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I '• ^PROTECTIVE TARIFF LAW. 

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THE GRAND OLD PARTY 




IT IS TRUE TO THE FLAG. 



REPUBLICAN PROMISES PERFORMED. 



In Nine Months the Republican Congress has Re- 
deemed All Its Pledges. 



A record quite unparalleled. 



thousands of dollars saved by economical 
administration. 



and a rise in agricultural values of at least 

one thousand millions brought about 

by wise legislation. 

The national elections about to take place are for mem- 
bers of the Fifty-second Congress. This Congress will 
not be erected until March 4, 1892, and will assemble in its 
first regular session in the succeeding December. The 
present Congress has been in session but nine months, and 
its Republican majority appeals to the people for a renewal 
of their confidence upon a record still incomplete. It 
comes before the country, however, with this assurance : 
that if the people really want what they demand, and if 
they believe in a party that keeps its promises, they must 
return the Republican party to power in this election. 

Indirectly the Administration which was chosen in 1888 
is also before the peonle for a sign of their approval, and 
it, too, enjoys a simft,r confidence. President Harrison 
has taken the people at their word. He has assumed that 
by electing him to the Chief Magistracy they meant to have 
him carry out the platform upon which he was presented for 
their suffrages. He has acted on this safe assumption. 
All the resources of his great office have been employed to 
carry out the public will as it was expressed in his election. 
In his recommendations to Congress and in the character 
and purpose of his executive acts he has been moved by 
the spirit of the people as it was displayed in the majorities 
cast in November, 1888. 



NOTABLE REFORM IN ADMINISTRATION. 



Economy, efficiency and good sense have guided the 
Administration in all its Departments. The Samoan con- 
troversy has been honorably settled in conformity with 
American demands ; closer relations have been cultivated 
with our South American neighbors ; the Navy is being 
rapidly rebuilt with ships than which there are no finer in 



the world ; harbor fortifications and coast defences are be- 
ing quickly constructed ; numerous military reforms have 
been accomplished ; the postal service has been purified of 
Democratic abuses and replaced upon its former efficient 
standing ; the Indian service has been greatly improved, 
and is moving rapidly towards the destruction of the reser- 
vation system and towards the introduction of a real civiliza- 
tion among the red people ; the crazy and seemingly 
malignant policy of the Democracy towards miners and 
settlers on the public lands has been overturned, while in 
financial administration, reforms of the greatest importance 
have been perfected. An increase in internal revenue col- 
lections of $7,000,000 a year maybe credited to Republican 
honesty and efficiency, and an actual saving of more than 
$32,000,000 to the Government has been made by the 
Treasury's amazingly low purchases of bonds. But above 
and beyond all this, the rise in the values of 
Americaa farm crops, resulting from tariff 
and silver legislation, is a grand total greatly 
in excess of one thousand millions of dollars. 
Let Democratic orators explain away these facts if they can. 
The Republican party is cheerful in the belief that they are 
the kind of facts which the people do not wish explained 
away. The Democracy's capital offense is that it did noth- 
ing to make them, but everything it could to prevent them. 
It can only add to its offense by seeking to explain them 
away or to dwarf their vast value. 

The National platform upon which this Republican Con- 
gress was chosen and which it was therefore commissioned 
by the people to execute, declared in favor of these 
reforms : 

1st. A Federal Election Lavr. 

2nd. Tariff Revision in Conformity with 
the Policy of Protection. 

3rd. The Restoration of Silver to its Money 
Uses. 

4th. Just Pension !Legislation. 

5th. The Revival of the American Mer- 
chant Marine. 

6th. The Exclusion of Contract Lahor and 
all other Forms of Cheap and I>egraded 
Labor. * 

7th. The Admission of such Territories as 
are Fit for the Duties of Statehood. 

8th. The Revival of the Navy and Harbor 
Fortifications, 

9th, Cheap Lictter Postage. 

This was the wise and beneficent programme which the 
people directed President Harrison and the Republican 
Fifty-first Congress to put into effect. Let us see what has 
been accomplished in carrying out the people's will. 



DEMOCRATIC OBSTRUCTIONS. 



Shall Congress be an Orderly, Deliberative Assem- 
bly OR A Lawless Mob? 



HOW THE DEMOCRATS CONSPIRED TO PREVENT ALL REPUB- 
LICAN LEGISLATION, AND HOW THEY WERE DE- 
FEATED BY COMMON SENSE AND COURAGE. 

At the very beginning of the session the Democrats 
announced their unpatriotic intention of preventing any 
legislation whatever in the direction of these reforms. 
Their purpose and the means they took to accomplish it 
were equally shameful. A Republican Congress was on 
trial ; it had but a few months of effort before the country 
would again be in the throes of a Congressional election, 
and the Democrats boldly, openly and with reckless inso- 
lence, declared that these few months should be barren of 
good works ; that the Republicans should be compelled to 
go to the country on an empty record. This, of course, 
would involve the people in a direct loss of at least 
$5,000,000, and would check or kill legislation most pro- 
foundly needed. But such considerations did not interest 
the Democratic leaders. 

Their scheme was simple. It consisted merely in the 
interruption of all business with motions to adjourn ; to 
recommit ; to amend, strike out, and insert — all frivolous 
in purport and insincere in motive, but most effective in the 
consumption of time ; and when these devices failed to 
bury a given measure, they proposed to sit in their seats 
silently during a roll-call, not responding to their names. 
This would almost certainly leave the record apparently 
showing that the House was without a quorum. 



HOW THE CONSPIRATORS WERE BEATEN. 

Speaker Reed had scarcely taken his seat before these 
contemptible tactics began, and when the House settled 
down to business, they were adopted in full force by the 
Democratic side. But they did not dismay the Speaker. 
He declined to entertain frivolous and obstructive motions, 
and he held that no member could remain within the 
Speaker's vision and declare himself present or absent ac- 
cording to the partisan ends he wished to serve. In other 
words, no member could deny his presence in order to 
break a quorum, and then affirm his presence to revive the 
quorum, being all the while, as a matter of fact, actually 
present in the House. It is for maintaining against Demo- 
cratic wails, howls, rage, violence and vituperation, these 
simple propositions, so clear in common sense and so just 
in common honesty, that the Speaker is denounced by our 
friends, the enemy, as a tyrant and a Czar. His only 
offense was that he declined to let them lie themselves out 
of sight when they wanted to prevent the passage of meas- 
ures which they did not have the voting strength to defeat. 

Mr. Reed's decisions were finally incorporated into the 
Rules of the House, since which time the public business 
has gone forward in an orderly manner. 



GOOD RULES MUST NOT BE PROSTITUTED TO BAD ENDS. 

(From a decision of Speaker Reed refusing to entertain a dilatory- 
motion.) 

There is no possible way by which the orderly methods of parlia- 
mentary procedure can be used to stop legislation. The object of a 



parliamentary body is action, and not stoppag-e of action. Hence, if 
any member or set of members undertakes to oppose the orderly pro- 
cess of business, even by the use of the ordinarily recognized par- 
liamentary motions, it is the right of the majority to refuse to have 
those motions entertained, and to cause the public business to 
proceed. 

, LET THE JOURNAL TELL THE TRUTH. 

(From the speech of the Hon. Wm. McKinley, Jan. 31.) 

Now, Mr. Speaker, what is this question ? We are contending that 
members who sit in their seats in this Hall shall be counted cs pres- 
ent, because they are present. They want the Journal to declare a lie; 
we want the Journal to declare the truth. Let us be honest with 
each other and with the country ; let us defeat bills in a constitu- 
tional way or not at all ; give freedom of debate, opportunity of 
amendment, the yea-and-nay vote, and we will preserve our own 
self-respect, give force to the Constitution, and serve the people 
whose trusts we hold. The position of the gentlemen on the 
other side means that they will either ruin or rule, al- 
though they are in the minority. We insist that while 
we are in tiie majority they shall do neither. 



DOES THE CONSTITUTION COMMIT SUICIDE? 

(From a speech of the Hon. Benj. Butterworth.) 

After quoting that clause of the Constitution which pro- 
vides that each House **may compel the attendance of 
absent members," Mr. Butterworth continued : 

Compel them to attend — for what? To leave the House in pre- 
cisely the same condition as before they were brought in — a condition 
which rendered it necessary to bring them in to change and improve 
it ? Was this authority conferred only to enable us to go through the 
farce of bringing in the absentees and learning after each had been 
seated in his place that while under the Constitution he is actually 
personally present to make a quorum to do business, yet when an 
attempt is made to do the thing which required his presence he at 
once, by merely closing his mouth, becomes constructively absent ? 



MR. SPRINGER SUSTAINS SPEAKER REED. 

In the Forty-sixth Congress Mr. Tucker (Dem.) brought 
in a rule precisely similar to the decision of Speaker Reed. 
In supporting Mr. Tucker, the Hon. W. M. Springer, who 
has been in this Congress the leading Democratic obstruc- 
tionist, and the sturdiest assailant of the Speaker, employed 
these words : 

A majority shall constitute a quorum to do business. That 
majority do not vote, but they must be here. If the majority is here 
the quorum is here. If we may compel the attendance of absent 
members what virtue is there in this provision unless it is to compel 
them to be here to constitute a quorum ? What is the constitutional 
provision for? What is it worth in the Constitution if, after having 
been exercised, it amounts to nothing at last and the man is not here? 
I wish to say by our legislative system our fathers understood that 
when this power was exercised the man was here, and all we have to 
do is to recognize that fact. 



ISSUE No. 1. 

Do you wish your Congress to be an 
orderly, deliberative assembly, or do 
you wish it to be a lawless mob ? 



THE GRAND OLD PARTY. 




IT IS TRUE TO THE FLAG. 



FEDERAL ELECTIONS. 



What the Situation Is and What the Republican 
House has Done to Cure it. 



A FAIR, honest LAW, FOR FAIR AND HONEST MEN. 



BUT A BAD LAW FOR THUGS, BALLOT-BOX-STUFFERS AND 
RASCALS GENERALLY. 



AND THAT IS WHY THEY KICK. 

In its National Platform, adopted at Chicago, June 21, 
1888, the Republican party proclaimed this doctrine : 

We reaffirm our unswerving- devotion * * * especially to the 
supreme and sovereign right of every lawful citizen, rich or poor, 
native or foreign-born, white or black, to cast one free ballot in 
public elections, and have that ballot counted. We xiemand effective 
legislation to secure tW integrity and purity of elections. 

The Republican majority in Congrress set promptly at 
work to redeem this pledge, and have passed a bill the 
merits of which are an issue in this campaign. 



WHERE CONGRESS'S AUTHORITY COMES FROM. 

(Section 4, Article i. Constitution of the United States.) 

The times, places and manner of holding elections for Senators and 
Representatives shall be prescribed in each State by the Legislature 
thereof ; but the Congress may at any time by law make or alter such 
regulations, except as to the places of choosing Senators 



HOW THE SUPREME COURT CONSTRUES THIS CLAUSE, 

(Ex Parte Siebold, 100 U. S., 371.) 

*'Make or alter!" What is the plain meaning of these words? 
There is no declaration that the regulations shall be made either 
wholly by the State Legislatures or wholly by Congress. If Con- 
gress does not interfere, of course they may be made wholly by the 
State ; but if it chooses to interfere, there is nothing in the words to 
prevent its doing so either wholly or partially. On the contrary, 
their necessary implication is that it may do either. It may either 
make the regulations or it may alter them. If it only alters, 
leaving, as manifest convenience requires, the general organization 
of the polls to the State, there results a necessary cooperation of 
the two governments in regulating the subject. But no repugnance 
in the system of regulations can arise, for the power of Cougress 
over the subject is paramount. 



THE NATION IN A DREADFUL DILEMMA. 

(Ex Parte Yarborough, iioU. S., 651.) 

If the Government of the United States has within its constitu- 
tional domain no authority to provide against these evils (force and 



fraud), if the very sources of power may be poisoned by corruption 
or controlled by violence and outrage without legal restraint, then, 
indeed, is the country in danger, and its best powers, its highest pur- 
poses, the hopes which it inspires, and the love which enshrines it, 
are at the mercy of the combinations of those who respect no right 
but brute force on the one hand, and unprincipled corruptionists on 
the other. 

HENRY WATTERSON'S CONFESSION. 



He Says There is No Such Thing as an Honest Elec- 
tion IN THE Colored Districts. 

(From the Louisville Courier-Journal^ 

I should be entitled to no respect or credit if 1 pretended that 
there is either a fair poll or count of the vast overflow of black votes 
in States where there is a negro majority, or that in the nature of 
things present there can be. —Henry Watterson, Leading Demo- 
cratic Editor of the South. 



JUDGE CAMPBELL'S CONFESSION. 



He says a Resort to Fraud and Murder should be 
Avoided *' If Possible." 

(From an address recently issued to the people of Mississippi by 

Judge J. A. P. Campbell, now a member of the Supreme 

Court of that State.J 

I know full well we can continue to govern this country. I h.ive 
no fears as to that. But if we should have to resort to shotguns and 
Winchesters, or to fraud, that would be too undemocratic for me, 
and it would be destructive of that liberty, equality and fraternity so 
dear to us, and should be avoided if possible. 



GENERAL SPINOLA'S CONFESSION. 



He Says it is Costly and Bothersome to Elect a 

Democrat in the North, but They Have 

Things Nicely Fixed Below the Line. 

(From a speech in Congress by the Hon. F. B. Spinola, Tammany 

Democrat.) 

With us it is a struggle to put a man in this House. Below Mason 
and Dixon's line it is an easy matter. One gentleman is declared to 
be the candidate, his neighbors rally round him, he is put to no ex- 
pense, he is called upon to perform no labor in the canvass, the 
ballots are printed, and they are deposited and he is elected. 



CONGRESSMAN HEMPHILL'S CONFESSION. 



He Takes a Solemn and Significant Oath as to the 
Thing They Won't Do. 

(From a speech in Congress by the Hon. J. J. Hemphill (Dem.), of 
South Carolina.) 

We know we must either rule the South or leave it. Now, I swear 
we will not leave it ! 



SOUTHERN ELECTION LAWS. 



No Such Thing as Home Rule in the South. 



IN order to perpetuate democratic rule the >lec 
toral machinery is centralized and con- 
trolled BY A FEW POLITICIANS. 

(From a speech by the Hon. N. P. Haugen.) 

In none of the southern tier of States is the choice of election 
officers lodged in tha community in which they are to serve. In 
Virginia the system is a perfect wheel with the Legislature at the 
crank. There never was a more perfect invention for self-perpetua- 
tion in office. In Maryland from the very beginning of colonial 



government down to the session of the last Legislature, the power of 
appointing local election boards was vested in the Sherin of the 
county. But some of the counties elected Republican Sheriffs, and 
the late Democratic Legislature placed the power of appointing local 
election officers in the hands of the Governor. In Mississippi an 
electoral commission, consisting of the Governor, Lieutenant-Gov- 
ernor and Secretary of State, forms the fountain-head from which 
flows all authority to supervise and control elections. In Alabama 
this power is vested in certain county officers ; in South Carolina it is 
in the State, and likewise in Florida and North Carolina. In short, 
you may look all through the Southern States in vain for a discovera- 
ble trace of the home, town, or city government inherited from New 
England. The tendency is all the time in the opposite direction — to 
rob the local community of the privilege of controlling its own affairs. 



AND THIS IS WHAT THE SYSTEM PRODUCES. 

(From a speech in Congress by the Hon. L. E. McComas.) 

Within a short period the treasuries of half the States in the South 
have been plundered by defaulting State treasurers : by Vincent, of 
Alabama; by Polk, of Tennessee; by Tate, of Kentucky; by Burke, 
of Louisiana ; by Nolan, of Missouri ; by Hemmingway, of Missis- 
sippi, just convicted, and by Archer, of Maryland. Minority rule is 
inevitably corrupt rule. 



TAKE A LOOK AT THESE FIGURES. 

They Show How the Republican Vote in the South 
IS Suppressed. 

(From speeches delivered in the present House.) 

In 1886 the total vote returned in Georgia for ten Congressmen was 
27,520— less than were returned in any one of 164 Northern districts 
in that same election. Georgia's voting population is not less than 
35o,cx)o. The entire South Carolinian delegation sits here on this 
iioor — seven members — with fewer votes behind them than were cast 
in the districts represented by Mr. Peters, of Kansas, Mr. Townsend, 
of Colorado, Mr. Snider, of Minnesota, or Mr. Dorsey, of Nebraska. 
Let us compare Mississippi and New Jersey, both Democratic States, 
both having in 1880 almost exactly the same number of inhabitants. 
In 1888 Mississippi cast 115,567 votes. New Jersey cast 303,741. Mis- 
sissippi's seven Congressmen sit here representing an average of 
16,459 votes cast and counted. New Jersey's seven Congressmen 
represent an average of 43,335 votes. In Mississippi there were 
males of voting age, in 1880, to the number of 108,254 whites and 
130,278 colored. These figures tell the story,— Mr. Lodge. 



In 1886 there were 27,430 votes cast for members of Congress in 
Georgia. There were 283,590 votes cast for members of Congress at 
the same election in Wisconsin. The 27,430 votes in Georgia elected 
ten Congressmen. The 283,590 votes cast in Wisconsin elected nine 
Congressmen. The average vote of a Congressional district in Geor- 
gia was 2,743. Ill Wisconsin it was 31,510. One vote cast in Georgia 
has the same influence upon national government, upon questions of 
taxation, internal improvements, control of corporations, pensions, 
etc., as iz% votes cast in Wisconsin. In Georgia 1,604 votes elected 
m^ friend Mr. Crisp. The lowest vote cast in any one district in 
Wisconsin was in the district of my Democratic colleague, Mr. Brick- 
ner, which cast 25,916 votes. Comparing these two districts, the dis- 
trict in each State casting the lowest number of votes, we find that 
1,604 votes elect a Representative in Georgia, while it takes 25,916 to 
accomplish the same thing in Wisconsin. In other words, one vote 
in Georgia on this basis is equal to 16 votes in my colleague's Demo- 
cratic district in Wisconsin.^-Mr. Haugen. ?: 



In 1888 (it was much worse in 1886) a total vote of 595,075 in five 
Southern States elected thirty-eight members of the House, while in 
the States of New York and Connecticut it required 1,470,873 votes 
to elect the same number. The atrocity of this outrage upon the 
ballot will appear in a still more vivid light when it is remembered 
that the enfranchisement of the colored race brought to the Electoral 
College in the South an acquisition of thirty-eight votes, which the 
Democracjr have appropriated to swell their Congressional represen- 
tation, while the colored Republicans in most sections remain un- 
represented.— Mr. Brosius. 



WHAT THE NEW LAW IS. 



Democratic Lies about its Character Exploded. 



IT DOES NOT INTERFERE WITH LOCAL SYSTEMS AT ALL, 

BWT MERELY PROVIDES A WAY BY WHICH FRAUDS 

CAN BE DETECTED AND PUNISHED. 

(From the speech in Congress of the Hon. R. M. LaFollette.) 

AVhat are the provisions of this bill ? 

It makes false registration a crime. 

It makes unlawful interference with registration, by vio- 
lence upon, or intimidation, or bribery by any person law- 
fully entitled to vote a crime. 

It makes wilfully keeping any false poll-list or know- 
ingly entering false names or false statements thereon a 
crime. 

It makes giving or accepting a bribe to induce a person 
to vote or refrain from voting a crime. 

It requires the ballot-box to be placed in plain sight of 
the voters and in such a position as to enable the election 
officers, National and State, and the voter when voting, to 
see that the ballot is in fact placed in the box. 

It makes the wilful rejection of legal votes, knowing 
them to be legal, a crime. 

It makes the wilful acceptance of illegal votes, knowing 
them to be illegal, a crime. 

It makes the fraudulent substitution of one ballot for 
another for the purpose of having the vote rejected, or for 
the purpose of having it counted for a person other than 
the voter intended, a crime. 

It makes wilfully placing ballots not lawfully cast in any 
ballot-box among ballots lawfully cast, for the purpose of 
changing the result, a crime. 

It makes unlawfully removing ballots from a ballot-box 
lawfully cast, for the purpose of aifecting the result of the 
election, a crime. 

It makes a wilfully false canvass of votes or the false 
certification and return of such vote a crime. 

It makes it a crime for every officer charged with a duty 
under the law to wilfully neglect to perform such duty or 
to be guilty of any corrupt or fraudulent conduct or prac- 
tice in its execution. 

It makes false swearing, in matters pertaining to such 
Congressional election, perjury. 

It makes stealing the ballot-box or the ballots a felony. 

And it provides just punishment, by fine or imprison- 
ment, or both, for each of these crimes against a govern- 
ment by the people through manhood suffrage. 

That is this bill. There is not a section, line, or syllable 
in it besides this more than is necessary to enforce with 
certainty these provisions. 



THE GRAND OLD PARTY. 




IT IS TRUE TO THE FLAG. 



PROSPERITY ASSURED. 



THE Mckinley bill— its motive and effect. 



It Surrounds the Farmer with Sure Guarantees of 
Better Times. 



It Assures the Mechanic of More Work and Higi^ 

Wages. 



AND IT collects THE GREATER PART OF THE NATIONAL 

REVENUES FROM FOREIGNERS WHO SEEK AMERICAN 

MARKETS FOR THEIR WARES. 

In its National Platform of 1888 the Republican party 

proclaimed this doctrine : 

We are uncompromisingly in favor of the American system of 
Protection. Its abandonment has always been followed by general 
disaster. The Republican party would effect all needed reduction of 
the National Revenue by repealing- the taxes on tobacco and the tax 
upon spirits used in the arts and for mechanical purposes, and by 
such a revision of the tariff laws as will tend to check imports of 
articles produced by our people. 



PROTECTION DISTRIBUTES WEALTH. 

(From Blaine's reply to Gladstone, January, 1890.) 

In no event can the growth of large fortunes be laid to 
the charge of the protective policy. Protection has proved 
a distributer of great sums of money ; not an agency for 
amassing it in the hands of a few. The benefit of Protec- 
tion goes first and last to the men who earn their bread in 
tke sweat of their faces. 



BISMARCK SAYS PROTECTION SECURES PROSPERITY. 

(From a speech in the Reichstag, by Prince Bismarck, May 12, 1882.) 

The success of the United States in material develop- 
ment is the most illustrious of modern time. The Ameri- 
can nation has not only successfully borne and suppressed 
the most gigantic and expensive war of all history, but im- 
mediately afterward disbanded its army, found work for all 
its soldiers and marines, paid off most of its debt, given 
labor and homes to all the unemployed of Europe as fast as 
they could arrive within the territory, and still by a 
system of taxation so indirect as not to be 
perceived, much less felt. Because it is my 
deliberate judgment that the prosperity of 



America is mainly due to its system of pro- 
tective laTl^S, I urge that Germany has now reached 
that point where it is necessary to imitate the tariff system 
of the United States. 

WHO BELIEVE IN FREE TRADE. 

(From a speech in Congress by Thomas B. Reed.) 

On the face of the earth to-day there are but two sets of people 
who believe in Free Trade — the Democratic party and the United 
Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, with Ireland suppressed. 
Russia, the granary of Europe, has abandoned Free Trade. France, 
Austria, Germany, Italy, Mexico, and the Dominion of Canada, that 
child of Britain herself, have all joined the army of Protection. It is 
the instinct of humanity against the assumptions of the book men. 
It is the wisdom of the race against the wisdom of the few. 



THE Mckinley bill. 



What it is, What it Seeks to Accomplish, and How 
IT Will Affect the Revenues. 

In accordance with its pledge the Republican party has 
passed what is called the McKinley bill, a comparison of 
which with the Mills bill reveals at once the economic dif- 
ferences between the two parties. The Republican bill 
places a duty on wool, the Democratic bill places wool on 
the free-list. The Republican bill places a protective duty 
on all animals, vegetables, barley, hemp, tobacco, flax and 
all products of the soil ; upon cotton goods, woolen goods, 
crockery, glassware, iron, steel, hardware and cutlery. 
The Democratic bill places vegetables on the free-list, 
leaves but a revenue duty on all animals, on barley and 
tobacco ; moves toward a revenue duty on cottons, woolens, 
crockery, glassware, iron, steel, hardware and cutlery. 
The Republican bill places sugar on the free-list ; the 
Democratic bill places the duty on sugar at 65 per cent. It 
will be seen that these measures are most marvelously 
unlike. It is not accident or chance. It is because one 
bill favors the protection of American agriculture, manu- 
factures and labor, and the other bill opposes this policy. 



THE PROTECTIVE THEORY. 



It Maintains that the Cheapest Way to Raise 

Revenue is to Collect it from Foreigners. 

(From a speech in Congress by the Hon. J. H. Walker). 

A protective tariff is not an "arbitrary restraint upon trade." 
As well say a bit and bridle, by which we guide, control, and de- 
velop to our use the power of the horse, is an arbitrary restriction on 
travel. 

Protection compels every European manufacturer to pay into the 
Treasury of the United States the money he has saved by not paying 
his workmen as much as American workman receive, before he is 
allowed to sell his goods in this country. 



THE CANADIAN PRIME MINISTER SAYS THE THEORY WORKS 

ALL RIGHT. 

(From a speech in the Canadian Parliament by Sir John A. 
Macdonald, Premier). 

Suppose the man has 100 acres on the Canadian side of the line and 
100 acres of land on the American side of the line. Suppose he grows 
1000 bushels of barley on each of his farms. He takes his locxi 
American bushels to the American market and gets $1 a bushel for it. 
He takes his 1000 bushels of Canadian barley to the American mar- 
ket and gets but 85 cts. per bushel, because he has to pay 15 cts. duty 
for taking it across the line. How can it, in this case, be said that 
the consumer pays the duty ? It comes out of the pockets of the 
Canadian farmers. 



THE FARMER AND THE TARIFF. 



Where and How his Advantage is Secured by the 
Protective Policy. 



THE CAUSES of PRESENT DEPRESSION IN AGRICULTURAL 

INTERESTS LEND THE MEANS TAKEN IN THE 

MCKINLEY BILL TO REMOVE THEM. 

(From a speech in Congress by Mr. LaFoUette.) 

The farmer is not suffering to-day, as gentlemen upon the other 
side contend, "because the tariff has greatly enhanced the cost of 
what he buys." All that he buys is cheaper to-day than it has ever 
been. Since 1880 barb wire has dropped from 10 to 4 cents a pound, 
wire nails from $6 per keg to I2.20, chains from 22 cents a pound to 12, 
zinc from 15 cents a pound to 10, tin-ware 50 per cent, window-glass 
25 per cent, kerosene 25 cents a gallon to 13, salt from $2.25 per barrel 
to $1.25, crockery 25 per cent, calico from 7 cents to 5, worsted dress 
goods 25 per cent, ready-made clothing 30 to 50 per cent, boots and 
shoes 33^ per cent, and furniture 40 to 50 per cent. 

Tlie farmer, I repeat, is not in distress to-day because 
of tlie liigli price of what he buys, but because of the 
low price of what he sells. 



AN ERA OF LOW PRICES. 

That this statement is undeniably true is proved by these 
facts: 

First. — A dollar will go further for a farmer to-day than at any 
other time since the war. Examine this table. It shows compara- 
tively the prices of farmers' implements since i860, and illustrates 
the operation of protection : 



Articles. 



One-horse steel plow, wood beam. . 
Two-horse steel plow, wood beam. . 
One-horse iron plow, wood beam. . . 
Two-horse iron plow, wood beam. . 
Two-horse side hill orrev'sible plow 

One potato digger 

Old-fashioned tooth-harrow 

One-horse cultivator 

Two-horse corn cultivator 

One-horse mowing machine 

Two-horse mowing machine 

Horse-rake, sulky 

Common hand-rake, horse 

Common iron garden rakes, lo-tooth 

steel, per dozen 

One-horse horse-power 

Two-horse horse-power 

Reaper 

Binder 

Thrasher 

B^agger 

Corn-sheller, one hole 

Fanning-mill 

Common hoes, cast-steel socket, per 

dozen 

Common rakes, wood, per dozen 

American grass scythes, per dozen,, 
American grain scythes, per dozen. . 
Patent scythes, sneaths, per dozen.. 

Ames' shovels, per dozen 

Ames' spades, per dozen 

Crow-bars, steel 

Crow-bars, iron 



^2.75 
12.00 
2.00 
8.00 
10.00 
7-SO 
6.50 

3-50 
15.00 
45.00 
50.00 
20.00 

3.50 

37.50 

25.00 

35 -oo 

75.00 

135.00 

400.00 

25.00 

6.00 

15.00 

3-50 

2.00 

7-50 

9-50 

4-50 

9.50 

10.00 

.06 

•05 



1880 



I3-50 
15.00 

3.00 
10.50 
12.00 
12.00 
10.00 

5.00 
25 .00 
70.00 
75.00 
25.00 

5.00 

5-75 

35- 00 

50.00 

85.00 

300.00 

475.00 

25.00 

8.50 

20,00 

S.75 

2.75 

12.00 

16.50 

9.50 

15.00 

16.00 

.08 

.06 



1873 



|6.oo 
20.00 

5.00 
13.00 
18.00 
20.00 
15.00 

7.00 
28.00 
85.00 
90.00 
30.00 

6.50 

12.00 
45.00 
65.00 
95.00 
25.00 
475.00 



T1.50 
25.00 

6.50 

3.00 

16.00 

21 .00 
11.00 
18.00 
18.50 



:86 = 



fa.oo 
26.00 



20.00 
25.00 
20.00 
10.00 
35- 00 
105.00 
110.00 

35 -oo 
8.00 

16.00 
60.00 
80.00 
120.00 
(*) 



15.00 
30.00 

8.00 
4.00 
21 .00 
26.00 
16.00 
20.50 
21 .00 



15 



[860 



5120.00 

125.00 

40.00 

10.00 



140.00 
(*) 



CHEAPER GOODS HERE THAN IN FREE TRADE COUNTRIES. 



Second. — A dollar will go further for a farmer in Protective America 
than it will in Free Trade England, as this table witnesses : 

Prices of Agricultural Implements in America and England. 



Articles. 



One-horse steel plow 

Two-horse steel plow 

Potato digger 

Two-horse mowing machine 

Horse rake 

Reaper 

Reaper and binder 

Hay tedder 



American 

Prices 
(Chicago). 



$10.00 
20.00 
11.00 
60.00 
25.00 



130.00 
45- 00 



Prices in Ensfland. 



John G. 
Rollins. 



$14.85 
25.29 
12.45 
75.00 
39.49 

119.55 



64.00 



J. &F. 
Howard. 



$15.60 



13.20 
76.64 
38.40 
124.80 
249.60 
60.00 



Samuel- 
son & Co. 



$72.80 



Consequently, the trouble is NOT that Protection increases the 
American farmer's expenses. 



BUT THE TROUBLE IS RIGHT HERE. 

The Farmer Cannot Obtain Living Prices for His 
Own Products under Existing Conditions. 

Third. — But the American farmer's market is being 
nsurped by foreign farm products. Importations of food 
have grown enormously under the tariff of 1883. Last year tbcy 
amounted to more than $65,000,000, as this table shows : 

Importations of Farfn Products into the United States during 1889. 

Horses, sheep and cattle $3,917, 031 

Barley ' 7,691,763 

Other grains 169,199 

Potato-starch and dextri ne 230,000 

Eggs 2,419,004 

Flax 2,060,664 

Hemp 2,047,927 

Hay 1 ,082,685 

Hops 1,100,408 

Meats and dairy products 1,769,892 

Flaxseed and seeds 4,557,198 

Tobacco 8,603,163 

Potatoes, vegetables and beans 2,295,499 

Lumber 9,768,644 

Wool 17,432.758 

Total 165,132,519 



THE REMEDY. 



How THE McKinley Bill has Met this Situation, 
and has Assured the Farmer of Better Things. 

Republican legislation has provided three efficacious 
remedies for this state of things : 

First.— It has increased the duties on foreign 
farm products so as to shut off importations. 

Second.— It has opened the way for reciprocal 
trade relations with South American coun- 
tries. 

Third.— It has restored Silver to its money 
uses. 



THE FARMER'S SCHEDULE. 



Various organizations representing the farmers of the 
country have been in communication with the Republican 



leaders in this Congress. They have understood them- 
selves very well and have fully appreciated the situation. 
They have submitted drafts of the legislation in their judg- 
ment necessary to secure a revival of husbandry, and their 
just demands have been fully recogmzed. This table 
shows what the McKiiiley bill has done for 
the better protection ot the farmer. It shows 
comparatively the importations of 1889, the late duties, and 
the duties under the McKinley bill : 



Article. 



Horses and mules. 
Cattle 



Hogs..... • •>>• 

Sheep 

Barley 

Buckwheat 

Oats 

Oatmeal » 

Butter 

Cheese 

Milk 

Beans 

Beans, peas, and mushrooms pre- 
pared Qr preserved 

Green or dried 



Split 

In papers, cartons, or packages. 

Cabbages 

Eggs 

Hay 

Hops 

Onions 

Plants, trees, shrubs, etc 

Potatoes 

Garden seeds, agricultural seeds, 

etc 

Vegetables : 

Prepared or preserved 

Pickles and sauces 

In their natural state 

Straw 

Apples : 

Green or ripe 

Dried or prepared in any 

manner.. . 

Bacon and hams 

Beef, mutton and pork 

Poultry ; 

Live ) 

Dressed. .[ 

F?ax seed or linseed, poppy-seed 

and other oil seeds 

Leaf tobacco for cigar wrappers r 

Not stemmed ) 

Stemmed i 

An other tobacco in leaf : 

i^ot stemmed 

Stemmed 

Cigars, Cigarettes, cheroot of all 
kinds. 



Imported 

1889. 



12,146,514.50 20 per cent. 
542,764.71 20 per cent. 



4,770.80 

1,189,192.38 

7,678,763.58 

25,469.85 

10,178.19 

55,995.00 

17,689.41 

1,132,143 28 

5,684.87 

759,802. 28 

No data. 

Included 

with beans. 

52,738.00 



No data 
2,419,004 37 
1,082,685.50 
1,100,408.00 
No data. 
823,762.82 
321,120.26 

187,448.69 

389,512.42 

334,9^-0.71 

437,377.37 

28,921.00 

No data. 

No data. 

45,899. .'5 1 
14,393.09 



164,866.26 

3,969,640.00 

1,417,302.40 

8,126,091.34 
475,679.25 

3,657.316 02 



Late duty. 



McKinley bill. 



percent.. .. 

per cent 

cts. per bush, 
per cent. 



cts. per bush. 



}4 cent per lb 
4 cts. per lb.. 
4 cts. per lb. . 
10 per cent.. 
10 per cent... 



35 per cent. 
10 per cent. 



$30 per head.* 
Over one year, 

$10 per head. 
Under one year, 

$2 per head. 
$1.50 per head. 
$1.50 per head. 
30 cts. per bush. 
15 cts. per bush. 
15 cts. per bush. 
1 cent per lb. 
6 cts. per lb. 
6 cts. per lb. 
5 cts. per gal. 
40 cts. per bush. 

40 per cent. 

40 cts. per bush. 

' 50 cts. per bush. 
; 1 ct. per lb. 

3 cts. each. 
j 5 cts. per dozen. 

$4 per ton. 

15 cts. per lb. 
1 40 cts. per bush. 

20 per cent. 

25 cts. per bush. 

40 per cent. 

45 per cent. 
45 per cent. 
25 per cent. 
30 per cent. 

Free 25 cts. per bush. 



20 per cent 

Notprovid'dfor 

10 per cent 

Free 

$2 per ton 

Sets, per lb 

10 per cent 

Free 

15 cts. per bush. 

20 per cent — . . 



30 per cent. 
35 per cent 
10 per cent. 
Free 



Free 

2 cts. per lb — 
1 ct. per lb 



f 10 cts. per lb.. 
{ 10 cts. per lb.. 

cts. per lb 

( 75 cts. per lb.. 
i $1 per lb. 



35 cts per lb 

40 cts. per lb 

$2 50 per lb. and 
V T per cent 



2 cts. per lb. 
5 Cts. per lb. 

2 Cts. per lb. 

3 cts. per lb. 

5 cts. per lb. 

30 cts. per bush. 

$2 per lb. 
$2.75 per lb. 

3* cts. per lb. 
50 cts. per lb. 

4.50 per lb. and 
25 per cent. 



* Provided that horses valued at over $150 shall pay an ad valorem duty of 
30 per cent. 



IT IS A MECHANIC'S BILL, TOO. 



Its Scope is National, its Effect Will be Felt in 
Every Industry. 



LABOR IS everywhere CONCERNED IN THE PROTECTIVE 

SYSTEM. — HOW IT IS OPERATING TO KEEP THE 

AMERICAN mechanic's WAGES AT 

DECENT FIGURES. 

While guarding by every wise and lawful means the 
interests of the American farmer^ the McKinley bill has 
skilfully maintained the conditions which have contributed 
so marvelously to the prosperity of the American mechanic 



13 



in the past twenty years. Every industry in which for- 
eigners are enabled to compete with Americans in the 
American market by reason of their lower scales of wages 
has received that sort of attention which aims at equalizing 
the situation. The industrial question becomes every year 
more and more a question of labor. So soon as the work- 
men of this country are desirous of reducing their wages 
to the British level, American manufactures can be in all 
cases as cheap as British manufactures. The reason of the 
McKinley bill is found in the following figures. It is a 
bill which enables American manufacturers to do a profit- 
able business notwithstanding the dreadful disparity in the 
price of labor which is witnessed here. The figures are 
from official sources, and they are both true and typical : 



Trade. 


America. 


England. 


France. 


Carpenters ; 

Man 


$700.00 
300.00 

$1000.00 

216.00 

$784.00 


$383.00 
153.20 


$310.00 
124.00 




Woman. . . . 






$434 00 
206 00 


Supplies 


206.00 
$330.20 








Possible savings 


$228.00 


Laborers, common : 

Man 


$300.00 
200. CO 

$500.00 

216.00 

$284.00 


$235.00 
94.00 

Mnnn i\f\ 


$188.00 
75 50 




Woman ... . 






$263.90 
206.00 


Supplies 


206.00 
$123.00 


Possible savings 


$57.90 


Dlackmiths : 

Man ... 


$650.00 
300.00 


$368.50 
147.40 


$290.00 
116.20 




Woman 






$406.20 
206.00 


Supplies .. 


216 00 


206.00 
$309.90 




Possible savings 


$734.00 


$200.20 


Locomotive engineers : 
Man 


$1250.00 
300.00 


$456.00 
182.40 


$516.00 

206.40 




Woman 






$722.40 
206.00 


Supplies 


216.00 


206.00 
$432.40 








Possible savings 


$1334.00 


$516.40 


Locomotive firemen : 

Man 


$750.00 
300.00 


$255.00 
102.00 


$342.00 
136.80 




Woman 






$478.80 
206.00 


Supplies 


216.00 
$834.00 


206.00 
$151.00 




Possible savings 


$272.80 


Tinsmiths : 

Man 


$550.00 
300.00 

dbo en l\f\ 


$325.00 
130.00 

$455.00 

206.00 

$249.00 


$273.00 
109.20 




Woman. 






$382 20 
206.00 


Sunnlies.... 


216." 00 
$634.00 








Possible savings 


$176.20 


Tanners : 

Man 


$450.00 
300 00 

$750.00 

216.00 


$350.00 
140.00 

$490.00 

206.00 

$263.00 


$347.00 
138.80 




Woman 






$485.80 
206.00 


Supplies 








Possible savings 


$534.00 


$279. fO 


Weavers : 

Man 


$500.00 
300.00 

$800.00 

216.00 

$584.00 


$350.00 
140.00 

$490.00 

206.00 

$284.00 


$250.00 
100.00 




W Oman 




Supplies 


$350.00 
206.00 






Possible savings 


$144.00 



OTHER PROTECTION MEASURES. 



Laws to Prevent Revenue Frauds and to Correct 
Tariff Inequalities. 

In perfecting their revenue system the Republicans have 
enacted a customs law to prevent undervaluations, to 



secure just and uniform appraisals on imported merchan- 
dise, and to assure the honest collection of the revenues. 

Under a construction given by the courts to the law of 
1883, worsteds have been admitted hitherto at lower rates 
of duty than other woolens. Other decisions had the same 
effect upon ribbons imported as trimmings. These in- 
equalities have been corrected. All woolens in the present 
law are woolens, and all ribbons are ribbons, and they all 
pay an equitable duty. 

TAXATION GREATLY REDUCED. 

The McKinley bill makes many changes in our tariff 
schedules. The free-list is greatly enlarged. Many duties 
are lowered, many raised. The effort has been in each 
case to do what is fair and right, according to the present 
condition of the trade. No man can tell precisely the 
degree in which its operation will affect the revenues. 
There can be no doubt that it will materially reduce them, 
probably in the sum of $65,000,000. Relatively the reduc- 
tion is ten per cent. Imports are placed on the free-list 
which last year paid a duty of $60,936,536. The question 
involved in the other changes is how far reduced duties 
will stimulate importation, and how far increased duties 
will restrain importation. This question can be deter- 
mined only by a test, but if experience is a good teacher, 
Government revenues will fall off under the McKinley bill 
about $65,000,000. 

ISSUE No. 3. 

This Bill preserves in operation, 
adapting" it to the present state of 
trade, that revenue system which the 
greatest statesman of Europe de- 
clares himself constrained to imi- 
tate ; a system which has given us a 
material development ''the most il- 
lustrious of modern time^' ; a system 
which first creates the finest market 
in the world and then controls it for 
our own principal enjoyment ; a sys- 
tem which has raised the American 
farmer to a dignity enjoyed by no 
other tiller of the soil, and the Ameri- 
can mechanic to a place in society 
and in affairs ivhich is the envy of his 
brethren in every land. Are you 
ready to abandon this system? Do 
you want to open your doors to the 
cheap, serf-wrought goods of other 
countries? Do you want to create 
here the very conditions that all our 
millions of foreign-born citizens have 
fled from ? IF NOT, YOU MUST RE- 
TURN A REPUBLICAN CONGRESS. 

IS 



THE GRAND OLD PARTY, 




IT IS TRUE TO THE FLAG. 



SILVEK AT $1.20. 

Its Money Uses are Fully Rfstored by Republican 

Action. 



THE UNITED STATES TREASURY RICHER BY $90,238,000 
BY silver's rise. 



ALL AMERICAN CEREALS HAVE GROWN IN VALUE, TOO. 



AND, AS USUAL, THE DEMOCRACY OBSTRUCTED. 

In its last National Platform the Republican party- 
declared this doctrine : 

The Republican party is in favor of the use of both gold and silver 
as money, and condemns the policy of the Democratic Administration 
in its efforts to demonetize silver. 

In conformity with this pledge, the Republican Congress 
has passed, against the unanimous opposition of Demo- 
cratic members, a silver bill, than which there has been no 
more useful and inspiring act since the resumption of specie 
payments. It provides, in brief, that the Secretary of the 
Treasury shall purchase 4,500,000 ounces of silver per 
month, at the market price, and issue in payment therefor 
legal tender Treasury notes, redeemable in coin. This 
afTords an annual increase in money of over $60,000,000. 
The Democratic Bland Act, under which the value of silver 
fell to the lowest figure it has ever reached, and the value 
of farm products to figures shockingly disastrous, afforded 
an annual increase of $24,000,000. But this money was of 
doubtful reputation. It was money that was good to-day 
and bad to-morrow. The money provided by the present 
Republican Congress is as good, and must in all circum- 
stances remain as good, as any money the world has ever 
seen. 

Happily, the country has not had to wait for the benifi- 
cent results of this legislation. They came as quickly and 
as surely as blossoms under a May-day sun. Indeed, the 
very presence of a Republican President in the White 
House and a Republican Congress in the Capitol, exercised 
an inspiring influence upon values and upon all commerce. 
In the wake of Democratic rule had followed a prostration 
of industry and an accumulation of farm mortgages, but 
the election of 1888 was received by the country as the 
sure promise of better days. That these better days are 
now arrived is unerringly revealed in the figures shown in 
this table : 

16 



Changes in the Value of Silver. 



Dates. 



Feb. 28, 

Mar. I, 

Mar. 22, 

Mar. I, 

May 19, 
Mar. 4, 

Dec. I, 
July 14, 

July 15, 

Aug. 13, 

Aug-. 30, 



1878 

1878 

1878 

1879 

1888 
1889 

1889 
1890 

1890 

1890 

i8qo 



Significance. 



Date of passage of the 

Bland act 

Day after passage of the 

Bland act 

Three weeks after passage 

of the Bland act... 
One year after passage of 

the Bland act 

Lowest price reached 

Inauguration of President 

Harrison 

Republican Congress met 
Passage of the new silver 

law 

Day after passage of new 

silver law 

"^ew silver law went into 

effect 

About three weeks after 

the silver law went into 

effect 



Price of Silver 

in London.— 

Pence. 


Equivalent 

value in 

U. S. Money. 


0^ •-" 


55- 


$1.20^ 


$1.19^ 


54li 


x.-zo^ 


1 .20 


54l- 


i.iS^ 


1 .20 


491 
41-1 


1. 035 
.91=^^ 


1.035 

.9x1 


::r 


.933? 


.93^ 
.964 


49i 


i.o7»6 


1.08 


S3- 


1 .09^ 


I .TO 


51-i 


I.IO^'^ 


^•13 


54i 


1.194^ 


I.I9I 



> V. 

> 



$0.9325 

.93^^ 
.91^8 



.83^=* 



.72*" 
.75" 

.834 

.84'^ 

.85^^ 

.92* 



RESULTS OF INCALCULABLE VALUE. 

The significance of this table is tremendous. The Demo- 
cratic Bland Act found silver at $1.20//^. On the very next 
day it fell, and it kept falling steadily. Grover Cleveland, 
who could not even wait until he was inaugurated before he 
gave silver a blow, pounded it until he and his party forced 
it down to 9i>^ and the silver dollar to ^of^-^. The day 
after President Harrison was elected, silver began to re- 
vive, and when the Fifty-first Congress met it had climbed 
up to 96X. To-day it is worth $1 20, and its monetary uses 
are fully restored. Was ever a clearer, sharper 
contrast drawn by hard fact between Repub- 
lican w^isdom and competency and Demo- 
cratic folly and incapacity than is shown in 
these uncompromising figures ! 

Why, the value of our silver coin since Harrison's in- 
auguration has increased $90,238,000. 

But this is not all. Wheat, barley, oats, rye — all the 
products of the farm, have similarly grown in value. The 
wheat crop of 1889 amounted to 490,560,000 bushels, and 
its value was $342,491,707, an average of a little less than 
seventy cents a bushel. That same crop would 
sell at to-day's prices, w^hich have increased 
to $1.02>^ a bushel, for $154,526,400 more 
than was actually realized. This table shows the 
facts : 



17 



Prices of American Cereals in Qhicago ^er bushel. 



Date. 


Significance. 


Price 

No. 2 

Spring 

Wheat 


Price 

No. 2 
Yellow 
Corn. 


Price 

No. 2 

White 

Choice 

Oats. 

^0.23 
•34 

*.4i 

•37M 


Price No. 2 
Rye. 


Dec. 2, 1889.. 
July 14, 1890. . 
Aug. 13,1890.. 
Aug. 30,1890.. 


Date of meeting of 
Republican Congr's 

Date of passage of the 
new silver law 

Date new silver law 
went into effect 

Date of present sta- 
tistics 


$0.79 
J-.88 

•99 
i.oiK 


So.3iX 
.38 

*.5oK 
•483/< 


^0.45 
i No sales 
\ 48K bid. 

*.63 

•63 









* The exceptional advance, during the month, was partially due 
to the material lowering in the condition of the crops. Rye is a 
cereal not extensively cultivated in the United States ; the figures 
given under that heading are, consequently, only important as show- 
ing the general rapid advance in prices of farm products from De- 
cember 2d, 1889, to the present date. 

In the presence of such facts as these the Democracy 
must stand dumb or argue itself an ass. Its representa- 
tives in Congress voted bodily against the silver bill. They 
have been occupied ever since cursing themselves and their 
blind leaders ! 



ISSUE No. 4. 

Do you \¥ant good money and plen- 
ty of it, or bad money and not even 
enough of that to go around ? 



18 



THE GRAND OLD PARTY. 




IT IS TRUE TO THE FLAG. 



LAWS TO HELP LABOR. 



Not Class Legislation Merely, but Measures of 
National Value. 



What Has Been Done in Aid of Industrial Reform 
BY this Congress. 



a striking review of facts showing how carefully 

THE interests OF THE POORER PEOPLE HAVE 
BEEN GUARDED AGAINST ENCROACH- 
MENTS OF ALL KINDS. 

This was among the declarations which the Republican 
National Convention of 1888 submitted to the people for 
their approval : 

We declare our hostility to the introduction into this country of 
foreign contract labor and of Chinese labor, and favor such imme- 
diate legislation as will exclude such labor from our shores. 

It may fairly be said that the only direct assurance of 
legislation in accordance with what may be called "labor's 
demands" which the Republican party has given, which it 
became the duty of this Congress to pass, related to the 
prohibition of cheap and degraded labor. But in perform- 
ance the Grand Old Party has far exceeded its promises. 
It does not recognize the existence of sections and classes 
among the people, each to be coddled and wooed for elec- 
tion purposes. The Republican party regards the people 
as a mass, itself of that mass, inspired by that mass, and 
moved by the will of its intelligent and patriotic majority. 
It has not passed labor bills as class bills, but as measures 
vitally affecting the interests of the whole people. 

Every important piece of legislation passed by this House 
has been a ** labor bill." The Elections law is immensely 
a labcr bill, for if the will of the poor and lowly voter — he 
who constitutes four-fifths of the people — can be thwarted 
by an arrogant aristocracy or an unscrupulous company of 
political bandits, free government is on a gallop to its 
grave ! The Tariff bill and the Silver bill, the Bankruptcy 
Act, the Land-grant forfeitures, the Shipping bills — all 
these, as we have seen, are moving toward the develop- 
ment of trade with the r»3sistless force of so many Corliss 
engines. They are all "labor bills." 



LABOR REFORMS ACCOMPLISHED. 



But it is also true to say that no House of Representa- 
tives that has assembled in the National Capitol since 



19 



Washington first set the machinery of government in motion 
has done so much as this House in response to the appeals 
of labor organizations for measures directly aifecting the 
social and industrial reforms they have at heart. Demo- 
cratic Congresses have set year after year, all heedless of 
the cries of the workingmen, deaf, dumb and blind to any- 
thing else than their pet sophistry — Free Trade ! Their 
every effort has been to spread mortgages all over Ameri- 
can farming lands and to fasten chains upon American 
factories ! 

In one week of this session the Republican majority — 
of course against Democratic objection and obstruction, 
has passed no less than five labor bills, pure and simple — 
measures asked for by the labor societies of the land. 
Look at the list. 

1. An effective prohibition of alien contract labor. 

2. An effective eight-hour law, constituting eight hours a 
full day's work for all Government employes. 

3. An adjustment law, enabling claimants under the old 
eight-hour law to submit their cases to judicial arbitrament, 

4. A law prohibiting the employment of convict labor on 
Government works. 

5. A law prohibiting the use of the product of convict 
labor by the Government in any of its Departments. 



THE AMERICAN HOG. 



Congress Has Vindicated His Honor and Opened 
Foreign Ports to His Triumphal Entry. 
In addition to these measures, several others have been 
enacted dealing directly with the welfare of the farmer and 
the mechanic. The enumeration of them affords a striking 
proof of the Republican party's broad and general solicitude 
for the advantage of the whole countr}^ 

1. The Meat Inspection bill, providing for the inspection of all 
meats intended to be sent abroad, and prohibiting the exportation of 
all adulterated articles of food or drink, and enabling the President 
to prevent by proclamation the importation into this country of 
impure food products. This bill is intended to bring about, as it 
inevitably must, a better treatment of the American ho^ by the foreign 
nations that are now holding their ports hard against it, to their own 
injury and to ours. 

2. The Compound Lard bill, defining lard to be the article com- 
monly known as lard, made exclusively from the fresh fat of slaugh- 
tered swine, and defining compound lard to be any imitation of pure 
lard, and imposing upon it a tax sufficient to secure a proper regula- 
tion of its manufacture. 

3 A Bankruptcy law, providing, at the urgent request of both 
debtor and creditor, a uniform system of bankruptcy. This measure, 
in its relation to commerce, great and small, is almost as valuable as 
the Republican system of uniform banking. 

4. A law providing for the forfeiture of unearned land-grants. 

5. A law endowing agricultural colleges. 



ISSUE No. 5. 
Will the workiiigiiien and their or- 
ganizations stand by the party which 
keeps its promises and performs its 
duties to them, or will they prefer 
the party which violates its promises 
and doesn't see its duties? 



THE GRAND OLD PARTY 




IT IS TRUE TO THE FLAG. 



LET'S HAVE OUR • OWN SHIPS. 



Republican Measures to Revive the American Mer- 
chant Marine. 



Why Waste $150,000,000 a Year on Foreigners when 
we can just as well Keep it Ourselves ? 



WHY contribute THESE MILLIONS TO THE BUILDING UP 

OF FOREIGN SHIPPING AND POSSIBLY HOSTILE 

NAVIES, WHEN WE CAN JUST AS WELL 

USE THEM TO BUILD UP 

OUR OWN? 

Pending in the House, having already passed the Senate, 
are the two important measures known as the shipping 
bills. Of their final passage by the House, probably at 
this session, certainly in the next, there can be no doubt. 
Their effect upon the revival of the American merchant 
marine, in the establishment of new lines of travel between 
our ports and those of SoLth America, will assuredly be to 
build up a large and important trade that has too long 
been neglected. 

The first of these bills provides for the payment to 
American built and American-owned vessels of more than 
500 tons register, engaged in the foreign trade, of certain 
small bounties according to the distances sailed, and under 
certain conditions. It is estimated that the amount paid 
to vessels complying with the act would be about one-half 
the sum of their annual interest, insurance and depreciation 
accounts. Probably $3,000,000 will be required to meet 
the bounty demands in the first year after the bill becomes 
a law and possibly as much as $8,000,000 when its stimulat- 
ing influences have had their full effect. This bill has been 



asked for by the chambers of commerce of more than 500 
cities and by at least 1800 other commercial societies. 



ENGLAND'S ENORMOUS SUBSIDIES. 



The second bill is in the interest of the foreign postal 
service, and provides a liberal rate of payment to American 
steamships carrying our foreign mails in case they shall be 
built according to certain naval specifications, in case they 
shall make at least 20 miles an hour, shall carry certain 
naval forces, and be subject to the call of the Government 
for naval service. 

Congress has been forcibly impressed with the fact that 
public sentiment is overwhelmingly in favor of these bills. 
They take the only means possible for the protection of an 
American carrying fleet against the subsidy laws of other 
nations. Many denials, inexplicable and foolish, have been 
made of the fact that England, Germany and France are 
to-day subsidizing their merchant marine. These denials 
are based on the principle that the character of a transac- 
tion can be changed merely by changing its name. The 
cold fact, that can only be denied by a cold lie, is that in the 
last sixty years England has paid no less than $275,000,000 
in postal subsidies and bounties and that she now pays an 
average of $3,750,000 per year. The United States pays to 
its vessels less than $100,000 — not enough to defray the 
expense of mail transportation. 



HONOR AND SAFETY AT STAKE. 



No nation can hold a truly great position among its con- 
temporaries without a foreign commerce, without flying its 
flag on every sea and landing its products in every port. 
National pride, national interest, every prompting of 
patriotic sentiment, every dictate of commercial selfishness 
requires that we should re-assume the place we once held 
among the maritime countries of the world. That place 
was acquired by protection. It was lost by free trade. 
The duration of our supremacy was coincident with the 
operation of our protective laws. The duration of our 
inferiority has been coincident v/ith the operation of our 
present careless system. We found a thousand advantages 
in supremacy when we held it. We are losing in national 
prestige and in money every day, and must lose so long as 
as we leave our shipping to compete unaided with the sub- 
sidized shipping of other nations. 



LET'S BRACE UP AND DO BETTER. 

(From President Harrison's last Annual Message.) 

There is nothing- more justly humiliating to the national pride, and 
nothing more hurtful to the national prosperity than the inferiority 
of our merchant marine compared with that of other nations whose 
general resources, wealth, and sea-coast lines do not sugg-est any 
reason for their supremacy on the sea. It was not always so, and 
our people are agreed, I think, that it shall not continue to be so. 



A DRAIN UPON NATIONAL RESOURCES. 

(From a special message of President Grant, March, 1870.) 

It is a national humiliation that we are now compelled to pay from 
twenty to thirty million dollars annually (exclusive of passage 
money, which we should share with other nations) to foreig^ners for 
doing the work which should be done by American vessels, American 
built, American owned, and American manned. 



WHY BE HELPLESS WHEN WE MIGHT BE STRONG ? 

(From a speech in Congress by Senator Frye.) 

Why should we fear to resort to bounties and subsidies ? Why 
should we pay $150,000,000 a year to foreign ships for carrying our 
carg^oes ? Why should we carry our mails under a foreign flag ? 
Why should every passenger who desires to sail from America 
abroad be compelled to sail under a foreign flag ? Why should we, 
with our immense wealth and our great power, our ship-yards and 
mechanics, our enormous coast line, depend upon foreign nations to 
do all of our foreign carrying business for us ? Why should we per- 
mit them to pay subsidies, as England has for fifty years, and quietly 
surrender the possession of all this business ? Why yield to Spain 
and Germany and Italy and Holland and the Argentine Republic ? 



ISSUE No. 6. 

Are you in favor of a merchant 
marine, do you wish to see the Stars 
and Stripes restored to their old 
place on the high seas, or are you 
Avilling to have America remain 
dependent on foreign ships for a 
foreign trade ? 



-3 



THE GRAND OLD PARTY 




IT IS TRUE TO THE FLAG. 



MORE PENSIONS. 



Thirty-Five Millions a Year Added t® the Pen- 
sions Account. 



Republican Pledges to Veterans Redeemed. 



©¥T OF every five DOLLARS COLLECTED AS NATIONAL 

REVENUE, TWO DOLLARS GO TO THE SOLDIERS 

AND SAILORS WHO SAVED THE UNION 

AND TO THEIR DEPENDENT 

FAMILIES. 

The Republican party in its last National Platform pro- 
claimed this doctrine : 

The leg-islation of Congress should conform to the pledges made 
hy a loyal people, and be so enlarged and extended as to provide 
against the possibilty that any man who honorably wore the Federal 
Uniform shall become the inmate of an alms-house or dependent 
upon private charity. 

In harmony with this recommendation, which the people 
indorsed, the Republican Congress and the Republican 
President have placed an additional annual sum of 
$35,000,000 to the credit of the pension fund for the benefit 
of 250,000 just claimants whose names have until now been 
absent from the rolls. The pensions of 50,006 men already 
there are increased from $2 per month to $6. The pension 
list is enlarged to include a total of 750,000 beneficiaries, 
and a total of $150,000,000 per year is applied for their 
relief. For the coming' year the iiovernment 
will pay two dollars out of every five col- 
lected for the maintenance of the infirm, 
maimed and dependent heroes who off*ered 
their lives in its defence. History contains no 
instance of such a practical demonstration of gratitude on 
the part of a nation to its soldiers and sailors ! This was 
accomplished at every stage, as perhaps was only natural, 
in the face of a violent, bitter, relentless Democratic oppo- 
sition. The party which, in the eloquent words of George 
William Curtis, the orator who now prostitutes his eloquence 
to its service, * ' fell from power in a conspiracy against 
human rights and now sneaks back into power in a con- 
spiracy for plunder and spoil," — that party would naturally 
starve the heroes who escaped its bullets. That it has failed 
to do so is not the fault of its Congresses or its President. 

24 



ISSUE No. 7. 

Do yovi wish the nation to keep its 
promises to the men who kept its 
flag aloft, or would you have it leave 
them to the tender mercies of poor- 
houses and private charity? 



MORE NEW STATES. 



The Dakotas, Montana and Washington Added to 

THE Union. 



Idaho and Wyoming Well Along on their Way. 

Among the promises made by the Republicans in their 
National council was one in favor of the prompt admission 
of such Territories as were plainly ready to enter upon the 
duties and obligations of statehood. This promise was 
made at a time when the Dakotas, Montana and Washing- 
ton were knocking at the door of a Democratic Congress, 
and knocking in vain. The Republican Senate had voted 
to admit them, but the Democratic House, for no reason in 
the world but the utterly mean one that they were Repub- 
lican communities, had shown a plain intention to keep 
them and their lively, thriving affairs in the embarrass- 
ments of territorial government. The conduct of the 
Democratic Administration toward the far western terri- 
tories afforded a most reckless and indecent exhibition of 
partisanship. Everything that rulers could do to hinder 
and oppress the ruled was done in these territories. 
Settlers were robbed outright in many cases of the lands 
they had earned, and in many others they were subjected 
to big and little annoyances, the sum of which amounted 
to a national outrage. 

When the election of 1888 had occurred and a Republi- 
can President and House had been chosen, some of the 
Democratic members were wise enough to see that the 
time had come to stop this sort of business unless they 
wished to turn the entire West more than ever against their 
party. A few of them then reversed their positions and 
voted with the Republicans to admit the four new States. 
President Harrison took office in time to extend his wel- 
coming hand to the new States, and they are now admitted 
** on equal terms with the original thirteen." 

Two other Territories have been brought in by the pres- 
ent Congress — Wyoming and Idaho, of course, against a 
united Democratic opposition. Untaught by their earlier 
lesson and unmoved by treaty pledges and considerations 
of public duty, the Democracy stood stubbornly against 
their admission, this time pretending that the conditions 
imposed in their Constitutions upon Mormons were harsh. 
The Republican party does not consider the 
perpetuation of polygramy to be one of its 
missions, and it fully endorsed the constitutional laws 
under which their disfranchisement was accomplished. 
Wyoming and Idaho came into the Union with masterful 
resources and a sterling population. The Nation is to be 
congratulated on their acquisition. 

as 



MORE SHIPS FOR THE NAVY. 



The Republican Party Continues its Work of 
National Defense. 

The Republican party promised the people in 1888 that 
it would proceed rapidly towards the rebuilding of the 
Navy and the construction of works for the protection of 
our harbors and great cities. Important steps have been 
taken in the redemption of this pledge. Among the naval 
appropriations passed by this Congress is one providing 
$23,000,000 for the construction of three large battle ships, 
one large cruiser, one small cruiser and one torpedo boat, 
adding six fine ships to the new navy. 

The sum of $4,232,935 has been appropriated for harbor 
defences and fortifications ; for the purchase of torpedoes, 
marine guns, mortar batteries and armaments ; for the 
establishment of an American gun factory and for the 
building and repairing of important fortifications. 

These acts make a considerable progress in the line of 
national safety. 



SOME GENERAL LAWS. 



Relieving Pressure in the Supreme Court. — A Blow 
at the Lottery. 

The act relieving the Supreme Court from the congestion 
which has almost paralyzed it, by the establishment of an 
intermediate court, is one of the most useful features of 
Republican legislation. The difficulties under which the 
Supreme Court have labored have amounted to a denial of 
justice. It is now able to proceed with its business in a 
rapid and orderly way. 

Important too, for the honor, not less than the welfare of 
the country, are the anti-lottery bills, which successfully 
take the United States Post-Office out of the service of that 
infamous institution known as the Louisiana State Lottery. 



I 



THE GRAND OLD PARTY. 




IT IS TRUE TO THE FLAG. 



THE RECORD MADE UR 



And There Never Was a Better One Since Con- 
gress First Began to Make History. 

Briefly, and all too briefly, this is the record of the Re- 
publican party in the House of Representatives during 
nine months of the two years in which it must perform its 
work. The history of this country, splendid as it is in the 
passage of safe, wise and helpful legislation, contains no 
example in times of peace of a session of Congress so re- 
markable for good. Its work has been done quickly, 
quietly, resolutely, and in the face of an opposition which 
has been bitter and unscrupulous in an equal degree. 

A hundred issues might be presented as a result of the 
differences between the two parties developed during this 
session of Congress. These are the paramount ones : 

Shall Congress be a deliberative assembly 
wherein public measures may be properly considered, 
duly debated, and then, without waste of time, actually 
voted upon ; and wherein the American principle of 
" majority rule " shall be respected, or sliall it be a 
mob, incompetent to act, powerless to carry out the pub- 
lic v/ill, with a majority so overcome by its own rules that 
it is dependent upon the minority for its authority and 
power ? 

Shall we allow the Capitol to be filled up 
with men who obtain seats in Congress not as the re- 
sult of a free ballot and a fair count, but by the forci- 
ble suppression of franchise rights, by whole- 
sale frauds, by murder, arson, brutality and other crimes ? 

Shall we abandon the policy of Protection, 
after all it has done for us, to enter upon a policy which 
we have tested many times to our immediate, unfailing and 
tremendous loss ? 

Shall we again rob ourselves of the rewards 
which have so richly come from the restoration of 
silver, and once more play into the hands of foreigners 
who have been for years buying our silver at low prices 
and using it against us in the grain markets of the world ? 

Shall w^e pay our money, $150,000,000 a year, to 
build up the merchant marine of England, to increase her 
strength upon the sea and her hold upon the foreign mar- 
kets of the world, when we might as well as not be paying 
it for our own advantage iu all of these re- 
spects ? 

27 



Shall we keep our plighted faith to the loyal 
men who offered their lives in defense of freedom and 
union and to the protection of whose families from waiiiC 
and misery we gave our word as a nation ? 

These are the chief and the most sharply defined issues 
upon which the country is asked to cast a deciding ballot 
this fall. Every effort is being made to side-track them, 
to envelope them in clouds and to carry the people away 
from them here and there on false pretenses. The Demo- 
crats start off in the next Congress, as usual, with thirty- 
one stolen seats. They have that number of seats to 
their credit without a campaign. By infamous gerry- 
manders, especially in Ohio, Maryland, Kentucky and 
Indiana, they expect to steal twenty -one oilier 
seats. This gives them an immense advantage. To the 
Republicans it is an awful handicap. But if the 
intelligent, thoughtful and patriotic people 
of the land will do their duty as citizens, if 
they will stand sturdily by their guns, if 
they will vote as they wish and think, the 
result will be a glorious Kepublican victory 
and a prompt and happy completion of the 
work which President Harrison and this 
Congress have carried forward so wisely and 
so well. 

September, 1890. 



t28 



^ 



lL^oo'),oi4.olU^^ 



^^ 



No man is good enough to 
govern another without his 
consent. 

-ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 



There is not a single elec- 
tion precinct in all this broad 
land where a Democrat may 
not cast his vote in peace 
and safety and have it count- 
ed as cast. But there are 
hundreds of precincts in 
which it is as much as a 
man's life is worth to appear 
at the polls with a Repub- 
lican ballot in his hands. If 
this evil is not soon cured 
what will become of free 
government ? 

-U. S. G-EANT.