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Full text of "The Graduate School announcements"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/graduateschoolan1937univ 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



:: = 

Vol. 34 



OFHCIAL PUBLICATION 



February, 1937 



No. 2 



THE GRADUATE 
SCHOOL 




ANNOUNCEMENTS 

1937 - 1938 

COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 



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THE UNIVERSITY 

of 

MARYLAND 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FOR THE SESSIONS OF 

1937-1938 




Issued monthly by tho University of Maryland at College Park, Md. Entered as 
second-class matter, under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Calendar, 1937-1938 4 

Board of Regents 5 

Administration Officers 6 

The Graduate School Council 6 

General Information 7 

History and Organization 7 

Location 7 

Libraries 7 

General Regulations 7 

Admission to Graduate School 7 

Registration 8 

Graduate Courses 8 

Program of Work 8 

Summer Graduate Work 9 

Graduate Work in Professional Schools at Baltimoi*e 9 

Graduate Work by Seniors in This University 9 

Admission to Candidacy for Advanced Degrees 9 

Requirements for the Degrees of Master of Arts and Master of 

Science 10 

Requirements for the Degi-ee of Doctor of Philosophy 11 

Rules Governing Language Examinations for Doctor of Philosophy 

Candidates 13 

Graduate Fees 13 

Fellowships and Assistantships 13 

Commencement 14 

Description of Courses 15 

Index 7G 



CALENDAR 
1937-1938 



1937 

Sept. 13-15 

Sept. 16 



First 
Monday-Wednesday 
Thursday, 8:20 a. m. 



October 6 Wednesday 



Nov. 24-29 

Dec. 21 
1938 
Jan. 3 
Jan. 19-26 



Wednesday, 4 : 10 p. m. 
Monday, 8:20 a.m. 
Tuesday, 4:10 p. m. 



Semester 

Registration. 

Instruction for first semester be 
gins. 

Modern language examinations for 
Ph. D. requirement. 

Last day to file applications for 
admission to candidacy for Doc- 
tor's degree at Commencement of 
1938. 

Thanksgiving recess. 



Monday, 8:20 a. m. 
Wednesday- Wednesday 



Christmas recess begins. 

Christmas recess ends. 
First semester examinations. 



Jan. 25-31 
Feb. 1 



Feb. 2 
Feb. 22 
April 14-19 

May 14 

May 21 



Second Semester 
Tuesday-Monday 
Tuesday, 8:20 a. m. 



Wednesday 

Tuesday 

Thursday, 4 :10 p. m.- 

Tuesday, 8:20 a. m. 

Saturday 

Saturday 



Registration for second semester. 

Instruction for second semester be- 
gins. 

Last day to file applications for 
admission to candidacy for the 
Master's degree at Commence- 
ment of 1938. 

Modern language examinations. 

Washington's Birthday. Holiday. 

Easter recess. 

Last day to deposit Doctor's thesis 
in office of Graduate School. 

Last day to deposit Master's thesis 
in office of Graduate School. 



May 23- 






June 1 


Monday-Wednesday 


Second semester examinations. 


May 29 


Sunday, 11:00 a.m. 


Baccalaureate sermon. 


May 30 


Monday 


Memorial Day. Holiday. 


June 1 


Wednesday 


Modern language examinations, 


June 3 


Friday 


Class Day. 


June 4 


Saturday 


Commencement. 




Stanmer 


Term 


June 22 


Wednesday 


Summer session begins. 


Aug. 2 


Tuesday 


Summer session ends. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

Term Expires 

W. W. Skinner, Chairman 1945 

Kensington, Montgomery County 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, Secretary 1938 

4101 Greenway, Baltimore 

W. Calvin Chesnut 1942 

Post Office Building, Baltimore 

William P. Cole, Jr 1940 

Towson, Baltimore County 

Henry Holzapfel, Jr 1943 

Hagerstown, Washington County 

Harry H. Nuttle 1941 

Denton, Caroline County 

J. Milton Patterson 1944 

Cumberland, Allegany County 

John' E. Raine 1939 

Towson, Baltimore County 

Clinton L. Riggs 1942 

903 North Charles Street, Baltimore 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

H. C. Byrd, LL. D. President of the University. 
C. O. Appleman, Ph. D., Dean of the Graduate School. 
Elsie Parrett, M. A., Secretary to the Dean. 
W. S. Small, Ph. D., Director of the Summer School. 
Adele Stamp, M. A., Dean of Women. 
H. T. Casbarian, Comptroller. 
W. M. HiLLEGElST, Director of Admissions. 
Alma H. Preinkert, M. A., Registrar. 
Grace Barnes, B. L. S., M. A., Librarian. 

H. L. Crisp, M. M. E., Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. 
T. A. HuTTON, B. A., Purchasing Agent and Manager of Students' Supply 
Store. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL COUNCIL 

H. C. Byrd, LL. D., President of the University. 

C. O. Appleman, Ph. D., Dean of the Graduate School, Chairman. 

M. Marie Mount, M. A., Professor of Home and Institutional Management 

H. J. Patterson, D. Sc, Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station. 

W. S. Small, Ph. D., Professor of Education. 

T. H. Taliaferro, C. E., Ph. D., Professor of Mathematics. 

L. B. Broughton, Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry. 

E. N. Cory, Ph. D., Professor of Entomology. 

H. F. Cotterman, Ph. D., Professor of Agricultural Education. 

William H. Falls, Ph. D., Professor of French. 

H. C. House, Ph. D., Professor of English Language and Literature. 

DeVoe Meade, Ph. D., Professor of Animal and Dairy Husbandry. 

Marvin R. Thompson, Ph. C.,Ph. D., Emerson Professor of Pharmacology 

(Baltimoi'e). 
Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D., Professor of Gross Anatomy (Baltimore). 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

HISTORY AND ORGANIZATION 

In the earlier years of the institution the Master's degree was frequently 
conferred, but the work of the graduate students was in charge of the 
departments concerned, under the supervision of the general faculty. The 
Graduate School of the University of Maryland was established in 1918, 
and organized graduate instruction leading to both the Master's and the 
Doctor's degree was undertaken. The faculty of the Graduate School in- 
cludes all members of the various faculties who give instruction in ap- 
proved graduate courses. The general administrative functions of the 
graduate faculty are delegated to a Graduate Council, of which the Dean 
of the Graduate School is chairman. 

LOCATION 

The University of Maryland is located at College Park, in Prince 
George's County, Maryland, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, eight 
miles from Washington and thirty-two miles from Baltimore. Washing- 
ton, with its wealth of resources, is easily accessible by train, street car 
and bus. 

The professional schools of Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Dentistry 
and Law are located in Baltimore, at the corner of Lombard and Greene 
Streets. 

LIBRARIES 

In addition to the resources of the University library, the great li- 
braries of the National Capital are easily available for reference work. 
Because of the proximity of these libraries to College Park they are 
a valuable asset to research and graduate work at the University of 
Maryland. 

The library building at College Park contains a number of seminar 
rooms and other desirable facilities for graduate work. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

ADMISSION 

Graduates from a recognized college regarded as standard by the insti- 
tution and by regional or general accrediting agencies are admitted to the 
Graduate School. The applicant shall present an oflficial transcript of 
his collegiate record which for unconditional admission shall show cred- 
itable completion of an undergraduate major in the subject chosen for 
specialization in the Graduate School. Any deficiencies may be made up 
in courses without credit toward a graduate degree. 

Application blanks for admission to the Graduate School are obtained 
from the office of the Dean. After approval of the application, a matricu- 
lation card, signed by the Dean, is issued to the student. This card per- 



mits one to register in the Graduate School. After payment of the fee, the 
matriculation card is stamped and returned. It is the student's certifi- 
cate of membership in the Graduate School, and may be called for at any 
succeeding registration. 

Admission to the Graduate School does not necessarily imply admission 
to candidacy for an advanced degree. 

REGISTRATION 

All students pursuing graduate work in the University, even though 
they are not candidates for higher degrees, are required to register in the 
Graduate School at the beginning of each semester. Students taking 
graduate work in the summer session are also required to register in the 
Graduate School at the beginning of each session. In no case will gradu- 
ate credit be given unless the student matriculates and registers in the 
Graduate School. Registration for the first semester is held in the 
Gymnasium-Armory on the dates designated in the calendar. Students 
register for the second semester and for the summer session in the office 
of the Dean, T-214, Agriculture Building. The program of work for the 
semester or the summer session is arranged with the major department 
and entered upon two course cards, which are signed first by the professor 
in charge of the student's major subject and then by the Dean of the 
Graduate School. One card is retained by the Dean. The student takes 
the other card, and in case of a new student, also the matriculation card, 
to the Registrar's office, where the registration is completed. After fees 
have been paid, class cards are issued by the Registrar. Students will not 
be admitted to graduate courses without class cards. Course cards may 
be obtained at the Registrar's office or at the Dean's office. The heads 
of departments usually keep a supply of these cards in their respective 
offices. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Graduate students must elect for credit in partial fulfillment of the 
requirements for higher degrees only courses designated For Graduates 
or For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates. Graduate students 
may elect courses numbered from 1 to 99 in the general catalogue but 
graduate credit will not be allowed for these. Students with inadequate 
preparation may be obliged to take some of these courses as prerequisites 
for advanced courses. No credit toward graduate degrees may be obtained 
by correspondence or extension study. 

PROGRAM OF WORK 

The professor who is selected to direct a student's thesis work is the 
student's adviser in the formulation of a graduate program, including 
suitable minor work, which is arranged in cooperation with the instructors. 
To encourage thoroughness in scholarship through intensive application, 
graduate students in the regular sessions are limited to a program of 
thirty credit hours for the year, including thesis work, which is valued at 
not less than six hours. 



SUMMER GRADUATE WORK 

' Graduate work in the summer session may be counted as residence to- 
ward an advanced degree. By carrying approximately six semester hours 
of graduate work for four summer sessions and upon submitting a satis- 
factory thesis, a student may be granted the degree of Master of Arts or 
Master of Science. In some instances a fifth summer may be required in 
order that a satisfactory thesis may be completed. 

Upon recommendation by the head of the student's major department 
and with the approval of the Graduate Council, a maximum of six semes- 
ter hours of graduate work done at other institutions of sufficiently high 
standing may be substituted for required work here; such substitution 
does not shorten the required residence period. 

By special arrangement, graduate work may be pursued during the 
entire summer in some departments. Such students as graduate as- 
sistants, or others who may wish to supplement work done during the 
regular year, may satisfy one-third of an academic year's residence by 
full-time graduate work for eleven or twelve weeks, provided satisfactory 
supervision and facilities for summer work are available in their special 
fields. 

The University publishes a special bulletin giving full information con- 
cerning the summer session and the graduate courses offered therein. The 
bulletin is available upon application to the Registrar of the University. 

GRADUATE WORK IN PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS AT BALTIMORE 

Graduate courses and opportunities for research are offered in some of 
the professional schools at Baltimore. Students pursuing graduate work 
in the professional schools must register in the Graduate School, and meet 
the same requirements and proceed in the same way as do graduate stu- 
dents in other departments of the University. 

The graduate courses in the professional schools are listed on pages 
69-75. 

GRADUATE WORK BY SENIORS IN THIS UNIVERSITY 

Seniors who have completed all their undergraduate courses in this Uni- 
versity by the end of the first semester, and who continue their i-esidence 
in the University for the remainder of the year, are permitted to register 
in the Graduate School and secure the privileges of its membership, even 
though the bachelor's degree is not conferred until the close of the year. 

A senior of this University who has nearly completed the requirements 
for the undergraduate degree may, with the approval of his undergraduate 
Dean and the Dean of the Graduate School, register in the undergraduate 
college for graduate courses, which may be transferred for graduate 
credit toward an advanced degree at this University, but the total of 
undergraduate and graduate courses must not exceed fifteen credits for 
the semester. Graduate credits earned during the senior year may not be 
used to shorten the residence period required for advanced degrees. 

ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY FOR ADVANCED DEGREES 

Application for admission to candidacy for either the Master's or the 
Doctor's degree is made on application blanks which are obtained at the 

9 



office of the Dean of the Graduate School. These are filled out in dupli- 
cate and after the required endorsements are obtained, the applications 
are acted upon by the Graduate Council. An official transcript of the 
candidate's undergraduate record and any graduate courses completed 
at other institutions must be filed in the Dean's office before the application 
can be considered. 

Admission to candidacy in no case assures the student of a degree, but 
merely signifies he has met all the formal requirements and is considered 
by his instructors sufficiently prepared and able to pursue such graduate 
study and research as are demanded by the requirements of the degree 
sought. The candidate must show superior scholarship by the type of 
graduate work already completed. 

Application for admission to candidacy is made at the time stated in 
the sections dealing with the requirements for the degree sought. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREES OF MASTER OF ARTS 
AND MASTER OF SCIENCE 

Advancement to Candidacy. Each candidate for the Master's degree is 
required to make application for admission to candidacy not later than the 
date when instruction begins for the second semester of the academic year 
in which the degree is sought, but not until at least twelve semester course 
hours of graduate work have been completed. An average grade of "B" 
in all major and minor subjects is required. 

Residence Requirements. Two semesters or four summer sessions may 
satisfy the residence requirements for the degree of Master of Arts or 
Master of Science. Inadequate preparation for the graduate courses the 
student wishes to pursue may make a longer period necessary. 

Course Requirements. A minimum of twenty-four semester hours in 
courses approved for gi'aduate credit is required for the Master's degree. 
If the student is inadequately prepared for the required graduate courses, 
either in the major or minor subjects, additional courses may be required 
to supplement the undergraduate work. Not less than twelve semester 
hours and not more than fifteen semester hours in graduate courses must 
be earned in the major subject. The remaining credits of the total of 
twenty-four hours required must be outside the major subject and must 
comprise a group of coherent courses intended to supplement and support 
the major work. Not less than one-half of the total required course 
credits for the Master's degree, or a minimum of twelve, must be selected 
from courses numbered 200 or above. The entire course of study must 
constitute a unified program approved by the student's major adviser 
and by the Dean of the Graduate School. No credits that are reported 
with a grade lower than "C" are acceptable for an advanced degree. 

At least eighteen of the twenty-four semester course credits required 
for the Master's degi-ee must be taken at this institution. In certain 
cases graduate work done in other graduate schools of sufficiently high 
standing may be substituted for the remaining required credits, but any 
such substitution of credits does not shorten the normal required residence 
at the University of Maryland. Part-time students are required to take 
the entire twenty-four semester course credits at this institution. The 

10 



Graduate Council, upon recommendation of the head of the major depart- 
ment, passes upon all graduate work done at other institutions. The 
final examination will cover all graduate work offered in fulfillment of the 
requirements for the degree. 

Thesis. In addition to the twenty-four semester hours in graduate 
courses a satisfactory thesis is required of all candidates for the Master's 
degree. It must demonstrate the student's ability to do independent woi-k 
and it must be acceptable in literary style and composition. It is assumed 
that the time devoted to thesis work will be not less than the equivalent 
of six semester hours earned in gi-aduate courses. If the Master's thesis 
is based upon independent research the student may register in research 
courses in the amount prescribed by his department, but not more than 
four semester hours of these can be included in the twenty-four semester 
hours required in graduate courses for the Master's degree. With the 
approval of the student's major professor and the Dean of the Graduate 
School, the thesis in certain cases may be prepared in absentia under di- 
rection and supei-vision of a member of the faculty of this institution. 

The original copy of the thesis must be deposited in the office of the 
Graduate School not later than two weeks before commencement. An ab- 
stract of the contents of the thesis, 200 to 250 woi'ds in length, must 
accompany it. A manual giving full directions for the physical make-up 
of the thesis is in the hands of each professor who directs thesis work, 
and should be consulted by the student before the typing of the manuscript 
is begun. Individual copies of this manual may be obtained at the Dean's 
office at nominal cost. 

Final Examination. The final oral examination is conducted by a com- 
mittee appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. The student's ad- 
viser acts as the chairman of the committee. The other members of the 
committee are persons under whom the student has taken most of his 
major and minor courses. The chairman and the candidate are notified 
of the personnel of the examining committee at least one week prior to 
the period set for oral examinations. The chairman of the committee 
selects the exact time and place for the examination and notifies the other 
members of the committee and the candidate. The examination should 
be conducted within the dates specified and a report of the committee sent 
to the Dean as soon as possible after the examination. A special form 
for this purpose is supplied to the chairman of the committee. Such a 
report is the basis upon which I'ecommendation is made to the faculty 
that the candidate be granted the degree sought. The period for the oral 
examination is usually one hour. 

The examining committee also approves the thesis, and it is the candi- 
date's obligation to see that each member of the committee has ample 
opportunity to examine a copy of the thesis prior to the date of the exami- 
nation. 

A student will not be admitted to final examination until all other re- 
quirements for the degree have been met. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Advancement to Candidacy. Candidates for the Doctor's degree must 

be admitted to candidacy not later than one academic year prior to the 

11 



granting of the degree. Applications for admission to candidacy for the 
Doctor's degree must be deposited in the office of the Dean not later than 
the first Wednesday in October of the academic year in which the degree 
is sought. The applicant must have obtained from the head of the Modern 
Language Department a statement that he possesses a reading knowledge 
of French and German. Preliminary examinations or such other substan- 
tial tests as the departments may elect are also required for admission to 
candidacy. 

Residence. Three years of full-time resident graduate study are re- 
quired. The first two of the three years may be spent in other institutions 
offering standard graduate work. On a part-time basis the time needed 
will be correspondingly increased. The degree is not given merely as a 
certificate of residence and work, but is granted only upon sufficient evi- 
dence of high attainments in scholarship, and ability to carry on inde- 
pendent research in the special field in which the major work is done. 

Major and Minor Subjects. The candidate must select a major and one 
or two closely related minor subjects. Thirty semester hours of minor 
work are required. The remainder of the required residence is devoted 
to intensive study and research in the major field. The amount of required 
course work in the major subject will vary with the department and the 
individual candidate. 

Thesis. The ability to do independent research must be shown by a dis- 
sertation on some topic connected with the major subject. The original 
typewritten copy and one clear carbon copy of the thesis, together with 
an abstract of the contents, 200 to 250 words in length, must be deposit- 
ed in the office of the Dean at least three weeks before commencement. 
One or two extra copies of the thesis should be provided for use of 
members of the examining committee prior to the date of the final 
examination. The thesis is later printed in such form as the committee 
and the Dean may approve, and fifty copies are deposited in the University 
library. 

A manual giving full directions for the physical make-up of the thesis 
is in the hands of each professor who directs thesis work, and should be 
consulted by the student before typing of the thesis is begun. Students 
may obtain copies of this manual at the Dean's office, at nominal cost. 

Final Examination. The final oral examination is held before a commit- 
tee appointed by the Dean. One member of this committee is a represent- 
ative of the Graduate Faculty who is not directly concerned with the stu- 
dent's graduate work. One or more members of the committee may be 
persons from other institutions, who are distinguished scholars in the stu- 
dent's major field. 

The duration of the examination is approximately three hours, and 
covers the research work of the candidate as embodied in his thesis, and 
his attainments in the fields of his major and minor subjects. The other 
detailed procedures are the same as those stated for the Master's exami- 
nation. 



12 



RULES GOVERNING LANGUAGE EXAMINATIONS FOR DOCTOR 
OF PHILOSOPHY CANDIDATES 

1. A candidate for the Doctor's degree must show in a written exami- 
nation that he possesses a reading knowledge of French and German. The 
passages to be translated will be taken from books and articles in his spe- 
cialized field. Some 500 pages of text from which the applicant wishes to 
have his examination chosen should be submitted to the head of the De- 
partment of Modern Languages at least three days before the examination. 
It is not expected that the candidate recognize every word of the text but 
it is presumed that he will know sufficient grammar to distinguish inflec- 
tional forms and that he will have a lai'ge enough vocabulary to give a 
good translation without the aid of a dictionary. 

2. Application for admission to these tests must be filed in the office 
of the Dean of the Graduate School at least three days in advance of the 
tests. 

3. No penalty is attached to failure in the examination, and the un- 
successful candidate is free to try again at the next date set for these 
tests. 

4. Examinations are held in the Seminar room, Library building, on the 
first Wednesdays in February, June, and October, at 2 p. m. 

GRADUATE FEES 

The fees paid by graduate students are as follows: 

A matriculation fee of $10.00. This is paid once only, upon admis- 
sion to the Graduate School. 

A fixed charge, each semester, at the rate of $4.00 per semester 
credit hour. 

A diploma fee (Master's degree), $10.00. 

A graduation fee, including hood (Doctor's degree), $20.00. 

FELLOWSHIPS AND ASSISTANTSHIPS 

Fellowships. A number of fellowships have been established by the 
University. A few industrial fellowships are also available in certain 
departments. The stipend for the University fellows is $400 for the 
academic year and the remission of all graduate fees except the diploma 
fee. 

Application blanks for University fellowships may be obtained from the 
office of the Gi^aduate School. The application, with the necessary creden- 
tials, is sent by the applicant directly to the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Fellows are required to render minor services prescribed by their major 
departments. The usual amount of service required does not exceed 
twelve clock hours per week. Fellows are permitted to carry a full gradu- 
ate program, and they may satisfy the residence requirement for higher 
degrees in the normal time. 

The selection of fellows is made by the departments to which the fellow- 
ships are assigned, with the approval of the Dean or director concerned, 

13 



but all applications must first be approved by the Dean of the Graduate 
School. The awards of University fellovi^ships are on a competitive basis. 

Graduate Assistantships. A number of teaching and research graduate 
assistantships are available in several departments. The compensation 
for these assistantships is $800 a year and the remission of all graduate 
fees except the diploma fee. Graduate assistants are appointed for one 
year and they are eligible to reappointment. The assistant in this class 
devotes one-half of his time to instruction or to research in connection 
with Experiment Station projects, and he is required to spend two years 
in residence for the Master's degree. If he continues in residence for 
the Doctor's degree, he is allowed two-thirds residence credit for each 
academic year at this University. The minimum residence requirement 
from the Bachelor's degree, therefore, may be satisfied in four academic 
years and one summer, or three academic years and three summer ses- 
sions of eleven or twelve weeks each. 

Other Assistants. Assistants not in the regular $800 class are fre- 
quently allowed to take graduate courses if they are eligible for admission 
to the Graduate School. The stipend for these assistants varies with 
the services rendered, and it may or may not include the remission of 
graduate fees. The question of fees is decided in each individual case 
by the Dean or director concerned when the stipend is arranged. The 
amount of graduate work these assistants are permitted to carry is de- 
termined by the head of the department, with the approval of the Dean 
or director concerned. The Graduate Council, guided by the recommenda- 
tion of the student's advisory committee, prescribes the required residence 
in each individual case at the time the student is admitted to candidacy. 

Futher information regarding assistantships may be obtained from 
the department or college concerned. 

COMMENCEMENT 

Attendance is required at the commencement at which the degree is 
conferred, unless the candidate is excused by the Dean of the Graduate 
School .and the President of the University. 

Application for diploma must be filed in the office of the Registrar be- 
fore March 1 of the year in which the candidate expects to obtain a degree. 

Academic costume is required of all candidates at commencement. Can- 
didates who so desire may purchase or rent caps and gowns at the Stu- 
dents' Supply Store. Order must be filed before March 20, but may be 
cancelled later if the student finds himself unable to complete his work 
for the degree. 



14 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

For the convenience of students in making out schedules of studies, the 
subjects in the following Description of Courses are arranged alphabetic- 
ally: Page 

Agricultural Economics 16 

Agronomy (Crops and Soils) 18 

Anatomy 69 

Animal Husbandry 19 

Bacteriology and Pathology 20, 71 

Biochemistry 71 

Botany 24, 73 

Chemistry 27 

Comparative Literature 32 

Dairy Husbandry 33 

Economics and Business Administration 34 

Education :• 36 

English Language and Literature 40 

Entomology 44 

Foods and Nutrition 48 

French 56 

Genetics and Statistics 45 

German 56 

History 46 

Home Economics 48 

Horticulture 50 

Mathematics 51 

Modern Languages 56 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 73 

Pharmacology 70, 74 

Pharmacy 75 

Philosophy 58 

Physics 59 

Physiology 70 

Political Science 61 

Psychology 62 

Rural Life and Agricultural Education 62 

Social Work 65 

Sociology 63 

Spanish 57 

Zoology 66 

For convenience in identification, Courses for Graduates and Advanced 
Undergraduates are numbered 100 to 199; Courses for Graduates are 
numbei-ed 200 and upward. 

The letter following the number of the course indicates the semester 
in which the course is offered: Thus, lOOf is offered the first semester; 
101s, the second semester; 102y, the year. 

The number of semester hours' credit is shown by the arable numeral 
in parentheses after the title of the course. In year courses the number 
shown is the total for both semesters. 

A separate schedule of courses is issued each semester, giving the 
hours, places of meeting, and other information required by the student 
in making out his schedule. Students ^vill obtain these schedules when 
they register. 



15 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

A. E. 101 s. Trans23ortation of Farm Products (3) — Two lectures; one 
laboratory. Not open to students who have taken or are taking Econ. 
112s, 

A study of the development of transportation in the United States and 
facilities for transporting farm products, with special attention to such 
problems as tariffs, rate structure, and the development of fast freight 
lines, refrigerator service, truck transportation of agricultural products; 
observation of transportation agencies in action. (Russell.) 

A. E. 102 s. Marketing of Farm Products (3) — Three lectures. Prereq- 
uisite, Econ. 5 f or s. 

A complete analysis of the present system of transporting, storing, and 
distributing farm products, and a basis for intelligent direction of effort 
in increasing the efficiency of marketing methods. (DeVault.) 

A. E. 103 f. Co-operation in Agriculture (3) — Three lectures. 

Historical and comparative development of farmers' co-operative organ- 
izations with some reference to farmer movements; reasons for failure, 
and essentials to success; commodity developments; the Federal Farm 
Board; banks for co-operatives; present trends. (Russell.) 

A. E. 104 s. Agricultural Finance (3) — Three lectures. 

Agricultural Credit requirements; development and volume of business 
of institutions financing agriculture; financing specific farm organizations 
and industries. Farm Insurance — fire, crop, livestock, and life insurance 
with especial reference to mutual developments — how provided, benefits, 
and needed extension. (Russell.) 

A. E. 105 s. Food Products Inspection (3) — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. 

This course, ari'anged by the Department of Agricultural Economics 
in co-operation with the State Department of Markets and the United 
States Department of Agriculture, is designed to give the students pri- 
mary instruction in the grading, standardizing and inspection of fruits 
and vegetables, dairy products, poultry products, meats, and other food 
products. Theoretical instruction covering the fundamental principles 
will be given in the form of lectures, while the demonstrational and prac- 
tical work will be conducted through laboratories and field trips to Wash- 
ington, D. C, and Baltimore. (Staff.) 

A. E. 106 s. Prices (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
A general course in prices, price relationships, and price analysis, with 
emphasis on prices of agricultural products. (Russell.) 

A. E. 107 s. Analysis of the Farm Business (3) — One lecture; two lab- 
oratories. 

A concise, practical course in the keeping, summarizing, and analyzing 
of farm accounts. (Hamilton.) 

A. E. 108 f. Farm Organization and Ojyeration (3) — Three lectures. 
A study of the organization and operation of Maryland farms from the 

16 



standpoint of efficiency and profits. Students will be expected to make 
an analysis of the actual farm business and practices of different types 
of farms located in various parts of the State, and to make specific rec- 
ommendations as to how these farms may be organized and operated as 
successful businesses. (Hamilton.) 

A. E. 109 y. Research Problems (1-3). 

With the permission of the instructor, students will work on any re- 
search problems in agricultural economics which they may choose, or a 
special list of subjects will be made up from which the students may 
select their research problems. There will be occasional class meetings 
for the purpose of making reports on progress of work, methods of ap- 
proach, etc. (DeVault.) 

A. E. 110 s. Economics of ConsumjAion (2) — -Two lectures. 

Economic activity and organization viewed from the standpoint of 
the consumer. Covers among other subjects a study of consumption 
theory, including Engel's laws and demand curves; also practical in- 
formation on standards of living; consumers' financial problems; grades 
of goods, brands and advertising; co-operative purchasing by consumers; 
and governmental consumer agencies. (Russell.) 

Courses for Graduates , 

A. E. 201 y. Special Problems in Agricxdtural Economics (3). 

An advanced course dealing more extensively with some of the eco- 
nomic problems affecting the farmer, such as land pi'oblems, agricultural 
finance, farm wealth, agricultural prices, transportation, and special 
problems in marketing and co-operation. (DeVault.) 

A. E. 202 y. Seminar (1-2). 

This course will consist of special reports by students on current eco- 
nomic subjects, and a discussion and criticism of the same by the members 
of the class and the instructor. (DeVault.) 

A. E. 203 y. Research (8) — Students will be assigned research work in 
agricultural economics under the supervision of the instructor. The work 
will consist of original investigation in problems of agricultural econom- 
ics, and the results will be presented in the form of a thesis. (DeVault.) 

A. E. 210 s. Taxation in Relation to Agriculture (2) — Two lectures. 

Principles and practices of taxation in their relation to agriculture, with 
special reference to the trends of tax levies, taxation in relation to land 
utilization, taxation in relation to ability to pay and benefits received; a 
comparison of the following taxes as they affect agriculture — general 
property tax, income tax, sales tax, gasoline and motor vehicle license 
taxes, inheritance tax, and special commodity taxes; possibilities of farm 
tax reduction through greater efficiency and economies in local govern- 
ment. (DeVault and Walker.) 

A. E. 211 f. Taxation in Theory and Practice (3) — Two lectures; one 
laboratory. 

Ideals in taxation; economic effects of taxation upon the welfare of 
society; theory of taxation: the general property tax, business and license 

17 



taxes, the income tax, the sales tax, special commodity taxes, inheritance 
and estate taxes; recent shifts in taxing methods and recent tax reforms: 
conflicts and duplication in taxation among governmental units; practical 
and current problems in taxation. (DeVault and Walker.) 

A. E. 212 f. Land Utilization and Agricultural Production (3) — Two 
double lecture periods a week. 

A presentation, by regions, of the basic physical conditions of the eco- 
nomic and social forces that have influenced agricultural settlement, and 
of the resultant utilization of the land and production of farm products; 
followed by a consideration of the regional trends and interregional shifts 
in land utilization and agricultural production, and the outlook for further 
changes in each region. (Baker.) 

A. E. 213 s. Consumption of Farm Products and Standards of Living 
(3) — Two double lecture periods a week. 

A presentation of the trends in population and migration for the nation 
and by states, of the trends in exports of farm products and their region- 
al significance, of the trends in diet and in per capita consumption of non- 
food products ; followed by a consideration of the factors that appear like- 
ly to influence these trends in the future, and of the outlook for commer- 
cial as contrasted with a more self-sufficing agriculture. (Baker.) 

A. E. 214 f. Advanced Co-operation (2) — Two lectures. 
Intensive studies of specific phases of agricultural co-operation. 

(Russell.) 

AGRONOMY 

Division of Crops 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Agron. 103 f. Crop Breeding (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Gen. 101. 

The principles of breeding as applied to field crops and methods used in 
crop improvement. (Kemp.) 

Agron. 121 s. Methods of Crop and Soil Investigation (2) — One lec- 
ture; one laboratory. 

A consideration of crop and soil investigation methods at the various 
experiment stations, and the standardization of such methods. (Metzger.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Agron. 201 y. Crop Breeding (4-10) — Credits determined by work ac- 
complished. 

The content of this course is similar to that of Agron. 103 f, but will be 
adapted more to graduate students, and more of a range will be allowed in 
choice of materials to suit special cases. (Kemp.) 

Agron. 203 y. Seminar (2) — One report period each week. 
The seminar is devoted largely to reports by students on current scien- 
tific publications dealing with problems in crops and soils. 

18 



Agron. 209 y. Research (4-8) — Credits determined by work accom- 
plished. 

With the approval of the head of the department the student will be 
allowed to work on any problem in agronomy, or he will be given a list 
of suggested problems from which he may make a selection. (Staff.) 

Division of Soils 
Courses for Graduates 

Soils 201 y. Special Problems and Research (10-12). 

Original investigation of problems in soils and fertilizers. (Staff.) 

Soils 202 y. Soil Technology (5 f, 2 s) — Two lectures, two laboratories, 
first semester; two lectures, one laboratory, second semester. Prereq- 
uisites, Geology 1, Soils 1, and Chemistry 1. 

In the first semester chemical and physico-chemical study of soil prob- 
lems as encountered in field, greenhouse, and laboratory. In the second 
semester physical and plant nutritional problems related to the soil. 

(Thomas.) 

Soils 204 s. Soil Microbiology (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Pre- 
requisite, Bact. 1. 

A study of the microorganisms of the soil in relation to fertility. It in- 
cludes the study of the bacteria of the soil concerned in the decomposi- 
tion of organic matter, nitrogen fixation, nitrification, and sulphur oxida- 
tion and reduction, and deals also with such organisms as fungi, algae, 
and protozoa. The course includes a critical study of the methods used by 
experiment stations in soil investigational work. (Thom.) 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

A. H. 110 s. Nutrition (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 

A study of digestion, assimilation, metabolism, and protein and energy 
requirements. Methods of investigation and studies in the utilization of 
feed and nutrients. (Meade.) 

Courses for Graduates 

A. H. 201 y. Special Problems in Animal Husbandry (4-6) — Credit 
given in proportion to amount and character of work completed. 

Problems which relate specifically to the character of woi-k the student 
is pursuing will be assigned. (Meade, Carmichael.) 

A. H. 202 y. Seviinar (2). 

Students are requii-ed to prepare papers based upon current scientific 
publications relating to animal husbandry or upon their research work, for 
presentation before and discussion by the class. (Staff.) 

A. H. 203 y. Research — Credit to be determined by the amount and 
character of work done. 

With the approval of the head of the department, students will be re- 
quired to pursue original research in some phase of animal husbandry, 
carry the same to completion, and report the results in the form of a 
thesis. (Meade, Carmichael.) 

19 



BACTERIOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY* 

A. Bacteriology and Immunology 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Bact. 101 f. Dairy Bacteriology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Bact. 1. Registration limited. 

Bacteria in milk, sources and development; milk fermentation; sanitary 
production; care and sterilization of equipment; care and preservation of 
milk and cream; pasteurization; public health requirements. Standard 
methods of milk analysis; practice in the bacteriological control of milk 
supplies and plant sanitation; occasional inspection trips. (Black.) 

Bact. 102 s. Dairy Bacteriology (Continued) (3) — One lecture; two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, Bact. 101 f, or Bact. 1 and consent of instruc- 
tor. 

Relation of bacteria, yeasts and molds to cream, concentrated milks, 
stai'ters, fermented milks, ice cream, butter, cheese, and other dairy prod- 
ucts; sources of contamination. Microbiological analysis and control; oc- 
casional inspection trips. (Black.) 

Bact. Ill f. Food Bacteriology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, Bact. 1 and consent of instructor. Alternates with Bact. 125 f. 
(Offered in 1937-1938.) 

Bacteria, yeasts and molds in foods; relation to preservation and spoil- 
age; food infections and intoxications; food control agencies and regu- 
lations. Microbiological examination of normal and spoiled foods; fac- 
tors affecting preservation. (Bartram.) 

Bact. 112 s. Sanitary Bacteriology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Bact. 1. Registration limited. 

Bacteriological and public health aspects of water supplies and water 
purification; swimming pool sanitation; sewage disposal; industrial 
wastes; disposal of gai-bage and refuse; municipal sanitation. Practice 
in standard methods for examination of water and sewage; differentia- 
tion and significance of the coli-aerogenes group ; other bacteriological 
analysis. (Bartram.) 

Bact. 115 f. Serology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. Prereq- 
uisite, Bact. 2 s, or consent of instructor. Registration limited. 

Infection and resistance; agglutination, precipitation, lytic and comple- 
ment fixation reactions; principles of immunity and hypersensitiveness. 
Preparation of necessary reagents; general immunologic technique; fac- 
tors affecting reactions; applications in identification of bacteria and 
diagnosis of disease. (Faber.) 

Bact. 116 s. Epidemiology (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Bact. 1. 
Alternates with Bact. 126 s. (Offered in 1937-1938.) 

Epidemiology of important infectious diseases, including history, charac- 
teristic features, methods of transmission, immunization and control; 
periodicity; px'inciples of investigation; public health applications. 

(Faber.) 



* One or more of the scheduled courses may also be given during the evening if a 
sufficient number of students register. A special fee is charged. 

20 



Bact. 121 f. Research Methods (1) — One lecture. Prei-equisite, Bact. 1 
and consent of instructor. 

Methods of research; library practice; current literature; preparation 
of papers; research institutions, investigators; laboratory design, equip- 
ment and supplies; academic practices; professional aids. (Black.) 

Bact. 122 f or s. Advanced Methods (2) — One lecture; one laboratorj^ 
Prerequisite, Bact. 1 and consent of instructor. Registration limited. 

Microscopy, dark field and single cell technique, photomicrography; 
colorimetric and potentiometric determinations; oxidation-reduction; elec- 
trophoresis; sui'face tension; gas analysis; special culture methods; 
filtration; animal care; practice in media and reagent preparation. 

(Bartram.) 

Bact. 123 f. Bacteriological Problems (2-3) — Laboi'atory. Prerequi- 
sites, Bact. 1 and any other courses needed for the project. Registration 
limited. 

Subject matter suitable to the needs of the particular student, or prob- 
lems as an introduction to research, will be arranged. The research is in- 
tended to develop the student's initiative and ability to carry on inde- 
pendent research. The problems are to be selected, outlined, and investi- 
gated in consultation vv^ith and under the supervision of a faculty mem- 
ber of the department. (Black.) 

Bact. 124 s. Bacteriological Problems (Continued) (2-3) — Laboratory. 
Prerequisites, Bact. 1 and any other courses needed for the project. Reg- 
istration limited. (Black, Bartram.) 

Bact. 126 s. Public Health (1) — One lecture. Bact. 1 desirable. Alter- 
nates with Bact. 116 s. (Not offered in 1937-1938.) 

A series of weekly lectures on public health and its administration by 
staff members of the Maryland State Depai-tment of Health, repi'esenting 
each of the bureaus and divisions. (James, in charge.) 

Bact. 127 f. Advanced Bacteriology (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Bact. 1 and consent of instructor. 

History; genetic relationship; special morphology; bacterial varia- 
tion; growth; chemical composition; action of chemical and physical 
agents ; systematic bacteriology ; classification, review of important genera. 

(Black.) 

Bact. 128 s. Bacterial Metabolism (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Bact. 1, Chem. 12 f, or equivalent, and consent of instructor. Alternates 
with Bact. 206 s. (Offered in 1937-1938.) 

Oxygen relations; enzymes; bacterial metabolism and respiration; chem- 
ical activities of microorganisms; changes produced in inorganic and 
organic compounds; industrial fermentations. (Black.) 

Bact. 131 f. Joui-nal Club (1) — Pi-erequisites, Bact. 1 and at least one 
of the advanced courses. 

Students will submit reports on current scientific literature or on indi- 
vidual problems in bacteriology, which will be discussed and criticized by 
members of the class and staff. (Black.'* 

21 



Bact. 132 s. Jouj-nal Club (Continued) (1). Prerequisites, Bact. 1 
and at least one of the advanced courses. (Black.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Bact. 201 f. Advanced General Bacteriology (3) — One lecture; two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, degree in biological science, and consent of in- 
structor. Students with credits in an approved elementray course will not 
receive credit for this course. Minor credit will not be given for Bact. 
201 f unless Bact 202 s is satisfactorily completed. 

History; microscopy; morphology; classification; metabolism; relation 
to industries and to diseases. Media preparation; examination of bacter- 
ia; staining; cultivation and identification of bacteria. (Faber.) 

Bact. 202 s. Advanced Pathogenic Bacteriology (3) — One lecture; two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, Bact. 1 or 201 f, or equivalent. Registration 
limited. 

Infection and immunity; pathogenic microorganisms. Isolation, identi- 
fication and effects of pathogens. (Faber.) 

Bact. 206 s. Physiology of Bacteria (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Bact., 10 hours, and Chem. 108 s or equivalent. Alternates with Bact. 
128 s. (Not offered in 1937-1938.) 

Growth; chemical composition; physical characteristics; energy rela- 
tionships; influence of environmental conditions on growth and meta- 
bolism; disinfection; physiological interrelationships; changes occurring 
in media. (James.) 

Bact. 207 f. Special Topics (1). Prerequisite, Bact., 10 hours. 
Presentation and discussion of fundamental problems and special sub- 
jects. (Black.) 

Bact. 208 s. Special Topics (Continued) (1). Prerequisite, Bact., 10 
hours. (Black.) 

Bact. 215 f or s. Food Sanitation (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Bact. 1, Bact. 2, and Bact. Ill, or their equivalent. 

Principles of sanitation in food manufacture and distribution; methods 
of control of sanitation in commercial canning, pickling, bottling, pre- 
serving, refrigeration, dehydration, etc. (James.) 

Bact. 221 f and 222 s. Research (1-6). Prerequisites, Bact. 1 and 
and other courses needed for the particular project. Credit will be deter- 
mined by the amount and character of the work accomplished. 

Properly qualified students will be admitted upon approval of the de- 
partment head and with his approval the student may select the subject 
for research. The investigation is outlined in consultation with and pur- 
sued under supervision of a faculty member of the department. The re- 
sults obtained by major students working towards an advanced degree are 
presented as a thesis, a copy of which must be filed with the department. 

(James, Black.) 

Bact. 231 f. Seminar (1). Prerequisites, Bact., 10 hours, and consent 
of instructor. 

Conferences and reports prepared by the student on current research 
and recent advances in bacteriology. (James.) 

22 



Bact. 232 s. Seminar (Continued) (1). Prerequisites, Bact., 10 hours, 
and consent of instructor. (James.) 

B. Pathology 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Bact. 103 f. Hematology (2) — Two laboratories. Bact. 1 desirable. 
Registration limited. 

Procuring blood; estimating the amount of hemoglobin; color index; 
examination of red cells and leucocytes in fresh and stained preparations, 
numerical count of erythrocytes and leucocytes; differential count of 
leucocytes; sources and development of the formed elements of blood; 
pathological forms and counts. (Reed.) 

Bact. 104 s. Urinalysis (2)— Two laboratories. Bact. 1 desirable. 
Physiologic, pathologic and diagnostic significance; use of clinical 
methods and interpretation of results. (Reed.^ 

Bact. 105 s. Comparative Anatomy and Physiology (3) — Three lec- 
tures. 

Structure of the animal body; abnormal as contrasted with normal; the 
inter-relationship between the various organs and parts as to structure 
and function. (Reed.) 

Bact. 106 s. Animal Hygiene (3) — Three lectures or demonstrations. 

Care and management of domestic animals, with special reference to 
maintenance of health and resistance to disease; prevention and early 
recognition of disease; general hygiene; sanitation; first aid. (Reed.) 

Bact. 109 f. Pathological Technique (3) — Three laboratories. Bact. 1 
desirable. 

Examination of fresh materials ; fixation ; decalcification ; sectioning 
by free hand and freezing methods; celloidin and paraflfin imbedding and 
sectioning; general staining methods. (Reed.) 

Bact. 110 s. Pathological Technique (Continued) (2-5) — Laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Bact. 109 f, or consent of instructor. 

Special methods in pathological investigations and laboratory pro- 
cedures which may be applied to clinical diagnosis. (Reed.) 

Bact. 125 f. Clinical Methods (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisites, Bact. 1 and consent of instructor. Alternates with Bact.lll f. 
(Not offered in 1937-1938.) 

Clinical material, diagnostic features. Methods in the qualitative and 
quantitative determination of important constituents of gastric contents, 
blood, urine, feces, and exudates. (Bartram.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Bact. 203 f or s. Animal Disease Problems (2-6). Prerequisite, de- 
gree in vetex*inary medicine from an approved veterinary college, or con- 
sent of instructor. Laboratoiy and field work by assignment. (Reed.) 

Bact. 204 y. Animal Disease Research (2-6). Prerequisite, degree in 
veterinary medicine from an approved veterinary college, or consent of 
instructor. (Reed.) 

23 



BOTANY 

A. General Botany and Morphology 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Box. 101 f. Plant Anatomy (3)— One lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. 1. 

The origin and development of the organs and tissue systems in the 
vascular plants, with special emphasis on the structures of roots, stems 
and leaves. Reports on current literature are required. (Bamford.) 

Box. 102 f. Mycology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. 

An introductoi-y study of the morphology, life histories, classification, 
and economics of the fungi. Methods of cultivating fungi and identifica- 
tion of plant pathogens constitute a part of the laboratory work. 

(Norton, Woods.) 

Box. 103 f. Plant Taxonomy (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. (Not 
given in 1937-1938.) 

Classification of the vegetable kingdom, and the principles underlying 
it; the use of other sciences and all phases of botany as taxonomic foun- 
dations; methods of taxonomic x"esearch in field, garden, herbarium and 
library. Each student to work on a special problem during some of the 
laboratory time. (Norton.) 

Box. 104 s. Advanced Plant Taxonomy (3) — One lecture; two labora- 
tories. 

Principles and criteria of plant taxonomy. Reviews and criticisms of 
current taxonomic literature. Each student works on an original prob- 
lem during the laboratory time. (Norton.) 

Box. 105 s. Ecoyiomic Plants (2) — Two lectures. (Not given in 1937- 
1938.) 

The names, taxonomic position, native and commercial geographic dis- 
tribution, and use of the leading economic plants of the world are studied. 
By examination of plant products from markets, stores, factories, and 
gardens, students become familiar with the useful plants both in the 
natural form and as used by man. (Norton.) 

Box. 106 f. Histoyy and Philosophy of Botany (1) — One lecture. 
Discussion of the development of ideas and knowledge about plants, also 
a survey of contemporary work in botanical science. (Norton.) 

Box. 107 f. Methods in Plant Histology (2) — Two laboratories. 
Principles and methods involved in the preparation of permanent slides. 

(Bamford.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Box. 201s. Cytology (4) — Two lectures; two laboratories. Prerequi- 
site, Bot. 1. 

A detailed study of the cell during its metabolic and reproductive stages. 
The major portion is devoted to chromosomes in mitosis and meiosis, and 
the relation of these stages to current theories of heredity and evolution. 

24 



The laboratory involves the preparation, examination and illustration of 
cytolog'ical material by current methods. (Bamford.) 

BOT. 203 f and s. Seminai- (1). 

The study of special topics in plant morphology, anatomy and cytology. 

(Bamford.) 
BoT. 204. Research. Credit according to work done. (Norton, Bamford.) 

B. Plant Pathology 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Plt. Path. 101 s. Diseases of Fruits (2-4) — Two lectures; laboratory 
according to credit desired. Prerequisite, Pit. Path. 1 f . 

An intensive study intended to give a rather thorough knowledge of 
the subject matter, such as is needed by those who expect to become ad- 
visers in fruit production, as well as those who expect to become special- 
ists in plant pathology. (Woods.) 

Plt. Path. 102 s. Diseases of Garden and Field Crops (2-4) — Two lec- 
tures; laboratory according to credit desired. Prerequisite, Pit. Path. 1 f. 

The diseases of garden crops, ti'uck crops, cereal and forage crops. In- 
tended for students of vegetable culture, agronomy, and plant pathology, 
and for those preparing for county agent work. (Temple.) 

Plt. Path. 103 s. Research Methods (2) — One conference and five 
hours of laboratory and library work. Prerequisite, Pit. Path. 1 f or 
equivalent. 

Technique of plant disease investigation : sterilization, culture media, 
isolation of pathogens, inoculation methods, single-spore methods, dis- 
infectants, fungicides, photography, preparation of manuscripts, and the 
literature in the scientific journals and bulletins on these subjects. 

(Woods.) 

Plt. Path. 104 f and s. Minor Investigations (1-3) — Credit according 
to work done. A laboratory course %\nth individual conferences. Prereq- 
uisite, Pit. Path. 1 f. 

In this course, only minor problems or special phases of major investi- 
gations may be undertaken. Their solution may include a survey of the 
literature on the problem under investigation and both laboratory and 
field work. (Norton, Temple, Woods.) 

Plt. Path. 105 s. Diseases of Ornamentals (2) — One lecture; one lab- 
oratory. 

The most important diseases of plants growing in gi'eenhouse, flower 
garden, and landscape, including shrubs and shade trees. (Temple.) 

Plt. Path. 106 y. Seminar (1). 

Conferences and reports on plant pathological literature and on re- 
cent investigations. (Temple, Norton.) 

Plt. Path. 107 f. Plant Disease Control (3) — Two lectures; one lab- 
oratory. Prerequisite, Pit. Path. 1 f. 

An advanced course dealing with the theory and practice of plant dis- 
ease control ; the preparation of sprays and other fungicides and the test- 

25 



ing of their toxicity in greenhouse and laboratory; demonstration and 
other extension methods adapted to county agent work and to the teach- 
ing of agriculture in high schools. (Temple.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Plt. Path. 201 f. FiVms Diseases (2) — Two lectures. 
An advanced course, including a study of the current literature on the 
subject and the working of a problem in the greenhouse. (Temple.) 

Plt. Path. 203 s. Non-Parasitic Diseases (3) — Two lectures; one lab- 
oratory. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

Effects of maladjustment of plants to their environment; injuries due 
to climate, soil, gases; dust and sprays; fertilizers; improper treatment 
and other detrimental conditions. (Norton.) 

Plt. Path. 205 y. Research — Credit according to work done. 

(Norton, Temple, Woods.) 

C. Plant Physiology 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Plt. Phys. 101 f. Plant Physiology (4) — Two lectures; two labora- 
tories. Prerequisite, Bot. 1 f or s. 

A summary view of the general physiological activities of plants. The 
aim in this course is to stress principles rather than factual details. 

(Brown.) 

Plt. Phys. 102 s. Plant Ecology (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisite, Bot. 1 f or s. 

The study of plants in relation to their environments. Plant formations 
and successions in various parts of the country are briefly treated. Much 
of the work, especially the practical, must be carried on in the field, and 
for this purpose type regions adjacent to the University are selected. 

(Brown.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Plt. Phys. 201 s. Plant Biochemistry (4) — Two lectures; two labora- 
tories. Prerequisite, an elementary knowledge of plant physiology and 
organic chemistry. 

An advanced course in plant physiology in which the chemical aspects 
are specially emphasized. It deals with the important substances in the 
composition of the plant body and with the important processes in plant 
life. (Appleman, Shirk.) 

Plt. Phys. 202A f. Plant Biophysics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Bot. If or s, and Pit. Phys. lOlf, or equivalents. An elementary knowl- 
edge of physics or physical chemistry is highly desirable. 

An advanced course dealing with the operation of physical forces in 
plant life processes. (Brown.) 

Plt. Phys. 202B f . Biophysical Methods (2). 

A laboratory course to accompany Pit. Phys. 202A f . 

(Appleman, Shirk.) 

26 



Plt. Phys. 203 s. Plant Microchemistry (2) — One lecture; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisites, Bot. 1 f or s, Chem. 1 y, or equivalents. 

The isolation, identification, and localization of organic and inorganic 
substances found in plant tissues by micro-technical methods. The use 
of these methods in the study of metabolism in plants is emphasized. 

(Brown.) 

Plt. Phys. 204 f. Growth and Development (2). (Not given in 1937- 
1938.) (Appleman.) 

Plt. Phys. 205 f and s. Seminar (1). 

Students are required to prepare reports of papers in the current liter- 
ature. These are discussed in connection with the recent advances in the 
subject. (Appleman.) 

Plt. Phys. 206 y. Research — Credit according to work done. 
Students must be specially qualified by previous work to pursue with 
profit the research to be undertaken. (Appleman, duBuy, Brown.) 

CHEMISTRY 

A. General Chemistry 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 104 f. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (4) — Two lectures; two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, Chem. 2 y. Lectures may be taken without 
laboratory. 

This course is an advanced study of the general principles of inorganic 
chemistry. Special emphasis is given to the reactions and the more un- 
usual properties of the common elements. Laboratory experiments are 
selected which involve important theoretical considerations. (White.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Chem. 200 Ay. Chemistry of the Rarer Elements (4) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, Chem. 2y. 

The course is devoted to a study of the elements not usually considered 
in the elementary course. (White.) 

Chem. 200 By. Advanced Inorganic Laboratory (4) — Two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

A laboratory study of the analyses and the compounds of elements con- 
sidered in Chem. 200 Ay. (White.) 

Chem. 201 f or s. An Introduction to Spectrographic Analysis (1). 
This is a laboratory course designed to give the student the fundamen- 
tal principles of spectrographic analysis. (White.) 

B. Analytical Chemistry 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 101 y. Advanced Quantitative Analysis (10) — Two lectures; 
three laboratories. Prerequisite, Chem. 6 y or equivalent. 

A broad survey of the field of inorganic quantitative analysis. In the 
first semester mineral analysis will be given. Included in this will be 

27 



analysis of silicates, carbonates, etc. In the second semester the analysis 
of steel and iron will be taken up ; however, the student will be given wide 
latitude as to the type of quantitative analysis he wishes to pursue during 
the second semester. (Wiley.) 

C. Organic Chemistry 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 116 y. Advanced Organic Chemistry (4) — Two lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Chem. 8 Ay and 8 By, or equivalent. 

This course is devoted to a more advanced study of the compounds of 
carbon than is undertaken in Chem. 8 Ay. Graduate students who de- 
sire an accompanying laboratory course should elect Chem. 210 y. 

(Drake.) 

Chem. 117 y. Organic Laboratory (2). 

This course is devoted to an elementary study of organic qualitative 
analysis. The work includes the identification of unknown organic com- 
pounds, and corresponds to the more extended course, Chem. 207. (Drake.) 

Chem. 118 y. Advanced Organic Laboratory (2). 

A study of organic quantitative analysis and the preparation of organic 
compounds. Quantitative determinations of carbon and hydrogen, nitro- 
gen and halogen are carried out, and syntheses more difficult than those 
of Chem. 8 By are studied. (Drake.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Chem. 203 f and s. Special Topics in Organic Chemistry (2-4-6). (A 
lecture course which will be given any half-year when there is sufficient 
demand.) 

The course will be devoted to an advanced study of topics which are too 
specialized to be considered in Chem. 116 y. Topics that may be covered 
are dyes, drugs, carbohydrates, plant pigments, etc. The subject matter 
will be varied to suit best the needs of the particular group enrolled. 

(Drake.) 

Chem. 205 f and s. Organic Preparations (4). 

A laboratory course, devoted to the synthesis of various organic com- 
pounds. This course is designed to fit the needs of those students whose 
laboratory experience has been insufficient for research in organic chem- 
istry. (Drake.) 

Chem. 206 f and s. Organic Microanalysis (4). 

A laboratory study of the methods of Pregl for the quantitative de- 
termination of halogen, nitrogen, carbon, hydrogen, methoxyl, etc., in 
very small quantities of material. The course is open only to properly 
qualified graduate students, and the consent of the instructor is necessary 
before enrollment. (Drake.) 

Chem. 207 f or s. Organic Qiialitative Analysis (variable credit to 
suit students, 2 to 6). Laboratory work devoted to the identification of 
pure organic substances and of mixtures. The text used is Kamm's 
"Qualitative Organic Analysis." 

This course should be taken by students seeking a higher degree whose 

28 



major is organic chemistry. The work is an excellent preparation for the 
problems of identification likely to be encountered while conducting re- 
search. (Drake.) 

Chem. 210 y. Advanced Organic Laboratory (4 to 6). Students elect- 
ing this course should elect Chem. 116 y. (Drake.) 

D. Physical Chemistry 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 102 Ay. Physical Chemistry (6) — Three lectures. Prerequi- 
sites, Chem. 6 y; Phys. 2y; Math. 5 y. Graduate students who take lab- 
oratory will elect Chem. 219 f and s (4). 

This course aims to furnish the student with a thorough background 
in the laws of theories of chemistry. The gas laws, kinetic theory, liquids, 
solutions, elementary thermodynamics, thermochemistry, equilibrium, chem- 
ical kinetics, etc., will be discussed. (Haring.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Note: Chem. 102 Ay and 219 f and s, or their equivalent, are prerequi- 
sites for all advanced courses in physical chemistry. 

Chem. 212 Af and s. Colloid Chemistry (4) — Two lectures. 

This is a thorough course in the chemistry of matter associated with 
surface energy. First semester, theory; second semester, practical appli- 
cations. (Haring.) 

Chem. 212 Bf and s. Colloid Chemistry Laboratory (4) — Two labora- 
tories which must accompany or be preceded by Chem. 212 Af and s. 

(Haring.) 

Chem. 213 f. Phase Ride (2) — Two lectures. (Not given in 1937- 
1938.) 

A systematic study of heterogeneous equilibria. One, two, and three 
component systems will be considered, with practical applications of each. 

(Haring.) 

Chem. 214 s. Structure of Matter (2) — Two lectures. 

Subjects considered are radioactivity, isotopes, the Bohr and Lewis- 
Langmuir theories of atomic structure, and allied topics. (Haring.) 

Chem. 215 s. Catalysis (2) — Two lectures. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 
This course consists of lectures on the theory and application of catal- 
ysis. (Haring.) 

Chem. 217 Af and s. Electrochemistry (4) — Two lectures. (Not given 
in 1937-1938.) 

A study of the principles and some of the practical applications of elec- 
trochemistry. First semester, theory; second semester, practical appli- 
cations. (Haring.) 

Chem. 217 Bf and s. Electrochemistry Laboratory (4) — Two labora- 
tories which must accompany or be preceded by Chem. 217 Bf and s. 
(Not given in 1937-1938.) (Haring.) 

29 



Chem. 218 y. Chemical Thermodynamics (4) — Two lectures. 
A study of the methods of approaching chemical problems through the 
laws of energy. (Haring.) 

Chem. 219 f and s. Physical Chemistry Laboratory (4 or 6) — Two lab- 
oratories and one conference. Students taking this course may elect 6 
credits of lectures in Chem. 102 Ay to replace the conference. (Haring.) 

E. Agricultural Chemistry 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 106 f or s. Dairy Chemistry (4) — -One lecture; three labora- 
tories. Prerequisites, Chem. 12 Ay and 12 Bf or s. 

Lectures and assigned reading on the constituents of dairy products. 
This course is designed to give the student a working knowledge and lab- 
oratory practice in dairy chemistry and analysis. Practice is given in ex- 
amining dairy products for confirmation under the food laws, detection of 
watering, detection of preservatives and added colors, and detection of 
adulterants. Students showing sufficient progress may take the second 
semester's work, and elect to isolate and make complete analysis of the 
fat or protein of milk. (McDonnell.) 

Chem. 108 s. General Physiological Chemistry (4) — Two lectures; two 
laboratories. Prerequisites, Chem. 12 Ay and 12 Bf or s, or equivalent. 

This course is a study of the fundamental principles of human nutrition, 
the chemistry of foods, digestion, absorption, assimilation, tissue composi- 
tion and excretion. The laboratory work consists of experiments in food 
analysis; salivary, gastric, pancreatic and intestinal digestion; and respir- 
ation. (Broughton.j 

Chem. 115 f or s. Organic Analysis (4) — One lecture; three labora- 
tories. Prerequisites, Chem. 4 f or s, or Chem. 12 Ay and 12 Bf or s. 

This course gives a connected introductory training in organic analysis, 
especially as applied to plant and animal substances and their manufac- 
tured products. The greater part of the course is devoted to quantitative 
methods for food materials and related substances. Standard works and 
the publicatons of the Association of Official Agricultural Chemists are 
used freely as references. (Broughton, Supplee.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Chem. 208 s. Biological Analysis (2) — Two laboratories. 

A course in analytical methods of special value to students majoring in 
the biological sciences. The work is varied to suit the needs or interests 
of the individual when possible. (Broughton, Supplee.) 

Chem. 221 f or s. Tissue Analysis (.3) — Three laboratories. Prerequi- 
sites, Chem. 12 Ay and 12 By or equivalent. 

A discussion and the application of the analytical methods used in de- 
termining the inorganic and organic constituents of plant and animal 
tissue. (Broughton.) 

30 



Chem. 223 Af and s. Physiological Chemistry (4) — Two lectures. Pre- 
requisites, Chem. 12 Ay and Chem. 12 By or equivalent. 

An advanced course in physiological chemistry. For the first semester 
the course w^ill consist of lectures and assigned reading on the constitution 
and reactions of proteins, fats, cai'bohydrates and allied compounds of 
biological importance. The second semester will deal with enzyme action, 
digestion, absoi'ption, metabolism and excretion. (Broughton.) 

Chem. 223 Bf. Physiological Cheynistry Laboratory (2) — Prerequisites, 
Chem. 4 f or s, and Chem. 12 Ay and 12 By. 

A laboratory course to accompany Chemistry 223 Af. Qualitative and 
quantitative analysis of foods; salivary, gastric, pancreatic, and intestinal 
digestion, and respiration. (Broughton, Supplee.) 

Chem. 224 f or s. Special Problems (4 to 8) — Total of eight credit hours 
may be obtained in this course by continuing the course for two semesters. 
Laboratory, library, and conference work amounting to a minimum of ten 
hours each week. Prerequisites, Chem. 223 Af and s, and consent of in- 
structor. 

This course consists of studies of special methods, such as the separation 
of the fatty acid from a selected fat, the preparation of carbohydrates or 
amino acids, and the determination of the distribution of nitrogen in a pro- 
tein. The students will choose, with the advice of the insti*uctor, the par- 
ticular problem to be studied. (Broughton.) 

Chem. 226 f or s. Toxicology (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. 
Theory and practice of the detection and estimation of toxic substances. 
The laboratory work includes alkaloids, toxic gases and inorganic poisons. 

(McDonnell.) 

F. Industrial Chemistry 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 110 y. Industrial Chemistry (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisites, 
Chem. 6 y and 8 y. 

A study of the principal chemical industries; plant inspection, trips, 
and reports; the preparation of a report on some chemical industry. 

(Machwart.) 

Chem. Ill f. Engineering Chemistry (2 or 3) — Two lectures; one lab- 
oratory. This course may be taken with or without laboratory. 

A study of the chemistry of engineering materials. (Machwart.) 

Chem. 113 y. Advanced Industrial Chemistry (6) — One lecture; two 
laboratories. Prerequisite, Chem. 110 y. 

Unit operations typical of industrial practices, fluid flow, heat trans- 
fer, distillation, etc. Examination of materials. Plant design. Applica- 
tion of unit operations to a complete chemical process. (Machwart.) 

Chem. 120 f. Elements of Chemical Engineering (4) — Three lectures; 
one laboratory. 

A theoretical discussion of heat transfer, pyrometry, liquid flow, humid- 
ity, air-conditioning, refrigeration, etc. (Machwart.) 

31 



Courses for Graduates 

Chem. 222 y. Unit Operations (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, con- 
sent of instructor. 

A theoretical discussion of evaporation, distillation, filtration, etc. Prob- 
lems. (Machwart.) 

Chem. 225 s. Gas Analysis (3) — One lecture; two laboratories. Pre- 
requisite, consent of instructor. 

Quantitative determination of common gases. Flue gas and water 
gas analysis, including calorific determinations of the latter. Problems. 

(Machwart.) 
G. History of Chemistry 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 121 y. The History of Chemistry (2) — One lecture. Prerequi- 
sites, Chem. 1 y and Chem. 8 y or equivalent. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

The development of chemical knowledge and especially the general doc- 
trines of chemistry which have been gradually evolved, from their earliest 
beginnings up to the present day. (Broughton.) 

H. Chemistry Seminar and Research 
Courses for Graduates 

Chem. 228 f and s. Seminar (2) — Required of all graduate students in 
chemistry. The students are required to prepare reports on papers in the 
current literature. These are discussed in connection with the recent ad- 
vances in the subject. (Chemistry Staff.) 

Chem. 229 f or s. Research in Chemistry. The investigation of special 
problems and the preparation of a thesis towards an advanced degree. 

(Chemistry Staff.) 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

The work in Comparative Literature is offered jointly by the faculties 
of the Department of English and the Department of Modern Languages. 

A minor only may be taken in Comparative Literatui-e. English 113 f 
and 114 s may be counted as Comparative Literature by students who 
have had Comparative Literature 105 f and 106 s. 

COMP. Lit. 101 f. Introduction to Comparative Literature (3) — Three 
lectures. 

Survey of the background of European literature through study in 
English translations of Greek and Latin literature. Special emphasis is 
laid on the development of the epic, tragedy, comedy, and other typical 
forms of literary expression. The debt of modern literature to the 
ancients is discussed and illustrated. (Prahl.) 

COMP. Lit. 102 s. Introduction to Comjjarative Literature (3) — Three 
lectures. 

Continuation of Comp. Lit. 101 f ; study of medieval and modern Con- 
tinental literature. (Prahl.) 

32 



COMP. Lit. 103 s. Types of English Literature (2) — Two lectures. 

An historical and critical survey of the principal types of English 
literature, with special attention to the influence of classical myth and 
legend and of classical literally ideals upon English and American writ- 
ers. (Harman.) 

COMP. Lit. 104 f. The Old Testament as Literature (2)— Two lectures. 
A study of the sources, development, and literary types. (Hale.) 

CoMP. Lit. 105 f. Romanticism in France (3) — Three lectures. 

Introduction to the chief authors of the Romantic movement in France. 
Lectures on the thought currents and literary movements of the late 
eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. The reading in this course is 
done in English translations. (Wilcox.) 

COMP. Lit. 106 s. Romanticism in Germany (3) — Three lectures. 
Continuation of Comp. Lit. 105 f. German literature from Buerger to 
Heine. The reading is done in English translations. (Prahl.) 

Comp. Lit. 110 y. The Modern Continental Drama (2) — Two lectures. 
(Not given in 1937-1938.) 

The Continental drama of the last fifty years (the English drama not 
included) will be studied as an expression of modern thought and as an 
art form. (Prahl.) 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY , 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

D. H. 103 s. Advanced Study of Dairy Breeds (2) — One lecture; one 
laboratory. 

A study of the historical background, characteristics, noted individuals 
and families, and the more important blood lines in the Holstein, Guern- 
sey, Ayrshire, and Jersey breeds. (Ingham.) 

D. H. 107 s. Analysis of Dairy Products (3) — One lecture; one four- 
hour laboratory (consecutive). Prerequisites, D. H. 2 f, Chem. 4, Bact. 1. 

The application of chemical and bacteriological methods to commercial 
dairy practice; analysis by standard chemical, bacteriological, and fac- 
tory methods; standardization and composition control; tests for adulter- 
ants and preservatives. (England.) 

Courses for Graduates 

D. H. 201 f. Advanced Dairy Production (3). 

A study of the newer discoveries in animal nutrition, breeding, and 
management. Readings and assignments. (Ingham.) 

D. H. 202 f. Dairy Technology (2)— Two lectures. 
A consideraton of milk and dairy products from the physio-chemical 
point of view. (England.) 

D. H. 203 s. Milk Products (2)— Two lectures. 

An advanced consideration of the scientific and technical aspects of 
milk products. (England.) 

33 



D. H. 204 y. Special Problems in Dairying (4-6). 

Special problems which relate specifically to the work the student is 
pursuing will be assigned. Credit will be given in accordance with the 
amount and character of work done. (Staff.) 

D. H. 205 y. Seminar (2). 

Students are required to prepare papers based upon current scientific 
publications relating to dairying or upon their research work, for presen- 
tation before and discussion by the class. (Staff.) 

D. H. 206 y. Research — Credit to be determined by the amount and 
quality of work done. 

The student will be required to pursue, with the approval of the head 
of the department, an original investigation in some phase of dairy hus- 
bandry, and report results in the form of a thesis. 

(Meade, Ingham, England.) 

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

EcON. 101 f. Money and Banking (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 3y or consent of the instructor. 

A study of the origin, nature, and functions of money, monetary sys- 
tems, credit and credit instruments, prices, interest rates, and exchanges. 

(Norris.) 

EcON. 102 s. Moyiey and Banking (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 101 f. 

Principles and practices of banking in I'elation to business. Special 
emphasis upon the Federal Reserve System. (Norris.) 

Econ. 103 f. Corporation Finance (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 3 y. 

Principles of financing, the corporation and its status before the law, 
basis of capitalization, sources of capital funds, sinking funds, distribu- 
tion of surplus, causes of failures, reorganizations, and receiverships. 

(Layton.) 

*A. & F. 104 s. Investments (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Econ. 
3y. 

Principles of investment, analyzing reports, price determination, taxa- 
tion of securities, corporation bonds, civil obligations, real estate securi- 
ties, miscellaneous investments. Lectures, library assignments, and chart 
studies. (Wedeberg.) 

Econ. 105 f. Insurance (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Econ. 3 y. 

A survey of the major principles and practices of life and property in- 
surance with special reference to its relationship to our social and econom- 
ic life. (Daniels.) 

A. & F. 107 y. Business Law (6) — Three lectures. 

Legal aspects of business relationships, contracts, negotiable instru- 
ments, agencies, partnerships, corporations, real and personal property, 
and sales. (Layton.) 



* A. & F. — Accounting and Finance. 

34 



ECON. 109 f. Labor Problems (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Econ. 
3 y or Soc. 1 f. 

The background of labor problems; labor organizations; labor legisla- 
tion; unemployment and its remedies; wages, working conditions, and 
standards of living; agencies and programs for the promotion of indus- 
trial peace. (Reid.) 

A. & F. 110 y. Advanced Accounting (6) — Three lectures. Prerequi- 
site, A. & F. 9 y. 

A continuation of A. & F. 9y, with emphasis on the theory of account- 
ing. Special phases of corporation accounting are studied. The introduc- 
tion of accounting systems for manufacturing, commercial, and financial 
institutions. (Wedeberg.) 

EcON. 112 s. Inland Transporution (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 3 y or Eoon. 5 f or s. 

The development of inland means of transportation in the United States. 
This course is devoted largely to a survey of railway transportation. 
Some study is given to other transportation agencies. (Daniels.) 

Econ. 113 f. Public Utilities (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Econ. 
3 y. 

The development of public utilities in the United States, economic and 
legal characteristics, regulatory agencies, valuation, rate of return, and 
public ownership. (Layton.) 

Econ. 114 s. Public Finance (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Econ. 

3 y. 

The nature of public expenditures; sources of revenue; taxation and 
budget. Special emphasis on the practical, social and economic problems 
involved. (Layton.) 

Econ. 116 s. Principles of Foreign Trade (3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisites, Econ. 3 y, Econ. 1 f, and Econ. 2 s, or their equivalent. 

The basic principles of import and export trade, as influenced by the 
differences in methods of conducting domestic and foreign commerce. 

(Daniels.) 

Econ. 119 f. Advanced Economics (2) — Two lectui'es. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 3 y. 

An analysis of the theories of contemporary economists. Special at- 
tention is given to the problems of value and distribution. (Nichol.) 

EcON. 120 s. Applied Economics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Econ. 
119 f or consent of instructor. 

Current economic problems are studied from the viewpoint of the econ- 
omist. Lectures and class discussions based on assigned readings. 

(Nichol.) 

A. & F. 121 f. Cost Accounting (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Econ. 
109 y and consent of instructor. 

Process cost accounting; specific order cost accounting; manufacturing 
expense; application of accounting theory; preparation of analytical 
statements. (Cissel.) 

35 



A. & F. 122 s. Cost Accounting (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, A. 
& F. 121 f. 

A continuation of A. & F. 121 f. (Wedeberg.) 

A. & F. 123 f. Income Tax Accounting (3) — Three lectures. Prerequi- 
site, A. & F. 110 y or consent of instructor. 

Selected cases illustrating the definition of taxable income of individ- 
uals, corporations and partnerships. (Wedeberg.) 

A. & F. 126 s. Auditing (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, A. & F. 110 y 
or consent of instructor. 

Principles of auditing, including a study of different kinds of audits, 
the preparation of reports, and illustrative cases or problems. 

(Cissel, Wedeberg.) 

Courses for Graduates 

ECON. 201 y. Research (4-6) — Credit proportioned to work accom- 
plished. (Staff.) 

EcON. 203 f and s. Seminar (4) — Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Discussion of major problems in the field of economic theory, accounting 
or business. Presentation of reports based upon original investiga- 
tions. Designed for students in the Department of Economics and Busi- 
ness Administration. (Staff.) 

EcON. 205 y. History of Economic Doctrines (4). 

Development from classical antiquity, with discussions of the different 
schools of economics. Extensive readings, with student reports. (Nichol.) 

EcON. 207 y. The Economics of Alfred Marshall (6). 
A study of the life work of the greatest English economist of 
the past generation. (Nichol, ) 

EcON. 209 y. Mathematical Economics (6). (Not given in 1937-1938.) 
Applications of geometry, algebra, and calculus to economic theory. 

(Nichol.) 

EDUCATION 

A. History and Principles 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Ed. 101 f. History of Education: Greco-Roman, Medieval, and Early 
Modern Education (2). 

A survey of the evolution in Europe of educational theory, institutions, 
and practices from the Greco-Roman era to 1750. (Long.) 

Ed. 102 s. History of Modern Education (2)- — Continuation of Ed. lOlf. 

The survey of the modern period is directed to the creators of modem 
education and the bases on which modern educational systems have been 
founded in various countries. (Long.) 

Ed. 103 s. Principles of Secondary Education (3) — Prerequisites, Ed. 
Psych. 1 f , Ed. 5 s. 

Evolution of the high school; European secondary education; articula- 
tion of the high school with the elementary school, college, and technical 

36 



school, and with the community and the home; the junior high school; 
high school pupils; pi^ograms of study and the reconstruction of curricula; 
teaching staff; student activities. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 105 f. Educational Sociology I (3) — Three lectures. 

A study of education as social control and emergent life, with special 
emphasis upon the application of the recently developed concepts in mod- 
ern school procedures. (Cotterman.) 

Ed. 107 f. Comparative Education (Europe) (2). 

The forces that cause different systems of education, and the charac- 
teristic differences in the educational policies and practices in various 
countries are studied in this course. The major emphasis is upon the 
principal European countries. (Long.) 

Ed. 108 s. Comparative Education (Latin America) (2). 
The method of this course is similar to that of Ed. 107 f, the content 
being the education of the Latin area of the New World. (Long.) 

Ed. 110 f. The Junior High School (2). 

This course considers the functions of the junior high school in the 
American public school system. Its development, present organization, 
curricula, and relation to upper and lower grades will be emphasized. 

(Long.) 

Ed. Ill f. Lives of Scientists (2). 

A study of the major achievements and interesting incidents in the 
lives of the pioneers of science. Though designed especially to provide 
enrichment material for the use of high school teachers, the course is of 
general cultural value. (Brechbill.) 

R. Ed. 104 s. Rural Life and Education (3). (See Rural Life and Agri- 
cultural Education.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Ed. 200 f. Organization and Administration of Public Education (3). 

This course deals objectively with the organization, administration, 
curricula, and present status of public education in the United States. 

(Small.) 

Ed. 201 s. Educational Interpretations (3). 

In this course a study is made of the social, economic, political, and cul- 
tural environment in which American educational institutions and policies 
have developed; and of the function of education in environmental change. 

(Small.) 

Ed. 202 s. College Teaching (3) — Three lectures. 

Analysis of the work of the college teacher; objectives; organization of 
subject matter; nature of learning; characteristics of college students; 
methods of college teachers; measuring results; extra course duties; 
problems, investigations, reports. (Cotterman.) 

Ed. 204 s. High School Administration and Supervision (2). 

This course will consider the principal's duties in relation to organiza- 
tion for operation, administration, and supervision of instruction, and 
community relationships. (Long.) 

37 



Ed. 205 s. Educational Sociology II (3) — Three lectures. 

This course deals with education as social adjustment through an 
analytical consideration of the objectives in the American program of 
education, methods of determining educational objectives, and a brief 
survey of the ways in which education has been used as social adjust- 
ment in foreign countries. (Cotterman.) 

Ed. 206 s. History of American Education to 1840 (2). 

The development of the public school in America prior to 1840. 

(Long.) 
Ed. 250 y. Seminar in Education (2-4). 

Required of all candidates for the Master's degree whose majors are in 
the field of education. (Staff.) 

(For additional courses see Rural Life and Agricultural Education.) 

B. Educational Psychology 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Ed. Psych. 101s. Advanced Educational Psychology (3) — Prerequi- 
sites, Ed. Psych. 1 f , Ed. 5 s. The latter may be taken concurrently with 
Ed. Psych. 101 s. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

Principles of genetic psychology; nature and development of the human 
organism; development and control of instincts. Methods of testing intel- 
ligence; group and individual differences and their relation to educational 
practice. Methods of measuring rate of learning; study of typical learn- 
ing experiments. 

Ed. Psych. 102 f. Educational Measurements (3) — Prerequisites, Ed. 
Psych. If, Ed. 5 s. 

A study of typical educational problems involving educational scales 
and standard tests. Nature of tests, methods of use, analysis of results, 
and practical applications .in educational procedure. Emphasis will be 
upon tests for high school subjects. (Brechbill.) 

Psych. 106 s. Mental Hygiene (3). (See Psychology.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Ed. Psych. 200 f. Systematic Educational Psychology (3). 

An advanced course for teachers and prospective teachers. It deals 
with the major contributions of psychology to educational theory from 
Herbart to the present time. (Sprowls.) 

Ed. Psych. 250 y. Seminar. 

C. Methods in High School Subjects 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Graduate credit for courses in this section will be given only by special 
permission of the Department of Education. 

Ed. 120 s. English in the High School (2) — Prerequisite, Ed. Psych. 
If. 

Objectives in English in the different types of high schools; selection 
and organization of subject-matter in terms of modern practice and group 

38 



needs; evaluation of texts and references; bibliographies; methods of pro- 
cedure and types of lessons; the use of auxiliary materials; lesson plans; 
measuring results. (Smith.) 

Ed. 122 s. The Social Studies in the High School (2) — Prerequisite, 
Ed. Psych. If. 

Selection and organization of subject-matter in relation to the objectives 
and present trends in the social studies; texts and bibliographies; methods 
of procedure and tjpes of lessons; the use of auxiliarj' materials; lesson 
plans; measuring results. (Long.) 

Ed. 124 s. Modei~)i Language in the High School (2) — Prerequisite, 
Ed. Psych. If. 

Objectives of modern language teaching in the high school ; selection 
and organization of subject-matter in relation to modern practices and 
group needs; evaluation of texts and references; bibliographies; methods 
of procedure and types of lessons; lesson plans; special devices; measur- 
ing results. 

Ed. 126 s. Science in the High School (2) — Prerequisite, Ed. Psych. If. 

Objectives of science teaching; their relation to the general objectives 
of secondarj^ education; application of the principles of psychology and of 
teaching to the science class room situation; selection and organization 
of subject-matter; history, trends, and status; textbooks, reference works, 
and laboratory equipment. Technique of class room and laboratory; 
measurement, standardized tests; professional ox-ganizations and litera- 
ture; observation and criticism. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 128 s. Mathematics in the High School (2) — Prerequisite, Ed. 
Psych. If. 

Objectives; the place of mathematics in secondary education; content 
and construction of courses; recent trends; textbooks and equipment; 
methods of instruction, measurements and standardized tests; profes- 
sional organizations and literature ; observation and criticism. 

(Brechbill.) 

Ed. 130 f. High School Course of Study — Composition (2). 
Content and organization of the materials of wi*itten and oral composi- 
tion in the several high school grades. (Smith.) 

Ed. 131 s. High School Course of Study— Literature (2). 
Content and organization of the literature course in the several high 
school gi-ades. (Smith.) 

Ed. 135 f. High School Course of Study— Geometry (2). 
Content and organization of intuitive and demonstrative geometry. 
Methods of analysis and problem solving. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 136 f. High School Course of Study— Biology (2). 

Content and organization of biology. (Brechbill.) 

Ed. 137 s. High School Course of Study — Physical Science (2). 
Content and organization of physics. Some consideration is given to 
content of chemistry. (Brechbill.) 

39 



Ed. 139 f or s. Supervised Teaching of High School Subjects (2). 
Obsez-vation and supervised teaching. A minimum of 20 teaching peri- 
ods. (Staff.) 

D. Home Economics Education 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

H. E. Ed. 105 f or s. Special Problems, Child Study (5). 

(McNaughton.) 

Courses for Graduates 

H. E. Ed. 201 f or s. Advanced Methods of Teaching Home Economics 
(2-4). 
Study of social trends as applied to the teaching of home economics. 

H. E. Ed. 250 y. Seminar in Home Economics Education (2-4). (See 
Ed. 250 y.) (McNaughton.) 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Eng. 100 f and s. Advanced Composition (2) — Two lectures. Prereq- 
uisites, Eng 1 y and Eng. 2 y. Course complete in one semester, but 
may be taken a second semester for credit. 

Theory and practice in the larger forms, the types to be varied each 
semester at the election of the class. (Staff.) 

Eng. 101 f. College Grammar (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 

ly. 

studies in the descriptive grammar of modern English. (Harman.) 

Eng. 102 s. History of the English Language (3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Eng. 101 f . 

An historical survey of the English language; its nature, origin, and 
development, with special stress upon structural and phonetic changes 
in English speech and upon the rules which govern modern usage. 

(Harman.) 

Eng. 103 y. Anglo-Saxon (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 1 y. 

A study of Anglo-Saxon (Old English) grammar and literature. Lec- 
tures on the principles of phonetics and comparative philology. (House.) 

Eng. 104 y. Chaucer and Other Poetry of the llfth Century (4) — -Two 
lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng 2 y. 

A study of the principal poets and poems of England in the 14th cen- 
tury, including Chaucer, Langland, Gaivaine and the Green Knight, The 
Pearl, and early poems about Arthur. Chaucer and Langland will be 
read in the original; other works in modernized versions. (Hale.) 

Eng. 105 f. Medieval Drama in England (3) — Three lectures. Prereq- 
uisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 y. 

A study of the development of medieval English drama from its be- 
ginnings to 1540. Class discussion of significant plays, outside reading, 
reports. (Fitzhugh.) 

40 



Eng. 106 s. Elizabethan Drama (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisites, 
Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 y. 

A study of the change in spirit and form of English drama from 1540 
to 1640, as seen in the works of the important dramatists other than 
Shakespeare. Class discussion of significant plays, outside reading, re- 
ports. (Fitzhugh.) 

Eng. 107 f. Elizabethan Non-Dramatid Literature (3) — Three lectures. 
Prerequisites, Eng. ly and Eng. 2 y. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

Survey of the non-dramatic poetry and prose from 1.557 to 1600, with 
emphasis upon the sonnet cycle, the epic, and the beginnings of fiction. 

(Warfel.) 

Eng. 108 f. Milton (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and 2 y. 

A study of the poetry and the chief prose works. (Murphy.) 

Eng. 109 f. Literature of the Seventeenth Century to 1660 (3) — Three 
lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng 2 y. 

A study of the chief prose writers and of the Metaphysical and Cava- 
lier traditions in poetry. (Murphy.) 

Eng. 110 s. The Age of Dryden (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisites, 
Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 y. 

This course emphasizes the relation of literature to the philosophical 
movements of the age. (Murphy.) 

Eng. Ill f. Literature of the Eighteenth Century (2) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisites, Eng. ly and Eng. 2 y. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

Readings in the period dominated by Defoe, Swift, Addison, Steele, and 
Pope. (Fitzhugh.) 

Eng. 112 s. Literature of the Eighteenth Century (2) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisites, Eng. ly and Eng. 2 y. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

A continuation of Eng. Ill f. Dr. Johnson and his Circle; the Rise of 
Romanticism; the Letter Writers. (Fitzhugh.) 

*Eng. 113 f. Prose and Poetry of the Romantic Age (3) — Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 y. 

A study of the development of the Romantic movement in England as 
exemplified by the prose and poetry of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Lamb, De 
Quincey, Hazlitt, Lander, and others. (Hale.) 

*Eng. 114 s. Prose and Poetry of the Romantic Age (3) — Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 y. 

A study of the late Romantic writers, including Byron, Shelley, Keats, 
Moore, Scott, and others. 

Eng. 115 f. Scottish Poetry (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 
1 y and Eng. 2 y. No knowledge of the Scottish dialect required. 

Readings in the Scottish Chaucerians; Drummond of Hawthornden; 
song and ballad literature; poets of the vernacular revival: Ramsay, 
Ferguson, and Burns. Papers and reports. (Fitzhugh.) 



* Eng. 113 f and Eng. 114 s may be counted as Comparative Literature by students who 
have had Comp. Lit. 105 f and Comp. Lit. 106 s. 

41 



Eng. 116 f. Tennyson (2)- — Two lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. ly and 
Eng. 2 y. 

Wide reading of the poems, with detailed study of The Princess. 

(House.) 

Eng. 117s. Browning (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. ly and 
Eng. 2y. 

Study of selections from Browning other than the dramas. 

Eng. 119 f. The Letter as a Literary Type (2) — Two lectures. Pre- 
requisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 y. 

Beginning with the Paston letters, the course is designed as a study of 
English and American letters, with special attention to use and changes 
in prose style. (Lemon.) 

Eng. 120 f. The Novel (2) — -Two lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. ly and 
Eng. 2y. 

Lectures on the principles of narrative structure and style. Class re- 
views of selected novels, chiefly from English and American sources. 

(House.) 

Eng. 121s. The Novel (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. ly 
and Eng. 2 y. 

Continuation of Eng. 120 f. 

Eng. 122 f. English and American Essays (2) — Two lectures. Pre- 
requisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 y. 

A study of the philosophical, critical, and familiar essays of England 
and America. Bacon, Lamb, Macaulay, Emerson, Chesterton, and others. 

(House.) 

Eng. 123 f. Modern Drama (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisites, Eng. 
1 y and Eng. 2 y. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

A survey of English drama during the two centures from 1660 to 1860. 
Class discussion of significant plays, outside reading, reports. (Fitzhugh.) 

Eng. 124 s. Contemporary Drama (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisites, 
Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 y. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

A study of significant European and American dramatists from Ibsen 
to O'Neill. Class discussion of significant plays, outside reading, reports. 

(Fitzhugh.) 

Eng. 125 f. Emerson and American Transcendentalism (3) — Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 y. 

Study of the writings of the Concord group : Emerson, Thoreau, Haw- 
thorne, Parker, Alcott, and Margaret Fuller. (Warfel.) 

Eng. 126 s. Whitman, Twain, and the Rise of Realism (3) — Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 y. 

Intensive study of the writings of Whitman, Twain, the local colorists, 
and the early realists. (Warfel.) 

Eng. 127 f. Contemporary American Poetry and Prose (3) — Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisites, Eng. 1 y and Eng. 2 y. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 
Tendencies and forms in non-dramatic literature since 1920. (Warfel.) 



42 



Courses for Graduates 

Eng. 201. Research (2-4) — Credit proportioned to the amount of work 
and ends accomplished. 

Original research and the preparation of dissertations looking towards 
advanced degrees. (Staff.) 

Eng. 202 y. Beoimdf (4) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 103 y. 
(Not given in 1937-1938.) 

Critical study of grammar and versification, with some account of the 
legendary lore. (Harman.) 

Eng. 203 f. Middle English (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 
103 y. 

A study of readings of the Middle English period, with reference to 
etymology and syntax. (House.) 

Eng. 204 s. Gothic (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Eng. 103 y. 

A study of the forms and syntax, with readings from the Ulfilas 
Bible. Con-elation of Gothic speech sounds with those of Old English. 

(House.) 

Eng. 205 s. Browning's Dramas (2) — Two lectures. 

Luria, The Return of the Druses, Pippa Passes, Colombe's Birthday, A 
Blot in the 'Scutcheon, and others. (Not given in 1937-1938.) (House.) 

Eng. 206 f. Shakespeare Seminar (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Eng. 11 f and Eng. 12 s. 

A survey of Shakespeare's complete works, with special attention to 
major problems in Shakespeare. (Harman.) 

Eng. 207 y. Medieval Romance in England (4) — Two lectures. (Not 
given in 1937-1938.) 

Lectures and readings in the cyclical and non-cyclical romances in 
medieval England and their sources, including translations from the 
Old French. (Hale.) 

Eng. 208 f. Seminar in Eighteenth Century Literature (2) — Two ses- 
sions. 

Intensive study of one man's work or of one important movement of 
the century. (Fitzhugh.) 

Eng. 209 y. Seminar in American Literature (4) — Two sessions. 
Critical and biographical problems in nineteenth-century American 
literatui-e. (Warfel.) 

Eng. 210 y. Seminar in the Romantic Period (4) — One discussion peri- 
od of two hours. Prerequisites, Eng. 115 f and Eng. 116 s or an equiva- 
lent satisfactory to the instructor. 

Special studies of problems or persons associated with the Romantic 
movement. The subject-matter of the course will vary with the interests 
of the class. (Hale.) 

Eng. 211s. Victorian Prose (2) — Two lectures. 

English prose from about 1830. Study devoted chiefly to Carlyle, Mill, 
Arnold, Ruskin. (House.) 

43 



ENTOMOLOGY 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Ent. 101 y. Economic Entovwlogy (4) — Two lectures. (Not offered in 
1937-1938.) 

An intensive study of the problems of applied entomology, including 
life history, ecology, behavior, distribution, parasitism, and control. 

(Cory.) 

Ent. 102 y. Economic Entomology (4) — Two laboratories. (Not offered 
in 1937-1938.) 

Expansion of Ent. 101 y to include laboratory and field work in econom- 
ic entomology. (Cory.) 

Ent. 103 y. Seminar (2). 

Presentation of original work, book reviews, and abstracts of the more 
important literature. (Cory, Knight.) 

Ent. 104 y. Insect Pests of Special Groups (6) — Two lectures; one 
laboratory. Prerequisite, Ent. 1 f or s. 

A study of the principal insect pests of one or more of the following 
groups, founded upon food preferences and habitat. The course is in- 
tended to give the general student a comprehensive view of the insects 
that are of importance in his major field of interest, and detailed informa- 
tion to the student specializing in entomology. 

Insect Pests of: 1, Fruit; 2, Vegetables; 3, Flowers, both in the open 
and under glass; 4, Ornamental and shade trees; 5, Forests; 6, Field 
crops; 7, Stored products; 8, Live stock; 9, The household. (Cory.) 

Ent. 105 f. Medical Entomology (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Ent. 
1 f or s, and consent of instructor. 

The relation of insects to diseases of man, directly and as carriers of 
pathogenic organisms. Control of pests of man. The fundamentals of 
parasitology. (Knight.) 

Ent. 106 f or s. Insect Taxonomy (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
An advanced course dealing with the principles and practices under- 
lying modern systematic entomology. (Hyslop.) 

Ent. 107 s. Theory of Insecticides (2) — Two lectures. 

The development and use of contact and stomach poisons, with regard 
to their chemistry, toxic action, compatability, and foliage injury. Recent 
work with insecticides will be especially emphasized. (Ditman.) 

Ent. 109 s. Insect Physiology (2) — Two lectures; occasional demon- 
strations. Enrollment subject to consent of instructor. 

The functioning of the insect body with particular reference to blood, 
circulation, digestion, absoption, respiration, reflex action and the nerv- 
ous system, metabolism, and excretion. (Yeager.) 

Ent. Ill s. Coccidology (2) — Two laboratories. 

A study of morphology, taxonomy, and biology of the higher groups 
of the scale insects. The technique of preparation and microscopy are 
emphasized. Laboratory studies are supplemented by occasional lectures. 

(McConnell.) 

44 



Courses for Graduates 

Ent. 201. Advanced Enfoynology (1-3). 

Studies of minor problems in morphology, taxonomy, and applied ento- 
mology, with particular reference to preparation for individual research. 

(Cory.) 

Ent. 202 y. Research in Entomology. 

Advanced students having sufficient preparation, with approval of the 
head of the department, may undertake supervised research in morphol- 
ogy, taxonomy, or biology and control of insects. Frequently the students 
may be allowed to work on Station or State Horticultural Department 
projects. The student's work may form a part of the final report on the 
project and be published in bulletin form. A dissertation, suitable for 
publication, must be submitted at the close of the studies as a part of 
the requirements for an advanced degree. (Cory.) 

Ent. 203 f. Insect Morphology (2-4) — Two lectures, and laboratory 
work by special arrangement, to suit individual needs. 

Insect anatomy with special relation to function. Given particularly 
in preparation for work in physiology and other advanced studies. 

(Snodgrass.) 

Ent. 204 y. Ecoyiomic Entomology (6) — Three lectures. 

Studies of the principles underlying applied entomology, and the most 
significant advances in all phases of entomology. (Cory.) 

Ent. 205 s. Insect Ecology (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 

A study of the fundamental factors involved in the relationship of in- 
sects to their environment. Emphasis is placed on the insect as a dy- 
namic organism adjusted to the environment. (Langford.) 

GENETICS AND STATISTICS 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Gen. 101 f. Genetics (3) — Three lectures. 

A general course designed to give an insight into the principles of 
genetics or of heredity, and also to prepare students for later courses in 
the breeding of animals or of plants. (Kemp.) 

Gen. 102 s. Advanced Genetics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Gen. 
101 f . Alternate year course. 

A consideration of chromosome irregularities and other mutations, 
identity of the gene, inter-species crosses, genetic equilibrium, and the 
evolutionary aspects of genetics. (Kemp.) 

Gen. lllf. Statistics (2) — Two lectures. 

A study of the collection, analysis, interpretation, and presentation of 
statistics. The course includes a study of expressions of type, variability, 
correlation and regression, error and significance of differences. (Kemp.) 

Gen. 112 s. Advanced Statistics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Gen. 
Ill f or its equivalent. 

A study of the theory of error, measures of relationship, multiple and 
partial correlation, predictive formulas, curve fitting and an introduction 
to analysis of variance. (Kemp.) 

45 



Gen, 114 s. Elements of Statistics (3) — Three lectures. 

A study of the fundamental principles used in statistical investigation. 
The course includes a study of expressions of type, variability, correlation, 
regression, and error, together with the making of diagrams, graphs, 
charts, and tables. (Kemp.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Gen. 201 y. Crop Breeding — Credit determined by work accomplished. 

(Kemp.) 
Gen. 209 y. Research — Credit determined by work accomplished. 

(Kemp.) 

HISTORY 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

H. 101 y. Amejncan Colonial History (6) — Three lectures. Prerequi- 
site, H. 2y. 

A study of the political, social, and economic development of the Ameri- 
can people from the discovery of America through the formation of 
the Constitution. (Crothers.) 

H. 102 y. Recent American History (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
H. 2y. 

The history of national development from the close of the Civil War 
to the present time. (Thatcher.) 

H. 104 f. Social and Economic History of the United States (3) 
— Three lectures. Prerequisite, H. 2 y. 

An advanced course giving a synthesis of American life from 1607 to 
1790, (Crothers.) 

H. 105 s. Social and Economic History of the United States (3) — Three 
lectures. Prerequisite, H. 2 y. 

This course is similar to H. 104 f, and covers the period from 1790 to 
1860. (Crothers.) 

H. 106 s. Diplomatic History of the United States (2) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, H. 2 y. 

A study of American foreign policy. (Thatcher.) 

H. 107 s. Diplomatic History of the United States (2) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, H. 2y. 

A continuation of H. 106 f. (Thatcher.) 

H. 108 f. ConstitutionMl History of the United States (3) — Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, H. 2 y. 

A study of the historical forces resulting in the formation of the Con- 
stitution and of the development of American constitutionalism in theory 
and practice thereafter. (Thatcher.) 

H. 109 s. Constitutional History of the United States (3) — Three lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, H. 2 y. 

A continuation of H. 108 f. (Thatcher.) 

46 



H. 110 f. History of the United States, 1790-1865 (2) — Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, H. 2 y. 

The history of national development to the end of the Civil War. 

(Thatcher.) 

H. Ills. History of the United States, 1790-1865 (2)— Two lectures. 
Prerequisite, H. 2 y. 

A continuation of H. 110 f. (Thatcher.) 

H. 115y. Medieval Civilization (4) — Two lectures. Pi-erequisite, H. 1 y. 

The cultural, institutional, economic, and political development of 
Europe from the decline of the Roman Empire to the opening of the 
fourteenth century. (VoUbrecht.) 

H. 117 f. Renaissance and Reformation (2) — Two lectures. Prerequi- 
site, H. 1 y. 

A detailed study of movements and leaders as vital factors in the 
transition from medieval to modern times. (VoUbrecht.) 

H. 118 s. Renaissance and Reformation (2) — Two lectures. Prerequi- 
site, H. 1 y. 

A continuation of H. 117 f. (VoUbrecht.) 

H. 119 f. Revolutionary and Napoleonic Europe (2). Prerequisite, 
H. ly. 

The course deals with the French Revolution and the relations of revo- 
lutionary France with the rest of Europe. (Silver.) 

H. 120 s. Revolutionary and Napoleonic Europe (2). Prerequisite, 
H. ly. 

A continuation of H. 119 f. (Silver.) 

H. 121 i. Expansion of Europe (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, H. 

ly. 

A treatment of European history from the Crusades to the present, 
emphasizing- especially the expansion of national states. (Silver.) 

H. 122 s. Expansion of Europe (3) — -Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
H. ly. 

A continuation of H. 121 f. (Silver.) 

H. 123 f. Diplomatic History of Europe since 1871 (3) — Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, H. 1 y. 

A study of European alliances and alignments. World politics and im- 
perialism in the pre-World War period, and developments since the World 
War. (VoUbrecht.) 

H. 124 s. Diplomatic History of Europe since 1871 (3) — Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, H. 1 y. 

A continuation of H. 123 f. (VoUbrecht.) 

H. 125 f. Constitutional History of England (3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, H. 1 y or H. 3 y. 

This course traces the historical development of English political insti-- 
tutions. (Silver.) 

47 



H. 126 s. Constitutional History of England (3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, H. 1 y or H. 3 y. 

A continuation of H. 125 f. (Silver.) 

H. 127 {. Europe since 1815 (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, H. 1 y. 
(Not given in 1937-1938.) 

An intensive course in European history from 1815 to the present 

time. (Vollbrecht.) 

H. 128 s. Europe since 1815 (3)^Three lectures and assignments. 
Prerequisite, H. 1 y. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

A continuation of H. 127 f. (Vollbrecht.) 

Courses for Graduates 

H. 200. Research (2-4). Credit proportioned to the amount of work. 

(Staff.) 

H. 201 y. Seminar in American History (4) — Conferences and reports 

on related topics. (Crothers.) 

H. 202 y. Bibliography and Historical Criticism (4). (Staff.) 

HOME ECONOMICS 

A. Foods and Nutrition 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

H. E. 131 f. Nutrition (3) — Three recitations. Prerequisites, H. E. 
Sly and Elements of Organic Chemistry (Chem. 12 Ay.) 

Nutritive value, digestion and assimilation of foods. (Welsh.) 

H. E. 132 s. Nutrition (3) — Two recitations; one laboratory. Prereq- 
uisite, H. E. 131 f. 

Selection of food to promote health; special diets. (Welsh.) 

H. E. 133 f. Demonstrations (2) — Two laboratories. 

Practice in demonstrations. (Welsh.) 

H. E. 134s. Advanced Foods (3) — One recitation; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, H. E. 31 y. 

Advanced study of manipulation of food material. (Welsh.) 

H. E. 135 f. Problems and Practice in Foods (5). 

Experimental foods. (Welsh.) 

H. E. 136 s. Child Nutrition (2) — Two recitations. 
Lectures, discussions and field trips relating to the principles of child 
nutrition. (Welsh.) 

Courses for Graduates 

H. E. 201 f or s. Seminar in Nutj-ition (3). 

Oral and written reports on assigned readings in the current literature 
of nutrition. Preparation and pi'esentation of reports on special topics. 

(Staff.) 

48 



H. E. 202 f or s. Research. Credits to be determined by amount and 
quality of work done. 

With the approval of the head of the department, students may pursue 
an original investigation in some phase of foods. The results may form 
the basis of a thesis for an advanced degree. (Welsh.) 

H. E. 203 f or s. Advanced Experimental Foods (3) — One recitation; 
two laboratories. (Welsh.) 

B. Textiles and Clothing 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

H. E. 112s. Special Clothing Problems (3) — One recitation; two lab- 
oratories. Prerequisite, H. E. Ill f. 

Each student selects an individual clothing study. (Westney.) 

H. E. 113 f. Problems and Practice in Textiles and Clothing (5) — Pre- 
requisite, H. E. Ill f. 

Opportunity for experience and study in laboratories or museums. 

(McFarland.) 

H. E. 114f ors. Advanced Textiles (3) — Two recitations; one labora- 
tory. 

Advanced study of textiles; historic textiles; economic phases of the 
textile industry which affect the consumer. (Westney.) 

C. Art 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

H. E. 121 y. History of Architecture and Interior Decoration (6) — Two 
recitations; one laboratory. Prerequisite, H. E. 21 f. 

Study of historic styles of achitecture and period furniture; their 
adaptation and use in modern architecture and furniture. 

Historic designs of rugs, tapestries, draperies, etc. ; their use in interi- 
or decoration and influence upon modern textile design. Application of 
the principles of design, line-proportion, color, harmony, balance, rhythm, 
emphasis, to interior decoration. (Murphy.) 

H. E. 122 Si Applied Art (1)— One laboratory. 

Application of the principles of design and color to practical problems. 

(Murphy.) 

D. Home Economics Seminar 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

H. E. 161 s. Semiyiar (3) — Three recitations. 

Book reviews and abstracts from scientific papers and bulletins relat- 
ing to Home Economics, together with criticisms and discussions of the 
work presented. (Staff.) 



49 



HORTICULTURE 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

HORT. 101 f. Commercial Fruit Growing (3) — Two lectures; one labor- 
atory. Prerequisite, Hort. 1 f. Given in alternate years. (Not given in 
1938-1939.) 

The proper management of commercial orchards in Maryland. Ad- 
vanced work is taken up on the subject of orchard culture, orchard fertil- 
ization, pollination, pruning, thinning, spraying, spray removal, picking, 
packing, marketing and storing of fruits; orchard by-products; orchard 
heating and orchard economics. (Schrader.) 

HORT. 102 f. Economic Fruits of the World (2) — Two lectures. Prereq- 
uisite, Hort. If. Given in alternate years. (Not given in 1938-1939.) 

A study is made of the botanical, ecological, and physiological charac- 
teristics of all species of fruit-bearing plants of economic importance, such 
as the date, pineapple, fig, olive, banana, nut-bearing trees, citrus fruits 
and newly introduced fruits, with special references to their cultural 
requirements in certain parts of the United States and the insular posses- 
sions. All fruits are discussed in this course which have not been dis- 
cussed in a previous course. (Haut.) 

Hort. 103 f. Ttiber and Root Crops (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 
Prerequisites, Hort. 11 s and 12 f. Given in alternate years. (Not given 
in 1938-1939.) 

A study of white potatoes and sweet potatoes, considering seed varie- 
ties, propagation, soils, fertilizers, planting, cultivation, spraying, har- 
vesting, storing and marketing. (Frazier.) 

Hort. 104 s. Advanced Truck Crop Production (1). Prerequisites, 
Hort. 11 s, 12 f, and 13 s. Given in alternate years. (Not given in 1938- 
1939.) 

A detailed study of some of the more important problems encountered 
in the commercial production of truck crops. A thorough study is made 
of recent literature pertaining to such problems as soil acidity, soil or- 
ganic matter relationships, new developments in insect and disease con- 
trol, plant production and transplanting, etc. (Frazier.) 

Hort. 105 f. Systematic Olericulture (3) — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisites, Hort. lis and 103 f. Given in alternate years. 
(Not given in 1937-1938.) 

A study of the classification and nomenclature of vegetables. Descrip- 
tion of varieties and adaptation of varieties to different environmental 
conditions. (Frazier.) 

Hort. 106 y. Plant Materials (5) — One lecture; one or two laboratories. 
Given in alternate years. (Not given in 1938-1939.) 

A field and laboratory study of trees, shrubs, and vines used in orna- 
mental planting. (Thurston.) 

Hort. 107 f. Systematic Pomology (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Given in alternate years. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

The history, botany, and classification of fruits and their adaptation 

50 



to Maryland conditions. Exercises are given in describing and identify- 
ing the leading commercial varieties of fruits. (Haut.) 

Courses for Graduates 

HORT. 201 y. Experimental Pomology (6) — Three lectures. 

A systematic study of the sources of knowledge and opinion as to 
practices in pomology; methods and difficulties in experimental woi'k in 
pomology and results of experiments that have been or are being conduct- 
ed in all experiment stations in this and other countries. (Schrader.) 

HORT. 202 y. Experimental Olericulture (6) — Three lectures. 
A systematic study of the sources of knowledge and opinion as to prac- 
tices in vegetable growing; methods and difficulties in experimental work 
in vegetable production and results of experiments that have been or are 
being conducted in all experiment stations in this and other countries. 

(Frazier.) 

HORT. 204 s. Methods of Research (2) — One lecture; one laboratory. 

Special drill will be given in the making of briefs and outlines of re- 
search problems, in methods of procedure in conducting investigational 
work, and in the preparation of bulletins and reports. A study of the 
origin, development, and growth of horticultural research is taken up. 
A study of the research problems being conducted by the Department of 
Horticulture will be made, and students will be required to take notes 
on some of the experimental work in the field and become familiar with 
the manner of filing and cataloging all experimental work. (Staff.) 

HORT. 205 y. Advajiced Horticultural Research (4, 6 or 8). 

Graduate students will be required to select problems for original re- 
search in pomology, vegetable gardening, floriculture, or landscape gar- 
dening. These problems will be continued until completed, and final re- 
sults will be published in the form of a thesis. (Staff.) 

HORT. 206 y. Advanced Horticultural Seminar (2). 

This course will be required of all graduate students. Students will 
be required to give reports either on special topics assigned them, or on 
the progress of their work being done in courses. Members of the de- 
partmental staff will report special research work from time to time. 

(Staff.) 

MATHEMATICS 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

(Courses Math. 101s, Ills, 112 s, 114 f, 115 f, and 140 y are taught 
every year; all other courses are given; in alternate years.) 

Math. 101 f. Mathematical Theory of Investment (3)— Three lectures. 
Prerequisite, Math. 11 f or 8 f . 

Application of mathematics to financial transactions; compound in- 
terest and discount; construction and use of interest tables; sinking 
funds; annuities; depreciation, valuation, and amortization of securities; 
building and loan associations; life insurance, etc. (Spann.) 

51 



Math. Ill f. Elementary Mathematics from an Advanced Standpoint 
(2) — Two lectures. 

A survey course in high school mathematics intended for workers in 
biological and social sciences, and for prospective teachers of mathe- 
matics and physics. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 112 s. College Mathematics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. Ill f or 8 f , or equivalent high school courses. 

A survey course of algebra, trigonometry, analytic geometry, and the 
calculus, intended for workers in the biological sciences and for pros- 
pective teachers of mathematics and physics. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 114 f. Differential Equations for Engineers (3) — Three lectures. 

This course is conducted in close cooperation with the College of Engi- 
neering, and deals with aspects of mathematics which arise in engi- 
neering theory and practice. Among the topics treated are the following: 
linear differential equations; advanced methods in kinematics and dy- 
namics; applications of analysis to electrical circuits, to aero-dynamics, 
bridge-design, etc. (Martin.) 

Math. 115 s. Applied Calcidns for Chemists (3) — Three lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Math. 16 y. 

This course is conducted in close co-operation with the Chemistry De- 
partment, and deals with the aspects of mathematics which arise in the 
theory and practice of chemistry. Among the topics treated are the 
following: partial and total derivatives; applications of mathematical 
analysis to thermo-dynamics, to molecular and atomic phenomena, and 
to physical chemistry. (Yates.) 

Math. 121s. Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics (2) — Two lec- 
tures. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

Foundations of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and analysis. The evo- 
lution of such concepts as number, limit, continuity, and infinity; the 
axioms of geometry; spatial forms and measurement; the concepts of 
space, time, and matter, leading up to the theory of relativity. 

(Martin.) 

Math. 122 s. History of Mathematics (2) — Two lectures. 

History of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, the calculus, and the theory 
of functions, from the period of classical Greece to modern times. 

(Dantzig.) 

Math. 123 f. Theory of Equations (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. 16 y. 

Symmetric functions; eliminations; the fundamental theorem of alge- 
bra; algebraic solution of equations; the Galois theory; asymptotic solu- 
tions of equations. (Taliaferro.) 

Math. 124 s. Theory of Numbers (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. 16 y. 

Linear congruences, continued fi-actions and diophantine equations; 
criteria of primality; quadratic residues; higher congruences; the Prob- 
lem of Fermat. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 125 f. Plane Curves (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 
16 y. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

52 



Infinitesimal properties of plane curves; contact and osculation; asym- 
potes and singular points; algebraic curves; polarity; the Plucker char- 
acters of a curve; cubic and quartic curves. (Alrich.) 

Math. 126 s. Analytical Geowetry in Space (2) — Two lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Math. 16 y. 

Point, plane, and line; line geometry; quadratic surfaces; twisted 
cubics; algebraic curves and surfaces; many-dimensional geometry. 

(Alrich.) 

Math. 127 f. Advanced Topics in Calculus (2) — Two lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Math. 16 y. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

Evaluation of definite integrals; expansion into series; line and sur- 
face integrals; the theorems of Green and Stokes; diff"erential equations, 
existence theorems. (Martin.) 

Math. 128 s. Advanced Differential Equations (2) — Two lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Math. 16 y. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

Existence theorems ; integration in series ; asymptotic solutions ; general 
theory of linear equations; ordinary diff'erential equations of the second 
order; singular solutions; elements of partial differential equations. 

(Martin.) 

Math. 129 f. Non-Euclidean Geometry (2) — Two lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Math. 16 y. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

Evolution of geometrical ideas; the axioms of geometry; theory of 
parallels; projective approach to geometries of Lobachevsky and Rie- 
mann; the Cayley-Klein theoi-y; the problem of space and the theory of 
relativity. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 130 f. Modern Algebra (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Math. 
16 y. 

Sets, groups, and extension of groups; polynomials; rings and fields; 
general theory of ideals; polynomial ideals; elements of algebraic geom- 
etry. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 131s. Analytical Mechanics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. 16 y and Math. 126 s. 

Kinematics; the dynamics of a particle; statics; the principles of 
D'Alembert; the dynamics of a system; the equations of Lagrange and 
Jacoby; the principle of Hamilton. (Yates.) 

Math. 132 s. Theory of Probabilities (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. 16 y. 

Frequency and probability; the concept of "equally likely"; combina- 
torial analysis; addition and multiplication theorems; frequency of dis- 
tribution; continuous probabilities; applications to statistics, theories of 
errors and correlations, and to molecular theories. (Yates.) 

Math. 133 y. Famous Mathematical Problems (2) — One lecture. Pre- 
requisites, Math. 16 y and Math. 17 y. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

Prime numbers; the problem of Fermat; trisection of angles; regular 
polygons and kindred problems; squaring the circle; transcendentality 
of pi and e; famous integi^als; maxima and minima; probability prob- 
lems; the three-body problem. (Dantzig.) 

53 



Math. 134 y. Advanced Algebra (2) — -One lecture. Prerequisites, Math. 
16 y and Math. 17 y. 

Determinants. Theory of elimination. Inequalities. Continued frac- 
tions. Combinatorial analysis. Algebraic solution of equations. Expan- 
sions and summations. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 135 s. College Geometry (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Math. 15 s and Math 18 y. 

Geometry of the triangle. Systems of circles. Ruler-compass con- 
struction. Linkages. Rollers and i-oulettes projection. General theory 
of conies. Properties of plane cubics and quartics. Twisted cubics. 

(Yates.) 

Courses for Graduates 

(With the exception of the Graduate Seminar, Math. 240 y, all the 
courses listed below are taught in alternate years.) 

Math. 221 f. Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable (2) — Two lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, Math. 127 f. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

Cauchy-Riemann conditions; power series and infinite products; con- 
formal mapping; the Cauchy integral theory; residues and periods; uni- 
form functions; analytical continuation. (Martin.) 

Math. 221s. Theory of Functions of a Real Variable (2) — Two lec- 
tures. Prerequisites, Math. 16 y and Math. 121 s. 

Logical development of the concept of number; aggregates, point-sets; 
convergence, limit; continuous and discontinuous functions; differentia- 
tion and generalized integration. (Martin.) 

Math. 223 s. Vectors and Matrices (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. 123 f. 

Scalars, vectors, matrices, and determinants; transformations; linear 
dependence; canonical forms; elementary divisors; applications to geom- 
etry and quantum theory. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 224 f. Algebraic Geometry (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Math. 16 y and Math. 125 f. 

Bi-rational transformations; invariants of algebraic curves and sur- 
faces; residuation; genus. (Alrich.) 

Math. 225 f. Projective Geometry (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Math. 125 f and Math. 126 s. 

The postulates of geometry; metric and descriptive properties; the 
principle of duality; the group of collineations; projective equivalence; 
projective theory of curves; projective differential geomtery; non-Eucli- 
dean geometry. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 226 s. Infinitesimal Geometry (2) — Two lectures. Prerequi- 
sites, Math. 16 y, Math. 125 f, and Math. 126 s. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

Principles of vector analysis; skew curves and surfaces; curvature, 
asymptotic lines and geodesies; triple orthogonal systems; the problem 
of space structure. (Dantzig.) 

54 



Math. 227 f. Infinite Processes (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Math. 127 f and Math. 128 s. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

Critei'ia of convergence for series and products; continued fractions; 
trigonometric series; series of polynomials; orthogonal functions; func- 
tions defined by pow^er series. (Martin.) 

Math. 228 s. Elliptic Functions (2)— Two lectures. Prerequisite, 
Math. 221 f . 

The theories of Legendre and Jacoby; the Weierstrass theory; doubly 
periodic functions; elliptic integrals; applications to algebra, geometry, 
and mechanics. (Yates.) 

Math. 229 f. Calculus of Variations (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Math. 127 f and Math. 128 s. 

Classical problems; the conditions of Euler; the Weierstrass theory; 
strong and weak minima; case of extremals with variable endpoints; 
extension of multiple integrals. (Martin.) 

Math. 230 s. Continuous Grouj)s of Transformations (2) — Two lec- 
tures. Prerequisites, Math. 126 s and Math. 223 s. 

Correspondence; transformation; semi-groups and groups; invariants; 
the Lie theory of groups; infinitesimal transformations; contact trans- 
formations; applications to diff"erential equations and to geometry. 

(Dantzig.) 

Math. 231 s. Partial Differential Equations ivith Applications to Mathe- 
viatical Physics (2) — Two lectures. Prei'equisites, Math. 127 f and Math. 
128 s. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

Partial differential equations of the first and second order; linear 
equations; total differential equations; equations of the Monge- Ampere 
type; the Laplace equation; harmonics; applications to electricity, heat, 
elasticity, and hydrodynamics; potential theory. (Yates.) 

Math. 232 s. The Theory of Relativity (2) — Two lectures. Prerequi- 
sites, Math. 226 s and Math. 131 f. 

History of the pi'oblem of relativity; the Maxwell equations; special 
theory of relativity; elements of tensor analysis; the general theory of 
relativity. (Dantzig.) 

Math. 233 s. Analytical Dynamics (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Math. 131 s and 221 f . 

Classical problems in celestial mechanics; the potential; stability of 
orbits; the restricted problems of three bodies. Textbook: Whittaker, 
Analytical Dynamics. (Martin.) 

Math. 240 y. Graduate Seminar (2) — One session. 

Required for all graduate students. Intended as a clearing house of 
problems arising in the graduate courses. Reports on progress on dis- 
sertations and critical discussion of results achieved. 

(Dantzig, Yates, Martin.) 



55 



MODERN LANGUAGES 
A. French 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

French 102 y. Ft ench Literature of the Seventeenth Century (4) — Two 
lectures. (Not given in 1937-1938.) (Wilcox.) 

French. 103 y. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century (4) — 
Two lectures. (Falls.) 

French. 104 y. French Literature of the Nineteenth Century (4) — Two 
lectures. (Wilcox.) 

French 105 y. French Literature of the Tweiitieth Century (4) — Two 
lectures. (Not given in 1937-1938.) (Liotard.) 

French 110 y. Advanced Composition (6) — Three lectures. Prerequi- 
site, French 9 y. (Falls.) 

French 120. Conference Course in Reading (2-4). 

This course proposes: (1) to fix the attention of the student upon his 
field of concentration as a whole rather than upon the detailed knowl- 
edge of the subject-matter of such courses as he has taken in the field; 
(2) to develop in the student the ability to read independently. Confer- 
ences with qualified members of the department take the place of formal 
lectures. 

Courses for Graduates 

French 201 y. Research. Credits determined by work accomplished. 

French 202 y. Diderot and the Encyclopaedists (4) — Two lectures. 
(Not given in 1937-1938.) (Falls.) 

French 203 y. Asp)ects and Conceptions of Nature in French Litera- 
ture of the Eighteenth Century (4) — Two lectures. (Not given in 1937- 
1938.) (Falls.) 

French 204 y. Georges Duhamel, Poet Dramatist, Novelist (4) — Two 
lectures. (Falls.) 

French 205 y. French Literature of the Middle Ages and the Renais- 
sance (4) — Two lectures. (Not given in 1937-1938.) (Darby.) 

French 210 y. Seminar (2-4) — One meeting weekly. Required of all 
graduate students in French. 

Attention is also called to Comparative Literature 105 f , Romanticistn 
in France. 

B. German 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

German 101 f. German Literature of the Eighteenth Century (3) — 
Three lectures. 

The earlier classical literature. (Prahl.) 

56 



German 102 s. German Literature of the Eighteenth Century (3) — 
Three lectures. 

The later classical literature. (Prahl.) 

German 103 f. German Literature of the Nineteenth Century (3) — 
Three lectures. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

Romanticism in Young Germany. (Prahl.) 

German 104 s. German Literature of the Nineteenth Century (3) — 
Three lectures. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

The literature of the Empire. (Prahl.) 

German 120. Conference Course in Reading (2-4). 

This course proposes: (1) to fix the attention of the student upon his 
field of concentration as a whole rather than upon the detailed knowl- 
edge of the subject-matter of such courses as he has taken in the field; 
(2) to develop in the student the ability to read independently. Confer- 
ences with qualified members of the departement take the place of formal 
lectures. 

Courses for Graduates 

German 201 y. Research. Credits determined by work accomplished. 

German 202 y. The Modern German Drama (4)— Two lectures. 

Study of the naturalistic, neo-romantic, and expressionistic drama 
against the background of Ibsen and other international figures. 

(Prahl.) 

German 203 y. Schiller (4)— Two lectures. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

Study of the life and works of Schiller with special emphasis on the his- 
tory of his dramas. (Prahl.) 

German 210 y. Se^ninar (2-4) — One meeting weekly. Required of all 
graduate students in German. 

Attention is called to Comparative Literature 106 s, Romanticism in 
Germany. 

C. Spanish 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Spanish 101 f. Spanish Poetry (3) — Three lectures. (Not given in 
1937-1938.) 

The epic, the ballad and popular poetry, early lyrics, poetry of the 
Golden Age. (Darby.) 

Spanish 102 s. Spanish Poetry (3) — Three lectures. (Not given in 
1937-1938.) 

Continuation of Spanish 101 f. Poetry of the 18th, 19th, and 20th 

centui'ies. (Darby.) 

Spanish 103 f. The Spanish Drama (3) — Three lectures. (Not given 
in 1937-1938.) 

The drama of the Golden Age. (Darby.) 

Spanish 104 s. The Spanish Drama (3) — Three lectures. (Not given 
in 1937-1938.) 

Contiuation of Spanish 103 f. The drama since Calderon. (Darby.) 

57 



Spanish 107 f. The Spanish Novel (3) — Three lectures. 
Somewhat simplified, edited texts of classical novels and short stories 
of the Golden Age will be used. (Darby.) 

Spanish 108 s. The Spanish Novel (3) — Three lectures. 

Continuation of Spanish 107 f . Reading of some modern novels. 

(Darby.) 

Spanish 120. Conference Course in Reading (2-4). 

This course proposes: (1) to fix the attention of the student upon his 
field of concentration as a whole rather than upon the detailed knowl- 
edge of the subject-matter of such courses as he has taken in the field; 
(2) to develop in the student the ability to read independently. Confer- 
ences with qualified members of the department take the place of formal 
lectures. 

Courses for Graduates 

Spanish 201 y. Research Credits determined by work accomplished. 

Spanish 202 y. The Golden Age in Spanish Literature (6) — Three lec- 
tures. 

Detailed study of the classical authors. (Darby.) 

Spanish 203 y. Cervantes (6) — Three lectures. (Not given in 1937- 
1938.) 

The life and times of Cervantes; principal prose works. (Darby.) 

Spanish 210 y. Seminar (2-4) — One meeting weekly. Required of all 
graduate students in Spanish. 

PHILOSOPHY 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Phil. 101 f. Systems of Philosophy (3) — Three hours. Lectures, re- 
ports and discussions. Prerequisite, two courses in philosophy, and the 
permission of the instructor. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

The system of one philosopher, or the development of one movement, 
will be studied throughout the semester. The topic will be changed from 
semester to semester, although after three or four semesters the same 
system may be chosen again. Not more than nine credits allowed to any 
one student. (Marti.) 

Phil. 102 s. Systems of Philosophy (3) — Thi-ee hours of lectures, 
student reports, and discussion. Prerequisite, two courses in philosophy 
and the permission of the instructor. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 
Continuation of Phil. 101 f. (Marti.) 

Phil. 103 f. Systems of Philosophy— F. W. J. Schelling, 1775-185^ (3) 
— Three hours of lectures, student reports, and discussion. Prerequisite, 
two courses in philosophy and the permission of the instructor. Continu- 
ation of Phil. 101 f. (Marti.) 

Phil. 104 s. Systems of Philosophy — Charles Sanders Pierce, 1839- 
19H (3) — Three hours of lectures, student reports, and discussion. Pre- 
requisite, two courses in philosophy and the permission of the instructor. 
Continuation of Phil. 101 f. (Marti.) 

58 



PHYSICS 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Phys. 101 f. Precision of Measurevietits (3) — Three lectures. Prereq- 
uisites, Phys. 1 y or 2 y and Math. 5 y or 6 y. 

A discussion of the principles underlying the treatment of experimental 
data, as to precision of observations, errors, interpolation, curve analysis, 
etc., with special emphasis on the planning of investigations involving 
measurements. The course is intended as an intx'oduction to quantitative 
experimental work. (Eichlin.) 

Phys. 102 s. Quantitative Physical Measurements (3) — Two lectures; 
one laboratory. Prerequisite, Phys. 101 f. 

This course, supplementing Phys. 101 f , is designed to familiarize the 
student with the manipulaton of various types of apparatus used in ex- 
perimentation in physical problems, and the adaptation and analysis of 
data so obtained. (Eichlin.) 

Phys. 103 y. Advanced Physics (6) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, 
Phys. ly. 

This course, supplementing Phys. 1 y, is an advanced study of physical 
phenomena in optics, spectroscopy, conduction of electricity through gases, 
photoelectricity, etc., with a comprehensive review of basic principles in- 
volved. It is intended to familiarize the student in a general survey with 
some of the recent developments in physics. (Dickinson.) 

Phys. 104 y. Advanced Experiments (6) — One lecture; two laboratories. 
Prerequisite, Phys. 103 y. 

This course, supplementing Phys. 1 y, is intended to provide the student 
with experience in experimental physics. (Dickinson.) 

Phys. 105 f. Heat and Thermodynamics (3) — Two lectures; one lab- 
oratory. Prerequisite, Phys. 2 y. 

The classical phenomena of heat and radiation are developed on 
the basis of the kinetic molecular theory and the quantum theory. 
The first and second laws of the thermodynamics are applied to physical 
processes. (Dickinson.) 

Phys. 106s. Theoretical Mechanics (3)— Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, Phys. 2 y. 

An analytical treatment of the fundamental principles of kinematics and 
dynamics is presented with problems and laboratory exercises to illus- 
trate these principles. The use of generalized cooi'dinates is illustrated. 
The equations of Lagrange are applied to selected topics in the field of 
dynamics. (Dickinson.) 

Phys. 107 f. Optics (3) — -Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite, 
Phys. 2y. 

A study is made of selected topics in the refraction, reflection, inter- 
ference, diffraction and polarization of light. The principles are employed 
on a detailed study of optical systems of telescope, microscope, spectro- 
scope and interferometer. (Dickinson.) 

59 



Phys. 108 s. Electricity and Magnetism (3) — Two lectures; one lab- 
oratory. Prerequisite, Phys. 2 y. 

A study is made of elementary and mathematical theory of electro- 
statics, magnetostatics, magnetism, electrical currents, etc. 

An experimental study of electrical instruments and their use in physi- 
cal measurements is included. (Dickinson.) 

Phys. 109 y. Electric Discharge (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. 
Prerequisites, at least two courses of the 105 f-108 s group. (Not given 
in 1937-1938.) 

The discrete nature of matter, electricity and radiation is emphasized 
from an empirical point of view. The determination of the fundamental 
electronic and molecular constants is treated in detail. The process of 
electrical discharge through gas and vacuum is ramified to include dis- 
cussion of radioactivity, photoelectricity, thermionics and atomic struc- 
ture. 

Courses for Graduates 

Phys. 201 f. Atomic Structure (3) — Three lectures. 

Development of theories on the structure of the atom through dis- 
cussion of optical and X-ray spectra, atomic models as applied to the 
periodic table, and related topics. (Eichlin.) 

Phys. 202 s. Advanced Spectroscopy (3) — Three lectures. Prerequi- 
site, 201 f. 

A continuation of Physics 201 f. (Eichlin.) 

Phys. 203 f. Quantum Theory (3) — Three lectures. 

Discussion of the application of the principles of the quantum theory 
to black body radiation, spectroscopy, collision processes, valence, etc. 

(Eichlin.) 

Phys. 204 s. Nuclear Physics (3) — Three lectures. 

Discussion of the constitution of the nucleus, natural radioactivity 
disintegration processes, neuti'on, position, nuclear energy states, artifi- 
cial disintegration, etc. (Eichlin.) 

Phys. 205 f and 206 s. Fiaidamental Concepts of Modern Physics (6) 
—Three lectures. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

Comprehensive surveys of the history of physics; the electromagnetic 
theory of radiation; interaction of radiation and matter; introduction to 
the quantum mechanics. 

Phys. 207 f. Electrodynamics (3) — Three lectures. (Not given in 1937- 
1938.) 

A mathematical study of electrostatics and electromagnetics with ap- 
plication to diffraction, dispersion, electro- and magneto-optics. 

Phys. 208 s. Physical Optics (3) — Three lectures. 

A mathematical study of the electromagnetic theory of light with ap- 
plications to interference, diffraction, dispersion, polarization. 

Phys. 209 y. Seminar (2). 

Presentation of reports and discussion of current developments in phys- 
ics and of original investigations on special problems. (Staff.) 

60 



Phys. 210 y. Research. 

The investigation of special problems in physics. (Staff.) 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Pol. Sci. 101 f. International Law (3) — Three lectures. 
A study of the principles governing international intercourse in time 
of peace as well as war, as illustrated in texts and. cases. (Steinmeyer.) 

Pol. Sci. 102 s. Intei-national Relations (3) — Three lectures. 
A study of the nature and importance of international relations; un- 
derlying problems ; agencies of control ; development of international or- 
ganizations. (Steinmeyer.) 

Pol. Scl 103 f. Current Problems in Goveimment (2) — Two lectures. 

This course deals with the governmental problems of international 
character, such as the causes of war, neutrality, propaganda, etc. Course 
is conducted by lectures and discussion method, with students required to 
report on readings from current literature. (Steinmeyer.) 

Pol. Scl 104 s. Current Problems in Government (2) — Two lectures. 

This course is conducted along lines similar to Pol. Sci. 103 f . Course 
deals with domestic problems of the government of the United States. 

(Lasson.) 

Pol. Scl 105 f. Constitutional Law (3) — Three lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Pol. Sci. 1 f or s. 

A study of constitutional law in the United States as interpreted by 
the Supreme Court. Special attention is given to the American federal 
system, the amending clause, the powers of the President, Congress, and 
the National Judiciary. (Lasson.) 

Pol. Scl 107 f. Political Parties and Public Opinion (2)— Two lec- 
tures. Prerequisite, Pol. Sci. 1 f or s. 

The political pai'ty as a part of the political machinery; party organi- 
zation; party activities; campaign methods; public opinion and party 
leadership; the true function of parties. 

Pol. Scl 109 f. Earhj Political Theory (2) — Two lectures. 

A survey of the principal political theorists who have influenced polit- 
ical thought and development. This course covers the various theories 
from Plato to the middle of the nineteenth century. (Oatman.) 

Pol. Scl 110^. Recent Political Thought (2)— Two lectures. 
A study of the political schools of thought from the middle of the 
nineteenth century to the present time. Special reference will be made 
to such recent developments as Socialism, Communism, Fascism, Naz- 
ism, etc. (Steinmeyer.) 



61 



PSYCHOLOGY 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Psych. 106 s. Mental Hygiene (3) — Two lectures and one clinic at St. 
Elizabeth's Hospital each week. Prei'equisite, Ed. Psych. 1 or Psych. 1 f 
or 1 s. 

A study of mental disorders in terms of personal and social adapta- 
tion. Problems of adjustment in social relations; obsessions, fears, con- 
flicts, inhibitions, and compensations. (Sprowls.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Ed. Psych. 200 f. Systematic Educational Psychology (3). 

An advanced course for teachers and prospective teachers. Deals 
with the major contributions of psychology to educational theory from 
Herbart to the present time. (Sprowls.) 

RURAL LIFE AND AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

R. Ed. 104 s. Rural Life and Education (3) — Three lectures. 

An intensive study of the educational agencies at work in rural com- 
munities, stressing particularly an analysis of school patronage areas, 
the possibilities of normal life in rural areas, early beginnings in rural 
education, and the conditioning effects of economic differences. The course 
is designed especially for persons who expect to be called upon to assist 
in shaping educational and other community programs for rural people. 

(Cottemian.) 

R. Ed. 105 f. Project Organizations and Cost Accounting (2) — Two 
lectures. 

The development of project programs in terms of placement oppor- 
tunities; pi'oject forecasting as a form of motivation; project estimating; 
systems of project cost accounting; practice in project accounting. 

(Worthington.) 

R. Ed. 107 f . Observation and Analysis of Teaching for Agricul- 
tural Students (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Prerequisite, Ed. 
Psych. 1 f . 

This course deals with an analysis of pupil learning in class groups. 

(Cotterman.) 

R. Ed. 109 f. Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture (3) — Three 
lectures. Prerequisites, R. Ed. 107 f, 105 f; A. H. 1, 2; D. H. 1; Poultry 
1 ; Soils 1 ; Agron. 1, 2 ; Hort. 1, 11 ; F. Mech. 101, 104 ; A. E. 2, 102 ; F. M. 2. 

A comprehensive course in the work of high school departments of 
vocational agriculture. It emphasizes particularly placement, supervised 
farming programs, the organization and administration of Future Farm- 
er work, and objectives and methods in all-day, continuation, and adult 
instruction. (Cotterman.) 

R. Ed. 112 s. Departmental Organization and Administration (2) — Two 
lectures. Prerequisites, R. Ed. 107 f, 105 f, 109 f. 

The work of this course is based upon the construction and analysis 

62 



of administrative programs for high school departments of vocational 
agriculture. As a project, each student prepares and analyzes in detail 
an administrative pi-ogram for a specific school. Investigations and re- 
ports. (Worthington.) 

R. Ed. 114 s. Teaching Farm Shop in Secondary Schools (1) — One 
lecture. 

Objectives in the teaching of farm shop; contemporary developments; 
determination of projects; shop management; shop programs; methods of 
teaching; equipment; materials of instruction; special projects. 

(Carpenter.) 

R. Ed. 120 f or s. Practice Teaching (2) — Prerequisites, R. Ed. 105 f, 10? 
f , 109 f . 

Under the immediate direction of a critic teacher the student in this 
course is i-equired to analyze and prepare special units of subject-matter, 
plan lessons, and teach in co-operation with the critic teacher, exclusive 
of observation, not less than twenty periods of vocational agriculture. 

(Cotterman, Worthington.) 

Ed. 105 f. Educational Sociology (3) — See Education. 

Courses for Graduates 

R. Ed. 201 f and 202 s. Rural Life and Education (3, 3)— Prerequisite, 
R. Ed. 104 s, or equivalent. 

A sociological approach to rural education as a movement for a good 
life in rural communities. It embraces a study of the organization, admin- 
istration and supervision of the several agencies of public education as 
component parts of this movement and as forms of social economy and 
human development. Discussions, assigned readings and major term pa- 
pers in the field of the student's special interest. (Cotterman.) 

R. Ed. 207 f and 208 s. Problems in Vocational Agriculture, Related 
Science and Shop (1-2, each semester). 

In this course special emphasis is placed upon the current problems 
facing teachers of vocational agriculture. It is designed especially for 
persons who have had sevex'al yeai's of teaching experience in this field. 
The three phases of the vocational teacher's program — all day, part-time, 
and adult work — receive attention. Discussions, surveys, investigations 
and reports. (Cotterman.) 

R. Ed. 250 y. Seminar in Rural Education (2-4). 

Problems in the organization, administration and supervision of the 
several agencies of rural education. Investigation, papers and reports. 

(Cotterman.) 

R. Ed. 251 y. Research (2-4) — Credit hours according to work done. 
Students must be specially qualified by previous work to pursue with 
profit the research to be undertaken. (Cotterman.) 

SOCIOLOGY 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
SOC. 101 f. Rural Sociology (2) — Two lectures. Graduate students 
will be required to prepare an extra term paper. 

63 



The structure and functions of rural communities, ancient and modem; 
the evolution of rural culture; rural institutions and their problems; the 
psychology of rural life; composition and characteristics of rural popula- 
tion; relation of rural life to the major social processes; the social 
aspects of rural planning. (Manny.) 

Soc. 102 s. Urban Sociology (2) — Two lectures. Graduate students 
will be required to prepare an extra term paper. 

The origin and growth of cities; composition and characteristics of 
city populations; the nature and significance of urbanization; the social 
structure and functions of the city; urban personalities and groups; 
cultural conflicts arising out of the impact of the urban environment. 

(Joslyn.) 

Soc. 103 f. Criminology and Penology (3) — Three lectures. Prerequi- 
site, Soc. Sci. 1 y or Soc. 1. 

The nature, extent, and cost of crime. Causative factors. Historical 
methods of dealing with criminals. Apprehension of alleged criminals. 
The machinery of justice. Penal institutions. Other means of caring 
for convicted persons. The prevention of crime. (Jacobi.) 

Soc. 104 s. Social Psychology (3)- — Three discussions. 

The development of human nature and personality as products of social 
experience and interaction; the behavior of public audiences, groups, 
crowds, and mobs; the development and functioning of such psycho- 
social forces as imitation, styles, fads, leadership, public opinion, propa- 
ganda, nationalism, etc. (Manny.) 

Soc. 105 f. Social Organization (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Soc. 
If. (Not offered in 1937-1938.) 

Social groupings above the family in size as found among primitives 
and modern civilizations including neighborhoods, communities, special 
interest organizations, etc.; leadership and followership in organization 
activities; interorgani2)ational conflict and co-operation. (Joslyn.) 

Soc. 107 s. Social Pathology (3) — Three lectures. Prerequisite, Soc. 
1 f, or consent of instructor. 

Causative factors and social complications in individual and group 
pathological conditions; historic methods of dealing with the dependent, 
defective, and delinquent classes. (Joslyn.) 

Soc. 109 f. Introduction to Social Woj'k (3) — Three lectures. Prereq- 
uisite, Soc. 107 s or consent of instructor. 

Brief historical review of the evolution of social work. Present-day 
types of social work, institutional treatment, public and private agencies; 
the theory and technique of social case work; recent development arising 
out of the depression ; visits to representative social agencies. This course 
is intended primarily for persons intending to take advanced professional 
training in this field. (Joslyn.) 

Soc. 110 s. The Family (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisite, Soc. If. 

Anthropological and historical backgrounds; biological, economic, psy- 
chological, and sociological bases of the family; the role of the family in 
personality development; family and society; family disorganization; 
family adjustment and social change. (Jacobi.) 

64 



Soc. Ill f. Recent Social Thought (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Soc. 1 f and consent of instructor. Intended mainly for sociology majors 
and minors. 

Critical study of the leading schools of sociolo^cal thought in various 
countries since 1900. (Joslyn.) 

Soc. 113 f. Dynamics of Population (2) — Two lectures. Prerequisites, 
Soc. 1 f and Gen. Ill f or consent of instructor. (Not offered in 1937- 
1938.) 

Causes of population growth and decline; major population migrations; 
population pressure and international problems; eugenic factors; statis- 
tical analyses of population trends in the United States. (Joslyn.) 

Soc. 115 f. The Village (2) — Two lectures. An extra term paper will 
be required of graduate students. 

The evolution of the American village; present day social structure 
and functions of the village; an analysis of village population; the rela- 
tionship of the village to urban and open-country areas; village planning. 

(Manny.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Soc. 201 f or s. Sociological Research (2-4) — Credit proportional to 
work accomplished. 

Individual research projects involving either field work or analysis of 
compiled data. (Staff.) 

Soc. 202 f or s. Seminar in Sociological Theories (2). 

Assigned topics for discussion dealing primarily with major sociologi- 
cal theories and problems. Designed for major students in the Depart- 
ment of Sociology. (Staff.) 



SOCIAL WORK 

Note: The following courses are offered in Baltimore under the joint 
auspices of the University of Maryland and the Baltimore Council of 
Social Agencies. Until further notice, enrollment in these courses is 
restricted to currently employed personnel of Maryland social agencies 
and constitutes part of the "in-service" training program of these agen- 
cies. To obtain graduate credit from the University of Maryland, stu- 
dents must meet all requirements for admission to the Gi'aduate School 
of the University. For further details, see special circular. 

Social Work 201 f or s. Introduction to Social Casework I (2) — Two 
lectures. 

A discussion of case material to give the student a general intro- 
duction to the basic processes of social casework with special emphasis 
on the individual and his social situation. (Barbee or Carter.) 

Social Work 202 s. Social Casework II (2) — Two lectures. Prereq- 
uisite, Social Work 201 or a similar introductory casework course. 
A further analytical study of casework methods. (Barbee.) 

65 



Social Work 205 s. Diagnosis as a Part of Casework Treatment (2) — 
Two lectures. Prerequisite, completion of one year's work in a graduate 
school of social work, or its equivalent. 

Case material illustrating various types of treatment will be used. 
Emphasis will be placed upon a study of the early period in treatment 
so that the student may develop an ability to establish and to understand 
the relationship with the client, to bring out and evaluate material im- 
portant for diagnosis, and to meet the real and psychological needs of the 
client which must be met prior to diagnosis. (Halloway.) 

Social Work 220 f or s. A Dynamic Approach to the Problems of Hitm- 
an Behavior (2) — Two lectures. 

The course includes such topics as behavior, its motivation, factors 
modifying behavior, the structure of the personality and of the psyche, 
the modification of the personality in various developmental phases, the 
evidence of maladjustment and an effort to relate maladjustments to ex- 
periences and personality patterns. Special I'eference will be made to 
the implications of the foregoing for social work in its theory and practice. 

(Hill.) 

Social Work 250 s. Public Welfare Administration (2) — Two lectures. 
Open to senior workers, supei'visors, and executives who have had some 
formal training in social work. 

The history, function, organization, and administration of local, state, 
and federal public welfare associations. (Van Driel.) 

ZOOLOGY 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

ZOOL. 101 f, 102 s. Mammalian Anatomy (2-6) — LaboratoiT. Regis- 
tration limited. Permission of the instructor must be obtained before 
registration. 

A course in the dissection of the cat or other mammal. Recommended 
for pre-medical students, for those whose major is zoology, and for pros- 
pective teachers of science in high schools. (Pierson.) 

ZoOL 103 f, 104 s. General Animal Physiology (3, 3) — Two lectures; 
one laboratory. Prerequisites, one year of chemistry and one course in 
vertebrate anatomy. Registration limited to twelve, and permission of 
instructor must be obtained before registration. 

The first semester's woi'k deals with thel principles of cellular and gen- 
eral physiology; the second semester is devoted to an application of these 
principles to the higher animals. (Phillips.) 

ZoOL. 105 y. Aquiculture (4) — One lecture; one laboratory. Prerequi- 
site, one course in zoology. 

A comprehensive consideration of the properties of natural waters 
which render them suitable for animal environments. (Truitt.) 

ZoOL. 106 f, 107 s. Journal Club (1, 1). 

Reviews, reports, and discussions of current literature. Required of all 
students whose major is zoology. (Staff.) 

66 



ZooL. 108 f, 109 s. Faunistic Zoology (3, 3) — Two lectures; one labora- 
tory. Prerequisite, a knowledge of invertebrate and vertebrate morpholo- 
gy- 
Classification, distribution, and habit studies of animals in which local 
forms are stressed for purpose of illustration. (Newcombe.) 

ZooL. Ill f, 112 s. Human Osteology (2-6)— A laborator>- course. 
Registration limited. Permission of the instructor must be obtained be- 
fore registration. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

A descriptive study of the human skeleton. (Pierson.) 

ZoOL. 120 s. Animal Genetics (3) — Two lectures; one laboratory. Per- 
mission of the instructor must be obtained before registration. 

The fundamental principles of heredity and variation. While primarily 
of interest to students of biology, this course will be of value to those 
interested in the humanities. Required of students whose major is zoolo- 
gy and who do not have credit for Genetics 101 f. (Burhoe.) 

Courses for Graduates 

ZoOL. 200 y. Marine Zoology {&)■ — One lecture; two laboratories. 
Problems in salt water animal life of the higher phyla. (Truitt.) 

ZoOL. 201 y. Advanced Vertebrate Morphology (6) — One lecture; two 
laboratories. 

Comparative morphologj' of selected organ systems of the important 
vertebrate classes. (Pierson.) 

ZooL. 203 y. Advanced Emh)-yology (6) — One lecture; two laboratories. 

Mechanics of fertilization and growth. A review of the important 
contributions in the field of experimental embryology- and development 
of animals. Opportunity will be given for indi\idual research. (Burhoe.) 

ZoOL. 204 y. Advanced Animal Physiology (6) — One lecture; two 
laboratories. 

The principles of general and cellular physiology as found in animal 
life. ' (Phillips.) 

ZoOL. 205 y. Biology of Marine Organisms (6) — One lecture; two lab- 
oratories. 

Biotic, physical, and chemical factors of the marine en\nronment, in- 
cluding certain fundamental principles of oceanography. Special refer- 
ence is made to the Chesapeake Bay region. (Newcombe.) 

ZooL. 206 y. Research — Credit to be arranged. (Staff.) 

CHESAPEAKE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY 

This laboratory, located in the center of the Chesapeake Bay country, 
is on Solomons Island, Maryland. It is sponsored by the University 
in co-operation with the Maryland Conservation Commission, Goucher 
College, Washington College, Johns Hopkins University, Western Marj'^- 
land College, and the Carnegie Institution of Washington, in order to af- 
ford a center for research and study where facts tending toward a fuller 

67 



appreciation of nature may be gathered and disseminated. The program 
projects a comprehensive survey of the biota of the Chesapeake region. 

The laboratory is open from June until September, inclusive; and dur- 
ing the summer of 1937, courses will be offered in the following subjects: 
Algology, Experimental Zoology, Physiology, Diatoms, Economic Zoolo- 
gy, Invertebrate Zoology, Biological Problems. 

These courses, of three credit hours each, are for advanced under- 
graduates and g'raduates. They cover a period of six weeks. Not more 
than two courses may be taken by a student, who must meet the require- 
ment of the Department of Zoology as well as those of the Laboratory be- 
fore matriculation. Each class is limited to five matriculants. Students 
working on special research problems may establish residence for the 
entire summer period. 

Laboratory facilities, boats of various types fully equipped (pumps, 
nets, dredges, and other apparatus), and shallow water collecting de- 
vices are available for the work without extra cost to the student. 

For full information consult special announcement, which may be ob- 
tained upon request from Dr. R. V. Truitt, Director, College Park, Mary- 
land. 



68 



GRADUATE COURSES IN THE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS AT 

BALTIMORE 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

ANATOMY 
Minors 

The courses recorded under "Minors" are acceptable as graduate courses 
only if they are taken to satisfy minor requirements in a major subject. 

Anat. 101s. Human Gross Anatomy (10) — Total number of hours 
288. Five lectures; fifteen laboratory hours per week throughout the first 
semester. 

A complete dissection of the human body (exclusive of the central 
nervous system). (Uhlenhuth, Aycock and Figge.) 

Anat. 102 f. Mammalian Histology (6) — Two lectures; ten laboratory 
hours per week. 

A general survey of the histological structure of the oi'gans of mam- 
mals and man. Opportunity is offered for examining and studying a 
complete collection of microscopical sections. (Davis, Lutz.) 

Anat. 103 s. Human Neurology (4) — Two lectures and four labora- 
tory hours per week for thirteen weeks of the first semester. Prerequi- 
site, Anat. 102 or equivalent. 

This course provides a general survey of the structure of the human 
central nervous system, being mainly directed toward the fiber tracts 
and nuclei contained therein. It includes a brief study of the special 
senses. The laboratory work is based on a dissection of the human brain, 
together with the study of prepared microscopic sections of the brain 
stem. (Davis, Lutz.) 

Majors 

Anat. 202 f and s. For ivork leading to a Ph. D. in Anatomy. 

A study of the neurological problems based on 103 s. Only students 
who have had the preceding course in neurology are eligible for this 
work. (Davis.) 

Courses 203, 204 and 205 are offered throughout the year, including the 
summer time. Time and credit are adjusted in personal conference be- 
tween student and instructor. 

Anat. 203. Advanced Gross Anatomy. 

The study of human anatomy by gross anatomical methods, especially 
by dissection of specialized structures and limited regions of the human 
body. The exact nature of this course will depend on the requirements 
of the applicant. It may be taken by students of anatomy, medicine and 
biology as well as by physicians desiring graduate work. 

(Uhlenhuth, Figge.) 

Anat. 204. ExpeHmental Anatomy of the Endocrine Glands. 

This course is intended to impart broad familiarity with the subject 
and to provide, through the medium of laboratoi'y work, a knowledge 

69 



of the methods of its investigation. Intimate contact with the instruc- 
tor, frequent informal discussions and properly selected reading take 
the place of formal lectures. (Uhlenhuth.) 

Anat. 205. Problems in the Experimental Anatomy of the Endocrines. 

This course is a continuation of the previous one, but on an advanced 
level. It may be used conveniently for the preparation of a Doctor's 
thesis and leads to a Ph. D degree. (Uhlenhuth.) 

PHARMACOLOGY 

All students majoring in pharmacology with a view to securing the de- 
gree of Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy should secure special 
training in anatomy, mammalian physiology, organic chemistry, and 
Physical Chemistry 10 y or, preferably. Chemistry 102 y. 

Minors 

Pharmacology 101 f and s. General Pharmacology (7) — Three lec- 
tures; one laboratory. This course consists of 75 lectures and 30 labora- 
tory periods of 3 hours each; offered each year, September to May in- 
clusive, at the Medical School. 

Pharmacology as applied to medicine and the fundamental principles 
of pharmacologic technique are taught in this course, hence it is a prereq- 
uisite for all other advanced courses in this subject. 

(Krantz, Evans, Musser, Harne, Carr, Johnson.) 

Majors 

Pharmacology 202 f. Chemotherapy. Ci-edit in accordance with the 
amount of work accomplished. 

The action of new synthetic compounds from a pharmacodynamic 
point of view. (Krantz.) 

Pharmacology 203 f. Carbohydrate Metabolism. Credit in accordance 
with the amount of work accomplished. 

A systematic study of the relationship between chemical constitution 
and the fate of carbohydrates and carbohydrate-like substances in the 
animal body. (Krantz and Carr.) 

Pharmacology 204 f. Research. Credit in accordance with the amount 
of work accomplished. 

Properly guided research problems in pharmacology and related fields. 
Open to students majoring in pharmacology. (Krantz, Carr.) 

PHYSIOLOGY 
Minors 

Physiology 101. The Principles of Physiology (8) — Three lectures and 
two laboratory periods a week, supplemented by conferences and demon- 
strations. February to May, inclusive. 

The fundamental concepts of physiology are presented in lectures and 
illustrated by laboratory experiments. Attention is given especially to 
those phases of physiology which are essential for a medical training. 

(Gregersen and Staff.) 

70 



Majors 

Physiology 201. Experimental MiDnmalian Physiology. Time and 
credit by arraRgement. 

Open to properly qualified graduate students. The work will consist 
of selected experiments and informal discussions involving the original 
literature. (Gregersen, Root.) 

Physiology 202. Physiological Effects of Radiation (1). Lectures and 
conferences Monday afternoons at four o'clock during November and 
December. Open only to students with an adequate training in physics. 
A thesis will be required. 

The purpose is to review the general principles and problems con- 
cerned in the use of radiation in medicine. (Oster.) 

Physiology 203. Seminar. Credit according to work done. 
Intensive study of the literature in selected fields of physiology as a 
preparation for research. (Gregersen.) 

Physiology 204. Research. By arrangement with the head of the de- 
partment. (Staff.) 

BACTERIOLOGY 

Minors 

Bact. 101 f. Sixteen lectures and 104 laboratory hours (5). 

The course includes the pieparation and sterilization of culture media 
and the study of pathogenic bacteria and the more important pi'otozoa. 
The principles of general bacteriology are discussed in lectures. 

Bact. 102 s. Sixteen lectures and 56 laboratory hours (4). 

Principles of immunology are discussed in the lectures. Experiments 
to demonstrate the action of various antibodies are performed by the 
students. 

Majors 

Bact. 201. Time and credit are subject to special arrangement. A lab- 
oratory course on selected problems of bacteriology. The lectures are 
supplemented by personal contact with the instructor, discussions of the 
various phases of the work and by reading. 

Bact. 202. Research. Time and credit are subject to special arrange- 
ment. 

BIOCHEMISTRY 
Minors 

BlOCHEM. 101 s. Fundamental Principles of Biochemistry (6) — Six lec- 
tures and conferences, and two three-hour laboratory periods per week 
for sixteen weeks, from February to May, inclusive. 

This course is designed to present the fundamental concepts of biologi- 
cal chemistry. The principal constituents and phenomena of living matter 
are discussed in the lectures and conferences and are examined in the lab- 
oratory. Training is afforded in the routine biochemical methods of in- 
vestigation. This course is a prerequisite for advanced work in this sub- 

71 



ject. Graduate students who take this course as a minor toward a higher 
degree are required to supplement it by extra-curricular work. 

(Wylie, Schmidt, Ogden.) 

Majors 

BlOCHEM. 201 f and s. A course in specialized fields of biochemistry 
designed to prepare the student for advanced research work. Prerequisite, 
Biochem. 101 s. The particular phases of biochemistry taken up in this 
course will vary with the requirements and interests of the student. The 
course is limited to students working toward a Ph. D. degree in biochem- 
istry and in other biological subjects. Credit is allotted in keeping with 
the extent and quality of work accomplished. (Wylie, Schmidt.) 

Biochem. 202 f and s. Research. Limited to graduate students seek- 
ing a Ph. D. degree in biochemistry. Credit is given on the basis of ex- 
tent and quality of accomplishment. (Wylie, Schmidt.) 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

BOTANY 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

BOT. 101 y. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants (4)— One lecture; one 
laboratory. 

A study of the kinds of seed plants and ferns, their classification, and 
field work on local flora. Emphasis will be placed on official drug plants. 
Instruction will be given in the preparation of an herbarium. 

BOT. 102 y. Advanced Vegetable Histology (8) — Two lectures; two lab- 
oratories. 

Work covers advanced plant anatomy, embedding of material in cel- 
loidin and in paraffin, section cutting, etc., leading to research. 

Courses for Graduates 

BoT. 201 y. Advanced Study of Vegetable Poivders (8) — Two lectures; 
two laboratories. Prerequisite, Bot. 102 y. 

A study of powdered vegetable drugs and spices from the structural 
and micro-chemical standpoints, including practice in identification and 
the detection of adulterants. 

BOT. 202 y. Advanced Taxonomy of Vascular Plants. Credit depen- 
dent on work done. Prerequisite, Bot. 101 y. 

Box. 203 y. Research in Pharmacognosy. Credit according to amount 
and quality of work performed. 

PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Phar. Chem. 101 f. Chemistry of Medicinal Products (3-5) — Two lec- 
tures ; one to three laboratory periods. 

A study of the more important medicinal plant pi'oducts and of syn- 
thetic compounds. The laboratory work will include the isolation and iden- 
tification of plant principles and the preparation of the simpler organic 
compounds used in medicine. (Hartung.) 

Phar. Chem. 101 s. Food Chemistry (4) — Two lectures; two labora- 
tory periods. 

A study of the composition of foods, their adulterants, and the meth- 
ods employed by public health and industrial laboratories for the analy- 
tical examination of foods. (Hartung.) 

Phar. Chem. 102 y. Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis (3-6) — Three 
laboratory periods. The course may be elected for either or both semes- 
ters, and may be taken by undergraduates with the consent of the pro- 
fessor in charge. 

A laboratory study of the qualitative and quantitative anal>i;ical pro- 
cedures and methods as applied to official and commercial, natural and 
synthetic drugs, their intermediates and derivatives. (Hartung.^ 

73 



Courses for Graduates 

Phar. Chem. 201 y. Chemistry of Alkaloids (4) — Two lectui-es. 
A survey of the chemical structure and the reactions of pharmaceuti- 
cally and pharmacologically important organic bases. (Hartung.) 

Phar. Chem. 202 y. Advanced Pharmaceutical Syntheses (1-8) — Lab- 
oratory work and conferences. 

A study of fundamental and basic chemical procedures employed in the 
synthesis of various drugs and their intermediates, and a survey of their 
application. (Hartung.) 

Phar. Chem. 203 y. Pharmaceutical Chemistry Seminar (2). 

Reports of progress and discussion of the problems encountered in re- 
search and the presentation of papers which survey the recent develop- 
ments of pharmacutical chemistry reported in the current literature. Re- 
quired of all students majoring in the department throughout their peri- 
od of matriculation. (Hartung.) 

Phar. Chem. 204 y. History of Pharmaceutical Chemistry (2-4) — One 
lecture and assigned reading. (Not given in 1937-1938.) 

A study of the development of pharmaceutical chemistry in relation to 
the history of other sciences, industry and civilization. (Hartung.) 

Phar. Chem. 205 y. Research in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Credit to 
be determined by the amount and the quality of the work performed. 

(Hartung.) 

PHARMACOLOGY AND THERAPEUTICS 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Pharmacology 101 f. Physiological Assaying and Testing (4) — Two 
lectures, two laboratories. Prerequisite, Physiology 1 f and Pharmacol- 
ogy 1 y. 

A course in physiological drug assaying with special reference to the 
methods of the United States Pharmacopoeia and National Formulary. 

(Thompson.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Pharmacology 201 y. Advanced Physiological Assaying and Testing 
(8) — -Two lectures; two laboratories. Prerequisite, Pharmacology 101 f. 

A study of modern unofficial methods of physiological assaying applied 
to the evaluation of medicinal substances. (Thompson.) 

Pharmacology 202 y. Special Studies in Pharmaco-dynamics (2-4) — 
Two lectures; two laboratories. Prerequisite, Pharmacology 101 f. 

The procedures involved in pharmacological analysis and in the deter- 
mination of the site of action and the nature of action of drugs. 

(Thompson.) 



74 



Pharmacology 203 y. Physiological Assay Methods (4-8) — Two lec- 
tures; two laboratories. Prerequisite, Pharmacology 101 f. 

The development of physiological assay methods for drugs for which 
no satisfactory chemical or physiological methods are known, involving 
both library and experimental studies. (Thompson.) 

Pharmacology 204 y. Research in Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 
Credit according to amount and quality of work performed. (Thompson.) 

PHARMACY 
Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Pharmacy 101 y. (6) — -One lecture; two laboratories. Prerequisite, 
consent of the instructor. 

A continuation of the courses given in the pharmacy school in the second 
and third years with special reference to methods employed in manufac- 
turing pharmacy. (DuMez.) 

Courses for Graduates 

Pharmacy 201 y. Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology (8) — Two 
lectures; two laboratories. 

A study of phaiTnaceutical manufacturing processes from the stand- 
point of plants, crude materials used, their collection, preservation, and 
transformation into forms suitable for therapeutic use. (DuMez.) 

Pharmacy 202 y. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature. Credit ac- 
cording to the work perfoiTned. 

Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining to pharmacy with spe- 
cial reference to the origin and development of the works on drug stand- 
ards; pharmaceutical periodicals. (DuMez.) 

Pharmacy 203 y. History of Pharmacy. Credit according to the 
woi'k performed. 

Lectures and topics on the development of pharmacy in America and 
in the principal countries of Europe. (DuMez.) 

Pharmacy 204 y. Research in Pharmacy. Credit according to the 
amount and quality of the work done. (DuMez.) 



75 



INDEX 



Page 

Administration 

Board of Regents 5 

Graduate Council fi 

Officers 6 

Admission 

to Graduate School 7 

to candidacy for degrees 9 

Agricultural Economics Ifi 

Agricultural Education 62 

Agronomy li^ 

Anatomy Gil 

Animal Husbandry 19 

Art 49 

Assistants 14 

Bacteriology 20, 71 

Biochemistry 71 

Botany 24, 73 

Business Administration 34 

Calendar 4 

Candidacy for advanced degrees 9 

Chemistry 27 

agricultural 30 

analytical 27 

general 27 

industrial 31 

organic 28 

physical 29 

Chesapeake Biological Laboratory 67 

Commencement 14 

Comparative Literature 32 

Dairy Husbandry 33 

Doctor of Philosophy 

requirements for 11 

modern language examinations for 13 

Economics 34 

Education 36 

history and principles 36 

educational psychology 38 

methods in H. S. subjects 38 

home economics 40 

English Language and Literature 40 

Entomology 44 

Examinations 

for Master's degree 11 

for Doctor's degree 12 

modern language for Ph.D. candidates 13 

Fees 13 

Fellowships 13 

application for 13 

service 13 

stipend 13 

residence requirements 13 



Page 

Foods and Nutrition 48 

French .56 

Genetics 45 

German 56 

Graduate Assistantships 14 

service 14 

stipend 14 

residence 14 

History of Graduate School 7 

History, course in 46 

Home Economics 48 

Horticulture 50 

Libraries 7 

Location of University 7 

Master's degree, requirements for 10 

Mathematics 51 

Medicine. School of 69 

courses in 69 

Modern Languages 56 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 73 

Pharmacy, School of 73 

courses in 75 

Pharmacology 70. 74 

Philosophy 58 

Physics 59 

Physiology 70 

Plant Pathology 25 

Plant Physiology 26 

Political Science 61 

Professional Schools in Baltimore 

general 9 

courses in 69 

Psychology 62 

Registration 8 

Residence requirements 

for Doctor's degree 11 

for Master's degree 10 

for assistants and fellows 13, 14 

for summer school students 9 

Rural Life 62 

Seniors, graduate work by 9 

Sociology 63 

Social Work 65 

Soils 19 

Spanish 57 

Statistics 45 

Summer School 9 

Textiles and Clothing 49 

Thesis 

Doctor's 12 

Master's H 

Zoology 66 



76