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Full text of "The Graduate School announcements"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/graduateschoolan1934univ 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



Vol. 31 



February, 1934 



No. 2 



THE GRADUATE 
SCHOOL 




ANNOUNCEMENTS 

1934-1935 

COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 



THE UNIVERSITY 

of 

MARYLAND 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FOR THE SESSIONS OF 

19341935 




Issued monthly by the University of Maryland at College Park, Md. Entered as 
second-class matter, under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Calendar, 1934-1935 4 

Board of Regents 5 

Administrative Officers 6 

The Graduate School Council _ 6 

General Information 7 

History and Organization 7 

Location 7 

Libraries _ 7 

The Graduate Club 7 

General Regulations 8 

Admission to Graduate School _ 8 

Registration 8 

Graduate Courses _ _ 8 

Program of Work 9 

Summer Graduate Work 9 

Graduate Work in Professional Schools at Baltimore 9 

Graduate Work by Seniors in This University _ 10 

Admission to Candidacy for Advanced Degrees 10 

Requirements for the Degrees of Master of Arts and Master of 

Science - _ 10 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 12 

Rules Governing Language Examinations for Doctor of Philosophy 

Candidates 13 

Graduate Fees _ 13 

FellowshiiDs and Assistantships 14 

Commencement „ 14 

Description of Courses 15 



CALENDAR 
1934-1935 

First Semester 



1934 

Sept. 17-19 
Sept. 20 
Oct. 1 



Nov. 28-Dec. 3 



Monday- Wednesday- 
Thursday, 8:20a. m, 
Monday 



Dec. 21 



Registration. 

Instruction for first semester begins. 

Last day to file applications for ad- 
mission to candidacy for the Doc- 
tor's degree at Commencement of 
193.5. 
Wednesday, 4:10 p. m.- Thanksgiving recess. 

Monday, 8:20 a.m. 
Friday, 12:10 p. m. Christmas recess begins. 



1935 

Jan. 3 Thursday, 8:20 a. m. Christmas recess ends. 

Jan. 23-30 Wednesday-Wednesday First semester examinations. 

Jan. 15-Feb. 4 Tuesday-Monday Registration for second semester. 



Second Semester 



Feb. 5 



Tuesday, 8:20 a.m. 



Feb. 22 
Apr. 17-24 

May 11 

May 18 

May 22-29 

May 26 
May 30 
May 31 
June 1 



June 26 
Aug. 6 



Friday 

Wednesday, 12:10 p. m. 

Wednesday, 8 :20 a. m. 

Saturday 

Saturday 

Wednesday- Wednesday 

Sunday, 11:00 a. m. 
Thursday 
Friday 
Saturday 



Instruction for second semester 
begins. 

Last day to file applications for ad- 
mission to candidacy for the Mas- 
ter's degree at Commencement of 
1935. 

Washington's birthday. Holiday. 

Easter recess. 

Last day to deposit Doctor's thesis 
in office of Graduate School. 

Last day to deposit Master's thesis 
in office of Graduate School. 

Second semester examinations for 
seniors. 

Baccalaureate sermon. 

Memorial Day. Holiday. 
Class Day. 
Commencement. 



SuDimer Term 



Wednesday 
Tuesday 



Summer School begins. 
Summer School ends. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

George M. Shriver, Chairman 1933-1942 

Old Court Road, Baltimore 

John M. Dennis, Treasurer 1932-1941 

Union Trust Co., Baltimore 

William P. Cole, Jr _ 1931-1940 

Towson, Baltimore County 

John E. Raine 1930-1939 

1200 St. Paul Street, Baltimore 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst (Appointed 1933) 1929-1938 

3902 St. Paul Street, Baltimore 

Dr. W. W. Skinner, Secretary 1927-1936 

Kensington, Montgomery County 

E. Brooke Lee (Appointed 1927) 1926-1935 

Silver Spring, Montgomery County 

Henry Holzapfel, Jr 1925-1934 

Hagerstown, Washington County 

Clinton L. Riggs 1933-1942 

Latrobe Apts., Baltimore 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

Raymond A. Pearson, M.S., D.Agr., LL.D., President of the University. 

H. C. Byrd, B.S., Vice-President. 

Frank K. Haszard, Executive Secretary. • 

C. 0. Appleman, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School. 

Elsie Parrett, M.A., Secretary to the Dean. 

W. S. Small, Ph.D., Director of the Summer School. 

Adele Stamp, M.A., Dean of Women. 

Maude F. McKenney, Financial Secretary. 

W. M. HiLLEGEiST, Registrar. 

Alma H. Preinkert, M.A., Assistant Registrar. 

Grace Barnes, B.S., B.L.S., Librarian. 

H. L. Crisp, M.M.E., Superintendent of Buildings. 

T. A, Hutton, B. a.. Purchasing Agent and Manager of Students' Supply Store. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL COUNCIL 

Raymond A. Pearson, M.S., D.Agr., LL.D., President of the University. 

C. O. Appleman, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School, Chairman, 

A. N. Johnson, D.Eng., Professor of Highway Engineering. 

M. Marie Mount, M.A., Professor of Home and Institutional Management. 

H. J. Patterson, D.Sc, Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station. 

W. S. Small, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

T. H. Taliaferro, C.E., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

E. C. AucHTER, Ph.D., Professor of Horticulture. 

J. H. Beaumont, Ph.D., Professor of Horticulture. 

L. B. Broughton, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

E. N. Cory, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology. 

H. F. Cotterman, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Education. 

H. C. House, Ph.D., Professor of English and English Literature. 

DeVoe Meade, Ph.D., Professor of Animal and Dairy Husbandry. 

A. E. Zucker, Ph.D., Professor of Modern Languages and Comparative 

Literature. 
G. L. Jenkins, Ph.D., Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry (Baltimore). 
Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D., Professor of Gross Anatomy (Baltimore). 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

HISTORY AND ORGANIZATION 

In the earlier years of the institution the Master's degree was frequently 
conferred, but the work of the graduate students was in charge of the 
departments concerned, under the supervision of the General Faculty. The 
Graduate School of the University of Maryland was established in 1918 and 
organized graduate instruction leading to both the Master's and the 
Doctor's degree was undertaken. The faculty of the Graduate School in- 
cludes all members of the various faculties who give instruction in approved 
graduate courses. The general administrative functions of the Graduate 
Faculty are delegated to a Graduate Council, of which the Dean of the 
Graduate School is chairman. 

LOCATION 

The University of Maryland is located at College Park, in Prince George's 
County, Maryland, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, eight miles from 
Washington and thirty-two miles from Baltimore. Washington, with its 
wealth of resources, is easily accessible by train, street car and bus. 

The professional schools of Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Dentistry and 
Law are located in Baltimore, at the corner of Lombard and Greene Streets. 

LIBRARIES 

In addition to the resources of the University library, the great libraries 
of the National Capital are easily available for reference work. Because of 
the close proximity of these libraries to College Park they are a very valu- 
able asset to research and graduate work at the University of Maryland. 

The new library building at College Park contains a number of seminar 
rooms and other desirable facilities for graduate work. 

THE GRADUATE CLUB 

The graduate students maintain an active Graduate Club. Several meet- 
ings for professional and social purposes are held during the year. Students 
working in different departments have an opportunity to become acquainted 
with one another and thus profit by the broad cultural values derived from 
contacts with fellow students working in different fields. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 

ADMISSION 

Graduates of colleges and universities of good standing are admitted to 
the Graduate School. Before entering upon graduate work all applicants 
must present evidence that they are qualified by their previous work to 
pursue with profit the graduate courses desired. Application blanks for ad- 
mission to the Graduate School are obtained from the office of the Dean. 
After approval of the application, a matriculation card, signed by the Dean, 
is issued to the student. This card permits the student to register in the 
Graduate School. After payment of the fee, the matriculation card is 
stamped and returned to the student. It is the student's certificate of mem- 
bership in the Graduate School, and may be called for at any succeeding 
registration. 

Admission to the Graduate School does not necessarily imply admission to 
candidacy for an advanced degree. 

REGISTRATION 

All students pursuing graduate work in the University, even though they 
are not candidates for higher degrees, are required to register at the begin- 
ning of each semester in the office of the Dean of the Graduate School, Room 
T-214, Agriculture Building. Students taking graduate work in the Sum- 
mer School are also required to register in the Graduate School at the 
beginning of each session. In no case will graduate credit be given unless 
the student matriculates and registers in the Graduate School. The pro- 
gram of work for the semester or the summer session is entered upon two 
course cards, which are signed first by the professor in charge of the 
student's major subject and then by the Dean of the Graduate School. One 
card is retained in the Dean's oflfice. The student takes the other card, and, 
in case of a new student, also the matriculation card, to the Registrar's 
office, where a charge slip for the fee is issued. The charge slip, together 
with the course card, is presented at the Cashier's office for adjustment of 
fees. After certification by the Cashier that fees have been paid, class 
cards are issued by the Registrar. Students will not be admitted to grad- 
uate courses without class cards. Course cards may be obtained at the 
Registrar's office or at the Dean's office. The heads of departments usually 
keep a supply of these cards in their respective offices. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Graduate students must elect for credit in partial fulfillment of the re- 
quirements for higher degrees only those courses designated For Graduates 
or For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates. Graduate students may 
elect courses numbered from 1 to 99 in the general catalogue but graduate 
credit will not be allowed for these courses. Students with inadequate 
preparation may be obliged to take some of these courses as prerequisites 
for advanced courses. 



PROGRAM OF WORK 

The professor who is selected to direct a student's thesis work is the stu- 
dent's adviser in the formulation of a graduate program, including suitable 
minor work, which is arranged in cooperation with the instructors. This 
program receives the approval of the Dean by his endorsement of the stu- 
dent's course card. 

To encourage thoroughness in scholarship through intensive application, 
graduate students in the reg-ular sessions are limited to a program of thirty 
credit hours for the year. If a student is doing only research work under 
the direction of an official of the institution he must register and pay for a 
minimum of four credit hours per semester. The number of credit hours 
reported at the end of the semester will depend upon the work accomplished, 
but it will not exceed the number for which the student is registered. 

SUMMER GRADUATE WORK 

Graduate work in the Summer Session may be counted as residence 
toward an advanced degree. By carrying approximately six semester hours 
of graduate work for four summer sessions and upon submitting a satis- 
factory thesis, a student may be granted the degree of Master of Arts or 
Master of Science. In some instances a fifth summer may be required in 
order that a satisfactory thesis may be completed. 

Upon recommendation by the head of the student's major department and 
with the approval of the Graduate 'Council, a maximum of six semester 
hours of graduate work done at other institutions of sufficiently high stand- 
ing may be substituted for required work here; such substitution does not 
shorten the required residence period. 

Graduate work may be pursued during the entire summer in some de- 
partments, by special arrangement. Such students as graduate assistants, 
or others who may wish to supplement work done during the regular year, 
may satisfy one-third of an academic year's residence by full-time graduate 
work for eleven or twelve weeks, provided satisfactory supervision and 
facilities for summer work are available in their special fields. 

The University publishes a special bulletin giving full information con- 
cerning the Summer School and the graduate courses offered during the 
Summer Session. The bulletin is available upon application to the Registrar 
of the University. 

GRADUATE WORK IN PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS AT BALTIMORE 

Graduate courses and opportunities for research work are offered in some 
of the professional schools at Baltimore. Students pursuing graduate work 
in the professional schools must register in the Graduate School, meet the 
same requirements, and proceed in the same way as do graduate students 
in other departments of the University. 

The graduate courses in the professional schools are listed on pages 56 
to 62. 



GRADUATE WORK BY SENIORS IN THIS UNIVERSITY 

Seniors who have completed all their undergraduate courses in this Uni- 
versity by the end of the first semester and who continue their residence in 
the University for the remainder of the year, are permitted to register in 
the Graduate School and secure the privileges of its membership, even 
though the bachelor's degree is not conferred until the close of the year. 

Seniors of this University who have nearly completed the requirements 
for the undergraduate degree may, with the approval of their undergraduate 
dean and the Dean of the Graduate School, register in the undergraduate 
college for graduate courses, which will be transferred for graduate credit 
toward a higher degree at this University, but the total of undergraduate 
and gi-aduate courses must not exceed 15 credits for the semester. 

ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY FOR ADVANCED DEGREES 

Application for admission to candidacy for either the Master's or the 
Doctor's degree is made on application blanks which are obtained at the 
office of the Dean of the Graduate School. These are filled out in duplicate 
and after the required endorsements are obtained, the applications are acted 
upon by the Graduate Council. An official transcript of the candidate's 
undei'graduate record and any graduate courses completed at other institu- 
tions must be filed in the Dean's office before the application can be con- 
sidered. 

A student making application for admission to candidacy for the degree 
of Doctor of Philosophy must also have obtained from the head of the 
Modern Language Department a statement that he possesses a reading- 
knowledge of French and German. 

Admission to candidacy in no case assures the student of a degree, but 
merely signifies that the candidate has met all the formal requirements 
and is considered by his instructors sufficiently prepared and able to pursue 
such graduate study and research as are demanded by the requirements of 
the degree sought. The candidate must show superior scholarship by the 
type of graduate work already completed. Preliminary examinations or 
such other substantial tests as the departments may elect are also required 
for admission to candidacy for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

Application for admission to candidacy is made at the time stated in the 
sections dealing with the requirements for the degree sought. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREES OF MASTER OF ARTS 
AND MASTER OF SCIENCE 

Advancement to Candidacy. Each candidate for the Master's degree is 
required to make application for admission to candidacy not later than the 
date when instruction begins for the second semester of the academic year 
in which the degree is sought, but not until at least 12 semester course hours 
of graduate work have been completed. 

10 



Residence Requirements. Two semesters or four summer sessions may 
satisfy the residence requirement for the degree of Master of Arts or 
Master of Science. Inadequate preparation for the graduate courses the 
student wishes to pursue may make a longer period necessary. 

Course Requirements. A minimum of 24 semester hours in courses ap- 
proved for graduate credit is required for the Master's degree. Additional 
courses may be required to supplement the undergraduate work if the stu- 
dent is inadequately prepared for the required graduate courses, either in 
the major or minor subjects. Not less than 12 semester hours and not more 
than 15 semester hours in graduate courses must be earned in the major 
subject. The remaining credits of the total of 24 hours required must be 
outside the major subject and they must comprise a group of coherent 
courses intended to supplement and support tKe major work. Not less than 
one-half of the total required course credits for the Master's degree must be 
selected from courses numbered 200 or above. The entire course of study 
must constitute a unified program approved by the student's major adviser 
and by the Dean of the Graduate School. No credits are acceptable for an 
advanced degree that are reported with a grade lower than "C". 

At least 18 of the 24 semester course credits required for the Master's de- 
gree must be taken at this institution. In certain cases graduate work done 
in other graduate schools of sufficiently high standing may be substituted for 
the remaining required credits, but any such substitution of credits does not 
shorten the normal required residence at the University of Maryland. The 
Graduate Council, upon recommendation of the head of the major depart- 
ment, passes upon all graduate work done at other institutions. The final 
examination will cover all graduate work offered in fulfillment of the re- 
quirements for the degree. 

Thesis. In addition to the 24 semester hours in graduate courses a satis- 
factory thesis is required of all candidates for the Master's degree. It must 
demonstrate the student's ability to do independent work and it must be 
acceptable in literary style and composition. It is assumed that the time 
devoted to thesis work will be not less than the equivalent of 6 semester 
hours earned in graduate courses. If the Master's thesis is based upon in- 
dependent research the student may be required to register in research 
courses, but not more than 4 semester hours in research courses can be in- 
cluded in the 24 semester hours required in graduate courses for the 
Master's degree. With the approval of the student's major professor and 
the Dean of the Graduate School, the thesis in certain cases may be prepared 
in absentia under direction and supervision of a member of the faculty of 
this institution. 

The thesis should be typewritten, double spaced, on a good quality of 
paper 11 x 8^^ inches in size. The original copy must be deposited in the 
office of the Graduate School not later than two weeks before commencement. 

It should be held together with removable clamp, and placed in a manila 
or other durable folder, with the title, and name of writer, on the outside. 
The thesis should not be stapled, as it is later bound by the University and 

11 



placed in the University library. One or two additional carbon copies should 
be provided for use of members of the examining committee prior to the 
final examination. If the thesis contains extensive charts or graphs, it is 
not necessary to duplicate them in the carbon copies, as the official copy will 
be accessible to the examining committee. 

Final Examination. The final oral examination is conducted by a commit- 
tee appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. The student's adviser acts 
as the chairman of the committee. The other members of the committee are 
persons under whom the student has taken most of his major and minor 
courses. The chairman and the candidate are notified of the personnel of 
the examining committee at least one week prior to the period set for the 
examination. The chairman of the committee selects the exact time and 
place for the examination and notifies the other members of the committee 
and the candidate. The examination should be conducted within the dates 
specified and a report of the examination sent to the Dean as soon as pos- 
sible after the examination. A special form for this purpose is supplied to 
the chairman of the committee. Such a report is the basis upon which 
recommendation is made to the faculty that the candidate be granted the 
degree sought. The period for the oral examination is usually one hour. 

The examining committee also approves the thesis, and it is the candi- 
date's obligation to see that each member of the committee has ample op- 
portunity to examine a copy of the thesis prior to the date of the exami- 
nation. 

A student will not be admitted to final examination until all other re- 
quirements for the degree have been met. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Advancement to Candidacy. Candidates for the Doctor's degree must be 
admitted to candidacy not later than one academic year prior to the grant- 
ing of the degree. Applications for admission to candidacy for the Doc- 
tor's degree must be deposited in the office of the Dean not later than 
October 1 of the academic year in which the degree is sought. 

Residence. Three years of full-time resident graduate study are required. 
The first two of the three years may be spent in other institutions offering 
standard graduate work. On a part-time basis the time needed will be 
correspondingly increased. The degree is not given merely as a certificate 
of residence and work, but is granted only upon sufficient evidence of high 
attainments in scholarship and ability to carry on independent research in 
the special field in which the major work is done. 

Major and Minor Subjects. The candidate must select a major and one 
or two closely related minor subjects. Thirty semester hours of minor 
work are required. The remainder of the required residence is devoted to 
intensive study and research in the major field. The amount of required 
course work in the major subject will vary with the department and the 
individual candidate. 

12 



Thesis. The ability to do independent research must be shown by a dis- 
sertation on some topic connected with the major subject. The original 
typev/ritten copy of the thesis must be deposited in the office of the Dean 
at least three weeks before the time the degree is granted. One or two 
extra copies should be provided for use of members of the examining 
committee prior to the date of the final examination. The thesis is later 
printed in such form as the committee and the Dean may approve and 
fifty copies are deposited in the University library. 

Final Examination. The final oral examination is held before a com- 
mittee appointed by the Dean. One member of this committee is a repre- 
sentative of the Graduate Faculty who is not directly concerned with the 
student's graduate work. One or more members of the committee may 
be persons from other institutions, who are distinguished scholars in the 
student's major field. 

The duration of the examination is approximately three hours and covers 
the research work of the candidate as embodied in his thesis, and his 
attainments in the fields of his major and minor subjects. Tlie other de- 
tailed procedures are the same as those stated for the Master's examination. 

RULES GOVERNING LANGUAGE EXAMINATIONS FOR DOCTOR 
OF PHILOSOPHY CANDIDATES 

1. Candidates for the Doctor's degree are expected to possess a reading 
knowledge of French and German. In the examination they will be expected 
to read at sight from books or articles in their specialized fields. It is not 
expected that the candidate know every single word of the text. The ex- 
aminers will supply occasional foreign terms, but it is presumed that the 
student knows sufficient grammar to recognize inflectional forms. 

2. The student is asked to bring books or periodicals to the examination 
to the amount of about 400 to 500 pages, from which the examiners will 
select a number of paragraphs for the reading test. 

3. No penalty is attached to failure in the examination and the unsuc- 
cessful candidate is free to try again at the next date set for these tests. 

4. Graduate students expecting to take the examination are asked to 
register their names in the Graduate School office at least three days prior 
to the test. Examinations are held in the Seminar room, Librari/ building, 
on the first Wednesdays in Febrnari/, Ju7ie, and October, at 2 p. m. 

GRADUATE FEES 

The fees paid by graduate students are as follows: 

A matriculation fee of $10.00. This is paid once only, upon ad- 
mission to the Graduate School. 

A fixed charge, each semester, at the rate of $4.00 per semester 
credit hour. 

A diploma fee (Master's degree), $10.00. 

Graduation fee, including hood (Doctor's degree), $20.00. 

13 



FELLOWSHIPS AND ASSISTANTSHIPS 

Fellowships. A number of fellowships have been established by the Uni- 
versity. A few industrial fellowships are also available in certain depart- 
ments. The stipend for University fellows is $400 for the academic year 
and the remission of all graduate fees except the diploma fee. 

Application blanks for University fellowships may be obtained from the 
office of the Graduate School. The application, with the necessary creden- 
tials, is sent by the applicant directly to the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Fellows are required to render minor services prescribed by their major 
department. The usual amount of service required does not exceed 12 clock 
hours per week. Fellows are permitted to carry a full graduate program, 
and they may satisfy the residence requirement for higher degrees in the 
normal time. 

The selection of fellows is made by the departments to which the fellow- 
ships are assigned, with the approval of the dean or director concerned, but 
all applications must first be approved by the Dean of the Graduate School. 
The awards of University fellowships are on a competitive basis. 

Teaching and Research Assistantships. A number of teaching and re- 
search assistantships are available in several departments. The stipend for 
assistantships varies with the services rendered, and the amount of graduate 
work assistants are permitted to carry is determined by the head of the de- 
partment, with the approval of the dean or director concerned. 

The compensation for a number of assistantships is $800 a year. These 
assistants devote one-half of their time to instruction or research in con- 
nection with Experiment Station projects, and they are required to spend 
two years in residence for the Master's degree. If they continue in residence 
for the Doctor's degree they are allowed two-thirds residence credit for each 
academic year at this University. The minimum residence requirement 
from the Bachelor's degree, therefore, may be satisfied in four academic 
years and one summer, or three academic years and three summers of 
eleven or twelve weeks. 

All graduate fees except the diploma fee are remitted to all assistants, 
provided they are in full graduate status and are carrying programs leading 
directly to an academic higher degree. 

Further information regarding assistantships may be obtained from the 
department or college concerned. 

COMMENCEMENT 

Attendance is required at the commencement at which the degree is con- 
ferred, unless the candidate is excused by the Dean and the President of 
the University. 



14 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

For the convenience of students in making out schedules of studies, the 
subjects in the following Description of Courses are arranged alphabetically: 

Page 

Agricultural Economics 16 

Agricultural Education and Rural Life 17 

Agronomy (Crops and Soils) - - - 19 

Anatomy _ 56 

Animal Husbandry 20 

Bacteriology and Pathology 20 and 59 

Biochemistry 58 

Botany 24 

Chemistry 27 

Comparative Literature — — 52 

Dairy Husbandry „ 32 

Economics and Sociology 33 

Education 36 

English Language and Literature _ 39 

Entomology _ 41 

Foods and Nutrition 44 

French 50 

Genetics and Statistics 42 

German _ _ 51 

History and Political Science 43 

Home Economics 44 

Horticulture 45 

Mathematics 48 

Modern Languages 50 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 60 

Pharmacognosy 60 

Pharmacology 57 and 6 1 

Pharmacy 62 

Physics 53 

Physiology 57 

Psychology 53 

Spanish 51 

Zoology and Aquiculture „ ., 54 

For convenience in identification, Courses for Graduates and Advanced 
Undergraduates are numbered 100 to 199; Courses for Graduates are 
numbered 200 and upward. 

The letter following the number of the course indicates the semester in 
which the course is offered: Thus, lOOf is offered the first semester; 101s, 
the second semester; 102y, the year. Capital S after a course number indi- 
cates that the course is offered in the summer session only. 

The number of semester hours' credit is shown by the arabic numeral in 
parenthesis after the title of the course. 

15 



A separate schedule of courses is issued each semester, giving the hours, 
places of meeting, and other information required by the student in making 
out his schedule. Students will obtain these schedules when they register. 

When enrolling, students should indicate on blue card the symbol, number 
and name of course, together with number of credits to be earned. 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

A. E. 101s. Transportation of Farm Products (3) — Two lectures; one 
laboratory. Not open to students who have taken or are taking Econ. 112 s. 

A study of the development of transportation in the United States, the 
different agencies for transporting farm products, with special attention to 
such problems as tariffs, rate structure, and the development of fast freight 
lines, refrigerator service, truck transportation of agricultural products, etc. 

(Russell.) 

A. E. 102 s. Marketing of Farm Products (3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 5 f or s. 

A complete analysis of the present system of transporting, storing, and 
distributing farm products and a basis for intelligent direction of effort in 
increasing the efficiency of marketing methods. (DeVault.) 

A. E. 103 f. Co-operation in Agriculture (3) — Three lectures. 

Historical and comparative development of farmers' co-operative organi- 
zations with some reference to farmer movements; reasons for failure and 
essentials to success; commodity developments; the Federal Farm Board; 
trend of present tendencies. (Russell.) 

A. E. 104 s. Agricultural Finance (3) — Three lectures. Agricultural 
Credit requirements; institutions financing agriculture; financing specific 
farm organizations and industries. Taxation of various farm properties; 
burden of taxation on different industries; methods of taxation; proposals 
for tax reform. Farm Insurance — fire, crop, livestock, and life insurance 
with especial reference to mutual developments — how provided, benefits, 
and needed extension. (Russell.) 

A. E. 10.5s. Food Products Inspection (3) — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. 

This course, arranged by the Department of Agricultural Economics in 
co-operation with the State Department of Markets and the United States 
Department of Agriculture, is designed to give students primary instruction 
in the grading, standardizing and inspection of fruits and vegetables, dairy 
products, poultry products, and meats. Theoretical instruction covering the 
fundamental principles will be given in the form of lectures, while the 
demonstrational and practical work will be conducted through laboratories 
and field trips to Washington, D. C, and Baltimore. (Staff.) 

A. E. 106s. Prices (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
A general course in prices and price relationships, with emphasis on 
prices of agricultural products. (Russell.) 

16 



A. E. 109 y. Research Problems (1-3). 

With the permission of the instructor, students will work on any research 
problems in Agricultural Economics which they may choose, or a special list 
of subjects will be made up from which the students may select their re- 
search problems. There will be occasional class meetings for the purpose of 
making reports on progress of work, methods of approach, etc. (DeVault.) 

Courses for Graduates 

A. E. 201 y. Special Problems in Agricultural EcoiLomics (3). 

An advanced course dealing more extensively with some of the economic 
problems affecting the farmer, such as land problems, agricultural finance, 
farm wealth, agricultural prices, transportation, and special problems in 
marketing and co-operation. (DeVault.) 

A. E. 202 y. Seminar (1-3) . 

This course will consist of special reports by students on current eco- 
nomic subjects, and a discussion and criticism of the same by the members 
of the class and the instructor. (DeVault.) 

A. E. 203 y. Research (8) — Students will be assigned research work in 
Agricultural Economics under the supervision of the instructor. The work 
will consist of original investigation in problems of Agricultural Economics, 
and the results will be presented in the form of a thesis. (DeVault.) 

A. E. 205 f. Advanced Agricultural Geography and Commerce (2) — One 
double period a week. 

Individual advanced study of agricultural geography from a commodity 
standpoint. (Russell.) 

A. E. 210 f. or s. Taxation in Relation to Agriculture (3) — One lecture; 
two laboratory or practicum periods per week. 

Principles and practices of taxation in their relation to agriculture, with 
special reference to the trends of expenditures and tax le\ies; taxation in 
relation to land utilization ; taxation in relation to ability to pay and benefits 
received; methods of assessing property; the general property tax as a 
major source of revenue; the Federal and State income tax; the gasoline 
and motor vehicle license tax; the sales tax; the inheritance and gift tax; 
other sources of revenue; and possibilities of economy in the expenditure of 
tax revenues. ( DeVault and Walker. ) 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND RURAL LIFE 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Ag. Ed. 101 s. Observation and the Anali/sis of Teaching for Agricul- 
tural Students (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite, Ed. 101. 

This course deals with an analysis of pupil learning in class groups. It 
includes a study of pupil and teacher objectives; objectives in secondary 
education; objectives in vocational education; objectives in vocational agri- 
cultural education; individual differences; varying elements in class and 

17 



classroom situations; lesson patterns; pupil activities and procedures in the 
class period; measuring results; steps in teaching procedure; types of 
lessons; class room management; observation and critiques. (Cotterman.) 

Ag. Ed. 103 f. Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture (3) — Three 
lectures. Prerequisites, Ag. Ed. 101, 102; A. H. 1, 2; D. H. 1; Poultry 
101; Soils 1; Agron. 1, 2; Hort. 1, 11; F. Mech. 101, 104; A. E. 2, 102; 
F. M. 2. 

Types of vocational schools and classes ; activities of high school depart- 
ments of vocational agriculture; the development of day class courses; 
methods, approaches, objectives and goals in day class instruction; the 
administration of projects and other forms of directed and supervised 
practice in day classes; objectives, course content, and methods in evening 
and part-time classes; equipment; extra-curricular activities of vocational 
departments; advisory committees and departmental goals; co-operative 
relationships; departmental administrative programs; ways of measuring 
results; publicity; records and reports. (Cotterman.) 

Ag. Ed. 104 s. Departmental Organization and Administmtion (2) — 
Two lectures. Prerequisites, Ag. Ed. lOl, 102, 103. 

The work of this course is based upon the construction and analysis of 
administrative programs for high school departments of vocational agri- 
culture. As a project each student prepares and analyzes in detail an ad- 
ministrative program for a specific school. Investigations and reports. 

(Cotterman, Worthington.) 

Ag. Ed. 106 s. Rural Life and Education (3) — Three lectures. 

Dynamics of life, changing rural communities ; possibilities of normal 
life in rural areas ; ancient and foreign rural communities ; evolution of 
American rural communities; the home, church, school, community, state, 
governmental and other volunteer organizations as a response to human 
aspiration and realization ; the place of elementary, secondary and higher 
education in rural life endeavors; educational objectives of fairs and similar 
agencies; tendencies in high grade rural living; the conditioning effect of 
economic differences; investigations and reports. This course is designed 
especially for persons who expect to assist in shaping educational and other 
community programs for rural people. (Cotterman.) 

Ed. 105 f. Educational Sociologi/ (3) — (See Education). 

Courses for Graduates 

Ag. Ed. 201 f . Comparative Agricidtural Education (3) — Prerequisite, 
Ag. Ed. 101. 

State systems of instruction in agriculture are examined and evaluated 
from the standpoint of objectives, the work of teachers and results accom- 
complished; special papers, investigations, and reports. (Cotterman.) 

Ag. Ed. 202 s. Supervision of Vocational Agriculture (3) — Prerequisite, 
Ag. Ed. 101. 

Analysis of the work of the supervisor; comparative studies of super- 
visoi'y programs, policies, and problems; principles of supervision; investi- 
tigations and reports. (Cotterman.) 

18 



Ag. Ed. 250 y. Seminar in Agricultural Education (2-4). 

Problems in the administration and organization of Agricultural Educa- 
tion — prevocational, secondary, collegiate, and extension; individual prob- 
lems and papers; current literature. (Cotterman.) 

Ag. Ed. 251 y. Research (2-8) — Credit hours according to work done. 
Students must be specially qualified by previous work to pursue with 
profit the research to be undertaken. (Cotterman.) 

Ed. 202s. Higher Education in the United States (H). (See Education.) 

AGRONOMY 

Division of Crops 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Agron. 103 f. Ci-op Breeding'' (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Gen. 101. 

The principles of breeding as applied to field crops and methods used in 
crop improvement. (Kemp.) 

Agron. 121 s. Methods of Crop and Soil Investigations* (2) — One lec- 
ture; one laboratory. 

A consideration of crop investigation methods at the various experiment 
stations, and the standardization of such methods. (Metzjier. ) 

* Cannot be counted as major toward an advanced degree. 

Courses for Graduates 

Agron. 201 y. Crop Breeding (4-10) — Credits determined by work ac- 
complished. 

The content of this course is similar to that of Agron. 103, but will be 
adapted more to graduate students, and more of a range will be allowed in 
choice of material to suit special cases. (Kemp.) 

Agron. 203 y. Seminar (2) — One report period each week. 
The seminar is devoted largely to reports by students on current scientific 
publications dealing with problems in crops and soils. 

Agron 209 y. Research (4-8) — Credits determined by work accomplished. 

With the approval of the head of the department the student will be 
allowed to work on any problem in agronomy, or he will be given a list of 
suggested problems from which he may make a selection. (Staff.) 

Division of Soils 

Courses for Graduates 

Soils 201 y. Special Problems and Research (10-12). 

Original investigation of problems in soils and fertilizers. (Staff.) 

19 



Soils 202 y. Soil Technology (7; 5 f , 2 s) — Two lectures, two laboratories, 
first semester; two lectures, one laboratory, second semester. Prerequisites, 
Geology 1, Soils 1, and Chemistry 1. 

In the first semester chemical and physico-chemical study of soil prob- 
lems as encountered in field, greenhouse, and laboratory. In the second 
semester physical and plant nutritional problems related to the soil. 

(Thomas.) 

Soils 204 s. Soil Microbiology (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Bact. 1. 

A study of the microorganisms of the soil in relation to fertility. It in- 
cludes the study of the bacteria of the soil concerned in the decomposition 
of organic matter, nitrogen fixation, nitrification, and sulphur oxidation and 
reduction, and deals also with such organisms as fungi, algae, and protozoa. 
The course includes a critical study of the methods used by experiment 
stations in soil investigational work. (Thom.) 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

A. H. 107 s. Nutrition (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 

A study of digestion, assimilation, metabolism, and protein and energy 
requirements. Methods of investigation and studies in the utilization of 
feed and nutrients. (Meade.) 

Courses for Graduates 

A. H. 201 y. Special Prohlans in Animal Husbandry (4-6) — Credit given 
in proportion to amount and character of work completed. 

Problems which relate specifically to the character of work the student is 
pursuing will be assigned. (Meade.) 

A. H. 202 y. Seminar (2)— One lecture. 

Students are required to prepare papers based upon current scientific 
publications relating to animal husbandry or upon their research work, for 
presentation before and discussion by the class. (Staff.) 

A. H. 203 y. Research — Credit to be determined by the amount and char- 
acter of work done. 

With the approval of the head of the department, students will be re- 
quired to pursue original research in some phase of animal husbandry, 
carry the same to completion, and report the results in the form of a thesis. 

(Meade, Hunt.) 

BACTERIOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Bact. 101 f. Dairy Bacteriology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, Bact 1. Registration limited. 

Bacteria in milk, sources and development; milk fermentation; sanitary 
production; care and sterilization of equipment; care and preservation of 
milk and cream; pasteurization; public health requirements. Standard 

20 



Methods of Milk Analysis; practice in the bacteriological control of milk 
supplies; occasional inspection trips. (Black.) 

Bact. 102 s. Dav-y Bacteriology (Continued) (3) — One lecture; two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, Bact. 101 f, or consent of instructor. 

Relation of bacteria, yeasts and molds to ice cream, butter, cheese, and 
other dairy products; sources of contamination. Microbiological analyses 
and control; occasional inspection trips. (Black.) 

Bact. 103 f. Hematologij (2) — Two laboratories. Bact. 1 desirable. Reg- 
istration limited. 

Procuring blood ; estimating the amount of hemoglobin ; color index ; ex- 
amination of red cells and leucocytes in fresh and stained preparations; 
numerical count of ei-ythi'ocytes and leucocji:es; differential count of leuco- 
cytes; sources and development of the formed elements of blood; patho- 
logical forms and counts. (Reed.) 

Bact. 104 s. Urinalysis (2) — Two laboratories. Bact. 1 desirable. 
Physiologic, pathologic and diagnostic significance ; use of clinical methods 
and interpretation of results. (Reed.) 

Bact. 10.5 s. Comparative Anatomij and Physiology (3) — Three lectures. 

Structure of the animal body; abnormal as contrasted with normal; the 
inter-relationship between the various organs and parts as to structure and 
function. (Reed.) 

Bact. 106 s. Animal Hi/gievc (3) — Three lectures or demonstrations. 

Care and management of domestic animals, with special reference to 
maintenance of health and resistance to disease; prevention and early rec- 
ognition of disease; general hygiene; sanitation; first aid. (Reed.) 

Bact. 109 f. Pathological Technique (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. 
Bact. 1 desirable. 

Examination of fresh material; fixation; decalcification; sectioning by 
free hand and freezing methods; celloidin and paraffin imbedding and sec- 
tioning; general staining methods. (Reed.) 

Bact. 110 s. Pathological Technique (Continued) (3) — One lecture; two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, Bact. 109 f, or consent of instructor. Special 
methods. (Reed.) 

Bact. lllf. Food Bacteriology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, Bact. 1. 

Bacteria, yeasts and molds in foods; relation to preservation and spoilage; 
sanitary production and handling; food plant sanitation; food regulations; 
food infections and intoxications. Technique in microbiological examination 
of foods; factors affecting preservation. (Black.) 

Bact. 112 s. Sanitai-y Bactei-iology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Bact 1. Registration limited. 

Bacteriological and public health aspects of water supplies, water purifica- 
tion methods, swimming pool sanitation; sewage disposal, industrial wastes; 
disposal of garbage and other municipal refuse. Practice in standard meth- 
ods for examination of water and sewage; differentiation and significance 

21 



of the coli-aerogenes group; interpretation of bacteriological analyses. 

(Black.) 

Bact. 115 f. Serologii (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. Prerequi- 
site, Bact. 2 s, or consent of instructor. Registration limited. 

Infection and resistance; agglutination, precipitation, lytic and comple- 
ment fixation reactions; principles of immunity and hypersensitiveness. 
Prepai'ation of necessary reagents; general immunologic technique; factors 
affecting reactions; applications in the identification of bacteria and diag- 
nosis of disease. (Faber.) 

Bact. 116 s. Epidemiolog}j (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Bact. 1. 

Epidemiology of important infectious diseases, including history, charac- 
teristic features, methods of transmission, immunization and control; peri- 
odicity; principles of investigation; public health applications. (Black.) 

Bact. 121 f. Research Methods (1) — One lecture. Prerequisite, Bact. 1 
and consent of instructor. 

Methods of research, library practice, current literature; preparation of 
papers ; research institutions, investigators ; laboratory design, equipment 
and supplies; academic practices; professional aids. (Black.) 

Bact. 122 f or s. Advanced Methods (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Bact. 1 and consent of instructor. Registration limited. 

Microscopy, dark field and single cell technique, photomicrography; colori- 
metric and potentiometric determinations ; oxidation-reduction, electro- 
phoresis; surface tension; special culture methods; filtration; disinfectants; 
animal care; practice in media and reagent preparation. (Bartram.) 

Bact. 123 f. Bacteriological Problems (3-5) — Laboratory. Prerequisite, 
Bact. 1 and any other courses needed for the project. Registration limited. 

Subject matter suitable to the needs of the particular student, or prob- 
lems as an introduction to research, will be arranged. The research is in- 
tended to develop the student's initiative. The problems are to be selected, 
outlined, and investigated in consultation with and under the supervision of 
a faculty member of the department. Results are to be presented in the 
form of a thesis. (Black.) 

Bact. 124 s. Bacteriological Problems (Continued) (3-5) — Laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Bact. 1 and any other courses needed for the project. Reg- 
istration limited. (Black.) 

Bact. 125 f. Clinical Methods (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, Bact. 1 and consent of instructor. 

Clinical material, diagnostic features. Methods in the qualitative and 
quantitative determination of important constituents of gastric contents, 
blood, urine, feces and exudates. (Bartram.) 

Bact. 126 s. Public Health (1) — One lecture. Prerequisite, Bact. 1. 

A series of weekly lectures on Public Health and its administration, by 
the experts of the Maryland State Board of Health. (Black, in charge.) 

Bact. 127 f. Advanced Bacteriology (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Bact. 1 and consent of instructor. 

History; systematic relationships; special morphology; bacterial varia- 

22 



tion; growth; chemical composition; action of chemical agents; systematic 
bacteriology; classification, review of important genera. (Black.) 

Bact. 128 s. Bacterial Metabolism (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Bact. 1, Chem. 12 f, or equivalent, and consent of instructor. 

O.xygen relations ; enzymes ; bacterial metabolism and respiration ; chemi- 
cal activities of microorganisms; changes produced in inorganic and organic 
compounds; industrial fermentations. (Black.) 

Bact. 131 f. Journal Club (1) — Prerequisites, Bact. 1 and at least one 
of the advanced courses. 

Students will submit reports on current scientific literature or on indi- 
vidual problems in bacteriology, which will be discussed and criticized by 
members of the class and staff. (Black and Staff.) 

Bact. 132 s. Journal Club (Continued) (1) — Prerequisites, Bact. 1 and at 
least one of the advanced courses. (Black and Staff.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Bact. 201 f. Advanced General Bacteriology (3) — One lecture; two lab- 
oratories. Prerequisite, degree in biological sciences, and consent of in- 
structor. Students with credit in an approved elementary course will not 
receive credit for this course. 

History; microscopy; morphology; classification; metabolism; relation to 
industries and to diseases. Media preparation ; examination of bacteria ; 
staining; cultivation and identification of bacteria. (Faber.) 

Bact. 202s. Advanced Paihogenic Bacteriology (3) — One lecture; two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, Bact. 1 or 201 f, or equivalent. Registration 
limited. 

Infection and immunity; pathogenic microorganisms. Isolation, identifi- 
cation and effects of pathogens. (Faber.) 

Bact. 203 f. Animal Disease Research (2-6) — Prerequisite, degree in 
veterinary medicine from an approved veterinary college, or consent of in- 
structor. Laboratory and field work by assignment. (Reed.) 

Bact. 204 s. Animal Disease Research (Continued) (2-6) — Prerequisite, 
degree in veterinary medicine from an approved veterinary college, or con- 
sent of instructor. (Reed.) 

*Bact. 205 f. Advanced Food Bacteriology (3) — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, Bact., 10 hours. 

Critical review of microorganisms necessary or beneficial to food products ; 
food spoilage ; theories and advanced methods in food preservation ; ap- 
plication of bacteriological control methods to manufacturing operations. 

(James.) 

* Bact, 206 s. Physiology of Bacteria (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisites, Bact., 10 hours and Chem. 108 or equivalent. 

Growth; chemical composition; physical characteristics; energy relation- 
ships; infiuence of environmental conditions on growth and metabolism; dis- 



* Ten students are required for each of these courses. A special fee is 
charged for them. 

23 



infection; physiological interrelationships; changes occurring in media. 

(James.) 

B ACT. 207 f. Special Topics (1) — Prerequisite, Bact., 10 hours. 
Presentation and discussion of fundamental pi-oblems and special subjects. 

(Black.) 

Bact. 208 s. Special Topics (Continued) (1) — Prerequisite, Bact., 10 
hours. (Black.) 

Bact. 209 f. Seminar (1) — Prerequisites, Bact. 10 hours, and consent of 
instructor. 

Conferences and reports prepared by the student on current research and 
recent advances in bacteriology. (Black.) 

Bact. 210 s. Seminar (Continued) (1) — Prerequisites, Bact. 10 hours, 
and consent of instructor. 

Bact. 211 f. Research (2-10) — Laboratory. Prerequisites, Bact. 1 and 
any other courses needed for the particular project. Credit will be deter- 
mined by the amount and character of the work accomplished. 

Properly qualified students will be admitted upon approval of the depart- 
ment head and with his approval the student may select the subject for 
research. The investigation is outlined in consultation with and pursued 
under supervision of a faculty member of the department. The results 
obtained by major students working towards an advanced degree are pre- 
sented as a thesis, a copy of which must be filed with the department. 

(Black.) 

Bact. 212 s. Research (Continued) (2-10) — Laboratory. Prerequisites, 
Bact. 1 and any other courses needed for the particular project. (Black.) 

BOTANY 

A. General Botany and Morphology 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

BOT. lOlf. Plant Anatomy (3) — One lecture; two laboi-atories. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. 1. 

The origin and development of the organs and tissue systems in the vas- 
cular plants, with special emphasis on the structures of roots, stems and 
leaves. Reports of current literature are recjuired. (Bamford.) 

Bot. 102 f. Mycology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

An introductory study of the morphology, life histories, classification, and 
economics of the fungi. Methods of cultivating fungi and identification of 
plant pathogens constitute a part of the laboratory work. 

(Norton, Simonds.) 

Bot. lOo f. Plant Taxonomy (.3) — One lecture; two laboratories. (Not 
offered in 1934-1935.) 

Classification of the vegetable kingdom, and the principles underlying it; 
the use of other sciences and all phases of botany as taxonomic foundations ; 
methods of taxonomic research in field, garden, herbarium and library. 

24 



Each student to work on a special problem during some of the laboratory 
time. (Norton.) 

BoT. 105 s. Economic Plants (2) — Two lectures. 

The names, taxonomic position, native and commercial geographic distri- 
bution, and use of the leading economic plants of the world are studied. By 
examination of plant products from markets, stores, factories, and gardens, 
students become familiar with the useful plants both in the natural form 
and as used by man. (Norton.) 

BOT. 106 f . History and Philosophy of Botany (1) — One lecture. 

Discussion of the development of ideas and knowledge about plants, also 
a survey of contemporary botanical science. (Norton.) 

Box. 107 f or s. Methods in Plant Histology (1) — One laboratory. 
Principles and methods involved in the preparation of permanent slides. 

(Bamford.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Box. 201s. Cytology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. Prerequisite, 
Bot. 1. 

A detailed study of cell contents and cell reproduction, and the methods 
of illustrating same. The bearing of cytology upon theories of heredity and 
evolution will be emphasized. (Bamford.) 

Box. 202s. Industrial Mycology (3 or more) — One lecture; two or more 
laboratories. 

Fungi in relation to canning, dairying, and other manufacturing pro- 
cesses; fermentation, sanitation, home economics, wood preservation, toxi- 
cology, soils, insect control, and other economic fields outside plant patho- 
logy. Part of the laboratory time to be spent in factories and technical 
laboratories. (Norton.) 

Box. 203 f and s. Seminar (1). 

The study of special topics in plant morphology. (Bamford.) 

Box. 204. Research. Credit according to work done. (Bamford, Norton.) 

B. Plant Pathology 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Plx. Paxh. 101 s. Advanced Plant Pathology (4) — Two lectures; two 
laboratories. Admission only after consultation with the instructor. 

This course covers the nature, cause and control of plant diseases in a 
much more thorough manner than is possible in the elementary course, and, 
in addition, includes sufficient practice in technique to give the background 
for research. (Temple.) 

Plx. Paxh. 104 f and s. Minor Investigations — Credit according to work 
done. A laboratory course with an occasional conference. Prerequisite, 
Pit. Path, 1 f. 

In this course the student may enter or withdraw at any time, including 
the summer months, and receive credit for the work accomplished. The 

25 



course is intended primarily to give practice in technique so that the student 
may acquire sufficient skill to undertake fundamental research. Only minor 
problems or special phases of major problems may be undertaken. Their 
solution may include a survey of the literature on the problem under investi- 
gation and both laboratory and field work. (Norton, Temple.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Plt. Path. 201 f. Vinin Diseases (2) — Two lectures. 

An advanced course dealing with the mosaic and similar or related dis- 
eases of plants, including a study of the current literature on the subject 
and the working of a problem in the greenhouse. (Temple.) 

Plt. Path. 203 f. Non-Parasitic Diseases (3) — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. (Not offered in 1934-1935.) 

Effects of maladjustment of plants to their environment; injuries due 
to climate, soil, gases, dusts and sprays, fertilizers, improper treatment and 
other detrimental conditions. (Norton.) 

Plt. Path. 204 f and s. Seminar (1 or 2). 

Conferences and reports on plant pathological literature and on recent 
investigations. (Temple.) 

Plt. Path. 205 y. Research — Credit according to work done. 

(Norton, Temple.) 

C. Plant Physiology 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Plt. Phys. 101 s. Plant Ecology (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. 1 f or s. 

The study of plants in relation to their environments. Plant formations 
and successions in various parts of the country are briefly treated. Much 
of the work, especially the practical, must be carried on in the field, and 
for this purpose type regions adjacent to the University are selected. 

Courses for Graduates 

Plt. Phys. 201 s. Plant Biochemistry (4) — Two lectures; two labora- 
tories. Prerequisite, an elementary knowledge of plant physiology and 
organic chemistry. 

An advanced course on the chemistry of plant life. It deals with mate- 
rials and processes characteristic of plant life. Primary syntheses and the 
transformations of materials in plants and plant organs are especially 
emphasized. (Appleman, Parker.) 

Plt. Phys. 202 f. Plant Biophysics (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 
Prerequisites, Bot. 1 f or Bot. 1 s, and Pit. Phys. 1 f or equivalent. An 
elementary knowledge of physics or physical chemistry is highly desirable. 

An advanced course dealing with the operation of physical forces in life 
processes and physical methods of research in plant physiology. Practice in 
recording meteorological data constitutes a part of the course. ( Greathouse. ) 

26 



Plt. Phys. 203 s. Plant Microchemistry (2) — One lecture; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisites, Bot. 1 f or s, Cliem. 1 y, or equivalents. 

The isolation, identification, and localization of organic and inorganic 
substances found in plant tissues by micro-technical methods. The use of 
these methods in the study of metabolism in plants is emphasized. (Parker.) 

Plt. Phys. 204 f. Growth and Development (2). (Appleman.) 

Plt. Phys. 205 f and s. Seminar (1) . 

Students are required to prepare reports of papers in the current litera- 
ture. These are discussed in connection with the recent advances in the 
subject. (Appleman.) 

Plt. Phys. 206 y. Research — Credit according to work done. 
Students must be specially qualified by previous work to pursue with 
profit the research to be undertaken. (Appleman, Greathouse, Parker.) 

CHEMISTRY 

General Chemistry 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 100 s. Special Topics for Tea-chers of Elementarif Chemistri/ (2) — 
Two lectures. Prerequisite, Chem. 1 y or equivalent. 

A study of the content and the method of presentation of a high school 
chemistry course. It is designed chiefly to give a more complete under- 
standing of the subject matter than is usually contained in an elementary 
course. Some of the recent advances in inorganic chemistry will be discussed. 

(White.) 

Chem. 104 f. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (4) — Two lectures; two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, Chem. 2 y. Lectures may be taken without 
laboratory. 

This course is an advanced study of the general principles of inorganic 
chemistry. Special emphasis is given to the reactions and the more unusual 
properties of the common elements. Laboratory experiments are selected 
which involve important theoretical considerations. (White.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Chem, 200 s. Chemistry of the Rarer Elements (.5) — Three lectures; two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, Chem. 2 y. Lectures may be taken without 
laboratory. 

The course is devoted to a study of the rarer elements and their com- 
pounds. The laboratory work involves the extraction of these elements 
from their ores and the pi'eparation of their compounds. (White.) 

Chem. 201 f and s. Research iyi Inorganic Chemistry — Open to students 
working for the higher degrees. Prerequisite, a Bachelor's degree in Chem- 
istry or its equivalent. (White.) 

27 



Analytical Chemistry 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 101 y. Advanced Qimntitative Analysis (10) — Two lectures; 
three laboratories. Prerequisite, Chem. 6 y or equivalent. 

A broad survey of the field of inorganic quantitative analysis. In the 
first semester mineral analysis will be given. Included in this will be 
analysis of silicates, carbonates, etc. In the second semester the analysis 
of steel and iron will be taken up; however, the student will be given wide 
latitude as to the type of quantitative analysis he wishes to pursue during 
the second semester. (Wiley.) 

Chem. 103 y. Advanced Industrial A7uihjsis (10) — Two lectures; three 
laboratories. 

This course includes the analysis of alloys of industrial application, the 
interpretation of chemical analysis and correlation of chemical composition 
and physical properties. A limited amount of work will be done with the 
microscope. (Wiley.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Chem. 202 f and s. Research in Quantitative Analysis — Open to students 
working for the higher degrees. Prerequisite, a Bachelor's degree in chem- 
istry or its equivalent. (Wiley.) 

Organic Chemistry 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates. 

Chem. 116 y. Advanced Organic Chemistry (4) — Two lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Chem. 8 A y and 8 B y or equivalent. 

This course is devoted to a more advanced study of the compounds of 
carbon than is undertaken in Chem. 8 A y. Graduate students who desire 
an accompanying laboratory course should elect Chem. 210 y. (Drake.) 

Chem. 117 y. Organic Laboratory (2). 

This course is devoted to an elementary study of organic qualitative 
analysis. The work includes the identification of unknown organic com- 
pounds, and corresponds to the more extended course, Chem. 207. (Drake.) 

Chem. 118 y. Organic Laboratory (2). 

A study of organic quantitative analysis and the preparation of organic 
compounds. Quantitative determinations of carbon and hydrogen, nitrogen 
and halogen are carried out, and syntheses more difficult than those of 
Chem. 8 B y are studied. (Drake.) 

Chem. 119 y. Advanced Organic Chemistry (4) — Two lectures. Pre- 
requisites, Chem. 8 y or its equivalent, and consent of instructor. 

A course designed to meet the needs of students not specializing in chem- 
istry who desire a more advanced course than Chem. 8 y. For a part of the 
year, one lecture a week will be devoted to reports and discussion of assigned 
collateral reading. 

28 



Courses for Graduates 

Chem. 203 f and s. Special Topics in Organic Chemistry (2). 

A lecture course which will be given any half-year when there is sufficient 
demand. The course will be devoted to an advanced study of topics which 
are too specialized to be considered in Chem. 116 y. Topics that may be 
covered are dyes, drugs, carbohydx-ates, plant pigments, etc. The subject 
matter will be varied to suit best the needs of the particular group enrolled. 

(Drake.) 

Chem. 204 f and s. Special Topics in Organic Chemistry (2) — A contin- 
uation of Chem. 20.3 f and s. Either this course or course 20.3 will be given 
when there is sufficient demand. (Drake.) 

Chem. 205 f and s. Organic Preparations (4). 

A laboratory course, devoted to the synthesis of various organic com- 
pounds. This course is designed to fit the needs of those students whose 
laboratory experience has been insufficient for research in organic chem- 
istry. (Drake.) 

Chem. 206 f and s. Organic Microanalysis (4). 

A laboratoiy study of the methods of Pregl for the Cjuantitative deter- 
mination of halogen, nitrogen, carbon, hydrogen, methoxyl, etc., in very 
small quantities of material. The course is open only to properly qualified 
graduate students, and the consent of the instructor is necessary before 
enrollment. (Drake.) 

Chem. 207 f and s. Organic Qualitative Analysis (4 or 6). 
Laboratory work devoted to the identification of unknown organic com- 
pounds and mixtures. (Drake.) 

Chem. 210 y. Advanced Organic Laboratory (4 or 6) — Students electing 
this course may take 4 lecture credits in Chem. 116 y. (Drake.) 

Chem. 211 f and s. Research in Organic Chemistry — Open to students 
working for the higher degrees. Prerequisite, a Bachelor's degree in chem- 
istiy or its equivalent. (Drake.) 

Physical Chemistry 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 102 y. Physical Cliemistry (10) — Three lectures; two laboratory 
periods. Prerequisites, Chem. 6 y. Physics 2y, Math. .5 y. One term may 
be taken for graduate credit with or without laboratory work. Graduate 
students may take lectures only in this course (6 credits) and elect also 
Chem. 219 f and s. With the consent of the instructor, graduate students 
may enter in the second semester. 

This course aims to furnish the student with a thorough background in 
the laws and theories of chemistry. The gas laws, kinetic theory, liquids, 
solutions, elementary thermodynamics, themiochemistry, equilibrium, chem- 
ical kinetics, etc., will be discussed. (Haring.) 

29 



Courses for Graduates 

Note: Chem. 102 f and s, or its equivalent, is jorerequisite for all ad- 
vanced courses in physical chemistry. 

Chem. 212 f and s. Colloid Chemist)!/ (8) or (4) — Two lectures; two 
laboratories; or two lectures only. 

This is a thorough course in the chemistry of matter associated with 
surface energy. First semester, theory; second semester, practical appli- 
cations. (Haring.) 

Chem. 213 f. Phase Rule (2)— Two lectures. 

A systematic study of heterogeneous equilibria. One, two and three com- 
ponent systems will be considered with practical applications of each. 

(Haring.) 

Chem. 214s. Structure of Matter (2)— Two lectures. (Not given in 
1934-1935.) 

Subjects considered will be radioactivity, isotopes, the Bohr and Lewis- 
Langmuir theories of atomic structure, and allied topics. (Haring.) 

Chem. 21.5 f. Catali/sis (2)— Two lectures. 

This course consists of lectures on the theory and applications of catalysis, 

(Haring.) 

Chem. 216 s. Theonj of Solutions (2) — Two lectures. (Not given in 
1934-1935.) 

A detailed study will be made of the modern theory of ideal solutions, of 
the theory of electrolytic dissociation and of the recent developments of the 
latter. (Haring.) 

Chem. 217f and s. Electrochemistri/ (8) or (4) — Two lectures; two lab- 
oratories; or two lectures only. 

A study of the principles and some of the practical applications of electro- 
chemistry. First semester, theory; second semester, practical applications. 

(Haring.) 

Chem. 218 y. Chemical Thermodi/Jiamics (4) — Two lectures. (Not given 
in 1934-1935.) 

A study of the methods of approaching chemical problems through the 
laws of energy. (Haring.) 

Chem. 219 f and s. Phi/sical Chemistri/ Laboratori/ (4 or 6) — Two lab- 
oratories and one conference. Students taking this course may elect 6 
credits of lectures in Chem. 103 y. (Haring.) 

Chem. 220 f and s. Research in Ph.i/sical Chemistry — Open to students 
working for the higher degrees. Prerequisites, a Bachelor's degree in 
chemistry or its equivalent, and consent of the instructor. (Haring.) 

Agricultural Chemistry 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 106 f or s. Dairi/ Chemistri/ (4) — One lecture; three laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Chem. 12 f. 

Lectures and assigned reading on the constituents of dairy products. 

30 



This course is designed to give the student a working knowledge and labora- 
tory practice in dairy chemistry and analysis. Practice is given in examin- 
ing dairy products for confirmation under the food laws, detection of 
watering, detection of preservatives and added colors, and the detection of 
adulterants. Students showing sufficient progress may take the second 
semester's work, and elect to isolate and make complete analysis of the fat 
or protein of milk. (McDonnell.) 

Chem. 108 s. General Physiological Chemistry (4) — Two lectures; two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, Chem. 12 f, or its equivalent. 

Biological chemistry in its relation to foods, digestion and metabolism, 
including laboratory examination and determination of compounds of bio- 
logical interest. (Broughton.) 

Chem. 115 f or s. Organic Analysis (4) — One lecture; three laboratories. 
Prerequisites, Chem. 12 f and 13 s. 

This course gives a connected introductory training in organic analysis, 
especially as applied to plant and animal substances and their manufactured 
products. The gi-eater part of the course is devoted to quantitative methods 
for food materials and related substances. Standard works and the publica- 
tions of the Association of the Official Agricultural Chemists are used freely 
as references. (Broughton.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Chem. 221 f or s. Tissue Analysis (3) — Three laboratories. Prerequisite, 
Chem. 12 f or its equivalent. 

A discussion and the application of the analytical methods used in deter- 
mining the inorganic and organic constituents of plant and animal tissue. 

(Broughton.) 

Chem. 223 f. Physiological Chemistry (5) — Three lectures; two labora- 
tories. Prerequisite, Organic Chemistry 12 f or its equivalent. 

Lectures and laboratories on the study of the constitution and reactions 
of proteins, fats, carbohydrates, and allied compounds of biological impor- 
tance. (Broughton.) 

Chem. 224 f or s. Special Problems (4 to 8) — A total of eight credit 
hours may be obtained in this course by continuing the course for two 
semesters. Laboratory, library and conference work amounting to ten hours 
each week. Prerequisites, Chem. 223 f and consent of instructor. 

This course consists of studies of special methods such as the separation 
of the fatty acids from a selected fat, the preparation of certain carbohy- 
drates or amino acids, and the determination of the distribution of nitrogen 
in a protein. The students will choose, with the advice of the instructor, 
the particular problem to be studied. (Broughton.) 

Chem. 227 f and s. Research — Agricultural chemical problems will be as- 
signed to graduate students who wish to gain an advanced degree. 

(Broughton.) 

31 



Industrial Chemistry 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

€hem. 110 y. Industrial Chemistry (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisites, 
Chem. 6 y and 8 y. 

A study of the principal chemical industries; plant inspection, trips and 
reports; the preparation of a report on some chemical industry. 

(Machwart.) 

Chem. Ill f. Encjineering Chemistry (2 or 3) — Two lectures; one lab- 
oratory. 

A study of the chemistry of engineering materials. (Machwart.) 

Chem. 113 y. Industrial Laboratory (4) — Two laboratories. Prerequi- 
site, consent of instructor. 

Experiments tyjncal of industrial operations. Examination of materials. 

(Machwart.) 

Chem. 114 y. Industrial Calculatioyis (4) — Two lectures. 
A study of industrial problems from the physical chemistry viewpoint. 
Problems typical of industry. (Machwart.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Chem. 222 y. Unit Operations (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, con- 
sent of instructor. 

A theoretical discussion of evaporation, distillation, filtration, etc. Prob- 
lems. (Machwart.) 

Chem. 225 s. Gas Analysis (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, consent of instructor. 

Quantitative determination of common gases. Flue gas and water gas 
analysis including calorific determinations of the latter. Problems. 

(Machwart.) 

Chem. 228 f and s. Research in Industrial Chemistry. 

The investigation of special problems and the preparation of a thesis 
towards an advanced degree. (Machwart.) 

Chem. 229 f and s. Seminar (2) — Required of all graduate students in 
chemistry. 

Students are reciuired to prepare rej^orts of papers in the current litera- 
ture. These are discussed in connection with the recent advances in the 
subject. (Chemistry Staff.) 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

D. H. 107 s. Advanced Breed Study (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 
Breed Association rules and regulations, important families and individ- 
uals, pedigree studies. Work largely by assignment. (Ingham.) 

32 



D. H. 108 s. Advanced Dairjf Manufacturing (3) — Lecture and labora- 
tory hours to be arranged. Prerequisite, D. H. 103 f and s. 

The work done in this course is varied to meet the needs of the individuals 
composing the class and relates especially to advanced and technical prob- 
lems in dairy manufacturing- and plant management. (England.) 

Courses for Graduates 

D. H. 201 y. Special Problems in Dairying (4-6) — Credit in accordance 
with the amount and character of work done. 

Special problems which relate specifically to the work the student is pur- 
suing will be assigned. (Meade.) 

D. H. 202 y. Seminar (2). 

Students are required to prepare papers based upon current scientific 
publications relating to dairying or upon their research work, for presenta- 
tion before and discussion by the class. (Staff.) 

D. H. 203 y. Research — Credit to be deteraiined by the amount and 
quality of work done. 

Students will be required to pursue, with the approval of the head of the 
department, an original investigation in some phase of dairy husbandry, 
carry the same to completion, and report the results in the form of a thesis. 

(Meade, Ingham, England.) 

ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY 

A. Economics 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ECON. 101 f. Money and Credit (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Econ. 
3 y or consent of the instructor. 

A study of the origin, nature, and functions of money, monetary systems, 
credit and credit instruments, prices, interest rates, and exchanges. 

(Brown.) 

EcoN. 102 s. Banking (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Econ. 101 f. 

Principles and practice of banking in relation to business. Special em- 
phasis upon the Federal Reserve System. (Brown.) 

Econ. 103 f. Corporation Finance (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Econ. 

3y. 

Principles of financing, the corporation and its status before the law, basis 
of capitilization, sources of capital funds, sinking funds, distribution of sur- 
plus, causes of failures, reorganizations, and receiverships. (Brown.) 

Econ. 104 s. Investments (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Econ. 3 y. 

Principles of investment, analyzing reports, price determination, taxation 
of securities, corporation bonds, civil obligations, real estate securities, and 
miscellaneous investments. Lectures, library assignments, and chart 
studies. (Brown.) 

33 



EcON. 105 f. Insurance (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Econ. 3 y. 

A survey of the major principles and practices of life and property in- 
surance with special reference to its relationship to our social and economic 
life. (Johnson.) 

EcON. 107 f . Business Law (3) — Three lectures. 

Legal aspects of business relationships, contracts, negotiable instruments, 
agency, partnerships, corporations, real and personal property, and sales. 

(Johnson.) 

EcoN. 108 s. Business Law (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Econ. 
107 f. A continuation of Econ. 107 f. (Johnson.) 

EcON. 110 y. Principles of Accotinting (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 109 y. 

A continuation of Econ. 109 y with emphasis upon the theory of account- 
ing. Special phases of corporation accounting are studied. The introduc- 
tion of accounting systems for manufacturing, commercial, and financial 
institutions. (Wedeberg.) 

Econ. 112 s. Land Transportation (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 3 y or Econ. 5 f or s. Not open to students who receive credit in 
A. E. 101 s. 

The development of inland means of transportation in the United States. 
This course is devoted largely to a survey of railway transportation. Some 
study is given to other transportation agencies. (Daniels.) 

Econ. 113 f. Public Utilities (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Econ. 3 y. 

The development of public utilities in the United States, economic and 
legal characteristics, regulatory agencies, valuation, rate of return and 
public ownership. (Johnson.) 

Econ. 114 s. Public Finance (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Econ. 3 y. 

The nature of public expenditures, sources of revenue, taxation and 
budgeting. Special emphasis upon the practical, social and economic prob- 
lems involved. (Johnson.) 

Econ. 116 s. Principles of Foreign Trade (3) — Three lectures. Prerequi- 
sites, Econ. 3 y, Econ. 1 f, and Econ. 2 s, or their equivalent. 

The basic principles of import and export trade, as influenced by the 
differences in methods of conducting domestic and foreign commerce. 

(Daniels.) 

Econ. 117 f. History of Economic Theory (2) — Two lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Econ. 3 y. 

History of economic doctrine and theories from the eighteenth century 
to the modern period. (Johnson.) 

Econ. 118 s. History of Economic Theory (2) — Two lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Econ. 117 f or consent of instructor. 

A continuation of Econ. 117 f. (Johnson.) 

Econ. 119 f. Advanced Economics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 3 y. 

An analysis of the theories of contemporary economists. Special atten- 
tion is given to the pi-oblems of value and distribution. (Brown.) 

34 



Ecox. 120 s. Applied Economics (2)-Two lectures. Prerequisite, Econ 
119 f, or consent of instructor. ' 

Current economic problems are studied from the viewpoint of the econo- 
mist. Lectures and class discussions based on assigned readings. (Brown ) 

ECON. 122 s. Cost Accounting (2) -Two lectures. Prerequisites, Econ 
109 y and consent of instructor. (Not given in 19.34-19.35 ) 

Process cost accounting; specific order cost accounting; manufacturing 
ex^P^ense; apphcat.on of accounting theory; preparation o^analytical "ate 

„ (Wedeberg-.) 

Econ. 126 s. A^cditin<, (2)-Two lecture... Prerequisite, Econ 109 y and 
consent of the instructor. ^ ^"" 

Principles of auditing, including a study of different kinds of audits the 
preparation of reports, and illustrative cases or problems. (Wedeberg ) 

Courses for Graduates 

Econ. 201 y. Research {A-&). /o* « x 

(otaiT.) 

Econ. 203 y Seminar (4) -Prerequisite, consent of instructor 
Discussion of major problems in the field of economic theory. ' Presenta- 
tion of reports based upon original investigations. (Staff ) 

B. Sociology 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Soc.lOlf. Rural Sociologij (2)— Two lectures 

Historical approach to rural life; structure and functions of rural com- 
rnunities; rural institutions and their problems; psychology of rura Hfe- 
stati tical analysis of rural population; relation of rural Hfe to the ma W 
social processes; the reshaping of rural life. (Bellman ) 

Soc. 102s. t/r6fmSociWo^;/ (2)— Two lectures. 

Historical survey of cities; statistical analysis of city groups- the nature 

^ons'oTfhrc-? '' '": ^^•^^--^-'^ P— ^ the social' sLctur'e ai d func 
tions of the city; urban personalities and groups; social change and prob- 
lems due to the impact of the urban environment. (Bellman ) 

relut^'L ^"t' ^"^^-'7^/!-^ Social Work (4) -Two lectures. Pre- 
lequisite, boc. 1 f, or consent of instructor. 

Causative factors and social complications in individual and group patho- 

hfoTy ZtT'^ '''7 ""'.'r' -^^-^ -^ institutional treltmen ; th" 
theory and technique of social case work; visits to major social agencies. 

Q„„ -lAf^r T , ^ (Bellman.) 

or Soc '/'/• f;"'^^^-«^^^"- (2)-Two lecture... Prerequisite, Econ. .3 v 
or boc. 1 t. (Not given m 1934-1935 ) > ^ .> 

The background of labor problems; labor organizations; labor legislation- 
unemployment and its remedies; wages, working conditions, and standard; 
of hvmg; agencies and programs for the promotion of industrial peace 

(Bellman.) 



Soc. 110 s. The Familij (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Soc. 1 f. (Not 
given in 1934-1935.) 

Anthropological and historical backgrounds, biological, economic, psycho- 
logical and sociological bases of the family; the role of the family in per- 
sonality development; family tension, maladjustment, and disorganization; 
family adjustment and social change. (Bellman.) 

(For other courses see Education, Agricultural Education and Rural 
Life.) 

EDUCATION 

A. History and Principles 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Ed. 101 f. History of Education: Education in Europe to Approximately 
1600 A. D. (2). 

A survey of the evolution in Europe of educational institutions, practices 
and theory from the Greco-Roman era and through the Christian era up to 
and including the Reformation. (Small.) 

Ed. 102 s. History of Modei-n Education (2). 

A continuation of Ed. 101 f. Attention is centered upon the creators of 
modern education and the development of education in America. (Small.) 

Ed. 103 s. Principles of Secondary Education (3) — Prerequisites, 4 f , 
Ed. 5 s. 

Evolution of the high school ; European secondary education ; articulation 
of the high school with the elementary school, college, and technical school, 
and with the community and the home; the junior high school; high school 
pupils; programs of study and the reconstruction of curricula; teaching 
staff; student activities. (Long.) 

Ed. 105 f. Educational Sociology (3), 

Education as social adjustment in foreign countries; major educational 
objectives; the function of educational institutions; the program of studies; 
objectives of the school subjects; group needs and demands; methods of 
determining educational objectives. (Cotterman.) 

Ed. 110 f. The Junior High School (3). 

This course considers the functions of the junior high school in the 
American public school system. Its development, present organization, cur- 
ricula and relation to upper and lower grades will be emphasized. (Long.) 

Ed. Ill f. Lives of Scientists (2). 

A study of the major achievements and interesting incidents in the lives 
of the pioneers of science. Though designed especially to provide enrich- 
ment material for the use of high school teachers, the course is of general 
cultural value. (Brechbill.) 

Ag. Ed. 106 s. Rural Life and Education (3). (See Agricultural Edu- 
cation.) 

36 



Courses for Graduates 

Ed. 200 f. Organization and Administration of Public Education (3). 

This course deals objectively with the organization, administration, cur- 
riculums, and present status of public education in the United States. 

(Small.) 

Ed. 201s. Educational Interpretations (3). 

In this course a study is made of the social, economic, political and cul- 
tural environment in which American educational institutions and policies 
have developed; and of the function of education in re-shaping this en- 
vironment. (Small.) 

Ed. 202 s. Higher Education in the United States (3) — One seminar 
period. 

European backgrounds of American higher education ; the development 
of higher education in the United States; present day adjustment move- 
ments in college; points of view in college teaching; uses of intelligence and 
other standardized tests; short answer examinations; course construction. 

(Cotterman.) 

Ed. 204 s. The Senior High School (3). 

This course will consider the principal's duties in relation to organization 
for operation, administration and supervision of instruction, and community 
relationships. (Long.) 

Ed. 250 y. Seminar in Education (2-4). 

Required of all candidates for the Master's degree whose majors are in 
the field of education. (Staff.) 

Ed. 251 y. Research (6-8). (Staff.) 

For additional courses see Agricultural Education. 

B. Educational Psychology 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Ed. 106 s. Advanced Educational Psi/chologij (3) — Prerequisites, Ed. 4 f , 
Ed. 5 s. The latter may be taken concurrently with Ed. 106 s. 

Principles of genetic psychology; nature and development of the human 
organism; development and control of instincts. Methods of testing intelli- 
gence; gi'oup and individual differences and their relation to educational 
practice. Methods of measuring rate of learning; study of typical learning 
experiments. (Sprowls.) 

Ed. 107 f. Educational Measurements (3) — Prerequisites, Ed. 4 f, Ed. 5 s. 

A study of typical educational problems involving educational scales and 
standard tests. Nature of tests, methods of use, analysis of results and 
practical applications in educational procedure. Emphasis will be upon 
tests for high school subjects. (Sprowls.) 

Ed. 108 s. Mental Hi/giene (3) — Prerequisite, Ed. 4 f or Psychol. 1 f or s, 
or equivalent. 

Normal tendencies in the development of character and personality. 
Solving problems of adjustment to school and society; obsessions, fears, 

37 



compulsions, conflicts, inhibitions, and compensations. Methods of person- 
ality analysis. (Sprowls.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Ed. 206 y. Si/stematic Educational Psi/cJioIogy (6). 

An advanced course for teachers and prospective teachers. It deals with 
the major contributions of psychologists from Herbart to Watson to educa- 
tional theory and practice. (Sprowls.) 

Ed. 252 y. Research {6-S) . 

C. Methods in High School Subjects 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Graduate credit for courses in this section will be given only by special 
permission of the Department of Education. 

Ed. 120 s. English in the High School (2) — Prerequisites, Ed. 4 f, Ed. .5 s. 

Objectives in English in the different types of high schools ; selection and 
organization of subject-matter in terms of modern practice and group needs ; 
evaluation of texts and references; bibliographies; methods of procedure 
and types of lessons; the use of auxiliary materials; lesson plans; measur- 
ing results. (Smith.) 

Ed. 121 for s. Supervised Teaching of English (3) — Observation and 
supervised teaching. Minimum of 20 teaching periods required. (Smith.) 

Ed. 122 s. The Social Studies in the High School (2) — Prerequisites, Ed. 
4 f , Ed. 5 s. 

Selection and organization of subject-matter in relation to the objectives 
and present trends in the Social Studies; texts and bibliographies; methods 
of procedure and types of lessons; the use of auxiliary materials; lesson 
plans; measuring results. (Long.) 

Ed. 123 f or s. Supervised Teaching of the Social Studies (3) — Observa- 
tion and supervised teaching. Minimum of 20 teaching periods required. 

(Long.) 

Ed. 124 s. Modern Language in the High School (2) — Prerequisites, Ed. 
4 f, 5 s. 

Objectives of modern language teaching in the high school ; selection and 
organization of subject-matter in relation to modern practice and group 
needs; evaluation of texts and references; bibliographies. Methods of pro- 
cedure and types of lessons; lesson plans; special devices; measuring 
results. 

Ed. 125 f or s. Supervised Teaching of Modern Language (3) — Observa- 
tion and supervised teaching. Minimum of 20 teaching periods required. 

Ed. 126 s. Science in the High School (2) — Prerequisites, Ed. 4 f , Ed. 5 s. 

Objectives of science teaching, their relation to the general objectives of 
secondary education; application of the principles of psychology and of 
teaching to the science class room situation; selection and organization of 

38 



subject-matter; history, trends and status; textbooks, reference works and 
laboratory equipment. Technic of class room and laboratory; measurement, 
standardized tests; professional organizations and literature; observation 
and criticism. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 127 for s. Supervised Teaching of Science (3) — Observation and 
supervised teaching. Minimum of 20 teaching periods. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 128 s. Matlieniatics in the High Scl(Ool (2) — Prerecjuisites, Ed. 4 f , 
Ed. 5 s. 

Objectives; the place of mathematics in secondary education; content and 
construction of courses; recent trends; textbooks and equipment; methods 
of instruction; measurement and standardized tests; professional organiza- 
tions and literature; observation and criticism. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 129 for s. Supervised Teaching of Mathematics (3) — Observation 
and supervised teaching. Minimum of 20 teaching periods required. 

(Brechbill.) 

D. Home Economics Education 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

H. E. Ed. 105 f or s. Special Problems, Child Study (.5). (McNaughton.) 

Courses for Graduates 

H. E. Ed. 201 f or s. Advanced Methods of Teaching Home Economics 
(2-4). 

Study of social trends as applied to the teaching of home economics. 

(McNaughton.) 

H. E. Ed. 250 y. Seminar m Home Economics Education (2-4). (See 
Ed. 250 y.) (McNaughton.) 

H. J. Ed. 251 y. Research. (6-8). (McNaughton.) 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Eng. 105 s. Poetry of the Romantic Age (3) — Three lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Eng. 7 and 8 or Com. Lit. 105, first semester. 

A study of the Romantic movement in England as illustrated in the 
works of Shelley, Keats, Byron, Wordsworth, Coleridge. This course is 
identical with the second semester of Com. Lit. 105 y. (Hale.) 

Eng. 115 f. Literature of the Eighteenth Centnrg (3) — Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, Eng. 7 and 8. 

Readings in the period dominated by Defoe, Swift, Addison, Steele, and 
Pope. (Fitzhugh.) 

Eng. 116 s. Literature of the EigJiteenth Centuri/ (3) — Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, Eng. 7 and 8. A continuation of Eng. 115 f. 

Dr. Johnson and his Circle; the Rise of Romanticism; the Letter Writers. 

(Fitzhugh.) 

39 



Eng. 119 y. Anglo-Saxon (6) — Three lectures. Some knowledge of Latin 
and German is desirable, as a preparation for this course. Required of all 
students whose major is English. 

A study of Anglo-Saxon (Old English) grammar and literature. Lec- 
tures on the principles of comparative philology and phonetics. (House.) 

Eng. 122 f. The Novel (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 1 y. 

Lectures on the principles of narrative structure and style. Class reviews 
of selected novels, chiefly from English and American sources. (House.) 

Eng. 123 s. The Novel (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 1 y. Con- 
tinuation of Eng. 1221 (House.) 

Eng, 124 f. English and American Essays (2) — Two lectures. 

A study of the philosophical, critical, and familiar essays of England 
and, America. Bacon, Lamb, Macaulay, Emerson, Chesterton, and others. 

(House.) 

Eng. 126 f. Victorian Poets (2) — Two lectures. 

Studies in the poetry of Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Swinburne, and 
others. (House.) 

Eng. 127 s. Victorian Poets (2) — Two lectures. Continuation of Eng. 
126 f. (House.) 

Eng. 129 f. College Grammar (3) — Three lectures. Required of all stu- 
dents whose major is English. 

Studies in the descriptive grammar of modern English, with some account 
of the history of forms. (Harman.) 

Eng. 130 f. The Old Testament as Literature (2) — Two lectures. 

A study of the sources, development, and literary types. (Hale.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Eng. 201. Research — Credit proportioned to the amount of work and ends 
accomplished. 

Original research and the preparation of dissertations looking toward 
advanced degrees. (Staff.) 

Eng. 202 y, Beowulf (4) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 119 y. Al- 
ternate with Eng. 203 f and 204 s. 

Critical study of grammar and versification, with some account of the 
legendary lore. (Harman.) 

Eng. 203 f. Middle English (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 119 y. 

A study of excerpts of the Middle English period, with reference to ety- 
mology and syntax. (House.) 

Eng. 204 s. Gothic (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 119 y. Eng. 
203 f and 204 s alternate with Eng. 202 y. 

A study of the forms and syntax with readings from the Ulfilas Bible. 
Correlation of Gothic speech sounds with those of Old English. (House.) 

Eng. 205 s. Browning's Dramas (2) — Two lectures. 

Luria, The Return of the Druses, Pippa Passes, Colombe's Birthday, A 
Blot in the 'Scutcheon. (House.) 

40 



Eng. 206 f. Victorian Prose (2)— Two lectures. 

Works of Carlyle, Arnold, Mill, Ruskin, and others. (Hale.) 

Eng. 207 y. Medieval Romance in England (4) — Two lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Eng. 7 f. 

Lectures and readings in the cyclical and non-cyclical romances in 
Medieval England and their sources, including translations from the Old 
French. (Hale.) 

Eng. 208 y. The Major Poets of th? Fourteenth Century (4)— Two lec- 
tures. Prerecjuisite, Eng 7 f . (Not given in 1934-1935.) 

Lectures and assigned readings in the works of Langland, Gower, 
Chaucer, and other poets of the fourteenth century. (Hale.) 

ENTOMOLOGY 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced L'ndergraduates 

Ent. 101 y. Economic Entomology (4) — Two lectures. 

An intensive study of the problems of applied entomology, including life 
history, ecology, behavior, distribution, parasitism, and control. (Cory.) 

Ext. 102 y. Economic Entomology (4) — Two laboratories. (Not oflfered 
in 1934-1935.) 

Expansion of Ent. 101 y to include laboratory and field work in economic 
entomology. (Cory.) 

Ent. 103 y. Seminar (1). 

Presentation of original work, book reviews, and abstracts of the more 
important literature. (Cory.) 

Ext. 104 y. Insect Pests of Special Groups (6) — Two lectures; one lab- 
oratory. Prerequisite, Ent. 1 f or s. (Not offered in 1934-1935.) 

A study of the principal insect pests of one or more of the following 
groups, founded upon food preferences and habitat. The course is intended 
to give the general student a comprehensive view of the insects that are 
of importance in his major field of interest and detailed information to the 
student specializing in entomology. 

Insect Pests of: 1, Fruit; 2, Vegetables; 3, Flowers, both in the open and 
under glass ; 4, Ornamental and shade trees ; 5, Forests ; 6, Field crops ; 
7, Stored products; 8, Live stock; 9, The Household. (Cory.) 

Ent. 105 f. Medical Entomology (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Ent. 
1 or consent of instructor. 

The relation of insects to diseases of man, dii*ectly and as carriers of 
pathogenic organisms. Control of pests of man. The fundamentals of para- 
sitology. (Knight.) 

Ent. 106 f or s. Insect Ta.<-onomy (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 

An advanced course dealing with the principles and practises underlying 
modern systematic entomology. (Hyslop.) 

Note: Course 106 runs from November 15 to March 15 to accommodate 
field workers. 

Ent. 107 s. Theory of Insecticides (2) — Two lectures. 

The development and use of contact and stomach poisons, with regard to 

41 



their chemistry, toxic action, compatability, and foliage injury. Recent 
work with insecticides will be especially emphasized. (Ditman.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Ent. 201. Advanced Entomology (1-3). 

Studies of minor problems in morphology, taxonomy, and applied ento- 
mology, with particular reference to preparation for individual research. 

(Cory.) 

Ent. 202 y. Research in Entomology (6-10). 

Advanced students having sufficient preparation, with the approval of the 
head of the department, may undertake supervised research in morphology, 
taxonomy, or biology and control of insects. Frequently the student may be 
allowed to work on Station or State Horticultural Department projects. The 
student's work may form a part of the final report on the project and be 
published in bulletin form. A dissertation, suitable for publication, must 
be submitted at the close of the studies as a part of the requirements for 
an advanced degree. (Cory.) 

Ent. 203. Insect Morphology (2-4), 

Insect anatomy with special relation to function. Given particularly in 
preparation for work in physiology and other advanced studies. Two lec- 
tui-es, and laboratory work by special arrangement, to suit individual needs. 

(Snodgrass.) 

(Note: Course 203 begins on November 15 and closes on March 15, and 
is taught at 4:30 p. m. in order to accommodate field workers.) 

Ent. 204 y. Economic Entomology (6) — Three lectures. Studies of the 
principles underlying applied entomology, and the most significant advances 
in all phases of entomology. (Cory.) 

GENETICS AND STATISTICS 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Gen. 101 f. Genetics (3) — Three lectures. 

A general course desigTied to give an insight into the principles of 
genetics or of heredity, and also to prepare students for later courses in 
the breeding of animals or of plants. (Kemp.) 

Gen. 102 s. Advanced Genetics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Gen. 
101 f. Alternate year course. 

A consideration of chromosome irregularities and other mutations, identity 
of the gene, inter-species crosses, genetic equilibrium, and the evolutionary 
aspects of genetics. (Kemp.) 

Gen. lllf. Statistics (2)— Two lectures. 

A study of the collection, analysis, interpretation, and presentation of 
statistics. The course includes a study of expressions of type, variability, 
correlation and regression, together with the making of diagrams, graphs, 
charts, and maps. (Kemp.) 

42 



Gen. 112 s. Advanced Stdtistics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Gen. 
Ill f or its equivalent. 

A study of the theory of error, measures of relationship, multiple and 
partial correlation, predictive formulas, curve fitting and an introduction to 
analysis of variance. (Kemp.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Gen. 201 y. Crop Breeding — 'Credits determined by work accomplished. 

(Kemp.) 
Gen. 209 y. Research — Credit determined by work accomplished. (Kemp.) 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

A. History 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

H. 101 f. Americcm Colonial Histonj (3) — Three lectures and assign- 
ments. Prerequisite, H. 2 y. 

A study of the political, economic, and social development of the American 
people from the discovery of America through the formation of the Consti- 
tuition. (Crothers.) 

H. 102 s. Recent American History (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
H. 2 y. 

The history of national development from the close of the reconstruction 
period to the present time. (Crothers.) 

H. 103 y. American History 1790-1865 (4) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
H. 2y. Alternates with H. 106 y. (Not given in 1934-1935.) 

The history of national development to the reconstruction period. 

(Crothers.) 

H. 104 y. World History Since 19H (6) — Three lectures. Alternates 
with H. 10.5 y. (Not given in 1934-1935.) 

A study of the principal nations of the world since the outbreak of the 
World War. (Jaeger.) 

H. 105 y. Diplomatic History of Europe in the Nineteenth and Tiventieth 
Oent2iries (6) — Three lectures. Alternates with H. 104 y. 

A study of the European nations, stressing their political problems and 
their political activities. (Jaeger.) 

H. 106 y. American Diplomacy (4) — Two lectures. Alternates with H. 
103 y. 

A study of American foreign policy. (Crothers.) 

H. 107 y. Social and Economic History of the Lbiit^d States, 1607 to the 
present time (4) — Two lectures. 

An advanced history course giving a synthesis of American life. 

(Crothers.) 

43 



Courses for Graduates 

H. 200y. Research. Credit according to work accomplished. 

H. 201y. Seminar American History {2) . (Crothers.) 

H. 202y. Seminar European History {2) . (Jaeger.) 

B. Political Science 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Pol. Sci. 101 f. Intel-national Laiv (3) — Two lectures and cases. 
A study of the sources, nature, and sanction of international law, peace, 
war, and neutrality. (Jaeger.) 

Pol. Sci. 102 s. International Relations (3) — Lectures and conferences. 

An examination of the economic and political reasons that motivate na- 
tions in their relations with one another. This course is designed to give 
the student a clear insight into the actual causes, whether economic or other- 
wise, that induce States to adopt one policy or another in the international 
sphere of their activity. (Jaeger.) 

HOME ECONOMICS 

A. Foods and Nutrition 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

H. E. 131 f. Nutrition (3) — Three recitations. Prerequisites, H. E. 31 y 
and Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12 f). 

Nutritive value, digestion and assimilation of foods. (Welsh.) 

H. E. 132 s. Nutrition (3) — Two I'ecitations ; one laboratory. Prerequi- 
site, H. E. 131 f. 

Selection of food to promote health; special diets. (Welsh.) 

H. E. 134 s. Advanced Foods (3) — One recitation; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, H. E. 31 y. 

Advanced study of manipulation of food matei'ial. (Welsh.) 

H. E. 135 f. Problems and Practice in Foods (.5). 

Experimental foods. (Welsh.) 

H. E. 136 s. Child Ntitrition (2) — One recitation; one laboratory. 
Lectures, discussions and field trips relating to the principles of child 
nutrition. (Welsh.) 

Courses for Graduates 

H. E. 201 f or s. Seminar in Nutrition (3). 

Oral and written reports on assigned readings in the current literature of 
Nutrition. Preparation and presentation of reports on special topics. (Staff.) 

44 



H. E. 202 f or s. Research. Credits to be determined by amount and 
quality of work done. 

With the approval of the head of the department, students may pursue 
an original investigation in some phase of foods. The results may form the 
basis of a thesis for an advanced degree. (Welsh.) 

H. E. 203 f or s. Advanced Experimental Foods (-3) — One recitation ; two 
laboratories. (Welsh.) 

B. Textiles and Clothins, 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

H. E. 112 s. Special Clothing Problems (3) — One recitation; two labor- 
atories. Prerequisite, H. E. Ill f. 

Each student selects an individual clothing study. (Westney.) 

H. E. 113 f. Problems and Practice in Textiles and Clothing (5) — Pre- 
requisite, H. E. lllf. 

Opportunity for experience and study in laboratories or museums. 

(McFarland.) 

H. E. 114 f or s. Advanced Textiles (3) — Two recitations; one labora- 
tory. 

Advanced study of textiles ; historic textiles ; economic phases of the 
textile industry which affect the consumer. 

C. Art 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

H. E. 121s. Interior Decoration (3) — Two recitations; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, H. E. 21 f. 

History of architecture and period furniture; application of principles of 
color and proportion to home decoration. (Murphy.) 

D. Home Economics Seminar 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

H. E. 161 s. Seminar (3) — Three recitations. 

Book reviews and abstracts from scientific papei's and bulletins relating 
to Home Economics, together with criticisms and discussions of the work 
presented. (Staff.) 

HORTICULTURE 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

HoRT. 101 f. Commercial Fruit Growing (3) — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, Hort. If. Given in alternate years. (Not offered in 
1934-1935.) 

The proper management of commercial orchards in Maryland. Advanced 
work is taken up on the subject of orchard culture, orchard fertilization, 

45 



picking, i^acking, marketing, and storing of fruits; orchard by-products; 
orchard heating, and orchard economics. (Wentworth.) 

HoRT. 102 f. Econoynic Fruits of the World (2) — Two lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Hort. 1 f. Given in alternate years. (Offered in 1934-1935.) 

A study is made of the botanical, ecological, and physiological character- 
istics of all species of fruit-bearing plants of economic importance, such as 
the date, pineapple, fig, olive, banana, nut-bearing trees, citrus fruits, and 
newly introduced fruits, with special reference to their cultural require- 
ments in certain parts of the United States and the insular possessions. 
All fruits are discussed in this course which have not been discussed in a 
previous course. (Beaumont.) 

HoRT. 103 f. Tuber and Root Crops (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Hort. 11 s. Given in alternate years. (Not offered in 1934- 
1935.) 

A study of white potatoes and sweet potatoes, considering seed, varieties, 
propagation, soils, fertilizers, planting, cultivation, spraying, harvesting, 
storing, and marketing. (Cordner.) 

HoRT. 104 s. Advanced Tmck Crop Production (1) — Prerequisites, Hort. 
11 s and 12 f. 

A trip of one week is made to the commercial trucking section of Mary- 
land, Delaware, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. A study of the markets in 
several large cities is included in this trip. Students are required to hand 
in a detailed report of this trip. The cost of such a trip should not exceed 
thirty dollars per student. The time will be arranged each year with each 
class. (Horticulture Staff.) 

Hort. 105 f. Systematic Olericulture (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Hort. 11 s. Given in alternate years. (Offered in 1934-1935.) 

A study of the classification and nomenclature of vegetables. Descrip- 
tions of varieties and adaptation of varieties to different environmental con- 
ditions. (Bosvvell.) 

Hort. 106 y. Plant Materials (5) — One lecture; one or two laboratories. 
Given in alternate years. (Not offered in 1934-1935.) 

A field and laboratory study of trees, shinibs, and vines used in orna- 
mental planting, (Thurston.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Hort. 201 y. Experimental Pomology (6) — Three lectures. 

A systematic study of the sources of knowledge and opinion as to prac- 
tices in pomology; methods and difficulties in experimental work in pomol- 
ogy and results of experiments that have been or are being conducted in 
all experiment stations in this and other countries. (Schrader.) 

Hort. 202 y. Experimental Olericulture (6) — Three lectures. 

A systematic study of the sources of knowledge and opinion as to prac- 
tices in vegetable growing; methods and difficulties in experimental work 
in vegetable production and results of experiments that have been or are 
being conducted in all experiment stations in this and other countries. 

(Boswell.) 

46 



HoRT. 203 s. Experimental Floric2iltHre (2) — Two lectures. 

A systematic study of the sources of knowledge and opinion as to prac- 
tice in floriculture are discussed in this course. The results of all experi- 
mental work in floriculture which has been or is being conducted will be 
thoroughly discussed. (Thurston.) 

HoRT. 204 s. Methods of Research (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 

Special drill will be given in the making of briefs and outlines of re- 
search problems, in methods of procedure in conducting investigational work, 
and in the preparation of bulletins and reports. A study of the origin, de- 
velopment, and growth of horticultural research is taken up. A study of the 
research problems being conducted by the Department of Horticulture will 
be made, and students will be required to take notes on some of the experi- 
mental work in the field and become familiar with the manner of filing and 
cataloging all experimental work. 

HoRT. 205 y. Advanced Ho7-ticiiltural Research (4, 6 or 8). 

Graduate students will be required to select problems for original research 
in pomology, vegetable gardening, floriculture, or landscape gardening. 
These problems will be continued until completed, and final results will be 
published in the form of a thesis. (Auchter, Boswell, Schrader, Gardner.) 

HoRT. 206 y. Advanced Horticultural Seminar (2). 

This course will be required of all graduate students. Students will be 
required to give reports either on special topics assigned them, or on the 
progress of their work being done in courses. Members of the departmental 
staff will report special research work from time to time. 

HORT. 207 y. National and International Horticultural Problems (4). 

Discussions of factors affecting the profitable production of horticultural 
crops in this and other countries ; the competition between different horti- 
cultural crops in the United States and between American and foreign 
crops; factors influencing the development of new horticultural industries 
in America. The applications of various fundamental sciences to the solu- 
tion of regional and national problems in horticultural crop production. 

(Auchter.) 

Special Requirements of Graduate Students in Horticulture 

Pomologii — Graduate students specializing in pomology who are planning 
to take an advanced degree will be required to take or offer the equivalent 
of the following courses: Hort. 1 f , 2 f, 101 f, 102 f, 201 y, 204 s, 205 y, and 
206 y; Plant Biochemistry (Pit. Phys. 201s), Plant Biophysics (Pit. Phys. 
202 f), Plant Microchemistry (Pit. Phys. 203 s), Plant Ecology (Pit. Phys. 
101 s) ; and Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8y). 

Olericulture — Graduate students specializing in vegetable gardening who 
are planning to take an advanced degree will be required either to take or 
offer the equivalent of the following courses: Hort. 12 f, 13 s, 103 f, 105 f, 
202 y, 204 s, 205 y, and 206 y; Plant Biochemistry (Pit. Phys. 201s), Plant 
Biophysics (Pit. Phys. 202 f) , Plant Microchemistry (Pit. Phys. 203 s), 
Plant Ecology (Pit. Phys. 101s); and Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8y). 

47 



Floiiculture — Graduate students specializing in floriculture who are plan- 
ning to take an advanced degree will be required to take or offer the equiv- 
alent of the following courses : Hort. 22 y, 23 y, 24 s, 25 y, 26 f , 203 s, 204 s, 
205 y, and 206 y; Plant Biochemistry (Pit. Phys. 201s), Plant Biophysics 
(Pit. Phys. 202 f), Plant Microchemistry (Pit. Phys. 203 s), Bot. 103f ors; 
and Organic Chemistry (Chem. 8 y) . 

Landscape Gardening — Graduate students specializing in landscape gar- 
dening who are planning to take an advanced degree will be required to 
take or offer the equivalent of the following courses : Hort. 32 f , 33 s, 35 f , 
105 f, 204 s, and 206 y; Botany 103 f or s; Drafting 1 y and 2 y, and Plane 
Surveying 1 f and 2 s. 

Additional Requirements — In addition to the above required courses, all 
graduate students in horticulture are advised to take physical and colloidal 
chemistry. 

Unless graduate students in horticulture have had some course work in 
entomology, plant pathology, genetics, and biometry, certain of these courses 
will be required. 

MATHEMATICS 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 103 f. Differential Equations (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. 7 y. 

Integration of ordinary differential equations. Singular solutions. Inte- 
gration by series. Applications to geometry, physics, etc. (Yates, Alrich.) 

Math. 104 s. Theoretical Mechanics (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. 7 y. 

Elementary Vector Analysis. Statics. Kinematics. The equations of 
motion. Applications. (Alrich.) 

Math. 105 f. Advanced Topics in Algebra (3) — Three lectures. 

Theory of equations. Galois groups. Matrices and determinants. Linear 
substitutions. Quadratic forms. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 106 s. Advanced Topics in Geometrg (3) — Three lectures. 

The Conic sections. Homogeneous co-ordinates. The quadratic surfaces. 
Collineations. Principles of projective geometry. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 107 f. Elementarij Theory of Functio^is (3) — Three lectures. (Not 
given in 1934-1935.) 

Functions of a real variable. Polynominals and rational functions. 
Transcendental functions. Principles of graphing and of approximation. 

(Dantzig.) 

Math. 108 s. Vector Analysis (3) — Three lectures. (Not given in 1934- 
1935.) 

Vector Algebra. Applications to geometry and mechanics. Vector differ- 
entiation and integration. Applications to mathematical physics. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 109 f. Advanced Algebra and Theory of Eqmitions (2) — Two lec- 
tures. (Not given in 1934-1935.) 

This course is designed to prepare the student for advanced work. A 

48 



study of the number system is made with special emphasis placed on the 
complex field. Further topics include the solution of equations, symmetric 
functions, fractional rational functions, partial fractions, series, deter- 
minants. (Taliaferro.) 

Math. 110 s. Theory of Numbers (2) — Two lectures. (Not given in 
1934-1935.) 

Systems of numeration. Factorization theorems and prime numbers. 
Criteria of primality. Linear congruences and Diophantine equations. 
Higher congruences. The theorem of Fermat. Quadratic residues. 

(Taliaferro.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Math. 201 y. Seminar (4-10) — Credit hours will be given in accordance 
with work done. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 202 f. Fundmnental Concepts of Mathematics (2) — Two lectures. 

Foundations of arithmetic, algebra, analysis and geometry. A critical 
study of such concepts as number, limit, continuity and the infinite; the 
axioms of geometry; measurement; spatial forms and pan-geometry; the 
concepts of space and time; the relativity theory. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 203 s. Differential Geometry, (2) — Two lectures. 

Plane curves: parametric representation, general co-ordinates, orthogonal 
networks. Skew curves; curvature and torsion; application to kinematics. 
Theory of surfaces, lines of curvature, asymptotic lines, geodetics. Gaussian 
geometry on a surface. Special surfaces: developables, applicable surfaces, 
surfaces of revolution. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 204 f. History of Mathematics (2) — Two lectures. (Not given in 
1934-1935.) 

History of individual mathematical disciplines : arithmetic and algebra ; 
geometry and trigonometry; the calculus and theory of functions. The 
nature of mathematical discovery and the influence of the great discoveries 
of the past upon the subsequent course of the science. A brief survey of 
the most salient modern discoveries. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 205 s. Theory of Transformations (2) — Two lectures. (Not given 
in 1934-1935.) 

The transformations of classical geometry. Infinite groups. Infinitesimal 
ti-ansformations. The metric group. The projective group. Invariants. 
Confomial transformations. Co-areal transformations. Cremona transfor- 
mations. Various applications of the theory. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 206 f. Advanced Calculus (2) — Two lectures. 

This course presupposes a knowledge of elementary calculus and the ele- 
ments of differential equations. A study is made of power series, hyperbolic 
functions, Taylor's series, partial differentiation, Jacobians, curvilinear co- 
ordinates, differentiation and integration of an integral form, certain 
definite integrals. Gamma and Beta functions, Green's and Stokes' theorems, 
review of differential equations with particular attention to Legendre's, 
Bessel's, and Laplace's equations. (Yates.) 

49 



Math. 207 s. Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable (2) — Two lec- 
tures. 

This course begins with a study of series and elementary functions, con- 
tinuing with a detailed examination of rational functions and transforma- 
tions. Particular attention is paid here to inversive geometry. General 
analytic functions are then considered under the topics: differentiation and 
integration, singular points, residues, conformal representation, Taylor's 
series, Laurent's series, Riemann sheets, etc. (Yates.) 

Math. 208 f. Differential Equations of Physics (2) — Two lectures. (Not 
given in 1934-1935.) 

A short review of vector calculus and elementary differential equations is 
made at the beginning of the course. Topics to be considered include the 
theory of vibrations, the wave equation, potential theory, boundary value 
problems, spherical harmonics, Bessel functions, and integral equations. 

(Yates.) 

Math. 209 s. Fourier Series and Spherical Harmonics (2) — Two lec- 
tures. (Not given in 1934-1935.) 

This is designed as a continuation of Math. 208 f. The theory of infinite 
series is studied with attention to continuity, convergence, summability, 
differentiation and integration, etc., in order to form a good foundation 
for the consideration of Fourier series and integrals, with applications to 
heat and electricity. (Yates.) 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

A. French 

(French 4 y, 5 y, 6 f , 7 s, and 10 y, or equivalent, are prerequisite for 
courses in this group.) 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

French 101 y. History of French Literature in the Middle Ages and 
Renaissance (4) — Two lectures. (Falls.) 

French 102 y. History of French Literature in the Seventeenth Cen- 
tury (4) — Two lectures. (Wilcox.) 

French 10.3'y. History of French Literature in the Eighteenth Cen- 
tury (4) — Two lectures. (Not given in 1934-1935.) 

French 104 y. History of French Literature in the Nineteenth Century 
(4)— Two lectures. (Not given in 1934-1935.) 

French 110 y. Advayiced Composition (4) — Two lectures. Open only to 
students whose qualifications prove satisfactory to the instructor. Prerequi- 
site, French 9 s. 

An attempt to introduce the students to the genius of the French lan- 
guage. (Falls.) 

Attention is also called to Comparative Literature 105, Romanticism in 
France, Germany and England. 

50 



Courses for Graduates 

French 201 y. Research. Credits determined by work accomplished. 
French 202 y. Diderot and the Encyclopaedists (4) — Two lectures (Not 
given in 1934-1935.) 

French 203 y. Aspects and Conceptio^is'of Natuve in French Literature 
of the Eighteenth Century (4) — Two lectures. (Falls.) 

B. German 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

(German 4 and 5, or equivalent, are prerequisite for courses in this 
group.) 

Glrman 101 f. German Literature of the Eighteenth Century (3) — 

Three lectures. (Not given in 1934-1935.) 

The earlier classical literature. (Zucker.) 

German 102 s. German Literature of the Eighteenth Century (3) —Three 

lectures. (Not given in 1934-1935.) 

The later classical literature. (Zucker.) 

German 103 f. German Literature of the Nineteenth Century (3)— Three 

lectures. Romanticism and young Germany. (Zucker.) 

German 104 s. German Literature of the Nineteenth Century (3)— Three 

lectures. The literature of the Empire. (Zucker.) 

Courses for Graduates 

German 202 y. The Modem German Drama (4). 

Study of the naturalistic, neo-romantic, and expressionistic drama against 
the background of Ibsen and other international figures. (Zucker.) 

German 203 y. Schiller (4)— Two lectures. (Not given in 1934-1935.) 
Study of the life and works of Schiller with special emphasis on the 
history of his dramas. (Zucker.) 

German 205 y. Research. Credits determined by work accomplished. 

(Zucker.) 
C. Spanish 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

(Spanish 9 f, 10 s, 11 f, and 12 s or equivalent are prerequisite for courses 
in this group.) 

Spanish 101 f. Spanish Poetry (3)— Three lectures. (Not given in 1934- 
1935.) 

The epic; the ballad and popular poetry; early lyrics; poetry of the Golden 
Age. 

Spanish 102 s. Spanish Poetry (3)— Three lectures. (Not given in 1934- 
1935.) 

Poetry of the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. 

Spanish 103 f. The Short Story and the Sketch (3)— Three lectures. 
Development from the earliest times to the present day. (Richards.) 

Spanish 104 s. Introduction to Spanish-American Literature (3) — Three 
^«^^"^^^- (Richards.) 

51 



Courses for Graduates 

Spanish 201 y. The Golden Age in Spanish Literature (4) — Two lec- 
tures. 

Detailed study of classical authors. (Richards.) 

Spanish 203 y. Research. Credits determined by the amount of work 
accomplished. 

D. Comparative Literature 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

The courses in Comparative Literature are, for the time being, under the 
direction of the Department of Modern Languages. They may be elected as 
partially satisfying major or minor requirements in this department. Com- 
parative Literature 101 f, 102 s, 104 s, and 105 y may also be counted toward 
a major or minor in English. 

Com. Lit. 101 f. Introduction to Comparative Literature (3) — Three lec- 
tures. 

Sui'vey of the background of European literature through study in Eng- 
lish translation of Greek and Latin literature. Special emphasis is laid on 
the development of the epic, tragedy, comedy, and other typical' forms of 
literary expression. The debt of modern literature to the ancients is dis- 
cussed and illustrated. (Zucker.) 

Com. Lit. 102 s. Introduction to Comparative Literature (3) — Three lec- 
tures. 

Continuation of 101 f ; study of medieval and modern Continental litera- 
ture. (Zucker.) 

Com. Lit. 104 s. The Modem Ibsen (2) — Two lectures. 

Lectures on the life of Ibsen and the European drama in the middle of 
the nineteenth century. Study of Ibsen's social and symbolical plays in 
Archer's translation. (Zucker.) 

Com. Lit. 105 y. Romanticism in France, Germany and England (6) — 
Two lectures and reports. 

Introduction to the chief authors of the Romantic movement in England, 
France, and Germany, the latter two groups being read in English transla- 
tion. Lectures on the chief thought currents and literary movements of the 
late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. First semester: Rousseau 
to Gautier; Buerger to Heine. Second semester: Wordsworth, Coleridge, 
Landor, Byron, Shelley, Keats, and others. The course is conducted by 
members of both the Modern Language and the English departments. 

(Zucker, Hale, Wilcox.) 

Com. Lit. 107 s. Introduction to the History of the Theatre (2) — Two 
lectures. (Not given in 1934-1935.) 

Survey of the history of the stage and staging from the Greeks to the 
present day. Study of various dramas with emphasis on the manner of 
their stage presentation. (Zucker.) 

Modern Language 202 s, Seminar (1) — Required of all graduate stu- 
dents in the department. One meeting weekly. 

52 



PHYSICS 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Phys. 101 f. Physical Measurements (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Phys. 1 y or 2 y. 

This course is designed for the study of physical measurements and for 
familiarizing the student with the manipulation of the types of apparatus 
used in experimentation in physical problems. (Clark.) 

Phys. 102 y. Graphic Physics (2) — One lecture. Prerequisite, Phys. 
1 y or 2 y. 

A study of physical laws and formulae by means of scales, charts, and 
graphs. (Eichlin.) 

Phys. 103 f. Advanced Physics (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Phys. 2y. 

An advanced study of molecular physics, wave motion, and heat. (Eichlin.) 

Phys. 104 s. Advanced Physics (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Phys. 2 y. 

An advanced study of electricity and magnetism. (Eichlin.) 

Phys. 105 y. Advanced Physics (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Phys. 
1 y or 2 y. 

A study of physical phenomena in optics, spectroscopy, conduction of elec- 
tricity through gases, etc., with a comprehensive review of their basic un- 
derlying princi^Dles. (Eichlin.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Phys. 201 y. Modern Physics (6) — Three lectures. Alternates with 
Phys. 202 y. 

A study of some of the problems encountered in modern physics. (Eichlin.) 

Phys. 202 y. Contemporary Physics (6) — Three lectures. Alternates with 
Phys. 201 y. (Not given in 1934-1935.) 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

See "Education" for description of the following courses: 
Ed. 106 s. Advanced Educational Psychology (3). 
Ed. 107 f. Educational Measurements (3). 
Ed. 108 s. Mental Hygiene (3). 

Courses for Graduates 

Ed. 206 y. Systenuitic Educational Psychology (6). (Sprowls.) 

Ed. 252 y. Research (6-8). 

53 



ZOOLOGY AND AQUICULTURE 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ZOOL. 101s. Embryology (4) — Two lectures ; two laboratories. Prerequi- 
site, two semesters of biology, one of which should be in this department. 
Required of three-year pre-medical students and majors in this department. 

The development of the chick to the end of the fourth day. This course, 
combined with Zool. 8 f, furnishes much of the evidence for organic evolu- 
tion, and indicates man's place in nature, (Pierson, Burhoe.) 

Zool. 102fors. Mammalian Anatomy (2-3) — A laboratory course. Pre- 
requisite, one semester of General Zoology. Registration limited. Permis- 
sion of the instructor must be obtained before registration. Recommended 
for pre-medical students, for those whose major is zoology, and for pro- 
spective science teachers in high schools. 

Dissection of a cat and other mammal. (Pierson.) 

Zool, 103 y. Jouimal Club (2). 

Reviews, reports, and discussions of current literature. Required of 
majors in zoology. (Staff.) 

Zool. 104s. General Animal Physiology (3) — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisites, one year of chemistry and one course in zoology. 
Registration is limited to twelve and permission of instructor must be ob- 
tained before registration. Required of majors in zoology. 

A study of the physiological phenomena exhibited by animal organisms. 

(Phillips.) 

Zool, 105 y, Aquicidtitre (4) — Lectures and laboratory to be arranged. 
Prerequisites, one course in general zoology and one in general botany. 

Plankton studies and the determination of other aquatic life of nearby 
streams and ponds. Morphology and ecology of representative commercial 
and game fishes in Maryland, the Chesapeake blue crab, and the oyster. 

(Truitt.) 

Zool. 110 s. Organic Evolution (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, two sem- 
esters of biological science, one of which must be in this department. (Not 
given every year.) 

The object of this course is to present the zoological data on which the 
theory of evolution rests. The lectures will be supplemented by discussion, 
collateral reading, and reports. (Pierson,) 

Zool, 120 f. Genetics (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite, 
one course in general zoology or general botany. Required of students in 
zoology who do not have credit for Genetics 101 f . 

A general introductory course designed to acquaint the student with the 
fundamental principles of heredity and variation. While primarily of in- 
terest to students of biology, it will be of value to those interested in the 
humanities. (Burhoe.) 

Zool. 140. Marine Zoology (4-6). 

This work is given at the Chesapeake Biological Laboi'atory, which is 
conducted co-operatively by the Maryland Conservation Department and 

54 



the Department of Zoology, on Solomons Island, where the research is 
directed primarily toward those problems concerned with commercial 
forms, especially the blue crab and the oyster. The work starts during 
the third week of June and continues until mid-September, thus affording 
ample time to investigate complete cycles in life histories, ecological rela- 
tionships, and plankton contents. Courses limited to a few students, whose 
selection will be made from records and recommendations submitted with 
applications, which should be filed on or befoi-e June 1. 

Laboratory facilities, boats of various types fully equipped (pumps, nets, 
dredges, and other apparatus) and shallow water collecting devices are 
available for the work without extra cost to the student. (Truitt.) 

Genetics 101 f. (See page 42.) 

Courses for Graduates 

ZoOL. 200 y. Marine Zoology (6) — Problems in salt water animal life of 
the higher phyla. (Truitt.) 

ZoOL. 201 y. Advanced Vertebrate Morphology (6) — Lecture and labora- 
tory work on the comparative morphology of selected organ systems of the 
important vertebrate classes. (Pierson.) 

ZoOL. 203 f and s. Advanced Anmial Histology (3) — One lecture; two 
laboratories. (Not given in 1934-1935.) 

Detailed study of the structure and function of animal cells and tissues. 
Laboratory work consists of the technical methods used in microscopic 
preparation and examination. (Phillips.) 

ZoOL. 204 y. Advanced Animal Physiology (6) — One lecture; two lab- 
oratories. 

Analysis of certain phases of the physiological activities of animals. 

(Phillips.) 

ZooL. 206 y. Research — Credit to be arranged. (Staff.) 



56 



GRADUATE COURSES IN THE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS AT 

BALTIMORE 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

ANATOMY 
Minors 

The courses recorded under "Minors" are acceptable as graduate courses 
only if they are taken to satisfy minor requirements in a major subject. 

Anat. 101s. Human Gross Anatomy (10)— Total number of hours 558. 
Five lectui-es and twenty-six laboratory hours per week throughout the first 
semester. 

A complete dissection of the human body (exclusive of the central nervous 
system). (Uhlenhuth, Aycock and Figge.) 

AXAT. 102 f. Mammalian Histology (6)— Two lectures; ten laboratory 
hours per week. 

A general survey of the histological structure of the organs of mammals 
and man. Opportunity is offered for examining and studying a complete 
collection of microscopical sections. (Davis, Lutz.) 

Anat. 103 s. Human Neurology (4) — Two lectures and three laboratory 
hours per week for eight weeks of the first semester. Prerequisite, Anat. 
102 or equivalent. 

This course provides a general survey of the structure of the human 
central nervous system, being mainly directed toward the fiber tracts and 
nuclei contained therein. It includes a brief study of the special senses. 
The laboratory work is based on a dissection of the human brain, together 
with the study of prepared microscopic sections of the brain stem. 

(Davis, Rubinstein.) 
Majors 

Anat. 202 f and s. For work leading to a Ph.D. in Anatomy. 

A study of neurological problems based on 103 s. Only students who have 
had the preceding course in neurology are eligible for this work. (Davis.) 

Courses 203, 204 and 205 are offered throughout the year, including the 
summer time. Time and credit may be adjusted in personal conference be- 
tween student and instructor. 

Anat. 203. Advanced Gross Anatomy. 

The study of human anatomy by gross anatomical methods, especially by 
dissection of specialized structui^es and limited regions of the human body. 
The exact nature of this course will depend on the requirements of the ap- 
plicant. It may be taken by students of Anatomy, Medicine and Biology as 
well as by physicians desiring post-graduate work. (Uhlenhuth, Figge.) 

Anat. 204. Morphological and Expenmental Endocrinology . 

Laboratory and research work are offered. Intimate contact with the 
instructor, personal discussions and conferences and properly selected read- 
ing take the place of formal lectures. This course is accessible to any 
qualified student interested in biological problems; it may be used for the 
dissertation of the degree of Ph.D. in Anatomy. (Uhlenhuth.) 

56 



AxAT. 205. Problems in Advanced Physiological Ayiutomti. 

Research work of problems which may be attacked by combined anatomi- 
cal and physiolog-ical methods. The work may be arranged so as to be per- 
formed partly in the Department of Anatomy and partly in the Department 
of Physiology. This course is accessible to any qualified student interested 
in biological problems ; it may form conveniently a continuation of Anat. 
203 and may be used for the dissertation of the degree of Ph.D. in Anatomy. 

(Uhlenhuth.) 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Minors 

Physiology 101. The Pnnciples of Physiology (8) — Lectures and con- 
ferences four hours a week; laboratory six hours a week, October to March, 
inclusive. Prerequisite, Biochemistry 101 s, Anatomy 10.3. 

The course is designed primarily to meet the needs of medical students. 
Graduate students who take this course as a minor toward a higher degree 
are required to do extra-curricular work. (Ries, Harne, and assistants.) 

Majors 

Physiology 201. Physiology of Blood, Circulation and Respiration (4) — 
Lectures and conferences four hours a week; laboratory six hours a week, 
during January, February and March. Prerequisite, Phys. 101. (Ries.) 

Physiology 202. Physiology of the X euro-muscular System and Special 
Senses (4) — Lectures and conferences four hours a week; laboratory six 
hours a week, during October, November and December. Prerequisite, Phys. 
101. (Ries, Harne, and assistant.) 

Physiology 203. Physiology of Digestion, Secretion, Excretion, Metabol- 
ism and Nutrition (4) — Lectures and conferences three hours a week; lab- 
oratoz-y six hours a week, during one quarter. Prerequisite, Phys. 101. 

(Ries, Harne, Painter.) 

Physiology 204. Selected Problems of Mammalian Physiology (4) — One 
lecture and two laboratories each week from October to March inclusive. 
Prerequisite, Phys. 101. The laboratory work is limited to eight students; 
registration by conference with instructor. (Ries.) 

Physiology 20.5. Research in Physiology. Credit to be determined by 
amount and quality of work performed. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

All students majoring in pharmacology with a view to securing the de- 
gree of Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy should secure special 
training in Mammalian Physiology, Organic Chemistry, and Physical Chem- 
istry 10 y or, preferably. Chemistry 102 y. 

Minor 

Pharmacology 101 f and s. General Pharmacology (7) — Three lectures; 
one laboratory. This course consists of 90 lectures and 30 laboratory 

67 



periods of 3 hours each; offered each year, September to May inclusive, at 
the Medical School. 

Pharmacology as applied to medicine and the fundamental principles of 
pharmacologic technic are taught in this course, hence it is a prerequisite 
for all other advanced courses in this subject. 

(Krantz, Evans, Musser, Harne, Carr.) 

Majors 

Pharmacology 202 f. Chemotherapy. Credit in accordance with the 
amount of work accomplished. 

The action of new synthetic compounds from a pharmacodynamic point 
of view, (Krantz.) 

Pharmacology 203 f. Colloid Systems. Credit in accordance with the 
amount of work accomplished. 

The application of the principles of colloid and physical chemistry in 
general pharmacology. (Krantz.) 

Pharmacology 204 f. Research. Credit in accordance with the amount 
of work accomplished. 

Properly gxiided research problems in pharmacology and related fields. 
Open to students majoring in pharmacology. (Krantz.) 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

Minors 

BioCHEM. 101 s. Fundamental Principles of Biochemistry (6) — Six lec- 
tures and conferences and two three-hour laboratory periods per week for 
sixteen weeks, from February to May, inclusive. 

This course is designed to present the fundamental concepts of biological 
chemistry. The principal constituents and phenomena of living matter are 
discussed in the lectures and conferences and are examined in the labora- 
tory. Training is afforded in the routine biochemical methods of investi- 
gation. This course is a prerequisite for advanced work in this subject. 
Graduate students who take this course as a minor toward a higher degree 
are required to supplement it by extra-curricular work. 

(Wylie, Ogden, Schmidt.) 

Majors 

BioCHEM 201 f and s. A course in specialized fields of biochemistry de- 
signed to prepare the student for advanced research work. Prei'equisite, 
Biochem. 101 s. The particular phases of biochemistry taken up in this 
course will vary with the requirements and interests of the student. The 
course is limited to students working toward a Ph.D. degree in biochemistry 
and in other biological subjects. Credit is allotted in keeping with the 
extent and quality of work accomplished. Available only to graduate 
students. (Wylie, Schmidt.) 

BiocHEM. 202 f and s. Research. Limited to graduate students seeking 
a Ph.D. degree in biochemistry. Credit is given on the basis of extent and 
quality of accomplishment. (Wylie, Schmidt.) 

58 



BACTERIOLOGY 
Minors 

Bact. 101 f. 16 lectures and 128 laboratory hours (5). A study of the 
pathogenic bacteria by means of cultures, animal inoculations and prepara- 
tions. In addition, methods of preparation and sterilization of culture media 
are taught; in the laboratory the most important protozoa are studied. The 
principles of general bacteriology are discussed in lectures. 

Bact. 102 s. 16 lectures and 96 laboratory hours (4). Principles of 
Immunology. 

Majors 

Bact. 201. Time and credit are subject to special arrangement. A lab- 
oratory course on selected problems of bacteriology. The lectures are sup- 
plemented by personal contact with the instructor, discussions of the various 
phases of the work and by reading. 

Bact. 202. Research. Time and credit are subject to special arrangement. 



59