(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Graduate School catalog"

THE UNIVERSITY OF 

SCRANTON 



A Jesuit University 




1998-99 



Gradxiate School 




Accreditations 

The Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges 
and Schools accredits the Universit)' of Scranton. In addition, the Graduate School is 
the only graduate school in Northeastern Pennsylvania to be accredited by all the fol- 
lowing professional associations. The Graduate Program areas and associated accred- 
itations are: 

EDUCATION AND SCHOOL COUNSELING 

Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) 

National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) 

HEALTH ADMINISTRATION 

Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration 
(ACEHSA) 

COMMUNITY COUNSELING AND SCHOOL COUNSELING 

Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Education Programs 
(CACREP) 

REHABILITATION COUNSELING 

Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) 

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The International Association for Management Education (AACSB) 

PHYSICAL THERAPY 

Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education/ APTA 



UNIVERSITY OF 

SCRANTON 

A JESUIT UNIVERSITY 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 
1998/1999 CATALOG 



VV here Potential 

Becomes 

Achievement 

in the 

Jesuit Tradition 



August 1998 

The Graduate School 

University of Scranton 

800 Linden Street 

Scranton, Pennsylvania 18510-4632 

Phone 717-941-7600 
or 1-800-FON-GRAD 

FAX 717-941-5995 
http://academic.uofs.edu/department/gradsch/ 

STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP 

This graduate catalog is owned and controlled by the Universitv' of Scranton, Scranton, 
Pennsylvania 18510-4632. Officers of the Uni\'ersit\' are: The Joseph M. McSliane, S.J., president; 
Marilyn Coar, secretary; David C. Christiansen, treasurer. 

CORPORATE TITLE 

"University of Scranton" 
Scranton, Pennsylvania 

© The University of Scranton, 1998 



Graduate Studen 



I 



_jaaUUV- - ,.„, experience. 

,aaua,e.u.escan.ea-^-^^^^^^ 

rontnent at the ^n ^^^^. ^^^ th^s m ^^ ^^ contacts ^ 



.^-t 



£?' 



ui^ 



Robert E.?=weUj,^l 
^^^Drrect«°»Bese«* 



Table of Contents 

Page 

Accreditations Inside Front Cover 

Calendar for 1998-1999 4 

General Information 6 

Admission and Registration 9 

Academic Regulations 15 

Resources 21 

Tuition and Fees 26 

Education 27 

Health Administration and Human Resources 49 

Community Counseling, Rehabilitation Counseling, School Counseling 64 

Business Administration 82 

English 96 

History 101 

Chemistry, Biochemistry, Clinical Chemistry 105 

Software Engineering 112 

Physical Therapy 116 

Theology 117 

Nursing 121 

University Administration 131 

Index 132 

Campus Map Inside Back Cover 



Calendar 

Fall '98 Term Schedule 

Orientation for new students Sun., Aug. 30 

CLASSES START Mon.,Aug. 31 

Last day to add a course Fri., Sept. 4 

Last day to drop a course Wed., Sept. 30 

Last day to register for Comprehensive Examinations Fri., Oct. 9 

Term break (No classes) Oct. 10 - 13 

Comprehensive Examinations administered Sat., Oct. 24 

Last dav to withdraw from course Wed., Nov. 11 

Thanksgiving Holiday Nov. 25 - 29 

Last dav for theses, scholarlv papers Fri., Dec. 4 

final' EXAMINATIONS.' Dec. 12 - 17 

Fall degree conferral date Dec. 31 

Intersession '99 Term Schedule 

Intersession/Spring 1999 Course Registration begins in October To be announced 

CLASSES START Mon., Jan. 4 

Last day to add a course Tues., Jan. 5 

Last day to drop a course Thurs., Jan. 7 

Last dav to withdraw from course Fri., Jan. 22 

final' EXAMINATIONS Jan. 27 - 28 

Intersession degree conferral date Jan. 31 

Spring '99 Term Schedule 

Intersession/Spring 1999 Course Registration begins on October To be announced 

Orientation for new students Sun., Jan. 31 

CLASSES START Mon., Feb. 1 

Last day to add a course Fri., Feb. 5 

Last day to drop a course Wed., Mar. 3 

Last day to register for Comprehensive Examinations Fri., Mar. 26 

Spring/Easter break (No classes) Mar. 27 - Apr. 5 

Last day to withdraw from course Wed., Apr. 14 

Comprehensive Examinations administered Sat., Apr. 17 

Last dav for theses, scholarlv papers Fri., Apr. 30 

final' EXAMINATIONS.' May 15 - 20 

COMMENCEMENT Sat., May 29 



Summer Sessions 
Common Dates for Summer '99 Terms 

Summer/Fall 1999 Course Registration begins in April To be announced 

Last day to register for Comprehensive Examinations Fri., June 25 

Comprehensive Examinations administered Sat., July 17 

Last day for theses, scholarly papers Fri., July 30 

Summer degree conferral date Aug. 31 

Summer I '99 Term Schedule 

CLASSES START Wed., June 2 

Last day to add a course Thurs., June 3 

Last day to drop a course Mon., June 7 

Last dav to withdraw from course Wed., June 23 

final' EXAMINATIONS June 28 - 29 

Summer G '99 Term Schedule 

CLASSES START Mon., June 21 

Last day to add a course Tues., June 22 

Last day to drop a course Thurs., June 24 

Last dav to withdraw from course Wed., July 21 

FINAL EXAMINATIONS July 28 - 29 

Summer II '99 Term Schedule 

CLASSES START Tues., July 6 

Last day to add a course Wed., July 7 

Last day to drop a course Fri., July 9 

Last dav to withdraw from course Fri., July 22> 

FINAL EXAMINATIONS Aug. 2 - 3 



Deadline to Apply for Degree Conferral 

Students planning to graduate at the end of a particular term must 
submit to the Graduate School Office the "Application for Degree" form 
when they register for the term in which they expect to complete all 
degree requirements. 



General Information 

The University of Scranton, the oldest Catholic institution of higher education in 
Northeastern Pennsylvania, was founded in 1888 as Saint Thomas College. It is char- 
tered under the laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and empowered to confer 
Bachelor's and Master's degrees in the Arts, Sciences, Business Administration, Health 
Administration and Education. In 1938 Saint Thomas College became the University 
of Scranton, while four years later the Societ)' of Jesus acquired tide from the Catholic 
Diocese of Scranton and administrative control from the Brothers of the Christian 
Schools. Thus Scranton became the twenty-fourth of the twenty-eight Jesuit colleges 
and universities in the United States. 

Programs 

Graduate study was initiated at the Universit}' of Scranton in 1950, the first mas- 
ter's degrees being awarded in 1952. At present, the following programs are offered 
by the Graduate School: 



Biochemistry 

Business Administration 

Chemistry 

Clinical Chemistry 

Communit)^ Counseling 

Elementary Education 

Elementary School Administration 

English 

Health Administration 

History 

Human Resources Administration 

Nursing 

Physical Therapy 

Reading Education 

Rehabilitation Counseling 

School Counseling 

Secondary Education 

Secondary School Administration 

Software Engineering 

Theology 



MS, MA 

MBA 

MS, MA 

MS, MA 

MS 

MS 

MS 

MA 

MHA 

MA 

MS 

MS 

MPT 

MS 

MS 

MS 

MS, MA 

MS 

MS 

MA 



The Universit)' has certification programs approved by the Pennsylvania Department 
of Education in the areas listed below. Some of these may be pursued in connection 
with an undergraduate degree, some in connection with a graduate degree, and some 
may be pursued independent of any degree program. 



Certification Pro£frams 

Biology German 

Chemistry Latin 

Communication Mathematics 

Elementary Education Physics 

Elementary Principal Reaciing Specialist 

Elementary School Counseling Secondary School Principal 

English Secondary School Counseling 

French Social Studies 

General Science Spanish 

Supervisor certificates in: 

Communication (English) School Guidance Services 

Foreign Languages Science 

Mathematics Social Studies 
Reading 

Objectives 

As one of the family of worldwide Jesuit Colleges and Universities, the 
University^ of Scranton shares with them a common educational heritage and tradi- 
tion. Its principal objective, therefore, is to lead the student to understand and to 
inspire him/her to fulfill that complex of dignities and responsibilities which man or 
woman, as a person and as a member of human society, is under God. 

The specific mission of the Graduate School is to provide acivanceti, post-bac- 
calaureate education through high quality programs which are coordinated with the 
University's other programs. The Graduate School subscribes to the Policy 
Statement on The Master's Degree of the Council of Graduate Schools regarding the 
nature, requirements and evaluation of master's level work. 

Organization and Location 

The administration and supervision of the Graduate School is the responsibility 
of the Dean of the Graduate School. The Dean is assisted by a Graduate Dean's 
Conference, an advisory committee, of which the Dean is chair. All questions con- 
cerning admission, candidacy and comprehensive examinations or modifications of 
course programs, must be submitted in writing to the Dean of the Graduate School. 
Decisions of the Dean of the Graduate School are final. 

The office of the Dean of the Graduate School is on the 2nd Floor of The 
Estate, located in the center of the campus (see map inside back cover). The office is 
open dailv from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. During Fall and 
Spring terms it is also open Monday through Thursday evenings. For students who 
wish to consult the Dean the courtesy of calling for an appointment is recommended. 



Graduate Dean's Conference: 1997-1998 

Robert E. Powell Chair, Dean of the Graduate School 

Carolyn E. Barnes Professor of Physical Tljerapy 

Christopher Baumann Professor of Chemistry 

Regina B. Bennett Assistant Dean 

Yaodong Bi Assistant Professor of Computing Sciences 

Raymond W. Champagne, Jr Professor of History 

Wayne H.J. Cunningham Associate Professor of Operations 

& Information Mana^fcment 

James L. Goonan Director of Graduate Admissions 

Mary Jane Hanson Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Valerie Kosky Instructor of Health Administration and Human Resources 

John M. Mclnerney Professor of English 

Oliver J. Morgan, S.J Associate Professor of Counseling and Human Services 

and Chair, Department of Counseling and Human Services 

Peter C. Olden Associate Professor of Health Administration and Human Resources 

Paul Perhach Director, Career Services 

Charles R. Pinches Professor of Theology/Religious Studies 

Murli Rajan Associate Professor of Economics/Finance 

Robert M. Weir, Jr Assistant Professor of Education 

Heather C. Beal Graduate Student 

Jeffrey Y. Lee Graduate Student 

David M. Shope Graduate Student 

Kimberly J. Stager Graduate Student 

Faye Cuchara Secretary of the Conference 

Policy on Students with Disabilities 

The University of Scranton complies with all applicable laws and regulations with 
respect to the accommodation of handicaps and disabilities as these terms are defined 
in the law. The University' will provide reasonable accommodations so students can 
fully participate in curricular and extracurricular activities. Students who need assis- 
tance should contact the Affirmative Action Office (717-941-7580) on a timely basis. 



Admission and Registration 

Application Process 

Students must be formally admitted to the Graduate School in order to register 
for any graduate courses. The Application for Admission form may be obtained from 
the Graduate Office. Completed applications, together with official transcripts of 
undergraduate and graduate work taken elsewhere, letters of recommendation, any 
required test scores, and other supporting documents, ordinarily should be in the 
Graduate Office at least one month before the term in which the student wishes to 
begin graduate study. International students should have all materials in the Graduate 
Office at least three months in advance. Processing of applications will not commence 
until all required documentation has been received by the Graduate School. 



Please refer to sections on individual programs for special application 
deadlines and additional admission requirements. 



Admission Standards 

The admission standards and policies of the Universit}' of Scran ton are free of 
any limitation, specification or discrimination on the grounds of race, religion, color, 
national or ethnic origin, sex, age, or handicap, except as provided by law. 

An applicant for admission to the Graduate School must possess a baccalaureate 
degree from an American college or university accredited by one of the recognized 
regional accrediting associations, or the equivalent from an international college or 
universit}'. The ordinary standard for admission to a graduate program is an under- 
graduate GPA of at least 2.75 (on a 4.0 scale). Students falling below this level may 
submit other evidence of their ability to successfully complete a graduate program, 
such as grades in other post-baccalaureate courses, scores from examinations, or a 
record of progressively higher work responsibilities. In addition, the applicant's pre- 
vious course work must show the successful completion of all prerequisites for gradu- 
ate work in the program to which application has been made. Individual depart- 
ments/programs may establish higher GPA requirements and/or introduce addition- 
al criteria for maldng the admissions decision. Consult the sections of this catalog 
devoted to the specific programs for such other criteria. Final action on an applica- 
tion for admission to the Graduate School is taken by the Graduate Dean. 

Ordinarily, the applicant must submit the following to be considered for admis- 
sion to the Graduate School: 

- The completed graduate application, along with the non-reftindable application fee 

- Official transcripts of all previous undergraduate and graduate work completed 
at accredited institutions ("student" copies of transcripts are not acceptable) 

- Three references from persons capable of evaluating the student's educational 
background and work or personal character 

- Any additional material required by a particular department or program, e.g., 
test scores, personal interview, etc. For details of such requirements for particular 
departments or programs, see the appropriate sections of this catalog. 



- International students must submit scores from TOEFL and an affidavit of 
financial support 

Applicants may be admitted to the Graduate School in one of the following cate- 
gories: 

Regular Admission. Applicants are admitted under this category when they have 
satisfied the admissions criteria of both the Graduate School and the department or pro- 
gram in which xhny are to enroll for graduate studies. 

Probationary Admission. Applicants who cio not meet all of the criteria for Regular 
Admission, but show reasonable promise for success in graduate studies, ma}' be accept- 
ed on a probationary basis. Recommendation for Probationary Admission must include 
a prescription of nine hours of specific course work (tliree graduate courses) that the stu- 
dent must complete wathin die first twelve hours of graciuate study as well as a discussion 
as to why this applicant should receive consideration for admission at diis time. 

Students accepted on probation may take a maximum of six (6) credits per 
semester (until the conditions of probation are satisfied) and must complete the pre- 
scribed nine hours of specific course work with a cumulative grade point average of at 
least 3.0. Failure to accomplish this will result in dismissal from the program. 

A student on Probationary Admission may not hold a graduate assistantship until 
the conditions of probation have been satisfied. 

Provisional Admission or Provisional Acceptance. Applicants who do not have the 
necessary undergraduate preparation in the discipline area requested but ha\'e demon- 
strated academic achievement indicative of successfLil graduate study with the proper 
preparation may be considered for Provisional Admission or Provisional Acceptance. 

Provisional Admission. The applicant may gain Provisional Admission with 
the proviso that he/she complete a specific prescription of undergraduate 
course work in conjunction with his/her graduate stuciies (a specific prospec- 
tus of stuciy must accompany this t)'pe of recommendation). 

Provisional Acceptance. The applicant may gain Provisional Acceptance with 
the proviso that he/she complete a specific prescription of undergraduate 
course work, with a GPA of at least 3.0 in these studies, prior to undertaking 
graduate course work (a specific prospectus of study must accompany this 
t}'pe of recommendation). Upon successful completion of the undergraduate 
requirements, the applicant will petition his/her Graduate Program Director 
in order to gain admission to the graduate program and to begin taking grad- 
uate course work in that particular graduate program. If the prescription of 
undergraduate course work is taken and a GPA less than 3.0 is achieved, then 
the status of Provisional Acceptance will be withdrawn. 

A student who has gained Provisional Acceptance may not hold a graduate 
assistantship until the undergraduate course work is successfriUy satisfied and 
acceptance into the Graduate School is granted. 

Special Admission. Applicants who are admitted to the Graduate School under 
this category are non-degree students. They are admitted to pursue studies for certi- 
fication, transfer of credit, self-improvement, master's equivalency, or auditing. 
Students matriculated at other institutions and wishing to take courses here for trans- 
fer purposes may follow an abbreviated admissions process. Contact the Graduate 
10 



Office regarding details of this process. The continuance of graduate studies under 
this category is governed by the standards of progress policy of the Graduate School. 
A qualified undergraduate student who has been admitted to an accelerated course of 
study that permits him or her to earn graduate credit is accepted into the Graduate 
School as a special student under this category. 




Faye Ciicham and Pcjioy Daggers of the Graduate School staff, James L. Gooiinii, Director ofGrnditnrc 
Admissions, Robert E. Powell, Dean. 

Combined Baccalaureate and Master's Decree Program Policy 

Undergraduate students, of the University, with outstanding undergraduate 
records may be eligible to be accepted and enrolled in a combined baccalaureate and 
master's degree program. 

A student who has achieved an overall Grade Point Average* of 
3.5 aftier 64 semester hours, 
3.4 after 80 semester hours, 
3.3 after 96 semester hours, 
or 3.2 after 112 semester hours 

may apply for early admission to a participating master's degree program by: 

* Students may be considered for the combined baccalaureate and master's degree 
program who have earned credits elsewhere (including transfer of credit from other 
colleges as well as AP courses taken in high school). The student must have earned at 
least 32 graded semester hours at the Universit}^ of Scranton with the indicated GPA 
requirement. 



11 



A. Completing the Application for Graduate Admission; 

B. Completing the Combined Baccalaureate and Master's Degree Program form 
which includes: 

1 . listing the courses at the undergraduate level which need to be taken for 
completion of the requirements for the baccalaureate degree, 

2. indicating the beginning date for graduate study, and 

3. listing of graduate courses to be utilized in satisfying the undergraduate 
degree requirements; 

C. Completing a prospectus of study leading to the completion of undergraduate 
degree and graduate degree requirements (see following note); 

D. Providing three letters of recommendation from instructors who are familiar 
with the students's achievements and intended academic goals; and 

E. Submitting any needed test scores from standardized examinations. 

The department that sponsors the particular graduate degree program will review the 
completed application and forward a recommendation to the graduate dean concern- 
ing possible admission. 

{NOTE: In participating undergraduate programs, students may apply up to 12 of 
their accumulated graduate hours toward the completion of their undergraduate 
degree requirements. [The maximum number of hours applicable to the undergradu- 
ate degree requirements is determined by each participating department and is listed 
in that department's program description in this Catalog.] The student's undergrad- 
uate program advisor will determine the undergraduate coursework for which gradu- 
ate credits may be substituted. In some departments, graduate coursework may be 
substituted only for elective undergraduate coursework and cannot be used as substi- 
tution within the major. The selection of the graduate coursework and the number of 
credits to be applied toward an undergraduate degree requires the approval of the 
student's undergraduate program advisor, the chair of the department housing the 
student's undergraduate program, the graduate program director in the student's 
academic discipline, the appropriate dean who is responsible for the undergraduate 
program, and the dean of the graduate school.) 

Second Decrees or Programs 

Students who wish to take additional courses or pursue a new program within 
the same degree area as their first program and do so within /ipormr^ of completing 
their first program need only advise the Graduate School Office and will be permitted 
to register for class. 

Students who wish to start a new program within the same degree area as their first 
program and do so between 2-5 vf«r5 of completing their first program must submit a new 
application with fee. Supporting materials will be pulled from the Graduate Office files. 

Students who wish to start a new program in a different degree area from that of 
their first program and do so within/n'^y^^/'j of completing their first program, must 
submit a new application with fee and letters of reference. All other supporting 
materials will be pulled from the Graduate Office files. 



12 



Students wishing to begin any new programs after five years must submit a new 
application, fee, and all supporting materials. 

Retention of Application Files 

Applications for admission will be kept for tnw yeaj's irom die original date of receipt. 
If the application has not been completed during this period, it will be destroyed. 

Applications for admission which are completed and have been acted upon will 
be kept for tivo years t\om the date of acceptance. If a student does not register for 
class during this period, the application will be destroyed. 

Prior to an application file being destroyed, the applicant will be notified by mail. 
If the applicant subsequently decides to enter a graduate program at the Universit)', 
he/she will be required to reassemble the entire application file. 

All documents submitted in connection with an application become the property' 
of the University. 

International Students 

Applicants who are citizens of non- English spealdng countries are required to obtain 
a score of at least 500 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) as one cri- 
terion for admission to the Graduate School. Certain degree programs, as described in 
the sections on those programs in this catalog, require TOEFL scores higher than 500. 
MBA students see page 86 for English proficiency requirement. International students 
are also required to submit a Certification of Finances form. All application materials for 
international students should be available for review in the Graduate Office a minimum 
of three months before the term in which the student wishes to begin study. 
Applications for admission for international students which are completed and acted 
upon will also be kept for two years Irom date of acceptance. International students 
must, howexer, update their Certification of Finances form afi:er one year. 

Ordinarily, international students whose native language is not English are limit- 
ed to six credits of work in their initial semester at the Universit}'. 




Prrrr I i;i„ 



Diircttir oflntcDintumal Student Affairs, meets with stiiHeiits. 



13 



Orientations for New Graduate Students 

Orientations for new graduate students, covering Graduate School policies and 
procedures, library and computer facilities, etc., are scheduled as listed below. 
Students beginning in Summer '98 or Fall '98 are expected to attend the Fall 
Orientation; students beginning in Intersession '99 or Spring '99 are expected to 
attend the Spring Orientation. 

FALL ORIENTATION: Sunday, August 30, 1998, 12-5 PM 

Lecture Hall 102, Hyiand Hall 

SPRING ORIENTATION: Sunday, lanuary 31, 1999, 12-5 PM 

Lecture Hall 102, Hyiand Hall 

Registration For Courses 

Registration for each semester will take place according to the schedules listed in 
the special bulletins which are issued prior to each semester. Registration will be with 
the approval of a student's mentor or chair of the department. Students who wish to 
cancel their repfistration mmt£[ive written notice to the Graduate School Office. Please 
see details under Dropping and Withdrawing from a Course. Students who are 
dropped from courses due to non-payment of tuition and subsequently wish to acti- 
vate their registrations will be charged a reinstatement fee (see Tuition and Fees sec- 
tion). 

In order to facilitate registration for both continuing and new students, a period 
of COURSE REGISTRATION is held prior to each term. All continuing students 
are expected to register for the subsequent term during this period. 

Undergraduate students may register for certain graduate courses. They must, how- 
ever, have the approval of the appropriate department chair and the appropriate deans. 




Gmduau Student Advisory Council officers David Shopc and Heather ( '. Heal. 



14 



Academic Regulations 

Mentors 

From the inception of graduate study, students will be assigned a mentor to help 
them formulate a program of studies and supervise their work. It is suggested that 
students work closely with their mentors and that the courtesy of arranging appoint- 
ments in advance with facult)' members so designated be observed by all students. 

Gradin£f System 

The following grades are used in graduate course work: 

Grade Quality Points Per Credit Definition 

A 4.00 Superior/outstanding 

A- 3.67 Excellent 

B-i- 3.33 Very good 

B 3.00 Good 

B- 2.67 Fair 

C-i- 2.33 Passing grade 

C 2.00 Minimal passing grade 

F 0.00 Failure 

S Not computed Satisfactory or Pass 

U Not computed Unsatisfactory or Fail 

"S" indicates satisfactory or pass. "U'^ indicates unsatisfactory or fail. S/U grading is 
authorized only for certain courses. 

"■W indicates a student is registered for a thesis or an approved research project 
which has not been completed at the end of a given semester but for which satisfacto- 
ry progress is being made. This grade is temporary and once the work has been com- 
pleted it must be converted to one of the permanent grade symbols. 

'^W^^ indicates that a student has withdrawn from a course. 

'^^P indicates postponement of the completion of a course. It is given at the discretion 
of the instructor to a student who is doing satisfactory work but who has not com- 
pleted all of the course requirements at the end of a given semester. Given such an 
extension, the student must complete all the required work, unless otherwise agreed, 
before the midpoint of the next regular semester. Failure to complete the necessary 
work within the stipulated time results in automatic conversion of the "Incomplete" 
to a permanent grade of F. 

M U^^ indicates that a student has taken a course for which permission has been granted 
without a grade being awarded. Students must secure such authorization prior to the 
start of a course. Entry of the audit grade on a transcript assumes satisfactory atten- 
dance at class meetings. The student should consult with the instructor as to what con- 
stitutes satisfactory attendance. 



15 



''NC is a temporary grade issued when a faculty member tails to meet the deadline 
for the submission of grade reports. Such temporary grades will be changed to per- 
manent grade symbols when issued by the professor. 

Special permission is not needed to repeat failed courses; however, prior approval 
of the student's Dean is needed to repeat non-fiiled courses. The recording of grades 
for repeated courses shall be governed by the following conditions: 1 ) Credit for a 
course will be granted only once. 2) Credit for the course will be lost if the course is 
repeated and tailed. 3) The most recent credit and grade will count toward the GPA 
with this exception: a "W" grade cannot replace another grade. 4) Each attempt to 
complete a course will be reported on the student's transcript. 5) Ordinarily, a student 
may repeat a course onlv in the same manner in which it was originally taken. 6) A 
student repeating a course must so indicate on his/her registration form. 

Regular attendance at class is considered a requisite for successful completion of 
a course. 

Appeal of a Graduate Course Grade 

A student who wishes to appeal the fmal grade in a graduate course should first 
contact the instructor of the course in order to remedy the situation informally. If, 
having met with the instructor, the student still thinks that he/she has been inappro- 
priately evaluated in the course, he/she may make a written request that the Chair of 
the facult)' member's department re\'ie\\- the process by which the grade \\^as deter- 
mined. The written request must describe, in detail, the situation and reason for 
appealing the course grade. The Chair will attempt to facilitate a reasonable solution 
at the departmental level. The Chair may make written recommendation to both the 
student and tacult)' member following the revie\\\ If the matter is not resolved at the 
departmental level, then the student may request, in writing, that the Dean of the 
Graduate School re\'iew the matter. The Dean will re\'iew the matter and provide a 
written decision to the student and faculty' member. The Dean's decision is final. 

Standards ofPro£iress 
All students must have a cumulative graduate grade point average (GPA) of at 
least 3.0 in order to graduate with a master's degree. In addition, it is expected that 
all students must maintain a cumulative graduate GPA of at least 3.0 in order to 
remain in good academic standing. 

If a student is placed on academic probation, then the student is required to 
obtain a cumulative graduate GPA of at least 3.0 within the next three courses taken 
(normally nine hours of course work). 

a. Successful achievement of this expectation will result in the student being 
reinstated to regular academic status. 

b. Failure to achie\'e this expectation ^^'ill cause the student to be subject to 
dismissal. 

While there is no set limitation on the number of courses a student may take in a 
semester while on academic probation, it is imperative that the student recognizes 
the necessity of improved academic performance in order to regain the minimum 
graduate GPA of 3.0 within the next three courses. 



16 




From left: Rosemary K. Purcell, Peter J. Blazes, Robert E. Powell, Dean, Mary Ann Kuzdro 
and Rejjina B. Bennett of the Graduate School staff. 

A student on academic probation is not eligible to receive an initial offer of a 
graduate assistantship. A student who is a graduate assistant and who is placed on 
academic probation may be reappointed for a second year provided he/she is making 
reasonable progress towards completion of degree requirements. In this situation, the 
student's program director will have to provide to the dean a written recommenda- 
tion for reappointment presenting a sufficient case for reappointment. 

Time Limit 

All graduate work for a degree, including the thesis, must be completed within 
six years of the date when the first graduate level course is taken. Time spent in the 
armed forces is not included in the six year period. Extension of this time restriction 
may be granted for vaUd reasons at the discretion of the Dean. 

Application for Decree 

In order to qualify for award of the master's degree, a student must complete the 
Application for Decree form. This should be done during the Course Registration 
period for the term in which the student expects to finish all requirements. Copies of 
the form are available in the Graduate Office. 

The University provides the opportunity for students who have completed 
degree requirements to graduate at the conclusion of each academic term: Summer, 
Fall, Intersession, Spring. Official dates of graduation are noted in the academic cal- 
endar. Commencement exercises are held once in the academic year, at the conclu- 
sion of the Spring term. Students who graduated in the previous Summer, Fall or 
Intersession terms, as well as in the current Spring term, participate in these com- 
mencement exercises. 

Transfer Of Credits 

Transfer of credits to graduate programs at the University' of Scranton is gov- 
erned by the following policies: 



17 



1 . Credits for transfer must be acquired in residence at an accredited institution 
as a graduate student. 

2. A maximum of nine (9) graduate credits may be transferred for graduate 
programs requiring at least 39 credit hours for completion and six (6) gradu- 
ate credits may be transferred for graduate programs that require less than 39 
credit hours for completion. 

3. Courses to be transferred must be integral to the student's program of study. 

4. Transferred credits must be taken within six (6) years of the date of the stu- 
dent's initial graduate enrollment. 

5. A grade of B or better is required in any course to be transferred and an offi- 
cial transcript demonstrating this must be submitted for work at other insti- 
tutions (including course descriptions of the credits in question). A grade of 
Pass or Satisfactory is not acceptable for transferred credits. 

6. The course to be transferred must be a regularly scheduled course (and not a 
workshop). 

Students matriculated at the University' of Scranton may take courses at other 
accredited graduate schools for the purpose of transfer of credit only with the prior 
permission of their mentor and the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Comprehensive Examinations 

Students in Master of Arts and Master of Science programs must pass a compre- 
hensive examination in their respective fields of study. The examination may be oral, 
written, or both. Comprehensive examinations are given on dates published in the 
academic calendar in this catalog (see pages 4-5). Students must apply to take the 
comprehensive examination by the deadlines given in the academic calendar, using the 
Application for Comprehensive Examination form available in the Graduate Office. 
Eligibilit}' for the examination is determined by the Director of the student's program. 
Students should consult their mentors regarding the nature of the examination in their 
field. Students failing the comprehensi\'e examination twice will be dismissed. 

Thesis 

Candidates for the Master of Arts degree in programs in the Departments of 
Chemistry and Education as wtW as students in Sofi^vare Engineering are required to 
complete a thesis. Students in English, History, Theolog}' and Nursing may opt to do 
a thesis. A thesis is prepared under the supervision of the candidate's thesis mentor 
and reviewed by at least one additional reader. Each master's degree candidate prepar- 
ing a thesis must defend the thesis at a public presentation. 

In the preparation of the thesis, style regulations prescribed by the student's 
department will be observed. Three copies of the accepted thesis must be submitted to 
the Graduate School Office on or before the date indicated in the University' calendar. 
A protot)^pe of the authorized cover approval page signed by each reader must accom- 
pany each thesis copy. The approval page may be obtained in the Graduate School 
Office. One copy of the thesis is placed in the Unversit}' Library. 



Dropping, Withdrawin£f From or Addin£i A Course 

Students are alerted that they may drop a course during the time in which they 
are entitled to a refund of any amount. (See "Refund Schedule", p. 26). To drop a 
course students must complete a "Schedule Change" form, which is available in the 
Graduate Office. This form must be completed and returned to the Graduate Office 
within the time in which students are entitled to a refund. The drop will be treated 
as if the student never registered for the course. 

After the time in which a student is entitled to a refund has elapsed, students will 
be permitted to withdraw from a course. 

To withdraw from a course students must complete a "Schedule Change" form 
and return it to the Graduate Office. The student's transcript will contain the course 
number and title, along with a "W" for "Withdraw". 

To add a course students must complete a "Schedule Change" form. This form 
must be completed and returned to the Graduate Office by the time of the "add 
deadline" (see "Calendar", pp. 4-5). 

See the academic calendar for deadlines for withdrawing. 

Note: There is a special fee for any course -related schedule change submitted 
after the first week of each term. 

Policy Changes, Academic Integrity, Student Conduct, and 
Student Rights of Confidentiality 

The Universit)' reserves the right to change any of the rules and regulations in 
this catalog. All such changes are effective at such times as the proper authorities 
determine and may apply not only to prospective students but also to those who are 
already matriculated in the Universit)^ However, curricular changes shall not become 
effective until published in the catalog unless specifically approved for an earlier 
implementation date by the appropriate body. If a change is approved for implemen- 
tation prior to its publication in a catalog, the appropriate school, department, or 
program shall inform students affected by the change. Application of policies, rules, 
and requirements, including changes thereto, may be appealed to the dean of the stu- 
dent's college. 

The University reserves the right to take appropriate disciplinary action in the 
case of any student who conducts himself or herself contrary to the standards of the 
University. These standards (particularly the "Academic Code of Honesty" and the 
"Policies Governing the Universit)' Communit}'") are given clear expression in the 
tacult)' and student handbooks of the University'. The Universit)' also reserves the 
right to modif}' admissions requirements, the right to change tuition and fee charges, 
and the right to change the semester schedule of courses. 

The University of Scranton recognizes the privacy rights of individuals who are or 
who have been students, as guaranteed by the Family Educational Rights and Pri\'acy 
Act (FERPA) of 1974. The complete "Student Rights and Conficientialit\' of 
Information Policy" can be reviewed in the Graduate School Office. Any student wish- 
ing to prevent disclosure of public information as deemed by FERPA may request so by 
notifying the Graduate School Office, where he/she may obtain the form prohibiting 
disclosure. 

19 



special Note For Students 
Students, note that it is your responsibility to be familiar with the academic regu- 
lations, fee structures, and other policies contained in this catalog. 



List of Commonly Used Forms 

This is a handy reference list of forms commonly used by graduate students. Certain 
less commonly used forms are not included here. The commonly used forms are readily 
available in the Graduate Office as well as in most department offices and from mentors. 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION: Use this form to apply for admission to the 
Graduate School. 

GRADUATE REGISTRATION: If registration for courses via the University of 
Scranton's telephone registration system, Royal Touch, is not permitted, use this 
form to register for courses. 

SCHEDULE CHANGE: Use this form to change a Registration form already sub- 
mitted, e.g., to withdraw from, drop or add a course. 

READER: Use this form, along with the Registration form, to register for a Reader 
course. 

GRADUATE CREDIT TRANSFER RECOMMENDATION: Use this form to 
request review of graduate credits taken elsewhere for transfer to your program here. 

APPLICATION FOR COMPREHENSFV^ EXAMINATION: Use this form when 
you are ready to take the Comprehensive Examination.* 

THESIS COVER APPROVAL PAGE: Submit this page, signed by each reader, with 
each copy of an accepted thesis. 

COMPUTER USE AGREEMENT: All newly admitted Graduate School students 
must complete and submit this form to the Graduate School Office to ensure contin- 
ued academic computing privileges. 

APPLICATION FOR DEGREE: Submit this form to the Graduate School Office 
when you register for the term in which you expect to complete all degree require- 
ments. 

REQUEST FOR TRANSCRIPT: Use this form to request an official copy of your 
graduate transcript. 

PROGRAM CHANGE: Use this form if you have already been admitted to one 
program but wish to be admitted to another; this includes changes between MA and 
MS programs within the same department. 

EMPLOYER REIMBURSEMENT FORM: Use this form if you are under an 
employer reimbursement plan for tuition benefits. Completed form must be 
returned to Bursar's Office each term with your registration agreement. 

APPLICATION FOR GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIP: Complete and submit this 
form to the Graduate Office by the March I deadline if you wish to be considered for 
a graduate assistantship for next year. 

* See Calendar (pp. 4-5) for deadlines. 

20 



Resources 

The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Memorial Library 

Library holdings include approximately 375,562 volumes; 2,124 print periodical 
subscriptions and over 2,000 full-text electronic journals; 409,550 microforms; 
11,025 non-print items, including videocassettes, records, films and filmstrips. Users 
may check holdings bv using terminals in the Library, by dialing in via a modem (717- 
941-7715), via Telnet (cat.uofs.edu), or using the Library's catalog on the \v^v\v 
(http://cat.uofs.edu). The Library's Online Public Catalog (OPC) and Information 
Gateway displays holdings and availability of materials - in the Library; in circulation; 
date due; overdue; on reserve. The catalogs of other libraries are available for search- 
ing via the Internet through the Weinberg Memorial Library's Gateway or Home 
Page on the World Wide Web (http://www.uofs.edu/admin/library.html). 

Library hours are posted on campus, on the OPC, on the World Wide Web and 
on a recording (717-941-7525). It is open 99.5 hours per week, with extended 
hours during exam periods. 

The Universit}' of Scranton belongs to a consortium of area colleges, NEPBC, 
that includes Mar^avood University, King's College, Wilkes University, College 
Misericordia, Keystone College, Luzerne County Community College and East 
Stroudsburg University. Students may borrow books directly from these libraries and 
from the Lackawanna Count)^ Library System. A list of other libraries' periodical 
holdings is available at the Reference desk. Interlibrary loan is available for materials 
not owned by the Library. There is a fee for photocopied articles; there is no charge 
for interlibrary loan books. A current contents/document delivery service, UnCover, 
is available to University students over the Internet. 

- Computer Database Services. The Library has 120 different CD and electronic 
indexes; 100 of these may be accessed by different simultaneous users within the 
Library and from labs, dorms, offices or homes. Instruction in search techniques is 
available for individuals and in classes. A list of CD databases is available at the 
Reference Desk and from the Library's home page on the WWW. Users search web- 
based and CD-ROM databases on their own without incurring fees. UnCover, a cur- 
rent contents of periodicals and document delivery database is available for searching 
free of charge; articles, which vary in price according to copyright fees, may be 
ordered for document delivery via fax. Three Information Access Company (lAC) 
databases are available online via the Internet through the Library's catalog or at CD 
stations. These are: Expanded Academic ASAP, Business Index ASAP full-text prod- 
ucts and Predicasts PROMT. Hispanic American Periodical Index is available 
through the Library's main menu. Bibliographic, directory and statistical information 
can be accessed online via DIALOG, OCLC, and EPIC. Searches are conducted by 
appointment with librarians. The average online search takes 20 minutes and costs 
from $10 - $30 depending on the online database accessed, number of citations print- 
ed, and length of connect time. 

- Assistance \s available to Library users at the Circulation (717-941-7524) and 
Reference (717-941-4000) desks. A formal instruction program orients users to the 
Library and its resources through individual, group and class presentations. 



21 



Career Services 

Career Services staff advise students on career development issues, assist students 
and graduates in job search, and help students plan for further academic work follow- 
ing graduation. During the academic year, the office presents workshops on resume/ 
interview preparation and career planning. A career library containing occupational 
information and some graduate school catalogs is also available. Office hours are 
8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Friday. 
Contact Career Services in the Gallery, 2R (717-941-7640) to arrange appointments. 

Graduate students who have two full years of study remaining are eligible to partic- 
ipate in the ROTC Program administered by the Military Science Department, College 
of Arts and Sciences. There are also opportunities for flill ROTC scholarships that pay 
$16,000 for tuition, $450 for books, and $1,500 for spending money annually. 
Students participate in adventure training, classroom leadership instruction, and intern- 
ships. Contact the Military Science Department at 717-941-4597, FAX 717-941- 
4340, e-mail ROTC@uofs.edu, or visit our homepage in the Academic section of 
w^vw.Liofs.edu. 




Ricipiiiits iif'tlic (..radiiatt Schon/'s I'^JOS ()iiTsta)idin^ Achievement Awards: Fiist roir, from left: 
Austin J. Burke, III (Softivare Etijjineerinjj); Mustafa Tuksel (International Understandin^i); Sharon 
A. Kohanski (Accounting); Vanessa Leijjh White (Community Counseling); Mejjan Anne O'Neill 
(Reading/School Administration); Kristin Noelle Sanner (English); Heather Armitajje Nelson 
(Community Counseling); Cheryl A. Bisi^gnani (Chemistry); Catherine Gavipian Seymour (Theolojjy). 
Second row, from left: Krista Carreau Kepler (Marketinjj/General); Scott McWilliam Hartley 
(International Business/Operations Management); Paras Dilip Zaveri (Finance); Patricia A. Lawless 
(Health Administration); Steven Tloomas Nalesnik (Finance); Shari A. McElwain (Physical Therapy); 
Kathleen C. Kubik (Physical Therapy); Jay Bradley Nelson (Human Resottrces Administration); Jill 
Kristin Canevari (Rehabilitation Counseling); Ryan Christopher Book (Elementary/Secondary 
Education); Deborah A. Jones (School Counselin£r); Christopher A. Terpak (Chemistry); Suzanne T 
Billings (Human Resottrces Administration). 

22 



Counseling Center 
The Counseling Center staff provide individual and group counseling for 
University students. Services are confidential and free of charge. The Center is open 
Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Later cxening sessions are available 
by appointment onl}'. In addition, emergency crisis consultation is a\'ailable from 
September through May (while classes are in session) on a 24 hours basis via contact- 
ing Public Safet)' and Securit>' (717-941-7777) to access the counselor-on-call. Stop 
by the Gallery building, floor 2F or call 717-941-7620 to make an appointment. 

Wellness Center 

The Wellness Center provides programs to assist in the physical, intellectual, 
emotional, spiritual, occupational and social well being of individuals. In addidon, 
the Wellness Center coordinates the Drug and Alcohol Information Center (DICE), 
Sexual Assault Response Team (SART) and HIV/AIDS peer education programs to 
educate the campus community' on issues related to alcohol and other drugs, sexual 
assault and HlV/AlDS. 

The Wellness Center is located in the Roche Wellness Center at 1130 Muberry 
Street (top of campus). The Center is open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. 
to 4:30 p.m. and evenings by appointment (941-4253). 

Graduate Assistantships, Financial Aid 

Approximately 60 graduate assistantships are available. For students in the reha- 
bilitation counseling program, traineeships are somerimes available. Information and 
application forms for the assistantships may be obtained from the Graduate Office. 
The deadline for applying for assistantships is March 1 . 

Residence Life Coordinator positions are offered to single male and female grad- 
uate students, whereby room anci board in the Universit)''s dormitories are pro\'ided. 
Applications may be obtained from the Student Affairs Office. A limited number of 
other campus jobs are also available. Inquiries regarding these should be directed to 
the Financial Aid Office (717-941-7700). 

Tuition Policy for Senior Citizens 

Persons 60 years of age and older may audit courses at the Universit}' at no 
tuition charge, on a "space available" basis. Such persons may take courses for credit 
at 50% tuidon. These reducdons are applicable only afi:er the person has applied for 
and receives any form of financial assistance normally available, e.g., state and federal 
assistance and employer reimbursement. Fees and other costs of courses (e.g., text- 
books) are assessed at the normal rate in all cases. 



23 



Computer Facilities 

The Uiiixersity provides an excellent array of computing facilities, both hardware and 
software. A simple listing of the facilities is provided below. Details regarding equipment, 
software, support ser\'ices, and hours are published by Information Resources at the 
beginning of each academic yeai', with periodic updates throughout the year. Students 
should consult current hiformation Resources publications for up-to-date details. 
General Access Computer Labs: 
Alumni Memorial Hall 

Pro Deo Room, Weinberg Memorial Library (24 hour access) 
Residence Hall Labs: 
Gavigan College 
Redington Hall 
Other Facilities: 

Chemistry Computer Lab, Loyola Hall, Room 317 
Communications Microcomputer Lab, St. Thomas Hall, Room T464 
Counseling/Human Services Microcomputer Lab, CHS Department 
Computing Sciences Workstation Labs, St. Thomas Hall 
Education Macintosh Lab, Education Department 
Foreign Languages Microcomputer Lab, St. Thomas Hall, Room T360 
Human Resources Microcomputer Lab, Human Resources Department 
Learning Resources Center Microcomputer Lab, Alumni Memorial Hall 
Literacy Lab I, St. Thomas Hall, Room T486 
Literacy Lab II, St. Thomas Hall, Room T375 
Math Microcomputer Lab, St. Thomas Hall, Room T461 
Military Science Computer Lab, Rock Hall, Room 107 
Nursing Instructional Microcomputer Lab, Nursing Department 
Occupational Therapy Microcomputer Lab, Leahy Hall, Room 2002 
Physics/Electrical Engineering CAD/CAM Lab, St. Thomas Hall, Room T170 
Ph}'sical Therapy Microcomputer Lab, Leahy Hall, Room 010 
Psychology Microcomputer Lab, Alumni Memorial Hall, Room 202 
Psychology' Instructional Microcomputer Lab, Alumni Memorial Hall, Room 214 
School of Management Instructional Microcomputer Lab, SOM 
Writing Center Computer Lab, Literary & Performing Arts, Room 224 
Further information and assistance may be obtained from the Information 
Resources Help Desk, Alumni Memorial Hall, 71 7-941 -HELP. Up-to-date informa- 
tion is also available online through the University of Scranton Web Server 
( http : //www. uofs.edu). 



24 



learning Resources Center 

The Unixersity's Learning Resources Center is located in Alumni Memorial Hall, 
Room 112. Services provided for the graduate student include tutoring for undergradu- 
ate courses, assistance with study skills, as well as computer assisted learning. An ESL class 
for international students is a\'ailable depending on enrollment. The Center is open from 
8:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Fridays 
during the Fall and Spring terms. Summer hours are 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday 
through Friday. Ser\'ices are also provided to students widi disabilities. Contact the 
Center for frirther information (717-941-4038). 

Byron Recreational Complex/John Lon^ Center 

Graduate students may use both the Byron Recreational C'omplex and the Long 
Center on a per semester fee basis. Facilities in the Byron Recreational Complex 
include three gymnasiums that may be used for basketball, volleyball, badminton, and 
tennis; indoor pool and locker rooms containing saunas and steam rooms; racquet- 
ball/handball courts; a dance/aerobics room; and individual fitness equipment. The 
John Long Center facilities, located adjacent to the Byron Complex, include a g>'m- 
nasium, weight room, wrestling room and locker rooms. 

Student Health Services 

Student Health Services is located in the Roche Wellness Center at the corner of 
Mulberry Street and N. Webster Avenue. Graduate students have the option of utiliz- 
ing the services we offer and become eligible to use Student Health Services by pay- 
ment of the health fee of $65.00 per semester. Payment of the health fee may be made 
at the Bursar's office. Services offered include health and wellness information, nurs- 
ing assessment, treatment of routine illnesses and injuries, medical services provided by 
physicians and a certified nurse practitioner by appointment, as well as referral to com- 
munity health care providers for services beyond the scope of a student health facility. 
Further information may be obtained by contacting Student Health Services (717- 
941-7667). 




Tuition and Fees 

Tuition (per semester hour of credit) $465.00 

Theology (per semester hour of credit) 233.00 

Fees- 

Application Fee 35.00 

Binding of Thesis 40.00 

Graduation Fee 80.00 

Reader Fee (per credit fee in addition to tuition) 30.00 

Registration Fee (per semester) 25.00 

Late Registration 20.00 

Schedule change fee (after 1st week of term) 15.00 

Reinstatement Fee 100.00 

Nursing Clinical Assessment/Clinical Practicum fee, per semester 110.00 

Transcripts 

Unofficial 2.00 

Official: current students 3.00 

Official: others 5.00 

Fees - Optional University Services 

English Proficiency Course 300.00 

Parking Fee (per year) 55.00 

Recreation Center 

Fall or Spring Term 70.00 

Summer or Intersession term 10.00 

Student Health Services (per semester) 65.00 

Certain courses also carry a special fee. Unless explicitly stated otherwise, tuition 
and fees are for one semester and are payable at registration. The graduation fee is 
payable, whether or not a student attends commencement exercises. 

Students will not be permitted to receive any degree, certificate, or transcript of 
record until their financial accounts with the Universit)' have been satisfactorily set- 
ded. 

The Universit)' will adhere rigidly to the following "Schedule of Refunds." Fees 
are not refundable. 

Schedule of Refunds 
Fall/Spring Semesters 

Until the end of the tenth calendar day of the term '. 100% 

Eleventh through seventeenth calendar day of the term 75% 

Eighteenth through t\vent}^-fourth calendar day of the term 50% 

Twenty-fifth through thirt\'-first calendar day of the term 25% 

Beyond thirt}'-one calendar days in th term No Refund 

Summer and Intersession 

Until the end of the third calendar day of the term 100% 

During the fourth calendar day of the term 50% 

Beyond four calendar days in the term No Refund 



26 



Secondary Education, Elementary 

Education, Administration (Secondary and 

Elementary), Reading, Supervision 

Dr. David A. Wiley, Chair, Education 
717-941-4032 
http://academic.uofs.edu/departmcnt/education 
Department faculty: Professors -Joseph M. Cannon, Joseph A. Fusaro; 
Associate Professors - Thomas W. Gerrity, Joseph Khazzaka, David A. Wiley; 
Assistant Professors - Robert Jeffrey Cantrell, Barber a Cozza, Tim Hobbs, 
Deborah Eville Lo, Robert M. Weir, Jr. 

The Department of Education offers a variety of programs for individuals currendy 
in the field of education as well as for those wishing to enter the field. The programs 
include initial certification for a variety of positions and additional certifications; the 
Master of Arts and Master of Science degrees, some of which are directly connected 
with certifications and some of which may be pursued without any certifications; and 
individual courses which may be taken for updating skills and knowledge or pursuing 
new fields. The various programs and options are described in the following sections. 

Departmental Requirements 

Admission requirements for all programs in the Department of Education are 
the same as those for the Graduate School as a whole, as described on pages 9-14 of 
this catalog. All candidates for a master's degree in education are required to suc- 
cessfi.illy complete a comprehensive examination in the field of their degree. Should a 
candidate fail one or more parts of the Comprehensive Examination, they may retake 
those parts at the next scheduled examination date. Additional requirements for each 
degree or certification are described under the respective programs in the following 
sections. 

Act 34 Clearance 

As a matter of University policy, all education students are required to submit a 
completed Act 34 clearance (and, in some cases, the Pennsylvania Child Abuse 
History clearance) to the Department of Education prior to being placed in any field 
experience that would put them in direct contact with children. This clearance is col- 
lected by the University' on behalf of the school entit\' where the field experience will 
occur. The completed Act 34 form will be delivered to the school entit)' by the 
Department of Education after the form is obtained by the student. The University' 
will not maintain a student's Act 34 clearance form or background check after deliv- 
ery of the form to the school entit)' where the field experience will occur. 



27 



Certification 

All certification candidates must exhibit pre-certification competency of PL 94- 
142 before being recommended for the certification they seek. Education students 
seeking certification are evaluated annually by the Department of Education faculty. 
This evaluation is based on academic and personal qualities cited in The Education 
Student Handbook, copies of which are available in the Weinberg Memorial Library 
and the Department of Education . Students whose professional development is 
deemed unsatisfactory in these areas are subject to departmental probation and may 
be recommended to the Graduate Dean for dismissal from the education program. 

A student who is enrolled in any certification program at the Uni\'ersit\' and is rec- 
ommended to be dropped fi^om the program or refiised Universit}' endorsement for cer- 
tification may appeal the decision. The appeal is made through the Chair of the 
Department to the Teacher Education Committee, and to a Committee consisting of 
three persons: the Graduate Dean, the Department Chair and a person fi^om the faculty 
selected by the Director of the Certification Program in which the student is enrolled. 

In order for certification applications to be processed, the student must achieve sat- 
isfactory scores on the National Teacher Examination required b\' the Pennsylvania 
Department of Education. These tests include: 

1) Basic Skills; 

2) General Knowledge; 

3) Professional Knowledge; 

4) The Specialization Area Test - mathematics, English, elementary 
education, etc. as appropriate for the certificate sought by the candidate. 

Approval of the mentor and certifying officer must be received before a course 
may be substituted for any course required in the specified certification program. 
Courses to be transferred from another college for certification purposes must also 
receive approval of the mentor and certifying officer before the courses are accepted 
for program requirements. 

Accreditation 

All graduate programs in the Department of Education are accredited by the 
Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) and the National Council for 
Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). 



28 



Secondary Education 

Dr. Da\id A. Wiley, Chair 
717-941-4032 • daw315@tiger.uofs.edu 

Tiie Secondary Education program offers a number of options for students. The 
person who ah^eady holds a secondary certificate may choose a master's degree in sec- 
ondary education with a curriculum and instruction option, psycholojjy option, content 
option, or general studies option, the selection depending on the student's interests. 
International students may be permitted to complete a master's degree without certi- 
fication as long as teaching standards recjuired by their home country have been satis- 
fied. 

The person who does not already possess a secondary education certificate may 
not be awarded a master's degree prior to completing certification requirements. 
Certification requirements may be pursued separately or at the same time as a mas- 
ter's degree in secondary education with a general studies option only. 

The Foundation and Research course requirements (9 credits) are the same for all 
options. All students must take Ed. 502 Educational Research aiid must take six (6) cred- 
its of additional Foundation courses by choosing from Ed. 501, Ed. 503, and Ed. 508. 

Research Course Requirement (3 credits) 

Ed. 502 Educational Research 3 

Foundation Course Requirement (6 credits) 

Ed. 501 Educational Psycholog)' 3 

Ed. 503 Educational Tests and Measurement 3 

Ed. 508 Advanced Foundations of Education 3 

The various options have the following requirements in addition to the Research 
and Foundation course requirements. 
Curriculmn and Instruction Option 

Ed. 509 Improving Instruction 3 

OR 

Ed. 512 General Methods and Planning 3 

Ed. 510 Curriculum Theory and Development 3 

Ed. 514 Group Processes in the Classroom 3 

Ed. 545 Reading/Language Arts in the Content Areas 3 

Ed. 560 Subject Methods 3 

Ed. 562 Teaching the Gifted Child 3 

Ed. 568 Education of the Exceptional Child 3 

Electives 6 

De£free Requirements: Thirty-six (36) credits and a comprehensive examination arc 
required for the Master of Science in Secondary Education with the Curriculum and 
Instruction Option. 



29 



Psycholo£fy Option 

Ed. 514 Group Processes in the Classroom 3 

Ed. 562 Teaching the Gifted Child 3 

Ed. 568 Education of the Exceptional Child 3 

COUN 508 Developmental Psychology 3 

COUN 531 Psychology of Adjustment 3 

Electives 12 

Decree Requirements: Thirty-six (36) credits and a comprehensive examination are 
required for the Master of Science in Secondary Education with the Psychology 
Option. 
Content Option 

Ed. 509 Improving Instruction 3 

Ed. 560 Subject Methods 3 

(English concentration - Engl 507) 

Electives 0-3 

The student and mentor will select fifteen (15) to eighteen (18) graduate credits 
in one of the content areas listed below: 

History Chemistry English Mathematics 

Decree Requirements: The Master of Science in Secondary Education with the 
Content Option is awarded with thirt\'-six (36) credits and the comprehensive exami- 
nation. 

General Studies Option 

Electives 27 

Dc£[ree Requirements: Thirty-six (36) credits and a comprehensive examination are 
required for the Master of Science in Secondary Education with a General Studies 
Option. This option requires prior approval by the mentor in consultation with the 
Chair of the Department of Education of a sequence of studies directed toward a 
professionally identified goal. 

Teacher Certification Requirements: Completion of the following courses, if not pre- 
viously transcripted or documented as being completed to the department's satisfac- 
tion, shall constitute the requirements for certification: 

Ed. 501 Educational Psychology 3 

Ed. 508 Advanced Foundations of Education 3 

Ed. 511 Computer Literacy for Educators 3 

Ed. 512 General Methods and Planning 3 

Ed. 515 Secondary Classroom Management and Discipline 3 

Ed. 516 Field Experience 1 1 

Ed. 517 Field Experience II 1 

Ed. 518 Field Experience III 1 

Ed. 545 Reading/Language Arts in the Content Areas 3 

Ed. 560 Subject Methods 3 

Ed. 581 Planning in the Secondary Teaching Internship 2 variable 

Ed. 582 Instruction in the Secondary Teaching Internship 2 variable 

Ed. 583 Management in the Secondary Teaching Internship 2 variable 

Ed. 584 Professional Growth in the Secondary Teaching Internship 3 variable 

30 



The number of credits required in die Teaching hiternsliip may be adjusted based on 
years of previous teaching experience. 

Note: Additional credits in the subject area may be required depending on the stu- 
dent's previous course work and how this relates to the program in which the student 
wishes to obtain certification. 

Additional Certifications and Self-Improvement 

Students who already possess secondary teaching certification may pursue addi- 
tional certifications. Courses required for the additional certifications will depend on 
the area(s) in which certification is sought and on previous course work. The student 
should consult the Director of the Secondary Education program regarding specific 
requirements. 

Students may also take graduate courses for self-improvement, without reference 
to either a degree program or a certification program. 




31 



Elementary Education 

Dr. Da\'id A. Wiley, Chair 
717-941-4032 • daw315@tiger.Liofs.edu 

The Elementary Education program offers a number of options for students. 
The person who already holds an elementary education certificate may choose a mas- 
ter's degree in elementary education with a curriculum and instruction option, a psy- 
cholojjy option, or a jjeneral studies option, the selection depending on the student's 
interests. International students may be permitted to complete a master's degree 
without certification as long as teaching standards required by their home country 
have been satisfied. 

The person who does not already possess a secondary education certificate may 
not be awarded a master's degree prior to completing certification requirements. 
Certification requirements may be pursued separately or at the same time as a mas- 
ter's degree in secondary education with a general studies option only. 

The Foundation and Research course requirements (9 credits) are the same for all 
options. All students must take Ed. 502 Educational Research and must take six (6) cred- 
its of additional Foundation courses by choosing from Ed. 501, Ed. 503, and Ed. 508. 

Research Course Requirement (3 credits) 

Ed. 502 Educational Research 3 

Foundation Course Requirement (6 credits) 

Ed. 501 Educational Psychology' 3 

Ed. 503 Educational Tests and Measurement 3 

Ed. 508 Advanced Foundations of Education 3 

The various options have the following requirements in addition to the Research 
and Foundation course requirements. 

Curriculum and Instruction Option 

Ed. 509 Improving Instruction 3 

Ed. 510 Curriculum Theory and Development 3 

Ed. 564 Teaching Elementary Language Arts 3 

Ed. 567 Teaching Elementary Social Studies 3 

Ed. 571 Teaching Elementary Mathematics 3 

Ed. 574 Teaching Elementary Science 3 

Electives 9 

Decree Requirements: Thirt)'-six (36) credits and a comprehensive examination are 
required for the Master of Science in Elementary Education with the Curriculum and 
Instruction Option. 

Psychology Option 

Ed. 514 Group Processes in the Classroom 3 

Ed. 562 Teaching the Gifted Child 3 

Ed. 568 Education of the Exceptional Child 3 



32 



COUN508 Developmental Psychology 3 

COUN 531 Psychology of Adjustment 3 

Electives 12 

Degree Requirements: Thirt\'-six (36) credits and a comprehensive examination are re- 
quired for the Master of Science in Elementary Education v\'ith the Psychology^ Option. 

General Studies Option 

Electives 27 

De£iree Requirements: Thirty-six (36) credits and a comprehensive examination are 
required for the Master of Science in Elementary Education with the General Studies 
Option. This option requires prior approval by the mentor in consultation with the 
Chair of the Department of Education of a sequence of studies directed toward a 
professionalh' identified goal. 

Teacher Certification Requirements: Completion of the following courses, if not pre- 
viously transcripted or documented as being completed to the department's satisfac- 
tion, shall constitute the requirements for certification: 

Ed. 501 Educational Psychology' 3 

Ed. 503 Educational Tests and Measurement 3 

Ed. 508 Advanced Foundations of Education 3 

Ed. 511 Computer Literacy for Educators 3 

Ed. 513 Elementary Classroom Management and Discipline 3 

Ed. 516 Field Experience 1 1 

Ed. 517 Field Experience II 1 

Eci. 518 Field Experience III 1 

Ed. 541 Foundations of Reading/Language Arts 3 

Ed. 545 Reading/Language Arts in the Content Areas 3 

Ed. 564 Teaching Elementary Language Arts 3 

Ed. 567 Teaching Elementary Social Studies 3 

Ed. 568 Education of the Exceptional Child 3 

Ed. 571 Teaching Elementary Mathematics 3 

Ed. 574 Teaching Elementary Science 3 

Ed. 586 Planning in the Elementary Teaching Internship 2 variable 

Ed. 587 Instruction in the Elementary Teaching Internship 2 variable 

Ed. 588 Management in the Elementary Teaching Internship 2 variable 

Ed. 589 Professional Growth in the Elementary Teaching Internship 3 variable 

Total Credits 42-48 

The number of credits required in the Teaching Internship may be adjusted based 
on years of previous teaching experience. 



33 



Administration 
(Elementary and Secondary) 

Dr. Robert M. Weir, Jr., Director 
717-941-6142 

The Elementary and Secondary Administration programs are designed to pre- 
pare principals. In addition to the Graduate School's requirements, the following are 
requirements for admission to the Administration programs: 

1. Recommendations from three persons capable of evaluating the candidate's 
personal qualities as well as academic potential. 

2. A written self-estimate of the candidate's qualifications for the position of 
principal. 

3 . A personal interview. 

The Master's Decree 

The student will be recommended for a Master of Science degree in either 
Elementary School Administration or Secondary School Administration after satisfac- 
tory completion of required courses as approved by the mentor, the comprehensive 
examination in School Administration, and an approved scholarly paper or a profes- 
sional project sixty days before graduation. With the mentor's permission, the stu- 
dent may substitute a prescribed three-credit course for the scholarly paper or profes- 
sional project. 

Normally thirty-six (36) credits are required for the Master of Science degree 
and forty-eight (48) credits for the Master of Science and certification as an 
Elementary School Principal or a Secondary School Principal. 

Courses are prescribed from the following list; other courses, including electives, 
may be substituted in consultation with the mentor. 




Robert M. Weir, Jr., Assistant Professor of Education and Director of the School Administration programs. 

34 



Course 



*Ed. 


521 


*Ed. 


522 


Ed. 


523 


Ed. 


524 


**Ed. 


525 


Ed. 


526 


Ed. 


527 


***Ed. 


528 


**Ed. 


529 


Ed. 


530 


Ed. 


531 


*Ed. 


532 


*Ed. 


533 


Ed. 


534 


*Ed. 


535 


Ed. 


536 


Ed. 


509 


*Ed. 


510 


Ed. 


541 


Ed. 


545 


COUN 503 


COUN 508 


COUN 531 


COUN 567 



Ed. 508 



Ed. 502 



Administrative Sequence: Credits 

Educational Administration 3 

Problems in School Administration and Supervision 3-6 

Public Relations for Educators 3 

Personnel Management for Educators 3 

School Finance 3 

School Plant Management 3 

School and Community' Relations 3 

Practicum in School Administration 3-6 

School Law 3 

Seminar in Advanced School Law 3 

Educational Management 3 

The Elementary School Principal as Administrator 3 

The Secondary School Principal as Administrator 3 

Administration & Organization of the Middle School 3 

Principles and Practices of Supervision 3 

Practicum in Supervision 3 

Curriculum and Instruction Sequence: 

Improving Instruction 3 

Curriculum Theory and Development 3 

Foundations of Reading 3 

Reading/Language Arts in the Content Areas 3 

Psychological and Behavioral Sequence (any one) *: 

Group Process and Practice 3 

Developmental Psychology 3 

Psychology of Adjustment 3 

Health and Behavior 3 

Philosophical and Sociological Sequence *: 

Advanced Foundations of Education 3 

Research Sequence*: 

Educational Research 3 



Normally required for degree and certification. 

Normally required for certification only. 

One semester of Ed. 528 is required for degree; a second semester 

of Ed. 528 is normally required for certification. 

Note: In certain circumstances, Ed. 530 may be substituted 

for Ed. 529 and Ed. 522 may be substituted for another 
course. 



35 



Reading Education 

Dr. Robert Jeffrey Cantrell, Director 
717-941-6282 • cantrellrl@tiger.uofs.edu 

The primary purpose of the reading program is to prepare indi\iduals to function 
as reading specialists in the schools. Individuals who successfully complete the read- 
ing program will ordinarily qualify for the Pennsylvania reading specialist instruction- 
al certificate, which is a K-12 certificate. An ancillary purpose is to prepare individu- 
als to teach de\'elopmental literacy on the higher education level, particularly in 
junior/communit)' colleges. 

Master's Degree and Reading Certificate for Certified Individuals 

Individuals who already hold a valid teaching certificate and want to acquire a read- 
ing specialist certificate and a Master of Science degree must complete the following: 

Research Course Requirement (3 credits) Credits 
Ed. 502 Educational Research 3 

Foundation Course Requirement (6 credits) 

Ed. 501 Educational Psycholog)^ 3 

Ed. 503 Educational Tests and Measurement 3 

Ed. 508 Advanced Foundations of Education 3 

Reading Courses (21 credits) 

Ed. 541 Foundations of Reading/Language Arts* 3 

Ed. 542 Reading: Psycholinguistic Bases 3 

Ed. 543 Diagnosis of Reading Disabilities 3 

Ed. 545 Reading/Language Arts in the Content Areas* 3 

Ed. 546 Organizing and Operating Reading Programs 3 

Ed. 549 Reading Practicum 3 

Ed. 563 Children's and Adolescent Literature 3 

Electives 0-6 

(The Director of the Reading Program may permit appropriate substitutions oHtzxrcd (*) cours- 
es if the candidate completed successfiilly similar courses on the undergraduate level within the 
last six years.) 

Degree Requirements: Thirt}' (30) credits, an approved scholarly paper or profes- 
sional contribution and a comprehensive examination. Individuals may choose six 
(6) additional credits in approved electives in Ueu of the scholarly paper or profes- 
sional contribution. Candidates for the reading specialist certificate in Pennsylvania 
must also pass the Reading SpeciaUst Test of the Praxis Series. 

Reading Certification Only for Certified Individuals 
Individuals who already hold a valid teaching certificate and want to acquire a 
reading specialist certificate, but not a master's degree must complete the twenty-one 
(21) credits in reading courses listed above and pass the Reading SpeciaUst Test of 
the Praxis Series. 



36 



Master's Decree and Reading Certificate for Non-Certified Individuals 

Non-certificated indi\'iduals with a bachelor's degree who want to acquire both a 
reading speciahst certificate and a Master of Science degree must complete Ed. 501, 
Ed. 502, Ed. 503, and Ed. 508 and the twent)'-one (21) credits in reading plus the 
fifteen (15) credits listed below: 

Credits 

Ed. 513 (or 515) Elementary (or Secondary) Classroom 

Management and Discipline 3 

Ed. 516 Field Experience 1 1 

Ed. 517 Field Experience 11 1 

Ed. 518 Field Experience III 1 

Ed. 581 (or 586) Planning in the Secondary (or Elementary) 

Teaching Internship 2 

Ed. 582 (or 587) Instruction in the Secondary (or Elementary) 

Teaching Internship 2 

Ed. 583 (or 588) Managing Classrooms in the Secondary 

(or Elementary) Teaching Internship 2 

Ed. 584 (or 589) Professional Development in the 

Secondary (or Elementary) Teaching Internship 3 

Decree Requirements: Forty-eight (48) credits, an approved scholarly paper or pro- 
fessional contribution and a comprehensive examination. Individuals may choose six 
(6) additional credits in approved electives in lieu of the scholarly paper or profes- 
sional contribution. 

Reading Certification Only for Non-Certified Individuals 

Non-certificated individuals with a bachelor's degree, who want a reading spe- 
cialist certificate only, must complete fort)'-five (45) of the fort)'-eight (48) credits 
listed above and on the preceding page, and they must pass a competency test. (Ed. 
502, Educational Research, is not required for certification only.) 

Developmental Literacy Option 

Individuals may pursue a Master of Science degree under the developmental lit- 
eracy option - which does NOT lead to certification as a reading specialist - by com- 
pleting the nine (9) credits in foundation courses plus the courses listed below: 

Credits 

Engl 505 Modern Grammar in the English Curriculum 3 

Engl 506 Composition in the English Curriculum 3 

Ed. 543 Diagnosis of Reading Disabilities 3 

Ed. 545 Reading/Language Arts in the Content Areas 3 

Ed. 548 Teaching of Study Skills 3 

Ed. 549 Reading Practicum 3 

Electives 3-9 

Degree Requirements: Thirt\' (30) credits, an approved scholarly paper or professional 
contribution and a comprehensive examination. Indix'iduals may choose six (6) additional 
credits in approved electives in lieu of the scholarly paper or professional contribution. 

Reading Supervisor 

The Universit}' offers an approved program for becoming certified as a Reading 
Supervisor in Pennsylvania. Please see the program description in the Supervision 
section of this catalog. 37 



Supervision 

Dr. Robert M. Weir, Jr., Director 
717-941-6142 

The Super\'ision program prepares elementary and secondary school subject 
supervisors in the following areas: 

School Guidance Services Foreign Languages 

Reading Mathematics 

Science Social Studies 

Communication (English) 

Admission Requirements 

The candidate must meet the following requirements for acceptance into the 
Supervision program: 

1. Possess adequate competency in the subject to be supervised. The appli- 
cation will be screened by the program faculty' in the area for which the supervisory 
certificate is to be awarded. 

2. Possess a valid teacher's certificate in area of concentration. 

3. Complete an application for the Graduate School and meet the Graduate 
School admission standards. 

Course Requirements 

A student is required to complete a minimum of 24 credits to satisfy the compe- 
tency requirements for supervisory certification and be recommended by the 
University' to the State Department of Education for certification as a supervisor. A 
suitable program, taken from the following courses and courses in the appropriate 
discipline, \\'ill be developed by the mentor in consultation with the student. The 
program must also be approx'ed by the Universit\'''s Certifying Officer. A competency 
needs anafysis will be made to assist in developing a program of studies. 

Courses Credits 

Ed. 502 Educational Research 3 

Ed. 509 Improving Instruction 3 

Ed. 510 Curriculum Theory and Development 3 

Ed. 522 Problems in School Administration and Supervision 3 

Ed. 529 School Law '. 3 

Ed. 535 Principles and Practices of Supervision 3 

Ed. 536 Practicum in Supervision 3 

COUN 503 Group Process and Practice 3 

COUN 508 Developmental Psycholog)' 3 



38 



Assistant Superintendent/ Superintendent 
Letter of Eligibility 

Dr. Robert M. Weir, Jr., Director 
717-941-6142 

The superintendent of a school district is the chief educational leader of a 
dynamic educational organization. In his/her roles there are specific functions which 
must be performed. Each person brings his/her own unique personality to these 
roles. Much of the skills and knowledge necessary to function are similar from set- 
ting to setting while others are site-specific. The objective of this program is to pro- 
vide both general and unique competencies. 

The superintendent is the chief executive officer of a school district. He/she 
must serve as the educational leader of the communit)' and as the manager of the 
human and fiscal resources of the school district. As managers, superintendents make 
accomplishments by cooperating with staff, board, and community'. Therefore, the 
traditional sldlls of management must be coupled with human relations skills and sen- 
sitivity to socio-economic forces within the community. Superintendents must have 
technical, human, and conceptual ability. 

This program is designed to develop superintendents and assistant superinten- 
dents competent to plan, to monitor, and to evaluate activities addressing many roles. 
Leaders must delegate. Therefore, the goal is not that program participants be 
experts in all areas but rather that they be competent enough to provide leadership 
and to accept accountability for all activities. Courses and experiences emphasize that 
education is a human process requiring group support and involvement if successful 
administration is to occur. 

Admission Requirements 

The candidate must meet the following requirements for acceptance into the 
program: 

1 . Possess a Master's Degree with a GPA of 3.50. 

2. Have three years professional experience as a school 
administrator/supervisor. 

3. Submit a resume, including educational background, \\'ork experiences, 
references, and any additional pertinent material. 

4. Submit official transcripts of all academic work beyond high school. 

5. Submit three letters of recommendation from employers or others 
known on a professional basis. 

6. Hold or be eligible for a Pennsylvania elementary/secondary principal or 
supervisor certificate at the point of application for initial Superintendent's Letter of 
Eligibility'. 

7. Submit a statement of purpose for enrolling. 



39 



Program Requirements 

It is expected that applicants have certain specific courses in their educational 
background. To ascertain what courses may be required in addition to the course 
requirements for the superintendent sequence, please see the program director. 

The course sequence specific to the preparation of superintendents and assistant 
superintendents represents 24 credits, six of which are the Superintendent''s Role 
Seminar and Internship. These experiences place students into an educational setting 
under the immediate supervision of a practicing superintendent. A contracted pro- 
gram of role-related experience will be developed which considers the needs of the 
candidate. Candidates will function in para- administrative capacities during this year- 
long sequence of field-related clinical experiences. 

The course requirements for the superintendent's sequence are 
as follows: 

Credits 

Ed. 524 Personnel Management for Educators 3 

Ed. 526 School Plant Management 3 

Ed. 527 School and Community' Relations 3 

Ed. 530 Seminar in Advanced School Law 3 

Ed. 535 Special Education 3 

Ed. 537 Seminar in Advanced School Finance 3 

Ed. 538 Internship and Seminar 6 




David A. Wiley, Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Education. 



40 



Course Descriptions 

General Courses 



Credits 



Ed. 501. Educational Psycholopiy 3 

(Prerequisite, teaching experience or consent of instructor) A study of psychological principles 
related to education, including learning, motivation, evaluation, with emphasis on practical 
application in the classroom setting. 

Ed. 502. Educational Research 3 

A course designed to introduce students to scientific research. Covered will be basic statistical 
techniques, such as correlation, r-test, and Chi-square; quantitative research designs; ethno- 
graphic research; and meta-analysis. Emphasis will be placed on hypothesis-testing. Students 
will be required to complete a scientific research project. 

Ed. 503. Educational Tests and Measurement 3 

Fundamental concepts applicable to educational testing, including validity, reliability, types of 
scores. Uses of standardized tests, especially achievement tests, in school settings. Methods of 
dexeloping classroom tests. 

Ed. 508. Advanced Foimdations of Education 3 

This course is intended to present the foundations of education in an integrated, multidiscipli- 
nary approach. It will trace the development of education both as an institution and in terms 
of the ideas that have shaped that institution. The goal is a thorough perspective of education 
as it is today. 

Ed. 509. Improving Instruction 3 

Students will study a wide spectrum of techniques and strategies to improve classroom instruc- 
tion and enhance learning. Emphasis will be on practical classroom applications. 

Ed. 510. Curriculum Theory and Development 3 

Principles of curriculum construction which underlie the reorganization of the program of 
studies for elementary and secondary schools, sources of the curriculum, methods of organiza- 
tion, structure of knowledge, and curriculum planning and development. 

Ed. 511. Computer Literacy for Educators 3 

This course for educators is designed to meet the following goals ( 1 ) knowledge of how com- 
puters operate; (2) develop abilit)' to use the computer; (3) become aware of some of the 
applications of computers; (4) to understand the social implications of computers and comput- 
ing; and (5) to understand the rudiments of the LOGO computing language, a language com- 
monly available for microcomputers which promotes structured programming characterized by 
top-down design with stepwise refinement through modularization. 

Ed. 512. General Methods and Planning 3 

Methodology' for setting direction in the classroom, creating a learning situation, de\eloping 
the content, reinforcing and evaluation will be covered. Students w ill be in\-ol\ed w ith de\el- 
oping plans for teaching. 

Ed. 513. Elementary Classroom Management and Discipline 3 

(Prerequisites, Ed. 564, 567, 571, 574 and 518. Co-requisites, Ed. 586, 587, 588 and 589) 
An in-depth study of the rationale, theories and techniques for creating an elementary school 
classroom emironment where learning can take place and for handling specific individual and 
group behavior problems in producti\'e ways. 



41 



Ed. 514. Group Processes in Classrooms 3 

A study of group processes as they impact on the management and instruction of classrooms. 
It will be presented in both its theoretical and practical dimensions. 

Ed. 515. Secondary Classroom Management and Discipline 3 

(Prerequisites, Ed. 512, 560 and 518. Co-requisites Ed. 581, 582, 583 and 584) An in-depth 
study of the rationale, theories and techniques for creating a secondary school classroom envi- 
ronment where learning can take place and for handling specific individual and group behavior 
problems in producti\'e ways. 

Ed. 516. Field Experience I 1 

(Co- or prerequisites, Ed. 508 or permission of instructor) Competency in making informed 
and structured observation of teaching st)'les, techniques and environments will be developed 
through \'ideotaped and written case studies. 

Ed. 517. Field Experience II 1 

(Prerequisite, Ed. 516 and co- or prerequisite, Ed. 501 or permission of instructor. Requires 
application to adxisor and approxal by program director during ad\'ance registration) Course 
stresses exposure to basic education environments by assigning projects to be carried out in 
basic education schools and other agencies. Assignments will be completed through observa- 
tion, tutoring and oral/written reports. 

Ed . 518. Field Experien ce III I 

(Prerequisite, Ed. 517 and co- or prerequisite, Ed. 512 or permission of instructor. Requires 
application to advisor and approval by program director during advance registration) Course 
stresses exposure to the world of the teacher by involving the student in activities in basic educa- 
tion. Activities will be completed under the guidance of an assigned teacher in a basic education 
school setting. Secondary settings are in the Fall semesters, and elementary are in the Spring 
semesters. 

Adm inistvation 

Ed. 521. Educational Administration 3 

A foundations course in general school administration, in\'ol\ing philosophical bases, organiza- 
tion in a democratic society, administration of instruction and personnel. Required of all stu- 
dents beginning a major in educational administration and a prerequisite for other courses in 
educational administration. 

Ed. 522. Problems in School Administration and Supervision 3-6 

(Prerequisite, Ed. 521) A seminar for the student seeking certification in elementary or sec- 
ondary school administration or in supervision. Emphasis is upon in-depth examination of a 
selected problem or issue in administration or supervision. Admission with approval of the 
instructor. 

Ed. 523. Public Relations for Educators 3 

An introduction to school public relations. Emphasis is focused upon establishing contact 
between schools and the general public through the use of mass media. 

Ed. 524. Personnel Management for Educators 3 

This course will focus on hiring techniques, job analysis and job evaluation procedures that 
comply with district, state and federal regulations. The collective bargaining process and the 
interpretation and implementation of an employee collective bargaining agreement will be 
studied. Evaluation research within applied settings will be examined. Specific topics include 
both qualitative and quantitative methods in program evaluation, needs assessment, data inter- 
pretation and utilization strategies. 



42 



Ed. 525. School Finance 3 

An introduction to public school tlnancc. Emphasis is focused upon the responsibilities in 
handling student funds, district budgeting and accounting, and modern planning-program- 
ming-budgetary systems. Admission with consent of instructor. 

Ed. 526. School Plant Management 3 

This competency- based course will familiarize the student with the program and planning 
activities used to determine short and long range programs, including facility' and financial 
needs. Ongoing maintenance activities to protect the district's capital investment and ensure 
its efficient operation will also be studied. The development, coordination, and implementa- 
tion of policies and programs will be emphasized in relation to finance and resource manage- 
ment. 

Ed. 527. School and Community Relations 3 

This course will review the history and philosophy of education in America and the ideas which 
fostered growth and change. Students will examine the relationship of the school to the com- 
munit\'. Emphasis will be placed on the school communit}' concept, community' analysis, com- 
munity characteristics affecting quality', education and public participation in educational plan- 
ning and district evaluation. The roles of group dynamics and conflict resolution are part of 
this course. 

Ed. 528. Practicum in School Administration 3-6 

(Prerequisite, Ed. 532 or Ed. 533 as applicable) The purpose of this course is to give the stu- 
dent practical experience in administrative work. A minimum of 150 clock hours in one 
semester must be spent on this work. Work is done under supervision in a local school system 
according to a definite schedule approved by the instructor and the administrator of the school 
system involved. Admission by special arrangement. (Normally offered Fall and Spring semes- 
ters only. ) 

Ed. 529. School Law 3 

A study of common law legislative enactments and directives of the Department of Education 
as they pertain to school systems. 

Ed. 530. Seminar in Advanced School Law 3 

This course will include an analysis of selected general legal principles, laws, and lav\'-making 
agencies that affect leaders and educational institutions. The legislative process will be analyzed 
with regard to governmental decision making and the legalities of lobbying. 

Ed. 531. Educational Management 3 

An overview of functions and problems in three major areas of responsibility: finance, law, and 
personnel. 

Ed. 532. The Elementary School Principal as Administrator 3 

(Prerequisite, Ed. 521) A technical course emphasizing the administrative duties and responsi- 
bilities of the elementary school principal. Attention is focused on types of organization, pro- 
gram of studies, pupil personnel, teaching staff, plant and equipment, and community relation- 
ships. 

Ed. 533. The Secondary School Principal as Administrator 3 

(Prerequisite, Ed. 521) A technical course emphasizing the administrative duties and responsi- 
bilities of the secondary school principal. Attention is focused on problems of organization, 
program of studies, pupil personnel, teaching staff, plant and equipment, and community rela- 
tionships. 



43 



Ed. 534. Administration and Orjjnnization of the Middle School 3 

(Prerequisite, Ed. 521) A technical course emphasizing tiie organizational and administrative 
duties and responsibilities of the middle school principal. Attention is focused on the problems 
of organization, program of studies, pupil personnel, teaching staff, plant and equipment, and 
community' relationships. 

Ed. 535. Principles & Practices of Supervision 3 

A description of a philosophy of supervision, principles of supervision, the role of the supervi- 
sor, planning a supervisory program, techniques of supervision, evaluation, coordinating the 
instructional program, and trends in supervision. 

Ed. 536. Practicum in Supervision 3 

(Prerequisites, Ed. 509 and Ed. 535) The purpose of this course is to give the student practical 
experience in supervision. A minimum of 150 clock hours in one semester must be spent on 
this assignment. This is accomplished under the super\ision of a certified supervisor, accord- 
ing to a definite schedule mutually approved by the instructor and cooperating supervisor. 

Ed. 537. Seminar in Advanced School Finance 3 

Students in this course will become knowledgeable about state fiscal law and will learn to dis- 
tinguish among the various revenue sources and district budgeting. Business office fianctions 
including bid law, purchasing, and building fund management will be studied. 

Ed. 538. Superintendent's Role Seminar and Internship 6 

This course will utilize uni\ersit\' facult\' and practicing administrators to analyze topics rele- 
\ant to the role of the superintendent, including but not limited to school board relationships, 
the legislative process, lobbying communit)' relations, program accountabilit)', ethics, and other 
role-specific concerns. In addition, practicing administrators, facult}', and interns will share 
internship problems, experience, concerns, and practices. 

Readin£i 

Ed. 541. Foundations of Readinjj/Lanjfiiafiie Arts 3 

A course designed to provide an introduction to reading/language arts instruction and pro- 
grams. Consideration will be given to literary instruction relevant to both skills-based pro- 
grams and whole-language programs. 

Ed. 542. Readin£i: Psycholin£iuistic Bases 3 

(Prerequisite, Ed. 541 or consent of instructor) A course designed to familiarize students with 
psycholinguistic underpinnings of reaciing. Language acquisition and dialect variation, along 
with their effect on learning to read, are co\ered. Strategies to make students proficient in 
graphophonemic, syntactic, and semantic sources of information are given prominence. 

Ed. 543. Diajfnosis of Readinjj Disabilities 3 

(Prerequisite, Ed. 542 or consent of instructor) A course designed to assist the student in 
becoming proficient in diagnostic skills. Standardized tests and informal assessment instru- 
ments will be examined and administered. The course has a practicum aspect in that the stu- 
dent will be required to diagnose de\elopmental and disabled readers at the elementary and 
secondary level. Reports detailing the findings and recommendations for o\'ercoming the 
problems will be written. 

Ed. 545. Readin£r/Lan£[ua^e Arts in the Content Areas 3 

A course designed for acquainting students with strategies for teaching functional reading in 
the elementary and secondary schools. Covered will be reading, writing, and discussing strate- 
gies that facilitate elementary and secondary students' ability to reconstruct meaning from 
content-area materials. 

44 



Ed. 546. Orjjnnizinjj and Opemtinff Readinjj Pi'ojjrams 3 

A course dealing with the responsibilities for setting up and directing a school reading pro- 
gram. Attention will be given to aspects of programs and approaches to reading instruction at 
various grade levels. Program evaluation, staff development, and societal problems that affect 
reading de\'elopment will be discussed. 

Ed. 548. Teaching of Study Skills 3 

A course designed to apprise the student of strategies effective in de\'eloping desirable study habits 
essential for learning. Consideration will be given to receptive, retlecti\'e, and expressive skills. 

Ed. 549. Reading Practicum 3 

(Prerequisite, Ed. 543 or consent of instructor) A practicum designed to provide supervised 
tutorial experiences. The student will diagnose a disabled elementary school reader and a dis- 
abled secondary school reader and provide tutorial instruction designed to ameliorate the dis- 
abled readers' problems. For each disabled reader tutored, the student will write a report con- 
taining the results of the diagnosis, remediation, progress, and recommendations. 

Ed. 550. Seminar in Readin£i Research 3 

A course designed to enable students pursuing the supervisory certificate in reading to exam- 
ine the recent research in reading education. Emphasis will be placed on studies that have a 
direct impact on reading instruction. Students will be required to complete a scientific research 
study in reading. 

Mathematics 

Ed. 554. Modern Algebra for Teachers 3 

A treatment of groups, rings, etc. culminating in the negative result, Abel's Theorem, that 
there can be no formula for solving polynomial equations of degree greater than four. 
Whenever possible, the material shall be related to the various subsets of the real number sys- 
tem covered in the secondary schools. 

Ed. 555. Linear Al£iebra and Theory of Equations 3 

A study of second, third and fourth degree equations and systems of equations. Along with the 
methods of solution, an attempt will be made to provide the teacher with a backlog of applica- 
tions for each type in the form of word problems. 

Ed. 556. Introductory Analysis 3 

An in-depth study of the concepts and principles of calculus that are generally encountered in a 
secondary school analysis course. Emphasis will be placed on the development of the concepts 
of limit, derivative and integral and the various techniques a teacher might utilize in presenting 
them to a secondary school class. The student need not presently possess facility with calculus 
as this will develop during the course. 

Ed. 557. Geometry 3 

A study of Euclidean geometry including a discussion of methods and materials that teachers 
may employ in order to generate interest and enhance presentations. Wherever possible, rele- 
vant practical applications will be provided. A discussion of certain transformations will also be 
included. 

Ed. 558. Probability and Statistics 3 

An axiomatic approach to probability' covering the basic rules, independence and conditional 
probabilit\', probabilit)' fiinctions, normal curve and hypothesis testing. 

Ed. 559. Introduction to Computin£[ 3 

A discussion of various secondary-school problem -solving techniques that involves the use of 
computers. 

45 



specific Subject Matter Methods and Miscellaneous Topics 

Ed. 560. Subject Methods 3 

Utilizing knowledge of planning and teaching generally, students will be guided in the analysis 
of specific content and techniques for teaching that content. They will demonstrate their abili- 
ty to carry out plans in "micro" teaching experiences. Offered for various content areas. 

Ed. 561. Creathnty in the Classroom 3 

This course is the study of the dynamics of creativit}' as it affects the classroom performance of 
students. Special attention will be given to teaching creativit}' as a skill or process, methodolo- 
gies for teaching creati\'e problem sohing, developing a classroom climate conducive to the 
creative process and programs which utilize creative problem solving. 

Ed. 562. Teaching the Gifted Child 3 

Teachers will have an opportunity to study the broad range of giftedness in children. Emphasis 
will be on how to foster the development of gifted youngsters in our schools. Programming 
for the gifted will be studied also. 

Ed. 563. Children's and Adolescent Literature 3 

A course designed to acquaint students with literature written for children and adolescents. 
Children and adolescents' literary needs and interests will be emphasized. 

Ed. 564. Teaching! Elementary Language Arts 3 

Focus is on the place of the language arts in the total elementary school curriculum. Topics 
included are integration of reading, writing, speaking and listening; correlation of these four 
areas of the language arts with the content subjects; and a consideration of innovatix'e spelling 
and handwriting programs. 

Ed. 565. Inclusionary Classroom Practices 3 

Students will receive guidance in supporting the disabled student in a general education class- 
room, and in supporting the special education teacher and ancillary staff in providing instruc- 
tion for the disabled child. We will explore methods for tacilitating the acceptance and learning 
of the disabled student in the context of a general education environment. 

Ed. 567. Teaching Elementary Social Studies 3 

Students will stud\' selected topics, problems, and recent developments in the elementary/ 
social studies curriculum and instruction. 

Ed. 568. Education of the Exceptional Child 3 

A general view of the field; historical background - bodi philosophical and legislative, with special 
emphasis upon PL 94-142. Physical, mental and emotional handicaps will be reviewed in some 
detail. Special concerns of gifted children will also be presented. Pre\'entative and remedial pro- 
grams and practices will be emphasized. 

Ed. 569. Workshop in Education 3 

Students will have the opportunit)' to develop and test innovative curriculum materials and strate- 
gies with special emphasis on models for individualizing instruction. 

Ed. 571 . Teaching Elementary Mathematics 3 

This course is designed to provide the elementary education major with planning and instruc- 
tional strategies appropriate for use in the science and mathematics areas of the elementary cur- 
riculum. An analysis of content will be made in light of the needs of the elementary school, 
the elementary student and societ>^ 



46 



Ed. 572. The Secondary School MatPjematics Curriculum 3 

(Co- or prerequisites, Ed. 512) This course examines the strategies and content of the mathe- 
matics curricula of the secondary school and attempts to compare them to major contemporary 
reform efforts. The course includes a review of secondary (Junior and Senior High School) 
mathemancs. 

Ed. 574. Tenchinjj Elementary Science 3 

Modern science curricula in elementary education. Consideration will be gi\en to scientific 
processes, organization, planning, methods, materials and e\aluation. 

Ed. 575. Elementary S-T-S Methods 3 

(Elementary science teaching experience or approval of instructor) This course will acquaint 
in-service teachers with the basic tenets of the field of science-technology-society and how it 
may pertain to elementary science education. By examining methods of introducing S-T-S 
issues and topics into the elementary school curriculum, students will be able to construct and 
implement S-T-S units for their own use. 

Ed. 576. Secondary S-T-S Methods 3 

(Secondary science teaching experience or approval of instructor) This course will acquaint in- 
service teachers with the basic tenets of the field of science-technology-society and how it may 
pertain to secondary science education. Bv examining methods of introducing S-T-S issues 
and topics into the secondary school curriculum, students will be able to construct and imple- 
ment S-T-S units for their own use. 

Internship and Research 

Ed. 581. Planninjj in the Secondary Teachin/j Internship Variable to 2 

(Prerequisites, Ed. 512, 516 and 517) Competency will be developed in unit and lesson plan- 
ning during actual teaching practice in a secondary school. Supervision and e\'aluation will be 
with appropriate school mentors and University facult)'. 

Ed. 582. Instruction in the Secondary Teaching Internship Variable to 2 

(Co-requisite, Ed. 581 ) Competency will be developed in the delivery of effective instruction 
utilizing appropriate methodologies at appropriate levels during actual teaching practice in a 
secondary school. Super\'ision and evaluation will be with appropriate school mentors and 
Universit)' facult}'. 

Ed. 583. Mana£[injj Classrooms in the Secondary 

Teaching Internship Variable to 2 

(Co-requisite, Ed. 582) Competency will be de\'eloped in classroom management including rou- 
tine paperwork, maintaining a positive atmosphere and utilizing appropriate discipline methods 
during actual teaching practice in a secondary school. Super\'ision and exaluation will be with 
appropriate school mentors and Uni\'ersit\' tacult\'. 

Ed. 584. Professional Development in the Secondary 

Teachin£[ Internship Variable to 3 

(Co-requisite, Ed. 582) Positive professional development will be documented during actual 
teaching practice in a secondary school through periodic evaluation and observation by 
assigned school mentors and University' facult\', participating in seminars, appropriate reaction 
to suggestions and criticism, and fulfilling general responsibilities as outlined in the Student 
Teaching Handbook. 

Ed. 586. Planning in the Elementary Teaching Internship Variable to 2 

(Prerequisites, Ed. 512, 516 and 517) Competency will be developed in unit and lesson plan- 
ning during actual teaching practice in an elementary school. Supervision and evaluation will 
be with appropriate school mentors and University facult}'. 

47 



Ed. 587. Instruction in the Elementary Tcaclmijj Internship Variable to 2 

(Co-requisite, Ed. 586) Competency will be developed in the delivery of effective instruction 
utilizing appropriate methodologies at appropriate levels during actual teaching practice in an 
elementarv school. Supervision and exaluation will be with appropriate school mentors and 
Uni\'ersity tacult}'. 

Ed. 588. Mana£iin^ Classrooms in the Elementary 

Teaching Internship Variable to 2 

(Co-requisite, Ed. 587) Competency will be developed in classroom management incltiding rou- 
tine paperwork, maintaining a positi\'e atmosphere and utilizing appropriate discipline methods dur- 
ing acuial teaching practice in an elementary school. Super\'ision and e\aluation will be with appro- 
priate school mentors and Uni\'ersit\' faculty. 

Ed. 589. Professional Development in the Elementary 

Teachinjj Internship Variable to 3 

(Co-requisite, Ed. 587) Positive professional development will be documented during actual 
teaching practice in an elementar\' school through periodic evaluation and observation by 
assigned school mentors and Universit)' facult\', participaring in seminars, appropriate reaction 
to suggestions and criticism, and fulfilling general responsibilities as outlined in the Student 
Teaching Handbook. 

Ed. 590. Research Seminar Variable to 3 

Designed for students who are working on their M.A. thesis. Registration is only with permis- 
sion of the student's advisor and the Department Chair. 

Ed. 592. Directed Study Variable to 6 

This course is designed for students working in independent study on special projects and 
w^orkshops. Registration in this course requires permission of the student's mentor, and the 
Department Chair. 




Health Administration and Human Resources 

Dr. Marie A. George, SPHR, Chair, Health Administration/Human Resources 

717-941-4350 • georgeml@uofs.edu 

http://academic.uofs.edu/department/HAHR/ 

Department faculty: Associate Professor - Daniel J. Myf; /r.; Assistant 
Professors - Shani D. Carter, Marie A. George, Alice O'Neill, Peter C. Olden, 
Tony Sinay; Instructor - William G. Wallick. 

The Department offers coursework leading to a Master of Health Administration 
(MHA) and a Master of Science degree in Human Resources Administration (HRA). 
The following policies and procedures apply to all these curricula. Specific curricular 
requirements are listed under the respective programs. 

Admission Requirements 

The applicant for admission to any Departmental program must possess a bache- 
lor's degree from an accredited college or university' and provide the Graduate School 
with evidence of satisfactory undergraduate preparation. The ordinary standard for 
admission is an undergraduate GPA of at least 2.75 on a grading scale of 4.00. 
Students falling below this level may submit other evidence of their abilit}' to com- 
plete successfully a graduate program, such as grades in other graduate level courses, 
a record of progressivelv higher work responsibilities, or scores from the Miller 
Analogies Test or Graduate Record Examination and may be accepted on a proba- 
tionary basis. A personal interview prior to acceptance is required. New HRA stu- 
dents may start coursework in Fall and Spring semesters only. MHA students start in 
the Fall semester only. To be assured initial consideration /or the MHA program, a 
student must apply for the program no later than April 15 (prior to the Fall semester 
of desired entry), however, applications received subsequent to this date and up to 
August 1 will be considered for admission on a space available basis. Applicants must 
be accepted by the Graduate School before starting courses. International students 
should score at least 575 on the TOEFL. 

The Health Administration program accepts applicants with or without profes- 
sional work experience. Students accepted into the Health Administration program 
with little to no work experience may be required to enroll in a residency to gain 
practical experience. The Human Resource program usually accepts only those appli- 
cants who have at least one year of professional work experience in a related field. 
Students accepted with limited professional work experience may be required to 
enroll in an internship to gain practical experience. Applicants should be prepared to 
discuss their career goals and employment possibilities with the program director 
during a personal interview, which is required prior to acceptance, and show how 
they see the curriculum supporting their longer-term goals. 

Standards of Progress and Transfer of Credits 

Upon acceptance, an academic mentor is assigned to each student to develop a 
course of study and appropriate fieldwork experience. Please refer to the Academic 
Regulations on pages 15-20 regarding standards of progress and transfer of credits 
for the Graduate School. 

In addition to academic competence, the student is continuously ex'aluated on 
commitment to the program and the profession, and on personal and emotional 
characteristics and qualities related to successful professional performance. Feedback 
on progress is provided by the student's mentor on a regular basis. 

49 



When the program faculty identify deficiencies in professional development which 
make a student unsuitable for performance of the professional role, the student and the 
Dean of the Graduate School will be advised by the mentor of such an evaluation. The 
mentor will assist the student in developing a plan to remediate the deficiencies which 
have been identified and a suitable time frame for remediation will be established. 
Completion of one semester following notification will be considered the minimum time 
frame to be allowed for remediation of deficiencies. At the conclusion of the time desig- 
nated, the faculty shall review the student's performance and recommend to the Dean of 
the Graduate School that the student should be retained, gi\'en additional time for reme- 
ciiation, or dismissed from the program. The student shall have the opportunit)' to pre- 
sent evidence to the program faculty prior to the recommendation to the Dean. 

Comprehensive Examination 

Students in all programs must successfially pass a comprehensive examination which 
may combine written, oral, and experiential components. Application for the compre- 
hensive examination is made when the student registers for HAD 5 09 -Administrative 
Issues or HRA 507-Professional Contribution. The examination is completed at the 
midpoint of the course. 

Application for Degree 

Application for degree should be made at Advance Registration for the last semester 
of coursework. Degrees are conferred in May, August, December and January, but com- 
mencement exercises are held in May only. 

financial Aid 

The Department has several graduate assistantships available. Applications for 
assistantships are made through the Graduate School. Students must be accepted as 
a student in one of the Departmental programs by March 1 to be considered for an 
assistantship for the following Fall semester. 

Scheduling 

Classes are offered fi^om 4:30 p.m. to 7:10 p.m. and from 7:20 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. 
on Mondays through Thursday's. Selected Health Administration courses are offered on 
Saturdays. Courses are scheduled to enable fiill-time students to attend classes two or 
three nights a week; part-time students usually attend one or two nights a week. Each 
course meets one night a week in the Fall or Spring semester or twdce weekly during 
Intersession or Summer sessions. Residency experiences in Health Administration may 
be spread over several semesters to accumulate the needed number of clock hours. 

Degrees in Health Administration and Human Resources Administration can be 
received in 24 months of fiall-time academic study, although most students attend on a 
part-time basis and earn their degree in 36 to 48 months. A maximum of 25 new HRA 
students start course work each Fall and Spring semester. A maximum of 25 students 
are started in the MHA program in the Fall semester only. Applicants above this num- 
ber will be placed on a waiting list for entry in the following Fall semester. Generally 
the first courses taken in the Health Administration program are HAD 500 and HAD 
501 and HRA 500 and HRA 502 in the Human Resources Administration program. 

Employment Opportunities 

According to the Occnpational Outlook Handbook, U.S. Department of Labor, 
employment in the fields of health administration and human resources is predicted 
to gro\\' at a taster than average pace through the year 2005. 

Other Information 

The student should refer to the Academic Regulations section of the Graduate 
School catalog for additional relevant policies. 

50 



Health Administration 

Dr. Peter C. Older, Director 
717-941-4242 • oldenpl@uofs.edu 

Today's health care executives need a combination of specialized skills and a thor- 
ough knowledge of health care systems, organizations and their operations. Courses in 
the graduate health administration program introduce a body of knowledge unique to 
the health care industry. Health care leaders must be flexible and adaptable to constant 
changes, and learn to manage and operate in environments of increasing diversity and 
complexity'. The MHA program is designed to accommodate flill-time and part-time 
students who want to de\'elop sldlls and acquire knowledge needed to be successfiil 
executives and leaders in health care organizations and systems. 

Program Objectives 

The program is specifically designed to: ( 1 ) academically prepare individuals to 
enter health care management and leadership positions; (2) enhance the performance 
of individuals employed in health care management and leadership positions, but 
who lack academic training and credentials; (3) academically prepare individuals to 
enter or advance in a variety' of health care staff positions; and (4) prepare individuals 
to advance to health care senior management positions. Faculty mentors work with 
students to design strategic career opportunities. The program emphasizes a learning 
environment wherein the student can acquire academic knowledge, develop practical 
skills, and engage in self- exploration and personal growth. Students are encouraged 
to work in health care settings during their academic studies which enables them to 
discuss current problems and issues in the classroom and immediately apply what is 
learned. 

Health Administration Careers 

The Master of Health Administration (MHA) program emphasizes preparation for 
and/or advancement in the broad field of health administration. Supervisory, adminis- 
trative, and executive personnel work in a variety of health-related organizations and 
service delivery systems such as hospitals, long-term care facilities, ambulatory care set- 
tings, physician group practices, social service agencies, rehabilitation centers, home 
health organizations, managed care organizations, insurance companies, and various 
planning and regulatory agencies. Depending on the position, they may be engaged in 
line supervision of direct service workers or other managers, or they may be involved in 
planning, community relations, education, training, staff development, personnel, cor- 
porate development, and marketing. 

Curriculum 
The MHA program requires 45 credits for a degree. The curriculum consists of 
42 core credits and 3 elective credits. All courses are chosen to complement and 
assist in achieving the student's career goals. Students entering the program must 
take certain courses in sequence to establish basic sldlls, competencies, and a core 
knowledge base. Foundation courses, taken in sequence, include HAD 500, HAD 
501, HAD 505, and HAD 519, and these courses also serve as prerequisite courses 
for more advanced courses in the curriculum. Health care management requires prac- 
tical experience, so all students do appropriate fieldwork as part of their graduate 

51 



studies. An administrative residency is required for students with no applied health 
care experience. Those students who need a formal administrative residency enroll 
for 12 additional graduate credits to pursue this option. All fieldwork electives are in 
addition to the 45 credits required for the degree, and require a designated precep- 
tor. Other t}pes of fieldwork include an internship (3 cr.), externship (1 cr.) or 
directed study (3 cr.). The program has a variety of one credit graduate seminars 
which focus on current topics in health care administration. Some of these are 
required while others can be taken as electives. 

There are four additional requirements, which must be completed in order to 
graduate. First, all students are expected to join the American College of Healthcare 
Executives (ACHE) as student members and join the University' of Scranton ACHE 
Student Chapter during their first semester in the program. Second, students must 
have and interact regularly with an identified external mentor. Third, all students 
must demonstrate personal computer sldlls. Fourth, all students must demonstrate 
and document 24 hours of community service by being actively involved with an 
organization that provides health care services to the community'. 

Combined B.S./M.H.A. Decree Program 

A combined Bachelor of Science/Master of Health Administration Degree 
Program is available to all University' of Scranton undergraduate Health 
Administration students who meet specific admissions criteria (refer to pages 11-12). 
Contact the MHA Program Director for additional information. 

Accreditation 

The graduate health administration program is accredited by the Accrediting 
Commission on Education for Health Services Administration (ACEHSA). This 
accreditation reflects the commitment to and achievement of national standards for 
graduate level health care administration education. It is the only program so accred- 
ited in Northeastern Penns\'lvania. 



Executive Certificate Program in Health Administration 

A 15 credit hour program is available for professionals who desire advanced man- 
agement training in health care administration. All applicants must have a minimum 
of two years administrati\'e or clinical experience in health services and meet the 
Graduate School admissions process and procedures. Each participant must meet 
with the program director and develop a written indix'idual study plan. The course of 
study must be completed within three years from the date of acceptance. This pro- 
gram is for professionals who do not wish to pursue a formal master's degree pro- 
gram but want to acquire specialized management skills to augment their existing 
management skills. All students must de\'elop and receive approval of an individual 
study plan designed to achieve specific career objectives. A maximum of six credits 
from the Certificate program may be transferred to the MHA degree program. 



52 



Health Administration Curriculum 
Core Courses (42 credits) 

HAD 500 Organization and Administration* 

HAD 501 Health Care Financial Management I* 

HAD 502 Health Care Law 

HAD 504 Human Resources Management 

HAD 505 Health Care Statistics and Research Methods* 

HAD 506 Health Care Economics and Policy 

HAD 507 Health Care Information Systems 

HAD 508 Leadership in Health Care Organizations 

HAD 509 Administrative Issues 

HAD 515 Health Care Planning and Marketing 

HAD 519 Health Services and Systems* 

HAD 521 Health Care Financial Management II 

HAD 522 Health Care Operations Management 

HAD 525 Medical Ethics and Social Responsibilit\' (1 cr.) 

HAD 526 Governance and Board Effectiveness (1 cr.) 

HAD 527 Managed Care ( 1 cr. ) 

Elective Courses (3 credits) 

(choose one 3-credit course) 

HAD 510 Hospital Administration 

HAD 511 Community Based Services and Networks 

HAD 512 Medical Practice Administration 

HAD 513 Long Term Care Administration 

HAD 582 Directed Study 

1-Credit Graduate Seminars 

(limited to three one-credit courses) 

HAD 584 Professional Skill Development 

HAD 584 Negotiation Skills 

HAD 584 Occupational Medicine 

HAD 584 International Health Care 

HAD 584 Home Health Care 

HAD 584 Advanced Managed Care 

Fieldwork Courses 

(credits in addition to 45 credits required for decree) 

HAD 580 Internship in Health Administration (3 crs.) 

HAD 581 Administrative Residency (12 crs.) 

HAD 582 Directed Study ( 3 crs. ) 

HAD 583 Externship in Health Administration (1 cr. ) 

Credits for Decree: 45 + Fieldwork 
* Foundation courses taken in sec]uence. 



53 



Human Resources 
Administration 

Prof. William G. Wallick, Director 
717-941-4128 • wgwl@uofs.edu 

The objective of the Human Resources Administration program is to prepare 
indi\iduals for entry into and/or advancement in positions of leadership within profit 
and non-profit organizations. Specifically, the program is designed to: (1) academi- 
callv prepare indiviciuals to enter leadership positions; (2) enhance the performance 
of individuals employed in leadership positions, but who lack academic training and 
credentials; and (3) academically prepare individuals to enter or advance in a variety 
of human resource -related positions and departments. The program emphasizes an 
active learning en\'ironment wherein the student can acquire knowledge, gain practi- 
cal skills, and engage in self-exploration and personal growth. Prospective students 
should be aware that the HRA program is not a business curriculum and is not 
intended to be the equivalent of an MBA program. 

Areas of Specialization 

Specialization allows the student to develop an area of expertise. The program 
contains three specializations. Organizational Leadership is the most general and 
provides the broadest academic preparation in general organization and administra- 
tion. Human Resources and Human Resource Development are more specialized 
and prepare the student for more delineated professional roles in human resources 
administration. The specialization is shown on the student's transcript. 

The Human Resources Administration program prepares individuals to enter 
and/or advance in the following three Areas of Application: 

Organizational Leadership. This specialization emphasizes preparation for 
and/or ad\'ancement in superx'isory and administrative positions in public and private 
organizations. Supervisory and administrative personnel work with people and need 
a variety of human, conceptual, and technical skills. They use the processes of plan- 
ning, communicating, problem solving and decision making to influence the efforts 
of individuals and groups to achieve organizational goals. 

Human Resources. This specialization emphasizes preparation for and/or 
acivancement in human resources systems which plan for and coordinate various per- 
sonnel services and fiinctions. These individuals work as human resource generalists in 
diverse organizational settings. Their tasks may involve assessing personnel needs; 
recruitment and selection; designing and implementing compensation and benefit sys- 
tems; developing discipline and grievance-handling systems; ensuring the organization's 
compliance with equal employment opportunity' and other governmental regulations. 

Human Resource Development. This specialization emphasizes preparation 
for and/or advancement in human resources systems which promote learning and 
change on an individual, group or organizational level. These human resource spe- 
cialists work in a staff or consultative capacit)^ in most organizations. Their tasks may 
include performance analysis; designing, implementing and evaluating training pro- 
grams; career and succession planning; organizational assessment and interventions; 
strategic human resource planning and managing change. 



54 



Curriculum 
The Human Resources Administration curriculum has three core courses. The 
two core courses, Organizational Leadership (HRA 500) and Human Resources 
(HRA 502) provide foundational knowledge in organization concepts, theories and 
human resources practices and should be taken in the first semester of study. The 
third core course, Professional Contribution (HRA 507) is a capstone course taken in 
the final semester prior to graduation. A specialization provides in-depth study in a 
particular area and encompasses five courses or fifteen credits including one required 
course. The remaining fifteen credits can be taken from other courses in the curricu- 
lum. For students with little work experience, an internship is recommended to be 
taken near the completion of course work. Computer applications are integrated 
throughout the curriculum, therefore entering students are expected to have profi- 
ciencv in word processing, spreadsheet and database applications. 

Combined B.S./M.S. Degree Program 

Outstanding undergraduate students in health administration or counseling and 
human services may be eligible to pursue jointly the HRA Master of Science program 
prior to undergraduate graduation. This opportunit)' could result in attaining both 
the baccalaureate degree and the M.S. in Human Resources Administration within a 
five year period. The opportunity' to take graduate courses prior to completing a bac- 
calaureate degree is conditional upon attainment of universit)'- stipulated Combined 
Baccalaureate/Master's Degree Program (see pages 11-12) requirements. Interested 
students should contact the HRA Program Director during the junior year of their 
undergraduate study for more information. 

Professional Certification 

The Societ}' for Human Resource Management (SHRM) has identified a speci- 
fied body of Icnowledge for professionals within the human resources field. The 
Human Resources Administration curriculum offers this body of knowledge for stu- 
dents interested in being certified. Two certification exams, the Professional in 
Human Resources (PHR) and Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) are 
administered by the Human Resource Certification Institute. Students are encour- 
aged to join the University of Scranton chapter of SHRM and plan to take the appro- 
priate certification exam near the completion of their program of study. Inquiries 
regarding the certification process should be directed to: 

Human Resource Certification Institute 

609 North Washington Street 

Alexandria, VA 22314-1997 

(703) 548-3440 



55 



Human Resources Administration Curriculum 

Required Core Courses 

(9 credits required) 
HRA 500 Organizational Leadership 
HRA 502 Human Resources 
HRA 507 Professional Contribution 

Area of Specialization 

Organizational Leadership 

(15 credits required) 

HRA 501 Planning 

HRA 503 Control and Budgeting Systems * 

HRA 509 Administrative Issues 

HRA 521 Work Motivation 

HRA 523 Individual Behavior 

HRA 524 Group Behavior 

HRA 525 Qualit)' Improvement 

HRA 527 Disability and Work 

HRA 528 Cultural Diversity' 

Human Resources 

(15 credits required) 

HRA 526 Human Resources Information Systems * 

HRA 530 Compensation Systems 

HRA 531 Benefit Systems 

HRA 532 Labor Relations 

HRA 535 Employee Assistance Programming 

HRA 536 Employment Law 

HRA 537 Human Resources Policies 

HRA 538 Health, Safet>', and Securit\^ 

Human Resource Development 

(15 credits required) 
HRA 505 Evaluative Research * 
HRA 534 Learning in Organizations 
HRA 540 Organizational Analysis 
HRA 541 Organizational Change 
HRA 543 Training Methods 
HRA 544 Human Resources Planning 
HRA 545 Career Planning and Development 

Additional Courses 
HRA 580 Internship 
HRA 582 Directed Study 
HRA 584 Special Topics 

Credits for Decree: 39 
* Required course in specialization. 



56 



Course Descriptions 

Health Administration 

Credits 
HAD 500. Health Care Organization and Administration 3 

The course examines organizational theories and systems, internal and external stakeholders, 
models of integration and competition, organizational structures, and organizational ciynamics. 
This survey course provides a foundation for other advanced courses in the curriculum. Health 
status of populations and determinates of health and illness are discussed. The planning, orga- 
nizing, staffing, intluencing, and controlling functions of administration are studied. 
HAD 501 . Health Care Financial Management I 3 

Designed to increase analytical and decision-making skills using finance theories, principles, 
concepts and techniques important to health management. This course integrates and applies 
financial management concepts and techniques relevant to health care settings. Topics include: 
analysis of cost and budgetary controls; interpretation and utilization of accounting reports 
and statements; operating accounting measurements; quantitative techniques; analysis of finan- 
cial statements; financial decision-making models; auditing; capital investments; strategic finan- 
cial management; working capital management; budgeting. 

HAD 502. Health Care Law 3 

Impact of legal factors affecting patient/client care and the operations and administration of 
health care j-acilities and systems. Examines principles and practices of law, legal relationships, 
sources of law and legal processes affecting the health services system. Conceptual foundations 
are drawn from the political sciences. 

HAD 504. Human Resottrces Management 3 

Examines human resource management functions, processes and systems within organizations 
including recruitment, selection, training and the legal and regulatory environment affecting 
HRM operations. Managing and developing human resources within and between 
systems/organizations is also studied. Organizational performance and creati\'it)' are examined. 
HAD 505. Health Care Statistics and Research Methods 3 

Designed to examine basic statistical techniques which are utilized in analyzing health care data. 
Topics include probabilitx', sampling, use of central tendenq' measures, reliability' and \alidit}', graph- 
ics, data display, fi-equency distribution, regression analysis, ANOVA, and technical report writing. 
HAD 506. Health Care Economics and Policy 3 

(Prerequisite, HAD 519) This required graduate course studies theoretical foundations of eco- 
nomics and public policy and applies them to the health care sector. The course examines 
provider behavior, production, costs, supply, market structure, competition, access, demand, 
insurance, expenditures, utilization, health care reform, and the health care public polic\' making 
process including policy formulation, implementation, and modification. 
HAD 507. Health Care Information Systems 3 

(Prerequisite, HAD 501 & HAD 505) The course is designed to educate students to the impor- 
tance of information systems in managing profit as well as not for profit organizations such as: man- 
utacturing, banking, and health care. The course emphasizes the role of information systems to 
increase productivit}', to improve quality of products and services, and to insure overall effectiveness 
of organizational operations. The course introduces the student to information and communication 
technologies; information system e\'aluation and development processes; information technology 
applications to problem solving and management decision making; and use of information technolo- 
gies to transaction processing and customer service. Appropriate application software will be used 
to get hands-on experience, to analyze cases, and to complete the class project. The student is 
expected to haxe basic knowledge of computing skills. 

57 



HAD 508. Leadership in Health Care Or^ianizations 3 

(Prerequisite, HAD 504) Micro and macro organizational beha\ior theories pro\ ide the theo- 
retical foundation for this course. The processes of communication, value analysis, problem 
solving and decision making are explored at an indixidual, team and organizational level. The 
imperative for health care leaders to understand and manage change will be emphasized. 
Various models of leadership will be critically analyzed. Conceptual foundations are drawn 
from the social sciences, psychology and related disciplines. 

HAD 509. Administrative Issues 3 

(Prerequisite, 36 core HAD credits or approval by Program Director) A case study method 
requiring integration and application of acquired knowledge, skills and competencies in health 
care management and leadership. Intensi\'e qualitative and quantitative analyses in major prob- 
lem areas. Teamwork skills are de\eloped. Ser\'es as a capstone course for the health adminis- 
tradon student. Emphasis is placed on understanding and assessment of health status, determi- 
nants of health and illness, and use of health services. Requires applicadon of knowledge 
acquired from all courses in the core curriculum. M\ written work requires an oral defense. 
Interaction with professionals in applied settings is required. 

HAD 510. Hospital Administration 3 

Operating and administratixe issues and problems in health and hospital systems with emphasis 
gixen to hospital operation, organization, and administration. The future role of acute care is 
examined in the context of integrated delivery models and systems. 

HAD 511. Community Based Services and Networks 3 

To understand and apply the concepts of networks and network development as related to 
communirs' based delivery systems. This course examines management and administrati\'e 
functions of a varietv of delivery models. It includes, but is not limited to, ambulatory services, 
outpatient services, community health partnerships, telemedicine, education, and behavioral 
medicine. Managing population based health care is discussed with a focus on service, cost, 
and qualit}'. 

HAD 512. Medical Pra ctice Adm in istra tion 3 

Examines factors influencing physician practices and the qualit)' of physician services. Topics 
include operating and administrative issues, compensation, staffing, billing, collections, reim- 
bursement mechanisms, and governance. The course also examines PHOs, HMOs, SDOs, 
MSOs and other integrated delivery networks, organizations and systems affecting physicians. 
HAD 513. Lonjj Term Care Administration 3 

Operation and administration of long term care facilities. Differences between acute and long 
term levels of care, t\'pes of long term care facilities, and special concerns on the long term care 
resident. Emerging models of care are discussed in addition to traditional management flinc- 
tions in the industry. 

HAD 51S. Health Care Plannin£[ and Marketinjj 3 

This required graduate course studies the purpose, fiinction, and application of planning and 
marketing in health care. Content includes strategic planning, situational analysis, strategy' for- 
mulation, action planning, exchange, buyer behavior, segmentation, market research, prod- 
ucts/ser\'ices, pricing, distribution, promotion, and marketing control. Selected theoretical 
concepts are drawn from disciplines such as economics, psychology, and sociology. 
HAD 519. Health Services and Systems 3 

This required graduate course studies the past, present, and future development of health ser- 
vices and systems in the United States. Topics include health, types of care, organizations, 
providers, workforce, technology, financing, policy, planning, quality, integration, and the 
structure and fiinction of the U.S. health care system. Selected conceptual foundations are 
drawn from disciplines such as systems theory, epidemiology, sociology, and economics. 



58 



HAD 52 1 . Health Care Financial Management II 3 

(Prerequisite, HAD 501) Exposure to complex problems and case studies with a focus on 
health care providers. This course develops skills in analysis, synthesis and evaluation of 
advanced financial management theories, principles, concepts and techniques. Topics include: 
quantitatixe analysis in financial management; premium rate setting; cost and utilization rates; 
advanced managerial accounting concepts; variance analysis; HMO rate setting; private and 
public health care reimbursement systems under managed care; financial aspects of integration; 
managing resources. 

HAD 522. Health Care Operations Management 3 

(Prerequisite, HAD 505) Takes a systems approach to decision-making in the operations emi- 
ronment emphasizing the interrelationships among operations, finance, accounting, marketing 
and human resources. Examines productivity and work management, employee performance 
improvement, and organizational forecasting. Application of behavioral science techniques in an 
organizational framework. A \'ariet)' of problems are considered including product mix, product 
blending, scheduling and production. Management information systems needed in health care 
operations management are discussed in conjunction with computer lab applications. 
HAD 525. Medical Ethics and Social Responsibility 1 

Examines ethical theories and moral issues in health care settings and how decisions made by 
managers affect other people at a personal, societal, and organizational level. Ethical analysis 
and application are stressed, in addition to ethical code of conduct. Case studies are used to 
enhance development of skills in ethical analysis and decision making. 
HAD 526. Governance and Board Effectiveness I 

Examination of goxerning structures in health care settings with a particular focus on organiza- 
tional systems, strategic planning, authorit)', policy decision making, regulatory compliance and 
Thomaccountabilir\'. 




Pcti I ( ' Oldt I/, . l^sistant Professor of Health Administration and Director 
of the Health Adininistratinn projjrajii. 



59 



HAD 527. Managed Care 1 

This course focuses on the impact of managed care on health care consumers, purchasers, pay- 
ors and providers. Various managed care programs, products, models, strategies, and financing 
are identified and studied. Specific emphasis is placed on integrated delivery system develop- 
ment, risk contracting, capitation, contract administration and regulatory compliance. 
Physician-hospital models are studied as well as MSOs, PSOs and SDOs. 
HAD 580. Internship in Health Administration 3 

(Prerequisite, 21 core credits completed) A 200 clock hour fieldwork placement in a staff or 
administrative position which is completed during a regular academic session. A semester pro- 
ject and preceptor designation is required. 

HAD 581. Administrative Residency 12 

(Prerequisite, 36 core credits completed) A 1,000 hour fieldwork experience in a senior man- 
agement position. Normally involves exposure to all major operating functions and contacts 
with department heads, administrative staff and medical staff Exposure to governing board 
functions, governmental forces and community influences. The resident is assigned projects of 
increasing complexity and importance and is expected to ha\'e an assigned preceptor. A major 
project is required. The residency is completed over several semesters. 
HAD 582. Directed Study 3 

(Prerequisite, 6 core credits completed) A 200 clock hour course which allows the student to 
pursue an area of health care interest, research, or scholarly activit}' under the guidance of a 
taculty person and/or preceptor. This course stresses the de\'elopment of refined writing, 
research, and technical skills using applied experiences and models. Student's are expected to 
expand or refine knowledge in specific areas of health care and/or develop additional compe- 
tencies \'ia supervised fieldwork. Approxal by the Program Director is required. 
HAD 583. Externship in Health Administration 1 

(Prerequisite, 9 core credits completed) A 50 clock hour fieldwork experience under supervi- 
sion of a preceptor which is completed during a regular semester. Allows the student to experi- 
ence a new health care setting or in-depth study of a division or department within an insdtu- 
tion. A written report is required summarizing the fieldwork experience. 
HAD 584. Special Topics 3 

Topics of current interest are offered on a variable basis including, but not restricted to, career 
de\'elopment, stress management, and interpersonal negotiations. Graduate seminars are 
de\'loped to address current or emerging health care systems changes. 

One Credit Special Topics Seminar Courses (HAD 584) 

Ne£[otiation Skills 1 

This course focuses on de\'eloping skills and strategies necessary to negotiate agreements, 
determining price and terms in purchase arrangements, finalizing and administering contracts, 
resolving legal conflicts, personal needs and transacdons. 

Home Health Care 1 

This course examines basic information about the organization, funding, regulation and type 
of home health care services. Home health care's position in the health care delivery system, 
current trends and information resources for managers are discussed. 

Professional Skill Development 1 

A course designed to refine management skills in time management, managing priorities, dele- 
gation and conflict management. Examination of specific occupational stressors, theories of 
stress, coping strategies and recognizing the etiolog}' of stress. This course pro\'ides further 
refinement of career planning identifying behaviors critical to management success. Students are 
provided with an opportunity' to improve communication skills, both oral and written skills. 
/;/ tern at ion nl He a Ith Ca re 1 

Examines the structure and management of health ser\ice systems in other countries, socioeco- 
nomic factors and national health policy. Topics include marketing opportunities, universal 
health coverage, and emerging trends in the global market of health care. 

60 



Occupational Medicine 1 

Examines basic models, settings, organizational views, marketing techniques, program struc- 
ture, regulatory agencies, insurances available, products and services used in occupational med- 
icine and health organizations. 

Advanced Mana^ied Care 1 

(Prerequisite, HAD 527) An advanced course in managed care focusing on netAvork/pro\'ider 
selection, contract development and analysis strategies for pricing, risk assessment and analysis, 
legal considerations, and information management. Students will utilize financial models to 
study IDOs/IDNs and managed care, and assessing capitated risk contracts. 

Human Resources Administration 
HRA 500. Organizational Leadership 3 

Organizational beha\ior, theories and practices examined from traditional and contemporary 
prospecti\'es. The role of effective leadership within a changing workplace and workforce is 
emphasized. 

UKA SOI. Planning} 3 

The strategic planning process reviewed with practical applications in emironmental scanning, 
SWOT analysis, strategy development, operational planning and evaluation. 
HRA 502. Human Resources 3 

A survey of human resources fi.inctions utilized within organizations and their implications for 
line and staff personnel. Some of the topics include recruitment,selection, compensation, per- 
formance review, training and the legal environment that affect personnel. 
HRA 503. Control and Bud£[etin£[ Systems 3 

The functions of finance including accounting conventions, financial statements, capital bud- 
geting and financing, revenue and expense budgets, cash flow and cash management, contract 
pricing, cost-benefits analysis. 

HRA 505. Evaluative Research 3 

Qualitative and quantitative research methods appropriate to the study of organizations. The 
significance and development of the practitioner as field researcher highlighted. 
HRA 507. Professional Contribution 3 

A seminar st\'le course which requires students to work in a self-directed manner on a professional 
contribution relexant to their career interests. The course results in a presentation and written 
report or publishable article. This course is taken as a culmination of students' graduate study. 
HRA 509. Administrative Issues 3 

A seminar which facilitates integration and application of complex organizational issues. A case 
study or simulation or self-directed project precedes formal student presentations. Completion 
of 27 credits required. 

HRA 52 1 . Work Motivation 3 

Models and theories of work motivation with their implications for managers and organiza- 
tional characteristics and the design of jobs and work systems. The interrelationships between 
motivation, productivity and job satisfaction. 

HKAS23. Individual Behavior 3 

Behavior of the individual with emphasis on interviewing, communications, and counseling. 
Personnel, counseling, and management theories are integrated into workable supervisory 
models and strategies. 

HRA 524. Group Behavior 3 

The study of group behavior in organizations including theories of group development, leader- 
ship, group roles and norms. An experiential approach will allow students to observe and par- 
ticipate in various problem solving and decision making situations. 



61 



HRA525. Qiiality Improvement 3 

Current organizational efforts in improving the qualit)' of services and products reviewed. Case 
studies and research findings included which explore the advantages and limitations of systemic 
change associated with ciualit\' improvement efforts. 

HRA 526. Human Resource Information Systems 3 

This course considers the role, function, and integration of Human Resources Information Systems 
(HRIS) witliin an organization's information s\'stems and technologv' architecture. Practical applica- 
tions of HRIS and office productivity' sofh\'are will be explored through hands-on use of personal 
computers. Proficienc\' in word processing, database and spreadsheet applications required. 
HRA 527. Disability and Work 3 

This course focuses on attitudes toward the disabled and their role in societ}', the work experi- 
ence of disabled workers, federal and state legislation affecting employment of the disabled, 
industrial accidents and rehabilitation, job modification and physical plant accessibilit}'. 
HRA 528. Cultural Diversity 3 

A serious challenge facing corporations is managing an increasingly diverse workforce. This 
course focuses on current social and cultural issues which shape human behavior and greatly 
affect the workplace. Managing diversity' will be addressed with emphasis on understanding 
multiculturalism, and manager and employee interactions. The students awareness, attitudes, 
and beliefs will be emphasized. 

HRA 530. Compensation Systems 3 

The study of strategic and operational decisions in the design and coordination of 
compensation systems. Considerations for external competitiyeness,internal equity, 
and the legal enxironment are explored. Job evaluation, salary surveys, and computer 
applications included. 

HRA 5 3 1 . Benefit Systems 3 

Concerns all of the ways in which organizations indirectly reimburse their employees and the 
legal/regulatory environment affecting benefits systems. The implications of employee benefits 
for organizational expenses and reward systems. 

HRA S32. Labor Relations 3 

The role of organized labor and collective bargaining in the workplace. The initiation, negotia- 
tion and management of the union contract including the griexance/arbitration process. 
HRA 534. Learninjj in Organizations 3 

The training function within organizations studied with an emphasis on performance analysis 
as a means to effecti\ely identifi,' and design learning interx'entions. The impact of continuous 
learning at an individual, team, and organizational level emphasized. 

HRA 535. Employee Assistance Pro^frammin^ 3 

Approaches of organizations to promote employee health and to provide assistance to employ- 
ees with a variet)' of problems that interfere with producti\'it)'. 

HRA S36. Employment Law 3 

A review of the legal and regulatory environment which affects employees and organizations. 
Federal and state legislation including significant court decisions examined. 
HRA 537. Human Resources Policies 3 

Development of policy statements and operational procedures necessary for maintaining effec- 
tive human resource activities and functions. Practical applications in researching and formulat- 
ing written policies and procedures. 

HRA 538. Health, Safety and Security 3 

Reviews organizational activities and the regulatory environment that relate to the occupation- 
al health, safety*' and security' of employees. 



62 



HRA 540. Organizational Analysis 3 

Emphasis on the role organizational analysis plays in the assessment of training needs and orga- 
nizational change strategies. Experience provided in the systematic analysis and evaluation of 
the effectiveness of variotis organizations. 

HKA S4l . Organizational Chan£[e 3 

Various organizational models will guide the exploration of the development of organizational 
change strategies and techniques. Re\'ie\vs the technical, political and cultural factors that affect 
the effective management of change. 

HRA 543. Traininpi Methods 3 

Adult learning theories will pro\'ide the theoretical framework to understanding the elements 
of an effccti\'ely designed training intervention. An experiential learning approach pro\'ides stu- 
dents with opportunities to de\ elop competencies in training assessment, design, implementa- 
tion, and evaluation. 

HRA 544. Human Resource Planninjj 3 

In-depth study of the steps in the human resource planning process including forecasting 
methods, affirmative action and succession planning. Implications for line managers and 
human resources staff explored. 

HRA 545. Career Plannin£i and Development 3 

Current workplace trends in career planning and its implications for the employee, supervisor 
and organization. Career development theories and the career planning process reviewed. 
HRA 580. Internship in Human Resources 3-6 

A 200-400 clock hour placement in a staff or administrative position which is taken after com- 
pletion of at least 27 credits. A semester project may be required. May be graded satisfactory 
(pass) and unsatisfactory (fail). 

HRA 582. Directed Study 3 

Allows the student to pursue an area of interest under the guidance of a facult}' person. 
Approval by the Program Director is required. An administratixe fee is charged. 
HRA 584. Special Topics 3 

Topics of current interest are offered on a variable basis. 




William G. Wallick , InstrucTnr ofHiniinii Rcsoiincs Admitiistrntioii and Director of the Graduate Program 
in Human Rcsoitrca Administration. 



63 



Community Counseling, Rehabilitation 
Counseling, School Counseling 

Dr. Oliver J. Morgan, SJ., Chair, Counseling and Human Services 

717-941-6171 

http://academic.uofs.edu/department/chs/ 

Department faculty: Associate Professors - Thomas M. Collins^ LeeAnn M. 
Eschbacb, David W. Hall, Oliver J. Morgan, S.J., Ann Marie Toloczko; Assistant 
Professors - Lori A. Bruch, Vivian V. Ripley 

The Department offers coursework leading to Master of Science degrees in 
Community Counseling, Rehabilitation Counseling, and School Counseling. The 
following policies and procedures apply to all these curricula. Specific curricular 
requirements are listed under the respective programs. 

Admission Requirements 

The applicant for admission to any Departmental program must possess a bachelor's 
degree from an accredited coUege or university and provide the Graduate School with evi- 
dence of satisfactory undergraduate preparation. The ordinary standard for admission is 
an undergraduate GPA of at least 2.75 on a grading scale of 4.00. Students falling below 
this le\'el may submit other e\idence of their abilit)' to complete successfiilly a graduate 
program, such as grades in other graduate le\'el courses, a record of progressively higher 
work responsibilities, or scores from the Miller Analogies Test or Graduate Record 
Examination and may be accepted on a probationary basis. Students accepted on proba- 
tion cannot enroll for more than six credits in a semester and must obtain a cumulative 
GPA of at least 3.0 after completing nine credits of coursework to be removed from pro- 
bation. International students should score at least 575 on the TOEFL. 

New students may start coursework in Fall and Spring semesters only. Students 
applying to begin study in the Fall semester must submit their completed application 
to the Graduate School prior to March 1 . The application deadline for students wish- 
ing to begin studies in the Spring semester is November 1 . Personal inter\'iews \x'\t\\ 
program facult)' and students prior to acceptance are required. Applicants must be 
accepted by the Graduate School before starting courses. 

Standards of Progress and Transfer of Credits 

Please refer to the Academic Regulations on pages 15-20 regarding standards of 
progress and transfer of credits for the Graduate School. Students who wish to waive 
a required course may petition the program director to do so. Courses waived will 
not reduce the number of credits required for graduation. 

In addition to academic competence, the student is continuously evaluated on 
commitment to the program and the profession, and on personal and emotional 
characteristics and qualities related to successfiil professional performance. Feedback 
on progress is provided by the student's mentor on a regular basis. 

When the ficult\^ identify deficiencies in professional cievelopment which make a 
student unsuitable for performance of the professional role, the student and the Dean of 
the Graduate School will be advised by the mentor of such an evaluation. The mentor 
will assist the student in developing a plan to remediate the deficiencies which have been 
identified and a suitable time frame for remediation will be established. Completion of 
one semester following notification will be considered the minimum time frame to be 



64 



allowed for remediation of deticiencies. At die conclusion of the time designated, the 
faculty' shall review die student's performance and recommend to the Dean of the 
Graduate School that the student should be retained, given additional time for remedia- 
tion, or dismissed from the program. The student shall have the opportunity' to present 
evidence to the program tacult\' prior to the recommendation to the Dean. 

Comprehensive Examination 

Students must successflilly pass a comprehensive examination which includes writ- 
ten and experiential components. Application for the comprehensive examination is 
made when the student registers for the counseling practicum. An acceptable level of 
performance in the practicum is required to pass the comprehensix'e examination. 

Application for Decree 

Application for degree should be made at Advance Registration for the last semester 
of coursework. Degrees are conferred in May, August, December and January, but com- 
mencement exercises are held in May only. 

Endorsement of Students 

Students who successflilly complete all dieir curricular and clinical training require- 
ments for die Master of Science degree will receive formal endorsement in their area of 
specialization by the facult}' of their program. Formal endorsement includes recommen- 
dation for state and/or national certification and employment in settings consistent with 
the training provided in their programs. Students will receive formal endorsement only in 
that program for which the)' lia\'e successfully completed all requirements and will be 
recommended only for certification and employment consistent with training pro\ided. 
In cases in which a certilA'ing body allows a student to sit for a certification examination, 
the program facult)' shall endorse the student as a candidate for that examination if the 
student has completed that portion of the program required by that certifying body. 

Financial Aid 

The Department has se\'eral graduate assistantships available. Applications for 
assistantships are made through the Graduate School. Students must be accepted as 
a student in one of the Departmental programs by March 1 to be considered for an 
assistantship for the following Fall semester. 

Students in tiiis program may also be interested in Residence Life Counselor posi- 
tions. For all these opportunities, see page 23. 

Scheduling 

Classes are offered from 4:30 p.m. to 7:10 p.m. and from 7:20 p.m. to 10:00 
p.m. on Mondays through Thursdays. Courses are scheduled to enable full-time stu- 
dents to attend classes two or three nights a week; part-time students usually attend 
one or two nights a week. Each course meets one night a week in the Fall and Spring 
semesters and twice weekly during Intersession and Summer sessions. Internships may 
be spread over several semesters to accumulate the needed number of clock hours. 

Employment Opportunities 

According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, U.S. Department of Labor, 
employment in the fields of counseling is predicted to grow at a faster than a\'erage 
pace through the year 2005. 

Other Information 

The student should refer to the Academic Regulations section of the Graduate 
School catalog for additional relevant policies. 



65 



Community Counseling 

Dr. Thomas M. Collins, Director 
717-941-4129 • collinstl@uofs.edu 

The Community Counseling program prepares professionals for direct entry 
into and/or advance in counseling-related positions in private and public human 
service organizations and systems. The program offers a Child Welfare Track specifi- 
cally designed to prepare for child welfare settings which provide families with the 
services and supports necessary to ensure each child a safe, secure, and risk-free per- 
manent environment. 

The program is designed to: (1) enhance knowledge of counseling concepts and 
practices; (2) provide individuals with the counseling sldlls necessary to fiinction in 
agency settings; (3) prepare individuals for certification in counseling; and (4) 
enhance individual's employabilit)' in entr)' level or advance positions either in human 
service or child welfare settings. The program offers a learning environment whereby 
the student acquires the academic competencies of the profession, refine them 
through practical experience, and increases self-understanding, self-confidence, and 
personal effectiveness. 

The Counseling Profession 

According to the American Counseling Association, counselors are skilled pro- 
fessionals who are trained to help others gain a perspective on their lives, explore 
options, make decisions, resoh'e problems, and take action. Counselors work with 
individuals, couples, tamilies, and groups of persons who experience academic, behav- 
ioral, career, emotional, interpersonal, and social problems. By establishing an effec- 
tive and trusting helping relationship, a counselor assesses a client's strengths and 
resources, and helps the client increase life-management skills so that mutually agreed 
upon goals may be achiex-ed. 

Curriculum 

The CommunitA' Counseling program is a 48 credit curriculum leading to the 
Master of Science degree. Thirt\'-three required credits include 27 credits of course 
work in principles and practice of counseling, 3 credits of practicum and 3 credits of 
internship. Fifteen credits of electives are offered to provide students with opportuni- 
ties for additional study in individual areas of interest and for development of skills in 
ciealing with specific client populations. 

The Child Welfare Track is a 48 credit curriculum with 39 required credits 
including 33 credits, 3 credits of agency-based practicum (100 hours of supervised 
counseling experience in a child welfare setting), 3 credits of agency- based internship 
(600 hours of supervised field experience), and 9 credits of electives. 

Professional experience in a counseling-related field is not required for entry into 
the program. 



66 



Accreditation and Certification 

The Community Counseling program is accredited by the Council for 
Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), a spe- 
cializeci accrediting body recognized by the Council for Higher Education 
Accreditation (CHEA). Hence, graduates meet all rec]uirements for certification as a 
National Certified Counselor (NCC). Graduates may apply to the National Board of 
Certified Counselors to take the National Counselor Examination prior to gradua- 
tion from the program. Students who pass the certification examination will be 
granted recognition as an NCC. Students who wish to explore other types of coun- 
selor certification should consult with the Program Director. All inquiries regarding 
certification as an NCC and application for same should be directed to: 

National Board for Certified Counselors, Inc. 

3-D Terrace Way 

Greensboro, NC 27403 

(919) 547-0607 

Refer to General Information under the Department of Counseling and Human 
Services for policies and procedures applicable to all departmental programs. 




Thomas M. CoIHjis, Associate Professor ofCottnselinj) and Hiimnn Services and Director of the Graduate 
Program in Community Counseling 



67 



Community Counseling Curriculum 

Professional Foundations 

(33 credits required) 

COUN 500 Professional Issues: Community Counseling 

COUN 501 Counseling and Interviewing Sldlls 

COUN 502 Counseling Theories 

COUN 503 Group Process and Practice 

COUN 504 Appraisal Techniques 

COUN 505 Research Methods 

COUN 506 Social and Cultural Issues 

COUN 507 Career and Lifest)'le Development 

COUN 508 Developmental Psychology 

COUN 590 Practicum: Communit)^ Counseling 

COUN 595 Internship: Community Counseling 

General Electives 
(15 credits required) 
Disability and Specialty Populations 
COUN 521 Physical Disabilities 
COUN 522 Vocational Aspects of Disabilit}' 
COUN 531 Psychology of Adjustment 
COUN 541 Homebased Family Intervention 
COUN 542 Family Violence 
COUN 560 Addictive Behaviors 
COUN 561 Substance Abuse Education 
COUN 562 Issues in Substance Abuse 
COUN 563 Crisis Intervention 
COUN 564 Children's Mental Health 
COUN 565 Psychiatric Disorders 
COUN 570 Problems of Adolescence 
COUN 571 Counseling Issues for Women 

Counseling Systems 
COUN 540 Famih' Counseling and Therapy 
COUN 566 Behavioral Counseling 
COUN 567 Health and Behavior 
COUN 572 Techniques of Consultation 

Clinical Experience 

COUN 594 Practicum: Group Counseling 

Directed Study 

COUN 582 Directed Study 

Credits for Decree: 48 
Total Required Credits: 33 Total Elective Credits: 15 



68 



Community Counseling 
Child Welfare Track Curriculum 

Professional Foundations 

(39 credits required) 

COUN 501 Counseling and Interviewing Skills 

COUN 502 Counseling Theories 

COUN 503 Group Process and Practice 

COUN 504 Appraisal Techniques 

COUN 505 Research Methods 

COUN 506 Social and Cultural Issues 

COUN 507 Career and Lifest\'le Development 

COUN 508 Developmental Psychology 

COUN 540 Family Counseling and Therapy 

COUN 550 Professional Issues: Child Welfare 

COUN 551 Child Welfare Services 

COUN 580 Child Welfare Agency Practicum (Agency-based) 

COUN 585 Child Welfare Agency Internship (Agency-based) 

General Electives 

(9 credits required) 

COUN 541 Homebased Family Intervention 
COUN 542 Family Violence 
COUN 560 Addictive Behaviors 
COUN 563 Crisis Intervention 
COUN 564 Children's Mental Health 
COUN 565 Psychiatric Disorders 
COUN 570 Problems of Adolescence 

Credits for Decree: 48 
Total Required Credits: 39 Total Elective Credits: 9 



69 



Rehabilitation Counseling 

Dr. Lori A. Bruch, Director 
717-941-4308 • bruchll@uofs.edu 

The Rehabilitation Counseling program prepares rehabilitation counselors and 
related professional personnel for entry into and/or advancement in counseling-relat- 
ed positions in public and private rehabilitation agencies, organizations, and systems. 

More specifically, the program is designed to: (1) enhance knowledge of rehabil- 
itation concepts and practices; (2) provide individuals with the counseling skills nec- 
essary for fijnctioning in rehabilitation settings; (3) increase awareness and sensitivity 
to disabilit}^ issues; (4) prepare individuals for certification as rehabilitation coun- 
selors; and (5) enhance individuals' employability in entry level or advanced clinical 
positions in rehabilitation settings. The program offers a learning environment in 
which the student can acquire the academic competencies of the profession and 
refine them through supervised practical experience. The program also provides a 
facilitative process through which the student can increase self-understanding, self- 
confidence, and personal effectiveness. 

Rehabilitation Counseling Profession 

The rehabilitation counselor is an intervention specialist who either delivers or 
arranges to deliver therapeutic services to a variety of persons with disabilities to assist 
them in reaching mutually agreed upon goals. The specific roles and functions of the 
rehabilitation counselor, the services provided, and the goals established will vary 
depending on the agency or organization in which the counselor is employed. In the 
t>'pical state-federal vocational rehabilitation agency, individuals with disabilities are 
provided a variet)' of psychological, medical, social and vocational services to assist 
the person achieve independence in living and in becoming competitively employed. 
In a mental health/mental retardation or drug and alcohol facilit)', the counselor may 
provide personal, social, or vocational adjustment services to assist the individual in 
achieving the maximum health, well-being, and independence possible. 

Curriculum 

The Rehabilitation Counseling program is a 48 credit curriculum leading to the 
Master of Science degree. Thirty-nine required credits include 33 credits of course- 
work in principles and practices of rehabilitation counseling, three credits of 
practicum (100 hours of supervised counsehng experience) and a minimum of 3 
credits of internship (600 hours of supervised field experience). Nine credits of elec- 
tives are offered to provide students with opportunities for additional study in indi- 
vidual areas of interest and for development of knowledge and skill in working with 
specific populations and in specific settings. Professional experience in a counseling- 
related field is not required for entry into the program. 



70 



Accreditation and Certification 

The Rehabilitation Counseling program is accredited by the Council on 
Rehabilitation Education (CORE), a specialized accrediting body recognized by the 
Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). Hence, graduates are eligi- 
ble to sit for the national qualif}'ing examination to become a Certified 
Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC). Students are encouraged to apply to take the 
examination in the final semester of study. Students who pass the examination are 
certified upon submitting evidence of successful completion of the degree and 
internship. 

Rehabilitation Counseling courses are approved by the Commission on 
Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC) toward certification as well as for 
certification maintenance credits. All inquiries regarding certification and application 
for same should be directed to: 

Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification 

1835 Rohlwing Road, Suite E 

Rolling Meadows, IL 60008 

(708) 394-2104 

Refer to General Information under the Department of Counseling and Human 
Services for policies and procedures applicable to all departmental programs. 




Lori A. Bnith, As.wsrniit Professor ofCoiinselituj and Hitiiiaii Scrrii 
Program in Kcbnbilitatioii Coinisclinjj. 



iiid Director of the Grndiinte 



71 



COUN 501 
COUN 502 
COUN 503 
COUN 504 
COUN 505 
COUN 506 
COUN 507 
COUN 508 
COUN 520 
COUN 521 
COUN 522 
COUN 591 
COUN 596 



COUN 531 
COUN 560 
COUN 561 
COUN 562 
COUN 565 
COUN 570 
COUN 571 
COUN 582 
COUN 584 

COUN 540 
COUN 566 
COUN 567 



Rehabilitation Coimseling Curriculum 

Professional Foundations 

(39 credits required) 

Counseling and Interviewing Slcills 

Counseling Theories 

Group Process and Practice 

Appraisal Techniques 

Research Methods 

Social and Cultural Issues 

Career and Litest)'le Development 

Developmental Psychology 

Professional Issues: Rehabilitation Counseling 

Physical Disabilities 

Vocational Aspects of Disability' 

Practicum: Rehabilitation Counseling 

Internship: Rehabilitation Counseling 

General Electives 

(9 credits required) 

Disability and Specialty Populations 

Psychology of Adjustment 
Addictive Behaxiors 
Substance Abuse Education 
Issues in Substance Abuse 
Psychiatric Disorders 
Problems of Adolescence 
Counseling Issues for Women 
Directed Study 
Special Topics 

Counseling Systems 
Family Counseling and Therapy 
Behavioral Counseling 
Health and Behavior 



Clinical Experience 
COUN 594 Practicum: Group Counseling 

Credits for Degree: 48 
Total Required Credits: 39 Total Elective Credits: 9 



72 



School Counseling 

Dr. LeeAnn M. Eschbach, Director 
717-941-6299 • cschbach@uofs.edu 

The School Counseling program prepares students for entry into secondary and 
elementar)' school counseling positions. Both elementary and secondary school coun- 
selors pro\ide professional services aimed at meeting the academic, career, personal 
and social needs of students. The programs pro\'ide the opportunity to acquire acade- 
mic competencies, refine them through practical experience, and increase self-under- 
standing and self-confidence. 

The School Counseling Profession 
According to the American School Counseling Association (ASCA), the school 
counseling division of the American Counseling Association, school counselors work 
with all students, school staff, families, and members of the community as an integral 
pai't of the education program. As skilled professionals, school counselors engage in a 
process of helping people by assisting them in malcing decisions and changing behavior. 

School counseling programs promote school success through a focus on academic 
achievement, prevention and intervention activities, advocacy, and social/emotional and 
career development. Services provitied by the school counseling program are compre- 
hensive and de\'elopmental in nature, with sensitivity to social and cultural ciifferences 
and special needs. 

Working in a specialt)' area within the field of professional counseling, school coun- 
selors meet the knowledge and sldll requirements for the general practice of professional 
counseling as well as die narrowly focused, advanced knowledge in the field of school 
counseling. 

Similar to the other areas of professional counseling, employment opportunities for 
school counselors are projected to grow faster than average for all occupations through 
2005 according to the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Outlook Handbook. 
School Counseling is noted as the fastest growing area of all specialty areas of profession- 
al counseling practice. 

Curricula 

The School Counseling programs are 48-credit curricula leading to the Master 
of Science degree. The curricula are divided into four areas or sequences: psycho- 
logical and sociological foundations, counseling, professional orientation, and 
research. A 3 credit practicum and 3 credit internship experience are among the 
required courses. Additionally, a student must satisfactorily complete their 
Professional Counselor Portfolio within the time frame outlined in the departmental 
Counseling Program Manual. 

Accreditations and Certification 

The School Counseling programs are designed to meet the standards for certifi- 
cation as Elementary or Secondary School Counselor established by the Pennsylvania 
Department of Education (PDE). Upon completion of the program, and the award- 
ing of the Master's Degree, students are eligible to apply for the Education Specialist 
1 Certificate in Elementary or Secondary School Counseling. The programs are 
competency based and designed to meet the Standards for Program Approval as out- 
lined by PDE. 

^ 73 



The School Counseling program is accredited by the Council for Accreditation 
of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), a specialized accredit- 
ing body recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditiation (CHEA). 
This accreditation affords a number of advantages to program graduates. The pro- 
gram is also accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher 
Education (NCATE). 

Certain students who already possess a relevant master's degree may desire certi- 
fication only. In those cases, their previous study and experience will be reviewed by 
a committee and a program of study will be recommended. Students completing the 
"certification only" option must meet all competency requirements for certification as 
identified by PDE. 

Because the School Counseling program is accredited by CACREP, graduates 
meet all academic requirements for certification as a National Certified Counselor 
(NCC) as well as a School Counseling Specialty' Certification. Graduates may apply 
to the National Board of Certified Counselors to take the National Counselor 
Examination upon graduation from the program. Students who pass the certification 
examination will be granted recognition as an NCC. All inquiries regarding certifica- 
tion as an NCC and application for same should be directed to: 

National Board for Certified Counselors, Inc. 

3-D Terrace Way 

Greensboro, NC 27403 

(919) 547-0607 

Refer to General Information under the Department of Counseling and Human 
Services for policies and procedures appUcable to all departmental programs. 




LeeAnn M. Eschbach, Associate Professor of the Department ofCoimselmjj and Human Services and 
Director of the School Counseling program. 

74 



School Counseling Curriculum 
Secondary School Counseling Specialization 

Psychological and Sociological Fotmdations Sequence: 

(9 credits required) 

COUN 506* Social and Cultural Issues 
COUN 507* Career and Lifestyle Development 
COUN 508* Developmental Psycholog\' 

Counselin£f Sequence: 

(21 credits required) 

COUN 501* Counseling and Interviewing Skills 

COUN 502* Counseling Theories 

COUN 503* Group Process and Practice 

COUN 504* Appraisal Techniques 

COUN 540* Family Counseling and Therapy 

COUN 592* Practicum: School Counseling 

COUN 597* Internship: School Counseling 

Professional Orientation Sequence: 

(6 credits required) 

COUN 530* Professional Issues: School Counseling 
COUN 533* Managing School Counseling Programs 

Research Sequence: 

(3 credits required) 

ED 502 Educational Research 

COUN 505 Research Methods 

Elective (s): 

COUN 511 Counseling with Children 

COUN 531 Psychology of Adjustment 

COUN 542 Family Violence 

COUN 560 Addictive Behaviors 

COUN 561 Substance Abuse Education 

COUN 562 Issues in Substance Abuse 

COUN 563 Crisis Intervention 

COUN 564 Children's Mental Health 

COUN 565 Psychiatric Disorders 

COUN 570 Problems of Adolescence 

COUN 571 Counseling Issues for Women 

COUN 582 Directed Study 

COUN 584 Special Topics 

COUN 594 Practicum: Group Counseling 

ED 501 Educational Psycholog)' 

ED 508 Advanced Foundations of Education 

ED 562 Teaching the Gifted Child 

ED 568 Education of the Exceptional Child 

Credits for Decree: 48 

Total Required Credits: 39 Total Elective Credits: 9 

* Required courses. The student's mentor may recommend appropriate deletions or substitu- 
tions, based on the evaluation of the student's credentials. 

75 



School Counseling Curriculum 
Elementary School Counseling Specialization 

Psychological and Sociological Foundations Sequence: 

(9 credits required) 
Social and Cultural Issues 
Career and Lifestyle Development 
Developmental Psychology 

Counseling Sequence: 
(21 credits required) 
Counseling Theories 
Group Process and Practice 
Appraisal Techniques 
Counseling with Children 
Family Counseling & Therapy 
Practicum: Elementary School Counseling 
Internship: Elementary School Counseling 
Professional Orientation Sequence: 
(6 credits required) 
Professional Issues: School Counseling 
Consultation in the Elementary School 

Research Sequence: 

(3 credits required) 
Education Research 
Research Methods 

Elective (s): 
Counseling and Interviewing Skills 
Psychology of Adjustment 
Family Violence 
Addictive Behaviors 
Substance Abuse Education 
Issues in Substance Abuse 
Crisis Intervention 
Children's Mental Health 
Psychiatric Disorders 
Problems of Adolescence 
Counseling Issues for Women 
Directed Study 
Special Topics 

Practicum: Group Counseling 
Educational Psychology 
Advanced Foundations of Education 
Teaching the Gifted Child 
Education of the Exceptional Child 

Credits for Degree: 48 
Total Required Credits: 39 Total Elective Credits: 9 
* Required courses. The student's mentor may recommend appropriate additions or substitu- 
tions, based on the evaluation of the student's credentials. 



COUN 506* 
COUN 507* 
COUN 508* 



COUN 502* 
COUN 503* 
COUN 504* 
COUN 511* 
COUN 540* 
COUN 593* 
COUN 598* 



COUN 530* 
COUN 534* 



ED 502 
COUN 505 

COUN 501 
COUN 531 
COUN 542 
COUN 560 
COUN 561 
COUN 562 
COUN 563 
COUN 564 
COUN 565 
COUN 570 
COUN 571 
COUN 582 
COUN 584 
COUN 594 
ED 501 
ED 508 
ED 562 
ED 568 



76 



Course Descriptions 

Credits 
COUN 500. Professional Issues: Community Counselinjj 3 

Focuses on the underlying philosophical, historical, professional, legal, and ethical issues 
involved in the profession of counseling. Designed to acquaint the student with important 
issues in the field of professional counseling and to help the student establish a sense of profes- 
sional identity'. 

COUN 501. Counseling and Interviennn£i Skills 3 

This course deals with the application of counseling theory to the practical inter\'ie\v situation. 
The counseling process and the core elements of a facilitative counseling relationship will be 
examined. Counselor candidates will begin to develop basic interviewing skills. 

COUN 502. Counselinjj Theories 3 

Selected theories and techniques of counseling are discussed and examined through a combi- 
nation of lecture, discussion, and role-playing activities. Emphasis will be upon evaluating the 
various theories and abstracting parts of these theories into a comprehensive overview of the 
counseling process. Application to different types of clients is discussed. 

COUN 503. Group Process and Practice 3 

A basic understanding of group dynamics and behavior is provided. Processes and patterns of 
interaction are analyzed primarily from the standpoint of their broad educational significance. 
The selection, evaluation and use of group counseling methods and materials are discussed. 
Methods of developing and organizing group programs are also presented. Students also par- 
ticipate in a group experience. 

COUN 504. Appraisal Techniques 3 

Emphasis will be placed upon the development of competency in the evaluation, use, and 
interpretation of tests and inventories used in assessing abilities, achievement, interests and per- 
sonalit)'. The relationship of informal data to the analysis of individual behavior will be includ- 
ed. Selected instruments will be examined in terms of their design and appropriate utilization. 

COUN 505. Research Methods 3 

An introduction to research issues and methodology in the field of counseling. Emphasis is 
placed on gaining the knowledge necessary to evaluate the conclusions of published research. 

COUN 506. Social and Cultural Issues 3 

Focuses on current social and cultural issues which shape human behavior and affect the prac- 
tice of counseling. Emphasis is placed on multicultural counseling and issues such as aging, 
sexualit}', AIDS and poverty are addressed. 

COUN 507. Career and Lifestyle Development 3 

Psychological and sociological aspects of vocational choice and vocational adjustment will be 
presented and major theories of career choice and development will be reviewed. Emphasis 
will be placed upon methods and resources for facilitating career development throughout the 
life span. Career education, computerized information systems, and decision-making methods 
will be considered along with innovative approaches for special needs populations. 

COUN 508. Developmental Psycholojjy 3 

This course provides an understanding of developmental psychology', including theoretical 
approaches and issues relating to physical, cognitive, personalit}' and moral development with 
particular emphasis on implication for counselors. Both psychological and sociological impacts 
on development will be overviewed. 



77 



COUN511. Counseling WitP) Children 3 

(Prerequisite, COUN 502) This course deals with the application of counseling theory to the 
counseling interxiew situation with elementary school clients. The counseling process, the core 
elements ot a facilitative counseling relationship, and specific techniques for counseling children 
will be examined. Counselor candidates will begin to develop basic interviewing skills. 

COUN 520. Professional Issues: Rehabilitation Counselin^i 3 

Identification of the principles underlying rehabilitation, including history, philosophy, struc- 
ture, and legislation. Study of the rehabilitation process from referral through follow-along 
activities. Concepts regarding legal issues, professional ethics, consumer advocacy, personal 
philosophy, communit\' organization and the team concept are presented through a combina- 
tion of guest lecturers and seminars. Field experience in supported employment with business 
and industry will be required. 

COUN 521. Physical Disabilities 3 

Unique problems of various disabilit}' groups encountered by the counselor. Psychodynamic 
principles underlying personal adjustment to disability with emphasis on client needs, conflicts, 
and adjustment mechanisms. Environmental adjustment problems in relation to the nuclear 
family and communit}'. 

COUN 522. Vocational Aspects of Disability 3 

Theories and models of vocational choice, career development, vocational counseling, and selected 
vocational assessment measures are presented. An in-depth study of the rehabilitation problems 
and issues dealt with by the counselor in placing individuals with disabilities is included. Job analy- 
sis and industrial visits are required. 

COUN 530. Professional Issues: School Cojtnselinjf 3 

This is a professional seminar wherein emphasis is placed upon the development of a sensitivity 
to the educational, sociological and philosophical implications of the counselor's role. This 
course is designed to provide for a smooth transition to the role of school counselor. Included 
in the course is a consideration of current ethical, legal, and professional development issues. 

COUN 531. Psycholojjy of Adjustment 3 

This course pro\'ides an understanding of adjustive behavior, including the discrimination of nor- 
mal from abnormal behavior and a thorough understanding of sources of stress and stress man- 
agement. Special attention is given to adjustment problems of a \'ariet)' of client populations. 

COUN 533. Manajjinfi School Counselinjj Projjram 3 

This course provides a detailed examination of issues relevant to the organization, administra- 
tion and coordination of school counseling programs. Topics such as interprofessional collab- 
oration, needs assessment, establishment of program initiatives and evaluation of service will 
be addressed. 

COUN 534. Consultation in the Elementary School 3 

This course provides an examination of issues relevant to the roles and functions of the ele- 
mentary school counselor as a consultant, collaborator, and program planner. Topics explored 
include guidance program planning and evaluation, and working with others both within the 
school system and the community'. 

COUN 540. Family Counseling! and Tlierapy 3 

The systems and communications theories of famil\' therapy will be presented with specific attention 
to the structural and strategic family therapy approaches. A variet\' of family therapy techniques and 
stages will be learned through tiie use of role play and videotaping. The utilization of famil\' therap\' 
in a \ariet\' of settings will be discussed. 



78 



COUN 541. Homebased Family Intervention 3 

(Prerequisite, COUN 540) This advanced family intervention course concentrates on 
services that are delivered to tamilies in which a child/adolescent is at risk of placement outside 
the home through child wclfire, mental health, juvenile justice, drug and alcohol, or special 
education. The emphasis will be on designing services that allow a child/ adolescent to stay in 
the home and within the community. 

COUN 542. Family Violence 3 

This course examines the dynamics and treatment strategies associated with work in homes 
where family members have experienced \'arious forms of physical, sexual, and emotional mal- 
treatment from other family members. 

COUN 550. Professional Issues: Child Welfare 3 

Focuses on the underlying philosophical, historical, professional, legal, and ethical issues faced by 
counselors in child welfare settings. Designed to acquaint the student with important issues and 
roles in the child welfare field and to help the student establish a sense of professional identity. 

COUN 5 5 L Child Welfare Services 3 

This course is designed to provide a comprehensive examination of principal child welfare issues, 
policies, and services. Supportive, supplementary, protective, and substitute services will be cov- 
ered with a special focus on the philosophical issues related to parent, child, and societal rights 
and responsibilities. Emphasis will be on child welfare ser\'ices as a field of counseling practice. 

COUN 560. Addictive Behaviors 3 

The problems of drug and alcohol dependency are examined. Treatment approaches and facil- 
ities are illustrated and discussed with guest lecturers and seminars. A field trip to a local treat- 
ment faciht}' is required. 

COUN 561. Substance Abuse Education 3 

Design, implementation, and evaluation of substance abuse prevention and education programs. 

COUN 562. Issues in Substance Abuse 3 

Legal and health consequences of substance abuse. Special attention is given to the role of the 
substance abuse specialist in relationship to health care and legal systems. 

COUN 563. Crisis Intervention 3 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the theory and practice of crisis interven- 
tion as it is applied to common crisis situations such as suicide, battering, violent behavior, 
post-traumatic stress disorder, substance abuse, sexual assault, and personal loss. Didactic 
instruction will be supplemented by role play experiences, guest lectures by crisis intervention 
specialists, and use of audiovisual materials. 

COUN 564. Children's Mental Health 3 

This course is designed to introduce the graduate student to counseling of children with men- 
tal health needs. Children's behavior will be examined along a continuum that ranges from 
normal developmental discontinuities to serious emotional, behavioral, or mental disorders. 
Each type of problem will be examined in terms of its etiology, preferred form of psychothera- 
peutic intervention, and psychopharmacological treatment where appropriate. \n addition, sys- 
temic issues will be examined that impact upon provision of services to children. 

COUN 565. Psychiatric Disorders 3 

An examination of the problems associated with mental and emotional disturbances. 
Emphasis is placed on contemporary modalities of treatment as they relate to community 
mental health programs. Critical issues in mental health including the dynamics behind these 
issues will be discussed. 

79 



COUN 566. Behavioral CoimselinFi 3 

The literature on behavior modification and therapy is examined with particular emphasis on 
the application of techniques to varied clinical populations. 

COUN 567. Health and Behavior 3 

Focuses on stress, the nonspecific response of the body to any demand, which affects thoughts, 
emotions, and the body. Stress-induced diseases of adaptation (the psychosomatic warning 
signs such as hypertension, gastrointestinal disorders, and nervous disturbances) along with the 
stress-related thought disorders and emotional disturbances are examined. 

COUN 570. Problems of Adolescence 3 

This course explores current concerns and challenges confronting adolescents and young 
adults. Topics will partially be determined by societal trends, and will cover a range of issues 
such as adolescent suicide, eating disorders, substance abuse and relationship conflicts. 
Selected issues will be explored from both a psychological and sociological perspective, with 
emphasis on implications for developing counselor intervention techniques. 

COUN 571. Counselin£i Issues for Women 3 

A basic understanding of psychological issues currendy facing women across the life span will be 
provided. Sociological concerns will be discussed as well as counselor intervention techniques. 

Coun 580. Child Welfare Agency Practicum 3 

(Prerequisites, COUN 501, 502, 504) Focuses on necessary and desirable counseling skills, 
development of counseling relationships, and case conceptualization within the child welfare 
agency. Practical application of counseling theories and techniques, psychological testing, and 
vocational development theory is emphasized. The practicum consists of 100 clock hours and 
includes direct ser\ice work, individual supervision and group supervision. 

COUN 582. Directed Study 3 

Allows the student to pursue an area of interest under the guidance of a faculty member. 

COUN 584. Special Topics 3 

Selected topics of current interest in the field of counseling are offered on a variable schedule. 

COUN 585. Child Welfare A^rency Internship 3 

(Prerequisite, COUN 580) Full time placement in a child welfare agency, facility' or institution 
involving 600 clock hours of supervised experience. These assignments may include work in 
mental health, drug and alcohol, family service, aging, or mental retardation facilities. The 
Internship must coincide with academic semester. 

COUN 590. Practicum: Community Counselin£j 3 

(Prerequisites, COUN 501, 502, 504) Focuses on necessary and desirable counseling skills, 
development of counseling relationships, and case conceptualization. Practical application of 
counseling theories and techniques, psychological testing, and vocational development theory 
is emphasized. The practicum consists of 100 clock hours and includes direct service work, 
individual supervision and group supervision. 

COUN 591. Practicum: Rehabilitation Counselin_0 3 

(Prerequisites, COUN 501, 502, 504) Focuses on necessary and desirable counseling skills, 
development of counseling relationships, and case conceptualization. Practical application of 
counseling theories and techniques, psychological testing, and vocational development theory 
is emphasized. The practicum consists of 100 clock hours and includes direct service work, 
individual supervision and group supervision. 



80 



COUN 592. Practicum: Secondary School Counseling 3 

(Prerequisites, COUN 501, 502, 504) This course consists of the actual counseling of clients 
under superxision. The primary focus is on necessary and desirable skills, dexelopment of counsel- 
ing, and case conceptualization. Practical application of counseling theories and technic^ues, psy- 
chological testing, and \'ocational cie\'elopment theor)' is emphasized. The practicum consists of 
100 clock hours and includes direct service work, individual supervision and group supervision. 

COUN 593. Practicum: Elementary School Counseling 3 

This course consists of actual counseling of clients under supervision. Practicum focuses on 
necessary and desirable counseling skills, development of counseling relationships, and case 
conceptualization. Practical applications of counseling theories and techniques, psychological 
testing, and career development theory are emphasized. A variety of on-site counseling experi- 
ences are provided for students. Required of all Elementary School Counseling students. 

COUN 594. Practicum: Group Counselirigi 3 

(Prerequisite, COUN 503) Focuses on necessary and desirable group counseling skills, the 
development of group environments and the use of group techniques for generating individual 
change. An advanced personal group experience under direction of the faculty is an ongoing 
part of this practicum. Admission by consent of instructor. 

COUN 595. Internship: Community Counselin^i 3 

(Prerequisite, COUN 590) Full-time placement in a communit}' agency, facility or institution 
involving 600 clock hours of supervised experience. These assignments may include work in 
mental health, drug and alcohol, family service, aging, or mental retardation facilities. A mini- 
mum of 3 credits is required of all students. Students who require more than one semester/term 
to complete the internship must register for three credits of internship per semester/term. 

COUN 596. Internship: Rehabilitation Counseling 3 

(Prerequisite, COUN 591) Full-time placement in a community agency, facility or institution 
involving 600 clock hours of supervised experience. These assignments may include work in 
State-Federal rehabilitation agencies, rehabilitation centers, sheltered workshops, selected men- 
tal and retardation programs, supported employment, independent living centers and programs, 
drug and alcohol programs, and other systems which provide services for State-Federal pro- 
grams. A minimum of 3 credits is required of all students. Selected students may earn a maxi- 
mum of 9 internship credits. Students who require more than one semester/term to complete 
the internship must register for three credits of internship per semester/term. 

COUN 597. Internship: Secondary School Counseling 3 

(Prerequisite, COUN 592) Placement of counselor- trainee students in a secondary school guid- 
ance office, involving 600 clock hours of supervised experience. Actual counseling of secondary 
school students under supervision occurs in this course. A variety' of experiences are provided for 
indi\'idual counseling and other counselor-related activities, usually on site. A minimum of 3 
credits is required of all students. Students who require more than one semester/ term to com- 
plete the internship must register for three credits of internship per semester/ term. 

COUN 598. Internship: Elementary School Counseling 3 

(Prerequisite, COUN 592) Placement of counselor- trainee students in an elementary school 
guidance office, involving 600 clock hours of supervised experience. Actual counseling of ele- 
mentary school students under supervision occurs in this course. A \'ariet}' of experiences are pro- 
vided for individual counseling and other counselor-related acti\'ities, usually on site. A minimum 
of 3 credits is required of all students. Students who require more than one semester/ term to 
complete the internship must register for three credits of internship per semester/term. 



81 



Master of Business Administration 

Dr. Wayne H. J. Cunningham, Director 

717-941-4387 • cunninghamwl@uofs.edu 

http://vv\\av.academic. uofs.edu/faculty/cunninghamwl 

http://www.academic.uofs.edu/department/mba/ 

Department of Accounting faculty: Professor - Brian Carpenter, CM. A. 
(Chair), Joseph R. Zandarski, CP^l.; Associate Professors - Ronald J. Grambo, 
C.RA., Daniel Mahoney, C.RA., Michael Ofosu Mensah, Assistant Professors - 
Laura Helene Ellis, Roxanne T. Johnson, Robyn Lawrence, Frank B. Linton. 

Department of Economics/Finance faculty: Associate Professors - Mri^en 
Rose, Frank P Corcionc, Satyajit P. Ghosh (Chair), Ralph W. Grambo, Jr., 
Riaz Hussain, John Kallianiotis, Hon£[ V. Nguyen, Murli Rajan, Edward M. 
Scahill, Susan Tr ussier. 

Department of Management/Marketing faculty: Associate Professors - 

Subramanian Balakrishnan, Gerald Biberman (Chair), Alan L. Bruma^fim, 
Satya P. Chattopadhyay, Jafor Chowdhury, Irene Goll, Robert L. McKea£fe, 
Delia A. Sumrall, Len Tischler, John M. Zych; Assistant Professors - Cynthia 
Cann, Eileen B. Hewitt, Francis J. Wormuth. 

Department of Operations & Information Management faculty: 

Professor - Prasadarao V. Kakumanu (Chair); Associate Professors - Tinj L 
Chien, Wayne H.J. Cunningham, Kin^isley S. Gnanendran, Deborah J. Gou0eon, 
Satyanarayana Prattipati, Rose Sebastianelli, Nabil Tamimi. 

The Master of Business Administration (MBA) program at the University of 
Scranton emphasizes the skills and perspectives necessary to succeed in today's global 
and technolog)^- based business environment. We attempt to develop in students of 
high intellectual calibre and leadership potential the knowledge, abilities and attitudes 
which will prepare them for further studies and/or management careers in this busi- 
ness environment. A significant emphasis is placed on providing an education which 
will benefit both the student and the local, national and/or international community 
through that student's decision-making skills as developed by the program. 

Accreditation 

The MBA program at the University of Scranton is one of only eleven graduate 
programs in Pennsylvania which is accredited by AACSB - The International 
Association for Management Education. Like other high quality MBA programs, the 
University of Scranton MBA provides for a broad business education, requiring 
courses in a number of fijnctional areas. At the same time, a degree of specialization 
is allowed. 

The Program 

The foundation of our MBA curriculum is comprised of eight core courses 
which thoroughly acquaint students with the functional areas of business and four 
elective courses selected to meet the student's particular career objectives. 



82 




Wavnc H.J. Citnniujjhnni, MBA Director {scntcdfar riffht) with MBA Mentors: Seated, left to right: Michael Ofosii 
Mensah (Accounting), John Kallianiotis (Economics/Finance), Cunningham. Standing, left to rijjht: Mtirli Rajan 
(Economics/Finance), Stibramanian Balakrishnan (Management/Marketing). 

Core Courses - 8 courses (24 credits) 

All students must complete each of the MBA core courses listed below. 
However, students with extensive background in a particular area may have the core 
course requirement(s) in that area waived. The student then takes an additional 
advanced elective to meet the 36 credit requirement. 

Ace 502 Accounting for Management 

Oim 503 Operations Management 

Oim 504 Management Information Systems 

Mgt 505 Organizational Behavior 

Mkt 506 Marketing Management 

Eco 507 Managerial Economics 

Fin 508 Financial Management 

Mgt 509 Business Policy 

Advanced Electives - 4 courses (12 credits) minimum 

Advanced elective courses are those courses numbered 510 and higher in the 
course description list below. Each student must take a minimum of four advanced 
elective courses (12 credits). At least one of these four courses must be an "interna- 
tional" course. Students may choose from Ace 525, Mgt 556, Mkt 563, Oim 577, 
and Fin 584; and Special Topics courses with an international focus which may be 
offered from time to time to fulfill the international requirement. 



83 



Specializations 

Students who choose to complete at least three Advanced Elective courses in one 
functional area may "specialize" in that area. MBA students may choose from one of 
the following "specialization" areas. 

• Accounting 

• Finance 

• Marketing 

• Operations Management 

• Management Information Systems 

• International Business 

Students who choose the International Business specialization choose at least 
three of the internationsl courses listed above to fulfill their specialization require- 
ment. 

Students who are interested in software development, as opposed to managing 
information systems, should consider the Soft:ware Engineering master's degree pro- 
gram described elsewhere in this catalog. 

The student may choose not to specialize, as well. Students who choose a 
"General" MBA maximize their flexibilit)' in the selection of advanced electives. The 
student who chooses this option may take any four Advanced Elective courses select- 
ed in any combination from the Advanced Electives as long as one course is an 
"international" course. 

Some students choose to pursue a "dual specialization" by taking the required 
number of Advanced Elective courses (3 courses, 9 credits) in each specialization 
area. However, the same course may not be used to fulfill the specialization require- 
ment in more than one area. For example, Mkt 563 may be used to fulfill the 9 cred- 
it requirement in the marketing specialization or the international specialization, but 
not both. 

Computer Literacy: Many courses in the MBA program assume a knowledge of 
computers. Specifically, students are expected to be familiar with I ) spreadsheet 
applications and techniques, 2) database management, 3) introductory VAX applica- 
tions, and 4) use of the World Wide Web. Students lacking computer background 
should inquire into University' of Scranton continuing education courses. 

Transfer of Credits 

A maximum of six graduate credits may be transferred to the University of 
Scranton in fiilfilling MBA course requirements. If the student is seeking to transfer 
courses from another lesuit institution participating in the Multilateral MBA 
Agreement, the six credit limit does not apply. The student may check with his/her 
mentor regarding credit transfer. For other regulations governing the transfer of 
graduate credits, see page 17-18 of this catalog. 

Class Schedules 

All classes are conducted in the evening. The class periods are 4:30-7:10 p.m. and 
7:10-10:00 p.m. During the Fall and Spring semesters each course meets one night per 
week. (Consult Summer and Intersession schedules for class times in these terms) 

84 



Students may attend either on a part-time or full-time basis. Most part-time stu- 
dents take two courses in each of the Fall and Spring terms. Most full-time students 
take three or four courses each Fall and Spring term, plus one or two courses each 
Summer and Intersession term. 

Graduate Assistantships 

Approximately 1 3 graduate assistantships are available for outstanding full-time 
MBA students in each year. The assistants may work with School of Management fac- 
ulty' in their research and other academic duties, in Information Resources, or in other 
University' offices. Assistants receive a stipend and are eligible for a tuition scholarship. 

Foundation Courses 

All MBA students must haxe academic preparation in the Foundation areas listed 
below. Courses designed to meet this requirement are ordinarily taken at the under- 
graduate level. Students with an undergraduate degree in business will ordinarily 
have completed all these courses and therefore can ordinarily complete the MBA 
program by talcing 12 courses (36 credits) as previously outlined. Students with 
undergraduate degrees in disciplines other than business may be required to take 
some courses designated as "Foundation" courses. Any foundation courses required 
of a student will be identified in the letter of admission to the program which is pro- 
vided after an examination of the student's transcript of previous academic studies. 

Any disagreement with the assigned Foundation courses should be reviewed with 
the student's mentor shortly after receiving the letter of admission. Note: 
Foundation courses are frequently cited as prerequisites for MBA Core and Advanced 
Elective courses. Students taking the latter courses without having the assigned 
Foundation requirements waived will be required to take the necessary foundation 
courses before graduating. 

Areas Covered U. ofS. Undergraduate Courses 

Financial and Ace 253 & 254 OR Ace 210 

Managerial Accounting 

Mathematics Math 1 06 & 1 07 OR Oim 2 1 
Statistics and Introduction to 

Management Science Stat 25 1 8c Oim 35 1 OR Oim 2 1 1 

Marketing Mkt 351 

Corporation Finance Fin 351 

Micro & Macro Economics Eco 153 & 154 OR Eco 210 

Principles of Management Mgt 351 
Business Law/Legal Environment of Bus. Mgt 251 

International Business* Eco 351 OR Eco 475 

* This is a foundation requirement only for students pursuing the specialization in international 
business. 

Foundation courses may be completed at the University of Scranton or at anoth- 
er accredited institution. There is no limit to the number of Foundation course cred- 
its which may be taken at another accredited institution. Also, grades in Foundation 

85 



courses do not enter into the calculation of the graduate GPA. After admission into 
the program, Foundation, Core and Advanced Elective courses may be taken simulta- 
neously as long as prerequisite requirements are not being violated. 

Admission Requirements 

The Graduate Management Admission Test (GAIAT) is a test designed to mea- 
sure certain learned abilities, which have been found to be indicators of success in 
graduate programs in business. This test is required of all students. Registration for 
the GMAT may be made via telephone (1-800-GMAT-NOVV) or via their web site 
(http://\v\vw. gmat.org). Visit the GMAT web site for more information about the 
computer- adaptive test. 

Admission to the MBA program is based on a combination of four indicators: 
previous academic performance; the applicant's GAL^T score; letters of recommenda- 
tion; and prior work experience, although prior work experience is not a precondition 
for admission. Particular attention is paid to the candidate's previous academic record 
and performance on the GMAT. 

Foreign students, whose nati\'e language is not English, are required to demonstrate 
their proficiena- in English by achieving a score of at least 500 in the Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL). Applicants scoring less than 500 are not admitted to the 
program. Applicants scoring less than 550 in the TOEFL are required to satisfactorily 
complete a course in English Proficiena^. The course must be taken prior to or during 
the student's first regular term at the University' of Scranton. 

Combined B.S./M.B.A. De£free in Accountin£i 

The Accounting Department offers a specialized program that enables outstand- 
ing undergraduate accounting students to earn both a Bachelor of Science degree in 
accounting and an MBA \\ith an accounting specialization. This specialized, dual- 
degree program is available to undergraduate students who are majoring in account- 
ing. With prudent use of Intersession and Summer sessions, students can complete 
the combined program \\ithin fi\e academic years. The program is structured to allow 
qualified students to take graduate courses while still taking undergraduate courses. 
The opportunity' to take graduate courses prior to completing a baccalaureate degree 
is conditional upon attainment of universit\'-stipulated Combined Baccalaureate/ 
Master's Degree Program (see pages 11-12) requirements. 



86 



Course Descriptions 

Foundation Courses 

Credits 

Eco 153. Principles of Microeconomics 3 

(Formerly Eco 152) This course centers on the salient characteristics of the modern free enter- 
prise econom\'. Topics include the operations of the price system as it regulates production, dis- 
tribution, and consumption, and as it is in turn modified and influenced by private groups and 
government. International economics is also covered. 

Eco 154. Principles of Macroeconomics 3 

(Formerly Eco 151) This course analyzes the determinants of aggregate economic activit)'. The 
main areas studied are the monetary and banking system, the composition and fluctuations of 
national income and inflation, all as influenced by monetary and fiscal policy. 

Eco 210. Essentials of Economic Theory 3 

Intended to provide a foundation in economics for MBA students, this is an intensive course 
that stresses economic theory and public policy implications. The topics include stabilization 
of the economy, the price system as it regulates production, distribution and consumption and 
as it in turn is modified and influenced by private groups and government. 

Eco 351. Envij^onment of International Business 3 

(Prerequisite, Eco 153 & 154 or Eco 210) This course introduces the student to the growing 
field of international business, touching on the economic, social and political environments of 
international trade and multinational corporations. International institutions and agencies that 
impact on international business are discussed and practical aspects of these topics are emphasized. 

Eco 475. International Economics & Finance 3 

(Prerequisite, Eco 351) Advanced foreign trade theories and practices, balance of payments 
analysis, regional integration, exchange rates determination, foreign exchange markets, capital 
movements, and current international economic problems. 

Ace 253. Financial Accounting 3 

A survey of the accounting cycle, basic financial statements, theory and techniques of income, 
asset, and liabilit)' recognition. 

Ace 254. Mana£ierial Accounting 3 

(Prerequisite, Ace 253) Completion of the financial accounting sequence, methods of cost 
accumulation and assignment; methods usefijl in managerial decision making. 

Ace 210. Survey of Managerial & Financial Accounting 3 

A foundation course for Ace 502. This course is devoted to various financial and managerial 
accounting fundamentals, including the accounting cycle (transaction recording and posting, 
adjusting entries, trial balance preparation, financial statement preparation, closing entries, 
accounting principles that underly the recording and reporting of financial information). 
Managerial coverage includes cost terminology and proper cost classification, the statements of 
cost of goods manufactured and cost of goods sold, and the budgetary process. Not open to 
students requiring six credits of introductory accounting. 

Math 106. Quantitative Methods I 3 

Topics from algebra including exponents, radicals, linear and quadratic equations, graphing, 
functions (including quadratic, exponential and logarithmic) and linear inequalities. 

Math 107. Quantitative Methods II 3 

(Prerequisite, Math 106 or equivalent) Topics from differential calculus including limits, deriva- 
tives, curve sketching, marginal cost fianctions, and maximum-minimum problems. Integration. 

87 



Stat 251. Statistics for Business I 3 

(Prerequisite, Math 107, Math 114 or Oim 210) Detailed coverage of descriptive statistics. An 
introduction to the elements of probabilit)' theory (including Bayes' theorem) and decision theo- 
ry, and index numbers. The major discrete and continuous probabilit)' distributions are covered 
with an emphasis on business applications. Data analysis will be done using appropriate software. 

Oim 351. Introduction to Management Scietice 3 

(Prerequisite, Stat 251 ) A survey of the quantitative techniques which are used by modern 
managers. Topic coverage focuses on model building, linear programming methods, queuing 
models, project management and simulation. Emphasis is placed on the use and limits of these 
quantitati\'e methods. Model analysis will be done using appropriate software. 

Oim 210. Qiiantitative Methods I 3 

An introduction to various mathematical tools used in the solution of business problems. Topics 
include: sets, vectors, matiices, system of linear equations; function; differential calculus ot single 
and several variables, classical optimization and integral calculus, sample space, basic probability 
concepts, random variables, discrete and continuous probabilit}' distributions, sampling. 




Cynthia Cann, Assistant Professor of the Department of Management/Marketing. 

Oim 211. Quantitative Methods II 3 

(Prerequisite, Math 106 & 107 or Oim 210) An analysis of how statistical and management 
science techniques assist in managerial decision making. Topics include: interval estimation, 
testing of hypothesis, simple and multiple regression models, linear programming, model for- 
mulation, problem solving, and sensitivity analysis, transportation and assignment problems. 

Mgt 351. Principles of Management I 3 

Survey course examines key aspects of organizations and their management e.g., dynamic envi- 
ronments and their effects, organization design and structure, roles/functions of managers, 
managing technology and change, global management, and alternative t^'pes of organizations. 
This course examines the expanding role of the manager from the traditional areas of planning, 
organizing, controlling and directing to addressing current topics including issues of workplace 
di\'ersit)'. Course will address the knowledge and skills managers must develop in working with 
others who are different from themselves. 



88 



Mkt351. Introduction to Marketin£i 3 

(Prerequisites, Eco 153 & 154 or Eco 210) This course introduces the student to the field of 
marketing. An o\'erview of the principles on which the discipline is founded is provided to stu- 
dents. In addition, the role that various institutions such as manuftcturing firms, wholesalers 
and retailers, and other facilitating middlemen play in the marketplace is examined. The mar- 
keting concept is presented as the framework under which the decisions related to marketing 
mix variables (product, place, price and promotion) are made by organizations. 

Fin 351. Introduction to Finance 3 

(Prerequisite, Ace 210 & Eco 153 or Eco 210) This course introduces the business student to 
the field of finance. It serves as the foundation course for financial principles used in both 
financial management and investment courses. Topics include time value of money, risk analy- 
sis, basic operation of the capital markets, current assets and liability analysis, and introduction 
to the topics of capital budgeting and cost of capital calculation. 

Mgt251. Lejjal Environment of Business 3 

The nature, sources, formation, and applications of law. The judicial Sanction, the court sys- 
tem, litigation and other methods of resolving disputes, legislation law from judicial decisions, 
law by administrative agencies, regulation of business activit)', antitrust law, consumer protec- 
tion, environment and pollution control. Substantive review of tort, criminal and insurance 
law. Full review pf property' rights for both personal and real property. Attention to business 
organization, principal of agency, partnership and cooperation. 

Core Courses 

Ace 502. Accountin£i for Management 3 

(Prerequisite, Ace 210 or Ace 253 and Ace 254) The student develops a deeper understanding 
of accounting as the "language of business", and the ways in which it can be employed to help 
menagers perform within their organizatins. Emphasis is placed on ways to use, analyze, and 
interpret accounting data in planning and controlling organizational activities. Selected tech- 
niques required for analysis and managerial decision making are introduced. 

Oim 503. Operations Management 3 

(Prerequisite, Stat 251 & Oim 351, or Oim 211) This course is designed to emphasize the 
strategic importance of operations management to the overall performance of the enterprise. 
Topics include: product and process planning and design, forecasting, facility location and lay- 
out, production staffing, job design and work measurement, capacity planning, aggregate plan- 
ning, inventory management, requirements planning, operations scheduling, Just-in-time, and 
qualit}' assurance. 

Oim 504. Management Information Systems 3 

The course is designed to educate students to the importance of information systems in man- 
aging profit as well as not for profit organizations such as: manufacturing, banking and health 
care. The course emphasizes the role of information systems to increase productivity, to 
improve the quality of products and services, and to insure overall effectiveness of organiza- 
tional operations. The course introduces the student to information and communication tech- 
nologies; information system evaluation and development processes; information technology 
applications to problem solving and management decision making; and use of information 
technologies to transaction processes and customer service. Appropriate application software 
will be used to get hands-on experience, to analyze cases, and to complete the class project. 
The student is expected to have basic Imowledge of computing skills. 



89 



Mgt 505. Organizational Behavior 3 

(Prerequisite, Mgt 351 or equivalent) A primary goal of an organization is the improved per- 
formance of individuals and work groups within the organization. Organizational behavior is 
the field of study that investigates and explains those concepts or theories which are vital in 
current management practices dealing with job performance. 

Mkt 506. Marketinjj Mana£[ement 3 

(Prerequisite, Mkt 351 ) Analysis of the conceptual and tactical mechanisms of marketing man- 
agement with emphasis on how today's firms and institutions mobilize their resources to 
achieve market penetration, sales volume, and satisfactory profits. Marketing planning with 
control and implementation of strategies as major aspects of decision making. Also, exploring 
market opportunities and formulation of marketing policies (marketing mix) exemplified 
through case studies. 

Eco 507. Managerial Economics 3 

(Prerequisite, Eco 153 & 154 or Eco 210) An intensive smdy of the problems of value and costs, 
including demand theory, empirical demand analysis, production theory, cost theory linear pro- 
gramming applications in resource allocation and cost analysis, empirical cost analysis, market 
structure and pricing theory, pricing practice and the role of government in the private economy. 

Fin 508. Financial Mana£iement 3 

(Prerequisite, Fin 351) Principles of policy formation in the modern corporation; the institu- 
tions, instruments and customary procedures that influence the determination of corporate 
policy; and the reasons for choices in seeking solutions to specific financial problems. A case 
approach will be utilized to cover problems of working capital management, capital budgeting, 
and capital structure. Computerized approaches to financial problems will be emphasized. 

Mgt 509. Business Policy 3 

(Prerequisite, all other core courses) This course introduces the student to methodologies for 
examining strategic policy issues within organizations, primarily business organizations. In 
providing the student with opportunities to devise policy solutions, the course draws on all of 
the functional areas in the MBA curriculum. The course also provides the student with the 
opportunity to present and defend policy solutions. 

Accountin£j Electives 

Ace 512. Survey of Federal Taxes 3 

(Prerequisite, Ace 502 or equivalent) This course is directed at graduate students who desire 
exposure to tax law, but have no prior tax course. The course will survey the general and basic 
rules which govern individuals, corporations, partnerships, and S corporations. The primary 
focus of this course will be directed toward compliance issues. 

Ace 521. Auditing 3 

(Prerequisite, Ace 502) Regulatory, legal, ethical, and technical issues related to the indepen- 
dent audit services. Intended for the general business student; not available to any student 
who has received credit of Ace 364 or its equivalent. 

Ace 522. Federal Taxation 3 

(Prerequisite, Ace 512 or Ace 363, or equivalent) Corporation income taxes, with special 
emphasis on current Internal Revenue Service regulations. Partnerships included. This course 
is not open to those students who have received credit for Ace 365 or its equivalent. 
Ace 525. International Accounting 3 

(Prerequisite, Ace 502 or Ace 252 or Ace 254 or equivalent) Accounting for international 
business; accounting control for the multinational enterprise, global accounting theory and 
practice, social accounting concepts, tax aspects of foreign transactions, and international 
financial reporting to investors. This course is not open to those students who have received 
credit for Ace 365 or its equivalent. 

90 



Ace 526. Managerial Accounting 3 

(Prerequisite, Ace 502) Decision models including pricing factor and product combina- 
dons. Examinadon of the problem of control in organizations, including transfer pricing 
and performance evaluation. This course is not open to students who have received credit 
for Ace 461 or its equi\'alent. 
Ace 527. Financial Accounting 3 

(Prerequisite, Ace 502) A critical study of the major accoundng pronouncements on general 
purpose financial statements. Specific topics include accounring for inventories, investments, 
propert}', plant and equipment, liabilities, income tax allocadon, pensions, and leases. This 
course is not open to those students who have received credit for Ace 362 or its equi\alent. 

Ace 529. Special Topics in Accounting 3 

Advanced Accountin£j Electives 
Each student in the Combined Bachelor of Science/Master of Business Administration 
Degree program must take at least three upper level graduate elective accounting courses. 
Depending upon the student's prior accoundng background, acceptable elecdve courses could 
include the following: Ace 522, 525, 529, and any elective accoundng course that is num- 
bered 530 or greater. 

Aec531. Advanced Auditing 3 

(Prerequisite, Ace 364 or equivalent, or Ace 521) Internal control and audidng issues reladng 
to EDP systems, including the organization, equipment, and applications controls; statistical 
sampling issues; and audit issues relating to certain operating cycles. 

Aec 532. Advanced Taxation 3 

(Prerequisite, Ace 365 or equivalent, or Aec 522) This course is directed at graduate students 
hax'ing an accounting and tax background. The course will examine tax regulations applicable 
to partnerships, limited liabilit\' companies/partnerships, corporadons, S corporations, and 
estates and trusts. The emphasis will be on tax planning. 

Ace 536. Advanced Managerial Accounting 3 

(Prerequisite, Ace 461 or Ace 526, or equivalent) Advanced study of the use of accounting 
information in the decision-making necessary for planning, organizing, directing, and control- 
ling a firm's operations, including budgeting, performance evaluation, statistical analysis, and 
transfer pricing. The behavioral implications of the processes discussed will be addressed 
throughout the course. This course is not open to those students who have received credit for 
Ace 462 or Ace 523. 

Ace 537. Advanced Financial Accounting 3 

(Prerequisite, Ace 362 or Ace 527, or equivalent) An in-depth study of selected advanced 
financial reporting issues. Topics include consolidated financial statements, foreign currency 
transactions and foreign investments, and governmental and non-profit accounting. This 
course is not open to those students who have received credit for Aec 524. 

Operations Management Electives 

Oim 541. Advanced Production and Operations Mana£fement 3 

(Prerequisite, Oim 503) The modeling of production inventory systems. Topics include: facili- 
ty design, aggregate and hierarchical planning, inventory control, and operations scheduling. 
Appropriate software will be used to design, analyze, and evaluate manufacturing operations. 



91 



Oim 542. Applied Operations Research 3 

(Prerequisite, Oim 503) A study of how operations research models may be used to soh'e practi- 
cal decision problems in the business sector. Techniques studied will be chosen from: linear 
programming, goal programming, integer programming, dynamic programming, network theo- 
ry, Markov processes, queuing theory and decision analysis. The course will emphasize problem 
formulation, model management and interpretation; both exact and heuristic algorithms will be 
considered. 

Oim 544. Business Forecasting Models 3 

(Prerequisite, Oim 503 or consent of instructor) This course deals with the study of quantita- 
tive forecasting techniques which include exponential smoothing, classical decomposition, 
regression analysis and Box- Jenkins (ARIMA) methodology, as well as qualitative (judgmental) 
methods. The emphasis is on their practical application in various business forecasting situa- 
tions. Issues important in the selection of appropriate forecasting methodolog)' such as data 
requirements, forecast accuracy, time horizon and cost are discussed. 

Oim 545. Total Qitality Management 3 

(Prerequisite, Oim 503 or consent of instructor) Total Qualit)' Management (TQM) provides 
the means for the organization to define its culture and to support the constant attainment of 
customer satisfaction through an integrated system of tools, techniques, and training. Topic 
coverage focuses on applying various continuous improvement techniques as statistical process 
charts and assessment frameworks (e.g., Deming's philosophy, Baldrige Criteria, ISO 9000) to 
achie\'e world class qualit)'. 

Oim 546. Business Database Mana^fement Systems 3 

(Prerequisite, Oim 504) This course focuses on the overall structure of database management 
applications with emphasis on the relational approach. Topics covered include: database 
design, data dictionaries, query system, methods of storage and access, data definition and 
manipulation, data security and integrity, recovery and concurrence, distributed database man- 
agement. Students will learn to design and implement database applications using micro 
and/or mainframe computers. 

Oim 548. Business Decision Support Systems 3 

(Prerequisite, Oim 503 & 504) This course introduces the student to the conceptual founda- 
tions, technological components, and organizational processes involved in building interaction 
computer-based systems to help decision makers solve relatively unstructured problems. 
Topics include: Decision Support Systems (DSS) and Expert Systems (ES) Architecture, Tools 
for Building DSS and ES, Development of Decision Support and Expert Systems, and 
Applications using DSS Generators and ES Shells. 

Oim 549. Special Topics in Operations and Information Management 3 

Management Electives 

Mgt 5 5 3 . Or^a n iza tional Tljeory 3 

(Prerequisite, Mgt 505) Study of the forces both within and outside the organization that 
determine the structure and processes of an organization. Topics to be co\'ered will include 
technolog)' and size influences, conflict, boundary roles, matrix structure, political factors, and 
sociotechnical systems. 

Mgt 554. Group Dynamics 3 

(Prerequisite, Mgt 505) Designing individual and group behavior systems, contemporary top- 
ics on designing organizational systems for better utilization of human resources. 



92 



Mgt 555. Organization Power & Politics 3 

(Prerequisite, Mgt 505) This course examines power and politics in organizations from theo- 
retical, applied, and research perspectives. 

Mgt 556. International Management 3 

(Prerequisite, Mgt 505) A basic graduate course in international management, this course 
focuses on the set of strategy decisions facing the multinational corporation. It will also focus 
on the external and internal variables that influence the choice and outcome of strategics. The 
specific strategies covered are entry/ownership, sourcing, control, marketing, financial, human 
resources, and public affairs. Other topics include the division of labor and resource allocation 
on a worldwide basis, cultural issues, and issues of nationalism. 
Mgt 559. Special Topics in Management 3 

Management Information Systems Electives 

Oim 546. Business Database Management Systems 3 

(Prerequisite, Oim 504) This course focuses on the overall structure of database management 
applications with emphasis on the relational approach. Topics covered include: database 
design, data dictionaries, query system, methods of storage and access, data definition and 
manipulation, data security and integrity, recovery and concurrence, distributed database man- 
agement. Students will learn to design and implement database applications using micro 
and/or mainframe computers. 

Oim 548. Business Decision Support Systems 3 

(Prerequisites, Oim 503 and 504) This course introduces the student to the conceptual foun- 
dations, technological components, and organizational processes involved in building interac- 
tive computer-based systems to help decision-makers solve relatively unstructured problems. 
Topics include: Decision Support Systems (DSS) and Expert Systems (ES) architecture, tools 
for building DSS and ES, development of decision support and expert systems, and applica- 
tions using DSS generators and ES shells. 

Oim 571. Information Networks and Electronic Commerce 3 

(Prerequisite, Oim 504) The main focus of the course is on the use of data communication 
networks to support effective and efficient management of information both within the organi- 
zation as well as among organizations and individuals. Topics include: basic concepts of com- 
munication networks; analysis of existing enterprise data and voice communication networks; 
nerv\ork management; electronic commerce and the world wide web; intranets and collabora- 
tive work; and emerging trends and issues in electronic commerce infrastructure. The course 
will include case studies and a term project related to the applications of information networks. 

Oim 573. Development of Business Applications 3 

(Prerequisite, Oim 504) This course focuses on end-user development of business applications 
using visual, event-driven development tools. Topics include: problem-solving logic and the 
application development process; objects, properties, events, and methods; design of user 
interfaces, dialogs and menus; macros and modular procedures; object linking and embedding; 
accessing databases; object-oriented programming concepts; and emerging trends in end-user 
application development. Prior programming experience is not required. 



93 



Oim 574. Information Technolo£iy and Business Process Reen^ineerin^ 3 

(Prerequisite, Oim 504) Information technology (IT) makes possible new and radically differ- 
ent ways of performing business functions. This course will address the ways in which infor- 
mation technology can be used by organizations to restructure and redesign business process- 
es. The course contents include: analysis of core business processes and cross-functional inte- 
gration, identification and evaluation of opportunities to apply IT to business processes, design 
and development of solutions to reengineer business processes, development of implementa- 
tion plans, and analysis of the key implications of the plan in terms of costs and organizational 
changes. Students will analyze and discuss several cases involving the use of IT in reengineer- 
ing. 

Oim 577. Global Information Systems 3 

(Prerequisite, Oim 504) This course examines the role of information systems and telecommu- 
nication technologies in managing international organizations. Topics include: impact of 
information technology at the functional level of multinational corporations; types of interna- 
tional information systems; organizing and managing international information systems; 
changes in telecommunication regulations; international standard setting organizations; build- 
ing strategic alliances through information technolog)^; and emerging information technology 
applications to understand and resolve issues raised by international trade and business. 
Students will discuss major cases that involve global information systems applications to multi- 
national corporations. 

Marketin£f Electives 

Mkt561. Marketing Research 3 

(Prerequisite, Mkt 506) Marketing Research is studied as the basis for decision making, for 
analysis of markets, and for evaluation of marketing strategies through systematic gathering of 
information and evidence. The foundations and methodology of research including behavioral 
sciences and multivariate analysis are discussed. Research projects are conducted by the class 
participants and research applications to marketing problems are exemplified. 

Mkt 562. Promotion Manajjement: Advertising and Sellin^i 3 

(Prerequisite, Mkt 506) A study of the promotion activities of business firms and institutions; 
analysis of audience behavior and motivation; communication through mass media and person 
to person interaction including advertising, personal selling, sales promotion, and publicity; the 
development of an integrated promotional strategy to generate sales and profits through 
informing, persuading, and activating middlemen and consumers. 

Mkt 563. International Marketing 3 

(Prerequisite, Mkt 506) A study, of the managerial problems in international marketing cover- 
ing factors affecting international markets in different cultural areas of the world. 

Mkt 564. Consumer Behavior 3 

(Prerequisite, Mkt 506) Study of the basic factors influencing consumer behavior with empha- 
sis on managerial use of consumer decision making models from both economics and the social 
sciences. 

Mkt 569. Special Topics in Marketing 3 

Economics and Finance Electives 

Eco581. Economics of Business Strategy 3 

(Prerequisite, Eco 507) This course provides an economic analysis of business strategies. 
Focusing on a firm's decision making, it analyzes vertical integration, economies of scale and 
scope, market structure and competition, strategic commitment, pricing rivalry, entry and exit, 
advertising, location, incentives and the principal-agent problem. 



94 



Fin 581. Financial Institutions 3 

(Prerequisite, Fin 508) A detailed survey, of the more important financial institutions of the 
United States in order to determine their fiinctions and interrelations in the national economy. 
Monetary and fiscal policy. Material covered will assist the student to better understand the eco- 
nomic, social and political scene in America. 

Fin 582. Advanced Financial Manajjement 3 

(Prerequisite, Fin 508) A case oriented approach to financial decision making with emphasis 
on current management, capital budgeting,capital structure, mergers and bankruptcy. 

Fin 583. Investment Analysis 3 

(Prerequisite, 508) A detailed study of the investment environment and the process of invest- 
ment management. Topics covered include the study of equity and debt markets, options and 
fijtures markets, stock and bond valuation models, portfolio selection theory, bond portfolio 
management and the use of derivative securities for hedging risk. 

Fin 584. International Finance 3 

(Prerequisite, Fin 508) A detailed study of the financial decision process in multinational cor- 
porations. Topics include the international finance environment, foreign exchange markets, 
measuring and managing foreign exchange risks, financing the global firm, foreign investment 
decisions, managing multinational operations and other advanced issues in multinational 
finance. 

Fin 589. Special Topics in Finance 3 




95 



English 

Dr. Francis X. Jordan, Chair, English 

Dr. John M. Mclnerney, Director of Graduate Program 

717-941-7659 • mcinerneyil@uofs.edu 

http://www.uofs.edu 

Department faculty: Professors - Rebecca S. Beat, Ellen M. Casey, Daniel V. 
Frnnstijio, Leonard G. Goit0eon, William Hill, S.J.,Jobn M. Mclnerney, William 
V. Rakanskas, Stephen E. Whittakej'; Associate Professors - Jones DeRiiter, Mary 
F. En^el, Michael Friedman, John M. Hill, Francis X. Jordan, Joan Robbins, 
Carl Schaffer; Assistant Professors - Geor^fe W. Bellah, III, Joseph L. Qitinn, 
S.J., Joyce Simcoe Simutis. 

The Department of English offers coursework leading to a Master of Arts degree 
in English. In addition, coursework is offered to support the Master of Science in 
Secondary Education with specialization in English. 

Admission Requirements 

The applicant must, prior to the start of his/her graduate program, possess a 
baccalaureate degree; and must have completed on the undergraduate upper-division 
level a minimum of eighteen semester hours in English; and must, further, have a 
GPA of not less than 2.75 (of a possible 4.0) in his/her upper-division courses in 
English. Applicants to the master's program in English must submit a writing sample 
on a literary subject. It must be at least five pages in length and may be a paper com- 
pleted as part of the applicant's undergraduate or other educational experience. 
Letters of recommendation should address the applicant's preparation to do graduate 
work in English Literature. Applicants are urged to submit scores from the GRE 
General Test and Subject Test in Literature. For certain applicants, the Director of 
the Graduate Program in English may require submission of these scores. 
International students must have a score of at least 550 on the TOEFL. For other 
application requirements see pages 9-10. 

Master of Arts in English 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Arts in English may select a thesis or 
non-thesis program. 

M.A. Thesis Program The M.A. thesis program will require the student to com- 
plete successfully 27 credits in courses in English, as outlined below; pass an oral 
exam; and present a critical study (thesis) of no fewer than 12,000 words. The com- 
prehensive examination for the M.A. (thesis) will be an oral examination, in which 
the candidate will defend his/her thesis and be questioned on literary material from 
the area of his/her thesis and two other major areas of English or American litera- 
ture. The specific areas for each student's oral examination will be established by the 
student and his/her mentor, based on the thesis topic. A summary description of the 
procedure to be followed in the preparation and defense of theses can be obtained 
from the secretary of the English Department. 



96 



The only specific course requirements for die M.A. (thesis and non-thesis) are 
English 500: Introduction to Research (three credits) and English 564: Studies in 
Literary Theory (three credits). Students must register for these courses the first 
semester they are offered after they have been accepted into the program. The 
remaining 21 hours of credit for the M.A. (thesis) are to be taken in courses 
approved by the student's mentor. These courses should be so chosen as to combine 
student interest in certain periods and genres, and coverage, both in range and depth, 
of the fields of British and American literature. The 33 credit hours necessary for the 
M.A. (thesis) are completed with the six hours granted for the thesis. 

M.A. Non-Ujesis Propiram The M.A. non-thesis program requires die student to com- 
plete successflilly 33 credits in courses in English, including English 500 and English 564, 
and pass a written comprehensive examination. The examination, which is given several 
times a year, as scheduled by the Graduate Office, will be composed of three sections focus- 
ing on a single literai^y period, a specific genre over several periods, and one major figure. 
Students will choose their own periods, genres and major figures fi"om lists of acceptable 
choices provided by the department, making sure that there is no oxerlap between the liter- 
ary period and the major figure. Students should consult widi the department chair afi:er 
completing nine credits of graduate study in order to begin preparing for the exam. They 
should also apply at the Graduate Office to take the examination sometime during the year 
in which they expect to complete their degree requirements. 

Master of Science in Secondary Education: English 

For a Master of Science in Secondary Education with specialization in English, 
refer to the criteria outlined by the Department of Education, Secondary Education, 
for application procedures and degree requirements. 




John M. Mclncnicy, Professor ofEiujlish and Director of the Graduate Program in English. 



97 



Course Descriptions 

Credits 
Engl 500. Introduction to Research 3 

Course familiarizes students with the important research tools and methods of the discipline, 
as well as with more specialized references and procedures in the students' particular areas and 
periods of interest. Reading and projects prepare students for large research projects, includ- 
ing the M.A. thesis and doctoral dissertation. 

Engl 501. History of the En£[lish Lan£[ua0e 3 

An investigation of the principal phonemic, morphological, and orthographic changes govern- 
ing the evolution of the English language from Anglo-Saxon times to the present; although 
the approach will be historical, due emphasis will be accorded the study of our language as a 
li\ing cultural entity. 

Engl 505. Modern Grammar in the En^flish Curriculum 3 

The theory of transformational grammar, studied against such other theories as prescriptivism, 
structuralism and case grammar, in practical application to the high school and college English 
curriculum. 

Engl 506. Composition in the En^flish Curriculum 3 

Designed for both high school and junior college English teachers, this course will review tradi- 
tional composition programs and approaches, explore innovative programs and methods, and 
consider the place of composition in a variet}^ of curricula. 

Engl 507. Literature in the English Curriculum 3 

In considering strategies for selecting, organizing, and teaching high school literature, this 
course wall explore the central question of what a sequential, well-balanced, efficient program in 
literature should consist of It will include adolescent literature, themes, genres, socio-political 
movements, thematic and short courses, autotutorial devices or systems, and inquiry methods. 

Engl 511. Medieval Enjjlish Literature 3 

A critical study of the major literary works in English of the Middle Ages, from Beowulf 
through Everyman. 

Engl 512. Introduction to Late Medieval Drama 3 

An introduction to the drama which flourished in the late fourteenth and fifteenth- century: 
the Corpus Christi cycle, morality' plays such as Everyman, Mankind, Castle of Perseverance, 
and the saint's play. (Individual plays studied will change from year to year.) 

Engl 514. Chaucer I: The Early Poems 3 

Close study of Chaucer's poetry other than The Canterbury Tales with particular emphasis on 
Troilns and Criseyde. 

Engl 515. Chaucer II: The Canterbury Tales 3 

A detailed examination of the general structure of The Canterbury Tales dind of the individual 
tales, with attention to specialized critical tools and techniques, and to various critical 
approaches to Chaucer. 

Engl 520. Shakespeare and Other Elizabethan Dramatists I 3 

A careflil study of Shakespeare's plays written before 1600, together with selected plays of 
Marlowe, Kyd, Greene, and Preston. 

Engl 52 1 . Shakespeare and Other Elizabethan Dramatists II 3 

A carefiil study of Shakespeare's plays written after 1600, together with selected plays by Jonson, 
Chapman, Dekker, Beaumont, Tourneur, Marston, Middleton, Massinger, Ford, Rowley, and 
Webster. 



98 



Engl 531. Sixteenth-Century Literature 3 

PoetrN' and prose of the English Renaissance, with special attention to the new birth of poetic 
form; examination in-depth of the great poetic achievements of Sidney, Spenser, and Shakespeare. 

Engl 532. Seventeenth-Century Literature 3 

A study in-depth of the major British authors of the seventeenth century other than Milton. 

Engl 534. Milton 3 

An appreciation of John Milton as poet, critic, and innovator, together with a critical survey of 
the poet's sources, poetical works, and literary forms. 

Engl 537. Restoration and Eijjhteenth-Century Drama 3 

An examination of the major developments in comedy, tragedy, and experimental dramatic 
forms on the English public stage between 1660 and approximately 1775. The reading list 
will include works bv Wycherley, Etherage, Behn, Dryden, Orway, Congreve, Rowe, Addison, 
Steele, Gay, Lillo, Fielding, Sheridan, Goldsmith, and others. 

Engl 538. Restoration and Ei£[hteenth-Century Poetry 3 

An examination of the major developments in English poetry between 1660 and 1780, exclud- 
ing Milton. The reading list will include works by Rochester, Dryden, Behn, Pope, Gay, 
Johnson, Gray, Collins, and Goldsmith, as well as lesser-known figures from this period. 

Engl 539. Tlie Eighteenth-Century British Novel 3 

An examination of the sources, primary texts, and sub-genres which combine to define the 
English novel and its audience during the eighteenth century. The reading list may include a 
few important precursors of the new form, as well as examples of realism, gothicism and senti- 
mentalism. The specific v\'orks on the reading list will change each time the course is offered, 
but the following authors will be included with some regularity': Behn, Swift, Defoe, 
Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, Sterne, Radcliffe, Burney, Godwin, and Shelley. 

Engl 540. Romantic Poetry and Criticism 3 

An examination of the poetry and critical writings of the major romantic poets. The aim is not 
an exhaustive survey but an intensive study of several of the following: Blake, Wordsworth, 
Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. 

Engl 543. Victorian Poetry and Non-Fictional Prose 3 

An examination of Victorian poetry and non-fictional prose in the light of its social, political, and intellec- 
tual backgrounds. The aim is not an exhaustive survey but an intensive study of several of the following: 
Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, and Pre-Raphaelites, Caryle, Newman, Ruskin and Pater. 

Engl 544. The Nineteenth-Century British Novel 3 

Readings in selected Victorian novels in the light of the social, political, and intellectual back- 
grounds of the age, with emphasis on the artistic development of the novel. 

Engl 550. Studies in Modern Poetry 3 

An intensive study of trends and techniques in such major twentieth-century poets as Hopkins, 
Yeats, Auden, Dylan Thomas, Frost, Stevens and Eliot. 

Engl 552. The Twentieth-Century British Novel 3 

Readings of selected twentieth-century novels in the light of the social, political, and intellectual 
background of the times. Such major British novelists of the century as Conrad, Joyce, D.H. 
Lawrence, E.M. Forster, Greene, Waugh, Virginia Woolf, and Muriel Spark will be included. 

Engl 554. Modern Drama 3 

The development of drama (Continental, British, Irish, and American) from Ibsen to the pre- 
sent day. Among playwrights whose works will be read and studied are: Ibsen, Strindberg, 
Chekhov, Synge, Yeats, Shaw, Pinter, Brecht, lonesco, Beckett, O'Neill, Shepard, Wasserstein, 
and Wilson. 



99 



Engl 556. American Romanticism and Transcendentalism 3 

Studies in the major works of Cooper, Poe, Hawthorne, Emerson, and Meh'ille. 

Engl 557. American Realism and Naturalism 3 

Studies in the major works of Twain, Crane, Norris, James, and Howells. 

Engl 559. The Twentieth-Century American Novel 3 

Modern American novels and short stories. The period from 1900 to the present will be covered, 
emphasizing such major figures as Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Steinbeck, and Updike. 

Engl 564. Studies in Literary Theory 3 

This course analyzes the derivation and methodology of the theories underlying contemporary 
practice. For historical perspective, we turn to Plato and Aristotle, and then to a survey of other 
major classical, renaissance, enlightenment, and 19th-century sources. Thence we examine 20th- 
century critical theories, namely: psychoanalysis, Marxism, feminism, formalism (new criticism), 
reader-response, structuralism, deconstruction, and cultural materialism (new historicism). 

(N.B. Each of the following seminars will involve concentrated study of a single literary figure, 
movement, or genre. The particular subject of each seminar will vary each year.) 

Engl 570. Seminar: Special Studies in English Literature 3 

Engl 571. Seminar: Special Studies in American Literature 3 

Engl 572. Seminar: Special Studies in Comparative Literature 3 

Engl 580. Afro-American Literature 3 

An introductory survey of Afro-American literature, stressing an in-depth examination of the 
works of Afro-Americans in poetr\', song, drama, the novel, the essay, and the sla\'e narrative. 
Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between the AfVo-American experience and the African 
experience. The period covered is from the founding of the American nation to the present day. 

Engl 598. Directed Study 3 

Engl 599. English: Thesis 3-6 

Students working on a thesis register for this course. Six thesis credits are normally required 
for M.A. students. These may be taken all in one term or in two different terms. 




Rebecca S. Beal, Professor ofEn£flish 



100 



History 

Dr. Michael D. DeMichele, Chair, History 

Dr. Ray Champagne, Director of Graduate Program 

717-941-7428 

http://ww\v.uofs.edu 

Department faculty: Professors - Raymond W. Champagne, Jr., Willis M. 
Conover, Michael D. DeMichele, Frank X.J. Homer; Associate Professors - 
Robert E. Hneston, Lawrence W. Kennedy, Susan Poulson; Assistant 
Professors - Roy R Domenico, Robert W. Shaffern. 

The Department of History offers coursevvork leading to a Master of Arts degree 
in History. 

Admission Requirements 

The applicant must possess the baccalaureate degree and should as an undergrad- 
uate have completed a minimum of 18 upper- division semester hours in History. 
Applicants should have a GPA of not less than 2.75 (based on 4.0 scale) in all his/her 
undergraduate history courses or have attained an acceptable score on the General 
Test of the GRE or an equivalent score in other nationally recognized tests. In the 
event that significant gaps occur in the student's undergraduate program, additional 
undergraduate history courses may be specified by the mentor. 

Master Of Arts In History 

Coarse Requirements: The Master of Arts in History requires successful comple- 
tion of 30 graduate credits. The only specific course requirement is History 500: 
Science and Methods of Historians. 

A Thesis or Non-Tliesis Program: A thesis or non-thesis program for the M.A. 
degree is the option of the student. Both the thesis and non-thesis programs entail 
successful completion of 30 graduate credits, and a successful comprehensive exami- 
nation in the field. The thesis program, however, will require the student to com- 
plete successfiilly a total of 24 course credits and to present an acceptable thesis for 
which six credits will be granted. The thesis topic must be approved by the student's 
mentor under whose active direction the thesis shall be satisfactorily completed. The 
thesis must be approved by a faculty panel assigned by the Chair of the Department. 

Comprehensive Examination: All candidates for the comprehensive examination 
in History must have the approval of the mentor, and have completed at least 24 
graduate credits in the program. Ordinarily, the comprehensive examination will be a 
written three hour exam. The exam will be graded by the appropriate facult}' mem- 
bers and will be designed to test both specific content of courses taken and a compre- 
hensive understanding of the history of the United States. 

Mentor: Upon admission to the Graduate School in History, the student will be 
assigned a mentor who will advise the student of all course work and who, if the pro- 
gram includes a thesis, will direct the student's research and writing of the thesis. 



101 



Combined B.A./M.A Decree Program 

The Department of History and Political Science offers a special program that 
enables the qualified student to obtain both a Bachelor's and Master's Degree nor- 
mally in five years. Within judicious use of Summer sessions and Intersessions, some 
students complete the program in four years. Twelve (12) graduate history credits 
may be applied to satisfy the B.A. degree program requirements. Students may be 
conditionally admitted to the program upon matriculation at the University and aft:er 
approval by the Department and the Deans of the College of Arts and Sciences and 
the Graduate School (see pages 11-12 for university-stipulated requirements). 
Students already enrolled at the Universit)' and transfer students may enter the pro- 
gram on a conditional basis up to the end of the second year of studies with the same 
approval mentioned above. 

A student must have an excellent GPA in all courses and have three letters of rec- 
ommendation, including at least one from one of his/her history professors in order 
to be considered for admission to the combined B.A./M.A. program. 

Students enrolled in the combined B.A./M.A. Degree Program are required to 
complete all other degree requirements specified in the catalogs of both the College 
of Arts and Sciences and the Graduate School of the UniversitA' of Scranton. 




Raymond W. Champagne, Jr. , Professor and Director of the Graduate pro£iram in History. 



102 



Course Descriptions 

Credits 

Hist 500. Science and Methods of Historians 3 

A study of application of scientific methodology required for gathering, assessing, synthesizing 
and documenting historical information with special attention gi\'en to American historians 
and historiography. 

Hist 505. America: From Province to Nation 3 

An examination of selected topics pertaining to the political, diplomatic and social history of 
the American colonies. 

Hist 510. The Shaping of the American Nation 3 

An examination of selected topics in the period from the adoption of the Federal Constitution 
to the retirement of Andrew Jackson. 

Hist 515. America's Immi^fration Experience 3 

An in-depth look at the immigration and Americanization of selected ethnic groups in U.S. 
SocietN'. 

Hist 518. The Local Ethnic Experience 3 

Immigration to America, early ethnic groups in Northeastern Pennsylvania, coal mining in the 
anthracite belt. 

Hist 520. American Expansionism 3 

A study of the expansionist instinct in U.S. foreign policy from the Revolutionary days to 
modern times. 

Hist 530. America's Response to Industrialism 3 

A study of the Civil War and Reconstruction, industrial growth and conflict, the American 
Black, the reform impulses and the transformation of national politics: Bryan, Roosevelt and 
Wilson. 

Hist 535. Twentieth-Centnry America 3 

A study of the Great War, the Twenties, the Depression, World War II, the Cold War, and the 
emergence and erosion of national consensus. 

Hist 538. Recent U.S. History 3 

A study of American societ}' during the past thirt)' years. Focus on such topics as the Cold 
War, the Vietnam War, the student counter-culture movement, Watergate, and the conserva- 
tive response to these developments. 

Hist 545. Pivotal Elections in American History 3 

An examination of the more significant and interesting Presidential elections in the history of 
the United States. 

Hist 546. History of American West 3 

A study of the acquisition, setdement, and development of the Trans-Mississippi West, includ- 
ing the mining, cattlemen's and farmers' frontiers; Indian removal; and Manifest Destiny in 
Texas and Oregon. Particular attention will be paid to the importance of the American West 
in the development of American culture. 

Hist 548. Seminar in American History 3 

An analysis of selected topics in American history from the Colonial era to the present. 

Hist 555. The Soviet Achievement 3 

An analysis of the social, cultural, economic and political accomplishments of the U.S.S.R. 

103 



Hist 560. Modern Germany 3 

A detailed study ot modern Germany from the formation of the German Empire to the demise 
of Adolf Hitler and the reconstruction of Germany after World War II. 

Hist 565. French Revolution and Napoleon 3 

A study of the causes and results of the French Revolution and the Age of Napoleon and its 
legacy. 

Hist 570. Anatomy of Modern Europe 3 

An analysis of the major institutions, problems and accomplishments of Europe since the end 
ofWorldWarll. 

Hist 575. Military Power in the 20th Century 3 

A stud\' of the role of military force in international relations and the impact of the military 
and war upon domestic societ)' in modem times. 

Hist 578. Seminar in European History 3 

An analysis of selected topics in European History from the nineteenth century to the present. 

Hist 598. Directed Study 3 

Allows the student to pursue a topic of special interest under the direction of a facult\' member. 

Hist 599. History: Thesis 6 

Students working on a thesis register for this course. 




Lawrence W. Kennedy, Associate Professor of the Department of Histoi-y. 



104 



Chemistry, Biochemistry, Clinical Chemistry 

Dr. Maurice I. Hart, Jr., Chair, Chemistry 
Dr. Christopher Baumann, Director of Graduate Programs 
717-941-6389 • cab302@tiger.uofs.edu 
http://benzene.chem.uofs.edu/homepage.html 
Department faculty: Professors - Michael C. Cann, Trudy A. Dickneider, 
Joseph H. Dreisbach, Maurice I. Hart, Jr., Joe A. Vinson; Associate Professors - 
Christopher Baumann, David E. Marx, Joan M. Wasilewski; Assistant 
Professors - Paul T. Buonora, Donna M. Narsava^e-Heald, Larry R. 
Sherman; Lecturer - Marianne Staretz. 

The Department of Chemistry offers Master of Arts and Master of Science 
degree programs in Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Clinical Chemistry. In addition, 
coursework is offered in support of the Master of Science in Secondary Education 
with specialization in Chemistry. 

Chemistry and Biochemistry Programs 

The Master of Arts program is a thesis degree that is directed toward subsequent 
work for the doctoral degree and an important preparation for research activity in 
industry or elsewhere. Its requirements include 30 credit hours of classroom courses 
and independent research under the direction of a faculty member. Usually 6 of the 
30 credits are devoted to the thesis research. 

Master of Science programs are offered in Chemistry and Biochemistry. The 
M.S. is usually a terminal degree intended to upgrade the student's professional com- 
petency and capabilities for work in industry or secondary education. Thirt)' (30) 
credit hours of classroom work are required. 

Students may also pursue a M.S. in Secondary Education with a content option 
in Chemistry. See pages 29-31 for details. 

Admission Requirements: Applicants for the Master of Arts or Master of Science 
programs in chemistry or biochemistry must possess, or be in close proximity to possess- 
ing, a baccalaureate degree which includes fiill-year courses in General and Analytical 
Chemistr}', Organic Chemistry, Physical or Biophysical Chemistry, General Physics and 
Mathematics through Integral Calculus. Applicants for the Master's degree in 
Secondary Education that is correlated with Chemistry must have, beside the baccalaure- 
ate degree, at least a flill year of General and Analytical Chemistry, College Physics and 
Mathematics. A GPA of 2.75 is required both overall and in the science courses. 

Certain of these requirements may be waived at the discretion of the 
Department Chair. Students with limited undergraduate course deficiencies may be 
admitted with the approval of the Chemistry faculty on condition that such deficien- 
cies are corrected concurrently with their initial graduate course. 



105 



Course Requirements: Core courses are those, within each program, that are 
required of all candidates. Since these are the hindamental courses that form the 
basis of the comprehensive examinations, it is essential that they be taken first in any 
candidate's program before any electives. 

Core courses for the M.A. and M.S. degrees in Chemistry are: 

Chem 530 Structural Organic Chemistry 

Chem 531 Mechanistic Organic Chemistry 

Chem 540 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 

Chem 562 Advanced Quantum Chemistry 

Chem 563 Advanced Thermodynamics and Equilibrium 

Chem 570 Ad\'anced Analytical Chemistry 

Chem 571* Analytical Methods 

*Will be waived for those indi\iduals who have previously taken an equivalent instrumental analysis labora- 
tory course. 

Core courses for the M.A. and M.S. degrees in Biochemistry are: 

Chem 531 Mechanistic Organic Chemistry 

Chem 550 Biochemical Structure and Function 

Chem 551 Biocatalysis and Metabolism 

Chem 563 Advanced Thermodynamics and Equilibrium 

Chem 570 Advanced Analytical Chemistry 

Chem 571* Analytical Methods 

*\Vill be waived for those individuals who have previously taken an equivalent instrumental analysis labora- 
tory course. With permission, Chem 560-561 may be substituted for Chem 563 for those with a less com- 
plete background. 

Core courses for the M.S. in Secondary Education with a content option in 
Chemistry are: 

Chem 531 Mechanistic Organic Chemistry 

Chem 540 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 

Chem 560 Introduction to Thermodynamics 

Chem 561 Introduction to Quantum Chemistry 

Chem 570 Advanced Analytical Chemistry 

Elective courses beyond the Core courses will be chosen from among the graduate 
courses offered by the Chemistry Department. In the Master's degree program in 
Secondary Education that is correlated with Chemistry, the mentor may allow students to 
frilfill dieir requirements with other courses in Chemistry. 

Clinical Chemistry Program 

The Clinical Chemistry program is designed to provide advanced scientific and 
management training to prepare participants for leadership positions in hospital, 
industrial, or other private analytical laboratories. The program has two tracks: 
Research and Administration. The Research track is designed for students who wish 
to emphasize development of research capabilities. This track requires completion of a 
research thesis and leads to the M.A. degree. The Administration track is designed for 
students who wish to combine their scientific training with some exposure to matters 
of administration in health/medical/laboratory environments; this track leads to the 
M.S. degree. Both tracks require a minimum of 36 graduate credits. 



106 



Admission Requirements: Applicants for the program will normally have a 
Bachelor's degree in Chemistry, Biochemistry, Biology, or Medical Technolog)^ 
Other undergraduate degrees may be acceptable if appropriate background courses in 
the sciences have been taken. The undergraduate transcripts of all applicants will be 
examined to determine if there are any deficiencies in background courses. 

An undergraduate GPA of at least 2.75, for all courses combined as well as for 
science courses, is expected for admission to the program. 

Course Requirements: The following courses, 27 credits in all, are required of all 
students in the Clinical Chemistry program: 

Chem 531 Mechanistic Organic Chemistry 

Chem 550 Biochemical Structure and Function 

Chem 551 Biocatalysis and Metabolism 

Chem 554 Biochemistry of Disease 

Chem 555 Chemical Toxicology 

Chem 556 Clinical Quality Control 

Chem 565 Instrumental Electronics 

Chem 570 Advanced Analytical Chemistry 

Chem 571 Analytical Methods 

While registered for Chem 556, the student will participate in a clinical affilia- 
tion. This course will ordinarily be taken as the last course in the student's program. 

Students take 9 elective credits. Electives may be taken from any of the follow- 
ing categories: 

Thesis: Students in the Research track will take 2-6 credits of thesis work (Chem 
599). The number of thesis credits will be determined in consultation with the stu- 
dent's mentor, depending on the scope of the thesis project. Normally, six thesis 
credits are devoted to the project. 

Students in the Administration track should take HAD 500, Health Care 
Organization and Administration, plus two other courses from among the following 
Health Administration (HAD) or Human Resources Administration (HRA) programs: 

HAD 502 Health Care Law 

HAD 506 Health Care Policy 

HAD 510 Hospital Administration 

HRA 521 Work Motivation 

HRA 534 Learning in Organizations 

HRA 538 Health, Safety and Security 

Students should consult with the Director of the HRA or HAD program, as well as 

with their mentor, regarding specifics of these courses. 

Other Chemistry Courses: Students may select other graduate courses offered 
by the Chemistry Department, in consultation with their mentor, to complete their 
electives. Of special interest in this category are the following: Chem 553, 
Enzymology and Chem 572, Applied Spectroscopy. 



107 



Combined B.S./M.A. or M.S. Decree Program 

The Chemistry Department offers outstanding undergraduate students in the 
Chemistry and Biochemistry majors the opportunity to earn both a bachelor and mas- 
ter's degree through the Combined Baccalaureate /Master's Degree program. The 
opportunity' to take graduate courses prior to completing a baccalaureate degree is con- 
ditional upon attainment of university-stipulated Combined Baccalaureate/Master's 
Degree Program (see pages 11-12) requirements. 

Comprehensive Examinations 

Candidates for the M.A. or M.S. degrees in Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Clinical 
Chemistry must pass a comprehensive examination, based on the core courses required 
in the respective programs. The comprehensive examination is normally taken after the 
core courses have been completed. Students who do not pass the comprehensi\'e exam 
on the first attempt will be allowed to take the entire examination a second time. 
Students failing the comprehensive exam for the second time will not be considered for 
the degree. 

Thesis 

M.A. candidates in Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Clinical Chemistry are required 
to do independent research and write a thesis. 

Early in the program, each student should choose a research director, decide 
with him/her on a project. Then xwo readers should be chosen and a proposal pre- 
pared for the research project. This proposal should be presented to the thesis com- 
mittee consisting of the research director and the two readers. When the project pro- 
posal is approved the student should progressively carry out the necessary laboratory 
experimentation. When the work is complete, it must be reported in a thesis which is 




Christopher Banmann, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Director of the Graduate Programs in 
Chemistry, Biochemistry and Clinical Chemistry. 

108 



publicly defended before the Chemistry Department. The credits awarded for the 
thesis (Chem 599) can vary from 2 to 6, depending on the needs of the student. 

Graduate Assistantships 

Each year approximately 20 students in the Chemistry programs hold graduate 
assistantships. Some of these are in the Chemistry department, some are in other 
departments (such as biology). GA's in the Chemistry department must be in the 
M.A. (thesis) program. They are responsible for conducting undergraduate laboratory 
sections during the two regular semesters. Responsibilities of GA's in other depart- 
ments vary, depending on the level of the assistantship and department needs; and 
they may be in either the M.A. or M.S. program. A graduate assistant receives a 
stipend and is eligible for a tuition scholarship. Application for all assistantships must 
be made through the Graduate School by March 1 . Contact the Graduate School for 
information about current stipend levels. 



Course Descriptions 

Credits 

Chem 530. Structural Orfjanic Chemistry 3 

A discussion on an advanced level of the most important features of structural theory, such as 
stereochemistry aromaticit)', resonance and modern methods of structural determination. 
Applications of Woodward-Hofmann theory are also discussed. 

Chem 53 L Mechanistic Organic Chemistry 3 

A consideration of the most important means of determining the detailed pathways of organic 
reactions. Substituent effects on rates of reactions are discussed. Mechanisms proceeding via 
polar, nonpolar and radical intermediates, including some biochemical reactions, are consid- 
ered. 

Chem 532. Theoretical Organic Chemistry 3 

(Prerequisite, Chem 531) A study of methodology of determining the relationship of structure 
to reactivity, the mechanisms of important reaction types and the factors that can influence 
rates and pathways. 

Chem 533. Heterocyclic Chemistry 3 

(Prerequisite, Chem 531) An introductory survey of the structure and reactivity of important 
t\'pes of heterocyclic compounds. 

Chem 540. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 3 

Theoretical concepts and their application to the reactions and structure of inorganic com- 
pounds. Introduction to coordination chemistry. Coordination chemistry and related topics; 
physical methods, reaction mechanisms. 

Chem 54T Bioinor£[anic Chemistry 3 

A study of the biological role of inorganic complexes and ions with particular attention paid to 
pumps and transport proteins, metalloenzymes, acid-base reactions, redox reactions dependent 
upon electron transfer, oxygen carriers, nitrogen fixation, and photochemically induced elec- 
tron transfer. 

Chem 550. Biochemical Structure and Function 3 

Survey of the structure and tiinction of biological macromolecules including proteins, carbohy- 
drates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Introduction to chemical aspects of molecular biology, includ- 
ing DNA replication, gene regulation and protein synthesis. 

109 



Chem 551. Biocatalysis and Metabolism 3 

A study of the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. Introduction to 
enzyme kinetics and enzyme mechanisms. 

Chem 552. Biochemical Genetics 3 

Chemical aspects of cell biology and genetics. Topics include an introduction to the theories 
of heredit)', structure of DNA and RNA, DNA replication, prokaryotic and eukaryotic gene 
regulation, translation and DNA technology. 

Chem 553. Enzymolo£iy 3 

A course on the chemical nature of enzymes with relation to mechanisms of enzyme action and 
kinetics. Purification and identification of enzymes and isozymes. Biochemical and physiologi- 
cal aspects of enzymes in living systems. 

Chem 554. Biochemistry of Disease 3 

A molecular description of pathological conditions in humans. Emphasis is placed on the 
effects of various disease states on metabolism. Diagnostic techniques and therapeutic 
approaches are also discussed. 

Chem 555. Chemical Toxicolojjy 3 

The nature, mode of action and methods of counteracting substances which have an adverse 
effect on biological systems, especially human. Medical, industrial, environmental and forensic 
aspects will be discussed. 

Chem 556. Clinical Quality Control 3 

A study of the design and operation of a quality control program in a clinical laboratory. The 
course will include all those actions necessary to provide adequate confidence that test results 
satisfy given requirements and standards. Such areas as statistics, patient preparation, specimen 
integrity', external proficiency control, internal quality' control, analytical goals and laboratory 
management will be covered. (Enrollment limited to Clinical Chemistry majors.) 

Chem 560. Introduction to Thermodynamics 3 

A review of the fundamentals of thermodynamics and kinetics. 

Chem 561. Introduction to Qiiantum Chemistry 3 

An introduction to quantum theory, with applications in spectroscopy and statistical mechanics. 

Chem 562. Advanced Qtiantum Chemistry 3 

Quantum mechanics and quantum chemistry, including perturbational theory, variational the- 
ory and specific applications of molecular orbital theories to organic molecules. Spectroscopic 
applications. 

Chem 563. Advanced Jljermodynamics and Equilibrium 3 

A comprehensive treatment of thermodynamics, including electrochemistry, thermochemistry 
and chemical equilibrium. Some introduction to the concepts of statistical mechanics and their 
application to thermodynamics will also be given. 

Chem 564. Polymer Chemistry 3 

Introduction to the physicochemical aspects of polymers; emphasis on structure, properties 
and application; thermodynamics of polymer solutions; statistical mechanical consideration of 
polymers, theories of rubber elasticity. 

Chem 564L. Polymer Chemistry Laboratory 1.5 

(Pre or co-requisite, Chem 564) Laboratory experiments investigate syntheses and characteri- 
zation methods for polymers, structure-property effects, and thermal analysis of polymers. 
(Labfee:$40/cr.) 



110 



Chem 565. Instrumental Electronics 3 

An introduction to analog and digital electronics and microcomputers in\'ol\'ed in computer 
automated laboratory instrumentation, including programming and interfacing required for 
laboratory data acquisition and control. 

Chem 570. Advanced Analytical Chemistry 3 

Theory, description, and application of modem analytical techniques with emphasis on spec- 
troscopy, potentiometry chromatography, electrochemistry, and radiochemistry. 

Chem 571. Analytical Methods 3 

Laboratory practice with special and analytical apparatus and methods used for process and 
control, and for research. (Lab fee: $40/cr.) 

Chem 572. Applied Spectroscopy 3 

The use of ultraviolet, visible spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance 
spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy as tools for the identification of organic compounds. The 
course will include laboratory work using these instruments. 

Chem 573. Electro-Analytic Chemistry 3 

Theory and application of potentiometry, polarography amperometry, coulometry, and other 
analytical methods. 

Chem 584. Special Topics Variable 

Current topics in chemistry, biochemistry or clinical chemistry offered by members of the 
Department. 

Chem 590. Seminar 1 

Current topics in chemisti-y and biochemistry are prepared and presented by the students. 

Chem 599. M.A. Thesis 2-6 




Doiiiia M. Narsava^e-Hcald, Assistant Professor of the Department ofChemistr^ 



111 



Software Engineering 



Prof. Richard Plishka, Chair, Computing Sciences 

Dr. Yaodong Bi, Director of Graduate Program 

717-941-6108 • biy@uofs.edu 

http://www.cs.uofs.edu 

Departanent faculty: Professors - John A. Beidler, CD. P.; Associate 

Professors - Yaodong Bi, Dennis S. Martin, Robert McCloskey., Richard 
Plishka, James R. Sidbury, Charles E. Taylor, C.D.R; Assistant Professors - 
Paul M. Jackowitz, C.D.R, C.CR 

Software engineering deals with the application of principles to the analysis, 
design, construction, and maintenance of computer software and its documentation. 
This master's degree program seeks to develop professionals who are knowledgeable 
about and skilled in the application of those principles. Soft^vare engineering is a rel- 
atively new field within the computing sciences, but one that is viewed as a crucial 
evolution as software proliferates and organizations become increasingly dependent 
on software both for routine operations and new developments. 

The Master of Science in Software Engineering (MSSE) program requires 36 
graduate credits, divided as follows: 

Fundamentals -4 courses, 12 credits: 
SE 500, 501, 504, and 507 

Advanced courses - 6 courses, 18 credits: 
SE 510, 524, plus four elective courses 

Thesis project - 2 courses, 6 credits: 
SE 598, 599 

Specific undergraduate background courses may be required, depending on the 
student's previous training. See Admission Requirements (item 4) below for a 
description of the required background for the program. 




Taodoujj Bi, Associate Professor of Computing Sciences and Director of the Software Enfitncenn^ program. 



112 



Admission Requirements 
The following are the normal admission requirements for the program. In mak- 
ing an admission decision, all of the information about an applicant will be viewed in 
combination. No single factor among those listed below will either qualify or disqual- 
ify an individual for admission to the program. 

1 . A bachelor's degree from an accredited institution with a minimum grade aver- 
age of 3.0 (based on a scale of 4.0). Official transcripts of previous academic 
work must be submitted. A bachelor's degree in computer science is preferred, 
but not required. At least one year's experience in software development is 
highly desirable. 

2. Scores from either the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or 
Graduate Record Examination (GRE): General Test must be submitted. 
Information regarding when these tests are administered may be obtained from 
the Graduate Office. Generally the test must be taken no later than January in 
order to meet the March 1 application deadline. 

3. Three letters of recommendation from professionals familiar with the software 
development work of the candidate. Letters from current and former profes- 
sors who can comment on the candidate's technical expertise are acceptable. 

4. Demonstratable knowledge equivalent to undergraduate courses in: 

a. Structured programming in a block structured language 
(Ada, Pascal, . . .). 

b. Operating Systems. 

c. Discrete mathematics. 

d. Data structures. 

e. File Processing. 

Students lacking such background but otherwise highly qualified for admission 
may be admitted on condition that certain undergraduate courses in the above 
areas be completed. If a student is lacking background in one or more of areas 
(a), (d), and (e) listed above, the student may be permitted to take SE 597 to 
fulfill the background requirement. 

5. Good English language skills (oral and written). A TOEFL score of 550 is 
required for international students who do not speak English as their native lan- 
guage. 

6. A one or two paragraph statement of objectives and expectations in enroUing in 
the program. This statement should be submitted along with the Application 
for Admission to the program. 

7. Students will be admitted only for entrance in the Fall term. (All application 
materials, as specified above, should be in the Graduate Office by March 1 pre- 
ceding the Fall term in which the student wishes to begin study. ) 



113 



Course Descriptions 



Credits 

SE 500. Mathematics for Softivare Engineering! ^ 

(Prerequisite, admission to the program) This course introduces the student to Software 
Engineering and formal foundations. Terminology and definitions are introduced. Topics 
include an over\'ie\\' of Software Engineering, mathematical foundations of software engineer- 
ing, set theory, predicate calculus, first and second order logic, temporal logic, finite state 
machines, etc. 

SE 501. Introduction to Software Development 3 

(Prerequisite, admission to the program) Introduction to the programming environment that 
will be used throughout the entire program. Review of common data structures: stacks, 
queues, linked lists, etc. Introduction to other data structures: graphs, B-trees, etc. 

SE 504. Formal Methods and Models 3 

(Prerequisite, SE 501 ) This course addresses issues concerning the production (and life) of 
qualitv' software throughout the software life cycle. Limitations of verification and validation. 
Qualit)' assurance. Proof of correctness methods. Technical reviews. Testing. 

SE 507. Requirements Analysis and Software Specification 3 

(Prerequisite, SE 500) Exploration of r\vo inter- related subjects of soft\vare life cycle process; 
requirements and their specifications. Topics: Requirements analysis techniques. Interview 
process, prototypes, t^'pes of requirements (functional, nonfunctional, reliability, quality', secu- 
rity, etc.), traceabilit)', languages of specification (Axiomatic, algebraic, finite state machine, 
abstract, operational, concurrency). 

SE 510. Principles and Applications ofSoftivare Desi^fn 3 

(Prerequisite, SE 507) The design of large software systems is an important activit)' of the soft- 
ware engineer. Topics include: abstraction, information hiding, modularit)'. Object design 
methods, data abstraction methods, interactive enhancement, data flow, program design lan- 
guages. Design verification, user interfaces, distributed systems, realtime systems, etc. 

SE 515. Software Generation and Maintenance 3 

(Prerequisite, SE 501 ) Maintenance accounts for about 70% of the software system life cycle. 
Designing new maintainable software systems is as important as dealing with existing non- 
maintainable onts. Topics include: writing reusable software components, automatic code 
and application generators and their limitations, regression analysis, reverse engineering, etc. 

SE 516. En£[ineerin£[ of Softivare Systems 3 

There is a parallel between hardware system engineering and software systems engineering. 
Several issues are relexant to both and in many cases they interact with each other. Topics 
include: system specification and design, interfaces with hardware and software systems, human 
interfaces, system integration, documentation, training, overall requirements, and require- 
ments gathering. 

SE S2l . Database Systems 3 

(Prerequisite, SE 507) A study of database systems and their design and implementation. 
Topics include: security, query analysis and optimization, database systems requirements analy- 
sis, specification and implementation, etc. 

SE 522. Cost Collection and Analysis Metrics 3 

(Prerequisite, SE 510) This course explores the concepts and theories of cost estimation and 
how they relate to all aspects of the software life cycle. What to measure and why. Where to 
measure and how. Relationship to risk analysis, project management, etc. 



114 



SE 524. Software Project Manajjement 3 

(Prerequisite, SE 510) Software system development. Project development. Budget and 
human factors. Relationship between e^ualit)' assurance, communication management and pro- 
ject documentation. Ethical and security issues. 

SE 532. Interactive and Time Critical Systems Desi^fn 3 

(Prerequisites, SE 507 &; 510) Real-time and embedded software systems development pre- 
sent a whole different set of variables to the software engineer. This course focuses on a num- 
ber of design, development and maintenance techniques for this type of system. Topics include 
data acquisition and generation, system design strategies, testing constraints, verification, etc. 

SE 533. CASE Tools 3 

(Prerequisite, SE 524) Stuciy and use of several CASE tools. CASE tools integration, choosing 
the tools for a particular environment. 

SE 592. Directed Study Variable 1-3 

SE 597. Computer Science Fundamentals 3 

(Prerequisite, admission to the program) This is a special topics course taught in the summers 
only. Potential students with good software development experience, but who may otherwise 
lack background in the newer trends in software engineering are required to take this course. 
Topics include an introduction to top-down and object-oriented design, information hiding, 
introduction to the programming language Ada, and mathematical formalisms as an integral 
part of software development. (This course does not count toward the 36 credits required for 
the degree.) 

SE 598. Project Analysis & Desi£in 3 

SE 599. Project Implementation and Evaluation 3 

(Prerequisite, having passed all required courses) SE 598 and 599 is a two semester sequence 
in which students are expected to undertake a software thesis project which requires the use of 
tools, techniques and theory learned from previous courses. It will be strongly recommended 
that thesis projects be developed in teams. 

f 




115 



Physical Therapy 

Dr. Carolyn E. Barnes, Chair, Physical Therapy 

717-941-7499 

http ://www. uofs . edu 

Departanent faculty: Professors - Carolyn E. Barnes, Gary E. Mattin^ly; 
Associate Professors - Edmund M. Kosmahl; John P. Sanko, Assistant Professor - 
Renee M. Hakim. 

The University offers a Master of Physical Therapy (MPT) degree program. 
Students begin this program as freshmen, proceed through five years of study, and 
receive the MPT degree upon completion of graduate requirements. Students are 
expected to maintain a 2.5 GPA for each semester of their freshman year, 2.75 GPA 
for each semester of their sophomore year, 2.85 cumulative GPA for their junior year, 
and a 3.0 cumulative GPA for their senior year. Students maintaining this expectation 
are admitted to the graduate program in their fifiih year and are expected to achieve a 
minimum 3.0 GPA for the fall term of their graduate year. No new students are 
admitted to the program in this fifth year. 

Since students are admitted to the physical therapy program as freshmen and the 
majorit)' of their course work is taken while they are undergraduates, the physical 
therapy program is described in the Universit)''s undergraduate catalog rather than in 
this graduate catalog. Inquiries about admission to the MPT program should be 
directed to the undergraduate Admissions Office: 717-941-7540. 




Dean Powell nt the Physical Tljerapy graduate student orientation. 



116 



Theology 

Dr. Brigid Curtin Frein, Chair, Theology/Religious Studies 

Dr. Charles R. Pinches, Director of Graduate Program 

717-941-4302 • pinchescl@uots.edu 

http://\\'\v'\\'.uofs.edu 

Department faculty: Professors - /. Brian Benestad, M.Jane Kopas, O.S.F., 
Charles R. Pinches, Richard W. Rousseau, S.J., E. Sprinjjs Steele; Associate 
Professors - John Bejjley, S.J., Stephen J. Casey, Mary Anne Foley, C.N.D., 
Brigid Curtin Frein, Susan Fournier Mathews, Thomas F. Sable, S.J.; Assistant 
Professors - Maria Po^i Johnson, Marc B. Shapiro; Instructor - Scott Bader- 
Saye. 

The Master of Arts in theology is designed to provide for serious academic study 
of theological topics, both historical and contemporary. The program assumes that 
students have a reasonable foundation in theological study and the humanities, as 
described below, as well as an aptitude and interest for more advanced study. The 
program should be of interest to clergy and religious, to teachers, and to lay persons 
of any denominational background. 

Admission Requirements 

Applicants must possess a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution and 
have a solid background in the humanities. Such a background would almost certainly 
be assured with at least 9 credits in philosophy and 1 5 credits in theolog)'/religious 
studies. However, other combinations of credits may be satisfactory. Students who 
lack the necessary undergraduate preparation but otherwise show promise of success 
in the program may be provisionally accepted, contingent on completion of certain 
undergraduate courses. An undergraduate GPA of at least 2.75 (4.00 scale) is expect- 
ed. Scores from standardized graduate admissions tests are not uniformly required 
but may be requested in certain cases. For the normal Graduate School practices in 
processing and classifying applications, see pages 9-10 of this catalog. 

Program Requirements 

The Master of Arts in theology requires completion of thirt)' (30) credits of 
graduate study. Students may select a thesis or non- thesis option. 

Under the thesis o]^XAon, the student completes 24 credits of course work and 
devotes six credits to the thesis. The thesis should be a critical study consisting of no 
less than 12,000 words, completed under the direction of a faculty mentor. It will 
include a thesis defense. 

Under the non-thesis OTpnon, the student completes 30 credits of course work 
and takes a comprehensive exam. The exam is a three hour written exam testing the 



117 



student's overall understanding of theology. 

Core requirements. The following 5 courses are required of all students: 

Old Testament Exegesis T/RS 500 

New Testament Exegesis T/RS 501 

Moral Theology: One of the following T/RS 540, 541, 542 or 543 

Systematic Theology: One of the following T/RS 535, 552, 553, 554 or 

a special topics course in a systematic area. 
History: One of the following T/RS 521, 536, 537 or a 

special topics course in an historical area. 

Electives. Students take 15 elective credits. In the thesis option, 9 credits are 
taken in courses and 6 credits are devoted to the thesis. In the non-thesis option, all 
15 credits are taken in courses. Selection of courses for the elective part of the pro- 
gram should be made in consultation with a faculty mentor. By judicious selection of 




Brigid Curtin Frein, Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of 
Theology/Religious Studies. 



118 



courses, students may form a concentration in such areas as Eastern Christian 
Studies, Scripture, or other areas. 

Course Descriptions credits 

T/RS 500. Old Testament Exegesis 3 

An introduction to the primary methods and problems of Old Testament interpretation focus- 
ing on the contents, historical background and theological import of major passages. Among 
the specific topics studied will be source, form and redaction criticism as well as more recent 
approaches to the text such as structuralist exegesis, narrative and feminist criticisms. 

T/RS 501. New Testament Exegesis 3 

An introduction to the primary methods and problems of New Testament interpretation focus- 
ing on the contents, historical background and theological import of major passages. Among 
the specific topics studied will be form and redaction criticism along with recent critical 
approaches to the text such as structuralist exegesis, narrative and feminist criticisms. 

T/RS 521 . The Church from Medieval to Modern Times 3 

A survey of the development of Christian life and thought from the Middle Ages through the 
Renaissance, Reformation, development of the New World, the industrial revolution and the 
20th century. 

T/RS 525. Roman Catholicism Today 3 

An overview of four significant areas of contemporary Roman Catholicism: its historical side, 
worldview, ritual and ethics and contemporary trends. 

T/RS 530. Central Issues in the Philosophy of Religion 3 

A study of such central problems in the philosophy of religion as the problem of evil, the 
meaning of religious language and the question of the self 

T/RS 531. Narrative Theolo£iy 3 

A study of the contemporary development of narrative as an essential element of interpretation 
of biblical and systematic theology. 

T/RS 535. The Sacraments of Initiation 3 

After an overview of recent developments in sacramental and liturgical theology the course will 
focus upon the rites of the sacraments of initiation. The scriptural, liturgical and patristic 
sources will be read as the basis of new sacramental models. 

T/RS 536. Three Councils of the Church that Shaped History 3 

An examination of the background, history, ideas and influence of the Councils of Trent, 
Vatican I and Vatican II using texts from the Councils themselves. 

T/RS 537. Great American Catholic Thinkers 3 

A study of the life and ideas developed from selections from Bishop England, Orestes 
Brownson, Bishop Spalding, Isaac Hecker, Bishop Hughes, Msgr. John Ryan, Archbishop 
Ireland, Dorothy Day, Dom Virgil Michel and John Courtney Murray, S.J. 

T/ RS 5 4 . Sources of Christia n Mora ITho ught 3 

An examination of the intellectual foundations of moral thought in Western Christianity as 
well as the way they survive in contemporary ethics and theology. Among sources examined 
will be Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Kant, Mill, Nietzsche, H.R. Niebuhr and other con- 
temporary theologians. 

T/RS 541 . The Development of Catholic Moral Theology 3 

A study of the history and development of Catholic moral theology beginning with Aquinas 
through manualism to the contemporary scene. It will include American moral thinking such 
as proportionalism in relation to Papal teaching and Protestant ethics. Readings will be drawn 
from Aquinas, J.C. Murray, Leo XIII, John Paul II, C. Curran and others. 

T/RS 542. Readings in Moral Theology 3 

119 



An exploration, based on a wide variety of reading from patristic, medieval and contemporary 
sources, of some typical themes of fiindamental moral theology' as well as analysis of the actual 
place of virtue in Catholic moral theology. 

T/RS 543. Catholic Social Thought 3 

A study of the origins and principles of Catholic teachings on the political and social order. 
Reading will be drawn from Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Thomas More, papal encyclicals 
from Rerum Novarum through Centesimus Annus, Vatican Council II, and selected contem- 
porary scholars writing on liberalism, public morality, law and religion. 

T/RS 544. Liturgical and Sacramental Development 3 

An overview of the liturgical, sacramental and theological development in the Church through 
various eras of her history. 

T/RS 552. Eastern Christian Spirituality 3 

A study of the meaning of the spiritual life for Eastern Christian writers with particular emphasis 
on St. Athanasius, St. Gregory of Nyssa and St. Gregory Palamas. Themes such as prayer, image 
and likeness with God, discernment of spirits, hesychasm and iconography will be discussed. 

T/RS 553. Theology of the Byzantine Churches 3 

Beginning with a survey of the main developments of Byzantine theolog}', this course exam- 
ines the important contributions of Eastern Christian thinkers in shaping the patristic heritage 
of the Church. It then examines characteristics of Byzantine theology in contemporary 
attempts to articulate our life in Christ. 

T/RS 554. The Trinity in Early Christian History 3 

An in-depth analysis of the hellenization process of Christian theology through a study of the 
influences of Platonic, Gnostic, and Plotinian thought structures on the development of such 
key Christian concepts as person, substance, nature, relation in the Holy Trinity, creation the- 
ology and christology. There will be a particular emphasis on the thought of Athanasius, Basil 
the Great, Gregory of Nyssa, Augustine, Maximos, and Gregory of Palamas. 

T/RS 584. Special Topics 3 

Selected r'>picv of current interest offered on a \ariable schedule. 

"^:;^ ^,. "•^. 




1998 Gmdunte School comtnencemcut principals: (from left to rijjht) Robert E. Powell, Dean, J A Panuska, S.J., 
President and principal speaker, and Richard H. Passon, Provost/Vice President for Academic Affairs. 



120 



Nursing 

Dr. Patricia Harrington, Chair, Nursing 

Dr. Mary Jane Hanson, Director of Graduate Program 

717-941-4060 • liansonm2@uofs.edu 

littp :/ /www. uofs.edu 

Department Faculty: Professor - Patricia A. Bailey, R.N.; 
Associate Professors - Dona Carpenter, R.N., Marian Farrell, R.N., Rosellen 
M. Garrett, CRNP, Sharon Httdacek, R.N., Marjorie Maddox, CRNP, Mary 
E. Muscari , CRNP, Mar£iarete LiebZalon, R.N.C.S.; Assistant Professors - 
Linda H. Desmond, R.N., Mary Jane Hanson, CRNP, Patricia Harrington, 
R.N., ; Instructor - Mary Jane DiMattio, R.N. 

The Department of Nursing offers coursework leading to a Master of Science 
degree in Nursing with specialization in either the Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) 
track or Adult Health (AH) track. A post-master's certificate program is also available 
for registered nurses who already have a master's degree in nursing and who wish to 
become Family Nurse Practitioners. Graduates of the FNP track will be eligible for 
certification as an FNP in Pennsyhania through the Pennsylvania State Board of 
Nursing and additionally through both the American Nurses' Credentialing Center 
and American Academy of Nurse Practitioners. 

Program Objectives 

The program is designed to prepare advanced practice registered nurses to: 1 ) 
evaluate issues relative to ativanced practice nursing consistent with personal and soci- 
etal values and beliefs; 2) engage in advanced practice nursing in accordance with 
specific special t}' standards of practice; 3) critically evaluate theoretical principles from 
nursing and other disciplines for their contribution to advanced nursing practice; 4) 
demonstrate mastery of knowledge and skills in a specialty' area of advanced practice 
nursing; 5 ) initiate collaborative relationships with other health care professionals to 
mobilize resources and facilitate quality patient care; 6) demonstrate responsibilit)' 
and accountability for providing quality health care for selected populations consis- 
tent with advanced practice nursing preparation and ethical principles; 7) demon- 
strate the ability to communicate ideas both in written and oral forms in an articulate 
and scholarly manner; and 8) critically examine problems relevant to advanced prac- 
tice nursing. 

Admission Requirements 

An applicant for the degree program must possess a baccalaureate degree in nurs- 
ing from an NLNAC (National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission) 
accredited program; have an undergraduate GPA of at least 3.0 or other evidence of 
ability to successfully complete a graduate program such as grades in other post- bac- 
calaureate courses, scores from exams, or a record of progressively higher work expe- 
riences; and be licensed as a registered nurse in the state of Pennsylvania. The appli- 
cant should have a minimum of one year of direct clinical nursing practice and have 
satisfactorily completed undergraduate or equivalent approved courses in (a) basic 
physical assessment and (b) statistics. The applicant must submit three professional 



121 



references and a 300 word essay identifying career goals, demonstrating communica- 
tion and writing skills. A personal interview with the program director or a faculty 
member to clarify goals and objectives is required. 

Applicants for the certificate projjram must possess a master's degree in nursing 
from an NLNAC accredited program. Additionally, they must comply with the same 
admission requirements as for the degree program (except for the essay) as listed 
above. 

For both the degree and certificate programs, students are admitted to begin 
course work in the Fall semester and must be accepted by the Graduate School prior 
to starting courses. For early consideration, students should submit their completed 
application by November 1 of the year prior to expected enrollment. For regular con- 
sideration, students should submit their completed application by March 1 of the 
year of expected enrollment. Completed applications received between March 1 and 
May 30 of the year of expected enrollment will be considered for admission on a 
space available basis. 

Combined B.S./M.S. Degree Pvo£fram 

A combined Baccalaureate and Master's Degree Program is available for regis- 
tered nurses with an associate degree or diploma in nursing from an NLNAC accred- 
ited program. This option is designed for registered nurses who do not have a bac- 
calaureate degree but wish to pursue specialty preparation at the master's level. With 
this program 9 graduate credits satisfy 9 undergraduate credit requirements. 
Specifically, the undergraduate Nurs 483, Independent Study (3 credits), require- 
ment may be satisfied by Nurs 510, Advanced Pathophysiology (3 credits); and, the 
undergraduate Nurs 490, Synthesis of Nursing Concepts (6 credits) requirement may 
be satisfied by both graduate Nurs 591, Issues in Advanced Nursing Practice (3 cred- 
its) and Nurs 595, Nursing Ethics (3 credits). 

The application process for the combined program involved two phases. Initial 
application (Phase 1) is filed through the Dexter Hanley College. Upon completion 
of 96 undergraduate credits hours - including Nurs 241 and Nurs 242, and a mini- 
mum GPA at the Universit>' of Scranton of 3.3, the student may proceed with Phase 
2 of the application process which involves completion of the application for graduate 
admission to the University of Scranton Graduate School accompanied by the 
Combined Baccalaureate and Master's Degree Program form (refer to pages 11-12). 
Upon acceptance into the combined program, all policies and procedures of the 
Graduate School apply. Applicants are accepted in the fall of each year. 

Scheduling 

The program can be completed in two years of fiiU time study or three to five years 
of part time study. Courses are usually offered Tuesday and Thursday evenings. 
Each course meets one night per week in the Fall and Spring semesters. Full-time 
students attend classes two nights per week; part-time students usually attend classes 
one night per week. Students may complete clinical preceptorships during interses- 
sions and summers, provided that they have completed the required hours before 
starting the next clinical course. 



122 



Students are expected to obtain a practitioner(s) who will serve as preceptor(s) for 
clinical practicums in the graduate program. For the family nurse practitioner pro- 
gram, the preceptor must be a certified registered nurse practitioner or a licensed 
physician in family or adult primary health care. For the adult health program, the 
preceptor must be a master's prepared registered nurse or licensed physician. 
Additional clinical preceptorships may be arranged to meet the needs of the indixid- 
ual student. 

Curricula 

Family Nurse Practitioner Program: The program is offered as a 46 credit mas- 
ter's degree for baccalaureate prepared nurses, and as a 27 credit program for nurses 
already holding a nursing master's degree. Course content provides necessary frame- 
work for both practice and role development as a family nurse practitioner. Through 
the curriculum, students are taught how to provide health promotion and primary 
care for families across the life span, including obstetric/gynecological (women's 
health), pediatric (children's health), adult and geriatric clients. The use of clinical 
decision-maldng, diagnostic and treatment skills are also emphasized. In addition, 
Nurs 583: Independent Study may be utilized to perform a research project, to 
enhance an area of primary practice, or to take an elective that will broaden the stu- 
dent's knowledge base. 

Adult Health Program: The program is offered as a 42 credit master's degree for 
baccalaureate prepared nurses. Course content is designed to prepare nurses to devel- 
op advanced competencies in nursing practice and strategies for improving the quali- 
ty of patient care. The curriculum emphasizes the development of adult health nurs- 
ing clinical expertise based on an in depth understanding of nursing practice and the- 
ory. In addition, students are introduced to a variety of patient care models, includ- 
ing case management. The graduate will be prepared to assume leadership/manage- 
ment roles in adult health nursing practice. In addition, Nurs 583: Independent 
Study may be utilized to perform a research project, to enhance an area of practice, 
or to take an elective that will broaden the student's loiowledge base. 

Tljesis Option: Candidates for a Master of Science in Nursing may opt to do a 
thesis as their independent study by taking Nurs 599 for five (5) credits in place of 
Nurs 583 and the free elective. Those who opt to do so are governed by the 
University of Scranton graduate thesis policy. 

Academic Regulations: Graduate nursing students are expected to conform to 
the regulations stated in both the Universit)' of Scranton Graduate Catalog and the 
Department of Nursing Graduate Student Handbook. 

Comprehensive Examination: All graduate students are expected to successfully 
complete a comprehensive examination as part of their graduation requirements. 



123 



Accreditation 

The undergraduate nursing program is accredited by the NLNAC and the gradu- 
ate nursing program is awaiting notification with regard to accreditation. The 
NLNAC is a resource of information regarding tuition, fees and length of accredited 
nursing program. Requests for information should be directed to: 

National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission 

350 Hudson St 

NewYork, NY 10014 

(212)989-9393 




Mary Jane Hanson, Assistant Professor and Director of the Graduate Projjrnni in Nursing 



124 



Course 
Fall 



Spring 



Fall 



Spring 



Family Nurse Practitioner Program 
Two Year Full Time Program 

First Tear 

Nurs 510 Advanced Pathoph\'siolog}' 

Nurs 520 Advanced Clinical Pharmacology 

Nurs 530 Advanced Family Clinical Assessment 

Nurs 541 Family Health Promotion 

Nurs 542 Family Clinical Practicum I 

Nurs 551 Health Problems in the Developing Family 

Nurs 552 Family Practicum II 

Nurs 591 Issues in Advanced Nursing Practice 

Nurs 595 Nursing Ethics 

Second Tear 

Nurs 561 Health Problems in the Established Family 

Nurs 562 Family Practicum III 

Nurs 590 Rural Health (variable 2-3 credits) 

Nurs 593 Research Methodolog\' 

Nurs 571 Family Health Synthesis 

Nurs 572 Family Clinical Practicum IV 

Nurs 583 Independent Study (Variable to 6 credits) 

Nurs 594 Theory and Research Application 

Free Elective 

Four Tear Part Time Program 



Course 




First Tear 


Fall 


Nurs 510 
Nurs 520 


Advanced Pathophysiology 
Advanced Clinical Pharmacology 


Spring 


Nurs 591 


Issues in Advanced Nursing Practice 




Nurs 595 


Nursing Ethics 


Fall 


Nurs 590 


Second Tear 

Rural Health (Variable 2-3 credits) 




Nurs 593 


Research Methodolog)' 


Spring 


Nurs 594 


Theory and Research Application 




Free Elective 






Third Tear 


Fall 


Nurs 530 


Advanced Family Clinical Assessment 




Nurs 541 


Family Health Promotion 




Nurs 542 


Family Clinical Practicum I 


Spring 


Nurs 551 


Health Problems in the Developing Family 




Nurs 552 


Family Practicum II 

Fourth Tear 


Fall 


Nurs 561 


Health Problems in the Established Family 




Nurs 562 


Family Practicum III 


Spring 


Nurs 571 
Nurs 572 


Family Health Synthesis 
Family Clinical Practicum IV 




Nurs 583 


Independent Study 



Credits 

3 
3 
3 
2 
1 
3 
2 
3 
3 

3 
2 
2 
3 
3 
2 
2 
3 
3 

46 

Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 

2 
3 
3 
3 

3 
2 
1 
3 
2 

3 
2 
3 

2 

2 

46 

125 



Course 
Fall 

Spring 



Fall 



Spring 



Adult Health Program 
Two Tear Ftill Time Program 

First Tear 

Nurs 510 Advanced Pathophysiolog)' 

Nurs 520 Advanced Pharmacolog}' 

Nurs 530 Advanced Clinical Assessment 

Nurs 553 Theoretical Foundations of Case Management 

Nurs 563 Advanced Theory Adult Health Nursing I 

Nurs 564 Advanced Applications/ Adult Health I 

Nurs 591 Issues in Advanced Practice Nursing 

Nurs 595 Nursing Ethics 

Second Tear 

Nurs 573 Advanced Theory Adult Health Nursing II 
Nurs 574 Advanced Applications/Adult Health II 
Nurs 593 Research Methodology 
Free Elective 

Nurs 583 Independent Study (Variable to 6 cr.) 
Nurs 584 Case Management Clinical Practicum 
Nurs 594 Theory and Research Application 
Free Elective 



Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3 



42 



Course 

Fall 

Spring 

Fall 
Spring 

Fall 
Spring 

Fall 
Spring 



Four Tear Part Time Program 

First Tear 

Nurs 510 Ad\'anced Pathophysiology 
Nurs 520 Advanced Pharmacology 
Nurs 591 Issues in Advanced Practice Nursing 
Nurs 595 Nursing Ethics 

Second Tear 
Nurs 593 Research Methodology' 
Free Elective 

Nurs 594 Theory and Research Application 
Free Elective 

Third Tear 

Nurs 530 Advanced Clinical Assessment 
Nurs 553 Theoretical Foundations of Case Management 
Nurs 563 Advanced Theory Adult Health Nursing I 
Nurs 564 Advanced Applications/ Adult Health 1 

Fourth Tear 
Nurs 573 Advanced Theory Adult Health Nursing II 
Nurs 574 Advanced Applications/Adult Health II 
Nurs 583 Independent Study (Variable to 6 cr.) 
Nurs 584 Case Management Clinical Practicum 



Credits 

3 
3 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
1 

3 
1 

3 
1_ 

42 



126 



Nine credits may be considered for transfer credits for RNs with prior graduate course 
work. Eacii credit of clinical equals eight hours so that total clinical time is 840 hours for the 
Family Nurse Practitioner program, and 392 hours for the Adult Health program. If necessary, 
students will be allowed to extend their practicum hours into the Intcrsession and Summer 
Sessions. 

Students must receive a grade of Satisfactory in the practicum courses. The grade is based 
upon both faculty and preceptor evaluations of the student's abilit\' to meet course objectives 
and demonstrate safe advanced clinical nursing practice. A grade of Unsatisfactory will result in 
the failure of the practicum and may result in a recommendation for dismissal from the pro- 
gram. 



Course 




Fall 


NursSlO 




Nurs 520 




Nurs 530 




Nurs 541 




Nurs 542 


Spring 


Nurs 551 




Nurs 552 


Fall 


Nurs 561 




Nurs 562 


Spring 


Nurs 571 




Nurs 572 



Family Nurse Practitioner Certificate Only 
Two Tear Full Time Pro£iram 



First Tear 

Advanced Pathophysiology 

Advanced Clinical Pharmacology 

Advanced Family Clinical Assessment 

Family Health Promotion 

Family Clinical Practicum 1 

Health Problems in the Developing Family 

Family Practicum II 

Second Tear 

Health Problems in the Established Family 
Family Practicum III 
Family Health Synthesis 
Family Clinical Practicum IV 



Credits 

3 
3 
3 
2 
1 
3 
2 

3 

2 
3 

2 



27 
Students wishing to complete a certificate on a part-time basis should meet with the program 
director. 



Course Descriptions 

Credits 

Nurs 510. Advanced Pathophysiology 3 

Utilizing principles from anatomy and physiology, this lecture course presents the pathophysi- 
ology underlying common disease entities across the life span, including their associated signs 
and symptoms and their appropriate laboratory data. 

Nurs 511. Epidemiology and Methods of Prevention 3 

This course is designed for graduate students desiring to utilize prevention strategies within 
advanced practice roles in acute care, chronic care and communit)' settings. The course 
explores the interrelationships of epidemiolog}', biostatistics, and public health promotion 
through primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention. Ethical and professional problems 
encountered in using epidemiology are critically examined. 

Nurs 520. Advanced Clinical Pharmacolojjy 3 

Lectures focus on the principles of drug therapy, mechanisms of action, side effects, drug inter- 
actions, general concepts in the selection of pharmaceutical agents in clinical practice, and pre- 
scriptive authorit)'. 



127 



Nurs 530. Advanced Clinical Assessment 3 

Lecture and laboratory pro\'ide theory and skills needed to obtain compressive histories and to 
perform comprehensive physical examinations on clients throughout the life span. Course 
includes 2 hours per week lecture, and 4 hours per week on-campus laboratory. 

Nurs 541 . Family Health Promotion 2 

(Pre or corequisites, Nurs 510, 520 and 530; corequisite, Nurs 542) This lecture provides an 
introduction to primary health care by discussing concepts and theories related to family 
process development, health promotion, sociocultural aspects, and common health deviations 
across the Hfe span. (Offered in Fall semester odd years.) 

Nurs 542. Family Clinical Practicum I 1 

(Pre or corequisites, Nurs 510, 520 and 530; corequisite, Nurs 541) Clinical application of 
principles discussed in family health promotion as well as advanced clinical assessment for 
clients across the life span. Students will be precepted at clinical sites during the last half of the 
semester. (98 hours of clinical lab, which is taken during the last 7 weeks of the semester, plus 
1 hour per week seminar.) (Offered in Fall semester odd years.) 

Nurs 551. Health Problems in the Developing Family 3 

(Prerequisites, Nurs 541 and 542; corequisite, Nurs 552) Lecture focuses on the epidemiolo- 
g)', differential diagnoses and management of acute and chronic health problems and illnesses 
of the developing tamily. (Offered in Spring semester even years.) 

Nurs 552. Family Clinical Practicum II 2 

(Prerequisites, Nurs 542 and a final grade of B or higher in both Nurs 530 and Nurs 541; 
corequisite, Nurs 551) Clinical application of theoretical principles presented in health prob- 
lems of the developing family. Students will be in a variet)' of clinical settings that provide 
opportunities to work with clients in these stages of the life span. (16 hours of clinical lab per 
week, which includes 2 hours per week seminar.) (Offered in Spring semester even years.) 

Nurs 553. Theoretical Foundations of Case Management 3 

(Pre or corequisites, Nurs 510, 520 and 530) Lecture focuses on the development and use of 
case management as an effective health care delivery system. The following components of case 
management are explored: selection of case t)'pes; review of literature related to selected case 
types; audits; case management plans, and critical paths. Effective marketing strategies and 
communication skills are also presented. (Offered in Fall semester even years.) 

Nurs 561 . Health Problems in the Established Family 3 

(Prerequisites, Nurs 551 and 552; corequisite, Nurs 562) Lecture focuses on the epidemiolo- 
gy, differential diagnoses and management of acute and chronic health problems and illnesses 
of the established family. (Offered in Fall semester even years.) 

Nurs 562. Family Clinical Practicum III 2 

(Prerequisites, Nurs 552 and a final grade of B or higher in Nurs 551; corequisite, Nurs 561 ) 
Clinical application of theoretical principles presented in health problems of the established 
family. Students will be in a variet)' of clinical settings that provide opportunities to work with 
clients in these stages of the life span. (16 hours of clinical lab per week, which includes 2 
hours per week seminar.) (Offered in Fall semester even years.) 

Nurs 563. Advanced Theory of Adult Health Nursing I 3 

(Prerequisite, Nurs 553; corequisite, Nurs 564) Theoretical concepts focus on the care of 
acutely ill adults. Role development focuses on the advanced practice nurse as clinical specialist, 
educator and leader in the care of acutely ill adults. Processes of interdisciplinary collaboration, 
decision- making and assessment of client and family emotional needs are emphasized. (Offered 
in Spring semester odd years) 



128 



Nurs 564. Advanced Applications of Adult Health Nursing I 1 

(Prerequisite, Nurs 553; corequisite, Nurs 563) Clinical pracricum is designed to facilitate the 
development of advanced assessment skills and clinical expertise in caring for a specific acutely 
ill adult population. (8 hours of clinical lab per week, which includes 1 hour per week seminar.) 
(Offered in Spring semester odd years.) 

Nurs 571. Family Health Synthesis 3 

(Prerequisites, Nurs 561 and 562; corequisite, Nurs 572) Synthesis of concepts from health 
promotion, health problems and supporting courses to utilize the nurse practitioner roles in 
more complex family health care problems. (Offered in Spring semester odd years.) 

Nurs 572. Family Clinical Practicum IV 3 

(Prerequisites, Nurs 562 and a final grade of B or higher in Nurs 561; corequisite, Nurs 571) 
Clinical application of syntheses of theoretical principles from health promotion, health prob- 
lems, and supporting courses. Students will be in a variet)' of settings that will provide oppor- 
tunities to utilize the roles of the nurse practitioner with families and more complex health 
problems. ( 16 hours of clinical lab per week, which includes 2 hours per week seminar.) 
(Offered in Spring semester odd years.) 

Nurs 573. Advanced Theory of Adult Health Nursing II 3 

(Prerequisite, Nurs 563, 564; corequisite, Nurs 574) Theoretical concepts focus on the care of 
chronically ill adults. Role development focuses on the adxanced practice nurse as clinical spe- 
cialist, change agent, collaborator and leader in the care of chronically ill adults. Processes of 
research, interdisciplinary collaboration, descision-making and assessment of client and family 
emotional needs are emphasized. (Offered in Fall semester odd years.) 

Nurs 574. Advanced Applications of Adult Health Nursin£i II I 

(Prerequisites, Nurs 563 and 564; corequisite, Nurs 573) Clinical practicum is designed to 
develop clinical expertise and the clinical specialist role for a specific chronically ill adult popu- 
lation. (8 hours of clinical lab per week, which includes 1 hour per week seminar.) (Offered in 
Fall semester odd years.) 

Nurs 583. Independent Study Variable to 6 

Students choose one of the following options: 1) a clinical practicum in a specialized setting to 
focus on one or more of the advanced practice nursing roles; 2) the completion of a research 
project; 3) an elective with tacult)' approval; 4) a thesis. 

Nurs 584. Case Mana^iement Clinical Practicum 1 

(Prerequisites, Nurs 573 and 574) The focus of the course is the clinical application of the the- 
oretical components of case management. Students will be with preceptors in various health 
care settings and will be expected to design case management plans for selected case types 
within a variety of practice settings. (8 hours of clinical lab per week, which includes 1 hour per 
week seminar.) (Offered in Spring semester even years.) 

Nurs 591. Issues in Advanced Practice Nursing 3 

This seminar provides students with the opportunity' to analyze contemporary issues and 
trends as they relate to advanced practice, including role dexelopment, legal issues, health care 
policy, and alternative health care practices. 

Nurs 593. Research Methodology 3 

This didactic course presents an introduction to the concepts and process of research, includ- 
ing problem formulation, rights of human subjects, research design, sampling, instrument eval- 
uation, and data collection and analysis strategies. It provides students with the opportunity' to 
analyze and critique \'arious quantitative and qualitative nursing research studies, including 
their implications for utilization. 

129 



Nurs 594. Theory and Research Application 3 

(Prerequisite, Nurs 593) This didactic and seminar course provides an intermediate study of 
levels of theory construction and the research process with emphasis on the integration of the- 
oretical elements in the development of a research proposal. 

Nurs 595 ISlursin^ Ethics 3 

This lecture, discussion, and core study analysis is used to enable the student to become a well 
informed participant in professional health care discussions involving ethical principles. 

Nurs 599. Nursin£[: Thesis 2-5 




130 



University Administration 

Executive Officers 



Joseph M. McShane, S.J. 
Richard H. Passon 
James T. Bryan 
David E. Christiansen 
Thomas D. Masterson, S.J. 

Robert J. Sylvester 



President 

Provost/Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Vice President for Student Affairs 

Vice President for Finance/Treasurer 

Vice President for University Ministries 

and University Chaplain 

Vice President for Institutional Advancement 



Academic Organization 

Office of the Provost and Academic Vice President 

Richard H. Passon Provost/Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Jerome P. DeSanto Associate Provost for Information Resources 

Abigail Byman - University General Counsel 



Robert E. Powell 
Regina B. Bennett 
Peter J. Blazes 
James L. Goonan 



The Graduate School 

Dean and Director of Research 

Assistant Dean 

Director of International Student Affairs 

Director of Graduate Admissions 



Joseph H. Dreisbach 
Mary F. Engel 
Gina Butler 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Dean 
Associate Dean 
Assistant Dean 



Shirley M. Adams 
Ann Clark Bass 



Dexter Hanley College 



Dean '' 
Assistant Dean 



Arthur J. Kania School of Management 



Ronald D. Johnson 
Ralph W. Grambo, Jr. 
Barbara Gleason 



Dean 

Acting Associate Dean 

Assistant Dean 



J.A. Panuska, S.J., College of Professional Studies 
James J. Pallante 
Georgia L. Narsavage 
Dianne M. Posegate 



Dean 
Associate Dean 
Assistant Dean 



131 



Index 



Academic Integrity 19 

Academic Regulations 15 

Accounting Courses 90 

Accreditation Inside Front Cover, 

28,52,67,71,73,82,124 

Act 34 Clearance 27 

Adding a Course 19 

Administration, Universit}' 131 

Admission 9 

Admission Standards 9 

Application Process 9 

Categories 10 

Probationary Admission 10 

Provisional Acceptance 10 

Provisional Admission 10 

Regular Admission 10 

Special Admission 10 

International Students 13 

Adult Health Program 123 

Appeal ot a Graduate Course Grade ...16 

Application for Degree 17 

Deadline 5 

Assistant Superintendent/Superintendent .. 

Letter of Eligibilit)^ 39 

Course Descriptions 41 

Assistantships 23 

Auditing a Course 15 

B 

Biochemistry 105 

Combined B.S./M.A. or M.S. Degree 

Program 108 

Comprehensive Examinations 108 

Courses Descriptions 1 09 

General Requirements 105 

Graduate Assistantships 1 09 

Thesis 108 



Calendar 4 

Campus Map Inside Back Cover 

Career Services 22 

Certification Programs 7 



132 



Certification, Professional 

28,55,67,71,73 

Chemistry 105 

Combined B.S./M.A. or M.S. Degree 

Program 108 

Comprehensive Examinations 108 

Course Descriptions 109 

General Requirements 105 

Graduate Assistantships 1 09 

Thesis 108 

Child Welfare Track 69 

Clinical Chemistry 106 

Comprehensive Examinations 108 

Course Descriptions 109 

General Requirements 107 

Graduate Assistantships 1 09 

Health Administration Courses.... 107 

Thesis 107, 108 

Combined Baccalaureate & Master's 
Degree Program. 11, 52, 55, 86, 102, 108, 122 

Commencement 4 

Commonly Used Forms 20 

Community' Counseling 66 

Accreditation and Certification 67 

Application Deadline 64 

Child Welfare Track 69 

Comprehensive Examination 65 

Course Descriptions 71 

Graduate Assistantships 65 

Comprehensive Examinations 

18,27,29,30,32,33,34,36,37,50, 
65,96,97,101,106,108,117,123... 

Application 20 

Deadline 4,5 

Computer Facilities 24 

Counseling Center 23 

Counseling and Human Services 64 

Application Deadline 64 

Community Counseling 66 

Comprehensive Examination 65 

Course Descriptions 77 

Employment Opportunities 65 

Endorsement of Students 65 

Graduate Assistantships 65 

Rehabilitation Counseling 70 

School Counseling 73 

Counselor Certification 67, 71 



D 

Deadlines 

Application for 

Comprehensive Examinations ..4,5 

Application for Degree 5 

Thesis Submission 4,5 

Developmental Literacy Option 37 

Dropping a Course 19 

E 

Economics Courses 94 

Education 27 

Accreditation 28 

Act 34 Clearance 27 

Assistant Superintendent/Superintendent 

Letter of Eligibilit)' 39 

Certification 28 

Course Descriptions 41 

Elementary Education 32 

Elementary School Administration ..34 

General Requirements 27 

Reading Education 36 

Secondary Education 29 

Secondary School Administration ..34 

Supervision 38 

Elementary Education 32 

Course Descriptions 41 

Elementary School Administration 34 

Course Descriptions 41 

Employer Reimbursement Form 20 

Endorsement of Students 65 

English 96 

Course Descriptions 98 

General Requirements 96 

M.A. Non-Thesis 97 

M.A. Thesis 96 

M.S. in Secondary 

Education: English 97 

F 

Fall '98 

Schedule of Refunds 26 

Term Schedule 4 

Family Nurse Practitioner Program 123 

Fees 26 

Finance Courses 94 

Financial Aid 22 



Grading System 15 

Graduate Assistantships 23 

Graduate Dean's Conference 8 

Graduate Management Admission 

TestlGMAT^j 86, 113 

Graduate Programs 6 

Biochemistry 105 

Business Administration 82 

Chemistry 105 

Clinical Chemistry 106 

Community Counseling 66 

Elementary Education 32 

Elementary School Administration ..34 

English 96 

Health Administration 51 

History 101 

Human Resources Administration ..54 

Nursing 121 

Physical Therapy 116 

Reading Education 36 

Rehabilitation Counseling 70 

School Counseling 73 

Secondary Education 29 

Secondary School Administration ..34 

Software Engineering 112 

Theology 117 

Graduate Record Examination 

(GRE) 49,64,96,113 

H 

Health Administration 51 

Accreditation 52 

Application Deadline 49 

Combined B.S./M.H.A. Degree 

Program 52 

Comprehensive Examination 50 

Course Descriptions 57 

Employment Opportunities 50 

Executive Certificate Program 52 

Graduate Assistantships 50 

History 101 

Combined B.A./M.A. Degree 

Program 102 

Comprehensive Examination 101 

Course Descriptions 103 

General Requirements 101 



133 



M.A. Non-Thesis 101 

M.A. Thesis 101 

Human Resources Administration 54 

Application Deadline 49 

Areas of Specialization 54 

Combined B.S./M.S. Degree 

Program 55 

Comprehensive Examination 50 

Course Descriptions 57 

Employment Opportunities 50 

Graduate Assistantships 50 

Professional Certification 55 

I 

International Students 13 

Intersession '99 

Schedule of Refimds 26 

Term Schedule 4 



Learning Resources Center 25 

Library 21 

Location 7,Inside Back Cover 

M 

Management Courses 92 

Management Information Systems 

Courses 93 

Marketing Courses 94 

MBA Program 82 

Accreditation 82 

Advanced Electives 83, 90 

Combined B.S./M.B.A. Degree in 

Accounting 86 

Computer Literacy 84 

Core Courses 83, 89 

Course Descriptions 87 

Foundation Courses 85, 87 

Graduate Assistantships 85 

Mentors 15 

Miller Analogies Test (MAT) 49, 64 

N 

National Teacher 

Examination (NTE) 28 

Nursing 121 



Accreditiation 1 24 

Adult Health Program 123 

Four Year Full Time Program 

Curriculum 126 

Two Year Full Time Program 

Curriculum 126 

Clinical Assessment Fee 26 

Combined B.S./M.S. Degree 

Program 122 

Comprehensive Examination 123 

Course Descriptions 127 

Course Scheduling 122 

Family Nurse Practitioner Program. 123 
Certificate Only Two Year Full Time 

Program Curriculum 127 

Four Year Part Time Program 

Curriculum 125 

Two Year Full Time Program 

Curriculum 125 

General Requirements 121 

Thesis Option 123 

O 

Objectives 7 

Operations Management Courses 91 

Organization and Location 7 

Orientations for New Students 14 

P 

Physical Therapy 116 

Policy Changes 19 

Policy on Students with Disabilities 8 

Program Change Form 20 

R 

Reader Forms 20 

Reading Education 36 

Course Descriptions 41 

Developmental Literacy Option 37 

Reading Certificate 36 

Reading Supervisor 37 

Recreational Complex 25 

Refijnd Schedule 26 

Registration for Courses 14 

Rehabilitation Counseling 70 

Accreditation and Certification 71 



134 



Application Deadline 64 

Comprehensive Examination 65 

Course Descriptions 71 

Graduate Assistantships 65 

Request for Transcript 20 

Resources 21 

Assistantships 23 

Career Services 22 

Computer Facilities 24 

Counseling Center 23 

Financial Aid 23 

Learning Resources Center 25 

Library 21 

Recreational Complex 25 

Senior Citizen Tuition Policy 23 

Student Health Services 25 

Wellness Center 23 

Retention of Application Files 13 

ROTC 22 

S 

School Counseling 73 

Accreditations and Certifications ...73 

Application Deadline 64 

Comprehensive Examination 65 

Course Descriptions 77 

Elementary School Specialization ..76 

Graduate Assistantships 65 

Secondary School Specialization ....75 

Second Degrees or Programs 12 

Secondary Education 29 

Course Descriptions 41 

Secondary School Administration 34 

Course Descriptions 41 

Senior Citizen Tuition Policy 23 

Software Engineering 112 

Application Deadline 113 

Course Descriptions 114 



General Requirements 112 

Spring '99 

Schedule of Refunds 26 

Term Schedule 4 

Standards of Progress 16 

Student Conduct 19 

Student Health Services 25 

Student Rights of Confidentiality 19 

Students with Disabilities 8 

Summer '99 

Schedule of Refunds 26 

Term Schedules 5 

Supervision 38 

Course Descriptions 41 

Supervisor Certificates 7, 38 



Teacher Certification 

Requirements 30, 33 

Test of English as a Foreign Language 

(TOEFL) 13, 49, 64, 86, 96, 113 

Theolog}' 117 

Course Descriptions 119 

General Requirements 117 

Non-Thesis Option 117 

Thesis Option 117 

Thesis 18 

Cover Approval Page 20 

Submission Deadlines 4,5 

Time Limit 17 

Transfer of Credit 17 

Tuition and Fees 26 

Tuition Policy for Senior Citizens 23 

W 

Wellness Center 23 

Withdrawing From a Course 19 



135 



Campus Map 



Graduate 
School Office 




Legend for Map 



2 


Alumni Memorial Hall 


6 


Byron Recreation Complex 


12 


Claver Hall 


20 


The Estate 


24 


The Gallery 


30 


Gunster Center 


34 


Health, Education & 




Human Resources Bldg. 


37 


Houlihan-McLean Center 


38 


Hyland Hall 



43 Leahy Hall 

45 Weinberg Memorial Library 

46 Center for Literary and 
Performing Arts 

48 John J. Long Center 

49 Loyola Hall 

60 O'Hara Hall 

61 Parking and Public Pavilion 
67 St. Thomas Hall 







Printed on recycled paper. 



The XJniversity of Scraxiton 
The Graduate School 
Scranton, PA 18510-4632 



BOOK