructure (3). 

Behavioral finance sUidies how human 
behavior affects investment and 
financial decisions by including biases 
and dependence. Market micro- 
structure examines intraday price, 
volume and volatility behavior. 
Prerequisite: FIN 6428. 

FIN 6625 International Bank Man- 
agement (FI, MA) (3). Management of 
the international banking fiinction; 
setting goals and developing strategies, 
establishing, an organizational structure 
and managing operations. International 
banking services. Foreign lending, 
risks, restraints, and portfolio consider- 
ations. International banking trends and 
implications for regulation. Prereq- 
isite: FFN 6428. 

FIN 6626 International Bank Lend- 
ing Policies and Practices (FI, MA) 

(3). Organization of the lending 
function and examination of the basic 
types of intemational lending: trade 
financing, loans or placements to 
foreign banks, loans to governments 
and official institutions, and loans to 
businesses. Syndicated bank loans. 
Documentation and legal considera- 
tions in foreign lending. Assessing and 
managing risk in the intemational loan 
portfolio. Prerequisite: FIN 6428. 

FIN 6636 Intemational Finance (FI, 

MA) (3). A comparative study of the 
institutional characteristics and internal 
efficiency of developed and under- 
developed capital markets. The 
relationships between world and capital 
markets and prospects for integration. 
The role of multilateral institutions, 
multinational corporations, states, and 
the structure of trade in the 
intemational short and long term 
capital flows. The development of 
financial centers. Prerequisite: FfN 
6428 or equivalent. 



FIN 6638 International Capital 
Markets (FI) (3). An exhaustive study 
of the current institutional aspects of 
the financial and monetary systems of 
the developed and emerging markets. 
Topics will include detailed discus- 
sions of capital markets including stock 
exchanges and the intemational assest 
pricing models. Prerequisite: FIN 6428 
or permission of the instructor. 

FEV 6644 Global Financial Strategy 
(3). Aspects of strategic financial 
environment and management of firms 
that operate in a global arena; to 
include recent developments in 
financial strategy, intemational trade 
and economic decision making. 
Prerequisite:FIN 6428 

FIN 6645 Global Finance for 
Executives (FI) (3). Deals with the 
theoretical and empirical aspects of the 
financial management of firms that 
operate in an intemational business 
environment. Prerequisite: FfN 6428. 

FES 6656 Latin American Financial 
Markets and Institutions (3). An 
evaluative overview of the money and 
capital markets in Latin America. 
Topics include review of the most 
recent literature on regulation and 
deregulation, globalization, regional 
markets, privatization, banking innova- 
tions, the role of foreign banks, and 
currency boards in Latin America. 
Applicable cases will be discussed. 
Prerequisite: FIN 6428. 

FIN 6804 The Theory of Finance (FI) 

(3). The study of the development of 
the theory of finance and its 
implications for the financial decisions 
made by the manager of business firms. 
Topics include: utility theory; capital 
budgeting; portfolio theory; capital 
market equilibrium; multi-period 
valuation; and the cost of capital. 
Financial decision making is explored 
under both certainty and uncertainty 
and within the context of both perfect 
and imperfect markets. Prerequisite: 
FIN 6428 or equivalent. 

FIN 6906 Independent Study in 
Finance (FI) (1-6). Individual con- 
ferences; supervised readings; reports 
on personal investigations. Consent of 
faculty tutor and Department 
Chairperson required. 

FIN 6915 Master's Project In 
Finance (FI) (1-6). An individualized 
research project and report, which may 
include field experience with a firm or 
agency; library research; computer 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Business Administration 201 



programming; or project development. 
The course should be taken during the 
last half of the student's graduate 
program. Consent of faculty tutor and 
Department Chairperson required. 

FIN 6936 Special Topics in Finance 
(FI) (1-3). For groups of students who 
desire intensive study of a particular 
topic or a limited number of topics not 
otherwise offered in the curriculum. 
Consent of faculty supervisor and 
Department Chairperson required. 

FIN 6943 Finance Internship (FI) (1- 

3). Student placement within a 
financial institution, business firm or 
other organization for the purpose of 
providing practical experience to 
supplement theoretical classroom 
instruction. Periodic reports and 
conferences required. Permission of the 
instructor and Department Chairperson. 

FIN 7527 Seminar in Investments 
(FI) (3). Examines analysis and 
measurement problems of investments. 
Includes the application of statistical 
techniques, current theoretical issues 
and empirical literature. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

FIN 7536 Seminar in Futures 
Markets (FI) (3). A comprehensive 
examination of the literature in futures 
markets. Emphasizes the structure and 
pricing of futures, and risk-manage- 
ment via hedging and arbitrage. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of the instructor. 

FIN 7606 International Corporate 
Finance (FI) (3). The study of topics of 
research interest to international 
financial decisions. Topics include 
foreign exchange risk, international 
financial markets, and foreign exchange 
market efficiency. Prereqisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

FIN 7807 Seminar in Corporate 
Finance (FI) (3). Familiarizes students 
with recent developments in finance 
theory. Includes such topics as the 
influence of leverage, uncertainty and 
the cost of capital, agency theory and 
related topics. Prerequisite: Permission 
of the instructor. 

FIN 7808 Financial Theory I (FI) (3). 
This course focuses on the theory of 
financial decision-making under 
certainty and risk. Includes investment 
under uncertainty, capital structure, 
dividend, asset valuation, and options 
pricing. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 



FIN 7809 Financial Theory II (FI) 

(3). This course focuses on the theory 
of financial decision-making under 
certainty and risk. Includes investment 
under uncertainty, capital structure, 
dividend, asset valuation, and options 
pricing. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

FIN 7810 Financial Theory III (FI) 

(3). This sequel to Financial Theory I 
and II focuses in on microfmance. 
Discusses issues primarily in corporate 
finance such as effects of taxation, 
agency theory, and signaling theory. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

FIN 7811 Seminar in Financial 
Markets and Institutions (FI) (3). 

Examines recent developments in 
economic and financial theories as 
applied to topics such as the structure 
of financial markets and the economics 
of information and financial institu- 
tions. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. 

FIN 7812 Seminar in Options and 
Contingent Claims (FI) (3). An 
examination of the theories of option 
valuation and arbitrage pricing, and 
their applications to security analysis, 
portfolio management and financial 
instrument valuation. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

FIN 7816 Seminar in Portfolio 
Theory (FI) (3). Examines investment 
and portfolio theory, with emphasis on 
the historical development of the 
literature in this area and the recent 
analytical and empirical work. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of the instructor. 

FIN 7818 Foundations of Financial 
Models (FI) (3). Introduction to 
mathematical and economic models 
underlying the development of modem 
finance theory. Includes discrete and 
continuous time models in finance 
using stochastic calculus. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 

FIN 7845 Statistical Methods in 
Finance I (FI) (3). Estimation, and 
testing of various economic and 
financial models. Emphasis on 
econometric techniques to deal with 
various problems of single-equation 
models and introduction to 
simultaneous equation. Prerequisite; 
Instructor's permission. 

FIN 7846 Statistical Methods in 
Finance II (FI) (3). Emphasis on 
econometric techniques and multi- 
variate statistics as applied in finance. 



Includes simultaneous equation 
models, multiple discriminant analysis 
and factor analysis. Prerequisite: 
Instructor's permission. 

FIN 7855 Financial Economics I (FI) 
(3). An advance doctoral course 
covering selected advanced topics in 
Microeconomic foundations and other 
topics related to business. Emphasis 
will be on economics of uncertainty, 
agency problems, information and 
signaling. Prerequisite: ECO 7115 or 
Permission of the instructor. 

FIN 7856 Financial Economics II (FI) 
(3). An advanced doctoral course 
covering selected advanced topics in 
the theory of macrofinance. Emphasis 
will be on financial intermediation. 
Prerequisite: ECO 7206 or Permission 
of the instructor. 

FIN 7906 Finance Doctoral 
Independent Study (3). Supervised 
research projects determined by 
professor and student. May involve 
conferences, supervised reading, and 
reports. Prerequisites: Consent of 
sponsoring professor and Chairperson 
required, (on demand) 

FIN 7916 Finance Doctoral Research 
Project (3). Intensive research project 
conducted during the summer 
following the student's first and second 
years of coursework. Each student 
develops his/her own research project 
under the supervision of a faculty 
member. Prerequisite: Graduate 

standing, (on demand) 

FIN 7936 Finance Doctoral Seminar 
(3). College colloquium series featuring 
presenters fi'om various academic 
disciplines and businesses. Prereq- 
uisite: (on demand). 

FIN 7980 Ph.D. Dissertation (1-12). 

Original research that is supervised by 
a faculty committee and defended 
openly before the university committee. 
Prerequisites: Permission of Major 
Professor and Doctoral Candidacy. 

FIN 7981 Finance Dissertation 
Preparation (3). Preparatory back- 
ground research and study to begin 
development of dissertation proposal. 
Students should be able to complete 
proposal by the end of the course. 
Prerequisites: Completion of TIER 1 
courses, (on demand) 

GEB 6907 Community Service 
Learning (3). The Integration of 
classroom theory with experimental 
learning in community service 



202 College of Business Administration 



Graduate Catalog 



participation, development, and 
management of community service 
projects, especially those associated 
with the business community. 

GEB 6941C Graduate Busiaess 
Internship (3-6). This program allows 
graduate students to work in jobs 
significantly related to their major area 
of study and career goals. This is 
supervised work with carefully 
designed and monitored work 
assignments. Specific placement must 
be approved by the faculty advisor 
prior to enrollment. Work performed 
on the current job cannot be used for 
internship credit. Prerequisite: 

Graduate Students. 

GEB 7906 Independent Study for 
Doctoral Students (1-15). Supervised 
research projects determined by 
professor and student. May involve 
conferences, supervised reading, and 
reports. Consent of sponsoring 
professor and chairperson required, (on 
demand) 

GEB 7910 Quantitative Research 
Methods in Business (3). This course 
introduces a structured approach to 
quantitative research methods such as 
surveys, experiments, data analysis, and 
multi-criteria analysis of judgements. 

GEB 7911 Qualitative Research 
Methods in Business (3). This course 
introduces a structured approach to 
qaulitative research in business. It 
includes study of methods such as case 
studies, ethnography, archival studies, 
and action research. 

GEB 7916 Doctoral Research Project 
in Business (BA) (1-15). Intensive 
research project conducted during the 
summer following the student's first 
and second years of coursework. Each 
student develops his/her own research 
project under the supervision of a 
faculty member. Prerequisite; Graduate 
standing, (on demand) 

GEB 7930 Seminar on Research in 
Emerging ICT and their Impications 
(3). This seminar will examine research 
on emerging information technologies, 
their application, and their implications 
for organizations and strategy. 

GEB 7931 Seminar on Research in 
Emerging Organizations (3). 

Globalization, de-regulation, and 
information-communication techno- 
logies are changing how organizations 
are coordinated and managed. This 
seminar examines emerging research in 
managing such organizations. 



GEB 7932 Seminar on Research in 
Managing Distributed Operations 
(3). This seminar examines research 
issues arising as a consequence of 
global distribution of operations, as 
enabled by ICT and globalization of 
business. 

GEB 7933 Seminar on Research in 
Measurement and Valuation in 
Knowledge Economy (3). Exam- 
ination of research on measurement and 
valuation of digital, knowledge, and 
relationship assets in knowledge 
economy. 

GEB 7934 Business as Dynamic 
Systems (3). This seminar course 
provides a systems theoretic framework 
for understanding and analysing 
organizations. Hard and Soft Systems, 
Systems Dynamics, Complexity 
Theories are examined. 

GEB 7935 Seminar on Research in 
Collaborative and Competitive 
Strategies in Global Economy (3). 

This seminar course examines research 
in emerging strategic transition from 
competitive to cooperative strategies in 
the context of internationalization and 
globalization. 

GEB 7936 Doctoral Seminar in 
Business Administration (BA) (1). 
College colloquium series featuring 
presenters from various academic 
disciplines and businesses. (on 
demand) 

GEB 7937 Seminar on Research in 
Acquiring and Implementing IS (3). 
Examination of research and theory on 
the acquisition, development, imple- 
mentation of information systems. 

GEB 7980 Ph.D. Dissertation (BA) 
(1-12). Original research that is 
supervised by a faculty committee and 
defended openly before the university 
committee. Prerequisite: Permission of 
Major Professor and Doctoral 
Candidacy. 

GEB 7981 Dissertation Preparation 
(1-10). Preparatory background 
research and study to begin 
development of dissertation proposal. 
Students should be able to complete 
proposal by the end of the course. 
Prerequisite; Completion of TIER 1 
courses, (on demand) 

ISM 6045 Current Economic and 
Social Implications of Information 
Systems (DS) (3). Effects and 
implications of socioeconomic factors 
in the operation of information systems 



and interdependence with the legal and 
international business environment. 
Privacy and fraud; computer system 
purchase and lease contracts; econom- 
ics of system design, selection and 
operation; electronic fund transfers and 
mail; international considerations. Pre- 
requisites: MAN 6830 and MAN 3025. 

ISM 6106 Systems Analysis (DS) (3). 
A study of the systems approach to 
problem solving as it applies to any 
area of specialization. Consideration of 
the problems in determining system 
objectives; identifying system bound- 
aries and constraints; marshaling 
resources for achieving system ob- 
jectives; analyzing the sub-components 
of the system and their respective 
objectives; and managing the system. 
Prerequisites; MAN 6830, CGS 3403, 
and COP 2210. 

ISM 6136 Data Mining and Analysis 

(3). Introduction to concepts of data 
mining, survey of techniques, models 
and applications. Comprehensive 
access and analysis of the organization 
data warehouse. Examination of 
knowledge discovery process to extract 
business rules and decision-aids. 
Prerequisite: Permission of Department 
and Introductory Statistics. 

ISM 6155 Information Systems 
Development (DS) (3). Concepts and 
methods used in the analysis and 
design of MIS. Feasibility study, 
system flow charting, data require- 
ments analysis, data design, user 
friendly systems design. Systems 
design project. Prerequisite: MAN 
6830 or equivalent. 

ISM 6156 Enterprise Information 
Systems (DS) (3). Introduces concepts 
of enterprise-wide computing, informa- 
tion architecture, process design, data 
models, and client/server computing. 

ISM 6157 Enterprise System Config- 
uration (DS) (3). 

ISM 6158 Enterprise-Wide System 
Administration (DS) (3). This course 
will expose students to key aspects 
involved in the implementation and 
operation of the R/3 system and will 
provide the technical and conceptual 
foundation necessary for developing 
appropriate strategies and approaches 
for implementation and maintenance of 
an enterprise-wide system. 

ISM 6205 Database Management 

(DS) (3). The course addresses 
techniques for structuring and manag- 
ing data in organizations. Discusses 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Business Administration 203 



data concepts, data modeling, database 
requirements definition, conceptual, 
logical, and physical design, data 
administration, and distributed data- 
base management. Prerequisite: MAN 
6830. 

ISM 6217 Database Administration 

(3). Administration of the physical 
realization of database, which includes 
studying physical database design, 
understanding database server 
architecture, studying recovery, and 
tuning the database. Prerequisite: ISM 
6205. 

ISM 6222 Telecommunications 
Network (DS) (3). This course will 
focus on providing the student with 
fijndamental understanding of the 
various concepts involved in modem 
data communica-tion and networking 
installations, along with its 
implications in the design of 
information systems. 

ISM 6225 Global Applications of 
Information Technology (3). Ex- 
amines information technology use in 
the intemational arena, e.g. for 
communication within a multinational 
corporation, or communication with 
customers, suppliers in another 
country. Topics include: transborder 
data flow; global connectivity through 
Telecommunications; IT transfer across 
national boundaries, management of IT 
in multinational corporations; case 
studies or global IT use. Prerequisite: 
MAN 6830 or equivalent. 

ISM 6305 Information Systems 
Planning (DS) (3). An in-depth study 
of systems concepts, as they apply to 
information systems in organizations. 
Consideration of planning for systems 
development and its accomplishment 
through the phases of the life cycle, and 
of the overall management of the 
information systems function. 

Prerequisites: MAN 6830 and MAN 
3025. 

ISM 6316 Project Management of 
Information Sciences (3). This course 
examines the defining characteristics of 
IT projects and introduces a variety of 
relevant techniques. The course 
includes project manager functions like 
managing scope, time, quality, and 
cost. Prerequisites: ISM 6205, ISM 
6106, ISM 6156. 

ISM 6326 Information Security (3). 
This course explores firwalls, digital 
signatures, encryption and other 
methods of security. It teaches students 



how to implement these techniques in 
■ the development and maintenance of 
information systems. Corequisite: ISM 
6222. 

ISM 6357 Computer Administration 
(DS) (3). The theory and computer 
management. Topics include selection, 
training, job and performance 
evaluation, and incentive schemes as 
they relate to key positions of systems 
analysis, programming, data prepara- 
tion and entry, and project manage- 
ment. Special attention is given to 
human resources management and 
development at various levels within 
the EDP department. 

ISM 6405 Management Support 
Systems (DS) (3). Concept of decision 
support is examined in a management 
decision context. Types of applied 
decision support and expert systems in 
business are surveyed. Prerequisite: 
MAN 6830. 

ISM 6423 Knowledge Management 

(3). This course explores the basic 
concepts of managing organizational 
intellectual capital, including appro- 
priate information technologies ranging 
from Intranets to Artificial Intelligence. 

ISM 6455 Microcomputer Applica- 
tions in Business (DS) (3). 

Fundamentals and comparison of 
contemporary microcomputers. Exten- 
sive usage of available software for 
making business decisions. Emphasis 
on small business applications and 
cases. Student projects. Prerequisites: 
Computer programming proficiency, 
MAN 4504 and COS 3300 or MAN 
6501 and 6830. 

ISM 6507 Electronic Commerce 
Strategy (3). This course will teach 
students strategies for the electronic 
commerce landscape to help them 
develop and execute a business plan for 
creating an e-business startup. 
Prerequisites: Technlogy of EC; ISM 
6316. 

ISM 6930 Special Topics in Manage- 
ment Information Systems (DS) (1-6). 

To study the recent developments in 
the MIS field not otherwise offered in 
the curriculum, such as office 
automation, computer graphics, etc. 
Prerequisites: Advanced standing and 
department chairman approval. 

ISM 7083 Deterministic Decision 
Models (DS) (3). This course deals 
with the optimal decision making and 
modeling of deterministic systems that 
originate from real life. These 



applications, which occur in 
government, business, engineering, 
economics, and the natural and social 
sciences, are largely characterized by 
the need to allocate limited resources. 

ISM 7087 Probabilistic Decision 
Models (DS) (3). This course deals 
with the optimal decision making and 
modeling of probabilistic systems that 
originate from real life. These 
applicahons, which occur in govern- 
ment, business, engineering, econom- 
ics, and the natural and social sciences, 
are largely characterized by the need to 
allocate limited resources. 

ISM 7126 Seminar on Systems 
Analysis (DS) (3). A system theorefic 
approach to understanding and 
analysing the role of information in 
organizations. Includes systems 

approach, systems dynamics, soft 
systems and complexity theoretic 
prospects. 

ISM 7152 Seminar on System 
Acquisition and Implementation (DS) 

(3). Theory and research on 
methodologies, tools, and techniques 
for acquiring, developing, and 
implementing informafion systems in 
organizations. 

ISM 7306 Seminar on Strategy and 
Information Resource (DS) (3). 

Theory and research on strategic 
perspective on the management of the 
information resources. Relates IT 
strategy and management to corporate 
startegy. 

ISM 7345 Seminar on IS and 
Organizations: Design and Impact 
(DS) (3). Theory and research on the 
impact of IS on organizational design 
and structure. 

ISM 7406 Decision Support Systems 
(DS) (3). Theory and research on the 
design of decision aids. Integrating 
models and data with a technological 
delivery system that supports 
unstructured problem-solving by 
executive. 

MAN 5524 Advanced Production 
Management (DS) (3). More advanced 
methods in master planning, fore- 
casting, capacity management, produc- 
tion activity scheduling/control, MRP 
and inventory management. This course 
has a professional orientation similar to 
the APICS certification guidelines. 
Prerequisite: MAN 4504 or MAN 
6501, or Department Chair-person's 
approval. 



204 College of Business Administration 



Graduate Catalog 



MAN 5930 Seminar in Personnel 
Management (MA) (3). Overview and 
examination of the various aspects of 
the personnel management function. 

MAN 6051 Organization and Man- 
agement Process (MA) (3). Analysis 
of organizations including the evolu- 
tion of management thought and the 
effects of technology and the environ- 
ment on the organization. Emphasis 
will be on such concepts as division of 
work, delegation and decentralization, 
leadership, motivation, work satis- 
faction; as well as planning, organiz- 
ing, directing, and controlling. 

MAN 6066 Business Ethics (MA) (3). 
Practical approaches for addressing 
ethical conflicts in organizational 
administration. Emphasis will be 
placed on developing participants' 
ability to accurately diagnose 
organizational ethics problems and 
determine constructive solutions. 

MAN 6085 Introduction to E- 
Business (3). Survey of the various 
types of E-Business, their economic, 
fmancial, accounting, ethical, legal and 
regulatory implications and their 
impact on major traditional industries. 
Also, examines how to build business 
models leading to profitable business. 
Prerequisite: Acceptance of the degree 
program. 

MAN 6121 Interpersonal Beliavior 
and Analysis (MA) (3). A human 
interaction/human relations training 
laboratory, designed to increase both 
self-awareness and understanding of 
behavior dynamics in groups. Course is 
intended to enable students to broaden 
their conceptual understanding of 
human interpersonal communications 
and conflict. 

MAN 6145 Intuition in Management 
(MA) (3). Interdisciplinary study of 
intuition and its applications in 
management. Apply learnings in a term 
project. Prepare Intuitive Experience 
Logs to discover intuition firsthand. 
Prerequisite: Computer Competency. 

MAN 6157 Wellness Management 
(2). This course focuses on the 
management of employee well-being, 
broadly defined and including safety, 
security, mental, attitudinal, and health- 
related outcomes. 

MAN 6204 Organization and 
Management Tlieory (MA) (3). 
Analysis and design of the structure 
and process of complex organizations. 
Effects of task uncertainty, growth, 



power, goals, and information 
technology on organization structure 
and control. 

MAN 6209 Organization Design and 
Behavior (MA) (3). Covers how 
managers interact with organizations to 
accomplish complex tasks by 
examining how strategy, structure and 
systems interact with behavioral 
variables. 

MAN 6245 Organizational Behavior 
(MA) (3). Individual, interpersonal, 
and small group behavior in complex 
organizations. Focus on behavior, its 
causes, and management interventions 
to improve organizational effect- 
iveness. Research methods to study 
organizational behavior. 

MAN 6265 Group Processes in 
Organizations (MA) (3). The social 
and psychological processes of 
organizational functioning. The roles 
played by small groups in 
organizational settings. 

MAN 6295 Conflict in Organizations 
(MA) (3). A critical examination of the 
role and impact of interpersonal and 
intergroup conflict in organizations. 
Models as approaches to utilizing and 
resolving conflict toward constructive 
personal and organization ends will be 
emphasized. 

MAN 6297 Labor Issues and Conflict 
Management (3). This course covers 
skills to enhance conflict management 
of disputes. It is designed to teach 
students methods to productively 
manage interpersonal disputes 
between/among parties. 

MAN 6311 Advanced Personnel 
Management (MA) (3). Attention is 
focused on the theory and practice of 
modem personnel management, as 
related to other management fiinctions. 
Topics include selection; training; job 
and performance evaluation; and 
incentive schemes. Special attention is 
given to human resources management 
and development at various 
organizational levels. 

MAN 6316 Human Resource 
Management Effectiveness (3). This 
course focuses on the linkage between 
human resources and the organization's 
financial plan. This includes 

budgeting, controlling, and measuring 
HRM impact. 

MAN 6317 Critical Thinldng in 
Human Resource Management (2). 
This course focuses on developing 



critical thinking skills to solve complex 
and multidemnsional human resource 
management problems. The course 
will emphasize the analysis and 
discussion of cases. 

MAN 6321 Personnel Selection and 
Placement (MA) (3). Individual 
differences and their measurement in 
personnel selection and job placement. 
Job design and redesign. 

MAN 6327 High Performance 
Human Resource Management (3). 

This course focuses on human resource 
practices that motivate and empower 
employees to excel on their job by 
fostering their participation and 
involvement in organizational decision- 
making. 

MAN 6328C Applied Methods in 
Human Resource Management (3). 

This course focuses on the application 
of research design and measurement 
theory to solve human resource 
problems. The emphasis is on applied 
methodology rather than on statistical 
issues. 

MAN 6331 Compensation Adminis- 
tration (MA) (3). An in-depth analysis 
of Wages and salary administration, 
including such topics as job evaluation; 
wage incentive systems; and work 
sampling. 

MAN 6336 Reward Systems 
Management (3). This course covers 
all aspects of compensation and reward 
systems such as the strategic alignment 
of compensation and other HR systems, 
job evaluation, merit - and skill-based 
pay, cost-effective benefit programs, 
and flexible pay. 

MAN 6347 Performance Manage- 
ment (3). This course focuses on the 
development and implementation of 
effective performance management 
systems. Multi-source, and electronic 
performance monitoring will be 
covered. 

MAN 6351 Personnel Training and 
Development (MA) (3). Determining 
training needs. Training methods. The 
training staff. Supervisor development. 
Equal Employment Opportunity man- 
agement. 

MAN 6356 Professional Develop- 
ment Seminar I (1). 

MAN 6357 Professional Develop- 
ment Seminar II (1). 

MAN 6358 Professional Develop- 
ment Seminar III (1). 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Business Administration 205 



MAN 6359 Human Resource 
Knowledge Management (3). This 
course focuses on the development of 
the organization's human capital. The 
identification of learning needs, current 
and fiiture performance problems, and 
leadership development will be 
discussed. 

MAN 6365 Stafflng Organizations 
(3). This course focuses on the 
identification, recruitment, selection 
and promotion of successfijl 
employees. 

MAN 6367 Career and Succession 
Planning (2). This course is based on 
an integrated "system thinking" model 
used to create and manage effective 
succession planning and leadership 
development processes. 

MAN 6368 Human Resource 
Deployment (3). This course focuses 
on the staffing, organization, training, 
and management of rapid response 
operations. 

MAN 6385 Human Resource 
Strategy and Planning (3). This 
course discusses the notion of strategic 
planning in the context of human 
resurce management. Alignment of 
culture and strategy. HR inventories 
and forecasting. 

MAN 6403 Employment Law and 
Human Resource Management (3). 

This course focuses on the legal and 
regulatory factors surrounding human 
resources management. The emphasis 
will be on creating awareness of legal 
constraints when making HR business 
decisions. 

MAN 6405 Labor Relations (MA) 
(3). Examines the collective bargaining 
system in the United States fi-om the 
viewpoint of the practitioner. Various 
aspects of the environment, structure, 
processes, issues and impact of 
collective bargaining are considered. 
Special attention is given to the 
negotiation and administration of 
agreements. 

MAN 6411 Collective Bargaining 
Topics (MA) (3). An advanced course 
in labor relations for students with 
some background who desire more 
depth than that provided in 
introductory courses. Topics of 
contemporary interest, such as public 
sector collective negotiations, are 
treated at length. 

MAN 6416 Corporate Negotiations 
(MA) (3). An examination and analysis 



of corporate negotiation strategies in 
such areas as collective bargaining, 
mergers, joint ventures, and with 
government regulation agencies. The 
legal environment affecting the 
negotiated process will be closely 
scrutinized, as well as internal and 
extemal political processes. 

Prerequisites: ACG 6026, MAN 6245, 
FIN 6428, MAR 6805. 

MAN 6446 Negotiations (MA/ME) 
(3). Negotiations are the processes of 
creating agreements between two or 
more parties. This course will introduce 
students to the art of negotiations in 
business transactions. The class will 
include a svide variety of negotiation 
cases. 

MAN 6501 Operations Management 
(DS) (3). This course covers analysis, 
design, and operations of organiza- 
tional systems. The systems approach is 
used to provide a framework or general 
model of analysis, to which specific 
concepts, quantitative techniques, and 
tools can be related. The material 
presented has application to any 
organization of people and machines, 
including hospitals, govem-mental 
agencies, service organizations, and 
industrial concerns. Prerequisite: QMB 
6357 or Pass QMB waiver exam. 

MAN 6525 Managing for Toul 
Quality (3). Addresses underlying 
management assumptions, methods, 
tools, culture and philosophy of total 
quality management - TQM. 

MAN 6529 Seminar in Production 
Control Systems (DS) (3). The control 
systems for production operations 
automation and its impact on 
organizations. Integrated operational- 
simulation approach. Group and 
individual projects. 

MAN 6559 Seminar in Management 
Science (DS) (3). New topics 
application areas will be explored. 
Lectures will relate to the latest 
advances in the theory and application 
of management science. Prerequisite: 
Instructor's approval. 

>L\N 6569 Managerial Decision- 
Making (DS) (3). This course will 
investigate and analyze the decision- 
making problems that managers face in 
business, volunteer organizations, 
government, and the public sector. 
Emphasis will be placed on providing a 
variety of decision-making experiences 
for the student. Prerequisite: QMB 
6603 or equivalent. 



NL\N 6585 Productivitv' Manage- 
ment Seminar (DS) (3). Analysis of 
productivity in manufacturing and 
service organizations and methodology 
for productivity improvement. Ex- 
tensive cases, projects, tours, and 
guests speakers. Prerequisite: Graduate 
students (or CBA certificate students). 

>LVN 6601 International Manage- 
ment (MA) (3). This course examines 
the functions of management in an 
international context: organization, 
communication, strategic planning, 
control, motivation, leadership, and 
human resource management. The 
topics include the cultural differences 
behind different managerial styles and 
customs. 

MAN 6603 Problems in Comparative 
Management (MA) (3). Discussion of 
literature, readings, and cases, aimed at 
underscoring the differences and 
similanties in management behavior in 
different countries and cultures. 
General instruction in obtaining and 
utilizing comparative data on 
management differences. 

MAN 6606 International Business 
Environment (ME, MA) (3). A 

macro-examination of economic, 
political, and cultural variables affect- 
ing the organization. Emphasis will be 
placed on social indications and 
societal forecasting of change; organ- 
izational responses to change; and the 
nature and rate of change in different 
societies. 

MAN 6608 International Business 
(MA) (3). This course examines the 
environmental variables affecting 
intemational operations, trade and 
investment theories, intemational 
institutions, and regional economic 
groups. It also focuses on intemational 
finance, international accounting, 
intemational marketing, and inter- 
national management problems and 
issues. 

MAN 6615 Intemational Labor- 
Management Relations (\L4) (3). 

Comparative analysis of selected 
industnal relations systems and impact 
on multinational firms and intema- 
tional labor movements. Emphasis on 
einpirical models and management- 
oriented case studies. 

MAN 6617 Managing Global 
Production and Technology (MA) 
(3). An exploration of the management 
of technology and its relationship to the 
dynamics of globalization of 



206 College of Business Administrarion 



Graduate Catalog 



production in both manufacturing and 
service industries. Prerequisite: MAN 
6608. 

MAN 6626 International Human 
Resource Management (3). Decisions 
about how to recruit, train, compensate, 
and manage global employees; cross- 
cultrual differences in values; 
managing the international asignee. 

MAN 6635 International Business 
Policy (MA) (3). An analysis of 
corporate strategies in a rapidly 
developing and changing world 
environment. Emphasis will be placed 
on forecasting, planning, and 
contingency strategies. The course is 
taught by case method and stresses the 
environmental and institutional 
constraints on decision making within 
the organization. Corporate executives 
are invited to attend whenever possible. 
Prerequisites: ACG 6026, MAN 6245, 
FIN 6428, and MAR 6805 and Man 
6603 or Man 6608. 

MAN 6675 Special Topics in 
International Business (MA) (3). For 
groups of students who wish to study 
intensively a particular topic, or a 
limited number of topics, in 
international business, not offered 
elsewhere in the curriculum. Prereq- 
uisites: Approval of the faculty advisor. 
Department Chairperson, and Dean. 

MAN 6676 Global e-Business 

Environment (3). Systematic review of 
the economic, financial, socio-political 
and infrastructure environments in 
which global e-business activity takes 
place. Introduces methods to evaluate 
the opportunities and constraints for e- 
business in a country. Prerequisite: 
Intro to e-business. 

MAN 6679 Master's Project in 
International Business (MA) (3). An 
individual research project on an 
international business problem, which 
may include field work (including 
internship), library research, computer 
modeling, or the use of an approved 
research methodology. Prerequisites: 
Assignment of faculty advisor and 
permission of Department Chairperson. 

MAN 6695 Independent Study in 
Business (MA) (3). Individual 
conferences; supervised readings; 
reports on personal investigations. 
Prerequisites: Assignment of faculty 
tutor and written permission of 
Department Chairperson, and Dean. 

MAN 6703 Colloquium in Managing 
Organizational Ethics (1). Manage- 



ment issues, responsibilities, and 
techniques associated with public and 
private expectations for ethical 
performance of large-scale organiza- 
tions. 

MAN 6706 Crisis Management (3). 
Response to crises such as product 
recalls, product tampering, industrial 
accidents, and violence in the 
workplace. 

MAN 6715 Business Environment 
and Public Policy (MA) (3). An 
examination of the economic, political, 
social and moral context in which 
management decisions are made. The 
focus is on the public policy 
environment of business, whereby 
community direction is transformed 
into corporate behavior. 

MAN 6726 Strategic Management 
(MA) (3). The use of cases, guest 
lectures, and gaming to integrate the 
analysis and measurement tools, the 
functional areas and public policy 
issues. The objective is to develop skill 
in broad areas of rational decision- 
making in an administrative context of 
uncertainty. Should be taken in the last 
semester of master's program. 

MAN 6727 Doing Business in the 
Marketplace (DS) (3). Give students 
practical lessons on the emerging world 
of the marketplace & teach them how 
to manage and make money there. 
Show how managing in the market- 
place works with managing in the 
marketplace. Prerequisite: MAN 6830. 

MAN 6746 Global Environmental 
Management (ME) (3). An explora- 
tion of the national, regional, and 
global forces emerging and influencing 
the management of the business firm's 
impact on the physical environment. A 
review existing and developing 
environmental management theories 
and control systems for business. 

MAN 6758 Project Consulting (3). 

Introduction to the basic principles, 
methodologies and tools of modem 
business consulting and project 
management as practiced by the large 
management consulting firms. 
Prerequisite: MAN 6830. 

MAN 6805 Entrepreneurship (MA) 
(3). A discussion of the general 
theories, principles, concepts and 
practices of entrepreneurship. Heavy 
emphasis is placed on lecture, readings, 
case studies and group projects. 



MAN 6830 Organization Informa- 
tion Systems (DS) (3). Introduction to 
information systems and their role in 
organizations from a user's viewpoint. 
Survey and application of the basic 
concepts necessary for understanding 
information systems. Study of the main 
activities in the development cycle used 
to acquire information systems 
capability. 

MAN 6830L Organization Informa- 
tion Systems Laboratory (DS) (1). 

Laboratory applications for MAN 
6830. 

MAN 6908 Independent Study in 
Business Environment (MA) (3). 

Independent project in the political, 
economic, social, cultural, ethical, or 
governmental relations environment of 
business. Directed study with a 
business environment faculty member. 
Prerequisites: MAN 6715, MAN 6606 
and Permission of the instructor. 

MAN 6910 Research Methods in 
Management (MA) (3). Covers the 
research methods and analytical 
techniques most widely used in 
research in human resources and 
general management. Emphasis is on 
helping students to become more aware 
of current techniques and their 
applications. 

MAN 6911 Research in Systems 
Development (DS) (3). Conduct an 
individual research project or thesis on 
a topic in the area of computer 
personnel, systems analysis and design, 
or other areas within the framework of 
the MIS program, subject to the 
instructor's approval. Prerequisite: ISM 
6155. 

MAN 6930 Master's Seminar in 
Management (MA) (1-3). An 
examination of recent research findings 
in selected areas of current concern. 
Emphasis is placed on readings; active 
discussion; and small, short-term action 
and research projects. The student may 
make a preliminary selection of his/her 
master's thesis or project topic. 
Prerequisites: Consent of faculty 
sponsor. Department Chairperson, and 
Dean. 

MAN 6937 Special Topics in 
Business Environment (3). A review 
of a contemporary dimension of 
business' environment in a field of 
faculty specialization. Prerequisites: 
MAN 6523, MAN 6606 or equivalent. 

MAN 6974 Master's Project in 
Management (MA) (1-6). Each 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Business Administration 207 



student is required to develop and 
conduct an individual research project 
or thesis on a topic of interest. The 
topic will be chosen in consultation 
with a faculty member in the College. 

MAN 6xxx Colloquium in Managing 
Organizational Etiiics (ME) (1). This 
course introduces students to core 
concepts and practices of managing 
ethical issues in business firms. Using 
cases, readings and speakers from the 
business community, the course teaches 
leadership skills and organiza-tional 
design strategies to resolve ethical 
business dilemmas in personal-ly, 
professionally and environmentally 
responsible ways. Topics covered 
include: personal values and ethics; 
creating and maintaining ethical work 
climates; ethical issues in stakeholder 
management, ethics in the global 
business environment, and ethical 
issues in managing technology and 
innovation. 

MAN 7146 Leadersliip I (MA) (3). 

Course identifies leadership theories 
and research bearing on modem 
management practice. Behavioral, 
situational and transformational 
theories of leadership are emphasized, 
compared and evaluated. 

MAN 7147 Leadersliip II (MA) (3). 
Draws on research and case studies for 
understanding of adaptive leadership in 
turbulent, uncertain environments. 
Emphasis on effective management of 
innovation, entrepreneurial activity and 
new ventures. 

MAN 7148 Intuition in Management 

(3). In-depth study of the nature and 
development of the intuitive process 
emphasizing its role in management 
decision making and its relationship to 
rational problem solving. Prerequisite: 
Permission of the instructor. 
Corequisite: MAN 7148L. 

MAN 7155 Fundamentals of 
Behavioral Research (MA) (3). 
Analytical tools to conduct systematic 
research. Methods of data collection in 
lab, survey and field research. 
Emphasis on principles of measurement 
and statistics to interpret/report 
behavioral data. 

MAN 7206 Organizational Analysis 
(MA) (3). Develops skills in 
organizational problem-solving through 
applications of theory and research to 
actual problems. Emphasis on needs 
analysis, process consultation, team- 
building and action research. 



MAN 7207 Theories of Organization 
(MA) (3). Organization functioning 
from a macro perspective; emphasis on 
evolution, structure, design and 
processes of complex systems. Study of 
communication/information networks, 
inter-group processes and control 
strategies. 

MAN 7235 Management Philosophy 
and Strategy (MA) (3). Compares 
various cross-cultural management 
philosophies to structure and function 
of different types of organizations. 
Emphasis on how to develop and 
implement a management strategy for 
maximum productivity in different 
organizations. 

MAN 7275 Organizational Behavior 
Management (MA) (3). An 
introduction to the study of human 
behavior in organizations. Emphasis is 
given to management of individual and 
group processes including conflict 
attitudes, decision making, motivation 
and stress. 

MAN 7305 Human Resource Man- 
agement (MA) (3). Personnel manage- 
ment topics including personnel 
selection, performance appraisal, train- 
ing design, employee development, and 
compensation administration. Legal 
and practical issues are emphasized. 

MAN 7412 Labor-Management 
Topics (MA) (3). Presents various 
aspects of the labor-management 
relationship to provide a contemporary 
perspective. Emphasis on structure, 
processes, strategies and legal issues in 
collective negotiation and industrial 
relations. 

MAN 7529 Seminar in Operations 
Management (DS) (3). Concepts, tools 
and recent research developments in 
the design, planning and control of 
operations management systems in 
business and service organizations. 
Prerequisite: ISM 7083. Corequisite: 
ISM 7084. 

MAN 7609 Comparative Manage- 
ment (MA) (3). Course focus is cross- 
cultural management, i.e., how cultural 
values influence managerial behavior. 
The problems of cross-cultural 
communications, leadership, motiva- 
tion, and decision making are examin- 
ed. Prerequisites: Admission to 
Doctoral program and completion of 
Doctoral core. 

MAN 7616 Multinational Firm 
Global Strategy (MA) (3). Overview 
of the strategic management and 



international business concepts that 
frame strategic activity in MNCs. 
Competitive business strategies in 
global and multidomestic industries. 
Prerequisite: Completion of business 
Ph.D. core. 

MAN 7620 International Business 
Operations I (MA) (3). Examination 
of the fiinctional management, 
operations and concerns of interna- 
tional businesses. Emphasizes analysis 
of problems in managing joint 
ventures, licensing, barter, and tech- 
nology transfer. Prerequisites: Admis- 
sion to Doctoral program and 
completion of doctoral core. 

MAN 7621 International Business 
Operations II (MA) (3). Focus on 
political, economic, and national 
security issues which influence IB 
operations or strategies. Examines 
techniques for political and economic 
risk, assessment and reactions to such 
influences. Prerequisites: Admission to 
Doctoral program and completion of 
doctoral core. 

MAN 7640 International Business 
Research Methods (MA) (3). 
Overview of IB academic research, 
emphasizing topics, literature, methods, 
information sources, applications, 
problems, and journal characteristics. 
Prerequisites: Admission to business 
Doctoral program and completion of 
doctoral core. 

MAN 7718 Analysis of Corporate 
Policy Methods (MA) (3). Links 
functional areas of management to 
provide integrated view of organization 
and public policy. Emphasis on 
measurement, analysis and 

conceptualization of organization as a 
totality of operations. 

MAN 7895 Seminar in Management 
(MA) (3). Key concepts in 
management ranging from individual 
worker styles to business ethics. 
Emphasis on topics such as men and 
women in organization, decision 
making styles, and attribution 
management. 

MAN 7910 Advanced Management 
Research (MA) (3). Covers 
applications of analytical methods in 
contemporary management research. 
Emphasis is given to complex research 
design strategies including multivariate 
techniques and multidimensional 
scaling. 



208 College of Business Administration 



Graduate Catalog 



MAR 6075 Current Issues in 
Marketing I (ME) (3). Intensive study 
of various topic areas in marketing. 
Course emphasizes student reading and 
research, with oral and written reports. 
Students electing to take this seminar 
may take no more than 3 credit hours of 
independent study in marketing. 
Prerequisite: MAR 6805. 

MAR 6158 International Marketing 
(ME) (3). This course discusses the 
nature and scope of international 
marketing, and explores problems 
facing multinational firms and other 
international marketing organizations, 
together with strategies for foreign 
market penetration. Prerequisite: MAR 
6805. 

MAR 6336 Integrated Marketing 
Communication (ME) (3). A broad 
introduction to the field of integrated 
marketing communications and how it 
fits into the marketing plan. Discussion 
of objective setting, budgeting, and 
media planning, as well as the strategic 
planning and evaluation of advertising 
media, sales promotion, public 
relations, direct marketing, personal 
selling and marketing communications 
on the internet. Prerequisite: MAR 
6805. 

MAR 6406 Sales Management (ME) 
(3). Analysis of personal selling's roles 
in marketing strategy using detailed 
case studies on field sales management, 
working with channel organization, and 
planning and controlling sales 
operations. Prerequisite: MAR 6805. 

MAR 6506 Consumer Beliavior (ME) 
(3). Modem comprehensive models of 
consumer behavior are utilized as a 
framework for understanding consumer 
decision processes. Prerequisite: MAR 
6805. 

MAR 6646 Managing Marketing 
Information (ME) (3). The role of 
research in providing information for 
marketing decision-making, including 
an examination of the research process 
and the tools available to the 
researcher. Prerequisite: MAR 6805 or 
Permission of the instructor. 

MAR 6675 Database Marketing 
(ME) (3). A practical approach to the 
use of database information to solve 
marketing problems. Emphasis is on 
obtaining, managing and using 
information about current and potential 
customers. Topics include data acqu- 
isition, data mining, list segmentation 
and customer modeling, and direct 



marketing, relationship marketing and 
customer lifetime value applications. 

MAR 6707 Current Issues in 
Marketing II (ME) (3). Students 
electing to take this seminar may not 
take independent study in marketing. 
Prerequisite: MAR 6075. 

MAR 6722 E-Marketing (3). 

Examines how e-business can 
transform the traditional marketing mix 
and how fundamental principles of 
marketing can be applied to develop e- 
business marketing plans. Pre- 

requisites: MAN 6085 (Intorduction to 
E-Business). 

MAR 6805 Marketing Management 
in the Global Environment (ME) (3). 
Analysis and application of theory and 
problem solving for marketing man- 
agement in the global environment. 
Emphasis will be on the role of 
marketing in the organization; planning 
the marketing effort; management of 
the marketing organization; control of 
marketing operations; and evaluation of 
the marketing contribution. 

MAR 6816 Corporate Simulation 

(ME) (3).- Course emphasis is on 
application and integration of concepts 
and tools, through participation in the 
marketing management of a firm in 
competition with other firms. The 
course's focal point is a computerized 
marketing management simulation. 
Prerequisite: ACG 6175, FIN 6428 & 
MAN 6501. 

MAR 6819 Marketing Strategy (ME) 
(3). A study of strategic marketing 
planning through case analysis and 
selected readings. Emphasis is on 
planning and problem solving 
processes, particularly directing, plan- 
ning, organizing, coordinating, and 
controlling as applied to a contempor- 
ary market-oriented organization. 
Prerequisites: MAR 6805 or 
equivalent. 

MAR 6838 Brand Management (ME) 

(3). The focus of this course is to 
provide a sound understanding of the 
function, issues and challenges of the 
brand or product manager. The scope 
of the course embraces U.S. and 
international situations and emphasis 
will be placed on analysis, strategy 
development and practical decision 
making. The course will draw on the 
students prior exposure to marketing 
management, research advertising and 
promotion and will provide insights 
and practice in application of these 



skills in the context of the product 
manager's roll in the enterprise. 

MAR 6915 Independent Study in 
Marketing (ME) (1-6). Individual 
conferences; supervised reading; 
reports on personal investigations. 
Consent of faculty tutor, Department 
Chairperson and Dean required. 

MAR 6936 Special Topics in 
Marketing (ME) (1-6). For groups of 
students desiring intensive study of a 
particular topic or a limited number of 
topics, not otherwise offered in the 
curriculum. Consent of faculty 
supervisor and Department Chair- 
person required. 

MAR 6XXX Negotiations (ME) (3). 
This course introduces students to the 
art and science of negotiations. The 
science involves learning about 
theories and methodologies which have 
been developed as guides for 
improving negotiated outcomes, and 
the art involves building negotiating 
skills and developing an understanding 
of one's own negotiating style through 
a series of realistic negotiations cases. 
The class will include a wide variety of 
negotiation cases, from two-person 
through multi-party and from simple 
issues of selling prices to multi-issue 
bargaining siutations. 

MAR 6XXX (e)Marketing (ME) (3). 
This course is designed to familiarize 
students with internet marketing. In 
particular, the course provides students 
with an understanding of the theory and 
practice of marketing on the internet. 
The course will include a critical 
evaluation of intemet applications 
appropriate to marketing management. 
Although both b2b and b2c 
applications are discussed, the 
emphasis on one or the other will vary, 
depending on the instructor. 

MAR 7205 Seminar in Channels of 
Distribution (ME) (3). Covers 
readings from the marketing, eco- 
nomics, logistics, organizational behav- 
ior, social psychology, and sociology 
literatures in developing a research 
perspective on channels of distribution. 

MAR 7246 Seminar in International 
Marketing (ME) (3). Examines major 
topics and theories in the international 
marketing literature. Analyzes various 
perspectives on business activities and 
strategies in global markets. 

MAR 7507 Seminar in Consumer 
Behavior (ME) (3). Covers the major 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Business Administration 209 



topics and theoretical perspectives in 

consumer behavior research, with 

emphasis on consumer decision 
making. 

MAR 7622 Marketing Research 
Methodology I (ME) (3). Philosophy, 
concepts, methods of marketing re- 
search design. Experimental methods, 
sampling procedures, measurement 
techniques, other methodological 
considerations. Prerequisites: Success- 
ful completion of first year research 
methods requirements in a College of 
Business Ph.D. Program or Permission 
of the instructor. 

MAR 7623 Seminar in Marketing 
Environment (ME) (3). Examines the 
role of marketing professionals in 
responding to social, economic, 
politcal, technological and ecological 
changes in the business environment. 
Addresses issues of marketing ethics, 
social accountability, and the design of 
responsible marketing strategies. 

MAR 7652 Seminar in Advertising 
and Persuasion (3). Covers the major 
topics and theoretical perspectives 
within the research literature 
addressing persuasive communications. 

MAR 7665 Seminar in Marketing 
Models (3). Examines the process of 
model building and the assumptions 
implicit in various modeling decisions. 
Emphasis in on learning to interpret, 
classify and critically evaluate models 
of marketing phenomena. Prerequisites; 
Calculus, Probability Theory, Statis- 
tics, and Matrix Algebra. 

MAR 7667 Seminar in Marketing 
Management (ME) (3). Covers 
programs of research related to the 
management of marketing organiza- 
tions and their role in improving 
organizational performance. Current 
and potential research topics will be 
considered from the perspective of 
leading scholars and marketing 
executives. 

MAR 7786 Seminar in Marketing 
Theory (ME) (3). Intensive analysis of 
the nature and role of hypotheses, 
generalizations, and empirical regu- 
larities. Critical examination of theories 
of marketing and interaction of 
marketing theory and practice. 

MAR 7815 Seminar in Foundations 
of Marketing Thought (ME) (3). 
Foundations of marketing, inter- 
disciplinary relationships; reviews 
major research areas: the marketing 
mix, consumer choice models, 



segmentation, stochastic, and analytical 
models. 

MAR 7845 Seminar in Services 
Marketing (ME) (3). Analyzes the 
nexus between services and marketing 
management. Identifies and appraises 
alternative corporate strategies within 
industries such as banking and finance, 
insurance, hospitality, entertainment 
and leisure, health care, and education. 

MAR 7875 Sectorial Marketing 
(ME) (3). Course includes retailing, 
wholesaling, pricing, distribution, 
advertising, sales promotion and 
management, personal selling, inter- 
national services and macromarketing; 
and marketing and economic 
development. 

MAR 7979 Doctoral Research in 
Marketing (ME) (1-6). Research while 
enrolled for a doctoral degree under the 
direction of faculty members. 
Prerequisite: Permission of Depart- 
ment. 

QMB 6357C Business Analysis for 
Decision Making (3). Review of the 
relevant quantitative techniques 
required for business analysis and 
decision making, including decision 
models, mathematical programming, 
statistics and forecasting. This is a 
WebCT and Excel based course. 
Prerequisites: College Algebra, com- 
puter literacy and working knowledge 
of Excel. 

QMB 6603 Quantitative Methods in 
Management (DS) (3). Introduction to 
basic quantitative tools for the analysis 
of problems arising in the management 
of organizations, and the application of 
these tools to real-life problems. 
Prerequisites: College Algebra and 
completion of the Computer 
Programming Proficiency requirement. 

QMB 6805 Deterministic Models for 
Management Analysis (DS) (3). 
Applications of deterministic models 
such as linear and nonlinear 
programming, network analysis 
(PERT), dynamic programming, and 
branch and bound algorithms) to 
managerial problems of allocation, 
planning, scheduling, investment, and 
control. 

QMB 6845 Simulation of Manage- 
ment Systems (DS) (3). Basic concepts 
of computer simulation of systems; 
application of these concepts to a 
variety of management problems. 
Industrial dynamics, urban dynamics, 
and large system simulation. 



Simulation in economic analysis, 
heuristic methods, and management 
games are covered. Prerequisites: MAN 
6569 and a Computer Programming 
Language. 

QMB 6855 Stochastic Models for 
Management Analysis (DS) (3). 

Applications of probabilistic models 
(such as queuing, inventory, and 
renewal) to their managerial problems. 

QMB 6875 Stochastic Models for 
Project Management (DS) (3). 

Review of deterministic models and 
principles. Introduction to GERT, 
critical path methods, criticality index, 
and resource considerations in 
stochastic networks. Emphasis on 
operational decision-making, advanced 
topics, and individual projects. 
Students use the computer, and existing 
programs, to analyze hypothetical 
project networks, and leam to interpret 
the results in order to facilitate 
operational decisions. (F) 

QMB 6905 Independent Study in 
Decision Sciences (DS) (1-6). 

Individual conferences; supervised 
readings; reports on personal 
investigations. Consent of instructor, 
Department Chairperson and Dean 
required. P/F only. 

QMB 6934 Seminar in Decision 
Sciences (DS) (1-3). An examination of 
recent research findings in selected 
areas of current concem. Emphasis is 
placed on readings; active discussion; 
and small, short-term action and 
research projects. Consent of instructor 
required. 

QMB 6974 Project in Decision 
Sciences (DS) (1-6). Each student is 
required to develop and conduct an 
individual research project or thesis on 
a topic of interest. The topic will be 
chosen in consultation with a faculty 
member in the College and approved 
by the Department Chairperson. 

QMB 7935 Seminar in Decision 
Sciences (DS) (3). Critical review and 
analysis of recent and important 
research developments in the area of 
decision sciences. Prerequisites: ISM 
7083 and ISM 7087. 

TAX 5066 Tax Research and 
Reporting (AC) (3). A study of tax 
planning aspects of a variety of 
business and other transactions. 
Emphasis will be placed upon 
perceiving tax issues and conducting 
research to resolve them. Prerequisite: 



210 College of Business Administration 



Graduate Catalog 



Permission of Accounting certificate 
program advisor. 

TAX 5106 Corporate Taxation (AC) 
(3). Tax implication of corporate 
formations, distributions, redemptions, 
liquidations, divisions, reorganizations, 
collapsibles, attributes, consolidations, 
S-Corp, AET and PHC's. Prerequisites: 
Permission of Accounting certificate 
program advisor. 

TAX 5405 Taxation of Estate and 
Gift (3). The study of the federal estate 
tax and federal gift tax provisions. 
Prerequisites: Permission of Account- 
ing Certificate program advisor. 

TAX 5406 Taxation of Estates and 
Trusts (AC) (3). Study of income tax 
aspects of decedents, followed by 
income taxation of estates and trusts 
(subchapter J). Special emphasis on 
throw-back rules, grantor trusts, 
charitable remainder trusts, and foreign 
trusts. Prerequisite: Permission of 
Accounting certificate program advisor. 

TAX 5506 International Dimensions 
of Taxation (AC) (3). Tax provisions 
affecting foreign corporations and non- 
resident aliens, as well as those tax 
provisions affecting U.S. person's 
business and investment activities 
outside the U.S. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of Accounting certificate program 
advisor. 

TAX 5725 Tax Planning for Man- 
agers (AC) (3). An exploration of the 
concepts of federal income taxation and 
tax planning, from the point of view of 
the manager. Prerequisites: ACG 6308 
and permission of accounting 
certificate program advisor. 

TAX 5875 Seminar in Taxation (AC) 
(3). An in-depth study of recent 
legislative, administrative, and judicial 
developments in taxation. Prereq- 
uisites: TAX 4001 or equivalent, and 
permission of Accounting certificate 
program advisor. 

TAX 5904 Independent Study in 
Taxation (AC) (3). Individual con- 
ferences, supervised readings, reports 
on personal investigations. Prereq- 
uisite: Written Permission of the 
instructor. Accounting certificate pro- 
gram advisor. School director, and 
dean. 

TAX 5936 Special Topics in Taxation 
(AC) (3). Intensive study for groups of 
students of a particular topic or topics 
not otherwise offered in the curriculum. 
Prerequisite: Written |}ermission 



instructor. Accounting certificate 
program advisor, School director, and 
dean. 

TAX 6005 Income Tax (AC) (3). A 
survey of federal income taxation, with 
emphasis on the taxation of individuals 
and corporations and the ethics of 
income tax accounting. Prerequisites: 
ACG 61 15 and admission to a graduate 
program in the School of Accounting 
or permission of the School Director. 
Not open to those with undergraduate 
accounting degrees. 

TAX 6026 Value-Added Tax 
Strategies for Business Decisions (3). 
Development and implementation of a 
tax-based framework to assist business 
decision makers and their advisors in 
the design of sound strategies when 
considering alternative business 
transactions. Prerequisite: Permission 
of School of Accounting. 

TAX 6065 Tax Research (AC) (3). An 
in-depth study and application of both 
traditional and computer-assisted tax 
research tools and of relevant practice 
and procedural mechanisms affecting 
taxation. Prerequisite: Admission to a 
graduate program in the School of 
Accounting or permission of the 
School Director. 

TAX 6105 Taxation of Corporations 

I (AC) (3). The study of federal tax 
consequences of the formation and 
operation of corporations ; distributions 
and redemptions; elections of 
Subchapter S status. Prerequisites: 
Admission to a graduate program in the 
School of Accounting or permission of 
the School Director. 

TAX 6107 Federal Corporate 
Taxation (3). Study of the federal 
income taxation provisions affecting 
the formation, operations, liquidation, 
acquisition, and reorganization of 
Subchapter C corporations. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of School of 
Accounting. 

TAX 6115 Taxation of Corporations 

II (AC) (3). The study of federal tax 
consequences of the liquidation and 
reorganization of corporations; 
multiple corporations; advanced topics 
in corporate taxation. Prerequisites: 
TAX 6105 and admission to a graduate 
program in the School of Accounting 
or permission of the School Director. 

TAX 6205 Partnership Taxation 
(AC) (3). The intensive study of the 
formation, operation, and dissolution of 
partnerships (general and limited). 



Prerequisites: Admission to a graduate 
program in the School of Accounting 
or permission of the School Director. 

TAX 6206 Taxation of Small 
Businesses (3). Study of small business 
entitles, emphasis on partnerships, 
limited liability companies and S 
coporations; includes choice, formation 
and operation of above and 
distributions, sales and exchanges of 
owemship in interests and transfers by 
death. Prerequisite: Permission of 
School of Accounting. 

TAX 6305 State and Local Taxation 

(3). The Constitutional, statutory, 
regulatory, and judicial principles 
affecting state and local taxation of 
business transactions, with emphasis on 
Florida taxation. Prerequisite: 

Permission of School of Accounting. 

TAX 6405 Estate and Gift Taxation 
(AC) (3). The study of the federal 
estate tax and federal gift tax 
provisions. Prerequisites: Admission to 
a graduate program in the School of 
Accounting or permission of the 
School Director. 

TAX 6415 Fiduciary Accounting and 
Taxation (AC) (3). The study of the 
income taxation of estates, trust, and 
the beneficiaries thereof, including the 
determination of distributable net 
income, and throwback rules. The 
grantor trust and income in respect of a 
decedent is emphasized. The use of 
trusts in tax and estate planning is also 
explored. Prerequisites: Admission to a 
graduate program in the School of 
Accounting or permission of the 
School Director. 

TAX 6445 Estate Planning (AC) (3). 
An in-depth discussion of the use of 
estate tax planning tools, such as 
lifetime gifts, life insurance, the marital 
deduction, the use of trusts, future 
interests, annuities, powers of 
appointment, charitable transfers, and 
post-mortem planning. Prerequisites: 
Admission to a graduate program in the 
School of Accounting or permission of 
the School Director. 

TAX 6446 Wealth Transfers (3). 

Study of gift estate, and generation- 
skipping transfer taxes and taxation of 
estates and trusts; use of estate 
planning tools: lifetime gifts, life 
insurance trusts, martial bequests, post- 
mortem estate planning. Prerequisite: 
Permission of School of Accounting. 

TAX 6505 International Taxation I 
(AC) (3). Federal income tax 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Business Administration 211 



provisions applicable to non-resident 
aliens and foreign corporations. 
Prerequisites: Admission to a graduate 
program in the School of Accounting 
or permission of the School Director. 

TAX 6507 Principles of International 
Taxation (3). Study of the federal 
income tax provisions applicable to 
foreign persons' U.S. income and to 
U.S. persons' foreign income. 
Prerequisite: Permission of School of 
Accounting. 

TAX 6515 International Taxation n 

(AC) (3). Federal income tax 
provisions applicable to U.S. persons, 
business, and investment activities 
outside the U.S. Prerequisite: TAX 
6505 and admission to a graduate 
program in the School of Accounting 
or permission of the School Director. 

TAX 6726 Tax Planning for 
Managers (AC) (3). An exploration of 
the concepts of federal income taxation 
and tax planning, from the point of 
view of the manager. Prerequisites: 
ACG 6026 or equivalent and 
permission of Accounting advisor. Not 
open to EMST or MACC students. 

TAX 6805 Tax Policy (AQ (3). A 

study of the tax accounting concepts 
and the judicial doctrines inherent in 
the federal tax law, tax planning, and 
tax policy. Prerequisite: Admission to a 
graduate program in the School of 
Accounting or permission of the 
School Director. 

TAX 6835 Taxation of Deferred 
Compensation (AC) (3). The taxation 
of qualified and non-qualified pension 
and profit-sharing plans, stock options, 
aimuities, lump-sum distributions, 
death benefits, rollovers, self- 
employment plans, employee stock 
ownership plans, etc. Prerequisites: 
Admission to a graduate program in the 
School of Accounting or permission of 
the School Director. 

TAX 6875 Current Developments in 
Taxation (AC) (3). The study of recent 
legislative, administrative and judicial 
developments in taxation. Prerequ- 
isites: At least four additional graduate 
tax courses and admission to a graduate 
program in the School of Accounting 
or permission of the School Director. 

TAX 6876 Transactions in Property 

(AC) (3). An in-depth investigation 
into tax problems relating to basis, 
capital gains and losses, and 
nonrecognition provisions for transac- 
tions in property with special emphasis 



on personal property transactions and 
securities investments. Prerequisites: 
Admission to a graduate program in the 
School of Accounting or permission of 
the School Director. 

TAX 6877 Seminar in Taxation (AC) 
(3). Intensive study of a particular topic 
or a limited number of topics. The 
topics included in this course will 
depend upon the availability of faculty 
with expertise in the following special 
classes of tax problems: advanced 
corporate taxation; taxation of not-for- 
profit institutions; interstate, state and 
local taxation; and others, as current 
developments demand. Prerequisites: 
Admission to a graduate program in the 
School of Accounting or permission of 
the School Director. 

TAX 6905 Independent Study in 
Taxation (AC) (1-3). Individual 
conferences, supervised readings; 
reports on personal investigations. 
Prerequisites: Admission to a graduate 
program in the School of Accounting 
or permission of the School Director. 

TAX 6935 Special Topics in Taxation 
(AC) (1-3). Intensive study for groups 
of students of a particular topic(s) not 
otherwise offered in the curriculum. 
Prerequisite: Admission to a graduate 
program in the School of Accounting 
or permission of the School Director. 

TAX 6XXXC Tax Research, 
Practice, and Procedures (3). Study of 
the tax enviroiunent, the tax law and its 
interpretations, tax research tools, and 
of revelant practice and procedural 
mechanisms affecting taxation. 
Prerequisite: Permission of School of 
Accounting. 

TAX 7067 Seminar: Special Topics in 
Taxation Research (AC) (3). Topics 
vary according to instructor and student 
interest in problems and issues on the 
frontier issues of taxation. Prerequisite: 
Permission of Doctoral advisor in 
Accounting. 

TAX 7815 Seminar: Tax Policy: An 
Analysis of the Issues (AC) (3). An in- 
depth examination of the horizontal 
and vertical equity issues in taxation, 
the effects on income distribution, 
business decisions, foreign balance of 
payments, public finance issues, and 
economic policy. Emphasized are the 
areas of empirical research vis a vis 
legal research. Prerequisite: Permission 
of Doctoral advisor in Accounting. 

TRA 5245 Transportation Logistics 
(ME) (3). Quantitative methods 



applied to solving problems in business 
logistics; mathematical and statistical 
models; optionalization theory and 
simulation. Problems selected from 
areas of physical distribution manage- 
ment, inventory control, mode selec- 
tion, and facility locations. 

TRA 5401 Transportation Opera- 
tions and Carrier Management (ME) 
(3). Contemporary management tech- 
niques as applied to carriers; manage- 
ment-problems peculiar to transporta- 
tion firms; economic analysis of 
marketing problems; capital formation; 
costs; pricing; labor relations; and 
government regulation. 

TRA 6015 Graduate Survey of 
Transportation Management (ME) 
(3). Graduate survey of transportation, 
its elements, and their impact on 
society. History, economics, and 
regulatory principles in transportation. 
Current policies and problems for all 
the major transportation modes. 

TRA 6905 Independent Study in 
Transportation (ME) (1-6). Individ- 
ual conferences; supervised readings; 
reports on personal investigations. 
Consent of faculty tutor, Department 
Chairperson, and Dean required. 

TRA 6936 Special Topics in 
Transportation (ME) {1-6). For 
groups of students desiring intensive 
study of a particular topic or a limited 
number of topics, not otherwise offered 
in the curriculum. Consent of faculty 
sufwrvisor and Department Chair- 
person required. 



212 College of Business Administration 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Business 
Administration 

Executive Dean Joyce J. Elam 

Dean, Alvah H. Chapman, 

Jr., Graduate School of 

Business Jose de la Torre 

Associate Dean, 

Finance and 

Administration Donald W. Fair 
Associate Dean, 

Academic Affairs and 

Undergraduate 

Programs Clifford Perry 

Assistant Dean, 

Undergraduate 

Advising Lynda Ralieem 

Assistant Dean, Marketing, 

Communication and 

Publications Sally M. Gallion 

Director, School of 

Accounting Dana A. Forgione 

Department Chairs: 

Decision Sciences 

and Information 

Systems Christos Koulamas 

Finance William Welch 

Management and 

International 

Business K. Galen Kroeck 

Marketing J.A.F. Nicholls 

Faculty 

Anderson, Gary, Ph.D. (University of 

Illinois), Associate Professor, 

Finance 
Auster, Rolf, Ph.D. (Northwestern 

University), CPA, CMA, Professor, 

Accounting 
Barber, Joel, Ph.D. (University of 

Arizona), Associate Professor. 

Finance. 
Bates, Constance S., D.B.A. (Indiana 

University), Associate Professor, 

Management and International 

Business and Barsky-Greenstein 

Professor 
Batra, Dinesh, Ph.D. (Indiana 

University), Associate Professor, 

Decision Sciences and Information 

Systems. 
Bear, Robert M., Ph.D. (University 

o//owa), Professor, Finance 
Becerra-Femandez, Irma, Ph.D. 

(Florida International University), 

Assistant Professor, Decision 

Sciences and Information Systems 
Berry, Delano H., Ph.D. (University 

of Kentucky), CMA, Instructor, 

Accounting 
Beste, Steve, M.B.A. (Florida 

International University), Director, 

Executive MBA Program 



Bierwag, Gerald O., Ph.D. 

(Northwestern University), Ryder 
System Professor of Business 
Administration, Finance 
Browner, Ellie, M.Ed. (Florida 
International University), Director, 
Graduate Admissions and Student 
Services 
Chang, Chun-Hao, Ph.D. 

(Northwestern University), Associate 
Professor, Finance 
Chang, Lucia, Ph.D. (University of 
Texas at Austin), Professor 
Emeritus, Accounting 
Corrales, Maria, M.B.A. (Florida 
International University), 
Counselor and Advisor 
Daigler, Robert T., Ph.D. (University 

of Oklahoma), Professor, Finance 
Dandapani, Krishnan, Ph.D. 
(Pennsylvania State University), 
Professor, Finance 
Daniels, Vincent, M.B.A. 

(Thunderbird University), Director, 
International MBA Program 
Davidson, Lewis F., Ph.D. 

(Pennsylvania State University), 
Professor , Accounting 
de la Torre, Jose, D.B.A. (Harvard 
University), Byron Harless Eminent 
Scholar in Management 
Development, Management and 
International Business, and Dean, 
Alvah H. Chapman, Jr., Graduate 
School of Business 
Dessler, Gary, Ph.D. (City University 
of New York), Professor, 
Management and International 
Business 
Dickson, Peter R., Ph.D. (Univeristy 
of Florida), Professor and Knight 
Ridder Eminent Scholar, Marketing 
Dieguez, Manuel, M.S.M. (Florida 
International University), CPA, 
Lecturer and Associate Director, 
Accounting 
Dittenboffer, Mort, Ph.D. (American 
University), Professor Emeritus, 
Accounting 
Dorsett, Herman W., Ed.D. 

(Columbia University), Associate 
Professor, Management and 
International Business 
Drakatos, Stylianos, M.S. (Ohio State 
University), Visiting Lecturer, 
Decision Sciences and Information 
Systems 
Dugan, Timothy, M.B.A. (Baruch 
College, CUNY.), Visiting 
Instructor, Marketing 
Dupoyet, Brice, Ph.D. (University of 
Washington), Assistant Professor, 
Finance 



Elam, Joyce, J., Ph.D. (University of 
Texas-Austin), Professor, Decision 
Sciences and Information Systems, 
James L. Knight Eminent Scholar, 
and Executive Dean 
Ellis, S. Christopher, M.B.A. (Florida 
International University), Instructor, 
Decision Sciences and Information 
Systems 
Fair, Donald W., M.Acc. (Bowling 
Green State University), CPA, 
Lecturer, Accounting, and 
Associate Dean 
Farrow, Dana, Ph.D. (University of 
Rochester), Professor, Management 
and International Business and 
Faculty Advisor, IMBA Program 
Forgione, Dana A., Ph.D. (University 
of Massachusetts at Amherst), CPA, 
CMA, CFE, Professor and Director, 
School of Accounting 
Friday, Earnest, Ph.D. (University of 
Miami), Assistant Professor, 
Management and International 
Business 
Gallion, Sally M., Ph.D. (University of 
Missouri), Assistant Dean, Marketing 
Garcia, Georgina, M.S.M. (Florida 
International University), CPA, 
Lecturer, Accounting 
Gelman, Wendy, J.D. (University of 
Miami), Lecturer, School of 
Accounting 
Gilbert, G. Ronald, Ph.D. (University 
of Southern California), Associate 
Professor, Management and 
International Business 
Gomez, Carolina, Ph.D. (University of 
North Carolina), Assistant 
Professor, Management and 
International Business 
Goodrich, Jonathan N., Ph.D. (State 
University of New York at Buffalo), 
Professor, Marketing 
Gray, C. Delano, M.S., (New York 
University). CIA, CBA. CFE. CFSA. 
Lecturer and Program Manager, 
EMSTand MACC. Accounting 
Greenberg, Bamett A., D.B.A. 
(University of Colorado). Professor. 
Marketing 
Gupta, Sushil K., Ph.D. (University of 
Delhi). Professor. Decision Sciences 
and Information Systems 
Hallbauer, Rosalie C, Ph.D. 

(University of Florida), CPA, CMA, 
Associate Professor, Accounting 
Hamid, Shahid, Ph.D. (University of 
Maryland). Associate Professor. 
Finance and Faculty Director. 
MSF Program 
Henry, Kenneth, M. Ace. (Florida 
International University). Visiting 
Lecturer. Accounting 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Business Administration 213 



Hogner, Robert H., Ph.D. (University 

of Pittsburgh), Associate Professor, 

Management and International 

Business 
Kaleem, Faisal, M.S. (Florida 

International University), Instructor, 

Decision Sciences and Information 

Systems 
Keys, James D., M.B.A. MSF 

(Florida International University), 

Instructor, Finance 
Klonarides, Gerard, M.B.A. (Laverne 
University), Lecturer, Decision 

Sciences and Information Systems 
Koulamas, Cbristos P., Ph.D. (Texas 

Tech University), Professor and 

Chair, Decision Sciences and 

Information Systems 
Kozloski, Laura, Ph.D. (University of 

Miami), Lecturer, Management and 

International Business 
Kroeck, K. Galen, Ph.D. (University 

of Akron), Professor and Chair, 

Management and International 

Business 
Kumar, Kuldeep, Ph.D. (McMaster 

University, Hamilton, Canada), 

Professor and Ryder Eminent 

Scholar, Decision Sciences and 

Information Systems 
Kyparisis, George J., D.Sc. (George 

Washington University), Professor, 

Decision Sciences and Information 

Systems 
Lassar, Walfried, Ph.D. (University of 

Southern California), SunTrust 

Professor, Marketing 
Lavin, David, Ph.D. (University of 

Illinois), CPA, Associate Professor, 

Accounting 
Lee, Chih-Chen, Ph.D. (Southern 

Illinois University), Assistant 

Professor, Accounting 
Levy, Yair, M.B.A., (Florida 

International University) Instructor 

and Online Learning Project 

Manager, Decision Sciences and 

Information Systems 
Li, Tiger, Ph.D. (Michigan State 

University), Associate Professor, 

Marketing 
Long, Cherie, Ph.D. (University of 

Texas- Austin), Assistant Professor, 

Decision Sciences and Information 

Systems 
Lubell, Myron, D.B.A. (University of 

Maryland), CPA, Associate 

Professor, Accounting 
Magnusen, Karl O., Ph.D. (University 

of Wisconsin), Professor, 

Management and International 

Business 
Maidique, Modesto A., Ph.D. 

(Massachusetts Institute of 



Technology), Professor, 

Management and International 

Business, and University President 
Mandakovic, Tomislav, Ph.D. 

(University of Pittsburgh), 

Professor, Decision Sciences and 

Information Systems 
Manheimer, Peter, J.D. (University of 

Miami), Lecturer, Accounting 
Martin, J. Randall, M.A. (University 

of Miami), Lecturer, Management 

and International Business 
McCosh, Andrew, D.B.A. (Harvard 

University), Chapman Eminent 

Scholar in Management and Ethics, 

Management and International 

Business 
Miniard, Paul, Ph.D. (University of 

Florida), BMI Professor of 

Marketing, Director of Ph.D. 

Program, Marketing 
Mintchev, Ligia M.S. (European 

University), Instructor, Decision 

Sciences and Information Systems 
Mishra, Suchismita, Ph.D. 

(University of Nebraska-Lincoln), 

Assistant Professor, Finance 
Miyazaki, Anthony, Ph.D. (University 

of South Carolina), Assistant 

Professor, Marketing 
Moncarz, Raul, Ph.D. (Florida State 

University), Professor, Finance and 

Vice Provost, Academic Affairs 
Moss, Sherry, Ph.D. (Florida State 

University), Associate Professor, 

Management and International 

Business and Faculty Advisor, 

Executive M.B.A. Program 
Most, Kenneth S., Ph.D. (University 

of Florida), CPA, F.C.A., Professor 

Emeritus, Accounting 
Munro, Michael S., M.B.A. 

(Stanford University), Visiting 

Instructor, Marketing 
Murphy, Kenneth E., Ph.D. 

(Carnegie Mellon University), 

Assistant Professor, Decision 

Sciences and Information Systems 
Newman, Charles, Ph.D. (Pace 

University), Coordinator, E-Business 

Initiatives 
Nicholls, J.A.F., D.B.A. (Indiana 

University), Professor and Chair, 

Marketing 
Noguera, Jose, Ph.D. (Louisiana State 

University), Assistant Professor, 

Decision Sciences and Information 

Systems 
Oliva, Robert R., Ph.D. (Florida 

International University) CPA, 

Professor, Accounting 
Ollveira, Manoel, Ph.D. (Florida 

International University), Instructor, 

and Director of Technology, 



Decision Sciences and Information 

Systems 
Ortiz, Marta, Ph.D. (University of 

Miami), Associate Professor, 

Marketing 
Parhizgari, All, M. Ph.D. (University 

of Maryland), Professor, Finance 
Paul, Karen, Ph.D. (Emory 

University), Professor, Management 

and International Business 
Perry, Clifford, Ph.D. (Purdue 

University), Distinguished 

Executive Professor, Research 

Fellow, Knight-Ridder Center 

Management and International 

Business and Associate Dean 
Polster, Eleanor, M.B.A. (Florida 

International University), Graduate 

Advisor 
Prakash, Arun, Ph.D. (University of 

Oregon), Professor, Finance 
Prietula, Michael J., Ph.D. 

(University of Minnesota), Ryder 

Systems Eminent Scholar Chair, 

Accounting 
Raghunandan, Kannan, Ph.D. 

(University of Iowa), Professor, 

Accounting 
Raheem, Lynda, M.B.A. (University 

of Miami), Instructor, Marketing, 

and Assistant Dean 
Rama, Dasaratha V., Ph.D. 

(University of Iowa), Professor, 

Accounting 
Rodriguez, Leonardo, D.B.A. 

(Florida State University), 

Professor, Accounting, and 

Management and International 

Business 
Rody, Raymond, Ph.D. (University of 

Southern California), Assistant 

Professor, Marketing 
Roomes, Donald, M.B.A. (Florida 

International University), Instructor, 

Management and International 

Business and Director, Weekend 

BBA 
Rose-Green, Ena, Ph.D. (Florida 

State University), CPA, Visiting 

Assistant Professor, Accounting 
Sanchez, Juan, Ph.D. (University of 

South Florida), Associate Professor, 

Management and International 

Business and Faculty Advisor, MSM, 

HR Track 
Seaton, Bruce, Ph.D. (Washington 

University), Associate Professor 
Shepherd, Philip, Ph.D. (Vanderbilt 

University), Associate Professor, 

Management and International 

Business 
Silverblatt, Ronnie, Ph.D. (Georgia 

State University), Associate 

Professor, Management and 



214 College of Business Administration ^ Graduate Catalog 

International Business 
Smith, Larry A., Ph.D. (State 

University of New York at Buffalo), 

Associate Professor, Decision 

Sciences and Information Systems 
Surysekar, Krishnamurphy, Ph.D. 
(University of Maryland), Assistant 

Professor, Accounting 
Taylor, Kimberly, Ph.D. (University 

of Pennsylvania), Associate 

Professor, Marketing 
Truex, Duane, Ph.D. (State University 

of New York-Binghamton), Assistant 

Professor, Decision Sciences and 

Information Systems 
Tsalikis, John, Ph.D. (University of 

Mississippi), Associate Professor, 

Marketing 
Vidaver-Cohen, Deborah V., Ph.D. 

(Columbia University), Associate 

Professor, Management and 

International Business 
Von Glinow, Mary Ann, Ph.D. (The 

Ohio State University), Professor, 

Management and International 

Business and Director, CIBER 
Wang, Tel-Wei, Ph.D. (University of 

Missouri), Assistant Professor, Decision 

Sciences and Information Systems 
Wass, Lauren, B.S. (Florida International 

University), Counselor and Advisor 
Welch, William W., Ph.D. (University 

of Michigan), Associate Professor 

and Chair, Finance 
Wheatley, Clark, Ph.D. (Virginia 

Polytechnic Institute), CPA, 

Associate Professor, Accounting 
Wishart, Nicole, M.B.A. (University 

of Miami), Lecturer, Decision 

Sciences and Information Systems 
Wrieden, John A., J.D. (George 

Mason University), Distinguished 

Senior Lecturer, Accounting 
Wyman, Harold, Ph.D. (Stanford 

University), Professor Emeritus, 

Accounting 
XIa, Ann, M.Acc. (Florida 

International University), Visiting 

Professor, Decision Sciences and 

Information Systems 
Zanakis, Steve H., Ph.D. 

(Pennsylvania State University), 

Professor, Decision Sciences and 

Information Systems 
Zdanowicz, John S., Ph.D. (Michigan 

Slate University), Professor and 

Director, Jerome Bain Real Estate 

Institute, Finance 
Zegan, Peter J., M.S. (University of 

Florida), Instructor, Decision 

Sciences and Information Systems 



Graduate Catalog College of Education 215 



College of 
Education 



216 College of Education 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Education 



The College of Education exists in an 
urban, multicultural setting and has a 
three-part mission. The first is to 
prepare professionals who have the 
abilities and dispositions to facilitate 
and enhance learning and development 
within diverse settings. The second is 
the discovery and dissemination of 
knowledge related to learning, teach- 
ing, and development. The third is the 
development of professional partner- 
ships to promote meaningful educa- 
tional, social, economic and political 
change. Our mission supports: 

> Curricula that reflect sound 
theory and best practice. 

> Qualified and diverse students 
and graduates. 

> Qualified and diverse faculty 
active in teaching, research and 
service. 

> Effective governance and 
organizational structure within 
an environment of open 
communication among faculty, 
administrators, staff, students 
and community. 

> Collaborative and mutually 
beneficial partnerships with 
schools and other organizations. 

> Visibility at local, state, 
national and international 
levels. 

> Continuous improvement of the 
College. 

The College offers instructional 
programs at the undergraduate and 
graduate levels, engages in research 
and program development activities, 
and provides field services to the 
educational community. The 

conceptual fi'amework guiding 
education curricula and programs in the 
College is grounded in four core 
concepts that are central to the vision 
faculty have of professional educators 
graduating from the College's 
programs: intercultural, interconn- 
ectedness, inquiry, and instructional 
leadership. 

The College, housed in the Sanford 
and Dolores Ziff Education Building 
(ZEB) at Florida International Univer- 
sity — University Park, is fully accredit- 
ed by the National Council for the 
Accreditation of Teacher Education, 
the Florida Department of Education, 
and the State University System. 

To support its mission, the College is 
organized into four separate but related 
departments: 



♦ Educational Leadership and 

Policy Studies 

♦ Educational and Psychological 

Studies 

♦ Health, Physical Education, and 

Recreation 

♦ Curriculum and Instruction 
Applicants to the College's programs 

should carefully examine the choices of 
major concentrations and program 
objectives. Because there are 
occasional revisions to the College of 
Education's curriculum during the 
academic year, some curriculum 
changes may not be reflected in the 
current catalog. Prospective students 
are advised to contact appropriate 
advisors to ask for current information 
regarding specific programs of interest. 

General advisement is available by 
telephone: (305) 348-2768 for 
University Park, (305) 919-5820 for 
Biscayne Bay Campus. Broward 
residents may call (954) 355-5622 for 
Biscayne Bay Campus or for the 
Broward Program. Dade residents may 
call (305) 760-5622 for the Broward 
Program. Additional information is 
available on the FIU website at 
www.fiu.edu . Specific program 
advisement is available by prearranged 
personal appointment with advisors at 
all locations. 

Note: The programs, policies, require- 
ments, and regulations listed in this 
catalog are continually subject to 
review in order to serve the needs of 
the University's various publics and to 
respond to the mandates of the Florida 
Legislature and the State University 
System. Changes may be made without 
advance notice. Please refer to the 
General Information section for the 
University's policies, requirements, and 
regulations. 

All stated admission requirements 
are to be considered minimum. A 
student who meets these minimum 
requirements is not automatically 
assured admission. Program admission 
requirements are subject to change. It is 
the responsibility of the student to 
assure that the requirements have been 
met. 

It is recommended that students meet 
with their advisors throughout the 
program to assure adequate progress. 



Masters, Specialist, and 
Doctoral Degrees 

Graduate studies offered by the College 
provide specialization in degree 
programs developed to reflect 
individual student interests. A graduate 
program may include courses, 
seminars, field experiences, research 
courses, theses, and dissertations, 
depending upon the student's level and 
area of emphasis. 

Master of Science Degree 
Programs 

Master of Science degree programs are 
offered in the following specialties: 

Adult Education 

Art Education 

Counselor Education 

School Counseling 

Mental Health Counseling Track 

Early Childhood Education 

Educational Leadership 

Elementary Education 

English Education 6-12 

Exercise and Sport Sciences: 

1 . Athletic Training Track 

2. Exercise Physiology Track 

3. Strength and Conditioning 
Track 

Home Economics Education 
(Family and Consumer Sciences 

Education) 
Human Resource Development 
International Intercultural 

Development Education 
Mathematics Education 
Modem Language Education 

French 

Spanish 
Music Education (see College of 

Arts & Science, School of Music) 
Parks and Recreation Management 

Recreational Therapy Track 
Physical Education 

Sports Management Track 
Reading Education 
Science Education: Biology, Chem- 
istry, and Physics 
Social Studies Education 
Special Education: 

Varying Exceptionalities/ESOL 

Track 
Teaching English to Speakers of 

Other Languages (TESOL) 
Technology Education 
Urban Education 

Instruction in Urban Settings 

Multicultural: Bilingual Education 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Education 217 



Multicultural: TESOL 
Learning Technologies 
Vocational Home Economics 

Education 
Vocational Education 

Administration and Supervision 

Track 
Vocational Industrial Education 

Applicants for admission to most 
Master's programs in Education must 
hold or qualify for Florida teacher 
certification in the appropriate area (see 
specific program area in this catalog for 
details). All applicants must also satisfy 
the following requirements: A GPA of 
3.0 in the last 60 semester hours of 
upper division undergraduate study or 
1000 (total of verbal and quantitative) 
on the Graduate Record Examination 
(ORE). Applicants admitted with a 
pending ORE score must submit a test 
score within one semester to be fully 
admitted. All applicants, regardless of 
GPA, must submit a GRE score. 

Specific programs may have higher 
standards for admission. Having a 
minimum GPA and/or GRE score does 
not assure admission to a program. 
Admission is subject to the approval of 
program faculty. 

Prior to formal admission to a 
graduate program, students may be 
approved to eru'oll in up to 15 semester 
hours of 5000 level graduate credit as 
non-degree seeking students, 12 of 
which, if applicable to the major field 
of study and approved by an advisor, 
may be applied to the degree program. 

Graduate students will complete at 
least 30 semester hours of study beyond 
the bachelor's degree to earn a Master 
of Science degree in education. 
However, specific programs may 
require more than the minimum 
number of hours. Students may transfer 
a maximum 6 semester hours taken at 
another accredited college or university 
toward a master's degree program 
having 30-45 semester hours, and a 
maximum 9 semester hours toward a 
program having more than 45 semester 
hours with advisor's approval. 

Master's program students must 
maintain an overall GPA of 3.0 in order 
to graduate. No more than two grades 
of 'C and no grades of 'C-' or less 
received in courses that are part of a 
master's degree program of study will 
be accepted toward graduation. 

No more than one workshop course 
may be included in a master's degree 
program. 



Alternate Masters Degree 
Tracks 

Applicants who hold a bachelor's degree 
in a field other than education and wish 
to teach may want to pursue an Alternate 
Masters Program. These are state 
approved programs leading to State of 
Flonda teacher certification plus a 
master's degree for the following 
programs: 

Art Education 
English Education/ESOL 
Mathematics Education 
Modem Language Education 
Music Education 
Science Education 
Social Studies Education 
Varying Exceptionalities/ESOL 
Admission requirements include those 
required of any graduate student in a 
M.S. level degree program. In 
addition, students must pass all sections 
of the CLAST. After July 1, 2002, 
students may substitute scores of 1 000 
in the GRE for the CLAST. New 
graduation requirements are in effect 
for all students entering initial teacher 
preparation programs beginning Fall 
2001. Candidates must pass all three 
sections of the new Florida Teacher 
Certification Exam, have a GPA of 3.0, 
and successfiilly demonstrate the 
Florida Educator Accomplished 
Practices. 

Note: Students who pass the CLAST 
prior to July 1, 2002 will be waived 
fi-om taking the new General 
Knowledge test. Please see your 
faculty advisor to be certain all 
requirements are met. 

Approval pending for a change in 
degree name to MAT. See advisor for 
current status. 

Educational Specialist Degree 
Programs 

Education Specialist degree programs 
are offered in the following specialties: 

■ Curriculum and Instruction: 

Instructional Leadership 

■ Educational Leadership 

■ School Psychology 

The programs require a minimum of 
36 semester hours of course work at the 
University beyond the Master's degree. 
However, specific programs may 
require more than the minimum 
number of hours and may include six 
semester hours of thesis if that option is 
chosen. 

Admission requirements and transfer 
of credit are the same as for the 
master's programs. 



Doctor of Education Degree 
Programs 

• Adult Education and Human 
Resource Development 

• Curriculum and Instruction 

• Educational Administration and 
Supervision 

• Exceptional Student Education 

• Higher Education 

Doctor of Education Degree 
Program Specialties 

Doctor of Education degree programs 
are offered in the following specialties: 

• Adult Education and Human 
Resource Development 

Vocational and Technical 
Education Leadership Track 

International and Intercultural 
Development Education 
Specialization 

• Curriculum and Instruction 

Art Education Specialization 
Early Childhood Education 

Specialization 
Elementary Education 

Specialization 
English Education 

Specialization 
Instructional Leadership 

Specialization 
International and Intercultural 

Development Education 

Specialization 
Modem Language Education 

Specialization 
Mathematics Education 

Specialization 
Reading Education 

Specialization 
Science Education 

Specialization 
Social Studies Education 

Specialization 
Teaching English to Speakers 

of Other Languages 

(TESOL) 

♦ Educational Administration and 

Supervision 

♦ Exceptional Student Education 

♦ Higher Education 

Administration 

Instruction 
Advisement for these programs may 
be obtained by calling the appropriate 
department office or by contacting the 
Office of Advanced Graduate Studies at 
(305) 348-2723. Detailed admission 
requirements, program descriptions, 
and graduation requirements may be 
obtained fi"om doctoral program 
advisors in specific areas and by 



218 College of Education . Graduate Catalog 

examining program descriptions in this 
catalog. 

Fingerprint Requirement 

State of Florida Teacher Certification, 
in addition to other criteria, requires all 
applicants to be fingerprinted and 
checked by the FBI. Some school 
districts also require a fingerprint check 
for student interns and/or student 
teachers. Students with a history of 
felony arrests may wish to consider this 
carefully, and seek advice from an 
advisor before applying to programs in 
the College. 



Graduate Catalog 



Curriculum and 
Instruction 

Gail P. Gregg, Associate Professor, 

English Education and Chair 
Cengiz Alacaci, Assistant Professor, 

Mathematics Education 
Kingsley Banya, Professor, 

Curriculum Studies, International 

and Comparative Education 
Maria A. Bilbao, Assistant Dean, 

Elementary Education 
Charles Bleiker, Associate Professor, 

Early Childhood Education 
Richard Campbell, Professor, 

Science Education 
David Y. Chang, Professor, Art 

Education 
Lisbeth Dixon-Krauss, Associate 

Professor, Literacy Education 
Eric Dwyer, Assisitant Professor, 

TESOL and Modern Language 

Education 
Mohammed K. Farouk, Associate 

Dean of Academic Affairs 
Joyce C. Fine, Associate Professor, 

Literacy Education 
Allen Fisher, Associate Professor, 

Learning Technologies 
Zhonghong Jiang, Associate 

Professor, Mathematics 

Education and Computer 

Education 
Sharon W. Kossack, Professor, 

Literacy Education 
Hilary Landorf, Assistant Professor, 

Social Sudies/Global Education 
Nancy Marshall, Associate Professor, 

Literacy Education 
Luis A. Martinez-Perez, Associate 

Professor, Science Education 
Edwin McClintock, Professor, 

Mathematics Education and 

Computer Education 
Alicia Mendoza, Associate Professor, 

Elementary Education 
Lynne D. Miller, Associate Professor, 

Literacy Education 
George E. O'Brien, Associate 

Professor, Science Education 
Aixa Perez-Prado, Assistant 

Professor, TESOL 
Francisco Ramos, Assistant 

Professor, TESOL 
William M. Ritzi, Instructor, Art 

Education 
Linda Spears-Bunton, Associate 

Professor, English Education 
M. O. Thirunarayanan, Associate 

Professor, Learning Technologies 
S. Lee Woods, Associate Professor, 
Educational Foundations and 



College of Education 219 



General Instructional Srategies 
General Information 

The Department of Curriculum and 
Instruction offers graduate programs 
leading toward the Master of Science, 
the Education Specialist, and the 
Doctor of Education degrees. 

Additionally the department offers 
Alternate Masters Tracks of many of its 
programs for students who do not hold 
a bachelor's degree in education. These 
programs lead to State of Florida 
teacher certification. 

The department is also committed to 
the generation and application of 
knowledge through research and 
service to the community. 
Alternate Master of Science 
Programs 
Art Education (K- 12) 
Biology Education (6-12) 
Chemistry Education (6-12) 
English Education (6-12)/ESOL 
French Education (K-12) 
Mathematics Education (6-12) 
Music Education (K-12) (See 

College of Arts and Sciences, 
School of Music) 
Physics Education (6-12) 
Social Studies Education (6-12) 

Advanced Master of Science 
Programs 

Art Education 

Early Childhood Education 

Elementary Education 

English Education 

Learning Technologies (See MS in 

Urban Education, Department of 

Educational Leadership and 

Policy Studies) 
Mathematics Education 
Modem Language Education 
Music Education (see College of 

Arts & Sciences, School of 

Music) 
Reading Education 
Science Education 
Social Studies Education 
Teaching English to Speakers of 
Other Languages (TESOL) 

Educational Specialist Program 

Curriculum and Instruction 
Specializations in: 

• Art Education 

• Early Childhood Education 

• Elementary Education 

• English Education 

• Instructional Leadership 

• Learning Technologies 

• Mathematics Education 

• Modem Language/Bilingual 

Education 



• Reading Education 

• Science Education 

• Social Studies Education 

Doctoral Program 

Curriculum and Instruction 
Specializations in: 

• Art Education 

• Early Childhood Education 

• Elementary Education 

• English Education 

• Intemational/Intercultural 
Development Education 

• Instructional Leadership 

• Leaming Technologies 

• Mathematics Education 

• Modem Language/Bilingual 
Education 

• Music Education (See College 

of Arts and Sciences, 
School of Music) 

• Science Education 

• Social Studies Eduction 

All stated admission requirements are 
to be considered minimum. A student 
who meets these minimum require- 
ments is not automatically assured 
admission. Program admission 
requirements are subject to change. It is 
the responsibility of the student to 
assure that he/she has met the 
requirements. 

*Master of Science: 
Alternate Track 

The Alternate Track modifies the 
existing master's degree programs to 
accommodate candidates with a 
baccalaureate degree appropriate to the 
certification area but without certifi- 
cation and are seeking entry into the 
teaching profession. This alternate 
track is no less rigorous than the 
existing master's degree program, but 
includes courses which provide the 
necessary background in professional 
education together with the master's 
level academic course work. 
♦ Approval pending for a change in 
degree name to MAT. See advisor for 
current status. 

Admission Requirements 

Entry requirements include a bach- 
elor's degree or a strong minor (30 
hours with a 3.0 or higher in the major 
subject area) in a certifiable teaching 
area such as the following: Art, 
Biology, Chemistry, English, 
Mathematics, Modem Languages, 
Music, Social Sciences and History, on 
and a minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA 
for the two most recent years of study 
or a combined ORE score of 1000. In 



220 College of Education 



Graduate Catalog 



either case, the GRE score must be 
submitted. A passing score on all four 
sections of the CLAST is also required. 
If taken before July 1, 2002, this test 
may be waived if the candidate has a 
score of 1000 or higher on the GRE. In 
addition to the minimum GPA or the 
combined GRE score, or both, the 
applicant must receive an affirmative 
recommendation from the designated 
Program Leader, Dean of the College, 
or his designee following a personal 
interview. 

New graduation requirements are in 
effect for candidates entering COB 
programs on and after Fall 2001 . 

Graduation Requirements 

1. An overall GPA ofat least 3.0 

2. Successful demonstration of all 
of the Florida Educator 
Accomplished Practices at the 
Preprofessional level 

3. Passing score on all three sections of 
the Florida Teacher Certification 
Examination. 

Note: If CLAST is passed prior to July 

1, 2002, the new General Knowledge 

subtest may be waived. 

This degree program requires a 

minimum of four semester sequence of 

full-time study which includes two 

Summer Terms, a Fall and a Spring 

Term and will consist of 45-48 

semester hours, depending on each 

student's previous academic 

preparation. 

Alternate Track Requirements 

All students admitted to these tracks 

will complete the following courses as 

well as the graduate program courses in 

each of the chosen fields. 

EDF 5443 Measurement and 

Evaluation in the 

Classroom 3 

EDF 5517 Education in American 

History 3 

EDG 5414 Instructional Strategies 

in Teaching 3 

EDP 5053 Educational Psychology: 

Principles and 

Applications 3 

EEX 605 1 Educational Needs of 

Students with 

Exceptionalities 3 

ESE 5344C Secondary Classroom 

Management 3 

RED 5339 Subject Related 

Reading 3 

TSL 5xxx ESOL Issues and 

Strategies for Content 

Teachers 3 

Special Teaching Lab: Area 3-6 

Student Teaching (Practicum) 6 



Applications to student teaching are 
due in the office of the Director of " 
Student Teaching by July 1 for Spring 
semester placement, and by March 1 
for Fall semester placement. Check 
with the program leader early in 
program enrollment to determine Fall 
placement availability. 

Specific program requirements vary 
depending upon applicant's bachelor's 
degree program, see program faculty 
for advisement. Contact the department 
(305) 348-2003 for complete program 
descriptions. 

Alternate Track Masters 

Program in Art Education 

(K-12) 

Degree Prograna Hours (45) 

Admission Requirements: 

1. BFA or a bachelor's degree or a 
strong minor (30 hours with a 3.0 GPA 
or higher) in Fine Arts and a minimum 
of 3.0 cumulative GPA for the two 
most recent years of study or 
combined GRE score of 1000. In 
either case, a score for the GRE must 
be submitted. 

2. Passing scores on all four sections 
of the CLAST. This test may be 
waived if the candidate has a score of 
1000 or higher on the GRE. 

3. In addition to the minimum GPA 
or the combined GRE score, or both, 
the applicant must receive an 
affirmative recommendation from the 
designated Program Leader, Dean of 
the College, or her designee following 
a personal interview. 

Required Courses (45) 
EDF 5443 Measurement and 

Evaluation in the 

Classroom 3 

EDF 5517 Education in American 

History 3 

EDG 5414 Instructional Strategies 

in Teaching 3 

EDP 5053 Educational Psychology: 

Principles and 

Applications 3 

EEX 605 1 Educational Needs of 

Students with 

Exceptionalities 3 

ESE 5344C Secondary Classroom 

Management 3 

RED 5339 Subject Related 

Reading 3 

TSL 5xxx ESOL Issues and 

Strategies for Content 

Teachers 3 

ARE 43 1 6 Special Teaching Lab: 

Art 3 



ARE 4341 Special Teaching Lab: 

Art 7-12 ■ 3 

ARE 5945 Practicum in 

Art Education 6 

ARE 6 1 40 Curriculum and 

Instruction in Art 3 

Graduation Requirements 

1 . An overall GPA ofat least 3.0 

2. Successful demonstration of all 
of the Florida Educator 
Accomplished Practices at the 
Preprofessional level 

3. Passing score on all three sections of 
the Florida Teacher Certification 
Examination. 

Note: IfCLAST is passed prior to July 
1, 2002, the new General Knowledge 
subtest may be waived. 

Alternate Track Masters 
Program in Biology 
Education (6-12) 
Degree Program Hours (42) 

Admission Requirements: 

1 . A bachelor's degree or a 

strong minor (30 hours with a 3.0 GPA 
or higher) in Biology and a minimum 
of 3.0 cumulative GPA for the two 
most recent years of study or 
combined GRE score of 1000. In 
either case, a score for the GRE must 
be submitted. 

2. Passing scores on all four sections 
of the CLAST. If taken before July 1, 
2002, this test may be waived if the 
candidate has a score of 1 000 or higher 
on the GRE. 

3. In addition to the minimum GPA 
or the combined GRE score, or both, 
the applicant must receive an 
affirmative recommendation from the 
designated Program Leader, Dean of 
the College, or her designee following 
a personal interview. 

Required Courses (42) 

EDF 5443 Measurement and 

Evaluation in the 

Classroom 3 

EDF 5517 Education in American 

History 3 

EDG 5414 Instructional Strategies 

in Teaching 3 

ESE 5344C Secondary Classroom 

Management 3 

EDP 5053 Educational Psychology: 

Principles and 

Applications 3 

EEX 605 1 Educational Needs of 

Students with 

Exceptionalities 3 

ESE 62 1 5 Secondary School 

Curriculum 3 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Education 221 



RED 5339 Subject Related 

Reading 3 

TSL 5xxx ESOL Strategies for 

Content Teachers 3 

SCE 4330 Special Teaching Lab: 

Science 3 

SCE 5945 Practicum: Science 

Education 6 

SCE 6635 Teaching Science in 

Secondary School 3 

SCE 6933 Science Education 

Seminar 3 

Graduation Requirements 

1. An overall GPAofat least 3.0 

2. Successful demonstration of all 
of the Florida Educator 
Accomplished Practices at the 
Preprofessional level 

3. Passing score on all three sections of 
the Florida Teacher Certification 
Examination. 

Note: If CLAST is passed prior to July 
1, 2002, the new General Knowledge 
subtest may be waived. 

Alternate Track Masters 
Program in Chemistry 
Education (6-12) 

Degree Program Hours (42) 

Admission Requirements: 

1. A bachelor's degree or a 

strong minor (30 hours with a 3.0 GPA 
or higher) in Chemistry and a rrunimum 
of 3.0 cumulative GPA for the two 
most recent years of study or 
combined GRE score of 1000. In 
either case, a score for the GRE must 
be submitted. 

2. Passing scores on all four sections 
of the CLAST. If taken before July 1 , 
2002, this test may be waived if the 
candidate has a score of 1000 or higher 
on the GRE. 

3. In addition to the minimum GPA 
or the combined GRE score, or both, 
the applicant must receive an 
affirmative recommendation from the 
designated Program Leader, Dean of 
the College, or her designee following 
a personal interview. 

Required Courses (42) 

EDF 5443 Measurement and 
Evaluation in the 
Classroom 3 

EDF 5517 Education in American 
History 3 

EDG5414 Instructional Strategies 

in Teaching 3 

EDP 5053 Educational Psychology: 
Principles and 
Applications 3 

EEX 605 1 Educational Needs of 



ESE 5344C 
ESE6215 
RED 5339 
TSL 5xxx 
SCE 4330 
SCE 5945 
SCE 6635 
SCE 6933 



Students with 
Exceptionalities 
Secondary Classroom 
Management 
Secondary School 
Curriculum 
Subject Related 
Reading 

ESOL Strategies for 
Content Teachers 
Special Teaching Lab: 
Science 

Practicum: Science 
Education 

Teaching Science in 
Secondary School 
Science Education 
Seminar 



Graduation Requirements 

1 . An overall GPA of at least 3.0 

2. Successful demonstration of all 
of the Florida Educator 
Accomplished Practices at the 
Preprofessional level 

3. Passing score on all three sections of 
the Florida Teacher Certification 
Examination. 

Note: If CLAST is passed prior to July 
I, 2002, the new General Knowledge 
subtest may be waived. 

Alternate Track Masters 
Program in English 
Education (6-12)/ESOL 
Degree Program Hours (45) 

Admission Requirements: 

1 . A bachelor's degree or a 

strong minor (30 hours with a 3.0 GPA 
or higher) in English and a minimum of 
3.0 cumulative GPA for the two most 
recent years of study or combined GRE 
score of 1000. In either case, a score 
for the GRE must be submitted. 

2. Passing scores on all four sections 
of the CLAST. If taken before July 1, 
2002, this test may be waived if the 
candidate has a score of 1000 or higher 
on the GRE. 

3. In addition to the minimum GPA 
or the combined GRE score, or both, 
the applicant must receive an 
affirmative recommendation from the 
designated Program Leader, Dean of 
the College, or her designee following 
a personal interview. 

Required Courses (45) 

EDF 5443 Measurement and 
Evaluation in the 
Classroom 3 

EDF 5517 Education in American 
History 3 



EDO 5414 Instructional Strategies 

in Teaching 3 

EDP 5053 Educational Psychology: 

Principles and 

Applications 3 

EEX 605 1 Educational Needs of 

Students with 

Exceptionalities 3 

ESE 5344C Secondary Classroom 

Management 3 

ESE 62 1 5 Secondary School 

Curriculum J 

RED 5339 Subject Related 

Reading 3 

TSL 5xxxC ESOL Issues and 

Principles I 3 

TSL 5xxxC ESOL Issues and 

Practices II 3 

LAE 5336C Special Teaching Lab: 

English 3 

LAE 5945 Practicum: English 6 

LAE 6339 Teaching Engslih in the 

Secondary School 3 

LAE 6935 Seminar in English 

Education 3 

Graduation Requirements 

1 . An overall GPA of at least 3.0 

2. Successful demonstration of all 
of the Florida Educator 
Accomplished Practices at the 
Preprofessional level 

3. Passing score on all three sections of 
the Florida Teacher Certification 
Examination. 

Note: If CLAST is passed prior to July 
I, 2002, the new General Knowledge 
subtest may be waived. 

Alternate Track Masters 
Program in French Education 
(6-12) 

Degree Program Hours (51) 

Admission Requirements: 

1 . A bachelor's degree or a 

strong minor (30 hours with a 3.0 GPA 
or higher) in the language of study and 
a minimum of 3.0 cumulative GPA for 
the two most recent years of study or 
combined GRE score of 1000. In 
either case, a score for the GRE must 
be submitted with a minimum score of 
550 on the pencil/paper test or 213 on 
the computerized exam. 

2. Passing scores on all four sections 
of the CLAST. If taken before July 1, 
2002, this test may be waived if the 
candidate has a score of 1 000 or higher 
on the GRE. 

3. In addition to the minimum GPA 
or the combined GRE score, or both, 
the applicant must receive an 
affirmative recommendation from the 
designated Program Leader, Dean of 



222 College of Educarion 



Graduate Catalog 



the College, or her designee following 
a personal interview. 

Prerequisites: (30) 

30 credit hours at the junior or senior 
level including: 
Introduction to 

Linguistics 3 

Grammar/Syntax/ 

Composition 12 

Phonetics/Phonology 3 

Culture/Civilization 3 

Literature 6 

Required Courses (51) 
EDF 5443 Measurement and 

Evaluation in the 

Classroom 3 

EDF 5517 Education in American 

History 3 

EDG 5414 Instructional Strategies 

in Teaching 3 

EDP 5053 Educational Psychology: 

Principles and 

Applications 3 

EEX 605 1 Educational Needs of 

Students with 

Exceptionalities 3 

ESE 5344C Secondary Classroom 

Management 3 

ESE 62 1 5 Secondary School 

Curriculum 3 

RED 5339 Subject Realted 

Reading 3 

TSL 5xxx ESOL Strategies for 

Content Teachers 3 

FLE 5xxx FLES Methods 3 

FLE 5945 Practicum: Modem 

Language 6 

FLE 6336 Methods of Teaching 

Modem Language 3 

FLE 6938 Seminar in Second 

Langauge Testing and 

Evaluation 3 

Grammar/Composition/Syntax course 

5000 level or higher 
Specialize in language when possible 3 
Culture/Civilization course 5000 level 

or higher 
Specialize in language when possible 3 
Linguistic course 5000 level or higher 
Specialize in language when possible 
Phonetics/Phonology preferred 3 

Literature course 5000 level or higher 
Must be in language of specialization 3 
Second langauge Acquisition course 
LIN 5720 Second Language 

Acquisition 3 

or 
TSL 5245 Developing Language 

and Literacy 3 

Graduation Requirements 

1. An overall GPAofat least 3.0 

2. Successful demonstration of all 
of the Florida Educator 



Accomplished Practices at the 

Preprofessional level 
3. Passing score on all three sections of 

the Florida Teacher Certification 

Examination. 
Note: IfCLAST is passed prior to July 
1, 2002, the new General Knowledge 
subtest may be waived. 

Alternate Track Masters 
Program in Mathematics 
Education (6-12) 
Degree Program Hours (45) 

Admission Requirements: 

1 . A bachelor's degree or a 

strong minor (30 hours with a 3.0 GPA 
or higher) in Mathematics and a' 
minimum of 3.0 cumulative GPA for 
the two most recent years of study or 
combined GRE score of 1000. In 
either case, a score for the GRE must 
be submitted. 

2. Passing scores on all four sections 
of the CLAST. If taken before July 1, 
2002, this test may be waived if the 
candidate has a score of 1000 or higher 
on the GRE. 

3. In addition to the minimum GPA 
or the combined GRE score, or both, 
the applicant must receive an 
affirmative recommendation from the 
designated Program Leader, Dean of 
the College, or her designee following 
a personal interview. 

Required Courses (45) 

EDF 5443 Measurement and 

Evaluation in the 

Classroom 3 

EDF 5517 Education in American 

History 3 

EDG 5414 Instructional Strategies 

in Teaching 3 

EDP 5053 Educational Psychology: 

Principles and 

Applications 3 

EEX 605 1 Educational Needs of 

Students with 

Exceptionalities 3 

ESE 5344C Secondary Classroom 

Management 3 

ESE 62 1 5 Secondary School 

Curriculum 3 

RED 5339 Subject Related 

Reading 3 

TSL 5xxx ESOL Strategies for 

Content Teachers 3 

MAE 4333C Special Teaching Lab: 

Mathematics 3 

MAE 5655 Computers in 

Mathematics 

Education 3 

MAE 5945 Practicum: 

Mathematics 6 



MAE 6336 Teaching Mathematics 
in the Secondary 
School 3 

MAE 6899 Seminar in 
Mathematics 
Education 3 

Graduation Requirements 

1 . An overall GPA of at least 3.0 

2. Successful demonstration of all 
of the Florida Educator 
Accomplished Practices at the 
Preprofessional level 

3. Passing score on all three sections of 
the Florida Teacher Certification 
Examination. 

Note: If CLAST is passed prior to July 
1, 2002, the new General Knowledge 
subtest may be waived. 

Alternate Track Masters 

Program in Physics Education 

(6-12) 

Degree Program Hours (42) 

Admission Requirements: 

1 . A bachelor's degree or a 

strong minor (30 hours with a 3.0 GPA 
or higher) in Physics and a minimum of 
3.0 cumulative GPA for the two most 
recent years of study or combined GRE 
score of 1000. In either case, a score 
for the GRE must be submitted. 

2. Passing scores on all four sections 
of the CLAST. If taken before July 1, 
2002, this test may be waived if the 
candidate has a score of 1000 or higher 
on the GRE. 

3. In addition to the minimum GPA 
or the combined GRE score, or both, 
the applicant must receive an 
affirmative recommendation from the 
designated Program Leader, Dean of 
the College, or her designee following 
a personal interview. 

Required Courses (42) 

EDF 5443 Measurement and 

Evaluation in the 

Classroom 3 

EDF 5517 Education in American 

History 3 

EDG 5414 Instructional Strategies 

in Teaching 3 

EDP 5053 Educational Psychology: 

Principles and 

Applications 3 

EEX 605 1 Educational Needs of 

Students with 

Exceptionalities 3 

ESE 5344C Secondary Classroom 

Management 3 

ESE 62 1 5 Secondar • School 

Curriculum 3 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Education 223 



RED 5339 Subject Reading 

Reading 3 

TSL 5xxx ESOL Strategies for 

Content Teachers 3 

SCE 4330 Special Teaching Lab: 

Science 3 

SCE 5945 Student Teaching 6 

SCE 6635 Teaching Science in 

Secondary School 3 

SCE 6933 Science Education 

Seminar 3 

Graduation Requirements 

1. An overall GPAofat least 3.0 

2. Successful demonstration of all 
of the Florida Educator 
Accomplished Practices at the 
Preprofessional level 

3. Passing score on all three sections of 
the Florida Teacher Certification 
Examination. 

Note: If CLAST is passed prior to July 
1, 2002, the new General Knowledge 
subtest may be waived. 

Alternate Track Masters 
Program in Social Studies 
Education (6-12) 
Degree Program Hours (45) 

Admission Requirements: 

1 . A bachelor's degree or a 

strong minor (30 hours with a 3.0 GPA 
or higher) in History and/or the Social 
Sciences and a minimum of 3.0 
cumulative GPA for the two most 
recent years of study or combined GRE 
score of 1000. In either case, a score 
for the GRE must be submitted. 

2. Passing scores on all four sections 
of the CLAST. If taken before July 1, 
2002, this test may be waived if the 
candidate has a score of 1 000 or higher 
on the GRE. 

3. In addition to the minimum GPA 
or the combined GRE score, or both, 
the applicant must receive an 
affirmative recommendation from the 
designated Program Leader, Dean of 
the College, or his designee following a 
personal interview. 

Required Courses (45) 

EDF 5443 Measurement and 
Evaluation in the 
Classroom 3 

EDF 5517 Education in American 
History 3 

EDG5414 Instructional Strategies 

in Teaching 3 

HOP 5053 Educational Psychology: 
Principles and 
Applications 3 

EEX 605 1 Educational Needs of 



Students with 

Exceptionalities 3 

ESE 5344C Secondary Classroom 

Management 3 

ESE 62 1 5 Secondary School 

Curriculum 3 

RED 5339 Subject Related 

Reading 3 

TSL Sxxx ESOL Strategies for 

Content Teachers 3 

SSE 5381 Developing a Global 

Perspective 3 

SSE 5385 Special Teaching Lab: 

Social Studies 3 

SSE 5945 Practicum: 

Mathematics 6 

SSE 6633 Teaching Social Studies 

in the Secondary 

School 3 

SSE 6939 Seminar in 

Social Studies 

Education 3 

Graduation Requirements 

1. An overall GPAofat least 3.0 

2. Successful demonstration of all 
of the Florida Educator 
Accomplished Practices at the 
Preprofessional level 

3. Passing score on all three sections of 
the Florida Teacher Certification 
Examination. 

Note: IfCLAST is passed prior to July 
1, 2002, the new General Knowledge 
subtest may be waived. 

Alternate Track Masters 
Program in Spanish 
Education (6-12) 
Degree program Hours (51) 

Admission Requirements: 

1 . A bachelor's degree or a 

strong minor (30 hours with a 3.0 GPA 
or higher) in the language of study and 
a minimum of 3.0 cumulative GPA for 
the two most recent years of study or 
combined GRE score of 1000. In 
either case, a score for the GRE must 
be submitted with a minimum score of 
550 on the pencil/paper test or 213 on 
the computerized exam. 

2. Passing scores on all four sections 
of the CLAST. If taken before July I, 
2002, this test may be waived if the 
candidate has a score of 1 000 or higher 
on the GRE. 

3. In addition to the minimum GPA 
or the combined GRE score, or both, 
the applicant must receive an 
affirmative recommendation from the 
designated Program Leader, Dean of 
the College, or her designee following 
a personal interview. 



Prerequisites: (30) 

30 credit hours at the junior or senior 
level including: 

Introduction to Linguistics 3 

Grammar/Syntax/Composition 12 

Phonetics/Phonology 3 

Culture/Civilization 3 

Literature 6 

Required Courses (51) 

EDF 5443 Measurement and 

Evaluation in the 

Classroom 3 

EDF 5517 Education in American 

History 3 

EDG 5414 Instructional Strategies 

in Teaching 3 

EDP 5053 Educational Psychology: 

Principles and 

Applications 3 

EEX 605 1 Educational Needs of 

Students with 

Exceptionalities 3 

ESE5344C Secondary Classroom 

Management 3 

ESE 62 1 5 Secondary School 

Curriculum 3 

RED 5339 Subject Realted 

Reading 3 

TSL Sxxx ESOL Strategies for 

Content Teachers 3 

FLE Sxxx FLES Methods 3 

FLE 5945 Practicum: Modem 

Language 6 

FLE 6336 Methods of Teaching 

Modem Language 3 

FLE 6938 Seminar in Second 

Langauge Testing and 

Evaluation 3 

Grammar/Composition/Syntax course 

5000 level or higher 
Specialize in language when possible 3 
Culture/Civilization course 5000 level 

or higher 
Specialize in language when possible 3 
Linguistic course 5000 level or higher 
Specialize in language when possible 
Phonetics/Phonology preferred 3 

Literature course 5000 level or higher 
Must be in language of specialization 3 
Second langauge Acquisition course 
LIN 5720 Second Language 

Acquisition 3 

or 
TSL 5245 Developing Language 

and Literacy 3 

Graduation Requirements 

1 . An overall GPA of at least 3.0 

2. Successfiil demonstration of all 
of the Florida Educator 
Accomplished Practices at the 
Preprofessional level 



224 College of Education 



Graduate Catalog 



3. Passing score on all three sections of 
the Florida Teacher Certification 
Examination. 

Note: If CLAST is passed prior to July 

1, 2002, the new General Knowledge 

subtest may be waived. 

Advanced Master of Science 
Degree Programs 

Applicants for admission to most 
Master's programs in Education must 
hold or qualify for Florida teacher 
certification in the appropriate area. For 
Early Chidlhood Education, apphcants 
must hold or qualify for Florida 
certification or equivalent in 
elementary, special or early childhood 
education (including practical teaching 
experience requirement). All 

applicants must also satisfy Board of 
Education admission requirements. A 
GPA of 3.0 in the last 60 semester 
hours of upper division undergraduate 
study or 1000 (total of verbal and 
quantitative) on the Graduate Record 
Examination (GRE). Applicants 
admitted with a pending GRE score 
must submit test score within one 
semester to be fully admitted or 
become a candidate for graduation. All 
applicants, regardless of GPA, must 
submit GRE score. 

Master of Science in Art 
Education 

Degree Program Hours: (42) 

Education, including Art 
Education: (21) 

EDF5481 Foundations of 

Educational Research 3 
EDF6211 Psychological 

Foundations of 

Education 3 

EDF 6608 Social, Philosophical, 

and Historical 

Foundations of 

Education 3 

ARE 6 1 40 Curriculum and 

Instruction in Art 3 

ARE 6262 Organization and 

Coordination of School 

and Community Art 

Programs 3 

ARE 6746 Seminar in Art 

Education: 

Contemporary Issues 

and Research 3 

ARE 6925-29 Workshop in Art 

Education 6 

Select one of the following: 
EDE 6205 Curriculum Design 

for Childhood 

Education 3 



ESE 62 1 5 Secondary School 

Teaching Field 3 

or 
EEX 605 1 Education of Students 

with Exceptionalities 3 

or 
EDS 6050 Supervision and Staff 

Development 3 

or 
EDF 5955 Field Study Abroad 3 

Fine Arts 

Art History 3 

Studio Art (Three semester hours 

credit for each studio course) 1 2 

Master of Science in Early 
Cliildbood Education 
Degree Program Hours: (36) 
Required Sequence of Courses: 
Yearl Fall 
EEC 626 1 Education Programs for 

Younger Children 3 

EDF 6608 Social Philosophical and 

Historical Foundations of 

Education 3 

Spring 
LAE54I5 Children's Literature 3 
EDF 62 11 Psychological Founda- 
tions of Education 3 
Summer 
LAE 6305 Instruction in Early 

Childhood 

Language Arts 3 

EDF 5481 Foundations Educational 

Research 3 

Year 2 Fall 
RED 6305 Instruction in Early 

Childhood Reading 3 
SCE 6306 Instruction in Early 

Childhood Science 3 

Spring 
MAE 6305 Instruction in Early 

Childhood 

Mathematics 3 

EEC 6xxx Arts and Technology in 

Early Childhood 

Education 3 

Summer 
SSE 6305 Instruction in Early 

Childhood Social 

Studies 3 

EEC 6678 Research in Eariy 

Childhood Education 3 
Entry to Program: Fall Semester - 
Students are encouraged to meet all 
admission requirements prior to beginning 
the program, however students may take a 
maximum of twelve (12) semester hours of 
course work applicable to the program prior 
to admission. 

Block Progression: Students should take 
courses in the sequence shown above. 



Graduation Requirements: Students must 
have a 3.0 GPA to graduate from the 
program. No more than two grades of "C" 
are permitted. Grades of "C-" or below will 
not be counted towards meeting program 
requirements. 

Thesis Option: Students may opt to extend 
the MS program (3 to 6 additional thesis 
credit hours) by request. 

Master of Science in 
Elementary Education 
Degree Program Hours: (36) 

Required Sequence of Courses: 
Yearl Fall 

EDE 6205 Curriculum Design for 

Childhood Education 3 
EDF 6608 Social and Philosophical 

Foundations of 

Education 3 

Spring 
RED 6314 Instruction in 

Elementary Reading 3 
EDF 621 1 Psychological 

Foundations of 

Education 3 

Summer 
LAE 5415 Children's Literature 3 
EDF 548 1 Foundations of 

Educational Research 3 
Year 2 Fall 
RED5XXX Subject Related 

Reading 3 

MAE 63 1 8 Instruction in 

Elementary Mathematics3 
Spring 
SCE 63 1 5 Instruction in 

Elementary Science 3 
SSE 6355 Instruction in 

Elementary Social 

Studies 3 

Summer 
ARE 63 1 5 Instruction in 

Elementary Art 3 

EDE 6488 Research in Elementary 

"iducation 3 

Entry to Program: Fall Semester - 
Students are encouraged to meet all 
admission requirements prior to beginning 
the program, however students may take a 
maximum of twelve (12) semester hours of 
course work applicable to the program prior 
to admission. 

Blocli Progression: Students should take 
courses in the sequence shown above. 
Graduation Requirements: Students must 
have a 3.0 GPA to graduate from the 
program. No more than two grades of "C" 
are permitted. Grades of "C-" or below will 
not be counted towards meeting program 
requirements. 



Graduate Catalog 



College of Education 225 



Thesis Option: Students may opt to extend 
the MS program (3 to 6 additional thesis 
credit hours) by request. 

Master of Scienc