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Full text of "The Graduate School announcements"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/graduateschoolan1960univ 



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January H. i960 



School 



1960-1961 




The provisions of this 'publication are not to he regarded 
as an irrevocable contract between the student and the 
University of Maryland. The University reserves the 
right to change any provision or requirement at any time 
within the student's term of residence. The University 
further reserves the right at any time, to ask a student 
to withdraw when it considers such action to be in the 
best interests of the University. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Catalog Series 19604961 




UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



VOLUME 13 JANUARY 8, 1960 NO. 9 

Bulletin of the University of Maryland published eight times in January; five times 
in February; three times in May and September; twice in March, July and November; 
once in April, June, August, October, and December. 

Re-entered at the Post Office in College Park, Maryland, as second class mail matter 
under the Act of Congress of August 24, 1912. 



CONTENTS 



GENERAL 



University Calendar v 

Graduate School Supplement to 

General Calendar vii 

Board of Regents viii 

Officers of Administration ix 

Committee Chairmen, 

Faculty Senate xii 

The Graduate School 1 

Location 2 

Libraries 2 

General Information 2 

Academic Information 3 

Admission 3 

Registration 3 

Graduate Courses 4 

Program of Work 4 

Summer Session 4 

Graduate Work, 

Professional Schools 4 

Oak Ridge Institute 4 

Foreign Students 5 

Graduate Work by Seniors ... 5 



Candidacy for Advanced 

Degrees 6 

Requirements for M.A. and 

M.S. Degrees 6 

Requirements for Degrees in 

American Civilization 8 

Requirements for M.Ed. Degree 9 
Requirements for M.B.A. 

Degree 10 

Requirements for Ph.D. Degree 10 
Language Examination for 

Ph.D. Degree 12 

Requirements for Ed.D. Degree 12 

Graduate Fees 13 

Fellowships and Assistantships 14 
Graduate Prize, College Park 

Branch of AAUW 15 

Student Loan Funds 15 

Commencement 15 

Numbering Courses and Count- 
ing Credit Hours 16 

Grades 17 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 



Aeronautical Engineering 18 

Agriculture 22 

Agricultural Economics 22 

Agricultural Education and 

Rural Life 26 

Agricultural Engineering 29 

Agronomy— Crops and Soils .... 32 

American Civilization 36 

Animal Husbandry 37 

Botany 38 

Business Administration 43 

Chemical Engineering 52 

Nuclear Engineering Courses . . 56 

Metallurgy 58 



Chemistry 60 

Civil Engineering 66 

Classical Languages and 

Literatures 69 

Comparative Literature 70 

Dairy 71 

Economics 73 

Education 77 

Electrical Engineering 99 

English Language and Literature 104 

Entomology 107 

Foreign Languages and Literature 109 

Geography 116 

Government and Politics 121 

(coiitinued on next fage) 



CONTENTS 



History 125 

Home Economics 133 

Horticulture 142 

Mathematics 144 

Mechanical Engineering 154 

Microbiology 159 

Music 162 

Philosophy 164 

Physical Education, Recreation 

and Health 167 

Physics 173 



Poultry Husbandry 181 

Psychology 183 

Sociology 190 

Speech and Dramatic Art 196 

Veterinary Science 201 

Zoology 202 

School of Dentistry 205 

School of Medicine 210 

Interdepartmental Courses 213 

School of Nursing 218 

School of Pharmacy 221 



The Graduate Council 228 

Graduate Faculty 229 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

FALL SEMESTER 1959 

JANUARY 1960 

4 Monday— Christmas Recess Ends 8 a.m. 
20 Wednesday— Pre-Examination Study Day 
21-27 Thursday to Wednesday, inclusive— Fall Semester Examinations 

SPRING SEMESTER 1960 
FEBRUARY 

1-5 Monday to Friday— Spring Semester Registration 

8 Monday— Instruction Begins 
22 Monday— Washington's Birthday Hobday 

MARCH 

25 Friday— Maryland Day 

APRIL 

14 Thursday— Easter Recess Begins After Last Class 
19 Tuesday— Easter Recess Ends 8 a.m. 

MAY 

18 Wednesday— Military Day 

26 Thursday— Pre-Examination Study Day 

j o> Friday to Friday, inclusive— Spring Semester Examinations 

29 Sunday— Baccalaureate Exercises 

30 Monday— Memorial Day, Holiday 

JUNE 

4 Saturday— Commencement Exercises 

SUMMER SESSION 1960 

JUNE 1960 

27 Monday— Summer Session Registration 

28 Tuesday— Summer Session Begins 

AUGUST 

5 Friday— Summer Session Ends 

SHORT COURSES 1960 

JUNE 1960 

20-25 Monday to Saturday— Rural Women's Short Course 

AUGUST 

8-13 Monday to Saturday-4-H Club Week 

SEPTEMBER 

6-9 Tuesday to Friday— Firemen's Short Course 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

FALL SEMESTER 1960 
SEPTEMBER 

12-16 Monday to Friday— Fall Semester Registration 

19 Monday— Instruction Begins 
NOVEMBER 

23 Wednesday— Thanksgiving Recess Begins After Last Class 
28 Monday— Thanksgiving Recess Ends 8 a.m. 
DECEMBER 

20 Tuesday— Christmas Recess Begins 
JANUARY 1961 

3 Tuesday— Christmas Recess Ends 8 a.m. 
20 Friday— Inauguration Day Holiday 

25 Wednesday— Pre-E.xamination Study Day 
Jan. 260 
Feb 1 1 Thursday to Wednesday, inclusive— Fall Semester Examinations 

SPRING SEMESTER 1961 
FEBRUARY 

6-10 Monday to Friday— Spring Semester Registration 
13 Monday— Instruction Begins 
22 Wednesday— Washington's Birthday Holiday 
MARCH 

25 Saturday— Maryland Day 

30 Thursday— Easter Recess Begins After Last Class 
APRIL 

4 Tuesday— Easter Recess Ends 8 a.m. 
MAY 

17 Wednesday— Military Day 

30 Tuesday— Memorial Day, Holiday 
JUNE 

2 Friday— Pre-Examination Study Day 

3-9 Saturday to Friday, inclusive— Spring Semester Examinations 

4 Sunday— Baccalaureate Exercises 

10 Saturday— Commencement Exercises 

SUMMER SESSION 1961 
JUNE 1961 

26 Monday— Summer Session Registration 

27 Tuesday— Summer Session Begins 
AUGUST 

4 Friday— Summer Session Ends 

SHORT COURSES 1961 
JUNE 1961 

19-24 Monday to Saturday— Rural Women's Short Course 
AUGUST 

7-12 Monday to Saturday-4-H Club Week 
SEPTEMBER 

5-8 Tuesday to Friday— Firemen's Short Course 



GRADUATE SCHOOL SUPPLEMENT TO GENERAL CALENDAR 

1960 

October 7 Friday Last day to file applications for admission 

to candidacy for Doctor's degrees on 
June 10, 1961 and Master's degrees on 
February 1, 1961. 

October 11 Tuesday Modern language examination for Ph.D. re- 
quirement. 

December 7 Wednesday Last day to file applications for diplomas at 

the office of the Registrar for degrees on 
February 1, 1961. 

1961 

January 13 Friday Last day to deposit theses in the office of 

the Graduate School for students com- 
pleting requirements for degrees on 
February 1, 1961. 

February 21 Tuesday Modern language examination for Ph.D. 

requirement. 

February 15 Wednesday Last day to file applications for admission 

to candidacy for Master's degrees on 
June 10, 1961. 

April 15 Saturday Last day to file applications for diplomas 

at the office of the Registrar for degrees 
June 10, 1961. 

May 15 Monday Last day to deposit theses in the office of 

the Graduate School for students com- 
pleting requirements for degrees on 
June 10, 1961. 

June 13 Tuesday Modern language examination for Ph.D. 

requirement. 

June 9 Friday Last day to file applications for admission 

to candidacy at June meeting of the 
Graduate Council. 

July 11 Tuesday Last day to file applications for diplomas at 

the office of the Registrar for degrees 
on August 4, 1961. 

July 21 Friday Last day to deposit theses in the office of 

the Graduate School for students com- 
pleting requirements for degrees on 
August 4, 1961. 

vii ► 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

and 
MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

Term 
Expires 
Charles P. McCormick 

Chairman 1966 

McCormick and Company, 414 Light Street, Baltimore 2 

Edward F. Holter 

Vice-Chairman 1968 

The National Grange, 744 Jackson Place, N.W., Washington 6 

B. Herbert Brown 

Secretary I960 

The Baltimore Institute, 10 West Chase Street, Baltimore 1 

Harry H. Nuttle 

Treasurer 1966 

Denton 

Louis L. Kaplan 

Assistant Secretary 1961 

5800 Park Heights Avenue, Baltimore 15 

Enos S. Stockbridge 

Assistant Treasurer 1960 

10 Light Street, Baltimore 2 

Thomas W. Pangborn 1965 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., Hagerstown 

Thomas B. Symons 1963 

Suburban Trust Company, 6950 Carroll Avenue, Takoma Park 

C. Ewing Tuttle 1962 

907 Latrobe Building, Charles and Read Streets, Baltimore 2 

William C. Walsh 1968 

Liberty Trust Building, Cumberland 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst 1967 

4101 Greenway, Baltimore 18 

Members of the Board are appointed by the Governor of the State for terms of nine 
years each, beginning the first Monday in June. 

The President of the University of Maryland is, by law, Executive Officer of the 
Board. 

The State law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland 
shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 

•< viii 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Principal Administrative Officers 

wilson h. elkins, President 

b.a., University of Texas, 1932; m.a., 1932; b.litt., Oxford University, 1936; 
D. PHIL., 1936. 

albin o. kuhn, Executive Vice President 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1939; ph.d., 1948. 

ALViN E. cormeny, Assistant to the President, in Charge of Endowment and 
Development 

b.a., Illinois College, 1933; ll.b., Cornell University, 1936. 

r. lee hornbake, Dean of the Facility 

b.s., State Teachers College, California, Pa., 1934; m.a., Ohio State University, 1936; 
ph.d., 1942. 

frank l. bentz, jr., Assistant, President's Office 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1942; ph.d., 1952. 

Emeritus 

harry c. byrd, President Emeritus 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1908; ll.d., Washington College, 1936; ll.d., Dickin- 
son College, 1938; d.sc, Western Maryland College, 1938. 

Administrative Officers of the Schools and Colleges 

myron s. aisenberg, Dean of the School of Dentistry 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1922. 

vernon e. Anderson, Dean of the College of Education 

b.s., University of Minnesota, 1930; m.a., 1936; ph.d., University of Colorado, 1942. 

ronald bamford, Dean of the Graduate School 

b.s., University of Connecticut, 1924; M.S., University of Vermont, 1926; ph.d., 
Columbia University, 1931. 

Gordon m. cairns, Dean of Agriculture 

b.s., Cornell University, 1936; M.S., 1938; ph.d., 1940. 

ray w. ehrensberger, Dean of University College 

b.a., Wabash College, 1929; m.a., Butler University, 1930; ph.d., Syracuse Uni- 
versity, 1937. 

noel e. foss, Dean of the School of Pharmacy 

ph.c, South Dakota State College, 1929; b.s., 1929; M.S., University of Maryland, 
1932; ph.d., 1933. 

lester M. FRALEY, Dean of the College of Physical Education, Recreation, and 

Health 

b.a., Randolph-Macon College, 1928; m.a., 1937; ph.d., Peabody College, 1939. 

ix ► 



Florence m. gipe, Dean of the School of Nursing 

B.s., Catholic University of America, 1937; M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1940; 
ed.d., University of Maryland, 1952. 

ladislaus F. grapski, Director of the University Hospital 

r.n., Mills School of Nursing, Bellevue Hospital, New York, 1938; b.s., University 
of Denver, 1942; m.b.a. in Hospital Administration, University of Chicago, 1943. 

irvin c. haut, Director, Agricultural Experiment Station and Head, Department 
of Horticulture 

b.s., University of Idaho, 1928; M.S., State College of Washington, 1930; ph.d., 

University of Maryland, 1933. 

roger howell, Dean of the School of Law 

b.a., Johns Hopkins University, 1914; ph.d., 1917; ll.b., University of Maryland, 
1917. 

wilbert J. huff, Director, Engineering Experiment Station 

b.a., Ohio Northern University, 1911; b.a., Yale College, 1914; ph.d., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1917; d.sc. (hon.), Ohio Northern University, 1927. 

selma f. lippeatt, Dean of the College of Home Economics 

b.s., Arkansas State Teachers College, 1938; M.S., University of Tennessee, 1945^ 
ph.d., Pennsylvania State University, 1953. 

Frederic T. mavis, Dean of the College of Engineering 

b.s., University of Illinois, 1922; M.S., 1926; c.e., 1932; ph.d., 1935. 

paul E. nystrom, Director, Agricultural Extension Service 

b.s., University of California, 1928; M.S., University of Maryland, 1931; m.p.a.* 
Harvard University, 1948; d.p.a., 1951. 

j. freeman pyle, Dean of the College of Business and Public Administration 
ph.b., University of Chicago, 1917; m.a., 1918; ph.d., 1925. 

leon p. smith, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

b.a., Emory University, 1919; m.a., University of Chicago, 1928; ph.d., 1930; 
Diplome de l'lnstitut de Touraine, 1932. 

william s. stone, Dean of the School of Medicine and Director of Medical 
Education and Research 

b.s., University of Idaho, 1924; M.S., 1925; m.d., University of Louisville, 1929; 

ph.d., (hon.), University of Louisville, 1946. 

General Administrative Officers 

G. watson algire, Director of Admissions and Registrations 
b.a., University of Maryland, 1930; M.S., 1931. 

Theodore R. aylesworth, Professor of Air Science and Head, Department of 

Air Science 

b.s., Mansfield State Teachers College, 1936; M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1949. 

norma J. azlein, Registrar 

b.a., University of Chicago, 1940. 



B. james borreson, Executive Dean for Student Life 
b.a., University of Minnesota, 1944. 

david l. brigham, Director of Alumni Relations 
b.a., University of Maryland, 1938. 

c. wilbur cissel, Director of Finance and Business 

b.a., University of Maryland, 1932; m.a., 1934; c.p.a., 1939. 

william w. cobby, Director of Athletics 
a.b., University of Maryland, 1930. 

lester m. dyke, Director of Student Health Service 

b.s., University of Iowa, 1936; m.d., University of Iowa, 1926. 

geary F. eppley, Dean of Men 

b.s., Maryland State College, 1920; M.S., University of Maryland, 1926. 

george w. fogg, Director of Personnel 

b.a., University of Maryland, 1926; m.a., 1928. 

Robert j. mccartney, Director of University Relations 
b.a., University of Massachusetts, 1941. 

george w. Morrison, Associate Director and Supervising Engineer Physical 
Plant (^Baltimore') 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1927; e.e., 1931. 

Howard rovelstad, Director of Libraries 

b.a., University of Illinois, 1936; m.a., 1937; b.s.l.s. Columbia University, 1940. 

ADELE h. stamp, Dean of Women 

b.a., Tulane University, 1921; m.a., University of Maryland, 1924. 

george o. weber, Director and Supervising Engineer, Department of Physical 
Plant 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1933. 

Division Chairmen 

john e. faber, jr., Chairman of the Division of Biological Sciences 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1926; m.s., 1927; ph.d., 1937. 

harold c. hoffsommer, Chairman of the Division of Social Sciences 

b.s., Northwestern University, 1921; m.a., 1923; ph.d., Cornell University, 1929. 

wilbert j. huff, Chairman of the Division of Physical Sciences 

b.a., Ohio Northern University, 1911; b.a., Yale College, 1914; ph.d., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1917; d.sc, (hon.), Ohio Northern University, 1927. 

Charles E. white, Chairman of the Lower Division 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1923; M.S., 1924; ph.d., 1926. 

adolf E. zucker, Chairman of the Division of Humanities 

b.a., University of Illinois, 1912; m.a., 1913; ph.d., University of Pennsylvania, 
1917. 



CHAIRMEN, STANDING COMMITTEES, FACULTY SENATE 

GENERAL COMMITTEE ON EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

Dr. Ronald Bamford (Graduate School), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS 

Dr. Russell G. Brown (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES 

Dr. Ronald Bamford (Graduate School), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON SCHEDULING AND REGISTRATION 

Dr. Robert Rappleye (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PROGRAMS, CURRICULA AND COURSES 

Dr. Irvin C. Haut (Graduate School), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS-IN-AID 

Dr. Paul Nystrom (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY RESEARCH 

Dr. Edward J. Herbst (Medicine), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC FUNCTIONS AND COMMENCEMENTS 

Mr. B. James Borreson (Executive Dean for Student Life), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARIES 

Dr. Charles Murphy (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

Dr. Charles A. Taff (Business and Public Administration), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 

Dr. L. Morris McClure (Education), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT PUBLICATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS 

Dr. Franklin Cooley (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT DISCIPLINE 

Dr. Allan J. Fisher (Business and Public Administration), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Professor Louis E. Otts (Engineering), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Dr. Marvin H. Eyler (Physical Education), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT EMPLOYMENT AND SELF-HELP 

Dr. Warren R. Johnson (Physical Education), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATB COMPETITION 

Dr. Clyne S. Shaffner (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PROFESSIONAL ETHICS, ACADEMIC FREEDOM AND TENURE 

Dr. Peter Lejins (Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON APPOINTMENTS, PROMOTIONS AND SALARIES 

Dr. William E. Bickley (Agriculture), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON FACULTY LIFE AND WELFARE 

Dr. Guy B. Hathorn (Business and Public Administration), Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON MEMBERSHIP AND REPRESENTATION 

Dr. Joseph C. Biddix (Dentistry), Chairman 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL WAS ESTABLISHED IN ITS PRESENT FORM IN 1918 
under the jurisdiction of the Graduate Council with the Dean of the Gradu- 
ate School serving as Chairman. It was created for the purpose of administer- 
ing and developing programs of advanced study and research for graduate 
students in all branches of the University. Prior to the present organization 
some advanced degrees were awarded but they were under the jurisdiction 
of the individual departments subject to the supervision of the general faculty. 
Despite the large expansion of graduate programs into new areas as the Uni- 
versity has grown, the spirit of each program is essentially that of individ- 
ual study under competent supervision. The Graduate School is not an ex- 
tension of the undergraduate program but was created rather for the prepara- 
tion of those who in the future will carry on the spirit of individual inquiry. 
Thus it promotes and provides an atmosphere of research and scholarship for 
both the students and the faculty; in particular, it stimulates that harmonious 
relationship between the two which results in the advancement of learning. At 
the present time over fifty departments are authorized to offer graduate pro- 
grams leading to one or more of the advanced degrees awarded by the Uni- 
versity. 

The Graduate Council consists of ex-officio, elected and appointed mem- 
bers of the Graduate Faculty and is charged with the formulation of the 
overall policies of the Graduate School. It meets regularly in March, June 
and November to consider all matters relating to graduate work brought to its 
attention by the University Administration, the Graduate Faculty and the 
Dean of the Graduate School. It may also be called for special meetings 
throughout the year if urgent business must be transacted. 

The Graduate Faculty consists of regular and associate members chosen 
in accordance with the Plan of Organization of the Graduate Faculty and is 
listed in the back of this catalog. The direction of individual programs and 
theses is primarily assigned to the regular members of the Graduate Faculty. 

The Graduate Faculty Assembly consists of the regular members of the 
Graduate Faculty and meets once each year. Special meetings may be called 
by the Dean of the Graduate School if necessary. In accordance with the 
University Faculty Organization Plan, it has authority over the educational 
policy of the Graduate School, may review actions taken by the Graduate 
Council and serves as a referendum body on questions referred to it by the 
Graduate Council. 

The Dean of the Graduate School serves as chairman and executive officer 
of both the Graduate Council and the Graduate Faculty Assembly. 

The following standing committees are appointed by the Dean of the 
Graduate School: The Committee on Publications, Committee on Language 
Requirements, Committee on Graduate Programs and Standards for Graduate 



General Information 

Work, Committee on Fellowships and Student Welfare, Committee on Re- 
search, Committee on Procedures, Committee on the Graduate Faculty, and 
the Committee on Elections. They report annually to the Graduate Council 
and reports may be requested by the Dean of the Graduate School or by the 
Graduate Faculty Assembly. 

LOCATION 

The office of the Graduate School is located on the second floor of the 
Skinner Building on the College Park campus. This campus is located in 
Prince Georges County on a large tract of rolling wooded land less than eight 
miles from Washington, D. C. and approximately thirty-two miles from Balti- 
more and is served by excellent transportation. 

The Baltimore campus of the University is located at the corner of Lom- 
bard and Greene Streets, and on this campus the various departments in the 
Schools of Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy and Nursing offer their graduate 
programs. 

LIBRARIES 

The libraries of the University are located on both the College Park and 
Baltimore campuses. They consist of the general University Library and 
the many college and departmental libraries which house special collections. 
Because of the location of the University the large libraries of Baltimore 
and Washington are a valuable asset to graduate work. Arrangements can be 
made for personal work in the Enoch Pratt Library of Baltimore, the Library 
of Congress, the United States Department of Agriculture Library and the 
many fine collections of other government agencies in Washington. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Detailed information concerning fees and expenses, scholarships and awards, 
student life, and other material of a general nature, may be found in the Uni- 
versity publication titled An Adventure in Learning. This publication may be ob- 
tained on request from the Office of University Relations, North Administration 
Building, University of Maryland at College Park. A detailed explanation of the 
regulations of student and academic life, may be found in the University publica- 
tion titled, University General and Academic Regulations. This is mailed in 
September of each year to all undergraduate students, and again in February to all 
new undergraduate students not previously enrolled in the preceding fall semester. 

Requests for course catalogs for the individual schools and colleges should be 
directed to the deans of these respective units, addressed to: 

COLLEGES LOCATED AT COLLEGE PARK: 

Dean 

(College in which you are interested) 
The University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 



Academic Information 

PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS LOCATED AT BALTIMORE: 

Dean 

(School in which you are interested) 
The University of Maryland 
Lombard and Greene Streets 
Baltimore 1, Maryland 

Academic Information 

ADMISSION 

An applicant for admission to the Graduate School must hold a bachelor's 
or a master's degree from a college or university of recognized standing. 
The applicant shall furnish an official transcript of his collegiate record which 
for unconditional admission must show creditable completion of an adequate 
amount of undergraduate preparation of high quality for graduate work in 
his chosen field. Application for admission to the Graduate School should be 
made not later than September 1 for the fall term and not later than January 1 
for the spring term on blanks obtained from the office of the Dean. Admission 
to the summer session is governed by the date listed in the Summer School 
Catalog, which is generally soon after June 1. 

After approval of the application a matriculation card, signed by the Dean, 
is issued to the student. This card permits him to register in the Graduate 
School. It is his certificate of membership in the Graduate School and should 
be retained by the student to present at each succeeding registration. 

Admission to the Graduate School does not necessarily imply admission 
to candidacy for an advanced degree. 

REGISTRATION 

All students pursuing graduate work in the University, even though they 
are not candidates for higher degrees, are required to register in the Graduate 
School at the beginning of each session. Graduate credit will not be given 
unless the student matriculates and registers in the Graduate School. This 
applies especially to those students who register through University College at 
locations away from the campus. 

The program of work for each session is arranged by the student with 
the major department and entered upon two course cards which are signed 
first by the professor in charge of the student's major subject and then by the 
Dean of the Graduate School. One card is retained by the Dean. The student 
takes the other card, and his matriculation card, to the Registrar's Office, where 
the registration is completed. Students will not be admitted to graduate courses 
until the Registrar has certified to the instructor that registration has been 
completed. Registration forms are obtained at the Registrar's Office. 

A time schedule, supplementing this catalog, is issued shortly before the 
beginning of each semester, showing the hours and location of class meetings. 
This schedule is available at the Office of the Registrar. 

3 ► 



Academic Information 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Graduate students must elect for credit in partial fulfillment of the re- 
quirements for higher degrees only courses designated For Graduates or For 
Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates. Students who are inadequately pre- 
pared for graduate work in their chosen fields or who lack prerequisites for 
minor courses may elect a limited number of courses numbered from 1 to 99 
in the general catalog, but graduate credit will not be allowed for these courses. 
Courses that are audited are registered for in the same way as other courses, and 
the fees are the same. 

PROGRAM OF WORK 

The professor who is selected to direct a student's thesis work is the student's 
adviser in the formulation of a graduate program, including suitable minor work, 
which is arranged in cooperation with the instructors. To encourage thorough- 
ness in scholarship through intensive application, graduate students in the regular 
sessions are limited to a program of fifteen credit hours per semester. If a student 
is preparing a thesis during the minimum residence for the master's degree, the 
registration in graduate courses should not exceed twelve hours for the semester 
since registration in research is required. 

SUMMER SESSION 

The University conducts a six-weeks summer session at College Park, with 
a comprehensive undergraduate and graduate program. The University publishes 
a separate bulletin giving full information on this summer session. This bulletin 
is available upon application to the Director of the Summer School, University 
of Maryland, College Park. 

GRADUATE WORK IN PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS AT BALTIMORE 

Graduate courses and opportunities for research are offered in the professional 
schools at Baltimore. Students pursuing graduate work in the professional schools 
must register in the Graduate School and meet the same requirements and pro- 
ceed in the same way as do graduate students in the other departments of the 
University. 

OAK RIDGE INSTITUTE 

The University is one of the sponsoring institutions of the Oak Ridge Institute 
of Nuclear Studies located at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. One of the features of this 
affiliation is the opportunity, in the appropriate fields, for graduate students to 
do their research problems and prepare their theses under a cooperative arrange- 
ment. Such opportunity is limited to those who have completed their course 
work on the campus, are working in a field where facilities are available, and 
generally are candidates for the doctoral degree. Successful applicants will re- 

+ 4 



Academic Information 

ceive Oak Ridge Graduate Fellowships with varying stipends depending upon 
their marital status and dependents. Detailed information can be obtained from 
the Graduate School office or from Dr. Ronald Bamford, Dean of the Graduate 
School, Councilor for the University. 



FOREIGN STUDENTS 

Graduate students from foreign countries where English is not the native 
tongue should be adequately prepared to read and write in this language. 
Admission to graduate study implies that the student is aware of this requirement 
and is prepared to fully participate in the course of study and research work that 
is assigned. A foreign student adviser is available to all graduate students from 
other countries to discuss matters of immigration. 

Since the admission and stay of foreign students are in part dependent on 
regulations issued by the United States Immigration and Naturalization Service, 
it is advisable for all graduate students who have been admitted to the Graduate 
School to consult the foreign student adviser in regard to their immigration 
status. Students wishing to come to the United States with a student visa must 
secure an Immigration 1-20 Form from the Dean of the Graduate School in order 
to secure the proper visa from the American consul. Students with student visas 
already studying in the United States who wish to transfer to the University 
of Maryland must also secure an 1-20 Form from the Dean of the Graduate 
School in order to request the Immigration and Naturalization Service to grant 
permission for the transfer. 

Ever}' foreign student is expected to see the foreign student adviser as soon 
as possible after arriving at the University. The adviser will be able to assist 
not only with various problems regarding immigration, housing, fees, etc., but 
also with more general problems of orientation to life in the University and the 
community. 



GRADUATE WORK BY SENIORS IN THIS UNIVERSITY 

A senior of this University who has nearly completed the requirements for the 
undergraduate degree may, with the approval of his undergraduate dean, the 
head of the department concerned, and the Dean of the Graduate School, register 
in the undergraduate college for graduate courses, which may later be trans- 
ferred for graduate credit toward an advanced degree at this University, but the 
student must be within seven credit hours of completing his undergraduate work 
and the total of undergraduate and graduate courses must not exceed fifteen 
credits for the semester. Excess credits in the senior year cannot later be used 
for graduate credit unless such pre-arrangement is made. Seniors who wish to 
register for graduate credit should apply to the Dean of the Graduate School for 
information about procedure. 

5 ► 



Academic Information 

ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY FOR ADVANCED DEGREES 

Application for admission to candidacy for the master's and for the doctor's 
degree is made on application blanks which are obtained at the office of the 
Dean of the Graduate School. These are filled out in duplicate by the student 
and submitted to his major department for further action and transmission to 
the Dean of the Graduate School. All applications for admission to candidacy 
must be approved by the Graduate Council. 

Admission to candidacy in no case assures the student of a degree, but merely 
signifies he has met all the formal requirements and is considered by his instruc- 
tors sufficiently prepared and able to pursue such graduate study and research 
as are demanded by the requirements of the degree sought. The candidate must 
show superior scholarship in graduate work already completed. 

Application for admission to candidacy is made at the time stated in the sec- 
tions dealing with the requirements for the degree sought. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREES OF MASTER OF ARTS 
AND MASTER OF SCIENCE 

advancement to candidacy. Each prospective candidate for the master's 
degree is required to make application for admission to candidacy not later than 
the date on the calendar for the semester in which the degree is sought. (See 
Graduate School Supplement to the General Calendar in the front of this Cata- 
log.) He must have completed at least twelve semester hours of graduate work at 
the University of Maryland. An average grade of "B" in all major and minor 
subjects is the minimum requirement. Courses completed with a "D" or "F" in 
the major and minor must be repeated. 

minimum residence. A residence of at least two semesters, or equivalent, 
at this institution, is required. 

course requirements. A minimum of twenty-four semester hours, exclu- 
sive of thesis and registration for research, with a minimum average grade of "B" 
in courses approved for graduate credit, is required for the degrees of Master of 
Arts and Master of Science. The student is also required to register for six 
semester hours for research and thesis work. The total number of credit hours 
required for the degree is thirty. If the student is inadequately prepared for the 
required graduate courses, either in the major or minor subjects, additional courses 
may be required to supplement the undergraduate work. Of the twenty-four 
hours required in graduate courses, not less than twelve and not more than 
sixteen semester hours must be earned in the major subject. The remaining credits 
must be outside the major subject and must comprise a group of coherent courses 
intended to supplement and support the major work. Not less than one-half of 
the total required course credits for the degree, or a minimum of twelve, must 
be selected from courses numbered 200 or above. No credit for the degree of 
Master of Arts or Master of Science may be obtained for correspondence courses 

^ 6 



Academic Information 

or those taken by examination. The entire course of study must constitute a 
unified program approved by the student's major adviser and by the Dean of 
the Graduate School. All requirements for the degree must be completed within 
an eight-year period. 

transfer of credit. Credit not to exceed six semester hours for course work 
at other recognized institutions may be applied towards the master's degree only 
when such course work has been taken after the student has been admitted to the 
University of Maryland Graduate School. Before taking course work for transfer, 
the student must have the approval of his adviser and the head of the department 
in his major field. Normally, approval may be given only for courses which are 
not offered by the University of Marvland during the period of the student's at- 
tendance. The request for transfer of credit shall be submitted to the Graduate 
Council for approval when the student applies for admission to candidacy. The 
candidate is subject to final examination by this institution in all work offered 
for the degree. 

If a graduate student working for an advanced degree at another institution 
wishes to take courses at the University of Maryland, his application for admission 
must be accompanied by a letter from the graduate dean of his institution stating 
that credit for such courses is acceptable toward his degree. 

thesis. In addition to the twenty-four semester hours in graduate courses, 
a satisfactory thesis is required of all candidates for the degrees of Master of Arts 
and Master of Science. (Exceptions may be made in the cases of candidates for 
the degree of Master of Arts in xAmerican civilization. See page 8-9). The thesis 
must demonstrate the student's ability to do independent work and it must be 
acceptable in literary style and composition. With the approval of the student's 
major professor and the Dean of the Graduate School, the thesis in certain cases 
may be prepared in absentia under direction and supervision of a member of the 
faculty of this institution. 

The original copy of the thesis must be deposited in the office of the Graduate 
School not later than the date specified in the calendar in the front of this 
catalog. The date published is the deadline for the acceptance of theses but they 
may be deposited earlier. The thesis should not be bound by the student, as 
the University later binds all theses uniformly. /\n abstract of the contents of 
the thesis, not to exceed 250 words in length, must accompany it. A manual 
giving full directions for the physical make-up of the thesis should be consulted 
by the student before the typing of the manuscript is begun. Students may 
obtain copies of this manual from the Students' Supply Store at nominal cost. 

final examination. The final oral examination is conducted by a com- 
mittee appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. The student's adviser 
acts as the chairman of the committee. The other members of the committee 
are persons under whom the student has taken most of his major and minor 
courses. The chairman and the candidate are notified of the personnel of the 
examining committee at least one week prior to the period set for oral examina- 
tions unless an emergency arises. The chairman of the committee selects the 



Academic Information- 
exact time and place for the examination and notifies the other members of the 
committee and the candidate. The examination is normally conducted at the 
end of the semester, but upon recommendation of the student's adviser, an ex- 
amining committee may be appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School at any 
time when all other requirements for the degree have been completed. A report 
of the committee is sent to the Dean as soon as possible after the examination. 
A special form for this purpose is supplied to the chairman of the committee 
and the approval must be unanimous. Such report is the basis upon which 
recommendation is made to the faculty that the candidate be granted the degree 
sought. The period for the oral examination is usually about one hour, but the 
time should be long enough to insure an adequate examination. 

The examining committee also approves the thesis, and it is the candidate's 
obligation to see that each member of the committee has ample opportunity 
to examine a copy of the thesis prior to the date of the examination. 

A student will not be admitted to final examination until all other require- 
ments for the degree have been met. In addition to the oral examination a 
comprehensive written examination may be required at the option of the major 
department. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREES IN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 

Studies in the American Civilization Program are intended to prepare the 
candidate for teaching and research in American culture. The program is par- 
ticularly designed for the teacher or student whose intellectual interest is not 
limited to a single academic department. For instance, the historian who likes 
literature, the literary critic who wishes to study the social background of liter- 
ature, the political scientist who wishes to know more about the history of this 
country, and the sociologist who wants to study the roots of sociology in America, 
all may find the American Civilization Program the proper one for them. The 
four cooperating departments of English, History, Government and Politics, 
and Sociology offer the basic work in the program, and the student will stress the 
work of one of those departments when he determines his course of graduate 
studies. All students, however, will be expected to understand the development 
of American institutions and to show some proficiency in the literary, social, 
economic, and political history of the United States. 

The study of American civilization brings in many different fields, so a 
student has an unusually wide opportunity to plan a program suited to his in- 
dividual need. To help him do this, a committee representing the departments 
whose American fields he intends to study is set up shortly after he registers. The 
chairman of the committee is from the department of the student's greatest 
interest and acts as his adviser. The committee also prepares and reads the 
student's comprehensive examination and reads the thesis if one is submitted. 

The candidate for a degree must pass a final written examination testing his 
understanding of American civilization in terms of his individual program of 
studies. 



Academic Information 

master of arts. With the approval of his advisers and committee, a candi- 
date for the Master of Arts degree with a major in American civilization may 
elect in lieu of the thesis six additional hours of course work, to include at least 
two substantial seminar papers. The total number of credit hours required for 
the degree would then be thirty semester hours. 

Each candidate must present credits for at least fifteen semester hours of 
work in two of the four cooperating departments, and credits for at least fifteen 
semester hours in supporting courses (nine hours if a thesis is elected). Sup- 
porting courses will normally be in such fields as European or Latin-American 
history, English literature, comparative literature, philosophy, art, education, 
sociology, economics, and government and politics. 

Each candidate must demonstrate in a written examination that he possesses 
a reading knowledge of one foreign language. 

All other requirements are the same as for the degrees of Master of Arts and 
Master of Science in other fields. 

doctor of philosophy. The American Civilization Program cuts across 
several fields; therefore, a faculty committee representing the departments in 
which the student plans to study will be appointed shortly after the student 
registers. The chairman of the committee is from the department of the student's 
major interest and acts as his adviser. The committee is responsible for helping 
the student to integrate his program. Working through the student's adviser, 
the committee aids in planning the student's over-all program, prepares and 
grades any comprehensive examinations, and reads the dissertation. 

The general requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in American 
civilization are the same as those for the doctoral degree in other fields. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF EDUCATION 

The Master of Education degree is designed to increase competency in applied 
areas within the general field of education. Thirty semester hours of course work 
are required. Of the thirty hours, one-half must be in courses numbered 200 
and above, and one-half must be in education. Subject to the foregoing limita- 
tions, courses in departments other than education may be selected by the 
student and his adviser. 

In connection with course work there are required two seminar papers, the 
nature and form of which are prescribed in a Statement of Policy issued by the 
Department of Education. 

The procedure for advancement to candidacy and the transfer of credits, 
is the same as for the degrees of Master of Arts and Master of Science. The 
nature of the comprehensive examination, and other matters pertaining to de- 
gree requirements, are described elsewhere in these announcements and in the 
Statement of Policy referred to above. 



Academic Information 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE 

DEGREE OF MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The Master of Business Administration program is designed primarily to 
train students for positions of responsibility in business and government. The aim 
is to develop technical competence plus a thorough knowledge and appreciation 
of the art of management. The study of administrative policies and practices 
encourages interest and realistic thinking in management problems and respon- 
sibilities. 

The program leading to the degree of Master of Business Administration 
includes advanced study of business organization and administration in the fields 
of accounting and statistics, finance, general business, industrial management, 
insurance and real estate, marketing, personnel relations, public utilities and 
transportation. 

Those students whose major undergraduate work has been in arts, argricul- 
ture, science, education, or engineering subjects are required to complete certain 
basic core course requirements in business and economics before undertaking 
specialized graduate work for the degree of Master of Business Administration. 
The core course requirements are listed below. Responsible experience of excep- 
tional value and importance may be substituted for specific courses. 

Principles of Economics 6 hours Marketing Management .... 3 hours 

Principles of Accounting. ..6 or 8 hours Personnel Management 3 hours 

Statistics 3 hours Money and Banking 3 hours 

Business Law 3 or 4 hours 

The other requirements for the degree are the same as for the degrees of 
Master of Arts and Master of Science. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

advancement to candidacy. Candidates for the doctor's degree must be 
admitted to candidacy at least one academic year prior to the conferring of degrees. 
Applications for admission to candidacy for the doctor's degree are made in 
duplicate by the student and submitted to his major department for further 
action and transmission to the Dean of the Graduate School. Blanks may be 
obtained at the office of the Graduate School. 

Before admission to candidacy the applicant must have demonstrated 
to the Head of the Foreign Language Department that he possesses a read- 
ing knowledge of at least two foreign languages from the list approved by his 
major department, one of which must be either French or German. Preliminary 
examinations or such other substantial tests as the departments may elect are 
also required for admission to candidacy. 

The student must complete all of his program for the degree, including 
the thesis and final examination, during a four-year period after admission 
to candidacy. Failure to do so requires another application for admission to 
candidacy with the usual preliminary examination unless the Graduate Council 
rules otherwise. 

** 10 



Academic Information 

residence. The equivalent of three years of full-time graduate study and 
research is the minimum required. Of the three years the equivalent of at 
least one year must be spent in residence at the University. On a part-time 
basis the time needed will be correspondingly increased. All work at other 
institutions offered in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Doctor of 
Philosophy degree is submitted to the Graduate Council for approval, upon 
recommendation of the department concerned, when the student applies for 
admission to candidacy for the degree. 

The doctor's degree is not given merely as a certificate of residence and 
work, but is granted only upon sufficient evidence of high attainments in 
scholarship, and ability to carry on independent research in the special field 
in which the major work is done. 

major and minor subjects. The candidate must select a major and one 
or two closely related minor subjects. At least twenty-four semester hours 
of course work, exclusive of research, are required in the minor. Of the 
twenty-four semester hours at least eight hours must be at the 200-level 
unless special permission is granted beforehand. If two areas are chosen 
for the minor requirement not less than nine semester credit hours may 
be presented in either area. The remainder of the required residence is devoted 
to intensive study and research in the major field. The amount of required 
course work in the major subject will vary with the department and the indi- 
vidual candidate. The candidate must register for a minimum of twelve semes- 
ter hours of research. 

thesis. The ability to do independent research must be shown by a dis- 
sertation on some topic connected with the major subject. An original type- 
written copy and one clear, plain carbon copy of the thesis, together with an 
abstract of the contents, not to exceed 600 words in length, must be deposited 
in the office of the Dean not later than the date specified in the calendar in 
the front of this catalog. The date published is the deadline for the acceptance 
of theses but they may be deposited earlier. It is the responsibility of the 
student also to provide copies of the thesis for the use of the members of 
the examining committee prior to the date of the final examination. 

The original copy should not be bound by the student, as the University 
later binds uniformly all theses for the general University Library. The carbon 
copies are bound by the student in cardboard covers which may be obtained at 
the Students' Supply Store. The abstracts are published by University Micro- 
films. 

A manual giving full directions for the physical make-up of the thesis 
should be consulted by the student before typing of the thesis is begun. Stu- 
dents may obtain copies of this manual at the Students' Supply Store. 

final examination. The final oral examination is held before a committee 
appointed by the Dean. One member of this committee is a representative of 
the graduate faculty who is not directly concerned with the student's gradu- 

11 ► 



Academic Information 

ate work. One or more members of the committee may be persons from other 
institutions who are distinguished scholars in the student's major field. 

The duration of the examination is approximately three hours, and covers 
the research work of the candidate as embodied in his thesis, and his attain- 
ments in the fields of his major and minor subjects. The other detailed pro- 
cedures are the same as those stated for the master's examination. 



RULES GOVERNING LANGUAGE EXAMINATIONS FOR 
CANDIDATES FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

1. A candidate for the doctor's degree must show in a written examina- 
tion that he possesses a reading knowledge of French and German or such 
languages as approved by the major department and the Graduate Council. 
The -passages to be translated will be taken from books and journals approved 
by the student's major department. The Foreign Language Department 
will select material amounting to approximately 500 words from the litera- 
ture submitted and present to the students in each field a common examina- 
tion in mimeographed form. The examination aims to test ability to use the 
foreign language so that the student may be able to read some of the original 
basic literature in the field. It is presumed that the candidate will know 
sufficient grammar to distinguish inflectional forms and that he will be able 
to translate in two hours 500 words with the aid of a dictionary. 

2. Students planning to take the examination must register personally in 
the office of the Department of Foreign Languages at least three weeks in ad- 
vance of the test. 

3. Examinations are held in the office of the Department of Foreign Lan- 
guages in October, February and June. The specific days when these examina- 
tions are given are announced in the supplementary calendar of the Graduate 
School Announcements. 

4. There is no limitation on the number of times the examination may 
be taken, but a $5.00 fee will be charged for the second and subsequent 
examinations. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF EDUCATION 

The Doctor of Education degree is offered for students who hold or ex- 
pect to hold teaching or administrative positions in education and who desire 
to develop exceptional competence in special areas. The ability to explore and 
solve practical educational problems is emphasized. The requirements are the 
same as for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy except as specified below. 

foreign languages. When the program of study and research does not 
involve the use of foreign languages the requirement may be waived by the 
Department of Education. 

* 12 



Academic Information 

major and minor subjects. The candidate must select one major area and 
one minor area in which he expects to develop exceptional competence. The 
minor may be a single area or may consist of a group of related areas selected 
to broaden the candidate's understanding of education. In addition to the 
major and minor, other areas if desired may be included in the program also. 
The amount of course work required in the major, minor, and related areas 
will vary according to the needs of each individual candidate. 

project. Instead of completing a thesis as required for a candidate for 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, a candidate for this degree must demon- 
strate exceptional competence to work through field problems by completing 
a project in the major area. A Committee on Doctoral Research is appointed 
for each candidate. The committee is composed of three members at least 
two of whom are from the faculty of the College of Education. The com- 
mittee passes upon the student's plans for research. The specialist in the 
student's major area serves as sponsor and provides detailed guidance for the 
project. 

The regulations governing submission and form of copies of the project 
are the same as for theses submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

written examinations. Written examinations for the degree of Doctor of 
Education parallel those for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in education. 

final oral examination. The final examination covers the project and 
its relationship to the general field in which it lies and the candidate's at- 
tainments in related areas. 



GRADUATE FEES 

The fees paid by graduate students are as follows: 

Matriculation fee of $10.00. This is paid once only, upon first registration 
in the Graduate School. 

Graduation fee for master's degree, $10.00. 

Graduation fee for doctor's degree including a hood, microfilming and 
binding of thesis, $50.00. 

Tuition fee. A fixed charge, each semester, of $12.00 per semester credit 
hour for students carrying ten hours or less; for students carrying more than ten 
hours, $120.00 for the semester. 

Foreign Language Examination (first examination without charge), $5.00. 

Testing fee for education majors, $5.00. 

Laboratory fees, where charged, range from $1.00 to $20.00 per course per 
semester. 

13 ► 



Academic Information 

Infirmary fee, (voluntary) $5.00 (College Park only). 

The Infirmary services normally furnished the undergraduate students are 
available to graduate students who elect to pay the fee of $5.00 for the year 
(not including Summer School), provided that the fee is paid not later than 
the end of the first week of classes in the regular academic session. A graduate 
student entering in February may benefit in the same manner by the payment 
of $2.50. This fee will not be remitted for graduate assistants, scholarship or 
fellowship students. 

There is a $3.00 fine for violation of the University parking regulations. 
All graduate students are expected to abide by these regulations, regardless of 
full-time or part-time attendance. The failure to register for a parking permit 
entails a $5.00 fee. 

living expenses and self-help. The University in no way assumes re- 
sponsibility for the housing of graduate students. 

Board and lodging are available in many private homes in College Park and 
Baltimore. The cost of board and room varies from about $105.00 to $140.00 
a month, depending upon the desires of the individual. For College Park only, 
a list of accommodations is maintained by the housing bureau in the Office of 
the Dean of Men. 

Application for student employment, aside from fellowships and assistant- 
ships, may be made through the Offices of the Dean of Men and the Dean of 
Women, or to department heads. 

FELLOWSHIPS AND ASSISTANTSHIPS 

fellowships. A number of fellowships have been established by the Uni- 
versity. The stipend for the University fellows is $800.00 for nine months and 
the remission of all graduate fees except the graduation fee. Several industrial 
and special fellowships, with varying stipends, are also available in certain 
departments. 

University Fellows are permitted to carry a full graduate program, and 
they may satisfy the residence requirement for higher degrees in the normal 
time. 

Applications for fellowships are made on blanks which may be obtained 
from the office of the Graduate School. The application, with the necessary 
credentials, is sent by the applicant directly to the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Applications are forwarded by the Dean to the departments for their con- 
sideration and recommendation. The awards of University fellowships are on a 
competitive basis. 

graduate assistantships. A number of teaching and research assistant- 
ships are available in several departments. The compensation is $180.00 per 
month unless otherwise specified and varies with the nature and amount of 

-* 14 



Academic Information 

service required and with the terms of appointment. The amount of credit al- 
lowed toward a degree is normally a maximum of ten credit hours in a regular 
semester. The research assistants usually participate in research that meets 
the requirements for a master's or a doctor's degree. 

Applications for graduate assistantships are made directly to the depart- 
ments concerned and appointments are made through the regular channels for 
staff appointments. Further information regarding these assistantships may be 
obtained from the departments concerned. 

residence counseling assistantships. Twenty-four assistantships are 
available to qualified graduate male students to act as supervisors in men's 
dormitories. Remuneration for all residence assistantships is $1,800.00 per year, 
payable in ten monthly payments, plus remission of Graduate School fees. 
Further information about residence counseling assistantships can be obtained 
from the Office of the Dean of Men. 



GRADUATE PRIZE OF THE COLLEGE PARK BRANCH OF AAUW 

A Graduate Prize of $100.00 will be awarded annually by the College 
Park Branch of the American Association of University Women to an out- 
standing woman student, admitted to candidacy for an advanced degree at the 
University of Maryland. The selection will be made by the Scholarship Com- 
mittee of the Branch from candidates recommended by departments and the 
Graduate School. 



STUDENT LOAN FUNDS 

National Defense Education Act Loan Funds are available to graduate stu- 
dents of the University of Maryland up to $1000 per year. Such applications 
should be directed to Dr. Paul R. Poffenberger, Office of Scholarships, Grants- 
in-aid, and Loans, North Administration Building, University of Maryland at 
College Park, Maryland. 

A Student Loan Fund is maintained by the College Park Branch of the 

American Association of University Women. It is administered through the 

Office of the Dean of Women, and is available to deserving women who are 
junior, senior or graduate students at the University of Maryland. 

Likewise the Sigma Chapter of Phi Delta Gamma Fraternity for Graduate 
Women provides loans to graduate women of the University of Maryland. 

For further information contact the office of the Graduate School. 

COMMENCEMENT 

Attendance is required at the June commencement if the degree is con- 
ferred at that time. 

15 ► 



Academic Information 

Application for diploma must be filed in the Office of the Registrar eight 
weeks before the date at which the candidate expects to obtain a degree ex- 
cept during the summer session. 

Academic costume is required of all candidates at the June commence- 
ment. Those who so desire may purchase or rent caps and gowns at the 
Students' Supply Store. Orders must be filed eight weeks before the date of 
convocation but may be cancelled later if the student finds himself unable 
to complete his work for the degree. 

METHOD OF NUMBERING COURSES AND COUNTING CREDIT HOURS 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates are numbered 100 
to 199; courses for Graduates only are numbered 200 and upward. 

A course with a single number extends through one semester. 

A course with a double number extends through two semesters. 

The number of semester hour credits is shown by the arabic numerals in 
parentheses after the title of the course. Examples: 

Course 101. Title (3). First semester. 

If a laboratory course: 

Course 101. Title (3). One lecture and two laboratory periods a week, first 
semester. 

(This is a semester course: offered once a year.) 

Course 101. Title (3). First and second semester. 

(This is a semester course, repeated each semester, and except for re- 
search, seminar, and certain problem courses, must be taken only one semester.) 

Course 103, 104. Title (3, 3). Three hours a week, first and second semesters. 

If a laboratory course: 

Course 103, 104. Title (3, 3). One lecture and two laboratory periods a week, 
first and second semesters. 

(This is a course extending through two semesters and carrying three 
semester credits each semester.) 

Course 103, 104. Title (3, 3). Three hours a week, second and first semesters. 

(This is a course extending through two semesters, but it begins with the 
second semester.) 

Course 105, f, s. Title (3, 3). Three hours a week, first and second semesters. 

(This is alternate way of listing a two-semester course.) 

M 16 



Academic Information 



GRADES 



The following symbols arc used for grades: "A", "B", "C" and "S"— Passing; 
"D" and "F"— Failure; "I"— Incomplete. Since graduate students must maintain 
an overall "B" average, every credit hour of "C" in course work must be balanced 
by a credit hour of "A." A grade of "A" in thesis research will not balance a grade 
of "C" in a course. All incomplete grades must be removed before the degree is 
conferred. 



17 ► 



CURRICULA AND COURSES 
AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING 

Professors: sherwood, corning and shen. 
Visiting Professors: ludford and weske. 
Associate Professor: rtvello. 
Lecturers: kurzweg, nicol aides, pai and wilson. 

The Department of Aeronautical Engineering offers courses and opportunities 
for research leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy 
in aeronautical engineering. 

Admission to the Graduate School for study in this Department is based 
primarily on the student having a Bachelor of Science degree in aeronautical 
engineering in addition to the requirements for admission under General 
Regulations. However, a student without the Bachelor of Science Degree in aero- 
nautical engineering may be accepted for graduate study if he has a Bachelor 
of Science degree in an allied field of science and shows evidence of sufficient 
preparation for graduate work in his chosen field of aeronautical engineering. 

Students may elect off-campus graduate courses given by the University, 
but off-campus credit may count toward the course requirement only if taken 
after graduate admission has been obtained. For the degree of Master of 
Science, a minimum of six semester hours of graduate instruction, exclusive 
of research, from resident faculty members of this department must be in- 
cluded in the student's program and passed with a grade of "B" or higher. 
An acceptable thesis written under the guidance of the graduate faculty is 
also required. 

Facilities for graduate research include a complete subsonic laboratory 
consisting of a 7.75 x 11 foot wind tunnel and related shops, offices and photo- 
graphic equipment. For high speed research, a 6" x 6" supersonic wind tunnel 
is available with Schlieren optical system, instantaneous strain-gauge type 
pressure pick-ups, remote angle of attack control and other accessories. A 100 
h.p. rotarv vacuum pump provides adequate pumping capacity for 10 second 
runs at 2 minute intervals. 

The general aerodynamics laboratory is equipped with the following major 
items: a two foot subsonic wind tunnel, a ballistics range for measuring super- 
sonic drag of projectile-shaped bodies, a water table for simulating compressible 
flow by hydraulic analogy, a large electrolytic tank for the solution of potential 
flow problems, manometer boards, and high speed flash photographic equipment. 

The structures laboratory has a 400,000 pound capacity universal testing 
machine, hydraulic tension-compression jacks and pumps, and lead shot bags 
for applying structural loading. Traction dynamometers and SR-4 tension- 
compression load cells are available to measure loads. The laboratory has SR-4 

-« 18 



Aeronautical Engineering 

strain indication equipment extensometers, compressomcters, Huggenbergcr ex- 
tensometers, and a recording oscillograph for measuring strain. Dial gauges and a 
transit are available for measuring deflections. 

for Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Aero. E. 101. Aerodynamics I. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 21 and Math. 21. Basic 
fluid mechanics and aerodynamic theory. (Sherwood.) 

Aero. E. 102. Aerodynamics 11. (2) 

First semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Aero. E. 101. Elements of hydro- 
dynamics and application to engineering problems. (Sherwood.) 

Aero. E. 107, 108. Airplane Design. (4, 4) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and two supervised calculation periods 
per week. Prerequisites, Aero. E. 101, Aero. E. 104, and M.E. 22, 23. Aero. E. 102 and 
Aero. E. 113 to be taken concurrently. Theory and method of airplane design, airplane 
stability and control, airloads, and structural design. Each student designs a jet trans- 
port, high speed private airplane or other suitable airplane of student's choice, based 
upon set specifications. Charts and formulas used in industry are derived and used 
as basis of design. Optimum airplane is obtained by variation of fundamental para- 
meters. (Coming.) 

Aero. E. 109, 110. Aircraft Power Plants. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisite, M.E. 100. Study of basic operating principles of reciprocating, turbojet, tur- 
boprop, ramjet, and rocket engines. Specific topics of study include thermodynamic 
processes, combustion, fuels, carburetion, supercharging, lubrication, and engine per- 
formance. Various engine tests are run in the laboratory. (Weske.) 

Aero. E. Ill, 112. Aeronautical Laboratory. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisite, Aero. E. 101. To be taken concurrently with Aero. E. 102 and Aero. E. 113. 
Wind tunnel tests. Structure tests. Ballistics tests. Fluid flow analogies. Report 
writing, original research project. (Staff.) 

Aero. E. 113, 114. Mechanics of Aircraft Structures. 

First and second semesters. First semester, 3 lectures a week. Second semester, 3 
lectures and one calculation period a week. Prerequisites, M.E. 22, 23 and Math. 64. 
Principles and problems of airplane stress analysis and structural design. (Rivello.) 

Aero. E. 115. Aerodynamics III. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Aero. E. 102. Elementary theory of the flow of a com- 
pressible gas at subsonic and supersonic speeds. (Sherwood.) 

Aero. E. 117. Aircraft Vibrations. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Math. 64. Vibration and 
other dynamic problems occurring in airplane structures. Specific topics of study include 
the single degree of freedom system, damping, forced vibrations, critical frequency, mul- 
tiple degrees of freedom, and vibration isolation and absorption. (Coming.) 

19 ► 



Aeronautical Engineering 

For Graduates 

Aero. E. 200. Advanced Aerodynamics. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Aero. E. 115, Math. 64. Review 
of thermodynamics and physical properties of gases. One dimensional flow of a perfect 
compressible fluid. Shock waves. Fundamental equations of aerodynamics of compres- 
sible fluid. Two-dimensional linearized theory of compressible flow, Prandd-Glauert 
Method, Ackeret method, Rayleigh-Janzen method. Hodograph method Karman-Tsien 
approximation. Two-dimensional transonic and hypersonic flows. Exact solutions of two 
dimensional isotropic flow. (Pai.) 

Aero. E. 201. Advanced Aerodynamics. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Aero. E. 200. Linearized 
theory of three-dimensional potential flow. Exact solution of axially symmetrical poten- 
tial flow. Method of characteristics. (Two-dimensional and axially symmetrical flow.) 
Nozzle design; flow in jets; rotational flow of compressible fluid. One-dimensional 
viscous compressible flow. Laminar boundary layer of compressible fluids. (Pai.) 

Aero E. 202. Advanced Aircraft Structures. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Math. 64 and Aero. E. 113, 
114, or permission of the instructor. Introduction to two-dimensional theory of 
elasticity, energy methods, plate theory, theory of elastic instability. (Rivello.) 

Aero. E. 203. Advanced Aircraft Structures. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Aero. E. 202. Aerodynamic 
heating of structures, thermal stresses, creep, creep bending and buckling, visco-elastic 
theory. (Rivello.) 

Aero. E. 204. Aircraft Dynamics. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Math. 64 and Aero. E. 114. Dynamics of a rigid body 
and applications to airplane dynamics. Generalized coordinates and Lagrange's equa- 
tions. Vibrations of simple systems. Dynamics of elastically connected masses. In- 
fluence coefficients. Mode shapes and principal oscillations. Transient stresses in an 
elastic structure. (Shen.) 

Aero. E. 205. Aircraft Dynamics. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Math. 64 and Aero. E. 101. Wing divergence and 
aileron reversal. Theory of two dimensional oscillating airfoil. Flutter problems. Cor- 
rections for finite span. Compressibility effects. (Shen.) 

Aero. E. 206, 207. Advanced Aircraft Power Plants. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisites, M. E. 100; Aero. E. 109, 110. Special problems of thermodynamics and 
dynamics of aircraft power plants; jet and rocket engines. Research in power plant 
laboratory. (Weske.) 

Aero. E. 208. Advanced Aircraft Design. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Aero. E. 101, 102, 113, 114. 
Theory and method of airplane design. Special emphasis is placed on the derivations 
and theoretical background of the formulas and experimental data used. (Corning.) 

< 20 



Aeronautical Engineering 

Aero. E. 209. Stability and Control. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Aero. E. 101, 102. Dynamic 
longitudinal and lateral stability and control, preceded by a brief introduction to static 
stability. (Corning.) 

Aero. E. 210. Aerodynamic Theory. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Aero. E. 101, Math. 64. Fundamental equations in 
fluid mechanics. Irrotational motion. Circulation theory of lift. Thin airfoil theory. 
Lifting line theory. Wind tunnel corrections. Propellor theories. Linearized equations 
in compressible flow. (Shen.) 

Aero. E. 211. The Design and Use of Wind Tunnels (Super sonic). (3) 
First and second semesters. The design and use of wind tunnels (supersonic). p^ e . 
view of basic aerodynamics and thermodynamics. Problems in supersonic tunnel design 
such as pumping, power supply, condensation and driers. Equipment for measuring 
results, including balances, manometer, optical instruments, such as Schlieren, spark 
illumination and X-ray equipment. Investigations in supersonic wind tunnels are de- 
scribed with special reference to similitude required for conversion to full scale. 

(Kurzweg.) 
Aero. E. 212, 213. Bodies at Supersonic Speeds. (3 7 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, degree in Aero. E. or M. E. or equivalent, 
and consent of instructor. Brief review of gasdynamics, drag, lift, stability, and damping 
on a body in a supersonic stream. Special aerodynamic problems in the design of super- 
sonic missiles. Methods for obtaining accurate test data on the aerodynamic charac- 
teristics of supersonic missiles. (Kurzweg.) 

Aero. E. 214. Seminar. 

(Credit in accordance with work outlined by the aeronautical engineering staff.) First 
and second semesters. Prerequisite, graduate standing. (Staff.) 

Aero. E. 216. Selected Aeroballistics Problems. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, degree in aeronautical engineering or electrical engineer- 
ing or equivalent and consent of instructor. Physical processes and aerothermodynamic 
laws connected with the flow around supersonic missiles. Boundary layer problems 
and the transfer of heat and mass. (Kurzweg.) 

Aero. E. 217. Aerodynamics of Viscous Fluids. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Aero. E. 101, Math. 64. Fundamental concepts. Navier- 
Stokes' equations. Simple exact solutions. Laminar boundary layer theory. Pohlhausen 
method. Turbulent boundary layer; mixing length and similarity theories. Boundary 
layer in compressible flow. (Shen.) 

Aero. E. 218. Selected Topics in Aerodynamic Theory. (3) 
First or second semester. Prerequisites, Aero. E. 210, 115. Topics of current inter- 
est and recent advances in the field of aerodynamics. (Shen.) 

Aero. E. 399. Research. 

(Credit in accordance with work outlined by aeronautical engineering staff.) First 

and second semesters. Prerequisite, graduate standing. (Staff.) 

21 ► 



Agricultural Economics 

AGRICULTURE 

Associate Professor: schultz. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Agr. 100. Introductory Agricultural Biometrics. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Introduction to 
fundamental concepts underlying the application or biometrical methods to agricultural 
problems with emphasis on graphical presentation of data, descriptive statistics, chi- 
square and t-tests, and linear regression and correlation. (Schultz.) 

Agr. 200. Agricultural Biometrics. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisite, 
Agr. 100 or equivalent. A continuation of Agr. 100 with emphasis on analysis 
of variance and co-variance, multiple and curvilinear regression, sampling, experi- 
mental design and miscellaneous statistical techniques as applied to agricultural 
problems. (Schultz.) 

Agr. 202, 203. Advanced Biological Statistics. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, approval of instructor. An advanced course 
dealing with specialized experimental designs, sampling techniques and elaborations 
of standard statistical procedures as applied to the animal and plant sciences. (Schultz.) 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

Professors: poffenberger, beal and walker. 
Visiting Professor: taylor. 

Associate Professors: Hamilton, Murray and smith. 
Assistant Professors: ishee, swope and wysong. 

The Department offers a course of study leading to the degree of Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Although the major field is agricultural 
economics, thesis topics may be selected and courses concentrated in farm man- 
agement, farm taxation, farm finance, marketing, land economics, agricultural 
policy and foreign agricultural trade. 

Department requirements, supplementary to the Graduate School, have 
been formulated for the guidance of candidates fo graduate degrees. Copies of 
these requirements may be obtained from the Department of Agricultural 
Economics. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

A. E. 101. Marketing of Farm Products. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Econ. 31, 32, or Econ. 37. The development of market- 
ing, its scope, channels, and agencies of distribution, functions, costs, methods used 
and services rendered. (Swope.) 

A. E. 103. Cooperation in Agriculture. (3) 

First semester. (Offered 1961-62.) Historical and comparative development of farmers' 

+ 22 



Agricultural Economics 

cooperative organizations; reasons for failure and essentials to success; commodity 
developments; operative practices; banks for cooperatives; present trends. (Smith. j 

A. E. 104. Farm Finance. (3) 

Second semester. (Offered 1960-61.) A study of credit principles as applied to private 
and cooperative farm business and the agencies extending farm credit. The needs for 
and benefits of farm insurance, including fire, crop, livestock, and life insurance. 

(Ishee.) 
A. E. 106. Prices of Farm Products. (3) 

Second semester. A general course in prices, price relationships, and price analysis, 
with emphasis on prices of agricultural products. (Wysong.) 

A. E. 107. Analysis of the Farm Business. (3) 

First semester. A concise, practical course in the keeping, summarizing, and analyzing 

of farm accounts. (Hamilton.) 

A. E. 108. Farm Management. (3) 

Second semester. A study of the organization and operation of farms from the stand- 
point of efficiency, selection of farms, size of farms, leasing systems, and factors 
affecting profits. Students will make an analysis of the actual farm business and 
practices of different types of farms, and make specific recommendations as to how 
these farms may be organized and operate as successful businesses. (Hamilton.) 

A. E. 111. Land Economics. (3) 

First semester. (Offered 1961-62.) A study of the principles, problems and policies 

in the utilization of land with special emphasis on agricultural land. (Ishee.) 

A. E. 112. Economic Development of American Agriculture. (3) 
First semester. (Offered 1960-61.) This course is designed to acquaint students with 
major economic development in American agriculture. It places particular emphasis 
upon the economic impact of major agricultural movements, such as, colonial agrarian- 
ism, the disposition of the public domain, farm organizations, recent governmental 
farm programs and the relationship of agriculture to public affairs. (Beal.) 

A. E. 114. Foreign Trade in Farm Products. (3) 

First semester. (Offered 1961-62.) Economic principles in historical setting, trade 
barriers, foreign exchange problems, measures to promote trade, past and prospective 
trends of American imports and exports of farm products. (Taylor.) 

A. E. 115. Marketing of Dairy Products. (2) 

First semester. (Offered 1960-61.) A study of principles and practices in the market- 
ing of milk and manufactured dairy products, including the influence of significant 
geographical and institutional relationships on costs and methods of distribution. 

A. E. 116. Marketing of Fruits and Vegetables. (2) 

Second semester. (Offered 1960-61.) A study of principles and practices in the 
marketing of fresh and processed fruits and vegetables, including the influence of 
significant geographical and institutional relationships on costs and methods of 
distribution. (Swope.) 

23 ► 



Agricultural Economics 

A. E. 117. Economics of Marketing Eggs and Poultry. (3) 

Second semester. (Offered 1961-62.) This course embraces the economic phases of 
egg and poultry marketing. Supply and demand factors, including trends, will be 
discussed along with marketing methods, marketing costs and margins, market facilities, 
transportation, government grading, storage and efficiency in marketing. Consumer 
preference, acceptance and purchases will be related to consumer income, pricing of 
competitive products, and display methods. (Smith.) 

A.E. 118. Foreign Agricultural Policies. (3) 

First semester. This course deals with how the agricultural policies of the United 
States and foreign countries of major agricultural importance are formulated and 
conducted. Specific policies are evaluated. The effect of various incentives and 
barriers to American exports and imports of agricultural products is appraised with 
the assistance of visiting discussion leaders working at the policy level in the United 
States and other major agricultural countries. (Taylor.) 

A. E. 119. Foreign Agricultural Economics. (3) 

Second semester. This course deals with differences between the agricultural economies 
of several countries and their significance to world-wide production, trade, and con- 
sumption of the agricultural products of major importance to the United States. 
Special emphasis is given to the roles of institutional and governmental arrangements. 

(Taylor.) 
A. E. 198. Research Problem. (2-2) (2 Cr. Max.') 

First and second semesters. With the permission of the instructor, students will 
work on any research problems in agricultural economics. There will be occasional 
class meetings for the purpose of making reports on progress of work. (Staff.) 

A. E. 199 A-B. Seminar. (I, I) 

First and second semesters. Students will prepare and present reports on economic 

literature and current agricultural economic problems. (Hamilton.) 

Technology of Market Eggs and Poultry. 
See Poultry Husbandry, P. H. 104. 

Potdtry Industrial and Economic Problems. 
See Poultry Husbandry, P. H. 107. 

Market Milk. 

See Dairy, Dairy 109. 

Livestock Markets and Marketing. 
See Animal Husbandry, A. H. 150. 

Meat and Meat Products. 

See Animal Husbandry, A. H. 160. 

Advertising. 

See Business Administration, B. A. 151. 

Retail Store Management. 

See Business Administration, B. A. 154. 

M 24 



Agricultural Economics 

For Graduates 

A. E. 208. Agricultural Policy. (3) 

Second semester. The evolution of agricultural policy in the United States, emphasiz- 
ing the origin and development or governmental programs, and their effects upon agri- 
cultural production, prices and income. (Beal.) 

A. E. 210. Agricultural Taxation. (3) 

First semester. (Offered 1960-61.) Principles, theory and practical problems of tax- 
ation applied to the held of agriculture; trends in farm taxes; farm tax burdens; 
equalizing and reducing farm tax burdens; taxation of farm cooperatives; forest lands 
and interstate agricultural commerce; application of income taxes and sales to farmers; 
taxation of agriculture in foreign countries. (Walker.) 

A. E. 211. Functional Aspects of Farm Taxation. (3) 

Second semester. (Offered 1961-62.) Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. 
Taxation policies and inter-governmental allocations and grants-in-aid as they affect 
public services for rural people, with special emphasis on public education, public 
highways, public welfare, social security, public debt; and governmental research, 
extension, and regulatory activities directly concerning agriculture. (Walker.) 

A. E. 214. Advanced Agricidtural Marketing. (3) 

First semester. Advanced study of the complex theoretical, institutional and legal 
factors governing both domestic and foreign agricultural trade, with particular atten- 
tion given to policies and practices affecting cost and price. (Beal.) 

A. E. 216. Advanced Farm Management. (3) 

Second semester. An advanced course in farm organization and management which 
applies the economic principles of farm production to the operation of farms of 
different sizes, types, operations, and geographical locations. Consideration is also 
given to adjustments which have taken place in farming specific areas and probable 
changes in the future. (Ishee.) 

A. E. 218. Agricultural Economics Research Techniques. (3) 
First semester. A study and an appraisal of agricultural economics research tech- 
niques. Experience is given in outlining and conducting research projects. A critical 
appraisal is made of methods of analysis and the presentation of results. (Beal.) 

A. E. 219. Advanced Land Economics. (3) 

Second semester. A critical analysis of the principles and problems in issuing and 
controlling land resources, including a review of land policies, is given, with special 
consideration being placed on the problems of submarginal lands, range lands, and 
water resources. Conservation of various land resources is appraised; problems of 
landed property are presented; and criteria essential to the development of a sound 
land policy are studied. (Ishee.) 

A. E. 220. World Agricultural Production. (3) 

First semester. A world-wide appraisal of the economic significance of the growth 
of population, changes in food and fiber requirements, development of land resources, 
development of crop and livestock productivity, substitute or supplementary products 
from factory and sea, the economic imbalance between developed and under-developed 

25 ► 



Agricultural Economics, Education and Rural Life 

countries, financial and social limitations, and organized international agricultural 
development activities. (Taylor.) 

A. E. 301. Special Problems in Farm Economics. (2) (4 Cr. Max.") 
First and second semesters. An advanced course dealing extensively with some of the 
economic problems affecting the farmer, such as land values, taxation, credit, prices, 
production adjustments, transportation, marketing, and cooperation. (Staff.) 

A. E. 302. Seminar. CD (4 Cr. Max.) 

First and second semesters. Students will be assigned research in agricultural economics 
under the supervision of the instructor. The work will consist of original investigation 
in problems of agricultural economics. (Staff.) 

A. E. 399. Research. 

Credit according to work accomplished. This course will consist of special reports 
by students on current economic subjects, and a discussion and criticism of the same by 
the members of the class and instructional staff. (Staff.) 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND RURAL LIFE 

Professor: warner. 

Associate Professor: rohrer. 

Assistant Professors: Hopkins and smith. 

The Department of Agricultural Education offers work leading to the degree 
of Master of Science. Students may choose either a program on vocational 
agriculture or extension education. Either program may be pursued on a part-time 
or full-time basis. 

VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE 

Students pursuing the program in vocational agriculture will be expected to 
have taken, or to take concurrently with the program, a minimum of sixteen 
credits in education, including a course in methods of teaching vocational 
agriculture. They should take advantage of special courses offered for teachers 
of vocational agriculture in the summer, and will find numerous acceptable 
courses offered in evenings and on Saturday during the school year. Some 
students may elect a limited number of special problems courses, mostly in 
agriculture. 

EXTENSION EDUCATION 

Students pursuing the extension education program will be expected to have 
had a minimum of two years of experience as an extension worker and eight 
undergraduate credits in extension and/or education courses. Deficiencies in 
prerequisites must be made up. This can be done while pursuing the graduate 
program. The major courses for these students wall be selected from courses 
emphasizing rural education, extension education, adult education, human devel- 
opment and rural sociology. A student may select a program with a major 

* 26 



Agricultural Education and Rural Life 

emphasis in extension or adult education. Each student will be assigned to an 
adviser for consultation in developing an acceptable program. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

R. Ed. 107. Observation and Analysis of Teaching Agrictdture. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. This course deals 

with an analysis of pupil learning in class groups. (Smith.) 

R. Ed. 109. Teaching Secondary Vocational Agricidture. (3) 
First semester. A comprehensive course in the work of high school departments of vo- 
cational agriculture. It emphasizes particularly placement, supervised farming programs, 
the organization and administration of Future Farmer activities, and objectives and 
methods in all-day instruction. (Hopkins, Smith.) 

R. Ed. 111. Teaching Young and Adult Farmer Groups. (I) 

First semester. Characteristics of young and adult farmer instruction in agriculture. 
Determining needs for and organizing a course; selecting materials for instruction, and 
class management. Emphasis is on the conference method of teaching. (Smith.) 

R. Ed. 112. Departmental Management. (I) 

Second semester. One laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, R. Ed. 107 and 109, or 
permission of the Head of the Department. The analysis of administrative programs 
for high school departments of vocational agriculture. Investigations and reports. 

(Hopkins, Smith.) 
R. Ed. 114. Rural Life and Education. (3) 

Second semester. An intensive study of the educational agencies at work in rural com- 
munities, stressing an analysis of school patronage areas, the possibilities of normal life 
in rural areas, early beginnings in rural education, and the conditioning effects of edu- 
cational offerings. (Rohrer.) 

R. Ed. 150. Extension Education. (2) 

Second semester. The Agricultural Extension Service as an educational agency. The 
history, philosophy, objectives, policy, organization, legislation, and methods used in 
extension work. (Warner.) 

R. Ed. 160. Agricultural Communications. (2) 

First semester. A general introduction to communications and the application of com- 
munication principles and problems of teaching agricultural workers, person to person, 
with groups and through mass media. (Warner.) 

R. Ed. 170 A-B. Workshop: Teaching Conservation of Natural Resources. 

(3-3) 
Summer session only. Laboratory fee, $25.00. This workshop is devoted to a study of 
the state's basic wealth, its natural resources, natural resource problems and practices 
pertinent to local, state, national and world welfare. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

R. Ed. 201. Rural Life and Education. (3) 

First semester. (Given in accordance with demand, but not more often than alternate 

27 ► 



Agricultural Education and Rural Life 

years). Prerequisite, R. Ed. 114 or equivalent. A sociological approach to rural 
education as a movement for a good life in rural communities. (Smith.) 

R. Ed. 203. Farm Organizations and Rural Education. (3) 
Second semester. (Given in accordance with demand, but not more often than alter- 
nate years). Prerequisite, R. Ed. 114 or equivalent. The part plaved by farm organi- 
zations in formal and informal education in the rural community. (Hopkins.) 

R. Ed. 207, 208. Problems in Vocational Agriculture. (2, 2) 
First and second semesters. (Given in accordance with demand, but not more often 
than alternate years). In this course special emphasis is placed upon the current prob- 
lems facing teachers of vocational agriculture. It is designed especially for persons who 
have had several years of teaching experience in this field. (Smith, Hopkins.) 

R. Ed. S207 A-B. Problems in Teaching Vocational Agriculture. (I, I) 
Summer session only. A critical analvsis of current problems in the teaching of voca- 
tional agriculture with special emphasis upon recent developments in all-day programs. 

(Hopkins, Smith.) 
R. Ed. S209 A-B. Adidt Education in Agriculture. (.1,1) 

Summer session only. Principles of adult education as applied to rural groups, especially 
young and adult farmers. Organizing classes, planning courses and instructional methods 
are stressed. (Staff.) 

R. Ed. S210 A-B. The Land Grant College System. (1, I) 

Summer session only. Development of teaching, research and extension in land grant 

colleges and the role these colleges have plaved in improving rural conditions. (Staff.) 

R. Ed. S213 A-B. Supervision and Administration of Vocational Agricidture. 

a o 

Summer session only. Administrative and supervisory problems in vocational agricul- 
ture including scheduling, local administrative programs, supervisor-teacher relation- 
ships and the responsibilities of superintendents and principals in the program. 

(Hopkins.) 
R. Ed. 215. Supervision of Student Teaching. (I) 

Arranged. (Given in accordance with demand, but not more often than alternate years). 
The role of the supervising teacher in checking progress, supervising and grading 
student teachers. Particular emphasis will be given to the region-wide program in 
training teachers of vocational agriculture, including the evaluation of beginning 
teachers. (Hopkins.) 

R. Ed. 240. Agricultural College Instruction. (I) 

Second semester. (Given in accordance with demand, but not more often than alter- 
nate years). Open to graduate students and members of the faculty in the College 
of Agriculture. A seminar tvpe of course consisting of reports, discussions, and lectures 
dealing with the techniques and procedures adapted to teaching agricultural subjects at 
the college level. (Staff.) 

K. Ed. S250 A-B. Critique in Rural Education, (i, I) 

Summer session onlv. Current problems of teaching agriculture arj analyzed and dis- 
cussed. Students are required to make investigations, prepare papers and make reports. 

(Hopkins, Smith.) 

-*3 23 



Agricultural Education and Rural Life, Agricultural Engineering 

R. Ed. 301. Field Problems in Rural Education, (i-3) 

First and second semesters and summer session. Prerequisite, six semester hours of 
graduate study. Problems accepted depend upon the character of the work of the stu- 
dent and the facilities available for study. Periodic conferences required. Final report 
must follow accepted pattern for field investigation. (Staff.) 

R. Ed. 302. Seminar in Rural Education. (I, I) 

First and second semesters. Problems in the organization, administration, and supervision 

of the several agencies of rural education. Investigations, papers, and reports. 

(Hopkins, Smith.) 
R. Ed. 399. Research. 

First and second semesters and summer session. Credit hours according to work done. 

(Staff.) 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Professors: green, burkhardt and krewatch. 
Associate Professors: geinger and winn. 
Assistant Professor: matthews. 

The Department of Agricultural Engineering offers a graduate course of 
study leading to the degree of Master of Science. The student may pursue 
major work in agricultural power and machinery, soil and water conservation 
engineering, agricultural structures or electric power and processing. A thesis 
based upon original research work is required. Employees of a nearby institu- 
tion may submit a thesis based on research work at the institution under the 
direction of aid with prior approval by the Department. 

Laboratory facilities are available for work in each area of specialization and, 
in cooperation with other departments, ample areas for field tests and studies are 
available. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Agr. Engr. 101. Agricultural Machinery. (2) 

First semester. Two lectures per week. Concurrent registration in Agr. Engr. 121 
or 131 required. Materials and construction of agricultural machinery with particular 
reference to functions of unit assemblies and complete machines, and factors affecting 
their adaptation and management. (Matthews.) 

Agr. Engr. 102. Agricultural Tractors and Power Units. (2) 
Second semester. Two lectures per week. Concurrent registration in Agr. Engr. 
122 or 132 required. Principles of internal combustion engines and fundamentals of 
power transmission and control mechanisms in self-propelled or stationary units. 

(Matthews.) 

Agr. Engr. 104. Farm Mechanics. (2) 

First semester. Two laboratory periods a week. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Available only 

to seniors in agricultural education. This course consists of laboratory exercises in prac- 

29 ► 



Agricultural Engineering 

tical farm shop and farm equipment maintenance, repair, and construction projects; 
and a study of the principles of shop organization and administration. (Gienger.) 

Agr. Engr. 105. Farm Structures. (2) 

First semester. Two lectures per week. Concurrent registration in Agr. Engr. 135 
required for students in agricultural engineering curriculum. Functional and environ- 
mental requirements of farm structures are stressed. Characteristics of materials and 
structural details of conventional types of construction are included. (Matthews.) 

Agr. Engr. 107. Soil and Water Conservation Engineering. (I) 
Second semester. One lecture per week. Concurrent registration in Agr. Engr. 127 
or 137 required. Applications of engineering sciences in erosion control, drainage, irriga- 
tion, and watershed management. (Green.) 

Agr. Engr. 109. Farm Applications of Electricity. (I) 

Second semester. One lecture per week. Concurrent registration in Agr. Engr. 129 
or 139 required. Applications of electricity for lighting, heating, cooling or power and 
characteristics of motors and equipment considered in design to meet requirements. 

(Matthews.) 
Agr. Engr. 111. Mechanics for Agricultural Processing. (3) 
First semester. (Offered 1961-62). Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. 
A study of the fundamentals of phvsics and mechanics and how they are applied in 
agriculture. Included are the basic laws and applications of mechanics, power trans- 
mission, heat and heat transfer, fluid flow, refrigeration, instruments, and lighting. 

(Matthews.) 

Agr. Engr. 112. Machinery and Equipment for Food Processing. (2) 
Second semester. (Offered 1961-62) One lecture and one laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite, Agr. Engr. 111. A study of the mechanical and engineering operations 
pertaining to food processing plants. Emphasis is placed on machinery and equipment 
for processing methods, plant sanitation, plant maintenance, and materials handling. 
Plant layout and design is also included. (Matthews.) 

Agr. Engr. 121. Agricultural Machinery Laboratory. (I) 

First semester. One three-hour laboratory period per week. Concurrent registration 
in Agr. Engr. 101 required. Studies of operating characteristics, adjustments and where 
applicable, calibration of current models of machinery. (Matthews.) 

Agr. Engr. 122. Agricultural Tractors and Power Laboratory. (I) 
Second semester. One three-hour laboratory period per week. Concurrent registra- 
tion in Agr. Engr. 102 required. Studies of power unit components as related to overall 
engine and tractor performance. (Matthews.) 

Agr. Engr. 127. Soil and Water Conservation Laboratory. (I) 
Second semester. One three-hour laboratory period per week. Concurrent registration 
in Agr. Engr. 107 required. Simple surveying and use of level for erosion control, 
irrigation and drainage. (Green.) 

Agr. Engr. 129. Farm Electrification Laboratory. (I) 

Second semester. One three-hour laboratory period per week. Concurrent registration 

-« 30 



Agricultural Engineering 

in Agr. Engr. 109 required. Layout and design of farmstead wiring plans together 
with essentials of wiring practices. (Staff.) 

Agr. Engr. 131. Agricultural Machinery Design Laboratory. (1) 

First semester. One three-hour laboratory period per week. Concurrent registration 
in Agr. Engr. 101 required. Prerequisite, C. E. 24 or M. E. 24. A study of design 
factors and force analysis including design of simple units. (Staff.) 

Agr. Engr. 132. Farm Power Analysis Laboratory. (I) 

Second semester. One three-hour laboratory period per week. Concurrent registration 
in Agr. Engr. 102 required. Prerequisite, M. E. 100. Determination of efficiency of 
internal combustion engines, forces and moments of tractor loading, and stability. 
Engineering aspects of hydraulic control systems and power transmission are included. 

(Staff.) 
Agr. Engr. 135. Farm Structures Design Laboratory. (I) 

First semester. One three-hour laboratory period per week. Concurrent registration 
in Agr. Engr. 105 required. Prerequisite, C. E. 160. Design of structures with em- 
phasis on functional and environmental requirements for agriculture. (Staff.) 

Agr. Engr. 137. Soil and Water Conservation Engineering Laboratory. (I) 
Second semester. One three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite, C. E. 110 and 
C. E. 140 or M. E. 102. Hydraulic design of water conveyance systems for erosion 
control, drainage and irrigation. (Green.) 

Agr. Engr. 139. Farm Electrification Engineering Laboratory. (I) 
Second semester. One three-hour laboratory period per week. Concurrent registra- 
tion in Agr. Engr. 109. Prerequisite, E. E. 52. Study of farmstead electrical loads 
and the design of distribution networks therefor. (Staff.) 

Agr. Engr. 198. Special Problems in Farm Mechanics. (1-3*) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, approval of Department. Problems assigned 

in proportion to credit. (Gienger.) 

For Graduates 

Agr. Engr. 201. Special Topics in Agricultural Engineering. (3) 
First and second semesters. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Timely 
topics in specialized areas of agricultural engineering will be selected. For example, 
Instrumentation for Agricultural Engineering Research. (Staff.) 

Agr. Engr. 301. Special Problems in Agricultural Engineering. (1-6) 

First and second semester and summer school. Work assigned in proportion to amount 

of credit. (Staff.) 

Agr. Engr. 302. Seminar. (I) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. (Staff.) 

Agr. Engr. 399. Research. Credit according to work accomplished. (.l-6~) 

(Staff.) 

31 ► 



AGRONOMY— CROPS AND SOILS 

Professors: rothgeb and street. 

Associate Professors: axley, bourbeau, decker, leffel and strickxfng. 

Assistant Professor: santelmann. 

The Department of Agronomy offers a graduate course of study leading to 
the degree of Master of Science and to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. The 
student may pursue major work in the crops division or in the soils division 
of the Department. A thesis hased on original research is required for each 
degree. Ample laboratory and greenhouse facilities for graduate work are avail- 
able on the campus. The Plant Research Farm, the Forage Research Farm, and 
the Tobacco Experiment Farm offer adequate nearby field research facilities. 
Many projects of the Department are conducted in cooperation with the Agricul- 
tural Research Service of the United States Department of Agriculture with 
headquarters located three miles from the campus. 

Departmental regulations have been assembled for the guidance of candidates 
for graduate degrees. Copies of these regulations are available from the Depart- 
ment of Agronomy. 

Courses Offered in Agronomy 
For Graduates and Advanced Undergradnaies 

CROPS 

Agron. 103. Crop Breeding. (2) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1960-61). Prerequisite, Bot. 117 or Zool. 
104. Principles and methods of breeding annual self and cross-pollinated plants and 
perennial forage species. (Leffel.) 

Agron. 104. Tobacco Production. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. A studv of the history, 
adaptation, distribution, culture, and improvement of various types of tobacco, with 
special emphasis on problems in Maryland tobacco production. Physical and chemical 
factors associated with yield and quality of tobacco will be stressed. (Street.) 

Agron. 107. Cereal Crop Production. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1960-61). Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. Study of the principles and practices of corn, 
wheat, oats, barley, rye, and soybean production. (Clark.) 

Agron. 108. Forage Crop Production. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1. 
Study of the production and management of grasses and legumes for quality hay, silage 
and pasture. (Decker.) 

Agron. 109. Turf Management. (2) 

First semester, alternate vears. (Offered 1961-62). Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, 
Bot. 1. A study of principles and practices in management of turf for lawns, athletic 
fields, playgrounds, airfields, and highway planting. (Staff.) 

^ 32 



Agronomy 

Agron. 151. Cropping Systems. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 1 or equivalent. The 
co-ordination of information from various courses in the development of balanced crop- 
ping systems, appropriate to different objectives in various areas of the state and 
nation. (Staff.) 

Agron. 152. Seed Production and Distribution. (2) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1960-61). One lecture and one laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 1 or equivalent. A study of seed production, 
processing, and distribution; federal and state seed control programs; seed laboratory 
analyses; release of new varieties and maintenance of foundation seed stocks. 

(Newcomer.) 
Agron. 154. Weed Control. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1961-62). Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 1 or equivalent. A study of the use of cultural 
practices and chemical herbicides in the control of weeds in field crops and turf. 

(Santelmann.) 

Additional courses under CROPS AND SOILS may be taken. 

For Graduates 

Agron. 201. Advanced Crop Breeding. (2) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1961-62). Prerequisite, Agron. 103 or equiva- 
lent. Genetic, cytogenetic, and statistical theories underlying methods of plant breed- 
ing. A study of quantitative inheritance, heterosis, heritability, interspecific and inter- 
generic hybridization, polyploidy, sterility mechanisms, inbreeding and outbreeding, 
and other topics as related to plant breeding. (Leffel.) 

Agron. 204. Technic in Field Crop Research. (2) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1960-61). Field plot technic, application 

of statistical analysis to agronomic data, and preparation of the research project. 

(LeClerg.) 

Agron. 205. Advanced Tobacco Production. (2) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1961-62). Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, 
permission of instructor. A study of the structural adaptation and chemical response 
of tobacco to environmental variations. Emphasis will be placed on the alkaloids and 
other unique components. (Street.) 

Agron. 207. Advanced Forage Crops. (2) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1960-61). Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, 
Bot. 101, Chem. 31 and 32, or equivalent, or permission of instructor. A fundamen- 
tal study of physiological and ecological responses of grasses and legumes to environ- 
mental factors, including fertilizer elements, soil moisture, soil temperature, air tem- 
perature, humidity, length of day, quality and intensity of light, wind movement, and 
defoliation practices. Relationship of these factors to life history, production, chem- 
ical and botanical composition, quality, and persistence of forages will be considered. 

(Decker, staff.) 

33 ► 



Agronomy 

Agron. 208. Research Methods. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, permission of staff. Development of research viewpoint 
by detailed study and report on crop research of the Maryland Experiment Station or 
review of literature on specific phases of a problem. (Staff.) 

Agron. S210. Cropping Systems. (I) 

Summer session only. An advanced course primarily designed for teachers of vocational 
agriculture and county agents. It deals with outstanding problems and the latest 
developments in the field. (Staff.) 

Additional courses under CROPS AND SOILS may be taken. 
SOILS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Agron. Si 10. Soil Management. (J) 

Summer session only. An advanced course primarily designed for teachers of vocational 
agriculture and county agents dealing with factors involved in management of soils in 
general and of Maryland soils in particular. Emphasis is placed on methods of main- 
taining and improving chemical, physical, and biological characteristics of soils. 

(Strickling.) 

Agron. 111. Soil Fertility Principles. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1960-61). Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, 
Agron. 10. A study of the chemical, physical, and biological characteristics of soils 
that are important in growing crops. Soil deficiencies of physical, chemical, or 
biological nature and their correction by the use of lime, fertilizers, and rotations are 
discussed and illustrated. (Strickling.) 

Agron. 112. Commercial Fertilizers. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 10 or permission of 

instructor. A study of the manufacturing and distribution of commercial fertilizers. 

(Axley.) 

Agron. 113. Soil Conservation. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1960-61). Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 10 or permission of instructor. A study of the 
importance and causes of soil erosion, and methods of soil erosion control. Special 
emphasis is placed on farm planning for soil conservation. The laboratory period will 
be largely devoted to field trips. (Miller.) 

Agron. 114. Soil Classification and Geography. (4) 

Second semester. Three lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 
10, or permission of instructor. A study of the genesis, morphology, classification and 
geographic distribution of soils. The broad principles governing soil formation are 
explained. Attention is given to the influence of geographic factors on the development 
and use of soils in the United States and other parts of the world. The laboratory 
periods will be largely devoted to field trips and to a study of soil maps of various 
countries. (Bourbeau.) 

< 34 



Agronomy 

Agron. 116. Soil Chemistry. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1960-61). One lecture and two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, Agron. 10, or permission of instructor. A study of the 
chemical composition of soils; cation and anion exchange; acid, alkaline and saline soil 
conditions; and soil fixation of plant nutrients. Chemical methods of soil analysis 
will be studied with emphasis on their relation to fertilizer requirements. (Axley.) 

Agron. 117. Soil Physics. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1961-62). Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisites, Agron. 10 and a course in physics, or permission of 
instructor. A study of physical properties of soil with special emphasis on relationship 
to soil productivity. (Strickling.) 

Agron. 119. Soil Mineralogy. (4) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1961-62). Two lectures and two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. A study of the fundamental 
laws and forms of crystal symmetry and essentials of crystal structure; structure, occur- 
rence, association and uses of minerals, determination of minerals by means of their 
morphological, chemical and physical properties. Particular attention is given to soil- 
forming minerals. Laboratory periods will be devoted to a systematic study of about 
75 minerals. (Bourbeau.) 

Additional courses under CROPS AND SOILS may be taken. 

For Graduates 

Agron. 250. Advanced Soil Mineralogy. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1960-61). Three lectures a week. Pre- 
requisites, Agron. 10, Agron. 119 and permission of instructor. A study of the struc- 
ture physical-chemical characteristics and identification methods of soil minerals, 
particularly clay minerals, and their relationship to soil genesis and productivity. 

(Bourbeau.) 
Agron. 251. Advanced Methods of Soil Investigation. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1961-62). Three lectures a week. Pre- 
requisites, Agron. 10 and permission of instructor. An advanced study of the theory 
of the chemical methods of soil investigation with emphasis on problems involving 
application of physical chemistry. (Axley.) 

Agron. 252. Advanced Soil Physics. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1961-62). Two lectures and one laboratory 

period a week. Prerequisites, Agron. 10 and permission of instructor. An advanced 

study of physical properties of soils. (Strickling.) 

Agron. 253. Advanced Soil Chemistry. (3) 

Ffxst semester, alternate years. (Offered 1960-61). One lecture and two laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisites, Agron. 10 and permission of instructor. A continuation 
of Agron. 116 with emphasis on soil chemistry of minor elements necessary for plant 
growth. (Axley.) 

Additional courses under CROPS AND SOILS may be taken. 

35 ► 



Agronomy, American Civilization 
CROPS AND SOILS 

For Graduates 

Agron. 260. Recent Advances in Agronomy. (2-4) 

First semester. Two hours each year. Total credit four hours. Prerequisite, permission 

of instructor. A study of recent advances in agronomy research. (Staff.) 

Agron. 302. Agronomy Seminar. (I, 2) 

First and second semesters. Total credit toward Master of Science degree, 2; toward 

Ph.D. degree, 6. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. (Staff.) 

Agron. 399. Research. 

First and second semesters. Credit according to work done. (Staff.) 

AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 

Committee on American Civilization: 
Assistant Professor beall, Executive Secretary. 
Professors: hoffsommer, land, murphy and plischke. 

The American Civilization Program offers work leading to both the degrees 
of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. The departments of English, 
History, Government and Politics, and Sociology join to offer integrated plans 
of study. In his class work the student will emphasize the offerings of any one 
of these departments. For lists of courses from which his particular program 
is to be developed, he is to see principally the listings of the four departments 
just mentioned. The Executive Secretary of the program will serve as the student's 
adviser in consultation with the chairman of the department in the field of the 
student's special interest. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Amer. Civ. 137, 138. Conference Course in American Civilization. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Four American classics, drawn from the fields of the 
co-operating departments, are studied in detail each semester. Specialists from the 
appropriate departments lecture on these books. The classics for this year are Franklin's 
Autobiography, The Life and Writings of Thomas Jefferson, De Tocqueville's Democ- 
racy in America, Schlesinger's The Age of Jackson, for the first semester; and for the 
second semester. Thoreau's Walden, Howells' The Rise of Silas Lapham. Veblen's 
The Theory of the Leisure Class, and Warner's Democracy in Jonesville. The Con- 
ference course, or either semester of it, may be chosen by a student outside the pro- 
gram as an elective. It also counts as major credit for the four cooperating departments. 
The course meets, like a seminar, once a week. (Bode and cooperating specialists.) 

For Graduates 

Amer. Civ. 201, 202. Seminar in American Civilization. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. (Bode.) 

-+ 36 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

Professors: foster and green. 
Associate Professor: leffel. 
Assistant Professor: young. 

The Department of Animal Husbandry offers work leading to the degrees of 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Course work and thesis problems 
are offered in the areas of animal breeding, nutrition, and livestock production. 

Departmental requirements have been formulated for the information and 
guidance of graduate students. Copies of these requirements are available from 
the Department of Animal Husbandry. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

A. H. 111. Animal Nutrition. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 31, 32, 33, 34; A. H. 110. 
Graduate credit allowed, with permission of instructor. Processes of digestion, absorp- 
tion, and metabolism of nutrients; nutritional balances; nature of nutritional require- 
ments for growth, production, and reproduction are considered. (Leffel.) 

A. H. 120. Principles of Breeding. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Zool. 104 or Bot. 117 and 
A. H. 130 or A. H. 131 or A. H. 132 or Dairy 20. Graduate credit (1-3 hours), allowed 
with permission of instructor. The practical aspects of animal breeding, heredity, 
variation, selection, development, systems of breeding, and pedigree study are con- 
sidered. (Green.) 

A. H. SI 30. Beef Cattle. CO 

Summer session. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. This course is designed pri- 
marily for teachers of vocational agriculture and Extension Service workers. Principles 
and practices underlying the economical production of beef cattle, including a study 
of the breeds and their adaptability, selection, breeding, feeding, management, and 
marketing of purebred and commercial cattle. (Foster.) 

A. H. 150. Livestock Markets and Marketing. (2) 

First semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, A. H. 1; Econ. 31, 32 or Econ. 
37; and A. H. 130 or A. H. 131 or A. H. 132. Graduate credit allowed, with 
permission of instructor. History and development of livestock markets and systems 
of marketing; trends of livestock marketing; effect of changes in transportation and 
refrigeration facilities; the merchandising of meat products are considered. 

(Young.) 

For Graduates 

A. H. 205. Advanced Breeding. (2) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1959-60). Two lectures a week. Pre- 
requisites, A. H. 120, or equivalent, and Biological Statistics. This course deals with 
the more technical phases of heredity and variation, selection indices, breeding sys- 
tems, and inheritance in farm animals. (Green.) 

37 ► 



Animal Husbandry, Botany 

A. H. 206. Advanced Livestock Management. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1960-61). Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisite, approval of staff. An intensive study of the newer de- 
velopments in animal breeding, animal physiology, animal nutrition, endocrinology, 
and other closely allied fields as they apply to the management and production of 
livestock. (Staff.) 

A. H. 207. Advanced Livestock Nutrition. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1960-61). Three lectures a week. Pre- 
requisites, Chem. 31, 32, 33, 34, or equivalent, and A. H. Ill, or permission of in- 
structors. Experimental techniques and recent developments in the feeding and nu- 
trition of beef cattle, sheep and swine are presented. (Leffel, Young.) 

A. H. 301. Special Problems in Animal Husbandry. (2-2) (4 Cr. Max) 
First and second semesters. Work assigned in proportion to amount of credit. Pre- 
requisite, approval of staff. Problems will be assigned which relate specifically to the 
character of work the student is pursuing. (Staff.) 

A. H. 302. Seminar. (I) (5 Cr. Max.) 

Students and staff discuss topics related to animal husbandry. (Staff.) 

A. H. 399. Research. (1-6) 

Credit to be determined by the work done. With the approval of the staff, the student 
will be required to pursue original research in some phase of animal husbandry, 
carry the same to completion, and report the results in the form of a thesis. (Staff.) 

BOTANY 

Professors: bamford, gauch, cox, appleman (emeritus), krauss, Norton 

(emeritus) and d. t. morgan. 
Associate Professors: brown and rappleye. 
Assistant Professors: sisler, jenkins, wilson and paterson. 

The Department of Botany offers a graduate course of study leading to 
the degree of Master of Science and to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 
The student may pursue major work in any one of the three main divisions 
of the Department, namely: plant physiology, plant pathology, or plant morphol- 
ogy, cytology and cytogenetics. Since a thesis based on original research is 
required for each degree, a qualified student may be allowed to pursue a problem 
of his own choosing, but it is more probable that the subject of his research will 
be that already in progress since the Department is devoted to a study of basic 
agricultural problems as well as projects of a more fundamental nature. An in- 
dividual employed at a nearby institution may submit a thesis based on his 
research work at the institution under the direction of, and subject to prior 
approval by, a member of the faculty. 

Laboratory facilities are available for research in each division, and there are 
ample greenhouses and plot space available on the campus or adjacent University 
farm land. 

* 38 



Botany 

In addition to the normal requirements of the Graduate School, one must 
possess a reading knowledge of either French or German, before the Master of 
Science degree is granted. 

PLANT PHYSIOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced U udergraduates 

Bot. 101. Plant Physiology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Bot. 1 

and general chemistry. Laboratory fee, $6.00. A survey of the general physiological 

activities of plants. (Krauss.) 

Bot. 102. Plant Ecology. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1 1 
or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $5.00. A study of plants in relation to their environ- 
ments. Plant successions and formations of North America are treated briefly and local 
examples studied. (Brown.) 

For Graduates 

Bot. 200. Plant Biochemistry. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Bot. 101 and elementary organic chemistry, or equivalent. 
A study of the important substances in the composition of the plant body and the 
chemical changes occurring therein. (Galloway.) 

Bot. 201. Plant Biochemistry Laboratory. (2) 

First semester. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 200 or concurrent 
registration therein. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Application of apparatus and techniques 
to the study of the chemistry of plant materials. (Galloway.) 

Bot. 202. Plant Biophysics. (2) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1960-61.) Prerequisites, Bot. 1 and introductory physics, 
or equivalent. An advanced course dealing with the operation of physical phenomena 
in plant life processes. (Galloway.) 

Bot. 203. Biophysical Methods. (2) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1960-61.) Two laboratory periods a week. Laboratory 

course to accompany Bot. 202. Laboratory fee, $10.00. (Galloway.) 

Bot. 204. Growth and Development. (2) 

First semester. (Not offered 1960-61.) Prerequisite, 12 semester hours of plant science. 
A study of current developments in the mathematical treatment of growth and the 
effects of radiation, plant hormones, photoperiodism, and internal biochemical balance 
during the development of the plant. (krauss.^ 

Bot. 205. Mineral Nutrition of Plants. (2) 

Second semester. Reports on current literature are presented and discussed in con- 
nection with recent advances in the mineral nutrition of plants. (Krauss.) 

39 ► 



Botany 

Bot. 209. Physiology of Algae. (3) 

First semester. (Not offered 1960-61.) Two lectures and one laboratory period a 
week. Prerequisite, Bot. 201, the equivalent in allied fields or permission of instructor. 
Laboratory fee, $10.00. A study of the physiology and comparative biochemistry of 
the algae. Laboratory techniques and recent advances in algal nutrition, photosynthe- 
sis, and growth will be reviewed. (Krauss.) 

PLANT MORPHOLOGY, CYTOLOGY, AND TAXONOMY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Bot. 111. Plant Anatomy. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 110 
or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $5.00. The origin and development of the organs and 
tissue systems in the vascular plants. (Rappleye.) 

Bot. 113. Plant Geography. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 1 or equivalent. A study of plant distribution 

throughout the world and the factors generally associated with such distribution. 

(Brown.) 
Bot. 115. Structure of Fconomxc Plants. (3) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1960-61.) One lecture and two laboratory periods a 
week. Laboratory fee, $5.00. A detailed microscopic study of the anatomy of the 
chief fruit and vegetable crops. (Rappleye.) 

Bot. 116. History and Philosophy of Botany. (I) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1960-61.) Prerequisite, 15 semester hours of botany. 
Discussion of the development of ideas and knowledge about plants, leading to a 
survey of contemporary work in botanical science. (Bamford.) 

Bot. 117. General Plant Genetics. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 1 or equivalent. The basic principles of plant 
genetics are presented; the mechanics of transmission of the hereditary factors in 
relation to the life cycle of seed plants, the genetics of specialized organs and tissues, 
spontaneous and induced mutations of basic and economic significance, gene action, 
genetic maps, the fundamentals of polyploidy, and genetics in relation to methods 
of plant breeding are the topics considered. (D. T. Morgan.) 

Bot. 136. Plants and Mankind. (2) 

First semester. A survey of the plants which are utilized by man, the diversity of such 

utilization, and their historic and economic significance. (Rappleye.) 

Bot. 15 IS. Teaching Methods in Botany. (2) 

Summer session. (Not offered 1960 or 1961.) Five two-hour laboratory and demonstra- 
tion periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 1, or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $5.00. A study 
of the biological principles of the common plants, and demonstrations, projects, and 
visual aids suitable for teaching in primary and secondary schools. (Paterson.) 

Bot. 153S. Field Botany. (2) 

Summer session. (Offered 1961.) Prerequisite, Bot. 1 or general biology. Laboratory 

< 40 



Botany 

fee, $5.00. The identification of trees, shrubs, and herbs, emphasizing the native 
plants of Maryland. Manuals, keys, and other techniques will be used. Numerous 
short field trips will be taken. Each student will make an individual collection. 

For Graduates 

Bot. 211. Cytology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, intro- 
ductory genetics. Laboratory fee, $10.00. A detailed study of the chromosomes in 
mitosis and meiosis, and the relation of these to current theories of heredity and 
evolution. (D. T. Morgan.) 

Bot. 212. Plant Morphology. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Bot. 
11, Bot. Ill, or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $5.00. A comparative study of the mor- 
phology of the flowering plants, with special reference to the phylogeny and develop- 
ment of floral organs. (Rappleye.) 

Bot. 215. Plant Cytogenetics. (3) 

First semester. (Not offered 1960-61.) Two lectures and one laboratory period a 
week. Prerequisites, introductory genetics. Laboratory fee, $10.00. An advanced study 
of the current status of plant genetics, particularly gene mutations and their relation 
to chromosome changes in corn and other favorable genetic materials. 

(D. T. Morgan.) 

PLANT PATHOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Bot. 122. Research Methods in Plant Pathology. (2) 

First or second semester. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or 
equivalent. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Advanced training in the basic research techniques 
and methods of plant pathology. (Wilson.) 

Bot. 123. Diseases of Ornamental Plants. (2) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1960-61.) Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. Symp- 
toms, control measures, and other pertinent information concerning the diseases which 
affect important ornamental plants grown in the eastern states. (Wilson.) 

Bot. 124. Diseases of Tobacco and Agronomic Crops. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. The symptoms and control of the 

diseases of tobacco, forage crops, and cereal grains. (O. D. Morgan.) 

Bot. 125. Diseases of Fruit Crops. (2) 

First semester. (Not offered 1960-61.) Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. Symp- 
toms and control of the diseases affecting fruit production in the eastern United States. 

(Weaver.) 

41 ► 



Botany 

Bot. 126. Disease of Vegetable Crops. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. The recognition and control 
of diseases affecting the production of important vegetable crops grown in the eastern 
United States. (Cox.) 

Bot. 128. Mycology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 
2, or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $6.00. An introductory study of the morphology, clas- 
sification, life histories, and economics of the fungi. (Wilson.) 

Bot. 141. Nematode Disease of Plants. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 20 or permission of instructor. Designed to acquaint 
students in agricultural sciences with the role of nematodes as plant pathogens; study 
of representative diseases caused by nematodes; principles of practice and control. 

(Jenkins.) 
Bot. 152S. Field Plant Pathology. (I) 

Summer session. (Not offered 1960.) Daily lecture for three weeks. Prerequisite, 
Bot. 20 or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $5.00. A course for county agents and teachers 
of vocational agriculture. Discussion and demonstration of the important diseases in 
Maryland crops. (Cox, Staff.) 

For Graduates 

Bot. 221. Virus Diseases. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Bot. 
20 and Bot. 101. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Consideration of the physical, chemical, and 
physiological aspects of plant viruses and plant diseases. (Sisler.) 

Bot. 223. Physiology of Fungi. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Organic Chemistry and Bot. 101 or the equivalent in 
bacterial or animal physiology. A study of various aspects of fungal metabolism, 
nutrition, biochemical transformations, fungal products, and mechanism of fungicidal 
action. (Sisler.) 

Bot. 224. Physiology of Fungi Laboratory. (I) 

First semester. One laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Bot. 223 or concurrent 
registration therein. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Application of equipment and techniques 
in the study of fungal physiology. (Sisler.) 

Bot. 226. Plant Disease Control. (3) 

First semester. (Not offered 1960-61.) Prerequisite, Bot. 20, or equivalent. An 

advanced course dealing with the theory and practices of plant disease control. (Cox.) 

Bot. 241. Plant Nematology. (3) 

Second semester. (Not offered 1960-61.) Two lectures and one laboratory period a 
week. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Detailed study 
of the nematodes parasitic on plants, their general morphology, taxonomy, reproduction, 
embryology, physiology, and ecology. Special emphasis will be given to recent advances 
in plant nematology. (Jenkins.) 

<< 42 



Botany, Business Administration 

But. 301. Special Problems in Botany. (2 or 3) 

First or second semester. Credit according to time scheduled and organization of 
course. Maximum credit toward an advanced degree for the individual student at 
the discretion of the Department. This course may be organized as a lecture series 
on a specialized advanced topic, or may consist partly, or entirely, of experimental 
procedures. It may be taught by visiting lecturers, or by resident staff members. 
Problems or topics may be in physiology, ecology, pathology, mycology, nematology, 
cytology, cytogenetics, morphology, anatomy, or taxonomy. (Staff.) 

Bot. 302. Seminar in Botany, (i) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. Discussion of 

special topics and current literature in all phases of botany. (Staff.) 

Bot. 399. Research. (Credit according to work done.~) 

A minimum of 6 credit hours is required for the M.S. degree, and an additional 
minimum of 12 hours is required for the Ph.D. degree. Students must be qualified to 
pursue with profit the research to be undertaken. (Staff.) 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Professors: Frederick, Clemens, cook, fisher, gentry, pyle, sweeney, 

SYLVESTER, TAFF, WEDEBERG AND WRIGHT. 

Associate Professor: dawson. 

The degree of Master of Business Administration is conferred on those 
students who satisfactorily complete the requirements which are set forth in 
the section of this catalog entitled, "Requirements for the Degree of Master of 
Business Administration." 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

B. A. 100. Office Operations and Management. (3) 

Prerequisite, junior standing. Deals with the principles of scientific management as 
they apply to the examination, improvement, installation, and operation of the most 
effective paperwork methods and systems that a given organization can use to achieve 
its objectives. Procedure flow analysis and form design for control of paperwork; 
process, work distribution, and layout charts, distribution of authority and responsibility 
for office activities are among the areas considered. (Staff.) 

B. A. 101. Integrated Data Processing for Internal Control. (3) 
Prerequisite, junior standing. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Comprises the bridge between 
accounting principles and the actualities of handling a large volume of data in modern 
business and government operations. Considers the measures necessary to marshall 
accounting and other information for internal control and for service to management at 
all levels. The basic principles involved in the combining of accounting and recording 
machines through a keyboard "language" that is "understood" by other machines will 
be presented. Punched-card tabulating and punched-tape methods are studied. Graphic 
flow-chart methods are used to integrate these data-gathering techniques into normal 
accounting and reporting processes. (Staff.) 

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Business Administration 

B. A. 102. Electronic Data Processing Systems. (3) 

Prerequisites, B. A. 165, junior standing. Laboratory fee, $10.00. The electronic 
digital computer and its use as a business data processer. The course includes the fol- 
lowing areas: CO Organization of business information; (2) Characteristics of com- 
mercially available equipment; (3) Flow charts; (4) Problems in reduction of pro- 
cesses to component parts; and (5) Programming typical internal control problems in 
business and government. (Staff.) 

B. A. 103. Office Automation and Management Problems. (3) 
Prerequisite, B. A. 114, or B. A. 165, or B. A. 168. Administrative problems exper- 
ienced in introducing computer systems, feasibility studies, and the effect of office 
automation upon management and organization applied to case situations. Procedure 
distribution charts, flow diagrams, process charts, and other tools used by the methods 
analysts are developed in actual situations. (Staff.) 

B. A. 110, 111. Intermediate Accounting. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, a grade of "B" or better in B.A. 21 for majors 
in accounting or consent of instructor. A comprehensive study of the theory and 
problems of valuation of assets, application of funds, corporation accounts and state- 
ments, and the interpretation of accounting statements. (Staff.) 

B. A. 112. Records Management. (2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, junior standing. Laboratory fee, $7.50. 
Specific management methods and techniques that have proved valuable in the 
creation, use, maintenance, protection and disposition of records are studied. (Staff.) 

B. A. 116. Public Budgeting. (3) 

Prerequisites, B.A. 21 and Econ. 32. A study of budgetary administration in the 
United States, including systems of financial control and accountability, the settlement 
of claims, centralized purchasing and the reporting of financial operations. (Wright.) 

B. A. 118. Governmental Accounting. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. Ill, or consent of instructor. The content of this course covers the 
scope and functions of governmental accounting. It considers the principles generally 
applicable to all forms and types of governmental bodies and a basic procedure adapt- 
able to all governments. (Wright.) 

B. A. 121. Cost Accounting. (4) 

Prerequisite, a grade of "B" or better in B.A. 21 for majors in accounting or consent of 
instructor. A study of the fundamental procedures of cost accounting, including those 
for job order, process and standard cost accounting systems. (Sweeney.) 

B. A. 122. Auditing Theory and Practice. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 111. A study of the principles and problems of 

auditing and application of accounting principles to the preparation of audit working 

papers and reports. (Wright.) 

B. A. 123. Income Tax Accounting. (4) 

Prerequisite, a grade of "B" or better in B.A. 21 for majors in accounting, or consent 
of instructor. A study of the important provisions of the Federal Tax Law, using illus- 
trative examples, selected questions and problems, and the preparation of returns. 

(Wedeberg.) 

M 44 



Business Administration 

B. A. 124, 126. Advanced Accounting. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, B.A. 111. Advanced accounting theory ap- 
plied to specialized problems in partnerships, estates and trusts, banks, mergers and 
consolidations, receiverships and liquidations; also budgeting and controllership. 

(Wedeberg.) 
B. A. 125. C.P.A. Problems. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 124, or consent of instructor. A study of the nat- 
ure, form and content of C.P.A. examinations by means of the preparation of solutions 
to, and an analysis of, a large sample of C.P.A. problems covering the various account- 
ing fields. (Wedeberg.) 

B. A. 127. Advanced Auditing Theory and Practice. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 122. Advanced auditing theory, practice and re- 
port writing. (Wright.) 

B. A. 128. Advanced Cost Accounting. (2) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 121. A continuation of basic cost accounting with special emphasis 

on process costs, standard costs, joint costs and by-product costs. (Sweeney.) 

B. A. 130. Elements of Business Statistics. (3) 

Prerequisite, junior standing. Required for graduation. Laboratory fee, $3.50. An 
introductory course. Emphasis is placed upon statistical inference. Topics covered 
include statistical observation, frequency distributions, averages, measures of vari- 
ability, elementary probability, sampling distributions, problems of estimation, simple 
tests of hypothesis, index numbers, time series, graphical and tabular presentation. 
Selected applications of the techniques are drawn from economics, industrial manage- 
ment, marketing and accounting. (Staff.) 

B. A. 132. Sam-pie Surveys in Business and Economics. (3) 
First semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 130. Laboratory fee, $3.50. A general course in 
scientific sample survey techniques. Review of elementary probability, characteristics 
of good estimators, estimates and sampling variances for measurement data and 
attribute data, errors of observation, simple random sampling, cluster sampling, com- 
parison of various sample designs, cost functions, examples of actual survey practices. 

(Nelson.) 

B. A. 133. Statistical Research and Control Techniques. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 130. Laboratory fee, $3.50. Review of elementary 
probability. Population distributions. Sampling distributions: binomial, Poisson, 
normal, "t", chi-square and F. Estimates and tests of hypotheses concerning the mean, 
variance and other parameters. Introduction to analysis of variance, linear regression 
and correlation. Introduction to quality control and acceptance sampling. (Nelson.) 

B. A. 134. Statistical Quality Control. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 130. Laboratory fee, $3.50. Statistical funda- 
mentals, theory, construction and use of control charts, acceptance sampling by 
attributes and variables, work sampling and other industrial applications of statistics. 

(Staff.) 
B. A. 135. Time Series Analysis and Forecasting. (3) 

First semester of even numbered years. Alternates with B.A. 132. Prerequisite, B.A. 
133. Laboratory fee, $3.50. Classical time series analysis, trend, periodic and irregular 

45 ► 



Business Administration 

components, seasonal adjustment, growth curves, recent developments in time series 
analysis, techniques of forecasting and quantities as labor force, capital formation, 
demand and sales. (Staff.) 

B. A. 140. Financial Management. (3) 

Prerequisites, B.A. 21 and Econ. 140. This course deals with principles and practices 
involved in the organization, financing, and rehabilitation of business enterprises; the 
various types of securities and their use in raising funds, apportioning income, risk, 
and control; intercorporate relations; and new developments. Emphasis on solution of 
problems of financial policy faced by management. (Fisher.) 

B. A. 141. Investment Management. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 140. A study of the principles and methods used 
in the analysis, selection, and management of investments; investment programs, 
sources of investment information, security price movements, government, real estate, 
public utility, railroad, and industrial securities. (Calhoun.) 

B. A. 142. Banking Policies and Practices. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 140. A study of the organization and manage- 
ment of the Commercial Bank, the operation of its departments, and the methods used 
in the extension of commercial credit. (Calhoun.) 

B. A. 143. Credit Management. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, B.A. 140. A study of the nature of credit 
and the principles applicable to its extension and redemption for mercantile and con- 
sumer purposes; sources of credit information and analysis of credit reports, the or- 
ganization and management of a credit department for effective control. Recent de- 
velopments and effective legal remedies available. (Calhoun.) 

B. A. 148. Advanced Financial Management. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 140. Advanced course designed for students spe- 
cializing in finance. Emphasis is placed upon the techniques employed by executives 
in their application of financial management practice to selected problems and cases. 
Critical classroom analysis is brought to bear upon actual methods and techniques used 
by business enterprises. (Fisher.) 

B. A. 149. Analysis of Financial Statements. (3) 

Prerequisites, B.A. 21, B.A. 140. Analysis of financial statements for the guidance of 
executives, directors, stockholders, and creditors, valuation of balance sheet items; 
determination and interpretation of ratios. (Fisher.) 

B. A. 150a. Marketing Principles and Organization. (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. This is an introductory course in the field of marketing. 
Its purpose is to give a general understanding and appreciation of the forces operating, 
institutions employed, and methods followed in marketing agricultural products, natural 
products, services, and manufactured goods. (Staff.) 

B. A. 150. Marketing Management. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 150a. A study of the work of the marketing division in a going 
organization. The work of developing organizations and procedures for the control of 
marketing activities are surveyed. The emphasis throughout the course is placed on the 

<* 46 



Business Administration 

determination of policies, methods, and practices for the effective marketing of various 
forms of manufactured products. (Staff.) 

B. A. 151. Advertising. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 150. A study of the role of advertising in the 
American economy; the impact of advertising on our economic and social life, the 
methods and techniques currendy applied by advertising practitioners, the role of the 
newspaper, magazine, and other media in the development of an advertising campaign, 
modern research methods to improve the effectiveness of advertising, and the organi- 
zation of the advertising business. utry.) 

B. A. 152. Advertising Copy and Layout. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, B.A. 151, and senior standing. A study of the prac- 
tices and techniques of copy writing and layout. The student will participate in ex- 
ercises designed to teach him the essential principles of writi; , r wiriuus media 
and presenting ideas in visual form. The course deals with the development of ideas 
rather than art forms. (Gentry.) 

B. A. 153. Purchasing Management. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, B.A. 150 and senior standing. Retail store organization, 
determining the proper sources, quality and quantity of supplies, and methods of 
testing quality; price policies, price forecasting, forward buying, bidding and negotia- 
tion; budgets and standards of achievement. Particular attention is given to govern- 
ment purchasing and methods and procedures used in their procurement. (Gentry.) 

B. A. 154. Retail Store Management. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, B.A. 150 and senior standing. Retail store organization, 
location, layout and store policy; pricing policies, price lines, brands, credit policies, 
records as a guide to buying; purchasing methods; supervision of selling; training and 
supervision of retail sales force; and administrative problems. (Cook.) 

B. A. 155. Problems in Retail Merchandising. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 154. Designed to develop skill in the planning 
and control of merchandise stocks. Deals with buying policies, pricing, dollar and unit 
control procedures, mark-up and mark-down policies, merchandise budgeting, and the 
gross margin-expense-net earnings relationships. (Cook.) 

B. A. 156. Marketing Research Methods. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, B.A. 130 and B.A. 150. This course is intended to 
develop skill in the use of scientific methods in the acquisition, analysis and interpre- 
tation of marketing data. It covers the specialized fields of marketing research, the 
planning of survey projects, sample design, tabulation procedure and report prepa- 
ration. (Cook.) 

B. A. 157. Foreign Trade Procedure. (3) 

Prerequisites, B.A. 150 and senior standing. Functions of various exporting agencies; 
documents and procedures used in exporting and importing transactions. Methods of 
procuring goods in foreign countries; financing of import shipments; clearing through 
the customs districts; and distribution of goods in the United States. (Heye.) 

47 ► 



Business Administration 

B. A. 158. Advertising Problems. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 151. This course is concerned with the way in 
which business firms use advertising as a part of their marketing program. The case 
study method is used to present advertising problems taken from actual business 
practice. Cases studied illustrate problems in demand stimulation, media selection, 
advertising research, etc. (Gentry.) 

B. A. 159. Newspaper Advertising. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 151. A study of the problems of newspaper ad- 
vertising with special attention to the needs of retail business. The course covers lay- 
out, production methods, sales techniques, and classified advertising. Students are en- 
couraged to work in the advertising departments of campus and nearby publications 
for actual experience. (Gentry.) 

B. A. 160. Personnel Management. (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 160. This course deals with the problems of directing and super- 
vising employees under modern industrial conditions. Two phases of personnel ad- 
ministration are stressed, the application of scientific management and the importance 
of human relations in this field. (Sylvester.) 

B. A. 163. Industrial Relations. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, B.A. 160 and senior standing. A study of the develop- 
ment and methods of organized groups in industry with reference to the settlement of 
labor disputes. An economic and legal analysis of labor union and employer associa- 
tion activities, arbitration, mediation, and conciliation; collective bargaining, trade agree- 
ments, strikes, boycotts, lockouts, company unions, employee representation, and in- 
junctions. (Sylvester.) 

B. A. 164. Recent Labor Legislation and Court Decisions. (3) 
First semester. Prerequisites, B.A. 160 and senior standing. Case method analysis of 
the modern law of industrial relations. Cases include the decisions of administrative 
agencies, courts and arbitration tribunals. (Sylvester.) 

B. A. 166. Business Communications. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, junior standing. A systematic study of the 
principles of effective written communications in business. The fundamental aim is 
to develop the ability to write clear, correct, concise, and persuasive business letters 
and reports. (Patrick.) 

B. A. 167. Job Evaluation and Merit Rating. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisites, B.A. 160, B.A. 169 and senior standing. The investiga- 
tion of the leading job evaluation plans used in industry, study of the development and 
administrative procedures, analyzing jobs and writing job descriptions, setting up a 
job evaluation plan, and relating job evaluation to pay scales. Study of various em- 
ployee merit rating programs, the methods of merit rating, and the uses of merit rating. 

(Staff.) 
B. A. 169. Industrial Management. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Econ. 160 and B.A. 11. Studies the opera- 
tion of a manufacturing enterprise. Among the topics covered are product develop- 
ment, plant location, plant layout, production planning and control, methods analysis, 

<* 48 



Business Administration 

time study, job analysis, budgetary control, standard costs, and problems of supervision. 

(StafF.) 
B. A. 170. Transportation Services and Regulation. (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. A general course covering the five fields of transportation, 
their development, service and regulation. (This course is a prerequisite for all other 
transportation courses.) (Taff.) 

B. A. 171. Industrial and Commercial Traffic Management. (3) 
Prerequisite, B.A. 170. Covers the details of classification and rate construction for 
ground and air transportation. Actual experiences in handling tariffs and classifications 
is provided. It is designed for students interested in the practical aspects of shipping 
and receiving and is required for all majors in transportation administration. CTaff.) 

B. A. 172. Motor Transportation. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 170. The development and scope of the motor 
carrier industry, different types of carriers, economics of motor transportation, services 
available, federal regulation, highway financing, allocation of cost to highway users, 
highway barriers. (Taff.) 

B. A. 172a. Motor Carrier Administration. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, B.A. 170 and 172. Over the road and terminal opera- 
tions and management, the use of management controls, management organization, 
Interstate Commerce Commission policy as affecting management decisions. (Taff.) 

B. A. 173. Water Transportation. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 170. Water carriers of all types, development and types of services, 
trade routes, inland waterways, company organization, the American Merchant Marine 
as a factor in national activity. (Heye.) 

B. A. 174. Commercial Air Transportation. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 170. The air transportation system of the United States; airways, 
airports, airlines. Federal regulation of air transportation. Problems and services of 
commercial air transportation; economics, equipment, operations, financing, selling of 
passenger and cargo services. Air mail development and services. (Frederick.) 

B. A. 175. Airline Administration. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 174. Practices, systems and methods of airline management; actual 
work in handling details and forms required in planning and directing maintenance, 
operations, accounting and traffic transactions, study of airline operations and other 
manuals of various companies. (Frederick.) 

B. A. 176. Problems in Airport Management. (3) 

Prerequisite, B.A. 174. Airports classified, aviation interests and community needs, 
airport planning, construction, building problems. Airports and the courts. Manage- 
ment, financing, operations, revenue sources. (Frederick.) 

B. A. 177. Motion Economy and Time Study. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, B.A. 169 and senior standing. A study of the prin- 
ciples of motion economy, simo charts, micromotion study, the fundamentals of time 
study, job evaluation, observations, standard times, allowances, formula construction 
and wage payment plans. (Watrous.) 

49 ► 



Business Administration 

B. A. 178. Production Planning and Control. (2) 

First semester. One lecture period and one laboratory period each week. Prerequisites, 
B.A. 169 and senior standing. An analysis of the man-, material-, and machine 
requirements for production according to the several types of manufacture. The 
development and application of inventory records, load charts, production orders, 
schedules, production reports, progress reports and control reports. (Staff.) 

B. A. 179. Problems in Supervision. (3) 

Prerequisites, B.A. 160, B.A. 169 and senior standing. A case study course in prob- 
lems of management and administration with emphasis upon analysis and reasoning 
applied toward a solution. (Staff.) 

B. A. 180, 181. Business Law. (4, 4) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, senior standing. Required in all business 
organization curriculums. Legal aspects of business relationships, contracts, negotiable 
instruments, agency, partnerships, corporations, real and personal property, and sales. 

(Staff.) 
B. A. 184. Public Utilities. (3) 

Prerequisites, Econ. 32 or 37 and senior standing. Using the regulated industries as 
specific examples attention is focused on broad and general problems in such diverse 
fields as constitutional law, administrative law, public administration, government 
control of business, advanced economic theory, accounting, valuation and depreciation, 
taxation, finance, engineering and management. (Clemens.) 

B. A. 189. Business and Government. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Econ. 32 or 37 and senior standing. A study of the 
role of government in modern economic life. Social control of business as a remedy 
for the abuses of business enterprise arising from the decline of competition. Criteria 
of and limitations on government regulation of private enterprise. (Clemens.) 

B. A. 190. Life Insurance. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. A general survey of life insurance: 
Its institutional development, selection of risks, mathematical calculations, contract pro- 
vision, kinds of policies, their functional uses, industrial and group contracts and 
government supervision. (Clickner.) 

B. A. 191. Property Insurance. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. A study of the insurance coverages 
written to protect individuals and business; fire, extended coverage, business interrup- 
tion, automobile, liability, fidelity, surety, inland marine and ocean marine. Hazards, 
rate-making, legal principles, standard forms and business practices are discussed. 

(Clickner.) 
B. A. 194. Insurance Agency Management. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 190 or 191. This course deals with the more 
practical problems and policies of the insurance agent, manager, or broker; the 
management of his own organization and its relations with the public and home 
offices. Advanced topics in life insurance and additional coverages in property insur- 
ance are considered also. (Staff.) 

B. A. 195. Real Estate Principles. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. This course covers the nature and 

*« 50 



Business Administration 



uses of real estate, real estate as a business, basic legal principles, construction prob- 
lems and home ownership, city planning, and public control ownership of real 
estate. (Clickner.) 

B. A. 196. Real Estate Finance. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. This course includes consideration 
of the factors influencing real estate values, methods and techniques in the general 
appraisal of real estate by brokers and professional appraisers, and general problems in 
real estate financing. (Clickner.) 

B. A. 197. Real Estate Management. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, B.A. 195 or 196. A study of mortgage banking in 
its relation to real estate operations, various financial institutions, and the general 
economy, and a study of real property management with its responsibilities to owners, 
tenants, employees, and the public. (Staff.) 



For Graduates 

B. A. 210. Advanced Accounting Theory. (2, 3) 
Prerequisite, B. A. 111. 

B. A. 220. Managerial Accounting. (3) 

B. A. 221, 222. Seminar in Accounting. 

B. A. 226. Accounting Systems. 

B. A. 228. Research in Accounting. 



(Wedeberg, Fisher.) 

(Wedeberg, Wright.) 

(Wedeberg, Wright. ) 

(Wedeberg, Sweeney/ 

(Wedeberg.) 



B. A. 229. Sttidies of Special Problems in the Fields of Control and Organiza- 
tion. 

(Staff.) 
B. A. 240. Seminar in Financial Management. (1-3) 
Prerequisite, B. A. 140. (Fisher.) 

B. A. 249. Studies of Special Problems in the Field of Financial Administration. 

(Fisher.) 
B. A. 250. Problems in Sales Management. (2-3) 



B. A. 251. Problems in Advertising. (3) 

B. A. 252. Problems in Retail Store Management. (3) 

B. A. 257. Seminar in Marketing Management. 

B. A. 258. Research in Marketing. 



(Cook, Reid.) 

(Gentry.) 

(Cook.) 

(Cook, Gentry, Reid.) 

(Cook, Gentry.) 

51 ► 



Business Administration, Chemical Engineering 

B. A. 262. Seminar in Contemporary Trends in Ijibor Relations. (3) 

(Sylvester.) 

B. A. 265. Development and Trends in Industrial Management. (3) 

(Staff.) 
B. A. 266. Piesearch in Personnel Management. 

(Sylvester.) 
B. A. 267. Research in Industrial Relations. 

(Sylvester.) 

B. A. 269. Studies of Special Problems in Employer-Employee Relationships. 

(Sylvester.) 
B. A. 270. Seminar in Air Transportation. (3) 



B. A. 271. Theory of Organization. (3) 

B. A. 275. Seminar in Motor Transportation. (3) 

B. A. 277. Seminar in Transportation. (3) 

B. A. 280. Seminar in Business and Government Relationships. 

B. A. 284. Seminar in Public Utilities. (3) 

B. A. 290. Seminar in Insurance. (3) 

B. A. 295. Seminar in Real Estate. (3) 

B. A. 399. Thesis Research. 



(Frederick.) 
(Staff.) 
(Taff.) 

(Frederick.) 
(Staff.) 

(Clemens.) 
(Staff.) 
(Staff.) 
(Staff.) 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Professors: huff, bonney, duffey, pennington and schroeder. 
Associate Professor: Silverman. 
Assistant Professor: gomezplata. 

The Department directs the programs or' graduate students who plan to 
qualify for the degree of Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy in the 
Department of Chemical Engineering. Courses in the subject area of nuclear 
technology and engineering are listed with chemical engineering courses below; 
and courses in the subject area of metallurgy are listed on Page 58. 

The basic requirements for the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor 
of Philosophy are set forth on pages 6 and 10 of this catalog. Supplemental 
regulations for the guidance of candidates for these degrees in the Department 
of Chemical Engineering are available in the department office. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Ch. E. 103, f, s. Elements of Chemical Engineering. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three hours a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 3, Math. 21, 
Phys. 21. Theoretical discussion of underlying philosophy and methods in chemical 

■< 52 



Chemical Engineering 

engineering and elementary treatment of important operations involving fluid flow, 
heat flow, evaporation, humidity and air conditioning, distillation, absorption, ex- 
traction, and filtration. Illustrated by problems and consideration of typical processes. 

(Huff.) 
Ch. E. 104. Chemical Engineering Seminar. (I) 

Both semesters. One hour a week. Prerequisite, permission of the Department of 
Chemical Engineering. The content of this course is constantly changing so a student 
may receive a number of credits by re-registration. Students prepare reports on current 
problems in chemical engineering and participate in the discussion of such reports. 

(Gomezplata.) 
Ch. E. 105, f, s. Advanced Unit Operation. (5, 5) 

Two lectures and one all-day laboratory a week. Prerequisites, Ch. E. 193, f,s, Chem. 
189, 190. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. Advanced theoretical treatment of 
basic chemical engineering operations. Study and laboratory operation of small scale 
semi-commercial type equipment. A comprehensive problem involving theory and 
laboratory operations is included to illustrate the development of a plant design requir- 
ing the utilization of a number of fundamental topics. (Bonney, Staff.) 

Ch. E. 106, f, s. Minor Problems. (6, 6) 

Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. (Staff.) 

Ch. E. 107. Fuels and Their Utilization. (3) 

Three hours a week. Prerequisite, Ch. E. 103, f,s, or permission of Department of 
Chemical Engineering. A study of the sources of solid, liquid, and gaseous fuels, 
their economic conversion, distribution, and utilization. Problems. (Huff.) 

Ch. E. 109, f, s. Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics. (3, 3) 
Three hours a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 187, 189, Ch. E. 103, f,s, or permission 
of instructor. A study of the application of the principles of engineering and chemical 
thermodynamics to some industrial problems encountered in the practice of chemical 
engineering. (Bonney.) 

Ch. E. 112, 113. Industrial Chemical Technology. (3, 3) 

Three hours a week. Prerequisite, Ch. E. 103, f,s, or simultaneous registration therein, 
or permission of the Department of Chemical Engineering. A study of the major 
chemical processes and industries combined with quantitative analysis of process 
requirements and yields. Plant inspection trips, reports, and problems. (Schroeder.) 

Ch. E. 114. Applications of Electrochemistry. (4) 

Laboratory fee, $8.00. (Staff.) 

Ch. E. 116. Applied Mathematics in Chemical Engineering I. (3) 
Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Math. 20, 21 and Ch. E. 103, f,s. A study of 
methods for analysis and solution of chemical engineering problems by use of differ- 
ential equations. Graphical, numerical and statistical methods and approximations by 
use of infinite series are covered. (Gomezplata.) 

Ch. E. 117. Applied Mathematics in Chemical Engineering II. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Ch.E. 116 or equivalent. Material covered 

53 ► 



Chemical Engineering 

includes formulation and solution of partial differential equations that arise in 
chemical engineering problems. Solution of chemical engineering problems by the 
calculus of finite differences, and numerical solution of partial differential equations 
are covered. (Staff.) 

Ch. E. 123, 124. Elements of Plant Design. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequi- 
sites, Ch.E. 103, f,s, Ch.E. 116, Chem. 189. The solution of typical problems en- 
countered in the design of chemical engineering plants. (Schroeder.) 

Ch. E. 131. Chemical Engineering Economics. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, simultaneous registration in or 
completion of Ch.E. 112, 113, 109, and 123, or permission of instructor. Economic 
evaluation of chemical processes. Determination of investment and operating costs for 
chemical engineering plants. Effect of risk and taxation on profits from such plants. 

(Schroeder.) 
Ch. E. 140. Introduction to Nuclear Technology. (2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Math. 21 and Phys. 21. Engineering problems 
of the different parts of the nuclear energy complex, including basic theory, nuclear 
reactor design, and isotopic and chemical separations are discussed. The emphasis 
is on the nuclear fission reactor. This is an orientation course for those only generally 
interested in applied atomic energy. (Duffey.) 

Ch. E. 142. Environmental Consideration of Nuclear Ftngineering. (3) 
First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Engineer- 
ing analysis of protection of the public and the environment from the hazards of nuclear 
energy operations. Emphasis is on the handling and disposal of gaseous, liquid and 
solid radioactive wastes. Meteorological, hydrological and geological phases are included. 
Typical problems encountered from mining of ores through nuclear reactor operations 
and chemical separations are considered. Legislative and economic factors, site selec- 
tion, plant design and operation as related to the environment are discussed. 

(Lieberman.) 

Ch. E. 145. Applications of Differential Equations and Statistics in Chemical 
Engineering. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture, two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Ch.E. 
103, f,s, Ch.E. 116, or permission of the instructor. (Staff.) 

Ch. E. 148. Nuclear Technology Laboratory. (3, 4) 

One lecture, two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 3, Phys. 21, Math. 
21, Ch.E. 140 or equivalents and permission of instructor. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per 
semester. Laboratory operations of equipment demonstrating techniques of detecting 
and making measurements of nuclear or high energy radiation. Radiation safety experi- 
ments are included. Both a sub-critical reactor and a critical reactor are used occasionally 
as a source of radiation. (Madey.) 

For Graduates 

Ch. E. 201. Graduate Unit Operations. (5) 

First semester. One hour conference, three or more laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, permission of the Department of Chemical Engineering. Laboratory fee, $8.00. 

M 54 



Chemical Engineering 

Advanced theoretical treatment of typical unit operations in chemical engineering. Prob- 
lems. Laboratory operation of small scale semi-commercial units with supplemental 
reading, conferences and reports. (Bonney.) 

Ch. E. 202. Gas Analysis. (3) 

One semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, permis- 
sion of the Department of Chemical Engineering. Laboratory fee, $8.00. Quantita- 
tive determination of common gases, fuel gases, gaseous vapors, and important gaseous 
impurities. Problems. (Bonney.) 

Ch. E. 203. Graduate Seminar. Q) 

One hour a week. Required of all graduate students in chemical engineering. The 
content of this course is constantly changing so a student may receive a number of 
credits by re-registration. Students prepare reports on current problems in chemical 
engineering and participate in the discussion of such reports. (Huff.) 

Ch. E. 207, f, s. Advanced Plant Design Studies. (3, 3) 

Three conference hours a week. Prerequisite, permission of the Department of Chemi- 
cal Engineering. (Huff, Schroeder.) 

Ch. E. 209, f, s. Plant Design Studies Laboratory. (3, 3) 

Three laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, permission of the Department of Chemi- 
cal Engineering. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. (Bonney.) 

Ch. E. 210, f, s. Gaseous Fuels. (2, 2) 

Two hours a week. Prerequisite, permission of the Department of Chemical Engineer- 
ing. An advanced treatment of some of the underlying scientific principles involved in 
the production, transmission and utilization of gaseous fuels. Problems in design and 
selection of equipment. (Huff.) 

Ch. E. 214, f, s. Corrosion and Metal Protection. (4) 

Four lecture hours a week. Prerequisite, Ch.E. 114 or Chem. 189 or Chem. 190 or 
consent of the instructor. The subjects to be covered include: theories of corrosion of 
ferrous and nonferrous metals, passive films, corrosion inhibitors, metal cleaning, stress 
corrosion, corrosive chemicals, electrolytic protection, restoration of ancient bronzes, 
organic coatings, metal coloring, parkerizing, hot dip coatings, plated coatings, and se- 
lection of engineering materials. Class demonstrations will illustrate the subject matter. 
Due to the diversity of subjects and scattered sources, considerable outside reading will 
be necessary. (Huff.) 

Ch. E. 216. Unit Processes of Organic Technology. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, permission of the Department 
of Chemical Engineering. This course coordinates the study of fundamental principles 
of organic synthesis with the requirements of the industrial plant. (Bonney.) 

Ch. E. 217. Unit Processes of Organic Technology Laboratory. (2) 
Second semester. Two or more laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, permission of 
the Department of Chemical Engineering. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. Pilot 
plant operation of processes such as halogenation, hydration, nitration, oxidation, reduc- 
tion and sulfonation. (Bonney.) 

55 ► 



Chemical Engineering 

Ch. E. 240, 241. Advanced Heat and Mass Transfer. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Elective of graduate students in chemical engineering and 
others. Prerequisite, permission of the Department of Chemical Engineering. The 
technical and scientific elements of the mathematical theory of heat and mass trans- 
fer. (Gomezplata.) 

Ch. E. 250. Chemical Engineering Practice. (6) 

Four hours conference and forty hours a week of work in laboratory and plant for eight 

weeks. Prerequisite, permission of the Department of Chemical Engineering. (Staff.) 

Ch. E. 280, 281. Graduate Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Ch.E. 109 or Ch.E. 
116, or permission of instructor. Advanced studies of the applications of the prin- 
ciples of engineering and chemical thermodynamics to some industrial problems encoun- 
tered in the practice of chemical engineering. (Bonney.) 

Ch. E. 290. Chemical Engineering Process Kinetics. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, permission of instructor. Methods 
of application of kinetic data to the design of reactors for industrially important pro- 
cesses are illustrated by solution of typical problems. Treatments for both homogeneous 
and heterogeneous reactions are given. (Gomezplata.) 

Ch. E. 301. Seminar in Nuclear Engineering, (i) 

First and second semesters. One meeting a week. Survey of nuclear engineering litera- 
ture, and oral presentation of prepared reports. Since the content of this course is 
changing, a student may receive a number of credits by re-registration. (Duffey.) 

Ch. E. 302, 303. Nuclear Reactor Engineering. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, permission of instruc- 
tor. The engineering problems of the design, construction and operation of typical 
nuclear reactors, including general design, nuclear reactor theory, materials of con- 
struction, heat transfer, and control. Emphasis is toward commercial nuclear reactors. 

(Duffey.) 
Ch. E. 305. Sub-critical Nuclear Reactor Laboratory. (3) 

One lecture, two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Ch.E. 148, 302, 303, or 
equivalents, and permission of instructor. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. Experi- 
mental work with the subcritical nuclear reactor. The appropriate radiation detection 
equipment is used. Experiments, such as infinite multiplication factors, lattice amplifica- 
tion, temperature coefficients, neutron flux distribution in the lattice, and neutron 
activation are carried out. (Gerken.) 

Ch. E. 308, 309. Nuclear Reactor Laboratory. Q4, 4) 

Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, permission of in- 
structor, Ch.E. 148, 302, 303, 305, or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $10.00 per semes- 
ter. Experiments demonstrating the techniques of using a critical nuclear reactor 
for research and development work as well as for industrial operations are performed. 
The University of Maryland reactor is employed. Experiments on reactor start-up and 
operation, shielding, control, neutron flux distributions, neutron and gamma spec- 
trum, cross section measurements are included. Experiments will include practice 
with a nuclear reactor simulator. (Staff.) 

+ 56 



Chemical Engineering 

Ch. E. 311, 312. Nuclear Separation Engineering. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Ch.E. 140 or equiva- 
lent, and permission of instructor. Application of chemical engineering to the chem- 
ical and isotopic separations necessary for nuclear reactor operation. These separations 
include (1) processing of uranium, thorium, and other ores; (2) chemical separation 
of plutonium, uranium, fission products and other elements from materials irradiated 
in nuclear reactors; (3) treatment of radioactive wastes; (4) isotopic separation of 
U235; and (5) isotopic separation of heavy water and other desired materials. Ch.E. 
311 concerns primarily chemical separations, while Ch.E. 312 concerns mostly 
isotopic separations and fuel cycles. Ch.E. 311 is not necessarily a prerequisite for 
Ch.E. 312. (Duffey.) 

Ch. E. 313. Selected Topics in Nuclear Engineering. (2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Topics of current interest 
and recent advances in the nuclear engineering field. Because of the rapid advances in 
the Held, information on special topics of much practical importance is continually 
becoming available. Such information will be presented in this course. Since the 
content changes, re-registration may be permitted. (Staff.) 

Ch. E. 314. Special Problems in Nuclear Engineering. 

Credit hours to be arranged. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, $10.00 
per semester. Research or special study. This is for individual projects on a graduate 
level. (Staff.) 

Ch. E. 315. Non-Power Uses of Nuclear or High Energy Radiation. (2) 
Second semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. An engi- 
neering survey of the current applications and those under development. Included are 
such uses of radiation as synthesizing chemicals, preserving foods, control of industrial 
processes. Design of irradiation installations, e.g., cobalt 60 gamma ray sources, elec- 
tronuclear machine arrangements, and specially built nuclear reactors are considered. 

(Duffey.) 

Ch. E. 320, 321. Advanced Nuclear Reactor Theory. (2, 2) 
First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Ch.E. 302, 303, year 
of advanced calculus, and permission of instructor. The theory of the calculation 
of critical masses, neutron flux distribution, neutron energy spectrum, kinetics of 
reactor behavior and gamma ray attentuation are presented. Multigroup treatment 
of reflected reactors, solution of the transport equations, perturbation theory, and other 
advanced calculation techniques are included. (Duffey.) 

Ch. E. 399. Research in Chemical Engineering. 

Credit hours to be arranged. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. The investigation of 
special problems and the preparation of a thesis in partial fulfillment of the require- 
ments of an advanced degree. (Huff, Bonney, Schroeder, Duffey.) 

Ch. E. 399. Research in Nuclear Engineering. 

Credit hours to be arranged. Laboratory fee, $10.00 per semester. The investigation 
of special problems and the preparation of a thesis in partial fulfillment of the require- 
ments of an advanced degree. (Duffey.) 

57 ► 



METALLURGY 

Note— Metallurgy is a subject area in the Department of Chemical Engineering. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Met. 104. Senior Metallurgical Seminar. (I) 

One hour a week. Students prepare reports on current problems in metallurgy and 
participate in the discussion of such reports. The content of this course is constantly 
changing so a student may receive a number of credits by re-registration. (McWilliams.) 

Met. 150, 151. Physical Metallurgy. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Math. 21 and Phys. 
21. States of matter, physical structure of gases, liquids and solids; physical structure 
and constitution of metals; properties as related to atomic structures; x-ray and crystal 
structure effect of mechanical working, heat treatment and composition; constitution and 
properties of alloy systems; phase transformation and diffusion theory; casting, shaping, 
welding, and testing metal objects. (Pennington.) 

Met. 152, 153. Physical Metallurgy Laboratory. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two three hour laboratories per week. Prerequisites, Math. 
21, Phys. 21, Met. 150, 151 (may be taken concurrently). Laboratory fee, $8.00 per 
semester. These courses are associated with Met. 150, 151, but are not required with 
the lecture courses except in the case of metallurgy majors. (McWilliams.) 

Met. 164, 166. Thermodynamics of Metallurgical Processes. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 187, 189; 
Chem. 188, 190. The application of the principles of thermodynamics to metallurgical 
systems with emphasis on steel making; laws of chemical reactions; materials and re- 
actions in steel making processes; applications of theory to steel making; applications 
of theory to selected nonferrous systems. (Pennington.) 

Met. 168, 170. Metallurgical Investigations. (2, 4) 

First semester. Two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Second semester. Three 
lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, concurrent registra- 
tion in or completion of Met. 182, 183. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. A study 
of the basic metals industry in which typical metallurgical processes in plant installa- 
tions are considered in some detail. Class and individual assignments involving labor- 
atory work and literature reviews. (Pennington.) 

Met. 172. Light Metals and Alloys. (2) 

First semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Met. 150, 151. The physical 
metallurgy of aluminum, magnesium, titanium, and their alloys. Discussion of the 
classic researches that have determined the course of thinking regarding such metals and 
alloys. Pertinent phase diagrams of industrial importance to light alloys. The special 
metallurgical processes influencing the fabrication and use of light metals. 

(Loring.) 
Met. 182, 183. Optical and X-Ray Metallography. (4, 4) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures and one laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisites, Met. 150, 151, or permission of instructor. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semes- 
ter. The application at an advanced level of the principles of metallography, with 
emphasis on the correlation of associated test procedures; constitution of metal systems 

* 58 



Metallurgy 

and phase transformations; alloy steels; hardenability and tempering of quenched 
steels. (Park.) 

Met. 188, 189. Alloy Steels I, II. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, graduate or under- 
graduate standing. (Met. 188 is not prerequisite to Met. 189.) Recent advances in the 
physical metallurgy of steel; ferrite, cementite, and austenite; the isothermal trans- 
formation of austenite; decomposition of austenite by continuous cooling; the effects of 
various metallurgical treatments on the mechanical properties of steels. The properties 
of quenched and tempered steels; importance of hardenability in engineering applica- 
tions; calculation of hardenability; variables affecting hardenability; intensifiers; effects of 
alloying elements on the mechanical properties of steels; efficient use of alloying ele- 
ments in steel. (Offered off-campus.) (Loring.) 

For Graduates 

Met. 220, 221. Solid Phase Reactions. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 187, 189; 
Chem. 188, 190; Met. 182, 183; or permission of instructor. The application of 
thermodynamics to the study of phase equilibria and transformations in metals; mechan- 
ism and rate determining factors in solid phase reactions in metals; order-disorder 
phenomena, diffusion processes, nucleation theory, precipitation from solid solution, 
eutectoid decomposition. (Offered off-campus.) (Moore.) 

Met. 224, 225. Advanced X-Ray Metallography. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisites, Math. 114, 115; Met. 182, 183. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. Analysis 
of crystallography or martensite reactions, and transformations in general; analysis of 
complex diffracting systems. (Staff.) 

Met. 228. Seminar in Metallurgy. (2) 

First and second semesters. One meeting a week. Required of graduate students in 
metallurgical curriculum. Survey of metals literature, and oral presentation of prepared 
reports. The content of this course is constantly changing, so a student may receive 
a number of credits by re-registration. (Pennington.) 

Met. 229. Gases in Metals. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, Met. 182, 183, or permission 
of the instructor. A consideration of the behavior of gases in metals with emphasis on 
the action of hydrogen in solid metals. (Pennington.) 

Met. 230, 231. Mechanical Metallurgy. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Math. 114, 115, Met. 
182, 183. Theory of plastic flow and rupture of polycrystalline metals; the influence of 
combined stresses, rate of deformation and temperature variation on the flow and rup- 
ture of metals. Flow and fracture in single crystals; theoretical crystal plasticity, theory 
of failure, recovery, recrystallization, and texture formation. (Offered off-campus.) 

(Moore.) 

Met. 232, 233. Advanced Physical Metallurgy. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Required of graduate students in 

59 ► 



Metallurgy, Chemistry 

metallurgical curriculum. The principles of X-ray metallography; the atomic theory of 
metals; magnetic materials; phase equilibria; review of important binary and ternary 
systems; diffusion and transformations in the solid state. (Offered off-campus.) 

(Moore.) 
Met. 238. Metallurgy of Nuclear Reactor Materials I. (2) 

First semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Met. 150-151. Theory and prac- 
tice relating to metals such as uranium, thorium, and plutonium. The preparation of 
such metals in their purest state for use in nuclear reactors. The physical, metallurgical 
and mechanical characteristics of fissionable metals, their melting, casting, fabrication, 
and heat treatment. The alloys of uranium, thorium, and plutonium. Theoretical con- 
siderations and precautions in their preparation, investigation and use. Discussion of 
phase diagrams of nuclear alloy systems. (Offered off-campus.) (Loring.) 

Met. 239. Metallurgy of Nuclear Reactor Materials II. (2) 
Second semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Met. 238. Theory and practice 
of nuclear metals used in reactors including structural materials such as beryllium and 
zirconium, and metals used for transfer of heat such as sodium, bismuth, and various 
low melting alloys. Discussion of pertinent phase diagrams. Radiation damage, mass 
transfer, and other specialized effects. (Offered off-campus.) (Loring.) 

Met. 399. Research in Metallurgy. 

Credit hours to be arranged. Laboratory fee, $8.00 per semester. The investigation of 
special problems and the preparation of a thesis in partial fulfillment of the require- 
ments of an advanced degree. (Pennington.) 

CHEMISTRY 

Professors: brown, lippincott, pratt, reeve, rollinson, svirbely, veitch, 

WHITE AND WOODS. 

Research Professor: bailey. 

Associate Professors: jansen*, jaquith, mason*, pickard, purdy, schamp* 

STUNTZ* AND VANDERSLICE.* 

Assistant Professors: boyd, dewey, kasler and maisch. 

Departmental regulations have been assembled for the guidance of candi- 
dates for graduate degrees. Copies of these regulations are available from the 
Department of Chemistry. 

Laboratory fees in Chemistry are $10.00 per laboratory course per semester, 
except in Chemistry 214, for which the fee is $20.00. 

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 123. Quantitative Analysis. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Pre- 

*Members of Institute of Molecular Physics. 
<* 60 



Chemistry 

requisite, Chem. 21 or equivalent. An intensive study of the theory and techniques 
ot inorganic quantitative analysis, including volumetric, gravimetric, electrometric and 
colorimetric methods. Required of all students majoring in chemistry. (Stuntz.) 

Chem. 125. Instrumental Analysis. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and six hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 
189, 190 or concurrent registration therein. A study of the application of physico- 
chemical methods to analytical chemistry. Techniques such as polarography, potenti- 
ometry, conductivity and spectrophotometry will be included. (Purdy.) 

Chem. 166, 167. Food Analysis. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. One lecture and two three-hour laboratory periods per 

week. Prerequisites, Chem. 33, 34. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

Chem. 206, 208. Spectrographic Analysis. Q, I) 

One three-hour laboratory a week. Prerequisite, Chem. 188, 190, and consent of the 

instructor. Registration limited. (White.) 

Chem. 221, 223. Chemical Microscopy. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. One lecture and one three-hour laboratory period a week. 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Registration limited. A study of the construction 
and optics of the microscope and its applications in chemistry, with particular emphasis 
on the optical properties of crystals. (Stuntz.) 

Chem. 225. Advanced Instrumental Analysis. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and six hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 
189, 190 or concurrent registration therein. An intensive study of physicochemical 
methods as applied to analytical chemistry. Laboratory work will include experiments 
in such fields as polarography, coulometry and amperometry, potentiometry and spectro- 
photometry, nephlometry. (Purdy.) 

Chem. 226. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Pre- 
requisite, Chem. 125, 225, or consent of instructor. A study of advanced methods with 
emphasis on the modern techniques of analytical chemistry. (Purdy.) 

Chem. 266. Biological Analysis. (2) 

Second semester. Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 

19, 33, 34. A study of analytical methods applied to biological material. (Staff.) 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 161, 163. Biochemistry. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Chem. 33, or Chem. 

37. (Woods, Veitch.) 

61 ► 



Chemistry 

Chem. 162, 164. Biochemistry Laboratory. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 

Chem. 34, or Chem. 38. (Woods, Veitch.) 

For Graduates 

Chem. 261, 263. Advanced Biochemistry. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Chem. 143 or consent 

of instructor. (Veitch.) 

Chem. 262, 264. Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 

consent of the instructor. (Veitch.) 

Chem. 265. Enzymes. (2) 

First semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Chem. 163. (Veitch." 

Chem. 268. Special Problems in Biochemistry. (2-4) 

First and second semesters. Two to four three-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisites, Chem. 161, 162, 163, 164, and consent of the instructor. (Veitch.) 

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 101. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 37, 123. (Staff.) 

Chem. 102. Inorganic Preparations. (2) 

Second semester. Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 123. 

(Jaquith.) 
Chem. 111. Chemical Principles. (4) 

Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 1 
and 3, or equivalent. Not open to students seeking a major in the physical sciences, 
since the course content is covered elsewhere in their curricula. A course in the prin- 
ciples of chemistry with accompanying laboratory work consisting of simple quantitative 
experiments. (Credit applicable only toward degree in College of Education.) 

(Jaquith.) 

For Graduates 

Chem. 201, 203. The Chemistry of the Rarer Elements. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. (White.) 

Chem. 202, 204. Advanced Inorganic Laboratory. (2) 

First and second semesters. Two three-hour laboratory periods a week. (Staff.) 

Chem. 205. Radiochemistry. (2) 

Two lectures a week. (Rollinson.) 

< 62 



Chemistry 

Chetn. 207. Chemistry of Coordination Compounds. (2) 

Two lectures a week. (Rollinson.) 

Chem. 209. Non-aqueous Inorganic Solvents. (2) 

First or second semester. Two lectures a week. (Jaquith.) 

Chem. 210. Radiochemistry Laboratory. (I or 2) 

One or two four-hour laboratory periods a week. Registration limited. Prerequisites, 

Chem. 205 (or concurrent registration therein) and consent of instructor. 

(Lakshmanan.) 
Chem. 211. Selected Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. (2) 

First or second semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 201, 203 or 
equivalent. An examination of some current topics in modern inorganic chemistry. 

(Boyd.) 
Chem. 213. Advanced Radiochemistry. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures per week. Prerequisite, Chem. 205 or consent of in- 
structor. Utilization of radioisotopes with special emphasis on applications to problems 
in the life sciences. (Lakshmanan.) 

Chem. 214. Advanced Radiochemistry Laboratory . Q or 2) 
Second semester. One or two four-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, 
Chem. 210 and Chem. 213 (or concurrent registration in Chem. 213) and consent of 
instructor. Registration limited. Laboratory training in utilization of radioisotopes with 
special emphasis on applications to problems in life sciences. (Lakshmanan.) 



ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 141, 143. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 37, 38. An 

advanced study of the compounds of carbon. (Reeve.) 

Chem. 144. Advanced Organic Laboratory. (2-4) 

First and second semesters. Two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, 

Chem. 37, 38. (Pratt.) 

Chem. 146, 148. The Identification of Organic Compounds. (2, 2) 
First and second semesters. Two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, 
Chem. 141, 143, or concurrent registration therein. The systematic identification of 
organic compounds. (Pratt.) 

Chem. ISO. Organic Quantitative Analysis. (2) 

First and second semesters. Two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite, 
consent of instructor. The semi-micro determination of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, 
halogen and certain functional groups. This course may be substituted for Chem. 144 
in the chemistry major curriculum. (Kasler.) 

63 ► 



Chemistry 

For Graduates 

(One or more courses from trie following group 241-254 will customarily be 
offered each semester. 

Chem. 240. Organic Chemistry of High Polymers. (2) 

First semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 141, 143. An advanced 
course covering the synthesis of monomers, mechanism of polymerization, and the 
correlation between structure and properties in high polymers. (Bailey.) 

Chem. 241. Stereochemistry. (2) 

Two lectures a week. (Woods.) 

Chem. 245. The Chemistry of the Steroids. (2) 

Two lectures a week. (Pratt.) 

Chem. 249. Physical Aspects of Organic Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures a week. (Woods.) 

Chem. 251. The Heterocyclics. (2) 

Two lectures a week. (Pratt.) 

Chem. 253. Organic Sulfur Compounds. (2) 

Two lectures a week. (Dewey.) 

Chem. 254. Advanced Organic Preparations. (2-4) 

First and second semesters. Two or four three-hour laboratory periods a week. (Pratt.) 

Chem. 258. The Identification of Organic Compounds, an Advanced Course. 
(2-4) 

First and second semesters. Two to four three-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisites, Chem. 141, 143, or concurrent registration therein. (Pratt.) 

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 

Tor Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 187, 189. Physical Chemistry. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 19 or 21; 
Phys. 20, 21; Math. 20, 21. This course must be accompanied by Chem. 188, 190, un- 
less excused by the instructor. (Svirbely.) 

Chem. 188, 190. Physical Chemistry Laboratory. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two three-hour laboratory periods a week. A laboratory 

course for students taking Chem. 187, 189. (Pickard.) 

Chem. 192, 194. Glassblowing Laboratory. (J, 2) 

First and second semesters. One three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 

consent of instructor. (Carruthers.) 

<4 64 



Chemistry 

For Graduates 

The common prerequisites for the following courses arc Chcm. 187 and 
189. 

One or more courses of the group, 281-323, will be offered each semester, 
depending on demand. 

Chem. 281. Theory of Solutions. (2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Chem. 307, or equivalent. (Svirbely.) 

Chem. 285. Colloid Chemistry. (2) 

Two lectures a week. (Pickard.) 

Chem. 287. Infra-red and Raman Spectroscopy. (2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 141, 143, 187, 189 and consent of in- 
structor. (Lippincott.) 

Chem. 295. Heterogeneous Equilibria. (2) 

Two lectures a week. (Pickard.) 

Chem. 299. Reaction Kinetics. (3) 

Three lectures a week. (Svirbely.) 

Chem. 303. Electrochemistry. (3) 

Three lectures a week. (Pickard.) 

Chem. 304. Electrochemistry Laboratory. (2) 

Two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

(Svirbely.) 
Chem. 307. Chemical Thermodynamics. (3) 
Three lectures a week. (Pickard.) 

Chem. 311. Physiochemical Calculations. (2) 

Two lectures a week. (Pickard.) 

Chem. 313. Molecular Structure. (3) 

Three lectures a week. (Brown.) 

Chem. 317. Chemical Crystallography. (3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Brown.) 

Chem. 319, 321. Quantum Chemistry. (3, 2) 

Three and two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Chem. 307, or equivalent. 

(Lippincott, Mason.) 

Chem. 323. Statistical Mechanics and Chemistry. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Chem. 307 or equivalent. (Brown.) 

65 ► 



Chemistry, Civil Engineering 

SEMINAR AND RESEARCH 

Chem. 351. Seminar. (I J 

First and second semesters. (Staff.) 

Chem. 399. Thesis Research. 

First and second semesters, summer session. (Staff.) 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Professors: looney, mavis, allen, otts and lepper. 
Associate Professors: barber, cournyn and wedding. 

The Civil Engineering Department offers graduate work in the following 
fields: engineering materials, highway engineering, hydraulic engineering, sani- 
tary engineering, soils and foundations, and structural engineering, leading to 
the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

C. E. 100. Seminar. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, C.E. 30, C.E. 110 and C.E. 140. (Otts.) 

C. E. 101. Construction Planning. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, consent of the Department of Civil Engineering. 

(Piper.) 
C. E. 110. Surveying 1. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, junior 
standing. (Gohr, Staff.) 

C.E. 111. Surveying II. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, C. E. 
110. (Gohr, Staff.) 

C. E. 112. Photo grammetry. (3) 

First or second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 

C. E. Ill, or equivalent. (Gohr.) 

C. E. 121, 122. Advanced Strength of Materials. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, C. E. 23 and 30 and senior standing. 

(Lepper, Wedding.) 
C. E. 140. Fluid Mechanics. (3) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisite, Math. 21. Concurrent registration in C. E. 23 and Phys. 21. (Cournyn.) 

C. E. 141. Fluid Mechanics. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, C. E. 20 and consent of instructor. 

(Cournyn.) 

^ 66 



Civil Engineering 

C. E. 142. Hydrology. (3) 

First or second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, 

C. E. 140 or C. E. 141. (Oournyn.) 

C. E. 150. Soil Mechanics. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, C. E. 23, 

24 and 30, or equivalents. (Barber.) 

C. E. 160. Structural Analysis I. (3) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequi- 
sites, C. E. 23 and C. E. 30. Concurrent registration in C. E. 30. (Piper.) 

C. E. 161. Structural Analysis U. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, C. E. 160, or equivalent. (Looney.) 

C. E. 762. Structural Design (Steel). (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, C. E. 160, 
or equivalent. (Allen, Piper.) 

C. E. 163. Structural Design (Concrete). (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, C. E. 
160 and C. E. 161. (Allen, Piper.) 

C. E. 170. Water Supply. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, C. E. 140, 

or equivalent. (Otts.) 

C. E. 171. Sewerage. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, C. E. 
140, or equivalent. (Otts.) 

C. E. 180. Transportation. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, C. E. 23, C. E. 30 and C. E. 110. (Wedding.) 

C. E. 181. Highways. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, C. E. 
150, or equivalent. (Barber.) 

C. E. 199. Research. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, senior standing. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

C. E. 221, 222. Advanced Strength of Materials. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, C. E. 23 and 30, or equivalent. (Lepper.) 

C. E. 223. Experimental Stress Analysis. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, C. E. 221 or permission of instructor. (Wedding.) 

C. E. 224. Advanced Engineering Materials Laboratory. (3) 

First or second semester. Prerequisites, C. E. 23 and 30, or equivalent. 

(Lepper, Wedding.) 

67 ► 



Civil Engineering 

C. E. 225, 226. Advanced Properties of Materials. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, C. E. 221 and 222. (Lepper.) 

C. E. 227, 228. Theories of Concrete & Granular Materials. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, C. E. 221, C. E. 222 and C. E. 224. 

(Wedding.) 
C. E. 231, 232. Theory of Concrete Mixtures 1, 11. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, C. E. 30, or equivalent. The second semester 
of this course is open only to students who are majoring in materials. ( Wedding.) 

C. E. 241. Hydraulic Engineering. (3) 

First or second semester. Prerequisites, C. E. 140, C. E. 141, or equivalent. (Cournyn.) 

C. E. 251. Soil Mechanics. (3) 

First or second semester. Prerequisite, C. E. 150. (Barber.) 

C. E. 252. Advanced Foundations. (3) 

First or second semester. Prerequisites, C. E. 150, 162 and 163, or equivalents. 

(Barber.) 
C. E. 261. Civil Engineering Planning. (3) 
First semester. Prerequisites, C. E. 160, 161, 162 and 163, or equivalent. 

(Looney, Piper.) 
C. E. 262. Civil Engineering Planning. (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, C. E. 261. (Looney, Piper.) 

C. E. 263. Theory of Structural Design. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, C. E. 160, 161, 162 and 163, or equivalent. (Looney.) 

C. E. 264. Theory of Structural Design. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, C. E. 263. (Looney.) 

C. E. 265, 266. Concrete Structures. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, C. E. 263 and 264. (Looney.) 

C. E. 267, 268. Steel Structures. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, C. E. 263 and 264. (Looney.) 

C. E. 271, 272. Sanitary Engineering Design. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, C. E. 170 and 171, or equivalent. (Otts.) 

C. E. 282, 282. Advanced Highway Engineering. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, C. E. 150, 180 and 181, or equivalent. 

(Barber.) 

C. E. 298. Seminar. 

First or second semester. Credit in accordance with work outlined by the Department. 

Prerequisite, consent of the Department of Civil Engineering. (Staff.) 

C. E. 399. Research. 

First and second semesters. Credit in accordance with work done. (Staff.) 

<« 68 



CLASSICAL LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

Professor: avery. 

The Department of Classical Languages and Literatures offers no program 
leading to the degrees of Master of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy at the present 
time. The following courses, however, are offered upon sufficient demand to 
supply the needs of graduate students in other fields, such as English, history, 
and modern foreign languages, who may wish to work in Latin in connection 
with their degree programs in such fields. Students should consult their major 
professors with respect to application of credit hours in Latin to their graduate 
programs. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Prerequisite, Latin 61 or equivalent. 

Latin 101. Catidlus and the Roman Elegiac Poets. (3) 

Lectures and readings on Catullus as a writer of lyric, an imitator of the Alexandrians, 
and as a writer of elegy, and on Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid as elegists. The read- 
ing of selected poems of the four authors. Reports. (Avery.) 

Latin 102. Tacitus. (3) 

Lectures and readings on Greek and Roman historiography before Tacitus and on 

the author as a writer of history. The reading of selections from the Annals and 

Histories. Reports. (Avery.) 

Latin 103. Roman Satire. (3) 

Lectures and readings on the origins and development of Roman satire. The reading 
of selections from the satires of Horace, Petronius' Cena Trimalchionis, and the 
satires of Juvenal. Reports. (Avery.) 

Latin 104. Roman Comedy. (3) 

Lectures and readings on the origins and development of Roman comedy. The read- 
ing of selected plays of Plautus and Terence. Reports. (Avery.) 

Latin 105. Lucretius. (3) 

Lectures and readings on Greek and Roman Epicureanism. The reading of selections 

from the De rerum natura. Reports. (Avery.) 

Latin 111. Advanced Latin Grammar. (3) 

An intensive study of the morphology and syntax of the Latin language supplemented 

by rapid reading. (Avery) 

For Graduates 
Prerequisite, Latin 61 or equivalent. 

Latin 210. Vulgar Latin Readings. (3) 

An intensive study of the phonology, morpholoy, and syntax of Classical Latin, fol- 

69 ► 



Comparative Literature 

lowed by the study of the deviations of Vulgar Latin from the classical norms, with 
the reading of illustrative texts. The reading of selections from the Peregrinatio ad 
loca sancta and the study of divergences from classical usage therein, with special 
emphasis on those which anticipate subsequent developments in the Romance 
Languages. Reports. (Avery.) 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

Professors: aldridge, falls, goodwyn, harman, mcmanaway (p.t.), murphy, 

PRAHL, ZBEVELD AND ZUCKER. 

Associate Professors: cooley, manning, parsons and werer. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Comp. Lit. 101, 102. Introductory Survey of Comparative Literature. (3, 3) 
First semester: Survey of the background of European literature through study of 
Greek and Latin literature in English translations, discussing the debt of modern 
literature to the ancients. Second semester: Study of medieval and modern Con- 
tinental literature. (Zucker.) 

Comp. Lit. 103. The Old Testament as Literature. (3) 

Second semester. A study of the sources, development and literary types. (Zucker.) 

Comp. Lit. 105. Romanticism in Prance. (3) 

First semester. Lectures and readings in the French romantic writers from Rousseau 

to Baudelaire. Texts are read in English translations. (Parsons.) 

Comp. Lit. 106. Romanticism in Germany. (3) 

Second semester. Continuation of Comp. Lit. 105. German literature from Buerger 

to Heine in English translations. (Prahl.) 

Comp. Lit. 107. The Paust Legend in English and German Literature. (3) 

First semester. A study of the Faust legend of the Middle Ages and its later treatment 
by Marlowe in Dr. Faustus and by Goethe in Faust. (Prahl.) 

Comp. Lit. 112. Ibsen. (3) 

First semester. A study of the life and chief works of Henrik Ibsen with special 
emphasis on his influence on the modern drama. (Zucker.) 

Comp. Lit. 114. The Greek Drama. (3) 

First semester. The chief works of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes 
in English translations. Emphasis on the historic background, on dramatic structure, 
and on the effect of the Attic drama upon the mind of the civilized world. (Prahl.) 

Comp. Lit. 125. Literature of the Middle Ages. (3) 

Narrative, dramatic, and lyric literature of the Middle Ages; studies in translations. 

(Cooley.) 

In addition, the following courses will count as credit in Comparative 
Literature: Eng. 104, Eng. 113, Eng. 121, Eng. 129, 130, Eng. 144, Eng. 
145, Eng. 155, 156, Eng. 157; Spanish 109; Speech 131, 132. 

-< 70 



Comparative Literature, Dairy 

For Graduates 

Coutp. Lit. 258. Folklore in Literature. (3) 

A study of folk heroes, motifs, and ideas as they appear in the world's masterpieces. 

(Goodwyn.) 
Comp. Lit. 301. Seminar in Themes and Types. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, one year's work in literature and the knowledge of one 
language other than English. Intensive study of fundamental motifs and trends in 
western literature. (Aldridge.) 

The following courses will count as credit in Comparative Literature: Eng. 
201, Eng. 204, Eng. 206, 207; Eng. 216, 217, Eng. 227, 228, German 203, 
German 204, German 208. 

DAIRY 

Professors: arbuckle, davis and shaw. 
Associate Professors: keeney and mattick. 
Assistant Professors: hemken and williams. 

The Dairy Department offers work leading to the degree of Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Candidates for the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree have the option of studying in one of two major fields: dairy pro- 
duction, which is concerned with breeding, nutrition and physiology of dairy 
animals, or dairy technology, which is concerned with chemical, bacteriological, 
and nutritional aspects of dairy products, as well as the industrial phases of 
milk processing. 

For Graduates and Advanced LJuder graduates 

Dairy 102. Physiology of Reproduction. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Anatomy, endocrine 

physiology, reproductive processes and artificial insemination of cattle. (Williams.) 

Dairy 103. Physiology of Milk Secretion. (3) 

Second semester. (Alternate years, given in 1961-62.) Two lectures and one laboratory 
period per week. Prerequisites, Zool. 1 and organic chemistry. The anatomy, evolution 
and metabolism of the mammary gland including hormonal control and the biosyn- 
thesis of milk constituents. (Williams.) 

Dairy 105. Dairy Cattle Breeding. (3) 

Second semester. (Alternate years, given in 1960-61.) Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisites, Dairy 1, Zool. 104. A specialized course in breeding 
dairv cattle. Emphasis is placed on methods of evaluation and selection, systems of 
breeding, and breeding programs. (Davis.) 

Dairy 108. Dairy Technology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Dairy 1, 

Microb. 133, Chem. 1, 3. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Keeney.) 

71 ► 



Dairy 

Dairy 109. Market Milk. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Dairy 

1, Microb. 133, Chem. 1, 3. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (King.) 

Dairy 110. Concentrated Milk, Cheese and Butter. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and one five-hour laboratory a week. Prerequisites, Dairy 
1, Microb. 133 or equivalent; Chem. 1 and 3. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Methods of pro- 
duction of butter, cheese, condensed and evaporated milk and milk products. Con- 
sideration is given to the procedures of processing quality control and the physio- 
chemical principles involved. (Mattick.) 

Dairy 112. Ice Cream Making. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Dairy 

108. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Arbuckle.) 

Dairy 116. Dairy Plant Management. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, at 
least three advanced dairy products technology courses. Principles of dairy plant man- 
agement, record systems; personnel, plant design and construction; dairy machinery 
and equipment. (Mattick.) 

For Graduates 
Dairy 201. Advanced Ruminant Nutrition. (3) 

First semester. (Alternate years, given in 1960-61.) Three one-hour lectures per week. 
Prerequisites, A. H. 110 or Dairy 101, organic chemistry and permission of the Depart- 
ment. Biochemical, physiological and bacteriological aspects of the nutrition of rumi- 
nants and other animals. (Hemken, Davis.) 

Dairy 202. Dairy Research Methods. (3) 

First semester. (Alternate years, given in 1961-62.) Prerequisite, permission of the De- 
partment. The application of physio-chemical and bio-chemical techniques to dairy 
research problems including chromatography, spectrophotometry, radioactive isotope 
tracer techniques and animal balance studies. (Keeney, Stewart.) 

Dairy 301. Special Problems in Dairying. (1-5) (4 Cr. Max.— M.S., 8 Cr. 

Max.-Ph.DO 
First and second semesters. Prerequisite, permission of professor in charge of work. 
Credit in accordance with the amount and character of work done. Methods of con- 
ducting dairy research and the presentation of results are stressed. A research problem 
which relates specifically to the work the student is pursuing will be assigned. (Staff.) 

Dairy 302. Advanced Dairy Seminar. (1) 

First and second semesters. M.S. candidates can obtain 4 credits; Ph.D. candidates 
can obtain 6 credits. Assigned readings, presentation and discussion of timely topics 
and fundamental research in dairy science. (Staff.) 

Dairy 399. Research. 

First and second semesters. Credit to be determined by the amount and quality of 
work done. Original investigation by the student of some subject assigned by the 
major professor, the completion of the assignment and the preparation of a thesis in 
accordance with requirements for an advanced degree. (Staff.) 

** 72 



ECONOMICS 

Professors: dillard, gruchy and hamberg. 
Associate Professors: grayson and gurley. 
Assistant Professors: dalton and measday. 
Lecturer: de beers. 

MASTER OF ARTS 

Requirements for the master's degree include (1) course work in eco- 
nomics as the Department deems appropriate in view of the candidate's pre- 
vious training, (2) course work in a minor subject, (3) a thesis on a topic 
approved by the Department, and (4) a comprehensive oral examination cover- 
ing the major and the minor subjects and defense of the thesis. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

The Ph.D. degree in economics is under the joint direction of the faculties 
of the Department of Economics and the Department of Business Organization 
and Administration. Before being advanced to candidacy doctoral students 
must pass comprehensive written and oral examinations in five of the following 
fields: (1) Accounting, (2) Comparative Economic Systems and Economic 
Planning, (3) Economic Development, (4) Economic Theory (required), (5) 
Financial Administration, (6) History of Economic Thought (required), (7) 
Industrial Administration, (8) International Economics, (9) Labor and Indus- 
trial Relations, (10) Marketing, (11) Money and Banking, (12) Public Finance 
and Fiscal Policy, (13) Public Utilities and Social Control of Business, (14) 
Transportation, (15) any other field, including the minor, approved by the 
faculty. Students should consult with members of the faculty concerning the 
choice of fields and the choice of courses within these fields. 

Six semester hours of statistics with grades of "B" or better must be pre- 
sented. Normally the foreign language requirements are taken before the com- 
prehensive examinations. 

Further information concerning requirements and procedures may be ob- 
tained from the departments administering the program. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Econ. 102. National Income Analysis. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32. An analysis of national income 

accounts and the level of national income and employment. (Hamberg, Staff.) 

Econ. 130. Mathematical Economics. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Econ. 102 and 132 or permission of instructor. A 
course designed to enable economics majors to understand the simpler aspects of mathe- 
matical economics. Those parts of the calculus and algebra required for economic 
analysis will be presented. (Staff.) 

73 ► 



Economics 

Econ. 131. Comparative Economic Systems. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. An investigation of the 
theory and practice of various types of economic systems. The course begins with an 
examination and evaluation of the capitalistic system and is followed by an analysis of 
alternative types of economic systems such as fascism, socialism, and communism. 

(Gruchy.) 
Econ. 132. Advanced Economic Principles. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, . Econ. 32. Required for economics majors. 
This course is an analysis of price and distribution theory with special attention to 
recent developments in the theory of imperfect competition. (Grayson.) 

Econ. 134. Contemporary Economic Thought. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Econ. 32 and senior standing. A survey of recent 
trends in American, English, and continental economic thought with special attention 
to the work of such economists as W. C. Mitchell, J. R. Commons, T. Veblen, W. 
Sombart, J. A. Hobson and other contributors to the development of economic thought 
since 1900. (Gruchy.) 

Econ. 136. International Economic Policies and Relations. (3) 
First semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. A descriptive and theoretical analysis 
of international trade. Full consideration is given to contemporary problems facing 
international trade and to the impact of governmental policy upon international com- 
mercial relations. (deBeers.) 

Econ. 137. The Economics of National Planning. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. An analysis of the principles and 
practice of economic planning with special reference to the planning problems of Great 
Britain, Russia, and the United States. (Gruchy.) 

Econ. 138. Economics of the Soviet Union. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. An analysis of the organization, 
operating principles and performance of the Soviet economy with attention to the 
historical and ideological background, planning, resources, industry, agriculture, domestic 
and foreign trade, finance, labor, and the structure and growth of national income. 

(Dodge.) 
Econ. 140. Money and Banking. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. A study of the organiza- 
tion, functions, and operation of our monetary, credit, and banking system; the relation 
of commercial banking to the Federal Reserve System; the relation of money and credit 
to prices; domestic and foreign exchange and the impact of public policy upon banking 
and credit. (Clemens, Glade, Hamberg, Shelby.) 

Econ. 141. Theory of Money, Credit, and Prices. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Econ. 32 and 140. A study of recent domestic and 

international monetary policies, their objectives and theoretical foundations. (Staff.) 

Econ. 142. Public Finance and Taxation. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. A study of government 
fiscal policy with special emphasis upon sources of public revenue, the tax system, gov- 
ernment budgets, and the public debt. (Grayson.) 

■< 74 



Economics 

Econ. 147. Business Cycles. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 140. A study of the causes of depressions and 

unemployment, cyclical and secular instability, theories of business cycles, and the 

problem of controlling economic instability. (Shelby.) 

Econ. 149. International Finance and Exchange. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 140; Econ. 136 recommended. This course con- 
siders the theory and practice of international finance and exchange. The increased 
importance of public authority in foreign trade, international policies, and finance is 
given due emphasis. (deBeers.) 

Econ. 160. Labor Economics. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. The historical development 
and chief characteristics of the American labor movement are first surveyed. Present- 
day problems are then examined in detail; wage theories, unemployment, social security, 
labor organization, and collective bargaining. (Dalton, Measday, Smith.) 

Econ. 170. Monopoly and Competition. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. Changing structure of the American 
economy; price policies in different industrial classifications of monopoly and competi- 
tion in relation to problems of public policy. (Smith.) 

Econ. 171. Economics of American Industries. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 32 or 37. A study of the technology, economics 

and geography of twenty representative American industries. (Clemens.) 

For Graduates 

Econ. 200. Micro-Economic Analysis. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 132. Price, output, and distribution analysis as 
developed by Chamberlin, Triffin, Hicks and others. Considerable attention is given 
to contributions in periodicals. (Grayson.) 

Econ. 201. Advanced Micro-Economic Analysis. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 200 or consent of instructor. A review and criti- 
cal analysis of resource allocation and the theory of the firm, including recent de- 
velopments in linear programming, activity analysis, and input-output analysis. (Staff.) 

Econ. 202. Macro-Economics Analysis. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 132. National income accounting: determination 
of national income and employment especially as related to the modern theory of effec- 
tive demand; consumption function; multiplier and acceleration principles; the role of 
money as it affects output and employment as a whole; cyclical fluctuations. (Dillard.) 

Econ. 204. Origins and Development of Capitalism. (3) 

Study of the transition from feudalism to capitalism and the subsequent development 
of leading capitalist institutions in industry, agriculture, commerce, banking, and the 
social movement. (Staff.) 

Econ. 205. Economic Development of Underdeveloped Areas. (3) 

Principles and problems of economic development in underdeveloped areas; policies and 

techniques which hasten economic development. (Staff.) 

75 ► 



Economics 

Econ. 206. Seminar in Economic Development. (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 205 or consent of instructor. Problems and policies of economic 

development in specified underdeveloped areas. (Staff.) 

Econ. 230. History of Economic Thought. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 132 or consent of instructor. A study of the de- 
velopment of economic thought and theories including the Greeks, Romans, canonists, 
mercantilists, physiocrats, Adam Smith, Malthus, Ricardo. Relation of ideas to eco- 
nomic policy. (Dillard.) 

Econ. 231. Economic Theory in the Nineteenth Century. (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, Econ. 230 or consent of the instructor. A study of 
various nineteenth and twentieth century schools of economic thought, particularly the 
classicists, neo-classicists, Austrians, German historical school, American economic 
thought and the socialists. (Dillard.) 

Econ. 232, 233. Seminar in Institutional Economic Theory. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. A study of recent developments in the field of institu- 
tional economic theory in the United States and abroad. (Gruchy.) 

Econ. 234. Economic Growth in Mature Economics. (3) 

Given in sequence with Econ. 232 and 233. Analysis of policies and problems for 
achieving stable economic growth in mature economies such as the United States, the 
United Kingdom, and the Scandinavian countries. (Gruchy.) 

Econ. 236. Seminar in International Economic Relations. (3) 

(Arranged.) A study of selected problems in international economic relations. (Staff.) 

Econ. 237. Special Seminar in Economic Growth and Development. (3) 
Visiting academic and government economists who are specialists in various aspects of 
economic growth and development will address the seminar on special topics. Students 
may enroll for credit and write papers under the supervision of the faculty member 
directing the seminar. (Staff.) 

Econ. 238. Seminar in Economic Development of the Soviet Union. (3) 
Prerequisite, Econ. 138 or consent of instructor. Measurement and evaluation of Soviet 
economic development including interpretation and use of Soviet statistics, measure- 
ment of national income and rates of growth, fiscal and monetary policies, investment 
and technological change, planning and economic administration, manpower and 
wage policies, foreign trade and aid, and selected topics in Bloc development. (Dodge.) 

Econ. 240. Seminar in Monetary Theory and Policy. (3) 

Theories of money, prices, and national income with emphasis on recent develop- 
ments. Monetary theories of income fluctuations. Domestic and international monetary 
policies. (Gurley.) 

Econ. 242. Public Finance and Fiscal Policy. (3) 

Prerequisite, Econ. 142 or consent of instructor. Taxation, public expenditures, and 
public debt; the use of fiscal policy as a stabilization device against inflation and re- 
cession. (Staff.) 

+ 76 



Education 

Econ. 247. Economic Growth and histability. (3) 

Second semester. An analytical study of long-term economic growth in relation to 
short-term cyclical instability. Attention is concentrated on the connection between 
accumulation of capital and the capital requirements of secular growth and business 
cycles. Earlier writings as well as recent growth models are considered. (Hamberg.) 

Econ. 248. The Economics of Technical Change. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A study of the determinants and 
impact of inventions and innovations. Attention is given to the qualitative and 
quantitative aspects of technical change, both at the micro-economic and macro-economic 
levels, and under different conditions of economic development. (Hamberg.) 

Econ. 270. Seminar in Economics and Geography of American Industries. (3) 
(Arranged.) (Clemens.) 

Econ. 399. Thesis. 

(Arranged.) (Staff.) 

EDUCATION 

Professors: Anderson, byrne, grentzer, hovet, kurtz } maley, marx, mayor, 

MC CLURE, MERSHON, MORGAN, NEWELL, PATRICK, PERKINS, PRESCOTT, SCHIND- 
LER, SCHMIDT, THOMPSON, VAN ZWOLL, WAETJEN AND WIGGIN. 

Associate Professors: blough, brandt, haring, Harrison, jacobsen, johnson, 

KEEDY, O'NEILL, RISINGER, SCHNEIDER, TIERNEY AND ULRY. 

Assistant Professor: spencer. 

Master of Arts and Master of Education 

A student in education has the option of qualifying for the degree of Master 
of Arts or Master of Education. 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to the Graduate 
School, applicants for unconditional admission with a major in education must 
have had sixteen semester hours of acceptabale undergraduate work in educa- 
tion and must meet other standards set by this department of the Graduate 
School. 

During the first semester of graduate work, the student is required to take 
a test battery, at a fee of $5.00, and to submit professional recommendations. 
Not later than the completion of the first two courses, the student must select 
a major adviser and a major area the course requirements for which must be 
met for favorable consideration for graduation. Following is a list of the major 
areas: 

Adult Education Guidance and Personnel 

Business Education Higher Education 

Educational Administration and Music Education 

Supervision History, Philosophy, and Compara- 



Elementary School Curriculum tive Education 

and Instruction 



77 ► 



Education 

Home Economics Education Human Growth and Development 

Secondary School Curriculum and Industrial Arts Education 

Instruction Vocational Industrial Education 

The time limit for completing either degree is the same as that prescribed 
for the Master of Arts and the Master of Science degrees of the Graduate School. 

MASTER OF ARTS REQUIREMENTS 

No student is recommended to the Graduate Council for advancement to 
candidacy for the Master of Arts degree until he has successfully passed the 
qualifying examination and has completed at least twelve hours of satisfactory 
graduate work at the University of Maryland. The candidate must meet all 
requirements including thesis and successful passing of the oral examination as 
prescribed by the Graduate School for the Master of Arts degree. 

MASTER OF EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

A student may be recommended for advancement to candidacy on the basis 
of course work plus recommendations of his major adviser and the Education 
Master's Committee acting for the Department of Education. The Master of 
Education candidate will write two seminar papers and will take a final compre- 
hensive examination covering all course work. The final examination must be 
taken by the full-time student in the second semester of course work and by the 
part-time student during the time he enrolled for the last six hours of course 
work. 

Currently both the qualifying and the comprehensive examinations are 
administered on the second Saturday of January and May and on the Saturday 
of the fourth week of the summer session. 

For further information respecting the master's degrees in education, see 
the statement of policy issued by the Department of Education. 

Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Education 

Each candidate is required to achieve exceptional ability in at least one 
major area and one minor area of competence. 

The candidate should choose his major from the following list of areas: 

Curriculum and Instruction History, Philosophy, and Comparative 

Educational Administration Education 

and Supervision Human Development Education 

Elementary Education Industrial Arts Education 

Guidance and Personnel Secondary Education 
*Physical Education, Recreation, Vocational-Industrial Education 
and Health 



*The Ph.D. program in this area is administered under a separate department of the 
Graduate School. 

•* 78 



Education 

Minors may be chosen from fields other than education as approved by the 
Committee on Candidacy, from the foregoing list of major areas, or from the 
following list: 

Adult Education Higher Education 

** Agricultural Education Home Economics Education 

Business Education Music Education 

In addition to the general University requirements for a doctor's degree, 
the following requirements must be met: 

1. The preliminary examination for admission to candidacy for the doc- 
tor's degree will cover the student's preparation in major and minor fields, 
and will include such other examinations as may be required by the faculty. 
A student must be admitted to candidacy in order to have the Department's 
official permission to be a candidate for a doctor's degree. 

2. A comprehensive examination covering the general fields of major and 
minor study must be passed by each candidate, after which the final examina- 
tion is administered by a committee appointed by the Dean of the Graduate 
School. 

In general the requirements for the Doctor of Education degree are the 
same as those for the degree Doctor of Philosophy. The most important differ- 
ences between the two degrees are as follows: 

1. The purpose of the Doctor of Education degree is to prepare persons of 
exceptional competence to work in the field. The emphasis for this degree is 
placed on broad understanding, whereas that for the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy is placed on specialized research. 

2. A reading knowledge of foreign languages is required for the degree of 
Doctor of Education only when needed for research and study in the doctoral 
program. 

3. In order to meet the residence requirements, a candidate for the Ph.D. 
degiee must spend at least two semesters in full-time study on the College Park 
campus. A candidate for the Ed.D. degTee may substitute two summers of resi- 
dence for one semester of residence, or four summers for two semesters. 

4. The doctoral study for the Ed.D. consists of a project rather than a 
dissertation. The project requires research to meet a practical field problem. 
Credit of six to nine hours is allowed for a project as compared with twelve 
to eighteen hours for a Ph.D. dissertation. For further information respecting 
the doctor's degree, see the "Statement of Policy, Doctoral Degrees in Education" 
issued by the Department of Education. 

** Administered under a separate department of the Graduate School. 

79 ► 



Education 

HISTORY, PRINCIPLES, CURRICULUM, AND ADMINISTRATION 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Ed. 100. History of Education in Western Civilization. (3) 
Educational institutions through the ancient, mediaeval, and early modern periods in 
the western civilization, as seen against a background of socio-economic development. 

(Wiggin.) 
Ed. 102. History of Education in the United States. (3) 

A study of the origins and development of the chief features of the present system 
of education in the United States. (Wiggin.) 

Ed. 107. Philosophy of Education. (2-3) 

A study of the great educational philosophers and systems of thought affecting the 
development of modem education. (Wiggin.) 

Ed. 121. The Language Arts in the Elementary School. (2-3) 
Teaching of spelling, handwriting, oral and written expression, and creative expres- 
sion. Special emphasis given to skills having real significance to pupils. (Staff.) 

Ed. 122. The Social Studies in the Elementary School. (2-3) 

Consideration given to curriculum, organization and methods of teaching, evaluation 
of newer materials, and utilization of environmental resources. (O'Neill.) 

Ed. J 23. The Child and the Curriculum. (3) 

Relationship of the elementary school curriculum to child growth and development. 
Recent trends in curriculum organization; the effect of environment on learning; 
readiness to learn; and adapting curriculum content and methods to maturity levels of 
children. (Denecke.) 

Ed. 124. Arithmetic in the Elementary School. (2-3) 

Emphasis on materials and procedures which help pupils sense arithmetical meanings 
and relationships. Helps teachers gain a better understanding of the number system 
and arithmetical processes. (Schindler.) 

Ed. 125. Art in Elementary Schools. (2) 

Concerned with art methods and materials for elementary schools. Includes laboratory 

experiences with materials appropriate for elementary schools. (Lembach.) 

Ed. 127. Teaching in Elementary Schools. (2-6) 

An overview of elementary school teaching designed for individuals without specific 
preparation for elementary school teaching or for individuals without recent teaching 
experience. (Staff.) 

Ed. 130. The Junior High School. (2-3) 

A general overview of the junior high school. Purposes, functions and character- 
istics of this school unit; a study of its population, organization, program of studies, 
methods, staff, and other similar topics, together with their implications for prospective 
teachers. (Staff.) 

Ed. 233. Methods of Teaching Social Studies in Secondary School. (2-3) 
Designed to give practical training in the everyday teaching situations. Use of various 

^ 80 



Education 

lesson techniques, audio and visual aids, reference materials, and testing programs and 
the adaption of teaching methods to individual and group differences. Present ten- 
dencies and aims of instruction in the social studies. (Risinger.) 

Ed. 134. Materials and Procedures for the Secondary School Core Curricu- 
lum. (3) 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. This course is designed to bring practical suggestions to teachers 
who are in charge of core classes in junior and senior high schools. Materials and teach- 
ing procedures for specific units of work are stressed. (Schneider.) 

Ed. 137. Methods of Teaching Mathematics and Science in Secondary School. 

(2-3) 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. Considers such topics as objectives, selection, organization, and 
presentation of subject matter, appropriate classroom methods and procedures, in- 
structional materials and evaluation of learning experiences in the areas of mathemat- 
ics, the physical sciences, and the biological sciences. (Ulry, Mayor, Keedy.) 

Ed. 140. Currictdum, Instruction, and Observation. (3) 

Graduate credit is allowed only by special permission. First and/or second semesters. 
Offered in separate sections for the various subject matter areas, namely, English, 
social studies, foreign language, science, mathematics, art education, business education, 
industrial education, music education, and physical education. Registration cards must 
include the subject-matter area as well as the name and number of the course. The 
objectives, selection and organization of subject matter, appropriate methods, lesson 
plans, textbooks, and other instructional materials, measurement, and other topics 
pertinent to the particular subject matter area are treated. Twenty periods of ob- 
servation. (Staff.) 

Ed. 141. Methods of Teaching English in Secondary Schools. (3) 

Content and methods in teaching the English language arts. (Bryan.) 

Ed. 142. Oral-aural Method of Teaching Foreign Languages. (3) 
Graduate credit allowed by special arrangement and adviser's approval. Designed for 
high school teachers. Methods in making and using tape recordings, using electronic 
laboratories, developing oral-aural skills and direct approach to language teaching are 
emphasized. (Staff.) 

Ed. 143. Foreign Language Methods in Elementary Schools. (3) 
Graduate credit allowed by special arrangement and adviser's approval. Registration 
limited and based upon approval of adviser. Methods and techniques for developmental 
approach to the teaching of modern foreign languages in elementary schools. Use of 
realia, development of oral-aural skills and understanding of young children in lan- 
guage development are stressed. (Staff.) 

Ed. 145. Principles and Methods of Secondary Education. (2-3) 
First and second semesters and summer session. This course is concerned with the 
principles and methods of teaching in junior and senior high schools. Instructional 
problems common to all of the subject fields are considered in relation to the needs and 
interests of youth, the urgent social problems of today, and the central values to which 
our society is committed. (Staff.) 

Ed. 147. Audio-Visual Education. (3) 

First semester and summer session. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Sensory impressions in their 

81 ► 



Education 

relation to learning; projection apparatus, its cost and operation; slides, film-strips, and 
films; physical principles underlying projection; auditory aids to instruction; field trips; 
pictures, models, and graphic materials; integration of sensory aids with organized 
instruction. Recommended for all education students. (Maley.) 

Ed. 150. Educational Measurement. (2) 

First and second semesters and summer session. Constructing and interpreting measures 

of achievement. (Johnson.) 

Ed. 151. Statistical Methods in Education. (3) 

Designed as a first course in statistics for students in education. Emphasis is upon 
educational applications of descriptive statistics, including measures of central tendency, 
variability, and association. (Johnson.) 

Ed. 153. The Teaching of Reading. (2-3) 

Concerned with the fundamentals of developmental reading instruction, including 
reading readiness, use of experience records, procedures in using basal readers, the im- 
provement of comprehension, teaching reading in all areas of the curriculum, uses of 
children's literature, the program in word analysis, and procedures for determining 
individual needs. (Schindler.) 

Ed. 154. Remedial Reading Instruction. (2-3) 

Prerequisite, Ed. 153 or the equivalent. For supervisors and teachers who wish to 
help retarded readers. Concerned with causes of reading difficulties, the identification 
and diagnosis of retarded pupils, instructional materials, and teaching procedures. 

(Schindler.) 

Ed. 155. Laboratory Practices in Reading for Elementary and Secondary 

Schools. (2-4) 
Prerequisite, Ed. 153 or Ed. 154. A laboratory course in which each student has one 
or more pupils for analysis and instruction. At least one class meeting per week to 
diagnose individual cases and to plan instruction. (Schindler.) 

Ed. 160. Educational Sociology. (2) 

Deals with data of the social sciences which are germane to the work of teachers. 
Implications of democratic ideology for educational endeavor, educational tasks imposed 
by changes in population and technological trends, the welfare status of pupils, the 
socio-economic attitudes of individuals who control the schools, and other elements of 
community background. (Risinger.) 

Ed. 161. Principles of Guidance. (3) 

First and second semesters and summer session. Overview of principles and practices of 

guidance-oriented education. (Byrne, Marx.) 

Ed. 162. Mental Hygiene in the Classroom. (2-3) 

The practical application of the principles of mental hygiene to classroom problems. 

(Denecke.) 

Ed. 163, 164, and 165. Community Study Laboratory 1, 11 and 111. (2, 2, 2) 
Involves experience from the educational standpoint with the agencies, institutions, 
cultural patterns, living conditions, and social processes which play significant roles in 

•* 82 



Education 

shaping the behavior of children and adults and which must be understood by indi- 
viduals working toward school and community improvement. Each participant becomes 
a member of a group in a given area of study and concentrates on problems which 
have direct application in his school situation. Readings are integrated with techniques 
of study. (Schindler.) 

Ed. 187. Field Experience in Education. Ql-4) 

a. Adult Education e. Higher Education 

b. Curriculum and Instruction f. Industrial Arts Education 

c. Educational Administration g. Supervision 

d. Guidance and Personnel h. Vocational-Industrial Education 

Planned field experience may be provided for selected graduate students who have 
had teaching experince and whose application for such held experience has been ap- 
proved by the education faculty. Field experience is offered in a given area to both 
major and non-major students. Prerequisites, at least six semester hours in education 
at the University of Maryland plus such other prerequisites as may be set by the major 
area in which the experience is to be taken. (Staff.) 

Ed. 188. Special Problems in Education. (2-3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Available only to mature students who have definite 
plans for individual study of approved problems. (Staff.) 

Note: Course cards must have the title of the problem and the name of the faculty 
member who has approved it. 

Ed. 189. Workshops, Clinics, and Institutes. (.1-6^) 

The following types of educational enterprises may be scheduled under this course 
heading: workshops conducted by the College of Education (or developed cooperatively 
with other colleges and universities) and not otherwise covered in the present course 
listing; clinical experiences in pupil-testing centers, reading clinics, speech therapy lab- 
oratories, and special education centers; institutes developed around specific topics or 
problems and intended for designated groups such as school superintendents, principal-, 
and supervisors. The maximum number of credits that may be earned under this 
course symbol toward any degree is six semester hours; the symbol may be used two or 
more times until six semester hours have been reached. (Staff.) 

Ed. 190. Problems and Trends in Contemporary American Education. (2-4) 

Designed to present a broad overview of some key issues and trends that relate to 
the improvement of instruction at elementary, secondary and teacher education levels. 
Lectures by visiting educators of national prominence will be reviewed and analyzed in 
discussion groups led by regular University staff members. 

For Graduates 

Ed. 202. The Junior College. (2) 

The philosophy and development of the junior college in the United States with 

emphasis on curriculum and administrative controls. (Staff.) 

Ed. 203. Problems in Higher Education. (3) 

A study of present problems in higher education. (Wiggin.) 

83 ► 



Education 

Ed. 205. Comparative Education. (3) 

A study of historical changes in ways of looking at national school systems, and of 

problems in assessing their effectiveness. (Wiggin.) 

Ed. 206. Seminar in Comparative Education. (2) 



Ed. 207. Seminar in History and Philosophy of Education. (2) 



(Wiggin.) 
(Wiggin.) 



Ed. 209. Adidt Education. (3) 

A study of adult education in the United States, with attention to adult abilities and 

intelligence, programs of adult education, and a rationale for adult education. 

(Wiggin.) 

Ed. 210. The Organization and Administration of Public Education. (3) 
First semester. The basic course in school administration. Deals with the organization 
and administration of school systems— at the local, state, and federal levels; and with 
the administrative relationships involved. (Newell.) 

Ed. 211. The Organization, Administration, and Supervision of Secondary 

Schools. (3) 
Second semester. The work of the secondary school principal. Includes topics such as 
personnel problems, supervision, school-community relationships, student activities, 
schedule making, and internal financial accounting. (Schneider. ) 

Ed. 212. School Finance and Business Administration. (3) 
An introduction to principles and practices in the administration of the public school 
finance activity. Sources of tax revenue, the budget, and the function of finance in 
the educational program are considered. (Van Zwoll.) 

Ed. 214. School Plant Planning. (2) 

An orientation course in which the planning of school buildings is developed as educa- 
tional designing with reference to problems of site, building facilities, and equipment. 

(Van Zwoll.) 
Ed. 216. Public School Supervision. (3) 

The nature and functions of supervision; various supervisory techniques and pro- 
cedures; human relationship factors; and personal qualities for supervisor. (Kairott.) 

Ed. 217. Administration and Supervision in Elementary Schools. (3) 
Problems in administering elementary schools and improving instruction. (Denecke.) 

Ed. 218. School Surveys. (2-6) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Includes study of school surveys with emphasis on 
problems of school organization and administration, finance and school plant planning. 
Field work in school surveys is required. (Newell.) 

Ed. 219. Seminar in Educational Administration and Supervision. (2-4) 
Prerequisite, at least four hours in educational administration and supervision or con- 
sent of instructor. A student may register for two hours and may take the seminar a 
second time for an additional two hours. (Newell, Van Zwoll.) 

Ed. 220. Pupil Transportation. (2) 

Includes consideration of the organization and administration of state, county, and dis- 

-< 84 



Education 

trict pupil transportation service with emphasis on safety and economy. The planning 
of bus routes; the selection and training of bus drivers, and maintenance mechanics; the 
specification of school buses; and procurement procedures are included. (Staff.) 

Ed. 221. Advanced School Plant Planning. (2) 

Ed. 214 is a prerequisite to this course. However students with necessary background 
may be admitted without completion of Ed. 214. This is an advanced course in school 
plant planning problems. Emphasis is given to analysis of the educational program and 
planning of physical facilities to accommodate that program. (Van Zwoll.) 

Ed. 223. Practicum in Personnel Relationships. (2-6) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Enrollment limited. Designed to help teachers, 
school administrators, and other school staff members to learn to function more effec- 
tively in developing educational policy in group situations. Each student in the course 
is required to be working concurrently in the field with a group of school staff mem- 
bers or citizens on actual school problems. (Newell.) 

Ed. 224. Apprenticeship in Education. (,6-9^) 

a. Curriculum and Instruction e. Industrial Arts Education 

b. Educational Administration f. Supervision 

c. Guidance and Personnel g. Vocational Industrial Education 

d. Higher Education 

Apprenticeships in the major area of study are available to selected students whose ap- 
plication for an apprenticeship has been approved by the Education faculty. Each ap- 
prentice is assigned to work for at least a semester full-time or the equivalent with an 
appropriate staff member of a cooperating school, school system, or educational institu- 
tion or agency. The sponsor of the apprentice maintains a close working relationship 
with the apprentice and the other persons involved. Prerequisites, teaching experience, 
a master's degree in education, and at least six semester hours in education at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. (Staff.) 

Note: The total number of credits which a student may earn in Ed. 187, Ed. 224, 
and Ed. 287 is limited to a maximum of twenty (20) semester hours. 

Ed. 225. School Public Relations. (3) 

A study of the interrelationships between the community and the school. Public opin- 
ion, propaganda, and the ways in which various specified agents and agencies within 
the school have a part in the school public relations program are explored. (Van Zwoll.) 

Ed. 226. Child Accounting. (2) 

An inquiry into the record keeping activities of the school system, including an ex- 
amination of the marking system. (Van Zwoll.) 

Ed. 227. Public School Personnel Administration. (3) 

A comparison of practices with principles governing the satisfaction of school person- 
nel needs, including a study of tenure, salary schedules, supervision, rewards, and 
other benefits. (Van Zwoll.) 

Ed. 228. Seminar in Student Personnel. (2) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Same as Psych. 228.) A systematic analysis of re- 

85 ► 



Education 

search and theoretical literature on a variety of major problems in the organization and 
administration of student personnel services in higher education. Included will be 
discussion of such topics as the student personnel philosophy in education, counseling 
services, discipline, housing, student activities, financial aid, health, remedial services, 
etc. (Byrne, Marx.) 

Ed. 229. Seminar in Elementary Education. (2) 

Primarily for individuals who wish to write seminar papers. Enrollment should be 

preceded by at least 12 hours of graduate work in education. (Staff.) 

Ed. 234. The School Curriculum. (2-3) 

A foundations course embracing the curriculum as a whole from early childhood through 
adolescence, including a review of historical developments, an analysis of conditions 
affecting curriculum change, an examination of issues in curriculum making, and a 
consideration of current trends in curriculum design. (Hovet.) 

Ed. 235. Principles of Curriculum Development. (3) 

Curriculum planning, improvement, and evaluation in the schools; principles for the 
selection and organization of the content and learning experiences; ways of working in 
classroom and school on curriculum improvement. (Hovet, Anderson.) 

Ed. 237. Curriculum Theory and Research. (2) 

The school curriculum considered within the totality of factors affecting pupil behavior 
patterns, an analysis of research contributing to the development of curriculum theory, 
a study of curriculum theory as basic to improved curriculum design, the function of 
theory in guiding research, and the construction of theory through the utilization of 
concepts from the behavior research disciplines. (Hovet.) 

Ed. 239. Seminar in Secondary Education. (2) 

(Staff.) 
Ed. 242. Coordination in Work-Experience Programs. (2) 

Surveys and evaluates the qualifications and duties of a teacher-coordinator in a work- 
experience program. Deals particularly with evolving patterns in city and county schools 
in Maryland, and is designed to help teacher-coordinators, guidance counselors, and 
others in the supervisory and administrative personnel concerned with functioning re- 
lationships of part-time cooperative education in a comprehensive educational program. 

Ed. 243. Problems of Teaching Arithmetic in Elementary Schools. (2) 
Implications of theory and results of research for the teaching of arithmetic in the ele- 
mentary schools. (Schindler.) 

Ed. 244. Problems of Teaching Language Arts in Elementary Schools. (2) 
Implications of current theory and results of research for the language arts in the ele- 
mentary schools. (Staff.) 

Ed. 245. Introduction to Research. (2) 

Intensive reading, analysis, and interpretation of research; applications to teaching 

fields; the writing of abstracts, research reports, and seminar papers. (Hovet.) 

Ed. 246. Problems of Teaching Social Studies in Elementary Schools. (2) 
Application to the social studies program of selected theory and research in the social 

^ 86 



Education 

sciences, emphasizing patterns of behavior, environmental influences, and critical think- 
ing. (O'Neill.) 

Ed. 247. Seminar in Science Education. (2) 

An opportunity to pursue special problems in curriculum making, course of study de- 
velopment, or other science teaching problems. Class members may work on problems 
related directly to their own school situations. (Blough, Ulry.) 

Ed. 248. Seminar in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education. (2) 

(See Ind. Ed. 248) (Maley.) 

Ed. 250. Analysis of the Individual. (3) 

Knowing students through use of numerous techniques. Ed. 161 desirable as prerequi- 
site. (Byrne.) 

Ed. 251. Intermediate Statistics in Education. (3) 

Prerequisite, Ed. 151 or equivalent. A study of the basic statistical techniques used 
for graduate research in education, including tests of significance and sampling tech- 
niques. Necessary arithmetic skills are developed as part of the course. (Johnson.) 

Ed. 253. Guidance Information. (2) 

Ed. 161 desirable as prerequisite. Finding, filing, and using information needed by 
students for making choices, plans, and adaptations in school, occupations, and in inter- 
personal relations. (Byrne.) 

Ed. 254. Organization and Administration of Guidance Programs. (2) 

All guidance courses except Seminar are prerequisites. Instilling the guidance point of 

view and implementing guidance practices. (Byrne, Marx.) 

Ed. 260. School Counseling: Theoretical Foundations and Practice. (3) 
Prerequisites, Ed. 161, 250, 253. Prerequisites may be waived by instructor. Explora- 
tion of learning theories as applied to counseling in schools, and practices which stem 
from such theories. (Byrne.) 

Ed. 261. Practicum in School Counseling. (2) 

Prerequisite, Ed. 260. Limited to 15 applicants in advance, who will have one or more 
pupils available for counseling. (Byrne.) 

Ed. 263, 264. Aptitudes and Aptitude Testing. (2, 2) 
(Offered in Baltimore.) 

Ed. 267. Curriculum Construction Through Community Analysis. (2) 
Prerequisites, Ed. 163, 164, 165. Selected research problems in the field of community 
study with emphasis on Baltimore area. (Staff.) 

Ed. 268. Seminar in Educational Sociology. (2) 

(Staff.) 
Ed. 269. Seminar in Guidance. (2) 

Registration only by approval of instructor. Final guidance course. Students study re- 
search and conduct one. (Byrne.) 

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Education 

Ed. 278. Seminar in Special Education. (2) 
An overview of education of exceptional children. 

Ed. 279. Seminar in Adidt Educatioti. (2) 

(Wiggin.) 
Ed. 2S0. Research Methods arid Materials. (2) 

Research methodology for case studies, surveys, and experiments; measurement and 
statistical techniques; design, form, and style for theses and research reports. Primarily 
for advanced students and doctoral candidates. (Johnson.) 

Ed. 281. Source Materials in Education. (2) 

Bibliography development through a study of source materials in education, special 

fields in education, and for seminar papers and theses. (Wiggin.) 

Ed. 287. Internship in Edtication. (12-16) 

a. Curriculum and Instruction d. Industrial Arts Education 

b. Educational Administration e. Supervision 

c. Guidance and Personnel f. Vocational-Industrial Education 

Internships in the major area of study are available to selected students who have 
teaching experience. The following groups of students are eligible: (a) any student 
who has been advanced to candidacy for the doctor's degree; and (b) any student who 
receives special approval bv the education facultv for an internship, provided that prior 
to taking an internship, such student shall have completed at least sixty semester hours 
of graduate work, including at least six semester hours in education at the University 
of Maryland. Each intern is assigned to work on a full-time basis for at least a semes- 
ter with an appropriate staff member in a cooperating school, school system, or educa- 
tional institution or agency. The internship must be taken in a school situation differ- 
ent from the one where the student is regularly employed. The intern's sponsor main- 
tains a close working relationship with the intern and the other persons involved. 
Note: The total number of credits which a student mav earn in Ed. 187, Ed. 224, 
and Ed. 287 is limited to a maximum of twenty (20) semester hours. 

Ed. 288. Special Problems in Education. (,1-6') 

First and second semesters and summer session. Master of Education or doctoral candi- 
dates who desire to pursue special research problems under the direction of their ad- 
visers may register for credit under this number. (Staff.) 

Note: Course card must have the title of the problem and the name of the faculty 
member under whom the work will be done. 

Ed. 290. Doctoral Seminar. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, passing the preliminary examinations for a doctor's degree in education, 
or recommendation of a doctoral adviser. Analysis of doctoral projects and theses, and 
of other on-going research projects. A doctoral candidate mav participate in the Semi- 
nar during as many University sessions as he desires, but may earn no more than three 
semester hours of credit in the Seminar. An Ed.D. candidate may earn in total no 
more than nine semester hours, and a Ph.D. candidate, no more than eighteen semester 
hours, in the Seminar and in Ed. 399. (Staff.) 

Ed. 399. Research-Thesis. (1-6) 

First and second semesters and summer session. Students who desire credit for a mas- 



Education 

ter's thesis, a doctoral dissertation, or a doctoral project should use this number. 

(Staff.) 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

B. Ed. 101. Problems in Teaching Office Skills. (2) 

Problems in development of occupational competency, achievement tests, standards of 
achievement, instructional materials, transcription, and the integration of office skills. 

(Patrick.) 

B. Ed. 102. Methods and Materials in Teaching Bookkeeping and Related 

Subjects. (2) 
Important problems and procedures in the mastery of bookkeeping and related office 
knowledges and skills including a consideration of materials and teaching procedures. 

(Patrick.) 

B. Ed. 104. Basic Business Education in the Secondary Schools. (2) 

Includes consideration of course objectives; subject matter selection; and methods of 
organizing and presenting business principles, knowledges, and practices. (Patrick.) 

For Graduates 

B. Ed. 200. Administration and Supervision of Business Education. (2) 
Major emphasis on departmental organization, curriculum, equipment, budget making, 
guidance, placement and follow-up, visual aids and the in-service training of teachers. 
For administrators, supervisors, and teachers of business subjects. (Staff.) 

B. Ed. 255. Principles and Problems of Business Education. (2) 
Principles and practices in business education; growth and present status; vocational 
business education; general business education; relation to consumer education and to 
education in general. (Patrick.) 

B. Ed. 256. Curricidum Development in Business Education. (2-6) 

This course is especially designed for graduate students interested in devoting the sum- 
mer session to a concentrated study of curriculum planning in business education. Em- 
phasis will be placed on the philosophy and objectives of the business education pro- 
gram, and on curriculum research and organization of appropriate course content. 

(Staff.) 

CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

C. Ed. 110. Child Development 111. (3) 

First and second semesters. Developmental growth of the child from the prenatal 
period through the early childhood years, with implications for home and school 
practice. For students in other colleges of the University. 

89 ► 



Education 

C.Ed. 115. Children's Activities and Activities Materials. (3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisites, C. Ed. 100, 101, or 110. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00. Storytelling; selection of books for pre-school children; the use, preparation, 
and presentation of such raw materials as clay, paint (easel and finger), blocks, wood, 
and scrap materials for nursery school and kindergarten. (Staff.) 

C. Ed. 116. Creative Music for Young Children. (2-3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Music 16 or equivalent. Creative experiences 
in songs and rhythms; correlation of music and everyday teaching with the abilities and 
development of each level; study of songs and materials; observation and teaching ex- 
perience with each age level (Brown.) 

C. Ed. 119. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation— Cooperative Nursery 

School. (2-3) 

(Staff.) 

C. Ed. 140. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation— Early Childhood Edu- 
cation (Nursery School and Kindergarten^). (3) 
Prerequisites, C. Ed. 100, 101, or 110. Philosophy of early childhood education; ob- 
servation of the developmental needs at various age levels, with emphasis upon the 
activities, materials, and methods by which educational objectives are attained. 

(Stant, Glass,) 
C. Ed. 145. Guidance in Behavior Problems. (3) 

First and second semesters. Development of an appreciation and understanding of 
young children from different home and community backgrounds; study of individual 
and gtoup problems. (Glass.) 

C. Ed. 160. Methods and Materials in Parent Education. (2-3) 
A survey of child development, child guidance, and related fields; a review of current 
materials, books, periodicals, leaflets, films, skits; study of individual parent conferences, 
guided observation, discussion leading, role playing, preparing materials and programs 
for parent groups and television skits with laboratory practice through the group itself. 

(Staff.) 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

H. E. Ed. 102. Problems in Teaching Home Economics. (3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisite, H. E. Ed. 140. A study of the managerial 
aspects of teaching and administering a home-making program; the physical environ- 
ment, organization, and sequence of instructional units, resource materials, evaluation, 
home projects. (Spencer.) 

H. E. Ed. 120. Evaluation of Home Economics. (3) 

The meaning and function of evaluation in education; the development of a plan for 
evaluating a homemaking program with emphasis upon types of evaluation devices, 
their construction, and use. (Spencer.) 

H. E. Ed. 140. Curriculum, Instruction, and Observation. (3) 

The place and function of home economics education in the secondary school curricu- 

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lum. Philosophy of education for home and family living; characteristics of adolescence, 
construction of source units, lesson plans, and evaluation devices; directed observation in 
junior and senior high school home economics departments. (Spencer.) 

For Graduates 

H. E. Ed. 200. Seminar in Home Economics Education. (2) 

(Spencer.) 

H. E. Ed. 202. Trends in the Teaching and Supervision of Home Economics. 
C2-4) 

Study of home economics programs and practices in light of current educational trends. 
Interpretation and analysis of democratic teaching procedures, outcomes of instruction, 
and supervisory practices. (Spencer.) 

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT EDUCATION 

For Graduates and Advanced U nder graduates 

H. D. Ed. 100, 101. Principles of Human Development I and 11. (3, 3) 
These courses give a general overview of the scientific principles that describe human 
development and behavior and relate these principles to the task of the school. A year- 
long study of an individual child is an integral part of the course and will require one 
half-day per week for observing children in nearby schools. This course is designed to 
meet the usual certification requirements in educational psychology. H. D. Ed. 100 
is prerequisite to H. D. Ed. 101. (Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 102, 103, 104. Child Development Laboratory I, 11 and 111. (2, 2, 2) 
These courses involve the direct study of children throughout the school year. Each 
participant gathers a wide body of information about an individual, presents the 
accumulating data from time to time to the study group for criticism and group analy- 
sis and writes an interpretation of the dynamics underlying the child's learning, behavior 
and development. Provides opportunity for teachers in-service to earn credit for partici- 
pation in their own local child study group. (Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 112, 114, 116. Scientific Concepts in Human Development I, 11, 

III. (3, 3, 3) 
Summer session. (Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 113, 115, 117. Laboratory in Behavior Analysis I, II, 111. (3, 3, 3) 

Summer session. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

H. D. Ed. 200. Introduction to Human Development and Child Study. (3) 

Offers a general overview of the scientific principles which describe human develop- 
ment and behavior and makes use of these principles in the study of individual chil- 
dren. Each student will observe and record the behavior of an individual child through- 

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out the semester and must have one half-day a week for this purpose. It is basic to 
further work in child study and serves as a prerequisite for advanced courses where 
the student has not had field work or at least six weeks of workshop experience in child 
study. When offered during the summer intensive laboratory work with case records 
may be substituted for the study of an individual child. (Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 201. Biological Bases of Behavior. (3) 

H. D. Ed. 250 a or b or c must be taken concurrently with this course. H. D. Ed. 
200 or its equivalent must be taken before H. D. 201 or concurrently. Emphasizes 
that understanding human life, growth and behavior depends on understanding the 
ways in which the body is able to capture, control and expend energy. Application 
throughout is made to human body processes and implications for understanding and 
working with people. (Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 202. Social Bases of Behavior. (3) 

H. D. Ed. 250 a or b or c must be taken concurrently with this course. H. D. Ed. 
200 or its equivalent must be taken before H. D. Ed. 202 or concurrently. Analyzes the 
socially inherited and transmitted patterns of pressures, expectations and limitations 
learned by an individual as he grows up. These are considered in relation to the pat- 
terns of feeling and behaving which emerge as the result of growing up in one's 
social group. (Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 203. Integrative Bases of Behavior. (3) 

H. D. Ed. 250 a or b or c must be taken concurrently with this course. H. D. Ed. 
200, or its equivalent, H. D. Ed. 201 and H. D. Ed. 202 are prerequisite. Analyzes 
the organized and integrated patterns of feeling, thinking and behaving which emerge 
from the interaction of basic biological drives and potentials with one's unique 
experience growing up in a social group. (Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 204, 205. Physical Processes in Human Development. (3, 3) 
H. D. Ed. 250 a or b or c must be taken concurrently with this course. Describes in 
some detail the major organic processes of: conception, biological inheritance; differenti- 
ation and growth of the body; capture, transportation and use of energy; perception of 
the environment; coordination and integration of function; adaptation to unusual 
demands and to frustration; normal invidual variation in each of the above processes. 

(Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 206, 207. Socialization Processes in Human Development I, 11. (3, 

3) 
H. D. Ed. 250 a or b or c must be taken concurrently with this course. Analyzes the 
processes by which human beings internalize the culture of the society in which they 
live. The major sub-cultures in the United States, their training procedures, and their 
characteristic human expressions in folk-knowledge, habits, attitudes, values, life-goals, 
and adjustment patterns are analyzed. Other cultures are examined to highlight the 
American way of life and to reveal its strengths and weaknesses. (Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 208, 209. Self Processes in Human Development 1 and 11. (3, 3) 
H. D. Ed. 250 a or b or c must be taken concurrently with this course. Analyzes the 
effects of the various physical and growth processes, affectional relationships, socializa- 
tion processes, and peer group roles and status on the integration, development, adjust- 
ment, and realization of the individual self. This analysis includes consideration of the 

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nature of intelligence and of the learning process; the development of skills, concepts, 
generalizations, symbolizations, reasoning and imagination, attitudes, values, goals and 
purposes; and the conditions, relationships and experiences that are essential to full 
human development. The more common adjustment problems experienced in our society 
at various maturity levels, and the adjustment mechanisms used to meet them are studied. 

(Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 210. Affectional Relationships and Processes in Human Develop- 
ment. (3) 
H. D. Ed. 250 a or b or c must be taken concurrently with this course. H. D. Ed. 200 
or its equivalent must be taken before or concurrently. Describes the normal develop 
ment, expression and influence of love in infancy, childhood, adolescence and adult- 
hood. It deals with the influence of parent-child relationship involving normal ac- 
ceptance, neglect, rejection, inconsistency, and over-protection upon health, learning, 
emotional behavior and personality adjustment and development. (Staff.) 

H. D. E^. 211. Peer-culture and Group Processes in Human Development. (3) 
H. D. Ed. 250 a or b or c must be taken concurrently with this course. H. D. Ed. 
200 or its equivalent must be taken before or concurrently. Analyzes the processes 
of group formation, role-taking and status-winning. It describes the emergence of the 
"peer-culture" during childhood and the evolution of the child society at different 
maturity levels to adulthood. It analyzes the developmental tasks and adjustment 
problems associated with winning belonging and playing roles in the peer group. 

(Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 212, 214, 216. Advanced Scientific Concepts in Human Develop- 
ment I, 11, 111. (3, 3, 3) 

Summer session. (Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 213, 215, 217. Advanced Laboratory in Behavior Analysis I, 11, 111. 

(3, 3, 3) 
Summer session. (Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 218. Workshop in Human Development. (6) 

Summer session. Prerequisites, H. D. Ed. 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217. (Staff.; 

H. D. Ed. 219. Psycho-Social Development of Exceptional Children. (3) 
Summer session. Studies intensively the psychology of exceptional children with 
stress upon the interrelationship among the psychological, physical, and social develop- 
ment of these children. (Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 220. Developmental Tasks. (3) 

H. D. Ed. 200 or its equivalent, H. D. Ed. 201, and H. D. Ed. 202 are prerequisite. 
Describes the series of developmental tasks faced by children. These tasks, made neces- 
sary by the normal processes of growth and development, are learnings that the child 
needs and desires to accomplish because of emerging capacities for action and relation- 
ship, because of the demands and expectancies of his family and of society, and because 
of the progessive clarification and the directive powers of his own interest, attitudes, 
values and aspirations. Emphasis will be placed on the use of developmental tasks con- 
cepts in educational planning and practice. (Staff.) 

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Education 

H. D. Ed. 230, 231. Field Program in Child Study 1 and 11. (2-6) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Offers apprenticeship training preparing properly 
qualified persons to become staff members in human development workshops, consult- 
ants to child study held programs and coordination of municipal or regional child 
study programs for teachers or parents. Extensive held experience is provided. In 
general this training is open only to persons who have passed their preliminary 
examinations for the doctorate with a major in human development or psychology. 

(Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 250a, 250b, 250c. Direct Study of Children. (I, I, 2) 
May not be taken concurrently with H. D. Ed. 102, 103, or 104. Provides the op- 
portunity to observe and record the behavior of an individual child in a nearby school. 
These records will be used in conjunction with the advanced courses in human develop- 
ment and this course will be taken concurrently with such courses. Teachers active 
in their jobs while taking advanced courses in human development may use records 
from their own classrooms for this course. (Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 260. Synthesis of Human Development Concepts. (3) 
Prerequisites, H. D. Ed. 204, 206 and 208. A seminar wherein advanced students 
work toward a personal synthesis of their own concepts in human growth and develop- 
ment. Emphasis is placed on seeing the dynamic interrelations between all processes 
in the behavior and development of an individual. (Staff.) 

H. D. Ed. 270. Seminars in Special Topics in Human Development. (2-6) 
Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. An opportunity for advanced students to focus 
in depth on topics of special interest growing out of their basic courses in human 
development. (Staff.) 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

hid. Ed. 105. General Shop. (2) 

Laboratory fee, $5.00. Designed to meet needs in organizing and administering a 
secondary school general shop. Students are rotated through skill and knowledge 
developing activities in a variety of shop areas. (Crosby.) 

Ind. Ed. 140. (Ed. 1400 Curricidum, Instruction, and Observation. (3) 
Major functions and specific contributions of industrial art education; its relation to 
the general objectives of the junior and senior high schools; selection and organization 
of subject matter in terms of modern practices and needs; methods of instruction; ex- 
pected outcomes; measuring results; professional standards. Twenty periods of observa- 
tion. (Maley.) 

hid. Ed. 143. Industrial Safety Education I. (2) 

This course deals briefly with the history and developing of effective safety programs 
in modern industry and treats causes, effects, and values of industrial safety education 
inclusive of hre prevention and hazard controls. (Staff.) 

Ind. Ed. 144. Industrial Safety Education 11. (2) 

In this course exemplary safety practices are studied through conference discussions, 

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Education 

group demonstrations, and organized plant visits to selected industrial situations. Meth- 
ods of fire precautions and safety practices arc emphasized. Evaluative criteria in safety 
programs are formulated. (Staff.) 

Ind. Ed. 150. Training Aids Development. (3) 

Study of the aids in common use as to their source and application. Special emphasis 
is placed on principles to be observed in making aids useful to shop teachers. Actual 
construction and application of such devices will be required. (Maley.) 

Ind. Ed. 157. Tests and Measurements. (2) 

Prerequisite, Ed. 150 or consent of instructor. The construction of objective tests for 

occupational and vocational subjects. (Staff.) 

Ind. Ed. 161. Principles of Vocational Guidance. (2) 

This course identifies and applies the underlying principles of guidance to the problems 

of educational and vocational adjustment of students. (Staff.) 

Ind. Ed. 164. Shop Organization and Management. (2) 

This course covers the basic elements of organizing and managing an industrial educa- 
tion program including the selection of equipment and the arrangement of the shop. 

(Crosby.) 
Ind. Ed. 165. Modern Industry. (3) 

This course provides an overview of manufacturing industry in the American social, 
economic, and culture pattern. Representative basic industries are studied from the 
viewpoints of personnel and management organization, industrial relations, production 
procedures, distribution of products, and the like. (Harrison.) 

Ind. Ed. 166. Educational Foundations of Industrial Arts. (2) 
A study of the factors which place industrial arts education in any well-rounded pro- 
gram of general education. (Jacobsen.) 

Ind. Ed. 167. Problems in Occtipational Education. (2) 

The purpose of this course is to secure, assemble, organize, and interpret data relative 

to the scope, character and effectiveness of occupational education. (Staff.) 

Ind. Ed. 168. Trade or Occupational Analysis. (2) 

This course should precede Ind. Ed. 169. Provides a working knowledge of occupational 
and job analysis which is basic in organizing vocational-industrial courses of study. 

(Jacobsen.) 
Ind. Ed. 169. Course Construction. (2) 

Surveys and applies techniques of building and reorganizing courses of study for effec- 
tive use in vocational and occupational schools. (Crosby.) 

Ind. Ed. 170. Principles of Vocational Education. (2) 

The course develops the vocational education movement as an integral phase of the 

American program of public education. (Staff/ 

Ind. Ed. 171. History of Vocational Education. (2) 

An overview of the development of vocational education from primitive times to the 

present. (Staff.) 

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Education 

Ind. Ed. US. Recent Technological Developments in Products and Processes. 

(3) 
This course is designed to give the student an understanding of recent technological 
developments as they pertain to the products and processes of industry. The nature 
of the newer products and processes is studied as well as their effect upon modern 
industry and/or society. (Merrill.) 

For Graduates 

Ind. Ed. 207. Philosophy of Industrial Arts Education. (3) 

This course is intended to assist the student in his development of a point of view in 
regard to industrial arts and its relationship with the total educational program. He 
should, thereby, have a "yardstick" for appraising current procedures and proposals 
and an articulateness for his own professional area. (Harrison.) 

Ind. Ed. 214. School Shop Planning and Equipment Selection. (3) 
This course deals with principles involved in planning a school shop and provides op- 
portunities for applying these principles. Facilities required in the operation of a satis- 
factory shop program are catalogued and appraised. (Tierney.) 

Ind. Ed. 216. Supervision of Industrial Arts. (2) 

(Tierney.) 

Ind. Ed. 220. Organization, Administration, and Supervision of Vocational Edu- 
cation. (2) 
This course surveys objectively the organization, administration, supervision, curricu- 
lar spread and viewpoint, and the present status of vocational education. (Staff.) 

Ind. Ed. 240. Research in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education. (2) 
This is a course offered by arrangement for persons who are conducting research in the 
areas of industrial arts and vocational education. (Staff.) 

hid. Ed. 241. Content and Method of Industrial Arts. (3) 

Various methods and procedures used in curriculum development are examined and 
those suited to the field of industrial arts education are applied. Methods of and de- 
vices for industrial arts instruction are studied and practiced. (Maley.) 

Ind. Ed. 248. Seminar in Industrial Arts and Vocational Education. (2) 

(Staff.) 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Mus. Ed. 128. Music for Elementary Classroom Teacher. (2-3) 
Prerequisite, Music 16 or consent of instructor. A study of the group activities and ma- 
terials through which the child experiences music. The course is designed to aid both 
music specialists and classroom teachers. It includes an outline of objectives and a sur- 
vey of instructional methods. (Grentzer, Henke.) 

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Education 

Mus. Ed. 129. Methods of Class Instrumental Instruction. (2) 
Prerequisites, or concurrent registration in Music 80, 81. Organization of and techniques 
for teaching beginning instrumental classes in the public schools. Two one-hour 
laboratories and one lecture per week. (Berman.) 

Mus. Ed. 132. Music in the Secondary School. (2) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A study of the vocal and instrumental programs in 
the secondary schools. A survey of the needs in general music and the relationship of 
music to the core curriculum. (Henke.) 

Mus. Ed. 139. Music for the Elementary School Specialist. (2) 
First semester. Prerequisite, senior standing. A survey of instructional materials; ob- 
jectives; organization of subject matter; lesson planning; methods and procedures in 
singing, listening, rhythms, simple instruments, and creative activities for the music 
specialist in the elementary school. Twenty periods of observation will be required for 
three credits. (Henke.) 

Mus. Ed. 163. Band Techniques and Administration. (2) 
Prerequisites, Music 81 and 161. Two lectures and two laboratory hours per week. 
Intensive study of a secondary wind instrument and of rehearsal techniques. A sur- 
vey of instructional materials, administrative procedures, and band pageantry will be 
included. (Henderson.) 

Mus. Ed. 170. Methods and Materials for Class Piano Instruction. (2) 
The study of the principles and techniques of teaching class piano. The following 
groups, beginning and advanced, will be used for demonstrations: elementary school chil- 
dren, junior and senior high school students, adults. Special emphasis will be placed on 
the analysis of materials. (De Vermond.) 

Mus. Ed. 171. String Teaching in the Public Schools. (2) 
A study of the problems of organizing and developing the string program in the public 
schools. Emphasis is placed on exploratory work in string instruments, on the study of 
teaching techniques, and on the analysis of music literature for solo, small ensembles, 
and orchestra. (Berman.) 

Mus. Ed. 173. The Vocal Music Teacher and School Organization. (2) 
Prerequisite, practice teaching or teaching experience. Study of the function of the 
vocal music teacher in the elementary and secondary schools. Students will serve 
as resource teachers for those enrolled in Mus. Ed. 139. Open to graduate students 
by permission of instructor. (Grentzer.) 

Mus. Ed. 175. Methods and Materials in Vocal Music for the High School. (2) 
Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A survey of suitable vocal and choral repertoire for 
the high school. Problems of diction, interpretation, tone production, and phrasing. 
The course is designed primarily for choral directors and teachers of voice classes. 

(Grentzer.) 
Mus. Ed. 180. Instrumental Seminar. (2) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Problems in the music directing of public-school 
instrumental organizations. A study of representative orchestral, band, and small-en- 
semble scores, and of the teaching problems involved. (Jordan.) 

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For Graduates 



Mus. Ed. 200. Research Methods in Music and Music Education. (3) 
The application of methods of research to problems in the fields of music and music 
education. The preparation of bibliographies and the written exposition of research 
projects in the area of the student's major interest. (Grentzer.) 

Mus. Ed. 201. Administration and Supennsion of Music in the Public Schools. 
(3) 

The study of basic principles and practices of supervision and administration with em- 
phasis on curriculum construction, scheduling, budgets, directing of in-service teaching, 
personnel problems, and school-community relationships. (Grentzer.) 

Mus. Ed. 204. Current Trends in Music Education (Seminar). (2) 
A survey of current philosophies and objectives of music in the schools. The scope and 
sequence of the music curricula, vocal and instrumental, on the elementary and sec- 
ondary levels. (Grentzer.) 

Mus. Ed. 205. Seminar in Vocal Music in the Elementary Schools. (2) 
A comparative analysis of current methods and materials used in the elementary schools. 
A study cf the music curriculum as a part of the total school program, and of the roles 
of the classroom teacher and the music specialist. (Grentzer.) 

Mus. Ed. 206. Choral Conducting and Repertoire. (2) 

The study and reading of choral literature of all periods, including the contemporary, 
suitable for use in school and community choruses. Style, interpretation, tone quality, 
diction, rehearsal and conducting techniques are analyzed. (Staff.) 

Mus. Ed. 207. Seminar in Vocal Music in the Secondary Schools. (2) 
A comparative analysis of current methods and materials used in teaching junior and 
senior high-school classes in general music, history and appreciation, theory, and voice; 
and in directing choral groups and community singing. (Grentzer.) 

A'lus. Ed. 208. The Teaching of Music Appreciation. (2) 

A study of the objectives for the elementary and secondary levels; the techniques of 
directed listening, the presentation of theoretical and biographical materials, course 
planning, selection and use of audio-visual aids, and library materials, and the corre- 
lation between music and other arts. (Ulrich.) 

Mus. Ed. 209. Seminar in Instrumental Music. (2) 

A consideration of acoustical properties and basic techniques of the instruments. Prob- 
lems of ensemble and balance, intonation, precision, and interpretation are studied. 
Materials and musical literature for orchestras, bands, and small ensembles are 
evaluated. (Staff.) 

Mus. Ed. 210. Advanced Orchestration and Band Arranging. (Seminar) (2) 
Prerequisite, Music 147 or the equivalent, or consent of the instructor. A study of 
arranging and transcription procedures in scoring for the orchestra and band. Special 
attention is given to the arranging problems of the instrumental director in the public 
schools. (Henderson.) 

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Education, Electrical Engineering 
SCIENCE EDUCATION 

Sci. Ed. IOS. Workshop in Science for Elementary Schools. (2-3) 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. Designed to help teachers acquire general science understandings 
and to develop teaching materials for practical use in classrooms. Includes experiments, 
demonstrations, constructions, observations, field trips, and use of audio-visual materials. 
The emphasis is on content and method related to science units in common use in 
elementary schools. (Blough.) 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Sp. Ed. 170. Introduction to Special Education. (3) 

Designed to give an understanding of the needs of all types of exceptional children, 

stressing preventive and remedial measures. (Haring.) 

Sp. Ed. 171. Characteristics of Exceptional Children. Q3-6~) 
A. Mentally Retarded. B. Gifted. Studies the diagnosis, etiology, physical, social, and 
emotional characteristics of exceptional children. Describes how the educational pro- 
gram should be modified to utilize the full capacity of these children. (Haring.) 

Sp. Ed. 172. Education of Exceptional Children. (3-6) 

A. Mentally Retarded. B. Gifted. Prerequisite, Sp. Ed. 171 or equivalent. Offers 
practical and specific methods of teaching exceptional children. Selected observation 
of actual teaching may be arranged. (Haring.) 

Sp. Ed. 173. Curriculum for Exceptional Children. (3-6) 

A. Mentally Retarded. B. Gifted. Prerequisite, Sp. Ed. 171 or equivalent. Examines 
the principles and objectives guiding curriculum for exceptional children; gives 
experience in developing curriculum for these children; studies various curricula 
currently in use. (Haring.) 

Sp. Ed. 278. Seminar in Special Education. (2) 

An overview of education of exceptional children. (Haring.) 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Professors: Corcoran, reed, wagner and weber. 

Associate Professors: price and rutelli. 

Lecturers: chu, freeman, katzin, schuchard, Trent and vanderslice. 

A written qualifying examination is required of all candidates for the 
master's degree in electrical engineering. This examination is usually held the 
first Saturday in October. Off-campus and part-time students must have satis- 
factorily completed a minimum of nine semester hours of graduate course work 
before being admitted to the written qualifying examination. Full-time students 
having less than nine semester hours of graduate course work are permitted to 
take this examination by special arrangement. The student must have been 

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Electrical Engineering 

admitted to the Graduate School (electrical engineering) before taking this 
examination. 

Students working toward the Master of Science degree in electrical engineer- 
ing must take a minimum of six semester hours of course work from resident 
professors of electrical engineering. Students working toward the Doctor of 
Philosophy degree must take a minimum of twenty-four semester hours of 
course work from resident professors of electrical engineering; students presenting 
a minor in electrical engineering must include at least six semester hours of 
electrical engineering from resident professors. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

E. E. 100. Alternating-Current Circuits. (4) 

First semester. Three lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Math. 
20, 21, Phys. 20, 21, and E.E. 1. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Required of juniors in 
electrical engineering. Single and polyphase-circuit analysis under sinusoidal and 
non sinusoidal conditions of operation. Mesh-current and nodal methods of analysis. 
Harmonic analysis by the Fourier series method. Theory and design of tuned 
coupled circuits. (Price, Simons.) 

E. E. 101. Engineering Electronics. (4) 

Second semester. Three lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 
E. E. 100. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Required of juniors in electrical engineering. Theory 
and applications of electron tubes and associated circuits with emphasis on equivalent- 
circuit and graphical analysis of audio amplifiers; theory of feedback amplifiers. 

(Price, Simons.) 

E. E. 102. Alternating-Current Machinery. (4) 

First semester. Three lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, E. E. 
65 and E. E. 100. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Required of seniors in electrical engineering. 
The operating principles of alternating-current machinery considered from theoretical, 
design, and laboratory points of view. Synchronous generators and motors; single and 
polyphase transformers; three-phase induction generators and motors; single-phase induc- 
tion motors. (Hodgins, Reed.) 

E. E. J 03. Engineering Analysis. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, E. E. 100. Analysis of physical 
systems with emphasis on the selection and application of appropriate mathematical 
methods. (Corcoran, Reed.) 

E. E. 104. Communications. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, E. E. 60 and E. E. 100. Re- 
quired of juniors in electrical engineering. Long-line theory applied to audio-frequency 
and ultra-high-frequency systems. Elements of filter theory; impedance matching; Max- 
well's equations in rectangular and cylindrical coordinates; elements of wave-guide 
theory. (Reed). 

E. E. 105, 106. Radio Engineering. (4, 4) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures and one laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisites, E. E. 101, E. E. 105. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Required of seniors in elec- 

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Electrical Engineering 

trical engineering. Characteristics of radio-frequency circuits including the design of 
tuned couple circuits and Class C amplifiers. Amplification, oscillation, modulation, 
and detection with particular emphasis on radio-frequency amplification and broadcast- 
range reception. Elements of wave propagation and antenna systems. (Wagner, Price.) 

E. E. 107. Electrical Measurements. (4) 

Second semester. Three lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, 
E. E. 100 and Math. 64. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Measurement and calibration tech- 
niques employing ballistic galvanometers, potentiometers, bridges, electromagnetic and 
cathoderay oscillographs, watt-hour meters, and electronic instruments. (Thompson.) 

E. E. 108. Electric Transients. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, E. E. 101, Math. 64. Required 
of seniors in electrical engineering. Current, voltage, and power transients in lumped- 
parameter networks. Introduction and utilization of Laplace transforms. Emphasis 
on natural circuit behavior as obtained from step and impulse excitation. 

(Price, Simons.) 
E. E. 109. Pulse Techniques. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, E. E. 108, Math. 64. Re- 
quired of seniors in electrical engineering. Generation, shaping, amplification, and delay 
of non-sinusoidal wave-forms. Circuit design techniques and application to radar, tele- 
vision, and computers. (Simons, Schulman.) 

E. E. 110. Transistor Circuitry. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, E. E. 101. P-n junction theory; 
point-contact and junction type transistors; transistor parameters; equivalent circuits; 
typical transistor amplifier and oscillator circuits. (Corcoran, Reed.) 

E. E. 114. Applied Electronics. (3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, E. E. 101. Detectors 
and discriminators; gas tube characteristics and associated circuits; photoelectric tubes 
and associated circuits; rectifiers and regulators; vacuum tube instruments. (Staff.) 

E. E. 115. Feedback Control Systems. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, E. E. 101 and E. E. 108. 
Servomechanisms and automatic regulators; investigations of electric, hydraulic, pneu- 
matic, and mechanical elements; analysis of system differential equations and develop- 
ment of transfer functions; stability criteria. (Price.) 

E. E. 116. Feedback Control Systems Laboratory. (J) 

Second semester. One laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, E. E. 115 or concurrent 
registration in E. E. 115. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Laboratory exercises involving some 
of the basic concepts of feedback control systems. (Price.) 

E. E. 117. Power Transmission and Distribution. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, concurrent registration in E. E. 
102. Inductance and capacitance calculations of polyphase transmission lines on a per 
wire basis; effective resistance calculations and depth-of-penetration formula; generalized 
parameters of four-terminal networks and long-line theory applied to power distribution 
systems; use of transmission line charts. (Reed.) 

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Electrical Engineering 

E. E. 120. Electromagnetic Waves. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Math. 64, senior standing in 
electrical engineering or physics. The basic mathematical theory of electromagnetic 
wave propagation employing Maxwell's equations in scalar and vector form and in 
generalized coordinates; application to wave-guide transmission; propagation in space. 

(Reed.) 
E. E. 130. Electronic Analog Computers. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, E. E. 101, Math. 64. Princi- 
ples of electronic computers of the analog type. Analog computing components, opera- 
tional amplifiers, d-c amplifiers, instrument servos, multipliers, and function generators. 

(Chu.) 
E. E. 131. Electronic Digital Com-ptiters. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, E. E. 101, Math. 64. Prin- 
ciples of electronic computers of the digital type. Digital computing operations, basic 
computing and control circuits, logical design, arithmetic unit, memory systems, and 
control units. (Chu.) 

E. E. 160, 161. Vacuum Tubes. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Math. 64, senior 
standing in electrical engineering or physics. Electron emission; laws of electron 
motion; space charge effects; noise in vacuum tubes; magnetic lenses; klystrons; mag- 
netrons; photoelectric tubes; other special-purpose tubes. (Weber.) 

For Graduates 

E. E. 200. Symmetrical Components. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, E. E. 102. Application of the 
method of symmetrical components to synchronous generators, transmission lines, trans- 
formers, static loads possessing mutual coupling, and induction motor loads. Complete 
network solutions in terms of symmetrical components. (Reed.) 

E. E. 201. Electromagnetic Theory. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, E. E. 120 or E. E. 215. Theo- 
retical analysis and engineering applications of Laplace's, Poisson's and Maxwell's 
equations. (Weber.) 

E. E. 202, 203. Transients in Linear Systems. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, undergraduate major 
in electrical or mechanical engineering or physics. Operational circuit analysis; the 
Fourier integral; transient analysis of electrical and mechanical systems and vacuum 
tube circuits by the Laplace transform method. (Wagner.) 

E. E. 206, 207. Microwave Engineering. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week first semester and two lectures and 
one laboratory period a week second semester. Prerequisite, E. E. 201 or E. E. 216. 
Laboratory fee, E. E. 207, second semester, $4.00. Basic considerations in solving field 
problems by differential equations; circuit concepts and their validity at high frequency; 
propagation and reflection of electromagnetic waves; guided electromagnetic waves; 
high-frequency oscillators and tubes; radiation engineering. (Weber.) 

^ 102 



Electrical Engineering 

E. E. 209. Stability in Power Systems. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, E. E. 200. An extension of 

symmetrical components. E. E. 200, as applied to power systems; study of the sta- 
bility problem; the swing equation and its solution; the equal-area and Routh's criteria 
tor stability; solutions or' faulted three-phase networks; system design. (Reed.) 

E. E. 212, 213. Servomechanisms. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, undergraduate major 
in electrical or mechanical engineering or physics. (It is desirable that the student 
should have had E. E. 202.) The design and analysis of regulatory systems, empha- 
sizing servo-mechanisms. Regulatory systems are analyzed by means of the governing 
differential equations to provide background for more practical studies of frequency 
spectrum analysis. Characteristics of actual systems. (Price.) 

E. E. 215, 216. Radio Wave Pro-pagation. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, undergraduate major 
in electrical engineering, physics, or mathematics. Maxwell's wave equation; concept 
of retarded magnetic vector potential; propagation over plane earth; propagation over 
spherical earth; refraction; meteorological effects; complex antennas; air-to-air propaga- 
tion; lobe modulation. (Reed.) 

E. E. 218, 219. Signal Analysis and Noise. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, undergraduate major 
in electrical engineering or physics. Fourier series and integrals; phase and frequency 
modulation; noise figures of linear systems; shot effect; power spectra; applications of 
correlation function; properties of noise. (Freeman.) 

E. E. 220, 22 i. Theory of Communication. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, E. E. 219. Measure 
of information and channel capacity; methods of describing random signals and circuit 
analysis involving those signals. The statistical theory of communication systems. Sys- 
tems which are statistically optimum. (Weber.) 

E. E. 222. Graduate Seminar. (1-3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, approved application for candidacy to the degree of 
Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy in Electrical Engineering. Seminars are held 
on topics such as micro-wave engineering, radiation engineering, non-linear circuit 
analysis, tensor analysis, and other topics of current interest. Since the subject matter 
is continually changing, a student may receive a number of credits by re-registration. 

(Corcoran, Reed, Wagner, Weber.) 

E. E. 230. Mathematics of Circuit Analysis. 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, undergraduate major in electrical 
engineering or physics. The mathematics of circuit analysis, including determinants, 
matrices, complex variable, and the Fourier integral. (Vanderslice.) 

E. E. 231. Active Network Analysis. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, E. E. 230. The complex fre- 
quency plane; conventional feedback amplifier theory; Bode's mathematical definitions 
of feedback and sensitivity; theorems for feedback circuits; stability and physical realiz- 
ability of electrical networks; Nyquist's and Routh's criteria for stability. 

(Vanderslice.) 

103 ► 



Electrical Engineering 

E. E. 232, 233. Network Synthesis. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, E. E. 231 or equiva- 
lent. Design of driving-point and transfer impedance functions with emphasis on the 
transfer loss and phase of minimum-phase networks; flow diagrams; physical network 
characteristics, including relations existing between the real and imaginary components 
of network functions; modern methods of network synthesis. (Vanderslice.) 

E. E. 235. Applications of Tensor Analysis. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, E. E. 202 or E. E. 230. The 
mathematical background of tensor notation which is applicable to electrical engineer- 
ing problems. Applications of tensor analysis to electric circuit theory and to field 
theory. „ (Wagner.) 

E. E. 399. Electrical Engineering Research. 

Prerequisite, approved application for candidacy to the degree of Master of Science or 
Doctor of Philosophy in electrical engineering. Six semester hours of credit in E. E. 
399 are required of M.S. degree candidates and a minimum of eighteen semester hours 
is required of Ph.D. candidates. A thesis covering an approved research problem and 
written in conformity with the regulations of the Graduate School is a partial require- 
ment for either the degree of Master of Science or the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
in electrical engineering. (Staff.) 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Professors: murphy, aldridge, bode, harman, mcmanaway (p.t.) and 

ZEEVELD. 

Associate Professors: cooley and weber. 
Assistant Professors: beall, lutwack and mish. 

The Department of English offers graduate work leading to the degrees of 
Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. Candidates normally take both major 
and minor work within the Department of English, but with permission students 
may take minor work in other departments. 

Departmental requirements for the degree of Master of Arts include: 
(1) reading knowledge of French or German; (2) Eng. 201; (3) 3 credits from 
the following: Eng. 101, 102, 107, 202; (4) a written examination on English 
and American literature. 

Departmental requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy include: 
(1) a reading knowledge of French and German; (2) 6 credits from the follow- 
ing: Eng. 102, 202, 203; (3) an oral qualifying examination (normally waived 
for University of Maryland Masters of Arts in English), to be taken in the first 
year of residence after the master's degree or its equivalent; (4) a comprehensive 
written examination on English and American literature. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Eng. 101. History of the English Language. (3) 

Second semester. (Harman.) 

M 104 



English Language and Literature 



Eng. 102. Old English. (3) 

First semester. (Ball.) 

Eng. 103. Beowulf. (3) 

Second semester. (Ball.) 

Eng. 104. Chaucer. (3) 

First semester. (Harman.) 

Eng. 107. American English. (3) 

Second semester (Ball.) 

Eng. 110, 111. Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. (Zeeveld, Mish.) 

Eng. 112. The Poetry of the Renaissance. (3) 

(Not offered 1960-61.) (Zeeveld.) 

Eng. 113. Prose of the Renaissance. (3) 

(Not offered 1960-61.) (Zeeveld, Mish.) 

Eng. 115, 116. Shakespeare. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. (Zeeveld.) 

Eng. 120. English Drama from 1660 to 1800. (3) 

Second semester. (Ward.) 

Eng. 121. Milton. (3) 

Second semester. (Murphy.) 

Eng. 122. Literature of the Seventeenth Century, 1600-1660. (3) 

First semester. (Murphy, Mish.) 

Eng. 123. Literature of the Seventeenth Century, 1660-1700. (3) 
Second semester. 



Eng. 125, 126. Literature of the Eighteenth Century. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. 

Eng. 129, 130. Literature of the Romantic Period. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. 

Eng. 134, 135. Literature of the Victorian Period. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. 

Eng. 139, 140. The English Novel. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. 

Eng. 143. Modern Poetry. (3) 
First semester. 



(Aldridge.) 

(Aldridge.) 

(Weber.) 

(Cooley.) 

(Ward, Brown.) 

(Fleming.) 



105 ► 



English Language and Literature 



Eng. 144. Modern Drama. (3) 
First semester. 

Eng. 145. The Modern Novel. (3) 
Second semester. 

Eng. 148. The Literature of American Democracy. (3) 
Second semester. 



(Weber.) 

(Andrews.) 

(Barnes.) 



Eng. 150, 151. American Literature. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. 



(Manning, Gravely, Lutwack, Beall.) 



Eng. 155, 156. Major American Writers. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. 

Eng. 157. Introduction to Folklore. (3) 
First semester. 



(Gravely, Manning, Portz.) 
(Cooley.) 



Eng. 160. Advanced Expository Writing. (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. 

Eng. 170. Creative Writing. (2) 
First semester. 

Eng. 171. Advanced Creative Writing. (2) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. 

Eng. 172. Playivriting. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. 

For Graduates 

Eng. 201. Bibliography and Methods. (3) 
First semester. 

Eng. 202. Middle English. (3) 
Second semester. 

Eng. 203. Gothic. (3) 
First semester. 

Eng. 204. Seminar in Medieval Literature. (3) 
Second semester. 

Eng. 206, 207. Seminar in Renaissance Literature. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. 



(Walker.) 
(Fleming.) 
(Fleming.) 
(Fleming.) 

(Mish.) 

(Harman.) 

(Harman.) 

(Cooley.) 



Eng. 210. Seminar in Seventeenth Century Literature. (3) 
Second semester. 



(McManaway, Zeeveld.) 
(Mish.) 



^ 106 



English Language and Literature, Entomology 

Eng. 212, 213. Seminar in Eighteenth Century Literature. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. (Aldridge.) 

Eng. 214, 215. Seminar in Nineteenth Century Literature. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. (Cooley, Weber.) 

Eng. 216, 217. Literary Criticism. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. (Murphy, Lutwack.) 

Eng. 225, 226. Seminar in American Literature. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. (Bode.) 

Eng. 227, 228. Problems in American Literature. (3, 3) 

(Not offered 1960-61.) (Aldridge) 

Eng. 399. Thesis Research. Ql-6~) 

Arranged. (Staff.) 

ENTOMOLOGY 

Professors: bickley, ditman and langford. 
Associate Professor: jones. 
Assistant Professor: haviland. 
Lecturer: sailer. 

The Department of Entomology offers work toward the degree of Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Candidates for the Ph.D. degree who are not 
employed by the Department are expected to register for a minimum of 24 
semester hours credit during two semesters at College Park. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Ent. 100. Advanced Apiculture. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, Ent. 4. Laboratory fee, $3.00. The theory and practice of apiary manage- 
ment. Designed for the student who wishes to keep bees or requires a practical 
knowledge of bee management. (Abrams.) 

Ent. 105. Medical Entomology. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 
Ent. 1, or consent of the Department. Laboratory fee, $3.00. A study of insects and 
related arthropods that affect the health and comfort of man direcdy and as vectors 
of disease. In discussions of the control of such pests the emphasis will be upon 
community sanitation. (Jones.) 

Ent. 107. Insecticides. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, consent of the Department. The development and 

use of contact and stomach poisons, fumigants and other important chemicals, with 

107 ► 



Entomology 

reference to their chemistry, toxic action, compatibility, and host injury. Recent 
research emphasized. (Shepard.) 

Ent. 109. Insect Physiology. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures and occasional demonstrations. Prerequisite, consent 
of the Department. The functioning of the insect body with particular reference to 
blood, circulation, digestion, absorption, excretion, respiration, reflex action and the 
nervous system, and metabolism. (Jones.) 

Ent. 115. Quarantine Procedures. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, consent of the Department. Lectures on the principles 

and procedures involved in preventing the introduction of foreign pests and the 

limitation of spread of endemic or introduced pests. (Johnson.) 

Ent. 116. Insect Pests of Ornamentals and Greenhouse Plants. (3) 
Second semester. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. 1 and Zool. 1. Laboratory fee, $3.00. The recognition, biology, and 
control of insects injurious to plants grown in ornamental plantings, nurseries, and 
under glass. (Haviland.) 

Ent. 119. Insect Pests of Domestic Animals. (2) 

First semester. One lecture and one two-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 
Ent. 1 or consent of the Department. Laboratory fee, $3.00. The recognition, biology, 
and control of insects and related arthropods injurious to horses, cattle, hogs, sheep, 
goats, and poultry. (Haviland.) 

Ent. 120. Insect Taxonomy and Biology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, Ent. 1. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Introduction to the principles of systematic 
entomology and the study of all orders and the important families of insects; immature 
forms considered. (Bickley.) 

Ent. 198. Special Prohlems. (1-3) 

First and second semesters. Credit and prerequisites, to be determined by the 

Department. Investigations of assigned entomological problems. (Staff.) 

Ent. 199. Seminar. (I, J) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, senior standing. Presentation of original 

work, reviews and abstracts of literature. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

Ent. 203. Advanced Insect Morphology. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Laboratory 
fee, $3.00. Insect structure with special reference to function. Given in preparation 
for advanced work in physiology or research in morphology. (Haviland.) 

Ent. 205. Insect Ecology. (2) 

First semester. One lecture and one two-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 

consent of the Department. Laboratory fee, $3.00. A study of fundamental factors 

** 108 



Entomology, Foreign Languages and Literature 

involved in the relationship of insects to their environment. Emphasis is placed on 
the insect as a dynamic organism adjusted to its surroundings. (Sailer.) 

Ent. 206. Culicidology. (2) 

Second semester. One lecture and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Laboratory 
fee, $3.00. (Alternate years; not offered in 1960-61). The classification, distribu- 
tion, ecology, biology, and control of mosquitoes. (Bickley.) 

Ent. 207. Advanced Insect Physiology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Labora- 
tory fee, $3.00. Prerequisites, one year of organic chemistry and Ent. 109 or equivalent. 
In this course students rear experimental insects, make up reagents and solutions to be 
used, set up equipment, calibrate it, and make detailed measurements and observations 
on the functions of selected organ systems. (Jones.) 

Ent. 301. Advanced Entomology. Ql-6) 

Credit and prerequisites to be determined by the Department. First and second 
semesters. Studies of minor problems in morphology, physiology, taxonomy and 
applied entomology, with particular reference to the preparation of the student for 
individual research. (Staff.) 

Ent. 399. Research. 

First and second semesters. Required of graduate students majoring in entomology. 
This course involves research on an approved project. A dissertation suitable for 
publication must be submitted at the conclusion of the studies as a part of the 
requirements for an advanced degree. (Staff.) 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE 

Professors: zucker, falls, goodwyn, prahl and smith. 
Associate Professors: parsons, quynn, rand and rosenfield. 
Assistant Professors: bulatkin, hering and nemes. 

Master of Arts 

Candidates must pass, in addition to written examinations in the courses 
pursued, a written examination based on the reading lists in their respective 
fields of French, German and Spanish, established by the Department. The 
examination will test the general familiarity of the candidate with his respec- 
tive field and his powers of analysis and criticism. The oral examination will 
deal chiefly with the field of his thesis. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Candidates must pass a comprehensive written examination at least three 
months before the degree is awarded. This examination will include linguistics 
and each of the major literary fields. 

Attention is called to the courses in Comparative Literature listed on pages 
70-71. 

109 ► 



Foreign Languages and Literature 
FRENCH 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

French 0. Intensh'e Elementary French. (0) 

First and second semesters and summer session. Graduate students should register as 
auditors only. Intensive elementary course in the French language designed particularly 
for graduate students who wish to acquire a reading knowledge. (Hall.) 

French 100. French Literature of the Sixteenth Century. (3) 

First semester. The Renaissance in France; humanism; Pxabelais and Calvin; the 

Pleiade; Montaigne. (Falls.) 

French 101, 102. French Literature of the Seventeenth Century. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. First semester: Descartes, Pascal, Corneille, Racine. Second 
semester: the remaining great classical writers, with special attention to Moliere. 

(Quynn, Rosenfield.) 

French 103, 104. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. First semester: development of the philosophical and 

scientific movement; Montesquieu. Second semester: Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau. 

(Falls, Bingham.) 

French 105, 106. French Literature of the Nineteenth Century. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. First semester: drama and poetry from Romanticism to 

Symbolism. Second semester: the major prose writers of the same period. 

(Bingham, Quynn.) 

French 107, 108. French Literature of the Twentieth Century. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. First semester: drama and poetry from Symbolism to the 

present time. Second semester: the contemporary novel. (Falls.) 

French 121, 122. Advanced Composition. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Translation from English into French, free composition, 

letter writing. (Falls.) 

French 161, 162. French Civilization. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. French life, customs, culture, traditions. First semester: 

the historic development. Second semester: present-day France. 

(Rosenfield, Bingham.) 
French 171. Practical French Phonetics. (3) 

First semester. Pronunciation of modem French. The sounds and their production, the 
stress group, intonation. (Smith.) 

French 199. Rapid Review of the History of French Literature, (1) 

Second semester. Especially designed for French majors. Weekly lectures stressing the 

leading concepts in the history of French literature. (Falls.) 

-4 110 



Foreign Languages and Literature 

For Graduates 

The requirements of students will determine which courses will be offered. 

French 207, 208. The French Novel in the First Half of the Nineteenth 

Century. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. First semester: Chateaubriand to Dumas. Second semester: 

Stendhal to Merimee. (Falls.) 

French 209, 210. The French Novel in the Second Half of the Nineteenth 

Century. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. First semester: Flaubert to Valles. Second semester: 

Huysmans to A. France. (Falls.) 

French 211. French Linguistics. (3) 

First semester. The development of the French language from its origins in Latin. 

(Smith, Bulatkin.) 
French 212. Old French Readings. (3) 

Second semester. Reading of texts in Old French with emphasis on the literature as 
an expression of medieval culture. (Smith, Bulatkin.) 

French 215,216. Moliere. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Moliere's plays considered in the development of French 

comedy. (Quynn.) 

French 221, 222. Reading Course. 

(Arranged.) Designed to give the graduate student a background of a survey of 

French literature. (Staff.) 

French 230. Introduction to European Linguistics. (3) 

Linguistic problems considered on the basis of several languages. (Smith, Bulatkin.) 

French 251, 252. Seminar. (3, 3) 

Required of all graduate majors in French. (Staff.) 

French 399. Research. 

Credits determined by work accomplished. 

GERMAN 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

German 0. Intensive Elementary German. (0) 

First and second semesters and summer session. Graduate students should register as 
auditors only. Intensive elementary course in the German language designed particu- 
larly for graduate students who wish to acquire a reading knowledge. (Hering.) 

German 101, 102. German Literature of the Eighteenth Century. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. The main works of Klopstock, Wieland, Lessing, Herder, 
Goethe, Schiller. (Prahl, Schweizer.) 

Ill ► 



Foreign Languages and Literature 

German 103, 104. German Literature of the Nineteenth Century. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Outstanding works of Kleist, Grillparzer, Grabbe, Hebbel, 
Ludwig, Stifter, Keller, Anzengruber. (Prahl, Scbweizer.) 

German 105, 106. Modern German Literature. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prose and dramatic writings from Gerhart Hauptmann 

to the present time (1890-1950.) (Prahl, Dobert.) 

German 107, 108. Goethe's Faust. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. First and second parts of the drama. (Hering.) 

German 121, 122. Advanced Composition. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Translations from English into German, free composition, 

letter writing. (Kramer, Dobert.) 

German 161, 162. German Civilization. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. A survey of two thousand years of German history, out- 
lining the cultural heritage of the German people, their great men, tradition, customs. 
art and literature, with special emphasis on the interrelationship of social and literary 
history. (Prahl.) 

German 199. Rapid Review of the History of German Literature. (2) 
Second semester. Especially designed for German majors. Weekly lectures stressing 
the leading concepts in the history of German literature. (Schweizer. 

Attention is called to Comp. Lit. 106, Romanticism in Germany, and Comp. Lit. 
107, The Faust Legend in English and German Literature. 

For Graduates 

The requirements of students will determine which courses will be offered. 

German 202, 203. The Modern German Drama. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Study of dramas from Hauptmann to Zuckmeyer. (Zucker.) 

German 204. Schiller. (3) 

Study of Schiller's works with emphasis on his dramas. (Prahl.) 

German 205. Goethe's Works outside of Faust. (2) 

Particular attention given to Goethe's lyrics and novels. (Zucker.) 

German 206. The Romantic Movement. (3) 

Special consideration given to the ideas and the style of romantic writers. (Prahl.) 

German 221, 222. Reading Course. 

(Arranged). First and second semesters. Designed to give the graduate student a 

background of a survey of German literature. (Staff.) 

German 230. Introduction to European Linguistics. (3) 

First semester. Linguistic problems considered on the basis of several languages. 

(Smith, Bulatkin.) 

M 112 



Foreign Languages and Literature 

German 231. Middle High German. (3) 

Second semester. Walther von der Vogelweide, the Nibelungenlied, Wolfgang von 

Eschenbach. (Schweizer.) 

German 251, 252. Seminar. (3, 3) 

Required of all graduate majors in German. (Staff.) 

German 399. Research. 

Credits determined by work accomplished. (Staff.) 

SPANISH 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Spanish 101. Epic and Ballad. (3) 

First semester. The legendary and heroic matter of Spain. Readings of the Poema 

del Cid and of ballads of various cycles. (Parsons.) 

Spanish 102. The Spanish Popular Ballad. (3) 

Second semester. Typical ballads composed and developed in the Spanish-speaking 
world during and since the Golden Age, with stress on the folkloristic point of view. 

(Goodwyn.) 
Spanish 104. The Drama of the Golden Age. (3) 

Second semester. Selected plays of Lope de Vega, Calderon de la Barca, Tirso de 
Molina and others. (Parsons.) 

Spanish 107. Cervantes: Plays and Exemplary Novels. (3) 

First semester. (Rand.) 

Spanish 108. Lope de Vega. (3) 

First semester. Selected works of Lope de Vega. (Parsons.) 

Spanish 109. Cervantes: Don Quijote. (3) 

Second semester. (Goodwyn.) 

Spanish 110. Modern Spanish Poetry. (3) 

First semester. Significant poems of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. (Rand.) 

Spanish 111. The Spanish Novel of the Nineteenth Century. (3) 
First semester. Readings of some of the significant novels of the nineteenth century. 

(Parsons.) 
Spanish 112. Modern Spanish Drama. (3) 
Second semester. Significant plays of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. (Nemes.) 

Spanish 113. The Spanish Novel of the Twentieth Century. (3) 

Second semester. Significant novels of the twentieth century. (Rand.) 

Spanish 115. Modem Spanish Thought. (3) 

First semester. The generation of 1898 and other significant and interpretative writings 

of the twentieth century. (Rand.) 

113 ► 



Foreign Languages and Literature 

Spanish 121, 122. Advanced Composition. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Training in self-expression in Spanish, free composition, 

letter writing. (Goodwyn.) 

Spanish 151. Spanish-American Fiction. (3) 

First semester. The novel and short story from the Wars of Independence to the 

present and their reflection of society in the republics of the Western Hemisphere. 

(Nemes.) 
Spanish 152. Spanish- American Poetry. (3) 

Second semester. Representative poetry after 1800 and its relation to European trends 
and writers. (Nemes.) 

Spanish 153. Spanish- American Essay. (3) 

First or second semester. Social and political thought from Bolivar to Vasconcelos and 

its relationship to social and political conditions in Spanish America. (Nemes.) 

Spanish 161, 162. Spanish Civilization. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Introductory study of the literary, educational, artistic 

traditions; great men, customs, and general culture. (Rand.) 

Spanish 163, 164. Latin-American Civilization. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Introductory study of the cultures of Latin America; the 
historical-political background and the dominating concepts in the lives of the people. 

(Goodwyn.) 

Spanish 199. Rapid Review of the History of Spanish Literature, Q) 
Second semester. Especially designed for Spanish majors. Weekly lectures stressing 
the leading concepts in the history of Spanish literature. (Parsons.) 

For Graduates 

Spanish 202. The Golden Age in Spanish Literature. (3) 

First semester. Intensive study of selected classics. (Goodwyn.) 

Spanish 203, 204. Spanish Poetry. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. First semester: poetry of the Golden Age. Second semester: 

romantic and modern poetry. (Goodwyn.) 

Spanish 205, 206. Spanish Literature of the Twentieth Century. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. First semester: significant works of Angel Ganivet, 
Unamuno, Pio Baroja. Second semester: Azorin, Valle Inclan, Antonio Machado. 

(Rand.) 
Spanish 211. Spanish Linguistics. (3) 
First semester. The development of the Spanish language from its origins in Latin. 

(Parsons, Bulatkin.) 
Spanish 212. Old Spanish Readings. (3) 

Second semester. Reading of texts in Old Spanish, with emphasis on the literature 
as an expression of medieval culture. (Parsons, Bulatkin.) 

-4 114 



foreign Languages and Literature 

Spanish 221, 222. Reading Course. 

(Arranged). Designed to give the graduate student a background of a survey of 

Spanish literature. (Staff.) 

Spanish 230. Introduction to European Linguistics. (3) 

Linguistic problems considered on the basis of several languages. 

(Smith, Bulatkin.) 
Spanish 251, 252. Seminar. (3, 3) 
Required of all graduate majors in Spanish. (Staff.) 

Spanish 399. Research. 

Credit determined by work accomplished. (Staff.) 

RUSSIAN 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Russian 101, 102. Modern Russian Literature. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Works of Maxim Gorky, Alexei Tolstoy, P. Romanov, M. 

Zoshchenko, M. Sholokhov. (Boborykine.) 

Russian 103, 104. Russian Literature of the Nineteenth Century. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Selected writings of Pushkin, Gogol, Lermantov, Turgenev, 
Dostoevsky, Leo Tolstoy, Chekhov. (Boborykine.) 

CHINESE 

Chinese 101, 102. Readings from Chinese History. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Based on an anthology of historians from the Chou to 
the Ching dynasties. (Chen.) 

Chinese 161, 162. Chinese Civilization. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. This course supplements Geography 134 and 135, Cultural 
Geography of East Asia. It deals with Chinese literature, art, folklore, history, govern- 
ment, and great men. Second semester: developments in China since 1911. Chinese 
161 and 162 may be counted as history credits in meeting major and minor require- 
ments. (Chen.) 

HEBREW 

Hebrew 101. The Hebrew Bible. (3) 

Reading of selected portions of the Pentateuch. (Greenberg.) 

Hebrew 102. The Hebrew Bihle. (3) 

Reading of selected portions of the Prophets. (Greenberg.) 

Hebrew 103. Modern Hebrew Literature. (3) 

The period of the Haskalah (Enlightenment). (Greenberg.) 

115 ► 



Foreign Languages and Literature, Geography 

Hebrew 104. Modern Hebrew Literature. (3) 

The period of the Tehiah (Modern Revival). (Greenberg.) 

GEOGRAPHY 

Professors: van royen and hu. 

Consulting Professor: roterus. 

Lecturers with rank of Professor: lemons and mc bryde. 

Associate Professor: augelli. 

Assistant Professors: ahnert and hooson. 

Students seeking graduate degrees in geography are expected to have 
acquired a broad foundation in the subject and in allied fields. This foundation 
must have included a minimum of 24 semester hours in geography, of which 6 
semester hours shall have been in morphology and map reading and inter- 
pretation, 6 semester hours in weather and climate, and 12 semester hours in 
human, economic, or regional geography. In addition the student must have 
taken successfully the following courses, or their equivalents, in allied fields: 
anthropology (3 semester hours), economics (6 semester hours), history (6 semes- 
ter hours), introductory or general botany (3 semester hours), sociology (3 semes- 
ter hours), foreign language (12 semester hours). Students who do not have 
this background will be accepted as graduate students in a provisional status 
only and will be required to make up their deficiencies before being admitted 
to candidacy for an advanced degree. Graduate credit will not be given for 
courses taken to make up for deficiencies in background. 

In addition to meeting the general requirements of the Graduate School, 
candidates for the master's degree in geography are required to have taken 
successfully: one field course (Geog. 170 or 200, or equivalent), a course 
in cartography, a course in soils, and one seminar. In addition to the final 
oral examination, the candidate for the master's degree in geography is required 
to pass satisfactorily a written examination covering the field in which he has 
worked, his understanding of basic principles, and his power of reasoning. 

A graduate student seeking the Doctor of Philosophy degree in geography 
must take a comprehensive written and oral examination to determine whether 
he has sufficiently broad and profound knowledge and understanding of the 
entire field of geography to qualify as a candidate for the doctor's degree. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Geog. 100. Regional Geography of Eastern Anglo- America. (3) 
Second semester, alternate years. Prerequisite, Geog. 1, 2 or Geog. 10, or permission 
of instructor. A study of the cultural and economic geography, and the geographic 
regions of eastern United States and Canada, including an analysis of the significance 
of the physical basis for present-day diversification of development, and the historical 
geographic background. (McArthur.) 

+ 116 



Geography 

Geog. 101. Regional Geography of Western Anglo- America. (3) 
Second semester, alternate years. Prerequisite, Geog. 1, 2 or Geog. 10 or permission 
of instructor. A study of western United States, western Canada, and Alaska along 
the lines mentioned under Geog. 100. (McArthur.) 

Geog. 103. Geographic Concepts and Source Materials. (2) 
First or second semester. A comprehensive and systematic survey of geographic con- 
cepts designed exclusively for teachers. Stress will be placed upon the philosophy of 
geography in relation to the social and physical sciences, the use of the primary tools 
of geography, source materials, and the problems of presenting geographic principles. 

(Staff.) 
Geog. 104. Geography of Major World Regions. (2) 

First or second semester. A geographic analysis of the patterns, problems, and prospects 
of the world's principal human-geographic regions, including Europe, Anglo- America, 
the Soviet Union, the Far East, and Latin America. Emphasis upon the casual 
factors of differentiation and the role geographic differences play in the interpreta- 
tion of the current world scene. This course is designed especially for teachers. 

(Staff.) 
Geog. 105. Geography of Maryland and Adjacent Areas. (3) 
First or second semester. An analysis of the physical environment, natural resources, 
and population in relation to agriculture, industry, transport, and trade in the state 
of Maryland and adjacent areas. (Staff.) 

Geog. 110. Economic and Cidtural Geography of Caribbean America. (3) 
First semester. An analysis of the physical framework, broad economic and historical 
trends, cultural patterns, and regional diversification of Mexico, Central America, 
the West Indies, and parts of Colombia and Venezuela. (Augelli.) 

Geog. 111. Economic and Cultural Geography of South America. (3) 
Second semester. A survey of natural environment and resources, economic develop- 
ment, and cultural diversity of the South American republics, with emphasis upon 
problems and prospects of the countries. (Augelli.) 

Geog. 120. Economic Geography of Europe. (3) 

First semester. The natural resources of Europe in relation to agricultural and indus- 
trial development and to present-day economic and national problems. 

(Van Royen, Hooson.) 

Geog. 122. Economic Resources and Development of Africa. (3) 
First or second semester. The natural resources of Africa in relation to agricultural 
and mineral production; the various stages of economic development and the 
potentialities of the future. (Deshler.) 

Geog. 123. Problems of Colonial Geography. (3) 

First or second semester. Problems of development of colonial areas, with special 
emphasis upon the development of tropical regions and the possibilities of white 
settlement in the tropics. (Staff.) 

Geog. ISO, 131. Economic and Political Geography of Southern and Eastern 

Asia. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters, alternate years with Geog. 134, 135. A study of China, 
Japan, India, Burma, Indo-China and the East Indies; natural resources, population 

117 ► 



Geography 

and economic activities. Comparisons of physical and human potentialities of major 
regions and of their economic, social, and political development. (Hu.) 

Geog. 134, 135. Cultural Geography of East Asia. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters, alternate years with Geog. 130, 131. A comprehensive and 
systematic survey of the geographical distribution and interpretation of the major 
racial groups and cultural patterns of China, Japan, and Korea. Special emphasis 
will be placed on the unique characteristics of the peoples of these areas, their basic 
cultural institutions, outlooks on life, contemporary problems, and trends of cultural 
change. Designed especially for students of the social sciences, and those preparing 
for careers in foreign service, foreign trade, education, and international relations. 

(Hu.) 
Geog. 140. Soviet Lands. (3) 

First or second semester. The natural environment and its regional diversity. Geo- 
graphic factors in the expansion of the Russian state. The geography of agricultural 
and industrial production, in relation to available resources, transportation problems, 
and diversity of population. (Hooson.) 

Geog. 146. The Near East. (3) 

First semester. The physical, economic, political, and strategic geography of the lands 

between the Mediterranean and India. (Staff.) 

Geog. 150. History and Theory of Cartography. (3) 

Second semester. The development of maps throughout history, geographical orienta- 
tion, coordinates, and map scales. Map projections, their nature, use, and limitations. 
Principles of representation of features on physical and cultural maps. Modern uses 
of maps and relationships between characteristics of maps and use types. (McBryde.) 

Geog. 151, 152. Cartography and Graphics Practician. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. One hour lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a 
week. Techniques and problems of compilation, design, and construction of various 
types of maps and graphs. Relationships between map making and modern methods 
of production and reproduction. Trips to representative plants. Laboratory work 
directed toward cartographic problems encountered in the making of non-topographic 
maps. (Staff.) 

Geog. 153. Problems in Cartographic Representation and Procedure. (3) 
First or second semester. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory a week. Study 
of cartographic compilation methods. Principles and problems of symbolization, classi- 
fication, and representation of map data. Problems of representation of features at 
different scales and for different purposes. Place-name selection and lettering; stick- 
up and map composition. (Staff.) 

Geog. 154. Problems of Map Evaluation. (3) 

First or second semester. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory a week. Schools 
of topographic concepts and practices. Theoretical and practical means of determining 
map reliability, map utility, and source materials. Nature, status, and problems of 
topographic mapping in different parts of the world. Non-topographic special use 
maps. Criteria of usefulness for purposes concerned and of reliability. (Staff.) 

■< 118 



Geography 

Geog. 155. Problems and Practices of Piioto Interpretation. (3) 
First or second semester. Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. 
Interpretation of aerial photographs with emphasis on the recognition of landforms 
of different types and man-made features. Study of vegetation, soil, and other data 
that may be derived from aerial photographs. Types of aerial photographs and limita- 
tions of photo interpretation. (Ahnert.) 

Geog. 160. Advanced Economic Geography 1. Agriciduiral Resources. (3) 
First semester, alternate years. Prerequisite, Geog. 1 and 2, or Geog. 10. The nature 
of agricultural resources, the major types of agricultural exploitation in the world, 
and the geographic distribution of certain major crops and animals in relation to the 
physical environment and economic geographic conditions. Main problems of con- 
servation. (Van Royen.) 

Geog. 161. Advanced Economic Geography 11. Mineral Resources. (3) 
First semester, alternate years. Prerequisite, Geog. 1 and 2, or Geog. 10. The nature 
and geographic distribution of the principal power, metallic, and other minerals. 
Economic geographic aspects of modes of exploitation. Consequences of geographic 
distribution and problems of conservation. (Van Royen.) 

Geog. 170. Local Field Course. (3) 

First semester. Training in geographic field methods and techniques. Field observa- 
tion of land use in selected rural and urban areas in eastern Maryland. One lecture 
per week with Saturday and occasional weekend field trips. Primarily for under- 
graduates. (Ahnert.) 

Geog. 180. History, Nature and Methodology of Geography. (3) 

First semester. A comprehensive and systematic study of the history, nature, and 
basic principles of geography, with special reference to the major schools of geographic 
thought; a critical evaluation of some of the important geographical works and 
methods of geographic research. (Hu.) 

Geog. 190. Political Geography. (3) 

Second semester. Geographical factors in national power and international relations; 
an analysis of the role of "Geopolitics" and "Geostrategy", with special reference to 
the current world scene. (Augelli.) 

Geog. 195. Geography of Transportation. (3) 

Second semester. The distribution of transport routes on the earth's surface; patterns 
of transport routes; the adjustment of transport routes and media to conditions of the 
natural environment; transportation centers and their distribution. (Staff.) 

Geog. 197. Urban Geography. (3) 

First semester. Origins of cities, followed by a study of the elements of site and loca- 
tion with reference to cities. The patterns and functions of some major world cities 
will be analyzed. Theories of land use differentiation within cities will be appraised. 

(McArthur.) 
Geog. 199. Topical Investigations. (1-3) 

First and second semesters. Restricted to advanced undergraduate students with credit 
for at least 24 hours of geography. Independent study under individual guidance. 

119 ► 



Geography 

Choice of subject matter requires joint approval of adviser and Head of the Depart- 
ment of Geography. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

Geog. 200. Field Course. (3) 

Field work in September, conferences and reports during first semester. For graduate 
students in geography. Open to other students by special permission of the Head of 
the Department of Geography. Practical experience in conducting geographic field 
studies. Intensive training in field methods and techniques and in the preparation 
of reports. For graduate students in geography. Open to other students by special 
permission of the Head of the Department of Geography. (Staff.) 

Geog. 210, 211. Seminar in the Geography of Latin America. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Geog. 110, 111 or consent of instructor. An 
analysis of recent changes and trends in industrial development, exploitation of 
mineral resources and land utilization. (McBryde.) 

Geog. 220, 221. Seminar in the Geography of Europe and Africa. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Geog. 120, 122 or consent of instructor. 
Analysis of special problems concerning the resources and development of Europe 
and Africa. (Van Royen, Deshler.) 

Geog. 230, 232. Seminar in the Geography of East Asia. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Analysis of problems concerning the geography of East 
Asia with emphasis on special research methods and techniques applicable to the 
problems of this area. (Hu.) 

Geog. 240, 241. Seminar in the Geography of the U.S.S.R. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisites, reading knowledge of Russian and Geog. 140 
or consent of instructor. Investigation of special aspects of Soviet geography. Emphasis 
on the use of Soviet materials. (Hooson.) 

Geog. 246. Seminar in the Geography of the Near East. (3) 

(Staff.) 
Geog. 250. Seminar in Cartography. 

(Credit to be arranged.) First or second semester. The historical and mathematical 
background of cartographic concepts, practices and problems, and the various philosophi- 
cal and practical approaches to cartography. Discussions will be supplemented by the 
presentation of specific cartographic problems investigated by the students. 

(McBryde.) 
Geog. 260. Advanced General Climatology. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Geog. 41, or consent of instructor. Advanced study of 
elements and controls of the earth's climates. Principles of climatic classification. 
Special analysis of certain climatic types. (Lemons.) 

Geog. 261. Applied Climatology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Geog. 41, or consent of instructor. Study of prin- 
ciples, techniques, and data of micro-climatology, physical and regional climatology 
relating to such problems and fields as transportation, agriculture, industry, urban 
planning, human comfort, and regional geographic analysis. (Lemons.) 

^ 120 



Geography, Government and Politics 

Geog. 262, 263. Seminar in Meteorology and Climatology. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Selected topics in 
meteorology and climatology chosen to fit the individual needs of advanced students. 

(Lemons.) 
Geog. 280. Geomorphology. (3) 

Second semester. An advanced comparative study of selected geomorphic processes 
and land forms; theories of land forms evolution and geomorphological problems. 

(Van Royen.) 
Geog. 290, 291. Selected Topics in Geography. (2-3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, joint consent of adviser and Head of the 
Department of Geography. Readings and discussion on selected topics in the field 
of geography. (Staff.) 

Geog. 399. Thesis Research. 

(Credit to be arranged.) First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

Professors: plischke, bowen, burdette, steinmeyer and wengert. 
Associate Professors: Anderson, harrison and hathorn. 
Assistant Professor: alford. 

The Department of Government and Politics offers a graduate course of 
study leading to the degree of Master of Arts and the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy. For the master's degree, the student may either pursue a general 
program in government and politics, or he may specialize in international affairs 
or in public administration. 

For the master's degree, a comprehensive written examination is given on 
graduate course work in the major field. At the discretion of the Department, 
an oral examination may be substituted for the written examination. 

The doctoral candidate must show in written examinations satisfactory com- 
petence in five of the following fields: (1) comparative government; (2) inter- 
national affairs; (3) political theory; (4) public administration; (5) public law; 
(6) public policy; (7) state and local government. No candidate may attempt 
the comprehensive examinations prior to completion of the language require- 
ments for the doctorate, and no candidate may attempt the comprehensive ex- 
aminations more than twice. 

Additional information respecting requirements and procedures may be 
obtained from the Department. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

G. & P. 101. International Political Relations. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the major factors underlying 
international relations, the influence of geography, climate, nationalism, and imperialism, 
and the development of foreign policies of the major powers. (Harrison.) 

121 ► 



Government and Politics 

G. & P. 102. International Law. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. Fundamental principles governing the 
relation of states, including matters of jurisdiction over landed territory, water, airspace, 
and persons; treatment of aliens; treaty-making; diplomacy; and the laws of war and 
neutrality. (Harrison.) 

G. & P. 104. Inter-American Relations. (3) 

Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. An analytical and historical study of the Latin-American 
policies of the United States and of problems in our relations with individual countries, 
with emphasis on recent developments. (Harrison.) 

G. & P. 105. Recent Far Eastern Politics. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. The background and interpretation of recent 

political events in the Far East and their influence on world politics. (Steinmeyer.) 

G. & P. 106. American Foreign Relations. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. The principles and machinery of the conduct 
of American foreign relations, with emphasis on the Department of State and the 
Foreign Service, and an analysis of the major foreign policies of the United States. 
* (Phschke.) 

G. & P. 108. International Organization. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the objectives, structure, 
functions, and procedures of international organizations, including the United Nations 
and such functional and regional organizations as the Organization of American 
States. (Phschke.) 

G. & P. 110. Principles of Puhlic Administration. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of public achninistration in the 
United States, giving special attention to the principles of organization and management 
and to fiscal, personnel, planning, and public relations practices. (Wengert.) 

G. & P. 111. Public Personnel Administration. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 110 or B. A. 160. A survey of public personnel 
administration, including the development of merit civil service, the personnel agency, 
classification, recruitment, examination techniques, promotion, service ratings, training, 
discipline, employee relations, and retirement. (Wengert, Alford.) 

G. & P. 112. Public Financial Administration. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 110 or Econ. 142. A survey of governmental 
financial procedures, including processes of current and capital budgeting, the admin- 
istration of public borrowing, the techniques of public purchasing, and the machinery 
of control through pre-audit and post-audit. (Wengert, Alford.) 

G. & P. 124. Legislatures and Legislation. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A comprehensive study of legislative organi- 
zation, procedure, and problems. The course includes opportunities for student con- 
tact with Congress and with the Legislature of Maryland. (Burdette, Hathorn.) 

G. & P. 131, 132. Constitutional Law. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A systematic inquiry into the 

<* 122 



Government and Politics 

general principles of the American constitutional system, with special reference to the 
role of the judiciary in the interpretation and enforcement of the federal constitution; 
the position of the states in the federal system; state and federal powers over commerce; 
due process of law and other civil rights. (Hathorn.) 

G. & P. 133. Administration of Justice. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. An examination of civil and criminal court 
structure and procedures in the United States at all levels of government, with special 
emphasis upon the federal judiciary. (Staff.) 

G. & P. 141. History of Political Theory. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A survey of the principal political theories set 

forth in the works of writers from Plato to Bentham. (Anderson.) 

G. & P. 142. Recent Political Theory. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of 19th and 20th century political 
thought, with special emphasis on recent theories of socialism, communism, and fascism. 

(Anderson.) 
G. & P. 144. American Political Theory. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the development and growth of 
American political concepts from the colonial period to the present. (Anderson.) 

G. & P. 154. Problems of World Politics. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of governmental problems of inter- 
national scope, such as causes of war, problems of neutrality, and propaganda. Students 
are required to report on readings from current literature. (Steinmeyer.) 

G. & P. 174. Political Parties. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A descriptive and analytical examination of 

American political parties, nominations, elections, and political leadership. 

(Burdette, Hathorn.) 
G. & P. 178. Public Opinion. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. An examination of public opinion and its effect 
on political action, with emphasis on opinion formation and measurement, propaganda, 
and pressure groups. (Burdette, Hathorn.) 

G. & P. 181. Administrative Law. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the discretion exercised by ad- 
ministrative agencies, including analysis of their functions, their powers over persons 
and property, their procedures, and judicial sanctions and controls. (Wengert.) 

G. & P. 191. The Government and Administration of the Soviet Union. (3) 
Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of the adoption of the communist philosophy by the 
Soviet Union, of its governmental structure, and of the administration of government 
policy in the Soviet Union. (Steinmeyer.) 

G. & P. 197. Comparative Governmental Institutions. (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, G. & P. 1. A study of major political institutions, such 
as legislatures, executives, courts, administrative systems, and political parties, in selected 
foreign governments. (Harrison.) 

123 ► 



Government and Politics 



For Graduates 



G. & P. 201. Seminar in International Political Organization. (3) 

A study of the forms and functions of various international organizations. (Plischke.) 

G. & P. 202. Seminar in International haw. (3) 

Reports on selected topics assigned for individual study and reading in substantive and 

procedural international law. (Plischke, Harrison.) 

G. & P. 205. Seminar in American Political Institutions. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the background and 

development of American government. (Burdette, Hathorn.) 

G. & P. 206. Seminar in American Foreign Relations. (3) 

Reports on selected topics assigned for individual study and reading in American foreign 

policy and the conduct of American foreign relations. (Plischke.) 

G. & P. 207. Seminar in Comparative Governmental Institutions. (3) 
Reports on selected topics assigned for individual study and reading in governmental 
and political institutions in governments throughout the world. (Steinmeyer, Harrison.) 

G. &• P. 211. Seminar in Federal-State Relations. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the field of recent fed- 
eral-state relations. (Wengert.) 

G. & P. 223. Prohlems of Public Administration. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the field of public 
administration. (Wengert.) 

G. & P. 214. Prohlems of Public Personnel Administration. (3) 
Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the field of public per- 
sonnel administration. (Wengert.) 

G. & P. 215. Prohlems of State and Local Government in Maryland. (3) 
Reports on topics assigned for individual study in the field of Maryland state and local 
government. (Bowen.) 

G. & P. 216. Government Administrative Planning and Management. (3) 
Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in administrative planning 
and management in government. (Staff.) 

G. &■ P. 217. Government Corporations and Special Purpose Authorities. (3) 
Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the use of the corporate 
form for governmental administration. The topics for study will relate to the use of 
the corporate form as an administrative technique, as in the cases of the Tennessee 
Valley Authority, the Port of New York Authority, and local housing authorities. 

(Staff.) 
G. & P. 22 1. Seminar in Public Opinion. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the field of public 
opinion. (Burdette, Hathorn.) 

< 124 



Government and Politics, History 

G. & P. 223. Seminar in Legislatures and Legislation. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading about the composition rnd 

organization of legislatures and about the legislative process. (Burdette, Hathorn.) 

G. & P. 224. Seminar in Political Parties and Politics. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the fields of political 

organization and action. (Burdette, Hathorn.) 

G. & P. 225. Man and the State. (3) 

Individual reading and reports on such recurring concepts in political theory as liberty, 
equality, justice, natural law and natural rights, private property, sovereignty, national- 
ism, and the organic state. (Anderson.) 

G. & P. 232. Seminar in Public Law. (3) 

Reports on topics assigned for individual study and reading in the fields of constitu- 
tional and administrative law. (Hathorn.) 

G. & P. 251. Bibliography of Government and Politics. (3) 

Survey of the literature of the various fields of government and politics and instruction 

in the use of government documents. (Staff.) 

G. & P. 26 1. Problems of Government and Politics. (3) 

Credit according to work accomplished. (Staff.) 

G. & P. 281. Department Seminar. (No Credit) 

Topics as selected by the graduate staff of the Department. Registration for two 

semesters required of all doctoral candidates. Conducted by the entire departmental 
staff in full meeting. (Staff.) 

G. & P. 399. Thesis Research. (Arranged) 

(Staff.) 

HISTORY 

Professors: land, bauer, chatelatn, merrill and prange. 
Associate Professors: Gordon, jashemski, sparks and stromberg. 
Assistant Professors: beard, Ferguson and rivlin. 

Master of Arts 

A. Course Requirements 

1. Course requirements are those set forth under Academic Infor- 
mation in this catalog, with the exception of 2 and 3 below. 

2. The course, H. 287— Historiography, is required. 

3. Fifteen hours of the total required for the Master of Arts degree 
must be in history, of which at least 9 hours shall be in the field 
of concentration. 

125 ► 



History 
B. Thesis 



1. A thesis is required of all candidates for the Master of Arts 
degree in history. 



C. Examinations 



1. Candidates for the Master of Arts degree must pass a 4 to 6 
hour written examination. The primary purpose of this exam- 
ination is to determine the student's mastery of the field in 
which his thesis lies. The examination will require factual and 
interpretive material as well as bibliography and historiography. 

2. The oral examination will be confined to the thesis and the field 
in which it lies. 

Doctor of Philosophy 
A. Course Requirements 

1. Course requirements are those set forth under Academic Infor- 
mation in this catalog, with the exception of 2 and 3 below. 

2. The course, H. 287— Historiograph y, is required. 

3. The course, H. 350, 351— Seminar in Historical Writing, is re- 
quired. 

4. In consultation with his adviser, candidates must select three 
general fields and two fields of concentration to present for 
examination. Each general field must lie in a different group. 
There can be no duplication of general fields and fields of con- 
centration. 

General Fields Fields of Concentration 

group I. 1. Ancient History Greek History 

Roman History 
2. Medieval History 

group II. 1. Europe, 1500-1789 

2. Europe, 1789-present 

3. England and the British Empire History of England 

The British Empire 

group III. 1. American History, 1492-1865 .. .American History 1492-1800 

American History 1800-1865 

** 126 



Hisloi > i 

group IV. 1 . Latin American I Iistory 

2. Asian History 

3. Middle Eastern History Modern Middle East 

group V. 1 . Minor 
B. Examinations 

1. The Qualifying Examination is normally taken after the student 
has completed one year's work beyond the M. A. Separate writ- 
ten examinations of 2 to 4 hours each will be given on two 
selected fields on successive days. One language examination must 
be passed before the qualifying examination can be administered. 

2. The Comprehensive Examination is taken at the completion of 
the student's course work. The comprehensive examination covers 
the three remaining fields and will consist of written examina- 
tions of 3 to 4 hours in each field and an oral examination of 
approximately two hours duration. The second language exam- 
ination must be passed before the comprehensive examination 
can be administered. The satisfactory completion of the com- 
prehensive examination shall for departmental purposes constitute 
admission to candidacy for which the student must make formal 
application within one month. 

3. The Final Examination is conducted by a committee appointed 
by the Dean of the Graduate School. This examination, of 
approximately three hours duration, covers the research of the 
candidate as embodied in his thesis and his attainments in the 
fields of his major and minor subjects. 

AMERICAN HISTORY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
H. 5, 6 are prerequisites for courses H. 101 to H. 142, inclusive. 

H. 101. American Colonial History. (3) 

First semester. The settlement and development of colonial America to the middle 

of the eighteenth century. (Ferguson.) 

H. 102. The American Revolution. (3) 

Second semesters. The background and course of the American Revolution through 

the formation of the Constitution. (Ferguson.) 

127 ► 



History 

H. 105. Social and Economic History of the United States to 1865. (3) 

First semester. A synthesis of American life from independence through the Civil War. 

(Chatelain.) 

H. 106. Social and Economic History of the United States Since the Civil 

War. (3) 
Second semester. The development of American life and institutions, with emphasis 
upon the period since 1876. (Chatelain.) 

H. 114. The Middle Period of American History 1800-1860. (3) 
First semester. An examination of the political history of the United States from 
Jefferson to Lincoln with particular emphasis on the factors producing Jacksonian 
democracy, Manifest Destiny, the Whig Party, the anti-slavery movement, the Republi- 
can Party, and secession. (Sparks.) 

H. 115. The Old South. (3) 

First semester. A study of the institutional and cultural life of the ante-bellum South 

with particular reference to the background of the Civil War. (Staff.) 

H. 116. The Civil War. (3) 

Second semester. Military aspects; problems of the Confederacy; political, social, and 

economic effects of the war upon American society. (Sparks.) 

H. 117. The New South. (3) 

First semester. The South 's place in the Nation from Appomattox to the present 

with special reference to regional problems and aspirations. (Staff.) 

H. 118, 119. Recent American History. (3, 3) 

Party politics, domestic issues, foreign relations of the United States since 1890. First 

semester, through World War I. Second semester, since World War I. (Merrill.) 

H. 121. History of the American Frontier. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. The Trans-Allegheny West. 

The westward movement into the Mississippi Valley. (Pitt.) 

H. 122. History of the American Frontier. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, H. 5, 6, or the equivalent. The Trans-Mississippi 
West. Forces and factors in the settlement and development of the Trans-Mississippi 
West to about 1900. (Staff.) 

11. 123. The New West. (3) 

Second semester. Regional peculiarities and national significance of the Plains and 

Pacific Coast areas from 1890 to the present. (Staff.) 

H. 124. Reconstruction and the New Nation 1865-1896. (3) 

First semester. Problems of reconstruction in both South and North. Emergence of 

big business and industrial combinations. Problems of the farmer and laborer. 

(Merrill.) 
H. 127, 128. Diplomatic History of the United States. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. An historical study of the diplomatic negotiations and 

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foreign relations of the United States. First semester, from the Revolution to the 
Civil War; second semester, from the Civil War to the present. (Wellborn.) 

H. 129. The United States and World Affairs. (3) 

First semester. A consideration of the changed position of the United States with 

reference to the rest of the world since 1917. (Welborn.) 

H. 133, 134. The History of Ideas in America. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. An intellectual history of the American people, embracing 

such topics as liberty, democracy, and social ideas. (Beard.) 

H. 135, 136. Constitutional History of the United States. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. A study of the historical forces resulting in the formation 
of the Constitution, and the development of American constitutionalism in theory and 
practice thereafter. (Land.) 

H. 141, 142. History of Maryland. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three hours a week. First semester, a survey of the 
political, social and economic history of colonial Maryland. Second semester, Mary- 
land's historical development and role as a state in the American Union. (Chatelain.) 

H. 145, 146. Latin-American History. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three hours a week. A survey of the history of Latin 
America from colonial origins to the present, covering political, cultural economic, 
and social development, with special emphasis upon relations with the United States. 
First semester, the colonial period. Second semester, the Republics. (Crosman.) 

H. 147. History of Mexico. (3) 

First semester. The history of Mexico with special emphasis upon the independence 
period and upon relations between ourselves and the nearest of our Latin American 
neighbors. (Crosman.) 

EUROPEAN HISTORY 

H. 1, 2 or H. 53, 54 are prerequisites for courses H. 151 to H. 191, inclusive. 

H. 151. History of the Ancient Orient and Greece. (3) 

First semester. A survey of the ancient empires of Egypt, the Near East, and Greece, 

with particular attention to their institutions, life, and culture. (Jashemski.) 

H. 753. History of Rome. (3) 

Second semester. A study of Roman civilization from the earliest beginnings through 

the Republic and down to the last centuries of the Empire. (Jashemski.) 

H. 155. Medieval Civilization. (3) 

First semester. A survey of medieval life, culture, and institutions from the fall of 

the Roman Empire to the thirteenth century. (Staff.) 

H. 161. The Renaissance and Reformation. (3) 

Second semester. The culture of the Renaissance, the Protestant revolt and Catholic 

reaction through the Thirty Years War. (Staff.) 

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H. 163, 164. The Middle East. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. A survey of the historical and institutional developments of 
the nations of this vital area. The Islamic Empires and their cultures; impact of the 
west; breakup of the Ottoman Empire and rise of nationalism; present day problems. 

(Rivlin.) 

H. 165. Topics from Middle Eastern History in the Nineteenth and Twentieth 

Centimes. (3) 
First semester. Prerequisites, H. 163, 164 or the equivalent or permission of the 
instructor. Conference Course for advanced undergraduate and graduate students. 
Lectures and special assignments, dealing with Middle Eastern institutions in the 
nineteenth and twentieth centuries. (Rivlin.) 

H. 166. The French Revolution. (2) 

First semester. The Enlightenment and the Old Regime in France; the revolutionary 
uprisings from 1789 to 1799. (Gordon.) 

H. J67. Napoleonic Europe. (2) 

Second semester. European developments from the rise of Napoleon to the Congress 

of Vienna. (Gordon.) 

H. 171, 172. Europe in the Nineteenth Century, 1815-1919. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. A study of the political, economic, social, and cultural 

development of Europe from the Congress of Vienna to the First World War. (Bauer.) 

H. 175, 176. Europe in the World Setting of the Twentieth Century. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. A study of political, economic, and cultural developments in 
twentieth century Europe with special emphasis on the factors involved in the two 
World Wars and their global impacts and significance. (Prange.) 

H. 185, 186. History of the British Empire. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. First semester, the development of England's Mercantilist 
Empire and its fall in the war for American Independence (1783); second semester, 
the rise of the Second British Empire and the solution of the problem of responsible 
self-government (1783-1867), the evolution of the British Empire into a Common- 
wealth of Nations, and the development and problems of the dependent Empire. 

(Gordon.) 
H. 187. History of Canada. (3) 

First semester. A history of Canada, with special emphasis on the nineteenth century 
and upon Canadian relations with Great Britain and the United States. (Gordon.) 

H. 189. Constitutional History of Great Britain. (3) 

Second semester. A survey of constitutional development in England with emphasis on 
the real property aspects of feudalism, the growth of the common law, the development 
of Parliament, and the expansion of liberties of the individual. (Gordon.) 

H. 191. History of Russia. (3) 

First semester. A history of Russia from the earliest times to the present day. (Staff.) 

H. 192. Foreign Policy of the USSR. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, H. 1, 2 and H. 191. A survey of Russian foreign 

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policy in the historical perspective, with special emphasis on the period of the USSR. 
Russian aims, expansion, and conflicts with the western powers of Europe, the Near 
and Middle East, and the Far East will be studied. (Staff.) 

H. 193, 194. History of European Ideas in Modern Times. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Beginning with a review of the basic Western intellectual 
traditions as a heritage from the Ancient World, the course will present selected 
important currents of thought from the scientific revolution of the 16th and 17th 
centuries down to the 20th century. First semester through the 18th century. Second 
semester, 19th and 20th centuries. (Stromberg.) 

H. 195. The Far East. (3) 

First semester. A survey of institutional, cultural and political aspects of the history 

of China and Japan and a consideration of present-day problems of the Pacific area. 

(Staff.) 
H. 196. Southeast Asia. (3) 

Second semester. The political, economic and cultural history of the new nations of 
Southeast Asia with emphasis on the colonial period and a view to understanding 
contemporary developments. (Staff.) 

H. 199. Proseminar in Historical Writing. (3) 

First and second semesters. (Bauer, Callcott.) 

For Graduates 

H. 201. Seminar in American History. (3) 

First and second semesters. (Staff.) 

H. 202. Historical Literature. (3) 

First and second semesters. Assignments in various selected fields of historical liter- 
ature and bibliography to meet the requirements of qualified graduate students who 
need more intensive concentration. (Staff.) 

H. 203, 204. Seminar in the History of Maryland. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. (Land.) 

H. 205, 206. Topics in American Economic and Social History. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Readings and conferences on the critical and source 

materials explaining our social and economic evolution. (Chatelain.) 

H. 20S. Seminar in Recent American History. (3) 

First and second semesters. (Merrill.) 

H. 211. The Colonial Period in American History. (3) 

First semester. Readings and conferences designed to familiarize the student with 
some of the sources and the classical literature of American colonial history. 

(Ferguson.) 
H. 222. Period of the American Revolution. (3) 

Second semester. Readings and conferences designed to familiarize the student with 
some of the critical literature and sources of the period of the American Revolution. 

(Ferguson.) 

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H. 214. Seminar in the Middle Period of American History. (3) 

A seminar in the sources and problems of American political and military history from 

the Jackson Era to the election of Lincoln. (Sparks.) 

H. 215. The Old South. (3) 

First semester. Readings and conferences designed to familiarize the student with 

some of the standard sources and the classical literature of the ante-bellum South. 

(Staff.) 
H. 216. Seminar in The American Civil War. (3) 

First semester. A seminar in the sources and problems of the history of the American 
Civil War. Military and political problems are emphasizd. (Sparks.) 

H. 217. Reconstruction and its Aftermath. (3) 

Second semester. A seminar on problems resulting from the Civil War. Political, social 
and economic reconstruction in South and North; projection of certain post-war 
attitudes and problems into the present. (Merrill.) 

H. 221, 222. History of the West. (3, 3) 

Readings and conferences designed to give the student an acquaintance with some 
of the more important sources and some of the most significant literature of the ad- 
vancing American frontier. (Staff.) 

H. 233, 234. Topics in American Intellectual History. (3, 3) 
Readings and conferences on selected phases of American thought, with emphasis 
on religious traditions, social and political theory, and development of American ideas. 

(Beard.) 
H. 245. Topics in Latin-American History. (3) 

Selected readings, research, and conferences on important topics in Latin American 
history. (Crosman.) 

H. 250. Seminar in European History. (3) 

First and second semesters. (Bauer.) 

H. 252. Seminar in Greek History. (3) 

Readings and conferences designed to acquaint the students with selected topics and 

sources in Greek and Hellenistic history. (Jashemski.) 

H. 253. Seminar in Roman History. (3) 

Readings and conferences designed to acquaint the student with selected topics and 

sources in Roman history. (Jashemski.) 

H. 255. Medieval Culture and Society. (3) 

(Arranged.) Readings and conferences designed to acquaint the student with the 
important literature and interpretations on such topics as feudalism, the medieval 
Church, schools and universities, Latin and vernacular literature, art and architecture. 

(Staff.) 
H. 265. Problems in Diplomatic History of the Middle East. (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisites, H. 163, 164 or H. 165 or the equivalent. Studies 
involving the international relations of the Middle East. A knowledge of French 

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and/or another foreign language is required or permission of the instructor. 

(Rivlin.) 
H. 282. Problems in the History of World War 11. (3) 

Investigation of various aspects of the Second World War, including military operations, 
diplomatic phases, and political and economic problems of the war and its aftermath. 

(Prange.) 

H. 285, 286. Seminar in the History of Britain and the British Empire. 

First and second semesters. Readings and conferences on the documentary and literary 
materials dealing with the transformation of England and the growth and evolution 
of the British Empire since 1763. (Gordon.) 

H. 287. Historiography. (3) 

First and second semesters. Readings and occasional lectures on the historical writing, 
the evolution of critical standards, the rise of auxiliary sciences, and the works of 
selected masters. The work of the course includes field trips to the Library of 
Congress and the National Archives. Required of all candidates for advanced degrees. 

(Sparks.) 
H. 399. Research. 0-6~) 
Credit apportioned to amount of research. First and second semesters. (Staff.) 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Professors: lippeatt, king and Mitchell. 
Associate Professor: braucher. 
Assistant Professor: wilbur. 

The College offers a program of study leading to the degree of Master of 
Science in the fields of food, nutrition, and textiles and clothing. 

A candidate for an advanced degree with a major or minor in home eco- 
nomics is expected to have an undergraduate major in home economics or in 
closely allied fields. The graduate study program will supplement the student's 
previous training and experience to achieve a well-rounded knowledge of the 
subject, with due consideration given to the student's purpose in undertaking 
graduate study. Graduate students may prepare for some specialized phases 
of home economics, including food, nutrition, textiles and clothing, and home 
economics education. (See Department of Education.) A student whose prep- 
aration is deficient in any area may meet prerequisites during a period of study 
as a special student or as a provisional candidate. Interdepartmental programs 
and ofrerinos in the several areas of home economics to give breadth of contact 
with the field of home economics are being developed. 

FOOD AND NUTRITION 

Students with a major or minor in the field of food and nutrition may select 
from a variety of courses, seminars, and experiences in independent study. 

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Each student plans his program in consultation with his major adviser, after 
consideration of his background and purpose in graduate study. 

A master's degree candidate wishing to major in this field is expected to 
have had training equivalent to that of an undergraduate major in the Depart- 
ment of Food, Nutrition, and Institution Management (basic courses in food and 
nutrition, organic and biochemistry, microbiology, and physiology). 

TEXTILES AND CLOTHING 

For students who wish to major or minor in textiles and clothing a variety 
of offerings is available as to course work and opportunities for independent 
study. Candidates for a Master of Science degree in the field of textiles and 
clothing are expected to acquire a general knowledge of all phases of the field 
and an understanding of research methods in it, and to concentrate in one of 
the various areas of textiles and clothing. 



FOOD AND NUTRITION 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Foods 100. Food Economics. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Foods 1 or 2, 3. One lecture and one laboratory period 
a week. Laboratory fee, $7.00. Sources of our food supply; buying of food for the 
family. ( Cornell.) 

Foods 101. Meal Management. (2) 

First and second semesters. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Foods 1, 
or 2, 3. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Planning, preparing and serving meals for family 
groups, considering nutritional needs and management of money, time and labor; 
includes entertaining. (Cornell, Hammel.) 

Foods 102. Experimental Foods. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Foods 
2, 3; Organic Chemistry, Chem. 31, 32, 33, 34. Laboratory fee, $10.00. A study 
of food preparation processes from the experimental viewpoint. (Cox.) 

Foods 104. Advanced Foods. (2-3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Foods 2, 3; Chem. 31, 32, 33, 34. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 
The physical and chemical behavior of the basic food constituents in food preparation 
and processing; study of recent advances in those fields. (Staff.) 

Foods 105. Foods of Other Countries. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Foods 
1 or 2, 3, or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Food preparation and food customs of 
the peoples of other countries. (Cornell, Cox.) 

Nut. 110. Nutrition. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Foods 2, 3; Organic Chemistry, Chem. 31, 

32, 33, 34 to precede or parallel. Laboratory fee, $10.00. A scientific study of principles 

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of human nutrition. Animal experimentation. Correction of nutritional deficiencies 
by dietary studies. (Braucher.) 

Nut. 111. Child Nutrition. (2) 

First and second semesters. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, 
Foods 1 or 2, 3, Nut. 10 or 110. Laboratory fee, $7.00. Principles of human nutri- 
tion applied to growth and development of children. Experience in a nursery school. 

(Collins.) 
Nut. 112. Dietetics. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Nut. 
110. Laboratory fee, $10.00. A study of food selection for health; planning and 
calculating dietaries for children, adults and family units; methods of teaching food 
values and nutrition. (Staff.) 

Nut. 113. Diet and Disease. (2) 

Second semester. Alternate years. Prerequisite, Nut. 110. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 
Modifications of the normal adequate diet to meet the nutritional needs in treating 
certain diseases. (Staff.) 

Nut. 114. Nutrition for Health Services. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Nut. 10 or the equivalent. Laboratory fee, $3.00. A 
scientific study of nutritional status and the effect of food habits and food consumption 
on family health. Nutritional requirements for individuals in different stages of 
development. Techniques and procedures for the application of nutrition knowledge 
with consideration of various economic levels and social backgrounds. For graduate 
nurses, dietitians, health teachers, and social workers. (Braucher.) 

Nut. 120. Advanced Nutrition. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Foods 3; Zool. 1; Biochemistry 81, 82 or concurrent. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. The progress of nutrition as found in the results of current 
research, with emphasis on interpretation and application. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

Foods 200. Advanced Experimental Foods. CSS - ) 

Second semester. Two lectures and three laboratory periods a week. Laboratory fee, 
$10.00. Selected readings of literature in experimental foods. Development of individ- 
ual problem. (Staff.) 

Foods 204. Recent Trends in Foods. (2-3) 

First semester. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Recent trends in the preparation, processing 

and marketing of foods. (Staff.) 

Foods 210. Readings in Foods. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Foods 102, 104. A critical survey of literature on 
recent developments in food research. (Staff.) 

Foods 220. Seminar. 0,0 

First semester. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Reports and discussions of current research in 
foods. (Staff.) 

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Foods 399. Research. (6) 

First and second semesters. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Credit in proportion to work 
done and results accomplished. Investigation in some phases of food which may 
form the basis of a thesis. (Staff.) 

Nut. 204. Recent Advances in Nutrition. (2-3) 

Second semester. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Factors that affect the nutritive value of 
food during production, cookery processes, holding practices, processing, packaging 
and storage. (Braucher.) 

Nut. 208. Recent Progress in Human Nutrition. (3) 

Second semester. Laboratory fee, $3.00. The recent developments in the science of 
nutrition with emphasis upon the interpretations of these findings for application in 
health and disease. Aids for the dietitian in creating a better understanding of 
nutrition among patients, students of graduate status and personnel, such as those of 
the dental and medical profession. (Braucher.) 

Nut. 210. Readings in Nutrition. (3) 

First semester. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Reports and discussion of outstanding nutri- 
tional research and investigation. (Braucher.) 

Nut. 211. Problems hi Nutrition. (3-5) 

Second semester. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Experience in a phase of nutrition research 
which is of interest to the student. Use of experimental animals, human studies or 
an extensive and critical survey of the literature. (Braucher.) 

Nut. 212. Nutrition for Community Service. (3) 

First semester. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Applications of the principles of nutrition to 
various community problems. Students may work on problems of their own choosing. 

(Braucher.) 
Nut. 220. Seminar. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Reports and discussions of current research in nutrition. 

(Staff.) 
Nut. 399. Research. (6) 

First and second semesters. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Credit in proportion to work done 
and results accomplished. Investigation in some phase of nutrition which may form the 
basis of a thesis. (Braucher.) 

HOME MANAGEMENT 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Home Mgt. ISO, 151. Management of the Home. (3, 3) 

Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, Econ. 37. Laboratory 
fee for Home Mgt. 151, $3.00. Principles of scientific management applied to the 
family's use of resources, particularly to use of time, energy and money, pointing up 
the importance of choice as values and goals change throughout the life cycle. Housing 
from the sociological aspects of what constitutes good housing, housing legislation, de- 
termination of a family's housing needs, ways and means of meeting them. House- 
hold equipment, its selection, use and care, as durable and non-durable goods of the 
family. (Crow, Staff.) 

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hlome Mgt. 152. Experience in Management of the Home. (3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Home Mgt. 150, 151. Laboratory fee, 
SI 0.00. Residence for one third of a semester in the Home Management House. 
Experience in planning, coordinating and participating in the activities of a household 
composed of a faculty member and a group of students. A charge of $40.00 for food 
and supplies is assessed each student. Students who board at the University may 
receive a pro-rata refund of the established charge if the Dining Hall Card is turned 
in during the period of residence in the Home Management House. Students not living 
in the dormitories are billed at the rate of $5.00 per week for a room in the Home 
Management House. (Crow, Staff.) 

Home Mgt. 155. Money Management. (2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Home Mgt. 150 or consent of instructor. Integrating 

the use of money and other available resources to meet both individual and family 

- and needs. Emphasis on areas of finance influencing family economic decisions. 

(Crow.) 
Home Mgt. 156. Household Equipment. (2) 

Two laboratory periods a week. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Problems in selection, use and 
care of small and large equipment. (Staff.) 

Home Mgt. 158. Special Problems in Management. (3) 

Summer session only. Five lectures; one two-hour laboratory. Prerequisites, Home 
Mgt. 150, 151 or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Analysis of some of the important 
management problems in the home and in the home economics classroom. Financial 
problems, problems in work simplification, problems related to housing and household 
equipment. (Crow.) 

Inst. Mgt. 160. Institution Organization and Management. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Foods 2, 3; Nut. 110, Home Mgt. 150, 151 to precede 
or parallel. Vocational opportunities in the field of institution management; organiza- 
tion of food service departments. Planning of functional kitchens and selection of 
equipment for quantity food services. Field trips. (Collins.) 

Inst. Mgt. 161. Institution Food Purchasing and Cost Control. (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, Foods 2, 3; Nut. 10 or 110 or equivalent. Selection 
of food, method and units of purchase in large quantities. Budgets, food cost account- 
ing and control. Field trips. (Collins.) 

Inst. Mgt. 162. Institution Foods. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Foods 
2, 3; Nut. 10 or 110 or consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Application of 
basic principles and procedures of food preparation to quantity food preparation. 
Standardizing recipes; menu planning for various types of food services; determination 
of food costs. Field trips. (Collins.) 

Inst. Mgt. 164. Food Service Administration and Personnel Management. (2) 
Second semester. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Inst. 
Mgt. 160, 161, 162 or the equivalent. Adrninistrative policies, problems, and per- 
sonnel management. Field trips. (Staff.) 

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Inst. Mgt. 165. School Food Service. (3) 

Two lectures and one morning a week for practical experience in a school food 
service. Prerequisites, Foods 1 or 2, 3 and Nut. 10 or 110, or consent of instructor. 
Not open to institution management majors. Study of organization, management, 
menu planning, food purchasing and preparation, and cost control for serving the 
noon meal in schools and child care centers. (Collins.) 

Inst. Mgt. Si 66. Nutrition and Meal Planning. (2) 

Summer session. One lecture and two laboratory periods. Prerequisites, Inst. Mgt. 

160 or equivalent. Special application to group food services; school lunches, 

restaurants, and hospitals. (Staff.) 

Inst. Mgt. SI 68. Cost Accounting for School Food Service. (2) 

Summer session. Food cost accounting systems for school lunch programs; programs 

and procedures of accumulating, recording, and interpreting data for control. (Staff.) 

Inst. Mgt. SI 69. Food Purchasing for School Food Service. (2) 

Summer session. Purchasing procedures; grading, processing, and packing of food; 

selection of food, specifications, and marketing regulations. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

Inst. Mgt. 200. Food Service Administration and Supervision. (3) 
Supervision and administrative policies; personnel management with emphasis on 
human relations, and philosophy underlying management practices. (Staff.) 

PRACTICAL ART AND CRAFTS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Pr. Art 100, 101. Mural Design. (2, 2) 

First semester, alternate years. Three laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 

1, 21. Fee, $3.00. Group and individual expression serving two types of objectives: 
temporary murals for the public schools developed from classroom study and rendered 
in colored chalk on wrapping paper; murals for permanent architectural decoration 
considering propriety to setting and rendered in oil paint, gouache, fresco, or mosaic. 
Brief study of civilization's use of murals. Trips to nearby murals having social 
significance. (Curtiss.) 

Pr. Art 120, 121. Costume Illustration. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 1, 

2, 20, 21. Fee, $3.00. Fashion rendering emphasizing clothing structure, representation 
of materials and development of individual rendering technique. Development of 
techniques employing transparent water color, India ink, Craftint, Zipatone and 
Burgess process. Study of styles of contemporary fashion illustrators. (Elliott.) 

Pr. Art 124, 125. Individual Problems in Costume. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 1, 

2, 20, 21, 120, 121. Fee, $3.00. Advanced problems in fashion illustration or 

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costume design for students who are capable of independent work. Program developed 
in consultation with the instructor. (Elliott.) 

Pr. Art 132. Advertising Layout. (2) 

First and second semesters. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 
1, 20, 30, 40. Fee, $3.00. Designing of rough to finished layouts for advertisements 
for newspapers, magazines, packaging, brochures and other forms of direct advertising. 
Included is the study of typography and illustration and their relationship to reproduc- 
tion. Experience in use of the airbrush. Field trip. (Cuneo.) 

Pr. Art 134, 135. Individual Problems in Advertising. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 
1, 20, 30, 40, 132. Fee, $3.00. Advanced problems in advertising layout. Opportunity 
to build skills in one area or more of advertising design. Readings. Field trip. 

(Cuneo.) 
Pr. Art 136. Display. (2) 

First and second semesters. Three laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 1, 
4, 30. Fee, $3.00. Practice in effective merchandise display in cooperation with retail 
establishments. Study of other aspects of display through field trips, discussion and 
research. (Longley.) 

Pr. Art 138. Advanced Photography. (2) 

First and second semesters. Three laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 

1, 38, 39. Fee, $3.00. Advanced experimental effects emphasizing design in pho- 
tography. Each student must have his own camera. (Davis.) 

Pr. Art 142, 143. Advanced Ulterior Design. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 1, 

2, 40, 41. Fee, $3.00. Designing of rooms drawn in perspective and isometrics and 
rendered in water color. Coordination with fabrics, floor and wall finishes. Study of 
budgets, costs, and manufacturing techniques. Field trips. (Jones.) 

Pr. Art 144, 145. Individual Problems in Interior Design. (2, 2) 
First and second semesters. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 1, 
2, 40, 41, 142, 143. Fee, $3.00. Advanced problems in interior design for students 
who are capable of independent work. Students assume the role of interior decorator 
serving the needs of theoretical clients. Field trips. (Jones.) 

Cr. 102. Creative Crafts. (2-4) 

Summer session. Daily laboratory periods. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 1 and permission of 
the instructor. Fee, $3.00. Interests of the persons enrolled will determine the crafts 
pursued. Suggested: block printing, wood burning, crayon decoration, paper sculpture, 
clay modeling, metalry, weaving. Excellent for teachers, directors of recreation centers, 
and persons who desire an introduction to recreational crafts. (Staff.) 

Cr. 120, 121. Advanced Ceramics. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Three laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 
1, Cr. 20, 21. Fee, $3.00. Advanced techniques in clay sculpture and in building 
pottery on the potter's wheel. Study of glaze composition and calculation. Experimenta- 
tion with several clay bodies. (Cox.) 

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Home Economics 

Cr. 124, 125. Individual Problems in Ceramics. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Three laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 1, 
Cr. 20, 21, 120, 121. Fee, $3.00. Individual problems in clay sculpture and pottery 
making. Use of gas kiln fired in the medium cone range and experimental research 
in glazes and original textural effects. (Cox.) 

Cr. 130, 131. Advanced Metalry. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Three laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 
1, Cr. 30, 31. Fee, $3.00. Advanced applications of basic techniques in metal 
working and jewelry making. Introduction of ring making, stone setting, and metal 
casting. (Longley.) 

Cr. 134, 135. Individual Problems in Metalry. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Three laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 
1, Cr. 30, 31, 130, 131. Fee, $3.00. Advanced problems in metalry and jewelry 
making. Supervised laboratory for students capable of independent work and 
research. (Longley.) 

Cr. 140, 141. Advanced Weaving. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Three laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 
1, Cr. 40, 41. Fee, $3.00. Advanced weaving on four and eight harness looms 
stressing creative weaves in relation to functional use. (Cox.) 

Cr. 144, 145. Individual Problems in Weaving. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Three laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Pr. Art 1, 
Cr. 40, 41, 141. Fee, $3.00. Advanced problems in creative weaving. Supervised 
laboratory for students capable of independent work and research. (Cox.) 

TEXTILES AND CLOTHING 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Tex. 100. Advanced Textiles. (3) 

First semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Tex. 1. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. The intensive study of textiles from the fiber to the finished 
fabric, from the producer to the consumer. Analysis of fabric construction and service- 
ability features. (Staff.) 

Tex. 101. Problems in Textiles. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Tex. 
100, organic chemistry. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Individual experimental problems 
in textiles. (Staff.) 

Tex. 102. Textile Testing. (3) 

Second semester. Three laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Tex. 100. Laboratory 
fee, $3.00. The theory of textile testing methods, the repeated use of physical and 
chemical testing, the interpretation of the data, and the presentation of the findings. 

(Staff.) 
Tex. 105. Consumer Problems in Textiles. (3) 
First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Tex. 1, or equivalent. 

<* 140 



Home Economics 

Laboratory fee, $3.00. Study of textiles from the consumer point of view for personal, 
household and institutional use. Evaluation of such textiles through analysis of com- 
parison shopping, laboratory tests, survey of literature and field trips. (Staff.) 

Tex. 10S. Decorative Fabrics. (2) 

First semester. Two lectures a week. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Study of historic and con- 
temporary fabrics and laces with analysis of designs and techniques of decorating 
fabrics. (Wilbur.) 

Clo. 120. Draping. (3) 

First semester. Three laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Clo. 21, Clo. 122. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. Demonstrations and practice in creating costumes in fabrics on 
individual dress forms; modeling of garments for class criticism. (Wilbur.) 

Clo. 122. Tailoring. (2) 

First and second semesters. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Clo. 21. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. Construction of tailored garments, requiring professional skill. 

(Mitchell, Heagney.) 
Clo. 123. Children's Clothing. (2) 

First semester. Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Clo. 20, or equivalent. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. Children's clothing from the standpoint of age, health, beauty, 
economy and personality; development of original designs. (Heagney, Wilbur.) 

Clo. 124. Projects and Readings in Textiles and Clothing. (2) 
First semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Clo. 120, Tex. 100. Laboratory 
fee, $3.00. Analysis of wardrobe planning preparatory to the job situation; grooming 
as related to the college girl and to the job holder; survey of job opportunities in the 
field; special projects. (Mitchell.) 

Clo. 125. Costume Draping. (3) 

Second semester. Three two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Pr. Art 20 
or consent of Department. Laboratory fee, $3.00. By means of draping in fabrics on a 
form the development of costumes both historic and contemporary for specific needs, 
purposes and occasions. Consideration of fabric, line and color are integral part of the 
work. (Wilbur.) 

Clo. 126. Fundamentals of Fashion. (2,3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Clo. 120. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Fashion history; 
current fashions, how to interpret and evaluate them; fashion show techniques; 
fashion promotion. The course includes oral and written reports, group projects, panel 
discussions and field trips. (Wilbur.) 

Clo. 127. Apparel Design. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Clo. 
120. Laboratory fee, $3.00. The art of costuming; trade and custom methods of 
clothing design and construction; advanced work in draping, pattern design and/or 
tailoring with study of the interrelationship of these techniques. (Staff.) 

Clo. 128. Home Furnishings. (3) 

First and second semesters. Three laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Tex. 1, 
Clo. 20, or consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Selection of fabrics for home 

141 ► 



Home Economics, Horticulture 

and institutional furnishings; care and repair of such furnishings; custom construction 
of slip covers, draperies, bedspreads; refinishing and upholstering a chair. (Wilbur.) 

For Graduates 

Tex. 200. Special Studies in Textiles. (2-4) 

Second semester. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Staff.) 

Clo. 220. Special Studies in Clothing. (2-4) 

First semester. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Mitchell, Wilbur.) 

Tex. and Clo. 230. Seminar. (I) 

First and second semesters. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Mitchell.) 

Tex. and Clo. 232. Economics of Textiles and Clothing. (3) 

Second semester. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Mitchell.) 

Tex. and Clo. 399. Research. C4-6) 

First and second semesters. Laboratory fee, $3.00. (Staff.) 

HORTICULTURE 

Professors: haut, kramer, link, scott, shanks, stark and Thompson. 
Associate Professors: Reynolds and wiley. 

This Department offers graduate work in the fields of floriculture and orna- 
mental horticulture processing, olericulture, and pomology leading to the Master 
of Science or Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 

Departmental requirements, supplementary to the material in the Graduate 
School Announcements have been formulated for the administration and guid- 
ance of graduate students. Copies of these requirements may be obtained from 
the Department. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Hort. 101. Technology of Fruits. (3) 

First semester. (Offered 1960-61.) Prerequisites, Hort. 6, Bot. 101. A critical analysis 
of research work and applications of the principles of plant physiology, chemistry, and 
botany to practical problems in commercial production. (Thompson.) 

Hort. 103. Technology of Vegetables. (3) 

Second semester. (Offered 1961-62.) Prerequisites, Hort. 58, Bot. 101. For a descrip- 
tion of these courses see the general statement under Hort. 101. (Stark.) 

Hort. 105. Technology of Ornamentals. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. A study of the physiological plant processes 

as related to the growth, flowering, and storage of floricultural and ornamental plants. 

(Link.) 

-* 142 



Horticulture 

Hort. 107, 108. Woody Plant Materials. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Bot. 11. A field and laboratory study of 

trees, shrubs, and vines used in ornamental plantings. (Staff.) 

Hort. 114. Systematic Horticulture. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1961-62.) Two lectures and one laboratory 
Deriod a week. A study of the origin, taxonomic relationship and horticultural classi- 
fication of fruits and vegetables. (Staff.) 

Hort. 123. Quality Control. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Offered 1961-62.) Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week. Principles involved in the evaluation of factors of quality in horti- 
cultural products including appearance, kinesthetic flavor and sanitation factors and 
statistical presentation of results. (Kramer.) 

Hort. 124. Quality Control Systems. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1961-62.) Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisite, Hort. 123. Development of quality control systems 
designed to maintain specific levels of quality for selected food products. (Kramer.) 

Hort. 150, 151. Commercial Floriculture. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisite, Hort. 11. Growing and handling bench crops and potted plants, and the 
marketing of cut flowers. (Link.) 

Hort. 155, 156. Fundamentals of Fruit and Vegetable Processing. (3, 3) 
First and second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1960-61.) Two lectures and one 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Chem. 32, 34, Hort. 61. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00 per semester. The fundamentals of canning, freezing and preserving of horti- 
cultural crops with emphasis on the chemical, biochemical and microbiological aspects 
of processing. (Wiley.) 

Hort. 159. Nursery Management. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1961-62.) Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisites or concurrently, Hort. 62, 107, 108. A study of all 
phases of commercial nursery management and operations. (Staff.) 

Hort. 160. Arboriculture. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1960-61.) Two lectures and one laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisites or concurrently, Hort. 107 and 108. A study of the 
planting and maintenance of ornamental shrubs and trees, including basic principles 
of park, institution and estate maintenance. (Staff.) 

Hort. 161. Physiology of Maturation and Storage of Horticidtural Crops. (2) 
Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1960-61.) Two lectures a week. Pre- 
requisite, Bot. 101. Factors related to maturation and application of scientific prin- 
ciples to handling and storage of horticultural crops. (Scott.) 

Hort. 198. Special Problems. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Credit arranged according to work done. For major 

students in horticulture or botany. Four credits maximum per student. (Staff.) 

143 ► 



Horticulture 



For Graduates 



Hort. 200. Experimental Procedures in Plant Sciences. (3) 
First semester. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. Organization of research 
projects and presentation of experimental results in the field of biological science. 
Topics included will be: Sources of research financing, project outline preparation, 
formal progress reports, public and industrial supported research programs, and 
technical and popular presentation of research data. (Haut.) 

Hort. 201, 202. Experimental Pomology. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. A systematic review of scientific 
knowledge and practical observations as applied to commercial practices in pomology. 

(Thompson.) 
Hort. 203, 204, 205. Experimental Olericulture. (2, 2, 2) 
First semester and in sequence. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. A systematic review of scientific 
knowledge and practical observations as applied to commercial practices in olericulture. 

(Stark.) 
Hort. 206. Experimental Vloriculture. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Bot. 101. A systematic review of scientific knowledge 
and practical observations as applied to commercial practices in floriculture. (Link.) 

Hort. 207. Methods of Horticultural Research. (3) 

Second semester. One lecture and one four-hour laboratory period a week. A critical 

study of research methods which are or may be used in horticulture. (Scott.) 

Hort. 210. Experimental Processing. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. A systematic review of 
scientific knowledge and practical observations as applied to commercial practices 
in processing. (Kramer.) 

Hort. 302. Advanced Seminar. (I) 

First and second semesters. Oral reports with illustrative material are required on 
special topics or recent research publications in horticulture. Three credit hours 
maximum allowed toward the M. S. degree or six credits maximum toward the Ph.D. 
degree. (Haut, Staff.) 

Hort. 399. Advanced Horticultural Research. (2-12) 

First and second semesters. Credit granted according to work done. (Staff.) 

MATHEMATICS 

Professors: cohen, diaz*, douglis, fullerton, jackson, martin, mayor and 

STELLMACHER. 

Research Professor: weinstein*. 

Associate Professors: brace and good. 

Associate Research Professors: ludford* and payne*. 

Assistant Professors: correl, ehrlich, horvath, hummel, pearl, reinhart, 

RIEGER, ROSEN AND ZEDEK. 

Assistant Research Professor: Weinberger*. 



* Member of the Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics. 
144 



Mathematics 

For admission to graduate study in mathematics the Department requires, 
in addition to the Graduate School requirements, an official transcript of the 
student's previous work for its files and evidence that the candidate for admis- 
sion has received sufficient prior training in mathematics to indicate that he 
will be able successfully to undertake graduate training. 

Before being recommended for admission to candidacy for the master's 
degree in mathematics in addition to the Graduate School requirements, the 
student must demonstrate a reading knowledge of one foreign language of 
scientific importance and must have completed the major part of the course 
work required for the degree and must have received an average grade of 
"B" or better in all graduate courses taken. 

A student preparing for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy with a major 
in mathematics will be offered a choice of two curricula, one with an emphasis 
on pure mathematics, the other with an emphasis on applied mathematics. 

The Department requires successful completion of a preliminary written and 
oral examination before giving its recommendation for admission to candidacy 
for the doctorate. Before presenting himself for this examination the student 
is expected to have acquired a background of mathematical knowledge equiva- 
lent to the following group of graduate studies. In the pure mathematics cur- 
riculum: algebra, six hours; analysis, twelve hours; geometry and topology, six 
hours; mathematical methods or mathematical physics or physics or (further) 
analysis, six hours. In the applied mathematics curriculum: analysis, fifteen 
hours (including Math. 286, 287, 288, 212); mathematical methods, six hours; 
mathematical physics, six hours (including Math. 260); algebra or geometry 
or topology as related to the student's individual work. 

A student who intends to present a minor in mathematics should consult 
with a member of the Graduate Committee in the Department of Mathematics 
to secure approval, in advance, for his proposed minor program. 

The Mathematics Department Colloquium meets frequently throughout the 
academic year for reports on current research by the resident staff, visiting 
lecturers, and graduate students. In addition the Institute for Fluid Dynamics 
and Applied Mathematics Colloquium meets at frequent intervals for reports 
on research in those fields. All colloquium meetings are open to the public. 



ALGEBRA 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 100. Higher Algebra. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. The algebra of vector spaces 
and matrices, with emphasis upon those aspects of interest to students in applied 
mathematics. (Good.) 



145 



Mathematics 

Math. 103, 104. Introduction to Modern Algebra. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. For Math. 104, the usual prerequisite of 
Math. 103 may be waived upon consent of instructor. In Math. 103 are studied the 
basic concepts of abstract algebra: integral domains, divisibility, congruences; fields, 
ordered fields; the fields of rational numbers, of real numbers, of complex numbers; 
polynomial domains over a field, including classical results on the theory of poly- 
nomial equations with rational, real, or complex coefficients; unique factorization 
domains, irreducibility criteria; rings. In Math. 104 are studied groups, vector spaces, 
linear transformations, matrices. (Rieger.) 

Math. 106. Introduction to the Theory of Numbers. (3) 

Summer school (2). Prerequisites, Math. 21 or equivalent. Integers, divisibility, 
Euclid's algorithm, Diophantine equations, prime numbers, Moebius function, congru- 
ences, residues. (Good.) 



For Graduates 

Math. 200, 201. Modem Algebra. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 103 or consent of instructor. Groups, rings, fields, vectors and 

matrices, linear transformations, linear dependence, rank, canonical forms. (Ehrlich.) 

Math. 202. Linear Algebra. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 201 or consent of instructor. Linear manifolds, the lattice of sub- 
spaces, projectivities, dualities, the ring of endomorphisms, the full linear group and 
its subgroups. (Pearl.) 

Math. 203. Galois Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 201 or consent of instructor. Field extensions, automorphisms of a 
field, the Galois group of a polynomial equation, solvability by radicals, recent develop- 
ments in Galois theory. (Good.) 

Math. 204, 205. Topological Groups. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. An introductory course in abstract groups, topological 
spaces, and the study of collections of elements enjoying both these properties. The 
concept of a uniform space will be introduced and studied. The representation problem 
will be considered together with the subject of Lie groups. (Good.) 

Math. 206. Number Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Foundations, linear and higher congruences, law 
of reciprocity, quadratic forms, sieve methods, elements of additive number theory 
and densitv, distribution of prime numbers and L-functions, discussion of unsolved 
problems. ' (Rieger.) 

Math. 208. Ring Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 201 or consent of instructor. According to the needs of the class, 
emphasis will be placed on one or more of the following: ideal theory, structure theory 
of rings with or without minimum condition, division rings, algebras, nonassociative 
rings. ° (Ehrlich.) 

** 146 



Mathematics 

Math. 209. Group Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 201 or consent of instructor. According to the needs of the class, 
emphasis will be placed on one or more of the following aspects of discrete group 
theory: finite groups, abelian groups, free groups, solvable or nilpotent groups, groups 
with operators, groups with local properties, groups with chain conditions, extensions. 

(Pearl.) 
Math. 271. Selected Topics in Algebra. (3) 
(Arranged.) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

ANALYSIS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 110, 111. Advanced Calculus. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Limits and continuity of real and complex 
functions, Riemann integration, partial differentiation, line and surface integrals, 
infinite series, elements of vector analysis, elements of complex variable theory. 
Emphasis on problems and techniques. (Correl.) 

Math. 114. Differential Equations. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 110 or equivalent. Ordinary differential equa- 
tions, symbolic methods, successive approximations, solutions in series, orthogonal 
functions, Bessel functions, Sturmian theory. (Stellmacher.) 

Math. 115. Partial Differential Equations. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 114 or equivalent. Partial differential equations of first and 
second order, characteristics, boundary value problems, systems of equations, ap- 
plications. (Martin.) 

Math. 116. Introduction to Complex Variable Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Open to students in engineering and the 
physical sciences. Graduate students in mathematics should enroll in Math. 286. 
Fundamental operations in complex numbers, differentiation and integration, sequences 
and series, power series, analytic functions, conformal mapping, residue theory, 
special functions. (MacCarthy.) 

Math. 117. Fourier Series. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 114 or equivalent. Representation of functions by series of 
orthogonal functions. Applications to the solution of boundary value problems of 
some partial differential equations of physics and engineering. (Ludford.) 

For Graduates 

Math. 212. Special functions. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 287 or consent of instructor. Gamma function; 
second order differential equations in the complex domain, regular and irregular 
singularities; hypergeometric functions, Riemann's P-functions, Legendre functions, 
confluent hypergeometric functions, Whittaker functions, Bessel functions. (Diaz.) 

147 ► 



Mathematics 

Math. 215, 216. Advanced Differential Equations. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, Math. 100, 111 and 114, or consent of instructor. Existence and uni- 
queness theorems for systems of ordinary differential equations and for partial differ- 
ential equations, characteristic theory, reduction to normal forms, the methods of 
finite differences. (Horvath.) 

Math. 218. Integral Equations. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Math. 100 and 287, or consent of instructor. Integral 
equations of the first and second kind, Volterra's equation, Abel's equation and 
fractional differentiation; the Fredholm theory, the Hilbert-Schmidt theory, Mercer's 
theorem, expansion in orthonormal series; existence theorems of potential theory and 
other applications. (Douglis.) 

Math. 272. Selected Topics in Analysis. (3) 

(Arranged.) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

Math. 278. Advanced Topics in Complex Analysis. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 288 or consent of instructor. Material selected to suit interests 
and background of the students. Typical topics: Conformal mapping, algebraic 
functions, Riemann surfaces, entire functions, Dirichlet series, Taylor's series, geometric 
function theory. (Hummel.) 

Math. 280, 281. Linear Spaces. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 287 or equivalent. Linear vector spaces and their topologies, 
linear operations and transformations and their inverses, Banach and Hilbert spaces. 

(Fullerton.) 
Math. 286, 287. Theory of Functions. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Math. Ill or equivalent. Basic topics in real and complex variable 
theory, real and complex number systems, point sets on the line and in space, con- 
tinuity, Riemann and Stieltjes integrals, Cauchy integral theorem, residues, power 
series, analytic functions, introduction to Lebesgue measures and integration. (Zedek.) 

Math. 288. Theory of Analytic Functions. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 287 or a course in complex variables. Advanced topics in complex 
function theory, properties of power series, entire functions, conformal mapping, 
classification of singularities, harmonic functions. (Hummel.) 

Math. 289. Measure and Integration. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 287 or a course in real variables. Set functions, abstract theory 
of measure, differentiability properties and absolute continuity of set functions, 
measurable functions, abstract integration theory, introduction to linear spaces. 

(Rosen.) 

GEOMETRY AND TOPOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 122, 123. Elementary Topology. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Open and closed sets, elementary topology of 
the straight line and the Euclidean plane, the Jordan Curve Theorem and its appli- 
cations, simple connectivity. (Correl.) 

<* 148 



Mathematics 

Math. 124, 125. Introduction to Projective Geometry. (3, 3) 
Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Elementary projective geometry largely from 
the analytic approach, projective transformations, cross ratio, harmonic division, 
projective coordinates, projective theory of conies, Laguerre's definition of angle. 

(Mayor.) 

Math. 126, 127. Introduction to Differential Geometry and Tensor Analysis. 

Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Ihe differential geometry of curves and surfaces 
with the use of vector and tensor methods, curvature and torsion, moving frames, 
curvilinear coordinates, the fundamental differential forms, covariant derivatives, 
intrinsic geometry, curves on a surface, applications to problems in dynamics, 
mechanics, electricity, and relativity. (MacCarthy.) 

Math. 128, 129. Higher Geometry. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 21 or consent of instructor. Math. 128 is not a prerequisite for 
Math. 129. Open to students in the College of Education. This course is designed 
for students preparing to teach geometry in high school. The first semester is devoted 
to the modern geometry of the triangle, circle and sphere. In the second semester 
emphasis is placed on the axiomatic development of Euclidean and non-Euclidean 
geometry. (Mayor.) 

For Graduates 

Math. 220, 221. Differential Geometry. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Math. Ill and 152, or consent of instructor. Curves and surfaces, 

geometry in the large, the Gauss-Bonnet formula, surfaces of constant curvature. 

(Jackson.) 
Math. 223, 224. Algebraic Topology. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, Math. 103 and 123, or consent of instructor. Homology, cohomology, 
and homotopy theory of complexes and spaces. (Reinhart.) 

Math. 225, 226. Set-theoretic Topology. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 123 or consent of instructor. Foundations of mathematics based 
on a set of axioms, metric spaces, convergence and connectivity properties of point 
sets, continua and continuous curves, the topology of the plane. (Lehner.) 

Math. 273. Selected Topics in Geometry and Topology. (3) 

(Arranged.) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 130. Probability. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Combinatory analysis, total, 

compound, and inverse probability, continuous distributions, theorems of Bernoulli 

and Laplace, theory of errors. (Karp.) 

149 ► 



Mathematics 

Math. 132. Mathematical Statistics. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Frequency distributions and 

their parameters, multivariate analysis and correlation, theory of sampling, analysis 

of variance, statistical inference. (Karp.) 

Math. 133. Advanced Statistical Analysis. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 132 or equivalent. Advanced methods in corre- 
lation analysis, regression analysis, analysis of variance and sequential analysis, 
curve fitting, testing of hypotheses, non-parametric testing, machine tabulation in 
statistics. (Staff.) 

HISTORY, LOGIC, AND FOUNDATIONS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 140. History of Mathematics. (3) 

Summer session (2). Prerequisite, Math. 21 or consent of instructor. A survey of 
the historical development of mathematics and of the mathematicians who have contribu- 
ted to that development. (Jackson.) 

Math. 146. Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics. (3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 21 or consent of instructor. Construction of the number system 
starting with the Peano Axioms for the natural numbers, development of the algebraic 
structures associated with the integers and rationals, theory of sets, equivalence 
classes, order relations, finite and infinite cardinals, positions of the various number 
systems in the hierarchy of order types. (Karp.) 

For Graduates 

Math. 244. Mathematical Logic. (3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Propositional calculus, predicate calculus and 

relations, formal deduction, the deduction theorem and the decision problem. (Keedy.) 

MATHEMATICAL METHODS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 150, 151. Advanced Mathematics for Engineers and Physicists. (3, 3) 
Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. An introduction to advanced mathematical 
methods and their application to the technical problems of physics and engineering. 
Topics include Fourier series, matrices, ordinary and partial differential equations 
of applied mathematics, numerical methods, Bessel functions, complex variables, opera- 
tional calculus. (Sedgewick.) 

Math. 152. Vector Analysis. (3) 

Summer session (2). Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Algebra and calculus of 

vectors and applications. (Sedgewick.) 

M 150 



Mathematics 

Math. 153. Operational Calculus. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Operational solutions of ordinary 
and partial differential equations, Fourier and Laplace transforms. (Sedgewick.) 

Math. 155. Numerical Analysis. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Math. 110 and 114, or consent of instructor. A brief 
survey of computing machines, study of errors involved in numerical computations, 
the use of desk machines and tables, numerical solution of polynomial and trans- 
cendental equations, interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, ordinary 
differential equations, systems of linear equations. (Good.) 

Math. 156. Programming for High Speed Computers. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. General characteristics of 
high-speed automatic computers; logic of programming, preparation of flow charts, 
preliminary and final coding; scaling, use of floating point routines; construction and 
use of subroutines; use of machine for mathematical operations and for automatic 
coding. Each student will prepare and, if possible, run a problem on a high speed 
computer. (Sinkov.) 

For Graduates 

Math. 250. Tensor Analysis. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Math. 100 and 152, or consent of instructor. Algebra 
and calculus of tensors, Riemannian geometry and its extensions, differential in- 
variants; applications to physics and engineering, and in particular the theory of 
relativity. (Stellmacher.) 

Math. 251. Hilbert Space. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Math. 100 and 287, or consent of instructor. The 
original and general Hilbert space, scalar product, metric strong and weak con- 
vergence, linear functionals, symmetric operators, complete continuity, eigenvalues, 
orthonormal systems, Schwartz-Bessel inequality and Parseval identity, eigenvalues 
in sub-spaces, spectral theorem. (Weinstein.) 

Math. 252. Variational Methods. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 260 or consent of instructor. The Euler- 
Lagrange equation, minimal principles in mathematical physics, estimation of capacity, 
torsional rigidity and other physical quantities; symmetrisation, isoperimetric in- 
equalities, estimation of eigenvalues; the minimax principle. (Payne.) 

Math. 255, 256. Advanced Numerical Analysis. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, Math. 100 and 155, or consent of instructor. Review of numerical dif- 
ferentiation and integration, solution of ordinary differential equations, stability, 
accuracy, use of high-speed digital machines, properties of elliptic, hyperbolic and 
parabolic partial differential equations, conversion of partial differential equations 
to partial difference equations, rates of convergence of relaxation methods, gradient 
methods, iterative methods, the method of characteristics; general methods of solving 
problems, existence and unique theorems for difference equations associated with 
partial differential equations, stability of solutions, perturbation, iterative procedures, 
steepest descent, eigenvalue problems. (Staff.) 

151 ► 



Mathematics 
MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 160, 161. Analytic Mechanics. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 21 or equivalent. Statics, kinematics, dynamics of a particle, 
elementary celestial mechanics, Lagrangian equations for dynamical systems of one, 
two, and three degrees of freedom, Hamilton's principle, the Hamilton-Jacobi partial 
differential equation. (Martin.) 

For Graduates 

Math. 260. Foundations of Mathematical Physics. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. General survey of mathematical 
methods and results employed in various branches of mathematical physics. The fol- 
lowing are among the general topics to be discussed: vector analysis and integral 
identities (Green-Gauss, Stokes, etc.), ordinary and partial differential and differ- 
ence equations, integral equations, formulation of typical boundary and initial value 
problems and indication of the main methods of solution. (Diaz.) 

Math. 261, 262. Fluid Dynamics. O, 3) 

Prerequisite, Math. 260 or consent of instructor. Basic kinematic and dynamic con- 
cepts, equation of continuity, velocity, potential and stream function, vorticity, 
Bernoulli's equation; perfect incompressible fluids, Helmholtz' vorticity theorems, 
plane hydrodynamics, Kutta-Joukowskl theory of lift, conformal mapping, vortices and 
vortex streets, Prandtl-Munk theory of finite wings; viscous fluids, Navier-Stokes 
equations, boundary layer theory; perfect gases, method of characteristics, subsonic, 
transonic, and supersonic flows, hydrograph method, theory of shock waves. (Ludford.) 

Math. 263, 264. Elasticity. (3, 3) 

Prerequisites, Math. 100 and 260, or consent of instructor. Stress and strain, nuclei 
of strain, compatibility equations, Saint-Venant principle, bending, torsion and 
flexure of beams, complex variable methods, Airy's stress function, axial symmetry, 
strain energy and potential energy, buckling, bending, and vibration of plates and 
shells. (Payne.) 

Math. 265. Hyperbolic Differential Equations. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Math. 260 or consent of instructor. Two variables, 
Cauchy's problem, characteristics, Riemann's method, properties of the Riemann 
function, quasi-linear equations and canonical hyperbolic systems, wave equation in 
n-dimensions, methods of Hadamard and Riesz, Euler-Poisson equation and the singular 
problems, Huygens* principle. (Douglis.) 

Math. 266. Elliptic Differential Equations. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Math. 260 or consent of instructor. The equations of 
Laplace and Poisson, flux, the theorems of Gauss and Green, potentials of volume 
and surface distributions, harmonic functions, Green's function and the problems of 
Dirichlet and Neumann; linear elliptic equations with variable coefficients, in 
particular the equations of Stokes and Beltrami; fundamental solutions, the principle 
of the maximum, and boundary value problems; introduction to the theory of non- 
linear equations. (Douglis.) 

** 152 



Mathematics 

Math. 274. Selected Topics in Applied Mathematics. (3) 

(Arranged.) Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

FOR TEACHERS OF MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 181. Foundations of Number Theory. (3) 

Summer session. Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of instruc- 
tor. Designed primarily for those enrolled in programs with emphasis in the teach- 
ing of mathematics and science. Not open to students seeking a major directly in 
the physical sciences, since the course content is usually covered elsewhere in 
their curriculum. Axiomatic development of the real numbers. Elementary number 
theory. (Jackson.) 

Math. 182. Foundations of Algebra. (3) 

Summer session. Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of instructor. 
Designed primarily for those enrolled in programs with emphasis in the teaching of 
mathematics and science. Not open to students seeking a major directly in the physical 
sciences, since the course content is usually covered elsewhere in their curriculum. 
Modern ideas in algebra and topics in the theory of equations. (Cohen.) 

Math. 183. Foundations of Geometry. (3) 

Summer session. Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of instructor. 
Designed primarily for those enrolled in programs with emphasis in the teaching 
of mathematics and science. Not open to students seeking a major directly in the 
physical sciences, since the course content is usually covered elsewhere in their 
curriculum. A study of the axioms for Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry. 

(Jackson.) 
Math. 184. Foundations of Analysis. (3) 

Summer session. Prerequisite, one year of college mathematics or consent of instructor. 
Designed primarily for those enrolled in programs with emphasis in the teaching 
of mathematics and science. Not open to students seeking a major directly in the 
physical sciences, since the course content is usually covered elsewhere in their cur- 
riculum. A study of the limit concept and the calculus. (Previous knowledge of 
calculus is not required.) (Good.) 

Math. 199. National Science Foundation Summer Institute for Teachers of 
Science and Mathematics. Seminar. (2-3) 

(Staff.) 

RESEARCH 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 190, 191. Honors Reading Course. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, permission by the Department to work for honors. Selected reading 
on topics in mathematics of special interest to the student under the guidance of a 
staff member. (Cohen.) 

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Mathematics, Mechanical Engineering 

For Graduates 

Math. 298. Proseminar in Research. Q) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, one semester of graduate work in mathematics. A 
seminar devoted to the foundations of mathematics, including mathematical logic, axiom 
systems, and set theory. (Doughs.) 

Math. 399. Research. 

(Arranged.) (Staff.) 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Professors: jackson and shreeve. 
Associate Professor: alxen. 
Assistant Professor: sayre. 

Instruction and research facilities are available for the degrees of Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in mechanical engineering. 

For the Master of Science degree in mechanical engineering, a minimum 
of six semester hours of course work in mechanical engineering must be taken 
in classes conducted by members of the resident graduate faculty. For the 
Doctor of Philosophy degree, the minimum is eighteen semester hours. 

Registration for six credits of research (M.E. 221, Research) for the M.S. 
degree and twelve credits for the Ph.D. degree are required. It is the policy 
of the Department to require that this research be conducted in the Department 
laboratories. Arrangements for the research, and for faculty supervision, must be 
made, and approved by the Department Chairman, well in advance of the 
registration for the research in order that the funds and equipment may be made 
available. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

M. E. 100. Thermodynamics. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 
20, Math. 21, concurrently. Required of juniors in mechanical and aeronautical 
engineering. The properties, characteristics, and fundamental equations of gases, and 
vapors. Application of the first and second laws of thermodynamics in the analysis 
of basic heat engines, air compression, and vapor cycles. Flow and non-flow processes 
for gases and vapors. (Eyler, Sayre.) 

M.E. 101. Heat Transfer. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, M.E. 100, M.E. 102 concur- 
rently. Basic principles of heat transfer, including a study of conduction by steady 
state and variable heat flow; free and forced convection, radiation, evaporation and 
condensation of vapors, and the application of the principles of heat transfer to design 
problems. (Eyler.) 

^ 154 



Mechanical Engineering 

M. E. 102. Fluid Mechanics. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory a week. Prerequisites, M.E. 100. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. Fluid statics, Bernoulli's equation, principles of impulse and 
momentum analysis, measurements of flow and fluid properties, dimensional analysis 
and dynamic similitude, hydraulic machinery. (Sayre.) 

M. E. 103. Metallography. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 
Prerequisites, M.E. 20, 21, 23. A study of the structure of metals and alloys as related 
to their properties. Study of crystallation, plastic deformation, constitution diagrams, 
heat treatment and effect of alloying elements on ferrous and non-ferrous materials. 
Laboratory work in thermal analysis, microscopy heat treatment and testing of metals. 

(Jackson, Eyler.) 
M. E. 104. Kinematics. (2) 

Second semester. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, M.E. 
24, Math. 21. A study of velocity, acceleration, and displacement of mechanisms, 
cam motion, gearing and gear trains. (Jackson, Hayleck.) 

M. E. 105. Principles of Mechanical Engineering. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 
21, Math. 21. Required of juniors in civil engineering. Elementary thermody- 
namics and the study of heat, fuel and combustion in the production and use of 
steam for generation of power. Supplemented by laboratory tests and trips to industrial 
plants. (Cather, Hurlbrink.) 

M. E. 107. Heat Power— Chemical and Nuclear. (4) 

Second semester. Three lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, M.E. 
100. Required of seniors in electrical engineering. Laboratory fee, $3.00 per semester. 
The study of power plant cycles using as heat sources nuclear reactors, solid, liquid 
and gaseous fuels. Includes analysis and design of such equipment as: reactors, boilers, 
turbines, regenerators and their accessories. (Cather, Hurlbrink.) 

M. E. 150, 151. Heat Power— Chemical and Nuclear. (4, 4) 
First and second semesters. Three lectures and one laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisites, M.E. 100; M.E. 102, concurrently. Required of seniors in mechanical 
engineering. The study of all types of power plants including internal combustion 
engines, gas turbines, and steam stations; using all types of heat sources including 
nuclear reactors, solid, liquid and gaseous fuels. Includes the study of such cycles as 
Otto, Diesel, Brayton, and Rankine. Analysis and design of various components such 
as: reactors, regenerators, turbines, compressors, boilers and condensers. 

(Shreeve, Cather.) 
M. E. 152, 153. Mechanical Engineering Design. (4, 3) 

First semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Second semester. Two 
lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, M.E. 103, M.E. 104. Design 
of machine elements. Machine design projects. Mechanical vibrations. 

(Jackson, Hayleck.) 
M. E. 154, 155. Mechanical Laboratory. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, 
senior standing. Laboratory fee, $3.00 per semester. Required of seniors in mechani- 
cal engineering. Experiments on fuels and lubricants, steam engine and turbines, 

155 ► 



Mechanical Engineering 

air compressors, gasoline and diesel engines and various other mechanical equipment. 
Written reports are required on all tests. (Staff.) 

M. E. 156. Heating and Air Conditioning. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, M.E. 
100; M.E. 101, concurrently. The fundamentals of heating and cooling load computa- 
tions. Basic information on heating and air conditioning systems for residential and 
industrial use. (Allen, Eyler.) 

M. E. 157. Refrigeration. Q'6) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, M.E. 
100, M.E. 101, M.E. 102 concurrently. Laboratory fee, $3.00 per semester. Thermo- 
dynamic analysis of air, vapor compression, absorption and water refrigeration systems. 
Characteristics of refrigerants. Study of refrigeration as applied to cooling and de- 
humidification in air conditioning. Low temperature refrigeration, the heat pump, 
and other special topics. (Allen, Eyler.) 

M. E. 158, 159. Applied Elasticity. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Math. 64, M.E. 23. 
Advanced strength of materials involving beam problems, curved bars, flat plates, shells, 
statically indeterminate structures. Methods of work and energy. (Staff.) 

M. E. 160, 161. Advanced Dynamics. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Math. 64, M.E. 24. 
Linear, plane and three dimensional motion, moving axes, Lagrange's equation, Ham- 
ilton's principle, balancing, vibration, gyroscope, etc. (Staff.) 

M. E. 162, 163. Advanced Thermodynamics. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, M.E. 100, 102; 
Math. 64. Advanced problems in thermodynamics on compression of gases and liquids, 
combustion and equilibrium. Problems in advanced heat transfer. (Allen, Shreeve.) 

M. E. 164. Research. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, "B" average and senior standing in mechanical 

engineering. Arrangements must be made in advance of registration. (Staff.) 

M. E. 165. Creative Engineering. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, senior standing in mechanical engineering. 

Solving design problems in engineering with emphasis on the creative approach. 

(Shreeve.) 
M. E. 166, 167. Advanced Fluid Mechanics. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, M.E. 102, Math. 64. 
Hydrodynamic theory, Navier Stokes equations, subsonic and supersonic compressible 
flow, normal shock theory. Engineering applications. (Sayre.) 

For Graduates 

M. E. 200, 201. Advanced Dynamics. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, M.E. 24, Math. 64, M.E. 153, M.E. 155. 
Mechanics of machinery. Dynamic forces. Balancing of rotating parts. Vibrations and 
virbation damping. Critical speeds. (Staff.) 

+ 156 



Mechanical Engineering 

M. E. 202, 203. Applied Elasticity. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, M.E. 23, Math. 64, M.E. 153. Advanced 
methods in structural and experimental stress analysis. Advanced strength of materials 
involving beam problems, curved bars, thin plates and shells, buckling of bars, plates 
and shells, etc. Advanced work in stress concentrations, plastic deformations, etc., and 
problems involving instability of structures. (Staff.) 

Af. E. 204, 205. Advanced Thermodynamics. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, M.E. 101, M.E. 151, 
Math. 64. Advanced problems in thermodynamics on compression of gases and liquids, 
combustion and equilibrium, humidification and refrigeration and availability. Prob- 
lems in advanced heat transfer covering the effect of radiation, conduction, and convec- 
tion, steady and unsteady flow, evaporation and condensation. (Shreeve, Allen.) 

M. E. 206, 207. Advanced Machine Design. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisites, Math. 64, M.E. 153. Application of advanced methods of stress analysis to 
design of special stationary and moving machine parts, including rotating disks, bear- 
ings, thick wall cylinders, screw fastenings, crankshafts, etc. Application of linear and 
torsional vibration and balancing in the design of machine members. Complete design 
of a machine. Study of current design literature. (Jackson.) 

M. E. 208, 209. Steam Power Design. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequi- 
site, M.E. 151. Design and specifications of power plants with special emphasis on 
central stations heated by conventional fuels and nuclear reactors. Design of all com- 
ponents including turbines, boilers, and reactors. Problems of water treatment and 
waste disposal (atomic and ash) are considered. (Shreeve.) 

M. E. 220, 211. Advanced Fluid Mechanics. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, M.E. 102, Math. 64 or equivalent. 
Potential flow theory; three dimensional flow examples; application of complex variables 
to two-dimensional flow problems; Blasius theorem, circulation and joukowski hy- 
pothesis; engineering applications to cavitation prediction and calculation of pressure 
distribution; introduction to viscous flow and theory of the boundary layer. (Sayre.) 

M. E. 212, 213. Advanced Steam Power Laboratory. (2, 2) 
First and second semesters. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequi- 
site, registration in M.E. 204, 205. Research on advanced steam power problems to 
illustrate and advance steam power theory. Power plant heat balances. (Shreeve.) 

M. E. 2J4, 215. Advanced Applied Mechanics Laboratory. (2, 2) 
First and second semesters. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequi- 
sites, registration in M.E. 200, 201 and M.E. 202, 203. Illustrative experiments and 
research on difficult problems in stress analysis. Photoelasticity. Mechanical vibrations. 
Critical speeds. Dynamic stresses. Fatigue of materials. (Staff.) 

M. E. 216, 217. Advanced Internal Combustion Engine Design. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisites, M.E. 150, 151; M.E. 152, 153 and registration in M.E. 200, 201 and 

157 ► 



Mechanical Engineering 

M.E. 204, 205. Each student will carry out complete designs of internal combustion 
engines. (Shreeve.) 

M. E. 218, 219. Advanced Internal Combustion Engine Laboratory. (2, 2) 
First and second semesters. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Prerequi- 
site, registration in M.E. 216, 217. Advanced laboratory tests and problems in the de- 
sign of internal combustion engines. (Shreeve.) 

M. E. 220. Seminar. 

Credit in accordance with work outlined by the staff of the Department of Mechanical 
Engineering. Prerequisite, graduate standing in mechanical engineering. (Staff.) 

M. E. 222. Advanced Metallography. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, M.E. 
103, M.E. 23. Advanced study of the structure and properties of metals and alloys. 
Study of the latest developments in ferrous and non-ferrous alloys including stainless 
steels, high temperature steels, tool steels, aluminum, magnesium and cooper alloys. 
Study of inspection of metals by the use of x rays, spectograph, metallograph and 
magniflux. Review of current literature. (Jackson.) 

M. E. 223, 224. Steam and Gas Turbine Design. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, M.E. 101, M.E. 151, 
Math. 64. Study of nozzles and blades, with application to all types of turbines and 
compressors based on detailed heat calculations. Design of regenerators and combustors 
for gas turbines. Applications to jet propulsion. Fundamentals of rocket, pulse jet and 
ram jet design. (Shreeve.) 

M. E. 225, 226. Advanced Properties of Metals and Alloys. (2, 2) 
First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, M.E. 23, M.E. 103, 
M.E. 152, M.E. 153. Properties of metals including tensile, impact, fatigue, damping 
capacity, hardenability, wear, etc. Fabrication problems and selection of metals and 
alloys. Service failures. Properties required for nuclear engineering applications. Prop- 
erties of metals at elevated and extremely low temperatures. (Jackson.) 

M. E. 227, 228. Theory of Elasticity. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, M.E. 202, 203. 
Stress and strain at a point. Relation between stresses and strains, general equations of 
elasticity, plane strain and plane stress, torsion, bending, axially symmetric distribution 
cf stress, plates, thermal stresses, strain energy and approximate methods. (Staff.) 

M. E. 229, 230. Jet Propulsion. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, M.E. 101, M.E. 150, 
M.E. 151. Types of thermal jet units. Fluid reaction and propulsive efficiency. Per- 
formance of rockets, aerothermodynamics, combustion chemical kinetics, aerodynamics 
of high speed air flow. Principles and design of solid and liquid propellant rockets. 
Design of turbojets and aerojets, ramjets and hydroduct units, including combustion 
chambers, turbines and compressor. (Shreeve.) 

M. E. 231, 232. Advanced Heat Transfer. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, M.E. 101. Advanced 

-55 158 



Mechanical Engineering, Microbiology 

problems covering effects of radiation, conduction, convection, evaporation and conden- 
sation. Study of research literature on heat transfer. (Shreeve, Allen.) 

M. E. 233, 234. Compressible Flow. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, M.E. 100, M.E. 102, Math. 64 or equivalent. 
One dimensional subsonic and supersonic flow; compressible flow in ducts and nozzles; 
two and three dimensional subsonic and supersonic flow; similarity rules; normal and 
oblique shock waves. (Sayre.) 

M. E. 399. Research. 

Credit in accordance with work outlined by the staff of the Department of Mechanical 
Engineering. Prerequisite, graduate standing in mechanical engineering. Research in 
any field of mechanical engineering as applied mechanics, heat transfer, thremodynamics, 
heat, power, etc. (Staff.) 

MICROBIOLOGY 

Professors: faber, hansen and pelczar. 
Associate Professors: laffer and doetsch. 
Visiting Professor: gordon. 
Lecturer: stadtman. 

The Department of Microbiology offers the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Graduate students associated with institutions away from College Park 
campus are required to take a minimum of 12 credit hours, exclusive of research, 
during one semester at College Park for the degree of Master of Science, and a 
minimum of 24 credit hours, exclusive of research, during two semesters at 
College Park for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

The research project, the experimental approach employed, and progress 
made must meet with the approval of the Head of the Department. 

Further information concerning graduate work in microbiology may be 
obtained from the Department. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Microb. 101. Pathogenic Microbiology. (4) 

First semester. Two lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 
Microb. 5. Laboratory fee, $11.00. The role of microorganisms in the diseases of man 
and animals with emphasis upon the differentiation and culture of microorganisms, 
types of disease, modes of disease transmission; prophylactic, therapeutic and epidemio- 
logical aspects. (Faber.) 

Microb. 103. Serology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, Microb. 101. Laboratory fee, $11.00. Infection and resistance; principles 

159 ► 



Microbiology 

and types of immunity; hypersensitiveness. Fundamental techniques of major 
diagnostic immunological reactions and their application. (Faber.) 

Microb. 104. History of Microbiology. (2) 

First semester. One lecture period a week. Prerequisite, a major or minor in microbi 
ology. History and integration of the fundamental discoveries of the science. The 
modern aspects of cytology, taxonomy, fermentation, and immunity in relation to 
early theories. (Doetsch.) 

Microb. 105. Clinical Methods. (4) 

First semester. Two lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 
consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, $11.00. A practical course designed to integrate 
clinical laboratory procedures in terms of hospital and public health demands. (Faber.) 

Microb. 108. Epidemiology and Public Health. (2) 

Second semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, Microb. 1. History, 

characteristic features, and epidemiology of the important communicable diseases; 

public health administration and responsibilities; vital statistics. (Faber.) 

Microb. 121. Advanced Methods. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, $11.00. The application of quan- 
titative techniques for the measurement of enzyme reactions, mutations, fermentation 
analyses and other physiological processes of microorganisms. (Hansen, Pelczar.) 

Microb. 131. Food and Sanitary Microbiology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, Microb. 1. Laboratory fee, $11.00. The relationship of microorganisms to 
fresh and preserved food and methods of control. Bacteriological and public health 
aspects of water supplies and sewage disposal, restaurant and plant sanitation, insect 
and rodent control. (Laffer.) 

Microb. 133. Dairy Microbiology. (4) 

First semester. Two lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 
Microb. 1. Laboratory fee, $11.00. Relation of bacteria, yeasts, and molds to milk, 
cream, butter, ice cream, cheese, and other dairy products. Standard methods of ex- 
amination, public health requirements, plant sanitation. Occasional inspection trips. 

(Doetsch.) 
Microb. 135. Soil Microbiology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, Microb. 1. Laboratory fee, $11.00. The role played by microorganisms in 
the soil; nitrification, denitrification, nitrogen-fixation, and decomposition processes; 
cycles of elements; relationships of microorganisms to soil fertility. (Hansen.) 

Microb. 150. Microbial Physiology. (2) 

Second semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, 8 credits in microbiology. 
Aspects of the growth, death, and energy transactions of microorganisms are considered, 
as well as the effects of the physical and chemical environment on them. (Doetsch.) 

Microb. 161. Systematic Bacteriology. (2) 

First semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, 8 credits in microbiology. 

< 160 



Microbiology 

History of bacterial classification; international codes of nomenclature; bacterial varia- 
tion as it affects classification. (Hansen.) 

Microh. 181. Microbiological Problems. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. Prerequisite, 16 credits in microbiology. 
Laboratory fee, $11.00. Registration only upon the consent of the instructor. This 
course is arranged to provide qualified majors in microbiology and majors in allied 
fields an opportunity to pursue specific microbiological problems under the super- 
vision of a member of the Department. (Faber.) 

For Graduates 

Mlcrob. 201. Medical Mycology. (4) 

First semester. Two lecture and two two-hour laborntorv periods a week. Prerequisite, 
30 credits in microbiology and allied fields. Laboratory fee, $11.00. Primarily a study 
of the fungi associated with disease and practice in the methods of isolation and 
identification. (Laffer.) 

Microb. 202. Genetics of Microorganisms. (2) 

Second semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 
An introduction to genetic principles and methodology applicable to microorganisms. 
Spontaneous and induced mutations, interaction between clones. (Hansen.) 

Microb. 204. Bacterial Metabolism. (2) 

First semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisites, 30 credits in microbiology 
and allied fields, including Chem. 161 and 162. Bacterial nutrition, enzyme formation, 
metabolic pathways and the dissimilation of carbon and nitrogen substrates. (Pelczar.) 

Microb. 206, 208. Special Topics. (I, I) 

First and second semesters. One lecture period a week. Prerequisite, 20 credits in 
microbiology. Presentation and discussion of fundamental problems and special sub- 
jects in the field of microbiology. (Staff.) 

Microb. 210. Virology and Tissue Culture. (2) 

Second semester. Two lecture periods a week. Prerequisite, Microb. 101 or equivalent. 
Characteristics and general properties of viruses and rickettsiae. Principles of tissue 
culture. (Gordon.) 

Microb. 211. Virology and Tissue Culture Laboratory. (2) 
Second semester. Two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Microb. 
101 or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $20.00. Registration only upon consent of in- 
structor. Laboratory methods in virology and tissue culture. (Gordon.) 

Microb. 214. Advanced Bacterial Metabolism. (I) 

Second semester. One lecture period a week. Prerequisite, Microb. 204 and consent 
of instructor. A discussion of recent advances in the field of bacterial metabolism with 
emphasis on metabolic pathways of microorganisms. (Pelczar.) 

Microb. 280. Seminar— Research Methods. (I) 

First semester. Discussions and reports by majors in microbiology engaged in current 

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Microbiology 

research; presentations of selected subjects dealing with recent advances in micro- 
biology. (Staff.) 

Microb. 282. Seminar— Microbiological Literature. (I) 

Second semester. Presentation and discussion of current literature in microbiology. 

(Staff.) 
Microb. 399. Research. 

First and second semesters; summer session. Credits according to work done. 
Laboratory fee, $11.00. The investigation is outlined in consultation with, and pur- 
sued under, the supervision of a senior staff member of the Department. (Staff.) 

MUSIC 

Professors: ulrich, grentzer and randall. 

Associate Professor: jordan. 

Assistant Professors: berman and Henderson. 

Certain courses in the Department of Music numbered 100 and above may be 
taken by candidates for graduate degrees in the College of Education. Students 
should consult their graduate advisers for details. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Music 120, 121. History of Music. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Music 1 or 20 and junior standing. A study 
of musical styles from their origins in western Europe to their present-day manifesta- 
tions. The interaction of music and other cultural activities. Music 120, the Greek 
period to Bach; Music 121, Bach to the present. (Jordan.) 

Music 141, 142. Musical Form. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Music 70, 71. A study of the organizing 
principles of musical composition, their interaction in musical forms, and their 
functions in different styles. Music 141, the phrase to the rondo; Music 142, the 
larger forms. (Jordan.) 

Music 143, 144. Composition. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Music 70, 71. The principles of musical 
composition, and their application to the smaller forms. Original writing in nineteenth- 
and twentieth-century musical idioms for various media. (Staff.) 

Music 145, 146. Counterpoint. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Music 70, 71. A course in eighteenth- 
century contrapuntal techniques. Study of devices of imitation in the invention and 
the choral prelude. Original writing in the smaller contrapuntal forms. 

(Bernstein.) 
Music 147, 148. Orchestration. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Music 70, 71. A study of the ranges, 
musical functions, and technical characteristics of the instruments, and their color 

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Music 

possibilities in various combinations. Practical experience in orchestrating for small 
and large ensembles. (Jordan.) 

Music 150. Keyboard Harmony. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Music 70, 71. One lecture and two laboratory hours 
per week. The application to the piano keyboard of the harmonic principles acquired 
in Music 70 and 71. Harmonization of melodies, improvisation and accompanying, 
playing from dictation, and transposition. (Meyer.) 

Music 160, 161. Conducting. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Music 160 or the equivalent is prerequisite to Music 161. 
A laboratory course in conducting vocal and instrumental groups. Baton technique, 
score reading, rehearsal techniques, tone production, style, and interpretation. Music 
of all periods will be introduced. (Grentzer, Henderson.) 

Music 166. Survey of the Opera. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Music 120, 121 or the equivalent. A study of the 

music, librettos, and composers of the standard operas. (Randall.) 

Music 167. Symphonic Music. (3) 

First semester; summer session (2). Prerequisite, Music 120, 121 or the equivalent. 
The study of orchestral music from the Baroque period to the present. The con- 
certo, symphony, overture, and other forms are examined. (Jordan.) 

Music 168. Chamber Music. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Music 120, 121 or the equivalent. The history 
and literature of chamber music from the early Baroque period to the present. Music 
for trio sonata, string quartet and quintet, and combinations of piano and string 
instruments is studied. (Ulrich.) 

Music 169. Choral Music. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Music 120, 121 or the equivalent. The history and 
literature of choral music from the Renaissance to the present, with discussion of 
related topics such as Gregorian chant, vocal chamber music, etc. (Jordan.) 

For Graduates 

Music 200. Advanced Studies in the History of Music. (3) 
First semester. Prerequisite, Music 120, 121, and consent of instructor. A critical 
study of one style period (Renaissance, Baroque, etc.) will be undertaken. The 
course may be repeated for credit, since a different period will be chosen each time 
it is offered. (Jordan.) 

Music 201. Seminar in Musicology. (3) 

Prerequisites, Music 120, 121, and consent of instructor. The work of one major 
composer (Bach, Beethoven, etc.) will be studied, with emphasis on musicological 
method. The course may be repeated for credit, since a different composer will be 
chosen each time it is offered. (Jordan.) 

163 ► 



PHILOSOPHY 

Professor: garvin. 

Associate Professors: lavdste and schlaretzki. 

Assistant Professor: Leslie. 

Instructor: diamadopoulos. 

The Department of Philosophy offers the degrees of Master of Arts and 
Doctor of Philosophy. 

A statement of departmental requirements for these degrees, supplementary 
to the requirements of the Graduate School, may be obtained on request from 
the Department. 

Courses numbered below 150 will not be accepted for graduate credit in a 
philosophy major. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Phil 101. Ancient Philosophy . (3) 

First semester. A history of Greek thought from its beginnings to the time of Justin- 
ian. The chief figures discussed: the Presocratic philosophers, Socrates, Plato, Aris- 
totle, Epicurus, the Stoic philosophers and Plotinus. (Diamadopoulos.) 

Phil. 102. Modern Philosophy. (3) 

Second semester. A history of philosophical thought in the West during the 16th, 
17th, and 18th centuries. The chief figures discussed: Bacon, Galileo, Descartes, 
Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume and Kant. (Schlaretzki, Lavine.) 

Phil 120. Oriental Philosophy. (3) 

Second semester. A brief survey of Indian and Chinese philosophy. Discussion of 
Indian thought will center about the Rig- Veda, the Upanishads, the Buddhist philos- 
ophers, and the chief Hindu systems. Discussion of Chinese thought will center 
about Confucius, Lao-tse and their disciples, particular attention being given to the 
development of democratic ideals from Mencius to Sun Yat-sen. (Leslie.) 

Phil. 123, 124. Philosophies Men Live By. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Phil. 123, extension (3). Designed as electives for stu- 
dents who wish to acquaint themselves with the field of philosophy. Phil. 123 not 
necessarily a prerequisite for Phil. 124. An exploration of the fundamental beliefs 
which determine what men make of their lives and of the world they live in. Each 
semester classic statements of these beliefs by great philosophers will be chosen for 
class discussion on the basis of their significance for the problems confronting mod- 
ern man. (Staff.) 

Phil 125. The Great Philosophers. (3) 

Offered in Baltimore only. A discussion of the ideas of the great Western philoso- 
phers, based on readings in their works. (Staff.) 

< 164 



Philosophy 

Phil. 130. Tlie Conflict of Ideals in Western Civilization. (3) 

First semester. A critical and constructive philosophical examination of the assump- 
tions, goals, and methods of contemporary democracy, fascism, socialism, and com- 
munism, with special attention to the ideological conflict between the United States 
and Russia. (Schlaretzki.) 

Phil. 140. Philosophical Bases of Educational Theories. (3) 

Second semester. A critical study of the foundations of major views regarding the 
proper ends of education and the implications of these views for educational practice. 

(Staff.) 
Phil 145. Ethics. (3) 

Second semester. A critical study of the problems and theories of human conduct, 
aimed at developing such principles of ethical criticism as may be applied to con- 
temporary personal and social problems and to the formulation of an ethical philoso- 
phy of life. (Schlaretzki, Garvin.) 

Phil 147. Philosophy of Art. (3) 

Second semester. An inquiry into the nature and functions of art. The course will 
begin with an examination of the relations between art and imitation, art and craft, 
art and beauty, art and pleasure, art and form, art and expression, art and not-art, 
and good, bad, and great art, and conclude with a consideration of the uses of art, 
propagandists, religious, escapist, and therapeutic. (Garvin.) 

Phil. 152. Philosophy of Social and Historical Change. (3) 
First semester. A survey and an assessment of the religious, the philosophic, and 
the scientific approaches to socio-historic change, including the theories of linear 
progress, evolutionary progress, cyclical repetition, Hegelian-Marxian dialectic, Web- 
erian secularization and bureaucratization. (Lavine.) 

Phil. 154. Political and Social Philosophy. (3) 

Second semester. An inquiry into the nature and functions of society and of the state. 
Attention is given to the major classical and contemporary theories, but the course is 
not primarily historical. The central problems: determination of the grounds of political 
obligation; reconciliation of the claims of personal freedom and social welfare. 

(Schlaretzki.) 
Phil 155. Logic. (3) 

Second semester. A critical exposition of deductive logic. The course includes an 
examination and appraisal of Aristotelian logic and a systematic presentation of the 
foundations of modern symbolic logic. Consideration is given to the application of the 
techniques of logic in the organization of knowledge and in scientific method. 

(Garvin.) 
Phil. 156. Philosophy of Science. (3) 

First semester. An inquiry into the relations of the sciences, the nature of observa- 
tion, hypotheses, verification, experiment, measurement, scientific laws and theories, 
the basic concepts and presuppositions of science, and the relations of science to 
society. (Lavine.) 

Phil 158. Philosophy of Language. (3) 

Second semester. An inquiry into the nature and function of language and other 

forms of symbolism. (Schlaretzki.) 

165 ► 



Philosophy 

Phil. 160. Medieval Philosophy. (3) 

First semester. A history of philosophical thought in the West from the close of the 
Classical period to the Renaissance. Based upon readings in the Stoics, early Christian 
writers, Neoplatonists, later Christian writers and Schoolmen. (Staff.) 

Phil. 162. American Philosophy. (3) 

Second semester. A survey of American philosophical thought from the 18th cen- 
tury to the present. Special attention is given to Edwards, Jefferson, Emerson, Royce, 
Peirce, James, Dewey and Santayana. (Schlaretzki.) 

Phil. 163. Nineteenth Century Idealism. (3) 

First semester. A survey of idealist thought following Kant: the Romantic Idealists, 

Hegel, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, the British School. (Garvin.) 

Phil. 164. Contemporary Movements in Philosophy. (3) 

First semester. A survey of recent and present developments in philosophy. Atten- 
tion will be given to such thinkers as James, Bergson, Russell, Dewey, and White- 
head and to such movements as Pragmatism, Idealism, Naturalism, Positivism, and 
Existentialism. Particular consideration will be paid to the bearing of these develop- 
ments on contemporary problems of science, religion and society. (Garvin.) 

Phil. 166. The Philosophy of Plato. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Phil. 101 or consent of the instructor. A critical study 

of selected dialogues. (Diamadopoulos.) 

Phil. 167. The Philosophy of Aristotle. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Phil. 101 or consent of the instructor. A critical study 

of selected portions of Aristotle's writings. (Diamadopoulos.) 

Phil. 168. The Philosophy of Kant. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Phil. 102 or consent of the instructor. A critical study 

of selected portions of Kant's writings. (Staff.) 

Phil. 170. Metaphysics. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, 3 hours of philosophy. A critical study of rival metaphysi- 
cal theories. Analysis of basic metaphysical categories and methods. (Staff.) 

Phil. 171. Epistemology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, 3 hours of philosophy. Systematic analysis of the 
central problems in the theory of knowledge. Idealism, realism, phenomenalism, 
pragmatism, empiricism, rationalism, positivism, and language analysis will be dis- 
cussed in the light of contemporary developments. (Staff.) 

Phil. 175. Symbolic Logic. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Phil. 41 or 155 or consent of the instructor. A study 
of the historical development of symbolic logic and a careful analysis of recent systems 
and techniques. (Garvin.) 

Phil. 191, 192, 193, 194. Topical Investigations. (1-3) 

Each semester. (Staff.) 

■* 166 



Philosophy, Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

For Graduates 

Phil. 215. Advanced Philosophy of Religion. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Philosophical consideration of 

selected problems. (Staff.) 

Phil. 220. Inductive Logic and Scientific Method. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. An examination of the logic of 

scientific procedure and of the structure and validity of scientific generalization. 

(Staff.) 
Phil. 230. The British Empiricists. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A critical study of selected writings 
of Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. (Staff.) 

Phil. 232. The Continental Rationalists. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. A critical study of the 
systems of some of the major 17th and 18th century rationalists, with special reference 
to Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz. (Staff.) 

Phil. 255. Seminar in the History of Philosophy. (2-3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

Phil. 256. Seminar in the Prohlems of Philosophy. (1-3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

Phil. 260. Seminar in Ethics. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. An examination of representative 

ethical theories. (Staff.) 

Phil. 261. Seminar in Aesthetics. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. An examination of representative 

aesthetic theories. (Staff.) 

Phil. 292. Selected Prohlems in Philosophy. O^ 

Each semester. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

Phil. 399. Research. (I-J2) 

Each semester. (Staff.) 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION AND HEALTH 

Professors: fraley, deach, Humphrey, johnson, massey and mohr. 
Associate Professors: eyler, harvey and husman. 

The graduate student majoring in physical education, recreation, or health 
education may pursue any of the following degrees: Master of Arts in physical 
education, Doctor of Education, and Doctor of Philosophy. Undergraduate 
requirements to be met by every candidate before admission to candidacy 
for a graduate degree in physical education are: basic sciences (human anatomy 
and physiology, physiology of exercise), kinesiology, therapeutics, sport skills, 

167 ► 



Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

methods, human development, measurement, administration, and student teach- 
ing. In eases where a student has had successful experience in teaching 
physical education, the prerequisites of sport skills, methods, and student teach- 
ing may be waived. Undergraduate prerequisites in recreation are: psychology, 
sociology, principles, administration, basic sciences, recreational activities, and 
practical experience. Undergraduate prerequisites in health education are: 
biological sciences, bacteriology, human anatomy and physiology, nutrition, 
chemistry, psychology, measurement, administration, principles, and field work. 

Every graduate student majoring in physical education and recreation is 
required to take the following courses: P.E. 201— Foundations in Physical Educa- 
tion, Recreation and Health; P.E. 210— Methods and Techniques of Research; 
and P.E. 196— Quantitative Methods or P.E. 230— Source Material Survey. 
Health education majors must fulfill the same requirements except that Hea. 
220— Scientific Foundations of Health Education, is taken in lieu of P.E. 201. 
In addition, every graduate student must register for and complete P.E. 200— 
Seminar in Physical Education, Recreation, and Health, at some time during 
his graduate program. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

For Graduates and Advanced U nder graduates 

P. E. 100. Kinesiology. (4) 

First and second semesters; summer session. Three lectures and two laboratory hours a 

week. Prerequisites, Zool. 1, 14, and 15, or the equivalent. (Massey.) 

P. E. 120. Physical Education for the Elementary School. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Humphrey.) 

P. E. 155. Physical Fitness of the Individual. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Massey.) 

P. E. 160. Theory of Exercise. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. Prerequisite, P. E. 100. (Massey.) 

P. E. 170. Supervision in Elementary School Physical Education. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. Prerequisite, P. E. 120. (Humphrey.) 

P. E. 180. Measurement in Physical Education and Health. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. Two lectures and two laboratory periods 

a week. (Eyler, Mohr.) 

P. E. 182. History of Dance. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, P. E. 52, 54, 56, 58, or permission of instructor. 

(Madden.) 

P. E. 184. Theory and Philosophy of Dance. (3) 

First and second semesters. (Madden.) 

+ 168 



Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

P. E. 189. Field Laboratory Projects and Workshop. Cl-6) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

P. E. 190. Administration and Supervision of Physical Education, Recreation 

and Health. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Johnson.) 

P. E. 191. The Curriculum in Elementary School Physical Education. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. Prerequisite, P. E. 120. (Humphrey.) 

P. E. 195. Organization and Administration of Elementary School Physical 

Education. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. Prerequisite, P. E. 120. (Humphrey.) 

P. E. 196. Quantitative Methods. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Massey.) 

For Graduates 

P. E. 200. Seminar in Physical Education, Recreation and Health. (I) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Massey.) 

P. E. 201. Foundations in Physical Education, Recreation and Health. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Eyler.) 

P. E. 202. Status and Trends in Elementary School Physical Education. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Humphrey.) 

P. E. 203. Supervisory Techniques in Physical Education, Recreation and 

Health. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Mohr.) 

P. E. 204. Physical Education and the Development of the Child. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. Three lectures a week. (Humphrey.) 

P. E. 205. Analysis of Contemporary Athletics. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Husman.) 

P. E. 220. Methods and Techniques of Research. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Mohr.) 

P. E. 215. Principles and Techniques of Evaluation. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Mohr.) 

P. E. 230. Source Material Survey. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Eyler.) 

P. E. 250. Mental and Emotional Aspects of Sports and Recreation. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Johnson.) 

169 ► 



Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

P. E. 280. Scientific Bases of Exercise. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Massey.) 

P. E. 287. Advanced Seminar. (1-2) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Deach.) 

P. E. 288. Special Problems in Physical Education, Recreation and Health. 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

P. E. 290. Administrative Direction of Physical Education, Recreation and 

Health. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Deach.) 

P. E. 291. Curriculum Construction in Physical Education and Health. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Deach, Mohr.) 

P. E. 399. Research. (IS) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Hea. 150. Health Problems of Children and Youth. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Johnson.) 

Hea. 160. Problems in School Health Education in Elementary and Secondary 

Schools. (2-6) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Johnson, Staff.) 

Hea. 170. The Health Program in the Elementary School. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. Prerequisites, Hea. 2 and 4, or Hea. 40. 

(Humphrey.) 
Hea. 178. Fundamentals of Sex Education. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Johnson.) 

Hea. 180. Measurement in Physical Education and Health. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Eyler, Mohr.) 

Hea. 189. Field Laboratory Projects and Workshop. (1-6) 

First and semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

Hea. 190. Administration and Supervision of School Health Education. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Johnson.) 

For Graduates 

Hea. 200. Seminar in Physical Education, Recreation and Health. (1) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Massey.) 

^ 170 



Physical Education, Recreation and Health 



Hea. 203. Supervisory Techniques in Physical Education, Recreation and 

Health. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Mohr.) 

Hea. 210. Methods and Techniques of Research. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Mohr.) 

Hea. 220. Scientific Foundations of Health Education. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Johnson.) 

Hea. 230. Source Material Survey. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Eyler.) 

Hea. 240. Modern Theories of Health. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Johnson.) 

Hea. 250. Health Problems in Guidance. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Johnson.) 

Hea. 260. Public Health Education. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Johnson.) 

Hea. 280. Scientific Bases of Exercise. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Massey.) 

Hea. 287. Advanced Seminar. (1-2) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Deach.) 

Hea. 288. Special Problems in Physical Education, Recreation and Health. 

0-6) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

Hea. 290. Administrative Direction of Physical Education, Recreation and 

Health. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Deach.) 

Hea. 291. Curriculum Construction in Physical Education and Health. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Mohr.) 

Hea. 399. Research. (1-5) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

RECREATION 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Rec. 120. Program Planning. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Rec. 30. (Harvey.) 

Rec. 150. Camp Management. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Harvey.) 

171 ► 



Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

Rec. 180. Leadership Techniques and Practices. (3) 

First and second semesters. (Harvey.) 

Rec. SI 84. Outdoor Education. (6) 

Summer only. (Staff.) 

Rec. 189. Field Laboratory Projects and Workshops. Ql-6~) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

Rec. 190. Organization and Administration of Recreation. (3) 

First and second semesters. (Harvey.) 

For Graduates 

Rec. 200. Seminar in Physical Education, Recreation and Health. (2) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Massey.) 

Rec. 201. Foundations in Physical Education, Recreation and Flealth. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Eyler.) 

Rec. 202. Philosophy of Recreation. (2) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Harvey.) 

Rec. 203. Supervisory Techniques in Physical Education, Recreation and 

Health. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Mohr.) 

Rec. 204. Modern Trends in Recreation. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Harvey.) 

Rec. 210. Methods and Techniques of Research. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Mohr.) 

Rec. 215. Principles and Techniques of Evaluation. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Mohr.) 

Rec. 230. Source Material Survey. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Eyler.) 

Rec. 240. Industrial Recreation. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Harvey.) 

Rec. 260. Hospital Recreation. (3) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Harvey.) 

Rec. 287. Advanced Seminar. (J -2) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Deach.) 

Rec. 288. Special Problems in Physical Education, Recreation and Health. 

0-6) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

** 172 



Physics 

Rec. 290. Administrative Direction of Physical Education, Recreation and 

Health. (3) 
First and second semesters; summer session. (Deach.) 

Rec. 399. Research. Q-5) 

First and second semesters; summer session. (Staff.) 

PHYSICS 

Professors: toll, ferrell, morgan, myers, singer and weber. 

Research Professors: burgers* and montroll*. 

Visiting Research Professors: farago, opik and weske*. 

Part-time Professors: delaunay and herzfeld. 

Associate Professors: Anderson, hornyak, iskraut, laster, macdonald and 

snow. 
Associate Research Professor: hama*. 

Assistant Professors: griem, marion, rodberg, Steinberg, stern and sucher. 
Assistant Research Professors: day, detenbeck, kasner, maradudin* and 

WEYMANN*. 

Research Associates: ayres, chopra, coldwell-horsfall, fujimoto, kohin, 

ONEDA, PAL, PERETTI*, PRAKASH, PRATS AND WIESE. 

Research Affiliate: burger. 

Part-time Lecturers: aitken, allen, bass, bennett, clark, drachtman, drum- 
meter, FRIEDMAN, GREEN, HAYWARD, JACKSON, JASTROW, KAHN, LIDE, MAR- 
TON, OPPENHEIM, OROURKE, OVERTON, RAFF, SAENZ, SCOTT, SHAPIRO, SLAWSKY, 
SNAVELY, F. STERN, TEMMER,WADA, WOLCOTT AND ZEMEL. 

It is expected that the following courses should have been taken prelim- 
inary to graduate work. Any deficiencies should be made up at once. A limited 
amount of graduate credit will be allowed for courses so taken. 

General Physics Electricity and Magnetism 

Heat Modern Physics 

Intermediate Mechanics Differential and Integral Calculus 

Optics Advanced Calculus 

Candidates for both the master's and doctor's degrees are required to take 
Introduction to Theoretical Physics (Phys. 200, 201). The course runs for a 
full year and carries 12 semester hours credit. The minimum prerequisites in 
mathematics are differential and integral calculus, but advanced calculus, differ- 
ential equations, and vector analysis are recommended. 

Candidates for the doctor's degree should take both the Introduction to 
Theoretical Physics and Quantum Mechanics. No other courses are specifical- 
ly required for students doing experimental thesis research, but Relativisric 
Quantum Mechanics is required for students doing dissertations in theoretical 
physics. It is recommended in the selection of further courses that the stu- 

* Member of the Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics. 

173 ► 



Physics 

dent avoid overspecialization in any field. In particular, he should take a wide 
variety of classical courses as well as courses in selected fields of modern physics. 
Some of the advanced courses are given only every second or third year; the 
student should check with the Physics Department to confirm when a given 
course is available. 

Candidates for advanced degrees in physics may have a minor in either 
chemistry, mathematics, engineering, and/or in those fields of physics other 
than general physics and their field of major specialization. 

Thesis (Ph.D.): 

The student must outline his topic to the graduate staff for approval. 
This outline must clearly set forth the nature of the problem, proposed method 
of procedure and the possible results that may be obtained. The completed 
thesis will also be presented to the graduate staff for approval. 

Off-Campus Courses: 

The Physics Department offers courses at convenient times and places so as 
to accommodate the greatest number of students. In order to facilitate graduate 
study in the Washington area, the Department has part-time professors in certain 
government laboratories where a large number of students are interested in grad- 
uate study. All students who began graduate work in the University of Maryland 
courses after 1954 will be required to complete on the College Park campus at 
least 18 credits of their graduate work for the Ph.D. degree in physics: these 
credits must include at least 2 credits of Phys. 230— Seminar, and the remainder 
can be divided among major and minor courses and thesis research. Normally, 
students will complete a much greater proportion of their graduate study on the 
College Park campus. At government agencies where there is no part-time 
professor, employees desiring to do graduate work in physics should contact 
a member of the graduate staff in the Physics Department. 

Further Information: 

For more information, students should write the Physics Department for 
the departmental publication entitled "Graduate Study in Physics." 

GENERAL PHYSICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Phys. 100. Advanced Experiments. (2 credits yer semester') 
Four hours of laboratory work per week. Prerequisite, four credits of Phys. 60 or 
consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, $10.00 per semester. Selected fundamental 
experiments in electricity and magnetism, elementary electronics, and optics. 

(Marion.) 

M 174 



Physics 

Phys. 102. Optics. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 11 or 21; Math. 21. 
It is suggested, but not required, that Phys. 60 or Phys. 100 be taken concurrently 
with this course. Geometrical optics, optical instruments, wave motion, interference 
and diffraction, and other phenomena in physical optics. (Rodberg.) 

Phys. 103. Applied Optics. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 102. A detailed study of 

physical optics and its applications. (Morgan.) 

Phys. 104, 105. Electricity and Magnetism. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 11 or 21; 
Math. 21. Electrostatics, direct current and alternating current circuitry, electro- 
magnetic effects of steady currents, electromagnetic induction, radiation, development 
of Maxwell's equations, Poynting vector, wave equations, and electronics. (Griem.) 

Phys. 106, 107. Theoretical Mechanics. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 51 or consent 
of instructor. A detailed study of Newtonian mechanics. Dynamics, the motion of 
rigid bodies, oscillation problems, etc., are studied. Lagrange's equation of the first 
kind and the Hamilton-Jacobi equation are introduced. (Singer.) 

Phys. 108. Physics of Electron Tubes. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 104 must be taken previous- 
ly or concurrently. A study of the electromagnetic principles relevant to electron tubes 
and of their applications. (Steinberg.) 

Phys. 109. Electronic Circuits. (4) 

Second semester. Four lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 105 must be taken 
previously or concurrently. Theory of physics detectors and pulse circuits. Applica- 
tion in circuit design. (Detenbeck.) 

Phys. 110. Special Laboratory Projects in Physics. (I, 2, or 3) 
Two hours laboratory work a week for each credit hour. One to three credits may 
be taken concurrently, each semester. Prerequisite, Phys. 100 and consent of 
adviser. Laboratory fee, $10.00 per credit hour. Selected advanced experiments. (Staff.) 

Phys. 111. Physics Shop Techniques, (i) 

First semester. One three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite, Phys. 100 or con- 
sent of instructor. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Machine tools, design and construction of 
laboratory equipment. (Horn.) 

Phys. 114, 115. Introduction to Biophysics. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, intermediate physics 
and Math. 21. A study of the physical principles involved in biological processes, with 
particular emphasis on current research in biophysics. (Britten.) 

Phys. 118. Introduction to Modern Physics. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, general physics and integral 
calculus, with some knowledge of differential equations and a degree of maturity as 
evidenced by having taken one or more of the courses Phys. 50 through Phys. 110. 

175 ► 



Physics 

Introductory discussion of special relativity, origin of quantum theory, Bohr atom, 
wave mechanics, atomic structure, and optical spectra. (Hornyak.) 

Phys. 119. Modern Physics. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 118. A survey of 
nuclear physics, x-rays, radioactivity, wave mechanics, and cosmic radiation. (Stern.) 

Phys. 130, 131. Basic Concepts of Physics. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, junior standing. Lecture 
demonstration fee, $2.00 per semester. A primarily descriptive course intended mainly 
for those students in the liberal arts who have not had any other course in physics. 
This course does not satisfy the requirements of professional schools nor serve as a 
prerequisite or substitute for other physics courses. The main emphasis in the course 
will be on the concepts of physics, their evolution and their relation to other branches 
of human endeavor. (Laster.) 

Phys. 140, 141. Atomic and Nuclear Physics Laboratory. (3, 3) 
One lecture and four hours of laboratory a week. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Prerequisites, 
two credits of Phys. 100 and consent of instructor. Classical experiments in atomic 
physics and more sophisticated experiments in current techniques in nuclear physics. 
Enrollment is limited to ten students. (Marion.) 

For Graduates 

Phys. 200, 201. Introduction to Theoretical Physics. (6, 6) 
First and second semesters. Six lecture hours per week. Prerequisite, Phys. 106 or 
consent of instructor. This basic course for graduate study in physics covers advanced 
classical mechanics, electrodynamics, relativity, thermodynamics, and statistical 
mechanics. (Myers.) 

Phys. 202, 203. Advanced Dynamics. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 200. A detailed 

study of advanced classical mechanics. (Myers.) 

Phys. 204. Electrodynamics. (4) 

Four lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 201. A detailed study of advanced classical 

electrodynamics. (Iskraut.) 

Phys. 206. Physical Optics. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 201. A detailed study of advanced 

physical optics. (Kasncr.) 

Phys. 208. Thermodynamics. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, Phys. 201. The first and 
second laws of thermodynamics are examined and applied to homogeneous and non- 
homogeneous systems, calculations of properties of matter, the derivation of equilibrium 
conditions and phase transitions, the theory of irreversible processes. (Schamp.) 

Phys. 212, 213. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics. (4, 4) 

First and second semesters. Four lectures per week. Prerequisite, Phys. 200 or an 

outstanding undergraduate background in physics. A study of the Schroedinger 

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Physics 

equation, matrix formulations of quantum mechanics, approximation methods, scatter- 
ing theory, etc., and applications to solid state, atomic, and nuclear physics. (Ferrell.) 

Phys. 222, 223. Boundary-Value Problems of Theoretical Physics. (2, 2) 
Prerequisite, Phys. 201. (de Launay.) 

Phys. 236. Theory of Relativity. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 200. A study of Einstein's special theory of 
relativity and some consequences, and a brief survey of the foundations of general 
relativity. (Weber.) 

Phys. 240, 241. Theory of Sound and Vibrations. (3, 3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 201. A detailed study of acoustics and 

the theory of vibrations. (Snavely. 

ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 
Phys. 126. Kinetic Theory of Gases. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 107 and Math. 21. Dynamics of gas 
particles, Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, diffusion, Brownian motion, etc. (Mason.) 

For Graduates 

Phys. 210. Statistical Mechanics. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 119, and Phys. 201. 
A study of the determination of microscopic behavior of matter from microscopic models. 
Microcanonical, canonical, and grand canonical models. Applications to solid state 
physics and the study of gases. (Montroll.) 

Phys. 214. Theory of Atomic Spectra. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 213. A study of atomic 
spectra and structure— one and two electron spectra, fine and hyper-fine structure, line 
strengths, line widths, etc. (Anderson.) 

Phys. 215. Theory of Molecidar Spectra. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 214. The structure and 

properties of molecules as revealed by rotational, vibrational, and electronic spectra. 

(Anderson.) 
Phys. 216, 217. Molecular Physics. (2, 2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 213. Molecular theory of gases and liquids, 
ensemble theory, analysis of empirical models for molecular interactions, theory of 
Coulomb interactions between charge distributions. (Jansen.) 

SOLID STATE PHYSICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Phys. 122. Properties of Matter. (4) 

First semester. Four lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 118 or equivalent. Thermal, 

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Physics 

elastic, and electromagnetic properties of solids. Characteristics of fluids, and high 
polymer physics. (Stern.) 

For Graduates 

Phys. 218, 219. X-Rays and Crystal Structure. (3, 3) 

Three lectures per week. Prerequisite, Phys. 201. A detailed study of crystal structure 

of solids and of x-rays. (Morgan.) 

Phys. 220. Application of X-Ray and Electron Diffraction Methods. (2) 
Two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, concurrent enrollment in Phys. 218. The 
investigation of crystal structure, using x-rays and electron diffraction. (Morgan.) 

Phys. 242, 243. Theory of Solids. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 213. Properties 
of metals, lattice vibrations and specific heats, Boltzmann, Fermi-Dirac, and Bose- 
Einstein statistics, free electron gas theories, band theory of metals. (Montroll.) 

NUCLEAR PHYSICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Phys. 120. Nuclear Physics. (4) 

Second semester. Four lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 118 or equivalent. Shell 
model, liquid drop model, statistical model of nuclei, interaction of radiation and 
charged particles with matter, nuclear reactors, conservation laws, beta decay and 
other selected topics. ( Horny ak.) 

Phys. 221. Neutron Physics and Fission Reactors. (4) 

Second semester. Four lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 120. Neutron diffusion 

and reactor physics. (Shapiro.) 

For Graduates 

Phys. 234, 235. Theoretical Nuclear Physics. (3, 3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 120 and Phys. 213. Nuclear properties 
and reactions, nuclear forces, two, three, and four body problems, nuclear spectroscopy, 
beta-decay, and related topics. (MacDonald.) 

ELEMENTARY PARTICLE PHYSICS 

Ph^.s. 237. Relativistic Quantum Mechanics. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 213. Classical field theory, 

Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations, invariance properties, second quantization, 

renormalization, and related topics. (Sucher.) 

Phys. 239. Elementary Particles. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 237. Survey of elementary particles 

and their properties, quantum field theory, meson theory, weak interactions, possible 

extensions of elementary particle theory. (Day.) 

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Physics 

Phys. 25S. Quantum field Theory. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 237. S-matrix, Feynman 
diagrams, scattering theory, renormalization, conservation laws, dispersion relations, 
and recent non-perturbation approaches to field theory. (Toll.) 

Phys. 260. High Energy Physics. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 237. Nuclear forces are studied by exam- 
ining interactions at high energies. Meson physics, scattering processes, and detailed 
analysis of high energy experiments. (Snow.) 

ASTROPHYSICS AND GEOPHYSICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Phys. 124. Introduction to Astrophysics and Geophysics. (3) 
First semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 118 or consent of instructor. 
Celestial mechanics, orbit theory, upper atmosphere physics, astronomical spectroscopy, 
motions of charged particles in the earth's magnetic field. (Opik.) 

For Graduates 

Phys. 221. Upper Atmosphere and Cosmic Ray Physics. (2) 
Second semester. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 200 or consent of instruc- 
tor. Structure of the atmosphere, rocket and satellite experiments, primary and second- 
ary cosmic rays, origins of cosmic rays, geomagnetic theory. (Singer.) 

FLUID DYNAMICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Phys. 116, 117. Fundamental Hydrodynamics. (3, 3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisites, Phys. 106 and Math. 21. Kinematics of fluid 
flow, properties of incompressible fluids, complex variable methods of analysis, wave 
motions. (Hama.) 

For Graduates 

Phys. 224, 225. Supersonic Aerodynamics and Compressible Flow. (2, 2) 
Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 201. (Pai.) 

Phys. 226, 227. Theoretical Hydrodynamics. (3, 3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 201. A detailed study of advanced fluid 

dynamics. (Burgers.) 

Phys. 232, 233. Hydromechanics Seminar. (I, I) 

First and second semesters. One meeting a week. (Staff.) 

Phys. 246, 247. Special Topics in Fluid Dynamics. (2, 2) 

Prerequisites, advanced graduate standing and consent of the instructor. (Burgers.) 

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Physics 

Phys. 262, 263. Aerophysics. (3, 3) 

Three lectures. Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. (Pai-) 

RESEARCH, SEMINARS AND SPECIAL TOPICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Phys. 150. Special Problems in Physics. 

Research or special study. Credit according to work done. Laboratory fee, $10.00 per 
credit hour when appropriate. Given each semester. Prerequisite, major in physics 
and consent of adviser. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

Phys. 230. Seminar. 

Seminars on various topics in advanced physics are held each semester, with the con- 
tents varied each year. One credit for each seminar each semester. (Staff.) 

Phys. 231. Applied Physics Seminar. 

One credit for each semester. (Staff.) 

Phys. 238. Quantum Theory— Selected Topics. (3) 

Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, Phys. 237. (Staff.) 

Phys. 245. Special Topics in Applied Physics. 

2 credits each semester. Two lectures a week. (Staff.) 

Phys. 248, 249. Special Topics in Modern Physics. (2, 2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisites, calculus and consent of instructor. (Staff.) 

Phys. 399. Research. 

Credit according to work done, each semester. Laboratory fee, $10.00 per credit hour. 
Prerequisite: an approved application for admission to candidacy or special permission 
of the Physics Department. (Staff.) 

SPECIAL PHYSICS COURSES FOR HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE TEACHERS 

The courses in this section were especially designed for high school teachers 
and are not applicable to B.S., M.S. or Ph.D. degrees in physics without special 
permission of the Physics Department. However, these courses can be included 
as part of a physics minor or as electives. No prerequisites are required. 

Phys. 118 A. Atoms, Nuclei, and Stars. (3) 

Three lectures per week. An introduction to basic ideas of the constitution and 

properties of atomic and subatomic systems and of the overall structure of the 

universe. (Iskraut.) 

Phys. 122 A. Properties of Materials. (3) 

Three lectures per week. An introduction to the study of solid state physics and the 

properties of fluids. (Maradudin.) 

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Physics, Poultry Husbandry 

Phys. 160 A. Physics Problems. (2, 2, 3) 

Lectures and discussion sessions arranged. (Laster.) 

Phys. 170 A. Applied Physics. (3) 

Three lectures per week. (Montroll.) 

Phys. 199. National Science Foundation Summer Institute for Teachers of 
Science and Mathematics Seminar, (2) 

Arranged during summer school. Enrollment limited to participants in the N.S.F. 
Summer Institute. Laboratory fee, $5.00. (Laster, Staff.) 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

Professors: shaffner and combs. 

Research Professor: shorb. 

Assistant Professors: creek, helbacka and wilcox. 

Course work and research leading to the Master of Science and the Doctor 
of Philosophy degrees are offered. The student may pursue work with the 
major emphasis either in nutrition, physiology, physiological genetics, or the 
technology of eggs and poultry. 

Department requirements, supplementary to the Graduate School, have 
been formulated for the guidance of candidates for graduate degrees. Copies 
of these requirements may be obtained from the Department of Poultry Hus- 
bandry. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

P. H. 104. Technology of Market Eggs and Poidtry. (3) 

First semester, alternate years. (Not offered in 1959-60.) Two lectures and one lab- 
oratory per week. A study of the technological factors concerned with the processing, 
storage, and marketing of eggs and poultry, also factors affecting their quality and 
grading. (Helbacka.) 

A. E. 117. Economics of Marketing Eggs and Poidtry. (3) 

Second semester. Three lectures per week. (See Agricultural Economics A. E. 117.) 

Potdtry Hygiene, see Veterinary Science, V. S. 107. 

(Staff.) 
Avian Anatomy, see Veterinary Science, V. S. 108. 

P. H. 105. Poultry Genetics. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. (Offered 1960-61.) Two lectures and one laboratory 
period per week. Prerequisites, P.H. 1 and Zool. 104. Inheritance of factors related 
to egg and meat production and quality are stressed. An experiment utilizing procedures 
of pedigreed matings will be performed in the laboratory. (Wilcox.) 

P. H. 109. Avian Physiology. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Zool. 1 

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Poultry Husbandry 

and V.S. 108 or equivalent. (V.S. 108 may be taken simultaneously with P.H. 109.) 
The basic physiology of the bird is discussed, excluding the reproductive system. 
Special emphasis is given to physiological differences between birds and other verte- 
brates. (Wilcox.) 

P. H. Sill. Poultry Breeding and Feeding. (I) 

Summer session only. This course is designed primarily for teachers of vocational 
agriculture and extension service workers. The first half will be devoted to problems 
concerning breeding and the development of breeding stock. The second half will be 
devoted to nutrition. (Combs, Wilcox.) 

P. H. S112. Poidtry Products and Marketing. (I) 

Summer session only. This course is designed primarily for teachers of vocational 
agriculture and county agents. It deals with the factors affecting the quality of poultry 
products and with hatchery management problems, egg and poultry grading, preservation 
problems and market outlets for Maryland poultry. (Helbacka.) 

P. H. 198. Special Poultry Problems. (2-2) 

First and second semesters. For senior poultry students. No more than three credits 
may be applied towards a graduate degree. The student will be assigned special prob- 
lems in the field of poultry for individual study and report. The poultry staff should 
be consulted before any student registers for this course. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

P. H. 202. Advanced Poultry Nutrition. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, 
P. H. 101, Chem. 31, 32, 33 and 34 or permission of instructor. A fundamental 
study of the dietary role of proteins, minerals, vitamins, antibiotics, and carbo- 
hydrates is given as well as a study of the digestion and metabolism of these sub- 
stances. Deficiency diseases as produced by the use of synthetic diets are considered. 

(Combs.) 
P. H. 203. Physiology of Reproduction of Poidtry. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisite, P. H. 
102 or its equivalent. The role of the endocrines in avian reproduction, is considered. 
Fertility, sexual maturity, broodiness, egg formation, ovulation, and the physiology of 
oviposition are studied. Comparative mammalian functions are discussed. (Shaffner.) 

P. H. 205. Poultry Literature. Ql-4^} 

First and second semesters. Readings on individual topics are assigned. Written 
reports required. Methods of analysis and presentation of scientific material are dis- 
cussed. (Staff.) 

P. H. 207. Poultry Nutrition Laboratory. (2) 

First semester, alternate years. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. To 
acquaint graduate students with common basic nutrition research techniques useful in 
conducting experiments with poultry. Actual feeding trials with chicks, as well as 
bacteriological and chemical assays will be performed. (Combs, Creek.) 

P. H. 302. Poultry Seminar. (1) 

First and second semesters. No more than two credits in Seminar may be applied 

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towards a graduate degree. Oral reports of current researches by staff members, 
graduate students, and guest speakers are presented. (Staff.) 

P. H. 399. Research. (2-6) 

First and second semesters. Credit in accordance with work done. Practical and 
fundamental research with poultry may be conducted under the supervision of staff 
members toward the requirements for the degrees of M.S. and Ph.D. (Staff.) 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Professors: Andrews, gustad, ross and verplanck. 

Associate Professors: mcginnies, magoon and solem. 

Assistant Professors: Anderson, heerman, pumroy, wegner and yarczower. 

Lecturer: brady. 

All graduate students who have deficiencies in their undergraduate prepa- 
ration in psychology will be required to remove the particular deficiencies by 
completing the required courses or by individual study. Deficiencies in the 
following course areas can be removed only by registering in and satisfactorily 
completing these courses: Experimental Psychology, Statistical Methods, and 
Tests and Measurements. 

Departmental requirements toward the Master of Arts or the Master of 
Science degrees: 20 hours in the following courses: Psych. 200, 211-212, 252- 
253, and 266-267; 6 hours of research (Psych. 399); a minimum of 8 hours in 
approved specialized courses; total 34 hours. 

Departmental requirements toward the Doctor of Philosophy degree: 26 
hours in the following courses: Psych. 200, 211-212, 205-206, 252-253, 
266-267; 18 hours of graduate research including 12 hours for Ph.D. Thesis; 
a minimum of 28 hours in approved specialized courses and research; total 72 
hours. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Graduate credit will be assigned only for students certified by the Depart- 
ment of Psychology as qualified for graduate standing. 

Psych. 106. Statistical Methods in Psychology. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Psych. 1 and Math. 1, 5, or 10, or equivalent. 
A basic introduction to quantitative methods used in psychological research; measures 
of central tendency, of spread, and of correlation. (Anderson, Heermann.) 

Psych. 110. Educational Psychology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 1. Researches on fundamental psychological 
problems encountered in education. Measurement and significance of individual dif- 
ferences; learning, motivation, transfer of training, and the educational implications 
of theories of intelligence. (Wegner.) 

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Psychology 

Psych. 122. Advanced Social Psychology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Psych. 21, senior standing and consent of instructor. 
A systematic review of researches and points of view in regard to major problems in 
the field of social psychology. (McGinnies, Wegner.) 

Psych. 123. Language and Social Communication. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 21, senior standing and consent of instructor. 
The nature and significance of verbal and non-verbal communication in social psycho- 
logical processes, including examination of relevant theoretical approaches to symbolic 
behavior. (Wegner.) 

Psych. 12S. Hitman Motivation. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Psych. 21. Review of research literature 
dealing with determinants of human performance, together with consideration of the 
major theoretical contributions in this area. (Verplanck.) 

Psych. 131. Abtiormal Psychology. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, 3 courses in psvchology including Psych. 5. 

The nature, diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of mental disorders. 

(Magoon, Pumroy, Rosen.) 
Psych. 136. Applied Experimental Psychology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Psvch. 1. A study of basic human factors involved in 
the design and operation of machinery and equipment. Organized for students in 
engineering, industrial psychology, and the biological sciences. (Ross, Anderson.) 

PsycJi. 140. Psychological Problems in Advertising. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 1. Psychological problems that arise in connec- 
tion with the production and testing of advertising; techniques emploved in attacking 
these problems through research. (Staff.) 

Psych. 142. Techniques of Interrogation. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Psych. 21. The interview, the questionnaire, 
and other methods of obtaining evidence on human attitudes and reactions, as viewed 
in the light of modern research evidence. (Anderson.) 

Psych. 145. Introduction to Experimental Psychology . (4) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Psych. 106. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Primarily 
for students who major or minor in psychology. A systematic survey cf the laboratory 
methods and techniques as applied to human behavior. Emphasis is placed on individual 
and group participation in experiments, use of data, and preparation of reports. 

(Ross, Yarczower." 
Psych. 148. Psychology of Learning. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 145. Review and analysis of the major phenomena 
and theories of human and animal learning, including an introduction to the fields 
of problem solving, thinking and reasoning behavior. (Verplanck, Yarczower.) 

Psych. 150. Tests and Measurements. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Psych. 106. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Critical 
survey of measuring devices used in counseling, educational and industrial practice 
with an emphasis on the theory, development and standardization. Laboratory 

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Psychology 

practice in the administration and interpretation of a variety of commonly used tests 
is provided. (Gustad, Magoon.) 

Psych. 161. Industrial Psychology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, 6 hours in psychology. A course designed to aid in 
the understanding of the problems of people in a variety of work situations; serving as 
an introduction to such technical problems as personnel selection, interviewing, morale, 
supervision and management, and human relations in industry. Lecture, discussion 
and laboratory. (Solem, Heermann.) 

Psych. 180. Physiological Psychology. (3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 145. An introduction to research on the physiological basis of 
human behavior, including considerations of sensory phenomena, motor coordination, 
emotion, drives, and the neurological basis of learning. (Ross, Brady.) 

Psych. 181. Animal Behavior. (3) 

(Same as Zool. 181). Second semester. Prerequisite, consent of instructor. A study 
of animal behavior, including considerations of social interactions, learning, sensory 
processes, motivation, and experimental methods, with a major emphasis on mammals. 

(Ross.) 
Psych. 194. Independent Study in Psychology. (l-3~) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, written consent of individual faculty 
supervisor. Integrated reading under direction, leading to the preparation of an ade- 
quately documented report on a special topic. (Staff.) 

Psych. 195. Minor Problems in Psychology. (J -3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, written consent of individual faculty super- 
visor. An individualized course designed to allow the student to pursue a specialized 
topic or research project under supervision. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

(All the following courses require consent of the instructor.) 

Psych. 200. Proseminar: Professional Aspects of Psychological Science. (2) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, consent of faculty advisor. Survey of professional prob- 
lems in psychology, including considerations of contemporary developments, professional 
ethics, literature resources, formulation of critical research problems, and discussion 
of the major institutions requiring psychological services. (Staff.) 

Psvch. 201. Sensory Processes. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Psych. 180 and 191. A detailed analysis of sensory 
systems emphasizing human processes and including anatomical, physiological, and 
psychological considerations. (Ross.) 

Psych. 202. Perception. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 191. Review of modern methods and results in the 
research areas of form and brightness perception, meaning and constancy phenomena, 
movement and depth, and the influences of attitudes and motivation on human per- 
ception. (Andrews.) 

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Psychology 

Psych. 203, 204. Graduate Seminar. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Surveys of contemporary American and foreign research 

literature in specialized fields in psychology. (Staff.) 

Psych. 205, 206. Historical Viewpoints and Current Theories in Psychology. 

0,3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Psych. 192. A study of the philosophical and 
scientific background of modern psychology, together with a review of its major 
systematic viewpoints and issues. (Verplanck.) 

Psych. 207. Learning Theory. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 192. Systematic survey of modern theories of 
learning, including those of Hull, Skinner, Tolman, and Spence, with emphasis 
on modern behavioral concepts. (Verplanck, Yarczower.) 

Psych. 208. Language and Thought. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 192. A study of thinking and language processes, 
as they have been investigated descriptively and experimentally in both normal and 
abnormal individuals. (Verplanck.) 

Psych. 211, 212. Advanced General Psychology. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Psych. 145. A systematic review of the more 

fundamental investigations upon which modern psychology is based. (Ross, Yarczower.) 

Psych. 220. Psychological Concepts in Mental Health. (3) 

Second semester. Introduction to the problem of mental health and potential contribu- 
tions of psychology to its solution. Examination of a variety of psychological principles 
and techniques with respect to their utility. Development of a conceptual framework 
for approaching mental health problem. (Gustad, Magoon, Rosen.) 

Psych. 221. Seminar in Counseling Psychology. (3) 

The seminar focuses attention upon the historical antecedents, definitional considera- 
tions, various theoretical orientations and their implications for training, service and 
research. The treatment process is treated in terms of client-expectations, relationship 
problems and in terms of observation, inference, hypothesis making, and hypothesis 
testing. Considerable attention is devoted to past and current research, investigations 
of the treatment process, its outcomes, and to needed research evidence. 

(Gustad, Magoon.) 
Psych. 222. Seminar in Clinical Psychology. (3) 

Prerequisites, Psych. 150, 220. This seminar deals more intensively with the theoreti- 
cal orientation of various treatments and the research evidence regarding the evalua- 
tion of the treatment process and its outcome. (Rosen, Pumroy.) 

Psych. 223. Diagnosis and Correction of Reading Difficulties. (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisites, Psych. 150, 220. Consideration of the range of read- 
ing difficulties, their etiology, manifestations and the various methods of corrective 
treatment employed in removing or alleviating the conditions. Opportunity for obser- 
vation and limited field work will be provided as available to demonstrate the varia- 
tions resulting from differences in ability, age, and educational level. (Staff.) 

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Psychology 

Psych. 224. Advanced Procedures in Clinical and Counseling Psychology. (3) 
Analysis of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, both group and individual, employed 
in remediation of normal and abnormal problems. Consideration of experimental and 
evaluative literature bearing on these. Examination of a variety of systematic approaches 
to remediation of mental health problems. (Staff.) 

Psych. 225, 226. Practicum in Counseling and Clinical Procedures. (1-3, i-3) 
First and second semesters. Psych. 225 gives the student limited experience in con- 
tact with campus and community mental health facilities, with current research in 
mental health through fieldwork, role playing, and observed demonstrations. Psych. 
226 initiates a continuing counseling relationship with both individual supervision and 
group consultation focused on the understanding of clients and the progress of the 
student's work. The students will engage in individual or group research projects in 
the general mental health area. (It is to be noted that a maximum of 6 credit hours 
may be used toward a graduate degree from any combination of Psych. 225, 226, 268 
and 269.) (Magoon, Pumroy.) 

Psych. 227. Occupational Development and Choice. (3) 

Alternate years. Prerequisites, Psych. 220 and permission of instructor. Analysis of 
theoretical and research literature on occupational behavior, development of occupa- 
tional skills and attitudes, theories of career choice and vocational adjustment. (Gustad.) 

Psych. 228. Seminar in Student Personnel. (2) 

(Same as Ed. 228.) First semester. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. The seminar 
is designed to acquaint the student with student personnel functions at the collegiate 
level. Attention is devoted to the historical antecedents of student personnel activities, 
the range of services, their functions, responsibilities, interrelationships and projected 
future status. Resource personnel presently engaged in student personnel services will 
participate as needed. (Byrne, Gustad, Magoon.) 

Psych. 229. Advanced Industrial Psychology. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 161 or equivalent. A review of certain fundamental 
problems in industry and the psychological techniques for studying them. Included will 
be analyses of motivation and morale, personnel selection and evaluation, management 
problem solving, and situational behavior controls. (Solem, Heermann.) 

Psych. 230. Determinants of Human Performance. (3) 

Second semester. An advanced seminar dealing with the analysis of factors and vari- 
ables which affect human performance and efficiency. (Ross.) 

Psych. 231. Training Procedures in Industry. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 148 or equivalent. A consideration of psy- 
chological principles and methods for improving job performance; skill development 
laboratory in application of methods and techniques is provided. (Solem.) 

Psych. 232. Personnel Selection and }6b Analysis. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 161 or equivalent. Psychological measurement 
as applied to the analysis of job requirements and the development and use of per- 
formance criteria and predictors. (Solem, Heermann.) 

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Psychology 

Psych. 233. Social Organization in Industry. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 229 or equivalent. Analysis of management 
organizations as social structures, and the application of concepts and methods of 
social psychology to problems of conflict, cooperation, and leader-group relations. 

(Solem.) 

Psych. 240. Interview and Questionnaire Techniques. (3) 

Second semester. Psychological concepts and methods in the use of interview, question- 
naire, and inventory procedures for the measurement, prediction and alteration of 
behavior. (Anderson.) 

Psych. 241. Mass Communication and Persuasion. (3) 

Second semester. Consideration of the communication process and the various media 
of mass communication. Factors related to the effectiveness of communications are 
analyzed in the light of experimental evidence, and various strategies and techniques 
of persuasion are reviewed. (McGinnies.) 

Psych. 242. Seminar in Social Psychology. (3) 

Second semester. Analysis and discussion of contemporary systematic positions in 
social psychology. Review of research methods in the area as well as theories and 
problems of current importance. (McGinnies.) 

Psych. 250. Mental Test Theory. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 253. Development of test theory from psychophysics 
and measurement theory. Consideration of formal and applied problems involved in 
developing and utilizing psychological tests and measurements. Special attention is 
given to problems of reliability, validity, and prediction. (Gustad.) 

Psych. 251. Development of Predictors. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 253. Review of statistical theory and practices in 
the design, development and analysis of techniques of prediction in the behavioral 
sciences, with special attention to the formal and practical problem of criteria for 
prediction. (Andrews.) 

Psych. 252, 253. Advanced Statistics. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Psych. 106. Detailed study of the funda- 
mentals of statistical inference, experimental design, and the analysis of regression 
and correlation concepts and techniques; a basic course for research students in the 
behavioral sciences. (Andrews, Anderson, Heermann.) 

Psych. 254. Factor Analysis. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 253. Analysis of major developments in factor 
theory as applicable to the behavioral sciences, including computational methods and 
research implications. (Andrews.) 

Psych. 255. Seminar in Psychometric Theory. (3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 253. Study of psychophysical methods, scaling techniques, and 

the statistical methods of pattern analysis. (Andrews.) 

Psych. 260. Individual Tests. (3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 150. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Analysis of the various theories of 

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Psychology 

intelligence and current research in the area; practical experience in the administra- 
tion, scoring and interpretation of currently used intelligence tests. (Magoon, Pumroy.) 

Psych. 262. Appraisal of Personality. (3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 150. Evaluation of the normal individual by use of a variety of 
psychological tests and techniques, the objective being a broader and deeper under- 
standing of the individual along as many dimensions as possible. (Rosen.) 

Psych. 263. Research Methods in Psychodynamics. (3) 

Alternate years. Prerequisite, Psych. 222 and permission of instructor. Systematic 
evaluation and discussion of the theoretical and research literature dealing with psycho- 
dynamics and personality theory. Particular attention will be paid to research methods 
applicable to these concepts. (Rosen.) 

Psych. 264. Projective Tests. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 260. Laboratory fee, $4.00. A familiarization 
with currently used projective tests, including the theory, historical background, and 
research in the area. The student receives experience in administration, scoring and 
interpreting currently used projective tests, as well as some experience in writing 
psychological reports. (Pumroy.) 

Psych. 265. Advanced Development Psychology. (3) 

Detailed examination of empirical, experimental, and theoretical literature related to 
developmental processes from birth throughout life. Included are discussion of physical, 
social, intellectual, and emotional development at various life stages. Emphasis on 
developmental approach to understanding of personality. (Rosen.) 

Psych. 266, 267. Theories of Personality and Motivation. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Psych. 128. A review of the experimental 
analyses and conceptual aspects of biological and acquired drives and motives, and a 
study of the use of motivational and other concepts in personality theories. 

(Verplanck, Rosen.) 

Psych. 268, 269. Advanced Practicum in Counseling and Clinical Procedures. 

(1-3, 1-3} 
First and second semesters. Prerequisites, Psych. 226 and consent of instructor. In 
Psych. 268 emphasis is placed upon direct individual supervision of casework, analysis 
of selected typical and atypical problems, and individual or group research projects 
in the general mental health area. Psych. 269 provides extensive practical experience 
throuoh varied assignments to such community mental health facilities as child guidance 
clinics, employment and rehabilitation service, mental health research agencies, out- 
patient clinics, and hospitals. (It is to be noted that a maximum of 6 credit hours 
may be used toward a graduate degree from any combination of Psych. 225, 226, 268, 
and 269.) (Magoon, Pumroy.) 

Psych. 270. Advanced Abnormal Psychology. (3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 131. Extensive and intensive analyses of deviant human behavior, 
with emphasis on the theoretical concepts proposed by Freud, Jung, Adler, Rank, 
Hornev, French and Alexander, Meyer, and Sullivan, as well as upon the contribution 
of the self-concept and neo-behavioral theorists. (Gustad, Rosen.) 

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Sociology 

Psych. 271. Special Testing of Disabilities. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Psych. 260. Study of a variety of the lesser known 
psychological tests and techniques useful in evaluating individuals with certain dis- 
abilities, including cerebral palsy, speech problems, brain damage. (Magoon.) 

Psych. 272, 273. Individual Clinical Diagnosis. (3, 3) 

Prerequisite, Psych. 264. Study of emotionally disturbed individuals with a variety of 
psychological tests and techniques, including the use of intensive case study methodol- 
ogy; the aim being to understand the individual as thoroughly as possible, as well as 
the evaluation for the implications for treatment. (Gustad, Rosen.) 

Psych. 280. Advanced Psychophysiology. (3) 

First semester. An advanced seminar dealing with special selected topics in the area 

of psychophysiology. (Ross, Brady.) 

Psych. 281. Seminar in Psychopharmacology. (3) 

Alternate years. Prerequisite, one year of graduate study in psychology or consent of 
the instructor. A critical review and detailed analysis of the literature and problems 
related to the effects of drugs on animal and human behavior. Designed for advanced 
graduate students in experimental psychology and mental health psychology. (Ross.) 

Psych. 288, 289. Special Research Problems. (1-3") 

First and second semesters. Supervised research on problems selected from the areas 

of experimental, industrial, social, quantitative, or mental health psychology. (Staff.) 

Psych. 399. Research, (credit arranged^). 

First and second semesters. (Staff.) 

SOCIOLOGY 

Professors: hoffsommer, lejins and melvin. 

Associate Professor: shankweiler. 

Assistant Professors: Anderson, coates, cussler and hirzel. 

The Department of Sociology grants the degrees of Master of Arts and 
Doctor of Philosophy. Fields of specialization include anthropology, crimi- 
nology, rural and urban sociology, mental health, the family, industrial and 
occupational sociology, social theory, social psychology and research methods. 

Prerequisites for graduate study leading to an advanced degree with a 
major in sociology consist of either (1) an undergraduate major (totalling at 
least 24 semester hours) in sociology or (2) 12 semester hours of sociology 
(including 6 semester hours of advanced courses) and 12 additional hours of 
comparable work in economics, political science, or psychology. Reasonable 
substitutes for these prerequisites may be accepted in the case of students 
majoring in other departments who desire a graduate minor or several courses 
in sociology. 

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For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 



Soc. 102. Intercidtural Sociology. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 2. On the basis of a comparative study of customs, 
individual and group behavior patterns and institutions, this course studies the 
ideologies of America and other modern societies. The analysis of focuses on the 
nature of the social processes and group behavior of various peoples having or not 
having a written language. (Melvin.) 

Soc. 105. Cultural Anthropology. (3) 

Second semester. A survey of the simpler cultures of the world, with attention to his- 
torical processes and the application of anthropological theory to the modern situation. 

(Anderson.) 

Soc. 106. Archeology. (3) 

Second semester. A survey of human cultural developments as revealed by archeologi- 
cal methods, with materials to be drawn from selected areas of both Old and New 
Worlds. (•Anderson.) 

Soc. 111. Sociology of Occupations and Careers. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, Soc. 2 or equivalent and junior standing. The sociology 
of work and occupational life in modern society. Changing occupational ideologies, 
values and choices. Occupational status systems and occupational mobility. The social 
psychology of career success. (Coates.) 

Soc. 112. Rural-Urhan Relations. (3) 

First semester. The ecology of population and the forces making for change in rural 
and urban life; migration, decentralization and regionalism as methods of studying 
individual and national issues. Applied field problems. (Cussler.) 

Soc. 113. The Rural Community. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. A detailed study of rural 
life with emphasis on levels of living, the family, school, and church and organiza- 
tional activities in the fields of health, recreation, welfare, and planning. 

(Hoffsommer, Hirzel.) 
Soc. 114. The City. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. The rise of urban civilization and 
metropolitan regions; ecological process and structure; the city as a center of dominance; 
social problems, control and planning. (Schmidt.) 

Soc. 115. Industrial Sociology. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Soc. 2, or its equivalent. The sociology of 
human relations in American industry and business. Complex industrial and business 
organizations as social systems. Social relationships within and between industry, busi- 
ness, community, and society. (Coates.) 

Soc. 116. Military Sociology. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Soc. 2. The sociology of military life. 
Social change and the growth of military institutions. Complex formal military 
organizations. Military organizations as social systems. Military service as an occupa- 

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Sociology 

tion or profession. Career patterns, problems and satisfactions. Relations between 
military institutions, civilian communities and society. (Coates.) 

Soc. 118. Community Organization. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Community organization and its 
relation to social welfare; analysis of community needs and resources; health, housing, 
recreation; community centers; neighborhood projects. (DiBella, McElhenie.) 

Soc. 121. Population. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1 or its equivalent. Population distribution and 

growth in the United States and the world; population problems and policies. (Hirzel.) 

Soc. 122. Population. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1 or its equivalent. Trends in fertility and mor- 
tality, migrations, population estimates and the resulting problems and policies. 

(Hirzel.) 

Soc. 123. Ethnic Minorities. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Basic social processes in the re- 
lations of ethnic groups within the State; immigration groups and the Negro in the 
United States; ethnic minorities in Europe. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 124. The Culture of the American Indian. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. A study of type cultures; 
cultural processes; and the effects of acculturation on selected tribes of Indians in the 
Americas. (Anderson.) 

Soc. 125. Cultural History of the Negro. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. The cultures of Africa south of 

the Sahara and the cultural adjustments of the Negro in North and South America. 

(Anderson.) 

Soc. 131. Introduction to Social Service. (3) 

First and second semesters. General survey of the field of social-welfare activities; 
historical development; growth, functions, and specialization of agencies and services, 
private and public. (DiBella, McElhenie.) 

Soc. 136. Sociology of Religion. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or equivalent. Varieties and sources of religious 

experience. Religious institutions and the role of religion in social life. (Anderson.) 

Soc. 141. Sociology of Personality. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or equivalent. Development of human nature and 
personality in contemporary social life; processes of socialization; attitudes, individual 
differences, and social behavior. (Motz, Cussler, Schmidt.) 

Soc. 144. Collective Behavior. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Social interaction in mass 
behavior; communication processes; structure and functioning of crowds, strikes, 
audiences, mass movements, and the public. (Cussler.) 

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Soc. 145. Social Control. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Forms, mechanisms, and 

techniques of group influence on human behavior; problems of social control in 

contemporary society. (Motz.) 

Soc. 147. Sociology of Law. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1 or its equivalent. Law as a form of social control; 
interrelation between legal and other conduct norms as to their content, sanctions, 
and methods of securing conformity; law as an integral part of the culture of the 
group; factors and processes operative in the formation of legal norms as determinants 
of human behavior. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 153. )uvenile Delinquency. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Juvenile delinquency in relation 
to the general problem of crime; analysis of factors underlying juvenile delinquency; 
treatment and prevention. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 154. Crime and Delinquency Prevention. (3) 

Second semester. (Offered in alternate years with Soc. 156.) Prerequisites, Soc. 1, or 
its equivalent; Soc. 52, Soc. 153, or consent of instructor. Mobilization of community 
resources for the prevention of crime and delinquency; area programs and projects. 

(Lejins.) 

Soc. 156. Instittitional Treatment of Criminals and Delinquents. (3) 
Second semester. (Offered in alternate years with Soc. 154.) Prerequisites, Soc. 1, or 
its equivalent; Soc. 52, Soc. 153, or consent of instructor. Organization and functions 
of penal and correctional institutions for adults and juveniles. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 160. Interviewing in Social Work. (VA") 

Summer session only. (DiBella, McElhenie.) 

Soc. 161. The Sociology of War. (3) 

First semester. The origin and development of armed forces as institutions; the social 
causes, operations and results of war as social conflict; the relations of peace and war 
and revolution in contemporary civilization. (Coates.) 

Soc. 162. Basic Principles and Current Practice in Puhlic Welfare. (3) 
Summer session only. (DiBella, McElhenie.) 

Soc. 163. Attitude and Behavior Problems in Puhlic School Work. QlVi') 
Summer session only. (DiBella, McElhenie.) 

Soc. 164. The Family and Society. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Soc. 1 and Soc. 64 or equivalent. Study of the family 
as a social institution; its biological and cultural foundations, historic development, 
changing structure and function; the interactions of marriage and parenthood, disor- 
ganizing and reorganizing factors in present day trends. (Shankweiler, Motz.) 

Soc. 171. Family and Child Welfare. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Programs of family and child 

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Sociology 

welfare agencies; social services to families and children; child placement; foster 
families. (DiBella.) 

Soc. 173. Social Security. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. The social security program in 
the United States; public assistance; social insurance. (DiBella.) 

Soc. 174. Puhlic Welfare. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Development and organiza- 
tion of the public welfare movement in the United States, social legislation interrela- 
tions of federal, state, and local agencies and institutions. (DiBella.) 

Soc. 180. Small Group Analysis. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 1. or its equivalent. Analysis of small group struc- 
ture and dynamics. Review of research on small groups in factories, military service, 
schools and communities. Presentation of techniques used in the study of small groups. 

(Franz.) 
Soc. 183. Social Statistics. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Measures of central 
tendency and dispersion, use of statistical inference in simple testing of null hypotheses, 
chi square, and labor saving computational devices for correlation. (Schmidt.) 

Soc. 185. Advanced Social Statistics. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Soc. 183, or equivalent. Provides refined statistical re- 
search methods for advanced students in the social sciences. Sampling theory, specialized 
correlation technique, advanced tests of significance, and other procedures. 

(Schmidt.) 
Soc. 186. Sociological Theory. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Soc. 1, or its equivalent. Development of the 
science of sociology; historical backgrounds; recent theories of society. (Melvin, Hirzel.) 

Soc. 191. Social Field Training. (7-3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites: For social work field training, Soc. 131; 
for crime control field training, Soc. 52 and 153. Enrollment restricted to available 
placements. Supervised field training in public and private social agencies. The 
student will select his particular area of interest and be responsible to an agency for 
a definite program of in-service training. Group meetings, individual conferences and 
written program reports will be a required part of the course. (Staff.) 

Soc. 196. Senior Seminar. (3) 

Second semester. Required of and open only to senior majors in sociology. Scope, 
fields, and research methods of sociology; practical applications of sociological knowl- 
edge. Individual study and reports. (Hoffsommer.) 

For Graduates 

Soc. 201. Methods of Social Research. (3) 

First semester. Selection and formulation of research projects; methods and techniques 

of sociological investigation and analysis. Required of graduate majors in sociology. 

(Hoffsommer.) 

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Sociology 

Soc. 21 5. Community Studies. (3) 

First semester. Intensive study of the factors affecting community development and 
growth, social structure, social stratification, social mobility and social institutions; 
analysis of particular communities. (Staff.) 

Soc. 216. Sociology of Occupations and Professions. (3) 

First semester. An analysis of the occupational and professional structure of American 
society, with special emphasis on changing roles, functions, ideologies and community- 
relationships. (Coates.) 

Soc. 221. Population and Society. (3) 

Second semester. Selected problems in the field of population; quantitative and 

qualitative aspects; American and world problems. (Hirzel.) 

Soc. 224. Race and Culture. (3) 

Second semester. Race and culture in contemporary society; mobility and the social 
effects of race and culture contacts and intermixture. (Anderson.) 

Soc. 230. Comparative Sociology. (3) 

Second semester. Comparison of the social institutions, organizations, patterns of col- 
lective behavior, and art manifestations of societal values of various countries. 

(Melvin.) 
Soc. 241. Personality and Social Structure. (3) 

First semester. Comparative analysis of the development of human nature, per- 
sonality, and social traits in select social structures. (Cussler.) 

Soc. 246. Public Opinion and Propaganda. (3) 

Second semester. Process involved in the formation of mass attitudes; agencies and 
techniques of communication; quantitative measurement of public opinion. (Motz.) 

Soc. 253. Advanced Criminology. (3) 

First semester. Survey of the principal issues in contemporary criminological theory 

and research. (Lejins.j 

Soc. 254. Seminar: Criminology. (3) 

Second semester. Selected problems in criminology. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 255. Seminar: Juvenile Delinquency. (3) 

First semester. Selected problems in the field of juvenile delinquency. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 256. Crime and Delinquency as a Community Problem. (3) 

Second semester. An intensive study of selected problems in adult crime and juvenile 
delinquency in Maryland. (Lejins.) 

Soc. 257. Social Change and Social Policy. (3) 

First semester. Emergence and development of social policy as related to social 
change; policy-making factors in social welfare and social legislation. (Melvin.) 

Soc. 262. Family Studies. (3) 

Second semester. Case studies of family situations; statistical studies of family trends, 

methods of investigation and analysis. (Shankweiler.) 

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Sociology, Speech and Dramatic Art 

Soc. 263. Marriage and Family Counseling. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Soc. 64 or Soc. 164 or consent of instructor. A 
sociological analysis of an emerging, family-centered profession: its interdisciplinary 
development and professional organization: its basic methods of coordinating art and 
science in solving family problems. Designed for advanced sociology majors or allied 
fields for use in vocations such as teaching, medicine, the ministry and others embody- 
ing the role of guidance. (Shankweiler.) 

Soc. 264. The Sociology of Mental Health. (3) 

First semester. A study of the sociological factors that condition mental health together 

with an appraisal of the group dynamics of its preservation. (Melvin.) 

Soc. 282. Sociological Methodology. (3) • 

Second semester. Logic and method of sociology in relation to the general theory of 

scientific method; principal issues and points of view. (Staff.) 

Soc. 285. Seminar: Sociological Theory. (3) 

First semester. Critical and comparative study of contemporary European and Ameri- 
can theories of society. Required of graduate majors in sociology. (Melvin.) 

Soc. 291. Special Social Problems. (Credit to he determined*) 

First and second semesters. Individual research on selected problems. (Staff.) 

Soc. 399. Thesis Research. (Credit to he determined') 

First and second semesters. (Staff.) 

SPEECH AND DRAMATIC ART 

Professor: stratjsbaugh. 
Associate Professor: hendricks. 
Lecturer: shutts and causey. 

The Department offers work leading to the Master of Arts degree in the 
field of speech and hearing science. 

For Graduates and Advanced U ndergradnates 

Speech 102. Radio Production. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 22. Laboratory fee, $2.00. A study of the 
multiple problems facing the producer. Special emphasis is given to acoustic setup, 
casting, "miking," timing, cutting, and the coordination of personnel factors involved 
in the production of radio programs. (Batka.) 

Speech 103, 104. Speech Composition and Rhetoric. (3, 3) 
First and second semesters. A study of rhetorical principles and models of speech 
composition in conjunction with the preparation and presentation of specific forms 
of public address. (Staff.) 

Speech 105. Speech— Handicapped School Children. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 3 for undergraduates. The occurrence, identi- 

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Speech and Dramatic Art 

fication and treatment of speech handicaps in the classroom. An introduction to speech 
pathology. (Craven, Staff.) 

Speech 106. Clinical Practice. (J lo 5 credits, up to 9) 

Each semester; summer session. Prerequisite, Speech 105. Laboratory fee, $1.00 per 
hour. Clinical practice in various methods of corrective procedures with various types 
of speech cases in the University Clinic, veterans hospitals, and the public schools. 
May be taken for 1-5 credit hours per semester. May be repeated for a total of 
9 semester hours credit. (Conlon.) 

Speech 107. Advanced Oral Interpretation. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 13. Emphasis upon the longer reading. Pro- 
gram planning. (Provensen.) 

Speech 109. Speech and Language Development of Children. (3) 
Second semester. Admission by consent of instructor. An analysis of normal and ab- 
normal processes of speech and language development in children. (Hendricks.) 

Speech 110. Advanced Group Discussion. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Speech 10. Required in speech curriculum 
and elective in other curricula. An examination of current research and techniques in 
the discussion and conference including extensive practice in this area. (Linkow.) 

Speech 111. Seminar. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisites, senior standing and consent of instructor. 

Required of speech majors. Present-day speech research. (Strausbaugh.) 

Speech 112. Phonetics. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Speech 3 or consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 
Training in the recognition and production of the sounds of spoken English, with an 
analysis of their formation. Practice in transcription. Mastery of the International 
Phonetic Alphabet. (Conlon.) 

Speech 113. Play Production. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 16 or consent of instructor. Development of 

procedure followed by the director in preparing plays for public performance. 

(Pugliese.) 

Speech 114. The Film as an Art Form. (3) 

First and second semesters. Laboratory fee, $7.50. A study of the motion picture as a 
developing form of entertainment, communication, and artistic expression. A series 
of significant American and foreign films are viewed to illustrate the artistic, historical 
and sociological trends of the twentieth century. (Niemeyer.) 

Speech 115. Radio in Retailing. (3) 

First semester. Limited to students in the College of Home Economics. Prerequisite, 
Speech 1 or 7. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Writing and production of promotional pro- 
grams for the merchandising of wearing apparel and house furnishings. Collaboration 
with Washington and Baltimore radio stations and retail stores. (Batka.) 

Speech 116. Radio Announcing. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, Speech 4 and 22 or consent of instructor. Laboratory 

fee, $2.00. The theory and application of all types of announcing. (Batka.) 

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Speech and Dramatic Art 

Speech 117. Radio and Television Continuity Writing. (3) 
First semester. Prerequisite, Speech 22 or consent of instructor. A study of trie princi- 
ples, methods and limitations of writing for radio and television. Application will be 
made in the writing of general types of continuities and commercials. (Aylward.) 

Speech 119. Radio Acting. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 22. A workshop course designed to give the 

student practice in radio acting. (Pugliese.) 

Speech 120. Speech Pathology. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Speech 105. Laboratory fee, $3.00. A continuation of 
Speech 105, with emphasis on the causes and treatment of organic speech disorders. 

(Hendricks.) 
Speech 122. Radio Workshop. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Speech 102 or 116. Laboratory fee, $2.00. A laboratory 
course dealing with all phases of producing a radio program. (Batka.) 

Speech 126. Semantic Aspects of Speech in Human Relations. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, one course in public speaking. An analysis of speech 

and language habits from the standpoint of general semantics. (Hendricks.) 

Speech 129, 130. Play Directing. (3, 3) 

Admission by consent of instructor. A lecture-laboratory course dealing with the 
fundamentals of script cutting, pacing, movement, blocking, and rehearsal routine as 
applied to the directing of plays. (Niemeyer.) 

Speech 131. History of the Theatre. (3) 

First semester. A survey of dramatic production from early origins to 1800. 

(Niemeyer.) 
Speech 132. History of the Theatre. (3) 
Second semester. A survey of dramatic production from 1800 to present. (Niemeyer.) 

Speech 133. Communication Processes in Conferences. (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 103 and 104 or the equivalent. Limited to 
students in the military studies curriculum. Group participation in conferences, 
methods of problem solving, semantic aspects of language and the function of con- 
ferences in industry and government. (Linkow.) 

Speech 135. Instrumentation in Speech and Hearing Science. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Speech 3. Laboratory fee, $2.00. The use of electronic 

equipment in the measurement of speech and hearing. (Linkow.) 

Speech 136. Principles of Speech Therapy. (3) 

Prerequisite, Speech 120. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Differential diagnosis of speech and 
language handicaps and the application of psychological principles of learning, moti- 
vation and adjustment in the treatment of speech disorders. (Hendricks.) 

Speech 138. Methods and Materials in Speech Correction. (3) 

Prerequisite, Speech 120 or the equivalent. Laboratory fee, $3.00. The design and use 

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Speech and Dramatic Art 

of methods and materials for diagnosis, measurement, and retraining of the speech- 
handicapped. (Craven.) 

Speech 139. Theatre Workshop. (3) 

First and second semesters. Prerequisite, Speech 8 or Speech 14. A laboratory course 
designed to provide the student with practical experience in all phases of theatre 
production. (Strausbaugh.) 

Speech 140. Principles of Television Production. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Speech 22. A study of the theory, methods, techniques 
and problems of television production and direction. Units of study covering 
television cameras and lenses, lighting theory and practices, scenery and properties, 
costumes and makeup, graphic arts and special effects, are included. Observation of 
production procedures at nearby television stations. Application will be made through 
crew assignments for University-produced television programs. (Batka.) 

Speech 141. Introduction to Audiometry. (2) 

First semester. Prerequisite, Speech 3. Required for students whose concentration is in 
speech and hearing therapy. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Analysis of various methods and 
procedures in evaluating hearing losses. (Craven.) 

Speech 142. Speech Reading and Auditory Training. (2) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 3. Required for students whose concentration is 
in speech and hearing therapy. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Methods of training individuals 
with hearing loss to recognize, interpret, and understand spoken language. (Conlon.) 

Speech 146. Television News and Public Affairs. (3) 

.Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 117 or Journ. 101. Training in presentation of 
television news, interviews, discussions and forums. (Batka, Staff.) 

Speech 147. Analysis of Broadcasting Processes and Results. (2) 
First semester. Prerequisite, Speech 22 or consent of instructor. Survey of the more 
common analytic approaches, methods, and results in the field of radio and television. 

(Batka, Staff.) 

Speech 148. Television Direction. (3) 

First semester. Two hour lecture, three hour laboratory. Prerequisite, Speech 22 or 
Speech 140. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Principles of television direction including 
analysis of script, casting, rehearsing, production, and video control. (Batka, Staff.) 

Speech 149. Television Workshop. (3) 

Second semester. Two hour lecture, four hour laboratory. Prerequisites, Speech 22, 
140 or 148, or consent of instructor. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Advanced laboratory 
course dealing with all phases of producing a complete television program. 

(Batka, Staff.) 

Speech 150. Radio and Television Station Management. (2) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 22 or consent of instructor. Broadcasting regula- 
tions, licenses, personnel functions, sales, advertising, and program and station 
promotion. (Batka, Staff.) 

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Speech and Dramatic Art 

For Graduates 
(All the following courses require consent of instructor.) 

The Department maintains a reciprocal agreement with Walter Reed 
General Hospital whereby clinical practice may be obtained at the Army 
Audiology and Speech Correction Center, Forest Glen, Maryland, under the 
direction of James P. Albrite, M.D., Director. 

Speech 201. Special Problems Seminar. (A through K) (1-3) 
(6 hours applicable toward M.A. degree.) Prerequisites, 6 hours of speech pathology 
and consent of instructor. A. stuttering; B. cleft palate; C. delayed speech; D. articu- 
lation; E. cerebral palsy; F. voice; G. special problems of the deaf; H. foreign 
dialect; I. speech intelligibility; J. neurophysiology of hearing; K. minor research 
problems. (Hendricks, Staff.) 

Speech 202. Techniques of Research in Speech and Hearing. (3) 
First semester. Prerequisite, 12 hours of speech pathology and audiology. Required 
of candidates for master's degree in speech and hearing therapy. Analysis of 
research methodology including experimental techniques, statistical analysis and 
preparation of reports for scientific investigations in speech and hearing science. 

(Williams.) 
Speech 203. Experimental Phonetics. (3) 

Prerequisite, Speech 112. Laboratory fee, $3.00. The application of experimental 
methods in the quantitative analysis of the phonetic elements of speech. (Hendricks.) 

Speech 210. Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing. (3) 

Prerequisites, 6 hours of speech pathology and audiology and consent of instructor. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. A study of the anatomy and physiology of the auditory and 
speech mechanisms. (Gerlach.) 

Speech 211. A, B, C, D. Advanced Clinical Practice. Ql-3 up to J2) 
(6 hours applicable toward M.A. degree.) Prerequisite, 12 hours of speech pathology 
and audiology. Laboratory fee, $1.00 per hour. Supervised training in the application 
of clinical methods in the diagnosis and treatment of speech and hearing disorders. 

(Craven.) 
Speech 212. Advanced Speech Pathology. (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisites, 6 hours in speech pathology and consent of instructor. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. Etiology and therapy for organic and functional speech 
disorders. (Lore.) 

Speech 214. Clinical Audiometry. (3) 

First semester. Prerequisites, 3 hours in audiology and consent of instructor. Laboratory 

fee, $3.00. Testing of auditory acuity with pure tones and speech. (Shutts.) 

Speech 216. Communication Skills for the Hard-of -Hearing. (3) 
First semester. Prerequisites, 3 hours in audiology and consent of instructor. Speech 
reading, auditory training, and speech conservation problems in the rehabilitation of 
the hard-of-hearing. (Causey.) 

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Speech, Veterinary Science 

Speech 2 1 7. Selection of Prosthetic Appliances for the Acoustically Handicapped. 

(3) 
Second semester. Prerequisite, Speech 214. Laboratory fee, $3.00. A laboratory course 
in modern methods of utilizing electronic hearing aids. (Shutts.) 

Speech 218. Speech and Hearing in Medical Rehabilitation and Special Edu- 
cation Programs. (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisites, 6 hours in speech pathology and audiology and 
consent of instructor. Administrative problems involved in the organization and opera- 
tion of speech and hearing therapy under different types of programs. (Hendricks.) 

Speech 219. Speech Disorders of the Brain-Injured. (3) 

Prerequisites, 6 hours in pathology and audiology and consent of instructor. Laboratory 
fee, $3.00. Methods of evaluation and treatment of children and adults who have 
suffered injury to brain tissue, with subsequent damage to speech and language 
processes. (Hendricks.) 

Speech 220. Experimental Audiology, (3) 

Second semester. Prerequisite, 6 hours in audiology. Laboratory fee, $3.00. A study 
of experimental techniques in the investigation of problems in audiology and psycho- 
acoustics. (Hendricks, Staff.) 

Speech 221. Communication Theory and Speech and Hearing Problems. (3) 
Second semester. Prerequisites, 6 hours in speech pathology and audiology and 
consent of instructor. Analysis of current theories of communication as they apply 
to research and therapy in speech and hearing. (Hendricks.) 

Speech 399. Research. (3-6") 

Credit in proportion to work done and results accomplished. (Hendricks.) 

VETERINARY SCIENCE 

Professors: brueckner, devolt, hansen and reagan. 
Associate Professor: byrne. 

No advanced degrees are given in the Department of Veterinary Science. 
Graduate students in other departments are accepted for problems in the Depart- 
ment of Veterinary Science upon approval of the department in which the 
graduate degree may be given. 

Vor Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

V. S. 101. Comparative Anatomy. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Normal structure of 

the domesticated animals; normal physiological activities; interrelationship of structure 

and function. (Staff.) 

V. S. 102. Animal Hygiene. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Nature of disease; 

immunity; prevention and control; common diseases of farm animals. (Staff.) 

201 ► 



Veterinary Science 

V. S. 107. Poultry Hygiene. (3) 

Second semester. Two lectures and one laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, Micro b. 

periods a week. Prerequisites, one year of zoology and on year of chemistry. 

trol, and eradication. (De Volt.j 

V. S. 108. Avian Anatomy. (3) 

First semester. Two lectures and one laboratory a week. Prerequisite, Zool. 1. Gross 

and microscopic structure, dissection and demonstration. (De Volt.) 

For Graduates 

V. S. 203. Electron Microscopy. (2) 

First semester. One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Theory of the electron 

microscope, preparation of specimens, manipulations, photography. (Reagan, Byrne.) 

V. S. 399. Animal Disease Research. (2-6) 

First and second semesters. Credit in accordance with work done. Prerequisite, 

veterinary degree or consent of staff. Studies of practical disease phases. 

(Poelma, DeVolt, Hansen, Byrne, Brueckner.) 

ZOOLOGY 

Professors: wharton, anastos and schoenborn. 
Associate Professors: brown, haley and wtnn. 
Assistant Professors: grollman, highton and ramm. 

The Department of Zoology offers work leading to the Master of Science 
and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The general academic requirements 
which must be fulfilled for these degrees are described earlier in the catalog. 

The special fields which graduate students may emphasize in working 
toward these degrees are behavior, cytology, ecology, embryology, fisheries, para- 
sitology, physiology, and systematics. Information concerning the specific re- 
quirements in each of these fields may be obtained from the Department. 

Alternate year courses will be offered according to the following schedule: 
(a) courses offered in 1960-61, not offered in 1961-62; (b) courses not offered 
in 1960-61, offered in 1961-62. 

All zoology courses with laboratory have a laboratory fee of $8.00 per 
course per semester. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Zool. 102. General Animal Physiology. (4) 

Second semester; occasional summer session. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory 

periods a week. Prerequisites, one year of zoology and one year of chemistry. 

(Schoenborn.) 

M 202 



Zoology 

Zool. 104. Genetics. (3) 

First semester; summer session. Two lectures and one discussion period a week. 
Prerequisite, one course of zoology or botany. (Highton.) 

Zool. 108. Animal Histology. (4) 

Second semester; occasional summer session. Two lectures and two three-hour 
laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, one year of zoology. (Brown.) 

Zool. 110. Parasitology. (4) 

First semester; occasional summer session. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory 
periods a week. Prerequisite, Zool. 1 and 2 or permission of the instructor. (Haley.) 

Zool. 111. Animal Parasitology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, Zool. 110 or equivalent. Alternate years (a). (Haley.) 

Zool. 118. Invertebrate Zoology. (4) 

First semester; occasional summer session. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory 

periods a week. Prerequisite, one year of zoology. (Linder.) 

Zool. 121. Principles of Animal Ecology. (3) 

Second semester; occasional summer session. Two lectures and one three-hour 
laboratory period a week. Prerequisites, one year of zoology and one year of 
chemistry. (Stross.) 

Zool. 127. Ichthyology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures, one two-hour and one three-hour laboratory period a 

week. Prerequisites, Zool. 5 and 20. Alternate years (a). (Winn.) 

Zool. 128. Zoogeography. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 

one year of zoology, botany, or geology. Alternate years (b). (Staff.) 

Zool. 129. Vertebrate Zoology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, 

Zool. 1, 2, 5, and 20 or permission of the instructor. (Winn.) 

Zool. 130. Hydrobiology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, 

one year of zoology and one year of chemistry or permission of the instructor. 

(Stross.) 
Zool. 181. Animal Behavior. (3) 

(Same as Psych. 181.) Second semester. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite, per- 
mission of the instructor. (Ross.) 

Zool. 199S. National Science Foundation Summer Institute for Teachers of 

Science and Mathematics. Seminar. (I) 
Summer school. Seminar fee, $5.00. (Brown, Staff.) 

203 ► 



Zoology 

For Graduates 

Zool. 202. Animal Cytology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, Zool. 108. Alternate years (a). (Brown.) 

Zool. 203. Advanced Embryology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, Zool. 20. Alternate years (b). (Ramm.) 

Zool. 204. Advanced Physiology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisites, Zool. 102 and one year of organic chemistry. (Schoenborn.) 

Zool. 207. Zoology Seminar. (.Credit to be arranged~) 

First and second semesters; summer session. One lecture a week for each credit hour. 
1. cytology; 2. embryology (general embryology, experimental embryology, invertebrate 
embryology, transplantation and regeneration, endocrines and development); 3. fish- 
eries; 4. genetics (population genetics); 5. parasitology (general parasitology, 
helminthology, fish diseases); 6. physiology (physiology of protozoa, invertebrate physi- 
ology, physiology of fishes, physiology of development); 7. systematics (evolution, 
herpetology, ichthyology, zoogeography); 8. ecology (experimental ecology, marine 
ecology, radioisotopes in ecology, population dynamics, limnology); 9. behavior (com- 
parative behavior, fish behavior, electronic instrumentation); 19. recent advances 
(microtechnique and histochemistry, Russian parasitology). (Staff.) 

Zool. 208. Special Problems in Zoology. (Credit to be arranged') 

First and second semesters; summer session. 1. cytology; 2. embryology; 3. fisheries; 

5. parasitology; 6. physiology; 7. systematics; 8. ecology; and 9. behavior. (Staff.) 

Zool. 209. Advanced Parasitology. (4) 

Second semester. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisite, Zool. 110 or permission of the instructor. Alternate years (b). (Haley.) 

Zool. 210. Systematic Zoology. (4) 

Second semester. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. 

Alternate years (a). (Highton.) 

Zool. 211, 212. Lectures in Zoology. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Three lectures a week. (Visiting Lecturers.) 

Zool. 215S. Fisheries Technology. (4) 

To be offered as needed during the summer session at the Sea Food Processing 
Laboratory, Crisfield, Maryland. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods 
a week. (Dunker.) 

Zool. 216. Physiological Cytology. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisites, Chem. 161, 162, Phys. 11, and Zool. 102, or permission of the instructor. 
Alternate years (b). (Brown.) 

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Dentistry 

Zool. 220. Advanced Genetics. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisite, Zool. 104. Alternate years (b). (Highton.) 

Zool. 223. Analysis of Animal Structure. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Alter- 
nate years (a). (Ramm.) 

Zool. 23 IS. Acarology. (3) 

Summer session. Lecture and laboratory. (Baker.) 

ZooZ. 232S. Medical and Veterinary Acarology. (3) 

Summer session. Lecture and laboratory. (Camin.) 

Zool. 23 3 S. Agricultural Acarology. (3) 

Summer session. Lecture and laboratory. (Baker.) 

Zool. 234. Experimental Mammalian Physiology. (4) 

First semester. Two four-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisites, Zool. 102 and 

one year of chemistry above general chemistry. (Grollman.) 

Zool. 235. Comparative Behavior. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods a week. Pre- 
requisites, Zool. 121 and 181, or permission of the instructor. Alternate years (b). 

(Winn.) 
Zool. 399. Piesearch. (Credit to he arranged) 

First and second semesters; summer session. Work on thesis project only. 1. cytology; 
2. embryology; 3. fisheries; 5. parasitology; 6. physiology; 7. systematics; 8. ecol- 
ogy; and 9. behavior. (Staff.) 

SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

ANATOMY 

Professor: hahn. 
Associate Professor: Thompson. 
Assistant Professor: piavis. 
Lecturer: lindenberg. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Anat. III. Human Gross Anatomy. (8) 

First semester. Two lectures and three laboratories a week. Second semester. Two 
lectures and two laboratory periods for eight weeks. This course consists of dissections 
and lectures supplemented by frequent conferences and practical demonstrations. The 
entire human body is dissected. The subject is taught with the purpose of emphasizing 
the principles of the body structure, the knowledge of which is derived from a study of 
its development, its organs and tissues and the action of its parts. 

(Hahn, Thompson, Piavis.) 

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Dentistry 

Anat. 112. Human Neuroanatomy. (2) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods for eight weeks. Prerequisite, 
Anat. Ill or equivalent. The work consists of a study of the brain and spinal cord 
by gross dissections and microscopic methods. Correlation is made, whenever possible, 
with the student's work in the histology and physiology of the central nervous 
system. (Hahn, Thompson, Piavis, Lindenberg.) 

For Graduates 

Anat. 211. Human Gtoss Anatomy. (8) 

Same as Anat. Ill but with additional work on a more advanced level. (Staff.) 

Anat. 212. Human Neuroanatomy. (2) 

Same as Anat. 112 but with additional instruction of a more advanced nature. 

(Hahn, Thompson, Piavis, Lindenberg.) 

Anat. 214. The Anatomy of the Head and Neck. (3) 

One conference and two laboratory periods per week for one semester. This course 
is designed to provide the student with a detailed study of the basic anatomy of the 
region and to correlate this knowledge with the various aspects of clinical practice. 

(Hahn, Piavis, Thompson.) 
Anat. 399. Research. 
(Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed.) (Staff.) 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

Professor: vaaden bosche. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Biochem. 111. Principles of Biochemistry. (6) 

First year. Prerequisites, inorganic and organic chemistry, with additional training in 
quantitative and physical chemistry desirable. Two lectures and one laboratory period 
throughout the year. (Vanden Bosche.) 

For Graduates 

Biochem. 211. Advanced Biochemistry. (6) 

Prerequisite, Biochem. 111. Two lectures, one conference and one laboratory period 

throughout the year. (Vanden Bosche.) 

Biochem. 399. Research. 

(Number of hours and credit by arrangement.) (Vanden Bosche.) 

HISTOLOGY 

Professor: provenza. 

Hist. 111. Mammalian Histology and Embryology. (8) 

First year. The course embraces the thorough study of the cells, tissues and organs 

^ 206 



Dentistry 

of the various systems of the human body. Although certain aspects of the dental 
histology phase of the course are given strictly as special entities, many are included 
in the instruction in general histology, since the two areas are so intimately related 
when functional and clinical applications are considered. The instruction in embryol- 
ogy is correlated with that in histology. It covers the fundamentals of develop- 
ment of the human body, particular emphasis being given to the head and facial 
regions, the oral cavity, and the teeth and their adnexa. Specific correlations are also 
made with the other courses in the dental curriculum. 

For Graduates 

Hist. 212. Mammalian Histology and Embryology. (6) 

This course is the same as Hist. Ill, except that it does not include the dental phases 
of Hist. Ill, but does include additional instruction and collateral reading of an 
advanced nature. (Staff.) 

Hist. 213. Mammalian Oral Histology and Embryology. (2) 
Prerequisite, Hist. Ill or 212, or an equivalent course. This course covers the dental 
aspects of Hist. Ill, and includes additional instruction in the relations of histologic 
structure and embryologic development of the teeth, their adnexa, and the head and 
facial regions of the human body. (Provenza.) 

Hist. 216. Inheritance and Development Biology. (6) 

This course is concerned with the study of the embryogeny and fetal development of 
vertebrate animals with special emphasis on mammalian embryology. In addition to 
tracing the developmental pattern, lectures are devoted to the discussion of inheritance 
mechanisms, gametogenesis and fertilization. (Provenza.) 

Hist. 217. Comparative Animal Histology. (6) 

Prerequisite, Hist. Ill, 212-213, or an equivalent course. This course is concerned 
with a comparative study of the morphology, structure and function of the cells, 
tissues and organs as found in representative members of the animal kingdom. 
Special emphasis is placed on techniques and research methods. (Cheng.) 

Hist. 218. Experimental Embryology. (4) 

Second semester of every year. Prerequisite, Hist. 216, or an equivalent course. 
This course is concerned with the historical and recent aspects of experimental 
embryology from both the applied and theoretical standpoints. Each student will be 
assigned a special problem in addition to the scheduled lectures. (Staff.) 

Hist. 219. Radiation Biology. (4) 

First semester of odd numbered years. The primary aim of this course is to familiarize 
the student with the techniques of handling radio-active isotopes as applied in biological 
research. The topics covered in the course are: the physics of radio activity from the 
standpoint of the biological researcher; the selection of isotopes for specific investiga- 
tions; the effects of radioactivity on cells, tissues and systems; the effect of radioactivity 
on inheritance; the role of environment on the effectiveness of radioactivity; and cer- 
tain phases of laboratory health physics. The laboratory will be concerned with the 
use and location as well as recording and interpreting data of isotopes as applied to 
biological research. (Cheng.) 

207 ► 



Dentistry 

Hist. 320. Seminar. (2) 

(Staff.) 
Hist. 399. Research. 
(Number of hours and credit by arrangement.) (Staff.) 

MICROBIOLOGY 
Professor: shay. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Microb. 115. Serology and Immunology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Protective reactions 
of the animal body against pathogenic microorganisms and their products; cellular and 
humoral immunity; anaphylaxis and allergies. 

Microb. 121. Dental Microbiology and Immunology. (4) 

First semester. Consideration is given to pathogenic bacteria, viruses, yeasts and 
molds. Special attention is given to those organisms which produce lesions of the 
oral cavity. Immunological principles are studied with emphasis on hypersensitivity 
resulting from antibiotics, antigens and vaccines. Laboratory teaching includes cultural 
characteristics, disinfection, sterilization, asepsis, animal inoculation, antibiotics assay 
and virus techniques. In all phases of the course emphasis is placed on dental appli- 
cations. 

For Graduates 

Microb. 200, 201. Chemotherapy. (I, J) 

Offered in alternate years. Prerequisites, Microb. 121 or equivalent, Biochem. Ill or 
equivalent. Lectures which deal with the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and 
therapeutic value of drugs employed in the treatment of disease. 

Microb. 202, 203. Reagents and Media. Ql, O 

Offered in alternate years. Consideration of media for special procedures, such as, 
antibiotic assays, blood cultures, spinal fluid, exudates and other materials. Anaerobiosis, 
differential media, biochemical reactions, sensitivity and sterility testing are considered 
in detail. Emphasis is placed on growth requirements of specific groups of micro- 
organisms. 

Microb. 210. Special Problems in Microbiology. 

(Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed.) Laboratory course. 

Special studies in the various divisions of microbiology. 

Microb. 211. Public Health. (2) 

Prerequisite, Microb. 121 or equivalent. A demonstration of public health facilities in 
the community and their relation to the practices of the health sciences carried on 
through lectures and discussion groups. The application of statistical and epidemiological 
methods to health problems is illustrated through lectures and demonstration. 

<* 208 



Dentistry 

Microb. 399. Thesis Research. 

(Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed.) Open only to candi- 
dates for advanced degrees in microbiology. 

ORAL SURGERY 

Professor: dorsey. 

Associate Professor: cappuccio. 

For Graduates 

Surg. 201. Clinical Anesthesiology. (6) 
Forty hours a week for thirteen weeks. 

Surg. 220. General Dental Oral Surgery. (4) 

Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week for one semester. 

Surg. 221. Advanced Oral Surgery. (4) 

Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week for one semester. 

Surg. 399. Research. 

Time and credit by arrangement. 

PATHOLOGY 

Professor: M. aisenberg. 



(Heldrich, Staff.) 

(Dorsey, Staff.) 

(Dorsey, Staff.) 

(Staff.) 



For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Path. 121. General Pathology. (4) 

Two lectures and two laboratory periods per week for one semester. 

For Graduates 



(Aisenberg.) 



Path. 211. Advanced Oral Pathology. (8) 

Two lectures and two laboratory periods throughout the year. This course is presented 
with the objective of correlating a knowledge of histopathology with the various as- 
pects of clinical practice. Studies of surgical and biopsy specimens are stressed. 

(Aisenberg.) 
Path. 339. Research. 
Time and credit by arrangement. (Aisenberg.) 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Professor: oster. 

Associate Professors: shipley and pollack. 



209 ► 



Medicine 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Physiology 121. Principles of Physiology. (6) 

Second year. 132 hours. Three lectures and one laboratory period in first semester, 
two lectures in second semester. The study of the functions of major mammalian 
organ systems is coordinated with basic cellular neural and hormonal physiology in 
relation to the integrated activity of the human body. 

(Oster, Shipley, Pollack, Staling.) 

Physiology 211. Principles of Mammalian Physiology. (6) 

Prerequisite, permission from the Department. Same as Physiology 121 but with 
collateral reading and additional instruction. Each student is required to write a 
review paper on some special phase of physiology. (Staff.) 

Physiology 212. Advanced Physiology. 

Hours and credit by arrangement. Prerequisite, Physiology 121 or its equivalent. 
Lectures and seminars on special problems and recent advances in physiology during 
the second semester. (Staff.) 

Physiology 213. Research. 

By arrangement with the Head of the Department. (Staff.) 

Physiology 399. Thesis Research. 

By arrangement with the Head of the Department. (Staff.) 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

ANATOMY 

Professors: figge and nauta. 

Associate Professors: krahl, mack, kuypers and leveque. 

The graduate degrees offered by the Department of Anatomy are the Master 
of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy. 

ANATOMY 

For Graduates and Advanced LJ tider graduates 

Anat. 101. Human Gross Anatomy. (8) 

Four conferences or lectures, 12 laboratory hours per week throughout the first semester. 
Laboratory fee, $25.00. This course gives the student an opportunity to develop a 
basic concept of the morphology of the human body. It is closely interwoven with the 
study of neuroanatomy, histology and embryology, and some time is devoted to 
roentgen anatomy. The entire human body is dissected. 

(Figge, Krahl, Mack, Leveque, Mech, McCafferty, Saunders.) 

Anat. 103. Clinical Anatomy. (4) 

Second semester. Laboratory fee, $20.00. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratories 

per week for 16 weeks. This course is designed to bridge the gap between abstract 

< 210 



Medicine 

anatomy and clinical anatomy as applied to the study and practice of medicine and 
surgery. It will be required of all majors in anatomy. The study of surface anatomy 
will be correlated with physical diagnosis. (Brantigan, Walker, Bowie, Settle, Staff.) 

For Graduates 

Anat. 201. General Anatomy of the Human Body. (8) 

Same course as Anat. 101, but on a more advanced level. It can be taken by graduate 

as well as post-graduate students. Laboratory fee, $25.00. (Figge, Staff.) 

Anat. 203. Clinical Anatomy. (4) 

Same course as Anat. 103 but on a more advanced level. Laboratory fee, $20.00. 

(Figge, Brantigan, Staff.) 
Anat. 204. Fetal and Infant Anatomy. (2) 

First semester. Laboratory fee, $10.00. Fifteen periods of three hours each, every 
Thursday from 2 to 5 p.m. for 15 weeks. This course is open to graduate students 
and post-graduates interested in pediatrics. (Krahl.) 

Anat. 399. Research in Anatomy. 

Maximum credits, 12 per semester. Research work may be taken in any one of the 

branches of anatomy. (Figge, Staff.) 

NEURO-ANATOMY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Neuroanat. 101. Human N euro- Anatomy. (4) 

First semester. Two lectures and four laboratory hours per week for 16 weeks. 
Laboratory fee, $15.00. The study of the detailed anatomy of the central nervous 
system is coordinated with structure and function of the entire nervous system. The 
dissection of the human brain and the examination of stained microscopic sections of 
various levels of the brain stem are required. (Figge, Nauta, Kuypers.) 

For Graduates 

Neuroanat. 201. Human N euro- Anatomy. (4) 

Same course as Neuroanat. 101, but with additional work of a more advanced nature. 

Laboratory fee, $15.00. (Figge, Nauta, Kuypers.) 

Neuroanat. 299. Research in N euro- Anatomy. 

Maximum credits, 12. Research work involving the central or peripheral nervous 

system. (Figge, Nauta, Kuypers, Leveque.) 

MICRO-ANATOMY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Microanat. 101. Mammalian Histology. (6) 

First semester. Three lectures and six laboratory hours a week for 16 weeks. 

Laboratory fee, $15.00. This course presents an integrated study of the histology and 

211 ► 



Medicine 

embryology of the human body. An attempt is made to correlate this with gross 
anatomy as well as other subjects in the medical curriculum. Special emphasis is 
placed on the dynamic and functional aspects of the subject. (Figge, Mack, Leveque.) 

For Graduates 

Microanat. 201. Mammalian Histology. (6) 

Same course as Microanat. 101, but with additional work of a more advanced nature. 

Laboratory fee, $15.00. (Figge, Mack, Leveque.) 

Microanat. 202. Normal and Atypical Growth. (2) 

Lectures in problems of growth. Two hours per week, time to be arranged. Sixteen 
weeks, second semester. (Figge.) 

Microanat. 399. Research. 

Maximum credits, 12. Research work may be taken in any one of the branches which 
form the subject of micro-anatomy (including cancer research). 

(Figge, Mack, Leveque.) 

MICROBIOLOGY 

Professor: wisseman. 

Associate Professor: smith. 

Assistant Professors: snyder and etlar. 

Instructor: myers. 

The Department of Microbiology offers the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 
While the degree of Master of Science may be offered in special instances, priority 
for research facilities will be given aspirants to the Ph.D. degree. This Depart- 
ment encourages students who wish to enroll in the combined M.D.-Ph.D. 
program. 

Emphasis is placed upon medical aspects of microbiology. Research pro- 
grams are available in virology, rickettsiology, medical bacteriology and mycology, 
microbial physiology and bacterial cytology. Opportunities are open for experience 
in teaching and in diagnostic bacteriology and serology. 

Vor Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Microh. 101. Medical Microbiology and Immunology. (8) 

First semester. Four lecture hours and eight hours in laboratory and group con- 
ferences per week. Laboratory fee, $10.00. This course begins with an introduction to 
basic principles of microbiology and immunology and then proceeds to consider the 
major groups of bacteria, spirochetes, fungi, rickettsiae and viruses that cause human 
disease. Emphasis is placed upon an analysis of the properties of microorganisms 
thought to be important in disease production, pathogenesis of infection and interaction 
with host defense mechanisms, epidemiology and control measures. 

(Wisseman, Staff.) 

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Medicine 



For Graduates 



Microb. 201. Medical Microbiology and Immunology. (8) 

I'irst semester. Four lecture hours and eight hours in laboratory and group conferences 
per week. Laboratory fee, $10.00. This course, intended for the serious advanced 
student of medical microbiology, is built upon the framework of Microb. 101 supple- 
mented with advanced readings and laboratory work. (Wisseman, Staff.) 

Microb. 203. Microbial Physiology. (3) 

Second semester, alternate years. Three lectures per week supplemented with 
demonstrations. By consent of instructor. This course surveys the metabolic pro- 
cesses of bacteria, fungi, rickettsiae, viruses and parasitic protozoa. (Myers, Wisseman.) 

Microb. 205. Cytology and Genetics of Microorganisms. (2) 
Second semester, alternate years. One lecture and one laboratory per week. Laboratory 
fee, $10.00. Registration by consent of instructor. The structure of microorganisms 
will be studied by various means, including the electron microscope, in a sequence 
leading to the ultimate analysis of the nucleus, which, in turn, will be related to the 
genetics of the cell and its capabilities for mutation. The recognition, origin and 
importance of bacterial, viral and fungal mutants will be considered. (Smith, Staff.) 

Microb. 206, 207. Seminar. Q, O 

First and second semesters. One session per week. Graduate students, staff and 
guests participate in comprehensive and critical reviews of subjects of special interest 
or pertinent to graduate training program. (Wisseman, Staff.) 

Microb. 208. Medical Mycology. (2) 

Second semester, alternate years. One lecture and one laboratory per week. Laboratory 
fee, $10.00. Registration by consent of instructor. Consists of a review of the 
fundamentals of elementary mycology; a consideration of methods for the isolation, 
cultivation and identification of actinomycetes, yeasts and fungi; and a study of the 
etiological agents and of the immunology, epidemiology, prognosis and treatment of 
the medical mycoses. (Smith.) 

Microb. 209. Special Topics. 

(Permission and credit arranged individually.) This course provides the opportunity 
for the graduate student to pursue under supervision subjects of special interest not 
offered in other formal courses. A study program is worked out with the instructor 
prior to registration and may consist of special readings, conferences, reports and, 
on occasion, laboratory experience. (Wisseman, Staff.) 

Microb. 399. Research. 

Maximum credits, 12 hours per semester. (Wisseman, Staff.) 

INTERDEPARTMENTAL COURSES 

ID. 101. Man and His Environment. (2) 

One-hour lecture and one-hour panel discussion Saturday mornings from 9 to 11 a.m. 
throughout the year. Distinguished leaders in American medicine participate in the 
presentation of these weekly sessions. The course is broad in scope, stressing the 

213 ► 



Interdepartmental Courses 

cultural aspects of anthropology with emphasis directed toward the sociological, 
psychological, physiological, and geneological relationships of man and his surround- 
ings. All departments of the School of Medicine participate. 

BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 

Associate Professors: herbst, rudolph and bessman. 
Assistant Professor: emery. 
Lecturers: summerson and layne. 

Graduate degrees offered by the Department of Biological Chemistry are 
the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Biochetn. 101. Principles of Biochemistry. (8) 

Second semester. Seven lectures and conferences and two three-hour laboratory periods 
a week. Prerequisites, inorganic, organic and quantitative or physical chemistry. 
Laboratory fee, $20.00. Studies of the composition of living organisms and the 
chemical and physical processes which occur during health and in disease. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

Biochetn. 201. Principles of Biochemistry. (8) 

Same course as Biochem. 101 with additional assignments in biochemical literature. 

Laboratory fee, $20.00. (Staff.) 

Biochem. 202. Special Topics in Biochemistry. (I, 1) 

Prerequisite, Biochem. 101 or 201. Reading assignments and written summaries of 

the classical research literature in biochemistry. (Herbst.) 

Biochem. 204, 205. Seminar. (I, I) 

First and second semesters. Reports on the current literature or on research in progress. 

(Herbst.) 
Biochem. 206. Enzymes and Metabolism. (3) 

First semester. Three lectures per week on enzyme kinetics and intermediary 
metabolism. Prerequisite, Biochem. 201. (Herbst, Rudolph, Layne.) 

Biochem. 207. Enzymes and Metabolism Laboratory. (3) 

First semester. Three three-hour laboratory periods per week on radioactive tracer 
methods, cell fractionation, enzyme preparation and assay procedures. To be taken 
concurrently with Biochem. 206. (Rudolph, Herbst, Emery.) 

Biochem. 208. Biochemical Preparations. Ql-4^) 

Credit according to work assigned. The preparation of biochemicals by methods 

illustrating useful techniques for the isolation and purification of natural products. 

(Herbst, Rudolph, Emery.) 
Biochem. 399. Research. 
Maximum credits, 12 hours per semester. (Herbst, Rudolph, Emery, Bessman.) 

M 214 



Interdepartmental Courses 



LEGAL MEDICINE 



Professor: fisher. 

Associate Professors: freimuth and lovitt. 

Leg. Med. 201. Legal Medicine. (I) 

One hour of lecture for twelve weeks, 4 hours assigned reading. This course embraces 
a summary of medical jurisprudence including the laws governing the practice of 
medicine, industrial compensation and malpractice, proceedings in criminal and civil 
prosecution, medical evidence and testimony, including medicolegal toxicology. (12 
hours). (Fisher, Lovitt, Freimuth.) 

Leg. Med. 202. Toxicology. (iO) 

Two hours lecture, 8 laboratory hours per week for 1 year. There is also included 
some discussion of industrial toxicology relating industrial exposures to toxic sub- 
stances to effects produced in the worker using these materials. The lectures include 
discussion of mechanism of action of poisons, lethal doses, antidotes and methods of 
detection and quantitation of poisons in tissues and body fluids. The laboratory work 
embraces practical application of analytical procedures for the detection and estimation 
of poisons in post mortem tissue samples. (Freimuth, Fisher.) 

Leg. Med. 203. Gross Pathologic Anatomy as Related to Toxicology. (2) 
Two hours per week for one year. This course includes elementary anatomy with 
normal histology and selected histopathology as it will be seen by the toxicologist. 
It is a correllated course embracing anatomy, basic physiology and the alterations in 
function as well as structure brought about by disease and poisoning. (Fisher, Lovitt.) 

Leg. Med. 399. Research in Toxicology. 

(Number of hours and credit arranged.) (Freimuth, Fisher.) 

This Department offers schedules leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy in toxicology. Candidates are expected to have 
completed undergraduate work as follows: Eight semester hours each in general 
chemistry, organic chemistry, analytical chemistry (qualitative and quantitative) 
physical chemistry, physics, biology and four semester hours in organic qualitative 
analysis. 

Candidates for the Master's degree must complete the following or equivalent 
courses : 

Leg. Med. 201, 202, 203 and 399. 

Pharm. 101 f. s., and Chem. 258. 

Candidates for the doctorate must complete the following or equivalent 
courses : 

Leg. Med. 201, 202, 203, 399. 

Pharm. 100 f. s., Physiol. 102, Bact. 101, Bact. 102, Biochem. 206, 

Chem. 206, 208, Chem. 221, 223, Chem. 258, Chem. 150, Pharm. 

Chem. Ill, 113, Pharm. Chem. 112, 114. 

215 ► 



Interdepartmental Courses 

Part of the above work is offered at College Park with the remainder to be 
done at the Baltimore Schools. Some of the course work in legal medicine and 
toxicology will be given at the laboratories of the Division of Legal Medicine 
located at the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, 700 Fleet Street, Baltimore, 

Maryland. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

Professor: krantz. 

Associate Professors: burgison and truitt. 

All students majoring in the Department of Pharmacology with a view to 
obtaining the degree of Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy should secure 
special training in anatomy, mammalian physiology, organic chemistry, and 
physical chemistry. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Pharmacol. 101, f.s. General Pharmacology. (8) 

Three lectures and one laboratory. This course consists of 96 lectures and 32 laboratory 

periods of three hours each, offered each year. Laboratory fee, $20.00. 

(Krantz, Truitt, Burgison, Musser, Harne.) 

For Graduates 

Pharmacol. 201, f.s. General Pharmacology. (8) 

Same as Pharmacol. 101, for students majoring in pharmacology. Additional instruc- 
tion and collateral reading are required. Laboratory fee, $20.00. 

(Krantz, Truitt, Burgison.) 

Pharmacol. 206, f.s. Pharmacologic Methodology. (4) 

Prerequisite, Pharmacol. 201, f.s. (Truitt.) 

Pharmacol. 207, 208. Chemical Aspects of Pharmacodynamics. (2, 2) 

(Burgison.) 
Pharmacol. 399. Research. 

Maximum credits, 12. Credit in accordance with the amount of work accomplished. 

(Krantz, Truitt, Burgison.) 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Professors: Ferguson and smith. 

Associate Professor: white. 

Lecturers: Anderson, brown, wilber and wills. 

The Department of Physiology prefers to accept students who have already 
had some graduate training elsewhere. Before admission to candidacy for the 

M 216 



Interdepartmental Courses 

Doctor of Philosophy degree the Department gives a qualifying examination, 
both oral and written, which must be satisfactorily passed. 

In the usual case a student majoring in physiology will be expected to 
take Physiol. 101 before, or concurrently with, courses 201 to 206 below. Such 
a student will extend his program by taking courses in other departments of 
this University, and by enrolling in the summer course in physiology at the 
Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Massachusetts. 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Physiol. 101. The Principles of Physiology. (9) 

Second semester. Five lectures, two conferences and two 4-hour laboratory periods 
per week for 16 weeks. Laboratory fee, $15.00. The lectures cover the major fields 
of physiology, including the following areas: central and peripheral nervous systems, 
neuro-muscular apparatus, heart and circulation, respiration, kidney and body fluids, 
gastrointestinal tract, endocrines and reproduction. The laboratory includes experiments 
with frog and turtle heart and nerve-muscle preparations, mammalian operative work 
and observations on the human subject. (Staff.) 

For Graduates 

Physiol. 201. Experimental Mammalian Physiology. 

Time and credit by arrangement. This course permits further experience in mammalian 
operative work. (Staff.) 

Physiol. 202. Blood and Tissue Proteins. (2) 

Two hours a week, lectures, seminars and conferences for 15 weeks. Consideration 
will be given to the physical, chemical and physiological properties of the proteins of 
blood and body tissues. (White.) 

Physiol. 204. Physiological Techniques. 

Time and credit by arrangement. The various technical procedures currently operating 
in the Department will be demonstrated and opportunity will be given for acquiring 
experience with them. (Staff.) 

Physiol. 205. Physiology of Kidney and Body Fluids. (2) 

Two hours a week, lectures, seminars and conferences, for 15 weeks. Consideration 
will be given to the current status of knowledge of renal function and body fluids in 
vertebrates, with particular reference to mammals. (Ferguson.) 

Physiol. 206. Seminar. 

Credit according to work done. Weekly meetings are held to discuss recent literature 

and results of departmental research. (Staff.) 

Physiol. 399. Research. 

By arrangement with Head of the Department. (Staff.) 

217 ► 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

PSYCHIATRIC NURSING, MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH, 
MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING, AND NURSING ADMINISTRATION. 

Professors: gipe, carl and grenell. 

The School of Nursing of the University of Maryland is one of the six 
schools in the South selected for membership in the Southern Regional Edu- 
cation Board. 

MAJOR OEJECTIVES OF THE GRADUATE PROGRAM 

The graduate program in nursing leading toward the degree of Master of 
Science in nursing is designed primarily to prepare registered nurses in psychi- 
atric nursing, maternal and child nursing as clinical specialists, teachers, and 
administrators in these clinical areas; and to prepare registered nurses in medical 
and surgical nursing as teachers and administrators. In addition, selected 
students following a graduate core of clinical nursing may register for preparation 
as administrators in nursing service and/or nursing education. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Admission to the graduate program in nursing, requires the applicant to 
be a registered nurse who has completed an undergraduate degree with aca- 
demic standing which is recognized by the Graduate School of the University 
of Maryland. In addition, the applicant must have clinical experience in med- 
ical and surgical nursing, psychiatric nursing, maternal and child nursing, and 
public health nursing, comparable to the requirements in the basic undergraduate 
nursing program at the University of Maryland. 

CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS 

Requirements for the Master of Science degree include the satisfactory 
completion of at least thirty semester hours of graduate work. The thirty- 
hour program includes twenty four semester hours of course work and six 
semester hours for the thesis. At least twelve semester hours must be taken 
in the major field, and at least eight semester hours must be taken in the 
minor field. It is required that at least twelve semester hours of course work 
will be taken in courses numbered in the catalog as 200 courses. 

THESIS 

A thesis representing research in the major field must be approved by the 
adviser of the student and presented to the Dean of the Graduate School as 
partial requirement for the Master of Science degree. Final approval of the 
thesis is given by the examination committee apppointed by the Dean of the 
Graduate School. 

<4 218 



Nursing 



LEARNING EXPERIENCES 



Through graduate study the student broadens and deepens understandings 
built first upon knowledge and then greater understanding of a particular 
specialty of study and work. Having the privilege of studying with graduate 
students in other disciplines, the graduate student in nursing has opportunities 
to transfer knowledge from other areas to enrich her understandings in her 
own field of specialty. The graduate student is given opportunity to learn to 
pursue, evaluate and apply results of research in nursing in order to find better 
ways of improving patient care. 

The extensive clinical facilities of the University of Maryland provide an 
excellent climate where this dynamic learning can occur. Seminars, work- 
shops, and institutes also provide opportunities for extending the scope of un- 
derstanding of the graduate student. Depending upon the functional interest, 
the student receives practice in teaching or supervision under guidance. 

For Graduates 

Nurs. 201. Trends of Higher Education in Nursing. (2) 

First semester. One lecture and two hour conferences a week. The central objective 
of this course is to bring to the student in nursing education a knowledge and an 
understanding of the current status of nursing in institutions of higher learning and 
what nursing must have as a goal before it can become a universally accepted pro- 
fession. (Gipe, Staff.) 

Nurs. 202. Interpersonal Interaction. (2) 

First semester. One lecture and one two-hour laboratory period a week. The course is 
primarily concerned with the application of psychodynamics and psychoanalytic under- 
standing to the nurse's relationships with patients. (Hurler, Carl.) 

Nurs. 203. Nursing in the Somatic Therapies. (2) 

First semester. One lecture and one two-hour laboratory period a week. The course is 
planned to assist the graduate student to broaden her ability to apply biological, 
physiological and somatic therapies of behavior to the care of psychiatric patients. 
Through this course the student may become aware of current research determining the 
causative factors of behavior, therefore, she may have an opportunity to formulate the 
effects of newer somatic methods of treatment upon her care of psychiatric patients. 

(Carl, Staff.) 
Nuts. 204, 205. Psychiatric Nursing. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. One lecture and two four-hour laboratory periods a week. 
The course includes dynamics of human behavior, including formation of personality, 
the techniques of problem solving and the skills of communication as preparation for 
administering expert therapeutic nursing care of psychiatric patients. 

(Cohelan, Richardson, Anderson.) 

Nurs. 206. Philosophical Concepts in Health. (2) 

Second semester. Two hour lecture a week. The course is planned with a contemp- 
orary approach to the problem of philosophical concepts in health. The discussions be- 

219 ► 



Nursing 

gin with general considerations and progress to the application of the concepts to more 
specific situations. (Spencer.) 

Nuts. 207, 208. Nursing in Child Health Services. (2, 2) 
First and second semesters. One lecture and two four-hour laboratory periods a week. 
The course is concerned with deeper knowledge of the place of nursing in the society's 
total program of child health services and increased skill in the nursing of children. 

(Reed.) 
Nurs.209, 210. Nursing in Maternal and Newborn Services. (2, 2) 
First and second semesters. One lecture and two four-hour laboratory periods a week. 
The course is concerned with knowledge of obstetrics and the opportunity to apply 
this knowledge in varying nursing situations as it relates to the patient, to the family 
and to the community. (Hydorn.) 

Nurs. 211. Seminar in Maternal and Child Health Services. (2) 
Second semester. One two-hour period a week. The course is concerned with under- 
standing and purposeful application of maternal and child health nursing as it normally 
exists within the family. The influence of the nurse on maternal and child health is 
traced through the many institutions and agencies where she contacts the mother and 
child, or the family as a whole. (Hydorn, Reed, Staff.) 

Nurs. 212, 213. Medical-Surgical Ntirsing. (2, 2) 

First and second semester. One lecture and two four-hour laboratory periods a week. 
The course is designed to meet the needs of students who are interested in developing 
the broader and deeper aspects of nursing care as it relates to the analyzing of those 
elements in the art and science of nursing which take the learner beyond the realm 
of general practice of nursing. (Hosfeld.) 

Nurs. 214. Application of Principles of Physical and Social Sciences in Nurs- 
ing. (2) 
First semester. One lecture and one two-hour laboratory period a week. The course is 
designed to apply physical and social science principles in a life situation in such a 
way that similar situations will be recognized by the learners in their day to day 
application. (Zitkus, Staff.) 

Nurs. 286. Research Methods and Materials in Nursing. (2) 
First semester. One two-hour lecture or conference period a week. The course deals 
with basic understandings of philosophical aspects as they relate to research, including 
the nature of scientific thinking; with the basic methodologies of research; with par- 
ticipation in research activities; and understanding of research literature in nursing. 

(Carl, Staff.) 
Nurs. 287. Seminar in Nursing. (2) 
Second semester. One two-hour lecture or conference period a week. (Staff.) 

Nurs. 288. Special Problems in Nursing. Ql-6') 

The major objective of this course is to develop further clinical and research com- 
petencies in selected students who have completed a graduate core of clinical nursing. 

(Staff.) 
Nurs. 290. Nursing Administration. (6) 
The major objective of this course is to develop competence in nursing administration 

< 220 



Pharmacy 

so that selected students following a graduate core of clinical nursing may be prepared 
as administrators in nursing service and/or nursing education. Learning activities in- 
clude both seminar and field experience. (Gipe, Staff.) 

Nurs. 399. Research-Thesis. (1-6) 

(Staff.) 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

Professors: foss, estabrook, ichniowski, purdum, richeson, shay and slama. 
Associate Professors: allen, miller and doorenbos. 
Assistant Professors: costello and shangraw. 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chern. 153. Biochemistry. (5) 

First semester. Four lectures and conferences and one four-hour laboratory period a 
week. Prerequisites, Chem. 35, 36, 37, 38, 15. (Staff.) 

PHARMACOGNOSY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Pharmacognosy 101, 102. Taxonomy of the Higher Plants. (2, 2) 
Given in alternate years. One lecture and one laboratory. Prerequisite, Pharmacognosy 
51, 52. A study of the kinds of seed plants and ferns, their classifications, and field 
work on local flora. Instruction will be given in the preparation of an herbarium. 

(Slama.) 
Pharmacognosy 111, 112. Plant Anatomy. (4, 4) 

Two lectures and two laboratories. Prerequisites, Pharmacognosy 51, 52. Lectures 
and laboratory work covering advanced plant anatomy with special emphasis placed 
on the structure of roots, stems and leaves of vascular plants. (Slama.) 

For Graduates 

Pharmacognosy 201, 202. Advanced Study of Vegetable Powders. (4, 4) 
Given in alternate years. Two lectures and two laboratories. Prerequisites, Pharma- 
cognosy 111, 112. A study of powdered vegetable drugs and spices from the structural 
and microchemical standpoints, including practice in identification and detection of 
adulterants. (Slama.) 

Pharmacognosy 211, 212. Advanced Pharmacognosy. (4, 4) 
Two lectures and two laboratories. Prerequisites, Pharmacognosy 111, 112. A study 
of many crude drugs not ordinarily studied in other pharmacognosy courses. Special 
attention will be given to practical problems and to the identification and detection of 
adulterants. (Slama.) 

221 ► 



Pharmacy 

Pharmacognosy 399. Research in Pharmacognosy. 

Credit according to the amount and quality of work performed. (Slama.) 

MATHEMATICS 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Math. 152, 153. Mathematical Statistics. (2, 2) 

Given in alternate years. Prerequisites, Math. 20, 21. Frequency distributions and their 
parameters, multivariate analysis and correlation, theory of sampling, analysis of 
variance, statistical inference. Illustrations will be drawn from the biological sciences. 

(Pucheson.) 

MICROBIOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Microh. 115. Serology and Immunology. (4) 

Second semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Protective reactions 
of the animal body against pathogenic microorganisms and their products; cellular 
and humoral immunity; anaphylaxis and allergies. (Shay.) 

For Graduates 

Microh. 200, 201. Chemotherapy. (I, O 

Alternate years. Prerequisites, Microbiology 121 or equivalent, Biochemistry 111 or 
equivalent. Lectures which deal with the chemistry, toxicity, pharmacology and 
therapeutic value of drugs employed in the treatment of disease. (Shay.) 

Microh. 202, 203. Reagents and Media. 0,1} 

Offered in alternate years. Consideration of media for special procedures such as 
antibiotic assays, blood cultures, spinal fluid, exudates and other materials. Anaerobiosis, 
differential media, biochemical reactions, sensitivity and sterility testing are considered 
in detail. Emphasis is placed on growth requirements of specific groups of micro- 
organisms. (Shay.) 

Microh. 210. Special Prohlems in Microhiology. 

Laboratory course. Special studies in the various divisions of microbiology. Credit 

determined by amount and quality of work performed. (Shay.) 

Microh. 211. Puhlic Health. (2) 

Prerequisite, Microb. 121 or equivalent. A demonstration of public health facilities 
in the community and their relation to the practices of the health sciences carried on 
through lectures and discussion groups. The application of statistical and epidemiological 
methods to health problems is illustrated through lectures and demonstration. (Shay.) 

Microh. 221. Research in Microhiology. 

Credit determined by amount and quality of work performed. Open only to candidates 

for advanced degrees in microbiology. (Shay.) 

Microh. 399. Thesis Research. 

(Shay.) 

^ 222 



Pharmacy 
PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chctn. 101. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. (2) 

The principles of inorganic chemistry at an advanced level— nuclear and atomic 
structure, bonding, complexions and coordination compounds, oxidation and reduc- 
tion, acids and bases; the descriptive chemistry of the elements. (Miller, Doorenbos.) 

Pharm. Chem. Ill, 113. Chemistry of Medicinal Products. (3, 3) 
A study of the synthesis of the structural relationships, and of the physical and chemi- 
cal properties of medicinal products. (Doorenbos.) 

Pharm. Chem. 112, 114. Chemistry of Medicinal Products. (2, 2) 
Laboratory exercises dealing with important and characteristic chemical properties of 
pharmaceutical and medicinal products. (Doorenbos.) 

Chem. 141, 143. Advanced Organic Chemistry. (2, 2) 

The advance theory and descriptive chemistry of organic compounds with more 

emphasis on theoretical concepts. (Miller.) 

Chem. 142, 144. Advanced Organic Laboratory. (2, 2) 

The more difficult preparations of organic compounds. (Doorenbos.) 

Chem. 146, 148. Indentifcation of Organic Compounds. (2, 2) 

The systematic identification of organic compounds, both individual and mixtures. 

(Doorenbos.) 

For Graduates 

Pharm. Chem. 201, 203. Survey of Pharmaceutical Chemistry. (2, 2) 

A study of the basic chemistry and stereochemistry of cyclic compounds including 

the chemistry of terpenes and steroids. (Miller, Doorenbos.) 

Pharm. Chem. 211, 213. Chemistry of Alkaloids. (2, 2) 

A study of the basic chemistry of amines, heterocyclic compounds, and alkaloids. 

(Doorenbos.) 
Pharm. Chem. 220. Advanced Pharmaceutical Synthesis. (2-6) 
Application of synthetic procedures in the preparation of various medicinal chemicals 
and their intermediates. (Miller, Doorenbos.) 

Pharm. Chem. 222. Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis. (.1-4^) 

A laboratory study of the analytical procedures and methods as applied to official, 

proprietary, natural and synthetic drugs, their intermediates and derivatives. 

(Doorenbos.) 
Pharm. Chem. 230. Pharmaceutical Chemistry Seminar. (J) 
Reports of progress and survey of recent developments in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

(Miller, Doorenbos.) 

223 ► 



Pharmacy 

Pharm. Chetn. 258. The Identification of Organic Compounds, An Advanced 
Course. (2-4) 

The techniques of identification of more difficult compounds, with emphasis on instru- 
mental methods. (Miller.) 

Pharm. Chem. 399. Research in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 

(Miller, Doorenbos.) 

PHARMACOLOGY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Pharmacology 111. Official Methods of Biological Assay. (4) 
First semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, 
Pharmacology 81, 82. A study of the official methods of biological assay of the 
United States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary. (Ichniowski.) 

For Graduates 

Pharmacology 201, 202. Methods of Biological Assay. (4, 4) 
First and second semesters. Laboratory and conferences. Prerequisite, Pharmacology 111. 
A study of the more important unofficial methods used in the quantitative evaluation of 
therapeutic substances. (Ichniowski.) 

Pharmacology 211, 212. Special Studies in Pharmacodynamics. (4, 4) 

First and second semesters. Laboratory and conferences. Prerequisites, Pharmacology 
81, 82 and the approval of the instructor. Offered in alternate years. A study of the 
methods used in the evaluation of drug action. (Ichniowski.) 

Pharmacology 221, 222. Special Studies in Biological Assay Methods. (2-4, 2-4) 
Credit according to the amount of work undertaken after consultation with the in- 
structor. First and second semesters. Laboratory and conferences. Prerequisites, Pharma- 
cology 111, 201, 202. Special problems in the development of biological assay methods. 

(Ichniowski.) 
Pharmacology 399. Research in Pharmacology. 

Properly qualified students may arrange with the instructor for credit and hours. 

(Ichniowski.) 

PHARMACY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Pharmacy 101, 102. Advanced Dispensing Pharmacy. (3, 3) 

Senior year, two lectures and one laboratory. Prerequisites, Pharmacy 21, 22, 51, 52. 
A study of the compounding of new medicinal ingredients and dispensing aids used 
in modern professional pharmacy, including the preparation of some important classes 
of pharmaceuticals on a commercial scale. (Allen.) 

<* 224 



Pharmacy 

Pharmacy 121. Hospital Pharmacy Administration. (2) 

First semester. Senior year. Two lectures. A study of hospital pharmacy practice 
and administration. (Purdum.) 

Pharmacy 132. Cosmetics. (3) 

Second semester. Senior year. Two lectures and one laboratory. Prerequisites, 
Pharmacy 21, 22, 51, 52, and 101. A study of the composition and manufacture 
of cosmetic preparations including laboratory work in the formulation of these products. 

(Allen.) 

For Graduates 

Pharmacy 201, 202. Manufacturing Pharmacy. (2, 2) 

Given in alternate years. Two lectures. Prerequisites, Pharmacy 101, 102. A study of 
manufacturing processes and equipment employed in the manufacture of pharmaceuti- 
cals on a commercial scale. (Shangraw.) 

Pharmacy 203, 204. Manufacturing Pharmacy. (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. Prerequisites, Pharmacy 201, 202, or may be taken simultaneously 
with Pharmacy 201, 202. Laboratory work dealing with the preparation of useful and 
important pharmaceuticals in large quantities. (Shangraw.) 

Pharmacy 205. Manufacturing Pharmacy Control. (3) 

Given in alternate years. Three lectures. A study of the specifications, inspection, 
sampling, packaging and labeling of drugs from their receipt to their shipping by 
pharmaceutical manufacturing plants. Includes detailed consideration of sanitary 
standards, the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, and other laws affecting the 
production and distribution of pharmaceutical products. (Foss.) 

Pharmacy 207, 208. Physical Pharmacy. (2, 2) 

Two lectures a week. Prerequisite, consent of the instructor; Physical Chemistry 187, 
188, 189, 190 recommended. A study of pharmaceutical systems utilizing the funda- 
mentals of physical chemistry. (Shangraw.) 

Pharmacy 211, 212. Survey of Pharmaceutical Literature. (I, J) 
Given in alternate years. One lecture. Lectures and topics on the literature pertaining 
to pharmacy, with special reference to the origin and development of the works of 
drug standards and the pharmaceutical periodicals. (Allen, Purdum.) 

Pharmacy 215, 216. Product Development. (2, 2) 

Two laboratories. Prerequisites, Pharmacy 132, 201, 202, 203, 204. A study of the 
development of new pharmaceutical preparations and cosmetics suitable for marketing. 

(AllenO 
Pharmacy 221, 222. History of Pharmacy. (2, 2) 

Given in alternate years. Two lectures. Lectures and assignments on the developmen: 
of pharmacy in America and the principal countries of Europe. (Purdum.} 

Pharmacy 230. Pharmaceutical Seminar. (I) 

Each semester. Required of students majoring in pharmacy. Reports of progress in 

research and surveys of recent developments in pharmacy. (Allen.) 

225 ► 



Pharmacy 

Pharmacy 231, 232. Special Problems in Pharmaceutical Technology. (2, 2) 
Two laboratories. A study of technical problems in the stabilization and preservation 
of pharmaceuticals and the various methods of compounding special prescriptions. 

(Allen, Purdum.) 
Pharmacy 399. Research in Pharmacy. 
Credit and hours to be arranged. (Foss, Purdum, Allen, Shangraw.) 

PHYSICS AND PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates 

Chem. 187, 189. Physical Chemistry. (3, 3) 

First and second semesters. Given in alternate years. Three lectures per week. Pre- 
requisites, Phys. 11, Chem. 15, 37, Math. 21. A study of the laws of chemistry, includ- 
ing the gas laws, kinetic theory, liquids, solutions, elementary thermodynamics, thermo 
chemistry, equilibrium, chemical kinetics, and electro-chemistry. (Estabrook.) 

Chem. 188, 190. Physical Chemistry. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 
187, 189, or may be taken simultaneously with these courses. Quantitative experiments 
are performed which demonstrate physical chemical principles, and acquaint the 
student with precision apparatus. (Estabrook.) 

Phys. 104, 105. Electricity and Magnetism. (.3,3) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Given 
according to demand. Prerequisites, Phys. 11 and Math. 21. A study of the funda- 
mental laws of magnetism, electrostatics, and current electricity. Selected experiments 
are performed illustrating these principles. (Estabrook.) 

Phys. 112, 113. Modern Physics. (2, 2) 

First and second semesters. Two lectures per week. Prerequisites, Chem. 189, 190, 
Phys. 10, 11. Given according to demand. A descriptive study of the nature of 
matter and radiation. Conduction of electricity, and ionization in gases, thermionics, 
x-rays, radioactivity, nuclear physics, and cosmic rays will be considered. 

(Estabrook.) 

Phys. 126. Thermodynamics and Kinetic Theory. (2) 

First and second semesters. Given in alternate years. Two lectures per week. Pre- 
requisite, Phys. Chem. 188, 190. A study of the laws of thermodynamics from a 
mathematical and statistical standpoint. Numerous problems are solved. (Estabrook.) 



For Graduates 

Phys. 200, 201. Introduction to Theoretical Physics. (5, 5) 
First and second semesters. Five lectures per week. Given according to demand. Pre- 
requisite, advanced standing in physics. A study of the fundamentals in physics from 
a mathematical standpoint. (Estabrook.) 

•< 226 



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PHYSIOLOGY 



Physiol. 243. Celhilar Physiology and Cytogenetics. (2) 

First semester. Two lectures a week. A study of the physical, chemical and physio- 
logical activities of the cell, its components, and its integrated activities including cell 
division and inheritance. (Costello.) 

Physiol. 244. Current Problems in Cellular Physiology and Cytogenetics. (I) 

Second semester. One lecture a week. By means of lectures and assigned student dis- 
cussion, current research trends in the field will be discussed in detail. (Costello.) 



227 



THE GRADUATE COUNCIL 

Ex-Officio Members 

wilson h. elkins, d.phil., President of the University 

harry c. byrd, ll.d., d.sc, President Emeritus 

r. lee hornbake, ph.d., Dean of the Eacidty 

ronald bamford, ph.d., Dean of the Graduate School 

charles o. appleman, ph.d., Dean Emeritus 

Augustus J. prahl, ph.d., Associate Dean and Secretary of the Graduate 
Eacidty Assemhly 

Appointed Members Term 

Expires 
noel E. Foss, ph.d., Professor of Pharmacy (Baltimore*) 1962 

Frederic T. mavis, ph.d., Professor of Civil Engineering 1961 

michael j. pelczar, ph.d., Professor of Microbiology 1960 

leon p. smith, ph.d., Professor of Foreign Languages 1963 

Elected Members 

franklin D. cooley, ph.d., Associate Professor of English 1961 

Dudley dillard, ph.d., Professor of Economics 1960 

nathan l. drake ph.d., Professor of Chemistry 

(deceased October 12, 1959) 1961 

Frederick p. Ferguson, ph.d., Professor of Physiology (Baltimore').. 1962 

hugh G. gauch, ph.d., Professor of Botany 1961 

irvin c. haut, ph.d., Professor of Horticidture 1960 

monroe h. martin, ph.d., Professor of Mathematics 1962 

benjamin H. massey, ph.d., Professor of Physical Education 1961 

Robert h. oster, ph.d., Professor of Physiology (Baltimore) 1960 

elmer plischke, ph.d., Professor of Government and Politics 1963 

george F. Corcoran, M.S., Professor of Electrical Engineering. . . . 1963 

clyne s. shaffner, ph.d., Professor of Poidtry Physiology 1962 

Gladys wiggin, ph.d., Professor of Education 1963 

g. forrest woods, Professor of Chemistry 

(to serve unexpired term of Dr. Nathan L. Drake) 1961 

< 228 



GHADUATE FACULTY 

1960-1961 
GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Administrative Officers 

ronald bam ford, Professor of Botany and Dean of the Graduate School 
b.s., University of Connecticut, 1924; m.s., University of Vermont, 1926; ph.d., 
Columbia University, 1931. 

Augustus j. prahl, Professor of Foreign Languages and Associate Dean of the 
Gradtiate School 

m.a., Washington University, 1928; ph.d., Johns Hopkins University, 1933. 

lucy a. lynham, Assistant to the Dean 
b.a., University of Maryland, 1933. 

Professors 

myron s. aisenberg, Professor of General and Oral Pathology and Dean of 
School of Dentistry 

d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1922. 

Alfred o. aldridge, Professor of English 

b.s., Indiana University, 1937; m.a., University of Georgia, 1938; ph.d., Duke 
University, 1942; Docteur de 1'Universite de Paris, 1955. 

russell b. allen, Professor of Civil Engineering and Assistant Dean of College 
of Engineering 

b.s., Yale University, 1923. 

william r. amberson, Professor and Head of Department of Physiology, 
School of Medicine 

ph.b., Lafayette College, 1915; ph.d., Princeton University, 1922. 

george anastos, Professor of Zoology 

b.s., University of Akron, 1942; m.a., Harvard University, 1947; ph.d., 1949. 

vernon E. Anderson, Professor and Dean of the College of Education 

b.s., University of Minnesota, 1930; m.a., 1936; ph.d., University of Colorado, 
1942. 

thomas G. Andrews, Professor and Head of Department of Psychology 

b.a., University of Southern California, 1937; m.a., University of Nebraska, 1939; 
PH.D., 1941. 

wbndell s. arbuckle, Professor of Dairy 

B.s. a., Purdue University, 1933; a.m., University of Missouri, 1937; ph.d., 1940. 

229 ► 



Faculty 

william T. avery, Professor and Head of Classical Languages and Literatures 
b.a., Western Reserve University, 1934; m.a., 1935; ph.d., 1937; Fellow of the 
American Academy in Rome, 1937-1939. 

ronald bamford, Professor of Botany and Dean of the Graduate School 

b.s., University of Connecticut, 1924; M.S., University of Vermont, 1926; ph.d., 
Columbia University, 1931. 

richard h. bauer, Professor of History 

ph.b., University of Chicago, 1923; m.a., 1928; ph.d., 1935. 

george m. beal, Professor of Agricultural Economics and Marketing 

B.s., Utah State Agricultural College, 1934; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1938; 
ph.d., 1942. 

william e. bickley, Professor and Head of Department of Entomology 
b.s., University of Tennessee, 1934; m.s., 1936; ph.d., University of Maryland, 
1940. 

glenn o. blough, Professor of Education 

a.b., University of Michigan, 1929; a.m., 1932; ll.d., Central Michigan College of 
Education, 1950. 

carl bode, Professor of English 

ph.b., University of Chicago, 1933; m.a., Northwestern University, 1938; ph.d., 
1941. Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature of the United Kingdom. 

donald bonney, Professor of Chemical Engineering 
b.e., Johns Hopkins University, 1926; ph.d., 1935. 

george M. brown, Professor of Chemistry 

b.a., Emory University, 1942; m.s., 1943; m.a., Princeton University, 1946; ph.d., 
1949. 

franklin l. burdette, Professor of Government and Politics 

a.b., Marshall College, 1934; a.m., University of Nebraska, 1935; a.m., Princeton 
University, 1937; ph.d., 1938. 

Richard h. byrne, Professor of Education 

a.b., Franklin and Marshall College, 1938; m.a., Columbia University, 1947; ed.d., 
1952. 

Gordon M. caibns, Professor of Dairy Husbandry and Dean of College of 
Agriculture 

b.s., Cornell University, 1936; m.s., 1938; ph.d., 1940. 

mary k. carl, Professor of Nursing 

b.s., Johns Hopkins University, 1946; ph.d., University of Maryland, 1951. 

verne E. chatelain, Professor of History 

b.a., Nebraska State Teachers College, 1917; m.a., University of Chicago, 1925; 
ph.d., University of Minnesota, 1943. 

< 230 



Faculty 

eh w. Clemens, Professor of Business Organization 

b.s., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1930; m.s., University of Illinois, 1934; ph.d., 
University of Wisconsin, 1940. 

leon w. cohen, Professor and Head of Department of Mathematics 

B.A., Columbia University, 1923; m.a., 1925; ph.d., University of Michigan, 1928. 

gerald F. combs, Professor of Poidtry N utrition 

B.s., University of Illinois, 1940; ph.d., Cornell University, 1943. 

j. allan cook, Professor of Marketing 

a.b., College of William and Man', 1928; m.b.a., Harvard University, 1936, 
ph.d., Columbia University, 1948. 

george F. Corcoran, Professor and Chairman of Department of Electrical 
Engineering 

b.s., South Dakota State College, 1923; m.s., University of Minnesota, 1926. 

gerald corning, Professor of Aeronautical Engineering 

b.s., New York University, 1937; m.s., Catholic University, 1954. 

Carroll e. cox, Professor of Platit Pathology 

a.b., University of Delaware, 1938; M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1940; 
ph.d., University of Maryland, 1943. 

Richard F. davis, Professor and Head of Dairy Department 

B.s., University of New Hampshire. 1950; M.S., Cornell University, 1952; ph.d., 
1953. 

Dorothy F. deach, Professor and Head of Department of Physical Educa- 
tion for Women 

b.s., University of Illinois, 1931; M.S., 1932; ph.d., University of Michigan, 1951. 

jules de launay, Professor of Physics (P.T.) 

a.b., Howard College, 1931; b.a., Oxford University, 1935; m.a., 193S; ph.d., 
Stanford University, 1939. 

Harold m. de volt, Professor of Veterinary Science 
b.s., Cornell University, 1936; d.v.m., 1923; m.s., 1926. 

Joaquin b. diaz, Professor in Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathe- 
matics 

b.a., University of Texas, 1940; ph.d., Brown University, 1945. 

Dudley dillard, Professor and Head of Department of Economics 
b.s., University of California, 1935; ph.d., 1940. 

lewis p. ditman, Professor of Entomology 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1926; m.s., 1929; ph.d., 1931. 

231 ► 



Faculty 

brice m. dorsey, Professor and Head of Department of Oral Surgery, School 
of Dentistry 

d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1927. 

avron douglis, Professor of Mathematics 

a.b., University of Chicago, 1938; m.a., New York University, 1949; ph.d., 1949. 

dick duffey, Professor of Chemical Engineering 

b.s., Purdue University, 1939; M.S., University of Iowa, 1940; ph.d., University of 
Maryland, 1956. 

wilson H. elkins, President, University of Maryland 

b.a., University of Texas, 1932; m.a., 1932; litt. b., Oxford University, 1936; 
D. PHIL., 1936. 

gaylord b. estabrook, Professor of Physics, School of Pharmacy 

b.sc, Purdue University, 1921; m.sc, Ohio State University, 1922; ph.d., Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh, 1932. 

john e. faber, jr., Professor and Head of Department of Microbiology 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1926; m.s., 1927; ph.d., 1937. 

william F. falls, Professor of Foreig7i Languages 

a.b., University of North Carolina, 1922; Certificate d'Etudes Francaises, Uni- 
versity of Toulouse, 1926; m.a., Vanderbilt University, 1928; ph.d., University 
of Pennsylvania, 1932. 

Frederick p. Ferguson, Professor of Physiology, School of Medicine 

b.a., Wesleyan University, 1938; m.a., 1939; ph.d., University of Minnesota, 1943. 

richard a. ferrell, Professor of Physics 

b.s., California Institute of Technology, 1948; M.S., 1949; ph.d., Princeton Uni- 
versity, 1952. 

frank h. j. figge, Professor and Head of Department of Anatomy, School of 
Medicine 

a.b., Colorado College, 1927; ph.d., University of Maryland, 1934. 

allan j. fisher, Professor of Accounting and Finance 

b.s., University of Pennsylvania, 1928; litt.m., University of Pittsburgh, 1936; 
ph.d., 1937. 

russell s. fisher, Professor of Legal Medicine, School of Medicine 

B.s., Georgia School of Technology, 1937; m.d., Medical College of Virginia, 1942. 

noel E. foss, Professor and Dean of School of Pharmacy 

ph.c, b.s., South Dakota State College, 1929; m.s., University of Maryland, 
1932; ph.d., 1933. 

•< 232 



Faculty 

john B. foster, Professor and Head of Department of Animal Husbandry 

b.s., North Carolina State College, 1926; M.S., Kansas State College, 1927; ph.d., 
Cornell University, 1937. 

lester m. fraley, Professor and Dean of College of Physical Education, 
Recreation and Health 

a.b., Randolph-Macon College, 1928; m.a., Peabody College, 1937; ph.d., 1939. 

john h. Frederick, Professor of Transportation and Foreign Trade and Head 
of Department of Business Organization 

b.s., University of Pennsylvania, 1918; m.a., 1925; ph.d., 1927. 

robert elston fullerton, Professor of Mathematics 

b.s., Heidelberg College, 1938; m.s., Syracuse University, 1940; ph.d., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1945. 

lucius garvin, Professor and Head of Department of Philosophy 
a.b., Brown University, 1928; a.m., 1929; ph.d., 1933. 

hugh g. gauch, Professor of Plant Physiology 

b.s., Miami University, 1935; M.S., Kansas State College, 1937; ph.d., University 
of Chicago, 1939. 

dwight l. gentry, Professor of Marketing 
a.b., Elon College, 1941; m.b.a., Northwestern University, 1947; ph.d., Uni- 
versity of Illinois, 1952. 

Florence m. gipe, Professor and Dean of the School of Nursing 
b.s., Catholic University, 1937; M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1940; ed.d., 
University of Maryland, 1952. 

frank goodwyn, Professor of Spanish and Latin American Civilization 
b.a., Texas College of Arts and Industries, 1940; m.a., 1941; ph.d., University of 
Texas, 1946. 

Francis b. Gordon, Visiting Professor of Microbiology 
b.s., Illinois Wesleyan, 1927; ph.d., University of Chicago, 1936; m.d., 1937. 

willard w. green, Professor of Animal Husbandry 

b.s., University of Minnesota, 1933; m.s., 1934; ph.d., 1939. 

Robert L. green, Professor and Head of Department of Agricultural Engineering 
b.s.a.e., University of Georgia, 1934; M.S., Iowa State College; ph.d., Michigan 
State University, 1953. 

Robert G. grenell, Professor of Psychiatry 

a.b., College of the City of New York, 1935; m.sc, New York University, 1936; 
ph.d., University of Minnesota, 1943. 

ROSE MARIE GRENTZER, ProfeSSOT of Music 

b.a., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1935; b.a., 1936; m.a., 1939. 

233 ► 



Faculty 

Allan G. gruchy, Professor of Economics 

b.a., University of British Columbia, 1926; m.a., McGill University, 1929; ph.d., 
University of Virginia, 1931. 

john w. gustad, Professor of Psychology and Director of University Counseling 
Center 

b.a., Macalester College, 1934; m.a., University of Minnesota, 1948; ph.d., 1949. 

vvilliam E. hahn, Professor of Anatomy, School of Dentistry 
a.b., University of Rochester, 1938; m.s., 1939; d.d.s., 1931. 

Daniel hamberg, Professor of Economics 

B.s., University of Pennsylvania, 1945; m.a., 1947; ph.d., 1952. 

poul A. Hansen, Professor of Veterinary Bacteriology 

ph.d., University of Copenhagen, 1922; m.s., Royal Technological College, Den- 
mark, 1926; ph.d., Cornell University, 1934. 

SUSAN EMELYN HARMAN, PwfeSSOT of English 

b.ed., Nebraska State Teachers College, 1916; b.a., University of Nebraska, 1917; 
m.a., 1918; ph.d., Johns Hopkins University, 1926. 

I. c. haut, Professor and Head of Department of Horticulture; Director Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station 

b.s., University of Idaho, 1928; M.S., State College of Washington, 1930; ph.d., 

University of Maryland, 1933. 

CHARLES M. HERZFELD, ProfeSSOT of PhySlCS (P.T.') 

B.CH.E., Catbolic University, 1945; ph.d., University of Chicago, 1951. 

harold c. hoffsommer, Professor and Head of Department of Sociology 

b.s., Northwestern University, 1921; m.a., 1923; ph.d., Cornell University, 1929. 

r. lee hornbake, Dean of the Faculty of the University, Professor of Industrial 

Education 

B.s., Pennsylvania State Teachers College, California, 1934; m.a., Ohio State Uni- 
versity, 1936; ph.d., 1942. 

kenneth o. hovet, Professor of Education 

b.a., St. Olaf College, 1926; ph.d., University of Minnesota, 1950. 

charles Y. hu, Professor of Geography 

B.s., University of Nanking, 1930; m.a., University of California, 1936; ph.d., Uni- 
versity of Chicago, 1941. 

wilbert j. huff, Professor and Chairman of Department of Chemical Engi- 
neering 

a.b., Ohio Northern University, 1911; a.b., Yale College, 1914; ph.d., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1917; d.sc, (hon.), Ohio Northern University, 1927. 

james h. Humphrey, Professor of Physical Education and Health 

b.a., Denison University, 1933; m.a., Western Reserve University, 1946; ed.d., 
Boston University, 1951. 

+ 234 



Faculty 

casimir T. ichniowski, Emerson Professor of Pharmacology, School of 
Pharmacy 

ph.c, University of Maryland, 1929; b.s., 1930; M.S., 1932; ph.d., 1936. 

john w. jackson, Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

b.s.m.e., University of Cincinnati, 1934; m.e., 1937; m.s.m.e., California Institute 
of Technology, 1940. 

Stanley b. jackson, Professor of Mathematics 

a.b., Bates College, 1933; a.m., Harvard University, 1934; ph.d., 1937. 

warren R. johnson, Professor of Physical Education 

b.a., University of Denver, 1942; m.a., 1946; ed.d., Boston University, 1950. 

florance b. king, Professor of Pood and Nutrition 

b.s., University of Illinois, 1914; m.a., University of California, 1926; ph.d., 
University of Indiana, 1929. 

amihud kramer, Professor of Horticulture 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1938; m.s., 1939; ph.d., 1942. 

john c. krantz, jr., Professor of Pharmacology, School of Medicine 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1923; m.s., 1924; ph.d., 1928. 

robert w. krauss, Professor of Botany 

b.a., Oberlin College, 1947; M.S., University of Hawaii, 1949; ph.d., University 
of Maryland, 1951. 

albin o. kuhn, Professor of Agronomy and Executive Vice President 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1938; m.s., 1939; ph.d., 1948. 

john j. kurtz, Professor of Education 

b.a., University of Wisconsin, 1935; m.a., Northwestern University, 1940; ph.d., 
University of Chicago, 1949. 

aubrey c. land, Professor and Head of Department of History 

b.ed., Southern Illinois University, 1934; m.a., Iowa State University, 1938; ph.d., 
1948. 

george s. langford, Professor of Entomology 

b.s., Clemson College, 1921; M.S., University of Maryland, 1924; ph.d., Ohio 
State University, 1929. 

peter p. lejtns, Professor of Sociology 

ph.m., University of Latvia, 1930; ll.m., 1933; ph.d., University of Chicago, 1938. 

henry A. lepper, jr., Professor of Civil Engineering 

b.s., George Washington University, 1936; m.s., University of Illinois, 1938; d.eng., 
Yale University, 1947. 

conrad b. link, Professor of Floriculture 

b.sc, Ohio State University, 1933; m.sc., 1934; ph.d., 1940. 

235 ► 



Faculty 

selma F. lippeatt, Professor and Dean of the College of Home Economics 
B.s., Arkansas State Teachers College, 1938; M.S., University of Tennessee, 1945; 
ph.d., Pennsylvania State University, 1953. 

ellis r. lippincott, Professor of Chemistry 

b.a., Earlham College, 1943; m.s., Johns Hopkins University, 1944; ph.d., 1947. 

Charles T. g. looney, Professor and Head of the Department of Civil 
Engineering 

B.s., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1932; m.s. in c.e., University of Illinois, 
1934; ph.d., in Engineering, 1940. 

donald maley, Professor and Head of Department of Industrial Education 
b.s., Pennsylvania State Teachers College, California, Pa., 1943; M.S., University of 
Maryland, 1947; ph.d., 1949. 

monroe h. martin, Professor of Mathematics and Director of Institute for 
Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 

B.s., Lebanon Valley College, 1928; ph.d., Johns Hopkins University, 1932. 

benjamin h. massey, Professor of Physical Education 

a.b., Erskine College, 1938; M.S., University of Illinois, 1947; ph.d., 1950. 

Frederic Theodore mavis, Professor of Civil Engineering and Dean of the. 
College of Engineering 

b.s., University of Illinois, 1922; m.s., 1926; c.e., 1932; ph.d., 1935. 

john r. mayor, Professor of Mathematics and Education 

b.s., Knox College, 1928; m.a., University of Illinois, 1929; ph.d., University of 
Wisconsin, 1933. 

l. morris mc clure, Professor and Assistant Dean of Education 

a.b., Western Michigan University, 1940; m.a., University of Michigan, 1946; ed.d., 
Michigan State University, 1953. 

james c mcmanaway, Professor of English (p.t.) 

b.a., University of Virginia, 1919; m.a., 1920; ph.d., Johns Hopkins University, 
1931. 

bruce l. melvin, Professor of Sociology 

b.s., University of Missouri, 1916; m.a., 1917; ph.d., 1921. 

jerome k. merlis, Professor of Physiology 

b.s., University of Louisville, 1933; m.d., 1937; M.S., 1938. 

HORACE S. MERRILL, ProfeSSOT of H'lStOTy 

b.e., Wisconsin State Teachers' College, River Falls, 1932; ph.m., University of 
Wisconsin, 1933; ph.d., 1942. 

madelaine mershon, Professor of Education 

b.s., Drake University, 1940; m.a., University of Chicago, 1943; ph.d., 1950 

M 236 



Faculty 

T. faye Mitchell, Professor and Head of Department of Textiles and Clothing 
b.s., Missouri State Teachers College, Springfield, 1930; m.a., Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1939. 

nonoTHY r. mohr, Professor of Physical Education for Women 

s.b., University of Chicago, 1932; a.m., 1933; ph.d., University of Iowa, 1944. 

delbert T. morgan, jr., Professor of Botany 

b.s., Kent State University, 1940; m.a., Columbia University, 1942; ph.d., 1948. 

hugh G. morgan, Professor of Education and Assistant Director of Institute of 
Child Study 

b.a., Furman University, 1940; m.a., University of Chicago, 1943; ph.d., 1946. 

Raymond morgan, Professor of Physics 

a.b., Indiana University, 1916; a.m., 1917; ph.d., University of Pennsylvania, 1922. 

Charles d. murphy, Professor and Head of Department of English 

b.a., University of Wisconsin, 1929; m.a., Harvard University, 1930; ph.d., 
Cornell University, 1940. 

ralph d. myers, Professor of Physics 

a.b., Cornell University, 1934; a.m., 1935; ph.d., 1937. 

walle j. h. nauta, Professor of Anatomy (P.T.~) 

m.d., University of Leiden (Holland), 1942; ph.d., University of Utrecht (Hol- 
land), 1945. 

clarence a. newell, Professor of Education 

a.b., Hastings College, 1935; a.m., Columbia University, 1939; ph.d., 1943. 

Robert h. oster, Professor of Physiology, Scholl of Dentistry, (deceased^) 
b.s., Pennsylvania State University, 1923; m.s., 1926; ph.d., Harvard University, 
1933. 

louis E. otts, jr., Professor of Civil Engineering 

b.a., East Texas State Teachers College, 1933; e.s., Agricultural and Mechanical 
College of Texas, 1946; m.s., 1946. 

Arthur s. Patrick, Professor of Business Education 

b.s., Wisconsin State College, 1931; m.a., University of Iowa, 1940; ph.d., American 
University, 1956. 

michael J. pelczar, jr., Professor of Microhiology 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1936; m.s., 1938; ph.d., University of Iowa, 1941. 

william a. penntngton, Professor of Chemical Engineering 
b.s., Union University, 1925; ph.d., Iowa State College, 1933. 

hugh v. perkins, Professor of Education 

a.b., & sch. mus.b., Oberlin College, 1941; a.m., University of Chicago, 1946; 
ph.d., 1949; ed.d., New York University, 1956. 

237 ► 



Faculty 

elmer plischke, Professor and Head of Department of Government and 

Politics 

ph.b., Marquette University, 1937; m.a., American University, 1938; PH.D., Clark 
University, 1943; Certificate, Columbia University, Naval School of Military Gov- 
ernment, 1944. 

paul r. poffenberger, Professor and Acting Head of Department of Agri- 
cultural Economics and Assistant Dean of Instruction, College of Agriculture 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1935; M.S., 1937; ph.d., American University, 1953. 

Augustus j. prahl, Professor of Foreign Languages and Associate Dean of the 
Graduate School 

m.a., Washington University, 1928; ph.d., Johns Hopkins University, 1933. 

Gordon w. prange, Professor of History 

a.b., University of Iowa, 1932; a.m., 1934; ph.d., 1937. 

brnest F. pratt, Professor of Chemistry 

a.b., University of Redlands, 1937; M.S., Oregon State College, 1939; m.a., Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1941; ph.d., 1942. 

daniel A. prescott, Professor of Education and Director of Institute for Child 
Study 

b.s., Tufts College, 1920; ed.m., Harvard College, 1922; ed.d., 1923. 

D. Vincent provenza, Professor of Histology and Embryology 
B.s., University of Maryland, 1939; M.S., 1941; ph.d., 1952. 

w. Arthur purdum, Professor of Hos-pital Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy 
ph.g., University of Maryland, 1930; b.s., 1932; M.S., 1934; ph.d., 1941. 

J. freeman pyle, Professor and Dean of the College of Business and Public 
Administration 

ph.b., University of Chicago, 1917; m.a., 1918; ph.d., 1925. 

henry r. reed, Professor of Electrical Engineering, Registered Professional 
Engineer 

b.s., University of Minnesota, 1925; M.S., 1927; e.e., South Dakota State College, 

1930; ph.d., University of Iowa, 1941. 

wilklns reeve, Professor of Chemistry 

b.s., Drexel Institute of Technology, 1936; ph.d., University of Wisconsin, 1940. 

A. w. richeson, Professor of Mathematics, School of Pharmacy 

b.s., University of Richmond, 1918; a.m., Johns Hopkins University, 1925; ph.d., 
1928. 

carl L. rolllnson, Professor of Chemistry 

b.s., University of Michigan, 1933; ph.d., University of Illinois, 1939. 

-* 238 



Faculty 

sherman ross, Professor of Psychology 

b.sc., College of the City of New York, 1939; m.a., Columbia University, 1941; 
ph.d., 1943. 

russell g. rothgeb, Professor of Agronomy 

B.s., University of Maryland, 1924; M.S., Iowa State College, 1925; ph.d., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1928. 

alvin w. schindler, Professor of Education 

b.a., Iowa State Teachers' College, 1927; m.a., Iowa State University, 1929; ph.d., 
1934. 

HENRY W. SCHOENBORN, PwfeSSOr of Zoology 

a.b., DePauw University, 1933; ph.d., New York University, 1939. 

wilburn c. schroeder, Professor of Chemical Engineering 
B.s., University of Michigan, 1930; m.s.e., 1931; ph.d., 1933. 

leland E. scott, Professor of Horticultural Physiology 

b.s., University of Kentucky, 1927; M.S., Michigan State College, 1929; ph.d., 
University of Maryland, 1943. 

clynb s. shaffner, Professor and Head of Department of Poultry Husbandry 
b.s., Michigan State University, 1938; M.S., 1940; ph.d., Purdue University, 1947. 

james b. shanks, Professor of Floriculture 

b.sc, Ohio State University, 1939; m.sc, 1946; ph.d., 1949. 

Joseph c. shaw, Professor of Dairy 

b.s., Iowa State College, 1932; M.S., Montana State College, 1933; ph.d., Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, 1938. 

donald e. shay, Professor and Head of Department of Bacteriology and 
Immunology, School of Dentistry, School of Pharmacy 

b.s., Lebanon Valley College, 1937; M.S., University of Maryland, 1938; ph.d., 

1943. 

shan-fu shen, Professor of Aeronautical Engineering 

b.s., National Central University, China, 1941; sc.d., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, 1949. 

A. wiley sherwood, Professor of Aerodynamics and Head of Department of 
Aeronautical Engineering 

m.e., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1935; M.S., University of Maryland, 1943. 

charles A. shreeve, jr., Professor and Head of Department of Mechanical 
Engineering 

b.e., Johns Hopkins University, 1935; M.S., University of Maryland, 1943. 

s. F. singer, Professor of Physics 

b.e.e., Ohio State University, 1943; a.m., Princeton University, 1944; ph.d., 1948. 

239 ► 



Faculty 

frank J. slama, Professor of Pharmacognosy, School of Pharmacy 

ph.g., University of Maryland, 1924; ph. a, 1925; b.s., 1928; M.S., 1930; PH.D., 
1935. 

Dietrich c. smith, Professor of Physiology and Associate Dean of the School 
of Medicine 

a.b., University of Minnesota, 1923; a.m., 1924; PH.D., Harvard University, 1928. 

leon P. smith, Professor of Foreign Languages and Dean of the College of Arts 
and Sciences 

b.a., Emory University, 1919; m.a., University of Chicago, 1928; ph.d., 1930; 

Diplome de l'lnstitut de Touraine, 1932. 

Francis c. stark, jr., Professor of Vegetable Crops 

B.s., Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1940; M.S., University of 
Maryland, 1941; ph.d., 1948. 

reuben g. steinmeyer, Professor of Government and Politics 
A.B., American University, 1929; ph.d., 1935. 

karl l. stellmacher, Professor of Mathematics 
d.phil., University of Gottingen, 1936. 

William s. stone, Dean of the School of Medicine and Director of Medical 
Education and Research 

B.s., University of Idaho, 1924; M.S., 1925; m.d., University of Louisville, 1929; 

ph.d. (hon.), 1946. 

warren l. strausbaugh, Professor and Head of Department of Speech 
b.s., Wooster College, 1932; m.a., State University of Iowa, 1935. 

orman E. street, Professor of Agronomy 

b.s., South Dakota State College, 1924; m.s., Michigan State College, 1927; ph.d., 
1933. 

william j. svirbely, Professor of Chemistry 

b.s., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1931; M.S., 1932; d.sci., 1935. 

Charles T. sweeney, Professor of Accounting 

b.s., Cornell University, 1921; m.b.a., University of Michigan, 1928; c.p.a., Iowa, 
1934; c.p.a., Ohio, 1936. 

harold Frederic Sylvester, Professor of Business Organization 
ph.d., Johns Hopkins University, 1938. 

charles a. taef, Professor of Transportation 

b.s., University of Iowa, 1937; m.a., 1941; ph.d., University of Maryland, 1952. 

Clifford curtis taylor, Visiting Professor of Agricultural Economics 

b.s., Colorado State College, 1917; m.s., Iowa State College, 1923; m.a., Harvard 
University, 1926; ph.d., 1930. 

<4 240 



Facuh\ 

Arthur ii. Thompson, Professor of Pomology 

b.s., University of Minnesota, 1941; ph.d., University of Maryland, 1945. 

fred r. Thompson, Professor of Education 

b.a., University of Texas, 1929; m.a., 1935; ed.d., University of Maryland, 1952. 

john toll, Professor and Head of Department of Physics 

B.s., Yale University, 1944; m.a., Princeton University, 1948; ph.d., 1952. 

E. G. vanden bosche, Professor of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry 

a.b., Lebanon Valley College, 1922; M.S., University of Maryland, 1924; ph.d., 
1927. 

william van royen, Professor and Head of Department of Geography 
m.a., Rijksuniversiteit te Utrecht, 1925; ph.d., Clark University, 1928. 

james A. van zwoll, Professor of Education 

a.b., Calvin College, 1933; m.a., University of Michigan, 1937; ph.d., 1942. 

Fletcher p. veitch, Professor of Chemistry 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1931; M.S., 1934; ph.d., 1936. 

Walter b. waetjen, Professor of Education 

b.s., Pennsylvania State Teachers College, Millersville, 1942; m.s., University 
of Pennsylvania, 1947; ed.d., University of Maryland, 1951. 

Robert E. wagner, Professor and Head of Department of Agronomy 

b.s., Kansas State College, 1942; m.s., University of Wisconsin, 1943; ph.d., 
1950. 

william p. walker, Professor of Agricultural Economics 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1921; m.s., 1925. 

kenneth F. warner, Professor of Extension Studies and Training. 

b.s., University of Nebraska, 1912; m.s., University of Minnesota, 1915; d. agr., 
University of Nebraska, 1954. 

Joseph weber, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Physics 
B.s., U.S. Naval Academy, 1940; ph.d., Catholic University, 1951. 

s. m. wedeberg, Professor of Accounting 

b.b.a., University of Washington, 1925; a.m., Yale University, 1935; c.p.a., Mary- 
land, 1934. 

fred w. wellborn, Professor of History 

b.a., Baker University, 1918; m.a., Kansas University, 1923; ph.d., University of 
Wisconsin, 1926. 

norman irving wengert, Professor of Government and Politics 

b.a., University of Wisconsin, 1938; m.a., Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, 
1939; ll.b., University of Wisconsin, 1942; ph.d., 1947. 

241 ► 



Faculty 

G. w. wharton, Professor and Head of Department of Zoology 
b.s., Duke University, 1935; ph.d., 1939. 

charles E. white, Professor of Chemistry 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1923; m.s., 1924; ph.d., 1926. 

Gladys A. wiggin, Professor of Education 

b.s., University of Minnesota, 1929; m.a., 1939; ph.d., University of Maryland, 
1947. 

charles l. wisseman, jr., Professor and Head of Department of Microbiology, 
School of Medicine 

b.a., Southern Methodist University, 1941; M.S., Kansas State College, 1943; 

m.d., Southwestern Medical College, 1946. 

G. forrest woods^ Professor and Acting Head of Department of Chemistry 

b.s., Northwestern University, 1935; M.S., Harvard University, 1937; ph.d., 1940. 

Howard w. wright, Professor of Accounting 

b.s.c, Temple University, 1937; m.a., University of Iowa, 1940; ph.d., 1947. 

w. Gordon zeeveld, Professor of English 

a.b., University of Rochester, 1924; m.a., Johns Hopkins University, 1929; ph.d., 
1936. 

adolph e. zucker, Professor and Head of Department of Foreign Languages 
b.a., University of Illinois, 1912; m.a., 1915; ph.d., University of Pennsylvania, 
1917. 

Research Professors 

william j. bailey, Research Professor of Chemistry 

b. chem., University of Minnesota, 1943; ph.d., University of Illinois, 1946. 

johannes martanus burgers, Research Professor in Institute for Fluid Dy- 
namics and Applied Mathematics 

doctob of mathematics and physics, University of Leiden, 1918; doctob honoris 
causa, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, 1948; doctor honoris causa, Universite 
de Poitiers, 1950; doctor of science in technology, The Technion, 1955. 

Elliott w. montroll, Research Professor in Institute for Fluid Dynamics and 
Applied Mathematics 

b.s., University of Pittsburgh, 1937; ph.d., 1940. 

shih-i pai, Research Professor in Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied 

Mathematics 

b.sc, National Central University, China, 1935; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, 1938; ph.d., California Institute of Technology, 1940. 

victor roterus, Considting Professor of Geography CP.T.') 
ph.b., University of Chicago, 1930; M.S., 1931. 

<* 242 



Faculty 

mary s. shorb, Research Professor of Poultry Husbandry 

b.s., The College of Idaho, 1928; sc.d., Johns Hopkins University, 1933. 

eduard uhlenhuth, Researcli Professor of Anatomy, School of Medicine 
ph.d., University of Vienna, 1909. 

Alexander weinstbin, Research Professor in Institute for Fluid Dynamics 
and Applied Mathematics 

ph.d., University of Zurich, 1921; d.sc, math., University of Paris, 1937. 

john r. weske, Visiting Research Professor in Institute for Fluid Dynamics and 
Applied Mathematics 

dipl. inc., Technical University, Germany, 1923; m.a., Harvard University, 1932; 

sc.d., 1934. 

Associate Professors 

benjamin F. allen, Associate Professor of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1937; ph.d., 1949. 

redfield w. allen, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1943; M.S., 1949. 

roy s. Anderson, Associate Professor of Physics 

a.b., Clark University, 1943; a.m., Dartmouth College, 1948; ph.d., Duke Uni- 
versity, 1951. 

Thornton H. Anderson, Associate Professor of Government and Politics 

a.b., University of Kentucky, 1937; m.a., 1938; ph.d., University of Wisconsin, 
1948. 

john p. augelli, Associate Professor of Geography 

b.a., Clark University, 1943; m.a., Harvard University, 1949; ph.d., 1951. 

john h. axley, Associate Professor of Agronomy 
b.a., University of Wisconsin, 1937; ph.d., 1945. 

Edward s. barber, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1935; c.e., 1952. 

samuel p. bessman, Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Biochemistry, School 
of Medicine 

m.d., Washington University Medical School, 1944. 

glenn o. blough, Associate Professor of Education 

a.b., University of Michigan, 1929; a.m., 1932; ll.d., Central Michigan College 
of Education, 1950. 

gerard a. bourbeau, Associate Professor of Agronomy 

b.a., St. Francis Xavier College, 1938; b.s., Laval University, 1943; m.s., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, 1946; ph.d., 1948. 

243 ► 



Faculty 

blanche llicile bovvie, Associate Professor of Education 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1942; m.a., Columbia University, 1946; ed.d., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1957. 

john w. brace, Associate Professor of Mathematics 

b.a., Swarthmore College, 1949; a.m., Cornell University, 1951; ph.d., 1953. 

richard m. brandt, Associate Professor of Education 

b.m.e., University of Virginia, 1943; m.a., University of Michigan, 1949; ed.d., 
University of Maryland, 1954. 

pela F. braucher, Associate Professor of Foods and Nutrition 

b.a., Goucher College, 1927; M.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1929. 

joshua r. c brown, Associate Professor of Zoology 
a.b., Duke University, 1948; m.a., 1949; ph.d., 1953. 

russell g. brown, Associate Professor of Botany 

b.s., agr., West Virginia University, 1929; M.S., 1930; ph.d., University of Mary- 
land, 1934. 

Raymond m. BUP.GisoN, Associate Professor of Pharmacology, School of Medicine 
b.s., Loyola College, 1945; M.S., University of Maryland, 1948; ph.d., 1950. 

Robert j. byrne, Associate Professor of Veterinary Science 

d.v.m., Cornell University, 1944; M.S., George Washington University, 1958. 

Joseph Patrick cappuccio, Associate Professor of Oral Surgery and Anes- 
thesiology 

b.s., University of Rhode Island, 1943; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1946. 

franklin d. cooley, Associate Professor of English 

a.b., Johns Hopkins University, 1927; m.a., University of Maryland, 1933; ph.d., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1940. 

john b. cournyn, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
b.s., University of Alabama, 1946; M.S., 1948. 

townes l. dawson, Associate Professor of Business Law 

b.b.a., University of Texas, 1943; b.s., U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, 1946; 
m.b.a., University of Texas, 1947; ph.d., 1950; llb., 1954; Member Texas Bar. 

A. morris decker, jr., Associate Professor of Agronomy 

B.s., Colorado Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1949; M.S., Utah State Col- 
lege, 1951; ph.d., University of Maryland, 1953. 

Raymond n. doetsch, Associate Professor of Microbiology 

B.s., University of Illinois, 1942; a.m., Indiana University, 1943; ph.d., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1948. 

norman J. doorenbos, Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 
b.s., University of Michigan, 1950; M.S., 1951; ph.d., 1953. 

< 244 



Faculty 

marvin Howard eyler, Associate Professor of Physical Education 

a.b., Houghton College, 1942; M.S., University of Illinois, 1948; ph.d., 1956. 

henry c. freimuth, Associate Professor of Legal Medicine, School of Medicine 
b.s., College of the City of New York, 1932; m.s., New York University, 1933; 
ph.d., 1938. 

richard a. good, Associate Professor of Mathematics 

a.b., Ashland College, 1939; m.a., University of Wisconsin, 1940; ph.d., 1945. 

donald c. Gordon, Associate Professor of History 

a.b., College of William and Mary, 1934; m.a., Columbia University, 1937; ph.d., 
1947. 

henry w. grayson, Associate Professor of Economics 

b.a., University of Saskatchewan, 1937; m.a., University of Toronto, 1947; ph.d., 
1950. 

john g. gurley, Associate Professor of Economics 
a.b., Stanford University, 1942; ph.d., 1951. 

a. james haley, Associate Professor of Zoology 

b.s., University of New Hampshire, 1949; m.s., 1950; sc.d., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1955. 

Arthur b. Hamilton, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics and 
Marketing 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1929; M.S., 1931. 

norris G. haring, Associcte Professor of Education 

b.a., Nebraska State College, 1948; m.a., University of Nebraska, 1950; ed.d., 
Syracuse University, 1956. 

horace v. harrison, Associate Professor of Government and Politics 

b.a., Trinity University, 1932; m.a., University of Texas, 1941; ph.d., 1951. 

paul E. harrison, jr., Associate Professor of Industrial Education 

b.ed., Northern Illinois State College, 1942; m.a., Colorado State College, 1947; 
ph.d., University of Maryland, 1955. 

ellen E. harvey, Associate Professor of Physical Education, Recreation and 
Health 

b.s., Columbia University, 1935; m.a., 1941; ed.d., University of Oregon, 1951. 

guy b. hathorn, Associate Professor of Government and Politics 

a.b., University of Mississippi, 1940; m.a., 1942; ph.d., Duke University, 1950. 

richard hendricks, Associate Professor of Speech 

a.b., Franklin College of Indiana, 1937; m.a., Ohio State University, 1939; ph.d., 
1956. 

245 ► 



Faculty 

edward J. herbst, Associate Professor of Biological Chemistry, School of 
Medicine 

b.s., University of Wisconsin, 1943; m.s., 1944; ph.d., 1949. 

william frank HORNYAK, Associate Professor of Physics 

b.e.e., College of the City of New York, 1944; m.s., California Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1949; ph.d., 1949. 

burris F. husman, Associate Professor of Physical Education 

b.s., University of Illinois, 1941; M.S., 1948; ed.d., University of Maryland, 1954. 

richard w. iskraut, Associate Professor of Physics 

b.s., City College of New York, 1937; sc.d., University of Leipzig, 1941. 

eckhart A. jacobsen, Associate Professor of Industrial Education 
m.s., Cornell University, 1946; ph.d., University of Connecticut, 1957. 

laurens jansen, Associate Professor in Institute of Molecular Physics 

cand. ex., State University, Utrecht, 1947; doct., 1950; doctorate, State Uni- 
versity of Leiden, 1954. 

richard h. jaquith, Associate Professor of Chemistry 

b.s., University of Massachusetts, 1940; M.S., 1942; ph.d., Michigan State Uni- 
versity, 1955. 

wiLHELMiNA jashemski, Associate Professor of History 

a.b., York College, 1931; a.m., University of Nebraska, 1933; ph.d., University of 
Chicago, 1942. 

Murray clemens Johnson, Associate Professor of Education 
b.s., University of Minnesota, 1943; m.a., 1950; ph.d., 1954. 

jack colvard jones, Associate Professor of Entomology 

b.s., Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1942; M.S., 1947; ph.d., Iowa State University, 
1950. 

h. bryce Jordan, Associate Professor of Music 

b.mus., University of Texas, 1948; m.mus., 1949; ph.d., University of North Caro- 
lina, 1956. 

mervin l. keedy, Associate Professor of Education 

b.s., University of Chicago, 1946; m.a., University of Nebraska, 1950; ph.d., 1957. 

mark keeney. Associate Professor of Dairy Husbandry 

b.s., Pennsylvania State College, 1942; m.s., Ohio State University, 1947; ph.d., 
Pennsylvania State College, 1950. 

vernon e. krahl, Associate Professor of Anatomy, School of Medicine 

b.s., University of Pittsburgh, 1939; M.S., 1940; ph.d., University of Maryland, 
1946. 

M 246 



Faculty 

norman c. laffer, Associate Professor of Microbiology 

b.s., Allegheny College, 1929; m.s., University of Maine, 1932; ph.d., Univer- 
sity of Illinois, 1937. 

Howard laster, Associate Professor of Physics 

a.b., Harvard College, 1951; ph.d., Cornell University, 1957. 

thelma z. lavine, Associate Professor of Philosophy 
a.b., Radcliffe, 1936; a.m., 1937; ph.d., 1939. 

emory c. leffel, Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1943; M.S., 1947; ph.d., 1953. 

Robert c. leffel, Associate Professor of Agronomy 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1948; m.s., Iowa State College, 1950; ph.d., 1952. 

Theodore F. leveque, Associate Professor Anatomy 

b.a., University of Denver, 1949; m.s., 1950; ph.d., University of Colorado, 1954. 

william v. lovitt, jr., Associate Professor of Legal Medicine, School of 
Medicine 

b.s., University of Nebraska, 1941; m.d., University of Colorado, 1944. 

william mccullough macdonald, Associate Professor of Physics 
b.s., University of Pittsburgh, 1950; ph.d., Princeton University, 1955. 

harry p. mack, Associate Professor of Anatomy, School of Medicine 
m.d., University of Maryland, 1948. 

Thomas m. magoon, Associate Professor of Psychology 

b.a., Dartmouth College, 1947; m.a., University of Minnesota, 1951; ph.d., 1954. 

edward a. mason, Associate Professor of Chemistry 

b.s., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1947; ph.d., Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1950. 

Joseph f. mattick, Associate Professor of Dairy 
b.s., Pennsylvania State University, 1942; ph.d., 1950. 

elliott m. mcginnies, Associate Professor of Psychology 

b.a., University of Buffalo, 1943; m.a., Brown University, 1944; ph.d., Harvard 
University, 1948. 

francis m. miller, Associate Professor of Chemistry, School of Pharmacy 
b.s., Western Kentucky State College, 1946; ph.d., Northwestern University, 1949. 

ray a. Murray, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 

b.sc, University of Nebraska, 1934; M.S., Cornell University, 1938; ph.d., 1949. 

boyd l. nelson, Associate Professor of Business Organization 
b.a., University of Wisconsin, 1947; m.a., 1948; ph.d., 1952. 

247 ► 



Faculty 

leo william o'neill, jr., Associate Professor of Education 

a.b., University of Chicago, 1938; m.a., University of Kansas City, 1952; ed.d., 
University of Colorado, 1955. 

Arthur c. parsons, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 
a.b., University of Maryland, 1926; m.a., 1928. 

hugh b. pickard, Associate Professor of Chemistry 

a.b., Haverfnrd College, 1933; ph.d., Northwestern University, 1938. 

burton r. pollack, Associate Professor of Physiology, School of Dentistry 
d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1946. 

henry w. price, jr., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1943; m.s., 1950. 

william c. purdy, Associate Professor of Chemistry 

b.s., Amherst College, 1951; ph.d., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1955. 

william r. quynn, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 

b.a., University of Virginia, 1922; m.a., 1923; ph.d., Johns Hopkins University, 
1934; officier d'academie (1951). 

marguerite c. rand, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 

b.a., Pomona College, 1919; m.a., Stanford University, 1921; ph.d., University of 
Chicago, 1951. 

robert d. rappleye, Associate Professor of Botany 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1941; m.s., 1947; ph.d., 1949. 

charles w. Reynolds, Associate Professor of Vegetable Crops 

A.B., University of Alabama, 1941; b.s., Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1947; m.s., 
1949; ph.d., University of Maryland, 1954. 

Robert G. RisrNGER, Associate Professor of Education 

B.s., Ball State Teachers College, 1940; m.a., University of Chicago, 1947; ed.d., 
University of Colorado, 1955. 

Robert m. rivello, Associate Professor of Aeronautical Engineering 
B.s., University of Maryland, 1943; M.S., 1948. 

albert rosen, Associate Professor of Psychology 

a.b., University of Pittsburgh, 1940; m.a., University of Minnesota, 1948; ph.d., 
1952. 

Leonora c. rosenfield, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 
b.a., Smith College, 1930; a.m., Columbia University, 1931; ph.d., 1940. 

guilford g. rudolph, Associate Professor of Biological Chemistry 

b.a., University of Colorado, 1940; M.S., Wayne State University, 1942; ph.d., 
University of Utah, 1948. 

<* 248 



Faculty 

Giovanni p. rutelli, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 

ph.d., (Physics), University of Palermo, 1923; ph.d., (Electrical Engineering), 
Polytechnic Institute of Turin, 1928. 

homer w. schamp, jr., Associate Professor in Institute of Molecular Physics 
a.b., Miami University, 1944; m.sc, University of Michigan, 1947; ph.d., 1951. 

Walter E. schlaretzki, Associate Professor of Philosophy 

a.b., Monmouth College, 1941; a.m., University of Illinois, 1942; ph.d., Cornell 
University, 1948. 

fern D. Schneider, Associate Professor of Education 

b.s., Nebraska Wesleyan University, 1932; m.a., George Washington University, 
1934; ed.d., Columbia University, 1940. 

vincent schultz, Associate Professor of Agricultural Biometrics 

b.sc, Ohio State University, 1946; m.sc, 1948; m.sc, Virginia Polytechnic Insti- 
tute, 1954; ph.d., Ohio State University, 1949. 

paul w. shankweiler, Associate Professor of Sociology 

ph.b., Muhlenberg College, 1919; m.a., Columbia University, 1921; Diploma, Union 
Theological Seminary, 1922; ph.d., University of North Carolina, 1934. 

E. Roderick Shipley, Associate Professor of Physiology, School of Dentistry 
a.b., Johns Hopkins University, 1938; m.d., University of Maryland, 1942; certifi- 
cate, University of Pennsylvania, 1947; diplomate, American Board of Surgery, 
1948. 

Andrew george smith, Associate Professor of Medical Microbiology 

B.s., Pennsylvania State University, 1940; M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1947; 
ph.d., 1950. 

harold D. smith, Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics and Marketing 

b.a., Bridgewater College, 1943; M.S., University of Maryland, 1947; ph.d., Ameri- 
can University, 1952. 

ceorge a. snow, Associate Professor of Physics 

b.s., City College of New York; m.a., Princeton University, 1947; ph.d., 1949. 

allen r. solem, Associate Professor of Psychology 

b.a., University of Minnesota, 1938; m.a., Wayne University, 1948; ph.d., Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1953. 

davtd s. sparks, Associate Professor of History 

a.b., Grinnell College, 1944; a.m., University of Chicago, 1945; ph.d., 1951. 

Clinton sprv r EY, Associate Professor of Business Organization 
b.s., University of Illinois, 1946; m.s., 1947; ph.d., 1957. 

edward strickling, Associate Professor of Agronomy 
b.s., Ohio State University, 1937; ph.d., 1949. 

249 ► 



Faculty 

roland n. stromberg, Associate Professor of History 

a.b., University of Kansas City, 1939; m.a., American University, 1946; ph.d., 
University of Maryland, 1952. 

Calvin F. stuntz, Associate Professor of Chemistry 
b.a., University of Buffalo, 1939; ph.d., 1947. 

guy paul Thompson, Associate Professor of Anatomy 
a.b., West Virginia University, 1923; a.m., 1929. 

william Francis TiERNEY, Associate Professor of Industrial Education 

b.s., Teachers College of Connecticut, 1941; m.a., Ohio State University, 1949; 
ed.d., University of Maryland, 1952. 

edward b. truitt, jr., Associate Professor of Pharmacology 

b.s., Medical College of Virginia, 1943; ph.d., University of Maryland, 1950. 

orval l. ulry, Associate Professor of Education and Director of Summer 
Session 

b.sc, Ohio State University, 1938; m.a., 1944; ph.d., 1953. 

Joseph T. vanderslice, Associate Professor in the Institute of Molecular Physics 
b.s., Boston College, 1949; ph.d., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1953. 

kurt weber, Associate Professor of English 

a.b., Williams College, 1930; b.a., Oxford University, 1932; m.a., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1933; ph.d., 1940. 

presley a. wedding, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1937; M.S., 1952. 

john i. white, Associate Professor of Physiology, School of Medicine 
b.a., University of Illinois, 1939; ph.d., Rutgers University, 1950. 

Robert c. wiley, Associate Professor of Horticulture 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1949; M.S., 1950; ph.d., Oregon State College, 1953. 

howard e. wiNN, Associate Professor of Zoology 
a.b., Bowdoin College, 1948; M.S., University of Michigan, 1950; ph.d., 1955. 

Associate Research Professors 

Francis r. hama, Associate Research Professor in Institute for Fluid Dynamics 
and Applied Mathematics 

m.engr., Tokyo Imperial University, 1940; d.sc, University of Tokyo, 1952. 

geoffry s. s. ludford, Associate Research Professor in Institute for Fluid 
Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 

b.a., Cambridge University, 1948; m.a., 1952; ph.d., 1952. 

* 250 



Faculty 

Lawrence e. paynb, Associate Research Professor in Institute for Fluid Dy- 
namics and Applied Mathematics 

b.s., Iowa State College, 1946; m.s., 1948; ph.d., 1950. 

paul n. winn, jr., Associate Research Professor of Agricultural Engineering 
b.s.a.e., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1947; m.s.a.e., 1958. 

Assistant Professors 

frank Oswald ahnert, Assistant Professor of Geography 
ph.d., University of Heidelberg, 1953. 

albert L. alford, Assistant Professor of Government and Politics 
a.b., University of Akron, 1948; a.m., Princeton, 1951; ph.d., 1953. 

frank gibbs Anderson, Assistant Professor of Sociology 

a.b., Cornell University, 1941; ph.d., University of New Mexico, 1951. 

nancy s. Anderson, Assistant Professor of Psychology 

b.a., University of Colorado, 1952; M.S., Ohio State University, 1953; ph.d., 1956. 

roy ashmen, Assistant Professor of Business Organization 

b.s., Drexel Institute, 1935; M.S., Columbia University, 1936; ph.d., Northwestern 
University, 1950. 

otho t. beall, jr., Assistant Professor of English 

a.b., Williams College, 1930; m.a., University of Minnesota, 1933; ph.d., University 
of Pennsylvania, 1952. 

Eleanor w. BULATKiN, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
m.a., Johns Hopkins University, 1951; ph.d., 1952. 

charles h. coates, Assistant Professor of Sociology 

b.s., United States Military Academy, 1924; m.a., Louisiana State University, 1952; 
ph.d., 1955. 

paul keith conkin, Assistant Professor of History 

b.a., Milligan College, 1951; m.a., Vanderbilt University, 1953; ph.d., 1957. 

Leslie c. costello, Assistant Professor of Zoology 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1952; M.S., 1954; ph.d., 1957. 

richard d. creek, Assistant Professor of Poultry Nutrition 
b.s. a., Purdue University, 1951; M.S., 1954; ph.d., 1955. 

Margaret T. cussler, Assistant Professor of Sociology 

m.a., New York State College for Teachers, 1932; m.a., Radcliffe College, 1941; 
ph.d., 1943. 

charles s. dewey, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

b.a., Pomona College, 1919; a.m., Harvard University, 1920; ph.d., 1924. 

251 ► 



Faculty 

Gertrude ehrlich, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

b.s., Georgia State College for Women, 1943; m.a., University of North Carolina, 
1945; ph.d., University of Tennessee, 1953. 

Arthur james emery, jr., Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry 
b.s., Bucknell University, 1946; ph.d., University of Rochester, 1954. 

E. james Ferguson, Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., University of Washington, 1939; m.a., 1941; ph.d., 1951. 

Sherman k. Fitzgerald, Assistant Professor of Sociology 

b.s., Brigham Young University, 1948; m.s., 1949; ph.d., Cornell University, 1952. 

rudd Fleming, Assistant Professor of English 

b.a., University of Chicago, 1930; ph.d., Cornell University, 1934. 

william p. glade, jr., Assistant Professor of Economics 
b.b.a., University of Texas, 1950; m.a., 1951; ph.d., 1955. 

albert gomezplata, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering 

b.ch.e., Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute, 1952; m.ch.e., Rensselaer Polytechnic In- 
stitute, 1954; ph.d., 1958. 

Sidney grollman, Assistant Professor of Zoology 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1947; M.S., 1949; ph.d., 1952. 

hans griem, Assistant Professor of Physics 
ph.d., Kiel University, Germany, 1954. 

floyd p. harrison, Assistant Professor of Entomology 

b.s., Louisiana State University, 1951; m.s., 1953; ph.d., University of Maryland, 
1955. 

Elizabeth E. haviland, Assistant Professor of Entomology 

b.a., Wilmington College, 1923; m.a., Cornell University, 1926; m.s., University 
of Maryland, 1936; ph.d., 1945. 

emil Francis heermann, Assistant Professor of Psychology 

b.a., University of Cincinnati, 1952; m.a., Ohio State University, 1957; ph.d., 1959. 

norman v. helbacka, Assistant Professor of Poultry Products Technology 
b.a., University of Minnesota, 1952; M.S., 1954; ph.d., 1956. 

roger w. hemken, Assistant Professor of Entomology 

b.s., University of Illinois, 1950; m.s., 1954; ph.d., Cornell University, 1957. 

Hubert p. henderson, Assistant Professor of Music 
a.b., University of North Carolina, 1941; m.a., 1950. 

christoph a. hering, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
ph.d., Rhein. Friedrich-Wilhelms Universitat, Bonn, 1950. 

* 252 



Faculty 

richard t. highton, Assistant Professor of Zoology 

b.a., New York University, 1950; M.S., University of Florida, 1953; ph.d., 1956. 

david j. m. hoc-son, Assistant Professor of Geography 

b.a., Oxford University, 1948; M.A., 1950; ph.d., London School of Economics, 1955. 

H. palmer hopkins, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Education 

b.s., Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1936; m.ed., University of 
Maryland, 1948. 

tohn horvath, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
ph.d., University of Budapest, 1947. 

james a. hummel, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.s., California Institute of Technology, 1949; m.a., Rice Institute, 1953; ph.d., 
1955. 

Sidney ishee, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics 

b.s., Mississippi State College, 1950; m.s., Pennsylvania State College, 1952; 
ph.d., 1957. 

william robert jenkins, Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology 

b.s., College of William and Mary, 1950; m.s., University of Virginia, 1952; ph.d., 
University of Maryland, 1954. 

ennis c. layne, Assistant Professor CP.TO of Biochemistry and Instructor 
in Pediatrics, School of Medicine 
b.s., George Washington University, 1949; m.s., 1953; ph.d., 1955. 

Leonard lutwack, Assistant Professor of English 

b.a., Wesleyan University, 1939; m.a., 1940; ph.d., Ohio State University, 1950. 

jerry b. marion, Assistant Professor of Physics 

b.a., Reed College, 1952; m.a., Rice Institute, 1953; ph.d., 1955. 

george l. marx, Assistant Professor of Education 

b.a., Yankton College, 1953; m.a., State University of Iowa, 1958; ph.d., 1959. 

Walter s. measday, Assistant Professor of Economics 

a.b., College of William and Mary, 1941; ph.d., Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1955. 

charles c. mish, Assistant Professor of English 

b.a., University of Pennsylvania, 1936; m.a., 1946; ph.d., 1951. 

graciela p. nemes, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 

b.s., Trinity College, 1942; m.a., University of Maryland, 1949; ph.d., 1952. 

betty Eleanor orr, Assistant Professor of Education 

a.b., Beloit College, 1943; m.a., University of Chicago, 1945; ph.d., 1958. 

253 ► 



Faculty 

Robert A. paterson, Assistant Professor of Botany 

b.a., University of Nevada, 1949; m.a., Stanford University, 1951. 

Bernard peck, Assistant Professor of Education 

A.B., Indiana University, 1939; m.a., Columbia University, 1942; ed.d., University 
of Maryland, 1957. 

george w. piavis, Assistant Professor of Anatomy, School of Dentistry 

a.b., Western Maryland College, 1948; m.ed., 1952; ph.d., Duke University, 1958. 

donald k. pumroy, Assistant Professor of Psychology 

b.a., University of Iowa, 1949; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 1951; ph.d., Uni- 
versity of Washington, 1954. 

Gordon m. ramm, Assistant Professor of Zoology 

b.a., University of Buffalo, 1949; m.a., 1950; ph.d., New York University, 1954. 

bruce l. reinhart, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

b.a., Lehigh University, 1952; m.a., Princeton University, 1954; ph.d., 1956. 

helen anne rivlin, Assistant Professor of History 

b.a., University of Rochester, 1949; m.a., Radcliffe College, 1950; ph.d., Oxford 
University, 1953. 

Leonard s. rodberg, Assistant Professor of Physics 

a.b., Johns Hopkins University, 1954; ph.d., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
1956. 

william g. rosen, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
b.s., University of Illinois, 1943; M.S., 1947; ph.d., 1954. 

paul william SANTELMANN, Assistant Professor of Agronomy 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1950; M.S., Michigan State College, 1952; ph.d., 
Ohio State University, 1954. 

Clifford leroy sayre, jr., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
b.s.m.e., Duke University, 1947; M.S., Stevens Institute of Technology, 1950. 

lyle d. schmidt, Assistant Professor of Education 

b.a., St. Cloud State Teachers College, 1955; a.m., University of Missouri, 1957; 
ph.d., 1959. 

ralph F. shangraw, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy 

b.s., 1952, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy; M.S., 1954; ph.d., University of 
Michigan, 1958. 

hugh d. sisler, Assistant Professor of Botany 
b.s., University of Maryland, 1949; M.S., 1951; ph.d., 1953. 

clodus r. smith, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Education 

b.s., Oklahoma A & M College, 1950; M.S., 1955; d.ed., Cornell University, 1960. 

<+ 254 



Faculty 

spencer m. smith, jr., Assistant Professor of Economics 
b.a., State University of Iowa, 1941; m.a., 1942; ph.d., 1948. 

merrill j. snyder, Assistant Professor of Medicine in Clinical Microbiology 
and Instructor in Microbiology, School of Medicine 

b.s., University of Pittsburgh, 1940; M.S., University of Maryland, 1950; ph.d., 
1953. 

mabel s. spencer, Assistant Professor of Home Economics Education 
b.s., University of West Virginia, 1925; m.s., 1946. 

allen l. steinhauer, Assistant Professor of Entomology 

b.s.a., University of Manitoba, 1953; M.S., Oregon State College, 1955; ph.d., 1958. 

Edward a. stern, Assistant Professor of Physics 

b.s., California Institute of Technology, 1951; ph.d., 1955. 

wolcott e. stewart, Assistant Professor of Dairy 
b.s., Cornell University, 1953; m.s., 1956; ph.d., 1957. 

Joseph sucher, Assistant Professor of Physics 

b.s., Brooklyn College, 1952; ph.d., Columbia University, 1957. 

benjamdn h. sweet, Assistant Professor of Microbiology 

b.s., Tulane University, 1946; m.a., Boston University, 1949; ph.d., 1953. 

daniel Augustus swope, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics 

b.s., Pennsylvania State University, 1942; m.s., Cornell University, 1943; ph.d., 
Pennsylvania State University, 1958. 

john m. vandersall, Assistant Professor of Dairy 

b.s., Ohio State University, 1950; M.S., 1954; ph.d., 1959. 

norma wegner, Assistant Professor of Psychology 

a.b., Hunter College, 1944; a.m., Cornell University, 1946; ph.d., University of 
Connecticut, 1955. 

june c. wilbur, Assistant Professor of Textiles and Clothing 

b.s., University of Washington, 1936; educ, 1937; M.S., Syracuse University, 
1940. 

prank Herbert wilcox, jr., Assistant Professor of Poidtry Husbandry 

b.s., University of Connecticut, 1951; M.S., Cornell University, 1953; ph.d., 1955. 

Walter F. willl\ms, Assistant Professor of Dairy 

a.b., University of Missouri, 1951; m.s., 1952; ph.d., 1955. 

jack b. wilson, Assistant Professor of Botany 
b.s., West Virginia University, 1953; M.S., 1954. 

john wright wysong, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics 

B.s., Cornell University, 1953; M.S., University of Illinois, 1954; ph.d., Cornell 
University, 1957. 

255 ► 



Faculty 

matthew yarczower, Assistant Professor of Psychology 

b.b.a., City College of New York, 1953; m.a., University of Maryland, 1955; ph.d., 
1958. 

edgar paul young, Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry 
b.s., Ohio State University, 1954; m.s., 1956; ph.d., 1958. 

Assistant Research Professors 

thomas b. day, Assistant Research Professor of Physics 

b.s., Notre Dame University, 1952; ph.d., Cornell University, 1957. 

wixliam henry kasner, Assistant Research Professor of Physics 

b.s., Case Institute of Technology, 1951; ph.d., University of Pittsburgh, 1958. 

alexei a. maradudin, Assistant Research Professor in Institute for Fluid 
Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 

e.s., Stanford University, 1953; M.S., 1954; ph.d., University of Bristol, England, 

1957. 

hans f. Weinberger, Assistant Research Professor in Institute for Fluid Dy- 
namics and Applied Mathematics 

b.s., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1948; M.S., 1948; sc.d., 1950. 

david m. zipoy, Assistant Research Professor of Physics 
b.s., University of Minnesota, 1954; ph.d., 1957. 

Lecturers 

Alfred h. aitken, Lecturer in Physics 

b.s., Lehigh University, 1949; M.S., Indiana University, 1950; ph.d., 1955. 

harry c. allen, jr., Lecturer in Physics 

b.s., Northeastern University, 1948; M.S., Brown University, 1949; ph.d., Uni- 
versity of Washington, 1951. 

robert s. anderson, Lecturer in Physiology, School of Medicine 

b.s., University of Washington, 1921; m.a., Columbia University, 1923; ph.d., 1925. 

arnold M. bass, Lecturer in Physics 

b.s., City College of New York, 1942; m.a., Duke University, 1943; ph.d., 1949. 

Lawrence h. bennett, Lecturer in Physics 

b.a., Brooklyn College, 1951; M.S., University of Maryland, 1955; ph.d., Rutgers 
University, 1958. 

Joseph Vincent brady, Lecturer in Psychology 

b.s., Fordham University, 1943; ph.d., University of Chicago, 1951. 

robert v. brown, Lecturer in Physiology , School of Medicine 

a.b., University of Mississippi, 1927; M.S., Emory University, 1928; ph.d., Chicago 
University, 1940. 

* 256 



Faculty 

G. donald causey, Lecturer in Speech 

b.a., University of Maryland, 1950; m.a., 1951; ph.d., 1954. 

yaohan chu, Lecturer in Electrical Engineering 

b.s., Chiao-Tung University, 1942; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
1945; sc.d., 1953. 

jacob j. freeman, Lecturer in Electrical Engineering 

b.s., College of William and Mary, 1933; m.a., Columbia University, 1935; ph.d., 
Catholic University, 1949. 

Abraham s. Friedman, Lecturer in Physics 

a.b., Brooklyn College, 1943; ph.d., Ohio State University, 1950. 

melville s. green, Lecturer in Physics 

b.a., Columbia College, 1944; m.a., Princeton University, 1947; ph.d., 1952. 

john s. debeers, Lecturer in Economics 

a.b., Cornell University, 1937; a.m., American University, 1939; ph.d., University 
of Chicago, 1951. 

william L. haberman, Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering 

b.m.e., Cooper Union, 1949; M.S., University of Maryland, 1952; ph.d., 1956. 

john N. hayes, Lecturer in Physics 

b.sc, University of Akron, 1951; m.sc, University of Wisconsin; ph.d., 1958. 

Raymond w. hayward, jr., Lecturer in Physics 

b.s., Iowa State College, 1943; ph.d., University of California, 1950. 

julius l. jackson, Lecturer in Physics 

b.a., Brooklyn College, 1945; m.a., Princeton University, 1947; ph.d., New York 
University, 1950. 

Robert jastrow, Lecturer in Physics 

a.b., Columbia College, 1944; a.m., Columbia University, 1945; ph.d., 1948. 

Arnold h. kahn, Lecturer in Physics 

b.s., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1950; m.a., University of California, 1952; 
ph.d., 1955. 

martin katzin, Lecturer in Electrical Engineering 

b.s.e. (e.e.), University of Michigan, 1928; b.s.e. (Mathematics), 1929; m.s.e. 
(e.e.), 1929 

herman h. kurzweg, Lecturer in Aeronautical Engineering 
ph.d., University of Leipzig, 1933. 

hoyt lemons, Lecturer in Geography 

b.ed., Southern Illinois University, 1936; m.a., University of Nebraska, 1938; 

PH.D., 1941. 

257 ► 



Faculty 

david r. lide, jr., Lecturer in Physics 

b.s., Carnegie Institute of Technology, 1949; m.a., Harvard University, 1951; ph.d., 
1952. 

richard LiNDENBERG, Lecturer in Anatomy, School of Dentistry 

graduation, University of Munich Medical School, 1934; m.d., University of 
Berlin, 1944. 

ladislaus l. marton, Lecturer in Physics 
ph.d., University of Zurich, 1924. 

felix w mcbryde, Lecturer in Geography 
b.a., Tulane University, 1930; ph.d., University of California, 1940. 

john Dudley NicoLAiDES, Lecturer in Aeronautical Engineering 
b.a., Lehigh University, 1946; m.s.e., Johns Hopkins University, 1952. 

irwin oppenheim, Lecturer in Physics 
a.b., Harvard University, 1949. 

Raymond c. o'rourke, Lecturer in Physics 

B.s., University of Michigan, 1945; M.S., 1947; ph.d., 1950. 

william c. overton, jr., Lecturer in Physics 
B.s., North Texas State College, 1941; ph.d., The Rice Institute, 1950. 

samuel penner, Lecturer in Physics 

b.a., University of Buffalo, 1952; M.S., University of Illinois, 1954; ph.d., 1956. 

Howard r. reiss, Part-time Lecturer in Physics 

b. aero. E., Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, 1950; m. aero, e., 1951; ph.d., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1958. 

albert w. saenz, Lecturer in Physics 

b.s., University of Michigan, 1944; m.a., 1945; ph.d., 1949. 

reece i. sailer, Lecturer in Entomology 
b.a., University of Kansas, 1938; ph.d., 1942. 

earl A. schuchard, Lecturer in Electrical Engineering 
b.s., University of Washington, 1933; m.s., 1934; ph.d., 1940. 

Arnold E. seigel, Lecturer in Aeronautical Engineering 

b.s., University of Maryland, 1944; s.m., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
1947; ph.d., University of Amsterdam, 1952. 

maurice m. SHAPrao, Lecturer in Physics 

b.s., University of Chicago, 1936; m.s., 1940; ph.d., 1942. 

r. edwin shutts, Lecturer in Audiology and Speech Pathology 

a.b., Indiana State Teachers' College, 1933; m.a., Northwestern University. 1947; 
ph.d., 1950. 

< 258 



Faculty 

MILTON M. SLAWSKY, Lecturer in PhySlCS 

b.s., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1933; m.s., California Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1935; ph.d., University of Michigan, 1938. 

benjamin l. snavbly, Lecturer in Physics 

b.s., Lehigh University, 1928; ph.d., Princeton University, 1935. 

earl r. stadtman, Lecturer in Microbiology 
B.s., University of California, 1942; ph.d., 1949. 

erank stern, Lecturer in Physics 

b.s., Union College, 1949; ph.d., Princeton University, 1955. 

William h. summerson, Lecturer in Biochemistry, School of Medicine 
b.chem., Cornell University, 1927; m.a., 1928; ph.d., 1937. 

Horace M. Trent, Lecturer in Electrical Engineering 

b.a., Berea College, 1928; m.a., Indiana University, 1929; ph.d., 1934. 

john l. vanderslice, Lecturer in Electrical Engineering 

b.s., University of Pennsylvania, 1928; a.m., 1930; ph.d., Princeton University, 
1934. 

Walter w. wada, Lecturer in Physics 

b.a., University of Utah, 1943; m.a., University of Michigan, 1946; ph.d., 1951. 

edward c. watters, Lecturer in Electrical Engineering 

B.s., University of Notre Dame, 1943; M.S., 1946; ph.d., University of Maryland, 
1954. 

Charles g. wilber, Lecturer in Physiology, School of Medicine 

b.sc, Marquette University, 1938; m.a., Johns Hopkins University, 1941; ph.d., 
1942. 

j. henry wills, Lecturer in Physiology, School of Medicine 

B.s., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1934; M.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1936; 
ph.d., University of Rochester, 1941. 

Robert E. wilson, Lecturer in Aercmautical Engineering 

b.s., Georgia Institute of Technology, 1941; M.S., 1942; ph.d., University of Texas, 
1952. 

Walter r. wise, jr., Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering 

b.s.m.e., Duke University, 1952; M.S., University of Maryland, 1955; ph.d., 1959. 

norman m. wolcott, Lecturer in Physics 

b.a., Harvard University, 1949; m.a., 1950; ph.d., Oxford University (England), 
1955. 

robert w. zwanzig, Lecturer in Physics 

b.s., Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, 1948; M.S., University of Southern California, 
1950; ph.d., California Institute of Technology, 1952. 

259 ► 



Faculty 

Research Affiliate 

Robert m. burger, Research Affiliate in Physics 

b.s., College of William and Mary, 1949; sc.m., Brown University, 1953; ph.d., 
1955. 

Research Associate 

allen c. pipkin, Research Associate in the Institute of Fluid Dynamics 

sc.b., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1952; ph.d., Brown University, 1959. 

Instructors 

elbert m. byrd^ jr., Instructor in Government and Politics 
b.s., The American University, 1953; m.a., 1954; ph.d., 1959. 

jacob d. goering, Instructor in Education 

b.a., Bethel College, 1941; b.d., Bethanv Seminary, 1949; ph.d., University of Mary- 
land, 1959. 

annabelle b. motz, Instructor of Sociology 

b.s., University of Wisconsin, 1941; m.a., University of Chicago, 1943; ph.d., 1950. 

William f. myers, Instructor of Microbiology 

a.b., University of Kansas, 1949; m.a., 1955; ph.d., 1958. 

edward c. rosenzweig, Instructor of Microbiology 

a.b., Centre College, 1951; m.sc, University of Maryland, 1956; ph.d., 1959. 

Joseph h. seipp, jr., Instructor of Histology and Embryology 

a.b., Loyola University, 1951; d.d.s., University of Maryland, 1955; M.S., University 
of Pittsburgh, 1959. 



* 260 



—The University is the rear guard and the 
advance agent of society. It lives in the 
past, the -present and the future. It is the 
storehouse of knowledge; it draws upon 
this depository to throw light upon the 
present; it prepares people to live and make 
a living in the world of today; and it 
should take the lead in expanding the 
intellectual horizons and the scientific 
frontiers, thus helping mankind to go forward 
— always toward the promise of a 
better tomorrow. 

— From "The State and the University, 
the inaugural address of 
President Wilson H. Elkins, 
January 20, 1955, 
College Park, Maryland. 



Howard Rove 1st ad 
Director of Libraries 
Campus 



S