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Full text of "The Graduate School announcements"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/graduateschoolan1949univ 



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Volume 2 



APRIL 1, 1949 
THE 



Number 1 



GRADUATE 
SCHOOL 

I S_S_U E 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FOR THE SESSIONS OF 
1949 -1950 









■■■■HRi^Hni 



! * JLit 




A UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND PUBLICATION 

is published three times during April, twice during May. once in August, October and 
December, and three times in January, February and March. 

Entered at the Post Office in College Park, Maryland, as second class mail matter 
under the Act of Congress of August 24, 1912. 

Edited by Harvey L. Miller, Director of Publications, University of Maryland. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

AND 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE Term 

Expires 
William P. Cole, Jr., Chairman, 100 West University Parkway, 

Baltimore 1949 

Stanford Z. Rothschild, Secretary, 109 East Redwood Street, 

Baltimore 1952 

J. Milton Patterson, Treasurer, 120 West Redwood Street, Balti- 
more f 1953 

E. Paul Knotts, Denton, Caroline County 1954 

Peter W. Chichester, 103 West Second Street, Frederick, Md 1951 

Harry H. Nuttle, Denton, Caroline County 1950 

Philip C. Turner, 2 East North Avenue, Baltimore 1950 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, 4101 Greenway, Baltimore 1956 

Charles P. McCormick, McCormick & Company, Baltimore 1948 

Millard E. Tydings, Senate Office Building, Washington, D. C 1951 

Edward F. Holter, Middletown, Md 1952 

Members of the Board are appointed by the Governor of the State for 
terms of nine years each, beginning the first Monday in June. 

The President of the University of Maryland is, by law, Executive Officer 
of the Board. 

The State Law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of 
Maryland shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 

A regular meeting of the Board is held the last Friday in each month, 
except during the months of July and August. 

GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 

President Byrd, Chairman 

Miss Preinkert, Secretary 
Dean Appleman Dean Eppley Miss Preinkert 
Dr. Bamford Mr. Fogg Dean Pyle 
Dean Benjamin Col. Griswold Dean Robinson- 
Mr. Benton Mr. Haszard Dean Smith 
Mr. Brigham Dean Howell Col. Stadtmax 
Mr. Brown Dr. Huff Dean Stamp 
Dr. Brueckner Dr. Hoffsommer Dean Steinberg 
Dr. Bishop Dr. Kabat Dean Symons 
President Byrd Miss Kellar Mr. Weber 
Mr. Cobey Ddiector Kemp Dr. White 
Dr. Corbett Dr. Long Dean Wylie 
Dean Cotterman Dean Mount Dr. Zucker 

EDUCATIONAL COUNCIL 

The President, Dean of the Faculty, Chairman, Deans of Colleges 
Heads of Educational Departments, Director of Admissions, Registrar 

I 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

H. C. Byrd, LL.D., D.Sc, President of the University 

H. F. Cotterman, Ph.D., Dean of the Faculty 

T. B. Symons, M.S., D.Agri., Director of Extension Service, Dean of Col- 
lege of Agriculture 

Leon P. Smith, Ph. D., Dean of Arts and Science 

J. Freeman Pyle, Ph.D., Dean of College of Business and Public Admin- 
istration. 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D.. Dean of School of Dentistry 

Harold Benjamin, Ph.D., Dean of College of Education, Director of Sum- 
mer School 

S. S. Steinberg, B.E., C.E., Dean of College of Engineering 

C. 0. Appleman, Ph.D., Dean of Graduate School 

M. Marie Mount, M.A., Dean of College of Home Economics 

Roger Howell, LL.B., Ph.D., Dean of School of Law 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D., Dean of School of Medicine 

Florence M. Gipe, M.S., R.N., Superintendent of Nurses, Director of 
School of Nursing 

, Dean of School of Pharmacy 

G. J. Kabat, Ph.D., Director of College of Special and Continuation Studies 

W. B. Kemp, Ph.D., Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station 

W. J. Huff, Ph.D., D.Sci., Director of the Engineering Experiment Station 

R. B. Corbett, Ph.D., Associate Dean of College of Agriculture and Associate 
Director of Extension Service 

Geary F. Eppley, M.S., Dean of Men 

Adele H. Stamp, M.A., Dean of Women 

James M. Tatum, B.S., Director of Athletics 

Harlan C. Griswold, Col., Inf., U. S. Army (Ret.), Acting Dean, College 
of Military Science, Physical Education and 'Recreation 

Claud E. Stadtman, Col., Inf., U. S. Army, Commandant R. O. T. C. 

Alma H. Preinkert, M.A., Registrar 

Edgar F. Long, Ph.D., Director of Admissions 

Charles L. Benton, M.S., C.P.A., Comptroller 

Howard Rovelstad, M.A., B.S.L.S., Acting Director of Libraries 

Harold A. Sayles, A.B., Assistant Superintendent of University Hospital 

Harry A. Bishop, M.D., Medical Director 

George W. Fogg, M.A., Director of Personnel 

George O. Weber, B.S., Business Manager 

Frank K. Haszard, B.F.S., Director of Procurement and Supply 

FOR OTHER ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS, 

Faculty Committees and Library Staff, see back of book, 

pages V, VI, VII, VIII 

II 




Headquarters of the Graduate School 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Md. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 3 

THE GRADUATE COUNCIL 

H. C. Byrd, LL.D., President of the University 

C. 0. Appleman, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School, Chairman 

Harold Benjamin, Ph.D., Professor of Education 

Guy A. Cardwell, Ph.D., Professor of English 

E. N. Cory, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology 

H. F. Cotterman, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Education 

N. L. Drake, Ph.D., Professor of Organic Chemistry 

Wilbert J. Huff, Ph.D., D.Sc, Professor of Chemical Engineering 

Harold C. Hoffsommer, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology 

W. B. Kemp, Ph.D., Director of Experiment Station 

M. Marie Mouunt, M.A., Professor of Home and Institution Management 

J. Freeman Pyle, Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Marketing 

A. E. Zucker, Ph.D., Professor of Foreign Languages 

Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D., Professor of Gross Anatomy (Baltimore) 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

C. 0. Appleman, Ph.D., Dean 

The faculty of the Graduate School includes all members of the various 
faculties who give instruction in approved graduate courses. The general 
administrative functions of the graduate faculty are delegated to the 
Graduate Council. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

HISTORY AND ORGANIZATION 

In the earlier years of the institution the Master's degree was frequently 

conferred, but the work of the graduate students was in charge of the 

departments concerned, under the supervision of the general faculty. The 

Graduate School of the University of Maryland was established in 1918, and 

organized graduate instruction leading to both the Master's and the Doctor's 

degree was undertaken. The faculty of the Graduate School includes all 

members of the various faculties who give instruction in approved graduate 

courses. The general administrative functions of the graduate faculty are 

delegated to a Graduate Council, of which the Dean of the Graduate School 

is chairman. 

LOCATION 

The University of Maryland is located at College Park, in Prince George's 
County, Maryland, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, eight miles from 
Washington and thirty-two miles from Baltimore. Washington, with its 
wealth of resources, is easily accessible by train, street car and bus. 

The professional schools of Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Dentistry and 
Law are located in Baltimore, at the corner of Lombard and Greene Streets. 



4 GRADUATE SCHOOL 

LIBRARIES 

In addition to the resources of the University libraries the great libraries 
of the national capital are easily available for reference work. Because of 
the proximity of these libraries to College Park they are a valuable asset 
to research and graduate work at the University of Maryland. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 
ADMISSION 

An applicant for admission to the Graduate School must hold a bachelor's 
or a master's degree from a college or university of recognized standing. 
The applicant shall furnish an official transcript of his collegiate record 
which for unconditional admission must show creditable completion of an 
adequate amount of undergraduate preparation for graduate work in his 
chosen field. Application for admission to the Graduate School should be 
made prior to dates of registration on blanks obtained from the office of 
the Dean. 

After approval of the application a matriculation card, signed by the 
Dean, is issued to the student. This card permits one to register in the 
Graduate School. After payment of the fee, the matriculation card is 
stamped and returned to the student. It is his certificate of membership 
in the Graduate School and should be retained by the student to present at 
each succeeding registration. 

Admission to the Graduate School does not necessarily imply admission 
to candidacy for an advanced degree. 

REGISTRATION 

All students pursuing graduate work in the University, even though they 
are not candidates for higher degrees, are required to register in the 
Graduate School at the beginning of each session. In no case will graduate 
credit be given unless the student matriculates and registers in the Graduate 
School. The program of work for each session is arranged by the student 
with the major department and entered upon two course cards, which are 
signed first by the professor in charge of the student's major subject and 
then by the Dean of the Graduate School. One card is retained by the Dean. 
The student takes the other card, and in case of a new student, also the 
matriculation card, to the Registrar's office, where the registration is com- 
pleted. Students will not be admitted to graduate courses until the Regis- 
trar has certified to the instructor that registration has been completed. 
Course cards may be obtained at the Registrar's office or at the Dean's 
office. The heads of departments usually keep a supply of these cards in 
their respective offices. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Graduate students must elect for credit in partial fulfillment of the 
requirements for higher degrees only courses designated For Graduates or 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 5 

For Graduates and Advanced Graduates. Students who are inade- 
quately prepared for graduate work in their chosen fields or who lack pre- 
requisites for minor courses may elect a limited number of courses num- 
bered from 1 to 99 in the general catalogue, but graduate credit will not be 
allowed for these courses. Courses that are audited are registered for in 
the same way as other courses, and the fees are the same. 

PROGRAM OF WORK 

The professor who is selected to direct a student's thesis work is the 
student's adviser in the formulation of a graduate program, including suit- 
able minor work, which is arranged in cooperation with the instructors. 
To encourage thoroughness in scholarship through intensive application, 
graduate students in the regular sessions are limited to a program of 
fifteen credit hours per semester. If a student is preparing a theses during 
the minimum residence for the master's degree, the registration in graduate 
courses should not exceed twelve hours for the semester. 

SUMMER SESSION 
The University conducts a six weeks' summer session at College Park, 
with a comprehensive undergraduate and graduate program. The Uni- 
versity publishes a separate bulletin giving full information on this sum- 
mer session. This bulletin is available upon application to the Director of 
the Summer Session, University of Maryland, College Park. 

GRADUATE WORK IN PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS AT BALTIMORE 

Graduate courses and opportunities for research are offered in the 
professional schools at Baltimore. Students pursuing graduate work in 
the professional schools must register in the Graduate School, and meet 
the same requirements and proceed in the same way, as do graduate stu- 
dents in other departments of the University. The graduate courses in the 
professional schools are listed on pages 84-91. 

GRADUATE WORK BY SENIORS IN THIS UNIVERSITY 

A senior of this University who has nearly completed the requirements 
for the undergraduate degree may, with the approval of his undergraduate 
dean and the Dean of the Graduate School, register in the undergraduate 
college for graduate courses, which may later be transferred for graduate 
credit toward an advanced degree at this University, but the total of under- 
graduate and graduate courses must not exceed fifteen credits for the 
semester. Excess credits in the senior year cannot later be used for 
graduate credit unless such pre-arrangement is made. Seniors who wish to 
register for graduate credit should apply to the Dean of the Graduate 
School for information about procedure. 

ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY FOR ADVANCED DEGREES 

Application for admission to candidacy for the Master's and for the 
Doctor's degree is made on application blanks which are obtained at the 



6 REQUIREMENTS 

office of the Dean of the Graduate School. These are filled out in duplicate 
by the student and submitted to his major department for further action 
and transmission to the Dean of the Graduate School. All applications for 
admission to candidacy must be approved by the Graduate Council. 

Admission to candidacy in no case assures the student of a degree, but 
merely signifies he has met all the formal requirements and is considered 
by his instructors sufficiently prepared and able to pursue such graduate 
study and research as are demanded by the requirements of the degree 
sought. The candidate must show superior scholarship in graduate work 
already completed. 

Application for admission to candidacy is made at the time stated in the 
sections dealing with the requirements for the degree sought. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREES OF MASTER OF ARTS 
AND MASTER OF SCIENCE 

Advancement to Candidacy. Each prospective candidate for the Master's 
degree is required to make application for admission to candidacy not later 
than the date when instruction begins for the semester in which the degree 
is sought. He must have completed at least twelve semester hours of 
graduate work at the University of Maryland. An average grade of "B" 
in all major and minor subjects is required. 

Minimum Residence. A residence of at least two semesters, or equiva- 
lent, at this institution, is required. 

Course Requirements. A minimum of twenty-four semester hours, exclu- 
sive of thesis and registration for research, with an average grade of "B" 
in courses approved for graduate credit, is required for the degrees of 
Master of Arts and Master of Science. At the option of the major depart- 
ment concerned the student may be required also to register for a maximum 
of six semester hours for research and thesis work. The total number of 
credit hours required for the degree would then be thirty. If the student 
is inadequately prepared for the required graduate courses, either in the 
major or minor subjects, additional courses may be required to supplement 
the undergraduate work. Of the twenty-four hours required in graduate 
courses, not less than twelve hours and not more than sixteen semester 
hours must be earned in the major subject. The remaining credits must be 
outside the major subject and must comprise a group of coherent courses 
intended to supplement and support the major work. Not less than one- 
half of the total required course credits for the degree, or a minimum of 
twelve, must be selected from courses numbered 200 or above. No credit 
for the degree of Master of Arts or Master of Science may be obtained 
for correspondence courses. The entire course of study must constitute a 
unified program approved by the student's major adviser and by the Dean 
of the Graduate School. 

Transfer of Credit. Credit not to exceed six semester hours, obtained 
at other recognized institutions, may be transferred and applied to the 



FINAL EXAMINATIONS 7 

course requirements of the Master's degree, provided that the work was 
of graduate character, and provided that it is approved for inclusion in the 
student's graduate program at the University of Maryland. This transfer 
of credit is submitted to the Graduate Council for approval when the stu- 
dent applies for admission to candidacy for the degree. Acceptance of the 
transferred credits does not reduce the minimum residence requirement. 
The candidate is subject to final examination by this institution in all work 
offered for the degree. 

Thesis. In addition to the twenty-four semester hours in graduate courses 
a satisfactory thesis is required of all candidates for the degrees of Master 
of Arts and Master of Science. (Exceptions may be made in the cases of 
candidates for the degree of Master of Arts in American Civilization. See 
page 11.) The thesis must demonstrate the student's ability to do inde- 
pendent work and it must be acceptable in literary style and composition. 
With the approval of the student's major professor and the Dean of the 
Graduate School, the thesis in certain cases may be prepared in absentia 
under direction and supervision of a member of the faculty of this 
institution. 

The original copy of the thesis must be deposited in the office of the 
Graduate School not later than two weeks before the convocation at which 
the degree is sought. The thesis should not be bound by the student, as 
the University later binds all theses uniformly. An abstract of the contents 
of the thesis, 200 to 500 words in length, must accompany it . A manual 
giving full directions for the physical make-up of the thesis is in the hands 
of each professor who directs thesis work, and should be consulted by the 
student before the typing of the manuscript is begun. Individual copies of 
this manual may be obtained by the student at the Dean's office, at nominal 
cost. 

Final Examination. The final oral examination is conducted by a com- 
mittee appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. The student's adviser 
acts as the chairman of the committee. The other members of the com- 
mittee are persons under whom the student has taken most of his major 
and minor courses. The chairman and the candidate are notified of the 
personnel of the examining committee at least one week prior to the period 
set for oral examinations. The chairman of the committee selects the exact 
time and place for the examination and notifies the other members of the 
committee and the candidate. The examination should be conducted within 
the dates specified by the Dean of the Graduate School at the end of the 
semester, but upon recommendation of the student's adviser, an examining 
committee may be appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School at any 
time when all other requirements for the degree have been completed. A 
report of the committee is sent to the Dean as soon as possible after the 
examination. A special form for this purpose is supplied to the chairman 
of the committee. Such report is the basis upon which recommendation is 
made to the faculty that the candidate be granted the degree sought. The 



8 AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 

period for the oral examination is usually about one hour, but the time 
should be long enough to insure an adequate examination. 

The examining committee also approves the thesis, and it is the candi- 
date's obligation to see that each member of the committee has ample 
opportunity to examine a copy of the thesis prior to the date of the 
examination. 

A student will not be admitted to final examination until all other require- 
ments for the degree have been met. In addition to the oral examination 
a comprehensive written examination may be required at the option of the 
major department. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS IN 
AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 

Studies in American Civilization are intended to prepare the student for 
teaching, for further study, and for research in the general field of Ameri- 
can Civilization, but with emphasis on one of two disciplines: history, 
including European backgrounds; or literature, including European litera- 
ture, particularly English. All students will be expected to understand the 
development of American institutions and to demonstrate proficiency in the 
literary, social, economic, and political history of the United States. 

With the approval of his adviser, a candidate for the Master of Arts 
degree with a major in American Civilization may elect in lieu of the thesis 
six additional hours of course work, to include at least two substantial 
seminar papers. The total number of credit hours required for the degree 
would then be thirty semester hours. 

Each candidate must present credits for at least fifteen semester hours 
of work in American literature and American history, and credits for at 
least fifteen semester hours in supporting courses (nine hours if a thesis 
is elected). Supporting courses will normally be in such fields as European 
or Latin-American history, English literature, comparative literature, phil- 
osophy, art, education, sociology, economics, and politics and government. 

Each candidate must demonstrate in a written examination that he pos- 
sesses a reading knowledge of one foreign language. 

All other requirements are the same as for the degrees of Master of 
Arts and Master of Science in other fields. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF EDUCATION 

Thirty semester hours of course work are required, which may include 
courses in departments other than Education not to exceed one-half of 
the total thirty hours, such courses to be selected in conformity with the 
student's special needs as agreed upon by the student and his adviser. Of 
the thirty hours, not less than one-half must be on the 200 level. 

At least four of the thirty semester hours must be in seminar work in 
connection with which two seminar papers will be prepared in specially 



GRADUATE YEAR ABROAD 9 

prescribed form, approved in writing by the instructor in charge of the 
seminar and the Dean of the College of Education, and filed in the College 
of Education. One of these papers shall deal with a topic in the student's 
major field of concentration. 

Included in the program must be courses in educational statistics and in 
procedure of educational research. 

The requirements in regard to advancement to candidacy, transfer of 
credits, and final oral examination are the same as for the degrees of 
Master of Arts and Master of Science. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The degree of Master of Business Administration represents a minimum 
of two semesters of graduate work in addition to the satisfaction of all 
undergraduate requirements for the Bachelor's degree. Graduate work 
will normally include a minimum of twenty-four semester course hours 
and the completion of a satisfactory thesis. An average grade of "B" 
must be obtained in the twenty-four hours offered for graduate credit. 

The undergraduate prerequisites for graduate work leading to the 
degree of Master of Business Administration may be satisfied by com- 
pletion of work for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Admin- 
istration at the University of Maryland, or by equivalent work leading to 
a corresponding degree at another accredited institution, providing this 
work is acceptable. 

Candidates with Bachelor's degrees who have not taken the core group 
courses required for the degree of B.A. in Business Administration at this 
institution must do so in preparation for the degree of M.B.A. The list 
of core group courses includes principles of economics and accounting, 
the equivalent of six semester hours in business law, and introductory 
courses in labor economics, labor management, money and banking, finan- 
cial management, marketing principles, marketing administration, and sta- 
tistics (see Bulletin of College of Business and Public Adminstraton for 
detailed list of core group courses). 

Candidates for the M.B.A. degree may register in the Graduate School 
for any of these courses, but credit may not count as a part of the 
required twenty-four course hours in graduate work. Those who hold the 
Bachelor's degree in Business Administration may normally expect to 
complete the work for the M.B.A. in one year, while those who hold a B.A. 
or B.S. degi'ee, other than in Business Administration, would normally 
require longer, but usually not to exceed two years. 

GRADUATE YEAR ABROAD 

Realizing the value for American students of study abroad, the Uni- 
versity of Maryland has set up Foreign Study Centers to coordinate and 
direct work of graduate students in Paris, France, and Zurich, Switzerland. 



10 DOCTOR OF EDUCATION 

Furthermore, the University has established the degree of Master of 
Foreign Study which will serve to give an American evaluation of work 
done abroad by the graduate students. The student attends courses at the 
University of Paris or at the University of Zurich and returns to the 
University of Maryland to submit his thesis and take an examination. 

Since the system in European universities is quite different from that in 
American institutions, the registrants for Foreign Study participate in an 
orientation period in Paris or Zurich which serves to improve their knowl- 
edge of the language and to familiarize them with European customs and 
institutions. 

Two kinds of awards are offered: the Certificate, for the successful com- 
pletion of an approved program of thirty semester hours; and the Master 
of Foreign Study degree. The requirements for this degree are the same 
as those for a Master of Arts — twenty-four semestr hours divided between 
a major and a minor and completion of a thesis. 

The Foreign Study Office is directed locally by Dr. A. E. Zucker, chair- 
man, Division of Humanities, while Dr. Edmund E. Miller is resident di- 
rector abroad with his offices in Zurich. For the year 1948-49 Dr. William 
R. Quynn and Professor F. C. A. Koelln are acting as resident deans in 
Paris and Zurich, respectively, and Dr. Dorothy M. Quynn is serving as 
non-resident professor of history in Paris. All communications concerning 
this program should be directed to the Foreign Study Office, University of 
Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF EDUCATION 

The Doctor of Education degree is offered for students who expect to 
hold teaching or administrative positions in education and who desire to 
develop exceptional competence in special areas. The ability to explore and 
solve practical educational problems is emphasized. The requirements are 
the same as for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy except as specified 
below. 

Foreign Languages. The requirement of foreign languages may be 
waived for candidates for this degree when the program of study and 
research does not involve the use of foreign languages. 

Major and Minor Subjects. The candidate must select one major area 
in which he expects to develop exceptional competence. The amount of 
required course work in the major subject will vary with the individual 
candidate. 

In addition to the major, the candidate must select approximately five 
other areas in which he intends to develop a high degree of competence. 
One or two of these areas may be designated as minor fields. 

The candidate must register for a minimum of six hours of research. 

Project. Instead of completing a thesis as required for a candidate for 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy a candidate for this degree must dem- 



DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 11 

onstrate exceptional competence to work through field problems by com- 
pleting a project in the major area. A Committee on Doctoral Research is 
appointed for each candidate. The committee is composed of three mem- 
bers, at least two of whom are from the faculty of the College of Educa- 
tion. The committee passes upon the student's plans for research, deter- 
mines the amount of course credit to be allowed for the doctoral study. 
The specialist in the student's major area serves as sponsor and provides 
detailed guidance for the project. 

The regulations governing submission and form of copies of the project 
are the same as for the Ph. D. thesis. 

Comprehensive Examination. A comprehensive examination must be 
passed before the candidate may take the final oral examination. The com- 
prehensive examination may be oral or written, or both; it will cover the 
general field of major and minor study. 

Final Oral Examination. The final examination covers the project and 
its relationship to the general field in which it lies and the candidate's 
attainments in related areas. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Advancement to Candidacy. Candidates for the Doctor's degree must be 
admitted to candidacy at least one academic year before the final examina- 
tion. Applications for admission to candidacy for the Doctor's degree are 
made in duplicate by the student and submitted to his major department for 
further action and transmission to the Dean of the Graduate School. Blanks 
may be obtained at the office of the Graduate School. 

The applicant must have demonstrated to the head of the Foreign Lan- 
guage Department that he possesses a reading knowledge of French and 
German. With the approval of the major department and the Graduate 
Council, in special cases another Foreign language may be substituted for 
either French or German. Preliminary examinations or such other sub- 
stantial tests as the departments may elect are also required for admission 
to candidacy. 

Residence. The equivalent of three years of full-time graduate study and 
research is the minimum required. Of the three years the equivalent of at 
least one year must be spent in residence at the University. On a part-time 
basis the time needed will be correspondingly increased. All work at other 
institutions offered in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Ph.D. 
degree is submitted to the Graduate Council for approval, upon recommen- 
dation of the department concerned, when the student applies for admission 
to candidacy for the degree. 

The Doctor's degree is not given merely as a certificate of residence and 
work, but is granted only upon sufficient evidence of high attainments in 
scholarship, and ability to carry on independent research in the special field 
in which the major work is done. 



12 LANGUAGE EXAMINATIONS 

Major and Minor Subjects. The candidate must select a major and one 
or two closely related minor subjects. At least twenty-four semester hours, 
exclusive of research, are required in minor work. The remainder of the 
required residence is devoted to intensive study and research in the major 
field. The amount of required course work in the major subject will vary 
with the department and the individual candidate. The candidate must 
register for a minimum of twelve semester hours of research. 

Thesis. The ability to do independent research must be shown by a dis- 
sertation on some topic connected with the major subject. An original type- 
written copy and two clear, plain carbon copies of the thesis, together with 
an abstract of the contents, 250 to 500 words in length, must be deposited 
in the office of the Dean at least three weeks before the convocation at 
which the degree is sought. It is the responsibility of the student also to 
provide copies of the thesis for the use of the members of the examining 
committee prior to the date of the final examination. 

The original copy should not be bound by the student, as the University 
later binds uniformly all theses for the general University library. The 
carbon copies are bound by the student in cardboard covers which may be 
obtained at the Student's Supply Store. The abstracts are published bien- 
nially by the University in a special bulletin. 

A manual giving full directions for the physical make-up of the thesis 
is in the hands of each professor who directs thesis work, and should be 
consulted by the student before typing of the thesis is begun. Students 
may obtain copies of this manual at the Dean's office, at nominal cost. 

Final Examination. The final oral examination is held before a com- 
mittee appointed by the Dean. One member of this committee is a repre- 
sentative of the graduate faculty who is not directly concerned with the 
sudent's graduate work. One or more members of the committee may be 
persons from other institutions who are distinguished scholars in the stu- 
dent's major field. 

The duration of the examination is approximately three hours, and covers 
the research work of the candidate as embodied in his thesis, and his 
attainments in the fields of his major and minor subjects. The other detailed 
procedures are the same as those stated for the Master's examination. 

RULES GOVERNING LANGUAGE EXAMINATIONS FOR CANDIDATES 
FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

1. A candidate for the Doctor's degree must show in a written examina- 
tion that he possesses a reading knowledge of French and German. With 
the approval of the major department and the Graduate Council, in special 
cases another foreign language may be substituted for either French or 
German. The passages to be translated will be taken from books and 
articles in his specialized field. Some 300 pages of text from which the 
applicant wishes to have his examination chosen should be submitted to 
the head of the Department of Foreign Languages at least three days 



FEES 13 

before the examination. The examination aims to test ability to use the 
foreign language for research purposes. It is presumed that the candidate 
will know sufficient grammar to distinguish inflectional forms and that he 
will be able to translate readily in two hours about 500 words of text, with 
the aid of a dictionary. 

2. Application for admission to these tests must be filed in the office of 
the Department of Foreign Languages at least three days in advance of 
the tests. 

3. No penalty is attached to failure in the examination, and an unsuc- 
cessful candidate is free to try again at the next date set for these tests. 

4. Examinations are held near the office of the Department of Foreign 
Languages, on the first Wednesday of October, February and June, at 2 p.m. 

GRADUATE FEES 

The fees paid by graduate students are as follows: 

A matriculation fee of §10.00. This is paid once only, upon admission to 
the Graduate School. 

A diploma fee (Master's degree), $10.00. 

A graduate fee, including hood (Doctor's degree), $25.00. 

College Park: 

A fixed charge, each semester, of $8.00 per semester credit hour for 
students carrying eight hours or less; for students carrying more than 
eight hours, $65.00 for the semester. 

Laboratory fees, where charged, range from $1.00 to $10.00 per course 
per semester. 

Living Expenses and Self Help: 

Boai-d and lodging are available in many private homes in College Park 
and vicinity. The cost of board and room changes from about $50.00 to 
$55.00 a month, depending on the desires of the individual. A list of accom- 
modations is maintained in the offices of the Dean of Women and the Dean 
of Men. 

Application for student employment, aside from fellowships and assist- 
antships, may be made through the offices of the Dean of Men and the Dean 
of Women, or to department heads. 

FELLOWSHIPS AND ASSISTANTSHIPS 

Fellowships. A number of fellowships have been established by the 
University. The stipend for the University fellows is $600 for nine months 
and the remission of all graduate fees except the diploma fee. Several 
industrial and special fellowships, with varying stipends, are also available 
in certain departments. 



14 COMMENCEMENT 

Fellows are required to render minor services prescribed by their major 
departments. The usual amount of service required does not exceed twelve 
clock hours per week. Fellows are permitted to carry a full graduate pro- 
gram, and they may satisfy the residence requirement for higher degrees 
in the normal time. 

Applications for fellowships are made on blanks which may be obtained 
from the office of the Graduate School. The application, with the necessary 
credentials, is sent by the applicant directly to the Dean of the Graduate 
School. Applications which are approved by the Dean are forwarded to the 
departments, where final selection of the fellows is made. The awards of 
University fellowships are on a competitive basis. 

Graduate Assistantships. A number of teaching and research assistant- 
ships are available in several departments. The compensation is $100 per 
month unless otherwise specified and varies with the nature and amount 
of service required and with the terms of appointment. The amount of 
credit allowed toward a degree likewise varies with the amount of time 
available for graduate study. The research assistants, especially those in 
the Experiment Station, usually participate in research that meets the 
requirements for a Master's or a Doctor's degree. 

Applications for graduate assistantships are made directly to the depart- 
ments concerned and appointments are made through the regular channels 
for staff appointments. Further information regarding these assistantships 
may be obtained from the department or college concerned. 

COMMENCEMENT 

Attendance is required at the commencement at which the degree is 
conferred. 

Application for diploma must be filed in the office of the Registrar eight 
weeks before the convocation at which the candidate expects to obtain a 
degree. 

Academic costume is required of all candidates at commencement. Those 
who so desire may purchase or rent caps and gowns at the Student's Supply 
Store. Order must be filed eight weeks before the date of convocation but 
may be cancelled later if the student finds himself unable to complete his 
work for the degree. 



A time schedule, supplementing this catalog, is issued shortly before the 
beginning of each semester, showing the hours and location of class meet- 
ings. This schedule is available at the office of the Graduate School, or the 
office of the Registrar. 

The provisions of this bulletin are not to be regarded as an irrevocable 
contract between the student and the University. The University reserves 
the right to change any provision or requirement at any time within the 
student's term of residence. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 15 
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

For the convenience of students in making out schedules of studies, the 
subjects in the following Description of Courses are arranged alphabetically : 

Agricultural Economics 16 

Agricultural Education and Rural Life 18 

Agronomy 19 

Anatomy 81, 85 

Animal Husbandry 19 

Bacteriology 20, 86, 88 

Biochemistry 85 

Botany 21, 89 

Business and Public Administration 23 

Chemistry 31 

Comparative Literature 34 

Dairy Husbandry 35 

Dentistry 84 

Economics 26 

Education 37 

Engineering 45 

English Language and Literature 53 

Entomology 55 

Foreign Languages and Literature 56 

Geography 27 

Government and Politics 29 

History 59 

Home Economics 62 

Horticulture 66 

Journalism p 67 

Mathematics 68 

Medicine 85 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 89 

Pharmacognosy 89 

Pharmacology 87, 90 

Pharmacy 88, 91 

Philosophy 71 

Physical Education, Health, Recreation 72 

Physics 74, 91 

Physiology 88 

Poultry Husbandry 76 

Psychology 76 

Sociology 79 

Speech 81 

Veterinary Science 83 

Zoology 83 



16 GRADUATE SCHOOL 

METHOD OF NUMBERING COURSES AND COUNTING 
CREDIT HOURS 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates are numbered 100 
to 199; courses for Graduates only are numbered 200 and upward. 

A course with a single number extends through one semester. 

A course with a double number extends through two semesters. 

The number of semester hour credits is shown by the arabic numerals 
in parentheses after the title of the course. Examples: 

Course 101. Title (3). First semester. 
If a laboratory course: 

Course 101. Title (3). One lecture and two laboratory periods a week, 
first semester. 

(This is a semester course: offered once a year.) 

Course 101. Title (3). First and second semesters. 

(This is a semester course, repeated each semester, and except for 
research, seminar, and certain problem courses, must be taken only 
one semester.) 

Course 103, 104. Title (3, 3). Three hours a week, first and second 
semesters. 

If a laboratory course: 

Course 103, 104. Title (3, 3). One lecture and two laboratory periods 
a week, first and second semesters. 

(This is a course extending through two semesters and carrying three 
semester credits each semester.) 

Course 103, 104. Title (3, 3). Three hours a week, second and first 
semesters. 

(This is a course extending through two semesters, but it begins with 
the second semester.) 

Course 105, f, s. Title (3, 3). Three hours a week, first and second 
semesters. 

(This is alternate way of listing a two-semester course.) 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND MARKETING 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

A. E. 100. Farm Economics (3). First semester. Prerequisites, Econ. 31, 
32, or Econ. 37. Shull. 

A. E. 101. Marketing of Farm Products (3). Second semester. Pre- 
requisites, Econ. 31, 32, or Econ. 37. Shull. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 17 

A. E. 103. Cooperation in Agriculture (3). First semester. Poffenberger. 

A. E. 104. Farm Finance (3). Second semester. Poffenberger. 

A. E. 105. Food Products Inspection (2). One lecture and one laboratory 
period a week, second semester. Staff. 

A. E. 106. Prices of Farm Products (3). Second semester. Poffenberger. 

A. E. 107. Analysis of the Farm Business (3). One lecture and two lab- 
oratory periods a week, first semester. Hamilton. 

A. E. 108. Farm Management (3). Second semester. Hamilton. 

A. E. 109. Research Problems (1-2). First and second semesters. 

DeVault. 

A. E. 110. Seminar (1, 1). First and second semesters. Hamilton. 

A. E. 111. Land Economics (3). First semester. . 

A. E. 114. Foreign Trade in Farm Products (3). Second semester. Shull. 

A. E. 115. Marketing of Dairy Products (3). First semester. Beal. 

A. E. 116. Marketing of Fruits and Vegetables (3). Second semester. 

Hoecker. 

Poultry Marketing Problems. See Poultry Husbandry, P. H. 104. 

Egg Marketing Problems. See Poultry Husbandry, P. H. 105. 

Poultry Industrial and Economic Problems. See Poultry Husbandry, 
P. H. 107. 

Market Milk. See Dairy Husbandry, D. H. 113. 

Livestock Markets and Marketing. See Animal Husbandry, A. H. 150. 

Meat and Livestock Products. See Animal Husbandry, A. H. 160. 

Economics of Consumption. See Economics, Econ. 130. 

Economics of Cooperatives. See Economics, Econ. 151. 

Advertising Programs and Campaigns. See Business Administration, 
B. A. 151. 

Retail Store Management. See Business Administration, B. A. 154. 

For Graduates 

A. E. 200, 201. Special Problems in Farm Economics (2, 2). First and 
second semesters. DeVault. 

A. E. 202. Seminar (1). First and second semesters.. DeVault. 

A. E. 203. Research. Credit according to work accomplished. Staff. 

A. E. 208. Agricultural Policy (3). Second semester. Beal. 



18 COURSE OFFERINGS 

A. E. 210. Taxation in Relation to Agriculture (2). Second semester. 

Walker. 

A. E. 211. Agricultural Taxation in Theory and Practice (3). Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period a week, first semester. Walker. 

A. E. 212, 213. Land Utilization and Agricultural Production (3, 3). Three 
hours a week, first and second semesters. Baker. 

A. E. 214. Consumption of Farm Products and Levels of Living (3). 

Second semester. Baker. 

A. E. 215. Advanced Agricultural Cooperation (3). First semester. 

Poffenberger. 

A. E. 216. Advanced Farm Management (3). Second semester. . 

A. E. 217. Agricultural Economics Research Techniques (2). First and 
second semesters. Hoecker. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND RURAL LIFE 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

R. Ed. 107. Observation and Analysis of Teaching for Agricultural Stu- 
dents (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period a week, second 
semester. Ahalt. 

Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture (3). First semes- 

Ahalt. 

Teaching Young and Adult Farmer Groups (1). First semes- 

Ahalt. 

R. Ed. 112. Departmental Management (1). One laboratory period a 
week, second sesemter. Prerequisites, R. Ed. 107, 109. Ahalt. 

R. Ed. 114. Rural Life and Education (3). .Second semester. Ahalt. 

For Graduates 

R. Ed. 201, 202. Rural Life and Education (3, 3). Three hours a week, 
first and second semesters. Prerequisite, R. Ed. 114, or equivalent. 

Ahalt. 

R. Ed. 207, 208. Problems in Vocational Agriculture (2, 2). Two hours a 
week, first and second semesters. Ahalt. 

R. Ed. 220. Field Problems in Rural Education (1-3). First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, six semester hours of graduate study. 

R. Ed. 250. Seminar in Rural Education (1-2). First and second semes- 
ters. Ahalt. 

R. Ed. 251. Research. Credit according to work done. Ahalt. 



R. 


Ed. 

ter 


109 


R. 

ter 


Ed. 


111 




COURSE OFFERINGS 19 

AGRONOMY 
A. Crops 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Agron. 103. Crop Breeding (2). First semester. Prerequisite, Zool. 104. 

Ronningen. 

Agron. 151. Cropping Systems (2). Second semester. Kuhn. 

Agron. 152. Seed Production and Distribution (2). Second semester. 

Liden. 

Agron. 153. Selected Crop Studies (2-4). First and second semesters. 

Staff. 
For Graduates 
Agron. 201. Crop Breeding (2-4). Two hours a week in addition to con- 
ference and assignments, second semester. Prerequisite, consent of 
instructor. Ronningen. 

Agron. 203. Seminar (1). First and second semesters. Staff. 

Agron. 204. Technique in Field Crop Research (2). First semester. 

Kuhn. 

Agron. 209. Research (4-8). Arranged. Staff. 

B. Soils 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Soils 103. Soil Geography (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period 
a week, second semester. Prerequisites, Soils 1 and Geology. 

Thomas and Gross. 

Soils 112. Soil Conservation (3). Two lectures and one discussion period 
a week, first semester. Prerequisite, Soils 1. Thomas. 

Soils 120. Soil Management (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period 
a week, second semester. Prerequisites, Soils 1 and 2. 

Thomas and Gross. 
For Graduates 
Soils 201. Special Problems and Research (10-12). Arranged. Thomas. 

Soils 202, 203. Soil Science (3, 3). Three hours a week, first and second 
semesters. Prerequisites, Soils 1 and 2, or equivalent. 

Thomas and Axley. 

Soils 212, 213. Soil Research Technique (2, 2). Two three-hour laboratory 
periods a week, first and second semesters. Thomas and Axley. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
A. H. 111. Animal Nutrition (3). First semester. Prerequisites, Chem. 
31, 32, 33, 34; A. H. 110. 



20 COURSE OFFERINGS 

A. H. 150. Livestock Markets and Marketing (2). First semester. Pre- 
requisite, A. H. 1. 

For Graduates 

A. H. 120. Principles of Breeding (3). Second semester. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Zool. 104. Graduate 
credit with permission of instructor. 

A. H. 201. Special Problems in Animal Husbandry (2-4). Credit in pro- 
portion to work accomplished. First or second semester. Staff. 

A. H. 202, 203. Seminar (1, 1). First and second semesters. Staff. 

A. H. 204. Research. Credit in proportion to work accomplished. Staff. 

A. H. 205. Advanced Breeding (2). Second semester. Prerequisite, Zool. 
104; A. H. 120; one course in biological statistics. 

A. H. 206, 207. Advanced Livestock Management (3, 3). Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week. First and second semesters. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Laboratory fees in Bacteriology are $10.00 per course per semester. 

Bact. 101. Pathogenic Bacteriology (4). Two lecture and two laboratory 
periods a week, first semester. Prequisite, Bact. 5. Faber. 

Bact. 103. Serology (4). Two lecture and two laboratory periods a week, 
second semester. Prerequisite, Bact. 101. Faber. 

Bact. 104. History of Bacteriology (1). One lecture period a week, first 
semester. Prerequisite, a major or minor in bacteriology. Doetsch. 

Bact. 105. Clinical Methods (4). Two lecture and two laboratory periods 
a week, first semester. Prerequisite, Bact. 103. Faber. 

Bact. 108. Epidemiology and Public Health (3). Three lecture periods a 
week, second semester. Prerequisite, Bact. 101. Faber. 

Bact. 131. Food Bacteriology (4). Two lecture and two laboratory periods 
a week, first semester. Prerequisite, Bact. 5. Laffer. 

Bact. 133. Dairy Bacteriology (4). Two lecture and two laboratory periods 
a week, first semester. Prerequisite, Bact. 5. Doetsch. 

Bact. 135. Soil Bacteriology (4). Two lecture and two laboratory periods 
a week, second semester. Prerequisite, Bact. 5. Hansen. 

Bact. 161. Systematic Bacteriology (4). Two lecture and two laboratory 
periods a week, first semester. Prerequisite, 16 credits in bacteriology. 

Hansen. 

Bact. 181. Bacteriological Problems (3). First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, 16 credits in bacteriology. Registration only upon the 
consent of the instructor. Staff. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 21 

For Graduates 

Bact. 201. Advanced Pathogenic Bacteriology (4). Two lecture and two 
laboratory periods a week, first semester. Prerequisite, 30 credits in 
bacteriology and allied fields, including Bact. 103. Laffer. 

Bact. 204. Bacterial Metabolism (2). Two lecture periods a week, first 
semester. Prerequisite, 30 credits in bacteriology and allied fields, in- 
cluding. Chem. 161 and 162. Pelczar. 

Bast. 206, .208. Special Topics (1, 1). One lecture period a week, first and 
second semesters. Prerequisite, 20 credits in bacteriology. Staff. 

Bact. 231. Advanced Food Bacteriology (4). Two lecture and two labora- 
tory periods a week, first semester. Prerequisite, 30 credits in bacteri- 
ology, including Bact. 131. Laffer. 

Bact. 280. Seminar (1). First and second semesters. Prerequisite, 30 
credits in bacteriology. Staff. 

Bact. 291. Research. First and second semesters. Prerequisite, 30 credits 
in bacteriology. Staff. 

BOTANY 

A. Plant Physiology 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Bot. 101. Plant Physiology (4). Two lectures and two laboratory periods 
a week, first semester. Prerequisites, Bot. 1, and general chemistry. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. Gauch. 

Bot. 102. Blant Ecology (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period a 
week, second semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 11, or equivalent. Brown. 

For Graduates 

Bot. 201. Plant Biochemistry (2 or 4). First semester. Prerequisites, 
Bot. 101, and elementary organic chemistry, or equivalent. (Labora- 
tory only [2 credits] given 1949-1950.) Lectures prerequisite. Labora- 
tory fee, $5.00. Gauch. 

Bot. 202. Plant Biophysics (2). First semester. Prerequisites, Bot. 101, 
and elementary physics, or equivalent. Gauch. 

Bot. 203. Biophysical Methods (2). First semester. To accompany Bot. 
202. Same prerequisites. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Bot. 204. Growth and Development (2). Second semester. Prerequisite, 
12 semester hours of plant science. 

Bot. 205. Salt Nutrition Seminar (1). Second semester. (Not given 1949- 
1950.) Gauch. 

Bot. 206. Research in Plant Physiology. Credit according to work done. 

Gauch. 



22 COURSE OFFERINGS 

B. General Botany and Morphology 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Bot. 111. Plant Anatomy (3). One lecture and two laboratory periods a 
week, first semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 110, or equivalent. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. Rappleye. 

Bot. 113. Plant Geography (2). First semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 1, or 
equivalent. Brown. 

Bot. 114. Advanced Plant Taxonomy (3). One lecture and two laboratory 
periods a week, first semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 11, or equivalent. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. Brown. 

Bot. 115. Structure of Economic Plants (2). Two laboratory periods a 
week, second semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 111. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Rappleye. 

Bot. 116. History and Philosophy of Botany (1). First semester. Pre- 
requisite, 15 semester hours of botany. Bamford. 

Bot. 117. Plant Breeding (2). Second semester. Prerequisites. Zool. 104, 
or equivalent. Morgan. 

For Graduates 

Bot. 211. Cytology (4). Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week, 
second semester. Prerequisites, Bot. 110, Zool. 104. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00. Bamford, Morgan. 

Bot. 212. Plant Morphology (2). Two laboratory periods a week, first 
semester. Prerequisites, Bot. 11, Bot. Ill, or equivalent. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. Rappleye. 

Bot. 213. Seminar (1). First and second semesters. Prerequisite, per- 
mission of instructor. Bamford. 

Bot. 214. Research. Credit according to work done. Bamford, Morgan. 

Bot. 215. Plant Cytogenetics (3). First semester. Prerequisites, Zool. 
104, Bot. 211. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Morgan. 

C. Plant Pathology 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Bot. 122. Research Methods in Plant Pathology (2). Two laboratory 
periods a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or 
equivalent. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Cox. 

Bot. 123. Diseases of Ornamental Plants (2). Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. 20, or equivelant. Jeffers. 

Bot. 124. Diseases of Tobacco and Agronomic Crops (2). (Not offered 
1949-1950.) Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. 




COURSE OFFERINGS 23 

Bot. 125. Diseases of Fruit Crops (2). First semester. Prerequisite, 

Bot. 20, or equivalent. Weaver. 

Bot. 126. Diseases of Vegetable Crops (2). (Not offered 1949-1950.) 

Prerequsite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. Cox. 

Bot. 128. Mycology (4). Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week, 

first semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 2, or equivalent. Laboratory fee, 

$5.00. Jeffers. 

For Graduates 
Bot. 221. Virus Diseases (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period a 
week, second semester. Prerequisites, Bot. 20, Bot. 101. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. Brierley. 

Bot. 222. Plant Nematology (2). Second semester. Two lectures. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. Steiner. 

Bot. 225. Research, Pathology. Credit according to work done. Staff. 

Bot. 226. Plant Disease Control (3). First semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 
20, or equivalent. Cox. 

Bot. 229. Seminar, Pathology (1). First and second semester. Jeffers. 

BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 
A. Business Administration 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

B. A. 110, 111. Intermediate Accounting (3, 3). First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisite, a grade of B or better in B. A. 21, or consent of 
instructor. 

B. A. 116. Public Budgeting (3). Prerequisites, B. A. 21 and Econ. 32. 

B. A. 118. Governmental Accounting (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 111. 

B. A. 121. Cost Accounting (4). Second semester. Prerequisite, a grade 
of B or better in B. A. 21, or consent of instructor. 

B. A. 122. Auditing Theory and Practice (3). First semester. Prerequi- 
site, B. A. 111. 

B. A. 123. Income Tax Accounting (4). First semester. Prerequisite, a 
grade of B or better in B. A. 21, or consent of instructor. 

B. A. 124, 126. Advanced Accounting (3, 3). First and second semesters 
Prerequisite, B. A. 111. 

B. A. 125. C. P. A. Problems (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, B. A. 
124, or consent of instructor. 

B. A. 127. Advanced Auditing Theory and Practice (3). Second semester. 
Prerequisite, B. A. 122. 



24 COURSE OFFERINGS 

B. A. 129. Apprenticeship in Accounting (0). 

B. A. 130. Elements of Business Statistics (3). First semester. 

B. A. 131. Statistics Laboratory. 

B. A. 132, 133. Advanced Business Statistics (3, 3). Three hours a week, 
first and second semesters. Prerequisite, B. A. 130. 

B. A. 140. Financial Management (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 140. 

B. A. 141. Investment Management (3). First semester. Prerequisite, 
B. A. 140. 

B. A. 142. Banking Policies and Practices (3). Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 140. 

B. A. 143. Credit Management (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, B. A. 
140. 

B. A. 144. Life, Group and Social Insurance (2). First semester. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 32 or 37. 

B. A. 145. Property, Casualty, and Liability Insurance (2). First semes- 
ter. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. 

B. A. 146. Real Estate Financing and Appraisals (2). Second semester. 
Prerequisites, Econ. 32 or 37, B. A. 156. 

B. A. 147. Business Cycles (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 140. 

B. A. 150. Marketing Management (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 150. 

B. A. 151. Advertising Programs and Campaigns (2). First semester. 
Prerequisite, B. A. 150. 

B. A. 152. Advertising Copy Writing and Layout (2). Second semester. 
Prerequisite, B. A. 151. 

B. A. 153. Purchasing Management (3). First semester. Prerequisite, 
B. A. 150. 

B. A. 154. Retail Store Management (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 150. 

B. A. 156. Real Estate Principles and Practice (2). First semester. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 32 or 37. 

B. A. 157. Foreign Trade Procedure (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 150. 

B. A. 160. Personnel Management (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 160. 

B. A. 162. Contemporary Trends in Labor Relations (3). First semester. 
Prerequisite, B. A. 160. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 25 

B. A. 163. Industrial Relations (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 
160. 

B. A. 164. Recent Labor Legislation and Court Decisions (3). Second 
semester. Prerequisite, Econ 160. B. A. 160 recommended. 

B. A. 165. Office Management (3). First semester. Prerequisite, B. A. 11 
or junior standing. 

B. A. 166. Business Communications (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, 
junior standing. 

B. A. 167. Job Evaluation and Merit Rating (2). Prerequisite, B. A. 160. 

B. A. 169. Industrial Management (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, 
B. A. (11) and 160. 

B. A. 170. Transportation I, Regulation of Transportation Services (3). 

First semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37 

B. A. 171. Transportation II, Services, Rules, and Practices (3). Pre- 
requisite, B. A. 170. 

B. A. 172. Transportation III, Motor Transportation (3). Prerequisite, 
B. A. 171. 

B. A. 173. Transportation IV, Overseas Shipping (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 
170. 

B. A. 174. Commercial Air Transportation (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 170. 

B. A. 175. Airline Administration (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 174. 

B. A. 176. Problems in Airport Management (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 174. 

B. A. 177. Motion Economy and Time Study (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 169. 

B. A. 178. Production Planning and Control (2). Prerequisite, B. A. 169. 

B. A. 179. Problems in Supervision (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 169. 

B. A. 180. 181. Business Law (4, 4). First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisite, senior standing. Required in all Bus. Adm. cum'culums. 

B. A. 183. Law for Accountants (2). Prerequisite, B. A. 181. 

B. A. 184. Public Utilities (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 
or 37 and senior standing. 

B. A. 186. Real Estate Law and Conveyancing (2). Prerequisite, B. A. 
156 and 180. 

B. A. 189. Government and Business (3). First semester. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 32 or 37. Senior standing. 

For Graduates 
B. A. 220. Managerial Accounting (3). 
B. A. 221, 222. Seminar in Accounting. Arranged. 



26 COURSE OFFERINGS 

B. A. 226. Accounting Systems (3). 

B. A. 228. Research in Accounting. 

B. A. 229. Studies of Special Problems in the Fields of Control and 
Organization. 

B. A. 240. Seminar in Financial Management (1-3). 

B. A. 260. Problems in Sales Management (3). 

B. A. 251. Problems in Advertising (3). 

B. A. 252. Problems in Retail Store Management (3). 

B. A. 257. Seminar in Marketing Management. 

B. A. 258. Research in Marketing. 

B. A. 262. Seminar in Contemporary Trends in Labor Relations. 

B. A. 265. Development and Trends in Modern Industrial Management (3). 

B. A. 266. Research in Personnel Management. 

B. A. 267. Research in Industrial Relations. 

B. A. 270. Seminar in Air Transportation (3). 

B. A. 271. Theory of Organization (3). 

B. A. 277. Seminar in Transportation (3). 

B. A. 280. Seminar in Business and Government Relationships. 

B. A. 284. Seminar in Public Utilities (3). 

B. A. 299. Thesis. 

B. Economics 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Econ. 131. Comparative Economic Systems (3). Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 32 or 37. 

Econ. 132. Advanced Economic Principles (3). First semester. Prerequi- 
site, Econ. 32. 

Econ. 134. Contemporary Ecnomic Thought (3). Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 32. 

Econ. 136. International Economic Policies and Relations (3). First semes- 
ter. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. Econ. 131 recommended. 

Econ. 137. Economic Planning and Post-war Problems (3). Second semes- 
ter. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. Econ. 131 recommended. 

Econ. 140. Money and Banking (3). First semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 
32 or 37. 

Econ. 141. Theory of Money, Credit, and Prices (3). Second semester. 
Prerequisites, Econ. 32 and 140. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 27 

Econ. 142. Public Finance and Taxation (3). First semester. Prerequi- 
site, Econ. 32 or 37. 

Econ. 149. International Finance and Exchange (3). Second semester. 
Prerequisite, Econ. 140. Econ. 141 recommended. 

Econ. 150. Marketing Principles and Organization (3). First semester. 
Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. 

Econ. 160. Labor Economics (3). First semester Prerequisite, Econ. 32 
or 37. 

Econ. 161. Government and Social Security (3). Second semester. Pre- 
requisites, G. & P. 4, Econ. 32. 

Econ. 170. Monoply and Competition (3). Second semester. Prerequi- 
site, Econ. 32 or 37. 

Econ. 171. Economics of American Industry (3). Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 32 or 37. 

For Graduates 

Econ. 230. History of Economic Thought (3). First semester. Prerequi- 
site, Econ. 132. 

Econ. 231. Economic Theory in the Nineteenth Century (3). Second 
semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 230 or consent of instructor. 

Econ. 235. Seminar in International Economic Relations (3). 

Econ. 237, 238. Seminar in Economic Investigation (3, 3). Three hours a 
week, first and second semesters. 

Econ. 240. Comparative Banking Systems (3). Second semester. 

Econ. 242. Research in Governmental Fiscal Policies and Practices (3). 

Econ. 270. Seminar in Economics and Geography of American Industries 
(3). 

Econ. 299. Thesis. Arranged 

C. Geography 

Geog. 100, 102. Regional Georgraphy of the United States and Canada 
(3, 3.) First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Geog. 1, 2 or Geo. 
60, 61, or permission of instructor. Baker. 

Geog. 102. The Geography of Manufacturing in the United States and 
Canada (3). First semester. Clemens. 

Geog. 110, 111. Latin America (3, 3). First and second semesters. 

Crist. 

Geog. 115. The Peoples of Latin America (2). Second semester. Crist. 



28 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Geog. 120. Economic Geography of Europe (3). First semester. 

Van Royen. 

Soc. 120, 121. Population. See Sociology. 

Geog. 122. Economic Resources and Development of Africa (3). Second 
semester. Van Royen. 

Geog. 123. Problems of Colonial Geography (3). First or second semes- 
ter. Van Royen. 

Geog. 130, 131. Economic and Political Geography of Southern and Eastern 
Asia (3, 3). First and second semesters. Hu. 

Geog. 140, 141. Soviet Lands (3, 3). First and second semesters. 

Geog. 150. Problems of Map Evaluation I, Topographic Maps (3). First 
semester. Davies (Army Map Service). 

Geog. 151. Problems of Map Evaluation II, Non-topographic Special-use 
Maps (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Geog. 150. 

Brierly (Army Map Service). 

Geog. 152. Problems and Practices of Photo Interpretation (3). Off- 
campus. First or second semester. Prerequisite, Geog. 31, or equiva- 
lent 

Geog. 160. Elementary Toponymy (3). First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisite, Geog. 30 and one foreign language. 

Aiken (Army Map Service). 

Geog. 162. Fundamentals of Climatology (3). First semester. Baum. 

Geog. 170. Field Studies in Geography (3). First semester and approxi- 
mately three weeks in the field immediately preceding the academic 
year. Staff. 

Geog. 180, 181. History, Nature and Methodology of Geography (3, 3). 

First and second semesters. Hu. 

Geog. 190, 191. Proseminar in Geography (3, 3). Staff. 

For Graduates 

Geog. 210. Seminar in Cartography (3). Karinen. 

Geog. 220. Advanced Geomorphology (3). Second semester. Van Royen. 

Geog. 230. Micro-Climatology (3). First semester. Prerequisite, Geog. 
162 or consent of instructor. Baum. 

Geog. 231. Advanced General Climatology (3). Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Geog. 162 or consent of instructor. Baum. 

Geog. 248, 249. Special Studies in Meteorology and Climatology (3, 3). 

Baum. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 29 

Geoff. 250, 251. Recent Economic Trends in Latin America (3, 3). First 
and second semester Crist. 

Geog. 260, 261. Problems in the Geography of Europe and Africa (3, 3). 

First and second semesters. Van Royen. 

Geog. 270, 271. Special Studies in the Geography of China (3, 3). First 
and second semesters. Hu. 

Geog. 290, 291. Seminar in Geography. Credit to be arranged. First 
and second semesters. Staff. 

Geog. 292, 293. Research Work. (Credit to be arranged.) First and second 
semesters and summer. 

A. E. 212, 213. Land Utilization and Agricultural Production. See Agri- 
cultural Economics. Baker. 

In addition to individual research projects, the preparation of the "Atlas 
of the World's Agricultural and Mineral Resources," a joint project of the 
University of Maryland, the United States Department of Agriculture, and 
the Department of the Interior, as well as cooperative projects with other 
government departments, provide facilities for graduate students to study 
under the guidance of experts in government service. The University of 
Maryland is cooperating also with the National Central University, in 
Nanking, China, in the preparation of an "Atlas of China." These atlases 
and other projects in preparation, may provide a vehicle of publication for 
parts of students' research work. 

D. Government and Politics 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

G. and P. 101. International Political Relations (3). First semester. 
Prerequisite, G. and P. 1. Plischke. 

G. and P. 102. International Law (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, 
G. and P. 1. Plischke. 

G. and P. 105. Recent Far Eastern Politics (3). First semester. Pre- 
quisite, G. and P. 1. Steinmeyer. 

G. and P. 106. American Foreign Relations (3). First semester. Pre- 
requisite, G. and P. 1. Plischke. 

G. and P. 110. Principles of Public Administration (3). First semester. 
Prerequisite, G. and P. 1. Ray. 

G. and P. 111. Public Personnel Administration (3). Second semester. 
Prerequisite, G. and P. 1. Mauck. 

G. and P. 112. Public Financial Administration (3). Second semester. 
Prerequisite, G. and P. 110 or Econ. 142. Mauck. 



30 COURSE OFFERINGS 

G. and P. 124. Legislatures and Legislation (3). Second semester. Pre- 
quisite, G. and P. 1. Burdette. 

G. and P. 131, 132. Constitutional Law (3, 3). First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisite, G. and P. 1. Dixon. 

G. and P. 133. Administration of Justice (3). Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, G. and P. 1. Dixon. 

G. and P. 141. History of Political Theory (3). First semester. Pre- 
requisite, G. and P. 1. Dixon. 

G. and P. 142. Recent Political Theory (3). Second semester. Prerequi- 
site, G. and P. 1. Dixon. 

G. and P. 144. American Political Theory (3). First semester. Prerequi- 
site, G. and P. 1. LaFuze. 

G. and P. 154. Problems of World Politics (3). Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, G. and P. 1. Steinmeyer. 

G. and P. 174. Political Parties (4). First semester. Prerequisite, G. and 
P. 1. Burdette. 

G. and P. 178. Public Opinion (3). First semester. Prerequisite, G. and 
P. 1. Burdette. 

G. and P. 181. Administrative Law (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, 
G. and P. 1. Ray. 

For Graduates 

G. and P. 201. Seminar in International Political Organization (3). 

Steinmeyer. 

G. and P. 211. Seminar in Federal-State Relations (3). Ray. 

G. and P. 213. Problems of Public Administration (3). Ray. 

G. and P. 214. Problems of Public Personnel Administration (3). Mauck. 

G. and P. 216. Seminar in Government Administrative Planning and Man- 
agement (3). Mauck. 

G. and P. 217. Government Corporations and Special Purpose Authorities 
(3). Mauck. 

G. and P. 221. Seminar in Public Opinion (3). Burdette. 

G. and P. 224. Seminar in Political Parties and Politics (3). Burdette. 

G. and P. 225. Man and the State (3). Dixon. 

G. and P. 231. Seminar in Public Law (3). Ray. 

G. and P. 251. Bibliography of Government and Politics (3). Staff. 

G. and P. 261. Research in Government and Politics (3). Staff. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 31 

G. and P. 281. Departmental Seminar (No Credit). Registration for two 
semesters required for doctoral candidates. Staff. 

G. and P. 299. Thesis Course. Arranged. Staff. 

CHEMISTRY 

Laboratory fees in Chemistry are $10.00 per course per semester. 

A. Analytical Chemistry 

For Graduates 

Chem. 206, 208. Spectographic Analysis (1, 1). One three-hour labora- 
tory a week. Prerequisite, Chem. 188, 190 and consent of the instructor. 
Registration limited. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. White. 

Chem. 221, 223. Chemical Microscopy (2, 2). One lecture and three one- 
hour laboratory period a week, first and second semesters. Registration 
limited. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Stuntz. 

Chem. 225. Polarography (2). Two lectures a week. 

Chem. 226, 228. Advanced Quantitative Analysis (2, 2). Two three-hour 
laboratory periods a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, 
consent of instructor. Stuntz. 

Chem. 266. Biological Analysis (2). Two three-hour laboratory periods a 
week, second semester. Prerequisites, Chem. 19, 31, 32, 33, 34. Wiley. 

B. Biochemistry 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 161, 163. Biochemistry (2, 2). Two lectures a week, first and 
second semesters. Prerequisites, Chem. 31, 33, or Chem. 35, 37. 

Chem. 162, 164. Biochemistry Laboratory (2, 2). Two three-hour labora- 
tory periods a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Chem. 
32, 34, or Chem. 36, 38. 

For Graduates 

Chem. 261, 263. Advanced Biochemistry (2, 2). Two lectures a week, first 
and second semesters. Prerequisites, Chem. 141, 143, or consent of 
instructor. Veitch. 

Chem. 262, 264. Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory (2, 2). Two three- 
hour laboatory periods a week, first and second semesters. Prerequi- 
site, consent of the instructor. Veitch. 

Chem. 268. Special Problems in Biochemistry (2-4). Two to four three- 
hour laboratory periods a week, first and second semesters. Prerequi- 
sites, Chem. 161, 162, 163, 164 and consent of the instructor. Veitch. 



32 COURSE OFFERINGS 

C. Inorganic Chemistry 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 101. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (2). Two lectures a week, 
second semester. Prerequisites, Chem. 23 and 37, 38. 

For Graduates 

Chem. 201, 203. The Chemistry of Rarer Elements (2, 2). Two lectures a 
week, first and second semesters. White. 

Chem. 202, 204. Advanced Inorganic Laboratory (2, 2). Two three-hour 
laboratory periods a week, first and second semesters. 

Chem. 205. Radiochemistry (2). Two lectures a week. Rollinson. 

Chem. 207. Chemistry of Inorganic Complex Compounds (2). Two lec- 
tures a week. 

Chem. 210. Radiochemistry Laboratory (1 or 2). One or two three-hour 
laboratory periods a week. Registration limited. Prerequisites, Chem. 
205 (or concurrent registration therein) and consent of instructor. 

Rollinson. 

Chem. 239. Physical Techniques in Chemistry (2). A survey of the tools 
available for the solution of chemical problems by means of physical 
techniques. 

D. Organic Chemistry 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 141, 143. Advanced Organic Chemistry (2, 2). Two lectures a week, 
first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Chem. 37, 38. 

Chem. 142, 144. Advanced Organic Laboratory (2, 2). Two three-hour 
laboratory periods a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, 
Chem. 19 or 23, and Chem. 37, 38. 

Chem. 146. 148. The Identification of Organic Compounds (2, 2). Two 

three-hour laboratory periods a week, first and second semesters. 
Prerequisites, Chem. 141, 143, or concurrent registration therein. 

Chem. 150. Organic Quantitative Analysis (2). Two three-hour laboratory 
periods per week. The semi-micro determination of carbon, hydrogen, 
nitrogen, halogen and certain functional groups. First and second 
semesters. 

(One or more courses from the following group 241-257 will customarily 
be offered each semester. Two of these courses will be presented in the 
academic year (1949-1950). 

Chem. 241. Stereochemistry (2). Two lectures a week. Woods. 

Chem. 245. The Chemistry of the Steroids (2). Two lectures a week. 

Pratt. 



Chem. 


249, 


w 


eek. 


Chem. 


251 


Chem. 


253, 



COURSE OFFERINGS 33 

Physical Aspects of Organic Chemistry (2). Two lectures a 

Woods. 

The Heterocylics (2). Two lectures a week. Pratt. 

Organic Sulfur Compounds (2). Two lectures a week. Dewey. 

Chem. 254. Advanced Organic Preparations (2 to 4). Two to four three- 
hour laboratory periods a week, first and second semesters. 

Chem. 257. Organic Laboratory Methods (2). Two lectures a week. 

Pratt. 

Chem. 258. The Identification of Organic Compounds, an Advanced Course 
(2 to 4). Two to four three-hour laboratory periods a week, first and 
second semesters. Pratt. 

Chem. 260. Advanced Organic Laboratory (1 or 2). One or two three- 
hour laboratory periods per week, first and second semesters. Pratt. 

Chem. 271. Glassblowing Laboratory (1). A practical course designed to 
teach the student elementary glassblowing. First and second semes- 
ters. Carruthers. 
E. Physical Chemistry 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 181, 183. Elements of Physical Chemistry (2, 2). Two lectures a 
week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Chem. 19; Phys. 1, 2; 
Math. 10, 11. 

Chem. 182, 184. Elements of Physical Chemistry Laboratory (1, 1). One 

three-hour laboratory period a week, first and second semesters. May- 
be taken ONLY when accompanied by Chem. 181, 183. 

Chem. 187, 189. Physical Chemistry (3, 3). Three lectures a week, first 
and second semesters. Prerequisites, Chem. 19 or 21; Phys. 20, 21; 
Math. 20, 21. 

Chem. 188, 190. Physical Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2). Two three-hour 
laboratory periods a week, first and second semesters. A laboratory 
course for students taking Chem. 187, 189. 

For Graduates 

The common prerequisites for the following courses are Chem. 187, 189, 
and 188, 190, or their equivalent. 

One or more courses of the group, 281-307, will be offered each semester, 
depending on demand. 

Chem. 281, 283. Theory of Solutions (2, 2). Two lectures a week, first 
and second semesters. Prerequisite, Chem. 307. Svirbely. 

Chem. 285. Colloid Chemistry (2). Two lectures a week. Pickard. 



34 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Chem. 295. Heterogenous Equilibria (2). Two lectures a week. Pickard. 

Chem. 299. Reaction Kinetics (3). Three lectures per week. Svirbely. 

Chem. 303. Electrochemistry (3). Three lectures a week. Pickard. 

Chem. 304. Electrochemistry Laboratory (2). Two three-hour laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Staff. 

Chem. 307 Chemical Thermodynamics (3). Three lectures a week. 

Svirbely. 

Chem. 311. Physicochemical Calculations (2). Two lectures per week. 

Pickard. 

Chem. 313 Molecular Structure (2). Two lectures per week. Brown. 

Chem. 321. Quantum Chemistry (3). Three lectures a week. Brown. 

Chem. 323. Statistical Mechanics and Chemistry (3) Three lectures a 
week. Brown. 

F. Seminar and Research 

Chem. 351. Seminar (1). First and second semesters. Staff. 

Chem. 360. Research. First and second semesters, summer session. Staff. 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Comp. Lit. 101. Introductory Survey of Comparative Literature (3). First 
semester. Zucker. 

Comp. Lit. 102. Introductory Survey of Comparative Literature (3). 

Second semester. Zucker. 

Comp. Lit. 103. The Old Testament as Literature (3). Second semester. 

Zucker. 

Copm. Lit. 104. Chaucer (3). First semester. Same as Eng. 104. 

Harman. 
Comp. Lit. 105. Romanticism in France (3). First semester. Staff. 

Comp. Lit. 106. Romantisicm in Germany (3). Second semester. Prahl. 

Comp. Lit. 107. The Faust Legend in English and German Literature (3). 

First semester. Prahl. 

Comp. Lit. 108. Some Non-English Influences on American Literature (3). 

Second semester. Zucker. 

Comp. Lit. 109. Cervantes (3). Second semester. Staff. 

Comp. Lit. 112. Ibsen (3) First semester. Zucker. 

Comp. Lit. 113. Prose of the Renaissance (3). Second semester. Same 
as Eng. 113. (Not offered in 1949-1950). Zeerveld. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 35 

Comp. Lit. 114. The Greek Drama (3). First semester. Prahl. 

Comp. Lit. 121. Milton (3). Same as Eng. 121. Murphy. 

Comp. Lit. 129, 130 Literature of the Romantic Period (3, 3) Three 
hours a week, first and second semesters. Same as Eng. 129, 130. 

Weber. 

Comp. Lit. 144. Modern Drama (3). First semester. Same as Eng. 144. 

Weber. 

Comp. Lit. 145. The Modern Novel (3). Second semester. Same as Eng. 
145. Cardwell. 

Comp. Lit. 155, 156. Four Major American Writers (3, 3). Three hours 
a week, first and second semesters. Same as Eng. 155, 156. Gravely. 

For Graduates 

Comp. Lit. 201. Bibliography and Methods (3). First semester. Same as 
Eng. 201. Mooney. 

Comp. Lit. 202. The History of the Theatre (3) Second semester. 

Zucker. 

Comp. Lit. 203. Schiller (3). Same as German 204. Prahl. 

Comp. Lit. 204. Medieval Romances (3). First semester. Same as Eng. 
204. (Not offered in 1949-1950.) 

Comp. Lit. 205. Georges Duhamel, Poet, Dramatist, Novelist (3). First 
semester. Same as French 204. Falls. 

Comp. Lit. 206, 207. Seminar in Sixteenth Century Literature (3, 3). First 
and second semesters. Same as Eng. 206 and 207. McManaway. 

Comp. Lit. 208. The Philosophy of Goethe's Faust (3). Same as German 
208. Zucker. 

Comp. Lit. 216, 217. Literary Criticism (3, 3). Three hours a week, first 
and second semesters. Same as Eng. 216, 217. Staff. 

Comp. Lit. 227, 228. Problems in American Literature (3, 3). Same as 
Eng. 227, 228. (Not offered in 1949-1950.) 

DAIRY 

Dairy 100. Dairy Cattle Management (1). One laboratory period a week, 
first semester. Prerequisite, Dairy 1. Cairns. 

Dairy 101. Dairy Production (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period 
a week, second semester. Prerequisites, Dairy 1, and A. H. 110. 

Cairns. 

Dairy 105. Dairy Breeds and Breeding (2). First semester. Prerequi- 
sites, Dairy 1, Zool. 104, A. H. 120. Cairns. 



36 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Dairy 108. Dairy Technology (4). Two lectures and two laboratory 
periods a week, first semester. Prerequisites, Dairy 1, Bact. 133, Chem. 
1, 3. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Gould, Johnson. 

Dairy 109. Market Milk (4). Two lectures and two laboratory periods a 
week, second semester. Prerequisites, Dairy 1, Bact. 1, 133, Chem. 
1, 3. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Gould, Johnson. 

Dairy 110. Butter and Cheese Making (4). Two lectures and two labora- 
tory periods a week, second semester. Prerequisites, Dairy 1, Bact. 1, 
Chem. 1, 3. (Alternate years, not given in 1949-1950.) Warren. 

Dairy 111. Concentrated Milk Products (2). One lecture and one labora- 
tory period a week, second semester. Prerequisites, Dairy 1, 108, 114. 
(Alternate years, not given in 1949-1950.) Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Warren. 

Dairy 112. Ice Cream Making (4). Two lectures and two laboratory 
periods a week, first semester. Prerequisites, Dairy 1, 108, 114. 

Warren. 

Dairy 114. Special Laboratory Methods (4). Two lectures and two labora- 
tory periods a week, second semester. Prerequisites, Dairy 1, 108, 
Bact. 1, 133, Chem. 1, 3, 19, 31, 32, 33, 34. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Gould, Johnson. 

Dairy 120, 121. Dairy Seminar (1, 1). One hour a week, first and second 
semesters. Prerequisites, students majoring in Dairy Husbandry, Dairy 
1, 101; students majoring in Dairy Products Technology, Dairy 1, 108. 

Cairns. 

Dairy 124. Special Problems in Dairying (2-4). First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisites, students majoring in Dairy Husbandry, Dairy 1, 
101 ; students majoring in Dairy Products Technology, Dairy 1, 108, 109. 
Credit in accordance with the amount and character of work done. 

Staff. 

Dairy 201. Advanced Dairy Production (3). First semester. Prerequi- 
site, Dairy 101, or equivalent. Cairns. 

Dairy 202. Advanced Dairy Technology (3). First semester. Prerequi- 
sites, Dairy 108, 114, or equivalent. Gould. 

Dairy 204. Methods of Dairy Research (1-5). First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisite, permission of professor in charge of work. Staff. 

Dairy 205. Seminar (1). First and second semesters. Staff. 

Dairy 208. Research (3-8). Credit to be determined by amount and quality 
of work done. Staff. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 37 

EDUCATION 

A student in Education has the option of qualifying for the degree of 
Master of Arts or for the degree of Master of Education. 

Special Departmental Requirements and Information 

Master of Arts and Master of Education 

Students who do not complete the requirements for the Master's degree 
in Education within six years of the date of matriculation may be required 
to take supplementary course work at the rate of two semester hours for 
each year the completion of the course requirements is deferred beyond 
six years, or to take special examinations based upon up-to-date materials 
in courses more than six years old. 

A qualifying written examination is required of all candidates for a 
degree, to be taken after the student has successfully completed ten semes- 
ter hours, and before he has completed nineteen hours (Master of Arts), or 
twenty-five hours (Master of Education). This examination covers the 
general information a student should have in the field of education. To 
assist in the choice of reading in preparation for the examination, a reading 
list has been prepared and is available in the office of the College of Educa- 
tion. The examination is usually given on the third Saturday of January 
and May and on the fourth Saturday on July, simultaneously at College 
Park and Baltimore. 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Education who are high school 
teachers not preparing for administrative positions are advised to take at 
least twelve semester hours in their subject fields. 

In addition to the general requirements for admission, applicants for 
unconditional admission with a major in Education must have had sixteen 
semester hours of undergraduate work in Education of acceptable quality, 
equivalent in character to the eighteen hours required in the junior and 
senior years of the University of Maryland. 

DOCTORAL DEGREES 

The Department of Education offers work towards degrees of Doctor 
of Philosophy and Doctor of Education. 

Each candidate is required to achieve exceptional ability in at least one 
major area of competence. For the Ph.D., he must, in addition, achieve 
competence in at least one minor area outside the field of education. For 
both degrees, the candidate is required to develop competence in approxi- 
mately six areas, including the major and minor. The choice of specific 
areas is optional with the student and his faculty adviser. 

The areas of specialization in education from which a student may select 
his major, his minor, and approximately four other areas of competence, 
are as follows: 



38 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Adult Education Home Economics Education 

Curriculum and Instruction Human Growth and Development 

Educational Administration and Industrial Arts Education 

Supervision Nursery School Education 

Elementary Education Research Principles and Techniques 

Guidance and Personnel Secondary Education 

Health and Physical Education Vocational-Industrial Education 
Higher Education 
History, Philosophy, and 

Comparative Education 

In addition to the general University requirements for a doctor's degree 
the following additional requirements must be met by students proposing 
to major in one of the above fields. 

1. Qualifying examination, oral or written, or both, at the discretion 
of the department, covering student's undergraduate and first year of 
graduate preparation, in education and related fields, to be taken as soon 
as possible after completion of the first year of graduate work and in 
any event required before receiving the department's official permission 
to take work beyond the Master's degree with the purpose of applying for 
candidacy for the doctorate. 

2. The preliminary examination for admission to candidacy for the 
doctor's degree will include a written examination covering the student's 
preparation in major and minor fields, and an oral examination covering 
his plan of research for the doctoral dissertations or project. 

In general the requirements for the Doctor of Education degree are the 
same as those for the degree Doctor of Philosophy. The most important 
difference between the two degrees are as follows: 

1. The purpose of the Doctor of Education degree is to prepare persons 
of exceptional competence to work in the field. The emphasis for this 
degree is placed on broad understanding, whereas that for the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy is placed on specialized research. 

2. A reading knowledge of foreign languages is required for the degree 
of Doctor of Education only when needed for research and study in the 
doctoral program. 

3. In meeting residence requirements, a candidate for the Ed.D. degree 
may substitute two summers of residence for one semester of residence or 
four summers for two semesters. 

4. The doctoral study for the Ed. D. consists of a project rather than a 
dissertation. ' The project requires research to meet a practical field problem. 
Credit of six to nine hours is allowed for a project as compared with twelve 
to eighteen hours for a Ph.D. dissertation. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 39 

A. History, Principles, Curriculum, and Administration 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Ed. 100. History of Education I (2). First semester Wiggin. 

Ed. 101. History of Education II (2). 

Ed. 102. History of Education in the United States (2). Second semester. 

Wiggin. 

Ed. 105. Comparative Education — European (2). First semester. 

Benjamin. 

Ed. 106. Comparative Education — Latin America (2). Second semester. 

Benjamin. 

Ed. 107. Philosophy of Education I (2). 

Ed. 108. Philosophy of Education II (2). 

Ed. 110. The Teacher and School Administration (2). 

Ed. 114. Educational Foundations (2). 

Ed. 121. The Language Arts in the Elementary School (2). 

Ed. 122. The Social Studies in the Elementary School (2). 

Ed. 123. The Child and the Curriculum (2). 

Ed. 124. Creative Expression in the Elementary School (2). 

Ed. 125. Creative Expression in the Elementary School II (2). Prerequi- 
site, Ed. 124 or taken concurrently. 

Ed. 126. The Elementary School Curriculum (2). 

*Ed. 130. Theory of the Junior High School (2). Newell. 

*Ed. 131. Theory of the Senior High School (2). Newell. 

Ed. 133. Methods of Teaching the Social Studies (2). Offered in Balti- 
more. 

Ed. 134. Materials and Procedures for the Senior High School Core Cur- 
riculum (2). 

Ed. 140. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation (3). Second semester. 

Staff. 
Graduate credit is allowed only by special permission. Separate sec- 
tions are offered in the following subject-matter areas: English, Social 
Studies, Foreign Languages, Science, Mathematics, Art Education, 
Business Education, Industrial Education, Music Education, Nursing 
Education, Physical Education for Men, and Physical Education for 
Women. 



1 Credit is accepted for Ed. 130 or for Ed. 131, but not for both courses. 



40 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Ed. 141. High School Course of Study— English (2). Bryan. 

Ed. 142. High School Course for Study— Literature (2). Bryan. 

Ed. 144. Materials and Procedure for the Junior High School Core Cur- 
riculum (2). 

Ed. 145. Principles of High School Teaching (2). First and second semes- 
ters. Brechbill. 

Ed. 146. The Teaching of Physics (3). Second semester. Laboratory 
fee, $6.00. R. Morgan 

Ed. 147. Audio- Visual Education (2). First semester. Laboratory fee, 
$1.00. Brechbill. 

Ed. 150. Educational Measurement (2). First and second semesters. 

Brechbill. 

Ed. 151. Remedial Reading Instruction (2). Schindler. 

Ed. 152. The Adolescent: Characteristics and Problems (2). 

Ed. 153. The Improvement of Reading (2). Schindler. 

Ed. 160. Educational Sociology — Introductory (2). First and second 
semesters. Schindler. 

Ed. 161. Guidance in Secondary Schools (2). Sievers. 

Ed. 162. Mental Hygiene in the Classroom (2). 

Ed. 170. Introduction to Special Education (2). 

Ed. 171. Education of Retarded and Slow-Learning Children (2). 

Ed. 183. Recent Trends in Curriculum and Methods in Elementary School 
(2). 

Ed. 184. Outdoor Education (6). 
in summer. 

Ed. 191. Principles of Adult Education (2). Wiggin. 

Ed. 195. Teaching Traffic Safety and Automobile Operation (2). Offered 
in Summer School. 

For Graduates 

Ed. 203. Problems in Higher Education (2). Benjamin. 

Ed, 205. Seminar in Comparative Education (2). Benjamin. 

Ed. 207. Seminar in Philosophy of Education (2). 

Ed. 209. Seminar in History of Education (2). Wiggin. 

Ed. 210. The Organization and Administration of Public Education (2). 

First semester. Newell. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 



41 



Ed. 

Ed. 
Ed. 
Ed. 
Ed. 
Ed. 
Ed. 
Ed. 
Ed. 
Ed. 
Ed. 
Ed. 
Ed. 
Ed. 
Ed. 
Ed. 
Ed. 
Ed. 
Ed. 
Ed. 
Ed. 
Ed. 
Ed. 

Ed. 



211. The Organization, Administration, and Supervision of Secondary 
Schools (2). Second semester. Newell. 

212. School Finance and Business Administration (2). VanZwoll 

213. Administration and Teaching in Junior High School (2). 

214. School Buildings and Equipment (2). VanZwoll. 

215. Public Education in Maryland (2). Newell. 

216. High School Supervision (2). Newell. 

217. Administration and Supervision in Elementary Schools (2). 

218. School Surveys (2-6). Newell. 

219. Seminar in School Administration (2). VanZwoll. 

220. Pupil Transportation (2). 

221. Functional School Plant Planning (2). VanZwoll. 

222. Seminar in Supervision (2). Newell. 

223. Practicum in Personnel Relationships (2-6). Newell. 

224. Internship in School Administration (12-16). Newell. 

225. School Public Relations (2). VanZwoll. 

226. Child Accounting (2). VanZwoll. 

227. Public School Personnel Administration (2). VanZwoll. 
229. Seminar in Elementary Education (2). Schindler. 
232. Student Activities in the High School (2). 

236. Curriculum Development in the Secondary School (2). 

239. Seminar in Secondary Education (2). 

242. Coordination in Work-Experience Programs (2). Brown. 

243. Application of Theory and Research to Arithmetic in Elementary 
Schools (2). Schindler. 

244. Application of Theory and Research to the Language Arts in 



Elementary Schools (2). 



Schindler. 



Ed. 245. Applications of Theory and Research to High School Teaching 

(2). Brechbill. 

Ed. 247. Seminar in Science Education (2). 

Ed. 248. Seminar in Vocational Education (2). Hornbake. 

Ed. 250. Analysis of the Individual (2). Second semester. Sievers. 

Ed. 261. Counseling Techniques (2). Sievers. 

Ed. 262. Occupational Information (2). Second semester. Sievers. 



42 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Ed. 263, 264. Aptitudes and Aptitude Testing (2, 2). Offered in Balti- 
more. 
Ed. 268. Seminar in Educational Sociology (2). Schindler. 

Ed. 269. Seminar in Guidance (2). Sievers. 

Ed. 278. Seminar in Special Education (2). 

Ed. 279. Seminar in Adult Education (2). Wiggin. 

Ed. 280. Research Methods and Materials in Education (2). 
Ed. 281. Source Materials in Education (2). 
Ed. 289. Research (1-6). First and second semesters. 

B. Business Education 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

B. Ed. 100. Techniques of Teaching Office Skills (2). Patrick. 

B. Ed. 101. Methods and Materials in Teaching Office Skills (2). 

B. Ed. 102. Methods and Materials in Teaching Bookkeeping and Related 
Subjects (2). 

B. Ed. 103. Basic Business Subjects in the Junior High School (2). 

B. Ed. 104. Basic Business Education in the Secondary Schools (2). 

For Graduates 
B. Ed. 200. Administration and Supervision of Business Education (2). 
B. Ed. 255. Principles and Problems of Business Education (2). Patrick. 

C. Home Economics Education 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

H. E. Ed. 102. Problems in Teaching Home Economics (3). First semes- 
ter. 

H. E. Ed. 140 Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation (3) Second 
semester. 

For Graduates 

H. E. Ed. 200. Seminar in Home Economics Education (2). 

H. E. Ed. 202. Trends in the Teaching and Supervision of Home Economics 



(2-4) 



D. Human Development Education 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 



H. D. Ed. 100, 101. Principles of Human Development I and II (2, 2). 

Prescott and Staff. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 43 

H. E. Ed. 102, 103, 104. Child Development Laboratory I, II, and III 

(2, 2, 2). Prescott and Staff. 

H. D. Ed. 112. Scientific Concepts in Human Development (3). 

Prescott and Staff. 

H. D. Ed. 113. Laboratory in Behavior Analysis (3). Prescott and Staff . 

For Graduates 

H. D. Ed. 200. Organic Processes and Factors in Human Development (2). 

First semester. Prescott and Staff. 

H. Do Ed. 201. Affectional Relationships and Processes in Human De- 
velopment (2). Second semester. Prescott and Staff. 

H. D. Ed. 202. Socialization Processes in Human Development (2). 

Prescott and Staff. 

H. D. Ed. 203. Peer-culture and Group Processes in Human Development 
(2). Prescott and Staff. 

H. D. Ed. 210. "Self-developmental Processes in Human Behavior (2). 

Prescott and Staff. 

H. D. Ed. 211. "Self-adjustment Processes in Human Development (2). 

Prescott and Staff. 

H. D. Ed. 212. Advanced Scientific Concepts in Human Development (3). 

Prescott and Staff. 

H. D. Ed. 213. Advanced Laboratory in Behavior Analysis (3). 

Prescott and Staff. 

H. D. Ed. 220, 221. Educational Implications of Human Development Re- 
search (2, 2). Prescott and Staff . 

H. D. Ed. 230, 231. Field Program in Child Study I and II (2, 2). 

Prescott and Staff. 
E. Industrial Education 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Ind. Ed. 105. General Shop (2). Second semester. 

Ind. Ed. 140. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation (3). First semes- 
ter. Hombake. 

Ind. Ed. 150. Training Aids Development (2). Second semester. Wall. 

Ind. Ed. 164. Shop Organization and Management (2) Second semes- 
ter. Wall. 

Ind. Ed. 165. Modern Industry (2). Summer session 

Ind. Ed. 166. Educational Foundations of Industrial Arts (2). First semes- 
ter. Brown and Hombake. 



44 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Ind. Ed. 167. Problems in Occupational Education (2). Offered in Balti- 
more. 

Ind. Ed. 168. Trade or Occupational Analysis (2). First semester. 

Tnd. Ed. 169. Construction of Vocational and Occupational Courses of 
Study (2). 

Ind. Ed. 170. Principles and Practices of Vocational Education (2). Sum- 
mer session. 

Ind. Ed. 171. History of Vocational Education (2). Summer session. 

For Graduates 

Ind. Ed. 207. Philosophy of Industrial Arts Education (2). First semes- 
ter. Hornbake. 

Ind. Ed. 214. School Shop Planning and Equipment Selection (2). Second 
semester. Hornbake. 

Ind. Ed. 216. Supervision of Industrial Arts (2). Second semester. 

Hornbake. 

Ind. Ed. 220. Organization, Administration, and Supervision of Vocational 
Education (2). 

Ind. Ed. 240. Research in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education (2). 

First and second semesters. Staff. 

Ind. Ed. 241. Content and Method of Industrial Arts (2). Second semes- 
ter. Hornbake. 

Ind. Ed. 248. Seminar in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education (2). 

F. Nursery School-Kindergarten Education 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

C. Ed. 100. Child Development I — Infancy (3). First semester. 

McNaughton. 

C. Ed. 101. Child Development II— Early Childhood (3). Second semes- 
ter. McNaughton. 

C. Ed. 102. Child Development III— The Child from 5 to 10 (2). First 
and second semesters. 

C. Ed. 110. Child Development IV (3). First and second semesters. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

C. Ed. 112. Play and Play Materials (2). Flannery. 

C. Ed. 113. Education of the Young Child I (2). McNaughton. 

C. Ed. 114. Education of the Young Child II— The Social and and Emo- 
tional Needs of the Young Child (2). McNaughton. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 45 

C. Ed. 115. Children's Activities and Activities Materials (3). Second 
semester. 

C. Ed. 116, 117. Creative Expressions; Art, Music, Dance (2-3, 2-3). 

C. Ed. 119. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — Cooperative Nur- 
sery School (2-3). 

C. Ed. 140. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — Nursery School (3). 

First and second semesters. Whitney. 

C. Ed. 145. Guidance in Behavior Problems (2). First semester. Whitney. 

C. Ed. 150. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — Kindergarten (2-3). 

Second semester. 

C. Ed. 160. Speech Problems in Child Development (2). 

C. Ed. 161. Behavior Problems of Childhood and Adolescence (2). 

C. Ed. 165. Leadership Training (2). 

G. Nursing Education 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

N. Ed. 112. School of Nursing Finance and Administration (3). Offered 
in Baltimore. 

N. Ed. 115, 116. Ward Management and Clinical Teaching (2, 2). Offered 
in Baltimore. 

N. Ed. 190. Principles of Pediatric Nursing (3). Offered in Baltimore. 

ENGINEERING 
A. Aeronautical Engineering 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Aero. E. 101, 102. Aerodynamics (3, 2). Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Math. 20, 21; 
Phys. 20, 21. 

Aero. E. 103. Airplane Detail Drafting (1). One laboratory period a 
week, first semester. Prerequisite, Dr. 1, 2, 3. 

Aero. E. 104. Airplane Layout Drafting (1). Two laboratory periods a 
week, second semester. Prerequisite, Aero. E. 103. 

Aero. E. 105, 106. Airplane Fabrication Shop (1, 2). One laboratory period 
a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, Shop 3. 

Aero. E. 107, 108. Airplane Design (4, 4). Two lectures and two labora- 
tory periods a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Mech. 50; 
Aero. E. 102, 104. 



46 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Aero. E. 109, 110. Aircraft Power Plants (4, 4). Three lectures and one 
laboratory period a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, 
Mech. 50; M. E. 100, 101. 

Aero. E. Ill, 112. Aeronautical Laboratory (2, 2). One lecture and one 
laboratory period a week, first and second semesters. 

Aero. E. 113, 114. Mechanics of Aircraft Structures (3, 3). Three hours 
a week. Prerequisites, Mech. 50 and Math. 64. 

For Graduates 

Aero. E. 200, 201. Advanced Aerodynamics (3, 3). Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, 
Aero. E. 101, 102; Math. 64. 

Aero. E. 202, 203. Advanced Aircraft Structures (3, 3). Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week, first and second semesters. Prerequi- 
sites, Aero. E. 115, 116. 

Aero. E. 204, 205. Aircraft Dynamics (3, 3). Two lectures and one labora- 
tory period a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Mech. 
50; Math. 64. 

Aero. E. 206, 207. Advanced Aircraft Power Plants (3, 3). Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week, first and second semesters. Pre- 
requisites, M. E. 100, 101; Aero. E. 109, 110. 

Aero. E. 208, 209. Advanced Aircraft Design and Construction (3, 3). 

One lecture and two laboratory periods a week, first and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisites, Aero. E. 107, 108; Math. 64. 

Aero. E. 210. Aerodynamic Theory (3). Three lectures a week. A study 
of the application of hydrodynamic theory to engineering problems. 
Circulation theory of lift, induced effects, velocity potential and stream 
function, conformal transformation. 

Aero. E. 211. The Design and Use of Wind Tunnels (Supersonic) (3). 

Three lectures a week. Application of aerodynamic theory to nozzle 
design and power computation for supersonic tunnels; design of dryers, 
balances and optical equipment. 

Aero. E. 212. Bodies at Supersonic Speeds (3). Three lectures a week. 
Brief review of gas dynamics, drag, lift, stability, and damping on a 
body in a supersonic stream. Special aerodynamics problems in the 
design of supersonic missiles. Methods for obtaining accurate test 
data on the aerodynamic characteristics of supersonic missiles. 

B. Chemical Engineering 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Ch. E. 103 f,s. Elements of Chemical Engineering (3, 3). Three hours a 
week, both semesters. Prerequisites, Chem. 1, 3; Phys. 20, 21. Huff. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 47 

*Ch. E. 104. Chemical Engineering Seminar (1). One hour a week, both 
semesters, Prerequisite, permission of department. Bonney. 

Ch. E. 105 f,s. Advanced Unit Operations (5, 5). Two lectures and one 
all-day laboratory a week, both semesters. Prerequisites, Ch. E. 103 f,s; 
Chem. 187, 188, 189, 190. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. Bonney. 

Ch. E. 106 f,s. Minor Problems (6, 6). Six hours a week, both semesters. 
Prerequisites, Ch. E. 105 or simultaneous registration therein. (Not 
offered 1949-1950.) Huff, Bonney and Staff. 

Ch. E. 107. Fuels and Their Utilization (3). Three hours a week, second 
semester. Prerequisite, Ch. E. 103 f,s, or permission of the depart- 
ment. Huff. 

Ch. E. 108 f,s. Chemical Technology (2, 2). Two hours a week, both 
semesters. Prerequisite, Ch. E. 103, or simultaneous registration there- 
in or permission of the department. Bonney. 

Ch. E. 109 f,s. Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (2, 2). Two hours 
a week, both semesters. Prerequisites, Ch. E. 103, f,s; Chem. 187, 188, 
189, 190, or permission of the department. Bonney. 

Ch. E. 110. Advanced Chemical Engineering Calculations (3). Three 
hours a week, first semester. Prerequisites, Math. 20, 21; Ch. E. 103 f.s. 

Bilbrey. 

Ch. E. 114. Applications of Electrochemistry (4). First semester. Three 
lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week. Prerequisite, consent 
of instructor. Laboratory fee, $8.00. Smatko. 

Ch. E. 160. 161. Metallurgical Technology (2, 2). First and second semes- 
ters. Two hours a week. Prerequisites, Ch. E. 60, 61 and Ch. E. 103 
f,s, or permission of the instructor Gottschalk. 

Ch. E. 180, 181. Unit Operations in Metallurgy (5, 5). First and second 
semeters. Two lectures and one all-day laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisites, Ch. E. 103 f,s; Ch. E. 21; Chem. 187, 188, 189, 190, or per- 
mission of the instructor. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. 

Gottschalk. 
For Graduates 

Ch. E. 201 f,s. Graduate Unit Operations and Processes (5, 5 or more). 

One hour conference, three or more three-hour laboratory periods a 
week, both semesters. Prerequisite, permission of the department. 
Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. Bonney. 

Ch. E. 202, f,s. Gas Analysis. (3). One lecture and two three-hour labora- 
tory periods a week, one semester, to be arranged. Prerequisite, permis- 
sion of the department. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. Bonney. 



* The contents of this course are constantly changing so a student may receive a number 
of credits by re -registering. 



48 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Ch. E. 203. Graduate Seminar (1). One hour a week, each semester. The 
content of this work is constantly changing, so a student may receive 
a number of credits by re-registering. Prerequisite, permission of the 
department. Bonney. 

Ch. E. 205. Research and Chemical Engineering. Prerequisites and credits 
to be arranged for individuals. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. 

Huff, Bonney. 

Ch. E. 207 f,s. Plant Design Studies (3, 3). Three hours a week, both 
semesters. Prerequisite, permission of the department. Huff. 

Ch. E. 209 f,s. Plant Design Studies Laboratory (3, 3). Three laboratory 
periods a week, both semesters. Prerequisite, permission of the de- 
partment. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. Bonney. 

Ch. E. 210 f,s. Gaseous Fuels (2, 2). Two hours a week, both semesters. 
Prerequisite, permission of the department. Huff. 

Ch. E. 214. Corrosion and Metal Protection (4). Second semester. Four 
lecture hours a week. Prerequisites, Ch. E. 114 or Chem. 187, 189 or 
Chem. 188, 190, or consent of the instructor. Smatko. 

C. Civil Engineering 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

C. E. 100. Theory of Structures (4). Three lectures and one laboratory 
period a week, second semester. Prerequisite, Mech. 50. 

C. E. 101. Soil Mechanics (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period a 
week, second semester. Prerequisites, Mech. 50 and Mech. 53. 

C. E. 102. Structural Design (6). Four lectures and two laboratory 
periods a week, first semester. Prerequisite, C. E. 100. 

C. E. 103. Concrete Design (6). Four lectures and two laboratory periods 
a week, second semester. 

C. E. 104. Water Supply (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period a 
week, first semester. Prerequisite, C. E. 50. 

C. E. 105 Sewerage (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period a week, 
second semester. Prerequisite, C. E. 50. 

C. E. 106. Elements of Highways (3). Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week, first semester. Prerequisite, C. E. 101. 

For Graduates 

C. E. 200. Advanced Properties of Materials (3). First or second semes- 
ter. Prerequisite, Mech. 52 or equivalent. 

C. E. 201. Advanced Strength of Materials (3). First or second semester. 
Prerequisites, Mech. 50, 51 or equivalent. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 49 

C. E. 202. Applied Elasticity (3). First or second semester. Prerequi- 
site, Math. 64 or equivalent. 

C. E. 203. Soils Mechanics (3). First or second semester. Prerequisite, 
C. E. 106 or equivalent. 

C. E. 204. Advanced Foundations (3). First or second semester. Pre- 
requisites, C. E. 102, 103, 106 or equivalent. 

C. E. 205. Highway Engineering (3). First or second semester. Prerequi- 
site, C. E. 101 or equivalent. 

C. E. 206. Theory of Concrete Mixtures (3). First and second semester. 
Prerequisite, Mech. 52 or equivalent. 

C. E. 207. Advanced Structures (4). Three lectures and one laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisites, C. E. 102, 103. 

C. E. 208. Advanced Sanitation (3). First or second semester. Prerequi- 
site, graduate standing in civil engineering. 

C. E. 209. Advanced Water Supply (3). First or second semester. Pre- 
requisite, C. E. 104 or equivalent. 

C. E. 210. Advanced Sewerage (3). First or second semester. Prerequi- 
site, C. E. 105 or equivalent. 

C. E. 211. Sanitary Engineering Design (3). First or second semester. 
Prerequisites, C. E. 104, C. E. 105 or equivalent. 

C. E. 212. Research. Credit in accordance with work done. First and 
second semesters. 

C. E. 213. Seminar. Credit in accordance with work outlined by the civil 
engineering staff. Prerequisite, graduate standing in civil engineering. 

D. Electrical Engineering 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

E. E. 100. Alternating-Current Circuits (6). Five lectures and one labora- 
tory period a week, first semester. Prerequisites, Math. 21, Phys. 21 
and E. E. 1. 

E. E. 101. Engineering Electronics (6). Five lectures and one laboratory 
period a week, second semester. Prerequisite, E. E. 100. 

E. E. 102, 103. Alternating-Current Machinery (4, 4). Three lectures and 
one laboratory period a week, first and second semesters. Prerequi- 
sites, E. E. 65 and E. E. 100. 

E. E. 104. Communication Circuits (3). Three lectures a week, second 
semester. Prerequisites, E. E. 60 and E. E. 100. 

E E. 105, 106 Radio Engineering (4, 4). Three lectures and one labora- 
tory period a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, E. E. 101. 



50 COURSE OFFERINGS 

E. E. 108. Electric Transients (3). Three lectures a week, first semester. 
Prerequisite, E. E. 101. 

E. E. 109. Principles of Radar (3). Three lectures a week, second semes- 
ter. Prerequisite, E. E. 105. 

E. E. 114. Applied Electronics (3). Three lectures a week (including 
demonstration lectures), first semester. Prerequisite, E. E. 101. 

E. E. 116. Alternating-Current Machinery Design (3). Two lectures and 
one calculation period a week, second semester. Prerequisite, concur- 
rent registration in E. E. 103. 

E. E. 117. Power Transmission and Distribution (3). Three lectures a 
week, first semester. Prerequisite, concurrent registration in E. E. 102. 

E. E. 120. Electromagnetic Waves (3). Three lectures a week, first 
semester. Prerequisites, senior standing in electrical engineering or 
physics and B average in mathematics. 

E. E. 160, 161. Vacuum Tubes (3, 3). Three lectures a week, first and 
second semesters. Prerequisites, senior standing in electrical engineer- 
ing or physics and B average in mathematics. 

For Graduates 

E. E. 200. Symmetrical Components (3). Three lectures a week, first 
semester. Prerequisite, E. E. 103. (Not offered in 1949-1950.) 

E. E. 201. Electromagnetic Theory (3). Three lectures a week, second 
semester. Prerequisite, E. E. 120. 

E. E. 202, 203. Transients in Linear Systems (3, 3). Three lectures a 
week, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, undergraduate major 
in electrical or mechanical engineering or physics. 

E. E. 204, 205. Advanced Circuit Analysis (3, 3). Three lectures a week, 
first and second semesters. Prerequisite, undergraduate major in 
electrical engineering or physics. (Not offered in 1949-1950.) 

E. E. 206. 207. Ultra-High-Frequency Techniques (3, 3). Three lectures 
a week, first semester; two lectures and one laboratory period a week, 
second semester. Prerequisite, E. E. 201. 

E. E. 209. Stability in Power Systems (3). Three lectures a week, second 
semester. Prerequisite, E. E. 200. (Not offered in 1949-1950.) 

E. E. 210, 211. Advanced Radio Engineering (3, 3). Three lectures a 
week, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, E. E. 106. (Not offered 
in 1949-1950.) 

E. E. 212, 213. Automatic Regulation (3, 3). Three lectures a week, first 
and second semesters. Prerequisite, undergraduate major in electrical 
or mechanical engineering or physics. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 51 

E. E. 215, 216. Radio Wave Propagation (3, 3). Three lectures a week, 

first and second semesters. Prerequisite, E. E. 120. 
E. E. 222 Graduate Seminar (1). First semester. Prerequisite, approved 

application for candidacy to the degree of Master of Science or Doctor 

of Philosophy in electrical engineering. 

E. E. 232. Active Network Analysis (3). Three lectures a week, first 
semester. Prerequisite, E. E. 202 or E. E. 204. 

E E. 233. Network Synthesis (3). Three lectures a week, second semes- 
ter Prerequisite, E. E. 232. 

E. E. 235. Applications of Tensor Analysis (3). Three lectures a week, 
second semester. Prerequisite, E. E. 202. (Not offered in 1949-1950.) 

E. E. 250 Electrical Engineering Research. Prerequisite, approved appli- 
cation for candidacy to the degree of Master of Science or Doctor of 
Philosophy in electrical engineering. Six semester hours are required 
of M.S. degree candidates and a minimum of 12 semester hours are 
required of Ph.D. candidates. 

E. Mechanical Engineering 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

M. E. 100. Thermodynamics (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period 
a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Math. 20, 21; Phys. 
20, 21. 

M. E. 101. Heat Transfer (2). First semester. Two lectures a week. 
Prerequisites, M. E. 54 and M. E. 100. 

M. E. 102. Heating and Air Conditioning (3). First semester. Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, M. E. 100, 101. 

M. E. 103. Refrigeration (3). Second semester. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, M. E. 100, 101. 

M. E. 104, 105. Prime Movers (4, 4). Two lectures and two laboratory 
periods a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Mech. 101; 
M. E. 50, 51. 

M. E. 106, 107. Mechanical Engineering Design (4, 4). Two lectures and 
two laboratory periods a week, first and second semesters. Prerequi- 
sites, Mech. 50; M. E. 100, 101. 

M. E. 108, 109. Mechanical Laboratory (2, 2). One lecture and one labora- 
tory period a week, first and second semesters. 

For Graduates 

M. E. 200, 201. Advanced Dynamics (3, 3). Three hours a week, first 
and second semesters. Prerequisites, Mech. 2, 50; Math. 64; M. E. 106, 
107; M. E. 108, 109. 



52 COURSE OFFERINGS 

M. E. 202, 203. Applied Elasticity (3, 3). Three hours a week, first and 
second semesters. Prerequisites, Mech. 2, 50; Math. 64; M. E. 106, 107. 

M. E. 204, 205. Advanced Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer (3, 3). 

Three hours a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, M. E. 
100, 101; M. E. 108, 109; Math. 64. 

M. E. 206, 207. Advanced Machine Design (3, 3). One lecture and two 
laboratory periods a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, 
M. E. 106, 107. 

M. E. 208, 209. Steam Power Plant Design (3, 3). One lecture and two 
laboratory periods a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, 
M. E. 108, 109. 

M. E. 210, 211. Advanced Fluid Mechanics (3, 3). Three hours a week, 
first and second semesters. Prerequisites, M. E. 54; Math. 64. 

M. E. 212, 213. Advanced Steam Power Laboratory (2, 2). One lecture 
and one laboratory period a week, first and second semesters. Pre- 
requisite, concurrent registration in M. E. 204, 205. 

M. E. 214, 215. Advanced Applied Mechanics Laboratory (2, 2). One lec- 
ture and one laboratory period a week, first and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, concurrent registration in M. E. 200, 201 and M. E. 202, 
203. 

M. E. 216, 217. Advanced Internal Combustion Engine Design (3, 3). One 

lecture and two laboratory periods a week, first and second semesters. 
Prerequisites, M. E. 106, 107; M. E. 108, 109; and concurrent registra- 
tion in M. E. 200, 201 and M. E. 204, 205. 

M. E. 218, 219. Advanced Internal Combustion Engine Laboratory (2, 2). 

One lecture and one laboratory period a week, first and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisite, concurrent registration in M. E. 216, 217. 

M. E. 220. Seminar. Credit in accordance with work outlined by Mechani- 
cal Engineering staff. 

M. E. 221. Research. Credit in accordance with work outlined by Mechani- 
cal Engineering staff. 

M. E. 222. Advanced Metallography (3). First or second semester. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Mech. 50; 
M. E. 533. 

M. E. 223, 224. Steam and Gas Turbine Design (3, 3). First and second 
semesters. Prerequisites, M. E. 100, M. E. 101, M. E. 106-107, and 
Math. 64. 

M. E. 225, 226. Advanced Properties of Metals and Alloys (2, 2). First 
and second semesters. Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, Mech. 52; 
M. E. 53, M. E. 106, M. E. 107. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 53 

M. E. 227, 228. Theory of Elasticity (3, 3). First and second semesters. 
Three lectures per week. Prerequisites, Mech. 52; M. E. 53, M. E. 106, 
M. E. 107; Math. 64. 

M. E. 229, 230, 231. Jet Propulsion (2, 2, 2). First and second semesters. 
Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, M. E. 101, M. E. 104, M. E. 105. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 
Special Departmental Requirements 

Master of Arts 

1. Candidates for the degree of Master of Arts in the Department of 
English must demonstrate a reading knowledge of a foreign language at 
the time of admission, or not later than three months before taking the 
degree. Choice of French or German is recommended. 

2. A final written examination will be based in part upon the courses 
pursued and in part upon general familiarity with English and American 
literature. The examination will test the candidate's powers of analysis 
and criticism. 

Doctor op Philosophy 

1. Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the Department 
of English must demonstrate a reading knowledge of German and one other 
approved modern foreign language. 

2. Candidates must pass a comprehensive written examination at least 
three months before they expect to be awarded degrees. This examination 
will include linguistics (morphology and phonology) and each of the major 
literary fields. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Eng. 101. History of the English Language (3). Second semester. 

Harm an. 

Eng. 102. Old English (3). First semester. Ball. 

Eng. 103. Beowolf (3). Second semester. Ball. 

Eng. 104. Chaucer (3). First semester. Harman. 

Eng. 106. English and Scottish Ballads (3). Second semester. Cooley. 

Eng. 110, 111. Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama (3, 3). Three hours a 
week, first and second semesters. (Not offered in 1949-1950.) Zeeveld. 

Eng. 112. Poetry of the Rennaissance (3). First semester. Zeeveld. 

Eng. 113. Prose of the Rennaissance (3). Second semester. Zeeveld. 

Eng. 115, 116. Shakespeare (3, 3). Three hours a week, first and second 
semesters. Zeeveld. 



54 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Eng. 120. English Drama from 1660 to 1800 (3). Second semester. 

Weber. 

Eng. 121. Milton (3). Second semester. Murphy. 

Eng. 122. Literature of the Seventeenth Century, 1600-1660 (3). First 

semester. Murphy. 

Eng. 123. Literature of the Seventeenth Century, 1660-1700 (3). Second 
semester. (Not offered in 1949-1950.) Aldridge. 

Eng. 125, 126. Literature of the Eighteenth Century (3, 3). First and 
second semesters. Aldridge. 

Eng. 129, 130. Literature of the Romatic Period (3, 3). Three hours a 
week, first and second semesters. Weber. 

Eng. 134, 135. Literature of the Victorian Period (3, 3). Three hours a 
week, first and second semesters. Cooley, Mooney. 

Eng. 139, 140. The English Novel (3, 3). Three hours a week, first and 
second semesters. Aldridge, Mooney. 

Eng. 143. Modern Poetry (3). First semester. Murphy. 

Eng. 144. Modern Drama (3). First semester. Weber. 

Eng. 145. The Modern Novel (3). Second semester. Manning. 

Eng. 148. The Literature of American Democracy (3). First semester. 

Bode. 

Eng. 150, 151. American Literature to 1900 (3, 3). Three hours a week, 
first and second semesters. Gravely, Manning. 

Eng. 155, 156. Four Major American Writers (3, 3). Three hours a week 
throughout the year. Bode, Manning. 

Eng. 170. Creative Writing (2). First semester. Prerequisite, permission 
of the instructor. R. Fleming 

Eng. 171. Advanced Creative Writing (2). Second semester. Prerequi- 
site, permission of the instructor. R. Fleming. 

Eng. 172. Play writing (2). Second semester. Prerequisite, permission of 
the instructor. R. Fleming. 

For Graduates 

Eng. 200. Research (3-6). Arranged. 

Eng. 201. Bibliography and Methods (3). First semester. Mooney. 

Eng. 202. Middle English (3). First semester. Harman. 

Eng. 203. Gothic (3). Second semester. (Not offered in 1949-1950.) 

Harman. 

Eng. 204. Medieval Romances (3). First semester. (Not offered in 

1949-1950.) Cooley. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 55 

Eng. 206, 207. Seminar in Renaissance Literature (3, 3). First and sceond 
semesters. McManaway. 

Eng. 210. Seminar in Seventeenth Century Literature (3). Second semes- 
ter. Murphy. 

Eng. 212, 213. Seminar in Eighteenth Century Literature (3, 3). First 
and second semesters. Aldridge. 

Eng. 214, 215. Seminar in Nineteenth Century Literature (3, 3). First and 
second semesters. Cooley, Mooney, Weber. 

Eng. 216, 217. Literary Criticism (3, 3). Three hours a week, first and 
second semesters. (Not offered in 1949-1950.) Cardwell. 

Eng. 225, 226. Seminar in American Literature (3, 3).. Three hours a 
week, first and second semesters. Bode. 

Eng. 227, 228. Problems in American Literature (3, 3). Cardwell. 

Eng. 230. Studies in American Language (3). (Not offered in 1949-1950.) 

Eng. 257. Problems in Folklore (3). Second semester. (Not offered in 
1949-1950.) 

ENTOMOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Ent. 100. Advanced Apiculture (3). Second semester. One lecture and 
two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Ent. 4. Labo- 
ratory fee, $3.00. Abrams. 

Ent. 101. Economic Entomology (3). (Not offered in 1949-1950.) Cory. 

Ent. 103, 104. Insect Pests (3, 3). Two lectures and one three-hour labora- 
tory period a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, Ent. 1 or 
consent of the department. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Cory. 

Ent. 105. Medical Entomology (3). Two lectures and one three-hour 
laboratory period a week, first semester. Prerequisite, Ent. 1 or con- 
sent of the department. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Vogt. 

Ent. 106. Advanced Insect Taxonomy (3). First semester. Two three- 
hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Ent. 3. Laboratory fee, 
$3.00. Vogt. 

Ent. 107. Insecticides (2). Second semester. Prerequisites, Ent. 1 and 
elementary Organic Chemistry. Shepard. 

Ent. 109. Insect Physiology (2). Two lectures and occasional demon- 
strations, second semester. Prerequisite, consent of the department. 

Munson. 

Ent. 110, 111. Special Problems (1, 1). First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisites, to be determined by the department. Cory. 

Ent. 112. Seminar (1). First and second semesters. Cory. 



56 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Ent. 114. Insect Pests of Greenhouses (3). Second semester. Two lec- 
tures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Ent. 1 
or consent of the department. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Haviland. 

For Graduates 

Ent. 201. Advanced Entomology. Credit and prerequisites to be deter- 
mined by the department. First and second semesters. Cory. 

Ent. 202. Research. Cory. 

Ent. 203. Advanced Insect Morphology (2-4). Two lectures a week; addi- 
tional laboratory work and credit by special arrangement with the 
department. First semester. Snodgrass. 

Ent. 205. Insect Ecology (2). One lecture and one three-hour laboratory 
period a week, second semester. Prerequisite, consent of the depart- 
ment. Vogt. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE 

A. French 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

French 100. French Literature of the Sixteenth Century (3). First 
semester. 

French 101, 102. French Literature of the Seventeenth Century (3, 3). 

Three hours a week, first and second semesters. 

French 103, 104. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century (3, 3). 

Three hours a week, first and second semesters. Falls. 

French 105, 106. French Literature of the Nineteenth Century (3, 3). 

Three hours a week, first and second semesters. 
French 121, 122. Advanced Composition (3, 3). Three hours a week, first 
and second semesters. Falls. 

French 161, 162. French Life and Culture (3, 3). Three hours a week, 
first and second semesters. Falls. 

For Graduates 
The requirements of students will determine which courses will be offered. 
French 201. Research. Credits determined by work accomplished. 

French 203, 204. George Duhamel, Poet, Dramatist, Novelist (2, 2). Two 

hours a week, first and second semesters. Falls. 

French 205, 206. French Literature of the Middle Ages (2, 2). Two hours 
a week, first and second semesters. 

French 207, 208. The French Novel in the First Half of the Nineteenth 
Century (2, 2). Two hours a week, first and second semesters. Falls. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 57 

French 209, 210. The French Novel in the Second Half of the Nineteenth 
Century (2, 2). Two hours a week, first and second semesters. Falls. 

French 211. Introduction to Old French (3). Second semester. 

French 213, 214. Seminar (2, 2). Two hours a week, first and second 
semesters. Required of all graduate majors in French. 

French 215, 216. Moliere (2, 2). First and second semesters. Quynn. 

French 221, 222. Reading Course (2, 2). One conference a week, first and 
second semesters. 

B. German 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

German 101, 102. German Literature of the Eighteenth Century (3, 3). 

Three hours a week, first and second semesters. Prahl. 

German 103, 104. German Literature of the Nineteenth Century (3, 3). 

Three hours a week, first and second semesters. Prahl. 

German 105, 106. Contemporary German Literature (3, 3). Three hours 
a week, first and second semesters. Prahl. 

German 107, 108. Goethe's Faust (2, 2). Two hours a week, first and 
second semesters. Zucker. 

Attention is called to Comp. Lit. 106, Romanticism in Germany, and Comp. 
Lit. 107, The Faust Legend in English and German Literature. 

German 121, 122. Advanced Composition (3, 3). Three hours a week, 
first and second semesters. Prerequisites, German 71, 80, or consent 
of instructor. 

German 161, 162. German Life and Culture (3, 3). Three hours a week, 
first and second semesters. Cunz. 

For Graduates 

The requirements of students will determine which courses will be offered. 

German 201. Research. Credits determined by work accomplished. 

German 202, 203. The Modern German Drama (3, 3). Three hours a 
week ,first and second semesters. Zucker. 

German 204. Schiller (3). Prahl. 

German 205. Goethe's Works Outside of Faust (2). Second semester. 

Zucker. 

German 206. The Romantic Movement (3). Prahl. 

German 208. The Philosophy of Goethe's Faust (3). First semester . 

Zucker. 



58 COURSE OFFERINGS 

German 210. Seminar (3). Three hours a week, first and second semes- 
ters. Required of all graduate majors in German. 

German 220, 221. Reading Course (2, 2). One conference a week, first 
and second semesters. 

German 230. Introduction to European Linguistics (3). 

German 231. Middle High German (3). 

C. Spanish 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Spanish 101. Epic and Ballad (3). First semester. 

Spanish 104. The Drama of the Golden Age (3). First semester. 

Spanish 105. The Spanish Novel of the Golden Age (3). Second semester. 

Spanish 106. The Poetry of the Golden Age (3). First semester. 

Spanish 107. The Spanish Mystics (3). Second semester. 

Spanish 108. Lope de Vega (3). First semester. 

Spanish 109. Cervantes (3). Second semester. 

Spanish 110. The Poetry of the Nineteenth Century (3). First semester. 

Spanish 111. The Novel of the Nineteenth Century (3). Second semester. 

Spanish 112. The Drama of the Nineteenth Century (3). Second semester. 

Spanish 113. The Novel of the Twentieth Century (3). First semester. 

Spanish 114. The Poetry of the Twentieth Century (3). First semester. 

Spanish 115. Spanish Thought in the Twentieth Century (3). First 
semester. 

Spanish 116. The Drama of the Twentieth Century (3). Second semester. 

Spanish 121, 122. Advanced Composition (3, 3). Three hours a week, first 
and second semesters. 

Spanish 151. Latin-American Novel (3). First semester. 

Spanish 152. Latin- American Poetry (3). Second semester. 

Spanish 153. Latin-American Essay (3). First semester. 

Spanish 161, 162. Spanish Life and Culture (3, 3). Three hours a week, 
first and second semesters. 

Spanish 163, 164. Latin-American Civilization (3, 3). Three hours a week, 
first and second semesters. 

For Graduates 
Spanish 201. Research. Credits determined by work accomplished. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 5 ( J 

Spanish 202. The Golden Age in Spanish Literature (3). First semester. 
Spanish 203, 204. Spanish Poetry (3, 3). Three hours a week, first and 

second semesters. 
Spanish 210. Seminar. Arranged. 

Spanish 213. Introduction to Old Spanish (3). Second semester. 
Spanish 221, 222. Reading Course. Arranged. 

HISTORY 

Special Departmental Requirements 

Eight to ten hours of the total major course requirements of all candi- 
dates for this degree must be acquired in the general field of thesis, i. e., 
either American or European history . 

Doctor of Philosophy 

1. At least thirty hours of the total major course requirements must be 
acquired in the general field of the thesis, i. e., American history or Euro- 
pean history. 

2. At least ten hours of the thirty required for a minor in history must 
be taken at the University of Maryland. 

3. Prospective candidates must pass preliminary written and oral exami- 
nations covering various fields of their major and minor subjects before 
admission to candidacy. Consult the head of the department for details. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

A. American History 

H. 5, 6 or H. 3, 4, are prerequisites for courses H. 101 to H. 142, inclusive. 

H. 101. American Colonial History (3). First semester. Ferguson. 

H. 102. The American Revolution (3). Second semester. Ferguson. 

H. 105, 106. Social and Economic History of the United States to 1860 
(3, 3). Three hours a week, first and second semesters. (Not offered 
in 1949-1950.) Chatelain. 

H. 107. Social and Economic History of the United States, 1860-1900 (3). 

First semester. Chatelain. 

H. 108. Social and Economic History of the United States, Since 1900 (3). 

Second semester. Chatelain. 

H. 115. The Old South (3). First semester. Merrill. 

H. 116. The Civil War and Reconstruction (3). Second semester. Merrill. 

H. 118, 119. Recent American History (3, 3). First and second semesters. 

Merrill. 



60 COURSE OFFERINGS 

H. 121, 122. History of the American Frontier (3, 3). Three hours a 
week, first and second semesters. Gewehr. 

H. 127, 128. Diplomatic History of the United States (3, 3). Three hours 
a week, first and second semesters. Wellborn. 

H. 129. The United States and World Affairs (3). First semester. 

Wellborn. 

H. 130. Territorial Dependencies of the United States (3). Wellborn. 

H. 133, 134. The History of American Ideas (3, 3). Three hours a week, 
first and second semesters. Johnson. 

H. 135, 136. Constitutional History of the United States (3, 3). Three 
hours a week, first and second semesters. Gewehr. 

H. 141, 142. History of Maryland (3, 3). Three hours a week, first and 
second semesters. (Not offered in 1949-1950.) Chatelain. 

H. 145, 146. Latin-American History (3, 3). Three hours a week, first 
and second semesters. Crosman. 

H. 147. History of Mexico (3). First semester. Crosman. 

B. European History 

H. 151. History of the Ancient Orient and Greece (3). First semester. 

Jashemski. 

H. 153. History of Rome (3). Second semester. Jashemski. 

H. 155. Medieval Civilization (3). First semester. Prerequisites, H. 1, 2, 
or H. 3, 4. Jashemski. 

H. 161. The Renaissance and Reformation (3). Second semester. Pre- 
requisites, H. 1, 2, or H. 3, 4. Jashemski. 

H. 166. Revolutionary and Napoleonic Europe (3). Second semester. Pre- 
requisites, H. 1, 2, or H. 3, 4. Bauer. 

H. 171, 172. Europe in the Nineteenth Century, 1815-1919 (3, 3). Three 
hours a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, H. 1, 2, or 
H. 3, 4. Bauer. 

H. 175, 176. Europe in the World Setting of the Twentieth Century (3, 3). 

Three hours a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, H. 1, 2, 
or H. 3, 4. Prange. 

H. 179, 180. Diplomatic History of Europe Since 1871 (3, 3). Three hours 
a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, H. 1, 2, or H. 3, 4. 

Prange. 

H. 181, 182. History of Central Europe (3, 3). Three hours a week, first 
and second semesters. Prerequisites, H. 1, 2, or H. 3, 4. Prange. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 61 

H. 185, 186. History of the British Empire (3, 3). Three hours a week, 
first and second semesters. Prerequisites, H. 1, 2, or H. 3, 4, or 
equivalent. Gordon. 

H. 187. History of Canada (3). First semester. Prerequisites, H. 1, 2, or 
H. 3, 4. Gordon. 

II. 191. History of Russia (3). First semester. Prerequisites, H, 1, 2, 
or H. 3, 4. Bauer. 

H. 192. Foreign Policy of the USSR (3). Second semester. Prerequisites, 
H. 1, 2 and H. 191. Bauer. 

H. 193. History of the Near East (3). First semester. Prerequisites, 
H. 1, 2, or equivalent. (Not offered in 1949-1950.) Gewehr. 

H. 195. The Far East (3). Second semester. (Not offered in 1949-1950.) 

Gewehr. 

H. 199. Proseminar in Historical Writing (3). Second semester. Staff. 

For Graduates 

H. 200. Research (3-6). Credit apportioned to amount of research. First 
and second semesters. Staff. 

H. 201. Seminar in American History (3). First and second semesters. 

Chatelain. 

H. 205, 206. Topics in American Economic and Social History (3, 3). 

Arranged. First and second semesters. Chatelain. 

H. 208. Topics in Recent American History (3). First and second semes- 
ters. Merrill. 

H. 211. The Colonial Period in American History (3). Arranged. First 
semester. Ferguson. 

H. 212. Period of the American Revolution (3). Arranged. Second semes- 
ter. Ferguson. 

H. 215. The Old South (3). Merrill. 

H. 216. The American Civil War (3). Merrill. 

H. 221, 222. History of the West (3, 3). Gewehr. 

H. 233, 234. Topics in American Intellectual History (3, 3). Johnson 

H. 235. Problems in American Constitutional History (3). First and 
second semesters. Gewehr. 

H. 250. Seminar in European History (3). First and second semesters. 

Bauer. 
H. 255. Medieval Culture and Society (3). Jashemski. 

H. 281. Topics in the History of Central Europe (3). Prange. 



62 COURSE OFFERINGS 

- 

H. 285, 286. Topics in the History of Modern England and Great Britain 

(3, 3). Three hours a week, first and second semesters. Gordon. 

H. 287. Historiography (3). Sparks. 

HOME ECONOMICS 
A. Textiles and Clothing 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Laboratory fees in Textiles and Clothing for graduate students are 
$3.00 per course per semester. 

Tex. 101. Problems in Textiles (3). One lecture and three laboratory 
periods a week, first semester. Prerequisites, Tex. 100; Organic 
Chemistry. Akin. 

Tex. 102. Textile Testing (3). Three laboratory periods a week, first 
semester. Prerequisite, Tex. 100. 

Tex. 103. Textile Microscopy (3). Three laboratory periods a week, sec- 
ond semester. Prerequisite, Tex. 101. 

Tex. 105. Consumer Problems in Textiles (3). Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, 
Tex. 1, or equivalent. Akin. 

Tex. 106. Household Textiles (3). Three laboratory periods a week, first 
semester. Prerequisite, Tex. 1. 

Tex. 108. Decorative Fabrics (2). One lecture and one laboratory period 
a week, first semester. 

Clo. 120. Draping (3). Three laboratory periods a week, first and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, Clo. 22. Wilbur. 

Clo. 121. Pattern Designs (2). Two laboratory periods a week, second 
semester. Prerequisite, Clo. 22. Wilbur. 

Clo. 122, 125. Tailoring (2, 2). Two laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, Clo. 22. Mitchell. 

Clo. 123. Children's Clothing (2). One lecture and one laboratory period 
a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, Clo. 20A or 20B, or 
equivalent. Wilbur. 

Clo. 124. Projects and Readings in Textiles and Clothing (2). Second 
semester. 

Clo. 126. Fundamentals of Fashion (2-3). First semester. Prerequisite, 
senior standing. 

Clo. 127. Apparel Design (3). Second semester. Prerequisites, Clo. 120; 
senior standing. Wilbur. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 63 

Clo. 128. Home Furnishings (3). Three laboratory periods a week, second 
semester. Prerequisites, Tex. 1, Clo. 20 A or B, or consent of instructor. 

For Graduates 

Tex. 200. Special Studies in Textiles (2-4). 

Clo. 220. Special Studies in Clothing (2-4). First and second semesters. 

Mitchell. 
Tex. and Clo. 230. Seminar (1). First and second semesters. 

Tex. and Clo. 231. Research. First and second semesters. 

Tex. and Clo. 232. Economics of Clothing and Textiles (3). Second semes- 
ter. 

B. Practical Art and Crafts 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Laboratory fees in Practical Arts for graduate students are 
$3.00 per course per semester. 

Pr. Art 100, 101. Mural Design (2, 2). Two laboratory periods a week, 
first semester. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 1, 2, 3, 21, and consent of the 
instructor. Cuneo. 

Pr. Art 102, 103. Advanced Mural Design (2, 2). Two laboratory periods 
a week, first semester. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 1, 2, 3, 21, 100, 101. 

Cuneo. 

Pr. Art 120, 121. Costume Illustration (2, 2). Two laboratory periods a 
week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 1, 20, 21, 22, 
and consent of instructor. Cassels. 

Pr. Art 124, 125. Individual Problems in Costume (2, 2). Two laboratory 
periods a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 1, 
20, 120, 121, and consent of instructor. Cassels. 

Pr. Art 132. Advertising Layout (2). Two laboratory periods a week, 
first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 1, 20, 21, 22, 30, and 
consent of instructor. Cuneo. 

Pr. Art 134, 135. Individual Problems in Advertising (2, 2). Two labora- 
tory periods a week, second semester. Prerequisite, Pr. Art 1, 20, 30, 
120, 132, or equivalent, and consent of instructor. Cuneo. 

Pr. Art 136. Merchandise Display (2). Two laboratory periods a week, 
first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Tr. Art 1, 20, 30; 120, 132 to 
precede or parallel. Cassels. 

Pr. Art 137. Advanced Merchandise Display (2). Two laboratory periods 
a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 1, 20, 30, 
120, 132, 13G, and consent of instructor. Cassels. 



64 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Pr. Art 138, 139. Advanced Photography (2, 2). Three laboratory periods 
a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 1, 38, 39. 

Cuneo. 

Pr. Art 140, 141. Interior Design (1, 3). One laboratory period a week, 
first semester; three laboratory periods a week, second semester. Pre- 
requisites, Pr. Art 1 and Pr. Art 2. Brown. 

Pr. Art 142, 143. Advanced Interior Design (2, 2). Two laboratory 
periods a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 1, 
140, 141, or equivalent. Brown. 

Pr. Art 144, 145. Individual Problems in Interior Design (2, 2). Two 

laboratory periods a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, 
Pr. Art 1, 140, 141, 142, 143, and consent of instructor. Brown. 

Cr. 120, 121. Advanced Ceramics (2, 2). Three laboratory periods a week, 
first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Cr. 20, 21. Lawson. 

Cr. 124, 125. Individual Problems in Ceramics (2, 2). Two laboratory 
periods a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Cr. 20, 21, 
120, 121, and consent of instructor. Lawson. 

Cr. 130, 131. Advanced Metalry (2, 2). Three laboratory periods a week, 
first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Cr. 30, 31. Lawson. 

Cr. 134, 135. Individual Problems in Metalry (2, 2). Three laboratory 
periods a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Cr. 30, 31, 
130, 131, and consent of instructor. Lawson. 

Cr. 140, 141. Advanced Weaving (2, 2). Three laboratory periods a week, 
first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Cr. 40, 41. Lawson. 

Cr. 144, 145. Individual Problems in Weaving (2, 2). Three laboratory 
periods a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Cr. 40, 41, 
140, 141, and consent of instructor. Lawson. 

Cr. 198. Crafts in Therapy (2). Second semester. Prerequisites, three 
courses in various crafts or art construction and consent of instructor. 

Curtiss. 
C. Home and Institution Management 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Home Mgt. 150, 151. Management of Home (3, 3). Three hours a week, 
first and second semesters. Crow and Burke. 

Home Mgt. 152. Experience in Management of Home (3). First and 
second semesters. Prerequisites, Home Mgt. 150, 151. Laboratory fee 
for graduate students, $7.00. Crow and Burke. 

Inst. Mgt. 160. Institution Organization and Management (3). Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period a week, first semester. Prerequisites, 
Foods 2, 3; Nut. 110; Home Mgt. 150, 151. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 65 

Inst. Mgt. 161. Institution Purchasing and Accounting (3). Two lectures 
and one laboratory period a week, second semester. Prerequisite, Inst. 
Mgt. 160. 

Inst. Mgt. 162. Institution Foods (3). One lecture and two laboratory 
periods a week, second semester. Prerequisites, Inst. Mgt. 160, 161. 

Inst. Mgt. 163. Practice in Institution Management (3). Arranged. Three 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Inst. Mgt. 160, 161. 

Inst. Mgt. 164. Advanced Institution Management (2). One lecture and 
one laboratory period a week, second semester. Prerequisites, Inst. 
Mgt. 160, 161, 162. 

Inst. Mgt. 165. School Lunch (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period 
a week, second semester and summer session. Prerequisites, Foods 2, 
3; Nut. 110, or equivalent. g 

Inst. Mgt. 181. Purchasing and Accounting for Housekeeping Administra- 
tion (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Inst. Mgt. 160. 

Inst. Mgt. 182. Housekeeping Management (3). First semester. Pre- 
requisite, Inst. Mgt. 160. 

Inst. Mgt. 183. Problems in Housekeeping Management (3). Second semes- 
ter. Prerequisites, Inst. Mgt. 160 and Inst. Mgt. 182. 

D. Foods and Nutrition 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Laboratory fees in Foods, for graduate students, are $7.00 
per course per semester. 

Foods 100. Food Economics (2). One lecture and one laboratory period 
a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, Foods 1 or 2, 3. 

LeGrand. 

Foods 101. Meal Service (2). Two laboratory periods a week, first and 
second semesters. Prerequisite, Foods 1 or 2, 3. Cornell and Spencer. 

Foods 102. Experimental Foods (3). One lecture and two laboratory 
periods a week, first semester. Prerequisites, Foods 2, 3; Organic 
Chemistry, Chem. 31, 32, 33, 34. Peers. 

Foods 103. Demonstrations (2). Two laboratory periods a week, first and 
second semesters. Prerequisites, Clo. 20; Foods 1 or 2, 3; Pr. Art 20; 
Tex. 1. Neylan. 

Foods 104. Advanced Foods (2). Two laboratory periods a week, second 
semester. Prerequisite, Foods 1 or 2, 3. Peers. 

Foods 105. Foods of Other Countries (3). One lecture and two laboratory 
periods a week, second semester. Prerequisite, Foods 1 or 2, 3, or 
equivalent. Neylan. 



66 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Nut. 110. Nutrition (3). First semester. Prerequisites, Foods 2, 3; Or- 
ganic Chemistry, Chem. 31, 32, 33, 34. LeGrand. 

Nut. 111. Child Nutrition (2). One lecture and one laboratory period a 
week, second semester. Prerequisite, Foods 1 or 2, 3; Nut. 110 or 10. 

Spencer. 

Nut. 112. Dietetics (3). One lecture and two laboratory periods an week, 
first semester. Prerequisite, Nut. 110. LeGrand. 

Nut. 113. Diet in Disease (2). Two periods a week, first semester. Pre- 
requisite, Nut. 110. Hagel. 

For Graduates 

Foods 200. Advanced Experimental Foods (3-5). Second semester. 

Nut. 210. Readings in Nutrition (3). First semester. 

Nut. 211. Problems in Nutrition (3-5). Second semester. 

Nut. 212. Nutrition for Community Service (3). First semester. 

Foods and Nut. 220. Seminar (1). First and second semesters. 

Foods and Nut. 221. Research. First and second semesters. 

E. Home Economics Extension 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

H. E. Ext. 100. Methods in Home Economics Extension (3). Second 
semester 

HORTICULTURE 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Hort. 101, 102. Technology of Fruits (2, 2). Two hours a week, first and 
second semesters. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. Haut. 

Hort. 103, 104. Technology of Vegetables (2, 2). Two hours a week, first 
and second semesters. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. 

Hort. 105. Technology of Ornamentals (2). Two hours a week, first or 
second semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. Link. 

Hort. 106. World Fruits and Nuts (2). Second semester. Haut. 

Hort. 107, 108. Plant Materials (3, 3). Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. 

Cornell. 

Hort. 114. Systematic Pomology (3). Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week, first semester. Given in alternate years. Haut. 

Hort. 116. Systematic Olericulture (3). Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week, first semester. Given in alternate years. Walls. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 67 

Hort. 126. Nutritional Analyses of Processed Crops (3). One lecture and 
two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 33 and 34, Bot. 
101. 

Hort. 159. Nursery Management (3). Second semester. Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites or concurrently, Hort. 62; 
107; 108. 

For Graduates 

Hort. 201, 202. Experimental Pomology (3, 3). Three hours a week, first 
and second semesters. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. Schrader. 

Hort. 203, 204. Experimental Olericulture (2, 2). Two hours a week, first 
and second semesters. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. 

Hort. 205. Experimental Pomology (3). Second semester. This course 
is a continuation of Hort. 201, 202. Schrader. 

Hort. 206. Horticulture Cyto-Genetics (3). Second semester. Prerequi- 
sites, Zool. 104, Bot. 101, Bot. 201, or equivalents. A course dealing 
with the field of cyto-genetics in relation to horticulture. . 

Hort. 207. Methods of Horticultural Research (3). Second semester. One 
lecture and one four-hour laboratory period a week. A critical study 
of research methods which are or may be used in horticulture. 

Scott and Staff. 

Hort. 208. Advanced Horticultural Research (2 to 12). First and second 
semesters. Credit granted according to work done. Staff. 

Hort. 209. Advanced Seminar (1). First and second semesters. Five 
credit hours for five semesters can be obtained. Oral reports with 
illustrative material are required on special topics or recent research 
publications in horticulture. Haut and Staff. 

JOURNALISM 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Journ. 160. News Editing, I (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period 
a week, first semester. Wood. 

Journ. 161. News Editing, II (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period 
a week, second semester. Wood. 

Journ. 164. Magazine Writing (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period 
a week, first semester. Bryan. 

Journ. 165. Feature Writing (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period 
a week, second semester. Bryan. 

Journ. 174. Editorial Writing (3). Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week, first semester. Estabrook. 



68 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Journ. 175. Reporting of Public Affairs (3). Two lectures and one labora- 
tory period a week, second semester. Prerequisite, Journ. 11. Wood. 

Journ. 176. Evaluation of Current Journalistic Practice (3). Two lectures 

and one laboratory period a week, second semester. Bryan. 

MATHEMATICS 
Special Departmental Requirements 

Master of Arts 

Before a candidate will be recommended for admission to candidacy the 
candidate will be required to: 

1. Demonstrate a reading knowledge of a foreign language of scientific 
importance. 

2. Pass a preliminary examination. The examination covers the candi- 
date's mastery of undergraduate and graduate studies in both major and 
minor fields. Ordinarily only one re-examination, to be held not before a 
semester has lapsed, may be given. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Before submitting himself for the preliminary examination required for 
admission to candidacy the student is expected to have acquired a background 
of mathematical knowledge represented by the following group of graduate 
studies: Analysis, four semesters; Algebra, two semesters; Geometry or 
Topology, two semesters; Applied Mathematics or Physics, two semesters. 

A. Algebra 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 100, 101. Higher Algebra (3, 3). (Not offered 1949-1950.) Pre- 
requisites, Math. 20, 21, or equivalent. Good. 

Math. 102. Theory of Equations (3). First semester. Prerequisites, 
Math. 20, 21, or equivalent. Good. 

Math. 103. Introduction to Modern Algebra (3). Prerequisites, Math. 20, 
21, or equivalent. (Not offered 1949-1950.) Good. 

For Graduates 

Math. 200, 201. Modern Algebra (3, 3). (Not offered 1949-1950.) Pre- 
requisite, Math. 103, or consent of instructor. Good. 

Math. 202. Matrix Theory (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 103, 
or consent of instructor. Good. 

Math. 204, 205. Topological Groups (3, 3). First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, consent of instructors. Good, Hall. 

Math. 271. Selected Topics in Algebra (3). Arranged. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 69 

B. Analysis 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 110, 111. Advanced Calculus (3, 3). First and second semesters. 
Prerequisites, Math. 20, 21, or equivalent. 

Math. 114, 115. Differential Equations (3, 3). Math. 114 will be given 
second semester. Math. 115 not offered 1949-150. Prerequisite, Math. 
20, 21, or equivalent. Leutert. 

Math. 116. Introduction to Complex Variable Theory (3). (Not offered 
1949-1950.) Prerequisites, Math. 20, 21, or equivalent. Open to students 
of engineering and the physical sciences. Graduate students to mathe- 
matics should enroll in Math. 210, 211. 

Math. 117. Fourier Series (3). (Not offered 1949-1950.) Prerequisite, 
Math. 114, or equivalent. 

For Graduates 

Math. 210, 211. Functions of a Complex Variable (3, 3). First and second 
semesters. Prerequisites, advanced calculus. 

Math. 213, 214. Functions of a Real Variable (3, 3). (Not offered 1949- 
1950.) Prerequisite, advanced calculus. 

Math. 215, 216. Analysis (3, 3). First and second semesters. Prerequi- 
site, advanced calculus, and a course in complex variable theory. 

Truesdell. 

Math. 272. Selected Topics in Analysis. To be arranged.. Weinstein. 

C. Geometry and Topology 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 122, 123. Elementary Topology (3, 3). First and second semesters. 
Prerequisites, Math. 20, 21, or equivalent. Hall. 

Math. 124, 125. Introduction to Projective Geometry (3, 3). (Not offered 
1949-1950.) Prerequisites, Math. 20, 21, or equivalent. Jackson. 

Math. 126. Introduction to Differential Geometry (3). (Not offered 1949- 
1950). Prerequisite, Math. 20, 21, or equivelent. Vanderslice. 

Math. 128, 129. Higher Geometry (3, 3). First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, two years of college mathematics. Open to students in 
the College of Education. 

For Graduates 

Math. 220, 221. Differential Geometry (3, 3). (Not offered 1949-1950.) 
Prerequisite, Math. 126, or equivalent. Jackson. 

Math. 223, 224. Combinatorial Topology (3, 3). (Not offered 1949-1950.) 



70 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Math. 225, 226. Set-theoretic Topology (3, 3). First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisite, advanced calculus. (Not offered 1949-1950.) Hall. 

Math. 227. Tensor Analysis (3). Second semester. Prerequisites. Math. 

110, 111, 134, or equivalent. 
Math. 273. Selected Topics in Geometry and Topology (3). Arranged. 

D. Applied Mathematics 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Math. 130, 131. Analytic Mechanics (3, 3). Prerequisites, Math. 20, 21, 
or equivalent. (Not offered 1949-1950.) 

Math. 132, 133. Advanced Mathematics for Engineers and Physicists (3, 

3). First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Math. 20, 21, or equiva- 
lent. Vanderslice. 

Math. 134. Vector Analysis (3). First and second semester. Prerequi- 
sites, Math. 20, 21, or equivalent. Vanderslice. 

Math. 135. Numerical Analysis (3). (Not offered 1949-1950.) Prerequi- 
site, Math. 114, or equivalent. 

Math. 139. Operational Calculus (3). (Not offered 1949-1950.) Prequi- 
site, Math. 64, or equivalent. Intended for students of engineering and 
physics. 

For Graduates 

Math. 230, 231. Applied Mathematics (3, 3). First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, advanced calculus and differential equations. Martin. 

Math. 232, 233. Partial Differential Equations of Mathematical Physics 

(3, 3). First and second semesters. Prerequisites, advanced calculus 
and differential equations. Martin. 

Math. 234. Potential Theory (3). Prerequisites, Math. 110, 111, or equiva- 
lent. (Not offered 1949-1950.) Weinstein. 

Math. 235. Advanced Numerical Analysis (3). Second semester. Pre*-- 
requisites, Math. 115, 135, or equivalent. (Not offered 1949-1950.) 

Math. 236. Mathematical Theory of Hydrodynamics (3). (Not offered 
1949-1950.) Prerequisite, a course in complex variable theory. 

Weinstein. 

Math. 237. Mathematical Theory of Elasticity (3). (Not offered 1949- 
1950.) Prerequisites, Math. 11.0, 111, or equivalent. Weinstein. 

Math. 238. Mathematical Theory of Continuous Media (3). (Not offered 
1949-1950.) Prerequisites, vector or tensor analysis and consent of in- 
structor. Truesdell. 

Math. 274. Selected Topics in Applied Mathematics (2). Arranged. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 71 

E. Statistics 

Math. 150, 151. Probability (3, 3). (Not offered 1949-1950.) Prerequi- 
site, differential and intergral calculus. 

Math. 152, 153. Mathematical Statistics (2, 2). First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisite, differential and integral calculus. 

Math. 154, 155. Applications of Statistics (3, 3). First and second semes- 
ters. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per week. Pre- 
requisites, Math. 20, 21, or equivalent. 

Math. 156. Biological Statistics (2). Second semester. Prerequisite, 
consent of instructor. 

F. Colloquium and Research 

For Graduates 
Math. 290. Colloquium. First and second semesters. 
Math. 300. Research. Arranged. 

PHILOSOPHY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Phil. 101. Ancient Philosophy (3). First semester. 

Phil. 102. Modern Philosophy (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Phil. 
101. 

Phil. 111. Medieval Philosophy (3). First semester. Prerequisite, Phil. 
101. (Not offered in 1949-1950; to be offered in 1950-1951.) 

Phil. 112. Recent and Contemporary Philosophy (3). Second semester. 
Prerequisite, Phil. 101. 

Phil. 121. American Philosophy (3). First semester. 

Phil. 151. Ethics (3). First semester. Prerequisite (after June, 1950), 
Phil. 2 or one year of philosophy. Baylis. 

Phil. 191. Topical Investigations (3). Each semester. Staff. 

For Graduates 

Graduate instruction in the Department of Philosophy is carried on mainly 
by independent investigation of special topics under individual supervision. 
Any of the courses listed below may be elected more than once. Course 
selections require the approval of the department chairman. 

Phil. 201. Research in Philosophy (3). Each semester. Staff. 

Phil. 203. Selected Problems in Philosophy (3). Each semester. Staff. 

Phil. 205. Seminar in the History of Philosophy (3). First semester. 

Staff. 



72 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Phil. 206. Seminar in the Problems of Philosophy (3). Second semester. 

Staff. 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH AND RECREATION 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

P. E. 100. Kinesiology (3). First and second semesters. 

P. E. 101, 103. Organization and Officiating in Intramurals (2, 2). First 
and second semesters. 

P. E. 112. History of Dance (3). First semester. Prerequisite, P. E. 52, 
54, 56, 58. 

P. E. 113, 115. Methods and Materials for Secondary Schools, I (2, 2). 

Two lectures and two laboratories a week. 

P. E. 114, 116. Methods and Materials for Secondary Schools, II (2, 2). 

Two lectures and two laboratory hours a week. 

P. E. 140. Therapeutics (3). First and second semesters. Prerequisite, 
P. E. 100. 

P. E. 150. History and Philosophy of Physical Education (2). Second 
semester. 

P. E. 170. Principles of Physical Education (3). First and second semes- 
ters. 

P. E. 180. Measurements in Health and Physical Education (3). First and 
second semesters. 

P. E. 181. Training and Conditioning (3). Second semester. 

P. E. 190. Health Administration and and Supervision of Physical Educa- 
tion and Recreation (3). First and second semesters. 

For Graduates 

P. E. 200. Departmental Seminar (1-2). First and second semesters and 
summer. Gloss and Deach. 

P. E. 201. Foundations in Physical Education, Health and Recreation (3). 

First and second semesters. Deach and Field. 

P. E. 203. Supervisory Techniques in Physical Education, Health and 
Recreation (3). First and second semesters and alternate summers. 

Hutto. 

P. E. 205. Administration of Athletics (2). First and second semesters 
and summer. Burnett. 

P. E. 210. Comparative Problems in Physical Education (2). First and 
second semesters. Gloss. 

P. E. 230. Contemporary Physical Education (3). First and second semes- 
ters and alternate summers. Gloss. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 73 

P. E. 250. Survey in the Area of Physical Education, Health and Recrea- 
tion (6). First and second semesters and summers. Gloss. 

P. E. 260. Research (1-6). First and second semesters and summers. 

Gloss and Burnett. 
A. Health Education 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Hea. 110. Health Service and Supervision (3). First and second semesters. 

Hea. 112. Home Nursing (2). First semester. 

Hea. 114. Health Education for Elementary Schools (2). First and second 
semesters. 

Hea. 120. Teaching Health (2). First and second semesters. Prerequisite, 
Hea. 40, or equivalent. 

Hea. 130. Organization and Administration of Health Education (3). First 
and second semesters. Elective. 

For Graduates 

Hea. 220. Principles and Practices of Health Education (3). First and 
second semesters and alternate summers. Burnett. 

Hea. 240. Advancements in Modern Health (3). First and second semes- 
ters and summer. Burnett. 
B. Recreation Education 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Rec. 100. Co-Recreational Games and Programs (2). First and second 
semesters. 

Rec. 102. Recreational Games for the Elementary School (2). First semes- 
ter. 

Rec. 110. Nature Lore (1-3). Second semester. (An evening course and 
six Saturdays and Sundays during April and May given in Washington.) 

Rec. 120. Camp Administration and Leadership (3). First and second 
semesters. 

Rec. 130. Principles and Practice of Recreation (3). First and second 
semesters. 

Rec. 140. Observation and Service in Recreation (5). First and second 
semesters. 

Rec. 170. Organization and Administration of Recreation (3). First and 
second semesters. 

For Graduates 

Rec. 210. Philosophy of Recreation (2). First and second semesters and 
alternate summers. Gloss. 



74 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Rec. 220. Contemporary Recreation (3). First and second semesters and 
alternate summers. Gloss. 

PHYSICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Phys. 100. Advanced Experiments. Three hours' laboratory work for each 
credit hour. One or more credits may be taken concurrently. Pre- 
requisites, Phys. 52 or 54 and four credits in Phys. 60. Laboratory fee, 
$6.00 per credit hour. Staff. 

Phys. 101. Laboratory Arts (1). Four hours laboratory a week, second 
semester. Prerequisite, two credits Phys. 100. Laboratory fee, $6.00. 

Staff. 

Phys. 102. Optics (3). Three lectures a week, first semester. Prerequi- 
sites, Phys. 11 or 21; Math. 21. Cooper. 

Phys. 104, 105. Electricity and Magnetism (3, 3). Three lectures a week, 
first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Phys. 11 or 21; Math. 21. 

Cooper. 

Phys. 106, 107. Theoretical Mechanics (3, 3). Two lectures a week, first 
and second semesters. Prerequisites, Phys. 11 or 21; Math. 21. Morgan. 

Phys. 112, 113. Modern Physics (2, 2). Two lectures a week. Prerequi- 
site, advanced standing in physics and mathematics. Cooper. 

Phys. 116, 117. Fundamental Hydrodynamics (3, 3). Three lectures a 
week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Phys. 107 and Math. 21. 

Kennard. 

Phys. 120, 121. Experimental Nuclear Physics (3, 3). Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week, first and second semesters. Prerequi- 
sites, Phys. 113 and two credits in Phys. 100. Johnson. 

Phys. 126. Kinetic Theory of Gases (3). Prerequisites, Phys. 107 and 
Math. 21, or equivalent. Kennard. 

For Graduates 

Of the following courses, 200, 201, 212 and 213 are given every year; 
all others will be given according to the demand. 

Phys. 200, 201. Introduction to Theoretical Physics (5, 5). Five lectures 
a week, first and second semesters. Myers. 

Phys 202, 203. Advanced Dynamics (2, 2). Two lectures a week. Pre- 
quisite, Phys. 200. 

Phys. 204. Electrodynamics (4). Four lectures a week. Prerequisite, 
Phys. 201. Iskraut. 

Phys. 206. Physical Optics (3). Prerequisite, Phys. 201. Myers. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 75 

Phys. 208, 209. Thermodynamics (2, 2). Prerequisite, Phys. 201 or equiva- 
lent. Cooper. 

Phys. 210, 211. Statistical Mechanics and the Kinetic Theory of Gases 
(2, 2). Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 112 and 201. 

McMillen. 

Phys. 212, 213. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics (2, 2). Two lectures 
a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Phys. 201. 

Brickwedde. 

Phys. 214, 215. Theory of Atomic Structure and Spectral Lines (2, 2). 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 213. McMillen. 

Phys. 216, 217. Molecular Structure (2, 2). Two lectures a week. Pre- 
requisite, Phys. 213. Brickwedde. 

Phys. 218, 219. X-Rays and Crystal Structure (3, 3). Three lectures a 
week, first and second semesters. Morgan. 

Phys. 220. Application of X-Ray and Electron Diffraction Methods (2). 

Two laboratory periods a week. Morgan. 

Phys. 222, 223. Boundary-Value Problems of Theoretical Physics (2, 2). 

Prerequisite, Phys. 201. 

Phys. 224, 225. Supersonic Aerodynamics and Compressible Flow (2, 2). 

Prerequisite, Phys. 201. McMillen. 

Phys. 226, 227. Theoretical Hydrodynamics (3, 3). Prerequisite, elemen- 
tary hydrodynamics. Kennard. 

Phys. 228, 229. The Electron (2, 2). Prerequisites, Phys. 204 and Phys. 
213. Johnson. 

Phys. 230. Seminar (1). First and second semesters. 

Phys. 232, 233. Hydromechanics Seminar (1, 1). Kennard. 

Phys. 234, 235. Nuclear Physics (2, 2). Prerequisite, Phys. 213. Johnson. 

Phys. 236. Theory of Relativity (3). Prerequisite, Phys. 200. Iskraut. 

Phys. 238. Quantum Theory — selected topics (3). Prerequisite, Phys. 236. 

Iskraut. 

Phys. 240, 241. Theory of Sound and Vibrations (2, 2). Prerequisite, 
Phys. 201. McMillen. 

Phys. 242, 243. Theory of Solids (2, 2). Two lectures a week, first and 
second semesters. Prerequisite, Phys. 213. Myers. 

Phys. 250. Research. Credit according to work done. Laboratory fee, 
$6.00 per credit hour. 



76 COURSE OFFERINGS 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

P. H. 104. Poultry Marketing Problems (3). Two lectures and one labora- 
tory period a week, first semester. Gwin. 

P. H. 105. Egg Marketing Problems (3). Two lectures and one labora- 
tory period a week, second semester. Gwin. 

P. H. 107. Poultry Industrial and Economic Problems (2). First semes- 
ter. Staff. 

P. H. 108. Special Poultry Problems (1-2). Assigned problems, first and 
second semesters. Staff. 

Poultry Hygiene. See V. S. 107. 

Avian Anatomy. See V. S. 108. 

Preservation of Poultry Products. See F. Tech. 108. 

For Graduates 

P. H. 201. Advanced Poultry Genetics (3). First semester. Prerequisite, 
P. H. 100, or equivalent. Jull. 

P. H. 202. Advanced Poultry Nutrition (3). Two lectures and one labora- 
tory period a week, second semester. Prerequisite, P. H. 101, or equiva- 
lent. 

P. H. 203. Physiology of Reproduction of Poultry (3). Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week, first semester. Prerequisite, P. H. 102, 
or equivalent. Shaffner. 

P. H. 204. Poultry Seminar (1). First and second semesters. Staff. 

P. H. 205. Poultry Literature (1-4). First and second semesters. Staff. 

P. H. 206. Poultry Research. Credit in accordance with work done. Staff. 

P. H. 207. Poultry Research Techniques (2). One lecture and one labora- 
tory period a week, first semester. Staff. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Graduate credit will be assigned only for students certified by the Depart- 
ment of Psychology as qualified for graduate standing. 

Psych. 106. Statistical Methods in Psychology (3). First and second 
semesters. Schaefer. 

Psych. 110. Educational Psychology (3). First and second semesters. 

Schaefer. 

Psych. 121. Social Psychology (3). First and second semesters. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 77 

Psych. 122. Advanced Social Psychology (3). Second semester. 

Psych. 125. Child Psychology (3). First semester. Schaefer. 

Psych. 126. Developmental Psychology (3). Second semester. Schaefer. 

Psych. 127. Psychology of Early Man (3). Second semester. Sprowls. 

Psych. 128. Human Motivation (3). First semester. Cofer. 

Psych. 131. Abnormal Psychology (3). Second semester. Sprowls. 

Psych. 136. Applied Experimental Psychology (3). Second semester. 

Walker. 

Psych. 140. Psychological Problems in Advertising (3). First semester. 

Psych. 142. Techniques of Interrogation (3). Second semester. Hackman. 

Psych. 145. Introduction to Experimental Psychology (3). First and 
second semesters. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Walker. 

Psych. 150. Tests and Measurements (3). First semester. Laboratory 
fee, $4.00. Smith. 

Psych. 155. Phychological Techniques in Vocational Counseling (3). Sec- 
ond semester. Smith. 

Psych. 161. Psychological Techniques in Personnel Administration (3). 

Second semester. Schaefer. 

Psych. 167. Psychological Problems in Aviation (3). Second semester. 

Walker. 

Psych. 191, 192. General Experimental Psychology (3, 3). First and 
second semesters. Hackman. 

Psych. 194. Independent Study in Psychology (3). First and second 
semesters. Staff. 

Psych. 195. Minor Problems in Psychotechnology (3). First and second 
semesters. Staff. 

Psych. 198. Proseminar: Current Research in Psychotechnology (3). 

Second semester. Staff. 

For Graduates 

Psych. 203, 204. Seminar: Review of Current Technological Researches 

(3, 3). First and second semesters. Staff. 

Psych. 205, 206. Historical Viewpoints and Current Theories in Psychology 
(3, 3). First and second semesters. Hackman, Cofer. 

Psych. 210. Occupational Information (3). Second semester. Prerequi- 
site, Psych. 150. 



78 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Psych. 211. Job Analysis and Description (3). First semester. Prerequi- 
site, Psych. 210. 

Psych. 220, 221. Counseling Techniques (3, 3). First and second semes- 
ters. Prerequisite, Psych. 210. Smith. 

Psych. 222. Rehabilitation Techniques (3). Second semester. Prerequi- 
site, Psych. 220. 

Psych. 223. Diagnosis and Correction of Reading Difficulties (3). First 
semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 221. 

Psych. 224. Counseling for Marital Problems (3). Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Psych. 221. 

Psych. 225. Participation in Counseling Clinic (3). First semester. Pre- 
requisite, Psych. 221. Smith. 

Psych. 230. Determinants of Human Efficiency (3). First semester. Pre- 
requisite, Psych. 128. Walker. 

Psych. 231. Training Procedures in Industry (3). First semester. Pre- 
requisite, Psych. 230. 

Psych. 233. Social Organization in Industry (3). First semester. Pre- 
requisite, Psych. 230. 

Psych. 241. Controlled Publicity (3). First semester. Prerequisite, con- 
sent of instructor. Hackman. 

Psych. 242. Measurement of Group Reaction (3). Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Psych. 241. Hackman. 

Psych. 250, 251. Development and Validation of Predictors (3, 3). First 
and second semesters. Prerequisite, Psych. 150. Schaefer. 

Psych. 252, 253. Advanced Statistics (3, 3). First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, Psych. 106. Hackman. 

Psych. 260, 261. Individual Tests (3, 3). First and second semesters. 
Laboratory fee, $4.00. Prerequisite, Psych. 150. Cofer. 

Psych. 263. Appraisal of Interests (3). Second semester. Prerequisite. 
Psych. 262. Schaefer. 

Psych. 264, 265. Projective Tests (3, 3). First and second semesters. 
Laboratory fee, $4.00. Prerequisite, Psych. 261. Cofer. 

Psych. 266, 267. Theories of Personality and Motivation (3, 3). First and 
second semesters. Cofer. 

Psych. 270. Advanced Abnormal Psychology (3). First semester. Pre- 
requisite, Psych. 131. Sprowls. 

Psych. 271. Special Testing of Disabilities (3). Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Psych. 270. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 79 

Psych. 272, 273. Individual Clinical Diagnosis (3, 3). First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, Psych. 261. Cofer. 

Psych. 274. Individual Therapy (3). First semester. Prerequistie, Psych. 
261. 

Psych. 275. Group Therapy (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 
274. 

Psych. 278. Seminar in Clinical Psychology for Teachers (3). First 
semester. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Sprowls. 

Psych. 280. Physiological Psychology (3). First semester. Prerequisite, 
consent of instructor. Walker. 

Psych. 290, 291. Research for Thesis (3, 3). First and second semesters. 

Staff. 
SOCIOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Soc. 113. The Rural Community (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 
1, or its equivalent. Hoffsommer. 

Soc. 114. The City (3). First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its 
equivalent. Houser. 

Soc. 115. Industrial Sociology (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, 
or its equivalent. Imse. 

Soc. 118. Community Organization (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, 
Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Bailey. 

Soc 121, 122. Population (3, 3). Three hours a week, first and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Baker. 

Soc. 123. Ethnic Minorities (3). First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, 
or its equivalent. Ebersole. 

Soc. 124. The Culture of the American Indian, (3). Second semester. 
Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Hutchinson. 

Soc. 131. Introduction to Social Service (3). First semester. Prerequisite, 
Soc. 1, or its equivalent. L. Houser 

Soc. 141. Sociology of Personality (3). First semester. Prerequisite, 
Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Ebersole. 

Soc 144. Collective Behavior (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, 
or its equivalent. Ebersole. 

Soc 145. Social Control (3). First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its 
equivalent. Ebersole. 

Soc. 147. Sociology of Law (3). First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or 
its equivalent. Lejins. 



80 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Soc. 153. Juvenile Delinquency (3). First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, 
or its equivalent. Lejins. 

Soc. 154. Crime and Delinquency Prevention (3). Second semester. Pre- 
requisites, Soc. 1, or its equivalent; Soc. 52, Soc. 153, or consent of 
instructor. Lejins. 

Soc. 156. Institutional Treatment of Criminals and Delinquents (3). Sec- 
ond semester. Prerequisites, Soc. 1, or its equivalent; Soc. 52, Soc. 153, 
or consent of instructor. Lejins. 

Soc. 171. Family and Child Welfare (3). First semester. Prerequisite, 
Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Shankweiler. 

Soc. 173. Social Security (3). First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its 
equivalent. Hutchinson. 

Soc. 174. Public Welfare (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or 
its equivalent. L. Houser. 

Soc. 183. Social Statistics (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, 
or its equivalent. Imse. 

Soc. 186. Sociological Theory (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, 
or its equivalent. Bailey. 

Soc. 196. Senior Seminar (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, senior 
standing with major in Sociology. Hoffsommer. 

For Graduates 

Soc. 201. Methods of Social Research (3). First semester. Hoffsommer. 

Soc. 215. Community Studies (3). First semester. Hoffsommer. 

Soc. 221. Population and Society (3). Second semester. Staff. 

Soc. 224. Race and Culture (3). Second semester. Staff. 

Soc. 241. Personality and Social Structure (3). Second semester. Staff. 

Soc. 246. Public Opinion and Propaganda (3). Second semester. Staff. 

Soc. 253. Advanced Criminology (3). First semester. Lejins. 

Soc. 255. Seminar: Juvenile Delinquency (3). First semester. Lejins. 

Soc. 257. Social Change and Social Policy (3). First semester. Staff. 

Soc. 262. Family Studies (3). Second semester. Shankweiler. 

Soc. 282. Sociological Methodology (3). Second semester. Staff. 

Soc. 285. Seminar: Socological Theory (3). First semester. Bailey. 

Soc. 290. Research in Sociology. Credit to be determined. Staff. 

Soc. 291. Special Social Problems. First and second semesters. Credit to 
be determined. Staff. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 81 

SPEECH AND DRAMATIC ART 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Speech 101. Radio Speech (3). First semester. Prerequisite, Speech 4, 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. Batka. 

Speech 102. Radio Production (3). Second semester. Consent of in- 
structor. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Batka. 

Speech 103, 104. Speech Composition and Rhetoric (3, 3). First and 
second semesters. Golden. 

Speech 105. Pathology (3). First semester. . Ansberry. 

Speech 106. Clinic (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 105. 

Ansberry. 

Speech 107. Advanced Oral Interpretation (3). Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Speech 13. Provenson. 

Speech 110. Teacher Problems in Speech (3). Second semester. For stu- 
dents who intend to teach. Hendricks. 

Speech 111. Seminar (3). Second semester. Ehrensberger. 

Speech 112. Phonetics (3). Second semester. Ansberry. 

Speech 113. Play Production (3). Second semester. Harris. 

Speech 114. Costuming (3). First semester. One lecture and two labora- 
tories a week. 

Speech 115. Radio in Retailing (3). First semester. Prerequisites, Speech 
1, 2; English 1, 2. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Batka. 

Speech 116. Radio Announcing (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, 
Speech 101. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Batka. 

Speech 117. Radio Continuity Writing (3). First semester. A study of 
the principles and methods of writing for broadcasting. Application 
will be made in the writing of the general types of continuity. Ad- 
mission by consent of instructor. Coppinger. 

Speech 118. Advanced Radio Writing (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, 
Speech 117. Advanced work with emphasis upon the dramatic form. 
Admission by consent of instructor. Coppinger. 

Speech 119. Radio Acting (3). Second semester. A workshop course 
designed to give the student practice in radio acting. Admission by 
consent of the instructor.. Batka. 

Speech 120. Advanced Speech Pathology (3). Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Speech 105. A continuation of Speech 105. Ansberry. 

Speech 121. Stage Design (3). Second semester. Prerequisites, Speech 
14, 15. The planning of stage settings and the application of the 
principles of design to the dramatic production. Admission by consent 
of the instructor. Harris. 



82 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Speech 122, 123. Radio Workship (3, 3). First and second semesters. A 
laboratory course dealing- with all phases of producing a radio program. 
Admission by consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Batka. 

Speech 124, 125. American Public Address (3, 3). First and second semes- 
ters. The first semester covers the period from Colonial times to the 
Civil War period. The second semester covers from the Civil War 
period through the contemporary period. Golden. 

Speech 126. Semantic Aspects of Speech Behavior (3). First semester. 
An analysis of speech and language habits from the standpoint of 
General Semantics. Hendricks. 

Speech 129, 130. Play Directing (2, 2). A lecture-laboratory course deal- 
ing with the fundamentals of script cutting, pacing, movement, blocking 
and rehearsal routine as applied to the directing of plays. Mayer. 

For Graduates 

The Department maintains a reciprocal agreement with Walter Reed 
General Hospital whereby clinical practice may be obtained at the Army 
Audiology and Speech Correction Center, Forest Glen, Maryland. 

Speech 200. Thesis (3-6). Credit in proportion to work done and results 
accomplished. Staff. 

Speech 201. Special Problems (2-4). Arranged. Staff. 

Speech 210. Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing (3). A study 
of the anatomy and physiology of the auditory and speech mechanisms. 

Glorig. 

Speech 211. Advanced Clinical Practice (3). A comprehensive survey of 
the entire field of present-day clinical practice. Glorig. 

Speech 212. Advanced Speech Pathology (3). Etiology and therapy for 
organic and functional speech disorders. Ansberry. 

Speech 213. Speech Problems of the Hard of Hearing (3). Correction of 
abnormal speech habits and instruction in speech conservation. Baltzer. 

Speech 214. Clinical Audiometry (3). Testing of auditory acuity with 
pure tones and speech. Sonday. 

Speech 215. Auditory Training (3). Orientation and adjustment of 
patients in the use of hearing aids. Staff. 

Speech 216. Speech Reading (3). A course of training designed to pre- 
sent the fundamentals of speech reading. Baughman. 

Speech 217. Clinical Practice in the Selection of Prosthetic Appliances (3). 

A laboratory course in modern methods of utilizing electronic hearing 
aids. Staff. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 83 

Speech 218. Problems of Hearing and Deafness (3). The adjustment of 
the individual with a hearing impairment socially, emotionally and 
vocationally. Staff. 

VETERINARY SCIENCE 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

V. S. 101. Comparative Anatomy (3). Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week, first semester Coffin. 

V. S. 102. Animal Hygiene (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period 
a week, second semester. Coffin. 

V. S. 103. Regional Comparative Anatomy (3). One lecture and one 
laboratory period a week, first semester. Coffin. 

V. S. 108. Avian Anatomy (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period 
a week, first semester. DeVolt. 

V. S. 107. Poultry Hygiene (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period 
a week, second semester. DeVolt. 

For Graduates 

V. S. Animal Disease Problems (2-6). Arranged. Staff. 

V. S. 202. Animal Disease Research (2-6). Arranged. Staff. 

V. S. 203. Electron Microscopy (2). One lecture and one laboratory period 
a week. Arranged. Staff. 

ZOOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Laboratory fees in Zoology are $6.00 per semester. 

Zool. 101. Mammalian Anatomy (3). Three laboratory periods a week, 
second semester. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Stringer, 

Zool. 102. General Animal Physiology (4). Two lectures and two labora- 
tory periods a week, second semester. Prerequisites, one year of Chem- 
istry, one course in Zoology. Phillips. 

Zool. 104. Genetics (3). First semester. Three lecture periods a week. 
Prerequisite, one course in Zoology or Botany. Burhoe. 

Zool. 108. Animal Histology (4). Two lecture and two laboratory periods 
a week, first semester. Prerequisite, one year of Zoology. Stringer. 

Zool. 110. Parasitology (4). First semester. Two lectures and two labo- 
ratory periods a week. Prerequisite, one year of Zoology. Negherbon. 

Zool. 116. Protozoology (4). Second semester. Two lectures and two 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Histology; Bacteriology de- 
sirable. Negherbon. 



84 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Zool. 121. Principles of Animal Ecology (3). Two lectures and one labo- 
ratory period a week, second semester. Prerequisites, one course in 
Zoology and one course in Chemistry. Littleford. 

Zool. 125. Fisheries Biology (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period 
a week, first semester. Prerequisites, Zool. 5, 102. Littleford. 

Zool. 130. Aviation Physiology (3). Three lectures a week, second semes- 
ter. Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. Reynolds. 

For Graduates 

Zool. 200. Ichthyology and Marine Zoology (4). Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week, first semester. Littleford. 

Zool. 201. Microscopical Anatomy (4). Two lectures and two laboratory 
periods a week, second semester. 

Zool. 202. Animal Cytology (4). Two lecture and two laboratory periods 
a week, first semester. Negherbon. 

Zool. 203. Advanced Embryology (4). Two lectures and two laboratory 
periods a week, second semester. Burhoe. 

Zool. 204. Advanced Animal Physiology (4). Two lectures and two labora- 
tory periods a week, first semester. Phillips. 

Zool. 205. Hydrobiology (4). Two lectures and two laboratory periods a 
week, second semester. Littleford. 

Zool. 206. Research. Credit to be arranged. First and second semesters. 

Staff. 

Zool. 207. Zoology Seminar (1). First and second semesters. One lecture 
a week. Staff. 

Zool. 208. Special Problems in General Physiology. Hours and credits 
arranged. Second semester. Phillips. 

Zool. 220. Advanced Genetics (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period 
a week, second semester. Prerequisite, Zool. 104. Burhoe. 

SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 
DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY 

Minors 
Anatomy 111. Humam Gross Anatomy (8). Two lectures and two labora- 
tory periods per week throughout the dental school academic year. 

Hahn, Thompson, and Pollack. 

Anatomy 113. Human Neuroanatomy (4). Three lectures and two labora- 
tory periods for approximately eight week. 

Hahn, Thompson, and Pollack. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 85 

Majors 

Anatomy 211. Human Grass Anatomy. Credits to be arranged. Same as 
course 111 but with additional instruction. Hahn, Thompson. 

Anatomy 213. Human Neuroanatomy. Credits to be arranged. Same as 
course 113 but with additional instruction. Hahn, Thompson. 

Anatomy 216. Research. Time and credit by arrangement. Staff. 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOCHEMISTRY 

Minors 

Biochemistry 111. Principles of Biochemistry (6). Two lectures, one con- 
ference and one laboratory period per week throughout the dental 
school academic year. Vanden Bosche. 

Majors 

Biochemistry 211. Advanced Biochemistry. Time and credits by arrange- 
ment. Vanden Bosche. 

Biochemistry 212. Research in Biochemistry. Time and credits by arrange- 
ment. Prerequisite, 211. Vanden Bosche. 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY 

Minors 

Histology 112. Mammalian Histology and Embryology (6). Two lectures 

and two laboratory periods per week throughout the dental school 

academic year. McCrea. 

Majors 

Histology 212. Mammalian Histology and Embryology. Number of credits 
by arrangement. Same as course 112 but with additional work and 
instruction of a more advanced nature. McCrea. 

Research in Histology 214. Number of hours and credit by arrangement. 
Prerequisite, 112 or 212. McCrea. 

Research in Embryology 215. Number of hours and credit by arrange- 
ment. Prerequisites by arrangement. McCrea. 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 
GROSS ANATOMY 

Minors 

Anat. 101. Human Gross Anatomy (10). Total number of hours, approxi- 
mately 350. Six conferences and lectures, eighteen laboratory hours 
per week throughout the first semester of every medical school year. 

Uhlenhuth, Figge, Krahl and Smith. 



86 COURSE OFFERINGS 

Majors 

Anat. 201. Human Gross Anatomy. Number of credits by arrangement. 
Same course as Anat. 101, but with additional work of a more advanced 
nature. Uhlenhuth, Figge, Krahl and Smith. 

Anat. 202. Advanced Anatomy. Number of hours and credits by arrange- 
ment. Prerequisite, Anat. 101 or 201. Uhlenhuth and Staff. 

Anat. 203. Research in Gross Anatomy. Number of hours and credits by 
arrangement. Prerequisite, Anat. 202. Uhlenhuth and Staff. 

Anat. 204. Problems in Physiological Anatomy. Number of hours and 
credits by arrangement. Prerequisites, Anat. 201, 202, and either 
Anat. 207 or 208. Uhlenhuth and Staff. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

Minors 

Bact. 101. General Bacteriology (5). Sixteen hours and 104 laboratory 
hours. Drs. Hachtel, McAlpine, and Levin. 

Bact. 102. Immunology (4). Sixteen lectures and 56 laboratory hours. 

Drs. Hachtel, McAlpine, and Levin. 

Majors 
Bact. 201. Special Problems. Time and credit by arrangement. 
Bact. 202. Research. Time and credit by arrangement. 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

Minors 

Biochem. 101. Principles of Biochemistry (8). Seven lectures and confer- 
ences and two three-hour laboratory periods a week for sixteen weeks. 
Prerequisites, inorganic, organic, and quantitative or physical chemistry. 

Schmidt and Staff. 
Majors 

Biochem. 201. Prerequisite, Biochem. 101. Credit proportioned to extent 
and quality of work accomplished. Schmidt and Weiland. 

Biochem. 202. Research. Credit proportioned to extent and quality of 
work accomplished. Schmidt and Weiland. 

HISTOLOGY, EMBRYOLOGY AND NEURO-ANATOMY 

Minors 

Hist. 101. Mammalian Histology (6). Two lectures, ten laboratory hours 
per week, throughout the first semester of every medical school year. 

Lutz, Harne. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 87 

Hist. 102. Human Neurology (4). Three lectures and six laboratory hours 
per week for ten weeks of the second semester of every medical school 
year. Prerequisite, Hist. 101, or equivalent. Lutz, Harne. 

Majors 

Hist. 201. Mammalian Histology. Number of credits by arrangement. 
Same course as Hist. 101, but with additional work of a more advanced 
nature. Harne. 

Hist. 202. Human Neurology. Number of credits by arrangement. Same 
course as Hist. 102, but with additional work of a more advanced 
nature. Prerequisite, Hist. 101 or 201. 

Hist. 203. Research in Embryology, Histology or Neuro-Anatomy. Credit 
by arrangement. Open to students majoring in Prerequisites, Anat. 
201; Hist. 201, 202. Harne. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

All students majoring in pharmacology with a view to obtaining the 
degree of Master of Science of Doctor of Philosophy should secure special 
training in anatomy, mammalian physiology, organic chemistry, and physi- 
cal chemistry. 

Minors 

Pharmacology 101, f,s. General Pharmacology (8). Three lectures and 
one laboratory. This course consists of 90 lectures and 30 laboratory 
periods of three hours each, offered each year. 

Krantz, Carr, Iwamoto, Musser, Harne. 

Majors 

Pharmacology 202, f,s. General Pharmacology. Same as 101 for students 
majoring in pharmacology. Additional instruction and collateral read- 
ing are required. Krantz, Carr, Iwamoto, Musser, Harne. 

Pharmacology 203. Chemotherapy. Credit in accordance with the amount 
of work accomplished. Krantz. 

Pharmacology 204. Carbohydrate Metabolism. Credit in accordance with 
the amount of work accomplished. Krantz, Carr. 

Pharmacology 205. Research. Credit in accordance with the amount of 
work accomplished. Krantz, Carr. 

Pharmacology 206. Special Problems in Toxicology. Credit in accordance 
with the amount of work accomplished. Carr. 

Pharmacology 207. Anesthesia. Credit in accordance with the work 
accomplished. Krantz, Carr. 



88 COURSE OFFERINGS 

PHYSIOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Physiology 101. Neurophysiology (3). Two lectures a week, for fifteen 
weeks; ten three-hour laboratory periods; second semester. This course 
covers the physiology of muscle, peripheral nerve, central nervous sys- 
tem and sense organs. Amberson and Staff. 

Physiology 102. The Principles of Physiology (7). Four lectures, one 
conference a week, for fifteen weeks; twenty-five four-hour laboratory 
periods; first semester. This course covers the physiology of circu- 
lation, respiration, digestion, the endocrines (including reproduction) 
and the kidney. Amberson and Staff. 

For Graduates 

Physiology 201. Experimental Mammalian Physiology. Time and credit 
by arrangement. Amberson and Smith. 

Physiology 202. Blood and Tissue Proteins (2). One lecture a week, for 
thirty weeks. Amberson. 

Physiology 203. Physiology of Reproduction (2). Two hours a week, 
lectures, conferences and seminars, for twenty weeks. Smith. 

Physiology 204. Electrophysiology (1). One lecture a week, for fifteen 
weeks. Oster. 

Physiology 205. Seminar. Credit according to work done. 

Amberson and Staff. 

Physiology 206. Research. By arrangement with the head of the depart- 
ment. Staff. 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

BACTERIOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Bact. 115. Serology and Immunology (3). Three lectures and three labora- 
tory periods a week, first semester. Shay. 

For Graduates 

Bact. 200, 201. Chemotherapy (1, 1). One lecture a week, first and second 
semesters. Offered in alternate years. Shay. 

Bact. 210. Special Problems in Bacteriology. Laboratory course. Credit 
determined by amount and quality of work. Shay. 

Bact. 211. Public Health (2). One lecture. Shay. 

Bact. 221. Research. Credit determined by amount and quality of work. 

Shay. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 89 

BOTANY AND PHARMACOGNOSY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Bot. 101, 102. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants (2-4). One lecture and one 
laboratory period a week. Given in alternate years. Slama. 

Bot. Ill, 113. PlantAnatomy (2-4). Two lectures a week. Slama. 

Bot. 112, 114. Plant Anatomy (2-4). Two laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisites, Bot. Ill, 113. Slama. 

For Graduates 

Pharmacoknosy 201, 202. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders (4-8). 

Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisties, Bot. 
Ill, 113, 112, 114. Slama. 

Pharmacognosy 211, 212. Advanced Pharmacognosy (4-8). Two lectures 
and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Bot. Ill, 113, 112, 
114. Slama. 

Pharmacognosy. 220. Research. Credit according to amount and quality 
of work performed. Slama. 

PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Pharm. Chem. Ill, 113. Chemistry of Medicinal Products (2, 2). Three 
Pharm. Chem. Ill, 113. Chemistry of Medicinal Products (2, 2). Two 

lectures a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Chem. 35, 
37, 53. Hager. 

Pharm. Chem. 112, 114. — Chemistry of Medicinal Products (2, 2). Two 

laboratory periods a week, either or both semesters. Prerequisites, 
Pharm. Chem. Ill, 113, or may be taken simultaneously with Pharm. 
Chem. Ill, 113. Hager. 

Chem. 142, 144. Advanced Organic Laboratory (2, 2). Two laboratroy 
periods a week, any one or both semesters. Prerequisites, Chem. 19 
or 23, and Chem. 37, 38. Staff. 

Chem. 146, 148. Identification of Organic Compounds (2, 2). One lecture 
and two laboratory periods a week, any one or both semesters. Pre- 
requisites, Pharm. Chem. Ill, 113, or Chem. 141, 143. Staff. 

Chem. 151, 153. Physiological Chemistry (2, 2). Two lectures a week, 
first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Chem. 35, 37 and Physiology 
22. Chapman. 

Chem. 152, 154. Physiological Chemistry (2, 2). Two laboratory periods a 
week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Chem. 35, 37, 151, 153, 
or may be taken simultaneously with Chem. 151, 153. Chapman. 



90 COURSE OFFERINGS 

For Graduates 

Pharm. Chem. 201, 203. Survey of Pharmaceutical Chemistry (2, 2). Two 

lectures a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Pharm. 
Chem. Ill, 113. Hager. 

Pharm. Chem. 211, 213. Chemistry of the Alkaloids (2, 2). Two lectures 
a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Pharm. Chem. Ill, 
113. Hager. 

Pharm. Chem. 220. Advanced Pharmaceutical Syntheses (2-6). Labora- 
tory and conferences, either or both semesters. Prerequisites, Chem. 
142, 144. Hager. 

Pharm. Chem. 222. Advanced Pharmaceutical Analyses (1-4). Labora- 
tory and conferences, either or both semesters. Prerequisites, Chem. 
146, 148. Hager.. 

Pharm. Chem. 230. Pharmaceutical Chemistry Seminar (1). Required of 
students majoring in pharmaceutical chemistry. Hager. 

Pharm. Chem. 235. Research. Credit determined by amount and quality 
of work performed. Hager and Staff. 

Chem. 258. The Identification of Organic Compounds. An advanced course. 
Two to four laboratory periods a week, either semester. Prerequisites, 
Chem. 146, 148, or equivalent. Staff. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Pharmacology 111. Official Methods of Biological Assay (4). Two lectures 
and two laboratory periods a week, first semester. Prerequisite, Phar- 
macology 51, 52. Chapman. 
For Graduates 

Pharmacology 201, 202. Methods of Biological Assay (8). Two lectures 
and two laboratory periods a week, first and second semesters. Pre- 
requisite, Pharmacology 111. Offered in alternate years. Chapman. 

Pharmacology 211, 212. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics (8). Two 
lectures and two laboratory periods a week, first and second semesters. 
Prerequisites, Pharmacology 51 and 52 and the approval of the 
instructor. Chapman. 

Pharmacology 221, 222. Special Studies in Biological Assay Methods (4-8). 
Credit according to amount of work undertaken after consultation with 
the instructor. Laboratory work and conferences, first and second 
semesters. Prerequistes, Pharmacology 111, 201, 202. Offered in alter- 
nate years. Chapman. 

Pharmacology 250. Research Pharmacology. Properly qualified students 
may arrange semester hours' credit with the instructor. Chapman. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 91 

PHARMACY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Pharmacy 101, 102. (3, 3.) Two lectures and one laboratory a week. 
Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. Allen, Balassone. 

Pharmacy 111, 112. Advanced Prescription Compounding (3, 3). Two 

laboratory periods a week. Allen, Meyers. 

Pharmacy 120. Hospital Management (2). Two lectures a week. Purdum. 

For Graduates 

Pharmacy 201, 202. Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology (4, 4). Two 

lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Purdum, Allen. 

Pharmacy 211, 212. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature (1, 1). One lec- 
ture a week. Purdum. 

Pharmacy 221, 222. History of Pharmacy (2, 2). Two lectures a week. 
Given in alternate years. Purdum. 

Pharmacy 235. Research in Pharmacy. Credit and hours to be arranged. 

Purdum. 
PHYSICS AND PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 

Chem. 187, 189. Physical Chemistry (3, 3). Three lectures a week, first 
and second semesters. Prerequisites, Phys. 10, 11; Chem. 15, 35, 37. 

Estabrook. 

Chem. 188, 190. Physical Chemistry (2, 2). Two laboratory periods a 
week, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, Chem. 187, 189, or 
may be taken simultaneously with these courses. Estabrook. 

Phys. 121, 122. Electricity and Magnetism (3, 3). Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week, first and second semesters. Given in alter- 
nate years. Prerequisites, Phys. 10, 11; Math. 20, 21. Estabrook. 

Phys. 208. Thermodynamics (2, 2). Two lectures a week, first and second 
semesters. Prerequisites, Phys. Chem. 187, 189, 188, 190. Given in 
alternate years. Estabrook. 




Campus Scene, College Park 



OTHER ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 
Office of the President 

Virginia G. Wilkinson Secretary to the President 

Office of the Director of Admissions 

Mary Burke Assistant, Baltimore Division Office 

Office of the Registrar 

Mary Anna Walker, M.A Assistant Registrar 

Lisette Thompson Assistant, Records 

Florence Stafford Assistant, Baltimore Division Office 

Dean of Women's Office 

Rosalie Leslie, M.A Assistant Dean of Women 

Marian Johnson, M.A Assistant Dean of Women 

Jane Caton, M.S Assistant Counselor 

Office of Financial Administration and Control 

C. L. Benton, M.S., C.P.A Comptroller 

W. A. Burslem, B.S Cashier 

Robert Morris Chief, Statistical Services 

Edith M. Frothingham Administrative Assistant 

W. V. Maconachy Assistant Comptroller (Baltimore) 

Charles W. Spicer Chief Accountant (Baltimore) 

J. H. Tucker Chief Clerk (Baltimore) 

Frank K. Haszard, B.F.S Director of Procurement and Supply 

McKinley L. Fuller Military Property Custodian 

C. Wilbur Cissel, M.A., C.P.A Assistant to the Comptroller 

Ernest A. Berger Chief Accountant (Baltimore) 

Office of Business Management 

George 0. Weber, B.S Business Manager 

Harry Gallogly, B.S Maintenance Engineer 

William Wood Service Supervisor 

Grace Hale, B.A Administrative Assistant II 

C. A. Speake Superintendent of New Construction 

Nelson O. Rima Superintendent of Veterans Housing 

Robert E. Blair Manager, Students' Supply Store 

Dining Hall 

Robinson Lappin General Manager 

Student Health Service 

Harry A. Bishop, M.D Medical Director 

W. Allen Griffith, M.D. Physician Consultant 

Estella C. Baldwin, R.N Supervisor of Nurses 

V 



Publications and Publicity 

Harvey L. Miller, Col. U.S.M.C. (Ret.) . .Dir. of Publications and Publicity 

Alumni Office 

David L. Brigham General Secretary 

FACULTY COMMITTEES 

Admission, Guidance, and Adjustment 

Professor Bamford, Chairman; Deans Eppley, Robinson, Smith, Stamp; 
Miss Preinkert; Professors Curtiss, Hodgins, Long, Quigley, Reid, 
Schindler, D. D. Smith, White. 

Coordination of Agricultural Activities 

Director Symons, Chairman; Director Kemp; Dean Corbett; Assist- 
ant Directors Cory, Magruder; State Chemist Bopst; Professors Ahalt, 
Bamford, Brueckner, Cairns, Carpenter, DeVault, Foster, Haut, 
Holmes, Jull. 

Council on Intercollegiate Athletics 

Dean Eppley, Chairman; Acting Dean Griswold; Directors Kemp, 
Tatum; Assistant Director Cory; Professor Supplee, the President of 
the Student Government Association, and the Chairman of the Alumni 
Council, ex-officio. 

Educational Standards, Policies and Coordination 

Dr. Charles White, Chairman; Professors Bamford, Drake, Cairns, 
DeVault, Hoffsommer, Martin, H. B. McCarthy, Shreeve, Strahorn, 
Wiggin, H. Boyd, Wylie. 

Extension and Adult Education 

DmECTOR Kabat, Chairman; Associate Dean Corbett; Assistant Dean 
Brechbill; Assistant Director Kellar; Professors Baker, G. D. Brown, 
Corcoran, DeVault, Ehrensberger, Martin, Phillips, Steinmeyer. 

Libraries 

Professor Cardwell, Chairman; Professors Aisenberg, Russell 
Brown, Corcoran, Dillard, Foster, Hackman, Hall, Harman, Inver- 
nezzi, Parsons, Reeve, Ida M. Robinson, Rovelstad, Spencer, Wiggin. 

Publications and Catalog 

Dean Cotterman, Chairman; Deans Benjamin, Howell, Mount, Pyle, 
Robinson, Smith, H. Boyd Wylie; Director Kemp; Professors Baker, 
Ball, Bryan, Reid, Zucker; Mr. Brigham; Mr. Durfee; Mr. Fogg; Miss 
E. Frothingham; Colonel Miller; Miss Preinkert. 

VI 



Public Functions and Public Relations 

Director Symons, Chairman; Deans Eppley, Howell, Mount, Robinson, 
Stamp, H. Boyd Wylie; Mr. Fogg; Colonel Stadtman; Mr. Brigham; 
Colonel Miller; Miss Preinkert; Professors Bopst, Cory, Gewehr, 
Randall, Reid, Shreeve, Snyder, Steinmeyer, Weber, Miss Leslie. 

Religious Life Committee 

Assistant Dean Rosalie Leslie, Chairman; Professors Marie Bryan, 
Gewehr, Hamilton, McNaughton, Randall, Reid, Scott, Shreeve, White. 

Scholarships and Student Aid 

Dean Cotterman, Chairman; Deans Eppley, Mount, Stamp; Director 
Long; Professors Reid, Steinmeyer. 

Student Life 

Professor James H. Reid, Chairman; Deans Eppley, Stamp; Colonel 
Stadtman; Miss Preinkert; Professors Russell Allen, Bishop, Bur- 
nett, Deach, Ehrensberger, Harman, Kramer, Lejins, Mitchell, Out- 
house, Phillips, Charles White, Wiggin ; Miss Leslie. 

THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 

Howard Rovelstad, M.A., B.S.L.S Acting Director of Libraries 

College Park 

Betty B. Baehr, A.B., B.S.L.S Loan Librarian 

Barbara H. Baker Assistant Reference Librarian 

Frances M. Bezanson, A.B Assistant Loan Librarian 

Agatha Brown, A.B., B.S.L.S Assistant Catalog Librarian 

Velma L. Charlesworth, B.S.E. in L.S Assistant Catalog Librarian 

Ruth S. Haun Assistant Loan Librarian 

Lois Holladay, A.B., B.L.S Catalog Librarian 

E. Louise Leyh, A.B Assistant Reference Librarian 

Stella S. Moyer, A.B., B.S.L.S Assistant Catalog Librarian 

Virginia Phillips, A.B., B.A.L.S Assistant Reference Librarian 

Merilyn Potter, A.B Assistant Loan Librarian 

H. David Turner, A.B., B.S.L.S Order Librarian 

Anna Mary Urban, A.B., B.A.L.S Reference Librarian 

Theresa Veverka Assistant Catalog Librarian 

Kate White Periodicals Librarian 

Baltimore: Dental, Medical, Pharmacy and School of Nursing Libraries 

Ida M. Robinson, A.B., B.S.L.S Librarian 

Elizabeth Anna Crouse Assistant Librarian (Dentistry) 

Rebecca Elam, B.A., B.S.L.S Catalog Librarian (Dentistry) 

Mary E. Hicks, A.B., B.L.S Assistant Librarian (Medicine) 

Simone C. Hurst Librarian in Charge (School of Nursing) 

VII 



Edith R. McIntosh, A.M., A.B.L.S Catalog Librarian (Medicine) 

Beatrice Marriott, B.S Assistant Librarian (Dentistry) 

Hilda E. Moore, A.B., A.B.L.S Assistant Librarian (Pharmacy) 

Florence R. Kirk Assistant Librarian (Medicine) 

Law Library 

Anne C. Bagby, A.B., B.L.S Librarian 



A. Section of University of Maryland Professional School Buildings in Baltimore 




INDEX — THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



Page 

Abroad, Graduate Year 9 

Administrative Board I, front 

Administrative Officers of the University, 

II, front; V. back 
Admission 

To Graduate School 4 

To Candidacy for Degrees 5 

Advanced Degrees, Candidacy for 6 

Aeronautical Engineering 45 

Agricultural Economics and Marketing 16 

Agricultural Education and Rural Life 18 

Agronomy 19 

Algebra 68 

American Civilization, Master of Arts in 8 

American History 59 

Analytical Chemistry 31 

Anatomy 84, 85 

Analysis, Mathematics 69 

Animal Husbandry 19 

Applied Mathematics TO 

Assistantships, Graduate 13 

Bacteriology 20, 86, 88 

Biochemistry 31, 85, 86 

Board of Regents I, front 

Botany 21, 22, 89 

Business Administration 25 

Business Education 42 

Business and Public Administration 23 

Calendar IV, front 

Campus Map Inside front cover 

Campus Picture Ill, front 

Candidacy for Advanced Degrees 5 

Catalogs, Other Back cover 

Chemical Engineering 46 

Chemistry 31 

Civil Engineering 48 

Clothing, Textiles and 62 

Colloquium and Research 71 

Commencement 14 

Committees, Faculty VI, back 

Comparative Literature 34 

Council, Educational I, front 

Crafts, Practical Art and 63 

Crops 19 

Dairy Husbandry 35 

Dentistry, School of 84 

Doctor of Philosophy, Requirements 11 

Language Examinations, Rules 12 

Doctor of Education, Requirements 10, 37 

Dramatic Art, Speech and 81 

Economics 26 

Education 37 

Electrical Engineering 49 

Educational Council I, front 

Embryology, Histology and 85, 86 

Engineering 45 

English Language and Literature 53 

Entomology 55 

European History 60 

Examinations 

For Master's Degree 8 

For Doctor's Degree 10 

Modern Languages for Ph.D. Candidates.... 12 

Extension, Home Economics 66 

Faculty 3 

Faculty Committees VI, back 

Fees 13 

Fellowships 13 

Application for 14 

Service 14 

Stipend 13 

Residence Requirements 13 

Foods and Nutrition 65 

Foreign Languages and Literature 56 

French 56 

Geography 27 

Geometry 69 

German 57 

Government and Politics 29 

Graduate Assistantships 13 

Service 13 

Stipend 13 

Graduate Council 3 



I'ak-e 

Graduate Courses 4 

Graduate Year Abroad 9 

Health and Recreation, Physical Education.... 72 

History of Graduate School 3 

History and Principles of Education 39 

History, Courses in 59 

Histology and Embryology 86, 86 

Home Economics 62 

Home Economics Education 42 

Home and Institution Management 64 

Horticulture 60 

Human Development Education 42 

Industrial Education 43 

Inorganic Chemistry 32 

Institution Management, Home and 64 

Journalism 67 

Kindergarten Education, Nursery School 44 

Libraries, University 4 

Library, Staff VII, back 

Literature, Comparative 34 

Literature, English Language and 53 

Literature, Foreign Languages and 66 

Map, Campus Inside, front cover 

Marketing, Agricultural Economics and 16 

Master of Arts, Requirements 6 

Master of Arts in American Civilization, 

Requirements 8 

Master of Business Administration, 

Requirements 9 

Master of Education, Requirements 8 

Master of Science, Requirements 6 

Mathematics 68 

Mechanical Engineering 51 

Medicine School of 85 

Morphology 22 

Neuro- Anatomy 86 

Nursery School-Kindergarten Education 44 

Nursing Education 45 

Nutrition, Foods and 65 

Officers, Administrative II, front ; V, back 

Organic Chemistry 32 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 89 

Pharmacognosy 89 

Pharmacology 87, 90 

Pharmacy 91 

Pharmacy, School of 88 

Philosophy 71 

Physical Chemistry 33, 91 

Physical Education, Health and Recreation 72 

Physics 74, 91 

Physiology 88 

Plant Pathology 22 

Plant Physiology 21 

Politics, Government and 29 

Poultry Husbandry 76 

Practical Art and Crafts 63 

Professional Schools in Baltimore 5 

Graduate Work in 5 

Courses in 84-91 

Program of Work 5 

Psychology 76 

Public Administration, Business and 23 

Recreation, Physical Education, Health, and.... 72 

Registration 4 

Research, Colloquium and 71 

Residence Requirements 

For Doctor's Degree 10 

For Master's Degree 8 

For Assistants and Fellows 13 

Rural Life, Agricultural Education and 18 

Seniors, Graduate Work by 6 

Sociology 79 

Soils 19 

Spanish 58 

Speech and Dramatic Art 81 

Statistics 71 

Summer Session 5 

Textiles and Clothing 62 

Thesis 

Doctor's 11 

Master's 7 

Topology 69 

Veterinary Science 83 

Zoology 83 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND'S CATALOGS 

At College Park 

Individual catalogs of colleges and schools of the University of Mary- 
land at College Park may be obtained by addressing the Director of Admis- 
sions, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. These colleges 
and schools are: 

1. College of Agriculture 

2. College of Arts and Sciences 

3. College of Business and Public Administration 

4. College of Education 

5. College of Engineering 

6. College of Home Economics 

7. College of Military Science, Physical Education and 
Recreation. 

8. College of Special and Continuation Studies 

9. Summer School 

10. Graduate School 

11. The Combined Catalog (a charge of 50 cents is made for 
this publication) 

At Baltimore 

Individual catalogs for the professional schools of the University of 
Maryland may be obtained by addressing the Deans of the respective schools 
at the University of Maryland, Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore 1, 
Maryland. These professional schools are: 

(1) School of Dentistry 

(2) School of Law 

(3) School of Medicine 

(4) School of Pharmacy 

(5) School of Nursing