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Full text of "Proceedings: Grand Lodge of A.F. & A.M. of Canada, 1889"

1IH 

111 




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BROCK 

UNIVERSITY 

LIBRARY 



From the 
Masonic Library 
of 
J. Lawrence Runnalls 
St. Catharines 
August 1988 



;oll£ C;> 
, ft 

.iwiWPRSITY 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Heritage Lodge No. 730 G.R.C. & Grand Lodge A.F.& A.M. of Canada in the Province of Ontario 



http://www.archive.org/details/grandlodge1889onta 



1 

{ 



Proceedings of the Grand Lodge 



Kiicieqt, f fee § Accepted Jtoijs 

OF CANADA, IN THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO, 



SPECIAL COMMUNICATIONS 

HELD AT 

Maitland, 22nd August, A. L. 5888 ; Langton, 22nd May, 
A.L. 5889; and Wellington, 26th June, A. L. 5889. 

ALSO AT THE 

Held at the Town or Owen Sound, 

ON THE 

17 th and 18th July, A. D. 1889, A. L. 5889. 




ORDERED TO 3E READ IN ALL LODGES AND PRESERVED 



HAMILTON : 

TIMES PRINTING COMPANY 



Grand Lodge of Canada, 



IN THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO. 



PROCEEDINGS 



At an Especial Commtinicatioti of the Grand Lodge of 
A. F. 6° A. M. of Canada, held at St. fames' Masonic 
Hall, in the Village of Mai t land, on Wed?iesday, the 
22nd day of August, A. D. 1888, A. L. 



Present : 
R. W. Bro. J. Reynolds, P.D.G.M., as Grand Master. 



V. w. 


' J. Dumbrille, as Deputy Grand Master. 


w. 


' P. W. D. Broderick 


, as Grand Senior AVarden 


w. 


' Geo. Gale, 


as ' 


' Junior " 




' D. F. Bogart, 


as ' 


' Chaplain. 




' R. J. Kelly, 


as ' 


' Treasurer. 




' John F. Wood, 


as ' 


' Registrar. 




' N. B. Colcock, 


as ' 


' Secretary. 




' W. R. Scace, 


as ' 


' Asst. Secretary 




' G. W. McEathron, 


as ' 


' Senior Deacon 




' Donald W. Ross, 


as ' 


' Junior " 




' Geo. A. Allen, 


as ' 


' Supt. of Works 




' E. A. Robinson, 


as ' 


' Architect. 


w. 


' R. G. Hervey, 


as ' 


' Dir. of Cer. 


c< 


' A. Burritt, 


as ' 


' Sword Bearer. 


(( 


' Thos. Brady, 


as ' 


' Organist. 




' W. J. Wright, 


as ' 


' Asst. Organist. 



GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 



W. 



W. 



Bro 

CI 


. Rufus S. Throop, 
Jno. Anderson, 




it 


Howard Bissell, 




<( 


Albert Pearson, 




(< 


Chas. B. Lemon, 




<< 
a 
(t 
u 
(< 


Jas. Alexander, 
Elgin Row, 
John L. Wood, 
W. J. McDougall, 
Robt. Grant. 


■ as Grand Stewards. 




John Dargavel 
N. T. Stevens, 




K 


James Norris, 






A. C. Johns, 
P. Perry, 
John Grant 


as " Pursuivant 
as " Tyler. 



Masters, Past Masters and brethren selected from the fol 
lowing lodges represented: Sussex, No. 5, Brockville; Moira 
No. 11, Belleville; St. John's, No. 20, London; Ontario 
No. 26, Port Hope ; St. Francis, No. 28, Smith's Falls 
Merrickville, No. 55, Merrickville; St. James, No. 74, Maitland 
Central, No. no, Prescott; Simpson, No. 157, Newboro 
Merritt, No. 168, Welland ; Builders, No. 177, Ottawa 
Zetland, No. 326, Toronto ; Salem, No. 368, Brockville 
Harmony, No. 370, Delta; Copestone, No. 373, Welland; 
Crystal Fountain, No. 389, North Augusta ; were present and 
took part in the proceedings. 

The Grand Lodge was opened in form at 1 1 a. m. 

After the Grand Lodge was opened the brethren, headed 
by the band of the 42nd Battalion, proceeded to the site of 
the new church where a temporary platform was erected for 
their convenience. After the singing of "Old Hundred," the 
Incumbent read the 7th chapter of 2nd Samuel. The acting 
Grand Master then spoke as follows : 

Men, women and children assembled here to-day : Know 
all of you that we are lawful Masons, true to the laws of our 



SPECIAL COMMUNICATION, MAITLAND, 5,888. 5 

Country, faithful in our allegiance to our Sovereign, and estab- 
lished of old with peace and honor (in most countries) to do 
good to our Brethren and fellow creatures, to assist in the 
erection of buildings, and to fear God who is the Great Architect 
of all things. 

We have certain secrets which must not be revealed ; they 
have been handed down to us and intrusted to our keeping 
from time immemorial, but these secrets are lawful and honor- 
able, and were it not that our Craft is good, and our calling 
honest, we would not have existed for so many centuries, nor 
would so many illustrious men have participated in our cere- 
monies, and countenanced our proceedings. 

We know that our Order is founded on the purest principles 
of piety and virtue, and that it inculcates the strict observance 
of those Golden Rules : — " Do unto others as you would they 
should do unto you," and "love thy neighbour as thyself ;" 
and it teaches also, and calls upon its members to practice that 
charity of tongue, as well as of heart, which would rather veil 
than blazon the errors of others ; that charity which cur first 
great light the Bible declares "thinketh no evil and never 
faileth," and without which, " though a man give of his goods 
and his money to the poor, his work is as nothing." 

It has been said by the outside world, and no doubt with 
considerable truth, "you have bad men in your ranks," but it 
should be remembered that a black sheep may find his way 
into any flock perhaps in consequence of the portals or barriers 
being insufficiently or improperly guarded, or from some other 
unforeseen cause. It is not fair that the Craft or its principles 
should be therefore condemned. Our endeavour is to extend 
our privileges to good and worthy men alone ; Masonry makes 
good men better, and as it draws its inspiration from the Bible, 
its lessons are pure. 

We seek to teach men so to live that they may not fear to 
die, and that to the good virtuous man, death hath no terrors 
equal to the stain of falsehood and dishonor. The good Mason 
is one to whom the burdened heart may pour forth its sorrow ; 



6 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

the distressed prefer his suits — one whose hand is guided by 
justice, and whose heart is expanded by benevolence. 

Though "the paths of glory lead but to the grave," yet 

" Lives of great men all remind us 

We can make our lives sublime, 
And departing, leave behind us 

Footprints on the sands of time ; 
Footprints that perhaps another, 

Sailing o'er life's solemn main, 
A forlorn and shipwrecked brother, 

Seeing shall take heart again." 

In all ages Masons have borne their part in the erection of 
stately and other edifices ; but in none do they take so hearty 
an interest as in those intended for the public worship of God 
— the promulgation of His wise, beneficent, and just laws and 
commands and the making known His most inexhaustible 
mercies. 

To operative Masons, the corner or foundation stone of 
every building is of -primary importance, but for Free Masons 
it has a special significance, and indeed every newly made 
brother has his attention called to the fact that he figuratively 
represents that stone, and is admonished upon the foundation 
then and there laid to build a superstructure perfect in all its 
parts, — honourable to our antient institution, and creditable 
to himself. 

By request of the Incumbent and Building Committee of St. 
George's Church, we appear here to-day to assist in the interest- 
ing ceremony of laying with appropriate forms, and according 
to antient custom, the foundation or corner stone of this new 
Church, intended to supply the wants of the English Church 
people in this flourishing neighbourhood. 

May this building be carried on to a successful completion 
and may it answer every end had in view by those who pro- 
jected it, and when completed may the word spoken within its 
walls be spoken with such power that it may never be spoken 
in vain. 

The Acting Grand Secretary then stepped forward and pro- 



SPECIAL COMMUNICATION, MAITLAND, 5,S88. 7 

ceeded to read the documents and place the several articles in 
the tin box to be deposited in the stone. First was the notice 
to W. Bro. Burritt, from R. W. Bro. J. J. Mason, Grand Sec- 
retary, convening an especial communication of Grand Lodge 
for the 22nd August, in the Lodge Room at Maitland for the 
purpose of laying the corner stone. Next was the scroll, 
beautifully engrossed, which read as follows : — 

gtt tijt llamr ana bq tlie f nvov of JUtntgljtt) ©ob, 

ON THE 22ND DAY of August, A. D. i888, A. L. 5888, 

And in the 22nd year of the reign of our 
Beloved Sovereign, 

@uttn gittovia, 

By the Grace of God Queen of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India 

and the dependencies in Europe, Asia, Africa, Australasia, 

Dominion of Canada, etc., etc., 

The Rt. Hon. SIR FREDERICK ARTHUR STANLEY, BARON 

STANLEY OF PRESTON, 

In the County of Lancaster in the Peerage of Great Britain, K. C. B., 

being Governor-General of Canada and Vice- Admiral of the same, 

The Hon SIR ALEXANDER CAMPBELL, G. C. M. G., being 
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario, 

The Rt. Hon. SIR JOHN A. MACDONALD, K. C. B., G. C. M. G., 
P. C, being Premier of Canada, 

The Hon. OLIVER MOWAT, Premier of Ontario, 

Walter Shanly, Esq., M. P., for the Riding of South Grenville, 

F. J. French, Esq., M. P. P., for the County of Grenville, 

Richard Thomas Walkem, Q. C, M. W. Grand Master of the 
Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons of Canada, 

W. Bro. P. W. D. Broderick, Esq., W. M. of Salem Lodge 
No. 368, G.R. C, 

W. Bro. Albert Bcjrritt, Esq., W. M. of St. James' Lodge, 
No. 74, G. R.C., 

The Rt. Rev. John Travers Lewis, D. D., Bishop of Ontario, 

Rev. John Street Lawder, D. C. L., Archdeacon of Ontario, and 
Commissary of the Bishop, 



8 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

The Rev. Richard Lewis, M A., Rural Dean of Grenville, 
Rector of Augusta, 

The Rev. G. S. Anderson, Curate, 

CTlje Corner Stone 

Of this St. George's Church 

Was laid by Rt. W. Bro. James Reynolds, P. D. D. G. M., St. 

Lawrence District, attended and assisted by an especial Grand Lodge 

of Free Masons of Canada and various Lodges and Brethren, 

whom may God prosper." 

A document of considerable local interest was then read as 
follows : — 

HISTORY OF THE CHURCH IN AUGUSTA. 

A short sketch of the history of the Church of England in 
the Parish of Augusta in the County of Grenville, Province of 
Ontario : — 

" The first church in this Parish was erected about the year 
1809, near the centre of the front part of the Township of 
Augusta, and was called the Blue Church from the color it was 
painted. Services were occasionally held in this Church until 
the year 181 3. It was afterwards burned down and the pre- 
sent small one built for the use of funeral services. 

"In 18 1 3 the Rev. John Bethune, afterwards Dean of 
Montreal, was placed in charge of the Mission of Augusta. 
He continued at his post until 1819, when he exchanged with 
the Rev. John Leeds, at that time Rector of Montreal. Mr. 
Leeds continued in Augusta until 1 82 1, when he took charge 
of the Mission of Elizabethtown and Brockville and was suc- 
ceeded in Augusta by the Rev. Robt. Blakie (who was sent 
out to Canada by the Society for the propagation of the 
Gospel,) and was afterwards appointed Rector of the Parish of 
Augusta. 

"In 1820, St. John's Church, Prescott, was opened for 
divine service, and in]i826 St. James' Church, Maitland, was 
erected, and opened for divine service in 1827. The first 



SPECIAL COMMUNICATION, MAITLAND, 5,888. 9 

Church Wardens of St. James' Church were George Longley 
and Dunham Jones. 

" Mr. Blakie was assisted in the latter part of his life, first by 
Rev. T. Leach, second by Rev. T. A. Parnell, and third by 
Rev. E. W. Beaven. Mr. Blakie died in 1858 and was suc- 
ceeded by the Rev. Richard Lewis, M. A., now Rural Dean. 
In 1862 Mr. Lewis was assisted by the Rev. James Bogert, 
and in the same year Mr. Lewis retired from the charge of 
Prescotfand took up his residence in Maitland, where he still 
lives, and is assisted by the Rev. G. S. Anderson. 

"In 1886 Christ Church was erected by subscription at 
Lord's Mill in this Parish, under the perseverance and super- 
vision of Rev. R. Lewis, and now on the 22nd day of August, 
1888, the Corner Stone of St. George's Church is laid by His 
Honor Judge James Reynolds, of Brockville, P. D. D. G. M. 
of A. F. & A. M. Grand Lodge of Canada. 

"This Church is to be built by subscription under the 
praiseworthy exertions of the Curate, Rev. G. S. Anderson, and 
the land on which it stands was kindly given by Mrs. Shepherd, 
widow of the late Thomas Shepherd. 

"Previous to the erection of the church at Lord's Mills, 
Divine Service was held in the School House there, and at the 
Temperance Hall, near the site of this Church. 

J. Dumbrille, 
Church Warden, St. James' Church." 

Maitland, Aug. 22nd,- 1888. 



The above documents, together with variour silver and 
copper coins and copies of the Dominion Churchman, Toronto 
Empire and Globe, Montreal Gazette, Brockville Daily and 
Weekly Times and Daily and Weekly Recorder and the Pres- 



IO GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

cott Messenger, were then placed in the tin box and deposited 
in the cavity of the corner stone. 

Mr. Arthur Shepherd, Chairman of the Building Committee, 
with a few appropriate remarks then presented to R. W. Bro. 
Reynolds a silver trowel bearing a suitable inscription, for 
which R. W. Bro. Reynolds expressed his thanks. 

The cement having been spread upon the corner stone, the 
upper stone was lowered with three halts at which intervals the 
band played bars of solemn music. When it had been guided 
into its place the Acting Grand Junior Warden applied the 
Plumb Rule, the Acting Grand Senior Warden the Level and 
the Acting Deputy Grand Master the Square, when the Acting 
Grand Master finished the work by declaring it " well made," 
" truly laid," " true and trusty," and invoking a blessing upon 
the undertaking. 

" The Church's one foundation " was then sung by the choir, 
after which corn was strewn upon the stone and wine and oil 
were poured upon it, when the Acting Grand Chaplain in- 
voked a blessing, at the conclusion of which, the public Grand 
Honors were given by the Brethren. An appropriate hymn 
was then sung by the choir. The Superintendent of Works 
then presented the plans, which were approved of by the 
Acting Grand Master and presented (with the implements 
applied to the stone) to the architect. The building was then 
handed over to the Rev G. S. Anderson, Incumbent, for com- 
pletion. The Acting Grand Master in conclusion tendered the 
congratulations of the Brethren to the Rev. gentleman upon 
the success which his labours and those of the Building Com- 
mittee had been attended with and proposed three good hearty 
cheers for the Queen, which were enthusiastically given.. The 



SPECIAL COMMUNICATION, M.UTI.AND, 5888. n 

band then played the National Anthem while the Brethren 
retired to their Lodge Room, and Grand Lodge was closed 
in form. 



ATTEST 




Grand Secretary. 



(IRANI) LODGE OF CANADA. 



Grand Lodge of Canada, 



IN THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO. 



PROCEEDINGS 

At an Especial Communication of the Grand Lodge of 
A. F. 6r> A. M. of Canada, held at the Village of 
Langton, in the County of Norfolk, on Wednesday, the 
22nd day of May, A. D. 1889, A. L. 5889. 

Present : 

R. W. Bro. Wm. McDonald, D.D.G.M., as Grand Master. 
W. S. Law, as Deputy Grand Master. 



J. N. Wood, 


as Grand Senior Warden. 


R. Clarke, 


as ' 


' Junior " 


Rev. Geo. Burns, 


as ' 


Chaplain. 


John McDonald, 


as ' 


' Treasurer. 


Geo. Smith, 


as ' 


' Secretary. 


Thos. Arnold, 


as ' 


' Senior Deacon. 


Geo. Durkee, 


as ' 


' Junior " 


Wm. Jeffries, 


as ' 


' Dir. of Cer. 


J. Barber, 


as ' 


' Supt. of Works 


R. Swain, 


as ' 


' Steward. 


Wm. Frick, 


as ' 


' Steward. 


J. Smith, 


as ' 


' Tyler. 



together with other brethren. 

The Grand Lodge was opened at twelve o'clock by R. W. 
Bro. W. McDonald, D.D.G.M., who stated that the Com- 
munication had been called for the purpose of assisting him in 
laying the corner stone of a Baptist Church in the Village of 
Langton. 

A procession was then formed and proceeded to the site, 



SPECIAL COMMUNICATION, LANGTON, 5889. 



13 



and the corner stone was laid with the usual Masonic 
ceremonies, after which the Acting Grand Master addressed 
the brethren and others assembled on the principles of 
Masonry. 

The brethren re-formed in procession and returned to the 
Masonic Hall, and the Grand Lodge was closed inform. 



attest : 




Grand Secretary. 



14 



GRAND LODOE OK CANADA. 



Grand Lodge of Canada, 



IN THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO. 



PROCEEDINGS 

At an Especial Communication of the Grand Lodge of 
A. F. e° A. M. of Canada, held at the Village of 
Wellington, on Wednesday, June 26th, A. D. i88g, 
A. L. 5889. 

Present : 

M. W. Bro. R. T. Walkem, Q.C., Grand Master. 



R. " 


' Wm. Smeaton, D.D.G. 


M., as Deputy G. M. 


H U 


' Donald Ross, 


as Grand Senior Warden. 




' F. C. Spencer, 


as Grand Junior " 


R. " 


' F. B. Stratton, 


as " Chaplain. 


V. " ' 


' S. W. Flagler, 


as " Treasurer. 




' H. Welbanks, 


as " Secretary. 




' S. M. Smith, 


as " Registrar. 




' R. B. Prout, 


as " Senior Deacon. 




' George Collins, 


as " Junior " 




' B. H. Young, 


as " Supt. of Works 




' Hugh McCullough, 


as " Dir. of Cer. 




' J. H. Colton, 


as " Pursuivant. 




' A. McDonald, 






' J. C. North, 






' R. Ringer, 






' Rev. Geo. Robinson, 






1 M. R. Allison, 






1 W. R. Leavens, 


'-as " Stewards. 




' W. T. Shaw, 






' A. M. Osborne, 






' G. R. Watson, M.D. 






' G. W. Ostrom, 






" P. C. Vanhorn, 





SPECIAL COMMUNICATION, WELLINGTON, 5889. 1 5 

Bro. G. W. Austin, as Grand Organist. 

« E. W.Green, j ag „ T , 

" John Badgley, ) 

Together with Masters, Past Masters and brethren from the 
following Lodges: Ancient St. John's, No. 3 ; Prince Edward, 
No. 18; United, No. 29; Trent, No. 38; Consecon, No. 50; 
Franck, No. 127 ; Star in the East, No. 164; Lake, No. 215 ; 
Marmora, No. 222 ; Eureka, No. 283; and Lome, No. 404. 

The Grand Lodge was opened in ample form in the 
Town Hall at high twelve, by the Most Worshipful the Grand 
Master, who stated that the Communication had been called 
for the purpose of assisting him in laying the corner stone of a 
Masonic Hall in the Village of Wellington. 

The brethren then marched in procession, headed by 
Gilmour's Brass Band of Trenton, to the site of the proposed 
Masonic Hall, and the front of the procession having reached 
the place, a halt was made, and the ranks opened and faced 
inwards, when the Grand Master, supported by the Grand 
Officers, passed through to the northeast corner where a plat- 
form had been erected for their convenience. 

Prayer having been offered by the Grand Chaplain (W. 
Bro. F. B. Stratton), the Acting Grand Secretary (W. Bro. H. 
Welbanks) read the following scroll : 

2tt ttf* |tamt an* by tijt fanor of ttje (Blortouo 
JUrtjitcct of Ijeaunt anH ©artlj, 

On the 26th day of June, A.D. 1889, A.L. 5889, 

And in the 53rd year of the reign of our 
Gracious Sovereign, 

Victoria, 

Queen of Gre.u Britain and Ireland, Empress of India, and dependencies 
in Asia, Europe and Africa, Dominion of Canada, Australia, etc. 

LORD STANLEY OF PRESTON, 
Governor-General of the Dominion of Canada. 

The Hon. SIR ALEXANDER CAMPBELL, Lieutenant-Governor 
of Ontario. 

The Rt. Hon SIR JOHN A. MACDONALD, Premier of the 
Dominion of Canada. 



1 6 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

The Hon. OLIVER MOW AT, Premier of Ontario. 

J. M. Platt, M.D., M.P., County of Prince Edward. 

John A. Sprague, Esq., M.P.P., County of Prince Edward. 

David Burlingham, Esq., Reeve of the Village of Wellington. 

S. W. Flagler, Esq., Treasurer, and John H. Osborne, Esq., Clerk. 

R. T. Walkem, Esq., Q.C, Grand Master of the Grand Lodge, A. F. & 
A. M. of Canada. 

Wm. Smeaton, Esq., D.D.G.M. of Prince Edward District. 

®lji0 ttovntv Stonr 

Of the Masonic Hall, erected by Star in the East Lodge 164, A. F. & A. M. 

Was laid by M. W. Bio. R. T. Walkem, Esq., Q. C. Grand Master, 

assisted by R. W. Bro. Wm. Smeaton, D.D.G.M., and the 

Grand Officers and a large concourse of Brethren, with 

the usual ceremonies of the Order. 

OFFICERS OF STAR IN THE EAST LODGE, NO. 164. 

W. Bro. Fred C. Spencer, W. M. Bro. F. A. Burlingham, S. W. 

Geo. E. Minns, J. W. Rev. W. R. Young, Chaplain. 

Thomas Jackson, Treasurer. A. M. Osborne, Secretary. 

C. C. Spencer, S. D. H. Benson, J. D. 

E. W. Green, J. G. John Badgley, Tyler. 

The Grand Secretary then announced that in the box to be 
deposited in the cavity in the stone were placed the scroll, a 
list of the officers and members of the Star in the East Lodge, 
No. 164, and copy of By-laws of Lodge, current coins of the 
Dominion of Canada, a copy of the Picton Times, Picton 
Gazette, Toronto Daily Globe, Daily Mail and Daily Empire. 

V. W. Bro. S. W. Flagler, on behalf of Star in the East 
Lodge, No. 164, then presented the Grand Master with a 
silver trowel, which bore the following inscription : — 

" Presented to M. W. Bro. R. T. Walkem, Q. C, Grand Master of the 
Grand Lodge of Canada, by the members of Star in the East Lodge, No. 
164, A. F. & A. M., G. R. C, on the occasion of his laying the corner 
stone of their Masonic Hall, June 26th, A. D. 1889, A. L. 



The Most Worshipful the Grand Master, having graciously 
acknowledged and accepted the gift, the cement was spread 



SPECIAL COMMUNICATION, WELLINGTON, 5889. 17 

and the upper stone lowered with three halts, at which intervals 
the band played bars of the National Anthem. 

When it had been guided to its proper place, the practical 
tests were made under the personal direction of the Grand 
Master; first by W. Bro. F. C. Spencer, Grand Junior Warden, 
with the Plumb Rule ; next by R. W. Bro. Donald Ross, Grand 
Senior Warden, with the Level ; and then by R. W. Bro. Wm. 
Smeaton, Deputy Grand Master, with the Square. The tests 
being satisfactory, the Grand Master then approached the 
stone and struck it three times with his Gavel, saying : — 

Nothing now remains but for me to complete the work, well 
made, well proved, truly laid, true and trusty, and may this 
undertaking be completed by the Craftsmen according to the 
grand plan of peace, harmony and brotherly love. 

The cornucopia or horn of plenty, borne by W. Bro. R. 
Murphy ; the wine, borne by W. Bro. J. D. Wilson ; and the 
oil, borne by W. Bro. J. B. Ruttan, were then handed to the 
Grand Master, by whom the stone was strewn with corn, 
moistened with wine and anointed with oil, and as he performd 
these ceremonies the Grand Master said : '"I strew corn upon 
the stone as an emblem of plenty ; I pour wine upon it as an 
emblem of cheerfulness ; and I anoint it with oil as an emblem 
of comfort and consolation. May corn, wine and oil, and all 
the necessaries of life, abound among men, and may the 
Supreme Architect of the Universe be upon this edifice and 
all connected with it." 

The band then played a selection, after which the contractors 
were entrusted with the tools and plans, after being inspected 
by the Grand Master, and admonished to continue the work to 
completion as well as they had commenced, and all would be 
well. 

The Grand Honors were then given, and the Grand 
Master subsequently addressed the spectators. He stated the 
objects of Freemasonry and pointed to some of the benefits it 
had secured; explained its relation to religion, and gave 



iS 



(IRANI) I.OJMIK OF CANADA. 



statistics to prove the rapidity with which it was extending 
over the whole habitable globe. 

After cheers for the Queen, the Grand Master, etc., the 
procession re-formed and marched to Tara Hall, where a 
sumptuous repast, prepared by the ladies of Wellington, was 
partaken of, followed by addresses by the Grand Master and 
others, after which the procession re-formed and marched to 
the Hall, where the Grand Lodge was closed inform. 



attest : 




Grand Secretary. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 



19 



Grand Lodge of Canada, 



IN THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO. 



PROCEEDINGS 

At the Thirty-Fourth Annual Communication of the Grand 
Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of Canada, 
in the Province of Ontario, held in the Town Hall, in 
the Town of Owen Sound, co?nmencing on Wednesday, 
the 17th day of July, A. D. 1889, A. L. 5889. 



Present : 
T. Walkem, Q. C, 



M. W. Bro. R. 
Throne. 
R. W. Bro. J. Ross Robertson, 

J. A. Wills, 

Jos. Beck, 

Rev. D. Armstrong, D. D. 

E. Mitchell, 

H. A. MacKelcan, 

J. J. Mason, 

Hy. Clark, 

Geo. Tait, 

C. F. Mansell, 

James Walters, 

Geo. E. Mason, Asst. 

J. H. Bothwell, 

W. F. Miles, 

J. P. Whitehead, 

Jas. Newton, 

W. B. Irving, 

Jas. McNeil, 



Grand Master, on the 

Deputy Grand Master. 

Grand Senior Warden. 

" Junior " 

, " Chaplain. 

" Treasurer. 

" Registrar. 

" Secretary. 

" Senior Deacon. 

" Junior Deacon. 

" Supt. of Works. 

" Dir. of Cer. 

" Secretary. 

" Pursuivant. 



Stewards. 



GRAND LODGE Of CANADA. 



V. 


w. 


Bro 


. C. Pve. 




Grand Standard Bearer 






.. 


Thos. Coleman, 




" Tyler. 










DISTRICT DEPUTY 


GRAND MASTERS. 




R. 


w. 


Bro 


. J. A. C. Anderson, 




Erie District N 


0. I 


i< 


cc 


cc 


W. S. Calvert, 




St. Clair " 


' 2 


(i 


cc 


cc 


John Boyd, 




London " ' 


1 3 


(i 


cc 


cc 


W. G. Duff, 


South Huron " 


' 4 


cc 


CI 


•• 


Richard Mahoney, 




Wellington " ' 


' 7 


cc 


cc 


cc 


\V. Freeman, M. D 


•5 


Hamilton " ' 


' 8 


C( 


cc 


cc 


Geo. Monkman, 




Georgian " ' 


' 9 


(1 


cc 


.. 


C. G. McDermott, 




Niagara " ' 


' IO 


(( 


cc 


cc 


Jas. Wayling, 




Toronto " ' 


1 1 1 


(( 


cc 


cc 


B. Shortly, 




Ontario ■' ' 


1 12 


(( 


cc 


cc 


W. Smeaton, 


Prince Edward " 


' 13 


cc 


cc 


cc 


H. J. Wilkinson, 




Frontenac " ' 


' 14 


(( 


cc 


cc 


W. J. Morris, 


St. Lawrence " 


' l 5 


cc 


cc 


cc 


David Taylor, 




Ottawa " ' 


' 16 


c< 


cc 


cc 


S. W. Ray, 




Algoma " ' 


' 17 








GRAND REPRESENTATIVES. 




M. 


w. 


Bro 


Hy. Robertson 


for 


District of Columbia. 




(( 


cc 


cc 


J. A. Henderson, 


cc 


New Hampshire. 




cc 


cc 


cc 


J. A. Henderson, 


cc 


New York. 




cc 


cc 


cc 


Jas. Moffat, 


cc 


Idaho. 




cc 


cc 


cc 


Jas. Moffat, 


cc 


Pennsylvania. 




cc 


cc 


cc 


Otto Klotz, 


cc 


Washington Territory. 


cc 


CC 


cc 


Otto Klotz, 


cc 


St. Domingo. 




cc 


cc 


cc 


Hugh Murray, 


cc 


Prince Edward Island. 


cc 


cc 


cc 


R. T. Walkem, 


" 


Peru. 




R. 


cc 


cc 


John Creasor, 


cc 


British Columbia. 




cc 


cc 
cc 


cc 

cc 


J. C. Hegler, 

E. Mitchell, 


cc 


Arkansas. 
California. 




cc 


cc 


cc 


E. T. Malone, 


cc 


Dakota. 




cc 


cc 


cc 


J. J. Mason, 


cc 


Florida. 




" 


cc 


cc 


J. J. Mason, 


cc 


Kansas. 




cc 


cc 


cc 


David McLellan, 


cc 


Georgia. 




cc 


cc 


cc 


David McLellan, 


cc 


Illinois. 





ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 21 



R. W. Bro. J. F. H. Gunn, for Michigan. 


CI (( 


' R. B. Hungerford, ' 


' Mississippi. 


V. " 


' C. W. Brown, 


' Nebraska. 


R. " 


' L. H. Henderson, ' 


' North Carolina. 




' T. C. Macnabb, 


' South Carolina. 




' D. H. Martyn, 


' Vermont. 




' J. Ross Robertson, ' 


' Virginia. 




' J. E. Harding, 


' West Virginia. 




' Thos. Sargant, ' 


' Wisconsin. 




' John Walsh, 


' U. S. of Columbia 




' Wm. Gibson, ' 


' Victoria. 



PAST GRAND OFFICERS. 



M. W. Bro. J. A. Henderson, 

" James Moffat, 

" Otto Klotz, 

" Hugh Murray, 

" Henry Robertson, 

R. " " Jas. H. Burritt, 

" John W. Coy, 

" John Creasor, 

" John Fisher, 

" J. M. Gibson, 

" Wm. Gibson, 

" J. F. H. Gunn, 

" J. C. Hegler, 

" L. H. Henderson, 

" W. L. Hamilton, 

" R. B. Hungerford, 

" J. E. Harding, 

" Alexander Irvine, 

' ; Henry Jennings, 

" H. G. Lindsay, 

" D. H. Martyn, 

" John Menish, 

" E. T. Malone, 

" R. McCaw, 



P. G. M. 



P. D. D 



G. M. 



22 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

R. W. Bro. Donald Ross, |\ |). I). Q. M 

" " " Geo. Russell, 
" " " R. Radcliffe, 
" " " W. G. Reid, 
" " " Wm. Rea, 

" Gavin Stewart, 
" T. Sargant, 
" " " John Sinclair, 
" " " JohnShupe, 
" " " T. L. M. Tipton, 

" T. Wilkinson, " 

" David McLellan, p. G. S W 

" " " Allan McLean, 

G. R. Vanzant, " 

J. S. Dewar, p. q. J W 

" " " Wm. Forbes, 
" " " W. A. Green, 

G. G. Rowe, " 

W. J. Simpson, « 

" " " John Walsh, 
" " " Hugh Walker, 

R. L. Gunn, P. q. r 

" " " F. C. Martin, 

G. J. Bennett, « 

" " " W. C. Wilkinson, 
V. " " F. F. Manley, p. G . S. D. 

S. J. Parker, " 

" " " Geo. Tait, 

M. D. Dawson, P. G. T D 

" " " L. F. A. Maingy, 
" " " J. McL. Stevenson, 

" " W. J. Hambly, P . C , D. of C. 

" John Kerr, « 

" " " Alex. Patterson, 

" John Malloy, p. Ass't G. Sec. 

C. W. Brown, p. G . Organist. 

" " " W. R. Howse, 
" " " W. Roaf, 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 23 

V. W. Bro. C. W. Brown, P. Ass't G. Organist. 

" " " L. Secord, 

" « " A. Morton, P- G. Pursuivant. 

" " " I). Barr, P- G - Steward. 

a 

I. Baker, 



a a 



W. B. Doherty, 

« " " T. McCarroll, 

" " " R. McKnight, 

" " " S. Pearcy, 

" " " Jas. Quigg, 

« " " G. E. R. Wilson, 

« « " Geo. Reekie, P- G. Standard Bearer. 

A constitutional number of Lodges being represented, the 
Grand Lodge was opened in ample form, at 2.45 p. m., and 
the acting Grand Chaplain implored a blessing from the G. A. 
O. T. U. upon all the proceedings. 

Before the opening of Grand Lodge, W. Bro. D. Morrison, 
the Mayor of Collingwood, and Mr. Chisholm, Reeve, were 
announced, introduced, and presented the following 

ADDRESS : 

To R. T. Walkem, Esq., Q. C, Grand Master, and the other 
Officers and Members of the Grand Lodge of Free and 
Accepted Masons. 

Sirs,— It is with feelings of the sincerest pleasure and pride 
that, as' Mayor of the Town of Owen Sound, I, on behalf of its 
Council and citizens, extend to you now a most hearty 
welcome. There are with us still not a few of those who 
assisted in hewing out of the virgin forest the spot where 
Owen Sound stands, and many, yet young in years, who 
remember it well as a place of very little importance, either in 
population or trade, without a railway of any kind, and distant 
a very long and tiresome day's journey from Toronto. Now 
our town has attained the very considerable proportions of 



24 CKAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

having a population of 8,000 inhabitants : a shipping trade 
probably greater than that of any other port in the Province, 
and been brought within three or four hours railway travel of 
the Provincial Capital. But of the many things which mark 
its growth and prosperity, none have been more gratifying, to 
those of us especially who are Masons, than this meeting of 
Grand Lodge. 

We appreciate it as a recognition of the growing importance 
of our Town, of its attractions and of your confidence in the 
desire and ability of its people to afford the accommodation 
required, and further as a compliment to the members of the 
Craft in this town and vicinity ; I can assure you it will be 
esteemed the pleasant duty and privilege of everyone to make 
your visit to Owen Sound as enjoyable as possible. 

As a member of the Craft myself, permit me to add that I 
believe the beneficial influences and teachings of Freemasonry 
have come to be very generally acknowledged. Here it must 
be admitted political and sectarian rivalries and strifes find no 
place. The principles of charity, of moral truth and justice 
and of virtue, in their fullest sense alone hold sway. Loyalty 
to all lawfully constituted authority, whether civil or religious, 
and patriotism, are fundamental principles of the Order. The 
cause of religion has never suffered, but on the contrary been 
greatly promoted through the teachings of Fremasonry, and 
nowhere throughout this mighty empire, to which we are 
proud to belong, can be found more devoted subjects of our 
gracious Queen, nor firmer believers in a bright and prosper- 
ous future for our own magnificent Dominion, this Canada of 
ours, than among those whose names are enrolled in the 
Register of the Grand Lodge of A. F. & A. M. of Canada. 

. DUNCAN MORRISON, 

Mayor of Owen Sound. 

Council Chamber, Owen Sound, 15th July, 1889. 

The address was acknowledged by the M. W. the Grand 
Master in appropriate terms. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 25 

The Board of General Purposes, as required by the Consti- 
tution, appointed R. W. Bros. R. B. Hungerford and John 
Walsh and Bro. Geo. Ingles, a committee on the Credentials 
of Representatives and Proxies from Lodges, who reported the 
following as being present : 

No. 2. Niagara, Niagara. 

R. W. Bro. J. Ross Robertson, Proxy. 

No. 3. The Ancient St. John \r, Kingston. 

W. Bro. John Waddell, W. M.; Bro. W. H. Macnee, S. W.; 
M. W. Bros. J. A. Henderson and R. T. Walkem, P. M's. 

No. 5. Sussex, Brockville. 

W. Bro. T. W. Sparham, P. M., Proxy; R. W. Bros. T. 
Wilkinson, John Menish and W. J. Simpson ; V. W. Bro. 
Jas. Quigg and W. Bro. W. H. Jackson, P. M's. 

No. 6. Barton, Hamilton. 

W. Bro. S. M. Kenny, W. M.; R. W.* Bros. Geo. Russell, 
Gavin Stewart and Wm. Gibson ; V. W. Bro. Geo. E. Mason 
and W. Bro. John Hoodless, P. M's. 

No. 7. Union, Grimsby. 

R. W. Bro. Wm. Forbes, P. M., Proxy. 

No. 9. Union, Napanee. 

V. W. Bro. J. Walters, W. M. 

No. ic. Norfolk, Simcoe. 

W. Bro. J. C. Boyd, W. M.; Bro. W. S. Wood, S. W T .; W. 
Bro. G. F. Counter, P. M. 

No. 11. Moir a, Belleville. 

W. Bro. John Newton, W. M.; R. W. Bro. L. H. Henderson, 

P. M. 
No. 14. True Britons, Perth. 

W. Bro. P. Hope, W. M.; Bro. T. Elliott, J. W.; R. W. 

Bro. W. J. Morris, P. M. 

No. 15. St. George's, St. Catharines. 

R. W. Bro. C. G. McDermott, P. M., Proxy. 
No. 16. St. Andrew's, Toronto. 

W. Bro. Jas. Glanville, W. M.; Bro. A. R. McDonald. S. W.; 

R. W. Bro. W. C. Wilkinson ; V. W. Bro. Geo. Tait and 

W. Bros. Wm. Anderson and Daniel Rose, P. M's. 

No. 17. St. John's, Cobourg. 

W. Bro. P. J. Lightburne, P. M., Proxy. 

No. 18. Prince Edward, Picton. 

W. Bro. James H. Colden, W. M.; R. W. Bro. Donald Ross 
and W. Bro. John Waring, P. M's. 



26 




No. 


20. 


No. 


21a 


No. 


22. 



i. KAM> LODGE OF CANADA. 

St. Johns, London. 
\V. Bro. John Fairgrieve, W. M.; M. W. Bio. Jas. Mofifat 
and V. W. Bro. M D. Dawson, P. M's. 

St. John's, Vankleek Hill. 
R. W. Bro. David Taylor, Proxy. 

King Solomon's, Toronto. 
W. Bro. [as. Reeve, W. M.; Bro. John Graham, J. W.; 
R. W. Bro. J. Ross Robertson ; V. W. Bro. W. J. Hambly 
and W. Bro. P. J. Slatter, P. M's. 

Richmond Lodge, Richmond Hill. 
W. Bros. Thos. Newton, W. M.; A. J. Rupert, P. M. 

St. Francis, Smith's Falls. 
W. Bro. S. N. Percival, P. M. 

Ionic, Toronto. 
W. Bro. F. M. Morson, W. M. ; V. W. Bros. C. W. Brown 
and F. F. Manley, P. M's. 

Ontario, Port Hope. 
W. Bro. W. J. Robertson, W. M. 

Strict Observance, Ha?nilton. 
W. Bro. P. D. Carse, W. M.; R. W. Bro. J. J. Mason and 
D. McLellan, P. M's. 

United, Brighton. 
W. Bro. P. J. Lightburne, Proxy. 

Composite, Whitby. 
W. Bro. A. M. Ross, W. M.; Bro. R. S. Cormack, J. W.; 
V. W. Bro. W. R. Howse, P. M. 

Jerusalem, Bozomanz'ille. 
W. Bros. T. H. Spry, W. M.; W. McKay, P. M. 

Amity, Dunnville. 
W. Bro. John Taylor, W. M. ; R. W. Bro. T. L. M. Tipton, 
P. M. 
No. 33. Maitland, Goderich. 

W. Bro. Tames Anderson, W. M. ; R. W. Bros. Jos. Beck and 
R. Radcliffe, P. M's. 

Thistle, Amherstburg. 
W. Bros. J. H. Webber, W. M. ; G. Gott, P. M. 

King Hiram, Ingersoll. 
W. Bro. John Podmore, W. M. ; R. W. Bro. J. C. Hegler 
and W. Bro. M. Walsh, P. M's. 

Trent Lodge, Trenton. 
W. Bro. Geo. Collins, W. M. 

Mount Zion, Brooklin. 
V. W. Bro. W. R. Howse, Proxy. 



No. 


23- 


No. 


24. 


No. 


25. 


No. 


26. 


No. 


27. 


No. 


29. 


No. 


3°- 


No. 


3i- 


No. 


32. 



No. 


34- 


No. 


37- 


No. 


38. 


No. 


39- 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 27 

No. 40. St. John's, Hamilton 

Bros. Wm. Birrell, S. W , Adam Rutherford, T- W. ; R. W. 
Bro. W. G. Reid ; V. W. Bro John Malloy and W. Bro. T. 
McCallum, P. M's. 

No. 41 . St. George's, Kingsville. 

W. Bro. A. H. Clarke, Proxy. 
No. 42. St. ■ George's, London. 

W. Bros. Wm. Skinner, P. M., Proxy ; A. B. Munson, P. M. 
No. 43. King Solomon's, Woodstock. 

W. Bro. J. W. Rippon, W. M. 
No. 44. St. Thomas, St. Thomas. 

W. Bro. Robt. McCully, P. M., Proxy ; V. W. Bro. W. B. 

Doherty, P. M. 

No. 46. Wellington, Chatham. 

W. Bro. Jas. Birch, W. M. 
No. 47. Great Western, Windsor. 

W. Bro. T. McGregor, W. M. ; Bro. W. Holdstock, J. W. 
No. 48. Madoc, Madoc. 

W. Bro. Jefferson Caverly, W. M. 
No. 50. Consecon, Consecon. 

R. W. Bro. D. Ross, Proxy. 
No. 52. Dalhousie, Ottawa. 

W. Bro. Geo. Ross, W. M. 
No. 54. Vaughan, Maple. 

W. Bro. R. B. Orr, P. M., Proxy. 
No. 56. Victoria, Sarnia. 

W. Bro. Geo. S. Samis, W. M. ; Bro. D. M. Grant, J. W. ; 

W. Bro. C. Mole, P. M. 

No. 57. Harmony, Binbrook. 

W. Bro. J. F. Senn, W. M. 
No. 58. Doric, Ottawa. 

W. Bro. R. W. Stephen, W. M. 

No. 61. Acacia, Hamilton. 

Bro. W. G. Townsend, J. W. ; M. W. Bro. Hugh Murray ; 
R. W. Bro. E. Mitchell and W. Bros. A. Smith and A. 
Poulter, P. M's. 

No. 62. St. Andrew's, Caledonia. 

W. Bro. Jas. Old, P. M., Proxy. 

No. 63. St. John's, Carleton Place. 

V. W. Bro. J. H. Bothwell, P. M., Proxy. 
No. 64. Kilwinning, London. 

W. Bro. C. C. Reed, P. M., Proxy; R. W. Bro. R. B. 

Hungerford, P. M. 



28 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

No. 65. Rehoboam, Toronto. 

Bros. W. J. Graham, S. W., John S. Ballantyne, J. W. ; W. 
Bro. Malcolm Gibbs, P. M. 

No. 66. Durham, Newcastle. 

W. Bros. D. Allin, W. M., Jas. Parker and W. T. Lock- 

hait, P. M's. 
No. 68. St. John's, Ingersoll. 

W. Bro. W. A. Sinclair, W. M. ; V. W. Bro. John Kern, 

P. M. 
No. 72. Alma, Gait. 

Bro. E. T. Kenning, S. W. 
No. 74. St. James, Maitland. 

W. Bros. T. W. Sparham, Proxy; Martel Davies, P. M. 
No. 75. St. John's, Toronto. 

W. Bro. W. E. Smith, W. M. 
No. 76. Oxford, Woodstock. 

W. Bro. W. T. Wilkinson, P. M., Proxy; R. W. Bro. F. C. 

Martin ; W. Bros. R. R. Fulton, D. H. Hunter and James 

Sutherland, P. M's. 

No. 78. King Hiram, Tilsonburg. 

W. Bro. D. H. Hunter, Proxy. 

No. 79- Simcoe, Bradford. 

W. Bro. Wm. Kilkenny, W. M. 

No. 81. St. John's, Mt. Brydges. 

R. W. Bro. H. G. Lindsay, P. M., Proxy. 
No. 83. Beaver, Strathroy. 

W. Bro. T. O. Currie, W. M. 
No. 85. Rising Sun, Farmersville. 

R. W. Bro. John Menish, Proxy. 
No. 86. Wilson, Toronto. 

W. Bro. John Firstbrook, W. M.; R. W. Bro. T. Sargant 

and V. W. Bro. Alex Patterson, P. M's. 

No. 87. Markham Union, Markham. 

R. W. Bro. G. R. Vanzant, P. M. Proxy. 

No. 88. St. George's, Owen Sound. 

W. Bro. Duncan Morrison, W. M.; Bros. Ewing Cameron, 
S. W., C. E. Munroe, J. W.; V. W. Bros. W. Wilson and R. 
McKnight, and W. Bros. T. Gordon, John Rutherford, Samuel 
Lloyd, Hugh Reid, D. R. Dobie, Allan Cameron, W. Graham 
and Tas. McLauchlan, P. M's. 

No. 90. Manito, Collingivood. 

W. Bro. H. G. Currie, W. M.; M. W. Bro. Henry Robertson 
and W. Bro. W. T. Toner, P. M's. 

No. 91. Colborne, Colborne. 

V. W. Bro. G. E. R. Wilson, W. M. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 29 

No. 92. Cataraqui, Kingston. 

R. W. Bro. H. J. Wilkinson, Proxy. 
No. 93. Northern Light, Kincardine. 

W. Bro. J. McK. Stewart, W. M. ; R. W. Bro. D. H. Martin, 

P. M. 
No. 94. St. Mark's, Port Stanley. 

W. Bro. Jas Learn, Proxy. 

No. 96. Corinthian, Barrie. 

W. Bro. D. F. Macwatt, W. M.; R. W. Bro. Geo. Monkman, 

P. M. 
No. 97. Sharon, Sharon. 

R. W. Bro. Jas. Wayling, P. M. 
No. 98. True Blue, Albion. 

W. Bro. T. Fisher, P. M., Proxy. 

No. 99. Tuscan, Newmarket. 

W. Bro. J. E. Hollingshead, W. M. 

No. 101. Corinthian, Peterborough. 

W. Bro. D. Spence, Proxy. 

No. 103. Maple Leaf, St. Catharines. 

Bro. H. J. Johnston, S. W.; R. W. Bro. John W. Coy, P. M. 

No. 104. St. John's, Norwich. 

W. Bro. T. B. Phepoe, W. M. 
No. 105. St. Marks, Niagara Falls South. 

Bro. W. D. Garner, S. W. 
No. 106. Burford, Burford. 

V. W. Bro. W. F. Miles, W. M. 
No. 109. Albion, Harrowsmith. 

Bro. F. S. Wartman, J. W. 
No. no. Central, Prescott. 

R. W. Bro. W. J. Simpson, Proxy. 

No. 113. Wilson, Wat ei ford. 

W. Bro. W. Messacer, W. M. ; Bro. W. E. Lemon, J. W. 
No. 114. Hope, Port Hope. 

W. Bro. W. J. Robertson, Proxy. 
No. 115. Ivy> Beamsville. 

W. Bro. John Keith, W. M. 

No. 120. Warren, Fingal. 

W. Bro. Robert McCully, Proxy. 

No. 121. Doric, Brant ford. 

W. Bro. F. C Heath, W. M. ; V. W. Bro. L. Secord, P. M. 



3° 




No. 


122. 


No. 


123. 


No. 


128. 


No. 


I29. 


No. 


131- 


No. 


133- 


No. 


135- 


No. 


137- 



»n LODGE OF CANAD L 

Ren) rew. 

V. W. Bro. David Barr, P. M., Proxy. 
The Belleville, Belleville. 
W. Bro. W. II. Adams, W. M. 

Pembroke, Pembroke. 
K. W. Bro. J. H. Burritt, P. M., Proxy. 
Rising Sun, Aurora. 

W. Bro. C. C. Robinson, W. M. 

St. Lawrence, Southampton. 
R. W. Bro. J. F. H. Gunn, Proxy. 

Lebanon Forest, Exeter. 
W. Bros. Hugh Spackman, W. M. ; George McLeod, P. M. 

St. Clair, Milton. 
W. Bro. J. A. Frazer, P. M., Proxy. 
Pythagoras, Meaford. 
W. Bro. J. D. Hamill, W. M. ; V. W. Bro. T. McCarroll, and 
W. Bros. W. N. Chisholm, George Hair, J. F. Mathews, A. 
Burritt and A. W. Carley, P. M's. 

No. 139. Lebanon, Oshawa. 

R. W. Bro. R. McCaw, P. M., Proxy. 
No. 140. Malahide, Aylmer. 

W. Bro. Asa Miller, P. M., Proxy. 

No. 141. Tudor, Mitchell. 

Bro. T. H. Race, J. W. ; W. Bro. W. White, P. M. 

No. 144. Tecumseh, Stratford. 

Bro. A. Hirst, S. W. 
No. 145. /. B. Hall, Millbrook. 

R. W. Bro. B. Shortly, Proxy. 
No. 147. Mississippi, Almonte. 

Bro. Jas. Robertson, Jr., S. W. 
No. 148. Civil Service, Ottawa. 

V. W. Bro. Le F. A. Maingy, P. M., Proxy ; R. W. Bro. John 

Walsh, and W. Bro. W. F. Boardman, P. M's. 
No. 151. The Grand Piver, Berlin. 

W. Bro. D. Forsyth, P. M., Proxy. 
No. 154. Lrving, Lucan. 

Bro. R. S. Hodgins, S. W. 
No. 155- Peterboro', Peterboro\ 

W. Bro. D. Spence, W. M. ; R. W. Bro. B. Shortly, P. M. 

No. 156. York, Eg Union. 

W\ Bro. John McCarter, P. M., Proxy ; R. W. Bro. John 
Fisher, P. M. 

No. 158. Alexandra, Oil Springs. 

W. Bro. R. W. Goisline, W. M. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 3 1 

No. 159. Goodwood, Richmond. 

W. Bro. R. Hill, \V. M. 
No. 161. Percy, Warkwortk. 

W. Bro. T. G. Smith, W. M. 
No. 162. Forest, Wroxeter. 

W. Bro. D. M. Walker, P. M.. Proxy. 
No. 164. Star in the East, Wellington. 

R W. Bro. Donald Ross, Proxy. 
No. 165. Burlington, Burlington. 

W. Bros. R. Hammond, P. M., Proxy ; Thos. Campbell, P. M. 
No. 166. Wentzvorth, Stoney Creek. 

Bros. R. G. Marshall, S. W. ; Rev. F. E. Howitt, J. W. 
No. 168. Merritt, Wetland. 

\Y. Bro. D. R. Pursel, W. M. 

No. 169. Maenad, Port Colborne. 

R. W. Bro. T. L. M. Tipton, Proxy; W. Bro. W. E. 
Henderson, P. M. 

No. 170. Britannia, Seaforth. 

W. Bro. W. J. Fear, W. M. ; R. W. Bro. W. G. Duff, P. M. 

No. 176. Spartan, Sparta. 

V. W. Bro. W. B. Doherty, Proxy. 
No. 177. The Builders, Ottawa. 

W. Bro. H. H. Cairns, W. M. ; Bro. F. Cook, S. W. ; R. W. 

Bros. David Taylor and Wm. Rea, P. M's. 

No. 178. Plattsville, Plattsville. 

W. Bro. Geo. Veitch, W. M. ; Bro. R. Marshall, T- W. ; 
W. Bro. W. R. Henderson, P. M. 

No. 180. Speed, Guelph. 

W. Bro. Thos. New, P. M., Proxy. 
No. 181. Oriental, Port Burwell. 

R. W. Bro. F. C Martin. Proxy. 
No. 184. Old Light, Lucknoi^'. 

W. Bro. Wm. Mallough, P. M., Proxy. 

No. 185. Ennishillen, York. 

W. Bro. D. T. Hind, Proxy. 

No. 190. Belmont, Belmont. 

W. Bro. T. G. Fawcett, P. M., Proxy; R. W. Bro. John Boyd, 
P. M. 

No. 192. Orillia, Oriliia. 

W. Bro. Wm. Sherman, W. M. 

No. 193. Scotland, Scotland. 

V. W. Bro. W. F. Miles, Proxy ; W. Bro. J. C. Shook, P. M. 



32 GRAND I.OIM'.K <>!• ( A.N \l)\ 

No. 194. Pctrolia, Fetrolia. 

R. W. Bro. John Sinclair, W. M. 

No. 195. The Tuscan, London. 

R. W. Bro. R. B. Hungerford, P. M., Proxy ; W. Bro. A. G. 

Smyth, P. M. 
No. 196. Madawaska, At nprior. 

R. W. Bro. J. H. Burritt, Proxy. 

No. 197. Saugeen, Walkerton. 

W. Bro. R. B. Hughes, W. M. ; Bro. Hugh Birss, J. W. ; 

R. W. Bros. J. F. H. Gunn and W. A. Green ; V. W. Bro. 

Hy. Clark, and W. Bros. W. R. Telford and C. Dempsey, 

P. M's. 
No. 201. Leeds, Ganaiioqiw. 

R. W. Bro. H. J. Wilkinson, Proxy. 
No. 203. Lrvine, Elora. 

W. Bro. Jos. Clarke, W. M. 

No. 205. New Dominion, New Hamburg. 

W. Bro. W. H. Erbach, P. M., Proxy. 

No. 209a. St. John's, London. 

W. Bro. G. C. Davis, W. M. ; Bros. A. Carruthers, S. W., 
J. Stephenson, J. W. ; R. W. Bro. J. S. Dewar, P. M. 

No. 209. Evergreen. Lanark. 

R. W. Bro. Wm. Rea, Proxy; V. W. Bro. J. H. Bothwell, 

P.M. 
No. 215. Lake, Ameliasburg. 

R. W. Bro. Wm. Smeaton, Proxy. 
No. 216. Harris, Orangeville. 

R. W. Bro. R. Mahony, Proxy. 
No. 217. Frederick, Delhi. 

Bro. W. B. Coles, J. W. 
No. 218. Stevenson, Toronto. 

W. Bro. Tohn Nicholson, W. M. ; Bro. J. H. Horswell, J. W. ; 

W. Bros." John Patton and R. Cuthbert, P. M's. 

No. 219. Credit, Georjetoiun. 

V. W. Bro. Jas. Newton, P. M., Proxy; R. W. Bro. W. 
Freeman, P. M. 

No. 220. Zeredatha, Uxbridge. 

W. Bro. Geo. Hobson, W. M. ; Bro. W. A. McCullough, 

J.W. 
No. 221. Mountain, Thorold 

W. Bro. R. Campbell, W. M. 
No. 222. Marmora, Marmora. 

W. Bro. W. Adams, P. M., Proxy. 
No. 224. Zurich, Hensall. 

W. Bro. Hugh Spackman, Proxy. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 33 

No. 225. Bernard, Listowel. 

W. Bros. J. B. Dinkel, W. M.; D. D. Campbell, P. M. 
No. 229. Ionic, Brampton. 

W. Bro. A. McKechnie, W. M. ; V. W. Bro. A. Morton and 

W. Bro. James Anderson, P. M's. 

No. 230. Kerr, Barrie. 

W. Bro. R. E. Fletcher, W. M. ; V. W. Bro. J. McL. 

Stevenson, P. M. 
No. 231. Fidelity, Ottaiva. 

R. W. Bio. Wm. Rea, Proxy. 
No. 232. Cameron, Wallacetown. 

V. W. Bro. W. B. Dohetty, Proxy. 
No. 234.. Beaver, Clarksburg. 

W. Bro. C. W. Hardman, W. M. ; V. W. Bros. C. Pye and 

Geo. Reekie, and W. Bros. Jas. Lewis and John H. Dickin- 
son, P. M's. 
No. 235. Aldworth, Paisley. 

W. Bro. J. J. Richardson, P. M., Proxy. 
No. 237. Vienna, Vienna. 

R. W. Bro. F. C Martin, Proxy. 
No. 239. Tweed, Tweed. 

R. W. Bro. Wm. Smeaton, Proxy. 

No. 241. Quinte, Shannonville. 

W. Bro. Peter Williams, P. M., Proxy. 
No. 242. Macoy. Mallorytown. 

V. W. Bro. J. Quigg, Proxy. 
No. 243. St. George, St. George. 

W. Bro. J. P. Lawrason, W. M. 
No. 247. Ashlar, Toronto. 

V. W. Bros. Wm. Roaf, P. M., Proxy ; S. Pearcy, P. M. 

No. 250. Thistle, Embro. 

W. Bro. G. W. Creighton, W. M. 

No. 253. Minden, Kingston. 

R. W. Bro. Allan McLean, P. M. 

No. 254. Clifton, Niagara Falls. 

Bros. M. P. McMaster, S. W.; J. C. Bartte, J. W. 

No. 255. Sydenham, Dresden. 

W. Bros. J. B. Carscallen, W. M.; W. H. Switzer, P. M. 

No. 256. Farran's Foint, Farran's Point. 

W. Bro. H. R. Hanes, W. M. 

No. 257. Gait, Gait. 

R. W. Bro. John Shupe, P. M. , Proxy. 



34 




No. 


258. 


No. 


260. 


No. 


261. 


No. 


262. 


No. 


264. 


No. 


265. 


No. 


266. 


No. 


267. 


No. 


268. 


No. 


269. 


No. 


270. 


No. 


271. 


No, 


272. 


No. 


277. 


No. 


278. 


No. 


279. 


No. 


283. 


No. 


284. 


No. 


287. 



GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

Guelph. Guelph. 
W. Bro. Wm. Stuart. W. M ; Bro. John Beckman. S. W. ; 
R. W. Bros. Hugh Walker and R. Mahony, P. M's. 

Washington, Petrolia. 

R. \V. Bro. John Sinclair, Proxy. 

Oak Branch, Inner kip. 
W. Bros. David Leitch, W. M., Thos. Baird, P. M. 

Harriston, Harriston. 
R. W. Bro. Alex. Irvine, P. M., Proxy ; W. Bro. George 
Leighton, P. M. 

Chaudiere, Ottawa. 
Bro. Robt. Stewart, S. W. 

Patterson, Thornhill. 
W. Bro. John E. Knox, W. M, 

Northern Light, Stayner. 
W. Bro. W. B. Sanders, W. M. 

Parthenon, Chatham. 
W. Bro. N. J. Bogart, P. M., Proxy. 
Verulam, Bobcaygeon. 
W. Bro. W. Gidley, J. W. 

Brougham Union, Brougham. 
W. Bro. R. W. Ward, W. M. 

Cedar, Oshawa. 
W. Bros. G. J. Scott, W. M ; A. L. Rundle, P. M. 

Wellington, Erin. 
W. Bro. T. H. Wansbrough, W. M. 
Seymour, Ancaster. 
R. W. Bro. Gavin Stewart, Proxy. 

Seymour, Port Dalhousie. 
W. Bro. John Green, W. M. 

Mystic, Roslin. 
R. W. Bro. Wm. Smeaton, Proxy. 

JVe?u Hope, Hespeler. 
Bro. W. H. Weaver, J. W. 

Eureka Belleville. 

W Bro. P. H. Hambly, P.M., Proxy; R. W. Bro. W. Smeaton, 
P.M. 

St. Joint's, Brussels. 

W. Bro. John Shaw, P. M , Proxy. 

Shuniah, Port Arthur. 

R. W. Bro. S. W. Ray, P. M., Proxy; W. Bro. J. A. Fraser, 
P. M. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 35 

No. 289. Doric, Lobo. 

W. Bro. A. McGugan, W. M. 
No. 290. Leamington, Leamington. 

W. Bro. G. C. Foster, W. M. 
No. 291. Dufferin, West Flamboro\ 

R. W. Bro. W. G. Reid, Proxy. 
No. 292. Robertson, Nobleton. 

W. Bro. Gilbert Gilmour, W. M. 
No. 294. Moore, Mooretown. 

W. Bros. W. Abernethy and Rev. D. Armstrong, P. M's. 

No. 295. Conestogo Drayton. 

W. Bro. W. H. Smith, W. M. 
No. 297. Preston, Preston. 

M. W. Bro. Otto Klotz, P. M., Proxy. 
No. 300. Victoria, Thorndale. 

W. Bro. W. H. Salmon, W. M. 
No. 303. Blyth, Blyth. 

W. Bro. J. Emigh, P. M. , Proxy. 
No. 304. Minerva, Stroud. 

R. W. Bro. Geo. Monkman, Proxy. 
No. 305. Humber, Weston. 

V. W. Bro. Geo. Tait, Proxy. 
No. 306. Durham, Durham. 

Bro. J. P. Telford, S. W.; W. Bros. A. Davidson, A. McKenzie 

and C. L. Grant, P. M's. 

No. 307. Arkona, Arkona. 

W. Bro. Frank Hooper, P. M., Proxy. 
No. 308. Grafton, Grafton. 

W. Bro. P. J. Lightburne, Proxy. 
No. 309. Morning Star, Smith's Hill. 

R. W. Bro. Jos. Beck, Proxy. 
No. 311. Blackwood, Woodbridge. 

W. Bro. J. O. Orr, W. M. 
No. 312. Pnyx, Wallaceburg. 

W. Bro. S. Stewart, W. M. 
No. 313. Clementi, Lakefield. 

Bro. Jas. Edward, J. W. 
No. 314. Blair, Palmerston. 

W. Bro. R. Doherty, W. M. 
No. 315. Clifford, Clifford. 

Bro. R. E. Biggar, J. W.; W. Bros. J. D. Allan and E. 

Tolton, P. M's. 



36 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

No. 316. Doric, Toronto. 

W. Bros. R. T. Williams, W. M.; K. A. Collins, A. A. S. 
Ardagh and John Ritchie, P. M's. 

No. 318. Wilmot, Baden. 

W. Bro. W. H. Erbach, W. M. 
No. 319. Hiram, Hagersville. 

W. Bro. D. T. Hind, Proxy. 
No. 322. North Star, Owen Sound. 

W. Bro. Thos. Kennedy, W. M. ; Bros. Geo. Ingles, S. W. ; 

Hy. Duiie, J W. ; R W. Bro. John Creasor ; V. W. Bro. S. 

J. Parker, and W. Bros. H. Robinson, H. Kennedy, D. 

Rutherford, John Miller, Robt. Edgar and P. W. D. Broderick, 

P. M's. 
No. 323. Alvinston, Alvinston. 

W. Bro. John Conn, W. M. 
No. 324. Temple, Hamilton. 

W. Bro. C. W. Mulligan, P. M., Proxy; R. W. Bros. J. M. 

Gibson and H. A. Mackelcan, P. M's. 

No. 325. Orono, Orono. 

W. Bro. T. Smith, W. M. 
No. 326. Zetland, Toronto. 

W. Bro. H. A. Taylor, W. M. ; Bros. H. J. Craig, S. W.; C. 

J. Hope, J. W. ; R. W. Bro. E. T. Malone and V. W. Bro. C. 

A. B. Brown, P. M's. 

No. 328. Ionic, Napier. 

W. Bro. W. S. Toshill, W. M. ; R. W. Bro. W. S. Calvert, 

P. M. 
No. 329. King So^io^s, Jarvis. 

W. Bro. H. J. Grasett, W. M. ; Bro. James Noble, S. W. ; 

W. Bros. D. T. Hind and Wm. Jaques, P. M's. 

Fordwich, Fordwich. 
W. M. Bro. A. C. Hutchison, W. M. 

Stratford, Stratford. 
W. Bro. W. G. Mowat, W. M. ; R. W. Bro. J. E. Harding, 
and V. W. Bro. I. Baker, P. M's. 

Prince Arthur, Flesherton. 
W. Bros. Jos. Blackburn and S. Demude, P. M's. 

Myrtle, Port Robinson. 
W. Bro. W. H. Andrews, P. M., Proxy. 
No. 339. Orient, Toronto. 

W. Bros. F. H. Anderson, W. M. ; Ira Bates, David Hunter, 
F. G. Inwood and J. K. Leslie, P. M's. 

No. 341. Bruce, Tiverton. 

W. Bro. J. R. Paterson, P. M., Proxy. 
No. 344. Merrill, Dorchester Station. 

R. W. Bro. J. S. Dewar, Proxy. 



No. 


33i- 


No. 


332- 


No. 


333- 


No. 


337- 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 37 

No. 346. Occident, Toronto. 

W. Bro. W. J. Meyerfey, P. M., Proxy. 
No. 347. Mercer, Fergus. 

W. Bros. H. Hanlin, P. M., Proxy ; J. Tindale, P. M. 
No. 348. Georgian, Peneianguishene. 

R. W. Bro. Hy. Jennings, P. M , Proxy. 
No. 352. Granite, Parry Sound. 

W. Bro. Wm. McGown, P. M., Proxy. 
No. 354. Brock, Cannington. 

W. Bro. M. L. Nutting. W. M. 
No. 356. River Park, Streelsville. 

W. Bro. A. Findlay, W. M. 
No. 357. Waterdown, Waterdown. 

W. Bro. W. S. Featherston, W. M. ; Bro. W. J. Clark, J. W. 
No. 358. Delaware Valley, Delaware. 

R. W. Bro. J. S. Dewar, Proxy. 
No. 359. Vittoria, Villoria. 

W. Bro. J. C. Boyd, Proxy. 
No. 360. Muskoka, Bracebridge. 

W. Bro. Jas. Whitten, W. M. 

No. 361. Waverley, Guelph. 

W. Bro. H. Gummer, W. M. 

No. 362. Maple Leaf, Tara. 

W. Bro. A. McCullough, W. M. ; Bro. G. W. Campbell, S. 
W. ; W. Bros. A. McDonald and R. C. Bruce, P. M's. 

No. 366. Euclid, Strathroy. 

W. Bro. J. H. Evans, W. M. ; V. W. Bro. J. P. Whitehead, 

P. M. 
No. 367. St. George's, Toronto. 

W. Bro. L. B. Montgomery, W. M. ; Bro. W. E. Lemon, J. 

W. ; R. W. Bro. J. A. Wills, and W. Bros. W. J. Guy and 

John Hetherington, P. M's. 

Salem, Brockville. 
W. Bro. Geo. Gale, P. M., Proxy; R. W. Bro. W. L. 
Hamilton, P. M. 

Mi/nico, Lambton- 
Bros. O. L. Hicks, S. W.; T- M. Cotton, J. W.; W. Bro. J. 
D. Evans, P. M. 

Harmony, Delta. 
R. W. Bro. W. J. Simpson, Proxy. 

Prince of Wales, Ottawa. 
W. Bro. J. W. Turley, W. M. 



No. 


368. 


No. 


369- 


No. 


370. 


No. 


371- 



38 (IRAN I • LODGE OF CANADA. 

No. 372. Palmer, Victoria. 

W. Bro. Jas. Shirton, W. M.; Bros. R. W. Martin, S. W.; 
J. G. Watts, J. W.j W. Bro. A. B. Hurrell, P. M. 

No. 374. Keene, Keene. 

V. W. Bro. Jas. McNeil, P. M., Proxy; W. Bro. R. English, 
P. M. 
No. 375 Lome, Omemee. 

W. Bro. J. W. Wallace, P. M., Proxy. 

No. 377. Lome, Shelbume. 

W. Bro. B. Tansley, W. M. 
No. 378. King Solomon's, Petersville. 

W. Bro. A. Currie, W. M. 
No. 379. Middlesex, Bryanslon, 

R. W. Bro. R. B. Hungerford, Proxy. 
No. 380. Union, London. 

W. Bro. Jas. Learn, W. M. 

No. 382. Doric, Hamilton. 

R. W. Bro. J. J. Mason, P. M., Proxy ; W. Bro. S. G. Treble, 

P. M. 
No. 384. Alpha, Parkdale. 

W. Bros. G. S. Booth, W. M.j J. Chambers, P. M. 
No. 385. Spry, Boston. 

\V. Bro. Joseph Wright, W. M. 
No. 386. McColl, West Lome. 

R. W. Bro. J. A. C. Anderson, Proxy. 
No. 387. Lansdozvne, Lansdowne. 

R. W. Bro. T. Wilkinson, Proxy. 
No. 391. Howard, Ridgetown. 

W. Bro. M. G. Hay, W. M.; Bro. J. A. Elliott, S. W.; R. W. 

Bro. J. A. C Anderson, P. M. 
No. 393. Forest, Chesley. 

W. Bros. J. M. Stewart, W. M.; J. Adams, P. M. 
No. 394. King Solomon's, Thamesford. 

W. Bro. M. Day, P. M., Proxy. 
No. 395. Parvaim, Comber. 

W. Bros. A. J. Brown, W. M.; C. W. Scherer, P. M. 
No. 396. Cedar, Wiarton. 

W. Bros. J. Irwin, W. M.; J. Walmsley, P. M. 
No. 399. Moffat, Harrietsville. 

R. W. Bro. John Boyd, Proxy. 
No. 400. Oakville, Oakville. 

Bro. F. Howarth, J. W.; W. Bro. W. A. Ferrah, P. M. 

No. 402. Central, Essex Centre. 

W. Bro. A. H. Clarke, P. M., Proxy. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 39 

No. 403. Windsor, Windsor. 

W. Bro. G. D. Adams, P. M., Proxy. 

No. 404. Lome, Tamworth. 

W. Bro. J. H. McLaughlin, W. M. 

No. 409. Golden Rule, Gravenhurst. 

V. W. Bro. W. B. living, P. M. 

No. 410. Zeta, Toronto. 

W. Bro. W. R. Cavell, W. M.; R. W. Bros. G. ]. Bennett 
and G. G. Rowe ; V. W. Bro C. F. Mansell, and W. Bros. 
W. Walker, J. T. Thompson and Thos. Todd, P. M's. 

No. 411. Rodney, Rodney. 

R. W. Bro. J. A. C. Anderson, Proxy. 

No. 412. Key Stone, Sault Ste. Marie. 

R. W. Bro. S. W. Ray, Proxy. 
No. 413. Naphtali, Tilbury Centre. 

R. W. Bro. J. A. C Anderson, Proxy. 
No. 414. Pequonga, Ral Portage. 

W. Bro. J. A. Warren, Proxy. 
No. 415. Fort William, Fort William. 

R. W. Bro. S. W. Ray, Proxy. 
No. 416. Lyn, Lyn. 

R. W. Bro. W. J. Simpson, Proxy. 
No. 417. Keeivatin, Keewatin Mills. 

W. Bro. J. A. Warren. P. M., Proxy. 
No. 419. Bismarck, Point Edward. 

W. Bro. G. S. Samis, Proxy. 
No. 420. Nipissing, North Bay. 

W. Bros. W. A. Porte, W. M. ; S. Huntington, P. M. 
No. 421 Scott, Grand Valley. 

W. Bro. R. R. Hopkins, W. M. ; Bros W. R. Scott, S. W. , 

A. Deans, J. W. 
No. 422. Star of the East, Bothwell. 

W. Bro. James Carscallen, Proxy. 

The M. W. the Grand Master granted permission for the 
admission cf all Master Masons in good standing, as visitors. 

The Grand Secretary read the rules and regulations for the 
government of Grand Lodge during time of business. 

The Grand Secretary commenced reading the minutes of 
proceedings at the last Annual Communication, when 



4<D GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

It was moved by R. W. Bro. J. Ross Robertson, seconded 
by M. W. Bro. Hugh Murray, and 

Resolved, — That the minutes of the proceedings of Grand Lodge at its 
Thirty-Third Annual Communication, held at the City of Toronto, on 
l8th and 19th days of July, A. D. 1888, having been printed, and copies 
thereof forwarded to Subordinate Lodges, the same be considered as read 
and now confirmed, and that the minutes of the several Special Commun- 
ications of Grand Lodge, entered by the Grand Secretary in the minute 
Book, be taken as read, and are hereby confirmed. 

ADDRESS FROM THE BRETHREN OF OWEN SOUND. 

The Worshipful Masters and Officers of St. George's Lodge, 
No. 88, and the North Star Lodge, No. 322, were announced, 
introduced, and presented the following 

address: 

To the M. W. the Grand Master and Members of Grand 
Lodge of A. F. and A. M. of Canada, in the Province of 
Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren, — We, the Officers 
and Members of St. George's and North Star Lodges bid you 
a cordial welcome to Owen Sound. We are sensible that the 
Cities in the Province contend for the honor of these Grand 
Lodge Meetings ; it is therefore especially gratifying to us to 
be honored with your presence on this occasion. Owen Sound 
has not yet attained to the dignity of a City, but it is rapidly 
approaching it, and we are pleased to be able to assure you 
that the progress of Masonry is keeping pace with the growth 
and material prosperity of the place. From the earliest history 
of the Town to the present time Owen Sound has had amongst 
its prominent citizens a goodly number of the noble fraternity 
of Masons, and from its Lodge Rooms the light of Masonry 
has shone through much of this Northern Country. From St. 
George's and North Star Lodges have sprung many other 
Lodges, now prosperous and well worked, while the parents 
themselves still retain the robust strength and vigour of youth. 

The Masons of Owen Sound will long remember with 
pleasure and satisfaction the honor done them by this meeting 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 4 1 

of Grand Lodge. We indulge the hope that you will thorough- 
ly enjoy yourselves while among us, and that you will return to 
your homes carrying with you pleasant recollections of your 
brief visit to the Liverpool of the North. 

Again, Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren, we bid you wel- 
come to Owen Sound while you remain. 

Duncan Morrison, 

W. M. St. Georges Lodge. 
Thomas Kennedy, 

W. M. North Star Lodge. 

The foregoing address was suitably acknowledged by the 
M. W. the Grand Master. 



42 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

(IRANI) MASTER'S ADDRESS. 

The Most Worshipful the Grand Master delivered the 
following address to the Brethren assembled in the Grand 
Communication. 

Brethren of the Grand Lodge : 

I bid you welcome to this, our 34th Annual Communication. 

By the favor of the Great Architect of the Universe we are 
permitted once more to assemble as Grand Lodge, or 
Masonic Parliament, for the performance of the important 
duties which have been committed to us by the members of 
the Craft throughout the Province of Ontario. 

We are met, under the provisions of the Constitution, to 
enact necessary legislation ; to review the work of the past year ; 
to sit as a Court of Appeal for the administration of justice and 
the settlement of matters of difference in our subordinate 
lodges; to dispense charity; to receive from our officers an 
account of their stewardship during the past year; and to select 
those to whom we will commit the management of our affairs 
during the year to come. 

May we be enabled to discharge our duties with minds free 
from prejudice and with an earnest desire to promote the 
welfare of the Craft and the happiness of all mankind. 

Any legislation which we may enact must necessarily take 
the shape of an amendment of the Constitution which we 
adopted two years ago, and which, in its present form, may be 
considered to represent the results of the experience of our 
predecessors in this Grand Lodge for thirty-three years, en- 
grafted on the code transmitted to us by our ancestors in the 
Grand Lodge of England. Now, we find ourselves to-day, 
Brethren, in a most enviable position amongst the Grand 
Lodges of the world. We are free from internal troubles ; our 
relations with foreign Grand Lodges are satisfactory; the 
Brethren throughout our jurisdiction are loyal, happy and 
contented ; we have an ample benevolent fund at our disposal, 
which is freely dispensed ; and the administrative work under- 
taken by Grand Lodge is, I believe, being well and effectively 
performed. When we look for the causes of this prosperity 
are we not bound to attribute it in large measure to the excel- 
lent administrative system and to the wise laws adopted by our 
predecessors and now embodied in our Book of Constitution ? 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 43 

I have no hesitation personally in referring much of our success 
to these causes, and I therefore feel bound to express the hope 
that Grand Lodge will, unless there is a clear and well ascer- 
tained necessity for change, discountenance all attempts to 
alter or amend a system which has in the past worked so well 
and produced such admirable results — that we shall, in fact, 
have no tentative legislation. 

It is important that our laws should be stable and certain, 
which cannot be the case if we constantly change them. They 
may not be and probably are not perfect, but, as regards 
minor defects, I believe it to be better for us to 

" bear those ills we have 
Than fly to others that we know not of." 

In accordance with time honored custom I propose, as your 
presiding officer, to invite your attention to a retrospect of the 
important events affecting our Order which have occurred 
during the past year, and to bring before you such matters as 
I think need your consideration. 

DEATHS. 

I cannot more fitly open this part of my address than by a 
reference to those Brethren who have passed away to their rest 
since last our Grand Lodge met. 

Philosophers have told us that death is by no means to be 
regarded as a calamity ; that it is " the Liberator of him whom 
freedom cannot release; the Physician of him whom medicine 
cannot cure; and the Comforter of him whom time cannot 
console." 

The fable of Tithonus, endowed by Aurora with the fatal 
gift of immortality, staggering beneath the weight of years 
and infirmity, praying the goddess to recall her fatal gift, 
and to permit him to return to the dust from whence he sprang, 
is an illustration of the light in which the Ancients, who had 
not our hopes and consolation, regarded death. 

Truly, it may be said, that 

" Death is the crown of life : 
Were death deny'd, poor men would live in vain, 
Were death deny'd, to live would not be life, 
Were death deny'd, even fools would wish to die." 

As Freemasons we are particularly taught to regard death 
as the avenue of entrance to a better world ; to raise our eyes 



44 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

from the darkness of the grave and to fix them upon the 
light of the resurrection which shines beyond it — not to sorrow 
at the grave as men without hope. 

On the 31st July, 1888, Rob. Morris, of Kentucky, an hon- 
orary member of this Lodge, with the rank of P. D. G. M., 
died after many years of suffering. He has left behind him a 
lasting monument in his Masonic poems, which, in the year 
1884, procured him the distinction of coronation as the Ma- 
sonic Poet Laureate. 

Death has also taken from us many well-known brethren in 
our own Jurisdiction, of whom I may mention : — 

R. W. Bro. C. D. Macdonnell, P. D. D. G. M. of Ontario 
District, who died on the 29th July, 1888 ; M. W. Bro. C. 
Doebler, P. G. Steward, who died on the 7th August, 1888; 
R. W. Bro. T. B. Bain, P. D. D. G. M., of Wilson District, who 
died on the 10th November, 1888 ; R. W. Bro. A. G. Mac- 
donell, P. D. D. G. M., of Central District, who died on 
the 2nd January, 1889; R. W. Bro. J. S. Loomis, P. D. 
D. G. M., of Prince Edward District, who died on the 
28th January, 1889; R. W. Bro. D. Curtis, P. D. D. G. M., of 
Wilson District, who died on the iSth February, 1889; V. W. 
Bro. Robert Robertson, P. G. S. B., who died on the 9th 
March, 1889, and V. W. Bro. Henry Bickford, who died on 
the 23rd April, 1889. 

Each of these brethren, I am told, did his duty well and 
faithfully in the sphere in which he was placed, and I hope 
Grand Lodge will take care that their memory shall be pre- 
served. 

VISITS. 

Immediately after the close of our last meeting I visited the 
Province of British Columbia, passing over the Canadian 
Pacific Railway, through the grand and impressive scenery of 
the Rocky Mountains. Though my visit was of a private 
nature, I was received by the Masons of Victoria as your 
chief officer with a heartiness and hospitality which I shall not 
readily forget, and an address of welcome was presented to 
me, signed by the Officers of the Grand Lodge and the Mas- 
ters of the two Lodges in the City of Victoria. I found that 
many of the Masons of British Columbia hailed from Ontario, 
and remembered with affection their mother Lodges. I was 
commissioned to present the fraternal greetings and good 
wishes of the Western Brethren to Grand Lodge, a duty which 
I have now much pleasure in fulfilling. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 45 

During the year I have paid the following official visits to 
important centres, and I only regret that in this respect I have 
been unable to do all that I desired to do. 

I visited Port Arthur on the 2ist August, 1888 ; St. George's 
Lodge, Toronto, on the 7th December, 1888; Peterboro' on 
the 18th December, 1888; Belleville on the 27th Decem- 
ber, 1888; Cobourg on the 3rd January, 1889; Picton on 
the 19th January, 1889; Cornwall on the 28th January, 
1889; Ottawa on the 31st January, 1889; Ionic Lodge, 
Toronto, on the 13th February, 1889; Kingston on the 27th 
February, 1889; Hamilton on the 29th April, 1889; London 
on the 2nd May, 1889 ; Guelph on the 24th June, 1889. 

To the gathering at these places all the surrounding Lodges 
were invited, and I take this opportunity of expressing my 
thanks to the District Deputy Grand Masters for the success 
of these meetings, and to the Brethren generally for the loyal 
and hearty reception I met with everywhere. 

I availed myself of the opportunities afforded by these visits 
to address the Brethren on subjects of interest connected with 
Masonry, and to impress upon the Masters of Lodges the 
necessity for making the Lodge meetings instructive and in- 
teresting by means of lectures, papers and discussions on 
Masonic history, symbolism, and kindred subjects. I suggest- 
ed to them that if these means were used there would be a 
better attendance at the Lodges and fewer suspensions for non- 
payment of dues— that intelligent men require more than the 
mere working of the ritual to satisfy the desires of their 
intellects, and cease to attend the Lodge because they do not 
get what they require ; that undue importance may be attach- 
ed to ritual and far too little to.the great objects of Masonry. 

The Grand Master of West Virginia, in his address delivered 
in 1888, referring to this subject, says: "We fall into error 
and overvalue our machinery when we suppose that the routine 
duty of the Lodge and the recital of the ritualistic work will 
meet the demands of our natures." 

The subject of Masonic education in our Lodges is, year by 
year, becoming more important, and may fitly engage the 
attention of Grand Lodge. 

I think it is exceedingly desirable that every brother should 
have some knowledge of the history of the Craft and of the 
ceremonies which are in use in our Lodges. Much that has 
been written in former times, by men who have been regarded 



4^» GRAND LODGE OK CANADA. 

as standard authorities, has been proved by the modern his- 
torians — Hughan, Lyon and Gould — to be unreliable ; and the 
works of these latter, representing as they do the result of 
years of patient study and research, must be regarded as 
constituting the standard history of Masonry at the present 
time. These works may not be accessible to every Brother, or 
even every Master of a Lodge, but a summary of their con- 
tents could, no doubt, be prepared and given in the form of 
lectures to the members of the Craft. 

In his address, delivered in January, 1888, the Grand Master 
of the Grand Lodge of Tennessee, referring to the subject of 
education, says: "Why could not our Lodges be required at 
each meeting to appoint some competent brother to lecture 
upon some one of the cardinal virtues — as patience, temperance, 
fortitude, truth — as well as to give the ritual of some degree ?" 

In Missouri, Lodges of Instruction have been established, 
and the Grand Master states that arrangements have been 
made to have an address delivered on a Masonic subject at 
each evening session, thus giving the Brethren an opportunity 
to listen to lectures by eloquent and distinguished Masons upon 
the history, symbolism, and moral teachings of Masonry. 

In connection with the subject of education, I feel bound to 
refer to the lectures on Craft Masonry in Canada for the past 
one hundred years, lately given to the Brethren by the D. G. 
M., R. W. Bro. J. Ross Robertson, in different parts of this 
Province. These lectures were, I am told, highly appreciated 
by those who heard them, and the thanks of the Brethren are, 
in my opinion, due to Bro. Robertson for having, at great per- 
sonal inconvenience, given the Craft the benefit of his labors. 
Bro. Robertson has secured possession of a large number of 
valuable documents relating to the early history of Craft 
Masonry in Canada, a summary of which, I understand, he 
intends to publish. 

Hearing that Miss Dean, daughter of the late John Dean, 
Provincial Grand Secretary for many years under the old 
regime, had a large number of her father's valuable papers in 
her possession, I applied to her for them. She very kindly 
sent them to me, placing them at my absolute disposal. I 
purpose handing them over to Grand Lodge. I regret to say 
that Miss Dean, who is now somewhat advanced in years, has, 
through the death of her brother and other misfortunes, been 
so much reduced in her circumstances as to require assistance, 
and I trust that Grand Lodge will see that the daughter of a 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 47 

man, who, I am told, did more for Masonry in this Province 
than any other single individual, who, in fact, spent a life-time 
in its service, shall not want for the necessaries of life. 

A Lodge of Instruction, at which I was present, was held 
by R. W. Bro. B. Shortly, D. D. G. M., at Peterboro' in 
December last, which was well attended and could not fail to 
be of service. It would be well if these Lodges were held at 
least once a year in each District, when instruction could be 
given not only in the ritual but in the other subjects that I 
have referred to. 

ENGLAND AND QUEBEC. 

At the last meeting of our Grand Lodge the following 
resolution was adopted : 

"That this Grand Lodge request the M. W. the Grand Master to enter 
into correspondence with H. R. H. the Most Worshipful the Grand 
Master of England and the M. W. the Grand Master of Quebec, looking 
to the end that harmony and brotherly love may prevail between England 
and the Craft in this Dominion." 

Acting upon this resolution, I opened communication with 
the Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Quebec, in order to 
ascertain whether my mediation would be acceptable. I 
received an answer in the affirmative, and after some cor- 
respondence, I was invited by the Grand Master to visit and 
to be the guest of his Grand Lodge during its session in the 
City of Montreal. I accepted this invitation, and at the end 
of January last I visited the Quebec Grand Lodge, by the 
members of which I was received in the most cordial manner. 
I found that these brethren earnestly desired a settlement of 
the difficulty between their Grand Lodge and the Grand Lodge 
of England, which should combine " peace with honor," and, 
adopting a recommendation contained in the address of the 
Grand Master, they passed the following resolution by an 
unanimous vote : 

" That with regard to that part of the Grand Master's Address which 
refers to the withdrawal of the edicts of this G. L. heretof >re issued against 
the Grand Lodge of England and the Lodges in this city adhering thereto, 
this Grand Lod^e fully recognizes the necessity of strengthening the hands 
of the Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Canada, in the Province of 
Ontario, in his mediation between this Grand Lodge and the said Grand 
Lodge of England and her Lodges, and hereby authorizes the Most 
Worshipful Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Quebec, who may be in 
office at any time, at the request of M. W. Bro. Walkem, to withdraw the 
said edicts, and that the remainder of said address be referred to ' The 
Committee on the State of Masonry,' to be reported on as soon as 
possible." 

I do not feel at liberty to say more at present than that I 



48 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

have entered upon the task committed to me, and am hopeful 
of carrying it to a successful issue. Meanwhile I must ask the 
Brethren, both in Ontario and Quebec, to exercise forbearance, 
and to refrain from criticism respecting the matters in dispute. 

NEW LODGES. 

As the result, I assume, of the policy of discountenancing 
the unnecessary multiplication of Lodges, adopted by my pre- 
decessors in office, I have during the past year received only 
three applications for dispensations to establish new Lodges, 
none of which I felt at liberty to grant. Two of these were for 
the establishment of Lodges at Waubaushene and Havelock, 
respectively, but neither was recommended by the District 
Deputy Grand Master by whom it was submitted, and I quite 
concurred in the reasons given by these officers for their refusal 
to recommend the applications. Weak Lodges cannot usefully 
exercise their functions ; they soon cease to work properly, 
and they bring discredit upon the Order. I would, therefore, 
advocate the union of existing Lodges instead of the creation 
of new ones, unless, in any particular case, the latter course is 
plainly desirable. 

The third application from some brethren at Jaffa, in Syria, 
I had no hesitation in rejecting. It is unwise, even if we have 
the right to do so, to establish Lodges in places where they 
cannot be efficiently supervised, and we have no officers whom 
we could spare to send to Syria on a tour of inspection. 

CORNER STONES. 

Special communications of Grand Lodge have been called 
for the performance of the ceremony of laying corner stones, 
and for the consecration and dedication of Lodges. 

The corner stones of the following buildings have been laid : 

St. George's Anglican Church, at the Township of Augusta, 
by R. W. Bro. James Reynolds, P. D. D. G. M., on the 22nd 
August, 1888. 

Baptist Church at Langton, by R. W. Bro. William 
McDonald, D. D. G. M., on the 22nd May, 1889. 

The new hall of Star in the East Lodge, Wellington, by 
myself, on the 26th June, 1889. 

St. Mark's Anglican Church, Avonmore, by myself, on the 
10th July, 1889. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 49 

CONSECRATIONS AND DEDICATIONS. 

Lodge rooms for the following Lodges have been con- 
secrated and dedicated during the past year : 

Star of the East Lodge, Bothwell, by R. W. Bro. J. A. C. 
Anderson, I). I). G. M., on the 27th December, 1888. 

Grand River Lodge, Berlin, by R. W. Bro. R. Mahoney, 
D. D. G. M., on the 22nd February, 1889. 

Salem Lodge, Brockville, by myself, on the 20th May, 1889. 

I observe with much pleasure that the new halls are more 
commodious than those formerly erected, and that we are 
gradually coming down stairs instead of monopolizing the 
upper chambers of buildings as we used to do. While no 
Lodge should be extravagant in the fitting up of its place of 
meeting, yet the exercise of taste in decoration and of care in 
arrangement is highly to be commended. We should be 
lodged in accordance with the dignity and importance of our 
Order. 

DECISIONS. 

A large number of questions were submitted to me during 
the year, for my decision. I suppose that my experience in 
this respect has been the same as that of my predecessors. I 
was obliged in some cases to decline to answer the questions 
submitted, on the ground that there was a possibility of their 
coming before me for adjudication, and it would be unwise to 
accept ex parte statements or to give ex parte decisions. I do 
not think the decisions I have given of sufficient importance to 
be reported. There are really very few unsettled questions, 
and if the Brethren who desire information would look care- 
fully into their Book of Constitution, and the decisions which 
have, from time to time, been given, they would find, in most 
cases, what they wish to know. 

I do not think it respectful to the District Deputy Grand 
Masters to apply to the Grand Master for advice over the heads 
of these Brethren, and I have discountenanced that practice as 
much as possible. 

PHYSICAL QUALIFICATIONS. 

Several applications have been made to me during the past 
year for rulings on the subject of the physical qualifications of 
candidates. The ancient charges prefixed to the Book of 
Constitution lay down the rule that " no Master should take 



50 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

an apprentice unless he is a perfect youth, having no maim or 
defect in his body that may render him incapable of learning 
the art or serving his Master's lord, and of being made a 
Brother and then a Fellow-craft in due time." This rule was 
adopted from the rules laid down by operative Masons for 
admission to the Craft, and does not require physical perfec- 
tion in the candidate, which indeed could rarely be found, and 
could be established only by careful medical examination. I 
have, in dealing with these cases, adopted the rule laid down 
by M. W. Bro. Henderson in 1880, which he states in these 
words : " I hold that unless a candidate be in a condition to 
receive, perform, and communicate all parts of the ceremonies 
and duties of the Order, he is not eligible for the degree ; he 
must be capable of making himself known in the dark as well 
as in the light." The capacity referred to is natural capacity 
without artificial assistance. This rule, it seems to me, is 
sufficiently liberal, and is in harmony with the ancient charges. 

I am not at all in favor of the strict construction of the rule 
respecting physical qualifications, adopted by some of our 
American brethren. Any rule should be construed with 
reference to the circumstances under which it was established, 
and the objects for which it was intended ; and its construction 
must also, I submit, be subject to modification from time to 
time, to meet altered circumstances. Even in the Courts of 
Law this principle is constantly recognized and acted upon. 
The qualifications required in a Mason at the present day, 
under our existing system, are essentially different from those 
required in the bygone time ; they are mental, rather than 
bodily qualifications, and I, therefore, think the rule we have 
adopted commends itself to reason and common sense. 

BY-LAWS. 

The clause of the Constitution which requires that the By- 
laws of Lodges shall be approved by the Grand Master, has 
imposed on me the duty of examining with care a large num- 
ber of By-laws which were sent to me from time to time. 
While anxious to interfere as little as possible with the right of 
self-government granted to Private Lodges, it was yet my duty 
to see that their By-laws did not clash with the provisions of 
the Constitution. I was obliged to return many for amend- 
ment, because this rule had not been properly observed. On 
the other hand, many of the By-laws sent me are mere re- 
enactments of the provisions of the Constitution, having no 
force or effect whatever as By-laws. It has been explained to 
me, in justification of this practice, that it is convenient to 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 5 1 

embody in the By-laws all the ordinary rules affecting discipline 
and the conduct of members in the Lodge. That object 
could be attained, however, by inserting in the book of By-laws 
an abstract of such of these rules as appear in the Constitution, 
and I would recommend the adoption of this suggestion in the 
framing of future By-laws. Some of the By-laws sent to me 
affecting the conduct of members in the Lodge appeared to me 
to be quite unnecessary and occasionally inquisitorial. The 
test of sobriety in the Lodge by inspection of a brother's 
countenance, suggested by some By-laws, is not always to be 
depended upon, and is certainly likely to lead to disputes. 
Many sinners against temperance carry no signs of their 
depravity in their faces, while on the other hand, many tem- 
perate are unjustly accused by their countenances. Regulations 
of this character are injudicious and unnecessary. The Master 
has full authority to enforce order in his Lodge, and his 
prerogative in this respect should be carefully preserved, and 
should not be made even to appear to depend upon a By-law 
of the Lodge. 

There are two other points in which mistakes are constantly 
made : One is in providing that the auditors shall be 
appointed by the Master, whereas the Constitution requires 
that they shall be elected by the Lodge. The other is in provid- 
ing for the election and composition of committees, whereas 
the Constitution (Clause 122) imposes on the Master the duty 
of appointing all standing committees for conducting the bus- 
iness of the Lodge, except the auditors. Many by-laws 
proposed to make the Master ex-officio a member of all 
committees — a provision which, even if not inconsistent with 
the clause I have just referred to, is objectionable on other 
grounds. The Master presides in the Lodge when the reports 
of committees are discussed, and it is important , that, so pre- 
siding, he shall not have pre-judged the matter under discussion, 
and shall be entirely free from bias in respect of it. 

NEW GRAND LODGES. 

By a circular dated at Sydney on the 1st September, 1888, 
I have been advised of the formation of the " United Grand 
Lodge of New South Wales." The Grand Lodge of New 
South Wales was formed in the year 1877, but several of the 
Lodges working in connection with the Mother Grand Lodges 
at first declined to join it. So far as I know, all the Lodges 
have now joined, and a new Grand Lodge has been formed 
under the title which I have mentioned. The Grand Master, 



52 GRAND LODGE OF CANAHA. 

Lord Carrington, who is Governor of the Colony, asks from 
our Grand Lodge official and fraternal recognition. 

I have also been advised of the formation on the 20th March, 
1889, °f ^e United Grand Lodge of Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons of Victoria, and of the election of the Hon. 
Sir W. J. Clarke, Baronet, as its first Grand Master. In the 
formation of this Grand Lodge, 142 out of 145 Lodges in the 
Colony, heretofore under the English, Irish, Scotch and 
Victorian Constitutions, joined. 

The Grand Master prefers a similar request for recognition 
to that made by the Grand Master of New South Wales. 

Within the last few days I have also received a circular from 
the Grand Master of the new Grand Lodge of North Dakota. 
This Grand Lodge has been formed by the division of the 
territory of Dakota into two parts, following its political 
division into the States of North and South Dakota. 

I am informed that the new Grand Lodge was organized on 
the 13th June, 1889, with the full consent of the Grand Lodge 
of Dakota, and in pursuance of the report of a committee of 
that body by whom it has been recognized as an independent 
Grand Lodge. 

The Grand Master, James W. Cloes, asks for recognition 
by our Grand Lodge. 

I have much pleasure in recommending a cordial compli- 
ance with these requests, and I wish the new Grand Lodges 
" God speed " in their career of usefulness. 

The Colonies of New South Wales and Victoria are, as most 
of the Brethren are no doubt aware, situated at the south-east 
angle of the Australian Continent. 

GRAND REPRESENTATIVES. 

On the recommendation of the Grand Master of the Grand 
Lodge of Arkansas I have appointed as our representative 
near that Grand Lodge, R. W. Bro. T. M. Horsfall, instead of 
the late R. W. Bro. R. McPherson ; and I have recommended 
the re-appointment of R. W. Bros. J. B. Trayes and David 
McLellan as the representatives, near our Grand Lodge, of 
the Grand Lodges of Delaware and Illinois, respectively. 
These latter appointments were rendered necessary by the 
adoption by their Grand Lodges of the practice of appointing 
their representative for limited terms ; a practice of which I 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 53 

approve, and which I think we should adopt. I would also 
recommend that no brother hold more than a limited number 
of appointments, to be determined by Grand Lodge. 

BENEVOLENT FUND. 

Grand Lodge had, on the 31st May, 1888, a capital of 
$69,243.43, of which $60,000 was invested. I observe that 
from 1868 to 1888, a period of twenty years, our capital has 
been increased from $35,340.70 to $69,243.43. The interest 
on the invested capital, $60,000, for the year ending the 
31st May, 1888, amounted to $3,006.55. 

From some statements kindly prepared for my use by M. W. 
Bro. Otto Klotz, Chairman of the Committee on Benevolence, 
I find that during the last thirty-one years the sum of 
$171,319.05 has been paid out of the funds of Grand Lodge 
in grants to widows, orphans, and needy Brethren. 

The direct grants for benevolence, given by Grand Lodge, 
amounted, in 1858, to $40.00; in 1859, to $100.00. Since 
1861, when the grants also amounted to $100.00, they have 
increased year by year, until, in 1879, tnev reached the sum 
of $11,090.00. The grants for the year 1888 amounted to 
$10,805.00; and the average for several years past may be 
said to be $11,000.00. These results shew careful manage- 
ment and a full appreciation by Grand Lodge of the claims 
made upon them for benevolent purposes. It rests with those 
who are responsible for the transmission to the Board of the 
information on which the grants are based to see that the 
returns asked for are regularly and correctly made. The 
Board cannot exercise a wise discretion in the distribution 
of charity unless they are furnished with reliable information 
respecting the applicants. There have been many complaints 
of carelessness in the sending in of these returns, and this 
carelessness has, in some cases, resulted in depriving worthy 
objects of bounty of the grants which would have been made 
to them had the rules of the Board been complied with. 

There are now upon our list of pensioners, 355 widows, 55 
orphans, and 31 needy Brethren. 

FLORIDA YELLOW FEVER SUFFERERS. 

In September last our Brethren in Florida, sorely stricken 
by the scourge of yellow fever, issued an appeal to their Breth- 
ren throughout the world for assistance. Believing that I 
should be carrying out the desire of Grand Lodge by respond- 



54 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

ing promptly to this appeal, I caused the sum of $200 to be 
sent to the Relief Committee at Jacksonville. This remittance 
was acknowledged by the Treasurer in a letter to our Grand 
Secretary, in which he says : " You have the honor of being 
the first contributor from any jurisdiction outside of the United 
States." I would ask Grand Lodge to approve of this grant 
as a proper exercise of the charity which we owe to our dis- 
tressed Brethren in every quarter of the globe. 

REPORT ON FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. 

The resolution to resume our report on Foreign Corres- 
pondence, passed at last meeting of Grand Lodge, has borne 
fruit, and the first number of the new issue has just been placed 
in my hands. M. W. Bro. Henry Robertson is the Chairman 
of the Committee which has charge of this important subject, 
and the work issued bears testimony to his care and industry 
in the examination of the proceedings of Foreign Grand Lodges, 
of which, fifty-three are reviewed. The money spent for the 
publication of this report is, in my opinion, wisely invested. 
We acquire from it a knowledge of what is going on around 
us, of the questions which agitate other Grand Lodges, and we 
are thus enabled to compare our work and condition with those 
of our neighbors to avoid what is evil, and adopt what is 
beneficial in their practice. I hope that this work will be 
continued. 

PLACE OF MEETING. 

The selection of our place of meeting is a very important 
matter as affecting the comfort and convenience of the members 
of Grand Lodge, and the success of the meeting itself. 

Objections have been made to leaving this question to be 
determined until nearly the close of the meeting of Grand 
Lodge. These objections come, I assume, not from those who 
have been present and voted on the question, but from those 
who attended Grand Lodge but left before the next place of 
meeting was selected. At any rate, the objections ultimately 
take the form that the wishes of these latter have not been 
consulted. If Brethren either do not attend Grand Lodge at 
all, or having attended, leave before the business is concluded, 
the presumption is, that they have willingly and confidently 
entrusted the conduct of its affairs to those who do attend dur- 
ing the whole session, and objections urged on their behalf 
are not worthy of much consideration. I would, however, 
advise that the place of next meeting be determined during the 
early part of the session of Grand Lodge. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 55 

I cannot close my remarks without expressing my thanks to 
the officers of Grand Lodge for the assistance they have given 
me during the past year. Our system of division into districts, 
each under the superintendence of a D. D. G. M.. has been 
much praised by foreign critics. To the District Deputy 
Grand Masters themselves, I must give the credit of being 
worthy and pains-taking officers. The success of our adminis- 
trative system depends largely upon the way in which these 
Brethren perform their duties. 

I have already alluded to the good work done by the D.G.M ., 
and I cheerfully bear witness to the ability, diligence, and 
punctuality of the Grand Secretary in the discharge of his very 
onerous duties. 

R. T. WALKEM, 

Grand Master. 

It was moved by R. W. Bro. J. Ross Robertson, seconded 
by M. W. Bro. Hugh Murray, and 

Resolved, — That the address of the M. W. the Grand Master be referred 
to the Board of General Purposes to report thereon. 

REPORTS OF THE DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS. 

It was moved by R. W. Bro. J. Ross Robertson, seconded 
by M. W. Bro. Hugh Murray, and 

Resolved, — That the reports from the various District Deputy Grand 
Masters be received, considered as read, and referred to the Board of 
General Purposes. 

ERIE DISTRICT, No. i. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge of Canada, in the Province 
of Ontario: 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren : — In submitting 
my report of Erie District, No. i, I can assure you it has been 
a pleasing duty to act in the honorable position to which I 
was unanimously elected at Grand Lodge last July. The 
kindness then accorded me has stimulated me during the year 
to give as much time and attention as possible to visiting the 
several Lodges comprising this District. If I have failed in 
the discharge of any of my Masonic duties it has been through 
errors of judgment. 

It was my intention to have begun my official visits shortly 
after my return from Grand Lodge, but on consulting with 



56 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

Brethren of several Lodges, I was asked to defer doing so 
until later. On October 18th I visited Rodney Lodge, No. 41 1 ; 
the second degree was conferred on a candidate by W. Bro. 
Mclntyre, of McColl Lodge, No. 386. The Wardens were 
fairly up in their work, but I could not say as much for the 
appointed Officers. On the 28th October I attended an 
emergency meeting of Great Western Lodge, No. 47, Windsor. 
The Worshipful Master being unavoidably absent, W. Bro. 
Craig had charge of the work, and conferred the third degree 
in a creditable manner. 

Kent Lodge, No. 274, Blenheim : I made my first official 
visit to Kent Lodge, No. 274, on the 12th of November. 
Although I had given due notice of my visit, I was dis- 
appointed on my arrival to learn that the W. Master was 
absent. Past Master Upper took charge of the Lodge. 

W. Bro. Carpenter, who accompanied me from Ridgetown, 
kindly conferred the third degree on a candidate at my request. 
The Wardens had their work up, and the other Officers gave 
fair support. 

Star of the East Lodge, No. 422, Both well : I visited this 
Lodge December the 27th and installed the Officers. This 
Lodge has been constituted about a year, and is doing well. 
After the installation, the opening and closing of the several 
degrees was exemplified, and I found the Officers well skilled. 
Although the membership is not large there is a good dis- 
position manifested among them to excel, if possible, in all 
their work. 

Howard Lodge, No. 391, Ridgetown : I visited this Lodge 
January 15th. This meeting was called for the purpose of 
installing the Officers, and I was invited to perform the 
ceremony. There not being any work I could not say as to 
their proficiency ; but, from what I know of them personally, 
I believe Howard Lodge will maintain its good reputation 
during this Masonic year. I noticed by the financial state- 
ment, as shown by the Auditors' report, that this Lodge is in 
a good financial standing. The Lodge room is commodious 
and comfortable. 

Leamington Lodge, No. 290, Leamington : I visited this 
Lodge on January 16th. From circumstances, beyond my 
control, I could not get there by the evening train, and to keep 
my engagement had to drive eighteen miles, and as it was nine 
o'clock when I reached there, the degree work was about 
through with, and unfortunately I did not have the pleasure of 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 57 

seeing it exemplified. I installed the Officers of this Lodge, 
and from the apparent unanimous selection, I bespeak a 
successful Masonic year for No. 290. 

Naphtali Lodge, No. 413, Tilbury Centre: I visited this 
Lodge January 17th, accompanied by Worshipful Bros. 
Carpenter and Bottoms. Since the inception and institution 
of this Lodge I have felt a personal interest in it. The 
Brethren started under the difficulty of not having a Past 
Master. Their first Master was absent from home on several 
occasions when there were regular meetings, and I (with other 
Brethren) was called on to do the work. There has been a 
steady growth, the Lodge is in a healthy state, and has Past 
Masters who are a credit to the Craft. It was also my pleasant 
duty to install the Officers for the ensuing year, and judging 
from my past acquaintance with the Brethren elected and 
appointed to office, I have reason to think they will conduct 
the affairs of the Lodge with zeal and prudence. 

Highgate Lodge, No. 336, Highgate : I visited this Lodge 
February the 1 5th, accompanied by a number of the Brethren 
of Howard Lodge, Ridgetown. The duty devolving on me on 
this occasion was the installation of Officers. After this cere- 
mony was performed, the Brethren then repaired to a Hall, 
where they were met by their families and invited guests, and 
after the usual introductions and salutations were gone through, 
a very intellectual and entertaining programme was introduced 
and enjoyed by all present. We had no sooner concluded the 
instructive and amusing part than we were invited to partake 
of a sumptuous bana ± uet. 

The membership of this Lodge is not large and they are 
scattered over an area of from six to ten miles, but it is to their 
credit to say that the meetings are well attended and every- 
thing is going on well, except the collection of dues. This 
matter has had the serious attention of the Brethren, and I 
have no doubt will shortly be put right. 

Tecumseh Lodge, No. 245, Thamesville : I visited this 
Lodge on February 26th, and was accompanied by V. W. Bro. 
Paine and W. Bro. Middleditch. Its being a regular meeting 
there was a raising, and V. W. Bro. Paine conferred the degree 
in his usual effective manner. 

This Lodge is progressing steadily, and although it suffered 
the loss by fire of nearly all its furniture, jewels and regalia, 
the Brethren very courageously have continued the work. 



58 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

They are now meeting in a hall with the I. O. O. F., as there 
is no other in the village that they can secure for their exclu- 
sive use. They have succeeded in securing premises, which 
are being conveniently fitted up and furnished. 

Lome Lodge, No. 282, Glencoe : I visited this Lodge on 
February 27th, and was royally and enthusiastically received by 
the Worshipful Master and Brethren. R. W. Bro. Lumley, 
the W. Master, very ably and efficiently rules, and to his 
ability and love for the old landmarks may be traced the past 
and present prosperity of Masonry in No. 282. There not 
being any work, the R. W. Master exemplified the opening and 
closing of the several degrees. There were a number of visiting 
Worshipful Masters and Brethren from sister Lodges, and the 
interchange of Masonic sentiment was entertaining, and, 
coming as it did from the heart, conduced to stimulate and 
encourage the Brethren. 

Hammond Lodge, No. 327, VVardsville : I visited this 
Lodge on March 1st, and was accompanied by W. Bros. 
Carpenter, Rheintgen and McGuggan. The work here was 
not up to the average. The W. Master and Officers live in 
the country, and on account of getting together only on Lodge 
nights, are not properly posted in their work. The Brethren 
gave me to understand they would meet together for instruc- 
tion ; and, as they are in a good financial condition, I have 
hopes of their future success. A pleasant evening was spent 
in the Lodge in discussing constitutional points, especially the 
care to be observed in admitting visitors. 

McColl Lodge, No. 386, West Lome : I visited this Lodge 
April 9th, accompanied by W. Bros. Dorland, Carpenter and 
others. This is a Lodge whose membership is composed of 
Brethren who reside in the surrounding country, and although 
they are living some distance from the Lodge, their register 
shows a good attendance, The Brethren of McColl Lodge 
are enthusiastic Masons, and I was very much pleased with the 
correct manner in which they have mastered the work. The 
Worshipful Master and Officers are all well posted. The 
Brethren spent a pleasant and profitable evening. 

Howard Lodge, No. 391, Ridgetown : I visited this Lodge 
April 1 6th. There was a large gathering on this occasion. In 
the early part of the evening representatives from McColl, 
Rodney, Highgate and Ridgetown Lodges met together and 
discussed the advantages of forming a Local Board of Relief, 
which resulted in the organization of a Provisional Board of 
Officers and appointment of a Committee to draft By-laws, to 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 59 

be submitted to the several Lodges. This being a regular 
meeeting, there was a candidate to be passed to the second 
degree. The W. Master of Howard Lodge requested W. Bro. 
Borland, of Rodney Lodge, to confer it, which he did with fine 
effect. I do not remember ever having heard the degree given 
in a more impressive manner. 

Parvaim Lodge, No. 395, Comber : I visited this Lodge on 
May the 10th. The attendance was not large, and I found 
here, as in some other instances, the Brethren do not come till 
late, and consequently the hour is late before the Lodge is 
opened, which is very detrimental to its best interests. The 
W. Master is well skilled, but he is only fairly supported by 
his Officers. The Lodge is making some progress and needs 
some enthusiasm worked up in order to assure a larger 
attendance at regular meetings. 

Thistle Lodge, No. 34, Amherstburg : I visited this Lodge 
May 14th, and was very cordially received by the Brethren, 
and had the pleasure of forming the acquaintance of a number 
of the old Pioneers in Masonry. This Lodge was constituted 
forty years ago and has enjoyed a successful career. From 
records that had been in possession of the Lodge, it appears 
that there was a Masonic Lodge in Amherstburg about the 
year 181 2, and it is supposed its being a military one that 
when the regiment was removed the charter and jewels were 
also taken. 

W. Bro. J. H. Webber, the W. Master, is an enthusiastic 
young Mason, and is anxious that No. 34 may not decline 
under his administration. All the Officers are well posted, in 
fact, the Brethren are alive to the interests of the Lodge. 

Central Lodge, No. 402, Essex Centre: I visited this 
Lodge May 15th. Bro. J. W. Richardson, the W. Master, con- 
ferred the first and third degrees on candidates impressively, 
and I was well satisfied with the way he conducted his Lodge. 
The Wardens were fairly up in their work. I would like to 
have seen a larger number present ; some were unavoidably 
detained by family sickness, but from the membership on the 
books I looked for a better attendance. Central Lodge has a 
large and commodious Lodge room, and is endeavoring to 
keep in a healthy condition by enforcing the By-laws in 
reference to non-payment of dues, and in this they are to be 
commended. 

St. George's Lodge, No. 41, Kingsville : I visited this 
Lodge May 16th, and was accompanied by W. Bro. Clarke of 



60 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

Essex Centre, I was unable to meet the Brethren on their 
regular, and desired their W. Master to call an emergency. 
Through absence from home, and an unusual press of (Gas) 
business, he was unable to give as much notice as might be 
desirable to assure a good attendance. However, we had a 
meeting, and I have only to say, that R. W. Bro. Allworth is 
W. Master, to assure the Craft who know him so well as an old 
and tried Mason, that prosperity still attends St. George. The 
Brethren have sold the property owned by them, and are now 
completing arrangements to build a brick block and fit up in 
it a suitable Lodge room. 

Windsor Lodge, No. 403, Windsor : I visited this Lodge 
May 17th, and had the pleasure of seeing Bro. Morgan, W. 
Master of this Lodge, confer the first degree on a candidate, 
and I may say the manner in which it was done reflected 
credit on every officer. The proper impression was made on 
the candidate, and those sublime principles which it is our aim 
and object to inculcate in the mind and conduct of newly 
initiated E. A's were fully demonstrated. 

Rodney Lodge, No. 411, Rodney: I visited this Lodge 
May 20th. The Brethren at Rodney gave me a most cordial 
reception. Invitations had been extended to Ridgetown, 
Highgate and McColl Lodges, which were accepted, and on 
my entrance was delighted to find the hall filled. Worshipful 
Bro. Dorland is a young Mason and well skilled in the land- 
marks. The Wardens are also well up in the work, and I 
found a marked improvement in the working of this 
Lodge since my last visit, which is due to the united interest 
the Brethren are now taking in their Lodge. 

Wellington Lodge, No. 46, Chatham : I visited this Lodge 
June 3rd. The W. Master Bro. Birch, presided, and conferred 
the first degree on a candidate very creditably. The Wardens 
are also well skilled. R. W. Bro. T. C. McNabb, who is a 
member of Wellington, was present, and as usual gave the 
Brethren the benefit of his matured experience. This Lodge 
is in a prosperous condition and has a large membership which 
is increasing. The Chatham Brethren have a commodious 
and beautifully furnished Lodge room, and are always pleased 
to meet Brother Masons and welcome them within their walls. 

Parthenon Lodge, No. 367, Chatham : I visited this Lodge 
on June the 5th, and was accompanied by R. W. Bro. Milner, 
V. W. Bro. Watson, W. Bros. Langford, Dart, (District 
Secretary,) Porterfield and others. Bro. Rankin is well skilled 
and enthusiastic ; the Wardens being absent I did not have the 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 6 1 

pleasure of meeting them. This Lodge has a membership of 
over sixty, but I am sorry to report that they do not attend 
meetings as they should. There was not any work, and it 
being the meeting for election of Officers, that business was 
proceeded with very unanimously. W. Bro. Rankin was 
re-elected to the W. Master's chair, which I think was for the 
best interest of the Lodge, as he is very anxious for its pros- 
perity. My impression is that Lodges would profit by re-elect- 
ing Masters to a second or third term of office when they 
succeed in getting a competent Bro. to preside over them. 
There not being any work, I requested the W. Master to open 
and close in the three degrees, and while doing so several points 
were discussed in an instructive and friendly way. 

Pynx Lodge, No. 312, Wallaceburg : I visited this Lodge 
June 10th, and was accompanied by W. Bros. Bogart, Cars- 
callen and Switzer. The Brethren of V\*allaceburg have a 
comfortable and tastily furnished Lodge room, which is a 
credit to them. There was a large attendance, and we had a 
good meeting. W. Bro. Stewart, Master of the Lodge, 
presided, and conferred the first degree on a candidate, and W. 
Bro. Switzer conferred the third degree — the work throughout 
being well done. I found the Officers attentive to their duties, 
and the average attendance good. There is a membership of 
over 80, and the Lodge is getting into a sound financial state. 
There has been, heretofore, in this Lodge (as in others) a ten- 
dency to allow the dues of members to fall in arrears. The 
W. Master informs me that since the by-laws are being 
enforced there is more attention given to the payment, and as 
a consequence the funds are increasing and the Lodge must 
go ahead. 

Sydenham Lodge, No. 255, Dresden : I visited this Lodge 
June 13th, and was accompanied by W. Bro. Bogart, of Par- 
thenon Lodge, Chatham, and received a very kind reception 
from the Brethren. It being the regular meeting for the 
election of officers, that order of business was conducted 
throughout most harmoniously. There not being any work 
before the Lodge other than routine, a Lodge of Instruction 
was opened in the third degree. W. Bro. N. J. Bogart very 
kindly consented to exemplify the secret work therein, for 
which he had the appreciation and thanks of those present. 
The Brethren of this Lodge are energetic and thorough in their 
work, and are careful in selection of material, which is to be 
commended in them and in every Lodge in our Grand Lodge 
Jurisdiction who make this a matter of care and prudence. 

Florence Lodge, No. 390, Florence : I visited this Lodge 



62 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

July 5th, accompanied by W. Bro. Rheintgen, of Newbury. 
W. Bro. Drew, W. Master of this Lodge, kindly called an 
emergency, and had a candidate for the third degree. At the 
request of the W. Master, •W. Bro. Rheintgen conferred the 
same in an impressive manner. The Senior and Junior 
Wardens and other Officers were well skilled. This Lodge has 
not a large membership. They have been unfortunate in 
losing members by removal to the North-West and other parts 
of the Dominion. It being a busy time, and the membership 
principally composed of Brethren who reside in the country, 
the attendance was small. The W. Master and Officers are 
energetic and anxious to succeed in all their work. 

This closes my official visits, and I have visited all the 
Lodges in this district except Albion, No. 80, Newbury. I 
went there on the 28th of February, and on arrival was disap- 
pointed to be informed by the W. Master that it would not be 
possible to get a meeting for that night. He had hopes that 
he would be able to call the Brethren together to meet me be- 
fore the close of my Masonic year ; however, he has failed in 
the attempt, not from any fault of his, as he assures me that he 
and other Brethren have endeavored to bring around a more 
satisfactory state of affairs, and an effort is now being put forth 
to get No. 80 into running order, and there are hopes of suc- 
ceeding. The cause of the trouble is the old story, arrearage 
of dues, the rock on which so many Lodges have foundered. 
After an examination of the books and inventory of the pro- 
perty, I don't see any reason why, by a combined effort on the 
part of the Brethren, No. 80, should not become the prosper- 
ous and good working Lodge it once was. 

I don't know how it is in other districts, I find there is a 
feeling among a number of the Lodges in No. 1, that the 
benevolent fund is not at their disposal just as freely as they 
would wish, and possibly it is wise that it is not. I have made 
it a point in my visits to draw the attention of the Brethren to 
the " Appendix of the new Constitution," which lays down the 
proper course to be taken to obtain grants for the needy and 
worthy. 

If Lodges do not put themselves in a position to secure 
assistance, they should not blame Grand Lodge or the Board 
of General Purposes. In several sections of this district I 
have pointed out the advantage of two or more Lodges to- 
gether forming Local Boards of Relief, not only that they may 
be in a position to get grants from Grand Lodge, if required, 
but also to raise a fund which would be available in an emer- 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 63 

gency. I have in a measure been instrumental in getting the 
Lodges at Ridgetown, Highgate, Rodney and West Lome, to 
form a Local Board of Relief. 

The Brethren have entered heartily into the matter, by 
appointing a Board of Directors, who have elected the necessary 
Officers and adopted By-laws which have been forwarded to 
the Most Worshipful the Grand Master for confirmation. A 
very happy feature of the establishment of this Board is the 
fraternal feeling which has sprung up between these Lodges 
through an interchange of visits and a friendly rivalry in per- 
fecting the work. 

In the early part of the month of May, I had the pleasure 
of calling two district meetings, one at Chatham and one at 
Windsor, for the purpose of hearing R. W. Bro. J. Ross 
Robertson deliver his interesting Lecture on " The Craft 
History of Canada for a Century Past." The meetings were 
well attended, particularly at Windsor, where a number of the 
Detroit Brethren availed themselves of the opportunity of 
hearing the lecture. The Brethren were delighted with the 
eloquent and pleasing manner in which it was delivered, and 
I am free to say that the Craft owes the R. W. Bro. a debt of 
gratitude for the labor and cost of getting the subject matter 
together, outside of delivering it. 

I issued the following Dispensations to appear in public 
clothed as Masons, to attend Divine Service : December 24th 
— Sydenham Lodge, No. 255, Dresden; Howard Lodge, No. 
391, Ridgetown; Pynx Lodge, No. 312, Wallaceburg ; June 
23rd — Kent Lodge, No. 274, Blenheim; June 23rd — Leaming- 
ton Lodge, No. 290, Leamington ; June 23rd — Central Lodge, 
No. 402, Essex Centre; June 30th — Naphtali Lodge, No. 413, 
Tilbury Centre and June 7th — Wellington Lodge, No. 46, 
Chatham. 

In reporting on the condition of Masonry in No. 1 district, 
I believe, on the whole, the Lodges are making satisfactory 
progress. On my return from Grand Lodge, I issued a circu- 
lar to the Lodges requesting the Secretaries to send me sum- 
monses of all meetings. This has been complied with in 
almost all cases, and from this source I am pleased to learn 
that the Lodges are having work to do. 

The harmony that exists within this district is shown from 
the fact that I have not had a case of grievance or appeal. 
This I can assure you is very gratifying to me. 

I cannot conclude my report on the First Masonic district. 



64 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

without thanking the Brethren for the courtesy and kindness 
they have on all occasions extended to me, and I sincerely 
hope that peace and prosperity may continue. 

Fraternally submitted, 

Jno. A. C. Anderson, 



Ridgetown, July ioth, 1889. 



D. D. G. M., No. /, (Erie) District. 



ST. CLAIR DISTRICT, No. 2. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge of A. F. and A. M. of 
Canada, in the Province of Ontario : 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren : — I beg respect- 
fully to submit my Annual Report on the condition of 
Masonry in St. Clair District, No. 2. 

The Brethren of the above district having done me the 
honor of electing me as their official representative for the past 
year, I desire to express my gratification for the honor con- 
ferred, and for the pleasure I have enjoyed and the kindness 
and courtsey shown me during my official term. 

This district contains 19 Lodges. I have officially visited 
all once, and some of them two or three times ; and I have 
pleasure in reporting that harmony, peace, and loyalty to the 
Craft and to properly constituted authority, is recognized 
by all. 

The following is a record of my official visits and acts for 
the past year : 

Havelock Lodge, No. 238, Watford : Paid my first official 
visit to this Lodge on August 14th, it being my mother Lodge. 
R. W. Bio. Jamieson presided and initiated a candidate with 
his usual skill and ability ; but I regret that some of the other 
Officers are not giving that attention to the "work" which is 
necessary for the skilful performance of same. Havelock, 
in years gone by, was considered one of the best working 
Lodges in the west, but, aside from the W. Master, the 
others require a good deal of drilling to bring their Lodge up 
to its former position among the Lodges in St. Clair 
District. Members present, 15. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN GOUND, 5889. 65 

I again visited Havelock on Sept. 18th, and with W. Bro. 
A. Cameron, of Ionic Lodge, No. 328, installed the Officers. 

Bismarck Lodge, No. 419, Point Edward: I visited this 
Lodge on Aug. 27th, it being the infant Lodge in my district 
so far as age is concerned, but for general proficiency and well- 
grounded Officers they rank among the oldest. The third 
degree was exemplified — W. Bro. Mclntyre in the East — and I 
need only say the work was done correctly, in fact as correct 
as can well be done by any Officer. Some W. Masters would 
perhaps give the wording of the degree a little more impres- 
sively, but none more accurately. The other Officers did 
their part equally well. I also installed the Officers of 
Bismarck Lodge, Sept. 10th, assisted by R. W. Bro. Sinclair 
and R. W. Bro. Newell, P. D. D. G. M's. Bismarck is growing 
rapidly. Members present, 20; visitors, 25. 

Alvinston Lodge, No. 323, Alvinston : I visited this Lodge 
October 17th. On account of bad roads I was a little late 
arriving, and the Lodge was opened in the third degree — W. 
Bro. French presiding. Bro. McCallum was raised to the 
sublime degree. The W. Master evidently understands the 
work well, but got slightly confused, no doubt on account of 
so many visitors, nearly all being P. M's. A visiting brother 
P. M. undertook to finish the degree, but with very little better 
success. The other Officers did their work fairly well. 
Opening and closing very good. Members present, 22 ; 
visitors, 8. 

St. John's Lodge, No. 81, Mt. Brydges : On October 
23rd I had the pleasure of occupying the chair in connection 
with a concert under the auspices of St. John's Lodge. This 
Lodge is composed of a number of pushing, energetic masons, 
and they presented a programme to the public creditable to 
themselves and worthy of the noble Order under whose banner 
they are laboring. This Lodge is in excellent financial cir- 
cumstances, and is prospering. 

Ionic Lodge, No. 328, Napier : I paid my official visit to 
this Lodge on Nov. 16th. The W. Master and J. W. not 
being present, W. Bro. A. Cameron, P. M., filled the East, and 
W. Bro. Dunlop, P. M., the South ; the West and other offices 
were filled with their respective officers. Bro. Sutherland was 
raised to the sublime degree. The work was well done, Ionic 
coming up to her previous record for accuracy and general 
proficiency. 13 members present. 

Euclid Lodge, No. 366, Strathroy : I visited this Lodge on 



66 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

Jan. 10th, 1889. The candidate expected for third degree did 
not put in an appearance. I #odge was opened in three degrees. 
W. Bro. Evans performed his part well, as did also his Wardens. 
The evening was spent as a Lodge of Instruction. Members 
present, 18. 

Huron Lodge, No. 392, Camlachie : I paid my official visit 
to this Lodge on Jan. 16th, when I installed the Officers, 
assisted by W. Bros. Kennedy and McMillan, P. M's of Huron 
Lodge, and W. liro. Dunlop, P. M. of Ionic Lodge, Napier. 
No other work was done, but the Brethren of Huron Lodge 
seem to be keeping up to the standard and doing their duty. 
After the Lodge adjourned we were invited to the Town Hall, 
and were very much surprised at the treat in store for us. The 
tables were set on both sides, full length of hall, and seated 
about 120 people. After lunch, speeches, readings, solos, 
duetts and instrumental music completed a very happy and 
profitable evening. Permission was granted Huron Lodge, No. 
392, to change their regular night of meeting from Wednesday 
on and after to Wednesday on or before, proper notice having 
been given. 

Burns Lodge, No. 153, Wyoming: I visited this Lodge on 
March 14th — Senior Warden absent, W. Bro. Wilson presiding. 
No work has been done in this Lodge for some time. W. 
Master has a very fair knowledge of the " work/' but requires 
more practice ; J. Warden will be all right with a little more 
study. Opened and closed in three degrees fairly well, but 
the Officers promised to give the subject their attention, and 
I am in hopes when my successor visits Burns Lodge next 
year he will find a good working Lodge. Members present, 1 1 . 

Beaver Lodge, No. 83 and Euclid Lodge, 366 : R. W. Bro. 
J. Ross Robertson, D. G. M., delivered his popular address 
on the "Craft," in above Lodge rooms, on March 18th; 
about 60 members were present from Watford, Napier, 
Delaware, Mt. Brydges, Lobo, Strathroy, and other places. 
R. W. Bro. Robertson was given the best of attention through- 
out his masterly address, and many favorable comments were 
expressed upon his zeal in the cause, in thus placing before the 
Brethren of the present day a chain of evidence showing the 
working of the Craft from its introduction on this continent 
down to the time of the formation of the present Grand Lodge. 
The members of Beaver and Euclid Lodges catered to the 
wants of the visitors, and a very pleasant and profitable 
evening was enjoyed by all. 

Victoria Lodge, No. 56, Sarnia : Paid my official visit to 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 67 

this Lodge on March igth — W. R. Bro. Samis in the East. 
The second degree was exemplified, the work being well done; 
each and every Officer performing his part proficiently. 
Victoria has plenty of active and enthusiastic Officers and 
members to do it. This was also the occasion of the second 
visit by the Deputy Grand Master to St. Clair district, who 
received the same kindly greeting and as an appreciative 
audience as on his first visit. Members present, 26; visitors, 25. 

Beaver Lodge, No. 83, Strathroy : I visited this Lodge on 
March 22nd — W. Bro. Currie presiding. Two candidates 
were balloted for, accepted and regularly initiated. This was 
W. Bro. Currie's first effort in the East (re initiation), and it 
is only fair to say that the work was done very impressively 
and correctly, the other Officers doing their parts well. 
Beaver Lodge is progressing, as she ought, for she has many 
expert craftsmen among her members. Members present, 1 6 ; 
visitors, 9. 

Leopold Lodge, No. 397, Brigden : Paid my official visit 
to this Lodge on April 10th — W. Bro. Leacock officiating. 
The evening was spent in initiating a candidate, and as a 
Lodge of instruction in opening and closing in the three 
degrees ; J. Warden was absent. This was W. Bro. Leacock's 
first experience as Master in the exemplification of a degree 
and, like many of the young W. Masters, did his duty well 
and to my entire satisfaction. The other Officers were well 
up in the work. Members present, 12. 

Moore Lodge, No. 294, Mooretown : I visited this Lodge 
on April nth. W. Master in the chair; J. Warden absent. 
No work. Opened and closed in three degrees, W. Master and 
S. W T arden doing that portion of the work well. The only 
question of importance in connection with Moore Lodge is that 
a number of the Brethren are anxious to remove the Lodge to 
Courtright, which is strongly opposed by others, who wish to 
retain it in its present position ; otherwise harmony prevails 
Members present, 14. 

Cassia Lodge, No. 116, Thedford : I officially visited this 
Lodge on April 15th. A candidate was expected for third 
degree, but did not come ; a Brother, however, offered his 
sen-ices, and the exemplification of the third degree was 
proceeded with. The W. M. has a good fair knowledge of the 
work, but lacks confidence and experience to do himself 
justice. I advised them to hold Lodges of instruction 
among themselves, as all the Officers require to give the subject 



68 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

more study and attention, when no doubt they will have a 
first-class Lodge. 

Application was also made asking permission to amend 
Cassia Lodge By-laws, reducing annual dues from 25c. per 
month to $1.00 per annum, which was granted by the M. W. 
the Grand Master ; also application asking for the expulsion 
of W. Bro. Parson, by Grand Lodge, for unmasonic conduct, 
which I referred to the Grand Secretary. V. W. Bro. 
Underwood, of Ingersoll, was present and ably assisted in the 
instructions in the third degree. Members present, 14; 
visitors, 3. 

Forest Lodge, No. 263, Forest : I visited this Lodge on 
April 1 6th — W. Bro. Griggs in the East. The W. M. rules 
his Lodge well. A candidate was duly initiated, and the 
ceremony performed correctly and effectively ; the Wardens 
and other Officers doing their part very satisfactorily. The 
Lodge was opened in the three degrees and, with the exception 
of the J. Warden (who is a very young Officer and has not had 
sufficient time to prepare himself further than the first degree), 
each Officer is thoroughly competent to fill his particular office 
with credit to himself and to his Lodge. Members present, 24. 

Petrolia Lodge, No. 194 and Washington, No. 260, Petrolia: 
The Brethren of these two Lodges very kindly allowed me the 
pleasure of paying my official visit to their respective Lodges 
on the evening of May 1st, being the date arranged for the 
visit of the Deputy Grand Master. There was a large attend- 
ance of the Brethren from Brigden, Oil Springs, Wyoming, 
Camlachie, Hamilton, London, Napier and other places, or 
about 60 Brethren outside of the members of Petrolia Lodges. 
The Deputy Grand Master and myself were entertained by the 
Brethren of Petrolia in a most hospitable and brotherly 
manner. The lecture by the D. G. M. was delivered well, 
considering the extra strain on his nervous system, from the 
fact that he had that afternoon received his first degree 
in the art of exploring for oil, and the great number of 
"jerkers" constantly on the move, as viewed by him for the 
first time, was almost sufficient to mystify even so brilliant an 
orator as our worthy Deputy. The address was highly ap- 
preciated by all present. A pleasant feature of the evening's 
entertainment was the presentation of a P. D. D. G. M's apron 
to R. W. Bro. Sinclair. The presentation was made by myself, 
on behalf of the Brethren of St. Clair District. R. W. Bro. 
Sinclair replied, expressing his sincere thanks for the honor 
conferred on him by the Brethren of this district. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 69 

Arkona Lodge, No. 307, Arkona : I visited this Lodge on 
May 9th — W. Master and J. Warden were absent. Their 
offices were filled with P. M's. Bro. Dodds was passed to the 
second degree, the exemplification being done very well, the 
balance of the evening was spent as a Lodge of instruction. 
Members present, 1 7 ; visitors, 3. 

DufTerin Lodge, No. 364, Melbourne : I officially visited 
this Lodge on May 15th. We were somewhat disappointed 
on getting into the Lodge room at the hour named, to notice 
an account of the W. Master being off attending to his pro- 
fessional duties, but at a late hour he returned and we were 
admitted. No work on hand ; J. Warden absent ; S. Warden 
not well up and the W. Master only requires a little brushing 
up to stand in the first ranks as a worker and a ruler in his 
Lodge. But there is one thing I respectfully beg to suggest 
to the officers and members of Dufferin Lodge, and especially 
those in the Village and near at hand, that if you wish your 
Lodge to occupy the very creditable position it firmly held, as 
regards members, and the interest manifested in Dufferin by its 
own Brethren, you must make it a point to get to your Lodge 
room earlier in the evening, and not keep the members who 
live quite a distance in the country waiting until 10 o'clock, or 
thereabouts, until Lodge is opened, as I am informed several 
of your members demitted on this account. Evening spent as 
a Lodge of instruction. Members present, 9. 

Alexandra Lodge, No. 158, Oil Springs. I visited this 
Lodge on May 16th, concluding my official visits. Through 
a misunderstanding, the Secretary of the Lodge did not receive 
^notice of my coming, and the W. Master was not present. 
W. Bro. Smith, P. M., took the chair. A candidate was 
balloted for and accepted. No other work and no candidate 
present. Cannot report as to general proficiency, the Lodge 
being opened only in first degree, but what was done was 
according to the "work." I think Alexandra is doing nicely. 
Members present, 12. 

THE CHARACTER OF THE WORK. 

I am happy to say that the great majority of the Lodges 
render the ritualistic part of the ceremonies as near as can be 
to the recognized work, and is certainly very agreeable to the 
D. D. G. M., as in most cases his duties are very light. 

DEATHS. 

The deaths of the following brethren have been reported to 



70 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

me : Bro. R. H. Cozens, member of Victoria Lodge, No. 56, 
Sarnia ; Bro. James Wright, a member of Huron Lodge, No. 
392, Camlachie. 

DISPENSATIONS. 

I have, during my term of office, granted Dispensations to 
the following Lodges to attend divine service, clothed as 
Masons : Victoria Lodge, No. 56, Sarnia ; Beaver Lodge, 
No. 83 and Euclid Lodge, No. 366, Strathroy; Alvinston 
Lodge, No. 323, Alvinston. 

DISTANCE TRAVELLED. 

I have, during my term of office, travelled about 940 miles 
in making official visits to the Lodges. 

EXPENSES. 

I desire to tender my thanks to the following Lodges for 
contributing towards the payment of my expenses : Bismarck, 
Alvinston, St. John's, Euclid, Huron, Burns, Victoria, Beaver, 
Leopold, Moore, Cassia, Forest, Petrolia, Dufferin and 
Alexandra. 

CONCLUSION. 

I wish to tender my sincere thanks to the Brethren of the 
district for the many acts of kindness and good will extended 
towards me during my term of office, and also to the Grand 
Secretary for information most heartly rendered by him when- 
ever required, and I think I can safely assure my successor a 
hearty and loyal welcome, and genuine support by the Brethren 
of the St. Clair District. 

W. S. Calvert, 

D. D. G. M., St. Clair District, No. 2. 
Napier, June 20th, 1889. 



LONDON DISTRICT No. 3. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge of A. F. 6° A. M. of 
Canada, in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren : — I have the 
honor to submit my report on the condition of Masonry in 
No. 3 District, better known as London District. This dis- 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 7 1 

trict contains twenty-eight Lodges, all of which I have officially 
visited. 

St. Thomas Lodge No. 44, St. Thomas : My first official 
visit was paid Aug. 2nd, 1888 ; had a good attendance ; saw the 
first and third degrees conferred ; the work was done by the 
regular Officers and was very well done. The work is in good 
hands and the Lodge is in a prosperous condition, I gave 
a lecture on the third degree at the close of the work. 

St. John's Lodge No. 209^7, London : Visited this Lodge 
on August 9th, and saw the third degree conferred according 
to their work. The work was done by the regular Officers, all 
of whom are most thoroughly posted. In fact good posting 
seems to be one of the essentials of office in this Lodge. 
There were about 50 Brethren present on the occasion, and 
it afforded me a great deal of pleasure to congratulate them on 
the possession of so well posted and competent a staff of 
Officers. Although the work is somewhat different from our 
own, yet the lessons taught and the principles instilled in the 
minds of the candidates are exactly the same as with ourselves. 

St. John's Lodge, No. 20, London : Visited Aug. 13th. This 
Lodge meets in the Masonic Temple. I did not see any work 
done. They had two candidates for advancement, but they were 
both absent from the city. The work is done by the regular 
Officers, and, judging from the manner of opening and closing, 
must be well done. 

Delaware Valley Lodge, No. 358, Delaware : Visited Aug. 
17th. They have a very nice Lodge here, with a membership 
of 32 in good standing. Did not see any work done. Caused 
them to open and close in the three degrees, which was very 
well done. There has been a little difficulty existing in this 
Lodge for several months past, but I am pleased to report that, 
with their own assistance, I have succeeded in settling it, and 
peace and harmony prevail. At the close of the meeting I 
gave a lecture on the first degree. 

Springfield Lodge, No. 259, Springfield : Visited Aug. 20. 
This Lodge has 23 members on the roll, of which there are 1 
over four years in arrears, 4 over three years and 2 over two 
years in arrears for dues. The books are kept in a business- 
like manner. They meet in a rented hall, which is very well 
furnished, for which they pay $25.00 a year. I found them in 
a very bad state, not having had a meeting for six months, and 
Grand Lodge dues had not been paid for five years. This 
Lodge was at one time a very bright and live Lodge, but they 



72 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

seem to have lost all interest in Masonry. Although I sent 
them notice ten clays previous to my visit, they could only 
muster the W. M., S. \Y\, j. W. and Secretary — four members 
in all. They had got quite discouraged, and were talking of 
giving up their Charter. I advised them to make another effort, 
as there were enough good paying members to run a first-class 
Lodge, and to suspend the rest. After some consideration 
they agreed to try it once more. I instructed the Secretary to 
notify me, from time to time, how they were getting along, and 
I am pleased to report that they have paid their Grand Lodge 
dues and have taken in four new members, and are doing well. 
I intended giving them another visit, but thus far I have been 
unable to do so. 

Prince of Wales Lodge, No. 171, Iona : Visited Aug. 24th. 
There was no work. They had two candidates for initiation, 
but both of them were away from home. I caused them to 
open and close in the three degrees, which, with the exception 
of a little nervousness on the part of the W. M., was very well 
done. They are good workers, and have the work very correct. 
I decided a few questions with reference to the ceremonies, 
and gave a lecture on the second degree. 

Corinthian Lodge, No. 330, London East : Visited Sept. 
4th. There was no work on hand here either. They meet in 
a rented hall, which is nicely furnished. I made them open 
and close in the three degrees ; the work was finely done ; 
the Officers are well posted. A pleasing feature of the work 
was the Musical Ritual, which was very fine and well rendered. 
There was a question brought up in the third degree for 
consideration, which I explained as it appeared to me, but 
which was outside of my power to give a ruling on. We spent 
a very pleasant and profitable evening, and at the close I gave 
a lecture on the first degree. 

Union Lodge, No. 380, London : Visited Sept. 10th. 
This Lodge meets in the Masonic Temple, and is remarkably 
well officered. Saw the first degree conferred, which was well 
done, there being no room for criticism. They have a mem- 
bership of 90, and the utmost harmony prevails. I gave a 
lecture on the first degree. 

Henderson Lodge, No. 388, Ilderton : Visited Sept. 17th. 
There was no work on hand. I caused the Lodge to be opened 
in the three degrees. The W. M. has the work all right as far 
as I could judge, but is very nervous. They have a very strong 
Lodge for a small place, numbering 42 members. The room is 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 73 

nicely furnished, for which they pay a rent of $44 a year. I 
gave a lecture on the first degree. 

Nilestown Lodge, No. 345, Nilestown : Visited Sept. 18th. 
There was no work on hand at this meeting, but they have 
been doing considerable work in the past year. This is a very 
live little Lodge, being well up in the work. They own the 
hall they meet in, and have it all paid for. I gave a lecture 
on the second degree. 

St. Paul's Lodge, No. 107, Lambeth; Visited Sept. 19th. 
Saw the third degree conferred, which was very well done. 
The W. M. was the only regular officer present, the rest of the 
Officers were acting as judges at St. Thomas Fair, but the 
offices were all well filled. I gave a lecture on the third 
degree. 

Doric Lodge, No. 289, Lobo : Visited Sept. 20th. Here I 
had the pleasure of seeing both the second and third degrees 
worked in a highly satisfactory manner; they take a deep 
interest in Masonry, and are accordingly bright and active 
workers. They have a membership of 55 in good standing. 
I gave a lecture on both the second and third degrees. 

St. George's Lodge, No. 42, London : Visited Oct. 3rd. 
The second degree was conferred in a highly satisfactory manner. 
The work was done by the regular Officers of the Lodge, and 
was done to my entire satisfaction. I gave a lecture on the 
second degree. Here the first point was raised in regard to the 
constitutionality of the lectures which I deliver, they being 
entirely different to the lectures issued by the Grand Lodge ; 
but I claim, and I think rightly, that the lessons taught and the 
explanations given were strictly Masonic ; such being the case, 
I had no fear that the Grand Lodge would interfere with me, 
and while I do not ask any Lodge to learn the lectures which 
I deliver, I consider it my duty to impart to the different 
Lodges under my jurisdiction all the information I may 
possess. 

Warren Lodge, No. 120, Fin gal : Visited Oct. 16th. In 
response to a pressing invitation of the W. M., who, by the 
way, is a very highly esteemed personal friend of mine, and 
who has become discouraged on account of the apathy of the 
Brethren in not attending more regularly the stated meetings 
of the Lodge, they not having had a meeting since he took the 
chair, I accordingly went to investigate the cause. I find 
they own the property they meet in, and have cash in the 
Treasurer's hands ; have a membership of 25 in good standing, 



74 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

and could see no reason why they should be discouraged. I 
suggested that the W. M. put a little more life into the work, 
so that it might interest the Brethren, and by that means call 
them together more regularly. I gave a lecture on the three 
degrees of Masonry to illustrate the point and to show the 
Brethren that there was much for them to learn yet before 
they could claim to be perfect in the work. I believe it has 
had a salutory effect, as I have heard no more complaints. 

Malahide Lodge, No. 140, Aylmer : Visited October 17th. 
There was no work on hand, but I caused the W. M. to open 
and close in the three degrees, and I found that they have the 
work in very good shape. The work is done by the regular 
Officers, and is very well done. I also gave the lectures on the 
three degrees to the Brethren present, as they have a very fine 
chart, but no one to lecture on it. They are a good, strong 
Lodge, having 68 members. 

Kilwinning Lodge, No. 64, London: Visited October 18th. 
Saw the first degree conferred, and I have much pleasure in 
saying that the work done was, without exception, the finest 
I have ever seen. The work was done by the regular Officers 
and was simply perfect. There was not a word out of place 
from the Inner Guard to the W. Master. It was really 
beautiful. Too much praise cannot be given to the W. M. 
and Officers of this Lodge for their care in getting up the work 
so thoroughly. 

Belmont Lodge, No. 190, Belmont: Visited October 19th. 
There was no work on hand. The W. M. volunteered a 
candidate for my benefit ; the work was very poorly done, and 
I expressed my dissatisfaction very freely, both to the W. M. 
and Officers, and have since ordered a Lodge of Instruction, to 
be held every two weeks, for work and instruction. There is 
some excuse for the W. M. in this case, as he is one of the 
first P. M's of the Lodge, and the work that he once knew has 
undergone considerable change ; but we hope before his term 
expires to be able to make a better report. 

Tuscan Lodge, No. 195, London: Visited November 5th. 
This Lodge meets in the Masonic Temple, and numbers 5 1 
members. There was no work on hand ; but the W. M. 
initiated a volunteer candidate, that I might judge of their 
proficiency. The work was only passably well done. I do 
not hold with volunteer candidates, as I have never yet found 
the work as well done as when performed on a regular- 
candidate. I then caused them to open in the second and 
third degrees, and gave them such instruction in the work as I 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 75 

thought necessary. Altogether we spent a pleasant and, I 
trust, a profitable evening. 

St. John's Lodge, No. 209a, London : Visited Nov. 8th, 
by invitation, for the purpose of seeing the third degree worked 
and assisting in receiving a deputation of visiting brethren from 
Ashlar Lodge, No. 247, Toronto. Too much praise cannot be 
given to the W. M. and Officers of this Lodge for the high 
state of perfection to which they have brought their work. 
The visitors expressed themselves as highly pleased, most of 
them never having seen the work done in this manner before. 

Moffat Lodge, No. 399, Harrietsville : Visited Dec. 12th. 
There was no work on hand, in fact I had to occupy the East 
myself, in order to fill the chairs to open the Lodge. There 
are a few very zealous Masons in this Lodge, to whose 
untiring energy the life of the Lodge is due. But such con- 
tinued exertion is beginning to be felt even by them, and 
unless the Brethren wake up to a sense of their responsibility 
it is only a matter of time how long they will retain their 
Warrant. They occcupy a rented room, for which they pay 
$25.00 a year. 

Merrill Lodge, No. 344, Dorchester Station : Visited Dec. 
13th. There was no work on hand. They have a very fine 
Hall, and neatly appointed ; and although they have a 
membership of 36, there were only 10 members present at the 
meeting. There seems to be a feeling of some kind amongst 
them that prevents them from meeting together in that love 
and harmony which should prevail among Masons. However, 
as there has been no complaint laid to me, I had to content 
myself by giving what I thought some good advice, and I hope 
the Lodge may profit by it. I caused the Lodge to be opened 
and closed in the three degrees, and gave a lecture on the 
first. 

King Solomon Lodge, No. 378, Petersville : Visited Dec. 
19th. There was no work on hand but election of Officers. 
There were 25 members present, and about 20 visitors from 
different parts. This is a very live Lodge, R. W. Bro. J. 
Simpson being a member of it, who sees after the work very 
closely. I caused them to open and close in the three degrees, 
which was well done. 

St. David's Lodge, No. 302, St. Thomas : Visited Dec. 20th. 
Had a first-class attendance. Saw the second degree conferred, 
which was very well done. The work was done by the regular 
Officers and, with the exception of a little nervousness on the 



76 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

part of the W. M., was well done. They occupy a rented Hall 
alone, for which they pay $50.00 a year. 

London City Lodges : St. John's night, Dec. 27th, I visited 
and installed the Officers of St. John's, No. 20 ; St. George's, 
No. 42; Kilwinning, No. 64; Tuscan, No. 195; St. John's, 
No. 209^ and Union, No. 380. Had a largely representative 
meeting and was assisted by R. W. Bro. J. S. Uewar, P. G. J. W., 
W. Bros. A. B. Greer, R. B. Walker, A. G. Smyth, Ed. Burk, 
W. R. Vining, J. H. Flock, and others. Spent a pleasant 
evening and was well pleased with the appearance of the 
W. Masters installed ; from what I know of them as S. 
Wardens, feel sure that Masonry will not suffer in their hands. 

St. Mark's Lodge, No. 94, Port Stanley : Visited Jan. 8th 
and installed their Officers. This Lodge has been laboring 
under difficulties for some time, but has finally succeeded in 
mastering them all, and they now feel like going on with a 
stout heart. I feel satisfied that with the material that I know 
they have amongst them, that they will give a good account of 
themselves in the future. 

Cameron Lodge, No. 232, Wallacetown : Visited Jan. 16th. 
The night was very bad, it having rained all afternoon and 
evening, and as most of the members live in Dutton, it 
will account for the very slim attendance. I had to take the 
chair myself in order to open. I think it would be in the 
interests of Masonry if this Lodge were moved to Dutton, as 
three-quarters of the members live there. Since my official 
visit they have applied for my permission to move the Lodge 
to Dutton, which has been granted. 

King Solomon Lodge, No. 394, Thamesford : Visited Jan. 
23rd. There was no work on hand for that night, but they 
have been working very well, having at the last meeting con- 
ferred the third degree on a candidate. The chairs were filled 
by the respective officers ; I caused the Lodge to be opened 
and closed in the second and third degree, and I am pleased 
to say that the work was done to my entire satisfaction. There 
was a good attendance of the Brethren, who listened with 
attention to any remarks I had to make. 

Mount Olivet Lodge, No. 300, Thorndale : Visited Feb. 
13th and found them in a good state of working order, also 
financially strong. Here Ave had an initiation. The work was 
done by the regular Officers, with the exception of the W. M., 
who called on W. Bro. Dunlop to fill the chair on this occasion, 
the work being very nicely done. The W. M. excused himself 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 77 

on the plea that having been just elected to the office he was 
not prepared to do the work yet. However, he has promised 
to prepare himself for the work at once, and I have no doubt 
but he will. The hall is owned by themselves and they have 
money on hand. Altogether they are in a very prosperous 
condition. 

Middlesex Lodge, No. 379, Bryanston. Visited February 
13th. There was no work on hand. They have not a 
very good hall to meet in, and on account of that can- 
not make the meetings as interesting to the Brethren 
as they could otherwise do. I caused the Lodge to be 
opened and closed in the three degrees, and offered 
such suggestions as I thought might be useful to them. 
The night was extremely cold and that may possibly account 
for the slim attendance. There is a case of jurisdiction against 
this Lodge, which I have been unable to settle, and have 
accordingly transferred it to the Board of General Purposes, 
where I trust it will be finally disposed of. 

St. John's Lodge, No. 2090, London: Visited April nth, 
and had the pleasure of meeting a large number of the 
Brethren from different parts of the district, who came to 
witness the exemplification of the third degree according to 
their work. The work was remarkably well done, and we 
had both a pleasant and instructive meeting. 

On April 30th, visited the St. Thomas Brethren at 
Lodge No. 44, for the purpose of meeting the Deputy 
Grand Master, R. W. Bro. J. Ross Robertson, and listening 
to his very able and instructive lecture on the progress of 
Masonry in Canada for the last hundred years. I was well 
pleased with his very excellent address and with the very 
hearty manner the distinguished brother was received. 

Visited the London Brethren May 2nd, for the purpose of re- 
ceiving the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, who paid us an 
official visit on that occasion, and who was royally received by 
the Brethren. M. W. Bro. Walkem brought up a few interest- 
ing points on the question of the non-payment of dues, and also 
on the responsibility resting on the W. M.'s in regard to making 
Lodge meetings interesting to the Brethren. Altogether we had 
a grand meeting, and I am satisfied that if the Brethren will 
only act on the timely hints thrown out by the M. W. the 
Grand Master, it will result in great good to the Craft. 

Spartan Lodge No. 176, Sparta : Visited May 13th. I 
found not many Brethren in attendance, and no work to be 



78 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

done— in fact they had not done any work for several years. 
I, however, found them very well up in their work. Caused 
them to open and close in the different degrees, and gave them 
some good advice in regard to arrearages for dues, which, if 
acted upon, will assist materially in putting the Lodge in a 
better financial position. I also gave a lecture on the second 
and third degrees. 

On June 24th I installed the Officers of Belmont Lodge 
No. 190. 

In concluding this official report I wish to thank the W. M. 
the Grand Master and the Grand Secretary, for the very 
prompt manner in which they answered all communications, 
and also those Brethren throughout the district who so kindly 
lent me their assistance in making my duties both light and 
pleasant. 

All of which is fraternally submitted. 

John Boyd, 

D. D. G. M., London District No. 3. 



SOUTH HURON DISTRICT, No. 4. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Me?nbers of the Grand Lodge of A. F. and A. M. of 
Canada, in the Province of Ontario : 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren : — I have the honor 
to present to you the following report on the condition of 
Masonry in the Fourth Masonic District. 

Having been elected to the honorable position of District 
Deputy Grand Master at the last Annual Communication of 
Grand Lodge, I have endeavored to perform the duties of that 
high office to the best of my ability, and I trust to the satis- 
faction of all concerned. 

My first official act was the appointing of W. Bro. Alex. 
Slimmon, a P. M. of Britannia Lodge, Seaforth, District 
Secretary, and I assure you, I am greatly indebted to him for 
his valuable assistance, kind advice, and prompt attention to 
all Masonic business entrusted to him. For these favors I 
return him my sincere thanks. 

I wrote to the Secretary of each Lodge in the district, ap- 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 79 

pointing a date for my official visit, and as my predecessor, 
R.. W. Bro. McLellan, had given much of his attention to the 
work of the degrees during his term of office, I stated that the 
work I wished to see exemplified was the opening and closing 
of the Lodges in the three degrees, and the asking and an- 
swering of the customary examination questions in each de- 
gree by the brethren present. This programme was adhered 
to at every meeting I attended in the district, except where 
the Lodge visited had some special work to do that could not 
be conveniently avoided at the time. I have visited each of 
the sixteen Lodges in the district, and am happy to be able to 
say," that peace and harmony prevail in them all. The officers 
and brethren on every occasion received me with the greatest 
courtesy and kindness, and contributed liberally towards the 
payment of my travelling expenses. For such generous 
treatment I now desire to express my gratitude, and only hope 
my official acts have been approved by all concerned. 

The work of the officers in the majority of the Lodges was 
well done, especially by the W. Masters and Wardens ; but, in 
a few cases, it might be greatly improved by a little earnest 
study. The books, without exception, are in excellent order. 
Secretaries, however, in many instances, neglected to send me 
notices of meetings about to be held, Bro. Alf. Kaufman, 
Secretary of Wilmot Lodge, Baden, being the only one in the 
district who has never failed in the performance of this 
important duty, and a few have failed to forward me a list of 
the names of their new officers. 

The attendance, on the whole, is far from what it should be. 
Almost one-third of the number of members in the district 
never attend their Lodge, and nearly one-fourth of the number 
are twelve months in arrears with their dues. This is a state 
of things to be regretted very much, and should be attended 
to by those concerned, as soon as possible. To improve the 
attendance, I advised the officers, when visiting the different 
Lodges, to make their meetings as interesting as possible by 
posting all the members thoroughly, and then by asking those 
brethren not in office to assist in the ceremonies whenever an 
opportunity presented itself, thus giving them a greater interest 
in the whole work. I would also suggest that all members 
who have not paid dues for twelve months, be dealt with 
according to the rules of the Constitution and By-laws. 

I visited, outside of the district, three of the Lodges in the 
city of Detroit, Michigan ; two in the city of Springfield, Ohio ; 
and Cedar Lodge, No. 396, Wiarton. In all of these Lodges 



80 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

the Brethren treated me with kindness and respect, and I 
would be most ungrateful if I did not express my appreciation 
of those favors. I have also to congratulate the Officers of 
the American Lodges visited, without an exception, on the 
excellence of their work. 

About the beginning of the month of March I received a 
communication from R. W. Bro. J. R. Robertson, Deputy 
Grand Master, intimating that he would be pleased to visit one 
or two central places in our district at an early date, if I thought 
it would be acceptable, for the purpose of delivering an address 
on the subject of "The Craft History of Canada for a Century 
Past," and spending an hour or two with the Brethren of the 
west. I replied that his proposition would, in my opinion, be 
favorably accepted by every Lodge in the jurisdiction, and 
gave him all the encouragement I could. He selected Stratford 
and Goderich as the most suitable places, and delivered his 
celebrated lecture in each, to appreciative audiences. I assure 
you he will receive a hearty welcome from one and all should 
he again visit our district. I only regret that business from 
home prevented me meeting our R. W. Brother at either 
place, but hope to have another opportunity of seeing and 
hearing him. 

I examined and approved of a new and revised edition of 
the By-laws of Britannia Lodge, No. 170, and obtained their 
confirmation by the M. W. the Grand Master. 

When making my visits I was accompanied on several 
occasions by Stratford and Seaforth Brethren, whose names I 
shall mention hereafter. This is evidence that we have a few 
energetic zealous Masons in these places. 

I have granted the - following despensations : To New 
Dominion Lodge, No. 205, Hamburg, for the purpose of 
attending divine service, clothed as Masons, on the 8th Oct., 
1888 ; to Stratford Lodge, No. 332, Stratford, to attend divine 
service, clothed as Masons, on the 30th day of June, 1889; 
and to Zurich Lodge, No. 224, Hensall, for the purpose of 
attending the funeral of our late Brother E. Buswell. 

Death has removed from our midst eight of our Brethren, 
but the name of one only has been reported to me, viz : Bro. 
E. Buswell, of Zurich Lodge, No. 224, Hensall. 

The following is a brief account of official visits, with dates 
and comments : — 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 8 1 

Maitland Lodge No. 33, Goderich : Visited this Lodge at 
a regular meeting on October 9th, 1888. This was my first 
official visit. The hall and other rooms are not the largest in 
the district, but are very comfortable and well furnished. The 
attendance was good, but the work of the Officers was not as 
well done as I expected it would be in a place like Goderich. 

Blyth Lodge No. 303, Blyth : Accompanied by Bros. W. J. 
Fear, J. Rose and G. Paterson, of Britannia Lodge, Seaforth, 
I visited this Lodge on 12th of October at an emergent 
meeting. On account of sickness in their families the Master 
and Past Masters were absent. No Officers were present but 
the S. W., J. D. and Tyler. Under these circumstances I opened 
and closed the Lodge and conferred the second and third 
degrees on candidates who were waiting. The Lodge room is 
not very large, but comfortable. The work of Officers present 
fair. The attendance was not large. 

Lebanon Forest Lodge No. 133, Exeter: I visited this 
Lodge at a regular meeting on the 15th October, accompan- 
ied by Bro. Fear, of Britannia Lodge. The lodge rooms 
are large, comfortable, and beautifully furnished. The Secre- 
tary, Treasurer and J. D. were all the Officers present, but 
several P. M.'s being with us we were able to proceed with the 
work. W. Bro. M. Eacrett, P. M., took the chair ; the work 
was done well, but attendance small. I was informed that the 
W. M. was thoroughly posted. At this meeting we were favor- 
ed by a visit from R. W. Bro. R. B. Hungerford. P. D. U. G. M., 
from whom we obtained much useful information, for which 
I feel grateful. 

Tudor Lodge, No. 141, Mitchell : In company with 
Brothers Fear, Town and Paterson, of Seaforth, I visited this 
Lodge, on the 1 6th of October, at a regular meeting ; R. W. 
Bro. McLellan, P. D. D. G. M., favoring us with his presence. 
The Lodge room is not large, but convenient and comfortable. 
The attendance was very small, and the work was well done, 
particularly by the Wardens, both of whom rendered their 
respective parts without a single mistake. 

Morning Star Lodge, No. 309, Smith's Hill : This Lodge 
I visited on the 17th October, at an emergent meeting. The 
room is small, comfortable, and the property of the Lodge. 
The attendance was large for a country place. Officers' work, 
fair. This Lodge is coming fast to the front among the Lodges 
in the district, if we consider the disadvantage to its members 
of being situated in the country. 



82 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

Zurich Lodge, No. 224, Hensall : Accompanied by Bro. 
H. Town, of Britannia Lodge, I visited this Lodge Oct. 18th. 
The Lodge room is not large, but comfortable; the attend- 
ance was very small, and few of the Officers were present'; 
the work was only middling. Since I paid this visit I have 
learned that some good material has been brought in, which 
will tend to increase the interest of the members and brighten 
the prospects of the Lodge. 

New Dominion Lodge, No. 205, Hamburg : I visited this 
Lodge October 22nd, at a regular meeting, accompanied by 
R. W. Bro. McLellan, P. D. D. G. M., of this district, Bro. A. 
Hirst, and others from the Stratford Lodges. The Lodge 
room is neatly furnished, very comfortable and a good size. 
The attendance was large and the work very fair, considering 
that the Officers were all new, having been installed in June. 

St. James' Lodge, No. 73, St. Marys : On the 23rd of Oct. 
I visited this Lodge at an emergent meeting. The Lodge 
room is suitable, of medium size, and well furnished. The 
attendance was not large, but the work was well done. This 
Lodge, at the time of my visit, was in rather embarrassed 
circumstances ; but since then has recuperated, and is now in 
a healthy condition. 

Tecumseh Lodge, No. 144, Stratford : This Lodge I visited 
on the 24th of October, at an emergent meeting. The rooms 
are large, suitable and furnished in the best style. There was 
a large number of Brethren present, and the work of the 
Officers was very accurate. 

Clinton Lodge, No. 84, Clinton : I visited this Lodge at an 
emergent meeting on the 26th of October, accompanied by 
five Brethren from Seaforth. I am sorry to say this Lodge 
was very unfortunate last year. On the 25th January, the 
Secretary, W. Bro. W. F. Murray, died, and the W. Master, 
Bro. J. Scott, moved to Manitoba in the spring. This left the 
Lodge with neither a Master nor Secretary. The hall is small, 
but comfortable and fairly well furnished. The attendance 
was very small. W. Bro. D. McG. Malloch, P. M., acted as 
Master, and the work was well done. 

Wilmot Lodge, No. 318, Baden : Accompanied by Bro. W. J. 
Fear of Seaforth, I visited this Lodge on the 16th day of 
December, at an emergent meeting. The hall is new, comfort- 
able and tasty, and I believe it is owned by the Lodge. The 
attendance was very small on account of W, Bro. W. Erbach, 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 83 

jr., the present Master, being very ill with typhoid fever; 
many were kept from attending also by the wet night, as it 
rained constantly. W. Bro. W. Erbach, sr., took the chair, 
and opened and closed the Lodge in the first degree, nothing 
further was done. I am pleased to be able to inform you that 
the W. M. recovered in a short time, and is now enjoying good 
health. 

Doric Lodge, No. 233, Parkhill : This Lodge I visited at 
an emergent meeting, on the 8th of January, and with the 
assistance of the P. Masters of the Lodge and W. Bro. J. H. 
McKay, of Craig Lodge, I installed the new Officers. The 
Hall is convenient, comfortable and furnished neatly ; the 
attendance was large ; the second degree was conferred by the 
retiring Master, and the work was done fairly well. 

Craig Lodge, No. 214, Ailsa Craig: I visited this Lodge, 
at a regular meeting, on April 15th. The Lodge room is very 
small, but answers the purpose very well. The attendance 
was large, and the work of opening and closing in the three 
degrees was not bad, considering that they have had no 
candidates for nearly five years. As my predecessor, R. W. 
Bro. McLellan, gave such an unfavorable report of this Lodge 
last year, I determined to get all the information I could con- 
cerning it. I, consequently, spent the forenoon of the 16th 
among the leading Brethren in the village, and in examining 
the books, which were in excellent order, with the exception 
that only a very few meetings were recorded. I asked the 
Secretary, W. Bro. McKay and W. Bro. Smith, P. M., why so 
few meetings had been held, and they replied : " that they had 
no work to do ; that they were not likely to have any for a 
time ; that many of the Brethren lived a long distance from 
the Lodge ; and that, consequently, it was very difficult to get 
a sufficient number together to form a quorum." I then 
advised them to meet as often as possible, and to do the very 
best they could, under the circumstances, until some one sent 
in an application, then these difficulties would disappear. The 
members are all hopeful, and I think if a little time is allowed, 
and a little encouragement given to them, the Lodge will 
revive. Although the report shows that Craig Lodge has 
contributed nothing towards relieving the distressed, the 
individual members have given several hundred dollars, during 
the last few years, to support an aged and infirm brother and 
his wife who live in the village, and they are still supplying 
them with all they need ; thus exemplifying the grand principles 
of Masonry. 



84 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

Irving Lodge No. 154, Lucan : I paid my visit to this 
Lodge on the 16th April at an emergent meeting. The hall is 
not very large, but neat and comfortable. The attendance 
was large and the members enthusiastic. The work was done 
fairly well by all the Officers. 

Stratford Lodge No. 332, Stratford : This Lodge I visited 
on the 17th April, at an emergent meeting The room same 
as that used by Tecumseh Lodge. The attendance was large 
but the work might have been better, excepting that of the 
J. W., which was absolutely perfect. 

Britannia Lodge No. 170, Seaforth : Being a member of 
this Lodge I attended several meetings, but visited it officially 
at an emergent meeting on the 19th April. The hall, I think, 
is as large as any in the district, very convenient and comfort- 
able and furnished fairly well. The attendance was not large. 
The work of all was well done. This is the only Lodge in 
the district that has no members twelve months in arrears with 
dues. 

In conclusion I wish to return sincere thanks to the Most 
Worshipful the Grand Master, the Grand Secretary, and P. D. 
D. G. M. McLellan, for valuable advice and information re- 
ceived from each of them. I am also grateful to Bros. Hirst 
of Stratford ; McKay, of Ailsa Craig, and Fox, of Lucan, for 
their kindness and hospitality when visiting the Lodges to 
which they belong ; and I finally acknowledge the favor 
shown me by those Brethren wbo accompanied me on so many 
visits. 

All of which is fraternally submittted. 

W. G. Duff, 

D. D. G. M. South Htiron District No. 4. 
Seaforth, July 2nd, 1889. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 85 



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86 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 



WILSON DISTRICT No. 6. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master and the Grand 
Lodge A, F. 6° A. M. of Canada, in the Province of 
Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren : — In submitting 
my report of the condition of Masonry in Wilson District I do 
so with deep regret that I have not been able to discharge the 
duties of the office as well as I would desire, but in making 
what visits I could I selected the smaller places, where it is 
hard work for the officers to keep the Lodges alive, and I have 
great pleasure in stating that in the Lodges where it was diffi- 
cult to get a quorum that the working was very good and the 
ritual faithfully adhered to. Most of the Lodges are in good 
financial condition, and a great many new members have been 
admitted during the year ; but I must draw the attention of 
Grand Lodge towards two Lodges which are, to all intents and 
purposes, defunct : — Ridout, of Otterville, and Langton, of 
Langton. R. W. Bro. Hegler, the P. D. D. G. M., in his report 
of last year brought up the subject of Ridout. I may state that 
it has held no meetings nor made any returns to the Grand 
Lodge for years, and it has amongst its members a number 
of Brethren who would be very pleased to have the Warrant 
withdrawn to allow them to affiliate with another Lodge. 
With regard to Langton Lodge I may state, that at the request 
of some of the Brethren I laid the foundation stone of the 
new Baptist Church in that place with Masonic ceremonies, 
but the Lodge has not had any regular meetings nor made any 
returns to Grand Lodge for a long time. In fact there has 
been no regular meeting since I installed the Officers three 
years ago. The younger members have never received their 
Grand Lodge certificates and the Officers and prominent mem- 
bers are badly in arrears. 

I would respectfully ask that the Grand Lodge give careful 
consideration to these statements, and I am very sure they will 
come to the conclusion that the Warrant ought to be with- 
drawn and the Brethren given an opportunity of joining other 
Lodges. 

I have as far as possible installed the Officers of the various 
Lodges. I was not able to arrange for a Lodge of Instruction 
during my term of office, but hope that my successor will meet 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 87 

with greater success. All Lodges seem to dread holding one, 
as it is an expensive luxury. 

I granted one dispensation for Brethren to wear regalia at 
divine service. 

All of which is fraternally submitted. 

W. McDonald, 
D. D. G. M. Wilson District No. 6. 



WELLINGTON DISTRICT, No. 7. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge of Canada, in the Province 
of Ontario T 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren : — I have the 
honor to present the following report on the condition of 
Masonry in the Seventh Masonic District during my term of 
office as D. D. G. M., for 1888-9. 

Having been honored by Grand Lodge with the responsible 
position of District Deputy Grand Master of this district, I 
entered upon the duties of that honorable position with a 
determination to do my duty to the Craft in the district. In 
accordance with my duties I made one visit to each of the 
twenty-one Lodges in the district, and some of them I visited 
the second time. In almost every case the rooms are suitable 
and neatly furnished. The Secretaries' and Treasurers' books 
are well kept. 

New Hope Lodge, No. 279, Hespeler : My first official 
visit was to this Lodge on the 17th day of September, 1888. 
Brethren present, 29. The first and second degrees were 
conferred on candidates in a most satisfactory manner by the 
W. M. and Officers. The Brethren of this Lodge are en- 
thusiastic Masons. With such Brethren as R. W. Bro. Jardine, 
W. Bros. Bruster and Pabst, New Hope Lodge has a bright 
future. I see by the notices sent to me that they generally 
have plenty of work. 

Scott Lodge, No. 421, Grand Valley : I visited this Lodge 
on the 17th day of October. Members present, 12. The 
second degree was conferred on a candidate ; the work was 
fairly well done (it being a new Lodge there is room for 



88 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

improvement). The Master and Officers are enthusiastic 
Masons ; the W. M. is well up in his work, and there is a 
bright future for Scott Lodge. 

My second visit to Scott Lodge was on February 13th, 1889. 
The first and third degrees were conferred on candidates in a 
most satisfactory manner. As there were two candidates for 
the third degree, I had the pleasure of assisting the W. M. 
I was pleased to notice an improvement in the work of the 
Officers. 

Blair Lodge, No. 314, Palmerston : I visited this Lodge 
on the 26th day of October, 1888. Brethren present, 18. 
The third degree was conferred on a candidate in a creditable 
manner by the W. M., but the other Officers are not so well 
up in the work. Their Lodge room is very neat and comfort- 
ably furnished. I hope that the officers of this Lodge will 
make an effort to get up the work in a first-clftss manner. 

Grand River Lodge, No. 151, Berlin : I visited this Lodge 
on the 13th day of November. Brethren present, 19. The 
first degree was exemplified by the Master and Officers, who 
are well up in their work. The Lodge was opened and closed 
in the second and third degrees. The Junior Warden gave 
the lecture on the first degree in a very creditable manner. 
The W. M. and Officers of Grand River Lodge are well 
skilled. 

Wellington Lodge, No. 271, Erin: Visited this Lodge on 
the 1 2th December, t888. Members present, 29. The work 
for the evening was in the third degree, which was well done 
by the W. M. and regular Officers. I had the pleasure of 
meeting Dr. Freeman, D. D. G. M., of the Eighth Masonic 
District. 

Ayr Lodge No. 172, Ayr : Visited this Lodge on the 17th 
December, 1888. Brethren present 7 : they had no work to 
present to me. The Lodge was opened in the several degrees. 
The Master and Wardens are scarcely able to open in the 
degrees. Ayr Lodge is in a bad shape at present. That love 
and harmony which should at all times characterize Freema- 
sons does not exist among the Brethren. I hope for the best. 
It will take some time to put matters right. The meetings are 
irregular, and they have had no work for two years or more, 
which accounts in some measure for their being in a bad 
working order. 

Prince Arthur Lodge, No. 334, Arthur : Visited this Lodge 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 89 

on the 15th of January, 1889. Brethren present, 10. They 
had no work on hand. The Lodge was opened in the several 
degrees, the W. M. and Officers doing their part of the work 
in a first-class manner. The great drawback which they labor 
under is the removal of a number of the Brethren from the 
town, but they are looking forward to better times. The hall 
is very neat and comfortably furnished. 

Alma Lodge, No. 72, Gait : Visited this Lodge on the 17th 
of January, 1889. Brethren present, 22. The third degree 
was conferred on a candidate in a very creditable manner by 
the W. M. and Officers of the Lodge, except the Junior 
Warden, who was not present. 

Conestogo Lodge, No. 295, Drayton : Visited this Lodge 
on the 22nd of January, 1889. Brethren present, 18. The 
first degree was conferred on a candidate in a very creditable 
manner by the W. M. and Officers of the Lodge. It being the 
first initiation for the W. M., he did his work in a first-class 
manner, and deserves credit for the great interest he has taken 
therein. 

Clifford Lodge, No. 315, Clifford: Visited this Lodge on 
the nth of February, 1889. Brethren present, 8. W. M. is 
able to open and close in the three degrees. Having no work 
for some time they are careless, and seem to me to take no 
interest in it. Their meetings are irregular, as I have only 
received a few notices during the year. 

Durham Lodge, No. 306, Durham : Visited this Lodge on 
the 1 2th of February, 1889. 19 Brethren and several visiting 
Brethren present. W. M. and Officers in their respective 
chairs. Having no work to present to me, the Lodge was 
opened and closed in the several degrees, which was done in 
a very creditable manner. The W. M. and Officers are well 
up in the work. I am satisfied that had they work on hand it 
would have been well done, as the Officers keep themselves 
well posted. 

St. Alban's Lodge, No. 200, Mount Forest : Visited this 
Lodge on the 15th of February. Only nine Brethren present. 
No work was done except opening and closing in the three 
degrees, the work being fairly done. I expected to see a good 
working Lodge, but was somewhat disappointed ; Masonry is 
not prospering there. From what I could learn while on my 
visit, there seems to be a lack of energy on the part of the 
Brethren. 



QO GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

Harriston Lodge, No. 262, Harriston: Visited this Lodge 
on the 1 8th of February, 1889. Brethren present, 21. There 
was no work on hand; the Lodge was opened and closed in 
the three degrees by the W. M. in a correct manner ; the other 
Officers are well posted. Their hall is new and neatly 
furnished. 

Gait Lodge, No. 257, Gait: Visited this Lodge on the 5th 
of March, 1889. Brethren present, 17. I witnessed the 
conferring of the second degree, and found that the W. M. 
and Wardens were well posted and skilled workmen ; the 
other Officers are not quite so well up in the work. 

Harris Lodge, No. 216, Orangeville : Visited this Lodge 
March 12th, 1889. Brethren present, 29. The work on hand 
was conferring the second and third degrees, which was done 
by the W. M. and Officers in a first-class manner, especially 
the third degree. Harris Lodge is, in every respect, a good 
working Lodge ; the Brethren are enthusiastic Masons and 
take that interest in Masonry which will make their Lodge a 
success. 

Preston Lodge, No. 297, Preston : Visited this Lodge 
March 15th, 1889. Brethren present, 10. Having no work 
on hand, the Lodge was opened in the three degrees, which 
was well done. The W. M. is well skilled ; the other Officers 
well up in the work. They have a neat Lodge room with 
everything in first-class working order. 

Irvine Lodge, No. 203, Elora : Visited this Lodge April 
1 2th, 1889. A large number of the Brethren present. Having 
no work on hand, the Lodge was opened and closed in the 
three degrees, which was very well done. The W. M. and 
Officers are well up in the work. From former visits to Irvine 
Lodge, I am satisfied that it is one of the best working Lodges 
in the district. 

Mercer Lodge, No. 347, Fergus : Visited this Lodge April 
18th, 1889. Brethren present, 32. Having no work on hand, 
the Lodge was opened and closed in the several degrees, 
which was done in a creditable manner by the W. M. and 
Officers. This Lodge contains many talented members and is 
in first-class order. 

Waverley Lodge, No. 361, Guelph : Visited this Lodge on 
April 22nd, 1889. Brethren present, 53. The work on hand 
was the first and second degrees, which was well done by the 
W. M. and Officers. The Officers of Waverley Lodge are 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 9 1 

well up in the work. The musical service by the Brethren 
was well rendered, and had a good effect on the candidates. 
Waverley Lodge is in every respect a first-class working Lodge 
and a credit to the Craft. 

Speed Lodge, No. 180, Guelph : Visited this Lodge May 
7th, 1889. Only a few of the Brethren present. They had no 
work that evening. From my personal acquaintance with 
Speed Lodge, I know it to be a first-class working Lodge. 
The W. M. and Officers are well posted. 

Guelph Lodge, No. 258, Guelph : Visited this Lodge 
May 14th, 1889. Not many of the Brethren present. The 
work presented was the second and third degrees, and reflected 
credit on the W. M. and Officers of the Lodge. 

DISPENSATIONS. 

I have issued the following Dispensations for the year : — 

Grand River Lodge, No. 151, Berlin, to appear in public, 
clothed as Masons, for the purpose of attending divine service 
on December 30th, 1888, A. L. 5888, and to attend an "At 
Home" on February 22nd, 1889, A. L. 5889. 

New Hope Lodge, No. 279, Hespeler, to attend an "At 
Home" on April 25th, 1889, A. L. 5889. 

Waverley Lodge, No. 361, Guelph, to attend an "At Home" 
on May 21st, 1889, A. L. 5889. 

Conestogo Lodge, No. 295, Drayton, to appear in public, 
clothed as Masons, for the purpose of attending divine service 
on Sunday July 7th, 1889. 

I had the pleasure of acting for the Most Worshipful the 
Grand Master in consecrating and dedicating the new Masonic 
Hall of Grand River Lodge, No. 151, Berlin. After the 
ceremony was over a very pleasant evening was spent by the 
Brethren and their friends. 

DEATHS. 

Death has removed from among us in this district : — W. Bro. 
Barbour, Alma Lodge No. 72, Gait, Oct. 30th, 1888; Bro. 
Wm. Spiers, Mercer Lodge No. 347, Fergus, Sept. 21st, 1888; 
Bro. Wm. Matthews, Guelph Lodge No. 258, Guelph, June 
23rd, 1889. 

In conclusion, I thank the Most Worshipful the Grand 
Master for his kind advice when required ; the Grand Secre- 



Q2 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

tary for his promptness in answering all my communications, 
and the Brethren of Guelph Lodge who accompanied me on 
my official visits to various Lodges in the district, and also 
R. W. Bro. Scoon,' of Speed Lodgo No. 180, for his assistance 
when required ; and lastly to the Officers and Brethren through- 
out the district for the kind reception given me on my official 
visits, and for their assistance in defraying my expenses. I 
have endeavored to the best of my ability to fulfil 
the high trust entrusted to my charge at the last Grand Lodge 
meeting, and, in resigning at the end of my year, I hope my 
visits to the Lodges may have been of some advantage to the 
Craft. 

All of which is fraternally submitted. 

Richard Mahoney. 

D. D. G. M. Wellington District No. 7. 
Gueli'h, June 29th, 1889. 



HAMILTON DISTRICT No. 8. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Brethrefi of the Grand Lodge of Canada, in the Province 
of Ontario: 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren : — I have the 
honor to submit the following report on the condition of 
Masonry in the Hamilton (Eighth) Masonic District. 

When elected to the honorable office of D. D. G. M. at the 
session of the Grand Lodge held at Toronto, I entered upon 
the duties with the intention of discharging the same in a 
manner that would tend to the general welfare of Masonry 
throughout the Hamilton District, and I am pleased to say 
that the year has been one of great pleasure to myself and I 
hope of service to the Lodges and Brethren whom I have vis- 
ited. 

The condition of Masonry throughout the district is most 
satisfactory ; all are working well and perfect harmony with 
the best of good feeling prevails. One of the Lodges, through 
its situation and membership, has not been as successful as I 
could wish, but I have strong hopes that 'ere long a new era of 
prosperity will dawn upon Dufferin, West Flamboro'. 

Every Lodge in the Eighth District has been visited, and 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 93 

the books and general affairs closely examined. The books 
were found, as a rule, very well and neatly kept, and the 
arrears of dues are, in my opinion, less than they have been 
for some time. 

I have endeavoured at each meeting to exemplify por- 
tions of the work and give all the instruction that the time at 
my disposal would allow, and I would recommend to the 
Worshipful Masters and Brethren the establishment of a more 
thorough and correct examination of visitors by the examining 
committees, and the placing by Masters of Master Masons 
with Past Masters on these Committees, so that the rank and 
file may be enabled to see and hear these examinations, and 
thus become, generally speaking, better acquainted with the 
mode and way to conduct a careful testing. Especially do I 
think that a more general knowledge of the Tyler's Oath is 
necessary, as I found many, otherwise well posted Brethren, 
who could not readily administer this, while others could not 
do it with anything approaching correctness, and I am sure it 
is only necessary to draw the attention of the Brethren in the 
district to this fact to cause the desirable change. 

The work, as illustrated by the Officers throughout the 
Lodges, has been of a high character, and shows that we have 
earnest, thoughtful men in charge, who are anxious to do all 
they can to attain the high standard of proficiency which is 
necessary to be deemed a successful officer in the Hamilton 
District. 

During my visits care has been taken to ascertain if the 
Lodges are doing their duty in the matter of benevolence, and 
I find that while some are not doing much — for the reason 
assigned of no claims — a large number are doing their duty 
nobly and distributing freely of the funds at their disposal. I 
would mention especially the work done by the Lodges in the 
city of Hamilton, where money and support is given system- 
atically and regularly to deserving ones, and use is made of 
the warning circulars issued by the General Board of Relief 
of the United States and Canada, to guard against impostors. 

I have not deemed it necessary to give a detailed statement 
of the affairs of each Lodge ; because, on the whole, they are 
very satisfactory; and my visits have been received in the 
most cordial and brotherly spirit, while the advice and warning 
given to Masters has been received in the same kind spirit 
with which it was given. 

During my term of office several worthy and prominent 



94 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

Brethren have been summoned to the Grand Lodge above. 
I will only mention R. W. Bro. David Curtis, of Brant Lodge, 
Brantford, a brother whose long and earnest work for the 
Craft, coupled with a kindly and loving manner, had won for 
himself a place in the hearts of the Brethren not easily to be 
filled by another; and V. W. Bro. H. Bickford, Mayor of 
Dundas, whose departure, in the prime of a useful and vigorous 
manhood, was a severe blow to the town of which he was the 
presiding officer, but more particularly an almost irreparable 
loss to Valley Lodge, No. ioo, of which he was a pillar and a 
personal friend to almost every member. In the history of 
the Lodge no brother was more generally beloved, and his loss 
will be most deeply deplored by all who had the pleasure of 
knowing him. 

The By-laws of the following Lodges have been revised and 
received the sanction of the Most Worshipful the Grand 
Master : — Barton, Strict Observance, Acacia, Credit and 
Harmony. 

During the year dispensations have been granted to the 
Lodges in Hamilton, Waterdown and Burlington, to appear in 
public with regalia. 

I had the pleasure at Brant Lodge, Brantford, of the 
company of R. W. Bro. Richard Mahoney, of Guelph, on the 
occasion of my official visit to that Lodge. 

During the year, Most Worshipful Sir, we had the honor of 
a visit from you at the city of Hamilton, when the immense 
gathering which received you testified to your popularity, and 
the loyal enthusiasm which was manifested, must have struck 
you as exhibiting the eminently Masonic feeling which pervades 
our district. To the Hamilton Lodges belong the credit of 
entertaining you, Most Worshipful Sir, and the splendid man- 
ner in which it was done, with the hearty and happy character 
of the banquet, must have sustained their reputation with you 
of doing all things well. 

I am happy to report that in all my visits I have been 
received with uniform courtesy and respect, and have much 
pleasure in recording my appreciation of the fact ; and the 
Brethren from Hamilton deserve my heartiest thanks for their 
constant attendance and help ; I cannot mention all, but R. W. 
Bros. Geo. Russell and Gavin Stewart, W. Bros. Treble, 
Wanzer, Lester and Geo. Mason are among them, but more 
especially to W. Bro. John Hoodless, District Secretary, are 
my warmest thanks due. He has most materially assisted me 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 95 

in my work by the zealous and energetic manner he has 
performed his duties, and he has my most sincere thanks and 
well wishes. 

In conclusion, taking the year, it has shown decided advance 
in Masonry, and I sincerely trust any efforts of mine have been 
in the right direction, as I have endeavored to perform my 
duties faithfully and honestly, and I trust they may commend 
themselves to you, Most Worshipful Sir, Officers and Members 
of Grand Lodge. 

All of which is fraternally submitted, 

Wm. Freeman, M. D., 
D. D. G. M. Hamilton District No. 8. 
Georgetown, June 29th, 1889. 



GEORGIAN DISTRICT, No 9. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge of Canada, in the Province 
of Ontario: 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren: — I have the honor 
to submit my report as to the condition of Masony in the 
Georgian (Ninth) Masonic District for the past year. 

My first official act was the appointment of W. Bro. D. F. 
Macwatt, W. M., of Corinthian Lodge, No. 96, as District 
Secretary, to whom I am greatly indebted for his diligence 
and active exertions to make my year a success. 

I do not propose to follow this year the custom observed 
during the last few years by many D. D. G. Masters in giving 
full details of each Lodge, as nearly all the information I could 
give would merely be a repetition of what appears in the report 
of the Grand Secretary. 

I desire, however, to mention particularly the Lodges that 
have shown a marked improvement over former years. 

There are twenty-three Lodges in this district, of which I 
have visited sixteen, and in every case I have been received in 
the most hearty and welcome manner. From my own observa- 
tion and from communications received, I feel it my duty to 
report that Masonry in this District, with a few exceptions, is 



96 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

in a very satisfactory condition. All my official visits, with 
one exception, have been made at regular meetings, and in 
every case the W. M. had timely notice thereof. I had the 
pleasure of attending the "At Home" given by Manito Lodge, 
No. 90, on the occasion of the presentation from the Grand 
Lodge to M. W. Bro. H. Robertson, P. G. M., a full report of 
which will no doubt be made by the Committee appointed by 
the Grand Lodge. 

I am very pleased to be able to report the decided advance 
made by Unity Lodge, No. 376, Huntsville. At the time of 
my official visit, the second and third degrees were exemplified 
by the W. M., assisted by W. Bro. Sacret, P. M., in a most 
able manner, and equal to any work in the district. The floor 
work was also ably done. I also wish to mention Northern Light 
Lodge, No. 266, Stayner. This Lodge has been in a dormant 
condition for a few years, but now I am pleased to say it is in 
quite a flourishing state, and much credit is due to the W. M., 
Bro. W. B. Sanders and his efficient corps of officers for this 
satisfactory state of affairs. The change from Bondhead to 
Cookstown of Manitoba Lodge, No. 236, has also been 
decidedly beneficial, as the work is now not only exemplified, 
but the membership is steadily increasing. The amalgamation 
of Orillia Lodge, No. 192 and Thorne Lodge, No. 281, 
Orillia, has also been decidedly advantageous to the Craft. 
I, unfortunately, was unable to visit this Lodge, but from all 
reports and from a perusal of the circulars, the membership 
is increasing and the work is well done. 

I do not wish the other Lodges in the district to think 1 
have singled out the above Lodges as the only ones doing 
well. All those I have visited are doing good work, with one 
exception mentioned below. 

I have with regret to report that Seven Star Lodge, No. 
285, Alliston, is in anything but a satisfactory condition. 
Meetings are frequently omitted. On account of some civic 
meeting my official visit was a failure, as no quorum could be 
had. 

I fully concur, from what I heard and observed when in 
Alliston, with what my predecessor said in his report last year, 
that " internal dissensions seem to have got hold of this 
Lodge." 

I would urge on my successor the necessity of promptly 
visiting this Lodge, and if the dissensions still continue it may 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 97 

be necessary, in the interests of the Craft, to recommend the 
withdrawal of the Warrant. 

In the majority of cases I found the Lodge books well 
and satisfactorily kept, and in the few cases where they were 
defective I had such rectified. In two instances I found that 
no register of members was kept. 

I have made up a full report of the condition of the 16 
Lodges visited by me, but do not consider it necessary to cum- 
ber this report with the details, as I was unable to visit all the 
Lodges in the district. 

I have granted the following Dispensations during the year : 

Manito Lodge, No. 90, Collingwood, "At Home" on the occa- 
sion of the Grand Lodge presentation to M. W. Bro. H. Rob- 
ertson, P. G. M., February 6th ; Muskoka, No. 360, Brace- 
bridge, to appear in regalia at the Masonic lecture on the 
"History and Mystery of Freemasonry," by Rev. Bro. 
Howson, March 19th; Golden Rule, No. 409, Gravenhurst, 
for the same purpose on May 28th ; Northern Light, 266, 
Stayner, to attend divine service on the 23rd June; Manito 
Lodge, No. 90, Collingwood, for same purpose on 23rd June. 

The deaths in this district during the year were ; — Bro. R. 
H. Cozens, of Orillia Lodge, No. 192, Orillia ; Bro. Henry 
Grose, of Kerr Lodge, No. 230, Barrie ; Bro. Robert Morris, 
of Pythagoras, No. 137, Meaford; Bro. Jos. McGee, of Manito, 
No. 90, Collingwood ; Bro. Rowe, of Seven Star Lodge, No. 
285, Alliston, and Bro. Richard Swain, of Muskoka Lodge, 
No. 360, Bracebridge. 

In November the Craft in Barrie had the pleasure of listen- 
ing to a very able lecture on Masonry by R. W. Bro. J. Ross 
Robertson, D. G. M., which was of great instruction to all who 
heard it. 

In conclusion, I have to thank you, M. W. Sir, and your 
Grand Secretary, for your kindness and advice to me during 
my year of office, and I trust that my efforts will commend 
themselves to the Officers and Members of Grand Lodge. 

I have also to thank the members of the Craft in this dis- 
trict for many acts of kindness and courtesy, and I especially 
desire to thank M. W. Bro. Daniel Spry, P. G. M., for his 
able advice and counsel so kindly given on many occasions. 

A.11 of which is fraternally submitted. 

Geo. Monkman, 

D. D. G. M. Georgian District No. g. 
Barrie, 3rd July, 1889. 



98 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

NIAGARA DISTRICT, No. 10. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge of Canada, in the Province 
of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren : — In accordance 
with the requirements of the Constitution, I have the honor 
to submit this my second report on the condition of Masonry 
in the Tenth Masonic District. 

There are in this district twenty-two Lodges, of which 
twenty-one are in good working order. Welland Lodge of 
Fonthill has been for some time dormant, which is due to the 
fact that the Lodge room, together with the furniture and the 
books, were destroyed by fire, and the Brethren did not 
possess sufficient ambition to revive the Lodge. I tried 
several times to have a meeting of the Brethren held, but 
without success. I am informed, however, by the Secretary 
that a meeting was held in June last, and it is the intention of 
the Brethren to get into working order and to have interest in 
Masonry again revived in this part of the district. I have 
visited eighteen lodges out of the twenty-one, and I find that 
in the majority of cases the prospects of Masonry are very 
good. No questions of importance have been presented to 
me for adjudication this year, which shows that harmony 
exists in the district. The Lodges are noted for correctness 
in their work. I regret, however, to say that the attendance 
of Members at the Lodge meetings is not what it should be. 
In my visits to the Lodges I have been received in the most 
cordial manner, the Officers of each Lodge doing everything in 
their power to make my visits as pleasant and agreeable as 
possible. 

I have issued three Dispensations to attend divine service in 
Masonic clothing, viz : One at Niagara Falls, one at 
Hagersville and one at St. Catharines ; in each case the 
gathering of the Brethren was such as to reflect credit on the 
Craft. I regret that we have not had the pleasure of a visit 
from the Most Worshipful the Grand Master in this large and 
important district, and trust that he will find it convenient to 
visit us at an early date. We are greatly indebted to the 
R. W. Bro. J. Ross Robertson, for the very able and instructive 
lecture which he gave in many parts of the district ; his visits 
will be remembered with profit and pleasure by the Brethren 
of the District. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 99 

We have to regret the death of W. Bro. Rodgers, of 
Beamsville. His funeral was attended not only by Masons 
but by the greater part of the residents of the village in which 
he lived ; he was in his lifetime greatly respected, not only as 
a citizen but as a brother. 

In conclusion I wish to thank the Officers and the Brethren 
in the several Lodges of the Niagara District for the many 
acts of kindness they have shown me during my official 
career. 

Fraternally submitted, 

Charles G. McDermott, 
D. D. G. M. Niagara District, No. 10. 



TORONTO DISTRICT, No. n. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge of Ca?iada, in the Province 
of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren : — I beg to present 
the followimg report on the condition of Masonry in the above 
mentioned district, which is one of the largest under the 
jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Canada. 

On assuming the duties of my office, I appointed V. W. 
Bro. Borngasser as my District Secretary, whose valuable 
assistance has materially lightened my labors, and to whom I 
desire to express my warmest thanks. 

I have visited each Lodge in the district once — Georgina, 
at the request of the W. M. and Officers, a second time — and 
I have no hesitation in saying that the condition of Masonry 
in this District is a favorable one ; the growth of the Order is 
healthy and progressive ; tranquility and harmony appear to 
prevail within the several Lodges, and I am pleased to be able to 
state that I found a marked improvement in the character of 
the " work " over that recorded in the reports of previous 
years, there being now no longer any difficulty in having a 
general uniformity of the working of the several Lodges, a 
desire long felt on the part of the Craft in general. 

I did not feel that it was necessary to hold Lodges of 
Instruction in the District, as the facilities now given by G. L. 
to enable the Officers of each Lodge to become proficient in 



IOO GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

their respective duties is sufficient, but I would strongly urge 
on each Lodge the necessity of having weekly or fortnightly 
meetings for rehearsal and instruction, to enable all the Officers 
to become proficient in their duties, as I have found that in 
some Lodges, although the W. M. and Wardens were good 
workers, yet some of the Junior Officers were not up to the 
standard to be desired. 

I granted Dispensations to the following Lodges to attend 
divine worship : Tuscan Lodge, No. 99 ; Blackwood Lodge, 
No. 311, and Mimico Lodge, No. 369. 

The following deaths have been reported to me : Henry 
Bickford, P. M., G. L. Garden, M. M., John Bryant, M. M., 
and Joseph Purvis, M. M., King Solomon's; Robt. Robertson, 
P. M., Thos. McCormock, M. M., and Wm. Turner, M. M., 
Wilson Lodge ; John McLean, P. M., and Richard Knill, 
M. M., Richardson Lodge; Robt. Phillips, M. M., Zeredatha 
Lodge ; R. A. Sinclair, M. M., and Geo. McDonald, P. M., 
Doric Lodge; Wm. Hamilton, M. M., St. George's Lodge; 
Joseph O'Brien, Alpha Lodge ; W. B. D. Thurston, P. M., 
and Geo. Robinson, M. M., Rehoboam Lodge; J. B. Burns, 
M. M., Zetland Lodge ; Lionel Yorke, M. M., St. Andrew's 
Lodge ; L. C. Hawkey, M. M., Seymour Porter, P. M., Geo. 
Gowland, M. M., St. John's Lodge ; Richard Stokes, P. M., 
Thos. Tripp, M. M., Brougham Lodge ; W. S. Robinson, 
P. M., Thos. A. Lockington, M. M., Ashlar Lodge. 

I now append a short report of my visit to each of the 
Lodges in the District, also a tabulated statement of the work 
done and the standing of the several Lodges. 

Tuscan Lodge, No. 99 : My first official visit in the 
district I paid to this Lodge on October 10th, accompanied by 
V. W. Bro. Borngasser, the District Secretary, I found this 
Lodge to be in good working order ; the attendance about 20 ; 
the W. M. opened and closed in the three degrees, and at 
my request exemplified the third, the work was very accurately 
performed ; the Wardens and subordinate Officers are up to 
the required standard ; the books are well kept, and I con- 
sider the prospects of this Lodge among the brightest in the 
district. 

Patterson Lodge, No. 265 : I visited this Lodge on the 
1 8th October, accompanied by W. Bro. C. C. Robinson, 
of Rising Sun Lodge ; there was a fair attendance of members 
and a large number of visiting brethren present ; the W. M. 
opened the Lodge but did not do any work ; the Senior 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. IOI 

Warden is an expert workman ; the third degree was conferred 
by W. Bros. Hills and Porter, of St. John's Lodge, Toronto ; 
the books of the Lodge I found to be in good condition and 
properly kept, the Secretary, W. Bro. Steele, being a very 
careful and painstaking officer. 

Zetland Lodge, No. 326: On Nov. 26th I visited this 
Lodge; it being the night of the election of officers, there was 
a large attendance, both of members and visitors ; was pleased 
to see the perfect unanimity and good feeling with which the 
election of officers passed off; the W. M., W. Bro. Brown, 
worked the first degree, the work was well done, not only by 
the W. M. but all the officers ; the books I found to be well 
and correctly kept. I was very much pleased to meet at this 
meeting that enthusiastic Mason, W. Bro. T. H. Brunton, of 
Tuscan Lodge. 

Alpha Lodge, No. 384 : I visited this Lodge on Dec. 6th ; 
the attendance was large, there being 72 members present; it 
being the night of the election of officers, the time occupied 
for that purpose precluded the possibility of seeing the degrees 
exemplified ; the W. M. opened and closed the Lodge in the 
three degrees, the work was done to my satisfaction ; the books 
are in a good condition and are correctly kept. From what I 
could judge of the newly elected officers, I believe that they 
will uphold the good reputation that Alpha Lodge has always 
done. 

St. Andrew's Lodge, No. 16 : On December nth I visited 
this Lodge, and at the request of the W. M., assisted by R. W. 
Bro. Wilkinson and V. W. Bro. Tait, installed the newly 
elected officers, a very large number of the Brethren being 
present. This Lodge has had a successful and prosperous 
year, under the management of W. Bro. Doan, and I feel sure 
that under the guidance of W. Bro. Glanville, the newly 
installed Master, who is an excellent worker, the Lodge has a 
bright future before it ; the books I found to be neatly and 
correctly kept ; on the whole I consider the prospects of this 
Lodge to be bright. 

Humber Lodge, No. 305 : Visited on December 12th, in 
connection with V. W. Bro. Tait, who was going there to in- 
stall the newly elected Officers. The attendance was not 
large, but from the zeal and energy displayed by the newly 
elected Officers, I am encouraged in the hope that this Lodge 
will, in the near future, increase in membership and prosper- 
ity. The books of the Lodge I found to be in a good condi- 
tion, and a fact that is worth while to meticn, as an incentive 
to others, is, there are no members in ''arrears for dues." 



102 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

King Solomon's Lodge, No. 22 : I visited this Lodge on 
December 13th, there being 42 members present. This 
Lodge, I regret to have to state, has not enjoyed that degree 
of prosperity and harmony so earnestly desired by every true 
Freemason ; only one candidate being initiated during the 
year. The unhappy condition to which this once prosperous 
Lodge is subjected is greatly to be deplored. The W. M. I 
am happy to state is a good officer, and ably supported by an 
efficient staff — and it is to be hoped that the dark cloud which 
covers its fair horizon will vanish at no distant day. The 
election of officers was held at this meeting, and from the 
earnestness and ability displayed by the W. M. elect, with the 
assistance of the other officers of the Lodge, I trust that in 
the near future a bright prospect is still in store for this Lodge. 

Occident Lodge, No. 346: On Dec. 19th I visited this 
Lodge for the purpose of installing the newly elected Officers, 
which I did, assisted by R. W. Bro. Wilkinson ; the attendance 
was not large, owing to the early hour at which the meeting 
was called, (six o'clock), to enable them to get through in time 
for their " Annual Conversazione," which was to be held 
immediately after the installation ; this Lodge numbers 150 
members on its register, and has had a very prosperous year, 
under the able guidance of W. Bro. Meyerfey and an efficient 
staff of Officers ; the books of the Lodge I find to be well 
kept ; the dues fairly well paid up, and the Lodge I consider 
to be in a healthy and prosperous condition. 

Doric Lodge, No. 316: I visited this Lodge officially on 
December 20th. The attendance was a large one ; theW. M., 
W. Bro. Ardagh, worked the first degree, the work was well 
done, not only by the W. M. but by the Wardens and subordi- 
nate Officers ; the newly elected Officers were installed by W. 
Bro. McDonald, and bid fair as to efficiency. The W. M., 
Bro. Williams, (whom I have since heard confer degrees on 
two different occasions), is a brother of more than ordinary 
merit, and I feel assured that the prospects of Doric Lodge, 
under his rule, will be a prosperous one. 

York Lodge, No. 156 : I visited this Lodge on Jan. nth, 
an emergency meeting having been called at 4 o'clock p. m., 
for the purpose of conferring degrees ; the attendance was not 
a large one ; there were three candidates for the second degree, 
the work was exemplified in a manner to commend itself to 
every lover of good work ; the W. M. is an excellent worker, 
and assisted by an able set of Officers ; the books I found to 
be correctly and neatly kept ; this Lodge is in a very prosperous 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. I03 

condition, it having initiated 5 candidates at the previous 
meeting. In the evening the Lodge held a " Conversazione," 
and the enjoyable time that I spent with the Brethren of York 
Lodge will long be remembered by me. I had much pleasure 
at meeting here an old friend in the person of R. W. Bro. 
Fisher, P. D. D. G. M. 

Georgina Lodge, No. 343 : I visited this Lodge on Jan. 
17th, accompanied by V. W. Bro. Borngasser; the W. M. 
opened and closed the Lodge in the three degrees and ex- 
emplified the first ; I regret to say that the work was not 
performed as well as I could have wished, but there are some 
reasons to which this may be partly attributed. This Lodge 
is situated in the very centre of the district which was infected 
with small-pox, and were not permitted to assemble for about 
three months, as directed by the Board of Health; subsequently 
the removal of the W. M. to a different locality, materially 
retarded the progress of this Lodge; there are, however, 
brighter prospects in store for it ; the newly elected W. M., 
Dr. Bently, is an enthusiastic Mason, as well as a good dis- 
ciplinarian ; the books I found in a good condition. 

Rising Sun Lodge, No. 129 : I visited this Lodge officially 
on Feb. 1st; the attendance was small, there being only four 
of the Officers of the Lodge present ; the W. M. opened and 
closed the Lodge in the three degrees ; he is an efficient worker. 
I regret to have to state that there appears to be a want of that 
unanimity and harmony which should exist in every prosperous 
Lodge, and manifests itself in some of the members withdraw- 
ing from the W. M. that assistance which is due him, and 
which greatly mars the prosperity of the Lodge. The books I 
found to be well and correctly kept, the Secretary being a par- 
ticularly efficient officer. 

St. John's Lodge, No. 75 : On February 4th I visited this 
Lodge ; there was a large attendance ; the first degree was 
worked ; the work was correctly performed not only by the 
W. M. but also by all the Officers ; the books are well kept ; 
the prospects of this Lodge I consider are bright. 

Orient Lodge No. 339 : I visited this Lodge on the 5th of 
February ; greeted by a very large assembly of Brethren not- 
withstanding the inclemency of the weather on that evening. 
The W. M. opened and closed in the three degrees and exem- 
plified the first ; the work of the Officers of this Lodge is uni- 
formly good : books are kept in a creditable manner and their 
hall one of the best in the district. I particularly admire the 
taste displayed in adorning and decorating their room, and 



104 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

their endeavour to make their Lodge room a pleasant re- 
treat is one to be commended. I was also pleased at the 
large number of the Past Masters of the Lodge I met on this 
occasion. It shows that they still retain their interest in the 
affairs of the Lodge, and are ready to aid by their counsel and 
advice their younger Brethren. This Lodge I consider a live 
one and its prospects among the brightest in the district. 

Richmond Lodge, No. 23 : I visited this Lodge on 
February nth. Attendance small. This Lodge has a 
membership of about 27. It has suffered by the removal 
of the Patterson Agricultural Works, which, in conse- 
quence, caused many of its members to demit, and 
affiliate, perhaps, elsewhere. This has materially altered the 
aspect of the Lodge. With no candidates for admission, 
perhaps for several years — no work to do — the interest of the 
few remaining members slackens, and the future prospects of 
the Lodge is not a good one. The W. M. opened and closed 
the Lodge in the three degrees. The work was fairly done. 
The books, I find, are well kept. Financially the Lodge is 
in a good state, as they have property worth about $4,000. 

Vaughan Lodge, No. 54 : On February 12th I visited this 
Lodge. Attendance was fair. The W. M. opened and closed 
the Lodge in the three degrees ; did not confer any degrees. 
The work was well done by the Master and Officers. The 
books are well kept. The prospects of this Lodge are good. 

Blackwood Lodge, No. 311: This Lodge I visited on 
February 15th, in company with W. Bro. Dr. Orr, of Maple, 
who very kindly drove me from Richmond Hill station to 
Woodbridge. The attendance not large. The W. M. initiated 
two candidates, and opened and closed in the three degrees. 
The work was well done. The books, I found, are admirably 
kept, and portray the efficiency of the Secretary. This Lodge, 
in some respects, closely resembles Richmond Lodge, as 
owing to the removal of the Abel Manufacturing Company, 
many of its members were compelled to seek new fields of 
labor. 

Wilson Lodge, No. 86 : I visited this Lodge on February 
19th. The attendance fair. The W. M. exemplified the E. 
A. Degree. The work of the Wardens and subordinate 
Officers was good, after which the W. M. opened and closed 
in several degrees. The W. M. is an excellent worker. The 
books I found to be correctly kept. The prospects of the 
Lodge are good 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 1 05 

Brougham Union, No. 269 : Visited this Lodge officially 
on February 20th, accompanied by V. W. Bro. Borngasser. 
The attendance was very fair. The W. M. opened and closed 
the Lodge in the three degrees, and at my request 
exemplified the third. In justice to the W. M. I may say that 
he exemplifies the work very accurately, but an excess of 
nervousness rather detracts from the effect of the ceremony. 
The Wardens' and subordinate Officers' work was fair. The 
Secretary is a painstaking Officer ; the books being well kept. 

Zeredatha Lodge, No. 220 : On March 12th I visited Zere- 
datha Lodge, the W. M. of which very kindly, at my request, 
called an emergency meeting for that purpose. This Lodge I 
found to be in excellent condition ; the W. M. and Officers in 
the character of their work are among the foremost in the 
district. The books are exceedingly well kept, the Secretary, 
Bro. Hastie, being thoroughly posted in his duties. The 
prospects of this Lodge are bright. 

Richardson Lodge, No. 136: I visited this Lodge on 
March 13th. The attendance was small. The W. M. had no 
work to offer, but opened and closed the Lodge in the three 
degrees ; the work was fairly done. This Lodge I regret to say 
is not in as healthy a state financially as could be desired ; 
the late Secretary, at his death, being indebted to the Lodge 
a considerable amount of monies, which had been handed to 
him to pay Lodge indebtedness, and which had not at his 
death been so applied, and thus far has not been recovered ; 
the present Secretary I find to be a good officer ; the books 
are correctly kept ; and I have good hopes that in the future 
the affairs of this Lodge will be conducted in a more business- 
like manner. 

Markham Union Lodge, No. 87 : This Lodge I visited on 
March 14th. The attendance was a good one. The W. M. 
opened and closed in all the degrees, and exemplified the first. 
The W. M. is an excellent worker ; the Officers are all well up 
in their duties ; the Secretary, Bro. McKay, has the books in 
thoroughly good order ; this Lodge I anticipate has a bright 
prospect before it. The W. M. and Officers all appear to take 
a deep interest in the welfare of the Lodge, and from the 
material of which it is composed, I feel assured of its prosperity. 
I also had much pleasure to meet on this occasion R. W. 
Bros. Vanzant and Speight of this Lodge. 

Ashlar Lodge, No. 247 : I visited this Lodge on March 
26th. The attendance was a very large one. there being official 



106 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

visits from three of the city Lodges on that occasion. I was 
very happy to have the pleasure of meeting on this occasion 
so large a number of the Craft — among others R. W. Bros. 
Saunders, Blackwood and Wilkinson, also V. W. Bro. Tait. 
The W. M. opened the Lodge in the three degrees and ex- 
emplified the third ; the work was well executed, both by the 
W. M. and subordinate Officers ; the books I found to be 
correctly kept. I predict for this Lodge, under the rule of 
W. Bro. Pearcy, a happy and prosperous year. 

Rehoboam Lodge, No. 65 : I visited this Lodge officially 
on April 4th, accompanied by the District Secretary, V. W. 
Bro. Borngasser ; the attendance on that occasion being a 
large one ; there were two initiations on that evening, W. Bro. 
Bain conferring the degree on the first in a praiseworthy manner; 
the assistant Officers also being well up in their respective parts. 
W. Bro. Williams, of Doric Lodge, initiated the second 
candidate ; his ability as a worker, as I have already stated 
in my report of Doric Lodge, is excellent. I was much gratified 
to meet on this occasion a very worthy Bro. whose acquaint- 
ance I formed some years back in my own Lodge at Sharon, 
I refer to V. W. Bro. F. Gallow. I was particularly pleased 
in seeing so many of the P. M's. taking a deep interest in the 
affairs of the Lodge, thus showing that they are yet willing 
workers in the Vineyard of the Lord. The excellent state in 
which I found the books is proof of a painstaking Secretary. 

St. George's Lodge No. 367 : April 5th visited St. George's 
Lodge. The attendance on this occasion was a large one. A 
commendable feature of this Lodge is that it opens sharp on 
time. There were two candidates initiated; the W. M., W. 
Bro. Montgomery, is a particularly good officer ; the Wardens 
and subordinate Officers all perform their work in a very credi- 
table manner; the books are well kept; prospects of this 
Lodge I consider are good. 

River Park Lodge, No. 356 : I visited this Lodge on April 
9th. The attendance was small. There was one initiation and 
one proposition received ; this, the W. M. informed me, was 
the first work they had done for three years. The W. M. 
worked the first and opened and closed in the three degrees in 
a very correct manner ; the Wardens and subordinate Officers 
did their work fairly well ; the books correctly kept ; prospects 
a little more favourable. 

Ionic Lodge No. 229 : I visited this Lodge officially on 
April 10th, and was very agreeably surprised to meet on that 
occasion R. W. Bro. Dr, Freeman, D. D. G. M. Hamilton 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 107 

District ; also. V. W. Bro. Roaf, W. Bro. Morson, Officers 
and members of Ionic, No. 25, Toronto. This Lodge I con- 
sider ranks amongst the foremost in the district ; the W. M. 
and Officers are all good workers ; the material of which it is 
composed is good, Officers and members all seeming to take 
a lively interest in the welfare of the Lodge ; prospects are very 
bright. 

Union Lodge, No. 118 : I visited this Lodge on April 15th, 
accompanied by W. Bro. Allan, of Tuscan Lodge. The 
attendance on this occasion was a very fair one ; the W. M. 
opened and closed in the three degrees and exemplified the 
first ; the work was fairly done ; an excess of nervousness on his 
part somewhat detracted from the effect of the ceremony ; 
Wardens' work fair ; the books are well kept ; the Secretary, 
Bro. Brereton, being an efficient officer. 

Brock Lodge, No. 354 : This Lodge I visited on May 15th, 
accompanied by the District Secretary. To visit this Lodge 
necessitates a drive of nearly 40 miles. I am greatly indebted 
to Bro. Mark Kay, of Wilfred, a member of this Lodge, for en- 
tertaining myself and the district Secretary, and driving us from 
his residence to Cannington and back that evening, a distance 
of about 16 miles. The attendance was not large, owing some- 
what to the inclemency of the weather, it being very wet and 
stormy ; the W. M. opened and closed in the three degrees, and 
at my request, exemplified the third in a manner highly com- 
mendable ; I have no hesitation in saying that in Bro. 
Nutting, Brock Lodge has a Master who ranks among the 
best in the district ; the Junior Warden is also a good officer ; 
the Senior was not present ; the books I found to be correctly 
kept ; the prospects of the Lodge I consider good. 

Zeta Lodge, No. 410 : On May 23rd I visited this Lodge. 
The attendance was large. This Lodge, I am pleased to be able 
to report is maintaining its past reputation as being one of the 
best in the district, the W. M., W. Bro. Cavell, being an excellent 
worker ; the Wardens as well as the subordinate Officers being 
all well up and efficient in the discharge of their respective 
duties. The books are kept in a neat, correct and business- 
like manner. 

Ionic Lodge, No. 25 : I visited officially this Lodge on June 
4th. The attendance was large. This Lodge possesses in the 
W. M., W. Bro. Morson, not only a first-class exemplifier of the 
work, but one of the best executive officers in the district, and 
an enthusiastic Craftsman. The work as exemplified by the 



108 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

Officers of this Lodge was as near perfect as it is possible to ex- 
pect. I also attended this Lodge on the occasion of the visit of 
the M. W. the Grand Master to the Brethren composing the sev- 
eral Lodges in the city, and I must thank them for the very 
hearty manner in which they acceded to my request that they 
would receive him and extend the hospitality of their Lodge to 
the Brethren who would assemble to welcome him. 

Stevenson Lodge, No. 218 : I visited this Lodge on June 
10th, the attendance on that occasion being an exceedingly 
large one. The VV. M., W. Bro. Nicholson, occupied the chair, 
opened and closed in the three degrees, and worked the 
E. A. degree in an excellent manner. The assistant Officers 
are all well up in their duties, and as a whole the Officers of 
this Lodge are quite competent to render the ceremonies at- 
tractive as well as instructive. The books are in excellent 
condition ; the prospects are very encouraging. 

Mimico Lodge, No. 369 : I visited this Lodge on June 
nth. There was a fair attendance of the Brethren present; 
the W. M. opened and closed the Lodge in the three degrees, 
and at my request, exemplified the first ; the W. M. exemplifies 
the work correctly, but hurries through it in such a manner as 
to spoil the beautiful effect which it has when properly 
rendered ; the Senior Warden is a good Officer ; other Officers 
are fairly well up in their duties ; the books I found in 
good condition and correctly kept. There is material in this 
Lodge for a first-class working one. 

Robertson Lodge, No. 292 : I visited this Lodge on June 
12th. The attendance of members was small, only 7 being 
present ; there being no work to offer the W. M. opened and 
closed in the three degrees, which was well done by all the 
Officers who were present. This Lodge has a very comfortable 
hall, which they built, and have just succeeded in completing 
the payment of the debt on it ; the books I found in a good 
state. The prospects of the Lodge are looking brighter. 

Sharon Lodge, No. 97 : I visited this Lodge on June 25th, 
the W. M., at my request, calling an emergency for that 
purpose. The attendance of members was fair. I was very 
much pleased to meet V. W. Bro. Roaf, Toronto ; also R. W. 
Bro. Widdifield, W. Bro. Branton and W. Bro. Allan, of 
Tuscan Lodge, on this occasion ; the W. M., Bro. Willson, is 
a good worker — he, at my request, opened and closed in the 
three degrees and exemplified the third, which he did very 
correctly ; the Wardens' and subordinate Officers' work fair ; 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. IO9 

the books are correctly kept. The prospects of the Lodge are 
good. 

In conclusion, I desire to express my thanks to the Officers 
and members of the several Lodges throughout the district 
for the uniform courtesy and fraternal feeling extended to me 
whenever I have met the Lodges or individual Brethren, either 
officially or otherwise, during my term of office, and I can 
assure them that the many pleasant and instructive hours spent 
with the Brethren of the Toronto District will be treasured up 
in my remembrance, and I shall always look back with pleasure 
to the year in which I held the office of D. D. G. M. of the 
district, and I trust that whoever my successor shall be that 
the same kind consideration will be extended to him that I 
have received at their hands. 

I also desire to thank R. W. Bro. Malone, P. D. D. G. M., 
for the assistance he has rendered me — his aid and counsel 
has been invaluable. 

All of which is fraternally submitted, 

Jas. Wayling, 
D. D. G. M. Toronto District No. 11. 
Sharon, July 1st, 1889. 



GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 








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GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 



ONTARIO DISTRICT No. 12. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge of Canada, in the Prov- 
ince of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren : — I have the 
honor of submitting for your consideration my second report 
on the condition of Masonry in District No. 12. 

It is gratifying to be able to report the district is in a pros- 
perous condition ; peace, harmony and brotherly love abound 
among the Brethren ; the Officers are for the most part skilled 
workmen ; excellent material has been introduced into the 
Order during the year, and the social features of Masonry, 
which tend so much to make our meetings attractive, are being 
more and more sedulously cultivated. 

Almost my first duty on returning from Grand Lodge last 
year was to visit the death-bed of our late Bro. C D. Macdon- 
nell, P. D. D. G. M of this District. He was a man of more 
than ordinary ability ; honest, upright and capable in the dis- 
charge of his avocations ; a faithful and diligent student of 
Masonic lore ; a wise counsellor ; a steadfast friend ; one whose 
ripe judgment and practical sagacity will be much missed 
among the Brethren. He was buried with Masonic honors 
on the 31st of July, 1888, and the large attendance of the 
Craft gave evidence of the high esteem in which Bro. Mac- 
donnell was held by those who knew him. 

The M. W. the Grand Master being desirous of meeting the 
Brethren of this District, I summoned the Lodges to meet in the 
Masonic hall, Peterborough, on Tuesday, the 18th Dec, 1888. 
There was a very large attendance, most of the Lodges being 
represented. The presence of such a distinguished visitor as 
the Grand Master largely contributed to the interest of the oc- 
casion, and his practical instructions and earnest addresses 
were greatly appreciated. The first degree was exemplified by 
W. Bro. H. Rush and Brethren of Corinthian and Peterbor- 
ough Lodges, and the second by W. Bro. A. Dawson. 
In the evening the attendance was considerably augmented, 
when actual work in the third degree was taken up, and the 
exposition of the impressive ceremonies by Officers of the 
same Lodges elicited marked attention. The meetings lasted 
two days, during which time the interest gradually increased, 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. II3 

and a great deal of practical information and sound Masonic 
instruction were imparted, while the exemplification of the 
work so accurately and carefully performed, could not fail to 
be of benefit to those who joined in the proceedings and to 
the Craft in general. 

OFFICIAL VISITS. 

Keene Lodge, No. 374, Keene: Visited Sept. 20th, 1888; 
found the Lodge in a satisfactory condition ; all the Officers 
understand their duties and the members are enthusiastic ; 
meetings are held regularly; the average attendance being 13. 
Much credit is due to V. W. Bro. Jas. McNeil, for the 
continued prosperity of this Lodge. 

On December 27th I visited Corinthian and Peterborough 
Lodges and had the pleasure of installing the newly elected 
officers. The unanimity and fraternal feeling existing between 
these Lodges is worthy of all commendation. 

Norwood Lodge, No. 223 : Visited January 15th, 1889, 
and installed the Officers. The old time interest in Masonic 
matters seems to have revived here ; the work is fairly well 
done and the attendance is better than it has been for years 
past. 

Clementi Lodge, No. 313, Lakefield : Visited Feb. 5th, 
18S9. W. B. Sheldrake is one of the best workers in the 
district, and the Secretary, Bro. R. Q. Dench, is deserving of 
praise for the excellent manner in which he performs his duties. 
The prospects of this Lodge are excellent. 

Murray Lodge, No. 408, Beaverton : Visited March 12th. 
There has been a decided improvement in this Lodge over 
last year. A goodly number of fit and proper persons have 
been initiated, and the outlook for growth and prosperity is 
encouraging. Before long it is expected a new Masonic Hall 
will be erected in the village. The average attendance has 
been 20. I had the pleasure of meeting here W. Bro. Cock- 
burn, ex-M. P. P., the honored founder of this Lodge, and 
one who is highly respected by the Brethren. 

Peterborough Lodge, No. 155, Peterborough : Visited 
March 1st, 1889. W. Bro. David Spence and his staff of 
assistants are well versed in Masonic matters. Instruction 
meetings were regularly held by the W. M., and the results are 
seen in an experienced and thoroughly well-equipped corps of 
Officers. The dues are faithfully collected and the books are 
neatly kept by the efficient Secretary, Bro. A. S. A. Smith. 



114 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

Lome Lodge, No. 375, Omemee : Visited May 2nd, 1889. 
Attendance, good. Work in the three degrees was exemplified 
very creditably. This Lodge has some able workers, among 
others V. W. Bro. W. Miller deserves credit. The meetings 
are regularly held and the future is assured. 

J. B. Hall Lodge, No. 145, Millbrook : Visited May 9th, 
1889. The W. M., R. W. Bro. Dr. Turner, is one of the best 
workers in the district, but there is much room for improvement 
in his subordinates. The Brethren have such an excellent 
Lodge room and such good material that the attendance ought 
to be larger and the work improved. 

Spry Lodge, No. 406, Fenelon Falls : Visited Feb. 8th, 1889. 
The W. M., Dr. Graham, is well qualified to fill the chair. I 
exemplified portions and instructed the Brethren in all the 
degrees. Meetings have been regularly held ; average attend- 
ance 17. The prospects are good, provided the Brethren carry 
out their obligations faithfully. 

Faithful Brethren Lodge, No. 77, Lindsay: Visited April 
5th, 1889. The attendance was good; the work well and 
creditably performed. The Lodge is in an extremely healthy 
condition ; the Secretary most efficient ; the W. M. and 
Wardens all that could be desired. The members are — many 
of them — faithful Masonic students, anxious to carry out our 
glorious principles ; with such characteristics the future of the 
Lodge is assured. 

Verulam Lodge, No. 268, Bobcaygeon : Visited May 9th, 
1889. The W. M., Bro. the Rev. W. Farncomb is able to 
exemplify all the degrees, the other Officers might improve. 
Membership increasing ; prospects good ; books well kept ; 
Lodge in good financial standing. 

Corinthian Lodge, No. 101, Peterboro : Visited June 12th, 
1889. The W. M., Col. H. C. Rogers and Officers are well 
grounded in the work ; the attendance should be better ; 
excellent material has been received during the year, and the 
working power of the Lodge should thereby be greatly 
increased. The Secretary, Bro. T. E. Bradburn, is a very 
efficient Officer; the average attendance, 15. 

Ontario Lodge, No. 26, Port Hope : This Lodge is in a 
prosperous condition, a large amount of work has been done 
during the year, and the meetings are well attended. The 
death of W. Bro. Chas. Doebler, one of its most useful mem- 
bers, leaves a blank on the Board of Relief, which is very hard 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 115 

to fill. The mournful cortege which followed his remains to 
their last resting place, attested the high esteem in which Bro. 
Doebler was held by his fellow citizens and many others. 

Hope Lodge, No. 114, Port Hope: I understand this 
Lodge has greatly improved during the year. Its member- 
ship has increased, meetings are regularly held and the 
prospects are good. 

Composite Lodge, No. 30, Whitby ; Jerusalem Lodge, No. 
31, Bomanville and Lebanon Lodge, No. 139, Oshawa : 
Reports from all these are very satisfactory. No more enthu- 
siastic Masons are found in this district. The Officers are 
competent ; the sick and needy are looked after ; and meetings 
are duly held. 

Mount Zion Lodge, No. 39, Brooklin, and Durham Lodge, 
No. 66, Newcastle : The territory from which these Lodges 
can draw is very circumscribed, and growth is therefore not to 
be expected. They number among the Brethren some efficient 
and earnest members, and it is due to their zealous efforts 
that the craft stands as it does to-day. 

Prince Albert Lodge, No. 183, Port Perry: The Brethren 
of this Lodge deserve praise for the earnest struggles they have 
made to refit and furnish the present Lodge room. They are 
now out of debt, except a small sum claimed by Grand Lodge. 
Initiations during the year, 4. Meetings held, 13. Number 
of deaths, 2. 

Cedar Lodge, No. 270, Oshawa: I was not able to visit 
this Lodge during the year, but the reports show satisfactory 
progress. 

Orono Lodge, No. 325, Orono : Though not situated near 
a railway, this Lodge has a membership of 51 and is in a 
thriving condition. 

Victoria Lodge, No. 398, Victoria Road : This Lodge has 
a membership of 34, chiefly farmers, most of them living at a 
distance from the hall. They attend the meetings regularly 
and take a lively interest in matters Masonic. The hall is 
owned by the Lodge and they are in a sound financial 
condition. 

DISPENSATIONS GRANTED, ETC. 

I granted Dispensations to the following Lodges to attend 
divine service, clothed as Masons, viz : The Spry Lodge, No. 



Il6 ('.RAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

405, Fenelon Falls, on December 27th, 1888, and Lome 
Lodge, No. 375, Omemee, on June 30th, 1889. 

I have revised and obtained the confirmation of the M. W. 
the Grand Master to By-laws of the following Lodges : 
Victoria Lodge, No. 398; Faithful Brethren, No. 77; 
Peterborough, No. 155 ; Corinthian, No. 101 ; Jerusalem, 
No. 31. 

PERSONAL. 

Through the unavoidable absence of Bro., the Rev. W. C. 
Bradshaw (our very efficient District Secretary), for a great 
portion of the year, I sustained a severe loss, but I am pleased 
to state he has returned from a winter's sojourn in the south 
much improved in health, and will I trust long be spared 
to assist the Craft in Canada by his zeal, ability and devo- 
ted service to the cause of Masonry. 

My best thanks are due to the M. W. the Grand Master for 
the assistance and counsel he has given me so readily during 
the year ; to the R. W. Bro. J. J. Mason, Grand Secretary, for 
promptness and regularity in correspondence, and to R. W. 
Bro. E. H. D. Hall, Peterborough, for his unremitting courtesy, 
advice and help whenever solicited. 

In conclusion I wish to render my unfeigned thanks to the 
Brethren of the district, not only for receiving me with respect 
and consideration, but for extending to me at all times the 
right hand of fellowship, and for their bestowal of unfailing 
hospitality. I can never forget their kindness and friend- 
ship and I can only hope my acts have received their cordial 
approval. I retire from the responsible position of trust which 
I have held by the courtesy of Grand Lodge for two successive 
years, feeling that the condition of Masonry has steadily im- 
proved during that time in the Ontario District, knowing as I 
do that peace, harmony and good will abound among the 
Brethren, and trusting that my successor may be enabled to 
advance the interests of the Craft much more satisfactorily 
than I have done, and that he may retire, as I fondly hope I 
do, with the approbation of the Brethren, and with an unsulli- 
ed official record. 

All of which is fraternally submitted. 

B. Shortly, 

D. D. G. M. Ontario District No. 12. 
Peterborough, June 26th, 1889. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 117 



PRINCE EDWARD DISTRICT, No. 13. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Brethren of the Grand Lodge of A. F. and A. M. of 
Canada, in the Province of Ontario : 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren : — In presenting 
you with this my second report, I do so with enhanced pleasure 
from the fact that I am again able to use the language of the 
former one, and state that " good feeling and fraternal fellow- 
ship reign throughout Prince Edward District." 

I have this year, as I did last, been enabled to visit each 
Lodge at least once, and for that purpose have so arranged my 
visits that an emergent meeting has been called but once for 
the purpose of receiving me. 

In all I have paid twenty-nine visits. 

In about one-half of the Lodges there was no work to be 
done. In cases of that kind, I always asked for an exhibition of 
what could be done by the W. M. and Officers, and must bear 
testimony to the fact that marked improvement was shewn in 
this respect over what was done on my former visit, and now 
have no hesitation in stating that the working of the degrees is 
as well exemplified in the 13th district, as in any other district 
in the jurisdiction. 

One matter I found every Lodge that I asked a test from 
very weak in, is that of the examination of visitors. The excuses 
offered for this were numerous. In most cases I found that the 
matter had been left in the hands of P. M's, who had become 
so rusty that in many instances the visitor might better have 
examined the examining committee. 

On occasions when no work was before the Lodge I invari- 
ably tried to impress upon the Officers and Brethren the 
necessity for some well skilled Brother to prepare a paper, 
lecture or talk on the teachings of the Craft through its 
symbols, emblems, characters and signs, and in some cases 
exacted promises from Brethren who I knew were capable of 
doing their duty along this line, that they would try to make 
their presence a benefit to their Lodge, and the meetings 
pleasant and profitable. 

Numerous questions have been asked me in regard to the 
Masonic population, wealth, etc., of this district, and conceiv- 
ing that it is a matter that may be of interest to many of the 



Il8 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

Brethren of Prince Edward District, I will now give a few 
figures as to our standing. 

I would have liked very much to hold up our progress for 
the instruction of each brother who reads this report, but 
from the fact that my tabulated statement was refused a place 
in the pages of last year's report of Grand Lodge, owing to the 
reason that it would occupy more than one page of that report, 
I refrain from doing so fearing that it might again be 
eliminated. 

We have in this district twenty-two Lodges ; out of that 
number there are three at least that are quite weak, only 
struggling for existence. 

Our district has 1 2 1 2 Masons on the rolls of the Lodges, 
the largest Lodge in numbers being that of Prince Edward, 
No. 18, Picton, and the smallest being that of Grafton, No. 
308, Grafton, their membership is respectively one hundred 
and thirty-eight and fourteen. 

Seventy new members have been made ; in all two hundred 
and thirty-three degrees have been conferred. Eleven have 
been removed by death, but as the Lodges have only reported 
the names in exceptional instances, I will mention but one who 
from his rank (that of P. D. D. G. M.,) and high estimation 
in which he was held by his Brethren, it will not seem invidious 
to mention, I refer to Dr. Loomis of Madoc Lodge, No. 48 
Madoc, his death occurred on the 30th January last. 

Nine of the buildings occupied as Masonic Halls are 
owned by the Craft, their value approximated being twenty- 
one thousand seven hundred dollars, and the value of the 
Masonic contents of entire Lodges of the district being about 
twelve thousand dollars ; on the buildings and contents there is 
an insurance of upwards of twenty thousand dollars. I find 
that ten persons have applied for and received Masonic relief, 
a very small number for such a district. 

The matter of the travelling expenses of the D. D. G. M., is 
one that should in some way be dealt with by Grand Lodge ; 
some more explicit ruling should be given in regard to this 
matter ; my opinion is that a stated sum from each Lodge 
should be required by Grand Lodge from the private Lodges. 
Many D. D. G. M's would rather go without the money than 
hear a Lodge discussion as to the amount that should be paid, 
and as in my own case have a member rise and object to any- 
thing of the kind being done, my immediate predecessor 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 119 

having been a member of this Lodge and no money for 
expenses having been voted to him when he visited. 

In other cases you are asked, well how much do we owe 
you ? with an air as though you were a hard creditor to settle 
with. Of course cases of this kind are exceptional but it 
should be made impossible for them to occur. 

The Thirteenth Masonic District has been exceptionally 
fortunate the past year in having had the presence of the 
Grand Master on four different occasions — at Belleville, when 
he made a presentation on behalf of the Craft of that city to 
V. W. Bro. Jas. Macoun ; at Cobourg, when he was tendered 
a banquet by the Brethren of St. John's Lodge, No. 17 ; at 
Picton, when he was similarly treated by Prince Edward 
Lodge, and at Wellington, when a Special Communication of 
Grand Lodge was convened for the purpose of enabling him to 
lay the corner stone of the Masonic temple that the fraternity 
are erecting there. 

We have also been honored by the D. G. M., who afforded 
the Brethren of this district a rich treat by delivering before 
them one of his lectures on Freemasonry. 

If numbers and enthusiasm is any indication of progress 
and affection, these rulers in the Royal Craft must have con- 
cluded that the tide had set in the right direction for Ma- 
sonry here. 

To those two distinguished Brethren are due, on behalf of 
the Craft, and are hereby tendered by me to them, the thanks 
of the district for the counsel, advice, instruction and loving 
brotherly lessons of purity and morality delivered by them to 
us; may they long live to honor and be ornaments to Masonry. 

Dispensations were granted by me to P. E. Lodge, Picton, 
and to Madoc Lodge, Madoc, the first for the purpose of 
attending divine sen-ice on the 23rd of June, and the second 
for the purpose of appearing clothed as Masons at a Demon- 
stration held at the latter place on St. John's day. 

Last year I reported that Grafton Lodge, No. 308, had 
resolved to surrender their warrant ; however, they have 
reconsidered the matter and concluded that they would make 
another effort to keep alive. In this Lodge is exemplified the 
fact that mere ritual will not keep a Lodge together. The W. 
M., Dr. Boyce, is a good worker, but a number of their members 
told me that they got tired of coming night after night and 
nothing to do but the work of opening and closing. 



1 20 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

Now, after two years of pleasant Masonic intercourse, I 
surrender the gavel of office — feeling that to my successor I 
leave a district where Masonry is a power for good ; a district 
wherein I have received numberless kindnesses and attentions ; 
a district that will receive any executive Officer with open arms 
when in the performance of duty ; and a district that embraces 
the brightest minds and the men of the most distinguished 
places in the community. 

I have tried to do my duty, and feel that I owe the Free- 
masons of this district more than I will ever be able to repay. 

All of which is fraternally submitted, 

Wm. Smeaton, 
D. D. G. M. Prince Edward District No. 13. 
Belleville, July 6th, 1889. 



FRONTENAC DISTRICT, No. 14. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge of A. F. and A. M. of 
Canada, in the Province of Ontario : 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren : — In compliance 
with the requirements of the Constitution of the Grand Lodge 
of Canada, I have the honor to submit the following report on 
the condition of Masonry in Frontenac District, No. 14 : — 

During my year in office I visited thirteen out of the 
sixteen Lodges in this district. 

My first visit was made to St. John's Lodge, No. 340, Pitts- 
burg, on the 9th day of January — an emergent called for 
installation of Officers, for which I procured a dispensation ; 
I notified the Secretary by letter, and also the W. M. personally. 
I had to drive about eleven miles, and the evening being 
stormy, was very unpleasant ; on my arrival found only the 
Secretary and Tyler ; after waiting about two hours and no 
other Brethren making their appearance, I returned home. 
I examined the Secretary's books and found most of the 
Brethren in arrears for dues. In my opinion, it would be 
better for Masonry if Lodges so situated were closed. 

Maple Leaf Lodge, No. 109, Bath : Accompanied by W. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 12 1 

Bros. J. Waddell and Geo. Sommerville, I visited this Lodge 
on January nth, 1889, on a regular meeting; the attendance 
was very good. The W. M., C. L. Rogers, conferred the third 
degree in an able and efficient manner, and was well assisted 
by his Officers. The Secretary's books are neat and well kept. 
The Lodge is in good hands, and prospects are very good. 

Frontenac Lodge, No. 363, Cataraqui : On the 15th Jan. 
I visited this Lodge and found them in a very bad condition, 
they not having had a meeting since June, 1888; the meeting 
was called to see if the Brethren would close up the Lodge or 
not, there were only seven members present, and they decided 
to do all in their power to bring the Lodge up to its former 
standing, and at their next regular meeting to elect and install 
their Officers for the ensuing year. I procured the necessary 
dispensation and again visited them, accompanied by R. W. 
Bro. Wm. Waddington, and assisted by him installed the 
Officers ; the attendance was very small. The Secretary keeps 
the books very creditably. 

Prince Arthur Lodge, No. 228, Odessa : Accompanied by 
R. W. Bro. Waddington, W. Bros. Kinghorn and Sommerville 
and Bro. F. B. Gillen, I visited Prince Arthur Lodge on the 
2 1 st January, tbe attendance was very fair; a dispensation 
having been procured I, assisted by W. Bros. Waddington, 
Kinghorn and Sommerville, installed the Officers for the 
ensuing year. I examined the Secretary's books and found 
them well kept. Masonry in this part of this district is not 
making much progress. 

Minden Lodge, No. 253 : On the 4th of February I made 
my official visit to this Lodge; about twenty-five members were 
present, also a fair representation of the other city Lodges. The 
second degree was conferred by the W. M., H. Mowat, in a 
very creditable manner ; the Wardens and other Officers had 
their work fairly well up. The Secretary's books are neatly 
and correctly kept, and prospects of this Lodge are bright. 
I also visited this Lodge at most of the regular meetings, and 
always found a very good attendance of the Past Masters and 
members, which adds very largely to the success of this 
Lodge. 

The Ancient St. John's Lodge, No. 3, my mother Lodge : 
I made my official visit on the 7th of February. Work for the 
evening, an initiation, which was very creditably done by the 
W. M., John Waddell ; the Wardens and Officers deserve 
credit for the efficient manner in which they did their work. The 
future prospects are that the Ancient St. John's will still main- 



122 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

tain their position as regards work for many years to come. 
The Secretary, W. Bro. I. Sutherland, a mason of very long 
standing, and for a number of years Secretary of this Lodge, 
deserves great credit for the neat and efficient manner in which 
his books are kept. The Treasurer, Bro. E. R. Welch, 
deserves special mention for the manner in which he conducts 
the finances of the Lodge. Prospects of this old Lodge were 
never better. 

Leeds Lodge, No. 201, Gananoque : I visited this Lodge 
on February 12th; about thirty members were present. The 
second degree was conferred by the W. M., Alex. C. Watt, 
who did the work very well ; the Wardens and Officers were 
fairly well up in their work. I had the pleasure of accepting, 
on behalf of the W. M. and members of Leeds Lodge, a 
handsome cushion presented to them by a few ladies, wives 
and prominent masons of Gananoque, a feature which added 
very much to the enjoyment of the evening. Prospects of 
this Lodge are very bright. 

Cataraqui Lodge, No. 92, City : I made my official visit to 
this Lodge on February 1 3th ; about twenty-five members were 
present, also a fair representation of the other city Lodges. 
As there was no work for the evening, I had the Lodge raised 
to the third degree and then closed down, which was done 
very creditably by the W. M., R. Bunt, assisted by his Wardens 
and Officers. The Secretary, D. Callaghan, deserves great 
credit for the neatness and correctness with which his books 
are kept. 

Albion Lodge; No. 109, Harrowsmith : Accompanied by 
about fifteen Brethren from the city Lodges, I made my 
official visit to this Lodge on the 15th February. The Lodge 
is in very good working order and good harmony seems to 
prevail. The W. M., B. Day, is very well up in his work. I 
had the pleasure that evening of presenting the W. M., on behalf 
of the Officers and members of Albion Lodge, with a very 
handsome P. M's Jewel. The books of this 1 ,odge are neat 
and well kept, and prospects very bright. 

Prince of Wales Lodge, No. 146, Newburgh : I made my 
official visit to this Lodge, March 13th, 1889; about twenty 
members were present. The Lodge is just recovering from 
the heavy loss sustained by the late fire. Work for the evening, 
an initiation, which was very well exemplified by the W. M., 
Geo. Anson Aylesworth ; the Warden and Officers are fairly 
well up with their work. The books are well and correctly 
kept. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 1 23 

Victoria Lodge, No. 299, Centreville : On the 14th of 
March, accompanied by the W. M. and a number of brethren 
of Prince of Wales Lodge, I visited Victoria Lodge ; work for 
the evening, an initiation, which was fairly done by the W. M. ; 
the Wardens and Officers are not very well up in the work 
owing to the dormant state in which this Lodge has been for 
some time past. Future prospects appear to be more 
favorable. 

Union Lodge, No. 9, Napanee : I made my official visit to 
this Lodge on the 15th day of March ; about 75 Brethren were 
present, including several Brethren from the 13th District. 
Since the amalgamation of this and Mount Sinai Lodge, 
it appears to be in a very flourishing condition, and the 
greatest harmony seems to prevail. The W. M., Wardens and 
Officers have their work up fairly well. The Chaplain, the 
Venerable Archdeacon Jones, gave an able and interesting 
address on Masonry, which added greatly to the enjoyment of 
the evening. The Secretary's books are well and neatly kept ; 
and future prospects of this Lodge are very bright. 

Lome Lodge, No. 404, Tamworth : I visited this Lodge 
on April 2nd, at an emergent called for my visit and the 
exemplification of the work in the third degree. Very W. Bro. 
Richardson, the W. M., exemplified the work in a very credit- 
able manner ; the Wardens and Officers are all well posted in 
the work ; the work done by this Lodge is above the average. 
The books are well and neatly kept. This Lodge is in a very 
flourishing condition. 

I installed the Officers of the Ancient St. John's, No. 3 ; 
Cataraqui, No. 92 ; Prince Arthur, No. 228 ; Minden, No. 253 
and Frontenac, No. 363. 

To the Brethren of the Lodges I have visited I desire to 
acknowledge most cordially their kind hospitalities accorded 
to me as their representative in Grand Lodge, and trust that 
the Lodges in this district will steadily advance in the pros- 
perity of our noble Order. 

All of which is fraternally submitted, 

H. J. Wilkinson, 
D. D. G. M. Fronteyiac District No. 14. 



124 GRAND LODGE OF CANAI>\. 

ST. LAWRENCE DISTRICT, No. 15. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Members of the Grand Lodge of A. F. and A. M. of 
Canada, in the Province of Ontario : 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren : — Although not 
present at Grand Lodge last year, the Brethren of St. Lawrence 
District No. 15, honored me by electing me their District 
Deputy Grand Master, a position which I accepted with much 
diffidence, as I hold strong views as to the duty of the D. D. 
G. M. to the Lodges, and correspondingly from the Lodges to 
him. In this district there are twenty-two Lodges, extending 
from Perth in the north, Lansdowne in the south, and away 
east to Lancaster, the whole district forming an exaggerated 
letter L, and I must say I think some alteration should be 
made so as to make the Lodges more easily accessible, as at 
present, to reach certain Lodges, other districts have to be 
crossed. I have visited sixteen out of the twenty-two Lodges, 
some of them twice, and in every case have addressed the 
Brethren on the history and symbolism of the Craft; after mak- 
ing the Officers show me their ability to perform the ordinary 
work of the Lodge, in all cases where no candidates were 
present. I have also been able to see the various degrees 
conferred in several Lodges, and am glad to say that I have 
almost always found the Officers well up in their work, and 
close attention paid to the ritual. In only one case had I to 
find fault with an attempt to diverge from the authorized 
work, and this I think is not likely again to occur. I also 
found the books well kept, but in many cases too much 
latitude allowed to Brethren to get in arrears for dues. I think, 
however, that this is now being remedied, and that another 
year will show a marked improvement. 

I had the honor of attending the Grand Master at Corn- 
wall Lodge, when the Officers were installed, and again at 
Brockville, when he dedicated and consecrated the fine new 
room for Salem Lodge. I also had the pleasure of welcoming 
Rt. Worshipful Bro. J. Ross Robertson to True Britons Lodge 
at Perth, where he delivered to a full Lodge his able lecture on 
"a Century of Masonry in Canada." I am specially requested 
by several Lodges in this district to thank the Most Worship- 
ful Grand Master and the Rt. Worshipful Deputy Grand 
Master for their several visits, which to my personal knowledge 
have been of great benefit to the Craft in this district, and 
already have infused new life in the Lodges. I trust our 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 1 25 

Brethren, who in the future are elected to these high positions, 
will follow the precedent now set, as while there are so many 
beneficiary societies in existence amongst us, unless our high 
Officers occasionally visit each district, interest fades away and 
the cause of Masonry is injured. There are in this and I 
suppose in all the districts, a great many unaffiliated Masons, 
whom I have as far as my feeble powers go, striven to draw 
back to the fold. I notice that many of the best men whom 
we initiate, drop away after a time, because all that is offered 
them, is a repetition of the usual formulas of opening and clos- 
ing Lodge, and conferring degrees, while no attempt is made 
to instruct them " in the reason why of our existence," nor in 
our antient history and peculiar laws and symbols. I feel con- 
fident that were this done and a little more sociability intro- 
duced, in addition to the ordinary formalities (I speak of 
Lodges outside the cities,) the Craft would still further 
prosper. I notice and am glad to see a growing desire 
amongst the Lodges to attend, as Masons, divine service at 
least once a year. 

Immediately after my election I was called upon to lay the 
foundation stone of a church at North Augusta, but not 
having then been installed, R. W. Bro. Beynolds, of Brockville, 
very kindly performed the ceremony. 

Several deaths have been reported to me as follows : — Bro. 
H. B. Wright, Sussex Lodge, No. 5, Brockville ; R. W. Bro. 
A. G. McDonell, Excelsior Lodge, No. 142 ; R. W. Bro. Jno. 
S. Coombs, True Britons Lodge, No. 14, Perth. 

In conclusion, I have only to say that wherever I have gone 
throughout the St. Lawrence District, I have met with the 
heartiest and most generous welcome from each .and every 
Lodge ; and I ask the Brethren, in whatever they see that I 
have failed in, to give me the benefit of their Masonic charity, 
and believe that at all events I have tried to do my best to 
forward the interests of the Craft in general, and this district 
in particular. 

Yours fraternally, 

W. J. Morris, 

£>. D. G. M. St. Latvrence District No. ij. 



126 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

OTTAWA DISTRICT No. 16. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers a?id 
Members of the Grand Lodge of A. F. cV A. M. of 
Canada, in the Province of Ontario. 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren : — I have the honor 
herewith to submit my second annual report on the condition 
of Freemasonry in this District. 

VISITATIONS. 

During the Masonic year just closed I have visited all the 
Lodges in the Ottawa District ; several I had the privilege of 
visiting twice or thrice, and some four or five times. There 
has been a marked improvement in exemplifying the degrees. 
If some of the W. M.'s, however, would give their subordinate 
Officers a little coaching previous to meeting nights, the work 
would be better done. I have pleasure in reporting that one 
Lodge in this district (Civil Service No. 148) has adopted the 
commendable practice of holding a private Lodge of Instruct- 
ion for the Officers prior to the regular meeting nights of the 
Lodge. The result is that the degrees are exemplified with a 
smoothness and a readiness which I feel satisfied few Lodges 
in the Jurisdiction can excel. Goodwood Lodge, No. 159, 
Richmond, has taken a new lease of life, and is now one of the 
most prosperous Lodges in the district ; some new blood has 
come to the front ; there has been a complete change in the 
staff of Officers, and the result is vitality of a most commenda- 
ble nature. In summing up the condition of the Craftsmen in 
this district the only regrettable feature appears to me to be 
the large amount of arrears of dues, of which so many Lodges 
complain. A remedy for the existing state of affairs, in my 
opinion, would be found by applying the spirit of clause 152 of 
the Constitution — which disqualifies any private Lodge from 
being represented at Grand Lodge unless Grand Lodge dues 
have first been paid to private Lodges, and debarring all 
those members, who are over twelve months in arrears for 
dues, from exercising their ballots on nights of election. 

St. John's Lodge, Vankleek Hill : I am pleased to be able 
to report that the negotiations for the transfer of St. John's 
Lodge, Vankleek Hill, from the Registry of the Grand Lodge 
of Ireland to that of the Grand Lodge of Canada, have 
been successfully concluded, St. John's Lodge now being num- 
bered 2\a on our Grand Register It was not until December 
last that the negotiations were finally terminated, and on the 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 1 27 

1 8th of that month, accompanied by R. W. Bro. Wm, Rea, 
P. D. D. G. M. ; R. W. Bro. Garrioch, D. D. G. M. for the 
Ottawa District, Q, R. ; W. Bro. Reynolds and others, I vis- 
ited Vankleek Hill, and handed over the Canadian Warrant, 
securing in return the Warrant held from the Grand Lodge of 
Ireland, which was subsequently forwarded to R. W. Bro. J. J. 
Mason, Grand Secretary. 

WELCOME VISITORS. 

During the year the Sixteenth District was officially visited 
by M. W. Bro. R. T. Walkem, G. M., and an able lecture on 
" A hundred years of Craft Masonry in Canada," was delivered 
by R. W. Bro. J. Ross Robertson to two hundred Craftsmen, 
under the auspices of Builders' Lodge, No. 177, Ottawa. The 
visits of these two distinguished Brethren to the Capital cannot 
fail to have a beneficial effect on the Craft in the District. 

OTTAWA MEMS. 

The plan referred to in my last year's report of establishing 
" Masonic nights " in Ottawa has been successfully carried out, 
and the seven city Lodges are now meeting on the consecutive 
Tuesdays and Fridays in each month. 

It is with pleasure that I have to report the entering into an 
agreement by all the Ottawa Lodges for the appointment of 
an Organist, who attends all the Lodge meetings and conducts 
the musical portion of our ceremonies, in a way which is a 
decided improvement over the old arrangement. 

DISPENSATIONS 

have been granted during the year to the Lodges meeting at 
North Bay, Vankleek Hill, Plantagenet, Carleton Place, 
Mattawa, Arnprior and Richmond, and to Dalhousie Lodge, 
Ottawa, to attend divine service in Masonic clothing. 

CLOSING REMARKS. 

In bringing to a close the duties which the Brethren of this 
district have imposed upon me for two years, I have to 
acknowledge the uniform kindness and courtesy shown me 
upon my official visitations, and I feel satisfied that the same 
fraternal spirit will be manifested towards my successor. I 
have to thank the Brethren of the district for the valuable 
assistance rendered to me on many occasions, and would 
conclude with the hope that Craft Masonry in the si?xteenth 
district may live and prosper. 

All of which is fraternally submitted, 

David Taylor, 

D. D. G. M. Ottawa District No. 16. 
Ottawa, July 2nd, 1889. 



128 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

A LOOM A DISTRICT, No. 17. 

To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master, Officers and 
Brethren of the Grand Lodge of Canada, in the Province 
of Ontario : 

Most Worshipful Sir and Brethren : — I have the 
honor to submit my report on the condition of Masonry in 
the 17th Masonic District. 

I have visited all the Lodges in the district. 

My first official act was to appoint W. Bro. J. A. Fraser of 
Port Arthur, District Secretary, and Rev. Bro. H. W. Fraser of 
Fort William, District Chaplain. I found my Secretary a very 
able assistant. 

Keystone Lodge, No. 412, Sault Ste. Marie: I visited this 
Lodge on the 8th of October, 1888, and witnessed the conferr- 
ing of the second and third degrees by W. Bro. Rodgers, 
assisted by an efficient set of Officers. The work was well 
done, and if I may particularize, I shall mention the duties of 
Deacon ably performed by our young Bro. Rev. Mr. Vanix. 
There were 22 present ; meetings held, 14 ; average attendance, 
12. A banquet was given me after the close of the meeting 
which was most enjoyable. 

Manitoulin Lodge, No. 407, Gore Bay : Visited on the 10th 
of October, 1888. Owing to the irregularity of the mail ser- 
vice, my letter to the W. M. apprising him of my intended 
visit only reached Gore Bay a day or two before myself. The 
W. M. was absent from home, but the Secretary called a meet- 
ing ; of course the attendance under the circumstances was 
small ; there were 9 present ; W. Bro. Young, P. M. of the 
Lodge presided. Owing to the insolated situation of this 
Lodge, the members have little chance of visiting other Lodges 
and in consequence I had to point out some little irregularities. 

The arrival of the Steamer which I had to return by shorten- 
ed the meeting somewhat. Number of meetings, 8 ; average 
attendance, 9. In March last I received a letter from the W. 
M. stating that several members had withdrawn from the 
Lodge in consequence of a candidate having been rejected. 
The W. M. suggested that I should cause the withdrawal of the 
charter and establish a Lodge elsewhere, and stating this 
was the wish of those who had withdrawn ; I had to reply that 
the members who had withdrawn placed it beyond their power 
to have any voice in the matter. I suggested that a meeting 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. I2Q 

should be called in order to try and heal the differences ; this 
was done and the W. M. informs me some have again joined 
the Lodge, although the larger number have not. I am in 
hopes that the exercise of judgment and patience may yet pro- 
duce the desired result. 

Fort William Lodge, No. 415 : Twice I had the pleasure 
of visiting this Lodge. 

The first time on the 12th of December, 1888, when I found 
all the Officers except the W. M. able to do their work very 
well. The W. M. had been much absent from home and in 
consequence was not perfect in his work ; since then a new 
election took place when Bro. F. C. Perry became W. M. 

Upon my second visit I found W. Bro. Perry both compe- 
tent and painstaking, and subordinate Officers capable. 
Number of meetings, 16; average attendance, 14. 

Pequonga Lodge, No. 414, Rat Portage: This Lodge I 
visited Dec. 14th, 1888. W. Bro. Kobold, the W. M., com- 
bines a clear head and impressive manner; therefore, the 
exemplification of the work — in the second degree — was highly 
satisfactory. The Lodge is in a prosperous condition. There 
were present, 32 ; average attendance, 24; meetings held, 20. 

Keewatin Lodge, No. 417, Keewatin : On the 15th of Dec, 
1888, I visited Keewatin Lodge. It has only been in existence 
about two years, but I found it in a splendid healthy condition ; 
every Officer, from W. Bro. Warren down, doing his work in a 
manner which would commend itself to the most careful critic. 
Two candidates received the third degree. Bro. R. A. Mather, 
the Secretary, w r as able to show me a most complete set of 
books. The Lodge is growing rapidly and gaining good 
material. Number present, 32 ; number of meetings, 20 ; 
average attendance. 21. 

Shuniah Lodge, No. 287, Port Arthur : Visited on the 8th 
of Dec, 1888 and the 14th of May, 1889. On both occasions 
the quality of work done was excellent. The Officers of 1888, 
those of the present term, being thoroughly conversant with 
their duties, it is but natural that the Lodge should be 
prosperous. Meetings held, 24; average attendance, 22. 

INSURANCE. 

All Lodges in this district have their furniture insured. 



130 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 



DISPENSATIONS. 



I have issued ten dispensations for attendance at divine 
service, etc., during the year. 

GRAND MASTER WALKEM. 

A very pleasing episode in the history of the year was an 
official visit from the M. W. the Grand Master, in August of 
1888, to Shuniah Lodge, Port Arthur. This was the first visit 
of a Grand Master to any part of the district, and has been a 
source of benefit and great gratification to the Craft. 

I take this opportunity of thanking my Brethren for the 
uniform courtesy and consideration I have received from one 
and all during my term of office. 

All of which is fraternally submitted, 

S. W. Ray, 
D. D. G. M. Algoma District No. 17. 
Port Arthur, 1st July, 1889. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF WARRANTS. 

R. W. Bro. J. Ross Robertson, President of the Board of 
General Purposes, presented and read the following ■ 

report : 

The Board beg to report as follows : 

That while desirous for the dissemination, in every proper 
way, of the principles of our beloved Order, and the extension 
among men of that brotherly love and affection inculcated by 
Freemasonry, the Board are nevertheless constrained, on a 
deliberate consideration of the whole subject, to congratulate 
Grand Lodge on the exceptional fact that no dispensations 
have been granted to new Lodges by the M. W. the Grand 
Master during the past year. 

The Board are of opinion that the strengthening and con- 
solidating of Lodges in many localities are what is needed, and 
not the multiplication of new Lodges, in or near those centres 
where Lodges already exist. In many places there are two 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 131 

Lodges which barely manage to exist — where there is only 
material for the formation of one strong flourishing Lodge. 

The Board would therefore beg leave to suggest that it be a 
direction of Grand Lodge that in all future applications for 
dispensations special measures be adopted by the D. D. G. M's 
to ascertain the condition of Masonry in the Lodges contiguous 
to the localities for which dispensations may be applied, and 
that the result of the enquiries be transmitted to the Grand 
Master with the application. 

With reference to the application for the establishment of a 
Lodge at Jaffa, in Syria, under the jurisdiction of our Grand 
Lodge, the Board concur in the opinion expressed by the 
M. W. the Grand Master, that whatever our right may be it is 
not expedient for us to establish Lodges in places where they 
cannot be properly supervised by us. 

All of which is fraternally submitted. 

Donald Ross, 

Chairman of Sub-Committee. 

It was moved by R. W. Bro. J. Ross Robertson, seconded 
by R. W. Bro. Donald Ross, and 

Resolved, — That the Report of the Board on Warrants be received and 
adopted. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD ON AUDIT AND 
FINANCE. 

R. W. Bro. J. Ross Robertson, President of the Board of 
General Purposes, presented and read the following 

report : 

The Board, through the Committee on Finance, have audit- 
ed the books of the Grand Treasurer and Grand Secretary, and 
certify to their correctness. 

All moneys received by the Grand Secretary have been paid 
over to the Grand Treasurer, and the receipt acknowledged 
by that officer. Vouchers have been produced for all pay- 



I32 ('.RAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

merits made by the (hand Treasurer, as authorized by Grand 
Lodge. 

The Receipts and Expenditure from 1st June, 1888, to 31st 
May, 1 889, have been as follows : — 

Receipts. 

Cash in Bank 31st May, 1888 $ 9,243 43 

Certificates 2 ,347 °° 

Dues 9,453 2 5 

Fees i,3S J °° 

Dispensations 82 00 

Warrants 40 00 

Constitutions 473 00 

Commutations 125 00 

Interest on General Fund 2,632 77 

Interest on Asylum Fund 333 00 

Sundries 170 30 

$26,250 75 

Expenditures. 

Grand Secretary's Salary $ 1,600 00 

Assistant " " , 800 00 

Grand Treasurer's " 200 00 

Rent of Grand Secretary's Office 175 00 

Incidental Expenses, namely : 

Fuel and Light $ 51 05 

Office Cleaning 40 40 

Express and Cartage 18 70 

Travelling Expenses 17 20 

Telegrams 16 20 

Books and Stationery 15 41 

Postages 241 80 

Sundries 11 20 

$411 96 
Less amount due Grand Secretary ... 1 1 1 96 

300 00 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 1 33 

Grand Secretary balance of Incidentals, 31st 

May, 1888 268 08 

Allowance to Grand Master for Expenses. . . . 500 00 
R. Duncan & Co., Books and Stationery. ... 32 30 
Times Printing Co., Proceedings, Constitut- 
ions, etc 989 5 l 

Buntin, Gillies & Co., Stationery 1 5 63 

Copp, Clark & Co., Certificates, etc 306 77 

Engraving and Printing Masonic Map 117 50 

G. E. B. Pense, Printing for G. M., 1879 6 50 

M. W. Bro. Klotz, Postages and Expenses as 

Chairman of Benevolence 1 5 00 

Masonic Relief Association U. S. and Canada. 194 50 
Expenses Board of General Purposes, re 

Minister and Langton et al 1 16 55 

Expenses of Annual Meeting of Board 7 84 55 

Premium of Grand Secretary's Bond 50 00 

Expenses at Meeting of Grand Lodge 169 00 

Office Furniture, new Stove, etc 39 75 

W. Bruce, Engrossing Addresses 25 25 

Presentation to M. W. Bro. Robertson 290 00 

Insurance on Regalia 15 75 

BENEVOLENCE : 

Orders on Benevolent Fnnd $9,77° °° 

Mrs. Wilson 300 00 

Miss Wilson 300 00 

Mrs. Harris 225 00 

Yellow Fever sufferers, Jacksonville. 200 00 

— io,795 °° 

Cash in Bank of Commerce, 31st May, 1889. 8,444 II 

$26,250 75 

The Funds of the Grand Lodge on 31st May, 1889, were as 
follows : — 

London Loan Co., debentures $10,000 00 

Western Canada Loan and Savings Co., 

debentures 10,000 00 

* 



134 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

Canada Permanent Loan and Savings Co., 

debentures 10,000 00 

Landed Banking and Loan Co., debentures. . 10,000 00 

Hamilton Provident and Loan Co., debentures. 10,000 00 
Huron and Erie Loan and Savings Co., 

debentures 10,000 00 

Cash in Bank of Commerce 8,444 1 1 



5,444 11 

Which represents the balances at the credit of the following 
accounts : — 

General Fund $56,686 86 

Asylum Fund — Balance 31st May, 

1888 $11,424 25 

Add interest collected 333 00 

11,757 25 

$68,444 XI 
The Board have examined the following accounts, and 
finding them correct recommend their payment : — 
Times Printing Co., Proceedings, Constitu- 
tions, etc $949 27 

Copp, Clark & Co., Certificates, etc 474 74 

M. W. Bro. Robertson, Foreign Correspon- 
dence 100 00 

Brown Bros., Register 10 00 

Buntin, Gillies & Co., Stationery 425 

R. Duncan & Co., Books and Stationery. ... 70 10 

Masonic Relief Association, United States and 

Canada 194 50 

M. W. Bro. Klotz, Postages, etc., re benevol- 
ence 15 00 

Grand Secretary, Balance of Incidentals, 1889. 111 96 
Grand Secretary, Advance for Incidentals .... 400 00 

$2,329 82 

The Board are in receipt of the Certificate from the Manager 

and Accountant of the Canadian Bank of Commerce, showing 

■:■'• 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 1 35 

that the Debentures belonging to the Grand Lodge are in the 
custody of the Bank for safe keeping, and that the balance of 
$8,444.11, to the credit of the current account of the Grand 
Lodge, as at 31st May, 1889, is correct. 

As the contract for printing expires during this coming year, 
the Board recommend that the Grand Secretary ask for tenders 
for three years, to be submitted to the Board at the next 
Annual Communication. 

In accordance with the recommendation made by the Board 
last year, the accounts of Grand Lodge have been simplified, 
so that but two accounts now appear in the Financial State- 
ment, namely, the General Fund and the Asylum Fund ; the 
payments on account of Benevolence appearing in the General 
Expenditures. 

Fraternally submitted, 

T. Sargant, 

Chairman of Sub- Committee. 

It was moved by R. W. Bro. J. Ross Robertson, seconded 
by R. W. Bro. Thomas Sargant, and 

Resolved, — That the report of the Board on Audit and Finance be 
received and (subsequently) adopted. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD ON BENEVOLENCE. 

R. W. Bro. J. Ross Robertson, on behalf of the Board, 
presented the following report : 

The Board have had under consideration the several applica- 
tions for relief, and, after due consideration, recommend that 
the following appropriations be paid during the ensuing year 
from the Funds of Benevolence, in two half-yearly payments, 
namely : — 

No. To Whom Granted. Amount. Through Whom Payable. 

i Toronto Board of Relief $100 Sec.-Treas. Toronto L.B.R. 

2 Hamilton " " 100 " Hamilton " 

3 London " " 100 " London " 

4 Ottawa " " 30 " Ottawa " 



'■ ,V< GRAND LODGE OF CANAD \ 

No. To Whom Granted. Amount. Through Whom Payable. 

5 Kingston Board of Relief $50 Sec-Treas. Kingst'n L.B.R 

6 Chatham " 20 " Chatham " 

7 Widow of [. K 10 " Toronto " 

8 " A. De G 40 

9 " J- P 3° 

10 " W. J 30 " " " 

n " J. J 20 " " " 

12 " F. N 20 " " " 

13 " J- A 10 " " « 

14 " J. P 20 " " " 

15 " J. McK 20 " " " 

16 " R. R 20 " " « 

17 " J. G 20 " " " 

18 " C. S 20 

19 " J. M 30 " " " 

20 " A. W. T 20 " " 

21 " J. G. B 30 " " " 

22 " E. N. M 40 " " " 

23 " J. W. F 40 " " " 

24 " C. G. F 30 

25 " D. S 20 •' 

26 " G. W. S 40 

27 " F. S. B 20 

28 " J. A. J 30 

29 " A. J. S 30 " " " 

30 Brother C. W. W 50 " " " 

31 Widow of P. P 20 " Hamilton " 

32 " T. B. H 20 

33 " J. H.W 20 

34 " W. S 20 

35 " W. W. R 20 

36 " P. S 30 

37 " W. L 20 

38 " T. McC 20 

39 " J. W. P 20 " " 

40 " J. S. L 30 " « « 

41 " J- McK 20 " " « 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 137 

No. To Whom Granted. Amount. Through Whom Payable. 

42 Widow of A. McM 20 Sec-Treas. Hamlt'n L.B.R. 

43 " J. B 20 

44 " T. S 30 

45 " W. D 20 

46 " G. S 20 

47 " J. A. M 30 

48 " J. L 40 

49 " F. R. B 30 

50 Brother C. S 50 

5i " J-K 50 

52 " A. B 40 

53 Widow of T. W 20 " London " 

54 " LeC 10 

55 " T. L 20 

56 " A. Mel 20 

57 " E. J. G 20 

58 " A. G 40 

59 " G. C 20 

60 " J. P 20 " 

61 " W. N. K 10 

62 " T. McC. L. . . 30 

63 " J. W 20 

64 " R. S. S 20 

65 " T. G. S 20 

66 " S. M 30 

67 " H. R. B 30 

68 " J. H 20 

69 " J. 30 " " " 

70 " J. R 10 " " 

7i " J- E 30 

72 " T. E 20 

73 " G. B. G 20 

74 " H. A. B 40 " " 

75 " J. W 20 " " " 

76 " F. L 30 " " 

77 " W. McC 20 " " 

78 " W. C 30 « " « 



I 3% GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

No. To Whom Granted. Amount. Throu R h Whom Payable. 

79 Orphans of J. O 20 Sec-Treas. London L.B.R. 

80 Brother J.I! 50 " " 

8,1 Widow of T. S 30 " Ottawa 

82 " J. s 20 

83 " J.H 20 

84 " T. S. S 20 

85 '• E. C. B 30 

86 « J. McK 30 

87 " E. P 30 

88 " J. W. 1 20 

89 " W. H. F 30 

90 " W. W. H 40 

91 " P. V 40 

92 Brother T. O'N 5 o «■ « 

93 Orphans of J. 40 " " « 

94 " H. McB 30 " « « 

95 Widow of T. G. H 20 << Kingston '< 

96 " R. C. B 30 

97 " S. H. B 30 

98 " J. R. T 20 

99 " J. K. 30 

100 " J. K. 20 

101 " W. T 30 « « » 

102 " W. J 40 « « tt 

103 " R. N 10 " 

104 " D. C 30 

105 " W. W. N 30 

106 " J. H. B 30 

i°7 " J. J. W 20 

108 Orphans of T. P 40 " « « 

i°9 " J. D 50 " " 

no " F. E 5 o « 

1 1 1 Widow of F. R 20 « Peterborough - 

112 " W. B 20 " " a 

113 " T. B. M 30 

"4 " E. T 40 

115 " S. W 20 

116 « A, E. B 20 « « « 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 139 

No. To Whom Granted. Amount. Through Whom Payable. 

117 Widow of J. J. J. T 20 Sec-Treas. Chatham L.B.R. 

118 " M. T. Q 20 

119 " R. L 20 

120 " D. C 30 

121 " J. McP 30 

122 " R. N. K 30 " Guelph 

123 " W. C 20 

124 Brother J. E. W 50 

125 Orphans of G. McG B. .. 10 

126 Louisa, dau. of R. H. L.. 20 

127 Widow of S. 1 20 " Stratford " 

128 " W. L 10 " Strathroy " 

129 " R. W. M 10 

130 " J. B. S 30 

131 " H. H 20 

132 " J. McN 20 

133 " D. Z 30 

134 Orphans of J. M. B 10 

135 Widow of C. J. E 30 " Gait " 

136 " T. B 20 " " 

i37 " J.C. S 30 

138 " G. G 30 

139 " H. R 20 " Goderich " 

140 " M. McP 30 

141 " D. McL 30 " " 

142 Brother J. S. V 50 

143 Widow of T. A 40 " Barrie " 

144 Brother J. B 50 

145 Widow of J. F 30 " Brockville " 

146 " H. B. S. W... 20 

147 " W. W 20 

148 Brother E. McN 50 " " 

149 Orphans of F. O. C. ... . . 30 

150 Widow of A. S. Mel 10 " Owen Sound " 

151 " J. T 20 W.M. Niagara, 2. 

152 " R. H 20 " 

153 " J- C 20 « Union, 9. 



140 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

No. To Whom Granted. Amount. Through Whom Payable. 

154 Widow of F. B 20 W. M. Union 9. 

155 " N. G 30 " 

156 " 1). V. P 20 " 

157 " N. VV. S 20 " 

158 " W.J). H 20 " Norfolk, 10. 

159 " J. B 20 " 

160 " A. D 20 " 

161 " L. W 30 " 

162 Brother J. H 40 " Moira, 11. 

163 Widow of W. 1) 20 " True Britons, 14. 

164 " J- H 30 « 

165 " W. S 30 " Prince Edward, iS. 

166 " J. J. C 20 " 

167 " R. L 20 " St. Francis, 24. 

168 Brother J. W. C 50 " 

169 Widow of J. McG 20 " Ontario, 26. 

170 " W. J. P 30 " 

171 W. J 20 " Composite, 3a 

172 " H. L. T 30 " Jerusalem, 31. 

173 " A. D 30 " 

174 Brother D. K 50 " 

175 Widow of W. L 30 " Amity, 32. 

176 " S. W 20 " 

177 " M. F 10 " 

178 Orphans of S. B 20 " 

179 Widow of J. McV 20 " Thistle, 34. 

180 " M. S 30 " 

181 " B. N 20 " Welland, 36. 

182 Brother H. T. R 50 " 

183 Widow of J. K 20 " Hiram, 37. 

184 " P. S. McK. ..20 " 

185 " J. C. B. G.... 40 " 

186 " I. N 30 « Trent, 38. 

187 " J. M 20 " King Solomon, 43. 

188 " D. L. C 10 " Madoc, 48. 

189 " A. G 30 " Merrickville, 55. 

190 " J. L. S 30 " Durham, 66. 



No. 
I 9 I 
192 

194 

i95 
196 
197 
198 
199 
200 
201 
202 
203 
204 
205 
206 
207 
208 
209 
210 
211 
212 
213 
214 

215 
216 
217 
218 
219 
220 
221 
222 
223 
224 
225 
226 
227 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN 
To^Whom Granted. Amount. 

Widow of T. B. C 40 W. 

D. C 20 " 

A. B 20 " 

Brother J. I ' 40 " 

Widow of W, I.I 30 " 

J. McK 20 " 

J. B 40 " 

R. H 20 " 

A. N. B 20 " 

G. G 10 " 

J. G. B 20 " 

J. M. M 20 " 

W. W. T 20 " 

Orphans of W. R 10 " 

Brother of J. M 50 " 

R. F 50 " 

Orphans of W. J. D 20 " 

Widuw of VV. H 20 " 

R. B. C. P.... 20 " 

C.G 30 " 

J. C 20 " 

G. G 20 " 

R. B 20 " 

J. F. R 30 " 

Orphans of S. S 20 " 

Widow of J. B. S 30 " 

Orphans of J. P 20 " 

E. W 20 " 

Widow of J. B. S 30 " 

Brother P. M 40 " 

Widow of J. P 30 " 

T. D. H 20 " 

W. A 20 " 

" W. S. P 20 " 

L. B 20 " 

W. P 20 " 

J. W. B 30 " 



SOUND, 5889. 141 

Through Whom Payable. 

M. Sterling, 69. 
St. James, 73. 



Faithful Brethren, 77. 
St. John's, 81. 
Manito, 90. 

Colborne, 91. 



Northern Light, 93. 
« 

Sharon, 97. 



Tuscan, 99. 
Valley, 100. 
Maple Leaf, 103. 

St. John's, 104. 

Burford, 106. 
« 

Albion, 109. 



Central, no. 
Wilson, 113. 



142 GRAN1» L0DG1 OF CANADA. 

No. To Whom Granl Amount. Throiir.h \\ 

228 Widow of A. M. '. 30 W. M. Ivy, 115. 

229 " J. H. H 30 " 

230 " K. I) 30 " Cassia, 116. 

231 " T. A 20 " . Maple Leaf, 119. 

232 " M. C 40 " 

233 " J. G. McT. R.. 20 " 

234 Orphans of S. J. B 10 " " 

235 Widow of R. N 20 " The Belleville, 123. 

236 " J. A. Mel 30 " 

237 " S. C. E 20 " 

238 Orphans of G. B. F 20 " 

239 Widow of J. A. P 20 " Cornwall, 125. 

240 " T. D 20 " 

241 " J. R 30 " Golden Rule, 126. 

242 " H. O'N 30 " 

243 " J. H 10 " Rising Sun, 129. 

244 Brother J. B 50 " Richardson, 136. 

245 Widow of W. C. J 20 " Pythagoras, 137. 

246 " W. F. L 10 " 

247 « R. M 40 " 

248 " J.J 30 " Lebanon, 139. 

249 " S. F 40 " 

250 " J. K 20 " J. B. Hall, 145. 

251 " J. T 30 " Mississippi, 147. 

252 " W. A. D 20 " 

253 " D. T 30 " " 

254 " W. S 20 " Grand River, 151. 

255 Brother E. J. H 20 " Simpson, 157. 

256 Widow of F. B 30 " Percy, 161. 

257 " J- C 10 « 

258 " J. K 30 " McNab, 169. 

259 " W. A. F 40 " Princeof Wales, 171 

260 " W. H. C 30 " Oriental, 181. 

261 " J. E. D 30 " 

262 " R. B. W 30 " Prince Albert, 183. 

263 " J. H 20 " Scotland, 193. 

264 " R. R 20 " Orillia, 192. 



No 
265 
266 
267 
268 
269 
270 
271 
272 

273 
274 

275 
276 
277 
278 
279 
280 
28l 
282 
283 
284 
285 
286 
287 
288 
289 
290 
291 
292 

293 
294 

2 95 
296 
297 
298 
299 
300 
301 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 1 43 

To Whom Granted. Amount. Through Whom Payable. 

Brother J. T 40 W. M. Petrolia, 194. 

Widow of W. W 30 " Madawaska, 196. 

C. H 20 " St. Thomas, 200. 

" H. W 30 " Leeds, 201. 

Brother J. D. F 50 " Irvine, 203. 

Widow of F. G 30 " Evergreen, 209. 

Brother I. C. L 50 " Craig, 214. 

" I. C. S 50 " Harris, 216. 

Widow of W. McK 20 " Credit, 219. 

" F. B 40 " Zeredatha, 220. 

Brother D. G. B 50 " Marmora, 222. 

Widow of J. Z 20 " Bernard, 225. 

W. L 40 " 

D. P 20 " 

" R. S 20 " Vienna, 237. 

T. F 40 " Havelock, 238. 

A. K 30 " Thistle, 250. 

" W. P 30 " Sydenham, 255. 

J. H 30 " Oak Branch, 261. 

" McK. C 30 " Cedar, 270. 

F. N 20 " 

W. S 40 " 

Brother W. H. H 40 " 

Widow of A. T 40 " Seymour, 272. 

" J. H 20 " New Hope, 279. 

S. W 40 " 

C. R 30 " Lome, 282. 

J. McR 20 " 

C. C. B 30 " Temple, 296. 

" J. R. A 20 " Victoria, 299. 

R. S 20 " Mount Olivet, 300. 

W. W 40 " Blyth, 303. 

A. B 20 " Minerva, 304. 

Orphans of J. F. W 30 " Humber, 305. 

Widow of J. S 30 " Durham, 306. 

" J J. E 20 " Morning Star, 309. 

G. H. R 40 " 



•44 



GR \\l> LODGE OF < \\ \l'\. 



No. To Whom Granted. Amouut. Throuph Whom Payable. 

302 Brother J. 1' 50 \V. M. Morning Star, 309. 



303 Widow of J. M 



3°4 

305 
306 

3°7 
308 

3°9 
310 

311 
312 

3 l 3 

3i5 

316 Brother J, 



I). J. I J. .. . 

C. I 

V. B 

H. E 

G. O 

E. E. S. . . . 

J- A 

A. F 

J. C. McT. 
H. P. B.. . 

\V. R 40 

R. V 20 

R- B 50 



20 
3° 
30 
20 

3° 

20 
20 
20 
20 
10 
3° 



Blair, 314. 
Wilmot, 318. 



I [iram, 319. 
\\ alker, 321. 
Alvinston, 323. 

Occident, 346. 
Granite, 352. 
Brock, 354. 
Waterdown, 357. 
McCall, 386. 

Crystal Fountain, 389. 
Florence, 390. 
Howard, 391. 
Huron, 392. 
Oakville, 400. 

A. B 40 M.W. Bro. A. A. Stevenson, 

[Montreal. 

The following returns have been received from the Local 
Boards of Relief, as at 31st May, 1889. 

TORONTO. 

RECEIPTS. 
Balance on hand 31st May, 



3 1 7 Widow of D. M 40 

318 Brother J. C 50 

319 Widow of J. W 20 

320 " E. A 30 

321 Brother R. M 50 

322 Widow of J. W 30 

323 " W. S 30 

324 



1888 $1,281 53 

Direct Grant from Grand 

Lodge 100 00 

To 30 Pensioners 740 00 

Grants from 8 Lodges, 

viz.: 22, 25, 65, 75, 86, 

218, 316, 410 476 40 

Other Sources 361 09 



$2,959 02 



EXPENDITURE. 

Grants from Grand Lodge 

to 30 Pensioners $ 720 00 

Local Relief 186 80 

Transient Relief 165 05 

Funeral Expenses 100 00 

Incidentals 25 60 

Two Orders returned... . 20 00 

Other Payments 529 20 



Total Expenditure $1,746 65 

Balance on hand 1,212 37 

$2,959 °2 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 145 



HAMILTON. 



RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand 31st May, 

1888 $ 526 56 

Direct Grant from Grand 

Lodge 100 00 

To 30 Pensioners 760 00 

Grants from 2 Lodges, 

viz. : 6, 324 82 45 

Other Sources 166 90 



$1,635 91 



EXPENDITURE. 
Grants from Grand Lodge 

to 30 Pensioners $ 760 00 

Local Relief 414 00 

Transient Relief 158 36 

Funeral Expenses 21 50 



Total Expenditure $1,353 86 

Balance on hand 282 05 



$1,635 91 



LONDON. 



RECEIPTS. 
Balance on hand 3 1st May, 

1888 $ 231 00 

Direct Grant from Grand 

Lodge ico 00 

To 36 Pensioners 860 00 

Grants from 5 Lodges, 

viz.: 42, 64, 195, 209a, 

326 54 70 

Other Sources 270 55 



$1,516 25 



EXPENDITURE. 
Grants from Grand Lodge 

to 36 Pensioners $ 860 00 

Local Relief 294 55 

Transient Relief 152 00 

Incidentals 7 94 



Total Expenditure $1,314 49 

Balance on hand 201 76 



$1,516 25 



RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand 31st May, 
1888 

Direct Grant from Grand 
Lodge.. 

To 13 Pensioners 

Grants from 6 Lodges, 
viz: 52, 58, 148, 177, 

264, 371 

Other Sources 



OTTAWA. 

EXPENDITURE, 

Grants from Grand Lodge 

$ 93 01 to 13 Pensioners $35° 00 

Local Relief 165 00 

30 00 Transient Relief 30 00 

350 00 Funeral Expenses 10 00 

Incidentals 7 00 



103 00 
20 00 



Total Expenditure $562 00 

Balance on hand 34 01 



$596 01 



KINGSTON. 



RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand 31st May, 

1888 $ 4 06 

Direct Grant from Grand 

Lodge 60 00 



EXPENDITURE. 

Grants from Grand Lodge 

to 12 Pensioners $44° 00 

Local Relief 144 00 

Transient Relief 62 50 



146 



i;kand lodge of Canada. 



To 18 Pensioner: $44000 

Grants from 2 Lodges, 

viz : 3, 92 228 89 

Other Sources 20 00 



Funeral Expenses $99 39 

Incidentals I 78 



Total Expenditure $747 67 

Balance on hand 5 28 



$752 95 



$752 95 



PETERBORO'. 



RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand 31st May, 

18S8 $ 12 84 

Direct Grant from Grand 

Lodge 20 00 

To 7 Pensioners 170 00 

Grants from 2 Lodges, 

viz : 101, 155 20 00 



EXPENDITURE. 

Grants from Grand Lodge 

to 7 Pensioners 

Local Relief 

Incidjntals 



Total Expenditure. 
Balance on hand. . 



5170 00 

40 00 

5 00 

$215 00 
7 84 

$222 84 



$222 84 

CHATHAM. 

EXPENDITURE. 

Grants from Grand Lodge 
$ 50 35 to 5 Pensioners $120 00 



Balance on hand 31st May, 

18S8 

To 5 Pensioners 120 00 Transient Relief 



Total Expenditure $150 00 

Balance on hand 20 35 



RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand 31st May 
1888 



* o 19 

To 5 Pensioners 150 00 

Grants from 3 Lodges, 

viz.: 180, 279, 360 33 50 



$170 35 

GUELPPI. 

EXPENDITURE. 

Grants from Grand Lodge 

to 5 Pensioners 

Local Relief 

Incidentals 



$170 35 



Total Expenditure 
Balance on hand . . 



$183 69 



$150 00 

10 20 

75 

$160 95 
22 74 

$183 69 



STRATFORD. 



RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand 31st May, 
18S8 

To I Pensioner 

Grant from 1 Lodge, viz.: 
332 



1 28 

20 00 



ID 



EXPENDITURE. 

Grants from Grand Lodge 

to 1 Pensioner $ 20 00 

Transient Relief 7 75 



Total Expenditure $27 75 

Balance on hand 9 73 



$37 48 



$37 48 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 147 

ST. THOMAS. 

RECEIPTS. EXPENDITURE. 

Balance on hand 31st May, Grants from Grand Lodge 

188S $ 9 00 to I Pensioner $ 30 OO 

To 1 Pensioner 30 00 Transient Relief 2 00 

Incidentals 12 

Total Expenditure. .... $ 32 12 
Balance on hand 6 88 

$39 °o $39 00 



RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand 31st May, 

1888 $ 14 87 

To 4 Pensioners 100 00 

Grant from I Lodge, 

viz : 257 92 70 

Chapter 20 00 



GALT. 

EXPENDITURE. 

Grants from Grand Lodge 

to 4 Pensioners $100 00 

Local Relief 1 17 70 

Transient Relief 1 20 

Incidentals 21 



$227 57 



Total Expenditure $219 n 

Balance on hand 8 46 



$227 57 



STRATHROY. 

RECEIPTS. EXPENDITURE. 

To 13 Pensioners $230 00 Grants from Grand Lodge 

Grants from 2 Lodges, to 13 Pensioners $23000 

viz : 83, 366 50 00 Local Relief 5 OO 

Balance due Treasurer... 50 Funeral Expenses 45 00 

Incidentals 50 

Total Expenditure $280 50 

$280 50 $280 50 



GODERICH. 

RECEIPTS. EXPENDITURE. 

To 8 Pensioners $200 00 Grants from Grand Lodge 

Grant from 1 Lodge, viz.: to 8 Pensioners $200 00 

33 8 00 Local Relief 8 00 

Total Expenditure $208 00 

$208 00 $208 00 



148 GKAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

WINDSOR. 

RECEIPTS. EXPENDITURE. 

Direct Grant from Grand Balance due Treasurer... $ o 50 
Lodge $30 00 Local Relief 10 95 

Total Expenditure $11 45 

Balance on hand 18 55 

$30 00 $30 00 

WOODSTOCK. 

RECEIPTS. EXPENDITURE. 

To 7 Pensioners $180 00 Balance due Treasurer. . . $ o 56 

Grants from 2 Lodges, Transient Relief 10 ;o 

viz.: 43, 76 66 00 Funeral Expenses 56 00 

Total Receipts $24600 Total Expenditure $247 10 

Balance due Treasurer. . . 1 10 

$247 10 $247 10 



BARRIE. 



RECEIPTS. 
Balance on hand 31st May, 

1888 $ 3 35 

To 2 Pensioners ........ 90 00 

Grants from 2 Lodges, 

viz : 93, 230 45 00 



$138 35 



EXPENDITURE. 
Grants from Grand Lodge 

to 2 Pensioners $ 90 00 

Local Relief 20 00 

Transient Relief 25 00 

Total Expenditure $135 00 

Balance on hand 3 35 

$138 35 



BROCKVILLE. 



RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand 31st May, 

1888 $ 50 40 

To 2 Pensioners 80 00 

Grants from 2 Lodges, 

viz: 5, 368 72 00 



$202 40 



EXPENDITURE. 
Grants from Grand Lodge 

to 2 Pensioners $ 80 00 

Transient Relief 871 

Funeral Expenses 28 00 



Total Expenditure $116 71 

Balance on hand 85 69 

$202 40 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 149 

OWEN SOUND. 

RECEIPTS. EXPENDITURE. 

Balance on hand 31st May, Grants from Grand Lodge 

1888 $ 3 45 to 2 Pensioners $ 30 OO 

To 2 Pensioners 30 00 Local Relief 2 00 

Transient Relief 5 °° 

Total Receipts $33 45 



Balance due Treasurer... 3 55 Total Expenditure $37 00 

$37 00 $37 00 

The Lodges which by their " return " of grants made by 
Grand Lodge, and made payable through the Master of the 
Lodge, show that they have raised money by local contribu- 
tion, and expended the same for benevolent purposes are the 
following, viz : No. 9, $140.10; No. 14, $40 ; No. 18, $72.50 ; 
No. 26, $171.82; No. 31, $25; No. 32, $11.50; No. 34, 
$35; No 54, $5.50: No. 73, $27.50; No. 81, $3.50; No. 
90, $75.00; No. 93, $101 ; No. 97. $45 : No. 104, $31 ; No. 
106, $10 ; No, 1 10, $26 ; No. 121, $10.00 ; No. 123, $228 ; 
No. 139, $1000; No. 146, $10; No. 192, $38.40; No. 201, 
$89; No. 209, $10; No. 250, $11; No. 270, $10; No. 296, 
$16.60; No. 304, $37; No. 306, $6; No. 314, $10; No. 
318, $30 ; No. 352, $15 ; No 357, $110 ; No. 390, $31 ; No. 
400, $20; amounting in the aggregate to $1,512.42. 

The Lodges which by their " return " of grants made by 
Grand Lodge, and made payable through the Master of the 
Lodge, only show the moneys received from Grand Lodge and 
paid over to the parties to whom such giants were made, but 
do not show that any money was raised or expended by such 
Lodges for benevolent purposes, are the following, viz. : — Nos. 
n, 48, 78, 100, 126, 136, 137, 153, 156, 157, 174, 207, 
214, 234, 254, 266, 278, 303, 309, 313, 321, 327, 339, 
362, 369, 375, 384, 386, 389, 391, 407. 

The Lodges in default of making " return " of grants, as 
required by rule of Grand Lodge, and in consequence of which 
default no order for any subsequent grant will be issued until 
such " return " is made, are the following, viz : For grants 
made in 1880, No. 94, $40; No. 353, $30. For grants made 
in 1 88 1, No. 179, $40. For grants made in 1882, No. 159, 



150 (IRANI) LODGE OF CANADA. 

$30; No. 217, $30. For grants made in 1883, No. 39, $20; 
No. 210, $50; No. 284, $40. For grants made in 1884, No. 
82, $30; No. 168, $20; No. 265, $50. For grants made in 
1885, No. 74, $30; No. 80, $70; No. 140, $30; No. 165, 
$30; No. 189, $50. For grants made in 1886, No. 29, $20; 
No. 89, $20; No. 171, $60; No. 215, $40; No. 235, $20; 
No. 239, $40; No. 261, $50; No. 263, $40; No. 281, $20; 
No. 286, $40; No. 307, $20; No. 311, $40; No. 388, $30 j 
No. 397, $30. For grants made in 1887, No. 24, $20; No. 
38, $30 ; No. 131, $40; No. 194, $40; No. 241, $20; No. 
272, $40; No. 289, $30; No. 347, $30. 

Among the above Lodges, the following are off the Grand 
Lodge list, viz : — 353, 210, 189, 89 and 281. 

For grants made in 1888, No. n, $40; No. 48, $10 
No. 78, $30; No. 100, $30; No. 126, $60; No. 136, $40 
No. 137, $30.; No. 153, $10; No. 156, $20; No. 157, $40 
No. 174, $50; No. 214, $40; No. 234, $50; No. 254, $40 
No. 266, $20; No. 278, $30; No. 303, $40; No. 309, $100 
No. 313, $10; No. 327, $50; No. 339, $40; No. 369, $40 
No. 375, $30; No. 384, $30; No. 386, $40; No. 389, $20 
No. 391, $50; No. 407, $40; amounting in all, for 1888, to 
$1,050 — and in addition to the above, $1,300, to a total of 
$2,360 ; of which large sum the Board of Benevolence have 
no evidence that the money ever reached the parties for whom 
it was granted. This is certainly a very important matter, into 
which it should be the duty of the several D. D. G. M's to en- 
quire and report thereon to Grand Lodge. 

The Board having regard to the fact that Grand Lodge 
desires the greatest good to the greatest number in the distri- 
bution of the Benevolent Fund, and in order to more fully ac- 
complish the object in view, would recommend that, in their 
opinion, benevolence would be better and more equitably dis- 
tributed were duplicate forms of application for relief sent to 
the D. D. G. M's as soon as may be after the session of Grand 
Lodge. 

And that it be made part of the duty of each D. D. G. M., 
on the occasion of his official visit to the Lodges in his dis- 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 151 

trict, to ascertain whether any such Lodge intends to apply to 
Grand Lodge for benevolence, and if so, to see that the 
forms be properly filled up, and also to get all the informa- 
tion in regard to such cases as may be possible, and forward 
the same to the Grand Secretary. 

When it is impossible for a D. D. G. M. to reach every 
Lodge in his district, it shall nevertheless be his duty to ascer- 
tain whether benevolence is required by such Lodge, and if so, 
to obtain the fullest information in reference thereto. 

The Board find on reference to the Report of the Com- 
mittee on Benevolence that up to the close of the year 1887 
the sum of $1,310, and for the year 1888 the sum of $1,050, 
or a total of $2,360 is the amount for which Lodges have failed 
to make returns, and for which large sum the Board have no 
evidence from the Lodges that the money ever reached the par- 
ties to whom it was granted ; and since this is a very important 
matter, the Board recommend that it shall be made part of the 
duty of each D. D. G. M. to enquire into the cause of the de- 
faulting Lodges in his district, with a view to have the return 
duly made and to report thereon to Grand Lodge. 

The Board have pleasure in calling attention to the use- 
fulness of affiliation with the General Board of Relief of the 
United States and Canada. By means of the information re- 
ceived and system pursued by this Association, a large amount 
of money has been saved to the Craft. 

In July, 1888, the Committee rejected 13 applications, 
being 6 new applications, and 7 applications for renewals 
amounting to $150. 

In July, 1889, the Committee rejected 42 applications ; of 
that number 9 were new applicants and 33 were for renewals 
of grants representing $700. 

The Board recommend that it shall be imperative for every 
Lodge intending to recommend an application for relief from 
the funds of benevolence of Grand Lodge, to pass a resolution 
to that effect in open Lodge, record the same in the minute 
book, and attach to each application for relief a copy of such 



152 GRAN'I) LODGE OP CANADA. 

resolution, signed by the Master or presiding Officer and Sec- 
retary of the Lodge, and having the seal of the Lodge attached 
thereto ; and that as to giants which are made payable through 
the Master of a private Lodge, the Master shall report to the 
Lodge the receipt of the orders for such grants, and that such 
information shall be recorded in the minutes of the Lodge. 

Fraternally submitted. 

Otto Klotz. 

Chairman of Sub- Committee. 

It was moved by R. W. Bro. J. Ross Robertson, seconded 
by M. W. Bro. Otto Klotz, and 

Resolved, — Thai the Report of the Board on Benevolence be received 
and (subsequently) adopted. 



REPORT ON THE CONDITION OF MASONRY. 

R. W. Bro. J. Ross Robertson, on behalf of the Board 
presented and read the following 

report : 

The Board having perused the reports of the D. D. G. M's, 
of sixteen out of the seventeen districts comprising Grand 
Lodge, have great pleasure in congratulating that body on their 
choice of representatives in the various districts. The work 
done by these brethren cannot be over estimated. The time 
and attention which they have devoted to their work, the skill 
and ability displayed by them in advancing and popularizing 
the cause of Masonry, as well as the conscientious and honest 
work performed, entitle them to your gratitude and love. The 
various reports display great care in their preparation, and with 
a couple of exceptions contain valuable information, enabling 
the Board to easily ascertain the progress made by the craft 
during the past year. The Board, without wishing to make 
complaints, would respectfully impress on District Masters the 
absolute necessity of forwarding their reports to the Grand 
Secretary within the time allotted to them by the Constitution. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 153 

The strict observance of this rule will materially aid the mem- 
bers of the Board in presenting a faithful record of the doings 
of the Craft, which cannot be attempted when some of the 
reports are not received until the meeting of the Board. 

No report has been received from (North Huron) District 
No. 5. This is to be greatly regretted, as Grand Lodge will 
be without any information concerning the position occupied 
by Masonry therein. 

On account of the general meagreness of the report from 
(Wilson) District No. 6, the Board cannot judge of the condi- 
tion of Masonry, except to copy the general statement contained 
therein, viz : — " Most of the Lodges are in good financial 
condition and a great many members have been admitted 
during the year." It is, however, clear that the Brother has 
visited only a few Lodges. It is to be regretted that the 
elimination of a portion of the report from (Prince Edward) 
District No. 13, should cause the absence of detailed informa- 
tion this year. We trust that no complaint will again be made 
on this heading. 

The Board are enabled to congratulate Grand Lodge on the 
prosperity it enjoys in this fair Province. 

Great credit for the same is due to the several D. D. G. M's, 
who have put forth their best efforts in the cause of Masonry, 
as well as to the visits made during the year to the several 
Districts by the M. W. the Grand Master and the R. W. the 
Deputy Grand Master. These visits have been productive of 
much good, while the instruction received by the Craft from 
these able Brethren has awakened new life in Masonry. Grand 
Lodge should congratulate itself in possessing two Brethren 
who are willing to devote their ability, their means and time 
in spreading the blessed Gospel of Brotherly Love, Relief and 
Truth. Doubly so, when it is stated that the D. G. M. trav- 
elled over 8,000 miles, held 40 meetings and addressed over 
5;ooo Brethren. 

OFFICIAL VISITS. 

The Board are pleased with the attention given by D. D. 



154 CKANl) LODGE OF CANADA. 

G. M's to the work laid out for them by Grand Lodge. In 

Districts Nos. i, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 11, 13, 16 and 17, all the 
Lodges were visited, while in Districts 9, 10, 14 and 15, all 
were visited with a few exceptions. This record speaks 
volumes for the fidelity of these Brethren. 

LODGES THAT ARE RETROGRADING. 

The Board regret that unfavorable reports on Lodges have 
been received from nine districts. In Wilson District it will be 
noticed that Ridout, No. 95, Otterville, is again reported 
against. No meetings were held and no returns have been 
made for years. An amalgamation with St. John's, 104, Nor- 
wich, is advisable. Langton, 335, Langton, has had no regu- 
lar meeting for three years. A number of Brethren are in 
arrears for dues, and the young Brethren have not yet received 
their certificates. The Board recommend a withdrawal of this 
Charter. Complaint is made against Ayr, 172. The coming 
D. D. G. M. should look into the affairs of this Lodge, and if 
there is no discernable improvement the Charter should be 
withdrawn. The affairs of Seven Star, 285, also require atten- 
tion. The Officers of St. John, 340, have not as yet been in- 
stalled. The D. D. G. M. should impress on them a sense of 
their duty. 

LODGE OF INSTRUCTION. 

The Board regret that with the exception of Ontario Dis- 
trict No. 1 2 no Lodges of Instruction have been held during 
the year. This is to be regretted, as it is one of the elements 
in producing uniformity in the work. The several District 
Masters have, however, given the requisite instruction during 
their official visits. In view of the fact that a W. M. was una- 
ble to open his Lodge, some wise legislation should be formu- 
lated with reference to the qualification of aspirants for the 
East. A certificate of competency from a D. D. G. M. 
should be insisted on before an installation can take place. 
None but qualified Brethren should be placed in power, as the 
welfare of the Lodge is in their keeping. 

The D. D. G. M. from London District reports that objec- 
tions were raised in St. George's, No. 42, London, to the lee- 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 155 

tures which it has been his custom to deliver in every Lodge in 
the district, and which lectures, he states, are different from 
those laid down by Grand Lodge. The Board cannot express 
an opinion without receiving further information. The worthy 
Brother is to be commended for imparting to the Brethren his 
store of Masonic knowledge, but if these lectures are repre- 
sented to be authorized by Grand Lodge, or intended to take 
the place of those laid down in the ceremonies, then the 
Board would suggest that a close observance of the Constitu- 
tion and rulings are at all times necessary and desirable. 

COLLECTION OF DUES. 

The reports of the various D. D. G. M's are of great interest 
on this question. The suggestion and advice therein given 
should be adopted by every Lodge in the Jurisdiction. 
Brethren, conduct your Lodges on business principles, other- 
wise you will be certain to reap the whirlwind. Grand Lodge 
places in your power the necessary legislation to rid yourselves 
of the "barnacles" which you find in most of your Lodges. 
Avail yourselves of it. But the Board would respectfully point 
out that an efficient Secretary attached to each Lodge, who 
will collect the dues on commission instead of a stated salary, 
will materially aid in settling this vexed and important question. 

BENEVOLENCE. 

The Board view with pleasure that Lodges throughout the 
country are amalgamating in the formation of Benevolent 
Boards, and that considerable attention is given to the proper 
working of the same. Also, that much credit is given to 
the warning circulars, issued by the Masonic Board of Relief 
of the United States and Canada. These circulars have been 
the means of saving to the Craft thousands of dollars, thus 
enabling the deserving needy to be assisted, while tramps and 
frauds are, on their arrival, welcomed as old acquaintances and 
presented with the "warning circular." 

DISPENSATIONS. 

The attendance of Masons at divine service, on the festival 
of St John, receives prominent notice in the various reports. 



156 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

The attention of D. D. G. M's is, however, drawn to the 
Constitution, wherein will be found the objects for which they 
may grant dispensations. Some of the District Masters have 
disregarded the warnings on this point, contained in last year's 
report, and have granted dispensations for " At Homes," and 
to change the night of meeting of a Lodge, which is beyond 
their power. 

EXPENSES OF D. D. G. M'S. 

The Board regret that in several of the districts the 
expenses of the District Masters have not been paid. Surely 
this must have been an oversight on the part of the Lodges, 
as their liability for the same is governed by Clause 178 of the 
Constitution, to which the earnest attention of the Craft is 
invited. The dignity and manhood of the Grand Lodge 
representatives must not be allowed to suffer by actions 
reported by one of the D. D. G. M's. 

HARMONV IN THE LODGES. 

It is with pleasure the Board note that, with a few exceptions, 
prosperity, peace and harmony are enjoyed by all the Lodges. 

ATTENDANCE AT LODGE MEETINGS. 

It is gratifying to note the general improvement in the 
attendance of members at Lodge meetings. In order to in- 
crease the attendance greater efforts should be made in 
providing literary entertainment for the members. If you wish 
to attract men of intelligence and intellectuality to your meet- 
ings it is necessary to provide literary treats that will be 
entertaining and instructive. You cannot expect men to leave 
comfortable firesides, or to forsake the numerous attractions 
of life, for the sake of spending an evening in a Lodge where 
the presiding Officer has no higher ambition than to initiate a 
candidate, or to call on the S. W. for the next order of business. 
On the roll of each Lodge can be found men who are fully 
qualified to prepare papers on the numerous interesting 
subjects with which Masonry abounds. Make an effort there- 
fore in this direction and you will have the best men in the 
community knocking at your doors for admission. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 157 

EXAMINATION OF VISITORS. 

The Board consider that sufficient attention is not given by 
the members to this important part of our system. This 
portion of the work is usually allotted to Past Masters, who, 
in some cases, have grown rusty on important points of our 
ceremonies. It is advisable that the rank and file of a Lodge 
should take part in these proceedings, and for that purpose 
the W. M. should instruct the members on Lodge nights in 
the proper mode to conduct such examinations. 

STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 

In order that your Board may be enabled to secure reliable 
information, on which to base their report on the condition of 
Masonry in this jurisdiction, they deem it essentially necessary 
to ask Grand Lodge to instruct the D. D. G. M's to confine 
their statistical information regarding their respective Lodges 
to the appended form, which we recommend to be printed and 
distributed by Grand Lodge. 

THE FRATERNAL DEAD. 

The Board are again called upon to record the inroads made 
in our ranks by the Angel of Death. The list this year is 
unusually large, and contains the names of Brethren who were 
loved for their virtues and exemplary conduct ; who were wise 
in Council, and zealous in the cause of Masonry, and who 
occupied prominent and responsible positions in the gift of 
the people. Our hearts go out in sorrow to the many afflicted 
homes. Our sympathies are extended to the sorrowing widow 
and fatherless children. Brethren, have we not a duty to per- 
form? We are taught that Masonry "comforts the mourner, 
speaks peace and consolation to the troubled spirit ; carries 
relief and gladness to the habitations of want and destitution, 
and dries the tears of the Widow and Orphan." Let us, 
therefore, who are enjoying the benefits of Masonry never 
forget the duties we owe to the Order. Let us also bear in 
mind, that although we are now enjoying the blessings of 
health and are permitted to give one another the warm grasp 
of hand, in a few short days " the pitcher may be broken at 



158 GRAND LODGE OP CANADA. 

the fountain and the wheel broken at the cistern," and the 
Brethren may be dropping the sprig of evergreen over our 
graves. Let us therefore remember that : 

" Death hath made no breach 

In love and sympathy, in hope and trust ; 

No outward sign or sound our ears can reach ; 

But there's an inward spiritual speech 

That greets us still, though mortal tongues be dust." 

" It bids us do the work that they laid down, 
Take up the song where they broke off the strain ; 
So journeying till we reach the heavenly town, 
Where are laid up our treasures and our Crown 
And our lost loved ones will be found again." 

Of the many who have passed " To the Beyond," one kind 
face is missed at this Communication, one honest, God-fearing 
man will no more join in our deliberations. He was loved by 
all who knew him. No worthy distressed person ever called 
on him and came away empty handed. We refer to V. W. 
Bro. Henry Bickford, who at the time of his death was Mayor 
of the Town of Dundas, whose death is not only a loss to 
Grand Lodge, but to the community in which he was a shining 
leader. Farewell, Brother ! May you enjoy in the Grand Lodge 
above the rewards which your good works entitle you to. We 
will emulate your noble qualities, and keep your memory fresh 
and green in our hearts. 

" But strew his ashes to the wind, 

Whose sword or voice has served mankind ; 

And is he dead, most glorious mind 

Lifts thine on high ? 
To live in hearts we leave behind 

Is not to die." 

The Board fraternally recommend the placing of memorial 
pages in our records to the memory of R. W. Bros. T. B. Bain, 
J. S. Loomis, David Curtis, A. G. Macdonnell, C. D. Macdon- 
nell and V. W. Bros. Henry Bickford, C. Doebler and Robert 
Robinson. 

All of which is fraternally submitted, 

E. T. Malone, 

Chairman of Sub- Committee. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 159 

It was moved by R. W. Bro. J. Ross Robertson, seconded 
by R. W. Bro. E. T. Malone, and 

Resolved, — That the report of the Board on the Condition of Masonry 
be received and (subsequently) adopted. 



Appendix to Report on Condition of Masonry. 

Returns to be filled up by the W. M. of each Lodge for 
the information of the D. D. G. M., showing the standing of 
the Lodge for one year, ending ist July, 188 : 

1. Number of Lodge. 

2. Name of Lodge. 

3. Location. 

4. Membership . 

(a) Total number of all members. 

(b) Increase during year. 
(c( Decrease during year. 

5. Degrees conferred : 

(a) E. A. 

(b) F. C. 

(c) M. M. 

6. Affiliations. 

7. Restorations. 

8. Resignations. 

9. Suspensions N. P D. 

10. Suspensions for other causes. 

11. Deceased. 

12. Meetings held : 

(a) Regular. 

(b) Emergent. 

(c) Total. 

13. Average attendance of members, 
j 4. Amount paid for relief. 

15. Number of members over twelve months in arrear. 

1 6. Total of all arrearages. 

17. Up to what date have Grand Lodge returns been sent in ? 



160 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

1 8. State of Lodge financially. 

19. Prospects of Lodge. 

20. Can W. M. work all the degrees ? 

21. Insurance. 



REPORT ON GRIEVANCES AND APPEALS. 

R. W. Bro. J. Ross Robertson, on behalf of the Board, 
presented and read the following 

report : 

The Board of General Purposes have had before them the 
following cases of grievances and appeals, all of which have 
been considered, and the conclusions arrived at are embodied 
in the report in detail upon each case as follows : 



In the matter of 

Prince Edward Lodge, 

No. 18, V At the last Communication 

and I of Grand Lodge it was ordered 

Bro. Samuel Whitney. I that Bro. Whitney be sum- 



moned to show cause, at the 
next Annual Communication of Grand Lodge, why he should 
not be expelled from the Craft. — (See G. L. P. 1888, page 176). 
Bro. Whitney has been duly summoned by letter, addressed 
to his last known place of residence, but has failed to appear 
in obedience to said summons. The Board, therefore, recom- 
mend that Bro. Whitney be expelled from the Craft. 



In the matter of 
Bro. Isaac B. Johnson 



"1 



Bro. Johnson appeals against 

I the ruling of the Acting Mas- 
Doric Lodge, No. 316. I t c ~ . T , x , , 
J ter of Doric Lodge, No. 316, 

upon a ballot for the election of W. M. of said Lodge, taken 

on the 15th day of November, A. D. 1888. Bro. Johnson 

claiming that he should have been declared elected on the 

first ballot ; there having been cast for him 36 ballots out of 

72 members present; two ballots having been declared dad. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. l6l 

The Board recommend that, whereas, in the election of W. M. 
a majority of the votes present is necessary to a choice ; there- 
fore, the decision of the acting Master of said Lodge, No. 316, 
be sustained and that Bro. Johnson's appeal be dismissed. 



In the matter of 
Jerusalem Lodge, No. 31, 



Jerusalem Lodge complains 
and I , ~ T j • 

„ I that Stevenson Lodge lmprop- 
Stevenson Lodge, No. 218. I , . . . , , TT ,-, ^ ,, 

_/ erly initiated one W . C. W ells, 

who, at the time of his initiation resided within the juris- 
diction of said Jerusalem Lodge. 

The Board find that Bro. Wells was improperly initiated by 
Stevenson Lodge, No. 218, and recommend that said Lodge, 
No. 218, be required to pay to Grand Lodge the sum of ten 
dollars and to Jerusalem Lodge, No. 31, the balance of the 
initiation fee paid by Bro. Wells. 



In the matter of 

Cassia Lodge, No. 116, 

and 

Bro. Parsons. 



In this case Bro. Parsons is 
said to have been found guilty 
by the Courts of counterfeit- 
ing and committed to the Penetentiary. He was also suspended 
by his Lodge and recommended to Grand Lodge for expulsion. 
The Board find that Bro. Parsons was suspended by said 
Lodge, No. 116, without due trial, and would therefore recom- 
mend that the matter be referred back to Cassia Lodge, with 
instructions to charge and try Bro. Parsons in accordance 
with Masonic Law. 



In the matter of 
Bernard Lodge No. 225, 



, > Bernard Lodge, No. 225, 

complains that Blythe Lodge, 
No. 303, did improperly initi- 



Blythe Lodge, No. 303. 



ate one J. A. Tanner, a teacher residing in Listowel, within 
the jurisdiction of said Bernard Lodge. 

In this case the Board find that, although Bro. Tanner's 



r62 (;r.\nh LODGE OF can \i>\. 

property is in Blythe, that his mother and sister, apparently 
his only relatives,' reside there and that it may, in a sense, he said 
to be his home; still he had been residing as a teacher in 
I, istowel, within the jurisdiction of Bernard Lodge, for some 
sixteen months immediately preceding his initiation, and 
therefore ought not to have been initiated by Blythe Lodge, 
without a dispensation from the Grand Master. 

The Board recommend that Blythe Lodge, be required to 
pay over to Bernard Lodge, the amount of Bro. Tanner's 
initiation fee. 



In the matter of 

The Board of Relief of 
City of Toronto, 



In this case V. W. Bro. 

T j Patterson, Secretary of the 

Board of Relief of the City 

of Toronto, complains that 



Orillia Lodge, No. 192. 



Orillia Lodge has refused to pay the cost of the funeral of our 
late Bro. F. G. Smith, at one time a member of that Lodge, 
after having, as Bro. Patterson claims, promised to do so. 

The Board find, after having read all the correspondence 
produced, and having heard the parties interested, that there is 
no evidence of Orillia Lodge having promised to pay the fune- 
ral expenses of our late Bro. Smith : and, therefore, the com-' 
plaint of V. W. Bro. Patterson must be dismissed. 

All of which is fraternally submitted. 

L. H. Henderson, 

Chairman of Snb-Co?iimiltee. 

It was moved by R. W. Bro. J. Ross Robertson, seconded 
by R. W. Bro. L. H. Henderson, and 

Resolved — That the Report of the Board on Grievances and Appeals 
be received. 

Subsequently it was moved by R. W. Bro. John Ross 
Robertson, seconded by R. W. Bro. L. H. Henderson, 

That the Report of the Board on Grievances and Appeals be adopted. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 1 63 

In amendment it was moved by W. Bro. R. Cuthbert, sec- 
onded by W. Bro. John Patton, 

That that portion of the Report referring to Stevenson Lodge, No. 
218, be struck out. 

The amendment was put to Grand Lodge and declared lost. 

The original resolution was then put to Grand Lodge and 
declared carried. 



REPORT ON FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. 

M. W. Bro. Henry Robertson presented the Report of the 
Committee on Foreign Correspondence, when it was moved 
by R. W. Bro. J. Ross Robertson, seconded by M. W. Bro. 
Henry Robertson, and 

Resolved, — That the Report of the Committee on Foreign Correspond- 
ence be received and printed as an Appendix to the Proceedings. 

Subsequently M. W. Bro. Henry Robertson presented the 
following supplementary 

REPORT : 

An application has been received from a Lodge at Hertza, 
in Roumania, setting forth, that in Roumania there is no exist- 
ing Grand Body, and asking that the members should be 
constituted as a Lodge, under a warrant from the Grand Lodge 
of Canada. 

They give no information as to their former allegiance, nor 
do they state under what authority they became a Lodge, 
and details are also wanting as to their present state, or the 
particular reasons for desiring a warrant from us. 

The Board are of opinion that it would not be desirable to 
act in this matter without further information, and while fully 
appreciating and acknowledging the compliment paid in the 
request, would recommend that the application be declined. 

Fraternally submitted, 

Henry Robertson, 

Chairman Sub-Committee on Foreign Corresfondence. 



[6 i ok.WD LODGE OF CANADA. 

It was moved by R. W. Bro. J. Ross Robertson, seconded 
by M. W. Bro. Henry Robertson, and 

Resolved, — That the Supplementary Report of the Board on Foreign 
Coriespondence be received and adopted. 

FEE FOR INITIATION. 

In accordance with notice given at the last Annual Com- 
munication, it was moved by R. W. Bro. Wm. Smeaton, 
seconded by V. W. Bro. J. Quigg, 

That Clause 136 in the Book of Constitution be amended to read as 
follows : 136. No private Lodge shall make a Mason for a less considera- 
tion than twenty-five dollars, such sum to include a Master Mason's apron, 
upon his receiving that degree, nor on any pretence remit or defer the 
payment of any part of this sum. This is not to extend to the making of 
a person who is to be a serving brother, who may be initiated without 
payment of any fee, provided that a dispensation from the Grand Master 
or District Deputy Grand Master be first obtained. 

The resolution was put to Grand Lodge and declared lost. 

RITUAL. 

In accordance with notice given at the last Annual Com- 
munication, it was moved by R. W. Bro. J. H. Burritt, sec- 
onded by R. W. Bro. J. C Hegler, 

That Clause 144 in the Book of Constitution be amended by striking 
out the following words : " Unless such Lodge can show to the Grand 
Master that it is entitled to continue the work in any other form as a 
condition of its having submitted to the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge." 

The resolution was put to Grand Lodge and declared lost. 

The Grand Lodge was called from labor to refreshment, to 
meet again on Thursday, the 18th July, at 10 o'clock, fore- 
noon. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 1 65 



Thursday, 18th July, A. D. 1889. 

The Grand Lodge resumed labor at 10.30 a. m. 

Present— -M. W. Bro. R. T. Walkem, Q. C, Grand Master, 
on the Throne : Grand Officers, Members and Representatives. 

CREDENTIALS OF REPRESENTATIVES. 
R. W. Bro. R. B. Hungerford, on behalf of the Committee 
on the Credentials of Representatives, presented and read the 
following 

report : 

The Committee on the Credentials of Representatives to 
this Grand Lodge beg to report that there are 354 Lodges on 
the Grand Register ; 146 Lodges are represented by their duly 
qualified Officers ; 117 are represented by proxy ; 6 Lodges 
are unrepresented, but in each case one or more Past Masters 
have registered ; and 85 Lodges are totally unrepresented for 
the purposes of voting. There are 485 duly qualified Rep- 
resentatives, having a total vote of 1080. 

The Committee desire to express their satisfaction at the 
arrangements made for them by the local Brethren, which by 
their completeness greatly facilitated the work of registering. 

All of which is fraternally submitted, 

R. B. Hungerford,^ 

John Walsh, J- Committee. 

Geo. Ingles, J 

It was moved by R. W. Bro. R. B. Hungerford, seconded 
by R. W. Bro. John Walsh, and 

Resolved, — That the Supplementary Report of the Committee on Cre- 
dentials of Representatives and Proxies be received and adopted. 

ELECTION OF OFFICERS. 

The M. W. the Grand Master appointed the following scru- 



r66 



M> LODGE OF CANADA. 



tineers of the ballot for Grand Officers, and elective members 
of the Board of General Purposes, viz. : — W. Bros. John 
Newton, \V. H. Adams, John Hoodless, Wm. Forbes, D. F. 
Macwatt. G. J. Scott, Wm. McKay, Le. F. A. Maingy, R. W. 
Stephen, S. Stewart, Geo. C. Davis and Alfred Poulter. 

The scrutineers having reported, the following Brethren 
were declared duly elected as office-bearers for the ensuing 
term, viz : — 

M. \V. Bro. R. T. Walkem, Q. C, Kingston, Grand Master. 

K. " " J. Ross Robertson, Toronto, Deputy Grand Master. 

" " " James McLauchlan, Owen Sound, Grand Senior Warden. 

" " " Michael Walsh, Ingersoll, Grand Junior Warden. 

" " " Rev. L). Armstrong, D.U., Moore, Grand Chaplain. 

" " " E. Mitchell, Hamilton, Grand Treasurer. 

ii it (i p^ jyr_ Morson, Toronto, Grand Registrar. 

" " " J. J. Mason, Hamilton, Grand Secretary. 

And by an open vote of Grand Lodge, 
Bro. E. Ball, Kingston, Grand Tyler. 

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTERS. 
The following Brethren were nominated by the Representa- 
tives of Lodges as District Deputy Grand Masters for their 
respective Districts, and were approved by the M. W. the 
Grand Master, viz, : — 



R. W. Bro. A. H. Clarke, Essex Centre, Erie 

ii .1 ii j p whitehead, Strathroy, St. Clair 

" " " W. B. Doherty, St. Thomas, London, 

" " " W. G. Duff, Seaforth, South Huron 

" " " R. C. Bruce, Tara, North Huron 

" " " D. H. Hunter, Woodstock, Wilson 

ii ii ii u^id Forsyth, Berlin, Wellington 

" " " John Malloy, Hamilton, Hamilton 

ii ii ii -p. McCarroll, Meaford, Georgian 

" " •' Wm. Jaques, M. D. Jarvis, Niagara 

" " " Wm. Roaf, Toronto, Toronto 

" " " W. R. Howse, Whitby, Ontario 

ii ii .1 p j Lightburne, Cobourg, Pr. Edward 

" " " H. J. Wilkinson, Kingston, Frontenac 

ii u .1 w. H. Jackson, Brockville, St. Lawrence 

" " " David Barr, Renfrew, Ottawa 

ci ii n jy p Ferguson, Rat Portage, Algoma 



Dis. No. 



I 

2 

3 
4 
5 
6 

7 
8 

9 
io 
ii 

12 

'3 
14 
»5 
16 

17 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 1 67 

BOARD OF GENERAL PURPOSES. 

The scrutineers having reported, the following brethren were 
declared duly elected members of the Board of General Pur- 
poses for the ensuing term, viz : — 



R. W. 


Bro. 


F. C. Martin, 


Woodstock 


it ci 


" 


J. F. H. Gunn, 


Walkerton. 


" " 


" 


David McLellan, 


Hamilton. 


V. " 


" 


L. Secord, M. D., 


Brantford. 


R. " 


" 


J. E. Harding, 


Stratford. 



Subsequently, the Grand Master was pleased to announce 
the following appointments as members of the Board of Gen- 
eral Purposes for the ensuing term, viz : — 

R. W. Bro. Henry Macpherson, Owen Sound. 

" " " Donald Ross, Picton. 

" " " J. H. Burritt, Pembroke. 

" " " L. H. Henderson, Belleville. 

" " " Henry Jennings, Penetanguishcne. 

NEXT ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. 

On motion, it was resolved that the next Annual Communi- 
cation of Grand Lodge be held at the City of Kingston. 

GRAND REPRESENTATIVE. 

R. W. Bro. David McLellan, Representative of the Grand 
Lodge of Illinois, presented his Credentials, which were 
accepted and the Representative saluted with Grand Honors. 

REPORT ON ADDRESS OF THE GRAND MASTER. 

R. W. Bro. J. Ross Robertson, on behalf of the Board, pre- 
sented and read the following 

REPORT : 

The Board welcome the address of the M. W. the Grand 
Master as an able, concise and satisfactory reviewal, that will 
be received with pleasure by the Grand Lodge, will enhearten 
and stimulate the active membership and quicken the flagging 
zeal of those who are indifferent in this jurisdiction. 

The Board recognize in the success which has attended our 



t68 M> LODGl Hi CANADA. 

institution since its foundation, the guiding hand of Hun, to 
whom the inner thoughts of all arc known, and arc thankful 
that by His favor we again greet our Royal Solomon and those 
also who compose a happy, united and zealous band of 
Craftsmen. 

The Board concur in the expression of your Grand Master 
that all our duties should be determined and discharged on 
the broad lines of the fullest justice, and our endeavors should 
be to gain an inspiration thai will guide us in promoting the 
welfare and happiness of not only the Craft but of all mankind. 

The board unite with the Grand Master in his allusion to 
the legislation which may amend our present code of Laws, 
and feel that the excellent manner in which our administrative 
system has worked is an indication that care should be 
exercised in alteration or amendment. Experimental legis- 
lation is rarely productive of the best results. At the same 
time the Board appreciate and recognize the existence of 
Grand Lodge as a deliberative organization, with the fullest 
capacity for self-government, and possessing an ability to guide 
the Craft and frame laws that wall strengthen the work in its 
various branches. 

The Board express the hope that the position of Grand 
Lodge as an exemplar of harmony and contentment, in its 
relations within and without the jurisdiction, may long be 
maintained, and re-echo the declaration of the Grand Master 
that we have great reason to congratulate ourselves upon the 
continuance of this eminently happy condition. 

The Board feel that the Executive of Grand Lodge has 
administered its affairs in an efficient manner, and that the 
soft-handed charity of the Craft hand has, in its dispensation, 
been free and comfort giving. 

The Board sorrow as the Grand Master inscribes the worthy 
names of those who have passed to that haven of us all. It 
is but fitting that our memorial record should bear a kindly 
remembrance of the days they were with us and the work they 
accomplished. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 169 

The Board congratulate the Grand Lodge not only on the 
close attention given to the routine duties of his office by the 
Grand Master, but also upon the series of official visits paid to 
different parts of the jurisdiction. These visits have been 
productive of much good. The Craft has been edified, 
enlightened and instructed. The generous and friendly calls 
thus paid confirm the view of your Board that the quickened 
zeal and interest awakened thereby must result in firing the 
Craft-heart with a realization of the truth that we are but yet 
in the youth of Craft work, and that if we hasten wisely onward 
we must advance in thought and knowledge. 

The Board agree with the Grand Master in his reference to 
the system pursued in foreign jurisdictions, by which lectures 
on the principles of the Order and kindred subjects are given 
at Lodge meetings. The offering of such addresses would 
impart new interest to meetings, induce attention, and so vary 
their routine of work and Lodge duties that members would 
be attracted rather than repelled from the Craft fold. 

The Board warmly approve of the suggestion of the Grand 
Master in connection with the daughter of the late V. W. Bro. 
John Dean, who for so many years in the early days of Masonry 
did herculean work for the cause, that she should have a little 
sunshine let into her declining life by a grant from the funds 
of Grand Lodge. The re-organization of the craft in early 
days was in a great part due to the untiring energy of 
Brother John Dean. 

The Board regret that the Grand Master is only able to 
note the assemblying of one Lodge of Instruction during the 
year. Such meetings are beneficial not only in connection 
with the esoteric work, but useful as a means of information 
upon matters immediately associated with Lodge government. 

The Board hope that the Grand Master may be enabled to 
carry to a successful issue his mission in connection with the 
differences between the Grand Lodge of Quebec and that of 
England. 

The Board recognize the wisdom of the Grand Master in 



170 OR \NI> LODG1 I IF can \d\. 

declining to encourage multiplication of Lodges. The creation 
of new Lodges is not an indication ol healthy growth j and, 
with thirty-three years of experience (which is an excellent 
teacher, even if the charges are exorbitant), the Board ap- 
prove of the view taken by the Grand Master. There are 
to-day sections in the jurisdiction that have suffered from 
undue multiplication of Lodges ; and in many instances, if 
the suggestions of the Grand Master were now carried out, 
great good would be accomplished. Amalgamation has 
revived Masonry in not a few districts. The applica- 
tion from distant Syria for a warrant should have been 
made nearer home. The case must be singular before 
we venture to allow our warrants to run in tropical climes far 
beyond the kindly eye of a District Deputy Grand Master. 

The Board recognize the courtesy which dictates invitations 
for craft aid in the erection of places for the worship of the 
Grand Architect, and see this work as one that is peculiarly 
in sympathy with the teachings of Masonry. 

The Board rejoice that a goodly list of dedications and 
consecrations of craft halls is recorded in the Grand Master's 
address. The erection of temples, consecrated to our work, 
should be the primal effort in all centres where it can be done 
with a due regard to economy. 

The Board feel that there is much weight in the suggestion 
of the Grand Master, that in all questions of craft dispute the 
District Deputy Grand Master should first be asked for advice 
rather than the highest authority. To pass these Officers 
over in seeking information is to say the least unfraternal. 
These Officers having the charge of districts, are generally well 
skilled and well informed, and in giving decisions are judicious 
and thoughtful, and where grave doubt exists, as a general 
rule, they are fortified with counsel which may be relied upon. 

The Board favor the opinion of the Grand Master with 
regard to the qualification of candidates, and think that a 
liberal construction should be placed upon the requirements 
which we demand of the initiate. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. I 7 I 

The Board deem worthy of the highest consideration the 
work of the Grand Master with respect to the compilation of 
the laws for the government of subordinate Lodges. That the 
Lodges in passing By-laws should exercise care and discretion 
is to be strongly commended. As a rule the constitution 
covers the main points connected with Lodge government, 
and By-laws may be passed which do not clash with the code of 
Grand Lodge, and at the same time not be of such an unduly 
scrutinizing character as may lead to violation. While the 
rights of private members ought to be protected, an endeavor 
should be always made to do the greatest amount of good with 
the least possible legislation. Lodges should bear in mind 
that the selection of auditors is made by the voice of the 
Lodge, and that while the naming of all committees is the 
prerogative of the W. M., conception that he can take part in 
their deliberations is foreign to the freedom of thought and 
action that, if otherwise, might prejudice his views as presiding 
Officer. 

The Board approve of the recognition of the newly formed 
jurisdictions of New South Wales, Victoria and North Dakota, 
and trust Grand Lodge will bid welcome with fraternal 
greeting these Grand Lodges as new links in the chain of a 
great Brotherhood. 

The Board express pleasure in the selection of ardent 
Craftsmen like R. W. Bros. J. B. Trayes and David McLellan, 
in filling the office of representatives of this jurisdiction, near 
the Grand Lodges of Delaware and Illinois respectively. The 
suggestion that Brethren should only hold a limited number 
of appointments, the Board think would conduce to increase 
the interest of the work. The positions are of an honorary 
character and acceptable as evincing an interchange of good 
will and fraternity, and as they are few in number and much 
esteemed, Brethren should restrain their anxiety to monopolize 
these positions and share the honors with those who by merit 
are entitled to recognition. 

The Board are gratified at the reference made to the dis- 
tribution of the Benevolent Lund, and feel assured that under 



172 GRAND LODGE OF < INADA. 

the careful management of M. W. Bro. Otto Klotz and the 
Committee on Benevolence, the best endeavors are used to 
apportion the fund to those whom it is our pride to think have 
a claim upon us. Your Board feel that the annual allowance 
to the beneficiaries of Grand Lodge has been productive of 
much good, and that by this and the bounty of subordinate 
Lodges, the sunless homes of widows and orphans have been 
brightened and gladdened. In order that our gifts may be 
well and wisely administered, reliable information is in all 
cases essential, and every means should be taken to secure it. 

The Board are in sympathy with the Grand Master in his 
prompt and generous donation from this Grand Lodge to our 
stricken Brethren in Florida. 

The Board agree with the Grand Master that the excellent 
report on Foreign Correspondence, by our M. W. Bro. Henry 
Robertson, is a valuable addition to craft literature, an epitome 
in pleasant form that puts the reader in touch with the progress 
of craft life all over the world. 

The Board value the suggestion of the Grand Master, that 
the important business of selecting a place of meeting should 
be determined early in the session of Grand Lodge, when we 
have a large representation of the Brethren with us. Hereto- 
fore this order of business has been relegated to the closing 
hours of the Communication, and past experience leads to the 
belief that the full voice of Grand Lodge should be heard on 
a question which is yearly becoming more important in view of 
the gathering strength of the governing body. 

The Board rejoice with the Grand Master in the assurance 
that the District Deputy Grand Masters and the Executive 
Officers of the Craft have discharged their duties as men who 
delight in the work entrusted to their care. 

All of which is fraternally submitted, 

J. Ross Robertson, 

Chairman of ' Sul>- Committee on the Grand Master's Address. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 1 73 

It was moved by R. W. Bro J. Ross Robertson, seconded 
by M. W. Bro. Hugh Murray, and 

Resolved, — That the Report of the Board on the Address of the M. 
W. the Grand Master, be received and adopted. 

BUSINESS IN THIRD DEGREE. 
In accordance with notice given at the last Annual Com- 
munication, it was moved by W. Bro. C. C. Robinson, seconded 
by W. Bro. R. Cuthbert, 

That hereafter, all business, except that of balloting for candidates, 
initiating and passing, be transacted in Warranted Lodges in the Third 
Degree. 

The resolution was put to Grand Lodge, was voted upon by 
ballot, and was declared lost. 

RESPECTING REJECTED APPLICANTS. 
In accordance with notice given at the last Annual Com- 
munication, it was moved by R. W. Bro. T. Sargant, seconded 
by R. W. Bro. E. T. Malone, and 

Resolved, — That where two or more Lodges have concurrent jurisdiction 
it shall be the duty of the Secretary of each Lodge to notify the other 
Lodge or Lodges of every rejected application, giving the name, residence 
and occupation of the rejected applicant. 

RULES RELATING TO BENEVOLENCE AMENDED. 
It was moved by M. W. Bro. Otto Klotz, seconded by 
R. W. Bro. J. Ross Robertson, and 

Resolved, — That Rule 5 (relating to Benevolence) of Appendix A to the 
Book of Constitution be amended by striking out the word "July" and 
inserting instead the word " June." 

CENTENNIAL OF MASONRY IN CANADA. 
It was moved by R. W. Bro. J. Ross Robertson, seconded 
by R. W. Bro. T. Sargant, and 

Resolved, — That whereas the one hundredth anniversary of the 
establishment of Masonry in Canada occurs in the year 1892, 
and whereas, in view of our national and Masonic importance, an 
event of such historic moment to the Craft in this country should be fit- 
tingly observed throughout the Dominion, and that ample time be per- 



174 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

mitted for the preparation necessary to the successful carrying out so im- 
portant an undertaking, be it therefore 

Resolved, — That the M. W. the Grand Master herewith appoint a Com- 
mittee to take into consideration the best means of celebrating Canada's 
Masonic Centennial, and to report the result of their deliberations to 
Grand Lodge at next Annual Communication, and that the Grand Secre- 
tary be instructed to forward a copy of this resolution to the several 
Grand Lodges interested. 

SPECIAL BENEVOLENT GRANTS. 
It was moved by R. W. Bro. T. Sargant, seconded by 
R. W. Bro. Donald Ross, and 

Resolved, — That the three special grants of Benevolence voted by Grand 
Lodge be transferred to the control of the Committee on Benevolence. 

REPORT Re TESTIMONIAL TO M. W. BRO. 
ROBERTSON. 

R. W. Bro. E. T. Malone, on behalf of the Committee on 
the presentation of a Testimonial to M. W. Bro. Henry 
Robertson, Past Grand Master, presented and read the follow- 
ing 

report : 

The Committee appointed by Grand Lodge at its last 
Annual Communication to procure and present a suitable 
testimonial to M. W. Bro. Henry Robertson, in recognition of 
the satisfactory manner in which he has discharged the duties 
of his high and responsible office during the past two years as 
Grand Master, respectfully report : — 

That they have complied with the directions of Grand 
Lodge and procured a suitable testimonial, which was presented 
to M. W. Bro. Robertson at a large and representative meeting 
of the Craft in the Town of Collingwood, (the place of 
residence of M. W. Bro. Robertson), on the 6th Feb., 1889; 
on which occasion there were in attendance the principal 
residents of the town, who are Freemasons, and R. W. Bro. 
Geo. Monkman., D. D. G. M. of the Georgian District, R. W. 
Bro. Henry Macpherson, and other leading Masons. The 
presentation took place under the auspices of Manito Lodge, 
No. 90 ; and the Committee desire to thank the members of 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 1 75 

that Lodge for the excellent arrangements made for making 
the occasion one of more than usual interest to Freemasonry, 
and shewing that M. W. Bro. Robertson was as much res- 
pected by his fellow-townsmen as by the Fraternity, and that 
while the Grand Lodge did honor to him, he did not require 
such a testimonial to shew his good standing in the community, 
nor such a certificate of the respect and esteem in which he 
is held. 

The presentation was accompanied by the following address 
suitably engrossed : — 

Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons 
of Canada, in the Province of Ontario. 

To the M. W. Bro. Henry Robertson, L. L. B., Past Grand Master: 

As Masons we are taught to give honor to whom honor is due, and to 
evince our approbation and appreciation of the meritorious services of him 
who deserves well of the Fraternity at large. 

It is our pleasing duty, on behalf of the Grand Lodge and representing 
over twenty thousand of your Brethren, to mark in some tangible manner 
the respect, love and admiration in which you are held. 

For years you have laboured zealously and faithfully in the interest of 
Grand Lodge, filling several important positions therein, and for the last 
two years presiding over our deliberations in the capacity of Grand 
Master, a position accorded to you by the unanimous voice of your 
Brethren. 

For the exalted position which the Craft occupies in this our loved 
Province ; for our increased and increasing prosperity ; and for the 
knowledge possessed by our Brethren of the landmarks, usages and 
regulations of the Fraternity, we are largely indebted to you as a Masonic 
Jurist, and are under obligations which we never can forget. 

The affairs of Grand Lodge prospered under your sway ; you presided 
over our deliberations with skill and ability, whilst your invariable 
courtesy, your kind and loving words of counsel and your impartial 
rulings have endeared you to the hearts of all your Brethren. 

In order that your learning and experience should be kept continually 
before the Craft, your Brethren at the last meeting of Grand Lodge 
decided that the Report on Foreign Correspondence should be resumed, 
and unanimously elected you Chairman of the Committee. 

We feel satisfied that you will be enabled to discharge the duties of that 
office with honor and reputation, and lay up for yourself a crown of joy 
and rejoicing, which shall never fade away but shall continue when time 
shall be no more. The task thus allotted to you is of the utmost import- 



I ■}(> 



GR \\'l> LODGE OF ( .\N.\h.\. 



ance. Remember that from your pen influences may How which may 

stimulate ami enlighten the whole Masonic world. Hear always in mind 

that :— 

Our many deeds, the thoughts that we have thought, 

They go out from us thronging every hour ; 

And in them all is folded up a power 

That on the earth doth move them to and fro ; 

And mighty are the marvels they have wrought 

In hearts we know not and may never know. 

It is our pleasing duty, on behalf of the Brethren, to request your 
acceptance of the accompanying testimonial, and may it be the means in 
after years of reminding you of the love and feelings which now animate 
us. May you be long spared to aid and assist in the propagation of these 
principles which are so dear to us; and may Heaven's choicest gifts be 
showered on you and your loved family. 



R. T. WALKEM, 

Grand Master. 



J. J. MASON, 

Grand Secretary. 




Daniel Spry, 
E. T. Malone, 
David McLellan, 



Committee. 



To which M. W. Bro. Robertson made the following reply : 

To M. W. Bro. Daniel Spry, and to R. W. Bros. E. T. Malone and 
David McLellan : 

My Dear Brethren : — To reply in suitable terms to the very 
complimentary expressions in your address is, to me, a difficult task. I 
cannot claim that I deserve the enconiums with which you have been 
pleased to honor me upon this occasion ; but I would fain hope that I 
have tried to do my duty as a Mason, as a member of that mighty brother- 
hood whose branches are spread over the habitable globe, and whose 
principles are as the everlasting hills, firm and durable, neither to be over- 
thrown nor shaken. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 1 77 

It has always been a source of satisfaction to me to belong to our 
most ancient and honorable Fraternity ; to be in connection with an 
organization founded upon the tenets of brotherly love, relief and 
truth, and which has been able to attract and retain the love and 
esteem of countless thousands of thinking, reasoning and intelligent 
men. 

I have been deeply interested in the investigation of its laws, usages 
and customs. Many of these are quaint and curious, some of them car- 
rying us far back into the misty realms of almost forgotten ages ; others 
clearly traceable to the necessity of combination among the handicrafts to 
resist oppression in a time when the Masons' Lodge was the only bright 
spot of liberty or liberality of thought and conscience in a horizon dark- 
ened by wrong and fanaticism, but all having some end in view, some 
good purpose to serve in connection with the welfare of the Fraternity. 
Its symbolism, its universality, its history, and many other phases of 
its scientific aspect, are also full of interest and delight to the diligent 
enquirer. This, however, is not the time for any elaborate disquisition 
upon its varied features. If any excuse were necessary for the devotion 
of years to the Masonic Institution it would be easy to furnish ample 
justification. 

You have pleased to refer to my services in the Craft and to the Grand 
Lodge, but I have only done what every Mason should do. The work 
of the Grand Lodge is of the most important character, nearly always 
laborious, and requiring the most assiduous care and attention. By the 
favor of my Brethren, I was retained as a member of the Board of Gene- 
ral Purposes for a lengthened period of years, and I could only endeavor 
to justify their confidence by using my best efforts to carry out faithfully 
the duties with which I was entrusted. I had no thought or anticipation 
of further honors, and my subsequent advancement was as unexpected as 
it was gratifying. 

As your Grand Master, I endeavored to uphold the proud position 
attained by the Grand Lodge of Canada under my illustrious predecessors. 
I was conscious of the exalted position and deeply grateful to my Brethren 
for their bestowal of the highest honor that can be conferred upon any 
member of the craft. During my two years occupancy of the Masonic 
Throne, the Craft prospered at home and retained its influence abroad. 
I was entrusted with large powers and I used them, I believe, with strict 
impartiality, and with an earnest desire for the good of the fraternity 
under my charge. 

Your presence here this evening and this magnificent testimonial from 
the Grand Lodge is surely a substantial and abundant manifestation that 
my humble services have been too highly appreciated. I can only express 
my deepest gratitude and thankfulness for their many acts of kindness 
towards me and for this very valuable mark of their esteem. 

It is an additional gratification that you have chosen at considerable 



178 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

inconvenience to yourselves, to make this presentation in my Masonic 
home where I was first "brought to light," some 27 years ago, and that 
this crowning event in my Masonic career should have taken place among 
the Brethren of my own Lodge, who have been so kind to me, and 
Brethren whom I am proud to call my friends. It will be an additional 
incentive to Manito Lodge to relax not in the work and to keep up the 
good reputation it has already attained. 

I am also delighted with the composition of the Committee appointed 
by the M. W. the Grand Master to carry out the wishes of the Grand 
Lodge. You, Brethren, have been fellow-workers with me in the quarries 
for many years and I have learned to esteem and respect you as thorough 
and devoted Masons. 

Dear Brethren, will you kindly convey to the Grand Lodge this 
feeble expression of my heartfelt gratitude for their great kindness and 
my assurance that I will ever cherish in loving remembrance my Brethren 
of the Grand Lodge of Canada. 

Yours fraternally, 

HENRY ROBERTSON, 

Past Grand Master. 
Collingwood, February 6th, 1889. 

Your Committee have only to add that they have had more 
than ordinary pleasure in performing their duty, and can 
assure the Grand Lodge that, while M. W. Bro. Henry 
Robertson has occupied the highest positions in the Craft, his 
zeal is unabated, and we trust that he may live to benefit Grand 
Lodge by his wisdom and experience. 

All of which is fraternally submitted. 

Daniel Spry, ] 

E. T. Malone, \ Committee. 

David McLellanJ 

It was moved by R. W. Bro. J. Ross Robertson, seconded 
by R. W. Bro. E. T. Malone, and 

Resolved,— That the Report of the Committee on the presentation of a 
testimonial to M. W. Bro. Henry Robertson, Past Grand Master, be 
received and adopted. 

INSTALLATION OF OFFICERS. 
M. W. Bro. R. T. Walkem, assisted by M. W. Bro. Henry 
Robertson, proceeded with the installation and investiture of 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 1 79 



the newly elected Officers, who were proclaimed and saluted 
with the customary Masonic honors. 

APPOINTED OFFICERS. 

At a subsequent date, the M. W. the Grand Master was 
pleased to notify the Grand Secretary of the following appoint- 
ments to office for the ensuing year, viz : — 

V. w. 



Bro. John Sutherland, 


Kingston, 


G. S. 


D. 


D. F. Macwatt, 


Barrie, 


G. J. D. 


" P. JSlatter, 


Toronto, 


G. S. of W. 


" Wm. Ballantyne, 


Seaforth, 


G. D. ofC. 


" A. Poulter, 


Hamilton, 


Ass't G. S. 


" E. W. Case, 


Picton, 


" G. D. of C 


" Jefferson Caverly, 


Madoc, 


G. S. B. 


" Omer Brown, 


Delta, 


G. O. 


" A. L. Rundle, 


Oshawa, 


Ass't G. O. 


" J. McCarter, 


Eglinton, 


G. P. 


" Daniel Welsh, 


Essex Centre, 


G. Steward. 


" A. Cameron, 


Napier, 






" S. Dubber, 


St. Thomas, 






" E. Miller, 


Kincardine, 






R. R. Fulton, 


Woodstock, 






" A. J. Little, 


Guelph, 






" W. A. Ferrah, 


Oakville, 






" A. Burritt. 


Meaford, 






" W. H. Andrews, 


Port Robinson, 






" Thos. Kennedy, 


Ottawa, 






" J. A. Warren, 


Keewatin Mills, 






" W. H. Chittick, 


Dorchester Stat 


ion, ' 




" H. Clements, 


Palmerston, 


G. Standard B. 


" A. Hood, 


Arnprior, 


i 


< 



VOTES OF THANKS. 

It was moved by R. W. Bro. D. H. Martyn, seconded 
by R. W. Bro. Donald Ross, and 

Resolved, — That the cordial thanks of Grand Lodge are due, and are 
hereby tendered to the Mayor and Corporation of the Town of Owen 
Sound, for the cordial reception and kindly attentions given Grand 
Lodge at the present Communication, and that a copy of this resolution be 
transmitted to the Mayor. 

It was moved by R. W. Bro. J. E. Harding, seconded 
by R. W. Bro. David McLellan, and 



iSo GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

Resolved, — That the cordial thanks of the Grand Lodge are due, and 
are hereby tendered to the Committee of Management of the Owen 
Sound Lodges, for the satisfactory arrangements made for the holding of 
the present Annual Communication. 

NOTICES OF MOTION FOR NEXT ANNUAL 
COMMUNICATION. 

i. By R. W. Bro. T. Sargant : 

That Clause 121 of the Book of Constitution be amended by insert- 
ing after the word " elect " the words " by a majority of all the mem- 
bers present in the lodge." 

2. By R. W. Bro. T. Sargant : 

That Clause 44 of the Book of Constitution be amended by striking 
out the words " shall have been given at the preceding Annual Communica- 
tion of Grand Lodge," and inserting instead the words " and shall have 
been sent to the Grand Secretary on or before the first day of December 
following the Communication of Grand Lodge." 

3. By W. Bro. C. C. Robinson : 

That hereafter all business, except initiating and passing, be transacted 
iu Warranted Lodges in the Third Degree, and that a Clause to this 
effect be added to the Constitution. Also, that anything in the Consti- 
tution or Regulations inconsistent with this resolution be, and the same 
is hereby repealed. 

4. By R. W. Bro. W. H. Jackson: 

That Clause 255 of the Book of Constitution be amended by adding 
next after the words " all the above jewels are to be of silver," the words 
" provided, however, that all the Lodges in the jurisdiction that took part 
in the organization of the Grand Lodge of Canada as well as the Lodges 
that already enjoy the privilege, shall be permitted to wear on their 
regalia gold jewels and gold trimmings." 

5. By R. W. Bro. David Taylor : 

That Clause 121 of the Book of Constitution be amended by adding 
thereto the following words : " Should the Lodge desire to do so, it may 
by By-law provide that no member shall be entitled to vote at the Annual 
Election of Officers who is twelve months in arrears of Lodge dues." 

6. By W. Bro. J. Reeve : 

That the systematic black-balling in any Lodge of candidates for 
admission to the Craft, with the view of accomplishing some ulterior 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. l8l 

object, and not on account of the unfitness of such candidates shall 
constitute a Masonic offence. 

That Clause 202 of the Book of Constitution be amended by providing 
" that upon the trial of a brother charged with such offence, any brother 
may disclose how he voted upon the taking of any ballot involved in such 
enquiry, provided that the District Deputy Grand Master for the particular 
district shall have first intimated to the Master of said Lodge that he is 
satisfied that there are reasonable grounds for believing such practice to 
exist." 

7. By V. W. Bro. F. F. Manley : 

That Clause 3 of the Book of Constitution be amended by adding 
thereto the following words : "The manner of conducting the Election 
of the Members of the Board of General Purposes shall be as follows : — 
The Committee on Credentials of Representatives shall prepare a list of 
the names of delegates to Grand Lodge, together with the number of votes 
each delegate is entitled to cast. The Grand Secretary or one of the 
Committee on Credentials shall call the names of the Brethren in rotation, 
when (after the brother has marked the number of votes he is entitled to 
cast upon the outside of the ballot paper), he shall hand it to one of the 
Grand Stewards to deposit in a ballot box provided for that purpose. 
The Grand Steward receiving the ballot shall see that the number marked 
upon it agrees with the number upon the report of the Committee on 
Credentials. No brother shall be permitted to deposit more than one 
ballot. The collection of the ballots shall take place immediately after 
the election of the Grand Wardens." 

8. By V. W. Bro. F. F. Manley : 

That Clause 178 of the Book of Constitution be amended by striking 
out the words "and each Private Lodge shall defray the travelling 
" expenses of the District Deputy Grand Master, to the extent of at least 
" one visit in each year," and by inserting instead the words " the sum of 

dollars shall be paid out of the funds of Grand Lodge to the 

District Deputy Grand Master of each district for each official visit made 
by him to the Lodges in his jurisdiction, to the extent of at least one visit 
to each Lodge in each year." 

9. By V. W. Bro. Le. F. A. Maingy : 

That in future the meetings of the Board of General Purposes shall be 
convened at such times before the Annual Communication as will permit 
the Reports of the Sub- Committees of the said Board being printed in 
time for distribution, upon the formal reception by Grand Lodge of the 
said reports. 

10. By R. W. Bro. Rev. David Armstrong, D. D. : 



182 (IRANI) LODGE OF CANADA. 

That Clause 226 of the Book of Constitution be amended by striking 
out the words " black balls " in the third and seventh lines and inserting 
instead the words " adverse votes," and that the following words be 
added to the Clause : " The method of balloting shall be fixed by the 
lty-laws of the Lodge." 

11. By R. W. Bro. H. A. MacKelcan : 

That the Grand Registrar be added to the Board of General Purposes. 

12. By W. Bro. H. Lockwood : 

That Clause 59 of the Book of Constitution be struck out and the 
following substituted : " The District Deputy Grand Master of each 
" district shall be elected after nomination, as follows : Any Past Master 
" may, not less than three months before the Annual Communication of 
" Grand Lodge, forward to the District Deputy Grand Master of his own 
" district, a single written nomination for the office of District Deputy 
" Grand Master. It shall be the duty of the District Deputy Grand Master 
" immediately to acknowledge the receipt of each nomination by mail, 
" and at least two full months before the Annual Communication of Grand 
" Lodge, he shall forward by mail to each Lodge in his district a list of the 
" Brethren so nominated, with their Masonic rank, residence and pro- 
" fession, and the names of the Lodges to which they respectively belong. 
" From the list of Brethren so forwarded by the District Deputy 
" Grand Master, the new District Deputy Grand Master shall be elected 
"by the majority of the Past Masters and the representatives of the 
" Lodges of such district at the Annual Communication of Grand Lodge, 
" and if his election be confirmed by the Grand Master, he shall, if 
" present, be regularly installed. He must be a Past Master and a resident 
" of the district for which he is elected. If a brother who is Master of a 
" Lodge be elected as District Deputy Grand Master, his election shall 
" ipso facto operate to vacate his election as Master and a new election 
" shall be held by the Lodge." 

13. By W. Bro. James Whitten : 

That districts Nos. 9 and 16 be divided by detaching all that portion of 
No. 9 lying north of Severn Bridge, and all that portion of No. 16 lying 
west of the eastern boundary of Mattawa Lodge, No. 405, and that a new 
district be formed out of these portions. 

14. By W. Bro. D. T. Hind: 

That Enniskillen Lodge, No. 185, York, be transferred from the 
Niagara District No. 10 to the Hamilton District No. 8. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 

THE GRAND LODGE CLOSED. 



183 



The business of Grand Lodge being ended, it was closed at 
3.45 p. m., in ample form. 



ATTEST. 




Grand Secretary. 



1 84 



GF \NI) LODGE OF CANADA. 



APPENDICES. 

GRAND SECRETARY'S STATEMENT OK RECEIPTS. 

Statement of moneys received by the Grand Secretary 
from 1 st June, 1888, to 31st May, 1889. 



NAMES OK LODGES. 



$ CtS. 



2 Niagara 26 75 

3 The Ancient St Johns. 6850 

5 Sussex 96 25 

6 Barton 17200 

7 Union 36 00 

9 Union 77 50 

10 Norfolk 57 25 

11 Moira 123 00 

14 True Britons 60 00 

15 St. George's 78 00 

16 St. Andrew's 102 00 

17 St. John's 31 75 

18 Prince Edward 99 50 

20 St. John's 70 25 

22 King Solomon's 79 50 

23 Richmond — — 

24 St. Francis 46 25 

25 Ionic 73 25 

26 Ontario 44 00 

27 Strict Observance. ... 149 00 

28 Mount Zion 

29 United 14 25 

30 Composite 34 25 

31 Jerusalem 33 25 

32 Amity 34 75 

33 Maitland 79 25 

34 Thistle 30 50 

35 St. John's 

36 Welland 

37 King Hiram 58 50 

38 Trent 3 00 

39 Mount Zion 25 00 

40 St. John's 199 00 

41 St. George's 33 00 

42 St. George's 57 25 

43 King Solomon's 

44 St. Thomas 5 00 

45 Brant 41 25 

46 Wellington 62 25 

47 Great Western 64 25 

48 Madoc 52 50 

50 Consecon 22 75 

52 Dalhousie 23 50 

54 Vaughan 29 50 

55 Merrickville 58 00 

56 Victoria 51 00 



NAMES OF LODGES. 



$ CtS. 



57 Harmony 44 00 

58 Doric 52 75 

61 Acacia 225 50 

62 St. Andrew's 25 00 

63 St. John's 51 00 

64 Kilwinning 86 50 

65 Rehoboam 1 15 75 

66 Durham , 22 00 

68 St. John's 56 25 

69 Stirling 103 00 

72 Alma 53 75 

73 St. James' 36 00 

74 St. James' 1 00 

75 St. John's 138 00 

76 Oxford 73 75 

77 Faithful Brethren 64 00 

78 King Hiram 54 5° 

79 Simcoe 15 00 

80 Albion — — 

81 St. John's 45 75 

82 St. John's 18 75 

83 Beaver 47 00 

84 Clinton 2 00 

85 Rising Sun 91 00 

86 Wilson 31 75 

87 Markham Union 44 75 

88 St. George's 29 25 

90 Manito 76 00 

91 Colborne 66 50 

92 Cataraqui 57 00 

93 Northern Light 65 00 

94 St. Mark's 5 00 

96 Corinthian 52 75 

97 Sharon 40 00 

98 True Blue — — 

99 Tuscan 25 75 

100 Valley 68 50 

101 Corinthian 58 00 

103 Maple Leaf 59 75 

104 St. John's 48 25 

105 St. Mark's 25 50 

106 Burford 42 00 

107 St. Paul 29 OO 

108 Blenheim 

109 Albion 37 75 

1 10 Central 42 50 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 1 85 

Grand Secretary's Report — [Continued.] 



NAMES OF LODGES. 



cts. 



1 13 Wilson 76 75 

1 14 Hope ... 40 50 

115 Ivy 34 00 

1 16 Cassia 12 75 

118 Union 13 25 

119 Maple Leaf 21 00 

120 Warren 12 25 

121 Doric 54 75 

122 Renfrew 39 5° 

123 The Belleville 115 50 

125 Cornwall 70 00 

126 Golden Rule 27 50 

127 Franck 127 00 

128 Pembroke 68 50 

129 The Rising Sun. .... 33 25 

131 St. Lawrence 21 50 

133 Lebanon Forest 43 5° 

135 St. Clair 40 00 

136 Richardson 18 50 

137 Pythagoras 38 50 

139 Lebanon 23 75 

140 Malahide 45 50 

141 Tudor 35 50 

142 Excelsior 84 00 

143 Friendly Brothers. .. . 20 50 

144 Tecumseh 46 75 

145 J. B. Hall 

146 Prince of Wales 40 00 

147 Mississippi .... 32 25 

148 Civil Service 36 50 

149 Erie 30 75 

151 The Grand River. ... 44 00 

153 Burns 29 00 

154 Irving 39 50 

155 Peterboro' 83 25 

156 York 26 75 

157 Simpson 37 00 

158 Alexandra 27 50 

159 Goodwood 86 50 

161 Percy 30 00 

162 Forest 25 75 

164 Star in the East 2650 

165 Burlington 42 00 

166 Went worth 3° 75 

168 Merritt 48 75 

169 Macnab 16 25 

1 70 Britannia 42 50 

171 Prince of Wales 19 25 

1 72 Ayr 

174 Walsingham 90 00 

176 Spartan. 16 00 



NAMES OF LODGES. 



$ cts. 



177 The Builders 91 25 

1 78 Plattsville 21 50 

179 Bothwell 6 00 

180 Speed 74 50 

181 Oriental 19 00 

183 Prince Albert 53 00 

184 Old Light 30 50 

185 Enniskillen. . ..' 17 00 

186 Plantagenet — — 

189 Filius Viduse. . . .... 

190 Belmont 12 50 

192 Orillia 34 00 

193 Scotland 15 1 25 

194 Petrolia 14 25 

195 The Tuscan 20 00 

196 Madawaska 54 00 

197 Saugeen 32 25 

200 St. Albans 

201 Leeds 40 50 

203 Irvine 63 50 

205 Xew Dominion iS 00 

207 Lancaster 24 25 

209a St. John's 134 50 

209 Evergreen 37 00 

212 Elysian 16 00 

214 Craig 7 75 

215 Lake 8 75 

216 Harris 15 00 

217 Frederick 33 50 

218 Stevenson 116 25 

219 Credit 30 00 

220 Zeradatha 38 50 

22 £ Mountain 48 25 

222 Marmora 34 75 

223 Norwood 2 00 

224 Zurich 1 7 25 

225 Bernard 46 00 

228 Prince Arthur — — 

229 Ionic 28 00 

230 Kerr 59 75 

231 Lodge of Fidelity. ... 

232 Cameron 24 00 

233 Doric 35 00 

234 Beaver 53 00 

235 Aldworth 36 00 

236 Manitoba 30 00 

237 Vienna 17 25 

238 Havelock 35 50 

239 Tweed 28 25 

241 Quinte 19 50 

242 Macoy 28 00 



[86 GRAND LODGE 01 CAM IDA. 

Grand Secretary's Report- [Continued.] 



NAMKS OK LODGES. 



$ Cts. 



243 St. George 3400 

245 Tecumseh 25 00 

247 Ashlar 125 25 

249 Caledonian 74 00 

250 Thistle 40 50 

253 Minden 52 25 

254 Clifton 48 25 

255 Sydenham. 24 25 

256 Farran's Point 46 00 

257 Gait 

258 Guelph 55 00 

259 Springfield 36 75 

260 Washington 23 75 

261 Oak Branch 25 25 

262 llarriston 46 50 

263 Forest , 32 50 

264 Chaudiere 55 00 

265 Patterson 22 50 

266 Northern Light 14 75 

267 Parthenon 38 75 

268 Verulam 24 75 

269 Brougham Union 35 00 

270 Cedar 35 00 

271 Wellington 42 50 

272 Seymour 27 50 

274 Kent 27 00 

276 Teeswater 12 50 

277 Seymour 41 50 

278 Mystic 19 00 

279 New Hope 30 00 

282 Lome 

283 Eureka 32 25 

284 St. John's 29 25 

285 Seven Star 

286 Wingham 15 00 

287 Shuniah 76 25 

289 Doric 41 75 

290 Leamington 54 25 

291 Dufferin 16 50 

292 Robertson 9 75 

293 The Royal Sol. Mother no 00 

294 Moore 20 00 

295 Conestogo — — 

296 Temple 42 75 

297 Preston 27 50 

299 Victoria 

300 Mount Olivet 3° 75 

302 St. David's 5 00 

303 Blyth 49 50 

304 Minerva 18 00 

305 Humber 18 50 

306 Durham 22 25 



NAMKS OK LODGES. 



$ cts. 



307 Arkona 24 75 

308 ( rrafton 19 00 

309 Morning Star 30 50 

311 Plackwood 12 25 

3' 2 i'nyx 48 75 

313 Clementi 21 50 

314 Blair 33 25 

315 ( Clifford II 50 

316 Doric 90 50 

318 Wilmot 17 00 

319 Hiram 34 00 

320 Chesterville 40 75 

321 Walker 17 25 

322 North Star 53 5° 

323 Alvinston 29 00 

324 Temple 147 25 

325 Orono 39 00 

326 Zetland 85 75 

327 The Hammond 21 50 

328 Ionic 17 50 

329 King Solomon 18 25 

330 Corinthian — — 

331 Fordwich 1625 

332 Stratford 29 75 

333 Prince Arthur 3 00 

334 Prince Arthur 

335 Langton 

336 Highgate 28 50 

337 Myrtle 31 00 

338 Dufferin — — 

339 Orient 91 50 

340 St. John's n 50 

341 Bruce 42 75 

342 Hiram — — 

343 Georgina 34 50 

344 Merrill 17 00 

345 Nilestown 23 75 

346 Occident 104 50 

347 Mercer 26 50 

348 Georgian 

349 Elgin 4 00 

352 Granite 85 75 

354 Brock 59 25 

356 River Park 18 75 

357 Waterdown 33 75 

358 Deleware Valley 6 00 

359 Vittoria 18 75 

360 Muskoka 31 75 

36 1 Waverley 65 50 

362 Maple Leaf. 12 00 

363 Frontenac 14 50 

364 Dufferin 67 00 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 1 87 

Grand Secretary's Report— [Continued.] 



NAMES OF LODGES. $ cts. 

366 Euclid 28 25 

367 St. George 80 00 

368 Salem 46 75 

369 Mimico 

370 Harmony 18 25 

371 Prince of Wales 46 75 

372 Palmer 16 25 

373 Copestoue 24 50 

374 Keene 18 75 

375 Lome 15 00 

376 Unity 58 75 

377 Lome 9 00 

37S King- Solomon's 74 50 

379 Middlesex 14 50 

380 Union 

382 Doric 83 25 

383 Henderson 2 00 

384 Alpha 120 25 

385 Spry 10 75 

386 McColl 20 50 

387 Lansdowne 3 50 

3S8 Henderson 47 25 

389 Crystal Fountain 21 75 

390 Florence 13 00 

391 Howard 4 00 

392 Huron 32 50 

393 Forest 

394 King Solomon 27 75 

395 Parvaim 

396 Cedar 48 25 

397 Leopold 34 00 



NAMES OF LODGES. $ CtS. 

398 Victoria 

399 Moffat 14 00 

400 Oakville 81 25 

401 Craig 15 50 

402 Central 30 50 

403 Windsor 24 00 

404 Lome 39 00 

405 Mattawa 40 00 

406 The Spry 31 25 

407 Manitoulin 21 75 

408 Murray 1 7 00 

409 Golden Rule 47 25 

410 Zeta *.. 52 00 

411 Rodney 23 00 

412 Keystone 80 50 

413 Naphtali 21 50 

414 Pequonga. 84 75 

415 Fort William 46 75 

416 Lyn 30 00 

417 Keewatin 52 75 

418 Maxville 43 75 

419 Bismarck 61 25 

420 Nipissing 74 25 

421 Scott 15 00 

422 Star of the East 50 50 

Interest — General Fund. ..2632 77 

" — Asylum Fund.. . . 333 00 
Sundries 183 30 

Total $17,007 32 



DISTRIBUTION OF MONEYS RECEIVED. 

Certificates $ 2>347 0Q 

?"* 9.45325 

£,? es •. 1,35100 

Dispensations 82 00 

Warrants .....'. 40 00 

Constitutions 47, DO 

Commutations i 2 r 00 

Interest on General Fund 2 632 77 

Asylum Fund 13 3 o 

Sundries jy , Q 

Total $17,007 32 



[88 



GF \N.< LODGE 01 CANADA. 



GRAND TREASURER'S STATEMENTS. 



The Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of Canada, in 

the Province of Ontario, in account with E. MITCHELL, 

Grand Treasurer. 



RECEIPTS. 



1 88 


S. 


May 


3i-By 


July 


18- " 


" 


18— " 


« 


24- " 


Oct. 


4— " 


Nov. 


30— " 


1889. 


Jan. 


31- '• 


April 


24— " 


May 


9— " 


" 


31— " 


" 


31— " 



By balance as per Balance Sheet $'9)731 '4 

Transfer benevolent Investment Account bal- 
ance, as per instructions of Grand Lodge. . . 35,784 53 
Transfer B. F. Current Account balance, as per 

instructions of Grand Lodge 2 >3°3 5 1 

Grand Secretary 5, too 00 

" " 2,000 00 

" " interest on Hank Account .... 113 24 



Interest on Bank Account.. 



4,000 00 

• 3»5°° °° 

1.055 50 

928 05 

77 53 

$74,493 50 



188 


8. 


July 


7- 


" 


7— 


" 


7— 


" 


7— 


" 


12 — 


" 


12 — 


" 


16— 


" 


16— 


" 


26— 


tt 


26 — 


" 


27— 


" 


So- 


" 


So- 




so— 


Aug. 


4— 


" 


4— 



15— 
18— 



25— 

28— 



DISBURSEMENTS. 

Paid Gr. Sec. salary to 30th June, 1888 

Assistant to Gr. Sec. salary to 30th June .... 

Grand Treasurer's salary to 30th June 

Masonic Hall Association, rent to 30th June, 
Mrs. W. M. Wilson, grant to 30th June .... 

Miss Mary Wilson, grant to 30th June 

Mrs. T. B. Harris, grant to 30th June 

Grand Master, half-yearly grant for expenses, 
R. Duncan & Co., books aud stationery .... 

Times Printing Co., sundry printing 

Buntin, Gillies & Co., for stationery 

Copp, Clark & Co., for certificates, etc 

James Murray & Co., printing 1000 maps. . . 
Globe Printing and Publishing Co. , alterations 

in maps 

Grip Printing Co. , engraving Masonic maps, 
Map and School Supply Co., mounting 

Masonic maps 

Masonic Relief Association of U. S. and 

Canada (fee) 

E. J. B. Pense, printing for G. M. in 1879 . . 

Chairman Ben. Committee for postage 

expenses Board meeting re Minister and 

Langton 

balance incidentals : G. Sec, $268.08, and 

on account 1888 and 1889, $300.00 

Seneca Jones, premium on G. Sec. Bond. . . . 
expenses of Board meeting, July, 1888 



400 


00 


200 


00 


50 


00 


43 


75 


75 


00 


75 


00 


56 25 


250 


00 


32 


30 


989 51 


15 63 


306 77 


23 


50 


IS 


00 


46 


00 


33 


00 


194 5o 


6 


5o 


15 


00 


116 


55 


568 


OS 


50 


00 


784 55 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 



189 






Nov. 



Disbursements— {Continued.} 

Oct. 3— Paid Grand Treasurer's salary to 30th Sept. ..... 

" 3 — " expenses Opera House, printing, etc., during 

G. L 

" 5 — " Mrs. W. M. Wilson, grant to 30th Sept 

" 5 — " Miss Mary Wilson, grant to 30th Sept 

Mrs. T. B. Harris, grant to 30th Sept 

22 — " Grand Secretary's salary to 30th Sept 

22 — " Assistant to G. Sec, salary to 30th Sept 

22 — " Masonic Hall Association, rent to 30th Sept., 
Draft in aid Yellow Fever Sufferers, Jackson- 
ville 

E. & C. Gumey Co., for stove, etc 

William Bruce, engrossing address 

Grand Treasurer's salary to date 

Miss Mary Wilson, grant to 31st Dec 

Grand Master, half-yearly grant for expenses, 

Grand Secretary's salary to 31st Dec 

Assistant to G. Sec, salary to 31st Dec 

Masonic Hall Association, rent to 31st Dec. . 

Mrs. T. B. Harris, grant to 31st Dec 

Mrs. W. M. Wilson, grant to 31st Dec 

Presentation (cost of) to M. W. Bro. Robertson 
Miss Edith E. Shaw, for illuminating address 

Miss M. Wilson, grant to 31st March 

Mrs. W. M. Wilson, grant to 31st March. . . 

Grand Secretary's salary to 31st March 

Assistant to G. Sec, salary to 31st March. . . 

Grand Treasurer's salary to 31st March 

Masonic Hall Association, rent to 31st March 

Mrs. T. B. Harris, grant to 31st March 

Fire Insurance Association, insurance on 

Regalia 

Orders, benevolence for year as per list 

Balance 



$ 50 00 



Dec 


31— ll 


1889. 


Jan. 


2 — " 


" 


2 — " 


" 


3— " 




3 


" 


3— " 


" 


3— " 


" 


3— " 


" 


3— " 


Feb. 


3— " 


April 


2 — " 


" 


3— " 


" 


3— " 


" 


3— " 


" 


3— " 




3 — 


" 


5- " 


" 


16— " 


May 


31— " 


" 


31— " 



169 


00 


75 


00 


75 
56 


00 
=5 


400 


00 


200 


(JO 


43 


75 


200 


00 


39 


75 


25 


25 


50 


DO 


75 


OO 


250 


OO 


400 


OO 


200 


00 


43 

56 


75 

2 5 


75 


00 


255 


00 


35 


00 


75 


On 


75 


00 


400 


00 


200 


OO 


50 


OO 


43 75 
56 25 


i5 


75 


9,770 00 
56,686 86 



$74,493 50 



190 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

PAYMENTS ON ACCOUNT OF BENEVOLENCE. 



1888. 

June 30 
30 



July 



Aug 



Mrs. Arnold. 
Mrs. !'>urgess 
Mrs. Burgess 
Mrs. Vardon 
Mrs. 1 tow . 
Mrs. Dow. . . 
Mrs. Fidell.. 
Bro. Halliday 
Bro. Halliday 
Mrs. Somerville 
.Mrs. McKenzie 
Mrs. Gilchrist. 
Mrs. McMenemy 
Daug. Bro. Eligl 
Mrs. Paterson . 
Mrs. Johnstone 
Ch'n Bro. Francis 
Mrs. Stronger 
B. Rlf. Peterboro 

Mrs. Tighe 

B. Rlf." Windsor 
Janet Maughan. 
Mrs. Shields. . . 
Bro. D. Bee ... 
E. Manghan. . . 

Mrs. Tuke 

Mrs. Garbutt . . . 
Mrs. McBride. . 

Mrs. Scott 

Mrs. Griffith . . 

Mrs. Sharpe 

Mrs. Adamson . 

Mrs. Flood 

Mrs. Sweeney. . 
Mrs. Newbury. . 

Mrs. Cox 

Mrs. McKenzie. 
Mrs. Kennedy. . 

Mrs. Parker 

Mrs. Renwick. . 
Mrs. Kesteven . . 
B. Rlf. London. 

Mrs. Wills 

Mrs. Walker . . . 
Mrs. Bailey .... 

Mrs. Greer 

Bro. Wilson . . . 
Mrs. Vanlaven.. 
Mrs. Carter. . . . 
Bro. Iluyck. . . . 
Mrs. McTaggart 
Mrs. Mclntyre . 
Mrs. Goslee.. . . 



$10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
IO CO 

10 00 

15 00 

15 00 
15 CO 
10 00 
15 co 
10 00 
10 00 

IO CO 

10 00 
20 00 

15 00 

IO 00 

20 00 
15 00 

5 °° 
20 00 
20 00 

5 °° 
10 00 
10 00 
IO 00 
IO 00 
IO 00 

15 00 

5 00 
20 00 
15 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
15 00 
15 00 
5 00 
50 00 
20 00 
15 00 
10 00 
15 00 
20 00 
10 00 
IO 00 
20 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 00 



18 
Aug. 



31 Mrs. Francis $10 00 

31 Mrs. Manning. . . 51 00 

31 Mrs. Harrington. 20 00 

31 Mis. Jones 20 00 

31 Mrs. Elliott . . . 20 00 

31 Mrs. Armson.... 2000 

31 Mrs. Waltho 1000 

31 Mrs. Harvey.... 10 00 

31 Mrs. Olmstead . 15 00 

31 Mrs. Lawrence.. 15 00 

31 Bro. Scott. ..... 25 00 

31 Mrs. Imlay 10 00 

31 Bro. Sutterworth 25 00 

31 Mrs. Wescott ... 10 00 

31 Mrs. Shupe 1500 

31 Orphans Brother 

Bonghart 5 00 

31 Mrs. Bradley 1000 

31 Mrs. Robertson. . 5 00 

31 Mrs. Pocock 1000 

31 Mrs. Cronin 20 00 

31 Mrs. Spickett ... 10 co 

31 Mrs. Wei banks. . 15 00 

31 Mrs. J. C. Smith 15 00 

31 Mrs. Scott 15 00 

31 Mrs. McVeaty... 10 00 

31 Mrs. Hixon 15 00 

31 Mrs. McNally... 2500 

31 Orp. Bro. Francis 10 00 

31 " Bro. Salmoni 5 00 

31 Bro. Munson 25 00 

31 Mrs. Palmer 15 00 

31 Mrs. Robson 20 00 

31 Mrs. Johnston — 10 00 

31 Bro. Meyers 20 00 

31 Bro. Worsfold. .. 25 00 

31 Mrs. Hill 10 00 

31 Mrs. Urquhart... 15 00 

31 Mrs. Middleton.. 5 00 

31 Mrs. Kerr 15 00 

31 Mrs. Reid 10 00 

31 Mrs. Christie. ... 10 00 

31 Mrs. Nixon 10 00 

31 Mrs. LeClair.... 5 00 

31 Mrs. Moore 15 00 

31 Mrs. Witmer 20 00 

31 Mrs. Gray 15 00 

31 Mrs. Fortier 15 00 

31 Mrs. McBeth 10 00 

31 Orphans Bro. Orr 20 00 

31 " Bro. McBride 15 00 

31 Mrs. Stairs 20 00 

31 Mrs. Pettit 15 00 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. igi 

Benevolence — {Continued. ] 



I88S. 






1888. 






Aug. 31 


Mrs. Hall 


$10 00 


Aug. 31 


Mrs. Phillips. . . 


$15 00 


3 1 


Mrs. Bowman . . .. 


10 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Sproule. . . 


• 15 00 


3 1 


Mrs. McKay. 


5 00 


" 31 


Mrs. McPhail. . 


• 15 o° 


" 9 , 1 


Bio. Thompson.. 


25 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Bryant. . . 


■ 15 00 


3 1 


Mrs. Stetham . . . 


10 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Perley 


10 00 


,, 3J 


Mrs. P. Smith. . . 


10 00 


" 31 


Orp. Bro. Oliver 


10 00 


3 1 




15 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Mclntyre. . 


10 00 


3 1 


Mrs. Davies 


10 00 


" 3 1 


Bro. Langstaff. . 


20 00 


,, 3I 




15 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Long 


5 00 


3 1 


Mrs. Neale 


10 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Campbell.. 


10 00 


,. 3I 


Mrs. Upham. . . . 


10 00 


li 3 1 


Mrs. Tredale. 


10 00 


3 1 


Mrs. D. Mitchell. 


10 00 


" 3* 


Mrs. McKillican 


• 15 °° 


3 1 


Mrs. Ilorlop .... 


10 00 


M 31 


Mrs. McKellar . 


15 00 


3 1 


Mrs. Leister .... 


10 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Rays 


10 00 


3 1 


Mrs. Sutherland . 


15 00 


" 3 1 


B. Rlf., Kingston 


. 30 00 


3 1 


Mrs. Small 


15 00 


" 3 1 


Mrs. McNice. . . 


10 00 


" 3f 


Mrs. Hessel 


15 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Hall 


5 00 


3 1 


Mrs. Beal 


IC 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Coulter . . 


10 00 


" 3I 


Mrs. Canning... . 


10 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Noble 


10 00 


3 1 


Mrs. Rubidge. . . . 


10 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Graham.. . 


15 00 


" 31 


Mrs. S my the .... 


10 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Halliday. . 


5 00 


.< 3I 


Mrs. Barber 


15 00 


" 31 




20 00 


3 1 


Mrs. Bridgeport. 


15 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Stopplcben 


10 00 


.< 3I 


Bro. Hallett 


20 00 


" 3 1 


Mrs. Martin. . . 


15 00 


3 1 


B. Rlf., Hamilton 


50 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Bald 


10 00 


3 1 


Mrs. Wright 


10 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Allen 


10 00 


3 1 


Mrs. Howells 


10 00 


.: 3 j 


Mrs. Campaign. 


10 00 


.< 3I 


Bro. C. W. Smith. 


25 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Salmond. . 


15 00 


3 1 


Mrs. Amsden. . . . 


15 00 


" 3 1 


Mrs. Gordon . . . 


15 00 


" 31 


Bro. Black 


25 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Jolley 


10 00 


" 31 


Orp. Bro. Barber. 


15 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Burns. . . . 


15 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Cummings. . 


5 00 


" 31 


B. Rlf, Toronto 


50 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Bailey 


15 CO 


" 31 


Mrs. Birtsch . . . 


10 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Cook 


15 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Jemison. . 


15 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Wills 


15 CO 


" 3i 


Mrs. Baxter 


20 00 


" 3i 


Bro. jno. Hill... 


25 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Jackson . . . 


5 00 


<< 3 , 


Mrs. Wylie 


10 00 


11 3 , 


Mrs. McKay 


10 00 


3 1 




10 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Street , 


5 °o 


" 31 


Daug'ter Bro. Lee 


10 00 


" 3i 


Mrs Hill 


10 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Baptie 


10 00 


" 3i 


Mrs. Kirby. . . . 


15 00 


" 3' 


Mrs. Smithett. . . 


15 00 


u 3I 


Mrs. Bennett 


15 00 


3 1 




20 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Wolf 


10 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Inman. . . . 


10 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Dack 


10 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Benedict. . . 


15 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Turner . . . 


15 00 


1. 3I 


Mrs. Blondheim. 


15 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Thoburn. . . 


15 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Milne 


15 00 


" 31 


Ch'n Bro. Covilk 


15 00 


" 31 




15 00 


" 31 


Miss Miller . 


5 00 


" 31 




25 00 


" 3 1 


Mrs. Rawlinson. . 


15 00 


" 31 


Mrs. Goldsmith . . 


20 00 1 


" 3 1 


Mrs. Raith 


5 00 


\ 3I 


Mrs. Robertson. . 


5 00 J 


'• 31 


Mrs. Webb 


10 00 


3 j 




15 00 j 


" 31 


Mrs. Sedden 


10 00 


" 31 


Bd. Rlf., Ottawa. 


15 00 1 


" 31 




15 00 



I I ' 



GRAND LODGE 01 ( VNADA. 



1 1 1 n evo lence — [Contim&d. 



1 888. 






188S. 


Aug. 31 


Mrs. Bethune . . . 


$10 00 


Sept. 30 


" 31 


Bro. Foster 


25 00 


" 30 


" 3 1 


Mrs. Howe 


10 00 


" 30 


.. 3I 


Or Bro. Anderson 


10 00 


" 30 


3 1 


( )r Bro. Fraser . . 


10 00 


" 30 


>. 3 , 


Mrs. White 


10 00 


" 3° 


>. 3I 


Mrs. Rowed .... 


20 00 


" 30 


3 1 


Mrs. Cray 


10 00 


" 3° 


3 1 


Mrs. Campbell . . 


10 00 


" 30 


3 1 


Mrs. Berlett 


10 00 


" 30 


3 1 


Bro. Baker 


25 00 


" 30 


3 1 


Mrs. Blythe 


10 00 


" 30 


3 1 


Mrs. Kneeshaw. . 


5 00 


" 30 


" 3 1 


Mrs. Martin .... 


20 00 


" 30 


" 31 


Mrs. Badgley. . . . 


15 00 


" 30 


" 3' 


Mrs. Hunter .... 


10 00 


" 30 


" 3 1 


Mrs. Hodgins . . . 


10 00 


" 30 


" 31 


Mrs. Hunter .... 


20 00 


» 30 


" 3' 


Mrs. Bailey 


10 00 


" 30 


" 31 


Mrs. Le Roy. . . . 


10 00 


" 30 


" 3 1 


Mrs. Roblin ... . 


10 00 


" 3° 


3 1 


Mrs. O'Neil 


15 00 


" 30 


" 3i 


Mrs. McKenzie. . 


10 00 


" 3° 


.. 3I 


Bro. Kennedy. . . 


25 00 


" 30 


3 1 


Mrs. McLellan . . 


5 00 


" 30 


3* 


Mrs. Boulton 


15 00 


" 30 


" 31 


Mrs. Christison . . 


10 00 


" 3° 


3 1 




25 00 


" 3° 


" 3 1 


Mrs. Frazer 


15 00 


" 3° 


" 3i 


Mrs. De Grassie. 


20 00 


" 3° 


3 1 


Mrs. Patterson . . 


10 00 


" 30 


" 3 1 


Bro. Sutherland.. 


25 00 


" 3° 


" 31 


Mrs. Pickhaven . . 


10 00 


" 30 


" 31 


Mrs. Hill. 


10 00 


" 30 


1, 3 , 


Orp. J. Nielson. . 


15 00 


" 30 


3 1 


Mrs. Destrich .... 


5 00 


" 30 


3 1 


Mrs. Davey 


15 00 


" 3° 


3 j 


Mrs. Harvey .... 


15 00 


" 30 


., 3 , 


Mrs. Pigott 


10 CO 


'• 30 


3* 




10 00 


" 30 


" 31 


Mrs. Seirch. . . 


15 00 


" 30 


" 3 1 


Mrs. Elsassen . . . 


15 00 


" 30 


" 31 


Mrs. Power 


10 00 


" 30 


3 1 


Mrs. Rees 


15 00 


" 30 


3 1 


Orp. Bro. Monroe 


5 00 


" 30 


3' 


Mrs. Burgess . . . 


10 00 


" 30 


3* 


Mrs. Baillie 


15 00 


" 3° 


3' 


Mrs. Aishton. . . . 


10 00 


" 3° 


•>ept. 30 


Mrs. Bourke .... 


10 00 


" 30 


" 30 


Mrs. Gill 


20 00 


" 3° 


" 30 


Mrs. Blount. .... 


15 00 


" 3° 


" 30 


Mrs. Thompson . 


10 00 | 


" 3° 



Mrs. Howard . . . $10 00 

Orp. Bro. Gregory 10 00 

Mis. Hogg .... 15 00 

Mrs. Johnston. . . 20 00 

Mrs. Hurst 10 00 

Mrs. Nancollas.. 5 00 

Mrs. Tandy 15 00 

Mrs. Conklin. ... 15 00 

Mrs. McRae .... 20 00 

Mrs. Scatchard. . 10 00 

Mrs. Barber 15 00 

Mrs. Beaver 20 OC 

Mrs. Ramsay. ... 20 00 

Mrs. Weir 10 00 

Mrs. Davis 15 00 

Orp. Bro Rees.. 10 00 

Mrs. Richardson. 10 00 

Mrs. Giboney ... 10 co 

Mrs. Gifford .... 5 00 

Mrs. Phipp 10 00 

Daug. Bro. Steele 20 00 

Mrs. Beaton .... 15 00 

Mrs. Oldham. ... 10 00 

Mrs. Ramsay. ... 10 00 

Mrs. Reid 10 00 

Mrs. Richardson. 10 00 

Mrs. Kerr 5 00 

Bro. Paterson ... 20 00 

Bro. Videan 25 00 

Mrs Arnold .... 5 00 

Mrs Joliffe 15 00 

Mrs. Deacon. ... 15 00 

Mrs. Marsh 10 00 

Mrs. Nash 15 00 

Mrs. Elliott 10 00 

Mrs. Matheson . . 20 00 

Mrs. Porteous. . . 10 00 

Mrs. Peverett ... 15 00 

Mrs. Fitzpatiick. 10 OO 

Mrs. France 20 00 

Mrs. Hogg 10 00 

Mrs. McPherson. 15 00 

Orp. Bro. Warren 20 00 

Mrs. Hill 15 00 

Mrs. Little 20 00 

Mrs. Francis .... 10 00 

Mrs. Clegg 10 00 

Mrs. Sanderson.. 15 00 

Mrs. Playtor 10 00 

Mrs. Gibson 10 00 

Mrs. Zimmerman 10 00 

Mrs. Dow jo o 1 



ANNUAL COMiMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 1 93 

I enevolence — [Continued.] 



18 

Sept, 



Oct. 



Nov. 



Dec. 



30 Mrs. Bernard. . . . $40 00 

30 Mrs. Connolly... 15 00 

30 Mrs. Handy .... 10 00 

30 Mrs. Mitchell... 10 00 

30 Mrs. McKay. ... 10 00 

30 Mrs. Parney 10 00 

30 Mrs. Halliday... 10 00 

30 Mrs. Steele 10 00 

30 Mrs. Ellis 15 00 

30 Mrs. Beattie .... 10 00 

31 Mrs. Malcolm ... 15 00 
31 Mrs, Fowler .... 20 00 
31 Mrs. Porteous... IO 00 

31 Mrs. Moore 5 00 

31 Bro. Graham.... 15 00 

31 Mrs. Cameron... 10 00 

31 Mrs. Beam 1000 

31 Mrs. Thompson. 10 00 

31 Orp. Bro. Davey 10 00 

31 Mrs. McCadden.. IO 00 

31 Mrs. Harvey.... 10 00 

31 Mrs. Kinsman... 5 00 

31 Mrs. Whitworth. 10 00 

31 Or. Br. Cummins 10 00 

31 Mrs. Adams 1000 

31 Mrs. Cameron... 15 00 

31 Mrs. Whitehead. 10 00 

31 Mrs. Taylor 10 00 

31 Mrs. Young 10 00 

30 Mrs. Spence 15 00 

30 Bro. Wilson 20 00 

30 Mrs. Leaney 15 00 

30 Mrs. Epplet 10 00 

30 Mrs. Vardon. ... 10 00 

30 Mrs. Oliver 15 00 

30 Mrs. McRae.... 10 00 

30 Mrs. Kingston... 15 00 

30 Mrs. Cosseboom. 15 00 

30 Mrs. Davis 10 00 

30 Mrs. Street 15 00 

30 Mrs. Bell 15 00 

30 Or. Bro. Walmer 20 00 

30 Mrs. Jewell 10 00 

30 Mrs. Pringle. ... 10 00 

30 Mrs. Quirk 10 00 

30 Mrs. Blue 20 00 

30 Dau. Bro. Smith 10 00 

30 Mrs. McComb. . . 10 00 

30 Mrs. Leith 10 00 

30 Mrs. Sharpe.... 10 00 

31 Mrs. G. Smith . . 10 00 
31 Mrs Leitch 20 00 



18 

Dec. 



1889 
Jany, 



3 1 Mrs. Stafford . . 
31 Mrs. Laing. . 
31 Mrs. Reid . . . 
31 Mrs. Clayton. 



515 oo 
15 00 
10 00 

20 00 



Feb. 



31 Bro. Bowman. .. 20 00 

31 Mrs. Grant 15 00 

31 Mrs. Livingston.. 5 00 

31 Mrs. Lowe 10 00 

31 Mrs. Lewis 5 00 

31 Mrs. Gilchrist. .. 15 00 

31 Bro. C. W. Smith 25 00 

31 Bd Rlf. Hamilton 50 00 

28 Mrs. Porteous. .. 10 00 

28 Mrs. Zimmerman 10 00 

28 Mrs. McKay 5 00 

28 Mrs. Robson.... 20 co 

28 Mrs. Iredale 10 00 

28 Mrs. Peverett ... 15 00 

28 Mrs. McGibbony 10 00 

28 Mrs. Clayton.... 20 00 

28 Mrs. Elsasser 15 00 

28 Mrs. Wells 15 00 

28 Mrs. Howard ... 10 00 

28 Mrs. Thompson . 10 00 

28 Mrs. Wilson ... 10 00 

28 Mrs. Palmer 15 00 

28 Mrs. Hurst 10 00 

28 Mrs. Newberry.. 10 00 

28 Mrs. Bennett 15 00 

28 Mrs. McLellan . . 5 00 

28 Mrs. McKellar . . 15 00 

28 Mrs. Lawrence . . 15 00 

28 Mrs. Small 15 00 

28 Mrs. Hall 10 00 

28 Mrs. McCadden. 10 00 

28 Bro. Butterworth. 25 00 

28 Mrs. Upham 10 00 

28 Mrs. Jones 20 00 

28 Mrs. Kneeshaw.. 5 00 

28 Mrs. Smythe. ... 10 00 

28 Mrs. Canning. . . 10 00 

28 Orphans Bro. Orr 20 00 

28 Mrs. Imlay 10 00 

28 Mrs. Barber 15 00 

28 Mrs. Blount 15 00 

28 Mrs. Goldsmith . . 20 00 

28 Bd. Rlf. Ottawa. 15 00 

28 Mrs. Lang 5 00 

28 Sarah Eligh 10 00 

28 Mrs. Oliver 15 00 

28 Mrs. Mitchell. .. 10 00 



194 



GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

Benevolence — [Continued.] 



1889. 
Feb. 



28 Mrs. Kennedy. . . $10 00 

28 Mrs. Smith 15 00 

28 Mrs. Bridgeport.. 15 00 

28 Mrs. Sutherland. 15 00 

28 Mrs. Turner .... 15 00 

28 Mrs. Dack 10 00 

28 Mrs. Thoburn.. . 15 00 

28 Mrs. Roblin .... 10 00 

28 Mrs. Jewell 10 00 

28 Mrs. McTaggart. 5 00 

28 Bro. McNally... 25 00 

28 Bro. Hallett 20 00 

28 Mrs. Olmstead. . . 15 00 

28 Mrs. Rubidge. .. 10 00 

28 Mrs. White 10 00 

28 Mrs. Stetham... . 10 00 

28 Orp.Bro.McBride 15 00 

28 Mrs. Pettit 15 00 

28 Mrs. Kerr 15 00 

28 Mrs. Urquhart... 15 00 

28 Mrs. Barber 15 00 

28 Mrs. McNeice... 10 00 

28 Mrs. Robertson.. 5 00 

28 Mrs. Kirby 15 00 

28 Mrs. Martin 15 00 

28 Mrs. Stoppleben. 10 00 

28 Mrs. Sproule.... 15 00 

28 Mrs. Weir 10 00 

28 Mrs. Westcott. . . 10 00 

28 Mrs. Fortier 15 00 

28 Mrs. Whitiner. . . 20 00 

28 Mrs. Hortop.. .. 10 00 

28 Mrs. Beattie 10 00 

28 Mrs. Little 20 00 

28 Mrs. O'Neil 15 00 

28 Orp. Bro. Fraser. 10 00 

28 Mrs. Street 15 00 

28 Mrs. Pigott 20 00 

28 Mrs. Adamson. . . 5 00 

28 Mrs. Sharpe 15 00 

28 Mrs. Garbutt. ... 10 00 

28 Mrs. Reid 10 00 

28 Mrs. France 20 00 

28 Mrs. McBeth. ... 10 00 

28 Mrs. Beaver 20 00 

28 Bro. Videan 25 00 

28 Mrs. Fitzpatrick. 10 00 

28 Mrs. Bailey 15 00 

28 Bro. Marcus 25 00 

28 Mrs. McDougall. 5 00 

28 Mrs. Oldham.... 10 00 

28 Bd.Rlf., Kingston 30 00 



18 
Feb. 



28 Mrs. McDougall. $5 00 

28 Mrs. Rome 15 00 

28 Mrs. Wylie 10 00 

28 Mrs. Perley 10 00 

28 Mrs. Hessel 15 00 

28 Mrs. Coulter.... 10 00 

28 Sirs Baxter 20 00 

28 Mrs. Middleton. . 5 00 

28 Bro. Ingram.. .. 20 00 

28 Mrs. Conklin. ... 15 00 

28 Mrs. Cummins. . . 5 00 

28 Mrs. Patterson. . . 10 00 

28 Mrs. Stronger... . 15 00 

28 Mrs. Bowman. . 10 00 

28 Bro. Hill .... 25 00 

28 Mrs. Jamieson. . . 15 00 

28 Mrs. Harington . 20 00 

28 Mrs. Cummins . . 5 00 

28 Bro. Huyck 20 00 

28 Mrs. Bradley 10 00 

28 Mrs. Robertson . . 5 00 

28 Mrs. Moore 15 00 

28 Mrs. Jackson. .. . 5 00 

28 Bro. Black 25 00 

28 Mrs. Gray 15 00 

28 Mrs. Armson. ... 20 00 

28 Mrs. Tandy 15 00 

28 Mrs. Shupe 15 00 

28 Bro. Wilson 20 00 

28 Mrs. Badgley. ... 15 00 

28 Mrs. Riggs 15 00 

28 Mrs. Neale 10 00 

28 Mrs. Stairs 20 00 

28 Mrs. Pocock.... 10 00 

28 Mrs. Marsh 10 00 

28 Mrs. Christie. ... 10 00 

28 Mrs. Griffith 10 00 

28 Mrs. Martin 20 00 

28 B. Rlf. London..' 50 00 

28 Mrs. Cronin .... 20 00 

28 Mrs. Mitchell ... 10 00 

28 Mrs. Walker. ... 15 00 

28 Mrs. McKenzie.. 10 00 

28 Mrs. Gill 20 00 

28 Mrs. Davies.. .. 10 00 

28 Bro. Kennedy... 25 00 

28 Mrs.Jolley 10 00 

28 Da. Bro. Maughan 5 00 

28 Bro. Foster 25 00 

28 Bro. Munro. ... 25 00 

28 Mrs. Bailey 10 00 

28 Mrs. Campbell. 10 00 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 1 95 
Benevolence — [Continued.'] 



Feb. 28 Mrs. Fowler $20 00 

" 28 Or. Bro. Banghart 5 00 

" 28 Mrs. Moore 5 00 

" 28 Mrs. Evans 15 00 

" 28 Mrs. Mclntyre . . 10 00 

" 28 Mrs. Kestivan... 5 00 

" 28 Mrs. Amsden. . . . 15 00 

" 28 Mrs. Miller 5 00 

28 Bro. Langstaff. . . 20 00 

" 28 Mrs. Halliday... 5 00 

28 Orp.Bro. Salmoni 5 00 

" 28 Mrs. McVetey. . . 10 00 

28 Orp. Bro. Francis 10 00 

28 Mrs. Johnston 10 00 

" 28 Mrs. Harvey... 10 00 

" 28 Mrs. McMenemy, 10 00 

" 28 Mrs. Elliott 20 00 

" 28 Lousia Lee 10 00 

" 28 Bro. Worsfold . . . 25 00 

" 28 Orp. Bro. Barber 15 00 

" 28 Mrs. Tighe 20 00 

" 28 Mrs. Spickett ... 10 00 

" 28 Mrs. Pringle 10 00 

" 28 Bro. Bee 20 00 

" 28 Mrs. Scott 10 00 

" 28 Mrs. Tuke 10 00 

" 28 Mrs. Manning. . . 15 00 

" 28 Mrs. McBride... 10 00 

" 28 Mrs. Renwick... 15 00 

" 28 Mrs. McKenzie.. 10 00 

" 28 Mrs. Cox 10 00 

" 28 Mrs. Nixon 10 00 

" 28 B. Rlf. Peterboro' 10 00 

" 28 Mrs. Parker 15 00 

" 28 Mrs. LeClair 5 00 

" 28 Mrs. McLeod ... 15 00 

" 28 Mrs. Sommerville 15 00 

" 28 Mrs. Mclntyre.. 5 00 

" 28 Dau. Bro. Palmer 20 00 

" 28 Mrs. McKellican. 15 00 

" 28 Mrs. Adam. . 10 00 

" 28 Or. Bro. Warren. 20 00 

" 28 Bro. Scott 25 00 

" 28 Mrs. Smith 10 00 

" 28 Mrs. Ross 15 00 

" 28 Mrs. Elliott 10 00 

" 28 Mrs. Richardson. 10 00 

" 28 Mrs. Inman 10 00 

" 28 Mrs. Bethune. .. 10 00 

" 28 Mrs. Hixon 15 00 

" 28 Mrs. Ramsay.... 10 00 

" 28 Mrs. Hill 10 00 



1} 

Feb 



. 28 Mrs. Green $15 00 

28 Mrs. Siersch 15 00 

28 Mrs. McRae 10 00 

28 Mrs. Street 5 00 

28 Mrs. Cummings. . 5 00 

28 Mrs. Milne 15 00 

28 Bro. Meyers. ... 20 00 

28 Mrs. Flood 20 00 

28 Mrs. Blondheim. . 15 00 

28 Mrs. Shields.... 20 00 

28 Or. Bro. Rees. . . 10 00 

28 Mrs. Waltho 10 00 

28 Eliza Smith 10 00 

28 Mrs. Gifford 5 00 

28 Mrs. Howe 10 00 

28 Mrs. Benedict... 15 00 

28 Mrs. Salmond... 15 00 

28 Mrs. Gordon.... 15 00 

28 Mrs. Hall 5 00 

28 Mrs. Rowed 20 00 

28 Bro. Patterson... 20 00 

28 Mrs. Bald 10 00 

28 Mrs. Davis 15 00 

28 Mrs. Locke 15 00 

28 Mrs. Smithett... 15 00 

28 Mrs. Bryant 15 00 

28 Mrs. Leister .... 10 00 

28 Mrs. Rowlinson. . 15 00 

28 Bro. Barber 25 00 

28 Bro. Sutherland.. 25 00 

28 Mrs. Graham ... . 15 00 

28 Or. Bro. Munro. . 5 00 

28 Or. Bro. Gregory 10 00 

28 Mrs. McKay 10 00 

28 Mrs. Wright 10 00 

28 Mrs. Wells 20 00 

28 Mrs. Burgess.... 10 00 

28 Mrs. Hill 10 00 

28 Mrs. Vardon.... 10 00 

28 Mrs. Boulton. ... 15 00 

28 Mrs. Beal 10 00 

28 Mrs. Berry 15 00 

28 Bro. Graham 15 00 

28 Mrs. Reid 10 00 

28 Bd. Rlf., Windsor 15 00 

28 Mrs. Fraser 15 00 

28 Mrs. Hogg 10 00 

28 Mrs. Johnston. . . 20 00 

28 Mrs. Cook 15 00 

28 Mrs. Christenson . 10 00 

28 Mrs. Gray 10 00 

28 Mrs. Bailie 15 00 



196 



GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

Benevolence — [Continued.] 



IS 
Feb. 



Mar. 



28 Mrs. McPhail.... $15 00 

28 Mrs. McKay. ... 10 00 

28 Mrs. Nancollis... 5 00 

28 Mrs. Campaigne. 10 00 

28 Mrs. De Wolf... . 10 00 

28 Mrs. Beam 10 00 

28 Mrs. Noble 10 00 

28 Mrs. Ramsay. ... 20 00 

28 Mrs. Wellbanks. . 15 00 

28 Mrs- Sweeney... 15 00 

28 Mrs. Carter 10 00 

28 Mrs. Bell 15 00 

28 Mrs. Kingston. . . 15 00 

28 Orp. Bro. Covill. 15 00 

28 Mrs. Hunter 20 00 

28 Mrs. Bourke 10 00 

28 Mrs. Howells.... 10 00 

28 Mrs. Handy 10 00 

28 Mrs. Bayley 10 00 

28 Bro. Wilson 20 00 

28 Mrs. Taylor 10 00 

30 Mrs. Berlet 10 00 

30 Mrs. McRae 20 00 

30 Mrs. Francis 10 00 

30 Mrs. Beaton 15 00 

30 Mrs. Blue 20 00 

30 Mrs. Rees 15 00 

30 Mrs. Locke 1 5 00 

30 Mrs. Richardson. 10 00 

30 Mrs. Aishton 10 00 

30 Bro. Nelson 20 00 

30 Mrs. Seddon.... 10 00 

30 Mrs. Nash 15 00 

30 Bro. Bowman... . 20 00 

30 Mrs. Pattison... . 10 00 

30 Mrs. Vanluven. . . 10 00 

30 Mrs. Scatchard.. 10 00 

30 Or. Bro. Anderson 10 00 

30 Mrs. Goslee 5 00 

30 Mrs. Connolly. . . 15 00 

30 Mrs. Philips 15 00 

30 Orp. Bro. Neilson 15 00 

30 Mrs. Harvey. ... 15 00 

30 Harriet Steele ... 20 00 

30 Mrs. Dettrick. ... 5 00 

30 Mrs. Joliffe 15 00 

30 Mrs. Baptie 10 00 

30 Mrs. Birtsch 10 00 

30 Mrs. Ellis 15 00 

30 Mrs. Preston 10 00 

30 Mrs. Blythe 10 00 

30 Mrs. Preston.... 10 00 

30 Mrs. Davis 10 00 

30 Mrs. Davis 10 00 

30 Mrs. Hill 15 00 

30 Mrs. DeGrassi . . 20 00 

30 Mrs. Burns 15 00 



Mar. 30 Bd. Rlf. Toronto. $50 00 

" 30 Mrs. Mathison . . 20 00 

" 30 Mrs. Power 10 00 

" 30 Mrs. Hill 15 00 

" 30 Mrs. Whitehead.. 10 00 

" 30 Mrs. Hill 15 00 

" 30 Mrs. Webb 10 00 

" 30 Mrs. Davey 15 00 

" 30 Mrs. McKenzie. . 10 00 

April 30 Mrs. Steele 10 00 

" 30 Mrs Grant 15 00 

" 30 Mrs. McComb . . 10 00 

" 30 Mrs. Leith 10 00 

" 30 Mrs. Malcolm... 15 00 

" 30 Mrs. Laing 15 00 

" 30 Mrs. Reid 10 00 

" 30 Mrs. Smith 10 00 

" 30 Mrs. Hogg 15 00 

" 30 Mrs. Sharpe .... 10 00 

" 30 Mrs. Stafford 15 00 

" 30 Mrs. Spence .... 15 00 

" 30 Mrs. Sanderson. . 15 00 

" 30 Mrs. Leitch 20 00 

" 30 Bro. Cooper 20 00 

" 30 Or. Bro. Oliver. . . 1000 

" 30 Mrs. Allen 10 00 

" 30 Mrs. Whitworth. 10 00 

" 30 Mrs. Hill 10 00 

" 30 Mrs. Allen (1). . . 5 00 

" 30 Mrs. Allen (2). . . 5 00 

" 30 Mrs. Kerr 5 °° 

" 30 Mrs. Hunter.... 10 00 

" 30 Mrs. Epplett 10 00 

" 30 Mrs. Parney .... 10 00 

" 30 Orp. Bro. Davey. 10 00 

" 30 Bro. Reist 25 00 

" 30 Mrs. Gipson .... 10 00 

" 30 Mrs. Kays 10 00 

" 30 Bro. Halliday ... 10 00 

" 30 Mrs. Kinsman .. . 5 °° 

" 30 Mrs. Young.. .. 10 00 

" 30 Mrs. Harvey.... 10 00 

" 30 Mrs. Pickhaven. . 10 00 

May 31 Mrs. LeRoy 10 00 

" 31 Mrs. Deacon.... 15 00 

" 31 Mrs. Phipp 10 00 

" 31 Mrs Cosseboom. 15 00 

" 31 Mrs. Lowe 1000 

" 31 Mrs. Raith 5 00 

" 31 Mrs. McPherson. 15 00 

" 31 Mrs. Campbell.. 10 00 

" 31 Bro. Nelson 2000 

" 31 Mrs. Campbell . . 10 00 

" 31 Mrs. Scott 15 00 

Total $9,770 00 



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212 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

LIST OF LODGES— BY DISTRICTS. 

ERIE DISTRICT NO. I. (23.) 

D. D. G. M.— R. W. Bro. A. H. Clarke, Essex Centre. 

No. 34, Thistle Amherstburg. 

" 41, St. George Kingsville. 

" 46, Wellington Chatham. 

" 47, Great Western Windsor. 

" 80, Albion Newbury. 

" 245, Tecumseh Thamesville. 

" 2 55> Sydenham Dresden. 

" 267, Parthenon • Chatham. 

" 274, Kent Blenheim. 

" 282, Lome Glencoe. 

" 290, Leamington Leamington. 

" 312, Pynx Wallaceburg. 

" 327, The Hammond Wardsville. 

" 336, Highgate Highgate. 

" 386, McColl West Lome. 

" 390, Florence Florence. 

" 391, Howard Ridgetown. 

" 395, Parvaim Comber. 

" 402, Central Essex Centre. 

" 403, Windsor Windsor. 

" 411, Rodney Rodney. 

" 413, Naphtali Tilbury Centre. 

" 422, Star of the East. Bothwell. 

ST. CLAIR DISTRICT NO. 2. (19.) 

D. D. G. M.— R. W. Bro. J. P. Whitehead, Strathroy. 

No. 56, Victoria Sarnia. 

" 81, St. John's Mt. Brydges. 

" 83, Beaver Strathroy. 

" 116, Cassia Thedford. 

" 153, Burns Wyoming. 

" 158, Alexandra Oil Springs. 

" 194, Petrolia Petrolia. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 213 



No. 



238, 
260, 
263, 
294, 
3°7, 
3 2 3, 
328, 
3 6 4, 
366, 
392, 
397, 
419, 



Havelock Watford. 

Washington Petrolia. 

Forest Forest. 

Moore Mooretown. 

Arkona Arkona 

Alvinston Alvinston. 

Ionic Napier. 

Dufferin Melbourne. 

Euclid Strathroy. 

Huron Camlachie, 

Leopold Brigden. 

Bismarck Point Edward. 



LONDON DISTRICT NO. 3. (29.) 

D. D. G. M.— R. W. Bro. W. B. Doherty, St. Thomas. 

No. 20, St. John's London. 

, St. George's London. 

, St. Thomas St. Thomas. 

, Kilwinning London. 

, St. Mark's Port Stanley. 

, St. Paul's Lambeth. 

, Warren Fingal. 

, Malahide Aylmer. 

, Prince of AVales Iona. 

, Spartan Sparta. 

, Belmont Belmont. 

, Tuscan London. 

fl,St. John's London. 

, Cameron Wallacetown. 

, Springfield Springfield. 

, Doric , Lobo. 

, Mt. Olivet Thorndale. 

, St. David's St. Thomas. 

, Corinthian London East. 

Merrill Dorchester Station. 

, Nilestown Nilestown. 

, Elgin St. Thomas. 

, Delaware Valley Delaware. 



20 
42 
44 
64 

94 
107 
120 
140 
171 
176 
190 

195 
209 
232 

259 
2 
300 
302 

33° 
344 
345 
349 

358 



214 GRAND LODGE OK CANADX. 

No. 378, King Solomon's Petersville. 

" 379, Middlesex Bryanston. 

" 380, Union London. 

" • 388, 1 [enderson Ilderton. 

" 394, King Solomon Thamesford. 

" 399, Moffat Harrietsville. 

SOUTH HURON DISTRICT NO. 4. (16.) 

D. D. G. M.— R. W. Bro. W. G. Duff, Seaforth. 

No. 33, Maitland Goderich. 

" 73) St. James St. Mary's. 

84, Clinton Clinton. 

" 133, Lebanon Forest Exeter. 

" 141, Tudor Mitchell. 

" 144, Tecumseh Stratford. 

" 154, Irving Lucan. 

" 170, Britannia Seaforth. 

" 205, New Dominion New Hamburg. 

" 214, Craig Ailsa Craig. 

" 224, Zurich Hensall. 

11 233, Doric Park Hill. 

" 303, Blyth Blyth. 

" 309, Morning Star Smith's Hill. 

" 318, Wilmot Baden. 

" 332, Stratford Stratford. 

NORTH HURON DISTRICT NO. 5. (15.) 

D. D. G. M.— R. W. Bro. R. C. Bruce, Tara. 

No. 93, Northern Light Kincardine. 

" 131, St. Lawrence Southampton. 

" 162, Forest Wroxeter. 

" 184, Old Light Lucknow. 

" 197, Saugeen Walkerton. 

" 225, Bernard Listowel. 

" 235, Aldworth Paisley. 

" 276, Teeswater Teeswater. 

" 284, St. John's Brussels. 

" 286, Wingham Wingham. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 215 

No. 331, Fordwich Fordwich. 

" 341, Bruce Tiverton. 

" 362, Maple Leaf. Tara. 

" 393? Forest Chesley. 

" 396, Cedar Wiarton. 

WILSON DISTRICT NO. 6. (2 1.) 

D. D. G. M— R. W. Bro. D. H. Hunter, Woodstock. 

No. 10, Norfolk Simcoe. 

" 37, King Hiram Ingersoll. 

" 43, King Solomon Woodstock. 

" 68, St. John's Ingersoll. 

" 76, Oxford Woodstock. 

" 78, King Hiram Tilsonburg. 

■' 82, St. John's Paris. 

" 104, St. John's Norwich. 

" 106, Burford Burford. 

" 168, Blenheim Drumbo. 

" 113, Wilson Waterford. 

" 149, Erie Port Dover. 

" 174, Walsingham Port Rowan. 

" 178, Plattsville Plattsville. 

" 181, Oriental Port Burwell. 

" 193, Scotland Scotland. 

" 217, Frederick Delhi. 

" 237, Vienna Vienna. 

" 250, Thistle Embro. 

" 261, Oak Branch Innerkip. 

" 335, Langton Langton. 

" 359? Vittoria Vittoria. 

WELLINGTON DISTRICT NO. 7. (2 1.) 

D. D. G. M.— R. W. Bro. David Forsyth, Berlin. 

No. 72, Alma Gait. 

" 151, The Grand River Berlin. 

" 172, Ayr . . Ayr. 

" 180, Speed Guelph. 



2i6 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

No. 200, St. Alban's Mount Forest. 

" 203, Irvine Elora 

" 216, Harris Orangeville. 

M 257, Gait Gait. 

" 258, Guelph Guelph. 

" 262, Harriston Harriston. 

" 271, Wellington Erin. 

" 279, New Hope Hespeler. 

" 295, Conestogo Drayton. 

" 297, Preston Preston. 

" 306, Durham.* Durham. 

" 314, Blair Palmerston. 

" 315, Clifford Clifford. 

" 334, Prince Arthur Arthur. 

" 347, Mercer Fergus. 

" 361, Waverley Guelph. 

" 421, Scott Grand Valley. 

HAMILTON DISTRICT NO. 8. (2 1.) 

D. D. G. M.— R. W. Bro. John Malloy, Hamilton. 

No. 6, Barton Hamilton. 

27, Strict Observance Hamilton. 

40, St. John's Hamilton. 

45, Brant Brantford. 

57, Harmony Binbrook. 

61, Acacia Hamilton. 

62, St. x\ndrew's Caledonia. 

100, Valley Dundas. 

121, Doric Brantford. 

1 35, St. Clair Milton. 

165, Burlington Burlington. 

166, Wentworth Stoney Creek. 

219, Credit Georgetown. 

243, St. George St. George. 

272, Seymour Ancaster. 

291, Dufferin West Flamboro' 

321, Walker Acton West. 

324, Temple Hamilton. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 217 



No. 357, Waterdovvn Waterdown. 

" 382, Doric Hamilton. 

" 400, Oakville Oakville. 

GEORGIAN DISTRICT, No. 9. (23.) 

G. M.— R. W. Bro. Thomas McCarroll, Meaford. 

Simcoe Bradford. 

St. George's Owen Sound. 

Manito Collingwood. 

Corinthian Barrie. 

True Blue Albion. 

Pythagoras Meaford. 

Orillia Orillia. 

Kerr Barrie. 

Beaver Clarksburg. 

Manitoba Cookstown. 

Caledonian Midland. 

Northern Stayner. 

Seven Star Alliston. 

Minerva Stroud. 

North Star Owen Sound. 

Prince Arthur Flesherton. 

Georgian Penetanguishene. 

Granite , Parry Sound. 

Muskoka Bracebridge. 

Unity Huntsville. 

Lome Shelburne. 

Spry Beeton. 

Golden Rule Gravenhurst. 

NIAGARA DISTRICT, No. IO. (22.) 

D. D. G. M.— R. W. Bro. Win. Jaques, M. D., Jarvis. 

No. 2, Niagara Niagara. 

" 7, Union Grimsby. 

" 15, St. George's St. Catharines. 

" 32, Amity Dunnville. 

" 35) St. John's Cayuga. 

" 36, Welland Fonthill. 





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GR \NI> LODGE OF CANADA. 



No. 103, Maple Leaf St. Catharines. 

" 105, St. Mark's Drummondvflle. 

" 115, Ivy Beamsville. 

" 168, Merritt Welland. 

" 169, Macnab Port Colborne. 

" 185, Enniskillen York. 

" 221, Mountain Thorold. 

" 254, Clifton Niagara Falls. 

" 277, Seymour Port Dalhousie. 

" 296, Temple St. Catharines. 

" 319, Hiram Hagersville. 

" 329, King Solomon Jarvis. 

" 337, Myrtle Port Robinson. 

" 338, Dufferin Wellandport. 

" 372, Palmer Victoria. 

" 373) Copestone Welland. 

TORONTO DISTRICT, No. II. (35.) 

D. D. G. M.— R. W. Bro. Wm. Roaf, Toronto. 
No. 16, St. Andrew's Toronto. 

22, King Solomon's Toronto. 

23, Richmond Richmond Hill. 

25, Ionic Toronto. 

54, Vaughan Maple. 

65, Rehoboam Toronto. 

75, St. John's Toronto. 

86, Wilson Toronto. 

87, Markham Union Markham. 

97, Sharon Sharon. 

99, Tuscan Newmarket. 

118, Union Schomberg. 

129, The Rising Sun Aurora. 

136, Richardson Stouffville. 

156, York Eglington. 

218, Stevenson Toronto. 

220, Zeredatha Uxbridge. 

229, Ionic Brampton. 

247, Ashlar Toronto. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 219 



No. 



No. 



265, Patterson Thornhill. 

269, Brougham Union Brougham. 

292, Robertson Nobleton. 

305, Humber Weston. 

311, Blackwood Woodbridge. 

316, Doric Toronto. 

326, Zetland Toronto. 

339, Orient Toronto. 

343, Georgina Sutton West. 

346, Occident Toronto. 

354, Brock Cannington. 

356, River Park Streetsville. 

367, St. George Toronto. 

369, Mimico Lambton. 

384, Alpha Parkdale. 

410, Zeta Parkdale. 

ONTARIO DISTRICT, No 12. (22.) 

D. D. G. M.— R. W. Bro. W. R. Howse, Whitby. 

26, Ontario Port Hope. 

30, Composite Whitby. 

31, Jerusalem Bowmanville. 

39, Mount Zion Brooklin. 

66, Durham Newcastle. 

77, Faithful Brethren Lindsay. 

101, Corinthian Peterborough. 

1 14, Hope Port Hope. 

139, Lebanon Oshawa. 

145, J. B. Hall Millbrook. 

155, Peterborough Peterborough. 

183, Prince Albert Port Perry. 

223, Norwood Norwood. 

268, Verulam . . Bobcaygeon. 

270, Cedar Oshawa. 

313, Clementi Lakefield. 

325, Orono Orono. 

374, Keene Keene. 

375, Lome Omemee. 



GK W'M LODGE OF CANADA. 



No. 398, Victoria Victoria Road. 

" 406, The Spry Fenelon Falls. 

" 408, Murray Beaverton. 

PRINCE EDWARD DISTRICT, No. 1 3. (22.) 

1). D. G. M.— R. W. Bro. P. J. Lightburne, Cobourg. 

No. 1 1, Moira Belleville. 

" 1 7, St. John's Cobourg. 

" 18, Prince Edward Picton. 

" 29, United Brighton. 

" 38, Trent Trenton. 

" 48, Madoc Madoc. 

" 50, Consecon Consecon. 

" 69, Stirling Stirling. 

" 91, Colborne Colborne. 

" 123, The Belleville Belleville. 

" 126, Golden Rule Campbellford. 

" 127, Franck Frankfort. 

" 161, Percy Warkworth. 

" 164, Star in the East . . .Wellington. 

" 215, Lake Ameliasburg. 

" 222, Marmora Marmora. 

" 239, Tweed Tweed. 

" 241, Quinte Shannonville. 

" 278, Mystic Roslin. 

" 283, Eureka Belleville. 

" 308, Grafton Grafton. 

" 401, Craig Deseronto. 

FRONTENAC DISTRICT, No. 14. (l7-) 

D. D. G. M.—R. W. Bro. H. J. Wilkinson, Kingston. 

No. 3, The Ancient St. John's Kingston. 

" 9, Union Napanee. 

" 92, Cataraqui Kingston. 

" 109, Albion Harrowsmith. 

" 119, Maple Leaf Bath. 

" 146, Prince of Wales Newburgh. 

" 157, Simpson Newboro. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 221 



No. 189, Filius Viduse Adolphustown. 

" 201, Leeds Gananoque. 

" 212, Elysian Garden Island. 

" 229, Prince Arthur Odessa. 

" 253, Minden Kingston. 

" 299, Victoria Centreville. 

" 340, St. John's Pittsburg. 

" 342, Hiram Wolfe Island. 

" 363, Frontenac Cataraqui. 

" 4.04. Lome Tamworth. 



ST. LAWRENCE DISTRICT, No. 15. (22.) 

D. D. G. M.— R. W. Pro. W. H. Jackson, Prockville. 

No. 5, Sussex Prockville. 

14, True Pritons Perth. 

24, St. Francis Smith's Falls. 

28, Mount Zion Kemptville. 

55, Merrickville Merrickville. 

74, St. James Maitland. 

85, Rising Sun Farmersville. 

1 10, Central Prescott. 

125, Cornwall Cornwall. 

142, Excelsior Morrisburg. 

143, Friendly Prothers Iroquois. 

207, Lancaster Lancaster. 

242, Macoy Mallorytown. 

256, Farran's Point Farran's Point. 

320, Chesterville Chesterville. 

368, Salem Prockville. 

370, Harmony Delta. 

383, Henderson West Winchester. 

387, Lansdowne Lansdowne. 

389, Crystal Fountain North Augusta. 

416, Lyn Lyn. 

418, Maxville Maxville. 

OTTAWA DISTRICT, No. 1 6. (18.) 

D. D. G. M.— R. W. Pro. David Parr, Renfrew. 

No. 21a, St. John's Vankleek Hill. 



222 



CKWI) LODGE OF CANADA. 



No. 



52 
58 

63 
121 
128 

147 
148 

!59 
177 
186 
196 
209 
231 
264 
37i 
405 
420 



I >alhousie Ottawa. 

Doric Ottawa. 

St. John's Carleton I 

Renfrew Renfrew. 

Pembroke Pembroke. 

Mississippi Almonte. 

Civil Service Ottawa. 

Goodwood Richmond. 

The Builders' Ottawa. 

Plantagenet Plantagenet. 

Madawaska Am prior. 

Evergreen Lanark. 

Lodge of Fidelity Ottawa. 

Chaudiere Ottawa. 

Prince of Wales Ottawa. 

Mattawa Mattawa. 

Nipissing North Bay. 



ALGOMA DISTRICT, No. 1 7. (6.) 

D. D. G. M.— R. W. Bro. D. T. Ferguson, Rat Portage. 

No. 287, Shuniah Port Arthur. 

" 407, Manitoulin Gore Bay. 

" 412, Keystone Sault Ste. Marie. 

" 414, Pequonga Rat Portage. 

" 415, Fort William Fort William. 

" 417, Keewatin Keewatin Mills. 

NOT ATTACHED TO ANY DISTRICT. 

No. 293, The Royal Solomon Mother, Jerusalem, Palestine. 
RECAPITULATION. 



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23 Lodges. 

J 9 
29 
16 

*5 

22 

21 






ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 223 



Hamilton District 


No. 8 


Georgian " 


" 9 


Niagara " 


" 10 


Toronto " 


" 11 


Ontario " 


" 12 


Prince Edward " 


" 13 


Frontenac " 


" 14 


St. Lawrence " 


" 15 


Ottawa " 


" 16 


Algoma " 


" i7 







Total , 



21 Lodges. 

•23 

, 22 

•35 
. 22 

, 22 

•17 
. 22 
.18 
, 6 
, 1 



oo 



EXPULSIONS. 



18 — Samuel Whitney. 

SUSPENSIONS— UNMASONIC CONDUCT. 

No. of 

Lodge. 

5— Thos. W. Miller. 
356 — Joseph G. Owens (for three years.) 

SUSPENSIONS— NON-PAYMENT OF DUES. 

So. of 
Lodge. 

2 — Geo. B. Wilson. 

3 — Wm. Davis. 

6— A. Calder, P. Corridi, G. A. M. Geddes, R. H. Knapp, 

F. W. Passmore, E. C. Passmore, Sydney Roberts, 
A. S. Vail. 

7 — Robt. Henry, H. E. Russ, Jno. B. Brant, A. C. Crosby, 

G. H. Hewson, Wm. Hannah, N. P. Henning. 
9— J. W. Dorland, R. Richardson, W. S. Williams, T. 

Miller. 
10 — Jno. W. Clark, W. G. Pennington, Joshua Potts, H. W. 

Johnstone, W. Dunlop, S. Gardner, T. G. Matheson, 

R. Osborne, D. Durward, J. T. Chadwick. 
14 — A. D. May, Robt. Burke, Joseph Coombs. 
15 — A. G. Brown, H. Holt, R. James. Jr., Jas. Ross, Jr., 

G. S. Yokum. 



224 GRAND LI IDG E 01 < w UDA. 

16— W. G. McWilliams, W. Nattras, Jos. Pitman, J. 
Barnett, L. H. Luke, Q. D. McCullough, A. Mc- 
Phedran. 

17 — S. Brisbin, Ceo. Beatty, Jas. Ewart. 

18— B. A. Hubbs, W. H. Orchard, D. W. Johnson, E. H. 
Vandusen, John S. Barker. 

20— F. H. Butler, J. F. Degeau, R. Elson, T. Flyn, R. W. 
Jackson, Jno. Lapthorne, J. A. McMillan, B. Noble, 
G. W. Plastow, Robt. Stevenson, Jno. Stevenson, 
P. H. Watson, R. Weir, H. West. 

22 — W. J. McClure, R. Lawrence, IT. Norwich. 

23 — F. Boynton. 

24— S. E. Code, E. H. Tallman, W. Garrett, R. Goodfellow, 
N. E. Stephens, P. G. Newman. 

26— A. N. Hugel, S. Bones, M. C. Lynell, Jos. Little. 

27 — Sam. Arthur, Jas. Johnston, Richard Mackay. 

28 — W. H. Mundle, Robert Kerr, Geo. McGooken. 

31 — Wm. Wright. 

32 — B. Albro, M. V. Farrar, Robt. Patterson, H. Root, Jas. 
W. Schofield, S. W. Brown, H. N. Camp. 

33— W. Dickson, A. Dart, J. A. Gladhill, G. Shepherd, J. 
Imrie, S. Andrews, J. D. Lutrill, J. Miller, J. Keiley, 
J. McDonald, C. E. Robertson, T. Hockstep, W. H. 
Ridley, J. Morgan, P. McFarland, H. Clucas, Jno. 
Knox. 

34 — Robt. Sample, T. Maloney, A. McKay. 

37 — J. M. Wilson, J. D. Henderson, D. Palmer, A. Arm- 
strong, J. W. Brown, T. J. Choate, E. C. Saunders, 
A. J. Crawford, J. McDonald, H. Cochrane, O. T. 
Wright, E. O'Connor, Chas. McLean, J. W. Marsden, 
Jas. Noxon. 

38 — G. Jackson, R. Corrigon, J. Brooks, E. Cooley, P. Ford. 

42 — Eli. Sawyer. 

43 _G. Rice, T. Hallock, H. Rice, T. Hall, C. E. Magee, 
A. Smith, F. A. Ficht, W. B. Teeple, T. Clements, 
A. Hall, T. McKee, J. R. Sutherland, F. Pilcher, 
J. W. Griffin, D. A. Muir, G. W. A. Ross, J. Burns. 

44 — A. Pitts, R. C. Parsons, H. Comfbrth, E. J. Steel, 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 225 

H. H. Hunt, J. Compton, N. B. Huffman, C. G. 

Butman. 
45 — D. Marquis, Angus Ross. 
46 — A. M. Livingston. 
58 — D. Robertson, V. M. Fisher. 
61 — M. C. Beasley, L. Eckerson, A. Fraser, E. B. Turnbull, 

E. J. Townsend. 
64 — F. Foster, H. C. Green, R. Anderson, A. W. Mitchell, 

J. W. Busby, J. Booth, G Mason, H. Aschenbach, 

G. E. Evans. 
65— W. Bailey, J. Hughes, D. Hughes, E. W. Hendrick, 

G. L. Kavanagh, W. Knox, Jas. McQuillan, D. Moir, 

M. Marks, Richard Stone. 
66 — Wm. Love, J. J. Jones, Jos. Taylor, S. C. Mason. 
68— W. McDowell, Jas. Day, S. Phelps, A. Webster, G. H. 

G. Hamond-Graeme, J. Dunnett, J. W. Gunn, J. A. 

Campbell. 
69 — R. Finch, Chas. Ashley, Chas. Bryant, G. T. Hubble, 

S. Caverley. 
73— J. Adair, W. W. Woolbridge, R. Leitch, R. Huston, T. 

Stanley, T. S. Bell, H. E. Wilson, J. Robinson. 
75— A. Bradshaw, J. H. Verables, T. P. Hayes, J. G. 

Malcolm, W. Simpson, J. C. Robb. 
77— A. Cullon, T. Crandell, W. H. Walsh, C. S. Jewett, G. 

Collins. 
79 _J. E. Stoddart, R. T. Polley, R. J. Sutherland, C. C. 

Campbell, W. Holmes, C. R. Kilkenny, W. W. Ellis, 

D. Wilson. 
82— J. H. Hackland, Robt. Graham, W. Watson. 
83 — A. G. Goodwin. 
84 — J. Callander, O. A. Patterson, C. Overbury, O. Lehrbaws, 

T. Grigg. 
86— Geo. W. Harper. 
87 — W. Robinson. 

90 — James Knox, W. Bell, Jas. Crossland, W. Arnott. 
92— F. Tracey, B. A. Booth, A. Snodden, W. S. Smyth. 
97 — W. H. Kavanagh, John Rafferty, A. Armstrong, G. W. 

Taylor. 



226 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

loo— W. H. Hawker, T. Seaman, P. Grant, A. H. Walker, A. 

A. Clowes, J. B. Meacham, T. J. Bell, J. A. Kyle. 
104 — Albert Freeman. 

io 6— W. H. Kiff, W. B. Underhill, C. E. McCaffey. 
109 — S. Walker, A. Church. 

no — J. A. Mackenzie, G. Birks, J. Tinkis, Alex. Glasgow. 
123 — D. Cunningham, W. J. Butler, Jno. Pepper, A. Black, 

Jno. Addison, W. P. Bates, I. Hetherington, W. West 
129— S. E. Phillips, G. Russell, J. F. Smith, J. C. B. Johns, 

G. H. Webb, A. W. Brodie, D. McLeod, G. 

Wilkinson. 
131 — Jas. Munn, John Ross, G. R. Thompson, A. Lamont. 
133 — G. W. Southcott, Geo. Moir, A. Holland, T. Penhale, 

A. Sheere. 
137 — E. B. Brown, W. C. Dunseath, J. H. Ford, Thos. J. 

Ariss, Hugh Knott, G. F. Vanwyck. 
140— R. H. Maw, G. W. Louks, E. R. Davis, T. T. Kennedy, 

W. J. Brooks, J. Huffman, T. H. Collins, W. 

Campbell, J. E. Black, A. Cameron. 
144— F. Mingay, A. M. Campbell, E. Bilbe, W. R. Knox, D. 

Scrimgeour. 
145— J. Atkins, W. Wilcox, Thos. Wilcox, W. J. White, Wm. 

Reynolds, Jas. Johnstone, Wm. Twigg. 
148 — F. H. W. Leggatt, John Graham. 
J 55 — W. C. Hamacher. 

158— D. C. Cumming, C. McNichol, W. Rumohr. 
165 — G. Anderson. 
166— D. F. Smith. 
171— A. E. Dangerfield, A. McNish. 
172 — W. Henderson, Wm. Mitchell, S. D. Brown. 
184— N. McMullen, D. E. Cameron, D. Kerr, K. Campbell, 

W. Grundy, John Beaton, A. McQuaig, J. L. Cain. 
185— R. Crawford. 
192— J. Wylie, I. J. Reid, W. P. Thompson, J. L. Cain, S. M. 

Ford, Henry Johnston, R. H. Denny, G. R. Hartwell, 

St. Clair Tilley, W. E. Size, L. Wilson, W. R. McPhee, 

Thos. Connell, A. Hector, O. T. Wright. 
193 — A. Freeman. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 227 

196 — Wm. McAdam, Jno. A. McAdam, Alex. McLachlin, 

Forbes W. McRae, P. T. Somerville, E. Mortimer. 
201 — J. Stunden, W. Casson. 
203 — W. Stephenson. 
207 — J. McKenzie, A. McGregor, B. Friedman, A. Falkner, 

H. Killert, I. Irwin, B. R. Eppes, C. McKey, W. S. 

Dunn, A. Urquhart, D. McNaughton, J. J. Reid, F. 

A. Edgar, J. K. McLennan, Jas. S. Stewart. 
209a— W. G. Fletcher, E. McKenzie, D. C. McDonald, R. J. 

Osborne, A. M. Ross, E. Davidson, J. Gillean, W. 

J. Lindsay, H. Munro, D. M. Mclntyre, R. M. 

McElhiran, J. A. Ross, John Ross, A. E. Tribilcock. 
216— W. Parsons, W, Green, T. Marshall, W. S. Smyth, J. F. 

Kennedy. 
220 — J. R. Dales, A. Lawr, C. McPhadden. 
225— W. D. Mitchell. 
230— E. M. Law, W. Ross, S. J. Reid, T. Hust, T. Ness, J. 

N. Bell, Jno. Scott, Geo. Moore, Geo. Baker 
231 — F. H. W. Leggatt, W. C. Teague, Wm. Tinson. 
232 — T. W. Jardine. 
233 — P. McGregor, D. McKenzie, John Ironside, R. G. 

McArthur. 
234 — Wm. H. Gilray. 
243 — Wm. S. Cassmore. 
247 — H E. F. Caston, Thos. Johnston. 
249 — F. Vincent, Chas. Cameron, J. O. McConnell. 
250 — D. G. Murray, K. Murray, G. A. Murray, Jno. Laycock, 

P. W. Murray, H. McLeod. 
253 — R. Spooner, W. McConnell, W. Bajus. 
254 — E. H Swift, E. J. Fessenden, Jas. S. McQueen, 

A. F. Prenster, Jas. H. Kalar. 
255 _0. French, R. J. Colville, S. J. Ball. 
259 — A. R. Ramage, A. Dynes. 
260 — Alex. McDonald, Jas. McConnell. 
263 — T. McVenn. 
265 — A. L. Wilson. 
266 — Geo. Carruthers, E. Lake, H. W. Baker, Jno. Bradbury, 

E. S. Rogers. 



228 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

267— Wm. Berry, E. Bedford, H. J. Eberts, S. E. St. Amour, 

F. L. Lanagan. 

269 — Wm. B. Turner, Thos. S. Leng. 

270 — C. Connor, A. Carswell, M. McArthur, G. A. Campbell, 

W. R. Adams, Robt. Strong, A. A. Adamson. 
272 — H. Richardson, J. H. Smith, E. Clark, T. Hawkyard, 

Chas. Duff. 
274 — J. E. Fishborne. 

276 — Hugh Managan, Geo. Peddie, C. W. Kaake. 
278 — R. Emerson, R. B. Garrison, Jno. Hicks, W. A. 

McMichael, Thos. Lloyd, Thos. Foley. 
282 — A. Munro, R. Conley, A. Smart, Henry Miller, John 

Taylor, R. S. Rodman. 
284— D. Little. 

285— W. J. Baycroft, J. Whalen, J. Wilkinson. 
287 — Jas. Bilsland, E. V. Robinson, M. A. Rafferty. 
291 — W. J. Stutt, P. Horning, D. Erwin, E. Hore, D. Inksetter. 
294— S. S. McGurk, A. Still. 
295 — Jas. Geroling, Geo. W. Green. 
300 — T. Chalmers, W. F. Kennedy, Jno. Leadman, Wm. 

Taylor, N. McKechnie, David Dickie, W. W. Lord, 

O. W. Tennant, Jas. Elgie, M. Chalcraft, Jas. Conn, 

H. Bailey. 
304 — Geo. B. Moor, S. J. Reid, J. Page. 
307 — John Mc Adams. 

308 — Jas. Gillespie, C M. Richardson, F. J. Drake. 
311 — H. A. Dillon, J. Brown, A. Brown, J. Rowntree, J. 

Gourley. 
312 — Wm. N. Ayers, N. McDonald. 
314 — R. Irwin. 

316— W. L. Rice, J. S. Cowley, A. F. Jones, W. A. Medland. 
319— Robt. F. Wood. 
321— C. Chase, H. Hunt, R. R. Rae. 
322 — Jas. Caton, Jas. Buchan, W. J. Paterson, J. M. Notter, 

G. D. Kilbourn, Hy. Riley, R. Hoath, Wm. Craig, 
W. A. Grier, G. F. Wood, P. C. Telfer, H. B. 
Weagent, John A. Piatt, John A. Shaw, Jas. Paterson, 
Jas. Douglas. 



\NNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 229 

325 — John Groves, John J. Scott, A. J. Gainsby. 

326 — J. B. Burns. 

331 — H. Bushert, P. Barr. 

333 — W. Smith, H. Sommerville, Geo. L. Dodds, I. Elliot, 

Geo. Ferguson, D. A. Ghent, T. Mullarkey, R. 

Davis, C. W. Morey. 
337 — Geo. Darby, J. C. Elliot, E. Shainholdts. 
339 — Jas. Hewitt, Geo. H. Lemon, Jos. H. Westman. 
340— P. G. Wilmot, E. Sibbet, W. E. Lyons. 
342 — Wm. Bates, Geo. W. Davis. 
343— M. McLaughlin, J. McDougal, J. Percy, W. G. Shera, 

J. S. Bradshaw. 
344 — W. E. Wilson, C. Conner, F. Russell, G. Patterson. 
346— R. E. Clarke, J. H. Clinkinbroomer, C. A. Crell, Sam'l 

Gregson, Geo. Ward. 
347 — Chas. E. Perry, Jas. Q. Richardson. 
357 — Jas. McMonies, Jr., Thos. Attridge, Jas. H. McMonies, 

Geo. Baker, Chas. M. Jarvis, T. J. Baker, Wm. 

Grierson, Sam. Crocker, Wm. T. Norton. 
358— Wm. D. Rees. 
360 — G. J. Beattie, Alex. McRae. 
363 — D. M. Bowerman, S. Ellery, Wm. Edwards. 
364 — L. McLaughlin, M. Mclntyre, G. Watson. 
366 — W. F. Barclay, John Paine. 
369 — B. Johnson, R. E. Clark. 
376— W. McKinny, Robt. Menzies, L. W. Davies, J. W. 

Birtch, John Murray, J. L. Fetterly. 
378— W. H. Heard, C. H. Wallace, Thos. Jeffries, J. S. 

Mickelborough. 
384 — W. J. Turner. 

385— Wm. Nichol, F. A. Wray, Sam. Huff, J. B. Stone. 
390 — W. A. Dunbar. 
391 — Jas. Rushton. 
393 — W. Cormack. 

394 — Wm. Dickie, Israel Day, J. H. Clarkson. 
395 — W. E. Bottoms, A. B. Howse, Jas. Fleming, D, 

Stephenson. 
397 — J. E. Demare v 



230 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

400 — Wm. C. Beatty, Chas. Brown. 

409 — Alex. Fraser, Alex. McArthur. 

410— C. A. McBride, T. J. Clark. 

414 — J. Weidman, A. W. McFarland, D. McDonald, John 

Thompson, A. McLeod, A. M. Claus, F. A. Cooke, 

J. Chisholm, A. Stunden. 

RESTORATIONS. 

No. of 

Lodge. 

2 — Robt. Frigette. 

3 — Wm. Stephenson. 

6 — Jas. Mcintosh. 

9 _D. P. Wilson. 
10 — Alex Innes. 

11— T. Ashton, W. A. McCamon. 
16 — E. D. Flanagan. 
18— P. Merrill. 
22 — A. Gruisted. 
23 — John Powell. 

26 — T. E. Shipley, Jacob Hoffman. 
27 — R. G. Sutherland. 
31 — D. Kilgour, Samuel Burden. 
32 — Geo. Fonger. 
34— E. C. Gatifeld. 
40 — Thos. J. Carroll. 
43 _G. W. A Ross. 
46— L. P. Springsteen, G. S. McLean, C. P. Lennox, E. W. 

Wood, R. McCorquodale, H. B. Darr. 
47 — G. A. Bontiellor. 
48 — F. Thompson. 
54 — A. McFayden. 
56 — Geo. S. McLean. 
58 — H. Hassard, A. Christie. 
64— Jas. W. Busby, R. Baker. 
68— R. H. Agur. 
73— Jas. Somerville, G. Marlatt, R. Box, K. Waring, D. H. 

Harrison. 
77— A. L. Hogg. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 2 

79— G. Cook, A. Thompson, C Elliott. 

81 — John Graves, W. Campbell. 

82 — John McKee, R. Graham. 

83— H. M. Wilson. 

9 o— W. Bell. 

91 — W. L. King, Jas. Dougherty, V. G. Cornwall. 

93 — W. R. Mackendrick. 

97 — T. T. Johnson. 
101— J. J. Hall, 
iro — J. Tinkis, A. Glasgow. 
116 — Geo. Weir. 

121 — Jos. Brown, B. F. Cheesboro. 
122 — Geo. Cochrane. 

125— A. F. Mulhem, L. A. Ross, D. A. McRae, H. Stiles. 
141 — Jas. D. Doig. 
142 — Alex. Vanallen. 
144 — John E. Birch, F. Mingay. 
153 — N. K. Xesbitt, Jas. McNames. 
169 — Jas. Canan. 
177 — R. J. McGilton. 
181 — John H. Vance. 
184 — W. R. Tompkins, F. Stuart. 
190 — Jas. Buchanan. 
195 — Wm. Lind. 
197— F. K. Hewitt. 
203 — Robt. Anderson. 

209a-Jos. Pigot, T. P. G. Bryan, H. A. McLean. 
217 — W. Armstrong, Hy. Armstrong. 
218 — Chas. Welband. 
220 — J. R. Dales. 

233 — E. E. Chipman, H. H. Kittridge. 
234 — Francis Hazzard. 
236 — Alex. Brown. 
243 — Jos. Vansickle. 
247— H. W. Darrell. 

250 — Ed. Whyte, Geo. Jamieson, John W. Beattie. 
253— W. Reid. 
261— D. W. McKay. 



232 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

269 — S. G. Picket. 

271— C. C Richardson, W. H. Gand. 

272 — Chas. Duff. 

290 — Jos. McCracken. 

291 — Alf. Bennett. 

295 — Jos. Gregory, Wm. Shaw, J. G. Adams. 

302 — Geo. C. Holmes. 

303 — W. H. Watson. 

312 — A. McDonald. 

316— Hy. Tolhurst, T. M. Cavan, F. S. Alderdice. 

332— T. M. How. 

340 — Robt. Austin, T. G. Smith. 

344 — Chas. Connor. 

357 — Rich. Green. 

366 — W. B. Lindsay. 

369 — Sam. Rice. 

385 — John Stewart. 

388— W. H. Burk. 

394 — Wm. Dickie. 

402 — C J. A, Batstone. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 233 

AT REST. 



NO. OF 
LODGE 



Alex. Gunn 

J. A. Hamilton. . . 
C. D. Macdonnell. 

Henry Nattall 

J. E. Brouse 

Thos. Brierley 

W. Marshall 

H. B.Wright 

Robt. Balfour 

Frederick Bennett. 

F. H. Teeter 

M. Pringle 

T. S. Williamson . 
W. R. Griffith.... 

R. Knowles 

S. McCullough . . . 
Jno. S. Coombs. ., 

L. Door 

A. Detrick 

M. E. Snider. . . . 
E. R. Stinson. 

Lionel York 

Wm. Rosevear. .. 

E. A. Minaker. . . 
J. A. Corkindale.. 

R. J. Evans 

M. H. Ferguson. . 
G- L. Garden. . . . 
Henry Bickford. ., 

Jas. Bryant 

Jos. Purvis 

J. C. Doebler 

Chas. H. Foster.. 

F. E. Ecclestone. 

J. P. Judd 

W. H. Schofield.. 
Hugh Gardner. . . 

A. Prentice 

A. K. Melville... 

Noah Bates 

P. Allen 

W. Milloy 

O. Hancock 

John L. Burt. . . . 

H. A. Smith 

R. P. Simmons. .. 

J. Hohmier 

H. Hall 

R. Merchant 

G. D. Beard 



January 15 

April 20 

July 29 

No date. 

April 20 

September 22 . . . 
November 2. . . . 

January 6 

October 6 

November 25. . . 

March 19 

January 14 

March 1 1 

August 20 

June 10 

February 6 

May 24 

September 8. ... 

August 

March 

February 19 ... . 

April 21 

November 16. . . 

February 

October 23 

April 12 

April 24 

May 9 

May 22 

August 7 

October 10 

April 9 

June 14 

July 12 

July 9 

January 16 

October 28 

November 7 . . . . 
December 15. . . 

March 30 

May 25 

November 13. . . 

August 26 

December 

March 2 

June 10 

August 3rd 

September 17... 



880 
881 



889 



888 



886 



234 



GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

AT REST. 



NO. OF 
LODGE 

43 

43 
43 
43 
43 
43 
43 
45 
45 
45 
48 

50 
52 
55 
56 
61 
61 
61 

63 
64 
64 
64 
64 
64 
64 
65 
65 
65 
72 
75 
75 
75 
76 

78 
79 
82 

83 
83 
85 
86 
86 
86 
90 
91 
9i 
92 

93 
100 
101 
105 



J. Forbes 

A. H. W. Jackson 
G. Middleton. . . . 

Wm. Muir 

J. Mander 

L. H. Swan 

Jas. Wilson 

H. Davis 

D. Curtis 

Chas. Avery 

W H. Tumelty... 

Adam Amans 

Peter Christie. . . . 
P. Y. Merrick.... 
Thos. Ellison. 

John Close 

J. A. Simpson. . . . 

Jas. Belling 

H. A. Ferguson . . 

H. A. Baxter 

Jas. Wallace 

A. W. Hill 

John Plummer. . . . 
Z. Hemphill. . . . 
David Porteous. .. 
Chas. Archibald . . 

D. Thurston 

Geo. Robinson 
John Barbour. . . . 
L. C. Hawkey. . 

S. Porter 

G. Gowland 

A. W. Francis. . . 

T. B. Bain , 

W. Payser 

Jas. Robertson 
W. H. Armstrong. 

Wm. Evely 

S. S. Cornell 

R. Robinson 

T. McCormack . . 

Wm. Turner 

Jas. McGee 

J. H. Henderson. 
W. W. Tuttle.... 
Thos. Palmer. . . . 
P. D. Mclnnes. . 

H. Bickford 

C. D. Macdonnell 
John Roberts. . . . 



September 8. , 
December 18. 

May 10 

May 27 

January 4. . . . 
February 27. , 

April 13 

November 26. 
February 18. . 

May 10 

April 25 

October 28 . . . 

July 9 

November 13. 

June 15 

January 8. . . . 
December 27. 

April 9 

May 16 

June 17 

February 13. . 

March 25 ... . 
September 14 
February 6 . . . 
August 12. .. . 
February 12.. 

June 18 

October 30 . . . 
October 29. . . 
January I . . . . 
February 2.. . 
February 27. . 
November 16 
No date. 

March 28 

June 4 

Februaiy 1 . . . 
October 13. . . 

March 9 

February 3 . . . 
November 6. . 
March 16.. . . 

May 28 

August 4 

September 24 

June 8 

April 24 

July 29 

August 19 



886 
886 
887 
888 



887 
888 
888 
888 
889 
888 
889 
888 
888 
887 
887 
887 
888 
889 
888 
889 
889 
888 
888 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 235 

AT REST. 



NO. OF 
LODGE 



I05 

no 

114 

"5 

"5 
119 
119 
119 
122 
123 
123 
123 
123 
128 
128 

137 

140 
141 
142 
142 
142 
142 

143 
144 

HS 
146 
146 
147 
147 
147 
148 
149 
153 
»S4 
154 
155 
168 
169 
183 
183 
183 
183 
190 
194 
194 
194 
197 
201 
205 
207 



NAME. 



Chas. Bossie 

E. McGrory 

Jos. Smith , 

John Johnston . . . 

B. Rodgers 

S. J. Benjamin. . . 
J. G. Mel. Ross... 
John Fleming. . . . 

Adam Inglis 

S. C. Edwards 

John Stewart 

A. E. Ellis 

Thos. Lockerty. . , 

Wm. F. Peden 

Jas. Grieve 

Robt. Morris 

J. M. Nairn 

Geo. Rock 

J. A. Bell 

John Montgomery. 
A. G. Macdonald. 
H. C. Kennedy. . . 

Jos. C. Irvine 

Geo. Brazier 

H. B. Weller 

Henry Tinkle. . . . 

T. Scott 

John Bennett 

C. H. Sheam 

A. Thoburn 

W. A. Henry 

Hy. Morgan 

Geo. Taylor 

H. Gooding 

R. C. Thompson. . 
G. V. Walker 
Jno. P. Evans. . . . 
C. B. Nimmo 

C. McKenzie 

W. T. Parrish 

A. Wood 

J. Dewart 

D. Sinclair 

G. M. Brown 

T. G. Melrose 

Jas. Waddell 

J. R. Hartley 

L. Knight 

Chas. Woodhead . . 

Name omitted . . 



October 27 1888 

September 28.... 1888 

July 4 1888 

April 8 1889 

June 20 1889 

August 11 1888 

January 30 1889 

March 30 1889 

April 5 1889 

October 1888 

November 1888 

1889 

May 1889 

April 13 1889 

June 23 1889 

September 22 ... . 1888 

June 1 1888 

December 9 1888 

September 26 1888 

November 28 1888 

January 2 1889 

March 19 1889 

November 1888 

September 1888 

August 17 1887 

July 17 1888 

March 12 1889 

November 7 1888 

November 26. . . . 1888 

April 4 1889 

May 3 1888 

December 3 1887 

December 17 1888 

December 10. . . . 1888 
December 14. . . . 1888 

June 6 1889 

January 1 1889 

June 12 1889 

August 14 1887 

August 16 1887 

September 20 . . . 1888 
September 16 . . . 1888 

April 4 1889 

September 21 ... . 1888 

October 3 1888 

January 16 1889 

January 16 1889 

June 1887 

March 20 1889 

January 27 1889 



236 



GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

AT REST. 



NO. OF 
LODGE 



209a 

209a 

209a 

2l6 

220 

224 

225 

23O 

231 
232 

233 
247 
247 
256 

257 
257 
257 

257 
258 
262 
264 
265 
269 
269 
271 
272 
276 

277 
277 
282 
283 
283 
283 
284 
285 
291 

299 
300 
302 
308 
309 
315 
316 
316 
326 
33° 
345 
347 
347 
357 



Sam. Thompson.... 

J. R. Crow 

J. H. Hodgins 

J no. Rundle 

R. Phillips 

R. Buswell 

Wm. Geo. Maher. . . 

Hy. Gross 

P. H. Varney 

D. C. McPhederaine 

S. Corbett 

T. A. Lockington . . 
W. S. Robinson .... 

A. G. McDonell 

Frederick Guggisberg 

Jas. C. Smith 

Wm. Hancock 

P. Beswick 

W. H. Matthews 

R. H. Young 

W. C. Gibson 

J. Aulcott 

R. Stokes 

T. Tripp 

H. A. McLaren 

Alex. Thomson 

Wm. Mason 

Jos. H. Johnston. . . . 

Thos. Noble 

N. Currie 

J. H. Garbutt 

H. Fenn 

K. Graham 

Ed. Auberry 

F. T. Rowe 

John A. Stutt 

E. M. Storms 

Wm. Harrison 

Geo. McDermand. . . 

H. W. Sargent 

Geo. H. Rowed .... 

J. G.Jeffery. 

R. A. Sinclair. .... 
Geo. McDonald .... 
Chas. H. Foster .... 
Samuel Crawford . . . 

Wm. Craig 

A. Leckie 

Wm. Spires 

R. Balfour , 



December 26 

May 7 

March 12. . . 
September 17 
October 22 . . , 

April 12 

July 10 

September 16 
No date. 
No date. 
September 20 
November 5 . 
February 25. . 
January 26. . . 
February 29 . 

May 26 

October 9 . . . 

July 27 

June 23 

January 31. . . 

April 1 

April 3 

April 20 

June 4 

October 14.... 
February 2. . . 
September 20. 
April 28 

July 5 

January 13.. . 
January 23 . . . 

March 2 

March 9 

July 21 

April 22 

No date. 

June 2 

August 7 . . . . 
June 1 

July 15 

May 20 

November .... 

April 8 

May 30 

October 10. . . 

May II 

January 9 . . . . 
January 23 . . . 
September 21 
November 3 . 



..18! 
. . 1889 
..1889 
..1888 
. . 1888 
. . 1889 
. . 1888 
. . 1888 



[888 



[887 



[889 
[889 



[887 



[889 



[888 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 

AT REST. 



237 



NO. OF 
LODGE 



357 

357 

358 
358 

359 
359 
360 
366 
366 

367 
368 

375 
376 
384 
384 
384 
384 
384 
39i 
39i 
392 
395 
400 
400 
402 
403 
405 
410 



Jno. Shopland 

S. L. Green 

Jno. Fitzallen 

Chas- G Anderson 

Arch. Reid 

Jos Stitt 

Rich. Swain 

D. Hill 

D. H. Zavity 

Wm. Hamilton 

J. P. Pickup 

Wm. T. Smithett 

A. Kennedy 

Jos. Priestman, Jr. . . . 
T. W. Ravvlinson 
Wm. Stephenson 

J. C. Smith 

Jos. O'Brien 

Mat. Willison 

Thos. H. Kyle 

Jas. Wright 

D. M. Williams, M. D 

W. B. Smith 

J. E. Halloran 

Hiram Lane 

E. Woodison 

T- C. Worthington . . . 
Wm. Hamilton 



December 26 

May 11 

March 17. . . 
November 4 
October 18. . 

May 6 

June 19 

October 11.. 
September 16 

August 3 

October 27. . , 
March 24 ... . 

May 2 

August 25 . . . 
September 11 
November 9. . 

May 26 

July 26 

January 23. . 
February 3 . . . 
November 30. 
March 22. . . . 

June 22 

September 10 
October 14. . . 
October 14. . . 

May 13 

August 2 . . . . 



888 
889 
888 
888 
888 



888 
8S8 
888 



887 
888 



888 






a 3 8 



GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 







ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 239 




240 



GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 




ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. OWEN SOUND. 5889. 241 




*42 



GRAND LODGK OK CANADA. 







ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 24^5 




244 



GRANT) I.OUOF. OF CANADA. 




ANNUM, COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 245 




'■4 ( ' 



GRAND [-ODG1 "i • INADA. 



SYNOPSIS OF THE RETURNS OJ LODGES. 

For the year ending 24th June, 1889. 



No. of Lodge. 


C 


Passings. 
Rai ings. 


u 

"3 
I— 1 


en 

1-3 


JS 
1) 

Q 


Q 
d. 

in 

3 
C/3 


U 

— 

D 
d. 

5 


a 
.2 

3 
_ 

- 


O 
u 


< 




5 

IO 

6 

6 

4 
9 
2 
2 

5 

1 

9 
2 
2 

1 


1 I 

8 6 

6 ! 6 


4 

5 
2 


3 
3 

2 
13 

7 
4 

1 

4 


: 

2 

2 

3 
1 
2 
2 


I 

I 

8 

7 

4 
10 

3 
5 
7 
3 
5 
H 






I 
I 


42 
10S 


1 






■>• • 


1 




134 
256 

55 
79 
75 
108 
82 


6 


10 10 I 8 




I 


7-- 
9 • 

10. . 

11 . . 

14.. 

16.. 
17.. 

18.. 
20. . 










I 

I 
2 


5 
8 

2 

: 

1 

10 
2 

1 


3 9 

14 2 

-. 1 
j 

4. 1 












104 
'73 
54 
138 
126 

29 
137 

25 

55 
125 

56 
221 

37 
33 
57 
64 
56 
85 
42 
62 


3 

1 

10 

3 
1 


1 




I 


I 
I 


3 
2 


3 




0. 


2 
2 

4 
2 
8 
4 


4 


3 
1 
6 






I 

I 


2 j 








24.. 
25.. 
26.. 
27.. 
28.. 


7 
16 

6 
12 


7 
10 

5 

8 


4 3 
6 






5 
6 


2 
6 
1 


1 

3 


4 
3 
3 






2 
I 










3o.. 


2 
2 


2 
1 


2 


















1 

2 
1 
3 
3 


1 
1 


I 

7 

17 
3 






2 

I 


32. 








33- • 
34-. 
35- • 
}6 


2 
5 
3 


1 

5 
2 




5 
1 


1 






I 












24 
74 
5° 
30 
272 
62 


37- ■ 
38-- 

3Q. . 


6 
8 


6 

8 


6 

5 




2 
2 
1 

4 
1 

10 
1 

7 
4 
3 

1 
1 
5 


1 

1 
1 

3 


15 

5 




















40.. 
41.. 
42.. 
43 • 

44- 

45- • 
46.. 

47- ■ 
48.. 
50.. 
52 .. 
54.. 
55- • 
S6.. 


'5 

1 
1 

28 
8 

n 
4 
5 
8 
2 

4 
2 

4 

4 


20 

1 

1 

22 
9 
J 

6 
8 
2 
6 

1 
4 
3 


18 
1 

1 

18 
6 
7 
3 
6 

7 
2 
6 
3 
3 
3 


1 

3 

2 

3 
3 

"0 








I 








3 
11 

3 


1 

17 
8 
2 
1 








100 






I 


88 






106 
70 
83 
97 
78 
27 
82 






6 

1 
1 






1 

1 
1 




























1 


49 
4i 
63 






1 

1 








5 


3 








1 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 58S9. 



*47 



Synopsis of the Returns of Lodges for the year ending 24th June, i5 
(Continued.) 



13 

O 

6 


.5 


.5 


Raisings. 

Joinings. 
Withdrawals. 


Deaths. 
Susp. N.P.D. 


■7. 


to 

C 
O 

'c/3 

a, 


CO 



to 


< 

— 

b 


57- 

58... 
61 


4 
6 


6 
5 


6 








40 


3 
S 
1 


1 6 

4 .... 
2 


2 

3 5 




2 


73 
186 


62 


1 1 

5 5 

5 4 

11 12 

2 4 






27 

65 

137 

159 

40 

66 

102 

76 

56 

38 

207 

no 

78 

81 

34 

17 

71 


63 


5 1 • 


T 








64.. 

65.. 
66 . 


1 28J6 


O 






2 


11 ' 4 1 3 10 
3 ■■■• 4 












68 






I 


69 . 






5 






72.. 
73- • 




3 
3 




I 








3 


3 




S 






5 


:::: ,. 4 . .::. ..:. 






75 ■• 
76.. 

77- • 
78.. 

79- • 
80.. 






11 

5 
3 


71-36 








9 6 

3 5 
7 6 

4 4 


3 21 
3 ^ .... 


5 


.:::::. 


2 


1 9 T 


8 






3 


.... 








81 


5 

1 
2 

1 

7 
3 


5 
1 

3 
2 
2 
3 
3 


4 i 2 

1 ! 

i :::: 

2 1 
2 4 
2 | 1 








2 


82 


4 13 
4 ' 2 1 1 

...... c 






2 j 28 


83.. 
84.. 

8; 






I ! 67 








60 

6l 

117 

33 

57 
ins 


I 

7 3 

I 










86 


1 
1 








87 








88.. 










90.. 
91.. 
92.. 
93- • 


12 

5 
3 
4 


12 

5 
3 

4 




1 1 


4 






I 


1 j 

4 
2 
6 


2 
1 


1 

6 


2 
I 

I 






•j 1 ;o 


4 








102 

IOI 

30 

80 

43 
43 
40 

67 
62 

95 
7i 

44 
72 
46 
14 
50 
75 
53 






I 








96.. 

97- • 
98.. 

99- • 
100. . 


3 
2 


4 

2 

is 


4 
4 
11 
I 
I 
6 
6 
3 


4 
1 

1 
1 


4 
1 
2 
I 
4 

2 
I 
2 

3 

3 














4 






I 














1 
6 

3 
2 


1 
6 

3 

2 


I 
I 


8 






I 










104. . 


2 


1 








106. . 

107. . 
108. . 


4 
3 


4 

2 


4 

2 


3 


















109. 


3 


3 

1 


■■;■■ 








2 










I 


4 






2 


113.. 


2 1 


2 









24* 



GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 



Synopsis of the Returns of Lodges for the year ending 24th June, 1889. 
( Continued.) 




"o 

C 
2 


c 

% 


!/> 

On 


b3 


b/) 

's 

'0 


t/5 

ft 


CI 

Q 


Q 

a,' 
2 
d. 



b 

a. 


c 
_c 

9 

a. 


C 

.2 



a: 


< 



II4-. 

"5- 
116.. 
118.. 
119.. 


4 

1 
2 

3 
2 


2 

I 
2 

3 
2 


1 
1 
2 
1 
3 






1 

2 






43 

24 


■■;■ 


I 

4 
1 
1 
















I 










28 


3 










27 
24 










121. 
122. . 
123.. 


7 
2 

7 


4 
I 

7 


3 

1 

7 


4 
1 

1 


3 










2 

I 


82 










40 


1 

2 


4 


8 






no 






4 


36 




















36 
























67 


128.. 
129. . 
131.. 
133 • 
135 ■• 


3 
4 
3 
9 
3 


4 1 5 

5 6 




6 


2 










90 
46 


8 
4 
S 




















28 


7 
2 


8 
1 


2 


4 
3 










68 








62 












2 5 










1 
1 




1 


6 








7i 
















47 


140. . 


1 


1 


1 


1 

2 
1 


1 
I 

4 
I 
1 
1 

2 

3 
1 
1 


10 








57 
41 






1 
1 


142. . 


10 


to 


8 










7i 






38 


144.. 

145- • 
146. . 
147.. 
148.. 
149.. 
151.. 
1 si 


4 
2 

4 
2 
2 
1 

7 


4 
2 

5 


3 

1 
6 


1 


4 
2 

2 


5 
7 






2 


75 
51 












5i 
51 










2 
1 
6 


2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
8 
i 


2 


2 








54 








48 


5 
1 


I 










72 


1 

2 
1 








2 


33 


154- • 
155.. 
156.. 


1 
3 

5 


1 

5 








57 


4 


3 

4 


1 








94 








64 












60 


158.. 
159.. 
161 


1 

4 
2 

4 
3 
5 
3 

5 
2 


2 


2 
6 


1 


1 

5 




3 








38 








59 


1 ■ 

4 ! 4 

3 1 2 

2 1 2 

5 ! 3 

3 | 3 
1 1 
8 5 












49 


162 


4 


1 












27 


164. . 
165.. 
166.. 
168.. 
169. . 












48 






1 
1 








44 


I 

1 


1 
1 

2 

2 


1 
1 








47 
81 














1 


65 
79 
38 








171. J 8 




2 









ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 249 

Synopsis of the Returns of Lodges for the year ending 24th June, 1889. 
(Continued.) 



V 

W) 
T3 

c 




2 


Initiations. 
Passings. 


£0 
_c 
"en 

'rt 

Pi! 


Joinings. 
Withdrawals. 


to 

u 
Q 


a* 

PL, 

d. 

'Si 

3 


U 
& 


c 


"3 

PL. 


to 

c 
_o 

«3 

5 

to 

Pi 


< 

O 

H 


172. . 








3 




•2 








24 
44 
29 
81 


174.. 
176. 
177. . 
178.. 
180. . 


2 


3 


2 














1 

2 

2 

1 










3 

2 

4 
1 

5 
2 
2 


2 

1 

4 
1 

5 
1 
2 


1 


5 










I 










35 
104 

3i 

52 
36 
19 
23 
24 
135 
25 
55 
49 
5 1 
41 
34 
70 

51 
3i 
20 


4 
1 

4 

; 














181.. 


I 

.... 8 
1 2 

.... 1 A. 










I 


183.. 
184.. 
185.. 
186.. 


4 








8 

1 






2 






!.. 








190. . 
192. . 

193- 
194. ■ 
195- ■ 
196. . 


1 
8 
1 






2 1 

3 .... 
2 .... 
1 i 








I 


5 
1 
1 
2 


4 


2 


15 

1 














: 










I 










I 






c 






197.. 
200. . 


1 
3 
9 
1 


1 
1 

8 

1 


1 
1 


I 


2 ] 1 


1 






I 






201. . 


3 


f. 


1 


2 








203.. 


1 1 


I 






I 


•■• • 


2 1 








10 1 


re 








209a. 
209. . 


11 9 




6 


2 


2 3 14 






3 


159 
36 
32 
3i 
28 














:::' ::.: : : 


















215.. 
216. . 


5 5 
14 8 

4 ( 4 

26 24 

1 1 


5 
6 










2 


6 1 


5 








68 


217. . 
218.. 


3 r 
25 , 4 

1 j 

2 

5 1 

6 | i 


2 
1 

2 
2 
3 








2 

1 


37 
161 


219. . 

220. . 










44 
53 
72 

52 
24 
30 
82 




2 

A 


1 


3 






1 


221 . . 


8 






222. . 


8 ; 8 
























224. . 


3 ' 3 

3 : « 


2 : 1 
4 .... 


1 

2 


1 

1 










225. . 
228. . 


1 











43 
76 
82 
38 


229.. 
230.. 
231.. 
232.. 
233 • 


4 2 

3 

1 1 

1 1 

4 i 4 

1 

2 4 

13 ' 13 


1 2 

2 3 


2 

3 
1 

2 

5 
2 
2 












1 

1 
1 
1 


9 
3 
1 

4 
i 








; .:::: 

2 ,.... 

4 1 








29 

42 
47 
38 
32 






2 
1 


234- • 

235 •■ 
236.. 










9 ' 








""1 


1 



GKAND LODGE OK CANADA. 



Synopsis of the Returns of Lodges for the year ending 24th June, li 
(Continued.) 



No. of Lodge. 
Initiations. 


u5 
fcfl 
c 
'77. 
tn 
« 


M 

'0 


(a 

'5 


t/i 

73 

is 
« 

•a 
1 


.5 
Q 


Q 

y. 

d 


•J 
D 


Expulsions. 
Restorations. 


< 
h 

O 
H 


237 .. 2 J I 

2^8. . A A 


I 

3 

2 

1 

4 
2 












24 


2 


2 
I 






1 


55 


239- ■ 
241.. 

2d2. . 


I I 
I I 

6 a 














18 













5i 

?4 




1 


I 




1 






I 












40 


247.. 
249.. 
25O.. 
2^. . 


9 '< 9 
4 

2 2 


10 

1 
3 


3 
1 

3 


6 
6 

4 
e 


2 


2 

2 






1 


138 
AX 








3 

1 


32 
79 




I 

4 




3 
5 
3 




.... 


254- • 

2^. . 


3 


1 


:::::; 


60 


2 


1 

4 
1 






40 


256. . 

257- • 
258.. 

259 • 
20O. . 
26l . . 


1 


., 


3 

5 
5 








58 


4 ) 3 




3 

3 








74 








87 






2 

2 








21 


...... 

4 
3 
3 
2 
6 


4 
2 

4 
2 

7 


2 
2 

3 
2 
6 
1 

3 
1 

J 




2 .... 






1 


46 
17 


262. . 


3 
1 

4 


4 
3 
2 
1 
1 
3 
3 
2 

2 
3 
4 
1 
1 

3 
2 


1 

1 
1 






55 
38 
80 


263.. 
264. . 
26 s\ . 


1 








1 
5 
5 








^6 


266.. 


5 

2 3 

3 

1 1 

3 3 

6 6 








26 


267. . 
268.. 








a.=; 








XI 


269. . 
270. . 
271 . 
272. . 


2 

1 
1 

1 
2 


2 






1 


48 


7 






AQ 






2 

1 


42 
36 


5 

1 

3 
6 






274.. 

276. . 

277.. 
278. . 
279.. 
282.. 


2 
1 


2 
1 


2 

1 
5 

4 
2 

1 


2 






44 
23 


5 1 5 

3 

4 A 








53 
18 


4 
4 
1 
1 


3 
2 

2 


1 

3 
1 
1 


6 








30 


283.. 
284 . 
28s.. 
286... 


1 
2 

2 


2 

2 










47 


1 

3 








3Q 








35 
26 












287.. 
289.. 

290. . 

2QI . . 


II 

1 
7 


10 

i 
7 


9 

1 

7 


1 


2 




3 








8s 








56 


I 










1 
1 


61 


4 


1 


5 








292. . 














3i 

22 


293 . . 




















294 .. 














2 








3i 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 25 1 

Synopsis of the Returns of Lodges for the year ending 24th Tune, 1889. 
(Continued '. ) 



v 

O 
►J 

O 


ft 


'5 




c 


fcfl 

'3 

1 — > 


"1 


1! 

P 


Q 

S3 

d, 

3 


U 

3 


u5 

"3 

c. 

X 

W 


tn 

C 
O 

I 
O 

To 
u 

(4 


■< 
h 


H 


295 ■• 
296. . 


2 
4 
3 
2 
1 
2 
10 


2 

5 
3 
1 
1 


2 

3 

2 
I 
I 

3 


2 


2 
I 




2 




... 


3 


25 
53 
29 
38 
30 
79 
48 
26 


297-- 
299- 
300.. 
302.. 
303- 
304.. 

3CK . . 












I 

5 


3 

4 


I 
I 


12 
I 

3 






1 
1 


8 i 7 

... . .... 

; 


1 

2 










38 
39 
37 
15 
49 
36 
86 

29 

47 


306. • 

307" 
308. . 


1 

5 


1 1 














5 


4 


1 


2 


I 
I 


I 

3 








309.. 
311.. 
312.. 
313 - 

3H- 
3i<;. . 


2 
3 
4 
1 

3 


2 
3 
4 
2 

3 


2 

2 

3 
2 

3 










2 

2 

3 


1 
1 
3 
3 
1 
2 


5 
2 












1 


I 

2 


1 














316.. 
318. 

319- 
320.. 


18 
2 
2 
6 


17 
1 
1 

3 
1 

5 
1 


14 


4 


4 






3 


119 

32 
3i 

60 






1 

5 








1 








1 


1 
1 












3 
16 








32 
63 

46 

152 
46 

137 

24 

33 
35 
86 


322.. 
323- 
324- 
325- 
326. 

327- 
328.. 
329- 
33° ■ 
331- • 
332-- 
333- 
334- 


6 
2 

27 

1 
17 

4 

1 

1 

6 

2 

3 

2 




8 
2 




3 
10 

3 


2 
5 
4 
2 
2 
1 
2 










29 ^o 


5 

1 










1 
15 
3 
1 
1 

5 
2 

3 

2 


3 
6 

3 
1 


3 
1 






























1 










3 
2 

4 

1 
















2 








26 


2 
1 


6 
10 








1 


36 
22 




9 












29 
24 
28 









































337- 
338 • 


3 


4 


4 


1 


3 




3 








40 
29 

140 








339- 

340- 

34i •• 

342.. 

343- 

311 


13 
4 


n 


7 


3 


3 
1 

2 
5 
5 
1 




3 

3 












2 


5 
3 
3 


6 

3 
2 








56 
26 


.... 
1 


3 

5 
4 














53 
32 
28 


1 






1 


345- 


2 


2 


2 









252 



CRAM I UH M.I OF CAN \DA. 



Synopsis of the Returns of Lodges for the year ending 24th June, 1 
(Continued.) 



T3 

O 

O 
C 
53 


t/5 

a 

.2 

.2 

'c 
>— 1 


CO 

C 


EA 

6fl 

S 

•a 


tn 

c 

"c 
"o 

4 

2 

3 
2 
2 


n 

a 

Ei 

6 
2 
7 

1 
2 
1 
3 

1 
2 

2 
2 
2 

4 
5 
1 

3 


| 
id 

P 


- 

z 

d. 

(A 

3 
S. 

5 


§ 
P 

d. 

U) 
3 
Cfl 


a 


3 

a. 

X 

w 


in 

c 


cd 

C 
u 


< 
O 


346.. 
348.. 

352- • 
354- • 
356.. 

357- 
^8.. 


8 
2 


8 
2 


n 

2 
7 
5 
2 

2 

1 

3 
11 

5 


143 
33 
55 
44 
36 
58 
26 


5 5 

4 ' 5 
2 2 

4 3 

1 2 
















I 




I 


3 

2 

2 
1 


9 
1 






1 










38 
36 

90 

43 
29 
33 
63 
135 
62 


360. . 
361.. 
362.. 
l6l. . 


4 
8 

5 


3 
9 
5 


2 


















2 

1 
1 


3 
3 
2 


.... 






364. . 


1 

1 

11 

6 
12 

2 
5 
5 
5 
2 
2 
7 


1 

3 
12 

5 
13 

4 
5 
4 
2 

2 

4 
6 


1 

7 
8 
1 


. . . . 






366.. 
367- • 
368.. 
369 • 
370.. 
371 ■■ 
372.. 

373-- 

374- • 
375 ■ 
376.. 
377- 

378.. 


3 
12 

7 
11 
2 
5 
4 
6 
1 

10 






I 














2 






I 


61 






50 
67 

3 f 
38 

25 
26 












.... 










1 


2 














.... 












1 

1 










1 


7 


6 








31 
3i 

54 

29 

102 


7 


















4 








^70. . 




















380. . 























382.. 


10 


6 


7 


1 


3 














383 .. 












39 
155 
24 
34 
14 
43 
35 
25 
62 


384- • 
385- • 
386.. 
387.. 
388.. 
389- • 


33 
4 
4 


31 

4 

3 


24 

1 

4 


12 
1 


4 
3 
1 


5 


1 

4 












I 






1 












1 
2 


1 

3 


1 

2 


1 

3 
1 
1 

1 

1 


1 
1 

2 

3 
2 

4 
I 

3 











I 










2 
1 

1 


1 
1 








391- 
392.- 

393- • 
394. . 


3 
3 
8 
1 


5 
3 
8 


7 
3 
7 

1 

5 














43 
34 
42 
29 
42 
38 
32 
14 
62 


1 

3 
4 






I 


395 -i 1 « 

396. . A- 












397- 
398. . 








1 




















399 ■ • ' 


1 


1 

4 




1 

. . . . 












400 . J 4 4 


2 


2 









ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 253 



Synopsis of the Returns of Lodges for the year ending 24th June, 1! 
(Continued. ) 



aj 
Jbf> 

O 

,-) 

O 

O 


Initiations. 


to 
c 

cd 

Oh 


So 
.5 

PS 


Joinings. 

Withdrawals. 

Deaths. 


Q 

Ph" 

ti, 

3 
C/3 


u 

P 
d 

s 
en 


s 
_o 

"5 

x 

W 


c 

CJ 
St 



w 
V 


< 

H 

O 


4OI. . 

402 
403 ■ 


1 


3 
1 

1 


3 
2 
1 


1 
2 












31 

55 
46 

35 
49 
39 
35 
31 
42 

58 
25 
41 
32 
68 

36 

46 
28 


1 


2 
1 


1 
1 








I 








5 
3 












405.. 


1 2 


6 


1 


1 




























......... 






408.. 
409 .. 
4IO. . 
411.. 
412. . 

413- • 
414.. 

4»5-- 

416. . 
417.. 
418.. 
419.. 

420. . 

421. . 

422. . 

u. r> 
u. r>. 

U. D 




5 5 
1 


5 
1 

9 

2 

6 

7 














4 
2 
1 


2 . . . . 2 
2 12 








10 

3 
12 

2 

4 
8 


8 
2 
9 

7 








2 
1 


























IO O 


1 


5 
1 
2 
1 

3 




9 








7 
5 

I I 


1 1 








5 
11 

4 
3 

27 
6 

7 


<; 


2 








.... 


II A 










6 


I 
I 
1 
I 

2 








3 

28 

6 


4 

26 

6 










4i 
72 
14 
23 
8 
12 
13 


4 
1 


















6 


6 




........ 












::::::;: 




.... 




















Total, 


1306 


1215 


"39 


3Si 


664 


229 


675 


2 


I 


126 


19818 



-54 



I IK \m> LODGE < »F CANADA. 



RECAPITULATION 



in THE RETURNS OF LODGES FOR THE VKAR ENDING 24TH JUNE, 
1889, AS FAR AS HEARD FROM. 

1 iOdges Organized and Affiliated 425 

" Extinct 28 

" Ceded to Grand Lodge of Quebec 38 

" " " Manitoba 5 

Number on Roll 354 

" Represented in Grand Lodge 263 

Initiations Reported i>3°6 

Passings " 1 , 21 5 

Raisings " 1,139 

J oinings " 35 l 

Restorations " 126 

Resignations " 664 

Deaths " 229 

Suspensions for Non-payment of Dues 675 

" for Unmasonic Conduct 2 

Expulsions 1 

Members in Good Standing 19,818 



Gross receipts for the year ending 31st May, 1888. $17, 007 32 
Assets of ' Grand Lodge as per Grand Treasurer's 

Statement, 31st May, 1889 68,444 1 1 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 255 



LIST OF GRAND LODGE OFFICERS FOR 1889-90. 



M. W. Bro. R T. Walkem, Q. C, 

R. " " J. Ross Robertson, 

" " " A. H. Clarke, 

" " " J. P. Whitehead, 

" " " W. B. Doherty, 

" " " W. G. Duff, 

" " " R. C. Bruce, 

" " " D. H. Hunter, 

li " " David Forsyth, 

" " " John Malloy, 

" " " Thomas McCarroll, 

" " " Wm. Jaques, M. D. , 

" " " Wm. Roaf, 

" " " W. R. Howse, 

" " " P. J. Lightburne, 

" " " Hy. J. Wilkinson, 

" " " W. H Jackson, 

" " " David Barr, 

" " " D. T. Ferguson, 

" " " Jas. McLauchlan, 

" " " Michael Walsh, 

" " " Rev. David Armstrong 

" " " E. Mitchell, 

li " " F. M. Morson, 

" " " J. J. Mason, 

V. " " John Sutherland, 

" " " D. F. MacWatt, 

" " " P. J. Slatter, 

" " " Wm Ballantyne, 

" " " A. Poulter, 

" " " E. W. Case, 

" " " Jefferson Caverley, 

" " " Omer Brown, 

" " " A. L. Rundle, 

" " •' J- McCarter, 

" " " Daniel Welsh, 

'■ A. Cameron, 

" " " S. Dubber, 

" " " E. Miller, 

" " " R. R. Fulton, 

" " " A. J. Little, 

" " " W. A Ferrah, 

" " " A. Burritt, 

" " " W H. Andrews, 

11 ii u Xhos. Kennedy, 

" " " T- A. Warren, 

" '• " W. H. Chittick, 

" " " H. Clements, 

" " " A. Hood, 

" E. Ball, 



Grand Master. 
Deputy Grand Master. 
D. D. G. M. 



Kingston, 

Toronto, 

Essex Centre, 

Strathroy, 

St. Thomas, 

Seaforth, 

Tara, 

Woodstock, 

Berlin, 

Hamilton, 

Meaford, 

Jarvis, 

Toronto, 

Whitby, 

Cobourg, 

Kingston, 

Brockville, 

Renfrew, 

Rat Portage, 

Owen Sound, 

Ingersoll, 

D.D. Moore, 

Hamilton, 

Toronto, 

Hamilton, 

Kingston, 

Barrie, 

Toronto, 

Seaforth, 

Hamilton, 

Picton, 
Madoc, 

Delta, 
Oshawa, 

Eglinton, 

Essex Centre, 

Napier, 

St. Thomas, 

Kincardine, 

Woodstock, 

Guelph, 

Oakville, 

Meaford, 

Port Robinson, 

Ottawa, 

Keewatin Mills, 

Dorchester Station,/ 

Palmerston, ) Grand Standard 

Arnprior, J Bearers. 

Kingston, Grand Tyler. 



G:and Senior Warden. 

" Junior " 

" Chaplain. 

" Treasurer. 

" Registrar. 

" Secretary. 

" Senior Deac n. 

" Junior " 

,: Sup't of Works. 

" Director of Cer. 
Ass't Grand Secretary. 

" " D. of Cer. 
Grand Sword Bearer. 

" Organist. 
Ass't Grand Organist. 
Grand Pursuivant. 



Grand Stewards. 



256 GB \M' LODGJ 01 C w IDA. 

B0AKH OF GENERAL PURPOSES— 1889-90. 



President : 
R. \V. Bro. J. Ross Robertson, Deputy Grand Master Toronto. 

VICE-PRESIDENT : 
R. W. bro. Henry Macpherson, P. G. S. W Owen Sound. 

BY VIRTUE OF OFFICE : 

M. \V. Bro. R. T. Walkem, Q. C, Grand Master Kingston. 

" " A, A. Stevenson, Past Grand Master Montreal. 

" J. K. Kerr, Q. C, " " Toronto. 

" " J. A. Henderson, Q.C.. " " Kingston. 

" " James Moffat, " " London. 

" " Daniel Spry, " " Barrie. 

" " Otto Klotz, " " Preston. 

" " Hugh Murray, " " Hamilton. 

" " Henry Robertson, " " Collingwood. 

R. W. " J. Ross Robertson, Deputy Grand Master. .Toronto. 

ELECTED BY GRAND LODGE : 

R. W. Bro. J. C. Hegler, P. D. D. G. M Ingersoll. 

" " R. B. Hungerforcl, " London. 

" " E. T. Malone, " Toronto. 

" " T. Sargant, " Toronto. 

" " D. H. Martyn, " Kincardine. 

" F. C Martin, P. G. R Woodstock. 

'• J. F. H. Gunn, P. D. D. G. M Walkerton. 

" David McLellan, P. G. S. W Hamilton. 

V. W. " L. Secord, M. D., P. Asst. G. O Brantford. 

R.W. " J. E. Harding, P. D. D. G. M Stratford. 

APPOINTED BY GRAND MASTER : 

R. W. Bro. T. S. Dewar, P. G. J. W London. 

" Allan McLean, P. G. S. W Kingston. 

" " John Creasor, Q. C., P. D. D. G. M Owen Sound. 

" " John Walsh, " Ottawa. 

" " W.L.Hamilton, " Kingston. 

* " " Henry Macpherson. P. G. S. W Owen Sound. 

" Donald Ross, P. D. D. G. M Picton. 

" " J. H. Burritt, " Pembroke. 

" " L.H.Henderson, " Belleville. 

" " Henry Jennings, " Penetanguishene. 

* Since deceased, and R. W. Bro. Wm. Rea, Ottawa, appointed in 
his stead. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 257 



BOARD OF GENERAL PURPOSES. 
1889-90. 

SUB-COMMITTEES. 



AUDIT AND FINANCE. 

R. W. Bros T. Sargant, Chairman; Allan McLean, R. B. Hungerford, 
F. C. Martin, W. L. Hamilton, John Malloy, J. P. Whithehead and W. 
B. Doherty. 

BENEVOLENCE. 

M. W. Bro. Otto Klotz. Chairman ; M. W. Bro. A. A. Stevenson ; 
R. W. Bros. David McLellan, J. E. Harding, A. H. Clarke, David 
Forsyth, W. G. Duff and David Barr. 

CONDITION OF MASONRY. 

R. W. Bro. E. T. Malone, Chairman ; M. W. Bro. Hugh Murray ; 
R. W. Bros. Henry Jennings, James McLauchlan, M. Walsh, J. S. Dewar 
and V. W. Bro. L. Secord. 

GRIEVANCES AND APPEALS. 

R. W. Bro. L. H. Henderson, Chairman; M. W. Bros. Daniel Spry 
and Henry Robertson; R. W. Bros. D. H. Martyn, R. C. Bruce, J. C. 
Hegler, John Creasor, J. H. Burritt, John Walsh and Wm. Roaf. 

JURISPRUDENCE. 

* R. W. Bro. Henry Macpherson, Chairman; M. W. Bros. J. A. 
Henderson and J. K. Kerr; R. W. Bros. W. Jaques, D. H. Hunter, T. 
McCarroll and W. R. Howse. 

* Since deceased, and R. W. Bro. Wm. Rea, Ottawa, appointed in his 
stead. 

WARRANTS. 

R. W. Bro. Donald Ross, Chairman ; M. W. Bro. James Moffat ; 
R. W. Bros. J. F. H. Gunn, H. J. Wilkinson, D. T. Ferguson, P. J. 
Lightburne and W. H. Jackson. 

FOREIGN CoRKhSPoNDENCE. 

M. W. Bro. Henry Robertson. 



-\v s 



CKAND LODGE OF CANADA. 



GRAND REPRESENTATIVES FROM THE GRAND LODGE 
OF CANADA. 



IN THE UNTIED KINGDOM. 

England R. W. Bro. Sir John B. Monckton. 

Ireland " " Humphrey Minchin, Dublin. 

Scotland " " Lindsay Mackersy, Edinburgh. 

IN THE DOMINION OF CANADA. 

British Columbia R. W. Bro. Wm. Dalby, Victoria. 

Manitoba M. li Rev. Sam'l P. Matheson, Winnipeg. 

New Brunswick " " John F. Ellis, St. Johu. 

Nova Scotia " Andrew K. McK'nlay, Halifax. 

Prince Edward Island. . . . M. " Hon. John Yeo, Port Hill. 
Quebec R. " Alexander Murray, Montreal. 

IN THE UNITED STATES. 

Alabama W. Bro. Geo. F. Moore, Montgomery. 

Arizona R. " Benjamin Titus, Tombstone. 

Arkansas " " T. M. Horsfall, Hazen. 

California M. " W. Caldwell Belcher, Marysville. 

Colorado " " Byron L. Carr, Longmont. 

Connecticut " Wm. Knox, Hartford. 

Dakota R. " John Davidson, Bismark. 

Delaware M. " Jos. W. H. Watson, Newport. 

District of Columbia R. " Joseph H. Jochum, Washington. 

Florida . ... " " DeWitt C. Dawkins, Jacksonville. 

Georgia " " Jas. A. Gray, Atlanta. 

Idaho " " B. M. Davis, Silver City. 

Illinois " " Wiley M. Egan, Chicago. 

Indian Territory " John Rennie, Savanna. 

Indiana M. " Robt. Van. Valzah, Terre Haute. 

Iowa " " Theodore S. Parvin, Cedar Rapids. 

Kansas R. " E. T. Carr, Leavenworth. 

Kentucky " " Jas. W. Hopper, Lebanon. 

Louisiana " " J. C. Batchelor, M. D., N. Orleans. 

Maine M. " David Cargill, East Livermore. 

Maryland R. " Woodward Abrahams, Baltimore. 

Michigan M. " John W. Finch, Adrian. 

Minnesota " " Edward W. Durant, Stillwater. 

Mississippi " " W. G. Paxton, Vicksburg. 

Missouri " " Xenophon Ryland, Lexington. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 259 

Montana W. Bro. Joseph A. Hyde, Butte City. 

Nebraska M. " Robt. C. Gordon, Grand Island. 

Nevada . . . . R. " Samuel W. Chubbuck, Gold Hill. 

New Hampshire M. " Andrew Bunton, Manchester. 

New Jersey " " Henry R. Cannon, Elizabeth. 

New Mexico R. " Simon B. Newcomb, Mesilla. 

New York " Sydney F. Walker, New York. 

North Carolina M. " Geo. W. Blunt, Wilson. 

North Dakota R. " Charles E. Jackson, Pembina. 

Ohio M. " Chas. A. Woodward, Cleveland. 

Oregon R. " Donald McKay, Portland. 

Pennsylvania " " Samuel C. Perkins, Philadelphia. 

Rhode Island R. " Geo. H. Kenyon, Providence. 

South Carolina " A. Doty, Jr., Charleston. 

Tennessee M. " Elihu Edmunson, Pulaski. 

Texas " " Philip C. Tucker, Galveston. 

Utah R. " Alex. Topence, Corinne. 

Vermont M. " Levant M. Read, Bellows Falls. 

Virginia R. " Rev. G. W. Dame, D. D., Danville. 

Washington Territory. . . . M. " John P. Jordan, Seattle. 

West Virginia R. " W. H. Freeman, Clarksburg. 

Wisconsin " " Charles Kahn, Milwaukee. 

Wyoming " " Jas. E. Gates, Laramie City. 

IN OTHER COUNTRIES. 

Brazil Bro. Franc de Paula Romas. 

Central America " L. Montafar. 

Chili " A.M.Medina. 

Greece M. W. " H. I. H. Prince Rhodocanakis. 

Italy " Francisco de Luca. 

Mexico " Louis Guapil. 

New Granada " J. M. Samper Angiano. 

New South Wales M. W. " Hon. J. S. Farnell. 

Peru " Gustavo Lama. 

Portugal " Joas Caetano D Almeida. 

Saint Domingo " Jacinto de Castro. 

Uruguay li Belisario Conrado. 

Venezuela " Antonia M. Mollejas. 

Victoria R. W. " Jas. Gregg, Melbourne. 



»6o 



GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 



GRAND REPRESENTATIVES IN THE GRAND LODGE OF 
CANADA. 



FOR THE UNTIED KINGDOM. 

England R. W. Bro. Rt. Hon. Sir John A. Macdonald, 

K. C. B. 

Ireland " " Kivas Tully, Toronto. 

Scotland " " i high A. Mackay, Berlin. 

FOR THE l" IM i I VN \I»A. 

British Columbia R. \Y. i!r". John Creasor, (,/. C, Owen Sound. 

Manitoba " " M. Irving. Q. C, Hamilton. 

New Brunswick " " J. A. C. Anderson, Ridgetown. 

Nova Scotia " " G. J. Waugh, Stratford. 

Prince Edward Island... . M. " Hugh Murray, Hamilton. 

Quebec R. " Robt. McKay, St. Thomas. 

FOR THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 

Alabama R. W. Bro. S. B. Harman, Toronto. 

Arizona " " R. Hendry, Jr., Kingston. 

Arkansas " " J. C. Hegler, Ingersoll. 

California " " E. Mitchell, Hamilton. 

Colorado " " F. J. Menet, Toronto. 

Connecticut M. " A. A. Stevenson, Montreal. 

Dakota R. " E. T. Malone, Toronto. 

Delaware " " J. B. Trayes, Port Hope. 

District of Columbia M. " Henry Robertson, Collingwood. 

Florida R. " J.J. Mason, Hamilton. 

Georgia " " iJavid McLellan, Hamilton. 

Idaho M. " James Moffat, London. 

Illinois R. " David McLellan, Hamilton. 

Indian Territory " " E. H. D. Hall, Peterborough. 

Indiana M. " J. K. Kerr, Q. C, Toronto. 

Iowa R. " J. H. Widdifield, Toronto. 

Kansas " " J. J. Mason, Hamilton. 

Kentucky M. " Daniel Spry, Barrie. 

Louisiana R. " Geo. S. Birrell, London. 

Maine " " John W. Murton, Hamilton. 

Maryland " " Wm. Smeaton, Belleville. 

Michigan " " J. F. II. Gunn, Walkerton. 

Minnesota M. " A. A. Stevenson, Montreal. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION. OWEN SOUND, 5889. 26 1 

Mississippi R. W. Bro. R. B. Hungerford, London. 

Missouri M. " J. K. Kerr, Q. C, Toronto. 

Montana R. " J. M. Gibson, Hamilton. 

Nebraska V. " C. W. Brown, Toronto. 

Nevada R. " R. L. Patterson, Toronto. 

New Hampshire M. " J- A. Henderson, Q. C, Kingston. 

New Jersey " " J. K. Kerr, Q. C, Toronto. 

New Mexico R. " P. J. Brown, Ingersoll. 

New York M. " J. A. Henderson, Q. C, Kingston. 

North Carolina R. " L. H. Henderson, Belleville. 

North Dakota " " J. S. Dewar, London. 

Ohio " " L. G. Jarvis, London. 

Oregon " " David Taylor, Ottawa. 

Pennsylvania M. " James Moffat, London. 

Rhode Island V. " Robt. Lewis, London. 

South Carolina R. " T. C. Macnabb, Chatham. 

Tennessee " " S. B. Harman, Toronto. 

Texas M. " J. K. Kerr, Q. C, Toronto. 

Utah " " J. K. Kerr, Q. C, Toronto. 

Vermont R. " DeWitt H. Martyn, Kincardine. 

Virginia " " J. Ross Robertson, Toronto. 

Washington Territory. ... M. " Otto Klotz, Preston. 

West Virginia R. " J. E. Harding, Stratford. 

Wisconsin " " Thos. Sargant, Toronto. 

Wyoming " " R. P. Stephens, Toronto. 

FOR OTHER COUNTRIES. 

Brazil M. W. Bro. A. A. Stevenson, Montreal. 

Chili R. " Rev. V. dementi, B.A., Peterboro'. 

Colon and Isle of Cuba. . . " " G. H. F. Dartnell, Whitby. 

Greece M. " Daniel Spry, Barrie. 

New South Wales 

Peru " " R. T. Walkem, Q. C , Kingston. 

St. Domingo " " Otto Klotz, Preston. 

United States of Colombia. R. " John Walsh, Ottawa. 

Uruguay 

Victoria " ' Wm. Gibson, Beamsville. 



262 



GRAND LODGE OF CAN VDA. 



LIST OF GRAND LODGES IN NORTH AMERICA, 
:< 'ith names and Residences of the Grand Secretaries. 



STATE OR PROVINCE. 



Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

British Columbia 

California 

Canada 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Dakota 

Delaware 

District of Columbia .... 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indian Territory 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Manitoba 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Brunswick 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Nova Scotia 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Prince Edward Island . . 
Quebec 



GRAND SECRETARY. 



Myles J. Greene 

G. J. Roskruge 

Fay Hempstead 

H. Brown 

Alexander G. Abell 

J. J. Mason • 

Edward C Parmelee 

Joseph K. Wheeler 

Charles T. McCoy 

William S. Hayes 

William R. Singleton 

DeWitt C. Dawkins 

A. M. Wolihin 

James H. Wickersham. . . . 

Loyal L. Munn 

J. S. Murrow 

William H. Smythe 

T. S. Parvin 

John H. Brown 

H. B. Grant 

James C. Batchelor, M. D. 

Ira Berry 

W. G. Scott 

Jacob H. Medairy 

S. D. Nickerson 

William P. Innes 

A. T. C. Pierson 

J. L. Power 

Rev. J. D. Vincil, D. D... 

Cornelius Hedges 

William R. Bowen 

Chauncey N. Noteware. ... 

Edwin J. Wetmore 

G. P. Cleaves 

Joseph H. Hough 

A. A. Keen. . 

E. M. L. Ehlers 

Donald W. Bain 

David S. Dodds 

Wm. Ross 

J. H. Bromwell 

S. F. Chadwick 

Michael Nisbet 

B. Wilson Higgs . . 

John H.Isaacson 



RESIDENCES. 



Montgomery. 

Tucson. 

Little Rock. 

Victoria. 

San Francisco. 

Hamilton. 

Pueblo. 

Hartford. 

Aberdeen. 

Wilmington. 

Washington. 

Jacksonville. 

Macon. 

Silver City. 

Freeport. 

Atoka. 

Indianapolis. 

Cedar Rapids. 

Wyandotte. 

Louisville. 

New Orleans. 

Portland. 

Winnipeg. 

Baltimore. 

Cambridge. 

Grand Rapids. 

St. Paul. 

Jackson. 

St. Louis. 

Helena. 

Omaha. 

Carson. 

St. John. 

Concord. 

Trenton. 

East Las Vegas. 

New York. 

Raleigh. 

Lakota. 

Halifax. 

Cincinnati. 

Salem. 

Philadelphia. 

Charlottetown. 

Montreal. 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 263 



LIST OF GRAND LODGES IN NORTH AMERICA, 

with Names and Residences of the Grand Secretaries. 
(Continued ) 



STATE OR PROVINCE. 



Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington Territory 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



GRAND SECRETARY. 



Edwin Baker 

Charles Inglesby . . 

John Frizzell 

Wm. F. Swain. . . . 
Christopher Diehl . 
Lavant M. Read . . 

W. B. Isaacs 

Thomas M. Reed . 
Geo. W. Atkinson. 
John W. Laflin . . . 
W. L. Kuykendall. 



RESIDENCE. 



Providence. 

Charleston. 

Nashville. 

Houston. 

Salt Lake City. 

Bellows Falls. 

Richmond. 

Olympia. 

Wheeling. 

Milwaukee. 

Cheyenne. 



► 6 i GRAND LODOI 01 CANADA. 



INDEX OF PROCEEDINGS, 1889. 

\ 

PAGE. 

Annual Communication, where held 19 

" " next place of meeting 167 

Accounts, Grand Secretary 184 

" " Treasurer 188 

Addresses of Welcome to the Grand Master 23-40 

Address of Grand Master 42 

" " " Report of Board on 167 

Audit and Finance, Report of Board on 131 

Appointment of Grand Officers 179 

" Members of Board of General Purposes 167 

Benevolence, Report of Board on 135 

Board of General Purposes, Election of 167 

" " List of Members of 256 

Condition of Masonry, Report of Board on 152 

Credentials, Committee on 25 

District Deputy Grand Masters, Nomination of 166 

Deaths 233 

Expulsions 223 

Grand Lodge: 

Special Communication. Maitland 3 

" " Langton 12 

" " Wellington 14 

Annual " Officers present 19 

" " Members present 25 

" " Officers elected 166 

" Officers appointed 179 

Grievances and Appeals, Report of Board on 160 

Grand Representatives, List of 258-260 

Grand Lodges, List of 262 

Grand Officers, List of 255 

" In Memoriam " Pages 238 

Lodges Represented at Annual Communication 25 

Lodges, List of 199 

" " by Districts 212 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 265 



Notices of Motion 



By R. W. Bro. T. Sargant — That Clause 121 of the Book of 
Constitution be amended by inserting after the word " elect " the 
words " by a majority of all the members present in the lodge." 

By R. \V. Bro. T. Sargant,— That Clause 44 of the Book of 
Constitution be amended by striking out the words "shall have 
been given at the preceding Annual Communication of Grand 
Lodge," and inserting instead the words "and shall have been 
sent to the Grand Secretary on or before the first day of December 
following the Communication of Grand Lodge." 

By W. Bro. C. C. Robinson. — That hereafter all business, except 
initiating and passing, be transacted in Warranted Lodges in the 
Third Degree, and that a Clause to this effect be added to the 
Constitution. Also, that anything in the Constitution or Regula- 
tions inconsistent with this resolution be, and the same is hereby 
repealed. 

By R. W. Bro. W. H. Jackson.— That Clause 255 of the Book of 
Constitution be amended by adding next after the words 'all 
the above jewels are to be of silver," the words "provided, 
however, that all the Lodges in the jurisdiction that took part in 
the organization of the Grand Lodge of Canada as well as the 
Lodges that already enjoy the privilege, shall be permitted to 
wear on their regalia gold jewels and gold trimmings." 

By R. W. Bro. David Taylor,— That Clause 121 of the Book of 
Constitution be amended by adding thereto the following words : 
" Should the Lodge desire to do so, it may by By-law provide that 
no member shall be entitled to vote at the Annual Election of 
Officers who is twelve months in arrears of Lodge dues." 

By W. Bro. J. Reeve, — That systematic black-balling in any 
Lodge of candidates for admission to the Craft, with the view of 
accomplishing some ulterior object, and not on account of the 
unfitness of such candidates shall constitute a Masonic offence. 

That Clause 202 of the Book of Constitution be amended by 
providing "that upon the trial of a brother charged with such 
offence, any brother may disclose how he voted upon the taking 
of any ballot involved in such enquiry, provided that the District 
Deputy Grand Master for the particular district shall have first 
intimated to the Master of said Lodge that he is satisfied that 
there are reasonable grounds for believing such practice to 
exist." 



266 GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

7. By V. \V. Bio. F. F. Manley.— That Clause 3 of the Book of 
Constitution be amended by adding thereto the following words : 
"The manner of conducting the Election of the Members of the 
Board of General Purposes shall be as follows : The Committee 
on Credentials of Representatives shall prepare a list of the 
names of delegates to Grand Lodge, together with the number of 
votes each delegate is entitled to cast. The Grand Secretary or 
one of the Committee on Credentials shall call the names of the 
Brethren in rotation, when (after the brother has marked the number 
of votes he is entitled to cast upon the outside of the ballot paper), 
he shall hand it to one of the Grand S* .wards to deposit in a 
ballot box provided for that purpose. The Grand Steward 
receiving the ballot shall see the number marked upon it agrees 
with the number upon the report of the Committee on Credentials. 
No brother shall be permitted to deposit more than one ballot. 
The collection of the ballots shall take place immediately after 
the election of the Grand Wardens." 

8. By V. W. Bro. F. F. Manley,— That Clause 178 of the Book of 
Constitution be amended by striking out the words " and each 
" Private Lodge shall defray the travelling expenses of the 
" District Deputy Grand Master, to the extent of at least one 
"visit in each year," and by inserting instead the words "the 

sum of dollars shall be paid out of the funds of Grand 

Lodge to the District Deputy Grand Master of each district for 
each official visit made by him to the Lodges in his jurisdiction, 
to the extent of at least one visit to each Lodge in each year." 

9. By V. W. Bro. Le. F. A Maingy, — That in future the meetings 
of the Board of General Purposes shall be convened at such times 
before the Annual Communication as will permit the Reports of 
the Sub-Committees of the said Board being printed in time for 
distribution, upon the formal reception by Grand Lodge of the 
said reports. 

10. By R. W. Bro. Rev. David Armstrong, D. D.,— That Clause 226 
of the Book of Constitution be amended by striking out the words 
" black balls " in the third and seventh lines and inserting instead 
the words " adverse votes," and that the following words be 
added to the Clause: "The method of balloting shall be fixed 
by the By-laws of the Lodge. 

11. By R. W. Bro. H. A. Mackelcan, — That the Grand Registrar be 
added to the Board of General Purposes. 

12. By \V. Bro. H. Lockwood, — That Clause 59 of the Book of 
Constitution be struck out and the following substituted : " The 
" District Deputy Grand Master of each district shall be elected 
" after nomination, as follows : Any Past Master may, not less 



ANNUAL COMMUNICATION, OWEN SOUND, 5889. 267 

'•than three months before the Annual Communication of Grand 
" Lodge, forward to the District Deputy Grand Master of his 
"own district, a single written nomination for the office of 
"District Deputy Grand Master. It shall be the duty of the 
" District Deputy Grand Master immediately to acknowledge the 
" receipt of each nomination by mail, and at least two full months 
"before the Annual Communication of Grand Lodge, he shall 
"forward by mail to each Lodge in his district a list of the 
" Brethren so nominated, with their Masonic rank, residence and 
"profession, and the names of the Lodges to which they re- 
spectively belong. From the list of Brethren so forwarded by 
"the District Deputy Grand Master, the new District Deputy 
" Grand Master shall be elected by the majority of the Past 
" Masters and the representatives of the Lodges of such district at 
"the Annual Communication of Grand Lodge, and if his election 
"be confirmed by the Grand Master, he shall, if present, be 
" regularly installed. He must be a Past Master and a resident 
"of the district for which he is elected. If a brother who is 
" Master of a Lodge be elected as District Deputy Grand Master, 
"his election shall ipso facto operate to vacate his election as 
" Master and a new election shall be held by the Lodge." 

13. By W. Bro. James Whitten,— That districts Nos. 9 and 16 be 
divided by detaching all that portion of No. 9 lying north of 
Severn Bridge, and all that portion of No. 16, lying west of the 
eastern boundry of Mattawa Lodge, No. 405, and that a new 
district be formed out of these portions. 

14. By W. Bro. D. T. Hind,— That Enniskillen Lodge, No. 185, 
York, be transferred from the Niagara District No. 10 to the 
Hamilton District No. 8. 

Report of D. D. G. Master, Erie District, No. 1 55 

" St. Clair " " 2 64 

" London " " 3 70 

" South Huron, " " 4 78 

" Wilson " " 6 86 

" Wellington " " 7 87 

" Hamilton " " 8 92 

" Georgian " " 9 95 

" Niagara " " 10 98 

" Toronto " " u QQ 

Ontario " " 12 112 

" P.Edward " " 13 117 

" Frontenac " " 14 120 

" St. Lawrence " " 15 124 

" Ottawa " " 16 126 

Algoma " " 17 128 



268 m> l .' »DGE OF CANADA. 

Reports of Board of General Purposes on: 

Audit and Finance 131 

lienevolence 135 

Grievances and Appeals 160 

Warrants 130 

Grand M aster's Address 167 

Condition of Masonry 152 

Report on Foreign Correspondence 163 

Report of Scrutineers of Ballot 166 

Report of Committee on Credentials 25, 165 

Report re Testimonial to M. W. Bro. Robertson 174 

Resolutions : 

To confirm Minutes of Annual Communication, 1888 40 

To confirm Special Communications, 1888 and 1889 40 

To refer Address of G. M. to the Board of General Purposes. . . 55 

To receive and adopt Report of the Board on Address 173 

That the Reports of D. D. G. M's be received and considered 

as read, and referred to the Board 55 

To receive and adopt Report on Warrants 131 

To receive and adopt Report on Audit and Finance 135 

To receive and adopt Report on Benevolence 152 

To receive and adopt Report on Condition of Masonry 159 

To receive and adopt Report on Grievances and Appeals 162 

To receive and adopt Report of Committee on Credentials 165 

To receive and print the Report on Foreign Correspondence. . . 163 

To amend Clause 136, Book of Constitution. — Lost. 164 

To amend Clause 144, Book of Constitution. — Lost 164 

That business be clone in the Third Degree. — Lost 173 

Respecting rejected Applications 173 

To amend Rules relating to Benevolence 173 

Respecting Centennial of Masonry in Canada 173 

Respecting Special Benevolent Grants 174 

To receive and adopt Report on Presentation to M. W. Bro. 

Robertson 178 

Thanking the Mayor and Corporation of Owen Sound, and the 

Owen Sound Lodges 179 

To determine the place for holding the next Annual Communication. 167 

Restorations 230 

Returns of Subordinate Lodges 199 

Recapitulation 254 

Scrutineers appointed . 166 

Suspensions, U. M. C 223 

Suspensions, N. P. D 223 

Synopsis of Returns to Grand Lodge 246 

Warrants, Report of Board on . . 130 



APPENDIX TO PROCEEDINGS OP 1889. 



Report 01? Foreign (§orrespoi}<lei}ce, 



To the Most Worshipful the Grand Master and the Grand Lodge of 
Canada, A. F. & A. M. 

Your Committee on Foreign Correspondence beg leave to 
present the following report : — 

After a lapse of eleven years, the resumption of this 
summary of the proceedings of other Grand Lodges has been 
deemed advisable. The Grand Lodge has recognized its 
utility to the craft and the importance of our members being 
properly informed as to Masonic matters abroad. As our 
space is limited, we will endeavor to be as brief as possible, 
consistently with giving a good general idea of the action had 
on matters of interest and prominence. Our comments will 
thus necessarily be few. 

In our last report of 1878, we find a number of questions 
discussed that are still being debated, and others that are now 
fairly well settled. 

The practice as to physical disqualifications is now generally 
uniform and excludes those who are not capable of complying 
with all the requisites of the several degrees. 

Life membership is forbidden in some jurisdictions, while 
others speak in its favor. 

The installation of Lodge Officers in public, has obtained a 
foothold in some conservative quarters where we would least 
expect it. It can be attributed only to a craze for public dis- 
play that is obnoxious to true Masonry. 

The proceedings received will be noticed in alphabetical 
order, and a list of them will be found at the close of this 
report. 



II. GK \M» LODGE OF CANADA. 

ALABAMA. 

68th Communication, Montgomery, December 3rd, 1888. 
M. W. Bro. Myles J. Greene, G. M. 

He mentions the death of Bro. Daniel Sayre, Grand Sec- 
retary since 1857. Few brothers were more widely known or 
more highly esteemed. 

Masonry in Alabama has enjoyed a year of unusual pros- 
perity. He formed five new Lodges In his conclusion, the 
Grand Master, says : — 

" In conclusion, let me remind you that the immense material resources 
of our State and section are attracting world-wide attention. The burst- 
ing treasuries of the capitalist are unlocked, and the money-kings of the 
old world, as well as the new, are investing their millions among us. The 
tide of immigration is turning from the frigid regions of the North and 
West, to the geniai clime of our own sunny South. But along with this 
mighty influx of population, there are coming moral, social and political 
elements, which, if not counteracted, will convert into a curse, that which 
should be a blessing. 

Infidelity, Communism and Nihilism have their greedy eyes upon us, 
and would dispoil us of our fair heritage. 

To stem this tide of corruption, and, if possible, avert the danger which 
threatens our cherished institutions, is the duty of every lover of his home 
and country. How are these great ends to be attained ? 

I answer, by the individual and organized efforts of our good people. 
Such efforts have already been put forth, and they should receive, not 
only the sympathy, but the active support of every Mason, It is our 
privilege and duty to co-operate with good men at all times, in the pro- 
motion of those virtuous influences that are being employed to combat 
evil. Let us, with zeal and earnestness, enter the field of conflict ; nerve 
ourselves for a vigorous contest against the encroachment of vice ; 
practice, as well as teach, the great " cardinal virtues " of our Order ; and 
see to it that we live up to the noble principles so eloquently symbolized 
in our sublime and beautiful rites." 

Resolutions were adopted in favor of Quebec as against 
England, and interdicting intercourse with the members of 
Hiram Lodge, No. 1, of Connecticut, whose charter was with- 
drawn by the Grand Lodge for insubordination. 

The office of Chief Lecturer was created, and Bro. James 
M. Brundidge was appointed thereto for life, with an annual 
salary of $300. His duty is to instruct the District Lecturers 
upon the work. 

The report of correspondence is by Bro. Palmer J. Pillans. 
Canada for 1888 is noticed. 

M. W. Bro. Henry H. Brown, (Birmingham,) G. M. 

R. W. Bro. Myles J. Greene, (Montgomery,) G. S, 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. ill. 

ARIZONA. 

7th Communication, Prescott, November 13th, 1888. 

M. W. Bro. Francis A. Shaw, G. M. 

They are "The Benjamin of the Tribes," but are proudly 
conscious of their noble heritage. They have gained two new 
Lodges, and sixty-two in membership. They have had no 
suspensions for non-payment of dues, although the dues are 
twelve dollars a year. One of the new Lodges is at Flagstaff, 
which is about the hottest place we ever were in. Our 
Brethren there will need all their patience to keep cool enough 
to continue their devotions at our mystic shrine. 

Among the proceedings received, they mention Canada for 
1888, and also "Province of Ontario," 1888. There is no 
legitimate craft Grand Body having jurisdiction in the Pro- 
vince of Ontario, except the Grand Lodge of Canada. All 
others are spurious. 

The Committee of Jurisprudence say : — 

" The question of physical disabilities has been discussed by nearly 
every Grand Lodge, and while many of them are opening the door to 
admit such as can literally comply with the requirements of the ritual, it 
seems to this committee that it would be wiser at present to require all 
candidates to be physically sound, not dismembered, and to be able to 
conform literally to the requirements of the degrees of Masonry." 

The following was adopted as a standing regulation : — 

" Secretaries of Subordinate Lodges are authorized to drop from their 
annual returns the names of all Entered Apprentices and Fellow Crafts 
who have been returned for two years previous, and who have not in that 
period applied for advancement." 

M. W. Bro. Morris Goldwater, (Prescott,) G. M. 

R. W. Bro. M. P. Freeman, (Tucson,) G. S. 

ARKANSAS. 

49th Communication, Little Rock, November, 27th, 1888. 

M. W. Bro. W. H. Gee, G. M. 

He reports the craft in a reasonably prosperous condition. 
He formed seven new Lodges. 

The Constitution was amended, fixing the time of the 
Annual Meeting on the third Tuesday of November, instead of 
the fourth. 

The following report was piesented, but the record does not 
show whether it was adopted or not : — 



IV. i ; RAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

"Your Committee are of opinion that none but a member of a Lodge 
has the right under the first section of the law of trials to make formal 
charges and act as prosecutor, for no one else has the right to, at all times, 
appear in and act as a part of the Lodge. But as decided by Grand 
Master Van Iloose in 1881 (proceedings of 1882, page 183), a profane, 
even a woman, may prefer charges, in the sense of making an accusation 
against a member, and on such accusation it would become the duty of 
the Master to appoint a Committee to investigate the charges ; and if the 
Committee find them well founded, it would be the duty of the Com- 
mittee to reduce the charges to form, and upon their report the accused is 
put on trial as prescribed in the By-Laws." 

The "United Grand Lodge of New South Wales" was 
recognized. 

Bro. George E. Dodge, presented his resignation as Chair- 
man of Correspondence, which was reluctantly accepted, and 
a vote of thanks passed for his past services. 

As soon as the Grand Lodge had been closed, the exercises 
of celebrating the fiftieth Anniversary of the formation of the 
Grand Lodge were entered upon. During these exercises, 
letters and telegrams of congratulation and best wishes were 
presented from Brethren in all parts of the country, including 
our own Grand Secretary. There is only one brother now 
living, who was a member of a Lodge in Arkansas in 1838. 
Namely, Bro. John Karns, who was present and gave some 
very interesting reminiscences. He was warmly welcomed. 

At the Banquet which followed, 525 persons attended, and 
the occasion was made memorable by the eloquent speeches 
and responses which were then delivered. 

M. W. Bro. R. H. Taylor, (Hot Springs,) G. M. 

R. W. Bro. Fay Hempstead, (Little Rock,) G. S. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

17th Communication, New Westminster, June 23rd, 1888. 

M. W. Bro. A. R. Milne, G. M. 

On the state of the craft, he says : — 

" It is with both pride and satisfaction that I am able to report to you 
that never since the organization of this Grand Lodge has the fraternity 
in British Columbia been more prosperous, and the reports which will be 
submitted to you will furnish grounds for encouragement and satisfaction. 
Within our jurisdiction all has been harmonious, we have no dissensions 
to report, no wounds to heal. Our brethren everywhere are zealously 
engaged in working together for the general good. Dissentions find no 
abiding place in our Lodges, and in all the fullness and appropriateness of 
the spirit and teachings of the fraternity, our members meet, act and part. 
Our increase has been wonderful but healthy ; our course onward and 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. V. 

cheering. Lodges have been added to our brotherhood, thus strengthen- 
ing the tie which binds us to the cause of a universal philanthropy." 

He conducted the ceremonies of unveiling the monument 
to Bro. Samuel Hudson, who nobly sacrificed his life while 
endeavoring to succor the victims of the explosion in the 
Vancouver Colliery. 

We copy his decisions : — 

" First. Application to re-ballot for a candidate on account of sup- 
posed near-sightedness of a member casting his ballot. This was refused. 

Second. Application to ballot for a candidate at an emergency meet- 
ing. This was refused. 

1. There is no law to prevent a Brother in good standing who is a 
member of a foreign Lodge, from affiliating with a Lodge in this jurisdic- 
tion, if he desires to do so, and the Lodge to which he applies is willing 
to receive him. 

2. A Brother who is a Past Master of a Lodge under a foreign juris- 
diction, and who affiliates with a Lodge in British Columbia, is entitled 
to a seat and vote in the Grand Lodge, provided that his name and the name 
of the Lodge in which he formerly served as Master have been duly 
entered in the returns made to the Grand Secretary by the Lodge which 
has admitted him as a joining member. 

3. That we do not recognize ' dual membership ' within this jurisdic- 
tion. 

4. The performance of the solemn service required by Masonry over 
the remains of a Brother is Masonic labor, and the Lodge so engaged is 
performing Masonic labor, and must have absolute and complete control, 
and can not permit any but affiliated Masons in good standing to take part 
therein. 

I am of the opinion that Masons, resident within our Province, should 
contribute to the support of the institution in this jurisdiction, otherwise 
not expect to receive its benefits and privileges, and I would recommend 
the enactment of a regulation limiting the time, that voluntary non- 
affiliates with'our Lodges, should be entitled to the privileges of Masonry." 

The Grand Lodge attended divine service, and heard an 
excellent sermon by Canon W. H. Cooper, F. R. G S., acting 
Grand Chaplain. 

The following was adopted : — 

" Resolved, that a uniform system of work and lectures be adopted by 
Grand Lodge for all Subordinate Lodges that may hereafter be chartered 
in this jurisdiction, and for those now holding charters, as the majority of 
the Lodge shall desire." 

M. W. Bro. A. R. Milne. (Victoria,) G. M. 
R. W. Bro. Henry Brown, (Victoria,) G S. 

CALIFORNIA. 

39th Communication, San Francisco, October 9th, 1888. 
M. W. Bro. Hiram Newton Rucker, G. M. 



vi. GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

The year past was a prosperous one and five new Lodges 
were organized. Some of his decisions are interesting : — 

" Question. Should a Mason, who is a life-member of a Lodge at the 
time of his expulsion by the Grand Lodge, and who was subsequently re- 
stored by that Body, be subject to the payment of dues in becoming a 
member of another Lodge, or of the Lodge of which he was a life- 
member ? 

Atiswer. Yes. In the first instance, such a contract can have no 
orce with any other than the Lodge with which it was made. In the 
second, the Grand Lodge only restored the individual to the rights and 
privileges of Masonry, and not to membership in his Lodge. 

Question. When the charter of a Lodge has been arrested and subse- 
quently restored, should its members, who were exempted from the 
penalty of suspension, pay dues during the time the charter was under 
arrest ? 

Answer. The matter may be left to the pleasure of the Lodge, unless 
there be dissention ; in which case payment should be exacted. 

Question. To whom should payment of such dues be made ? 

Answer. To the Lodge, after the restoration of its charter. 

Question. In the event that the charter should not be restored, what 
course should be followed with reference to the exempted member? 

Answer. He may receive a dimit from the Grand Lodge, bearing date 
of the arrest of the charter, provided his dues have been paid to that date. 

Question. Is a newly elected Master required to take the Past Master's 
degree before presiding as Master of a Lodge ? 

Answer. No. The degree is permitted by the Grand Lodge, and may 
be conferred, when practicable, as an honorary reward to the brother who 
has been found worthy by his Lodge to occupy the Oriental Chair, 
but is not a pre-requisite. 

Question. Would it be proper to confer the degrees of Masonry upon 
one who is subject to epileptic fits ? 

Answer. It would not be proper. 

Question. In the event of a tie vote at the annual election for officers 
of a Lodge, has the Master the right, in addition to his proper vote, to 
have the casting vote ? 

Answer. Certainly not. 

Question. What is the correct and exact Masonic definition of ' ballot,' 
as applied in the Grand Lodge Constitution ? 

Answer. A secret vote by balls, or cubes, or slips of paper. 

Question. Can the degrees of Masonry be conferred gratuitously 

Answer. No. It would be contrary to our Constitution. 

Question. Is the Entered Apprentice, who has been refused advance- 
ment, entitled to a return of the fee accompanying his application for the 
degrees, or to any part thereof? 

Answer. The fee should be returned, less the amount charged by the 
Lodge for the Entered Apprentice degree. 

Question. Has the Master of a Lodge the right to refuse admission to 
a visitor on the objection of a member, without requiring said member to 
state such objection to him, that he may determine upon its validity? 

Answer. The Master should ' require that the reasons therefor be 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. Vll. 

stated to him, and he must be the judge of their sufficiency.' [The word 
' should ' is used instead of ' may ' in a former report of the Committee on 
Jurisprudence as a fair interpretation of Sec. 16, Art. Ill, Part III, of the 
Constitution, and would seem to make it the imperative duty of the 
Master to require that the reasons be stated to him.]" 

The Grand Master is against the incorporation of Lodges 
and also against having stimulants at Lodge Banquets. 

Bro. James Wright Anderson, has an excellent and elaborate 

report on correspondence, covering 145 pages. Canada for 

1887 receives a good notice. On life membership, he says : — 

"We are opposed to life-memberships on principle; but we do not 
think that anywhere is it universally conceded, or even almost universally, 
that they are detrimental. We are sorry that it is not so conceded, and 
we will go so far as to say that we think that it would conserve the in- 
terests of Masonry and our Lodges, if Grand Lodge would deal with this 
matter as they generally do with the matter of incorporation of Lodges. 
Where, however, a contract of life-membership has been entered into, we 
do not think that it is competent for a Lodge or a Grand Lodge to annul 
such contract." 

California wrestled with the question of incorporation for 
several years, and after very careful consideration, arrived at 
the conclusion that it would be unwise to permit Lodges to 
incorporate. Bro. Anderson thinks that Lodges should not be 
permitted to put themselves in a position where they could set 
themselves in opposition to any regulation of the Grand 
Lodge. We think he is quite correct. 

The following report on some of the decisions of the Grand 
Master, by the committee on jurisprudence, was adopted : — 

"With respect to the first of these, (1), they agree with the Grand 
Master that the contract of life-membership is with the particular Lodge 
of which the party was a member at the date of the contract ; that the 
contract was only that, for a consideration deemed by the Lodge sufficient, 
he would thereafter be exempt from dues in that Lodge ; and that, if for 
any reason his connection with that Lodge should be severed and he 
should become a member of another Lodge, he would be subject to the 
payment of dues in that Lodge. But -if, as in the case presented in the 
question, having been expelled and subsequently restored, he should be 
again elected to membership in the particular Lodge of which he had 
been a member, your committee think that he should be deemed to be 
restored to all the rights pertaining to his life-membership, as well as to 
others. His contract was that in that Lodge he should be forever exempt 
from the payment of dues, and common justice would require the observance 
of that contract on the part of the Lodge. It is true that when his con- 
nection was once severed by expulsion or withdrawal it would be for the 
Lodge to say whether it would receive him again, but if it should receive 
him, it should restore him to his former standing in all respects, and should 
be ready to perform all its obligations to him. 

As to the decisions in relation to the dues of Masons, who, by the 



vin. GR \nd LODGE 01 can \i>.v 

order arresting the charter of a Lodge, are exempted from suspension, 
(2,) your committee think that the rule should be absolute that members 
so exempted should pay dues during the period of arrest — to the Lodge if 
the charter be restored, and to the Grand Lodge if it be revoked and the 
Lodge be declared extinct. Of course either of these bodies could remit 
such dues, but unless remitted they should be paid. In case the charter 
be revoked they should be paid up to the date of issuing the certificate by 
the Grand Secretary, which entitles its holder to all the rights which 
would have been his had he received a certificate of withdrawal (dimit) 
from his Lodge. At the date of the declaration by the Grand Lodge that 
a Lodge has become extinct, whether by the revocation of its charter or by 
the acceptance of the surrender thereof, all its members, theretofore in 
good standing, become non-affiliated Masons, and, as such, are to be 
deemed subject to the provisions of Section I, Article II, Part V, and Sec- 
tion 8. Ariicle V, Part VI, of our Constitution. The rule in this matter 
should be fixed, and never left to the discretion of the Lodge, because the 
exercise of such discretion would be very likely to produce the dissension 
which is spoken of in the decision, 

And as to the decision relative to the so-called degree of Past Master, 
(3,) your committee suggest that the Grand Master has probably over- 
looked the 1st of the General Regulations of our Grand Lodge, which 
reads as follows : — 

1. This Grand Lodge recognizes no degree of Past Master conferred by any 
authority not holden under a legitimate Grand Lodge — acknowledging only theOrder 
of that name as it exists in the ceremonies attending the installation of the Master 
elect of a chartered Lodge; which Order shall be conferred only by a convocation of 
Masters or Past Masters, not less than three in number, who have thus regularly 
received it. 

While the real reason for the adoption of this Regulation was, doubtless 
that Past Masters of Chapter creation often claimed the right, at an early 
period of our history, to participate in the proceedings of such a convoca- 
tion as is therein named, it is evident that the Grand Lodge not only 
recognized theOrder or Degree — whichever it may be called — as an existing 
part of the ceremonies attending the installation of the Master elect of a 
chartered Lodge, but, inferentially at least, concurred in the propriety of 
observing that ancient usage by prescribing the manner in which the Order 
should be conferred. It appears in most, if not all, of the many Masonic 
Manuals, Monitors, Trestle Boards, etc., which have from time to time 
been published, as being conferred at the time of the installation, but in 
this Jurisdiction it is customary to confer it previously thereto, to avoid an 
interruption of the ceremonies. The Regulation has never been rescinded, 
and your committee therefore consider it to be a still existing law." 

The same committee thus reported on life membership : — 

" Excelsior Lodge, No. 166, adopted a standing resolution to the effect 
that any one of its members who had paid his dues to the Lodge and had 
maintained good standing therein for the period of twenty-five years, 
should thereafter be exempt from the payment of dues. This resolution 
was in direct conflict with a by-law of that Lodge which declares that 
'The dues of each member of the Lodge shall be one dollar per month, 
payable quarterly in advance.' The Grand Master very properly declared 
this resolution void, as it is clear that no Lodge can amend, repeal, or 
nullify one of its by-laws by a standing resolution. 

Your committee join with him in his disapproval of the plan proposed 
by that resolution, even were it lawful, and in his suggestion that the better 
plan, if there be any good plan at all in regard to life-membership, would 
be to grant such exemption only upon the payment of a sum of money 



foreign correspondence;. ix. 

which the Lodge shall judge to be at least a fair equivalent for its monthly 
dues ; and that the money so received should in all cases be 
securely invested as a distinct fund, of which only the income should be 
used for current or even extraordinary expenses. That fund should stand 
in the place of the member himself for the payment of dues. If extra- 
ordinary expense is at any time incurred, it should be met by an increase 
of the dues of the members of the Lodge, and a life-member should no 
more be exempt from such an increase than one who had maintained his 
standing by the monthly payment of his dues." 

M. W. Bro. Morris M. Estee, (San Francisco,) G. M. 
R. VV. Bro. Alexander G. Abell, (San Francisco,) G. S. 
We regret to learn of the continued ill health of Bro. Abell, 
and hope for his speedy recovery. 

COLORADO. 

28th Communication, Denver, September 18th, 1888. 

M. W. Bro. George K. Kimball, G M. 

He believes that the Past Masters' Degree has no place in 
Craft Masonry, and that it is not necessary that a master 
should have it before he can preside in his Lodge. We differ. 
It is a necessary part of the installation of a master, and he is 
not qualified to preside until he is properly installed. It is, 
however, improperly called the " Past Masters' Degree ;" it is 
properly " the degree of an installed master." 

He formed four new Lodges. 

He declined to grant permission for brethren to appear in 
regalia at a pic-nic and dance, holding " that Masonic clothing 
is only to be worn when at labor." We approve. 

He declined to lay the corner-stone of a new Opera House, 
" deeming such duty not compatible with Masonic work, the 
proposed building not being either for charitable, religious or 
educational purposes." We approve. 

The following resolution was adopted : — 

"Resolved., That this Grand Lodge recognizes no degrees in Masonry 
except those conferred under the regulations of the Grand Lodges of the 
various States and Territories of the United States, and the Governments 
throughout the World. It admits the following named organizations, and 
none other, to be regular and duly constituted Masonic Bodies, namely : 
The General Grand R. A. Chapter of the U. S. ; the Grand R. A. 
Chapters of the several States and Territories of the U. S., and the R. A. 
Chapters and other bodies under their jurisdiction ; the General Grand 
Council of Royal and Select Masters of the U. S. ; the Grand Councils of 
Royal and Select Masters of the several States and Territories of the U. 
S., and the Councils under their jurisdiction ; the Grand Encampment of 
the U. S. ; the Grand Commanderies of the several States and Territories 



X. GRAND LODGE OF CANADA, 

of the U. S., and the Commanderies under their jurisdiction ; the Supreme 
Councils of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite for the Northern and 
Southern jurisdictions of the U. S., of which Henry L. Palmer and Albert 
Pike are Sov Grand Commanders, respectively, and the various bodies 
under their jurisdiction." 

If none other than those named are regular Masonic bodies, 
what becomes of the Grand and Subordinate Lodges ? 

The report on correspondence is by Bro. James H. Peabody, 
P. G. M., and notices Canada for 1887. He says we are a 
well-governed jurisdiction. 

In his conclusion, he says : — 

" We have stood by the ancient landmarks of the Order, as they were 
explained to us, when given us in charge. 

We do not, have not, and can not favor such propositions as " perpetual 
jurisdiction," " forced affiliation," " public installations," the necessity of 
the Past Master's Degree as a prerequisite to the installation of the Master 
ot a Lodge, or galloping through the degrees by the aid of a five dollar 
note and a Grand Master's dispensation. 

Neither do we favor the admission into our Order of deformities, 
whether of a mental or physical character. 

We fully realize that some of our brethren will denominate us a 
" riqid constructionist," and so we are. In like manner, they in turn may 
be criticised by others. 

Wherein we have erred, we have done so in our endeavor to protect our 
landmarks, ceremonies and symbolisms from innovation." 

M. W. Bro. William D. Todd, (Denver,) G. M. 
R. W. Bro. Edward C. Parmelee, (Pueblo,) G. S. 

CONNECTICUT. 
101st Communication, New Haven, January 16th, 1889. 
M. W. Bro. John W. Mix, G. M. 
New South Wales was recognized. 
The following resolution was adopted : — 

" Resolved, That there be required and paid to the Grand Lodge from 
each Subordinate Lodge within its jurisdiction, the sum of twenty cents 
from each member upon its rolls ; provided, however, that in estimating 
its membership, all members may be deducted who have been Masons for 
thirty years, and also those whose whereabouts have been unknown for the 
five preceding years." 

The term of office for grand representatives was fixed at 
five years from the dates of their commissions. 

The title of District Deputy Grand Master was changed to 
that of " District Deputy." 

The Grand Secretary was ordered to procure a sufficient 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. XI. 

number of Past Grand Masters' Jewels, to be owned by the 
Grand Lodge, and to be worn in public processions by the 
Past Grand Masters of this Grand Lodge. 

The report on correspondence is by the Grand Secretary and 
notices Canada for 1888. In his conclusion, he says : — 

"We find the craft enjoying an unusual degree of prosperity, and 
harmony seems to exist throughout the entire domain of free-masonry, 
except th ;t disturbance which now exists within our own borders. In 
our report we have incorporated all that has been said referring to this 
unfortunate controversy, and in every case the Grand Lodge is sustained 
in the course which has been pursued. The controversy seems to hinge on 
the question of landmarks, which has been very forcibly answered by 
Brother Drummond of Maine, which was published in our report a year 
ago, and by Brother William R. Singleton, of the District of Columbia, 
which appears in our present report. 

Our own opinion is in accordance with the views, which these distin- 
guished brethren have presented, i. e., that ' a dueguardis not a landmark.' 
but of comparatively recent origin, and has been subject to change by 
several bodies, and at the present time there is no uniformity, although 
about four-fifths of the American jurisdictions are using what was last 
adopted by the Grand Lodge of Connecticut. In some jurisdictions the 
dueguard is unknown in the M. M. degree. Among these can be numbered 
the Grand Lodge of Canada, which traces its source and customs to the 
Grand Lodge of England, and the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania, which 
boasts of the introduction of Masonry from England, into its jurisdiction, 
as early as 1730. 

Brother Albert G. Mackey says ' the dueguard is an Americanism, and 
of comparatively recent origin, being unknown to the English and con- 
tinental systems. In some of the old rituals of the date of 1757, the 
expression is used, but only as referring to what is now called the sign.' 

I have accumulated quite a large amount of correspondence on this 
subject which would be of interest, but its esoteric nature forbids the 
printing of it." 

M. W. Bro. John H. Swartwout, (Stamford,) G. M. 

R. W. Bro. Joseph K. Wheeler, (Hartford,) G. S. 
DAKOTA. 

14th Communication, Dead wood, June 12th, 1888. 

M. W. Bro. Henry M. Wheeler, G. M. 

He hopes that their deliberations may be characterized by 
an earnestness and wisdom commensurate with the length of 
their travel, as their place of meeting is among the Black 
Hills in the extreme south-western portion of the State. He 
formed eight new Lodges. They have 100 Lodges and 4051 
members, increase, 512. Their average membership per 
Lodge is gradually increasing 

Excellent rules regarding non-?ffiliates were adopted : — 



xii. -;n LODGE OF CAN UDA. 

"it. An unaffiliated Mason has no right to visit any one Lodge in this 
jurisdiction more than three times, nor can he be permitted to join in any 
Masonic procession or participate in any festivity of the Lodge except by 
the courtesy thereof. 

2nd. He or his family can make no claim for charity upon the funds of 
the Lodge, but the same may be granted when thought just and proper. 
He is, however, bound to respond, so far as his ability permits, to the call 
of distress by an individual Mason, and they are in like manner bound to 
him. 

3rd. I Ie has no right to Masonic burial, but the same may be given 
him by the Lodge at its discretion, if he has shown commendable zeal for 
the interests and adhered to the principles of the institution. 

4th. He is subject to all Masonic obligations as a member of the 
fraternity at large, and for any violation of the moral or Masonic law, 
subject to trial and discipline by the Lodge near which he sojourns or 
resides." 

The Grand Master was authorized to establish schools of 
instruction, and to appoint a Grand Lecturer at five dollars a 
day and expenses, the per diem to be paid by the Lodges 
instructed, and the expenses by the Grand Lodge. 

Membership in the Grand Lodge is confined to the Grand 
Officers, the Masters and Wardens and Past Elective Grand 
Officers. This rules out all Past Masters. 

A proposal to reduce the Grand Lodge dues from seventy- 
five cents to fifty cents was not adopted. 

The report on correspondence is by Bro. Frank J. Thomp- 
son, and notices Canada for 1887. 

M. W. Bro. John Q. A. Braden, (Aberdeen,) G. M. 
R. W. Bro. Charles T. McCoy, (Aberdeen,) G. S. 

DELAWARE. 

82nd Communication, Wilmington, October 3rd, 1888. 

M. W. Bro. George W. Marshall, G. M. 

He congratulates the Brethren upon the progress they have 
made and on the harmony prevailing. He visited nearly all of 
their 21 Lodges. He mentions one brother, Robert B. Jump, 
who has completed the 62nd year of his Masonic relations, 
and the 85th year of his life. 

A Lodge of instruction was established at Wilmington, solely 
for the dissemination of the work and lectures of Ancient 
Craft Masonry, and instruction in Masonic knowledge 
generally. It is to hold regular monthly meetings. 

The report on correspondence is by Bro. Lewis H. Jackson, 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. Xlll. 

P D. G. M., and has a good notice of Canada for 1887. 
In it he says : — 

" This Grand Lodge has a praise-worthy system of piactical benevolence, 
which we do not believe is equalled by any other Grand Lodge on this 
continent. Think of it, brethren— $10,850 disbursed the past year among 
the distressed members' widows and orphans of the Craft in Canada ! 
Well done ! and worthy of all praise ! 

The ' Journal of Proceedings ' is a volume of 320 pages, beautifully 
bound in ' purple and gold,'' well befitting such a Grand Lodge, and we 
have been filled with admiration in the perusal of its contents." 

He has the following sensible remarks on the Mission of 
Masonry with regard to the liquor sellers : — 

" But we ask what is the " nature and mission of Masonry." Is it not 
"a beautiful system of morality," and its mission to promote " brotherly 
love, relief and truth " among men? And is there anything in " .Saloon - 
keeping or liquor selling" in agreement with these beneficent objects ? 
Is not the entire tendency of "the business " against the " nature and 
mission of Masonry?" How can any one, engage in such "business" 
when he applies for admission into Masonry, honestly declare, as he is 
required to do, that he has " a sincere desire of being serviceable to his 
fellow- creatures? " Masonry is not departing from its "nature and 
mission " when it declines to take into its bosom individuals whose 
"nefarious business" is so dangerous to the peace and happiness of 
humanity. 

We would respectfully propound the following questions for our M. W. 
Brother's serious consideration. 

1. Have the saloons ever done any good ? 

2. Have the homes of our citizens been made happier or brighter, and 
men made nobler or better in any way by the presence of the saloons ? 

3. Do they add anything to the neatness and attractiveness of our 
towns and villages, or make them more desirable as places of residence ? 

4. Do they not increase the number of poor and degraded people in any 
community?" 

M. W. Bro. James S. Dobb, (Wilmington,) G. M. 

R. W. Bro. William S. Hayes, (Wilmington,) G. S. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 
78th Communication, Washington, November 14th, 1888. 
M. W. Bro. Jesse W. Lee, Jr., G. M. 
On the question of mixed Funerals, he says : — 

" In the early part of my administration a subject which, at one time, 
caused considerable feeling in this jurisdiction, (and a great deal of com- 
ment outside of it,) and which was supposed to have been finally adjusted 
and set at rest, was presented to me for action. I refer to the question of 
" mixed funerals." A member of one of our Lodges died, being also a 
member of a non- Masonic organization. This latter expressed a desire to 
attend the funeral and perform its service at the grave. The attendance 
and performance of service was readily enough granted, but the question 
arn?e, "Which service should have precedence at the grave? " Section 
25, article XX, of the Grand Constitution, read thus : 



m\. GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

" No Lodge shall form a public procession, except for a Masonic funeral, 
without permission o( the M. \V. ('.rand Master; and none but Master Masons shall 
participate in Masonic funeral services. When other associations, or the military, 
attend the funeral oi a toother, who is be int,'buiied Masonically, the Lodge performing 
the service must of necessity have entire control of all arrangements." 

You will perceive that the section just quoted is silent as to precedence, so 
far as the btuial service is concerned. 

There was a difference of opinion expressed by those with whom I con- 
sulted on the subject. 

I learned that on some occasions the Lodge had performed its service, 
then withdrew, leaving the non- Masonic body to perform theirs, and bury 
the Brother ; on other occasions the Lodge had performed the final service. 

The matter was left to the discretion ot the Master of the Lodge having 
charge. 

Almost immediately thereafter a Brother of another Lodge died, he also 
being a member of a non-Masonic organization. The same question arose. 
I then directed that the Masonic burial service should be the concluding 
or final one. 

It appeared to me that it was not only proper that the Lodge should 
have charge of the "arrangements" of the funeral, but also perform the 
last sad rites, and see the Brother's remains deposited in the bosom of our 
common mother earth." 

The Grand Lodge of New South Wales was recognized. 

At a special communication, resolutions upholding the 
Grand Lodge of Connecticut in the matter of Hiram Lodge, 
were adopted. 

The corner stone of the new Cathedral of the Ancient 

and Accepted Scottish Rite, was laid by the Grand Master, 

and an eloquent address was delivered by Bro. Albert Pike, 

from which we make the following extract : — 

" Wherever Freemasons have in any time met in Lodge together, 
whether in English inns or in open air, in cities or in the camps of armies, 
or in our lately peopled villages, where the church, the school-house, and 
the Masonic-hall, builded side by side, marked the advance of American 
civilization on its march across the continent ; or in boats on the bay of 
Naples, to elude the spies of the twin tyrannies ; whether in Spain under 
the bloody Ferdinand, in Russia under a tolerant Czar, in the city of 
Constantine permitted by the Sultan, in Egypt under the protection of the 
Khedive, himself a Mason, or in the Mohammedan and Parsee Lodges of 
Bombay under the Provincial Grand Lodge of Scotland ; whether in its 
youth, or since it has grown to its present estate of ripening manhood, 
there have always been present in the Lodge, as inspectors of the work, 
those divinities, beautiful and gracious, the spirit of brotherhood, trustful- 
ness in the beneficence of God, the love of truth, fleet-footed chanty, 
large-souled tolerance, and warm-hearted loving-kindness, whose presence 
has made the most plainly furnished lodge in camp or frontier village 
radiant with a greater beauty than that which adorns the chambers of 
luxury in the palaces of kings. 

It has been said that Masonry is not a religion. If it be said that it is 
not Christianity, or Hebraism, or Mohammedanism, or Parseeism, this is 
true ; but there was religion in the world befoie any of these were ; and if 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. 



the faith of the enlightened thinkers of Greece and Rome, of Egypt and 
India, who believed that there was one Divine Creator and Preserver of 
the Universe, its Lord or Ruler, loving and adoring Him as beneficent and 
wise, and that the intelligent soul of man did not cease to be at the death 
of the body; if this was a religion, surely Freemasonry, having the same 
belief and trustful reverence, is likewise a religion, within the definition of 
the Apostle James and the Prophet Isaiah, and by the declaration of 
Christ himself as to that which which was " all the law and the prophets." 
When the railing accusation was brought against Freemasonry that it is 
hostile to a lawful government, a Mason need make no other reply than 
this : That as our institution is the faithful handmaiden of religion when- 
ever that which calls itself religion claims only the power to teach and 
persuade, and does not pretend to the right to persecute, or exert itself to 
overcome republican or constitutional government, so everywhere, Free- 
masons, individually and collectively are loyal and active supporters of 
such governments, in all the American republics, in France and Switzer- 
land, in Great Britain and Denmark, in Sweden and Norway, in the 
Netherlands and Belgium, in Brazil, in Germany and Spain and Portugal, 
in Hungary and Italy and Greece, for felicity and loyalty, and peace and 
order, and subordination to lawful authority are the household gods of 
Freemasonry. 

No human institution lives long without changes in its organic structure, 
in the processes of its action, in its forms and methods, and even in its' 
principles once regarded as essential and unchangeable. The restless 
activity of humanity makes stability impossible. From the common lot 
of all Freemasonry is not exempt ; but, in the main, it has stood upon the 
old ways, and thence made progress. The constitutions of civil govern- 
ment and political organization, whether written or broadened from 
precedent to precedent, change more in a score of years than Masonry 
has changed in a century. For the most part it has adhered to the spi.it, 
if not altogether to the letter of the old Charges and Regulations, too 
much, perhaps, in some things, in which it might be better if the letter of 
the old law governed it less and its spirit more." 

The Grand Secretary reports on correspondence. On 
Masonry as a religion, he says : — 

"Masonry requires every entrant to acknowledge his " trust in God." 
Now the word religion essentially means just what Masonry requires ; 
and, when the Grand Orient of France took that feature from her Con- 
stitution, she became, in effect, the advocate of " irreligious libertinism " 
and un-Masonic. 

Masonry is unsectarian, non-denominational, and not dogmatic; but 
essentially religious, because, according to the belief of every honest 
Mason, he is " bound back," as the word religio signifies, to the Being in 
whom he puts his implicit trust, and if that be not relig/ozes, then what is 

As a life-long professor of the Christian religion we heartily endorse 
the religion, as such of every Mason as positively opposed to the Atheism 
of the \\ orld, and we doubt not that when Bro. Maxwell will duly consider 
the difference between religion in the abstract and any dogmatism 
or sectarianism, he too must confess that every Mason must, " by his 
tenure," be not only a "moral man," but also a religious one, for there is 
no morality possible unless founded upon a religious acknowledgment of a 
supreme superintending moral Governor, to whom all moral questions 
must of necessity be referred, or as our lecture says, " otherwise no obliga- 



\\ : (IRANI) l.OIH'.K OK CANAD \. 

tion would be binding upon us." If a conscientious Mason will start from 
his ackn " trust in God " and reason upwardly, he must become 

natic religionisl of some sort ; greatly depending upon the course 
which he may pursue. This writer has landed in the dogmatisms of 

ianity; not because he was so educated, but by a course of philo 
sophical reasoning. Another Brother may deduce his Jewish faith and 
another his Mahommedanism, yet all must be ex necessitate from the 
original basis of belief, i. e. in God, which is not sufficient for man in this 
life nor the life to come.'''' 

In his review of Canada for 1888, he thus comments on one 
of our rulings : — 

" In his decisions he states that " a visitor has a right to know that the 
Body he proposes to visit is a legal Body, and he has the right to inspect 
the warrant at a proper time, but he has no right to put the Lodge or its 
officers to trouble or inconvenience while at work. The Master would be 
justified in refusing to allow the warrant to betaken out of the Lodge-room 
while the Lodge is at work." 

We heartily concur in the first part of this decision, and in dictum, 
that no one can put the Lodge to inconvenience ; but we cannot concur in 
the last part, for the simple reason that the charter being in charge of the 
Examining Committee is Masonically in the Lodge and its premises. 

We know of no Masonic law requiring the charter to be in the actual 
room where work is being conducted. Such was not the old custom. 

Many a Lodge has worked when the charter was at the home of the 
Master. Its presence was not absolutely necessary. 

What constitutes a Lodge? is a modern phrase of ritualism, and not a 
landmark unalterable ; hence any Grand Lodge can legislate on the con- 
duct of a Lodge or a W. Master as to where the charter must be, to permit 
work to be legitimately performed. If a Grand Lodge declares its actual 
presence in the "room " necessary, then it should never be absent. This 
is the custom in the District of Columbia, and consequently precedent 
regulates it with us." 

M. W. Bro. Harrison Dingman, G. M. 
R. W. Bro. W. R. Singleton, G. S. 

FLORIDA. 
60th Communication, Jacksonville, January 15th, 1889. 
M. W. Bro. Norvelle R. Carter, G. M. 
On the Yellow Fever visitation, he says : — 

" Early after the epidemic became general, Bro. W. L. Baldwin 
stated to me, by letter, that the distress was becoming general among the 
fraternity, and that local resources were about exhausted. 1 immediately 
instructed Bro. Baldwin to have printed and circulated, at once, an appeal 
to the Order of this jurisdiction for assistance, which was liberally respond- 
ed to, but the rapid spread of the fever, and suffering among the fraternity, 
rendered it necessary to make an appeal to the brotherhood throughout the 
United States. Bro. Baldwin having succumbed to the prevailing 
disease, ami Bio. C. W. Johnson being Chairman, with Bro. Conova, 
Treasurer of Masonic Relief Committee, and Bro. A. W. Knight as Grand 
Secretary, pro tern., with my authority issued the appeal, which was so 
liberally and generously responded to, and with such promptness, that 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. xvil. 

very soon the committee had to call a halt. From all appearances, we 
had sufficient funds for all possible emergencies, both for the relief of 
distress in the City "of Jacksonville and in other afflicted Towns in this 
jurisdiction, which I instructed the committee to look after." 

Eight new Lodges were formed. The Grand Master sug- 
gests that the proper position for a Lodge Chaplain is to the 
left and in front of the Master. He ruled that the Master of 
a Lodge can dimit. On the importance of correct work, he 
says : — 

" I recommend to the fraternity the importance of learning and sticking 
to the Grand Lodge work. It is too frequently the case that Masters and 
Brethren of the particular Lodges are indifferent about learning the work 
as adopted by the Grand Lodge, and use and teach the work as learned 
by themselves in some other jurisdiction. While tiiere is no material 
difference, the verbiage, in many instances, is different, and more volumin- 
ous, while it does not add to the beauty or simplicity of the work. If, 
Brethren, you think more of the forms than the beauties and principles of 
Masonry, then you will continue to contend for the practice of the forms 
learned in the jurisdictions where you were made Masons. But, as before 
stated, if you honestly endeavor to harmonize upon local edicts, with a 
view to improvement, there will be no confusion about our work." 

Comp. D. C. Dawkins, gives one of the very best reports on 
correspondence that has come before us. We had marked 
many passages to extract, but find that our space will not 
permit their insertion. Our proceedings for 1888 arc 
reviewed. 

M. W. Bro. Henry W. Long, (Martel,) G. M. 

R. W. Bro. Dewitt C. Dawkins, (Jacksonville,) G. S. 

GEORGIA. 

102nd Communication, Macon, October 30th, 1888. 

M. W. Bro. John S. Davidson, G. M. 

We copy some of his decisions : — 

" 5. An applicant being within thirty-six hours of twenty-one years of 
age filed his petition to be made a Mason. The Lodge laid it on the 
table until the expiration of the thirty-six hours and then desired to 
entertain it. Held illegal. The petition for Masonry cannot legally be 
made by one not twenty-one years of age at the date he applies. If it 
could be legally laid on the table for thirty-six hours, it could be for a year 
or more, and a person of any age could apply. 

6. A Mason who wilfully removes from the ballot-box all the black 
ballots, so as to prevent a full and free exercise of the right of ballot, is 
guilty of a high crime against Masonry, and, if convicted, should be 
recommended for expulsion. 

7. A Mason is guilty of fornication or adultery with a lewd woman 
who is known to him at the time he committed the offence to be the 



xviii. GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

daughter of a Mason. Held, that the want of chastity in the woman does 
not change the Masonic offence. 

8. Ml J d not recognize any side degrees and does not attempt 

to exercise any jurisdiction over them. It can only punish its members for 
any improper use of its secret work in connection with such degrees." 

Two new Lodges were organized. Their prosperity con- 
tinues without sign of retrogression. The social feature is 
growing more in favor and practice. 

In a letter from Bro. J. Emmett Blackshear, who was visiting 
in London, we find the following : — 

" I have had the opportunity of attending only one Communication of 
the Grand Lodge of England since I came to London. The meetings are 
quarterly, as you know, and are conducted very differently from the manner 
in which we do business in American Grand Lodges. They have a Board 
of General Purposes, who meet monthly, to hear grievances and to attend 
to any other business that may arise. It is before this Board that all dis- 
cussions take place and all matters are finally disposed of. They say they 
prefer to wash their dirty clothes at home, in the family, so they can come 
before the Grand Communication clad in clean garments. What is there 
done is simply a formal recognition of what the aforesaid Board has done. 
The Grand Communications are, therefore, of brief duration, never lasting 
over one evening. The one I attended opened at 8 p. m. and closed at 9 
p. m., and yet the hall, which is quite large and gorgeously decorated, was 
filled to overflowing, even the galleries. Every one in attendance, more- 
over, was in full evening dress, and full jeweled, no one being admitted 
without his jewel. Many where, indeed, ablaze with jewels. 

I never had much taste for personal decorations, yet for the nonce I 
rather regretted that I had not, before leaving America, supplied myself 
with a modest emblem of my Masonic rank, which would have entitled me 
to a position of honor ; as it was, I borrowed a Past Master's jewel and 
took my seat among the small fry. I, perhaps, enjoyed it as much, how- 
ever, as if I had been among the Princes and Lords of the Realm, the 
Prince of Wales being at the head. 

The Temple, which is on Great Queen Street, presents a very respectable, 
though not particularly imposing exterior. The facade is ornamented with 
six Corinthian columns, and with statuary representing the Cardinal Vir- 
tues. Adjoining the Temple is the Freemasons' Tavern, where the Grand 
Banquets are held. 

The following resolutions were adopted : — 

" Resolved, That it is the sense of this Grand Lodge, that the election 
to the Degrees in Masonry of persons engaged in the business of saloon- 
keeping should be discouraged, and that all members of Lodges who are 
engaged in such business should be encouraged to discontinue the same as 
hurtful, not only to the Craft, but to the community at large." 

"Whereas, We learn that the Most Worshipful Grand Master, John 
S. Davidson, is preparing a lecture upon the meaning of Masonic signs. 
Therefore be it 

Resolved, That he be requested to deliver such lecture before the next 
meeting of the Grand Lodge, at such an hour as may suit his convenience." 

The report on correspondence is written by five members, 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. XIX. 

each taking part of the proceedings received. Canada does 
not appear. 

M. W. Bro. John S. Davidson, (Augusta,) G. M. 

R. W. Bro. A. M. Wolihin, (Macon,) G. S. 

IDAHO. 

21st Communication, Boise, September nth, 1888. 

M. W. Bro. Edward A. Stevenson, G. M. 

Fifteen Lodges were represented, out of seventeen on the 
roll and two under dispensation. 

The Grand Master reports the Craft in a flourishing con- 
dition. He thinks there is a tendency on the part of members 
to disobey Lodge notices, and believes that every Mason is 
under the strongest obligation to obey the summons of the 
Lodge, and that a neglect or refusal to obey such summons is 
good cause for discipline, even to expulsion. Surely suspen- 
sion would be sufficient punishment for this offence, the death 
penalty should only be inflicted for the gravest offences. 

The California work was approved and adopted as the work 
of this jurisdiction. 

Charges were directed to be preferred against a Brother who 
had obtained the Degrees under an assumed name, thereby 
fraudulently preventing a full and complete inquiry into his 
former character. 

Resolutions were proposed regarding the consolidation of 
Lodges and enlarging the powers of the Grand Lodge as to 
trials, but the record does not show that they were adopted. 

Among the 723 members, they have 149 farmers, 142 
miners, 36 stock-growers, 22 blacksmiths and only one real 
estate agent. 

Bro. Charles C. Stevenson reports on correspondence, and 
notices Canada for 1887. 

M. W. Bro. John Hunter, (Boise City,) G. M. 

R. W. Bro. James H. Wickersham, (Boise City,) G. S. 



XX. GRAND LODGE OF CANAI>\. 

ILLINOIS. 

49th Communication, October 2nd, 1888. 

M. W. Bro. John C Smith, G. M. 

His address covers 38 pages. The general condition of the 
Craft is excellent. Scotland has made a Mason of a resident 
of Illinois and the Grand Master complained, with the usual 
result. The correspondence is given in full. Scotland refused 
to acknowledge that they had done any wrong, and Bro. Smith 
thinks that if the Grand Lodges on this continent were to 
make Masons of tourists from Europe, as they do of those 
from the United States, there would soon be a change of their 
laws on this subject. We doubt if it would make the slightest 
difference. 

Bro. Smith strongly upholds Quebec against England. He 

formed two new Lodges and refused some fifteen others. He 

advocates the reduction of mileage from ten to six cents. On 

their " Home " he says : — 

"There are now fourteen children in the Home, carefully fed, clothed, 
and being educated. Do you ask where the money comes from to do 
these things ? I answer, from the charitably disposed brethren, a few 
Masonic bodies, and the Knights Templar ball of last winter. I deeply 
regret to have to say that it is not to any great extent from the Lodges, 
the orphan children of whose deceased members have been the recipients 
of their generous bounty ; as I am credibly informed that there have been 
several children from Lodges the membership of which have never con- 
tributed one dollar to the institution." 

We copy two of his decisions, both right : — 

"4. "I claim that it requires seven Master Masons and a Tiler to open 
and close Lodge." 

Answer. You are wrong ; Grand Lodge has decided that seven Master 
Masons, though one of the seven be the Tiler or a brother acting as Tiler, 
are the number required to be present, and seven members of the Lodge 
are required to be present to transact the business of the Lodge. 

5. Can we receive the petition of a worthy man, who is well respected 
in our community, but who is of one-eighth African blood? 

Answer. Yes. If the applicant possesses all the qualifications required 
by the ancient landmarks and our laws. [See Sections I. and II., Art. 
XII., part second, Grand Lodge By-Laws.] Masonry knows no distinc- 
tion of race or color. It is the mental, moral and physical qualifications 
of the man that are to be considered, and not the color of his skin." 

He thinks that Grand Lecturers should be paid by those 
who employ them, and in this connection he has some very 
excellent remarks on the social features of Masonry : — 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. XXI. 

"There is no more reason why Grand Lodge should pay for ritualistic 
lectures than that it should pay for lectures on friendship, morality, or 
brotherly love. There is, I am sorry to say, a tendency on the part of the 
few to look upon the perfect Ritualist as a model Mason, no matter what 
his deficiency in all that goes to make a master workman, a good executive 
officer, or a companionable Craftsman. You can no more command the 
interest of your membership by making the ritual the all-absorbing and 
ideal thought of Masonry, than you can build up the congregation of a 
church by the pastor reciting the creed to his people on every Sabbath, 
and giving them nothing more. Masonry was founded for social and 
fraternal purposes, and when you depart from these cardinal and organic 
principles you reduce the fraternity to a level with the life and health 
associations of the present day. Better give up Masonry than do this, for 
you cannot compete with them. The strength of this fraternity is not in 
the number of its members, but in the intelligence, virtue and companion- 
ship of the Craftsmen. 

Our members were thought, in former times, to have given too much of 
their time and means to this social feature ; but they were only in accord 
with the times, and they were never accused of a failure to respond to the 
cry for relief. It now behooves us not to go to the other extreme, which 
in some communities we are certainly doing. 

In getting rid of certain customs, which in this day have become vices, 
we drove them from the Lodge to chapter, from chapter to commandery, 
and from commandery to, well ! I may say clubs ; and with them went 
the entire social and companionable features of Freemasonry. This is all 
wrong, and is working an evil. No sooner is the Brother taken through 
the various associations of Freemasonry named, than he is told that he 
must now join the "Ancient Companions,'' or some similar organization, 
to find that social companionship he has so much expected in the Lodge. 
So with what is known as the " higher grades." A Mason climbs to 
the "Thirty-third " round of the ladder, and is there met with the inform- 
ation that what he sought and for which the man ever craves, companion- 
ship, is only to be found in the " Plebeian Order of No Man's Land." 

Far be it from me to advocate a return to that social habit, now so 
much detested by all Freemasons ; and much less would I advocate a 
reckless expenditure of money to the bankruptcy of Lodges, but knowing, 
from practical experience, the benefits arising from a simple and inexpen- 
sive luncheon, I would justify any Lodge in an expenditure for the same, 
and most earnestly recommend that they participate in such more fre- 
quently than they now do, and that they take their wives and daughters 
with them on all proper occasions. One of the most elegant banquets I 
attended last winter was set by the Craftsmen of Taylorville ; but I assure 
you, brethren, that it gave me no more pleasure than the simple coffee and 
sandwich of the Brothers at Danville. 

There is a good deal that is human in the advice given by an old lady 
to a niece who was just married : " Auntie," said the bride, "if John and 
I can only live as long and as happy together as you and uncle, I will die 
content. Tell me the secret of your happiness ! Won't you ? " The old 
lady replied: "Yes, Lottie; I will. All men love good eating ; feed 
John well ! " 

His concluding remarks are also very good : — 

'* The constant application for dispensation to permit Lodges to parade 
upon other than " strictly Masonic" occasions, were so numerous, and the 
reasons so few that admitted of the request being granted, that I deter- 
mined to call a halt and remind the brethren of their duties as Freemasons. 



xxii. GRAND LODI I OF CAN U3A. 

The facts are that in a large majority of cases, the wish to parade was 
born of the desire to make a display and participate with civic and military 
organizations in attracting public attention. 

To keep up with the band wagon and divide plaudits of children with 
the drum major is not Freemasonry. Acts of pure charity, disinterested 
friendship, and other Masonic virtues are practiced in secret, and away 
from the prying eyes of the outside world. This circular also calls atten- 
tion to the fact that a dispensation is necessary to close Lodge in the 
summer months, or for any period beyond the time named in by-laws. 

No appeal for aid other than in case of a general disaster, as that of the 
destruction by cyclone of the city of Mt. Vernon, have been recommended 
by me during the past year. I have permitted the same on request of 
officers of Lodge, but only then attached certificate that Lodge was a 
legally warranted Lodge. 

The reasons assigned were often the lifting of mortgage from farm, fail- 
ure to insure property, death of a horse or cow, to erect a saw-mill or buy 
a flat-boat, a class of property which a large majority of the Craft never 
owned, that I deemed it necessary to restrict these appeals. Upon inquiry 
I found little or no contributions had been made by membership of Lodge 
asking to make appeal for aid, that I had to add to my circular as follows : 
' This statement to Grand Master must also give, as near as can be, 
amount of money contributed by the brethren and donated by Lodge.'" 

There were only two appeals, which is a good showing for 
so large a jurisdiction. We notice that they do not print the 
names of the Brethren interested in these matters. 

The following report was adopted : — 

" Your committee on Masonic correspondence to whom has been referred 
certain documents emanating from a body having its seat of government at 
Mayaguez, in the island of Porto-Rico, and styling itself the Sovereign 
Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Porto-Rico, including an 
application for recognition by, and an interchange of representatives with 
this Grand Ledge, has had the same under consideration, and fraternally 
reports : 

The body making this application was organized in September, 1885, by 
the deputies and representatives of fourteen Lodges, being all the Lodges 
existing in the Island, all previously owning allegiance to the United Grand 
Lodge of Colon and the Island of Cuba, which body, by a decree issued 
on the 5th of July, 1885, formally relinquished the territory of the Island 
to the new body. 

The Grand Lodge of Illinois has declined to recognize the parent body 
known as the United Grand Lodge of Colon and the island of Cuba, 
whereof the alleged lodges participating in the formation of this new body 
were constituents ; not because of curable irregularities in its formation, 
such as the non-participation ol a majority of the Lodges in the territory, 
or the like, but for congenital and incurable illegitimacy of the bodies 
forming it, it having been organized by so-called Lodges chartered by a 
supreme council, or by a grand orient whose charters were required to be 
vised by a supreme council before they became effective. 

In 1879 this Grand Lodge formally declared (Proc. i8yg, page^o,) as 
follows : " We utterly deny that any body save a representative Grand 
Lodge can by warrant or charter create a Lodge that has any claim what- 
ever to the name of Masonry, or that can administer its rites ; and as 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. XX111. 

emphatically deny that any body which establishes as a condition of eligi- 
bility to membership therein any distinctions save those known to " The 
Charges of a Freemason," viz : Master, Fellow and Apprentice, or which 
admits that any organization based upon, or by virtue of, distinctions other 
than these, may supervise, veto, or in any manner restrict its action, within 
the sphere circumscribed by those charges, is a Grand Lodge within the 
meaning of Masonic law." 

Standing upon this ground, which your committee believes to be not 
only unassailable but the only ground consistent with loyalty to the ancient 
landmarks whose constraint is acknowledged by an express proviso of its 
constitution, this Grand Lodge has steadfastly denied the legitimacy of 
Lodges assumed to be created by charters issued by supreme councils or 
by grand orients wherein the supreme council holds either the power of 
direction or of veto, and has repeatedly decided that the members of such 
bodies could not be permitted to visit its Lodges. 
*A11 of the bodies participating in the organization of the alleged Grand 
Lodge now seeking recognition as a governing body in Masonry being of 
this spurious character, your committee knows of no principle of law by 
which they can convert themselves into Lodges of Free and Accepted 
Masons by simply inserting the words " Free and Accepted Masons " in 
the title of the body which they unite to create. 

Your committee therefore recommends that the Grand Lodge of Illinois 
decline to enter into fraternal relations with the body styling itself the 
Sovereign Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Porto-Rico, or to 
recognize it as a legitimate governing body in Masonry." 

We copy part of the report of the committee on Jurispru- 
dence : — 

" Your Committee, however, is of the opinion that Masonic burial of a 
deceased Brother by a Lodge, under any circumstances is optional, and not 
compulsory, but notwithstanding, we have yet to learn of a single instance 
where such sad service has been refused, upon proper request ; on the con- 
trary to perform the last sad rites over the remains of a departed Brother 
has become a melancholy pleasure, so universal among the Craft as to 
assume the force of law. 

In the matter of creating the grade of honorary membership in this Grand 
Lodge, your Committee is unanimously of the opinion, that the creation of 
such grade is unwise and is therefore not concurred in by your Committee. 

In the matter of the Grand Lodge of Scotland, referred to by the Grand 
Master, and more fully set out in the correspondence accompanying, your 
Committee is of the opinion that our Grand Master has done all in his 
power to maintain the dignity and enforce the sovereignty of this Grand 
Lodge, without resorting to more extreme measures, than the circumstances 
of the case seems to warrant. Your Committee deem it best for the inter- 
est of all concerned at this time to simply re-affirm the views expressed by 
the Committee on Jurisprudence at the last annual communication and 
unanimously adopted by the Grand Lodge at that time." 

It was decided that the commissions of representatives to 
other Grand Lodges should expire at the end of five years. 

An oration was delivered on the three pillars, in which the 
following passage occurs : — 

" In the ancient mysteries of various lands three pillars occupied a con- 



XXIV. GB \ N I > LODGE OF C VNADA. 

spicuuus position. Among thu Hindu illuminants they were placed east, 
west and south, and the one in the east denoted Brahma, or wisdom ; the 
one io the west represented Vishnu, the preserver, or strength ; and the 
one in the south symbolized Siva, or beauty. These deities were con- 
sidered as a trinity, and three pillars were regarded by many mystics as 
emblematical of the Divine Triad. The prevalence of such conceptions 
may be inferred from the fact that the Persians claimed that their Mithratic 
Cave was supported by three intelligencies — Ormisda, Mithra, and Mith- 
ras ; and that the Egyptian Deity was presented under the forms of Wis- 
dom. Power, and Goodness. So general was the custom of combining 
these attributes that the Oracle of Damascus is credited with the saying : 
" Throughout the world a Triad shines forth, which resolves itself into a 
Monad." In studying this mystery, and meditating on its significance, I 
have come to the belief, that while the primary reference is to Deity, in a 
secondary sense it is to man : that the Divine trinity of Wisdom, Strength 
and Beauty is destined to resolve itself, as from eternity ran the purpose, in 
the human Monad." 

They have 68 1 Lodges, and 40,725 members. Dues paid, 
$30,1 1 1.80. Their gain of membership was 516. 

Bro. Joseph Robbins has a very extensive and elaborate 
report on correspondence, covering 235 pages. In his in- 
troductory remarks, we find the following : — 

" But by far the most important factors in the year's events and discuss- 
ions, are those which involve the relations of Masonry with associations of 
Masons other than Lodges, calling themselves " Masonic bodies." This 
crops out chiefly in two directions : in new forms of the Massachusetts 
departure, as in Ohio, where instead of amending the constitution of the 
Grand Lodge in order to declare a lot of side degrees an integral part cf 
Masonry, as was done in Massachusetts, the same end is sought to be 
reached by far-fetched and sophistical interpretations of existing regula- 
tions ; and second, in the attempt to secure recognition for so-called Grand 
Lodges in Mexico, Central and South America, and the West Indies, and 
through that recognition get the assent of the legitimate Grand Lodges of 
the world to the doctrine that Supreme Councils and Grand Orients can 
create just and lawfully constituted Lodges of Symbolic Masonry. We 
say " Symbolic Masonry" because it is a term in common use to designate 
the three degrees conferred in what are commonly called " Blue Lodges," 
the Masonry of the Lodge ; but we do not mean that there is or can be 
any other Masonry — whatever we may say from habit or for convenience. 

Some of these so-called Grand Lodges made up of "Lodges" without 
legitimate parentage and composed of alleged Masons whom the Grand 
Lodge of Illinois has again and again decided cannot visit her Lodges, 
have secured recognition by some Grand Lodges in the United States, and 
by some others recognition once accorded has been withdrawn. Similar 
European bodies were formerly in correspondence with many of our Grand 
Lodges, but that was before their true nature and composition was under- 
stood. The thorough examination which their claims to be called Masonic 
bodies has undergone in recent years, has placed within reach of all Grand 
Lodges the information necessary to an intelligent judgment, and none 
need recognize them now without being conscious that they are countenan- 
cing '' dissenters from the original plan of Masonry." 

They are made up of so-called Lodges created by Supreme Councils and 
Grand Orients of the mis-called Scottish Rite, and the fact that Albert 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. XXV. 

Pike, the Grand Commander of the Supreme Council of the Southern 
Jurisdiction, is advising the Supreme Councils of Mexico and the South 
American continent to relinquish jurisdiction over the blue degrees and 
encourage the formation of independent " Symbolic Grand Lodges " should 
throw no loyal Mason off his guard. In the advice to relinquish jurisdic- 
tion lies the claim that they possess it, no matter how much smooth talk may 
partly cover the claim. This claim should not be admitted for one instant 
by any loyal Mason, and we warn the Ancient Craft everywhere to beware 
lest under some specious plea for harmony and good neighborhood, the 
cuckoo's egg gets deposited in their nest to hatch out mischief in the future. 
It may suit the present purpose of others of these Supreme Councils to 
raise the " stop thief" cry that the particular faction of the rite composing 
the " Cerneau bodies " are claiming the right to confer the three degrees 
of Freemasonry, but it is difficult to see why they should trouble them- 
selves in that behalf. The Grand Lodge is the only governing body having 
any interest in the matter, and it is fully competent to deal with it. For 
ourselves we have no dispositions to condemn them on this point unheard, 
and we await the result of inquiries addressed to those high in authority in 
the Cerneau faction before expressing an opinion as to the correctness of 
the charge. We have been disappointed in not receiving the information 
sought before being compelled to close our report." 

In his notice of Alabama, he corrects Bro. Pillans as to our 
position : — 

" Past Grand Master Pillans, chairman of the Committee on foreign cor- 
respondence, submitted a special report on the so-called Grand Lodge of 
Ontario, into which, through a superficial examination of the subject, he 
has managed to get a great deal of misinformation. 

So far from the gist of the quarrel being about the name, as it appears 
to Bro. Pillans, the gist of it lies primarily in the question whether the 
formation of a Grand Lodge in the Province of Quebec (formerly Lower 
Canada), left the Province of Ontario (formerly Upper Canada) Masoni- 
cally unoccupied or open territory. Passing over for the moment the fact 
that the whole Masonic world agreed in considering that province fully 
occupied by the Grand Lodge of Canada, which had heretofore occupied 
both provinces, and supposing for the time being that it was unoccupied, 
then there was one way in which a Grand Lodge could be lawfully estab- 
lished there, viz : by the concurrent action of not less than three Lodges, 
these three constituting a majority of the Lodges already existing in such 
territory, or subsequently planted there by lawful authority. 

A Grand Lodge thus formed would have jurisdiction in the province 
whether it called itself the Grand Lodge of Ontario, the Grand Lodge of 
the Three Globes, or the Grand Lodge of the Four Jack Planes. So we 
see that the gist of the quarrel could not be about the name, as is falsely 
claimed by the so-called Grand Lodge of Ontario. 

Further, we are quite sure that Bro. Pillans, will cease to hope that a 
union of the two bodies may be brought about when his attention is called 
to the manner in which the so-called Grand Lodge of Ontario was formed, 
and, for a stronger reason, when his memory is refreshed as to the princi- 
ples on which that organization is based. 

We have not the proceedings of the organization of that body before us. 
and must therefore state the facts from memory, but we think we state 
them correctly when we say that it was formed without any constituency, 
■hat is, by individuals not authorized to represent the Lodges to which they 
belonged, if indeed they belonged to any, and it was only after they had 



\w i. GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

built their steeple that they began to build the structure to put under it. 
Surely not all the names in the calendar could legitimatize such a body a> 
that. 

But — and here we come to matters which we know we state correctly — 
the organization set on foot by these parties was not a Masonic body at all, 
but a mutual benefit and insurance society, whose organic law provides 
that each member of the subordinate bodies which, in imitation of Masonry, 
are styled Lodges, shall receive three dollars per week in cise he is sick, 
and his family — if he have one — a lump sum of fifty dollars in case of his 
death. Such a provision takes the concern at once out of the category of 
Masonic bodies, and while it may possibly render it eligible for union with 
the Druids, or United Workmen, it makes a union of it with the Grand 
Lodge of Canada an impossibility." 

Bro. Robbins is quite correct. This clandestine organiza- 
tion was incorporated as a Grand Lodge before it had any 
subordinates, and the degrees were peddled about the country 
by one of our expelled members for any sum he could obtain, 
however trifling. We afterwards, by arrangement, took in all 
their good members and they surrendered their act of incor- 
poration and delivered up to us their seal and all their docu- 
ments and disbanded their organization, but this expelled 
member, whom we refused to take back, still continued his 
nefarious work. Latterly, however, we have heard very little of 
him, and his so-called Lodges may be considered as nearly all 
defunct. 

Bro. Robbins is strong in his opposition to the absurd doc- 
trine of perpetual jurisdiction and we do not see how his 
arguments can be successfully disputed : — 

" We agree with the committee that the regulation requiring one year's 
residence is subject to the dispensing power of the Grand Master, but we 
confess to some surprise that any Grand Lodge should think it necessary 
in the case of an original petitioner to ask leave to receive his petition 
from the Masonic authorities of the Jurisdiction from which he emigrated. 
The potential Jurisdiction which a Lodge has over a profane residing with- 
in its territorial limits is only the exclusive right to receive his petition if 
he should ever seek to become a Mason while he lives there ; and this 
ceases as absolutely the next minute after he has made a bona fide removal 
from its territory as if he had left it half a century before. The mere fact 
of his having lived within its bailiwick never gave the Lodge a shadow of 
a right to say what he should do, or what any Lodge should do with him, 
after he has gone elsewhere." 

Canada for 1887 received due attention. He thinks that it 
is an anomaly that the Grand Master should be a member of 
the Board of General Purposes over which he does not preside. 
The explanation is to be found in the fact that the Board has 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENXE. XXVU. 

sole control of the funds of the Grand Lodge and also that the 
Board have to sit in judgment upon the acts of the Grand 
Master. They have no power to over-rule him, but it is on 
the reports of the Board that all matters of importance come 
before the Grand Lodge. Some years ago we decided that an 
appeal would lie from the act of the Grand Master to the 
Grand Lodge. 

As to the powers of District Deputies, our rules as to trials 
provide that an appeal may be had to them for any irregularity 
in the trial, or any infringement of the rights of the accused, 
but not on questions of fact. This will dispose of the objection 
of Bro. Robbins that the justice of the sentence should be left 
to the Grand Lodge alone. 

He discusses with Bro. Singleton the recognition of Grand 
Lodges in foreign countries : — 

"The genesis of the whole brood of parasitic bodies is coming to be 
generally understood, so that Masons of even limited reading can see the 
utter absurdity of the claim of any one of them to administer, or to exer- 
cise the remotest authority in Masonry itself ; and the downright disloyalty 
of recognizing any one of them, by any Mason, or body of Masons legiti- 
mately descended from the Masons who formed the first Grand Lodge and 
solemnly covenanted with themselves and with each other to accept the 
Charges of a Freemason as embodying the fundamental laws of the Frater- 
nity, as duly constituted Masonic bodies." 

He corrects Bro. Dawkins, of Florida, in his idea of unoccu- 
pied Territory, that it is not necessarily Territory in which there 
are no Lodges, but Territory in which there is no Grand 
Lodge. On Asylum building without money in hand, he 
says : — 

"We had supposed that after the experience of the Grand Lodge of 
Kentucky, no Jurisdiction as well informed of what is going on elsewhere 
as is Iowa, would embark in asylum building on a plan which involved 
taxation by the Grand Lodge — a plan which takes no account of the 
fundamental idea of Masonic charity, that is, the relative ability of indi- 
viduals to pay, and which in 1879 Grand Master Pettit confessed had 
been " the rock that came well nigh dividing, if not stranding it [the Craft 
of Kentucky] forever." 

On the Scottish Rite quarrels, he says : — 

" Bro. Parvin's report gives abundant evidence that " Cerneauism " is 
his red rag. For the information of most of our home readers perhaps we 
ought to explain that the term Cerneau is adjectively applied to certain 
bodies of the so-called Scottish Rite who find their warrant for existence 
in what in the vernacular of that multitudinous agglomeration is called a 
" patent," from one Joseph Cerneau, by certain other bodies of the same 



XXV1H. GRA \i i i CAN \I>A. 

species who hold a " patent " from some other fellow, by virtue of which 
they claim that the sole right to confer these side degrees, in certain states, 
belongs to a spectacular combination, known as the Supreme Council of 
the Sovereign Grand Inspectors General of the Holy Empire of the North- 
ern Jurisdiction of the United States of America. For legitimate Masonry 
the question which of these two is the real heir, or whether neither of them 
is — there being in Boston alone three or four other more or less obscure 
holders of patents, e:ich claiming to be the original Tichborne — for legiti- 
mate Masonry this question would have no more essential interest than the 
disputed authorship of " The Beautiful Snow," were it not that the warring 
factions have transferred the seat of war from their pinchbeck empire to 
the republic of the true Fraternity. The Grand Lodges in several juris- 
dictions have been dragged into the quarrel, through the influence of 
trusted and honored members, whose brethren could never believe them 
capable of forgetting their primary duty to genuine Masonry, with its 
common level of equal rights and equal eligibilities, in a mad scramble for 
the baubles and distinctions of a seven-by-nine by-play of imperialism. 

Through such influences, wielded at the behest of the Supreme Council 
of the Northern Jurisdiction, the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts was in- 
duced to abdicate its position as the conservator of Masonry, and the only 
power which could create regular and duly constituted Masonic bodies, and 
voluntarily parcel out to a half dozen other bodies the heritage whose pre- 
servation intact was the sole warrant of its being." 

" We don't care how much he and others pitch into Cerneauism, or how 
much the Cerneauites pitch into them, except that as those on both sides 
happen also to be Masons, and equally our brethren, we dislike to see them 
manifest an unseemly heat. It would be as unreasonable on our part to 
expect them to agree as to the government of their " empire," as to be of 
one mind in civil politics, but we have a right to insist that they shall not 
invoke the aid of Masonry to settle their differences in either." 

We had marked a large number of passages for quotation, 
but must be content with the following : — 

" Bro. Fellows' idea of the signification of the term " Grand Orient " is 
quite different from ours. We understand it to include the administrative 
bureaus of the various blocks of degrees into which the thirty-three or more 
are broken up, in which the so-called " Grand Lodge " is the bureau 
which nominally administers the affairs of the first three ; but that its acts 
are subject to the supervision and veto of the Supreme Council which sits 
supreme over all, and that its charters are not valid until vised by that 
oligarchical body or its autocratic head. If this view of their method of 
constitution is correct, Grand Orients are not the same as Grand Lodges, 
and their power or legality as bodies having any authority in Masonry can- 
not be maintained. Nor does the fact that one of the constituent parts of 
the Grand Orient is called a Grand Lodge — if all those constituents are 
equally subordinate to the Supreme Council — make those who have receiv- 
ed the degrees of Entered Apprentice, Fellow Craft, and Master Mason, 
under the authority of these putative Grand Lodges, any less clandestine- 
made Masons than those who have received them direct from Supreme 
Councils or Inspectors General." 

" The Grand Lodge of Illinois has not legislated on the question of 
saloon-keeping, and yet it has found no difficulty in sustaining its Lodges 
in their efforts to inflict discipline for selling liquor in violation of law. 
And so it will be found everywhere as a rule. Occasionally a Masonic 
Lodge gets on the down grade through some unfortunate chain of circum- 
stances nntil it becomes a stench that' has to be abated. But as a rule a 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. XXIX. 

Masonic Lodge, so far from being a demoralizing and degrading influence 
in a community, is a conservator of public order, decency and morality, 
and does not need the prodding of continual legislation by the Grand 
Lodge to keep it fully abreast of the best sentiment of society around it. 
Consider the fact that in its earlier history, when everybody drank in- 
toxicating drinks, the almost universal meeting place of the Lodge was in 
the tavern, and that yet, in a comparatively new State like Illinois, peo- 
pled largely by immigrants from localities were drinking was the rule 
rather than the exception, fourteen years ago the Grand Lodge could em- 
body in its code a provision absolutely excluding any kind of intoxicating 
drink from all Masonic premises without a ripple of opposition, and it will 
be seen beyond all cavil that Masonry is no dead weight upon the advanc- 
ing sentiment of the age towards cleaner, soberer, and purer lives." 

" To our lay mind all pleas, however skilful and cogent as to the legal 
effect of a favorable ballot, must vanish into thin air when a Master of a 
Lodge is asked to admit one whom he has not fotind to be as lawfully enti- 
tled to the secrets of Masonry as he is himself. Going behind the action 
of the Lodge would be a bagatelle compared to going behind the immem- 
orial and irrevocable laws of Masonry. 1 ' 

M. W. Bro. John C. Smith, (Chicago,) G. M. 
R. W. Bro. Loyal L. Munn, (Freeport,) G. S. 

INDIANA. 

67th Communication, Indianapolis, May 22nd, 1888. 

M. W. Bro. Mortimer Nye, G. M. 

They have had an era of prosperity, the increase in member- 
ship during the year being 424. He formed three new Lodges, 
and thinks that they have enough now. On the powers of the 
Grand Master, he says : — 

" The idea seems to prevail in the minds of many members of the fra- 
ternity that the Grand Master has the power at will to set aside any 
provision of the Constitution or standing rule or regulation of the Grand 
Lodge — in fact, that the Grand Master is the Grand Lodge to all intents 
and purposes, and often the most persistent efforts are employed to induce 
the Grand Master to do so. To all applications of this character, I have 
earnestly endeavored to impress upon the minds of Masons the fact that 
the Grand Master possesses no power of such a character ; that he is not 
the Grand Lodge ; that it is as much his duty to obey the law as the most 
obscure member of a Subordinate Lodge, and, in fact, more so, because it 
is his duty to enforce obedience to the laws of the Grand Lodge, and it 
would be in exceeding bad taste for him to be guilty of the violation of law 
or the usurpation of power not specially conferred upon him. I have there- 
fore been compelled very many times to refuse Lodges dispensations to 
remove from one town to another, to march on Decoration Day, make 
Masons without legs and arms, meet in halls occupied by other societies, 
and, in fact, to violate nearly every rule for the government of Subordinate 
Lodges. Most applications for special dispensations have been refused, 
and very few indeed have been granted. I shall always be ready to advo- 
cate the proposition that the Grand Master is not the Grand Lodge. " 

Their Grand Lodge property is in good repair. Their 



XXX. GRAND LODGE OF CANAlu. 

Temple is heated with natural gas at an expense of $320 per 
year, which is the cheapest fuel they have had. 

A lengthy report on their ritualistic work was presented and 
the conclusion is arrived at that Indiana is entitled to be placed 
in the front rank for genuine, antique, Webb-Preston work. 

The Grand Lodge condemned the three-year term for Grand 
Representatives, seeing no necessity for putting their officers to 
the trouble of making out fifty commissions every three years. 

Begging circulars were prohibited. 

The United Grand Lodge of Colon and the Island of Cuba 
was recognized. 

The report on correspondence is by Bro. Simeon S. Johnson 
and notices Canada for 1886 and 1887. He doubts the pro- 
priety of wearing Masonic clothing at a ball, thinks that a 
Mason's daughter or sister is entitled to Masonic assistance^ 
although married to a profane, that a certificate is no safeguard 
against an impostor, and that the tyler, who does not hear the 
evidence in a trial, should not be allowed to vote on the 
verdict. With all of which, we agree. 

M. W. Bro. Isaac P. Leyden, (New Albany,) G. M. 

R. W. Bro. William H. Smythe, (Indianapolis,) G. S. 

INDIAN TERRITORY. 

14th Communication, Fort Gibson, November 6th, 1888. 

M. W. Bro. Florian H. Nash, G. M. 

Their membership is increasing, and three new Lodges were 

formed. 

In the report of the Grand Lecturer, we find the following : — 

"A few of our Lodges had the work pretty well, while others had the 
work of Texas, Missouri, or some other Jurisdiction. Some had it wonder- 
fully mixed, and I am sorry to say, a few had no work at all ; do not see 
how they conferred the degrees, even "in a loose, slip-shod manner." 

My presence may have intimidated so that they can do better than they 
exemplified before me. 

All (with few exceptions) were apt and anxious, and before I left, knew 
their work well, or they followed me to the next neighbor, which was often 
done. I never knew hungrier students ; they interrogated freely in the 
hall, on the road-side, at their home or elsewhere, put in all the day, 
(with " dinner on the ground,") and also the night, if necessary." 

There are several Lodges educating or supporting Masons 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENXE. XXXI. 

Orphans and a special committee was appointed to devise a 
plan for the systematic education of Masonic Orphans and to 
raise funds to secure a Masonic Orphanage. 

There are 26 Lodges and 832 Members. 

The report on correspondence is by Bros. Murrow, Hill and 

Ross. Canada for 1888 is noticed. Bro. Hill thinks that the 

Grand Lodges should not interfere in Scottish Rite Quarrels. 

In his notice of Michigan. Bro. Ross says : — 

" We do not believe in mixing things, still we allow all who are inclin- 
ed, to weep over the remains of our departed Brother. Even if his bereft 
family chooses friends outside of the Order to dig the grave, put up a 
monument or become pall-bearers we offer no protest. We have no sym- 
pathy for, or interest in. the sword and feather Knights, Nobles, etc. We 
left our feathers with our moccasins and paint, have not needed the sword 
e threw aside the bow and arrow, and believe that the sweetest 
water is at the mouth of the fountain, or the germ of Masonry is found in 
the Blue Lodge." 

M. W. Bro. John Rennie. (Lehigh,) G. M. 

R. W. Bro. Joseph S. Murrow, (Atoka,.; G. S. 

IOWA. 
jth Communication. Cedar Rapids, June 5th, 1888. 

M. W. Bro. Edwin C Blackmar, G. M. 

He states that the most important business is the considera- 
tion of the new Constitution and Code. He believes that the 
Grand Master has only such powers as are given him by the 
Constitution, and that he has no power to dispense with any 
provision of that Constitution. 

He condemns begging circulars and lottery schemes. He 
formed seven new Lodges. On Lodge attendance, he says : — 

" Much has been said and written upon the question of " how shall we 
make our Lodge meetings attractive " and thus secure better attendance ? 
I am almost daily in receipt of letters from Lodge Officers all over the 
state complaining of the non-attendance of the members at Lodge meetings, 
and asking what can be done to awaken a greater interest. 

To such inquiries I can only reply that the meetings should be made 
attractive and interesting by the adoption of any method that may seem to 
promise sn accomplishment of the desired result. 

Let every meeting be made a lave feast ! A hearty ha?id-shake all around, 
with words of cordial greeting to each ; and the manifestation of a kindly 
interest in the welfare of all will greatly strengthen and cement the ties of 
brotherly love which should exist between all the members of the Lodge. 

During the meeting, when time will permit, vary the routine of Lodge 
business by the introduction of short addresses and essays on subjects of 
Masonic interest. A feast to all who love and would live Masonry, and 



XXX11. (IRANI) I,OIk;k OF CANADA. 

who would extend their knowledge of its teachings and application, will 
he found in reading our annual Report on Fraternal Correspondence, a 
portion of which should be read !>y some competent Brother at each meet- 
ing of the I i 

Let each member feel that he is a special committee of one to do some- 
thing to make some other Brother happy, and to feel that his interest and 
happine is is the concern of all ; and above all let it be manifested by and 
between all the members that full and implicit reliance may be placed up- 
on each others integrity, not only in connection with Lodge affairs, bat 
also in the daily routine of business transactions, so that every Mason's 
word may become in reality as good as his bond, which is the prime essence 
of the teachings of our institution, and one of the principal points of our 
solemn obligation. 

Finally, organize and maintain a regular series of Lodge sociables, to be 
held at stated intervals, the ladies, of course, to take part, varying the en- 
tertainment at each so as to make it pleasant to all who participate. At 
such sociables make it the special duty of the brethren to see that all are 
made welcome ; that those who may be strangers be introduced, and in 
every manner possible endeavor to make them feel " at home." 

The Grand Secretary has the following notice of Bro. 
Seymour : — 

"James Seymour, P. G. M. (1870), Canada, was one of the most distin- 
guished Masons of that province. He became well known to many of the 
leading Masons of the states by his numerous visits to the national bodies 
meeting at Buffalo, Cleveland, Detroit, Chicago, and elsewhere, at which 
he was always a welcome visitor. His responses to the welcomes he ever 
received were models of eloquence. He was a native of Limerick, Ireland, 
and removed to Canada in 1828, where he spent his boyhood. Learning 
the printing business, he later became publisher and editor, and continued 
therein till his appointment as Collector of Internal Revenue, which office 
he held till his death. In early life he became a Mason, and through all 
these years proved his devotion to the cause he espoused. In 1870 he was 
elected Most Worshipful Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Canada, 
which position he filled with credit to himself and honor to the brothers. 

Dying at St. Catharines, his home, January 9th last, he left an honored 
name and record, and his memory is held dear by all his brethren and very 
many, who, like ourself on this side the river, knew him well, and appre- 
ciated the man and his services." 

The new Constitution and Code of Masonic Law were 
adopted. 

The Grand Secretary was presented with a certificate of 
deposit for $1,530, contributed by his friends as a testimonial 
of regard. 

The Grand Lodge of Victoria was recognized. 

The Committee on Jurisprudence asked for a year's time to 
consider whether a Lodge, on the occasion of a Masonic 
Funeral, has power to grant the request of the family to have 
pall-bearers who are not Masons. We should say, certainly not, 
otherwise it would not be a Masonic Funeral. 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. XXX111. 

The report on correspondence is by the Grand Secretary, 
who has lost none of his old-time fire and energy. Canada for 
1887 receives a good notice. He is much pleased with our 
reports on grievances and appeals, "in the conciseness of their 
statements, their power of condensation and the plainness of 
their conclusions." On our methods, he says : — 

" The finances of this Grand Lodge are in a most healthy condition, 
there being a balance in the treasury of $68,221.77, which is wei l presented, 
as the Grand Treasurer's report alone covers thirty-three pages fifteen times 
as long as any one we have read during the year; and still the Grand Lodge 
has not money enough to pay for the writing and printing of a report on 
correspondence, the worst feature in the history of the body. There are a 
great many good things in this volume shown in the table of recapitulation, 
the best by far, and the most commendable, being the fact that the Grand 
Lodge pays no " mileage nor per diem," and 33T yet has a larger per cent, 
of its Lodges annually represented than can be shown by the Grand Lodges 
on this side of the great lakes and the St. Lawrence, notwithstanding that 
they feed their members on sugar plums to induce their attendance. More- 
over the business of the Grand Lodge of Canada is better and more safely 
conducted through the able administration of its Grand Master and its 
Committee on General Purposes than any of our American Grand Lodges. 
Reader, do you ask the secret of this ? Our answer is the members have a 
mind to do it, and work for the love of it and for the good of Masonry, 
without the hope of fee or reward. When men so work it cannot be other- 
wise than that they work well and to some purpose. The introduction of 
the system of mileage in our Grand Lodges has introduced into our annual 
sessions an element of membership whose love of Masonry is measured by 
the standard of the amount of mileage they receive." 

The Grand Lodge of Iowa expressly forbids its subordinates 
to become incorporated and has let its own act of incorpora- 
tion lapse. 

M. W. Bro. Edwin C. Blackmar, (Burlington,) G. M. 

R. W. Bro. T. S. Parvin, (Cedar Rapids,) G. S. 

IRELAND. 

Through the kindness of R. W. Bro. James H. Neilson, of 
Dublin, we have some information about the Grand Lodge of 
Ireland. This Grand Lodge does not publish any of its pro- 
ceedings. 

Quarterly meetings are held on the first Thursday in the 
months of March, June, October and December. The Board 
of General Purposes meets on the Monday preceding the first 
Thursday in each month. The Committee of Charity and 
Inspection meets on the second and fourth Wednesday in each 
month. The Grand Lodge of Instruction meets every second 



X.wiv. GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

month. All these meetings are held at Freemasons' Hall, 
Dublin. 

All Master Masons, properly vouched for, may attend the 
Grand Lodge of Instruction. All candidates for admission to 
any of the Dublin Lodges, or to any Country Lodge, if resident 
in Dublin, must be approved of by the Committee of Charity 
and Inspection. This Committee consists of the Grand 
Officers and the Master for the time being of each Lodge in the 
Dublin District. There are 37 Lodges in Dublin. At the 
head of the list is " the Grand Master's Lodge," without any 
number. Lodge No. 1 is at Cork. 

There are 18 Provincial Grand Lodges, 13 in Ireland and 
the others in Victoria, New Zealand, Queensland, Ceylon and 
Tasmania. The Lodges in the Dublin District are not includ- 
ed in any Masonic Province, but are under the immediate 
superintendence of the Grand Lodge. There are 15 Lodges 
in Victoria, 15 in New Zealand, 14 in Queensland, 4 in Ceylon 
and 9 in Tasmania. There are also 7 Lodges in Military 
Corps not stationary. 

They have a Masonic Female Orphan School, with 7 2 pupils, 
and a Masonic Orphan Boys' School, with 52 pupils, both 
supported solely by voluntary subscriptions. The former was 
established in 1792 and the latter in 1867. 

The Duke of Abercorn is Grand Master, and the Earl of 
Bandon is Grand Secretary. All communications should be 
addressed to Archibald St. George, Deputy Grand Secretary, 
Freemasons' Hall, Molesworth Street, Dublin. 

Nine Warrants were issued in 1888, five in Ireland, and the 
others in Mauritius, Queensland, Tasmania and New Zealand. 

KENTUCKY. 

89th Communication, Louisville, October 16th, 1888. 

M. W. Bro. J. Soule Smith, G. M. 

He considers that the " Cerneau " bodies are irregular, 
illegal and unmasonic, and should not be countenanced in any 
manner. He declared that a resolution passed by the Grand 
Lodge in 1886, to the effect that selling liquor is a Masonic 
offence, was unconstitutional, because it had not been passed 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. XXXV. 

with the formalities required for an amendment to the Con- 
stitution. He decided that the Past Masters' Degree was a 
necessary part of the installation ceremony, as a part of the un- 
written Law of Masonry and that it could not be abolished by 
a resolution of the Grand Lodge. He would not give any de- 
cision officially which was to be kept secret from the Lodge or 
suppressed from his report to Grand Lodge. He reports the 
order in a flourishing condition and giving evidence of renewed 
life and vigor. He formed three new Lodges. On their 
Masonic Widows' and Orphans' Home, he says : — 

" This great and noble charity is still flourishing, as it ought to be. It is 
the crown of Kentucky Masonry, the finishing touch to our edifice of 
brotherly love, relief and truth Let me urge on every one of you to go 
and inspect it- No Mason in this Jurisdiction has ever truly enjoyed his 
Masonry, or felt the real significance of its teaching, until he has gone to 
this institution, and felt the tears well into his eyes when he looked into 
the bright faces of these children, who would be left desolate but for His 
love and the all embracing arm of Masonic charity. They have not the 
furtive glances of the outcast, nor the shuffling uneasiness of the tramp. 
They look straight into the Mason's eyes without fear of harm, because 
they know he has become a father to the fatherless. They nestle their 
little cheeks against his heart because they know he loves them. Go and 
see them at their home, my brothers, and you will be the better for it. 
They will appear before you this afternoon, and not one of you should be 
out of his place. In their innocence you may renew your youth, and you 
may gladden your hearts in contemplation of their beauty and their 
happiness." 

On the importance of having the full names of members 
given in the returns from the Lodges, the Grand Secretary has 
the following remarks in his report : — 

" I. Why are full given names required when they are not printed in 
the proceedings ? 

Answer. Because unless the full names are given it is often impossible 
to identify the particular brother as the one reported last year, for ex- 
ample : A brother is familiarly known as "Tony" because of some 
peculiarity or good-humored story, and the Secretary gives that name. 
Next year the Secretary finds that the true name is "James " and so re- 
ports it. As " Tony" has not died, demitted, been suspended or expelled, 
it must be assumed that he is still a member and his name is put on the 
list, when the return is examined, and a correspondence and dissatisfaction 
results. To take an actual case : Brother James Zenophon Napoleon 
Bonaparte Howard is sometimes reported as Zenophon Howard, and 
sometimes by other names or part of his initials. If the given names were 
reported, even if one was left out, we might be able to identify the 
brother, but if initials only are used we find this, by experience, to be out 
of the question. 

Two cases have occurred in whirh, if the full names had been reported 
so that complete identification of the brethren could have been established, 
it would have resulted, as I was informed, in considerable financial benefit 
to their families. 



w\\ I. GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

As all know, there are many " Masonic Tramps " who travel over the 
country under assumed names. These are often obtained from Grand 
Lodge Proceedings or visits to Lodges and many of the members' names 
are made familiar to the tramps' catalogue of information. If the full 
names are reported and known to the Lodge Secretary, the tramp may be 
called upon for his full name, which is not likely to correspond with the 
facts. That he may not be fully informed the initials only are published 
in the Proceedings, but the information is on file in the Grand Secretary's 
office, as it must also be in the archives of the Lodge." 

The Committee on Jurisprudence indorsed all the decisions 
of the Grand Master. The following are extracts from their 
report : — 

" There is no Masonic Grand Body in the world which has announced 
more clearly or held more tenaciously the American doctrine of exclusive 
territorial jurisdiction, the Monroe doctrine of Masonry, than the Grand 
Lodge of Kentucky. " It is a doctrine," this Grand Lodge has uttered 
to the world, " rendered necessary by the progress of Masonry, to prevent 
difficulties, heart-burnings, strife and confusion. Its assertion is sanction- 
ed by the very necessities that have arisen for its promulgation in the well- 
being and orderly government of the Craft in each Jurisdiction, and to 
prevent confusion among the workmen." 

The territory of Kentucky, therefore, having been peaceably occupied 
for more than thirty years by the Grand Consistory of Kentucky, there is 
no room for the competing Cerneau body, and we respectfully submit the 
following resolutions : 

Resolved, That the action of the Grand Master, in the matter of Cerneau 
Masonry, be and the same is hereby approved. [Adopted.] 

Resolved, That this Grand Lodge affirms its declaration of the year 
1869, regarding the legitimacy of the Supreme Councils of the Northern 
and Southern Jurisdictions of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite. 
[Adopted.] 

Resolved, That any bodies invading the territory of the Supreme 
Councils recognized by this Grand Lodge are clandestine and fraudulent. 
[Adopted.] " 

The Committee on necrology report on the death of their 
late distinguished brother, Rob Morris : — 

" Rob Morris, Past Grand Master and Poet Laureate of Freemasonry, 
is dead ! This announcement, on July 31st, 1888, flashed over the wires, 
carrying sadness, pain, and mourning, not only throughout the borders of 
our own dear land, but to the remotest recesses of the earth. Past Grand 
Master Morris was undoubtedly the most universally known Mason in his 
day. As a Masonic traveller and lecturer he made the acquaintance and 
gained a warm place in the hearts both of peasant and crowned head in 
every land. 

Born August 31, 1818, made a Mason in 1846, he attained to the highest 
rank in the York, Scottish, and Memphis Rites of Masonry, and on Decem- 
ber 17, 1884, he was crowned " Poet Laureate of Freemasonry " by a large 
concourse of the dignitaries of Masonry from all over our own country and 
representatives from some foreign shores. This ceremony was performed 
in the city of New York. 

Bro. Morris wrote a large number of valuable works on Masonry. He 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. XXXV11. 

edited the " Kentucky Freemanson " in 1853, the " American Freemason," 
1853-58, " The Voice of Masonry," 1859-67, " Light in Masonry," 1873, 
besides contributing to the columns of almost every Masonic paper that 
has been published for the past twenty-five years. 

He drafted the Constitution of the Grand Encampment, 1856, and that 
of the Grand Lodge of Kentucky, i860. He was chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Foreign Correspondence for many years. Having passed through 
the Chairs of Lodge, Chapter, Council, Commandery, Grand Consistory, 
and Grand Lodge, and having spent the strength, thought, and wisdom of 
his early manhood in a close study of the rituals, codes, and forms of our 
art, he very justly deserved the title of the brightest Mason of his day. 

He was generous to a fault, kind, tender of heart, loving in disposition, 
and was happiest when sharing what the Lord had bestowed upon him 
with his less fortunate fellow man. 

We know of no better conclusion to this report than the words of Bro. 
Morris in the following beautiful poem, written just before his death, with 
the request that it be not made public until after his demise : 

Brothers, in June or in December, 

Honoring the memory of the dear St. John, 
Then let some kind participant remember 

The name of him who wrote this, but is gotie ; 
Let some kind brother rise, while all are silent, 

And with deep pathos and fond friendship say : 
He was a Mason, gentle, true, not violent, 

And loved old things that do not pass away. 

He loved his friends ; in them his heart found anchor, 

Bound in affection as with hooks of steel ; 
As for his foes, he gave few signs of rancor. 

But bore their slanders patiently and well. 
He loved to make in simple verses that rhyming 

Where ancient signs and emblems smoothly lie ; 
Where deeds of brother-love and truth are chiming, 

And Masonry is wed to poetry. 

He loved the word of God ; its hopes eternal 

Grew sweeter as the end of life drew nigh ; 
A sinful man, but saved by grace supernal, 

Trusting in Christ, he dreaded not to die. 
At times a cloud the promises disguising, 

And deep humility obscured the scene, 
But the bright Son of Righteousness uprising 

Dispelled the gloom and warmed his soul again. 

He gave the widows and the orphans duly 

A portion of his hard-earned scanty store, 
And though the amount might seem but trifling truly, 

He gave so cheerfully it seemed the more. 
His heart was in his work, to Build the Teinple, 

In fervency, he toiled through many years, 
To " build the temple" spiritual and mental, 

He triumphs now — is freed from toils and tears. 

He's gone : the problem that so long he studied, 
That mystery of " the world to come " profound, 

Is solved ; his tree of life, which only budded, 
Bears now full harvest in Celestial Ground. 



vwvin. GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

In the Great Presence, with the wearied resting, 

He has his wages and is well content. 
Brothers, in silence stand : your love attesting — 

This is the word your dying Brother sent ! ' 

The Committee on Library were given power to act with 
reference to the purchase of the Library of the late Bro. Bob 
Morris as soon as the Catalogue of the same should be 
completed. 

The United Grand Lodge of New South Wales was 
recognized. 

The Prize Jewel, offered by the Grand Secretary for the best 
Lodge returns, was won by Bro. J. C. Morton, Secretary of 
Russellville Lodge, No. 17. The Committee took into con- 
sideration neatness and accuracy of compilation as well as 
beauty of penmanship. 

The report on Correspondence is by Bros. Bassett, Staton 
and Grant. On " Mixed Funerals, " Bro. Grant says : — 

" Suppose a Brother Mason was a member of the Odd Fellows and 
dies, could not the Masons "in regalia" attend the funeral because the 
Odd Fellows also attended in regalia ? Isn't that putting it pretty strong ? 
I am wholly unable to see a good reason for such an edict. There is a 
recognized law of etiquette that gives age precedence, and Masonry being 
the oldest of all Benevolent Societies might and does claim the post of 
honor in processions, and I have never seen or heard of its rights in this 
respect called in question, but why it should take the extreme view cited 
for fear of dissensions as to precedence I do not know." 

" The Jurisprudence Committee tackled the question whether a Lodge 
could select non- Masons as pall-bearers — at the request of the family of the 
deceased — and then asked further time to consider the momentous 
question. 

We get impatient at the toploftical nonsense of Masonic intolerance, in 
its refusal to turn out to bury a brother unless the Lodge is High Tycoon. 
Other organizations are gifted with quite as much intelligence, and while 
Masonry, because of its antiquity, is entitled to respect, the post of honor, 
and all that, a little less baseless sentiment and more toleration, which we 
boast so much of, might do well on a pinch." 

A new question is raised as to the legality of holding a Grand 
Lodge meeting without a constitutional quorum, on such occa- 
sions as laying a corner-stone, etc. The arguments may be of 
some force in jurisdictions where the Constitution provides for 
a quorum, but in ours there is no such provision. 

Canada, for 1887, receives a good notice. On our investi- 
gation of a charge that the ballot was falsely declared, Bro. 
Grant says : — 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. XXXIX. 

" On complaint that false declaration as to the state of the ballot had 
been made, the committee were ordered to investigate, and brethren 
" permitted to disclose how they voted." I can not see how the Grand 
Lodge could set aside or ignore the sacredness of the secret ballot. A vote 
is cast with the distinct understanding that it is secret, and no methods 
will be resorted to to discover it. I feel pretty certain that if a Mason's 
secret ought to be respected when Masonically made known, there can be 
no justification in any attempt, by prying or " investigation," that shall rob 
him of that lawful secret which he desires to retain. Let the question as 
to how any brother voted be made a matter of prying into and it is not a 
secret ballot at all. Besides, is not the inquiry a violation of previous 
pledges ? 

We may explain that the secrecy of the ballot was in no way 
impaired by us. Brethren were not required to disclose how 
they voted. They were expressly told that they need not do so, 
but they were given to understand that they might do so, on this 
occasion, if they wished. It was considered that the law as to 
the secrecy of the ballot, or the law preventing any inquiry 
being made as to how a Brother voted was never intended to 
cloak such a monstrous fraud as was involved in the charge of 
knowingly making a false declaration that the ballot was clear 
when it was really the reverse. We are happy to say, for the 
honor of our institution, that a full investigation completely 
acquitted the parties charged with the offence. 

On the Past Master's Degree, Bro. Grant says : — 

" This absurdity hangs on in New Jersey, but they have exhibited the 
rare good sense about it to formulate a ritual, so that there is some chance 
for the Master elect to be invested with the incubus " consistent with the 
object to be obtained," which we presume is a large amount of informa- 
tion and many impressive lessons from the solemn and instructive cere- 
monies. (?) At any rate, whatever the ritual may be the Grand Master 
ordered its promulgation, and one objection to the degree is removed by 
its having as we presume, some law to govern it." 

He also wants to know if the ancient landmarks justify a 
Grand Master in setting aside a statute of the Grand Lodge. 
We should say no. 

M. W. Bro. James D. Black, (Barboursville,) G. M. 

R. W. Bro. H. B. Grant, (Louisville,) G. S. 

LOUISIANA. 

77th Communication, New Orleans, Feb. nth, 1889. 

M. W. Bro. Charles W. Buck, G. M. 

On the state of the Craft, he says : — 

"The year has been a fairly active and prosperous one. The progress 
of revival is slow and intermittent : but its signs are unmistakable, and 



xl. GKAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

warrant the assertion that the sleep of indifference has been broken, and 
Freemasonry in Louisiana stands to-day as "sure and firm-set" in its 
mission of usefulness and good, as in apparently more prosperous juris- 
dictions." 

" While not showing an active condition, the reports, as a rule, indicate 
the prevalence of a better and more hopeful feeling among the brethren. 
One of the reports deals with the evil of life membership, and suggests the 
importance of some action looking to its eradication from the laws of our 
Lodges. The evil effects of" life membership" have been the burden of 
many a lament ; but there seems to be no escape from them, except such 
as may corne from the total abolition of the laws, operating in future 
This M. W. Grand Lodge decided at its last annual communication, by a 
large vote, " that a Lodge has no right to amend its By-laws to the detri- 
ment of life members already made and acknowledged as such." 

The Grand Master formed three new Lodges. He decided 
that the lapse of time since a Brother's dimission did not affect 
his right to affiliate. He followed their custom and precedent in 
accepting the resignation of an officer and authorizing the Lodge 
to elect a successor, holding that an installed officer cannot 
resign to the Lodge, but may to the Grand Master. He toler- 
ates joint occupancy of Lodge halls only when the very exist- 
ence of the Masonic body was at stake. 

The Grand Master was requested to form a project for the 
appointment of a Grand Lecturer. 

Bro. J. Q. A. Fellows reports on correspondence and arranges 
his extracts and comments under the following heads : — 

" Pursuing the course of the past two years, we present this year the 
following topics of discussion : 

" The Saloon Question ; 

" Physical Qualifications ; 

" The Ritualism of Freemasonry ; 

"The Right of Visit; 

" Resurrection of the Body ; 

'' Hiram Lodge No. I, Connecticut ; 

" The Quebec and England Controversy ; 

" Consolidation of Lodges ; 

" New South Wales : 

"The Mission of Freemasonry ; 

" The Sociable Feature in Freemasonry ; 

" Aid or Appeals for Relief — Charity ; 

" Condition of the Order ; 

" Non-payment of Dues ; 

" Non-affiliation ; 

'■ Life Membership ; 

" History of Freemasonry ; 

" Grand Lodges and Grand Masters : extent and source of their pow- 
ers, rights and privileges ; prerogatives and powers of Grand Masters. 

" The ' Cerneau ' Controversy. 

" Mexico and other Foreign Grand Bodies." 

On all these subjects Bro. Fellows gives arguments and 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. xli. 

opinions more than usually able, clear and incisive. We have 
not the space to follow his arguments and will have to content 
ourselves with the following extracts : — 

" Bro. Parvin was not quite as ingenuous in his quotations from us as is 
usual with him. We did not write " Masonic offences consist only of those 
made such under the criminal statute of the State." That was only half 
of what we said — " or by the obligations we have taken as Masons." 
How does he know the Masons of New England never recognized the laws 
about riding in town, or kissing one's wife, on Sunday ? If there were 
Masons in those days in New England, they were law-abiding people, 
and, indeed, helped make the laws in question. But the truth is, there 
were no Masons in New England at the time the so-called Blue Laws 
were in force. We still insist that, the adding to the obligations of 
Masons, to the tie which binds us together, destroys the universality of 
the Order, and makes that obligatory in Iowa which is not in Louisiana. 
When we see this question answered, or attempted to be answered, we 
shall see what, so far, we have not yet seen. This saloon question is the 
hobby of one-idea men, who always run everything into the ground, and 
are forever making the attempt to reform, by legislative enactments. Our 
policy has ever been, in all matters, to avoid such people, and keep them, 
as far as possible, in due bounds." 

" The old documents and records, so far as have been recovered, show 
that these Masons' Guilds were each independent of the other, and the 
latest before the organization of Grand Lodges, governed by their own 
separate regulations and by-laws, all, so far as known, under the old 
Charges and such esoteric work, as they may have had, and which, for 
the most part, were similar, if not identically the same. At the begin- 
ning of the eighteenth century, there were, of a certainty, four of these 
Lodges at London, one at York, England, three in Scotland, and no doubt 
many others in Ireland, England and Scotland. There were, as members 
of these guilds, more or less, at the beginning of the century, others than 
operative Masons, actual or honorary, men of distinction, who brought 
about the idea of permanent national, or at any rate, provincial organiza- 
tion of the several guilds under a common governing head. This was first 
done by the four known Lodges in London in 1 71 7 — in the formation of 
the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of England, which was 
followed, in 1725, by the organization of the Grand Lodge of all England, 
at York; in 1728, of the Grand Lodge of Ireland, and in 1736, of the 
Grand Lodge of Scotland. Three of these, that of England, Ireland and 
Scotland, have had a continuous existence till the present time, while that 
at York only ceased to exist shortly after 1792, when, or soon after, the 
members of its Lodges took charters from the Grand Lodge of England. 
That there were Lodges in Ireland prior to 172S, or even 1717, is certain, 
for the proof is, that neither of the Grand Lodges in England chartered 
any Lodges in Ireland, nor for that matter in Scotland, and the certain 
presumption is, that in Ireland and Scotland many Lodges, by immemo- 
rial custom, existed and were chartered by their Grand Lodges after their 
organization ; and we may say the same, especially of the Grand Lodge of 
England, located in London. 

Previous to this organization of the Lodges into Grand Lodges, erro- 
neously called the revival of Masonry, but properly the organization of the 
Masonic Lodges or guilds under a governing head, into Grand Lodges, 
there were no such a thing as a Grand Lodge or Grand Master. Each 
Lodge or guild had its presiding officer, and was generally under the pat- 
ronage of some one appointed by the Crown, with various designations, 



xlii. GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

and more or less controlled in their government by the edicts or regula- 
tions promulgated, from time to time, by these royal appointees ; though 
each Lodge strenuously kept themselves under the precepts of the old 
Charges, if they had them, and so far as known, each had one or more 
copies of these Charges, and retained and practised such esoteric work as 
they had. 

As a national (or Grand Lodge) organization, then, we have none prior 
to 1 71 7, when the Grand Lodge at London was formed. It placed itself 
as forever bound by the old Charges, as then collated from the various 
copies then extant, and proceeding to frame such "Regulations" as the 
need of the Craft under the new form of government seemed to require ; 
the old Charges and the landmarks, whatever these may have been, to re- 
main forever unalterable, We take it, that these old Charges and the 
essentials of the esoteric work, constituted the landmarks, and that they 
contained nothing more. All other matters are embraced in the Regula- 
tions, which have been from time to time changed as the necessities of the 
Craft have seemed to demand. 

Whatever may be the primal origin of Freemasonry, there was a time 
in the not remote past, and of which there exist authentic records, when 
there was no Grand Lodge and no Grand Master of Masons, as we under- 
stand the terms. The earliest records show the existence of bodies of 
Masons, united in more or less perfect organization — called Lodges — each 
independent of the other, and many authorizing, or, at all events, sanction- 
ing, colonies of their members in the formation of new Lodges. The 
esoteric teaching in these Masonic bodies (Lodges,) were, in all probability, 
the same as taught in our Lodges ; the form and manner of teaching, man- 
ifestly, so far as present knowledge goes, not very much different. The 
spirit of Freemasonry pervaded all ; a belief in God, our Father ; in the 
immortality of the soul ; in the brotherhood of man ; and in the necessary 
practice of all the moral and social virtues, were the essentials ; " our duty 
to God, our country, our neighbor, and ourselves," were every where and 
universally inculculated. These we take to be the landmarks of the 
Order. If there are any others, they are in those other elements that make 
the Brotherhood universal, namely : (as years ago proclaimed by our 
Grand Lodge,) the means of recognition, and the tie which binds us to- 
gether. That these are landmarks, the early manuscripts, called " Con- 
stitutions," clearly show, and they do not clearly show that there are any 
others. All other so-called landmarks, under the rule that landmarks 
cannot be changed or violated, are legislative enactments, and which, in 
the usual or required form, any Grand Lodge, or convention of Masons, 
can add to, alter or change. 

The first Grand Lodge of Freemasons that ever existed was that created 
by the delegates of the four old Lodges in London, in 1717. There may, 
and in all probability, had been, conventions or general assemblies of 
Masons, when, on some feast day, the Masons assembled, the oldest 
master presiding, for mutual encouragement and social intercourse. But 
that was all, such assemblies had, and exercised no power other than that 
of advice, and the oldest master ceased to have any powers after the feast- 
ing was over and the assembly adjourned. Right here we may add, that 
there were Grand Masters, appointed by the political rulers, but these were 
to regulate, in the interest of the State, the Craftsmen, who were actual 
laborers at their trade, and whatever powers these governors of the Craft 
may have exercised over Freemasons, if any, is unknown. They certainly 
had nothing to do with Masonry as a speculative or moral institution. 

Shortly after 171 7, Grand Lodges were formed in Scotland and Ireland 
following the example of the four old Lodges of London, and another in 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. xliii. 

the North of England, at York. None of the Lodges had what is known 
as charters, but each recognized the other as holding by immemorial usage, 
and thus holding, organized their respective Grand Lodges, for the future 
general government of the Craft. It is only necessary to allude to but one 
other Grand Lodge, that of the " Ancients," called " Schismatics," by the 
adherents of the Grand Lodge of 1 717 — as the Grand Lodge was in turn 
called the " Modern," by the newly formed Grand Lodge. This was 
created in London, in 1752, and it is now pretty generally conceded was 
formed mostly by Masons of the " Saints John Lodges" with others, made 
under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodges of Scotland and Ireland. 

From these five Grand Lodges have originated all recognized Lodges or 
Bodies of Freemasons to the civilized world. What there may be of 
Masonry among the American Indians, the Arabs or Chinese, we know 
not, have no definite or authentic proof, further than that among all these 
people, there were, and are, secret societies, but that they have any sem- 
blance to Freemasonry, other than their secrecy, is wholly unknown. 

As every Freemason, we can or ever have recognized, trace their origin 
back by a regular chain of progenitors to the Lodges which formed these 
five Grand Lodges, they are bound by the landmarks, as we have laid them 
down in the foregoing, and to follow as far as may be, the general princi- 
ples of the Order as appear in the regulations and customs of those original 
Grand Lodges. Of those five, the Grand Lodge at York ceased to exist 
in the latter part of the last century, and the " Ancient " and " Moderns" 
became the United Grand Lodge of England in 1813; hence, we, and all 
other Freemasons, may say we trace our origin to the four Grand Lodges 
(now three,) existing in the last century in the British Dominions — Eng- 
land, Scotland and Ireland. 

We may, also, right here remark, that the terms, "Ancient "and 
" Modern, " was never applied to the two respective Grand Lodges, as 
indicative of the date of their origin, but as to the esoteric work in their 
respective Lodges. The " Ancient " claimed that they had, and prac- 
ticed the ancient work, and that the " Moderns" had changed and mod- 
ernized the ritual. It is believed, that the latest investigations show that 
the claim of the " Ancients " was well founded. It is certain, that the 
esoteric (secret) work in the Irish, Scotch and York Lodges was almost, 
if not quite, identical with that of the Ancients, and that that work, was 
the true ancient work of the order. This is confirmed by the term of 
"Schismatics" applied to the "Ancients" by the "Moderns," based 
upon the charge that they became dissatisfied with certain changes, and 
seceded from the London Grand Lodge. This is probably true, as to 
many of them, but we think it equally certain and susceptible of proof 
that the large majority of those who formed the " Ancient " organization, 
as heretofore stated, were from the Lodges under the jurisdiction of the 
Grand Lodges of York, Scotland and Ireland, including the Saints John 
Masons. 

"the cerneau controversy.'' 

In our reports for last year and the year previous, we have studiously 
refrained from any expression of opinion or statement of facts or occur- 
rences in the Masonic World, concerning what is called the Cerneau con- 
troversy. But the subject has taken on itself so large a scope, and 
become so momentous in its nature in several Grand Lodge jurisdictions, 
notably so, of late, in Ohio, that we have thought it best to make a note of 
it. The contest is now, over the pretensions of the several bodies, claim- 
ing to be national in the character of their organizations, of the Ancient 
and Accepted Scottish Rite. 

There are, in the United States, four such bodies : 



\hv. GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

1. The Supreme Council of the A. and A. Kite for the Southern juris- 
diction, the presiding officer and head of which is Bro. Albert Pike, 
residing in Washington, D. C. 

2. The Supreme Council of the A. and A. Rite for the Northern juris- 
diction, the presiding officer or head of which is Bro. Henry L. Palmer, 
residing in Milwaukee, Wis. 

These two together, without conflict between them, and recognizing each 
other as supreme in their respective jurisdictions, cover the whole territory 
of the United States ; the latter, or second named body, claiming jurisdic- 
tion over the six New England States, New York, New Jersey, Delaware, 
Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan and Wisconsin ; and the 
former, of all the remaining States, the Territories, and the District of 
Columbia. 

3. The Supreme Council of the A. and A. Rite for the United States, 
their Territories and dependencies, the presiding officer or head of which 
is Bro. John J. Gorman, residing in New York City. This body is known 
as the " Cerneau Supreme Council." 

4. Another Supreme Council is the one also claiming to be the Simon 
pure " Cerneau Supreme Council," the head ot which is Bro. F. J. S. 
Gorgas, residing in Baltimore, Md. 

Before entering upon any further account of these bodies, their history, 
claims and contests, it is proper to remark that it has been said that we, 
as Master Masons, can know nothing of them, and have no right or capa- 
city to treat of them or their actions, or claims. This is true, so far as 
their esoteric work is concerned, but is not correct so far as their history, 
or pretensions, are concerned ; their history, so far as they have an authen- 
tic history ; their claims, so far as they have manifested any ; their regu- 
larity, rights, powers and pretensions, are, or may be, as well known by 
any Master Mason, or by any one not a Mason, as by themselves. Their 
Constitutions and Regulations, the history of their origin and subsequent 
proceedings, so far as known to themselves, have been published and are 
accessible to every one, Mason or no Mason. Every one, therefore, has as 
full opportunity and capacity to portray and discuss any and all matters of 
controversy between the bodies themselves, or between them and other 
bodies of Masons, as they themselves, and where controversies arise or 
exist between these bodies, or any of them, and Grand Lodges, it may 
become necessary, at any rate is proper, for Committees on Foreign Cor- 
respondence, or others, to discuss and treat upon the matters in controversy. 
These remarks apply with the same pertinency to other " higher " bodies 
composed of Masons ; as for example, Royal Arch Masons and Knights 
Templar — for their history and laws are also known or may be ascertained 
by any reading Mason, or other person. 

We cannot come to any other conclusion as a matter of history than that 
the " Cerneau " Supreme Council is not a legitimate body of the A. and 
A. Scottish Rite ; that in its origin it was only a consistory of the Rite of 
Perfection — French Rite ; that Cerneau possessed only the degrees of that 
rite, and never had any other. 

It is manifest that Grand Lodges, should occasion ever demand, have the 
capacity and the right to inquire into and pass upon the legality of any 
body claiming jurisdiction over degrees in Masonry, or which pretend to 
such claims above that of Master Mason, and it may be their duty so to 
inquire and determine, when the interests of the Craft are affected by the 
acts or pretensions of such bodies, and especially to determine as to the 
pretensions of rival bodies, each claiming to be the legitimate body." 

M. W. Bro. Charles F. Buck, (New Orleans,) G. M. 
R. W. Bro. J. C. Batchelor (New Orleans,) G. S. 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. xlv. 



MAINE. 



69th Communication, Portland, May 1st, 1888. 

M. W. Bro. Frank E. Sleeper, G. M. 

On the condition of the Craft, he says : — 

" An inspection of the returns shows that there has been a net increase 
in membership— though none of the footings differ very materially from 
those of last year. A fair amount of work has been done, an unusual 
number of new halls have been built, calls for charity have been responded 
to very freely, new Lodges are being called for, and signs of increasing 
interest are apparent." 

He had some correspondence with a gentleman who threaten- 
ed to bring a suit at law against a Lodge, to compel it to return 
the fee deposited with his petition. His petition' had been 
accepted, but he refused to receive the degrees, and the Lodge 
under their By-laws retained the deposit. We cordially hope 
that this gentleman will bring his suit and win it. We can 
imagine no more disgraceful position for a Lodge to occupy. 
Masons should be above that sort of thing. We do not want 
to take any one's money for nothing. Masons, of all men, should 
not be suspected of the slightest unfairness. That gentleman, 
doubtless, had good reasons for not coming forward, and we do not 
want any unwilling candidates. His fee should have been 
returned at once. As to the trouble he may have put the 
Lodge to, that is too trifling to be mentioned and our good 
name is of more consequence than the small amount involved. 
That Lodge should have its By-laws amended immediately. 

Grand Master Sleeper believes that conventions of Grand 
Masters might prove of much benefit in promoting a greater 
uniformity of legislation upon matters of general interest to all 
Lodges. 

He formed two new Lodges, and was very careful about 
granting special dispensations, although he is a believer in the 
inherent prerogatives and powers of Grand Masters. 

The oldest Mason in Maine, Bro. John Dennis Lord, died 
April 1 8th, at the age of 91, having been initiated in 1818. 

A copy of the original charter, granted by the Grand Lodge 
of Massachusetts, to Solar Lodge at Bath in 1804, has been 
found, containing the names of the original charter members. 



xlvi. GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

The thanks of the Grand Lodge were voted to Bro. Edmund 
B. Mallet, J. R., who has for the third time provided a free bed 
in the Maine General Hospital for the use of the Masonic 
fraternity of Maine. 

A contribution of $51.09 was taken up for a blind brother. 

Standing resolutions were adopted to provide for the con- 
solidation of Lodges. 

The report on correspondence is by Bro. Josiah H. Drum- 
mond, whose learning and ability, coupled with his intense 
devotion to the interest of the Craft and his unwearied diligence, 
have earned for him the foremost place in the ranks of the 
reviewers. 

Canada, for 1887, receives a good notice. Lie has found no 
jurisdiction in which the District Deputies perform their duties 
with more zeal, fidelity, ability and thoroughness than in Can- 
ada. He copies from some of their reports and commends 
them both as to the kind of work and style of report. On 
the report of the Board, deprecating the length of some of these 
reports, he says : — 

" It is true that the plan of tabular statements would save space, but 
we doubt if they would be read by those interested as generally as they 
would be when the Lodge is named and its condition fully stated. With 
due deference to the Board, such is our appreciation of the value of efficient 
service by Deputies, that we cannot help saying that we think the criticism 
in their report is not wholly just or deserved, unless the reports were re- 
vised before being printed. We think these reports are extraordinarily 
free from extraneous matters, and must be of inestimable value to the 
Grand Lodge. They may not be required to be made so full every year, 
but we do not feel sure of that even. A full, honest and impartial state- 
ment of the condition of a Lodge greatly tends to cause its members to 
make efforts to remedy the deficiencies, or, if they fail to do so, to demon- 
strate that it ought to cease to exist. The Board warmly endorses the 
holding of Lodges of Instruction in the several districts." 

On the trouble in Connecticut, where Hiram Lodge, No. 1, 
was in rebellion on account of the manner of giving the D. G. 
of A. M. M., he says : — 

" We lose all patience when we consider upon what a frivolous pretext a 
few leaders acted in misleading their fellows into the destruction of this 
old Lodge and the disturbance of the peace of Masonry." 

In his notice of Florida, he says : — 

" Now Quebec was a Province and had no Grand Lodge established in 
it ; it therefore comes within his second proposition, and yet he holds that 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. xlvii. 

it was an exception to the law he formulates ; he bases his conclusion upon 
an assumed surrender of the territory "by the pre-occupant, the Grand 
Lodge of Canada." This assumption is neither legally nor historically 
correct. Quebec formed a Grand Lodge precisely according to Bro. 
Davvkins' propositions, as matter of right, precisely as the Grand Lodges 
of Massachusetts and Pennsylvania were formed without regard to any con- 
sent of, or surrender by, the Grand Lodges of Scotland and England, the 
" pre-occupants " of the territory. As shown by the early history of the 
Grand Lodges of Pennsylvania, recently published, and the early records of 
Massachusetts Grand Lodge, now in course of publication, either Quebec 
is entitled to govern all the Lodges in the Province, or else the proceed- 
ings of the two old Grand Lodges named were without right, and not en- 
titled to be taken as precedents, as they have been in the formation of 
some fifty Grand Lodges !" 

He thinks that where the election is provided to be by ballot, 

it should be by ballot, and not by directing a brother to cast 

the vote of the Grand Lodge for a particular brother, or by 

voting to dispense with the ballot. On the " Quorum," he 

says : — 

" Representatives of fifty Lodges are required to make a quorum in the 
Grand Lodge : we deem this rule (a modern one) unwise, because when 
Lodges can be represented there is no danger that the required number 
will not be, and when they cannot be represented, the Grand Lodge should 
not be paralyzed and possibly destroyed by the fetters of such a law : such 
a thing has happened at two distinct periods to Masonic Grand Bodies in 
this country, and it may happen again." 

He believes that there was a Grand Master of Masons before 

there was any Grand Lodge. 

On permanent membership in Grand Lodges, he says : — 

" This leads us to state our views as to the reasons for permanent mem- 
bership and the benefit arising therefrom. Human experience has establish- 
ed that in a representative form of government, two legislative bodies are 
necessary for the greatest good ; the members of one coming directly from 
comparatively small communities of the people, and composing the most 
numerous branch ; the members of the other coming from much larger con- 
stituencies, or selected in a different manner, and composing the smaller 
branch ; the members of the popular body will necessarily be younger, less 
experienced and more impetuous, while the members of the other body will 
be older, more cautious, and better qualified in most all respects ; the two 
together combine all the elements for wise and yet progressive legislation. 
This system cannot be adopted in Masonry : we can have but one govern- 
ing body ; yet in that we want all the elements of both bodies in our civil 
government. The idea of permanent membership was a happy solution of 
the question. The permanent members constitute the senate, while the 
Masters and Wardens represent the popular branch. Again, in civil gov- 
ernment, the three departments are separate, but in Masonry all are com- 
bined ; in the former, the most learned, able and experienced are selected 
to decide and expound the law ; that element, therefore, should be repre- 
sented in the Grand Lodge : in the executive branch are demanded, also, 
men of experience as well as men of energy. We have often remarked 
that our Grand Lodge system wonderfully combines all the elements of the 



xlviii. <;kani> LODGE of Canada. 

prosperous, hut safe and conservative government, required by the charac- 
ter of our institution. The representatives of our Lodges are usually 
comparatively young men, ardent, enthusiastic and progressive : they 
understand the wants of their Lodges, but have little experience in legisla- 
tion, and less in determining questions of law, as the questions presented 
to Grand Masters abundantly show : Past Grand Officers are older, of more 
ripened judgment, of greater experience, of larger knowledge of Masonic 
law, and, (perhaps as important as anything) have no ambition to gratify, 
which will prevent their giving their best efforts unselfishly to promote the 
interests of the Craft. Their number is comparatively so small that there 
is no danger of their outvoting the representatives of Lodges. In fine, as 
the result of carefully watching the operations of the system for many years, 
we believe that the Grand Lodges, which have a fair number of permanent 
members with full powers, have been the most prosperous, have attained 
the highest influence, and, in a word, have most fully subserved the pur- 
pose of their existence ; they have had less bad legislation, less erroneous 
decisions, closer adherence to fundamental principles, and better work." 

He thinks that the Junior Warden, when acting as official 
accuser on a trial, should not be allowed to vote on the verdict. 

He is satisfied that the doctrine of Territorial Jurisdiction 
originated in England and came to this country when Masonry 
came, and that the maintenance of a Lodge in the jurisdiction 
of another Grand Lodge is as much an infringement of its 
sovereignty as the chartering of a Lodge there. So are we, and 
that is the logical result of the doctrine, otherwise there would 
be an exclusive jurisdiction that is not exclusive. 

It is quite universally held that a Mason cannot be tried for 
offences committed before he was a Mason, except for some 
fraud connected with his admission into the fraternity. 

On the subject of life-membership, Bro. Drummondhas some 
excellent remarks, from which we make the following extracts : — 
"There is one phase of this subject that presents an important question. 
Life-membership is usually created by a by law in a code which provides 
that any by-law may be repealed, or amended in the manner therein pro- 
vided It has been assumed that when a life-membership has been paid 
for, it is a contract between the Lodge and the member, which cannot be 
rescinded or varied without his consent. But courts have held that the 
clause of the by-law providing for amendment or repeal is also a. part of 
the contract, and. therefore, that the by-law, in relation to life-membership 
may be repealed in the manner provided in the by-laws, and the member 
thereafter subjected to the payment of the regular dues. We think that 
this will be the settled decision of the courts. But as the decision is based 
upon a technicality and is contrary to the original understanding of the 
parties, it ought not to be adopted as Masonic law, except perhaps in 
extreme cases. The question is not a merely supposable one. It has al- 
ready arisen in some jurisdictions, and is liable to arise frequently 

There have been cases, and may again be cases, in which another rule of 
law may properly be invoked. Contracts made upon a mutual mistake of 
facts may be rescinded by either of the parties, subject to certain con- 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. xlix. 

ditions. Cases have arisen in which by mutual mistake of facts essential 
to a correct basis for a contract of life-membership, the price has been 
made entirely inadequate, and a Lodge has suddenly found itself 
with an empty treasury, and with an income from dues less than its necess- 
ary expenses, on account of the large number of life-members not subject 
to dues. They had purchased the life-membership at a price much lower 
than its value, and had aided in prematurely spending the money. In such 
a case, we can see no wrong in rescinding the contract upon equitable 
terms. The sum paid with the current rate of interest should be credited 
in offset to the dues, and the member should pay no dues until after that 
sum is exhausted : of course, if it is exhausted before the by-law is repealed 
no back dues can be charged. This course would be admissible only in 
extreme cases in which it is absolutely certain that the price of the life- 
membership was materially inadequate. 

In some Lodges, life-membership is acquired by the regular payment of 
dues for a given number of years. We do not think that this constitutes a 
contract in either a legal or moral sense. There is no consideration for it. 
The regular performance of a duty is no consideratiou for a contract. It is 
a Mason's duty to belong to a Lodge and pay dues, and unless he does 
something additional it does not seem to us that he can claim a reward, 
for he has only performed his duty." 

We agree with Bro. Drummond that the courts would hold 
that the by-law providing for life-membership could be repealed 
and that the repeal would affect those members who had 
acquired life-membership under it, because the by-laws them- 
selves provide that they may be repealed, and the member 
knowingly made that provision a part of the contract. But it 
is a question whether Masons should take advantage of such a 
ruling. Vested rights are usually respected, and we think that 
if any such by-law should be repealed, provision should be 
made that it should not affect those who had acquired rights 
under it, in other words, it should be considered as applicable 
only to the future. 

In the case put by Bro. Drummond, where both parties are 
under a mistake of facts, of course the repeal should apply to 
all. 

In his last paragraph, above quoted, Bro. Drummond raises 
a new and very discriminative point. Many lodges make Hon- 
orary Members of those who have regularly paid dues for 
twenty or twenty-five years, but according to Bro. Drummond 
this is illegal, as the performance of duty is no consideration 
and it was their duty to pay their dues. That may be so, but 
still we think that Lodges should have some consideration for 
those who have been so regular in their performance of duty 



I. 



<;k\ni> lodge of Canada. 



for so many years, and it is nothing more than a well-merited 
compliment for faithful service, such as is done every day to 
those retiring from office who have only done their duty faith- 
fully. The average duration of Lodge membership is, we 
believe, considerably less than ten years, and we think that 
Lodges are deserving of credit who honor those of twenty-five 
years standing by relieving them of any further money payments 
in the way of dues. 

We copy Bro. Drummond's valuable table of statistics : — 

" STATISTICS." 
We are able to give statistics for all the American Grand Lodges covered 
by our review, down to the latest publication, except those whose Proceed- 
ings for 1888 are received as our report is going through the press. 

COMPARISON OF STATISTICS. 



G. Lodges. 


Totals G. Lodges. 


Totals. G. Lodges. Totals. 


1888. 


1888. 


1887. 


1887. 


1886. 


1886. 


Members, 55 • • • 


.615,136 .. 


55... 


605.408. . . 


55-- 


• 596,464 


Raised, 54. .. 


. 29,985... 


53 • • • 


28,066... 


54- 


. 24,818 


Admissions, &c, 53 . . 


. 20,593... 


51... 


19-335- •• 


54- 


. 16,760 


Dimissions, 55- • • 


. 16,681... 


54- ■■ 


16,236. . . 


55 ■ • 


■ I4-307 


Expulsions, 50. . . 


370... 


52... 


388... 


53 • • 


416 


Suspensions, 37 • • • 


■ 348... 


33 ••• 


310... 


35 •• 


278 


" npt. dues, 54. . . 


. 15,024... 


.54... 


• 15-994- •• 


• 54-- 


. . 12,729 


Deaths 55- • • 


. 8^,214... 


54- •• 


8,151... 


55-- 


• 7,426 



GENERAL TABLE. 



GRAND 
LODGES. 















*_, 


<u 


T3 






T3 
0) 


T3 



T3 


- E 
O 0> . 


,0 


1) 


Admit 

and 

Restor 


»-i 




C 


33 >. s 


a 




T3 


— 

W 


V 

a, 


Susp 

non-pa 

ofd 



Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

British Columbia. 

California 

Canada 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Dakota.. , 

Delaware 

Dist. of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia , 



7,305 


460 


445 


304 


8 


10 


331 


355 


20 


24 


16 








24 


". 153 


573 


635 


462 


23 


3i 


300 


393 


46 


3i 


18 







*5 


14,622 


493 


678 


425 


8 


8 


322 


I9.450 


1,030 


469 


608 


2 


6 


543 


4,o77 


202 


181 


140 


2 




*I04 


14.510 


560 


150 


98 




6 


138 


3-594 


386 


271 


164 





4 


46 


i,553 


90 


6 


14 


1 




*I2 


3,i9i 


i«5 


107 


40 




2 


45 


2,949 


235 


226 


140 


4 




*S6 


11,461 


641 


508 


517 






*282 



169 

6 

211 

3 
197 
198 

44 
208 

25 
20 
42 
63 
179 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. 



Grand Lodges. 




Idaho. 

Illinois. 

Indiana. 

Indian Territory. 

Iowa 

Kansas . 

Kentucky. 

Louisiana. 

Maine. . . . 

Manitoba . 

Maryland . 

Massachusetts 

Michigan. 

Minnesota. 

Mississippi. 

Missouri. 

Montana. 

Nebraska . 

Nevada . 

New Brunswick. 

New Hampshire . . 

New Jersey 

New Mexico. 
New York ... . 

North Carolina. 
Nova Scotia. 

Ohio , 

Oregon . 
Pennsylvania. 
P. E. Island. 
Quebec. 
Rhode Island. 
South Carolina. 
Tennessee 
Texas. 
Utah. 
Vermont. 
Virginia. . 
Washington. 
West Virginia. 
Wisconsin. . . . 
Wyoming 



Total 6l 5i36 29985 20593 16681I 370I 348 15024I8214 

* Including suspensions for all causes. 

M. W. Bro. Frank E. Sleeper, (Sabatis,) G. M. 

R. W. Bro. Ira Berry, (Portland,) G. S. 

MANITOBA. 
14th Communication, Winnipeg, February 13th, 1889. 
R. W. Bro. James A. Ovas, as Grand Master. In conse- 



Hi. GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

quenceofa severe domestic bereavement, the Grand Master, M. 
\V. Bro. Thomas Clarke, was unable to be present. 

Two new Lodges were formed, one at Lethbridge and the 
other at Anthracite, both in Alberta. 

The returns show that Masonry is keeping pace with the 
general progress of the country. They have 40 Lodges and 
1704 members, an increase during the year of 105. They 
have a Library, under the management of the efficient and 
energetic Grand Secretary, Bro. W. G. Scott, and a free reading 
room, open daily, (Sundays excepted,) from 9 a m., to 10 p. m. 
The expenses for periodicals and for lighting and heating are 
all paid by the City Lodges of Winnipeg. 

They have two authorized rituals in this Jurisdiction, and 
one Lodge has attempted to combine them. This illustrates 
one of the difficulties attendant on such a system : — 

" Referrring to the irregularities, or rather the innovations, in the matter 
of opening and closing Lodge, practised in Ionic Lodge No. 25, as referred 
to in this report, your Committee is of the opinion that the form laid down 
in the ritual should be strictly adhered to, and that no amalgamation of 
the two rituals should be countenanced. 

Your Committee would recommend that each Lodge should be enjoined 
to work in strict accordance with the ritual (either of the two recognized 
by this Grand Lodge) which it may adopt. " 

Their Lodge in Morocco has sent money for dues, and an 
explanation of the delay in forwarding returns. 

New South Wales was recognized. 

A resolution to adopt the Canada work as the authorized 
work, and allowing those Lodges using the York work to con- 
tinue during the pleasure of the Grand Lodge, received the six 
months' hoist. 

M. W. Bro. Rev. Canon James D. O'Meara, (Winnipeg,) 
G. M. 

R. W. Bro. William G. Scott, (Winnipeg,) G. S. 

MARYLAND. 

Semi-annual, May 8th, 1888. 

The Grand Master reports universal prosperity and enthu- 
iasm. He advocates dual membership. 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. liii. 

In order to facilitate the election of officers, the following 
resolutions were adopted : — 

'■'■Resolved, The second day's session of the Annual Communication 
shall be called at 5 o'clock P. M., when the reports of Committees shall be 
made and such, other business transacted as may be presented for consider- 
ation. A collation shall be served at 6£ to 7 o'clock, immediately after 
which the annual election for Grand Officers shall be held. 

Resolved, Six or more collectors shall be appointed to collect the ballots, 
during the collection and counting of which every Brother shall remain in 
his seat until the result of the ballot is announced." 

Fifty dollars was appropriated for the relief of a worthy 
Past Grand Officer. 

The following were adopted : — 

"Whereas, The belief in an infinitely wise, beneficent, and Supreme 
Being, is an essential tenet of our institution, therefore, be it, 

Resolved, That the Grand Lodge of Maryland recommend the Subor- 
dinate Lodges in its jurisdiction, to attend Divine Service when conveni- 
ent to do so, at least once a year, on Sunday nearest either Festival of 
St. John. 

Resolved, That the M. W. Grand Master at the expense of this Grand 
Lodge, be requested to provide for our Representatives near other Grand 
Lodges, an appropriate Jewel as a Badge of Office, to be worn by said 
Representatives while acting as such, and to be delivered to their successors 
in office, or returned to the Grand Lodge of Maryland." 

Our old friend, Bro. E. T. Schultz, has an excellent report 
on correspondence, in which our proceedings for 1887 receive 
due attention. 

He thinks that it is not illegal for Lodges to pay the Funeral 
expenses of an unaffiliated Brother. So do we. 

On the prerogatives of Grand Masters, he says : — 

"Brother Drummond is fully able to take care of himself and to sub- 
stantiate any statement he may have made, we will, therefore, merely say, 
that the history of the revival of Masonry in England in 171 7, will show 
that the Grand Master was chosen before the Grand Lodge was formed ; 
therefore, at least one Grand Master did exist before the formation of 
the mother Grand Lodge of the world, as he calls it in another part of his 
report. 

Let us see if Grand Masters have no powers other than that which may 
be given by the Constitution ? 

In the proposed new Constitution of Iowa the Grand Master is recog- 
nized as having power and authority to grant dispensations for the forma- 
tion of new Lodges, to arrest the charter of a Lodge and to suspend the 
Master of a Lodge, and these are about all the powers that are specifically 
given him. Will Brother Parvin say that the Grand Master of Iowa can- 
not, or should not, exercise any other powers than these ? If yes, what is 
meant by this clause in the same article of the Constitution, which, or 
something similar, is in every Grand Lodge Constitution, viz., "and is 
entitled to all the privileges and prerogatives which attach to bis office by 
the ancient usages of Freemasonry? " 



llV GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

The Regulations of 1723, Brother Parvin terms, " By-Laws of the Grand 
Lodge of England, which may be altered or repealed at pleasure, and as to 
the landmarks, he says, no two Brothers agree as to what they are. Now 
if this V>e true, is it not time, that the phrase " ancient charges, regulations, 
landmarks and usages of Masonry," about which Brother Parvin, as well 
as every one else, is continually repeating, should either be well defined 
and understood, or else stricken from our Constitutions, forms and cere- 
monies ? 

There may be a difference of opinion regarding some of the landmarks of 
Masonry, but there is sufficient unanimity of opinion regarding those of 
most importance. Our own opinion is, that the traditions, customs and 
usages which have prevailed among the Craft generally, for nearly two hundred 
years, if not landmarks have the sanctity of such, and should be so held and 
regarded. For one hundred and sixty years at least, certain inherent 
rights and privileges have been recognized as existing in Grand Masters, 
by the Craft throughout the world. 

The designation Grand Master of Masons, and not Grand Master of the 
Grand Lodge, indicates that he is not the creature of the Grand Lodge, 
but has powers beyond its control." 

He is justly severe on the demoralizing practice of rotation 
in office : — 

" Your Committee has long entertained and frequently expressed the 
opinion, that the practice which has become so prevalent of late years, of 
rotation and yearly changes in the presiding officers of our Masonic bodies, 
is of the most hurtful character. 

In our opinion this practice is the fruitful source of non-attendance and 
non-affiliation, which so much excites the solicitude of our Grand Lodges. 
There can be little or no inducement for an intelligent Brother to attend 
the meetings of his Lodge, when he sees continuously an inexperienced 
Brother in the chair ; and this must be the case by the system of change 
referred to ; the consequence is, he ceases to attend the meetings and in 
time asks for a dimit. 

We call to mind a number of cases, where Brethren of decided ability 
and fitness for the office, but by reason of timidity not able to preside with 
comfort either to themselves or the Brethren, until near the end of their 
term, would if the opportunity had been given them, have been an honor 
to the Lodge and a credit to the fraternity. 

If this is the case with officers of subordinate Lodges, with how much 
more force does it apply to the high and responsible position of Grand 
Master of Masons, the chief overseer of the Craft; how important it is that 
he should possess that knowledge which can only be acquired by practice 
and experience ? 

The custom of changing the Grand Master each year, as Grand Master 
Kimbrough very correctly says, "degrades the office" and " gives but 
1 ittle honor to the official and less to the Craft." 

We were surprised to discover that this yearly change of Grand Masters 
prevails in so many jurisdictions ; but we also find in these jurisdictions, 
that the opposition to the doctrine of " inherent powers of Grand Masters " 
does most abound, and quite naturally. It becomes absolutely necessary 
to hedge by constitutional enactments inexperienced and incompetent 
Grand Masters, who by the system of rotation must necessarily sometimes 
slip into the office." 

102nd Communication, Baltimore, Nov. 20th, 1888. 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. lv. 

M. W. Bro. Thomas J. Shrylock, (Baltimore,) G. M. 

Among the representatives from other Grand Lodges present, 
we notice the name of R. W. Bro. Henry Macpherson, from 
Canada. 

The Grand Master reports harmony in every section of the 
state and unusual activity among the Lodges. 

In the report of the Grand Inspectors, we find the following:— 

"It may not be out of place in this report to say, that they have observ- 
ed with much gratification, the good that is being done our membership 
by the educational influences that are developed through constant attend- 
ance at Lodge meetings, and occupancy of stations of honor therein. 

These influences being exerted in the cultivation of so large a body of 
men in those graces and habits of easy manners and general culture, so 
happily illustrated in the meetings of the Grand Lodge, they deem it wise 
thus publicly to advert to them. 

These benefits are not left within the Lodge doors, but are carried 
without, into the various parts of the commonwealth, and as freeborn 
American citizens they are better qualified to discharge their duties as 
such. 

The polish, confidence and information gained by a Brother while 
serving his Lodge in the various positions from Junior Steward to Wor- 
shipful Master, are not easily calculated, and fit him to fill posts of honor 
and trust in the social, business, political and religious world. 

They would also observe that when all the Lodges throughout the 
jurisdiction are fully officered, there is a body of some eight hundred men 
being constantly trained in these elevating pursuits, truly leaven enough 
to leaven a large proportion of the community. 

It should therefore stimulate every Brother to endeavor to serve his 
Lodge, by promptly attending its communications, and thus put himself in 
line to be called with honors. 

In looking over the City and State and witnessing the conspicuous 
places filled by the members of the Craft, one is forced to admit that, 
although Masonry seeks not worldly wealth and honors, yet the benefits 
she confers enables a Brother to serve God, his country and himself, with 
greater freedom and ability." 

The Grand Secretary having completed the twenty-fifth year 
of service in that capacity was the recipient of numerous and 
valuable tokens of esteem from the Grand Lodge and individual 
Lodges with which he was connected. The testimonial from 
the Grand Lodge was a " Loving Cup," an Etruscan vase, 
having the capacity of one gallon, suitably inscribed. 

A special committee reported against dual membership. 
They found only one Grand Lodge, that of Virginia, which 
allows it, out of the forty-three Grand Lodges from which they 
had obtained information. 



lvi. GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

The question was raised as to the Grand Lodge, being an 
appellate body, having original jurisdiction, or the right to try 
any brother for a Masonic offence. The Grand Lodge decided, 
with but one dissenting vote, that it had such a right. 

The following amendment was adopted : — 

" No Lodge in the City of Baltimore shall confer the three degrees of 
Masonry for a less sum than fifty dollars, provided the City of Baltimore, 
for one year shall be understood to be comprised within the limits of the 
present twenty wards ; provided also, that at the end of the time specified, 
Lodges in the territory now known as the Belt, in the event of annexation 
shali be included in the above requirement." 

An amendment to give the Lodges in the counties concur- 
rent jurisdiction was rejected. 

M. W. Bro. Thomas J. Shrylock, (Baltimore,) G. M. 
R. W. Bro. Jacob H. Medairy, (Baltimore,) G. S. 

MICHIGAN. 

45th Communication, Detroit, January 22nd, 1889. 

M. W. Bro. William B. Wilson, G. M. 

He formed four new Lodges and refused two others. He 
strongly recommends assistance to the Masonic Home about to 
be established at Grand Rapids. R. W. Bro. J. F. H. Gunn 
appears in his list of Grand Representatives appointed. The 
Grand Master rightly refused permission to a Lodge to solicit 
aid from other Lodges to rebuild their hall, which had been 
destroyed by fire and no insurance. 

The question of life-membership has had a serious issue for 
one Lodge. They have 152 members, but 97 of these are life 
members, paying no dues, and in consequence there is an 
annual deficit of about $200.00. The following report was 
adopted : — 

" In view of this state of facts, the Lodge now asks this Grand Lodge for 
such legislation as will enable it to collect such dues as may be fixed by its 
by-laws, from each and every member of said Lodge, irrespective of any 
question of life-membership. 

In 1885, the right of this Lodge to compel the members who had been 
exempted from the payment of dues, to pay the same, came before Grand 
Lodge, and it was then decided that it would be unjust so to do, but the 
question then before the Grand Lodge was a naked one, and only involved 
the rights of the members so affected. 

In the opinion of your Committee the question now presented involves 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. lvil. 

not only the rights of the non-due paying members, but of those who pay 
dues as well, and over and above all the very life of the Lodge itself. 

The question now before the Grand Lodge is simply this : whether the 
Grand Lodge will permit and authorize this Lodge to compel its one hun- 
dred and fifty members to share equally its burdens, or compel the Lodge 
to submit to the inevitable, namely : the surrender of its charter. 

If the latter, then the ninety-five non-paying members, as well as the 
fifty-five due-paying members, are without a Masonic home. 

It seems to your Committee that the greatest good can be secured for 
even what are termed the life-members, by granting the prayer of the 
petition. 

The by-laws of the Lodge can not be amended except by a two-thirds 
vote, and the members of the Lodge who have appeared before us are 
confident that the necessary vote can be secured. 

Behind all these questions, there is the more serious question of whether 
a Lodge has the right, or ever had the right, to exempt its members from 
future and unforeseen liabilities, and your Committee doubt if this can be 
done. 

Your Committee, therefore, recommend that the prayer of said petition 
be granted, that said Kilwinning Lodge be authorized so to amend its by- 
laws by the necessary two-thirds vote, as to make all of its members liable 
to the payment of annual dues from and after the adoption of such by-laws, 
giving at least thirty days notice of such amendment." 

The Grand Lodge annual dues were reduced from thirty-five 
cents to thirty cents. 

The Grand Secretary reports on correspondence and notices 
our proceedings for 1888. 

M. W. Bro. W. Irving Babcock, (Niles,) G. M. 

R. W. Bro. W. P. Innes, (Grand Rapids,) G. S. 

MINNESOTA. 

36th Communication, St. Paul, -January 16th, 1889. 

The Grand Master was absent through illness. From the 
address of the Deputy Grand Master, we learn that two new 
Lodges were formed, and that the Craft is in a prosperous 
condition. 

A special Committee was appointed to consider the expedi- 
ency of establishing a Grand Lodge Library. A new form of 
By-laws was adopted. 

The Grand Secretary reports on correspondence, and notices 

our proceedings for 1888. On the American work, he says : — 

" The American system of lectures was gotten up and arranged by Snow, 
Hanmer, Fowle, Webb, Nye, etc. At the time Webb had been a Mason 
but three or four years, but as he published a monitor and was most active 



lviii. GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

in disseminating the new lectures, the system received the name " Webb 
Work." 

Preston arranged the lectures into six sections in the first degree, four 
in the second and twelve in the third. Whoever heard of the term 
"Preston-Webb" until it was used to push the fortunes of some litho- 
graphic sheets and afterward of mnemonics ? With equal propriety the 
term " Hutchinson- Webb " or " Dunckerly-Webb," or " Martin Clare- 
Webb" might be used, as each of them arranged a system of lectures be- 
fore Preston did. 

Webb taught the system to Gleason, Cushman, Wadsworth, Enos, 
Cross, etc., who went about the country on lecturing tours. Each had 
certificates from Webb, but each differed in language as Webb did him- 
self ; but the work was the same, and that was the object of Webb's 
monitor, to introduce a uniformity in ceremonial or work, which was 
happily accomplished, and for which the memory of Thomas Smith Webb 
deserves more credit than that of either of his coadjutors. 

Masonic lessons are to-day taught all over the country by symbols that 
Webb knew nothing about, notably the " weeping virgin," introduced by 
Nye through Cross ; very pretty and very appropriate, but first published 
in Cross' Hieroglyphical Chart in 1819." 

M. W. Bro. Jacob A. Kiester, (Blue Earth City,) G. M. 
R. W. Bro. A. T. C. Pierson, (St. Paul,) G. S. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

71st Communication, Meridian, Feb. 14th, 1889. 

M. W. Bro. M. M. Evans, G. M. 

He arrested the charters of two Lodges for refusal to obey 
the Grand Lodge regulation against the admission of saloon- 
keepers. He formed four new Lodges. He appointed R. W. 
Bro. R. B. Hungerford as their representative near Canada. 
He congratulates the Brethren that the Craft in Mississippi is 
inspired with new life and vigor. The Grand Lodge is in 
better financial condition than it has been for years. 

The following report was adopted by a vote of 681 to 95 : — 

"Your Committee having considered the general subject of Saloon 
Keeping, recommend that the following be substituted for the statute en- 
acted at the last Grand Lodge : 

Section— That Subordinate Lodges shall not initiate, pass or raise any 
candidate or admit to membership any non-affiliated Mason engaged, as 
principal or employe, as a saloon keeper." 

A new regulation was enacted as follows : — 

"Master Masons of twenty-one years continuous affiliation, and who are 
over the age of seventy years, are exempt from dues to either Grand or 
Subordinate Lodges, except the ten cents annual charity dues ; and a suit- 
able certificate of the fact shall be furnished by each Lodge to the members 
so exempt, which certificate shall be attested by the Grand Secretary, 
and by him made a matter of record." 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. lix. 

Bro. Frederic Speed, P. G. M., is engaged in the preparation 
of a digest of their laws, and the Grand Lodge decided to con- 
tinue the work and it will probably be issued authoritatively. 

The report on correspondence is by Bro. A. H. Barkley. 

Our proceeedings do not appear to have been received. We 

copy his opening paragraph : — ■ 

" In looking over the Masonic field during the past year, we have found 
much to interest, instruct and enlarge the mind of the Masonic student. 
The principles and tenets of this time-honored Institution ever remain the 
same, nor will its true votaries ever consent to innovations upon the body 
of Masonry. A search among the archives, and a closer study of the mis- 
sion and intent of Masonry, oftimes brings out into clearer light, great 
truths which before were but imperfectly, if at all, understood. A new 
impetus is being given to the study of the cardinal virtues, and a proper 
application of the principles of moral rectitude has in every instance tended 
to the correction of evil. " There are great truths at the foundation of 
Freemasonry — truths which it is its mission to teach." To find out these 
great truths, to appropriate to ourselves the pure lessons which they im- 
part, and make them the rule of our conduct, is a duty incumbent on every 
Mason. To be good and true men is the foundation of every virtue. Every 
truth brought to light in Masonry, inculcates the principles of Morality. 
The jewels of every Mason are Morality and Brotherly Love, and these we 
are to exemplify in what we do." 

M. W. Bro. William G. Paxton, (Vicksburg,) G. M. 

R. W. Bro. J. L. Power, (Jackson,) G. S. 

MISSOURI. 

68th Communication, St. Louis, October 9th, 1888. 

M. W. Bro. William M. Williams, G. M. 

The past year has been one of unusual prosperity. They 
have declared that saloon-keeping is a Masonic offence, and 
the Grand Master reports that not a single Lodge within their 
borders has a member engaged in this business He refused 
all dispensations for joint celebrations. He held five State 
Lodges of instruction, at which, in addition to the work, 
Masonic addresses were delivered upon the history, symbolism 
and moral teachings of Masonry. He formed thirteen new 
Lodges. 

When a vote was taken upon the report on appeals con- 
nected with the expulsion of a member who denied the God of 
the Bible and the truth of the Book of the Law, it was adopted 
by a rising vote with entire unanimity and great enthusiasm. 

The reports on grievances and appeals are given at great 



be. r.RAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

length and in full detail. They are not, however, pleasant 
reading, and we think it would be better if these reports were 
not so much in detail, the shorter the better. 

Their " Masonic Home " is to be located at or near St. Louis, 
and they have about $53,000 on hand and will commence the 
work at once. 

The Grand Secretary has an extensive report on correspond- 
ence, covering 183 pages. Canada, for 1887, receives a good 
notice and the Grand Master is highly complimented on his 
address. 

Bro. Vincil justly condemns Lodge meetings on Sunday, and 
also the expulsion of members for non-payment of dues. 
He calls perpetual jurisdiction " the most indefensible and 
unjustifiable dogma of the times." On their Lodge in Mexico, 
he says : — 

" Missouri was aware, when she created Toltec Lodge in the City of 
Mexico, that some kind of a Grand Body existed there. But as such Body 
was not working what is called the " York Rite," our Toltec Lodge was 
recommended by the existing Rite, and welcomed among them with hearti- 
ness. Our Grand Lodge believed that the field was open and that we 
were welcome. 

The creation of Toltec Lodge being recommended by the " Rite then 
and there existing, Missouri planted the " York Rite " Lodge in the capi- 
tal of Mexico, to work in English, for the benefit of American and other 
English speaking Masons. The formation of the Grand Lodge in the 
Federal District clearly places all Lodges in that jurisdiction under its con- 
trol. Missouri will not hesitate to transfer Toltec Lodge to Mexico Grand 
Lodge when arrangements are perfected." 

The following also has our approval : — 

"As to the first part when a Mason is to be buried by the Templars, 
they rendering their own service, let Master Masons, as such stay away. 
If a Mason prefers a request while living, to have a Templar funeral when 
dead, his wish should be respected. Let the Templars bury him. Master 
Masons should have nothing to do with the affair in their Lodge character. 
The Lodge with me must have the first place all the while. A templar 
escort is eminently proper where a Lodge has exclusive control, provided 
always it is desired by the living or was the known wish of the deceased. 
There is just a little too much parade and demonstration connected with 
some Masonic funerals. I want none of it when loved ones shall bear my 
mortal part to the silent City. And above all things I do not want the 
feelings of my family, — already bleeding — harrowed and tortured by the 
blare of trumpets, the rattle of drums and screeching of other instruments 
when I am borne to my final resting place. No brass band accompani- 
ment for a funeral in my case. I do not possess greatness enough to merit 
a big funeral. I want a quiet one." 

M. W. Bro. James P. Wood, (New London,) G. M. 

R. W. Bro John D. Vincil, (St. Louis,) G. S. 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. lxi. 

These proceedings form a bulky volume of 390 pages, and 
were printed in three working days after Grand Lodge closed 
and mailed on the fourth. This beats the record. And yet 
some Grand Secretaries take months over the same work. 

MONTANA. 

24th Communication, Missoula, October 3rd, 1888. 

R. W. Bro. A. C. Logan, D. G. M., acting as G. M. 

The Grand Master, M. W. Bro. J. W. Hathaway, was absent 
through matters connected with his Civil Office. In his 
address he congratulates the Brethren upon the prevailing 
harmony. He formed two new Lodges. 

The Grand Lodge of New South Wales was recognized. 

The Grand Master properly ruled that in case any delegate 
was temporarily absent from the Grand Lodge, no other person 
was entitled to cast a vote for him. 

Grand Orator Gould had for his subject, "Masonry, the 
Pioneer of Civilization." We quote a few paragraphs :— 

"The influence of Freemasonry upon the growth of civilization in 
Montana, cannot be measured by any ordinary standard. Few Masons are 
aware of the influence it exerted in our early days, and a still less number 
appreciate it. But that noble band of Brothers who freely gave the best 
years of their early manhood, or the counsel of their riper years to the 
protection of society and the advancement of every lawful interest of the 
territory — which was honored beyond compare by their presence and influ- 
ence—should receive the profound gratitude of every citizen of our beautiful 
territory. Their courage was of a type akin to that of a Douglass, and 
their self-denial would have honored the early martyrs. 

Between them and the states, to whom they might look for succour or 
protection, rolled the green billows of a boundless wilderness. The 
treacherous red man of the prairie formed a gauntlet of death through 
which relief must come, and through whose fiery wall they must dash, did 
they seek protection of the honorable law, or did their weary hearts desire 
to bask in the sunlight of home. 

Never in the history of America had there gathered together such a 
heterogeneous mass of humanity. Here met the loyal citizen and the out- 
law ; the criminal and nature's nobleman ; uncompromising honor and 
unblushing villany ; Southern chivalry and Northern valor ; infidel and 
Christian ; men of all climates and complexions ; and among them all a 
distrust born of mixed society and troublesome times. 

A country officered by road agents and directed by foot-pads organized 
for crime would be a spectacle for Gods and men ; such would approxi- 
mate the then state of things in some portions of Montana now happily 
basking in the sunshine of peace. " How good and how pleasant " it 
must have been at such a time to hail the token recognized as well in the 
midnight darkness as in the glare of the noonday sun. How " like the 
precious ointment upon the head " to meet a brother to whom the weary 



lxii. grand lodge of Canada. 

soul could unburden itself, whose sympathetic ear would be open to the 
cry of distress ; whose strong arm would be ready to defend, and the 
counsel of whose lips was wisdom. A sign ; a token ; and a few Masons 
gathered together. No matter from whence they came their sign language 
was the same. No matter where they met ; it might be in the rude cabin 
of some brother whose remote habitation gave a promise of secrecy ; or in 
the twilight hush of some moss carpeted canyon, whose rocky and precip- 
itous sides presented a barrier against eavesdroppers. Or on some 
mountain's side, where nature's grandeur inspired their hearts with renewed 
zeal, and where the solemn pines stood guard against the approach of 
cowans, each heart stirred with a sincere desire to promote the public 
weal." 

After adjournment the whole membership was treated to a 
Railway Excursion up the Bitter Root Valley and fared 
sumptuously at Victor and Grantsdale. 

The report on correspondence is by the Grand Secretary. 
Our proceedings for 1887 are noticed. He thinks that our 
requirements of dues for honorary members is peculiar, " but 
it is a healthy check upon this gushing tendency." Our 
minutiae of dress and regalia would excite amusement if pro- 
posed in Montana. 

Bro. Hedges has an excellent conclusion : — 

" And now there is space for but a word on the general prospects at 
home. Everything is bright and promising. Montana and her sister Ter- 
ritories will soon be sovereign States. In all save distant Alaska there is 
now an independent Grand Lodge, and Masonry is doing a great work in 
bringing order out of chaotic elements and giving impetus to all civilizing 
and harmonizing influences. 

The most prominent and characteristic present general feature of 
Masonry in this country is its movement to provide Homes for the widow, 
orphans and infirm. It appears everywhere. Some have heard and heed- 
ed the demand, and hundreds are already provided for. Others appar- 
ently better able seem to turn a deaf ear, but there is no escape. The 
demand comes back every time with greater volume and power. The era 
of Temple building, which a few years ago was so general and brought so 
many failures, burdens and bitter disappointments, is about over. It was 
the poorest kind of speculative Masonry. The era of practical charity, the 
real, true work of Masonry has come and taken its place. We bid it wel- 
come with all our heart. The Temples on which we are to exercise our 
skill and lavish our wealth are those of flesh and blood. These words of 
inspiration: "Inasmuch as ye have done it unto the least of these my 
brethren, ye have done it unto me," are the summons that we cannot dis- 
obey except at our everlasting peril." 

M. W. Bro. Arthur C. Logan, (Helena,) G. M. 
R. W. Bro. Cornelius Hedges, (Helena,) G. S. 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. lxiii. 

NEBRASKA. 

31st Communication, June 20th, 1888, at Lincoln. 

M. W. Bro. Milton J. Hull, G. M. 

He reports a prosperous year. He formed 14 new Lodges. 
He thinks that new Lodges should have at least twenty charter 
members. He travelled 5000 miles in making his official 
visits. 

The Grand Custodian exemplified the work in 40 Lodges 
and held fifteen schools of instruction. 

In this Jurisdiction it appears that the Lodges which make 
their returns promptly and correctly are allowed a credit of one 
cent per member per day, for each day that the returns are in 
before a specified time, and this year the credits amount to the 
large sum of $1,654.08, the total dues being $6,946.54. 

On the disputed point as to the proper use of the words 
«' Meeting " and " Communication," the following report was 
adopted : — 

" Your special committee appointed one year ago to report to this Grand 
Lodge the proper word to be used at the congregations of brethren, beg 
leave to report that, having given the matter due consideration, going back 
over the records for one hundred and fifty years, or the earliest records 
accessible, we find that the word to be used is " meetings," as applied to 
Subordinate Lodges, and " communications" for Grand Lodges. 

The conclusion reached is that the old word was "meeting" ninety- 
nine times out of every hundred. It is remarked, however, that in the 
early days of American Freemasonry, our brethren " held Lodges " instead 
of " held meetings." They would " hold a Lodge," and record same as 
the proceedings of " a Lodge held." 

So much for the custom of American Freemasons before other secret 
societies existed in the United States ; and the same reason exists for cling- 
ing to the word " meeting," as to the words " cowan," " eaves-dropper," 
"oblong-square," "hale," etc. A further reason is that "meeting" is 
short, simple, Saxon, while "communication " is long, lumbering, Latin. 
The first truly describes our congregations, the latter does not, either in its 
strict, original, or present meaning ; and it is hoped that no thought exists 
among us to lift ourselves by our bootstraps — to convey a big idea by using 
a big word — for such attempt would be as vain as if we were to throw aside 
our white gloves and aprons for the gay trappings of the many secret 
societies of the present decade. Our only hope is to continue to be dis- 
tinguished by simplicity, and to excel in that direction ; and as in our work, 
the word is " give it," rather than " communicate it ;" so, on the several 
grounds of old-time usage, true meaning, and simplicity, I think ' ' meeting " 
is to be preferred to " communication." 

The salary of the Grand Custodian was fixed at $1,200, and 

his travelling and Hotel expenses are to be paid by the Lodges 

visited. 



[Xiv. GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

The term of office of Grand Representatives was fixed at 
three years from the date of commission. 

M. W. Bro. George B. France, (York,) G. M. 
R. W. Bro. William R. Bowen, (Omaha,) G. S. 

NEVADA. 

24th Communication, Virginia, June 12th, 1888. 

M. W. Bro. A. L. Fitzgerald, G. M. 

Virginia City is built upon the famous Comstock Lode, and, 
we presume the Grand Lodge drew proper inspiration there- 
from, and they all became silver-tongued orators and sterling 
homunculi. 

The Grand Master had no less than four cases of invasion of 
Jurisdiction on his hands : — 

"The foregoing— four cases of invasion pending in one Grand Lodge 
" at one and the same time " — in a very striking manner brings us face to 
face with a question which in other jurisdictions than Nevada is now dis- 
turbing the peace and harmony of the builders of the Grand Masonic 
Temple on earth : that question is whether each Grand Lodge shall have 
exclusive jurisdiction over the territory in which it is situated ; or whether 
all Grand Lodges, "whithersoever dispersed around the globe," shall 
have concurrent jurisdiction of the entire earth. I believe it is unquestion- 
ably better for Masonry that each Grand Lodge have exclusive jurisdiction 
and control over its territory and all " material " therein. 

Holding firmly to this view I gave the following order to the Worshipful 
Master of each Lodge into the jurisdiction of which an invasion was 
made : — 

That such Master should not recognize as a Mason the person in his 
jurisdiction so receiving the degrees elsewhere or have any Masonic inter- 
course with him ; or permit any member of his Lodge to do either ; and 
that this order be announced by the Master in open Lodge at its next 
communication. This order I trust the Grand Lodge may approve, In 
this connection, in view of the great increase in the frequency of the inva- 
sion of our rights, which increase I attribute largely to the uncertainty, 
indefiniteness aad uneffectiveness of the remedies heretofore attempted to 
be applied, I recommend that the Grand Lodge resolve : — 

That in future whenever any Master Mason of this jurisdiction ascertains 
that one whom he knows to be a resident of this state goes elsewhere to 
get the degrees of Masonry, it shall be the duty of such Master Mason 
immediately to report the facts to the Worshipful Master of the Lodge in 
whose jurisdiction the one so taking the degrees resides ; that it shall be 
the duty of such Worshipful Master to announce at the next meeting of his 
Lodge that no member thereof shall recognize such person as a Mason or 
have any Masonic intercourse with him until the Lodge is in receipt of an 
order therefor from either the Grand Master or the Grand Lodge ; that it 
shall also be the duty of such Worshipful Master immediately to lay the 
facts of the case before the Grand Master ; and that it shall be the duty of the 
Grand Master through the Grand Secretary immediately to give to each 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. lxv. 

constituent Lodge of the jurisdiction a notice of the matter accompanied 
by a similar order as to recognition and Masonic intercourse. Such a 
course promptly taken and firmly adhered to will, in my judgment, soon 
stop this growing evil of trespass, infringement and invasion." 

The report on correspondence is by Bro. R. L. Fulton, and 

notices Canada for 1887. 

M. W. Bro. William McMillan, (Virginia,) G. M. 

R. W. Bro. Chauncey N. Noteware, (Carson,) G. S. 

NEW BRUNSWICK. 

21st Communication, St. John, April 24th, 1888. 

M. W. Bro. James McNichol, G. M. 

In twenty years they have increased in membership from 
1312 to 1833. The past year has been rather uneventful. 
They enjoy a moderate degree of prosperity and harmony 
prevails. 

The following report was adopted : — 

"The Committee on relations with Foreign Grand Lodges have much 
pleasure in reporting that the fraternal relations of this Grand Lodge with 
sister Grand Lodges continues, as heretofore, in perfect harmony. 

During the past year there has been no new application for recogni- 
tion by any Grand Lodge, nor has there been any change in the position of 
the Grand Lodge of Mexico or Grand Lodge of Porto Rico which would 
warrant your Committee in recommending action at present on their 
application for recognition by this Grand Lodge." 

M. W. Bro. James McNichol, (St John,) G. M. 
R. W. Bro. Edwin J. Wetmore, (St. John,) G. S. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

99th Communication, Concord, May 16th, 1888. 

M. W. Bro. William R. Burleigh, G. M. 

The returns show a small gain in membership. The Order 

is in a sound and healthful condition. In the report of the 

Fifth District we find the following : — 

' ' Within the past year there died in Haverhill, Miss Eliza Cross, a sister 
of Jeremy L. Cross. At the death of Brother Cross, all his books, papers 
and correspondence relating to Masonry came into her possession, all of 
which she religiously preserved, and from her I had repeated assurances 
that all of these should be given to the Grand Lodge of New Hampshire 
for preservation. I had also received assurances from the person chosen as 
her executor that I should, at least, have an opportunity to examine all such 
things. I did receive, and sent to the Grand Secretary, some publications 
of J. L. Cross, and others, but nothing, of any particular historical value to 



[xvi. GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

the Craft ; but the most important part of this collection, the letters receiv- 
ed by him upon Masonic matters for forty years or more, 1 failed to receive, 
or to see. To my astonishment and dismay, I was informed by the person 
in charge, soon after the decease of Miss Cross, that these letters had been 
burned." 

As a guide for the information of Investigating Committees 
we give the terms of a Standing Regulation adopted by this 
Grand Lodge : — 

" It is hereby made the duty of committees on character of applicants for 
initiation, to report upon each of the following named points : 

1. What is the applicant's age ? 

2. Where is his residence (specifying locality in Town or City as near 

as may be,) and has he a legal residence in the place of his 
present domicile ? 

3. Is he married or single, and if married, is he living with his wife ? 

4. What is his occupation, and where is he employed ? 

5. Is he physically qualified for admission ? 

6. Is he addicted to the intemperate use of intoxicating liquors ? 

7. Does he gamble, or associate with bad characters ? 

8. Does he habitually use profane or indecent language ? 

9. Has he a good character among his neighbors ? 

10. Does he possess sufficient education and intelligence to understand 

and value the principles of Freemasonry ? 

11. Has he previously made application for the Degrees, and if so, when 

and where? 

12. Are there any other facts known to the committee which should 

properly be brought to the attention of the Lodge before bal- 
loting ? 

Bro. A. S. Wait reports on Correspondence, and notices our 
proceedings for 1887. He has a curious idea of the effect of 
an edict of non-intercourse : — 

" Here, perhaps, is a proper occasion to reiterate what we many years 
since expressed, that we do not doubt the power of the Grand Lodge to 
decline fraternal intercourse with a sister Grand Lodge, though we think 
it should be an extreme case to justify such a step. But we are fully of the 
opinion that such a determination can only affect the official relations of 
the two Grand Bodies, and cannot extend to the Masonic status of the 
membership of their jurisdictions. That is to say, it is not within the 
legitimate province of a Grand Lodge, because of some conceived affront 
from another Grand Body, to deny recognition as Masons to all Masons of 
its obedience, or to prescribe non-recognition between the members of the 
two, considered as individual Masons." 

If this be correct, we are at a loss to know what non- 
intercourse means. Grand Lodge is only the representative 
of the Subordinate Lodges and the individual members of 
such Lodges. Non-intercourse means that the persons against 
whom the edict is directed are not to be recognized as 
Masons. It would certainly be an odd state of affairs that we 
should be forbidden to recognize a Grand Lodge as Masonic 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. lxvii. 

and yet be able to hail as brothers the individual members 
composing that body. 

Bro. Wait is correct in his opposition to the doctrine of per- 
petual jurisdiction, and his arguments on that subject are very 
good. 

It is very hard to " condense " Bro. Wait, but we have no 
space for further extracts from his admirable report, as our 
Grand Lodge has restricted us to 75 pages. 

M. W. Bro. George W. Currier, (Nashua,) G. M. 

R. W. Bro. George P. Cleaves, (Concord, G. S. 

NEW JERSEY. 

102nd Communication, Trenton, January 23rd, 1889. 

M. W. Bro. Robert M. Moore, G. M. 

Their condition is prosperous and happy, and the Lodges 
are steadily improving in the work. Eleven District Lodges of 
Instruction were held. Two new Lodges were formed. 

The following were adopted : — 

"Resolved, That where a waiver of jurisdiction over a candidate is 
requested by a sister Lodge of this or any other Grand Jurisdiction, a 
Committee of Investigation must be appointed to ascertain and report to 
the Lodge as to the worthiness or unworthiness of the candidate, before a 
vote is taken upon such request." 

" Resolved,^ That all correspondence between Lodges of this and sister 
Grand Jurisdictions relative to requests for waiver of jurisdiction, territorial 
or penal, or to the advancement of candidates, must be submitted to the 
Grand Master before action is taken thereon." 

" Resolved, That the Grand Master shall have power to appoint a pri- 
vate secretary, who shall receive a salary of two hundred dollars per 
annum." 

The Grand Secretary, having completed fifty years of con- 
tinuous service, received an address and testimonial, consisting 
of an album and a gold-mounted ebony cane. 

The Governor of the State, a Past Master, was appropriately 
received, and seated in the East. 

The Report on Correspondence is by Bro. Henry Vehslage, 
and notices Canada for 1888. 

M. W. Bro. Charles H. Mann, (Haddonfield,) G. M. 

R. W. Bro. Joseph H. Hough, (Trenton,) G. S. 



Ixviii. (IRANI) LODGE OF CANADA. 

NEW MEXICO. 

nth Communication, Santa Fe, Jan. 14th, 1889. 

M. W. Bro. W. S. Harroun, G. M. 

He instituted two new Lodges, one at Kingston, Sierra 
County, and the other at Chama, Rio Arriba County. He 
issued several dispensations allowing joint occupancy of halls, 
which appears to be a necessity in that Jurisdiction. 

The Grand Lecturer reports considerable proficiency and 
great advancement in several of the Lodges. He is properly 
conservative in the selection of material, and against undue 
haste in conferring degrees. 

A Committee was appointed to draft resolutions with refer- 
ence to the permanent location of the Grand Lodge. These 
resolutions provide for the election of one delegate from each 
Lodge, who with the Grand Master are to meet and consider 
the matter and report at next Grand Lodge. 

The following report was adopted : — 

" The decision of the M. W. Grand Master in the matter of allowing a 
member of a certain Lodge in this jurisdiction to " withdraw " from the 
Lodge and have his name erased from the roll of membership, because 
" he believes the Holy Bible to be a dangerous book, etc.," is one with 
which your Committee find themselves unable to concur. To allow a 
member of a Lodge to " withdraw " from the Lodge and have his name 
erased from the roll of membership would, in effect, send him out to the 
world an unaffiliated, undemitted Mason. Your Committee believe with 
the M. W. Grand Master that no man should be permitted to retain his 
membership, " in an organization, the foundation principles of which he 
cannot respect," but our Constitution and Laws provide a means by 
which an unworthy member may be severed from the body of Masonry. 
This can be accomplished by trial, conviction and expulsion. Your Com- 
mittee, therefore, recommend that this matter be referred back to the 
Lodge of which the offending Brother is a member, with instructions to 
have charges preferred against and served upon him, and that he be tried 
as provided by our Constitution and Laws for the trial of offenders against 
Masonic Landmarks." 

The report on Correspondence is by Bro. Max Frost, Past 
Grand Master and Grand Lecturer last year. Canada for 1888 
receives due notice. 

M. W. Bro. A. H. Morehead, (Silver City,) G. M. 

R. W. Bro. Alpheus A. Keen, (East Las Vegas,) G. S. 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. Ixix. 

NEW YORK. 

107th Communication, New York, June 5th, 1888. 
M. W. Bro. Frank R. Lawrence, G. M. 
On the benefit of official visits he says : — 

" The system of District visitations carried on during the two previous 
years has been continued, with results which fully justified the effort re- 
quired. During the past year the Grand Master has visited sixteen of the 
Districts, including several not thus visited before. It is believed that to 
bring the brethern generally in contact with those who administer the 
affairs of the Craft, as well as to facilitate the dissemination of knowledge 
and an interchange of views upon current topics, these events are infinitely 
useful ; and it is to be hoped that they may, whenever practicable, be 
continued in the future. 

The throngs of brethren who to this time have continued to attend these 
visitations, the heartiness with which the Grand Master has everywhere 
been greeted, and the enthusiasm evoked by the result of our labors, have 
demonstrated how permanent and deeply-rooted is the interest of the 
fraternity at large in the objects of our endeavors. Those upon whom the 
burden has chiefly rested have never failed to derive new strength from 
the generous encouragement which the Masters, officers and active members 
of the Lodges have upon every such occasion so freely extended ; and 
when the way has seemed long and the burden heavy, inspiration to renew- 
ed exertion has never failed to come from the knowledge of the sympathy 
and appreciation of the great body of the Craft." 

The Ladies' Association held a Masonic Fair on Nov. 28th) 
1887, at which the enormous sum of $76,352.37 was realized 
in aid of the fund for building an Asylum. The Grand Master 
thus speaks of it : — 

" To describe the Fair itself is well-nigh impossible. Only those actu- 
ally upon the spot can fully appreciate its interest and its charm ; and 
none who took part in it can ever forget its bright and bewildering scene. 

The room in which you now assemble was divided into streets and alleys 
and lanes, which gave access to more than forty bazaars, each a fair in it- 
self ; all filled and over-filled with objects of inexpressible variety, in the 
bringing together of which labor, skill, ingenuity and expense had been 
lavished without limit. In the halls without, and even to the topmost 
corridor, the scene was the same. Rather than a Fair, it was a succession 
of fairs that the visitor beheld. 

For three weeks great throngs of people daily crowded this building to 
the utmost. From the opening hour until the final close, the interest taken 
both by the Fraternity and the public never diminished ; and when the 
close came, not the smallest accident or mischance had occurred, ncr had 
anything taken place to disturb the hearty good feeling which marked the 
proceedings from the beginning to the end." 

He succeeded in further reducing the debt on their Hall by 
voluntary contributions to the extent of $103,663.24, making 
in all that has been raised by him $335,869.36, and there is a 



|\\. i;n \NI> M Ux.l OK CANADA. 

reasonable prospect that the debt will be all discharged during 

the next year. « 

The Special Committee on the address say : — 

"We do most earnestly recommend a careful perusal of this able and 
interesting address by the entire Craft, and the glorious work of which it 
treats, the grand results accomplished, the brilliant future which it predicts, 
and the gratifying fact that before the close of the present calendar year 
the gigantic debt which has for over fifteen years nearly paralyzed Masonry 
in this jurisdiction will be a thing of the past, and when this Grand Lodge 
meets again it will be free from debt, witha sound surplus ready to erect that 
great institution which is so near the heart of every true Mason, namely : 
An asylum for indigent Masons, their widows and orphans, at the same 
time reminding the brethren that these glorious results and present pros- 
perous condition of Masonry in this state is owing to the bold, fearless and 
untiring persistency of our able and eloquent Grand Master." 

All the officers were unanimously re-elected. 

The Committee on antiquities presented their second annual 
report, with a list of articles received during the year. 

The historian, R. W. Bro. Charles T. McClenachan, present- 
ed as the result of his labor during the year, the first volume 
of the " History of Freemasonry in New York." The price 
was fixed at $1.50 per volume, and one copy is to be presented 
to each Grand Lodge. 

An amendment was proposed to allow the Districts to select 
their District Deputies instead of their being appointed by the 
Grand Master, as is the case at present. This amendment 
was lost, the committee taking strong ground that it would 
lead to wire-pulling and log-rolling and that the Grand Master 
would be responsible for his Deputies although he would not 
have their appointment. We have the elective system here 
and it works well in general, although there have been cases 
where the tactics of the ward politician have been introduced, 
with the usual evil results. 

The report on correspondence is again by Bro. John W. 
Simons, but we have since received the mournful intelligence 
that he is dead. Bro. Simons was Grand Master in i860 and 
for eleven years thereafter, he was Grand Treasurer. He was 
the only one since Dewitt Clinton, who held the Chief Offices 
in the three Grand Bodies in New York, and for many years 
he was Chairman of Correspondence. He was probably the 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. lxxi. 

best known of Masonic writers and his numerous works on 
Jurisprudence have been quoted as high authority for some 
time. 

Under " Florida," he says : — 

" We note that, upon investigation, it was found that the Grand Lodge 
had been incorporated as far back as 1843, and referring to what we said 
last year, we respectfully suggest to our Florida brethren and others 
desiring a like entanglement that, in the first place, the incorporation does 
not seem to have been of any striking benefit, since its very existence was 
forgotten ; and hence that nothing has been gained in the way of holding 
title to property that might not just as well have been reached by incorp- 
orating Trustees, while there remains the disability of being liable to suits 
at law before the courts ; one phase of which may readily be imagined in 
the case of any brother who, feeling himself aggrieved for any cause what- 
ever, may seek his remedy in the courts rather than in the Lodge or Grand 
Lodge, thus transforming the Grand Lodge from a sovereign and inde- 
pendent body to a ward of the state, and liable to be called to account for 
its Masonic doings and the execution of its own laws before the civil courts. 

That nothing of the kind has happened is no reason why there should be 
permanent exemption from such troubles, and were we a resident of 
Florida, we should never rest until this anomalous state of things had been 
cured by a surrender of the act of incorporation." 

Canada for 1887 receives a good notice. 

From his notice of the Grand Lodge League of Germany 

we quote : — 

" A German periodical gives as total number of Freemasons in Ger- 
many, forty-four thousand and sixteen in three hundred and sixty-four 
Lodges, and says that, apparently, Freemasonry is mostly propagated in 
the sea-ports of Northern Germany. In the city of Lubeck are, among 
ten thousand inhabitants, eighty-two Masons ; in Hamburg, fifty-four ; in 
Bremen, forty-five ; Berlin has twenty-nine ; Duchy of Anhalt, twenty- 
three ; Grand Duchy of Mecklenburg, nineteen ; Prussian Province 
Saxony, sixteen ; Thuringa, fifteen ; Brunswick, fourteen ; Wurtemburg 
and Bavaria, each three ; Grand Duchy of Baden, four ; Alsace-Lorraine, 
two among ten thousand inhabitants. The number of Lodges is the 
largest in the Prussian Province Silesia, where thirty exist ; in the Province 
of Brandenburg are thirty-five ; in the Prussian Province Saxony, twenty- 
seven ; in the Rlienish Prussian Provinces, twenty-five ; in the kingdom 
of Saxony, eighteen ; in the Prussian Province Hessen-Nassau, sixteen ; 
in Mecklenburg, thirteen ; in Hamburg, fourteen Lodges. We cannot 
guarantee the correctness of this statement. 

In conclusion, we remark that the German Grand Lodge League (con- 
stituted in 1872), under the protectorate of "Emperor Wilhelm." consists of 
the eight German Grand Lodges ; its organ, or rather executive, is the 
Grand Lodge Diet, which is composed of the eight Grand Masters and two 
members to be elected by each Grand Lodge from the Master Masons of 
the jurisdiction. The yearly meetings take place at Whitsuntide alter- 
nately at the seat of the Grand Lodges. The Archive is deposited with 
the Grand Lodge, " Three Globe.,," at Berlin. Under the supervision of 
the Grand Lodge Diet is the " Victoria Institute," a benevolent institute 
which is described in former reports of our foreign correspondence. This 



Ixxii. GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

" Victoria Institute " has its bank account with one of the Berlin kmks, 
and its treasurer is Brother Schnoesenberg, Berlin, S. W. No. 29, Linden- 
strasse. 

Emperor Wilhelm was not the only imperial brother in the chain of the 
German Fraternity. Emperor Francis I. was also a zealous and true mem- 
ber of the Masonic Brotherhood. He received, as Duke of Lorraine, the 
first degree, May 14, 1731, when twenty-three years old, at the Hague, 
being then initiated by a delegation of the Grand Lodge of England, 
headed by the Deputy Grand Master, Bro. Desaquiliers. The English 
Grand Master, Uro. Lovel, gave him the second and third degree in Lon- 
don in the same year. Married in 1736 to the Empress Maria Theresa, as 
Prince Consort, and made in 1740 Regent ; he was elected, 1745, German 
Emperor. The Lodge "to the Three Canons" at Vienna, of which 
Francis I. was an active member, elected him several times as Master, and 
was very much indebted to him for his effective defence against the fiend- 
ish attacks of the clerical party, and the whole Catholic priesthood." 

And on the Grand Orient of the Netherlands : — 

" From the " Year Book " we ascertain that this Grand Body, founded 
December 26, 1756, has eighty-five Subordinate Lodges, of which forty- 
nine are in Europe, with three thousand and sixty members, twenty-three 
at the Cape of Good Hope, thirteen in other colonies, with about four 
thousand three hundred and ninety-eight members. Deputy and Provin- 
cial Grand Masters are : Bro. Derkinderen, at Batavia ; Bro. A. J. Jessu- 
run, at Surinam ; Bro. P. J. Beaujon, at Curacoa ; Bro. J. H. Homejer, 
at Capetown. A map appended to the " Year Book," of 1887, shows the 
Kingdom of the Netherlands, and gives very plain and conspicuously the 
seats of the Subordinate Lodges in the several towns, with enumeration of 
the number of members in each Lodge. 

The " Bulletin's " first section contains three circular letters of the 
National Grand Master, directed to the Subordinate Lodges, relating to 
internal and domestic matters only. The second section has very elaborate 
reports on the " Louisa Institute," a benevolent institution, devoted to the 
whole Fraternity of the Jurisdiction. This institution was founded in 1869, 
is located at the Hague, and we find in the report of the " Bulletin " very 
interesting items of its efficiency and administration. The third section 
has nothing but internal matters and recommendations directed to the 
Subordinate Lodges, and of course of no general interest. 

Another benevolent institution besides the " Louisa Institute," " The 
Widow and Orphan Fund's Administration," comprises also the Jurisdic- 
tion, and the whole Fraternity of the Netherlands is entitled to its benefits, 
the " Year Book " giving also a report of its activity. We have further 
to state that nearly every Subordinate Lodge has its private benevolent 
institutions for the members and their families. Statements of amounts of 
these Lodge funds and of the disbursements are not given." 

M. M. Bro. Frank R. Lawrence, (New York,) G. M. 

R. W. Bro. E. M. L. Ehlers, (New York,) G. S. 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

102nd Communication, Raleigh, January 8th, 1889. 
M. W. Bro. Charles H. Robinson, G. M. 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. lxxiil. 

Their general progress has been satisfactory. The Grand 

Master favors the appointment of District Deputies and the 

abolishment of the system of Grand Lecturers. He formed 

six new Lodges. He has the following remarks on their Orphan 

Asylum, and they contain food for reflection by those who are 

contemplating similar erections. 

" I come now to this subject — nearest to the heart of every true Mason. 
The report of the Superintendent will inform you of its situation now, the 
work of the past year, its increased efficiency and usefulness, its crowded 
condition, its happy life and its progress towards becoming more self- 
sustaining. 

We now have to look some facts in the face as they rise up before us. 
We have the honor of establishing the first Orphan Asylum in the State. 
It has so recommended itself that our example is followed. We should be 
proud of this, and it should stimulate us to renewed exertion. But it 
must cause us to consider what it means. It means probably the establish- 
ment of an Orphan Asylum by each prominent religious denomination 
in the State. Alluding to this last year in my address, I said : " there is 
room for all, need for all, and God's blessing will be upon all." I say so 
now. 

There are thousands of orphans and they need homes and training. 
The result of the establishment of denominational Asylums, however, must 
be to diminish our resources, to some extent. The support of their own 
Asylums will devolve on the Churches, and to members of these Churches 
giving to its denominational Asylum will become a duty, while contribu- 
tions to ours will become a charity. I believe there are hundreds of 
Church members, who, while sustaining their own Asylums, will continue 
to support ours, but we must prepare to expect some falling off in conse- 
quence of inability of some to do as much as heretofore. We have ample 
grounds, a beautiful situation, and the testimony of the years past to the 
faithfulness of the work. We have the endorsement and contribution of 
the State. We have fully repaid her by taking her homeless children of 
any denomination — alas too often of no denomination — and have fed and 
clothed them, instructed them in lessons necessary for this life, and for the 
life beyond this world, and have made them useful men and women. The 
State has made a good investment, and will continue to do so. 

It becomes our duty to take counsel together and determine wisely for 
the future of this Asylum, that no step backward may be taken, but that 
it may go on to increasing usefulness." 

It was decided to divide the State into eight Districts, and 
that the Grand Master should appoint District Deputies and 
one Grand Lecturer. Only actual expenses to be paid to 
these appointees. 

The Grand Lodge dues were increased from fifty cents to 
sixty cents per capita per annum. 

The Grand Lodge requested the Craft to give more attention 
to the Adoptive Rites for the ladies. 



|\\iv. GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

The Report on Correspondence is by Bro. Eugene S. 
Martin, and notices Canada for 1888. 

M. W. Bro. Samuel H. Smith, (Winston,) C. M. 
R. \V. Bro. Donald W. Bain, (Raleigh,) C. S. 

NOVA SCOTIA. 

23rd Communication, Halifax, June 6th, 1888. 

M. W. Bro. Lewis Johnstone, G. M. 

After opening, the Grand Lodge, headed by the band of the 
63rd Volunteer Battalion, proceeded to St. Paul's Church, 
where Divine Service was performed by several reverend breth- 
ren. 

The Grand Master reports having suspended a Master who 
had initiated a candidate who was physically disqualified by 
the loss of the left arm. He legalized an election by an 
ex post facto exercise of his prerogative as Grand Master. 
There is evidently no modern theory business about him. 

We also notice that he laid the corner stone of the new bank 
of Nova Scotia at Amherst, at the request of the authorities of 
that institution. This action is open to criticism. A bank is 
not an edifice appropriatad to religious, educational, charitable 
or Masonic purposes, nor is it a building belonging to the pub- 
lic in any way. We think it would be well to draw the line 
somewhere, and we have always understood that private build- 
ings should not be honored in this way. 

The practice of balloting for advancement to the second or 
third degrees is not warranted by their Constitution. The fol- 
lowing report and resolutions were adopted : — 

" The decisions of the M. W. G. Master will meet with the hearty 
endorsement of Grand Lodge, as will also his exercise of his prerogative in 
all the cases which the M. W. Grand Master has mentioned— especially in 
regard to the suspension of the late W. Master of Charity Lodge, Mahone 
Bay, for his flagrant act in daring to initiate into the mysteries of Masonry 
a candidate physically disqualified by the loss of the left arm— after objec- 
tion made. 

Your Committee feel that it will be well for Grand Lodge to take some 
special action, not only for the purpose of signifying its cordial endorse- 
ment of the Grand Master's act, but also in order that all who read the 
proceedings of this Grand Lodge may be warned never similarly to trans- 
gress. Your Committee would express their surprise that the late Master 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. lxxv. 

of Charity Lodge did not make it convenient to obey the Grand Master's 
summons to attend at this Communication of Grand Lodge. 

Resolved, That W. Bro. Burgoyne, of Charity Lodge, be suspended from 
all Masonic privileges till the next Annual Communication of this Grand 
Lodge ; and 

Resolved further, That Charity Lodge be censured for its action in sus- 
taining the action of the Worshipful Master of the Lodge ; and that this 
decision of Grand Lodge be forthwith communicated to Bro. Burgoyne and 
Charity Lodge." 

They have 67 Lodgers and 2,837 members. 160 initiations. 
The report on Correspondence is by Bro. David C. Moore, 
and notices Canada for 1887. 

M. W. Bro. Rev. David C. Moore, (Stellarton,) G. M. 
R. W. Bro. Benjamin Curren, D. C. L., (Halifax,) G. S. 

OHIO. 

79th Communication, Toledo, October 23rd, 1888. 

M. W. Bro. S. Stacker Williams, G. M. 

He formed three new Lodges. 

They have had trouble in Ohio for several years with what 
are called the " Cerneau " Bodies of the Ancient and Accepted 
Scottish Rite. These Bodies are declared illegal and clandes- 
tine by the other branch of the Scottish Rite, and the Grand 
Lodge of Ohio, has also declared them irregular and unmasonic 
and has forbidden all its members from belonging to them. 
The Grand Master says that this Order has been very generally 
observed, but in a few Lodges, officers have been elected who 
belong to the Interdicted Bodies, and the Grand Master sus- 
pended Proceedings under these elections. The situation was 
accepted and his authority was respected in all but two 
Lodges. 

The Committee on Jurisprudence considered the subject 
under four heads : — 

'I 1. Did the Grand Master have any authority in Masonic law for his 
actions in the premises ? 

2. If so, was this authority properly exercised in each given case ? 

3. What motive or spirit prompted a resort to the civil courts of the 
State by certain Lodges, and what is the effect on our Fraternity of these 
injunction cases? 

4. What action, if any, should now be taken by this Grand Lodge in 
each of the given cases ? 



Ixxvi. GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

On the first head, after quoting authorities, they conclude: — 

" The Grand Master has the undoubted power, and in many cases it is 
his duty, to forbid the installation of elected officers, until the charges 
against them can be duly investigated. 

The inherent power of the Grand Master must be preserved in all its 
original vigor. He stands superior to the Lodge, and the latter must obey 
his authority, respect his order, yield to his objection, and comply with 
his requirements, made in the discharge of his official duty. 

If a Subordinate Lodge, officer, or member thereof feels aggrieved, it or 
he must come for redress to this Grand Lodge. In our Order, as well as 
in all institutions, judicial and executive, sovereignty, so far as its votaries 
are concerned, must, from necessity, reside somewhere. With us it resides 
in this Grand Lodge. During vacation it abides with the Grand Master, 
subject, however, to be reviewed by this Grand Body, and by this Grand 
Body only." 

On the second head they found that the facts warranted the 
action of the Grand Master and recommend that the same be 
approved. 

On the third head, they conclude : — 

" Your Committees are therefore constrained to find that the members 
or Lodges who brought these actions were actuated by no desire to redress 
any wrong, but in pursuance of a settled plan to aid the interdicted 
Cerneaus in their warfare against legitimate Masonry." 

On the fourth head, they recommend that the charters of 
three Lodges be arrested, and these Lodges stricken from the 
roll. 

This report was adopted by a vote of 673 to 318. 

The following was also adopted : — 

" Whereas, This Grand Lodge, at its Annual Communication in 
October, 1&87, declared the Bodies calling themselves " The Ancient 
Accepted Rite for the United States of America, its Territories and 
Dependencies," and commonly called the " Cerneau Rite" to be " irreg- 
ular, illegal, and unmasonic," and that they " ought not to be counten- 
anced or recognized in any manner by Brethren under obedience to this 
Grand Lodge ;" and 

Whereas, Brethren subordinate to the authority of this Grand Lodge 
are still selling and conferring the Cerneau and other degrees, pronounced 
to be irregular, to Master Masons in this Jurisdiction, and are thereby 
violating the laws of this Grand Body : therefore, 

Be it Resolved, That any Mason subordinate to the authority of this 
Grand Lodge, who shall hereafter take, or receive, or communicate, or be 
present at, or assist any one to take or apply for said degrees, or any of 
them, shall be subject, after due trial under the Code, to expulsion from 
all the rights and privileges of Masonry." 

Five hundred dollars were voted to the Grand Master and 
the cordial thanks of the Grand Lodge to Bro. John D. Cald- 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. lxxvii. 

well, who retired from the Grand Secretaryship after many 
years service. 

Bro. W. M. Cunningham, reports on Correspondence. 
M. W. Bro. Leander Burdick, (Toledo,) G. M. 
R. W. Bro. J. H. Bromwell, (Cincinnati,) G. S. 

OREGON. 

38th Communication, Portland, June 13th, t888. 

M. W. Bro. Andrew Nasburg, G. M. 

In the opening of his address he says : — 

"I heartily congratulate you upon the prosperous condition of Masonry 
in this jurisdiction, and upon the advancement our young state has made 
in the last year in all branches of industry. We have reason to return 
thanks to the Ruler and Preserver of the universe for an abundant harvest 
and the manifold blessings bestowed upon us as a people and a nation. 

The influx of immigration has never been greater in the history of our 
state than within the last twelve months ; and before long all the available 
vacant land in the northwest will be occupied and, it is to be hoped, con- 
verted into comfortable, contented and happy homes. 

Since the last communication of this Grand Lodge, one of the most 
important events has transpired — that of driving the last spike in the 
Oregon & California railway, connecting the cities of San Francisco and 
Portland by rail, as well as furnishing the state with another competing 
transcontinental transportation line." 

He formed three new Lodges. He commends the course of 
a Lodge in trying to reconcile differences between brethren. 

A proposed amendment to increase the dues from one dol" 
lar to one dollar and twenty-five cents was rejected. 

The report on Correspondence is by Bro. S. F. Chad- 
wick. Canada for 1887 is well noticed. He commends our 
financial system and our practical benevolence. 

On the question of Indians becoming Masons, he has the 
following in reply to Bro. Wait, of New Hampshire : — 

" Our Brother W. thinks, because we said, " Indians in Oregon are not 
regarded as material in any sense," that our ritual should read, " that 
Masonry unites men of every country, sect and opinion, all but Indians, 
who must remain at a perpetual distance." We desire to add, that it is 
not necessary to change the ritual in the letter, the spirit of it is its life. 
There is not an Indian Mason on the Pacific slope that we are aware of. 
They do not associate with the whites, and have no interests in common 
with them. Our Indians are divided into different tribes. The so-called 
" Tarhead " would understand Masonry no better than a hedge-hog, and 
this class is about as numerous as any other. These are coast Indians, 
and live below the surface of the ground in covered pits during winter. 



IxXViii. GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

'['heir food is principally fish, the older the better. Blubber of the whale 
makes a feast for them. The only degree they could take would be that 
which Utah has abolished, with its variations. There are other classes of 
Indians that are higher in the scale of civilization, but they are Indians 
after all. I may better illustrate the case by referring to Indian schools 
established in Oregon and other places by the general government. These 
schools are supplied with a few pupils from Indian tribes from California 
to Alaska. We have a general average. It has not been our pleasure to 
view these schools in a very flattering light. The boys and girls learn very 
well. There are many who make fair musicians, and in a very few 
instances the girls sing quite well. The boys have instruments and form 
into bands and discourse very good music. They play baseball well, even 
to the smallest " kids," as they are called. They speak fair English after 
a while, but lack force or purpose. They do not realize the benefit of an 
education, unless they intend to teach. When thus employed they do 
fairly well, but when left to themselves after leaving school they return, in 
almost all cases, to their tribes. The Indian in them is uppermost all the 
time. These are specimens of the general Indian character here. We 
have seen chiefs who would come nearer being material. Even they 
could not be made intelligent Masons. Their tribes could not and would 
not adopt anything of the kind. There would be too much conflict of 
jurisdiction, and not a whit of brotherly love. We have seen all sorts of 
Indians on this coast, but we have never seen one who could be made a 
Mason. There are half-breeds who are not subject to these objections. 
One we know to be a Mason. Pie was educated at Harvard, we believe ; 
studied medicine and returned here quite a skilful physician. We know 
of no other who is a Mason. Our Indians, we regret to say, have not the 
attractions of your eastern Indians, or of the Choctaws. There is no poetry 
in our natives. We have no Pocahontas, nor have we the Mohicans. 
Civilization does nothing to benefit our Indians in the main. Our reserva- 
tions are run by different religious sects, but, when it is all summed up, 
they do no more than to keep order and feed and clothe the Indians. We 
would not take from the credit due that portion that follow farming on 
reservations. Some in eastern Oregon raise grain and vegetables. They 
have fairly comfortable houses for themselves. But they have no social 
relations as we have, and do not take to those things that make up society. 
Brother Wait, if you could see the Indians in California, Oregon and 
the north, including Alaska, you would find few, if any, that would be 
suitable material. 

As we have said, the eastern idea of an Indian flattens out to nothing 
when it conies to this coast. Cooper, had he lived here, would have found 
but little in Indian life and habits to have given him opportunity to por- 
tray Indian character in the glowing terms that he did that of the aborigi- 
nal inhabitants of New York and New England. 

We used to spend a little time in visiting, with the multitude, the 
grounds of the young basket makers, as they made their annual pilgrim- 
age through New England towns. Then we thought— we were quite 
young— some of them were really handsome, and they certainly were quite 
ingenious. But in no respect have their equals ever been found on this 
coast. 

Our Indians have their country and tribal limits. Indians here are not 
slaves, but are wards of the government. They have no sects nor have 
they opinions above their condition of purchased or forced servitude. 
Hence, the ritual can not well include these Indians when it says that 
" Masonry unites men of every country, sect and opinion." We wish they 
were material. There may be Indians found who would be good material. 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. lxxix. 

Some years before the war there was a little newspaper started in a town 
on the lower Mississippi, that had a prospectus which read " that all men 
were created free and equal except negroes." Our Constitution, it was 
thought then, did not include them, but it has received an interpretation 
since which gives the negro his opportunity to become a useful citizen. 
But, no revolution can fit our Indians for Masonry." 

M. W. Bro. Jacob Mayer, (Portland,) G. M. 
R. W. Bro. Frelon J. Babcock, (Salem,) G. S. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

At the Quarterly Communication held on June 6th, 1888, 

the Committee of Past Grand Masters appointed to consider 

the matter of the recognition of bodies commonly known as 

" Cerneau " Masons, presented an interesting report, and the 

resolutions accompanying it were unanimously approved : — 

" Shall this Grand Lodge recognize as in and of Freemasonry a body of 
men, of unquestioned integrity, claiming to be Freemasons of high degree, 
who seek within this Jurisdiction to establish and multiply their 
organization ? 

Your Committee will not enter upon the discussion of the legitimacy of 
either branch of the organizations claiming power to confer high degrees. 
It is foreign to what is held and taught by this Grand Lodge, and wholly 
unnecessary in the view taken by the Committee. But if it is correct, as 
was stated by the Right Worshipful Grand Master, that a body of men, 
Masons, seek to introduce, or have introduced, into this Jurisdiction an 
organization which claims the right to confer the Ancient Degrees of Free- 
masonry, then a decent self-respect requires our earnest denial of any such 
right, and uncompromising hostility to the incoming of such organization. 

Your Committee submit the following : — ■ 

Resolved, That if, as alleged, the organization known as the Consistory 
of the Cerneau Rite claims the power, or authority, or right to confer the 
three degrees of Ancient Freemasonry, it is not consistent with the duty 
of members of Lodges subordinate to this Grand Lodge to seek or retain 
membership in that organization. 

Resolved, That the permission by a subordinate Lodge for the use of its 
place of meeting for the practice of the Cerneau Rite, or for any other pur- 
pose than the one recognized as Masonic, is unauthorized and improper. 

Resolved, That this Grand Lodge expressly declines to enter upon any 
discussion of the history, use, or legitimacy of any body claiming to confer 
what is known as the high degrees in Freemasonry, or to be committed to 
the recognition of any such body as being Masonic, or as identified with or 
a part of Ancient Craft Masonry." 

The Annual Communication was held December 27th, 1888. 

M. W. Bro. Joseph Eichbaum, G. M. 

The Craft is in a very prosperous condition and the appli- 
cants for admission are carefully scrutinized. None of the 
Lodge rooms are being used as places of meeting by the 



1\V\. GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

"Cerneau" bodies, and but very few of their members are 
connected therewith. 

Bro. Richard Vaux has an excellent Report on Correspond- 
ence, covering 240 pages. He is in favor of the abolition of 
the Past Masters' degree and against the public installation of 
Officers : — 

" We think the " Past Master's Degree", may no longer be regarded as 
requiring further notice. It is an excrescence at best, that either disfigures 
or deforms the true ritualistic ceremonial of the subordinate Lodges. As 
it is not permitted to write fully the reasons, which would involve matters 
that are not to be cried out from the house-top, we conclude all further 
reference to this subject. As a parting word we feel it proper to remark 
that a dismembered or deformed body cannot be admitted into Free- 
masoniy, and the body of a ceremony cut in half is within the exclusion. 

On the subject of the public installation of officers of Lodges, we have 
fully explained our views. All criticism of them that we have read rests 
on that special pleading called in profane jurisprudence li confession and 
avoidance." It is approved, when approved, because it is, — -and why it 
is ? is answered that it is a sort of rule. We have yet met with no argu- 
ment in favor of the innovation which pretends to defend it, as within the 
strict letter of either Masonic law or Landmark." 

In his notice of Canada for 1888 he makes a distinction be- 
tween " lawful " and " legal." It is too fine for us. 

M. W. Bro. Clifford P. McCalla, (Philadelphia,) G. M. 
R. W. Bro. Michael Nisbet, (Philadelphia,) G. S. 

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND. 
13th Communication, Charlottetowm, June 26th, 1S88. 
M. W. Bro. John Yeo, G. M. 
Ten Lodges represented out of twelve on the roll. 
They have 495 members, an increase of 36. 
A motion against public installations was lost. 

The Grand Lecturer's expenses in visiting Subordinate 
Lodges are to be paid by Grand Lodge. 

The Grand Master has continuously held his position since 
the organization of the Grand Lodge, thirteen years ago, and 
was again re-elected, although he asked to be relieved. 

M. W. Bro. John Yeo, (Port Hill,) G. M. 

R. W. Bro. B. Wilson Higgs, (Charlottetown,) G. S. 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. Ixxxi. 

QUEBEC. 

19th Communication, Montreal, January 30th, 1889. 

M. W. Bro. H. L. Robinson, G. M. 

Our Grand Master, M. W. Bro. R. T. Walkem, was present 
and was received with all the honors, to which he suitably 
responded. 

Grand Master Robinson during part of the year, was in- 
capacitated by severe illness. He returns thanks for the kind- 
ness he received from Masons in the Southern States during 
his illness. He reports the Craft as progressive, their member- 
ship now reaching 2,820. On the mediation with England, he 
says : — 

" The Grand Lodge of Canada (in the Province of Ontario), at its last 
Annual Communication, in a kind and fraternal spirit which this Grand 
Lodge fully understands and appreciates, authorized its Grand Master to 
offer his mediation both to England and Quebec. M. W. Bro. Walkem, 
Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Canada, accepted the position, and, 
under the authority of the resolution of this Grand Lodge, just quoted, 
your Grand Master and Grand Secretary have considered the proposition 
made, and have accepted the mediatorial offer. 

That distinguished Brother hopes to visit England during the present 
year, and from his high character as a man and a Mason, his eminent 
position at the Bar of his Province, his comprehension of the points of 
difference, and his fraternal desire to arrange those differences, it will be 
seen that no better mediator could have been selected. There is also the 
additional reason, not without its weight in such an effort to terminate our 
disputes with England, that the Grand Lodge of Canada, as our Mother 
Grand Lodge, is the fittest mediator in this matter with the Grand Lodge 
of England, which was its Mother Grand Lodge. 

The selection of such an intermediary is in the highest degree judicious 
and appropriate. 

In view of this offer, and with a desire to strengthen the hands of M. 
W. Brother Walkem in mediating, I would suggest that Grand Lodge at 
this Communication should authorize and empower my successor in office, 
the Grand Master of this Grand Lodge, to suspend or even withdraw the 
edicts of this Grand Lodge against the Grand Lodge of England and its 
Lodges, whenever advised or requested so to do by Grand Master Walkem. 
In his judgment and good will we have a sufficient guarantee that the 
advisory power thus given him will be judiciously employed ; and this 
action from us may facilitate the efforts he may make to accomplish suc- 
cessfully his mission." 

The following resolution was then adopted unanimously : — 

"That with regard to that part of the Grand Master's Address which 
refers to the withdrawal of the edicts of this G. L. heretofore issued against 
the Grand Lodge of England and the Lodges in this city adhering thereto, 
this Grand Lodge fully recognizes the necessity of strengthening the hands 
of the Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Canada in the Province of 
Ontario in his mediation between this Grand Lodge and the said Grand 



IxXXii. C.RAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

Lodge of England and her Lodges, and hereby authorizes the M. Wor. 
Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Quebec, who may be in office at any 
time, at the request of M. Wor. Bro. Walkem, to withdraw the said edicts, 
and that the remainder of said address be referred to " The Committee on 
the State of Masonry," to be reported on as soon as possible." 

The remarks of M. W. Bro. Walkem were received with pro- 
found attention and he received thanks for the interest he and 
his Grand Lodge had manifested in the interest of Quebec. 

The report on Correspondence is by Bro. E. T. D. Cham- 
bers and gives our proceedings for 1888 a very good notice. 

M. W. Bro. Isaac H. Stearns, (Montreal,) G. M. 

R. W. Bro. John H. Isaacson, (Montreal,) G. S. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

98th Communication, Providence, May 21st, 1888. 

M. W. Bro. William N. Ackley, G. M. 

Among the deaths of the year were two Past Grand Masters, 
the Grand Lecturer and the Grand Tyler. Bro. George H. 
Kenyon was recognized as the representative of Canada, in 
place of Past Grand Master Ariel Ballou, deceased. The 
Grand Master made 33 official visitations and found everything 
favorable. On the convention of Grand Masters, he says : — 

" It was with much regret that I found myself unable to attend the 
Convention of Present and Past Grand Masters held in Chicago last June. 
While such gatherings can have only moral force, they cannot fail to be of 
great value in this very direction, and more especially as tending to 
quicken the feeling of kindred among the different Jurisdictions, and help- 
ing the Fraternity to realize the sublime fact that, while as Masons, we 
represent separate legislative bodies and households, yet we are one un- 
divided body of Brethren." 

The Committee on the Webb Monument, which has been 
in position for 30 years, found it in good condition and 
report no necessity for a new one to replace it. 

The following resolution was adopted : — 

" Ordered, That the Grand Secretary, all Secretaries of Subordinate 
Lodges and all Masons under the Jurisdiction of this Grand Lodge, are 
forbidden to furnish lists of the members of this Grand Lodge or its 
Subordinate Lodges to any person, whether he be a Mason or not, whom 
it is believed intends to use said list in connection with his or any other 
person's business." 

The estate of Past Grand Master Ballou donated to the 

Grand Lodge $100, to cover all expenses incurred in attending 

his funeral at Woonsocket. The estate of Past Grand Master 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. Ixxxiii. 

" Father " Hutchison donated to the Grand Lodge two shares 
of Freemasons' Hall Corporation. The thanks of the Grand 
Lodge were voted to the several donors. 

The estate of Grand Tyler White presented a cheque for 
$166, which had been bequeathed to the Grand Lodge by him. 
It was the amount donated to him by the Grand Lodge some 
time since and he desired to return it. The Grand Lodge 
accepted and immediately voted the same amount to his 
widow. 

M. W. Bro. Rev. William N. Ackley, (Warren,) G. M. 
R. W. Bro. Edwin Baker, (Providence,) G. S. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

112th Communication, Charleston, December nth, 1888. 

M. W. Bro. Andrew H. White, G. M. 

He reports peace and harmony, but the failure of the crops 
in some parts of the State has possibly hindered the prosperity 
of some of the Lodges. He formed two new Lodges. He 
visited several of the Lodges and believes that more attention 
should be paid to the social features of Masonry, as tending to 
revive and keep up the interest in the meetings more than 
anything else. 

The following report was adopted : — 

" As to the communication from M. W. Grand Lodge of Ohio, referred 
to us by the Grand Secretary, your Committee beg leave to suggest : 

That we as Blue Lodge Masons under the Jurisdiction of this Grand 
Lodge know of nothing else save the three symbolic degrees under the 
Jurisdiction of this M. W. Grand Lodge. 

Your Committee therefore are of the opinion that no body of Masons 
styled by any other name, can assume authority over the degrees as con- 
ferred in a Subordinate Lodge or Grand Lodge, wheresoever located. 

We therefore recommend that this Grand Lodge declare themselves in 
full sympathy with the action of the M. W. Grand Lodge of Ohio, with 
reference to Cerneau Masonry as shown by the circular from said Grand 
Lodge." 

Our Representative, R. W. Bro. A. Doty, was present and 
was elected Grand Senior Warden. He was also appointed to 
act as Master of a Past Masters' Lodge, to be opened at the 
close of the meeting, for the purpose of conferring that degree 



I\\\i\. GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

upon certain brethren who had not been able to receive it at 
their installation. 

The Report on Correspondence is by the Grand Secretary. 
He has a good notice of Canada for 1888. He supposed that 
every Grand Lodge requires a unanimous ballot for candidates 
for initiation. With us, two black balls are required, except 
in cases where the By-laws of the Lodge require a unanimous 
ballot, and most of our Lodges have By-laws to that effect. 

M. W. Bro. R. F. Divver, (Anderson,) G. M. 

R. W. Bro. Charles Inglesby, (Charleston,) G. S. 

TENNESSEE. 
75th Communication, Nashville, January 30th, 1889. 
M. W. Bro. Henry H. Ingersoll, G. M. 
On the state of the Order he says : — 

" An abstract of the returns from the Subordinate Lodges shows the 
condition of the Craft to be more prosperous in 1889 than for many preced- 
ing years. There is an increase over former years in the number of degrees 
conferred, and the number of affiliations, and a decrease in dimissions. 
The consequence is an increase in Grand Lodge dues and in remittances. 

This improved condition of the Craft is attributable to the general pros- 
perity of the country, and also, doubtless, to the general appreciation of 
the fact that the insurance fraternities, however useful and inviting, are not 
and can never become substitutes for the grand old parent Order of Free- 
masons, instituted to recall to our minds, in the midst of innocent, social 
pleasures, the sublime truths founded on Liberality, Brotherly Love and 
Charity ; to teach men that happiness is the greatest good, and that the 
surest way to be happy is by making others so. To every true Brother, 
therefore, this exhibit of the prosperity of the Order is highly gratifying." 

The Grand Master wished to appoint as their representative 

to Ohio some brother who was opposed to the policy of the 

dominant majority in that State in the matter of the Cerneau 

Scottish Rite, and the Grand Master of Ohio refused to do so, 

and on this subject the Committee on Jurisprudence, whose 

report was adopted, say : — 

" Your Committee are impressed with the serious nature of the unfortu- 
nate controversy which has arisen between the Grand Master of Ohio and 
the Grand Master of Tennessee with regard to the interchange of Grand 
Representatives, and, while declining to discuss the expediency of the 
inauguration of the controversy so much to be regretted, and while 
earnestly deploring that such a condition of affairs should exist, we cannot 
but feel, after carefully studying the correspondence, that the Grand 
Master of Tennessee has truly reflected the sentiments and wishes of the 
Masons of this Jurisdiction in insisting that he who shall be commissioned 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. 1XXXV. 

as our Representative shall be one who is willing to ignore the strifes of 
outside organizations, and to preserve unbroken the integrity, peace and 
good will which should, and we trust will, ever prevail in the great 
Brotherhood of Ancient Craft Masonry. 

The three degrees of our beloved Fraternity — Entered Apprentice, 
Fellow Craft and Master Mason — comprising all over which the Grand 
Lodge claims Jurisdiction and over which its right of supreme control it 
will ever maintain, embrace within their triple lines all which concerns 
our welfare. Let us not be drawn unwillingly into disputes which may 
arise between organizations of which we have no legal knowledge, and in 
which, except as reluctant spectators of their troubles, we have no interest. 

In Tennessee, God willing, we are determined that no such strife shall 
disturb our councils. Standing thus firmly upon that determination as 
our sure foundation of safety, we are of the opinion that those who may 
be selected and commissioned as the Representatives of the Masons of 
Tennessee, even in those Grand Jurisdictions where such unfortunate 
controversy may exist, shall be of like convictions with ourselves. This 
being so, and the Grand Master of Ohio being unwilling that any but a 
paitisan in the struggle in which his Jurisdiction is unfortunately involved, 
shall hold our Commission and receive courteous and fraternal reception 
from the Grand Lodge of Ohio, it would be undignified that we should 
insist, and still less true to our own convictions and self respect that we 
should consent to the appointment of one, however otherwise worthy, who 
would in so important an issue hold opinions at variance with our own. 

Much as we regret, therefore, the apparent rupture of those official 
courtesies which have so long and so pleasantly passed between these two 
distinguished Grand Bodies, we feel that we must be content to abide the 
decision made by the Grand Master of Ohio until such time as the Most 
Worshipful Grand Lodge of that distinguished Grand Jurisdiction shall 
determine to seek a renewal of those relations which have ever been so 
highly prized and gladly reciprocated on our part. In the meantime, let 
us resolve that nothing shall disturb the cordiality which we trust will 
ever exist between the brethren of the Craft, whether Ohio or Tennessee 
claims their allegiance — let us, at all times " meet upon the level and part 
upon the square," and in no way feel that any grievance subsists between 
those who we hope may ever be able to meet about a common altar." 

Bro. Frank M. Smith submits his report on Correspondence 

"To the reading Masons of Tennessee." Canada for 1888 

receives a good notice. On the Negro question he says : — 

" The negro question is not giving the Masonic fraternity of the South 
any trouble. We can take care of ourselves on that score. There are 
negroes here that are Masons, so-called. There are Masonic Lodges, so- 
called, for the Brother in black all over this section of the Union. No 
member of the Masonic fraternity ever pays any attention to these colored 
Masons, so-called, nor will any attempt ever be made to find out anything 
about these colored Masons, so-called. Again, we can take care of our- 
selves on that question." 

He is sound on the doctrine of perpetual jurisdiction, and 
thus records his opposition thereto : — 

" The term " good common sense " is often used. How to apply that, 
it seems to me, good common sense will say that when a Lodge rejects an 
applicant for the degrees, that should be an end of the matter. The idea 



Ixx.wi. ('.RAN I) I.OIK'.K OF CANADA. 

of saying " he is our rejected material " should be discarded. If you reject 
him he is not your material in any sense. I may as well say, when offered 
an orange at the dinner table, "that I do not want an orange to-day, but 
this is my ' rejected material? and you must put it away and not let anyone 
else eat it." The orange is put away and decays. 

So long as the rejected material resides in the jurisdiction of the Lodge 
where rejected, he cannot, of course, petition any other Lodge, but when 
he removes to the jurisdiction of another Lodge, or to another grand juris- 
diction, then the Lodge that rejected him has, or should have, no control 
over him." 

M. W. Bro. John T. Williamson, (Columbia,) G. M. 
R. W. Bro. John Frizzell, (Nashville,) G. S. 

TEXAS. 

53rd Communication, Houston, December nth, 1888. 

M. W. Bro. Anson Rainey, G. M. 

While their condition is flourishing, he thinks they have too 
many poor and weak Lodges as well as luke-warm brethren, 
and that brethren are too anxious to organize a Lodge before 
conditions are favorable. He formed ten new Lodges. We 
presume that the conditions were all favorable in these cases. 
He decided that it was an ancient custom to preside " covered," 
and that it must be complied with. We wonder how ancient 
this custom is. We have no trace of it here. 

The Grand Lodge of New South Wales was recognized. 

Lodges were forbidden to hold Masonic communication 
with the " Superior Grand Orient of Mexico," and the Grand 
Master was authorized to appoint a competent brother to in- 
vestigate the state of Mexican Masonry, and report at next 
meeting. 

A large amount of local business was transacted. 

The report on Correspondence is by Bro. Thomas M. 
Matthews, and covers no less than 297 pages. Canada for 
1887 and 1888 receives due attention. Under the head of 
Mexico, he says : — 

" Masonry in our sister Republic is apparently making gratifying and 
permanent progress, notwithstanding the bitter antagonism of the Church 
of Rome and its adherents. The York Rite appears to be now firmly 
established. New Lodges are being instituted in all parts of the country 
and Grand Lodges are being formed in each state when there are found to 
be a sufficient number of Lodges therein to warrant such formation. We 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. lxxxvii. 

cannot say that universal harmony prevails, for in some instances dissen- 
sions have arisen which there is reason to believe have been more or less 
fomented by the adherents of the Supreme Council of the Scottish Kite. 
Be that as it may, the calm judgment and evidently strong desire of the 
great majority of our Mexican brethren to have a representative government 
for symbolic Masonry, will probably soon dispose of the ineconcilables." 

M. W. Bro. William S. Fly, (Gonzales,) G. M. 
R. W. Bro. William F. Swain, (Houston,) G. S. 

UTAH. 

1 8th Communication, Salt Lake, January 15th, 1889. 

M. W. Bro. Samuel Paul, G. M. 

All the seven Lodges in the Jurisdiction were represented. 

One Lodge surrendered its charter. 

In this Territory they are surrounded by an element antag- 
onistic to Masonry, and their efforts to advance are thereby 
retarded. 

In the Grand Secretary's report we find : — 

" The harvest in the Masonic field in Utah did not yield as much fruit 
as it promised at the beginning of the year. The early spring months were 
very encouraging, the weather was fine, and it looked as if we could garner 
plenty, but all at once a frost came and nipped the blossoms, causing 
another off-year. Besides having lost one Lodge, our numerical strength 
has again decreased. My last report exhibited 462 members, the present 
one only 458, being a loss of four members." 

He predicts that if Utah is admitted as a State, there will be 
no room for the Masonic edifice in the new kingdom : — 

•■ Masonry and Mormonism can never occupy the same soil. The one is 
for light and progress, the other wants to go back to the dark ages. Up 
to this time Masonry has not yielded an inch to the hierarchical powers 
that be in this fair territory, but if it should become a state in its present 
condition, the odds would be so much against our Lodges that they would 
be forced to surrender their charters. The Grand Lodge could then dis- 
solve and every true Mason in Utah hunt for " greener fields and pastures 
new." 

We hope he is mistaken. Masonry has secured a good 
foothold there, and although the circumstances may be try- 
ing, we trust they may continue in the good work, and with 
further accessions they may present a united front, and be as 
Masons always have been, a bulwark against fanaticism and 
tyranny in all its phases. 

That Bro. Diehl has not lost all hope is evident from the fact 



IwWlli. GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

that he strongly urges the building of a new hall and more 
assistance for his Grand Lodge library, of which he is so justly 
proud. 

The new Grand Lodge of New South Wales was recognized, 
and the following resolution adopted : — 

" That the Grand Lodge of Utah is in hearty sympathy with the action 
taken by the Grand Lodge of Ohio in sustaining its Grand Master, and 
will ever sustain and sympathize with all efforts of our Sister Grand Lodges 
to defend and uphold the pure and simple principles of Freemasonry as 
handed down to us by our fathers, discountenancing to the fullest extent 
of our power all innovations of whatever name or nature in the body of 
Masonry." 

The report on Correspondence is by the Grand Secretary, 
and notices Canada for 1888. On the right of a visitor to in- 
spect the warrant, he says : — 

" Probably no member of the Committee desires our opinion on that 
point, and we are not going to offer it for its future guide, but we do want 
to state right here that we consider it one of the greatest farces in Masonry 
we know of. Many times have we smiled when we were appointed by our 
Masters to examine visitors, previous to which they demanded an inspec- 
tion of our Lodge Charter, because we saw they looked at it as the traveler 
in Egypt looks at the sphinx. They never saw our Grand Lodge seal 
before, the signatures of our Grand Lodge Officers were to them hierogly- 
phics, and all they beheld was a piece of old and much handled parchment. 
The expression of their eyes convinced us every time that they knew just 
as much after the inspection of our Charter as before. Every visitor ought 
to acquaint himself with the status of the Lodge before he calls to make 
the visit, and if he neglects to do that it is his own fault, not that of the 
Lodge. The clandestine Lodges are not so plentiful in our country and 
any Mason who reads a Masonic journal, or the Proceedings of his own 
Grand Lodge, which every Mason should do, can easily find out where 
there are such, or which Lodges his Grand Lodge forbids him to visit." 

M. W. Bro. Abbot Rodney Hey wood, (Ogden,) G. M. 
R. W. Bro. Christopher Diehl, (Salt Lake City,) G. S. 

VERMONT. 

95th Communication, Burlington, June 13th, 1888. 
M. W. Bro. Alfred A. Hall, G. M. 
On the state of the Craft, he says : — 

" The year has been a prosperous one. Never since I became familiar 
with the workings of the different Masonic organizations, have I seen a 
more earnest desire manifested, not only to excel in ritualistic work and 
ceremonial, but to become better posted in the law and philosophy of 
Masonry, and to turn out material qualified to stand the test of an over- 
seer's square that should measure the mental and moral worth of the man. 

When such a spirit becomes universal throughout our state, the Masonic 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. lxxxiX. 

organization will have no critics, but its membership will be greatly in- 
creased and the good it can accomplish will be incalculable. 

My Brother, if your Lodge has been careless in this respect ; if its mem- 
bership is looked upon as of doubtful character ; if the best men in your 
society feel that by attending your meetings or associating with some of 
the members they are bringing upon themselves the reproach of the world, 
it is time that earnest, honest effort was exhibited. It is your duty to re- 
claim the erring if possible ; make your meetings models of decorum ; 
select the best material presented, and purge it of everything that is un- 
becoming a society founded upon the grand principles of Truth and Just- 
ice, Virtue and Morality." 

He appears to have done his duty in full : — 

" During the year I have made fourteen official visits to Lodges ; per- 
formed the installation ceremony once privately, and twice publicly ; 
assisted in the presentation of a jewel ; attended three district meetings; 
convened the Grand Lodge on two funeral occasions and for one dedica- 
tion, and have delivered six addresses. 

If time and space permitted I would be glad to speak in detail of the 
welcome given us by Mount Anthony Lodge and its hospitality ; of the 
pleasure we had there in meeting M. W. William R. Burleigh of New 
Hampshire, Past Grand Master Parkham, who came as the representative 
of the Grand Master of Massachusetts, and M. W. Charles H. Robinson 
of North Carolina ; of the efforts made to reach the summit of Jay Peak 
with brethren of Masonic Union Ledge, and how we were driven to seek 
shelter from the storm in a rude shanty where a Lodge was extemporized, 
the third degree worked and an address delivered ; of the pleasant occasion 
at Hartford when United Brethren Lodge celebrated its seventy-fifth anni- 
versary ; of the beautiful hall at Brattleboro, dedicated to Masonry, to 
Virtue and Universal Benevolence; of the days imprisoned at 
Jacksonville by one of the great storms, and the entertainment of our good 
brethren there ; of the interest manifested at district meetings ; and of the 
excellent work I have seen and of hospitality extended, and loyalty and 
good will everywhere exhibited. 

If questions have sometimes perplexed, tiring the brain ; or if long 
journeys through drifts and snow, have been wearisome to the flesh, the 
meeting of Brothers has always cheered the heart and given encouragement 
for the work before us, and the only regret is that the stern demands of 
business have prevented my visiting all the Lodges in the jurisdiction." 

Among other things, he laid the corner-stone of the Ben- 
nington Battle Monument, designed to commemorate the vic- 
tory achieved by the Patriot forces over the British forces on 
August 1 6th, 1777. We might discourse here on the impro- 
priety of Masons commemorating strife, but we forbear. In 
the ceremony we notice that the Grand Master, after using the 
elements of consecration, solemnly dedicated the stone to 
virtue, loyalty and patriotism ! We do not know where he got 
his ceremony, but it is the first time we ever heard of a stone 
being dedicated to anything, 



XC. GRAND LODGE OF CANAItX. 

The Grand Secretary reports that every Lodge in the Juris- 
diction has paid up all dues and arrearages. 

A resolution to secure a nucleus for a Masonic temple 
fund was voted down. 

Canada for 1887 receives due notice. 

M. W. Bro. Alfred A. Hall, (St. Albans), G. M. 

R. W. Bro. Lavant M. Read, (Bellows Falls,) G. S. 

VIRGINIA. 

111th Communication, Richmond, Dec. nth, 1888. 

M. W. Bro. W. F. Drinkard, G. M. 

He formed four new Lodges. The cost of their new tem- 
ple will be not less than $130,000, or $14 for each affiliated 
Master Mason in Virginia, and the Trustees have made more 
than $50,000 of that sum by judicious investments. We quote 
two of his decisions : — 

" In Virginia membership, like initiation, must be of the petitioner's 
own free will and accord. A Brother raised in a Lodge has the privilege 
of declaring himself a member of it. If he neglects to do so at that meet- 
ing he becomes a non-affiliate. Under like cirenmstances he becomes a 
non-affiliate if raised in a Lodge in another state at the request of a Lodge 
in this state. But if the Lodge in Virginia surrenders jurisdiction to a 
Lodge in another state, the Brother is under the law of that state, and 
must petition as a non-affiliate for membership in Virginia. 

That a Tiler, though a member of the Lodge he tiles, takes the office 
cum onerc — that is to say, knowing that it is his duty to be at all times 
•' without the door." And as he cannot, without neglecting his duties, hear 
what is said for or against a petitioner, and therefore is not qualified to vote 
unless he knows the petitioner personally, he may be excused from voting 
on a petition for the degrees. Nevertheless if he claims the right to vote 
it must be accorded to him. " 

A committee was appointed to consider the advisability of 

establishing a Masonic Orphan Asylum. 

In the Report from District No. 1 2 we find the following : — 

" The recovery by Kilwinning Crosse Lodge of a second installment of 
the jewels and regalia stolen from the Lodge room in Port Royal during 
the late war by raiding Federal soldiery, through the efforts of Brother 
Emory Packard, of Paul Dean Lodge, Easton Mass., affords a pleasing 
illustration of the value of Masonic principles. The correspondence had 
in effecting this restitution led to the interchange of Masonic courtesies and 
of fraternal and personal intercourse between the brethren of these two 
Lodges mutually pleasant and beneficial. 

These jewels and regalia on account of their antiquity and associations, 
are exceedingly interesting and valuable, having been brought over from 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. XC1. 

Scotland along with the original Charter of Kilwinning Crosse Lodge, under 
which it was established, as the second Lodge in the Colony of Virginia. 
They are perhaps the oldest Masonic emblems in this country. Their ac- 
quisition, therefore, is a matter of congratulation to the Craft in this state.' 

The report on Correspondence is by Bro. W. F. Drinkard, 
and notices Canada for 1888. He is against perpetual juris- 
diction over rejected candidates, and we are glad to learn that 
his Grand Lodge has never claimed it. In proof that 
there was a Past Master's degree, Bro. Drinkard says : — 

" We have before us a pamphlet containing the By-laws of Manchester 
Lodge, No. 14, in Virginia, as "passed February 3d, A. D. 5821," 
"printed by John Warrock, printer to the Grand Lodge of Virginia." 
The first By-law provides that " the Lodge shall be assembled in the First 
Degree " on the first Saturday of every month, and on the anniversaries of 
the Saints John ; " a Lodge of Fellow Crafts shall be held " in September, 
November," January, and March ; and a Lodge of Master Masons in Octo- 
ber, December, February, and April. Article V. is headed, " Of Passing, 
Raising, and Advancing to the Degree of Past Master. " Another article 
provides that no fee shall be required for conferring " the Degree of Past 
Master," but "the candidate or candidates shall nevertheless pay the 
expenses of the Lodge called to confer it." Not " meeting " notice, but 
" Lodge." The list of members shows that there were three " Past Mast- 
ers elect" and eleven in the " Past Master's Degree." Three of the 
Officers were recorded as " Fourth Degree." Nine members were Master 
Masons, two Fellow Crafts, and six Entered Apprentices." 

M. W. Bro. Robert T. Craighill, (Lynchburg,) G. M. 
R. W. Bro. William B. Issacs, (Richmond,) G. S. 

WASHINGTON. 

31st Communication, Port Townsend, June 13th, 1888. 

M. W. Bro. Joseph Smith, G. M. 

He formed five new Lodges and declined a petition from 
Alaska. 

It is not necessary in this Jurisdiction that a Master should 
have previously served as Warden, Query? Is not this a 
violation of an ancient landmark ? 

The Grand Master decided that an Officer could not be in- 
stalled into office while under charges. In this we think he is 
wrong. He assumes the accused to be guilty beforehand, 
contrary to the well known rule that a man must be presumed 
to be innocent until he is proved to be guilty. It would be 
an easy matter for the unsuccessful candidate at an election to 
prefer charges against his successful opponent, and under this 



xcii. CRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

rule, to prevent him being installed. We all know how deeplj 
chagrined the unsuccessful candidates sometimes are, and we 
would not expose them to the temptation of being able to 
harass and annoy the elected party. The charges of unma 
sonic conduct may be properly prosecuted whether the accused 
is in or out of office, and full justice done in the premises, 
without violating the wholesome rule of presumed innocence. 

On the state of the Craft, Bro. Smith says : — 

" It affords me great pleasure to report to you that our relations with 
other Grand Lodges in communication with us are of the most friendly 
and harmonious character. Masonry in our own jurisdiction was never in 
a more prosperous condition than at the present time. Peace and har- 
mony prevail in all our Lodges, and our prospects for the future are bright 
and encouraging. Thousands of people are coming to our territory to 
make permanent homes, and amongst them we find many influential men, 
and many good and true Masons are affiliating with us. Our ranks are 
rapidly filling up, and the roll of members of our Lodges lengthening. In 
order for us to keep pace with the rapid strides of prosperity with which 
we now are blessed, is for us to enact good and wholesome laws, keep the 
outer door closely guarded and see that none enter but such as are duly 
qualified and will be an honor to our beloved institution." 

" The Washington Monitor and Freemasons' Guide to the 
Symbolic Degrees," is the title of a little volume issued recently 
from the office of the Grand Secretary. 

They have 50 Lodges and 2,103 members, showing an in- 
crease of 167. 

The Committee on Jurisprudence recommended that the 
decision of the Grand Master which we have noticed above, be 
not concurred in, and their report was adopted by the Grand 
Lodge. 

The following was adopted : — 

" Resolved, That no Lodge in this Jurisdiction shall receive the petition 
for the degrees of Masonry from any person engaged in the manufacture or 
sale of intoxicating liquors as a beverage." 

The report on Correspondence is by the Grand Secretary, 
and notices Canada for 1887. Bro. Reed does not believe in 
perpetual jurisdiction, nor that Grand Lodges should interfere 
in Scottish Rite quarrels. 

M. W. Bro. Nathan S. Porter, (Olympia,) G. M. 

R. W. Bro. Thomas M. Reed, (Olympia,) G. S. 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. XC111. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 
24th Communication, Parkersburg, November 13th, 1888. 
M. W. Bro. Charles H. Collier, G. M. 

On the necessity of intellectual development in Masonry, he 
has the following good remarks : — 

" In my judgment one great need in our Subordinate Lodges is a pure 
literature. There is not a Lodge in this jurisdiction within my knowledge 
that can boast of a Masonic library or a library of Masonic and literary 
books. Having visited many I have failed to find one, and, therefore, 
make this declaration with some degree of certainty. The means of mak- 
ing Masons intelligent are not from Masonic sources. 

We fall into error and overvalue our machinery when we suppose that 
the routine duty of the Lodge and the recital of the ritualistic work will 
meet the demands of our natures. The growing mind will seek other 
associations, and it will not be long before the many will be known as 
Masons by attendance at the annual meetings only. This is in great 
measure present experience. 

It is our work to develop the intellect as well as the conscience, uniting 
the two into one nature so as to produce an unclouded mind with fidelity 
to principle which constitute the highest type of manhood. 

How wonderfully incomprehensible, yet true, is the individuality of free 
Masonry. The unity of her relations is not disturbed by the telescope of 
the astronomer or the pick of the geologist. There are no theories to be 
overturned, and therefore she feels no scientific evolution. Whatever is 
developed as truth in the triumphal march of civilization shakes not her 
foundations, while the theories of many institutions, after the combat for 
superiority has ended, crumble into dust. 

These are questions upon which the world is agitated to-day. The true 
Masonic mind will sift out the error and retain the truth, provided the 
means of obtaining a knowledge of the world's history, the progress of 
humanity, the development of science and all kindred questions are placed 
within his reach. Such knowledge can only be obtained from books. 
But there are hundreds of them that ought to grace the shelves of every 
Masonic library. Masonic histories and works upon the seven liberal arts 
and sciences are eminently proper. 

The night a Brother is raised to the degree of Master Mason, he is laun- 
ched upon the world — a finished Mason. Could we but fix in his mind 
that the ritual is but the alphabet upon which he is expected to build the 
temple of his Masonic knowledge, Freemasonry would become a subject of 
investigation, and would command the respect of the highest intelligence. 
The many would learn. Let us, my brethren, foster these means of making 
our membership the recipients of all that is good in knowledge that each 
may grow in wisdom's ways, and live as God intended man to live." 

He ruled against the propriety of holding fairs and festivals 
in Masonic halls ; also, against erecting a building to be jointly 
occupied by the Masons and Oddfellows. He decided that the 
Grand Lodge could not be opened in Special Communication 
in each of two towns upon the same day, these towns being 300 
miles apart, but on this subject the Committee on Masonic 



XC1V. GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

Jurisprudence and the Grand Lodge differed from the ('.rand 
Master, holding that at these Special Communications the 
Grand Master is usually represented by proxy, and there could 
be several proxies engaged in special Masonic work at the same 
time. We think, however, that the Grand Master was right. 
The Grand Lodge has to be opened on each of these occa- 
sions, and how the same body can be in two places at once 
passes our comprehension. 

Grand Master Collier formed two new Lodges, and on the 
state of the Craft he says : — 

"It is a matter of great congratulation that in all the districts reported 
there is a steady growth in interest as well as membership. But few of the 
Lodges are passive. The influence of Freemasonry is growing with the 
growth of the state. These hill tops and valleys are destined to be cov- 
ered with the homes of a million people who are to be fed morally as well 
as physically, who are to give to the world the products of coal, iron, salt 
and lumber which nature has so lavishly bestowed upon us. The workmen 
on the hilltops, in the valleys, in the mines and on the rivers are to become 
the representatives of our Order. As the smoke ascends from the furnaces 
in the metropolis of our young and growing Commonwealth, as the pick 
of the miner away down in the dark mine severs the black diamonds, as 
the axe of the woodman resounds through the forest, all telling of future 
wealth and luxury, of peace and happiness to many homes, so will the 
riches from the mines of Masonic lore be developed, thereby strengthening 
the bonds that make us a happy people." 

Grand Lodge decided that an objection to the initiation of a 
candidate, communicated privately to the Master, should be 
as effective as a black ball. 

The following report was adopted : — 

" Intemperance is unmasonic, and we insist that every Subordinate 
Lodge shall strictly and diligently discipline any member or members, 
within its jurisdiction, who shall, so far depart from the teachings and in- 
structions of Masonry, as to become intoxicated or drunk by the use of 
spirituous or malt liquors, or drinks of like character, thereby betraying 
the trust committed to him or them and disgracing the cause of Masonry." 

Bro. O. S. Long has prepared a digest of Masonic law for 
local government, which received the approval of the Grand 
Lodge, and each Lodge was ordered to procure three copies. 

The report on Correspondence is by Bro. George W. Atkin- 
son, P. G. M., in which Canada for 1888 receives due notice. 

We regret to learn of the death of Bro. Thomas H. Logan, 
who was Grand Secretary for seven years and Grand Master 
for three years. He was a faithful christian, a cultured man 
and a distinguished citizen. 

M. W. Bro. Gustav Brown, (Charleston,) G. M. 

R. W. Bro. Geo. W. Atkinson, (Wheeling,) G. S. 



FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE. xcv. 

WISCONSIN. 

44th Communication, Milwaukee, June 12th, 1888. 

M. W. Bro. Eugene S. Elliott, G. M. 

The year has been quiet, but prosperous, and the Craft were 
never more harmonious. The Grand Master refused to grant 
a dispensation to allow a Lodge to join with the G. A. R. in 
ceremonies of memorial day, or to participate in a parade to a 
reception to President Cleveland. We wonder at the ignorance 
that would make such requests. 

In the report of the Grand Secretary, he says : — 

" I have been especially favored for the past two years by the continued 
presence and watchful supervision of the M. W. Grand Master. That 
Officer having scarcely failed for a single day, when in the city, from call- 
ing at the office of the Secretary." 

What a nuisance he must have been ! 

The Grand Master was authorized to draw his warrant on 
the Grand Treasurer for charitable purposes in cases of 
emergency. 

The schools of instruction held by the Grand Lecturer have 
been better attended than heretofore. 

Resolutions were proposed to appropriate $5,000 towards a 
Masonic home and to levy a tax of forty cents per capita, but 
as two-thirds did not vote in their favor they were not considered. 

The installation of Officers was peculiarly interesting, the 
P. G. M., not conveniently finding a monitor, improvised the 
service, making appropriate addresses to each Officer. 

The report on Correspondence is by Bro. Duncan McGregor, 
and notices Canada for 1887. 

M. W. Bro. Myron Reed, (Waupaca,) G. M. 

R. W. Bro. John W. Laflin, (Milwaukee,) G. S. 

WYOMING. 

14th Communication, Laramie, December 4th, 1888. 

M. W. Bro. Nathaniel R. Davis, G. M. 

Five Lodges represented out of ten on the roll. 

This is a new and small jurisdiction, whose Lodges are few 
and the distances between them great. One new Lodge was 
formed. 

New South Wales was recognized. 

No less than five resolutions were voted down ; one to make 
visitors produce their last receipt for dues ; a second to give 
extra pay to the delegates from Lodges in the Northern portion 



XCVi. GRAND LODGE OF CANADA. 

of the Territory ; a third to prohibit non-affiliates of over two 
yens' standing from visiting; a fourth to change the time ol 

meeting to November; and the fifth another proposal in favor 
of the Northern Lodges. 

A special Committee was appointed to adopt a ritual and 
select a custodian therefor. 

The (hand Secretary reports on Correspondence and notices 
our Proceedings for 1888. 

M. W. Bro. William Daley, (Rawlins,) G. M. 

R. W. Bro. W. L. Kuykendall, (Cheyenne,) G. S. 



CONCLUSION. 
The Proceedings which have been received are those of the 
following Grand Lodges, fifty-three in number, namely : — 



Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

British Columbia. 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Dakota 

Delaware 

Dist. Columbia . . 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Indian Territory. 
Iowa 



Ireland 

Kentucky. . 
Louisiana.. . 

Maine 

Manitoba.. . 
Maryland... 
Michigan.. . 
Minnesota.. 
Mississippi. 
Missouri... . 



S89 
888 
888 



889 

888 



Montana 1888 

Nebraska 1888 

Nevada 1888 

New Brunswick 1888 

New Hampshire 1S88 

New Jersey 1S89 

New Mexico 1889 

New York 1888 

North Carolina 1889 

Nova Scotia 1888 

Ohio 1888 

Oregon 1888 

Pennsylvania 1888 

Prince Edward Island 1888 

Quebec 1889 

Rhode Island 188S 

South Carolina lS£ 

Tennessee li 

Texas 1888 

Utah ^889 

Vermont 1888 

Virginia 1S88 

Washington 1888 

West Virginia 1888 

Wisconsin 1888 

Wyoming 1888 



Those not received are Kansas and Massachusetts. 
All which is fraternally submitted, 

HENRY ROBERTSON, 

Chairman. 
Collingwood, Ontario, Canada, 
June 3rd, 1889. 



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