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Full text of "The Graduate School announcements"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/graduateschoolan1944univ 



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I 



DNIVERSITV OF MARYLAID 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



June 1, 1944 




No. 2 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FOR THE SESSIONS OF 

1944-1945 




COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 



OIVGRSITV OF MilllYLilND 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

41 June 1,1944 No. 2 




THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FOR THE SESSIONS OF 

1944 1945 



University of Maryland Official publication issued semi-monthly during 
May, June and July and bi-monthly the rest of the year at College Park, 
Maryland. Entered as second class matter, under act of Congress of August 
24, 1912. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Calendar, 1944-1945 4 

Board of Regents 5 

Administrative Officers 6 

The Graduate School Council 6 

General Information ; 7 

History and Organization 7 

Location 7 

Libraries 7 

General Regulations 7 

Admission to Graduate School 7 

Registration 8 

Graduate Courses 8 

Program of Work 8 

Summer Session for Teachers 8 

Graduate Work in Professional Schools at Baltimore 9 

Graduate Work by Seniors in this University 9 

Admission to Candidacy for Advanced Degrees 9 

Requirements for the Degrees of Master of Arts and Master of 

Science 9 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Education 11 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Business Administration 11 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 12 

Rules Governing Language Examinations for Doctor of Philosophy 

Candidates 13 

Graduate Fees 13 

Fellowships and Assistantships 14 

Commencement 15 

Description of Courses 16 

Index 65 



1944 

July 7-8 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR, 1944-1945 
COLLEGE PARK 



Summer Quarter 



Friday-Saturday 



July 10 Monday 

August 18 Friday 
Sept. 4 Monday 



Registration for summer quarter 
Registration for six-weeks' session 
Instruction begins 
Closing date, six weeks' session 
Labor Day, holiday 



Sept. 25-28 Monday-Thursday Examinations 



Oct. 6-7 
Oct. 9 
Oct. 16 



Nov. 23 
Dec. 22 



Friday-Saturday 

Monday 

Monday 



Thursday 
Friday 



Fall Quarter 

Registration for fall quarter 

Instruction begins 

Last day to file applications for admission 
to candidacy for Doctor's degree at 
spring commencement, 1945 

Thanksgiving, Holiday 

Closing date, fall quarter 



Winter Quarter 



1945 

Jan. 5-6 Friday-Saturday 

Jan. 8 Monday 

Feb. 22 Thursday 

March 26-29 Monday-Thursday 



Registration for winter quarter 
Instruction begins 
Washington's Birthday, holiday 
Examinations 



April 6-7 
April 9 
April 9 



May 30 



Spring Quarter 
Friday- Saturday Registration for spring quarter 



Monday 
Monday 



Wednesday 



Instruction begins 

Last day to file applications for admission 
to candidacy for the Master's degree 
at spring commencement, 1945. 

Memorial Day, holiday 



June 25-28 Monday-Thursday Examinations 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

Term Expires 

Rowland K. Adams, Chairman 1948 

1808 Fairbank Road, Baltimore 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, Secretary 1947 

4101 Greenway, Baltimore 

J. Milton Patterson, Treasurer 1944 

1015 Argonne Drive, Northwood, Baltimore 

T. Roy Brookes 1952 

Bel Air, Harford County 

W. Calvin Chesnut 1951 

Roland Park, Baltimore 

William P. Cole, Jr 1949 

100 University Parkway, West, Baltimore 

Paul S. Knotts 1945 

Denton, Caroline County 

Harry Nuttle 1950 

Denton, Caroline County 

John E. Semmes 1951 

100 W. University Parkway, Baltimore 

Philip C. Turner 1950 

Parkton, Baltimore County 

Stanford Z. Rothschild 1952 

2215 Ken Oak Road, Baltimore 



6 GENERAL INFORMATION 

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

H. C. Byrd, LL.D., President of the University 

CO. Appleman, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School 

Elsie Parrett, M.A., Secretary to the Dean 

Adele Stamp, M.A., Dean of Women 

Alma H. Preinkert, M.A., Registrar 

Carl W. E. Hintz, A.M.L.S., Librarian 

T. A. HuTTON, B.A., Purchasing Agent and Manager of 

Student Supply Store 



THE GRADUATE COUNCIL 

H. C. Byrd, LL.D., President of the University 

C. O. Appleman, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School, Chairman 

Harold Benjamin,* Ph.D., Professor of Education 

A. E. JOYAL, Ph.D., Acting. 
R. B. CORBETT, Ph.D., Director of Experiment Station 

W. B. Kemp, Ph.D., Acting. 
E. N. Cory, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology 
H, F. Cotterman, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Education 
N. L. Drake, Ph.D., Professor of Organic Chemistry 
WiLBERT J. Huff, Ph.D., D.Sc, Professor of Chemical Engineering 
L. H. James, Ph.D., Professor of Bacteriology 
John G. Jenkins,* Ph.D., Professor of Psychology 

W. R. Clark, Ph.D., Acting. 
DeVoe Meade, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Husbandry 
M. Marie Mount, M.A., Professor of Home and Institution Management 
Hw J. Patterson, D.Sc, Dean Fmeritus of Agriculture 
J. Freeman Pyle, Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Marketing 
A. E. ZuCKER, Ph.D., Professor of Modern Languages 
Walter H. Hartung, Ph.D., Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 

(Baltimore) 
Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D., Professor of Gross Anatomy (Baltimore) 
•On military leave. 



Office of the Graduate School, 
Room 214, Agricultural Building 



I 



¥ 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 7 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

HISTORY AND ORGANIZATION 

In the earlier years of the institution the Master's degree was frequently 
conferred, but the work of the graduate students was in charge of the depart- 
ments concerned, under the supervision of the general faculty. The Graduate 
School of the University of Maryland was established in 1918, and organized 
graduate instruction leading to both the Master's and the Doctor's degree was 
undertaken. The faculty of the Graduate School includes all members of the 
various faculties who give instruction in approved graduate courses. The 
general administrative functions of the graduate faculty are delegated to a 
Graduate Council, of which the Dean of the Graduate School is chairman. 

LOCATION 

The University of Maryland is located at College Park, in Prince George's 
County, Maryland, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, eight miles from 
Washington and thirty-two miles from Baltimore. Washington, with its wealth 
of resources, is easily accessible by train, street car and bus. 

The professional schools of Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Dentistry and 
Law are located in Baltimore, at. the corner of Lombard and Greene Streets. 

LIBRARIES 

In addition to the resources of the University libraries the great libraries 
of the National Capital are easily available for reference work. Because of the 
proximity of these libraries to College Park they are a valuable asset to re- 
search and graduate work at the University of Maryland. 

The library building at College Park contains a number of seminar rooms 
and other desirable facilities for graduate work. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

ADMISSION 

An applicant for admission to the Graduate School must hold a bachelor's 
or a master's degree from a college or university of recognized standing. The 
applicant shall furnish an official transcript of his collegiate record which for 
unconditional admission must show creditable completion of an adequate 
amount of undergraduate preparation for graduate work in his chosen field. 
Application for admission to the Graduate School should be made prior to 
dates of registration on blanks obtained from the office of the Dean. 

After approval of the application a matriculation card, signed by the Dean, 
is issued to the student. This card permits one to register in the Graduate 
School. After payment of the fee, the matriculation card is stamped and 
returned to the student. It is his certificate of membership in the Graduate 
School and should be retained by the student to present at each succeeding 
registration. 

Admission to the Graduate School does not necessarily imply admission 
to candidacy for an advanced degree. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 



REGISTRATION 



All students pursuing graduate work in the University, even though they 
are not candidates for higher degrees, are required to register in the Graduate 
School at the beginning of each quarter. In no case will graduate credit be 
given unless the student matriculates and registers in the Graduate School. 
The program of work for each session is arranged by the student with the major 
department and entered upon two course cards, which are signed first by the 
professor in charge of the student's major subject and then by the Dean of the 
Graduate School. One card is retained by the Dean. The student takes the 
other card, and in case of a new student, also the matriculation card, to the 
Registrar's office, where the registration is completed. Students will not be 
admitted to graduate courses until the Registrar has certified to the instructor 
that registration has been completed. Course cards may be obtained at the 
Registrar's office or at the Dean's office. The heads of departments usually 
keep a supply of these cards in their respective offices. 



GRADUATE COURSES 

Graduate students must elect for credit in partial fulfillment of the require- 
ments for higher degrees only courses designated For Graduates or For Grad- 
uates and Advanced Undergraduates. Students who are inadequately prepared 
for graduate work in their chosen fields or who lack prerequisites for minor 
courses may elect a limited number of courses numbered from 1 to 99 in the 
general catalogue, but graduate credit will not be allowed for these courses. 
Courses that are audited are registered for in the same way as other courses, 
and the fees are the same. 



PROGRAM OF WORK 

The professor who is selected to direct a student's thesis work is the stu- 
dent's adviser in the formulation of a graduate program, including suitable 
minor work, which is arranged in cooperation with the instructors. To en- 
courage thoroughness in scholarship through intensive application, graduate 
students in the regular sessions are limited to a program of fifteen credit hours 
per quarter. If a student is preparing a thesis during the minimum residence 
for the master's degree, the registration in graduate courses should not exceed 
twelve hours for the quarter. 



SUMMER SESSION FOR TEACHERS 

In addition to the regular summer quarter, the University will conduct a six 
weeks summer session for teachers at College Park, with a comprehensive un- 
dergraduate and graduate program. The University publishes a separate 
bulletin giving full information on this summer session for teachers. This 
bulletin is available upon application to the Director of the Summer Session 
for Teachers, University of Maryland, College Park. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 9 

GRADUATE WORK IN PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS AT BALTIMORE 

Graduate courses and opportunities for research are offered in some of the 
professional schools at Baltimore. Students pursuing graduate work in the 
professional schools must register in the Graduate School, and meet the same 
requirements and proceed in the same way, as do graduate students in other 
departments of the University. The graduate courses in the professional 
Schools are listed on pages 59-64. 

GRADUATE WORK BY SENIORS IN THIS UNIVERSITY 

A senior of this University who has nearly completed the requirements for 
the undergraduate degree may, with the approval of his undergraduate dean 
and the Dean of the Graduate School, register in the undergraduate college 
for graduate courses, which may later be transferred for graduate credit toward 
an advanced degree at this University, but the total of undergraduate and 
graduate courses must not exceed fifteen credits for the quarter. Excess credits 
in the senior year cannot later be transferred unless such prearrangement is 
made. Graduate credits earned during the senior year may not be used to 
shorten the residence period required for advanced degrees. 

ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY FOR ADVANCED DEGREES 

Application for admission to candidacy for the Master's and for the Doctor's 
degree is made on application blanks which are obtained at the office of the 
Dean of the Graduate School. These are filled out in duplicate by the student 
and submitted to his major department for further action and transmission to 
the Dean of the Graduate School. An ofTicial transcript of the candidate's un- 
dergraduate record and any graduate courses completed at other institutions 
must be on file in the Dean's office before the application can be considered. 
All applications for admission to candidacy must be approved by the Grad- 
uate Council. 

Admission to candidacy in no case assures the student of a degree, but 
merely signifies he has met all the formal requirements and is considered by his 
instructors sufficiently prepared and able to pursue such graduate study and 
research as are demanded by the requirements of the degree sought. The can- 
didate must show superior scholarship in graduate work already completed. 

Application for admission to candidacy is made at the time stated in the 
sections dealing with the requirements for the degree sought. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREES OF MASTER OF ARTS 
AND MASTER OF SCIENCE 

Advancement to Candidacy. Each prospective candidate for the Master's 
degree is required to make application for admission to candidacy not later 
than the date when instruction begins for the quarter in which the degree is 
sought. He must have completed at least twelve quarter hours, but not more 
than twenty-four quarter hours of graduate work at the University of Mary- 
land. An average grade of "B" in all major and minor subjects is required. 

Miniro um Residence. A residence of at least three quarters or its equivalent, 
at this institution, is required. 



10 GENERAL REGULATIONS 



I 



Course Requirements. A minimum of thirty-six quarter hours, exclusive 
of research and thesis, with an average grade of "B" in courses approved for 
graduate credit, is required for the degrees of Master of Arts and Master of 
Science. At the option of the major department concerned the student may be 
required also to register for a maximum of nine quarter hours for research and 
thesis work. The total number of credit hours required for the degree would 
then be forty-five. If the student is inadequately prepared for the required 
graduate courses, either in the major or minor subjects, additional courses 
may be required to supplement the undergraduate work. Of the thirty-six 
hours required in graduate courses, not less than eighteen quarter hours and 
not more then twenty-four quarter hours must be earned in the major subject. 
The remaining credits must be outside the major subject and must comprise a 
group of coherent courses intended to supplement and support the major work. 
Not less than one-half of the total required course credits for the degree, or a 
minimum of eighteen, must be selected from courses numbered 200 or above. 
No credit for the degree of Master of Arts or Master of Science may be ob- 
tained for correspondence or extension courses. The entire course of study must 
constitute a unified program approved by the student's major adviser and by 
the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Transfer of Credit. Credit not to exceed nine quarter hours, obtained at 
other recognized institutions, may be transferred and applied to the course re- 
quirements of the Master's degree, provided that the work was of graduate 
character, and provided that it is approved for inclusion in the student's 
graduate program at the University of Maryland. This transfer of credit is 
submitted to the Graduate Council for approval when the student applies for 
admission to candidacy for the degree. Acceptance of the transferred credit 
does not reduce the minimum residence requirement. The candidate is subject 
to final examination by this institution in all work offered for the degree. 

Thesis. In addition to the thirty-six quarter hours in graduate courses a 
satisfactory thesis is required of all candidates for the degrees of Master of 
Arts and Master of Science. It must demonstrate the student's ability to do 
independent work and it must be acceptable in literary style and composition. 
It is assumed that the time devoted to thesis work will be not less than the 
equivalent of nine quarter hours earned in graduate courses. With the approval 
of the student's major professor and the Dean of the Graduate School, the 
thesis in certain cases may be prepared in absentia under direction and super- 
vision of a member of the faculty of this institution. 

The original copy of the thesis must be deposited in the office of the Grad- 
uate School not later than two weeks before the convocation at which the de- 
gree is sought. The thesis should not be bound by the student, as the Uni- 
versity later binds all thesis uniformly. An abstract of the contents of the 
thesis, 200 to 250 words in length, must accompany it. A manual giving full 
directions for the physical make-up of the thesis is in the hands of each pro- 
fessor who directs thesis work, and should be consulted by the student before 
the typing of the manuscript is begun. Individual copies of this manual may 
be obtained by the student at the Dean's office, at nominal cost. 

Final Examination. The final oral examination is conducted by a committee 
appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. The student's adviser acts as 
the chairman of the committee. The other members of the committee are per- 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 11 

sons under whom the student has taken most of his major and minor courses. 
The chairman and the candidate are notified of the personnel of the examining 
committee at least one week prior to the period set for oral examinations. The 
chairman of the committee selects the exact time and place for the examina- 
tion and notifies the other members of the committee and the candidate. The 
examination should be conducted within the dates specified at the end of the 
quarter, but upon recommendation of the student's adviser, an examining com- 
mittee may be appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School at any time when 
all other requirements for the degree have been completed. A report of the 
committee is sent to the Dean as soon as possible after the examination. A 
special form for this purpose is supplied to the chairman of the committee. 
Such a report is the basis upon which recommendation is made to the faculty 
that the candidate be granted the degree sought. The period for the oral ex- 
amination is usually about one hour, but the time should be long enough to in- 
sure an adequate examination. 

The examining committee also approves the thesis, and it is the candidate's 
obligation to see that each member of the committee has ample opportunity to 
examine a copy of the thesis prior to the date of the examination. 

A student will not be admitted to final examination until all other require- 
ments for the degree have been met. In addition to the oral examination a 
comprehensive written examination may be required at the option of the 
major department. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF EDUCATION 

Course Requirements. Forty-five quarter hours of course work are re- 
quired, which may include courses in departments other than Education not 
to exceed one-half of the total forty-five hours, such courses to be selected in 
conformity with the student's special needs as agreed upon by the student 
and his adviser. Of the forty-five hours, not less than one-half must be on the 
200 level. 

At least six of the forty-five quarter hours must be seminar work which shall 
include one or more seminar papers in the student's major field of concentra- 
tion in the Department of Education. 

Included in the program must be courses in educational statistics and in pro- 
cedure of educational research. 

The requirements in regard to advancement to candidacy, transfer of credits, 
and final oral examination are the same as for the degrees of Master of Arts 
and Master of Science. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF BUSINESS 

ADMINISTRATION 

The degree of Master of Business Administration represents a minimum of 
three quarters of graduate work in addition to the satisfaction of all under- 
graduate requirements for the bachelor's degree. This will normally include a 
minimum of thirty-six quarter course hours and the completion of a satisfac- 
tory thesis. 



^ 



12 GENERAL REGULATIONS 

The undergraduate preprequisites for graduate work leading to the degree 
of Master of Business Administration may be satisfied by completion of work 
for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, or by equivalent work leading to a corresponding degree 
at other institutions, provided this work is of sufficiently high quality. Holders 
of other bachelor's degrees must satisfy the prerequisite course requirements 
for the Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration at this institu- 
tion, which include Economics 140, 150, 160, and Business Administration 140, 
150, 160, 180, 181, and 182. All other requirements are the same as for the de- 
grees of Master of Arts and Master of Science. 

The degree of Master of Business Administration represents specialized 
work in a particular field of business administration. To this end course and 
thesis work should contribute to one field of specialization, such as Accounting, 
Marketing, Finance, Labor, Public Utilities, Foreign Trade, or to some other 
field of the candidate's specialized interest. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Advancement to Candidacy. Candidates for the Doctor's degree must be 
admitted to candidacy at least three quarters before the final examination. 
Applications for admission to candidacy for the Doctor's degree are filled out 
by the student and submitted to his major department for further action and 
transmission to the Dean of the Graduate School. 

The applicant must have obtained from the head of the Modern Language 
Department a statement that he possesses a reading knowledge of French and 
German. Preliminary examinations or such other substantial tests as the de- 
partments may elect are also required for admission to candidacy. 

Residence. The equivalent of three years (nine quarters) of full time 
graduate study and research is the minimum required. Of the three years the 
equivalent of at least one year must be spent in residence at this university. 
On a part-time basis the time needed will be correspondingly increased. All 
work at other institutions offered in partial fulfillment of the requirements for 
the Ph.D. degree is submitted to the Graduate Council for approval, upon 
recommendation of the department concerned, when the student applies for 
admission to candidacy for the degree. 

The Doctor's degree is not given merely as a certificate of residence 
and work, but is granted only upon sufficient evidence of high attainments 
in scholarship, and ability to carry on independent research in the special 
field in which the major work is done. 

Major and Minor Subjects. The candidate must select a major and one or 
two closely related minor subjects. At least thirty-six quarter hours, exclusive 
of research, are required in minor work. The remainder of the required resi- 
dence is devoted to intensive study and research in the major field. The amount 
of required course work in the major subject will vary with the department 
and the individual candidate. The candidate must register for a minimum of 
eighteen quarter hours of research. 

Thesis. The ability to do independent research must be shown by a disserta- 
tion on some topic connected with the major subject. An original typewritten 
copy and two clear, plain carbon copies of the thesis, together with an abstract. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 13 

of the contents, 250 to 500 words in length, must be deposited in the office of 
the Dean at least three weeks before the con ocation at which the degree is 
sought. It is the responsibility of the student also to provide copies of the 
thesis for the use of the members of the examining committee prior to the date 
of the final examination. 

The original copy should not be bound by the student, as the university 
later binds uniformly all theses for the general university library. The carbon 
copies are bound by the student in cardboard covers which may be obtained 
at the students' supply store. The abstracts are published biennially by the 
university in a special bulletin. 

A manual giving full directions for the physical make-up of the thesis is 
in the hands of each professor who directs thesis work, and should be consulted 
by the student before typing of the thesis is begun. Students may obtain copies 
of this manual at the Dean's office, at nominal cost. 

Final Examination. The final oral examination is held before a committee 
appointed by the Dean. One member of this committee is a representative of 
the graduate faculty who is not directly concerned with the student's graduate 
work. One or more members of the committee may be persons from other in- 
stitutions who are distinguished scholars in the student's major field. 

The duration of the examination is approximately three hours, and covers 
the research work of the candidate as embodied in his thesis, and his attain- 
ments in the fields of his major and minor subjects. The other detailed pro- 
cedures are the same as those stated for the Master's examination. 

RULES GOVERNING LANGUAGE EXAMINATIONS FOR 
CANDIDATES FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

1. A candidate for the Doctor's degree must show in a written examination 
that he possesses a reading knowledge of French and German. The passages 
to be translated will be taken from books and articles in his specialized field. 
Some 300 pages of text from which the applicant wishes to have his examina- 
tion chosen should be submitted to the head of the Department of Modern 
Languages at least three days before the examination. The examination aims 
to test ability to use the foreign language for research purposes. It is presumed 
that the candidate will know sufficient grammar to distinguish inflectional forms 
and that he will be able to translate readily in two hours about 500 words of text, 
with the aid of a dictionary. 

2. Application for admission to these tests must be filed in the office of the 
Department of Modern Languages at least three days in advance of the tests. 

3. No penalty is attached to failure in the examination, and the unsuccess- 
ful candidate is free to try again at the next date set for these tests. 

4. Examinations are held near the office of the Department of Modern 
Languages, on the first Wednesday of each quarter, at 2 p. m. 

GRADUATE FEES 

The fees paid by graduate students are as follows: 

A matriculation fee of $10.00. This is paid once only, upon admission to 
the Graduate School. 



14 GENERAL REGULATIONS 

A diploma fee (Master's degree), $10.00. 

A graduate fee, including hood (Doctor's degree), $20.00. 

College Park: 

A fixed charge, each quarter, of $4.00 per quarter credit hour for students 
carrying eight hours or less; for students carrying more than eight hours, 
$34.00 for the quarter. 

Laboratory fees range from $2.00 to $8.00 per course per quarter. 

Living Expenses and Self Help: 

Board and lodging are available in many private homes in College Park and 
vicinity. The cost of board and room ranges from about $50.00 to $55.00 a 
month, depending on the desires of the individual. A list of accommodations 
is maintained in the offices of the Dean of Women and the Dean of Men. 

Application for student employment, aside from fellowships and assistant- 
ships, may be made through the offices of the Dean of Men and the Dean of 
Women, or to department heads. 

FELLOWSHIPS AND ASSISTANTSHIPS 

Fellowships. A number of fellowships have been established by the Uni- 
versity. The stipend for the University fellows is $500 and the remission of all 
graduate fees except the diploma fee. Several industrial fellowships, with vary- 
ing stipends, are also available in certain departments. 

Fellows are required to render minor services prescribed by their major 
departments. The usual amount of service required does not exceed twelve 
clock hours per week. Fellows are permitted to carry a full graduate program, 
and they may satisfy the residence requirement for higher degrees in the normal 
time. 

Applications for fellowships are made on blanks which may be obtained from 
the office of the Graduate School. The application, with the necessary credent- 
ials, is sent by the applicant directly to the Dean of the Graduate School. Ap- 
plications which are approved by the Dean are forwarded to the departments, 
where final selection of the fellows is made. The awards of University fellow- 
ships are on a competitive basis. 

Graduate Assistantships. A number of teaching and research graduate 
assistantships are available in several departments. The compensation for 
these assistantships is $600 to $1,003 a year and the remission of all graduate 
fees except the diploma fee. Graduate assistants are appointed for one year 
(four quarters) and are eligible to reappointment. The assistant in this class 
devotes one-half of his time to instruction or to research in connection with 
Experiment Station projects, and he is required to spend six quarters in resi- 
dence for the Master's degree. If he continues in residence for the Doctor's 
degree, the minimum residence requirements from the Bachelor's degree may 
be satisfied in twelve quarters. 

Applications for graduate assistantships are made directly to the depart- 
ments concerned, and appointments are made through the regular channels for 
stafif appointments. Further information regarding these assistantships may- 
be obtained from the department or college concerned. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 15 

COMMENCEMENT 

Attendance is required at the commencement at which the degree is con- 
ferred. 

Application for diploma must be filed n the office of the Registrar eight weeks 
before the convocation at which the candidate expects to obtain a degree. 

Academic costume is required of all candidates at commencement. Those 
who so desire may purchase or rent caps and gowns at the Student's Supply 
Store. Order must be filed eight weeks before the date of convocation but may 
be cancelled later if the student finds himself unable to complete his work for 
the degree. 



A time schedule, supplementing this bulletin, is issued shortly before the 
beginning of each quarter, showing the hours and location of class meetings. 
This schedule is available at the office of the Graduate School, or the office of 
the Registrar. 

The provisions of this bulletin are not to be regarded as an irrevocable 
contract between the student and the University. The University reserves the 
right to change any provision or requirement at any time within the student's 
term of residence. 



16 DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

For the convenience of students in making out schedules of studies, the 
subjects in the following Description of Courses are arranged alphabetically: 

Page 

Agricultural Economics 18 

Agricultural Education and Rural Life 19 

Agronomy (Crops and Soils) 19 

Anatomy 59 

Animal Husbandry 20 

Bacteriology 20,60,62 

Biochemistry 29, 60 

Botany 22,62 

Business and Public Administration; Economics 23 

Chemistry 28 

Classical Languages 30 

Comparative Literature 31 

Dairy Husbandry 32 

Education 32 

Engineering 36 

English Language and Literature 39 

Entomology 42 

French 50 

German 50 

History 43 

Home Economics 45 

Horticulture 47 

Mathematics 48 

Modern Languages 50 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 62 

Pharmacology 60, 63 

Pharmacy 64 

Physics 51 

Physiology 61 

Political Science 52 

Poultry Husbandry 53 

Psychology 54 

Sociology 55 

Spanish 51 

Speech 57 

Veterinary Science 57 

Zoology 58 



METHOD OF NUMBERING COURSES 17 

METHOD OF NUMBERING COURSES AND COUNTING 
CREDIT HOURS 

Courses for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates are numbered 100 to 
199; Courses for Graduates only are numbered 200 and upwards. 

A course with a single number extends through one quarter. 
A course with a double number extends through two quarters. 
A course with a triple number extends through three quarters. 

The number of quarter hours' credit is shown by the arable numeral in 
parentheses after the title of the course. 

Examples: 

Course 101. Title (3). Fall quarter. Prerequisite. 

If a laboratory course: 

Course 101. Title (3). One lecture and two laboratory periods a week, fall 

quarter. (This is a one-quarter course, offered one a year.) 
Course 101. Title (3). Fall and winter quarters. Prerequisite. 

(This is a quarter course, repeated each quarter indicated, and except for 

research, seminar, and certain special problem courses, may be taken only 

one quarter.) 

Course 103, 104. Title (6). Three hours a week, winter and spring quarters. 

Prerequisite. 
If a laboratory course: 
Course 103, 104. Title (6). One lecture and two laboratory periods a week, 

fall and winter quarters. 

(This is a course extending through two quarters, and completion of both 

quarters is required.) 
Course 103, 104. Title (6). Three hours a week, fall and winter quarters; 

spring and summer quarters. 

(This is a course extending through two quarters, and it is repeated for the 

two quarters indicated.) 

Course 105, 106, 107. Title (9). Three hours a week, fall, winter, and spring 

quarters. Prerequisite. 
If a laboratory course: 
Course 105, 106, 107. Title (9). One lecture and two laboratory periods a 

week, fall, winter, and spring quarters. 

(This is a course extending through three quarters, and completion of all 

three quarters is required.) 



Course 105, 106, 107. (3, 3, 3). Three hours a week, fall, winter, and spring 
quarters I 

(This is a course extending through three quarters, but with the permission 
of the instructor, credit may be obtained for any quarter separately'.) 



18 AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND FARM MANAGEMENT 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND FARM MANAGEMENT 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

A. E. 100. Farm Economics (3). Fall quarter. Prerequisites, Econ. 31, 32, 33, 
or Econ. 37. DeVault. 

A. E. 101. Marketing of Farm Products (3). Winter quarter. Prerequisites, 
Econ. 31, 32, 33, or Econ. 37. DeVault. 

A. E, 103. Cooperation in Agriculture (3). Fall quarter. Troelston. 

A. E. 104. Farm Finance (3). Spring quarter. Troelston. 

A. E. 105. Food Products Inspection (2). One lecture and one laboratory period 
a week, summer quarter. Staff. 

A. E. 106. Prices of Farm Products (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period 
a week, winter quarter. Troelston. 

A. E. 107. Analysis of the Farm Business (3). One lecture and two laboratory 
periods a week, winter quarter. Hamilton. 

A. E. 108. Farm Management (3). Spring quarter. Hamilton. 

A. E. 109. Research Problems (1-2). Fall, winter, spring, and summer quar- 
ters. DeVault. 

A. E. 111. Land Economics. (3). Fall quarter. 

A. E. 11 . Agricultural Policy (3). Spring quarter. Troelston. 

For Graduates 

A. E. 200, 201. Special Problems in Farm Economics (2,2). Two hours a week, 
winter and spring quarters. DeVault. 

A. E. 202. Seminar (1-3). Fall, winter and spring quarters. DeVault. 

A. E. 203. Research. Credit according to work accomplished. DeVault. 

A. E. 210. Taxation in Relation to Agriculture (2). Spring quarter. Walker. 

A. E. 211. Agricultural Taxation in Theory and Practice (3). Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week, fall quarter. Walker. 

A. E. 212, 213. Land Utilization and Agricultural Production (3, 2). Three 
hours a week, fall quarter; two hours a week, winter quarter. Baker. 

A. E. 214. Consumption of Farm Products and Standards of Living (3). Spring 
quarter. Baker. 

A. E. 215. Advanced Agricultural Cooperation (3). Winter quarter. 

Troelston. 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND RURAL LIFE 19 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND RURAL LIFE 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

R. Ed. 107. Observation and Analysis of Teaching for Agricultural Students 
(3). One lecture and two laboratory periods a week, fall quarter. 

Ahalt. 
R. Ed. 109. Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture (4). Fall quarter. Pre- 
requisite, R. Ed. 107. Cotterman, Ahalt. 

R. Ed. 110. Rural Life and Education (4). Winter quarter. Cotterman. 

R. Ed. 111. Teaching Part-Time and Adult Classes (2). Fall quarter. 

Cotterman, Ahalt. 
R. Ed. 112, 113. Departmental Management (1, 1). One laboratory period a 
week winter and spring quarters. Prerequisites, R. Ed. 107, 109. 

Ahalt. 

R. Ed. 114. Organization and Management of Farm Mechanics in Secondary 

Schools (2). Two laboratory periods a week, spring quarter. Prerequisites, 

Ag. Eng. 54; R. Ed. 107. Carpenter. 

For Graduates 

R. Ed. 201, 202, 203. Rural Life and Education (3, 3, 3). Three hours a week, 
fall, winter, and spring quarters. Prerequisite, R. Ed. 110, or equivalent. 

Cotterman. 
R. Ed. 207, 208, 209. Problems in Vocational Agriculture, Related Science, 
and Shop (2, 2, 2). Two hours a week, fall, winter, and spring quarters. 

Cotterman. 
R. Ed. 250. Seminar in Rural Education (1-3). Fall, winter, and spring quar- 
ters. Cotterman. 

R. Ed. 251, Research, Credit according to work done. Cotterman. 

AGRONOMY 

A. Crops 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Agron. 103. Crop Breeding (3). Fall quarter. Prerequisite, Zool. 104. Kemp. 
Agron. 151. Cropping Systems (3). Spring quarter. Kemp. 

For Graduates 

Agron. 201. Crop Breeding (3-6). Fall quarter. Prerequisite, consent of in- 
structor. Kemp. 
Agron. 203. Seminar (1). Fall, winter, and spring quarters. StafiF. 
Agron. 209. Research. Staff. 

B. Soils 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Soils 103. Soil Geography (4). Three lectures and one laboratory period a 
week, spring quarter. Prerequisites, Soils 1 and Geology. Thomas. 



20 ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Soils 112. Soil Conservation (3). Two lectures and one discussion period a 
week, fall quarter. Prerequisite, Soils 1. Thomas. 

Soils 120. Soil Management (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period a 
week, winter quarter. Prerequisites, Soils 1 and 2. Thomas. 

For Graduates 

Soils 201. Special Problems and Research (10-12). Arranged. Thomas. 

Soils 202, 203, 204. Soil Science (3, 3, 3). Three lectures a week, fall, win- 
ter, and spring quarters. Prerequisites, Soils 1 and 2, or equivalent. 

Thomas. 

Soils 212, 213, 214. Soil Technique (2, 2, 2). Two three-hour laboratory 
periods a week, fall, winter, and spring quarters. Thomas. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

A. H. 112. Livestock Markets and Marketing (2). Fall Quarter. Prere- 
quisite, A. H. 2. Leinbach. 

A. H. 114. Animal Nutrition (3). Fall quarter. Prerequisites, Chem. 13, 14, 
15, 16; A. H. 52. Meade. 

A. H. 116. Light Horse Production (1). Fall quarter. 

Finney, Brueckner, Outhouse. 

A. H. 117. Advanced Light Horse Production (1). Spring quarter. Prere- 
quisite, A. H. 116. Finney, Brueckner. 

For Graduates 

A. H. 201. Special Problems in Animal Husbandry. Credit in proportion to 
work accomplished. Fall, spring and summer quarters. Staff 

A. H. 202. Seminar (1). Fall and spring quarters. Staff. 

A. H. 203. Research. Credit in proportion to work accomplished. Staff. 

A. H. 204. Advanced Breeding (2). Spring quarter. Prerequisites, Zool. 104; 
A. H. 53. Meade. 

A. H. 206, 207. Advanced Livestock Management (3, 3). Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week, fall and winter quarters. Leinbach. 



BACTERIOLOGY 
A. Bacteriology 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Bact. 101. Milk Bacteriology (.5). Three lectures and two laboratory periods 
a week, fall and spring quarters. Prerequisites, Bact. 1 and 5. Hansen. 



BACTERIOLOGY 21 

Bact. 102. Dairy Products Bacteriology (4). Two lectures and two labor- 
atory periods a week, winter and sunnmer quarters. Prerequisites. Bact. 1 
and 5; Bact. 101 desirable. Hansen. 

Bact. 111. Food Bacteriology (5). Three lectures and two laboratory periods 
a week, winter and summer quarters. Prerequisites, Bact. 1 and 5, James. 

Bact. 112. Sanitary Bacteriology (4). Two lectures and two laboratory 
periods a week, fall and spring quarters. Prerequisites, Bact. 1 and 5. 

Hansen. 

Bact. 115. Serology (5). Three lectures and two laboratory periods a week 
fall and spring quarters. Prerequisite, Bact. 2. Goldsmith 

Bact. 116. Epidemiology (3). Winter quarter. Offered in alternate years. 
Prerequisite, Bact. 1, and credit or concurrent registration in Bact. 2 or 2A 

Bact. 118. Systematic Bacteriology (4). Two lectures and two laboratory 
periods a week, winter quarter. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite, 
10 hours of bacteriology. Hansen. 

Bact. 125. Clinical Methods (2). Two laboratory periods a week, fall and 
spring quarters. Prerequisite, Bact. 2 or 5, and consent of instructor. 



For Graduates 

Bact. 211. Bacterial Metabolism (3). Winter quarter. Prerequisites, Bact. 1, 
Chem. 13, 14, 15, 16. Hansen. 

Bact. 212. Advanced Food Bacteriology (4). Two lectures and two laboratory 
periods a week, spring quarter. Prerequisite, Bact. Ill, or equivalent. 

James. 

Bact. 216. Advanced Serology (3). Winter quarter. Prerequisite, Bact. 115, 
or equivalent. 

Bact. 221. Research. Credit to be determined by amount and character 
of work accomplished. Staff. 

Bact. 231. Seminar (2). Summer, fall, winter and spring quarters. Staff. 



B. Food Technology 

F. Tech. 100. Food Microscopy (3). Two laboratory periods a week, fall 
and spring quarters. James. 

F. Tech. 108. Preservation of Poultry Products (3). One lecture and two 
laboratory periods a week, spring quarter. Prerequisite, Bact. 1. James. 

F. Tech. 110. Regulatory Control (1). One lecture and demonstration a week, 
summer quarter. James. 



22 BOTANY 

BOTANY 
A. General Botany and Morphology 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Bot. 101. Plant Anatomy (3). One lecture and two laboratory periods a 
week, fall quarter. Prerequisite, Bot. 51. Bamford, Jones. 

Bot. 104. Advanced Plant Taxonomy (3). One lecture and two laboratory- 
periods a week, summer quarter. Prerequisite, Bot. 50, Brown. 

Bot. 105. Structure of Economic Plants (2). Two laboratory periods a week, 
winter quarter. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. Bamford, Jones. 

Bot. 106. History and Philosophy of Botany (1). (Not offered in 1944-1945). 

Stafif. 

For Graduates 

Bot. 201. Cytology. (5). Three lectures and two laboratory periods a week, 
spring quarter. Prerequisites, Bot. 51, Zool. 104, or equivalent. Bamford. 

Bot. 202. Plant Morphology (2). Two laboratory period? wee\'. Prere- 
quisites, Bot. 50, 101, or equivalent. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

Bamford, Jones. 

Bot. 203. Seminar (1). Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Prerequisite, per- 
mission of instructor. Bamford. 

Bot. 204. Research. Credit according to work done. Bamford. 



B. Plant Pathology 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Pit. Path. 101. Diseases of Special Crops (3). Fall quarter. Prerequisite, 
Bot. 20, or equivalent. Woods, Cox, Jeffers, Petty. 

Pit. Path. 108. Mycology (5). Three lectures and two laboratory periods a 
week, spring quarter. Prerequisite, Bot. 2. Petty, Woods. 



For Graduates 

Pit. Path. 201. Virus Diseases (2-3). Two lectures, or two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week, spring quarter. Prerequisite, Pit. Phys. 101. 

Woods. 

Pit. Path. 205. Research. Credit according to work done. Staff. 

Pit. Path. 206. Plant Disease Control (3). Winter quarter. Prerequisite, 
Bot. 20, or equivalent. Jeffers, Cox, Petty, Woods. 

Pit. Path. 209. Seminar (1). Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Staff. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 23 

C. Plant Physiology 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Pit. Phys. 101. Plant Physiology (5). Three lectures, and two laboratory per- 
iods a week, fall quarter. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. Brown. 

Pit. Phys. 102. Plant Ecology (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period 
a week, summer quarter. Prerequisites, Bot. 1 and Bot. 50. Brown. 

For Graduates 

Pit. Phys. 20 . Plant Biochemistry (4). Winter quarter. Prerequisite, an 
elementary knowledge of plant physiology and organic chemistry. 

Appleman, Shirk. 

Pit. Phys. 202A. Plant Biophysics (2). Prerequisites, Bot. 1; Pit Phys. 101; 
or equivalent. (Not offered in 1944-1945). Appleman. 

Pit. Phys. 202B. Biophysical Methods (2). (Not offered in 1944-1945.) Shirk. 

Pit. Phys. 203. Plant Metabolism (3). Spring quarter. Prerequisite, an 
elementary knowledge of plant physiology and organic chemistry. 

Appleman. 

Pit. Phys. 204. Growth and Development (2). Fall quarter. Prerequisite, 
18 hours of plant science. Appleman. 

Pit. Phys. 205. Seminar (1). (Not offered in 1944-1945.) Appleman. 

Pit. Phys. 206. Research. Credit according to work done. Staff. 

BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION; ECONOMICS 
A. Business Administration 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

B. A. 120. Intermediate Accounting (5). Fall and summer quarters. Pre- 
requisite, B. A. 22. 

B. A. 121. Cost Accounting (5). Winter quarter. Prerequisite, B. A. 22. 

B. A. 122. Auditing Theory and Practice (5). Spring quarter. Prerequisite, 
B. A. 120. 

B. A. 123. Income Tax Accounting (5). Winter quarter. Prerequisite, B. A. 
120. 

B. A. 124. Advanced Accounting. (.5). Fall and winter quarters. Prere- 
quisite, B. A. 120. 

B. A. 125. C. P. A. Problems (5). Spring quarter. Prerequisite, consent of 
instructor. 

B. A. 130. Elements of Statistics (4). Fall, spring and summer quarters. 



24 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

B. A. 131. Business Statistics (4). Winter and summer quarters. Prere- 
quisite, B. A. 130. 

B. A. 132, 133. Advanced Business Statistics (4, 4). Four hours a week, fall 
and spring quarters. Prerequisite, B. A. 131. 

B. A. 140. Financial Management (4). Winter and summer quarters. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 140. 

B. A. 141. Investment Management (4). Spring quarter. Prerequisite, B. A. 
140. 

B. A. 142. Banking Policies and Practices (4). Spring quarter. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 140. 

B. A. 143. Credit Management (3). Spring quarter. Prerequisite, B. A. 140. 

B. A. 144. Life, Group and Social Insurance (3). Fall and summer quarters. 
Prerequisite, Econ. 33 or 37. 

B. A. 145. Property, Casualty, and Liability Insurance (3). Winter quarter. 
Prerequisite, Econ. 33 or 37. 

B. A. 146. Real Estate Financing and Appraisals (3). Spring quarter. Pre- 
requisites, Econ. 33 or 37; B. A. 156. 

B. A. 147. Business Cycle Theory (4). Spring quarter, Prerequisite, Econ. 
140. B. A. 131 recommended. 

B. A. 150. Marketing Management (4). Winter and summer quarters. Prere- 
quisite, Econ. 150. 

B. A. 151. Advertising Programs and Campaigns (3). Fall quarter. Prere- 
quisite, B. A. 150. 

B. A. 152. Advertising Copy Writing and Layout (3). Winter quarter. Pre- 
requisite, B. A. 151. 

B. A. 153. Purchasing Management (3). Spring quarter. Prerequisite, 
B. A. 150. 

B. A. 154. Retail Store Management (4). Spring quarter. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 150. 

B. A. 156. Real Estate Principles and Practice (3). Fall quarter. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 33 or 37. 

B. A. 157. Foreign Trade Procedure (4). Prerequisite, B. A. 150. (Not 
offered in 1944-1945.) 

B. A. 160. Personnel Management (4). Winter and summer quarters. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 160. 

B. A. 162. Contemporary Trends in Labor Relations (3). Fall quarter. Pre- 
requisite, B. A. 160. 

B. A. 163. Industrial Relations (3). Winter quarter. Prerequisite, Econ. 160. 

B. A. 165. Office Management (3). Fall and spring quarters. Prerequisite, 
B. A. 10. 

B. A. 170. Industrial Management (4). Spring quarter. Prerequisites, B. 
A. 11 and 12; 160. 

B. A. 171. Transportation II (4). Prerequisite, P. A. 170. (Not offered in 
1944-1945.) 

B. A. 172. Transportation III (4). Prerequisite B. A. 171. (Not offered in 
1944-1945.) 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 25 

B. A. 173. Transportation IV — Overseas Shipping (4). Prerequisite, P. A, 

170. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 
B. A. 180, 181. 182. Business Law I, II, III (9). Three hours a week, fall, 

winter, and spring quarters. 

B. A. 183. Law for Accountants (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 182. (Not offered 

in 1944-1945.) 
B. A. 186. Real Estate Law and Conveyancing (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 156. 

(Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

For Graduates 

B. A. 220. Managerial Accounting (4). (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

B. A. 228. Research In Accounting. Arranged. 

B. A. 229. Studies of Special Problems in the Fields of Control and Organiza- 
tion. Arranged. 

B. A. 240. Seminar in Financial Management (1-3). Prerequisites, Econ. 140; 
B. A. 22, 140. 

B. A. 250. Problems in Sales Management (3). Spring quarter. 

B. A. 251. Problems in Advertising (3). 

B. A. 252. Problems in Retail Store Management (3). Spring and summer 
quarters. 

B. A. 257. Seminar in Marketing Management. Arranged. 

B. A. 258. Research in Marketing. Arranged. 

B. A. 262. Seminar in Contemporary Trends in Labor Relations. Fall and 
summer quarters. 

B. A. 266. Research in Personnel Management. Winter quarter. Arranged. 

B. A. 267. Research in Industrial Relations. Arranged. 

B. A. 269. Studies in Special Problems in Employer-Employee Relation- 
ships. Arranged. 

B. A. 299. Thesis. Arranged. 

B. Economics 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Econ. 130. Economics of Consumption (3). Spring quarter. Prerequisite 
Econ. 33 or 37. 

Econ. 131. Comparative Economic Systems (4). Fall quarter. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 33 or 37. 

Econ. 132. Advanced Economic Principles (4). Spring quarter. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 83 or 37. 

Econ. 134. Contemporary Economic Thought (4). Spring quarter. Prere- 
quisite, Econ. 33 or 37. 

Econ. 135. Economic Institutions and War (4). Summer quarter. Prere- 
quisite, Econ. 33 or 37. 

Econ. 140. Money and Banking (4). Fall, spring and summer quarters. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 33 or 37. 

Econ. 141. Theory of Money, Credit, and Prices (4). Fall quarter. Prere- 
quisites, Econ. 33 and 140. 



26 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Econ. 150. Marketing Principles and Organization (4). Fall and spring quar- 
ters. Prerequisite, Econ. 33 or 37. 

Econ. 151. Economics of Cooperatives (3). Winter quarter. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 33 or 37. 

Econ. 160. Labor Economics (4). Fall, winter and summer quarters. 
Prerequisite, Econ. 33 or 37. 

Econ. 170. Industrial Combination and Competition (4). Spring and fall quar- 
ters. Prerequisite, Econ. 33 or 37. 

Econ. 171. Economics of American Industry (4). Fall and summer quarters. 
Prerequisite, Econ. 33 or 37. 

For Graduates 

Econ. 230. History of Economic Thought (4). Fall quarter. Prerequisite, 

Econ. 132. 
Econ. 231. Economic Theory in the Nineteenth Century (4). Spring quarter. 

Prerequisite, Econ. 230, or consent of instructor. 
Econ. 237, 238, 239. Seminar in Economic Investigation (3, 3, 3). Three 

hours a week, fall, winter, and spring quarters. 
Econ. 240. Comparative Banking Systems (4). Winter quarter. 
Econ. 270. Seminar in Economics of American Industries (3). Arranged. 
Econ. 299. Thesis. Arranged. 

C. Natural and Human Resources 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

N. H. R. 100. Physical Resources of the United States and Canada (3). Fall 

quarter. 
N. H. R. 101. Land Utilization and Agricultural Geography, United States 

and Canada (3). Winter quarter. 
N. H. R. 102. The Geography of Manufacturing in the United States and 

Canada (3). Spring quarter. 
N. H.'R. 110. Middle America (3). Fall quarter. 
N. H. R. 111. South America (3). Winter quarter. 

N. H. R. 112. Recent Economic Trends in Latin America (3). Spring quar- 
ter. 

N. H. R. 120, 121, Economic Geography of Europe (6). Three hours a week, 
spring and summer quarters. 

N. H. R. 122. Economic Geography of Africa (3). Fall quarter. 



For Graduates 

N. H. R. 203. Advanced Physiography (3). Fall quarter. 

N. H. R. 204. Advanced Climatology (3). Winter quarter. 

N. H. R. 221. Seminar in Regional Geography (3, 3, 3). Three hours a week, 
fall, winter, and spring quarters. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 27; 

D. Public Administration 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

P. A. 110. Principles of Public Administration (3). Winter quarter. Pre- 
requisites, Pol. Sci. 4; Econ. 33. 

P. A. 111. Public Personnel Administration (3). Spring quarter. Prere- 
quisites, P. A. 110; Econ. 160. 

P. A. 114. Public Budgeting (3). Prerequisites, B. A. 22; Econ. 33. (Not 
offered in 1944-1945.) 

P. A. 124. Governmental Accounting (4). Winter quarter. Prerequisite, 
B. A. 124. 

P. A. 126. Government and Social Security (3). Spring quarter. Prere- 
quisites, Pol. Sci. 4; Econ. 33. 

P. A. 130. International Economic Policies and Relations (4). Fall quarter. 
Prerequisite, Econ. 33 or 37; Econ. 131 recommended. 

P. A. 137. Economic Planning and Post-war Problems (4). Winter quarter. 
Prerequisite, Econ. 33 or 37; Econ. 131 recommended. 

P. A. 140. Public Finance and Taxation (4). Fall quarter. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 33 or 37. 

P. A. 141. International Finance and Exchange (4). Spring quarter. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 140; Econ. 141 recommended. 

P. A. 161. Recent Labor Legislation and Court Decisions (4), Winter quar- 
ter. Prerequisite, Econ. 160; B. A. 160 recommended. 

P. A. 170. Transportation I, Regulation of Transportation Services (4). 

Fall quarter. Prerequisite, Econ. 33 or 37. 

P. A. 180. Government and Business (4). Fall and spring quarters. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 33 or 37. 

P. A. 184. Public Utilities (4). Spring quarter. Prerequisite, Econ. 33 or 37. 

For Graduates 

P. A. 201. Seminar in International Organization (3). Arranged. 

P. A. 213. Problems of Public Administration (2). Arranged. 

P. A. 214. Problems of Public Personnel Administration (3). 

P. A. 235. Seminar in International Economic Relations (3). Arranged. 

P. A. 240. Research in Governmental Fiscal Policies and Practices (3), Ar- 
ranged. 

P. A. 280. Seminar in Business and Government Relationships. Arranged. 

P. A. 284. Seminar in Public Utilities (3). Prerequisite, P. A. 184, and con- 
sent of instructor. 



P. A. 299. Thesis. Arranged. 

I 



28 CHEMISTRY 

CHEMISTRY 

A. Inorganic Chemistry 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 101. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3). Spring quarter. Prere- 
quisites, Chem. 23, and 37, 38. White. 

For Graduates 

Chem. 201, 203. The Chemistry of Rarer Elements (6). Three lectures 
a week, fall and winter quarters. White. 

Chem. 202, 204. Advanced Inorganic Laboratory (2, 2). Two three-hour 
laboratory periods a week, fall and winter quarters. Prerequisite, consent 
of instructor. White. 

Chem. 206. An Introduction to Spectrographic Analysis (2). Two three-hour 
laboratory periods a week, winter and spring quarters. Prerequisite, con- 
sent of instructor. White. 

B. Analytical Chemistry 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 121, 123. Chemical Microscopy (3, 3). One lecture and two three- 
hour laboratory periods a week, fall and winter quarters. Chem. 121 is a 
prerequisite for Chem. 123. Svirbely. 

For Graduates 

Chem. 221, 223. Chemical Microscopy (3, 3). One lecture and two three- 
hour laboratory periods a week, fall and winter quarters. Svirbely. 

Chem. 226, 228. Problems in Quantitative Analysis (3, 3). Three three-hour 
laboratory periods a week. Arranged. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Svirbely. 

C. Organic Chemistry 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 141, 143. Advanced Organic Chemistry (6). Three lectures a week, 
fall and spring quarters. Prerequisites, Chem. 37, 38. Drake. 

Chem. 142, 144. Advanced Organic Laboratory (3, 3). Three three-hour 
laboratory periods a week, fall, winter, spring, and summer quarters. 
Prerequisites, Chem. 19, or 23, and Chem. 37, 38. Kilmer. 

Chem. 146, 148. The Identification of Organic Compounds (3, 3). One lecture 
and one or two three-hour laboratory periods a week, fall, winter, spring, 
and summer quarters. Prerequisites, Chem. 141, 143, or concurrent reg- 
istration therein. Kilmer. 

For Graduates 

(One course from the group 241-251 is offered each quarter, excepting the 

summer quarter.) 
Chem. 241. Stereochemistry (2). IKilmer. 



CHEMISTRY 29 

Chem. 243. The Polyene Pigments and Certain Vitamins (2). Kilmer. 

Chem.245. The Sterols and Sex Hormones (2). Kilmer. 

Chem. 247. The Chemistry of Nitrogen Compounds (2). Kilmer. 

Chem. 249. Physical Aspects of Organic Chemistry (2). Kilmer. 

Chem. 251. The Heterocyclics (2). Kilmer. 

Chem. 254. Advanced Organic Preparations (3 to 5). Three to five three- 
hour laboratory periods a week, fall, winter, spring and summer quarters. 

Kilmer. 

Chem. 256. Organic Microanalysis (5). Five three-hour laboratory periods 
a week, fall, winter and spring quarters. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Drake. 

Chem. 258. The Identification of Organic Compounds, An Advanced Course 
(3 to 5). Three to five three-hour laboratory periods a week, fall, winter, 
spring and summer quarters. Kilmer. 

Chem. 260. Advanced Organic Laboratory (2 to 3). Two or three three-hour 
laboratory periods a week, fall, winter, spring and summer quarters. 

Kilmer. 

D. Biochemistry 

For Gr.aduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 161. Biochemistry (3). Winter quarter. Prerequisites, Chem. 37, 38, 
or consent of instructor. Creech. 

Chem. 162, 164. Biochemistry Laboratory (2, 2). Two three-hour laboratory 
periods a week, winter and spring quarters. Creech. 

Chem. 166, 168. Food Analysis (3, 3). One lecture and two three-hour labor- 
atory periods a week, fall and winter quarters; spring and summer quarters. 
Prerequisites, Chem. 31, 32, 33, 34; Chem. 19. Wiley. 



For Graduates 

Chem. 261, 263. Advanced Biochemistry (6). Three lectures a week, fall and 
winter quarters. Prerequisites, Chem. 141, 143, or equivalent. Creech. 

Chem. 262, 264. Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory (4). Two three-hour 
laboratory periods a week, fall and winter quarters. Prerequisites, Chem. 
36, 38. Creech. 

Chem. 266. Biological Analysis (2). Two three-hour laboratory periods a 
week, fall and winter quarters. Prerequisite, Chem. 19. Creech. 

Chem. 268. Special Problems in Biochemistry (3-6). Two to six three-hour 
laboratory periods a week, fall and winter quarters. Prerequisite, consent 
of instructor. Creech. 

E. Physical Chemistry 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 181, 183. Elements of Physical Chemistry (6). Three lectures a 
week, fall and winter quarters. Prerequisites, Chem. 13; Phys. 1,2; Math. 
10, 11. Oesper. 



I 



30 CLASSICAL LANGUAGES 

Chem. 182, 184. Elements of Physical Chemistry Laboratory (2). One three- 
hour laboratory a week, fall and winter quarters. May be taken only when 
accompanied by Chem. 181, 183. Oesper. 

Chem. 187, 189. Physical Chemistry (10). Five lectures a week, fall and 
winter quarters; spring and summer quarters. Prerequisites, Chem. 21, 
23; Phys. 3, 4, 5; Math 20, 21, 22. Haring. 

Chem. 188, 190. Physical Chemistry Laboratory (6). Three three-hour labor- 
atory periods a week, fall and winter quarters; spring and summer quarters. 

Oesper. 

For Graduates 

The common prerequisites for the following courses are Chem 187, 189 and 
Chem. 188, 190, or equivalent. 

Chem, 281, 283. Theory of Solutions (3, 3). Fall and winter quarters. 

Svirbely. 

Chem. 285, 287, Colloid Chemistry (6). Three lectures a week, fall and 
winter quarters. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) Haring. 

Chem. 286, 288. Colloid Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2). Two three-hour labor- 
atory periods a week, fall and winter quarters. This course must accom- 
pany or be preceded by Chem. 285, 287. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

Haring. 

Chem. 289. Quantum and Statistical Mechanics (3). Fall quarter. (Not 
offered in 1944-1945.) Oesper. 

Chem. 291. Valence Theory (3). Winter quarter. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

Oesper. 

Chem. 295. Phase Rule (3). Winter quarter. Haring. 

Chem. 297. Catalysis (3). Spring quarter. Haring. 

Chem. 299, 301. Reaction Kinetics (4). Two lectures a week, fall and winter 
quarters. Oesper. 

Chem. 303, 305. Electrochemistry (6). Three lectures a week, fall and winter 
quarters. . Haring. 

Chem. 304, 306. Electrochemistry Laboratory (3, 3). Three three-hour labor- 
atory periods a week, fall and winter quarters. Haring. 

Chem. 307, 309. Chemical Thermodynamics (6). Three lectures a week, 
winter and spring quarters. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) Haring. 

Chem. 351. Seminar (1). Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Staff. 

Chem. 360. Research. Fall, winter, spring, and summer quarters. Staff. 



CLASSICAL LANGUAGES 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Latin 121. Roman Prose Writers (5). Prerequisite, 10 quarter hours beyond 

Latin 3. 
Latin 122. Roman Satire (5). Prerequisite, 10 quarter hours beyond Latin 3. 
Latin 131. The Historian Tacitus (5). Prerequisite, 10 quarter hours beyond 

Latin 3. Banta. 



COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 



31 



Latin 132. Martial, Selected Epigrams (5). Prerequisite, 10 quarter hours 
beyond Latin 3. Banta. 

Latin 141. Lucretius, De Rerum Natura (5). Prerequisite, 10 quarter hours 
beyond Latin 3. 

Latin 152. Catullus (5). Prerequisite, 10 quarter hours beyond Latin 3. 

Latin 171. History or the Latin Language (3). Prerequisite, 10 quarter hours 

beyond Latin 3, or special permission of the instructor. Banta. 

Latin 172. Medieval Latin (3). Prerequisite, 10 quarter hours beyond 

Latin 3. Banta. 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Comp. Lit. 101. Introductory Survey of Comparative Literature (3). Zucker. 

Comp. Lit. 102. Introductory Survey of Comparative Literature (3). Zucker. 
Comp. Lit. 103. Chaucer (3). Fall quarter. Harman. 

Comp. Lit. 104. The Old Testament as Literature (3). Zucker. 

Comp. Lit. 105. Romanticism in France (3). Wilcox. 

Comp. Lit. 106. Romanticism in Germany (3). Prahl. 

Comp. Lit. 107. The Faust Legend in English and German Literature (3). 

Prahl. 
Comp. Lit. 108. Milton (3). Summer quarter. Same as Eng. 108. Ball. 

Comp. Lit. 109. Cervantes (3). 

Comp. Lit. 110. Introduction to Folklore (3). 

Comp. Lit. 111. A Study of Literary Criticism (5). 

Comp. Lit. 112. Ibsen (4). Zucker. 

Comp. Lit. 113, 114. Prose and Poetry of the Romantic Age (3, 3). Two 

hours a week, fall and winter quarters. Same as Eng. 113, 114. 

Weeks. 
Comp. Lit. 124. Contemporary Drama (5). Fall quarter. Same as Eng. 124. 

Andrews. 
Comp. Lit. 125. Emerson, Thoreau, and Whitman (3). Same as Eng. 125. 



For Graduates 
Comp. Lit. 200. The History of the Theatre (3). 

Comp. Lit. 201. Medieval Romance in England (3). Same as Eng. 204. 

Comp. Lit. 203. Schiller (5). Same as German 203. Prahl. 

Comp. Lit. 204, Goethe's Faus* (3). Same as German 204. Zucker. 

Comp. Lit. 205. Georges Duhamel, Poet, Dramatist, Novelist (5). Same as 

French 204. Falls. 

Comp. Lit. 206. Seminar in Sixteenth Century Literature (3). Fall quarter. 

Same as Eng. 205. Zeeveld. 

Comp. Lit. 207. Seminar in Shakespeare (3). Winter quarter. Same as Eng. 

207. Zeeveld. 



32 DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

D. H. 101. Dairy Production (4). Three lectures and one laboratory period a 
week, fall quarter. Prerequisites, D. H. 1, and A. H. 52. 

D. H. 10.5. Dairy Breeds and Breeding (3). Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week, winter quarter. Prerequisites, D. H. 1, Zool. 104, A. H. 53. 

Berry. 

D. H. 109. Cheese Making (4). One lecture and three laboratory periods a 
week, fall quarter. Prerequisites, D. H. 1, Bact. 1, and Bact. 5. Hughes. 

D. H. 110. Butter Making (2). One lecture and one laboratory period a 
week, fall quarter. Prerequisites, D. H. 1, Bact. 1, and Bact . 5. 

D. H. 111. Concentrated Milks (3). One lecture and two laboratory periods 
a week, spring quarter. Prerequisites, D. H. 1, Bact. 1, and Bact. 5. 

D. H. 112. Ice Cream Making (4). One lecture and three laboratory periods 
a week, winter quarter. Prerequisites, D. H. 1, Bact. 1, and Bact. 5. 

D. H. 113. Market Milk (5). Three lectures and two laboratory periods a 
week, fall quarter. Prerequisites, D. H. 1, Bact. 1, and Bact. 5. 

D. H. 114. Analysis of Dairy Products (5). Two lectures and three labor- 
atory periods a week, winter quarter. Prerequisites, D. H. 1, Bact. 1. 
Bact. 5, Chem 4, 12, 13, 15 and 16. 

D. H. 119, 120, 121. Dairy Literature (1, 1, 1). One hour a week, fall, winter 
and spring quarters. Prerequisite, D. H. 1. Berry, Moore- 

D. H. 123. Methods of Dairy Research (2-5). Summer, fall, winter, and 
spring quarters. Berry, Moore. 

For Graduates 

D. H. 201. Advanced Dairy Production (3). Fall quarter. Moore. 
D. H. 202. Dairy Technology (3). Fall quarter. 
D. H. 203, Milk Products (2). Winter quarter. 
D. H. 204. Special Problems in Dairying (2-5). Summer, fall, winter, and 

spring quarters. StaflF. 

D. H. 205. Seminar (1). Fall, winter and spring quarters. Staff. 

D. H. 208. Research. Credit to be determined by amount and quality of 

work done. Staff. 

EDUCATION 

A student in Education has the option of qualifying for the degree of Master 
of Arts or for the degree of Master of Education. (For requirements see pages 
9-11.; 

Special Departmental Requirements and Information 

Master of Arts and Master of Education 

Students who do not complete the requirements for Master's degree within 
six years of the date of matriculation may be required to take supplementary 



EDUCATION 38 

course work at the rate of three quarter hours for each year the completion of 
the course requirements is deferred beyond six years, or to take special ex- 
aminations based upon up-to-date materials in courses more than six years old. 

A qualifying written examination is ntquired of all candidates for a degree, 
to be taken after the student has successfully completed fifteen quarter hours, 
and before he has completed twenty-eight hours (Master of Arts), or thirty- 
eight hours (Master of Education). This examination covers the general 
information a student should have in the field of education and in his minor 
field. To assist in a choice of reading in preparation for the examination, a list 
has been prepared and is available in the office of the College of Education. 
The examination is usually given on the first Saturday in December, February 
and June, simultaneously at College Park and Baltimore. 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Education who are high school teach- 
ers not preparing for administrative positions are expected to take at least 
eighteen quarter hours in their subject fields. 

In addition to the general requirements for admission, applicants for un- 
conditional admission with a major in Education must have had twenty-four 
quarter hours of undergraduate work in Education of acceptable quality, 
equivalent in character to the twenty-four hours required in the junior and 
senior years of the University of Maryland. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

The Department of Education offers work towards the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy with major or minor in the following fields: 

a. General Education: includes history of education, comparative edu- 
cation, educational sociology, secondary education, elementary education, and 
adult education. 

b. Educational Administration: includes organization and administration 
of elementary, secondary, and higher education; school finance, business 
administration of schools; and supervision of elementary and secondary schools. 

c. Curriculum and Instruction: includes principles of curriculum making, 
special methods and curricula in various fields, guidance, and research studies 
in the teaching of special subjects. 

In addition to the general university requirements for the degree the follow- 
ing additional requirements must be met by students proposing to major in one 
of the above fields. 

1. Qualifying examination, oral or written, or both, at the discretion of the 
department, covering student's undergraduate and first year c f graduate prep- 
aration in education and related fields, to be taken as soon as possible after com- 
pletion of the first year of graduate work and in any event required before re- 
ceiving the department's official permission to take work bej'ond the Master's 
degree with the purpose of applying for candidacy for the doctorate. 

2. The preliminary examination for admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. 
degree will include a written examination covering the student's preparation in 
major and minor fields, and an oral examination covering his plan of research 
for the doctoral dissertation. 



34 EDUCATION 

A. History, Principles, Curriculum, and Administration 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Ed. 100. History of Education in the United States (3). Winter and summer 

quarters. 
Ed. 102. History of Modern Education (3). Fall and spring quarters. 
Ed. 103. Theory of the Senior High School (3). Fall quarter. Joyal. 

Ed. 104. Principles of Education (3). Winter and summer quarters. 

Schindler, 

Ed. 105. Educational Measurements (3). Winter and summer quarters. 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Brechbill. 

Ed. 107. Comparative Education (3). (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 
Ed. 108. Comparative Education (3). (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 
Ed. 110, Theory of the Junior High School (3). Winter, spring, and summer 

quarters. Joyal. 

Ed. 112. Educational Sociology — Introductory (3). Fall and spring quarters. 

Schindler. 

Ed. 114. Guidance in the Schools (3). Winter and summer quarters. 

Schindler. 

Ed. 120. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — English (5). Fall and 

winter quarters. Bryan. 

Ed. 122. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — ^Social Studies (5). 

Fall and spring quarters. Schindler. 

Ed. 124. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — Foreign Languages (5). 

Spring quarter. 
Ed. 126. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — Science (5). Winter and 

spring quarters. Brechbill. 

Ed. 127. High School Course of Study — Literature (3). Spring and summer 

quarters. Bryan. 

Ed. 128. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — Mathematics (5). 

Winter and spring quarters. Brechbill. 

Ed. 129. High School Course of Study — English (3). Winter quarter. Bryan. 
Ed. 133. Remedial Reading Instruction (2). Fall quarter. Zerbola. 

Ed. 138. Visual Education (3). Fall, spring, and summer quarters. Brechbill. 
Ed. 141. Administration and Supervision in the Elementary School (3). 

Summer quarter. 
Ed. 142. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — Physical Education (5). 

Spring quarter. Tenney. 

Ed. 143. The Elementary School Curriculum (3). Winter and summer 

quarters. Schindler. 

Ed. 180. Introduction to Special Education (2). Fall and summer quarters. 

For Graduates 

Ed, 200. The Organization and Administration of Public Education (3). Fall 
quarter. Joyal. 



EDUCATION 36 

Ed. 202. The Organization, Administration, and Supervision, of Secondary 
Schools (3). Winter quarter. Joyal. 

Ed. 203. High School Supervision (3). Spring quarter. Joyal. 

Ed. 204. Source Materials in Education (2). Fall and winter quarters. Joyal. 

Ed. 209. Public Education in Maryland (3). Summer quarter. Joyal. 

Ed. 211. The Adolescent: Characteristics and Problems (3). Summer 
quarter. 

Ed. 216. School Finance and Business Administration (3). Summer quarter. 

Joyal. 
Ed. 217. Research Methods (2). Spring quarter. Joyal. 

Note: Students qualifying for the degree of Master of Education will elect 
the required six quarter hours of seminar work from the following list of 
seminars (Ed. 220-Ed. 234, inclusive). These courses are open for election 
by any other graduate student. 

Ed. 220. Seminar in Secondary Education (3). Fall and summer quarters. 

Schindler. 

Ed. 222. Seminar in Adult Education (3). (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

Ed. 224. Seminar in History of Education (3). Spring quarter. 

Ed. 226. Seminar in Administration (3). Summer quarter. Joyal. 

Ed. 228. Seminar in Special Education (3). Summer quarter. 

Ed. 230. Seminar in Science Education (3). Fall quarter. Brechbill. 

Ed. 232. Seminar in Educational Sociology (3). Winter quarter. Schindler. 

Ed. 234. Seminar in Comparative Education (3). (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

Ed. B236. Seminar in Vocational Education (3), commonly given in the Balti- 
more division, may be used to satisfy this requirement. Summer quarter. 

Ed. 237. Curriculum Development in the Secondary School (3). Summer 

quarter. Schindler. 

Ed. 299. Research. Staff. 

B. Commercial Education 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Ed. 150. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — Commercial Subjects (5) 
Spring quarter. Patrick. 

C. Home Economics Education 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

H. E. Ed. 101. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — ^Home Economics 

(5). Fall, winter, and spring quarters. McNaughton. 

H. E. Ed. 104. Nursery School Techniques (3-5). Winter and summer quar- 
ters. McNaughton. 

H. E. Ed. 105. Special Problems. Child Study (5). Spring and summer 
quarters. McNaughton. 



3S ENGINEERING 

For Graduates 

H. E. 201. AdTanced Methods of Teaching Home Economics (3-5). Winter 
and summer quarters. McNaughton. 

H. E. Ed. 250. Seminar in Home Economics Education (3-5). Fall and spring 
quarters. McNaughton. 

D. Industrial Education 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Ind. Ed. 160. Essentials of Design (3). Fall and spring quarters. 
Ind. Ed. 162. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — Industrial Educa- 
tion (5). Winter quarter. 
Ind. Ed. 164. Shop Organization and Management (3). Summer quarter. 

Brown. 
For courses offered in Baltimore address Professor Glen D. Brown, Depart- 
ment of Industrial Education, University of Maryland, Lombard and 
Greene Streets, Baltimore-1, Maryland. 

ENGINEERING 
A. Chemical Engineering 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Ch. E. 103 a,b,c. Elements of Chemical Engineering (9). Three hours a 
week. Parts a,b,c, summer, fall and winter quarters; part a, spring quarter 
1945. Prerequisites: Chem. lA, 3A; Physics 3A, 4A, 5A. 

Ch. E. 104 a,b,c. Chemical Engineering Seminar (3). One hour a week. Parts 
a,b,c, summer, fall and winter quarters; part a, spring quarter 1945. 

Ch. E. 105 a,b,c. Advanced Unit Operations (15). Two lectures and one all-day 
laboratory period a week. Parts a,b,c, summer, fall and winter quarters; 
part a, spring quarter 1945. Prerequisites: Ch. E. 103 a, b, c; Chemistry 
187, 188, 189, 190. 

(This is a course extending through three quarters, and completion of all 
quarters is required.) 

Ch. E. 106 a,b,c. Minor Problems (18). Six hours a week. Prerequisites: Ch. 
E. 105 a,b,c, or simultaneous registration therein. (Not offered in 1944- 
1945.) 

Ch. E. 107 a,b,c. Fuels and Their Utilization (6). Two hours a week. Parts 
a,b,c, summer, fall and winter quarters; part a, spring quarter 1945. 
Prerequisites: Ch. E. 103 a,b,c, or permission of Department of Chemical 
Engineering. 

Ch. E. 108 a,b,c. Chemical Technology (6). Two hours a week. Parts a,b,c, 
summer, fall and winter quarters; part a, spring quarter 1945. Prere- 
quisites: Ch. E. 103 a,b,c, or simultaneous registration therein, or per- 
mission of the Department of Chemical Engineering. 

Ch. E. 109 a,b,c. Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (6). Two hours a 
week. Parts a,b,c, summer, fall and winter quarters; part a, spring quar- 
ter 1945. Prerequisites: Physical Chemistry 187, 188, 189, 190; Ch. E. 
103 a,b,c, or permission of instructor. 



ENGINEERING 37 

C"h. E. 110 a.b.c. Chemical Engineering Calculations (9). Three hours a week. 
Parts a,b,c, summer, fall and winter quarters; part a, spring quarter 1945. 
Prerequisites: Math. 20, 21, 22; Ch. E. 103 a.b.c. 

Ch. E. HI a.b.c. Explosives and Toxic Gases (6). Two hours a week. Pre- 
requisites: Organic Chemistry 35, 37, Physical Chemistry 187, 188, 189, 
190. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 



For Graduates 

Ch. E. 201 a,b,c. Graduate Unit Operations. (15 or more). One hour con- 
ference, three or more laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, permission 
of Department of Chemical Engineering. 

(This is a course extending through three quarters, and completion of 
all quarters is required.) 

Ch. E. 202. Gas Analysis (3). One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, permission of Department of Chemical Engineering. 

Ch. E. 203. Graduate Seminar (1). One hour a week. Required of all grad- 
uate students in Chemical Engineering. 

Ch. E. 205. Research. Credit to be arranged. 

Ch. E. 207A. 208A, 209A. Plant Design Studies (9). Three conference hours a 
week. Prerequisite, permission of Department of Chemical Engineering. 

Ch. E. 207B, 208B, 209B. Plant Design Studies Laboratory (6). Three labor- 
atory periods a week. Prerequisite, permission of Department of Chemical 
Engineering. 

(This is a course extending through three quarters, and completion of all 
quarters is required.) 

Ch. E. 210 a,b,c. Gaseous Fuels (6). Two hours a week. Prerequisite, per- 
mission of Department of Chemical Engineering. 



B. Civil Engineering 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

C. E. 100. Theory of Structures (6). Five lectures and one laboratory period 
a week, spring quarter. Prerequisite, Mech 51. 

C. E. 101. Elements of Highways (5). Three lectures and two laboratory 

periods a week, fall quarter. Prerequisite, Mech. 51. 
C. E. 102, 103, 104. Concrete Design (11), Three hours a week, fall and 

spring quarters; four lectures and one laboratory period a week, winter 

quarter. Prerequisite, C. E. 100. 
C. E. 105, 106, 107. Structural Design (11). Three lectures a week, fall and 

spring quarters; four lectures and one laboratory period a week, winter 

quarter. Prerequisite, C. E. 100. 
C. E. 108, 109, 110. Municipal Sanitation (9). Two lectures and one labor- 
atory period a week, fall, winter and spring quarters. Prerequisite, C. E. 

50. 
C. E. 111. Soils and Foundations (4). Three lectures and one laboratory 

period a week, spring quarter. Prerequisite, C. E. 100. 



38 ENGINEERING 

C. E. 112, 113. Elements of Structures (4). Two hours a week, fall and 
winter quarters. Prerequisites, Phys. 3A, 4A, 5A and Mech. 1 or 2. For 
non-civil engineering students. 

For Graduates 

C. E. 200. Advanced Properties of Materials (3). Fall, winter or spring quar- 
ter. Prerequisite, Mech. 53 or equivalent. 

C. E. 201. Advanced Strength of Materials (3). Fall, winter or spring quar- 
ter. Prerequisite, Mech. 50, 51, or equivalent. 

C. E. 202. Applied Elasticity (3). Fall, winter, or spring quarter. Prere- 
quisite, Math. 114, or equivalent. 

C. E. 203. Soil Mechanics (3). Fall, winter, or spring quarter. Prerequisite, 
C. E. Ill, or equivalent. 

C. E. 204. Advanced Foundations (3). Fall, winter, or spring quarter. Pre- 
requisite, C. E. 102, 103, 104, or equivalent. 

C. E. 205. Highway Engineering (3). Fall, winter, or spring quarter. Pre- 
requisite, C. E. 101 or equivalent. 

C. E. 206. Theory of Concrete Mixtures (6). Fall, winter, or spring quarter. 
Prerequisite, Mech. 53 or equivalent. 

C. E. 207. Advanced Structures (4). Three lectures and one laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisites, C. E. 102, 103, 104 and C. E. 105, 106, 107. 

C. E. 208. Research, Credit in accordances, with work done. Fall, winter, or 
spring quarter. 

C. Electrical Engineering 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

E. E. 100. Alternating-Current Circuits (7). Five lectures and two laboratory 
periods a week, winter quarter. Prerequisite, E. E. 55. 

E. E. 101. Engineering Electronics (6). Five lectures and one laboratory 
period a week, spring quarter. Prerequisite, E. E. 55; E. E. 100. 

E. E. 102, 103, 104. Alternating-Current Machinery (14). Three lectures 
and two laboratory periods a week, fall and winter quarters; three lectures 
and one laboratory period a week, spring quarter. Prerequisite, E. E. 100. 

E. E. 105, 106. Radio Communication (8). Three lectures and one laboratory 
period a week, fall and winter quarters. Prerequisites, E. E. 100 and E. 
E. 101. 

E. E. 107. Communications Networks (4). Fall quarter. Prerequisite, con- 
current registration in E. E. 102. 

E. E. 108. Electric Transients (4). Spring quarter. Prerequisite, concurrent 
registration in E. E. 104. 

E. E. 112. Illumination (4). Three lectures and one laboratory period a 
week, spring quarter. Prerequisite, E. E. 100. 

E. E. 113. Electric Railways (4). Fall quarter. Prerequisite, concurrent reg- 
istration in E. E. 102. 

For Graduates 

E. E. 200. Symmetrical Components (3). Fall quarter. Prerequisite, E. E. 
104, or equivalent. 



ENGINEERING 89 

E. E. 202. Advanced Circuit Analysis (3). Winter Quarter. 
E, E. 204. Operational Circuit Analysis (3). Spring quarter. Prerequisite, E.E. 
104 or equivalent. 

D. Mechanical Engineering 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

M. E. 100, 101, 102. Thermodynamics (9). Two lectures and one laboratory 

period a week, fall, winter, and spring quarters. Prerequisites, Math. 20, 

21, 22; Phys. 3A, 4A, 5A. 
M. E. 103, 104. Heating and Ventilation (6). Two lectures and one laboratory 

period a week, fall and winter quarters. Prerequisites, M. E. 100, 101, 102. 
M. E. 105. Refrigeration (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period a week, 

spring quarter. Prerequisites, M. E. 100, 101, 102. 
M. E. 109, 110, 111. Prime Movers (12). Two lectures and two laboratory 

periods a week, fall, winter, and spring quarters. Prerequisites, Mech. 

50; M. E. 100, 101, 102. 
M. E. 112, 113, 114. Mechanical Engineering Design (12). Two lectures 

and two laboratory periods a week, fall, winter, and spring quarters. 

Prerequisites, Mech. 50; M. E. 100, 101, 102. 

M. E. 115, 116, 117. Mechanical Laboratory (6). One lecture and one labor- 
atory period a week, fall, winter, and spring quarters. 
M. E. 118, 119, 120. Airplane Structures (9). Fall, winter and spring quarters. 

For Graduates 

M. E. 200, 201, 202. Advanced Dynamics (6). Two hours a week, fall, winter, 

and spring quarters. 
M. E. 203, 204, 205. Applied Elasticity (6). Two hours a week, fall, winter, 

and spring quarters. 

M. E. 206, 207, 208. Advanced Aircraft Structures (6). Two hours a week, 
fall, winter, and spring quarters. 

M. E. 209, 210, 211. Advanced Hydrodynamics and Aerodynamics (6). Two 

hours a week, fall, winter, and spring quarters. 

M. E. 212, 213, 214. Advanced Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer (6). 

Two hours a week, fall, winter, and spring quarters. 
M. E. 215. Seminar. Fall, winter, or spring quarter. Credit in accordance 

with work outlined. 
M. E. 216. Research. Fall, winter, or spring quarter. Credit in accordance 

with work done. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Requirements for Advanced Degrees with Major in English (in addition to 
the general requirements of the Graduate School). 

Master of Arts 

1. Candidates for the degree of Master of Arts in the Department of 
English must demonstrate a reading knowledge of French or German at the 
time of admission, or not later than six months before taking the degree. 

2. In the thesis the candidate will be expected to demonstrate his ability 



40 ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

to use the ordinary methods of research in the discovery of knowledge and to 
organize and present his findings in a clear, eifective English style. 

3. The final examination will be based in part upon the courses pursued 
and in part upon first-hand knowledge of all the literary works included in the 
departmental list of reading for the Master's degree. The examination will 
test the candidate's powers of analysis and criticism. 

Major work in the department may be elected in any of the following fields, 
the requirements of which are listed below. 

a. Major work in English literature: Old English, and at least nine hours 
from seminar courses in Medieval Romance, the Elizabethan period, the 
Eighteenth Century, the Romantic period, the Victorian period. 

b. Major work in American literature: the seminar in American literature, 
and at least nine hours from the advanced undergraduate courses in American 
literature. 

c. Major work in Drama: History of the Theatre, and at least nine hours 
from the following. Introduction to Comparative Literature (first quarter), 
Medieval Drama, Elizabethan Drama, Modern Drama, Contemporary Drama, 
American Drama, The Faust Legend, The Modern German Drama, Spanish 
Drama, Ibsen. 

d. Major work in philology: Old English, Beowulf, Seminar in Old English 
Poetry, Middle English, Gothic, and either Medieval Romance or Chaucer. 

e. Major work, designed chiefly for teachers in secondary schools: Old 
English, and at least nine hours from the following groups: Elizabethan 
Drama, or an Elizabethan seminar; Milton; the Eighteenth Century; either 
Prose and Poetry of the Romantic Age or Seminar in the Romantic Period; 
Contemporary American Prose and Poetry or the American seminar; Victorian 
Prose and Poetry or seminar in the Victorian Period; Advanced Writing. 

Doctor of Philosophy 
Each candidate must have the following courses: 

a. Five credit hours in Comparative Literature. 

b. Six credit hours in Old English, Eng. 102, 103, and 212. 

c. Six credit hours in the Middle English Language, Eng. 202, and Gothic, 
Eng. 203. 

Candidates must pass a comprehensive written examination one year 
before they expect to be awarded degrees. This examination will include 
linguistics (morphology and phonology) and each of the major literary fields, 
from which the candidate may select two for particularly detailed examination, 
specifically: Old English, Middle English, the Drama, the Sixteenth and 
Seventeenth Centuries, the Eighteenth Century, the Nineteenth Century, 
American Literature. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Eng. 101. History of the English Language (.5). Winter and summer quar- 
ters. Prerequisite, Eng. 15. Harman. 

Eng, 102. Old English (3). Fall quarter. Prerequisite, Eng. 15. Ball. 

Eng. 103. Beowulf (3). Winter quarter. Prerequisite, Eng. 102. Ball. 

Eng. 104. Chaucer (3). Fall quarter. Prerequisites, Eng. 4, 5, 6. Harman. 

Eng. lO.^. Medieval Drama in England (3). Prerequisites, Eng. 4, 5, 6. 
(Not offered in 1944-1945.) 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 41 

Eng. 106. Elizabethan Drama (3) Spring quarter. Prerequisite, Eng. 4, 5, 6. 

Zeeveld. 
Eng. 107. Renaissance Poetry and Prose (3). Summer quarter. Prerequisites, 

Eng. 4, 5, 6. Zeeveld. 

Eng. 108. Milton (3). Summer quarter. Prerequisites, Eng. 4, 5, 6. Ball. 
Eng. 109. Literature of the Seventeenth Century to 1660 (3). Summer quar- 
ter. Prerequisites, Eng. 4, 5, 6. Ball. 
Eng. Ill, 112. Literature of the Eighteenth Century (3, 3). Prerequisites, 

Eng. 4, 5, 6. (Not ofifered in 1944-1945.) Ball! 

Eng. 113, 114. Prose and Poetry of the Romantic Age (3, 3). Three hours a 

week, fall and winter quarters. Prerequisites, Eng. 4, 5, 6. Weeks. 

Eng. 116, 117. Victorian Prose and Poetry (3, 3). Two hours a week, spring 

and suramer quarters. Prerequisites, Eng. 4, 5, 6. Weeks. 

Eng. 118. Modern and Contemporary British Poets (3). Winter quarter. 

Prerequisites, Eng. 4, 5, 6. Macleod. 

Eng. 123. Modern Drama (3). Summer quarter. Prerequisites, Eng. 4, 5, 6. 

(Not offered in 1944-1945.) 
Eng. 124. Contemporary Drama (3). Fall quarter. Prerequisites, Eng. 4, 5, 

6- Andrews. 

Eng. 125. Emerson, Thoreau, and Whitman (3). Summer quarter. Prere- 
quisites, Eng. 11, 12. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 
Eng. 126. American Fiction (3). Prerequisites, Eng. 11, 12. (Not offered in 

1944-1945.) 
Eng. 127. Contemporary American Poetry and Prose (3). Spring quarter. 

Prerequisites, Eng. 11, 12. Macleod. 

Eng. 128. American Drama (3). Prerequisites, Eng. 11, 12. (Not offered in 

1944-1945.) 
Eng. 135. Creative Writing (3). Fall and spring quarters. Prerequisites, 

Eng. 4, 5, 6. Macleod. 

Eng. 136. Magazine Writing (3). Summer quarter. Prerequisites, Eng. 4. 5, 6. 

Macleod. 
Eng. 137. Advanced Creative Writing (3). Winter quarter. Prerequisite, 

English 135 or 136; open to other students by permission of the instructor 

after submission of an original composition. Macleod. 

Eng. 140. Major American Poets (3). Prerequisites, Eng. 4, 5, 6. (Not 

offered in 1944-1945.) 
Eng. 141. Major American Prose Writers (3). Prerequisites, Eng. 4, 5, 6. 

(Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

For Graduates 

Eng. 200. Seminar in Special Studies (2-5). Staff. 

Eng. 201. Research. Staff. 

Eng. 202. Middle English Language (3). Spring quarter. Prerequisites, 
Eng. 102 and 103 Harman. 

Eng. 203. Gothic (3). Summer quarter. Prerequisite, Eng. 102. Harman. 
Eng. 204. Medieval Romance in England (3). (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 
Eng. 205. Seminar in Sixteenth Century Literature (3). Fall quarter. 

Zeeveld. 



42 ENTOMOLOGY 

Eng. 207. Seminar in Shakespeare (3). Winter quarter. Prerequsites, Eng. 
11, 12, or equivalent. Zeeveld. 

Eng. 208. Seminar in Eighteenth Century Literature (3). (Not offered in 
1944-1945.) 

Eng. 209. Seminar in American Literature (3). (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

Eng. 210. Seminar in Romantic Period (3). Spring quarter. Prerequisites, 
Eng. 113, 114, or equivalent satisfactory to the instructor. Weeks. 

Eng. 211. Seminar in the Victorian Period (2-3). Prerequisites, Eng. 116, 
117, or the permission of the instructor. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

Eng. 212. Old English Poetry (2-3). Prerequisite, Eng. 102, or equivalent. 
(Not offered in 1944-1945.) Ball. 

Eng. 213. Bibliography (2). (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 



ENTOMOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Ent. 101. Economic Entomology (3). Winter quarter. Prerequisite, consent 
of the department. Cory. 

Ent. 103, 104. Insect Pests (4, 4). (Not offered in 1944-1945.) Cory. 

Ent. 105. Medical Entomology (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period a 
week, spring and summer quarters. Cory. 

Ent. 107. Insecticides (3). Winter quarter. Prerequisites, Ent. 1 and ele- 
mentary chemistry. Ditman. 

Ent. 109. Insect Physiology (3). Three lectures a week and occasional demon- 
strations, fall quarter. Yeager. 

Ent. 110, 111. Special Problems (2, 2). Two hours a week, spring and sum- 
mer quarters. Prerequisite to be determined by the department. 

Cory. 

Ent. 112. Seminar (1-3). Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Cory. 

Ent. 113. Photomicography (2). Two laboratory periods a week and oc- 
casional lectures, winter quarter. Chisolm. 

For Graduates 

Ent. 201. Advanced Entomology. Credit and prerequisites to be arranged. 
Fall, winter, spring, and summer quarters. Cory. 

Ent. 202. Research. Cory. 

Ent. 203. Insect Morphology (3-5). Fall quarter. Snodgrass. 

Ent. 205. Insect Ecology (3). Two lectures and on laboratory period a week, 
winter quarter. Langford. 



HISTORY 43 



HISTORY 



Special Departmental Requirements for Degrees, in Addition to the General 
Requirements of the Graduate School 

Master of Arts 

Twelve to fifteen quarter hours of the total major course requirements of 
all candidates for this degree must be acquired in the general field of the 
thesis, i.e., either American or European History. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

1. At least forty-five quarter hours of the total major course requirements 
must be acquired in the general field of the thesis, i.e., American History or 
European History. 

2. At least fifteen quarter hours of the forty-five required for a minor in 
history must be taken at the University of Maryland. 

3. Prospective candidates must pass preliminary written and oral ex- 
aminations covering various fields of their major and minor subjects before ad- 
mission to candidacy. Consult the head of the department for details. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
A. American History 

H. 5, 6, 7, or equivalent, are prerequisite for courses H. 101 to H. 142, in- 
clusive. 

H. 101. American Colonial History (3). Fall quarter. Baker-Crothers. 

H. 103. The American Revolution (3). Winter quarter. Baker-Crothers. 
H. 105, 106. Social and Economic Hi«?tory of the United States to 1860 

(3,3). Three hours a week. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) Baker-Crothers. 
H. 115. The Old South (3). Fall quarter. Gewehr. 

H. 116. The American Civil War (3). Winter quarter. Stampp. 

H. 117. Reconstruction and the New South (3). Spring quarter. Stampp. 
H. 121, 122. History of the American Frontier (3, 3). Three hours a week, 

winter and spring quarters. Gewehr. 

H. 125. The United States in the Twentieth Century (3). Fall quarter. 

Freidel. 

H. 127, 128. Diplomatic History of the United States (3, 3). Three hours a 

week. Spring and summer quarters, 1944. Stampp. 

H. 129. The United States in World Affairs (3). Spring quarter. Gewehr. 
H. 133, 134. The History of American Ideas (3, 3). Three hours a week, 

fall and winter quarters. Hofstadter. 

H. 135, 136, 137. Constitutional History of the United States (9). Three hours a 

week. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 
H. 141, 142. History of Maryland (3, 3). Three hours a week, spring and 

summer quarters, 1944. Baker-Crothers. 

H. 145, 146. Latin American History (3. 3^. Three hours a week, winter and 

spring quarters. Prerequisites, 9 hours of fundamental courses. Freidel. 



44 HISTORY 

B. European History 

H. 151, 152. History of the Ancient Orient and Greece (3, 3). Three hours 

a week. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 
H. 153. History of Rome (3). (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 
H. 155, 156, 157. Medieval Civilization (3, 3, 3). Three hours a week. (Not 

offered in 1944-1945.) 
H. 161, 162. The Foundations of Modern Culture (3, 3). Three hours a we k. 

(Not offered in 1944-1945.) 
H. 165, 166. Revolutionary and Napoleonic Europe (3, 3). Three hours a 

week, fall and winter quarters. Prerequisites, H. 1, 2, 3, or equivalent. 

Freidel. 
H. 171, 172, 173. Europe in the Nineteenth Century, 1815-1919 (3, 3, 3). 

Three hours a week, fall, winter, and spring quarters. Prerequisites, H. 1, 

2, 3, or equivalent. Freidel. 

H. 175, 176. Europe in the Twentieth Century (3, 3). Three hours a week. 

Prerequisites, H. 1, 2, 3, or equivalent. (Not offered in 1944-1945 ) 
H. 179, 180. Diplomatic History of Europe Since 1871 (3, 3). Three hours a 

week. Prerequisites, H. 1, 2, 3, or equivalent. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 
H. 181, 182. History of Central Europe (3, 3). Three hours a week. Prere- 
quisites, H. 1, 2, 3, or equivalent. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 
H. 185, 186, 187. History of the British Empire (3, 3, 3). Three hours a week. 

Prerequisites, H. 1, 2, 3, or equivalent. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) Silver. 
H. 191, 192. History of Russia (3, 3). Three hours a week. Prerequisites, H. 

1, 2, 3, or equivalent. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

H. 193. History of the Near East. (3). Summer quarter. Prerequisites, H. 1, 

2, 3, or equivalent. 

H. 195. TheFar East (3). Summer quarter. Gewehr. 

H. 199. Proseminar in Historical Writing (3). Spring quarter. Hofstadter. 

For Graduates 

H. 200. Research. Credit apportioned to amount of work. Staff. 

H. 201. Seminar in American History (2). Arranged. Staff. 

H. 205, 206. Topics in American Economic and Social History (3, 3). Ar- 
ranged. Freidel. 

H. 211. The Colonial Period in American History (3). Arranged. 

Baker-Crothers. 

H. 215. The Old South (3). Arranged. Gewehr. 

H. 216. The American Civil War (3). Arranged. Gewehr. 

H. 221. History of the West (3). Arranged. Gewehr. 

H. 233. Topics in American Intellectual History (3). Arranged. Hofstadter. 

H. 250. Seminar in European History (2). Arranged. Staff. 

H. 255. Medieval Culture and Society (3). Arranged. 

H. 281. Topics in the History of Central Europe (3). Arranged. 

H. 285. Topics in the History of Modern England and Great Britain (3). Ar- 
ranged. Silver. 

H. 297. Historians and Historical Criticism (3). Arranged. Staff. 



HOME ECONOMICS 45 

HOME ECONOMICS 

A. Textiles 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

H. E. 110, 111. Advanced Textiles (6). One lecture and two laboratory 

periods a week, fall and winter quarters. Prerequisites, H. E. 10; Chem. 31, 32, 
33, 34. Genger. 

K. E. 112. Problems in Textiles (3). One lecture and two laboratory periods 
a week, spring quarter. Prerequisite, H. E. 111. Genger. 

H. E. 113. Consumer Problems in Textiles (3). Two lectures and one labor- 
atory period a week, fall and summer quarters. Prerequisite, H. E. 10, 
or consent of the instructor. Genger. 

B. Clothing 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

H. E. 120. Pattern Design (3). Three laboratory periods a week, winter and 
summer, 1945, quarters. Prerequisite, H. E. 20A or 20B. Mitchell. 

H. E. 121. Children's Clothing (2). Two laboratory periods a week, summer, 
1944, and winter quarters. Prerequisite, H. E. 20A or 20B. Mitchell. 

H. E. 122. Draping (5). Five laboratory periods a week, fall and spring quar- 
ters. Prerequisities H. E. 20A, 71, or equivalent. McFarland. 

H. E. 124. Tailoring (3). Three laboratory periods a week, fall and spring 
quarters. Prerequisites, H. E. 20A or 20B. Mitchell. 

H. E. 125. Problems in Clothing (3). Spring and summer, 1945, quarters. Pre- 
requisites, H. E. 122. McFarland. 

C. Practical Art 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

H. E. 170. Interior Design (5). Two lectures and three laboratory periods a 
week, fall, winter, and spring quarters. Prerequisites, H. E. 20, or equiva- 
lent. Brown. 

H. E. 172. Advanced Interior Design (3). Three laboratory periods a week, 
fall and winter quarters. Prerequisites, H. E. 70, 170, or equivalent. 

Curtiss. 

H. E. 174. Merchandise Display (3). Three laboratory periods a week, fall, 
winter, spring, and summer quarters. Prerequisites, H. E. 20, or equiva- 
lent. Curtiss. 

H. E. 175. Advanced Merchandise Display (3). Three laboratory periods a 
week, fall, winter, spring, and summer quarters. Prerequisites, H. E. 70, 
174. Curtiss. 

H. E. 176. Advertising Layout and Store Coordination (3). Three laboratory 
periods a week, fall quarter. Prerequisites, H. E. 70, or equivalent. 

Curtiss. 

H. E. 178. Radio in Retailing (3). Spring quarter. Prerequisites, Speech 1, 2; 
Eng. 1, 2, 3; Econ. 150; H. E. 174. Curtiss. 



46 HOME ECONOMICS 

H. E. 185, 186. Individual Problems in Design (6). Three hours a week, fall 
and winter; spring and summer quarters. H. E. 70, 71, 170, 172, 173, must 
precede or parallel this course. Curtiss. 



D. Home and Institutional Management 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

H. E. 150, 151, 152. Management of the Home (9). Three hours a week, fall, 
winter, and spring quarters. England. 

H. E. 153. Practice in Management of the Home (3). Fall, winter, spring, and 
summer quarters. Prerequisites, H. E. 150, 151, 152. England. 

H. E. 160. Institution Organization and Management (3). Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week, fall quarter. Prerequisites, H. E. 31, 32, 
33, 150, 151, 152. 

H. E. 161. Institution Equipment and Food Purchasing (4). Three lectures 
and one laboratory period a week, winter quarter. 

H. E. 162. Accounting and Food Control (3). Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week spring quarter. 

H. E. 163. Institution Cookery (5). Two lectures and three laboratory per- 
iods a week, winter and spring quarters. Prerequisites, H. E. 31, 32, 33, 
131, 135. 

H. E. 165. The School Lunch (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period a 
week, spring and summer quarters. Prerequisites, H. E. 31, 32, 33, 134 or 
135. England. 

H. E. 166. Advanced Institution Management (3). Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week, winter and spring quarters. Prerequisites, H. E. 
160, 161, 162. Mount. 

E. Foods and Nutrition 
For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

H. E. 130. Food Economics (2). One lecture and one laboratory period a 
week, winter quarter. Prerequisites, H. E. 31, 32, 33. Brown, 

H. E. 131. Meal Service (3). One lecture and two laboratory periods a week, 
fall, winter, spring, and summer quarters. Prerequisites, H. E. 31, 32, 33. 

Brown. 

H. E. 132. Demonstrations (3). Three laboratory periods a week, spring and 
winter quarters. Prerequisites, H. E. 10, 31, 32, 33. Lapp. 

H. E. 133. Experimental Foods (5). Two lectures and three laboratory per- 
iods a week, spring and summer, 1945, quarters. Prerequisites, H. E. 31, 
32, 33, 130, 131; Chem. 13, 14, 15, 16. Brown. 

H. E. 134. Advanced Foods (5). Two lectures and three laboratory periods a 
week, spring quarter. Prerequisites, H. E. 31, 32, 33. 

H. E. 135. Nutrition (5). Fall and spring quarters. Prerequisites, H. E, 31, 
32, 33; Chem. 13, 14, 15, 16. 

H. E. 136. Dietetics (5). Three lectures and two laboratory periods a week, 
fall and winter quarters. Prerequisite, H. E. 135. Neylan. 



HORTICULTURE 47 

H. E. 137. Diet in Disease (5). Four lectures and one laboratory period a 
week, winter quarter. Prerequisite, H. E. 131. Hagei. 

H. E. 138. Child Nutrition (4). Three lectures and one laboratory period a 
week, spring and summer quarters. Prerequisite, H. E. 135. 



For Graduates 

H. E. 230. Readings in Nutrition (3). Fall quarter. 

H. E. 231. Seminar in Nutrition (3). Spring and summer, 1945, quarters. 
H. E. 232. Advanced Experimental Foods (5). Two lectures and three labor- 
atory periods a week, winter quarter. Brown. 

H. E. 233. Seminar in Food Preparation (3-5). Spring quarter. 
H. E. 234. Research. Credit to be determined by amount and quality of 
work done. 

F. Home Economics Extension Methods 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

H. E. 190. Methods in Home Economics Extension (3). Spring quarter 

Kellar and Assistants. 

HORTICULTURE 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Hon. 101, 102. Technology of Horticultural Plants— Fruits (3. 3). Three 
hours a week, fall an J winter quarters. Prerequisite, Pit. Phys. 101. Haut. 

Hort. 103, 104. Technology of Horticultural Plants— Vegetables (3, 3). Three 
hours a week, fall and winter quarters. Prerequisite, Pit. Phys. 101. 

Mahoney. 

Hort. 105. Technology of Horticultural Plants— Ornamentals (3). Fall and 

winter quarters. Prerequisite, Pit. Phys. 101. Haut 

Hort. 106. World Fruits and Nuts (3). Winter and spring quarters. Haut. 
Hort. 107. Plant Materials (2). One lecture and one laboratory period a week, 

fall quarter. Thurston. 

Hort. 108. Plant Materials (2). One lecture and one laboratory period a 

week, winter quarter. Thurston. 

Hort. 109. Plant Materials (2). One lecture and one laboratory period a week, 

spring quarter. Thurston. 

Hort. 112. Canning Crops Technology (4). Three lectures and one labor- 

tory period a week, fall quarter. Given in alternate years. 

Mahoney, Walls. 

Hort. 114. Systematic Pomology (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period 
a week, fall quarter. Given in alternate years. Haut. 

Hort. 116. Systematic Olericulture (3). Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a wf^ek, summer quarter. Wa'ls. 



48 MATHEMATICS 

For Graduates 

Hort. 201. Experimental Pomology (3). Fall and winter quarters, Prere- 
quisite, Pit. Phys. 101. Schrader. 

Hort. 202. Experimental Pomology (3). Spring and summer quarters. Pre- 
requisite, Pit. Phys. 101. Schrader. 

Hort. 203. Experimental Olericulture (3). Fall and winter quarters. Prere- 
quisite, Pit. Phy?. 101. Mahoney. 

Hort. 204. Experimental Olericulture (3). Spring and summer quarters. Pre- 
requisite, Pit. Phys. 101. Mahoney. 

Hort. 205. Experimental Pomo'ogy (3). Spring quarter. A continuation of 
Hort. 201, 202. Schrader. 

Hort. 206. Experimental Olericulture (3). Spring quarter. Prerequisites, 
Zool. 120, Pit. Phys. 101, or equivalents. Mahoney. 

Hort. 207. Methods of Horticultural Research C3). Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week, fall and winter quarters. Staff. 

Hort. 208. Research. Credit given according to work done. Staff. 

Hort. 209. Seminar (1). Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Staff. 

MATHEMATICS 

A. Algebra 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 100, 101, 102. Higher Algebra (9). Three hours a week, winter, spring. 

and summer, 1945, quarters. Prerequisite, Math 22, or equivalent. 

Vanderslice. 
Math. 103, 104. Introduction to Modern Algebra (6). Three hours a week. 

Prerequisite, Math 22, or equivalent. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) Jackson. 

For Graduates 
Math. 200, 201, 202. Algebra (9). Three hours a week. (Not offered in 1944- 
1945.) Jackson. 

Math. 250. Selected Topics in Algebra (3). Arranged. 

B. Analysis 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Math. 110, 111, 112. Advanced Calculus (9). Three hours a week. Winter, 
spring, and summer, 1945, quarters. Prerequisite, Math 22, or equivalent. 

Martin. 

Math. 113, 114, 115. Differential Equations (9). Three hours a week, spring, 

summer, and fall quarters, 1944. Prerequisite, Math. 22, or equivalent. 

Vanderslice. 

For Graduates 

Math. 210, 211, 212. Functions of a Complex Variable (9). Three hours a 

week, winter, spring, summer, 1945, quarters. Prerequisites, Math. 110, 

111, 112, or equivalent. Hall. 

Math. 213, 214, 215. Functions of a Real Variable (9). Three hours a week, 

spring, summer, fall quarters, 1944. Hall. 

Math. 251. Selected Topics in Analysis (3). Arranged. 



MATHEMATICS 49 

C. Geometry 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 120, 121. Advanced Analytic Geometry (6). Three hours a week, spring 
and summer quarters, 1944. Prerequisite, Math. 22, or equivalent. 

Dantzig. 

Math. 123, 124, 125. Introduction to Projective Geometry (9). Three hours a 

week, spring summer, and fall quarters, 1944. Prerequisite, Math. 22, or 

equivalent. Jackson. 

Math. 126, 127. Introduction to Differential Geometry (6). Three hours a 

week. Prerequisite, Math. 22, or equivalent. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

Vanderslice. 

For Graduates 

Math. 220, 221. Differential Geometry (6). Three hours a week. Prere- 
quisites, Math. 126, 127, or equivalent. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

Jackson. 

Math. 223, 224. Topology (6). Three hours a week, winter and spring quar- 
ters. Prerequisites, Math. 110, 111, 112, or equivalent. Hall. 
Math. 252. Selected Topics in Geometry and Topology (3). Arranged. 



D. Applied Mathematics 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 130, 131, 132. Analytic Mechanics (9). Three hours a week. Prere- 
quisite, Math. 22, or equivalent. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) Martin. 

Math. 133, 134. Vector Analysis (6). Three hours a week. Prerequisite, 
Math. 22, or equivalent. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) Dantzig. 

Math. 135, 136. Probability (6). Three hours a week. Prerequisite, Math. 
22, or equivalent. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) Vanderslice. 

Math. 137, 138. Mathematical Statistics (6^. Three hours a week. Prere- 
quisite, Math. 22, or equivalent. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

Vanderslice. 

For Graduates 

Math. 230, 231, 232. Applied Mathematics (9). Three hours a week, spring, 
summer and fall quarters, 1944. Martin, 

Math. 233, 234. Tensor Analysis (6). Three hours a week. Prerequisites, 
Math. 126, 127, or equivalent. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) Vanderslice. 

Math. 253. Selected Topics in Applied Mathematics (3). Arranged. 

E. History 

For Graduates 
Math. 240, 241. Seminar in the History of Mathematics (4^. Two hours a 
week. Arranged. Dantzig. 



60 MODERN LANGUAGES 

F. Colloquium and Research 

For Graduates 

Math. 260. Colloquium. Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Staff. 

Math. 270. Research, Summer, fall, winter, and spring quarters. Staff. 



MODERN LANGUAGES 

A. French 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
French 101. French Literature of the Sixteenth Century (3). Falls. 

French 104, 105, 106. French Literature of the Seventeenth Century (3, 3, 3). 

Three hour* a week. Wilcox. 

French 107, 108. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century (3, 3). Three 

hours a week. Falls. 

French 110, 111, 112. French Literature of the Nineteenth Century (3, 3,3,). 

Three hours a week. Wilcox. 

French 113, 114, 115. French Literature of the Twentieth Century (3, 3, 3). 

Three hours a week. Liotard. 

French 121, 122, 123. Advanced Composition (3, 3, 3). Three hours a week. 

Prerequisites, French 60, 61. Falls 

For Graduates 
French 201. Research. Credits determined by work accomplished. Staff. 
French 202. Diderot and the Encyclopaedists (5). Falls. 

French 204. Georges Duhamel, Poet, Dramatist, Novelist (5). Falls. 

French 205. French Literature of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance (5). 

Correa. 

French 207. The French Novel in the First Half of the Nineteenth Century 
(5). Falls. 

French 209. The French Novel in the Second Half of the Nineteenth Cen- 
tury (5). Falls. 

French 213. Introduction to Old French (3). Falls. 

French 215. Seminar. Arranged. Staff. 

French 221, 222. Reading Course. Arranged. Falls. 

B. German 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

German 107, 108, 109. German Literature of the Eighteenth Century (3, 3, 3). 

Three hours a week. Prahl. 

German 110, 111, 112. German Literature of the Nineteenth Century (3, 

3, 3). Three hours a week. Prahl. 

German 113, 114, 115. Contemporary German Literature (3, 3, 3). Three 

hours a week. Prahl. 



PHYSICS 



51 



For Graduates 
German 201. Research. Credit determined by work accomplished. 
German 202. The Modern German Drama (5). 
German 203. Schiller (5). 
German 204. Goethe's Faust (3). 
German 20.5. Goethe's Works Outside o( Faust (3). 
German 206. The Romantic Movement (5). 
German 210. Seminar. Arranged. 
German 214. Middle High German (5). 
German 220, 221. Reading Course. Arranged. 
German 231. Introduction to Indo-European Linguistics (.5). 



Staflf. 

Prahl. 

Prahl. 
Zucker. 
Zucker. 

Prahl. 

Staflf. 

Banta. 

Prahl. 

Banta. 



C. Spanish 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Spanish 101. Epic and Ballad (3). Correa. 

Spanish 104, 105, 106. The Golden Age (3. 3. 3). Three hours a week. Correa. 
Spanish 107. The Spanish Mystics (3). 
Spanish 108. Lope de Vega (3). 
Spanish 109. Cervantes (3). 

Spanish 110, 111, 112. Spanish Literature of the Nineteenth Century (3, 

3, 3). Three hours a week. Rand. 

Spanish 113, 114, 115. Modern Literature (3, 3, 3), Three hours a week. 

Correa. 
Spanish 116. Twentieth Century Drama (3). 

Spanish 121, 122, 123. Advanced Composition (3, 3, 3). Three hours a week. 

Prerequisite, Spanish 60 or the consent of the instructor. Correa. 

Spanish 151, 152, 153. Latin-American Literature (3, 3, 3). Three hours a 



week. 

Spanish 201. 
Spanish 202. 
Spanish 203. 
Spanish 204. 
Spanish 210. 
Spanish 213. 



For Graduates 
Research. Credit determined by work accomplished. 
The Golden Age in Spanish Literature (3). 
Spanish Poetry (3). 
Spanish Poetry (3). 
Seminar. Arranged. 
Introduction to Old Spanish (3). 



Spanish 220, 221. Reading Course. Arranged. 



Correa. 

Correa. 
Correa. 
Correa. 
Correa. 
Correa. 
Rand. 
Correa. 



PHYSICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Phys. 104. Advanced Experiments (3). One lecture and two laboratory 

periods a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 4A, 5A. (Not ofifered in 1944-1945.) 

Phys. 105, 106, 107. Theoretical Mechanics (6). Three lectures a week, fall, 

winter, and spring quarters. Prerequisites, Phys. 4A, 5A; Math. 20. 

Morgan. 



52 POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Phys. 108. Optics (5). Three lectures and two laboratory periods a week, 

spring quarter; repeated every third quarter. Prerequisites, Phys. 4 A, 

5A; Math. 20. 
Phys. 109, 110. Electricity (10). Two lectures and two laboratory periods a 

week, spring and summer quarters. Prerequisites, Phys. 4A, 5A; Math. 20. 
Phys. 111. Sound (5). Three lectures and two laboratory periods a week. 

Prerequisites, Phys. 4A, 5A; Math. 20. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 
Phys. 112, 113, 114. Electron Physics (9). Two lectures and one laboratory 

period a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 4A, 5A; Math. 20. (Not offered in 

1944-1945.) 
Phys. 115. Heat (5). Three lectures and two laboratory periods a week, 

fall quarter; repeated every third quarter. Prerequisites, Phys. 4A, 5A; 

Math. 20. 
Phys. 117, 118. Applied Mechanics (6). Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, 

Phys. 4A, 5A. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 
Phys. 119, 120, 121. High Frequency Phenomena (9). Two lectures and one 

laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 4A, 5A; Math. 20. (Not 

offered in 1944-1945.) 

For Graduates 

Phys. 201, 202, 203. Dynamics (9). Three lectures a week. Brickwidde. 

Phys. 204, 205. Electrodynamics (4). Two lectures a week. (Not offered in 

1944-1945.) 
Phys. 206, 207. Physical Optics (4). Two lectures a week. Myers. 

Phys. 208, 209, 210. Thermodynamics (6). Two lectures a week, fall, winter, 

and spring quarters. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 
Phys. 211, 212, 213. Statistical Mechanics and the Kinetic Theory of Gases 

(6). Two lectures a week. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 
Phys. 214, 215, 216. Quantum Mechanics (9). Three lectures a week, fall, 

winter, and spring quarters. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 
Phys. 217, 218. Atomic Structure (4). Two lectures a week. (Not offered in 

1944-1945.) 
Phys. 219. 220. Molecular Spectra (4). Two lectures a week. Myers. 

Phys. 221, 222, 223. X-Rays and Crysta' Structure (9). Three lectures a week, 

fall, winter, and spring quarters. (Not off ere 1 in 1944-1945.) 
Ph s. 224. Application of X-Ray and Electron Diffraction Methods (4). Two 

laboratory periods a week, winter and spring quarters. Morgan. 

Phys. 225, 226, 227. Modern Physics (9). Three lectures a week, (Not 

offered in 1944-1945.) 
Phys. 228. Seminar (1). Fall, winter and spring quarters. 
Phys. 250. Research. Credit according to work done. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Pol. Sci. 102. International Law (3). 
Pol. Sci. 105. Recent Far Eastern Politics (3). 



POULTRY HUSBANDRY 53 

Pol. Sci. 124. Legislatures and Legislation (3). 

Pol. Scl. 131. Constitutional Law (3). 

Pol. Sci. 141. History of Political Theory (3). 

Pol. Sci. 142. Recent Political Theory (3). 

Pol. Sci. 144. American Political Theory (3). 

For Graduates 

Pol. Sci. 201, 202. Seminar in International Organization (2, 2). Two hours 
a week. 

PoL ScL 251. Bibliography of Political Science (2). 

Pol. Sci. 261. Research. 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

P. H. 104. Poultry Marketing Problems (3). Three lectures, demonstration 
and quiz periods a week, fall quarter. Gwin. 

P. H. 10.1. Egg Marketing Problems (3). Three lectures, demonstration and 
quiz periods a week, winter quarter. C win 

P. H. 107. Poultry Industrial and Economic Problems (3). Fall quarter. Staff. 

P. H. 108. Special Poultry Problems (1-2). Assigned problems, fall, winter 
and spring quarter*. Staff. 

Fo:i Graduates 

P. H. 201. Advanced Poultry Genetics (3). Spring quarter. Prerequisite, 
P. H. 51 or equivalent. JuU. 

P. H. 202. Advanced Poultry Nutrition (3). Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week, spring quarter. Prerequisite, P. H. 52, or equivalent. 

P. H. 203. Physiology of Reproduction of Poultry (3). Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week, fall quarter. Prerequisite, P. H. 56, or equiva- 
lent. Phillips. 

P. H. 204. Seminar (1). Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Staff. 

P. H. 205. Poultry Literature (1-4). Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Staff. 

P. H. 206. Research. Credit in accordance with work done. Staff. 



54 PSYCHOLOGY 

PSYCHOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Psych. 118. Psychology of Adolescence (3). Spring quarter. Prerequisite, 
Psych. 18. Thurston. 

Psych. 140. Psychological Problems in Market Research (3). Prerequisite, 
Psych. 19. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

Psych. 141. Psychology in Advertising and Selling (3). Prerequisite, Psych. 
19. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

Psych. 147. Psychological Problems in Aviation (3). Prerequisite, Psych. 29. 
(Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

Psych. 149. Legal Psychology (3). Prerequisite, Psych. 17. (Not offered in 
1944-1945.) 

Psych. 150. Advanced Social Psychology (3). Fall quarter. Prerequisite, 
Psych. 15. Edwards. 

Psych. 155. Psychology of Personality (3). Winter and spring quarters. Pre- 
requisite, Psych. 15, or permission of instructor. Edwards. 

Psych. 156. Pre-seminar in Advanced Personality (2). Spring quarter. Pre- 
requisite, Psych. 155, or permission of instructor. Edwards. 

Psych. 157. Psychological Aspects of the Post War Situation. (3). Fall 
quarter. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Sprowls. 

Psych. 159. Psychology of Propaganda (3). Winter quarter. Prerequsite, 
Psych. 15, or permission of instructor. Edwards. ' 

Psych. 160, 161. Psychology of Personnel (3, 3). Fall and winter quarters. 
Prerequisite, Psych. 19, or permission of instructor. Clark. 

Psych. 165. Industrial Psychology (3). Spring quarter. Prerequisite, Psych. 

16. Clark. 
Psych. 170.XAbnormal Psychology (3). Winter quarter. Prerequisite, Psych. 

17, Sprowls, Hall. 

Psych. 172. Tests and Measurements (5). Winter and summer quarters. 
Prerequisite, Psych. 29. Thurston. 

Psych. 174. Advanced Psychological Testing (5). Fall and winter quarters. 
Prerequisite, Psych. 172. 

Psych. 178. Vocational Orientation (3). Prerequisite, Psych. 172. (Not 
offered in 1944-1945.) 

Psych. 179. Detection and Treatment of Defects in Reading (3). Prere- 
quisite, permission of instructor. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

Psych. 180. Advanced Educational Psychology (3). Prerequisite, Psych. 80. 

(Not offered in 1944-1945.) 
Psych. 190. Psychology of Learning (3) Winter quarter. Prerequisite, 

Psych. 29. 
Psych. 192. Psychology of Early Man (3) Spring quarter. Prerequisite, 

Psych. 15, or permission of instructor. Sprowls. 

Psych 194. History of Psychology (3). Spring quarter. Prerequisite, 9 hours 

of psychology. 



SOCIOLOGY 65 

Psych 195. Minor Problems in Psychology (2-3). Fall, winter, spring, and 
summer quarters. Staff. 

Psych 199. Proseminar: Contemporary Problems in Psychology. (Not 
offered in 1944-1945.) 

For Graduates. 

Psych. 200. Research in Psychology (3). Fall, winter, spring and summer 

quarters. Staff, 

Psych, 240. Seminar in Current Psychotechnological Problems (3). (Not 

offered in 1944-1945.) 

Psych. 245. Advanced Psychological Problems in Market Research (3). 

(Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

Psych, 257, 258, Seminar in Psychology of Morale in Wartime (3, 3). Three 
hours a week, fall and winter quarters. Sprowls. 

Psych. 260. Seminar in Personnel Psychology (2). Spring quarter. Clark, 

Psych, 275, 276, 277, 278, Participation in Testing Clinic (2-4 each quarter). 
Fall, winter, spring, and summer quarters. Thurston. 

Psych. 272, Development and Validation of Psychological Tests (3). (Not 
offered in 1944-1945.) 

Psych. 274, Field Work in Clinical Psychology of the Abnormal (3-5). Spring 
quarter. Sprowls. 

Psych, 279, Occupational Psychology (3), (Not offered in 1944-1945,) 

Psych, 280. Seminar in Educational Psychology (3). (Not offered in 1944- 
1945.) Sprowls. 

Psych, 290. Problems in Experimental Design in Psychology (2), Spring 
quarter. Edwards, 



SOCIOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanxed Undergraduates 

Soc. 101, Social Stratification (3), Summer and winter quarters. Prere- 
quisite, Soc. 1 or 3, or consent of instructor. Mills, 

Soc. 103, Rural Sociology (3). Summer quarter. Prerequisite, consent of 
instructor. Form. 

Soc. 104, Urban Sociology (3), Winter quarter. Form, 

Soc. 105, Population Problems (3), Summer and fall quarters. Prerequisite, 
Soc. 3, or consent of instructor. 

Soc. 106. Regional Sociology (3). Winter quarter. Prerequisite, Soc, 3, or 
consent of instructor. Form. 

Soc, 107. Ethnic Minority Groups (3). Summer quarter, Prerequisite.^Soc. 3, 
or consent of instructor. Lejins. 

Soc. 108. World Population Problems (3). Winter quarter. Prerequisite, 
Soc. 105, or consent of instructor. Lejins. 

Soc, 109, World Survey of Rural Organization (3). Prerequisite, Soc, 103, or 
consent of instructor. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 



56 SOCIOLOGY 

Soc.no. Sociology of the Professions (3). Fall and spring quarters. Pre- 
requisite, Soc. 1 or 3, or consent of instructor. Mills. 

Soc. 112. Sociology of Communication (3). Summer and winter quarters. 
Prerequisite, Soc. 1 or 3, or consent of instructor. Mills. 

Soc. 120. Community Disorganization (3). Prerequisite, Soc. 52, or consent 
of instructor. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

Soc. 121. Community Welfare Planning (3). Prerequisite, Soc. 120, or consent 
of instructor. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

Soc. 123. Public Welfare Services (3). Prerequisite, Soc. 71 and 81, or con- 
sent of instructor. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

Soc. 124. Public Welfare Administration (3). Prerequisite, Soc. 123, or con- 
sent of instructor. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

Soc. 125. Sociology of War (3). Fall quarter. Prerequisite, consent of in- 
structor. Lejins. 

Soc. 126. Juvenile Delinquency (3). Fall and spring quarters. Prerequisite, 
Soc. 72, or consent of instructor. Lejins. 

Soc. 127. Community Programs of Crime Control (3). Fall quarter. Prere- 
quisite, Soc. 72, or consent of instructor. Lejins. 

Soc. 128. Institutional Treatment of Criminals and Delinquents (3). Spring 
quarter. Prerequisite, Soc. 72, or consent of instructor. Lejins. 

Soc. 130. Recent Social Thought (3). Fall and spring quarters. Prerequisite, 
Soc. 1 or 3, or consent of instructor. Mills. 

Soc. 135. Sociology of Law (3). Spring quarter. Prerequisite, Soc. 3, or con- 
sent of instructor. Lejins. 

Soc. 136. Sociology of Religion (3). Spring quarter. Prerequisite, Soc. 3, or 
consent of instructor. Form. 

Soc. 140. Design of investigation in Sociology (3). Fall quarter. Prerequisite, 
Soc. 3, or consent of instructor. Mills. 

Soc. 141. Introduction to Social Research and Statistics (3). Summer and 
spring quarters. Prerequisite, Soc. 3, or consent of instructor. Form. 

Soc. 142. Statistical Problems in Social Analysis (3). Fall quarter. Prere- 
quisite, consent of instructor. Form. 

Soc. 150. Field Practice in Social Work (3). Prerequisite, Soc. 81, or con- 
sent of instructor. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

For Graduates 

Soc. 200. Seminar in Methodology (3). Fall and spring quarters. Staff. 

Soc. 201. Seminar in Systematic Sociology (3). (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

Soc. 202. Sociological Theory (3). Fall quarter. Mills. 

Soc. 203. Sociology of Knowledge (3). Winter quarter. Mills. 

Soc. 204. Social Organization (3). (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

Soc. 205. Community Organization (3). (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

Soc. 206. Comparative Sociology (3). Summer quarter. Mills. 

Soc. 207. Rural-Urban Sociology (3). (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 



VETERINARY SCIENCE 57 

Soc. 210. Special Problems of Population (3). (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

Soc. 211. Advanced Regional Sociology (3). (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

Soc. 215. Seminar in Sociology of the Professions (3). Spring quarter. Mills. 

Soc. 216. Sociology of the Family (3). Summer quarter. Lejins. 

Soc. 217. Seminar in the Sociology of the Law (3). Spring quarter. Lejins. 

Soc. 218. Sociological Problems of Leadership (3). (Not offered in 1944-1945.) 

Soc. 221. Advanced Criminology (3). Fall quarter. Lejins. 

Soc. 222. Recent Criminological Theories (3). Winter quarter. Lejins. 

Soc. 223. Juvenile Delinquency (3). Spring quarter. Lejins. 

Soc. 250. Research in Sociology. Credit apportioned to work accomplished. 
Summer, fall, winter, and spring quarters. Staff. 

SPEECH 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Speech 101. Introduction to Radio (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period 
a week, fall, spring, and winter quarters. Admission by audition or con- 
sent of instructor. Ehrensberger. 

Speech 102. Radio Program Production (3). Laboratory course, spring quar- 
ter. Prerequisite, Speech 101, or consent of instructor. Ehrensberger. 

Speech 103, 104. Speech Composition (6). Three hours a week, fall and winter 
quarters. (Not offered in 1944-1945.) Ehrensberger. 

Speech 105. Speech Pathology (3). Fall quarter. Hutcheson. 

Speech 106. Speech Clinic (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period a 
week, winter quarter. Prerequisite, Speech 105. Hutcheson. 

Speech 107. Advanced Oral Reading (3). Spring quarter. Prerequisite, 
Speech 10. Provenson. 

Speech 108. Teacher'Problems in Speech (5). Summer quarter. Hutcheson. 

VETERINARY SCIENCE 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

V. S. 101. Comparative Anatomy (5). Summer and winter quarters. 

V. S. 102. Animal Hygiene (5). Fall and spring quarters. 

V. S. 107. Poultry Hygiene (4). Three lectures and one laboratory period a 
week, fall and spring quarters. 

V. S. 108. Avian Anatomy (4). Three lectures and one laboratory period a 
week, summer and winter quarters. 

For Graduates 
V. S. 201. Animal Disease Problems (2-8). Arranged. 
V. S. 202. Animal Disease Research. 



58 ZOOLOGY 

ZOOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Zool. 101. Mammalian Anatomy (3). Three laboratory periods a week, fall 
and spring quarters. Phillips. 

Zool. 102, 103. General Animal Physiology (6). Two lectures and one labor- 
atory period a week, winter and spring quarters. Either quarter may be 
taken first, but both quarters must be completed before credit is granted. 

Phillips. 
Zool. 104. Genetics(3). Fall and winter quarters. Burhoe. 

Zool. 108. Animal Histology (3). One lecture and two laboratory periods a 
week, fall and spring quarters. Prerequisite, one course in zoology. 

Littleford. 

Zool. 120. Advanced Genetics (3). One lecture and two laboratory periods a 
week, winter quarter. Prerequisite, Zool. 104. Burhoe. 

Zool. 121. Principles of Animal Ecology (3). Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week, fall and spring quarters. Prerequisite, one course in zoology. 

Tressler. 
For Graduates 

Zool. 200. Marine Zoology (5). Three lectures and two laboratory periods a 
week, fall quarter. 

Zool. 201. Microscopical Anatomy (5). Three lectures and two laboratory 
periods a week, fall quarter. Littleford. 

Zool. 203. Advanced Embryology (5). Three lectures and two laboratory 
periods a week, fall quarter. Burhoe. 

Zool. 204. Advanced Animal Physiology (5). Three lectures and two labor- 
atory periods a week, winter quarter. Phillips. 

Zool. 205. Hydrobiology (.5). Three lectures and two laboratory periods a 
week, spring quarter. Tressler. 

Zool. 206. Research. Credit to be arranged. Staff. 

Zool. 207. Seminar (1). Summer, fall, winter and spring quarters. Staff. 

CHESAPEAKE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY 

This laboratory, located in the center of the Chesapeake Bay country, is on 
Solomons Lsland, Maryland. It is sponsored by the University of Maryland 
in cooperation with the Maryland Conservation Department, Washington Col- 
lege, Johns Hopkins University and Western Maryland College, in order to 
afford a center for wild life research and study where facts tending toward a 
fuller appreciation of nature may be gathered and disseminated. The program 
projects a comprehensive survey of the biota of the Chesapeake region. 

The laboratory is open throughout the year. Ordinarily courses are offered 
for advanced undergraduate and graduate students, during a six-week summer 
session, in the following subjects. Economic Zoology, Protozoology Inverte- 
brates, Ichthyology, Algae, and Diatoms. Not more than two courses may be 
taken by a student, who must meet the requirements of the Department of 
Zoology as well as those of the laboratory before matriculation. Classes are 
limited to eight. Students pursuing special research may establish residence for 
the summer, or for the entire year. Formal courses have been temporarily sus- 
pended. 



ANATOMY 59 

Laboratory facilities; boats of various types fully equipped w ith pumps, nets, 
dredges and other apparatus; and shallow water collecting devices, are avail- 
able for the work without cost to the students. 

For further information about work at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, 
apply to Dr. R. V. Truitt, Director, Solomons, Maryland. 

GRADUATE COURSES IN THE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS AT 

BALTIMORE 

The academic calendars and fees of the professional schools in Baltimore 
will be found in the separate catalogues published by these schools. 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

ANATOMY 

Minors 

Anat. 101. Human Gross Anatomy (10). Total number of hours, approxi- 
mately 350. Six conferences and lectures. Eighteen laboratory hours per 
week throughout the first semester of every medical school year. 

Uhlenhuth, Figge, Evans, Krahl. 

Anat. 102. Mammalian Histology (6). Two lectures, ten laboratory hours 
per week, throughout the first semester of every medical school year. 

Davis, Lutz, Harne, Hard. 

Anat. 103. Human Neurology (4). Three lectures and six laboratory hours per 
week for ten weeks of the second semester of every medical school yeai. 
Prerequisite, Anat. 102, or equivalent. 

Davis, Lutz, Harne, Hard. 

Majors 

Anat. 201. Human Gross Anatomy. Number of credits by arrangement. 
Same course as Anat. 101, but with additional work of a more advanced 
nature. Uhlenhuth, Figge. 

Anat. 202. Mammalian Histology. Number of credits by arrangement. Same 
course as Anat. 102, but with additional work of a more advanced nature. 

Davis, Harne, Hard. 

Anat. 203. Human Neurology. Number of credits by arrangement. Same 
course as Anat. 103, but with additional work of a more advanced nature. 
Prerequisite, Anat. 102 or 202. 

Anat. 204. Research in Embryology, Histology or Neuro-Anatomy. Credit 
by arrangement. Open to students majoring in anatomy. Prerequisites, 
Anat. 201, 202 and 203. Davis, Harne, Hard. 

Anat. 205. Advanced Anatomy. Number of hours and credits by arrange- 
ment. Prerequisite, Anat. 101 or 201. Uhlenhuth, Figge, Evans. 

Anat. 206. Research in Gross Anatomy. Number of hours and credits by ar- 
rangement. Prerequisite, Anat. 205. Uhlenhuth, Figge. 

Anat. 207. Comparative Morphology of the Endocrines. Number of hours and 
credits by arrangement. Prerequisites, Anat. 201. 202. Uhlenhuth. 



60 BACTERIOLOGY 

Anat. 208. Experimental Anatomy of the Endocrines. Prerequisite, Anat. 207. 

Uhlenhuth. 

Anat. 209. Problems in Physiological Anatomy. Prerequisites, Anat. 201, 202 

and either 207 or 208. Uhlenhuth, Figge. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

Minors 

Bact. 101. General Bacteriology (5). Sixteen lectures and 104 laboratory 

hours. 
Bact. 102. Immunology (4). Sixteen lectures and 56 laboratory hours. 



Majors 

Bact. 201. Special Problems. Time and credit by arrangement. 
Bac . 202. Research. Time and credit by arrangement. 



BIOCHEMISTRY 

Minors 

Biochem. 101. Principles of Biochemistry (8). Seven lectures and confer- 
ences, and two three-hour laboratory periods a week for sixteen weeks. 
Prerequisites, inorganic, organic, and quantitative or physical chemistry. 

Wylie, Schmidt, Ogden, Weiland, Brown. 



Majors 

Biochem. 201. Prerequisite, Biochem. 101. Credit proportioned to extent and 
quality of work accomplished. Wylie, Schmidt, Weiland. 

Biochem 202. Research. Credit proportioned to extent and quality of work 
accomplished. Wylie, Schmidt, Weiland. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

All students majoring in pharmacology with a view to obtaining the degree 
of Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy should secure special training in 
anatomy, mammalian physiology, organic chemistry, and physical chemistry. 



Minors 

Pharmacology 101 f, s. General Pharmacology (8). Three lectures and 
one laboratory. This course consists of 90 lectures and 30 laboratory per- 
iods of three hours each, offered each year. 

Krantz, Carr, Evans, Musser, Harne, WoUenweber. 



I 



PHYSIOLOGY 61 

Majors 

Pharmacology 202 f, s. General Pharmacology. Same as 101 for students 

majoring in pharmacology. Additional instruction and collecteral reading 

are required. 

Krantz, Carr, Evans, Musser, Harne, Wollenweber. 
Pharmacology 203. Chemotherapy. Credit in accordance with the amount of 

work accomplished. Krantz. 

Pharmacology 204. Carbohydrate Metabolism. Credit in accordance with the 

amount of work accomplished. Krantz, Carr. 

Pharmacology 205. Research. Credit in accordance with the amount of 

work accomplished. Krantz, Carr. 

Pharmacology 206. Special Problems in Toxicology. Credit in accordance 

with the amount of work accomplished. Evans, Wollenweber. 

Pharmacology 207. Anesthesia. Credit in accordance with the work accom- 
plished. Krantz, Carr, Evans. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Physiology 101. The Principles of Physiology (8). Five lectures, one con- 
ference, and two laboratory periods a week, for sixteen weeks, supple- 
mented by demonstrations. Amberson and Staff. 



For Graduates 

Physiology 201. Experimental Mammalian Physiology. Time and credit by 
arrangement. Amberson, Smith, Oster. 

Physiology 202. Water and Electrolyte Balance in the Vertebrate Body (1). 
One lecture a week, for sixteen weeks. Amberson. 

Physiology 203. Humoral Control of Physiological Function (1). One lecture 
a week, for sixteen weeks. Smith. 

Physiology 204. Electrophysiology (1). One lecture a week, for sixteen weeks. 

Oster. 

Physiology 205. Cellular Respiration (1). One lecture a week, for sixteen 
weeks. Anderson. 

Physiology 206. Seminar. Credit according to work done. 

Amberson and Staff. 

Physiology 207. Research. By arrangement with the head of the depart- 
ment. Staff. 



62 PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
BACTERIOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Bact. 115. Serology and Immunology (6). Three lectures and three laboratory 
periods a week, fall quarter. Grubb and Scigliano. 

For Graduates 

Bact. 200, 201. Chemotherapy (1, 1). One lecture a week, fall and winter 
quarters. Offered in alternate years. Grubb. 

Bact. 210. Special Problems in Bacteriology. Laboratory course. Credit 
determined by amount and quality of work. Grubb. 

Baci. 221. Research. Credit determined by amount and quality of work. 

Grubb. 

BOTANY AND PHARMACOGNOSY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Bot. 101. 102. 103. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants (2-6). One lecture and 
one laboratory period a week, each quarter. Given in alternate years. 

Slama. 

Bot. Ill, 112, 113. Plant Anatomy (2-6). Two lectures a week, each quar- 
ter. Slama., 

Bot. lllA, 112A, 113A. Plant Anatomy (2-6). Two laboratory periods a week, 
each quarter. Prerequisites, Bot. Ill, 112, 113. Slama, 

For Graduates 

Pharmacognosy 201, 292, 293. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders 

(4-12). Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week, each quarter. 
Prerequisites, Bot. Ill, 112, 113, and lllA, 112A, 113A. Slama. 

Pharmacognosy 211, 212, 213. Advanced Pharmacognosy (4-12). Two lec- 
tures and two laboratory periods a week, each quarter. Prerequisite, Bot. 
Ill, 112, 113, and lllA, 112A, 113A. Slama. 

Pharmacognosy 220. Research. Credit according to amount and quality of 
work performed. Slama. 

PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Pharm. Chem. Ill, 112, 113. Chemistry of Medicinal Products (6). Three 

lectures a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 11. Hartung. 

Pharm. Chem. 114, 11.5, 116. Chemistry of Medicinal Products (2-6). Two 

laboratory periods a week, one to three quarters. Hartung. 

Chem. 120B, 121 B. Advanced Organic Laboratory (3-6). Three laboratory 

periods a week, one or two quarters. Prerequisites, Pharm. Chem. 114, 

115, 116, or equivalent. Starkey. 

Chem. 151, 152, 153. Physiological Chemistry (6). Two lectures a week. 

Prerequisites, Chem. 11 and Physiology 23. Chapman. 



PHARMACOLOGY 63 

Chem. 154, 155, 156. Physiological Chemistry (4-6). Two laboratory per- 
iods a week, two or three quarters. Prerequisites, Chem. 1.51, 152, 153. 
or may be taken simultaneously with Chem. 151, 152, 153. 

Chapman, Gittinger, Koppe. 



For Graduates 

Pharm. Chem. 201, 202, 20.3. Survey of Pharmaceutical Chemistry (6). Two 

lectures a week. Prerequisites, Pharm. Chem. Ill, 112, 113. Offered in 
alternate years. Hartung. 

Chem. 207B. Organic Qualitative Analysis (3-5). Three to five laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisites, Phar. Chem. 114, 115, 116, or equivalent. 

Starkey. 

Pharm. Chem. 211, 212, 213. Chemistry of the Alkaloids (6). Two lectures a 
week. Prerequisites, Pharm. Chem. Ill, 112, 113. Offered in alternate 
years. Hartung. 

Pharm. Chem. 220. Advanced Pharmaceutical Syntheses (3-9). Laboratory 
and conferences. Prerequisite, Chem. 120B, 121B. Hartung. 

Pharm. Chem. 222. Advanced Pharmaceutical Analyses (2-6). Laboratory 
and conferences. Prerequisite, Chem. 207B. Hartung. 

Pharm. Chem. 230. Pharmaceutical Chemistry Seminar (1). Hartung et al. 

Pharm. Chem. 235. Research. Credit determined by amount and quality 
of work performed. Hartung et al. 



PHARMACOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Pharmacology 111. Official Methods of Biological Assay (4). Two lectures, 
and two laboratory periods a week, fall quarter. Prerequisites, Physiology 
23, and Pharmacology 51, 52, 53. Chapman. 



For Graduates 

Pharmacology 201, 202. 203. Methods of Biological Assay (12). Two lec- 
tures and two laboratory periods a week, fall, winter and spring quarters. 
Prerequisite, Pharmacology 111. Offered in alternate years. Chapman. 

Pharmacology 211, 212, 213. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics (4-12). 

Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week, fall, winter, and spring 
quarters. Prerequisite, Pharmacology 51, 52, 53< Chapman. 

Pharmacology 221, 222, 223. Special Studies in Biological Assay Methods 

(3-9j. Laboratory work and conferences, fall, winter, and springquarters. 
Prerequisites, Pharmacology 111, Pharmacology 201, 202, 203. Chapman. 

Pharmacology 250. Research in Pharmacology. Properly qualified students 
may arrange quarter hours' credit with the instructor. Chapman. 



€4 PHARMACY 

PHARMACY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Pharmacy 101, 102, 103 (9). Two lectures and one laboratory a week. Pre- 
requisite, consent of the instructor. DuMez, Purdum. 
Pharmacy 1X1, 112, 113, Advanced Prescription Compounding (2, 4, or 6). 

Two laboratory periods a week. DuMez, Purdum. 

For Graduates 

Pharmacy 201, 202, 203. Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology (12). Two 
lectures and two laboratory periods a week. DuMez. 

Pharmacy 211, 212, 213. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature (3). One 
lecture a week. ' DuMez. 

Pharmacy 221, 222, 223. History of Pharmacy (6). Two lectures a week. 
Given in alternate years. DuMez. 

Pharmacy 235. Research in Pharmacy. Credit and hours to be arranged. 

DuMez, 

PHYSICS AND PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem, 102A, 103A, 104A. Physical Chemistry (9). Three lectures a week. 
Prerequisites, Phys. 11, 12, 13; Chem. 8 and 11. Estabrook. 

Chem. 102B, 103B, 104B. Physical Chemistry (6). Two laboratory periods a 
week. Prerequisites, Chem. 102A, 103A, 104A, or may be taken simul- 
taneously with these courses. Estabrook. 

Phys. 101, 102. Thermodynamics (4). Two lectures a week. Given in alter- 
nate years. Prerequisites, Phys. 11, 12, 13; Math. 20, 21, 22; Phys. Chem. 
102A, 103A, 104A, 102B, 103B, 104B. Estabrook. 

Phys. 121, 122, 123. Electricity and Magnetism (9). Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 11, 12, 13; Math. 20, 21, 22. 
Given in alternate years. Estabrook. 



rjN D E X 



Page 
Administration 

Board of Regents 5 

Graduate Council 6 

Officers 6 

Admission 

to Graduate School 7 

to candidacy for degrees 9 

Agricultural Economics 18 

Agricultural Education 19 

Agronomy 19 

Anatomy , 59 

Animal Husbandry 20 

Bacteriology 20,60,62 

Biochemistry 29, 60 

Botany 22,62 

Business and Public Administration 23 

Calendar 4 

Candidacy for advanced degrees 9, 12 

Chemistry 28 

Analytical 28 

Biochemistry 29 

Inorganic 28 

Organic 28 

Physical 29 

Chesapeake Biological Laboratory 58 

Classical Languages 30 

Commencement 15 

Comparative Literature 31 

Dairy Hxisbandry . 32 

Doctor of Philosophy, requirements 12 

Economics 25 

Education 32 

History and principles 34 

Commercial 35 

Home Economics 35 

Industrial 36 

Engineering 36 

English Language and Literature 39 

Entomology 42 

Examinations 

for Master's degree 10 

for Doctor's degree 13 

modem language for Ph.D. candidates 13 

Fees . . 13 

Fellowships 14 

application for 14 

service 14 

stipend 14 

residence requirements 14 

French 50 

German 50 



Page 

Graduate Assistantahips 14 

service 14 

stipend 14 

residence 14 

History of Graduate School 7 

History, courses in 43 

Home Economics 45 

Foods and nutrition 46 

Home and Institution management 46 

Clothing 45 

Practical Art 45 

Horticulture 47 

Libraries 7 

Master of Art, Master of Science, 

requirements 9 

Master of Education, requirements H 

Master of Business Administration 11 

Mathematics 48 

Medicine, School of 59 

Modern Languages 50 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 62 

Pharmacognosy 62 

Pharmacy, School of 62 

courses in 64 

Pharmacology 60, 63 

Physics 51, 64 

Physiology 61 

Plant Pathology 22 

Plant Physiology 23 

Political Science 52 

Poultry Husbandry 53 

Professional Schools in Baltimore 

general 9 

courses in 60 

Psychology 54 

Registration 8 

Residence Requirements 

for Doctor's degree 12 

for Master's degree 9 

for assistants and fellows 14 

Seniors, graduate work by 9 

Sociology 55 

Soils 19 

Spanish 51 

Speech 57 

Thesis 

Doctor's 12 

Master's 1" 

Veterinary Science 57 

Zoology 58