(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Graduate School announcements"

Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 witii funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/graduateschoolan1955univ 



A UNIVERSITYiOF 




PUBllCATION 



The 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 



1955-1956 



UNIVERSITY OF 
MARYLAND 

COLLEGE PARK. 
MARYLAND 






luisslmrnui^li (3)"" 







OLDEST CAMl'US lU ILDING 



IMPORTANT 



^ HE proTisioni of this publication or* not to b« r*0cird*d 

an on irrevocable contract between the student and the 

University of Moryland. The UniTersity reserres the right 

to change any provision or requirement at any time within 

the student's term of residence. The University further 

reserves the right at any time, to ask a student to 

withdraw when it considers such action to be in 

the best interests of the University. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

For informatiom in reference to the University grounds, 
buildings, equipment, library facilities, requirements in 
American Civilization, definition of resident and non-resi- 
dent, regulation of studies, degrees and certificates, tron- 
scripts of records, student health and welfare, living 
arrangements in the dormitories, ofi-compus housing, meals, 
University Counseling Service, scholarships and student aid, 
athletics and recreation, student government, honors and 
awards, religious denominational clubs, fraternities, socie- 
ties and special clubs, the University band, student publi- 
cations, University Post Office and Supply Store, vrrite to 
the Director of Publications for the General Information issue 
of the Catalog. 



See Outside Back Cover for List of Other Catalogs 
Index in the Back of the Book 



Volume 8 May 5, 1955 No. 1 

A Ualrcraltr ol MjiryUad PsbUeaUos la published (our times in January, F«bnBr7. 
March and April ; three times in May ; once In June and July ; twice in Aucust. September. 
October and Noveml>er ; and three times in December. 

Re-entered at the Post Office in Collete Park. Maryland, as second chuia mall 
matter under the Act ot Conrress of Aucuat 24, 1911. Harvey L. Miller, ESditor ol 
Unlveralty ot Maryland PubUcatloae. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

AND 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE Term 

Expires 

\\'n.i.iAM P. Cole. Jr., Chairman, 100 West University Parkway, Baltimore... 1958 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, Vice-Chairman, 4101 Greenway, Baltimore 1956 

B. Herbert Brown, Secretary, 12 west Madison Street, Baltimore 1960 

Harry H. Nuttle, Treasurer, Denton 1957 

Louis L. Kaplan, Assistant Secretary, 1201 Eutaw Place, Baltimore 1961 

Edmuno S. Burke, Assistant Treasurer, Cumberland 1959 

EnwARD F. Holter, Middletown 1959 

Arthur O. Lovejoy, 104 West 39th Street, Baltimore 1960 

Charles P. McCormick, AicCormick and Company, Baltimore 1957 

C. EwiNG TuTTLE, 1114 St. Paul Street, Baltimore 1962 

Thomas B. Symoxs, 7410 Columbia Avenue, College Park 1963 



Members of the Board are appointed hy the Governor of the State for terms of 
nine years each, beginning the first Monday in June. 

The President of the University of Maryland is, by law, Executive Officer of 
tlic Board. 

The State law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland 
shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 

A regular meeting of the Board is held the last Friday in each month, except 
during the months of July and August. 



CHAIRMEN OF THE ACADEMIC DIVISIONS 

Charles E. White, Professor of Chemistry and Chairman, The Lower Division. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1923; M.S., 1924: Ph.D.. 1926. 

John E. Faber, Jr., Professor and Head, Department of Bacteriology and Chair- 
man, The Division of Biological Sciences. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1926; M.S., 1927; Ph.D.. 1937. 

Adolph E. Zuker, Head, Department 6f Foreign Languages and Chairman, The 
Division of Humanities. 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1912; M.A., 1913; Ph.D.. University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1917. 

Wilbert J. Huff, Professor of Chemical Engineering; Director, Engineering Ex- 
periment Station; Chairman, Division of Physical Science?. 

B.A., Ohio Northern University, 1911; B.A., Yale College, 1914; Ph.D., Yale 
University. 1917; D.Sc, (hon.), Ohio Northern University, 1927. 

Harold C. Hoffsommer, Head, Department of Sociology and Chairman, The Di- 
vision of Social Sciences. 

B.S.. Northwestern University, 1921 ; M.A., 1923 ; Ph.D., Cornell University, 
1929. 



OFFICERS OF THE ADMINISTRATION 

Wilson H. Elkins, President, University of Maryland. 

B.A.. University of Texas, 1932 ; M.A., 1932 ; Litt.B.. Oxford University, 1936 ; 
Ph.D., 1936. 

Harry C. Byrd, President Emeritus, University of Maryland. 

B.S., Univer.sitv of .Maryland, 190S ; LL.D., Washington College. 1936; L.L.D.. 
Dickinson College, 1938; D.Sc, Western Maryland College, 1938. 

Harold F. Cotterman, Dean of the Faculty of the University. 

B.S.. Ohio State University, 1916; ^LA., Columbia University, 1917; Ph.D., 
American University, 1930. 

Rox.^LD Bamford, Dean of the Graduate School. 

E.S . University of Connecticut, 1924; M.S.. University of Vermont, 1926: 
Ph.D.. Columbia University, 1931. 

Gordon M. Cairns, Dean of Agriculture. 

B.S., Cornell University, 1936; M.S., 1938; Ph.D., 1940. 

Paul E. Xystrom, Director of Instruction, College of Agriculture and Head, De- 
partment of Agricultural Economics and Marketing. 

B S., Universitv of California. 1928 : M.S.. University of Maryland, 1931 , 

M.P.A., Harvard Univer-'ity. 1948; D.P.A., 1951. 

James M. Gwin, Director, Agricultural Extension Service. 

B.S., University of Connecticut, 1931; M.A., American University, 1941; Ph.D., 
Cornell University, 1949. 

Irvin C. H.\ut, Director, Agricultural Experiment Station and Head, Department 
of Horticulture. 

B.S., University of Idaho. 1928 ; M.S., State College of Washington. 1930 ; 

Ph.D., University of Maryland. 1933. 

Leon P. Smith, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. 

B.A., Emory University, 1919; ^LA., University of Chicago, 1928; Ph.D.. 
1930; Diplome le I'Institut de Touraine, 1932. 

J. Freem.\n Pyle, Dean of the College of Business and Public Administration. 
Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1917; M.S.. 1918. Ph.D., 1925. 

MvRON S. AiSEXBERG, Dean of the School of Dentistry. 
D.D.S., University of Maryland. 1922. 

Wilbur De\ilbiss, Dean of the College of Education and Director of the Summer 

Session. 

B.A., Western Maryland College, 1925 ; M.A., University of Maryland, 1935 . 
Ed.D., George Washington University. 1946. 

S. Sidney Steinberg, Dean of the Glenn L. Martin College of Engineering and 
Aeronautical Sciences. 

B.E., Cooper Union School of Engineering, 1910; C.E., 1913; Registered 

Professional Engineer. 

Wilbert J. Huff, Director, Engineering Experiment Station. 

B.A., Ohio Northern University, 1911; B.A.. Yale College, 1914; Ph.D., Yale 
University, 1917; D.Sc. (hon.), Ohio Northern University. 1927. 

M. Marie Mount, Dean of the College of Home Economics. 

B.A., University ol Indiana, 1916 ; M.A., Columbia Teachers College, 1924. 

Roger Howell, Dean of the School of Law. 

B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1914; Ph.D., 1917; LL.B., University ol 
Maryland, 1917. 

William S. Stone, Director of Medical Education and Research. 

B.S.. University of Idaho, 1924; M.S., 1925; M.D., University of Louisville, 
1929; Ph.D., (hon.), University of Louisville, 1946. 

H. Boyd Wylie, Dean of the School of Medicine. 
M.D, Baltimore Medical College. 1912 

Florence M. Gipe, Dean of the School of Nursing. 

B.S., Catholic University of America, 1937 ; M.S., University of Pennsylvania. 
1940; Ed.D., University of Maryland. 1952. 

2 



CiEOK(.K II. Buck, Director of tlie University Hospital. 
I'h.B., University of Chicago, 1935. 

Joseph R. Ambrose, Dean of the College of Military Science. 

B.A., University of Denver, 1948 ; Colonel. U.S. Air Force. 

Noel E. Foss, Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 

Ph.C. South Dakota Slate College, 1929; B.S., 1929; M.S., University of 
Maryland, 1932; Ph.D., 1933. 

Lestfr M. Fr.vley, Dean of tlie College of Physical Education, Recreation, and 
Health. 

B.A., Randolph Macon College, 1928; M.A., 1937; Ph.D., Peabody College, 
1939. 

R.\Y \V. Ehre.nsherger, Dean of the College of Special and Continuation Studies. 

B.A.. Wabash College, 1929; M.A., Butler University, 1930; Ph.D., Syracuse 
University. 1937. 

Ge.\ry F. Eppley, Director of Student Welfare and Dean of Men. 

B.S., Maryland State College, 1920; M.S., University of Maryland, ir'26. 
.Adele H. Stamp, Dean of Women. 

B.A., Tulane University, 1921; M.A., University of Maryland, 1924. 
Edoar F. Long, Dean of Students. 

B.A.. Blue Ridge College, 1911; M.A., University of Kansas, 1914; Ph.D.. 
Johns Hopkins University, 1932. 

G. Watson Algire, Director of Admission and Registrations. 
B.A., University of Maryland, 1930; M.S., 1931. 

Norma J. Azlein, Associate Director of Registrations. 
B A., University of Chicago, 1940. 

Dorothy L. Powell, Associate Director of Admissions. 
B.A., University of Maryland, 194 3. 

David L. Brig ham, Alumni Secretary. 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1938. 

James M. Tatum, Director of Athletics and Head Football Coach. 
B.S., University of North Carolina, 1935. 

George O. Weber, Director and Supervising Engineer, Department of Physical Plant. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1933. 

George W. Morrison, Associate Director and Supervising Engineer Physical Plant. 
(Baltimore). 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1927; E.E., 1931. 

C. Wilbur Cissel, Comptroller. 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1932; M.A., 1934; C.P.A., 1939. 

Charles L. Benton, Director of Finance and Business. 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1940; C.P.A., 1940. 

Howard Roxtllstad, Director of Libraries. 

B..A., University of Illinois, 1936; M.A., 1937; B.S.L.S., Columbia University, 
1940. 

George W. Fogg, Director of Personnel. 

B.A., University of Maryland, 1926; M.A., 1928. 

George W. Warren, Director of Procurement. 
B.A., Duke University, 1942. 

Harvey L. Miller, Director of Publications and Publicity. 

Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps, Retired. 

Harry A. Bishop, Director of the Student Health Service. 
M.D., University of Maryland. 1912. 

John P. O'Reagan, Commandant of Cadets, Air Force R.O.T.C. 
B.S., Gsorgetown University, 1950. 

3 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 

Admission, Guidance, and Adjustment 

Chairman Reid ; Messrs. Algire, Cairns, Eppley, Foss, Gustad, Hodgixs, 
Long. Quigley, Schindler, Manning, Weigand, White; Mmes. Crow, Stamp. 

Coordination of Agricultural Activities 

Chairman Cairns; Messrs. Ahalt, Bamford, Bopst, Brueckxer, Carpenter. 
Cory, Foster, Gwin, Haut, Jull, Kuhn, Magruder, Nystrom. 

Council on Intercollegiate Athletics 

Chairman Eppley; Messrs. Ambrose, Cory, Faber, Reid, Tatum ; President 
OF THE Student Government Association and the Chairman of the Alumni 
Council, ex-officio. 

Educational Standards, Policies and Coordination 

Chairman Cotterman; Messrs. Bamford, Cairns, Devilbiss, Dr-a.ke, Hahn, 
Hoffsommer, Kuhn, Martin, Shreeve, L. P. Smith, Strahorn, W%t-ie, Mmes. 
Mitchell, Wiggin. 

Special and Adult Education 

Chairman Ehrensberger; AIessrs. Ambrose, Brechbill, Drazek, Manning, 
Reid. 

Honors Programs 

Chairman Cotterman; Messrs. Devilbiss, Hoffsommer, Smith, Zuckeb. 

Libraries 

Chairman M.'lRtin ; Messrs. Aiseneerg. G. M. Brown, Russell Brown, 
Foster, Hackman, Hall, In\'ernezzi, Parsons, Rovelstad, Slama, Spencer; 
AImes. Harman, Ida M. Robinson, Wiggin. 

Publications and Catalog 

Chairman Cotterman ; Messrs. Algire, Ball, Bamford, Crowell, De\ilbiss, 
Fogg, Foss, Gwin, Haut, Howell, I^Iiller, Pyle, Smith, W\t.ie, Zucker; Mmes. 
E. Frothingham, Mount. 

Public Functions and Public Relations 

Chairman Pyle; Messrs. Ambrose, Brigham, Cook, Cory, Ehrensberger, 
Eppley, Fogg, Foss, Howell, Jackson, Miller, Morrison, RLandall, Reud, Shree\-e, 
Smith, Weber, Wylie; Mmes. Mount, Stamp. 

Religious Life Committee 

Ch.^irman Shreevt:; Messrs. Daiker, Gewehr, Hamilton, Reid, Scott, 
Springmann, White; Mmes. Billings, Bryan, McNaughton. 

Scholarships and Student Aid 

Chairman Cotterman; Messrs. Eppley, Long, Reid, Steinmeyer; Mmes. 
Mount, Stamp. 

Student Life 

Chairman Reid ; Messrs. Algire, Allen, Eppley, James, Kramer, Quigley, 
Strausbaugh, Tatum, White; Mmes. Handy, Harman, Stamp and the Presi- 
dent OF THE Student Go\t;rnment AssoaATioN and the President of the Men's 
League and the President of the Women's League. 



CALENDAR, 1955-56, COLLEGE PARK 

The University year is divided into two semesters of approximately seventeen 
weeks each, and a summer session of six weeks. 



1955 

September 20-23 
September 26 
October 20 
November 23 
November 28 
December 20 

1956 

January 3 
January 20 
January 24 
Jan. 25-Feb. 1 



February 7-10 
February 13 
February 22 
March 26 
March 29 
April 3 
May 10 
May 30 
May 31 
June 1-8 
June 3 
June i 



June 25 
June 26 
August 3 



June 18-23 
August 6-11 
September 4-7 



First Semester 



Tuesday- Friday 

Monday 

Thursday 

Wednesday after last class 

Monday, 8 a.m. 

Tuesday after last class 



Tuesday, 8 a.m. 

Friday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday-Wednesday, inc. 

Second Semester 

Tuesday-Friday 

Monday 

Wednesday 

Monday 

Thursday after last class 

Tuesday, 8 a.m. 

Thursday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday-Friday, Inc. 

Sunday 

Saturday 



Registration, first semester 
In.struction begins 
Convocation, faculty and student* 
Thanksgiving recess begins 
Thank.«glvlng recess ends 
Christmas recess begins 



Christmas recess ends 
Charter Day 

Pre- Examination Study Day 
First semester examinations 



Registration, second semester 
Instruction begins 
Washington's birthday, holiday 
Observance of Maryland Day 
Easter recess begins 
Easter recess ends 
Military Day 
Memorial Day, holiday 
Pre -Examination Study Day 
Second Semester examinations 
Baccalaureate exercises 
Commencement exercises 



Summer Session, 1956 



Monday 

Tuesday 

Friday 



Short Courses 



Monday- Saturday 
Monday- Saturday 
Tuesday- Friday 



Registration, summer session 
Summer session begins 
Summer session ends 



Rural Women's Short Course 
4-H Club Week 
Firemen's Short Course 



simitiwitTfIs 



I 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 IS 16 

17 18 I3Z0 2I 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 

- I 2 3 4 5 S 

7 B 9 to II 12 13 

14 15 18 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

282930 31 

I 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 IS 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

2526 27 2829 30- 
I 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 II 12 13 14 IS 

15 17 IB 19 20 21 22 
2324 25 26 27 2829 

3031 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 Q 9 10 II 12 
1314 IS 16 1/ IB 19 
20 21 22 23 24 2526 

27282930 

I 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
II 12 13 14 IS 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 j 



in 
2 

JAN 

FEB 

m 

APR 
MAY 



SlMlTiWITlFlS 



I 2 3 4 5 6 7 

6 9 10 II 12 13 14 
1515 17 16 19 20 21 
223 24 25 26 27 28 

S303I 

12 3 4 

S 6 7 a 9 10 II 
12 t3l4 IS 16 17 IB 
1920 21 £223 24 25 

rS27 2829 

I 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 S 10 
tl 12 13 14 IS 16 17 
iai9 20 21 22 23 24 
2526 27 28 29 30 31 



12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


IS 16 17 IB 19 20 21 


2223 24 25 26 27 28 


2930 



6 7 

1314 
2021 
2728 



3 4 

|] II 
17 18 
2425 



12 3 4 5 

8 9 10 II 12 
IS 16 17 18 13 
22 2324 2526 

29 3331 

12 

5 6 7 8 S 
12 13 14 IS 16 
19 20 21 22 23 
26 2728 29 30 



S[F 



SlMlTlWlTlPlS 



2 3 4 5 6 7 
a 9 10 II 12 13 14 
1516 17 IB 13 20 21 
2223 24 25 26 27 28 

2*J03I 

12 3 4 

S 6 7 8 9 10 II 
12 13 14 IS 16 17 IB 
1920 21 22 23 24 25 
282728293031 - 



2 3 4 5 

9 10 II 12 
IS 17 IB 19 
2324 25 26 

30 

-12 3 
7 8 9 10 
14 IS 16 17 
2122 23 24 
2029 3031 



6 7 8 

13 14 IS 
20 2122 
27 2829 



4 5 6 

II 1213 
IB 19 20 
25 26 27 



4 5 G 7 

M 12 13 14 
18 19 20 21 



I 2 3 
8 9 10 
IS 16 17 
i:23 24 
2326 27 2S 29 30- 
I 

6 7 8 

13 14 IS 
20 21 22 
27 28 29 



2 3 4 5 

9 10 II 12 
15 17 IB 19 
2324 2326 
3331 - - 



FEB 



MAY 



SMiTWT FlS 



- - 12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 to II 12 
1314 tS 16 17 18 19 
2021 22 23 24 25 26 
272823 3031 

12 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
13 II t: 13 14 15 16 
17 IB 19 20 212223 

2425 26 27 28 

I 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

13 II 12 13 14 IS 16 
1718 19 20 21 22 23 
242526 27282930 

51 

-12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 II 12 13 

14 IS 16 17 18 19 20 
2122 23 242526 27 

232930 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 II 

12 13 14 15 16 17 IB 

13 20 21 222324 23 
28Z72B29303I - 
I 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 II 12 13 14 IS 

15 17 IB 19 20 21 22 
2324 25 26 272829 
30 



EASTER SUNDAYS, April 10, 1955 ; AprU 1, 1956 ; AprU 21, 1957 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




BUILDING CODE UETTCXS FOR CLASS SCMCDULlS. 

Art( a Sei«nc««'Fronc>t Scoll Kty HoM 

Armory 

MukiC 

Nursery School 

Adminrstrotion 

Chtmistry 

Coliteum 

Ooiry-Turn«r Laboratory 

Temporory Clossroom 

Oeon of Women 

Agronomy ■ Botany • H j Potttrton Hall 

Counseling Center 

Hofticunure - Hoijopfei Hon 

Journalism 

Ritctile Gymnotium 

Home Economics • Morgoral Brent Holl 

Agriculturol Engr. - Shriver Loborotory 

Engr. Classroom Bidg. 

Zoology - Silvester Holl 

Llbrory - Shoemolier Building 

Morrill Hall 

Geography 

Agriculture -Symons Holl 

industriol Arts 8 Education -J M.Patterson Bldg- 

Business 8t Public Administration -Tolioferro Hall 

Clossroom Building . Woods Holl 

Engr. Loborotories 

Education - SKinner Building 

Chem. Engr. 

Wind Tunnel 

Preinhert Field House 

Judging Pavilion 

Mothemotics 

Physics 

Poultry -Jull Holl 

Engines Research Lab (Moleculw Ptiytica) 



Cnil 

OcflflH ^ 




-^MBSl 



SKINNER BUILDING 
Headquarters of the Graduate School 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 
1955-1956 

THE GRADUATE COUNCIL 

W. H. Elkins, D.Phil., President of tlie University 

H. C. Byrd., LL.D., D. Sc, President Emeritus 

Ronald Bamford, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School, Chairman 

C. O. Appleman, Ph.D., Dean Emeritus 

E. N. Cory, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology 

Harold F. Cotterman, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Education 

Wilbur Devilbiss, Ed.D., Professor of Education 

N. L. Drake, Ph.D., Professor of Organic Chemistry 

Noel E. Foss, Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacy (Baltimore) 

I. C. Haut, Ph.D., Professor of Horticulture 

Harold C. Hoffsommer, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology 

WiLBERT J. Huff, Ph.D., D.Sc, Professor of Chemical Engineering 

M. Marie Mount, M.A., Professor of Home and Institution Management 

J. Freeman Pyle, Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Marketing 

Leon P. Smith, Ph.D., Professor of Foreign Languages 

E. G. Vanden Bosche, Ph.D., Professor of Biochemistry (Baltimore) 

A. E. ZucKER, Ph.D., Professor of Foreign Languages 



10 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



GRADUATE SCHOOL SUPPLEMENT TO GENERAL CALENDAR 



1955 

October 4 Tuesday , 

October 8 Saturday . 



December 7 Wednesday . 



1956 

January 7 Saturday 



February 7 Tuesday . 

February 18 Saturday . 

April 14 Saturday. 

May 19 Saturday. 

June 5 Tuesday . 

June 11 Monday . 

July 7 Saturday. 

July 21 Saturday. 



.Modern language examination for Ph.D. re- 
quirement 

.Last day to file applications for admission 
to candidacy for Doctor's degrees on 
June 9, 1956 and Master's degrees on 
February 1, 1956. 

.Last day to file applications for diplomas at 
the office of the Registrar for degrees 
on February 1, 1956. 



.Last day to deposit theses in the office of 
the Graduate School for students com- 
pleting requirements for degrees on 
February 1, 1956. 

, Modern language examination for Ph.D. re- 
quirement 

.Last day to file applications for admission 
to candidacy for Master's degrees on 
June 9, 1956 

.Last day to file applications for diplomas at 
the office of the Registrar for degrees 
on June 9, 1956 

.Last day to deposit theses in the office of 
the Graduate School for students com- 
pleting requirements for degrees on 
June 9, 1956 

.Modern language examination for Ph.D. re- 
quirement 

.Last day to file applications for admission 
to candidacy at June meeting of the 
Graduate Council 

.Last day to file applications for diplomas at 
the office of the Registrar for degrees 
on August 3, 1956 

Last day to deposit theses in the office of 
the Graduate School for students com- 
pleting requirements for degrees on 
August 3, 1956 



GRADUATfi SCHOOL 11 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Arthur M. Auai.t, Professor aiul Head of Department of Agriniltiiral Kflucation 
and Rural Life. 

B.S,. I'nivfisity «.( Miuyhiiul, l'.i:!I ; M.S., I'cnn.sylvania State fniversity, 1!K:7 

William R. Ahrendt, Lecturer in Electrical Engineering. 

S.B., Ma.ssachusetts In.stitute of Technology, 1941 ; S.M., 1942. 

Myro.v S. Aisenbkrg, Professor of General and Oral Pathology and Dean of School 
of Dentistry. 

D.D.S., I'niversily of .Maryland, i;t22. 

Alfred O. Aldridce, Professor of English. 

B.S., Indiana University, 19:i7; M.A., University of Georgia, 1938; Ph.D., Duke 
University, 1942. 

Benjamin F. Allen, Associate Professor of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy. 
B.S., University of iMaryland, 1937; Ph.D., 1949. 

J. Frances Allen, Instructor in Zoology. 

B.S., Radford College, 193S ; M.S.. University of Maryland, 194S ; Ph.D., 1952. 

Redfield W. Allen, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1943 ; M.S., 1949. 

Russell B. Allen, Professor of Civil Engineering. 
B.S., Yale University, 1923. 

William R. AmbErson, Professor and Head of Department of Physiology, School 
of Medicine. 

Ph.B., Lafayette College, 1915; Ph.D., Princeton University, 1922. 

George Anastos, Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

B.S., University of Akron, 1942; M.A., Harvard University, 1947; Ph.D., 1949. 

James L. Anderson, Research Associate of Physics. 

B.S., University of Chicago, 1946 ; M.S., 1949 ; Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1951. 

Roy S. Anderson, Assistant Professor of Physics. 

A.B,. Clark University, 1943; A.M., Dartmouth College, 1948; Ph.D., Duke Uni- 
versity, 1951. 

Thornton H. Anderson, Assistant Professor of Government and Politics. 

A.B., University of Kentucky, 1937; M.A., 1938; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 
1948. 

Thomas G. Andrews, Professor and Head of Department of Psychology. 

B.A., University of Southern California, 1937; M.A., University of Nebraska, 1939; 
Ph.D., 1941. 

Wendell S. Arbuckle, Professor of Dairy. 

B.S.A., Purdue University, 1933; A.M., University of Missouri, 1937; Ph.D., 1940. 

John P. Augelli, Assistant Professor of Geography. 

B.A., Clark University, 1943; M.A., Harvard University, 1949; Ph.D., 1951. 

John H. Axley, Associate Professor of Agronomy. 
B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1937 ; Ph.D., 1945. 



12 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Arthur W. Ayers, Associate Professor of Industrial Psychology. 
B.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1933; M.A., 1938; Ph.D., 1940. 

William J. Bailey, Research Professor of Chemistry. 

B. Chom., University of Minnesota, 1943 : Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1946. 

Ronald Bamford, Dean of the Graduate School and Head of Department of Botany. 
B.S., University of Connecticut, 1924 ; M.S., University of Vermont, 1926 ; Ph.D., 
Columbia University, 1931. 

Edward S. Barber, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1935; C.E., 1952. 

Arnold M. Bass, Lecturer in Physics. 

B.S., City College of New York, 1942 ; M.A., Duke University, 1943 ; Ph.D., 1949. 

Richard H. Bauer, Associate Professor of History. 

Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1923; M.A., 1928; Ph.D., 1935. 

George M. Beal, Professor of Agricultural Economics and Marketing. 

B.S.. Utah State Agricultural College, 1934; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1938; 
Ph.D., 1942. 

Glenn H. Beck, Professor and Head of Dairy Department. 

B.S., University of Idaho, 1936; M.S., Kansas State College, 1938; Ph.D., Cornell 
University, 1950. 

William E. Bickley, Associate Professor of Entomology. 

B.S., University of Tennessee, 1934: M.S., 1936; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 
1940. 

Glenn O. Blough, Associate Professor of Education. 

A.B., University of Michigan, 1929: A.M., 1932; LiL.D., Central Michigan College 
of Education, 1950. 

Carl Bode, Professor of English and Executive Secretary of American Civilization 
Program. 

Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1933: M.A., Northwestern University, 1938; Ph.D., 

1941. 

Luther B. Bohanan, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics and Market- 
ing. 

B.S., University of Tennessee, 1932; M .S., 1939. 

Donald Bonney, Professor of Chemical Engineering. 
B.E., Johns Hopkins University, 1926; Ph.D., 1935. 

Gerard A. Bourbeau, Associate Professor of Agronomy. 

B.A., St. Francis Xavier College, 1938; B.S., I.,aval University, 1943; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, 1946 ; Ph.D., 1948. 

Don L. Bowen, Associate Professor of Government and Politics and Director of 
Bureau of Governmental Research. 

B.S., Utah State Agricultural College, 1944; MS., University of Denver, 1945; 

D.S.S., Syracuse University, 1949. 

Richard M. Brandt, Assistant Professor of Education. 

B.M.E., University of Virginia, 1943; M.A.. University of Michigan, 1949; Ed.D., 
University of Maryland, 1954. 

Pela F. Braucher, Associate Professor of Foods and Nutrition. 

B.A., Goucher College, 1927 ; M.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1029. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 13 

Hknry BREciiniLL, Professor and Assistant Dean of College of Education. 

A.B., Blue RldKe CoIIeRe. 1911: A.M., University o( Pittsburgh, 1917; Ph.D., 
George Washington University, 1933. 

Ferdinand G. Brickwedde, Professor of Physics (P. T.) 

B.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1922; M.A., 1924; Ph.D., 1925. 

Donald M. Britton, Assistant Professor of Horticulture. 

B.A., University of Toronto, 1946 ; Ph.D., University of Virginia, 1950. 

George M. Brown, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, 

B.A., Emory University, 1942; M.S., 1943; M.A., Princeton University, 1946; 
Ph.D., 1949. 

Glen D. Brown, Professor of Industrial Education. 

A.B., Indiana State Teachers College, 1916; M.A., Indiana University, 1931. 

Joshua R. C. Brown, Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

A.B., Duke University, 1948; M.A., 1949; Ph.D., 1953. 

Russell G. Brown, Associate Professor of Botany. 

B.S. Agr., West Virginia University, 1929 ; M.S., 1930 ; Ph.D., University of Mary- 
land, 1934. 

Raymond M. Burgison, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology, School of Medicine. 
B.S., Loyola College, 1945; M.S.. University of Maryland, 1948; Ph.D., 1950. 

Sumner O. Burhoe, Professor of Zoology. 

B.S., University of Massachusetts, 1925; M.S., Kansas State College, 1926; Ph.D., 
Harvard University, 1937. 

David J. Burns, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics and Marketing. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1948; M.S., 1949; Ph.D., 1954. 

Richard H. Byrne, Associate Professor of Education. 

A.B., Franklin and Marshall College, 1938; M.A.. ColHmbia University, 1947; Ed.D., 
1952. 

Gordon M. Cairns, Dean of College of Agriculture. 

B.S., Cornell University, 1936; M.S., 1938; Ph.D., 1940. 

Charles J. Carr, Professor of Pharmacology, School of Medicine. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1933; M.S., 1934; Ph.D., 1937. 

Verne E. Chatelain, Professor of History. 

B.A., Nebraska State Teachers College, 1917; M.A., University of Chicago, 1925; 
Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1943. 

Eli W. Clemens, Professor of Business Organization. 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1930 ; M.S., University of Illinois, 1934 ; Ph.D., 
University of Wisconsin, 1940. 

Charles N. Cofer, Professor of Psychology. 

A.B., Southeast Missouri State College, 1936 ; M.A., State University of Iowa, 
1937 ; Ph.D., Brown University, 1940. 

Gerald F. Combs, Professor of Poultry Nutrition. 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1940; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1948. 

J. Allan Cook, Professor of Marketing. 

A.B., College of William and Mary, 1928; M.B.A., Harvard University, 1936; Ph.D., 
Columbia University, 1948. 



14 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Fraxklix D. Cooley. Associate Professor of English. 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1927; M.A., University of Maryland, 1933; Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1940. 

Albert H. Cooper, Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

B.S., University of Tennessee, 1929; M.S., 1930; Ph.D., Michigan State College, 
1933. 

George F. Corcor.ax, Professor and Chairman of Department of Electrical Engi- 
neering. 

B.S., South Dakota State College, 1923; M.S., University of ISIinnesota, 1926. 

Gerald Cornixg, Associate Professor of Aeronautical Engineering. 
B S., New York University, 1937; MiB., Catholic University, 1954. 

Erxest N. Cory, State Entomologist, Professor and Head of Department of Ento- 
mology and Assistant Director of Extension. 

B.S., Maryland Agricultural College, 1909 ; M.S., 1913 ; Ph.D., American Univer- 
sity, 1926. 

Harold F. Cottermax, Dean of the Faculty of the University. 

B..S., Ohio State University, 1916; M.A., Columbia University, 1917; Ph.D., Ameri- 
can University, 1930. 

JoHx B. CouRXYX, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 
B.S., University of Alabama, 1946; M.S., 194S. 

Carroll E. Cox, Professor of Plant Pathology. 

A.B.. University of Delaware, 1938; M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1940; 
Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1943. 

Herbert A. Crosmax, Assistant Professor of History. 

A.B., Harvard University, 1938; A.M., 1938; Ph.D., 1948. 

Dieter Cuxz, Professor of Foreign Languages. 
Ph.D., Frankhjrt University, 1934. 

Richard F. Davis, Assistant Professor of Dairy. 

B.S., University of New Hampshire, 1950; M.S., Cornell University, 1952; Ph.D.. 
1953. 

TowxES L. Dawsox, Associate Professor of Business Law. 

B.B.A., University of Texas, 1943; B.S., U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, 1946; 
M.B.A., University of Texas, 1947; Ph.D., 1950; LL.B., 1954; Member Texas Bar. 

Dorothy F. Deach, Professor and Head of Department of Physical Education for 
Women. 

B.S.. University of Illinois, 1931; M.S., 1932; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1951. 

A. Morris Decker, Jr., Assistant Professor of Agronomy. 

B.S., Colorado Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1949 ; M.S., Utah State Col- 
lege, 1951 ; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1953. 

Jules de Lauxay, Professor of Physics (P. T.). 

A.B., Howard College, 1931; B.A., Oxford University, 1935; M.A., 1938; Ph.D., 
Stanford University, 1939. 

Wilbur Devilbiss, Dean of the College of Education. 

B.A., Western Maryland College, 1925; M.A., University of Maryland, 1935; Ed.D., 
George Washington University, 1946. 



CRADVATE SCHOOL 15 

Jdaouin B. Diaz, Associate Roscarcli Professor in Institute fur I'hiid Dynamics 
and Applied Matlieinatics. 

H.A.. I'liiv.Tsity of T«>x:is. liMO; I'h.D., Brown Uiiivcrslty, IIH.'.. 

DuDiJ.Y Dii.i.AKii, Professor and Head of Department of Economics. 
B.S., UnivtMsily of California, 1935; Ph.D., 1940. 

Lf.wis p. Ditman, Research Professor of Entomology. 

I!.S., ITniver.sity of Maryland, 1926; M.S., 1929; Ph.D., 1931. 

ivoHKKT G. DixoN, Jr., Assistant Professor of Government and Politics. 
A.B , Syracuse University, 1943; Ph.D., 1947. 

Raymond N. Doktsch, Assistant Professor of Bacteriology. 

B.S., University of Illinois, 1942; A.M., Indiana University, 1943; Ph.D.. Univer- 
sity of I\Iaryland, 1948. 

Brice M. Dorsev, Professor and Head of Department of Oral Surgery, School of 
Dentistry. 

D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1927. 

Nathan L. Drake, Professor and Head of Department of Chemistry. 
A.B., Harvard University, 1920; A.M., 1921; Ph.D., 1922. 

Wilson H. Elkins, President, University of Maryland. 

B.A., University of Texas, 1932; M.A., 1932; Litt. B., Oxford University, 1936; 
D.Phil., 1936. 

Gaylord B. Estabrook, Professor of Physics, School of Pharmacy. 

B.Sc., Purdue University. 1521; M.Sc, Ohio State University, 1922; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh, 1932. 

John E. Faber. Jr., Professor and Head of Department of Bacteriology. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1926 ; M.S., 1927 ; Ph.D., 1937. 

William F. Falls, Professor of Foreign Languages. 

A.B., University of North Carolina, 1922 ; Certificate d'Etudes Francaises, Uni- 
versity of Toulouse, 1926; .M.A., Vanderbilt University, 1928; Ph.D., University 
of Pennsylvania, 1932. 

Frederick P. Ferguson, Associate Professor of Physiology, School of Medicine. 

B.A., Wesleyan University, 1938; M.A., 1939; Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1943. 

Richard A. Ferrell, Assistant Professor of Physics. 

B.S., California Institute of Technology. 1948; M.S., 1949; Ph.D., Princeton Uni- 
versity, 1952. 

Frank H. J. Figge, Professor of Anatomy, School of Medicine. 

A.B., Colorado College, 1927; PhD., University of Maryland, 1934. 

Allan J. Fisher, Professor of Accounting and Finance. 

B.S. in Ch.E., University of Pennsylvania, 1928 ; Litt.M., University of Pittsburgh, 
1936; Ph.D., 1937. 

Russell S. Fisher, Professor of Legal Medicine, School of Medicine. 

B.S., Georgia School of Teclinology, 1937; M.D., Medical College of Virginia, 1942. 

Noel E. Foss, Professor and Dean of School of Pharmacy. 

Ph.C. & B.S., South Dakota State College, 1929 ; M.S., University of Maryland, 
1932 ; Ph.D., 1933. 



16 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

John E. Foster, Professor and Head of Department of Animal Husbandry. 

B.S., North Carolina State College, 192G; M.S., Kansas State College. 1927; Ph.D. 
Cornell University, 1937. 

Stewart H. Fowler, Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

B.S.A., University of Florida, 1947 ; M.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1950 ; 
Ph.D., Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas, 1954. 

Lester M. Fraley, Dean of College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health. 
A.B., Randolph -Mac on College, 192S ; M.A., Peabody College, 1937; Ph.D., 1939. 

John H. Frederick, Professor of Transportation and Foreign Trade and Head of 
Department of Business Organization. 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1913; M.A., 1925; Ph.D., 1927. 

Jacob J. Freeman, Lecturer in Electrical Engineering. 

B.S., College of William and Mary, 1933; M.A., Columbia University, 1935; Ph.D., 
Catholic University, 1949. 

Henry C. Freimuth, Assistant Professor of Legal Medicine, School of Medicine. 
B.S., College of the City of New York, 1932; M.S., New York University, 1933; 
Ph.D., 1938. 

Lucius Garvin, Professor and Head of Department of Philosophy. 
A.B., Brown University, 1928; A.M., 1929; Ph.D., 1933. 

Hugh G. Gauch, Professor of Plant Physiology. 

B.S., Miami University, 1935; M.S., Kansas State College, 1937; Ph.D., University 
of Chicago, 1939. 

DwiGHT L. Gentry, Associate Professor of Marketing. 

A.B., Elon College, 1941; M.B.A., Northwestern University, 1947; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Illinois, 1952. 

Wesley M. Gewehr, Professor and Acting Head of Department of History. 
Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1911; M.A., 1912; Ph.D., 1922. 

Richard A. Good, Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

A.B., Ashland College, 1939; M.A., University of Wisconsin, 1940; Ph.D., 1945. 

Robert A. Goodell, Assistant Professor of Business Organization and Administra- 
tion. 

B.A., Augustana College and Theological Seminary, 1943 ; M.A., University of 

Iowa, 1950 ; Ph.D., 1953. 

Frank Goodwyn, Professor of Spanish and Latin American Civilization. 

B.A., Texas College of Arts and Industries, 1940; M.A., 1941; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Texas, 1946. 

Donald C. Gordon, Assistant Professor of History. 

A.B., CoUege of William and Mary, 1934 ; M. A., Columbia University, 1937 ; 
Ph.D., 1947. 

Ira J. Gordon, Associate Professor of Education. 

B.B.A., New York City College, 1943; M.A., Columbia University. 1947; Ed.D.. 
1950. 

Frank A. Grant, Assistant Professor of Physics. 

B.Engr., McGill University, 1942; M.A.Sc, University of Toronto, 1946; Ph.D.. 
1949. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 17 

Henry \V. Cjrayson, Associate Professor of Economics. 

B.A,. l^niversity of Saskatrhfwan, 1937; M.A., University <■( Torr)nto, i;M7; I'h.D., 
1050. 

Mf.lvillk S. Grkkn. Lecturer in Physics. 

B.A., Cohiml.ia ColIeRc. 10»l; .MA.. Princeton I'nivfrsity. 1347; fh n.. lO'.L'. 

Wii.LARD W. Grkex. Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

B.S., University of .Minnesota, 10:5"; M.S., 10:!4; I'h.D., 10:10. 

John D. (.jreene. Associate Professor of Kducation. 

B.A., I^ouisiana Polytothnic Institute, lOSR; IMA.. Tvonisiana Si;ilr [Tnivi-rsity. 1011 ; 
Ed.D.. Univer.sily of Maryland, 1952. 

All.\n G. Gruchy, Professor of Economics. 

B.A., University of British Columbia. 102H; M.A., .M.<;m Iriivcrsity. 10:i:i; rh.I'., 
University of \'irginia, 1931. 

John G. Gurley, Associate Professor of Econoinics. 
A.B., Stanford University, 1042; Ph.T>., lO.Jl. 

John W. Gustap, Director of University COunscliiiR Center and .\ssociatc Pro- 
fessor of Psychology. 

B.A., Macale.ster College, 104:5; M.A., University r.f Minnesota, 1!i4n; I'h.It., 1940. 

Ray C. Hackman, Professor of Psychology. 

B.A., ITniversity of Nebra.«ka, 1935; M.A., 1036; Ph.D., University of .Minnesota, 
1040. 

George P. Hager, Professor of Pharmaceutical Chcmi.-try. School of Pharmacy. 

n..«!.. University of Maryland. 10:58; M.S., 1040; Ph.D., University of .Maryland, 1042. 

William E. Hahx, Professor of Anatomy. School of Dentistry. 
A.B., University of Rochester, 1938; M.S., 1939; D.D.S., 1931. 

Dick W. Hall, Professor of Mathematics. 

B.S.. University of Virginia. 10.'54: M.S., 1035; Ph.D., lO.TS. 

Francis R. Hama, Assistant Research Professor in Institute for I'luid Dynamics 

and Applied Mathematics. 

.M.Engrr., Tokyo Imperial University. 1040; D.Sc, University of Tokyo, 1052. 

Daniel Hamberg, Assistant Professor of Economics. 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1945; M.A., 1947; I'h.D., 1952. 

Arthur B. Hamilton, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics and Market- 
ing. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1929 ; M.S., 1931. 

Poul a. Hansen, Professor of Veterinary Bacteriology. 

Ph.B., University of Copenhagen, 1922 ; M.S., Royal Technological College, Den- 
mark, 1926 ; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1934. 

Susan Emolyn H.\rmax, Professor of English. 

B.Ed., Nebraska State Teachers College. 1916; B.A., University of Nebraska. 
1917; M.A., 191S; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1926. 

Hor.\ce V. Harrison, Assistant Profes.sor of Government and Politics. 

B.A., Trinity University, 1932; M.A., University of Texas, 1941; Ph.D., 1051. 

Ellen E. Harvey, Associate Professor of Physical Education, Recreation and 

Health. 

B.S.. Columbia University, 1035; M.A., 1041; Ed.D., University of Oregon. 19..1. 



18 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

I. C. Haut, Professor and Head of Department of Horticulture ; Director Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station. 

B.S., University of Idaho. 1928; M.S., State College of Washington, 1930; Ph.D., 

University of Maryland, 1933. 

Elizabeth E. Haviland, Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

B.A., Wilmington College, 1923 ; M.A., Cornell University, 1926 ; M.S., University 
of Maryland, 1936 ; Ph.D., 1945. 

Richard Hendricks, Assistant Professor of Speech. 

A.B., Franklin College of Indiana, 1937; M.A., Ohio State University, 1939. 

Edward J. Herbst, Associate Professor of Biological Chemistry, School of Medicine. 
B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1943; M.S., 1944; Ph.D., 1949. 

Charles M. Herzfeld, Lecturer in Physics. 

B.Ch.E., Catholic University, 1945; Ph.D., University of Chiiago, 1951. 

Harold C. Hoffsommer, Professor and Head of Department of Sociology. 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1921 ; M.A., 1923 ; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1929. 

D. Lee Hornbake, Professor and Head of Department of Industrial Education. 

B.S., Pennsylvania State Teachers College, California, 1934 ; M.A., Ohio State Uni- 
versity, 1936; Ph.D., 1942. 

Kenneth O. Hovet, Associate Professor of Education. 

B.A., St. Olaf College, 1926; Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1950. 

Charles Y. Hu, Professor of Geography. 

B.S., University of Nanking, 1930; M.A., University of California, 1936 Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1941. 

Alfred Huber, Research Associate in Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied 

Mathematics. 

M.C.E., Eldenoessische Technlsche Hochschule, 1945 ; M.S., Eidenoessische 
Technische Hochschule, 1949 ; D.Sc, Eidenoessische Technlsche Hochschule, 1951. 

WiLBERT J. Huff, Professor and Chairman of Department of Chemical Engineer- 
ing. 

A.B., Ohio Northern University, 1911; A.B., Yalta CoUege, 1914; Ph.D., Yale 
University, 1917 ; D.Sc. (hon.), Ohio Northern University, 1927. 

Casimir T. Ichniowski, Emerson Professor of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy. 
Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1929; B.S., 1930; M.S., 1932; Ph.D., 1936. 

Richard W. Iskraut, Associate Professor of Physics. 

B.S., City College of New York. 1937; Sc.D., University of Leipzig, 1941. 

John W. Jackson, Professor Mechanical Engineering. 

B.S.M.E., University of Cincinnati. 1934; M.E., 1937; M.S.M.E., California Institute 
of Technology, 1940. 

Stanley B. Jackson, Professor and Head of Department of Mathematics. 
A.B., Bates College, 1933; A.M., Harvard University, 1934; Ph.D., 1937. 

Laurens Jansen, Assistant Professor in Institute of Molecular Physics. 

Cand. Ex. State University, Utrecht, Holland, 1947; Doct., 1950; Doctorate, 1954. 

WiLHELMiNiA Jashemski, Assistant Professor of History. 

A.B., York College, 1931; A.M., University of Nebraska, 1933: Ph.D., University 
of Chicago, 1942. 

Robert Jastrow, Lecturer in Physics. 

A.B., Columbia CoUege, 1944; A.M., Columbia University, 1945; Ph.D., 194S. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 19 

Walter F. Jkffers, Professor of Botany. 

U.S., ITniversity of Maryland, 1935; M.S., 1937; Ph.D., 1939. 

Warren R. Johnson, Professor of Physical Education. 

B.A., University of Denver, 1942; M.A., 1946; Ed.D., Boston University. 1950. 

Mary Juhn (Mrs. Richard M. Fraps), Research Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 
Race. es. sc, University of Zurich, 1916 ; Ph.D., 1923. 

MoRLEY A. JuLL, Profcssor and Head of Department of Poultry Husbandry. 

B.S.A., University of Toronto, 1908; M.S., McGill University, 1914; Ph.D., Uni- 
ver.sity of Wisconsin, 1921. 

Mark Keeney, Associate Professor of Dairy Husbandry. 

B.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1942; M.S., Ohio Stale University, 1947; I'h.D., 
Pennsylvania State College, 1950. 

Earle H. Kennard, Professor of Physics (P. T.). 

B.A., Pomona College, 1907; B.Sc, Oxford University, 1911; Ph.D., Cornell Uni- 
versity. 1913. 

\'^FJ?NON E. Krahl, Associate Professor of Anatomy, School of Medicine. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1939; M.S., 1940; Ph.D., University of .Maryland, 
1946. 

John C. Krantz, Jr., Professor of Pharmacology, School of Medicine. 
B.S., ITniversity of Maryland, 1923; M.S., 1924; Ph.D., 1928. 

Robert W. Krauss, Research Associate of Botany. 

B.A.. Oberlin College, 1947; M.S., University of Hawaii, 1949; Ph.D., University 
of Maryland, 1951. 

Aaron D. Krumbein, Assistant Professor of Physics. 

A.B., Brooklyn C\)llege, 1941; Ph.D., New York University, 1951. 

Albin O. Kuhn, Professor and Head of Department of Agronomy. 
U.S., University of Maryland, 1938 ; M.S., 1939 ; Ph.D., 1948. 

John J. Kurtz, Professor of Education. 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1935 ; M.A., Northwestern University, 1940 ; Ph.D. 
University of Chicago, 194 9. 

Norman C. Laffer, Associate Professor of Bacteriology. 

B.S., Allegheny College, 1929; M.S., University of Maine. 1932; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Illinois, 1937. 

George S. Langford, Professor of Entomology. 

B.S., Clemson College, 1921; M.S., University of Maryland, 1924; Ph.D., Ohio 
State University, 1929. 

Emory C. Leffel, Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1943 ; M.S., 1947 ; Ph.D., 1953. 

Peter P. Lejins, Professor of Sociology. 

Ph.M., University of Latvia, 1930; LL.M., 1933; Ph.D., University of Chicago, 
1938. 

Hoyt Lemons, Lecturer in Geography. 

B.Ed., Southern Illinois University, 1936; M.A., University of Nebraska, 1938; 
Ph.D., 1941. 

Richard Lindenberg, Lecturer in Anatomy, School of Dentistry. 

Graduation, University of Munich Medical School, 1934 ; M.D., University ol Berlin, 
1944. 



20 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Conrad B. Link, Professor of Floriculture. 

B.Sc, Ohio State University. 1933; M.Sc, 1934; Ph.D., 1940. 

Robert A. Littleford, Associate Professor of Zoology. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1933 ; M.S., 1934 ; Ph.D., 1938. 

Ralph H. Loxg, Jr., Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

B.S.M.E., Tufts College, 1943; M.Eng., Yale University, 1948; D.Eng., 1952. 

William V. Lovitt, Jr., Assistant Professor of Legal Medicine, School of Medicine. 
B.S., University of Nebraska. 1941; M.D., University of Colorado, 1944. 

Geoffrey S. S. Ludford, Associate Professor of Mathematics and Institute lor Fluid 
Djnamics and Applied Mathematics. 

B.A., Cambridge University, 194S ; M.A., 1952; Ph.D., 1952. 

H.\RRY P. Mack, Assistant Professor of Anatomy, School of Medicine. 
M.D., University of Maryland, 1948. 

DoN.ALD Maley, Associate Professor of Industrial Education. 

B.S., Pennsylvania State Teachers College, California, 1943 ; M.S.. University of 
Maryland, 1947 ; Ph.D., 1949. 

Charles Maxxixg, Associate Professor of English and Assistant Dean of College 
of Arts and Sciences. 

B.S., Tufts College, 1929: A.M., Harvard University, 1931; Ph.D.. University of 

North Carolina, 1950. 

Monroe H. Martin, Professor of Mathematics and Director of Institute for Fluid 
Dynamics and Applied ^Mathematics. 

B S., Lebanon Valley CoUege, 1928; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1932. 

Ladislaus L. Marton, Lecturer in Physics. 
Ph.D., University of Zurich, 1924. 

Benjamin H. Massey, Professor of Physical Education. 

A.B., Erskine College, 193S ; M.S.. University of Illinois, 1947; Ph.D., 1950. 

Joseph F. M.attick, Associate Professor of Dairy. 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1942 ; Ph.D., 1950. 

Felix W. McBryde, Professor of Geography. 

B.A., Tulane University, 1930; Ph.D., Univer.sity of California. 1940. 

Harold S. McConnell, Research Associate Professor of Entomology. 
B.S., Clemson College, 1516; M.S., University of Maryland, 1931. 

Marion W. McCrea, Professor of Histology and Embryolog>-, School of Dentistry. 
D.D.S., Ohio State University, 1935; M.S., University of Rochester, 1937. 

EixiOTT M. McGiNXiES, Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

B.A., University of Buffalo, 1943 ; M.A., Brown University, 1944 ; Ph.D., Har- 
vard University, 1948. 

James G. McManaway, Lecturer in English 

B.A., University of Virginia, 1919; M.A., 1920; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 
1931. 

Bruce L. Melvin, Associate Professor of Sociology. 

B.S., University of Missouri, 1916; M.A., 1917; Ph.D., 1921. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 21 

Horace S. Merrill. Associate Professor of History, 

Ji.K.. Wisionsin Slate Teachers' College, River Falls, 1932; Ph.M., University 
of Wisconsin, 19113; Ph.D., 1942. 

Madelaine Mershon, Professor of Education. 

B.S., Drake University, 1910; M.A., University of Chicago, 1943; Ph.D., 1950. 

Francis M. Miller, Associate Professor of Chemistry, School of Pharmacy. 

B.S., Western Kentucky State College, 1946; Ph.D., Northwestern University, 
1949. 

Thyra F. Mitchell, Professor and Head of Department of Textiles and Clothing. 
B.S., Missouri State Teachers College, Springfield, 1930; M.A., Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1939. 

Dorothy R. Mohr, Professor of Physical Education for Women. 

S.B., University of Chicago, 1932; A.M., 1933; Ph.D., University of lowra, 1944. 

Elliott W. Montroll, Research Professor in Institute for Fluid Dynamics and 
Applied Mathematics. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1937 ; Ph.D., 1940. 

E. Aubert Mooney, Jr., Associate Professor of English. 

A.B., Furman University, 1930; M.A., University of Virginia, 1933; Ph.D., Cor- 
nell University, 1937. 

Delbert T. Morgan, Jr., Associate Professor of Botany. 

B.S., Kent State University, 1940 ; M.A., Columbia University, 1942 ; Ph.D., 1948. 

Hugh G. Morgan, Professor of Education and Assistant Director of Institute of 
Child Study. 

B.A., Furman University, 1940; M.A., University of Chicago, 1943; Ph.D., 1946. 

Raymond Morgan, Professor of Physics. 

A.B., Indiana University, 1916; A.M., 1917; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 
1922. 

M. Marie Mount, Dean of the College of Home Economics. 

B.A., University of Indiana, 1916; M.A., Columbia University, 1924. 

Charles D. Murphy, Professor and Acting Head of Department of English. 

B.A., University of Wisconsin, 1929; M.A., Harvard University, 1930; Ph.D., 
Cornell University, 1940. 

Ray a. Murray, Associate Professor of Agricultural Education. 

B.Sc, University of Nebraska, 1934; M.S., Cornell University, 1938; Ph.D., 1949. 

David S. Muzzey, Jr., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering (P. T.). 
A.B., Harvard University, 1923; M.A., 1924; Ph.D., 1930. 

Ralph D. Myers, Professor of Physics. 

A.B., Cornell University, 1934; A.M., 1935; Ph.D., 1937. 

Clarence A. Newell, Professor of Education. 

A.B., Hastings College, 1935; A.M., Columbia University, 1939; Ph.D., 1943. 

Paul E. Nystrom, Director of Instruction, College of Agriculture and Head of 
Department of Agricultural Economics and Marketing. 

B.S., University of California, 1928; M.S., University of Maryland, 1931; M.P.A., 

Harvard University, 1948 ; D.P.A., 1951. 



22 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Irwin Oppenheim, Lecturer in Physics. 
A.B., Harvard University, 1949. 

Raymond C. O'Rourke. 

B.S., University of Michigan, 1945; M.S., 1947; Ph.D., 1950. 

Robert H. Oster, Professor of Physiology, School of Dentistry. 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1923; M.S., 1926; Ph.D., Harvard Univer- 
sity, 1933. 

Louis E. Otts, Jr., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

B.A., East Texas State Teachers College, 1933; B.S., Agi-icultural and Mechani- 
cal College of Texas, 1946 ; M.S., 1946. 

Shih-I Pai, Associate Research Professor in Institute for Fluid Dynamics and 
Applied Mathematics. 

B.Sc, National Central University, China, 1935 ; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, 1938 ; Ph.D., California Institute of Technology, 1940. 

Arthur C. Parsons, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages. 
A.B., University of Maryland, 1926; M.A., 1928. 

Donald J. Patton, Associate Professor of Geography. 

S.B., Harvard University, 1942; A.M., 1947; Ph.D., 1949. 

Lawrence E. Payne, Assistant Research Professor in Institute for Fluid Dynamics 
and Applied Mathematics. 

B.S., Iowa State College, 1946; M.S., 194S ; Ph.D., 1950. 

Michael J. Pelczar, Jr., Professor of Bacteriology. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1936; M.S., 1938; Ph.D., University of Iowa, 1941. 

William A. Pennington, Professor of Metallurgical Option. 

B.S., Union University, 1925; Ph.D., Iowa State College, 1933. 

Hugh V. Perkins, Associate Professor of Education. 

A.B. & Sch. Mus.B., Oberlin College, 1941; A.M., University of Chicago, 1946; 
Ph.D., 1949. 

Richard L. Petritz, Lecturer in Physics. 

B.S., Northwestern University, 1944; B.S.E.E., 1946; M.S.E.E., 1947; Ph.D., 1950. 

Norman E. Phillips, Professor of Zoology. 

B.S., Allegheny College, 1916 ; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1931. 

Hugh B. Pickard, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

A.B., Haverford College, 1933 ; Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1938. 

Elmer Plischke, Professor and Acting Head of Department of Government and 

Politics. 

Ph.B., Marquette University, 1937; M.A., American University, 1938; Ph.D., Clark 
University, 1943 ; Certificate, Columbia University, Naval School of Military Gov- 
ernment, 1944. 

Paul R. Poffenberger, Professor of Agricultural Economics and Marketing. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1935; M.S., 1937; Ph.D., American University, 1953. 

Burton R. Pollack, Assistant Professor of Physiology, School of Dentistry. 
D.D.S., University of Maryland, 1946. 

Augustus J. Prahl, Professor of Foreign Languages. 

M.A., Washington University, 1928 ; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1933. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 23 

Gordon W. Prance, Professor of History. 

A.B., University ot Iowa. 1932; A.M., 1934; Ph.D., 1937. 

Ernest F. Pratt, Professor of Chemistry. 

A.B., University of Redlands, 1937; M.S., Oregon State College, 1939; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1941; Ph.D., 1942. 

Daniel A. Prescott, Professor of Education and Director of Institute for Child 
Study. 

B.S., Tufts College, 1920; Ed.M., Harvard College, 1922; Ed.D., 1923. 

W. Arthur Purdum, Professor of Hospital Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy. 
Ph.G., University of Maryland, 1930 ; B.S., 1932 ; M.S., 1934 ; Ph.D., 1941. 

J. Freeman Pyle, Dean of the College of Business and Public Administration. 
Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1917; M.A., 1918; Ph.D., 1925. 

William R. Quynn, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages. 

B.A., University of Virginia, 1922; M.A., 1923; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 
1934. 

M.\rguerite C. Rand, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages. 

B.A., Pomona College, 1919; M.A., Stanford University, 1921; Ph.D., University 
of Chicago, 1951. 

Robert D. Rappleye, Assistant Professor of Botany. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1941; M.S., 1947; Ph.D., 1949. 

Henry R. Reed, Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1925; M.S., 1927; E.E., South Dakota State College, 
1930 ; Ph.D., University of Iowa, 1941. 

Wilkins Reeve, Professor of Chemistry. 

B.S., Drexel Institute of Technology, 1936 ; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1940. 

Edwin L. Resler, Jr., Associate Research Professor in Institute for Fluid Dynam- 
ics and Applied Mathematics. 

B.S., University of Notre Dame, 194 7; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1951. 

Chaiiles W. Reynolds, Assistant Professor of Vegetable Crops. 

A.B., University of Alabama, 1941; B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1947; 
M.S., 1949 ; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1954. 

A. W. Richardson, Professor of Mathematics, School of Pharmacy. 

B.S., University of Richmond, 1918; A.M., Johns Hopkins University, 1925; Ph.D., 
1928. 

Robert M. Rivello, Associate Professor of Aeronautical Engineering. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; M.S., 1948. 

John M. Robinson, Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 

A.B., Middlebury College, 1945; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1949. 

Carl L. Rollinson, Professor of Chemistry. 

B.S., University of Michigan, 1933 ; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1939. 

George L. Romoser, Assistant Professor of Poultry Nutrition. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1950; M.S., 1951; Ph.D., 1953. 

Thomas S. Ronningen, Associate Professor of Agronomy. 

B.S., Wisconsin State Teachers College. River Falls, 1939 ; M.S., University of 
Wisconsin, 1947; Ph.D., 1949. 



24 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Franklin R. Root, Assistant Professor of Economics. 

B.S., Trinity College, 1947; M.B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1948; Ph.D., 1951. 

Leonora C. Rosenfield, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages. 

B.A., Smitli College, 1930; A.M., Columbia University, 1931; Ph.D., 1940. 

Sherman Ross, Associate Professor of Psychology. 

B.Sc, College of the City of New Yorlt, 1939 ; M.A., Columbia University, 1941 ; 
Ph.D., 1943. 

Victor Roterus, Consulting Professor of Geography (P. T.). 
Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1930; M.S., 1931. 

Norman R. Roth, Assistant Professor of Sociology. 

B.A., Hobart College, 1942 : M.A., University of Rochester, 1949 ; M.A., Colum- 
bia University, 1950 ; Ph.D., 1950. 

Russell G. Rothgeb, Professor of Agronomy. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1924; M.S., Iowa State College, 1925; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1928. 

Albert W. Saenz, Lecturer in Physics in Training Program at Naval Research 
Laboratory. 

B.S., University of Michigan, 1944 ; M.A., 1945 ; Ph.D., 1949. 

Homer W. Schamp, Jr., Associate Professor in Institute of Molecular Physics. 
A.B., Miami University, 1944; M.Sc., University of Michigan, 1947; Ph.D., 19ol. 

Alvin W. Schindler, Professor of Education. 

B.A., Iowa State Teachers' College, 1927 ; M.A., Iowa State University, 1929 ; 
Ph.D., 1934. 

Walter E. Schlaretzki, Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 

A.B., Monmouth College, 1941; A.M., University of Illinois, 1942; Ph.D., Cornell 
University, 1948. 

Emil G. Schmidt, Professor and Chairman of Department of Biological Chemistry, 
School of Medicine. 

B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1921; M.S., 1923; Ph.D., 1924. 

Fern D. Schneider, Assistant Professor of Education. 

B.S., Nebraska Wesleyan University, 1932; M.A., George Washington University, 
1934; Ed.D., Columbia University, 1940. 

Wilburn C. Schroeder, Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

B.S., University of Michigan, 1930; M.S.E., 1931; Ph.D., 1933. 

Leland E. Scott, Professor of Horticultural Physiology. 

B.S., University of Kentucky, 1927; M.S., Michigan State College, 1929; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland, 1943. 

Clyne S. Shaffner, Professor of Poultry Physiology. 

B.S., Michigan State College, 1938; M.S., 1940; Ph.D., PVirdue University, 1947. 

Irving H. Shames, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

B.S., Northeastern University, 1948; M.S., Harvard University, 1949; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1953. 

James B. Shanks, Associate Professor of Horticulture. 

B.Sc,, Ohio State University, 1939; M.Sc, 1946; Ph.D., 1949. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL ^S 

Paul W. Shankwkilkk, Associate Professor of Sociology. 

Ph.B., Muhlenberg College, 1919; M.A., Columbia University, 1921; Diploma, L'nlon 
TheoloKioal Seminary. 1922; I'h.D., University of North Carolina. 1934. 

Maurice M. Shapiro, Lecturer in Physics. 

B.S, University of Chicago, 1936; M.S., 1940; Ph.D., 1942. 

Joseph C. Shaw, Professor of Dairy. 

B.S., Iowa State College. 1932; M.S., Montana State College, 1933; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, 1938. 

Donald E. Shay, Professor and Head of Department of Bacteriology and Immu- 
nology, School of Dentistry, School of Pharmacy. 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College, 1937 ; M.S., University of Maryland, 1938 ; Ph.D., 

1943. 

Shan-Fu Shex, Associate Professor of Aeronautical Engineering. 

B.S.. Xational Central University, China. 1941; Sc.D., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, 1949. 

A. Wiley Sherwood, Professor of Aerodynamics. 

M.E., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1935; M.S., University of Maryland, 1943. 

E. Roderick Shipley, Assistant Professor of Physiology, School of Dentistry. 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University, 1938 ; M.D., University of Maryland, 1942 ; Certifi- 
cate, University of Pennsylvania, 1947 ; Diplomate, American Board of Surgery, 
1948. 

J^Iary S. Shore, Research Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 

B.S., The College of Idaho, 1928 ; Sc.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1933. 

Charles A. Shreeve, Jr., Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

B.E., Johns Hopkins University, 1935; M.S., University of Maryland, 1943. 

Stanley C. Shull, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics and Marketing, 
B.A., Bridgewater College, 1941 ; M.A., University of Virginia, 1943 ; Ph.D., Cor- 
nell University, 1951. 

R. Edwin Shutts, Lecturer in Audiology and Speech Pathology. 

A.B., Indiana State Teachers' College, 1933 ; M.A., Northwestern University, 
1947 ; Ph.D., 1950. 

S. F. Singer, Associate Professor of Physics. 

BEE., Ohio State University, 1943; A.M., Princeton University, 1944; Ph.D., 
1948. 

Hugh D. Sisler, Assistant Professor of Botany. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1949; M.S., 1951; Ph.D., 1953. 

Frank J. Slama, Professor of Pharmacognosy, School of Pharmacy. 

Ph.G., University of Maryland. 1924; Ph.C, 1925; B.S., 1928; M.S., 1930; Ph.D., 
1935. 

Milton M. Slawsky, Lecturer in Physics. 

B.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1933 ; M.S., California Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1935; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1938. 

Zaka L Slawsky, Research Professor in Institute of Molecular Physics. 

B.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1933 ; M.S., California Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1935; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1938. 



26 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

J. Samuel Smart, Lecturer in Physics. 

B.A., Westminster College, 1939; M.S , Louisiana State University, 19-11; I'h.D,, 
University of Minnesota, 1948. 

Andrew G. Smith, Assistant Professor of Medical Microbiology, School of Med- 
icine. 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1940; M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 19-17; 
Ph.D., 1950. 

Dietrich C. Smith, Professor of Physiology, School of Medicine. 

A.B., University of Minnesota, 1923; A.M., 1924; Ph.D., Harvard University, 1928. 

Harold D. Smith, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics and Marketing. 
B.A., Bridgewater College, 1943 ; M.S., University of Maryland, 1947 ; Ph.D., 
American University, 1952. 

Leon P. Smith, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. 

B.A., Emory University, 1919; M.A., University of Chicago, 1928; Ph.D., 1930; 
Diploma de I'lnstitut de Touraine, 1932. 

Benjamin L. S navel y. Lecturer in Physics. 

B.S., Lehigh University, 192S ; Ph.D., Prhiceton University, 1935. 

Merrill J. Snyder, Assistant Professor of Medicine in Clinical Microbiology and 
Instructor in Microbiology, School of Medicine. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1940; M.S., University of Maryland, 1950; Ph.D., 

1953. 

David S. Sparks, Assistant Professor of History. 

A.B., Grinnell College, 1944; A.M., University of Chicago, 1945; Ph.D., 1951. 

Guilford L. Spencer, H, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

B.A., Williams College, 1943; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Tefhnology, 1948; 
Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1953. 

Mabel S. Spencer, Assistant Professor of Home Economics Education. 
B.S., University of West Virginia, 1925; M.S., 1946. 

Robert A. Spurr, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

A.B., Rollins College, 1935 ; B.S., 1936 ; Ph.D., California Institute of Technology, 
1942. 

Francis C. Stark, Jr., Professor of Vegetable Crops. 

B.S., Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, 194 0; M.S., University of 
Maryland, 1941; Ph.D., 1948. 

Martin C. Steele, Lecturer in Physics. 

B.Ch.E., Cooper Union, 1940; M.S., University of Maryland, 1949; Ph.D., 1952. 

Edward Steers, Associate Professor of Microbiology, School of Medicine. 

B.S., Moravian College, 1932; M.S., Lehigh University, 1937; Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1949. 

S. S. Steinberg, Dean of the College of Engineering and Chairman of Department 
of Civil Engineering. 

B.E., Cooper Union, 1910; C.E., 1913. 

Reuben G. Steinmeyer, Professor of Government and Politics. 
A.B., American University, 1929; Ph.D., 1935. 

William S. Stone, Director of Medical Education and Research. 

B.S., University of Idaho, 1924; M.S., 1925; M.D., University of Louisville, 1929; 
Ph.D., (hon.), 1946. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 27 

Warren L. Strausbaugh, Associate Professor and Head of Department of Speech. 
B.S., Wooster ColleKP, 1032; M.A., State University of Tnwa. 1035. 

Orman E. Street, Professor of Agronomy. 

BS., South Dakota State College. 1024; M.S.. MifhiKan State College, 1027; Ph.D., 
1933. 

KnwARD Strickling, Assistant Professor of Agronomy. 
B.S., Ohio State Unlver.sity, 1937 ; Ph.D., 1949. 

Calvin F. Stuntz, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
B.A., University of Buffalo, 1939; Ph.D., 1947. 

William H. Summerson, Lecturer in Biochemistry, School of Medicine. 
B.Chem., Cornell University, 1927; M.A., 1928; Ph.D., 1937. 

William J. Svirbely, Professor of Chemistry. 

B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1031; M.S., 1932; D.Sri., 193.5. 

Charles T. Sweeney, Professor of Accounting. 

B.S., Cornell University, 1921; M.B.A., University of Michigan, 1928; C.P.A., 
Iowa. 1934; C.P.A., Ohio, 1936. 

Harold F. Syl\t;ster, Professor of Business Organization. 
Ph.D., .lohns Hopkins ITniversity, 1938. 

\''icT0R G. Szebehely, Lecturer in Physics. 

B.S., University of Budape.st, 1943; Dr. Eng., 194fi. 

Charles A. Taff, Associate Professor of Transportation. 

B.S.S., University of Iowa, 1937; M.A., 1941; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1952. 

Arthur H. Thompson^ Professor of Pomology. 

B.S., University of Minnesota, 1941; Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1945. 

John Toll, Professor and Head of Department of Physics. 

B.S., Yale University, 1944 ; M.A., Princeton University, 1948 ; Ph.D., 1952. 

Richard H. Tredgold, Research Associate in Physics. 
B.Sc, University of Nottingham, 1951 ; Ph.D., 1954. 

Horace M. Trent, Lecturer in Electrical Engineering and Head of Applied Mathe- 
matics Branch of Naval Research Laboratory. 

B.A., Berea College, 1928; M.A., Indiana University, 1929; Ph.D., 1934. 

Eduard Uhlenhuth, Professor and Head of Department of Anatomy, School of 

Medicine. 

Ph.D., University of Vienna, 1909. 

E. G. Vaxden Bosche. Professor of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry. 

A.B., Lcban^jn Valley College, 1922 ; M.S., University of Maryland, 1924 ; Ph.D., 
1927. 

Raymond E. Vanderlinde, Associate Professor of Biological Chemistry, School of 

Medicine. 

A.B., Syracuse University. 1944; M.S., 1045; M.S., 1947; Ph.D., 1950. 

John L. Vanderslice, Lecturer in Electrical Engineering. 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1928; A.M., 1930; Ph.D., Princeton University, 
1934. 



28 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

William Van Royen, Professor and Head of Department of Geography. 
M.A., Rijksuniversiteit te Utrecht, 1925; Ph.D., Clark University, 1928. 

James A. Van Zwoll, Professor of Education. 

A.B., Calvin College, 1933; M.A., University of ISIiehigan, 1937; Ph.D., 1942. 

Fletcher P. Veitch, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1931 ; M.S., 1934 ; Ph.D., 1936. 

William M. Visscher, Research Associate in Physics. 

B.A., University of Minnesota, 1949 ; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1953. 

Walter W. Wada, Lecturer in Physics. 

B.A., University of Utah, 1943; M.A., University of Michigan, 1946; Ph.D., 1951. 

Walter B. Waetjen, Associate Professor of Education. 

B.S., Pennsylvania State Teachers College, Millersville, 1942 ; M.S., University 
of Pennsylvania, 1947 ; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1951. 

T. C. Gordon Wagner, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

B.S., Harvard University, 1937; M.A., University of Maryland, 1940; Ph.D., 1943. 

William P. Walker, Professor of Agricultural Economics. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1921 ; M.S., 1925. 

Roald K. Wangness, Professor of Physics (P. T.). 

B.A., University of Minnesota, 1944 ; Ph.D., Stanford University, 1950. 

James D. Watson, Professor of Finance. 

B.A., Reed College, 1926 ; M.B.A., University of Michigan. 1931; Ph.D., North- 
western University, 1941; C.L.U., American College of Life Underwriters, 1941. 

Joseph Weber, Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

B.S., U.S. Naval Academy, 1940; Ph.D., Catholic University, 1951. 

Kurt Weber, Associate Professor of English. 

A.B., Williams College, 1930; B.A., Oxford University, 1932; M.A.. Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1933 ; Ph.D., 1940. 

Presley A. Wedding, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 
B.S., University of Maryland, 1937; M.S., 1952. 

Hans F. Weinberger, Assistant Research Professor in Institute for Fluid Dynamics 
and Applied Mathematics. 

B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1948; M.S., 194S: Sc.D., 1950. 

Alexander Weinstein, Research Professor in Institute for Fluid Dynamics and 
Applied Mathematics. 

Ph.D., University of Zurich, 1921; D.Sc.Math., University of Paris, 1937. 

S. M. Wedeberg, Professor of Accounting. 

B.B.A., University of Washington, 1925; A.M., Yale University, 1935; C.P.A., 
Maryland, 1934. 

G. W. Wharton, Professor and Head of Department of Zoology. 
B.S., Duke University, 1935 ; Ph.D., 1939. 

Clayton E. Whipple, Consulting Professor in Geography. 

B.S., New York State Agricultural College, 1925; M.S.Ed., 1925. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 29 

Charles E. White, Professor of Chemistry. 

n.S.. University of Alaryland. 1023; M.S.. 1924: Ph.D.. 1026. 

John I. White, .'\ssistant Professor of Physiology, School of Medicine. 
R.A., Univor.slty of Illinois, lOHO: PhD.. Riitpers TTnivprsity. lO.iO. 

Glaiiys a. Wiggin, Professor of Education. 

B.S., University of Minnesot.T, 1020; M.A., 1030: Ph.D.. University of Maryland, 
1047. 

Ji'NK C. WiLBF.R, Assistant Professor of Textiles and Clothing. 

B.S.. University of Washingrton, 1036; Educ, 1937: M.S., Syraruse Univer.sity, 1040. 

Robert C. Wiley. Assistant Professor of Horticulture. 

B.S . Univer.«ity of Maryland, 1949; M.S., 1950: Ph.D., Oregon State College, 1053. 

J. Henry Wills, Lecturer in Physiology, School of Medicine. 

B.S.. Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1034 : M.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1936; 
Ph.D., University of Rochester, 1941. 

Charles L. Wisseman, Jr., Professor and Head of Departinent of Microbiology, 

School of Medicine. 

B.A., Southern Methodist University, 1941; M.S., Kansas State College, 19 43; 
M.D.. Southwestern Medical College, 1046. 

G. Forrest Woods, Professor of Chemistry. 

B.S.. Northwestern University, 1935; M.S., Harvard University, 1937; Ph.D., 
1940. 

Howard W. Wright, Professor of Accounting. 

B.S.C, Temple University, 1937; M.A.. University of Iowa, 1910; Ph.D., 1047; 
C.P.A., Texas, 1040. 

1 r. BoYD Wylie, Dean of the School of Medicine. 
M.D., Baltimore Medical College, 1012. 

David M. Youxg. Jr., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

B.S., Webb Institute, 1044 : M.A., Harvard University, 1947 ; Ph.D.. 1950. 

John E. Younger, Professor and Chairman of Department of Mechanical Engineer- 

in.ST- 

B.S., University of California, 1923 ; M.S., 1924 ; Ph.D., 1925. 

W. Gordon Zeeveld, Associate Professor of English. 

A.B., University of Rochester, 1024; M..\., Johns Hopkins University, 1920; 
Ph.D., 1936. 

Adolph E. Zucker, Professor and Head of Department of Foreign Languages. 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1912; M.A., 1015; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 
1917. 



30 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Ronald Bamford, Ph.D., Dean 
Lucy A. Lynham, B.A., Secretary to the Dean 

HISTORY AND ORGANIZATION 

THE Graduate School was established in its present form in 1918 under 
the jurisdiction of the Graduate Council with the Dean of the Graduate 
School serving as chairman. It was created for the purpose of ad- 
ministering and developing programs of advanced study and research for 
graduate students in all branches of the university. Prior to the present organi- 
zation some advanced degrees were awarded but they were under the jurisdiction 
of the individual departments subject to the supervision of the general faculty. 
Despite the large expansion of the graduate programs into new areas as the 
university has grown, the .spirit and basis of each program is essentially that of 
individual study under competent supervision. The Graduate School is not an ex- 
tension of the undergraduate program but was created rather for the preparation 
of those who in the future will carry on the spirit of individual inquiry. Thus it 
promotes and provides an atmosphere of research and scholarship for both tlie 
stndents and the faculty ; in particular, it stimulates that harmonious relationship 
between the two which results in the advancement of learning. At the present time 
over fifty departments are authorized to ofifer graduate programs leading to one 
or more of the advanced degrees awarded by the university. 

The Graduate Council is made up of representatives of all branches of the 
university where active graduate programs are in progress. The members are 
appointed by the President of the University and are charged with the formulation 
of overall policies. The Graduate Council meets regularly in March, June and 
November to consider all matters relating to graduate work brought to its attention 
by the University Administration, the Graduate Faculty and the Dean of the Graduate 
School. It may also be called for special meetings throughout the year if urgent 
business must be transacted. 

The Graduate Faculty is chosen in accordance with the regulations adopted 
on September 27, 1954. These allow three types of membership: (1) Ex-officio, 
(2) regular, and (3) temporary. The first two groups are listed in the front of this 
catalog. The direction of individual programs and theses is primarily assigned to 
regular members of the Graduate Faculty. 

LOCATION 

The office of the Graduate School is located on the second floor of the Education 
Building on the College Park campus. This campus is located in Prince Georges 
County on a large tract of rolling wooded land less than eight miles from Washington, 
D. C. and approximately thirty-two miles from Baltimore. It is served by excellent 
transportation regardless of whether private car, street car, railroad or bus is used. 

The Baltimore campus of the university is located at the corner of Lombard 
and Greene Streets, and on this campus the various departments in the Schools of 
Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmacy offer their graduate programs. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 31 

LIBRARIES 

I 1r' libraries uf the uiiivfisity are located on liolh tlie College Park and 
I'.altiinore campuses. They consist of tlie (General Library, tlie Library Annex 
ami the many college and departmental libraries which house special collections. 
lUcause of the location of the university the large libraries of Baltimore and 
Washington are a valuable asset to graduate work. Arrangements can be made 
for personal work in the Enoch Pratt Library of Baltimore, the Library of 
Ciiiigress, the United States Department of Agriculture Library and the many 
hne collections of other government agencies in Washington. 

MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 

For information in reference to the LIniversity grounds, buildings, equipment, 
transcripts of records, off-campus housing, meals, athletics and recreation, 
religious denominational clubs, fraternities, sororities, societies and special clubs, 
student publications. University supply store, write to the Director of Publications 
for the General Information Lssue of the Catalog. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

ADMISSION 

An applicant for admission to the Graduate School must hold a Bachelor's or 
a Master's degree from a college or university of recognized standing. The applicant 
shall furnish an official transcript of his collegiate record which for unconditional 
admission must show creditable completion of an adequate amount of undergraduate 
preparation of high quality for graduate work in his chosen field. Application for 
admission to the Graduate School shoould be made prior to dates of registration on 
blanks obtained from the office of the Dean. 

After approval of the application a matriculation card, signed by the Dean, is 
issued to the student. This card permits one to register in the Graduate School. 
It is his certificate of membership in the Graduate School and should be retained 
by the student to present at each succeeding registration. 

Admission to the Graduate School does not necessarily imply admission to 
candidacy for an advanced degree. 

REGISTRATION 

All students pursuing graduate work in the University, even though they are 
not candidates for higher degrees, are required to register in the Graduate School 
at the beginning of each session. In no case will graduate credit be given unless 
the student matriculates and registers in the Graduate School. This applies 
especially to those students who register through the College of Special and Contin- 
uation Studies at locations away from the campus. 

The program of work for each session is arranged by the student with the 
major department and entered upon two course cards, which are signed first by the 
professor in charge of the student's major subject and then by the Dean of the 
Graduate School. One card is retained by the Dean. The student takes the other 



32 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

card, and in case of a new student, also the matriculation card, to the Registrar's 
office, where the registration is completed. Students will not be admitted to graduate 
courses until the Registrar has certified to the instructor that registration has been 
completed. Course cards may be obtained at the Registrar's office or at the Dean's 
office. The heads of departments usually keep a supply of these cards in their 
respective offices. 

A time schedule, supplementing this catalog, is issued shortly before the begin- 
ning of each semester, showing the hours and location of class meetings. This 
schedule is available at the office of the Registrar. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Graduate students must elect for credit in partial fulfillment of the requirements 
for higher degrees only courses designated For Graduates or For Graduates and 
Advanced Graduates. Students who are inadequately prepared for graduate work 
in their chosen fields or who lack prerequisites for minor courses may elect a 
limited number of courses numbered from 1 to 99 in the general catalogue, but 
graduate credit will not be allowed for these courses. Courses that are audited are 
registered for in the same way as other courses, and the fees are the same. 

PROGRAM OF WORK 

The professor who is selected to direct a student's thesis work is the student's 
adviser in the formulation of a graduate program, including suitable minor work, 
which is arranged in cooperation with the instructors. To encourage thoroughness 
in scholarship through intensive application, graduate students in the regular sessions 
are limited to a program of fifteen credit hours per semester. If a student is 
preparing a theses during the minimum residence for the master's degree, the 
registration in graduate courses should not exceed twelve hours for the semester 
since registration in research is required. 

SUMMER SESSION 

The University conducts a six-weeks summer session at College Park, with a 
comprehensive undergraduate and graduate program. The University publishes a 
separate bulletin giving full information on this summer session. This bulletin is 
available upon application to the Director of the Summer Session, University of 
Maryland, College Park. 

GRADUATE WORK IN PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS AT BALTIMORE 

Graduate courses and opportunities for research are offered in the professional 
schools at Baltimore. Students pursuing graduate work in the professional schools 
must register in the Graduate School, and meet the same requirements and proceed 
in the same way, as do graduate students in other departments of the University. 

OAK RIDGE INSTITUTE 

The University is one of the sponsoring institutions of the Oak Ridge Institute 
of Nuclear Studies located at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. One of the features of this 
affiliation is the opportunity, in the appropriate fields, for graduate students to do 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 33 

their research problems and prepare their theses under a cooperative arrange- 
ment. Such opportunity is limited to those who have completed their course work 
on the campus, are working in a field where facilities are available, and generally 
are candidates for the doctoral degree. Successful applicants will receive Oak 
Ridge Graduate Fellowships with varying stipends depending upon their marital 
status and dependents. Detailed information is available in the Graduate School 
oflFice. 

GRADUATE WORK BY SENIORS IN THIS UNIVERSITY 

A senior of this University who has nearly completed the requirements for the 
graduate degree may, with the approval of his undergraduate dean, the Head of 
the department concerned, and the Dean of the Graduate School, register in the 
undergraduate college for graduate courses, which may later be transferred for 
graduate credit toward an advanced degree at this University, but the student must 
be within seven credit hours of completing his undergraduate work and the total 
of undergraduate and graduate courses must not exceed fifteen credits for the 
semester. Excess credits in the senior year cannot later be used for graduate 
credit unless such pre-arrangement is made. Seniors who wish to register for 
graduate credit should apply to the Dean of the Graduate School for information 
about procedure. 

ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY FOR ADVANCED DEGREES 

Application for admission to candidacy for the Master's and for the Doctor's 
degree is made on application blanks which are obtained at the office of the Dean 
of the Graduate School. These are filled out in duplicate by the student and 
submitted to his major department for further action and transmission to the Dean 
of the Graduate School. All applications for admission to candidacy must be ap- 
proved by the Graduate Council. 

Admission to candidacy in no case assures the student of a degree, but merely 
signifies he has met all the formal requirements and is considered by his instructors 
sufficiently prepared and able to pursue such graduate study and research as are 
demanded by the requirements of the degree sought. The candidate must show 
superior scholarship in graduate work already completed. 

Application for admission to candidacy is made at the time stated in the sections 
dealing with the requirements for the degree sought. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREES OF MASTER OF ARTS 
AND MASTER OF SCIENCE 

Advancement to Candidacy. Each prospective candidate for the Master's 
degree is required to make application for admission to candidacy not later 
than the date on the calendar for the semester in which the degree is sought. 
(See Graduate School Supplement to the General Calendar in the front of this 
Catalog.) He must have completed at least twelve semester hours of graduate 
work at the University of Maryland. An average grade of "B" in all major 
and minor subjects is the minimum requirement. 

Minimum Residence. A residence of at least two semesters, or equivalent, 
at this institution, is required. 



34 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Course Requirements. A minimum of twenty-four semester hours, exclu- 
sive of thesis and registration for research, with a minimum average grade of 
"B" in courses approved for graduate credit, is required for the degrees of 
Master of Arts and Master of Science. The student is also required to register 
for six semester hours for research and thesis work. The total number of credit 
hours required for the degree is thirty. If the student is inadequately prepared 
for the required graduate courses, either in the major or minor subjects, ad- 
ditional courses may be required to supplement the undergraduate work. Of 
the twenty-four hours required in graduate courses, not less than twelve hours 
and not more than sixteen semester hours must be earned in the major sub- 
ject. The remaining credits must be outside the major subject and must 
comprise a group of coherent courses intended to supplement and support the 
major work. Not less than one-half of the total required course credits for 
the degree, or a minimum of twelve, must be selected from courses numbered 
200 or above. No credit for the degree of Master of Arts or Master of Science 
may be obtained for correspondence courses or those taken by examination. 
The entire course of study must constitute a unified program approved by the 
student's major adviser and by the Dean of the Graduate School. All require- 
ments for the degree must be completed within an eight-year period. 

Transfer of Credit. Credit not to exceed six semester hours, obtained at 
other recognized institutions, may be transferred and applied to the course 
requirements of the Master's degree, provided that the work was of graduate 
character, and provided that it is approved for inclusion in the student's graduate 
program at the University of Maryland. This transfer of credit is submitted 
to the Graduate Council for approval when the student applies for admission 
to candidacy for the degree. Acceptance of the transferred credits does not 
reduce the minimum residence requirement. The candidate is subject to final 
examination by this institution in all work oflFered for the degree. 

Thesis. In addition to the twenty-four semester hours in graduate courses, 
a satisfactory thesis is required of all candidates for the degrees of Master of 
Arts and Master of Science. (Exceptions may be made in the cases of candi- 
dates for the degree of Master of Arts in American Civilization. See page 673.) 
The thesis must demonstrate the student's ability to do independent work and 
it must be acceptable in literary style and composition. With the approval of 
the student's major professor and the Dean of the Graduate School, the thesis 
in certain cases may be prepared in absentia under direction and supervision of 
a member of the faculty of this institution. 

The original copy of the thesis must be deposited in the office of the 
Graduate School not later than the date specified in the calendar in the front 
of this catalog. The date published is the deadline for the acceptance of theses 
but they may be deposited earlier. The thesis should not be bound by the stu- 
dent, as the University later binds all theses uniformly. An abstract of the 
contents of the thesis, 200 to 500 words in length, must accompany it. A 
manual giving full directions for the physical make-up of the thesis is in the 
hands of each professor who directs thesis work, and should be consulted by 
the student before the typing of the manuscript is begun. Individual copies of 
this manual may be obtained by the student from the Student's Supply Store 
at nominal cost 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 35 

Pinal Examination. The final oral examination is conducted by a committee 
appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. The student's adviser acts as 
the chairman of the committee. The other members of the committee are 
persons under whom the student has taken most of his major and minor courses. 
The chairman and the candidate are notified of the personnel of the examining 
committee at least one week prior to the period set for oral examinations unless 
an emergency arises. The chairman of the committee selects the exact time 
and place for the examination and notifies the other members of the committee 
and the candidate. The examination is normally conducted at the end of 
the semester, but upon recommendation of the student's adviser, an examining 
committee may be appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School at any time 
when all other requirements for the degree have been completed. A report of 
the committee is sent to the Dean as soon as possible after the examination. 
A special form for this purpose is supplied to the chairman of the committee 
and the approval must be unanimous. Such report is the basis upon which 
recommendation is made to the faculty that the candidate be granted the degree 
sought. The period for the oral examination is usually about one hour, but the 
time should be long enough to insure an adequate examination. 

The examining committee also approves the thesis, and it is the candidate's 
obligation to see that each member 8f the committee has ample opportunity to 
examine a copy of the thesis prior to the date of the examination. 

A student will not be admitted to final examination until all other require- 
ments for the degree have been met. In addition to the oral examination a 
comprehensive written examination may be required at the option of the major 
department. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREES IN 
AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 

Studies in the American Civilization program are intended to prepare the 
candidate for teaching and research in American culture. The program is 
particularly designed for the teacher or student whose intellectual interest is 
not limited to a single academic department. For instance, the historian who 
likes literature, the literary critic who wishes to study the social background of 
literature, the political scientist who wishes to know more about the history of 
this country, and the sociologist who wants to study the roots of sociology in 
America, all may find the American Civilization program the proper one for 
them. The four cooperating departments of English, History, Government and 
Politics, and Sociology ofter the basic work in the program, and the student will 
stress the work of one of those departments when he determines his course of 
graduate studies. All students, however, will be expected to understand the 
development of American institutions and to show some proficiency in the 
literary, social, economic, and political history of the United States. 

The study of American Civilization brings in many diflFerent fields, so a 
student has an unusually wide opportunity to plan a program suited to his 
individual needs. To help him do this, a committee representing the depart- 
ments whose American fields he intends to study is set up shortly after he 
registers. The chairman of the committee is from the department of the stu- 
dent's greatest interest and acts as his adviser. The committee also prepares 



36 UNll'F.RSiry OF MARYLAND 

and reads the student's comprehensive examination and reads the thesis if one 
is submitted. 

The candidate for a degree must pass a f^nal written examination testing 
his understanding of American Civilization in terms of his individual program 
of studies. 

Master of Arts. With the approval of his advisers and committee, a candi- 
date for the Master of Arts degree with a major in American Civilization may 
elect in lieu of the thesis six additional hours of course work, to include at 
least two substantial seminar papers. The total number of credit hours required 
for the degree would then be thirty semester hours. 

Each candidate must present credits for at least fifteen semester hours of 
work in two of the four cooperating departments, and credits for at least fifteen 
semester hours in supporting courses (nine hours if a thesis is elected). Sup- 
porting courses will normally be in such fields as European or Latin-American 
history, English literature, comparative literature, philosophy, art, education, 
sociology, economics, and government and politics. 

Each candidate must demonstrate in a written examination that he posesses 
a reading knowledge of one foreign language. 

All other requirements are the same a§ for the degrees of Master of Arts 
and Master of Science in other fields. 

Doctor of Philosophy, The American Civilization program cuts across 
several fields; therefore, a faculty committee representing the departments in 
which the student plans to study will be appointed shortly after the student 
registers. The chairman of the committee is from the department of the stu- 
dent's major interest and acts as his adviser. The committee is responsible for 
helping the student to integrate his program. Working through the student's 
adviser, the committee aids in planning the student's over-all program, prepares 
and grades any comprehensive examinations, and reads the dissertation. 

The general requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Ameri- 
can Civilization are the same as those for the doctoral degree in other fields. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF EDUCATION 

The Master of Education degree is designed to increase competency in 
applied areas within the general field of education. Thirty semester hours of 
course work are required. Of the thirty hours, one-half must be in courses 
numbered 200 and above, and one-half must be in Education. Subject to the 
foregoing limitations, courses in departments other than Education may be 
selected by the student and his adviser. 

At least four of the thirty semester hours must be in seminar work or 
other 200 courses in connection with which two seminar papers will be prepared 
in prescribed form. Only those seminar papers which have the written 
approval of the instructor in charge of the course and the student's adviser 
are considered as meeting degree requirements. Seminar papers are filed in the 
College of Education office. One of these papers shall deal with a topic in 
the student's major field of concentration. The other paper may be written 
in a 200 course outside of the field of Education. 

The requirements in regard to advancement to candidacy, transfer of credits, 



CRADUAl n SCHOOL 37 

and final ora! cxatniiiatiun aio llu' same as lor llic dcgri'cs (if Master of Arts 
and Master of Science. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF BUSINESS 

ADMINISTRATION 

The Master of Business Administration program is designed primarily to 
train students for positions of responsil)ilit3' in business and government. The 
aim is to develop technical competence plus a thorough knowledge and appre- 
ciation of the art of management. The study of administrative policies and 
practices encourages interest and realistic thinking in management problems and 
responsibilities. 

The program leading to the degree of Master of Business Administration 
includes advanced study of business organization and administration in the fields 
of accounting and statistics, finance, general business, industrial management, 
insurance and real estate, marketing, personnel relations, public utilities and 
transportation. 

Admission. Admission to the Master of Business Administration program 
is limited to those students whose undergraduate records from accredited institu- 
tions demonstrate special abilities and promise of further development. Under- 
graduate records, participation in student activities, and business experience are 
carefully evaluated. Personal interviews are desirable. 

Those students whose major undergraduate work has been in arts, agri- 
culture, science, education, or engineering subjects are required to complete 
certain basic core course requirements in business and economics before under- 
taking specialized graduate work for the degree of Master of Business Adminis- 
tration. The core course requirements are listed below. Responsible experience 
of exceptional value and importance may be substituted for specific courses. 

Principles of Economics 6 hours Marketing Management 3 hours 

I'rinciples of Accounting. .G or 8 hours Personnel Management 3 hours 

Statistics 3 hours Money and Banking 3 hours 

Business Law 3 or 4 hours 

Curriculum Requirements. Requirements for the Master of Business Ad- 
ministration degree include the completion of at least thirty hours of graduate 
credit in a program approved by the faculty adviser. The thirty-hour program 
includes 24 credit hours of course work and 6 credit hours for the thesis. At 
least 12 hours and not more than 16 hours of course work will be taken in the 
student's major field of concentration. Courses outside the major field should 
be related to the student's interest, and it is strongly urged that at least two 
credit courses in economic theory or analysis be included. 

Twelve hours of the required twenty-four credit hours must be made up 
of courses numbered in the catalog as 200 courses, which are courses limited to 
graduate students. 

All requirements for the degree must be completed within an eight-year 
period. 



38 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Thesis. A thesis representing research in the major field of concentration 
and submitted in partial satisfaction of the requirements for the Master of 
Business Administration must be approved by the student's adviser and pre- 
sented in its final form to the Dean of the Graduate School not later than the 
date specified in the calendar in the front of this catalog. The date published 
is the deadline for the acceptance of theses but they may be deposited earlier. 
Final approval of the thesis is given bj' the examination committee appointed by 
the Dean of the Graduate School. Detailed directions for the formal prepara- 
tion of the thesis may be obtained from the Student's Supply Store. 

Admission to Candidacy for the Master of Business Administration Degree. 
At the beginning of the semester in which the student plans to obtain the 
Master of Business Administration degree, he must make formal application to 
the Graduate Council for admission to candidacy for the degree. Such applica- 
tion must be endorsed by the student's faculty adviser, and by the head of the 
department in which he is studying. 

The final requirement of the blaster's program is the final examination, 
either written or oral as requested by the faculty adviser and the head of the 
department. The examination will cover three phases of the graduate work — 
the major field of specialization, the minor fields and defense of the thesis. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF EDUCATION 

The Doctor of Education degree is offered for students who hold or expect 
to hold teaching or administrative positions in education and who desire to 
develop exceptional competence in special areas. The ability to explore and 
solve practical educational proble»xis is emphasized. The requirements are the 
same as for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy except as specified below. 

Foreign Languages. When the program of studj' and research does not 
involve the use of foreign languages the requirement mav be waived by the 
Department of Education. 

Major and Minor Subjects. The candidate must select one major area and 
one minor area in which he expects to develop exceptional competence. The 
minor may be a single area or may consist of a group of related areas selected 
to broaden the candidate's understanding of education. In addition to the major 
and minor, other areas if desired may be included in the program also. The 
amount of course work required in the major, minor, and related areas will vary 
according to the needs of each individual candidate. 

Project. Instead of completing a thesis as required for a candidate for the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy, a candidate for this degree must demonstrate 
exceptional competence to work through field problems by completing a project 
in the major area. A Committee on Doctoral Research is appointed for each 
candidate. The committee is composed of three members, at least two of whom 
are from the faculty of the College of Education. The committee passes upon 
the student's plans for research. The specialist in the student's major area 
serves as sponsor and provides detailed guidance for the project. 

The regulations governing submission and form of copies of the project are 
the same as for the Doctor of Philosophy thesis. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 39 

Written Examinations. \Vritlcii examinations for tlic Doctor of Educatian 
degree parallel those for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in education. 

Final Oral Examination: The final examination covers the project and its 
relationship to the general field in which it lies and the candidate's attainments 
in related areas. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF 
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Advancement to Candidacy. Candidates for the Doctor's degree must be 
admitted to candidacy at least one academic year before the final examination. 
Applications for admission to candidacy for the Doctor's degree are made in 
duplicate by the student and submitted to his major department for further action 
and transmission to the Dean of the Graduate School. Blanks may be obtained 
at the ofTice of the Graduate School. 

The applicant must have demonstrated to the head of the Foreign Language 
Department that he possesses a reading knowledge of French and German. 
With the approval of the major department and the Graduate Council, in special 
cases another Foreign language may be substituted for either French or German. 
Preliminary examinations or such other substantial tests as the departments may 
elect are also required for admission to candidacy. 

The student must complete all of his program far the degree, including 
the thesis and final examination, during a four year period after admission 
to candidacy. Failure to do so requires another application for admission to 
candidacy with the usual preliminary examination unless the Graduate Ccnincil 
rules otherwise. 

Residence. The equivalent of three years of full-time graduate study and 
research is the minimum required. Of the three years the equivalent of at least 
one year must be spent in residence at the L^niversity. On a part-time basis 
the time needed will be correspondingly increased. All work at other institutions 
offered in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree is submitted to the Graduate Council for approval, upon recommendation 
of the department concerned, when the student applies for admission to candidacy 
for the degree. 

The Doctor's degree is not given merely as a certificate of residence and 
work, but is granted only upon sufficient evidence of high attainments in scholar- 
ship, and ability to carry on independent research in the special field in which 
the major work is done. 

Major and Minor Subjects. The candidate must select a major and one 
or two closely related minor subjects. At least twenty-four semester hours, 
exclusive of research, are required in minor work. Of the twenty-four semester 
hours at least eight hours of 200 courses must be in the minor field or fields 
unless special permission is granted beforehand. If two areas are chosen for 
the minor requirement, at least nine semester hours must be in one area. 
The remainder of the required residence is devoted to intensive study and re- 
search in the major field. The amount of required course work in the major 
subject will vary with the department and the individual candidate. The candi- 
date must register for a minimum of twelve semester hours of research. 



40 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Thesis. The ability to do independent research must be shown by a dis- 
sertation on some topic connected with the major subject. An original type- 
written copy and two clear, plain carbon copies of the thesis, together with an 
abstract of the contents, 250 to 500 words in length, must be deposited in the 
office of the Dean not later than the date specified in the calendar in the front 
of this catalog. The date published is the deadline for the acceptance of theses 
but they may be deposited earlier. It is the responsibility of the student also 
to provide copies of the thesis for the use of the members of the examining 
committee prior to the date of the final examination. 

The original copy should not be bound by the student, as the University later 
binds uniformly all theses for the general University library. The carbon copies 
are bound by the student in cardboard covers which may be obtained at the Students' 
Supply Store. Tlie abstracts are publislied by University Microfilms. 

A manual giving full directions for the physical make-up of the thesis is in 
the hands of each professor who directs thesis work, and should be consulted 
by the student before typing of the thesis is begun. Students may obtain 
copies of this manual at the Students' Supply Store. 

Final Examination. The final oral examination is held before a committee 
appointed by the Dean. One member of this committee is a representative 
of the graduate faculty who is not directly concerned with the student's graduate 
work. One or more members of the committee may be persons from other 
institutions who are distinguished scholars in the student's major field. 

The duration of the examination is approximately three hours, and covers 
the research work of the candidate as embodied in his thesis, and his attain- 
ments in the fields of his major and minor subjects. The other detailed pro- 
cedures are the same as those stated for the Master's examination. 

RULES GOVERNING LANGUAGE EXAMINATIONS FOR 
CANDIDATES FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

1. A candidate for the Doctor's degree must show in a written examination 
that he possesses a reading knowledge of French and German. With the ap- 
proval of the major department and the Graduate Council, in special cases 
another foreign language may be substituted for either French or German. The 
passages to be translated will be taken from books and articles in his specialized 
field. Some 300 pages of text from which the applicant wishes to have his 
examination chosen should be submitted to the head of the Department of 
Foreign Languages at least two weeks before the examination. The examina- 
tion aims to test ability to use the foreign language for research purposes. It 
is presumed that the candidate will know sufficient grammar to distinguish 
inflectional forms and that he will be able to translate readily in two hours 
about 500 words of text, with the aid of a dictionary. 

2. After the book has been approved it must be deposited in the office of 
the Department of Foreign Languages at least three days in advance of the test. 

3. Examinations are held at the office of the Department of F'oreign 
Languages, on the first Tuesday of October, February and June, at 2 P. M. 

4. There is no limitation on the number of times the examination may be 
taken but a $5.00 fee will be charged for the second and subsequent examinations. 



CRADUATR SCHOOf. 41 



GRADUATE FEES 



The fees paid by graduate students are as follows: 

Matriculation fee of $10.00. This is paid once only, upon first registration 
in tlie Graduate School. 

Diploma fee for Master's degree, $10.00. 

Graduation fee for Doctor's degree inchidiii)^ a liood, microfilming and 
I>in<ling of thesis, §50.00. 

College Park: 

A fixed charge, each semester, of $10.00 per semester credit hour for stu- 
dents carrying ten hours or less; for students carrying more than ten hours, 
$100.00 for the semester. 

Laboratory fees, where charged, range from $1.00 to $20.00 per course per 
semester. 

There is a S3. 00 fine for violation of the University parking regulations. 
All graduate students are expected to abide by these regulations, regardless of 
full-time OT part-time attendance. The failure to register for a parking permit 
entails a S5.00 fee. 

Baltimore: 

The fees for graduate work at the professional schools in Baltimore are 
determined by the individual school concerned. Students should consult the 
catalog of the respective school in which they intend to pursue their work. 

Living Expenses and Self-Help: 

The University in no way assumes responsibility for the housing or medical 
care of graduate students. 

Board and lodging are available in many private homes in College Park and 
vicinity. The cost of board and room varies from about $60.00 to $75.00 a 
month, depending upon the desires of the individual. A list of accommodations 
is maintained by the housing bureau in the office of the Dean of Men. 

Application for student employment, aside from fellowships and assistant- 
ships, may be made through the offices of the Dean of Men and the Dean of 
Women, or to department heads. 

FELLOWSHIPS AND ASSISTANTSHIPS 

Fellowships. A number of fellowships have been established by the Uni- 
versity. The stipend for the University fellows is $675 for nine months and 
the remission of all graduate fees except the diploma fee. Several industrial and 
special fellowships, with varying stipends, are also available in certain depart- 
ments. 

University Fellows are permitted to carry a full graduate program, and they 
may satisfy the residence requirement for higher degrees in the normal time. 

Applications for fellowships are made on blanks which may be obtained 
from the office of the Graduate School. The application, with the necessary 
credentials, is sent by the applicant directly to the Dean of the Graduate School. 



42 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Applications which are approved by the Dean are forwarded to the departments, 
where final selection of the fellows is made. The awards of University fellow- 
ships are on a competitive basis. 

Graduate Assistantships. A number of teaching and research assistantships 

arc availaljle in several departments. The compensation is §135.00 per month 
unless otherwise specified and varies with the nature and amount of service 
required and with the terms of appointment The amount of credit allowed 
toward a degree is normally ten credit hours. The research assistants, 
especially those in the Experiment Station, usually participate in research that 
meets the requirements for a Master's or a Doctor's degree. 

Applications for graduate assistantships are made directly to the departments 
concerned and appointments are made through the regular channels for staff 
appointments. Further information regarding these assistantships may be 
obtained from the department or college concerned. 

COMMENCEMENT 

Attendance is required at the June commencement if the degree is conferred 
at that time. 

Application for diploma must be filed in the office of the Registrar eight 
weeks before the date at which the candidate expects to obtain a degree except 
during the summer season. 

Academic costume is required of all candidates at the June commencement. 
Those who so desire may purchase or rent caps and gowns at the Students* 
Supply Store. Orders must be filed eight weeks before the date of convocation 
but may be cancelled later if the student finds himself unable to complete his 
work for the degree. 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

For the convenience of students in making out schedules of studies, the 
subjects in the following Description of Courses are arranged alphabetically: 

Aeronautical Engineering 44 

Agricultural Economics and Marketing 46 

Agricultural Education and Rural Life 48 

Agronomy 49 

American Civilization 51 

Anatomy 136, 138 

Animal Husbandry 52 

Bacteriology 52, 136, 145 

Biochemistry 136, 146 

Biological Chemistry 140 

Botany 54, 146 

Business Administration 57 

Chemical Engineering 61 

Chemistry 65 

Civil Engineering 68 

Comparative Literature 70 

Dairy 71 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 43 

Dentistry 136 

Economics 72 

Education 74 

Electrical Engineering 84 

English Language and Literature 86 

Entomology 88 

Foreign Languages and Literature 90 

Geography 93 

Government and Politics 96 

Histology and EmbryologA' 136 

History 99 

Home Economics 102 

Horticulture 107 

Legal Medicine 141 

Mathematics 109, 146 

Mechanical Engineering 113 

Metallurgical Option 64 

Microbiology 142 

Oral Pathology 137 

Oral Surgery 137 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry 146 

Pharmacognosy 146 

Pharmacolcgy- 142, 147 

Pharmacy 148 

Philosophy 115 

Physical Educaticm, Health, Recreation 116 

Physics and Physical Chemistry 120, 148 

Physiology 1 37, 143 

Poultry Husbandry- 124 

Psychiatric Xursing 145 

Psychology- 125 

Sociology 128 

Speech and Dramatic Art 130 

Veterinary Science 132 

Zoology- 133 



METHOD OF NUMBERING COURSES AND COUNTING 
CREDIT HOURS 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates are numbered 100 to 199; 
courses for Graduates only are numbered 200 and upward. 

A course with a single number extends through one semester. 

A course with a double number extends through two semesters. 

The number of semester hour credits is shown by the arable numerals in 
parentheses after the title of the course. Examples: 



Course 101. Title (3). First semester. 



44 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

If a laboratory course: 

Course 101. Title (3). One lecture and t\vo laboratory periods a week, first 
semester. 

(This is a semester course: offered once a year.) 

Course 101. Title (3). First and second semesters. 

(This is a semester course, repeated each semester, and except for research, 
seminar, and certain problem courses, must be taken only one semester.) 

Course 103, 104. Title (3, 3). Three hours a week, first and second semesters. 

If a laboratory course: 

Course 103, 104. Title (3, 3). One lecture and two laboratory periods a week, 

first and second semesters. 

(This is a course extending through two semesters and carrying three 

semester credits each semester.) 

Course 103, 104. Title (3, 3). Three hours a week, second and first semesters. 
(This is a course extending through two semesters, but it begins with the 
the second semester.) 

Course 105, f, s. Title (3, 3). Three hours a week, first and second semesters. 
(This is alternate way of listing a two-semester course.) 

AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Sherwood; Associate Professors Corning, Shen. Rivello; Lecturer, 
Pai. 

The Department of Aeronautical Engineering offers courses and oppor- 
tunities for research leading to the degree of Master of Science in Aeronautical 
Engineering. 

Admission to the Graduate School for study in this department is based 
primarilj'- on the student having a Bachelor of Science degree in Aeronautical 
Engineering in addition to the requirements for admission under General Regu- 
lations. However, a student without the Bachelor of Science degree in Aero- 
nautical Engineering may be accepted for graduate stndj' if he has a Bachelor 
of Science degree in an allied field of science and shows evidence of sufficient 
preparation for graduate work in his chosen field of Aeronautical Engineering. 

Students may elect off-campns graduate courses given by the University 
of ^faryland but must take a minimum of six semester hours of graduate in- 
struction, exclusive of research, from resident faculty members of this depart- 
ment and pass with a grade of "B" or higher. An acceptable thesis written 
under the guidance of the graduate faculty is also required. 

Facilities for graduate research include a complete subsonic laboratory 
consisting of a 7.75 x 11 ft. wind tunnel and related shops, offices and photo- 
graphic equipment. For high speed research, a 6" x 6" supersonic wind tunnel 
is available with Schlieren optical S3''Stem, instantaneous strain-gauge type pres- 
sure pick-ups, remote angle of attack control and other accessories. A 100 h. p. 
rotary vacuum pump provides adequate pumping capacity for 10 second runs 
at 2 minute intervals. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 45 

The general aerodynamics laboratory is equipped with the following major 
items : a two foot subsonic wind tunnel, a ballistics range for measuring super- 
sonic drag of projectile-shaped bodies, a water table for simulating compressible 
flow by hydraulic analogy, a large electrolytic tank for the solution of potential 
flow problems, manometer boards, and high speed flash photographic equipment. 

The structures laboratory has a 400,000 pound capacity universal testing 
machine, hydraulic tension-compression jacks and pumps, and lead shot bags 
for applying structural loading. Traction dynamometers and SR-4 tension- 
compression load cells are available to measure loads. The laboratory has SR-4 
strain indication equipment, extensometers, compressometers, Huggenberger ex- 
tensometers, and a recording oscillograph for measuring strain. Dial gages and 
a transit are available for measuring deflections. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Aero. E. 101. Aerodsmamics I (3). Three lectures a week, second semester. 

Sherwood. 

Aero. E. 102. Aerodynamics II (2). Two lectures a week, first semester. 

Continuation of Aero E. 101. Sherwood. 

Aero. E. 105. Airplane Fabrication Shop (1). One laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite, Shop 2. Guess. 

Aero. E. 106. Airplane Fabrication (1). One lecture a week. Prerequisite, 
Aero. E. 105. Guess. 

Aero. E. 107, 108. Airplane Design (4, 4). Two lectures and two supervised 
calculation periods per week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, 
Aero. E. 101, Aero. E. 104, and M. E. 52. Aero. E. 102 and Aero. E. 113 
to be taken concurrently. Corning. 

Aero. E. 109, 110. Aircraft Power Plants (3, 3). Three lectures and one 

laboratory period a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, M. E. 

100. Guess. 

Aero. E. Ill, 112. Aerona«tical Laboratory (2, 2). One lecture and one lab- 
oratory period a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, Aero. E. 

101. To be taken concurrently with Aero. E. 102 and Aero. E. 113. Staff. 

Aero. E. 113, 114. Mechanics of Aircraft Structures (3, 4). First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, M. E. 52 and Math. 64. Rivello. 

Aero. E. 115. Aerodynamics III (3). Second semester. Elementary theory of 
the flow of a compressible gas at subsonic and supersonic speeds. Prere- 
quisite, Aero. E. 102. Sherwood. 

Aero. E. 117. Aircraft Vibrations (2). Second semester. Prerequisite, Aero. 
E. 113, Math. 64. Guess. 

For Graduates 

Aero. E. 200, 201. Advanced Aerodynamics (3, 3). Three lectures a week, first 
and second semesters. Prerequisites, Aero. E. 101, 102, 115, Math. 64. 

Pai. 



46 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Aero. E. 202, 203. Advanced Aircraft Structures (3, 3). First and second 
semesters. Prerequisites, Aero. E. 113, 114. Rivello. 

Aero. E. 204. Aircraft Dynamics (3). First semester. Prerequisites, Math. 64 
and Aero. E. 114. Shen. 

Aero. E. 205. Aircraft Dynamics (3). Second semester. Prerequisites, Math. 
64, Aero. E. 114 and Aero. E. 101. Shen. 

Aero. E. 206, 207. Advanced Aircraft Power Plants (3, 3). Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, 
M. E. 100; Aero. E. 109, 110. 

Aero. E. 208. Advanced Aircraft Design (3). Three lectures a week, first 
semester. Prerequisites, Aero. E. 107, 108; Math. 64. Corning. 

Aero. E. 209. Stability and Control (3). Three lectures a week, second semes- 
ter. Prerequisites, Aero. E. 101, 102, 115. Corning. 

Aero. E. 210. Aerodynamic Theory (3). First semester. Prerequisites, Aero. 
E. 101, 102, Math. 64. Shen. 

Aero. E. 211. The Design and Use of Wind Tunnels (Supersonic) (3). First 
and second semesters. Kurzweg. 

Aero. E. 212, 213. Bodies at Supersonic Speeds (3, 3). First and second 
semesters. Prerequisites, degree in Aero. E. or M. E. or equivalent, and 
consent of instructor. Kurzweg. 

Aero. E. 214. Seminar. (Credit in accordance with work outlined by Aero. 
Engr. staff.) First and second semesters. Prerequisite, graduate standing. 

Aero. E. 215. Research. (Credit in accordance with work outlined by Aero 
Engr. staff.) First and second semesters. Prerequisite, graduate standing. 

Aero. E. 216. Selected AerobalHstics Problems (3). First semester. Prere- 
quisite, degree in Aero. E. or M. E. or equivalent and consent of instructor. 

Kurzweg. 

Aero. E. 217. Aerodynamics of Viscous Fluids (3). Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Aero. E. 101, 115, Math. 64. Shen. 

Aero. E. 218. Selected Topics in Aerodynamic Theory (3). First or second 
semesters. Topics of current interest and recent advances in the field of 
aerodynamics. Prerequisites, Aero. E. 210, 115. Shen. 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND MARKETING 

Professors Nystrom, DeVault, (emeritus) Beal, Walker, Poffenberger; As- 
sociate Professors Hamilton, Shull; Assistant Professors Bohanan, Smith, Burns. 

The Department offers a course of study leading to the degrees of Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Although the major field is Agricultural 
Economics, thesis topics may be selected and courses concentrated in Farm 
Management, Farm Taxation, Farm Finance, Alarketing and Land Economics. 

Departmental requirements, supplementary to the Graduate School, have 
been formulated for the guidance of candidates for graduate degrees. Copies of 
these requirements may be obtained from the Department of Agricultural 
Economics and Marketing. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 47 

1-OR GKADUATtS AND AUVANCEU UNDERGRADUATES 

A. E. 101. Marketing of Farm Products (3). Second semester. Prerequisites, 
Econ. 31, 32, or Econ. 37. Shull. 

A. E. 103. Cooperation in Agriculture (3). First semester. Poffenberger. 

A. E. 104. Farm Finance (3). Second semester. Poffenberger. 

A. E. 105. Food Products Inspection (2). One lecture and one laboratory 
period a week, second semester. Staff. 

A. E. 106. Prices of Farm Products (3). Second semester. Poffenberger. 

A. E. 107. Analysis of the Farm Business (3). First semester. Hamilton. 

A. E. 108. Farm Management (3), Second semester. Hamilton. 

A. E. 109. Research Problems (1-2). First and second semesters. Staff. 

A. E. 110. Seminar (1, 1). First and second semesters. Hamilton. 

A. E. 111. Land Economics (3). First semester. Bohanan. 

A. E. 112. Economic Development of American Agfriculture (3). First semester. 

Beal. 

A. E. 114. Foreign Trade in Farm Products (3). Second semester. Shull. 

A. E. 115. Marketing of Dairy Products (3). First semester. Beal. 

A. E. 116. Marketing of Fruits and Vegetables (3). Second semester. Burns. 

A. E. 117. Economics of Marketing Eggs and Poultry (3). Second semester. 

Smith. 

Technology of Market Eggs and Poultry. See Poultry Husbandry, P. H. 104. 

Poultry Industrial and Economic Problems. See Poultry Husbandry, P. H. 
107. 

Market Milk. See Dairy, Dairy 109. 

Livestock Markets and Marketing. See Animal Husbandry, A. H. 150. 

Meat and Meat Products. See Animal Husbandry, A. H. 160. 

Advertising. See Business Administration, B. A. 151. 

Retail Store Management See Business Administration, B. A. 154. 

For Graduates 

A, E. 200, 201. Special Problems in Farm Economics (2, 2). First and second 
semesters. StaflF. 

A. E. 202. Seminar (1, 1). First and second semesters. StaflF, 

A. E. 203. Research. Credit according to work accomplished. Staff. 

A. E. 208. Agricultural Policy (3). Second semester. Beal. 



48 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

A. E. 210. Agricultural Taxation (3). First semester. Walker. 

A. E. 211. Functional Aspects of Farm Taxation (3). Second semester. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period a week. Walker. 

A. E. 214. Advanced Agricultural Marketing (3). First semester. StaflF. 

A. B. 215. Advanced Agricultural Cooperation (3). First semester. 

Poflfenberger. 
A. E. 216. Advanced Farm Management (3). Second semester. ( ). 

A. E. 218. Agricultural Economics Research Techniques (3). l^irst semester. 

Bohanan. 
A. E. 219. Advanced Land Economics (3). Second semester. Bohanan. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND RURAL LIFE 
Professors Ahalt, Cotterman; Associate Professor Murray. 

This department offers work leading to the degree of Master of Science. 
Students may work full-time towards a degree or they may complete the re- 
quirements on a part-time basis, taking the special three-week courses offered for 
agriculture teachers in summer, regular six-week summer school courses, and 
courses offered in the evenings and on Saturday during the school year. 

Some students profitably elect special problems courses, mostly in agricul- 
ture, in which they work on problems in their local school and community. All 
students are required to enroll in a minimum of four of the three-week summer 
sessions for agriculture teachers, or their equivalent, in course work on the 
campus at College Park. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

R. Ed. 107. Observation and Analysis of Teaching in Agriculture (3). Second 
semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Murray. 

R. Ed. 109. Teaching Secondary Vocational Agriculture (3). First semester. 

Ahalt, Murray. 
R. Ed. 111. Teaching Young and Adult Farmer Groups (1). First semester. 

Murray. 

R. Ed. 112. Departmental Management (1). Second semester. One laboratory 

period a week. Prerequisites, R. Ed. 107, 109. Ahalt, Murray 

R. Ed. 114. Rural Life and Education (3). Second semester. Ahalt. 

R. Ed. 150. Extension Education (2). Second semester. ( .) 

R. Ed. 160. Agricultural Information Methods (2). I'irst semester. ( ). 

For Graduates 

R. Ed. 201, 202. Rural Life and Education (3, 3). First and second semesters, 
alternate years. Prerequisite, R. Ed. 114, or equivalent. Ahalt. 

R. Ed. 207, 208. Problems in Vocational Agriculture (2, 2). First and second 
semesters, alternate years. Ahalt, Murray. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 49 

R. Ed. S207 A-B. Problems in Teaching Vocational Agriculture (1-1). Summer 
session only. 

R. Ed. S208 A-B. Problems in Teaching Farm Mechanics (1, 1). Summer 
session only. 

R. Ed. S209 A-B. Adult Education in Agriculture (1-1). Summer session only. 
R. Ed. S210 A-B. Land Grant College Education (1-1). Summer session only. 

R. Ed. S211 A-B. Agricultural Extension Service Education (1-1). Summer 

session only. 
R. Ed, S212 A-B. Educational Functions of Rural Institutions (1-1). Summer 

session only. 

R. Ed. S213 A-B. Supervision and Administration of Vocational Agriculture 
(1-1). Summer session only. 

R. Ed. 215. Supervision of Student Teaching (1). Arranged. Ahalt. 

R. Ed. 220. Field Problems in Rural Education (1-3). Second semester. 
Summer session. Prerequisite, six semester hours of graduate study. 

Ahalt, Murray. 
R. Ed. 240. Agricultural College Instruction (1). Second semester. 

Cotternian, Ahalt. 
R. Ed. 250. Seminar in Rural Education (1-1). First and second semesters. 

StaflF. 
R. Ed. S250 A-B. Seminar in Rural Education (1-1). Summer session only. 

R. Ed. 251. Research. Credit according to work dane. First and second se- 
mesters and summer session. Staff. 

AGRONOMY— CROPS AND SOILS 

Professors Kuhn and Street; Associate Professors Axlej', Bourbeau, Ronningen; 
Assistant Professors Bentz, Decker, Santelmann, Strickling. 

The Department of Agronomy offers a graduate course of study leading 
to the degree of Master of Science and to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 
The student may pursue major work in the Crops Division or in the Soils 
Division of the Department. A thesis based on original research is required 
for each degree. Ample laboratory and greenhouse facilities for graduate work 
are available on the campus. The Plant Research Farm and the Tobacco 
Experimental Farm offer adequate nearby field research facilities. Many projects 
of the Department are conducted in cooperation with the Bureau of Plant 
Industry and Soils of the United States Department of Agriculture with head- 
quarters located three miles from the campus. 

A. Crops 

For Gradu.ates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Agron. 103. Crop Breeding (2). First semester. Prerequisite, Zool. 104. 

Ronningen. 



so UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Agron. 105. Tobacco Production (2). Two lectures a week, first semester. 
Prerequisite, Agron. 1. Street. 

Agron. 106. Tobacco Production (2). Two lectures a week, second semester. 
Prerequisite, Agron. 105. Street. 

Agron. 107. Cereal Crop Production (3). First semester. Two lectures and one 
laboratorj' period a week. Santelmann. 

Agron. 108. Forage Crop Production (3). Second semester. Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week. Decker. 

Agron. 151. Cropping Systems (2). Second semester. Kuhn. 

Agron. 152. Seed Production and Distribution (2). One lecture and one 
laboratory (2 hr.) period a week, second semester. Prerequisite, Agron. 1. 

Santelmann. 

Agron. 154. Weed Control in Field Crops (2). First semester. Two lectures a 
week. Prerequisite, Agron. 1. 

For Graduates 

Agron. 201. Crop Breeding (2). Second semester. Prerequisite, consent of 
instructor. Ronningen. 

Agron. 203. Crop Seminar (1, 1). First and second semesters. Staff. 

Agron. 204. Technic in Field Crop Research (2). First semester. Kuhn. 

Agron. 205. Biogenesis of Tobacco (2). Two lectures a week, second semester. 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. ("Offered in odd j^ears.) Street. 

Agron. 206, 207. Recent Advances in Crop Production (2, 2). Two lectures a 
week, first semester. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Agron. 207 not 
offered 1955-56.) Decker. Kuhn, Street, Ronningen. 

Agron. 208. Research Methods (2-4), Second semester. Prerequisite, consent 
of staff. StaflF. 

Agron. 209. Research in Crops (1-8). First and second semesters. Staff. 

Agron. S210. Cropping Systems (1). Summer only. Kuhn. 

Agron. 211. Biosynthesis of Tobacco (2). Second semester. Two lectures a 
week. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Offered in even years. 

Street. 

B. Soils 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Agron. SI 10. Soil Management (1). Summer only. Strickling. 

Agron. 111. Soil Fertility Principles (3). Three lectures a week, first semester. 
Prerequisite, Agron. 10. Strickling. 

Agron. 112. Commercial Fertilizers (3). Three lectures a week, second 
semester. Prerequisite, Ag^ron. 10. Axley. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 51 

Agron. 113. Soil Conservation (3). Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory 
a week, first semester. Prerequisite, Agron. 10 or permission of the 
instructor. Bentz. 

Agron. 114. Soil Classification and Geography (4). Three lectures and one 
tliree-hour laboratory period a week, second semester. Prerequisite, Agron. 
10 and permission from instructor. Bourljeau. 

Agron. 116. Soil Analysis for Plant Nutrients (3). One hour lecture, one two- 
hour laboratory, and one three-hour laljoratory a week, first semester. Pre- 
requisite, Agron. 10 or permission of instructor (Not offered 1955-56.) 

Axley. 

Ag^on. 117. Soil Physics (3). Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory a 
week, second semester. Prerequisite, Agron. 10 and a course in Physics, 

or permission of instructor. (Not offered 1955-56.) 

Agron. 118. Special Problem in Soils (1). .Summer only. Prerequisite, Agron. 
10 and permission of instructor. Staff. 

Agron. 119. Soil Mineralogy (4). First semester (every other year). Two 
lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite per- 
mission of instructor. Bourbeau. 

For Graduates 

Agron. 250. Advanced Soil Mineralogy (3). Three one-hour lectures a week, 
first semester every other year. Prerequisite, Agron. 10, Agronomy 119 and 
permission of instructor. (Not offered 1955-56.) Bourbeau. 

Agron. 251. Advanced Methods of Soil Investigation (3). Three one-hour 
lectures a week, first semester. Prerequisite, Agron. 10 and permission of 
instructor. Axley. 

Agron. 252. Advanced Soil Physics (3). Two lectures and one three-hour 
laboratory a week, second semester. Prerequisite, Agron. 10 and permission 

of instructor. (Not offered 1955-56.) 

Agron. 253. Advanced Soil Analysis for Plant Nutrients (3). One hour lecture 
one two-hour laboratory and one three-hour laboratory periods a week, 
first semester. Prerequisite, Agron. 10 and permission of instructor. Not 
offered 1955-56.) Axley. 

Agron. 255. Soil Seminar (1, 1). First and second semesters. Prerequisite, 
Agron. 10 and permission of instructor. Staflf. 

Agron. 256. Soil Research (1-12). First and second semesters. Staff. 

AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 

Professor Bode and cooperating specialists. 

The American Civilization program offers work leading to both the degrees 
of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. The departments of English, 
History, Government and Politics, and Sociology join to offer integrated plans 
of study. In his class work the student will emphasize the offerings of any one 



52 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

of these departments. For lists of courses from which his particular program 
is to be developed, he is to see principally the listings of the four departments 
just mentioned. His adviser will be the chairman of the department whose work 
the student plans to emphasize, or if not the chairman then someone appointed 
by him. 

Amer. Civ. 137, 138. Conference Course in American Civilization (3, 3). First 
and second semesters. Four American classics, drawn from the fields of 
the cooperating departments, are studied in detail each semester. Specialists 
from the appropriate departments lecture on these books. The classics for 
this year are: Franklin's Autobiography, De Tocqueville's Democracy in 
America, Schelesinger's The Age of Jackson, and Thoreau's Walden, for the 
first semester; and for the second semester, Twain's The Adventures of 
Huckleberry Finn, Veblen's The Theory of The Leisure Class, the Lynd's 
Middletown, and Myrdal's An American Dilemma. 

The Conference Course, or either semester of it, may be chosen by a student 
outside the program as an elective. It also counts as major credit for the four 
cooperating departments. The course meets like a seminar, once a week. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Professors Foster, Green; Assistant Professors Buric, Fowler, Lefifel. 

The Department of Animal Husbandry offers work leading to the degree 
of Master of Science. Although the major field is Animal Husbandry, course 
work and thesis problems are offered in the fields of animal breeding, nutrition, 
livestock management, and meats. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

A. H. 111. Animal Nutrition (3). Three lectures a week, first semester. Pre- 
requisite, Chem. 31, 32, oZ, 34; A. H. 110 or permission of instructor. 
Graduate credit allowed with permission of instructor. Leffel. 

A. H. 120. Principles of Breeding (3). Three lectures a week, second semester. 
Prerequisite, Zool. 104 and A. H. 130 or A. H. 131 or A. H. 132 or Dairy 
101. Graduate credit (1-3 hours) allowed with permission of instructor. 

Green. 

A. H. S130. Beef Cattle (1). Summer session only. I'liis course is designed 
primarily for teachers of Vocational Agriculture and Extension Service 
Workers. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Foster. 

A. H. 150. Livestock Markets and Marketing (2). Two lectures a week, first 
semester. Prerequisite, A. H. 1. Graduate credit allowed with permission 
of instructor. Fowler. 

For Graduates 

A. H. 200, 201. Special Problems in Animal Husbandry (1-2, 1-2). First and 
second semesters. Work assigned in proportion to amount of credit. Pre- 
requisite, approval of staff. StaflF. 



CkADVAtE SCHOOL S3 

A. H. 202, 203. Seminar (1, 1). First and second semesters. StafiF. 

A. H. 204. Research (1-6). First and second semesters. Credit to be determined 
by amount and character of work done. Staff. 

A. H. 205. Advanced Breeding (2). Two lectures a week, second semester. 
Prerequisites, A. H. 120 or equivalent and biological statistics. Green. 

A. H. 206. Advanced Livestock Management (3). Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week, first semester. Prerequisite, approval of staff. 

Staff. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

Professors Faber, Hansen, Pelczar; Visiting Professors Hilleman, Warren; 
Associate Professor LafTer; Assistant Professor Doetsch; Lecturer Kent. 

The Department of Bacteriology offers the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Graduate students associated with institutions away from the College Park 
campus are required to take a minimum of 12 credit hours, exclusive of research, 
during one semester at College Park for the degree of Master of Science, and 
a minimum of 24 credit hours, exclusive of research, during two semesters at 
College Park for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

The research project, the experimental approach employed, and progress 
made must meet with the approval of the head of the department. 

Further information concerning graduate work in Bacteriology may be 
obtained from the department. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Bact. lOL Pathogenic Bacteriology (4). Two lecture and two laboratory 
periods a week, first semester. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Prerequisite, Bact S. 

Faber. 

Bact. 103. Serology (4). Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week, 
second semester. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Prerequisite, Bact 101. Faber, 

Bact. 104 History of Bacteriologfy (1). One lecture period a week, first 
semester. Prerequisite, a major or minor in bacteriology. Doetsch. 

Bact. 105. Clinical Methods (4). Two lecture and two laboratory periods a 
week, first semester. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Prerequisite, consent of 
instructor. Faber. 

Bact. 108. Epidemiology and Public Health (2). Three lecture periods a week, 
second semester. Prerequisite, Bact 101. Faber. 

Bact. 121. Advanced Methods (4). Two two-hour laboratory periods a week, 
second semester. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Hansen and Pelczar. 

Bact 131. Food and Sanitary Bacteriology (4). Two lectures and two lab- 
oratory periods a week, second semester. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Prere- 
quisite, Bact. 1. Laffer. 



54 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Bact 133. Dairy Bacteriology (4). Two lecture and two laboratory periods a 
week, first semester. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Prerequisite, Bact. 1. 

Doetsch. 

Bact. 135. Soil Bacteriology (4). Two lecture and two laboratory periods a 
week, second semester. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Prerequisite, Bact. 1. 

Hansen. 

Bact 161. Systematic Bacteriology (2). Two lecture periods a week, first 
semester. Prerequisite, 8 credits in bacteriology. Hansen. 

Bact 181. Bacteriological Problems (3). First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisite, 16 credits in bacteriologj'. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Registration 
only upon the consent of the instructor. Staff. 

For Graduates 

Bact 201. Advanced Pathogenic Bacteriology (4). Two lecture and two lab- 
oratory periods a week, first semester. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Prerequisite, 
30 credits in bacteriology and allied fields. Laffer. 

Bact 202. Genetics of Microorganisms (3). Second semester. Three lecture 
periods a week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Hansen. 

Bact 204. Bacterial Metabolism (2). Two lecture periods a week, first semester. 
Prerequisite, 30 credits in bacteriology and allied fields, including Chem. 
161 and 162. Pelczar. 

Bact 206, 208, Special Topics (1, 1). One lecture period a week, first and 
second semesters. Prerequisite, 20 credits in bacteriology. Staff. 

Bact 210. Virology (1). One lecture period a week, second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Bact 101 or equivalent Warren. 

Bact 211. Virology Laboratory (2). One lecture and one laboratory period a 
week, second semester. Laboratory fee, $20.00. Prerequisite, Bact 101 or 
equivalent. Registration onh' upon consent of instructor. Hilleman. 

Bact. 214. Advanced Bacterial Metabolism (1). One lecture period a week, 
second semester. Prerequisite, Bact 204 and consent of instructor. Pelczar. 

Bact. 280. Seminar — Research Methods (1). First and seccmd semesters. Staff. 

Bact. 282. Seminar — Bacteriological Literature (1). Staff. 

Bact 291. Research. First and second semesters. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 

Staff. 

BOTANY 

Professors Bamford, Jeffers, Gauch, Cox, Appleman (Emeritus), Norton, 

(Emeritus); Associate Professors Brown, D. T. Morgan; Assistant Professors 

Dugger, Rappleye; Research Associate Krauss. 

The Department of Botany offers a graduate course of study leading to the 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 55 

degree of Master of Science and to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. The 
student may pursue major work in any one of the three main divisions of the 
department, namely: Plant Physiology, Plant Pathology, or Plant Morphology, 
Cytology and Cytogenetics. Since a thesis based on original research is required 
for each degree, a qualified student may be allowed to pursue a problem of his 
own choosing, but it is more probable that the subject of his research will be 
that already in progress since the department is devoted to a study of basic 
agricultural problems as well as projects of a more fundamental nature. 

An individual employed at a nearby institution may submit a thesis on his 
research work at the institution under the direction of, and approved by, a 
member of the faculty. Laboratory facilities are available for research in each 
division, and there are ample greenhouses and plot space available on the campus 
or adjacent University farm land. 

In addition to the normal requirements of the Graduate School, one must 
possess a reading knowledge of either French or German, before the Master 
of Science degree is granted. 

A, Plant Physiology 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Bot. 101. Plant Physiology (4). First semester. Two lectures and two lab- 
oratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Bot. 1, and general chemistry. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. Gauch, Dugger. 

Bot. 102. Plant Ecology (3). Second semester. Two lectures and one lab- 
oratory period a week. Prerequisites, Bot. 11, or equivalent. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. Brown. 

For Graduates 

Bot. 201. Plant Biochemistry (4). First semester. Prerequisites, Bot. 101, and 
elementary organic chemistry, or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $5.00 (Not 
offered 1955-56.) Gauch. 

Bot. 202. Plant Biophysics (2). Second semester. Prerequisites, Bot. 101, and 

elementary physics, or equivalent. Dugger. 

Bot 203. Biophysical Methods (2). Second semester. To accompany Bot. 
202. Same prerequisites. Laboratory fee, S5.00 Dugger. 

Bot. 204. Growth and Development (2). First semester. Prerequisite, 12 
semester hours of plant science. Krauss. 

Bot. 205. Mineral Nutrition of Plants (2). Second semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 
101, or equivalent. (Not offered 1955-56.) Gauch. 

Bot. 206. Research in Plant Physiology. Credit according to work done. 

Gauch, Dugger, Krauss. 
Bot. 207. Special Topics in Plant Physiology (2). Second semester. Prere- 
quisite, permission of instructor. 

Bot. 208. Seminar in Plant Physiology (1). First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Gauch, Dugger, Krauss. 



56 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Bot. 209. Physiology of Algae (3). First semester. Two lectures and 
one laboratory a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 201, the equivalent in allied fields, 
or permission of instructor. Laboratory fee §5.00. Krauss. 

B. General Botany and Morphology 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Bot. 111. Plant Anatomy (3). First semester. One lecture and two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 110, or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Rappleye. 

Bot. 113. Plant Geography (2). First semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 1, or 
equivalent. Brown. 

Bot. 114. Advanced Plant Taxonomy (3). First semester. One lecture and two 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 11, or permission of instruc- 
tor. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Brown. 

Bot. 115. Structure of Economic Plants (3). Second semester. One lecture 
and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 111. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00. Rappleye. 

Bot. 116. History and Philosophy of Botany (1). First semester. Prere- 
quisite, 15 semester hours of botany. (Not offered 1955-56.) Bamford. 

Bot. 117. Plant Breeding (2). Second semester. Prerequisite, Zool. 104, or 
equivalent. D. T. Morgan. 

Bot. 135. Aquatic Plants (3). First semester. One lecture and two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisites, Bot. 1, Bot. 11 or equivalent Laboratory 
fee $5.00. (Not offered 1955-56.) 

Bot. 136. Plants and Mankind (2). First semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 1 or 

equivalent. (Not offered 1955-56.) Rappleye. 

Bot. 151S. Teaching Methods in Botany (2). Summer. Prerequisite, Bot. 1, 
or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Owens. 

For Graduates 

Bot. 211. Cytology (4). Second semester. Two lectures and two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisites, Bot. 110, Zool. 104. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 
(Not offered 1955-56.) Bamford, D. T. Morgan. 

Bot. 212. Plant Morphology (3). First semester. One lecture and two lab- 
oratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Bot. 11, Bot. Ill, or equivalent. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. Rappleye. 

Bot. 213. Seminar in Plant Cytology and Morphology (1). First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. D. T. Morgan, Rappleye. 

Bot. 214. Research in Plant Csrtology and Morphology. Credit according to 
work done. Bamford, D. T. Morgan. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 57 

Bot. 215 Plant Cytogenetics (3). First semester. Prerequisites, Zool. 104, 

Bot. 211. LaI)oratory fee, 5:5.00. D. T. Morgan. 

Bot. 219, Special Topics in Plant Morphology and Cytology (2). First semes- 
ter. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 

C. Plant Pathology 

For GRAnuATES and Advanced Undergraduates 

Bot. 122. Research Methods in Plant Pathology (2). First or second semester. 
Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. Lab- 
oratory fee, $5.00. Cox. 

Bot. 123. Diseases of Ornamental Plants (2). Second semester. Prerequisite, 
Bot. 20, or equivalent. Jeffers. 

Bot. 124. Diseases of Tobacco and Agronomic Crops (2). First semester. Pre- 

rcfiuisite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. (Not offered 1955-1956.) O. D. Morgan. 

Bot. 125. Diseases of Fruit Crops (2). First semester. Prerequisite, Bot 20, 

or equivalent. Weaver. 

Bot. 126. Diseases of Vegetable Crops (2). Second semester. Prerequisite, 
Bot. 20, or equivalent. (Not offered 1955-1956.) Cox. 

Bot. 128. Mycologfy (4). Second semester. Two lectures and two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 2, or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Jeflfers. 

Bot. 1528. Field Plant Pathology (1). Summer, first three weeks. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. Cox, Staff. 

For Graduates 

Bot. 221. Virus Diseases (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period a week, 

second semester. Prerequisites, Bot. 20, 101. Laboratory fee, $5.00 (Not 
offered. 1955-1956.) Sisler. 

Bot. 222. Plant Hematology (2). Two lectures. Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or 
equivalent. Jenkins. 

Bot. 225. Research in Plant Patholog^y. Credit according to work done. 

Staff. 

Bot. 226. Plant Disease Control (3). First semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 20, 

or equivalent. Cox. 

Bot. 228. Special Topics in Plant Pathology (2). Second semester. Prere- 
quisite, permission of instructor. 

Bot. 229. Seminar in Plant Pathologfy (1). First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisite, permission of instructor. Jeffers, Cox. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Professors Frederick, Calhoun, Clemens, Cook, Cover, Fisher, Mounce, Pyle, 
Reid, Sweeney, Sylvester, Watson, Wedeberg, Wright; Associate Professors 



58 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Kappler, Tafif; Assistant Professors Ash, Daiker, Goodell, Nelson, Lee, Philips; 
Instructors Edelson, Gentry, Dawson. 

The degree of Master of Business Administration is conferred on those 
students who satisfactorily complete the requirements which are set forth in 
the section of this catalog entitled, "Requirements for the Degree of Master of 
Business Administration." 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

B. A. 110, 111. Intermediate Accounting (3, 3). 

Prerequisite, a grade of "B" or better in B. A. 21, or consent of instructor. 

Daiker. 
B. A. 116. Public Budgeting (3). Prerequisites, B. A. 21 and Econ. 32. 

B. A. 118. Governmental Accounting (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 111. 

B. A. 121. Cost Accounting (4). Prerequisite, a grade of "B" or better in B. A. 
21, or consent of instructor. Sweeney. 

B. A. 122. Auditing Theory and Practice (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 111. 

Wright. 

B. A. 123 Income Tax Accounting (4). Prerequisite, a grade of "B" or better 

in B. A. 21, or consent of instructor. Wedeberg. 

B. A. 124, 126. Advanced Accounting (3, 3). Prerequisite, B. A. HI. 

Wedeberg. 

B. A. 125. C. P. A. Problems (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 124, or consent of 

instructor. Wedeberg. 

B. A. 127. Advanced Auditing Theory and Practice (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 
122. Wright. 

B. A. 130. Elements of Business Statistics (3). Laboratory fee, |3.50. Ash. 

B. A. 131. Statistics Laboratory. 

B. A. 132, 133. Advanced Business Statistics (3, 3). Prerequisite, B. A. 130. 
Laboratory fee, $3.50. Ash. 

B. A. 140. Financial Management (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 21, Econ. 140. 

Calhoun. 

B. A. 141. Investment Management (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 140. Calhoun. 

B. A. 142. Banking Policies and Practices (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 140. 
B. A. 143. Credit Management (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 140. Calhoun. 

B. A. 147. Business Cycles (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 140. Dillard. 

B. A. 148 Advanced Financial Management (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 140 
B. A. 149. Analysis of Financial Statements (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 140. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 59 

B. A. 150. Marketing Management (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 150. 

Cook, Reid. 
B. A. 151. Advertising Programs and Campaigns (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 150. 

Gentry. 
B. A. 152. Advertising Copy Writing and Layout (3). Prerequisite. B. A. 151. 

Gentry. 
B. A. 153. Purchasing Management (3). Prerequisite, A. B. 150. Gentry. 

B. A. 154. Retail Store Management (3). Prerequisite. Econ. 150. Cook. 

B. A. 155. Problems in Retail Merchandising (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 154. 

Cook. 
B. A. 157. Foreign Trade Procedure (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 150. 

B. A. 158. Advertising Campaigns (3). Prerequisites, B. A. 151 and B. A. 152. 

Gentry. 

A. B. 159. Newspaper Advertising (3. Prerequisite, B. A. 151. Gentry. 

B. A. 160. Personnel Management (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 160. Sylvester. 

B. A. 163. Industrial Relations (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 160. Sylvester. 

B. A. 164. Recent Labor Legislation and Court Decisions (3). Prerequisite, 
B. A. 160. Sylvester. 

B. A. 165. Office Management (3). Patrick. 

B. A. 166. Business Communications (3). 

B. A. 167. Job Evaluation and Merit Rating (2). Prerequisite, B. A. 160. 

Goodell. 

B. A. 158. Advanced Office Management (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 165. 

B. A. 169, Industrial Management (3). Prerequisites, B. A. 11 and 160. 

Goodell, Phillips. 

B. A. 170. Transportation Services and Regulation (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 32 
or 37. Taff. 

B. A. 171. Industrial and Commercial Traffic Management (3). Prerequisite, 
B. A. 170. Taff. 

B. A. 172. Motor Transportation (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 170. Taff. 

B. A. 173. Overseas Shipping (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 170. Taff. 

B. A. 174. Commercial Air Transportation (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 170. 

Frederick. 
B. A. 175. Airline Administration (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 174. Frederick. 

B. A. 176. Problems in Airport Management (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 174. 

Frederick. 
B. A. 177. Motion Economy and Time Study (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 169. 

Goodell. 



60 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

B. A. 178. Production Planning and Control (2). Prerequisite, B. A. 169. 

Goodell. 

B. A. 179. Problems in Supervision (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 169. Goodell. 

B. A. 180, 181. Business Law (4, 4). Mounce. 

B. A. 184. Public Utilities (3). Prerequisites, Econ. 32 and 37. Clemens. 

B. A. 189. Business and Government (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. 

Nelson. 

B. A. 190. Life Insurance (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. Watson. 

B. A. 191. Property Insurance (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. Watson. 

B. A. 194. Insurance Agency Management (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 190 or 191. 

Watson. 
B. A. 195. Real Estate Principles (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. Watson. 

B. A. 196. Real Estate Finance (3). Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. Watson. 

B. A. 197. Real Estate Management (3). Prerequisite, B. A. 195 or 196. 

Watson. 

For Graduates 

B. A. 210. Advanced Accounting Theory (2, 3). Prerequisite, B. A. 111. 

Wedeberg, Fisher. 

B. A. 220. Managerial Accounting (3). Wedeberg, Wright. 

B. A. 221, 222. Seminar in Accounting. Wedeberg, Wright. 

B. A. 226. Accounting Systems. Wedeberg, Sweeney. 

B. A. 228. Research in Accounting. Wedeberg. 

B. A. 229. Studies of Special Problems in the Fields of Control and Organiza- 
tion. 

B. A. 240. Seminar in Financial Management (1-3). Prerequisite, B. A. 140. 

Calhoun, Fisher. 
B. A. 249. Studies of Special Problems in the Field of Financial Adminis- 
tration. 

B. A. 250. Problems in Sales Management (1-3). Cook, Reid. 

B. A. 251. Problems in Advertising (3). Gentry. 

B. A. 252. Problems in Retail Store Management (3). Cook. 

B. A. 257. Seminar in Marketing Management. Cook, Gentry, Reid. 

B. A. 258. Research in Marketing. Cook, Gentry. 

B. A. 262. Seminar in Contemporary Trends in Labor Relations. 

Sylvester. 
B. A. 265. Development and Trends in Industrial Management (3). Sylvester. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 61 

B. A. 266. Research in Personnel Management. Sylvester. 

B. A. 267. Research in Industrial Relations. Sylvester. 

B. A. 269. Studies of Special Problems in Employer-Employee Relationships. 

Sylvester. 
B. A. 270. Seminar in Air Transportation (3). Frederick. 

B. A. 271. Theory of Organization (3). Sylvester. 

B. A. 275. Seminar in Motor Transportation. Taif. 

B. A. 277. Seminar in Transportation (3). Frederick. 

B. A. 280. Seminar in Business and Government Relationships. 

B. A. 284. Seminar in Public Utilities (3). Clemens. 

B. A. 290. Seminar in Insurance (3). Watson. 

B. A. 295. Seminar in Real Estate (3). Watson. 

B. A. 299. Thesis. Staff. 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

T'rofcssors Iluff, Bonney, Cooper, Schroeder, Penninp;tnn: Assistant Professor 
AfacLaiigblin; Instructor? Duffey, Reid. 

This Department directs the programs of graduate students who plan to 
qualify for the degree of Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy in Chemical 
F.ngineering, Nuclear Engineering or in Metallurgy. 

Departmental regulations have been assembled for the guidance of candi- 
dates for graduate degrees in Chemical Engineering and in the Metallurgical 
Option. Copies of these regulations are available on request from the Depart- 
ment of Chemical Engineering. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Ch. E. 103 f,s. Elements of Chemical Engineering (3, 3). Three hours a 
week, both semesters. Prerequisites, Chem. 1, 3; Phys. 21; Math. 21. 

Huff. 

Ch. E. 104. Chemical Eng^ineering Seminar (1). One hour a week, both 
semesters. Prerequisite, permission of the Department. The contents of 
this course are constantly changing so a student may receive a number of 
credits by re-repistering. Rcid. 

Ch. E. 105 f,s. Advanced Unit Operations (5, 5). Two lectures and one all- 
day laboratory a week, both semesters. Prerequisites, Ch. E. 103 f,s; Chem. 
187, 188, 189, 190. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. Bonney and Staff. 

Ch. E. 106 f,8. Minor Problems (6, 6). Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

Ch. E. 107. Fuels and Their Utilization (3). Three hours a week, second 
semester. Prerequisite, Ch. E. 103 f,s, or permission of the department. 

Huff. 



62 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

C. E. 108 f,s. Industrial Chemical Technology (2, 2). Two hours a week, 

both semesters. Prerequisite, Ch. E. 103, or simultaneous registration therein, 
or permission of the department. Schroeder. 

Ch. E. 109 f,s. Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (3, 3). Two hours 
a week, both semesters. Prerequisites, Ch. E. 103 f,s; Chem. 187, 189, or 

permission of the department. Cooper. 

Ch. E. 110. Advanced Chemical Engineering Calculations (3). Three hours a 

week, first semester. Prerequisites, Alath. 20, 21. Also given at Army 
Chemical Center. Schroeder. 

Ch. E. 114. Applications of Electrochemistry (4). Three lecture hours and 
three laboratory hours a week, first semester. Prerequisite, consent of 

instructor. Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

Ch. E. 119. Empirical Equations and Nomography (3). Three hours a week, 
second semester. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Also given at Army 

Chemical Center. 

Ch. E. 123, 124. Elements of Plant Design (3, 3). First and second semesters. 
Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Ch. E. 103 
f, s, Ch. E. 110: Chem. 189. Cooper. 

Ch. E. 131. Chemical Engineering Economics (2). Second Semester, two lec- 
tures a week. Prerequisites, simultaneous registration in or completion of 
Ch. E. 108, 109 and 123, or permission of instructor. Schroeder. 

Ch. E. 140. Introduction of Nuclear Technology (2). First Semester, two lec- 
tures a week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Duflfey. 

Ch. E. 145. Applications of Differential Equation and Statistics in Chemical 
Engineering (3). Second semester, one lecture, two laboratory periods a 
week. Prerequisites, Ch. E. 103, Ch. E. 110 or permission of instructor. 



For Graduates 

Ch. E. 201. Graduate Unit Operations (5). One hour conference, three or 
more three-hour laboratory periods a week, first semester. Prerequisite, 
permission of the department. Laboratory fee, $8.00. Bonney. 

Ch. E. 202 f,8. Gas Analj^is (3). One lecture and two three-hour laboratory 
periods a week, one semester, to be arranged. Prerequisite, permission of 
the department. Laboratory fee, $8.00. Bonney. 

Ch. E. 203. Graduate Seminar (1). One hour a week, each semester. The 
content of this work is constantly changing, so a student may receive a 
number of credits by re-registering. Prerequisite, permission of the depart- 
ment. Also g^iven at Army Chemical Center. Huff. 

Ch. E. 205. Research in Chemical Engineering. Prerequisites and credits to 
be arranged for individuals. Laboratorj^ fee, $8.00 per semester. 

Huflf, Bonney, Cooper, Schroeder. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 63 

Ch. E. 207 f,s. Advanced Plant Design Studies (3, 3), Three hours a week, 
both semesters. Trerequisite, permission oi tlie department. Also given at 
Army Chemical Center. Huff, Cooper. 

Ch. E. 209 f,s. Plant Design Studies Laboratory (3, 3). Three laboratory 
periods a week, both semesters. Prerequisite, permission of the department 
Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. Bonney. 

Ch. E. 210 f,8. Gaseous Fuels (2, 2). Two hours a week, both semesters. 
Prerequisite, permission of the department. HufiF. 

Ch. E. 214. Corrosion and Metal Protection (4). Second semester. Four 
lecture hours a week. Prerequisites, Ch. E. 114 or Chem. 187, 189 or Chem. 
188, 190, or consent of the instructor. Also given at the Army Chemical 
Center. 

Ch. E. 216. Unit Processes of Organic Technology (3). Three lectures a week, 

second semester. Prerequisite, permission of the Department. 

Ch. E. 217. Unit Processes of Organic Technology Laboratory (2). Two or 

more laboratory periods a week, second semester. Prerequisite, permission 
of the instructor. Laboratory fee, S8.00. Bonney. 

Ch. E. 240, 241. Advanced Heat and Mass Transfer (2, 2). Two lectures a week, 
both semesters. Elective of graduate students in chemical engineering and 

others. Prerequisite, permission of the Department. Also given at Army 
Chemical Center and Camp Detrick. 

Ch. E. 250. Chemical Engineering Practice (6). Four hours conference and 
forty hours a week of work in laboratory and plant for eight weeks. Pre- 
requisite, permission of the Department. Offered at the Army Chemical 
Center only. 

Ch. E. 270. Plastics Technology (3). Two lectures and one laboratory a week, 
first semester. Prerequisite, permission of the Department. Laboratory 

fee, ?8.00. 

Ch. E. 280, 281. Graduate Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (3, 3). Three 
lectures a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Ch. E. 109, f,s; 
Ch. E. 110; or permission of instructor. Bonney. 

Ch. E. 290. Chemical Engineering Process Kinetics (3). First semester, three 
lectures a week. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Reid. 

Ch. E. 302, 303. Nuclear Reactor Engineering (3, 3). First and second semes- 
ters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Duffey. 

Ch. E. 311. Nuclear Separation Engineering (2). Second semester. Two lec- 
tures a week. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Duffey, Cooper. 

Ch. E. 315. Industrial Applications of Nucleer Reactors (2). Second semester. 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, permission of instructors. Duffey, Cooper. 



64 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

METALLURGICAL OPTION 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Met. 104. Senior Metallurgical Seminar (1, 1). One hour a week. Tlie con- 
tent of this course is constantly changing so a student may receive a number 
of credits by re-registration. 

Met. 164, 166. Thermodynamics of Metallurgical Processes (3, 3), Three lec- 
tures a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 187, 189; Chem. 188, 190. 

Met. 168, 170. Metallurgical Investigations (2, 4). First semester, two three- 
hour laboratory periods a week; second semester, three lectures and one 
three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, concurrent registration 
in or completion of Met. 182, 183. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. 

Met. 182, 183. Optical and X-Ray Metallography (4, 4). Three lectures and 
one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Met. 64, 66; Met. 68, 70; or 
permission of instructor. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. 

Met. 188, 189. Alloy Steels I, II (2, 2). Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, 
graduate or undergraduate standing. (Met. 188 is not prerequisite to Met. 
189. Offered at off-campus naval installations as determined by departmental 
and registration requirements). 

For Graduates 

Met. 205. Research in Metallurgy. Prerequisites and credits to be arranged for 

individuals. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. 

Met. 220. 221. Solid Phase Reactions (3, 3). Three lectures a week. Pre- 
requisites, Chem. 187, 189; Chem. 188, 190; Met. 182, 183; or permission of 
the instructor. 

Met. 224, 225. Advanced X-Ray Metallography (3, 3). Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Math 114, 115; Met. 182, 183. 
Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. 

Met. 228. Seminar in Metallurgy (1, 1). One meeting a week. Required of 
graduate students Iti Metallurgical curriculum. The content of this course 
is constantly changing, so a student may receive a niunber of credits by re- 
registration. 

Met. 229. Gases in Metals (2). Second semester. Two lectures per week. Pre- 
requisites, Met. 182, 183, or permission of the instructor. 

Met. 230, 231. Mechanical Metallurgy (3, 3). liirfe lectures a week. Pre- 
rc.iuisites Matii. 114, 115; Met. 182, 183. 

Met. 232, 233. Advanced Physical Metallurgy (3, 3). Three lectures a week. 
Required of graduate students in Metallurgical curriculum. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 65 

CHEMISTRY 

Professors Drake, Pratt, Reeve, Rollinson, Svirbely, White, Woods; Research 

Professors Bailey, Michcls, Slawsky; Associate Professors Pickard, Pratt, 

Schamp, Spurr, Stuiitz, Veitch; Assistant Professors Brown, Jansen. 

Departmental regulations have been assembled for the guidance of candi- 
dates for graduate degrees. Copies of these regulations are available from the 
Department of Chemistry. 

Laboratory fees in Chemistry are $10.00 per laboratory course per semester. 

A. Analytical Chemistry 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 123. Quantitative Analysis (4). Second semester. Two lectures and 
two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 1, 3. 
An intensive study of the theory and techniques of inorganic quantitative 

analysis, including volumetric, gravimetric, electrometric, and colorimetric 

methods. Required of all students majoring in Chemistry. 

For Graduates 

Chem. 206, 208. Spectographic Analysis (1, 1). One three-hour laboratory a 
week. Prerequisite, Chem. 188, 190, and consent of the instructor. Registra- 
tion limited. White. 

Chem. 221, 223. Chemical Microscopy (2, 2). One lecture and three one-hour 
laboratory periods a week, first and second semesters. Registration limited. 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Stuntz. 

Chem. 226, 228. Advanced Quantitative Analysis (2, 2). Two three-hour 
laboratory periods a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, consent 
of instructor. Stuntz. 

B. Biochemistry 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 161, 163. Biochemistry (2, 2). Two lectures a week, first and second 
semesters. Prerequisites, Chem. 31, 33, or Chem. 35, Z7. 

Chem. 162, 164. Biochemistry Laboratory (2, 2). Two three-hour laboratory 
periods a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Chem. Z2, 34, or 
Chem. Z6, 38. 

For Graduates 

Chem. 261, 263. Advanced Biochemistry (2, 2). Two lectures a week, first 
and second semesters. Prerequisites, Chem. 141, 143, or consent of instructor. 

Veitch. 



66 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Chem. 262, 264. Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory (2, 2). Two three-hour 
laboratory periods a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, consent 
of the instructor. Veitch. 

Chem. 265. Enzymes (2). Two lectures a week, first semester. Prerequisites, 
Chem 161, 163. Veitch. 

Chem, 268. Special Problems in Biochemistry (2-4). Two to four three-hour 
laboratory periods a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Chem. 
161, 162, 163, 164, and consent of the instructor. Veitch. 



C. Inorganic Chemistry 



For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 101. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (2). Two lectures a week, second 
semester. Prerequisites, Chem. 23 and Z7, 38. 

For Graduates 

Chem. 201, 203. The Chemistry of The Rarer Elements (2, 2). Two lectures 
a week, first and second semesters. White. 

Chem. 202, 204. Advanced Inorganic Laboratory (2). Two three-hour lab- 
oratory periods a week, first and second semesters. 

Chem. 205. Radiochemistry (2). Two lectures a week. RoUinson. 

Chem. 207. Chemistry of Coordination Compounds (2). Two lectures a week. 

Rollinson. 

Chem. 209. Non-aqueous Inorganic Solvents (2). Two lectures a week, first 

or second semester. Story. 

Chem. 210. Radiochemistry Laboratory (1 or 2). One or two four-hour lab- 
oratory periods a week. Registration limited. Prerequisites, Chem. 205 
(or concurrent registration therein) and consent of instructor. Rollinson. 



D. Organic Chemistry 



For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 141, 143. Advanced Organic Chemistry (2, 2). Two lectures a week, 
first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Chem. Z7, 38. 

Chem. 144. Advanced Organic Laboratory ((2-4). Two three-hour laboratory 
periods a week, second semester. Prere(|uisites, Chem. 2)7, 38. 

Chem. 146, 148. The Identification of Organic Compounds (2, 2). Two three- 
hour laboratory periods a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, 
Chem. 141, 143, or concurrent registration therein. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 67 

Chem. 150. Organic Quantitative Analysis (2). Two three-hour laboratory 
periods per week, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, consent of 
instructor. 



For Graduates 

(One or more courses from the following group 241-254 will customarily 
be offered each semester. Two of these courses will be presented in the academic 
year 1953-1954.) 

Chem. 240. Organic Chemistry of High Polymers (2). Two lectures a week, 
first semester. Prerequisites, Chem. 141, 143. Bailey. 

Chem. 241. Stereochemistry (2). Two lectures a week. Woods. 

Chem. 245. The Chemistry of the Steroids (2). Two lectures a week. Pratt. 

Chem. 249. Physical Aspects of Organic Chemistry (2). Two lectures a week. 

Woods. 

Chem. 251. The Heterocylics (2). Two lectures a week. Pratt. 

Chem. 253. Organic Sulfur Compounds (2). Two lectures a week. Dewey. 

Chem. 254. Advanced Organic Preparations (2 to 4). Two to four three-hour 
laboratory periods a week, first and second semesters. Pratt 

Chem. 258. The Identification of Organic Compounds, an Advanced Course 
(2 to 4). Two to four three-hour laboratory periods a week, first and 
second semesters. Prerequisites, Chem. 141, 143, or concurrent registration 
therein. Pratt. 

E. Physical Chemistry 

Fob Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 181, 183. Elements of Physical Chemistry (2, 2). Two lectures a week, 
first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Chem. 19; Phys. 1, 2; Math. 10, 11. 

Chem. 182, 184. Elements of Physical Chemistry Laboratory (1, 1). One three- 
hour laboratory period a week, first and second semesters. May be taken 
ONLY when accompanied by Chem. 181, 183. 

Chem. 187, 189. Physical Chemistry (3, 3). Three lectures a week, first and 
second semesters. Prerequisites, Chem. 19 or 21; Phys. 20, 21; Math. 20, 
21. This course must be accompanied by Chem. 188, 190. 

Chem. 188, 190. Physical Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2). Two three-hour lab- 
oratory periods a week, first and second semesters. A laboratory course for 
students taking Chem. 187, 189. 

Chem. 192, 194. Glassblowing Laboratory (1, 1). One three-hour laboratory 
period a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Carruthers. 



68 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

For Graduates 

The coninion prerequisites for the following courses are Chem. 187 and 189. 

One or more courses of the group, 281-323, will be ofifered each semester, 
depending on demand. 

Chem. 281. Theory of Solutions (2). Two lectures a week. Prerequisite. Chem. 
307, or equivalent. Svirbely. 

Chem. 285. Colloid Chemistry (2). Two lectures a week. Pickard. 

Chem. 287. Infra-red and Raman Spectroscopy (2). Two lectures a week. 
Prerequisites, Chem. 141( 143, 187, 189. Spurr. 

Chem. 289. Selected Topics in Advanced Colloid Chemistry (2). Two lectures 

a week. Prerequisite, Chem. 285. 

Chem. 295. Heterogenous Equilibria (2). Two lectures a week. Pickard. 

Chem. 299. Reaction Kinetics (3). Three lectures per week. Svirbely. 

Chem. 303. Electrochemistry (3). Three lectures a week. Pickard. 

Chem. 304. Electrochemistry Laboratory (2). Two three-hour laboratory 

periods a week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Svirbely. 

Chem. 307. Chemical Thermodynamics (3). Three lectures a week. Pickard. 

Chem. 311. Physicochemical Calculations (2). Two lectures a week. Pickard. 

Chem. 313. Molecular Structure (3). Three lectures a week. 

Chem. 317. Chemical Crystallography (3). Three lectures per week. Pre- 
requisite, consent of Instructor. Brawn. 

Chem. 321. Quantum Chemistry (3). Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, 
Chem. 307. Spurr. 

Chem. 323. Statistical Mechanics and Chemistry (3). Three lectures a week. 

Prerequisite, Chem. 307 or equivalent. Brown. 

F. Seminar and Research 
Chem. 351. Seminar (1). First and second semesters. StaflF. 

Chem. 360. Research. First and second semesters, summer session. StaflF. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Professors Steinberg, Allen, Otts; Associate Professors Barber, Cournyn, Gohr, 
Wedding; Assistant Professor Piper. 

The Civil Engineering Department offers graduate work in the following 
fields: highways, hydraulics, soils and foundations, structures, and sanitary 
engineering, leading to the degree of Master of Science. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 69 

Fob Graduates Ain> Advanced Underoeaduates 

C. E. 100. Theory of Structures (4). Three lectures and one laboratory period 
a week, second semester. Prerequisite, Mech. 50. Piper. 

C. E. 101. Soil Mechanics (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period a week, 
first semester. Prerequisites, Mech. SO and S3. Barber. 

C. E. 102. Structtiral Design (6). Five lectures and one laboratory period a 
week, first semester. Prerequisite, C. E. 100. Allen. 

C. E. 103. Concrete Design (6). Five lectures and one laboratory period a 
week, second semester. Prerequisite, C. E. 100. Allen. 

C. E. 104. Water Supply (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period a week, 
first semester. Prerequisite, C. E. SO. Otts. 

C. E. 105. Sewerage (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period a week, 
second semester. Prerequisite, C. E. 50. Otts. 

C. E. 106. Elements of Highways (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period 

a week, second semester. Prerequisite, C. E. 101. Barber. 

C. E. 107. Statically Indeterminate Structures (3). Two lectures and one lab- 
oratory period a week, first or second semesters. Prerequisite, C. E. 100 
or equivalent. Allen, Piper. 

C. E. 108. Photogrammetry (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period a 

week, first or second semester. Prerequisite, Surv. 50. Gohr. 

C. E. 109. Hydrology (3). Two lectures and one laboratory a week, first 
or second semester. Prerequisite, C. E. 50. Cournyn. 



For Graduates 

C. E. 200. Advanced Properties of Materials (3). First or second semester. 
Prerequisite, Mech. 53 or equivalent Wedding. 

C. E. 201. Advanced Strength of Materials (3). First or second semester. Pre- 
requisites, Mech. 50, or equivalent. Wedding. 

C. E. 202. Experimental Stress Analysis (3). Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week, first or second semester. Prerequisite, C. E. 201 or per- 
mission of instructor. Wedding.. 

C. E. 203. Soil Mechanics (3). First or second semester. Prerequisite, C. E. 
101 or equivalent. Barber^ 

C. E. 204. Advanced Foundations (3). First or second semester. Prerequisites,. 
C. E. 101, 102 and 103 or equivalent. Barber.. 

C. E. 205. Highway Engineering (3). First or second semester. Prerequisite,. 
C. E. 106 or equivalent. Barber. 

C. E. 206. Theory of Concrete Mixtures (3, 3). First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, Mech. 53 or equivalent. Wedding. 



70 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

C. E. 207. Advanced Structural Analysis (3). Two lectures and one laboratory 

period a week, first or second semester. Prerequisites, C. E. 107, or equiva- 
lent. Allen, Piper. 
C. E. 208. Advanced Sanitation (3). First or second semester. Otts. 

C. E. 209. Advanced Water Supply (3). First or second semester. Prere- 
quisite, C. E. 104 or equivalent. Otts. 

C. E. 210. Advanced Sewerage (3). First or second semester. Prerequisite, 
C. E. 105 or equivalent. Otts. 

C. E. 211. Sanitary Engineering Design (3). First or second semester. Pre- 
requisites, C. E. 104, 105 or equivalent. Otts. 

C. E. 212. Research. Credit in accordance with work done. First and second 
semesters. StaflF. 

C. E. 213. Seminar. First or second semester. Credit in accordance with work 
outlined by the civil engineering staflf. Staff. 

C. E. 214. Sanitary Engineering Laboratory (3). First or second semester. 
Prerequisite, C. E. 104 and C. E. 105 or equivalent. Otts. 

C. E. 215. Sanitary Engineering Laboratory (3). First or second semester. 
Prerequisite, C. E. 104 and 105 or equivalent. Otts. 

C. E. 216. Hydraulic Engineering (3). First or second semester. Prerequisite, 
C. E. 50 or equivalent. Cournyn. 

C. E. 217. Hydraulic Machinery (3). First or second semester. Prerequisite, 
C. E. 50 or equivalent. Cournyn. 

C. E. 218. Advanced Structural Design (3). First or second semester. Prere- 
quisite, C. E. 102, 103 or equivalent. Allen. 

C. E. 219. Sanitary Engineering Design (3). First or second semester. Pre- 
requisite, C. E. 104, 105 or equivalent. Otts. 

C. E. 220. Soil Mechanics Laboratory (3). One lecture and two laboratory 
periods a week, first or second semester. Prerequisite, C. E. 101 or equiva- 
lent. Barber. 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

Professors Aldridge, Falls, Goodwyn, Harman, Murphy, Prahl, Zucker; Lecturer 

McManaway; Associate Professors Cooley, Manning, Mooney, Weber, Zeeveld; 

Assistant Professors Andrews, Gravely, Parsons. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Comp. Lit. 101, 102. Introductory Survey of Comparative Literature (3, 3). 
First and second semester. Zucker. 

Comp. Lit. 103. The Old Testament as Literature (3). Second semester. 

Zucker. 
Comp. Lit. 105. Romanticism in France (3). First semester. Parsons. 



GRADUATE SCffOOL 71 

Comp. Lit. 106. Romanticism in Germany (3). Second semester. Prahl. 

Comp. Lit. 107. The Faust Legend in English and German Literature (3). 

First semester. Prahl. 

Comp. Lit 112. Ibsen (3). First semester. Zucker. 

Comp. Lit 114. The Greek Drama (3). First semester. Prahl. 

Comp. Lit. 125. Literature of the Middle Ages. Cooley. 

In addition, the following courses will count as credit in Comparative 
Literature: Eng. 104, Eng. 113, Eng. 121, Eng. 129, 130, Eng. 144, Eng. 145, 
Eng. 155, 156, Eng. 157; Span. 109; Speech 131, 132. 

For Graduates 
Comp. Lit. 258. Folklore in Literature (3). Second semester. Goodwyn. 

The following courses will count as credit in Comparative Literature: Eng. 
201, Eng. 204, Eng. 206, 207, Eng. 216, 217, Eng. 227, 228; Ger. 203, Ger. 204, 
Ger. 208. 

DAIRY 

Professors Beck, Shaw, Arbuckle; Associate Professors Mattick, Keeney; 
Assistant Professors Davis and Brown. 

The Dairy Department offers work leading to the degrees of Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Candidates for the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree have the option of studying in one of two major fields; Dairy Production, 
which is concerned with breeding, nutrition and physiology of dairy animals, or 
Dairy Technology, which is concerned with the chemical, bacteriological and 
nutritional aspects of dairy products, as well as the practical industrial phases 
at milk processing. 

Dairy 101. Dairy Production (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period a 

week, first semester. Prerequisites, Dairy 1 and A. H. 110. Davis. 

Dairy 103. Physiology of Milk Secretion (3). Second semester. Two lectures 
and one laboratory period per .week. Prerequisites, Zool. 1, Organic Chem- 
istr}'. (Alternate years, given in 1955-56.) The anatomy, evolution and 
metabolism of the mammary gland including hormonal control and the 
biosynthesis of milk constituents. Shaw. 

Dairy 105. Dairy Cattle Breeding (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period 

a week, second semester. Prerequisites, Dairy 1, Zool. 104. Beck. 

Dairy 108. Dairy Technology (4). Two lectures and two laboratory periods a 
week, first semester. Prerequisites, Dairy 1, Bact. 133, Chem. 1, 3. Labora- 
tory fee, $3.00. Mattick. 

Dairy 109. Market Milk (4), Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week, 
first semester. Prerequisites, Dairy 1, Bact. 133, Chem. 1, 3. Laboratory 
fee, $3.00. Arbuckle. 

Dairy 110. Butter and Cheese Making (3). One lecture and one five-hour lab- 



72 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

oratory period a week, second semester. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Prerequisites, 
Dairy 1, Bact. 1, Chem. 1, 3. (Alternative j^ears, not given in 1953-1954.) 

Mattick. 

Dairy 111. Concentrated Milk Products (3). One lecture and one five-hour 

laboratory period a week, second semester. Prerequisites, Dairy 108, 114. 

Alternate years, given in 1953-1954. Laboratory fee, ^.00. Mattick. 

Dairy 112. Ice Cream Making (4). Two lectures and two laboratory periods a 
week, second semester. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Prerequisites, Dairy 108. 

Arbuckle. 

Dairy 114. Special Laboratory Methods (3). Two lectures and two laboratory 
periods a week, second semester. Prerequisites, Dairy 108, Bact 133, Chem. 
19, 31, 32, 33, 34. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Keeney. 

Dairy 115. Quality Control in the Dairy Industry (3). First semester. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Dairy 109. Ap- 
plication of quality control methods in relation to dairy ordinances, standards 
and farm and plant inspection. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Mattick. 

Dairy 116. Dairy Plant Management (3) — Second semester. Three lecture 
periods a week. Prerequisites, at least three advanced dairy products 
technology courses. 

Principles of dairy plant management, record systems; personnel, plant de- 
sign and construction; dairy machinery and equipment. Mattick. 

Dairy 201. Advanced Ruminant Nutrition (3). First Semester. Three one- 
hour lectures per week. Prerequisites, A. H. 110 or Dairy 101, Organic 
Chemistry and permission of Department. (Alternate years, given in 1956- 
57.) Biochemical, physiological and bacteriological aspects of the nutrition 
of ruminants and other animals. Shaw and Davis. 

Dairy 202. Advanced Dairy Technology (3). First semester. Prerequisites, 
Dairy 108, 114, or equivalent Keeney. 

Dairy 204. Special Problems in Dairying (1-5). First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, permission of professor in charge of work. Staff. 

Dairy 205. Seminar (1). First and second semesters. Staff. 

Dairy 206. Advanced Dairy Research Seminar (1). Second semester. Discus- 
sion of fundamental research in dairy science. Staff. 

Dairy 208. Research (3-8). Credit to be determined by amount and quality of 
work done. Staff. 

ECONOMICS 

Professors Dillard, Gruchy; Associate Professors Grayson, Gurley; Assistant 
Professors Hamberg, Root, Smith; Instructors Dawson, Measday, Yeager. 

MASTER OF ARTS 

Requirements for the Master's degree include (1) course work in economics 
as the Department deems appropriate in view of the candidate's previous train- 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 73 

ing, (2) course work in a niinor subject, (3) a thesis on a topic approved by 
the Department, and (4) a compreliensive oral examination covering the major 
and the minor subjects and defense of the thesis. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

The Ph.D. degree in Economics is under the joint direction of the faculties 
of the Department of Economics and the Department of Business Organization 
and Administration. Before being advanced to candidacy doctoral students must 
pass comprehensive written and oral examinations in five of the following fields: 
(1) Accounting, (2) Comparative Economic Systems and Economic Planning, 
(3) Economic Development, (4) Economic Theory (required), (5) Financial 
Administration, (6) History of Economic Thought (required), (7) Industrial 
Administration, (8) Insurance and Real Estate, (9) International Economics, 
(10) Labor and Industrial Relations, (11) Marketing, (12) Money and Banking, 
(13) Public Finance and Fiscal Policy, (14) Public Utilities and Social Control 
of Business, (15) Transportation, (16) Any other field, including the minor, 
approved by the faculty. Students should consult with members of the faculty 
concerning the choice of fields and the choice of courses within these fields. 

Six semester hours of Statistics with grades of "B" or better must be 
presented. Normally the foreign language requirements are taken before the 
comprehensive examinations. 

Further information concerning requirements and procedures may be ob- 
tained from the Departments administering the program. 



For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Econ. 131. Comparative Economic Systems (3). First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. Gruchy. 

Econ. 132. Advanced Economic Principles (3). First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, Econ. 32. Grayson. 

Econ. 134. Contemporary Economic Thought (3). First semester. Prere- 
quisite, Econ. 32. Gruchy. 

Econ. 136. International Ek:onomic Policies and Relations (3). First semester. 
Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. RooL 

Econ. 137. The Economics of National Planning (3). Second semester. Prere- 
quisite, Econ. 32 or 37. Gruchy. 

Econ. 140. Money and Banking (3). First and second semesters. Prerequisite, 

Econ. 32 or 37. Gurley and Staff. 

Econ. 141. Theory of Money, Credit, and Prices (3). Second semester. Pre- 
requisites, Econ. 32 and 140. Gurley. 

Econ. 142. Public Finance and Taxation (3). First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. Grayson. 

Econ. 149. International Finance and Exchange (3). Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Econ. 140. Econ. 136 recommended. Root 



74 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Econ. 150. Marketing Principles and Organization (3). First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or Z7. Reid and Staff. 

Econ. 160. Labor Economics (3). First and second semesters. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 32 or 27. Staff. 

Econ. 170. Monopoly and Competition (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, 

Econ. i2 or 2>7 . Smith. 

Econ. 171. Economics of American Industries (3). First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, Econ. Z2 or 37. Clemens. 

For Graduates 

Econ. 200. Micro-Economic Analysis (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 132 or equivalent, Grayson. 

Econ. 202. Macro-Economic Analysis (3). First semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 
132. Recommended Econ. 141. Dillard. 

Econ. 230. History of Economic Thought (3). First semester. Prerequisite, 
Econ. 132 or consent of instructor. Dillard. 

Econ. 231. Economic Theory in the Nineteenth Century (3). Second semester. 
Prerequisite, Econ. 230 or consent of instructor. Dillard. 

Econ. 232, 233. Seminar in Institutional Economic Theory (3, 3). First and 
second semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 132 or consent of instructor. Gruchy. 

Econ. 236. Seminar in International Economic Relations (3). Root. 

Econ. 237. Seminar in Economic Investigation (3). 

Econ. 240. Seminar in Monetary Theory and Policy (3). First semester. 

Gurley. 
Econ. 247. Economic Growth and Instability (3). Second semester. Prere- 
quisite, A course in Business Cycles or consent of instructor. Hamberg. 

Econ. 270. Seminar in Economics and Geography of American Industries (3). 

Clemens. 
Econ. 299. Thesis. Arranged. Staff. 

EDUCATION 

Professors Brechbill, Brown, Cotterman, Devilbiss, Hornbake, McNaughton, 
Mershon, Mohr, Morgan, Newell, Prescott, Schindler, Van Zwoll, Wiggin; 
Associate Professors Blough, Bryan, Byrne, Hovet, Kurtz, Maley, Patrick, 
Perkins, Woods; Assistant Professor Beatty, Greene, Gordon, Schneider, Spencer, 
Thompson, Tierney, Waetjen. 

The Department of Education offers Graduate School programs leading 

to the Master of Arts, Master of Education, Doctor of Philosophy, and Doctor 
of Education degrees. 

Master of Arts and Master of Education 
A student in Education has the option of qualifying for the degree of 
Master of Arts or Master of Education. 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to the Graduate 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 75 

School, applicants for unconditional admission with a major in Education must 
have had sixteen semester hours of acceptable undergraduate work in Educa- 
tion. 

The time limit for completing either degree is the same as that prescribed 
for the Master of Arts and the Master of Science degrees of the Graduate School. 

A qualifying written examination is required of all candidates for a degree. 
The examination may be taken any time after the student has successfully 
completed at least 12 semester hours of satisfactory graduate work at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. This examination covers the student's major area of 
work for the degree. Following is a list of the areas in which this examination 
may be taken: 

Adult Education History, Philosophy, and Compara- 
Business Education tive Education 

Educational Administration and Home Economics Education 

Supervision Secondary School Curriculum and 
Elementary School Curriculum and Instruction 

Instruction Human Growth and Development 

Guidance and Personnel Industrial Arts Education 

Health, Physical Education, and Nursing Education 

Recreation Vocational Industrial Education 
Higher Education 

Reading lists in the several areas are available from the professors in charge 
of the areas. No student is recommended to the Graduate Council for advance- 
ment to candidacy until he has successfully passed the qualitVing examination. 
Currently the examination is administered on the third Saturday of January 
and May and on the Saturday preceding the last week of the Summer Session. 
A student failing the examination may repeat it. However, a student is not 
allowed to take the examination more than three times. 

Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Education 

Each candidate is required to achieve exceptional ability in at least one 
major area and one minor area of competence. 

The candidate should choose his major from the following list of areas: 
Curriculum and Instruction History, Philosophy, and Comparative 

Educational Administration Education 

and Supervision Human Development Education 

Elementary Education Industrial Arts Education 

Guidance Secondary Education 

Physical Education, Recreation, Vocational-Industrial Education 

and Health 
Minors may be chosen from fields other than Education as approved by the 
Committee on Candidacy, from the foregoing list of major areas, or from the 
following list: 

Adult Education Higher Education 

*Agricultural Education Home Economics Education 

Business Education 



•Administered under a separate department of the Graduate School 



76 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

In addition to the general University requirements for a Doctor's degree, 
the following requirements must be met: 

1. The preliminary examination for admission to candidacy for the Doctor's 
degree will cover the student's preparation in major and minor fields, and will 
include such other examinations as may be required by the faculty. A student 
must be admitted to candidacy in order to have the department's official per- 
mission to be a candidate for a Doctor's degree. 

2, A comprehensive examination covering the general fields of major and 
minor study must be passed by each candidate, after which the final examination 
is administered by a committee appointed by the Dean of the Graduate SchooL 

In general the requirements for the Doctor of Education degree are the 
same as those for the degree Doctor of Philosophy. The most important diflFer- 
ences between the two degrees are as follows: 

1. The purpose of the Doctor of Education degree is to prepare persons of 
exceptional competence to work in the field. The emphasis for this degree is 
placed on broad understanding, whereas that for the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy is placed on specialized research. 

2. A reading knowledge of foreigfn languages is required for the degree of 
Doctor of Education only when needed for research and study in the doctoral 
program. 

3. In order to meet the residence requirements, a candidate for the Ph.D. 
degree must spend at least two semesters in full-time study on the College 

Park campus. A candidate for the Ed.D. degree may substitute two summers 
of residence for one semester of residence, or four summers for two semesters. 

4. The doctoral study for the Ed.D. consists of a project rather than a 
dissertation. The project requires research to meet a practical field problem- 
Credit of six to nine hours is allowed for a project as compared with twelve 
to eighteen hours for a Ph.D. dissertation. 

A. History, Principles, Curriculum, and Administration 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

EA 100. History of Education I (2). First semester. Wiggin. 

Ed. 101. History of Education II (2). Wiggin. 

Ed. 102. History of Education in the United States (2). Second semester. 

Wiggin. 
Ed. 105. Comparative Education — European (2). First semester. 

Ed. 106. Comparative Education — Latin America (2). Second semester. 

Ed. 107. Philosophy of Education (2). 

Ed. 121. The Language Arts in the Elementary School (2-3). 

Ed. 122. The Social Studies in the Elementary School (2). 

Ed. 123. The Child and the Curricalmn (2). 

Ed. 124. Arithmetic in the Elementary Schools (2). 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 77 

Ed. 125. Creative Expression in the Elementary School (2). 

Ed. 126. The Elementary School Curriculum (2). 

Ed. 127. Teaching in Elementary Schools (2-6). 

•Ed. 130. Theory of the Junior High School (2). 

*Ed. 131. Theory of the Senior High School (2). 

Ed. 133. Methods of Teaching the Social Studies (2). (Offered in Baltimore.) 

Ed. 134. Materials and Procedure for the High School Core Curriculum (2). 
Fee $1.00. 

Ed. 137. Science in the Junior High School (2). Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

Eld. 140. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation (3). Staflf. 

Graduate credit is allowed only by special permission. Separate sections 
are offered in the following subject-matter areas: English, Social Studies, 
Foreign Languages, Science, Mathematics, Art Education, Business Educa- 
tion, Industrial Education, Music Education, Nursing Education, Physical 
Education for Men, and Physical Education for Women. 

EJd. 141. High School Course of Study— English (2). Bryan. 

Ed. 142. High School Course of Study— Literature (2). Bryan. 

Ed. 145. Principles of High School Teaching (2-3). First and second semesters. 

BrechbilL 

Ed. 147. Audio-Visual Education (2). First semester. Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

Ed. 150. Educational Measurement (2). First and second semesters. 

Ed. 152. The Adolescent: Characteristics and Problems (2). 

Ed. 153. The Teaching of Reading (2). 

Ed. 154. Remedial Reading Instruction (2). 

Ed. 155. Laboratory Practices in Reading for Elementary and Secondary 
Schools (2-4). 

Ed. 160. Educational Sociology — Introductory (2). 

Ed. 161. Principles of Guidance (2). First and second semesters. Byrne. 

Ed. 162. Mental Hygiene in the Classroom (2). 

Ed. 163, 164, 165. Community Study Laboratory I, II and III (2, 2, 2,). 

Ed. 170. Introduction to Special Education (2). 

Ed. 171. Education of Retarded and Slow-Learning Children (2). 

Ed. 188. Special Problems in Education (1-3). 



♦Credit is accepted (or Ed. 130 or for Ed. 131, but not for both courses. 



78 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Ed. 189. Workshops, Clinics, Institutes, and Field Laboratory Projects (1-6). 

Ed. 191. Principles of Adult Education (2). Wiggin. 

For Graduates 

Ed. 202, The Junior College (2). 

Ed. 203. Problems in Higher Education (2). 

Ed. 205. Seminar in Comparative Education (2). 

Ed. 207. Seminar in History and Philosophy of Education (2). Wiggin. 

Ed. 210. The Organization and Administration of Public Education (2). First 

semester. Newell. 

Ed. 211. The Organization, Administration, and Supervision of Secondary 

Schools (2). Second semester. Newell. 

Ed. 212. School Finance and Business Administration (2). VanZwolI. 

Ed. 214. School Buildings and Equipment (2). VanZwoll. 

Ed. 215. Public Education in Maryland (2). 

Ed. 216 High School Supervision (2). Newell. 

Ed. 217. Administration and Supervision in Elementary Schools (2). 

Ed. 218. School Surveys (2-6). Newell. 

Ed. 219. Seminar in School Administration (2). VanZwolI. 

Ed. 220. Pupil Transportation (2). 

Ed. 222. Seminar in Supervision (2). 

Ed. 223. Practicum in Personnel Relationships (2-6). Newell. 

Ed. 224. Internship in School Administration (12-16). Newell. 

Ed. 225. School Public Relations (2). VanZwolI. 

Ed. 226. Child Accounting (2). VanZwoll. 

Ed. 227. Public School Personnel Administration (2). VanZwoll. 

Ed. 229. Seminar in Elementary Education (2). Schindler. 

Ed. 230. Elementary School Supervision (2). 

Ed. 232. Student Activities in the High School (2). 

Ed. 234. The School Curriculum (2). 

Ed. 235. Curriculum Development in Elementary Schools (2). 

Ed. 236. Curriculum Development in the Secondary School (2). 

Ed. 237. Curriculum Theory and Research (2). 



Ch'/inr.-iTI: SCHOOL 79 

Ed. 239. Seminar in Secondary Education (2). 

Ed. 242. Coordination in Work-Experience Programs (2). Brown. 

Ed. 243. Application of Theory and Research to Arithmetic in Elementary 
Schools (2). Schindler. 

Ed. 244, Application of Theory and Research to the Language Arts in Ele- 
mentary Schools (2). Schindler. 

Ed. 245. Applications of Theory and Research to High School Teaching (2). 

Ed. 246. Applications of Theory and Research to the Social Studies in Elemen- 
tary Schools (2). 

Ed. 247. Seminar in Science Education (2). 

Ed. 248. Seminar in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education (2). 

See I. Ed. 248. Brown, Hornbake. 

Ed. 250. Analysis of the Individual (2). First semester. Byrne. 

Ed. 253. Guidance Information (2). Second semester. Byrne. 

Ed. 254. Organization and Administration of Guidance Programs (2). 

Ed. 260. Principles of School Counseling (2). First semester. Prerequisites, 
Ed. 161, 250, 253 for majors. Prerequisites may be waived by instructor. 

Byrne. 

Ed. 261. Case Studies in School Counseling (2). Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Ed. 260. Bj-rne. 

Ed. 263, 264. Aptitudes and Aptitude Testing (2, 2). (Offered in Baltimore.) 

Ed. 267. Curriculum Construction Through Community Analysis (2). Schindler. 

Ed. 268. Seminar in Educational Sociology (2). 

Ed. 269. Seminar in Guidance (2). Second semester. Registration only on 
approval of instructor. Byrne. 

Ed. 278. Seminar in Special Education (2). 

Ed. 279. Seminar in Adult Education (2). 

Ed. 280. Research Methods and Materials in Education (2). 

Ed. 281. Source Materials in Education (2). 

Ed. 288. Special Problems in Education (1-6). First and second semesters. 

Staff. 
Ed. 289. Research— Thesis (1-6). First and second semesters. Staff. 

B. Business Education 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

B. Ed. 101. Methods and Materials in Teaching Office Skills (2). 

B. Ed. 102. Methods and Materials in Teaching Bookkeeping and Related 
Subjects (2). 



80 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

B. E<L 103. Basic Business Subjects in the Junior High School (2). 
B. Ed. 104. Basic Business Education in the Secondary Schools (2). 

For Graduates 
B. Ed. 200. Administration and Supervision of Business Education (2). 
B. Ed. 255. Principles and Problems of Business Eklucation (2). Patrick. 

B. Ed. 256. Curriculum Development in Business Education (2-6). 

C. Childhood Education 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

C. Ed. 100. Child Development I — Infancy (3). First semester. McNaughton. 

C. Ed. 101. Child Development II — Early Childhood (3). Second semester. 

McNaughton. 
C. Ed. 102. Child Development III— The Child from 5 to 10 (2). First 

and second semesters. 

C. Ed. 110. Child Development IV (3). First and second semesters. Labor- 

atorj' fee, $1.00. 

C. Ed. 113. Education of the Young Child I (2). McNaughton. 

C. Ed. 114. Education of the Young Child II— The Social and Emotional 
Needs of the Young Child (2). McNaughton. 

C. Ed. 115. Children's Activities and Activities Materials (3). Laboratory fee, 
$5.00. Second semester. 

C. Ed. 116, 117. Creative Expressions; Art, Music, Dance (2-3, 2-3). 

C. Ed. 119. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — Cooperative Nursery 
School (2-3). 

C. Ed. 140. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation — Early Childhood Edu- 
cation (Nursery School and Kindergarten) (3). First and second semesters. 

C. Ed. 145. Guidance in Behavior Problems (2). First semester. 

C. Ed. 160. Methods and Materials in Parent Education (2-3). 

C. Ed. 165. Leadership Training (2). 

D. Home Economics Education 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

H. E. Ed. 102. Problems in Teaching Home Economics (3). First semester. 

Spencer. 
H. E. Ed. 120. Evaluation of Home Economics (2). Spencer. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 81 

H. B. Ed. 140l Carricalaxn, Instruction, and Observation (3). Second semester. 

Spencer. 

Fos Graduates 

H. S. Ed. 200. Seminar in Home Economics Education (2). Spencer. 

H. E. Ed. 202. Trends in the Teaching and Supervision of Home Economics. 

Spencer. 

B. Human Development Education 

Foa. GsAOUATSS akd Advanced Undergraduates 

H. D. Ed. 100, 101. Principles of Human Development I and II (3, 3). 

H. D. Ed. 102, 103, 104. Child Development Laboratory I, II and III (2, 2, 2). 

H. D. Ed. 112, 114, 116. Scientific Concepts in Human Development I, II,. 
Ill, (3, 3, 3). 

H. D. 113, 115, 117. Laboratory in Behavior Analysis 1, II, III, (3, 3, 3,). 

For Graduates 

H. D. Ed. 200. Introduction to Human Development and Child Study (3). 

H. D. Ed. 201. Biological Bases of Behavior (3). 

H. D. Ed. 202. Social Bases of Behavior (3). 

H. D. "Ed. 203. Integrative Bases of Behavior (3). 

H. D. Ed. 204, 205. Physical Processes in Human Development (3, 3). 

H. D. EkL 206, 207. Socialization Processes in Human Development I, 11 
(3, 3). 

H. D. Ed. 208, 209. Self Processes in Human Development I and II (3, 3). 

H. D. Ed. 210. Affectional Relationships and Processes in Human Develop- 
ment (3). 

H. D. Ed. 211. Peer-culture and Group Processes in Human Development (3). 

H. D. Ed. 212, 214, 216. Advanced Scientific Concepts in Human Development 
I, II, III (3, 3, 3). 

H. D. Ed. 213, 215, 217. Advanced Laboratory in Behavior Analysis I, II, Iir 
(3, 3, 3). 

H. D. Ed. 218. Workshop in Human Development (6). Prerequisites, H. D.. 
Ed. 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217. 

H. D. Ed. 220. Developmental Tasks (3). 

H. D. Ed. 230, 231. Field Program in ChUd Study I and II (2-6). 



82 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

H. D. 250a, 250b, 250c Direct Study of Children (1, 1, 1). 

H. D. Ed. 260. Synthesis of Human Development Concepts (3). 

H. D. Ed. 270. Seminars in Special Topics in Human Development (2-6). 

F. Industrial Education 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Ind. Ed. 105. General Shop (2). Second semester. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Ind. Ed. 140. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation (3). First semester. 

Hornbake. 
Ind. Ed. 143. Industrial Safety Education I (2). 

Ind. Ed. 144. Industrial Safety Education II (2). 

Ind. Ed. 145, 146. Industrial Hygiene Education (2, 2). 

Ind. Ed. 150. Training Aids Development (2). Second semester. 

Ind. Ed. 157. Tests and Measurements (2). 

Ind. Ed. 161. Principles of Vocational Guidance (2). 

Ind. Ed. 164. Shop Organization and Management (2). Second semester. 

Ind Ed. 165. Modern Industry (3). Summer Session. 

Ind. Ed. 166. Educational Foundations of Industrial Arts (2). First semester. 

Brown, Horbake. 
Ind. Ed. 167. Problems in Occupational Education (2). OflFered in Baltimore. 

Ind. Ed. 168. Trade or Occupational Analysis (2). First semester. 

Ind. Ed, 169. Course Construction (2). 

Ind. Ed. 170. Principles of Vocational Education (2). Summer session. 

Ind. Ed. 171. History of Vocational Education (2). Summer session. 

For Graduates 

Ind. Ed. 207. Philosophy of Industrial Arts Education (2). First semester. 

Hornbake. 

Ind. Ed. 214. School Shop Planning and Equipment Selection (2). Second 

semester. Hornbake. 

Ind. Ed. 216. Supervision of Industrial Arts (2). Second semester. 

Hornbake. 
Ind. Ed. 220. Organization, Administration, and Supervision of Vocational 
Education (2). 

Ind. Ed. 240. Research in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education (2). 
First and second semesters. Staff. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 83 

Ind. Ed. 241. Contcirt and Method of Industrial Arts (2). Second semester. 

Hornbake. 
Ind. Ed. 248. Seminar in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education (2). 

Brown, Hornbake. 

G. Music Education 
For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Mus. Ed. 125. Creative Activities in the Elementary School Which Contribute 
to Musical Development (2). Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Mus. Ed. 127. Methods and Materials for Program Productions in the Sec- 
ondary School (2). I'rerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Mus. Ed. 128. Workshop in Music for Elementary Schools (2). Prerequisite, 
consent of instructor. 

Mus. Ed. 132. Workshop in Music for the Junior High School (2). Prere- 
quisite, consent of instructor. 

Mus. Ed. 140. Workshop in Popular Music for Secondary Schools (2). 

Mus. Ed. 155. Organization and Technique of Instrumental Class Instruction 
(2). Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Mus. Ed. 170. Methods and Materials for Class Piano Instruction (2). Pre- 
requisite, consent of instructor. 

Mus. Ed. 175. Methods and Materials in Vocal Music for the High School 
(2). Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Mus. Ed. 180. Instrumental Seminar (2). Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

H. Nursing Education 
For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

N. Ed. 112. School of Nursing Finance and Administration (3). (Offered in 

Baltimore.) 
N. Ed. 115, 116. Ward Management and Clinical Teaching (2, 2). (Offered 

in Baltimore.) 
N. Ed. 117. Newer Trends in Nursing Service (2). (Offered in Baltimore.) 
N. Ed. 118. Industrial Nursing (2). (Offered in Baltimore.) 
N. Ed. 190. Principles of Pediatric Nursing (3). (Offered in Baltimore.) 

For Gradu.^tes 

N. Ed. 286. Research Methods & Materials in Nursing Education (2). (Of- 
fered in Baltimore.) 

N. Ed. 287. Seminar in Problems in Nursing Education (2). (Offered in 
Baltimore.) 

I. Science Education 

Sci. Ed. 105. Workshop in Science for Elementary Schools (2). Summer 
School Laboratory fee, $2.00. 



84 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Professors Corcoran, Reed, Weber; Lecturers Ahrendt, Freeman, Vanderslice, 
Trent; Associate Professors Wagner, Price, Muzzey; Assistant Professor 
Simons. 

Electromagnetic Waves, £. E. 120, is required of all candidates for the 
Master of Science degree in electrical engineering unless the candidate has had 
a comparable undergraduate course. Electromagnetic Theory, K K 201, is 
reqtiired of all candidates unless permission for an appropriate substitution is 
granted. 

A written qualifying examination is required of all candidates for the 
Master's degree in electrical engineering. This examination will be held Satur- 

day, October 1, 1955. Off-campus and part-time students must have sat- 
isfactorily completed a minimum of nine semester hours of graduate course work 
before being admitted to the written qualifying examination. Full-time students 
having less than nine semester hours of graduate course work are permitted 
to take this examination by speciall arrangement The student must have been 
admitted to the graduate school before taking this examination. 

Part-time students working toward the Master of Science degree in electrical 
engineering must take a minimum of six semester hours of course work from 
resident professors of electrical engineering. Part-time students working 
toward the Doctor of Philosophy degree must take a minimum of twenty-four 
semester hours of course work from resident professors of electrical engineering. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

E. E. 100. Alternating-Current Circuits (4). Three lectures and one laboratory 

period a week, first semester. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Prerequisites, Math. 
21, Phys. 21, and E. E. 1. Price, Simons. 

E. E. 101. Engineering Electronics (4). Three lectures and one laboratory 
period a week, second semester. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Prerequisite, 

E. E. 100. Price, Simons. 

E. E. 102, 103. Alternating-Current Machinery (4, 4). Three lectures and one 
laboratory period a week, first and second semesters. Laboratory fee 
$4.00. Prerequisites, E. E. 65 and E. E. 100. Hodgins. 

E. E. 104. Communication Circuits (3). Three lectures a week, second semes- 
ter. Prerequisites, E. E. 60 and K E. 100. Reed. 

E. E. 105, 106. Radio Engineering (4, 4)... Three lectures and one laboratory 
period a week, first and second semesters. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Pre- 
requisite, E. E. 101. Wagner, Price. 

E. E. 108. Electric Transients (3). Three lectures a week, second semester. 

Prerequisite, E. E. 101, Math. 64. Reed, Price. 

E. E. 109. Pulse Techniques (3). Three lectures a week, second semester. 
Prerequisite, E. E. 105. Schulman. 

E. E. 114. Applied Electronics (3). Three lectures a week, first semester. 
Prerequisite, E. E. 101. Schulman. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 85 

E. E. 115. Industrial Electronics (4). Three lectures and one laboratory period 
a week, second semester. Prerequisite, E. E. 101. Laboratory fee, $4.00. 

Price. 

E. E. 116. Alternating- Current Machinery Design (3). Two lectures and one 
calculation period a week, second semester. Prerequisite, concurrent reg- 
istration in E. E. 103. Reed. 

E. E. 117. Power Transmission and Distribution (3). Three lectures a week, 
first semester. Prcrctiuisite, concurrent registration in E. E. 102. Reed. 

E. E. 120. Electromagnetic Waves (3). Three lectures a week, first semester. 
Required of M. S. degree candidates in electrical engineering. Prerequisite, 
Math. 64. Reed. 

E. E. 160, 161. Vacuum Tubes (3, 3). Three lectures a week, first and second 

semesters. Prerequisite, Math. 64. Weber. 

For Graduates 

E. E. 200. Symmetrical Components (3). Three lectures a week, first semester. 
Prerequisite, E. E. 103. Reed. 

E, E. 201. Electromagnetic Theory (3). Three lectures a week, second semes- 
ester. Prerequisite, E. E. 120. Required of M. S. degree candidates in 
electrical engineering. Weber. 

E. E. 202, 203. Transients in Linear Systems (3, 3). Three lectures a week, 
first and second semesters. Prerequisite, undergraduate major in electrical 
or mechanical engineering or physics. Required of M. S. degree candidates 
in electrical engineering. Wagner. 

E. E. 204, 205. Advanced Circuit Analysis (3, 3). Three lectures a week, first 
and second semesters. Prerequisite, undergraduate major in electrical en- 
gineering or physics. Reed, Vanderslice. 

E. E. 206, 207. Microwave Engineering (3, 3). Three lectures a week, first 
semester; two lectures and one laboratory period a week, second 
semester. Laboratory fee, second semester, $4.00. Prerequisite, E. E. 201. 

Weber. 

E. E. 209. Stability in Power Systems (3). Three lectures a week, second 
semester. Prerequisite, E. E. 200. Reed. 

E. E. 212, 213. Automatic Regulation (3, 3). Three lectures a week, first and 
second semesters. Prerequisite, undergraduate major in electrical or me- 
chanical engineering or physics. Ahrendt. 

E. E. 215, 216. Radio Wave Propagation (3, 3). Three lectures a week, first 
and second semesters. Prerequisite, E. E. 120. Reed. 

E. E. 218, 219. Signal Analysis and Noise (3, 3). Three lectures a week, first 

and second semesters. Prerequisite, E. E. 202 or equivalent. 

Weber, Freeman. 

E. E. 222. Graduate Seminar (1). First semester. Prerequisite, approved 



86 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

application for candidacy to the degree of Master of Science or Doctor of 
Philosophy in electrical engineering. Graduate Staff. 

E. E. 232. Active Network Analysis (3). Three lectures a week, second 
semester. Prerequisite, E. E. 202 or E. E. 204. Corcoran, Vanderslice. 

E. E. 233. Network Synthesis (3). Three lectures a week, first semester. 
Prerequisite, E. E. 232. Corcoran, Reed. 

E. E. 235. Applications of Tensor Analysis (3). Three lectures a week, 

first semester. Prerequisite, E. E. 202. Wagner. 

E. E. 250. Electrical Engineering Research. Prerequisite, approved application 
for candidacy to the degree of Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy 
in electrical engineering. Six semester hours are required of M.S. degree 
candidates and a minimum of 18 semester hours are required of Ph.D. 
candidates. Graduate Staff 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Professors Murphy, Aldridge, Bode, Harman; Lecturer AIcAIanaway; Associate 
Professors Ball, Coolej^ Manning, Moonej'^, Ward, Weber, Zeeveld; Assistant 
Professors Andrews, Coulter, Fleming, Gravely, Schaumann, Instructors 
Adams, Barnes, Beal], Burkhart, Casey, Demaree, Dinwiddie, Ellis, Goldsmith, 
Renault, Herzbrun, Holberg, Kelly, Lipsman, McGreal, ^Martin, Miller, Mish, 
Pierson, Portz, G. A. Smith, G. S. Smith, Stone, Thorberg, Weaver. 

Master of Arts 

1. Students must demonstrate a reading knowledge of a foreign language 
before they will be recommended for admission to candidacy. A choice of 
French or German is recommended, but in exceptional cases another language 
may be substituted by special permission of the Department. 

2. Candidates must pass a final written examination covering the English 
language and the whole course of English and American literature. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

1. Students must demonstrate a reading knowledge of German and French 
before they will be permitted to take the preliminary qualifying examination. 

2. Students must pass a preliminary qualifying examination before they will 
be recommended for admission to candidacy. They are expected to take this 
examination by the time they have completed a full year of residence beyond the 
Master of Arts requirement. 

3. Candidates must pass a comprehensive written examination covering 
linguistics and the whole course of English and American literature. 

Eng. 101. History of the English Language (3). Second semester. Summer 
School (2). Harman. 

Eng. 102. Old English (3). First semester. Summer School (2). Ball. 

< 

Eng. 103. Beowulf (3). Second semester. Ball 

Eng. 104. Chaucer (3). First semester. Summer School (2). Harman. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 87 

Eng. 110, 111. Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama (3, 3). (Not offered 1955- 
1950.) Zeeveld. 

Eng. 112. The Poetry of the Renaissance (3). First semester. 

Zeeveld. 

Eng. 113. Prose of the Renaissance (3). Second semester. Zeeveld. 

Eng. 115, 116. Shakespeare (3, 3). First and second semesters. Summer 
School (2. 2). Zeeveld. 

Eng. 120. English Drama from 1660 to 1800 (3). Second semester. Ward. 

Eng. 121. Milton (3). Second semester. Summer School (2). Murphy, 

Eng. 122. Literature of the Seventeenth Century, 1600-1660 (3). (Not offered 
1955-1956.) Murphy. 

Eng. 123. Literature of the Seventeenth Century, 1660-1700 (3). Not offered 
1955-1956.) Aldridge. 

Eng. 125, 126. Literature of the Eighteenth Century (3, 3). Eng. 125, Summer 
School (2). First and second semesters. Aldridge. 

Eng. 129, 130. Literature of the Romantic Period (3, 3). Summer School (2, 2). 
First and second semesters. Weber. 

Eng. 134, 135. Literature of the Victorian Period (3, 3). (Not offered 1955- 
1956.) Summer School (2, 2). Cooley, Mooney. 

Eng. 139, 140. The English Novel (3, 3). First and second semesters. Eng. 
140, Summer School (2). Ward, Mooney. 

Eng. 143. Modern Poetry (3). First semester. Summer School (2). Murphy. 
Eng. 144. Modem Drama (3). First semester. Weber. 

Eng. 145. The Modern Novel (3). Second semester. Andrews. 

Eng. 148. The Literature of American Democracy (3). (Not offered 1955- 
1956. Manning. 

Eng. 150, 151. American Literature (3, 3). First and second semesters. Sum- 
mer School (2, 2). Gravely, Manning. 

Eng. 155, 156. Major American Writers (3, 3). First and second semesters. 
Summer School (2, 2). Manning, Gravely. 

Eng. 157. Introduction to Folklore (3). First semester. Summer School (2). 

Cooley. 

Eng. 170. Creative Writing (2). First semester. Prerequisite, permission of 
the instructor. Fleming. 

Eng. 171. Advanced Creative Writing (2). Second semester. Prerequisite, 
permission of the instructor. Fleming. 

Eng. 172. Playwriting (2). (Not offered 1955-1956.) Prerequisite, permission 
of the instructor. Fleming. 



88 LWIl'liRSlTY OF MARYLAND 

For Graduates 

Eng. 200. Research (1-6). Arranged. StaflF. 

Eng. 201. Bibliography and Methods (3). First semester. Mooney. 

Eng. 202. Middle English (3). lirst semester. Suiniuer School (2). Harman. 

Eng. 203. Gothic (3). Second semester. Harman. 

Eng. 204. Medieval Romances (3). Second semester. Cooley. 

Eng. 206, 207. Seminar in Renaissance Literature (3, 3). First and second 

semesters. Eng. 206, Summer School (2). McManaway. 

Eng. 210. Seminar in Seventeenth Century Literature (3). Summer School 
(2). Second semester. Zeeveld, Murphy. 

Eng. 212, 213. Seminar in Eighteenth Century Literature (3, 3). (Not offered 
1955-1956.) Aldridge. 

Eng. 214, 215. Seminar in Nineteenth Century Literature (3, 3), First and 
second semesters. Eng. 214, Summer School (2). Cooley, Mooney, Weber. 

Eng. 216, 217. Literary Criticism (3, 3). (Not offered 1955-1956.) Murphy. 

Eng. 225, 226. Seminar in American Literature (3,3). First and second semes- 
ters. Summer School (2, 2). Bode. 

Eng. 227, 228. Problems in American Literature (3, 3). Eng. 227, Summer 
School (2). ■ First and second semesters. Aldridge. 

ENTOMOLOGY 

Professors Cory, Ditman, Langford; Lecturers Munson, Sailer, Sasscer, 
Shepard; Associate Professors Bickley, Bissell, Graham, McConnell; Assistant 
Professors Abrams, Haviland. 

The Department of Entomology offers work toward the degrees of Alaster 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Ent. 100. Advanced Apiculture (3). One lecture and two three-hour labora- 
tory periods a week, second semester. Prerequisite, Ent. 4. Laboratory 
fee, $3.00. Abrams. 

Ent. 101. Economic Entomology (3). Lectures, demonstrations and field 
trips, second semester. Prerequisite, consent of the department. (Alter- 
nates with Ent. 118; not offered in 1955-1956.) Cory. 

Ent. 105. Medical Entomology (3). Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory 
period a week, first semester. Prerequisite, Ent. 1 or consent of the depart- 
ment. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Bickley. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 89 

Ent. 106. Advanced Insect Taxonomy (3). 'Iwo tliree-hour laljoratory periods 
a vvt-ek, first semester. Prere(iuisite, Eiit. 3. l.aliDratary fee, p.OO. (Alter- 
nates with Ent. 119; not offered in 1955-1956.) Bickley. 

Ent. 107. Insecticides (2). Second semester. I'rereqnisites, consent of tlie 
department. Shepard. 

Ent. 109. Insect Physiology (2). Two lectures and occasional demonstrations, 
second semester. Prerequisite, consent of the department. Munson. 

Ent. 110, 111. Special Problems (1, 1). First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisites, to be determined by the Department. Cory and Staff. 

Ent. 112. Seminar (1, 1). First and second semesters. Cory and StalT. 

Ent. 113. Entomological Literature (1). Second semester. Bickley. 

Ent. 115. Quarantine Procedures (2). First semester. Prerequisite, consent 
of the department. Sasscer. 

Ent. 116. Insect Pests or Ornamentals and Greenhouse Plants (3). Two 

lectures and one two-hour laboratory period a week, second semester. 
Prerequisite, Ent. 1 or consent of the department. Laboratory fee. $3.00. 

Haviland. 

Ent. 117. Insect Pests of Field Crops and Stored Products (2). One lecture 
and one two-hour laboratory period a week, first semester. Prerequisite, 
Ent. 1 or consent of the department. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Alternate 
years; not offered in 1955-1956.) Cory and Bickley. 

Ent. 118. Insect Pests of Fruit and Vegetable Crops (3). Two lectures and 
one two-hour laboratory period a week, second semester. Prerequisite, 
Ent. 1 or consent of the department. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Cory and Bickley. 

Ent. 119. Insect Pests of Domestic Animals (2). One lecture and one two- 
hour laboratory period a week, first semester. Prerequisite, Ent. 1 or 
consent of the department. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Bickley. 



For Graduates 

Ent. 201. Advanced Entomology. Credit and prerequisites to be determined 
by the department. First and second semesters. Cory and Staff. 

Ent. 202. Research. Credit and prerequisites to be determined by the depart- 
ment. First and second semesters. Cory and Staflf. 

Ent. 203. Advanced Insect Morphology (2). One lecture and one three-hour 
laboratory period a week, second semester. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Alter- 
nates with Ent. 206; not offered in 1955-1956.) Bickley. 

Ent. 205. Insect Ecology (2). One lecture and one two-hour laboratory 
period a week, first semester. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Prerequisite, consent 
of the department. (Alternates with Ent. 107; not ofTered in 1955-1956.) 

Sailer. 



90 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Ent. 206. Bionomics of Mosquitoes (2). One lecture and one three-hour 
laboratory period a week, second semester. Laboratory fee, §3.00. 

Bickley. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE 

Professors Zucker, Falls, Prahl, Cunz, L. P. Smith, Goodwyn, Associate 
Professor Quynn; Assistant Professors Parsons, Rand, Rosenfield. 

Master of Arts 

Candidates must pass, in addition to written examinations in the courses 
pursued, a written examination based on the reading lists in their respective fields 
of French, German and Spanish, established by the Department. The examin- 
ation will test the generall familiarity of the candidate with his respective field 
and his powers of analysis and criticism. The oral examination will deal chiefly 
with the field of his thesis. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Candidates must pass a comprehensive written examination at least three 
months before the degree is awarded. This examination will include linguistics 
and each of the major literary fields. 

Attention is called to the courses in Coviparaivve Literature listed on page 70. 

A. French 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

French 0. Intensive Elementary French (0). Intensive elementary course in 
the French language designed particularly for graduate students who wish to 
acquire a reading knowledge. (StaflF.) 

French 100. French Literature of the Sixteenth Century (3). First semester. 

Falls 

French 101, 102. French Literature of the Seventeenth Century (3, ). Three 

hours a week, first and second semesters. Quynn, Rosenfield. 

French 103, 104. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century (3, 3). Three 
hours a week, first and second semesters. Falls, Bingham. 

French 105, 106. French Literatiure of the Nineteenth Century (3, 3). Three 
hours a week, first and second semesters. Bingham, Quynn. 

French 107, 108. French Literature of the Twentieth Century (3, 3). Three 
hours a week, first and second semesters. Falls. 

French 121, 122. Advanced Composition (3, 3). Three hours a week, first and 
second semesters. Falls. 

French 161, 162. French Civilization (3, 3). First and second semesters. 

Rosenfield. 

French 171. Practical French Phonetics (3). First semester. Smith. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 91 

French 199. Rapid Review of the History of French Literature (1). Second 
semester. Especially designed for French majors. Weekly lectures. Falls 

For Graduates 
The requirements of students will determine which courses will be offered. 
French 201. Research. Credit determined by work accomplished. Staff. 

French 203, 204. George Duhamel, Poet, Dramatist, Novelist (2,). Two hours 
a week, first and second semesters. Falls. 

French 205, 206. French Literature of the Middle Ages (3, 3). Three hours a 
week, first and second semesters. Smith. 

French 207, 208. The French Novel in the First Half of the Nineteenth Century 
(2, 2). Two hours a week, first and second semesters. Falls. 

French 209, 210. The French Novel in the Second Half of the Nineteenth 
Century (2, 2). Two hours a week, first and second semesters. Falls. 

French 211. Introduction to Old French (3). Second semester. Smith. 

French 215, 216. Moliere (3, 3). First and second semesters. Quynn. 

French 221, 222. Reading Course. (Arranged.) StafiF. 

French 230. Introduction to European Linguistics (3). Smith 

French 251, 252. Seminar (3, 3). Required of all graduate majors in French. 

StafiF. 

B. German 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

German 0. Intensive Elementary German (0.) Intensive elementary course in 
the German language designed particularly for graduate students who wish 
to acquire a reading knowledge. Staff. 

German 101, 102. German Literature of the Eighteenth Century (3, 3). Three 
hours a week, first and second semesters. Prahl, Schweizer. 

German 103, 104. German Literature of the Nineteenth Century (3, 3). Three 
hours a week, first and second semesters. Prahl, Cunz. 

Grman 105, 106. Modem German Literature (3, 3). Three hours a week, first 
and second semesters. Prahl, Hammerschlag. 

German 107, 108. Goethe's' Faust (2, 2). Two hours a week, first and second 
semesters. Zucker. 

Attention is called to Comp. Lit. 106, Romanticism in Germany, and Comp. 
Lit. 107, The Faust Legend in English and German Literature. 

German 121, 122. Advanced Composition (3, 3). Three hours a week, first and 

second semesters. Kramer, Cunz. 



92 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

German 161, 162. German Civilization (3, 3). Three hours a week, first and 
second semesters. Cunz. 

German 199. Rapid Review of the History of German Literature (1). Second 
semester. Especially designed for German majors. Weekly lectures. 

Schweizer. 

For Graduates 

The requirements of students will determine which courses will be offered. 

German 201. Research. Credits determined by work accomplished. Staff. 

German 202, 203. The Modem German Drama (3, 3). Three hours a week, 
first and second semesters. Zucker. 

German 204. Schiller (3). Prahl. 

German 205. Goethe's Works outside of Faust (2). Second semester. Zucker. 

German 206. The Romantic Movement (3). Prahl. 

German 208. The Philosophy of Goethe's Faust (3). First semester. Zucker. 

German 221, 222. Reading Course. (Arranged). First and second semesters. 

Staff. 
German 230. Introduction to European Linguistics (3). First semester. Smith 

German 231. Middle High German (3). Second semester. Schweizer. 

German 251, 252. Seminar (3, 3). Required of all graduate majors in German. 

Staff. 

C. Spanish 
Spanish 101. Epic and Ballad (3). First semester. Parsons. 

Spanish 102. The Spanish Popular Ballad (3). Second semester. Goodwyn. 

Spanish 104. The Drama of the Golden Age (3). Second semester. 

Parsons. 

Spanish 108. Lope de Vega (3). First semester. Parsons. 

Spanish 109. Cervantes (3). Second semester. Rand. 

Spanish 110. Modern Spanish Poetry (3). First semester. Rand. 

Spanish 111. The Spanish Novel of the Nineteenth Century (3). First semes- 
ter. Parsons. 

Spanish 112. Modern Spanish Drama (3). First semester. Nemcs. 

Spanish 113. The Spanish Novel of the Twentieth Century (3). Second semes- 
ter. Rand. 

Spanish 115. Modern Spanish Thought (3). Second semester. Rand. 

Spanish 121, 122. Advanced Composition (3, 3). First and second semesters. 

Goodwyn. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 93 

Spanish 151. Spanish-American Novel (3). First semester. Nemes 

Spanish 152. Spanish-American Poetry (3). Second semester. Nemes. 

Spanish 153. Spanish-American Essay (3). I-irst semester. Nemes. 

Spanish 161, 162, Spanish Civilization (3, 3). First and second semesters. 

Rand. 

Spanish 163, 164. Latin-American Civilization (3, 3). First and second 

semesters. Goodwyn. 

Spanish 199. Rapid Review of the History of Spanish Literature (1). Second 

semester. Especially designed for Spanish majors. Weekly lectures. 

• Parsons. 

For Graduates 

Spanish 201. Research. Credit determined by work accomplished. Staff. 

Spanish 202. The Golden Age in Spanish Literature (3). First semester. 

Goodwyn. 

Spanish 203, 204. Spanish Poetry (3, 3). Three hours a week, first and second 

semesters. Goodwyn. 

Spanish 211. Introduction to Old Spanish (3). Second semester. Parsons. 

Spanish 221, 222. Reading Course. (Arranged). StafiF. 

Spanish 230. Introduction to European Ling^uistics (3). Smith. 

Spanish 251, 252. Seminar (3, 3). Required of all graduate majors in Spanish. 

Staff. 

D. Russian 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Russian 101, 102. Modern Russian Literature (3, 3). Three hours a week, first 
and second semesters. Boborykine. 

Russian 103, 104. Russian Literature of the Nineteenth Century (3, 3). Three 
hours a week, first and second semesters. Boborykine. 

GEOGRAPHY 

Professors Van Royen, Hu: Consulting Professors Roterus, Whipple; Lecturers 
with rank of Professor Lemons, McBryde; Associate Professor Patton; Assist- 
ant Professors Ausyelli, Herhst. 

Students seeking graduate degrees in geography are expected to have 
acquired a broad foundation in the subject and in allied fields. This foundation 
must have included a minimum of 24 semester hours in geography, of which 6 
semester hours shall have been in Morphology and Map Reading and Inter- 
pretation, 6 semester hours in Weather and Climate, and 12 semester hours in 
Human, Economic, or Regional Geography. In addition the student must have 
taken successfully the following courses, or their equivalents, in allied fields; 
Anthropology (3 semester hours), Economics (6 semester hours), History (^ 



94 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

semester hours), Introductory or General Botany (3 semester hours), Sociology 
(3 semester hours). Foreign Language (12 semester hours). Students who do 
not have this background will be accepted as graduate students on a provisional 
status only and will be required to make up their deficiencies before being ad- 
mitted to candidacy for an advanced degree. Graduate credit will not be given 
for courses taken to make up for deficiencies in background. 

In addition to meeting the general requirements of the Graduate School, 
candidates for the Master's degree in geography are required to have taken 

successfully: one field course (Geography 170 or 200, or equivalent), a course 
in cartography, a course in soils, and one seminar. In addition to the final 
oral examination, the candidate for the Master's degree in geography is required 
to pass satisfactorily a written examination covering the fields in which he 
has worked, his understanding of basic principles, and his power of reasoning. 

A graduate student seeking the Doctor of Philosophy degree in geography 
must take a comprehensive written and oral examination to determine whether 
he has sufficiently broad and profound knowledge and understanding of the entire 

field of geography to qualify as a candidate for the Doctor's degree. 

Geog. 100. Regional Geography of Eastern Anglo-America (3). First semester. 
Prerequisite, Geog. 1, 2 or Geog. 10 or permission of instructor. Herbst. 

Geog. 101. Regional Geography of Western Anglo-America (3). Second 
semester. Prerequisite, Geog. 1, 2 or Geog. 10 or permission of instructor. 

Herbst. 

Geog. 105. Geogfraphy of Maryland and Adjacent Areas (3.) First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. 

An analysis of the physical environment, natural resources, and population 
in relation to agriculture, industry, transport, and trade in the state of Maryland 
and adjacent areas. Patton. 

Geog. 110. Economic and Cultural Geography of Caribbean America (3). First 
semester. Augelli. 

Geog. 111. Economic and Cultural Geography of South America (3). Second 
semester. AugelH. 

Geog. 120. Economic Geography of Europe (3). First semester. 

Van Royen, Patton. 

Geog. 122. Economic Resources and Development of Africa (3). Second 

semester. Van Royen. 

Geog. 123. Problems of Colonial Geography (3). First or second semester. 

Geog. 130, 131. Economic and Political Geography of Southern and Eastern 
Asia (3, 3). First and second semesters. Hu. 

Geog. 134, 135. Cultural Geography of East Asia (3, 3). First and second 
semester. Hu. 

Geog. 140. Soviet Lands (3). First or second semester. 
Geog. 146. The Near East (3). First semester. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 95 

Geog. 150. Problems of Map Evaluation I. Topographic Maps (3). OflE 
campus. First or second semester. Two hours lecture and two hours 
laboratory a week. Prerequisite, Geog. 30. Davies, Geological Survey. 

Geog. 151. Problems of Map Evaluation II. Non-Topographic Special-Use 
Maps (3). Off campus. First or second semester. Two-hour lecture and 
two hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite, Geog. ISO. 

Brierly, Army Map Service. 

Geog. 152. Problems and Practices of Photo Interpretation (3). First err 
second semesters. Two-hour lecture and two hours laboratory a week. 
Prerequisite, Geog. 30, 35 or equivalent. 

Geog. 154, 155. General Cartography and Graphics (3, 3). First and second 
semesters. One lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, Geog. 30 or consent of instructor. Karinen. 

Geog. 160. Advanced Economic Geography I. Agricultural Resources (3). 

First semester, i'rereciuisite, Geog. 1 and 2, or Geog. 10. 

The nature of agricultural resources, the major types of agricultural 
exploitation in the world, and the geographic distribution of certain major 
crops and animals in relation to the physical environment and economic geo- 
graphic conditions. Alain problems of conservation. Van Royen. 

Geog. 161. Advanced Economic Geography II. Mineral Resources (3). Second 

semester. Prerequisite, Geog. 1 and 2, or Geog. 10. 

The nature and geographic distribution of the principal power, metallic and 
other minerals. Economic geographic aspects of modes of exploitation. Con- 
sequences of geographic distribution and problems of conservation Van Royen. 

Geog. 170. Local Field Course (3). First semester. Karinen. 

Geog. 180. History, Nature and Methodology of Geography (3). First semester. 

Hu. 
Geog. 190. Political Geography (3). Second semester. 

Geographical factors in national power and international relations; an 
analysis of the role of "Geopolitics" and "Geostrategy," with special reference to 
the current world scene. Augelli. 

Geog. 195. Geography of Transportation (3). Second semester. 

The distribution of transport routes of the earth's surface; patterns of 
transport routes; the adjustment of transport routes and media to conditions of 

the natural environment; transportation centers and their distribution. Patton. 

Geog. 197. Urban Geography (3). First semester. 

Origins of cities, followed by a study of the elements of site and location 
with reference to cities. The patterns and functions of some major world 
cities will be analyzed. Theories of land use differentiation within cities will be 
appraised. Patton. 

Geog. 199. Topical Investigations (1-3). First and second semesters. 

Independent study under individual guidance. Choice of subject matter 
requires joint approval of adviser and head of the Department of Geography. 



96 VNIVURSITY OP MAHYLAND 

Restricted to advanced undergraduate students with credit for at least 24 hours 
of geography. Staff. 

For Graduates 

Geog. 200. Field Course (3). Field work in September, conferences and reports 
during first semester. For graduate students in geography. Open to other 
students by special permission of the Head of the Department of Geography. 

Geog. 210, 211. Seminar in the Geography of Latin America (3, 3). First and 
and second semesters. Prerequisites, Geog. 110, 111 or consent of instructor. 

McBryde. 

Geog. 220, 221. Seminar in the Geography of Europe and Africa (3, 3). First 
and second semesters. Prerequisites, Geog. 120, 121 or consent of instructorj 

Van Royen. 

Geog. 230, 231. Seminar in the Geography of East Asia (3, 3). First and 
second semesters. 

Analysis of problems concerning the geography of East Asia with emphasis 
on special research methods and techniques applicable to the problems of 
this area. 

Geog. 240, 241. Seminar in the Geography of the U.S.S.R. (3, 3). First and 
second semesters. Prerequisites, reading knowledge of Russian and Geog. 
140 or consent of instructor. 

Geog. 246. Seminar in the Geography of the Near East (3). 

Geog. 250. Seminar in Cartography. (Credit to be arranged.) First or second 
semester. Karinen, Davies. 

Geog. 260. Advanced General Climatology (3). First semester. Prerequisite, 

Geog. 41, or consent of instructor; Lemons. 

Geog. 261. Applied Climatology (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Geog. 41, 
or consent of instructor. Lemons. 

Geog. 262, 263. Seminar in Meteorology and Climatology. (3, 3). First and 
second semesters. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Lemons. 

Geog. 280. Geomorphology (3). Second semester. Van Royen. 

Geog. 290. 291. Selected Topics in Geography (1-3). First and second se- 
mesters. Prerequisite, joint consent of adviser and Head of the Department 
of Geography. Staff. 

Geog. 292, 293. Dissertation Research. (Credit to be arranged.) First and 
second semesters and summer. 

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

Professors Burdette, Plischke, and Steinmeyer; Associate Professor Bowen; 
Assistant Professors Anderson, Dixon, and Harrison; Instructors Alford, 
Bundgaard, and Hathorn; Junior Instructor Henderson. 

For the Master's degree, a comprehensive written examination is given on 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 97 

graduate course work in the major field. At the discretion of the Department, 
an oral examination may be substituted for the written examination. 

The doctoral candidate must show in written examinations satisfactory 
competence in five of the following fields: (1) Comparative Government; (2) 
International Political Affairs; (3) Local Government; (4) Political Theory; (5) 
Public Administration; (6) Public Law; (7) Public Policy. No candidate may 
attempt the comprehensive examinations prior to completion of the language 
requirements for the doctorate, and no candidate may attempt the comprehensive 
examinations more than twice. 

Government and Politics 

For Gr.'Vduates .^nd Advanced Undergraduates 

G. & P. 101. International Political Relations (3). First semester. Prerequisite, 
G. & P. 1. Harrison. 

G. & P. 102. International Law (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. 

Harrison. 

G. &. P. 105. Recent Far Eastern Politics (3). First semester. Prerequisite, 

G. & P. 1. Steinmeyer. 

G. &. P. 106. American Foreign Relations (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, 
G. & P. 1. Plischke. 

G. & P. 108. International Organization (3). First semester. Prerequisite, 
G. & P. 1. Plischke. 

G. &. P. 110. Principles of Public Administration (3). First semester. Pre- 
requisite, G. & P. 1. Bowen. 

G. &. P. 111. Public Personnel Administration (3). First semester. Prere- 
quisite. G. & P. 110 or B. A. 160. Alford. 

G. &. P. 112. Public Financial Administration (3). Second semester. Prere- 
quisite, G. & P. 110 or Econ. 142. Alford. 

G. &, P. 124. Legislatures and Legislation (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, 
G. & P. 1. Burdette, Hathorn. 

G. &. P. 131, 132. Constitutional Law (3, 3). First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. Dixon. 

G. &. P. 133. Administration of Justice (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, 
G. & P. 1. Dixon. 

G. &. P. 141. History of Political Theory (3). First semester. Prerequisite, 
G. & P. 1. Anderson. 

G. &. P. 142. Recent Political Theory (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, 
G. & P. 1. Anderson. 

G. & P. 144. American Political Theory (3). First semester. Prerequisite, 
G. & P. 1. Anderson. 



98 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

G. & P. 154. Problems of World Politics (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, 
G. & P. 1. Steinmeyer. 

G. &. P. 174. Political Parties (3). First semester. Prerequisite, G. &. P. 1. 

Burdette, Hatharn. 

G. &. P. 178. Public Opinion (3). First semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. 

Burdette. 

G. &. P. 181. Administrative Law (3). Second semester. Prerequisite G. & P. 1. 

Dixon. 

G. &. P. 197. Comparative Governmental Institutions (3). Second semester. 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. Harrison. 



For Graduates 

G. &. P. 201. Seminar in International Political Organization (3). 

Plischke. 

G. & P. 202. Seminar in International Law (3). Plischke, Harrison. 

G. &. P. 205. Seminar in American Political Institutions (3). Burdette. 

G. & P. 206. Seminar in American Foreign Relations (3). Plischke. 

G. &. P. 207. Seminar in Comparative Governmental Institutions (3). 

Steinmeyer, Harrison. 

G. &. P. 211. Seminar in Federal-State Relations (3). Staflf. 

G. & P. 213. Problems of Public Administration (3). Bowen. 

G. &. P. 214. Problems of Public Personnel Administration (3). StaflF. 

G. &. P. 215. Problems of State and Local Government in Maryland (3). StaflF. 

G. &. P. 216. Government Administrative Planning and Management (3). StaflF. 

G. &. P. 217. Government Corporation and Special Purpose Authorities. StaflF. 

G. & P. 221. Seminar in Public Opinion (3). Burdette. 

G. &. P. 223. Seminar in Legislatures and Legislation (3). Burdette. 

G. & P. 224. Seminar in Political Parties and Politics (3). Burdette. 

G. St. P. 225. Man and the State (3). ■ Anderson 

G. & P. 231. Seminar in Public Law (3). Dixon. 

G. & P. 251. Bibliography of Government and Politics (3). StaflF. 

G. & P. 261. Problems of Government and Politics (3) StaflF. 

G. &. P. 281. Departmental Seminar (No Credit). Registration for two semes- 
ters required of all doctoral candidates. Staff. 

G. & P. 299. Thesis Course (Arranged). 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 99 

HISTORY 

Professors, Gewelir, Chatelain, Praiigc, Wellborn; Associate Professors Bauer, 

Merrill; Assistant Professors Crosman, Gordon, Jashemski, Sparks; Instructors 

Bates, Beard, Ferguson, Hanks, Riddelberger. 

Master of Arts 

1. Eight to ten hours of the total major course requirements of all candi- 
dates for this degree must be acquired in general field of the thesis, i.e., either 
American or European history. 

2. H. 287, Historiography, is required of all candidates for graduate degrees 
in history. 

3. Candidates for the Master of Arts degree must pass a two-hour qualifying 
written examination no later than one month before the date set for the final oral 
examination. The purpose of the written examination is to determine the stu- 
dent's general grasp of the larger field in which the thesis lies, (e. g. American, 
European, English, Latin-American). The examination will include not only 
factual and interpretative material, but also biblography and historiography. 
However, it will not be based on courses as such. 

4. The final oral examination will be confined to the general field of the 
thesis, and the thesis itself. It is understood that the representative of the minor 
field may examine the candidate on the minor subject or subjects at his discretion, 

5. The thesis must be submitted in final form to the candidate's committee 
three weeks prior to the final oral examination. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

1. At least thirty hours of the total major course requirements, including 
H. 287, must be acquired in the general field of the thesis, i.e., American history 
or European history. 

2. At least ten hours of the thirty required for a minor in history must be 
taken at the University of Maryland. 

3. Recommendations for admission to candidacy will be determined by the 
department on the basis of achievement which the student may be required to 
substantiate by oral or written examinations. 

4. Before confirmation for the degree the student must pass a written com- 
prehensive examination in addition to the final oral examination required by 
the Graduate School. 

5. The thesis must be submitted in final form to the candidate's committee 
five weeks prior to the final oral examination. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

A. American History 

H. 5, 6 are prerequisites for courses H, 101 to H. 142, inclusive. 

H. 101. American Colonial History (3). First semester. Summer School (2). 

Ferguson. 



100 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

H. 102. The American Revolution (3). Second semester. Summer School (2). 

Ferguson. 
H. 105. Social and Economic History of the United States to 1865 (3). First 

semester. Chatelain. 

H. 106. Social and Economic History of the United States Since the Civil War 

(3). Second semester. Chatelain. 

H. 114. The Middle Period of American History 1824-1860. (3). First semester. 

Summer School (2). Sparks. 

H. 115. The Old South (3). First semester. Summer School (2). 

Riddelberger. 

H. 116. The Civil War (3). Second semester. Summer School (2). Sparks. 

H. 117. The New South (3). First semester. Summer School (2). 

Riddelberger. 

H. 118, 119. Recent American History (3, 3). Summer School (2, 2). Merrill. 

H. 121. History of the American Frontier (3). First semester, Summer School 
(2). Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. 

The Trans- Allegheny West. The westward movement into the Mississippi 
Valley. Gewehr. 

H. 122. History of the American Frontier (3). Second semester. Summer 
School (1). Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. 

The Trans-Mississippi West. Forces and factors in the settlement and de- 
velopment of the Trans-Mississippi West to about 1900. Gewehr. 

H. 123. The New West (3). Second semester. Summer School (2). Bates. 

H. 124. Reconstruction and the New Nation 1865-1896 (3). Second semester. 

Summer School (2). Merrill. 

H. 127, 128. Diplomatic History of the United States (3, 3). First and second 

semesters. Wellborn. 

H. 129. The United States and World Affairs (3). First semester. Summer 
School (2). Wellborn. 

H. 133, 134. The History of Ideas in America (3, 3). First and second semes- 
ters. Summer School (2, 2). Beard. 

H. 135, 139. Constitutional History of the United States (3, 3). First and 
second semesters. Gewehr. 

H. 141, 142. History of Maryland (3, 3). Three hours a week, first and second 
semesters. Chatelain. 

H. 145, 146. Latin-American History (3, 3). Three hours a week, first and 

second semesters. Summer School (2). Crosman. 

H. 147. History of Mexico (3). First semester. Crosman. 

B. European History 

H. 1, 2 or H. 53, 54 are prerequisites for courses H. 151 to H. 191, inclusive. 

H. 151. History of the Ancient Orient and Greece (3). First semester. 

Jashemski- 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 101 

H. 153. History of Rome (3). Second semester. Jashemski. 

H. 155. Medieval Civilization (3). l-irst semester. Summer School (2). 

Jasliemski. 

H. 161. The Renaissance and Reformation (3). Second semester. Summer 

School (2). Jasliemski. 

H. 166. The French Revolution (2). First semester. 

The Hnhghtenment and the Old Keginie in France; the revolutionary 
ui)risings from 1789 to 1799. (Bauer, Gordon.) 

H. 167. Napoleonic Europe (2). Second semester. 

European Developments from the rise of Napoleon to the Congress of 
Vienna. (Bauer, Gordon.) 

H. 171, 172. Europe in the Nineteenth Century, 1815-1919 (3, 3). First and 
second semesters. Bauer. 

H. 175, 176. Europe in the World Setting of the Twentieth Century (3, 3). 

I'^irst and second semesters. Summer School (2, 2). Prange. 

H. 185, 186. History of the British Empire (3, 3). First and second semesters. 

H. 186, Summer School (2). Gordon. 

H. 187. History of Canada (3). First semester. Summer School (2). Gordon. 

H. 189. Constitutional History of Great Britain (3). Second semester. 

Gordon. 
H. 191. History of Russia (3). First semester. Bauer. 

H. 192. Foreign Policy of the USSR (3). Second semester. Summer School 
(2). Prerequisites, H. 1, 2 and H. 191. Bauer. 

H. 195. The Far East (3). First semester. Summer School (2). Gewehr. 

H. 199. Proseminar in Historical Writing (3). First and second semesters. 

Sparks, Riddelberger. 
For Graduates 

H. 200. Research (3-6). Credit apportioned to amount of research. First and 
second semesters. StafiF. 

H. 201. Seminar in American History (3). First and second semesters. Summer 
School (2). Staff. 

H. 202. Historical Literature (3). First and second semesters (Summer School 
2). Assignments in various selected fields of historical literature and bib- 
liography to meet the requirements of qualified graduate students who need 
more intensive concentration. (StafT.) 

H. 205, 206. Topics in American Economic and Social History (3, 3). First 
and second semesters. Chatelain. 

H. 208. Topics in Recent American History (3). First and second semesters. 

Merill. 

H. 211. The Colonial Period in American History (3). First semester. 

Ferguson 

H. 212. Period of the American Revolution (3). Second semester. 

Ferguson 



102 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

H. 215. The Old South (3). First semester. Riddelberger. 

H. 216. The American Civil War (3). First semester. Sparks. 

H. 217. Reconstruction and its Aftermath (3). Second semester. Merrill. 

H. 221, 222. History of the West (3, 3). Summer School (2, 2). Gewehr. 

H. 233, 234. Topics in American Intellectual History (3, 3). Beard. 

H. 245. Topics in Latin-American History (3). Crosman. 

H. 250. Seminar in European History (3). First and second semesters. Summer 
School (2). Bauer. 

H. 251. Topics in Greek Civilization (3). Jashemski. 

H. 253. Topics in Roman History (3). Jashemski. 

H. 255. Medieval Culture and Society (3). (Arranged). Jashemski. 

H. 282. Problems in the History of World War II (3). Prange. 

H. 285, 286. Topics in the History of Modern England and Great Britain 
(3,3). First and second semesters. Gordon. 

H. 287. Historiography (3). First and second semesters. Required of all 
candidates for advanced degrees in history. Sparks. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

A. Textiles and Clothing 

Professor Mitchell; Assistant Professor Wilbur; 
Instructors, Heagnej', Parker 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Tex. 100. Advanced Textiles (3). First Semester. One lecture and two lab- 
oratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Tex. 1. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Tex. 101. Problems in Textiles (3). One lecture and three laboratory periods 
a week, first semester. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Prerequisite, Tex. 100; 
Organic Chemistry. Staff. 

Tex. 102. Textile Testing (3). Three laboratory periods a week, second semester. 

Prerequisite, Tex. 100. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Staff. 

Tex. 105. Consumer Problems in Textiles (3). Two lectures and one labora- 
tory period a week, second semester. Prerequisite, Tex. 1, or equivalent. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. Wilbur. 

Tex. 106. Household Textiles (3). Three laboratory periods a week, first 
semester. Prerequisite, Tex. 1, or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Wilbur. 

Tex. 108. Decorative Fabrics (2). One lecture and one laboratory period a 
week, second semester. Prerequisite, Tex. 1, or equivalent. Laboratory 
fee, $3.00. Wilbur. 

Clo. 120. Draping (3). Three laboratory periods a week, first and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, Clo. 21, 22. Laboratory fee, $3.00 Wilbur. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 103 

Clo. 122. Tailoring (2). Two laboratory periods a week, first and second 
semesters, summer session, 1955. Prerequisite, Clo. 21. Laboratory fee, 
$3.00. Mitchell, Heagney, Parker. 

Clo. 123. Children's Clothing (2). Two laboratary periods a week, first se- 
mester. Prere(|uisite, Clo. 20.^, or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Heagney, Wilbur. 

Clo, 124. Projects and Readings in Textiles and Clothing (2). First semester. 
Prerequisites Clo. 120, Tex. 100. Laboratory fee, ?3.00. Mitchell. 

Clo. 125. Costume Draping (3). Second semester. Three two-hour laboratory 
periods a week. Prcrequi.site, Pr. Art 20 or consent of department. Lab- 
oratory fee, $3.00. 

Clo. 126. Fundamentals of Fashion (2-3). Three lecture periods a week. Sec- 
ond semester. Prerequisites, Clo. 120, Tex. 100. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

Wilbur. 

Clo. 127. Apparel Design (3). First and second semesters. One lecture and 
two lal^oratoTv periods a week. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Prerequisite, Clo. 
120. Wilbur. 

Clo. 128. Home Furnishings (3). Three laboratory periods a week, first and 
second semesters. Prerequisites, Tex. 1, Clo. 20A, or consent of instructor. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. Wilbur. 

For Graduates 

Tex. 200. Special Studies in Textiles (2-4). Second semester. Laboratory fee, 
$3.00. Staflf. 

Clo. 220. Special Studies in Clothing (2-4). First semester. Laboratory fee, 
$3.00. Mitchell, Wilbur. 

Tex. and Clo. 230. Seminar (1). First and second semesters. Laboratory 
fee, $3.00. Mitchell. 

Tex. and Clo. 231. Research (4-6). First and second semesters. Laboratory 
fee, $3.00. StaflF. 

Tex. and Clo. 232. Economics of Textiles and Clothing (3). Second semester. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. Mitchell. 

B. Practical Art and Crafts 

Professor Curtiss; Assistant Professors Cuneo; Instructors Davis, Elliott, Eno, 

Hodgson, Longley. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Pr. Art 100, 101. Mural Design (2, 2). Two laboratory periods a week, second 
semester. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 1, 2, 3, 21, and 
permission of the instructor. Curtiss. 

Pr. Art 120, 121. Costume Illustration (2, 2). Two laboratory periods a week. 



104 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

first and second semesters. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 
1, 20, 21, 22, and permission of instructor. Elliott. 

Pr. Art 124, 125. Individual Problems in Costume (2, 2), Two laboratory 
periods a week, first and second semesters. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Pre- 

rcqui'^ites, Fr. .Art 1. 20, 120. 121, and pcrniission of instructor. Elliott 

Pr. Art 132. Advertising Layout (2). Two laboratory periods a week, first 
and second semesters. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 1, 20, 

21, 22, 30, and permission of instructor. Cuneo. 

Pr. Art 134, 135. Individual Problems in Advertising (2, 2). Two laboratory 
periods a week, second semester. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Prerequisites, Pr. 
Art 1, 20, 30, 120, 132, or equivalent, and permission of instructor. 

Cuneo. 

Pr, Art 136. Display (2). Two laboratory periods a week, first and second 
semebters. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 1, 20, 30. Prac- 
tice in efifective display for teaching and for merchandising. Cooperation 
with retail establishments. 

Pr. Art. 138. Advanced Photography (2). Tliree laboratory periods a week, 
first and second semesters. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Prerequisites, Pr. Art. 1, 
38. 39. or permission of the instructor. Davis. 

Pr. Art 142, 143. Advanced Interior Design (2, 2). Two laboratory periods 

a week, first and second semesters. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Prerequisites, 
Pr. Art 1, 40, 41, or equivalent. Eno. 

Pr. Art 144, 145. Individual Problems in Interior Design (2, 2). Two labor- 
atory periods a week, first and second semesters. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 
Prerequisites, Pr. Art. 1, 40, 41, 142, 143, and permission of instructor. 

Eno. 

Cr. 120, 121. Advanced Ceramics (2, 2). Three laboratory periods a week, first 
and second semesters. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Prerequisites, Cr. 20, 21. 

Hodgson. 

Cr. 124, 125. Individual Problems in Ceramics (2, 2). Two laboratory periods 
a week, first and second semesters. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Prerequisites, 

Cr. 20, 21, 120, 121, and permission of instructor. Hodgson. 

Cr. 130, 131. Advanced Metalry (2, 2). Three laboratory periods a week, first 
and second semesters. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Prerequisites, Cr. 30, 31. 

Longley. 

Cr. 134, 135. Individual Problems in Metalry (2, 2). Three laboratory periods 
a week, first and second semesters. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Prerequisites, 
Cr. 30, 31, 130, 131, and permission of instructor. Longley. 

Cr. 140, 141. Advanced Weaving (2, 2). Three laboratory periods a week, 
first and second semesters. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Prerequisites, Cr. 40, 41. 

Longley. 

Cr. 144, 145. Individual Problems in Weaving (2, 2). Three laboratory periods 
a week, first and second semesters. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Prerequisites, Cr. 
40, 41, 140, 141, and permission of instructor. Longley. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 105 

C. Home and Institution Management 

Professor Mount; Associate Professor Braucher; Assistant Professor Crow; 
Instructor Collins, Mearig. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Home Mgt. 150, 151. Management of the Home (3, 3). Two lectures and one 
laboratory periods a week. Crow, Mearig. 

Home Mgt 152. Experience in Management of Home (3). First and second 
semesters. Prerequisites, Home Mgt. 150, 151. Laboratory fee, $7.00. 

Crow, Mearig. 

Home Mgt. 155. Money Management (2). Two hours a week. Not offered 

1955-56. 

Home Mgt. 156. Household Equipment (2). Two laboratories a week. Not 
offered 1955-56. 

Inst. Mgt. 160. Institution Organization and Management (3). Two lectures 

and one laboratory period a week, first semester. Prerequisites, Foods 
2, 3; Nut. 110, Home Mgt. 150, 151 to precede or parallel. Collins. 

Inst. Mgt- 161. Institution Purchasing and Accounting (3). Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week, second semester. Prerequisite, Inst. Mgt. 160. 

Collins. 

Inst Mgt 162. Institution Foods (3). One lecture and two laboratory periods 
a week, second semester. Prerequisites, Inst. Mgt. 160, 161. Collins. 

Inst Mgt. 164. Advanced Institution Management (2). One lecture and one 
laboratory period a week, second semester. Prerequisites, Inst Mgt 160, 

lol, 162, or the e.iuivalent. Braucher. 

Inst Mgt. 165. School Lunch (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period 
a week, second semester and summer session. Prerequisites, Foods 2, 3; 
Nut 110, or equivalent 

Inst Mgt S166. Nutrition and Meal Planning (2). Summer Session. One 
lecture and two laboratory periods. Prerequisites Inst Mgt. 160 or Equiva- 
lent 

Inst. Mgt 181. Purchasing and Accounting for Housekeeping Administration 
(3). Two lecture periods a week. Second semester. I'rerequisite, Inst. 
Mgt. 160. 

Inst. Mgt. 182. Housekeeping Management (3). Three lecture periods a week. 
First semester. Prerequisite, Inst. Mgt. 160. 



106 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Inst. Mgt. 183. Problems in Housekeeping Management (3). One lecture, two 
laboratory periods a week. Second semester. Prerequisites, Inst. Mgt. 160 
and Inst. Mgt. 182. 

Inst. Mgt. 200. Advanced Food Service Management and Supervision (3). 

First semester. Prerequisites Inst. Algt. 102, 165 or e(]uivalent. 



D. Foods and Nutrition 

Associate Professor Braucher; Assistant Professors Cornell, 
Instructors Collins, Duke. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Foods 100. Food Economics (2). One lecture and one laboratory period a 
week, first semester. Laboratory fee, $7.00. Prerequisite, Foods 1 or 2, 3. 

Foods 101. Meal Service (2). Two laboratory periods a week, first and second 
semesters. Laboratory fee, $7.00. Prerequisite, Foods 1 or 2, 3. 

Cornell, Duke 

Foods 102. Experimental Foods (3). One lecture and two laboratory periods 
a week, first semester. Laboratory fee, $7.00. Prerequisites, Foods 2, 3; 
Organic Chemistry, Chem. 31, il, ii, 34. Staff. 

Foods 103. Demonstrations (2). Two laboratory periods a week, second semes- 
ter. Laboratory fee, S7.00. Prerequisites, Foods 1 or 2, 3; Tex. 1; Clo. 20 
or Pr. Art. 20. Staff. 

Foods, 104. Advanced Foods (2). Two laboratory periods a week, first se- 
mester. Laboratory fee, $7.00. Prerequisite, Foods 1 or 2, 3. Cornell. 

Foods 105. Foods of Other Countries (3). One lecture and two laboratory 
periods a week, second semester. Alternate years. Laboratory fee, $7.00. 

Prerequisite, Foods 1 or 2, 3, or equivalent. Staff. 

Nut. 110. Nutrition (3). First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Foods 2, 
3; Organic Chemistry, Chem. 31, 2)2, ZZ, 34. Laboratory fee, $7.00. 

Braucher. 

Nut. 111. Child Nutrition (2). One lecture and one laboratory period a week, 

first and second semesters. Prerequisite, Foods 1 or 2, 3; Xut. 110 or 10. 

Collins. 

Nut, 112. Dietetics (3). One lecture and two laboratory periods a week, 
second semester. Laboratory fee, $7.00. Prerequisite, Nut 110. Braucher. 

Nut. 113. Diet and Disease (2). Second semester. Alternate years. Prere- 
quisite, Nut 110. • 

Nut. 114. Nutrition for Health Services (3). Three lecture periods a week. 
Second semester. Prerequisite Xut. 10 or the equivalent. Braucher. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 107 

For Graduates 

Foods 200. Advanced Experimental Foods (3-5). Laboratory fee, $7.00. Second 
semester. 

Nut. 208. Recent Progress in Human Nutrition (3). Second Semester. 

Brauchcr. 

Nut. 210. Readings in Nutrition (3). First semester. 

Nut. 211. Problems in Nutrition (3-5). First and second semesters. 

Nut. 212. Nutrition for Community Service (3). First semester. 

Foods and Nut. 204. Recent Advances in Foods and Nutrition (2-3). Second 
semester. 

Foods and Nut. 220. Seminar (1, 1). First and second semesters. 

Foods and Nut. 221. Research. First and second semesters. Laboratory 
fee, $7.00. 

HORTICULTURE 

Professars Haut, Kramer, Link, Scott, Stark, Thompson: Associate Professor 
Shanks; Assistant Professors Britton, Reynolds, Wiley. 

This Department offers graduate work in the fields of Floriculture and 
Ornamental Horticulture, Horticultural Processing, Olericulture, and Pomology 
leading to the Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 

Departmental requirements, supplementary to this Graduate Catalog have 
been formulated for the administration and guidance of graduate students. 
Collies of these requirements may he obtained from the department. 

For Gr.'vduates anp Apvaxcep Undergraduates 

Hort. 101, 102. Technology of Fruits (2, 2). Two hours a week, first and 
second semesters. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. Thompson. 

Hort. 103, 104. Technology of Vegetables (2, 2). Two hours a week, first and 
second semesters. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. Stark. 

Hort 105. Technology of Ornamentals (2). Two hours a week, first semester. 
Prerequisite, Bot. 101. Link. 

Hort. 106. World Fruits and Nuts (2). Second semester. Haut 

Hort. 107, 108. Plant Materials (3, 3). Two lectures and one laboratory period 
a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, Bot 11 or equivalent 

Enright 

Hort 114. Systematic Pomology (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period 
a week, first semester. Given in alternate years. Haut 

Hort 116. Systematic Olericulture (3). Two lectures and one laboratory 

period a week, first scnuster. Given in alternate years. Reynolds. 

Hort. 122. Special Problems (2, 2). First and second semesters. Credit ar- 



108 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

ranged according to work done. For major students in horticulture or 
botany. Staff. 

Hort. 123. Grades and Standards for Canned and Frozen Products (2). Second 
semester. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, 
Hort 124. 

Hort. 124. Quality Control (3). First semester. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Hort. 58, 155, 156. 

Hort 126. Nutritional Analyses of Processed Crops (2). Second semester. 
Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Chem. ZZ and 34, Bot. 101, 
Hort. 123. 

Hort. 150, 151. Commercial Floriculture (3, 3). First and second semesters. 

Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Hort. 11. 

Link. 

Hort. 155. Commercial Processing I (3). First semester. Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Prerequisites, 

Chem. 32, 34, Hort. 61. Wiley. 

Hort 156. Commercial Processing II (2). Second semester. One lecture and 

one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Hort. 155. Wiley. 

Hort. 159. Nursery Management (3). Second semester. Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, or concurrently, Hort. 62, 
107, 108. Enright 

For Graduates 

Hort. 200. Experimental Procedures in Plant Sciences (3). First semester. 
Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Haut. 

Hort 201, 202. Experimental Pomology (3, 3). First and second semesters. 

Prerequisite, Bot. 101. Thompson. 

Hort 203, 204. Experimental Olericulture (2, 2). First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, Bot 101. Stark. 

Hort. 205. Experimental Olericulture (2). First Semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 

101. Stark. 

Hort. 206. Experimental Floriculture (3). First semester. Prerequisite, 
Bot 101. Link. 

Hort 207. Methods of Horticultural Research (3). Second semester. One 
lecture and one four-hour laboratory period a week. Scott 

Hort 208. Advanced Horticultural Research (2-12). First and second semes- 
ters. Credit granted according to work done. Staff. 

Hort. 209. Advanced Seminar (1, 1). First and second semesters. Five credit 
^ours for five semesters can be obtained. Haut and Staff. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 109 

Hort. 210. Experimental Processing (2). Second semester. Prerequisite, 
permission of instructor. Kramer. 

MATHEMATICS 

Professors Jackson. Hall, Martin: Ivcscarcli Professor Wcinstcin*; Associate 
Professors Goad, Ludford, Young; Associate Research Professor Diaz*; As- 
sistant Professors Haywood, Spencer; Assistant Research Professor Payne*; 
Instructors Brace, Brewster, Crec. EhrHch, Greenspan, McAulcy, McLean, 
Ivosen, Roth, Sliepherd; Instructor Part Time Lepson; Junior Instructors Cato, 
Munsan, Wilkinson, Zcmcl; Junior Instructors Part Time Aziz, Vanderslice. 

The Colloquium meets weekly for reports on the research of the faculty and 
graduate students, and for expository lectures on papers published in current 
mathematical journals. 

In addition to satisfying the Graduate School requirements, a student, before 
being recommended for admission to candidacy for the degree of Master of 
Arts with a major in mathematics, must demonstrate a reading knowledge of 
one foreign language of scientific importance and must pass an oral preliminary 
examination covering undergraduate and graduate work in both major and minor 
fields of study. 

A student preparing for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy with a major in 
mathematics will be offered a choice of two curricula, one with an emphasis on 
pure mathematics, the other with an emphasis on applied mathematics. 

Before presenting himself for the preliminary examination for the doctorate, 
a student is expected to have acquired a background of mathematical knowledge 
equivalent to the following group of graduate studies. In the pure mathematics 
curriculum: Algebra, six hours; Analysis, twelve hours; Geometry and Topology, 
six hours; Mathematical Methods or Mathematical Physics or Physics or 
(further) Analysis, six hours. In the applied mathematics curriculum: Analysis, 
eighteen hours Cincluding Math. 211, 214, 212); MatlTcmatical Methods, six 
hours; Mathematical Physics, six Iiours Cincluding Math. 260); Algebra or 
Geometry or Topology as related to tlic student's individual work. 

A student who intends to present a minor in mathematics of more than 
nine credit hours for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy must include at least 
three credit hours of 200 courses in mathematics. If the program includes 
more than 12 credit hours, at least six credit hours must be in 200 courses 
in mathematics. 

A. Algebra 

For Graduates and AnvANCEn Undergraduates 

Math. 100. Higher Algebra (3). First semester. Prerequisite, Math 21 or 
c(iuivaleiit. Ehrlich. 

Math. 102. Theory of Equations (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 21 
or equivalent. Ehrlich. 



•Member of the Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics. 



110 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Math. 103, Introduction to Modem Algebra (3). First semester. Prerequisite, 
Math. 21 or equivalent Good. 

Math. 106. Introduction to the Theory of Numbers (3). Second semester. 
Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent Good. 

For Graduates 

Math. 200, 201. Modem Algebra (3, 3). Prerequisite, Math. 103 or consent of 

instructor. Good. 

Math. 202. Matrix Theory (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 103 or 
consent of instructor. Good. 

Matii. 204, 205. Topological Groups (3, 3). Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Hall, Good. 
Math. 271. Selected Topics in Algebra (3). Arranged. 

B. Analysis 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 110, 111. Advanced Calculus (3, 3). Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent 

Hall. 

Math. 114. Differential Equations (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 

110 or equivalent. Spencer. 

Math. lis. Partial Differential Equations (3). Prerequisite, Math. 114 or 
equivalent. Spencer. 

Math. 116. Introduction to Complex Variable Theory (3). Prerequisite, 
Math. 21 or equivalent. Open to students in engineering and the physical 
sciences. Graduate students in mathematics should enroll in Math. 210, 211. 

Ludford. 

Math. 117. Fourier Series (3). Prerequisite, Math. 114 or equivalent. 

Ludford. 

For Graduates 

Math. 210, 211. Functions of a Complex Variable (3, 3). Prerequisite, Math. 

111 or equivalent. Spencer. 

Math. 212. Special Functions (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 210 
or consent of instructor. Diaz. 

Math. 213, 214, Functions of a Real Variable (3, 3). Prerequisite, Math. Ill 
or equivalent. Hall. 

Math. 215, 216. Advanced Differential Equations (3, 3). Prerequisite, Math. 
Ill and 114. or consent of instructor. Young. 

Math. 217. Existence Theorems in Differential Equations (3). Second semester. 
Prerequisite, Math. 114 or equivalent. Soencer. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 111 

Matli. 218. Integral Equations (3). I irsl semester. Prcreijuisite, Math. 211 or 
consent of instructor. Ludford. 

Math. 272. Selected Topics in Analysis (3). Arranged. 

Math. 280, 281. Linear Spaces (3, 3). J'rerequisite, Math. 214 or equivalent. 

Brace. 

C. Geometry and Topology 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 122, 123. Elementary Topology (3, 3). Prerequisite, Math. 21 or 
equivalent. Haywood. 

Math. 124, 125. Introduction to Projective Geometry (3, 3). Prerequisite, Math. 
21 or equivalent. Jackson. 

Math. 126, 127. Introduction to Differential Geometry and Tensor Analysis 
(3, 3). Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Jackson. 

Math. 128, 129. Higher Geometry (3, 3,). Prerequisite, Math. 21 or consent of 
instructor. Math. 128 is not a prerequisite for Math. 129. Open to students 
in the College of Education. Jackson. 

For Graduates 

Math. 220, 221. Differential Geometry (3, 3). Prerequisite, Math. Ill and 152, 
or consent of instructor. Jackson. 

Math. 223, 224. Algebraic Topology (3, 3). Prerequisite, Math. 103 and 123, 
or consent of instructor. Spencer. 

Math. 225, 226. Set-theoretic Topology (3, 3). Prerequisite, I^Iath. 123 or con- 
sent of instructor. Hall. 

Math. 273. Selected Topics in Geometry and Topology (3). Arranged. 

D. Probability and Statistics 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 130. Probability (3). First semester. Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. 

Good. 

Math. 132. Mathematical Statistics (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 

21 or equivalent. Good. 

E. History 

For Graduates and Advanced Undercsiaduates 

Math. 140. History of Mathematics (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 
21 or consent of instructor. Good. 

F. Mathematical Methods 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

• Math. 150, 151. Advanced Mathematics £or Engineers and Physicists (3, 3). 
Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Martin. 



112 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Math, 152. Vector Analysis (3). First semester. Prerequisite, Matli. 21 or 
equivalent. Haywood, 

Math, 153. Operational Calculus (3). I'irst semester. Prerequisite, Math. 21 or 
equivalent. Haywood. 

Math. 155, Numerical Analysis (3). First semester. Prerequisite, Math. 110 
and 114, or consent of instructor. Young. 

Math. 156. Programming for High Speed Computers (3). Second semester. 
Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Young. 

For Graduates 

Math. 250. Tensor Analysis (3). First semester. Prerequisite, Math. 152 or 
consent of instructor. Weinberger. 

Math. 251, Hilbert Space (3). First semester. Prerequisite, Math. 214 or con- 
sent of instructor. Weinstein. 

Math. 252, Variational Methods (3), Second semester. Prerequisite, Math, 260 
or consent of instructor. Weinstein, 

Math, 255, 256. Advanced Numerical Analysis (3, 3). Prerequisite, Math. 155 
or consent of instructor. Young. 

G. Mathematical Physics 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 160, 161. Analytic Mechanics (3, 3). Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. 

Ludford, 

For Graduates 

Math. 260. Foundations of Mathematical Physics (3). First semester. Prere- 
quisite, consent of instructor. Diaz. 

Math, 261, 262. Fluid Dynamics (3, 3), Prerequisite, Math. 260 or consent of 
instructor. Payne. 

Math. 263, 264. Elasticity (3, 3). Prerequisite, Math. 260 or consent of in- 
structor. Weinberger. 

Math. 265. Hyperbolic Differential Equations (3). Second semester. Prere- 
quisite, Math. 260 or consent of instructor. Ludford. 

Math. 266. Elliptic Differential Equations (3). First semester. Prerequisite, 
Math. 260 or consent of instructor. Payne. 

Math. 274. Selected Topics in Applied Mathematics (3). Arranged. 

H. Research 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 190, 191. Honors Reading Course (3, 3). Prerequisite, permission 
by the department to work for lionors. Jackson. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 113 

For Graduates 

Math. 298. Proseminar in Research (1). Second semester. Prerequisite, one 
semester of graduate work in mathematics. Spencer. 

Math. 300. Research. Arranged. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Gra(hiatc Faculty: Professors Younger, Shreeve, Long, Jackson; Associate 
Professor Allen; Assistant Professor Shames. 

Instruction and research facilities are availahle for the degrees of Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in Mechanical Engineering. 

For the Master of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering, a minimum 
of six semester hours of course work must be taken in classes conducted by 
meml)ers of the resident graduate faculty. For the Doctor of Philosophy de- 
gree, the minimum is eighteen semester hours. 

Registration for six credits of research (M.E. 221, Research) for the M.S. 
tliesis is required. Arrangements for faculty supervision of this research must 
he made and approved Ijy the department chairman before registration in the 
course. 

For the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, one of tlic minors must be Mathe- 
matics, in wliich 12 credits in graduate (200) courses are required. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

M. E. 100. Thermodynamics (3). First semester. Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 20, Math. 21, concurrently. 
Laboratory fee, |3.00. 

M. E. 101. Heat Transfer (2). First semester. Two lectures a week. Prere- 
re(|uisites, AI. E. 100. M. E. 54 concurrently. 

M. E. 102. Heating and Air Conditioning (3). Second semester. Two lec- 
tures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, M. E. 100, M. E. 
101 concurrently. 

M. E. 103. Refrigeration (3). First semester. Two lectures and one labora- 
tory period a week. Prerequisites, M.E. 100, M.E. 54, concurrently. Lab- 
oratory fee, $3.00. 

M. E. 104, 105. Prime Movers (4, 4). First and second semesters. Three 
lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, M. E. 100, M. E. 
54 concurrently. 

M. E. 106, 107. Mechanical Engineering Design (4, 4). First and second semes- 
ters. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, 

Mech. 52; M. E. 53, for 107. 

M. E. 108, 109. Mechanical Laboratory (2, 2). First and second semesters. 
One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

M. E. 110. Applied Elasticity (3). First semester. Three lectures a week. 
Prerequisites, Mech. 2, Mech. 52; Math 64, concurrently. Younger, Love. 



114 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

M. E. 111. Dynamics (3). Second semester. Three lectures a week. Pre- 
requisites, :Mcch. 2, Alech. 52; Math. 64, concurrently. Younger, Long. 

For Graduates 

M. E. 200, 201. Advanced Djmamics (3, 3). First and second semesters. 
Prerequisites, Mech. 52, Math. 64, M. E. 107; M. E. 109. Younger, Long. 

M. E. 202, 203. Applied Elasticity (3, 3). First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisites, Mech. 52, Math. 64, M. E. 107. Younger, Long. 

M. E. 204, 205. Advanced Thermodynamics (3, 3). First and second semesters 
Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, M. E. 101, M. E. 104, M. E. 105, 
Math. 64. Shreeve, Allen. 

M. E. 206, 207. Advanced Machine Design (3, 3). First and second semesters. 
Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Math. 64, 
M. E. 107. Jackson. 

M. E. 208, 209. Steam Power Plant Design (3, 3). First and second semesters. 
One lecture and two laboratory periods. Prerequisite, M. E. 105. Shreeve. 

M. E. 210. 211. Advanced Fluid Mechanics (3, 3). First and second semesters. 

Prerequisites, M. E. 54, Math. 64. Shames. 

M. E. 212, 213. Advanced Steam Power Laboratory (2, 2). First and second 
semesters. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 
registration in M. E. 204, 205. Shreeve. 

M. E. 214, 215. Advanced Applied Mechanics Laboratory (2, 2). First and 

second semesters. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisites, registration in M. E. 200, 201 and M. E. 202, 203. Shames. 

M. E. 216, 217. Advanced Internal Combustion Engine Design (3, 3). First 
and second semesters. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisites, M. E. 104, 105; M. E. 106, 107 and registration in M. E. 
200, 201 and M. E. 204, 205. Shreeve. 

M. E. 218, 219. Advanced Internal Combustion Engine Laboratory (2, 2). 
First and second semesters. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite, registration in M. E. 216, 217. Shreeve. 

M. E. 220. Seminar. Credit in accordance with work outlined by mechanical 
engineering staff. Staff. 

M. E. 221. Research. Credit in accordance with work outlined by mechanical 

engineering staff. Staff. 

Research in any field of mechanical engineering as applied mechanics, 
heat transfer, thermodynamics, heat, power, etc. 

M. E. 222. Advanced Metallography (3). First semester. Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, M. E. 53, Mech. 52. Jackson. 

M. E. 223, 224. Steam and Gas Turbine Design (3, 3). First and second 
semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, M. E. 101, M. E. 104, 
M. E. 105, Math. 64. Shreeve. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 115 

M. E. 225, 226. Advanced Properties of Metals and Alloys. (2, 2). First and 
second semesters. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Mech. 52, M. E. 53, 
M. E. 106, M. E. 107. Jackson. 

M. E. 227, 228. Theory of Elasticity (3, 3). First and second semesters. Three 
lectures a week. Prerequisites, Mech. 52, M. E. 53, M. E. 106, M. E. 107, 
Math. 64. Younger, Long. 

M. E. 229, 230. Jet Propulsion (3, 3). First and second semesters. Three lec- 
tures a week. Prert- quisitcs, M. E. 101. M. E. 104 and M. E. 105. 

Shreeve. 

M. E. 231, 232. Advanced Heat Transfer (3, 3). First and second semesters. 
'Ihree lectures a week. Prerequisites, M. E. 101, AI. E. 102 and M. E. 105. 

Shreeve, Allen. 

M. E. 233, 234. Compressible Flow (3, 3). First and second semesters. Three 
lectures a week. Prerequi>itcs, M. F. JlU, 211 or equivalent. 

Shames. 



PHILOSOPHY 

Professor Garvin; Assistant i'rofessors Robinson and Schlaretzki. 

This Department is now offering the Master of Arts degree and providing 
minor work for related areas. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Phil. 101. Ancient Philosophy (3). First semester. Robinson. 

Phil. 102. Modern Philosophy (3). Second semester. Robinson. 

Phil. HI. Medieval Philosophy (3). First semester. Robinson. 

Phil. 114. Contemporary Movements in Philosophy (3). First semester. 

Garvin. 

Phil. 120. Oriental Philosophy (3). Second semester. Robinson. 

Phil. 121. American Philosophy (3). First semester. Schlaretzki. 

Phil. 123, 124. Philosophies Men Live By (2, 2). Staff. 

Phil. 130. The Conflict of Ideals in Western Civilization (3). Second semester. 

Schlaretzki. 
Phil. 140. Philosophical Bases of Educational Theories (3). Second semester. 

Robinson. 
Phil. 151. Ethics (3). First semester. Garvin, Schlaretzki. 

Phil. 153. Philosophy of Art (3). First semester. Robinson. 

Phil. 154. Political and Social Philosophy (3). Second semester. Schlaretzki. 

Phil. 155. Logic (3). Second semester. Garvin, Schlaretzki 



116 UNIVERSlTr" OF MARYLAND 

Phil. 156. Philosophy of Science (3). First semester. Summer School (2). 

Robinson. 

Phil. 191, 192, 193, 194. Topical Investigations (1-3). Each semester. Staff. 

For Graduates 

Graduate instruction in the Department of Philosophy is carried on mainly 
by independent investigation of special topics under individual supervision. Any 
of the courses listed below may be elected more than once. Course selections 
require the approval of the department chairman. 

Phil. 201. Research in Philosophy (1-3). Each semester. Staff. 

Phil. 203. Selected Problems in Philosophy (1-3). Each semester. Staff. 

Phil. 205. Seminar in the History of Philosophy (1-3). I'lrst semester. 

Staff. 

Phil. 206. Seminar in the Problems of Philosophy (1-3). Second semester. 

Staff. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION AND HEALTH 

Dean Fraley; Professors Deach, Johnson, Massey, Mohr; Associate Professors 
Harvey, Humphrey; Assistant Professor Husman. 

The graduate student majoring in Physical Education, Recreation, or Health 
Education may pursue any of the following degrees: Master of Arts in Physi- 
cal Education, Doctor of Education, and Doctor of Philosophy. Undergraduate 
requirements to be made of every candidate before admission to candidacy for 
a graduate degree in Physical Education are: basic sciences (human anat- 
omy and physiology, physiology of exercise), kinesiology, therapeutics, sport 
skills, methods, human development, measurement, administration, and student 
teaching. In cases where a student has had successful experience in teaching 
Physical Education, the prerequisites of sport skills, methods, and student 
teaching may be waived. Undergraduate prerequisites in Recreation are: 
psychology, sociology, principles, administration, basic sciences, recreational 
activities, and practical experiene. Undergraduate prerequisites in Health Ed- 
uation are: biological sciences, bacteriology, human anatomy and physiology, 
nutrition, chemistry, psychology, measurement, administration, principles, and 
field work. 

Every graduate student majoring in Physical Education, Recreation, or 
Health Education is required to take the following courses (or transfer their 
equivalent) before taking the qualifying examination: P. E. 201, Foundations in 
Physical Education, Recreation and Health; P. E. 210, Methods and Tech- 
niques of Research; and P. E. 230, Sourse Material Survey. In addition, every 
graduate student must register for and complete P. E. 200, Seminar in Physical 
Education, Recreation, and Health, at some time during his graduate career. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 117 

A. Physical Education 
For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

P. E. 120. Physical Education for the Elementary School (3). First and second 
semesters and summer. 

P. E. 130. Fundamentals of Body Dynamics (3). First and second semesters 
and summer. Wesscl. 

P. E. 150. Physical Education for Aviation Personnel (3). First and second 
semesters and summer. Johnson. 

P. E. 160. Scientific Bases of Movement Applied (3). l-'irst and second semes- 
ters and summer. Prerequisite, P. E. 100. Wessel. 

P. E. 170. Supervision in Elementary School Physical Education (3). First 
and second semesters and summer. Prerequisite, P. E. 120. Humphrey. 

P. E. 180. Measurement in Physical Education and Health (3). First and 
second semesters. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. 

Massey. 

P. E. 181. Training and Conditioning (3). Second semester. Two lectures and 
two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Zool. 14, 15, 53. Wyre. 

P. E. 182. History of Dance (3). First semester. Prerequisites, P. E. 52, 54, 
56, 58, or permission of instructor. Madden. 

P. E. 190. Administration and Supervision of Physical Education, Recreation 
and Health (3). First and second semesters, and summer. Johnson. 

P. E. 191. The Curriculum in Elementary School Physical Education and 
Health Education (3). First and second semesters and summer. Prere- 
quisite, P. E. 120. Humphrey. 

P. E. 195. Organization and Administration of Elementary School Physical 
Education (3). First and second semesters and summer. Prerequisite, 
P. E. 120. Humphrey. 

For Graduates 

P. E. 200. Seminar in Physical Education, Recreation and Health (1). First 
and second semesters and summer. Staff. 

P. E. 201. Foundations in Phj^ical Education, Recreation and Health (3). First 
and second semesters and summer. Deach, Johnson, Field. 

P. E. 203. Supervisory Techniques in Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health (3). First and second semesters and summer. Mohr. 

P. E. 205. Administration of Athletics (3). First and second semesters and 
summer. Fraley. 

P. E. 210. Methods and Techniques of Research (3). First and second semes- 
ters and summer. Mohr. 

P. E. 220. Quantitative Methods (3). First and second semesters and summer. 

Massey. 



118 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

P. E. 230. Source Material Survey (3). First and second semesters and 
summer. Massey. 

P. E. 250. Mental and Emotional Aspects of Physical Education Activities (3). 
First and second semesters and summer. Johnson. 

P. E. 280. Scientific Bases of Physical Fitness (3). First and second semesters 
and summer. Massey. 

P. E. 287. Advanced Seminar (1-2). First and second semesters and summer. 

Staff. 

P. E. 288. Special Problems in Physical Education, Recreation and Health 
(1-6). First and second semesters and summer. Staf?. 

P. E. 289. Research-Thesis (1-5). First and second semesters and summer. 

Stafif. 

P. E. 290. Administrative Direction of Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health (3). First and second semesters and summer. Johnson. 

P. E. 291. Curriculum Construction in Physical Education and Health (3). First 
and second semesters and summer. Mohr. 

B. Health Education 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Hea. 160. Problems in School Health Education in Elementary and Secondary 
Schools (2-6). First and second semesters and summer. Staff. 

Hea. 170. The Health Program In The Elementary School (3). First and 
second semesters and summer. Prerequisite, Hea. 2 and 4, or Hea. 40. 

Humphrey. 

Hea. 180. Measurement in Physical Education and Health (3). First and sec- 
ond semesters and summer. Massey. 

Hea. 190. Organization and Administration of Health Education (3). First 

and second semesters and summer. Johnson. 

For Graduates 

Hea. 200. Seminar in Physical Education, Recreation and Health (1). First 
and second semesters and summer. Staff. 

Hea. 201. Foundations in Physical Education, Recreation and Health (3). First 
and second semesters and summer. Johnson, Deach. 

Hea. 203. Supervisory Techniques in Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health (3). I'irst and second semesters and summer. 

Mohr, Humphrey. 

Hea. 210. Methods and Techniques of Research (3). First and second semes- 
ters and summer. Mohr. 

Hea. 220. Principles and Practices of Health Education (3). First and sec- 
ond semesters and summer. Johnson. 

Hea. 230. Source Material Survey (3). First and second semesters and sum- 
mer. Massey. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 119 

Hea. 240. Advancements in Modern Health (3). iMist and second semesters 
and summer. Johnson. 

Hea. 250. Health Problems in Guidance (3). First and second semesters and 
summer. Johnson. 

Hea. 260. Public Health Education (3). I'irst and second semesters and 
summer. Johnson. 

Hea. 280. Scientific Bases of Physical Fitness (3). First and second semesters 
and summer. Massey. 

Hea. 287. Advanced Seminar (1-2). First and second semesters and summer. 

Staff. 

Hea. 288. Special Problems in Physical Education, Recreation and Health 
(1-6). First and seccmd semesters and summer. Staff. 

Hea. 289. Research — Thesis (1-5). First and second semesters and summer. 

Staff. 

Hea. 290. Administrative Direction of Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health (3). First and second semesters and summer. Tohnson-Deach. 

Hea. 291. Curriculum Construction in Physical Education and Health (3). 

First and second semesters and summer. Mohr. 

C. Recreation 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Rec. 130. Leadership Techniques and Practices (3). First and second semesters. 

Rec. 150. Camp Management (3). First and second semesters and summer. 

Harvey. 

Rec. 170. Principles and Practice of Recreation (3). First and second semesters. 

Harvey. 

Rec. S184. Outdoor Education (6). Summer only. Staff. 

Rec. 190. Organization and Administration of Recreation (3). First and second 
semesters. Harvey. 

For Graduates 

Rec. "^00. Seminar in Physical Education, Recreation and Health (1). First 
and second semesters and summer. Staff. 

Rec. 201. Foundations in Physical Education, Recreation and Health (3). First 
and second semesters and summer. Harvey. 

Rec. 202. Philosophy of Recreation (2). First and second semesters and sum- 
mer. Harvey. 

Rec. 203. Supervisory Techniques in Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health (3). First and second semesters and summer. Harvey. 



120 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Rec. 204. Modern Trends in Recreation (3). First and second semesters and 
siininicr. Harvey. 

Rec. 210, Methods and Techniques of Research (3). First and second se- 
mesters and summer. Mohr. 

Rec. 220. Quantitative Methods (3). First and second semesters and summer. 

Masse j\ 

Rec. 230. Source Material Survey (3). First and second semesters and sum- 
mer. Massey. 

Rec. 240. Industrial Recreation (3). First and second semesters and summer. 

Harvey. 

Rec. 260. Hospital Recreation (3). First and second semesters and summer. 

Harvey. 

Rec. 287. Advanced Seminar (1-2). First and second semesters and summer. 

Staff. 

Rec. 288. Special Problems in Physical Education, Recreation and Health 
(1-6). First and second semesters and summer. Staff. 

Rec. 289. Research — Thesis (1-5). I'irst and second semesters and summer. 

Staff. 

Rec. 290. Administrative Direction of Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health (3). First and second semesters and summer. 

Johnson-Deach. 

PHYSICS 

Professors Morgan, Myers, Toll; Research Professor Montroll*; Part-time 
Professors Brickwedde, de Launay, Kennard, Wangsness; Associate Professors 
Iskraut, Singer; Associate Research Professors Pai*, Resler*; Assistant Pro- 
fessors R. Anderson, Ferrell, Grant, Krumbein; Assistant Research Professor 
Hama*; Research Associates J. Anderson, Potts, Tredgold, Visscher; Part- 
time Lecturers Bass, Jastrow, Green, Herzfeld. Marton, O'Rourke, Oppenheim, 
Petritz, Saenz, Shapiro, M. Slawsky, Smart, Snavely, Steele, Szebehely, Wada. 

It is expected that the following courses should have been taken preliminary 
to graduate work. Any deficiencies should be made up at once. A limited 
amount of graduate credit will be allowed for courses so taken. 

General Physics Electricity and Magnetism 

Heat Modern Physics 

Intermediate Mechanics Differential and Integral Calculus 

Optics 

Candidates for both the Master's and Doctor's degree are required to take 

Introduction to Theoretical Physics (Physics 200, 201). The course runs for a 
full year and carries 10 semester hours credit. The minimum prerequisites in 



•Member of the Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 121 

mathematics are diflferential and integral calculus, but advanced calculus and 
differential equations are recommended. 

Candidates for the Doctor's degree should follow the Introduction to 
Theoretical Physics with Quantum Mechanics. No other courses are specifically 
required. It is recommended in the selection of further courses that the student 
avoid overspecialization in any field. In particular he should take a wide variety 
of classical courses as well as courses in selected fields of Modern Physics. 

Candidates for advanced degrees in Physics may have a minor in either 
chemistry, mathematics, engineering, applied physics, or a satisfactory combina- 
tion of two or more of the group. 

Thesis (Ph.D.): The student must outline his topic to the graduate staff 
for approval. This outline must clearly set forth the nature of the problem, 
proposed method of precedure and the possible results that may be obtained. 
The completed thesis will also be presented to the graduate staff for approval. 

Off-Campus Courses: The Physics Department offers courses at convenient 
times and places so as to accommodate the greatest number of students. In 
order to facilitate graduate study and supervision of research in the Washington 
area, the Department has part-time professors in certain government laboratories 
where a large number of students are interested in graduate study and where 
there are facilities for research. All students who began graduate work in 
University of Maryland courses after 1954 will be required to complete on the 
College campus at least 18 credits of their graduate work for the Ph. D. degree 
in physics: these credits must include at least 2 credits of Physics 230, 
Seminar, and the remainder can be divided among major and minor courses 
and thesis research. Normally, students will complete a much greater propor- 
tion of their graduate study on the College Park campus. At government 
agencies where there is no part-time professor, employees desiring to do grad- 
uate work in physics should contact a member of the graduate staff in the 
Physics Department. 

A. General Physics 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Phys. 100. Advanced Experiments. Three hours of laboratory work for each 
credit hour. One or more credits may be taken concurrently. Prerequisites, 
Phys. 52 or 54. Laboratory fee, $6.00 per credit hour. Krumbein. 

Phys. 102. Optics (3). Three lectures a week, second semester. Prerequisites, 
Phys. 11 or 21; Math. 21. Krumbein. 

Phys. 104, 105. Electricity and Magnetism (3, 3). Three lectures a week. Pre- 
requisites, Phys. 11 or 21; Math. 21. Grant. 

Phys. 106, 107. Theoretical Mechanics (3, 3). Three lectures a week, first and 
second semesters. Prerequisites, Phys. 51 or consent of instructor. 

Resler. 

Phys. 118. Introduction to Modern Physics (3). First semester. Three lectures 
a week. Prerequisite, a college physics course. Toll. 

Course with a minimum of mathematics, covering the main field of modern 
physics. This course should be taken by all students minoring in physics 



122 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

and is recommended for tlie general student wishing to learn something of 
modern physics. 

Phys. 119. Modern Physics (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Phys. 118. 

Toll. 

Phys. 120. Nuclear Physics (4). I'^our lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 
118 or equivalent. Visscaer. 

Phys. 126. Kinetic Theory of Gases (3). Prerequisite, Phys. 107 and Math. 21, 
or equivalent. 

Phys. 130, 131. Basic Concepts of Physics (2, 2). Two lectures a week. First 
and second semester. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Lecture demonstra- 
tion fee, $2.00 per semester. J. Anderson. 
A primarily descriptive course intended mainly for those students in the 
liberal arts who have not had any other course in Physics. This course does 
not satisfy the requirements of professional schools nor serve as a prerequisite 
or substitute for other physics courses. The main emphasis in the course will 
be on the concepts of physics, their evolution and their relation to other 
branches of human endeavor. 

Phys. 150. Special Problems in Physics. Research or special study. Credit 
according to work done. Laboratory fee, $6.00 per credit hour when ap- 
propriate. Prerequisite, major in physics and consent of Instructor. Staflf. 

For Graduates 

Of the following courses, 200, 201, 212 and 213 are given every year; all 
others will be given according to the demand. 

Phys. 200, 201. Introduction to Theoretical Physics (5, 5). Five lectures a 
week, first and second semesters. Myers. 

Phys. 202, 203. Advanced Dynamics (2, 2). Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, 
Phys. 200. 

Phys. 204. Electrodynamics (4). Four lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 
201. Iskraut 

Phys. 206. Physical Optics (3). Prerequisite, Phys. 201. Myers. 

Phys. 208, 209. Thermodynamics (2, 2). Prerequisite, Phys. 201 or equivalent. 

Brickwedde. 

Phys. 210. 211. Statistical Mechanics and the Kinetic Theory of Gases (2, 2). 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 112 and 201. Montroll. 

Phys. 212, 213. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics (3, 3). Three lectures a 

week, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, Pliys. 213. Ferrell. 

Phys. 214. Theory of Atomic Spectra (3). Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, 
Phys. 201. Anderson, R. 

Phys. 215. Theory of Molecular Spectra (3). Three lectures a week. Pre- 
requisite, Phys. 214. Anderson, R. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 123 

Phys. 216, 217. Molecular Structure (2, 2). Two lectures a week. Prere- 
quisite, Phys. 213. Brickweddc. 

Phys. 222, 223. Boundary- Value Problems of Theoretical Physics (2, 2). Pre- 
requisite, Phys. 201. de Launay. 

Phys. 228, 229. The Electron (2, 2). Prerequisites, Phys. 204 and Phys. 213. 

de Launay. 

Phys. 230. Seminar. Seminars on various topics in advanced physics are held 
each semester, witli the contents varied each year. One semester credit for 
each seminar each semester. Staff. 

Phys. 234, 235. Theoretical Nuclear Physics (3, 3). Prerequisite, Phys. 213. 

Witten. 

Phys. 236. Theory of Relativity (3). Prerequisite, Phys. 200. Iskraut 

Phys. 238. Quantum Theory — selected topics (3). Prerequisite, Phys. 212 and 

236. Anderson, J. 

Phys. 242, 243. Theory of Solids (2, 2). Two lectures a week, first and second 

semesters. Prerequisite, Phys. 213. Montroll. 

Phys. 248, 249. Special Topics in Modem Physics (2, 2). Two lectures a week. 

Prerequisite, Calculus and consent of instructor. Faculty. 

Phys. 250. Research. Credit according to work done. Laboratory fee, $6.00 

per credit hour. Prerequisite: An appro-ved application for admission or 
special permission of the Physics Department. Faculty. 

B. Applied Phsrsics 
For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Phys. 101. Laboratory Arts. Three hours laboratory a week for each credit 
hour. One or more credits may be taken concurrently. Laboratory fee, 
$6.00 per credit hour. Morgan. 

Phys. 103. Applied Optics (3). Three lectures a week, first semester. Prere- 
quisite, Phys. 102. 

Phys. 108. Physics of Electron Tubes (3). Three lectures a week, first 
semester. Prerequisite, Phys. 104 must be taken previously or concurrently. 

Grant. 

Phys. 109. Electronic Circuits (4). Four lectures a week, second semester. 
Prerequisite, Phys. 105 must be taken previously or concurrently. Grant. 

Phys. 110. Applied Physics Laboratory (1, 2, or 3). Three hours laboratory 
work for each credit hour. One to three credits may be taken concurrently 
Prerequisites, Phys. 52 or Phys. 54; and one credit in Phys. 100. 

Phys. 111. Physics Shop Techniques (1). One three-hour laboratory per week. 
Laboratory fee, $6.00. 

Phys. 114, 115. Introduction to Biophysics (2, 2). First and second semesters. 
Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, intermediate Physics and Calculus. 

Morowitz. 



]?4 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Phys. 116, 117. Fundamental Hydrodyn^lmic8 (3, 3). Three lectures a -week. 
Prerequisites. Phys. 107 and Math. 21. Resler. 

Phys. 121. Neutron Physics and Fission Reactors (4). Four lectures a week, 
second .semester. Prerequisite, Phj-s. 120. Shapiro. 

For Graduates 

Phys. 218. 219. X-Rays and Crystal Structure (3, 3). Three lectures a week, 
first and second semesters. Morgan. 

Phys. 220, Application of X-Ray and Electron DifiFraction Methods (2). Two 
laboratory periods a week. Morgan. 

Phys. 224, 225. Supersonic Aerodynamics jmd Compressible Flow (2, 2). Pre- 
requisite, Phys. 201. Pai. 

Phys. 226, 227. Theoretical Hydrodynamics (3, 3). Prerequisite, Phys. 201. 

Myers. 

Phys. 231. Applied Physics Seminar. fOne semester credit for each seminar 
each semester). Faculty. 

Phys. 232, 233. Hydromechanics Seminar (1, 1), Kennard. 

Phys. 240, 241. Theory of Sound and Vibrations (3, 3). Prerequisite, Phys. 201. 

Phys. 244. Aerophysics (3). Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. Resler. 

Phys. 245. Special Topics in Applied Physics. (2 credits each semester). Two 
lectures a week. Faculty. 

Phys. 246, 247. Special Topics in Fluid Dynamics (2, 2). Prerequisites, ad- 
vanced graduate standing and consent of the instructor. Resler. 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

Professors Jul!, Shaffner, Combs, Mary Juhn, Mary S. Shorb, Romoser 

Course work and research leading to the Master of Science and the Doctor 
of Philosophy are offered. 

For Graduates and Advattckd Undergraduates 

P. H. 104. Technolog^y of Market Eggs and Poultry (3). Two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week, first semester. 

A. E, 117. Economics of Marketing Eggs and Poultry (3). Three lectures 
a week, second semester. (See A. E. 117.) Smith. 

P. H. 107. Poultry Industrial and Economic Problems (2). First semester. 

Staff. 

P. H. 108. Special Poultry Problems (1-2). Assigned problems, first and 

second semesters. Staff. 

Poultry Hygiene. See V. S. 107. 

Avian Anatomy. See V. S. 108. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 125 

For Graduates 

P. H. 201. Advanced Poultry Genetics (3). First semester. Prerequisite, P.H. 
100, or equivalent. Jull. 

P. H. 202. Advanced Poultry Nutrition (3). Three lectures a week, second 
semester. Prerequisite, P. H. 101, Chem. 31, 32, 33, and 34 or permission 
of instructor. Combs. 

P. H. 203. Physiology of Reproduction of Poultry (3). Tviro lectures and one 
laboratory period a week, first semester. Prerequisite, P. H. 102, or 
equivalent Shaflfner 

P. H. 204. Poultry Seminar (1). First and second semesters. Staff. 

P. H. 205. Poultry Literature (1-4). First and second semesters. Staff. 

P. H. 206. Poultry Research (1-6). Credit in accordance with work done. 

Staff. 
P. H. 207. Poultry Nutrition Laboratory (2). One lecture and one laboratory 
period a week, first semester. (Not given in 1955-56). 

Combs, Romoser. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Professors Andrews, Cofer, Hackman; Associate Professors Avers, Giistad, 
Ross: Assistant Professor McGinnies. 

All graduate students who have deficiencies in their undergraduate prepara- 
tion in psychology will be required to remove the particular deficiencies by com- 
pleting the required courses or by individual study. Deficiencies in the following 
course areas can be removed only by registering in and satisfactorily completing 
these courses: Experimental Psychology, Statistical Methods, and Tests and 
Measurements. 

Departmental requirements toward the Master of Arts or the Master of 
Science degrees: 14-hours in the following courses: Psych. 191-192, 198, and 
252-253; 6 hours of research (Psych. 290-291); a minimum of 6 hours in ad- 
vanced courses in area of specialization; and 8 hours in an approved minor field; 
total 34 hours. 

Departmental requirements toward the Doctor of Philosophy degree: 24 
hours in the following courses. Psych. 191-192, 198, 202, 203, 205-206, 252-253, 
which constitute a minor in General Psychology; 18 hours of graduate research 
including 12 hours for Ph.D. Thesis; a minimum of 30 hours in areas of spec- 
ialization; total 72 hours. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Graduate credit will be assigned only for students certified by the Depart- 
ment of Psychology as qualified for graduate standing. 

Psych. 106. Statistical Methods in Psychology (3). First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, Psych 1. Hackman. 



126 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Psych. 110. Educational Psychology (3). Second semester. rrcrequisite, 
Psycli. 1. Heintz. 

Psych. 121. Social Psychology (3). First and second semesters. Prerequisite, 
Psych. 1 Heintz, McGinnies. 

Psych. 122. Advanced Social Psychology (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, 
Psych. 121 and consent of instructor. McGinnies. 

Psych. 125. Child Psychology (3). First semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 1. 

Heintz. 

Psych. 126. Developmental Psychology (3). First semester. Prerequisite, 
Psych. 1. Heintz. 

Psych. 128. Human Motivation (3). First and second semesters. Prerequisite, 
Psych. 121. Cofer. 

Psych. 129. Psychological Aspects of Literature (3). First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, Psych. 131 or permission of instructor. Sprowls. 

Psych. 131. Abnormal Psychology (3). First and second semesters. Prere- 
quisite, 3 courses in PsyclioioK.v. ATcCormick, Sprowls. 

Psych. 136. Applied Experimental Psychology (3). Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Psych. 1. Ross. 

Psych. 140. Psychological Problems in Advertising (3). Second semester. 
Prerequisite, Psych. 1. ITackman. 

Psych. 142. Techniques of Interrogation (3). First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, Psych. 121. Hackman. 

Psych. 145. Introduction to Experimental Psychology (4). First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, Psych. 4. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Ross. 

Psych. 150. Tests and Measurements (3). I""irst semester. Prerequisite, 
Psych. 106. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Gustad. 

Psych. 161. Industrial Psychology (3). Second semester. .Avers. 

Psych. 167. Psychological Problems in Aviation (3). l-'irst semester. Pre- 
requisite, Psych. 1. Payne. 

Psych. 180. Physiological Psychology (3). Prere(|uisilc, Psych. 145. 

Andrews, Ross. 

Psych. 181. Animal Behavior (33). (Same as Zool. 181). Second semester. 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Ross. 

Psych. 191, 192. Advanced General Psychology (3, 3). First and second 
semesters. Prerequisite, 15 hours of Psycholopy including Psych. 145 and 
consent of instructor. Ross, Cofer. 

Psych. 194. Independent Study in Psychology (1-3). First and second se- 
mesters. Prerequisite, written consent of individual faculty supervisor. 

Staff. 



GRADVATR SCHOOL 127 

Psych. 195. Minor Problems in Psychology (1-3). First and second semesters. 
Prerequisite, written consent of individual faculty supervisor. Staff. 

Psych. 198. Proseminar: Professional Aspects of Psychological Science (2). 

Second semester. Prerequisite, consent of faculty advisor. Staff. 

For Graduates 

CAM the following courses require consent of the instructor.) 

Psych. 202. Seminar in Advanced Experimental Psychology (2). .\ndre\vs. 

Psych 203, 204. Graduate Seminar (2, 2). First and second semesters. Staflf. 

Psych. 205, 206. Historical Viewpoints and Current Theories in Psychology 
(3, 3). First and second semesters. Hackman, Cofer. 

Psych. 211. Job Analysis and Evaluation (3). First semester. Ayers. 

Psych. 220. Counseling Techniques (3). Second semester. 

Gustad, McCormick. 

Psych. 222. Rehabilitation Techniques (3). I'rerequisite.s, Psych. 150, 220. 

McCormick. 

Psych. 223. Diagnosis and Correction of Reading Difficulties (3). Second 

semester. Prerequisites, Psych. 15U, 220. McCormick. 

Psych. 225. Participation in Counseling Center (1-3). First and second semes- 
ter. Prerequisite, Psych. 22U. Gustad, McCormick. 

Psych. 230. Determinants of Human Efficiency (3). Second semester. 

Ross. 

Psych. 231. Training Procedures in Industry (3). Second semester. Ayers. 
Psych. 233. Social Organization in Industry (3). First semester. Ayers. 

Psych. 235. Psychological Aspects of Management-Union Relations (3). 

I'irst semester. Ayers. 

Psych. 240. Intervievir and Questionnaire Techniques (3). Second semester. 

Hackman. 

Psych. 241. Mass Communication and Propaganda (3). Second semester. 

McGinnies. 

Psych. 242. Seminar in Social Psychology (3). Second semester. McGinnies. 

Psych. 250. Mental Test Theory (2). First semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 253. 

Gustad. 
Psych. 251. Development of Predictors (3). First semester. Prerequisite, 
Psych. 253. 

Psych. 252, 253. Advanced Statistics (3, 3). First and second semesters. Pre- 
requisite, Psych. 106. Hackman, Andrews. 

Psych. 255. Seminar in Psychometric Theory (2). Prerequisite, Psych. 253. 

Andrews, Hackman. 



128 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Psych. 260. Individual Tests (3). i'rerequisitc, Psych. 150. Laboratory fee, 
<4 (JO McCormick. 

Psych. 262. Appraisal of Personality (3). Prerequisite, Psych. 15U. Cofer. 

Psych. 264. Projective Tests (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 260. 

Laboratory fee, S4.0ii. Prerequisites, Psych. 2<')(^. Cofer. 

Psych. 266, 267. Theories of Personality and Motivation (3, 3). First and 
second semesters. Cofer. 

Psych. 270. Advanced Abnormal Psychology (3). Prerequisite, Psych. 131. 

Cofer, Gustad. 

Psych. 271. Special Testing of Disabilities (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, 
Psych. 260. McCormick. 

Psych. 272, 273. Individual Clinical Diagnosis (3, 3). Prerequisite, Psych. 260. 

Gustad, 

Psych. 280. Advanced Psychophysiology (2). First semester. Andrews, Ross. 

Psych. 288, 289. Special Research Problems (1-3). First and second semes- 
ters. Staff. 

Psych. 290, 291. Research for Thesis (credit arranged). First and second 
semesters. Staff. 

SOCIOLOGY 

Professors Hoffsommer, Lejins; Associate Professors Melvin, 
Shankweiler; Assistant Professors Anderson, Fitzgerald, Rohrer, Roth. 

The Department of Sociology grants the degrees of Master of Arts and 
Doctor of Philosophy. As indicated by the courses listed, the student has a con- 
siderable range of choice in selecting specialized fields of sociological study. 

Prerequisites for graduate study leading to an advanced degree with a major 
in sociology consist of either (1) an undergraduate major (totalling at least 24 
semester hours) in sociology or (2) 12 semester hours of sociology (including 6 
semester hours of advanced courses) and 12 additional hours of comparable 
work in economics, political science, or psychology. Reasonable substitutes for 
these prerequisites may be accepted in the case of students majoring in other 
departments who desire a graduate minor or sevral courses in sociology. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Soc. 105. Applied Anthropology (3). Second semester. Anderson. 

Soc. 112. Rural-Urban Relations (3). First semester. Melvin. 

Soc. 113. The Rural Community (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, 
or its equivalent. Hoffsommer, Fitzgerald. 

Soc. 114. The City (3). First semester. Summer School (2). Prerequisite, 
Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Schmidt 

Soc. 115. Industrial Sociology (3). Second semester. Summer School (2). 
Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Imse. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 129 

Soc. 118. Community Organization (3). I'irst semester. Summer School (2). 
r'rcreqiiisitr, Soc. 1, or its (•(luivali'iit. Roth. 

Soc. 121, 122. Population (3, 3). Three liuurs a week, first and second 
semesti^rs. Soc. 121, Suniinor Scliodl (1). Prencjuisito, .Soc. I, or its 
equivalent. Imse. 

Soc. 123. Ethnic Minorities (3). First semester. Summer School (2). Pre- 
requisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Lcjins. 

Soc. 124. The Culture of the American Indian (3). Second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Anderson. 

Soc. 131. Introduction to Social Service (3). First and second semesters. 

Roth.. 

Soc. 136. Sociology of Religion (3). First semester. .Summer School (2). Pre- 
requisite, Soc. 1, or equivalent. Anderson. 

Soc. 141. Sociology of Personality (3). First semester. Summer School (2). 
Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Motz. 

Soc. 144. Collective Behavior (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, 
or its equivalent. Melvin. 

Soc. 145. Social Control (3). First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its 
equivalent. Motz. 

Soc. 147. Sociology of Law (3). First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its 
equivalent. Lejins. 

Soc. 153. Juvenile Delinquency (3). First semester. Summer School (2). Pre- 
requisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Lejins. , 

Soc. 154. Crime and Delinquency Prevention (3). Second semester. Pre- 
requisites, Soc. 1, or its equivalent; Soc. 52, Soc. 153, or consent of instructor. 

Lejins. 

Soc. 156. Institutional Treatment of Criminals and Deliquents (3). Second 
semester. Summer School (2). Prerequisites, Soc. 1, or its equivalent; Soc. 
52, Soc. 153, or consent of instructor. Lejins. 

Soc. 160. Interviewing in Social Work (l^O. Summer School only. 

Soc. 161. The Sociology of War (3). First semester. Summer School (2). 

Staff. 

Soc. 162. Basic Principles and Current Practice in Public Welfare (3). Summer 

School onl}'. 
Soc. 163. Attitude and Behavior Problems in Public School Work (1^4). 

Summer School onh'. 
Soc. 164. The Family and Society (3). Summer School (2). Shankweiler. 

Soc. 171. Family and Child Welfare (3). First semester. Summer School (2). 

Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Roth. 

Soc. 173. Social Security (3). First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its 

equivalent. Staff. 

Soc. 174. Public Welfare (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its 

equivalent. Roth. 

Soc. 183. Social Statistics (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its 

equivalent Imse. 



130 UNIVERSITY OP MARYLAND 

Soc. 185. Advanced Social Statistics (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, 
Soc. 183, or its equivalent. Imse. 

Soc. 186. Sociological Theory (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or 
its equivalent. Schmidt. 

Soc. 196. Senior Seminar (3). Second semester. Hoffsommer. 

For Graduates 

Soc. 201. Methods of Social Research (3). First semester. Hoffsommer. 

Soc. 215. Community Studies (3). First semester. Hoffsommer. 

Soc. 221. Population and Society (3). Second semester. Staff. 

Soc. 224. Race and Culture (3). Second semester. Anderson. 

Soc. 230. Comparative Sociology (3). Second semester. Melvin. 

Soc. 241. Personality and Social Structure (3). Second semester. Melvin. 

Soc. 246. Public Opinion and Propaganda (3). Second semester. Motz. 

Soc. 253. Advanced Criminology (3). First semester. Lejins. 

Soc. 254. Seminar: Criminology (3). Second semester. Lejins. 

Soc. 255. Seminar: Juvenile Delinquency (3). First semester. Lejins. 

Soc. 256. Crime and Delinquency as a Community Problem (3). Second 
semester. Lejins. 

Soc. 257. Social Change and Social Policy (3). First semester. Staff. 

Soc. 262. Family Studies (3). Second semester. Shankweiler. 

Soc. 264. The Sociology of Mental Health (3). First semester. ^^lelvin. 

Soc. 282. Sociological Methodology (3). Second semester. Staff. 

Soc. 285. Seminar: Socological Theory (3). First semester. Schmidt. 

Soc. 290. Research in Sociology. Credit to be determined. Staff. 

Soc. 291. Special Social Problems. First and second semester. Credit to 
be determined. Staff. 

SPEECH AND DRAMATIC ART 

Associate Professors Ansberry, Straushaugh; Assistant I'rnfcssor Hendricks; 

Lecturer, Shutts. 

The Department offers work leading to the Master of Arts degree in the 
field of Speech Pathology and Correction. 



GRADUATR SCHOOL 131 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Speech 102. Radio Production (3). Sccaiul semester, .-\dmisbion by consent 
of instructor. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Batka. 

Speech 103, 104. Speech Composition and Rhetoric (3, 3). First and second 
semesters. Staff. 

Speech 105. Speech-Handicapped School Children (3). Second semester. Ad- 
mission by consent of instructor. . Ansberry. 

Speech 106. Clinical Practice (1-5 credits, up to 9). Each semester and sum- 
mer. Prerequisite, Speech 105. Craven. 

Speech 107. Advanced Oral Interpretation (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, 

Speech lo. Provensen. 

Speech 111. Seminar (3). I'irst and second semesters. Strausbaugh. 

Speech 112. Phonetics (3). First semester. Ansberry. 

Speech 113. Play Production (3). Second semester. Pugliese. 

Speech 115. Radio in Retailing (3). First semester. Limited to students in 
the College of Home Economics. Prerequisites, Speech 1, 2; English 1, 2. 
Laboratory fee, §2.00. Batka. 

Speech 116. Radio Announcing (3). Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 
4. Laboratory fee, §2.00. Batka. 

Speech 117. Radio Continuity Writing (3). First semester. Admission by 

consent of instructor. Aylward. 

Speech 118. Advanced Radio Writing (3). Second semester. Prerequisites, 
Speech 117 and consent of instructor. • Aylward. 

Speech 119. Radio Acting (3). Second semester. Admission by consent of 
the instructor. Pugliese. 

Speech 120. Speech Pathology (3). First semester. Prerequisite, Speech 105. 
A continuation of Speech 105. Ansberry. 

Speech 122, 123. Radio Workshop (3, 3). First and second semesters. Ad- 
mission by consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, S2.00 per semester. 

Batka. 

Speech 126. Semantic Aspects of Speech Behavior (3). Second semester. 

Hendricks. 

Speech 131. History of the Theatre (3). First semester. Niemeyer. 

Speech 132. History of the Theatre (3). Second semester. Niemeyer. 

Speech 133. Staff Reports, Briefings, and Visual Aids (3). Second semester. 
Limited to the students in the College of Military Science. Prerequisites, 
Speech 5 and 6. Linkow. 



132 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Speech 135. Introduction to Audiology (3). Second semester. Study of the 
basic problems of deafness among children and adults. Ansberry. 

Speech 136. Principles of Speech Therapy (3). Prerequisite, Speech 120. 

Hendricks. 

Speech 137. Experimental Phonetics (3). Prerequisite, Speech 112. 

Hendricks. 

Speech 138. Methods and Materials in Speech Correction (3), Prerequisite, 
Speech 120 or the equivalent. Craven. 

Speech 139. Theatre Workshop (3). Prerequisite, Speech 8 or Speech 14. 

Strausbaugh. 

For Graduates 

The Department maintains a reciprocal agreement with Walter Reed General 
Hospital whereby clinical practice may be obtained at the Army Audiology and 
Speech Correction Center, Forest Glen, Maryland, under the direction of James 
P. Albrite, M. D., Director. 

Speech 200. Thesis (3-6). Credit in proportion to work done and results ac- 
complished. Ansberry. 

Speech 201. Special Problems (2-4). Arranged. Hendricks. 

Speech 210. Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing (3). Staff. 

Speech 211. Advanced Clinical Practice (3). Staflf. 

Speech 212. Advanced Speech Pathology (3). Second semester. Senft. 

Speech 213. Speech Problems of the Hard of Hearing (3). First semester. 

Senft. 

Speech 214. Clinical Audiometry (3). First semester. Shutts. 

Speech 215. Auditory Training (3). Second semester. Shutts. 

Speech 216. Si>eech Reading (3). First semester. Shutts and Staflf. 

Speech 217. Clinical Practice in the Selection of Prosthetic Appliances (3). 

Second semester. Ambrose. 

Speech 218. Problems of Hearing and Deafness (3). Horlick and Butler. 

Speech 219. Speech Disorders of the Brain-Injured (3). Hendricks. 

VETERINARY SCIENCE 

Professors Brueckner, DeVolt, Poelma, Hansen, Reagan; 
Associate Professor Sperry 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

V. S. 101. Comparative Anatomy (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period 
a week, first semester. Sperry. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 133 

V. S. 102. Animal Hygiene (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period a 
week, second semester. Sperry. 

V. S. 103. Regional Comparative Anatomy (3). One lecture and one laboratory 
period a week, first semester. Sperry. 

V. S. 104, Advanced Regional Comparative Anatomy (2). Two laboratory 
periods a week, second semester. Sperry. 

V. S. 107. Poultry Hygiene (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period a 
week, second semester. DeVolt. 

V. S. 108. Avian Anatomy (3). Two lectures and one laboratory period a 
week, first semester. DeVolt. 

Foe Graduates 

V. S. 201. Animal Disease Problems (2-6). Arranged 

Poelma, DeVolt, Hansen, Brueckner. 
V. S. 202. Animal Disease Research. Arranged. 

Poelma, DeVolt, Hansen, Brueckner. 

V. S. 203. Electron Microscopy (2). One lecture and one laboratory period a 

week, first semester. Reagan, Brueckner. 

ZOOLOGY 

Professors Burhoe, Phillips, Wharton; Associate Professors Anastos, Littleford; 
Assistant Professor Brown. 

The Department of Zoology offers work leading to the Master of Science 
and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The general academic requirements 
which must be fulfilled for these degrees are described earlier in the catalog. 

The special fields which graduate students may emphasize in working 
toward these degrees are cytology, embryology, fisheries biology, genetics, 
parasitology, physiology and systematics. In some fields opportunities for train- 
ing and summer employment in nearby research laboratories are available to 
qualified students and under certain circumstances graduate students may work, 
under supervision, with the unrivaled collections of the U. S. National Museum 
of the Smithsonian Institution, in Washington, D. C. Information concerning 
the specific requirements in each of these fields may be obtained from the 
department. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Zool. 102. General Animal Physiology (4). Two lectures and two three-hour 
laboratory periods a week, second semester. Laboratory fee, $8.00. Prere- 
quisites, one year of zoology and one year of chemistry. Phillips. 

Zool. 104. Genetics (3). Three lecture periods a week, first semester. Prere- 
quisite, one course in zoolog^y or botany. Burhoe. 

Zool. 108. Animal Histology (4). Two lecture and two three-hour laboratory 
periods a week, first semester. Laboratory fee, $8.00. Prerequisite, one year 
of zoology. Brown. 



134 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Zool. 110. Parasitology (4). Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory 
periods a week, first semester. Laboratory fee, $8.00. Prerequisite, one year 
of zoology. Anastos. 

Zool. 111. Veterinary Parasitology (4). Two lectures and two three-hour lab- 
oratory periods per week, second semester. Prerequisite one year of 
Zoology or permission of the instructor. Alternate years. Not offered 
1955-56. Laboratory fee, S8.00. Anastos. 

Zool. 112. Wildlife Parasitology (4). Two lectures and two three-hour lab- 
oratory periods per week, second semester. Prerequisite one year of Zoology, 
or permission of the instructor, .\lternate years. To be offered 1955-56. 
Laboratory fee, §8.00. Anastos. 

Zool. 118. Invertebrate Zoolog^y (4). Two lectures and two three-hour lab- 
oratory periods a week, first semester. Alternate years. Not offered 
1955-56. Laboratorj' fee, §8.00. Prerequisites, one year of zoology. 

Allen. 

Zool. 121. Principles of Animal Ecology (3). Two lectures and one three-hour 
laboratory period a week, second semester. Laboratory fee, $8.00. Prere- 
quites, one year of zoology aiul one year of chemistry. Allen. 

Zool. 125. Fisheries Biology and Management (3). Two lectures and one 
three-hour laboratory period a week, first semester. Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

Allen. 
Zool. 126. Fisheries Biology and Management (3). Two lectures and one three- 
hour laboratory period a week, second semester. Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

Allen. 

Zool. 127. Ichthyology (3). One lecture and two three-hour laboratory periods 
a week, first semester. Laboratory fee $8.00. Prerequisite, Zool. 5 and 20. 
Alternate years. To be offered 1955-56. Littleford. 

Zool. 181. Animal Behavior (3). (Same as Psych. 181.) Three lectures a week, 
second semester. Prerecjuisite, permission of instructor. Alternate years. 
Not offered 1955-56. Ross. 

For Graduates 

Zool. 200. Marine Zoolog^y (4). Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory 

periods a week, first semester. LaI)oratory fee, $8.00. 

Zool. 202. Animal Cytology (4). Two lecture and two three-hour laboratory 
periods a week, first semester. .Alternate years. Not offered 1955-56. 
Laboratory fee, $8.00. Brown. 

Zool. 203. Advanced Embryology (4). Two lectures and two three-hour lab- 
oratory periods a week, second semester. Alternate years. Not offered 
1954-55. Laboratory fee, $8.00. Burhoe. 

Zool. 204. Advanced Animal Physiology (4). Two lectures and two three- 
hour laboratory periods a week, first semester. Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

Phillipi. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 135 

ZooL 205. Hydrobiology (4). Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory 
periods a week, sceoiid semester. Alternate years. To be offered 1955-56. 
Laboratory fee, §8.00. Littleford. 

Zool. 206. Research. Credit to be arranged. First and second semesters. Work 
on thesis project only. A — Cytology; B — Embryology; C — Fisheries Bi- 
ology; D — Genetics; E — Parasitology; F — Physiology; and G — Systemetics. 
Laboratory fee, $8.00. Staff. 

Zool. 207. Zoolog^y Seminar. (Credit to be arranged). One lecture a week, 

for each credit hour, first and second semesters. A — Cytology; B — Embry- 
olog}'; C — Fisheries Biology; D — Genetics; E— Parasitology; F — Physi- 
olog\'; and G — Systemetics. Staflf. 

Zool. 208. Special Problems in Zoology: A. Cytology, B. Embryology, C. 
Fisheries Biology, D. Genetics, E. Parasitology, F. Physiology and G. 
Systematics. Hours and credits arranged. First and second semester. 
Laboratory fee $8.00. Staflf. 

Zool. 209. Advanced Parasitology (4). Two lectures and two three-hour lab- 
oratory periods per week, second semester. Prerequisite Zoology 110 or 
permission of instructor. Alternate years. Not oflfered 1955-56. Lab- 
oratory fee, $8.00. Anastos. 

Zool. 210. Systematic Zoology (4). Three lectures and one three-hour lab- 
oratory period per week, second semester. Alternate years. Not ofTered 
1955-56. Laboratory fee, $8.00. Wharton. 

Zool. 211, 212. Lectures in Zoology (3, 3). Three lectures per week, first and 
second semesters. Visiting Lecturers. 

Zool. 215. Fishery Technology (4). Two lectures and two three-hour labora- 
tory periods a week. Alternate years. To be oflfered in June 1955 at 
Seafood Processing Laboratory, Crisfield, Md. Laboratory fee, $8.00. Pre- 
requisite, consent of instructor. Littleford. 

Zool. 216. Physiolog^ical Cytology (4). Two lectures and two three-hour lab- 
oratory periods per week, second semester. Prerequisite, Chemistry 161, 
162, Physics 11, Zoology 102, or permission of the instructor. Alternate 
years. To be oflfered 1955-56. Laboratory fee, $8.00. Brown. 

Zool. 220. Advanced Genetics (4). Two lectures and two three-hour labora- 
tory periods a week, first semester. Laboratory fee, $8.00. Prerequisite, 
Zool. 104. Alternate years. Not oflfered 1955-56. Burhoe. 

Zool. 2318. Acarology (3). Lectures, recitations and laboratory daily. Lab- 
oratory fee, $8.00. StaflF. 

Zool. 232S. Medical and Veterinary Acarology (3). T^ectures, recitations and 
laboratory daily. Laboratory fee, $8.00. Staff. 

Zool. 233S. Agricultural Acarologj' (3). Lectures, recitations and laboratory 
daily. Laboratory fee, $8.00. StaflF. 



136 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

ANATOMY 

Professor Hahn; Associate Professor Thompson; Dr. Lindenberg. 

Anatomy 111. Human Gross Anatomy (8). Two lectures and two laboratory 

periods per week throughout the year. Hahn, Thompson, Lindenberg. 

Anatomy 113. Human Neuroanatomy (2). Two lectures and two laboratory 
periods for eight weeks. Prerequisite, Anatomy 111. 

Hahn, Thompson, Linden1)erg. 

For Graduates 

Anatomy 211. Human Gross Anatomy. Credits to be arranged. Same as 
course 111 but with additional instruction. Hahn, Thompson. 

Anatomy 213. Human Neuroanatomy. Credits to be arranged. Same as course 

113 but with additional instruction. Hahn, Thompson, Lindenberg. 

Anatomy 214. The Anatomy of the Head and Neck (3). One lecture and two 
laboratory periods with conferences per week for one semester. 

Hahn, Thompson. 
Anatomy 216. Research. Time and credit by arrangement. Staff. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

See Bacteriology Courses listed under "School of Pharmacy." 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

Professor Vanden Bosche. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Biochemistry 111. Principles of Biochemistry (6). Two lectures, one con- 
ference and one laboratory period per week through the year. 

Vanden Bosche. 

For Graduates 

Biochemistry 211. Advanced Biochemistry. Time and credits by arrangement. 

Vanden Bosche. 
Biochemistry 212. Research in Biochemistry. Time and credits by arrangement. 
Prerequisite, 211. 

HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY 

Professor McCrea. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Histology. 112. Mammalian Histology and Embryology (6). Two lectures and 
two laboratory periods per week throughout the year. McCrea. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 137 

For Graduates 

Histology 212. Mammalian Histology and Embryology. Number of credits 
by arrangement. Same as course 112 but with additional instruction and 
collateral reading of a more advanced nature. McCrea. 

Histology 213. Mammalian Oral Histology and Embryology. Number of 
credits by arrau^iement. McCrea. 

Research in Histology 214. Number of hours and credit by arrangement. Pre- 
requisite, 112 or 212. StafT. 

Research in Embryology 215. Number of hours and credit by arrangement. 
Prerequisites by arrangement. Staff. 

ORAL PATHOLOGY 

Professor Aisenbcrg. 
For Graduates and Advanceid Undergraduates 

Oral. Path. 111. General Pathology (4). Two lectures and two laboratory 
periods per week for one semester. Aisenberg. 

For Graduates 

Oral Path. 211. Advanced Oral Pathology (8). Two lectures and two labora- 
tory periods throughout the year. Aisenberg. 

Oral Path. 212. Research. Time and credits by arrangement. Aisenberg. 

ORAL SURGERY 

Professors Dorsey, Dodd; Assistant Professor Cappuccio. 

For Graduates 

Oral Surgery 201. Clinical Anesthesiology (6). Forty hours per week for 
thirteen weeks. Dodd, Hackett. 

Oral Surgery 220. General Dental Oral Surgery (4). Two lectures and two 
laboratory periods per week for one semester. Dorsey and Staff. 

Oral Surgery 221. Advanced Oral Surgery (4). Two lectures and two labora- 
tory periods per week for one semester. Dorsey and Staff. 

Oral Surgery 222. Research. Time and credit by arrangement. Staff. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Professor Oster; Assistant Professors Shipley, Pollack. 

This Department offers work leading toward the degree of Master of Science. 
The general requiremnts for this degree are set forth in the section of this 
catalog entitled "Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts and Master of 
Science." 



138 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Physiology 111. Principles of Physiology (6). Sixty-six lectures and seventy- 
two hours of laboratory w^ork througohut the year. For details of schedul- 
ing, consult the Dental School catalog. Oster, Shipley, Pollack. 

For Graduates 

Physiology 211. Principles of Mammalian Physiology. Credits to be arranged. 

Same as course HI but with additional instruction and collateral reading. 

Oster, Shipley, Pollack. 
Physiology 212. Advanced Physiology. Lecture and seminar during the second 

semester. Hours and credit by arrangement. Oster, Shipley, Pollack. 

Physiology 213. Research. Credit and hours by arrangement. 

Oster, Shipley, Pollack. 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE* 

ANATOMY 

A. Gross Anatomy 

Professors Uhlenhuth and Figge; Associate Professor Krahl; Assistant Pro- 
fessor Mech; Instructors McCaffert.v, Wadsworth. 

The graduate degrees offered by the Department of Gross Anatomy are 
the Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Anat. 101. Human Gross Anatomy (8). Total number of hours approximately 
350. Four conferences and lectures, 18 laborator}^ hours per week through- 
out the first semester. Laboratory fee, $15.00. 

Uhlenhuth, Krahl, Mech, McCafiferty, Wadsworth. 

Anat. 102. Osteology of the Human Skull (1). One period of one hour once 
a week, for 10 weeks; Wednesday from 9:00 to 10:00 A. M., from September 
to December, inclusive. Uhlenhuth. 

Anat. 103. The Peripheral Nervous System (1). One period of one hour once 
a week, for 10 weeks; Fridays from 9:00 to 10:00 A. M., during the first 
semester. Figge. 

For Graduates 

Anat. 201. General Anatomy of the Human Body (8). Same course as 101, 
but on a more advanced level. It can be taken by graduates as well as 
post-graduate students. Laboratory fee, $f 15.00. Uhlenhuth, Figge, Krahl. 

Anat. 202. Osteolog^y of the Human Skull (1). Same course as 102, but on 
a more advanced level. Uhlenhuth. 

Anat. 203. The Peripheral Nervous System (1). Same course as 103, but on 
a more advanced level. Figge. 



♦In the Departments of Anatomy, Bacteriology, Biochemistry, and Pharmacology, 
courses listed under "For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates" and numbered 
with 100 are credited for .Tork only when taken to satisfy credits in the minors. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 139 

Anat. 204. The Anatomy of the Human Pelvis (2). Total number of hours, 
60; 15 periods of four liours eacli, every I'riday morning from 9:00 A. M. 
to 1:00 P. M., for 15 weeks during the second semester. This course is 
open to graduate students and post-graduate students specializing in Gyne- 
cology, Obstetrics and Urology. Uhlenhuth. 

Anat. 205. Fetal and Infant Anatomy (2). Total number of hours, 45; 15 
periods of tliroe hours each, every Thursday from 2:00 to 5:00 P. M. for 15 
weeks during the second semester. This course is open to graduate students 
and post-graduates interested in pediatrics. Krahl. 

Anat. 206. Research in Anatomy. Maximum credits, 12 per semester. Re- 
search work may be taken in any one of the branches which form the 
subject of anatomy and with either of the instructors listed. 

Uhlenhuth, Figge, Krahl. 

B. Histology, Embryology and Neuro-Anatomy 
Professor Figge; Associate Professor Harne; .Assistant Professor Afack. 

The graduate degrees oflFered by the Department of Histology, Embryology 
and Neuro-Anatomy are the Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Histol. 101. Mammalian Histology (6). Total number of hours, 144. Four lec- 
tures and eight laboratory hours, four times a week for 12 weeks during 
the first semester. Laboratory fee, §10.00. Figge and Staff. 

Histol. 102. Human Neuro-Anatomy (4). Total number of hours, 96. Two lec- 
tures and four laboratory hours per week for 16 weeks of the second semester 
of every medical school year. Prerequisite. Histol. 101, or equivalent. Lab- 
oratory fee, $10.00. Figge and Staff. 

For Graduates 

Histol. 20L Mammalian Histology (6). Same Course as Histol. 101, but with 
additional work of a more advanced nature. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 

Figge, Mack. 

Histol. 202. Human Neuro-Anatomy (4). Same course as Histol. 102, but with 
additional work of a more advanced nature. Prerequisite, Histol. 101 and 
21. Laboratory fee, SIO.OO. Figge and Staff. 

Histol. 203. Normal and Atypical Growth, Lectures in Problems of Growth (2). 
Two hours per week, time to be arranged. Sixteen weeks, second semester. 

Figge. 

Histol. 204. Research. Maximum credits, 12. Research work may be taken in 
any one of the branches which form the subject of anatomy (including 
cancer research). Figge, Mack. 

FOR GRADUATES AT ARMY CHEMICAL CENTER, 
Edgewood, Maryland 

Instructors: Weiss, Innes, Light, McAdams, Wheelwright. 
Histology 210. Mammalian Histology (2). One lecture and one laboratory 



140 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

period per week, first semester. Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. 
Offered only at the Army Chemical Center. Weiss and Staff. 

Histology 211. Mammalian Histology (2). One lecture and one laboratory 
period per week, second semester. This is a continuation of Histology 210. 
Offered only at the Army Chemical Center. Weiss and Staff. 

BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 

Professor Schmidt; Associate Professor Hcrbst; Associate Professor 
Vanderlinde; Lecturer Summerson; Instructor Brown. 

Graduates degrees offered by the Department of Biological Chemistry are 
the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Biochem. 101. Principles of Biochemistry (8). Seven lectures and conferences 
and two three-hour laboratory periods a week, second semester. Prere- 
quisites, inorganic, organic and quantitative or physical chemistry. Labor- 
atory fee, $20.00. Schmidt, Herbst, Vanderlinde, Brown. 

For Graduates 

Biochem. 201. Principles of Biochemistry (8). Same course as Biochem. 101, 
but on a more advanced level for graduate students. Laboratory fee, $20.00. 

Schmidt, Herbst, Vanderlinde, Brown. 

Biochem, 202. Special Topics in Biochemistry (1, 1). Prerequisite, Biochem. 
101 or 201. Schmidt. 

Biochem. 203. Research. Maximum credits, 12. Credit proportioned to extent 
and quality of work accomplished. Schmidt, Herbst, Vanderlinde. 

Biochem. 204, 205. Seminar (1, 1). First and second semesters. Schmidt. 

Biochem. 206. Enzymes and Metabolism (2-3). First semester. Herbst. 

Biochem. 207. Biochemical Preparation (1-4). Credit according to work done. 

Schmidt. 
Biochem. 208. Chemistry and Metabolism of the Steroid Hormones (2-3). 

Vanderlinde. 

For Graduates at Army Chemical Cenit,r, Edgewood, Maryland 

Instructors Summerson, Jandorf, Michel, Schaffer, Wagner-Jauregg. 

Graduate degrees offered at the Army Chemical Center are the Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Biochem. 221, 223. Principles of Biochemistry (2, 2). Two lectures a week, 
first and second semesters. Prerequisites, undergraduate courses in inorganic, 
organic, and quantitative or physical chemistry. Summerson. 

Biochem. 222, 224. Experimental Biochemistry (2, 2). One lecture and one 
three-hour laboratory period a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, 
Biochemistry 221 and 223, which may be taken concurrently, or equivalent 
preliminary training in biochemistry. Summerson, Jandorf, Michel, Schaffer. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 141 

Biochem. 225. Chemistry of Amino Acids and Proteins (2). Two lectures a 
week, first semester. Prerequisite, Biochemistry 221 and 223, or adequate 
undergraduate training in organic chemistry, with the consent of the 
instructor. Summerson. 

Biochem. 226. Chemistry of Chemotherapeutic Compounds (1). One lecture 
a week, first semester. Prerequisite, adequate knowledge of organic 
chemistry. Wagner-Jauregg. 

Biochem. 227. Enzyme Chemistry (2). Two lectures a week, second semester. 
Prerequisites, Biochemistry 225 (Protein Chemistry), or equivalent training 
in biochemistry, with consent of instructor. Jandorf. 

Biochem. 228. Seminar (3). Summerson. 

Biochem. 229. Research. Maximum credits, 12. Credit according to extent 
and quality of work accomplished. Summerson, Jandorf. 

LEGAL MEDICINE 

Professor Fisher, Associates Freimuth, Lovitt and Guerin. 

Leg. Med. 201. Legal Medicine (1). One hour of lecture for twelve weeks, 
4 hours assigned reading, first semester. Fisher, Lovitt, Guerin, Freimuth. 

Leg. Med. 202. Toxicology (10). Two hours lecture, 8 laboratory hours per 
week for 1 year. Freimuth, Fisher. 

Leg. Med. 203. Gross Pathologic Anatomy as Related to Toxicology (2), Two 

hours per week for one year. Fisher, Lovitt, Guerin. 

Leg. Med. 204. Research in Toxicology leading to preparation of a Thesis for 
the M.S. (6). Minimum credits, six. Freimuth, Fisher. 

Leg. Med. 205. Research in Toxicology leading to preparation of a Thesis for 

the Ph. D. (30). Fisher, Freimuth. 

This Department oflfers schedules leading to the degrees of Master of Sci- 
ence and Doctor of Philosophy in Toxicology. Candidates are expected to have 
completed undergraduate work as follows: Eight semester hours each in general 
chemistry, organic chemistry, analytical chemistry (qualitative and quantitative), 
physical chemistry, physics, biology and four semester hours in organic qualita- 
tire analysis. 

Candidates for the Master's Degree must complete the following courses: 
Leg. Med. 201, 202, 203 and 204. 
Pharm. 101, f. s. and Chem. 258. 

Candidates for the doctorate must complete the following courses: 

Leg. Med. 201, 202, 203, 205. 

Pharm. 101, f.s., Physiol. 102, Bact. 101, Bact. 102, Biochem. 206, Chem. 206, 
208, Chem. 221, 223, Chem. 258, Chem. ISO, Pharm. Chem. Ill, 113, Pharm. Chem. 
112, 114. 

Part of the above work is offered at College Park with the remainder to be 
done at the Baltimore Schools. Some of the course work in Legal Medicine and 
Toxicology will be given at the Laboratories of the Division of Legal Medicine 



142 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

located at the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, 700 Fleet Street, , 
Baltimore, Md. 

MICROBIOLOGY 

Professor Wisseman; Associate Professor Steers; Assistant Professor Smith; 
Instructor Snyder; Associate Levin; Junior Instructor Heinz. 

Graduate degrees offered by the Department of Bacteriology are Master of J 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 1 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Microbiol. 101. Medical Microbiology (6). Three lectures and seven labora- 
tory hours per week for sixteen weeks, first semester. Laboratory fee, 
?10.00. Wisseman, Steers, Smith, Snyder, Levin, Heinz. 

Microbiol. 102. Immunology (4). One lecture and three laboratory hours per>, 
week, second semester. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 

Wisseman, Steers, Smith, Snyder, Levin, Heinz. 

For Graduates 

Microbiol. 201. Medical Microbiology (6). Same course as Bact. 101, but with 
additional work at a more advanced level. Laboratorj^ fee, $10.00. 

Wisseman, Steers, Smith, Snyder. 

Microbiol. 202. Immunology (4). Same course as Bact. 102, but with addi- 
tional work at a more advanced level. Laboratory fee, $10.00. 

Wisseman, Steers, Smith, Snyder. 

Microbiol. 203. Bacterial Physiology (3). Three lectures per week, but no 
laboratory, first semester. Steers. 

Microbiol. 204. Research. Maximum credits, 12. Wisseman, Steers, Smith. 

Microbiol. 205. Genetics of Microorganisms (1). One lecture per week, sec- 
ond semester. Steers, i 

Microbiol. 206, 207. Seminar (1, 1). One hour per week, first and second 
semesters. Wisseman, Steers, Smith. 

(« 
PHARMACOLOGY 

Professor Krantz; Professor Carr; Assistant Professor Burgison; Ij 

Instructor Musser; Lecturer Marrazzi. 

All students majoring in pharmacology with a view to obtaining the degree 
of Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy should secure special training 
in anatomy, mammalian physiology, organic chemistry, and physical chemistry. 

i 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Pharmacol. 101, f.s.. General Pharmacology (8). Three lectures and one labora- 
tory. This course consists of 90 lectures and 30 laboratory periods of three 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 143 

hours each, offered each year. Laboratory fee, $20.00. 

Krantz, Carr, Burgison, Musser, Bird, Marrazzi, Harne. 

For Graduates 

Pharmacol. 201, f.s., General Pharmacology (8). Same as 101, for students 
niajorinj^' in pliannacology. Additional instruction and collateral reading are 
required. Laboratory fee, $20.00. Krantz, Carr, Burgison. 

Pharmacol. 202. Chemotherapy. Maximum credits, 3. Credit in accordance with 
the amount of work accomplished, first semester. Burgison. 

Pharmacol. 205. Research. Maximum credits, 12. Credit in accordance with the 
amount of work accomplished. Krantz, Carr. 

Pharmacol. 206. Anesthesia. Alaximum credits, 2. Credit in accordance with 
the work accomplished. Krantz, Carr. 

Pharmacol. 207, 208. Chemical Aspects of Pharmacodynamics (2-2). Burgison. 

For Graduates at Army Chemical Center, Edgewood, Maryland 
Instructors Marrazzi, Hart, Wills, Horton. 

Graduate degrees offered at the Army Chemical Center are the Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Pharmacol. 220, 222. Principles of Pharmacology (3, 3). Three lectures a week, 
first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Biochemistry 221-224 and Phy- 
siology 221 and 222, or their equivalents. To be taken concurrently with 
Pharmacology 221 and 223 except by special arrangement with the instructor. 

Marrazzi, Hart, Wills. 

Pharmacol. 221, 223. Experimental Pharmacology (1, 1). One three-hour lab- 
oratory period a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Bio- 
chemistry 221-224 and Physiology 221 and 222, or their equivalents. To be 
taken concurrently with Pharmacology 220 and 222 except by special arrange- 
ment with the instructor. Marrazzi, Hart, Wills. 

Pharmacol. 225. Biometric Principles and Their Application (1). One lecture a 
week, first semester. Horton, Wills. 

Pharmacol. 226. Electropharmacology. Maximum credits, 2. Time to be ar- 
ranged. Marrazzi, Hart. 

Pharmacol. 227. Advanced Biometry (2). 

Pharmacol. 228. Seminar (1). Hart, Wills. 

Pharmacol. 229. Research. Maximum credits, 12. Marrazzi, Wills. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Professors Amberson, Smith; Associate Professor Ferguson; Assistant 
Professor White; Lecturer Wills; Instructor Fox. 

The Department prefers to accept students who have already had some 
graduate training elsewhere. Before admission to candidacy for the Doctor of 



144 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Philosophy degree the Department gives a qualifying examination, both oral 
and written, which must be satisfactorily passed. 

In the usual case a student majoring in Physiology will be expected to take 
Pliysiol. lUl and 102 before, or concurrently with, courses 201 to 206 below. 
Such a student will extend his major program by taking courses in other 
departments of this University, and by enrolling in the summer course in 
physiology at the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Massachusetts. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Physiol. 101. The Principles of Physiology (9). Five lectures, two conferences 
and two 4-hour laboratory periods per week for 15 weeks; second semester. 
Laboratory fee $15.00. Amberson and Staff, 

For Graduates 

Physiol. 201. Experimental Mammalian Physiology. Time and credit by ar- 
rangement. Amberson and Staflf. 

Physiol. 202. Blood and Tissue Proteins (2). Two lectures a week, for 15 
weeks. Amberson and White. 

Physiol. 203. Physiology of Reproduction (2). Two hours a week, lectures, 
conferences and seminars, for 15 weeks. Smith. 

Physiol. 204. Physiological Techniques. Time and credit by arrangement 

Amberson and Staff. 

Physiol. 205. Physiology of Kidney and Body Fluids. (2). Two lectures a 

week, for 15 weeks. Ferguson. 

Physiol. 206. Seminar. Credit according to work done. Staff. 

Physiol. 207. Research. By arrangement with the head of the department. 

Staff. 



For Graduates at Army Chemical Center, Edgewood, Maryland 

Physiol. 221, 223. Principles of Physiology (3, 3). Three lectures and con- 
ferences, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Biochem. 221-4, or 
equivalent. Wills and Staff. 

Physiol. 222, 224. Experimental Physiology (1, 1). One three-hour laboratory 
a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Physiol. 221-3, which may 
be taken concurrently, or equivalent preliminary training in physiology. 

Wills and Staff. 

Physiol. 225. Cellular Physiology (2). Two hours a week, lectures, conferences 
and seminars, for 15 weeks. Prerequisites, Biochem. 221-4 and Physiol. 
221-4, or equivalents. Wills and Staff. 



JRADVATIl SCHOOL 145 

Physiol. 226. Physiology of Circulation and Respiration (2). Two hours a 
week, lectures, conferences anrl seiniiiars, for 15 weeks. Prerequisites, 
BicH-hem. 221-4 and Physiol. 221-4, or rriuivalenfs. Wills and Staff. 

Physiol. 227. Environmental Physiology (2). Two hours a week, lectures, 
conferences and seminars, for 15 weeks. Prerequisites, Biochem. 221-4 and 
Physiol. 221-4, or equivalents. Wills and Staff. 

Physiol. 229. Seminar (1). One liour per week for 15 weeks. Wills and Staf?; 

Physiol. 230. Research. Maximum credits, 12. Credit according to extent and 
quality of work accomplished. Wills and Staff. 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

PSYCHIATRIC NURSING 

The Master of Science dcRrce in Psychiatric Nursing will be offered 
effective in the fall of 1955. For details of this program inquiry should be made 
to Dean Florence Gipc, of the School of Nursing, University of Maryland, 
Baltimore, Maryland. 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

Professors F".stabrook, Foss, Hager. ]c!iniowski, Purdum, Richeson, Shay, 
Slama: Associate Professors .Allen, Miller. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

This Department offers work leading toward the Master of Science and the 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Requirements for the doctoral degree are ful- 
filled by supplementing the courses offered in this Department with selected 
courses from the College Park curriculum. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Bact. 115. Serology and Immunology (4). Third year, two lectures and two 

laboratory periods a week, second semester. Shay, Haubrick. 

For Graduates 

Bact. 200, 201. Chemotherapy (1-2). One lecture a week. Offered in alternate 
years. Shay. 

Bact. 202, 203. Reagents and Media (1, ). One lecture a week. Offered in 
alternate years. Shay. 

Bact. 210. Special Problems in Bacteriology. Laboratory course. Credit de- 
termined by amount and quality of work performed. Shay. 

Bact. 211. Public Health (1-2). One lecture a week. Prerequisites, Bacteriology 
1, 115. Shay. 

Bact. 221. Research in Bacteriology. Credit determined by amount and qual- 
ity of work performed. Shay. 



146 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 153. Biochemistry (5). Four lectures and conferences and one four-hour 
laboratory period a week, first semester. Prerequisites, Chem. 35, 36, 37, 
38, 15. Schmidt and Staff. 

BOTANY AND PHARMACOGNOSY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Bot. 101, 102. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants (2, 2). One lecture and one 
laboratory period a w^eek. Prerequisites, Botany 1, 21. Given in alternate 
years. Slama. 

Bot. Ill, 113. Plant Anatomy (2, 2). Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, 
Bot. 1, 21, 22. Slama. 

Bot. 112, 114. Plant Anatomy (2, 2). Two laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisites, Bot. Ill, 113. Slama. 

For Graduates 

Pharmacognosy 201, 202. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders (4, 4). Two 

lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Bot. Ill, 113, 
112, 114. Given in alternate years. Slama. 

Pharmacognosy 211, 212. Advanced Pharmacognosy (4, 4). Two lectures and 
two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Bot. Ill, 113, 112, 114. Slama. 

Pharmacognosy 220. Research. Credit according to amount and quality of 
work performed. Slama. 

MATHEMATICS 

Math. 152, 153. Mathematical Statistics (2, 2). Prerequisites, Math. 20, 21. 

Richeson. 

PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 101. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (2). Two lectures a week, first 
or second semester. Prerequisites, Chem. 15, Pharm. Chem. 53 or equivalent, 
and Chem. 37, 38. Miller. 

Pharm. Chem. Ill, 113. Chemistry of Medicinal Products (2, 2). Two lectures 
a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Chem. 35, 37, 53. Hager. 

Pharm. Chem. 112, 114. Chemistry of Medicinal Products (2, 2). Two labora- 
tory periods a week, either or both semesters. Prerequisites, Pharm. Chem. 
Ill, 113, or may be taken simultaneously with Pharm. Chem. Ill, 113. 

Hager. 

Chem. 141, 143. Advanced Organic Chemistry (2, 2). Two lectures a week, 
first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Chem. 37, 38. Miller. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 147 

Chem. 142, 144. Advanced Organic Laboratory (2, 2). Two laboratory periods 
a week, any one or both semesters. Prerequisites, Chem. 19 or 23, and 
Chem. 2,7, 38. Miller. 

Chem. 146, 148. Identification of Organic Compounds (2, 2). One lecture and 
two laboratory periods a week, any one or both semesters. Prerequisites, 
Pharm. Chem. Ill, 113, or Chem. 141, 143. Miller. 

For Graduates 

Pharm. Chem. 201, 203. Survey of Pharmaceutical Chemistry (2, 2). Two 
lectures a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Pharm. Chem. 
Ill, 113. Hager. 

Pharm. Chem. 211, 213. Chemistry of the Alkaloids (2, 2). Two lectures 
a week, first and second semesters. Prerequisites, Pharm. Chem. Ill, 113. 

Hager. 

Pharm. Chem. 220. Advanced Pharmaceutical Synthesis (2-6). Laboratory and 
conferences, either or both semesters. Prerequisites, Chem. 142, 144, or 
Pharm. Chem. 112, 114. Hager. 

Pharm. Chem. 222. Instrumental Methods of Pharmaceutical Analyses (1-4). 

Laboratory and conferences, eitlier or both seniester.s. Prereciuisites, Chem. 
146, 148. Hager, Miller. 

Pharm. Chem. 230. Pharmaceutical Chemistry Seminar (1). Required of stu- 
dents majoring in pharmaceutical chemistry each semester. Hager. 

Pharm. Chem. 235. Research in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Credit determined 
by amount and quality of work performed. Hager, Miller. 

Chem. 258. The Identification of Organic Compounds. An advanced course. 
Two to four laboratory periods a week, either semester. Prerequisites, Chem. 
146, 148, or equivalent. Miller, Hager. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Pharmacology 111. Official Methods of Biological Assay (4). Two lectures and 

two laboratory periods a week, first semester. Prerequisite, Pharmacology 

-- 81, 82. Ichniowski. 

For Graduates 

Pharmacology 201, 202. Methods of Biological Assay (4, 4). Laboratory and 
conferences, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, Pharmacology 111. 
Oflfered in alternate years. Ichniowski. 

'Pharmacology 211, 212. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics (4, 4). Labora- 
tory and conferences, first and second semesters. Prerequisite, Pliarma- 
cology 81 and 82 and the approval of the mstructor. Off"ered in alternate 
years. Ichniowski. 



148 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Pharmacology 221, 222. Special Studies in Biological Assay Methods (2-4, 2-4). 
Credit according to amount of work undertaken after consultation with the 
instructor. Laboratory work and conferences, first and second semesters. 
Prerequisites, Pharmacology 111, 201, 202. Ichniowski. 

Pharmacology 250. Research in Pharmacology. Properly qualified students 
may arrange semester hours' credit with the instructor. Ichniowski. 

PHARMACY 
For Graduates and Advakced Undergraduates 

Pharmacy 101, 102. Advanced Dispensing Pharmacy (3, 3). Two lectures and 
one laboratory a week. Prerequisites, Pharmacy 1, 2, 51, 52. 

Allen and Staff. 

Pharmacy 121. Hospital Pharmacy Administration (2). First semester, two 
lectures a week. Purdum. 

Pharmacy 132, Cosmetics (3). Second semester, two lectures and one lab- 
oratory a week. Prerequisites, Pharmacy 1, 2, 51, 52. 

Allen and Staff. 
For Graduates 

Pharmacy 201, 202. Manufacturing Pharmacy (2, 2). Two lectures a week. 
Given in alternate years. Prerequisites, Pharmacy 101, 102. 

Foss and Allen. 

Pharmacy 203, 204. Manufacturing Pharmacy (2, 2). Two laboratories a week. 
Prerequisites, Pharmacy 201, 202, or may be taken simultaneously with 
Pharmacy 201, 202. Foss and Allen. 

Pharmacy 205. Manufacturing Pharmacy Control (3). Three lectures a week. 
Given in alternate years. Foss. 

Pharmacy 211, 212. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature (1, 1). One lecture 
a week. Given in alternate years. Allen and Purdum. 

Pharmacy 215, 216. Product Development (2, 2). Two laboratories a week. 
Prerequisites, Pharmacy 132, 201, 202, 203, 204. Allen. 

Pharmacy 221, 222. History of Pharmacy (2, 2). Two lectures a week. Given 
in alternate years. Purdum. 

Pharmacy 230. Pharmaceutical Seminar (1). Each semester. Foss and Allen. 

Pharmacy 231, 232. Special Problems in Pharmaceutical Technology (2, 2). ''"^ 

Two laboratories a week. Allen and Purdum. 

Pharmacy 235. Research in Pharmacy. Credit and hours to be arranged. 

Foss, Purdum, Allen. 

PHYSICS AND PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 187, 189. Physical Chemistry (3, 3). Three lectures a week, first and 
second semesters. Prerequisites, Phys. 11; Chem. 15, 35, 37. Math 20, 21. 

Estabrook. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 149 

Chem. 188, 190. Physical Chemistry (2, 2). Two laboratory periods a week, 
first and second semesters. Prerequisite, Chem. 187, 189, or may be taken 
simultaneously with these courses. Estabrook. 

Phys. 104, 105. Electricity and Magnetism (3, 3). Two lectures and one labora- 
tory period a week, first and second semesters. Given in alternate years. 
Prerequisites, Phys. 11; Math. 21. Estabrook. 

Phys. 112, 113. Modern Physics (2, 2). Two lectures a week, first and second 
semesters. Prerequisites, Phys. Chem. 187, 189, 188, 190. Given according 
to demand. Estabrook. 

For Graduates 

Phys. 200, 201. Introduction to Theoretical Physics (5, 5). Five lectures a week, 
first and second semesters. Given according to demand. Estabrook. 

Phys. 208, 209. Thermodynamics (2, 2). Two lectures a week, first and second 
semesters. Prerequisite?, Phys. riiem. 187, 188, 189, 190. Given in alternate 
vears. Estabrook. 



150 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



INDEX 



Suhjoct Page 

Academic Divisions, Chairmen of 1 

Administration, Officers of 2 

Admission 31 

to candidacy for degrees 33 

to (Graduate School 31 

Advanced Degrees, Admission 33 

Aeronautical Engineering 44 

Agricultural Economics and Marketing 46 

Agricultural Education and Rural Life 48 

Agronomy 49 

Algebra 109 

American Civilization 51 

American Civilization, Degree Require- 
ments 35 

American History 99 

Analysis, Mathematical 110 

Analytical Chemistry 65 

Anatomy 13 6, 138 

Animal Husbandry 52 

Army Chemical Center 139 

Arts and Crafts, Practical 103 

Assistants and Fellowships. . . . a 41 

Bactei-iology 53, 136 

Baltimore Professional Schools 32 

Biochemistry 65 

Biological Chemistry 136, 140 

Board of Pi,egents 1 

Botany 54 

Botany and Pharmacognosy 146 

Business Administration 57 

Business Education 79 

Calendar, General 5 

Calendar, Graduate School Supplement 

to 10 

Campus Map 6, 7 

Chairmen. Academic Divisions 1 

Chemical Engineering 61 

Chemistry 65 

Chemistry, Biological 140 

Childhood Education SO 

Civil Engineering 68 

Clothing, Textiles and 102 

Commencement 42 

Committees, Faculty 4 

Comparative Literature 70 

Council. Graduate 9 

Courses, Description of 42 

Courses, Numbering of 43 

Courses, Graduate 32 

Crafts, Practical Art and 103 

Credit Hours, Counting of 43 

Crops and Soils 49 

Dairy 71 

Dentistry, School of 136 

Department Heads 2 

Description of Courses 42 

Doi'tor of Efluc:iliiin, Iic(|uirfnifnts . . ■'^K 

Doctor of Philosophy, Economics 73 

Doctor of Philosophy, Requirements.. 39 

Dramatic Art, Speech and 130 

Economics 72 

Education 74 

Edgewood, Md 137 

Electrical Engineering 84 

Embryology and Histology 136 

English Liinguage and Literature 86 

Engineering, Aeronautical 44 

Engineering, Chemical 61 

Engineering, Civil 68 

Engineering, Electrical 84 

Engineering, Mechanical 113 

Entomology 88 

European History 100 

Faculty 11 

Faculty Committees 4 



Suhject Page 

Fees 41 

Fellowships and Assistants 41 

Foods and Nutrition 106 

Foreign Languages and Literature.... 90 

French 90 

General Regulations 31 

Geograjihy 93 

Geometry and Topology Ill 

German 91 

Government and Politics 96 

Graduate Council 9 

Graduate Courses 32 

Graduate School Calendar 10 

Graduate Work by Seniors 33 

Gross Anatomy 136 

Heads of Departments 2 

Health Education 116 

Histology and Emliryology 130 

Histology, Embryology and Neuro- 

Anatomy 130 

History 99 

History and Organization of Graduate 

School 3D 

H'lmc and Institution Management.... 105 

Home Economics 101 

Home Economics Education 80 

Horticulture 107 

Hours Credit 43 

Human Development Education 81 

Industrial Education 82 

Information, Miscellaneous 31 

Inorganic Chemistry 66 

Institution Management 105 

Languages and Literature, Foreign.. 90 
Language Examinations, Doctor of 

Philosophy 40 

Legal Medicine 141 

libraries .'^1 

literature. Comparative 70 

Literature. English Language and.... 86 

liiternture. Foreign Languages and... 90 

Ivocatinn 30 

Map. Campus 6, 7 

Marketing. Agricultural Economics and 46 

Master of Art, Economics 72 

Master of Art. Foreign Languages. ... 90 
Master of Arts, Requirements (or.... 33 
Master of Arts in American Civiliza- 
tion. Requirements for 35 

Master of Business Administration, 

Requirements for 37 

Master of Education, Requirements for 36 

Master of Science, Requirements for.. 33 

Mathematics 109, 146 

Mechanical Engineering 113 

Medicine, School of 138 

Metallurgical Option 64 

Method of Numbering Courses 4 3 

Microbiology 142 

Miscellaneous Information 31 

I\Iorpholog>-, Botany and 56 

Music Education 83 

Nursing Education 83 

Nursing, Psychiatric 145 

Nutrition, Foods and 106 

Officers, Administrative 2 

Oak Ridge Institute 32 

Oral Pathology 137 

Oral Surgery 137 

Organic Chemistry 66 

Organization and History of Graduate 

School 30 

Pharmacognosy and Botany 146 

Pharmacology 142, 147 

Pharmacy 148 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



151 



INDEX 



Siii>)<(( I'ufrc 

riuirinaceutii'al Chemistry 146 

l'hilo.s()i>hy 115 

I'hilosiiphy, Doi-tor of, Economics.... 73 

J'hysical Chemistry, Physios and.. 67, 148 
Physical Education, Recreation and 

Health 116 

T'hysics 120 

I'hvsics and T'liysical Chemistry 148 

Physiology 137, 143 

I'lant Pathology 57 

Plant Physiology 55 

I'olitics and Government 96 

Poultry Husbandry 124 

Practical Art and Crafts 103 

Program of Work 32 

Professional Schools in Baltimore .... 32 

Psychology 125 

Psychiatric Nursing 145 

Recreation and Health, Physical Edu- 
cation and 116 

Regents, Board of 1 

Registration 31 

Regulations, General 31 

Requirements, Master of 

American Civilization 35 

Arts 33 

Business Administration 37 



Siihjfcf Page 

Education 36 

llequircment. Doctor of 

Education 38 

Foreign Languages 90 

Philosophy 39 

I'.ural Life, Agricultural Education and 4X 

Russian 93 

School of Dentistry 136 

School of Medicine 138 

School of Nursing 145 

School of J^harmacy 145 

Science Education 83 

Seminar, Research 64 

Seniors, Graduate Work 33 

Skinner Building 8 

Sociology 128 

Soils. Crops and 49 

Spanish 92 

Speech and Dramatic Art 130 

Staff • 11 

Summer Session 32 

Textiles and Clothing 102 

Topologj', Geometry and Ill 

\'eterinary Science 132 

Work Program 32 

Zoology 133 







J 


■ 


I 


■ 








V} 












o 

m 


> 




;»?i 


1 






D, 

CD 
O 
O 
O 


a 

0) 

.2 






Iff' '^y. 


u 


0) 


0) 






X 


M 









L - 


u 


'> 


^ 


oi 




i ■ 


u 


^ 


(1> 


0) 




r- '% 


M 









f ".^ 


H 


0, 




u 




>j- 


2 


< 


s 

o 








S 


A 


"a 


(U 






u 












u 


D 


^ 


HH 






^ 




VI 






ill 


(-1 


V 






s, 





0) 


'w 


.«^^s? 




^ 


3 










o 


o 


G 
O 






1 


u 


to 

o 
"u 
D 

a 

VI 

(1) 

.^ 

a 
O 


a 

0) 
0) 

o 

M 

a) 






* 



f% 



''j ^mJM^ t 






ii$7!«^1^L'^J 




EDUCATION 



/•/^"pDUCATION does not mean teaching people what they do not know. It 
•*-* means teaching them to behave as they do not behave. It is not teaching 
the youth the shapes of the letters and the tricks of numbers, and then leaving 
them to turn their arithmetic to roguery and their literature to lust It means, 
on the contrary, training them into the perfect exercise and kingly continence 
of their bodies and souls. It is a painful, continual and difficult work to be done 
by kindness, by watching, by warning, by precedent, and by praise, but above 
all — by example." — John Ruskin. 



"In our country no man is worthy the honored name of statesman, who 
docs not include the highest practicable education of the people in all hit 
plans of administration." — Horace Mann. 



"Promote, then, as an object of primary importance institution* for the 
general diffusion of knowledge. In proportion as the structure of a government 
gives force to public opinion, it is essential that public opinion should be 
enlightened." — George Washington. 



'The good education of youth has been esteemed by wise men in all ages 
at the surest foundation of the happiness both of private families and of com- 
monwealths." — Benjamin Franklin. 



"The whole pec^le must take upon themselves the education of the whole 
people and be willing to bear the expense of it" — John Adauns. 



"If a nation expects to be ignorant and free in a state of civilization, it 
expects what never was and never will be." — Thomas Jefferson. 



"A popular government without popular information or the means of ac- 
quiring it, is but the prologue to a farce or a tragedy, or perhaps both." 

— James Madison 



"An educated man is never poor and no gift is more precious than 
education." — Abraham Lincoln. 



"Without popular education no government which rests on popular action 
can long endure; the people must be schooled in the knowledge and in the 
virtues upon which the maintenance and success of free institutions depend." 

— Woodrow Wilson 



"We have faith in education as the foundation of democratic government" 

— Franklin D. Roosevelt 







SEPARATE CATALOGS 

At College Park 

Individual catalogs of college* and school* of the Univeriity oi 
Maryland at College Park may be obtained by addressing the Director 
of Publications, University of Maryland, College Park. Ilarylcmd. 

These catalogs and schools are: 

1. General Information 

2. College of Agriculture 

3. College of Arts and Sciences 

k. College of Business and Public Administration 

5. College of Education 

6. Glenn L. Martin College of Engineering and Aeronautical 
Sciences 

7. College of Home Economics 

8. College of Military Science 

9. College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

10. College of Special cmd Continuation Studies 

11. Summer School 

12. Graduate School 

At Baltunore 

Individual catalogs for the professional schools of the Univereity 
of Maryland may be obtained by addressing the Deans of the respec- 



of Maryland, Lombard and 
The profesaionol schools ore: 



Greene 



tive schools at the University 
Streets, Baltimore 1, Maryland. 

13. School of Dentistry 

14. School of Low 

15. School of Medicine 

16. School of Pharmacy 

17. School of Nursing 

At Heidelberg 

The catalog of the European Program may be obtained by addressing 
the Dean, College of Special and Continuation Studies, College Pork 
Maryland.