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Full text of "Great Whelnetham parish registers, 1561 to 1850. Little Whelnetham parish register, 1557 to 1850"

Uloh VoU.7 B;°"= 
Brigham Young University 




GIFT OF 

Utah County 
Genealogical and 
Historical Society 



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Circulate 



nmmm to utw vauft 

BR GINEMOGKM UBRAM 
AT B.t.U. by 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2010 with funding from 
Brigham Young University 



http://www.archive.org/details/greatwhelnethamp15whel 



Great Whelnetham Parish Registers, 

1561 to 1850. 

Little Whelnetham Parish Registers, 

1557 to 1850. 

With historical and biographical notes, illustrations, 
map and pedigrees. 



SUFFOLK GREEN BOOKS. 
No. XV. 




.i 



BURY ST. EDMUNDS: 

PAUL & MATHEW, BUTTER MARKET 

1910. 

BTAH COUNTY GENEALOGICAL 
^ ANQ tilSTORiCAL SOCIETY 



BRJSHAM YOUNG UNiVERs/ry 
i^...:^£RQyO. UTAH 



CONTENTS. 



]'reface 



PART I. 



Registers— Great Whelnetham 
— Little Whelnetham 

Monumental Inscriptions in Great Whelnetham Church 
Tombstones in Great Whelnetham Churchyard ... 
Monumental Inscriptions in Little Whelnetham C^hurch . 
Tombstones in Little Whelnetham Churchyard ... 
Notes in the Registers of Great Whelnetham ... 
Notes in the Registers of Little Whelnetham ... 
Whelnetham Tax Payers, 1327 — 1674 ... 
Valuations and Returns, a.d. 1086, 1292, 1340, 1453, 1535, 160 
Little Whelnetham Rate-book 1699 — 1768 
Whelnetham Wills, 1343 — 1724 
Feet of Fines, 1258 — 1498 
Inquisitions post mortem, 13 12 — 1590 ... 
Documents relating to the House of Crutched Friars, 

1274—1540 
Miscellaneous Documents 1281 — 1540 ... 
Unattached de Whelnethams 

More Whelnetham Wills (James and Jane Merest) 
Document relating to Joan de Bures, a nun, 141 7 
Statutes, 1285 — 1331. (Winchester and two others) 



page 

1—103 

104—163 

164, 165 

166 — 191 

192 

193—203 

204—207 

208, 209 

210 — 227 

228 — 233 

234—237 
238 — 272 
273—288 
289 — 300 

301—306 
307, 308 
308—314 
315. 316 
317,318 
3^9, 320 



CONTENTS. 



PART II. 

PAGE 

Chapter I. The Manors and their lords ... ... 321—379 

(i). The undivided Whelnetham : the abbot of Bury, the 

earl of Mortain ... ... ••• 322 

(2). Great Whelnetham : de Whelnetham family 324 — 341 : 324 — 364 
Heirs of Sir John de Whelnetham, de Bures, Brokes- 
borne, Raynsford, Waldegrave, Rookwood, 341 — 355 : 
Drury 357, 358 : Jermyns and their heirs, 358 — 361 : 
Postscripts 362 — 364 

(3). Little Whelnetham : de Cayley 364 : de Weyland 365 — 364—379 
369 : heirs of de Weyland, viz. Burghersh, le Despencer, 
de Beauchamp 369 — 373 : Duke of York 370 : Audley 
374 — 377 : Jermyns and heirs 377 — 379. 

Chapter II. The Crutched Friars and the Chapel of St. 

Thomas the Martyr ... ... ... 380 — 394 

Chapter III. The Rectors ... ... ... ... 395 — 417 

(i). Great Whelnetham 395 — 407. (2). Little Whelnetham 
407 — 415. (3). Curates and stray Clergy 415 — 417. 

Chapter IV. Great Whelnetham Hall and Advowson ... 418 — 423 

Chapter V. Gipps Family ... ... ... ... 424 — 447 

Miscellaneous Gippses 424 — 428. Gipps of Whelne- 
tham 428 — 447. Sir Richard Gipps 431 — 438. John 
Gipps the Nonjuror 441 — 443. Gipps pedigrees 445, 
446. 

Chapter VI. A Walk round the two parishes ... ... 448 — 496 

Sicklesmere 448. Amerdown 450. The Waggon 451. 
Little Whelnetham present rectory 451. Wash farm 
452. Great Whelnetham church 453 — 459. Copdoes 
459 — 466. Macro family 461 — 466. Macro pedigree 
465. Nether hall 466. An old site 467. Brooke 
green 468. Bell's hill 468. Great Whelnetham 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 



rectory 468. Great Whelnetham hall 469. Skipper's 
farm 470. Oxley wood 470. Partridge family 471 — 
473. Craske's cottage 473. Cock's green 473. 
Cock's green farm 474. Ely family 475. Copy farm 
475. Cock family 476. Manor farm 477. Little 
Whelnetham church 478 — 485. Little Whelnetham 
hall 485 — 494. Biddell family 487 — 493. Little 
Whelnetham old rectory 494. A green lane 495. 

Chapter VIL Roman Remains at Whelnetham ... 

Chapter VIIL Great Whelnetham Manor Court Rolls 

Chapter IX. Final Notes 

The name, Whelnetham 510. Heraldry in Little Whelne- 
tham church 512. Heraldry in the Manger Inn 516. 
St. Thomas' Chapel 516. Sicklesmere 516. Aggas 
lane 516. An old site 516. Bowes family 517. 
Batteley and Merest families 518. Rev. Thomas Lord 
519. Rev. John Pack 520. Population 520. Tablets 
on Bury houses to Defoe and Sir Thomas Hanmer 521 

No. 1. Index to Great Whelnetham Registers ... 

No. 2. Index to Little Whelnetham Registers ... 

No. 3. Index to Tombstone Inscriptions 

No. 4. General Index 

Corrections 



497—504 
505—509 
5'o— 525 



526-554 
555—572 

573—575 
576—580 

581 






CONTENTS. 



PEDIGREES. 



DE Whelnetham (unattached, tentative) ... 

DE Whelnetham ... 

DE Brokesborne, Raynford and Waldegrave 

Drury 

Jermyn and heirs via Spring 

Jermyn and heirs via Davers 

DE Weyland, Despencer and Beauchamp 

From Edward III to Sir John Audley 

Folkes and Lord (see p. 520) 

Boldero and Gipps (tentative) 

Gipps OF Great Whelnetham 

Macro of Whelnetham and Bury 

Edward III to George, lord Bergavenny, by two routes 



339 



PAGE 

3^1 

356 
356 
358 
361 

379 
373 
373 
406 

445 
446 

465 
5^5 



SMALL ILLUSTRATIONS. 



House of Crutched Friars 

North side 

South side 

Chapel 

South east 

South side 

South east 
Ticket of admission to masque 1682 
Gipps heraldic shield 
Brokesborne heraldic shield 
Raynford heraldic shield 
DE Whelnetham heraldic shield 
Stone now in porch of Great Whelnetham church 
Girling heraldic shield 



page 
390 
390 
39^ 
392 
393 
394 
431 
447 
447 
447 
454 
456 
484 



CONTENTS. 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



St. Thomas' Chapel 

Sir Richard Gipps 

Great Whelnetham Hall (North side) 

The Waggon at Sicklesmere 

Little Whelnetham Rectory 

Wash Farm at Sicklesmere 

Great Whelnetham Church (outside) 

Great Whelnetham Church (inside) 

COPDOES 

Great Whelnetham Rectory 

Great Whelnetham Hall (South side) 

Cocks Green Farm 

Little Whelnetham Church, showing the apse 

Little Whelnetham Church 

Little Whelnetham Hall 



To face p. 381 
To face p. 43 1 
To face p. 419 
To face p. 450 
To face p. 451 
To face p. 452 
To face p. 453 
To f^ice p. 455 
To face p. 459 
To face p. 468 
To face p. 470 
To face p. 474 
To face p. 478 
To face p. 481 
To face p. 485 



Map to illustrate the walk round the two parishes 



To face p. 448 



viii PREFACE. 



PREFACE. 



I HAVE divided this volume into two parts. Part I contains chiefly raw material. 
(P. I to 320). Part II contains that raw material (with additions) cooked and 
dished up in nine dishes. (P. 321 to 525.) Part I is the butcher's shop, Part II is 
the dinner table spread. I provide for two hundred and fifty guests to sit down. 
Judging from past experience I may expect twenty at the most. 

In making out the history of any parish a very large part of the labour is 
generally bestowed upon the lords of the manor, though as often as not they are 
absentees, and the pursuit of them takes one away from the place rather than into it. 
And by the time one has done with them one's patience is exhausted, the winter is 
past, the summer calls one out, a sufficient number of pages have been filled, and so 
the unfinished book is brought to a speedy end. This is not as it should be, and in 
every parish there are many other things besides the succession of the lords of the 
manor that call for more attention. I have followed the usual course in this volume 
and not the right course. 

The succession of the lords of the manor of the two Whelnethams has been made 
out entirely from contemporary records, most of which are printed in Part I. In the 
case of Great Whelnetham those lords were not absentees, or at any rate they were 
not far off. I have made out their succession with more or less certainty r..id fulness 
from the time of Edward I, when the de Whelnetham family was in possession, to 
the time of Henry VIII, when that acquiring family, the Jermyns of Rushbrooke, 
were at the height of their acquisitiveness, and were able to acquire to their hearts 
content, so great was the quantity of land which the Reformation was then throwing 
into the market. But there is a time between the de Whelnethams and the Jermyns, 
between 1400 and 1500, during which I have somehow (without noticing it at the 
time) left the lords of this manor in a nebulous state. You only see them as you see 
the stars in the Milky Way, or as the still half blind man saw men like trees walking, 
or as we see things through a glass darkly. There was an interesting family, interestimg 



PREFACE. ix 



for their failures, their misfortunes and their devotion to lost causes, rather than for 
their successes, their prosperity and their worship of rising suns, the Rokewoods of 
Stanningfield, who seem to have owned the manor then and of whom I have said little. 
I can only hope that a forthcoming history of Stanningfield (not by me) will turn my 
milky way into individual stars each one shining brightly, and will make the men look 
like men and not like walking trees. 

While the lords of the manor of Great Whelnetham keep one at home in the 
neighbourhood of the place, the lords of Little Whelnetham on the other hand take 
one right away till the Jermyn or Reformation period. From the time of Thomas de 
Weyland, the unjust judge of the reign of Edward I, who though disgraced and 
banished managed to hand down this possession to his son and through him to all 
the great people ultimately descended from him, from that judge to the time of the 
Jermyns (who of course acquired it) the list of lords is full of interest. But that 
interest is general and not local. The chapters containing the details of them would 
be chapters from the history of England and not from the history of a parish. 

Lady Constance, daughter of Edmund Langley, duke of York, and granddaughter 
of Edward III, does not quite come into the list of owners of the manor, but it is 
curious how it goes all round her and clings to her connections and descendants. 
(Pedigree, p. 373.) It would have been her husband's, but his head was taken off in 
his mother's lifetime, whose inheritance it was. Then her brother, a royal duke, had 
it till he fell at Agincourt. Then her daughter, a posthumous child, had it. Then 
another kind of daughter had it, whose descendants kept it (in spite of confiscations 
during the wars of the Roses) till the incoming and innings of those acquiring 
Jermyns, who came in bat in hand to score notches where they could. I do not 
know how much more is known of Lady Constance, but if not much more of bad is 
known of her, due allowance should be made for her misfortunes and the difBculties 
of her position, and the words "a woman of an evil reputation," which is the whole 
account of her given in the D. N. B., strike one as harsh. If it said as much it should 
have said more to justify it. I may set down here (from the D. N. B.) the date of 
her death, having omitted to give it elsewhere, viz. 28 Nov., 14 16. 

Of the small religious house in Whelnetham I have made out as much as I could 
from contemporary documents. It is more than will be found anywhere else, which 
is all that can be said for it. I should have liked to have made out who it was that 
originated a chapel there to Thomas Becket and why. 



PREFACE. 



I have mentioned at p. 515 that the Ordnance Survey has turned Aggas lane into 
Hawker's lane. One hopes that they will put it right again. Of course it is possible 
that one of the two rectors named Aggas (p. 410 — 412) may have persuaded Lord 
St. Albans or one of the Jermyns to grant this right of way through their park at 
Rushbrooke, and so it was called Aggas lane. But I hesitate to suggest this for two 
reasons : (i) because there is no particular reason for suggesting it : (2) because 
there is a tendency to suppose that all rights of ways through parks have been 
graciously granted and given by the owner of the park. It is nothing of the kind. In 
most cases rights of ways through parks are older than the park. They were there 
first and the park came afterwards and surrounded them. It would be as true to say 
that the public gave the park as it is to say that the owner of the park gave the right 
of way. All he did was not to take it away, and he did not always do that. It would 
be as well if this fiction about the gracious gifts of the lords of manors were got rid 
of. They have taken away from the public a great deal more than they have ever 
given, and even now they are sometimes taking away or trying to. 

I have to express my best thanks to the Rev. E. H. Sankey, rector of Great 
Whelnetham, and to the Rev. R. Gibson, rector of Little Whelnetham, for allowing 
me the use of the registers and for helping in every possible way. I hope I have 
elsewhere expressed my thanks to others wherever they were due. 

Manuscripts in London have been transcribed for me by Mr. Muskett and Mr. 
A. Heintz ; those in East Anglia by Mr. Fred. Johnson of Norwich. The large 
illustrations are mostly from photographs taken by Mr. Jarman of Bury St. Edmunds. 
That of Copdoes is from a photograph by Mr. Fred Watson of Bury St. Edmunds. 

The map drawn by Col. C. R. W. Hervey, and engraved by Messrs Sparks & 
Co. of Bury St. Edmunds, is intended to illustrate the walk taken in Chapter VI and 
to show us where we are as we go along. It is based on Bryant's large Map of Suffolk, 
1826. But that map has placed Hawstead Green quite wrongly, and so we altered it. 
I may mention that Lenny's Map of Ten miles round Bury, 1823, is quite wrong in 
some respects. Great Whelnetham Hall is placed at Copdoes, and Copdoes (wrongly 
called Copdock) is placed in or near Hawstead. 

Bury St. Edmunds., S. H. A. H. 

August igio. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM PARISH 

REGISTERS. 



BAPTISMS. 



I56I. 


Aug. 


17- 


1562. 


Aprill 


14. 




Aprill 


30- 




June 


27. 


^5(^3- 


Julye 


5- 




Julye 


31- 




Aug. 


7- 




Aug. 


20. 




Sept. 


18. 


1564- 


Oct. 


I. 


1565- 


Maya 


27. 




June 


29. 




March 


10. 


1566. 


Maye 


4- 




Julye 


7- 




Feb. 


23- 




Marche 


23- 


1567- 


Sept. 


2 . 




Sept. 


2. 




Nov. 


2. 




Feb. 


8. 



Robart sonne of Rychard Taylor. 
Robart sonne of John Pilhorowe. 
William sonne of Thomas Makroe. 
John sonne of John Addams. 
Mathewe sonne of Mathewe Sorrier. 
Elizabeth dau. of W^illiam Manninge. 
Ellen dau. of Nicholas Inholde. 
Thomas sonne of Robert Taylor. 
Joane dau. of John Kinge. 
Thomas sonne of Thomas Makroe. 
Roger sonne of William Manninge. 
Elizabeth dau. of John Addams. 
Robert sonne of Robert Tyler. 
Rose dau. of Nicholas Inholde. 
Thomas sonne of Thomas Inholde. 
Anne dau. of \V^illiam Manninge. 
John sonne of Robert Nunne. 
Grizel dau. of William Fizzye. 
Thomas sonne of Roger W'arde. 
Ralphe sonne of Thomas Makroe. 
Alice dau. of John Addams. 



GREAT WIIELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



1568. 


Sept. 


5- 




Aug. 


6. 




Sept. 


21. 




Feb. 


24. 


1569. 


Aprill 


20. 




Maye 


8. 




Jan. 


29. 


1570- 


Dec. 


3- 




Marche 


II. 


1571- 


Aprill 


22. 




Apnll 


22. 




Nov. 


I. 


1572. 


Julye 


21. 




Aprill 


30- 




Sept. 


7- 




Nov. 


16. 


1573- 


Marche 


I. 




Aprill 


12. 


I574- 


Julye 


18. 




Sept. 


2Z- 




Feb. 


7- 


1575- 


Marche 


25- 




Aprill 


24. 




Maye 


I. 




June 


20. 




Aug. 


28 




Jan. 


22. 




Marche 


I T. 


1576. 


Oct. 


7- 


1577- 


Aug. 


22. 




Sept. 


I. 




Sept. 


22. 




Nov. 


12. 




Nov. 


14. 




Dec. 


27. 



Clement sonne of Thomas Inholde. 
Ellen dau. of Robert Nunne. 
John Sonne of Robert Tyler. 
John Sonne of William Manninge. 
John Sonne of Robert Hammonde. 
Susan dau. of William Turle. 
Annes dau. of Thomas Addams. 
Henrye sonne of Robert Nunne. 
Elizabeth dau. of Robert Tyler. 
Grace dau. of Robert Hanmiond. 
Robert sonne of William Turle. 
Robert sonne of Thomas Inholde. 
John sonne of Thomas Addams. 
William sonne of William Manninge. 
Edward sonne of Thomas Makroe. 
Elizabeth dau of Thomas Kinge. 
John sonne of Raphe Manninge. 
John sonne of ^Villiam Turle. 
Margarett dau. of Thomas Nayler. 
Robart sonne of Thomas Addams. 
Robart sonne of Raynold Hammond. 
John sonne of Thomas Kinge. 
Thomas sonne of Robart Hammond. 
Thomas sonne of William Manninge. 
Roger sonne of Roger Manninge. 
I'homas sonne of Thomas Makroe. 
'I'homas sonne of William Turle. 
Amye dau. of Thomas Saunder. 
Dorothye dau. of Thomas Nayler. 
Rafe sonne of Rafe Manninge. 
George sonne of Gyles Clarke. 
Libbeus sonne of Libbeus Barwicke. 
Marye dau. of William Manninge. 
Thomas sonne of Robarte Hammond. 
John Sonne of Thomas Griggs. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



3 



Thomas sonne of Thomas Kinge. 

Marye dau. of William Turle. 

Susan dau. of Thomas Makroe. 

Benjamin & Christian, twinnes, sonne & dau. of Libbeus 

Barwicke. 
Prudence dau. of John Pattriche. 
Robart sonne of Raphe Manninge. 
John sonne of Thomas Saunder. 
Thomas sonne of Rychard Neweman. 
Rose dau. of ^V'illiam Manninge. 
Anne dau. of Thomas Rolfe. 
Marrion dau. of William Turle. 
Rychard sonne of Thomas Kinge. 
Sara dau. of Libbeus Barwicke. 
Anthonye sonne of Thomas Makroe. 
Robart sonne of Thomas Saunder. 
Anne dau. of Raphe Manninge. 
John sonne of John Pattriche. 
Raphe son of Thomas Kinge. 
James sonne of Libbeus Barwicke. 
Bridgett dau. of William Turle. 
Barbara dau. of Libbeus Barwicke. 
Dorothye dau. of John Pattriche. 
John sonne of John Addams. 
Dorothye dau. of Roger Manninge. 
Jeremye sonne of Thomas Kmge. 
Alice dau. of William Manninge. 
Thomas sonne of Thomas Addams. 
Rychard sonne of John Addams. 
Elizabeth dau. of John Pattriche. 
William sonne of Robart Addams. 
Marye dau. of William Clarke. 
Marye dau. of Thomas Kinge. 
Thomas sonne of John Pattriche. 
Susan dau. of John Addams. 



1577- 


Feb. 


9- 


1578. 


Maye 


25- 




Oct. 


12. 


1579- 


Feb. 


15- 




Marche 


18. 


1580. 


Dec. 


13- 




Jan. 


I. 




ApriU 


4- 




Aprill 


10. 




Julye 


3- 




Jan. 


15- 




Marche 


26. 




March 


28. 


1581. 


Oct. 


22. 


1582. 


Marche 


26. 




Maye 


6. 




Maye 


13- 




Maye 


20. 




Sept. 


2. 


1583- 


Aprill 


I. 


1584. 


Aug. 


23- 




Oct. 


II. 


1585- 


March 


I. 




June 


20. 




Oct. 


13- 


1586. 


Julye 


3°- 




Nov. 


25- 




Dec. 


26. 




Jan. 


8. 


1588. 


Dec. 


I. 




Dec. 


I. 




Dec. 


8. 




Feb. 


9- 


1589. 


Aug. 


17- 



4 

.589. 
I590. 
1591- 

1592. 
1593- 

1594- 

1595- 
1596. 
1597- 
1598. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



^599- 



Sept. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Maye 

J ulye 

Feb. 



5- 
24 

23- 
ult. 
18. 
15- 
3- 
17- 
16. 



Oct. 

Feb. 

Sept. 

Feb. 

Julye 

Aug. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Julye 

Oct. 10 

Marche 25 

Julye 8 

Marche 24 

June 16 

Aug. 

Jan. 

Feb. 

Aprill 

June 

Feb. 

Aug. 

Nov. 

Feb. 

Maye 

Oct. 

Jan. 

Aprill 

Aprill 



4- 
12. 
12. 



29. 
28. 

6. 

8. 



25- 

3- 

28. 
26. 
6. 
22. 
10. 



Ann dau. of William Taylor. 

Marye dau. of Robart Hynes. 

Elizabeth dau. of Rychard Stafford. 

Rose dau. of William Clarke. 

John Sonne cf Thomas Addams. 

Marye dau. of John Addams. 

Luke Sonne of Thomas Kinge. 

Robart sonne of John Pattriche. 

Rychard sonne of \Mlliam Taylor. 

Samuell son of Edmond Inhold. 

Jeremye sonne of Rychard .Stafford. 

Robart sonne of Thomas ^Vifif^n. 

Henrye sonne of John Pattriche. 

Marye dau of Edmond Inholde. 

Elizabeth dau. of John Addams. 

Susan dau. of Rychard Stafford. 

Raphe sonne of Raphe Makroe. 

Anne dau. of Bennett Scott. 

John sonne of John Mawldin. 

John sonne of Edmond Inholde. 

John sonne of Edmonde Cozen. 

Alice dau. of John Addams. 

Rychard sonne of Rychard Stafford. 

Marye dau. of John Maul din. 

Robart sonne of Bennet Scott. 

Susan dau. of John Pattriche. 

Marye dau. of Robert Tyler. 

lilisabeth Kinge bastard dau. of Thomas Kinge jun. & 

of Margaret Smyth. 
Grace dau. of John Addams. 
Marye dau. of Robart [sic] Scott. 
George sonne of Thomas Creeme. 
Marye dau. of John Addams sen. 
Elizabeth dau. of Rychard Stafford. 
William sonne of Bennet Scott. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



Susan dau. of Edmond Hewett. 
Elizabeth dau. of John Mawldin. 
Bridgett dau. of John Pattriche. 
Margarett dau. of George Seniman. 

John Sonne of Shillinge. 

Robarte sonne of Rychard Stafforde. 

Fraunces sonne of Robart Tyler. 

Robart & Annable, twynnes, sonne <S: dau. of John Addams. 

Rychard sonne of Bennet Scott. 

Susann dau. of Thomas Clarke of Pakenham. 

Amye dau. of Henrye Lakers. 

John sonne of John Ladyeman. 

Thoniassin dau. of John Pattriche. 

^^'illiam sonne of Rychard Stafford. 

William sonne of Robart Tjler. 

John sonne of John Howe. 

Bridgett dau. of Robart Spark e. 

James sonne of Bennet Scott. 

Anne dau. of John Ladyeman. 

Anne dau. of Rychard Stafford. 

George sonne of John Howe. 

Anne bastard dau. of ^^'illiam White & Ester Hall. 

Anne dau. of Thomas Hall. 

Robarte sonne of William Barnard. 

John son of Steven Burrowe of Burye St Edmond. 

James sonne of Rychard Stafford. 

Marye dau. of Bennet Scott. 

Edmond sonne of Edmund Sylvester. 

Alice dau. of John Ladyeman. 

Katherin dau. of Robart Bryan. 

Ursula dau. of Henrye Lakers. 

.Vnne dau. of John Howe. 

Margaret dau. of Rychard Stafford. 

Samuell sonne of Thomas Hall. 

Marye dau. of Robart Nunne. 



1599- 


Feb. 


10. 




Marche 


16. 


1600. 


Maye 


I. 




Aug. 


24. 




Oct. 


5- 


1 60 1. 


Aprill 


26. 




Maye 


24. 




Oct. 


14. 




Feb. 


7- 




Feb. 


18. 


1602. 


Aprill 


1 1. 




Aprill 


22. 




Feb. 


13- 


1603. 


Aprill 


26. 




Julye 


17- 




Oct. 


2. 




Jan. 


I. 




Jan. 


^5- 




Jan. 


15- 


1604. 


Julye 


4- 




Marche 


9- 


1605. 


Julye 


10. 




Sept. 


22. 




Jan. 


I. 




Jan. 


5- 




Jan. 


5- 




Jan. 


12. 


1606. 


Marche 


30- 




June 


5- 




Jan. 


29. 




Feb. 


22. 




Marche 


5- 


1607. 


Oct. 


15' 


1608. 


Aprill 


17- 




Julye 


31- 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



1608. Aug. 18. ^Villianl Sonne of John Price. 

Sept. 25. William sonne of Robart Rowge. 

Jan. 18. Robart sonne of Humffrye Steward. 

] 609. Aug. 24. Abigaile dau. of Rychard Stafford. 

Jan. 14. Benjamin sonne of Edward Leache. 

Jan. 16. John sonne of John Hammond. 

1 6 10. Sept. 4. Robarte sonne of John Addams. 
Sept. 23. Rychard sonne of Thomas Hall. 
Sept. 30. Marye dau. of Rafe Kinge. 
Oct. 28. Elizabeth dau. of Robart Nunne. 
March John bastard sonne of Marye Kinge. 

161 1. June 18. George sonne of William Cocke. 
June 23. Barbara dau. of Robart Inhold. 
Sept. 25. Robart sonne of John Hammond. 
Dec. 8. Rachel! dau. of Henrye Lakers. 

1 61 2. Maye 12. J^Mward sonne of Edward Leach. 
Nov. 15. Margaret dau. of Thomas Hall. 
Feb. II. ^\'illiam sonne of John Hammond. 

1 61 3. Aprill 13. A\'illiam Sonne of AMlliam Cocke. 
Julye. 28. Anne dau. of Anthonye Goodriche. 
Sept. 5. Elisabeth dau. of John Howe. 
Sept. 12. James sonne of Rychard Stafford. 
Dec. 28. Rachell dau. of John Addams. 

1 614. Oct. 9. John sonne of Rafe Kinge. 
Dec. 27. Thomas sonne of ^Villiam Cocke. 

161 5. Marche 30. 'i'homas sonne of John Hammond. 
Aprill 10. Elizabeth dau. of William Linge. 
Aprill 10. Urselye dau. of John Steward. 
Maye 30. John sonne of Edward Leach. 

1 6 16. Marche 28. Rafe sonne of Robarte Addams. 
Aprill 18. Elizabeth dau. of John Addams. 
Julye 18. Jt)hn sonne of William Cocke. 
Aug. 1 1 . Thomas sonne of Thomas Hall. 
Oct. 8. Anne dau. of Robart [sic] Tillot. 

1617. Aprill 30. Rafe sonne of Rafe Kinge. 



GREAT WHELNE'rHAM REGIS'! ERS.— BAPTISiMS. 



1617. 



1618. 



1619. 



1620. 



1621. 



1622. 



Jul ye 


8. 


Aug. 


15- 


Nov. 


^^0- 


Marc he 


15- 


Aprill 


19. 


Maye 


19. 


Maye 


26. 


Maye 


31- 


June 


2. 


June 


28. 


Oct. 


6. 


Nov. 


22. 


Dec. 


17- 


Maye 


28. 


Feb. 


13- 


March 


'6. 


Aprill 


17- 


Aprill 


30- 


May 


7- 


May 


28. 


June 


I. 


J une 


18. 


Sept. 


17- 


Dec. 


13- 


Aprill 


2. 


Sept. 


16. 


Sept. 


18. 


Oct. 


18. 


March 


5- 


June 


4- 


June 


26. 


July 


3- 


Oct. 


3°- 


Dec. 


4- 


Dec. 


1 1. 



Roger Sonne of Roger Tillett. 

^^'illiam sonne of Edward Eeache. 

George & Gyles, twinnes, sonnes of John Hammond. 

^\'illlam sonne of Thomas Goldston. 

Nathan somie of Gabriell Catchpoll. 

John Sonne of George Scott. 

Robart sonne of Robart Churche. 

Anne dau. of John Mawldin. 

Anne dau. of Robart Addams. 

James sonne of William Cocke. 

Alice dau. of Roger Tillott. 

Marye dau. of Thomas Moore. 

John sonne of John Addams. 

Elizabeth dau. of William Adson. 

Marye dau of Roger Tillott. 

Elizabeth dau. of AVilliam Cocke. 

Susan dau. of John Pattridge. 

Robert sonne of George Chynnery. 

Thomas sonne of John \\'adkin. 

William sonne of George Scot. 

Anthony sonne of Robert Addams. 

Isabell dau. of John Mauldin. 

Alice dau. of Thomas Goldston. 

AVilliam sonne of John Addams. 

William sonne of William Adson. 

Henry sonne of Giles Parker. 

Anne dau. of Robert Scot. 

Mary dau. of Robert Cason. 

Anne dau. of Roger Tillet. 

John Sonne of John Maldin. 

Richard sonne of George Scot. 

Fayth dau. of William Cocke. 

Mary dau. of John Nunne 

Giles Sonne of Robert Adams. 

Mary dau. of John Adams 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



1622. 



1623. 



1624. 



1625. 



1626. 



1627. 



1628. 



1629. 



1630. 



Jan. 


I. 


March 


9- 


March 


16. 


July 


22. 


Sept. 


24. 


Jan. 


3°- 


Feb. 


22. 


Aprill 


20. 


April! 


25- 


May 


25- 


Feb. 


26. 


Feb. 


9- 


March 


so- 


Nov. 


lo. 


Dec' 


14. 


March 


22. 


Sept. 


20. 


Jan. 


10. 


March 


13- 


March 


26. 


June 


20. 


Aug. 


19. 


Dec. 


27- 


Jan. 


3- 


April 




Nov. 


19. 


Jan, 


27. 


Feb. 


10. 


Sept. 


20. 


Oct. 


13- 


Jan. 


20. 


Feb. 


25- 


July 


21. 


Feb. 


2. 


March 


6. 



Susannah dau. of John Hammond. 

Susannah dau. of ^^'illiam Adson. 

John Sonne of John Pattridge. 

Mary dau. of Thomas Loudoll. 

Susan dau. of John Wadkin. 

Richard sonne of George Scot. 

Mary dau. of William Ausson of Castor in Norfolke Sayler. 

Elizabeth dau. of Henry Peach. 

Mary dau. of Henry Reinolds. 

Robert sonne of Henry How. 

Susan dau. of John Adhams. 

Martha dau. of Henry Gooderich. 

Susan & Elizabeth daus : of John Maldin. 

John sonne of Roger Sturgeon. 

j\[ary dau. of A\'illiam Sparke. 

Richard sonne of George Scot. 

Rrigit dau of Robert Adhams. 

Rachell dau. of John Pattridge. 

Mary dau. of William Adson. 

Susan dau. of Henry How. 

Frances dau. of John Adhams. 

Jeremy sonne of Moses Butler. 

John sonne of James "W^oolfendon. 

Dorothie dau. of John Maiden. 

George sonne of George Scot. 

Anne dau. of John Nunne. 

Susan filia Thomae Loudall. 

Margaret dau. of George Sturgeon. 

Abrie filia Willmi Adson. 

Susan filia Henrici How. 

George filius Georgii Scot. 

An filia Johannis Adhams. 

Robert filius Johannis Maldin. 

John filius Georgii Sturgeon. 

]\Iathew sonne of Mathew Grieson. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



John son of William Adson. 
Anne dau. of Edward Macroe. 
Robert sonne of John Nun. 
Elizabeth dau. of John Maldin. 
Thomas sonne of William Adson. 
Marie dau. of Henery How. 
George sonne of George Sturgeon. 
Edmond .sonne of William Adson. 
E^llen dau. of Edward Macroe. 
Roger sonne of John Lowdall. 
John sonne of Antonie & Tamsin Steward. 
Robert sonne of John & Margaret Summer. 
Nicholas sonne of William & Elizabeth Adson. 
Ruth dau. of Thomas & Susan Lowdall. 
Anne dau. of John & Barbarie Clarke. 
Elizabeth dau. of Robert & Elizabeth Santy. 
Mary dau. of Robert & Mary Cason. 
Barbarie dau. of John & Mary Summers. 
John sonne of Henry & Susan How. 
Antonie sonne of Antonie & Tamsin Steward. 
Elizabeth dau. of John <S: Barbarie Clarke. 
Robert sonne of Robert & Erances Adams. 
Mary dau. of Robert & Elizabeth Santy. 
Thomas sonne of John & Mary Seller. 
Susan dau. of Edward &: Anne Macro. 
John sonne of John &: .Sarah Mills. 
Thomas sonne of Benjamin &z Mary Goodridge. 
Lawrence sonne of John & Katherine "Womock. 
Robert sonne of Robert & Elizabeth Santy. 
Rachell dau. of William & Elizabeth Adson. 
John sonne of John & Mary Seller. 
Katharine dau. of Robert & Frances Adams. 
Robert .sonne of Robert & Mary l^edman. 
Elizabeth dau. of Edward & Anne Macro. 
Thomas sonne of Matthew &: Anne Greece. 



I63I. 


April 


3- 




May 


24. 




Nov. 


24. 




J.vn. 


4- 




March 


1 1. 


1632. 


Aprill 


19. 


^('>33- 


March 


28. 




July 


14. 




Aug. 


6. 




Sept. 


3- 




Oct. 


28. 




Jan. 


23- 


1634. 


Sept. 


16. 




Sept. 


22. 


1635- 


Aprill 


14. 




July 


26. 




Dec. 


I. 




Feb. 


25- 


1636. 


May 


1. 




May 


10. 




Sept. 


20. 




Nov. 


10. 




Dec. 


6. 




Dec. 


18. 




Feb. 


5- 


1637. 


July 


2. 




Oct. 


15- 




Feb. 


2. 




Feb. 


24. 




March 


II. 


1638. 


May 


9- 




Oct 


14. 




Nov. 


20. 




Dec. 


9- 




Jan. 


27. 



10 


GREAT 


WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 


1638. 


Feb. 


3- 


Robert sonne of Robert t\: Tanisin Steward. 


i639- 


Oct. 


13- 


John sonne of Robert (^ Elizabeth Santy. 




Feb. 


7- 


Edmund sonne of Edmund & Margarett Crow. 


1640. 


March 


25- 


Charles sonne of John t\: Mary Seller. 




May 


20. 


Elizabeth dau. of John c\: Dorothy Pazy. 




Oct. 


I. 


Susan dau. of Robert & Su.san Adams. 




Jan. 


13- 


John Sonne of Matthew & Anne Greece. 




Feb. 


7- 


Anne dau. of Robert & Priscilla Peirson. 


1641. 


March 


25- 


Henry sonne of John &: Mary Seller. 




Aug. 


8. 


Briget dau. of John & Dorothy Pazy. 




Feb. 


18. 


Mary dau. of John (S: Mary Seller. 




Feb. 


27. 


Francis bastard child of Mary How. 




March 


22. 


Robert sonne of Robert & Susan Adams. 


1642. 


March 


31- 


Katharine dau. of John & Philip Grimwood. 




Sept. 


29. 


John sonne of John iS: Dorothy Paz)'. 




Nov. 


16. 


Anne dau. of George & Anne How. 


1643. 


Aprill 


18. 


Mary dau. of John & Gorbold. 




May 


3°- 


Samuel sonne of John & Mary Seller. 




Aug. 


4- 


dau. of Thomas <S: Sarah Sturgion. 




Aug. 


3- 


\Villiam sonne of Robert (S: Susan Adams. 




Oct. 


18. 


Margaret dau. of John & Pattridge. 


1644. 


March 


28. 


Dorothy dau. of John Pazy. 




Nov. 


8. 


John sonne of John Leech. 




Dec. 


27. 


Elizabeth dau. of George How. 




March 


2. 


Bridgett dau. of Thomas Sturgeon. 




March 


3- 


Mary dau. of Mathew Grisson alias Greece. 




March 


15- 


John son of Robert Adams. 


1645. 


*Jan. 


29. 


Thomas Green. 




Feb. 


22. 


Amy Scarfe. 




March 


15- 


Mary dau. (jf John Pazy. 




In June. 




John son of John & Elizabeth Pattridg. 


1647. 


Sept. 




Dorothy dau. of John & Elizabeth Pattridg. 



^■'From now till 1662 the entries appear to have been squeezed in by various hands and at various 
times from memory. Ed. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



11 



1 649. 


Feb. 


14. 




May 


6. 


1652. 


Jan. 


5- 




Oct. 


J5- 


1653- 


Sept. 


20. 


1654- 


Sept. 


15- 


•655 


April 


19. 


i^^57- 


July 


30- 


1658. 


May 


6. 


1659. 


Sept. 


i5> 


1660. 


Aug. 


8. 


1661. 


Sept. 


10. 


1662. 


June 


29. 




Nov. 


14. 


1663. 


ApriU 


14. 




May 


16. 




June 


4- 




Nov. 


19. 




Jan. 


23- 


1664. 


March 


31- 




May 


29. 




Sept. 


2. 




Nov. 


17- 




Oct. 


13- 




Jan. 


24. 


1665. 


March 


27. 




Aprill 


20. 




Oct. 


28. 


1666. 


Aprill 


12. 




Oct. 


6. 




Feb. 


17- 


1667. 


Oct. 


18. 




Dec. 


31- 


1668. 


July 


1 1. 




Dec. 


10. 



John son of John Maiden. 

Susan dau. of Robert & Susan Adams. 

Henry son of Sir Edmund Foley. 

Robert Nunn. 

Anna dau. of John Conningsby. 

Mary dau. of Robert Xunn. 

William son of Henry Holden. 

Ralph son of Henery iS: Mary Holden. 

Mary dau. of Mr John Gipps. 

Richard son of Mr John Gipps. 

Elizabeth dau. of Mr John c^ Mary Gipps. 

Dority dau. of Henery & Mary Holden. 

Susanna dau. of AVilliam Herbert rector. 

John son of Mr John Gipps. 

Sarah dau. of William & Tabitha Smyth. 

Elizabeth dau. of John & Mary Garwood. 

Mary dau. of Henry iS: Mary Holden. 

David Sonne of John & Mary Gypps. 

Liddah bastard dau. of Phillis Lyncon widdow. 

Thomas sonne of Thomas & Dorathy Harwold. 

Anne dau. of Thomas & Mary Wright. 

Gyles Sonne of Robert & Elizabeth Addams. 

Nicholas sonne of John & Susan Browne. 

John Sonne of John & Anne Steward. 

William sonne of William e^ Tabitha Smyth. 

Mary dau. of John iS: Mary Choate. 

Anna dau. of John ^: Mary Gypps. 

Mary dau. of Richard Poreter. 

Henry sonne of William Smyth. 

Anna dau. of Thomas &: Dorothy Harrold. 

John son of John and Susan Candeler. 

Elizabeth dau. of Thomas & Mary ^^'right. 

Anne dau. of William tS: Elizabeth Garwood. 

Thomas son of Thomas & Mary Jolly. 

John son of John & Mary Crick. 



12 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



1669. Aprill 25. 





Nov. 


TO. 




Dec. 


14. 




Feb. 


6. 




Feb. 


15- 


1670. 


July 


8. 




Sept. 


1 1. 




Nov. 


20. 




Feb. 


24. 


I67I. 


Aug. 


20. 




March 


24. 


1672. 


April 


14. 




June 


7- 


1673. 


May 


I. 




May 


4- 




Aug. 


15- 




Aug. 


17- 




Sept. 


18. 




Feb. 


15- 


1674. 


June 


4- 




June 


23- 




Aug. 


13- 




Oct. 


4- 


1675- 


July 


14. 




Sept. 


18. 




Oct. 


13- 




May 


26. 


1676. 


Jan. 


29. 




Dec. 


24. 




Dec. 


24. 


1677. 


March 


31- 




Feb. 


24. 


1678. 


Oct. 


26. 




Dec. 


II. 



Mary dau. of Thomas & Dorothy Harrold. 

Jonathan son of &: Rose Barrell. 

Anne dau. of Thomas & Anne Cooke. 
Elizabeth dau. of William & Elizabeth Garviood. 
John son of Thomas &: Mary Joll)-. 
Robert son of Robert & Mary Largent. 
Thomas son of "William & Eh'zabeth Clavden. 
Mary Smith dau. of a travailing woman. 
Penelope dau. of Thomas & Anne Cooke. 
Edward son of John (^ Mary Cricke. 
^^'llliam son of W^illiam &: Elizabeth Garwood. 
William son of ^Villiam & Mary Bridgman. 
Thomas son of Thomas &: Mary Jolly. 
A\^illiam son of Isaac & Anne Archer. 
William son of AN'illiam & Elizabeth Clayden. 
John son of ^^'illiam & Mary Bridgman. 
Margaret dau. of John & Mary Crick. 
Penelope dau. of John & Susanna Spencer. 
W'illiam dau. of John &: Anne Stewart. 
Mary dau. of Thomas & Anne Cooke. 
Robert son of Mr William &: Mary Bridgman. 
Daniel son of Daniel <S: Mary Lot. 
John son of John & Dorothy Maldin. 
Sarah dau. of Robert & Sarah \\'hiterod. 
Robert son of Robert & Sarah ^VhiteIod. 
John son of John & Dorothy Maldin. 
Thomas son of Mr ^^'illiam & Mary Bridgman. 
Nancy dau. of John & Susanna Spencer. 
John son of Daniel & Mary Lot. 
Daurothy dau. of John & Daurothy Maiden. 
Bridget dau. of John & Susanna Spencer. 
Samuel son of Daniel & Mary Lot. 
Mary dau. uf ^Villiam & Ann Burrowes. 
Mary dau. of John & .Susan Spencer. 
George son of Thomas & Ann Scot. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



13 



I67S. 


Aug. 


8. 




March 


7- 


1679. 


NFay 


21. 




Aug. 


24. 


1680. 


June 


6. 




June 


10. 




Aug. 


8. 




Sept. 


16. 


i68r. 


April 


24. 




May 


24. 




Oct. 


16. 




Dec. 


21. 


1682. 


May 


28. 




May 


29. 




Sept. 


7- 




Oct. 


3°- 




Dec. 


14. 




Jan. 


21. 




March 


18. 


1683. 


April 


3- 




April 


6. 




April 


18. 




Aprill 


19. 




June 


7- 




June 


13- 




Jan. 


10. 




Feb. 


24. 




March 


2. 


1684. 


May 


18. 




July 


3- 




July 


1 1. 




Feb. 


17- 


.685. 


Apiil 


21. 



June 



Dorothy dau. of John &: Dorothy Brown. 

Elisabeth dau. of Robert & Christian Brook. 

AV^illiam son of Daniel 1 &: Mary Lot. 

Gyles son of Gyles & Mary Moore. 

^Villiam son of William & Ann Burrowes. 

John son of John & Susan Spencer. 

Elisabeth dau. of John & Ann Steward. 

Edmund son of Edmund Coleman Esq. & Mary his wife. 

John son of John & Dorothy Brown. 

Francis son of ^Villianl &: Mary Brook. 

Mary dau of John &: Mary Cue. 

Thomas son of John & Susan Steward. 

Elisabeth dau. of John & Susan Spencer. 

Charles son of Robert & Christian Brook. 

Elisabeth dau. of John &: Dorothy Maiden. 

Martha dau. of William & Su.san Mathew. 

Eli.sabeth dau. of A\'illiam & Mary Brook. 

Samuel son of John <Jt Mary Cue. 

John son of William & Ann Burrowes. 

John son of James and Dorothy Spight. 

Sarah dau. of John & Dorothy Brown. 

Thomas son of Michaell & Rebekah Mower. 

Michaell son of Michaell & Rebekah Mower. 

Elisabeth dau. of John & Elizabeth Brundish. 

Frances dau. of John <!v: Susan Steward. 

Margaret dau. of ^VilIiam i^, Mary Brook. 

Dorothy dau. of John (S: Susan Spencer. 

Susan dau. of Jeofry & Abigail Partridge. 

John son of Matthew & Margaret Smee. 

Elisabeth dau of John &; Dorothy Maiden. 

Elisabeth dau. of George & Christian Prick. 

Thomas son of \\' illiam &: Mary Brook. 

being Easter Tuesday, Ann dau. of John &: Elisabeth 

Brundish. 
Mary dau. of George & Susan Spere. 



14 GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS —BAPTISMS. 



Elisabeth dau. of Dorothy Maiden. 
Michaell son of Michaell & Rebekah Mower. 
Mary dau. of Robert & Mary Garland. 
Thomas son of John & Dorothy Brown. 
Sarah Gladwell, a traveller's child. 
Matthew son of Matthew & Margarett Smee. 
Esther dau. of John «!^ Susan Spencer. 
Mary dau. of George &: Christian Prick. 
Jeofry son of Jeofry & Susan Partridge. 
Rose dau. of John & Rose Sparke. 
Mary dau. of Samuell & Mary Baker. 
Mary dau. of John & Elisabeth Brundish. 
John son of Robert & Mary Garland. 
David son of Matthew &: Margarett Smee. 

John son of John & Bilham. 

Samuel son of Samuel & Mary Baker. 
George son of George & Christian Prick. 
Robert son of John & Dorothy Brown. 
John son of John & Susan Spencer. 
Mary dau. of John & Rose Spark. 
Thomas son of John & Elisabeth Brundish. 
John son of Edward & Frances Langham. 
John son of Robert & Mary Garland. 
George son of Mathew & Margrett Smee. 
Elisabeth dau. of AVilliam & Ann Burrowes. 
Rebecca dau. of John & Susan Spencer. 
John son of John & Elisabeth Brundish. 
John son of Jeofry & Susan Partridge. 
Abigail dau. of Jeofry Sc Susan Partridge. 

Thomas son of Thomas & Griffin. 

Nicholas son of John &: Dorothy Brown. 

John son of John Bilham. 

William son of Matthew & Margrett Smee. 

Eliz: Bull. 

Richard son of Sir Richard Gipps Kt. 



1685. 


Nov. 


26. 




Nov. 


26. 




Dec. 


10. 




Jan. 


2. 




March 


23- 


I6S6. 


Aprill 


29. 




April 


— 




Sept. 


6. 




Sept. 


II. 




Oct. 


16. 




Jan. 


6. 


1687. 


June 


^7- 




Jan. 


10. 




Feb. 


27. 


1688. 


April 


13- 




July 


9- 




July 


19. 




Oct. 


12. 




Nov. 


18. 




Nov. 


22. 




Nov. 


29. 


1689. 


Oct. 


17- 




Nov. 


7- 


1690. 


April 


20. 




Oct. 


19. 




Nov. 


18. 




Dec. 


6. 




Dec. 


6. 




Feb. 


21. 




Feb. 


26. 


1 69 1. 


April 


1 1. 




Jan. 


10. 


1692. 


July 


13- 




Aug. 


16. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 15 

1692. Nov. 15. Thomas son of Thomas Harold. 
Constantia dau. of John & Elisabeth Brundish. 
Thomas son of William & Ann Burroughs. 

1693. -^ug- 3'- Robert son of Robert and Mary Garland. 
John Giles son of Sir Richard Gipps Kt and Dame Mary 

Gipps. 

1694. May 13. Mary dau. of John & Dorothy Brown, 
being Ascension day, Edmund son of Edmund Bull. 
George son of Jeofry & Susan Partridge. 
Robert son of Richard & Elisabeth Cason. 

169s. May 24. William son of William & Susanna Smith. 

Benjamin son of John &: Elisabeth Brundish. 
Ellen dau. of Thomas & Ellen Avis. 
Richard son of William & Anne Burroughs. 
Margret dau. of Mathew & Margrett Smee. 

1696. May 14. Susanna dau. of William & Susanna Smith. 
John son of Richard & Elisabeth Cason. 
Eli.sabeth dau. of Deal. 

1697. April 22. Mary dau. of Sir Richard Gipps Kt & Dame Mary Gipps. 
Elisabeth dau. of Thomas & Ellin Avis. 
Margaret dau. of John &: Elisabeth King. 
Thomas Griffin. 

1698. Oct. 22. Edward George third son of Sir Richard Gipps Kl & Dame 

Mary Gipps. 

Elisabeth dau. of John King husbandman. 

1699. April 27. Mary dau. of Thomas Avis labourer & Ellen his wife. 
Thomas son of Matthew Smee labourer & Margaret [his 

wife]. 

1700. April 21. Elisabeth dau. of William Smith labourer & Susan his wife. 
Erancis son of Jeoffry Partridge labourer & Susan his wife. 
Mary dau. of Francis Ottewell labourer & Rose his wife. 
Thomas son of Richard Cason farmer & Elisabeth his wife. 
Agnes dau. of Sir Richard Gipps Kt & Dame Mary his wife, 
^\'illiam son of William Boldero day labourer & Elisabeth 

his wife. 



Nov. 


15- 


Feb. 


21. 


Aug. 


31- 


Oct 


26. 


May 


13- 


May 


17- 


June 


6. 


Nov. 


8. 


May 


24. 


July 


23- 


Aug. 


25- 


Dec. 


22. 


Feb. 


23- 


May 


14. 


Sept. 


19. 


Jan. 


9- 


April 


2 2. 


April 


24. 


Dec. 


19. 


July 




Oct. 


22. 


Nov. 


5- 


April 


27. 


Dec. 


16. 


April 


21. 


June 


23- 


July 


7- 


Aug. 


6. 


Sept. 


19. 


Tan. 


26. 



16 



GREAT AVHELNETHAM REGISTERS.- BAPTISMS. 



1 701. March 30. 



1703- 



1704. 



1705- 



1706. 



1707. 



Jan. 


29, 


April 


5 


April 


16, 


Oct. 


4- 


Feb. 


27. 


June 


15' 


July 


15- 


Oct. 


3°- 


Feb. 


28. 



Feb. 



April 



16. 



April 


20, 


Aug. 


6. 


Sept. 


25- 


May 


13- 


May 


17- 


Jan. 


12, 


Aug. 


20. 


July 


14. 


Sept. 


22, 


Jan. 


I. 



April 


4. 


July 


20, 


Dec. 


19- 



Richard Harold base son of Robert Bray servant and 

Elisabeth Harold widow. 
Mary dau. of William Cason a smal farmer. 
Sarah dau. of Francis Ottewell day labourer & Rose his wife. 
John son of William Boldero day labourer & Elisabeth his 

wife. 
Sarah dau. of William Smith day labourer & Susan his wife. 
Elisabeth Johnson base child of George Cason carpenter c^r 

Mary Johnson. 
Elisabeth dau. of Richard Cason farmer & Elisabeth his wife. 
Anne dau. of A\'illiani Wyard farmer ti: Anne his wife. 
Anne dau. of Thomas Avis day labourer. 
Frances dau. of Francis Ottewell day labourer & Rose his 

wife. 
Elisabeth dau. of John Boldero day labourer & Elisabeth his 

wife. 
Robert son of Robert Bug day labourer & Kerenhappuch his 

wife. 
Alice dau. of George Cason jun. farmer & Alice his wife. 
William son of William Smith day labourer & Susan his wife. 
Mary dau. of Richard Cason farmer cs: Elisabeth his wife. 
Ellen dau. of Francis Ottewell day labourer ds: Rose his wife. 
Ann dau. of Robert Bug day labourer & Kerenhappuch his 

wife. 
Rebekah dau. of Thomas Avis day labourer. 
George son of George Cason farmer & Ann his wife. 
Thomas son of Francis &: Rose Ottewell. 
Robert son of John & Elisabeth Boldero. 
William son of William & Ann Wyard. 
William son of Elisabeth Bray. 
Mary dau. of George & Alice Cason. 
Mary dau. of Cieorge tK: Alice Cason. 
Thomas son of Thomas tS: Susan Bell. 
Thomas son of Thomas Avis. St Thomas [day]. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



r 



Anne daii. of Richard &: Elisabeth Cason. 

Mary dau. of Robert i!s: Kerenhappuch Bug. 
1 70S. Nov. 26. Elisabeth dau. of George vS: Alice Cason. 

John son of John & Susan Evered. 

Elisabeth dau. of \\^illiani & Anne ^^'yard. 

Ann dau. of Francis & Rose Ottewel. 
1709. May 12. Elisabeth dau. of Edmund tS: Elisabeth Fuller. 

John son of John & Kerenhappuch Bug. 

Mary dau. of Robert Cason. 

Elisabeth dau. of Thomas l\: Susan Bell. 

James son of AVilliam & Ann Wyard. 

Elisabeth dau. of John & Kerenhappuch Bug. 

Thomas son of George & Alice Cason. 
171 1. (Jet. 4. Joseph son of Thomas A- Susan Bell. 

Ann dau. of Robert & Mary Cason. 

Easter Sunda)'. Thomas son of Thomas &: Sarah Bird. 

Anne dau. of Martin Bowes Est}. iS: Mrs Elisabeth Bowes. 

Anne dau. of George & Alice Cason. 

Elisabeth dau. of Thomas & Mary Tayler. 

Mary dau. of James & Mary ^^'yard. 

John son of John & Kerenhappuch Bug. 

Susan dau. of William &: Elisabeth Boldero. 

Mary dau. of Thomas & Susan Bell. 

1 7 13. Sept. 4. Mary dau. of John & Bridget ^Villingham. 
Mary dau. of John & Kerenhappuch Bug. 
Thomas son of William & Anne \Vyard. 

1 7 14. — — James son of James & Mary "Wyard. 
Mary dau. of George «S: Alice Cason. 

715. June ij. Mary dau. of Thomas &: Mary Nun. 
John son of Thon^as & Susan Bell. 
Thomas son of Thomas & Mary Tayler. 



April 


18.* 


Sept. 


14. 


Nov. 


26. 


Oct. 


I. 


Jan. 


13- 


Jan. 


26. 


May 


12. 


June 


19. 


Sept. 


3°- 


Nov. 


20. 


April 


27- 


Nov. 


12. 


March 


8. 


Oct. 


4- 


Dec. 


13- 


April 


20. 


May. 


— 


Aug. 


14. 


Aug. 


^5- 


Sept. 


10. 


Nov. 


16. 


Jan. 


15- 


Jan. 


23- 


Sept. 


4- 


Dec. 


6. 


March 


-7 

J- 


July 


8. 


June 


12. 


Aug. 


6. 


Feb. 


21. 



" This entry and the next are entered plainly under 1707, but I e.xpect that they belong to 1708. 
The year under which entries are made often seems to mean the year for which returns were made 
rather than the year in which the baptisms took place, and the year for which returns were made was 
decided by the Bishop or Archdeacon's Visitation; which mij^ht not lake place till June or July. 



18 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



1716. 


March 


31- 




May 


6. 




June 


— 


I7I7. 


Nov. 


29. 




Jan. 


25- 




March 


4- 


1718. 


Aug. 


15- 




Oct. 


4- 




Dec. 


5- 


I7I9. 


May 


17- 




Aug. 


13- 




Nov. 


28. 


I 720. 


Sept. 


4- 




Sept. 


1 1. 




Sept. 


19. 




Dec. 


29. 




Jan. 


13- 




Feb. 


26. 


I72I. 


Feb. 


I. 


1722. 


Nov. 


13- 




Dec. 


15- 


1723. 


March 


28. 




Aug. 


10. 




Sept. 


12. 




Sept. 


26. 


1724. 


Sept. 


17- 




Dec. 


23- 




Feb. 


23- 


1725- 


April 


17- 




May 


23- 




June 


29. 




July 


15- 




Sept. 


30. 




Jan. 


1 1. 




March 


13- 



Elisabeth dau. of Robert &: Elisabeth Skumer. 

Sarah dau. of Robert & Mary Cason. 

Robert son of Robert Bug. 

Alice dau. of William & Alice Holden. 

Robert son of Robert ^' Elisabeth Skinner. 

William son of Thomas & Susan Bell. 

Mary dau. of John & Anne Garland. 

Margaret dau. of James King. 

Robert son of Thomas & Mary Nun. 

Abraham son of William & Susan Catchpole. 

Anne dau. of John & Anne Garland. 

Mary dan. of Thomas & Lydia Bennet. 

Thomas son of Thomas (S: Bridget Balls. 

Robert son of Robert [sic] & Kerenhappuch Bug. 

John son of John t\: Anne Garland. 

James son of James King 

Mary dau. of Robert & Elisabeth Skinner. 

Thomas son of A\' illiam (S: Susan Catchpole. 

Susannah dau. of John & Ann Garland. 

George son of George & Rachel AVyard. 

Sarah Coe. 

Susan dau. of John & Ann Garland. 

Braybrook. 

Bridget King. 

John son of John A\'illingham. 

James son of James King. 

Elizabeth dau. of Thomas Nunn. 

James son of George >^ Rachel Wyard. 

Richard son of Richard & Frances Williams clerk. 

William son of William c^ Sarah Coe. 

William & John sons of John & Elizabeth Bryan. 

John son of Robert & Margaret A\^eilden. 

John son uf Thomas & Elizabeth Pask. 

Richard son of Richard & Elizabeth Ave. 

John son of James & Mary King. 



CxREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 19 



1726. April 14. Isaac son of Isaac «5t Margaret Farrow. 
Rebecca dau. of Thomas cV' Mar)- Nunn. 
John son of John & Elizabeth Grimwood. 
EHzabeth dau. of George & Rachel Wyard. 

1727. Sept. 24. Charles son of William & Sarah Coe. 
Elizabeth dau. of Thomas (^c Elizabeth Pask. 
Henry son of John (S: Elizabeth Bryan. 
.Susan dau. of Thomas & Mar)- Nunn. 
Hammond Brown base son of Abraham Norman of Little 

^^llelnetham »!^: Mar)- Brown. 
\\'illiam son of Henry cS: Mary Rheeman of Stanningfield. 
172S. May 12. AVilliam base son of Susan Catchpole widow (fc William 

Alderton. 
Sarah dau. of ^^'illiam tS: Sarah Tunbridge. 

1729. Jan. 21. John son of John (S: Katherine Norman. 
Rachel dau. of George & Rachel ^^'yard. 
Edward son of George iv: Tvlizabeth Smitli. 
James son of Isaac & Margaret Farrow. 
Mar)' dau. of Thomas <S: Mary Allen. 
Thomas son of Thomas & Elizabeth Pask. 
Charles son of Thomas & Elizabeth Tayler. 
Elizabeth dau. of John & Elizabeth Bryan. 

1730. Feb. 27. Samuel son of John &: Katharine Norman. 
Ann dau. of A\'illiam (I^: Sarah Tunbridge. 
Elizabeth dau. of Thomas & Mary Harrington. 
Sarah dau. of William & Ellen Alderton. 

1 73 1. July 29. Abraham son of John & Katherine Norman. 
Mary dau. of Thomas «.\: Elizabeth Paske. 

1732. Jan. 9. Elizabeth dau. of Thomas & Mary x\llen. 
John son of John & Katherine Curling. 
Sarah dau. of Thomas & Elizabeth Paske. 
John & Thomas sons of Thomas & Mary Nunn. 

1733. Feb. 27. Samuell son of John & Katherine Norman. 
Robert & Henry sons of John & Elizabeth Bryan. 
Susan dau. of Thomas & Elizabeth Paske. 



April 


14. 


May 


^5- 


Dec. 


25- 


Feb. 


23- 


Sept. 


24. 


Aug. 


27- 


Aug. 


— 


Nov. 


26. 


March 


10. 


March 


17- 


May 


12. 


Aug. 


9- 


Jan. 


21. 


Feb. 


2. 


Feb. 


2. 


May 


25- 


Sept. 


28. 


Oct. 


TO. 


Oct. 


17- 


Dec. 


14. 


Feb. 


27. 


May 


7- 


Aug. 


20. 


Sept. 


J- 


July 


29. 


Oct. 




Jan. 


9- 


April 


16. 


Sept. 


4- 


Sept. 


14. 


Feb. 


27. 


July 


1. 


Aug. 


16. 



20 



GREAT AVHELNIiTHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



1734- 


Jan. 


13- 




March 






March 


14. 




March 


27. 




March 


31- 




Oct. 


20. 




Nov. 


5- 


1735- 


Feb. 


1 1 




March 


9- 




May 


18. 




May 


25- 


1736. 


Feb. 


2. 




March 


10. 




April 


26. 




May 


1 1. 




Dec. 


9- 




Dec. 


17- 


1737- 


Aug. 


12. 




Sept. 


9- 




Oct. 


3°- 


1738. 


Jan. 


6. 




Feb. 


21. 




Feb. 


2. 




March 


19. 




April 


2. 




April 


4- 




June 


7- 


1739- 


Jan. 


2. 




March 


13 




May 


13- 




May 


16. 


1740. 


Feb. 


18. 




June 


15- 


1741. 


Jan. 


4- 




March 


I. 



Ann dau. of Thomas & Mary Allen. 

Edward son of James How 

Charles son of John & Hannah Siday. 

Thomas son of Thomas &: Mary Nunn. 

William son of William & Ellen Alderton. 

John son of William & Sarah Tunbridge. 

Mary dau. of John & Katherine Gurling. 

■William son of John & Katherine Norman. 

Deborah dau. of George & Deborah Sparke. 

Mary dau. of John & Mary Tweed. 

John son of Thomas & Elizabeth Paske. 

Thomas son of William «X: Ellen Alderton. 

John son of Thomas & Mary Allen. 

^^^illiam son of William &: Elizabeth Bowers. 

Mary dau. of George & Mary Cawson. 

John son of John & Diana Ely. Private. 

Christian dau. of John & Katherine Gurling. 

John son of John &: Sarah Tunbridge. 

John son of John & Mary Tweed. 

John son of Jonathan & Mary Carpenter. 

James son of James & Esther Pett. 

Elizabeth dau. of William & Rose Cooke. 

John son of John & Diana Ely. 

^Villiam son of James & Mary King. 

Marmaduke son of William ^K: Grace Avis. 

Jonathan son of John & Elizabeth Cross. 

Joseph & Elizabeth son & dau. of William & Ellen Alderton. 

Robert son of Robert «& Martha Crick. 

John son of John & Ann Bugg. 

Susan dau. of Thomas & Elizabeth Pask. 

John son of William &: Elizabeth Bowers. 

Susannah dau. of Robert & Susannah Gurling. 

Ann dau. of William & Ellen Alderton. 

Mary dau. of John & Diana Ely. 

Edmund son of William & Sarah Tunbridare. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



21 



1741. 


Nov. 


5- 




Dec. 


13 


1742. 


Jan. 


I, 




Aug. 


22. 




Aug. 


29. 




Oct. 


24, 




Dec. 


6. 


1743- 


Jan. 


9- 




Jan. 


10, 




March 


24, 




July 


3- 




July 


4- 




Sept. 


22. 




Sept. 


27. 


1744. 


May 


4- 




May 


20. 




July 


5- 




Sept. 


2. 


1745- 


Jan. 


25- 




Feb. 


14. 




June 


20. 




July 


15- 




Aug. 


8. 




Nov. 


16, 




Dec. 


I. 


1746. 


Jan. 


18. 




Feb. 


16. 




May 


16. 




June 


28. 




July 


12. 


1747- 


March 


5- 




June 


4- 


1748. 


Jan. 


10 




Jan. 


31- 




Jan. 


3T. 



William son of William & Rose Cooke. 
Sarah dau. of Robert «Sc Susannah Gurling. 
James son of William & Elizabeth Wyard. 
Edward son of Jonathan & Mary Carpenter. 
John son of William & Ellen Alderton. 
Thomas son of William & Elizabeth Bowers. 
Charles son of William & Sarah Tunbridge. 
Alice dau. of Thomas & Alice Avis. 
Thomas son of John «Sc Elizabeth Cross. 
Thomas son of William &: Elizabeth Wyard. 
Alice dau. of Robert & Susannah Gurling. 
Elizabeth dau. of Henry & Elizabeth Fairbrother. 
Ann dau. of John (!y: Hannah Armstrong. 
Thomas son of John & Diana Ely. 
Ann dau. of Robert & Ann Bugg. 
John son of John & Sarah Gridley. 
Ellen dau. of William & Ellen Alderton. 
Mary dau. of Thomas &: Alice Avis. 
Robert son of Robert & Mary Gurling. 
John son of Jonathan & Mary Carpenter. 
Ursula dau. of Roger & Sarah Green. 
Hannah dau. of Roger Groom. 
Elizabeth dau. of John & Hannah Armstrong. 
Ann dau. of Robert & Ann Bugg. 
Elizabeth dau. of Thomas & Alice Avis. 
Ann dau. of John & Rose Cross. 
William son of John & Sarah Gridley. 
Elizabeth dau. of William & Elizabeth Wyard. 
Mary dau. of William & Elizabeth Steel. 
John son of John & Margaret Farrow. 
Mary dau. of William & Ellen Alderton. 
William son of William & Susan Pawsey. 
Mary dau. of William & Mary Gaut. 
William son of William & Elizabeth Coe. 
John son of John & Sarah Willingham. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



1748. 



1749- 



1750- 



1751- 



/o- 



March 

March 

April 

April 

Sept. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

April 

July 

Sept. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Feb. 

June 

Dec. 

Feb. 

March 

March 

March 

March 

June 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Jan. 

March 

April 

July 

Aug. 

Nov. 

May 

May 

July 

Sept. 



3- 
6. 

17- 
28. 

5- 
5- 
6. 

20. 

27. 

26. 
2. 

22. 

21. 

28. 

18. 

17- 

23- 

17- 
3- 

'7- 

24- 

31- 

2. 

12. 

6. 

15- 
19. 
19. 
1 1. 

6. 

6. 
1 1. 
14. 



Richard Shute Plum base child of Mary Plum. Private. 

Ellen dau. of Thomas & Alice Avis. 

iSIary dau. of Jonathan & Mary Carpenter. 

Deborah dau. of John &: Elizabeth Cross. Private. 

Susan dau. of Thomas &: Susan Sparke. Private. 

Elizabeth dau. of John & Elizabeth Tricker. 

Mary dau. of Henry & Elizabeth Fairbrother. 

Joseph son of Joseph tS: Elizabeth Alderton. 

Susannah dau. of William (S: Elizabeth Steel. 

Jonathan .^on of Jonathan & Mary Ely. Private. 

Mary dau. of James c^ Mary Garwood. 

Susan dau. of William cS: Susan Pausey. 

Mary dau. of Samuell »S: Mary Reynolds. Private. 

Grace dau. of John & Elizabeth Tricker. 

Frances dau. of William & Jane Bryan. 

Elizabetli dau. of William «.^ Mary Gaut. 

Abraham son of Abraham & Susan Gridley. 

Ann dau. of William iX: Elizabeth Steel. 

Sarah dau. of John & Sarah Willingham. 

James son of \Villiam & Ellen Alderton being the roth child. 

Keziah dau. of Henry &: Elizabeth Fairbrother. 

Ann dau. of Jonathan &: Mary Carpenter. 

Edward son of Samuell & Mary Reynolds. 

Ann dau. of Jacob & Ann Brooks. Private. 

Rose dau. of John &" Sarah Mac Murdy. 

James son of James «&: Mary Garwood. 

Susan dau. of Abraham & Susan Gridley. 

Ann dau. of John & Ann Leech. 

Benjamin son of John & Lydia Gooday. 

John son of Jacob & Ann Brook. 

William son of William & Mary Gaut. 

Samuel son ot Samuel & Mary Reynolds. 

Alice dau. of William & Dorothy Cooke. 

Mary & Amy daus. of Jacob & Ann Brook. 

John son of Abraham & Susan Gridley. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



23 



1754 



1755- 



1756. 



1757 



175-^- 



1759- 



June 


2. 


June 


27. 


June 


30. 


Aug. 


18. 


Dec. 


22. 


Jan. 


12. 


Jan. 


19. 


April 


9- 


May 


3- 


June 


I. 


June 


8. 


Aug. 


2. 


Oct. 


12. 


Dec. 


7- 


Dec. 


16. 


Jan. 


17- 


Sept. 


2. 


Sept. 


19. 


Dec. 


15- 


Jan. 


30. 


Feb. 


6. 


Feb. 


13- 


Feb. 


24. 


March 


6. 


March 


20. 


May- 


10. 


June 


14. 


Aug. 


29. 


Feb. 


5- 


Oct. 


3°- 


Nov. 


5- 


Feb. 


4- 


March 


29. 


April 


22. 


April 


29. 



John son of Matthew & Mary Mingay. 

Ann dau. of John & Ann Farrow. 

Judith dau. of John &: Sarah ^^'illingham. 

George son of William & Elizabeth Steel. 

Amy dau. of Jacob &: Ann Brooks. 

Hannah dau. of James & Mary Garwood. 

John son of William &: Mary Gaut. 

Mary dau. of John & Ann Leech. Private. 

John son of Samuel & Mary Cracknall. Private. 

William son of Samuel &: Mary Reynolds. 

Mary dau. of Abraham & Susan Gridley. 

John son of John (!s: Mary Pressland. 

John son of William & Mary Potter. 

Mary dau. of John & Sarah Willingham. 

Margarett dau. of Jacob c\: Ann Brook. Private. 

John base son of John Green & Elizabeth Drury. 

Elizabeth dau. of Jonathan c\: Mary Carpenter. Private. 

Hannah & Robert dau. & son of James <S: Mary Garwood. P. 

George son of John &: Mary Pressland. 

Keziah dau. of Abraham & Susan Gridley. 

Elizabeth dau. of John & Ann Leech. 

John son of John & Mary Leng. 

Edward son of William & Mary Gaut. P. 

John son of John & Lydia Gooday. 

Robert son of Samuel & Mary Cracknall. 

William son of John & Rose Westrop. 

John son of Jacob & Ann Brooke. P. 

Jane dau. of William & Elizabeth Steel. P. 

Bridgett dau. of John & Sarah Willingham. 

William son of Robert & Frances Tooley. P. 

Sarah dau. of John & i\nn Leech. 

Elizabeth dau. of Abraham & Susan Gridley. 

Abraham son of John & Rose Westrop. 

Martha dau. of William & Mary Gaut. 

Ann dau. of John & Mary Leng. 



24 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



1759- 



June 



1760. 



1761. 



1762. 



1763. 



1764. 



June 


24, 


July 


22. 


Nov. 


4- 


Feb. 


3- 


May 


4- 


May 


18. 


July 


27. 


Nov. 


3- 


April 


7- 


May 


17- 


May 


31- 


Aug. 


9- 


Aug. 


23- 


Sept. 


13- 


Dec. 


20. 


March 


21. 


April 


4- 


May 


15' 


June 


20. 


Sept. 


12. 


Sept. 


16. 


Dec. 


7- 


Jan. 


9- 


Feb. 


25- 


Feb. 


27. 


March 


20. 


May 


29. 


Jan. 


I. 


Feb. 


26. 


May 


13- 


May 


17- 


Tune 


16. 



John base son of Thomas Bridges of Ixworth & Elizabeth 

Plummer. 
John son of Richard & Elizabeth Osborn. 

William son of John & Parsons. 

John son of John &: Sarah Johnson. 

Betty dau. of Edward & Sarah Notley. 

John son of John & Sarah Leathers. 

John son of Richard & Susan Willingham. 

Judith dau. of John & Sarah Willingham. 

John son of John &: Ann Leech. P. 

John base son of William Wyard jun. & Sarah Leakes. 

Elizabeth dau. of Peter &: Elizabeth Bowers. 

Elizabeth dau. of Thomas & Elizabeth Spencer. 

James son of William & Mary Gaut. 

Ruth dau. of Abraham & Susan Gridley. 

Richard son of Richard &: Elizabeth Osborn. 

Elizabeth base child of EHzabeth Alderton. 

Joseph son of John & Ann Leng. 

William son of Edward & Sarah Notley. 

Susan base child of Susan Thornton. P. 

William son of Richard &: Susan Willingham. 

William son of John <S: Sarah Willingham. 

Katherine dau. of Richard &: Katherine Helder. P. 

Betty dau. of Jonathan &: Mary Ely. 

Mary dau. of Peter & Elizabeth Bowers. 

John son of William & Sarah Rawlinson. P. 

Elizabeth dau. of Robert & Hannah Clarke. 

Elizabeth dau. of Richard & Elizabeth Osborn. 

Martha dau. of John &: Ann Leech. 

Mary dau. of Ambrose & Clark. 

Mary dau. of William &: Sarah Rawlinson. 

Thomas son of John & Mary Leng. 

Susan dau. of John & Ann Leech. 

Susannah dau. of Richard &: Katherine Helder. P. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



25 



1764. 



1765- 



1766. 



July 



i7u7. 



1768. 



1769. 



1770. 



Sept. 


16. 


March 


5- 


March 


31- 


June 


so- 


March 


so- 


March 


so- 


Aug. 


17- 


Aug. 


31- 


Sept. 


10. 


Sept. 


25- 


Nov. 


2. 


Nov. 


9- 


Dec. 


6. 


April 


20. 


June 


1 1. 


June 


14. 


Aug. 


16. 


Sept. 


27. 


Dec. 


IS- 


Feb. 


21. 


March 


8. 


Oct. 


9- 


Dec. 


4- 


Dec. 


17- 


Jan. 


26. 


July 


23- 


July 


3°- 


Oct. 


20. 


Dec. 


18. 


Feb. 


I [. 


Feb. 


2«^. 



Thomas son of Elizabeth Spencer, wife of Thomas Spencer, 
who had left his wife in 1761, the said Elizabeth swearing 
the child to John Martin, singleman, servant to Mr Lord. 

Sarah dau. of John & Sarah Johnson. 

Newport son of Jonathan & Mary Ely. 

Richard son of Richard & Susan Willingham. 

Nathan son of Edward & Sarah Notley. 

Mary dau. of Richard &: Elizabeth Osborn. 

Elizabeth dau. of William & Sarah Rawlinson. 

John base child of Margaret Tricker. 

Hannah dau. of John &: Ann Leech. 

Elizabeth dau. of Richard & Elizabeth Rolfe. P. 

Philip son of Philip & Alice Rawlinson. P. 

Edmund son of Richard & Susan AVillingham. 

Peter son of Peter &: Rebecca Bowers. 

William son of William & Rose Cook. P. 

Mary dau. of John & Mary Leng. 

Rose dau. of Jonathan & Mary Ely. 

Mary dau. of James & Mary Dunthorn. 

James son of Robert & Hannah Clarke. 

Ann dau. of Richard & Elizabeth Rolf. 

John son of William «S: Sarah Rawlinson. 

Elizabeth base child of Elizabeth Plummer. 

William son of William &: Rose Cook. 

Hannah dau. of Richard & Elizabeth Rolf. 

James son of Robert & Hannah Clarke. 

Jemima dau. of John & Ann Leech. P. 

Sarah dau. of William & Sarah Rawlinson. 

Alice dau. of Philip & Alice Rawlinson. 

James son of Samuel & Ann Norman. 

Ann dau. of Jonathan & Mary Ely, being the tenth child 
living. 

George son of John & Cawston. 

John son of James &: Ann Dunthorn. 
)f William &: Rose Cook. 



^■— J<3lin-siju of William &: Rose Cook. 

MTAH COUNTY GENEALOGICAL 
AND. HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



26 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



1770. 



1771. 



177; 



1774- 



Feb. 


23. 


March 


18. 


Nov. 


28. 


Jan. 


6. 


Jan. 


3^- 


March 


31- 


April 


28. 


April 


29. 


May 


6. 


Sept. 


29. 


Oct. 


6. 


Feb. 


16. 


March 


29. 


April 


26. 


May 


10. 


June 


21. 


June 


28. 


Aug. 


2. 


Oct. 


4- 


Dec. 


6. 


Feb. 


14. 


April 


4- 


Aug. 


10. 


Sept. 


5 


Nov. 


28. 


Dec. 


II. 


March 


6. 


April 


15- 


June 


5- 


June 


26 


Aug. 


17- 


Sept. 


27. 


Nov. 


27. 



Elizabeth dau. of Peter & Rebecca Bowers. P. 

Richard son of Richard & Elizabeth Rolf. 

John son of John & Ann Farrow. P. 

Samuel son of Ambrose & Elizabeth Clarke. 

Thomas son of William &: Sarah Rawlinson. 

James son of William & Mary Lofts. 

Robert base child of Elizabeth Plummer & John Martin. 

John son ot Laurence & Ann Skipper. P. 

Mary dau. of Richard c\: Elizabeth Rolf 

Mary dau. of John Willingham jun & Mary his wife. 

Elizabeth dau. of Joseph Sc Elizabeth Reeve. 

Robert son of John & Ann Farrow. 

Mary dau. of William & Mary Lofts. 

Ann dau. of James & Ann Dunthorn. 

Robert son of Robert «S: Hannah Clark. 

Mary dau. of Richard <S: Elizabeth Rolf 

Ann dau. of Ambrose & Elizabeth Clarke. 

Alice dau. of William (S: Rose Cooke. 

Thomas son of William vv: Mary Rawlinson. 

Robert son of John & Ann Leech, being the tenth child now 

living. 
Ann dau. of John & Ann Farrow. 
Elizabeth dau. of John & Mary Leng. 
Ann dau. of John & Ann Farrow. P. 
James base child of Mary Mingay <.^' George Blomfield of 

Pakenham. 
John son of John & Elizabeth Gurling. 
Rebeccah dau. of Thomas & Sarah Biddel. 
George son of Richard & Elizabeth Rolf. 
Sarah dau. of William >S: Rose Cooke. 
Mary dau. of Lawrence & Ann Skipper. P. 
Ann dau. of Ambrose & Elizabeth Clarke. 
Joseph son of Joseph & Elizabeth Reeve. P. 
Samuel son of Samuel & Ann Norman. P. 
William son of John & Ann Farrow. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



1774- 


Dec. 


23- 


T775- 


April 


14. 




May 


18. 




Oct. 


I. 




Oct. 


22. 




Nov. 


16. 


1776. 


Jan. 


21. 




March 


17- 




April 


5- 




Nov. 


10. 


1777- 


Feb. 


9- 




Feb. 


16. 




March 


23- 




April 


20. 




April 


6. 




Jan. 


12. 




July 


'3- 




Oct. 


19. 




Oct. 


26. 




Oct. 


26. 


1778. 


Jan. 


4- 




Feb. 


8. 




March 


22. 




June 


21. 




July 


12. 




Aug. 


16. 




Oct. 


4- 




Oct. 


25- 




Dec. 


28. 


1779. 


Jan. 


17- 




Jan. 


31- 




April 


2. 




May 


27. 




June 


6. 




Sept. 


26. 



George son of William &: Mary Rawlinson. 
Mary dau. of Robert & Susan Clarke. 
Elizabeth dau. of Thomas &: Sarah Biddel. 
Anna Maria dau. of John & Elizabeth Gurling. 
Susannah dau. of Robert & Susannah Hibble. 
Mary dau. of John & Ann Farrow. 
Lawrence son of Laurence & Ann Skipper. 
George son of John &: Mary Leng. 
William son of Ambrose & Elizabeth Clarke. 
Mary dau. of James & Margery Clarke. 
Samuel son of Anthony & Mary Reeve. 
Sarah base dau. of Ann Byat. 
William son of Robert & Susan Clarke. 
James son of Richard & Susan Willingham. 
Ann dau. of Joseph & Elizabeth Reeve. 
George son of Simon «S: Ann Kemp. 
Mary dau. of Robert & Susanna Hibble. P. 
Susanna dau. of George tSr Susanna Cocksedge. 
James son of George & Frances Biddel. P. 
Judith dau. of John & Elizabeth Willingham. 
Elizabeth dau. of Thomas & Ann Farrow. 
Ann dau. of Lawrence & Ann Skipper. P. 
Christian dau. of William & Rose Cooke. P. 
Hannah dau. of James & Margery Clarke. 
Alice dau. of John & Elizabeth Allen. P. 
Elizabeth dau. of George & Elizabeth Hurrell. 
Robert son of Robert & Susan Hibble. P. 
William son of William & Mary Norman. P. 
James son of John *t Ann Leng. P. 
George Robert son of John & Elizabeth Girling. 
James son of John & Alice Rheman. P. 
John son of Robert & Susan Clarke. P. 
Mary dau. of John & Rachel ^Voodgate. 
Martha dau. of Thomas & Sarah Biddell. P. 
Priscilla dau. of Ambrose & Elizabeth Clarke. 



28 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



1779- 


Nov. 


21. 


1780. 


June 


25- 




July 


2. 




July 


19. 




Sept. 


3- 




Sept. 


3- 


1781. 


Jan. 


14. 




Jan. 


22. 




Feb. 


II. 




Feb. 


26. 




April 


4- 




April 


6. 




July 


I. 




July 


15- 




Aug. 


26. 




Sept. 


30- 




Nov. 


23- 


1782. 


March 


3- 




March 


10. 




April 


18. 




April 


28. 




Sept. 


15- 


1783. 


March 


3°- 




May 


4- 




June 


29. 




July 


27. 




Dec. 


7. 


1784. 


June 


6. 




Dec. 


19. 


17S5. 


Feb. 


19. 




Feb. 


25- 




April 


3- 




April 


10. 




April 


29. 




May 


15- 



John son of William &: Mary Norman. P. 
James son of Joseph & Hannah Cook. P. 
Joseph son of Joseph & Hannah Alderton. P. 
Henry son of John & Alice Rheman. 
Priscilla dau. of George & Elizabeth Hurrel. 
Sarah dau. of Lawrence & Ann Skipper. P. 
Alice dau. of James &: Margery Clarke. 
William son of William & Elizabeth Chapman. P. 
Elizabeth dau. of William & Rose Cooke. P. 
William son of John c\: Rachel Woodgate. P. 
Susannah dau. of Robert &: Susan Clarke. P. 
Sarah dau. of Thomas & Ann Farrow. P. 
Robert son of Robert & Susan Hibble. P. 
Ann dau. of Samuel & Ann Norman. 
Thomas son of Joseph & Hannah Alderton. P. 
William son of John & Elizabeth Girling. 
Abraham son of ^Villiam «S: Mary Norman. 
Henry son of John & Alice Rheman. P. 
Joab son of John & Elizabeth MuUy. 
Joseph son of Joseph dt Hannah Cook. P. 
James son of James & Margery Clarke. 
Sarah dau. of George & Elizabeth Harrold. 
Mary dau. of Isaac & Mary Hyde. 
Susanna dau. of Thomas & Sarah Bidwell. 
John son of William &: Elizabeth Chapman. 
Ehzabeth dau. of John & Rachel Woodgate. P. 
Mary dau. of William & Mary (Howe) Norman. 1 
Elizabeth dau. of Joseph & Hannah Alderton. P. 
Richard son of John & Mary Clarke. P. 
James son of Samuel & Ann Norman. P. 
John son of Thomas &: Ann Farrow. P. 
Charlotte dau, of Simon & Betty (Ely) Wright. P. 
Mary dau. of Robert & Sarah Mann. 
George son of William & Mary Norman. P. 
George son of George & Elizabeth Harrold. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



29 



Henry son of ^Villiam cS: Ann Pearson. P. 

Robert son of William & Elizabeth Chapman. 

Henry son of John & Alice Rheman. P. 

Ann dau. of John & Ann (Ely) Brook. P. 

Mary Anne dau. of Henry &: Mary Lee. 

Susan dau. of William & Mary Norman. P. 

Sophia dau. of John & Elizabeth Jackson. 

^Villiam son of Robert & Sarah Mann. 

Mary dau. of Edward & Mary Lawrence. 

John son of Henry & Mary Lee. P. 

Matthias son of Thomas & Frances Chinery. P. 

AVilliam son of William &: Rose Alderton. 

Alice dau. of John & Alice Rheman. P. 

Elizabeth dau. of William & Mary Norman. P. 

John son of Thomas & Ann Farrow. P. 

William son of Joseph & Hannah Alderton. P. 

William son of ^Villiam &: Ann Pearson. P. 

Nathaniel son of John & Rachel Woodgate. P, 

Robert son of Isaac & Mary Hyde. 

Susan dau. of George & Elizabeth Harrold. 

Jonathan son of ^^^illiam & Elizabeth Chapman. 

John son of Robert & Elizabeth Greenwood. P. 

Abraham son of John & Elizabeth Jackson. P. 

^^'illiam son of Henry & Mary Lee. P. 

Dorothy dau. of John & Alice Rheman. P. 

Maria dau. of Thomas & Frances Chinery. P. 

Joshua son of Joshua & Mary Horrex. P. 

Rhode dau. of ^\^illiam & Anne (Hawes) Pearson. P. 

Catherine dau. of William iv: Mary (Howe) Norman. P. 

Sophia dau. of Henry & Mary (Pawsey) Lee. P. 

Joseph son of Robert &: Sarah CWells) Mann. 

Hannah dau. of Isaac & Mary Hide. 

Mary Anne dau. of Robert «S: Elizabeth (Payne) Greenwood. 

Henry son of Henry & Mary (Pawsey) Lee. P. 

Newport son of Newport & Mary (Allen) Ely. P. 



>7S5- 


Sept. 


28. 


1786. 


March 


19. 




April 


2. 




May 


4- 




Sept. 


10. 




Oct. 


15- 


17S7. 


April 


6. 




June 


Cl- 




June 


io. 




Oct. 


7- 




Nov. 


II. 




Nov. 


18. 


1788. 


Feb. 


17- 




March 


16. 




May 


4- 




June 


8. 




June 


29. 




June 


29. 




Aug. 


17- 




Aug. 


24. 




Aug. 


24. 




Oct. 


5- 




Dec. 


7- 


1789. 


Feb. 


I. 




April 


12. 




May 


29. 




Nov. 


4- 


1790. 


Jan. 


5- 




Maich 


25- 




April 


18. 




April 


18. 




Oct. 


17- 




Nov. 


28. 


1791. 


April 


2 2. 



June 



30 



GREAT WHELNETHAA[ REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



1791, 



1792. 



^793- 



1794. 



1795- 



1796. 



June 


12. 


Aug. 


14. 


Sept. 


25- 


Oct. 


2. 


Dec. 




Jan. 


29. 


Jan. 


29. 


March 


II. 


Oct. 


7- 


Nov. 


4- 


March 


24. 


May 


17- 


June 


12. 


July 


8. 


Aug. 


4- 


Nov. 


10. 


Dec. 


15- 


May 


6. 


July 


12. 


Sept. 


16. 


Dec. 


22,- 


March 


8. 


June 


14. 


Aug. 


9- 


Oct. 


II. 


Nov. 


8. 


Nov. 


8. 


Feb. 


28. 


March 


6. 


May 


8. 


June 


5- 


Nov. 


II. 



Anne dau. of Edward & Mary (\\'ilding) Laurence. 
Daniel son of William & Elizabeth (Spells) Death. 
John son of George & Elizabeth (Townshend) Harrold. 
Mary Anne dau. of Thomas tt Frances (Stedman) 

Chinery. P. 
Jacob &: Elizabeth twins of John & Ann (Rook) Farrow. P. 
Mary dau. of William &: Elizabeth Chapman. 
John son of Joshua is: Mary Horrex. 
Flannah dau. of Joseph & Mary (Rooks) Farrow. P. 
Susan dau. of John 6c Ann (Boby) Tweed. 
Susan dau. of Robert *S: Sarah (Wells) Mann. 
Louisa Nunn dau. of Rachel Stow. P. 
Alfred son of Samuel tV: Lucy (Beales) Fenton. P. 
Stedman son of Thomas <!v: Frances (Stedman) Chinery. P. 
Richard Willingham son of Martha Rolfe. 
John son of Newport & Mary (Allen) Ely. 
'i'homas son of Thomas (S: I>ydia (Clarke) ^^'estley. 
James son of Edward & Mary (A\'ilding) Laurence. P. 
Sarjeant William son of Sarjeant & Anna Maria (Goldsmith) 

Talbot. P. 
James son of Henry & Mary (Pawsey) Lee. P. 
Elizabeth dau. of William & Rose (Robinson) Dench. P. 
Holden Gooch son of Robert & Sarah (Baker) Nunn. P. 
Mira dau. of Joseph & Mary (Rooks) Farrow. P. 
James son of James & Mary Ann (Alderton) Bridgman. 
William son of George «& Elizabeth (Townshend) Harrold. 
Elizabeth dau. of Newport & Elizabeth (Crick) El)-. 
Robert son of Joshua & Mary Horrex. 
Sophia dau. of Thomas & Lydia (Clarke) Westley. 
Elizabeth dau. of Robert & Sarah (^Vells) Mann. 
Susanna dau. of Richard & Martha (Rolfe) Willingham. 
Mary Ann dau of Thomas & Frances (Stedman) Chinery. P. 
John son of Edward & Mary (Wilding) Lawrence. 
Elizabeth dau. of Samuel &: Lucy (Beales) Fenton. P. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 31 

ig6. Nov. 28. Mary Ann dau. of fames & Marj^ Ann (Alderton) 
Bridgman. P. 
1797. Feb. 23. Lucy dau. of William & Rose (Robinson) Dench. P. 

Susan base child of Mary Clarke «S: ^^'illiam Pearsons 

labourer. P. 
Phoebe dau. of Robert it Sarah (Baker) Nunn. 
98. Jan. 7. Susanna dau. of Susanna Collins. P. 

Mary & Martha twins of Richard & Martha (Rolfe) 

Willingham. P. 
Hannah dau. of Edward & Mary (\\^ilding) Lawrence. 
Thomas son of George & Elizabeth (Townshend) Harrold. 
Elen dau. of John &: Mary (Spall) Mortlock. P. 
Elizabeth dau. of Henry & Mary (Pawsey) Lee. 

1799. March 3. Phoebe dau. of Robert & Sarah (^Vells) Mann. 
Mary Ann dau. of Edward & Susan (Munns) Frost. P. 
A\'illiam son of Thomas & Lydia (Clarke) ^^'estley. 
Mary dau. of William & ]\Iary (Orridge) Abbot. 
Amy dau. of John & Anne (Boby) Tweed. P. 

1800. March 2. Mary Ann dau. of Thomas (S: Elizabeth (Woodgate) 

Chinery. P. 

Priscilla dau. of Robert & Sarah (Baker) Nunn. 
Robert base child of Sarah Mann & James Lyng. 
Samuel son of Edward &: Mary (Wilding) Lawrence. 
John son of Richard &: Martha (Rolfe) Willingham. 
Frederick son of Samuel &: Lucy (Beales) Fenton. P. 
Elizabeth dau. of William & Ann (Hawes) Pearson. P. 

1801. May 31. Ralph son of Elizabeth Alderton. 
George son of Thomas &: Lydia (Clarke) Westley. P. 
William son of William &: Mary (Orridge) Abbot. P. 
Anna Maria dau. of Judith \\'illingham. 
Thomas son of William iv: Ann (Hawes) Pearson. 

1802. Jan. 31. Elizabeth dau. of Robert & Sarah (Wells) Mann. 
Lucy dau. of Richard & Martha (Rolfe) Willingham. P, 
Alfred son of Samuel & Lucy (Beales) Fenton. P. 
Mary Ann dau. of John & Ann (Boby) Tweed. P. 



Feb. 


-3- 


April 


16. 


Dec. 


24. 


Jan. 


7- 


Feb. 


I. 


Feb. 


II. 


May 


27- 


July 


2 2. 


Oct. 


21. 


March 


3- 


Oct. 


20. 


Oct. 


27. 


Nov. 


3- 


Nov. 


7- 


March 


2, 


April 


13- 


July 


6. 


Aug. 


3- 


Aug. 


24. 


Sept. 


M- 


Oct. 


5- 


May 


31- 


May 


^5- 


Dec. 


13- 


Dec. 


20. 


Dec. 


^5- 


Jan. 


3^- 


Feb. 


^5- 


April 


4- 


July 


17- 



32 



GREAT 


Feb. 


6. 


May 


8. 


June 


12. 


Nov. 


2. 


Dec. 


4- 


Feb. 


5- 


Feb. 


19. 


March 


5- 


Ma)- 


13- 


Jul)- 


15- 


Aug. 


5- 


Sept. 


24. 


Nov. 


18. 


Dec. 


9- 


Feb. 


27. 


March 


TO. 


April 


10. 


April 


18. 


Aug. 


IS- 


Jan. 


20. 


May 


1 1. 


Aug. 


17- 


Aug. 


28. 


Dec. 


14. 


Jan. 


1 1. 


Feb. 


22. 


April 


20. 


May 


20. 


May 


31- 


July 


14. 


Nov. 


29. 


Feb. 


20. 


March 


20. 


April 


17- 



WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



180' 



1804. 



1805. 



1806. 



T807. 



1 80S. 



Caroline dau. of Edward & Susan (Munns) Frost. P. 
Henry Robert son of John & Elizabeth (Traice) Pearl. P. 
James son of ^^'illiam & Ann (Hawes) Pearson. P. 
Elizabeth Mar}' dau. of Edward & Mary (Normiin) Talbot. P. 
Sarah dau. of Thomas & Sarah (Eulmer) Cowper. P. 
Mary Ann dau. of Robert & Sarah (Baker) Nunn. 
Eleanor dau. of James & Ann (Hickey) Wyard. P. 
Hannah dau. of Joseph & Hannah (Key) Farrow. P. 
Mary dau. of William & Sarah (Payne) Rolfe. 
Hannah dau. of Robert & Hannah (Ramsay) Last. 
Nathaniel son of Sarah Death. 

Sarah dau. of Robert t^- Mary (Barrell) Creasey. P. 
Sarah dau. of John tS: Anne (Boby) Tweed. 
Joseph son of Joseph & Hannah (Key) Farrow. 
Loui.sa dau. of William &: Dorothy (Pearson) Clarke. P. 
Elizabeth Johnson dau. of Elizabeth Rolfe. P. 
Ann Maria dau. of Richard &: Martha (Rolfe) Willingham. P. 
Frances Mary dau. of John & Elizabeth (Traice) Pearl. P. 
Caroline dau. of ^^'illiam & Phoebe (Smith) Reeman. P. 
Robert son of Robert & Mary (Barrell) Creasey. P. 
Susanna dau. of Thomas & Sarah (Bulmer) Cowper. 
Thomas son of Thomas & Mary (Cason) Alderton. 
Susan dau. of Joseph &: Hannah (Key) Farrow. P. 
Dorothy dau. of John & Frances (Rash) Cason). 
Priscilla dau. of William & Dorothy (Pearsons) Clarke. 
Robert son of John & Anne (Boby) Tweed. P. 
Chailes Sidney .son of John & Elizabeth (Traice) Pearl. P. 
Thomas son of Jeremiah &: Jane-Stevens (Pryke) Hayward. l\ 
James son of ^^'illiam & Phoebe (Smith) Reeman. P. 
Abigail dau. of Robert & Sarah (Baker) Nunn. P. 
George son of Edward & Mary (Pearsons) Frost. P. 
Frances dau. of Jonathan & Dorothy (Bird) Ely. P, 
James son of Sarah Nobbs. 

Frances &: Martha twins of Richard & Martha (Rolfe) 
Willingham. P. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



33 



1808. 



1809. 



May 


4- 


May 


29. 


July 


3- 


Sept. 


25- 


Nov. 


6. 


Nov. 


27. 


Feb. 


19. 


April 


9- 


May- 


12. 


May 


7- 


July 


9- 


Sept. 


18. 


Oct. 


29. 


Nov. 


19. 


Dec. 


4- 


Dec. 


17- 


Dec. 


24. 


Jan. 


17- 


April 


8. 


April 


8. 


April 


14. 


June 


20. 


Aug. 


19. 


Jan. 


6. 


Jan. 


20. 


March 


24. 


June 


16. 


June 


n- 


Aug. 


18. 


Sept. 


22. 


Sept. 


22. 


Nov. 


17- 


Jan. 


9- 



Eliza dau. of William &: Elizabeth Ann (Baker) Taylor. P. 

Mary dau. of Robert & Mary (Barrell) Creasey. 

William son of Thomas & Mary (Cason) Alderton. 

Mary Ann dau. of Thomas & Sarah (Buhner) Cowper. 

Miriam dau. of Joseph & Hannah Farrow. 

Jane dau. of Benjamin & Jane (Barfield) Edwards. P. 

Amelia dau. of William & Phoebe (Smith) Reeman. P. 

Sarah dau. of Robert «S: Sarah (Baker) Nunn. 

Anna Maria Josepha dau. of Edward & Mary (Pearson) 

Frost. P. 
Caroline dau. of George & Hannah (Rolfe) Carrington. P. 
Eliza Ann dau. of Samuel & Lucy (Fenton) Snape. P. 
Marian dau. of Elizabeth Walker. 
Mary dau. of William & Mary (\Voodgate) East. P. 
James son of Jacob &: Mary (Parsons) Allington. P. 
Eliza dau. of John &: Mary (Hitchcock) Cooke. P. 
James son of Thomas & Mary (Cason) Rollinson. P. 
Eliza Ann dau. of Sophia Lawrence. 
Thomas son of George & Mary (Greenwood) Rollinson. 
Robert son of James & Ann (Sargent) Butcher. Born 

Oct. 9. 1807. 
William son of James &: Ann Butcher. Born July 5. 1809. 
Harriet dau of William & Elizabeth (Baker) Taylor. P. 
Robert son of John & Elizabeth (Traice) Pearl. P. 
Eliza Ann dau. of Elizabeth Nunn. 

Louisa Sarah dau. of Samuel & Lucy (Fenton) Snape. P. 
Lucy dau. of Benjamin & Jane (Barfield) Edwards. P. 
James son of John & Anne Tweed. P. 
Eliza dau. of John & Anne (Rosbrook) Parsons. P. 
George son of George &: Mary (Greenwood) Rollinson. P. 
Susan dau. of Robert & Sarah (Baker) Nunn. 
Mary dau. of James & Elizabeth (Ambrose) Padley. P. 
William son of Richard & Sarah (Parsons) Jackaman. 
Elizabeth dau. of John & Rose (Dench) Major. P. 
Robert son of Thomas & Mary (Cason) Alderton. P. 



34 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



1813. 



1814. 



Jan. 


26. 


March 


12. 


April 


16. 


March 


22. 


Aug. 


30- 


Oct. 


4- 


Oct. 


23- 


Jan. 


10. 


Feb. 


6. 



Feb. 



Feb. 


19. 


Feb. 


21. 


Feb. 


24. 


March 


18. 


July 


16. 


July 


27. 


Sept. 


19. 


Sept. 


20. 


Oct. 




Oct. 


31 


Jan. 


4- 


Jan. 


23' 



Feb. 

Feb. 
March 



27. 
I. 



Susan dau. of A\^il]iam & Mary (Woodgate) East. P. 
Eliza Ann dau. of Edward & Mary (Pearson) Frost. 
William son of William & Mary (Woodgate) East. Privately 

bapt. at Lavenham March 18, 1808. 
James son of Sophia Lawrence. 

Mary dau. of George & Mary (Greenwood) Rollinson. 
Melinda dau. of John & Maria (Pettit) Webb. 
\\^illiam son of John & Anne (Rosbrook) Parsons. P. 
Harriet dau. of Mary Pawsey. 
Benjamin son of Benjamin & Jane (Barfield) Edwards 

laborer. 
Mary dau. of John & Elizabeth (Woodcock) Girton, 

nursery man. 
Samuel Fenton son of Samuel & Lucy Snape, farmer. 
Isaac son of Joseph & Mary (Nunn) Pettit, laborer. 
William Dench son of John &: Rose Major, carpenter. 
John son of Robert & Sarah (Baker) Nunn, laborer. 
John son of William & Elizabeth (Goode) Carver, shepherd. 
Mary Anne dau. of John & Mary (Wastell) Cartwright, 

clergyman. 
William & John twins of William & Elizabeth (Baker) 

Taylor, laborer. 
AVilliam son of George & Mary (Greenwood) Rollinson, 

butcher. 
Edward son of John & Elizabeth (Woodcock) Girton, 

nursery man. Born Oct. 15, 1810. 
James son of James & Sarah (Ling) Warren, laborer. 
Lucy dau. of Thomas & Sarah (Bulmer) Cowper, laborer. 
Sarah Ann dau. of John & Anne (Rosbrook) Parsons, 

laborer. 
Jane dau. of Richard & Sarah (Parsons) Jackaman, 

bricklayer. 
Sarah dau. of John & Elizabeth (Thompson) Sutton, laborer. 
James son of William & Deborah (Night; Parsons, laborer. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



35 



1814. 



1815. 



1816. 



March 


5- 


May 


9- 


May 


22. 


June 


19. 


Oct. 


30. 


Dec. 


18. 


Dec. 


18. 


Jan. 


8. 


April 


9- 


April 


16. 


June 


II. 


June 


18. 


Aug. 


20. 


Oct. 


7- 


Oct. 


7- 


Oct. 


^3- 


Oct. 


31- 



Jan. 



29. 



April 


28. 


June 


9- 


June 


9 


July 


I, 



Aug. 



25- 



Elizabeth Mary dau. of Nathaniel & Frances (Moore) 

Woodgate, farmer. 
Louis & Louisa children of Edward & Mary (Pearson) Frost, 

miller. 
Thomas son of Thomas & Mary (Cason) Alderton, labourer. 
John son of Robert & Sarah (Baker) Nunn, labourer. 
Marian dau. of James & Mary Makin, labourer. 
William Henry son of Samuel &: Lucy (Fenton) Snape, 

farmer. 
Lucy dau. of Joseph & Mary (Nunn) Pettit, labourer. 
James son of John & Sarah (Widow Allington) Bugg, 

labourer. 
Harriet dau. of Thomas & Sophia Wallace, labourer. 
William son of William & Susan Middleditch, labourer. 
Charles son of Benjamin & Jane (Barfield) Edwards, 

labourer. 
Thomas son of Thomas & Anne (Miller) Boreham, labourer. 
Robert son of William & Elizabeth (Banks) Reeman, 

labourer. 
Lucy dau. of George «& Mary Rollinson, labourer. 
Emily & George children of Plenry &: Sarah (Petchey) 

Smith, labourer, 
George son of George & Anne (^Vatts) Death, labourer. 
Thomas & Richard sons of Joseph & Hannah (^Key) 

Farrow, carpenter. 
Henry William son of Samuel & Lucy (Fenton) Snape, 

farmer. 
Marianne dau. of William & Anne Pryke of Bury, bricklayer. 
Robert son of Robert & Sarah Holmes of Sicklesmere, 

shepherd. 
James son of John & Rose Major of Sicklesmere, carpenter. 
Lucy dau. of Samuel & Elizabeth Hogg of Sicklesmere, 

Lieut, of Militia. 
Caroline dau. of Caroline Farrow and James Upsom, fiirmer. 



36 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



1816. 



1817. 



1818. 



1819. 



Aug. 25. Thomas Griffiths son of Edward & Mary (Pearson) Frost, 

miller 
Sept. 10. Lucy Mary dau. of Samuel & Lucy Snape, farmer. 
Nov. 17. Thomas son of Robert & Sarah Holmes of Sickelsmere, 

shepherd. 
Nov. 27. William Major son of Richard & Mary Ann Butters of 

Sickelsmere, carpenter. [Entered in 1820.] 
George son of Charles & Mary Crosby, labourer. 
Henry &: John sons of John & Sarah Bugg of Sickelsmere, 

labourer. 
William son of Simon <&: Hannah Hazelwood, labourer. 
Rachel Anne dau. of Nathaniel & Frances Woodgate, farmer. 
James son of William & Anne A\'^oodgate of Brettenham, 

farmer. Born Sept. 21. 1807. 
Fanny Maria dau. of Henry & Sarah Smith, labourer. 
John son of James & Mary Makins, labourer. 
Robert son of Thomas & Mary OUington, labourer. 
Samuel son of Thomas & Maria Webb, wheelwright. 
Susannah dau. of \Villiam & Susannah Middleditch, labourer. 
Robert son of George & Susan Sturgeon, labourer. 
Thomas son of Henry & Sarah Townsend, labourer. 
William son of John & Sophia Plumb, thatcher. 
Frances dau. of Caleb & Maria Lee, carpenter. 
James son of James & Elizabeth Lawrence of Sicklesmere, 

blacksmith. 
William son of John & Margaret ^Vright, labourer. 
John son of William &: Elizabeth Taylor, labourer. 
Sophia dau. of Thomas & Mary Ann Bantick of Sicklesmere, 

labourer. 
Thomas son of John & Ann Parsons, labourer. 
Mary Ann dau. of Samuel &: Lucy Snape, farmer. 
William son of Edward & Susan Bruce, labourer. 
Sarah Ann dau. of Richard &: Mary Ann Butters of 

Sicklesmere, carpenter. 
March 1 2. Eliza dau. of John & Sarah Bugg of Sicklesmere, labourer. 



March 


16. 


May 


4- 


June 


15- 


Feb. 


19. 


Feb. 


19. 


March 


22. 


June 


21. 


June 


28. 


July 


5- 


Sept. 


6. 


Oct. 


4- 


Oct. 


1 1. 


Oct. 


1 1, 


Nov. 


29. 


Jan. 


10. 


Jan. 


3i' 


July 


1 1, 


Aug. 


15 


Sept. 


12 


Nov. 


8, 


Jan. 


2, 


March 


5- 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



1820. Ma)- 7. Simon Moore son of Nathaniel & Frances Woodgate, farmer. 
May 23. Charles son of William & Maria Veier of Sicklesmere, 

labourer. 
June 18. Hannah dau. of William & Deborah Parsons of Sicklesmere, 

labourer. 
Robert son of Thomas li: Mary Ollington, labourer. 
Mary Ann dau. of Walter & Susan Tweed, labourer. 
Samuel son of Henry & Mary Ann Cooper, miller. 
Mary Ann dau. of Henry & Mary Ann Cooper, miller. 
Eliza Ann dau. of James & Elizabeth Lawrence, blacksmith. 
Lucy dau. of Robert & Elizabeth Rollinson, miller. 

182 1. March iq. Lucy Ann dau. of John & Rose Major of Sicklesmere, 

carpenter. 

John son of John & Ann Parsons, labourer. 

Frances dau. of William & Susan Middleditch, labourer. 

David son of James & Mary Makings, labourer. 

Mary dau. of George & Susan Sturgeon, labourer. 

Elizabeth dau. of Robert «S: Mary 'I aylor of Sicklesmere, 

coachman. 
Mary Ann dau. of John Butcher & Ann Lawrence, labourer. 
Eliza dau. of Holden & Mary Nunn, labourer. 
Sarah Ann dau. of Edward & Susan Bruce, labourer. 
Emily dau. of James &: Elizabeth Lawrence, blacksmith. 
Robert son of John & Priscilla Armstong of Sicklesmere, 

labourer. 

1822. March 10. Sarah Ann dau. of George & Mary Regen, labourer. 
John son of Nathanael & Frances Woodgate, farmer. 
Mary Ann dau. of William & Elizabeth Spink, labourer. 
Deborah dau. of William & Deborah Parsons, labourer. 
Martha dau. of William & Maria Verer of Sickelsmere, 

labourer. 
Sarah dau. of Henry & Sarah Townsend, labourer. 
Isabella dau. of George & Sophia Clarke of Sicklesmeie, 
labourer. 
Dec. 29. James son of John & Sarah Verer of Sicklesmere, labourer. 



Aug. 


6. 


Sept. 


3- 


Oct. 


25- 


Oct. 


31- 


Nov. 


3- 


Nov. 


6, 


March 


19. 


May 


6. 


June 


24. 


July 


8. 


July 


22. 


July 


22, 


Aug. 


16. 


Oct. 


14. 


Oct. 


21, 


Dec. 


19. 


Dec. 


23- 


March 


10. 


April 


5- 


May 


6. 


May 


6. 


May 


19. 


May 


19. 


July 


28. 



38 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



1823. 



Feb. 



1824. 



1825. 



March 


SO- 


March 


SO- 


April 


6 


April 


13- 


April 


27- 


May 


4- 


May 


II. 


May 


18. 


June 


5- 


June 


5- 


Dec. 


16. 


Jan. 


18. 


Jan. 


25- 


Feb. 


15- 


May 


2. 


May 


9- 


May 


16. 


May 


23. 


May 


SO. 


May 


SO. 


July 


II. 


July 


25- 


Oct. 


24. 


Nov. 


28. 


Feb. 


13- 


March 


6. 


April 


3- 


April 


10. 


April 


10. 



Susan dau. of Walter (S: Susan Tweed of Sicklesmere, 

labourer. 
Zechariah son of John & Mary Stebbins, labourer. 
James son of William & Elizabeth Everett, labourer. 
Lucy dau. of Edward & Susan Bruce, labourer. 
Emma Ann dau. of Robert tS; Elizabeth RoUinson, farmer. 
James son of John & Priscilla Armstrong, labourer. 
Isabella dau. of William & Ann Stinton of Brent-eleigh, 

gardener. 

Emily dau. of John &: Anne Parsons, labourer. 

Sarah dau. of James & Mary Pryke, labourer. 

Jane Isabella ) , ^ c- 1 t o c 

Christiana /daus. ot Samuel & Lucy Snape, farmer. 

William Samuel son of William & Fanny Fenton of Swaffham 
Bulbeck, Co. Cambridge, merchant's clerk. 

Martha dau. of James & Charlotte Upson, farmer. 

James Edward son of James & Elizabeth Lawrence, 
blacksmith's labourer. 

George son of Isaac & Sophia Willingham, labourer. 

Ellen dau. of James & Mary Makins, labourer. 

Mary Anne dau. of William & Martha Cawston, labourer. 

"William son of George & Susan Sturgeon, labourer. 

James son of Robert & Frances Holmes, labourer. 

Mary dau. of William & Susan Middleditch, labourer. 

Frederick Hale son of Benjamin & Elizabeth Puckle, clerk. 

George son of Edward &: Susan Bruce, labourer. 

Phebe Nunn dau. of Thomas & Mary Ann Paske, labourer. 

AVilliam son of William Smith labourer & Phoebe Mann. 

Eliza dau. of James & Mary Pryke, labourer. 

Alice dau. of John & Elizabeth Crick, cattle dealer. 

Michael son of John & Sarah Verer, labourer. 

Sarah dau. of Nathaniel & Charlotte Pettit, labourer. 

Elizabeth dau. of Richard & Mary Ann Butters, carpenter. 

George Hale son of Benjamin & Elizabeth Puckle, clerk. 

Sophia dau. of Joshua & Hannah Hollocks, labourer. 



GREAT 


May 


8. 


May 


8. 


May 


15- 


May 


22. 


July 


3- 


July 


24. 


Aug. 


14. 


Oct. 


30- 


Tan. 


6. 



WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 39 



1825. May 8. Eliza dau. of John & Esther Garwood. 
Susan"^ jcliildren of George & Mary Regen, labourer. 

Lucy dau. of Robert & Mary Taylor, coachman. 
Rebecca dau. of Walter &: Susan Tweed, labourei-. 
George son of William & Elizabeth Everett, labourer. 
Robert son of James «S: Elizabeth Padley, labourer. 
Jermyn son of George & Sophia Clark, labourer. Previously 

bapt. at Bury Oct. 8, 1824, by Rev. John Standly. 
Mary Ann dau. of John & Ann Parsons, labourer. 

1826. Jan. 6. Sophia Frances dau. of William & Fanny Fenton of 

Swaffliam Bullbeck, merchant's clerk. 

Jan. 15. George son of John & Mary Hammond of Sicklesmere, 

shepherd. 

Mary Ann 1 , ^ t o tv t . 

Elizabeth Mariaj^^^- ^^ J'^^^^es & Mary Ayers, steward. 

James son of Thomas & Mary Ann Pask, labourer. 
Sophia dau. of Joshua & Hannah Hollocks, labourer. 
Robert son of Robert &: Mary Taylor, servant. 
Alfred son of George & Mary Rolfe, labourer. 
Benjamin son of Mary Snape, at the Hall. 
Benjamin son of James & Mary Makings, labourer. 
William son of James &: Elizabeth Lawrence of Sicklesmere, 

smith. 
Maria dau. of Edward & Susan Bruce, labourer. 
Henry son of Robert & Martha Ungles, labourer. 
James son of Robert <S>: Martha Ungles. Born May 10. 

1823. 
Martha dau. of Ann Lawrence. 
Charlotte dau. of Bloom &: Elizabeth Randall, of Sicklesmere, 

turnpike keeper. 
Mary Ann dau. of George & Sarah Young, shepherd. 
Harriet dau. of John & Elizabeth Crick, dealer. 
Harriet dau. of James & Mary Pryke, labourer. 
Oct. 15. Mary Ann dau. of Nathaniel &: Charlotte Pettit, labourer. 



Jan. 


22. 


March 


28. 


April 


3. 


April 


4- 


April 


16. 


May 


5- 


May 


5- 


May 


14- 


May 


14. 


July 


4- 


July 


3°- 


Aug. 


6. 


Aug. 


27. 


Aug. 


27. 


Sept. 


24. 


Oct. 


15- 



40 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



T826. Oct. 


17- 


1827. March 


18. 


April 


8. 


April 


15- 


April 


29. 


May 


7- 


May 


15- 


May 


17- 


June 


10. 


July 


I. 


July 


2. 


July 


15- 


Dec. 


12. 


Dec. 


16. 


1828. Feb. 


26. 


March 


2?>- 


March 


23- 


March 


28. 


April 


6. 


May 


I. 


May 


25- 


June 


15- 


July 


6. 


Aug. 


17- 


Aug. 


3f- 


Oct. 


26. 


Nov. 


16. 


Nov. 


16. 


Dec. 


28. 


1829. Feb. 


2. 



Henry James Wake son of James & Charlotte Upson, farmer. 

Mira dau. of William & Martha Cawson, labourer. 

William son of George & Mary Lofts, labourer. 

Hannah Jemima dau. of Richard «S: Hannah Pawsey, miller. 

Samuel son of George & Susan Sturgeon, labourer. 

John Jennings son of Thomas & Sarah Smith of London. 

Visitor at the Parsonage. Born June 4, 1789. 
Louisa dau. of Thomas &: Lucy Howard, labourer. 
James son of James & Mary Ayers, steward. 
Richard Hudson son of John &: Catharine Gibson, clerk 

[curate]. Born Dec. t8, 1826. 
John son of Edward &: Susan Bruce, labourer. 
Sarah dau. of James &: Mary Makings, labourer. 
Amelia dau. of Robert Borgos labourer & Deborah Parsons. 
John son of George «S: Mary Regen, labourer. 
Samuel son of William & Elizabeth Everett, labourer. 
Martha Emma dau. of Michael & Matilda Mortlock, 

blacksmith. 

Robert Mortlock son of George & Mary Rolfe, labourer. 

Joseph ) sons of Isaac Purkis labourer &: Harriet 
Benjaminj Alderton. 

William son of John & Elizabeth Crick^ dealer. Born June 

12, 1826. 

Mary Ann dau. of John & Sarah Verer, gardener. 

Catharine dau. of William & Sarah Nelson, labourer. 

Caroline dau. of Ralph & Susan Alderton, labourer. 

Frederick son of Robert & Martha Ungles, glover. 

William son of John & Ann Parsons, labourer. 

Louisa dau. of John «Sr Esther Garwood, labourer. 

Henry son of Robert & Eliza Borgos, labourer. 

Elizabeth dau. of Frederick Fenton, farmer, & Susan Burmen. 

Alfred son of James & Mary Pryke, labourer. 

Thomas son of Richard Brown, labourer, & Hannah Parish. 

Emma dau. of Thomas & Mary Ann Pask, labourer. 

Frances Elizabeth dau. of John & Catharine Gibson, clerk. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



41 



1829. 



1830. 



April 


12, 


May 


17 


June 


7 


June 


r 


Sept. 


13- 


Oct. 


II 


Nov. 


I 


Nov. 


22. 


Nov. 


22. 


Feb. 


23- 


Feb. 


23- 


March 


14. 



April 



1 8-. I. 



May 


9- 


May 


16. 


May 


20. 


June 


13- 


June 


27. 


June 


27. 


July 


I. 


July 


I. 


July 


I. 


July 


18. 


Oct. 


17- 


Nov. 


14- 


Dec. 


12. 


Dec. 


12. 


Dec. 


15- 


Feb. 


27. 


April 


9- 



Holden Nunn son of Joseph & Sarah Bugg, labourer. 

Sophia dau. of James & Charlotte Upson, farmer. 

Mary Ann Eliza dau. of William tS: Ann Meller, labourer. 

Sarah dau. of George & Sarah Young, labourer. 

Sophia dau. of William & Suzan Middleditch, labourer. 

Jonathan Taylor son of Joseph & Eliza Garwood, labourer. 

Alfred son of William & Martha Cawston, labourer. 

Eliza dau. of Edward & Susan Bruce, labourer. 

Lucy dau. of John & Sarah Verer, gardener. 

John Ellis son of John & Eliza Fenton, farmer. 

Myra Anna dau. of Michael & Matilda Mortlock, blacksmith. 

Elizabeth Jane dau. of Henry & Maryanne Makings, 

labourer. 
Alice Ann dau. of George & Mary Regen of Sicklesmere, 

labourer. 
George Henry son of James & Mary Ayers, steward. 
Sarah Ann dau. of Isaac & Mary-ann Butcher, labourer. 
Sarah Ann dau. of Samuel &: Eliza Finch, miller. 
Sophia dau. ot John & Ann Parsons, labourer. 
John son ot William & Elizabeth Everet, labourer. 
Elizabeth dau. of Ralph & Susan Alderton, labourer. 
Ervin son of Thomas & Lucy Howard, labourer. Born 

Dec. 16, 1825. 
Sarah Ann, born Aug, 1827. ^ children of Thomas & 
Charles Barnes, born Apr. 1830.J Lucy Howard. 

Jeremiah Samuel son of Henry & Ann Self, turnpike keeper. 
Joanna Sophia Miriam dau. of Forster & Sophia Maynard, 

clerk [curate]. 
Eliza dau. of George & Susan Sturgeon, labourer. 
Lucy Ann dau. of George & Mary Rolfe, labourer. 
William son of William & Sarah Nelson, labourer. 
Frederick son of Robert & Eliza Boggis of Sicklesmere, 

labourer, 
John son of Robert & Sarah Holmes, shepherd. 
Elizabeth Ann dau. of Joseph & Eliza Garwood, labourer. 



42 GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 

1831. April 17. Anna Maria dau. of George & Sarah Youngs of Sicklesmere, 

shepherd. 
Maria dau. of Henry Taylor labourer & Maria Langham of 

Hawsted. 
William son of William »Sc Elizabeth Woodard of Sicklesmere, 

labourer. 
Thomas son of Thomas & Maryanne Pask, labourer. 

John son of Nathaniel & Charlotte Pettit of Stanningfield, 

labourer. 
James son of Edward &: Mary Andrews, carpenter. 
John son of Henry &: Marianne Makins, labourer. 
Sarah dau. of John & Sarah Vearer, labourer. 
Charles son of John & Hester Garwood, labourer. 
Susan dau. of William & Lucy Rice, labourer. 
Marianne dau. of Thomas Amys labourer & Hannah Parish. 
Amelia dau. of ^^'illiam & Anne Miller, labourer. 
Elizabeth Anne dau. of Joseph & Eliza Garwood, labourer. 
Robert son of Ralph & Susan Ollerton, labourer. 
Robert son of Robert & Sarah Warren, farmer. 
Diana Sarah dau. of John & Mary Ungles, glover. 
Caroline dau. of John & Abigail Butcher, labourer. 
Charles son of Charles & Sarah Drury, labourer. 
Josiah John son of Michael & Matilda Mortlock, blacksmith. 
Elizabeth Anne dau. of Thomas &: Frances Tilson, labourer. 
Eliza dau. of Jonathan & Sophia Wright, labourer. 
Emily dau. of Edward & Susan Bruce, labourer. 
Edward son of Edward «Sc Martha Ungles, glover. 
Matilda dau. of Dennis & Phoebe Pulfer, labourer. 
Amy Tweed dau. of Robert & Susan Avery of Banham in 

Norfolk, gardener. 

Emma Ann dau. of George & Marianne Kirby, labourer. 

William son of William & Martha Cawston, labourer. 

Robert son of John &: Elizabeth Polly of Gedding, labourer. 

John ] 

Ellice Ann V children of George «S: Mary Regen, labourer. 

George | 



April 


17- 


April 


17- 


May 


8. 


May 


15- 


June 


2. 


July 


II. 


Sept. 


4- 


Sept. 


4- 


Sept. 


4- 


Sept. 


i I. 


Oct. 


2. 


Oct. 


9- 


Oct. 


9- 


Dec. 


18. 


Dec. 


6. 


Jan. 


5- 


Jan. 


22. 


Jan. 


29. 


Feb. 


23- 


Feb. 


26. 


March 


I. 


April 


[. 


May 


6. 


June 


3- 


Aug. 


5- 


Sept. 


2. 


Sept. 


2. 


Sept. 


2. 


Dec. 


2. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 43 

1832. Dec. 2. James son of John & Anne Pearsons, labourer. 

Christiana Henrietta dau. of Frederick Fenton, farmer, & 
Lucy Bruce. 
^^33' J'l"- "3- Harriett dau, of Joshua & Hannah Horrex, miller. 

Alfred son of William & Elizabeth Everett, labourer. 

FrcQGnclc ) • • • 

^.,■^ [ children of Robert (Iv: Eliza Borgiss, labourer. 

Eliza Ann ) ° ' 

Georgina dau. of Henry & Frances Phillips, clerk. 

William son of George & Mary Rolfe, labourer. 

Lucy Ann dau. of Robert & Anne Mann, labourer. 

Elizabeth Catherine dau. of Charles & Maria Wilkin, 

shoemaker. 

Eliza dau. of Joseph & Eliza Garwood, labourer. 

Abigail dau. of James & Martha Goldspink, servant. 

Martha Nunn dau. of Nathaniel & Charlotte Pettit, labourer. 

Robert William son of William & Anne Miller, labourer. 

Frederick son of William James labourer tK: Phoebe Man. 

Sarah Ann dau. of Henry & Marianne Makings, labourer. 

Edward George son of Edward & Marianne Webb, miller. 

1834. Jan. 5. George son of James & Marianne Polly, labourer. 
Elizabeth Jane dau. of Thomas & Marianne Rollinson, 

labourer. 
Sarah dau. of William tSi Elizabeth Woodward, labourer. 
Sarah dau. of Robert & Sarah Warren, farmer. 
Mary dau. of Thomas & Fanny Tilson, labourer. 
Mary Ann dau. of Edward & Susan Bruce, labourer. 
Joseph son of John & Hester Garwood, labourer. 
Clara Mary Cooper dau. of John & Mary Ungles, glover. 
William son of Ralph & Susan Ollerton, labourer. 
Lucy Anne dau. of George & Mary Ann Norman, labourer. 
Anne Maria dau. of George & Mary Lofts, labourer. 

1835. Feb. I. Hannah dau. of Jonathan & Sophia Wright, labourer. 
Emma Jane dau. of George & Mary Regen, labourer. 
Catherine dau. of Henry & Frances Phillips, clerk. 
George son of George & Susan Mingay, labourer. 



Dec. 


2. 


Dec. 


27. 


Jan. 


13- 


Feb. 


3- 


Feb. 


3- 


April 


7- 


April 


7- 


April 


7- 


July 


7- 


July 


7- 


Oct. 


6. 


Oct. 


6. 


Nov. 


3- 


Dec. 


I. 


Dec. 


I. 


Dec. 


24. 


Jan. 


5- 


Jan. 


5- 


Jan. 


5- 


May 


4- 


May 


4- 


May 


4- 


May 


4- 


May 


18. 


June 


I. 


Sept. 


6. 


Oct. 


8. 


Feb. 


I. 


March 


I. 


April 


4- 


May 


3- 



44 GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



1835. June 7. Jane Elizabeth dau. of Benjamin & Elizabeth Edwards, 

labourer. 
Thomas son of George & Sarah Young, shepherd. 
George son of George & Mary Rolfe, labourer. 

Alf d I ^^^i'^^''^" of Isaac & Marianne Butcher, labourer. 

Lucy Anne dau. of Thomas & Marianne RoUinson, labourer. 
Eliza dau. of Robert &: Lucy Harding, labourer. 
James son of Robert & Anne Sharp, labourer. 
Elizabeth dau. of William & Martha Cawston, labourer. 
Keziah dau. of Joseph & Eliza Garwood, labourer. 
Marianne dau. of Isaac & Sarah Pettit, labourer. 
John son of Nathan & Charlotte Pettit, labourer. 
Maria dau. of Robert & Anne Mann, labourer. 
Joseph son of John & Eliza Bird, farmer. 

1836. March 6. Eliza dau. of George & Mary Norman, labourer. 
Walter son of William & Lucy Rice, labourer. 
Ambrose son of Robert OUerton labourer «& Susan Pearsons. 
Sarah Anne dau. of John & Abigail Butcher, labourer. 
Henrietta dau. of Robert & Sarah Warren, farmer. 
David John son of Robert & Eliza Borgiss, labourer. 
Mary dau. of Robert & Elizabeth Hunt, labourer. 
George son of Henry & Marianne Makins, labourer. 
Maria Ann dau. of Ralph & Susan Alderton, labourer. 
Susanna dau. of George & Susan Mingay, labourer. 
Marianne dau. of Robert & Lucy Hardy, labourer. 
Charlotte dau. of Edward & Susan Bruce, labourer. 
Lucy Anne dau. of Benjamin & Elizabeth Edwards, labourer. 

?37. March 5. George son of William &: Anne Miller, labourer. 
John son of John & Elizabeth Claydon, miller. 
Emily dau. of Isaac & Sarah Pettit, labourer. 
Benjamin son of George &: Mary Region, labourer. 
Frances dau. of Thomas & Frances Tilson, labourer. 
James son of John t& Hester Garwood, labourer. 
Holden Nunn son of Thomas «S: Marianne Pask, labourer. 



June 


7- 


June 


7- 


June 


7- 


July 


7- 


Sept. 


6. 


Sept. 


6. 


Sept. 


6. 


Sept. 


6. 


Oct. 


4- 


Oct. 


4- 


Oct. 


4- 


Dec. 


20. 


March 


6. 


April 


3- 


April 


3- 


May 


1. 


May 


I. 


Sept. 


4- 


Sept. 


4- 


Oct. 


2 


Nov. 


6. 


Nov. 


6. 


Nov. 


6. 


Dec. 


4- 


Dec. 


4- 


March 


5- 


April 


2. 


May 


7- 


May 


7- 


May 


7- 


May 


7- 


May 


7- 



GREAT WHELNEIHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



45 



1837- 



1838. 



1839. 



May 
June 
June 



June 

July 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

March 

March 

May 

May 

June 

June 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Feb. 

May 

May 

May 

May 

June 



7- 

4- 

26. 

26. 

2. 
2. 

6. 
6. 
6. 
I. 
I. 
I. 
4. 
5- 

5- 

IT. 
II. 

6. 
6. 
3- 
3- 

7- 
7- 
8. 

5- 
5- 
5- 
5- 
9- 



James son of Edward & Marianne Webb, miller. 

Diana dau. of John Cawston labourer & Jemima Garnham. 

William Henry Horatio son of Frederick Fenton farmer & 

Lucy Bruce. Bapt. at 6 years old. 

Samuel Jeremiah 1 , ■, , r t^ j • 1 v t t- . 

Jane Alethea [ ^^^'^^/^'^ °^ Frederick c\: Lucy Fenton 

A .. r- ■ farmer. 

Augusta Georgma) 

Jemima dau. of George &: Mary Rolfe, labourer. 

George"! 

Arthur V sons of James & Marianne Polly, labourer. 

John J 

Marianne dau. of William & Eliza Evered, labourer. 

Sarah dau. ot Nathaniel & Charlotte Pettit, labourer. 

Frances dau. of John Jackson labourer & Mary Jackson, 

William John son of William & Lucy Major, carpenter. 

Hannah dau. of George & Mary Norman, labourer. 

Marianne dau. of William & Lucy Rollinson, labourer. 

Elizabeth dau. of William & Lucy Rice, labourer. 

Thomas Edward son of Thomas Edward tt Hannah 

Robinson, registrar. 

Elizabeth dau. of John & Elizabeth Bird, farmer. 

Jane dau. of Henry & Frances Phillips, rector. 

Mary Jane dau. of Thomas & Elinor Wright, drawing master. 

John son of Joseph & Eliza Bugg, labourer. 

Ellen Victoria dau. of Frederick & Lucy Fenton, farmer. 

Eliza dau. of John & Sarah Verer, labourer. 

Emma dau. of Benjamin & Elizabeth Edwards, labourer. 

George son of Robert & Lucy Hardy, labourer. 

Rebecca dau. of William & Martha Cawston, labourer. 

Robert William son of Robert &: Sarah Warren, farmer. 

Susan dau. of Henry & Marianne Makins, labourer. 

Anne dau. of James & Charlotte Upson, farmer. 

James son of Abraham & Eliza Makins, labourer. 

Matilda dau. of Robert & Elizabeth Hunt, labourer. 

VVir r ^°"^ °^ Ralph & Susan Alderton, labourer. 



46 
1839. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



1840. 



1842. 



Jane 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

March 

April 

June 

June 

June 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Feb. 

March 

April 

April 

April 

May 

May 

June 

June 

July 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Jan. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

March 



9. Elizabeth dau. of Nathaniel & Charlotte Pettit, labourer. 

II. George son of James & Mary Reeman, labourer. 

22. Maria dau. of Isaac & Sarah Pettit, labourer. 

29. Marianne dau. of Edward & Marianne Webb, miller. 

29. Edward son of Edward & Susan Bruce, labourer. 
3. James son of George & Mary Rolfe, labourer. 

3. David son of Charles & Eliza Tilson, labourer. 

5. Emma Anne dau. of James & Marianne Polly, labourer. 

5. Lucy Anne dau. of Thomas &: Maria Paske, labourer. 
14. George son of Isaac & Marianne Butcher, labourer. 

30. James son of George & Mary Region, labourer. 

1. Sophia dau. of William Everett, labourer. 

3. Lucy Emily dau. of Frederick & Lucy Fenton, farmer. 
13. Robert son of Henry & Frances Phillips, rector. 

13. George son of John & Hester Garwood, labourer. 
21. Susan dau. of John & Elizabeth Bird, farmer. 

2. Arthur son of John & Sarah Verer, labourer. 

6. Frances dau. [?] of Robert & Ann Mann, labourer. 
21. Augusta dau. of John & Mary Ungles, glover. 

14. Susanna dau. of Isaac & Sarah Pettit, labourer. 

4. Jane Maria dau. of Henry & Marianne Makins, labourer. 
4. William son of Samuel & Mary Farrow, labourer. 

4. Abraham son of Nathaniel & Charlotte Pettit, labourer. 
2. William son of James & Eliza Alderton, labourer. 

2. Eliza dau. of William & Lucy Rice, labourer. 

6. Alfred son of William & Lucy Cawston, labourer. 

6. Thomas Jonathan son of Robert «& Sarah Warren, farmer. 

4. Marianne dau. of James & Charlotte Padley, labourer. 

5. Mary Anne dau. of Charles & Sarah Drury, labourer. 
12. Marianne dau. of James & Mary Reeman, labourer. 

15. Agnes dau. of John & Elizabeth Bird, farmer. 

6. Rebecca dau. of George & Mary Rolfe, labourer. 

6. Marianne dau. of Henry & Frances Pettit, labourer. 
6. 



Reuben\ 
Lucy / 



children of Robert & Eliza Boggis, labourer. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



47 



184: 



184: 



April 


3- 


June 


24. 


July 


3- 


Aug. 


I. 


Aug. 


7- 


Aug. 


7- 


Aug. 


7- 


Sept. 


4- 


Oct. 


2Z- 


Oct. 


29. 


Nov. 


6. 


Jan. 


I. 


Jan. 


1. 


Jan. 


I. 


Feb. 


5- 


Feb. 


5- 


March 


7- 


April 


2. 


April 


2. 


April 


2. 


May 


7- 


May 


7- 


May 


28. 


June 


4- 


June 


4- 


Aug. 


6. 


Aug. 


6 


Aug. 


6. 


Aug. 


6. 


Sept. 


3- 


Sept. 


3- 



Henry son of William & Maria Borley, publican. 
John George son of John & Anne Hibble, miller. 
Thomas Edward son of Robert & Martha Petti tt, labourer. 
Emma Anne dau. of Ralph & Susan Alderton, labourer. 
Joseph son of James & Marianne Polly, labourer. 
Edward Girton son of Edward Girton labourer & Abigail 

Miller. 
Alfred George son of William & Lucy Rollinson, labourer. 
Henry son of Robert & Louisa Sturgeon, labourer. 
Francis son of Arthur & Susan Budd, labourer, 
Rosina dau. of Daniel and Marianne Pendle, carpenter. 
James son of William and Martha Cawston, labourer. 

Sar^r \\n ] ^'^''^^^'"' °^ George & Mary Region, labourer. 
Charles Henry son of Robert & Louisa Bugg, labourer. 
James William son of James Butcher labourer & Elizabeth 

Grimwood. 
Samuel son of James & Eliza Alderton, labourer. 
Marianne dau. of William & Elizabeth Everitt, labourer. 
Adelaide dau. of John & Mary Ungless, shopkeeper. 
WilHam son of Isaac & Sarah Pettitt, labourer. 
Eliza Ann dau. of Thomas & Maria Pearsons, labourer. 
John son of William & Elizabeth Everitt, labourer. 
Martha dau. of Philip & Susan Arbon, labourer. 
Honor dau. of William Harding labourer & Sarah Grimwood. 
John son of James & Eliza Jackson, labourer. 
Marianne \ daus. of Thomas & Marianne Rollinson, 
Lucy Anne / labourer. 

George son of Samuel & Mary Farrow, labourer. 
Marianne dau. of Robert &: Sarah Warren, farmer. 
James son of William & Deborah Townsend, labourer. 
Jane dau. of James & Charlotte Padley, labourer. 
Anne Fenton dau. of Joseph & Anne Ellis, farmer. 
Martha dau. of Robert & Lucy Hardy, labourer. 
Robert Philip son of Nathaniel & Charlotte Pettit, labourer 



48 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



1843. 


Nov. 


5- 


1844. 


Jan. 


7- 




Jan. 


7- 




March 


3- 




March 


3- 




March 


3- 




April 


7- 




April 


7- 




April 


7- 




Oct. 


6. 




Nov. 


3- 




Dec. 


I. 


1845. 


Jan. 


5- 




Jan. 


5- 




Jan. 


5- 




Jan. 


5- 




Jan. 


5- 




Fell. 


9- 




March 


23- 




April 


6. 




April 


6. 




May 


4- 




June 


I. 




June 


I. 




June 


6. 




June 


6. 




Aug. 


3- 




Aug. 


3- 




Aug. 


3- 




Aug. 


3- 




Sept. 


7- 




Oct. 


5. 



William son of James & Mary Reeman, labourer. 
James Ambrose son of John G. & Anne Hibble, miller. 
Marianne dau. of Ralph & Susan Alderton, labourer. 
Phoebe dau. of John &: Eliza Nunn, labourer. 
William son of William eS: Maria Borley, publican. 
Edward son of Robert e^ Louisa Sturgeon, labourer. 
Elizabeth dau. of Robert & Eliza Boggis, labourer. 
Alfred son of John & Sarah Plumb, labourer. 
Charles son of Mark & Sarah Pearsons, labourer. 
Anne dau. of Arthur & Susan Mudd, wheelwright. 
Sarah Anne dau. of Isaac & Sarah Pettit, labourer. 
Marianne dau. of James ^: Marianne Polly, labourer. 
Eliza dau. of William & Mary Bruce, labourer. 
Harriet dau. of William &: Elizabeth Everitt, labourer. 
Athaling [son ?] of John & Mary Ungles, glover. 
Elizabeth Madelina dau. of Reuben & Anne Warren, 

bricklayer. 
Frederick son of George & Mary Rolfe, labourer. 
Henry son of Henry & Frances Pettitt, labourer. 
Sophy dau. of Thomas & Maria Pettit, labourer. 
Susan dau. of John &: Mary Coe, labourer. 
Joseph son of William &: Mary Borley, publican. 
Emily dau. of Philip &: Susan Albon, labourer. 
Thomas son of James & Eliza Alderton, labourer. 
Eliza dau. of William & Marianne Aves, labourer. 
Arthur George son of William & Deborah Town send, 

labourer. 
Robert son of James & Charlotte Padley, labourer. 
Marianne dau. of Samuel & Mary Farrow, labourer. 
Elizabeth Rebecca dau. of Charles & Mary Wright, labourer. 
Matilda Rosina dau. of William & Lucy Rollinson, labourer. 
William son of Robert & Louisa Sturgeon, labourer. 
Abigail dau. of Robert & Sarah Warren, farmer. 
Ann dau. of John & Maria Musk, shoemaker. 



GREAT WHELNKTHAM KI':CilS'll<:RS. -BAPTISMS. 49 



1845. 


Dec. 


7- 




Dec. 


7- 


1846. 


Feb. 


I. 




Feb. 


I. 




April 


5- 




May 


3- 




May 


3- 




Ma)- 


3- 




June 


7. 




June 


7- 




July 


12. 




Aug. 


2. 




Sept. 


6. 




Sept. 


6. 




Sept. 


6. 




Oct. 


11. 




Oct. 


II. 




Oct. 


II. 




Oct. 


II. 




Nov. 


I. 




Nov. 


I. 




Nov. 


19. 




Dec. 


6. 


1847. 


Feb. 


7- 




Feb. 


7- 




April 


4- 




April 


4- 




May 


2. 




May 


2. 




July 


4- 



John son of James & Mary Reeman, labourer. 

Charlotte Isabella dau. of Joseph & Mahala Osborne, shoe 

maker. 
Hannah dau. of James <fe Eliza Jackson, labourer. 
George son of Henry & Phoebe Cocksedge, labourer. 
Arthur son of Mark &; Sarah Pearsons, labourer. 
Anne dau. of William & Marianne Bruce, labourer. 
George son of John & Sarah Plumb, labourer. 
Christiana dau. of Samuel & Emily Fenton, labourer. 
Mary lAicy dau. of Henry & Lucy Mary Hilder, farmer. 
Joseph George son of William & Lucy Rice, labourer. 
Thomas son of ^Villiam & Deboiah I'ownsend, shepherd. 
Donna Maria dau. of William & Mary Steel, shoemaker. 
Keziah dau. of John &: Abigail Butcher, labourer. 
Emily dau. of William & Martha Cawston, labourer. 
Marianne dau. of Ralph & Susan Alderton, labourer. 
Elizabeth dau. of Thomas (Jv: Elizabeth Wheeler, bailiff. 
George son of Martha Townsend. 
George Edward son of George »S: Marianne Norman, 

lal)ourer. 
Thomas son of William c\: Emily \Vrighl, labourer. 
Marianne dau. of Robert & Eliza Boggis, labourer. 
Harriet dau. of James <&: Eliza Alderton, labourer. 
Abraham son of James & Mary Reeman, labourer. 
Catherine dau. of George &: Catherine Coleman, labourer. 
Henry son of Arthur &: Susan Mudd, carpenter. 
Henrietta Sarah Ann dau. of Joseph & Mahala Osborne, 

shoemaker. 
Laetitia Louisa dau. of Reuben & Anne Warren, bricklayer. 
George son of Robert & Louisa Sturgeon, labourer. 
Rowland John son of John & Mary Ungles, glover. 
William son of William & Betsy Everitt, labourer. 
Charlotte Augusta dau. of Nathaniel tV Charlotte Pettit, 

labourer. 



50 


GREAT 


i847. 


July 


4- 




July 


4- 




Oct. 


3- 




Oct. 


3- 




Nov. 


7- 




Nov. 


7- 




Nov. 


7- 




Nov. 


II. 




Dec. 


5- 




Dec. 


5- 




Dec. 


5- 


1848. 


Jan. 


2. 




Jan. 


2, 




Feb. 


6. 




March 


12. 




May 


7- 




May 


7- 




June 


4- 




June 


4- 




July 


2. 




July 


2. 




Aug. 


3- 




Aug. 


3- 




Aug. 


3- 




Aug. 


6. 




Sept. 






Oct. 


I. 




Oct. 


I. 




Dec. 


5- 


1849. 


Jan. 


7- 



WHELNETHAM REGISTERS. -BAP TISMS. 



Rebecca dau. of George & Mary Rolfe, labourer. 

Catherine dau. of James & Charlotte Padley, labourer. 

Maria dau. of Robert & Martha Pettit, labourer. 

William son of Philip & Susan Albon, labourer. 

Margaret dau. of William & Mary Anne Bruce, labourer. 

Mary Anne dau. of Miriam Cawston. 

Eliza dau. of Samuel & Eliza Coleman, labourer. 

Robert Beales | 

Benjamin Puckle J-sons of Frederick & Lucy Fenton, farmer. 

Joseph J 

Elizabeth dau. of John & Maria Musk, shoemaker. 

Maryanne dau. of George & Martha Baldwin, labourer. 

John son of ^V^illiam & Deborah Townsend, labourer. 

Robert son of Robert & Susannah Cox of Sicklesmere, 

labourer. 

Alfred son of William & Emily ^Vright, labourer. 

George son of Samuel & Maryanne Farrow, labourer. 

e f daus. of Robert & Elizabeth Hunt, labourer. 

Susanna j ' 

Eliza dau. of John & Mary Coe, labourer, 

William son of Henry & Phoebe Cocksedge, labourer. 

David son of James «Sr Louisa Cawston, labourer. 

Charlotte dau. of Sidney &: Amelia Grimwood, labourer. 

Thomas son of Isaac & Sarah Pettit, labourer. 

John son of William & Lucy Race, labourer. 

Joshua James son of Robert & Sarah Warren, farmer. 

Georgina Mary dau. of Reuben & Anne Warren, bricklayer. 

Jane Louisa dau. of Henry & Lucy Mary Hilder, farmer. 

Anne Elizabeth dau. of Elizabeth Rolfe. 

Robert son of John & Eliza Nunn, labourer. 

David son of John «& Sarah Plumb, labourer. 

Eliza dau. of Robert & Sarah Plumb, labourer. 

Hannah dau. of William & Deborah Townsend, labourer. 

Marianne dau. of Robert & Emily Sexton, labourer. 



GRKAT WHELNETHAM RECilSTERS. -BAFl'lSMS. 



51 



1849. 



1850. 



March 


4- 


March 


4- 


March 


4- 


March 


4- 


March 


4- 


June 


3- 


July 


I. 


July 


I. 


July 


I. 


Aug. 


5- 


Aug. 


5- 


Aug. 


5- 


Oct. 


7- 


Oct. 


7- 


Oct. 


7- 


Nov. 


4- 


Nov. 


4- 


Jan. 


6. 


Jan. 


6. 


Jan. 


6. 


Jan. 


6. 


March 


3- 


March 


^5- 


April 


7- 


April 


7- 


April 


7- 


April 


7- 


May 


5- 


July 


7- 


July 


7- 


July 


7- 



John son of AA'illiam «& Anne Bruce, labourer. 

Artliur Robert son of Robert & Louisa Sturgeon, labourer. 

George son of Robert & Eliza Boggis, labourer. 

Albert son of James «& Mary Reeman, labourer. 

Marianne dau. of John Tiffin labourer & Harriet Pryke. 

Lavinia dau. of Robert Emerson &: Harriet Alderton. 

Ellen Mary dau. of John & Mary Ungles, glover. 

Philip son of Arthur &: Susan Mudd, carpenter. 

Simon son of Charles & Mary AVright, shoemaker. 

Frederick son of George «S: Mary Norman, labourer. 

Ambrose son of James & Charlotte Padley, labourer. 

Henry son of Samuel & Mary Farrow, labourer. 

Lucy Anne dau. of William & Lucy Rollinson, labourer. 

Susanna dau. of Robert & Susanna Cox, labourer. 

Frederick George son of Frederick Boggis labourer & Jane 

Pryke. 
Rebecca dau. of Charles & Mary Wright, shoemaker. 
Robert son of John & Lucy Grimwood, labourer. 
Lucy Anne dau. of Henry & Frances Pettitt, labourer. 
Rachel dau. of George & Martha Baldwin, labourer, 
Julia dau. of Samuel William & Emily Brown, labourer. 
Mary Anne dau. of James & Eliza Alderton, labourer. 
Eliza Kezia Anne dau. of ^^'illiam & Lucy Bugg, labourer. 
George son of Thomas & Marianne Rollinson, labourer. 
Susanna dau. of Ralph «S: Susan Alderton, labourer. 
Harriet Mary dau. of George t\: Mary Rolfe, labourer. 
James son of Philip & Jane Albon, labourer. 
Anna Maria dau. of John & Maria Musk, shoemaker. 
James son of \\'illiam &: Elizabeth Everett, labourer. 
Rosina dau. of Sidney & Amelia Grimwood, labourer, 
William Henry son of Henry & Lucy Mary Hilder, farmer. 
Charles son of William & Emily Wright, labourer. 



GREAT W}lE].NE'rHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



Walter George son of George & Su.san Melton, labourer. 
Frederick son of Henry & Phoebe Cocksedge, labourer. 
Joseph Richard son of Joseph & Mahala Osborne, shoemaker. 
John son of Thomas & Maria Pearsons, labourer, 
Rosina dau. of Henry & Elizabeth Ungles, labourer. 
Alice Ann dau. of James & Charlotte Padley, labourer. 
Isaac son of Robert & Martha Pettitt, labourer. 



52 


(iREAT ' 


1850. 


July 7- 




July 7- 




Aug. 4. 




Sept. I. 




Oct. 6. 




Oct. 6. 




Dec. I. 






GREAT VVHELNETHAM REGISTERS. -MARRIAGES. 



53 



MARRIAOKS. 



1562. 


Sept. 


4- 


John Debnam 


& 


Urselye Hunte. 


1563- 


Sept. 


7- 


Mathewe Sommer 


& 


Margaret Inholde. 


1564. 


Jan. 


20. 


Thomas Tahvorthye 


& 


Alice Pattriche. 


1567- 


June 


18. 


William Fizzye 


& 


Eden Sallowes. 




Nov. 


2. 


Raynolde Howe 


& 


Joane Peache. 


1569. 


Jan. 


29. 


Thomas Nayler 


& 


Alice Addams. 


157'- 


April! 


t8. 


AVilliam Smythe 


& 


Marye Keble. 




Sept. 


17- 


Thomas Kinge 


& 


Margaret Steedeman. 


1572. 


Aug. 


10. 


Nicholas Inholde 


& 


Margaret Tebbold. 


1575- 


April 


II. 


William Brooke 


& 


Anne Sallowes. 




Maye 


19- 


Thomas Saunder 


& 


Marye Addams. 




Nov. 


13- 


Rychard Hall 


& 


Agnes AUam. 


1577- 


N(w. 


7- 


George Camberlen 


& 


Marye Nunne. 


1579- 


Feb. 


3- 


Rychard Neweman 


& 


Alice Addams. 


1580. 


June 


19. 


John Caweson 


& 


Prudence Hammond. 




Aug. 


14. 


Anthonye Rawelin 


& 


Dorothye Man. 


1582. 


Oct. 


18. 


Baylye 


& 


Horner. 


1588. 


Nov. 


2. 


Robert Wylde 


& 


Christian Aldham. 




Nov. 


IT. 


Benjamin Barwicke 


& 


Margaret Cocke. 


1589. 


J une 


10. 


Robert Hynes 


& 


Alice Nayler. 




Nov. 


5- 


Rychard Stafford minister 












of this parishe 


& 


Elizabeth Bantofte. 




Nov. 


12. 


Rychard Cuttbert 


& 


Anne Hanmiond. 


1590. 


Jan. 


26. 


Robart Taylor 


& 


Agnes Addams. 




Marche 


23- 


Henrye Lambe 


& 


Frauncisse Ostler. 


1591 


Maya 


18. 


Lewes Underwoode 


& 


Frauncisse Mayhewe. 




Maye 


25- 


Henrye Howe 


& 


Elizabeth Hammond. 



54 



GREAT A\HELNETHAM REGISTERS.- MARRIAGES. 



1592. 


Sept. 


II. 


Raphe Makroe 


& 


Margarett Smythe. 


1593- 


Maye 


7- 


Thomas Byrde 


& 


Phillis Langham, 


1596. 


Oct. 


28. 


John Tyllett 


& 


Ellen Ham.mond. 


1597- 


Julye 


25- 


Robart Scott 


& 


Anne Manninge. 


1598. 


Nov. 


30. 


\Villiam Rushbrooke 


& 


Anne Howe. 


1600. 


June 


5^ 


Isaac Bantofte 


& 


Anne Rogers. 




Julye 


31- 


Charles Reeve 


& 


Marye Hammond. 


1 60 1. 


Aprill 


29. 


Thomas Clarke 


& 


Susann Makroe. 




Julye 


so- 


George Nelson 


& 


Grace Hammond. 




Feb. 


il. 


John Ladyemann 


& 


Annable Mawldin widowe 


1602. 


June 


29. 


John Bale 


& 


Prudence Pattriche. 




Julye 


18. 


John Manninge 


& 


Bridgett Algare. 


1603. 


Sept. 


15- 


Edmonde Sylvester 


& 


Rose Manninge. 


1606. 


Julye 


16. 


Peter Whitaker widower 


& 


Prudence Bale widow. 




Sept. 


24. 


James Fayrecliffe 


& 


Lucye Gippes. 


1607. 


June 


24. 


Thomas Naylor 


& 


Marye Manninge. 




Nov. 


4- 


John Howe 


& 


Amye Addams. 


1608. 


June 


15- 


Robart Rowge 


& 


Marrion Turle. 




Aug. 


16. 


John Forde widower 


& 


Phillip In hold widowe. 




Sept. 


II. 


Thomas Addams 


& 


Alice Manninge. 




Nov. 


3°- 


Henrye Umffrye 


& 


Urselye Neweman. 




Feb. 


23. 


John Hammond 


& 


Susann Sadler. 


1609. 


Oct. 


22. 


Edward Leache 


& 


Bridgett Turle. 




Jan. 


17. 


Rafe Kinge 


& 


Anne Foarde. 


i6io. 


Nov. 


5- 


John Steward 


& 


Anne Pattricke. 


1611. 


June 


24. 


John Scott 


& 


Susann Brayge. 


1612. 


Oct. 


5- 


Robarte Tillet 


& 


Alice Ladyeman. 




Oct. 


1 1. 


William Tillett 


& 


Elizabeth Coe [?]. 


1613. 


Nov. 


I. 


John Reeder 


& 


Anne Saunders. 




Jan. 


6. 


AVilliam Sweeteing 


& 


Ann Lakers. 


1614. 


Julye 


25- 


John Steward 


& 


Ursula Morrice. 




Feb. 


16. 


Thomas Makroe 


& 


Susan Bryden. 


1615. 


Nov. 


I. 


Roger Nunne 


& 


Sara Myles. 


1616. 


Oct. 


26. 


Roger Garrard 


& 


Dorothye Naylor. 


16 [ 7. 


Sept. 


22. 


John Wadkin 


& 


Anne Skarfe. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— MARRIAGES. 



I6I7. 


Oct. 


9- 


Simon Westropp 


& 


Bridgett Pettyward. 




Oct. 


15- 


Thomas Hargrave 


& 


Anne Ladyeman. 


I6I8. 


Sept. 


22>- 


Thomas Wiffin 


& 


Frauncisse Baker. 


1622. 


Aprill 


30. 


Thomas Dedman 


& 


Elizabeth Crouch. 




June 


24. 


Edward Worth 


& 


Susan Pattrich. 


1623. 


June 


30- 


John Clarke 


& 


Elizabeth Ladyman. 




July 


10. 


^Villiam Coppin 


& 


Anne Macroe. 


1625. 


Oct. 


2. 


William Adhams 


& 


Isabell Nonne. 


1630. 


July 


7- 


Anthony Steward 


& 


Thomasin Pattridge. 


1631. 


Feb. 


14. 


John Fitch 


& 


Anne Kerington of Reede. 


1632. 


Aprill 


12. 


George Bigby of Bradfield St George & Elizabeth Smith of 








Stooke. 






1634. 


June 


30- 


John Clarke 


& 


Barbarie Innoll of great 
Wheltham. 


1638. 


May 


14. 


John Garland 


& 


Elizabeth Wiffen. 


1639. 


Oct. 


9. 


Robert Adams 


& 


Susan Frost. 




Oct. 


9- 


Daniell Howe 


& 


Anne Adams. 




Nov. 


20. 


Francis Sparke 


& 


Mary Cason. 


I64I. 


Oct. 


27. 


John Norminton 


& 


Susan Bugg. 


1642. 


Jan. 


23- 


Gualter Nun 


& 


Anne Gooch. 




Feb. 


2. 


Thomas Sturgion 


& 


Sarah Crow. 


1643. 


June 


14- 


John Thurston 


& 


Elizabeth Cosin. 




Oct. 


9- 


William Golson 


& 


Alice Coppin. 



1663. 

1665. 

1667. 



1669. 
1670. 



Oct. 15. John Choate 



& Mary Hammond. 



May 
Aug. 
March 

May 

Oct. 



25- 
15- 
24. 



II. 



John Candler & Susan Adson. 

William Deave & Mary Bridge both of Nolton. 

Samuel Sparrow of Wickhambrooke & Dorothy Ames of 

Whelnetham. 
Robert Largent & Mary Spencer both of great 

Whelnetham. 
Robert Addams & Anne Spencer both of this parrish. 



56 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— MARRIAGES. 



I67I. 


May 


12. 


William Ames of Hunston 
le Willows. 


cc Elizabeth Vincent of \Vhalsham 


1672. 


June 


30- 


Samuel Shipp of Mildenhall & Rose Lilly of this parish. 




July 


27. 


Henry Frent of Bury & Dorothy Saunders of Lawshall. 


1674. 


July 


9- 


John Wholl [?] of St Edmunds Bur\- & Anne Bradford of 








great Weltham. 




1677. 


Oct. 


9- 


John Brown 


& Dorothy Harwell. 


1678. 


April 


9- 


Edmund Coleman Esq. 


& Mrs Mary Gipps. 


1679. 


April 


28. 


John Cue 


d' Mary Smith. 


1680. 


April 


12. 


John Steward 


& Susan Sparke. 


I68I. 


Dec. 


I. 


William Mathew 


& Susan Porter. 


1682. 


April 


25- 


John Brundish, Rector of this parish, & Elizabeth Parker. 




Oct. 


1. 


Thomas Grififin 


& Sarah Harwell. 


1683. 


Nov. 


5- 


Matthew Smee 


& Margarett Orvis. 


1684. 


Sept. 


23- 


John Steward 


& Elisabeth Russell. 




Jan. 


15- 


Thomas Harold 


&: Elisabeth Alexander. 


1685. 


May 


12. 


Samuell Ray gent : 


& Susan Tillet. 


1686. 


Aprill 


22. 


Edmund Spurgen 


& Elisabeth Steel. 




March 


24. 


Phillip White 


& Mary Adams. 


1687. 


May 


22. 


William Langham & Rose 


Boggas both of Fornham Genovefe. 




Feb. 


— 


Benjamin Gardner 


& Rose Bigworth. 




Feb. 


23- 


John Theobalds 


& Elizabeth Johnson. 


1688. 


Oct. 


1 1. 


Mr John Purcas of Bury 


& Mrs Dor : Maiden. 


I69I. 


April 


21 or 22 [sic] Roger Nun & Mary Jar my n both of Hawstead. 




Oct. 


4- 


Thomas Helder 


& Margarett Goodwin. 




March 


20. 


William Claydon 


& Jane Checkard both of 
Hawsted. 


1693. 


Feb. 


14. 


John Brook 


& Susan Goodrich. 


1695. 


July 


18. 


Daniel Jewers of Bury 


& Hannah Manning of Felsham . 




Dec. 


30- 


Mr. Samuel Waller of Stowmarket & Mrs Mary Brundish of 








Bildestone. 






Feb. 


7- 


John Chenery & Lydia Burd both of Stanningfield. 


i6i)6. 


June 


18. 


Samuel EUis 


& Sarah Birch of Lavenham. 



GREAT WHELNE'l'HAM KEGISTERS. ^MARRIAGES. 



57 



1696. 
1697. 

1698. 

1700. 

1701. 
1703- 

1704. 



1705- 
1706. 

1709. 



1710. 
n'3- 



Feb. 10. Henry Gyles 



1714. 

1715- 
1716. 



Oct. 

Jan. 

June 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Nov. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Oct. 
Oct. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Feb. 

*May 
Oct. 
June 
July 
July 
Dec. 
Oct. 



7- 
27. 
14. 

3- 
31- 
18. 

7- 
SI- 
29. 
29. 

7- 
12. 

7- 

3- 
28. 
10. 

31 

22. 

14- 
12. 
19. 
8. 
26. 
28, 
10. 



& Mary Ling of Bury St 
Edmunds. 
Edmund Walker & Mary Goody. 

Edmund Murrels & Margaret Crick. 

Whit tuesday. Samuel Crreenwood & Susan Jerman. 
William Boldero a day labourer &: Elisabeth Crack. 
Jonathan BauUy hurdle maker & Anne Drury. 
Simon Kemp farmer & Miriam Harrison. 

Henry Talbot of Bury St Edmunds innholder &: Christian 

Baily. 
James Francis of Fornham All Saints baker tl^c Mary White 

of Bury. 
William Wilden of Cockfield day labourer &: Ann Wilden of 

Bradfield Combust. 



John Barrel carpenter & 

William Lepingwell <& 

Mr. Roger Houghton & 

Henry Howard of London & 



Mary Scarfe. 
Elisabeth Wyard. 
Mrs Deborah Culpet. 
Mary Bell of Bury. 



Robert Frost of Bradfield St Clare e^ Esther Adams of 
Bradfield Combust. 



Abraham Parker of Hartist &: 
John Leech & 

Henry Goodwin & 

Michael Mower & 



Anne Fletcher. 
Anne Hervey. 
Sarah Scarfe. 
Sarah King. 



Belwood Raven of Lynn Regis & Mary Chaplyn of Bury. 
Matthew Otly of Somerton & Esther Spencer of Whelnetham. 



Colonel Bowes & 

Robert Clark & 

John White & 

John Heyward & 

Philip Wiftin cS: 
Innocents. William Pet & 

James Reeve <^ 



Mrs Thurland. 
Judith Crane. 
Alice Johnson. 

Nelson. 

Frances Parker, 
the Widow Cason. 
the Widow Spite. 



* This entry I think belongs to 1714, but may possibly belong to 17 13. Ed. 



58 


GREAl 


^ ^^ 


I7I7- 


Oct. 


I. 




Oct. 


I. 




Feb. 


6. 


i7i8. 


Sept. 


23- 




March 


30. 


1719. 


Sept. 


3- 




Oct. 


4. 


1722. 


Aug. 


14, 


1724. 


Dec. 


21. 


1725- 


Dec. 


20. 


1727. 


June 


26. 




Oct. 


I, 


1729. 


Aug. 


10. 




Jan. 


29. 


1730. 


Nov. 


10. 




Dec. 


10. 


1731- 


Jan. 


3- 


1732. 


Sept. 


30- 


1733- 


Dec. 


2, 


1734- 


Oct. 


I. 


1735- 


June 


1 1. 




Sept. 


30' 


1736. 


April 


I. 


1737- 


Nov. 


I, 


1738. 


Feb. 


22, 




May 


3- 


1739- 


June 2 


3- 


1741. 


Sept. 


30. 




Oct. 


I, 


1742. 


March 


I. 



WHELNE'l'HAM REGISTERS.— MARRIAGES. 



& 

& 
& 
& 
& 
& 



Ambrose Braybrook 

Anthony Bannock 

Thomas Field of Bury 

Mr James Challice 

William Smee 

Mr John Algar 

Robert King 

John Manning of Ixworth & 

Mr Samuel Fisher & 

Thomas Hammond of Bradfield St Clare & Alice Causon. 

Peter Betson widower of St Mary's, Bury, & Mary Prick 

single of this parish. 
\Villiam Tunbridge & Sarah Peachy. 

Charles London of Hawkedon & Ann Wyard. 
Henry Dusen & Elizabeth Bridge of Pakenham. 



Bridget Arnold. 
Anne Menby. 
Elisabeth Alston. 
Mrs Martha Boggest. 
Anne Burroughs. 
Mrs Alice Wyard. 
Susan Giggins. 
Margaret Pain. 
Mrs Anne Pammen. 



John Worton «& 

Mr John Garland & 

John Farrow & 

Jonallian Carpenter & 

John Tweed of Lawishall & 

William Bowers & 



Barbary Weymark. 
Mrs Ann Wright. 
Henrietta Maria King. 
Mary Willingham. 
Mary Balls. 
Elizabeth Leeks. 



John Mayes of Stoke by Clare & Rebecca Avis of this parish. 
Samuel Myson of Rougham & Martha Tyllett of this parish. 
John Baines of Foulden in Norfolk & Jane Griss of this 

parish. L, 
William Wyard jun. & Elizabeth Bruer both of this 

parish. L. 
Francis Nun of Brockley & Bridget Frost widow. L. 
Isaac Chenery of Bradfield St George & Elizabeth King of 

Little Whelnetham. L. 
John Woodruff of St Edmunds Bury widower & Alice 

Holden of this parish spinster. L. 
Richard Nun of Hawsted & Mary Avis spinster. 
Henry Fairbrother & Elizabeth Twitchett. Banns. 
William Avis widower & Elizabeth Plum spinster. L. 



1742. 


Oct. 


5- 


1744- 


April 


I. 




Dec. 


i6. 


1747- 


Oct 


22. 


1748. 


Dec. 


8. 


1749- 


July 


25- 



GREAT WHELNETHAM RKCISTERS.— MARRIAGES. -59 

Robert Spencer single man & Rose Douse spinster. L. 
John Gridley & Sarah More. B. 
1 6. William Gaut &: Mary Skinner. 

John French of Bury St Edmunds cS: Ann Osborn of 
Rougham. L. 
8. William Bryan & Jane Cellis both of this parish. B. 

William Curry of Little Livermoor single man &: Judith 
Wright of said parish spinster. L. 
1750. May 20. Joseph Snell single man & Ruth Gridley spinster both of 

Lavenham. L. 
Oct. I. Jonathan Hart widower & Martha Randsom spinster both 

of this parish. B. 
1752. June 18. Mr Charles London widower & Mary Steel widow both of 

Hawkedon. L. 
June 23. Mr William Cooke widower c\: Dorothy Rheeman spinster 

both of this parish. L. 
Nov. 25. Samuel Cracknall of Bradfield Combust single man & Mary 
Wright of this parish. L. 
1754. July 27. Charles Merest clerk & Elizabeth Wilkin. L. 

Mem. Mr Charles Merest was resident in this parish, & Elizabeth 

Wilkin spinster of Mildenhall. 
[added by a contemporary hand] Mrs Merest dyed Oct. 15, 1772 
at Soham, Cambridgeshire. 
1755- Sept. 29. John Wright single & Honour Holland spinster, both of 

this parish. 
1756. March 16. Samuel Clary of Saffron Walden, co. Essex, single & Mary 

Green of this parish spinster. L. 
1759- J^"- ^^- Richard Osborn single &: Elizabeth Amy spinster, both of 

this parish. B. 
Oct. 14. John Sarient of Little Whel : widower & Mary Crisp of this 

parish widow. L. 
Oct. 14. Joshua Phillipson single & Sarah Roberson spinster, both of 

this parish. B. 
Nov. 4. Charles Hart of Hawsted single & Elizabeth Folker of this 

parish spinster. B. 



60 GREAT WHELNETHAAl REGISTERS.— MARRIAGES. 



1760. 


Jan. 




May 




July 


1762 


Aug. 




Nov. 


1764. 


Nov. 


1765- 


April 




May 




June 




Nov. 




Dec. 


1768. 


Oct. 


1769. 


Jan. 




Jan. 




Oct. 


1770. 


June 




Sept. 




Oct. 



28. Richard Willingham & Susan Byran, both of this parish. B. 
20. Samuel Fisher of Little Whel : single & Elizabeth Rheeman 
of this parish spinster. B. 

17. Peter Bowers single & Elizabeth Bryan spinster, both of this 

parish B. 
20. Richard Hilder of Cockfield single & Catherine Norman of 

this parish spinster. L. 
8. William Rawlinson single & Sarah Gurling spinster, both of 

this parish. B. 
5. James Pavvley of Bradfield St Clare single & Martha Trick er 

of this parish spinster. B. 
7. John Warren of Stanton St John single & Mary Cocksedge 

of this parish single. L. 

18. John Kerrington of Stanningfield widower & Catherine 

Pearson of this parish spinster. L. 
24. Peter Bowers widower & Rebecca Nun spinster both of this 
parish. B. 

28. Jeremiah Brown of this parish single & Elizabeth Rodbard 

of Debenham spinster. L. 
14. William Wake ot Gazeley single & Margarett Nun of this 

parish single. L. 
24. Samuel Norman & Ann Thoroughgood both of this 

parish. B. 
12. James Spalding of Great Barton & Elizabeth Burroughs of 

this parish. B. 
30. John Cook of Hawsted single & Betty Mingay of this parish 

single. B. 
20. James Dunthorn widower & Ann Mingay spinster both 

of this parish. L. 
5. Philip Rawlinson of this parish widower & Mary Tricker of 

Stowmarket widow. B, 
2. William Lofts single & Mary Thorowgood spinster both 

of this parish. L. 

29. Thomas Farrow single & Anne Plumb spinster both of this 

parish. B. Married by Charles Merest. 



GREAT WHELNE'lliAM REGISTERS.— MARRIAGES. 61 



177 1. May I. Thomas Biddell of Bradfield St George single & Sarah 

Mayes of this parish spinster. L. 
Oct. 17. George Raisin of Depden single & Elizabeth Fincli of 

this parish spinster. L. 

1772. Maich I. John Sparke of Whepsted single & Elizabeth Wyard of 

this parish spinster. L. 
June I. John Nun the younger of St Mary's, Bury St. Edmund's 

single & Mary Sturley of this parish spinster. L. 

1774. March 28. James Alderton of Bradfield Combust single & Mary Ely of 

this parish spinster. L. 
Oct. II. Edmund Spinke of Rushbrook single & Sarah Crick of this 

parish single. B. 
Dec. 6. Joseph Alderton of Bradfield Combust & Sarah Ely of this 

parish spinster. L. 
Dec. 10. Robert Clarke widower & Susan Pawsey both of this 

parish. B. 

1775. Jan. 9. John Willi ngham widower & Elizabeth Plomer single both of 

this parish. B. 

1776. March 24. George Cocksedge of Little Whel : single & Susanna Nunn 

of this parish spinster. L. 
Sept. 5. Simon Kemp of Stanningfield single & Ann Pickering of this 

parish. L. 
Sept. 20. James Thorowgood of this parish widower <Sr Ann White of 

St Mary's, Bury St Edmunds, widow. L. 
Oct. 10. Robert Bray of Bradfield St Clare single & Mary Smith 

of this parish spinster. B. 

1777. Feb. 20. George Biddell of Bradfield Combust single & Frances 

Pickering of this parish spinster. L. 
Oct. 22. Isaac Hide widower & Mary Mortlock spinster both of this 

parish. B. 
1779. Oct. II. John Mulley single cS; Elizabeth Etheridge spinster both 

of this parish. B. 
Oct. 21. Joseph Alderton single & Hannah Savage spinster both of 

this parish. B. 



62 GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— MARRIAGES. 



2 2. Thomas Derisley of Otton Belchamp, co. Essex, single & 
Phillis Sturley of this parish spinster. L. 

19. William Church of St Mary's, Bury St Edmunds, single 
& Keziah Smith of this parish spinster, L. 

II. Anthony Reeve widower & Sarah AVancy spinster both of this 
parish. B. 
I. John Brook of Little Whel. single <S: Ann Ely of this parish 
single. L. 

10. John Bullock of Rushbrook single & Mary Paine of this 
parish spinster. B. 

18. John Leathers widower & EHzabeth Cocksedge single both of 
this parish. B. 
9. John Bull widower of St Mary's in Bury & Ann Beck of 

this parish single. L. 
5. Richard Melton of Rougham single & Mary Pawsey of this 
parish single. B. 
18. Newport Ely single & Mary Allen single both of this 
parish. L. 

11. John Tweed single &: Anne Boby single both of this 
parish. B. 

25. Samuel Payne of Hawstead single & Anne Reeve of this 

parish single. B. 
10. John Carrington single & Anne Wilding single both of this 

parish. B. 
16, Charles Guest of St Mary's in Bury single & Ann Cansdale 

of this parish spinster. L. 

20. Edmund Andrews of Rougham single & Elizabeth Clarke of 
this parish single. B. 

21. Samuel Barrett single & Sophia Wright single both of 
this parish. L. 

1 2. John Taylor ot Withersfield, co. Suffolk, single & Rose Cooke 

single of this parish. L. 
1795. May 5. James Bridgman single & Mary Ann Alderton single both of 

this parish, B. 



1781. 


Jan. 




June 




Oct. 


1785. 


Dec. 


1786, 


Oct. 


1787. 


June 




Oct. 




Nov, 


1790. 


Oct, 


I79I. 


Oct, 




Oct. 


1792. 


June 




Aug. 




Sept, 




Oct. 


1793- 


Sept. 



GREAT WHELNETHAiM REGISTERS.— MARRIAGES. G3 



J795- 


May 




Oct. 


1796. 


Dec. 


1797- 


May 




Nov. 


1798. 


May 




July 




Oct. 


1800. 


Nov. 


1802. 


Aug. 




Aug. 




Sept. 


1803. 


Tan. 



5. Newport Ely widower & Elizabeth Crick single both of this 
parish. B. 

30. Richard Willingham single & Martha Rolfe single both of 

this parish. L. 
27. John Holt single & Dorothy Casing single both of this 
parish. B. 
8. John Cocksedge of Rougham single & Mary Ann Howlett of 

this parish single. B. 
7. Timothy Elsden single & Ann Rolfe single both of this 
])arish. B. 
21. Joseph Bixby single &: Ann Wilding single both of this 
parish. L. 
I. William Ashton of Felsham single & Susan Gibson Baker of 
this parish single. B, 

1 1. George Curby of Bradfield Combust single & Mary Saunders 
of this parish spinster. B. 

27. John Gosling of Shimpling single & Elizabeth Chandler of 

this parish single. L. 
10. Joseph Farrow single & Hannah Key single both of this 

parish. B. 

12. Ambrose Payne single & Elizabeth Alderton single both of 
this parish. B. 

6. John Bull of Long Melford single & Priscilla Clarke of this 
parish single. B. 

14. John Pearl of Tittle Whel : single & Elizabeth Traice of this 

parish single. L. 
March i. Jeremiah Fenton of Chevington single & Christian Cooke of 

this parish spinster. L. 
April 12. Edward Talbott of Stanningfield single & Mary Norman of 

this parish single. L. 
Oct. 13. John Bruce singled Mary Mann single both of this parish. B. 

Oct. 31, James Wyard single & Anne Hickey single both of this 

parish. B. 
1804. Feb. 6. William Chapman widower & Hannah Bradbrook single both 

of this parish. B. 



64 GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— MARRIAGES. 

1804. March 27. John Mulley single & Ann Brundish single both of this 

parish. B. 
Oct. 12. William Taylor single <S: Elizabeth i\nn Baker single both of 

this parish. B. 

1805. Jan. 17. William Reeman single &: Phoebe Smith single both of this 

parish. L. 
Oct. II. John Gooch single &: Mary Harold spinster both of this 

parish. B. 
Nov. 5. Thomas Alderton single &: Mary Cason single both of 

this parish. B. 
Nov. 21. Sir Thomas Charles Bunbury Baronet of Great Barton & 

Margaret Cock sedge of Great Barton single. Married in 

this Parsonage house by special licence by me Robert 

Phillips, rector. Witnesses : John Phillips. Frances 

Phillips. Mary Phillips. 

1806. Dec. 23. William Wade of Somerton, co. Suffolk, single & Susan 

Norman of this parish single. L. 

1807. Jan. 6. Jonathan Ely single (S: Dorothy Bird single both of this 

parish. B. 
March 12. George Rollinson single »Sc Mary Greenwood single both 

of this parish. B. 
Oct. 13. Caleb Newman single & Martha Wilding spinster both of this 

parish. B. 
Nov. 10. John Pearsons single & Pamela Cawston spinster both of this 

parish. B. 
i8c8. April 5. Samuel Snape single & Lucy Fenton single both of this 

parish. L. 
Nov. 10. John Skipper widower & Sarah Osborn spinster both of this 

parish. B. 
1S09. March 21. Henry Harris single & Margaret Blyth spinster both of this 

parish. L. 
Nov. 18. Jacob Allington single «S: Mary Parsons spinster both of this 

parish. B. 
Dec. 5. William Allington single & Sarah Nobbs spinster both of this 

parish. B. 



GREAT WHELNE'lHAM Rl^GlSTERS.— MARRIAGES. 65 



I8I0. 


Nov. 


18II. 


Aug. 




Sept. 




Oct. 


I8I3. 


Dec. 


I8I4. 


April 




Aug. 




Oct. 




Dec. 


I8I5. 


May 




Sept. 




Oct. 




Dec. 


I8I6. 


June 




Oct. 




Oct. 


1817. 


Jan. 



12. Richard Norris single t^ Elizabeth Farrow spinster both of 

this parish. B. 
30. John Major single tS: Rose Dench spinster both of this 
parish. B. 

13. James Padley single 6c Elizabeth Ambrose spinster both of 

this parish. L. 
12. John Wright single & Margaret Plumb spinster both of this 
parish. B. 

25. Robert Downing single & Mary Rampling spinster botii 

of this parish. B. 

26. Robert Creasey widower & Sarah Elder widow both of this 

parish. B. 
25. Thomas Wallace widower & Sophia Lawrence spinster both 

of this parish. B. 
12. Stephen Knock single & Sarah Seele spinster both of this 

parish. B. 
10. Richard Butters single & Mary Ann Major spinster both 

of this parish. B. 
18. Edmund Craske bachelor & Susan Race spinster both of this 

parish. B. 
2. Samuel Hogg of Bury St Edmunds & Elizabeth Girton 

of th's parish widow. L. 
20. John Eyas bachelor & Anne Clarke spinster both of this 

parish. B. 
25. William Pryke bachelor & Ann Butcher spinster both of this 

parish. B. 
18. James Bennet bachelor & Elizabeth Harrold spinster both of 

Rushbroke. B. 
12. David Gill of Stanningfield bachelor & Mary Ann Makings 

spinster of this parish. B. 
22. John Gowers of Risby single &: Matilda Smith of this 

parish. B. 
28. Joseph Mills single & Judith Ann Theobald single both of 

this parish. B. 



66 GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— MARRIAGES. 



1817. May I. James Young of St Mary's in Bury St Edmunds & Elizabeth 

Dench of this parish. L. 
July 8. James Knights of Watchfield parish & Elizabeth Barrell of 

this parish widow. B. 

1818. Sept. 10. Joseph Farrow widower «Sr Ann Brook widow both of this 

parish. L. 
Oct. 12. David Yarrow single & Lucy Gilbey smgle both of this 

parish. B. 

18 19. Jan. 28. William Farrow bachelor & Mary Gaston spinster both of this 

parish. B. 
Aug. 30. John Armstrong single & Priscilla Nunn single both of this 

parish. B. 
Nov. 16. Robert Rollinson bachelor & Elizabeth Fenton spinster both 

of this parish. L. 

1820. March 7. James Bolton widower & Mary Francis single both of this 

parish. B. 

1821. Jan. 12. John Garwood bachelor & Esther Yerer spinster both of this 

parish. B. 
June 12. Holden Nunn bachelor & Mary Denny spinster both of this 

parish. B. 
Dec. 25. William Spink bachelor & Elizabeth Parsons spinster both of 

this parish. B. 
Dec. 25. James Pryke bachelor & Mary Rolfe spinster both of 

this parish. B. 
1823. Oct. 13. William Cawston bachelor & Martha Austin spinster both of 

this parish. jB. 
Oct. 13. Frederick Wright bachelor & Susan Crack widow both 

of this parish. B. 
Oct. 13. Thomas Parsk bachelor & Mary Ann Nunn spinster both of 

this parish. B. 
Oct. 27. Charles Golden bachelor & Mary Middleditch spinster both 

of this parish. B. 
Dec. 16. James Upson bachelor & Charlotte Wright spinster both of 

this parish. L. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGIS TERS.-MARRIAGES. 67 



1824. March 26. William Major of Honington bachelor &: Lucy Deiich of this 

parish spinster. B. 
Oct. 12. Nathaniel Pettit bachelor &: Charlotte Nunn spinster both of 

this parish. B. 

1825. Jan. 24. George Loft bachelor & Mary Barrel spinster both of this 

parish. B. 
May 23. Thomas Fisher of Wormingford, co. Essex, widower &: Lucy 

Edwards of this parish spinster. L. 

1826. July 25. Henry Hilder of Pakenham bachelor & Christiana Fenton of 

this parish spinster. L. 
Dec, 25. Robert Ungles of this parish bachelor & Sophia Middleditch 
of St Mary's in Bury St Edmunds, spinster. B. 

1827. April 24. Robert Alvis of St Mary's, Bury St Edmunds, bachelor & 

Dorothy Cawston of this parish spinster. B. 
April 24. Robert Sutde of Chedburgh bachelor &: Sarah Pryke of this 

parish spinster, B. 
June 29. Ralph Alderton of this parish single &: Susan Aston of 

Bradfield Combust smgle. B. 
Sept. 27. Michael Mortlock of Hawstead (S: Matilda Bird of this 

parish. L. 

1828. Jan. 8. William Woollard of Hawstead & Mary Ann Tweed of this 

parish. B. 
Oct, 13. Joseph Bugg & Sarah Nunn both of this parish. B. 

Dec. 25. Joseph Garwood single & Eliza Taylor single both of this 

parish. B. 

1829. Oct. 14. William Reace single & Lucy Corbie single both of this 

parish. B. 
Dec. 25. Samuel Hunt of Rougham bachelor & Susan Nunn of this 

parish. B. 
Dec. 25. Isaack Butcher single &: Maryanne Good single both of this 

parish. B. 

1830. Jan. 12. John Amberos single & Heniietta Fanny Hubbard single 

both of this parish. B. 
Feb. 9. ^Villiam Pettit single &: Deborah Parsons widow both of this 

parish. B, 



68 GREAT WHELNETHA.\[ REGISTERS.--MARRIAGES. 



1830. Oct. 12. James Reeman single & Mary Cawston single both of this 

parish. B. 
Oct. 19. John Bean of Cockfield single & Susan Burman of this 

parish single. B. 
Nov. 22. John Ungles bachelor & Mary Cooper spinster both of this 

parish. B, 
Dec. 24. Robert Mann single & Ann Coleman single both of this 

parish. B. 

1831. June 7. John Brewster of St Mary'.s, Bury St Edmunds, widower 

(Sc Mary Warren of this parish spinster. B. 
Oct. 22. John Butcher single & Abigail Nunn single both of this 

parish. B. 
Nov. 17. Robert Alderton single &; Mira Bird single both of this 

parish. L. 

1832. Feb. 25. George Salvage of Rougham & Mary Bugg of Little 

Whelnetham. L. 
June 10. William Peachy of Mildenhall widower &: Hannah Woods of 

this parish spinster. B. 
Nov. 5. Thomas RoUinson single & Mary Anne Clarke single both of 

this parish. B. 

1833. March 3. Charles Frost or Wilkin of Bardwell & Maria Sutton of this 

parish spinster. B. 
June 6. Robert Taylor of St James, Bur}' St. Edmund'.s, bachelor & 

Caroline Pearsons of this parish spinster. B. 
Dec. 24. George Norman single & Mary Anne Harding spinster both 

of this parish. B. 

1834. Jan. 13. Robert Cox single & Susanna Catchpole single both of this 

parish. B. 
Dec. 6. Frederick Fenton single & Lucy Bruce single both of this 

parish. L. 
Dec 14. James Alderton single & Hannah Greenwood single both of 

this parish. B. 

1835. March 3. Benjamin Edwards single & Elizabeth Wright single both of 

this parish. B. 



GREAT WHKLNETHAM REGISTERS.— MARRIAGES. 69 



1835. March 3. Robert Hardy single & Lucy Pettitt single both of this 

parish. B. 
April II. James Bemman & Frances Salvage both of this parish. B. 
May 9. Isaac Pettit & Sarah Ann Pearsons single both of this 

parish. B. 
Sept. 6. Edward Smith of Bradfield Combust & Mary Ann Makings 

of this parish spinster. B. 
Nov. 19. William Harvey single & Ann Lawrence spinster both 

of this parish. B. 

1836. June 23. John Claydon single (^ Elizabeth Crick spinster both of this 

parish. B. 

1837- 
April 21. William Dench Major, single, 

Lucy Rebecca Hogg spinster, both of this parish. L. 
*Sept. 26. George Doel, farmer, of Weeting, son of George Doel, grocer, 

Eliza Cooke, dau. of John Cooke, farmer. 
Nov. 24. Abraham Makins, son of Abraham Makins, labourer, 

Eliza Purkis, dau. of Isaac Purkis, labourer. 
Dec. 25. James Everett, widower, son of Edward Everett, labourer, 

Rhoda Ebbor, spinster. 
Dec. 25. George Balls, son of James Balls, labourer, 

Mary Garwood, dau. of James Garwood, labourer. 
1839. 
June 28. George Cook, son of John Cook, labourer, 

Susan Middleditch, dau. of William Middleditch, labourer. 
Oct. 19. Mainprice Barton, miller, of Great Barton, son of James Barton, farmer, 

Sarah Fisher, dau. of James Fisher, carpenter. 
Nov. 28. William Adams, carpenter, of Lawshall, son of James Adams, 

Lucy Wallaker, dau. of William Wallaker, labourer. 
Dec. 26. William Rushbrooke of Bradfield St George, son of Charles 

Rushbrooke, labourer, 

Hannah Pearsons, dau. of William Pearsons, labourer. 

'■' From now till 1850 the parties are always "single"' and " of Whelnetham " unless otherwise 
stated. Ed. 



70 GRf:AT W Hi:LNi:riIAM KECilSlKRS.-. MARRIAGES. 



1840. 
Feb. II. James Hannah, son of Peter Hannah, labourer, 

Charlotte White of Dickleburgh, dau. of John \\'hite, labourer. 
Oct. 13. Joseph Cronshey, widower, soldier, of St Mary's, Bury, son of Samuel 

Cronshey, bricklayer, 

Mary Lofts, widow, dau. of Simon Barrow, labourer. 
Dec. 24. James Alderton, son of Thomas Alderton, labourer, 

Eliza Halsted, dau. of Samuel Halsted, labourer. 
1841. 
Jan. 23. Henry Pettit, son of Joseph Pettit, labourer, 

Frances Boreham, dau. of AV'illiam Boreham, labourer. 
Jan. 23. William A\'right, son of John Wright, labourer, 

Lucy ("awston, dau. of Robert Cawston, labourer. 
April 24. John Nunn, son of Robert Nunn, labourer, 

Eliza Bugg, widow, dau. of John Bugg, labourer. 
Aug. 22. Robert Pettitt, son of Joseph Pettitt, labourer, 

Martha Smith, dau. of Edward Smith, labourer. 
Oct. 30. Thomas Pearsons, son of John Pearsons, labourer, 

Maria Pettitt, dau. of Joseph Pettit, labourer. 
Oct. 30. Robert Sturgeon, son of George Sturgeon, labourer, 

Louisa Plum, dau. of Edward Plum, labourer. 
Nov, 6. Mark Pearsons, son of "William Pearsons, labourer, 

Sarah Grimwood, dau. of John Grimwood, labourer. 
Dec. 28. AVilliam Evered, son of William Evered, labourer, 

Elizabeth Horrex, dau of Joshua Horrex, labourer. 
1842. 
Feb. 17. Reuben Warren, son of Reuben ^Varren, bricklayer, 

Ann Girton, dau. of John Girton, nursery man. 
April 2. William Boreham, son of William Boreham, labourer, 

Sarah King, dau. of Stephen King, labourer. 
Nov. 20. Henry Jackson, carpenter, son of Samuel Jackson, woolcomber, 

Eliza Horrex, dau. of Joshua Horrex, miller. 
Nov. 27. William Townsend, son of Henry Townsend, labourer, 

Deborah Pearsons, dau. of ^^'^illianI Pearsons, labourer. 



GREAT WHELNElHAiM RE( IIS ri:KS.— MARRIAGES. 



71 



1843. 
March 23. Henry Mason, gardener of Mildenhall, son of ^\'illiam Mason, labourer, 

Harriett Kent, dau. of Isaac Rutterford, labourer. 
Sept. 16. Richard Catchpole, son of John Catchpole, labourer, 

Elizabeth Griniwood, dau. of John Grimwood, shoemaker. 
1844. 
April 6. William Bruce, son of Edward Bruce, labourer, 

Marianne Hurrell, dau. of Stephen Hurrell, labourer. 
Dec. 24. David Makins, son of James Makins, labourer, 

Eliza Crick, dau. of James Crick, labourer. 
1845. 
June 22. Henry Cocksedge, son of George Cocksedge, labourer, 

Phoebe Pask, dau. of Thomas Pask, labourer. 
1846. 
May 6. William AVright, widower, son of John AWight, labourer, 

Emily Plumb, dau. of John Plumb, labourer. 

1847. 
May 26. George Baldwin, son of John Baldwin, labourer, 

Martha Townsend, dau. of Henry Townsend, labourer. 
May 26. Sidne)' Grimwood, son of John Grimwood, labourer, 

Amelia Pearsons, dau. of Robert Boggis, labourer. 
Aug. 22. Julius Sharpe, son of Julius Sharpe, labourer, 

Harriet Pearl, dau. of Henry Pearl, labourer. 
1848. 
Feb. 19. John Grimwood, labourer, son of John Grimwood, shoemaker, 

Lucy Verer of Nowton, dau. of John Verer, gardener. 
Dec. 2. Frederick Borgiss, son of Robert Borgiss, labourer, 

Jane Pryke, dau. of Jane Pryke. 
1850. 
Jan. II. James Bugg, son of Isaac Bugg, labourer, 

Sarah Makins, dau. of James Makins, labourer. 
Feb. 16. Henry Ungles, son of Charles Ungles, labourer, 

Elizabeth Rolfe, dau. of Antony Rolfe, labourer. 



72 GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— MARRIAGES. 



1850. 
Sept. 2 1 . William Pearsons, son of John Pearsons, labourer, 

Sarah Verer, dau. of John Verer, labourer. 
Oct. 15. Charles Mothersole, of Bury St Edmunds, son of John Mothersole, 

farmer, 
Harriet Deacon, dau. of Roger Deacon, bricklayer. 
Oct. 26. Michael Verer, son of John Verer, labourer, 

Sarah Pearsons, widow, dau. of John Grimwood, shoe maker. 






GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 



73 



BURIALB. 



1562. 


April! 


2. 


1563- 


Maye 


4- 


1564. 


Jan. 


6. 


1565- 


Aug. 


20, 


1567- 


June 


14. 




Oct. 


7- 


1568. 


Aug. 


14. 


1569. 


Jan. 


21. 


1571- 


Aprill 


27. 




Maye 


10. 


1573- 


Marche 


19. 


1574- 


April! 


18. 




June 


2. 


1575- 


Maye 


4- 


1576. 


Sept. 


29. 


1577- 


Jan. 


7- 




Feb. 


21. 


1 5 So. 


Oct. 


23- 


15S1. 


Aug. 


3* 


1586. 


Jan. 


9- 




Dec. 


4- 


>587- 


Nov. 


r8. 


.588. 


Dec. 


4. 


>59i- 


June 


5- 




Sept. 


24. 




i:)ec. 


24. 


'593- 


Julye 


J- 




Sept. 


13- 




Feb. 


6. 


'594- 


Dec. 


26. 



Robart Warren. 

Agnes wyfe of Rychard Taylor. 

Anne Rushell. 

John Sonne of Thomas Inhold. 

Thomas Parkin. 

Joane Warde. 

Raphe Makroe. 

John Kinge. 

Margaret Kinge widow. 

Thomas sonne of Thomas Makroe. 

William sonne of John Gooche. 

Thomas sonne of Thomas Inhold. 

Joane wyfe of Thomas Flower. 

Thomas sonne of Robert Hammond. 

George Howe. 

Thomas Flower. 

Edward sonne of John Pattriche. 

John Kinge. 

Rychard sonne of Thomas Kinge. 

The wyfe of John Pattriche. 

\Villiam Pattriche. 

Thomas Nayler. 

The widowe Pattriche. 

Rychard Taylor. 

Rychard sonne of John Addams. 

Agnes wyfe of John Mawldin. 

Amye daughter of Parker of Burye St Edmonds. 

Elizabeth daughter of Rychard Stafford. 
Raynold Hammond. 
John Coclte. 



u 


(;re. 


\r 


1595- 


Julye 


15- 


1596. 


Feb. 


3- 


1597- 


Nov. 


10. 




Nov. 


30- 




Jan. 


7- 




Feb. 


13- 


1600 


Aug. 


24. 




Dec. 


25- 


1602. 


Oct. 


19. 




Dec. 


28. 


1603. 


Aprill 


I. 




Nov. 


20. 


1605. 


June 


17- 




Oct. 


23- 


1606. 


Aprill 


S- 




Maye 


17- 


1608. 


Aprill 


6. 




Nov. 


29. 


1609. 


Dec. 


9- 




Dec. 


31- 


1610. 


Maye 


20. 




June 


10. 




Julye 


I. 




Aug. 


24. 




Feb. 


19. 


161 1. 


Aug. 


24. 




Sept. 


15- 




Marche 


22. 


1613. 


Maye 


8. 




Feb. 


5- 


1614. 


Aprill 


5- 




Aprill 


30- 




June 


28. 




Julye 


12. 


161 V 


Nov. 


14. 



\\HELNETHAM RECilSTl^RS.- -BURIALS. 

Susan Kinge. 

Alice daughter of John Addams. 

Ellen wyfe of Thomas Makroe. 

Robart Hammond jun. 

Hester ^Vells. 

Anne Inholde. 

^^'illiam Turle. 

John Mawldin. 

Margaret Hammonde widdowe. 

John Sonne of John Tvadyeman. 

Anne Tyler. 

Anne Froste latelye the wyfe of Henrye Froste. 

Robarte Hammonde. 

Edmond sonne of Edmond Silvester. 

Joane Howe widdowe. 

Margaret Snape alias Tyler widowe. 

Annes Turle. 

Marye Princett. 

James sonne of Rychard Stafford. 

Annable wyfe of John Ladyeman. 

William sonne of William Turle. 

Abigaile daughter of Thomas Creeme. 

William sonne of Robart Rowge. 

Marye wyfe of Robarte Tyler. 

Robart Tyler. 

Ellen Turle latelye ye wyfe of William Turle. 

Anne daughter of Thomas Addams. 

Thomas Kinge. 

Bennet Scott. 

Ann daughter of John Howe. 

George Frost. 

William Makroe. 

William sonne of Fraunces Hughes. 

Henrye Frost. 

Ann wyfe of George Chinnerye. 





GREAT 


i6i6. 


June 27. 




Nov. I. 




Nov. 26. 


1617. 


Julye 25. 




Nov. 13. 




Marche 24. 


1618. 


Oct. 3. 


1611;. 


Aprill 1 4. 




June 25. 




Nov. 25. 



WH El.N lyi'H AM R !:( tISI'J': RS.— BURIALS. 



75 



1620. 



Julye 



1622. 


Sept. 


IS- 


1623. 


Aprill 


8. 




Aug. 


26. 




Oct. 


31- 


1624. 


Aug. 


16, 




Nov. 


15' 




Dec. 


19. 




March 


3- 


1625. 


March 


27. 




Aprill 


4- 




May 


26. 


1626. 


Aprill 


5- 




Aug. 


7- 


1627. 


J une 


7- 




June 


18. 


1628. 


July 


8. 




July 


23- 




Jan. 


28. 


1630. 


May 


9- 




Sept. 


30- 




Jan. 


14. 




Feb. 


3- 



Thoma.s Hall. 

Alice wyfe of Thomas Parkin. 

ThonuLS Parkin. 

Rafe Sonne of Rafe Kinge. 

Gregorye Ralls. 

Edmond Ladyeman. 

Thomas son of Thomas Hall. 

Margarett Hall. 

Richard Stafford mynester of this parish. 

Gabriell Catchpoll departed this life upon Nov. 21, and was 

buried the 25th day of the same moneth. 
Margaret daughter of Mr Richard Stafford, late Rector of 

this towne. 
Susan daughter of John ^Vadkin. 
Richaid sonne of George Scott. 
Raphe Macroe. 
Thomas Macroe the elder. 
John Pattridge the elder. 
Mary Scot daughter of Francis Scot widowe. 
Alice A\^adkin widowe. 
An unknowne travailer. 
Margaret wife of A\'illiam Pattricke. 
Elizabeth daughter of John Maldin. 
Mary daughter of Henry Reynolds. 
Susan daughter of Thomas Eowdall. 
William Pattricke. 
John Hamond the elder. 
John Pattridge. 
Vidua Balles. 
Thomas Adhams senior. 
George sonne of George Scot. 
Mary dau, of William Adson. 
Robert sonne of John Maldin. 
Alice daughter of W^illiam Adson. 
Vidua Lademan. 



76 


GREAT 


WHELNETHAM RliGISTERS.— 


1631. 


Aug. 


20. 


Elizabeth Catchpoll. 


1632. 


June 


3- 


Anne daughter of the widow Scot. 




July 


18. 


Elizabeth wife of Thomas Clarke. 


i633- 


July 


27. 


Edmond sonne of William Adson. 




Feb. 


17- 


Margaret Patrick. 




March 


6. 


Thomas Creame. 


1635- 


July 


7- 


John How. 




July 


19. 


Anne wife of John Watkin. 




Nov. 


23- 


Susan wife of Abraham Wright. 




Dec. 


3- 


Margaret daughter of Robert Adams, 


1637. 


March 


29. 


Elizabeth wife of Francis Sparke. 




April! 


18. 


Dorothy wife of William Sparke. 




July 


24. 


John Sonne of John Seller. 




July 


31- 


Francis Sparke. 




Feb. 


10. 


George sonne of George Ch inner ie. 


1638. 


May 


I. 


Widdow Pattridge. 




July 


24. 


Robert sonne of Robert Adams. 




March 


6. 


Edward Clarkes wife. 




ApriU 


8. 


Mary Reeve. 


1639. 


Sept. 


27. 


Robert Adams. 


1 64 1. 


Aug. 


22. 


Susan Adams. 




Feb 


II. 


Tamisin wife of John Maiden. 


1642. 


ApriU 


9- 


Elizabeth daughter to Robert Santy. 




May 


3T. 


Elizabeth wife of Thomas Sturgion. 




June 


5- 


Widdow Stafford. 




June 


16. 


George Creame. 




Feb. 


5- 


The wife of Robert Cason. 




March 


5- 


John sonne of Robert Santy. 


1643. 


Aug. 


26. 


Samuell sonne of John Seller. 




Sept. 


24. 


Susan Pattridge. 






* 


* * * * 


1656. 


ApriU 


14. 


Margreat wife of Robert Nunn. 






* 


* * * * 



BURIALS. 



1663. Aug. 



The widdow Reiner. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 



i t 



Mary wife of Edmond Hibble. 

The widdow Gris. 

Nicholas Ingruni a traviloer. 

Edmond Mills. 

Francis Locke daughter of Rachell Addams widow. 

William Adson. 

Elizabeth daughter of George & Mathew How. 

Elizabeth Patteridge widdow. 

Mary wife of John Gypps. 

William sonne of William Smyth clearke was buried. 

in Cockfield church yearde. 
Sarah daughter of William Smyth clearke. 
Henry sonne of William Smyth clearke. 
Martin Scarfe. 
The widdow Young. 

Thomas son of Thomas & Dorothy Harrold. 
Luke Cann. 
Robert Scott. 

David son of John & Mary Gipps. 
John Browne. 
Robert Steward. 

John son of William Herbert rector. 
Rachell wife of Richard Poreter. 
Katharine Sego. 
Elizabeth Garland widdow. 
Anne daughter of Henry & Anne Wright. 
Tamesin Stewarde widdow. 
John Chandler. 
Anne Addams. 
George How. 

Mrs Walker. 

Mary daughter of Thomas & Dorothy Harold. 

Elisabeth Wright. 

Samuel Smith. 

Robert son of Robert & Anne Adams of Munksbradfield, 



1663. 


June 


5- 




Feb. 


20. 




March 


25- 


1664. 


June 


26. 




Aug. 


2. 




Aug. 


20. 




Sept. 


16. 




March 


18. 


1665. 


Aprill 


3°- 




June 


I. 




Aug. 


25- 


1666. 


July 


14. 




Sept. 


30- 




Feb. 


I. 




March 


I. 


1667. 


April 


5- 




June 


13- 




Jan. 


16. 


1668. 


March 


28. 




June 


14. 




Sept. 


27. 




Dec. 


26. 


1669. 


Sept. 


3- 




Nov. 


29. 




Dec. 


7- 




Dec. 


31- 


1670. 


Aug. 


24. 




Sept. 


24. 




Oct. 


21. 


I67I. 


Jan. 


19. 


1672. 


Oct. 


14. 




Nov. 


2. 




Nov. 


4- 




Nov. 


18. 



78 



GREAT WHELNE'I'HAiM RECllS'l'KRS.— BURIALS. 



1672. 


Feb. 


16. 


1673. 


June 


II. 




June 


12. 




July 


3- 


1674. 


Sept. 


— 




March 


6. 


1678. 


Sept. 


30- 



1679. 



1680. 



I6SI. 



1682. 



Oct. 



June II. 



May 



May 



Oct. 
Dec. 
Feb. 

May 

May 

May 

June 

June 

July 

April 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 



5- 
30. 



8. 
25- 
31- 

4- 
13- 

15- 

8. 

4- 

7- 

21. 



William Sheldrake. 

Edward son of John & Mary Crick. 

Elizabeth wife of Franci.s Garland. 

John Right of little Wheltham. 

John son of John & Dorothy Maldin. 

Susan daughter of Francis & Elizabeth Davis. 

An affidavit was brought to me John Spencer within 8 dayes 

that Penelope Spencer widdow was buried Sept. 30 

according to the act of parliament for woolling. 
An affidavit was brought to me John Spencer within 8 dayes 

that John Garland was buried Oct. 2 according to the 

aforesaid act of parliament for burying in woollen. 
An affidavit was brought to me John Spencer within 8 dayes 

that Elizabeth Porter was buried June 1 1 according to the 

aforesaid act of parliament. 
An affidavit was brought to me John Spencer within 8 dayes 

that John Adson was buried May i according to the 

aforesaid act of parliament. 
An affidavit was brought to me John Spencer within 8 dayes 

that steward Bridgman was buried May 2 according to 

the aforesaid act of parliament. 

Brown wudow. 

Ann wife of John Steward. 

Dr Herbert, Rector of this parish, was buryed February ye 

latter end. 
John son of William & Mary Bridgman. 
George Bird. 
The widow P)rown. 
Thomas Bigworth. 
Henry Partridge. 

John son of John & Susan Spencer. 
Edmund son of Edmund Coleman Esq. & Mary his wife. 
John Partridge. 

Elizabeth daughter of John & Dorothy Maiden. 
William Adams. 



GREAT WHELXE'l IIA-M REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 



79 



1683. 


April 


23- 




June 


16. 




Dec. 


3°- 


1684. 


June 


24. 




Aug. 


12. 




Sept. 


18. 




March 


18. 


1685. 


Aprill 


18. 




May 


26. 




July 


3- 




Oct. 


13- 




Jan. 


^5- 


1686. 


March 


25- 




Aprill 


17- 




Aprill 


25- 




June 


27. 




June 


28. 




Aug. 


13- 




Sept. 


6. 




Sept. 


15- 




March 


7- 




March 


20. 


1687. 


Nov. 


15- 


1688. 


May [?] 


21. 


1689. 


March 


27. 




May 


17- 




July 


3- 




March 


12. 




March 


10. 




March 


18. 


1690. 


May 


25- 




Aug. 


2. 




Oct. 


18. 




Aug. 


20. 




Nov. 


8. 



Michaell son of Michaell & Rebekah Mower. 

Francis daughter of John & Susan Steward. 

Dorothy wife of Thomas Harold. 

The widdow Wolph [sic]. 

Elisabeth daughter of John & Dorothy Maiden. 

Susan Candler Avidow. 

The wife of William Baker. 

Sarah wife of Thomas Griffin. 

Robert Adams. 

John Maiden. 

Elisabeth late wife of John Web of little Wheltham. 

Elisabeth daughter of Dorothy Maiden. 

Sarah Gladwell, a traveller's child. 

Thomas son of Thomas Griffin. 

John Styleman. 

The widow Mills. 

Thomas Jolly. 

Henry Copsey. 

Mrs Elisabeth Herbert widow. 

James Richardson. 

John Maiden. 

Mrs Catharine Stafford. 

John son of Robert Garland. 

Hannah late wife of Tweed of Cockfield. 

Robert Bixby of Wheltham parva. 

Dorothy wife of John Styleman. 

Mary Porter. 

Robert Brown. 

Samuel son of Samuel Baker. 

Rose Spark. 

John son of John Pyman. 

Elisabeth late wife of Thomas Harold. 

John son of John & Biiham. 

Edward Willingham. 
Mrs Youna;. 



80 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISl'ERS.— BURIALS. 



John son of John Sutton. 

John Styleman aged 89. 

Thomas Cock. 

Thomas Griffin. 

Mary Scarfe widow. 

The widow Jolly. 

The widow Bixby. 

Michael son of Michael Mower. 

Samuel Baker. 

The widow Richardson. 

The wife of Anthony Facer. 

John Adams. 

Thomas Cook. 

William Smith. 

Christopher Desborough. 

Thomas Griffin. 

John Holyday. 

Gyles Adams. 

Ann Gardiner. 

The widow Holyday. 

Francis Garland. 

being Easter Sunday. Mary Brown. 

Thomas Harold. 

Margaret King. 

Margaret Burroughs. 

Nicholas son of John Brown labourer. 

John Spencer labourer. 

John Wright labourer, being killed by the gravel in ye pit at 

Stanningfield falling upon him. 
Widow Styleman. 
Charles Blathwait a sadler. 
Francis son of Jeofry Partridge, day labourer. 
The \vife [of] Christopher Spite a farmer. 
Agnes dau. of Sir Richard Gipps Kt & Dame Mary Gipps. 
Elisabeth wife of George Cason a farmer. 



1691. 


March 


28. 




Oct. 


6. 




Oct. 


22. 


1692. 


May 


6. 




Aug. 


II, 




Oct. 


30- 




Feb. 


19. 


T693. 


Oct. 


22, 




May 


n- 




Nov. 


8. 


1694. 


Feb. 


6. 




Feb. 


II, 


1695. 


April 


13- 




May 


25 




June 


II, 




July 


28. 




Jan, 


12. 




Feb. 


18. 


1696. 


June 


3- 




July 


10. 




Jan. 


22. 


1697. 


April 


4, 




May 


18. 




Dec. 


19. 




Feb. 


2. 


1698. 


Nov. 


14. 




Jan. 


16. 


1699. 


May 


24. 




July 


15- 


1700. 


April 


9- 


I70I. 


April 


3- 




April 


15- 




Oct. 


12. 




March 


21. 



GREAT AVHELNETHAM RECilSTERS. -BURIALS. 



81 



1702. 

1703. 
1704. 



1705- 
1706. 

1707. 
1708. 



1709. 



1710. 



Aug. 25. Anthony Scarfe a miner. 

Dec. 8. John Spere a day labourer. 

Jan. 8. Matthew Smee a day labourer. 

Feb. 27. Dame Mary Gipps late wife of Sir Richard Gipps Kt. 

March 23. John son of John Boldero a day labourer. 

Aug. 16. A still born child of the widow Smees a poore woman. 

May 23. Elisabeth Johnson dau. of George Cason a farmer. 

June 18. Richard Porter clerk and sexton of this parish aged 96 years. 

Aug. 8. AVilliam son of William Smith a day labourer. 

Sept. 28. Robert son of Robert Bug a day labourer. 

Jan. 14. Gefifry Partridge a day labourer. 

Sept. 20. Thomas son of Michael Mower a day labourer. 

x^ug. 20. Ann Harold who took collection. 

July 5. Edward son of Sir Richard Gipps. 

Dec. 8. Thomas Ottewel. 

June 5. Mr John Gipps. 

Sept. 16. The widow Eray. 

June 6. John Cock. 

Feb. 8. John Bull. 

Nov. 19. William Cason. Dyed of ye smal pox. 

Dec. 24. Sir Richard Gipps. 

Dec. 16. Mary Bug. 

Jan. II. W^illiam Bray. 

Jan. 25. Robert Bug. 

Feb. 12. Elizabeth Wyard. 

Feb. 14. James Wyard. 

March 3. Sarah Brown. 

June 23. John Bug. 

Oct. 18. Widow Spere. 

Nov. 10. Robert Cason. 

March 30. Susan Smith. 

April 23. Frances & Ellen Ottewell. 

May 9. John Willingham. 

June 6. Mary Cason. 

July 2. 'I'homas Griffin. 



82 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 



1 710. 


Nov. 


16. 


Elisabeth Bug. 


I7II. 


Aug. 


12. 


Anthony Facer. 




Aug. 


19. 


John Cock. 




Sept. 


22. 


James Catchpool, a blind boy belonging to Whelnetham 
parva, but fixt upon our parish by order of Sessions. 




Sept. 


19. 


Ann Ottewel. 


I7I2. 


Aug. 


4- 


John Bird. 




Aug. 


2. 


Mrs Elisabeth Cock. 




Nov. 


10. 


Mary Wyard. 




Jan. 


4- 


Mary Crick. 




Jan. 


23- 


William Burroughs. 


1713- 


July 


4- 


Mr Joseph How. 




Sept. 


21. 


The Widow Griffin. 




Nov. 


12. 


Margaret Avis. 




Dec. 


^3- 


Elisabeth Bell. 




Dec. 


30- 


Mary Bell. 


I7I4. 


April 


13- 


George Cason. 




April 


17 


Henry Goodwin. 




July 


26. 


Susan Evered. 




Jan. 


I. 


John Evered. 


1715- 


Jan. 


28. 


Christopher Spite. 




Feb. 


I'!- 


John Brown. 




March 


t8. 


The widow Bull. 


1 7 16. 


Sept. 


1 1. 


The widow Kerington. 




Dec. 


24. 


Robert Garland. 




March 


10. 


Robert Bug. 


1717. 


Sept. 


29. 


Hannah Bixby. 




Jan. 


22. 


Sarah Cason. 




Nov. 


10. 


Hannah Wyard. 


1718. 


Oct. 


22>- 


Margaret daughter of James King. 


1719. 


Sept. 


13- 


Mary Harold. 




Dec. 


10. 


Stead. 


1720. 


Sept. 


10. 


William Shoesmith alias Land. 




Nov. 


6. 


The wife of William Burroughs. 




Nov. 


4- 


John Cock. 



CxREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS. -BURIALS. 83 



1720. March 5. Alice Cason. 

1 72 1. April I. Mary daughter of Robert Ciarland. 
Jan. 20. John Crick. 

July 13. Sarah Smith. 

1722. May II. Charles Battely Esq. 
Aug. 4. William Catchpole. 
Oct. 8. Mr James Wyard. 

Oct. 30. Susannah daughter of John Garland. 

1723. March 30. Ann wife of John Garland. 
June 2. Robert Whiterod. 

June 19. Widow Spencer. 

Aug. 12. Mary Braybrook a child. 

1724. April 2. Susan Garland. 

May 5. Mrs Margaret Brundish. 

July 4. John Adams of Bradfield Combust. 

July 6. The Rev. Mr John Brundish, rector. 

July II. Mrs Mary Brundish. 

Sept. 14. Mr Thomas Welham. 

Nov. 8. John Martin. 

1725. April 3. Mrs Elizabeth Brundish, the relict of the Rev. Mr John 

Brundish late rector of ye parish. 

Aug. 4. Thomas son of John Brundish. 

Nov. I. James Erost. 

1726. Sept. 20. Mary wife of James Wyard. 
Nov. 6. Elizabeth wife of John Billham. 

Jan. 12. A man stranger, his name not known, being found in \e 
High way. 

1727. July 9. Mary wife of James King. 

Sept. 24. Frances Wyard of Fornham St Gen. 

Oct. 9. Mary dau. of Robert & Susan Garland of Risby. 

Nov. 26. Susan daughter of Thomas & Mary Nunn. 

Feb. 2. John Bilham. 

March 3. William Burroughs. 

April 9. John son of Thomas & Elizabeth Pask. [Probabl) 1728. Ed.] 

1728. Sept. 4. Kerenheppah wife of Robert Bugg. 



84 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 



1728. 


Sept. 


25- 




Sept. 


30. 




Oct. 


19. 




Nov. 


2. 




Dec. 


I. 


1729. 


Jan. 


29. 




April 


20. 




July 


21. 




Sept. 


15- 




Dec. 


14. 


1730. 


Jan. 


23- 




Feb. 


IS- 




March 


IS- 




May 


2. 




Nov. 


24. 




July 


26. 


1731- 


Aug. 


31- 




May 


29- 




Sept. 


17- 


1732. 


Feb. 


10. 




April 


24. 


1733- 


May 


2. 




June 


17- 




June 


22. 




July 


26. 




Oct. 


19. 


1734. 


Jan. 


3- 


1735- 


Jan. 


17- 




Feb. 


I r. 




Feb. 


17- 


1736. 


Jan. 


9- 




Feb. 


J- 


1737- 


March 


4- 



Widow Adams of Bradfield Combust. 

Ann wife of William Smith. 

The widow Partridge. 

The widow Catchpole. 

Henry son of John iS: Elizabeth Byran. 

Mary Baker of Flempin [sic]. 

Robert son of Robert & Susan Garland of Risby. 

Francis Ottwell labourer. 

Richard Babbage gent : of Stanningfield. 

Simon Wright gent. 

Isaac Farrow butcher. 

William Catchpole infant. 

Mary Evett of Hartist. 

Mary daughter of Mr Simon Wright. 

Alice wife of George Cawson. 

James Farrow infant. 

Margarett Sparrow widow. 

Mary Garland widow. 

John & Thomas sons of Thomas & Mary Nunn. 

Elizabeth daughter of the Rev. Mr Brundish. 

Thomas Cawson. 

George Cawston of Bradfield Combust. 

Matthew Smee. 

William Smith. 

?Ienry Bryan infant. 

John Bird clerk of this parish. 

Mary daughter of Thomas & Elizabeth Paske. 

A woman a stranger found in Mr Siday's Lays on Jan. 14 

about four in ye afternoon, left there and found dead the 

next morning. 
John son of William & Sarah Tunbridge. 
Margarett Burroughs widow. 
Mr James Frost of little Whelnetham. 

Mrs Frost widow, mother of Mr James Frost of little Whel. 
Rose daughter of Mr James Frost. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 



85 



1737. 


Dec. 


12. 




Sept. 


23- 


1738- 


Jan. 


5- 




Oct. 


22. 


1739- 


Feb. 


I. 




Feb. 


8. 




Feb. 


24. 




March 


10. 




Mnich 


20. 


1740. 


Feb. 


14. 




May 


3- 




June 


5- 


J741. 


May 


14. 




Nov. 


25- 


1742. 


JMarch 


30- 




April 


26. 




June 


3'^- 




Aug. 


I. 




Sept. 


14. 


1743- 


March 


4- 




March 


7- 




Sept. 


4- 


(744. 


Jan. 


8, 




May 


7- 




May 


20. 


1745- 


Jan. 


16. 




March 


12. 




July 


II. 




July 


12. 




July 


IS- 




Aug. 


IS- 




Oct. 


28. 




Nov. 


30. 




Dec. 


27. 


1746. 


March 


4- 



John son of John (S: Diana Ely. 

Thomas son of Thomas & Mary Nun. 

John son of Jonathan &: Mary Carpenter. 

Susan daughter of Thomas l^ Elizabeth Pask. 

William son of James King. 

William son of Robert <S: Martha Crick. 

Mary Brown spinster. 

Mary daughter of John tv: Mary Tweed. 

Mrs Burroughs widow. 

Thomas Bell labourer. 

Grace wife of William Avis. 

Thomas Brown of Lawishall. 

Jonathan Cross infant. 

Mrs Norman wife of Mr John Norman. 

Thomas Avis labourer. 

Mrs Wyard widow. 

Rachell Cross widow. 

William Boldero labourer. 

Ellen wife of Thomas Avis aged 83. 

Ambrose Braybrook labourer aged 62. 

Bridget Braybrook his wife. 

Ann Balls spinster. 

Mrs Holden wife of ^^'illiam Holden aged 66. 

Charles son of William & Sarah Coe aged 16. 

Ann daughter of Robert &: Ann Bugg. 

James King a baker. 

Mr William Holden. 

Mr William Lepingwell of Hawsted [aged] 78. 

John Balls aged 67. 

Mrs Groom wife of Roger Groom. 

Mrs Garland wife of John Garland aged 60. 

Roger son of Mr Roger Groom. 

Mary daughter of Mr Roger Groom. 

Ursula daughter of Mr Roger Groom. 

The wife of Thomas Taylor. 



86 


GREAT 


1746. 


April 26. 




July 17. 


1747- 




1748. 


Feb. 17- 




March 6. 




July 9. 




Oct. 23. 




Dec. 5. 


1749- 


Sept. 5. 





Oct. 


2C. 




Oct. 


26. 




Dec. 


19. 




Feb. 


IT. 


1750- 


Oct. 


3- 




Nov. 


II. 




Nov. 


18. 




Jan. 


29. 




March 


14. 


1751- 


Dec. 


10. 


1752. 


Jan. 


2. 




Feb. 


18. 




March 


3°- 




April 


2. 




Aug. 


10. 




Oct. 


22. 


1753- 


May 


3°- 



WHELNETHAM REGISTERS. —BURIALS. 

Mr. William Wyard sen. 

Mrs Farrow wife of John Farrow. 

None buried this year. 

Rose wife of George Spark brought from St Clare's 

Bradfield. 
Richard Shute Plumb base son of Mary Plumb. 
Eleanor dau. of Robert Garland of Little Whel : aged 18. 
William son of William & Mary Gaut. 
Elizabeth wife of Joseph Alderton. 
Elizabeth Boldero widow aged 87 : was for a long time 

maintained by the Parish, tho' her son William Boldero 

was in flourishing circumstances, but constantly refus'd 

her any relief, tho' applied to by the ofificers of the parish, 

& refus'd the expences of her Burial. 
Cursed be he that setteth light by Father or Mother. 

Deut. 27. 16. 
Sarah wife of John Gridley. 
The wife of Michael Mower. 
Mr. James Wyard aged 71. 
Michael Mower aged more than one hundred. 
The widow Durrant aged 81. 
The wife of William Coe of the small pox. 
William Coe labourer of the small pox. 
Grace dau. of John & Elizabeth Tricker. 
Susan dau. of Thomas & Susan Sparke. 
Mrs Cook wife of William Cook. A funeral sermon 

preached. Is. 26. verse 4. 
William Alderton, left ten children. 
Mrs. Elizabeth Lepingwell aged 69. 
. John infant son of John Leech. 

Mrs Batteley relict of Mr Charles Batteley aged 83. 
. Benjamin son of John & Lydia Gooday. 

John son of Jacob & Ann Brooke. 
. Edmund son of William cS: Sarah Tunbridge, kill'd by a fall 

from a horse. . 



GREAT WHKI.XK'IHA.M RF/IIS'I'KRS.— BURIALS. 



87 



1754. June 6. Mr James Wyard aged 40. 

July 5. Judith dau. of John & Sarah ^Villingham. 

July 7. Thomas Pask, clerk of this Parish, aged 62. 

July 31. Dame Willingham aged 6r years. 

Aug. 3. Amy dau. of Jacob & Ann Brooks. 

Nov. 28. Mr Robert Garland of Fornham aged 60. 

1755. March 22. Abraham son of John & Rose Westrop. 
— — Mary daughter of John [sic] 

1756. Jan. 26. William Reynolds infant. 

Feb. I. William Tunbridge labourer aged 52, dying suddenly. 

June 2. Elizabeth wife of William Bowers aged 60. 

July 17. Deborah Sparks aged 22, dyed in childbed. 

Aug. 30. Dame Bird widow aged near 90 years. 

Sept. 2c. Margarett dau. of Jacob & Ann Brook. 

Nov. 5. The widow Bell aged 80 years. 

1757. March 3. Edward son of William & Mary Gaut. 

April 18. John son of John & Lydia Goodday of small pox. 

April 29. John Goodday labourer aged 40 of small pox. 

Apjil 30. John Tricker brickmaker aged 46 of small pox. 

May 22. Mr Column Grove aged 68. 

1759. Jan. 18. Margarett dau. of Jacob & Ann Brook. 
April 24. Mrs King of Beighton aged 75. 

Aug. 3. Mrs Wyard relict of Mr William Wyard aged 82. 

Aug. 10. son of Isaac t^t Hannah Farrow of Beighton aged 

7 years. 

Oct. 19. Elizabeth wife of William Steel aged 44. 

1760. July I. Mary dau. of Jacob & Ann Brooks of Little Wheltham aged 

7 years. 

Oct. 5. Jacob son of Jacob & Ann Brooks aged 9 months. 

1761. Feb. 4. Elizabeth wife of John Bryan aged 75, drowned in a Pond 

near Oxhill wood. 

Feb. 19. Elizabeth Briindish spinster of Bury aged 78. 

June 2. Mary Garland spinster of Little Whelnetham aged 42. 

July 8. William Bryan of little Whelnetham aged 36. 



88 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 



1761. 


Oct. 


2. 


1762. 


April 


24. 




Nov. 


7- 


1763. 


Jan. 


8, 




March 


18, 


1764. 


Feb. 


27, 




April 


29. 




May 


II. 



1765- 



1767. 



1768. 



1769. 



1770. 



May 


20. 


May 


21. 


Oct. 


I. 


Oct. 


12. 


Feb. 


13- 


April 


28. 


Nov. 


17- 


March 


10. 


May 


5- 


May 


24. 


Dec. 


17- 


Aug. 


18. 


Aug. 


24. 


Oct. 


I. 


Nov. 


21. 


Dec. 


6. 


Dec. 


13- 


April 


16. 


July 


10. 



Susannah dau. of Jacob & Ann Brooks of Little Wheltham 

aged 6 months. 
Sarah wife of John Mac^furdy of little Wheltham aged 31. 
Susan base child of Susan Thornton & Thomas Gardiner, 

being brought from Lavenham. 
Mr John Garland of Little Wheltham aged 73. 
John son of William & Sarah Rawlinson, the mother having 

the small pox when the child was born. 
Thomas Nun labourer aged 83. 
Ann wife of George Spark husbandman aged 59. 
Mrs Mary Lord, relict of Mr Robert Lord, was buried by the 

Rev. Mr Cullum, rector of Hawsted, in the Chancel, at 

the West end, close to the arch, next the pulpit, aged 75 

years. 
Elizabeth wife of Peter Bowers aged 36. 
Charles son of William & Sarah Tunbridge aged 21 years. 
John son of John Parsons, lived at Beighton, aged 19 years. 
Mrs Ann Deadman, mother to Mrs Pickering of this parish, 

aged 82. She came from Hopton. 
Thomas son of Elizabeth Spencer ; born July 29, 1764. 
William son of William & Rose Cook. 
James son of Robert & Hannah Clarke. 
Stephen Miller Scovel, an infant aged four months from 

Hitcham. 
Mary dau. of James & Mary Dunthorn, an infant. 
Mr Miller aged 63. 
Mr Parsons aged 59. 

Alice wife of Philip Rawlinson aged 24, dyed in child-bed. 
Joseph Alderton aged 60 years. 

Elizabeth dau. of Peter »& Elizabeth Bowers aged 8 years. 
William Steel labourer aged 59. 

James son of Samuel & Ann Norman aged 6 months. 
Susan wife of William Pawsey aged 62 years. 
Ann wife of Elias Sturley farmer aged 69. 
Alvis Skinner widow of Melford aged 49. 



GREAT AVHELNETHAM REGIS TERS.— BURIALS. 89 



1770. 


Oct. 


3- 


I77I. 


April 


2. 




April 


18. 




April 


3°- 




Aug. 


8. 


1772. 


Jan. 


17- 




May 


15- 




May 


24. 




Sept. 


7- 




Sept. 


17- 




Sept. 


30- 




Nov. 


IS- 


1773- 


Jan. 


25- 




Jan. 


28. 




March 


I. 




April 


5- 




April 


13- 




Dec. 


8. 


1774- 


March 


6. 




June 


22. 




Aug. 


17- 




Oct. 


I. 




Dec. 


1 1. 


1775- 


June 


3- 




July 


9- 




Aug. 


16. 




Aug. 


20. 


1776. 


April 


29. 




Dec. 


19. 


1777. 


May 


3- 




Aug, 


17- 



Jonathan Pickering farmer aged 59. 

Elizabeth wife of David Wright of Maiden, Essex, aged 33 

years, with her child John aged 3 days. 
Sarah dau. of Jeremiah & EHzabeth Brown aged 9 months. 
James son of William & Mary Lofts. 
Mr Roger Prickel of Bury St Edmunds was buried in the 

chancel. 
Mary dau. of Ricliard & Elizabeth Rolf. 
Robert base child of Elizabeth Plummer. 
Ellen relict of William Alderton aged 68. 
George Sparke labourer aged 65. 
Elizabeth wife of William Wyard aged 70. 
Thomas son of William & Mary Rawlinson. 
Mary dau. of Richard & Elizabeth Rolf. 
Susan, relict of Mr Robert Garland, of Bury St. Edmunds, 

aged 81. 
William Tooley aged 80. 
Ann dau. of Ambrose & Elizabeth Clarke. 
Thomas Baker aged 55. 
John Bryan labourer aged 74. 
Hannah wife of Robert Clarke aged 39. 
Susan Gridley aged 2 1 years. 

Elizabeth dau. of John & Ann Leech aged 18 years. 
Hannah dau. of John «Sr Ann Leech aged 8 years. 
Elizabeth wife of Richard Rolt aged 36. 
Samuel son of Samuel & Ann Norman. 
Mary widow of Thomas Nun aged 91 years. 
John Leech labourer aged 50 years. 
Mrs Thoroughgood wife of James Thoroughgood farmer 

aged 73. 
Elizabeth relict of Thomas Paske aged 81 years. 
Mr Norman aged 80 years. 
Mr Cook aged 79 years. 
Mrs Ely aged 82. 
Ann infant dau. of Samuel & Ann Norman. 



90 


GREAT 


1778. 


March 


15- 




July 


16. 




Nov. 


3- 


1779- 


Feb. 


7- 




Feb. 


24. 




May 


30- 




July 


18. 


1780. 


March 


9- 




May 


17- 




Aug. 


25- 




Nov. 


21. 




Dec. 


5- 


1781. 


Jan. 


2. 




Jan. 


31- 




Feb. 


13- 




July 


7- 




Aug. 


2. 




Aug. 


so- 




Oct. 


lo. 




Nov. 


7- 




Dec. 


18. 


1782. 


Feb. 


19. 




April 


24. 




May 


I. 




July 


29. 




Nov. 


10. 


1783. 


Jan. 


27. 




Aug. 


7- 




Sept. 


8. 


1784. 


Feb. 


18. 




May 


17- 




July 


5- 




Nov. 


26 



GREAT WHELNEIHAM REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 



Sarah widow of William Tunbridge aged 77. 

Jolin son of Richard tS: Susan Willingham aged 18, being 

killed by a kick ot a horse. 
Widow Thompson. 

George infant son of Simon & Ann Kemp. 
Mrs Constantia Marker. 
Robert son of Robert & Susan Hibble. 
Martha infant dau. of Thomas &: Sarah Biddel. 
Jonathan Ely farmer aged 88. 
John Rainer labourer. 

Joseph infant son of Joseph & Hannah Alderton. 
Henry infant son of John & Alice Rheman. 
The widow Baker aged 60. 
Mr William Wyard farmer. 

Alice infant daughter of James & Margery Clarke. 
The Rev. Benjamin Brundish Marker aged 45. 
Susan wife of Robert Hibble. 
Thomas Pratt. 

Jonathan Carpenter aged 71. 
The widow Carpenter aged 68. 
The widow Bowers aged 60. 
Elizabeth dau. of John & Elizabeth Spark of Whepstead 

aged 9 years. 
William Pawsey labourer aged 70. 
Mrs Tooley relict of William Tooley aged 93. 
Isaac Farrow aged 56. 
Henry infant son of John & Alice Rheman. 
John Holly aged 26. 
Mrs Upson aged 42. 
Ann wife of John Bugg aged 71. 
John Bugg aged 71. 
Mr James Upson, farmer, aged 45. 
Sarah Leech spinster aged 26. 
William infant son of William & Ann Pearson. 
Dorothy widow of William Cooke farmer. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 



91 



1785- 


Jan. 


9- J 




Jan. 


30- 




March 


6- 




March 


17- 




May 


7- : 




June 


19. ] 




Oct. 


17- . 




Oct. 


27. 


1786. 


March 


14. 




March 


14. ; 




May 


9. . 




April 


27. ] 




Sept. 


20. ] 


1787. 


July 


26. : 


1788. 


March 


iS- 




March 


13- : 




July 


15- 




Aug. 


14. 




Sept. 


17- 




Bee. 


10. 


1789. 


Jan. 


31- 




June 


30- 




Aug. 


25- ■ 




Oct. 


13- ■ 


1790. 


April 


17- ^ 




May 


20. 




Aug. 


28. 




Nov. 


5- 


I79I. 


Feb. 


3- . 




April 


22. , 




June 


^7- 




Nov. 


3- . 




Dec. 


16. 



Joseph Bell labourer aged 73. 

Elizabeth Alderton an infant. 

John infant son of Thomas & Ann Farrow. 

The widow Alderton, relict of Joseph Alderton, aged 8^. 

Susan wife of Richard Willingham aged 50. 

Robert son of Robert <!v Susan Hibble of Whepstead. 

John Clarke an infant. 

Mr Elias Sturley farmer aged 85. 

Rebecca Mayes aged 80. 

Robert Rolfe aged 30. 

Ann infant dau. of John &: Ann Brook. 

Henry infant son of John & Alice Rheman. 

Mary Rawlinson spinster aged 22. 

Mary Anne Lee an infant. 

The widow Farrow aged 69. 

Sarah wife of John Willingham aged 67. 

Alice Rheman an infant. 

The Rev. Thomas Lord, 63 years rector of this parish, died 

on Aug. 6 in ye 86 year of his age. 
William Pearson an infant. 
Joshua Horrex an infant. 
Frances Garland spinster aged 67. 
Philip Rawlinson labourer aged 54. 
Dorothy infant dau. of John & Alice Rheman. 
John Ling labourer aged 58. 

\\^illiam ^Vyard bachelor aged 5 1 from Bradfield St Clare. 
Rhode infant dau. of William & Anne (Hawes) Pearson. 
Sophia infant dau. of Henry & Mary (Pawsey) Lee. 
Henry Symons from Wickhambrook, servant to Thomas 

Chinery, aged 18. 
John son of Robert & Elizabeth (Payne) Greenwood aged 2. 
Abraham Gridley labourer aged 70. 
Newport infant son of Newport & Mary (Allen) Ely. 
John Mayes widower aged 86. 
Mary Anne infant of Thomas iv: Frances (Stedman) Chinery. 



92 GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS. -BURIALS. 



July 


23- 


Oct. 


15- 


Nov. 


21. 


Dec. 


25- 



July 


26. 


Sept. 


12. 


Dec. 


12. 


March 


12. 


April 


5- 


May 


24. 


Sept. 


I. 


Sept. 


4- 



1792. July 23. Thomas .son of William & Mary (GuUen) Rawlinson aged 19. 
John son of Jonathan &: Mary Ely aged 39. 
Mary infant of William & Elizabeth Chapman. 
Susan (Pawsey) wife of Robert Clarke aged 43, from Little 

Whelnetham. 

1793. July 10. William son of ^Villiam &: Mary (Thoroughgood) Lofts aged 

15, unfortunately drowned. 
Elizabeth wife of William Chapman. 
Alfred son of Samuel & Lucy (Beales) Fenton. 
Elizabeth Nobbs widow, dau. of William & Mary (Gullen) 

Rawlinson, aged 27. 

1794. March 12. John base son of Frances Bull aged 7. 
Rhode infant of William & Anne Pearsons from Little W. 
Mary (Allen) wife of Newport Ely, of small pox. 
Edward Notley labourer aged 62. 
Susan Jones widow aged 71, of the parish of St James in 

Bury St Edmunds. 
Nov. 29. Robert Greenwood labourer aged 27. He unfortunately fell 
under a waggon, which went over his body. He lived 
about 3 hours. He has left a wife and one child to 
bewail his loss. 

1795. Feb. 27. William Cooke farmer aged 53. 
Mira infant dau. of Joseph & Mary (Rooks) Farrow. 
Ann Leng widow of John Leng labourer aged 64. 

1796. July 10. Frances dau. of Robert Clarke widower of Little Welnetham 

aged 7. 

Thomas son of Jonathan & Mary Ely aged 45. 
Mary wife of William Abbot aged 44. 
Alice (Cooke) wife of John Rheman aged 43. 
Elizabeth Francis from Hitcham. 

1797. Feb. 23. Thomas infant of William &: Anne Pearsons of Little 

Whelnetham. 

Sarah dau. of William & Sarah Rawlinson aged 28. 
Margaret wife of Joseph Dickerson from Great Livermere 
aged 52. 



Feb. 


27. 


May 


3- 


Aug. 


5- 


July 


10. 


July 


19. 


Aug. 


13- 


Sept. 


6. 


Nov. 


24. 


Feb. 


23- 


April 


22. 


May 


28. 





GREAT \ 


1797- 


June 


27. 


1798. 


March 


3^- 




May 


1 1. 




]VIay 


16. 




June 


16. 




June 


19. 




Dec. 


21. 


1799- 


Feb. 


17- 




March 


10. 




March 


T2. 




July 


29. 




Dec. 


29. 


i8oi. 


March 4 


or 14. 




May 


3- 


l802. 


March 


22. 



WHKLXETHAM REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 



9:3 



1803. 



Tune 



1804. 



June 


1 1. 


July 


6. 


Jan, 


30- 


Feb. 


24. 


Aug. 


2. 


Oct. 


12, 


Nov. 


6. 


Nov. 


9- 


Dec. 


4- 


Dec. 


14. 


May 


4- 


June 


24. 



Mary Bell widow aged So. 

Martha infant twin dau. of Richard & Martha (Rolfe) 

AVillingham. 
John son of Thomas & Ann (Plumb) Farrow aged 10. 
John Willingham widower aged 74 : 45 years clerk of this 

parish. 
Mary (Rooks) wife of Joseph Farrow aged 44. 
Martha Upson spinster aged 18. 
Susanna Gridley widow aged 73. 
Ann Leech widow aged 70. 
A\'illiam Lofts labourer aged 54. 

Elizabeth dau. of Robert & Sarah (Wells) Mann aged 3. 
William Nobbs an orphan aged 11. 
James Thurgood labourer aged 85. 
John infant of Richard & Martha (Rolfe) Willingham. 
Joshua Horrex married man by trade a miller aged 39. 
William son of Thomas & Rebecca (Palfrey) Nunn aged 5 

from Little AVelnetham. 
William son of William ^t Mary (Orridge) Abbot aged 6 

months. 
Richard A\'illingham widower aged 80, labourer. 
Thomas son of William & Ann (Hawes) Pearson aged 6 

months. 
Mary (Newport) wife of Jonathan Ely farmer aged 73. 
Elizabeth dau. of Robert & .Sarah (Wells) Mann aged 13 

months. 
James infant of William & Ann (Hawes) Pearson. 
Ambrose Clarke labourer aged 62. 
John Leathers labourer aged 74. 
John Bruce labourer aged 24 of the small pox. 
Lawrence Skipper labourer aged 56. 

Sarah dau. of Robert & Elizabeth (Wells) Mann aged 21. 
Alfred son of Samuel <!v: Lucy (Beales) Fenton aged 2 years. 
Robert son of John <S: Frances (Rash) Cason aged 1 1 \-ears. 



94 



GREAT WHELNETHAiM REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 



1804. 



Sept. 





Oct. 


14, 




Oct. 


31 




Dec. 


12. 


1805. 


Feb. 


15 




Dec. 


i3. 


1806. 


Feb. 


9- 




May 


25' 



1807. 



1808. 



1809. 



Nov, 



Feb. 



26. 



Dec. 


29. 


Feb. 


28. 


March 


4- 


April 


23- 


May 


15- 


Nov. 


10. 


Dec. 


16. 


Feb. 


20. 


April 


23- 


July 


5- 


Aug. 


27. 


Feb. 


6. 



March 


10. 


April 


24. 


April 


19. 


June 


15- 


Aug. 


19. 


Aug. 


21. 



Susanna wife of John Skipper of Rougham aged 28, late 

Susanna Tweed widow. 
Nathaniel son of Sarah Death aged 3 months. 
William Abbot labourer aged 56. 

John Macmurdy of Little Welnetham labourer aged 85. 
Hannah (Savage) wife of Joseph Alderton aged 56. 
Hannah (Bradbrook) wife of William Chapman. 
Edward Lawrence labourer aged 44. 
Susanna dau. of John (S: Ann (Skipper) Bonnett from St 

James, Bury St Edmunds, aged 9 months. 
Frances dau. of Jonathan & Rose (Brewster) Ely of St 

Mary's, Bury St Edmunds, aged 21 years. 
Rebecca (Palfrey) wife of Thomas Nunn aged 54 years. 
Pamela (Cawston) wife of John Pearsons aged 27 years. 
Elizabeth (\V'yard) wife of John Sparke of Whepstead 

aged 62. 
Richard Rolfe labourer aged 75 years. 
Martha infant of Richard & Martha (Rolfe) Willingham. 
Frances wife of Robert Tooley of Sicklesmere aged 7 7 years. 
John Sparke of Whepstead aged 62. 
The Rev. Robert Phillips, 20 years rector of this parish, 

died on Feb. 11, in the 51st year of his age. 
Elizabeth Willingham widow aged 70 or upwards. 
William RoUinson died July i aged 71. 
Elizabeth wife of Joseph Reeve died Aug. 23 aged 60. 
James son of Jacob & Mary (Parsons) Allinfton aged 

9 weeks. 
Rose (Brewster) wife of Jonathan Ely of St Mary's, Bury St 

Edmunds, aged 65 years : died Feb. 3. 
Ann Skipper died March 5. 

Elizabeth Willingham died April 19 aged 80 years. 
James son of Sarah Knobs aged 2 years. 
Richard Michael Mulley aged 20 years. 
Elizabeth Nunn aged 2 1 years. 
William Butcher aged i year. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 



95 



t8io. Dec. 3. Mary Coe aged 34 years. 

181 1. April 8. \Villiam Dench died April i aged 60. 
April 14. Elizabeth Clark died April 10 aged 76. 
May 4. James Wyard died May i aged 38. 

June 21. William son of John & Ann Parsons aged i year, 

July 13. Lucy dau. of George & Mary RoUinson aged 4 years. 

July 30. Sarah RolHnson widow aged 73. 

Aug. 7. Isaac son of Joseph & Mary Pettit aged i year. 

Oct. 6. Eliza dau. of Elizabeth Nunn aged i year. 

181 2. April 28. Robert son of Thomas & Mary (Cason) Alderton aged 

17 weeks. 

June 28. Robert Tooley aged 81. 

Dec. 10. William son of John &: Ann Parsons aged 6 weeks. 

1813. May 14. Thomas Farrow aged 68. 
May 21, Robert Clarke aged 73. 
June 13. John Nunn aged 3 months. 

Sept. 9. John Gurton of Sicklesmere aged 40. 

Sept. 19. James Wyard aged 72. 

1 8 14. Feb. 4. Sophia Browning of the parish of Raydon aged 38. 
Jan. 3. James Lawrence aged i year. 

Jan. 6. Mary Payne aged i year. 

Jan. 13. Samuel Fenton Snape aged 11 months, 

March 20. Ann Farrow widow aged 66. 

March 19. Elizabeth Cooke spinster aged 33. 

March 27. Mary Hollox widow aged 55. 

March 11. Rose Mills aged 46. 

April 22. Elizabeth Etheridge spinster of Little Whelnetham aged 21. 

Dec. 25. John Taylor aged 16 months. 

Dec. 25. William Norman aged 80 years. 

July 9.* Michael Yarrow of Sicklesmere aged 75. 

1815. Jan. 5. Thomas Alderton aged 8 months. 

Nov. 12. Elizabeth Leathers of Bradfield aged 68. 

Nov. 23. Samuel Hog of Sicklesmere aged 33. 

* It is not clear whether this entry belongs to 1814 or 1815. There are signs of carelessness and 
omissions for the next few years. Ed. 



96 



GREAT WHELNEIHAM k I XtISTERS.— BURIALS. 



1816. 



1818. 



1819. 



1S22. 



March 


16. 


April 


24. 


April 


25- 


Ma)- 


23- 


June 


27. 


Jan. 


10. 


May 


24. 


May 


31- 


April 


19. 


July 


5- 


July 


31- 


Nov. 


14. 


Dec. 


8. 


Dec. 


30- 


Feb. 


20. 


Feb. 


21. 


March 


12. 


March 


25- 


May 


29. 


July 


27. 


Oct. 


9- 


Nov. 


23- 


Jan. 


2. 


Jan. 


7- 


Jan. 


25- 


Jan. 


28. 


Feb. 


4- 


July 


12. 


Nov. 


3- 


April 


3- 


May 


2. 


May 


4. 


May 


7- 


May 


10, 


May 


10. 



John James Reenian of Lawshall aged 7 years. 

Charles Edwards of Sicklesmere aged 11 months. 

Elizabeth Thoroughgood of Sicklesmere aged 77. 

Henry W'elham Snape aged 18 months. 

Susan Clarke aged 19 )ears. 

William Hurrell of Bury St Edmunds aged 22 years. 

Joseph Ollington aged 69. 

Jonathan Ely aged 93. 

James Lawrence of Sicklesmere aged 4 months. 

Sarah Wake aged 65. 

Merinda Alderton of Sicklesmere aged 3I years. 

William Wesley aged 20 years. 

Robert Ollington aged ih years. 

Samuel Lawrence of Sicklesmere aged 19 years. 

Mary Ann Coe of Bury St Edmunds aged 15 years. 

George RoUinson aged 48. 

William Taylor aged 6h years. 

Mary Ann Snape aged 8 months. 

John Farrow of Sicklesmere aged 76. 

Edmund Craske aged 45. 

William Taylor aged 59. 

Eliza Ann Lawrence aged i month. 

Ann Verer of Sicklesmere aged 16. 

Samuel Cooper aged 3 months. 

Mary Ann Cooper aged 35. 

Robert Ollington aged 6 months. 

Thomas Coe of Bury St Edmunds aged 42. 

Mary Lingley of Sicklesmere aged 72. 

John ^^'oodgate aged 72. 

Margaret Clarke aged 83. 

William Parsons of Sicklesmere aged 27. 

Elizabeth Helder of Sicklesmere aged 18. 

Sarah Ungells of Sicklesmere aged 19. 

John Lawrence of Sicklesmere aged 20. 

James Parsons of Sicklesmere aged 9. 



(iREA'l" WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 



97 



1S2- 



1824. 



1825. 



T826. 



1827. 



June 


10. 


June 


16. 


Jan. 


20. 


Feb. 


8. 


April 


27. 


July 


29. 


Oct. 


II. 


July 


15- 


Sept. 


3- 


Oct. 


I. 


Oct. 


24. 


Jan. 


20. 


March 


29. 


April 


6. 


April 


12. 


June 


12. 


July 


18. 


Aug. 


I. 


Aug. 


25- 


Oct. 


3- 


Oct. 


7- 


Nov. 


4. 


Jan. 


29. 


Feb. 


24. 


March 


30. 


May 


IS- 


May 


IS- 


July 


6. 


July 


18. 


July 


28. 


Nov. 


13- 


Dec. 


3°- 


Jan. 


10. 


Feb. 


13- 



James Sutton of Sicklesmere aged 14. 

Elizabeth Payne of Sicklesmere aged 16. 

Mary Loft aged 84. 

William Parsons of Sicklesmere aged 64. 

Susan Tatum aged 83. 

Joab Mulley aged 41. 

Ann Norman aged 80. 

Joseph Farrow aged 45. 

Sarah Brickwood of Norwich aged 50. 

Henry Parsons aged 36. 

Phoebe Nunn aged 26. 

Sarah Major aged 30. 

Robert Payne aged 16. 

Harriet Taylor aged 15. 

Sophia HoUocks aged i day. 

Elizabeth Major aged 24. 

George Harrold aged 71. 

John Reeman aged 79. 

Rose Muddy of Bury aged 73. 

Mary Ann Clark aged 18. 

Lucy Snape aged 38. 

Walter Tweed aged 28. 

Mary Hogg aged 13. 

Lucy Reeve aged 30. 

Mary Mingay aged 72. 

Benjamin son of Mary Snape aged 10 days. 

Benjamin Makings aged 12 days. 

Robert Padley aged 13 months. 

Charlotte Wright of Bury aged 41. 

John Major aged 37. 

Susan Mills aged 69. 

Ann Warren aged 20. 

Robert Mann aged 77. 

Martha Bird aged 1 7. 



98 


GREAT 


1827. 


March 


23- 




Aug. 


29. 




Oct. 


6. 




Nov. 


1 1. 


i828. 


Jan. 


16. 




April 


28. 




July 


20. 


*^i829. 


Nov. 
Jan. 


3- 

4- 




March 


23- 




Sept. 


19. 




Dec. 


9- 


1830. 


Jan. 


2, 




April 


22. 




J une 


22. 




July 


15- 




Oct. 


21. 




Oct. 


23- 




Dec. 


28. 


1831. 


Jan. 


9- 




June 


16. 




Sept. 


22. 




Sept. 


28. 




Oct. 


16. 




Nov. 


6. 


1832. 


Jan. 


4- 




Jan. 


5- 




]March 


I. 




March 


8. 




May 


5- 




May 


T I. 




June 


15- 




Sept. 


21. 




Oct. 


16. 




Dec. 


16. 



WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 



Christiana Snape aged 5. 

Sarah Sutton aged 13. 

Samuel Fenton aged 74. 

Ann Farrow aged 75. 

Ann Farrow aged 59. 

William Lingley of Thorpe aged 91. 

Benjamin Alderton aged 20 weeks. 

Mary RoUinson aged 56. 

Sarah Notley of Sicklesmere aged 94. 

Thomas Parish aged 5 months. 

Catherine Fenton aged 51. 

Harriet Alderton of Whelnetham Parva aged 26. 

Zechariah Stebbing aged 7. 

Mary Anne Vearer of Sicklesmere aged 2. 

Christiana Hilder of Pakenham aged 26. 

Thomas Reeman of Cockfield aged 88. 

Robert Ungles of Sicklesmere aged 56. 

John vSutton of Sicklesmere aged 59. 

Joseph Reeve aged 84. 

Elizabeth Harrold aged 75. 

Sophia Parsons aged i. 

Amy Tweed aged 30. 

George Jackson aged 74. 

Elizabeth Ely aged 55. 

Jonathan Ely of Bury aged 84. 

Sarah Bugg aged 23. 

Phoebe Ramsbottom of Bury aged 22. 

Elizabeth Pryke aged 27. 

John Bird aged 52. 

Charlotte Alderton aged 15. 

Rose Cook aged 84. 

Samuel Snape aged 50. 

Lucy Edwards aged 21. 

Anne Reeman of Lawshall aged 62. 

Susan Cawston of Little \\'helnetham aged 55. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 



99 



1833- 



1834- 



18 



35- 



1836. 



Jan. 


8. 


Sept. 


24. 


Oct. 


2. 


Oct. 


5- 


Jan. 


14. 


Feb. 


IT- 


Aug. 


IS- 


Aug. 


25- 


Sept. 


6. 


Oct. 


12. 


Nov. 


I. 


Nov. 


8. 


Jan. 


1 1. 


Jan. 


23- 


Feb. 


20. 


March 


II. 


April 


4- 


April 


23- 


April 


30- 


May 


21. 


May 


28. 


June 


6. 


June 


13- 


Aug. 


I. 


Aug. 


12. 


Aug. 


18. 


Aug. 


20. 


Aug. 


26. 


Sept. 


8. 


Sept. 


27. 


Oct. 


I. 


Oct. 


1 1. 


May 


28. 


June 


6. 


J une 


6. 



Clara Ungles aged 6 weeks. 

Jonathan Taylor Garrard aged 4 years. 

Elizabeth Ann Garrard aged 3 years. 

John Pryke aged 20. 

Lucy Rawlinson aged 19. 

Sarah Rolfe aged 69. 

William Lawrence aged 21. 

Joseph Bird aged 57. 

Mary Cawston aged 35. 

Anna Maria Lofts infant. 

Sarah Regen aged 12. 

Sophia Lee aged 39. 

Thomas Nunn aged 87. 

Sarah Riley aged 44. 

Joseph Farrow aged 76. 

Elizabeth Sarah Everitt infant. 

John Everitt aged 5. 

John Willingham aged 25. 

Henry Boggis aged 7. 

Alfred Pryke aged 28. 

Louisa Garwood aged 7. 

Charles Garwood aged 4. 

George Mingay aged 9 weeks. 

Ellen Anne Snape infant. 

Marianne Makings infant. 

John Bruce aged 8. 

William Rolfe aged 79. 

Sarah Anne Makings infant. 

Mary Anne Pearsons aged 11. 

Mary Ungles aged 28. 

Robert Warren aged 4. 

Emily Pearsons aged 1 2. 

Ann Bird aged 58. 

Robert Everitt infant. 

Martha Upson aged 1 2. 



100 



1836. 



1837- 



1838. 



i839. 



1840. 



1841. 



GREAT ^ 


Nov. 


5- 


Dec. 


I. 


Dec. 


19. 


March 


26. 


April 


25- 


May 


4- 


July 


29. 


Aug. 


29. 


Oct. 


II. 


Oct. 


26. 


Nov. 


3- 


Dec. 


26. 


Feb. 


18. 


March 


I. 


April 


5- 


May 


13- 


May 


29. 


July 


14. 


Aug. 


13- 


Aug. 


31- 


Dec. 


31- 


Dec. 


3T. 


Dec. 


3^- 


Dec. 


31- 


March 


I. 


April 


9- 


April 


19. 


July 


II. 


Dec. 


7- 


May 


19. 


June 


29. 


Aug. 


27. 


Jan. 


2. 


Jan. 


IS- 


Feb. 


13- 



WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 



Joseph Verer infant. 

Mary RoUinson aged 22. 

Sarah Cooke of Ruiy St Edmunds aged 36. 

Sarah Bugg infant. 

Mary Andrews of Stanningfield aged 87. 

Susan Borgiss aged 20. 

John William Cooke of Bury St Edmunds aged 2 

Lucy Anne Rollinson aged 2. 

Anne Pearsons aged 44. 

Ambrose Pearsons aged i. 

Susan Pearsons aged ig. 

William Butters aged 22. 

Sarah Pettitt infant. 

Martha Pettitt aged 4. 

Robert Rolfe aged 10. 

Ann Tweed aged 66. 

Ann Caroline Fenton aged 21. 

Diana Garnham aged 1 2. 
Lucy Fenton aged 19. 
Martha Crick aged 23. 
Thomas Alderton aged 58 
Ann Lyas aged 62. 
George Lofts aged 59. 
Joseph Bugg aged 34. 
Jane Crick aged 6. 
Sarah Mann aged 85. 
Jane Edwards aged 66. 
Eliza Doel aged 29. 
James Butcher aged 69. 
Mary Jane Wright aged 2. 
Sarah Butters aged 19. 
Charles Taylor aged 2. 
Helen Victoria Fenton aged 3. 
Reuben Warren aged 60. 
Elizabeth Coxe aged 7. 



(;rea'1' w'helnetham registers.— burials. 



101 



1841. 



IS42. 



184: 



1844. 



March 


I/- 


March 


17- 


June 


20. 


June 


25- 


Jul)- 


I. 


July 


9- 


July 


22. 


May 


16. 


June 


12. 


July 


17- 


Sept. 


19. 


Oct. 


6. 


Nov. 


10. 


Jan. 


26. 


April 


8. 


May 


31- 


June 


30. 


July 


4- 


July 


i8. 


July 


22. 


Aug. 


3- 


Sept. 


15- 


Sept. 


27. 


Oct. 


16. 


Oct. 


20. 


Feb 


16. 


April 


20. 


May 


24 


May 


30- 


June 


8. 


June 


25- 


July 


4- 


Aug. 


20. 


Sept. 


7- 


Sept. 


13 



Abraham Makins aged 30. 

William Mann aged 17. 

Marianne Farrow aged 2. 

Sophia Edwards aged 24. 

John Andrews aged 97. 

John Tweed aged 77. 

Jane Maria Makins, infant. 

Frances Cawston of Horsecroft aged 76. 

Marianne Reeman aged i year. 

Anne Deacon aged 14. 

Rose Dench aged 7 1 . 

Elizabeth Claydon of Bury St Edmunds aged 29. 

Mary Anne Bruce aged 8. 

Rose Major aged 52. 

Eleanor Sophia Wright aged 45. 

Thomas Wright infant. 

Lucy AVright aged 23. 

Alfred Wright aged 2. 

Jeremiah Fenton aged 61. 

Charlotte Ellis aged 60. 

George Henry Barnes aged 8. 

Mary Crick aged 21. 

Sarah Race infant. 

Samuel Mayhew aged 77. 

John Lee aged 56. 

Rev. T. Hickman of Bury St Edmunds aged 89. 

James Pask aged 19. 

Rebecca Rolfe aged 2. 

Marianne Tweed aged 23. 

Edmund Frost aged 76. 

Sarah Snape of Cockfield aged 60. 

Anne Austin aged 78, 

Mary Pettitt aged 63. 

Mary Cooke aged 75. 

James Upson aged 68. 



102 

t844. 
1845. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 



1.846. 



1847. 



1848. 



1849. 



Sept. 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Feb. 

March 

March 

June 

Aug. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

July 

July 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Jan. 

March 

March 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Feb. 

April 

April 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Jan. 

Ian. 



21. Hannah Wright aged 9. 

18. Su.sanna Wright aged 64. 

23. Emily Rice infant. 

21. Marianne Alderton aged i. 

1. Arthur Verer aged 4. 
6. Sophia Everitt aged 5. 

13. Sarah Hickman of Bury St Edmund.s aged 87. 

30. Robina Pendle infant. 
15. Elizabeth Sutton aged 68 

II. Jame.s Major of Little Whelnetham aged 29. 

13. Thomas Alderton aged 6 months, 
29. John Reeman aged 1 7 weeks. 

22. Marianne Tweed aged 18. 

28. Phoebe Reeman of Lawshall aged 70. 

14. Anna & Maria Aves twin infants. 

2. Arthur Pearson aged 7 months. 

14. Joseph George Rice aged 22 weeks. 

21. Eliza Fenton aged 44 years. 

24. John Cooke of St. Mary's, Bury St. Edmunds aged 76. 
9. George Farrow aged 3 years. 

2. Abraham Reeman infant. 

29. Robert Nunn infant. 

31. Thomas Aves aged 75. 
28. Anne Bruce aged i. 

8. Robert Alderton aged 15. 

10. Isaac Farrow aged 69. 

22. Samuel Fenton of Cockfield aged 64. 

13. WiUiam Cooke of St. Mary's Square, Bury St. Edmund's, 
aged 80. 

23. Eliza Coleman aged 6 months. 
17. John Townsend aged 15 months. 

8. Abigail Butcher aged 41. 

30. Mary Alderton aged 73. 

2. Elizabeth Marshall Bird aged 38. 

19. Mary Warren aged 77. 



GRKAT WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 



1U3 



1849. 



1850. 



Jan. 

Feb. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

March 

May 

July 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Dec. 



20. 

9- 
10. 
2 I. 
19. 

17- 

28. 

I. 

1 1. 

5- 
22. 

30- 
4- 
12. 
18. 
2 2. 
21. 
26. 
19. 
22. 

30- 
2 I. 



Sarah Skipper aged 76. 

AVilliam Reeman of Lawshall aged 72. 

Mary Phillips of Great Barton aged 89. 

Robert Alderton aged 72. 

Mark Pearson aged 31. 

Lucy Cooke aged 24. 

Ambrose Padley infant. 

Honor Grimwood aged 10. 

Lucy Plumb aged 19. 

Margaret Wright aged 62. 

^Villiam Baldwin infant. 

Harry Harvey aged 3 months. 

William Reeman aged 7. 

William John Major aged 12. 

John Reeman of Lawshall aged 77. 

John Reeman aged 14. 

George Rollinson infant. 

Robert Nunn aged 82. 

Augusta Georgina Fenton of Bury St Edmunds aged 15. 

Martha Willingham aged 85. 

Reuben Boggis aged 1 1 . 

Edward Ungles aged 18. 

Anne Butcher aged 85. 






104 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.- BAPTISMS. 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM PARISH 

REGISTERS, 



A Regester book for the parish of Litle Wheltham Begining- 
at the yeare of our Lord God 1557. 









BAPTISMS. 


1557- 


Jan. 


7- 


Christian Ballard. 


1558. 


Nov. 


13- 


Thoma.s Rysinge. 




Nov. 


17- 


James Holt. 




Jan. 


21. 


William King. 


1559- 


March 


20. 


Alice Ballard. 


1 560. 


April 


27. 


Alice Adams. 




Sept. 


10. 


Laurence Steven. 


1561. 


April 


25- 


William Uepnam. 




:\Iay 


24. 


Thomas Gypps. 




Nov. 


16. 


\Villiam Heyward. 




Jan. 


18. 


Mathew Innold. 




March 


8. 


ffrancisca B riant. 


1562. 


May 


17- 


John Adams. 




March 


24. 


John Symont. 


1563- 


April 


25- 


^Villiam Goddard. 




Jan. 


22. 


John Gypps. 




Jan. 


28. 


John Sonne of William Innold, and buried, 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



105 



1564. 


Aug. 


13- 


1565- 


July 


10. 




Sept. 


16. 


1566. 


Dec. 


15- 


1567- 


July 


6. 




Sept. 


23- 




Dec. 


25- 


£568. 


Feb. 


27. 


1569. 


April 


17- 




April 


20. 




Sept. 


I r. 


1570- 


Dec. 


26. 


1571- 


April 


T. 




June 


10. 


1572. 


April 


— 




June 


8. 




Feb. 


^5- 


1573- 


April 


12. 




May 


10. 


1574- 


? 


28. 




Dec. 


27. 


1575- 


July 


29. 




Aug. 


21. 




Feb. 


22. 




March 


IT. 


1576. 


Oct. 


7- 




Oct. 


28. 


1577- 


April 


21. 




Sept. 


I. 




Feb. 


17- 


'578. 


May 


I. 




Feb. 


24. 


1579- 


-April 


7- 




June 


TO. 




Oct. 


25- 



Elizabeth dau. of Thomas Adams. 
Mary dau. of William Innold. 
Edmund Hewet. 
Anne dau. of Thomas Adames. 
William Ladiman. 
John Hewett. 
John Innold. 

John Sonne of John Ladiman. 
Elizabeth dau. of John Salmon. 
Susan dau. of ^Villiam Carter. 
Anne dau. of ^Villiam Nune. 
Henry sonne of John Ladiman. 
William sonne of William Innold. 
Rose dau. of Reinold Howe. 
Mary dau. of William Carter. 
John sonne of John Croftes. 
Thomas sonne of John Ladiman. 
Thomas sonne of William Innold. 
Elizabeth dau. of John Ringland. 
Robert sonne of Thomas Manhood. 
John sonne of John Ringland. 
John Sonne of John Croftes, and buried. 
Anne dau. of John Ladiman. 
Alice dau. of Georg Smith. 
Thomas sonne of William Innold. 
Agnes dau. of John Salmon. 
Joan dau. of John Croftes, and buried. 
Brigitt dau. of John Wrettam. 
Christian dau. of John Steward. 
Elizabeth dau. of John Ladiman. 
Robert sonne of John Croftes. 
John sonne of Henry Howe, 
Mary dau. of Arthur Daveson. 
Thomas sonne of Thomas Manhood. 
Alice dau. of John Steward. 



106 



LinLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



15S1. 
1582. 



1 5 So. April 
June 
June 
Aug, 
Oct. 
March 
April 
May 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Dec. 
Feb. 
April 
May 
Jan. 

1584. April 
July 
Sept. 
Nov. 
Feb. 
Feb. 

1585. Sept. 
March 



15S: 



1586. 



1587- 



10. 

12. 

26. 
7- 
9- 

13- 
8. 

13- 
12. 
12. 
26. 
24. 
14. 
26. 
26. 
26. 
14. 

27- 
8. 

7- 
14. 
1 1. 

6. 

17- 
2 r. 



May 
Aug. 
Oct. 
Dec. 
Feb. 
Aug. 
Feb. 
1588. April 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Jan. 
* Probably EcUvaid h 



21. 

6. 
14. 
18. 
14. 

8. 
24. 
12. 



Thomas sonne of John Wrettam. 

Robert sonne of John Ladiman. 

Robert sonne of William Skittler. 

Joan dau. of Thomas Parker. 

Hellen dau. of Robert Steward. 

Joan dau. of William Skarpe, and buried. 

Mary dau. of William Skittler, 

Thomas sonne of Thomas Parker. 

John sonne of John Steward. 

Agnes dau. of John Steward. 

Margarett dau. of Robert Steward. 

Mary dau. of John Ladiman. 

John sonne of William Elmar. 

William sonne of John Ringland. 

Judith dau. of Thomas Ward. 

AVilliam sonne of Thomas Parker. 

Dorithy dau. of Richard Goodrick esquyer. 

sonne of George Seely. 

sonne of William Elmar. 

dau. of John Steward. 

Rebecca dau. of Edmund Salmon. 
Suzan dau. of Robert Steward. 
Robert sonne of Edward Goodrick Esq. * 
William sonne of William Skittler. 
Alice dau. of John Ladiman. 
Benjamyn sonne of William Clarke. 
Suzan dau. of Richard [Edward erased] Goodrick esq. 
Edmund sonne of Thomas Parker. 
Suzan dau. of John Ringland. 
Alice dau. of Robert Steward. 
Alice dau. of William Skittler. 
John .sonne of Bennett Skott. 
Edmond sonne of John Ladiman. 
Robert sonne of James Wolfenden. 
an original error for Richard. See Bapt : Dec 1586 and Burials July 158S. 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGLSTERS.— BAPTLS.MS. lu; 



1589. Aug. 10. Robert Sonne of Robert Steward. 

— — Mary base dau. of Kendall widdow. 

John Sonne of Robert Debnehani, 
John Sonne of John Bannock. 
Georg Sonne of Bennet Skott. 
Abigaile dau. of James Wolfenden. 
Lidia base dau. of ye wyfe of John Steward. 
John Sonne of Robert Debneham. 
Elizabeth dau. of John Langdaile. 
Jonathan sonne of John Bannock. 
John sonne of James Wolfenden. 
Thomas sonne of Robert Debneham. 
Mary dau. of John Langdaile. 
John sonne of Robert Steward. 
Zacharye sonne of John Croftes. 
Elizabeth dau. of Clement Innold. 
Suzan dau. of James AVolfenden. 
John sonne of John Langdayle. 
Dorithy base dau. of ye widdowe Kendall. 
Anne dau. of John Bannock. 
John sonne of Edmund Hewett. 
John ba.se child of Alice Wattkin. 
Suzan dau. of Clement Innold. 
James sonne of James Wolfenden. 
Marmaduke sonne of John Langdayle. 
Dorothy dau. of Edmund Innold. 
Rose dau. of Clement Innold. 
Marye filia Ja : Wolfenden & his wiffe. 
Rodger filius Rodger Weight & his wiffe. 
Clement sonne of Clement Aenold et uxoris. 
Marye dau. of John Winter et uxoris. 
Marye dau. of Robert & Mary Debnam. 
Margarett dau. of James ^Volfenden & his wiffe. 
Hester dau. of Edmund Aenold & his wiffe. 
William filius John Croltes & his wiffe. 





Nov. 


2T,- 




Dec. 


27. 


1590. 


Aug. 


3°- 




Aug. 


3°- 




Sept. 


13- 




Dec. 


6. 


^591- 


Aug. 


1 2. 


1592. 


July 


23- 




Aug. 


20. 




Oct. 


'5- 


1593- 


April 


I. 




July 


15- 




Sept. 


30- 




Dec. 


15- 


1594- 


Aug. 


I r. 




Oct. 


20. 




Dec. 


15- 


1595- 


May 


24. 




July 


'3- 




Sept. 


7- 




Sept. 


9- 


J 596. 


Sept. 


29. 




March 


6. 


1597- 


Feb. 


5- 




March 


II. 


1599- 


Aug. 


29. 




Feb. 


7- 


1600. 


June 


8. 




Aug. 


31- 




Jan. 


6. 


1601. 


July 


I 2. 




July 


26. 




Oct. 


10. 



108 


LITTLE 


l6o2. 


J une 


16. 




Oct. 


10. 




Jan. 


13- 


1603. 


April 


3- 




Oct. 


2. 




Nov. 


27. 


1604. 


April 


22. 




May 


14. 




Aug. 


26. 




March 


24. 


1605. 


Sept. 


22. 




Oct. 


15- 




Nov. 


3- 




Dec. 


IS- 




Jan. 


IS- 




March 


II. 


1606. 


June 


I. 


1607. 


March 


6. 


1608. 


May 


19. 




July 


14. 




Oct. 


9- 


1609. 


April 


2. 




May 


21. 




Oct. 


18. 




Jan. 


14. 


I6IO. 


July 


3- 




Sept. 


6. 




March 


2S- 


I6II. 


Dec. 


3 




Dec. 


11. 


I6I2. 


April 


19. 




June 


28. 




Aug. 


16. 




Feb. 


14. 


1613. 


April 


S- 



WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



Ann dau. of Anthony Scarrp & his wiffe. 
Edmond sonn of Edmond Huett at uxoris. 
Francis dau. of Robert Tipshath & Susan his wiffe. 
Katerin dau. of Clement Aenold & his wiffe. 
Sara dau. of James Wolfenden & his wiffe. 
John sonn of Henry Howe et uxoris. 
Susan dau. of Thomas Hall «& his wiffe. 
Edmund sonn of Edmund Silverstone & his wiffe. 
Philipp dau. of Edmund Innold & his wiffe. 
Margrett dau. of John Roote & Dorithy his wiffe. 
Ann dau. of Edmund & Katerine Huett. 
Robert sonne of Robert Spark e et uxoris. 
Jelice dau. of Thomas Sanders & his wiffe. 
Robert sonn of Clement Innold et uxoris. 
Robert sonn of Robert & Mary Debnam. 
Ann dau. of James Wolfenden & his wiffe. 
Ann dau. of Robert & Susan Tipshath. 
Harvye a sonn a bastard of Rose Banbery widdow. 
Henry sonn of Clement & Dorithy Innold. 
John sonn of James & Susan Wolfifenden. 
Ann dau. of John & Bridgett Scepper. 
Susan dau. of Robert Tipshath &: his wiffe. 
Laurance sonn of John & Dorithy Roote. 
Mary dau. of Thomas & Mary Nayler. 
Edward sonn of John Crofts & his wiffe. 
Elizabeth dau. of Tobias Cowper & his wiff. 
Marye dau. of Edmund & Ann Clark. 
William sonn of Robert Rouge & his w^iffe. 
Thomas sonn of Thomas &: Mary Nayler. 
Edmund sonn of Edmund Curling and his wiffe. 
Susan Clark. 
Robert Tipshath. 

Thomas sonn of William Robinson & his wiffe. 
Francis Innoll. 
Susan dau. of Robert Rouge & his wiffe. 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGLSTERS.— BAPTISMS. 109 

William sonn of Robert Tipshath & his vvifife. 

Dorithe dau. of Edmund & Dorithe Willis. 

Susan dau. of Thomas & Mary Nayler. 

Ann dau. of Edmund & Ann Clarke. 

Robert sonn of William Ringland et uxoris. 

James sonn of Edmund Gurling & his wiff. 

Elizabeth dau. of Edmund Willis et uxoris. 

Susan dau. of Robert & Margett Andrew. 

John sonn of John Steward & his wiffe. 

Rachell dau. of William Dimbleton & his wife. 

Elizabeth dau. of Edmund Clark & his wiffe. 

Susan dau. of Edward Goimer & his wiffe. 

Susan dau. of John Watkin <S: his wiff. 

Edmund sonn of Edmund & Dorothye Willis. 

William sonn of John Steward &: his wiffe. 

Robert & Thomas sonnes of George fitts & his wiffe. 

Katherin Tipshath. 

Henry sonn of W. Renold et uxoris. 

Sarah Clarke. 

Robert Nayler. 

Robert Steward. 

Abigaill dau. of John Shronsbery & his wiff strangers. 

William sonn of Edmund & Dorithy Willis. 

John sonn of John Thornton & his wiffe. 

Robert Reinold sonn of his father & mother. 

Marye dau. of her mother a stranger. 

Edmund sonn of Edward Leach & his wiffe. 

Marke sonn of John Steward & his wiffe. 

Ann dau. of Thomas & Sarah Nayler. 

Susan dau. of WiUiam Eelye & Bridget his wife. 

Diana dau. of William Elie & his wife. 

*The Little Whelnetham paiish chest contains no entries of Baptisms, Marriages or Burials 
I)et\veen 1623 and 1680, a gap of nearly 60 years. But the copies sent yearly to the Registry of the 
Archdeaconry of Sudbury are still there. Mr. Talljot Crossfield has very kindly sent me his transcript 
■of the Archidiaconal returns for these years, so that I am able to fill up the gap more or less com- 
pletely. Ed. 



I6I3. 


Nov. 


3°- 


I6I4. 


April 


TO. 




April 


17- 


T6I5. 


April 


16. 




July 


16. 




Aug. 


— 




Dec. 


17- 


I6I6. 


June 


9- 




Sept. 


26. 




Jan. 


22. 




March 


23- 


I6I7. 


Dec. 


23- 




Jan. 


6. 


I6I8. 


May 


ro. 




Nov. 


5- 




March 


21. 


i6ig. 


Sept. 


23- 




Feb. 


13- 


1620. 


March 


25- 




May 


15- 




July 


25- 




Sept. 


29. 




Jan. 


6. 




Jan. 


6. 


1621. 


Aug. 


2T. 




Sept. 


23- 


1622. 


July 


2. 




Nov. 


I. 




Jan. 


14. 


1623. 


Sept. 


10. 


1625. 


April* 


21. 



110 LITTLE WIIELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 

Sarah dau. of Edmund Willi.s & his wife. 

John Sonne of Anthonie Makro & his wife. 

Ann dau. of John & Ann Carver. 

William sonne of William Nayler & his wife. 

Bridget dau. of Thomas Wiet. 

Charles son of John Steward & his wife. 

Thomas son of Thomas Wyat & his wife, 

John son of Edmund Willis & his wife. 

Abraham son of Abraham & Susan Wright. 

Mary dau. of Henry Peach & his wife. 

Alexander son of Alexander & Sara Piston 

Richard son of Henry & Dorothy Peach. 

George son of Edmund & Ann Willis. 

Anne dau. of Thomas &: Mary Cornish. 

Robert son of Thomas & Bridget Wyat. 

Ezekiel son of Abraham & Susan Wright. 

Anne dau. of Alexander & Sara Pistor. 

Robert son of Robert &: Mary Cason. 

Elizabeth dau. of Thomas di: Bridget Wyat. 

Ursly & Susan daus. of John & Isabel Ely. 

Edmund son of Edmund &: Elizabeth Goymar. 

Elizabeth dau. of Robert & Mary Cason. 

Mary dau. of Alexander & Sara Pistor. 

Elizabeth dau. of John tS: Dorothy Stileman. 

Anne dau. of Thomas & Bridget Wyat. 

Sara dau. of Robert & Mary Cason. 

Rose dau. of Richard & Susan Mount. 

James & Gilian children of Thomas & Elizabeth Spring, Irish 

travellers. 
****** 

****** 

1663. May I. Danyell sonne of Edward & Rachell Agas. 

Aug. 20. Edward sonne of Edward & Margarett Kinge. 

*This entry is made twice in the Archidiaconal returns. In the other place the father is called 
Robert. Apparently John is right. Ed. 



1625. 


June 


19. 




Jan. 


14 


1626. 


Oct. 


II. 




Nov. 


7- 


1629. 


Sept. 


13- 




Sept.* 


16. 


I63I. 


Oct. 


3- 




Nov. 


20. 




March 


20. 


1632. 


Nov. 


26. 


1635- 


May 


28. 




June 


28. 




Aug. 


2. 




Sept. 


17- 




Sept. 


24. 




Nov. 


8. 


1636. 


Nov. 


22. 




Jan. 


22. 




Feb. 


19. 


1637. 


April 


3°- 




July 


2. 


1638. 


Oct. 


28. 


1639. 


July 


7- 




July 


14. 




Oct. 


6. 


1640. 


May 


7- 




July 


26. 




Tan. 


3- 





LITTLE 


i663. 


Nov. 


5- 


1666. 


Sept. 


5- 


1667. 


Jan. 


26. 


1671. 


Jan. 


7- 




Jan. 


30- 


1672. 


Aug. 


18. 




March 


7- 



WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. Ill 

Elizabeth dau. of Willyam & Grace Barker. 

Sarah dau. of John & Mary Gooday. 

Thomas sonne of Willyam & Sarah Sturgeon. 

Mary dau. of Willyam & Sarah Sturgeon. 

Susan dau. of John & Susan Spencer of greate Wheltham. 

Sarah dau. of John «Sz: Sarah Leech. 

Francis sonne of Francis Davy of Kerningall in co. of Norfolke 

mettle man & Elizabeth his wife. 
1673. Aug. 31. Benjamin sonne of Benjamin Leech late deceased & Phillip his 

mother. 
Oct. 12. Joseph sonne of Joseph Mason of Whepsted iS; Dorothy his 

mother. 
Elizabeth dau. of John & Mary Tooley. 
Edward sonne of John & Sarah Leech. 
Francis sonne of ^Villyam & Sarah Sturgeon. 
Robert sonne of Willyam & Ursula Taylor. 
Willyam sonne of Ambrose &: Frances Willyam son. 
Katharine dau. of Willyam & Susan Bally. 
Phillip dau. of John & Phillip Webb. 
Mary dau. of Ambrose & Mary Willyamson. 
Sarah dau. of George & Sarah Cocksage. 
John sonne of John &: Sarah Leech. 
Joseph son of Robert & Sarah Whiterod. 
Robert son of John & Mary Tooley. 
Philip son of Philip & Ann Ward. 
Elizabeth dau. of Ambrose & Elizabeth Flack. 
Francis son of Robert & Sarah Whiterod. 
Elizabeth dau. of Ambrose & Elizabeth Flack. 
Bridget dau. of John & Bridget King. 
Margaret dau. of James & Margaret Frost. 
Thomasin dau. of Edward & Thomasin Leach. 
Mary dau. of John & Katherine Johnson. 
John son of Philip & Ann "Ward. 
Mary dau. of James & Margaret Frost. 
1684. May 12. John son of William Burroughs. 





Dec. 


21. 


1676. 


April 


6. 




Aug. 


13- 




Sept. 


29. 




Nov. 


I. 




Nov. 


7- 


1677. 


April 


12. 




Oct. 


21. 




Nov. 


30. 


1679. 


April 


22. 


1680. 


Sept. 


19. 




Nov. 


8. 


1681. 


June 


10. 




July 


15- 


1682. 


July 


30. 




Sept. 


5- 




Dec. 


29. 




Feb. 


8. 


1683. 


April 


I. 




June 


24. 




Nov. 


I. 




Feb. 


21. 



112 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



1684. June 6. Mary dau. of James & Mary Garwood. 
June 7. Susan dau. of John &: Sarah Leach. 
Aug. 2. Francis son of William & Sarah Sturgeon. 
Oct. 21. Rose dau. of Ambrose & Elizabeth Flack. 
Oct. 23. Edward son of John & Bridget King. 
Oct. 23. Mary dau. of Richard & Mary Whiterod. 

1685. March 29. Sarah dau. of Robert & Sarah Whiterod. 
Sep. 20. Elizabeth filia Elizabethse Tooly et populi. 
Dec. 14. William son of John & Susan I wring. 
Feb. 28. John son of John & Katherine Johnson. 

1686. Sept. 30. James son o^ James & Mary Garwood. 
Nov. 4. Margaret dau. of John & Bridget King. 
Nov. '14. Susan dau. of Edward <!s: Thomasin Leach. 
March 17. Ambrose son of Ambrose & Elizabeth Flack. 

1687. March 27. James son of Nathanael & Dorothy Jestrick> 
May 26. James son of James & Susan Frost. 

July 10. Benjamin son of John & Sarah Leach. 

July 24. Susan dau. of John & Susan Iwring. 

Oct. 14. James son of James & Mary Garwood. 

1688. March 30. John son of John & Elizabeth Whiterod. 
April I. Robert son of Robert & Sarah Whiterod. 

July 20. Henrietta — Maria dau. of John & Bridget King. 

Nov. 3. Katharine dau. of John & Katharine Johnson. 

Nov. 28. Richard son of Ambrose & Elizabeth Flack. 

Feb. 3. Edward son of Edward & Thomasin Leach. 

Feb. 21. Edmund son of James & Susan Frost. 

1689. April 25. Nathan son of Isaack & Matthew Pett. 
July 28. John son of John & Susan Iwring. 
Dec. 5. William son of John & Bridget King. 
Jan. 26. John son of John & Mary Pyman. 

1690. Aug. 17. Mary dau. of Robert & Sarah Whiterod. 
Nov. 27. John son of Ambrose & Elizabeth Flack. 
Dec. 19. Robert son of John & Elizabeth Whiterod. 
Jan. 15. James son of Isaac & Matthew Pett. 
Feb. 26. Ann dau. of Edward «& Thomasin Leach. 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



113 



1691. July 26. John son of John & Mary Py man. 
Aug. 23. Sarah dau. of John & Sarah Leach. 
Aug. 27. Susan dau. of James & Susan Frost. 
Oct. 22. Mary dau. of John &: Bridget King. 
Nov. 12. John son of John & Rose Sparke. 
Jan. 31. Esther dau. of George & Ann Frost. 

Feb. 22. Abraham son of Samuel &: Susan Banham. 

1692. April 15. Thomas son of John & Susan Iwring. 
Oct. 6. James son of Ambrose & Elizabeth Flack. 
Oct. 20. Jacob son of John & Katharine Johnson. 
Dec. 20. Ann dau. of Isaac & Matthew Pett. 
March 16. Jonathan son of John & Bridgett King. 

1693. June 25. son of John & Mary Pyman. 

Dec. I. John son of John & Susan Horrex. 

Jan. 21. William son of James &: Mary (rarwood. 

1694. Dec. 16. James son of John Iwring & his wife. 
Dec. 26. Mary dau. of Ambrose & Elizabeth Flack. 

1695. April 2. James son of John & Bridget King. 
Feb. 9. Charles son of John &: Hannah Gipson. 
March 20. Anthony Horrex. 

1696. June 21. Ann Waplin. 

July 9. Robert son of John & Bridget King. 

1697. April 23. Ann dau. of John &: Hannah Gibson. 
June 25. James son of James & Mary Frost. 

June 27. Elizabeth dau. of James & Mary Garwood. 

Sept. 5. Elizabeth dau. of John & Elizabeth Iwring. 

Jan. 27. George son of Ambrose & Elizabeth Flack. 

1698. March 25. Thomas son of John & Bridgitt King. 
June 30. Philip son of Thomas & Mary Basset. 

Nov. 4. Elizabeth dau. of Abraham & Ann Hammond. 

Dec. 15. William son of John & Hannah Gibson. 

1699. Oct. 8. Bridgitt dau. of James &: Mary Garwood. 
Jan. 8. John son of Abraham &: Ann Hammond. 
Jan. 26. Margaret dau. of John & Bridgitt King. 
Feb. 26. William son of John & Hannah Gibson. 



114 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



1700. 

1701. 
1702. 
1703. 
1704. 

1706. 



1707. 

1708. 
1709. 
1711, 



1712. 

1713- 
1714. 

1715- 



I. 

13- 
22. 
24. 
21. 

22. 
5- 



Aug. 

Sept. 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Sept. 

Feb. 

Jan. 

March 1 1 

July 24 

March 1 2 

Aug. 8 

Oct. 

Nov. 

April 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Nov. 

Feb. 

Sept. 

Nov. 

Aug. 

Jan. 

May 

Oct. 

Feb. 

June 

Dec. 

Dec. 

June 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

May 

Jan. 

Jan. 



6. 

23- 
18. 

9- 
18. 

25- 
2. 

4- 
21. 
19. 

5- 

25- 

23- 

9- 

6. 

5- 
13- 

6. 

T I. 
25- 
13- 
31- 

8. 



Thomas son of John & Elizabeth Iwring. 
Joshuah son of John & Susan Horrex. 
James son of Nicholas «& Mary Baker. 
Margaret dau. of Thomas & Alicia Hayvvard. 
Elizabeth dau. of John & Bridgitt King. 
Elizabeth dau. of Nicholas & Mary Baker. 
Elizabeth dau. of John & Bridgitt King. 
Abraham son of Abraham & Ann Hammond. 
John son of John & Mary How. 
Christopher son of John & Elizabeth Iwring. 
Mary dau. of John & Mary How. 
Jonathan son of Isaack & Mathew Pett. 
Thomas son of Thomas & Katharine Britton. 
Mary dau. of John & Ann Nun. 
Elizabeth dau. of Thomas & Katharine Britton. 
John son of John Johnson Sz his wife. 
James son of John & Mary How. 
Martha dau. of John & Elizabeth Iwring. 
Rose dau. of Thomas & Rose King. 
Margarett dau. of John & Mary How. 
Andrew son of Robert & Elizabeth Nun. 
Alicia dau. of John & Mary How. 
James son of John & Mary How. 
James son of Robert & Elizabeth Nun. 
John son of Nathan & Esther Pett. 
Susan dau. of John & Susan Johnson. 
Elizabeth dau. of Edward & Elizabeth King. 
John son of John & Esther Frost. 
Elizabeth dau. of John & Mary Iwring. 
John son of John & Susan Johnson. 
Elizabeth dau. of John & Mary Iwring. 
Ann dau. of John «& Mary How. 
Samuel son of Joseph & Alicia Ray. 
Elizabeth dau. of John & Esther ffrost. 
Elizabeth dau. of Paul & Margarett Chaplin. 



1716. 


Feb. 


18. 


1717- 


July 


30. 




Sept. 


I. 




Sept. 


27. 




Dec. 


3^- 




Feb. 


16. 


17.8. 


June 


10. 




Aug. 


10. 




Aug. 


21. 




Oct. 


3- 




Dec. 


II. 


T7I9- 


Aug. 


9- 




Aug. 


2 I. 




Oct. 


4- 




Jan. 


3- 




Jan. 


19. 




March 


18. 


1 720. 


Nov. 


3- 


1721. 


Dec. 


4- 




Dec. 


29. 




Feb. 


4- 




Feb. 


1 1. 




Feb. 


25- 




Feb. 


26. 


1722. 


Jan. 


27. 


i7-'3- 


April 


18. 




April 


21. 




May 


5- 




Oct. 


31- 




Feb. 


2. 




March 


15- 


1724. 


May 


21. 




Aug. 


21. 




Aug. 


30. 




Aug. 


30- 



LFITLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS. — BAPTISMS. 115 



John son of Joseph & Alicia Ray. 
Frances dau. of John &: Frances Candeler. 
Mary dau. of Nathan «S: Esther Pett. 
Robert son of Robert &: Frances Jervas. 
John Goshawke base child of Mary his mother. 
Elizabeth dau. of John & Elizabeth Thorpe. 
John son of John & Mary Yardley. 
Thomas son of John &: Esther Frost. 
Joseph son of Joseph &: Alicia Ray. 
James son of James & Mary Frost. 
Elizabeth dau. of John & Frances Candeler. 
Elizabeth dau. of Paul & Margarett Chaplin. 
Edward son of Edward & Elizabeth King. 
John son of Robert & Frances Jervas. 
William son of William & Ann Smee. 
Mary dau. of Robert «S: Susan Garland. 
Mary dau. of James & Mary Frost. 
John son of Edward & Elizabeth King. 
Mary dau. of Edward & Elizabeth King. 
Frances dau. of Robert & Susan Garland. 
Mary dau. of John & Elizabeth Thorpe. 
Richard son of John «S: Hester Frost. 
Hester dau. of Nathaniel & Hester Pett. 
Alice dau. of George & Margaret Lumly. 
William son of James & Ann How. 
George son of George & Margaret Lumly. 
Edward son of John & Ann Leach. 
John son of Paul & Margaret Chapman [sic]. 
Mary dau. of Thomas & Mary Canham. 
John son of John & Martha Haward. 
Susan dau. of John & Eliza.belh Thorp. 
Rose dau. of James & Mary Frost. 
Margaret dau. of Edward & Elizabeth King. 
Anna Maria dau. of John & Hannah Sergeant. 
George son of William & Ann Smee. 



116 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



1724. 



1725- 



1726. 



1727. 



1728. 



1729. 
1730. 



1731- 
1732. 



Sept 

Dec. 

Dec. 

May 

Aug. 

Nov. 

Jan. 

May 

May 

June 

Feb. 

Feb. 

July 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Feb. 

May 

Feb. 

Feb. 

March 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

April 

March 30. 

Aus. 20. 



1733- 
1734- 
1735- 



Sept. 

Sept. 

Nov. 

Jan. 

Feb. 

July 

.Vug. 

[une 



20. 

6. 

23- 

^7- 

8. 
2. 

30- 
12. 

15- 
26. 

TO. 
19. 
30- 

5- 
23- 
29. 
19. 

7- 

18. 

2. 

4- 
8. 

3- 
3- 

25- 



10. 
18. 
28. 
8. 
14. 
28. 
1 1. 



William son of John &: Esther Frost. 

James son of James & Ann How. 

Thomas son of Thomas & Mary Canham, 

Ann dau. of John &: Frances Candler. 

Mary Johnson. 

Isaac son of George & Margaret Lumley. 

Samuel son of Paul «Sc Francis Chapman [sic]. 

Ambrose son of James & Mary Frost. 

Sarah dau. of Thomas &: Mary Canham. 

John son of John & Hannah Serjeant. 

Isaac son of Isaac & Ann Wilson. 

Margaret dau. of Georjje & Margaret Lumly. 

Samuel son of Paul & Francis Chapman [sic]. 

Margaret dau. of William & Ann Smee. 

Elizabeth dau. of John & Ehzabeth Flack. 

Rose dau. of Edward & Elizabeth King. 

Mary dau. of John &: Frances Candler. 

Richard son of Richard & Bruce Reeve. 

John son of Thomas & Mary Canham. 

James son of John & Hannah Sergeant. 

Richard son of James & Mary Frost. 

Mary dau. of John & Elizabeth Flack. 

Alice dau. of William & Ann Smee. 

Susan child of Susan Balls. 

John son of John & Frances Candler. 

Margarett dau. of John & Elizabeth Flack. 

William son of Richard tSz; Bruce [sic] Reeve. 

Mary dau. of Nicholas & Mary Locke. 

Mary dau. of Paul & Frances Chapman [sic]. 

John son of John & Hannah Serjeant. 

Ambrose son of John & Elizabeth Flack. 

Martha dau. of John & Diana Ely. 

John son of John & Mary Evered. 

Martha dau. of John & Frances Candler. 

Mary dau. of Richard & [Bruce erased] Prudence Reeve. 



l.riTLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



117 



1735- June 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
March 

1736. April 
Nov. 
Jan. 

1737. Oct. 
Dec. 



1738- 
I 739- 



1740. 



1741. 



1742. 



^74: 



Jan. 

April 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Feb. 

July 

Sept. 
Nov. 
April 
Sept. 
Jan. 
March 
March 13. 
April 18. 



July 
Sept. 
Oct. 

1744. Oct. 
Dec. 

1745. June 
June 
Aug. 



29. 

3- 
14. 

25- 
19. 

9- 
21. 
14. 

3°- 
9- 
4- 

12. 
2. 
t. 
2. 

23- 

30. 
24. 
20. 
18. 

23- 
12. 

17- 

4- 
6. 



18. 
14. 
16. 

25- 
2, 
2. 

26. 

25- 



Frances dau. of Thomas & Frances Parfree of Rushbrook. 

Ann dau. of Thomas & Faith Hammond. 

William son of James & Bridgett Frost. 

William son of John & Hannah Sergeant. 

George son of George & Elizabeth Brook. 

Susannah child of Susannah Boldero. 

Elizabeth dau. of Nicolas &: Mary Lock. 

Mary dau. ot Richard & Prudence Reeve. 

Isaac child of Elizabeth King. 

Thomas son of Thomas & .Margarett Green. 

Elizabeth dau. of Thomas & Faith Hammond. 

Samuel son of Richard & Prudence Reeve. 

Ann dau. of William &: Elizabeth Bowers. 

Edmund son of Edmund l\: Ann Southgate. 

Robert son of Thomas <Sz Margaret Green. 

Caleb son of William 6c Su'^annah Steckles. 

Isaac son of Isaac tSc Elizabeth Chenry. 

Sarah dau. of Robert & Ann Adams. 

William son of William (li: Ellen Bo)den. 

Rose dau. of John & Elizabeth Flack. 

Antony son of Richard &: Prudence Reeve. 

John son of ^^'illiam & Elizabeth Steele. 

William son of John & Catharine Girling. 

Catharine dau. of John & Catharine Girling. 

Margaret dau. of Thomas & Margaret Green. 

William son of William & Elizabeth Steel. 

George son of Edmund & Ann Southgate. 

John son of Robert & Ann Adams. 

Ann dau. of Richard &: Prudence Reeve. 

Ambrose son of Ambrose & Elizabeth Friend. 

Elizabeth dau. of Ambrose tS: Elizabeth Friend. 

Isaac son of Edmund &: Ann Southgate. 

Susan dau. of William & Susannah Steckles. 

Charles son of John & Catharine Girling. 

Joseph son of William &: Boydon. 



118 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGIS'lERS.— BAPTISMS. 



1745- 
1746. 



1747. 



1748. 



1749. 



1750- 



1751- 



'752. 



1753- 



Dec. 29. William son of William & Mary Gault. 

Aug. 3. Ann dau. of Thomas «S: Margaret Green. 

Oct. II. William son of William & Ann Kemball. 

Jan. 5. Henry son of Henry (^ Elizabeth SkuUford. 

April 29. Betty dau. of John tS: Judith Bell. 

July 30. Elizabeth dau. of Robert &: Mary Girling. 

Oct. 4. Kezia dau. of Edmund & Ann Southgate. 

Dec. 29. John son of William & Ann Kemball. 

Feb. 14. William son of William & Susannah Steckles. 

Oct. 25. A\'illiam son of William & Mary Clark. 

Nov. 20. Sarah dau. of Henry & Elizabeth Skulford. 

March 19. Sarah dau. of John & Ann Bugg. 

April 13. Sarah dau. of Samuel & Isabella Wright. 

Sept. 29. Susan dau. of William & Susan Pawsey. 

Oct. 22. Joseph base child of Prudence Reeve. 

Dec. 13. Samuel son of Samuel &: Mildray Scutchy. 

June 7. Samuel son of Robert & Mary Girling. 

June 19. Isabella dau. of Samuel «^ Isabella Wright. 

Oct. 28. Ann dau. of Henry «& Elizabeth Skulford. 

Nov. 25. William son of William & Elizabeth Reeman. 

Dec. 10. Ann dau. of Benjamin & Elizabeth Robinson. 

Jan. 24. Margaret child of Margaret King. 

Feb. 10. John son of John il^c Lydia Goodday. 

March i. Simon son of Samuel & Elizabeth Scutchy. 

March 16. Ambrose son ot Ambrose >S: Elizabeth Wright 

April II. John son of William & Susannah Steckles. 

July 7. Ambrose son of John & Ann Bugg. 

July 21. John son of John & Judith Bell. 

March 22. William son of William & Elizabeth Reeman. 

May II. John son of John & Ann Avey. 

May 24. William son of Samuel & Elizabeth Scutchy. 

Dec. 31. John son of Robert and Mary Girling. 

Jan. 28. Jermyn son of William & Mary Clark. 

March 27. Mary dau. of James & Mary Wilding. 

.'Xpril 8. Susan dau. of James & Margaret Alderton. 



LITTLE AVHELNETHAM REGIS rEKS.— BAPTISMS. 119 



1753. Dec. 30. Ann child of Ann Carter was baptized by Rev. Mr Coulter, 

Curate of Bradfield Manger. 
Sarah dan. of John &: Sarah Murdy. 
Thomas son of William &: Susannah Steckles. 
Richard son of John & Ann Avey. 
Ann dau. of Robert & Mary Girling. 
James son of James & Margaret Alderton. 
Mary dau. of William & Elizabeth Reeman. 
Ann dau. of James & Mary Wilding. 
Susannah dau. of William & Mary Clark. 
Elizabeth dau. of John & Ann Avey. 
Samuel son of John & Ann Bugg. 
Ambrose Flack child of Mary Taylor. 
John son of John iS: Ann Avey. 
Roger son of William &: Elizabeth Reeman was baptized by Rev. 

Mr. Knowles. 
Margaret dau. of Jacob & Ann Brooks. 
Thomas child of Ann Carter was baptized by Rev. Mr Young 

of Bradfield Manger. 
Elizabeth dau. of James cV' Mary Wilding. 
Elizabeth & Mary twin daughters of Thomas & Elizabeth Roffe, 

by the Rev. Mr Lord of Great Welnetham. 
Mary dau. of Ambrose & Elizabeth Flack. 
Joshua son of John & Elizabeth Allen. 
Sarah dau. of William & Elizabeth Reeman. 
Edward son of Thomas & Elizabeth Roffe. 
Jacob son of Jacob & Ann Brook. 
Mary dau. of John & Ann Avey. 
William son of William «S: Mary Lingley. 
Susannah dau. of John & Mary Alderton. 
Susan dau. of Ambrose & Elizabeth Flack. 
John son of John & Hannah Angier travellers. 
Thomas son ot Thomas & Elizabeth Roffe. 
Susannah dau. of Jacob & Ann Brook. 
John son of John & Elizabeth Allen. 



1754- 


Jan. 


13- 




Jan. 


27. 




Oct. 


II. 




Dec. 


15- 


1755- 


May 


18. 




June 


IS- 




June 


22. 




Nov. 


9- 


1756. 


May 


2. 




June 


13- 


1757- 


April 


I. 


1758- 


May 


4- 




May 


9- 




May 


29. 




July 


18. 




Oct. 


22. 




Oct. 


25- 


f759- 


March 


3°- 




June 


3°- 




Nov. 


29. 




Dec. 


6. 




Dec. 


9- 


1760. 


May 


4- 




June 


23- 




July 


I. 




July 


13- 




Sept. 


28. 




Dec. 


4- 


1761. 


April 


26. 




June 


21. 



120 


LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 


1761. 


Aug. 


16. 


Samuel son of Samuel & Elizabeth Fisher. 




Aug. 


23- 


Elizabeth dau. of James & Mary Garrod. 




Sept. 


8. 


Susanna dau. of Ambrose & Elizabeth Flack. 




Nov. 


8. 


John son of William & Mary Lingley. 


1762. 


Aug. 


so- 


Alice Gooch child of Susan Gurling. 


1763. 


Sept. 


il. 


Jacob son of Jacob &: Susan Salvage. 




Sept. 


t8. 


Thomas son of John & Elizabeth Allen. 




Dec. 


4- 


Fanny dau. of William & Elizabeth Reeman. 




Dec. 


II. 


Violet dau. of John & Mary Alderton. 


1764. 


Jan. 


I. 


Martha dau. of Abraham & Susan Gridley. 




Jan. 


8. 


Mary dau. of William & Mary Lingley. 




Dec. 


16. 


Elizabeth dau. of John & Elizabeth Allen. 




Dec. 


30. 


Mary dau. of John & Susan Tweed. 


1765 


July 


28. 


Susan dau. of Jacob & Susan Salvage. 




Dec. 


I. 


William son of Abraham & Susan Gridley. 


1766. 


Jan. 


24. 


Mary dau. of Thomas & Mary Rolfe. 




March 


9- 


Thomas son of William & Mary Lingley. 




Oct. 


6. 


Henry son of Henry & Elizabeth Rolfe. 




Dec. 


28. 


Robert son of John & Susan Tweed. 


1767. 


May 


17- 


Mary dau. of John & Elizabeth Allen. 


1768. 


March 


6. 


Thomas son of Jacob & Susan Salvage. 




April 


24. 


Elizabeth dau. of William & Mary Lingley. 




Aug. 


19. 


William son of Henry & Elizabeth Rolfe. 




Oct. 


30- 


Robert son of Robert & Alice Girling. 


1769. 


Jan. 


29. 


Jane dau. of Thomas & Elizabeth Rolfe. 




May 


5- 


Richard son of John & Elizabeth Allen. 




May 


7- 


Alice dau. of Abraham & Susan Gridley. 




July 


16. 


John son of John & Elizabeth Reeman. 




Dec. 


24. 


Ann dau. of Edward & Sarah Knotley. 




Dec. 


27. 


Mary dau. of John & Ann Farrrow. 


I770. 


Feb. 


1 1. 


John son of Henry & Elizabeth Rolfe. 




Feb. 


18. 


Martha dau. of William & Mary Lingley. 




May 


13- 


John son of Jacob & Susan Savage. 




July 


1. 


Ann dau of John & Elizabeth Allen. 




July 


6. 


William son of Robert is:: Sarah Pearl. 



'77I. 


Nov. 


3- 




Dec. 


22. 


1772. 


Jan. 


5- 




March 


20. 


1773- 


Feb. 


14. 




April 


II. 




June 


13- 


1774- 


March 


6. 




June 


7- 


1775- 


June 


18. 




June 


25- 




Sept. 


24. 




Oct. 


29. 


1776. 


Jan. 


16. 




Feb. 


6. 




July 


26. 




Oct. 


25- 




Nov. 


iS. 


1777- 


Feb. 


23- 




Aug. 


31- 


1778. 


April 


13- 




April 


26. 




Aug. 


23- 




Aug. 


30- 




Nov. 


29. 


1779- 


Jan, 


17- 




June 


13- 




Nov. 


17- 


1780. 


Jan. 


16. 




May 


15- 




May 


28. 




Aug. 


2. 




Oct. 


15- 




Oct. 


22. 




Nov. 


19. 



IJ'iTLK WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 121 



Mary dau. of John & Mary Causton. 

Mary dau. of John & Elizabeth Reenian. 

Edith dau. of Robert & Sarah Pearl. 

Robert son of Henry & Elizabeth Rolfe. 

Mary dau. of Thomas & Mary Barrell. 

Lucy dau. of William & Mary Lingley. 

Hannah dau. of Jacob & Susan Savage. 

Robert son of Robert & Sarah Pearl. 

Mary dau. of Henry & Elizabeth Rolfe. 

Elizabeth dau. of Jacob & Susan Savage. 

Joseph son of Joseph & Sarah Alderton. 

Sarah dau. of Edmund & Sarah Spinks. 

Thomas son of Thomas & Rebecca Nunn. 

Sarah & Amey twin daughters of John & Ann Farrow. 

Mary child ot Amey Brook. 

Mary dau. of James & Mary Garwood. 

Sarah dau. of Joseph & Sarah Alderton. 

Thomas Reading son of Robert & Sarah Pearl. 

James son of William & Mary Lingley. 

Henry son of John & Elizabeth Reeman. 

Isaac son of John & Ann Farrow. 

Sarah dau. of Jacob & Susan Savage. 

Frances dau. of Henry & Elizabeth Rolfe. 

Mary dau. of Isaac & Mary Hide. 

Robert son of Joseph & Sarah Alderton. 

Elizabeth dau. of George «Sr Susan Cocksedge. 

Charles son of Robert & Sarah Pearl. 

Robert son of Robert & Mary Tooley. 

Samuel son of Joseph & Elizabeth Reeve. 

Thomas son of Thomas & Mary Barrell. 

Robert child of Amey Brook. 

Joseph son of John & Ann Farrow. 

Mary dau. of William & Mary Tooley. 

William son of John & Elizabeth Reeman. 

Mary dau. of Joseph & Sarah Alderton. 



122 



LITTLE WHELNEIHAM REGIS lERS.— BAPTISMS. 



Mary Betts child of Mary Rolfe. 

John son of John & Elizabeth Lias. 

Christian dau. of James & Elizabeth Auburn. 

Ann dau. of John & Ann Fresland. 

George son of George & Susan Cocksedge. 

Phinehas son of Jacob & Susan Savage. 

Anna Maria dau. of John & Ann Farrow. 

Mary dau. of Joseph <!!t Elizabeth Reeve. 

Frances dau. of William & Mary Tooley. 

Arthur .son of George & Elizabeth Biddell. * 

John son of Robert & Susan Pearl. 

The new Act of Parliament relating to Parish Register books 

takes place. 
Elizabeth dau. of Thomas «S: Sarah Barrell. 
John son of John (^ Sarah Cocksedge. 
Elizabeth dau. of Joseph & Sarah (Ely) Alderton. 
Isaac son of Joseph & Mary Farrow. 
Charlotte dau. of Daniel & Prudence Alderton. 
William son of Jacob & Elizabeth Savage. 
William son of William iSc Mary Tooley. 
Mary- Ann dau. of John ^: Sarah Co cksedge. 
William son of Thomas & Sarah Barrell. 
John son of .Ambrose & Phebe Clark. 
Rachel dau. of Thomas & Sarah Barrel. 
Bett dau. of William &: Mary Tooley. 
Ambrose son of Ambrose & Phebe Clark. 
Sarah dau. of John «S: Sarah Cocksedge. 
Elizabeth dau. of Thomas & Rebecca Nunn. 

Elizabeth dau, of Samuel «S: Eliza Casen. 
Mary dau. of Joseph & Elizabeth Reeve. 

Sophy dau. of John & Susan Bonnett. 

John son of Daniel &: Prudence Alderton. 



I78I. 


Feb. 


21. 




March 


2. 




March 


2. 




Dec. 


2. 




Dec. 


16. 


1782. 


Jan. 


27. 




June 


3- 




Nov. 


10. 


1783- 


Feb. 


23- 




March 


9- 




May 


4- 




Oct. 


I. 




Dec. 


14. 


1784. 


Jan. 


4- 




May 


16. 


1785. 


Aug. 


21. 




Sept. 


II. 




Nov. 


26. 


1786. 


Jan. 


8. 




March 


12. 




April 


17- 




May 


14. 


1787. 


July 


15- 




Aug. 


5- 




Dec. 


23- 


1788. 


March 


16. 




March 


23- 




May 


4- 




May 


18. 




June 


8, 




Aug. 


17 



* This entr}- has not been erased, though at first it looks as if it had been. It has been written 
over marks that were previously there. Ed. 





LITTLE 


1789. 


Jan. 


25- 




June 


5- 




June 


7- 




Oct. 


1 1. 


1790. 


March 


7- 




March 


21. 




April 


18. 




Aug. 


29. 


1791. 


Jan. 


2. 




.\pril 


10. 




May. 


I. 




Oct. 


4- 


1792. 


Feb. 


5- 




March 


1 1. 




June 


17- 




July 


15- 




July 


29. 




Sept. 


9- 




Sept. 


3°- 




Oct. 


28. 


1793- 


Jan. 


27. 




Feb. 


17- 




Sept. 


29. 




Dec. 


I. 


1794- 


Jan. 


10. 




Jau. 


12. 




Feb. 


9- 




Oct. 


5. 




Nov. 


13- 



WHELNEJ'HAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



12.3 



Sophia dau. of John & Mary Lawrence. 

William son of Thomas & Mary Marchant. 

Elizabeth dau. of Joseph & Mary Farrow. 

Ann dau. of AVilliam & Mary Tooley. 

Edith dau. of John & Sarah Cocksedge. 

Samuel son of Samuel & Mary Causin. 

John son of Avey & Frances Baker. 

Elizabeth & John children of Isaac & Ann Butcher. 

Rose dau. of William & Rose (Robinson) Dench. 

John son of Thomas & Rebecca Nunn. 

Sophia dau. of AVilliam &: Mary Tooley. 

James son of Joseph & Elizabeth Reeve. 

\Villiam son of William & Frances Baker. 

Louisa dau. of John & Sarah Cocksedge. 

Charlotte dau. of Isaac & Ann (Reman) Butcher. 

Sophia dau. of ^Villianl &: Elizabeth Lock. 

James son of Daniel &: Prudence Alderton. 

John son of Samuel & Mary Causin. 

John son of William & Sarah Rolfe. 

AVilliam son of William & Ann Parsons. 

John & James twins of John & Mary Bullock. 

Robert son of AVilliam & Mary Tooley. 

Henry son of John e^ Rachel (Lanham) Reman. 

Lucy dau. of Samuel (li: Elizabeth (Everett) Cawston. 

Rhode dau. of William & Ann (Hayward) Pearsons. * 

William son of AVMlliam & Ann (Hayward) Pearsons. Born 

Sept. 30, 1792. 
Martha dau. of Thomas «S: Rebekah (Palfrey) JNunn. 
Sophia dau. of William & Elizabeth (Dale) Lock. 
John son of John & Ann (Booby) Tweed. 



* The entries aie long at this time. Three dates are given to each child, viz. (i) when born, (2) 
when named or privately baptized, (3) when fully or pultlicly baptized or received into the Church. 
Of these three dates I have chosen the second under which to make the entry. As a general rule 
the private baptism takes place a day or two after birth, and the reception about a month after that. 
But Rhode Pearson is enteied as born Dec. 14, privately baptized Jan. 10, fully baptized Jan. 12. 
What was the use or meaning of the private baptism I dont know. 



124 


LITTLE 


1794- 


Nov. 


i6. 




Dec. 


7- 


1795- 


Jan. 


4- 




Feb. 


25- 




March 


29. 




May 


17- 




July 


19. 



WHELNLTHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



Oct. 



25- 



Lucy dau. of Joseph & EHzabeth (Drake) Reeve. 

Richard son of Joseph (S: Elizabeth Reeve. Born Aug. 1788. 

Dorothy dau. of Avey cS: Frances (Cawston) Baker. 

John son of Avey & Frances Baker. Born April 1790. 

Mary Ann dau. of John & Rachel (Lanham) Reeman. 

Sarah dau. of William & Mary (Mannerd) Tooley. 

Sarah dau. of James & Sarah (Bumpstead) Cooke. Born Dec. 

1794- 
Martha dau. of Tliomas ^^ Martha (Rampley) Alloni. Born 

Dec. 1794. 
Ambrose son of Samuel (Nc Sarah (Cook) Bugg. 
Thomas son of William & Ann (Hawes) Pearsons. 
William son of Thomas & Rebecca (Palfrey) Nunn. 
Sarah dau. of William & Sarah (Payne) Rolfe. 
Thomas child of Alary Barrell. 
Elizabeth dau. of John & Rachel Reeman. 
Walter son of John 'I'weed. 

Michael Thomas son of Mann & Hannah Hutchinson. 
Isaac son of Samuel & Sarah Bugg. 
John son of John «S: Dorothy Holt. 
\\^illiam son of William Tooley. 
Sarah dau. of Samuel ^: Sarah (Cook) Bugg. 
Sarah dau. of John & Rachel (Lannam) Reeman. Born Nov. 

1799. 
Sophia dau. of Samuel & Sophia (^Vright) Barrett. Born July 

1794. 
William son of Samuel & Sophia Barrett. Born May 1796. 
Lucy dau. of Samuel & Sophia Barrett. Born April 1798. 
Mary dau. of Samuel &: Elizabeth (Everitt) Cawston. 
Eliza Ann dau. of Samuel & Sophia (Wright) Barrett. 
George son of William & Mary (Mannerd) Tooley. 
Dorothy dau. of John & Dorothy (Casmg) Holt. 
Mary Ann dau. of Tohn A; Mary (Hitchcock) Cooke. 
Mary Ann Maria child of Mary Ann Bigsby. 
Jacob son of Samuel & Sarah (Cook) Bugg. 



1796. 


May 


I. 




June 


26. 


1797. 


Jan. 


8. 




May 


14. 




May 


22. 




June 


25- 




Oct. 


29. 




Nov. 


12. 


1798. 


Feb. 


25- 




April 


29. 




Sept. 


3°- 


1800. 


July 


13- 




Nov. 


2. 



Oct. 





Oct. 


23- 




Oct. 


23. 


I80I. 


Feb. 


8. 




May 


10. 




May 


31- 




June 


16. 




Sept. 


6. 


1802. 


March 


21. 




June 


20. 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



125 



Zoe dau. of Henry & Lydia (Dale) Braddock. 

Ann dau. of John & Sarah (Underwood) Redging. 

Thomas Samuel son of Samuel & Sophia (Wright) Barrett. 

William son of John & Rachel (Lanham) Reeman. 

William son of John & Mary (Hitchcock) Cook. 

Mary Ann dau. of Charles &; Ann (Ellis) Haward. 

Charles child of Alice Allen. 

Thomas son of Henry & Lydia (Dale) Braddock. 

John son of William & Elizabeth (Goei) Barret. 

Ann dau, of Samuel & Sarah (Cook) Bugg. 

Charles son of Robert & Sarah (Decks) Ungles. Publicly 

baptized at Bradfield Combust Jan. 12, 1806. 
Mary Ann dau. of Henry & Charlotte (Allington) Rofe. 
Sarah dau. of John & Mary (Hitchcock) Cook. 
Frances dau. of Robert &: Mary (Baker) Cawston. 
Elizabeth dau. of Edward & Sarah (Nunn) Smith. 
James son of William &: Sarah (^Girt) Butcher. 
Maria Ely child of Mary Tooley. 
Sophia child of Mary Bugg. 
John son of Thomas & Maria (Pettit) Webb. 
Joseph son of Samuel & Sarah (Cook) Bugg. 
Mary Ann dau. of Robert & Mary Ann (Winkup) Alderton. 
Martha Ann dau. of John & Mary (Hitchcock) Cook. 
William son of Joseph & Mary (Nun) Pettit. 
Susan dau. of William &: Sarah (Girt) Butcher of Kettlebaston. 
Wilham child of Alice Allen. 
Elizabeth child of Ruth Fenner. 
Elizabeth dau. of Thomas & Maria (Pettit) Webb. 
Sarah dau. of Thomas & Ann (Holt) Elder. 
William son of Thomas & Sarah (Bulmer) Cooper. 
^Villiam son of Jacob & Mary (Man) Ramsbotham. 
Robert son of Robert & Mary Ann (Winkup) Alderton. 
Lucy dau. of ^Villiam & Sarah (Girt) Butcher. 
Betsy dau. of Robert & Mary Ann (Whincop) Alderton. 
Lucy dau. of John \: Rachel (Langham) Reeman. 

SffAH COUNTY GENEALOGICAt: 
AND HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



1803. 


March 


13- 




April 


8. 




May 


I. 




July 


10. 




Sept. 


5- 


J 804. 


]\Iay 


27. 




Oct. 


28. 




Dec. 


2. 


1805. 


Jan, 


8. 




May 


3- 




May 


6. 




June 


23- 




Oct. 


27. 


1806. 


Feb. 


16. 




April 


20. 




June 


29. 




Aug. 


10. 


1807. 


May 


24. 




Sept. 


6. 


1808. 


Feb. 


7- 




March 


12. 




May 


24. 


1809. 


Feb. 


19. 




Feb. 


19. 




July 


23- 


I8I0. 


Jan. 


14. 




March 


25- 




Aug. 


19. 




Nov. 


25- 


I81I. 


Feb. 


3- 




April 


28. 




June 


9- 




July 


29. 




Aug. 


11. 



126 


LITTLE 


i8ii. 


Nov. 


10. 


1812. 


June 


14. 




July 


26. 




Dec. 


25- 


1813. 


Jan. 


3- 




Jan. 


3- 




April 


1 1. 




March 


7- 




Aug. 


29. 


1814. 


Jan. 


9- 




Jan. 


31- 




May 


8. 




Sept. 


II. 




Sept. 


25- 




Dec. 


18. 


1815. 


Feb. 


5- 




Feb. 


26. 




Sept. 


17- 




Nov. 


26. 


1816. 


Jan. 


28. 




Jan. 


14. 




Feb. 


1 1. 




Feb. 


25- 




J une 


9- 


1817. 


March 


20. 




April 


6. 




May 


25- 




July 


6. 




July 


20. 




Sept. 


13- 



WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



Aug. 



Sophia dau. of Jame.s & Sophia (Hawkins) Sturgeon. 
Robert son of Samuel & Sarah (Cook) Bugg, labourer. 
Betsy dau. of John tSj Margaret (Plumb) Wright, labourer. 
Ann dau. of James &: Elizabeth (Ambrose) Padley, labourer. 
John son of Jacob & Mary (Mann) Ramsbotham, labourer. 
Lucy dau. of John & Rachel (Langham) Reeman, labourer. 
Mary dau. of William & Elizabeth (Banks) Reeman, labourer. 
Frederick son of Thomas tSc Ann (Holt) Elder, labourer. 
Sophia & Mary Ann twins of Judith Willingham. 
Sarah Wincop dau. of Robert & Mary Ann (Wincop) Aldertdn, 

blacksmith. 
William son of James & Ann (Sier) Barwick, farmer. 
Charles son of William & Sarah (Girt) Butcher, labourer. 
James son of William & Deborah (Knight) Parsons, labourer. 
John son of John & Sarah (Stephens) Austin, labourer. 
Ambrose son of James & Elizabeth (Ambrose) Padley, labourer. 
Charles son of Charles &: Hannah (^^'arren) Manning, publican. 
Elizabeth dau. of Jacob & Mary (Mann) Ramsbotham, labourer. 
James son of Thomas & Ann (Holt) Elder, labourer. 
William &: Henry sons of Thomas & Jane (Greenberry) Woolsey, 

labourer. 
Elizabeth dau. of Samuel & Susan (Nunn) Cason, labourer. 
Merinda dau. of Robert «S: Mary Ann (Wincop) Alderton, 

blacksmith. 
Mary Ann dau. of John & Lucy (Sutton) Reeman, labourer. 
William son of John & Sarah (Stephens) Austin, labouier. 
James son of Richard & Sarah (Parsons) Jackaman, bricklayer. 
George son of William & Deborah (Knight) Parsons, labourer. 
William son of John & Elizabeth Emerson, innkeeper. 
Edward son of Thomas & Ann (Flolt) Elder, labourer. 
Susan dau. of Jacob & Mary (Mann) Ramsbotham, labourer. 
Edward son of Thomas & Jane (Greenberry) Woolsey, labourer. 
William son of Charles &: Elizabeth (Smith) Rushbrooke, labourer. 
Mary dau. of John & Sarah (Stephens) Aston, labourer. 
Maria dau. of Jacob & Mary (Parsons) Alderton, labourer. 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



127 



I8I8. 


March 


8. 




May 


24. 




July 


12. 




July 


19. 




Aug. 


9- 




Aug. 


30- 




Sept. 


6. 




Dec. 


27. 


I8I9. 


Jan. 


10. 




Feb. 


14. 




March 


24. 




May 


22. 




Sept. 


12. 




Oct. 


3- 


1820. 


Feb. 


13- 




May 


28. 




June 


4- 




July 


9- 




Sept. 


17- 




Oct. 


8. 




Oct. 


19. 


I82I. 


April 


29. 




April 


29. 




July 


I. 




Aug. 


12. 




Dec. 


2. 


1822. 


June 


30. 




June 


30. 




Sept. 


I 




Sept. 


15- 




Sept. 


22. 




Oct. 


6. 


1823. 


Jan. 


I. 



George son of James & Elizabeth Bennet, labourer. 

Mark son of William & Deborah Parsons, labourer. 

Samuel son of Samuel & Susan Cason, labourer. 

Emily dau. of Richard & Sarah Jackaman, bricklayer. 

Charlotta dau. of Robert & Mary Ann Alderton, blacksmith. 

Ezra Theobald son of Joseph & Judith Ann Mills, shoemaker. 

Samuel son of Samuel & Elizabeth Aves, labourer. 

Henry son of Robert & Sarah Holmes, labourer. 

Isaac son of Thomas & Maria Bugg, labourer. 

George son of Judith Willingham. 

Charles son of James &: Mary Ramsbottom, labourer. 

Sophia dau. of Thomas & Ann Elder, labourer. 

Robert son of Jacob & Mary AUerton, labourer. 

James son of John & Sarah Aston, labourer. 

James son of James & Elizabeth Bennett, labourer. 

Anna Maria dau. of Robert cSj: Mary Anne Alderton, blacksmith. 

Robert son of Joseph & Mary Pettit, labourer. 

Mahala [dau. ? of] Joseph & Judith Ann Mills, shoemaker. 

Susan dau. of George & Sarah Banham, labourer. 

Elizabeth dau. of Samuel & Elizabeth Aves, labourer. 

Sarah dau. of Robert & Sarah Holmes, labourer. 

Mary Ann Caroline dau. of Richard & Sarah Jackaman, 
bricklayer. 

Daniel son of James & Mary Ramsbottom, labourer. 

\Villiam son of Anna Maria Willingham. 

Emily dau. of William & Elizabeth Smith, carpenter. 

Thomas son of James & Elizabeth Bennett, labourer. 

Mary dau. of George & Sarah Banham, labourer. 

William son of Robert & Frances Holmes, shepherd. 

Maria dau. of Joseph & Mary Pettett, labourer. 

William son of Joseph & Elizabeth Mills, labourer. 

Laban son of Joseph & Judith Ann Mills, shoemaker. 

James son of Samuel & Elizabeth Avis, shepherd. 

Edward Samuel son of Samuel Hurry & Jane Frances Alderson, 
clerk. 



128 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



Lois dau. of Robert & Elizabeth Tooley, labourer. 

Martha dau. of Robert & IVTary Ann Alderton, blacksmith. 

Henry son of Stephen & Sarah Knock, labourer. 

James Thomas son of Samuel Hurry & Jane Frances Alderson, 

clerk. 
William son of Henry & Sarah Reeman of Great W. labourer. 
Marianne dau. of William &: Elizabeth Smith, carpenter. 
Eliza dau. of Samuel & Elizabeth Avis, shepherd. 
Isaiah son of Joseph &: Judeth Ann Mills, shoemaker. 
Charles son of Jacob & Mary Ramsbottom, labourer. 
Robert son of George & Sarah Banham, labourer. 
Robert son of Robert & Elizabeth Tooley, labourer. 
George son of Joseph & Elizabeth Mills, labourer. 
James \\'illiam son of Robert & Mary Ann Alderton, blacksmith. 
Philip Robert son of Samuel Hurry & Jane Frances Alderson, 

clerk. 
Alfred son of Thomas & Maria Bugg, labourer. 
James Westrup son of Samuel & Elizabeth Bromley of Little 

Whelnetham Lieut : R.N. 
Hannah dau. of Flenry & Sarah Reeman, labourer. 
Louisa Ann dau. of Stephen & Sarah Knock, labourer. 
Charles son of Mark <& Lydia Dyson, labourer. 
George son of Robert tSc Frances Holmes, shepherd. 
Harriet dau of Henry & Elizabeth Pearl, labourer. 
George son of Robert &: Elizabeth Tooley, labourer. 
William son of Robert & Dorothy Alvis, labourer. 
Sophia dau. of Samuel & Elizabeth Avis, labourer. 
Alice Prescott Brett dau. of John & Alice Brett of Keddistone 

in Norfolk, farmer, aged 24 years. 
Samuel Brett son of Samuel & Alice Prescott Brett Howard of 

Little Whelnetham, turnpike keeper. 
Elizabeth dau. of George <Sc Sarah Banham, labourer. 
Eliza dau. of John & Mary Hammond, shepherd. 
Robert son of James & Elizabeth Lawrence, blacksmith. 



1823. 


March 


9' 




May 


30' 




July 


13 


1824. 


Feb. 


20. 




Feb. 


22. 




July 


25- 




Sept. 


19. 




Sept. 


[9. 




Oct. 


24. 


1825. 


Jan. 


16. 




March 


6. 




April 


16. 




July 


31- 




Sept. 


19. 




Oct. 


2. 




Oct. 


6. 




Oct. 


16. 


1826. 


Jan. 


8. 




Jan. 


25- 




July 


2. 


IS27. 


March 


12. 




May 


13- 




J une 


10. 




June 


17- 




July 


I. 



July 



Sent. 


16. 


Dec. 


9- 


Dec. 


12. 





LITTLE 


i828. 


March 


23- 




March 


30. 




April 


12. 




June 


22. 




June 


29. 




Oct. 


3°- 




Dec. 


17- 


1829. 


March 


15- 




March 


22. 




July 


13- 




Aug. 


16. 




Sept. 


27- , 




Oct. 


25- : 




Nov. 


29. ; 




Dec. 


25- 


1830. 


Feb. 


28. 




March 


14. 




July 


1 1. 




Nov, 


10. 


1831. 


Jan. 


23- 




Jan. 


3°- 




Jan. 


3°- 




Feb. 


20. 




July 


3- 




Nov. 


13- 




Nov. 


13- 




Dec. 


4. 


1832. 


Feb. 


19. 




March 


II. 




May 


I. 




June 


17. 



WHELNETHAM REGIS TERS.—RAPITSMS. 



129 



Robert son of Stephen & Sarah Knock, labourer. 

Sarah dau. of Henry & Sarah Reeman. labourer. 

Sarah dau. of Thomas & Maria Bugg, labourer. 

Mary Anne dau. of Joseph & Elizabeth Mills, labourer. 

Mary Anne dau. of William & Martha Last, labourer. 

Jane Fanny dau. of Samuel Hurry & Jane F. Alderson, clerk. 

George son of Charles &: Sarah Drury, labourer. 

George son of Robert & Dorothy Aves, labourer. 

John son of Robert &: Elizabeth Tooley, labourer. 

Louisa dau. of Mark & Lydia Dyson, labourer. 

Reuben son of Henry & Ann Bantick, labourer. 

Joseph son of Samuel &: Elizabeth Aves, labourer. 

Edward son of James & Elizabeth Lawrence, blacksmith. 

Mary Ann dau. of William & Sarah Case, shoemaker. 

Lucy Ann dau. of Robert & Mary x\nn Alderton, blacksmith. 

Rosina dau. of Henry &: Sarah Reeman, labourer. 

John Robert son of William & Susan Reeman of Great ^V. 

labourer. 
Edward son of George &: Sarah Banham, labourer. 
Elizabeth Mary dau. of Samuel Hurry & Jane F. Alderson, clerk. 
Charles son of James & Elizabeth Lawrence, blacksmith. 
William Henry son of William & Elizabeth Tooley, labourer. 
Alfred son of Thomas & Maria Bugg, labourer. 
George son of Jacob «S: Eliza Bugg, labourer. 
Emma dau. of William & Sarah Case, shoemaker. 
Charles son of Robert tS: Elizabeth Tooley, carpenter. 
Edward son of .Stephen & Sarah Knock, labourer. 
Harriet Augusta dau. of John & Elizabeth Frost of Great W. 

labourer. 
Ambrose Charles son of Samuel & Elizabeth Aves, labourer. 
Marianne dau. of Henry &; Ann Bantock, labourer. 
Ellen Hurry dau. of Samuel Hurry &: Jane F. Alderson, clerk. 
Alfred son of Jacob & Eliza Bugg, labourer. 



130 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



1832. June 
July 
Nov. 
Nov. 

1833. Jan. 
March 
June 

Sept. 

Oct. 



24. 

15- 
II. 
12. 

6. 

2. 



24. 



1834. 


Jan. 


9- 




Jan. 


26. 




March 


2. 




March 


28. 




July 


27. 




July 


27. 




July 


27. 




Aug. 


10. 




Nov. 


23- 




Dec. 


21. 


1835- 


Jan. 


1 1. 




March 


22. 




March 


29 




April 


17- 




Sept. 


5 



Oct. 



1836. Jan. 



Elizabeth dau. of Joseph & Elizabeth Mills, labourer. 

Mary dau. of William & Elizabeth Tooley, labourer. 

John son of Henry & Sarah Reeman, labourer. 

Jane dau. of Mark i^^ Lydia Dyson, labourer. 

Jane dau. of James c^ Mary Anne Pryke, labourer. 

Sarah Anne dau. of William & Sarah (Tooley) Case, shoemaker. 

Henry William son of William & Susan (Farrow) Reeman of 

Great ^Vhelnetham, labourer. 
Edwin Henry son of James & Elizabeth (Morris) Lawrence, 

blacksmith. 
Henry son of Henry John & Charlotte Elizabeth (Gould) 

Hasted, clerk. 
Josiah son of Mary Ashman of Bury St. Edmund's. 
William son of Jacob & Eliza (Baylham) Bugg, labourer. 
Elizabeth dau. of William & Elizabeth (Ranson) Tooley, labourer. 
Arthur John son of Frederick &: Anne (Pryke) Denton, farmer. 
Thomas son of Robert & Elizabeth (Bridges) Tooley, carpenter. 
Henry son of Samuel & Elizabeth (Turner) Avis, labourer. 
Elizabeth Anne dau. of Robert & Mary Anne (Groom) Bugg, 

labourer. 
Caroline dau. of Stephen & Sarah (Seeley) Knox, labourer. 
Alfred son of Dennis & Phoebe (Howe) Pulfer, of Great 

Whelnetham, labourer. 
James son of Joseph & Elizabeth (Freeman) Mills, labourer. 
Su.sanna dau. of Henry & Sarah (Parish) Reeman, labourer. 
John son of James <!i: Elizabeth (Morris) Lawrence, blacksmith. 
Emma dau. of William & Sarah (Tooley) Case, shoemaker. 
Mary Anne dau. of William & Susan (Farrow) Reeman, labourer. 
John Ord son of Henry John & Charlotte Elizabeth (Gould) 

Hasted, clerk. 
William Henry son of Frederick & Anne (Pryke) Denton, 

farmer. 
Alfred son of Joseph & Eliza (Last) Bugg of Great Whelnetham, 

labourer. 



LIITLK ^VHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTiSMS. 



131 



1836. Feb. 7. 
March 13. 
April 24. 
June 12. 

Nov. 7. 

Dec. 4. 

1837. Feb. 12. 
Feb. 26. 

March 5. 

April 16. 

May 28. 

Oct. 8. 

Dec. 17. 

1838. Jan. 18. 

Feb. 4. 

March 1 1 . 

March 18. 

April 29. 

July 8. 

July 15- 

1839. March 24. 

April 6. 

May 19. 

July 21. 

Dec. 25. 



James son of Hannah Parish. 

Elizabeth dau. of James & Mary Anne (Rolfe) Pryke, labourer. 
Henry son of Jacob & Eliza (Baylham) Bugg, labourer. 
James son of William & Elizabeth (Ransom) Tooley, labourer. 
Edward Gould son of Henry John & Charlotte Elizabeth 

(Gould) Hasted, clerk. 
Caroline dau. of Robert & Elizabeth (Bridges) Tooley, carpenter. 
Fanny dau. of Samuel & Elizabeth (Turner) Avis, labourer. 
William son of James & Elizabeth (Morris) Lawrence, 

blacksmith. 
Sarah Matilda dau. of Robert & Mary Anne (Groom) Bugg of 

Great Whelnetham, labourer. 
Rachel dau. of Henry & Sarah (Parish) Reeman, labourer. 
Thomas son of Joseph & Elizabeth (Freeman) Mills, labourer. 
Christopher son of Thomas & Maria (Clarke) Bugg, labourer. 
Thomas son of ^Villiam & Susan (Farrow) Reeman, labourer. 
Frederick Robert son of Frederick iS; Anne (Pryke) Denton, 

farmer. 
Emily dau. of Jacob &: Eliza (Baylham) Bugg, labourer. 
George son of James & Mary Anne (Rolfe) Pryke, labourer. 
Hannah dau. of Isaac & Mary Anne (Good) Butcher of Great 

^^'helnetham, labourer. 
Alice dau. of William &: Elizabeth (Ranson) Tooley, labourer. 
Robert son of Robert & Mary Anne (Groom) Bugg, of Great 

Whelnetham, labourer. 
George son of Louisa Alderton of Thingoe Union House. 
Georgina dau. of James & Elizabeth (Morris) Lawrence, 

blacksmith. 
Georgiana dau. of Frederick &: Anne (Pryke) Denton, farmer. 
William son of Robert & Mary Anne (Reeman) Last, labourer. 
Sarah Anne dau. of Robert &: Elizabeth (Bridges) Tooley, 

carpenter. 
Benjamin son of Joseph & Elizabeth (Freeman) Mills, labourer. 



13: 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM Rl'LGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 



1839. Dec. 25. 

1840. March i. 
March i. 
April 15. 
April 26. 

May 23. 

May 24. 

June 2 1 . 

July 5- 

July 7- 

Dec. 20. 

1841. June 20. 

June 20. 

June 20. 

July 2. 

July 10. 

Aug. 12. 



Nov. 
Dec. 



21. 

5- 



1842. June 26. 

June 26. 
July 10. 



July 



24. 



Charles James son of William Dench & Lucy Rebecca CHogg) 

Major, carpenter. 
Sarah dau. of W^illiam & Susan (Farrow) Reeman, labourer. 
Charlotte dau. of James & Charlotte (Alderton) Padley, labourer 
Sarah Anne dau. of Matilda Alderton. 
William son of William & Martha (Offord) Bugg of Great 

Whelnetham, labourer. 
George Henry son of Robert & Susanna (White) Robinson, 

turnpike-gate keeper. 
Maria dau. of Robert & Lucy (Pettit) Hardy of Great 

Whelnetham, labourer. 
Frederick son of James & Elizabeth (Morns) Lawrence, 

blacksmith. 
Arthur son of Jacob & Eliza (Baylham) Bugg, labourer. 
Edward son of Frederick «S: Anne (Pryke) Denton, farmer. 
Louisa dau. of Dennis & Phoebe (Howe) Pulfer, labourer. 
Emily dau. of William & Martha (Offord) Bugg of Great 

Whelnetham, labourer. 
Arthur son of Emily Alderton of Great ^Vhelnetham. 
Abraham son of Ellen Knox or Knock. 
John Harry son of Frederick & Lucy (Bruce) Fenton of Great 

Whelnetham, farmer. 
Walter son of John &: Hannah (Avis) Scarfe labourer. 
Weaker Craske son of Henry John & Charlotte Elizabeth (Gould) 

Hasted, clerk. 
George son of Henry & Sarah (Parish) Reeman, labourer. 
Alice dau. of William &: Elizabeth (Ransom) Tooley, labourer. 
John son of John &: Elizabeth (Retham) Rodwell of Great 

Whelnetham, servant. 
George son of George & Susan (Cawston) Mingay, labourer. 
Maria dau. of John & Mary (King) Coe of Great Whelnetham, 

labourer. 
Henry son of Joseph & Elizabeth (Freeman) Mills, labourer. 



LITPLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BAPTISMS. 133 



Nov. 


13- 


Jan. 


8. 


Feb. 


12. 


Aus. 


20. 



May 


5 


May 


5- 


June 


2. 


Aug. 


25' 


Feb. 


24, 


March 


2, 



1842. Aug. 7. Elizabeth dau. of James & EHzabeth (Morris) Lawrence, 

blacksmith. 
James son of William & Susan (Farrow) Reeman, labourer. 

1843. Jan. 8. Charlotte Anna dau. of Anna Alderton. 
Emma dau. of John & Hannah (Avis) Scarfe, labourer. 
Eliza & William twins of Dennis «S: Phoebe (Howe) Pulfer, 

labourer. 
1S44. March 24. George son of John &: Elizabeth (Retham) Rodwell of Great 

Whelnetham, servant. 
Clarence Edward son of William Dench & Lucy Rebecca (Hogg) 

Major, innkeeper. 
Frederick son of Reuben & Anne (Girton) Warren of Great 

Whelnetham, bricklayer. 
Henry son of Samuel & Esther (Coe) Smith, carpenter. 
^Valter son of Jacob & Eliza (Baylham) Bugg, labourer. 

1845. Feb. 24. James son of Ellen Knock. Born April, 1844. 
William Henry son of William & Elizabeth (Ranson) Tooley, 

labourer. 
March 9. Sarah Mary Anne dau. of Samuel S: Sarah (Rollinson) Fisher, 
brick-maker. 
Rachel dau. of William & Susan (Farrow) Reeman, labourer. 

1846. Feb. 8. Charlotte dau. of John & Hannah (Avis) Scarfe, labourer. 
Eliza dau. of Eliza Avis. 

Flenry son of Robert & Mary Anne (Marsh) Tooley, carpenter. 
John son of Dennis & Phoebe (Howe) Pulfer, labourer. 
Arthur Perkins son of Robert & Amelia (Perkins) Fletcher, 

tollgate keeper. 
Rosina dau. of Jacob & Eliza (Baylham) Bugg, labourer. 
Pauline Lucy Elizabeth dau. of William Dench & Lucy Rebecca 

(Hogg) Major, inn-keeper. 

1847. Jan. 24. Elizabeth dau. of John & Elizabeth (Retham; Rodwell of Great 

Whelnetham, servant. 
Sept. 12. Maryanne dau. of George & Susanna (Cawston) Mingay, labourer. 
Nov. 21. John son of Samuel & Esther (Coe) Smith, carpenter. 



Nov. 


9- 


Feb. 


8. 


Feb. 


8. 


July 


19. 


Sept 


13- 


Nov. 


8. 


Nov. 


8. 


Nov. 


20. 



134- littlp: whelnetham registers.— baptisms. 



1848. May 21. Caroline dau. of Thomas «Sc Sarah (Catchpole) Bruce, domestic 
servant. 
Jane dau. of Charles & Ellen (Knock) Drury, labourer. 
George son of John & Hannah (Avis) Scarfe, labourer. 
Ellen dau. of John & Elizabeth (Retham) Rodwell, servant. 
Robert son of Samuel & Drusilla (Risby) Ford, toll-gate keeper. 
William son of William & Susan (Farrow) Reeman, labourer. 
Jane dau. of Elizabeth Avis. 

Douglas Wallace son of Thomas & Sarah (Catchpole) Bruce, 
butler. 
Aug, 4. Mary Anne dau. of Charles & Ellen Drury, labourer. 





July 


16. 




Sept. 


10. 




Dec. 


3- 


1849. 


April 


2. 




April 


29. 


1850. 


June 


2. 




June 


23- 






LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.- MARRIAGES. 



1:55 



MARRIAGEB. 



1557- 


Sept. 


29. 


Robert Kent 


& 


Hellen Godard. 


1562. 


June 


21. 


William Symont 


& 


Alice Goddard. 


1565- 


Sept. 


30- 


Roger ^Varde 


& 


Joan fibster. 




Dec. 


— 


Robert Nune 


& 


Prudence Howe. 


1566. 


June 


II. 


Henry Nune 


& 


Mary Goddard. 




Oct. 


15- 


John Wynter 


& 


Elizabeth Carver. 


1569. 


Oct. 


4- 


Roger Deay 


& 


Joan Harrison. 


1572. 


May 


6. 


John Croftes 


& 


Ciscily Nune widdow. 




June 


15- 


John Overing 


& 


Hellen Skittler. 




Aug. 


3- 


Robert Nune 


& 


Elizabeth Steven. 


1573- 


March 


3°- 


Andrew Playfer 


& 


Rebecca fibster. 




April 


4- 


Thomas Manhood 


& 


Elizabeth Eriant. 




June 


27. 


John Hildred 


& 


Alice ffitts. 




Nov. 


12. 


William ffoule 


& 


Elizabeth Peche. 


1574- 


— 


— 


Robert Browne 


& 


Agnes Hewett widdow 


I575- 


Oct. 


23- 


Roger Chapman 


& 


Joan Elmer. 




March 


19. 


Thomas Spillsby 


& 


Alice Nune widdow. 


1577- 


Nov. 


6. 


John Hill 


& 


Margaret Bramston. 


1580. 


July 


5- 


Thomas Parker 


& 


Agnes Elmer. 




July 


21. 


William Skarpe 


& 


Mary fibster. 


158c. 


Nov. 


17- 


Henry Andrews 


& 


Christian Randall. 




Feb. 


4- 


William Elmar 


& 


Joan Hunt. 


1583- 


July 


25- 


John Kendall 


& 


Anne Innold. 


1585- 


July 


19. 


John Rowland 


& 


Margarett Baker. 




Aug. 


22. 


William Honiton 


& 


Joan Goodchild. 




Feb. 


17- 


John Heyward 


& 


Agnes Weight. 


issy- 


Dec. 


23- 


Thomas ffornaham 


& 


Alice Harpley vidua. 



136 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— ALARRL\( IKS. 



1588. 


Nov. 


7- 


Robert Uebneham 


& 


.Mary Innold. 


1589. 


March 


19. 


Robert ffuUer 


& 


Anne Debenhani. 


1592- 


July 


25- 


Edward ffillbrigg 


& 


Elizabeth Mannings. 


1595- 


Feb. 


23- 


Gualter Winter 


& 


Anne Hunt. 


1597- 


April 


21. 


William Thedam gen. 


& 


Christian MinshuU. 




Oct. 


t8. 


Anthony Mille.s 


& 


Dorothy Howe. 


1598. 


June 


5- 


John Adams 


.:i: 


Mary ^Vard. 




July 


25- 


Robert Colman 


& 


Joan Rowland. 


1600. 


May 


6. 


Richard Howe 


& 


Jone Howe. 


1602. 


June 


22. 


John Howe 


& 


Ann Howe. 


1603. 


June 


14. 


John ^Verner 


& 


Margett Rowland widdowe. 


1605. 


July 


23- 


Henrye Hilldrid 


& 


Elizabeth Browne. 




July 


25- 


Anthony Pitt 


& 


Ellen Steward. 


1608. 


June 


6. 


John Tillett 


& 


Elizabeth Hoult. 


1609. 


Jan. 


30. 


Richard Hall 


& 


Diana Miles [?]. 


1613. 


May 


2. 


Daniell Snowe 


& 


Abigail! Wolffenden. 


1614. 


Sept. 


12. 


John Sergent 


& 


Agnes Huett. 




Oct. 


18. 


Rodger Dikes 


& 


Amy Nayler. 


1615. 


April 


18. 


Georg Cocke 


& 


Rose Frost. 


1619. 


Aug. 


12. 


Henry Howe 


&: 


Susan Wiffin. 




Jan. 


18. 


Raffe Manninge 


& 


Marabl Croftes. 


1620. 


July 


10. 


Joseph Kichiner 


& 


Abigaill Briant. 


1622. 


April 


3°- 


Thomas Mairett 


& 


Susan Wolffenden. 




April 


30- 


William Eelye 


& 


Bridgett Dimbleton. 




Oct. 


22. 


Henry Peachye 


& 


Dorithe Howe. 


1625. 


Nov. 


10. 


Gabriel Catchpoole 


& 


Ann Lady man. 


1626. 


April 


18. 


Thomas Baxter 


& 


Marion Culham. 


1632. 


Nov. 


6. 


William Dtiye 


& 


Mary Coltrop. 


1634. 


May 


5- 


Christopher Stafford 


& 


Dorothy Dimbleton single. 




June 


10. 


Thomas Sache widdovver 


& 


Anne Davy widdow. 




Nov. 


24. 


John Sargeant widdower 


& 


Rose Kinge single. 


1635- 


Oct. 


28. 


Anthony Hayward 


& 


Elizabeth Andre wes. 




Jan. 


21. 


John Mills 


& 


Sara Dimbleton. 


1636. 


Oct. 


23- 


Edmund Goymer 


& 


Elizabeth Goodman. 


1637. 


Oct. 


26. 


John Stileman 


& 


Dorothy Coltrop. 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGLSTERS.— MARRLAGES. 137 



1637. 


Nov. 


2. 


Thomas Raye 


& 


Rose Sargeant. 




Jan. 


18. 


^Villianl Pausy 


& 


Marget Andrews. 


1638. 


Oct. 


3- 


Roger Bulbrook 


& 


Lucretia More. 




Jan. 


5- 


Stephen Benche 


& 


Sara Corder. 


1639. 


Oct. 


29. 


John Hey ward 


& 


Deborah Whiteing. 


1640. 


Oct. 


28. 


John Crouch 


& 


Susan Andrewes. 



1663. 


Oct. 


29. 


1667. 


May 


9- 




June 


1 1. 


1669. 


May 


20. 


1671. 


Aug. 


31- 




Sept. 


14. 


1672. 


Feb. 


2. 


1673. 


Aug. 


TO. 


1677. 


Nov. 


15- 


1679. 


June 


TO. 


1681. 


Dec. 


27- 




Dec. 


27. 


1682. 


July 


31- 


1684. 


Oct. 


2. 




Oct. 


16. 




Oct. 


30- 


1685. 


Oct. 


8. 


1686. 


July 


II. 


1687. 


June 


9- 



William Baldwyn of Thorpe Moirux & Elizabeth Smyth widdow 

of Lawshall. 
John Padley &: Sarah Cason. 
Robert Folkard & ]Mary ^^'yat. 
John Usher of St Mary's, Bury, & Mary Bridon of St. James, 

Bury. 
George Baker of Hopton, widower, & Mary Pett of Bury St 

Edmunds. L. 
John Leech of Little ^Vheltham & Sarah Robinson. 
John Toole of Rushbrooke &: Mary Palmer both single. L. 
William Taylor & Ursula Steward. 

William Lilly of Stansted &: Joane Robinson of little Wheltham. 
Joseph Bumsted & Ann Taylor both of Rushbrooke. 
James Garwood & Mary Baker. 
Thomas Dunham of Bury St Edmonds & Elizabeth Baker of 

Norton. 
John Iwring & ATartha Goodday. 
John Lvring & Susan Rose. 
Mr John Hunt of Bradfield St George 
Mrs Rachel Agas of Rushbrook. 
George Smith & Elizabeth Rose. 

Mr Robert Smith & Mrs. Mary Bi.xby both of Thorpe Morreux. 
Paul Chaplin & Elizabeth Dunham both of Bury St Edmonds. 
John Whiterod & Elizabeth Tooley. 



138 LITTLE WHELNETHAM RPXHSTERS.- MARRIAGES. 



1690. 


Oct. 


9- 


I70I. 


May 


25- 


1702. 


Sept. 


6. 



Philip Pilbrow & Grace Hodson. 
John Threder & Elizabeth White. 
John How of Great \\'helthani single 
Mary Frost of Little Wheltham single. 
1704. Oct. 15. Leonard Clarke of ffornham All Saints 
Bridgitt Sparke of Great Barton. 

William Leigh of Rattlesden & Bridgitt King of Little Wheltham. 
Thomas King single & Rose Sparrow widow both of Little W. 
James Hart & Ann Wales both single & of Rushbrooke. 
Thomas Shoosmith of Rushbrooke & Susan Frost of Little W. 
Thomas Nun of Great Wheltham 
Mary Whiterod of Little "Wheltham. 
James ffrost & Mary fiflacke both of Little Wheltham. 
Robert Jervas &: ffrances Barett both of Little Wheltham. 
Thomas Paske of Great Wheltham 
Elizabeth Durrant of Little Wheltham. 

Robert Canham of Rushbrook «&: Elizabeth King of Little W. 
Isaac Wilson & Ann Howe both of Rushbrook. 
Edward Burch of Beighton single 
Margarett Mourett of Lavenham single. 
James Piett & Esther Sparke both single & of Little W. 
George Brook &: Elizabeth Smith. 
John Crick of Lawshill 

Martha Eurin of Little Wheltham both single. 
Burrough Sharp of St Maries in St Edmunds Bury single 
Ann Dolby of the same single. Licence. 
Richard Flail of Rushbrook single 
Tabitha Knock of this parish widow. Licence. 

1744. Oct. 25. Thomas Balls of Great Whelnetham 

Hannah Parish of Little 'Whelnetham both single. B. 

1745. June 30. Henry Grimwood widower 

Rebecca Ross single both of Thorp Morieux. 
Jan. 13. Robert London single & Hannah Haward single. 
1748. May 5. Thomas Wright of Felsham single 

Elizabeth Rose of this parish single. 



1705- 


June 


24. 


1706. 


Jan. 


19. 


I7I0. 


Aug. 


20. 




Nov. 


12. 


I7I4. 


Oct. 


7- 


i7'5- 


Nov. 


13- 




Feb. 


2. 


1724. 


Oct. 


I. 


1725- 


July 


II. 




Feb. 


22. 


1728. 


July 


9- 


1733- 


Nov. 


I. 




Feb. 


25- 


1734- 


Jan. 


13- 


1736. 


April 


27. 


1738. 


April 


3- 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— MA RRL-VGES. 139 



1750. Dec. 3. Abraham Fenn of St Maries in Bury St Edmunds single 

Abigail Sparke of the same single. L. 
1752. Oct. 16. Stephen Allcock of Lackford 

Frances Ling of Little Whelnetham both single. 

1757. Jan. 13. Charles Bumpstead of Woolpit 

Ann Ling of Little Whelnetham both single. 
Nov. 5. John Fenner widower & Prudence Reeve widow both of Little AV. 

1758. Jan. 3. Robert Tooly single of Great Whelnetham 

Frances Andrews single of Little Whehietham. 
March 28. Thomas Rolfe single 

Elizabeth Scutchy widow both of Little Whelnetham. 
John Allen & Elizabeth Gooch both single & of this parish. 
William Lingley single of Great Whelnetham 
Mary Ely single of Little Whelnetham. 
Nicholas Jackson of Bradfield St George widower 
Jane Briant of this parish widow. 

Ambrose Clarke & Elizabeth Plum both single & of this parish. 
Robert Christmas & Sarah Alderton both single & of this parish. 
Thomas Rolfe widower & Mary Nunn single both of this parish. 
Henry Rolfe single & Elizabeth Flack widow both of this parish. 
Thomas Manning of Barrow 
Mary Gurling of Little Whelnetham both single. 
Robert Gurling & Alice Marchant both single & of Little W. 
John Farrow of Great Whelnetham 
Ann Brook of Little Whelnetham both single. 
1770. Jan. 12. John Durrant of Cockfield 

Diana Marchant of Little Whelnetham both single. 
Oct. II. John Notley of Bradfield St George 

Ann Lord of Little Whelnetham both single. 

John Gurling & Elizabeth Cocksedge both single & of 1 .ittle W. 

John Spencer & Elizabeth Nunn both single «& of Little W. 

James Arbon & Elizabeth Snell both single & of Little W. 

Samuel Bugg & Ann Borley both single & of Little W. 

John Cocksedge & Sarah Karrington both single & of Little W. 

Jacob Savage widower & Elizabeth Bell widow both of Little W. 



1759- 


Feb. 


8. 




Oct. 


25- 


1762. 


Aug. 


IS- 


1763. 


Aug. 


8. 




Oct. 


11. 


1765- 


Oct. 


31- 




Nov. 


21. 


1766. 


Jan. 


14. 


1768. 


Aug. 


2. 


1769. 


Sept. 


7- 



1772. 


Nov. 


5- 


1779. 


Feb. 


10. 


1780. 


July 


3- 




Dec. 


2. 


1783- 


July 


14. 


'785- 


July 


31- 



1785. 


Oct. 


17- 


1786. 


Jan. 


12. 




June 


28. 




Oct. 


22. 




Nov. 


23- 


1787. 


Sept. 


24. 


1788. 


Jan. 


22. 



140 LIT'l'LE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— MARRIAGES. 

David Wilkinson of St James', ^^'estminstel•, widower, 

Sarah Mills single of Little Wheltham. 

Nicholas Browne of St Mary's, Bury, widower, 

Violet Alderton of Little Wheltham single. 

Thomas Marchant & Mary ^^'ells both single & of Little ^^^ 

William AMllingham &: Frances Reman both single & of Little W. 

Thomas Clarke of ^^'oolpitt 

Susan Flack of Little Whelnetham both single. 

John Polly & Elizabeth Ave both single & of Little Whelnetham. 

William Ranson of Bradfield St George 

Charlotte Nunn of Little Whelnetham both single. 
Dec. 9. Samuel Thorogood of Great Whelnetham 

Betty Thorogood of Little Whelnetham both single. 
1790. Jan. 26. William Dench widower 

Rose Robinson single both of Little Whelnetham. 
1792. March 21. John Reeman of Little Whelnetham 

Rachel Lanham of Nowton both single. 
Nov. 25. Solomon Maulkin of Bury St Edmunds 

Edith Pearl of Little Whelnetham both single. 

John Bullock widower & Sarah Barrel widow both of Little W. 

Thomas Aves &: Martha Canham both single & of Little ^^^ 

James Ungles of Alpheton 

Susan Reman of Little 'Whelnetham both single. 
1800. Sept. 30. William Airy of Alnwick in CO. Northumberland 

Ann Bidden of Little Whelnetham. 

1803. Aug. II. William Elder of Bradfield, CO. Suffolk, 

Sarah Barrell of Little Whelnetham. 

Married by Joseph Sandys, curate. 

Witnesses William Tooley &: Frederick Hervey Sandys. 

1804. Jan. 24. Robert Creasey & Mary Barrell both single & of Little W. 
Feb. 14. George Sillett & Mary Nunn both single «& of Little Whelnetham. 

1805. March to. James Elder single & Elizabeth Cawston widow both of Little W. 
April I . Robert Everett of Lidgate widower 

Ruth Elder of Little Whelnetham single. 
May 3. Plenry Rolfe & Charlotte Allington both single & of Little ^V. 



1795- 


Nov. 


17- 


1796. 


Oct. 


18. 


1798. 


Oct. 


1 1. 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— MARRIAGES. 



Ul 



1805. Nov. 5. 

1806. Nov, 15. 

1807. March 13. 

Oct. 18. 

Nov. 10. 

1809. Feb. 14. 
Dec. 7. 

1810. Feb. I. 

181 1. May 14. 
Oct. 12. 

1812. Jan. 4. 
Feb. 20. 

May 28. 

Nov. I o. 

1814. Sept. II. 

Sept. 27. 

1816. July 21. 

1817. Oct. 13. 

1819. Dec. 24. 

1820. June 20. 
Aug. 16. 

1821. July 26. 

1822. April 22. 

Nov. 5. 

1826. March 24. 

Sept. 10. 



Robert Cawston & Mary Baker both single & of Little W. 

John Johnson of Lawshall 

Elizabeth Rolfe of Little Whelnetham both single 

Robert Alderton of Little Whelnetham 

Mary Ann Winkup of Fornham St Martin both single. 

Benjamin Edwards & Jane Barfield both single & of Little W. 

Joseph Pettit & Mary Nunn both single & of Little W. 

Robert Last & Elizabeth Alderton both single & of Little W. 

Joseph Aves & Martha Gault both single & of Little W. 

John Halls widower & Ruth Fenner widow both of Little VV. 

William Gault & Bett Tooly both single & of Little W. 

John Alderton & Susannah Burroughs both single & of Little W. 

William Reeman & Elizabeth Banks both single & of Little W. 

William Newson of St Saviour's in Norwich single 

Mary Carss of Little Whelnetham aged 19 years. 

John Youngs of St Etheldred's in Norwich single 

Lois Carss of Little Whelnetham single. 

John Brett & Mary Rose both single & of Little Whelnetham. 

James AUentine & Susan Middleditch both single & of Little W. 

John Bugg single & Sarah AUentine widow both of Little W. 

John Farrow & Charlotte Wilden both single & of Little ^V, 

James Smith widower of Great Barton 

Alice Allen single of Little Whelnetham. 

John Griggs & Judith Turner both single & of Little W. 

Robert Tooley & Elizabeth Bridges both single & of Little W. 

William Smith & Elizabeth Pettit both single & of Little W. 

Daniel Bantick of Great Ashfield 

Sarah Bugg of Little Whelnetham both single. 

Robert Holmes widower 

Frances Caston single both of Little Whelnetham. 

William Clarke & Sophia Tooley both single & of Little ^^^ 

Henry John Addison of St James, Bury St Edmunds, single 

Elizabeth Taylor of Little Whelnetham single. 

Thomas Leech of St Maries, Bury St Edmunds, single 

Mary Ann Reeman of Little Whelnetham single. 



142 



I^ITTLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— MARRIAGES. 



1827. ]an. 23. 



1828. 
1829. 



Oct. 

April 

July 



9- 
13- 



1830. 


Sept. 


4- 


I83I. 


Jan. 


I. 




July 


28. 


1832. 


Dec. 


31- 


1833- 


Jan. 


22. 




May 


28. 




June 


25- 




Oct. 


I. 


1834. 


Nov. 


II. 


1836. 


Dec. 


5- 



1837. April 2I 



Isaac Barrell of Brettenham widower 

Ann Platfoot of Little Whelnetham single. 

William Killingworth single & Bett Gault widow both of Little W. 

William Case of Great ^^'helnetham 

Sarah Tooley of Little Whelnetham both single. 

Thomas Lock of Rougham widower 

Elizabeth Payne of Little Whelnetham widow. 

Jacob Bugg of Little W. &: Eliza Baalam of Nowton both single. 

William Bugg widower 

Judith Ann Mills widow both of Little ^^'helnetham. 

Frederick Denton of Rushbrook 

Ann Pryke of Little AVhelnetham both single. 

James Taylor of St Times', Bury St Edmunds, single 

Sarah Reeman of Little Whelnetham single. 

William Baker of Stowmarket widower 

Charlotte Keeble of Little Whelnetham single. 

\\'illiam Frost of Rougham 

Susan Cason of Little Whelnetham both single. 

Daniel Alderton & Mary Burroughs both single & of Little W. 

John Cawston of Little Whelnetham 

Mary Mash of Great Whelnetham both single. 

George Mingay & Susan Cawston both single & of Little W. 

Henry Bowie of St James, Bury St Edmunds, single 

Maria Humphrey of Little Whelnetham single. 

Thomas Clarke of Little Whelnetham widower 

Ann Nunn of Lawshall widow. 



1838* 
June 5. Robert Last, son of William Last, labourer, 

Mary Anne Reeman, dau. of John Reeman, labourer. 

1839. 
Jan. 19. William Bugg, son of Thomas Bugg, labourer, 

Martha Offord, of Rushbrooke, dau. of Nathaniel Offord, labourer. 



From now till 1850 the parties are always " single" and " of Whelnetham" unless otherwise 

stated. Ed. 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— ^L\RRL\GES. U3 



1839. 
Nov. 15. James Padley, son of James Padley, labourer, 

Charlotte Alderton, dau. of James Alderton, blacksmith. 

1841. 

Aug. 7. Daniel Alderton, son of James Alderton, blacksmith, 

Maria Cook, dau. of George Cook, labourer. 
Dec. 24. James Rodwell, son of Samuel Rodwell, labourer, 

Elizabeth Retham, dau. of Edward Retham of Great W. tradesman. 

1842. 
March 25. William Howe, of Bradfield St Clare, son of William Howe, labourer, 
Mary Banham, dau. of George Banham, labourer. 

1844. 
May 28. James Cook, of Rushbrooke, son of John Cook, labourer, 
Emily Alderton, dau. of James Alderton, blacksmith. 

1846. 
Jan. 6. James Alderton, widower, son of Daniel Alderton, blacksmith, 

Elizabeth Mills, widow, dau. of Thomas Freeman, labourer. 
June 23. Edward Kemp, son of Benjamin Kemp, shoemaker, 

Eliza Avis, dau. of Samuel Avis, labourer. 
Oct. 24. James Everett, son of William Everett, labourer, 

Lois Tooley, dau. of Robert Tooley, carpenter. 

1847. 
July 10. Charles Drury, widower, son of Samuel Drury, labourer, 
Ellen Knock, single, dau. of Stephen Knock, labourer. 

1848. 
Aug. 29. John Wright, butcher, of Lavenham, son of William Wright, labourer, 
Judith Cook, dau. of Samuel Cook, labourer. 

1850. 
Feb. 19. Theophilus Fisher, son 01 Samuel Fisher, brickmaker, 
Mary Anne Last, dau. of William Last, labourer. 



144 



LI ITLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 



BURIAL.B. 



1557- 




26. 


John Revell. 




Sept. 


3°- 


A wandring woman, the name unknowi 




Sept. 


31- 


Joan Clark. 




Nov. 


30- 


John Hall. 




Jan. 


I. 


Margarett Mosby. 




Jan. 


13- 


Henry Ladiman. 




March 


2. 


Rose Hall. 


1558. 


Jan. 


10. 


Hellen Kent. 




Jan. 


20. 


Thomas Whodam. 




Feb. 


II. 


Alice Ladiman. 




March 


10. 


Alice Goddard. 




March 


14. 


Alice dau. of Thomas Ladiman. 




March 


24. 


Joan wyfe of William Symont. 


1559- 


Sept. 


17- 


Joan dau. of William Symont. 




Feb. 


9- 


Robert Adams. 




March 


19. 


Joan Whodam. 


1560. 


April 


7- 


Robert Whodam. 




May 


26. 


Andrew Weyght. 




Sept. 


19. 


Laurence Steven. 




Jan. 


16. 


James Mosby. 




Feb. 


15- 


Bennet Depnam. 


1561. 


April 


3°- 


Thomas Smith late of Cockfield. 




Dec. 


19. 


John Gipps. 




March 


9- 


John Goddard. 


1562. 


April 


19. 


Katheryne Goddard. 




Nov. 


2. 


Helene Avis. 


1563- 


March 


3°- 


John Symont. 




May 


9- 


Richard Briant. 




Jan. 


28. 


John Sonne of William Innold. 



LITTLE WTIELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 



145 



1565. 


Jan. 


8. 


1566. 


July 


31- 


1569. 


April 


26. 




March 


5- 


1570- 


Dec. 


21. 




Jan. 


22. 




Feb. 


23- 




Feb. 


26. 


157'- 


July 


7- 




Dec. 


3°- 




Feb. 


26. 


1572- 


Dec. 


5- 


1573- 


May 


14. 




Sept. 


6. 


^575- 


July 


29. 




Nov. 


21. 




Dec. 


12. 


1576. 


April 


28. 




Oct. 


28. 


1578. 


Aug. 


15- 




Feb. 


12. 


1579- 


Nov 


29. 




Dec. 


22. 


1580. 


Dec. 


25- 


1581. 


Aug. 


I. 




March 


13- 


1582. 


Oct. 


24. 


1583. 


Oct. 


8. 


1584. 


June 


27. 




July 


II. 




Oct. 


3°- 




March 


9- 


1585- 


April 


25- 




March 


I. 


1586. 


Dec. 


II. 



Thomas Goddard. 

Alice Chapman widdow. 

Katheryn dau. of Andrew Overing. 

Alexander Flarvey. 

Anne dau. of John Nune. 

William Nune. 

Rose wife of John Hildred. 

Thomas sonne of John Nune. 

John Nune. 

Maryan ffitts. 

William sonne of William Innold. 

Thomas ffitts. 

The same Elizabeth Ringland. [See Bapt. May 10]. 

Edmund Ringland. 

John sonne of John Croftes. 

Margarett ye wyfe of John Skittler. 

William Revell servant to John Heyward. 

John sonne of Roger Ward. 

Joan dau. of John Croftes. 

Robert Eade a stranger. 

John sonne of John Elmar. 

Thomas sonne of Thomas Manhood. 

Joan Hart a stranger. 

John Skittler. 

Clement Steeven. 

Joan dau. of William Skarpe. 

The same Agnes Steward. [See Bapt. Aug. 12.] 

John sonne of John Steward. 

Thomas Sweyton a straunger. 

Alice wyfe of John Heiward. 

John sonne of John Kendall. 

Alice wyfe of Thomas Spilsby. 

Joan wyfe of John Rowland. 

William Harpley. 

Cisly wyffe of John Croftes. 



146 


LITTLE \VHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— B 


1587- 


Dec. 


II. 


Margarett dau. of John Debnehm. 




Jan. 


II. 


John Weight clarke. 




Feb. 


14. 


John Sonne to Mr Ahiion of Bury. 




March 


9- 


Alice dau. of Robert Steward. 


1588. 


July 


13- 


Robert sonne of Richard Goodrick esq. 




Jan. 


20. 


John Heyward. 


1589. 


Dec. 


15- 


John Sonne of Robert Debnehm. 


I590. 


July 


2 1. 


Edmund ffoster. 


I59I- 


Nov. 


30- 


Thomas Vincent. 


1592. 


Jan. 


14. 


John Sonne of James Wolfenden. 


1593- 


Aug. 


15- 


Thomas sonne of John Ladiman. 


1594- 


July 


10. 


Margaret Mathew. 




Aug. 


9- 


William Innold. 




Dec. 


17- 


The same Dorothy. [See Bapt. Dec. 15. J 


1596. 


Dec. 


10. 


William sonne of John Ladiman. 




March 


13- 


Sara Evered, servant to Thomas ffornahm. 


1597- 


Nov. 


29. 


Robert Saxye. 


1598. 


Nov. 


18. 


Alice wyfe of Thomas ffornam. 


i6oo. 


May 


30- 


Ann fiUa Johannis Bannock. 




Nov. 


II. 


Marye Winter. 




Jan. 


16. 


Marye Debnam. 


1601. 


Nov. 


29. 


Henry Howe. 




Dec. 


J- 


John Steward. 




Feb. 


3- 


John Rowland. 


1603. 


June 


19. 


Thomas Manwood. 




Aug. 


5- 


John Ladiman. 


1605. 


Aug. 


20. 


Mrs Elizabeth Briant. 




Jan. 


12. 


William sonn of William Godfray of Bury. 


1606. 


May 


27. 


Edmund Innold. 




Aug. 


'7- 


Dorithy Innold. 




Oct. 


6. 


Samuel! Innold. 


1608. 


July 


22. 


Robert Innold. 




Dec. 


2. 


John Wolffenden. 


1610. 


May 


26. 


John Croftes. 




July 


7. 


James Pierson. 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 



147 



I6I0. 


Oct. 


30. 


161 1. 


April 


7- 


I6I2. 


March 


so- 




Jan. 


lo. 




Feb. 


5- 




March 


10. 


I6I3. 


May 


4- 




May 


21. 




June 


7- 




Aug. 


7- 




Feb. 


20. 




March 


20. 


1614. 


April 


14. 




April 


21. 




June 


10. 




Aug. 


8. 


I6I5. 


July 


17- 




Oct. 


3- 


1616. 


Nov. 


23- 


1617. 


May 


9- 


I6I8. 


Feb. 


3- 


I6I9. 


March 


27. 


1620. 


May 


17- 




June 


28. 




Jan. 


17- 


I62I. 


Sept. 


27. 


1623. 


Nov. 


16. 




Nov. 


18. 


1625. 


* Aug. 


24. 




Aug. 


27. 


1626. 


Sept. 


6. 




Oct. 


20. 




Nov. 


7- 



Widdow Howe. 

William Ronge [or Rouge]. 

John Ringland. 

Robert Tipshath. 

Dorithy Roote. 

John Wretthani. 

Elizabeth Greene a wanderer. 

Mother Ladiman. 

Margett Werner uxor. 

Susan Huett maide. 

Widdowe Innold. 

Elizabeth Innolds maide. 

The foresaid Dorithy Willis. [See Bapt. April 10.] 

Foresaid Susan Nayler. [See Bapt. April 17.] 

Mary wiffe of Thomas Nayler. 

William Manning. 

Francis Tipshath. 

Marye Huett. 

Agnes uxor Robert Brown. 

Gearg Scarpp. 

Elizabeth uxor John Werner. 

Thomas fitts. 

Ales Nayler. 

William Dimbleton. 

John Thornton. 

Ann the stranger. [See Bapt. Sept. 23.] 

Robert Steward. 

Margett wiffe of Robert Steward. 

John Ladyman. 

AViddow Fisher. 

William Euars. 

Mother Wretham. 

Robert Macro. 



* See p. 109 note. 



148 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BURL\LS. 



1626. Dec. 
1629. "I 



, - J- June 

Aug. 

Sept. 

May 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Dec. 

Jan. 

1 63 1. Nov. 

1632. Sept. 
Jan. 

1634. Nov. 

1635. April 
Feb. 

1636. March 26 
Aug. 28 
Marcli 

1638. Aug. 
Sept. 

1639. April 
July 
Oct. 

1640. Jan. 
Jan. 



23- 
8. 

16. 
8. 

4- 
1 1. 

13- 
12. 
20. 
10. 
19. 
7- 
17- 
14. 



7- 

14. 

2. 

27. 

15- 
14. 
10. 
12. 



A vagrant died by the wayside and was buried with us. 

Anne dau. of Edmund Hewet. 

George Ely son of the wife of Edmund Willis. 

Mary wife of Robert Tillet. 

Bezaleel Carter clarke. 

Alice wife of Robert Tiliet. 

Agnes wife of John Sargeant. 

Henry Howe. 

Mrs Mantwod. 

Susan dau. of William Ely. 

Dorothy Cornish widdovv. 

Elizabeth Goodman single. 

The wife of Raphe Manning. 

Francis dau. of Edmund Goymar single. 

Mary dau. of Thomas <!s: Mary Cornish. 

Elizabeth wife of John Thornton. 

Robert son of Thomas Wyat. 

Priscilla Goodman widdow. 

John Sargeant. 

John Warner. 

Elizabeth wife ot John Clarke. 

Alexander son of Alexander c^r Sara Pistor. 

Ursly dau. of John Ely. 

Thomas butler a stranger. 

Gilian Spring aforesayd. [See Baptisms Jan. 3.] 

Rose dau. of Richard & Elizabeth Mount. 



1666. March 28. Erasmus Martiall a traveller. 
Aug. 20. The widdow How. 
Feb. 15. Susan dau. of John & Mary Jolly of Create Wheltham. 

* The next nine entries belong to 1629 and 1630, but it is not clear which to which. The burial 
of Robert 'fillet's wife is entered twice, but each time with a different christian rame. Ed. 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 



U9 



Susan dau. of John & Mary Gooday. 

Widdow Manninge. 

Vidua Brett. 

Sarah dau. of John & Sarah Leech. 

Benjamin Leech. 

Willyam Gierke. 

John Sonne of John tS: Phillip Webb. 

The widdow Cason. 

Frances wife of Ambrose Willyamson & Willyam his sonne were 

buried together. 
The wife of Willyam Barker. 
Rachell wife of Edward Agas, clerke. 
Willyam sonne of John Leech. 
Widdow Coulson. 
Willyam Tooly. 
The widdow Garwood. 
The wife of Robert Whiterod. 
Sarah dau. of Willyam Sturgeon. 
Elizabeth [sic] wife of John Leech. 
Elizabeth dau. of John & Sarah Leech. 
Edward Agas, who had been Rector of this Parish for above 

35 years. 
William Taylor. 

Robert son of William & Ursula Taylor. 
Elizabeth [infant] dau. of Ambrose & Elizabeth Flack. 
Joseph son of Robert & Sarah Whiterod. 
Sarah wife of William Barker. 
Mary wife of John Gooday. 
Dorothy Gipps. 
Robert Whiterod. 
Elizabeth Taylor. 
Philip wife of John Webb. 
Ann Clarke widow. 
Sarah Goodday. 
Thomas King. 



1667. 


Aprill 


14, 


1669. 


March 


29. 




Aug. 


12. 


1672. 


Aug. 


21. 


1673. 


July 


14, 




Sept. 


24, 


1676. 


Aprill 


4- 




May 


7- 




Dec. 


7- 


1677. 


June 


5- 




Aug. 


3- 




March 


5- 


1679. 


Aug. 


5- 




Oct. 


7- 




Jan. 


2. 




Jan. 


4- 




Feb. 


24. 


1680. 


June 


28. 




Jan. 


9- 




Jan. 


23- 


I68I. 


April 


16. 




April 


27. 




July 


31- 




Aug. 


16. 




Sept. 


2. 




Oct. 


8. 




Nov. 


6. 




Feb. 


27. 


1682. 


July 


3- 




Aug. 


26. 




Dec. 


31- 




Feb. 


1 1. 


1683. 


April 


15- 



150 


LITTLE 


1683. 


April 


27. 




May 


II. 




July 


15- 




July 


28. 




Sept. 


8. 




March 


1 1. 


1684. 


March 


28. 




Aug. 


3- 


1685. 


July 


3°- 




Dec. 


I [. 




Dec. 


24. 




Jan. 


3- 


i686. 


April 


3- 




May 


8. 




Nov. 


4- 


1687. 


June 


7- 




June 


10. 




Feb. 


12. 


1688. 


Sept. 


19. 




Oct. 


14. 


1690. 


May 


8. 




May 


21. 


1691. 


Aug. 


31- 




Feb. 


7- 


1692. 


.^pril 


17- 




Sept. 


4- 




Nov. 


30. 


1693. 


Oct. 


27. 




Nov. 


18. 


1695. 


May 


25- 




May 


31- 




Oct. 


22. 




Nov. 


6. 




Jan 


27. 



WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 



Ann dau. of John Webb. 

James son of James Garwood. 

Margaret ffrost. 

Ann wife of Richard Whiterod. 

Hannah Baker. 

Martha Iwring. 

Thomasin Leach. 

fifrancis Sturgeon. 

Margaret wife of James ffrost. 

Mary Sturgeon. 

William Sturgeon. 

Sarah Sturgeon. 

Elizabeth dau. of John Tooley. 

John Bridge. 

Elizabeth dau. of John Leach. 

James son of James ffrost. 

Ann Gooday. 

Mary dau. of John Tooley. 

John son of John Leach. 

John Leach aged about So yeeres. 

William Garwood. 

John Tooley. 

Susan wife of James Frost. 

Esther Frost. 

The said Thomas Iwring & Susan his mother. [See Baptism 

April 15.] 
John son of John & Mary Pyman. 
Ambrose Williamson. 
Robert Adams. 
Mary Whiterod. 
Alicia Armsby. 
Rose Sparke. 
Edmond Frost. 
John Sparke. 
Thomas Gipson. 



LITTLE WflELNETHAM REGLSTERS. — BURIALS. 



151 



1695. 


March 


20. 


1696. 


Sept. 


29. 




Dec. 


I. 


1697. 


July 


24. 


1698. 


April 


14. 




Dec. 


18. 


1699. 


Dec. 


25- 


1700. 


Dec. 


I. 


I70I. 


May 


8. 


1702. 


June 


12. 




June 


12. 


1703. 


Oct. 


2. 




Dec. 


21. 




Jan. 


7- 


1704. 


March 


i.S- 


'705- 


June 


7- 




July 


IS- 




Oct. 


4- 




Nov. 


9- 


1706. 


Oct. 


25- 




Oct. 


31- 




Dec. 


9- 


1707. 


April 


5- 


1708. 


June 


8. 




Aug. 


31- 




Dec. 


26. 


1710. 


Nov. 


30. 


1711. 


Feb. 


14. 


1712. 


April 


6. 


1 7 14. 


April 


24. 




Aug. 


18. 


1715- 


Jan. 


10. 




Feb. 


2. 




Feb. 


12. 


1716. 


Dec. 


23- 



Grace Tooley. 

John Pyman. 

Thomas Dunham. 

Robert Taylor. 

Ann Gibson. 

William son of John & Hannah Gibson. 

Ann Willis widow aged 95 years. 

Mary wife of John Sparke. 

James son of Nicholas Baker. 

Samuel son of Nicholas Baker. 

Bridgilt dau. ot James Garwood. 

Ann Avife of Abraham Hammond. 

Bridgitt dau. of Nicholas Baker. 

Mary wife of Nicholas Baker. 

Mary Tooly widow. 

Joseph Sparrow. 

Judith Parke a travellers infant. 

Elizabeth Tooley. 

William Bauley. 

John Sparke. 

John Johnson. 

James How. 

John Lait. 

Philip Ward aged about 72. 

Ann Ward widow. 

Philip Ward aged about 27 years. 

Elizabeth wife of John Whiterod. 

Margarett Webb. 

John Pett. 

Robert Whiterod. 

Elizabeth Ivvring. 

Ann Pett. 

The said Ehzabeth Chaplin. [See Bapt. Jan. 22. 

John Catchpole. 

John Iwring. 



152 


LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 


I7I7- 


May 


9- 


Isaac Pett. 




Jan. 


r. 


The said John Goshawke. [See Bapt. Dec. 31.] 


I7i8. 


June 


II. 


The said infant John Yardley. [See Bapt. June 10.] 




June 


14. 


Mary wife of John Yardley. [Yearsley on tombstone. Ed.] 




Oct. 


21. 


Susan Bauley widow. 




Nov. 


10. 


William King of Bury St Edmunds. 


1720. 


May 


19. 


John King aged 72 years. 




Nov. 


S- 


The said John King. [See Bapt. Nov. 3.] 




Nov. 


10. 


Ann Leach. 




Feb. 


27- 


Edward King. 


1721. 


Oct. 


10. 


Catharine Bretton widow aged 44. 




Jan. 


3- 


Anthony Agas, Rector of this Parish and of Rushbrooke for 
above 40 years and aged 76. 




Feb. 


22. 


Robert Jarvis. 




March 


5- 


Jonathan King. 


1722. 


Aug. 


22. 


John l^each. 


1723. 


May 


10. 


Mary wife of James Garwood. 




May 


23- 


John Chapman infant. 




Jan. 


14. 


Margaret wife of Paul Chapman [Chaplin]. 




Feb. 


9- 


Ann dau. of John & Frances Candler. 




Feb. 


24. 


Elizabeth wife of .Ambrose Flack. 


1724. 


Jan. 


31- 


Ann Arnsby. 


1725- 


Sept. 


II. 


Ambrose Flack. 


1726. 


Aug. 


22. 


Samuel son of Paul & Francis Chapman. 




Sept. 


II. 


Edward Leach. 


1727. 


May 


26. 


John Webb. 




June 


10. 


James Garwood. 




Jan. 


14. 


Margaret Smee infant. 




Jan. 


20. 


Samuell Chapman infant. 




March 


17- 


Sarah Leach widow. 


1728. 


May 


19. 


James Garwood. 




May 


25- 


Elizabeth Garwood. 




July 


25- 


Rose Catchpole. 




July 


28. 


Mary Candler infant. 




Aug. 


5- 


Nicholas Baker. 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 



153 



1728. 



1729. 



1730. 



1732. 
1733- 
1734- 

1735- 



1736. 



T737- 
1738. 

1739- 
1741. 



1742. 



J743- 
1744. 



Aug. 

Aug. 

Feb. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

May 

Oct. 

April 

Dec. 

March 1 8 

Feb. 

Sept. 

July 

Aug. 

Oct. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

March 30. 

Jan. 12. 

March 13. 

Nov. 22. 

Sept. 

Feb. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

March 

May 

Oct. 

Nov. 

April 

Sept. 



5- 
18. 

9- 

3- 

12. 

24. 

15- 

18. 

27. 

I. 

15- 
24. 

18. 



22. 
20. 

4- 
17- 
23- 

6. 
24. 



25- 
19. 
20. 
7- 
31- 
29. 

4- 
28. 
22. 



A travelling woman. 

John Whiterod. 

Richard son of Richard & Bruce Reeve. 

Thomasin Leach widow. 

Samuell How. 

James Serjeant infant. 

John son of John & Hannah Serjeant. 

Mary wife of James Frost & Richard their son. 

Rose wife of Thomas King. 

Anibrose Flack. 

Rose King. 

Margarett dau. of William & Ann Smee. 

Isaac Wilson. 

John Haward 

Hannah dau. of John «& Hannah Serjeant. 

Elizabeth Flack. 

Bridget King widow of Great Whelnetham. 

Elizabeth Bretton. 

Thomas King. 

Mary Goshawk. 

Mary dau. of Richard & Prudence Reeve. 

Mary wife of John How of Bradfield Saint Clare. 

Mary Reeve infant. 

Isaac King infant. 

John Candler. 

Mary Irwin widow. 

Ann wife of John Leach. 

Thomas Briton. 

Sarah Adams. 

AVilliam Girling infant. 

Esther Pett. 

A travelling boy. 

Elizabeth Howard. 

George Southgate infant. 

Harriot wife of John Farrow of Great ^Vhelnetham. 



154 


LITTLE 


1744- 


Oct. 


28. 




Dec. 


16. : 


1745- 


June 


10. 




July 


6. 




July 


14. 


1747- 


Aug. 


14. 




Aug. 


16. ' 




Jan. 


12. 




Feb. 


9- 


1748. 


July 


18. 




Aug. 


15- : 




Nov. 


15- 


1749- 


July 


3- i 




Nov. 


9- 


I750- 


Jan. 


18. ' 




Feb. 


23- . 


I75I- 


July 


23. 




Sept. 


18. 


T752- 


April 


12. 




June 


3- 


1753- 


May 


14. . 




May 


2T. 


^754- 


Jan. 


6. . 




Oct. 


13- 




Nov. 


30- 


1755- 


Jan. 


23- 




Feb. 


15- 




May 


9- 




Dec. 


28. 


1756. 


April 


4- . 




June 


28. 




Sept. 


13- 


1757- 


March 


2. 



WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 



Elizabeth Friend infant. 

Richard Frost of Bradfield Saint Clare. 

Charles Girling. 

Richard Reeve. 

Ann ^Vilson widow. 

Betty Bell infant. 

Thomas Green. 

Frances Chapman. 

Thomas King. 

Kezia Southgate infant. 

Margaret Green. 

William Clark infant. 

Sarah Rivers. 

Martha Pit widow. 

^^^illiam Reeman infant. 

John Frost. 

William Smee. 

John Bell infant. 

William son of William & Elizabeth Reeman. 

William Banks infant. 

John son of John &: Ann Avey. 

John Flack. 

Ann child of Ann Carter. 

Richard son of John & Ann Avey. 

Mary wife of ^^'illiam How from Bradfield Saint George. 

Ann dau. of Robert & Mary Girling. 

Hannah dau. of James & Mary Garrod from Great "Welnecham. 

Esther Frost widow. 

Nathaniel Rett. 

John Leach from Rushbrook. 

Esther wife of James Pitt of Great Welnetham. 

Samuel Scutchy. 

Margaret King. No affidavit was brought, because, as I am told, 

ye Justices & others were afraid to give ye oath upon account 

of ye small pox. 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BURL\LS. 



155 



1757. March 20. 
March 22. 



March 29. 
April 1 2. 



Aug. I o. 

1758. June 12. 

Aug. 19. 

Aug. 30. 

Oct. 29. 

Nov. 10. 

1759- July 3- 

1760. Jan. 4. 
April 15. 
April 20. 
Oct. 28. 
Nov. 28. 
Dec. 9. 
Dec. 23. 

1761. Jan. 2. 
Feb. 5. 
May 4. 

1762. June 12. 
June 23. 
Sept. 10. 

1763. March 31. 
July 2. 
Oct. 2. 

1764. March 20. 
June 20. 
June 29. 
Sept 9. 



Sarah Fenner. 

Edward King. No affidavit, because, as I am told, ye Justices 

& others were afraid to give ye oath upon account of ye small 

pox. 
Elizabeth dau. of John Fenner. 
Elizabeth King widow. No affidavit, because, as I am told, ye 

Justices & others were afraid to give ye oath upon account of 

ye small pox. 
Hannah Serjeant. 
Mary Garwood. 

Roger infant son of William & Elizabeth Reeman. 
George Flack from Somerton. 

Elizabeth & Mary twin daus. of Thomas & Elizabeth Roffe. 
Ann Harvey widow. 
Joshua son of John & Elizabeth Allen. 
Sarah dau. of William & Elizabeth Reeman. 
James Flack from Somerton. 
John Fenner. 
Jonathan Carter. 

Susan dau. of Ambrose & Elizabeth Flack. 
Thomas son of Thomas & Elizabeth Roffe. 
Elizabeth wife of Thomas Roffe. 
Alice Gurling. 
Elizabeth Allen. 
Edward son of Thomas Roffe. 
Ann Smee. 
Mary Serjeant. 
Alice Carter widow. 
John Pack late Rector of this parish. 
John Serjant. 

Thomas son of John & Elizabeth Allen. 
Ambrose Flack. 
William Garwood. 
Faith wife to Thomas Hammond. 
Judith wife to John Bell. 



156 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 



1766. Feb. 
April 

Aug. 
Aug. 
Nov. 



1767. 
1768. 

1769. 

1770. 

1771. 

1772. 
1773- 
1774- 

1775- 
1776. 



1777. 



Jan. 
Sep. 
Sep. 
Jan. 
May 
May 
July 

April 

April 

May 

May 

May 

May 

July 

Aug. 

Aug. 

May 

July 

Jan. 

May 

Aug. 

Jan. 

Oct. 

March 

April 

June 

July 

Oct. 

Jan. 

June 



5. John Douse. 
9. Robert Green. 

6. John son of ^Villiam & Elizabeth Raymon. [Reeman] 
6. Esther Pitt widow. 

4. James Cook ye younger of the small pox. 
12. James Cook ye elder died of ye small pox. 
14. Thomas Allen, Parish clerk. 
30. A\'illiam Rolfe an infant. 
10. William Scott. 

10. Thomas Rolfe and Elizabeth his wife. 

14. Jane Rolfe an infant. 

30. Richard Allen an infant. 

2. Mary Flack an infant. 
6. Sarah Scott widow. 

10. Mary Farrow an infant. 

28. Frances Candler widow. 

3. Susannah Steckles single woman aged 25, 

31. Mary Angel an infant. 

24. Mary wife of Robert Girling sen. 

3. John Scutchey. 

6. Robert Rolfe an infant. 

9. Goodchild Alderton about 21, small pox. 

29. John Farrow sen. 

10. Ann Hammond single woman. 

11. Thomas Hammond, the father of Ann. 

24. Mary infant dau. of Henry & Elizabeth Rolfe. 

25. Widow Garwood. 

12. Nicholas Lock aged 82. 

4. Amey one of the twins of John & Ann Farrow. 

5. Diana wife of John Ely. 
18. Thomas Nunn an infant. 

30. Mary Garwood an infant. 
20. Mary child of Amey Brook. 

22. John Nicholls the Toll-gate keeper, aged 70. 

28. Abigail wife of Robert Girling sen. 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 



157 



1778. Nov. 2. 
Nov. 12. 
Dec. 20. 

1779. Feb. 28. 
Aug. 26. 
Nov. 30. 

1780. Oct. 15. 

1 781. June I. 
Sept. 28. 

1782. March 20. 
March 26. 
March 27. 
April 4. 
May 13. 
May 15. 
Aug. 20. 

1783. Jan. 19. 
April 30. 
Sept. 2. 
Oct. I . 



Oct. 
Dec. 
Dec. 

1784. Jan. 
Feb. 
April 
July 
Sept. 
Sept. 

1785. Aug. 

1786. Jan. 
April 
July 
July 



14. 
14. 
18. 



15- 
14. 

20. 

4- 
20. 
19. 

13- 
26. 



Frances Rolfe an infant. 

Mary Lock widow aged 80. 

Elizabeth wife of Henry Rolfe aged 42. 

Mary Reeman an infant aged 7. 

Susan Cocksedge single woman aged 31. 

Robert infant of Robert & Mary Tooley. 

Jane Warren an infant from Nowton. 

Ann wife of John Ave. 

Amey dau. of Mr Jacob Brook. 

Frances Mansfield an infant. 

Mary wife of Thomas Barrell aged 31. 

Margaret Green widow aged 74. 

Elizabeth wife of Charles Girling. 

Ann mother of ye above Frances Mansfield. 

\Villiam Steckles aged 86. 

George Cocksedge an infant. 

Hannah wife of William Dench aged 30. 

Edmund Southgate, a married man aged 80. 

Mary wife of John Cocksedge aged 64. 

The New Act of Parliament relating to Parish Register Books 

takes place 
Thomas Marchant a married man aged 68. 
Mary wife of James Garwood aged 70. 
Ann the wife of Mr Jacob Brook aged 64. 
Elizabeth Barrell an infant. 
Elizabeth Cook widow aged 68. 
Susan wife of George Cocksedge aged 30. 
John Girling widower aged 86. 
Elizabeth Marchant widow aged 7 1 . 
Susan wife of Jacob Savage aged 47. 
Samuel Steckles single man aged 32. 
Ann Avey an infant. 

William infant of Thomas & Sarah Barrell. 
James Garwood, a married man aged 30. 
Charles son of Robert &: Sarah Pearl aged 7 years. 



158 



LITTLE WHELNETHAiM REGISTERS. — BURIALS. 



John infant of Ambrose & Phebe Clark. 

John Ely widower aged 80 years. 

Elizabeth wife of John Reeman. 

John Bell widower aged 73. 

"William infant of ^^^illiam &: Mary Tooley. 

Sarah wife of Robert Pearl aged 38. 

Rachel Barrell an infant, 

Robert Garwood an infant. 

Mary Warren from Bury aged 17. 

Thomas Barrell, a married man aged 36. 

Ambrose Clarke, a married man aged 24. 

George Pearl aged 20. 

Ambrose Clarke an infant. 

Mary Allen widow aged 85. 

Mary Cocksedge an infant. 

Robert Girling, a married man aged 70 years. 

Thomas Manning, a batchelor aged 70 years. 

Mrs Lina Cocksedge, wife of the Rev. Roger Cocksedge, rector 

of this parish, (late Lina Whitely spinster) aged 60 years. 
Sarah wife of John Avey, late Sarah Bigsby, spinster, aged 27. 
James infant of Joseph & Elizabeth Reeve. 
William Holt aged 12 years. 
Elizabeth Hammond spinster aged 60 years. 
John Cocksedge widower aged 82 years. 
John Allen single man aged 32 years 
William Baker aged 3 months. 
Mary wife of John Bullock aged 35 years. 
Patrick child of Mary Ann Bigsby aged 6 months. 
Dorothy dau. of Avey & Frances Baker aged 14 weeks. 
Mary wife of John Alderton aged 70 years. 
Aim wife of John Pettit of Bradfield St George aged 49. 
Jacob Brooks aged 85. 
Mary Lock aged 65. 
Robert Cason aged 6 weeks. 
Michael Thomas son of Mann & Hannah Hutchinson. 



1786. 


Sept. 


3- 




Sept. 


3' 




Dec. 


3- 


1787. 


April 


6. 




Aug. 


8. 




Dec. 


2. 




Dec. 


5- 


1788. 


Jan. 


23- 




July 


24. 




Nov. 


27. 




Nov. 


30- 


T789. 


Jan. 


22. 




Feb. 


6. 




March 


31- 




May 


18. 


1790. 


June 


12. 




July 


18. 




Sept. 


25- 




Dec. 


16. 


I79I. 


Oct. 


12. 




Nov. 


8. 




Dec. 


29. 


I7y2. 


March 


19. 




April 


17- 




April 


24. 


1794. 


Aug. 


21. 




Aug. 


25- 


1795- 


April 


19. 




July 


28. 


1796. 


June 


5- 


1797. 


Jan. 


19. 




May 


14. 




Dec. 


10. 




Dec. 


3°- 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BURL\LS. 



159 



1798. April 

1800. July 
Oct. 

1 80 1. April 
May 
Dec. 

1802. May 
May 

1803. Feb. 
April 
Oct. 

1804. April 



May 



22. 
2. 
26. 
30- 
17- 

25- 
2. 

31- 
6. 

24. 
2. 

24. 



June 15. 

Nov. 29. 

1805. March 13. 

May 5. 

1806. March 20. 



April 29. 



16. 



Sept. 


17- 


Dec. 


21. 


807. Feb. 


8. 


Feb. 


15- 


July 


10. 


Aug. 


23- 


Oct. 


II. 



Thomas child of Mary Barrel). 

Margaret wife of Danniel Pledger of Safroii Walden aged 50. 

Henry Rolfe single man aged 34. 

Walter child of Mary Ann Bigsby aged 14 weeks. 

Ann Green widow aged 55 years. 

Rebekah Ginnery spinster aged 80 years. 

Samuel Cawston aged 40 years. 

Mary Ann Maria infant of Mary Ann Bigsby. 

Elizabeth wife of John Girling of Hardgrave aged 58. 

Martha wife of Robert Girling of Great Whelnetham aged 72. 

John Girling of Hardgrave aged 54. 

James Garwood married man of St Mary's, Bury St Edmunds, 

aged 80. 
Elizabeth wife of William Reeman aged 85. 
Sarah dau. of Robert &: Mary (Barrel) Creasy of Great 

Whelnetham aged 10 weeks. 
Elizabeth wife of Henry Rolfe aged 6t years. 
Avey Baker, married man aged 5 i . 

The Rev. Roger Cocksedge M.A. of Bury St Edmunds, who 
during 29 years was Rector of this Parish, which he resigned 
on Lady Day, 1796, died March 14, having very nearly 
attained the 90th year of his age. 
Integritas ipsa — pietatis exemplar spectabile I 
Robert son of Robert and Mary Creasy of Great 

Whelnetham aged 3 months. 
Robert Pearl, married man of Bury St Edmunds, formerly of 

Sicklesmere, a hamlet belonging to this parish, aged 68. 
John Reeman widower aged 75. 
Maria Ely child of Mary Tooley aged 5 months. 
Elizabeth child of Mary Ann Bigsby. 
John Alderton widower in his 80th year. 
Sarah Carss widow aged 78 years. 
John Ave single man. 
Elizabeth wife of John Allen aged 75. 



160 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGIS TERS.—BURLALS. 



1808. March 5. 



July 26. 





Sept. 


25- 


1809. 


Sept. 


4- 


I8I0. 


Jan. 


20. 




June 


17- 




Aug. 


16. 




Dec. 


23- 


I8II. 


Feb. 


15- 




Feb. 


16. 




May 


12. 




May 


12. 




Aug. 


18. 


I8I3. 


Jan. 


17- 




March 


7- 




Sept. 


5- 


I8I4. 


Feb. 


6. 




Feb. 


21. 


I8I5. 


July 


13- 


1816. 


Jan. 


21. 




Dec. 


^5- 


I8I7. 


March 


25- 


I8I9. 


Feb. 


2. 




Feb. 


14. 




April 


29. 




June 


8. 




June 


9- 


1820. 


March 


16. 




May 


15- 




Oct. 


19. 




Dec. 


14. 


I82I. 


Jan. 


14. 



Elizabeth dau. of Thomas and & Maria (Pettit) Webb aged 

2 years & 10 months. 
John Smirk from St Mary's, Bury St Edmund's, single in his 

70th year. 
Mary dau. of Robert tS: Mary (Barrel) Creasy aged 20 weeks. 
William Barrett aged 38. 
William infant child of Alice Allen. 
John Brooks labourer aged 53. 
Elizabeth Halls dau. of Elizabeth Fenner. 
Ann dau. of Samuel and Sarah Bugg aged 5 years. 
Mary Ann Warren. 
Sarah Vent. 

Sophia dau. of Samuel & Sophia (Wright) Barrett aged 16 years. 
Dorothy wife of John Holt aged 42. 
Edith dau. of John & Sarah Cocksedge. 
John Holt aged 40 years. 
Mary wife of Robert Creasy aged 40 years. 
Mary Ann child of Judith Willingham aged 6 days. 
William Reeman widower aged 89 years. 
William Pearle. 
William Garner of Edwardstone aged 18, killed by accident in 

this parish. 
Maria Pearce of Bury aged 3 days. 
Henry Rolfe aged 79 years. 
William Emerson aged 3 days. 
Lucy Barrett aged 20 years. 
Lucy Reeman aged 7 years. 
Charles Ramsbottom aged 7 weeks. 
Susan Ramsbottom aged 2 J years. 
Sophia Bugg aged 1 2 years. 
Mary Ann Willingham aged 6h years. 
Rachel Brett aged 78 years. 
Sarah Holmes aged 26 years. 
Sarah Holmes aged 8 weeks 
John Allen aged 85 years 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BURL\LS. 



161 



1821. 
1822. 
1825. 



1826. 



1827. 



1829. 
J 830. 
1831. 



1832. 

1833- 
1834. 

1835- 



July 
Oct. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Nov. 



13- 

19. 

23- 
18. 

7- 



1836. 



March 31. 

June 3. 

Nov. 7. 

March 31. 

April 13. 

April 

April 

May 

Sept. 

Feb. 

Sept. 

June 

Jan. 

March 

March 

May 

April 

July 

Feb. 

March 

June 

April 

April 

M.vy 1 

May 2. 

May 17. 

March 5. 

April 9. 



27. 
28. 
21. 
2. 
22. 
14. 
30. 

30- 
6. 

18. 

20. 
2. 

25- 

23- 
I. 

IT- 
S' 
6. 



Thomas Marchant aged 74 years. 

Sophia Barrett aged 58 years. 

Mary Tooley aged 65 years. 

Joseph Mills aged 38 years. 

William Clark aged 29 years. 

Lydia Holt aged 88 years. 

Samuel Bromley aged 6 years. 

John Cocksedge aged 76 years. 

Joseph Holt aged 74 years. 

William Airy of Bury St Edmunds aged 77 years 

Sarah Bullock aged 76 years. 

Sophia Clerk aged 36 years. 

Susan Caston aged 48 years. 

Robert Carss of Bury St Edmunds aged 77 years. 

John Ave of Stanningfield aged 69 years. 

William Gault aged 40 years. 

Sarah Cocksedge aged 69 years. 

Edward Lawrence aged 9 months. 

Alfred Bugg aged 5 years. 

John Holmes aged 3 weeks. 

John Bullock of Great Whelnetham, aged 75 years. 

Prudence Alderton aged 78 years. 

Mary Merchant aged 80 years. 

Emma Case aged 2 years. 

Mary Bigsby of Cockfield aged 70 years. 

Sophia Baylham aged 11 years. 

Sophia Carss of St James', Bury St Edmunds, aged 81 years. 

Harriet Dyson aged 13 years. 

Lucy Dyson aged 5 years. 

William Lawrence aged 9 years. 

Elizabeth Dyson aged 16 years. 

William Case aged 33 years. 

Caroline Knox aged i year. 

Anne Fenn aged 55 years. 



16: 



LITTLE WHELNETHAAI REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 



1836 May 8. 



1837- 


April 


4 




Sept. 


17- 




Sept. 


17- 




Dec. 


10. 


1838. 


Feb. 


25' 




April 


7- 




May 


20. 




May 


31- 




Aug. 


8. 




Dec. 


27. 


1839. 


March 


10. 




April 


14. 




May 


5- 




June 


20. 




July 


5- 




Oct. 


21. 




Nov. 


20. 


1840. 


Jan. 


3- 




Jan. 


29. 




March 


15- 




June 


26. 




July 


15- 




Nov. 


4- 




Nov. 


5- 




Dec. 


18. 


IS4I. 


IVfay 


I. 




May 


25- 




Nov. 


14. 




Dec. 


5- 


1842. 


May 


1 1. 




Dec. 


4- 


1843. 


Jan. 


^7- 



Ezra Theobald Mills of St Mary's, Bury St. Edmund's, aged 
18 years. 

James Tooley aged 10 months. 

Mary Alderton aged 44 years. 

Mary Causton aged 29 years. 

Elizabeth Pryke aged 2 years. 

William Bugg aged 4 years. 

Isaiah Mills of St Mary's, Bury St Edmunds, aged 1 2 years. 

Stephen Knox aged 57 years. 

George Pryke aged 5 months. 

Mary Ann Pryke aged 36 years. 

Sarah Pryke aged 15 years. 

William Killingworth aged 50 years. 

John Blencowe of Stoke by Nayland aged 77 years. 

Sarah Case aged 43 years. 

Emily Bugg of Great Whelnetham aged 9 months. 

John Reeman aged 70 years. 

James Alderton aged 13 years. 

Frances Tilson aged 39 years. 

Samuel Barrett of Great Whelnetham aged 70 years. 

Benjamin Mills aged i month. 

Abraham Knox aged 25 years. 

Mary Ann Robinson aged 4 years. 

William Henry Tooley aged 9 years. 

Sarah Reeman aged 12 years. 

Emma Scarfe aged 2 years. 

Alice Tooley aged 2 years. 

Ann Airy of Greenwich aged 74 years. 

William Holmes aged 19 years. 

Rachael Reeman aged 72 years. 

Martha Bugg of Great Whelnetham aged 23 years. 

Daniel Alderton aged 88 years. 

Joseph Mills aged 53 years. 

William Tooley aged 84 years. 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM REGISTERS.— BURIALS. 163 



1843. May 3. Hasted Jermyn Heigham of St. James, Bury St Edmunds, aged 

9 months. 

1844. Jan. 21. Edmund Avey of Bradfield St George, aged 45 years. 
Oct I. Henry Mills aged 2 years. 

Oct. 25. John Fenn of Thetford aged 70 years. 

Dec. 8. William Mills aged 22 years. 

1845. P'eb. 14. Mary Mills aged 79 years. 
April 7. Alfred Bugg aged 13 years. 
April 22. Walter Bugg aged 10 months. 
May 19. Alice Plummer aged 76 years. 
Nov. 30. Thomas Holmes aged 29 years. 

1846. April 16. Sarah Drury aged 46 years. 

1847. March 23. Anne Carss. 

1848. Dec. 21. Joseph Freeman Mills aged 30 years. 

1849. Jan. 4. Isaac Bugg aged 30 years. 
April 12. Robert Ford aged 3 weeks. 

1850. Feb. I. Elizabeth Blencowe of Stoke by Nayland aged 86 years. 
Feb. 22. James Everett aged 27 years. 

Dec. 31, Mary Pearce of Bury St Edmunds aged 70 years. 






164 GREAT WHELNE'l'HAM TOMBSTONES. 



Monumental Inscriptions 
IN Great Whelnetham Church. 



[Marble, on north wall of the chancel. Above the in.scription is the Gipps 
shield, viz. Azure a fess between 6 stars Or.] 

In niemoriam non ita interituram [imperituram] Richardi Gipps de Whelnetham 
Magna generosi, qui in fide ecclesige Anglicanae scilicet Catholicae expiravit 
12 Jan. an. dom. i66o astat. 67, fruiturque Domino, simul et prsstolatur 
etiam num [nunc] de coelis olim certe glorioso postliminio rediturum. 
Tantum est, viator, baud moror te fere dum legis hac [hoc] legendum. 

[Marble, on north wall of the chancel. Above is shield and crest J. 
Shield : Gules a grififin segreant Or (.for Battely) impaling Argent a bend 

engrailed between two bucks heads cabossed Azure (for Needham). 
Crest : a Griffin's head erased Or. 

In memory of Charles Battely Esq. who died May i, 1722, aged 55 years. 
And of Elizabeth Battely his widow, who died March 21, 1752, aged 83 years. 
This monument was erected by their ever respectfuU daughter Jane, relict of 
James Merelst Esq.. Clerk assistant of the House of Lords. 
[Marble, on north wall of the chancel.] 
The Reverend Thomas Lord, LXIII years rector of this parish. Died on the 

VI day of August MDCCLXXXVIII in the LXXXYI year of his age. 
[On the outside of the west wall of the north aisle is a stone built in with this 
inscription : — Near this place lies the Rev. Thomas Lord.] 

[Flat stone in the chancel.] 
Beneath this stone lie the remains of the Rev. Robert Phillips, 20 years rector 

of this parish, who died Feb. 11, 1809, aged 50 years. 
Also of Mary his sister, who died March 4, 1849, aged 89 years. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 165 



[Flat stone in the chancel. The organ makes it impossible to see a single word 
of the inscription.] 

[Marble, on south wall of the chancel.] 
Sacred to the memory of the Rev. Henr}' George Phillips, fifty seven years 

rector of this parish and fifty five years vicar of Mildenhall, who entered into 

his rest July 29, 1873, aged 81 years. 
Therefore being justified by faith we have peace with God through our Lord 

Jesus Christ. Rom. v. i. 

[Marble, on south wall of the chancel.] 
Sacred to the memory of Frances the beloved wife of the Rev. H. G. Phillips, 

rector of this parish, who departed this life June 11, 1852, aged 59. 
Also to their son Benezra, who died Jan. 27, 1852, aged 22. 
Also to Henry of the 26 Regt. M.N. I., who died on the Neilgherries, India, 

July 10, 1853, aged 32. 

[Marble, on south wall of the chancel.] 
Sacred to the memory of Frances, the eldest beloved daughter of the Rev. H. 

G. Phillips & Frances Phillips, who died Feb. 23, 1858, aged ;^^ years. 
Also to the memory of Louisa their second daughter, who died Nov. 15, 1855, 

aged 29 years. 
Also to the memory of Georgina their fourth daughter, wife of General Brind 

C.B., Avho died at Simla, North India, June 9, 1862, aged 30 years. 
Also to the memory of Catharine their fifth daughter, who died Sept. 24, 1858, 

aged 23 years. 
And white robes were given unto every one of them, and it was said unto them 

that they should rest for a little season. Rev. vi. xi. 



166 GREAT WHELNEIHAM TOMBSTONES. 



Tombstones in Great Whelnetham 

Churchyard. 



I have begun numbering at the east gate of the churchyard, moving westwards 
and doing all the stones on the north side of the path first, and then those on the 
south side. Nos. i to 109 are on the north or church side of the path that runs from 
one gate to the other: Nos. no to 180 are on the south or yew tree side of it. 
There are often differences in ages and dates between the stones and the registers. 

1. John son of William & Charlotte Pryke, who died Oct. i, 1833, aged 20 years. 

Alfred son of William & Charlotte Pryke, 
who died May 17, 1835, ^ged 28 years. 

2. Elizabeth daughter of William & Charlotte Pryke, 
who died Feb. 24, 1832, in the 27th year of her age. 

3- A wooden headstone. Inscription gone. 

4' GeorgeiRolfe, who died Nov. 5, 188 r, aged 83 years. 

He giveth his beloved sleep. 
Mary Rolfe, his wife, who died Aug. 26, 1894, aged 93 years. 
Home at last, thy labour done. 
Safe and blest, the victory won ; 
Jordan past, from earth set free, 
Angels now have welcom'd thee, 

5- Phoebe daughter of Robert & Sarah Nunn, 

who died Oct. 19, 1824, aged 26 years. 
Afflictions sore long time I bore, 

All human aid was vain, 
Till God did please to give me ease, 
And rid me of my pain. 
With wasting pain death found me sore opprest, 
Pity'd my sighs and kindly brought me rest. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 167 



6. E. A. 1831. C. A. 1832. 

[Only the footstone with these initials remains. They seem to belong to the 
Alderton family, but tliere is no E. A. in the register for 1831.] 

7. Lucy daughter of Benjamin &: Jane Edwards, 

who died Sept. 14, 1832, aged 21 years. 
A pale consumption gave the fatal blow, 
'I'he stroke was certain but the effect was slow ; 
With wasting pain death saw her sore opprest, 
Pity'd her sighs and kindly gave her rest. 

8. Wooden headstone. Inscription gone. 

9. Mary the wife of John Ungless, who died Sept. 22, 1835, aged 28 years. 

Afflictions sore long time I bore. 

Physicians were in vain, 
Till God did please to give me ease. 

And rid me of my pain. 
Also two of their children died infants. 

TO. Walter Kerridge, who died Sept. 15, 1S93, aged 42 years. 

Prepare to meet thy God. 

11, Charles Kerridge, who died Aug. 12, 1865, aged 64 years. 

Our brother's fight is over, 

His arduous course is run ; 
Twas by thy grace and power 

The race of life he won. 
He now is sweetly sleeping ; 

His spirit rests with Thee ; 
And thougli thy saints are weeping. 

Our song is — Victory. 

12. Amelia daughter of Charles & Eliza Kerridge, 
who died Sept. 9, 1853, in the 15th year of her age. 

A pale consumption gave the fatal blow, 
The stroke was certain but the effect was slow ; 
With lingering breath God saw me sore oppress'd, 
Pitied my sighs and kindly gave me rest. 



168 GREAT WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 



13. Charles son of Charles «S: EHza Kerridge, who died Feb. 18, 1852, aged 9 years. 

Also Emma Jane their daughter, who died Feb. 24, 1852, aged 5 years. 
Farewell, dear children ; here we leave your dust : 
Since you are gone, in Heaven is all our trust. 

14. Frederick son of Charles & Susanna Kerridge, 

who died April i, 1852, aged 19 years. 
Dear Friends, O let my sudden death 
Teach you to spend your fleeting breath 
In pra)'er to God : repent and pray, 
For you may die this very day. 

15. Kate Ellen Kerridge, who died March 30, 1865, aged i year : 
Jane Kerridge, who died Oct. 20, 1866, aged i month : 

The much loved children of William & Mary Kerridge. 
Teach our hearts to say, 
Lord, Thy will be done. 

16. William Kerridge, who died Aug. 14, 1899, aged 61 years. 
Watch therefore, for ye know not what hour your Lord doth come. 

17. Fanny Mary James [sic] Kerridge, who died Oct. 11, 1881, aged 17 years. 

And they shall be mine, saith the Lord of Hosts, in that day when I 
make up my jewels. 

18. Rebecca wife of Henry Holmes, who died Oct. 11, 1873, ^ged 48 years. 

\\'eep not for me but be content, 
I was not yours but only lent ; 
Dry up those tears and weep no more ; 
I am not lost but gone before. 

19. .Amy daughter of John & Ann Tweed, 

who died Sept. 17, 1831, in the 32 year of her age. 
A lingering illness did me seize ; 
No skill on earth could give me ease, 
Till God reliev'd me by his grace, 
And call'd me to that blessed place, 
\\' here weary souls do rest in peace. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 169 



20. John Girton, who died Sept. 3, 1813, aged 40 years. 

Also Lieutenant Sam. Hogg, who died Nov. 20, 18 15, aged 33 years. 

21. WilHam the son of George & EHzabeth Harrold, 
who departed this life Jan. 8, 18 18, aged 23 years. 

Rest here in Peace : thy life was from a child 
Dutiful, loving and of temper mild ; 
Belov'd, respected and esteem'd was you 
By all your friends and much lamented too ; 
But God who knows and spies out all our ways 
Will recompence with joys and endless days. 

22. William Cooke of Risby Hall in this county, 
who died June 7, 1861, in the 58 year of his age ; 
only son of John & Mar\- Cooke late of this parish. 

23. Mary Anne, daughter of John & .Vlary Cooke, 

who died March 17, 1853, aged 51 years. 
My flesh shall slumber in the ground 
Till the last trumpet's joyful sound ; 
Then burst the chains with sweet surprise. 
And in my Saviour's image rise. 

24. John Cooke, who died Dec. 17, 1846, aged 76. 
Mary his wife, who died Sept. 3, 1844, aged 76. 

Forgive, blest shade, the tributary tear. 
Which mourns your exit from a world like this : 
Forgive the wish that would have kept you here. 
And stay'd your progress to the seats of bliss. 

25. Eliza, the beloved wife of George Doel [of] Weeting, Norfolk, 
daughter of John & Mary Cooke, who died July 4, 1839, in her 29 year. 

26. William Cooke of Bury St. Edmunds, formerly of this parish, 

who died April 9, 1848, aged 80 years. 

Sarah the 2nd wife of William Cooke, who died Dec. 13, 1836, in her 36 year. 

Also John their son, who died July 26, 1837, aged 2 years. 



170 GREAT WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 



27. James Reeman. Born May 29, 1807. Died May ti, 1896. 

In the sight of the unwise they seemed to die, but they are in peace. 
John Offord Reeman, who died Jan. 15, 1874, aged 25 years. 
Edward Meeking Reeman, who died April 9, 1852, aged i year. 

28. James Reeman, who died Sept. 23, 1857, aged 78 years. 

The Lord knoweth the days of the upright, and their inheritance shall 
be for ever. 

29. Phoebe the beloved wife of William Cooke Reeman, 
who died July 22, 1846, aged 70 years. 

Into thine hand I commit my spirit : thou hast redeemed me, O Lord 
God of truth. 

William Cooke Reeman, who died Feb. 3, 1849, aged 73 years. 

30. John Reeman, who died July 28, 1825, in the 80th year of his age. 

An honest man lies here inter'd ; 
For truth and justice he appear'd ; 
He show'd through life a generous mind, 
And died in peace with all mankind. 

31. Alice wife of John Reeman, died Sept. 2, 1796, aged 43 years. 

A pleasing mind, a gentle generous heart, 
A good companion, honest without art, 
Just in her dealings, faithful to her friend, 
Belov'd by all, lamented at her end. 

32. John James Reeman, son of John &: Ann Reeman, 
died March 12, 18 16, aged 7 years and 7 months. 

The great Jehovah, full of love. 

An angel bright did send, 
To fetch this little spotless dove 

To joys that never end. 

33. Anne wife of John Reeman, who died Oct. 2, 1832, aged 60 years. 

Caird by affliction every grace to prove. 

O'er death victorious through her Saviour's love. 

Cautious she trod in every path of life, 

A tender mother and a virtuous wife ; 



GRKAT WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 171 

Courteous to all and to the poor a friend, 
Slow to dispraise and willing to commend, 
In sincere hope she drew her latest breath. 
Life not disdaining nor afraid of death. 

34. John Reeman who died Jan. 12, 1850, aged 77 years. 

35. Samuel Mayhew who died Oct. 12, 1843, aged 77 years. 

36. Robert son of Robert & Sarah Warren, who died Sept. 27, 1835, in his 4 year. 

Ere sin could blight or sorrow fade, 

Death came with friendly care. 
The op'ning flow'r to Heav'n convey'd. 

And bade it blossom there. 

37. Lucy Mary Hilder, daughter of Samuel & Lucy Snape, formerly of 
this parish, who departed this life Nov. 29, 1856, in her 39th year. 

38. Eliza Ann Snape, 

who departed this life May 19, 1851, in the 42nd year of her age. 

39. [A four-sided monument enclosed by iron rails. J 

North Side. 

Sacred to the memory of Samuel Fenton, the son of Samuel & Lucy 
Snape, who departed this life Jan. 7, 1814, aged 11 months. 

Also of Henry Williair. their son, 
who departed this life May 28, 1816, aged 18 months. 

And of Mary-.A.nn their daughter, 
who departed this life March 20, 1820, aged 9 months. 

West Side. 
Sacred to the memory of Lucy the much lamented and beloved wife 
of Samuel Snape, who departed this life Oct. 2, 1825, aged 38 years. 
Of humble spirit, though of taste refin'd. 
Her feelings tender but her will resign'd, 
Call'd by affliction every grace to prove, 
In patience perfect and complete in love. 
O'er death victorious through her Saviour's might 
She reigns triumphant with the saints in light. 



172 GREAT WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 



South Side. 
Sacred to the memory of Christiana the daughter of Samuel & Ivucy 
Snape, who departed this life March i8, 1827, aged 5 years. 

East Sidk. 
Sacred to the memory of Samuel Snape. Died June 9, 1832, aged 50 years. 

40. Catherine Ann Cockrill, who died March 21, 1870, aged 7 months. 

Laura Fanny Beatrice Cockrill, 
who died April 2, 1870, aged 2 years it 6 months. 

41. Mary Ann daughter of Thomas &: Frances Chenery, 

who died in her infancy 1792. 

sooner came 

Thy bloom, 

But death has cropt thy tender bud, 
And laid thee in this mournful! tomb. 

42. [Altar shaped monument.] 

Sub obscuro hoc marmore venerandi sepulchri indice 
Joannes & Elizabetha Brundish. 
Ille pastor fidus, bonus, concionator vehemens sed dulcis, qui postquam 
per LXXIII ann : curriculum simplicitate cordis, sinceritate doctrinae, vitgeque 
sanctimonia, conscientiam Deo probasset, ut vixit pie obiit, Julii III, 
MDCCXXIV. 

Ilia, lectissima foemina, fidelissima conjux, amantissima mater, quae non 
posse mori solo dolore post talem virum opinata maerore inferiore confecta 
placide decessit Martii XXXIII [sic] MDCCXXV anno etatis LXVJJl. 
Also in memory of Constantia Marker, 
who died Feb. 19, 1779, aged 87 years. 
And of the Rev. Benj. Brundish Marker, A.M. her son, 
died 9 Feb. 1781. aged 45 years. 

43. [Nos. 43, 44, 45, 46, are enclosed together by iron rails.] 

In memory of Samuel Fenton, who died Feb. 16, 1848, aged 64 years. 
Behold I come quickly : I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the ending, 
saith the Lord. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 173 



44. In memory of John Fenton, who died Oct. 15, 1857, aged 68 years. 

Ad finem esto fidelis ; nam sola Deus salus. 

45. In memory of Eliza, wife of John Fenton, 

who died Nov. 16, 1846, aged 44 years. 

Certum pete finem et memento mori. 

46. Sacred to the memory of Samuel Fenton, 

who died Sept. 30, 1827, in the 74th year of his age. 
A christian true, a friend sincere, 

In all his actions just, 
A tender husband, father dear, 
Consign'd to native dust. 

His example was worthy of emulation in this world, ?nd may his 

be rewarded in the next. 

Lucy the beloved wife of Samuel Fenton, 
who departed this life on Aug. 12, 1838, in the 78th year of her age. 
Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord, for their reward is eternal life. 

47. Boa.st not thyself of to morrow. 

Frederick Fenton who died at Bury St Edmunds Dec. 25, 1867, aged 67 years. 
Many years occupier of Copdoe's Farm in this parish. 
Our life hangs by a single thread, 
A\'hich soon is cut and we are dead ; 
Then boast not. Reader, of thy might, 
Alive at noon and dead at night. 

48. John Spenceley Fenton, who died Nov. ir, 1862 : 
Arthur Ellis Fenton, who died April 16, 1863 : 

infant sons of John & Margaret Fenton. 

49. Margaret wife of J. E. Fenton, who died June 3, 1875, aged 45 years. 
For with thee is the fountain of life ; in thy light shall we see light. 

50. Anne Caroline the beloved daughter of William & Fanny Fenton, 

who died on May 25, 1838, in her i8th year. 
^^'atch, for ye know not at what hour the Son of Man cometh. 



174 GREAT WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 



^i. Fanny the dearly beloved wife of William Fenton of Bury St Edmunds, 

who died May i6, 1864, aged 67 years. 

Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord. 
William Fenton, who died Dec. 8, 1869, aged 78 years. 
The memory of the just is blessed. 

52. Robert Rollinson, who departed this life Nov. 5, 1852, in the 66th year of his age. 

Man dieth and wasteth away ; yea, he giveth up the ghost and where is he ? 
Also Elizabeth his wife, 
who departed this life May 13, 1874, in the 78th year of her age. 

Also Emma Anne Rollinson, daughter of the above, 
who departed this life Feb. 7, 1854, in the 32nd year of her age. 
The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away : blessed be the name of the Lord. 

53. Reuben Warren, who died April 8, 1883, in the 69th year of his age. 
Anne his wife, who died July 4, 1895, ^g^d 86 years. 

Herbert Reuben Warren, infant son of the above, 
Born Aug. 14. Died Oct. 20, 1849. 

54. Reuben Warren. Died Jan. 4, 1841, aged 6i years. 
Mary his wife. Died Jan. 15, 1849, ^ged 76 years. 
Ann their daughter. Died Dec. 25, 1826, aged 20 years. 

55. Frost senior, who died Feb. 9, 1735, aged 68 years. 

[The upper part is broken off. The footstone has M.F. 1735. See Register,] 

56. Here lieth the body of James Frost, who died Nov. i, 1725, aged 76 years. 

57. In memory of James Frost, who died Jan. 14, 1735, aged 38 years. 

58. In memory of Rose the daughter of James Frost, 

who died March 11, 1735, aged 13 years. 

59. Here lyeth ye body of Joan ye wife of Mr Roger Young. 

She dyed 16 Nov., 1690. 

60. S. Browning. Died Jan. 26, 181 4, aged 38 years. 

61. M. Upson. Died Jan. 20, 1783. 

62. J. Upson. Died Feb. 13, 1784. 

63. In memory of George Cawston, who died May i, 1733, aged 64 years. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 175 



64. Here lieth ye body of Alice ye wife of George Cawstoii, 

who departed this life Sept. 21, 1730, aged 55 years. 

65. Ill memory of Rose ye wife of William Cook, 

who died Dec. 14, 1751, aged 29 years. 
Here lyes ye body of a valu'd wife, 
Who always led a virtuous life ; 
To industry her thoughts she did incline, 
Submitting to the Powers divine. 

66. In memory of \Villiam Cooke, sen., 

who died Dec. 15, 1776, in the 80th year of his age. 

67. In memory of Dorothy, wife of William Cook, 

who died Nov. 22, 1784, aged 71 years. 

68. In memory of William Cooke, who died Feb. 22, 1795, aged 54 years. 
Rose his wife, who died May 6, 1832, aged 84 years. 

Trust in the Lord for ever ; for in the Lord Jehovah is everlasting strength. 

Isaiah xxxi., i. 

69. Elizabeth Cooke spinster, died March 19, 1814, aged 33 years. 

70. Sarah wife of Latham Brickwood and second daughter of William Cooke 
of this parish, who departed this life August 29, 1824, aged 50 years. 

Fir'd at the prospect of eternal gain, 
She frown'd at pleasure and she smil'd at pain ; 
While here below her heart v>as bent on heav'n. 
And triumph'd in that life which God had giv'n. 

71. Jeremiah Fenton, who departed this life July 11, 1843, aged 61 years. 

For all flesh is as grass, and the glory of man as the flower of grass. 
The grass withereth and the flower thereof falleth away ; but the word of the 
Lord endureth for ever. And this is the word which by the Gospel is 
preached unto you. 

Christian wife of Jeremiah Fenton, and third daughter of William 
& Rose Cooke late of this parish, who died Sept. 13, 1829, aged 51 yeais. 

A lingering illness did me seize, 

No skill on earth could give me ease, 

Till God reliev'd me by his grace, 

And call'd me to that blessed place, 

Where weary souls do rest in peace. 



176 GREAT WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 



Christian wife of Henry Hilder of Pakenham in this County, and daughter of 
the abovesaid J. and C. Fenton, who died June i6, 1830, aged 26 years. 
Of humble spirit tho' of taste refin'd, 
Her feelings tender but her will resign'd ; 
Call'd by affliction every grace to prove, 
In patience perfect and complete in love. 
Christiana second and beloved daughter of S. W. and E. Fenton, 
who departed this life Oct. 12, 1870, aged 25 years. 

72. S. ^V. Fenton. Died Oct 12, 1873, aged 63 years. 
The souls of the righteous are in the hand of the Lord. 

73. In memory of James Wyard. Died Sept. 14, 1813, aged 73 years. 

74. In memory of James son of James and Elizabeth Wyard. 

Died April 30, 181 1, aged 38 years. 

75. In memory of William Wyard jun. late of Bradfield St Clare, 
who departed this life April 13, in ye year 1790, aged 50 years. 

76. In memory of William Wyard, who died Dec. 28, 1780, aged 74 years. 

77. In memory of Elizabeth ye wife of William Wyard, 

who died Sept. 21, 1772, aged 70 years. 

78. In memory of Elizabeth the daughter of John & Elizabeth Sparke. 

She died Dec. 15, 1781, aged 9 years. 

79. In memory of John Sparke, late of Whepstead, 

who died Dec. 9, 1808, aged 61 years. 
Elizabeth his wife, who departed this life Feb. 26, 1808, aged 63 years. 
A tender father, a mother dear. 
Two faithfuU friends lie buried here ; 
Their sorrows in this world are past 
^^llO took the greatest care ; 
Now hope they're gone to joys that last, 
Where heavenly mansions are. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 177 

80. In memory of Sarah RoUinson, who died April 20, 1797, aged 28 years. 

No grief for her, but rather praise be sung, 
Nor think it strange or hard she died so young : 
Made meek by grace, in hopes of heavenly bliss, 
Why should she stay in such a world as this ? 
Yet why mourn ! her dying pains are o'er, 
Her soul is landed in the native shore ; 
Yet though beneath this earth her body lies, 
Her soul's unfaded in the native skies. 

81. [Altar stone with iron railing.] 

In memory of Amelia, daughter of William & Phoebe Reeman, who 
after fulfilling her duty in the relations of life which her Creator had allotted 
her, rendering herself respected and beloved for her many Christian virtues, 
died x\ug. I, 1S58. 

Blessed are the pure in heart for they shall see God. 

Ye pure in heart, what sight tis yours to see 
Your God in all things. Ye can trace his way 
From bright creation's morn and know tis He 
Who call'd the light from darkness into day. 
Oh bless'd indeed those children of the Lord, 
Whose hearts are purified from deadly stain 
Of guile and treachery, who love his word 
And seek thro' Christ his glory to obtain. 
Also Louisa Ann, wife of James Moore of Lawshall Hall. 
Died Jan. i, 1892, aged 81 years. 
She hath done what she could. 

82. In affectionate remembrance of Caroline Reeman, only daughter of 
Caroline Land, who died July 6, 1868, aged 28 years. 

The grass withereth, the flower fadeth : but the word of our God shall stand 
for ever. 
In loving memory of Caroline wife of the late B. H. Land of Little 
Cressingham, Norfolk, who died Aug. 11, 1889, aged 84 years. 

I have waited for thy salvation, O Lord. Gen. xlix., 18. 

M 



178 GREAT WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 



83. William Holt, who departed this life Sept. 12, 1871, aged 67 years. 
Ann wife of William flolt, who departed this life Jan. 26, 1882, aged 97 years. 

I know that my Redeemer liveth. 

84. William Austen, who died Feb. to, 1882, aged 57. 

Do not despise the faded flower, 
Although it never more will bloom ; 
We only live for one long hour, 
And that will pass and very soon. 

85. In loving memory of Elinor Sarah, the affectionate wife of John A. 
Gates of Sapiston Grange, and daughter of Thomas and Elinor Sophia Wright 
formerly of this parish. She died Jan. 19, 1863, aged 27 years. 

What I do thou knowest not now, but thou shalt know hereafter. 
So he giveth his beloved sleep. 

86. Thomas Wright, who died March 3, 1858, aged 75. 
Elinor Sophia his wife, who died April 4, 1843, aged 46. 
Mary Jane their youngest daughter aged 4. 

To die is gain. 

87. [The inscription on this stone is beautifully cut.] 
Gone to the many mansions our Saviour has prepared. 

In affectionate remembrance of Walter Hibble, 
who died at Clare, Oct. 12, 1873, aged 28 years. 
For if we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so them also 
which sleep in Jesus will God bring with him. 

88. John G. Hibble, who died June 23, 1854, aged 59 years. 

Ann wife of the above, who died at Clare Nov. 14, 1876, aged 75 years. 

89. John Thomas Hale, who died May 4, 1865, aged 92 years. 

Mary his wife, who died Nov. 5, 1864, aged 73 years. 

90. James Clarke, who died March i, 1874, in his 72nd year. 

Praised be the name of the Lord. 
He loved the church, on Christ alone relied, 
And cheered by faith in hope and comfort died. 
Hannah his wife, who died April 6, 1875, in her 60th year. 
Farewell, dear parents ; not a long adieu. 
For we, if faithful, soon may be with you. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 179 

91. David Holden, who died Nov. 11, 1885, aged 61 years. 

Thy will be done. 

92. Joseph Pask, who departed this life March 8, 1900, aged 66 years. 

Thy purpose, Lord, we cannot see, 
But all is well that's done by Thee. 

93. In loving memory of John Joseph Badeley, Rector of this parish from 
1873 to 1899. Born March 20, 1833. Died Nov. 10, 1899. 

Lord, remember me when Thou comest into Thy kingdom. 

94. Sacred to the memory of Arthur Symonds. 

Born Sept. 29, 182 i. Passed away June 24, 1901. 
Till he come. 

95. In loving memory of Harriette Amelia Symonds. 

Born Nov. 29, 1857. Died March 17, 1903. 
God is love. 

96. [This consists of a flat stone and an upright one enclosed by iron rails.] 

Beneath this stone are deposited in jo)ful hope of the resurrection to 
eternal life the mortal remains of the Rev. Thomas Hickman, formerly 
Congregational Minister of Lavenham in this county, who fell asleep in Jesus 
Feb. 9, 1844, in the 89 year of his age. 

Sarah his beloved wife slept in Christ June 6, 1845, i'^ the 87th year of her age. 
My flesh shall slumber in the ground 
Till the last trumpet's joyful sound ; 
Then burst the chains with sweet surprise, 
And in my Saviour's image rise. 
To die is gain. 
This stone is placed to the memory of 

Thomas Greene and Celia Hickman, 
the two eldest children of Thomas and Sarah Hickman, whose remains are 
placed with those of their beloved parents in this vault. 
Thomas Greene Hickman, clerk, M.A., of Trinity College, Cambridge, 
and formerly Curate of this parish, died at Bury St Edmunds on May 26, 
1878, in the 87th year of his age. 



180 GREAT WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 



Celia Hickman died at Bury St Edmunds on Nov. 2\, 1873, and in the 
80th year of her age. 

I look for the resurrection of the dead and the Hfe of the world to come. 

97. Isaac Farrow, who departed this Ufe June 4, 1847, aged 69 years. 

Affliction sore long time I bore, 

Physicians were in vain, 
Till God was pleas'd to give me ease, 

And free me from my pain. 

98. Robert Jennings, who died June 22, 1861, aged 74 years. 

A tender husband and a father dear. 
Mary wife of Robert Jennings, who died Jan. 21, 1853, aged 66 years. 
Prepare to meet thy God. 

99- [Shield and crest.] 

[The Shield (without tinctures) bears Eyre impaling Eyre. The Eyre 
shield is Argent on a chevron Sable three quatrefoils Or. 

The crest is a leg erect in armour, couped at the thigh.] 
Beneath are the earthly remains of Arthur George, son of the Rev. 
C. J. P. Eyre, Perpetual Curate of tlie Parish of St Mary, Bury St Edmunds. 
Born Jan. 30, 1850. Died Feb. 10, 1851. 
Also Emma. Born Aug. 15, 1846. Died March 29, 1855. 
James. Born June 4, 1843. Died April 8, 1855. 
Exil'd from earth, at home above. 
Rest, lov'd ones, in the arms of love ; 
He snatch'd you from a world of sin. 
To wear the crowns ye did not win. 

100- Here rest sleeping in Jesus 

Frances the beloved wife of the Rev. H. G. Phillips, rector of this parish, 
who died June 11, 1S52, aged 59 years. 
Also Benezra their fourth son, who died Jan. 27, 1852, aged 22 years. 

Them also which sleep in Jesus will God bring with him. 
Also Louisa their 2 daughter, who died Nov. 15, 1855, aged 29 years. 
And Frances their eldest daughter, 
who died Feb. 23, 1858, aged ^^ years. 



GREA'l' WHELNETHAM TOM USTONES. 181 



TOT. [Shield and crest.] 

[The shield bears, [Or] a lion rampant and a chief Sable. 

The crest is a leopard sejant.] 

Sacred to the memory of the Rev. Henry George Phillips, 

fifty seven years rector of this parish, 

who entered into his rest July 29, 1873, aged 81 years. 

Also to the memory of Catharine Phillips^ his fifth daughter, 

who died Sept. 24, 1858, aged 23 years. 

102. Sacred to the memory of John Phillips. 
second son of Rev. H. G. Phillips & Frances his wife. 

Born June 26, 1822. Died Oct. 29, 1901. 
Fear not, for I have redeemed thee : I have called thee by thy name : 
thou art mine. Isaiah 43. ?'. i. 

103. Sacred to the memory of Joseph Manning de Carle, 

who died April 12, 1853, aged 56 years. 
Forgive the wish that would have kept thee here. 

Also of his son John Parkerson, 
who died at Scutari Feb. 12, 1855, in his 25 year. 

104. Flolden Nunn Pask, who died Dec. 24, 1S97, aged 60 years. 

Angels are waiting above for me. 

105. In memory of George Creed, F.R.C.S., of Bury St Edmunds, sometime 
resident in this parish, and for furt)-four years surgeon to the West 
Suffolk Militia. He died Nov. 28, 1868, aged 69, deeply regretted. 

Thy will be done. 

106. Sacred to the memory of Sophia South, 
who died F'eb. 8, 1870, aged 90 years. 

Also of her sister Mary South, who died May 28, 1870, aged 88 years. 
They resided together for many years in Bury St Edmunds. 
The longest life is but a shadow, so soon passeth it away. 

107. Sacred to the memory of Sarah Stigwood, for 32 years a valued 
servant of the Miss South's. She departed this life Jan. 22, 1865, aged 
66 years. 

This stone is erected by her mistresses as a tribute of respect to a good 
and faithful servant. 



182 GREAT WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 

1 08. Hannah the beloved wife ot Thomas Richer, 
who departed this Hfe Sept. 29, 1893, aged 62 years. 

In the midst of life we are in death. 

109. Cornelius Denny. Born Aug. 30, 1823. Died Aug. 6, 1890. 

Come unto me ye weary, and I will give you rest. 

no. Ralph Alderton, who died Feb. 3, 1874, aged 73 years. 

His beloved wife Susannah Alderton, 
who died May 23, 1881, aged 74 years. 

To parents dear this stone we raise, 
Whose tender care exceeds all praise ; 
A record true of fervent love 
To them who dwell with Christ above. 

1 1 1. Elizabeth daughter of Ralph & Susan Alderton, 

who died June 16, 1856, aged 26 years. 
Mary Ann their daughter, who died Feb. 17, 1846, aged 15 months. 
Robert their son, who died May 4, 1847, aged 16 years. 

Mark, ye that read this solemn truth, 

Soon must ye quit this life's stage ; 

A worm is in the bud of youth, 

And at the root of age. 

112. Martha Ann, daughter of Joseph and Ann Bird, 

who died Feb. 5, 1827, in her 17th year, 
John Bird, who died March i, 1832, aged 52 years. 
The vital spirit's fled 
To meet its dearest Lord, 
Who for him shed His blood. 
That he might dwell with God, 
Who now with the celestial three 
He dwells to all eternity. 
Joseph Bird, who died Aug. 21, 1834, aged 56 years. 
A tender husband and a father dear, 
The same was he who now lies here. 
Ann his wife, who died May 23, 1836, in the 57th year of her age. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 183 

Frances Reeman, who died July ii, 1830, aged 88 years. 
Elizabeth Marshall, the much loved wife of John Bird of this parish, 
who died Dec. 26, 1848, aged 38 years. 
Peace ! tis the Lord Jehovah's hand, 

That blast our joys in death. 

Changes the visage once so dear. 

And gathers back the breath. 

113. James Alderton, who died June 11, 1866, aged 55 years. 
Mary Ann, daughter of James & Eliza Alderton, 

who died Dec. 7, 1876, aged 27 years. 
Had He asked us, well we know 
We should cry, oh ! spare this blow ; 
Yes, with streaming tears should pray, 
Lord, we love them, let them stay. 
Harriet wife of Alfred Ager, who died Sept. 8, 1879, aged 33 years. 

114. In memory of Rebecca, wife of ]ohn Mayes, 

who died March 11, 1786, aged 80 years. 

115. In memory of John Mays, who died Nov. i, 1792, aged 86 years. 

All you that do this place pass by. 
Remember Death for you must die ; 
For as you are so once was I, 
And as I am so must you be ; 
Therefore remember eternity. 

116. In memory of Mary the wife of James Thurgood, 

who died Aug. 13, 1775, aged 73 years. 

117. In memory of Elias Sturley, who died Oct. 22, 1785, aged 85 years. 

This modest stone, what few vain marbles can, 
May safely say, Here lies an honest man ; 

A safe companion and friend, 

Unblam'd through life, lamented in his end. 

118. In memory of Ann the wife of Elias Sturley, 

who died April 12, 1770, aged 69 years. 



184 GREAT WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 



119. In memory of Will. Holden, who died March 10, 1745, aged 58[?] years. 
In memory of Alice, wife of Will. Holden, 

who died Jan. 1744, aged 64 [?] years. 

I 

2 

3. c- in this bed of clay 

4. Untill the Resurrection day. 

120. Sophia the wife of John Lee, who died Nov. 3, 1834, aged 39 years. 

From cheerful life consign'd to gloomy clay, 
Here sleeps of powerful death the sudden prey. 
Stand, stand prepar'd, the shield of faith employ, 
Expire victorious and be crown'd with joy. 

121. Sacred to the memory of John I.ee. 
Died Oct. 16, 1843, aged 56 years. 

A^lso of George Henry Barnes. 
Died July 30, 1843, aged 9 years, 

122. In memory of John Garland, who died Dec. 25, 1763, aged 76 years. 

T23. Here lyeth ye body of Francis Garland, 

who dyed Jan. 20, [696, aged 90 years. 

124. Mary Scarfe, wife of Anthony Scarfe, dyed ye 8 of August, 1692. 

125. Elizabeth Garland departed this life the 10 day of June, 1673. 

126. Here lieth the body of John Garland, 

who departed this life the last day of November, 1679. 

127. Robert Garland departed this life Dec. 19, 1716, aged 67 years, 7 months. 

The world is nothing but Heaven is all ; 
Death did not hurt me by my fall ; 
I tell every friend that for me wepe, 
I am not dead but left aslepe. 

128. In memory of Mary wife of Robert Garland, 

who died May 15, 1730, aged 63 years. 

129. Here lieth ye body of Ann ye beloved wife of John Garland. 

who died March 2 ., 1723, aged 28 years. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 185 



130. In memory of Robert Garland jun. 
who died Nov. 5, 1754, aged 60 years. 

Also of Susan his wife, died Jan. 22, 1773, aged 81 years. 

131. In memory of Fran. Garland, who died Jan. 26, 1789, aged 67 years. 

132. In memory of James Wyard jun., 
who died Dec. .., 1749, aged 71 years. 

133. In memory of James son of James & Mary Wyard, 

who died June 1754, aged 41 years. 

134. In memory of Mary wife of James Wyard jun. 

who died Sept. 17, 1725, aged 41 years. 

135. Here lieth ye body of John Adams of Bradfield Combust, 

who died [July] . 1724, aged 76 years. 

136. To ye memory of Jane ye wife of John Adams of Bradfield Combust, 

who died Sept. 25, 1728, aged 70. 

137. [This stone, early in the eighteenth century, is the end one of a row of 
six between the porch and the yew, nearest to the yew. The inscription might 
perhaps be made out.] 

138. Hannah the daughter of James & Elizabeth Wyard, 

who died Nov. .. 171 7, aged 31 years. 

139. Here lyeth ye body of James Wyard, 
who dyed March 10, 1708, aged 8 . years. 

140. James Wyard died Oct. . 1722, aged 7 . years and . months. 

141. In memory of Eliza : the wife of James Wyard, 

who died April 20, 1742, aged 90 years. 

142. In memory of Margaret the wife of John Burroughs, 

who died March 21, 1739, aged 77 years. 

143. Here lieth ye body of John Maiden junior. 

Hee died the 7th of March, 1686. 



186 GREAT WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 

144. Here lieth the body of John the sune of John Maiden, 

who dyed Sept. 6, 1674. 
And Elizabeth his first daughter, who dyed Nov. 6, 1678 [1682]. 
And Elizabeth his second daughter, who dyed Nov. . 16.. [1684]. 
And Elizabeth his third daughter, who dyed Jan. 13, 1685. 

145. In memory of Mr. Simond Wright, 
who died Dec. 29, 1729, aged 51 years. 

Mrs. Mary Wright his daughter, died April 30, 1730, aged 21 years. 
Whoever comes to this stone, 
Take this advice and consider 
That yesterday we were what thou art ; 
To morrow perhaps or in a short time 
Thou shall be what we are. 
Begon and prepare thyself. 

146. In memory of Ann the wife of John Garland, widow of Simon Wright, 
who died Aug. 11, 1746, aged 60 years. 

147. Here lyeth the body of Dorothy Stilman, 

who dyed May 4, 1689, aged 85 years. 

148. Here lyeth the body of John Maiden, 
who departed this life the . day of July, 1685. 

149. Here lyeth the body of John Stilman, who died April 23, 1686. 

I go. In this spot lie the remains of William Dench carpenter of Sicclesmere 

in this parish. He died on April 3, 181 1, aged 60. He was an 
affectionate husband, a kind father, a faithful friend, and by his integrity 
and upright conduct in his profession gained the respect and esteem of all 
his employers. His afflicted widow inscribes this stone to his memory, 
humbly hoping that his moral and religious life here may ensure him a 
blessed reward hereafter. 

151, In memory of Rose Dench his wife, 

who died Sept. 13, 1842, aged 74 years. 



GRKAT WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 187 



152. Sacred to the memory of Jolin Major, 

who departed this life July 22, 1826, aged 37 years. 
Rose his wife, who departed this Hfe Jan. 20, 1843, aged 52 years. 
Ehzabeth daughter of John & Rose Major, 
who died July 12, 18 13, aged i year & 8 months. 

153. James son of John & Rose Major, 

who departed this life Nov. 5, 1845, aged 29 years. 
In the midst of life we are in death. 

154. William John, son of William Dench and Lucy Rebecca Major, 

who departed this life Jan. 9, 1850, aged 12 years. 
Requiescat in pace. 
Oh see how soon the flowers of life decay, 
How soon terrestial pleasures fade away. 
This star of comfort, for a moment given, 
Just rose on earth, then set to rise in heaven. 
Yet mourn not as of hopes bereft his doom. 
Nor water with thy tears his early tomb ; 
Redeem'd by God from sin, releas'd from pain. 
His life were punishment, his death is gain. 

155- No mortal woes can reach 

The peaceful sleepers here. 

In loving remembrance of William Dench Major, 
who died Jan. 11, 1876, aged 62 years. 
Also of Lucy Rebecca his wife, who died Dec. 23, 1893, aged 77 years. 
Also of Charles James their son, who died May 7, 1889, aged 49 years. 

156- John WiUiam, son of William & Lucy Major, late of Honington in 
this county, who died April 27, 1853, in the 26th year of his age. 

Humbly we hope that death to him was gain, 
To whom God's mercy thro' his blessed Son 
Gave gracious strength thro' long continued pain 
Meekly to trust and say. Thy will be done ! 

157- George Jackson, who died Sept. 28, 1831, aged 74 years. 
Mary his wite, who died Jan. 31, 1837, aged 80 years. 



188 GREAT WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 

158. Sarah Sophia Riley, who departed this Hfe Jan. 18, 1835, aged 44 years. 

This brambled turf protects the dear remains 
Of one who long endured afflictions pains : 
Faith, hope and charity in her bore sway, 
And here she sleeps till resurrection day. 

159. Richard Butters, who died Dec. 8, 1856, aged 75 years. 
Mary Ann his wife, who died Oct. 9, 1859, aged 67 years. 

Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord. 

i6o. William Major Butters, son of Richard &: Mary Ann Butters, 

who died Dec. 22, 1837, aged 22 years. 
Sarah Ann Butters their daughter, 
who died June 25, 1840, aged 20 years. 

161. In memory of Mary wife of Joseph Farrow, 

who died June 13, 1798, aged 43 years. 
[There follow four lines of poetry which I have not made out. The 
stone is near the path.] 

162. Sacred to the memory of Joseph Farrow, 

who departed this life July 15, 1824, in the 45th year of his age. 

163. Sacred to the memories of 
Annie Julia 10 

Ellen Louisa aged 8 - years. 
Kate Butters 6 

who died in April, 187 1, 
daughters of Richard M. and Elizabeth Mattholie. 
To die is gain. 

164. Sarah Ann daughter of William & Emma Wright, 

who died Nov. 25, 187 1, aged 17 years. 
Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord. 

165. In memory of Mary Ann, the beloved and much lamented daughter 
of James & Mary Pryke, who died Dec. 11, 1852, aged 22 years. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 189 



Also of Mary Ann Pryke her niece, 
who died Feb. 28, 1853, aged 4 years. 
Is it nothing to you, all ye that pass by ? Behold and see if there be 
any sorrow like unto my sorrow which is done unto me. 

Thy will be done. 

166. [This stone has baffled me, but it might be made out. It is near the path.] 

167. [Under the Yew.] 

In memory of John Norman, 
who died April 26, 1776, aged 80 years. 

Also of Catharine his wife, 
who died Nov. 22, 1741, aged 40 years. 

168. To the memory of William Norman, 
who died Dec. 19, 18 14, aged 81 years. 

Mary his wife, who died March 12, 181 1, aged 61 years. 

169. Elizabeth Etheridge, who died April 18, 18 14, aged 21 years. 

My late lov'd friends who view this stone 
Attend. Oh I think how soon life's gone. 
Repent — believe in earnest — pray — 
You may not see another day. 
What if your sun should set at noon : 
Are you prepar'd to die so soon ? 
Reflect upon your youthful crimes ; 
Resolve to seek the Lord betimes. 
Eternal glory, endless bliss, 
None of his saints shall ever miss. 

1 70. [This monument is of wood.] 

Lucy wife of William Wright, who died June .. 1843, ^g^^ 23 years. 
Thomas Wright, who died May 28, 184 [sic] aged 3 weeks. 
Alfred Wright, who died July 8, 1843, aged 2 years. 

Short was my life tho' long my rest may be, 

as you may plainly see; 

Nurs'd up with care, parents dear had I, 

Who lov'd me well and grieved to see me die. 



190 GREAT WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 



lyi. Joab second son of John & Elizabeth Mulley, 

who died July 25, 1823, aged 41 years. 

IJ2. Richard Michael MiiUey, third son of Richard & Hannah Mulley 

late of Bury. He died June 11, 18 10, in the 21st year of his age. 

ly^ Rose the wife of James Miles, 

who died March 5, 1814, aged 46 years. 
A broken heart, oppress'd with grief, 
The Lord hath now sent her relief: 
She longed [sic] then desir'd to die. 
To live with God eternally. 

i-jA In memory of John the son of Jonathan & Mary Ely, 

who died Oct. 12, 1792, aged 39 years. 

lyc. In memory of Jonathan Ely late of this parish, 

who died May 29, 181 8, aged 93 years. 
Reader. 
He was a husband to a wife, 
A father to the fatherless ; 

He reliev'd the widows in distress : He valu'd neither 

Heliv'd 

Mary his wife, who died Jan. 21, 1803, aged 73 years. 
Reader, 
[illegible.] 

I y6. Ann the wife of Joseph Farrow, 

who died Jan. 11, 1828, aged 59 years. 
Our life hangs by a single thread. 
Which soon is cut and we are dead ; 
Then boast not, reader, of thy might. 
Alive at noon and dead at night. 

£ /y. In memory of Jonathan Ely sen., 

who died March 6, 1780, aged 88 years. 
Elizabeth his wife, who died April 30, 1777, aged 82 years. 



GREAT WHELNETHAAL TOMBSTONES. 191 



178. In memory of Thomas the son of Jonathan & Mary Ely, 

who died July 16, 1796, aged 45 years. 

179- In memory of Elizabeth wife of Joseph Reeve, 

who died August 23, 1809, aged 60 years. 
The best of wives the grave incloses here, 
A tender mother to her children dear ; 
She with a Christian courage did resign 
Her soul to God at His appointed time. 

180. In memory of Elizabeth wife of John Ely, late of Bury St Edmunds, 

who departed this life Oct. 9, 1831, aged 55 years. 
She was a faithful wife and a sincere friend. 
Most patiently she bore affliction's rod. 
Nor murmur'd at the sentence of her God ; 
Inspir'd with steadfast hope from Heaven above, 
With lively faith in her Redeemer's love, 
She undismay'd resign'd her latest breath. 
And sunk serene into the arms of death. 






192 LITTLE WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 



Monumental Inscriptions 
IN Little Whelnetham Church. 



[Flat stone in the chancel.] 
Here lyeth ye body of Edward Agas, Rector of Rushbrooke and of this parish, 

who departed this life Jan. 23, 1680, aged 63. 
Here lyeth ye body of Rachel wife of Edward Agas, who departed this life 

Aug. 3, 1677, aged 52. 

[Flat stone in the chancel. The words within brackets are guessed, being hidden 

by the organ.] 
Here lyeth ye body of [the Rev.] Anthony Agas, who succeeded Edward his 

father as Rector of Rushbrooke and of this parish, and continued so 41 

years. He departed this life Dec. 31, 1721, aged 76. 

[Flat stone in the chancel.] 

Here lieth the body of Katharin the wife of Thomas Briton, 

who died Oct. 10, 1721, aged 45 years. 

Elizabeth Briton daughter of Thomas and Catharine Briton : 

Born . . IX., AIDCCVI. 

Died ^^S^^^ XHL, MDCCXXXIV. 

Also Thomas Briton, son of Thomas and Catharine Briton, 

who died Oct. 17, 1741, aged 36 years. 

[Flat stone in the chancel.] 
Here lyeth ye body of William Bauley, 
who departed this life Nov. i, 1705, aged 75 years. 
Here lyeth ye body of Susan ye wife of William Bauley, 
who departed this life Oct. 19, 1718, aged 78 years. 

[Mural brass on south side of the nave.] 
In memory of the Rev. Charles Roe, formerly Rector of this parish, 
who died on April 15, 1878. 
Also of Catherine his wife, who died on December 21, 1884. 



LITTLE WHKLNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 1«3 



Tombstones in Little 
Whelnetham Churchyard. 



I have begun numbering at the churchyard gate, going round from .south to 
north. Nos. i to 72 are on the east and south sides of the church : Nos. 7^ to 76. 
are on the west side : Nos. 77 to 99 are on the north side : Nos. 100 to 103 are close 
under the east window. I have generally omitted the words that precede the name, 
such as " In memory of." Nothing else is omitted. 

1. In loving memory of Emma Tooley, daughter of George and P'rances 
Tooley, who died May 23, 1903. 

Nothing in my hand I bring, 
Simply to thy cross I cling. 

2. Frances wife of George Tooley, who died Jan. 22, 1890, aged 85 years. 

The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away. 

3. George Tooley, who died Dec. 30, 1870, aged 69 years. 

Thy will, O Lord, be done. 

4. James Everett who departed this life Feb. 17, 1850, aged 27 years. 

Dear wife, forbear to mourn and weep, 
Whilst I in dust do sweetly sleep ; 
And when the blessed day appear, 
1 hope in heaven to meet you there. 

5. William Tooley who died Nov. 20, 1878, aged 80 years. 

I know that my Redeemer liveth. 

6. Elizabeth Tooley wife of William Tooley ; 
who died Nov. 25, 1875, ^g^d 69 years. 

Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord. 



194 LITTLE WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 

7. Alice daughter of William and Elizabeth Tooley; 

died Dec. 13, 1840, aged 2 years and 8 months. 

James son of William & Elizabeth Tooley ; 

died March 31, 1837, aged 10 months. 

William Henry Tooley their son ; 

died July 10, 1840, aged 9 years & 6 months. 

8. Robert Tooley, who departed this Hfe Dec. 21, 1872, aged 79 years. 

We've not forgot thee, dear departed shade ; 
Thy memory's dear and ever shall remain ; 
We loved thee living and lament thee dead ; 
Our loss we hope is thy eternal gain. 

9. John Pulfer who passed away Dec. 15, 1899, aged 55 years. 

He is not dead but sleepeth. 

10. Dennis Pulfer who died Dec. 6, 1881, aged 79 years. 

Also Phoebe wife of Dennis Pulfer, who died Jan, 11, 1884, aged 76 years. 
In Thee is our trust. 

11. In memory of Mrs. Cocksedge, wife of the Rev. Mr. Cocksedge, Rector of 

this parish, who died Sept. 18, 1790. 

12. In memory of the Rev. Roger Cocksedge MA., 
who died March 14, 1806, in the 90th year of his age. 

13. Thomas Marchant who died Oct. 9, 1783, aged 67 years. 

14. Alice the wife of Thomas Marchant, who died Sept. 10, 1784, aged 71 years. 

[In the Register she is called Elizabeth.] 

15. Here lyes the body of the Rev. John Pack L.L.B. Rector of this parish. 

Constant in his devotion, extensive in his charity, and affable in his 
conversation, he lived universally esteemed and dyed universally lamented, 
March 21, 1763, aged 41 [or 44] years. 

16. William Tooley, clerk of this parish 52 years, 

who died Jan. 12, 1843, ^g^d 84 years. 
Also Mary his wife died Jan. 25, 1825, aged 65 years. 



LITTLE WHELNLTHAM TOMBSTONES. 195 



ly, Mary the wife of John Alderton, who died July 24, 1795. 

With pain I was so sore opprest, 
\Vhich wore my strength away, 
Which made me look for Heaven's rest, 
That never will decay. 

18. John Alderton carpenter, who died Feb. ir, 1807, in the 80th year of his age. 

A tender father all his life, 
A loving husband to his wife, 
A steady friend sincere and kind, 
And mourn'd by all he's left behind. 
He rests beneath this humble stone 
Li the same grave with his dear son. 
Goodchild his son died in 1774 [1773], aged 21 years. 

19. Mary wife of James Pryke who died Aug. 3, 1838, aged 36. 

Sarah their daughter who died Dec. 23, 1838, aged 15. 
Also George and Elizabeth who died infants. 

20. Mary daughter of John & Mary Warren who died July 21, 1788, aged 17 years. 

Pray cease to weep, my mother dear, 
I am not dead but sleeping here ; 
As I am now so must you be ; 
So pray prepare to follow me, 

21. Mary wife of John Cocksedge, who died Aug. 29, 1783, aged 64 years. 

22. Susan Cocksedge who died Aug. 23, 1779, aged 31 years. 

2:^. Bett wife of AVilliam Killingworth, who died May 22, 1852, aged 63 years. 

24. William Killingworth who died March 5, 1839, aged 50 years. 

25. William Gault who died Feb. 18, 1828, aged 40 years. 

Affliction sore long time I bore. 

Physicians were in vain. 
Till Christ did please to give me ease, 

And rid me of my pain. 

26. Henry Haggitt. 

Born May 23, 1825. Fell asleep March 18, 1884. 
ThoD wilt keep him in perfect peace whose mind is stayed on thee. 



196 LITTLE WHELNETHAAl TOMBSTONES. 



27. Marianne Haggitt. 

Bom Aug. 14, 1836. Fell asleep June 13, 1895. 
I know whom I have believed. 

28. Richard D'Arcy Haggitt. 

Born Jan. 30, 1869. Fell asleep Aug. 6, 1872. 
And Jesus called a little child unto him. 

29. George John Haggitt. 

Born Oct. 11, 1859. Fell asleep April 17, 1883. 
Out of weakness were made strong. 

30. The Rev. John William Heigham Phillips M.A. Priest, 14 years rector of 

this parish. Born Nov. 21, 1851. Taken to rest Sept. 10, 1894. 
He is not dead but only lieth sleeping 
In the sure refuge of the Master's breast, 
And far away from sorrow, toil and weeping, 
He is not dead but only taking rest. 

31. Martha wife of William Last, 

who departed this life Nov. 22, 1S53, in the 62nd year of her age. 
Watch and pray, for blessed are the dead which die in the Lord. 

32. Frances Elizabeth only daughter of Robert and M.A. Last, 

who departed this life March 8, 1879, 'i"* her 16 year. 
Gone but not lost. Her end was peace. 

33. Mary Ann the beloved wife of Robert Last, 

who departed this life Dec. 21, 1859, in the 45 year of her age. 
A dutiful daughter all her life, 
A tender mother and a loving wife. 

34. William son of Robert and Mary Ann Last, 

who departed this life June 27, 1853, in the 15 year of his age. 
The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away ; blessed be the name of the Lord. 

35. John Reeman who died July 8, 187 1, in the 79th year of his age. 

Remember all as you pass by. 
As you are now so once was I ; 
As I am now so must you be ; 
Therefore prepare to follow me. 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 19^ 

36. Ann daughter of John and Elizabeth Scott of Felsham, 

who died Aug. 15, 1863, aged 39 years. 

37. [Both sides of this stone are inscribed.] 

Mary Ann relict of Thomas Leech and daughter of John and Rachel Reeman, 

who died Nov. i, 1859, aged 65. 

Looking for the mercy of our Lord Jesus Christ unto eternal life. Jude 21. 

Thomas Leech of Bury St Edmunds, who died April 29, 1853, aged 60 years. 

We cannot, Lord, thy purpose see. 

But all is well that's done by thee. 

38. Rachel wife of John Reeman, who died Nov. 9, 1841, in her 72 year. 

Children, weep not but be content, 
She was not yours but only lent ; 
Wipe off that tear and weep no more. 
She is not lost but gone before. 

39. John Reeman who died June 30, 1839, aged 70 years. 

The best of husbands the grave encloses here, 
A tender father to his children dear ; 
Great was our loss for his eternal gain, 
But hope in heaven we shall meet again, 

40. Henry Reeman who died July 20, 1874, aged 81 years. 

Thy will be done. 

41. Robert Girling who died June 9, 1790, aged 76 years. 

Mary wife of Robert Girling who died July 21, 1771, aged 62 years. 
It can hardly be said she died ; 
But having steer'd through every course of life. 
The girl, the maid, the woman and the wife. 
She softly landed on that silent shore, 
Where billows never break or tempests roar. 
Where peacefull scepters for the Patient grow. 
And crowns repay our long fatigues below. 
On the tvesfface of this stone is a large heraldic shield : 
On a bend between two cotisses three fleur de lys (for Girling) impaling 
three bars between eight roundels, three, two, two and one. 
Crest : A bird with winafs extended. 



198 LITTLE WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 

42. Abigale Sparke wife of Robert Girling, who died June 25, 1777, aged 63 years. 

43. Martha relict of Robert Girling who died April 21, T803, aged 72 years. 

44. Here lieth ye body of Rose ye wife of Thomas King, 

who died Nov. 27, 1729, aged 57 years. 

45. Here lyeth ye body of William King, son of John and Bridget King. 

He dyed Nov. 9, 17 18, aged 29 years. 

46. In memory of Bridget King who died July 3, 1734, aged 74 years. 

A broken heart opprest with grief. 
The Lord hath now sent her relief ; 

She longed then desir'd to die, 
To live with God eternally. 

47. Here heth ye body of Johnnathan King who died March 2, 172I aged 29 years. 

O think of heaven and on God's marcy call. 
In early \ears God gave to me my fall. 

48. Margaret the wife of Daniel Pledger of Saffron Walden in Essex, 

who died June 29, 1800, in the 50th year of her age. 

49. Here lyeth ye body of Mary wife of John Yearsley and daughter of John and 

Bridget King. She dyed June 12, 17 18, aged 27. 

50. Ann the wife of Isaac VVillson, who died July 11, 1745, aged 59 years. 

51. Isaac VVillson, who died Dec. . . 1731 aged 42 years. 

52. Mildred ye wife of Samuel Scutchy, who died Dec. 18, 1749, aged 38 years. 

[Not in the Register of Burials.] 
Weep not for me, weep not in vain ; 
Weep for your sins, from them refrain ; 
I sleep in peace and free from pain, 
Till Christ shall raise me up again. 

53. Elizabeth wife of Thomas Rolfe, who died Dec. 19, 1760, aged 32 years. 

A loving wife, a mother dear, 
A faithful friend lies buried here ; 
I hope her soul is gone to rest, 
In Jesus Christ we all are blest. 
Also Edward their son. 



LITTLE W^HELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 199 

54. Samuel Scutchy, who died Sept. 10, 1756, in the 39th year of his age. 

Tho long affliction did my life attend, 
Time and patience have brought it to an end ; 
God has releas'd me from my misery, 
I have left ye world in peace and unity. 

55. In memory of Samuel How, who died Aug. 8, 1729, aged 8 years. 

56. Here lieth ye body of James Howe, ye son of John and Mary Howe. 

He died Nov. 8, 1706, aged i month. 

57. Frederick Charles Lord. 

Born Jan. 5, 1882. Died Jan. 9, 1889. 

58. Here lieth ye body of Susan ye wife of James Frost. 

She dyed Aug. 29, 1691. 

59. Here lyeth ye bodys of James and Marget son and daughter to James Frost. 

James dyed June 5, 1687. Marget dyed July, 1683. 

60. Here lyeth ye body of Margaret the wife of James Frost. 

She died July 30, 1685. 

61. Rachael wife of William Brett, who died May 12, 1820, aged 78 years. 

My dear Redeemer is above, 

Him do I wish to see. 
And all my friends in Christ below 

Quickly to follow me. 

62. Sarah the wife of Robert Pearl, who died Nov. 28, 1787, aged 38 years. 

Robert Pearl wh-o died May 9, 1806, aged [68] years. 

63. Sacred to the memory of my loving husband Simon Wright late of the R.H.A. 

Died April 21, 1904, aged 55 years. 
A Past Master of Lodge Rohilla Star, Bareilly, No. 1843 E.I. R.I. P. 

64. James Garwood who died April 21, 1804, aged 80 years. 
Mary wife of James Garwood, who died Dec. 11, 1783, aged 63 years. 

65. James Garwood jun. who died July 10, 1786, aged 31 years. 

Stay, mortal, stay, depart not from this stone, 
But stand and ponder well where I am gone : 
Death quickly took my strength and sense away, 
And laid me down in this dark bed of clay : 



200 LITTLE WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 



Consider of it and take home this line : 
The grave that next is open may be thine. 

66. John Flack who died May 27, 1753, aged 63 years. 

67. Mary ye wife of James Frost. 

She died Oct. vi, 1729, in ye 36 [?] year of her age. 

son who died 

[This probably refers to the infant buried with her. See Register.] 

68. James Flack who died April 12, 1760, aged 66 years. 

69. Here lieth the body of Elizabeth wife of Ambrose Flack, 

who died Feb. 21, 1723, aged 69 years. 

70. Here lieth ye body of Ambrose Flack, 
who died Sept. 8, 1725, aged 70 years. 

71' Ambrose Flack, who died April 29, 1730, aged 44 years. 

72. Elizabeth Flack, who died Sept. 14, 1733, aged 70 years. 

73. Elizabeth the wife of Henry Roife, who died Dec. 15, 1778, aged 43 years. 

74. Henry Rolfe, late blacksmith to Sir Charles Davers Bart : forty years, 

who died Dec. 11, 181 6, in the 80th year of his age. 

Elizabeth wife of Henry Rolfe, who died March 6, 1805, aged 66 years. 
Affliction sore long time I bore, 

Physicians were in vain, 
Till God did please to give me ease, 

And freed me from my pain. 

75. Ann Mudd, who departed this life June 18, 1869, aged 24 years. 

Weep not, my father, weep not, mother dear, 
And you, my friends, restrain the falling tear ; 
If death come early, thanks to him who gave 
His life a ransom our lost souls to save. 
To depart and be with Christ is far better. 

76. In memory of the Rev. Charles Roe, formerly rector of this parish, 

who died April 15, 1878. 
Also of Catharine his wife, who died Dec. 21, 1884. 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 201 

77. Gertrude Newson. Died June 9, 1864, aged 10 years. 

[These next seven stones Nos. 78 to 84, which cannot be accused of verbosity, 
are in one enclosure. Ann Carss, No. 84, is not in the Register of Burials.] 

78. Sarah Carss. July 6, 1807. 78. 

79. John Smirk. July 20, 1S08. 70. 

80. Robert Carss. May 14, 1827. 76. 

81. Sophia Carss, June 10, 1834. 80. 

82. George Moor. Dec. 12, 1857. Aged 81. 

Sophia Moor. Nov. 8, 1855, aged 73. 

83. Robert Martin Carss. Sept. 27, 1872. 84. 

Sophia Carss. Aug. 10, 1885. 85 years. 

84 Ann Carss. March 13, 181 7. Aged 64. 

85. Priscilla, beloved wife of Richard Cropley, 

who died Oct. 4, 1897, aged 43 years. 
I know that my Redeemer liveth. 

86. Lizzie eldest daughter of Richard and P. Cropley, 

who died Dec. 3, 1895, aged 17 years. 
For me to live is Christ, to die is gain. 

87. Samuel Ford, who died March 28, 1884, aged 79 years. 

The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away ; blessed be the name of the Lord. 

88. Our dear mother Drusilla Ford, wife of Samuel Ford, 

who died March 22, 1902, in her 88th year. 
My anchor's cast — cast on a rock 

Where I shall ever rest. 
From all the labours of my thoughts 
And workings of my breast. 

89. Francis Davis who died May 3, 1881, aged 87 years. 

Looking unto Jesus. 

90. Sarah widow of Thomas Bruce, who fell asleep May 25, 1893, ^g^d 85 years. 

He giveth his beloved sleep. 



202 LITTLE WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 



91. Thomas Bruce who died Oct. 20, 1883, aged 79 years. 

Lord Jesus, I come. 

Also Charles his son who lies by his side. Died Jan. 8, 1851, aged 6 years. 

A lamb taken from the fold. 

92. Ann the wife of John Fenn, who died April 5, 1836, aged 54 years. 

Also John Fenn who died Oct. 20, 1844, aged 70 years. 

93. Ann Airy, daughter of George Biddell. 

Born 1767 at Rougham. Died 1841 at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich. 
I have waited for thy salvation, O Lord. 

94. William Airy. Born 1750 at Luddington, Lincolnshire. 

Died 1827 at Bury St. Edmund's. 
He knoweth our frame ; he remembereth that we are dust. 

95. Elizabeth Airy, only daughter of William & Ann Airy, & sister of Sir George 

Biddell Airy of Greenwich & the Rev. William Airy of Keysoe. 
Born at Hereford 1803, Feb. 15. 
Died at Bedford 1879, March 17. 
For forty years resident at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich. 

96. Elizabeth, wife of John Blencowe and daughter of George Biddell formerl)' of 

the Hall farm in this parish, who departed this life Jan. 24, 1850, aged 86 
years. 
She opened her mouth with wisdom and in her tongue was the law 
of kindness. Prov. xxxi. 26. 
Loved during life, lamented at her end. 
Kind, gentle-hearted, to the poor a friend. 
She lived in peace, in hope resigned her breath : 
Learn then a lesson from her life and death. 

97. John Blencowe, late of Stoke by Nayland in this county, 

who departed this life April 5, 1839, aged 77 years. 

Mark the perfect man and behold the upright, for the end of that man 

is peace. Prov. xxxvii. 37. 

98. Jane Blencowe who died at Ipswich after many years of severe affliction, 

Dec. 24, 1866, aged 66 years. 

She v.as the elder daughter of John and Elizabeth Blencowe, who died 

at Stoke by Nayland and are buried in this churchyard. 



I 



LITTL?: WHELNETHAM TOMBSTONES. 



203 



99. Lucy Blencowe who died at Bury St Edmunds Sept. 15, 1867, aged 64 years. 
She was the second daughter of John & Elizabeth Blencowe of Stoke by 
Nayland in this county. 
In memory of Jacob Brook, who died Jan. . 1797, aged 85 years. 

In memory of Ann the wife of Jacob Brook, 

who died Dec. 13, 1783, aged 64 years. 

Also near this place lieth one of their daughters, Ann Brook, single woman. 

In memory of John Brook, who died June 12, 18 10, aged 53 years. 
How lov'd, how valu'd now availes thee not. 
To whom related or by whom begot ; 
A heap of dust alone remains of thee ; 
Tis all thou art and all the proud shall be. 
[03. This is a fine medieval slab, or stone coffin lid, with a highly decorated cross 
running the whole length of it, two yards. It is not in its original position, 
but has probably been moved from inside the church. 
It has been sawn in half, probably when it was moved. There is no stone 
coffin under it now. 






204 NOTES IN THE REGISTERS. 



Notes in the Registers. 



Under this heading I will put together all the notes and memora^ida ivhich 
have been made on the covers atid fly leaver of the registers^ and which I have not printed 
with the entries. 

GREAT WHELNETHAM. 

The first volume of the Great Whtbietham registers contains Baptisms. 
Marriages^ and Burials, arranged separately, from 1561 to 1700. On the inside of 
the cover are these memoranda : 

Mem : The Parsonage house was thatch'd in June 1733. 

Mem: The Chancel was thatch'd on ye South side in May, 1734: there were 96 

yards : paid ^i..4..o. 
Mem : In 1749 the Belfrey was erected at the expence of James Merest Esq. 

The succession oj rectors is oft the fly-leaf. The three texts and the death 
of Dr Herbert are written by the hand of Mr Brundish. All that precedes the 
death of Dr Herbert is (/ think) written by the hand of Dr Herbert. 

Mr Stafford came 1561. 
Mr Stafford died 1619. 

58 years Rector of this parish. 



Mr Hely died 1633. 



Generatio una abit et altera advenit : 

quamvis terra in seculum permanent. 

Eccles. I. 4. 
Generatio generationi laudibus com- 

mendet opera tua, prout haec indicant I Mr Seller died 1646. 

omnimodam potentiam tuam. j Dr Herbert came 46. 

Psal. 145- 4- 



NOTES IK THE REGISTERS. 205 



Quseso, Domine, ut decorem gloriamque 1 

majestatis tua, et res mirabiles tuas [ Dr Herbert dyed 1680 Feb. 
eloquar : ita precor. J.B. J 

Mr Brundish who succeeded Dr. Herbert 

dyed July 3, 1724. 
Mr Rushbrook succeeded & resigned 1726. 
Mr Lord was inducted Dec. 21, 1726. 

TAe succession of rectors is again written in the iniddle of this Vol. i. // 
is all in one hand as Jar as the induction {inclusive) of Mr Lord, and therefore I 
assume that the hand is his. 

Mr Stafford, Rector of this Parish, came 1561, dyed 1619. 

Mr Hely his successor dyed 1633. 

Mr Seller his successor dyed 1646. 

Dr Herbert his successor dyed 1680. 

Mr Brundish his successor dyed July 3, 1724. 

Mr Rushbrook instituted Dec. 19, 1724, resign'd Dec. 20, 1726. 

Mr Lord inducted Dec. 21, 1726, died Aug. 6, 1788. Was 63 years rector. 

Mr Robert Phillips inducted 1788, died Feb. 9, 1809. 

Mr John Cartwright inducted 1S09, resigned 181 6. 

Mr Henry Phillips inducted 1816. 

One generation passeth away and another succeedeth. 

On the last page of Vol. i is this short list of Briefs : 
CoUectiones. 

Collected in the Parish of Great Weltham toward the reliefe of the poor £ s. d. 
inhabitants of Fordingbridg in the county of Southampton the 
summe of six shillings & three pence 063 

Collected Aprill 12, [16J74, the summe of seaven shillings «S: four pence 
in the church of Great Weltham towards the Briefe for the 
inhabitants in the Parish of St Martins in the Fields in London 074 

Collected in the Parish aforesaid for the inhabitants of Benenden in the 

CO. of Kent the summe of eight shillings & four pence 084 

Collected towards the reliefe of the inhabitants of Redborne in the co. of 

Hertford the sum of five shillings and six pence May 23, 1675 056 



206 NOTES IN 'I'HK REGISTERS. 



The second volume of the Great Whelnetham registers contains Baptisms 
and Burials from 1700 to 1783, and Marriages from 1700 to 1754. This 
Memorandum has bfen ivritten on the fly leaf : 

Mem : Jan. 2, 1767. It began to snow very much this day, the wind blowing 
strong and heaping up the snow, continued at times snowing every day, & on Friday 
the 9th it snow'd all day, the wind blowing strong, which gathered up the snow so 
much as to make the hollow roads level, all carriages laid by, the stages could get 
only from Bury to Bradfield Manger, forc'd to turn back again to Bury. In the 
Rectory Garden at Great Wheltham Jan. 10, 1767, the snow before the Parlour Front 
measur'd three feet, three inches deep. In the strawberry ground a ridge of snow 
four feet deep. In the walk from the Urns to the Alcove, the upper end of the 
Garden to the upper Mound, the snow lay at the Urns three feet deep, so to four feet, 
so to five feet in a regular slope from the Urns to the Alcove, the snow being five 
feet deep at the Alcove. 

Jan. IX, Sunday. At two of the clock afternoon I attempted on horseback to 
get to church, could not ride so far as the Hall Gate, with difficulty got back, the 
road being wholly covered and smooth, in places above four feet deep. Jan. 12. 

The rest of the leaf containitiq this Memorandum atid the whole of another 

leaf have been cut away. Several leaves have also been cut out at the other etid of 

this 7'olume. One 7vonders what was ivritten. on than. This next memorandum is 
on the last remaining leaf. 

In the year 1701 six persons did their penance in the space of 8 dayes, and were 
these : 

William Boldero & Elizabeth his wife. 
Francis Ottewell & Rose his wife. 
These for antinuptial fornication, on Sunday, April 13. 

Robert Bray on Good Fryday, April 18. 

Elizabeth Harold on Sunday, April 20, being Easter Sunday. 

These for fornication with each other. 

Never was the like ^I suppose) before in ye Town. 

From fornication &: all other deadly sin libera nos, Domine. 

Two of these seemed very penitent, especially the widow Harold. But Boldero 

& Ottewell the 2 men appeared with an impudent or whores forehead. 



NOTES IN THE REGISTERS. 207 

Sunday, Jan. 31, 1702. George Cason did his penance for committing fornication 
with Mary Johnson, but showed no sign of penitence, rather to the contrary. 

A volume of the Great Whelnetham registers containing Baptisms and Burials 
from December, 1783, to December, 1800, has on a fly leaf a copy of the certificate 
zvhich from 1679 omvards had to be produced at a burial. 

This is to certify that A.B. of this Parish came before me this day and made oath 
that the body of CD. late of this parish aforesaid when buried at Wei: was not 
wrapped up in any materials but what appertain to sheeps according to Act of 
Parliament. 

Gummed to the fly leaf is this cutting from the Bury and Nonvich Post in 
February, 1799. 

Mr Mulley, farmer, of Sicklesmere, came into local prominence this month 
through several unusual circumstances which occurred on his premises. For one 
thing, he and his wife and son were instrumental in saving the life of a man found 
perishing by the roadside : secondly Mrs Mulley bravely cut down a woman whom 
she found hanging in the cowhouse, and who was subsequently restored to animation 
and reason on the arrival of medical aid from Bury : whilst to cap it all Mr Mulley 
lost a valuable cow, which slipped down and broke its neck. There is no record as 
to whether public sympathy was sufficiently great to ensure his financial compensation. 



208 



NOTES IN THE REGISTERS. 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM. 

The first volume of the Little Whebietham registers is a thin volume of eleveji 
parchment leaves with parchment covers. It is all in one hand, that of James 
Wolfenden, luhose signature is at the foot of each of the twenty-two pages. It 
contains Baptisms, Marriages and Burials {not separate) from 1557 to 1623 inchisive. 
The page containing entries from 1613 to 1615 has also the signatures, or at least 
the 7iames, of John Tillett and Robert Brotvne, zvho I presume 7vere churchivardtns. 
On the inside of the end cover is entered what Jollows : 

The collection for the English Captives in Algiers Oct. 14, 1680. 







£ 


s. 


d. 




£ 


s. 


d. 


Edward Agas, Re 


ctor 





2 


6 


Ambrose fflack 








3 


Philip Ward 







I 





James Richardson 








4 


George Willis 










6 


George Cocksege 








2 


John How 










6 


Widow Baker 








6 


^^'idow King 










6 


William Bawley 








6 


Robert Bixby 










6 


\V'illiam Baker 








4 


James Garwood 










4 
















Nathan Pett 










3 


Summa 





8 


6 


Edw. 


Agas, 


Rector. 















There is no doubt about any of the figures, though as they stand the total is 
only Si'. 2d. 



The secojid surviving volume of the Little Whelnetham registers contains Baptisms 
and Burials frotn 1680 to 181 1, sometimes separate, sometimes not. These 
Memoranda are ivritten on the fly leaves : 

In Rogation week, 1734, was a Perambulation of the Bounds of this Parish. 

On July 25, 1734, was a parochiall visitation. 

On Monday, June 16, 1735, was the primary visitation of the Right Reverend 
Father in God Robert, Lord Bishop of Norwich. 

In Rogation week, 1747, was a Perambulation of the Bounds of this parish. 

On Ascension day, May 31, 1753, was a Perambulation of ye Bounds of this 
parish. 

On June 5, 1753, was ye Primary Visitation of ye Right Reverend Father in God 
Thomas, Lord Bishop of Norwich. 



NOTES IN THE REGISTERS. 209 

Ascension day, May 28, 1767, was a Perambulation of the Bounds of this Parish, 
the first year of R. Cocksedge being Rector. 

In Rogation week, Friday, May 21, 1773, was a Perambulation. 

Tuesday, May 13, 1777, was a Perambulation. 

In Rogation week, Friday, May 22, 1789, was a Perambulation. 

In Rogation week, Friday, May 26, 1797, was a Perambulation of the bounds of 
this Parish, the second year of R. Davers being Rector. 

1843, Jan. 17, was buried ^^'illiam Tooley, who for 54 years had served the office 
of Parish Clerk at Little Whelnetham. He succeeded John Tweed, who lies buried 
in the churchyard at Bradfield Combust, and whose death is thus registered : "John 
Tweed was buried Nov. 16, 1788." 

This Memorandum as to the succession of rtciors is in /he excellent writing of 
Roger Cocksedge as far as his ow7i succession ; since then each successive rector has 
entered his own date excepting, Marnwduke Wilkinson^ 7vho is entered by Frederick 
IJeiiry Barnwell, curate. Mr Barnwell has also added the fe^v words in praise of 
Roger Cocksedge. 

Anthony Agas, Rector when this book began, 1680, 

continued Rector till 1722, was so upwards of 40 years. Died Jan. 1722, 
Edward Peach succeeded him in 1722. 
John Symonds succeeded him in 1724. 
Garnham Ray succeeded him in 1725. 
John Peck succeeded him in 1752. 
Thomas Davers succeeded him 1763. 
George Rogers succeeded him in 1766. 

Roger Cocksedge succeeded him in 1767. Integer vitas ! NuUi secundus ! 
Robert Davers succeeded him in 1796. 
Marmaduke Wilkinson succeeded him in 180 . [sic] 
Henry John Hasted succeeded him in 1832. 
Charles Roe succeeded him in 1849. 
Charles S. Johnston succeeded him in 1878. 
John William Heigham Phillips succeeded him in 1880. 
Robert Gibson succeeded him in 1894. 



210 WHELNETHAM TAX PAYERS. 



Whelnetham Tax Payers. 



Under this heading I give occasional hsts of those who paid the king's taxes for 
the two Whehiethams, from the reign of Edward III to that of Charles II. The lists 
are made out from the original returns in the Public Record Office. They are for 
these years : 



1327. I 1566. 



1523- 
1542. 
1546. 



1580. 
1620. 
1625. 



1639 Ship money. 

1641. 

1642. 



1664 I 

1670 ^ Hearth tax. 

1674 J 



In the Denham volume of this series (Suffolk Green Books, No. VIII, p. 134 — 
149), I have given a full account of a subsidy and of the special circumstances under 
which some of these subsidies were raised, and shall not repeat it all here. 

I. ist year of Edward III. 1327. A twentieth. 

In January, 1327, Edward II was deposed and Edward III reigned in his 
stead. Parliament granted the new king a twentieth of the value of moveable goods, 
such as cattle, crops severed from the ground, stock in trade and other chattels. 
These are they who paid for the two Whelnethams, and these are the sums they paid. 
If we multiply the total by 20, it will give ^40 as the rateable value of all the 
moveables in the two parishes. I have, in a parallel column, put the sums paid in a 
more modern form. 

There appears to be some reason for the order in which the names occur. I 
imagine that the first twelve may have belonged to Great Whelnetham, and the next 
six (beginning with Walter the clerk) may have belonged to Little Whelnetham, and 
the last four may have been non-residents, who in the eighteenth century would have 
been called " outsetters." 

The second and fourth names in the list, Crack and Brewster, are still plentifully 
represented in the neighbourhood. 

No. 7, Agnes le Lauender, did the washing, launder or lavender being the older 
form of laundress, before ess was tacked on to give it a more feminine look. 
AValter the clerk was prol)abIy rector of Little Whelnetham. 



WHELNETHAM TAX PAYERS. 



211 



Of Thomas de Castell, or at least of the castle from which he took his name I 
shall have more to say presently. I will only say now that I am inclined to put him 
at Sicklesmere, where the present rectory is. 

Villata de Whelnitham Magna cum parva. 



De Dyonis: de Coleuyle 


s 
IX 


d 


— Juliana Crach 


HI 




— Johanne le Carter 




VI 


— Galfrido le Breustere 




VIII 


— Willmo Hochard 


n 




— Johanne le Longe 


II 




— Agneta le Lauender 




VI 


— Edmundo atte Berne 




XII 


— Henrico Cokenian 




XVI 


— Simfine Bercar 


II 


VI 


— Adam Cok 




VI 


— Edmundo de Mora 




VI 


— Waltero clerico 


iiii 




— Thoma de Castell 




XX 


— Alexandre le 'Wolf 




VI 


— Henrico Aleyn 




X 


— Roberto de Whelnitham 




XII 


— Willmo Cokeman 




VI 


— Ricardo Freysel 


III 




— Alexandre de Walsham 


III 




— Johanne de Stonham 




XII 


— Johanne Maymond 




XII 



£ 



.. d 

.. o 

.. o 

6 

8 

.. o 

,. o 

6 

. o 

• 4 

. 6 

6 

6 

. o 

. 8 

6 

lO 

. o 

6 
, o 

o 

o 

o 



Summa 



XL 



11. 15th year of Henry VIII. 1523. A Subsidy. 
In 1522 Henry VIII declared war with France, and having failed to get money 
by forced loans had to come to Parliament. Wolsey proposed to raise ;^8oo,ooo by 
a property tax of 20 p.c. After a fortnight's struggle with the House of Commons he 
had to be satisfied with less than half of his demand. Parliament granted a yearly 
subsidy for four years. 



212 WHELNETHAM TAX PAYERS. 

During the first two years all native subjects of the king were to pay one shilling 
in the pound on the yearly value of their lands. They were to pay one shilling in 
the pound on all moveables of the value of ^20, and six pence in the pound on 
moveables from J[^z to ;!^20. All natives of 16 years of age and upwards having ^2 
in goods, or receiving daily, weekly or yearly wages of 20 shillings by the year, were 
to pay four pence yearly. Aliens liable to any of the above charges were to pay 
double, or, if not liable, were to pay 8 pence yearly. 

In the third year lands worth ^50 a year were to pay i shilling in £,. 

In the fourth year moveables worth ^50 were to pay i shilling in jQ. 

Persons were to be rated where they resided. If they had two places of abode a 
certificate of being assessed in one would be a discharge against being assessed in the 
other. 

No person rated for moveables during the first two years was to be rated also 
for lands, nor vice vers?. No person rated for moveables in the fourth year was to 
be rated for lands in the third year, nor should persons rated for lands in the third 
year be rated for moveables in the fourth year. 

This is the list for each Whelnetham separately. It is for one of the first two 
years of the four. It gives the sum at which each man is assessed as well as what he 
pays. These are all residents. The clergy do not come in to it, as they taxed 
themselve? in Convocation. The names with a query in the Little Whelnetham list 
are uncertain, the original roll being much faded. 

WELLTOM MAGNA. 

d 

John Goddard in moveables ^^III dat XVIII 

John Lorde in moveables XLs „ XII 

Wyllyam Kyng in moveables ;^III „ XVIII 

Thomas Adams in moveables XLs „ XII 

John Kyng in moveables XLs ,, XII 

Raff Macrow in moveables XXVIs . Vllld „ VIII 

Gylys Adams in labor be yer XXs „ IIII 

Wylliam Perterych in labor be yer XXs „ IIII 

Robert Slyxston in labor be yer XXs „ IIII 

Sum ma VII .. VIII 



WHELNETHAM TAX PAYERS. 



213 



EYTYL WELTAM. 
John BoUe in moveables ^XXX 
Clement Ladyman in moveables 
Rychaid Sargant in wages be yeer 
Thomas Crek [?] in wages be yeer 
Robert Saymore in wages be yeer 
John Alweys in moveables ^VIII 
Rychard Harple in do. ^VIII 
John Goddard in do. ;^V 

John Bradstret in do. XLs 

Marget Kyng in londes be yeer XXs 
Raff Kyng in labor be yeer XXs 
John Mannyng in labor be yeer XXs 
Wyllyam Wyx in labor be yeer XXs 
Thomas Greyt [?] in labor be yeer XXs 
Edward Legat [?] in labor be yeer XXs 
Wyllyam Ladyman in londes be yeer XXs 

Sum ma 



dat 



s 
XXX 
VI 



nil 

nil 

II 



YIII 

iiii 
iiii 
iiii 



VI 
XII 
XII 

IIII 

Till 

IIII 
IIII 
IIII 

XII 



LII 



X 



III. 34th & 35th Henry VIII. 1542-44. A subsidy. 

This time it is Scotland that causes a need of money. The preamble to the 
Statute states that the Almighty having been pleased to call to his mercy " the late 
pretensed king of Scottes," it was an apt time for Henry to recover his right to that 
crown. So Parliament granted him one whole subsidy to continue for three years. 
It was to be levied thus : 

Moveables from ^i to £,^ to pay 

,. ^5 to ;^io 
„ £^0 to ^20 
., ,, ;^2o & upwards ,, 

Realty of yearly value of £\ to ^5 to pay 
,, „ ,. ^5 to ^10 

;^io to ^20 
Over ^20 

One half the subsidy was to be paid the first year, and the remainder in equal 
portions in the second and third years. The following list is for the second or third 
year. 





4d 


in 


£■ 




8d 


in 


£■ 


I 


.. 4 


in 


£ 


2 


.. 


in 


£ 




8d 


in 


£ 


I 


.. 4 


in 


£ 


2 


.. 


in 


£ 


3 


.. 


in 


£ 



214 



WHELNETHAM TAX PAYERS. 



WHELTHAM MAGNA. 



d 

EafF Macrowe for goodes XII 

Raffe Adams for goodes X 

Robert Slyxston for goodes II 

Thomas Tyler for goodes II 

Wyllyam Adams for goodes II 

Wyllyam Revel for goodes I 

Wyllyam Enold for goodes I 

Richard Tayler for goodes I 

Thomas Adams for goodes I 

Edmund Tyllot for goodes I 



WHELTAM PARVA. 

d 

Mr Skott for goodes XII 

Elyzabeth Bull vidua for goodes XII 



Sum ma 



II 



IX 



Jhon Ladyman for goodes X 

Margett Ladyman for goodes X 

Jhon Butller for goodes III 

Wyllyam Bradley for goodes I 

Thomas Bernard for goodes I 

Robert Goddard for goodes I 

Jhon Adams for goodes I 

Amy Moone for goodes I 

Thomas Welles for goodes I 

Mat : Anderton for goodes I 

Robert Crome for goodes I 



Sum ma 



nil VII 



IV. 37th Henry VIII. 1546. A subsidy. 

In 1545, or early in 1546, Parliament granted Henry VIII two fifteenths and 
tenths, to be levied on moveable goods, the first to be paid by June, 1546, and the 
other by June, 1547. And perceiving that that will be too little they also grant a 
whole subsidy payable in two years. The subsidy is to be levied thus : 



to pay 



to pay 



Moveables from ^5 to ;^,io 

„ „ £10 to ;^20 

,, ,, ^20 & upwards 

Lands of 20s a year & upwards 
The list that follows is for the subsidy. 

WHELTHAM MAGNA. 

John King in moveables ;£X [to pay] 

John Alves in londes XLs ,, 

Raffe Makerowe in moveables ^VI ,, 
Raffe Adamjs in moveables ^V ,, 

Wyllyam Adamys in londes XXs ,, 



8d in ^. 
1 2d in £. 
i6d in £. 

2s in ^. 



Xs 

IIII 

IIII 

III 

II 



Illld 



Summa 



XXIII 



IIII 



WHELNETHAM TAX PAYERS. 



215 



WHELTHAM PARVA. 

Mr Scott in londes XXXVs [to pay] 

John Alves in moveables ^XIIII „ 

Johanne Ladyman in londes XXVIs .. Vllld „ 
John Godard in moveables ;^VIII „ 

Robert Seymore in moveables ;^VIII „ 

Margaret la dispencer in moveables ^V ,, 

Sum ma 



s 


d 


III 


VI 


XIIII 




II 


VIII 


V 


nil 


V 


IIII 


III 


nil 


XXXIIII 


II 



V. 8th year of Elizabeth. 1566. A subsidy. 

Parliament having expressed its gratitude to the Queen for several things, and 
having expressed a hope that she would marry as soon as God gave her an opportunity, 
went on to grant her a fifteenth and tenth and one whole subsidy. The subsidy was 
to be paid at two payments, viz. the first by April i, 1567, the other by April i, 1568. 
It was to be levied thus : 

Goods of ;^3 and upwards to pay at the first payment is and at the next lod 
in p£. Lands of 20s and upwards by the year to pay i6d in ^ at each payment. 

The following list for each Whelnetham is for the second year. 
WHELNETHAM [MAGNA]. 



William Holt gent, in moveables ^V 
lohn Kynge do. ;,^X 

Thomas Macrowe do. ;i£y 

Sir Jamys Barwycke, clarke, in londes XLs 
William Pertryche in moveables ^III 
Robert Hamont do. ;^III 

John Gotche do. ^III 

John Mawldyng [Maiden] do. ^HI 
John Adam do. ^i^HI 

Summa 



[to pay] 



s 


d 


IIII 


II 


VIII 


IIII 


IIII 


II 


II 


VIII 


II 


VI 


II 


VI 


II 


VI 


II 


VI 


II 


VI 



XXXI 



216 WHELNETHAM TAX PAYERS. 



John Nonne 




do. 


^v 


John Hayward 




do. 


^v 


Henry Nonne 




do. 


^v 


Thomas Adam 




do. 


^nii 


Edraond Foster 




do. 


^ni 


Clement Stephen 




do. 


;^ni 


John Ladyman in 


londs 




XXs 


John Kynge in ni< 


Dveabl 


es 


^ni 



WHELNETHAM PARVA. 

s d 

WiUiam Harpeley in moveables ;^X [to pay] VHI HH 

HH n 

iHi n 

„ nn II 

III nil 

11 VI 

II VI 

XVI 

11 VI 

Summa XXXIII 

VI. 23rd year of Elizabeth. 1580-1. A subsidy. 

Early in 1581 Parliament granted Queen Elizabeth a subsidy and two fifteenths 
and tenths. In the preamble to the Act they say that they cannot but consider the 
great charge her Majesty had sustained " not only in stopping foreign attempts but 
" especially in the prosecution of certain evil affected members of your realm of 
" Ireland, that most disloyally and unnaturally entered into actual rebellion with a 
"manifest intent to shake off the subjection and obedience that by the laws of God 
"and man they are bound to yield." 

These are fine words, but one wishes that they had told us by which of the laws 
of God it was that the Ireland of their day was bound to obey the Queen's 
government. Chapter and verse might have been useful. 

The first fifteenth and tenth was to be paid before June 4 next [1581], and the 
second before May 10, 1582. 

Personalty over ^3 was to pay is 8d in ^ for first payment, and is. for second. 
Aliens were to pay double. If not otherwise liable all aliens of 7 years of age and 
upwards were to pay a poll tax of 4d. for each of the two years. 

Lands of 20s. a year and upwards were to pay 2s. 8d. the first year and is. 4d. 
the second. 

Persons were to be rated where they resided. Persons rated for real property 
were not to be rated for personalty and vice versa. 



WHELNETHAM TAX PAYERS. 



217 



It is clear that the following list is for the second year, and shows what was paid 
by May, 1582. 

WHELTHAM MAGNA. 

s 



Joane Lowe vidua in lands ^ill 

Robert Hamond in moveables ;£lll 



[to payj 



Thomas Macro 


do. 


^ni 


John Mawlding 


do. 


:^ni 


Thomas King 


do. 


£in 


William Parteriche 


do. 


^ni 


Thomas Adames 


do. 


^iii 


John Cocke 


do. 


^ni 


Thomas Roffe 


do. 


£m 



Sum ma 
WHELTHAM PARVA. 

Elizabeth Bryant in lands XXs [to pay] 

Thomas Manhood in moveables ^HI 

Henrye Howe in lands ;^IIII 
Thomas Spylsbye do. XLs 

John Heyward in moveables ^HI 

Edmond Foster do, ^HI 

Thomas Inowld do. ;^in 

William Harplye do. ;;^V 
John Ladyman in lands XXs 

Summa 



xxvn 



s 


d 


y] 


XVI 


HI 




V 


iiii 


n 


VIII 


HI 




HI 




HI 




V 






XVI 


xxvn 


VIII 



VII. 18 James I. 1 620-1. A subsidy. 

After two prorogations the new Parliament met on Jan. 30, 1621. On March 22 
two Acts received royal assent, viz. (i) an Act for the grant of two whole subsidies by 
the Temporalty : (2) an Act for the confirmation of subsidies granted by the clergy. 
No copy of these Acts has been found, and consequently they are not printed among 
the Statutes. The following list is for the subsidy granted by the Temporalty. 
The clergy do not come into it. 



218 



WHELNETHAM TAX PAYERS. 



WHELNETHAM MAGNA. 



John Howe in lands XLs 

William Cooke do. XXs 

John Mauldinge do. XXs 

Thomas Macroe in moveables ^IIII 
John Hamont do. j£m 



Sum ma 



[to pay] 



s 


d 


II 


VIII 




XVI 




XVI 


nil 




III 





XII 



IIII 



WHELNETHAM PARVA. 



John Ladyman in lands XXs 

Henrie Howe do. XXs 

Elizabeth Manwood in moveables ^III 

Sum ma 



[to pay] 



s 


d 




XVI 




XVI 


III 





VIII 



VIII. I & 2 Charles I. 1625-6. A subsidy. 

Charles I came to the throne on March 27, 1625. Within a few months 
Parliament made him a grant. " We humbly present your Majesty with the free and 
cheerful gift of two entire subsidies.'' 

Personal property of ^^ and over was to pay 2s 8d per ^ for each subsidy. 
Aliens and Popish recusants were to pay double. If not otherwise chargeable, aliens 
of 7 years and upwards, and Popish recusants of 1 7 years, or who being 2 r years of 
age had not received the holy Communion within one year last past, were to pay a 
poll tax of 8d for each subsidy. 

Realty of 20s a year was to piy 45 per ^ for each subsidy : aliens double. 

The first subsidy was to be paid before the last day of October next [1625], and 
the second before the last day of April next [1626]. 

As the two payments were the same I have no means of telling whether the 
f(;l lowing list is for 1625 or 1626. There are no aliens or recusants in it. 



WHELNETHAM TAX PAYERS. 219 

WHELTHAM MAGNA. 

s 

John Howe in lands XLs [to pay] VIII 

John Maiden do. XXs „ IIII 

Jeremy Kinge do. XXs „ IIH 

Edward Macro m goods ;^I 1 1 „ VIII 

John Hamond do. ^11 1 „ VIII 



Summa XXXII 

WHELTHAM PARVA. 

s 
John Sache ui goods ^IH [to pay] VIII 
Susan Lady man in lands XXs „ IIII 

Henry Howe do. XXs „ IIII 



Summa XVI 

IX. 15th year of Charles I. 1639-40. Ship-money. 

If a king would have money granted him by Parliament he must call that 
Parliament together. But if he means to do without Parliament, he must either have 
no need of money or he must find other ways of getting it. Charles I wanted to do 
without Parliament, and so some way of getting money had to be found other than by 
a Parliamentary grant. Plence Ship-money, which was originally levied on sea ports 
only, but afterwards extended to the whole country. 

This is what a contemporary historian, Lord Clarendon, says of it. After 
mentioning various irregular proceedings of the king he says : — 

— Lastly, for a spring and magazine that should have no bottom, and for an 
— everlasting supply of all occasions, a writ is framed in a form of law, and directed to 
— the sheriff of every county of England, " to provide a ship of war for the king's " 
— " service and to send it, amply provided and fitted, by such a day to such a place ; " 
— and with that writ were sent to each sheriff instructions, that " instead of a ship" 
— " he should levy upon his county s\.ch a sum of money and return the same to " 
— " the treasurer of the Navy for his Majesty's use, with direction in what manner " 
■ — " he should proceed against such as refused ; " and from hence that tax had the 
— denomination of ship-money, a word of a lasting sound in the memory of this 
— kingdom ; by which for some years really accrued the yearly sum of ;j^2 00,000 to 
— the king's coffers ; and was in truth the only project that was accounted to his own 
— service. And after the continued receipt of it for four years together, was at last 



220 



WHELNETHAM TAX PAYERS. 



— (upon the refusal of a private gentleman to pay thirty shillings as his share) with 
— great solemnity publicly argued before all the judges of England in the exchequer 
— chamber, and by the major part of them the king's right to impose asserted and 
— the tax adjudged lawful ; which judgment proved of more advantage and credit to 
— the gentleman condemned (Mr Hamden) than to the king's service. — Clarendon's 
History of the Rebellion. Book i. Par. 148. 

To this I need only add that one of the first acts of the Long Parliament which 
met in November, 1640, was to reverse the decision of the judges and to declare the 
illegality of ship-money. Statutes, 16 Charles I, Chap, 32. 

The Suffolk Archaeological Institute has just printed the Ship money returns for 
Suffolk from a manuscript in the British Museum, and from that volume I take the 
lists for the two Whelnethams. The total for Great Whelnetham does not agree with 
the items, and two surnames seem to have been mis-copied. I have given the 
correct names in brackets. The out setters are outsiders, not resident in the parish 



for which they are charged. 



Sir \Villiam Harvye 
John Sellors, clerk 
Widow Hammond 
Richard Gips 
Francis Sparke 
John Maldinge 
George How 
Robert Pattridge 
Edw. Marrow [Macrow] 
Robert Snnell [Innell] 
John Adams 
Robert Capon 
John Garlond 
Robert Adams 
Robert Debname 
Thomas Adams 
Robert Sante 
William Sparke 
Edmund Heble 



WHELNETHAM MAGNA. 






£ s 


d 




£ s 


d 


4 • 


6 


John Patrick 


3 • 


. 6 


I .. 4 . 





Robert Adams 


2 . 


. 6 


2 .. . 


. 


Edward Clarke 


I 


• 3 


I .. 6 . 

2 . 


. 
. 


William Sparke, 
Ager in his fa 


Nath ) 

2 
•m ) 


. 6 


I .. . 


. 


Robert Scott 


I . 


. 


17 • 


. 


Thomas Goldsmith 2 


. 


2 . 


. 


OUTSITTERS. 




13 • 
8 . 

10 . 

12 . 

12 . 

17 • 
7 • 
5 • 
I . 


. 
. 
. 
. 

. 6 


John Gillie 
John Coppine 
Henry How 
Robert Smith 
George Bird 


2 . 
2 . 

4 • 
2 . 
I . 


. 6 
. 

. 
. 
. 


. 



William Parker 
Ralph Sparke 


3 • 
2 . 


. 
. 6 






Mr Sage 

Total 


I . 


. 6 


8 . 


[sic] 13 .. .. 





14 . 


6 




[^3 •• 14- 


9j 



WHELNETHAM TAX PAYERS. 



221 





WHELNETHAM PARVA. 








John Sache 
Thomas Cornish 


15 .. 
6 .. 3 


John Steward 
John Crouch 




2 . 

3 • 


. 
• 3 


Thomas Parker 


7 .. 


OUTSETTERS. 






John Kinge 
John Thornton 
Edmund Willis 
Henry Peach 
Elizabeth Howe 


11 .. 6 

5 .. 

5 •• 
4 .. 6 

3 •• 6 

6 .. 3 


Martin Fokes 
John Maulden 
William Parker 
Robert Hayward 
John Santye 

Total 




I . 

3 • 
I . 


• 9 

• 9 
. 6 

6 
9 


Robert Cason 


£3 •• 


17 • 


. 6 



X. 1 6th year of Charles I. 1640. Subsidy. 

The days are darkening and civil war is very near. Parliament grant four entire 
subsidies to be paid at two payments. 

Personalty of ^3 and upwards is to pay 2s .. 8d per ^ for each subsidy. Aliens 
and Popish recusants are to pay double, and, if not chargeable, are to pay a poll tax 
of 8d for each subsidy, as in the preceding subsidy. 

Lands of 20s a year and upwards to pay 4s per ;£ for each subsidy. Aliens and 
recusants to pay double. 

The first two of the four subsidies were to be paid by March 4, 1640. The last 
two to be paid by April 20 next, which must mean 1640 also. 

WELTHAM MAGNA. 



Richard Gyppes in terris 
John Maulding do. 
John Grymwood do. 
Edward Mackrowe do. 



Ls [to pay] 

XXXs „ 

XXXs „ 
XXXs 

Sum ma 



I . 



s 
o 

12 
12 
12 



16 



WELTHAM PARVA. 



John Sage [Sache] gent, in terris ^IHI 
Thomas Cornish do. XLs 

Thomas Parker do. XXXs 



[to pay] 



£ -s d 

I .. 12 .. o 

16 .. o 

12 .. O 



Summa 



222 



AVHELNE^FHAM TAX PAYERS. 



XI. 1 8th year of Charles I. 1642. Subsidy. 

Parliament grants ^400,000 to be raised by two equal payments on all persons 
spiritual and temporal. Towards this sum the county of Suffolk is charged with the 
payment of ^^20,609 ..17.0. 

Commissioners are appointed for each county, who are to issue precepts to 
certain substantial inhabitants in the various towns to collect the money. Precepts 
for the first payment are to be issued by April 26, 1642 ; and for the second payment 
by Sept I, 1642. 

WELTHAM MAGNA. 



£ 



£ 



Sir William Harvey 






Robert Innoll 


8 


. 8 


knight 


4 • 


. 6 


Thomas Adams 


4 


• 4 


Mr Sellers i . 


• 15 • 


• 9 


John Adams de Halstead 


2 . 


. 2 


Mr Gyppes i 


. 16 . 


■ 3 


Robert Haywood 


2 . 


. 2 


John Grymwood 2 . 


. 8 . 


• 4 


John Gilly 


2 . 


. 2 


John Maulden i . 


• 4 • 


■ 4 


Henry Howe 


4 • 


■ 4 


George Howe 1 . 


I 


. 8 


Mr Sterne 


T . 


. I 


Edward Macro 


15 ■ 


. 8 


George Bird 


I . 


. T 


John Adams 


10 . 


10 


William Parker 


3 • 


• 3 


Jvobert C?son 


15 • 


2 


Mr Edgar 


2 . 


. 2 


John Garlond 


14 . 


I 


Robert Smith 


I . 


. I 


Robert Adams 


17 • 


4 


Mr Sache 


3 • 


• 3 


Robert Deadman 


8 . 


8 


John Kinge 


2 . 


2 


Robert Santy 


4 • 


4 


Francis Sparke 


2 . 


2 


William Sparke 


9 • 


8ob. 


Robert Partridge 


I . 


I 


Edmund Kibble 


17 • 


4 


Robert Hamon 




6 


George Sturgeon 


4 . 


4 


George Chenery 


T . 


I 


John Partridge 


3 • 


3 


William Adson 


I . 


I 


John Johnson 


2 . 


ob. 


Widdow Howe 


I . 


I 


Edmund Clarke 


6 .. 


6 








Robert Scott 


T 










Thomas Goldsmith 


1 

3 •• 


I 

3 


Sum ma ry . 


• 9 • 


4 



WHELNETHAM TAX PAYERS. 



223 





WELT HAM PARVA. 








s .. d 




s . 


d 


John Sacche gent 


iS .. o 


Henry Howe 


4 • 


. 6 


Thomas Cornish 


14 .. 


John Stileman 


I . 


• 9 


Alexander Pistor clerke 


8 .. 


Edward Leach 




9 


John Kinge 


11 .. 6 


Francis Browne 




6 


Thomas Parker 


7 .. 


William Lymmer 




9 


John Steward 


2 .. 


Marti ne Folkes 


I 


• 9 


Edmund WiUis 


4 .. 


William Parker 


I 


. 6 


Henry Peach 


4 ■• 4 


Robert Hayward 




6 


AViUiam Thornton 


6.0 


Robert Pearson 




9 


Robert Cason 


6 .. 














John Crouch 


4 .. 2 


Summa ^^4 . 


17 


• 9 



Xn. Charles U. The Hearth tax. 

Under this heading I give the Hearth-tax returns for three years, 1664, 1670 
and 1674. 

In March, 1662, Parliament granted to Charles H two shillings a year for ever 
on every hearth or chimney to be paid by the occupier (not owner) of every dwelling 
house. This was the first hearth tax, which continued through the reigns of Charles 
H and James II, and was given up by William III in 1689. The window tax took 
its place, which went on till 1S51. 

The only perfect return for the county of Suffolk in the Public Record Office is 
that for the year ending at Ladyday, 1674. This I have printed bodily in one of the 
volumes of this Series. But there are fragmentary returns for other years. 

Those persons entered as " not chargeable " and " certified for "' are those who 
were exempt from paying by poverty. If the minister, churchwardens and overseers 
of the Poor certified that a man's house was not of greater value than 20 shillings 
yearly, and the certificate was allowed by the two nearest Justices, then he was exempt 
for that year. 



224 



WHELNETHAM TAX PAYERS. 



HEARTH TAX. 1664. WHELTHAM MAGNA. 

Several of the names for Great Whelnetham are torn away in this return, but the 
number of hearths in each of their houses remains. I have in one or two cases 
guessed at the missing syllable and added it within brackets. William Smyth is the 
curate, the rector, Dr Herbert, being non-resident 



Chargeable. 


Hearths 


Mr John Gibbs 


1 1 


Mr William Smyth 


4 


Mr Charles Beauly 


9 


[Nu]nn 


3 


.... [Stile]man 


2 
2 




2 
3 




I 




3 




2 




I 




I 




2 


John G[arland] 


4 


Martin S[carfe] 


I 


John Partrich 


2 


Thomas Wright 


3 


Henry Holden 


3 


Widow Garland 


3 


Thomas Talbott 


2 


William Adams 


2 


Henry Hunt 


I 


John Browne 


3 



70 



Not chargeable. 
William Adson 
Edmund Mills 
Widow Lilly 
Widow Grece 



Hearths 



WHELNETHAM TAX PAYERS. 



225 



HEARTH TAX. 


1664. 


WHELTHAM PARVA. 




Chargeable. 


Hearths. 






Mr Haggas 




4 






Mr Bacon 




4 






Edmond Wills 




2 


Not chargeable. 


Hearths 


Phillip Ward 




8 


John Leach 




Edward Kinge 




3 


Robert Whitrod 




. . Harwell 




4 


Callabut Brett 




John Buckhand 




3 


John Crouch 




James Garwood 




2 


William Clarke 




Widow Howe 




I 


John Good 




John Wright 




3 


Thomas Wise 




Isaac Burham 




2 


William Barker 




Thomas Kinge 




I 




— 


Nathan Pett 




I 




8 


Widow Garland 




I 
39 







HEARTH TAX. 1670. WELTHAM MAGNA. 

I think the third item refers to the rectory house, and means, Mr Ames, clerk. 
The rector was non-resident. " Nor distreese " means having nothing to distrain. 



Chargeable. 
Mr John Gippes 
And for an empty house 
Mr Amos Gierke 
Robert Nunn 
Francis Garland 
William Garwood 
Thomas Harwell 
Robert Heiward 
Richard Cocke 
John Pattridge 
William Claydon 
John Creeke 



Hearths. 
10 

9 

4 

3 

2 

4 
2 

3 • 
3 

2 
I 

I 



Chargeable. 
John HoUyday 
Thomas Jolly 
Mr Roger Young 
George Risinge 
Robert Largant 
Widow Spencer 
William Adams 
Widow Howe 
John Stileman 
Henry Wright 
Thomas Cooke 



Hearths. 
2 

3 
2 
I 
3 
3 
2 

3 
3 

3 

I 

70 



226 



WHELNETHAM TAX PAYERS. 



Not chargeable nor distresse. 


Hearths. 


Not chargeable nor distresse. Hearths. 


Richard Porter 




George Bird i 


William Sheldrake 




Thomas Wright i 


Widow Mills 




— 


Widow Browne 




Viewed \ Robert Stanton, Collector. 


Widow Chandler 




by J Thomas Jolly, Constable. 


HEARTH TAX. 1670. 


WELNETHAM PARVA. 


Chargeable. 


Hearths. 




.... Aggas, clerke 


3 




Phill : Ward 


7 




John Gooch 


I 


Not chargeable nor distresse. 


Robert Bixby 


3 


William Clarke 


Edward Kinge 


2 


Robert Whiterod 


George Willis 


2 


William^ Sturgeon 


John Howe 


I 


John Goodall 


Widow Garwood 


2 


William Taylor 


John Bucknam 


4 


Robert Taylor 


John Leech 


I 


Widow Cason 


Isaack Banham 


2 


John Wright 


William Baker 


4 


Thomas Kinge 


William Rett 


I 




George Levell a forge only for 






halfe a yeere 


I 




James Richardson 


4 




William Parker 


2 






40 


Viewed \ Robert Stanton, Collector, 
by / Georee Willis. Constable. 



HEARTH TAX. 1674. WELNETHAM MAGNA. 
I am not certain whether the names bracketted together always and necessarily 
mean that the persons bracketted lived in double or treble houses. 



Chargeable. 
Mr John Gipps 
Mr Bridgman 
John Stileman 
Robert Whiterold 
William Claydon 



Hearths. 
10 
9 
3 



Chargeable. 
John Maiden 
Thomas Cooke 
George Risinge 
Roger Younge 
Robert Brooke 



Hearths. 
3 
3 

3 

3 



WHELNETHAM TAX PAYERS. 



227 



Chargeable. 


Hearths. 


Widow Spencer 


3 


William Adams -v 
Francis Garland / 




4 


Richard Cocke 


3 


Widow Howe 


3 


Thomas Harwell 2 -» 
John Patteridge 2 / 




4 


John Cricke -^ 
John Holliday / 




3 


Thomas Jolly 


2 


John Brooke 


4 


Robert Hay ward 


3 


James Spight 


4 




69 


HEARTH 


TAX. 1674 


Chargeable. 


Hearths. 


William Baker 


4 


Robert Bixby 


3 


John Howe 


4 


Nathan Pett -> 
Widow Leech / 




3 


James Richardson 


4 


Widow Bertium -v 
Widow Garwood / 




4 


Phill : Ward 


7 


Edmund Kinge ^ 
George Willis / 




4 


John Leech -j 
Thomas Kinge j 




2 


William Early 


4 



Certified for. 
Widow Sheldrake 
Richard Porter 
George Bird 
Thomas Wright 
Widow Browne 
Widow Mills 
Widow Chandler 
John Steward 



Hearths. 
3 



WELNETHAM PARVA. 



Certified for. 
William Sturgeon 
John Gooday 
Widow Cason 
Thomas Wiett 
Robert Whitwod 
William Taylor 
Robert Taylor 
Thomas Kinge 



39 



Hearths. 
4 



10 



228 VALUATIONS AND RETURNS. 



Valuations and Returns. 



Under this heading I place these returns relating to the two Whelnethams. 

I. From Domesday Book, a.d. 1086. 

II. From the Taxatio Ecclesiastica of Pope Nicholas IV, a.d. 1292. * 

III. From the Inquisitio Nonarum, a.d. 1340. * 

IV. From the so called Ipswich Domesday Book, a.d. 1453. 

V. From the Valor Ecclesiasticus of Henry VIII, a.d. 1535. * 

VI. From the answers to Archbishop Whitgift's circular, a.d. 1603. 

I. Domesday Book, A.D. 1086. In this year William the Conqueror 
ordered the survey of England to be made which is contained in what we call 
Domesday book. The return is not made out parish by parish but feudal lord by feudal 
lord, showing what he held of the king in each county and hundred. Whelnetham 
comes in twice, viz. among the possessions of Robert, Earl of Mortain, and among 
those of St. Edmund, i.e. the abbey of Bury St. Edmunds. 

The part which was among the lands of the Earl of Mortain is much the 
smallest, and is thus described : 

In Telueteham one freeman under the protection (commendatus) 
of Bishop Elmer in the jurisdiction (soca) of Saint Edmund holds 40 
acres of land. Then there was one plough, now there are two oxen. 
Then it was worth ten shillings, now twenty. 

The larger part which is entered among the lands of St. Edmund is thus 
described : 

In Hueltiham are 41 freemen with 6 carucates of land. Ernulf 
holds of the abbot one of these 6 carucates of land. One carucate 
besides his (super eum) [is worth] 20 shillings. And Robert holds 20 
acres. There are 12 cottagers (bordarii). Always 16 ploughs among 
them all. And 13 acres of meadow. And wood for 10 pigs. These 
all could give or sell their lands. But jurisdiction (soca) would remain 

* These returns were published by the Record Commsssioners early in the last Century, and 
the volumes will be found in the borough library at Moyses hall. 



VALUATIONS AND RETURNS. 229 

with Saint Edmund. In the time of King Edward it was worth two 
pounds ; now worth three pounds, ten shiUings. Two churches 
endowed with 40 acres of free land held by religious service. This 
town (villa) has one league in length and six quarentenes in breadth, 
and pays 10 pence. 
I am not going to attempt to explain the intricacies of Domesday book, but one 
or two things may be noted as to the foregoing entries. 

(i). The Hundred, Thed wastry, is clearly given, otherwise one would have 
taken Earl Robert's Telueteham to be Thelnetham in the neighbouring Hundred of 
Blackbourne. In the other entry the Norman scribe writes the long awkward name 
as well as he can make it out from hearsay, Huelfiham. The difference between his 
way and our way is greater to the eye than to the ear. 

(2). There is no mention of Great or Little Whelnetham, and so probably the 
formal division into two parishes had not yet been made. But the two endowed 
churches mentioned in the second entry point to the division that was to be later on. 

(3). Robert, Earl of Mortain, was half brother to William the Conqueror, and 
younger brother of Odo, Bishop of Bayeux. He fought at the battle of Hastings, 
and " appears in Domesday as holding a larger share of the conquered land than any 
one man in William's following." (Freeman's Norman Conquest, IV, 169, 764.) 
His possessions were in nearly every shire, but chiefly in Yorkshire and in the West, 
including nearly all Cornwall. 

(4). Bishop Elmer or Aylmer, brother of Archbishop Stigand, was bishop of 
East Anglia or Elmham before and at the time of the Conquest. But four years 
after it, in toyo, he fell into disgrace with William and was deprived. His protection 
therefore could not have been worth much in 1086. 

(5). In each entry it will be seen that the value of the land increased greatly 
between then, /. e. the time of Edward the Confessor, and now when the survey is 
being made. 

(6). The first entry gives no names, but only alludes to one anonymous 
freeman, who held and I suppose resided on his holding of 40 acres. The second 
entry gives us two names, Ernulf and Robert, apparently both Normans and I 
suppose both residents. Besides them it alludes to 39 freemen and 12 cottagers. 
The two entries seem to show a total population of about 250 souls. 

(7). The township is described as 3 miles long and 1320 yards broad. 



230 VALUATIONS AND RETURNS. 

II. A.D. 1292. This year a valuation of all the churches in England was 
made. It is known as the Taxatio Ecclesiastica of Pope Nicholas IV, and its object 
was to guide the collector of taxes when the clergy were taxed. It continued to do 
so till the reign of Henry VIII, when a new ecclesiastical valuation was made. 
(See No. V.) This is the entry relating to the two Whelnethams. 

:L s. d. 
Quelnetham Magna. Taxatio ^8 .. 13 .. 4. Decima — 17 ■• 4 
Quelnetham Parva. Taxatio ;^4 .. 13 .. 4. Decima — 9.-4 

There we have the taxable value of each church, and the amount that the 
parson would have to pay when the clergy granted the king a tenth. The division 
into two parishes has been made by this time. 

III. A.D. 1340. This year Parliament granted to Edward III the ninth 
sheaf, the ninth fleece, and the ninth lamb, i.e. the ninth part of the value of corn, 
wool and lambs. The grant was made necessary by wars in Scotland and France. 
Elaborate preparations were made for assessing its value. The representatives of 
each Hundred met the great officials, and three or four inhabitants of each parish 
came before them and gave sworn information as to their respective parishes. The 
names of the three from Great VVhelnetham and four from Little Whelnetham will 
be found below. The inquiry for the Hundred of Thedwastre was held at Henhowe 
before the Abbot of Leiston and others on the Saturday next after the Feast of St. 
Grcgoiy. Four and twenty representatives of the Hundred were there, and the result 
of their valuation (which I translate from the original Latin) was as follows : — 

Great Whelnetham. Value 13 marks. The ninth sheaf, fleece and 
lamb are worth this year ;^4 and no more : because the rector of the 
church has 54 acres of plough land, which are worth yearly 18 shillings, 
at 4 pence per acre. There are there 3 acres of wood worth yearly 
3 shillings. There are there 2 acres of meadow worth yearly 4 shillings. 
There are there 2 acres of pasture worth yearly 2 shillings. There are 
there rents of assize worth yearly 6s. .. 8d. There are there four 
principal offerings worth yearly 2 marks. There are there tithes of 
milk and hay and one mill worth yearly 20 shillings. There are there 
small tythes and holyday offerings worth yearly 13s. .. 4d. As witness 
Thomas de Castel, Walter Stulle and Henry Aleyn, jurors of said 
township. 



VALUATIONS AND RETURNS. 231 

Little Whelnetham. Value 7 marks. The ninth sheaf, fleece and 
lamb are worth this year 40 shillings and no more : because the rector 
of the church has 40 acres of land worth yearly 13s. .. 4d., at 4 pence 
per acre. There are there rents of assize worth yearly 10 shillings. 
There are there tithes of milk and hay worth 10 shillings. There are 
there four principal offerings worth yearly 10 shillings. There are 
there small tythes and holyday offerings worth yearly 10 shillings. As 
witness John de Stonham, Alexander de Cokeman, William Craiss and 
John Martyn jun. 

These valuations require a word of explanation. Before giving their valuation 
of the ninths they first set down the value of the tenths, /. e. the ecclesiastical value 
of each parish as decided by the valuation of Pope Nicholas, 13 marks (^8 .. 13 .. 4) 
in the one parish, and 7 marks {£,i, .. 13 .. 4) in the other parish. Then they give 
their valuation of the ninths, which in each parish is much less than the value of the 
tenths. And then they go on to give the reasons why the ninths are worth so much 
less than the tenths, viz. because the rector has this and he has that and so on, and 
that makes his tenths so high. And the reason why they give those reasons, as it 
were in defence of their valuation, is because it had been thought by the authorities 
that the king's ninth should be equal in value to the church's tenth. On the one 
hand the ninth is a bigger fraction than the tenth, but on the other hand the tenth 
had so many more things on which to be raised, as the ninth was only to be raised 
on three articles. It was thought that those two facts would balance each other and 
leave the ninth equal to the tenth. But there were so many things to swell the value 
of the tenth that the assessors of the ninth could not make them equal, and so in 
each parish we see that the ninth is returned as being less than the tenth, jQ\ against 
j£,^ odd in the one parish, and ;^2 against j[^\ odd in the other. In consequence 
of the assessors feeling it necessary to defend their valuation of the ninths the return 
is really an enumeration of church property, which they had nothing to do with. A 
single sentence deals with the ninths with which they were concerned, and all the 
rest of their return is concerned with the tenths with which they were not concerned. 

It will be seen that one of the sworn inhabitants of Little Whelnetham had the 
surname Craiss. I imagine that that is the same as Craske, a name which has ever 
since abounded in the neighbourhood. I imagine it is the Norman-French Crasse, 
meaning fat, and therefore the same as the Roman name, Crassus. 



232 VALUATIONS AND RETURNS. 

IV. A.D. 1453. In the Proceedings of the Suffolk Arch. Inst., Vol. VI, 

p. 195 — 219, Mr. Evelyn White has given some account of what are called the 

Ipswich Domesday books, containing inter alia the amount of taxes paid to the king 

by each "town" in Suffolk. First is set down something corresponding to the 

rateable value of each " town," and then the amount it pays to the king. Under 

the Hundred de Thedwardestre I find thus : — 

s. d. 

Whelnetham magna et parva 52 .. 4I 

Unde donatur pro dicto Rege 6 .. 4 

I have already pointed out (Denham p. 154) that there is no fixed proportion for all 

townships between their valuation and what they paid to the king, and that this 

return required more explanation than it received. 

V. A.D. 1535. In the reign of Henry VIII a new valuation of the church in 
each parish was made to take the place of that made in a.d. 1292. (See No. II.) 
It will be seen that after deducting what was allowed to be deducted there was a 
small increase in the value of Great Whelnetham, but that Little Whelnetham stood 
exactly as it was. 

Wheltham Magna. John Redman rector there. 





£ s. 


d. 




£ 


s. 


d. 


Glebe land worth yearly 
Other tithes and offerings 


2 .. .. 

8 .. 5 ■• 



3 


i 


10 


•• 5 


•• 3 


Deduct Archdeacon's procurage 
And Bishop's sinodals 


7 •• 
2 .. 


1\ 

I 


} 




9 


.. 81 


There remains 








9 •• 


IS 


.. 61 


Of which for tithe 










19 


.. 6i 


:ltham Parva. Gilbert Sympson 


rector there. 














£ s. 


d. 




£ 


s. 


d. 


Glebe 

Other tithes and offerings 


13 •• 

4 .. 8 .. 


4 
9| 


} 


5 •• 


2 .. 


li 


Deduct Archdeacon's procurage 


6 .. 


8 


J 




8 .. 


9 


And Bishop's sinodals 


2 .. 


I 






There remains 


4 •• 


13 •• 


~A\ 


Of which for tithe 










9 •• 


4 



VALUATIONS AND RETURNS. 233 

VI. A.D. 1603. In June, 1603, Archbishop Whitgift sent a circular letter to 
the bishops of the province of Canterbury asking for certain information from their 
dioceses. Each bishop proceeded to get this information through his archdeacons. 
From a manuscript in the British Museum the Suffolk Arch. Inst, has printed this 
information as far as the archdeaconries of Suffolk and Sudbury are concerned. 
(Vols. vi. xi.) Here are the returns for the two Whelnethams. The answers will 
show what the questions were. 

Wheltham Magna. Mr. Richard Stafford, rector, says that there 
are 80 persons who receive the Communion. There are no recusants 
nor any that do refuse the Communion. He hath no other benefice. 
There is no impropriation nor vicarage. Sir Robert Jermyn knight is 
patron. 

Wheltham Parva. Mr. James Wulvenden, rector, says that there 
are 62 communicants. No recusants from Church or Communion. 
He hath no other benefice. There is no impropriation nor vicarage. 
Sir Robert Jermyn knight is patron. 






234 LITTLE WHELNETHAM RATE-BOOK. 

Little Whelnetham Rate-book 
1699-1768. 

The Little Whelnetham parish chest contains a small quarto volume of i66 
pages, bound in vellum, containing the poor rates paid by each ratepayer in the 
parish for each year from 1699 to 1768 inclusive. It is well written all through. It 
is so seldom that I have found in Suffolk parish chests anything (except the register) 
earlier than the nineteenth century that I will give some account of this volume. 

At the beginning of each ecclesiastical year, i.e. in April, a list is entered 
showing what each ratepayer would pay if the rate was a penny in the pound, This 
penny rate produces £^\ .. lo .. o, and continues to do so to the end, as there is no 
fresh valuation. The only difference between the amount it produced in 1699 and 
the amount it produced in 1768, viz. a diminution of 3s. .. 4d., is caused by the 
total disappearance in 1767 of the Parsonage, which till then had been assessed 
at ;;^4o. For the first ten years a penny rate sufficed to meet the expenses incurred 
in the relief of the poor. But as the eighteenth century got older those expenses 
went on increasing. In the last year, running from Easter 1768 to Easter 1769, no 
less than 39 penny rates were needed, which produced ;£^2 odd. 

After the resident ratepayers have been entered there follow the outsetters, /. e. 
those who occupied land within the parish but resided outside it. As a bit of 
Rushbrooke park comes into the parish, the successive Jermyns and Daverses who 
owned it are among the ratepayers. Lord Jermyn is there in 1699 — 1703, and in 
1704 Sir Robert Davers enters in his stead. But the overseers could never make up 
their minds whether to enter them as outsetters or not. Some years they do, and 
some years they dont. The bit that comes in was assessed at ;^38, to which in 
some years was added Gipps' field assessed at ^6, and Amerdown at ;£8. Gipps' 
field is I think the same as the Linke wood, which is named only in 1758 and 1759. 

Each year the rate is signed by two or three of the neighbouring Justices, so 
that the volume is a sort of autograph book. Richard Gipps, Christopher Calthorpe, 
Robert and Jermyn Davers, Clement Corrance, Anthony Wroth, and many others 
are there in autograph. Hamon L'Estrange of Barton Mere signs over and over 
again, for the first time in 1717, for the last time in 1763. He would then have been 
89 years of age, and his hand has got very shaky, though he lived six years more. 
Frederick Hervey signs twice in 1761, a large, clear, tidy hand like his grandfather's. 
He was then a young unbeneficed clergyman living at Horringer, and later on was to 
be Bishop of Derry and Earl of Bristol. 

I will give here the first, last and four intermediate lists, just as they are entered, 
and will leave further deductions for a later chapter. 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM RATE-BOOK. 



235 



A rate made by the inhabitants 
APRIL lo, 1699. 



of Wheltham Parva for the relief of the Poore. 
MARCH 30, 1719. 



John Horrex for the 
Parsonage 

James Frost 

Mrs. Baker ... 

John Kinge 

William Bauley 

John Gibson 

Mr. How for Frances 
Whitrods 

Ambrose Flacke 

Richard Earnsby 

John Whitrod 

William Bauley for the 
Lords ground 

Mrs. Baker for Garwoods 
house ... 

John Leach 

Nicholas Baker 

Vidua ToUey 

Nathan Rett 

Edward Leach 

OUTSITTERS. 

The Right Hon. Thomas 
Lord Jermine 

John Wilkin gent 

Mrs. Kinge ... 

Richard Pleasants 

Robert Garland for his 
owne and the chapell 

Captaine Younge 

Jonathan Parker 

Mr. Lock for the Lords 
ground... 

Robert Goodchild 



d. 

4 
7 
4 
o 
8 
7 

3 

7 
o 
6 



3 
8 
6 
6 

1 1 
3 



Total 



£^ 



Mr. Agas for his Lease 
lands, glebe and 
Parsonage 

James Frost 

John King ... 

Mrs. Bretton 

Joseph Ray ... 

Robert Garland 

Ambrose Flack 

Richard Armisby 

John Frost ... 

James Garwood 

James Garwood 

John Leach 

Edward Leach 

James Howe 

OUTSITTERS. 

Sir Robert Davers baronett 

Mr. Scoit ... 

Jermyn King 

Mr. Young ... 

John Garland 

Mr. Boggest 

James Andrews 

Robert Goodchild 

John Lock 



Total 



£^ 



6 

7 
4 
6 

7 
3 
7 
o 
6 

3 
2 
1 
2 
2 

3 
8 
6 

3 

1 1 

6 

2 

5 
4 



236 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM RATE-BOOK. 





A rate 


made 


for th€ 


; relief of the Poore. 






APRIL II, 


1726. 






APRIL 3, 1738. 










s. 


d. 




s. 


d. 


Sir Jermyn Davers for the 






John Garland for ye 






park 




4 


■ 5 


Parsonage 


4 


. 1 1 


more for Gips field ... 




6 


John Garland for ye Hall 






Thomas King for 


Lease 






farm 


4 


• 5 


land and Parsonage 


3 


. 6 


Mrs. Ann Wilson 


I 


• 3 


James Frost 




4 


• 5 


Mr. Isaac Chinery 


I 


. 8 


Widdow King 




3 


• 4 


Mr. Sturgeon 


I 


3 


James Wyard 




I 


. 8 


Mr. James Flack 


5 


• 5 


Thomas King late 








more for Mr. Lings ... 




8 


Haywards 




I 


• 7 


Mr. Edward King 


I 


. 10 


John Garland 




I 


• 3 


Mr. William Garwood ... 




3 


Ambrose Flack 




I 


. 6 


Mr. John Flack for Will 






more 




I 





Harveys 




2 


Edward King 




2 


. 


Richard Reeve 




I 


John Frost ... 
James Garwood 




I 


• 4 
3 


OUTSITTERS. 






John Leach 






I 


Sir Jermyn Davers for his 






Edward Leach 






2 


Parke ... 


4 


• 7 


James How... 






2 


more for John Howe's 






Thomas Canham 






2 


house ... 




4 


OUTSITTERS. 






more for Gipps field ... 
John Garland for ye 




6 


John Garland 


... 


I 


. II 


Chappell 


I 


. 8 


Samuel How 






6 


Mr. John Gurling 




3 


Thomas Jannings 






2 


Mr. Samuel Howe 




6 


John Firman 






3 


Mr. George Howe 




I 


Robert Goodchild 






5 


Mr. Thomas Jannings ... 

Mr. John Stedman 

Mr. Robert Goodchild ... 




2 


Total 


^i .. 


10 


• 7 


I 

5 










Nathaniel Peet 




I 



Total 



^i 



LITTLE WHELNETHAM RATE-BOOK. 



237 



A rate made for the 



EASTER, 1758. 

Sir Robert Davers for ye 
Park ... 

Ditto for Armerdown . . . 

Ditto for ye Link wood 

Cooke for Hayward's 
lands ... 

Rev. Mr. Pack for ye 
Parsonage 

Jacob Brooke for ye Hall 

Ditto for ye Chappel 

Thomas Rolfe 

John Farro 

Ditto for Mr. Ray's land 

John Ave ... 

Elias Sturley 

Thomas Merchant 

James Garwood 

William Garwood 

Ambrose Flack 

Robert Curling 

William Westrup 

James Playle 

John Robinson 

William Cooke 

Robert Goodchild 

Mr. Durrent 



4 

c 

8 

6 

5 

of 

7f 

5 

10 
I 
I 
2 
I 
3 
3 
6 

li 
6 

2 



Total 



£^ 



elief of the Poor. 






EASTER, 1768. 








s. 


d. 


Sir Charles Davers for ye 






Park ... 


3 


2 


Thomas Rolfe 


2 


2 


John Cocksedge 




II 


Jacob Brook for ye Hall 


6 





Ditto for the Chapel 


I 


. 8 


John Farrow in all 


I 


■ 5f 


John Ave ... 


I 


• 7f 


Elias Sturley 


4 


•• 5 


Thomas Merchant 


I 


. 10 


James Garwood 




I 


Robert Curling 




I 


Henry Rolfe 




2 


OUTSITTERS. 






Mr. Durrant 




8 


Mr. Hassted 




I 


Jonathan Ely 


I 


• 3 


John Norman 




3 


John Robinson 




6 


William Cooke 




I 


Robert Goodchild 




5 


Total £v .. 


6 


. io| 



The diminution in the last year is all but entirely caused by the disappearance 
of the Parsonage, valued at £^0 and therefore paying 3s. .. 4d. The rate being a 
penny in the pound it is easy to calculate what is each man's rateable value. 



238 WHELNETHAM WILLS. 



Whelnetham Wills. 



There are a good many Whelnetham wills at the Probate Office at Bury St. 
Edmund's, and a few at Norwich and Somerset House. Of these I here print all 
those belonging to pre-Reformation days, and a certain number of later ones. 
Altogether I print thirty-two wills, ranging from 1350 to 1724.* They belong to 
gentry, clergy and yeomanry. I have given them very fully, but have occasionally 
shortened long sentences and left out needless words. The originals are all in 
English except those which I have stated to be in Latin. The two dates that I 
place in the heading to each will are those of the making and proving of it 
respectively. I shall further on in this volume draw upon the information that these 
wills contain. 

No. I. Alan Godfrey of Little Whelnetham. Aug. 1343. Dec. 1350. (Latin). 

In dei nomine Amen. I Alan Godferey of Whelnetham parva being in sound 
mind and good memory at Whelnetham on August i, a.d. 1343, do make my 
testament in this manner. Imprimis I leave my soul to Almighty God, the Blessed 
Mary the "Virgin, and all the Saints, and my body to ecclesiastical sepulture. 
Item to the High Altar of the church of Whelnetham i2d. Item to John Taylour a 
cart (biga) with iron wheels (rota) with all belonging to said cart, and a horse. To 
Isabell, daughter of Thomas Eadyman, an iron pot containing 3 gallons. To each 
son of said Thomas 2 sheep. To Richard my servant 2 sheep. To John Bischop's 
wife 2 sheep. To Isabell my wife all my household goods and utensils. The residue 
of all my goods I leave to Isabell my wife to pay my debts and to see me honestly 
buried according to God's pleasure. I make Isabell my wife and John Taylour 
executors of this my testament, and I give to said John for his labour 3s. .. 4d. 

Proved Dec. 2, 1350 
Bury St. Edmunds. 

Book II. fo. 114. 

* Those at Bury and Norwich have been transcribed for nie by Mr. Fred. Johnson of Norwich. 



WHELNETHAM WILLS. 239 

No. 2. Joan Dekys of Whelnetham. March 1453. (Latin). 

In Dei nomine Amen. I Johanna Dekys of Whelnetham being of sound mind 
and good memory do make my testament in this manner. To the High Altar for 
tenths forgotten 2s. To the fabric of the tower of said church 6s. .. 8d. To each 
" puerorum meoruni " 6s. .. 8d. To Edmund Dekys all my lands and tenements 
in Whelnetham on condition that he find an honest priest to celebrate for my soul 
and the souls of my ancestors for one whole year. The residue of all my goods not 
before bequeathed I give to my executors to sell and dispose for my soul and souls I 
am bound for in masses and good deeds. Of this my will I make my sons Geoffrey 
Dekys and Edmund Dekys the executors. 

Proved at Fornham March i8, 1453. 
Bury St. Edmunds. 

Book II. fo. 171. 

[There is no date to the making of this Will.] 

No. 3. John Tone of Little Whelnetham. Sept. 1458. 

The will of John Tone de Quelnetham parva was proved before us at Fornham 
on the last day of September 1458, and administration was granted to Isabella the 
executor. Power was reserved to William Butt [?] executor. 

Bury St. Edmunds. 

Book II. fo. 206. 

No. 4. John Pery of Great Whelnetham. July 1462. Dec. 1462. (Latin.) 

In dei nomine Amen, a.d, 1462, July 21, I John Pery of Whelnetham magna 
being of sound mind do make my testament in this manner. Imprimis I commend 
my soul etc. [sic]. I leave to the high altar of Whelnetham aforesaid 3s. .. 4d. To 
the high altar of Sentclere Bradfeld i2d. To the high altar of Bradfeld Combust 
1 2d. I leave to the reparation of the book of the Sacraments (libri sacramentorum) 
of the church of the Blessed Mary of Whelnetham aforesaid a cow. I will my 
executors as soon after my decease as they can to find an honest priest to celebrate 
for my soul and my mother's soul and my friends for one whole year, or for two years 
if my goods will allow of it, in the church of Whelnetham aforesaid, and to have for 
his stipend 8 marks a year "cum vestura sua." Certain lands of mine called 
Templeris Wodbrige and Harrys akyr to be sold by my executors. I leave to each 



240 WHELNETHAM WILLS. 

godchild 4d. To Thomas Sawere my godson i2d. The residue of all my goods I 
leave to the disposition of my executors, whom I ordain Galfridus Dyx of Ampton 
and John Bend of said Quelnetham, and I appoint John Appylby of Bury St. 
Edmunds the supervisor to see this will performed for the good of my soul and my 
friends souls as he shall answer before the High judge in the last day. 

Proved at Fornham St. Martin Dec. 2, 1462. 
Bury St. Edmunds. 

Book II. fo. 206. 

No. 5. John Bunne of Little Whelnetham. Dec. 1462. Feb. 1462-3. (Latin.) 

In dei nomine Amen, December 29, 1462, John Bunne of Whelnetham parva 
seeming to come in peril of death do make my testament in this manner. In the 
first place I leave my soul to God etc. [sic]. I leave to the high altar there i2d. 
To the altar of St. Mary of Whelnetham magna 4d. To the altar of St. Peter of 
Nowton 4d. To Matilda my wife I leave three acres of land bought by me for the 
whole term of her life ; and after her death I will that my messuage with said three 
acres remain to John my son and his lawful heirs ; and if he die without lawful 
children, then my executors to sell said messuage and land for the best price they 
can. My executors are to find an honest priest to celebrate for a whole year in 
Little Whelnetham church for my soul and for my parents souls, and he to have for 
his stipend 8 marks to be paid out of the sale of my lands. Item I leave to Isabell, 
Johane, Alice and Agnes, my daughters, 4 marks in equal parts to be delivered to 
them by my executors if God so please to dispose so for them. Item to John 
Mannyng of Whelnetham aforesaid 3s. .. 4d. To Thomas Ladyman 3s. .. 4d. To 
each godchild 4d. To the convent of St. Francis of Babwell 5 bushels of barley. 
To Luce Angold an ewe, and one to John Rawlyn. To Matilda my wife I leave all 
my utensils and house-goods. To my executors I leave all my goods not before 
bequeathed to be disposed by them, and I make Matilda my wife, John Mannyng 
and Thomas Ladyman my executors, they to pay my debts and fulfill this my will as 
they best can and as seems pleasing to God, as they shall answer before the High 
Judge. 

Proved at Fornham St. Martin Feb. 7, 1462. 
Bury St. Edmunds. 

Book II. fo. 338. 



WHFLNETHAM WILLS. 241 



No. 6. Simon Bally of Little Wlielnetham. Nov. 1462. Dec. 1462. (Latin). 

In dei nomine Amen. Nov. 30, 1462, Simon Bally of Qhelnetham parva in 
sound mind and seeming peril of death do make this my testament. Imprimis I 
commend my soul to Almighty God [etc.]. To the high altar of Qhelnetham magna 
I leave 6d. To the high altar of Nowton church 6d. To the reparation of the 
church of Qhelnetham parva one quarter of barley. I will that all my land and 
tenements shall remain to Katharine my wife for the whole term of her life, and at 
her decease, if that land and tenements shall fall by law to my heir Thomas Bailey my 
father, as in a deed thereof made more fully appears, then I will that all my other 
lands and tenements shall remain to my eldest son and heir lawfully begotten, and if 
he die without lawful children then to the next heirs of my said son. I appoint as 
my faithful and especial attorney Edmund Tylney clerk, and he to deliver estate and 
seizin as my executor by virtue of a letter of attorney under my seal delivered to him. 
My executors to pay all my debts and carry out this will, and to them 1 leave all 
goods not before disposed of. I ordain as my executors Katherine Bailey my wife, 
Thomas Ladyman and John Bunne of Qwelnetham aforesaid, and I leave to said 
Thomas Ladyman 2od. and John Bunne 2od. for their labour. 

Proved at Fornham Martin Dec. 13, 1462. 
Bury St. Edmunds. 

Book II. fo. 348. 

No. 7. William Bradstrete of Little Whelnetham. March 1462. (Latin). 

In dei nomine Amen. This March 10, 1462, I William Bradstrete of 
Qwelnetham parva being of sound mind do make my testament in this manner. 
Imprimis I leave my soul to God [etc.]. To the high altar of Qwelnetham aforesaid 
2od. To the fabric of said church 3s. .. 4d. To Johane my wife all my household 
goods and utensils belonging to my house. To her also all my lands and tenements 
lying in the town and fields of Whelnetham aforesaid, Whelnetham Magna, 
Rushbrooke, Bradfeld, and Norton [? Nowton], for the term of her life, and after her 
death to Roger my son and his heirs. I leave to an honest chaplain 8 marks of 
lawful English money lo celebrate for my soul and for the soul of Johane my wife 
and for all our benefactors for one whole year after my death. The residue of all my 
goods I leave to Johane my wife to dispose of and to pay my debts. I entreat my 



242 WHELNETHAM WILLS. 



feoffees to deliver full estate and lawful seizin of all my lands when so required. I 
ordain Johane my wife and Roger my son my executors to perform this will and to 
pay all my debts as far as is in their power. And I make Thomas Drury of Rougham 
the supervisor of my will. 

Proved at Fornham St. Martin March 28, 1462. 
Bury St. Edmunds. 

Book IV. fo. 22. 

No. 8. Thomas Ladyman of Little Whelnetham. April 1467. Jan. 1469 (1469-70?) 

(Latin). 

In dei nomine Amen. I Thomas Ladyman of Little Whelnetham, being in 
sound mind and good memory, this April 23, 1467, do make my testament in this 
manner. Imprimis I leave my soul to Almighty God, the Blessed Mary the Virgin 
and all the Saints, and my body to ecclesiastical se[)ultLire. I leave to the high altar 
of the church of Whelnetham aforesaid for my offerings forgotten or too little paid 
1 2d. To the reparation of said church 6s. .. 8d. To Agnes my wife all my lands 
and tenements for the term of her life, and after her death to John my son, his heirs 
and assigns for ever, on this condition, that he be honestly ruled by his mother and 
shall pay an honest chaplain to celebrate for half a year in said church 4 marks, and 
shall also pay all my debts and to each of his brothers and sisters 6s. .. Sd. Item I 
give to said John my son all my instruments of trade whatsoever. I leave to the 
convent of Friars at Sudbury to pray and intercede for my soul 3s. .. 46. The 
residue of all my goods and chattels I give to Agnes my wife and John my son on the 
above condition, and I make them executors truly to perform this will. In witness 
whereof I have placed my seal. 

Witnesses, Edmund Dyx, Godefrid Ladyman, John Hachet and others. 

Proved January 29, 1469. 
Bury St. Edmunds. 

Book II. fo. 439. 

No. 9. John Coptoo of High Easter, Essex. Nov. 1469. Jan. 1470. (Latin). 

In dei nomine Amen. On November 26, a.d. 1469, and in the 9 year of 
Edward the fourth after the Conquest, I John Coptoo of High estre gentilman, 
London diocese, of whole mind and good memory, do make my will in this manner. 
First I leave my soul to Almighty God, my Creator and Redeemer, and to the blessed 



WHELNETHAM WILLS. 243 



Virgin Mary his mother and to all the Saints of heaven, and my body to be buried 
in the churchyard of Highestre near the grave of Sir Thomas Coptoo, clerk, my 
brother. Item I leave to the high altar of said church for tithes, offerings and 
oblations kept back 6s. .. 8d. Item to the repair of the closet of the Holy Trinity 
(ad reparacionem le Closet sanctce Trinitatis) in said church 6s. .. 8d. Item to the 
high altar of the church of Great Dunmowe for tithes and offerings 3s. .. 4d. Item 
to the repair of said church 3s. .. 4d. Item I will that Johanna my wife should have, 
hold and enjoy immediately after my death for the term of her life an annuity of 12 
marks to be received from all my lands and tenements in Great Whelnetham, Little 
Whelnetham, Newton, Stanfeld, Brendbradfeld, Cokefeld, Lawshull, Haustede and 
Bury in the county of Suffolk, in two equal portions at Easter and Michaelmas. Item 
I will that all my feoffees who are enfeoffeed in all my lands [etc.] in said towns 
should feof Merabil, daughter of my son Thomas Coptoo, when she shall come of 
age, in all said lands [etc.] to hold to herself and the heirs lawfully begotten of her. 
And if said Merabil should die without such heirs, then I will that said lands [etc.] 
should wholly remain to Johanna my daughter, wife of Robert Parker, and the heirs 
lawfully begotten of her. And if said Johanna should die without such heirs, then I 
will that said lands [etc.] should wholly remain to John son of John Coptoo my 
brother, and the heirs lawfully begotten of his body. And if said John son of said 
John Coptoo my brother should die without such heirs, then I will that all 
said lands [etc.] should wholly remain to the right heirs of me John Coptoo. 
Item I leave to the mending of the muddy way in the king's way (vie lutose 
in Regia via) between my tenement called Podypoles and the tenement of 
William Trenchaunt 6s. .. 8d. Item to every priest (sacerdoti) who comes to 
my funeral and to the mass on the day of burial 46. Item to every clerk 
(clerico) who comes in like manner 2d. Item I leave for distribution among 
the poor who are most in want on the day of my burial 20s, Item to Merabil, 
daughter of my son Thomas Coptoo, one suplectulum of silk (serico), one great 
suplectulum of green and white colour, one bed-canopy (celor :) and 3 curteyns of 
white cloth (panno) lunes, one fetherbed, six silver spoons (cocliar :), one saltcellar 
with covering (coopertoris) of silver, one bowl (crateram) with coverings (coopertoris) 
of silver, one towel of fine linen (linthiamen de lawen). And if said Merabil should 
die unmarried, then I will that Johanna my daughter have said bowl, and that 
Johanna wife of Henry Bury have said saltcellar, and that Margaret Edolf my cousin 
have said six silver spoons. Item I leave to Johanna my wife all household goods 



244 WHELNETHAM WILLS. 

and utensils within my tenement in which I dwell. Item to the friars Minors 
preachers of Chelmysford los. Item to the friars Minors of Badwell [sic] 20s, 
Item to the fiiars Minors of London 20s. Item to Ellik my servant 40s. to be paid 
him [or her] as he [or she] needs it at the discretion of my executors. Item to 
Johanna my daughter, wife of Robert Parker of Writle, 20 marks to be paid to her 
immediately after that she has statum in four tenements of said Robert situate in the 
town of Writle by agreement made between me and said Robert. Item to Johanna 
wife of Henry Bury my cousin 10 marks. Item to Margaret Edolf my cousin 10 
marks. Item I will that Johanna my wife have the custody of Merabil, daughter of 
Thomas Coptoo my son, to govern her till she comes to legal age to govern herself. 
And if said Johanna should die before Merabil comes to legal age to govern herself, 
[the rest of the sentence is omitted in my copy]. Item to John Coptoo my cousin 
20s. Item to the repair of the church or chapel of Bishoppeswoodchapell 6s. .. 8d. 
Item for the keeping of torches (torchiarorum) burning round my body within the 
church of Highestre on the day of my burial 6s. .. 8d. Item to each maidservant 
of John Trenchaunt 6s. .. 8d. Item to each godson (filiolo) and goddaughter 
(filiole) of mine i2d. Item to each person who is in my service at the time of my 
death 4d. Item I will that Thomas Mongomery miles, John Grene, William Grene 
and others who have statum to my use in a certain annuity of 50 marks to be 
received yearly for a term of 8 years of Geoffrey Gates miles from a manor called 
Gernettes in the towns of Highestre, Great Dunmow and Broneston, should grant to 
my executors full power and authority under their seals to receive said annuity of 
said Geoffrey Gates and to give receipt for the payment of it. Item to Henry Parker, 
son of Johanna my daughter, when he comes to an age to find himself at school (ad 
scholas) 20s. Item to Isabel Taylor my servant 20s. The residue of all my goods 
and chattels I give to Johanna my wife, Robert Kylliner, rector of the church of 
Masshabury, William Pecok, rector of the church of Margarete Rothing, Henry Bury 
and Walter Bust, and I make them executors of this my will, and Geoffrey Gattes 
miles and John Grene armiger supervisors, that they may dispose of them for my 
soul and the souls of all my benefactors and of all those departed in faith, as shall 
seem to them best and pleasing to God. In testimony whereof I have set my seal. 
Given at the place and in the year abovesaid. 

Proved at Lamehith Jan. 30 in the above said year. [1469-70.] 
P.C.C. 29 Godyn. 



WHELNETHAM WILLS. 245 



No. 10. Joan Bradstrete of Little Whelnetham. March 1470. June 1471. (Latin). 

In dei nomine Amen. I Johaiine Bredstret of Qwelnetham parva this March 4, 
1470, make my tebtament in tliis manner. In the first place I leave my soul to 
Almighty God, the Blessed Mary the Virgin and all the Saints, and my body to be 
buried in the cemetery of the town aforesaid. I will have a trentall of St. Gregory 
the Pope for my soul's health twice to be celebrated. I give to John Bredstret my 
nephew a folding table, and to Johane Bredstret my niece a pair of beads of gagate. 
The residue of all my goods I leave to Roger Bredstret my son to pay my debts and 
to see this my will faithfully performed, and I make him my executor to dispose for 
me and my soul as he shall think fit and most pleasing to God. 

Proved at Fornham St. Martin June 10, 1471. 

Bury St. Edmunds. 

Book II. fo. 480. 

No. 11. Richard Manning of Little Whelnetham. June 1489. July 1490. (Latin). 

In dei nomine. I Richard Mannyng of Whelnetham parva being of sound 
mind and good memory this June 10, 1489, do make my testament in this manner. 
Imprimis I leave my soul to God Almighty, the Blessed Mary the Virgin and all the 
Saints, and my body to ecclesiastical sepulture. I leave to the high altar of 
Whelnetham aforesaid for my tithes and oblations forgotten or too little paid and for 
my soul's welfare i2d. I leave to the high altar of the church of Whelnetham 
magna i2d. I will that Johane my wife shall have my tenement in which I dwell 
with 3 acres of land for the term of her life, and after her death they shall remain 
wholly to Roger Mannyng my son and his heirs and assigns for ever, on condition 
that he shall pay in the first year of said Johane to Alice my daughter 13s. .. 4d., and 
in the second year to Edmund my son 13s. .. 4d., and in the third year to John my 
son 13s. .. 4d., and in the fourth and last year to William my son 13s. .. 4d. And 
if said Roger dies before his mother, then on her death said tenement and lands to 
be sold by the executors of said Johane, and from the money so coming I will my 
testament to be carried out, and the residue of such money to be disposed for my 
soul's good and my benefactors' souls. I leave to Johane my wife all such household 
goods and utensi's as belong to my house. The residue of all goods and chattels I 
leave to be sold and disposed for the welfare of my own and my friends' souls in 



246 WHELNETHAM WILLS. 



masses and other pious deeds. I desire my co-feoffees to deliver seisin of my lands 
when so required, and I appoint as my executors Johane my wife and Roger my son. 

Witnesses, Johanna Ladyman, John Bune & others. 

Proved at Fornham St. Martin July g, 1490. 
Bury St. Edmunds. 

Book in. fo. 382. 

No. 12. William Manning of Great Whelnetham. Sept. 1503. 

In the name of God Amen. I William Mannyng of Welnetham magna the 7 
day of the monyth of September in the yer of our lord 1503 make my testament and 
last wyll in thys manner of wyse folowyng. Fyrst I bequethe my sowle to God 
Almyghty, to our lady seynt Mary, and to all the holy company of Hevyn, and my 
body to be buryyd in the chyrche of moche Whelnetham. Item I bequethe to the 
hye autere of moche Welnetham for my tythes and offeryngs forgoten and nott payde 
2S. Item I bequeth to thatt thyng that is most necessary to be doon in the chyrche 
of moche Welnetham 26s. .. 8d. Item I bequeth to the same chyrche of moche 
Thelnetham 7 yer immediatly aftyr my decesse eche yer to the prosygnz [?] 
of the sayd chyrch a combe of whete and a combe of malte. Item I bequethe to the 
reparacion of Seynt Thomas Chapell at Chokesnethys thatt they may pray for my 
sowle 3s. .. 4d. To the fryers of Babwell to pray for my sowle i2d. To Isabell my 
wyff my house that I dwelle in with all the londs thereto belongyng for the terme of 
hyr lyff, and aftyr her decesse to remayne to Wylliam Mannyng my sone and his 
assignes for evermore. Item to Isabell my wyff 2 acres of londe arable be it more or 
be it lesse callyd Pipers lying by Sidolysmer medewe, the on hed abuttyng upon 
Salters weye and the othyr hed abuttyth upon Mr. Clopton's medow and on the 
medow longyng to moche Thelnetham halle and on the medow longyng to lytell 
Thelnetham halle, to have and to holde said 2 acres of londe for the terme of her 
lyff, and aftyr her decesse to Thomas Mannyng my son and hys assignes for evermore. 
Item to Isabell my wyff all my horlylments and utensylys to my house belonging. 
Item to ^Vylliam my sone 2 horse of tho thatt I have in my carle sweche as my 
executors shall to hym assigne. Item to Thomas Mannyng my sone a cowe sweche 
as my executors shall to hym assigne. Item to Richard Harpley my sone in lawe 
13s. .. 4d. Item to Margaret my doughter thatt is his wyffe 13s. .. 4d. Item to 
Amy Spycere 13. .. 4d. Item to Water Hunte 6s. .. 8d. Item to Agnes hys wyff 



WHELNETHAM WILLS. 247 

that is my doughter 13s. .. 4d. Item to eche of Richard Harpless chyldryn i2d. 
Item to Amy Spycer's chylde i2d The resydew of all my goods and catallys 
movable and onmoval)le with all my detts I bequethe them to my executors to pay 
my detts and fulfylle thys my testament and last wylle, whom I constitute and ordeyn 
Thomas Jermyn of Russhebrok gentilman, Isabell my wyff and Richard Harpelee, 
and I bequeth to said Thomas Jermyn for his labor 6s. .. 8d. In whytnesse whereof 
to this present testament and last wil I have setto my scale. These wyttnesses, John 
Mannyng, John Bunne, Thomas Mannyng and other. Yoven the day and tyme 
above wretten. 

Proved at Fornham St. Martin Sept. 2, 1503. 
Bury St. Edmunds. 

Book V. fo. 134. 

[There is some original mistake either in day or month or year, either of the 
making or proving this will. See beginning. Ed.] 

No. 13. William Goddard of Great Wheltham. Aug. Nov. 1526. 

In the name of God Amen. The 6 daye of August in the yeare of our lorde 
God 1526 I Wylliam Goddarde of muche Wheltham in the dyosis of Norwych 
husbondman, hooll of mynde and good rememberaunce beinge, make this my 
presente and last will in forme folowinge. Ferste I bequeathe my sowle to God, my 
bodie to be buried in holye sepulture where yt shall please him. Item I bequeath to 
the highe altar in the churche of muche Whelthome in recompensinge my tythes and 
oblacions 8s .. 8d. Item I bequeath to the sayde churche 2 milche neate of the 
besie and 10 cumbe barlie. Item to the highe aulter of litle Wheltham 4od. Item 
to Sir William Stubbes 6s. .. 8d. Item to the friers of Babwell for a trentall ther to 
be donne for my sowle los. Item to the white friers of Cambrige for a trentall ther 
to be done for my sowle 10s. Item to Thomas Alves my sunne in lawe 2 kyne and 
ID lambes, my beste bedde with all that pertaynethe therunto, and parte of my 
howshold stuffe. Item to Gyles Adame one ewe shepe and iis. .. 4d. in monye. 
Item to William Patriche one cowe with a calffe. Item to Robarte my brother 40s. 
and a parte of my howsholde stuffe. Item to my mother one cowe, los. in monye 
and my wyves beste goune. Item to Wyllyam Kinge 8s. .. 8d. Item to Margerie 
Codlinge a goune. Item I will there be distributed in almes to the poore people in 
Burie Sainte Edmunds 6s. .. 8d. Item to Nicholis Mannynge of sayde toune of 



248 WHELNETHAM WILLS. 



Burie husbondman los. The resydewe of all my goods and cattail with ymplements 
of stuffe of howsholde above not bequeathed I putto the disposicion of niyne 
executors, whom I constitute John Kinge and Raffe Macro, and I bequeath to eche 
of them for there labor 13s. .. 4d., and the overplus of my goods and debts to me 
dewe to be disposed be my executors in almesse deads, my wyll performed, my debts 
payde. These wytnes, Sir John Redman parsonne of the churche of muche 
Wheltham, Sir William Stubbes, Robert Godarde, Wyllyam Partriche with other. 

Proved Nov. 12, 1526. 
Bury St. Edmunds. 

Book XL fo. 163. 

No. 14. John Bradstrete of Little Whelnetham. Sept. 1526. 

In dei nomine Amen. The 22 daye of the monethe of September, 1526, I John 
Bradstrete beinge of good mynde and perfighte memorie make my testament and last 
will in this manner folowinge. Firste I bequethe my sowle to Almightie God, our 
blyssed ladye and to all the holie company of Heven, my bodie to be buried in the 
churche yarde of litle Wheltham. Item I bequethe to the highe aultar of the sayde 
churche in dischardinge of my conscience and for the weale of my soule 2s. To the 
mother chirche of Norwiche 4d. To the highe aultar of muche Wheltham 2od. To 
the highe aultar of Monks Bradfylde 2od. To the highe aultar of Russhebrooke i2d. 
To the highe aultar of Nowton i2d. Item I will that my wiffe shall have the profitts 
of all my lands and tenements for the bringinge up of my children till they be of 
lawful age, and she for to keape the reparacions of sayde tenement sufficient in the 
meane tyme. And as soon as my children be cum to lawfull age I will that sayde 
lands and tenements be equallie devyded to all my children. And yf chaunce be 
that onye of my children departe within age, I will that those that be over lyve shall 
enjoye the others parte. And yf chaunce be that all my children departe within age, 
then I will that all my lands and tenements shall be solde and done for me and my 
friends in deeds of charitie as shall seme moste beste by myne executors. And yf 
chaunce be that my wyfife departe before that my children be of age, then I will that 
sayde lands and tenements shall remayne in the hands of my executors to the use of 
my children till they be of age. Item I bequethe to my sister [not named] a bullock, 
and to her husband a horse, and to his doughter 3 shepe. I will that my wyfife shall 
have all my moveables, corne and cattail and howsholde, to paye my debts and 



WHELNETHAM WILLS. 249 

bringe me to ye yearthe and to do for rne at my 30 daye and yere daye, as shall seme 
most beste by the counsell of my father in lawe John Frier of Harteste, Roger 
Bradstreete my brother and WiUiam my brother, the which 3 I do putt in truste to 
be my executors to the performing of this my presente will, and Mr. Bacon to be 
supervisor. 

Bury St. Edmunds. 

Book XL fo. 196. 

[No probate recorded.] 

No. 15. John Bole of Little Whelnetham. April, May, 1534. 

In the name of God Amen. The laste daye of Aperlle in the yere of our Lord 
God 1534 I John Bole of lytyll Wheltham, hole of mynde good of remembraunce 
beynge, make this my present testament and last will. Firste I comende my sowUe 
to Alniyghty Gode, my body to be buried in holy sepultur wher it shall please hym. 
Item I beqeath to the hye auter in the churche of lytyll Wheltham in recompensyng 
of my tythes and oblacones be me forgotoune and to lytyll tythid and for the helth 
of my sowle 6s. .. 8d. Item I bequeath to the reparacons of sayd church 40s. Item 
I will ther be dystrubutid at my thirty daye to the pore peple in the towne of Munks 
BradfiUd, Bradfild St. Clare, brenty Bradfilde, Stansfelld, muche Wheltham, lytell 
Wheltham, Ruschebroke, Cokefild, Nortone, Rougham, Throstone, Bertoune, and to 
eche of them 4s., that is to say to every persone 4d. or hys debyte of the sayd 
towne for a dirige to saye for my sowle, and to the ryngers of everye of the sayd 
townys 4d., and 3s. .. 4d. to be pute to the churche wardensys hands of every 
of the forseyde townes at that tyme beynge to dystribute among the pore peple wher 
they shall see moste nede. Item I bequeath to eche of my godchyldren 3s. .. 4d. 
Item I will that Isabell my wyfFe have all my copye landes durynge hir lyffe ; and 
after her dysseas I will they remayne onto the eldeste chylde of Thomas Adams of 
Water Lane, that is to say my copye lying in muche Wheltham, and if he dye I will 
it shall remayne to the eldeste next of the sayd Thomas, and so from on to another 
of hys children in lyke case for ever. Item I will that the sayde Isabell my wiff have 
halffe of all my greynns [grain] and corne that is growinge on my sayde lands, and 
fyve nett of the best at hir owne choyse with all my implements and stuff of howsolde. 
Item I bequeath to John Mannynge my godsone 20s. Item to John Ladymane 20s. 
Item I will a pryst shall synge for my sowll and all cristen sowlls in the church of 



250 WHELNETHAM WILLS. 

lylyll Wheltham the space of halffe a yer, and he to have for hys wagis 53s. .. 4d. 
Item to eche of my maydens 6s. .. Sd. Item to Hary Ladyman 20s. Item to 
Roburd Seymor 6s. .. 8d. Item to Thomas Atiams 20s. To Amy Adams' chyldren 
eche of them 6s. .. 8d. To Marget Adams' chyldren eche of them 6s. .. 8d. To 
Bury to the pore peple of bothe paryshes 40s. to be dystributed ther [sic] ned is. 
Item to Nicholas Skotte 6s. .. 8d., to Isabell Skote 6s. .. 8d., to George Skote the 
Sonne of George Skote my godsone 20s. To Jonne Wareyn my tenement beynge 
copy lyinge in litill Wheltham be the hey waye after the discease of Isabell my wiffe, 
and if it fortine the sayde Jonne Warene dye befor the age of 21 yere, than I will it 
shall reuiayne to George Skote my godsonne, the sonne of George Skotte, [and if he 
die under age then to his brother Nicholas, and if he die under age then to his 
sister]. Item to Marget Adams wedew 30s. Item to Raffe Adams my blake ballid 
hande horsse and my grey lashe horse. Item to Anne Bolle my brother's doughter 
6s. .. 8d. To Stevyne Bolle of Shoteley 40s. To eche of Stevyne Bollys chilldren 
6s. .. 8d. ; and if it fortyne ony of them to deceas, then I will the money shall 
remayne to the other beynge alyve. Also I bequeath to the hye waye betwyxte 
Wheltome hall gate and the elmon : slowe 40s. Also to John Bolle of Shelfangill 
my brother 10 combe of malte, that to be deliverid at Bury St. Edmund. Item to 
the frers of Babwell for a irentall to synge for my sowle los. ; and 3s. .. 4d. to pray 
for my father and my mother. Also to Parnell dwellynge with Mathew Langham of 
Bury 3s. .. 4d. And fyve servants moo dwellinge with the sayde Langham, I will 
that eche of them fyve have 2s. a pece. Item to Isabell my wyffe 10 marks in mony 
that IS to be payd contynently after my decease, and other 10 marks to be payd yerly 
20s. tyll the sume of the forsede 10 markes be contentid and payde. The resydewe 
of all my goods and catall I assine on to my executors paying my detts, whom I orden 
George Skotte of Munks Bradefyld, he to have for his labor 20s., and Thomas Adams 
of Muche Wheltham, and he to have for his labor 20s. Also I make Sir Gylberde 
Symsonne parson of lytyll Wheltham supervisor, and he to have 6s. .. 8d. In 
wytenesse to these premysses Sir Gylberd Symsonne pryste, Clement Ladymane, 
John att Howe, Raffe Adams, Robard Seymor with other moo. 

Proved 16 May, 1534, by the executors. 
Bury St. Edmunds. 

Book XII. fo. 220. 



WHELNETHAM WILLS. 251 

No. 16. Ralph Macro of Great Wheltham. May 1566. Aprfl 1569. 

In the name of God Amen. On May 4, in the yeare of our Lord God 1566, m 
the 8 yeare of Queen Elizabeth, I Rafe Macrowe of Greate Wheltham yeoman, being 
ot good and perfect remembraunce thanks be gevyn to Allmightie God, rcvokinge, 
dyssannullinge and making frustrate, voyde and of none effect all other wills and 
testaments heretofore by me made or cawsed to be wrylten, knowne or by me spoken 
of in whoose custody or kepinge so ever thei be, I doo make them all for ever 
hereafter frustrate, voyde and of none effect. And I doo orden and make this my 
present testament and last will in manner and forme following in this paper wrytlen. 
First I bequethe my sowle to Allmighti God, and my body to be buryed in the 
churche yarde of Wheltham beforeseide. Item I gyve to every of my godchildren 
1 2d. a peace. Item to every of my servants as well maydes as men servants 3s. .. 4d. 
a peace. The resydewe of all my goods and cattell, corne and howsehowlde stiiffe 
and all other my goods moveable and unmoveable not before bequethed, my detts 
paide and my body honestly brought in yearth, I gyve and bequethe yt wholi and 
fully to Thomas Macrowe my naturall sonne, which Thomas Macrowe I doo orden 
and make sole executor of this my present testament and last will. Moreover my 
will is yf the seide Thomas my sone doo depart this worlde before the seid Rafe 
Macrowe, then I will and bequethe all my foreseide goods [etc.] to Elyn Macrowe 
my daughter in lawe and William Macrowe and to Thomas Macrowe my sonnes 
Sonne, to be equally devyded betwyn them part and part leake. In witnes herof I to 
this my will and testament have sett to my hand and scale. 

Witnesses : John Adams, John Gooche, Thomas Bruer, John Kyffyn. 

Proved at Bury St. Edmunds April 15, 1569, by the executor. 
Bury St. Edmunds. 

Booke Peade, fo. y6. 

No. 17. John King of Great Whelnetham. Jan. 1566. March 1569. 

In the name of God Amen. The 28 daye of Januarye in the yeare of our Lorde 
God 1566, I John Kynge of Greate Weltum husbondman, being of whole mynde 
and good remembraunce thancks be geven to AUmyghte God, doo make this my 
present testament conteyninge herin my last will. Fyrst I bequethe my sowle into 
the handes of Allmighti God my maker and Savyor, and my bodye to be buryed in 
the parryshe churche yarde of Greate Weltom. Item I gyve to Margaret my wyfe 



252 WHELNETHAM WILLS. 



the profifytt of 'all my howses and londes, both fre and coppie, whersoever thei lye, 
duringe her natural! lyfe, kepinge upp my howses in good reperacions yf she lyve 
after me. Item I give to John Kynge my eldeste son my howses and londes lyeinge 
in Sykylsmere after my wyfes deathe to hym and his heires for ever ; and yf he dye 
without yssue, then to be sowld and equalli devided amonge my two sonnes and 
Alice my daughter by even porcyons then being alyve. Item I give to younge John 
Kinge my sonne all my houses and londes in muche Wheltum that I nowe dwell in 
after my wyfe's discease to hym and his heirs for ever ; and yf he dye without yssue, 
then to be soulde and equally devyded betwyn my two sonnes and Alice my daughter. 
Item I give to Thomas Kynge my youngest sonne my house at Stanningfeld more, 
percell of the grounde called two medowe platts, and other two percells the one 
Deyes heathe and the other Justeninge hethe, and a close called Hoyes by estimacion 
thre acres lienge next unto brocks grene, and an other percell of grounde in a felde 
called Woodbrydge felde, after the dysceace of my wyfe to him and his heires for 
ever ; [and if he die without issue then to be equally divided between my two sons 
and daughter Alice.] Item to Thomas my sonne ^20 to be delyvered to him after 
the deathe of my wyfe, and yf he dye before my wyfe without yssue, then to be 
equally devided betwyn my two sonnes and Alice my daughter. Also to Alice my 
daughter ;^2o [as above]. The resydewe of all my goods moveables and unmoveables 
I put them to the disposicion of my executors, whome I make Margaret my wyfe 
and Thomas my sonne, theas beinge witnesses, Sir R^?^"^. [sic] Hill, Sir Roger 
Macro, writers of the same, and John Adams, Nicholas Ynnolde, John Wryte with 
others. Item I will that Thomas my sonne shall have one cawldron and one chiste. 
And herein I make John my eldest sonne my supervisor unto my last will and 
testament one this maner wise paienge unto him 3s. .. 4d. 

Proved at Bury St. Edmunds 7 March, 1569, by the executors. 
Bury St. Edmunds. 

Booke Peade, fo. 89. 

No. 18. Margaret King of Great Whelnetham. April 1571. March 1571-2. 

In the name of God Amen, The 20 daye of Apriie in the yer of our Lord God 
1 57 1 I Mergret Kinge of Great Wheltom widowe, being of whole meynd and of good 
remembraunce thanks be given to Almightie God, do mak this my presentt testament 
conteyning herein my last will. First I bequeth my soule to the hands of Allmightie 



WHELNETHAM WILLS. 253 

God my maker and Saviour, and my body to be buried in the parish churche yard of 
Great Wheltom. Item I give unto Jhone Kinge my sonne the eldest 40s. Unto 
John King the younger, and unto John King the sunne of sayd John, and to Barbara 
his daughter, ;^3, that is to saye 20s. a pece, wherof sayd John Kinge hath 50s. of 
the same sume remaining in his own hand since the deth of his father. Item to 
Thomas Kinge my sunne 20s. Item to Ehzabeth Potter my daughter 40s. Item to 
Raffe Ramsey, John Ramsey and Roger Ramsey, to eyther of them 5s. a pece. Item 
to Stephen Potter, Katherin Potter and Barbara Potter, to eyther of them 6s. .. 8d. 
a pece. Item to AHce King my daughter 13 shepe and ;£/\. in redye monye. Item 
I give 20s. to be distributed at my buriall unto the pore. Item I give unto my sister 
Alice Enoulde 3s. .. 4d. and all my owlde apenill. Item to my two daughters in 
law 5s. a pece. Item to Alice my daughter all the rest of my aparell both lininge 
and wollinge. Item unto eche of my godchildren i2d. a pece. Item unto John 
Potter, Edmund Potter and Francis Potter 5 grots a pece. Item unto my sonne in 
lawe Roger Potter 20s. All thes summes of monye and legaces above named I will 
to be raysed of my parte of my goods which are in the hands and in occupiinge 
betwext my sonne Thomas and me. And as for the rest of my goods I give unto the 
discression and use of my executors, whome I make Alice Kinge my daughter and 
Roger Potter my sonne in lawe : thes beinge wittnesses, John Adams, Abraham 
Barker and John Potter the writter herof. 

Mem : The sayd Mergret Kinge being of perfecte minde and memorie and 
further proceedinge to the fuller declaracon of hir testament, in the presence of the 
wittnesses above remembred sayd as followinge, viz. I will that Alice my daughter 
shall have all my householde stuffe holye to her selfe without any particion therof to 
be made. 

Proved at Bury St. Edmunds 7 March, 1571, by the executors. 
Bury St. Edmunds. 

Book 1570-1. fo. 345. 

No. 19. William Harpley of Little Whelnetham. Jan. March 1585-6. 

In the name of God Amen. In the yeere of our Lord God 1585, on Jan. 26, I 
Wylliam Harpley of Wheltham Parva yeoman, beinge of good remembrance [etc.] doe 
ordayne and make this my last wyll and testament. First I doe bequeathe my sowle 
to Almightye God, and my bodye to be buryed in the churchyard of Wheltham parva. 



254 WHELNETHAM WILLS. 



Item I doe give to Alee Harpley my wyfe my howse and land coppy and free in 
Wheltham parva and Wheltham magna during her lyfe and one month after her lyf 
and one monthe after her decease, and I appoynt her to pay by herself or my 
deputies as Thomas Macrowe and Richard Aubone all the legasyes appoynted to be 
payd. Item I doe give to Alee Harpley my wyff all my moveable goods. Item I 
bequeath my howse and my land coppye and free to Thomas Macrowe of Wheltham 
magna after the decease of my wyff, payinge out of it ;^io ; and yf said Thomas dye 
[etc.] then my godsonne Wylliam Macrow and hys heyres shall enjoy it ; and if sayd 
Wylliam dye without issue that then yt be devided amongst the rest of the chyldren 
of sayd Thomas Macrow. Item I doe give to Wynter's wyfe of Rushbrooke my 
howse which I have in Burye St. Edmunds untyll her sonne my godsonne come to 
thage of fower and twentye yeeres, and that then the sayd howse be given to hym 
and to hys sister Alee Winter whom I doe bringe upp. I doe give to Robert Carver 
20S. to be payd within one yeere and one daye after my decease. Allsoe I wyll 
that my wyff shall paye in this order all other legacyes : to Margery Calver ^^ ; to 
the poore of Wheltham parva 20s. ; to the poore in Bury 20s. I doe give to 
Wylliam Macrow a fetherbedd with all things belonging to be delivered to him within 
fower yeers of my decease or immediately after the death of my wyff. To every one 
of Thomas Macrowe's children 5s. To John Alam ^3 .. 6 .. 4. To every one of 
Wynter's chyldren of Rushbrooke 20s. To every one of my godchildren 2s. a peice. 
To Alee Allam los. To Richard Hall 5s. To Alee Wynter the bedd wherein I 
now lye with all things that doe belong to yt, a brasse polt and two pewter platters, 
after the decease of my wyff. I geve to Alee my wyff a peice of land lyinge in 
Newton duringe her naturall lyf, and after her decease I doe geve yt to Wylliam 
Wynter my godsonne and to his heyres. To eyther of my executors, Thomas Macrow 
and Richard Aubone, I doe geve 2od., and to Robert Saxye 2od. To Jeane Creeme 
3s. .. 4d. I wyll that Thomas Macrowe paye unto hys owne chyldren and unto 
Wynter's chyldren at the age of 21 yeres ;^7 .. 10 .. o out of the ^10 appoynted to 
be payd by hym, that ys 30s. to his owne chyldren and j^j to Wynter's chyldren.* 
The sayd Thomas Macrowe shall pay to Alee my wyfe ;^io within one yere of my 
decease. I give to Fraunces Byxbye 3s. .. 4d. ; to Margarett Mathew ^3 .. 6 .. 8. 
(Edmund Salmon, John Ladiman and Richard Aubon can testifye and wytness to 
the surrender of copyholds to the use of my wife into the hands of John Ladiman 

* This is obscure, but probably means that /^J was to go to Winter's children and 30 shillings 
to each of two children of Thomas Macrow, 



WHELNETHAM WILLS. 255 

and Thomas Macrowe.) In the presence of John Ladiman, Wylliam Manninge, 
John Debnam, Robert Saxey, Thomas Macrow. 

Proved March 22, 1585, by the executors. 

Inventory ;£8g .. o .. 6, 
Bury St. Edmunds. 

Book Frende, fo. 3S8. 

No. 20. William Macro of Great Whelnetham. Aug. 1612. May 1614. 

In the name of God Amen. The first daie of August in the yere of our Lord 
God 1612 I WiUiam Macro of Greate Wheltliam yeoman, being of perfect mynde and 
remembraunce God therfore be thancked, doth ordeine this my last will and 
testament. First I commend my soule into the hands of Almighiie Goil my Creator 
and unto Jesus Crist his sonne my Redeemer and onlie Saviour, by whose pretious 
deathe and passion and by noe other meanes whatsoever I hope and assuredly trust 
to have pardon and forgiveness of all my synnes ; and my bodie I will be buried with 
christian buryall. Item I give unto Thomas IMacro my lovinge father the thirtie 
poundes I lent him towards the purchase of Sciclesmer filde and meadowe with tenne 
poundes I lent him synce. All which I freely give him m regard of the charges I 
have putt him unto, desiring him that the said land or the monie therof yf it be sould 
male be bestowed upon those my bretheren which shall have not parte of his house 
and land in greate Wheltham. Item I give unto Susan Macro my goddaughter my 
brother Rafe's daughter ;^5 ; unto Susan Clarke my goddaughter ;^2o ; t(j be paide 
them within one quarter of a yere nexte after my decease : [if not of sufificient age to 
give a discharge, then their father or some friend to do so and enter into a bond to 
employ the same for their use :] if either dye, then their share to be equally devided 
among the rest of the children which my brother RafFe and my brother in lawe 
Clarke shall have then livinge by Margarett Smythe and Susan Macro their wyves 
and iione other.* Item I give to my aunt Evers 40s., to my brother Raffes wife 5s., 
to Raffe Macro his sonne 40s , to Anne his dawghter 20s., to the two children of my 
brother in lawe Thomas Clarke, Thomas and Elizabeth, los. a peece, to my brother 
Anthonie's sonne Thomas 20s., to Anne Cadge, now Raffe Addams wife, 20s., and 
to her daughter and Susan my goddawghter 40s., to my goddawghter my cosen 
Carver's dawghter los., to my cosen John Tyllett's eldest son 10s., to my cosen 

_ *These are their maiden names : Ralph Macro married Margaret Smylh and Thomas Clarke 
married Suzan Macro, 



256 WHKLNETHAM WILLS. 

Huetts Sonne John 5s., to Ball's wife my father's servant los., to the rest of his 
servauntes 5s., to some learned man that will preach at my buriall 5s., to the poore 
of Create Wheltham 20s., to the poore of Little Wheltham 20s., and to my executors 
for their paines 20s. All which somes I will be paid at my buriell or within one 
moneth next after. And as touching all other my goods, leases, bills, bonds etc. and 
all the overplus, my detts beinge trewly paid and my funerall charges deducted, my 
mynde and will is the same shall be equallie parted amongst my foure brethren, viz. 
Raffe, Edward, Thomas and Antonie, or soe manye of them as shall be then Jyvinge. 
I give to my brother Rafife my sword and daggard ; to my brother Edward my best 
cloke; to my brother Thomas my gould ringe with my Dixionary and president 
booke ;* to my brother Anthonie my deske chest and best suyte of apparrell ; to 
Susan Clarke my goddawghter my bedsted, featherbed with all other furniture ther 
unto belonging ; to Susan Macro my goddawghter my Bible; to my uncle Evers my 
best cloake saving one with a suyte of apparrell ; and as for anie other my goods my 
desire is that my executors dispose of them amongst my poore friends as they shall 
thinke good. And of this my last will and testament I constitute and make my 
brother Raffe Macro and my brother Thomas Macro sole executors, and my brother 
in law Thomas Clarke supervisor. 

Witness John Wadkine. 

Proved May 23, 16 14, by the executors. 
Bury St. Edmunds. 

Book Stevens, fo. 22. 

No. 21. Thomas Macro of Great Whelnetham. Jan. 1614. Nov. 1623. 

[This is a mere abstract of a long will.] 

The 10 day of January, 1614, I Thomas Makroe of Great Wheltham make my 
will. My body to be buried at the discretion of my executor. To Edward Makroe 
my son and his heirs male begotten all that my messuage or tenement wherein I now 
dwell situate in Great Wheltham, with all such lands and grounds as I purchased of 
Sir William Drury knight deceased called Cobdows : and all my coppiehold or 
customary lands holden of the manors of Wheltham hall and Hawsted in Wheltham 

*This book shows he was a lawyer. It may have been A newe Boke of Precedents. By E. 
Whytchiirch, 1^42, / or, A hoke of Presidents exactely written in manner of a Register. London, 
1^62 ; one of the earliest treatises on Conveyancing, says AUibone. The Dixionary might be John 
Withals, of which several editions were printed in the i6th Century. 



WHELNETHAM WILLS. 257 

called Walshams ; and two peeces of coppiehold or customary land lying in the 
churchfield in Wheltham containing 7 acres ; and one rode more lying in Wheltham 
at the Green by the churchfield : with remainder in default of heirs male begotten to 
Thomas my son and his heirs male begotten : with remainder to Anthony my son 
and his heirs male begotten : with remainder to my right heirs for ever. I give to 
my son Thomas and his heirs for ever 12 acres of land and meadow lying together 
in said Wheltham as it is now divided with hedge or dike which I purchased of Mr. 
Rookwood. To Rafife my son ;^6o to be paid within 3 years of my decease. To 
Anthony my son £60. To Raffe, son of my son Raffe, ;£<^ at his age of 21 years. 
To Susan and Ann Makroe, daughters of my son Raffe, 40s. each at the age of 21 
years. To Susan Clark, daughter of Thomas Clark my son in law, ;^io. To 
Thomas and Elizabeth Clark, two other children of my said son in law, 40s. each at 
the age of 21 years. To the two children of my son Anthony 40s. each at the age 
of 21 years. To said Suzan Clark one cubbard standing in the hall in said messuage. 
To my sister Evers 20s. I give my son Edward all my goods and personal effects, 
and my mind is that he pay all legacies here mentioned. If said 12 acres given to 
Thomas my son happen to be sown with corne at the time of my death, it shall be 
lawful for Edward my son quietly and peaceably to reap the same to his own use for 
the better payment of the legacies. Edward my son shall permit Gregory Ball and 
Isabel his wife quietly to have their dwelh'ng and abode in the chamber of said 
messuage wherein they now dwell for the term of their lives or of the longest survivor. 
I give to said Isabel 40s. If any of my sons, Thomas, Anthony, Raff or Edward, 
hinder or oppose my will, he or they opposing shall take no benefit from it. I 
appoint my son Edward Makroe my sole executor, and Thomas Clarke, my son in 
law, supervisor. 

This will was openly redd in the presence and understanding of the testator and 
of these witnesses : Thomas Gippes, Edmond Clarke, Robert Bulmer. 

Proved at Bury St. Edmunds 10 Nov., 1623. 
Bury St. Edmunds. 

Book Harrold, fo. 680. 

No. 22. James Wolfenden, rector of Little Whelnetham. April, Nov. 1624. 

In the name of God Amen. April 21, 1624, I James Wolfendewe [sic] doe 
make this my last will and testament. First I bequeath my sowle into the hands of 



258 WHELNETHAM WILLS. 

Almightie God, and my boddy to the earth to be buried in comelye manner in hope 
of a joyfull resurreccion to eternall liffe. I give to Susan my wife all that my land 
lyeinge in Assington, 12 acres more or less, with the house and barne, duringe her 
naturall liffe. Then I give said lande, house and barne to my son James Wolffendew 
and my daughters Abigail Snow, Marye Wolffendew, Margrett Wolffendew and Ann 
Wolffendew, their executors and assignes, to be sould by my executor with the advice 
and helpe of my supervisor, and the mony to be equally devided amongst them, viz. 
James, Abigail, Mary, Margrett and Ann. I bequeath to Susan my wiffe the best 
cowe, best bedd, bedsteade, covering blancketts, 2 paire of sheets, 2 pillow beres, a 
pillowe boulster. The rest of my bedes, bedinge and bedsteads I bequeath to 
James Wolfendewe. Mary Wolfendewe, Margrett Wolfendewe and Anne Wolfendewe, 
to be equally devided among them. I bequeath all my brasse, peuter, woodden 
vessells, tables, chayres, stooles, formes, cushions, to Susan my wiffe, James, Mary, 
Margrett and Anne, to be equally devided among them. I bequeathe to Robert 
Wolfendewe my sone £2>- To Hester his wife 20 shillings. To James Wolfendewe 
his son 20 shillings. To Hester his daughter 40 shillings. I bequeath to Abigail 
Marrett, Sara Bass, my grandchildren, 20 shillings a peece. I bequeath to James 
Wolfendewe my sone my best mare, ploughe, cartes, harrowes, tumbrell, harnesse 
belonging to husbandrie. To Anne Wolfendewe a cowe. To Margrett Wolfendewe 
another cowe. To Thomas Marret my typt pott. To Jonathan Basse my quernes. 
To the poore of Welnetham parva 10 shillings. To Susan my wiffe 6 bushells of 
wheat, 6 bushells rye, 6 bushells barley, if it be to be had. I bequeath all the rest of 
my corne to my daughters Abigail Snowe, Susan Marrett, Sara Basse, Mary, Margret 
and Ann Wolfendew, and James Wolfendew my sone, if there be any, to be equally 
devided among them. I bequeath to Susan my wiffe a little house and halfe an acre 
of lande lyeinge in Moonckeselye [Monks Eleigh] during her naturall life ; then I 
bequeath it to Daniell Snowe his heirs and assignes. I bequeath to Ann Wolfendewe 
20 shillings, to Margrett 10 shillings. The rest of my goods unbequeathed I give to 
Daniell Snowe, whom I make my executor, ernestly intreatinge him to see this my 
will truly performed. I appoynte my brother in lawe Abraham Chaplyn my 
supervisor, craveinge his help herein. Sealed, subscribed and delivered in the 
presence of Abraham Chaplyn, John Thorneton. 

Proved Nov. 5, 1624, by Daniel Snowe, executor. 
Norwich, Reg. 1624, fo. 7. 



WHELNETHAM WILLS. 259 

No. 23. Bezaliel Carter, rector of Little Whelnetham. April, June, 1629. 

In the name of God Amen. The 7 day of Aprill, [629, I Bezaleel Carter of 
litle Wheltham, dark, being the unprofitable servant of God, at this time weake in 
bodie but stronge in mynde (I give God praise), doe ordaine this my last will and 
testament. First I doe willinglie and with a fre hart render and give againe into the 
hands of my Lord God and Creator my spirit which he of his fatherlie goodness gave 
unto me when I was first facioned in my mother's wombe, nothing doubtinge but 
accordinge to the article of my faith at the great day of the generall resurrection, 
when we shall appeare before the Judgment seate of Christ, I shall receive the same 
againe by the mightie power of God, wherewith he is able to subdue all things to 
himselfe. And whereas my deare father together with myselfe did purchase of Sir 
Thomas Jermyn knyght one tenement with certaine lands thereto belonging lyinge in 
Great and Little Wheltham late in the occupacion of William Adson, as may appeare 
by an indenture made Jan. 10 in the 2 yeare of our lord King Charles [1627] betwene 
Sir Thomas Jermyn knyght, William Jermin esquire and John Sache gent of the one 
part, and John Carter and Beza [sic] on ye other part, I doe freely give all my right 
in the same (after the decease of my father and of Hester his wife, my deare mother,) 
unto Anne my carefuU and lovinge wife during her naturall life, according to the 
terme of ye indenture before mentioned ; and after her decease I give the same unto 
Bezaleel Carter my eldest sonne and his heires, paying out of it such portions to the 
residue of my children as are hereafter mentioned, that is to saye — To Hester my 
daughter ;£io within one yeare and half next after he shall be lawfullie possessed of 
same tenement : and to Elizabeth my daughter ;^to within three years : and to 
William my son ;^io within four years : and to Roger my son ;^io within five years 
after he shall be lawfullie possessed of it. And my mind and will is to make my 
fower yonger children's porcions ;^2o apeece. I will therefore that Bezaleel my 
Sonne shall pay out of the lands that I have given him, to Hester my daughter jQxo 
more within 6 years next after he be possessed of the same, and to Elizabeth ^10 
more within 7 years, and to William ^10 more within 8 years, and to Roger ;^io 
more within 9 years : all these payments to be made at the porch of the parish church 
of Great Wheltham. And I do will every of my said children that they doe seal and 
deliver an acquittance upon the receipt of it. And further my will and mynd is that 
if my son Bezaleel and his heires shall make default in the payment of said legacies 
or any of them, then it shall be lawful for such of my children to whom default shall 
be made to enter into said tenement and hold the profitts thereof till he or she shall 



260 WHELNETHAM WILLS. 



be paid with his or her necessary costs and charges fullie satisfied. And whereas 
one William Wentford, late of Debenham in co. of Suffolk husbondman deceased, for 
a certain sum of money by me paid to one William Tillett late of Debenham butcher 
at the request of and for the dett of said William Wentford hath sold to me and 
myne heires the ymediate revercion and remainder of said William Wentford in 
certain messuages, fower shops or stalls, an ortyard, a cottage and yard with 
appurtenances scituate in Debenham, as sone as the same shall happen immediately 
after the death of one John Julians and Jone his wife, as in an indenture made 
between said William Wentford on the one part and me on the other part bearing 
date May ii in the 20 year of the raigne of our late sovereigne lord James, King 
[etc.] doth more plainly appeare. Now I knowing myself satisfied of said sum of 
money by me disbursed for said William Wentford doe bequeath these last rehersed 
messuages in Debenham to Anne late wife of said William Wentford during her 
naturall life, and after her decease to the right heires of said William Wentford for 
ever. All my moveable goods I doe wholly give them to Anne my wief, whom I 
have alwaies found to be a lovinge and comfortable helpe for me both in health and 
sickness, intreatinge her in the fear of God and for the rautuall love that hath bene 
betwene us while we lived together that she will be carefull in the education of our 
children, and for the payment of my detts, and bestowinge my body in decent and 
christian buriall. And I doe ordaine her sole executrix of this my last will and 
testament, and doe intreat my kinde frend John Sache gen. to be supervisor of the 
same. In witnes whereof I have to these two sheets of paper sett to my hand and 
scale the day and year above written. 

[Not signed or witnessed.] 
Proved at Bury St. Edmunds on 17 June, 1629, by the oath of Anne Carter the 
executrix. 
Norwich, 1629, No. 126. 

No. 24. John Sache of Little Whelnetham. Oct. 1645. Feb. 1645-6. 

In the name of God Amen. On October 2, 1645, I John Sache of Little 
Wheltham gent being in good health and perfect memory, for which I render to 
Almightie God most hearty thanks and praise, revokinge all former wills doe make 
this my last will and testament. First I commend my soule into ye hands of 
Almighty God my Creator, assuredly hoping to be made partaker of everlasting life 
by ye only meritt and mediation of Jesus Christ, my blessed Saviour and Redeemer. 



WHELNETHAM WILLS. 261 



And my body I committ to ye earth to be decently buried in christian buriall at ye 
discretion of my executrix hereafter named. Item I give unto Elizabeth my well 
beloved wife all that my mannor of Great Weltham Hall and all that my capital 
messuage called Great Weltham Hall with appertenances for the terme of her naturall 
life ; and after her decease (if that Richard Gipps gent, my sonne in law be living) 
then my will is that my lovinge brother Mr. Thomas Sache or his assignes shall 
receive all ye rents and profetts of ye said mannour and make yearly payment thereof 
to Elizabeth Gipps my daughter, wife of said Richard Gipps, or to whom she shall 
appoint by word or writing from time to time obtained, and this part of my will I 
desire my brother Sache faithfully to performe to my daughter Gipps during her 
naturall life. Item I give after the decease of Elizabeth my wife and Elizabeth my 
daughter and ye survivor of them all that my mannor [etc.] in Weltham unto John 
Gipps my grandchild, eldest sonne of said Richard Gippes, and his heirs and assignes 
for ever, he paying to my grand children Mary Gippes and Luce Gippes his two 
sisters ye full summe of ;^4oo at ye said capital messuage of Great Weltham Hall in 
manner foUowinge, that is to say unto said Mary Gippes ^^2^ yearly and every year 
for eight years on May i and Nov. i by equal portions, the first payment to begin 
on the first of those days which shall first happen after the decease of Elizabeth my 
wife and Elizabeth my daughter ; and so likewise to Luce his other sister. And if 
my said grandchildren depart this life before said term of 8 years be fully expired, 
then my will is that said yearly sum or sums of them so departed in such manner as 
It should have been payd to the mother of such issue if she had been living. \sic^ but 
it is dear what words after departed are otiiitted.^ Item I give to my brother Thomas 
Sache all my messuages, lands [etc.] in Bury St. Edmunds upon this trust, that he 
shall pay all rents arising out of them to such uses as my daughter Elizabeth shall in 
writing declare during her life : and after her decease I will that they shall remain 
unto Lucy Gipps my grandchild and her heirs for ever, provided that Elizabeth my 
wife shall have, if she please, her dwelling in that house wherein Mr. Spooner lately 
dwelt, she keeping the same in good reparations without paying of any rent. Item I 
give to John Gipps my grandchild and Thomas Sache my brother and Mr. John Wall 
minister at Bury all my messuages [etc.] in Lopham in ye co. of Norfolk, which I 
together with Richard Gipps Esquire since deceased had of ye Rt, Hon. Thomas, 
Earl of Arundle and Surrey for ye term of 62 yeares, together with all my right and 
term of years unexpired in them. And I will that said John Gipps, Thomas Sache 
and John Wall shall pay out of the rents of said lease ;^2o to such uses as my 



262 WHELNETHAM WILLS. 



daughter Elizabeth shall in writing appoint, said sum to be paid yearly on May i and 
Nov. I by equal portions during her life. Also I will that said John Gipps, Thomas 
Sache and John Wall shall pay to Elizabeth Lucas, now wife of Gibson Lucas 
esquire, the yearly sum of ;^5 for tenn yeares next after my decease. Also they 
shall further pay to Lucy Gippes my grandchild ;^5o yearly during the unexpired 
term of said lease. Also they shall pay to Mary Gippes my grandchild ;£s° yearly 
every year during the unexpired term of said lease. And also to Elizabeth my wife 
;^2o every year during her life. And if said Elizabeth my wife and Elizabeth Gipps 
my daughter shall die before the expiration of the years yet to come in said lease, then 
I will that said John Gipps, Thomas Sache and John Wall shall pay the said yearly 
sum of ^20 to the younger children of said Gibson Lucas begotten of said Elizabeth 
Lucas my grandchild. And if it shall happen that either of my grandchildren Mary 
Gipps or Luce depart this life before the determination of said lease leaving issue, 
then said yearly summe or summes shall be paid to the issue of her deceased, to each 
mother's issue the mother's part, as it ought to have been paid to the mother if she 
had been then living. And if either said Mary or Luce depart this life without issue, 
then the part of her dying shall be paid to the survivor. And if it shall happen that 
said annuities out of rents of said lease be behind or unpaid, then it shall be lawful 
for such persons to whom they ought to be paid to enter into said land at Lopham 
and distrein. I give unto Richard Gipps my son in law ;^io to be paid him within 
one yeare after my decease. I give unto John Gipps my grandchild in consideration 
of the trust reposed in him ;^2o out of said lease at Lopham. I give unto my 
grandchild John Gipps in consideration of the former trust ;^ioo. I give unto 
William Lucas ye sonne of Gibson Lucas of Horningsheth ^^ to be paid him when 
he shall attain to ye age of 16 yeares, I give unto Elizabeth Lucas daughter of said 
Gibson Lucas ^5 to be paid when she shall attain to ye age of 16 years. I give to 
my kinsman John Styleman ^^40 to be paid within 2 yeares after my decease. I give 

unto the [sic] children of my sister Dodden which she had by her husband Seir 

j£^ among them. I give unto ye poorest and most religious sort of people of ye 
Borough of Buty St. Edmunds ^10 to be distributed by my executrix. I give to ye 
poore of Great Wheltham 40s. to remain for ever in ye hands of ye churchwardens 
and overseers of ye poore for a stock to ye use of ye said poore people. I give to 
John Pistor my godsonne 20s. at 21 yeares. I give to ye widdow Dane of Felstead 
in Essex ^^. I give to my loving brother Mr. Thomas Sache one ringe of gould 
worth 40 shillings, and to Mary and Sarah my sisters to either of them a ringe of gold 



WHELNETHAM WILLS. 263 



worth 20 shillings. I give to aforesaid Gibson Lucas ;£^. Also to Mary Gipps my 
grandchild ;£io within one yeare after my wives death, and unto Lucy Gipps my 
grandchild ;!^io. And all other my goods and chattells, plate, ready money, house- 
hold stuffe and utensils of household I give unto Elizabeth my well beloved wife, 
whom I make sole executrix of this ray last will and testament. And I doe hereby 
ordeine supervisors of this my last will and testament my son in law Richard Gipps, 
Gibson Lucas, Mr. Wall minister of Maries parish in Bury St. Edmunds and Mr. 
Pistor, desiring them to be councelling and ayding unto my executrix, and earnestly 
requiring my executrix to be advised and ruled by them in all things and doubts that 
may arise from this my last will and testament for any legacie therein given, if my 
executrix shall desire it. And I further give to every of them towards their care and 
paines therein 20 shillings over and above all charges and expences that they shall 
expend by reason of their supervisorsbip. In witness whereof I to this my last will 
and testament contained in fowre sheets of paper to every severall sheete thereof 
have subscribed my name, and also have affixed my seale in a labell fastening ye 
fowre sheets together at ye top thereof, and published ye same to be my last will and 
testament ye day and yeere first above written. John Sache. 

Witnesses : Gibson Lucas, John Styleman. 

Mem : My mind is that John Gipps my grandchild shall pay out of his annuity 
of ;!^2o out of Lopham lease ^5 as is expressed above to my grandchild Elizabeth 
Lucas. John Sache. 

Proved at Norwich 16 Feb. 1645 by Elizabeth Sache widow and executrix. 
Norwich 1646, fo. 113. 

No. 25. Richard Gipps of Great Wheinetham. Aug. 1659. Feb. 1661 [1661-2?]. 

In the name of God Amen. I Richard Gipps of Great Wheltham gent this 22 
day of August, 1659, doe make this my last will and testament revokeing all former 
wills made by me. First and before all things I bequeath and commend my soule 
to the hands of the Almightie God my maker and loveing Redeemer, expectinge and 
lookinge for Salvacion and pardon for all my sinnes by the onely meritts of my Lord 
and Saviour Jesus Christe. And for my body I committ to the earth whereof it was 
first framed. And for that estate which God in mercy have given me I dispose of it 
thus : I give to John Gipps my sonne all that my right, title and interest of all rent 
and rent charges whatsoever which I have or may have out of that lease which my 
father in lawe John Seche purchased of the honourable Thomas Earle of Arrendall 



264 WHELNETHAM WILLS. 

and Surrey, lyeing in Lophani in co. of Norfolk, called and knowne by the name of 
Lophara parke, and to his heires for soe longe time as it continue. Item I give to 
Mary Lurkin, daughter to my daughter Mary Lurkin, fiftie pounds of currant money. 
And to Elizabeth her sister ;^ioo. And to Gressell Lurkin her sister, mye grand- 
childe, ;^5o. And to Lucy Lurkin her sister my grandchilde, ^^50. And to 
Richard Lurkin there brother my grandsonne ;^5o. All which five sumes being 
;^3oo of current English money my will and niynd is shall be payd to there father 
John Lurkin my sonne in lawe, ;^ioo a yeare to be payd him within three yeares 
next after my decease, and by him to be improved to the best advantage and profitt 
for his said children, and to be by him payd with all the profitt and benefilt which 
shall arise thereof to his saide four daughters and sonne as they shall come to their 
severall ages of eighteene yeares. If any of them dye before there age of eighteene 
yeeres, then his or there part with all the profitt thereof equally to be devided to 
those that shall survive as they come to there severall ages of 18 yeeres. If they 
happen all to depart this life before there severall ages of 18 yeares, then to be payd 
to any other of the younger children of my said daughter Lurkin ; and if she have 
noe more children, then to be payd to his eldest son John Lurkin. Item I give to 
my daughter Mosely ^200 of currant money to be paid a hundred markes a yeare 
within three yeares next after my decease to any one whom my said daughter Mosely 
shall appoint under her hand and seale without the consent of her husband, and the 
acquittances of whom she shall soe nominate to receive it shall be a sufficient 
discharge to my executor for said money. Item I give to my cousin Richard Gipps, 
my brother's son, a ring of gold of 40 shillings. To Mr. Harbert our mynister a 
ring of gold of 40 shillings. To John Stylman and Dorothy Stylman, children to my 
cousin Stylman, 20 shillings a peece. To my sonne in lawe John Lurkyn tenn 
pounds of currant English money. The residue of all my goods, chattel, cattell, 
household stuffe and personall estate whatsoever kynd or nature they be of, I doe give 
to my son John Gipps, he paying my debts which of right I doe owe. And I doe 
make my sonne John Gipps and my sonne in lawe John Lurkin executors of this my 
last will and testament. I have hereunto sett my hand and seale the day and yeare 
above written, 1659. Richard Gipps. 

Witnesses, John Gipps and John Stylman, marke of John Brooke. 

Item I give tenn pounds of currant money for the use of the poore of Great 
Wheltham, which money shall be putt into the hands of the Minister, Churchwardens 
and Overseers of Weltham for the time being, the benefitt and profitt arysing thereof 



WHELNETHAM WILLS. 265 

which shall yearely accrewe by them to be given to the said poore, provided they 
take sufficient securitie for the principall. 

Proved at Bury St. Edmunds Feb. 5, 1661, by John Gipps son and executor. 
Power reserved to John Lurkin the other executor. 

Bury St. Edmunds. 

Book Rex Redux, fo. 272. 

No. 26. William Herbert, D.D., rector of Great Whelnetham. 
Feb. March 1680-1. 

In the name of God Amen. I William Herbert Doctor in Divinity, rector of 
Rougham in the County of Suffolk, being sicke and weake in body but (thanks be to 
God) of perfect minde and memory, doe make this my last will and testament. First 
I commend my soule to God, and my body I committ to the earth. And as for my 
worldly estate I dispose thereof as followeth. I give to my sonne William Herbert 
^50, to be paid him within one year next after my decease, and his owne receipt 
shall be sufficient discharge altho he should not then be one and twenty. Also I 
give to my said sonne William Herbert ail my bookes except such English bookes as 
my wife shall make choice of for her own private use. Item I give to my sonne 
John Herbert ;^ioo to be paid him within three moneths after my wife's decease or 
at his age of 24, which shall first happen. But if my wife shall lay out and expend 
any money in the binding him out as an apprentice, then she may deduct out of his 
legacy soe much money as she shall expend in binding him out. Item I give to my 
three daughters, Mary Herbert, Suzan Herbert and Elizabeth Herbert, to each of 
them ;^ioo a peice, to be paid within 3 moneths after my wife's decease or at their 
respective dayes of marriage, which shall first happen : provided they shall marry 
with my wife's consent and approbation or else their legacies shall not be paid until 
3 moneths next after my wife's decease : provided also that if my wife remarry after 
my decease, then the several legacies given to my children shall immediately upon 
her marriage be payable to them. If any of my children happen to die before his or 
her legacy becomes due, such legacy to be equally divided among the survivors. The 
rest of all my goods and personall estate I give to my deare wife Elizabeth Herbert 
(towards the paying of my debts and discharging of my funerall expences and the 
maintaining and educating of my younger children) together also with the interest 
which shall be made of the several legacies given to my children till they become 
due. And I appoint my wife sole executrix of this my last will and testament. In 



266 WHELNETHAM WILLS. 

witness whereof I have hereunto sett my hand and seale this 25 day of February, 
1680. (English stile.) 

Witnesses: William Colman N.P,, Anne Beales, John Marsh. 

Proved at Bury 9 March, 1680, by the relict and executor. 
Bury St. Edmunds. 

Book Brydon, fo. 767. 

No. 27. Richard Qipps of Fornham St. Martin. Feb. 1673. March 1682. 

In the name of God Amen. The 3 day of February, 1673, I Richard Gipps of 
Fornham St. Martyns gent make this my last will. First I doe bequeath my soule 
into the hands of Almighty God my Creator, hoping to be saved by the meritts of 
Jesus Christ my Redeemer. Item I give unto Elizabeth Suckerman my neice livemg 
in Mildenhall ;^3o to be paid within one year of my decease. Item I give unto 
John Kendall of Fornham St. Martyns, rector, and Thomas Hamond of Bury St. 
Edmunds apothecary, each of them ;^5 to be paid within a year of my decease. 
Item to Frederick Cornwallis, second sonne of my lord Cornwallis, my silver tankard 
with my amies engraven on it. Item unto John Boreham all the bonds he oweth 
me to pay all the bonds I stand engaged with him, if not paid before my death. 
Item to Mary my wife the jQzot a yeare annuity I bought of my cosine Henry Parker 
esquire during her life, upon condition she shall discharge all the debts owing before 
marriage and since done by her own act, and release the third of the house I had of 
my brother Richard Walker, or this legacy to be void. All the rest of my goods, 
lands etc. I give to John Boyden and Elizabeth his wife, and I make John Boyden 
my executor and Elizabeth his wife my executrix. Nevertheless if there be found 
more goods then will pay my debts and legacyes, my meaning is that the remainder 
shall be equally devided between Elizabeth Boyden and Anne Boreham my nieces, 
and that my executor or executrix shall add ;^ioo more to her [whose?] divident 
and purchase land with it and settle it upon her during her life, the remainder to her 
heires, and that my executor John Boyden shall have the disposing of it during his 
life towards the maintenance of her and her children. In witness whereof [etc.] this 
4 Feb., 1673. 

Witnesses : John Chesson, Elizabeth Chesson, John Gurling. 

Proved at Bury St. Edmunds 29 March, 1682, by John and Elizabeth Boydon, 
executors. 

Bury St. Edmunds. 

Book Underwood, fo. 261. 



WHELNETHAM WILLS. 267 

No. 28. John Styleman of Great Whelnetham. Jan. 1690-1. April 1694. 

In the name of God Amen. The 22 day of January, in the 2 year of William 
and Mary, a.d. 1690, I John Stileman of Great Whelnetham yeoman being in sound 
and perfect mind doe make this my last will and testament. First I give unto John 
Brundish of Great Whelnetham clerke all that my messuage and lands thereto 
belonging in Bradfield St. Cleere and all other my lands in Suffolk upon trust that 
said John Brundish shall out of the rents thereof pay to Anthony Facer my nephew 
;^5 within a year of my decease : and also 50s. to Robert Rackett, son of John 
Rackett of Bury St. Edmunds lyme burner, within two years of my decease : and also 
50s. to Susanna Rackett, sister of said Robert, within two years of my decease : and 
also ^5 to Francies Stileman my daughter in law within three years of my decease. 
Also to pay the rest of said rents to Dorothy Maiden my granddaughter during the 
joynt lives of Dorothy my daughter and John Purcas her husband : [and also will, 
if she survive her husband, convey said premises to her, and if she die in her 
husband's lifetime then convey them to said Dorothy my granddaughter.] I doe 
appoint said John Brundish sole executor of this my will. 

Witnesses : Edward Barker, John Steggalls, John Browne. 

Proved at Bury St. Edmunds the last day of April, 1694, by John Brundish. 
Bury St. Edmunds. 

Book 1692-5, fo. 353. 

No. 29. John Qipps of Great Whelnetham. May 1704. 5ept. 1708. 

In the name of God Amen. May 4, 1704, I John Gipps of Great Whelnetham 
gent, being sick in body but of good understanding, doe make this my last will and 
testament. Imprimis I commit my soul into the hands of Almighty God my Maker, 
hopeing to find his mercy thro' the onely meritts of Jesus Christ my Saviour, and my 
body to the earth in faith and hope of a glorious resurrection, there decently to be 
buryed according to the discretion of my executor. And as for that porcion of 
worldly goods which God of his great bounty hath left me I dispose of it in manner 
following. I give unto the parish of Great Whelnetham ;£^ per annum to be laid 
out yearly at Christmass for the poor of the parish as my heire and executor shall 
judge most meet : and for default and want of payment of the yearly rent of ;£^ for 
the charitable uses of the poor I give to the said parish for such uses two pightles 
conteyning by estimacion 6| acres more or less which I lately purchased amongst 
other lands of Sir Richard Gipps of Horninger in co. of Suffolk, lying and abutting 



268 WHELNETHAM WILLS. 

on the west by Stanningfield Moor Green, and abutting on the south by John 
Patrick, and abutting on the east by Sir William Hervies woodes, and abutting on 
the north against Oxall wood and upon my owne groundes. And in case the yearly 
rent of ^^5 be not paid to the uses aforesaid by my heire and executor every yeare 
after my decease and so paid for ever, then it shall be lawful! for the minister and 
churchwardens and overseers for the time being when any such distribution or 
payments shall be unpaid to enter into the two said pightles and no otherwise. And 
I doe make my son and heire Sir Richard Gipps sole executor of this my last will 
and testament. 

Witnesses : Anna Warren, Sarah Ponder, John Brundish. 

Proved 26 Sept. 1708 by Sir Richard Gipps, son and executor. 

Bury St. Edmunds. 

Goodwin IV. fo. 173. 

No. 30. Sir Richard Gipps of Great Whelnetham. Dec. 1708. Feb. 1708-9. 

I Sir Richard Gipps of Great Whelnetham, knight, being of sound and disposing 
mind tho' weak in body, do make this my last will and testament. First I commend 
my soul to God, hoping thro' his mercy and the meritts of Jesus Christ to obtein 
pardon of my sins and everlasting life ; and my body to be buried decently without 
any funerall pomp or pageantry in the grave of my most beloved wife lately deceased. 
Whereas I have sealed two severall articles and contracted with Mr. Thomas 
Stistead of Ipswich, gentleman, for the sale of my mannors, lands [etc.] in Brockley, 
Reed, and the townes there adjacent, I doe hereby confirm the said articles, and 
devise my said mannors [etc.] to be sold pursuant to said articles. And I give the 
moneys arising by such sale (after the mortgages upon said premises and after the 
notes, orders or bills given under my hand be paid) to my executors upon trust to 
pay my other debts. I give all my mannors, advowsons, lands [etc.] in the towns of 
Totnes, Asprington and elsewhere within the county of Devon, and alsoe in the 
towns of Great Whelnetham, Stanningfield, Hastead and elsewhere in Suffolk, and 
alsoe my chambers in Greys Inn, to be sold by my executors. And the clear 
moneys which shall arise by such sale (after the mortgages upon them, and the 
charges of my funerall, the proving this my will and what my executors shall be putt 
unto about law suits, if any happen, about their executorships untill they shall be 
respectively sold) I give with all my personail estate unto my executors upon the like 



WHELNETHAM WILLS. 269 

trust. After all the mortgages, bills, charges and legacies hereafter given shall be 
paid, I then order the surplusage to be devided into five equal! parts. Two parts 
whereof I give to my eldest son Richard at his age of one and twenty years ; and if 
he dye before that age, the same to be divided between my son John and my 
daughter Mary equally, or be given to the survivor at his or her age of one and twenty 
years. Item I give other two parts of said surplusage to my said daughter Mary at 
her age of one and twenty years or day of marriage, which shall first happen ; and if 
she dye before the said times I give the said two parts to be divided between my said 
two sons if then alive. I give the fifth part of said surplusage to my son John at his 
age of one and twenty years ; and if he die before then said fifth part to be divided 
between my son Richard and my daughter Mary, or the survivor of them. I give 
the interest money which shall be made of said children's portions untill it be due to 
them unto my executors upon trust to educate and maintain them with necessarys 
suitable to their said portions. I direct my executors to convey such of my estates 
in Great Whelnetham, Staningfield and Hastead as remain unsold to my son 
Richard for his life, with remainder to his first son and the son of said son, and for 
want of such to the second son of said Richard in like manner, and soe to the third, 
fourth and every other son in like manner ; and for want of such to the daughters of 
said Richard and the children of said daughters in like manner as before ; and for 
want of such to my younger son John for his life and his sons and daughters as 
before ; and for want of such to my daughter Mary for her life with remainder to her 
sons and daughters as before ; and for want of such then to the right heirs of me 
said Sir Richard Gipps for ever. I give the perpetuall advowson of Brockley to my 
executors and their heirs upon trust onely to present my son John to be instituted 
and inducted when it shall become void, in case he shall be capable of being 
presented ; and if not, then upon trust to present such person as my eldest son and 
his heirs shall appoint. I appoint James Harvey esquire, Richard Gipps of Bury St. 
Edmunds gentleman, and Richard Babbage my executors ; to each of which I give 
;^5o for the discharge of the trust reposed in them. In witness whereof I have 
hereunto set my hand and seal this lo day of December, 1708. In the presence of 
us John Brundish, James Wyard, James Selley. 

Proved Feb. 19, 1708, by James Harvey, Richard Gipps and Richard Babbage, 
executors. 

P.C.C. 34 Lane. 



270 WHELNETHAM WILLS. 



No. 31. Richard Qipps of Bury St. Edmunds. June 1714. Feb. 1714-5. 

In the name of God Amen. I Richard Gipps of Bury St. Edmunds gent being 
of sound and perfect mind (tho' somewhat indisposed in body) do make this my last 
will and testament. First I resign my soul into the merciful! hands of Almighty 
God my Creator, hoping through the meritts of Jesus Christ my Saviour to obtain 
free pardon for all my sins. And my body I commit to the earth to be therein 
decently interred at the discretion of Mr. John Wright, And as to that worldly 
estate with which it has pleased Almighty God to bless me, I dispose thereof as 
follows : — Concerning all that my messuage with yards, gardens, limekiln etc. wherein 
I now dwell in Bury St. Edmunds, which I lately purchased of Mary Bland and 
Thomas Bland, and all that my reversion or remainder expectant upon the death of 
my mother in law Mrs. Isabella Talbot in that messuage and farm lands in 
Hockwould cum Wilton in co. of Norfolk, I give the same to Alice my loving wife 
for her life ; and after her decease to Richard Rackett my godson and his heires for 
ever. But if said Richard Rackett shall die without issue in my wife's lifetime, then 
said premises to go to Alice my wife and her heirs for ever. Concerning my lands 
etc. in Chevely and Ashley in co. Cambridge, I give them to my wife for her life, and 
after her decease to my brother William Gipps and Katherine and Jane his sisters 
and their heires equally among them as tenants in common and not as joynt tenants. 
But in case my wife marry again, my estate last mentioned to be given to her for life 
shall immediately after such marriage descend to said William, Katherine and Jane 
Gipps. Item I give unto Alice my wife my moyety or half part of the messuage etc. 
in Hogslane in Bury St. Edmunds, to her and her heires for ever. All the before- 
named estates are given her in lieu of dower. Item I give all freehold and copyhold 
messuages in Bridgham in co. Norfolk (immediately after my said mother in law her 
decease) unto Mrs. Mary Gipps, daughter of Sir Richard Gipps deceased, and to her 
heirs for ever. Item I give all my freehold and copyhold messuages in Cranwich in 
CO. Norfolk (on the death of my said mother in law) unto Ann Newman my 
goddaughter, daughter of Charles Newman of Bury St. Edmunds bellfounder 
deceased, and to her heirs for ever. Item I give unto my very good friend John 
Wright of Bury St. Edmunds gent all that my manor and lordship of Gunvilles in 
Wymondham, co. Norfolk, to him and his heires for ever, he paying all my funeral 
expences. And I earnestly desire said Mr. Wright to be aiding and assisting to my 
executrix in the performance of this my will. And I hereby nominate Alice my wife 



WHELNETHAM WILLS. 271 

to be sole executrix of this my last will and testament, to whom I give all my 
personal estate whatsoever. 
Dated 28 June, 17 14. 
Witnesses : Robert Manning, Robert Heath, Joshua Grigby jun. 

Proved 10 Feb. 17 14 by Alice Gipps the executrix. 
Bury St. Edmunds. 

Goodwin V. fo. 524. 

No. 32. John Brundish, rector of Great Whelnetham. June, August, 1724. 

Li the name of God Amen. I John Brundish of Great Whehietham clerk, being 
ot sound mind and memory, for which I give hearty thanks to Almighty God, doe 
make and ordaine this ye remainder of my last will and testament. First I surrender 
my soul unto Almighty God who gave it, and my body to be decently buried in ye 
churchyard of Great Whelnetham, and as to that porcion of worldly goods which it 
hath pleased God to intrust me with I dispose thereof as follows:^! do hereby 
ratifye and confirme that part of my will which I have already made in writing at the 
time of my son John's marriage. Touching that part of my estate in or near Great 
Whelnetham only, I doe hereby will that instead of ye sume of ;!^4oo which John my 
son is to pay to my executors out of my Whelnetham estate within 3 months after 
my decease, he shall pay within i month after my decease ;^r5o and no more, and 
that my said estate at my decease shall be discharged of all ye residue of said sum 
of ;^40o I give to Benjamin Brundish my youngest son and his heirs my messuage, 
farm lands etc. in Felsham, Thorpe Morieux and Cockfield now in the tenure of 
John Pawsey or his assigns, on condition that said Benjamin pay my executors ;^2 5o, 
and that he pay out of the rents of said estate ;i^24 a year to Elizabeth my beloved 
wife for the term of her naturall life at four equal quarterly payments clear of all 
deductions. And further that he pay out of said estate to Elizabeth, Mary and 
Constantia my daughters p^ioo a piece within a month after my wife's decease. I 
give to my son Thomas Brundish and his heirs all my share of the estate both real and 
personall given to me by ye last will and testament of Benjamin Brundish my brother 
deceased. I give to my said three daughters, Elizabeth, Mary and Constantiaj ^200 
a piece to be paid them by my executors within a month after my decease. I give 
to Anne my daughter ;^2io to be paid by my executors within a month after my 
decease. I give all my household linnen to be equally parted between my four 
daughters, and I give to said John and Benjamin my sons my library and wearing 



272 WHELNETHAM WILLS. 

apparell. I appoint Elizabeth my beloved wife and Thomas my son executors of 
this my will, and I give said Thomas ;!{^2o for his care and trouble in the execution 
thereof. And I will that ye sumes of ^150 and ;^25o to be paid to my executors 
by John and Benjamin my sons together with all my goods, chattells and personall 
estate (not herein particularly bequeathed) be applyed towards ye payment of all my 
just debts, ye legacys hereby given, my funerall charges, ye charge of proving this 
will and all other charges incidental to ye execution thereof. And I revoke all former 
wills, ordaining this and ye aforesaid former part of my will to be the whole of my 
last will and testament. In testimony whereof I have hereto set my hand and seal 
this 21 June, 1724. 

Witnesses : William Webb, Edmund Howard, Abram Wetherell. 

Proved 3 August, 1724, at Whelnetham by Elizabeth and Thomas, the executors. 

Norwich, Reg. 1724, fo. 152. 






WHELNETHAM FINES. a73 



Feet of Fines, 

(Or Pedes Finium). 



Amongst the enormous quantity of records now safely housed in the Public 
Record Office is the series of Feet of Fines or Pedes Finium, running in unbroken 
succession from the reign of Henry II. c. iiSo to 1834. They show the final part 
of the proceedings whereby property was sometimes conveyed from one person to 
another. There was a fictitious suit and then an agreement. The would be purchaser 
sued the vendor for wrongfully keeping him out of possession. The vendor there- 
upon acknowledged it to belong to the purchaser, and guaranteed it to him and his 
heirs against all men for ever and ever. And in return the purchaser performed his 
part. The complainants in this suit are generally called quaerentes or petentes ; the 
defendants are generally called tenentes, deforcientes or impedientes. 

When they had come to an agreement the particulars of it were entered three 
times upon a tripartite indenture. When this was divided in three, the two parties 
each took one of the three parts, and the third part remained with the Court. The 
agreement began with these words : Haec est finalis concordia : t. e. This is the final 
agreement. From the word finalis it got to be called a fine. And as the part which 
remained with the Court was written on the undivided indenture crossways at the 
foot of the other two parts, it was called the foot of the fine. I presume that the two 
upper parts of the tripartite indentures, which were carried off by the two parties in 
each suit, have for the most part perished. But the third parts, the feet or pedes, 
which remained in the possession of the Court, have been preserved in unbroken 
succession for seven hundred years. This way of conveying land was abolished 
in 1834. 

The agreements or fines are delightfully short and simple, though of course in 
Latin. This, they say, is the final agreement made in the King's Court on such a 
day between A. B. and C. D. concerning such and such a manor or messuage or 



274 WHELNETHAM FINES. 



advowson. C. B. acknowledges it to belong to A. B. and guarantees it to him 
against all men. And in return A. B. gives C. D. whatever the price is. 

The agreements were made in the Court of Common Pleas, which was at one 
time a part of the King's Court, moving about with the king. But a clause in Magna 
Charta enacted that the Court of Common Pleas should not follow the king, but be 
held in one certain place. So it was established at Westminster. But it will be 
noticed that two of the fines which I print were not made at Westminster but at 
Cattishall, in the parish of Great Barton, just outside the Bury boundary, where a 
farmhouse on the site still keeps up the name. They would have been made before 
the judges in eyre. 

In 1900 the Suffolk Archseological Institute printed a Calendar of the Feet of 
Fines for Suffolk from 1189 to 1485. This makes it easy for one to find out what 
fines there are relating to particular persons and places in the county ; and then one 
only has to get a transcript made from the original document. I have chosen for 
transcription a few which seemed to promise information about the people and place 
with whom and with which this volume is concerned. Those transcripts have been 
made for me by Mr. J. J. Muskett. I have translated them and left out a few 
needless statements. But being short already there was no need or chance to shorten 
them much more. The numbers and headings of each fine are of my giving. No 
month nor anno domini is given in the originals. 

No. 1. January 14, 1258.— 42 Henry III. 

This is the final agreement made in the King's Court at Katteshdl on the 
morrow of St. Hillary in the 42 year of King Henry, son of King John, before 
Gilbert de Preston [etc.] : between Robert son of Walter de Meleford querent and 
Cristiana daughter of Walter de Welnetham impediens ; concerning one messuage, 
40 acres of arable land, 5 acres of wood and 4 acres of meadow, with belongings, in 
Great Welnetham. 

Cristiana acknowledged said holdings to be the right of Robert as being those 
which Robert has of her gift. 

And Robert in return for this acknowledgment has granted to Cristiana said 
holdings to have and to hold of him and his heirs for her life, doing all the services 
which belong to them. And Robert and his heirs guarantee to her for her whole life 



WHELNETHAM FINES. 275 

said holdings and services against all men. And after the death of Cristiana said 
holdings shall revert to Robert and his heirs, to be held of the chief lord of that fee 
for ever by the services which belong to the holdings. 

No. 2. Sept. 15, 1269.— 53 Henry III. 

This is the final agreement made in the King's Court at Catteshull on the 
morrow of the exaltation of the holy cross in the 53 year of King Henry, son of 
King John : between Nicholas Bret petens and William de la Chambere and Isabella 
his wife tenens : concerning one messuage, 50 acres of arable land, 4 acres of 
meadow and 4 acres of wood with belongings in Great Welnetham. 

Nicholas acknowledged said lands to be the right of William and Isabella, and 
for himself and his heirs he renounced his claim to them to said William and Isabella 
and the heirs of Isabella for ever. 

And in return William and Isabella have given to Nicholas one goshawk a year 
old (austircum sorum). 

No. 3. Sept. 15, 1269.— 53 Henry HI. 

This is the final agreement made in the King's Court at Catteshull on the 
morrow of the exaltation of the holy cross in the 53 year of King Henry, son of King 
John : between Nicholas le Bret petens and Robert de Royning and Alice his wife, 
whom Richard Fresel summons for a guarantee, and who guarantee to him in the 
same court : concerning one messuage and 2 acres of arable land in Great 
Welnetham. 

Nicholas acknowledged said messuage and land to be the right of Robert and 
Alice, and for himself and his heirs he renounced his claim to them to Robert and 
Alice and the heirs of Alice for ever. 

And in return Robert and Alice have given to Nicholas one sparrow hawk a 
year old (spervarium sorum). 

[In dorso.] William son and heir of Henry de Neketon puts in his claim. 

No. 4. July 1, 1277.— 5 Edward I. 

This is the final agreement made in the King's Court at Westminster on the 
octave of St. John the Baptist in the 5 year of King Edward, son of King Henry : 



276 WHELNETHAM FINES. 

between Thomas Welond querent and Master William of Little Welnetham 
deforciant: concerning one messuage, 41 acres of arable land, one acre of meadow, 
5 acres of pasture, 4 acres of wood and 4 shillings rent with belongings in Little 
Welnetham. 

William acknowledged that said holdings were the right of Thomas ; and in 
return Thomas granted to William and Matilda his sister all said holdings to be held 
of said Thomas and his heirs for the whole life of both William and Matilda : paying 
therefrom yearly one penny at the feast of St. Michael, and doing to the chief lords 
of those fees for said Thomas and his heirs all other services which belong thereto. 
And Thomas and his heirs guarantee to William and Matilda all said holdings and 
services against all men for the whole life of each of them ; and after the death of 
both of them all said holdings shall revert to Thomas for the whole of his life. And 
if it should happen that William son of said Thomas should survive said Thomas, then 
said holdings shall remain to William and the heirs of his body, to be held of the 
right heirs of said Thomas for ever. And if it should happen that William should die 
without heirs of his body, then all the holdings shall revert to the right heirs of said 
Thomas to be held of the chief lords for ever. 

No. 5. Feb. 17, 1278.— 6 Edward I. 

This is the final agreement made in the King's Court at Westminster at 15 days 
from the day of the Purification of the Blessed Mary in the 6 year of King Edward, 
son of King Henry : between Thomas Welond querent and Robert de Bradfeld and 
Agnes his wife deforciant : concerning the advowson of the church of Little 
Whelnetham. 

Robert and Agnes acknowledge that said advowson is the right of Thomas, and 
for themselves and the heirs of Robert they renounce claim to it to Thomas and his 
heirs for ever. 

And in return Thomas grants to Robert and Agnes 12 acres of arable land and 
2 acres of meadow in the same town which lie in the field called le Ho, to be held 
by Robert and Agnes and the heirs of Robert of Thomas and his heirs for ever. 
And Thomas and his heirs guarantee said holding to ihem against all men. 

And this agreement was made in the presence of Alexander of Whelnetham, 
who agreed thereto (concedente), and who remitted for himself and his heirs to 
Thomas and his heirs the whole right and claim which he had in said advowson, 



WHET.NETHAM FINES. 277 

No. 6. Easter 1282.— 10 Edward I. 

This is the final agreement made in the King's Court at Westminster at 15 days 
from Easter day in the 10 year of King Edward, son of King Henry : between 
Thomas Welond and WilHam his son querents and Thomas de Cayly, Simon his 
brother and Johanna who was the wife of Alexander de Whelnetham deforcients : 
concerning two parts of the manor of Little Thelnetham [sic]. 

Thomas de Cayly, Simon and Johanna acknowledged said two parts together 
with the advowson of the church of that town to be the right of said William, to be 
held to said Thomas and William and the heirs begotten by said William of the chief 
lords of that fee by the services which belong to those two parts for ever. And 
moreover Thomas de Cayly granted for himself and his heirs that the third part of said 
manor, which Alice who was the wife of Philip of Whelnetham held as dower of said 
Thomas de Cayley by purchase of said Thomas de Cayly on the day on which this 
agreement was made, and which after the death of said Alice was due to return to 
said Thomas and his heirs, should wholly remain to Thomas Welond and William 
and the heirs of William, to be held together with said two parts which remain to 
them by this fine. And if it should happen that William should die without heir 
begotten of him, then said manor and advowson after the death of said Thomas 
Welond and Alice shall wholly remain to John Welond, brother of said William, and 
his heirs. And Thomas de Cayly, Simon and Johanna for themselves and their 
heirs have renounced for ever to Thomas Welond and William and John and the 
heirs of William and John all the right and claim which they had in said manor or in 
the yearly rent of six marks which they had been accustomed to receive at the hands 
of Thomas Welond on account of said manor. 

And in return for all this Thomas Welond and William have given to Thomas 
de Caly, Simon and Johanna six score marks of silver. 

No. 7. Day after the Ascension, 1282.— 10 Edward I. 

This is the final agreement made in the King's Court at Westminster on the 
morrow of the Ascension in the 10 year of King Edward, son of King Henry: 
between Thomas Welond petens and Robert, son of Philip, and Alice* who was the 
wife of Philip of Little Thelnetham [sic] deforcients : concerning one messuage, 45 

* In the Calendar of Suffolk Fines printed by the Suffolk Arch. Inst., Sibilla has here been 
wrongly printed for Alicia at p. 82. 



278 WHELNETHAM FINES. 



acres of arable land, 5 acres of wood, 2 acres of meadow and 12 pence rent 
(denarratis) in Little Thelnetham : which land and holdings said Alice holds as 
dower of said Thomas by the assignment of Alexander, son and heir of said 
Philip. 

Robert acknowledged said holdings to be the right of said Thomas, and for 
himself and his heirs he renounced claim to them to Thomas and his heirs for 
ever. 

And in return Thomas gave to Robert one sparrow hawk of the first year 
(spervarium sorum). 

And be it known that if Robert and Alice or the heirs of Robert henceforth 
bring forward any deeds or muniments concerning said holdings, they shall be held 
as nought. 

No. 8. Octaves of the Trinity, 1292.— 20 Edward I. 

This is the final agreement made in the King's Court at Westminster within the 
octaves of the Holy Trinity in the 20 year of King Edward, son of King Henry : 
between Gilbert de la Haye and Isabel his wife querents and Robert de Rothynges 
and Alice his wife deforcients : concerning 6 messuages, 330 acres of arable land, y^ 
acres of meadow, 61^ acres of pasture, 4 acres and i rood of wood, 17 shillings and 
2 pence rent, in Great Welnetham, Little Welnetham, Little Bradefeld, Haustede, 
Newton [Nowton] next the town of St. Edmund, Gaysle, Nedham, Hegham, 
Kenteford, Muleton [MoultonJ, Bernham next Thefford, Tumpston, Easton, 
Alpheton, Meleford and the town of St. Edmund. 

Robert and Alice acknowledged said holdings to be the right of said Isabel, and 
for themselves and the heirs of Alice they renounced their claim to Gilbert and 
Isabella and the heirs of Isabella for ever. 

And in return Gilbert and Isabella for themselves and the heirs of Isabella have 
renounced for ever to Robert and Alice and the heirs of Alice all the right and claim 
which on the day when this agreement was made they had in one messuage, 200 
acres of arable land, one mill, 3 acres of meadow, and 14 shillings rent with 
belongings in Ryshebrok, Great Welnetham, Bradefeld Monachorum, Rugham, 
Haustede and the town of St. Edmund. 



WHELNETHAM FINES. 279 

No. 9. January 21, 1295.— 23 Edward I. 

This is the final agreement made in the King's Court at Westminster on the 
octave of St. Hillary in the 23 year of King Edward, son of King Henry : between 
Richard son of Salomon of St. Edmund and Isabel his wife querents, and Henry de 
Bernardiston and Amicia his wife impedients : concerning one messuage, 30 acres of 
arable land, 3 acres of wood, 2^ acres of pasture, and the half of one acre (medietatera 
unuis acre) of meadow with belongings in Great Whelnetham, Little Whelnetham, 
Ressebrok and Bradefeld. 

Henry and Amicia acknowledge said holdings to be the right of Richard as 
being those which Richard and Isabel held of the gift of Henry and Amicia. And 
moreover Henry and Amicia have granted for themselves and the heirs of Amicia 
that they will guarantee to Richard and Isabel and the heirs of Richard said holdings 
against all men for ever. 

And in return Richard and Isabella have given to Henry and Amicia 20 marks 
of silver. 

No. 10. June 25, 1295.— 23 Edward I. 

This is the final agreement made in the King's Court at Westminster on the 
morrow of St. John the Baptist in the 23 year of King Edward, son of King Henry : 
between Richard son of Salomon of St. Edmund and Isabel his wife querents, and 
Thomas de Depeden and Beatrice his wife impedients ; concerning 20 acres of arable 
land, 3 acres of wood, and a half part of one acre of meadow with belongings in 
Great Whelnetham, Little Whelnetham and Rysshebrok. 

Thomas and Beatrice acknowledged said holdings to be the right of Richard as 
being those which Richard and Isabel held of the gift of Thomas and Beatrice. 
And moreover they granted for themselves and the heirs of Beatrice that they would 
guarantee to Richard and Isabella and the heirs of Richard said holdings against all 
men for ever. 

And in return Richard and Isabella have given to Thomas and Beatrice 20 
marks of silver. 

No. 11. Octaves of the Trinity, 1302.— 30 Edward I. 

This is the final agreement made in the King's Court at York on the octave of 
the holy Trinity in the 30 year of King Edward, son of King Henry : between 
Edmund de Ho and John son of Edmund de Whelnetham, querents, and Simon de 



280 WHELNETHAM FINES. 

Ho and Matilda his wife impedients : concerning one messuage, 58 acres of arable 
land, 4 acres of meadow, 4I acres of pasture, 18 pence (denaratis) rent, with 
belongings, in Stanefeld, Lausele, Resshebrok and Little Whelnetham. 

Simon acknowledged said holdings to be the right of said John, as being those 
which Edmund and John hold of the gift of Simon. 

And in return Edmund and John have granted said holdings to Simon and 
Matilda and to the right heirs of Simon, to be held of the chief lords of that fee for 
ever. 

No. 12. February, 1309.— 2 Edward II. 

This is the final agreement made in the King's Court at Westminster within the 
octaves of the Purification of the Blessed Mary in the second year of King Edward, 
son of King Edward ; between John de Weyland and Mary his wife, querents, and 
Henry de Stonham and Sarra his wife, deforcients : concerning one messuage and 
26 acres of arable land in Little Welnetham and Ryshbrok. 

Henry and Sarah acknowledge said holdings to be the right of John, as being 
those which said John and Mary hold of the gift of Henry and Sarra, to be held by 
John and Mary and the heirs of said John for ever. And Henry and Sarra have 
granted for themselves and for the heirs of Sarra that they will guarantee to John 
and Mary and to the heirs of John all said holdings against all men for ever. 

And in return John and Mary have given to Henry and Sarra 20 marks of 
silver. 

No. 13. Michaelmas, 1311.— 5 Edward II. 

[0/ie end of this document is torn Ojff; so that from 2> ^0 6 ivords at the beginning 
of each line are gone. But there does not seem to be much doubt or difficulty in 
supply ifig them. I have put the supplied words in square brackets, i.e. the English 
equivalent of the supplied Latin words. Ed.'\ 

[This is the final] agreement made in the King's Court at Westminster at 15 
days from Michaelmas day in the 5 year of [King Edward] son of King Edward : 
[between] John de Whelnitham and Alice his wife querents and Geoffrey de 
Ketelesberston [chaplain and Nicholas] de Whelnitham deforcients : concerning the 
manor of Alfeton with belongings. 



WHELNETHAM FINES. 281 



John and Alice acknowledge said manor [to be the right of said Geoffrey] as 
being that which said Geoffrey and Nicholas hold of the gift of said John [and 
Alice.] 

[And in return] said Geoffrey and Nicholas have granted [said manor] to John 
and Alice and have given it up to them at this same Court, to be held to said John 
and [Alice and the heirs] begotten by John of Alice for ever of the chief lords of that 
fee by the [services which belong] to that manor. And if it should happen that said 
John should die without [heirs] begotten of said Alice, then after the death of John 
and Alice said manor shall wholly [remain to the right] heirs of Alice to be held of 
the chief lords of that fee for ever by the services [which belong to the manor]. 

No. 14. Michaelmas, 1311.— 5 Edward II. 

This is the final agreement made in the King's Court at Westminster at 15 days 
from Michaelmas day in the 5 year of King Edward, son of King Edward : between 
John de Whelnitham and Alice his wife querents, and Geoffrey de Ketelberston 
chaplain and Nicholas de Whelnitham deforcients : concerning two parts of the 
manor of Great Whelnitham with belongings. 

John acknowledged said two parts to be the right of Geoffrey as being those 
which Geoffrey and Nicholas hold of the gift of John, 

And in return Geoffrey and Nicholas have granted said two parts to John and 
Alice, to be held to John and Alice and the heirs begotten by John of Alice of the 
chief lords of that fee. And should it happen that said John should die without heir 
begotten of Alice, then after the death of John and Alice said two parts shall wholly 
remain to the right heirs of John, to be held of the chief lords of that fee for ever by 
the services which belong to said two parts. 

In dorso. Robert de Welwytham and Nicholas his brother put in their claim. 

No. 15. Michaelmas, 1329.— 3 Edward III. 

This is the final agreement made in the King's Court at Westminster within the 
octaves of St. Michael in the third year of King Edward the third from the conquest : 
between John son of Robert de Bradefeld jun. and Matilda his wife, querents, and 
Edmund Saxi de Stanefeld and Elena his wife deforcients : concerning one messuage, 
80 acres of arable land, 4 acres of meadow and 16 acres of pasture with belongings 
in Brands Bradfeld, Great Whelnetham and Little Whelnetham. 



282 WHELNETHAM FINES. 



John acknowledged said holdings to be the right of Edmund. 

And in return Edmund and Elena have granted said holdings to John and 
Matilda. And if it should happen that said John should die without heir begotten 
of his body, then after the deaths of John and Matilda said tenements shall wholly 
remain to Geoffrey of Ely and his heirs for ever. 

No. 16. Easter tide, 1332.— 6 Edward III. 

This is the final agreement made in the King's Court at Westminster at one 
month from Easter day in the 6 year of King Edward the third from the conquest ; 
and afterwards on the morrow of St. John the Baptist in the same year there 
recorded : between John de Ingham and Amicia his wife, querents, through William 
de Boxstede placed in the place of said Amicia for the land of the lord king to be 
gained or lost, and John de Welnytham chivalier and Henry de Welnytham, 
deforcients : concerning one messuage, 388 acres and a half of arable land, 23 acres 
of meadow, ten acres of wood and 6 shillings and nine pence rent in Manston, 
Briokeleye, Lawsill, Wepstede and Great Welnytham, 

John de Ingham acknowledged said holdings to be the right of John de 
Welnytham, as being those which John and Henry hold of the gift of John de 
Ingham. 

And in return John de Welnytham and Henry have granted said holdings to 
John de Ingham and Amicia. And they have rendered them to them at the same 
Court to have and to hold to John and Amicia and the heirs of John for ever. 

No. 17. Michaelmas, 1337.-11 Edward III. 

This is the final agreement made in the King's Court at York at 15 days from 
Michaehnas day in the 11 year of King Edward the third from the conquest; and 
afterwards granted and recorded at Westminster at 15 days from the day of the holy 
Trinity in the 15 year ot the same king: between Michael de Bures querent and 
John de Whelnetham deforcient : concerning 3 messuages, 120 acres of arable land, 
6 acres of meadow, 8 acres of pasture, 4 acres of wood, 4 acres of alder grove (alneti) 
and 20 shillings rent with belongings in Ketelberston and Preston, which Henry de 
Whelnetham and Robert his brother hold for life. 

John acknowledged said holdings to be the right of Michael, and for himself 
and his heirs granted that said holdings which said Henry and Robert held for life of 



WHELNETHAM FINES. 283 

the inheritance of said John in said towns on the day when this agreement was made, 
and which after the death of Henry and Robert we re due to return to John and his 
heirs, should after the deaths of Henry and Robert wholly remain to Michael and his 
heirs for ever. And John and his heirs will guarantee said holdings to Michael and 
his heirs against all men for ever. 

And in return Michael gave to John loo marks of silver. 

No. 18. Michaelmas, 1364.— 38 Edward III. 

This is the final agreement made in the King's Court at Westminster at one 
month from St. Michael's day in the 38 year of King Edward the third from the 
conquest : between Michael de Bures querent and William de Walsham deforcient : 
concerning one messuage, 100 acres of arable land, 7 acres of meadow, 20 acres of 
pasture, 6 acres of wood and 20 shillings rent with belongings in Great and Little 
Whelnetham. 

William acknowledged said holdings to be the right of Michael, and rendered 
them to him at the same Court to have and to hold to Michael and his heirs of the 
chief lords of that fee by the services which belong to said holdings for ever. And 
William granted for himself and his heirs that they will guarantee said holdings to 
Michael and his heirs against all men for ever. 

And in return Michael gave to William 100 marks of silver. 

No. 19. Michaelmas, 1364.— 38 Edward 111. 

This is the final agreement made in the King's Court at Westminster at 3 weeks 
from St. Michael's day in the 38 year of King Edward the third from the conquest : 
between Michael de Bures querent and Walter de Shetyngton of London cotiller and 
Elizabeth his wife deforcients : concerning one messuage, 80 acres of arable land, 3 
acres of meadow, and 2 shillings rent with belongings in Great Whelnetham, Little 
Whelnetham, Risshebrok and Nouton. 

Walter and Elizabeth acknowledged said holdings to be the right of Michael, 
and for themselves and the heirs of Elizabeth they renounced claim to Michael and 
his heirs for ever. 

And in return Michael gave to Walter and Elizabeth 100 marks of silver. 



284 WHELNETHAM FINES. 



No. 20. Day after the Ascension, 1385.— 8 Richard II. 

This is the final agreement made in the King's Court at Westminster on the 
morrow of the Ascension of the T>ord in the 8 year of the reigns of Richard king of 
England and France : between John de Bures querent and John Straunge and 
Elizabeth his wife deforciants : concerning one messuage, loo acres of arable land, 7 
acres of meadow, 20 acres of pasture, 6 acres of wood and 20 shillings rent with 
belongings in Stanefeld, Haustede, Lausele, Great Whelnetham and Little 
Whelnetham. 

John Straunge and Elizabeth acknowledged said holdings to be the right of 
John de Bures, and for themselves and the heirs of Elizabeth they renounced their 
claim to John de Bures and his heirs for ever. And moreover they granted for 
themselves and the heirs of Elizabeth that they would guarantee said holdings to 
John de Bures and his heirs against all men for ever. 

And in return John de Bures gave to John Straunge and Elizabeth 100 marks 
of silver. 

No. 21. July 9, 1413.— 1 Henry V. 

This is the final agreement made in the King's Court at Westminster at 15 days 
from the day of St. John the Baptist in the first year of the reigns of Henry son of 
King Henry, king of England and France ; and afterwards on the octave of St. 
Michael in the same year there granted and recorded : between Clement Spice, 
William Sautre, Robert Gildesburgh, John Stretende clerk, Thomas Dale clerk, John 
Cosyn clerk, and Walter Boen, querents, and William Copto and Agnes his wife, 
deforcients : concerning two messuages, one toft, 280 acres of arable land, 18 acres 
of meadow, 40 acres of pasture, 5 acres of wood, and 10 shillings rent, in Great 
Whelnetham, Little Whelnetham, Bradfeld Combusta, Stanefeld, Neweton and 
Haustede. 

William Copto and Agnes acknowledged said holdings to be the right of said 
Robert, as being those which said Robert, Clemens, William Sautre, John, Thomas, 
John and Walter held of the gift of William Copto and Agnes. And for themselves 
and the heirs of William they renounced claim to said querents and to the heirs of 
Robert for ever. 

And in return said querents have given to said William Copto and Agnes 100 
marks of silver. 



WHELNETHAM FINES. 285 



No. 22. Easter tide, 1417.— 5 Henry V. 

This is the final agreement made in the King's Court at Westminster at three 
weeks from Easter day in the 5 year of the reigns of Henry son of King Henry, king 
of England and France : between William Rokewode sen., John Howard miles, 
William Clopton, Ralph Chambirlayne, John Notyngham, Giles atte Pirie and 
Geoffrey Salle, querents, and Thomas Garneys and Matilda his wife, deforcients : 
concerning three messuages called Walshames, Sydolemers and Carbonells with 
belongings in Rosshebroke, Stanfeld, Great Whelnetham, Little Whelnetham, 
Brendbradfeld and Noweton. 

Thomas and Matilda acknowledged said messuages to be the right of said 
William Rokewode, as being those which said William, John, William Clopton, 
Ralph, John, Giles and Geoffrey hold of the gift of Thomas and Matilda. And for 
themselves and the heirs of Matilda they renounced claim to said querents for ever. 

And in return said querents have given to Thomas and Matilda 30 marks of 
silver. 

No. 23. The Ascension, 1420.— 8 Henry V. 

This is the final agreement made in the King's Court at Westminster on the 
morrow of the Ascension of the Lord in the 8 year of the reigns of Henry son of 
King Henry, king of England and France ; and afterwards within the octaves of St. 
Michael in the 9 year of the same king granted and recorded there : between William 
Phelyp miles, Thomas Marny miles, Richard Waldegrave miles junior, William 
Berdewell miles, William Swynbourne, John Wodehous, Robert de Teye, John 
Lancastre, Richard Baynard, Guy Corbet, William Rokewode senior, John 
Rokewode, John Chetebere clerk, querents, and William Rokewode junior and 
Agnes his wife deforcients : concerning the manor of Great Whelnetham with 
belongings, 4 messuages, 380 acres of arable land, 24 acres of meadow, 20 acres of 
wood, 32 acres of pasture, and 49 shillings and 8 pence rent, in Great Whelnetham, 
Little Whelnetham, Brendbradefeld, Haustede, Stanefeld, Lausele, Nouton, Resshe- 
brook, Lavenham, Preston, Thorp Moryeuex, Myldynge, llleghe Monachorum, 
Illeghe Combusta, and Little Waldyngfeld, and the advowson of the church of 
Great Whelnetham. 

Said William Rokewode junior and Agnes acknowledged said manor, lands and 
advowson to be the right of said John Chetebere j of which said John and the other 



286 WHELNETHAM FINES. 

querents hold two parts of said manor, said messuages, 120 acres of arable land, 8 
acres of meadow, 4 acres of wood, 8 acres of pasture, 17 shillings rent and said 
advowson, in Great Whelnetham, Little Whelnethani, Brendbradefeld, Haustede, 
Stanefelde, Lausele, Nouton, Resshebrook, Lavenham, Preston, and Thorp Moryeuex 
of the gift of said William Rokewode junior and Agnes, to be held by said querents 
and the heirs of John Chetebere of the chief lords of that fee. 

And moreover William Rokewode junior and Agnes granted that the third part 
of the said manor, 260 acres of arable land, 16 acres of meadow, 16 acres of wood, 
24 acres of pasture, 32 shillings and 8 pence rent, in Great Whelnetham, Little 
Whelnetham, Lavenham, Preston, Thorpe Moryeuex, Myldinge, Illeghe Monachorum, 
Illeghe Combusta, and Little Waldyngfeld, which Thomas Berners and Matilda his 
wife held for said Matilda's life of the inheritance of said Agnes on the day whereon 
this agreement was made, and which after the death of said Matilda were due to 
return to said William Rokewode junior and Agnes, should wholly remain to said 
querents and to the heirs of said John Chetebere, to be held (together with said two 
parts, lands and advowson which remain to them by this fine) of the chief lords of 
that fee for ever. 

And in return said querents gave to said William Rokewode junior and Agnes 
200 marks of silver. 

No. 24. June 25, 1426.— 4 Henry VI. 

This is the final agreement made in the King's Court at Westminster on the 
morrow of St. John the Baptist in the 4 year of the reigns of Henry king of England 
and France the sixth from the conquest ; and afterwards within the octaves of St. 
Michael in the 7 year of the same king there granted and recorded : between 
Thomas Heigham, Robert Pope, Thomas Harewell, John Heigham, querents, and 
Edmund Bret de Cokefeld armiger deforcient : concerning the manor of Brettyshalle 
and the advowson of the church of Bradfeld Combusta, and 3 messuages, 10 tofts, 
600 acres of arable land, 40 acres of meadow, 200 acres of pasture, 80 acres of wood, 
and 40 shillings and 6 pence rent, with belongings, in Cokefeld, Herthest, Bradfeld 
Combusta, Bradfeld Seyncler, Bradfeld Monachorum, Great Whelnetham and Little 
Whelnetham. 

Edmund acknowledged said manor and holdings and advowson to be the right 
of said Thomas Heigham ; of which said querents hold said manor, 5 tofts, 380 acres 



WHELNETHAM FINES. 287 



of arable land, 30 acres of meadow, 100 acres of pasture, 66 acres of wood and said 
rent and advowson of the gift of said Edmund : and for himself and his heirs he 
renounced claim to said querents and to the heirs of Thomas Heigham for ever. 

And moreover said Edmund granted for himself and his heirs that 2 messuages, 
5 tofts, 200 acres of arable land, 10 acres of meadow, 100 acres of pasture, 14 acres 
of wood, in the towns of Bradfeld Seyncler and Cokefeld which Richard Sterefacre 
held for the term of his life and one year more, and that one messuage and 20 acres 
of arable land in the town of Bradfeld Seyncler which John Holgate held for a term 
of eleven years of the inheritance of said Edmund on the day whereon this agreement 
was made, and which after the death of said Richard and said terms were due to 
return to Edmund and his heirs, should then wholly remain to said querents and to 
the heirs of said Thomas Heigham : to be held with aforesaid manor and advowson 
of the chief lords of that fee by the services which belong to them for ever. And said 
Edmund and his heirs guarantee them to said querents and to the heirs of Thomas 
Heigham against all men for ever. 

And in return said querents gave to said Edmund 300 marks of silver. 

No. 25. Easter tide, 1430.— 8 Henry VI. 

This is the final agreement made in the King's Court at Westminster at one 
month from Easter day in the 8 year of the reigns of Henry King of England and 
France the sixth from the conquest : between John Verney clerk and William Lee 
querents and Richard Earl of Warwick and Isabella his wife deforcients : concerning 
the manors of Carleton, Middulton, Clopton, Sweynlond, Cokfyld, Fenhall and 
Welneiham with belongings. 

Said Earl and Isabella acknowledged said manors to be the right of said John, 
as being those which said John and William hold of the gift of the Earl and Isabella. 
And the Earl and Isabella guarantee said manors to John and William and the heirs 
of John against all men for ever. 

And in return John and William gave the Earl and Isabella 1000 pounds 
sterling (sterlingorum). 

No. 26. July 9, 1498.— 13 Henry VH. 

This is the final agreement made in the King's Court at Westminster at 15 days 
from the day of St. John the Baptist in the 13 year of the reigns of Henry king of 



288 WHELNETHAM FINES. 

England and France the seventh from the conquest; and afterwards within the 
octaves of St. Michael in the 14 year of the same king there granted and recorded : 
between Robert Sexten, Thomas Hogge clerk, Robert Craske clerk, querents, and 
John Audeley miles and Miriel his wife, deforcients : concerning the manor of Little 
Whelnetham with belongings, and 160 acres of arable land, 14 acres of meadow, 60 
acres of pasture, 40 acres of wood, 2 acres of marsh and 15 shillings rent, in Great 
Whelnetham, Little Whelnetham, Neuton, Brendbradfeld, Rosshebroke, Bradfeld 
Senkeler, Bradfeld Monachorum and Hausted. 

John and Miriei acknowledged said manor and holdings to be the right of said 
Robert Craske. And fur themselves and for the heirs of Miriel they renounced 
claim to said Robert, Thomas and Robert and the hens of said Robert Craske for 
ever. And moreover said John and Miriel for themselves and the heirs of Miriel 
guarantee to said Robert, Thomas and Robert and heirs of Robert Craske said 
manor and holdings against all men for ever. 

And in return Robert, Thomas and Robert gave to John and Miriel 200 pounds 
sterling (sterlingorum). 






INQUISITIONS POST MORTEM. 289 



INQUISITIONS Post Mortem, 



Under this heading I print some of the inquiries that were held after the death 
of a tenant in chief {i.e. one who held direct of the king to whom all land belonged) 
or other landowner. For each county there was an official called the king's 
escheator. On the death of a landowner he received a writ telling him to call a local 
jury, through whom these questions had to be answered. 

1. What lands did the deceased hold. 

2. By what services or rents were those lands held, and of whom. 

3. Who was his next heir and how old was that heir. 

The findings of the jury were written on rolls and sent up to London. They are 
known as Inquisitiones post mortem. Thousands of them, from about the year 
1220 to 1644, when the feudal system ceased and inquisitions of this sort were no 
longer held, are preserved in the Public Record Office. If a man had lands in two 
or more counties, a separate jury was called and a separate inquisition held for each 
county. The object of them was to find out the death duties. 

These inquisitions are sometimes very long and I do not print them in full. I 
give so much as concerns this volume. The originals are in Latin. The headings 
are mine. The original description "who was the wife of" is generally understood 
to mean " widow of." But in the case of Alice de Sutton, No. 7, her husband was 
still alive. 

No. 1. John de Weyland. Inquiry held December, 1312. 

/ take it that the manor named herein is that of Whelnetham Farva, though 
it is not so specified. 

Inquisition taken at Blaxhale in the County of Suffolk before the King's 
escheator on Saturday next after the Feast of St. Andrew the Apostle in the 6 year of 
King Edward son of King Edward by the oath of jurors. Who say on their oaths 



290 INQUISITIONS POST MORTEM. 



that John de Weylound on the day he died held [inter alia] the manors of Onhous 
and Whelwitham of the Abbot of St. Edmund by the service of a quarter of one 
knight's fee and 2 shillings a year, and they are worth yearly 10 marks. Also they 
say that Richard de Weylaund is the son of said John and is his next heir, and is 
past 22 years of age. In testimony of which said jury have affixed their seals. 

No. 2. John Carbonel. Inquiry held Aug. 30, 1333. 

The writ for holding the inquisition 7ms dated May 28, a lo7ig time i?tferve?iing 
between the writ and the ifiquisition. Another inquisition was held for what he had 
in Essex, viz. a messuage and rent in Misteley, 7vhich I have not had transcribed. 

Inquisition held before John de Blommell, escheator of the king, at Beccles in 
the county of Sufiblk on August 30 in the 7 year of Edward the third from the 
Conquest by the oaths of jurors. Who say that John Carbonel deceased held on the 
day he died no lands nor tenements in Suffolk in his demesne of the king in chief. 
But on the day he died he held the manor of Great Waldingfeld of the Earl of 
Oxford by the service of one knight's fee, and it is worth yearly ;^2o. Also he then 
held the manor of Chilton of Roger de Huntingfeld by the service of one knight's 
fee, and it is worth yearly 100 shillings. Also he then held the manor of Newton 
juxta Sudbury of Eleanor who was the wife of Guy Ferre by the service of half a 
knight's fee, and it is worth yearly 12 marks. Also he then held certain tenements 
called Grenecroft, Poppesmede and Gordland in the towns of Waldingfeld and 
Aketon of Andrew de Bures as of the manor of Aketon by the service of 20 shillings 
a year. Also he then held in the towns of Great Welnetham and Stanefeld one 
messuage and 60 acres of the Abbot of St. Edmund and of John de Wheiwetham by 
the service of 2 shillings and one quarter of oats, and it is worth yearly 20 shillings. 
And they say that Alice daughter of said John is his next heir and is past 10 years of 
age, and is in the custody of the Earl of Oxford. In testimony whereof said jury 
have set to their seals. 

No. 3. Elizabeth widow of John de Brokesborne. Inquiry held Aug. 30, 1326. 

Being a widow she tnust be the mother or steptnother of John de Brokesbortie 
who follows her. 

Inquisition taken at Waldyngefeld Magna, co. Suffolk, on 30 August, in the 20 
year of Edward the second by the oath of the jurors. Who say that Elizabeth who 



INQUISITIONS POST MORTEM. 291 

was the wife of John de Brokesbourne held of the Earl of Oxford for her life the 
manor of Waldyngfeld Magna of the inheritance of John son and heir of Thomas 
Carbonell. She also held of Robert de Gore 13 acres of arable land in the town of 
Aketon of the said inheritance. And the jurors say that John son and heir of said 
Thomas Carbonell is the next heir of said holdings and is 16 years of age. 



No. 4. John de Brokesburn. Inquiry held 20 Nov., 1342. 

Inquisition taken at Maintre, co. Essex, on 20 November in the 16 year of 
Edward III by the oath of the jurors. Who say that John de Brokesburn held no 
lands of the king or others, but on the day he died he held jointly with Margery his 
wife who is still living the manor of Bradefeld and tenements in the towns of 
Kyrkebi and Walton by gift and grant of Richard de Hastinge clerk, John vicar of 
the church of Rameseye, and Henry de Welnitham, by fine thereof levied. He also 
held for his life by gift and grant of said Richard, John and Henry by fine thereof 
levied tenements in Misteleye, with remainder to William and Nicholas his sons. 
The jurors say that Robert de Brokesbourn, son of said John, is his next heir of the 
blood and he is past 30 years of age. 



No. 5. Edward le Despencer. Inquiry held January, 1376. 

Inquisition taken at Ipswich before John de Rokewood, escheator of the king 
in Suffolk, on Thursday day next after the feast of the Circumcision in the 49 year 
of Edward the third after the Conquest, by virtue of the king's writ, by the oath of 
the jurors. Who say on their oath that Edward le Despencer chivaler deceased did 
not hold any lands or tenements in his demesne as de feodo in said county on the 
day he died, but he then held by right of Elizabeth his wife who is still living the 
manor of Welnetham parva with the advowson of the church, and the manors of 
Blaxhale [etc.]. And said manor of Welnetham parva with the advowson of said 
church is held of the Abbot of St. Edmund by military service, and is worth yearly 
5 marks. And said manor of Blaxsale is held of the Prior of Buttele, the Prioress of 
Campesseye and William de Kerdeston chivaler by military service, and is worth 
yearly 20 marks. And Thomas, son of said Edward and Elizabeth, is their next heir 
and is past 2 years of age. In testimony whereof [etc.] 



292 INQUISITIONS POST MORTEM. 

No. 6. Margery, widow of Sir John de Sutton. Inquiry held Sept., 1384. 

She was the daughter of Sir John de Whehietham. Her two previous hisbands 
had been John de Brokeshourne, No. 4, and John de Cockfield. There zvas a separate 
inquisition held for each county, Essex and Sufolk. 

ESSEX. —Inquisition taken at Colchester before Henry Helyoun, escheator of 
the king in the county of Essex, on the Saturday next after the feast of St. Mathew 
in the 8 year of Richard the second after the conquest by the oath of Simon 
Badele, John Hardyng, Thomas atte Grene, Richard Buxston, John de Burgh, . . . , 
John Lech, John Crall, WilHam persoun, WiUiam Damyoun, Richard Rande and 
John Beneyt, jurors. 

Who say on their oath that Margery who was the wife of John [Sutton] miles 
held no lands or tenements in her demesne of the king in chief on the day on which 
she died. But they say that she then held the manor of Bradefeld in co. of Essex 
jointly with John Brokesbourn miles lately her husband deceased, to herself and the 
heirs of said John Brokesbourn, of the heirs of Hubert de Ruly miles by the service 
of half a knight's fee : and that said manor is worth yearly ;^io. 

And that on the day she died she held of the heirs of Hugh de Blount miles by 
the service of half a knight's fee the manor of Tendrynghall, and a certain tenement 
in said town of Tendryngg called Gemouns, as dower from the endowment of John 
de Sutton miles her husband, the reversion thereof belonging to John de Sutton 
miles, son and heir of said John de Sutton miles : and that said manor of 
Tendrynghale is worth yearly 100 shillings ; and that said tenement called Gemouns 
is worth yearly 20 shilhngs. 

And they say that she did not hold any other lands or tenements in her 
demesne of the king or of any others in the co. of Essex on the day she died : and 
that she died on Tuesday next after the feast of St. Peter ad Vincula last past, and 
that Edmund de Brokesbourn is the next heir of said John and Margery and is over 
45 years of age. 

SUFFOLK. — Inquisition taken at Stretford in the county of Suffolk before 
William Cursun de Byllyngford, escheator of the king in said county, on September 
10 in the 8 year of Richard the second after the Conquest by the oaths of John 
Tynte, Robert Whyte, Walter Cosyn, Thomas Florote, John Florote senior, Henry 
Quardon, Ad : Taillor, Andrew Baker, John Cristemas, John atte Hil, John Kebbyl 
and Robert Sebrich, jurors. 



INQUISITIONS POST MORTEM. 293 

Who say on their oath that Margery, who was the wife of John de Sutton miles, 
now dead, on the day she died held of the king in chief four messuages, 7o| acres of 
arable land, 19 acres and 3 roods of meadow, 52 acres and i rood of pasture, and 17 
shillings and 3 pence and one halfpenny rent in Estbergholt jointly with John de 
Sutton miles lately her husband deceased, to herself and the heirs of said John : and 
they say that said messuages, lands and rents are held of the king in chief in socage 
by the service of 20 shillings to be paid yearly to the king and his heirs by the hands 
of the sheriff of Suffolk in equal portions at the terms of Easter and St. Michael the 
archangel for all services rendered called Blauncheferme. 

And said messuages are worth nothing ultra reprise. And said arable land is 
worth yearly iis. .. gd. at 2d. per acre: and said meadow is worth yearly 35s. .. 6d. 
at 2S. per acre : and said pasture is worth yearly 52s. .. 3d. at i2d. per acre. And 
there is there one pigeon house which is worth yearly 40 pence ultra reprisa : Also 
there is there a certain fishery which is worth yearly 2 shillings : which pigeon 
house and fishery are held of the king by said service. 

And they say that on the day she died she held a half of the manor of 
Estbergholt called Oldehalle to herself and said John late her husband deceased and 
the heirs of said John : in which half is one messuage, 88 acres of arable land, 24 
acres of meadow, 52 acres of wood, 5 acres of pasture, and 65s. .. 8^d. of rent of 
assize to be paid at the feasts of St. Andrew the apostle. Easier, the Nativity of St. 
John the Baptist, and St. Michael the archangel, in equal porcions. Also there are 
there 8J days work for mowing the meadows, 82 days work in the autumn ; also 17 
days work for carrying corn in the autumn. Also there is there a certain leet to be 
held at the feast of St. Barnaby the apostle. Also there is there one fullers water 
mill. Which half of said manor together with the other half is held of the Countess 
of Warwyk by the service of one pair of gilt spurs worth 6d. 

And they say that said messuage is worth nothing yearly ultra reprisa ; and that 
said arable land is worth yearly 14s. at 2d. per acre ; and that said meadow is worth 
yearly 48s. at 2s. per acre ; and that said wood can be cut each seventh year and is 
then worth 3s. per acre, and so at the season yearly 7^ acres ; and that said pasture 
is worth yearly 2s. .. 6d. at 6d. per acre ; and that said days works for mowing the 
meadows are worth yearly 2s. .. id. at 3d. per days work : and that said autumn 
works are worth yearly 6s. .. lod. at id. each work; and that said works for carrying 
corn are worth yearly 2s. .. lod. ultra reprisa capienda de domino at 3d. each work ; 
and that said leet is worth yearly 4od. ultra reprisa iO;,<, suit, and perquis : cur: is 



294 INQUISITIONS POST MORTEM. 

worth yearly 3s. .. 4d. ultra reprisa, and said mill is worth yearly 20s. and no more 
ultra reprisa. 

Also said Margery held in the said town of Stratford one messuage, 77 acres of 
arable land. Also she held 7 acres of meadow, 5 acres of pasture and 14s. .. 8d. rent 
of assize to be paid at the four usual terms, and 2 hens of rent to be paid at the feast 
of the Nativity of the Lord. And there are there 15 days of autumn work for the 
lord's food. And they say that said messuage, lands and rent are held of Gilbert of 
Dabynham by the service of 3d. yearly ; and said messuage is worth nothing ultra 
reprise, and said arable land is worth yearly 12s. .. lod. at 2d. per acre, and said 
meadow is worth yearly 14s. at 2s. per acre, and said pasture is worth yearly 4s. .. 2d. 
at lod. per acre, and said autumn works are worth yearly ultra reprisa i5d. at id. 
per work and said hens are worth yearly 2d. at id, per hen. 

And they say that John son of said John de Sutton miles is the next heir of said 
John de Sutton miles and is over 50 years of age. 

Also they say that on the day she died she held the manor of Alpheton to herself 
and the heirs from her body proceeding in fee talliato, and it is held of the abbot of 
St. Edmund by military service, and is worth yearly ;!^2o, and Edmund de 
Brokesborn, son of said Margery, is her next heir and is over 40 years of age. 

Also that said Margery held the manor of Cokefeld in said county jointly with 
John de Cokefeld late her husband deceased to herself and the heirs of said John de 
Cokefeld, which manor is held of the abbot of St. Edmund by military service, and 
is worth yearly ;^io. And they say that John Bret, consanguineus of said John de 
Cokefeld, is his next heir, and is over 24 years of age. 

And they say that said Edmund de Brokesborn is son and next heir of the 
blood of said Margery and is over 40 years of age. And that said Margery died on 
the Tuesday next after the feast of St. Peter ad Vincula last past. In testimony 
whereof said jurors have set to their seals. 

No. 7.— Alice who was the wife of John de Sutton. Died Aug. 23, 1392. 

Her first husband was Aridtew de Bures. Her second husband, John de Sutton, 
was stepson of the preceding Margery. Her two inquisitions zvere both held in 
September, 1392. There is really only one inquisition for Suffolk, though it has the 
appearance of tivo. 

ESSEX. — Inquisition taken at Alphamstone, co. Essex, on Thursday next 
before the feast of St. Mathew the Apostle and Evangelist in the 16 year of 



INQUISITIONS POST MORTEM. 295 

Richard II by the oath of jurors. Who say that Alice who was the wife of Sir John 
de Sutton knight held no lands of the king in Essex, but she held one acre in 
Middelton, and the advowson of the church of Middelton, and 19 shillings rent from 
divers tenants in Bulmere for her life, the reversion belonging to Alice Brian, 
daughter of Robert de Bures, son of Andrew de Bures and said Alice now deceased 
and formerly wife of said Andrew. They say that Alice who was the wife of John de 
Sutton died on Friday the eve of St. Bartholomew the Apostle last past, and that 
said Alice Brian is kinswoman and next heir of said Alice now deceased, and she is 
past 30 years of age. 

SUFFOLK. —Inquisition taken at Kersey, co. Suffolk, on Tuesday next after 
the feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary in the 16 year of Richard II by 
the oath of jurors. Who say that Alice who was the wife of Sir John de Sutton 
knight held the manor of Aketon for her life jointly with Sir Andrew de Bures knight 
late her husband now deceased by gift and grant of Edmund le Boteler by fine levied 
in the court of King Edward, the present king's grandfather, to hold to said Andrew 
and Alice and the heirs of Andrew. The manor is held of the king in chief as of 
the Honor of Hatfield Peverel. Alice died on Friday the eve of St. Bartholomew 
last past. Alice Brian, daughter and heir of Sir Robert de Bures knight, son of said 
Andrew and Alice, is kinswoman and next heir of said Andrew [sic] and is past 28 
years of age. 

SUFFOLK. — Inquisition taken at Kerseye on Tuesday next after the feast of 
the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary in the 16 year of Richard II by the oath of 
jurors. Who say that Alice who was the wife of Sir John de Sutton knight now 
deceased on the day she died held one manor in Reydon late of Sir Robert de 
Reydon knight and the advowson of the church jointly with Sir Andrew de Bures 
knight late her husband by gift and grant of Michael de Ponynges and Thomas le 
Boteler by fine dated 10 Edward III in the court of the present king's grandfather, 
to hold to Andrew and Alice and the heirs of their bodies, with remainder (in 
default of such) to the right heirs of Alice for ever. Alice died [etc. as above] and 
Alice Bryan [etc. as above.] 

No. 8. Sir John de Sutton chivaler. Died Sept., 1393. 

This is the second Sir John de Sutton of IVyvenhoe, afid stepson of Margery No. 6. 
His two inquisitions were both held in September, 1393. 

SUFFOLK.— Inquisition taken at Stratforde juxta Bergholte, co. Suffolk, on 



296 INQUISITIONS POST MORTEM. 

Monday next after the feast of St. Matthew the Apostle in the 17 year of Richard II 
by the oath of jurors. Who say that Sir John de Sutton chivaler now deceased on 
the day he died held tenements in* Bergholte of the king in chief, and a moiety of 
the manor of Bergholt of the Earl of Warwick, and tenements in Stratford of Gilbert 
de Debynham [etc.]. Sir John died on Friday next after the feast of the Nativity of 
the Blessed Virgin Mary last past. And Richard de Sutton his brother is his next 
heir aged 60 years and upwards. 

ESSEX. — Inquisition taken at Colchester on Saturday next before the feast of 
St. Michael in the 17 year of Richard II by the oath of jurors. 

[This is a long inquisition which does not concern this volume. His heir is the 
same as in the Suffolk Inquisition.] 

No. 9. Sir Richard de Sutton knight. Died April 7, 1396. 

Brother and heir of the preceding Sir John. His inquisition was held at 
Michaelmas, 1396. 

ESSEX. — Inquisition taken at Manytre, co. Essex, on Monday next before the 
feast of St. Michael in the 20 year of Richard II by the oath of jurors. Who say 
that Sir Richard de Sutton knight on the day he died held nothing of the king in 
chief. But he was seized of the manors of Wyvenho [etc.], and before his death he 
granted them by his charter to Thomas Cogeshale, Edmund Brokesborne, Roger 
Wolfreston, John Boys, Thomas Monchasy, Ralph Chamberleyn and Peter Westwode, 
to hold to them and their heirs and assigns for ever. Afterwards by fine in the 
quinzaine of Michaelmas in the 17 year of Richard II he remitted his right in said 
manors to said persons for ever. Sir Richard died on April 7 last past, and Thomas 
de Sutton is his son and next heir aged 12 years on the feast of St. Matthew the 
Apostle and Evangelist last past. 

No. 10. Edward, Duke of York. Killed at Agincourt Oct. 25, 1415. 

Inquisition taken at Stowmarket on Tuesday next after the feast of the 
Purification of the Blessed Mary in the 3 year of king Henry the fifth after the 
Conquest before Thomas Heath, the king's escheator for Norfolk and Suffolk, by 
virtue of the king's writ sent to him and sewn on to this inquisition, by the oath of 
jurors. Who say on their oath that Edward late Duke of York on the day he died 
held no lands nor tenements in Suffolk in his demesne of the king in chief nor of 



INQUISITIONS POST MORTEM. 297 



others. But he then held for his life the manor of Welnetham with the advowson 
of the church of that manor, and with the knights fees belonging to that manor, 
and all other knights fees and advowsons of churches and of other ecclesiastical 
benefices which Elizabeth who was the wife of Edward late Lord le Despencer 
formerly held for her life in Suffolk, by grant of the present king made by his letters 
patent to the late duke for his life on April i6 in the 2 year of his reign : said manor 
of Whelnetham with said advowsons and knights fees to remain immediately after 
the death of said late duke to Richard Beauchamp de Bergevenny chivaler and 
Isabella his wife, sister and heir of Richard son and heir of Thomas late Lord le 
Despenser deceased, and the heirs male begotten of said Richard and Isabella, by 
reason of certain other letters patent of the said king made to Richard and Isabella 
on Feb. 17 last past. [Here I leave out a whole page of words which seem to mean 
nothing.] And said jury say that the reversion of said manor of Whelnetham with 
said advowsons and knights fees, after the death of said Elizabeth who was the wife of 
Edward late Lord le Despencer deceased which she held for her life of the 
inheritance of said Thomas late Lord Despencer, and which Elizabeth died on the 
feast of St. Anne in the 12 year of Henry IV, belonged to said Thomas late Lord 
Despencer, and that ?aid Edward late Duke (named in said brief) held said manor of 
Whelnetham with advowsons and knight fees for his life by the grant of the present 
king on the occasion of the judgement of forfeiture lately returned against said 
Thomas : with remainder to said Richard and Isabella as promised immediately after 
the death of said Duke. And they say that said manor of Whelnetham with 
advowson and knights fee is held of the king in chief by military service, and that 
the manor of Whelnetham is worth yearly loS shillings and 4 pence. And the 
advowson of said church of Whelnetham is valued at 20 marks yearly with 
accidentals. And they say that said Edward late Duke died on Oct. 25 last past • 
and that Richard, son of Richard late Earl of Cambridge brother of said duke, is 
consanguineus and next heir of said Duke, and is past 3 years of age. 

No. II. William Raynford esquire. Died June, 1434. 

SUFFOLK. — Inquisition taken at Newmarket on Friday next after the feast of 
the Apostles Peter and Paul in the 12 year of king Henry VI by the oath of 13 
jurors. Who say that William Raynford esquire held the manor of Alfton hall in 
Alfton [Alpheton] and Aketon of the king as of his honor of Peverell. He died on 
Sunday next after the feast of St. Petronilla the Virgin last past, and Lawrence 
Raynford is his son and next heir, and is past 15 years of age. 



298 INQUISITIONS POST MORTEM. 

ESSEX. — Inquisition taken at St. Osyth on Monday next after the feast of 
Beheading of St. John Baptist in the 12 year of Henry VI by the oath of 20 jurors. 
Who say that William Raynford esquire held nothing of the king, but he held of 
Humphrey Duke of Gloucester as of his demesne of Colchester the manor of 
Frankeshalle in Bradefeld [etc.]. He died on Monday next before the feast of 
Pentecost last past, and Lawrence is his son and next heir, and is past 15 years of 
age. 

No. 12. Henry Drury of Lawshall. Died Jan. 25, 1587. 

Inquisition taken at Bury St. Edmunds on 2 June, 29 Elizabeth, after the death 
of Henry Drewrye esquire before the Queen's escheater for the county by the oath of 
fifteen jurors. Who say that Henry Drury long before his death was seized of the 
manor of Great Whelnetham in his demesne as of fee with its members and lands 
called Sydlesmere, Walshams, and Carbonells alias Carboines, and other lands in 
Great Whelnetham, Little Whelnetham, Brent Bradfeld, Hawstead, Stanfield, 
Lawshull, Nowton and Rushebrooke, late purchased from Sir William Waldegrave 
knight. And divers lands m Hawstead, Great and Little Whelnetham and Rushbroke 
containing tS^ acres lately purchased from Sir Ambrose Jermyn. And lands called 
Michelfield and Hawkyns in Lawshull, Stanningfield and Cockfield, containing 86 
acres lately purchased from Sir William Spring knight. And 37 acres of meadow 
and pasture and 33^ acres of wood lately being parcel of the manor of Copdoes alias 
Cobdoes in Great Whelnetham, Little Whelnetham, Hawstead, Nowton, Rushbrooke 
and Bradfield Combusta lately purchased from Sir William Drury knight. Thus 
seized Henry Drury made his will 19 January in 29 year of Elizabeth, leaving the 
manor of Great Whelnetham, Sydelsmere, Walshams, Carboines, Cobdoes, to 
descend to his son Henry Drury and the heirs male of his body, with remainder to 
the heirs male of the body of Sir William Drury knight. Henry Drury was also 
seized of the manor of Lawshull, and by indenture of 20 July, 22 year of Elizabeth, 
between himself on the one part and William Drury his son* and heir apparent and 
Thomas Rolf of Great Whelnetham on the other part, in consideration of the jointure 
of Elizabeth his wife it was agreed that he (Henry Drury) should before Michaelmas 
following convey to William Drury and Thomas Rolf the manor of Lawshull, they to 
stand seized thereof to the use of said Henry and Elizabeth Drury during both their 
lives, with remainder after their deaths to the right heirs of Henry Drury for ever. 
*There is something wrong here. William was not his son and heir. 



INQUISITIONS POST MORTEM. 299 

Afterwards Henry Drury by his writing of the same date (20 July) granted that 
manor to said William Drury and Thomas Rolf, without having first obtained the 
Queen's licence, to have and to hold to them, and their heirs and assigns, to their 
own use for ever, Henry Drury died 25 January last past, and Henry Drury the son 
is living in London and is the eldest son and next heir of Henry Drury deceased, 
and on the day he died Henry Drury the son was past 21 years of age. Elizabeth 
late the wife of Henry Drury deceased is still living at LawshuU and has not married 
since her husband's death. 

No. 13. Sir William Drury of Hawstead. Died Jan. 8, 1590. 

Inquisition taken at Bury St. Edmunds 16 June in 32 year of Elizabeth before 
the Queen's escheator and other persons, commissioners, after the death of Sir 
William Drewry knight by the oath of fifteen jurors. Who say that Sir William 
Drewry knight was seized in his demesne as of fee tail, namely to himself and the 
heirs male of his body, of the manors of Hanyngfeild, Bradfeild in Wynderviles, 
manor or farms called Redehall in le Tyle kill there, farm called Pipers and Mattres 
in Hawsted and Lawshull, manors of Brookleigh, Talmages and Wifoldes in Brockley, 
and advowson of the churches of the manors of Chedbergh and Arneborowes in 
Chedbergh, and advowson of the church of Chedbergh. By his deed 26 Oct. in 
15 year of Elizabeth between the lady Dorothy Stafford on the one part and himself 
(then William Drury of Hawsted esquire) on the other part, in consideration of his 
forthcoming marriage with Elizabeth Stafford, daughter of said Dorothy, which 
marriage was afterwards solemnized, the premises were settled on Elizabeth Stafford, 
now Lady Drury, for her life and for part of her jointure, and after her death to the 
heirs male of said Sir William and Elizabeth, and in default of such to the heirs male 
of Sir William Drury, and in default of such to the heirs male of Sir William Drury 
knight deceased, grandfather of Sir William Drury (of this inquisition), and in 
default of such to the use of Robert Drury .... [here several pieces are torn off] 
and in default of such to the right heirs of Sir William Drury (of this inquisition). 
Afterwards Elizabeth Drury died [sic but she did'nt], and said William Drury likewise 
died, and said Elizabeth late his wife who still lives and survived them was and still 
is seized of said manors of Bradfeld, Winderfeld etc. Sir William Drury was also 
seized of property (capital messuage etc.) in the parish of St. Clement Danes without 
the bar of the new Temple in the county of Middlesex. He settled it to the use of 
himself and his wife for their lives. Afterwards he died, and Elizabeth his wife 



300 INQUISITIONS POST MORTEM. 



survived him and was alone seized thereof. Sir Wilham Drury was also seized of the 
manors of Hawsted alias Hawsted hall, and Buckenhams alias Talmages, the manor 
of Whepsted lately belonging to the dissolved monastery of Bury St. Edmunds, lands 
called Overcages hall in Whepsted, lands called Monkeslondes, land called Bankhill 
Lees in Horningserth Magna, manor called Hoores, 20 gardens near the mansion 
house called Drury house, manor called Pykards, manor of Cobdoes. Sir WilHam 

Drury made his will i July in 29 year of Elizabeth [The will follov^^s 

in full, but so much is torn off that nothing is complete. There are bequests 
to executors for a term of 9 years, after which they remain to Robert Drury his son 
and heir apparent and to the heirs male of him lawfully begotten ; and in default of 
such to his second, third, fourth and fifth sons and their heirs male begotten in 
succession, and then to the heirs male of his brother begotten, and then " to the use 
of my cousin Henry Drury and his heirs male," and some other remainders that 
cannot be made out. Then mention of " said Thomas Drury," and a bequest of 
money " to William Mynne my nephew and godson,* which bequest must be paid 
or it will be lawful for said William Mynne to enter for distraint upon the manor of 
Hawsted."] Afterwards, viz. upon 8 Jan. in the 32 year of Queen Elizabeth, said 
Sir William Drury died, and Robert Drury is his son and heir begotten of Elizabeth 
his wife, and on the day of taking this inquisition Robert was 15 years, 4 months, 
16 days, of age. 

*From here to the end is on another parchment, which has got detached and is bound up in 
another volume, vol. 225. What precedes is in vol. 226. 






THE HOUSE OF CRUTCHED FRIARS. 301 



The House of Crutched Friars. 



The batch of nine documents that now follow relate to the house of Crutched or 
Crossbearing friars in Whelnetham, whose chapel was dedicated to St. Thomas the 
Martyr. In the two post-dissolution documents this chapel is called the chapel of 
Chockesmythes. They will be utilized in Part II, where I shall give so much of its 
history as I can find out. 

The two short Edwardian records from the Patent Rolls do not tell much, but 
they show to what an early date this house belongs. 

The Inquisitions ad quod damnum show the benefactors. When a man would 
give lands to a religious house, it was possible that harm might be done to the king 
or someone through that house not being able to perform the services which were 
due from those lands. So before he could get leave to give, the king's escheator had 
to call a jury to inquire into it. This inquiry was called an inquisitio ad quod 
damnum. The last three words may be translated. What harm will it do ? 

The longer documents from the Patent Rolls show the granting of the Priory 
premises after the dissolution of the Monasteries in 1536. 

No 1. Patent Roll. 2 Edward I. A.D. 1274. 

T. de Weyland and W. de Saham ten : at the assize of new disseisin to be held 
(cap :) which the Prior of the Holy Cross of Little Whelnetham has demanded (arr :) 
against Robert de Bradefeld and others concerning a tenement in Little Welnethani. 

No. 2. Patent Roll. 3 Edward I. A.D. 1275. 

G. [Galfridus] de Leukenor and J. [John] de Mettingham con: at the assize of 
new disseisin to be held which Brother Henry of the chapel of St. Thomas of Little 
Welnetham has demanded (arr :) against Walter parson of the church of Great 
Welnetham concerning a tenement in Little Welnetham. 



302 THE HOUSE OF CRUTCHED FRIARS. 



No. 3. Inquisition ad quod damnum. 21 Edward I. A.D. 1293. 

Iti explanation of this document and No. 4 // must be said that a writ dated 24 
Jan., 21 Edward I, had been setit to the Sherij^ of Cambridge, telling him to call 
together a Jury to consider whether it would be to the hurt of the king or anyone else if 
the king granted the Prior and brethren of the Holy Cross of Little Whelnetham leave 
to acquire the chapel of Bergham and belo?igtngs in the diocese of Ely. The Jury 
decided, as we see, that it ivould hurt the king to the amount of 12 pence a year. Then 
the Prior of Whelnetham found a layman 7vho bound himself and his heirs and his 
lands to make good this annual loss for ever. So he petitioned the king that the chapel 
of Bergham might be cofifirmed to them. The endorsement on the petition says it zvas 
left over to the next Parliament. 

Inquiry made through the jurors according as the writ demanded. Who say on 
their oath that it is to the prejudice of the king, in that the lands and tenements 
belonging to the chapel of Berkham owe two appearances yearly at the Sheriff's 
Court (turnum), which is m the hand of the Earl of Brittany by commission of the 
king, and are worth yearly 12 pence. And they say that it is not to any other harm 
or prejudice of the king nor of any one else. Concerning the consent of the diocesan 
or rector of the place they know not. And they say that all the belongings of said 
chapel are worth yearly in all their outgoings 2 marks. And they say that Robert 
de Furneus is the true patron and bene consents. 

No. 4. Petition of the Prior and Brethren. 21 Edward I. A.D. 1293. 

The petition that follows is in Fretich. It is thus endorsed {also in French) : The 
petition of the Prior and Brethren of the Cross of Wolnetham. 

// is further endorsed in Latin thus : — A certain layman is willing to bind and 
burden himself and his heirs and his holdings for doing the services for which the 
chapel is bound, for which that business may stand over (remansit) to another 
parliament. 

Then foUo'ivs the petition : — The Prior of the Holy Cross of Welnetham showeth 
to our lord the king that whereas he commanded by his letter to the Sheriff of 
Cambridge that he by upright and lawful men of the county would enquire if it would 
be to the prejudice of the king that he should confirm the chapel of Berkham with 
belongings to said Order [of the Cross of Whelnetham] or not : It was found that it 
was to the king's prejudice to the yearly amount of 12 pence. And the said Prior is 



THE HOUSE OF CRUTCHED FRIARS. 303 

prepared to find a surety and his heirs, sure and good, to do the suits which belong 
to said chapel and belongings. And also said surety is enfeoffed of said tenancy and 
is sufficiently distrainable. And he will do it willingly. Then the said Prior prayeth 
our lord the king for the love of God and his sweet mother and for the soul of the 
good king Henry and the soul of the Queen his good companion, that he will confirm 
and grant this thing. 

No. 5. Inquisition ad quod damnum. 5 Edward III. Aug. 13, 1331. 

Leave for Robert de Bures to give lands in mortmain. 

Inquisition at Lavenham before the Escheator of the king in the county of 
Suffolk on August 13 in the 5 year of King Edward the third from the Conquest 
according to the tenor of the king's writ, on the oath of Peter le Botiller, Geoffrey le 
Clerk [etc.]. Who say on their oath that it is not to the harm or prejudice of the 
king or of others that the king should allow Robert de Bures of Aketon to give to 
the Prior and brothers of the order of the Holy Cross of Whelnetham 4 messuages, 
240 acres of arable land, 20 acres of pasture with belongings in Aketon and 
Waldingfeld, to have and to hold to them and their successors for finding two 
chaplains to perform sacred services (divina celebantur) for the soul of said Robert, 
and the souls of hi.s ancestors, and of all the faithful departed, in the church of said 
prior and brothers of Whelnetham every day for ever. They say nevertheless that 
of the aforesaid lands and holdings, said Robert de Bures intends to give at present 
only one messuage, 28 acres of arable land and i acre of meadow in Aketon, one 
messuage and 60 acres of arable land in Waldingfeld, for the finding of two chaplains 
as aforesaid. And they say that said messuage and lands in Aketon are held of the 
king as of the honour of Peverel in the king's hand by the service of two parts of a 
knight's fee, and are worth yearly in all their outgoings according to their true value 
17 shillings, viz. the messuage 12 pence, the arable land 6 pence per acre, and the 
meadow 2 shillings. And that said messuage and lands in Waldingfeld are held of 
William de Athelly by the service of 12 pence yearly, and said William holds them 
of the Earl of Oxford, and the Earl holds them of the king in chief, and they are 
worth yearly 31 shillings, viz. the messuage 12 pence, the arable land 6 pence per 
acre. And they say that there is left to Robert de Bures (after the above gift) the 
manor of Acton and divers other manors, lands and holdings in the counties of 
Norfolk, Suffolk and Essex, which are held of divers lords by divers services which 
at present they do not know, which are worth yearly ;^ioo and more : And that they 



304 THE HOUSE OF CRUTCHED FRIARS. 



are sufficient for the customs and services due to be done both for the lands thus 
given and for the lands that he retains, and for all other burdens which he bore and 
was used to bear, as in suits, frank pledges, tallage, fines, redemptions, contributions 
[etc.] and all other emergencies to be borne. And they say that said Robert is able 
to be placed on assizes, juries, and other recognizances as he used to be before said 
gift So that the country will not be burdened by this gift in default of said Robert 
more than before. In testimony whereof said jury have placed their seals to this 
inquisition. Given at Lavenham on the day and year above said. 

No. 6. Patent Rolls. 17 Edward III. Nov. 1, 1343. 

Leave for the Priory tc acquire lands. 
Rex omibus [etc.] salutem. Know ye that we of our special grace have granted 
for ourselves and our heirs, so far as we can, to our beloved in Christ the Prior and 
brethren of the Order of the Holy Cross of the Chapel of St. Thomas the Martyr of 
Whelnetham that they may acquire lands and tenements to the yearly value of lOo 
shillings according to their true value both of their own fee and of another's, 
excepting lands and tenements which are held of us in chief: to have and to hold to 
themselves and their successors for ever: notwithstanding the statute concerning 
lands and tenements not to be placed in mortmain ; provided nevertheless by 
inquiries to be held in due form and returned to our Chancellary it may be found 
that it can be done without loss or prejudice to ourselves or our heirs or any others. 
Teste rege apud Langele November i. Per breve de privato sigillo. 

No. 7. Inquisition ad quod damnum. 20 Edward III. April 13, '346. 

Leave for Robert de Rokewode to give lands in mortmain. 

Inquisition taken at Henhowe in the county of Suffolk before William de 
Middeltone, escheator of the king, on April 13 in the 20 year of Edward the third 
after the Conquest, according to the tenor of the king's writ, on the oath of Robert 
le Boteler [etc.]. Who say on their oath that it is not to the harm or prejudice of 
the king nor of any one else that the king should allow Robert de Rokewode to give 
to the Prior and brothers of the Order of the Holy Cross of the chapel of St. Thomas 
the Martyr of Whelnetham 60 acres of arable land in Cokefeld, Stanfeld and 
Whelnetham, to have and to hold to themselves and their successors for ever, in part 
satisfaction of lands and tenements to the value of 100 shillings yearly, which the 



THE HOUSE OF CRUTCHED FRIARS. 305 



present king by his letters patent allowed said Prior and Brethren to acquire both 
of their own fee and of another's, excepting lands and tenements which are held of 
the king in chief. And they say that 40 acres of said land are held of Alexander de 
Walsham by fealty and by the service of 6s. .. 8d. yearly. And said Alexander holds 
them of Thomas de Grey miles, and he holds them of the king. And [the remaining] 
20 acres of said land are held of Henry Aleyn by the service of 5s. .. 4d. yearly for 
all services : and said Henry holds them of Richard de Cokesfeld miles, and said 
Richard holds them of Bartholomew de Burwache the son, and he holds them of the 
king. And each of the above 60 acres is worth yearly 2 pence and a halfpenny over 
and above rent resolute, and no more because the soil is sandy and weak (sabulosa 
et debilis). And there remain to said Robert lands and tenements in Stanfeld, 
Aketon and Stoke which are held of divers lords by divers services, and are worth 
yearly ;^io, besides the above to be given, which are sufficient for the customs and 
services due to be done both for what is given and for what is retained, and for all 
burdens accustomed to be borne. So that the country will not be burdened owing 
to this gift in default of said Robert more than before. In witness whereof [etc.]. 

No. 8. Patent Rolls. 31 Henry VIII. March, 1540. 

Grant of the Priory and various Manors to Anthony Rotis. 
Rex omnibus [etc.] salutem. Know ye that we for the sum of ^1678 .. 10 .. o 
of lawful money of England paid to our use into the hands of the Treasurer of the 
Court of Augmentations of our Crown by our beloved servant Anthony Rous of 
Denyngton in Suffolk esquire, have of our special grace granted to him the 
reversion of said manor of Iklyngham (formerly given to George Rous of London 
gent). Also all those manors of Iklyngham and Worlingworth lately belongmg to 
the late dissolved monastery of Bury St. Edmunds. And the advowsons of the 
rectories and churches of Iklyngham St. James and Worlingworth and of the chapel 
of Southwolde. Also we give Anthony Rous all our manor of Bedfelde in Suffolk, 
lately belonging to the monastery of Eye suppressed by the authority of Parliament. 
And further we give to Anthony Rous all the chapel of Chockesmythes, and one 
messuage, one garden and one orchard (ortum) adjacent to said chapel, containing 
in all three roods of land : And 13 acres of arable land and pasture, 2 acres of 
meadow and 5 acres of wood, and all the land and soil (terram et solum) of said 
wood with its belongings in Wellnitham magna, Wellnitham parva and Bradfeld 

U 



306 THE HOUSE OF CRUTCHED FRIARS. 



Combusta, which lately and for long belonged to the late dissolved Priory or house 
of Crossbearing Friars within the City of London ; to have, hold and enjoy all said 
possessions to him and his heirs and assigns for ever ; to be held in chief of our heirs 
and successors by the service of a tenth part of one knight's fee, and by the annual 
payment to us and successors of 72 shillings and 6 pence for said manor of 
Worlingworth, and 59 shillings for the manor of Ikelingham, and 50 shillings and 8 
pence for the manor of Bedfelde, and 4 shillings and 5 pence for the chapel of 
Chockesmythes and the other premises belonging to the late Priory of Crutched 
Friars ; to be paid each year into our Court of Augmentations at the feast of St. 
Michael the Archangel. Teste Rege apud Walden March 29. 

No. 9. Patent Rolls. 32 Henry VIII. April, 1540. 

Leave for Afithony Rons to sell the Priory to John Skott. 

Rex omnibus [etc.] salutem. Know ye that we of our special grace and for 13 
shillings and 4 pence paid to us in our hanaper give leave for ourselves and our heirs 
as far as in us lies to our beloved servant Antony Rous esquire to alienate to John 
Skott and Joan Cokerell all that his chapel of Chockesmythe, and one messuage, one 
garden and one orchard adjacent to said chapel, containing in all 3 roods of land : 
and 13 acres of arable land and pasture, 2 acres of meadow and 5 acres of wood and 
all the ground and soil of said wood, in Welvetham Magna, Welvetham Parva and 
Bradfeld Combusta, which lately belonged to the Priory or house of the crossbearing 
brothers within the city of London lately dissolved, and which are held of us in chief : 
to have, hold and enjoy said chapel and other premises to John and Joan and the 
heirs of John for ever of us and our heirs by the services that are due and customary. 
And likewise we give leave to said John and Joan to receive said chapel and premises 
from said Antony and to hold them to themselves and the heirs of John as aforesaid 
for ever. [Provision against their being molested by us, our heirs or ministers.] 

Teste Rege apud Westminster 26 April. 






MISCELLANEOUS DOCUMENTS. 307 



Miscellaneous Documents. 



No. 1. Patent Roll. 9 Edward I. A.D. 1281. 

R. Luueday and R. de Ludham con : at the assize to be held which Robert son 
of Walter de Meleford has demanded against Richard Freysel and others de quodam 
fossato levato in Great Whelnetham. 

No. 2. Patent Roll. 9 Edward I. A.D. 1281. 

R. Loueday and R. de Ludham con : at the assize of new disseisin to be held 
which Robert son of Walter de Meleford has demanded against Richard Freysel 
concerning common of pasture in Great Welnetham. 

No. 3. Inquisition ad quod damnum. 39 Edward ill. Nov. 6, 1365. 

Inquisition taken at Estbergholte, co. Suffolk, on Nov. 6 in the 39 year of 
Edward III by the oath of William Hervy and other jurors. Who say that it would 
not be to the damage of the king or of others if the king should grant to Sir John de 
Sutton of Wyvenho chivaler and Margery his wife that they may retain certain 
premises in Estbergholte which they acquired from Walter de Barkworth and 
Katherine his wife, William de Waldyngfeld and Amflesia his wife, and John Wolf of 
Maintre and Joan his wife, without having obtained royal licence, to have and to 
hold to themselves and the heirs of John of the king and his heirs. 

Sum of the value of the premises ;^6 .. 14 .. 6|. 

No. 4. Patent Rolls. 31 Henry Vlll. March, 1540. 

Grant of abbey lattds to Sir Thomas Jermyn. 

Rex omnibus [etc.] salutem. Know ye that we for the sum of one thousand, 
three hundred and five pounds, eleven shillings and eight pence, paid into the hands 
of our Treasurer to our use by our beloved Thomas Jermyn of Rushebroke knight, of 
our special grace have granted to him all our manors of Bradfeld Monachorum and 
Stanton lately belonging to the dissolved monastery of Bury St. Edmunds : also all 
those woods called Mounces Parke, Felsham Hawe, Frewoode [etc.] situate in 
Bradfeld Monachorum, Bradfeld Seyntclere and Felsham : and the advowsons of 
the churches of Bradfeld Monachorum and Stanton : and all the messuages, lands, 



308 MISCELLANEOUS DOCUMENTS. 



tenements, mills, warrens, gorse and heaths, liberties of foldage, fisheries [etc.] in 
the towns and hamlets of Bradfeld Monachorum, Tostok, Hedgesett, Whelnetham 
parva alias called Whelwetham, Barton, Drynkeston, Felsham, Thorpe, Norton, 
Gedding, Rougham, Bradfeld Seyntclere, Bradfeld Combiista, Pakenham, Wetherden, 
Russhebroke, Stanton, Over Stanton, Nether Stanton, Ixworth, Berdwell, Stowe 
Langtoft, Wattesfeld, Walsham and Hapworth, lately belonging to said monastery, 
and a parcel of lands containing in all 70 acres late in the tenure of said Thomas 
Jermyn and lying amongst his lands in the towns of Russhebroke, Rougham and 
Barton ; which lands are part of the manor of Oldehalle lately belonging to the late 
monastery : And also one tenement called the Sextens tenement, and all the lands, 
woods, rents and services in Little Whelnetham alias Whelwetham, Russhebroke, 
Bradfeld Monachorum and elsewhere in Suffolk belonging to the Sextens tenement, 
as fully and wholly as they all were lately made over to William Brodstrete and Alice 
his wife and Thomas Bradstrete their son. And all that grove of wood called 
Northlond grove m Russhebroke. We also give to said Thomas Jermyn all our 
manor of Thorpe hall in Norfolk lately belonging to the monastery of Dartford in 
Kent, and messuages in the towns of West Wrotham, Illington and Croxton in 
Norfolk, to be held of us, our heirs and successors in chief. 
Teste apud Walden March 10. 



Unattached de Whelnethams. 



Under this heading I have gathered together a number of people whom I have 
come across in early records and who are all called de Whelnetham. They need not 
all be akin to each other. They need not all be akin to the family of de Whelnetham 
which owned the manor of Great Whelnetham for a few generations and which will 
be fully described under another heading. Some of them certainly were, some of 
them as certainly were not. But they all have this in common, viz. that for one 
reason or another they took their name from the place with which this volume is 
dealing. They did not call the land after their name, but the land called them after 
its name, 



UNATTACHED DE WHELNETHAMS. 309 



It will be seen that with the exception of John who held some land at 
Tuddenham they all lived between c. 1150 and c. 1350. At that early time 
hereditary surnames had not become rigidly fixed. They sat loosely upon a man, 
and were easily thrown by some change of circumstance. And so you cannot be 
sure that either the fathers or the children of these men were called de Whelnetham 
too. That makes it difificult to say who were their fathers or who were their 
children. You cannot even be sure that they continued to be called de Whelnetham 
to the end of their lives. They may have gone forth and gained a new dwelling 
place elsewhere, and with that new dwelling place they may have gained a new name. 
I have good reason for thinking that one of them, Thomas, did do so, and became 
Thomas of Wordwell instead of Thomas of Whelnetham. Later on surnames sat 
tighter, and were not easily moved by a change of abode. 

I set them down in alphabetical order, and I show where I met them and what 
they were doing. That alphabetical order enables me to begin very suitably with 

ADAM. July 29, 1225. King Henry HI, in 9 year of his reign, witnessed at 
Windsor an order that the justiciaries on their first arrival in Suffolk should take the 
suit which was down for hearing between Nicholas son of Master Stephen of St. 
Edmund petens and Adam de Whelnetham tenens, concerning 2 acres arable in 
Rougham and 2^ acres arable and one messuage and i^ acre of meadow in 
Whelnetham. (Patent Rolls.) 

ADAM. Jan. 23, 1230. King Henry HI, in 14 year of his reign, witnessed at 
Havering the appointment of William de Fraunchvill, William Peche, William de 
Hanifeld and Robert de Hulmo (the two last substituted for Adam de Falesham and 
Walter de Bradfeld) as justiciaries at the assize to be held at Cateshal at 15 days from 
Easter, which Robert, parson of the greater Whelnetham, demanded (aramiavit) 
against Adam de Whelnetham chaplain and Jordan his brother, to determine 
whether 7 acres of land and two messuages in the greater Whelnetham are free 
possessions (libera elemosina) belonging to the church of said Robert or a lay fee of 
said Adam and Jordan. (Patent Rolls.) 

ADAM. June 10, 1231. King Henry IH, in 15 year of his reign, witnessed 
at Westminster the appointment of Robert de Hulmo, Jerebert de Seincler, Adam de 
Welnetham and Richard de Ikeworth as justiciaries at the assize of new disseisin to 
be held at CateshuU at three weeks from the day of St. John the Baptist, which 
Robert de Hul has demanded (aramiavit) against Richard, abbot of St. Edmund, 



310 UNATTACHED DE WHELNETHAMS. 



concerning a tenement in Barton. Afterwards William de Fredney and Adam de 
Folesham were joined with them for holding the assize. (Patent Rolls.) 

In 1232 ADAM de Whelnetham and John de Tifteshall were appointed 
collectors of the tax, a fortieth, in the liberty of St. Edmund in Suffolk. And on 
March 21, 1233, they were ordered to carry it to Norwich and deliver it to the king's 
constable, with rolls showing clearly the whole and particular sums received by them, 
which were to be placed there with the other fortieths from Norfolk and Suffolk. 
(Close Rolls.) 

The Red Book of the Exchequer contains a list of the knights of the Honor of 
St. Edmund of the old feoffment of the time of king Henry. This list includes 
Adam de Welwethame, 3 parts of one knight. 

I imagine that Adam the justiciary and tax collector was one man, and that 
Adam the chaplain was another. 

ALEXANDER. At some time between 1157 and 11 80 Hugh, abbot of Bury, 
confirmed to William son of Leo the manor of Hengrave which had been granted to 
his father. Amongst a number of the neighbouring gentry who witnessed this deed 
were Alexander de Whelnetham and Walter his son. (Gage's Thingoe, p. 166.) 

In 1209 and again in 12 18 Alexander de Whelnetham and Sarah his wife were 
parties in a fine concerning land at Exning. (Cal. Suff. Fines, p. 16, 21.) 

ALEXANDER, ALICE, PHILIP, JOANNA, ROBERT, THOMAS. 

On Nov. 24, 1281, the sheriff of Suffolk was ordered to direct Robert son of 
Philip to give up to Thomas de Weyland a messuage, 45 acres of land, 5 acres of wood, 
2 acres of meadow, 12 pence of rent, in Little Whelnetham, in which Robert has 
not entry except by Alice late the wife of Philip de Parva Whelnetham, who held them 
of said Thomas de Weyland in dower of the assignment of Alexander, son and heir 
of Philip, of the gift of Philip her late husband, which ought to revert to Thomas de 
Weyland after the demise made by Alice to Robert contrary to the statute of 
Gloucester : and the sheriff was to summon Robert, if he did not do so, to be before 
the justices at Westminster in the octaves of St. Hilary, to show cause why he has 
not done so. (Close Rolls, 10 Edward I.) 

In 1282 Johanna wife of Alexander de Whelnetham sells two parts of the manor 
of Little Whelnetham to Thomas de Weyland. See Fines, No. 6, p. 277. 



UNATTACHED DE WHELNETHAMS. 311 

In 12S2 Robert, son of Philip, and Alice, widow of Philip, sell land in Little 
Whelnetham to Thomas de Weyland. See Fines, No. 7, p. 277. 

In c. 1280 Alexander, son of Philip, made a grant of Doveton hall in 
Whepstead. And in 1291 Thomas, son of Alexander, is mentioned in a deed 
relating to Doveton hall. And in 1331 Margaret Doverons, widow of Philip de 
Whelnetham, is mentioned in a deed relating to Doveton hall. (Gage's Thingoe, 
P- 397-) 

Oat of the above allusions I make this tentative pedigree. I imagine that this 
family were of Little Whelnetham and had nothing to do with the family which 
owned the manor of Great Whelnetham. 

Philip = Alice 



Alexander = Johanna Robert = Matilda 

I I. 

Thomas Philip = Margaret = (2) — Doverons 

ALEXANDER de Welvetham granted to Constance, the prioress, and the nuns 
of Wykes in Essex 4 shillings yearly rent which Wlward son of Simon used to pay 
him for a tenement in West Stow. And Wlward bound himself to pay to Constance 
and the nuns the yearly 4 shillings which he used to pay to Alexander. (Two deeds 
in P.R.O., mentioned in Suff. Arch. Inst. Proc. x. 328.) These deeds are not dated, 
and I do not know whether the date of this Alexander fits the date of the preceding 
one. 

ALICE. Wife of Philip and mother of Alexander. See above. 

CHRISTIANA. Daughter of Walter de Whelnetham. In a fine of January 
1258 we see her getting a grant for life of lands at Great Whelnetham. See p. 274. 

EDMUND. The father of Sir John. He will be found in Part II. In 1335 
an Edmund was the defendant in a fine, Michael de Bures and Mary his wife being 
the complainants. He must be a different man, though probably of the same family. 
Perhaps a younger brother of Sir John. 

GEOFFREY. In the Rotuli Curiae Regis he is mentioned as doing something, 
I cant understand what, in the first year of king John, 1199. 

In the Chronicle of Jocelin of Brakelond we read : " In the year of grace 1200 
a marshalling took place of the knights of St. Edmund and of their fees, whereof 



312 UNATTACHED DE WHELNETHAMS. 



their ancestors had been enfeoffed." Then follows a long list, which includes 
" Geoffrey of Whelnetham and Gilbert of Manston, one knight's fee in Whelnelham 
and Manston." (New ed. by Sir E. Clarke, p. 183.) 

HENRY. He was certainly a younger brother of the second Sir John de 
Whelnetham, whose annals I have given at some length in Part II of this volume. 
He will be found there under the year 13 14 charged with taking part in some riotous 
proceedings and throwing a lady into a pit. In 1324-5 he is one of the two 
complainants in a fine concerning the manor of Cockfield, which I have not had 
transcribed. (Cal. Suff. Fines p. 155.) In 1332 and 1337 he is mentioned in two 
more fines which I have had transcribed. See p. 282, Nos. 16, 17. He does not 
come into "Suffolk in 1327," unless, as I strongly suspect, he is the Henry de 
Welham under Great Horringer in that volume, p. 167. A contracted Welnetham 
might easily be mistaken for Welham. 

JOHANNA. Wife of Alexander, whom see. 

JORDAN. Brother of Adam, whom see. 

JOHN son of Ralph de Qwelnetham. In 1228 he was complainant in a fine 
concerning land at Nowton. Cal. Suff. Fines, p. 28. He might be the first Sir 
John. See Part II. 

JOHN and MATILDA his wife. In 1252 he gave king Henry III a mark for 
a writ about something I cant understand what, and the sheriff of Cambridge was 
told to see about it. (Excerpta e Rot. Fin. in Turre Londin.) This may be the 
first Sir John, who will be found in Part II. 

JOHN the clerk. A patent roll dated from Westminster June 5, 1320, grants 
protection for John de Hastings, who is going beyond the seas with the king, and for 
John de Welvetham clerk and eight others who are going with him. This is likely 
to be the same man as John, parson of Little Whelnetham, who took a part in the 
riotous proceedings at Bury abbey in 1327. See The Clergy in Part II of this 
volume. 

The two knights. Sir John de Whelnetham, will be found in Part II, 

JOHN. In the Inquisition post mortem of Johanna, widow of William de 
Beauchamp, Lord Bergavenny, held in 1435-6, John Whelnetham is said to have 
held a half of one fee at Tuddenham. And in the inquisition of Edward Neville, 
Lord Bergavenny, held in 1476, John Whelnetham holds one fee there. 



UNATTACHED DE WHELNETHAMS. 313 

NICHOLAS, c. 1 196. He is mentioned in the 1835 Calendar of Rotuli 
Curi» Regis as doing something, I dont know what, towards the end of the reign of 
Richard I. 

Another Nicholas will be found in two fines Nos. 13, 14, printed at p. 280. 
Their date is Michaelmas 131 1. He has a brother Robert, and I think he is either 
younger brother or uncle of the second Sir John. 

In 1325 Nicholas de Whelnetham, an acolyte, was presented to tbe rectory of 
Great Whelnetham. See The Clergy in Part II. 

MARGARET. Wife of Philip junior. See under Alexander. 

MATILDA. Wife of John, whom see. 

MATILDA. Wife of Robert, whom see. See above pedigree. 

PHILIP. In 1246 he was complainant in a fine about land at Timworth. And 
in 1247 he was one of several complainants in a fine about land at Whepstead. 
(Cal. SufF. Fines, p. 48, 49.) Soon afterwards, not later than 1264, he was one of the 
witnesses to a deed whereby Simon, abbot of Bury, gave leave to Thomas de 
Ickworlh to empark some lands at Ickworth. (Gage's Thingoe, p. 278.) This 
seems to be the same man as the Philip of Little Whelnetham, who is mentioned 
under ALEXANDER. 

In "Suffolk in 1327" another Philip will be found at p. 32 under Cotton, 
which makes it look as if he was a son of Robert and Matilda, and grandson of 
Philip and Alice. Margaret Doverons in 1331 might be his widow. See pedigree. 

RALPH. Father of John, whom see. 

ROBERT. In 1242 he is defendant in a fine about land at Preston and 
Hawkedon. (Cal. Suffolk Fines, p. 46.) 

In the Testa de Nevill is a list of the fees of Master William de Kentewell. 
Among them Robert de Whelnetham holds half a fee in Preston of said William, 
which William holds of the king. That was in the reign of Edward I, which ran 
from 1272 to 1307. 

In 1282 Robert, son of Philip and Alice of Little Whelnetham, and younger 
brother of Alexander, is a party to a fine. See No. 7, p. 277. 

In 1292 there was some dispute, fictitious or otherwise, about land at Cotton in 
Suffolk, in which Robert and Matilda his wife were parties. (Rot. in Cur. Scacc. 
Abbrev.) 



314 UNATTACHED DE WHELNETHAMS. 

In 131 1 Robert and Nicholas his brother were parties in a fine. See No. 14, 
p. 281. I rather expect them to be uncles, possibly brothers, of the second Sir John. 

In 13 14 Robert and Henry his brother were charged, with their brother the 
second Sir John, with throwing a lady into a pit. See Sir John in Part II. 

In "Suffolk in 1327" Robert who appears under Whelnetham must be the 
brother of Sir John, and perhaps it is also him who appears under Ipswich. And it 
must be this same Robert who is party to a fine in 1337. See No. 17, p. 282. 

THOMAS. A charter roll dated Oct. 8, 1303, grants to Thomas de Whelnetham 
and his heirs free warren in all their demesne lands in Wrydewell (vVordwell), co. 
Suffolk. Now in " Suffolk in 1327 " the big man at Wordwell is seen to be Thomas 
de Wordwell. And in the Wordwell volume of this series it will be seen that the 
presentations to Wordwell rectory from 1306 to 1329 were all made by Thomas de 
Wordwell. I therefore think it is highly probable that this Thomas de Whelnetham 
and Thomas de Wordwell are one and the same man. He was probably a native of 
Whelnetham and perhaps a member of the family who owned it ; and when he 
became possessed of Wordwell he dropped his name de Whelnetham and took that 
of de Wordwell. 

It may be only a coincidence, but it is curious that in 1230 we had a Jordan de 
Whelnetham and in 1282 there was a Jordan de Wordwell : we have had an 
Alexander de Whelnetham, and at about the same time there was an Alexander de 
Wordwell. And once more, in the marshalling of the knights already alluded to as 
told by Jocelin the monk, we see a William de Wordwell holding half a knight's fee 
in Whelnetham. 

In 1 29 1 Thomas son of Alexander, son of Philip, is mentioned in a deed 
relating to Doveton hall in Whepstead. I expect he is a different man though 
contemporary. Gage, p. 397. 

WALTER. In the Rotuli Curiae Regis he is mentioned as doing something c. 
1 1 96, and again in 1199. Also the Rotulus Cancellarii mentions him in 1201. I 
cannot understand these villainously abbreviated documents, but the chief point is 
that in such and such a year there was living such and such a man. This Walter 
may be the same man as Walter son of Alexander mentioned in the first entry under 
Alexander, He may also be the Walter who was the father of Christiana, 



MORE WHELNETHAM WILLS. 315 



More Whelnetham Wills. 



No. 33. James Merest. June, 1740. 

This is the last will of me James Merest of St. Margaret's, Westminster, gent, 
made this 12 June, 1740. First I most humbly resign my soul to Almighty God 
who gave it, hoping for salvation thro' the merits and mediation of Jesus Christ my 
Redeemer ; and my body to the earth to be decently interred (but privately) at 
Woking in Surrey, the place of my nativity, near where the rest of the family lyes. 
And as concerning my temporal estate, which is all personal, I dispose of it thus. 
— To my two sons ^^2500 apiece, and to my four daughters ;^'2ooo apiece, to be 
paid them at their respective ages of 21 years. The income and dividends of my said 
estate to be applied towards the maintenance and education of my children according 
to the discretion of their mother. Item I give to my only sister living ;^2o a year 
to be paid her half yearly, and ^100 to her daughter, the wife of Mr. Bynes, and 
;^5o apief-e to her two sons now living. Item to Richard Gold, the only son of my 
eldest sister, ^100, and to John Goodyear, the son of my youngest sister, ^100. 
To my godson, the only son of Thomas Allen esquire, ;^5o. Item to the poor of 
the parish of Woking ^30, and it is my will that ^^20 may be laid out on a 
monument against the pillar next to the place of the burial of the family in the 
church at Woking, on which I would have written an account of the persons there 
buried. All the aforesaid legacies, except to my children, I will should be paid 
within six months after my decease. Lastly I make my wife and brother executors of 
this my will, and desire that the profit of all the manuscript books which shall belong 
to me at the time of my death may be equally divided between them. And as to all 
my debts owing to me upon bonds or notes (but no other), I hereby give to my wife, 
whom I enjoin to use her utmost endeavour by suits at law or otherwise to recover 
particularly what is due to me from my Lord Delawarr. I have not mentioned yet 
the Suffolk estates, nor do I think I need do it, the same in my opinion being 
subject to the determination already made by the Master of the Rolls. But I give 
to my wife all my household goods as well as plate, not doubting but she will 
continue her indulgence and kindness to the children and take great care of their 
education, particularly with respect to virtue now grown so scarce in the world. In 



316 MORE WHELNETHaM WILLS. 

witness of this my will, all of my own handwriting, I have hereunto set my hand 
and seal. 

Memorandum. It is this 3 July, 1741, recommended to the executors by the 
testator to make a due provision for what shall be born of my wife if she is at present 
with child. 

No. 34. Jane Merest widow. May, 1776. 

In the name of God Amen. I Jane Merest, late of Laleham in the Co. of 
Middlesex, widow, but now residing with my son John Merest Esq. in the Little 
Cloysters, Westminster Abbey, being of sound and disposing mind, memory and 
understanding, but regarding the uncertainty of this mortal life, do make this my last 
will and testament. First I most humbly resign my soul to God who gave it, hoping 
for salvation thro' the merits and mediation of Jesus Christ my Redeemer, and my 
body to the earth, and my request is that I may be interred at Woking as near to the 
remains of my late husband James Merest Esq. as possible, and that my funeral may 
be conducted in the same manner, and the same persons may, if possible, conduct 
and attend it as directed and attended my late husbands. I give to my sons the 
Rev. Mr. Charles Merest, John Merest and James Merest, and to my daughters 
Charlotte Fisher widow and Mary now the wife of Captain Michael Hare, ^50 each 
for mourning. To my sister Mrs. Elizabeth Brooker ;^2o for mourning. To my said 
daughter Charlotte Fisher a miniature picture of my late husband in enamel by 
Zincke, as also my silver tea kettle and lamp. To my son John Merest my house in 
Abingdon street wuh the appertenances to hold to him, his executors etc : also my 
large two handled silver cup, my tea chest with silver cannisters which he made me a 
present of, as also my two silver boats and my best diamond ring. I also give my 
son John all such household goods and furniture of every kind, except plate, as shall 
be belonging to me and in his house at the time of my death. Item I do direct that 
all the rest of my plate shall be equally divided between my son James Merest and 
my daughter Mary Hare. I direct that my son James Merest shall within three 
months after my decease pay into the hands of my executor ;z^5oo, to be laid out in 
the purchase of stocks or at interest on Government or other real securities, upon 
trust to pay the profits thereof to my daughter Mary Hare for her own use, it being 
my intention that the same shall not come to the hands or be liable for the debts of 
her husband Captain Michael Hare, unless it shall appear to my executor that the 
laying out of such sum of ;^5oo in the purchase of a commission in the army for 



MORE WHELNETHAM WILLS. 317 

him will be for the benefit of him and of Mary his wife ; in which case and not 
otherwise I empower my executor with the consent of my daughter Mary Hare to be 
given in writing to lay out such sum of ;^5oo in the purchase of such commission. 
Otherwise I direct that the profits of said ;^5oo shall continue to be paid to Mary 
Hare for her sole use for her life, and from her death shall be divided among all the 
children of Mary Hare then living, share and share alike with benefit of survivorship. 
But if there be no children living at her death, then said sum of ;^5oo shall be 
considered as part of the revenue of my personal estate. Item I direct that one 
annuity of j£2o shall be paid by my son James Merest to my executor to be by him 
paid to my sister Elizabeth, the wife of James Brooker, during her natural life by 
weekly, monthly or quarterly payments at his discre tion for her own sole use ; and 
her receipt alone, nothwithstanding her coverture, to be a sufficient discharge, it being 
my mind that said annuity shall not come into the hands nor be liable to the debts 
of said James Brooker. Item I give my son James Merest and his heirs for ever all 
my freehold and copyhold lands and tenements in the co. of Suffolk or elsewhere in 
the Kingdom of Great Britain. Item all the rest of my estate and effects whatsoever 
and wheresoever I give to my son James Merest and his heirs. And in case my 
personal estate shall not be sufficient to pay my debts and legacies, I charge my real 
estate devised to my son James Merest wiih the payment of so much as shall be 
wanting. My executor shall not be liable for any loss that may happen in the 
execution of the trust relating to the above ;^5oo unless such loss shall arise thro' 
his wilfuU default. I hereby nominate my son John Merest to be sole executor of 
this my will. In witness whereof I have to this my will written on three sides or 
pages of paper to the first two set my name and to the last page thereof my hand 
and seal this 6 May, 1776. 

Witnesses : Hen" Brooker, Hy Brooker, James Dagge. 



Joan de Bures, a nun at St. Helen's. Nov., 1417. 

T/n's is a iraiislation of a Latin document in the British Museum. Topham 
MSS. Charter No. 39. 

To all the faithful in Christ to whom the present written indenture comes, 
Andrew Botiller knight, Robert Teye, Richard Baynard, John Rowhed, Robert Cooke 
de Lavenham, John Badewell, William Rookwode, and John son of said William, 
eternal health in the Lord. Know ye that we have granted, and by this present 



318 JOAN DE BURES, A NUN. 

indenture have confirmed to the Prior and Convent of the house of Nuns of St. 
Elena within Bishopsgate, London, and their successors, a certain annual and quit 
rent of loo shillings sterling to have and receive yearly during the natural life of 
Johanna de Bures, nun of the said house, if it happens that Johanna should remain 
so long in said house, and for half a year more, out of all those woods and tenements 
of ours called Sydolesmers, Walshams and Carbonels with their appertenances in the 
towns of Great Whelnetham, Little Whelnetham, Rosshebrook and Newton in co. 
Suffolk, which lately we had from the demise and feoffment of John Howard knight, 
William Clopton, Ralf Chaumberleyn, Giles Pirye, John Notyngham and Geoffrey 
Salle; so that 40 shillings of said 100 shillings are to be paid to the use of Johanna 
de Bures at the four principal terms of the year, viz. at the feasts of the Nativity of 
the Lord, Easter, the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, and St. Michael the archangel, 
by equal portions and in the church of St. Elena within Bishopsgate, London. 
Provided that if said yearly payment of 100 shillings after any term when it should 
be paid should be partly or wholly unpaid, then it shall be lawful for the Prioress and 
Convent and their successors and attorneys during the life of Johanna de Bures and 
for half a year after to enter and distrain upon said lands and tenements, and the 
distraints thus taken lawfully to carry off (asportare, abducere et fugare) and keep in 
their own possession until there shall be full satisfaction of the payment in arrear. 
[Then follow further instructions about distraining and receiving the expenses of 
distraining; and no payment is to be made elsewhere than in the church of St. Elena, 
and any payment made elsewhere shall be treated as nothing.] Of which yearly 100 
shillings we place the Prioress and Convent in full possession by the payment of 40 
pence which we deliver to them nomine seisine. In testimony of which to one part 
of this indenture remaining in the possession of the Prioress and Convent we have 
placed our seals. To the other remaining in our possession the Prioress and Convent 
have caused to be placed their common seal. Given at London 12 November in the 
fifth year of King Henry the fifth after the Conquest. 

Etidorsed in English : 5 Henry V. An annuity of ;£$ per annum granted to 
the nunns of St. Elen, London, out of lands in Suffolk during the life of Joan de 
Bures, a nunn there. 



STATUTES. 319 



Statutes. 



STATUTE OF WINCHESTER. 



Made at Westminster. 13 Edward I. A.D. 1285. 

As the Statute of Wmchester is very often referred to m the atinals of Sir John 
de Whebietham, and as it gives some idea of the state of the country, both of the 
people and of the roads, I give here a summary of it. The full Statute will be 
foil fid in the Statutes of the Realm. There seetns to be some confusion as to its 
name, it beinq sometimes called the Statute of Westminster. The two Statutes that 
follow of Edward III are also alluded to in the annals of Sir John de Whelnetham. 

Forasmuch as from day to day robberies, murthers, burnings and thefts be more 
often used than they have been heretofore, and felons cannot be attainted by the 
oath of jurors, which had rather suffer strangers to be robbed than to indite the 
offenders, of whom great part be people of the same country, our lord the king for to 
abate the power of felons hath established a pain in this case, so that from henceforth 
for fear of the pain more than for fear of any oath they shall not spare any nor 
conceal any felonies. 

The Hundred is made answerable for robberies. They shall have 40 days and 
no more either to answer for the robber or to produce him. In great towns being 
walled the gates shall be closed from sunsetting to sunrising, and no man shall lodge 
in the suburbs without his host will answer for him. At every gate in every town so 
many men shall watch from sunsetting to sunrising. And if any stranger do pass 
he shall be arrested till morning, and then go quit if no suspicion. If they will not 
obey the arrest they shall levy hue and cry upon them, and the hue and cry shall be 
raised from town to town till they be arrested. 

Further, highways leading from one market town to another shall be enlarged, 
so that there be neither dyke, tree nor bush where a man may lurk to do hurt within 
200 feet of one side or the other ; but this shall not extend to ashes, oaks or great 
trees. And if the lord will not abate the dyke, underwood or bushes, he shall be 
answerable for any robberies committed ; and if murder be done he shall be fined at 
the king's pleasure. And if the lord cannot fell the underwoods, the country shall 
aid him. And if perchance a park be near the highways, the lord shall set his park 



320 STATUTES. 



200 feet from the highway, or make such a wall, dyke or hedge that offenders may 
not pass to do evil. 

Further, every man shall have in his house harness for to keep the peace, /. e. 
every man between 15 and 60 shall be assessed to armour according to his lands and 
goods. [Then follows the armour a man must have if valued at j[^\'^ lands or 40 
marks goods, at j[^\o lands or 20 marks goods, etc.] The view of armour is to be 
made twice a year. And constables chosen in each hundred and franchise are to 
view it. And the constables shall present before justices such as are in default. 
And they shall present such as lodge strangers in uplandish towns for whom they will 
not answer. And the justices shall present them to the king at Parliament, and the 
king shall provide remedy. 

And henceforth let sheriffs take good heed [etc.]. And the king commaudeth 

and forbiddeth that from henceforth neither fairs nor markets be kept in churchyards 

for the honour of the church. 

Given at Winchester Oct. 8 in 13 year of the king. 



1 Edward III, 1327. Statute 2. C. 16. 

For the better keeping and maintenance of the Peace the king will that in every 
county good men and lawfull which be no maintainors of evil or barrettors in the 
country shall be assigned to keep the peace. 

5 Edward III, 1331, C. 14. {Only one Statute this year.) 

Whereas in the statute made at Winchester in the time of king Edward, 
grandfather to the king that now is, it is contained. That if any stranger pass by the 
country in the night of whom any have suspicion, he shall presently be arrested and 
delivered to the sheriff and remain in ward till he be duly delivered ; and because 
there have been divers manslaughters, felonies and robberies done in time past by 
people that be called Roberdesmen, Wastors and Draw-latches ; It is accorded that 
if any man have any evil suspicion of such, be it by day or by night, they shall be 
incontinently arrested by the constables of the towns and delivered to the bailiffs of 
the franchises or to the sheriffs, and kept in prison till the coming down of the 
justices assigned to deliver the gaol. And in the meantime the sheriffs or bailiffs 
shall enquire of such arrests and return their inquests at the coming of the justices. 
And if they have not enquired they shall be amerced, and the justices shall make 
enquiry and proceed to the deliverance of the gaol. 

END OF PART I. 



PART II. THE MANORS AND LORDS. 321 



Part II. Chapter I. 



The Manors and their Lords. 



Section i. The Undivided Whelnetham. 
Section 2. Great Whelnetham. Section 3. Little Whelnetham. 



Up to this point what has been printed has been raw material, quite raw ; part 
from parchment, part from stone ; part gathered in London, part in Suffolk ; 
registers, tombstones, wills, fines, inquisitions, and medieval documents of all sorts. 
I have not exhausted that raw material ; there is heaps more. But unless one can 
combine the years of Methuselah with the purse of a millionaire, one must draw the 
line somewhere, and so I draw it here. I will now proceed to cook such raw material 
as I have got, and will dish it up under several headings. The first heading shall 
be, The Manors and their lords. 

And as from an early time there have been two manors, viz. Great Whelnetham 
and Little Whelnetham, and as they have always had a different set of lords, so I 
must take them separately, first the one and then the other ; for it would be no more 
possible to take them together than it would be to follow the courses of two different 
streams in the same strides of the same stroll. 

And as there was a time before the division of the manor into two, so I must 
devote a section to the undivided Whelnetham before I reach the sections devoted 
to Great and Little Whelnetham respectively. 



322 PART II. THE MANORS AND LORDS. 

Section i. The undivided Whelnetham. 

Of this I have very little to say, and part of that little has been already said at 
p. 228 — 9, and need not be repeated. I have met with no mention at all of 
Whelnetham earlier than that in the Domesday survey of A.D. 1086. I have looked 
through three stout volumes of the Cartularium Saxonicum, edited by Mr. Walter 
Birch, containing about 1350 charters between A.D. 430 and A.D. 975. But not 
one of them records any gift or transfer of land in Whelnetham. So that 1086 is the 
earliest actual mention of the name that I know of, and that must be my starting 
point. The various forms of that name, and anything that there may be to be said 
about its meaning, I leave for a later chapter. 

The Domesday survey showed us a manor having two churches in it, whereof 
the abbot of Bury was lord. Of that I have already said all I know and rather more. 
I imagine that those two churches are the germ or foreshadowing of the division 
that was to be later on into two manors and two parishes. When that division actually 
took place, if there ever was an actual moment of its taking place, I dont know. 
The earliest mention of a Great Whelnetham that I have met with, which is also the 
earliest proof that a division had taken place, is in A D. 1230. (See p. 309.) So we 
may put down the division to have taken place between 1086 and 1230. 

Besides the abbot's holding with its two churches, the Domesday survey showed 
us a small holding of 40 acres held by the Earl of Mortain. 

Robert, Earl of Mortain, was half brother to William the Conqueror whom he 
accompanied into England, and whole brother to Bishop Odo. The 40 acres that he 
had here were a very small drop in the ocean of his vast possessions. Mr. E. A. 
Freeman, the historian of the Norman Conquest, has pointed out that he h.-tJ a larger 
share of the conquered land than any one follower of the Conqueror. His manors 
were chiefly in the northern and south-western counties. How he came by this little 
bit I dont know. He died in or about 1091, and was succeeded by his son William. 

William, Earl of Mortain, rebelled against Henry I, and m 1104 was banished 
from England. He went back to Normandy, still followed a rebellious course, took 
part in the battle of Tinchebrai in rio6, was taken prisoner and (says Freeman) was 
probably blinded and imprisoned for life. But Doyle's Official Baronage says that 
after a long imprisonment from 1106 to 1140 he returned to England in his old age, 
and became a monk at Bermondsey. Can a greater contrast be imagined than that 
between the father, in all the glory of his vast possessions, and the son, sightless, 



THE MANORS AND LORDS. 323 



friendless, landless, homeless, glad of the shelter of a monastery as a nineteenth 
century labourer was glad in his old age of the shelter of a workhouse ! 

What happened to the 40 acres when he forfeited his possessions I cannot say. 
It occurs to me that possibly the house and chapel of the Crutched Friars may have 
later on occupied a part of them, 

Section 2. Great Whelnetham Manor. 

At some time before 1230 Whelnetham has become divided into Great and 
Little Whelnetham. In 13 16 a return was made showing who was the lord of each 
township in the county. That return has been printed by the Suffolk Arch. Inst, in 
their Proceedings, xi, 173, and also by Lord Francis Hervey in his edition of Reyce's 
Breviary, p. loi. It shows that there was then a township of Great Whelnetham 
and a township of Little Whelnetham, and that the abbot of Bury was lord of both. 
I need not give the names of the successive abbots. The abbot never died nor sold, 
and so there he was from 1086 (and I dont know how much earher) till the 
suppression of monasteries in 1536. 

But while the abbot held it of the king, who held it of the abbot ? While the 
abbot did suit and service for it to the king, who did suit and service for it to the 
abbot ? 

The first family that I can see doing so is a family that took its name from the 
place, and was called de Whelnetham. And the first member of that family that I 
can see in possession is Sir John de Whelnetham, knight, in the reign of Henry III, 
c. 1260. I will call him No. i as there was another Sir John afterwards. Of the 
hundred and fifty years immediately following the Norman Conquest I fear I have 
nothing to say. 

I will now proceed to give as full an account as I can of the de Whelnetham 
family and its heirs and descendants. My authorities shall be almost entirely original 
and contemporary authorities such as the public records. And now that printed 
calendars have made those records so easy to be used, there is no excuse for anybody 
to go elsewhere, even if there be any elsewhere to go to. I shall confine myself in 
this section to those de Whelnethams who were in possession. Various other de 
Whelnethams who are to be met with in early records, and who though they took 
their name from this same place need not necessarily belong to this same family, 
will be found gathered together in Part I, p. 308 — 314. 



324 GREAT WHRLNETHAM MANOR. 

De Whelnetham Family. 

SIR JOHN DE WHELNETHAM, No. i. The long reign of Henry HI 
stretched from 1216 to 1272. In the 37 year of his reign, 1253, protection was 
granted for about 350 people who were going with the king to Gascony, for as long 
as they were in his service. Amongst them was John de Whelnetham. (Patent 
Rolls.) 

Amongst the manuscripts belonging to the Corporation of Bury St. Edmunds is 
a deed relating to a meadow at Whepstead, of the reign of Henry III but the exact 
year not known. One of the witnesses to it is Sir John de Whelnetham knight. 

In 1836 were printed two volumes of Excerpta from the rolls of fines preserved 
in the Tower of London. Among them is a villainously abbreviated one about John 
de Welvetham and Matilda his wife giving the king one mark for a writ (brevi) about 
something or other ; and an order was given to the sheriff of Cambridge to see about 
it. Dated 36 Henry III (125 £ — 2). This may or may not relate to the man we are 
dealing with. 

Sir Richard Gipps (who will come into a later section) had some proof of Sir 
John being seated at Whelnetham in 49 Henry III, A.D. 1265, but he does not tell 
us what that proof was. 

I am afraid that is all I can say of Sir John de Whelnetham No. i. 

EDMUND DE WHELNETHAM. He succeeded Sir John and was probably 
his son, but I have no actual proof of it. Sir Richard Gipps says that he succeeded 
him in the tenth year of Edward I, which ran from Nov. 20, 1281. And as Sir 
Richard was a collector and copyist of ancient deeds, he probably had good reason 
for saying so. In the third year of Edward I, a.d. 1274 — 5, I find Edmund the 
defendant in a fine about land at Kettlebaston in Suffolk. This fine probably gives 
us the date of his marriage, for I find that fines were often made at the time of 
marriage, and we shall see presently that his son and heir was born in 1276. 

It is clear from what will be told presently that Edmund died while his son 
John was yet a minor, that is before 1297. Besides John who succeeded him he 
had two younger sons, Henry and Robert, and possibly two more, Nicholas and 
Edmund. 

I may set down here that among the Close Rolls is a memorandum that on 18 
May, 1327, Ahce came into Chancery at Wirsop (Worksop) and acknowledged the 



SIR JOHN DE WHELNETHAM. 325 

following deed : viz. a release by Alice, daughter of Sibil Thweng of Tykehill, to 
John, son of Thomas de Swinford, of her right in the lands that she has of the 
feoffment of Edmund de Whelnetham her brother in Kelm. Dated at Blith on 
Thursday in Easter week i Edward III (1327). 

That is puzzling. The places mentioned are all in Nottinghamshire or there- 
abouts. Edmund is not said to be alive in 1327, and so he might be the Edmund 
who heads these paragraphs. But more likely it is a younger man, as Sibil Thweng 
seem.s to be still alive. The mention of de Swinford helps to connect him with the 
family that we are dealing with, and so I think he must be a son of that Edmund. 
In which case Sibil was the widow of the Edmund who heads these paragraphs, and 

she made a second marriage with Thweng. The Thwengs were a Yorkshire 

family of some note. I shall refer again presently to these out-of-Suffolk de 
Whelnethams. 

Leaving Edmund in a nebulous condition I pass on to his son and heir. 

JOHN DE WHELNETHAM, No. 2. Born 1276. Died between 1342 and 
1346. Now we come to someone who is a little more substantial than the two 
shadows who have gone before him. He lives a fairly long life for that time of day, 
and a very busy one. We can see him once or twice a year for many years together. 
He is generally one of those chosen by the state or the county to do that which has 
to be done, be it parliamentary or judicial or military work. He goes to France and 
Scotland for war ; I have reason for thinking that he was in the disastrous fight at 
Bannockburn ; he goes to Westminster or York or elsewhere for Parliament ; and in 
his own county he is responsible for the collection of the king's tax, and sits in 
judgement upon the disturbers of the public peace, and arrays the men of war. I 
shall set down everything that I can see about him, which is not very much after all. 
If he merely signs his name I shall set it down. If it shows nothing more it will 
show that at any rate he was still alive. And if when we reach the church we can 
find anything there of the date 1300 to 1342, it may be put down to him. 

In his History of Thingoe Hundred, p. 35 — 38, Mr. Gage has printed in part 
a most interesting report of a suit that was tried in London in the Hilary term of 
1297. A certain Benedict of Blakeham had to prove in 1297 that he had reached 
the age of 21 years, and one witness after another gave evidence of it. Amongst 
others Sir Walter de Berneham, knight, then 60 years of age, said that he was at the 
feast when Benedict's mother was churched. And he said that he (Walter) married 



326 GREAT WHELNETHAM MANOR. 

the mother of Edmund de Whelnetham, which Edmund had a son John who was 
born a quarter of a year after Benedict, which John was of full age and had livery 
of his lands from the lords of the fee. Therefore of course Benedict must be of full 
age too. Mr. Gage was not writing or thinking of Whelnetham and the de 
Whelnethams, and it is only incidentally that the suit that he describes gives us 
information of them. It shows that John was the son of Edmund, that he was born 
in or near 1276, and that he was a minor when his father died. 

1298, May II. To my astonishment I find him now settled in Lincolnshire. 
Among the Close Rolls is one dated as above from Thetford, and addressed to the 
Sheriff of Lincoln. This is a summary of it : 

As Robert de Ho knight of Co. Bedford, Edmund de Ho of Co. 
Cambridge, John de Swyneford of Co. Northants, and John de 
Whelnetham of Co. Lincoln, have undertaken before the king that 
Thomas de Swyneford shall find the king for his war in Scotland 
an armed man with a barded (cooperto) horse, the king has pardoned 
Thomas and Margaret his wife their trespass in entering certain lands 
in Noketon and Dunston in Co. Lincoln which are held of the king in 
chief without the king's licence by the feoffment of Norman Darcy 
deceased, and orders the sheriff to restore the lands to Thomas and 
Margaret. 

I dont think there can be much doubt about this John de Whelnetham in 
Lincolnshire being the man that we are dealing with. He is associated with de 
Hoos and de Swinfords as also were the Suffolk de Whelnethams. He must be 
connected with the Edmund de Whelnetham who was connected with Nottingham- 
shire, and if the one was connected with Suffolk the other was too. Of course one 
must not argue in a circle and say that John of Lincolnshire was the same man as 
John of Suffolk because he was connected with Edmund, and then that Edmund of 
Nottinghamshire was Edmund of Suffolk because he was connected with John. 
But still the two together out of Suffolk do help to support each other as being the 
two of Suffolk. Each props the other. They support each other after the fashion 
of an aged couple whom I recollect to have seen years ago taking the air on the 
cathedral green at Wells. Neither could get along without the other, but they went 
side by side and each one leant a little against the other, and so each one propped 
the other and prevented the other from falling. But if either one had fallen the 



SIR JOHN DE WHELNETHAM. 327 



other would have fallen too. And so these two out-of-Suffolk de Whelneihams go 
side by side and each one supports the other as belonging to Suffolk. Each leans 
against the other and keeps him up. But should one fall, i. e. should one of the 
two turn out to be not of Suffolk, then they both fall. We can keep both or neither. 

It therefore seems likely that John after losing his father while quite young was 
brought up in Lincolnshire, perhaps in consequence of his mother's second marriage, 
and did not return to Suffolk till after he had come of age. 

1302. In the summer of this year we find him and Edmund de Hoo granting 
a messuage of his in Little Whelnetham to Simon de Hoo and Matilda his wife. 
(Fine No. 11, p. 279). 

131 1. At Michaelmas we see him getting possession of the manor of Alpheton 
and two parts of the manor of Great Whelnetham. (Fines Nos. 13, 14, p. 280.) 
In these fines he is associated with Alice his wife, the first mention of her that I 
have seen. Here I must stop for a moment to ask, Who was Alice his wife ? 

There seems to have been some connection with the de Hoos, and possibly she 
was a de Hoo. But more likely Edmund de Hoo's mother was a de Whelnetham, 
Edmund de Whelnetham's sister. 

But there is another possibility. Under the parish of Rockland-Toft in Norfolk, 
Blomfield mentions the manor of Kirkehall-Moynes in that parish, which had 
belonged to the le Moyne family. He says that in 1334 John le Moyne's heir had 
it, and he supposes that John de Brokesbourne married her, for he then presented 
to the rectory; and afterwards in 1358 Sir John de Sutton presented in right of his 
wife. 

Now in the course of a few more pages we shall see (what Blomfield did not 
. know, at least not when writing that particular page,) that the wife of John de 
Brokesbourne in 1334 and the wife of Sir John de Sutton in 1358 were the same 
person, viz. Margery daughter and co-heiress of John de Whelnetham whom we are 
now pursuing. Therefore it looks as if they both presented in her right, and as she 
was not a le Moyne herself Alice her mother may have been. But of course this is 
only a possibility, and it is rather against it that Alice and her husband were still 
alive in 1334, and so should have presented for themselves. 

1 3 14. This year is a notable year, annus mirabilis. We have two encounters 
with a lady named Christiana : we escort the Queen of England into France : we 



328 GREAT WHELNETHAM MANOR. 

hurry back in time for the fight at Bannock burn, at least I beUeve we do : we are 
knighted. We can hardly be knighted for the two encounters, but it might be for 
the journey to France or for the fight in Scotland. I will set down what I can see of 
these events in the Calendars. 

On Feb. 20 protection till Whitsunday was granted to several persons who were 
going beyond seas. Among them is John de Whelnetham. Apparently they are 
going with Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, who is going on the king's service in 
the train of Queen Isabella, who was a daughter of Philip, king of France. The 
document granting protection was signed by Edward II at Canterbury. (Patent 
Rolls.) As the Earl of Gloucester had possessions in West Suffolk, it is possible that 
John de Whelnetham held land under him by some kind of service, in which case his 
going to France would not be " an appointment" as we should call it, but simply the 
payment of his rent. 

The Earl of Gloucester was back from France in time to be at the fight at 
Bannockburn on the following June 25. He came not back from Scotland, but was 
left there among the slain. As the huge army which Edward II led into Scotland 
for this expedition was gathered from all parts of his dominions, in France and 
England, it is extremely likely that John de Whelnetham was there too, perhaps 
remaining in the company of the Earl of Gloucester. His lands held by military 
service may have left him no choice even if he had not wished to go. Unlike the 
Earl of Gloucester he survived (if he went) to come back. The one was taken, the 
other left. I shall presently mention a relic of this or of some other visit to Scotland 
at about this time. 

On that same Feb. 20 another document was signed by Edward II at Canterbury. 
It was a commission issued to certain persons, all of Suffolk, to try a case. Their 
names were Hervey de Stanton, William de Ormesby, Robert de Reydon, Thomas 
de Grey, John de Boylaund. The complainant in the case was Christiana de Moese. 
Her complaint was that certain persons had gone to her houses at Stanefeld 
[Stanningfield], co. Suffolk, had besieged and burned them, had wounded her, 
thrown her into a pit (foveam), trampled upon her and carried away her goods. The 
persons whom she charged with doing this were these : John de Whelnetham with 
Henry and Robert his brothers, John de Luton, Simon de Hoo, Nicholas Pykard, 
William de Claverynnge, John de Cramavylle, Robert son of John de Sancto 
Quintino of Sudbury and John his brother, Robert son of Nicholas Darre, Richard 



SIR JOHN DE WHELNETHAM. 329 

Fresel, Bartholomew Jonesspencer de Whelnetham, Edmund de Saxham, John 
Hillary, Richard Markaund of Sudbury, John le Mower of St. Edmunds, John 
Stulle, Thomas de Rome of St. Edmunds, Geoffrey de Holand and John his brother, 
Edmund de Wylburgham, Thomas Hereward, Adam Hunte, John Hamund, John 
de Bradefeld Monachorum, Robert de Derham and John Haverlond, with others. 
(Patent Rolls.) 

One does not expect to find the lord of the manor throwing a lady into a pit 
and stamping upon her. And I thought at first that this must be some other man 
of the same name. But no, it must be him. He heads the list of names as the 
chief man there. His brothers Henry and Robert are expressly mentioned. Those 
who follow are mostly substantial and well to do men. If any one is curious to know 
whence they came and what was their substance, he will find most of them in another 
volume of this series, viz. Suffolk in 1327. 

The pit into which the unfortunate lady was thrown seems to have been in the 
adjoining parish of Stanningfield. As an elaborate history of that parish is being 
written, I leave it to the ai:'^or thereof to identify the pit ; and should Christiana in 
the struggle have dropped her purse or her jewelry, he will no doubt find it and hand 
it over to her heirs and assigns. 

We have not yet done with this quarrel. In this same year 1314, on Nov. 26, 
commission was granted to William de Ormesby, Robert de Maddyngle and Edmund 
de Hemegrave to try a case. This time John de Whelnetham is the complainant. 
He complains that Christiana, late the wife of John Carbonel, Andrew de Berneham, 
Robert parson of the church of Garboldesham, John de Mose chaplain and Adam 
de Sherewode with others assaulted him at Melford. I presume that since the last 
affair, when he was just starting for France, he has been there and thence to 
Scotland and come home again, and that this took place soon after his return. Or 
more likely it took place before he went, and his absence in France and perhaps 
afterwards in Scotland prevented him making his complaint sooner. 

These two Christianas, Christiana de Mose or Moese complainant in February, 
and Christiana, late wife of John Carbonel, defendant in November, were the same 
person. John Carbonell, lord of a manor called Carbonells in Great VValdingfield 
close by where she assaulted John de Whelnetham, married Christiana daughter of 
Sir William Latimer. He died in 1303, and she married secondly Sir Robert de 
Bosco, and thirdly Sir Thomas Mose. (Copinger's Manors I, 238.) Dr. Copinger 



330 GREAT WHELNETHAM MANOR. 

says she died about 13 13. But here she is at the end of 13 14 very much alive, as 
John de Whelnetham could have told us. In making her assault Christiana had 
the support of the Church in the shape of two clergymen, who were charged with 
her. There is now a deep water in Melford village by the way side, and I presume 
it was there then, as among the inhabitants of Melford in 1327 was Isabell atte 
Water. John de Whelnetham was lucky not to have been flung in as Christiana 
had been flung into the pit. 

At p. 290 I have printed the inquisition post mortem of a John de Carbonell 
who died c. 1334. He must have been the grandson of Christiana's first husband. 
It will be seen that he held land under John de Whelnetham. These two assaults 
probably sprung from some dispute about land. There was a tenement in Great 
Whelnetham called Carbonells, but I cannot quite locate it. 

Once more before this eventful year goes out we see John de Whelnetham, 
apparently none the worse for the fight at Bannockburn nor for the encounter at 
Melford. At Acton, which adjoins Melford, in December he witnessed a deed 
concerning land released to the Talemache or Tollemache family. It was on the 
Saturday before St. Thomas' day. (Suff". Arch. Proc. x, 343.) And he signs as a 
knight. There is no record of the creation of knights at this early date, but possibly 
the knighthood may have been the result of the journey to France or of the fight at 
Bannockburn. Being now a knight I presume he will leave off throwing ladies into 
pits. But perhaps he never did do such a thing. We only know of the charge, and 
we dont know that it was proved. 

13 16, March 26. Certain persons are appointed to be commissioners of array 
for their several counties for the general hosting for war against the Scots. For 
Suffolk were appointed Robert de Bures, Peter de Denardiston and Robert de 
Aspale. But on June 20 John de Boylond and John de Whelnetham were 
substituted for Robert Batelkyn and Robert de Aspale. (Pat. Rolls.) Apparently 
' Robert Batelkyn and Robert de Bures are the same man. 

13 18, July 20. The king grants him and his heirs free warren in all their 
demesne lands in Great and Little Whelnetham, Bradfeld, Stanefeld, and Alpheton. 
(Charter Rolls.) 

13 19. A parliament is summoned to meet at York in May. The representatives 
for Suffolk are Richard de Amundeville sen. and John de Whelnetham. 



SIR JOHN DE WHELNETHAM. 331 

1320. July 26. He and John de Luton were appointed conservators of the 
peace for the county of Suffolk. A marginal note says, To arrest malefactors within 
the county of Lincoln. (Pat. Rolls.) We have seen him in his youth described as 
" of Lincoln," but why a Suffolk conservator should have to act in Lincoln I dont 
know. It will be remembered that John de Luton was one of those who had helped 
him to throw Christiana into a pit. It will now be their duty to see that ladies are 
not thrown into pits. — A parliament was summoned to meet at Westminster in 
October of this year. John de Whelnetham and William de Weyland represented 
Suffolk. 

132 1. On November 11 Edmund de Hemegrave and John de Whelnetham 
were appointed conservators of the peace for Suffolk, in pursuance of the Statute of 
Winchester or Westminster. I have printed a summary of this statute at p. 319. 

1322. A parliament was summoned to meet at York in May. He and John 
de Dagworth represented Suffolk. — May 16. Two persons in each county are 
commissioned to select one footman from each town, and to get them armed and 
conducted to Newcastle by the eve of St. James to serve the king for 40 days. For 
Suffolk Edmund de Hemegrave and John de Whelnetham were appointed, and 
John de Whelnetham (as I understand it) personally conducted them. The two 
Suffolk commissioners were instructed to let off the town of Bawdesey from finding a 
footman, as that town had granted the king a ship provided with men at arms, 
victuals etc., to stay in his service for a certain time at their expence. The 
commissioners were to see that Bawdesey was preparing the ship before they let 
them off the footman. (Pat. Rolls. Close Rolls.) 

On July 18 protection until All Saints was granted for several persons who 
were going with the king into Scotland. These included Robert de Haustede, John 
de Whelnetham, John de Norwyco, Thomas son of Laurence de Herdwyk, and 
others. As Hawsted, Whelnetham and Hardwick are contiguous, this looks like a 
family party. 

On July 21 protection was granted for William de la Cressenore and John 
Alisaundre de Rendham, who were going with John de Whelnetham. (Patent Rolls.) 
Probably their going with him was fulfilling the condition under which they held 
lands under him, and so it was the payment of their rent. I presume that these 
grants of protection in foreign parts corresponded to the passport which has only 
lately gone out. In "Suffolk in 1327" William Cressenor will be found at 



332 GREAT WHELNETHAM MANOR. 

Whepstead and Icklingham. John Alisaundre I do not see there, and he may have 
been one of those who went to the war but came not back. 

In December, a tenth and a sixth having been lately granted to the king, two 
assessors and collectors were appointed for each county. Edmund de Hemegrave 
knight and John de Whelnetham were appointed for Suffolk. (Pat. Rolls ) 

1323. On April 5 two or three persons were commissioned in different counties 
to array footmen armed with haketons, basnets and palettis, and to lead them to the 
king (Edward II) at Newcastle on Tyne by the Octave of the Nativity of St. John 
the Baptist to go against the Scots. For Suffolk and Norfolk John Haward, John de 
Fitton and John de Whelnetham were commissioned to array 700 footmen. 

In connection with these expeditions to Scotland I may mention here that one 
day over 50 years ago, when my father was living at Ickworth Lodge, I recollect his 
gardener, Thomas Goodchild by name, finding a silver penny when working in what 
was then our kitchen garden, and which fifty years earlier still had been the drying 
ground. At a much earlier date still, before Ickworth Lodge had become a 
residential house, a road had crossed where this kitchen garden was, going in one 
direction towards Wickhambroke and in the other direction towards Bury. It can 
still be traced in the park outside Ickworth Lodge premises, though it must have 
been done away with two centuries ago. This silver penny was a Scotch coin of 
about the date with which we are dealing. It bore the image and superscription of 
Alexander king of Scotland. I have not got it before me, and so I cannot say 
whether of Alexander II, 1214 — 1249, or Alexander III, 1249 — 1285. But it must 
have been one or the other as there was no later Alexander. It might well have 
been brought home from Scotland by one of these 700 footmen, who either dropped 
it on the road as he was marching home, or perhaps lived near the spot where it was 
found. Or perhaps Sir John dropped it himself. 

1324. A parliament was summoned to meet at Westminster in January. John 
de Whelnetham and Thomas Bavent are the representatives of Suffolk. 

On August I two or three persons in each county were commissioned to 
supervise the array of men in their county in defence of the realm, especially now 
that the king of France is gathering a great army against the king and the duchy of 
Aquitaine ; and to certify the king of the number of horse and foot to be armed with 
steel armour by Michaelmas next. The commissioners for Suffolk are Robert de 
Aspale and John de Whelnetham. (Pat. Rolls.) 



SIR JOHN DE WHELNETHAM. 333 

On Sept. 19 Thomas de Bavent was associated with John de Whelnetham in 
the place of Robert de Aspale to array in the county of Suffolk (excepting the towns 
of Gippewiz and St. Edmunds) 640 footmen. (Pat. Rolls.) 

On Nov. 17 two persons in each county were commissioned to array in their 
several counties the knights, esquires and other men at arms and all fencible men, 
to be ready by Candlemas for service in Gascony against the king of France ; and to 
enquire what knights, esquires and other men at arms there are, and by whom 
retained ; and the king has commanded the arrayers and sheriff to help them. They 
are to spare no one nor take bribes as others have done. William Giffard and John 
de Whelnetham were appointed for Suffolk. (Pat. Rolls.) 

1325. On Feb. 16 John de Daggeworth was substituted in the preceding 
commission for John de Whelnetham, because John de Whelnetham was going to 
Gascony in the company of Robert de Mohaut. (Pat. Rolls.) 

On Nov. 6 John de Whelnetham presented Nicholas de Whelnetham to the 
rectory of Great Whelnetham, who may have been his nephew. 

In 1326 and in 1327 the relations between the town and abbey of Bury St. 
Edmunds were strained, to put it mildly. In the memorials of St. Edmunds Abbey 
Mr. Arnold has printed what he calls the extorted charter, t. e. the charter extorted 
from the abbot by threats. It was sealed by Abbot Draughton in the presence of 
Monsieurs Edmund of Hengrave, John de Coue, William Criketot, Richard de la 
Ryvere, William Giffard, John de Whelnetham, Alexander of Walsham, John de 
Craneville, John de Schelton, knights. " Done at St. Edmunds on Thursday next 
before the Purification of our Lady in the year of our Lord's Incarnacion 1326." 
This concession of a charter did not prevent the serious riots of 1327, when the 
abbey gate was destroyed and much damage done to the abbey property. See 
" Suffolk in 1327," p. xxx, for a complete list of the rioters. 

1327. On March 4 John de Whelnetham, Benedict de Cokefeld and John de 
Ingram were commissioned to hear the complaint of Peter de Denardeston, who 
complained that Edmund de Sancto Mauro, William Cockerel knight, Andrew le 
Forester, John le Neve de Brendilleye and others broke his houses at Brendilleye 
(Brent lUigh) and Meldyng, felled his trees there and carried away his goods. (Pat. 
Rolls.) 



334 GREAT WHELNETHAM MANOR. 

On March 8 commission of the Peace was issued to two persons in each county 
according to the Act, i Edward III, Stat. 2, Cap. 16. The two for Suffolk were 
John de Whelnetham and John de Tendryng. (Pat. Rolls.) I have printed Cap. 16 
at p. 320. 

In January this year Edward II had been deposed and Edward III placed on 
the throne. In September, a twentieth of moveables having been granted to the 
king for the defence of the kingdom against the Scots, two persons in each county 
were appointed to collect it. The two for Suffolk were John de Tendryng and John 
de Whelnetham, who chose a clerk. (Pat. Rolls.) 

This 1327 subsidy has been printed as one of this Green Book Series. It is 
interesting to find in it most of those whom I have been mentioning of about this 
date. But it is curious that neither of the two collectors are in it themselves. I do 
not know that the collectors were exempt in return for their trouble in getting the 
tax collected and carrying it up to London. Robert de Whelnetham, who appears 
as a small payer under Great Whelnetham, is I suppose the brother of Sir John who 
helped to throw Christiana into the pit at Stanningfield. He, or another man of the 
same name, is also to be found under Ipswich. 

1327, Dec. 20. On this day was issued a writ to the escheator to hold an 
inquisition post mortem for Bartholomew de Badelesmere. For Suffolk it was held 
on Feb. 11, 1328, In that county he only had the manor and advowson of Barrow, 
held of the Earl of Norfolk by the service of two knights fees, and the manor of 
Brende Bradfeld. Of this last he held 40 acres of John de Whelnetham by the 
service of 3s. .. 4^d. and ilb. of cummin yearly ; and the rest of it he held of the 
abbot of St. Edmund by the service of rendering 18 pence at the end 'h every 20 
weeks. Giles his son aged 14 years was his next heir. 

1329, Jan. 3. John de Whelnetham, Edmund de Cretyng and Ralph de 
Bockyng are placed on the commission of peace within the liberty of the abbot of 
St. Edmund, pursuant to the Statute of Winchester. On May 18 Thomas Bavent 
and John de Daggeworth are substituted for de Cretyng and de Booking, (Pat. 
Rolls.) For the Statute of Winchester see p. 319. 

^330. On Aug. 28 John de Whelnetham and John de Tendryng were appointed 
to array the knights and other men capable of bearing arms in Suffolk, assembled by 
proclamation to resist the king's rebels. (Pat. Rolls.) 



SIR JOHN DE WHELNETHAM. 335 

1330. On Sept. 16 John de Whelnetham is exempted for life from being put 
on assizes, juries or recognizances, and from appointment as mayor, sheriff, coroner 
or other minister of the king, against his will. (Pat. Rolls.) This is a slight 
intimation that time has been running on, and he is not as young as he was. 
However, he is still only 54 years of age, and is not yet past work. On the same day 
that the above exemption was granted he was placed on the commission of the peace 
in Suffolk according to the Statute of Winchester, and again in January, February 
and June 1331. 

1332. On March 21 five or six persons for each county were appointed as 
keepers of the county according to a statute made in the present parliament, to 
arrest all disturbers of the king's peace therein and to hear and determine the 
trespasses whereof they are indicted. The keepers for Suffolk were Thomas, Earl of 
Norfolk, Thomas Lovayn for whom William Giffard was substituted two days later, 
John de Whelnetham, John de Tendryng, Ralph de Bokkyng. (Pat. Rolls.) 

At Easter this year we see him (described as chevalier) associated with Henry 
de Whelnetham in a fine about land at Whepstead and thereabouts. I presume that 
is his brother Henry who had helped him in 131 4 to throw Christiana into the pit at 
Stanningfield. (Fine No. 16, p. 282.) From another fine this year which I have 
not printed we see that Alice his wife is yet alive. He is associated with her in the 
transfer of some land at Alpheton, (Cal. Suff. Fines, p. 175.) 

1333- On April 14 he is appointed with John de Shardelow and John de 
Norton to hear the complaint of Elena late the wife of John Dautref. She 
complained that Richard de Nowers, John Warde, Peter de Poyton the younger, 
Alina late wife of Ralph de Hemenhale, Walter son of Simon de Preston, Thomas 
son of same Walter, Robert de Hemenhnle and others at Meldyngg, co. Suffolk, 
broke her close and the doors and windows of her houses, took away 12 horses and 
4 oxen worth ;^30, carried away her goods and assaulted her servants. (Pat. Rolls.) 
Uautref is I suppose the name Daltry, Hawtrey, de alta ripa. I do not see this 
name at Milding or anywhere else in "Suffolk in 1327," but Ralph de Hemenhale 
is a very big man at Wickham Skeith and Otley. 

1334. On Aug. 4 he and three others are commissioned with regard to an 
inquisitio post mortem of John Carbonel. This inquisition I have printed at p. 290. 
They are also commissioned to see whether some lands in Waldingfield and Acton 
held by the late escheater, John de Blounville, were held in chief or not, and so 



336 GREAT WHELNETHAM MANOR. 



whether the king ought to have the custody of Alice his daughter aged lo years. 
(Pat. Rolls.) 

On Sept. 21 he, John de Shardelowe and Ralph de Bokking are commissioned 
to hear the complaint of William Germyn and Elena his wife. They complained that 
Aline late the wife of Ralph de Hemenhale, Robert her son, Guy de Sancto Glare 
and others at Melding broke her close and doors and windows, and took away 12 
horses and 4 oxen worth ^30, and assaulted her servants. (Pat. Rolls.) This is the 
same row at Milding as we saw in April 1333. For some reason the commission had 
to be renewed. It is interesting to note that in the interval Elena late wife of John 
Dautref has become the wife of William Germyn. 

***** 

Here is a gap of five years. Between the autumn of 1334 and the autumn of 
1339 I cannot meet with any mention of Sir John de Whelnetham. 

1339. On the Sunday before Michaelmas at Rushbrooke he witnesses a deed 
about land at Rushbrooke, Whelnetham and thereabouts. (Suff. Arch. Inst. 
Proc. X, 256.) 

1340. A parliament was summoned to meet at Westminster in March. For 
Suffolk were chosen John de Whelnetham and Richard de Amundeville. Annual 
parliaments have been chosen for the last twenty years, but he has been in none 
since 1324. 

May 10. A writ is made out to the Sheriff of Suffolk for payment to him and 
Richard de Amundeville, knights of the shire, of ;^2o .. 16 .. o, for their expences in 
attending a parliament at Westminster on Wednesday after Sunday in mid Lent, to 
wit for 52 days at 4 shillings a day. (Close Rolls.) 

May 15. He, John de la Rokele and Robert de Clere were commissioned to 
find out by an inquisition whether the port of Erewell with the arm of the sea there 
belongs to Ipswich. This was in consequence of a petition to the king from the 
burgesses of Ipswich, who complained of claims put forth by the men of Harwich. 

1 34 1. A parliament was summoned to meet at Westminster in April. He and 
William Wauncy represented Suffolk. This was his last parliament. 

In the summer of this year a fine made a few years before is confirmed. See 
p. 282, No. 17. He and his two brothers, Henry and Robert, whom we first saw 
gathered round the pit in Stanningfield twenty seven years ago, seem to be all alive. 



SIR JOHN DE WHELNETHAM. 337 

After the summer of 1341, when he would have been 65 years of age, I can see 
no more of him. Thirty years have gone by since we first saw him associated in a 
fine with Alice his wife, and we can see him continuously since then up to now. 
Twenty seven years have gone by since that eventful year 13 14, the year of 
Bannockburn, the year of his knighthood, and the year when he threw that poor lady 
into a pit at Stanningfield, And now he disappears from Charter rolls and Patent 
rolls, and Close rolls, and fines and the other like sources of information. And I 
think the reason is obvious — he has gone down into the pit himself, a larger one than 
that at Stanningfield. There is one document left for him to come into, an inquisition 
post mortem, but unfortunately he does not come into it. For one reason or another 
there is none existing for him, and so I can only infer his death from his absence. 

In March, 1346, there is a vacancy in the rectory of Great Whelnetham, and the 
appointment of a new rector is made by his son in law, Sir John Sutton of Wyvenhoe 
in Essex. That looks as if he were gone. 

In 1348 we have certain proof that he was gone. In the Calendar of Entries in 
the Papal Registers relating to Great Britain and Ireland, of which 8 volumes have 
been printed so far dealing with 1198 to 1447, are mentioned several indults to 
persons to choose confessors, who shall, if they be penitent, give them plenary 
remission at the hour of death. An indult in the Roman Catholic church is explained 
in the N. E. D. to mean a licence granted by the Pope, which authorizes something 
to be done which the common law of the church does not sanction. 

Now among these indults is one granted on Nov. 8, 1348, to Alice relict of 
John de Whelnetham, knight, of the diocese of Norwich. That shows us that Sir 
John was then dead and that Alice his wife was soon about to rejoin him, 

I think therefore we may put down his death to have taken place at some time 
between the summer of 1341 and March 1346, when he would have been from 65 to 
70 years of age, according to the exact year when he died. He was buried at Great 
Whelnetham, as I shall presently show. Alice his wife was buried at the nunnery at 
Wykes or Wix, 8 miles from Harwich, 12 miles from Colchester, with which the 
de Whelnetham family were closely connected. I am assuming that Alice his wife of 
131 1 and Alice his widow of 1348 are one and the same person, but I cannot prove 
that they are not two different wives of the same name. 

w 



338 GREAT WHELNETHAM MANOR. 



Sir John de Whelnetham left no son behind him. If any had been born he 
went early, perhaps buried in the soil of France or Scotland. But three daughters, 
co-heiresses, can be seen, and perhaps a fourth, a mere possibility. I will set down 
the mere possibility first, and then the three certainties. 

MATILDA. Tanner and Dugdale, in their accounts of the Benedictine 
nunnery at Wykes in Essex, both mention the names of a few prioresses which 
happen to be recorded. Amongst them is Matilda de Whelnetham who died 
May 12, 1370. They say nothing more about her. But as Alice the widow of Sir 
John was buried there, as one of Sir John's sons in law lived in the adjoining parish 
of Bradfield, and as two of Sir John's sons in law endowed it with lands, it seems 
very likely that Matilda de Whelnetham the prioress was his daughter. The year 
1370, when she might have been about 60, suits very well for the year of her death. 

The three certainties I will just set down, and then must leave them to make a 
digression, and return to them again. They were 

1. MARGERY. She was thrice married, (i) To John de Cockfield. (2) To 
Sir John de Brokesbourne of Bradfield, Essex. (3) To Sir John de Sutton of 
Wyvenhoe. She survived them all and died in August 1384. I have printed her 
inquisition post mortem at p. 292. 

2. MARY. She married Michael de Bures, and had a son John de Bures. 

3. AMISIA or AMY. She married John (or Thomas) de Scales. She is not 
quite a certainty. 

Now instead of at once going on to these children and their children, as I should 
greatly prefer, I must pause for a moment to argue. One is groping in the dark and 
cannot make statements without arguing for them. When I had made out the 
succession of the de Whelnethams from the various contemporary records as I under- 
stood it, I went to see how my conclusions agreed with the Davy MSS in the British 
Museum. And I am bound to say that they do not agree with them at all. Nor do 
mine agree with Sir Richard Gipps' account. Both Davy and Gipps make two 
Johns after Edmund while I only make one. 

This is Gipps' account of the family. 

WHELNETHAM or WHELTHAM. This most ancient 
family was of Knight's degree and seated at Great Wheltham in 
Thedwestry Hundred. Sir John de Whelnetham was seated there 



SIR JOHN DE WHELNETHAM. 339 

49 Henry IH. To him succeeded Sir Edmund de Whelnetham 
lo Edward I. John de Whelnetham his son was knight of the shire 
12, 15, 17, Edward H; 14, 15, Edward HI. Sir John de Whelnetham 
his son left his sole daughter and heir married to Edmund Brokesborne, 
by whom he had issue Elianora his sole daughter and heir married to 
Sir William Rainsforth. They were lords of Great Wheltham 49 
Henry HI, of Alpheton 9 Edward II, and had divers lands in 
Lawshall : and bare Or on a Fess az. 3 plates. 



Davy pedigree. 

Sir John de W, in 1265. 

I 
Sir Edmund de W. 

I 
John de W. M.P. 1318, 1321. 



My pedigree. 

Sir John de W. in 1253 etc. 

I 
Edmund d. before 1297. 



Sir John = Alice died c. 1348. 
Born 1276. died c. 1342. 
M.P. 1319 — 22, 1340 — 41. 



Sir John de W. = Alice, 
M.P. 1339, 1340, 1342. 
dead 1365. 

It will be seen that Davy and Gipps agree in having two Johns to my one. 
Every allusion that I find in the records to a John de Whelnetham between about 
1300 and 1342, I put it to the account of one and the same man. They, not 
having the advantage that I have had in the use of Calendars of the Public Records, 
have not met with near so many allusions as I have, but such as they did meet with 
they divide among two men, father and son. It is possible that there were two 
Johns after Edmund, but I am still strongly inclined to think that there was but 
one. I will give a reason or two for thinking so. 

(i) Chronology, that great help to genealogy, does not require two. The first 
John, son of Edmund, was certainly born in 1276. Margery, daughter of the last 
John (if there were two), certainly died in 1384. As she had three husbands and 
about fifty years of married life, she could very easily have been the daughter of a 
man born in 1276. But I must acknowledge that in those days of early marriages 
it was just possible (only just) for her to have been his grandaughter. 

(2) Neither Gipps nor Davy make any attempt to say when their first John 
died, or when their second John began, and I take it that the reason is that there was 
no first John to die, and there was no second John to begin. There was but one. 



340 GREAT WHELNETHAM MANOR. 

(3) The wife of the first John was certainly Alice. The wife of the last John (if 
there were two) was also certainly Alice. I think these two Alices are the same 
person, and therefore the two Johns must be the same person too. 

(4) Neither Gipps nor Davy produce any evidence of a John alive after 1342, 
when (or thereabouts) I say that the last of the name died. 

(5) Gipps and Davy, though they agree in two Johns do not agree in this: Gipps 
makes the M.P. of 1320 to be the same as the M.P. of 1340, as of course I do, 
having only got one. Davy makes these two different men. When you have two 
opponents, it is satisfactory to see them divided for a moment and smiting each 
other. For a moment I was inclined to think they were two when I saw the long 
interval during which the name was absent from Parliament. But eventually I came 
to the conclusion that that was not enough to beat down the evidence in favour of 
one. 

(6) Gipps is certainly wrong in giving his last John only one daughter, whose 
christian name he had not found out, and in marrying her to Edmund de 
Brokesbourne, who was certainly her son. As he made these two obvious mistakes 
he may easily have made one more not quite so obvious. 

(7) Davy is much more thorough and painstaking than Gipps, but I think I can 
see how he was encouraged to go wrong about the two Johns. He had not seen the 
document of 1348 in which Alice is described as widow of John, nor had he the 
evidence that John was probably dead in 1346. He only had a document of 1365 
which showed that the last John was dead then. So he entered him in one pedigree 
as " dead in 1365." But, probably by accident, this " dead in 1365 " got improved 
into " died in 1365," a totally different thing. And that of course settled the matter 
in favour of two Johns, because the first one having been born in 1276 was not very 
likely to have lived till 1365. 

(8) The allusions to John from contemporary records which I have brought 
together, running from c. 1300 to 1342, do not show a decided joint anywhere. 
When a bit of wall has been built on to a wall already standing, you see a joint in 
the masonry where the old wall left off and the new wall began. And so when the 
records of a son are tacked on to the records of the father, as has been done if there 
were two Johns, you would expect to see a decided joint where the records of the 
father stopped and the records of the son began. But no joint is very apparent in 
the records which have just been strung together. The only appearance of a joint is 



SIR JOHN DE WHELNETHAM. 341 

the gap from 1334 to 1339, preceded by the exemption of 1330 and followed by a 
return to Parliament after nearly twenty years absence. But after all that is not 
much. The records of five or six centuries ago must needs be scanty, and it is not 
strange that you should lose sight of a man for five years, especially when he cannot 
be expected to be as busy as he had been. So I say that the reason why there is no 
decided joint is because it all belongs to one man and not to father and son. 

These eight reasons are not conclusive, neither singly nor jointly. But I can see 
nothing on the other hand to support the two Johns except the bare statements of 
Gipps and Davy unsupported by any contemporary evidence. It is most unfortunate 
that there is no inquisition post mortem which might have settled the matter. 

Now we go on again where we left off before the arguing began. Having 
buried Sir John de Whelnetham in Great Whelnetham church in or soon after 1342 
at the age of 66 years or a little more, and having buried Alice his widow at the 
nunnery of Wykes or Wix early in 1349, we may go to their children and children's 
children, whom I will put under a new heading. 

The Heirs of Sir John de Whelnetham. 

The three daughters and co-heiresses of Sir John de Whelnetham were, as I have 
already said, Margery, Mary and Amisia or Amy. Another probable daughter was 
Matilda, the prioress of Wykes nuimery, but she had chosen another lot in hfe, and 
so the title of co-heiress cannot be applied to her. 

Part of the evidence for the three co-heiresses I can only give at second hand, 
as I do not know where the document is. But it was seen by Blomfield, probably 
in some private collection of MSS to which he had access, and that must do. Under 
Thelton, I, 149, and again under Titleshale, X, 61, Blomfield mentions a deed of 
partition made in 1372. At the latter reference he writes thus : — 

In 46 Edward III Margery widow of Sir John de Sutton sen., 
daughter and co-heir of Sir John de Whelnetham, and John de Bures, 
son and heir of Mary formerly wife of Michael de Bures and sister of 
Margery, made partition of the manor of Whelnetham Magna and the 
advowson with Amicia Schalers, widow of Sir Thomas de Schalers, 
another sister and heir as I take it, X, 62. 

Under Thelton he makes Amicia to be the wife of Sir John (not Thomas) de 
Scalers, and adds the manor of Alpheton to the de Whelnetham property that was 



342 GREAT WHELNETHAM MANOR. 

divided. From the words "as I take it" it would seem that the deed did not make 
it absolutely certain to him that Amicia was a sister of Margery and Mary, though it 
is highly probable as she comes into it. The de Scalers or de Scales family were 
connected with Thelton for several generations. I do not see any further mention 
of Amicia or her heirs in connection with Whelnetham, and so I will not pursue her 
any further. I dont know why they waited so many years, thirty years after the 
death of their father, and twenty four years after the death of their mother, before 
they made this partition. Perhaps those who stand up for two Johns will say that it 
was the first John died in 1342, and that the second John was just now dead. But 
I dont think this will stand close examination. 

Having disposed of Amicia, said to be the youngest of the three, I will take 
Mary next, the second daughter, because her descendants do not run on for so long 
as those of Margery do, or if they did, at any rate I am not going to run after them. 

MARY, second daughter of Sir John de Whelnetham and Alice his wife, may 
have been born c. 13 10 or earlier. Somewhere about 1330, certainly not later than 
1335, she was married to Michael de Bures, a younger son of Robert de Bures of 
Acton. This Robert de Bures was a benefactor to the house of Crulched Friars at 
Whelnetham, and I shall refer to him again when we get there. 

In 1326 one sees Michael associated with his father in the purchase of lands, 
(Cal. Sufif. Fines, p. 160,) and possibly that was as much a sign and a preliminary of 
getting married as it would be if a young lady went into a shop and bought 
trousseau. I have noticed how very often the date of marriage corresponds with 
the date of being the petent or querent in a fine. So, perhaps, at the same time 
that Michael and his father were purchasing these lands, Mary de W^helnetham 
and her mother were going into Bury shops to buy trousseau, whatever trousseau 
may be. 

The Calendar of Suffolk Fines shows him as a querent in fines from time to 
time between 1331 to 1365. Some of these fines I have printed in Part i of this 
volume. In 1335 he is associated in a fine with Mary his wife. Edmund de 
Whelnetham, who is one of the deforcients, was I presume her uncle. In 1341 he 
was buying messuages in Kettlebaston and Preston from John de Whelnetham, who 
I presume was his father in law. In 1364 he was buying messuages in Whelnetham. 
(See No. 19, p. 283.) 



THE HEIRS OF DE WHELNETHAM. 343 

Soon after that he must have died. The deed of partition in 1372 implies 
that both he and Mary his wife were dead then. What children there were besides 
John who succeeded them I do not know. I imagine there may have been a 
daughter who married a Rookwood, who at this time were at Acton, as I find the 
Rookwoods later on apparently inheriting a share of Sir John de Whelnetham's 
estate. 

Where Michael and Mary de Bures lived I do not know. Apparently the 
manor of Great Whelnetham was their share of Sir John de Whelnetham's estate, 
while the manor of Alpheton went to Sir John's eldest daughter, Margery. So 
possibly they lived at Great Whelnetham. They do not come into "Suffolk in 
1327," it being I suppose just too early for them. The advowson of Great 
Whelnetham seems to have belonged to Margery and Mary alternately, judging from 
the presentations. 

The family of de Bures of Acton has many points of interest, especially if the de 
Bures of London and Banstead in Surrey belong to them. The numerous allusions 
to them in the various rolls in the Public Record Office need to be collected and set 
down in order, and then we shall know what can be known. And this needs to be 
done leisurely, and not in the scrambling fashion of Dr. Copinger. And whoso does 
this should do it first and go to Davy afterwards for possible additions. If he 
goes to Davy first, he may be put on a wrong scent and never get right again. 
Besides which it is so much better to make your own original mistakes than to copy 
those which have been already made by other people. 

JOHN DE BURES, son and heir of Michael and Mary de Bures, succeeded 
to his mother's share of Sir John de Whelnetham's estate, viz. the manor and 
advowson of Great Whelnetham. In 1385 we have seen him buying lands in 
Whelnetham and roundabouts. (See Fine No. 20, p. 284.) In 1380 and again in 
1400 he presented to the rectory of Great Whelnetham. He is described as John de 
Bures de Whelnetham, and so I presume that he resided at the hall. He did not 
present to the rectory in 1402, nor in 1403 when there was another vacancy, and so 
I suppose he died between June 1400 and Oct. 1402. 

I can see no sign of his being succeeded by a son. The presentation to the 
rectory of Great Whelnetham in 1402 and 1403 by trustees looks as if his heir was a 
minor. If a minor it would probably be a granddaughter, or a great niece or great 
nephew. In 1420 we see the manor and advowson of Great Whelnetham being sold 



344 GREAT WHELNETHAM MANOR. 



by William Rookwood jun. and Agnes his wife to a huge crowd of feoffees. I 
imagine that these Rookwoods must have inherited it by descent from Sir John de 
Whelnetham, but how descended from him I cannot say. Either Michael de Bures 
or John de Bures may have had a daughter who married a Rookwood. But 
apparently this sale of the manor and advowson in 1420 was not a real sale whereby 
you part with a thing and it is yours no more, but only a legal fiction of some sort, 
because in 144 1 and in 145 1 I still find the Rookwoods presenting to the rectory. 

Amidst all these doubts and obscurities it seems pretty certain that with the 
death of John de Bures de Whelnetham between (as I suppose) 1400 and 1402, when 
he might be getting on for 70 years of age, that branch of de Bures which was 
descended from Sir John de Whelnetham died out in the male line ; and it seems 
almost as clear that the Rookwood family, who by this time had left Acton and come 
to Stanningfield, represented that branch in the female line. 

I ought to make some allusion to Joan de Bures, a nun at St. Helen's within 
Bishopsgate, London. I have printed at page 317 an indenture of November 141 7, 
whereby certain lands in Whelnetham are charged with the payment of ;£^ a year to 
that nunnery as long as she remained in it. I imagine that she must certainly have 
been a descendant of Michael and Mary de Bures, but as one does not know her age 
in 141 7 one cannot say to which generation she belonged. She might have been a 
daughter of John de Bures de Whelnetham ; or, if he had a son who died before his 
father, she might have been a daughter of that son, in which case she would have 
been entering the nunnery in early life. In the other case she would have been 
entering it rather late in life, if 141 7 is the year of her entering it. 

I ought by rights now to take up the Rookwoods, and follow them. But as their 
possession of the manor does not last very long, and as I have reason to believe that 
a forthcoming history of Stanningfield will make everything quite clear, I will not 
follow the line of Mary de Whelnetham any further. 

Having now disposed of two of the three daughters and co-heiresses of Sir John 
de Whelnetham, we come to MARGERY, the eldest. She with her long life, her 
three husbands, her inquisition post mortem, her descendants to the third and fourth 
generation, is not to be got rid of so quickly as the other two, 

MARGERY, eldest daughter of Sir John de Whelnetham and Alice his wife, 
may have been born about 13 10 or before it. Davy's MSS give the order of her 
three husbands thus : John de Brokesbourne, John de Cockfield, John de Sutton. 



THE HEIRS OF DE WHELNETHAM. 345 

But I shall show presently that we know the date of de Brokesbourne's death and 
the date of the de Sutton marriage, and that it is not possible to squeeze another 
husband in between those two dates. So I shall alter that order and put de 
Cockfield first. I imagine that Davy put them in that order because that is the 
order in which they are mentioned in her inquisition post mortem. But inquisitions 
were held for the purposes of taxation and not for purposes of chronology or 
biography, and so they were not bound to put the three husbands in their right 
order. 

Her first husband, then, was John de Cockfield. He held a manor in the place 
from which he took his name, and I suppose there he resided, and so was almost a 
next door neighbour to the de Whelnethams at Whelnetham. He held that manor 
of the abbot of Bury by military service. Their married life could not have been 
very long. Perhaps the military service brought it to an end and left him dead in 
France or Scotland. His name does not seem to have been continued after him. 
In Margery's inquisition his then (1384) heir is said to have been his consanguineus 
John Bret, 24 years of age. Possibly John Bret was his daughter's son. In a fine 
which I have printed at p. 286 we see an Edmund Bret of Cockfield selling his land 
in 1426, which Edmund may have been a son of John the consanguineus. 

In or about 1331 Margery married secondly John de Brokesbourne of Bradfield 
in Essex. Bradfield lies on the road from Colchester to Plarwich. Wykes nunnery, 
which we are often coming across, was close by. She must have been his second 
wife, as his inquisition shows that Robert his son and heir was born in 131 2. At 
p. 290 I have printed the inquisition taken in 1326 after the death of Elizabeth de 
Brokesbourne, " who was the wife of John de Brokesbourne." That expression 
implies that she was a widow, and so she could not have been the first wife of our 
John de Brokesbourne, She may have been his mother or stepmother. Apparently 
her maiden name was Carbonell. We have met with that name before in connection 
with a pit at Stanningfield. 

In his History of Essex Morant says that in 13 12 William Frank granted his 
manor of Bradfield to John de Brokesbourne and Joan his wife, which Joan was 
probably William Frank's daughter. They were then lately married, Robert the son 
and heir being born in 131 2. There seems from the inquisition to have been two 
more sons, William and Nicholas, by this first marriage. Joan died I dont know 
when. 



346 GREAT WHELNETHAM MANOR. 

In 1 33 1 John de Brokesbourne was a benefactor to Wykes or Wix nunnery, 
which was close to Bradfield. In 1332, if not before, he was certainly married to 
Margery, for Morant says that by a fine in that year they settled Bradfield upon 
themselves. John de Brokesbourne comes into "Suffolk in 1327" by reason of 
something that he possessed in Great Waldingfield. As Elizabeth de Brokesbourne 
held the manor of Great Waldingfield (see her inquisition), and had died the year 
before, that confirms my supposition that she was his mother. 

In 1334 and 1341 John de Brokesbourne presented to the rectory of Rockland 
Tofts. Blomfield thought he did so in right of his wife, but I rather doubt it. 

In 1342 John de Brokesbourne was dead. Inquisitions were generally held 
pretty soon after death, and his was held on Nov. 20. (See p. 291.) Robert, his son 
and heir by his first wife, was then 30 years of age, and Edmund, his son by his second 
wife, would have been about 3 years of age. 

In 1343 Robert de Brokesbourne came into Chancery at Westminster and 
acknowledged certain deeds. One of those deeds was a grant of the manor of 
Bradfield to his stepmother Margery and her heirs male by John de Brokesbourne. 
This grant was dated at Bradfield on Sunday the Feast of the Purification, 
17 Edward III, i.e. Feb. 2, 1343. Another deed of the same date was a grant by 
the same Robert to John de Sutton knight and Margery widow of John de 
Brokesbourne and her heirs male by John de Brokesbourne of lands in Bradfield. I 
do not know why this was done. As Robert came into Chancery, apparently he was 
not dying though he might have been doomed. Was he renouncing this world and 
its wealth and about to go into a monastery ? Whatever the reason of this 
renunciation on the part of Robert these deeds, which I get from the Calendar of 
Close Rolls, show that Margery's second widowhood was a very short one. If not 
already married again in Feb. 1343, yet the linking of her name with Sir John de 
Sutton shows that it was settled. So it is perfectly impossible to squeeze in John de 
Cockfield. 

Her third husband, then, is Sir John de Sutton of Wyvenhoe in Essex, knight, 
and they are married in 1343. He has two sons by a former marriage, John and 
Richard, at this time boys of 10 or 12 years of age. They both in turn succeeded 
to Wyvenhoe, they were both knights in their father's life time, and their inquisitions 
will be found at p. 295 — 6. I believe their mother's name was Agatha. 



THE HEIRS OF DE WHELNETHAM. 347 

Margery's new home at Wyvenhoe is five miles from Colchester. According to 
Morant her husband's father, Sir William de Sutton, had obtained it, and also the 
old hall manor of Tendring, by his marriage with Margery, daughter and heiress of 
Sir Richard Bataile. In March 1347 Sir John de Sutton in right of his wife presented 
to the rectory of Great Whelnetham. In 1349 and again in 1360 we see Sir John 
and Margery associated in fines. (Cal. Sufif. Fines, p. 209(2), 225.) In December 
1358 Sir John presented to the rectory of Rockland Tofts in right of his wife, which 
she had from her former husband, John de Brokesbourne. 

In 1365 I come across them in a very interesting document for which I am 
indebted to Blomfield's History of Norfolk. Blomfield does not say where he saw 
the document, and I imagine that it was in some private collection of MSS to which 
he had access. He says that in a grant dated at Claketon (Clacton), i6th of the 
Kalends of September, 39 year of Edward III, Simon Sudbury, Bishop of London, 
granted to all who would pray for the soul of Sir John de Whelnetham knight 
deceased, whose body was buried in the church of Whelnetham Magna, and say the 
Lord's Prayer and the angelick salutation, and for the souls of the Lady Alice late 
his wife, of Sir John de Brokesbourn knight, John de Cockfield esquire, James de 
Sutton and the Lady Maud de Sutton deceased, whose bodies lie in the chapel of 
the Blessed Virgin in the Conventual church of Wykes Nunnery in Essex, should 
have forty days pardon. (Blomfield X, 62.) This grant must have been made at the 
request of Margery. In it are named her father and mother, and two of her husbands, 
the third being still alive. I am sorry that the two husbands are not named in the 
order in which I have placed them, but I cannot alter it. Probably Davy saw this 
grant in Blomfield and took his order from it. The two de Suttons named may be 
two of Margery's children who died young, but I have no evidence of them. 

The two de Sutton boys, John and Richard, have by now grown up and been 
knighted, and the three knights. Sir John the father. Sir John the son, Sir Richard, 
are constantly to be met with in contemporary documents. 

I can find no inquisition held after the death of Sir John de Sutton the father, 
and so I cannot give the exact date of his death. He is alive in Nov. 1365, the date 
of an inquisition ad quod damnum, printed at p. 307 ; and I think he is alive in 
1368 (Cal. Suff. Fines, p. 237); he is dead in 1372, the date of the deed of partition 
of the de Whelnetham property. 

Margery survived him twelve years or more. I imagine she lived during what 
was nominally her third widowhood but really her first, so short had been the time of 



348 GREAT WHELNETHAM MANOR. 

the other two, at her dower house of Tendring old hall in Essex. The site of this 
house is probably now occupied by a farm house owned, and till lately also occupied, 
by Mr. Douglas Hervey. By a curious accident Mr. Douglas Hervey also owns the 
Scotch coin that I have mentioned as having been probably dropped by Sir John de 
Whelnetham or one of his soldiers on their return from a military expedition to 
Scotland. So that the coin which the father (may have) dropped finds a shelter 
nearly six hundred years later in his daughter's house ! If any one had put such a 
thing into a novel, one might have said. How absurd ! 

In April 1382 her nephew John de Bures presented to the rectory of Great 
Whelnetham, but in the following January she herself presented. 

And now fifty five years or more having gone by since her first marriage there 
only remains to set down the date of her death. This one can do with great 
exactness, thanks to the inquisition held after it. She died of a Tuesday. It often 
happens that on looking into one's own memory one finds what little things remain 
there while greater things have dropped out. And so Ukewise in the records of past 
centuries one often finds such little things remaining while greater things are lost. 
Here is a lady born just 600 years ago ; in the course of about 75 years of life there 
must have been some things she did relatively of consequence ; and yet after giving 
the names of her three husbands one cannot say much more of her than that she 
died of a Tuesday. The Tuesday remains while the greater things are lost. The 
particular Tuesday on which she died was the Tuesday next after August i, 1384. 

She was buried in the church of Wyvenhoe. Blomfield gives the epitaph which 
was there : (X, 62.) 

Margery de Sutton gist icy, 

Dieu de sa alme eiyt mercy, 

s' alme priera 

xl jours de pardon avera. 
Here we have the promise of 40 days pardon for whoso would pray for her soul as in 
the deed of 1365 already mentioned. 

Her inquisition was held in the following September. As her manors and lands 
lay in two counties, two inquisitions had to be held. That for what she had in 
Suffolk was held at Stratford, that for Essex at Colchester. The life possessions were 
contributions from each of her three husbands. The manor in Cockfield, which 
came to her from John de Cockfield, now went to his heir and consanguineus, John 



THE HEIRS OF DE WHELNETHAM. 349 

Bret, aged 24 years. The manor of Bradfield in Essex, which came to her from Sir 
John de Brokesbourne, now went to her son by him, Edmund, now aged 45 years. 
Sir John's sons by a former marriage have all mysteriously disappeared. The 
manor of Tendring hall in Essex and lands at East Bergholt, which came to her from 
Sir John de Sutton, now went to his son and heir, her stepson, Sir John de Sutton, 
now aged 50 years. The manor of Alpheton, inherited from her father, now goes to 
her son Edmund de Brokesbourne. But I will leave the inquisition to speak for 
itself. It will be seen that the one for Suffolk goes much more into curious details 
than that for Essex. See p. 292. 

EDMUND DE BROKESBORNE. Born in 1339 or 1340, as we may gather 
from his mother's inquisition. Having lost his father at the age of 3 years, I presume 
he was brought up at Wyvenhoe with his two half brothers, John and Richard de 
Sutton. The inheritance to which he succeeded on his mother's death, when he had 
reached the mature age of 40 years, was Bradfield in Essex and Rockland Tofts in 
Norfolk, which was de Brokesborne property, and Alpheton in Suffolk, which was his 
mother's share of the de Whelnetham property. Whelnetham itself was in the 
possession of his cousin John de Bures. 

In his list of rectors of Rockland Tofts Blomfield has one presented on Dec. 26, 
1377, by Edmund son of Edmund de Brokesborne knight. For a moment I thought 
we were going to have here the same difficulty as we had in the case of Sir John de 
Whelnetham, viz. in deciding whether there were two of the name or only one. But 
I am certain that in this case there is only one, and that Edmund son of Edmund 
knight is a slip of Blomfield's or somebody's pen for Edmund son of John knight. 
We know from Margery de Sutton's inquisition that her son, Edmund son of John, 
was still alive in 1377, and so in all probability he would have presented and not his 
son Edmund, even if he had one. Besides which Edmund was not a knight, and 
John was, and besides that it would have required a very early marriage for Edmund 
to have had a son of age in 1377. But still the slip in Blomfield, if it is a slip, is a 
tiresome one, and just prevents that absolute certainty which it is always so 
comfortable to feel. 

Edmund belongs to Essex rather than to Suffolk, and I have very little to say 
about him. He was aUve in the middle of 1393, as the Calendar of Suffolk Fines 
shows him one of several feoffees who are querents in a suit concerning land at 
Bergholt. It is a family suit, as his half brother Richard de Sutton is the defendant. 
(Cal. p. 267.) 



350 GREAT WHELNETHAM MANOR. 



In vol. VI. of the Proceedings of the Essex Arch. Soc. is a paper on some 
brasses in Essex churches. From it I learn that in Halstead church is a brass of 
Bartholomew, Lord Bourchier, and his two wives. His first wife was Margaret, 
daughter of Sir John de Sutton, who must be the second Sir John, half brother to 
Edmund de Brokesborne. Lord Bourchier's second wife was Idonea nee Lovey, 
widow (i) of Edmund de Brokesborne, (2) of John Glevant. As Idonea was married 
to her third husband before 1399 when she had a daughter by him, Edmund de 
Brokesborne must have died very soon after 1393, when he was a party in the fine. 
In fact I think he was already dead then, for in June, 1392, he did not present to 
the rectory of Rockland Tofts. 

Idonea died in September 1410. I imagine she must have been about 30 years 
younger than Edmund, which rather favours the idea of there being two Edmunds, 
father and son, and her husband being the son. But the objections against two 
Edmunds require more than that to upset them. Whether he had made a previous 
marriage I cannot say. He left a daughter Eleanor, who carries us out of the 
de Brokesborne family into that of Raynford, Raynforth or Raynsforth. Davy and 
Gipps call her an only daughter, but I am not certain that there were not two. 

Before leaving Edmund de Brokesborne it may be as well to put down concisely 
the reasons for and against two Edmunds. They are not conclusive either way, but 
I and 2 against are very nearly so. All four For can be got over; but i and 2 
Against cannot well be got over. 

For. I. Blomfield, quoting I suppose a Norwich episcopal record, says Edmund 
son of Edmund knight, presented in 1377. 

2. Eleanor, daughter and heiress of Edmund, would have been born when her 

father was about 50 years old if there was only one, and when he was 
about 25 if there were two. 

3. Idonea, wife of Edmund, would have been about 30 years younger than 

her husband if there was only one, and about 5 years younger if there 
were two. 

4. The number of years occupied by several generations would prefer two 

generations to one. 

Against, i. We know for certain that Edmund sen. (if there were two) was alive in 
1377, and so his son Edmund, if he had one, should not have 
presented. 



THE HEIRS OF DE WHELNETHAM. 351 

2. We have strong reason for thinking that there was no Edmund knight, 

but there certainly was a John knight, father of Edmund. 

3. As the first Edmund (if there were two) was born in 1339 or 1340, it 

would have required an early marriage for him to have had a son 
of age in 1377. 

Raynford or Raynsforth. 

ELEANOR, daughter and heir of Edmund de Brokesborne, would have been 
born about 1390. I am assuming that she was his daughter by Idonea, whom he 
must have married rather late in life, and not by some former marriage of which I 
know nothing. Morant says that she married (i) John Fitz Raufe, and (2) William 
Raynford. Of the Fitz Raufe marriage I am very doubtful. In the Cal. of Suffolk 
Fines is a fine early in 141 7 between John Fitz Ralph on the one part and William 
Raynforth and Eleanor his wife on the other part concerning land in Essex (p. 286.) 
So I dont see how he could have been her husband. On the other hand some 
connection with Fitz Ralph is shown by the fact that in 1439 a John Fitz Ralph 
presented to the rectory of Rockland Tofts, which had for long been de Brokesborne 
property. It looks much more as if Eleanor had a sister who married John Fitz 
Ralph, and who carried to him the de Brokesborne property in Norfolk. However, 
that does not very much concern this volume. 

Ignoring, then, this very doubtful first marriage I shall simply say that before 
141 7, the date of the fine, she was married to William Raynford or Raynsforth. 
Probably the fine and the marriage were of about the same date. He appears to 
have come from somewhere within the diocese of Lichfield. His wife brought to him 
the de Brokesbourne inheritance of Bradfield in Essex and the de Whelnetham 
inheritance of Alpheton in Suffolk. As they jointly presented to the rectory of Great 
Whelnetham in 142 1, I presume that she inherited the advowson thereof. But what 
to say about Fine No. 23, printed at p. 285, I dont know. There is the manor and 
there is the advowson, and apparently the Rokewoods are selling it. But who is the 
real purchaser goodness knows. 

Somehow William Raynforth and Eleanor his wife were cousins, without her 
knowing it, and so were liable to excommunication. In the Calendar of Entries in 
the Papal Registers relating to Great Britain and Ireland there is the entry of this 
indult or permission : — 



352 GREAT WHELNETHAM MANOR. 



1428. 17 Cal. December, To William Raynforth layman of the 
diocese of Lichfield. — Lately, upon its being set forth to the Pope on 
behalf of said William and the late Eleanor Brokesburne damsel, that 
they, he being [not] ignorant and she being quite unaware that they 
were related in the second degree of afifinity, had contracted marriage 
per verba legitime de presenti and had begotten offspring, the Pope 
ordered the Bishop of London to absolve William from the sentence 
of excommunication which he had incurred, enjoining upon him a 
salutary penance, and to dispense him and Eleanor, after temporary 
separation, to contract marriage anew and remain therein, and to 
declare past and future offspring legitimate, the Pope's will being that 
if William survived Eleanor, he should remain perpetually unwed. At 
William's recent petition declaring that Bishop Richard made the said 
absolution and dispensation, and that William and Eleanor contracted 
marriage anew, and that Eleanor has died and that he wishes to marry 
again, the Pope grants him indult (leave) to marry again now and as 
often as he may be without wife. 

She therefore died before him and before December 1428. Morant, who had 
not the advantage of seeing this Calendar, makes her survive her husband and die in 
July 1437. 

He died in June 1434, whether of a Sunday or of a Monday I am not quite 
sure. Being a two-county man two inquisitions were held after his death, for Suffolk 
at Newmarket, tor Essex at St. Osyth. The Suffolk jury returned him as dying on 
the Sunday next after the feast of St. Petronilla, /. e. the Sunday after May 31. The 
Essex jury, who perhaps knew best, returned him as dying on the Monday next 
before the feast of Pentecost. The difference between them might be one of less than 
a mmute, so I wont spend time over it. (See p. 297.) Lawrence was returned as his 
son and heir aged 15 years. 

LAWRENCE RAYNFORD. Born in or near 1419. Eldest son of William 
and Eleanor Raynford. Though he owned the advowson of Great Whelnetham, yet 
he had little to do with the place or with Suffolk, and I shall not give myself the 
trouble of hunting him out. He presented to Great Whelnetham in 1455, in 1476, 
and in 1484. He was sheriff of Essex and Herts, and was knighted in or before 
1466. The two inquisitions held after his death show that he was then holding 



THE HEIRS OF DE WHELNETHAM. 353 

Bradfield in Essex, and Moynes manor in Rockland Tofts in Norfolk, but there is no 
inquisition for Suffolk. Possibly it is lost. He died Sept. 18, 1490, and was buried 
in St. John's abbey at Colchester. John Raynford his son and heir was then past 
30 years of age. 

JOHN RAYNSFORD. Born 1460. Son and heir of Sir Lawrence Raynsford 
knight. He was knighted in June 1497 at the foot of London bridge, when Henry 
VH entered London after defeating the Cornish rebels at the battle of Blackheath. 
(Shaw's Knights of England.) He presented to the rectory of Great Whelnetham in 
15 1 2 and 1 5 19, but I cannot be sure that he had anything besides the advowson. 
No Raynsford comes into "Suffolk in 1524," but that might be because he was 
charged under Essex, and I believe you were only charged for what you had in that 
county in which you had most. 

I believe he was twice married ; (i) to Ann, daughter of Sir Humphrey Starkey, 
one of four daughters and co-heiresses : (2) to Margaret, Lady Shaw. By the first 
wife he had a son and heir, John. By the second he had a daughter, Julian, who 
married William Waldegrave and whom we shall see again presently. 

His will is dated Sept. 17, 1521, and was proved Feb., 1521-2. He desires 
"if I die in the realme of England within 50 miles of Colchester, to be buried 
within the monastery of St John's at Colchester, within our Lady chapel where my 
father lyeth buried." He bequeathed to Bradfield church a silver cross. I have 
not seen this will, but take this extract from the Proceedings of the Essex Arch. Soc, 
New Ser. H, 365. 

JOHN RAYNSFORD. Son and heir of Sir John Raynsford knight. He 
presented to the rectory of Great Whelnetham in 1549 and 1554. He too was 
knighted. Mr Shaw's great work on the Knights of England give a John Raynsford 
knighted in August 15 13, possibly in France at the battle of Spurs, and a John 
Raynsford with otheis knighted on July i, 1523, by the Lord Admiral after the 
taking of Morlaix " for their hardiness and noble courage." I dont know which of 
these is him, or whether the tap on the shoulder may not have been given him twice 
over. This Sir John and his father have been rolled by Morant into one, 
and that one is consequently granted a long life of 99 years. Laborious and 
painstaking as the old genealogists were, they often make stupid and obvious 
mistakes through neglecting chronology. Three generations are made to fill up the 



SU GREAT WHELNETHAM MANOR. 



space of one, or one of three. One man has a century or more of life, another is a 
grandfather before he is two years old. If they had simply counted up, they would 
at once have seen some of their mistakes. 

Sir John died without issue in 1559. He desired to be buried in St Katherine's, 
Cree Church. That brings the name of Raynsford to an end as far as Great 
Whelnetham is concerned, and lets in WALDEGRAVE. 

JULY AN, daughter of the first of the two Sir John Raynsfords and half sister of 
the other one, married Sir William Waldegrave knight of Smallbridge in Bures. He 
was captain of 200 Suffolk men in France, and died at Calais on 12 December, 1554- 
He was buried there in the church of our Lady, but his epitaph was in Bures church. 
Sir William and Julyan had one son, William, and three daughters. So much I 
learn from Reyce's Breviary of Suffolk, ed. by Lord Francis Hervey in 1902. The 
epitaph at Bures is there given and an ample Waldegrave pedigree up to Reyce's date. 

WILLIAM Waldegrave of Smallbridge, only son of Sir William and Julyan, was 
also a knight. He presented, or at least had the right of presenting, to the rectory 
of Great Whelnetham in 1588. So I think we may assume that he had inherited 
from his mother so much of the de Whelnetham property as had come through the 
de Brokesbournes to the Raynsfords. From the inquisition post mortem of Henry 
Drury I gather that at some time before 1587 he had sold to Henry Drury the 
manor of Great Whelnetham. See p. 298. He died Aug. 17, 1613, and was buried 
at Bures. 

And now we part from the de Whelnethams and their heirs and descendants. 
Whether their descendants under some name or other are to be found living to day I 
do not know. Very likely they are. But at the point which we have now reached, viz. 
c. 1600, their long connection with the manor and advowson of Great Whelnetham 
has utterly come to an end. We have followed them through ten generations for 
about 350 years, from the first Sir John de Whelnetham of the reign of Henry III, 
C. 1250, through de Brokesbournes, Raynsforths and Waldegraves, to the very end of 
the reign of Queen Elizabeth. As on an average thirty years always go to a 
generation, I should have been better satisfied if I had had eleven generations instead 
of ten. But the excess of years is after all not very great. The late-in-life marriage of 
Edmund de Brokesborne may account for a part of it ; and the fact that in counting 
to nearly the end of William Waldegrave's long life we are really including the time 
of the generation that followed his will account for the rest of it. 



ME HEIRS OF DE WHELNETHAM. 355 

The question arises, Have we, while following these generations, been carrying 
the manor along with us all the time ? We certainly started with it, and we certainly 
finished or nearly finished with it. But it does not appear that the Brokesbornes 
and Raynsforths in between had it. They presented to the rectory, and the advowson 
and manor went together, and yet I do not think they had the manor. I can 
therefore only suppose that in consequence of a marriage between cousins the line 
descended from Margery de Whelnetham and the line descended from Mary her 
sister became one line, so that the Waldegraves with whom we finished were the 
descendants, heirs and representatives of both sisters. Or if there was no such 
marriage between cousins, then the descendants of Michael and Mary de Bures must 
have come to an end, and the descendant of Margery must have consequently 
become the heir of Mary, and so have become possessed of the manor. Had I 
pursued the Rookwoods, as I ought to have done, this would have been proved or 
disproved. 

The sale of the manor and advowson in 1420, as shown in Fine No. 23 at p. 285, 
is not a very clear transaction. William and Agnes Rookwood are selling it, who I 
think must have inherited it by descent from Mary de Bures. When one looks to 
see who is buying it, one sees only a crowd of feoffees, thirteen of them, kicking up 
as much dust as a motor car and making it difficult to see what is going on. The 
price paid is 200 marks, /. e. ;^i33 .. 6 .. 8. Apparently one of the feoffees, a clerk 
named John Chetebere (Chedburgh), is the one for whom it is really bought. But 
as one sees nothing more of this John Chetebere, and as it all still continues to be in 
the possession of the descendants of the de Whelnethams, it would seem as if the 
sale was only a legal fiction and no sale at all, and the sellers were not selling and the 
buyers were not buying. 

Before we part from the de Whelnethams and their decendants it may be as well 
lo set them down in a tree. 



356 



GREAT WHELNETHAM MANOR. 






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DRURY OF LA\VSHALL. 357 

Drury of Lawshall and Hawstead. 

Now we come to new owners who have obtained us by purchase and not by 
inheritance. 

HENRY DRURY of Lawshall. He was the younger of the twin sons of Sir 
William Drury of Hawstead, who died in January, 1558. In Sir John CuUum's 
History of Hawstead, p. 147, is printed the will of that Sir William. In it he 
mentions his lands at Sicklesmere which had belonged to his father. Sir Robert, 
before him, but there is no mention of Great Whelnetham manor, which clearly was 
not his. At p. 298 I have printed the inquisition post mortem of Henry Drury, 
which was held at Bury St. Edmunds in June 1587. That inquisition shows 
distinctly that Henry Drury died possessed of the manor, and that he had bought it 
some years before his death from Sir William Waldegrave. That is satisfactory, as it 
shows that we have no gap needing to be filled up between this subsection and the 
one before it. Henry Drury follows William Waldegrave as Tuesday follows 
Monday. 

Henry Drury, whose house at Lawshall is still to be seen near the church, died 
in January 1587. His heir was his only son Henry, then 21 years of age. I know 
nothing more of young Henry, but I think he must have died very soon afterwards 
unmarried. 

SIR WILLIAM DRURY of Hawstead. Henry Drury, the father, left his 
estate to his nephew. Sir William Drury of Hawstead, in the event of Henry his son 
having no male issue. This Sir William was killed in a duel in France in January 
1590. I have printed his inquisition post mortem at p. 299. There is no mention 
in it of the manor of Great Whelnetham, and I think that it is clear that he sold it to 
the Jermyns of Rushbrooke. 

Before parting from the Drurys I should mention that Davy in his MSS, now in 
the British Museum, says that in 18 14 he saw the Court rolls of Great Whelnetham 
manor, which were then in the keeping of J. Topple at Bury St. Edmunds, and by 
leave of Mr. J. Benjafield he made some extracts from them. He says that they 
began in 7 year of Queen Elizabeth, i.e. Nov. 1564 — 1565. He mentions a court 
held Nov. 9, 1566, of George Howard miles as guardian of Wenefrid Raynsforth, 
widow, per Elizabeth Drury, widow of Sir William Drury. And another court, held in 
1575, of George Howard as custodian of Wenefrid per Henry Drury. And the first 
court of Thomas Pendleton and Andrew Winter held in April 1590. And a court of 



358 GREAT WHELNETHAM MANOR. 

Sir Robert Jermyn held Sept. i8, 1590. These courts show the transitional period, 
when the manor was passing from the heirs of de Whelnetham to the Drurys and 
Jermyns, and the owners at the moment were not very clearly defined. Wenefrid 
Raynsforth was, I believe, a lunatic. 

I give a Drury pedigree as far as we are concerned with them. (See Muskett's 
S.M.F. vol. I.) 

Sir Robert Drury died 1535 
had Sicklesmere 

Sir William = (2) Elizabeth Sothell died 1575 
died 1557 



Robert died before his father twins Henry of Lawshall died i kSj 

0. . I I 

Sir William = Elizabeth Stafford Henry aet. 21 in 1587 

killed 1590 

Jermyns of Rushbrooke and their heirs and descendants. 

Sir Thomas Jermyn of Rushbrooke acquired a good deal of land which had 
belonged to monasteries. I have printed at p. 307 a document that shows some of 
the Bury abbey lands that he purchased. He died in October 1552. In his will he 
mentions " the revenues of my manors of Wheltham Magna and Parva." But we 
have clear evidence that Henry Drury had it later than that. And no Jermyn held 
a court before Sir Robert in 1590. Nor does this manor appear in the will or 
inquisition post mortem of his son Sir Ambrose, to whom he says he leaves it. I 
feel quite certain, therefore, that he did not possess it, but that the word "manor" is 
used carelessly in his will for " lands." We know how carelessly the word is often 
used now, and apparently that careless use of it did not begin yesterday. 

The first of the Jermyn family who possessed it was Sir Robert, son of Sir 
Ambrose, son of Sir Thomas. He it was who built the Elizabethan house at 
Rushbrooke much as we see it now. He held a court at Great Whelnetham in 1590 
having then lately obtained it. The Waldegrave, Drury and Jermyn families were 
at this time all connected, and so he may have obtained it by purchase or otherwise. 

The Jermyns did not keep the advowson of Great Whelnetham very long. 
They had parted with it before the seventeenth century was out. But they and 



JERMYNS AND THEIR HEIRS. 359 

their heirs kept the manor till after the middle of the nineteenth century, /. e. from 
1590 to C. 1870. I have "done" the Jermyns fully in the Rushbrooke volume of 
this series, so that it is not necessary to " do " them again here. But for completeness 
sake I will just set down the succession of them. 

Sir Robert Jermyn died in possession of the manor in April, 16 14, leaving it to 
his wife for her life. She only survived him six months, dying in the following 
October. It then went to Sir Thomas Jermyn, eldest son of Sir Robert, who died in 
January, 1645. Then to his eldest son, Thomas, who died in November, 1659. 

Henry, Earl of St Albans, younger brother of the last Thomas, had abundance 
of money and no inherited estates, and I presume had a lease of the Rushbrooke 
estate from his nephew. At any rate he held a court in 1663, 1670, 1674. He 
died unmarried (unless he had married the dowager queen, Henrietta Maria,) in 
January 1684. 

Thomas, Lord Jermyn, son of the last-named Thomas, succeeded, held a court 
in 1685, and died in April, 1703, leaving only daughters. 

Great Whelnetham fell to the share of one of these daughters, Merelina, who 
married (i) Sir William Spring, (2) Sir William Gage. She held a court in October, 
1704. She died in 1727, and was succeeded by her son. Sir William Spring, 4th 
baronet. He held his first court in October, 1730, and died unmarried in 1737. 

His sisters and co-heiresses were Mary, wife of Dr. John Symonds, rector of 
Horringer, and Merelina, wife of Thomas Discipline of Bury St Edmunds. Dr. 
John Symonds and Thomas Discipline held their first court in October, 1737. Dr. 
John Symonds died in 1757, and Mary his wife in 1765. After them came their 
eldest son. Professor John Symonds, D.C.L., who died unmarried in February, 1807. 

Mary Anne Symonds, daughter of Captain Thomas Symonds and niece of the 
Professor, married Captain John Benjafield of Bury St. Edmunds, a king's messenger. 
John and Mary Anne Benjafield held their first court in 1809; and in 1814 gave 
Davy leave to make extracts from the court rolls, which extracts are among the Davy 
MSS in the British Museum. Mary Anne Benjafield died at Bath in 1815 aged 46, 
and was buried at Pakenham : John Benjafield died in 1832, and Frederick their 
only son in May, 1837. 

John and Mary Anne Benjafield had two daughters, of whom Marianne married 
the Rev. James William Wenn, rector of Broome in Norfolk, son of James Wenn of 



S60 GREAT WHELNETHAM MANOR. 

Ipswich, attorney. James William Wenn died at Broome in July 1867, leaving two 
sons and three daughters. 

Of the sons, the eldest James Benjafield Wenn was born at Bury St. Edmunds 
in December, 1830, educated at Harrow and Caius College, succeeded his father as 
rector of Broome in 1867, and died c. 1888. The other son, Charles Hanbury, was 
born in July 1846, educated at Caius College, curate of Ixworth 1869 — 75, and died 
at Mistley in Essex in September, 1879. 

The Wenns sold their estate in Great Whelnetham soon after 1870, and I 
believe it was then purchased by Mr. Henry James Oakes of Nowton Court. He 
died in 1875 aged 79, and was succeeded by his eldest son, James Henry Porteous 
Oakes, who died unmarried in 1901 aged 79. He was succeeded by his nephew, 
Orbell Henry Oakes, Lieut. -Col. in ist Worcestershire Regiment, the present owner. 
The manorial rights of Great Whelnetham were bought by Mr. J. H. P. Oakes in 
1896 from Mr. A. J. Young, who had apparently bought them of the Wenns. 

THE NUTSHELL. The owners of the manor put into a nutshell will be 
thus : 

De Whelnetham and descendants 10 generations 1250 — 1570 

Drury 2 generations 157° — 159° 

Jermyns and descendants 10 generations 1590 — 1870 

Oakes 3 generations not out 1870 — 

This makes 25 generations for 660 years. The rule of 30 years for a generation 
of course does not apply in this case, when the estate is sometimes passing from one 
family to another, whose generations may overlap. 

I give a pedigree of the Jermyns and their descendants so far as concerns the 
passing of this manor. It will be seen that ten generations of them had it, beginning 
with Sir Robert, from 1590 to 1870. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM MANOR. 



361 






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362 GREAT WHELNETHAM MANOR. 

POSTSCRIPT No. I. The deed of partition. Since the preceding pages 
were printed I have seen what I think must be Blomfield's authority for the deed of 
partition which I have alluded to at p. 341. 

Among the Harleian MSS in the British Museum is a small 4to volume, No. 
971, containing the collections of Thomas Gibbon for Norfolk and Suffolk from the 
public records. At p. no is an extract from a Close Roll of 46 Edward III (1372) 
m, 13; and at page 176 is an extract from a Close Roll of 46 Edward III m. 7. 
These two extracts, which seem to be exactly the same, are in a seventeenth century 
handwriting. 

Also, there is a folio volume in the Harleian collection containing Nos. 1175, 
1 1 76, bound up together. No. 11 76 is entitled, Extracts from records preserved in 

the Tower of London. This volume was given in June 1631, to by Arthur 

Squibb Esq., one of the Tellers of the Exchequer. The extracts appear to be in an 
Elizabethan handwriting. At any rate they were made before 1631. At p. 77 is the 
same extract as appeared twice over in Gibbon's volume. It is this : — 

Margeria quae fuit uxor Johannis Sutton de Wyvenho militis, una 
filiarum et heredum Johannis de Whelnetham militis, ET Johannis de 
Bures, filius et heres Marias quondam uxoris Michaelis de Bures, sororis 
dictae Margerige, DE partitione facta inter eos et Amiciam (Avisiam) 
Schalers, quondam uxorem Thomae de Scalers militis, sororis et co- 
heredis dicti Johannis de Whelnetham, DE maneriis de Magna 
Whelnetham cum advocatione ecclesiae ejusdem villse in Com. Suff. et 
cum suis membris in eadem villa et in villis de Parva Whelnetham, 
Hausted, Brendebradfeld, Bradfeld Seintcler, Multon, Bury et Stanfeld, 
cum manerio de Alpheton. 

The relationship of Amisia (who is called Avisia in one extract) to John de 
Whelnetham is put a little obscurely, which accounts for Blomfield's " as I take it." 
But it seems impossible to take it in any other way, and sororis must refer to 
Margery and Mary and not to John. Possibly the extractors have omitted a word. 
I do not know whether the original roll is still in existence. The calendars have not 
yet reached this year. 

POSTSCRIPT No. 2. A Rookwood legend. In my account of the manor 
I have shown that the Rookwood family possessed it for a short time somewhere 
between 1400 and 1500, probably through descent from Michael and Mary de Bures. 



GREAT WHELNETHAM MANOR. 363 

But I have omitted to give any account of them, nor have I shown how it came to 
them or how it passed from them. I am not going to supply that omission. But I 
would point out that the following curious story, which I take from Arnold's 
Memorials of St. Edmund's Abbey, seems to show that they resided here for a time. 
Mr. Arnold has printed in an appendix a long list of miracles performed by St. 
Edmund, as told by medieval chroniclers. Here are a few specimens. 

In a village near Bury a young labourer making a hay rick fell from it when it 
was 12 feet high, and nearly broke his neck. The bailiff invoked St. Edmund, and 
the young labourer recovered. 

A boy at Cockfield, not 9 years old, playing with a knife cut himself badly. His 
parents invoked St. Edmund, and the bleeding immediately ceased. 

A boy playing with his sister at Ingham fell into a pit. After some time he was 
taken out nearly dead. But St. Edmund being invoked he soon recovered. 

The next incident concerns the Rookwoods at Whelnetham, and I will tell it at 
full length, merely putting it out of Latin into English. 

There was a small boy (parvulus et puerulus) by name Robert, 
son of John de Rokewode, de valentioribus patriae sancti Edmundi ; 
who when abiding (cum raoraretur) with his parents at Whelnetham 
escaped one day from his nurse's hand and accidentally fell into a 
certain pond (stagnum) ; and after going under two or three times at last 
floated on the water.* In the meantime he is anxiously sought for, and 
a certain maidservant running up and seeing him floating declared that 
he was dead and was lying turgidum on the water. His parents, 
therefore, astonished and much troubled considered how they should 
draw him to land and bury him ; and taking up a rake and therewith 
drawing him to them, they placed the stiff body near the fire to be 
warmed, and seeing no sign of life in him they called on St. Edmund. 
Without any delay they see the boy of whose life they had despaired 
now alive and smiling, and they praised God and St. Edmund. IIT, 344. 

In all these stories we can please ourselves as to how much or how little we 
believe St. Edmund to have done ; but the persons and places are real, and probably 

* I am guessing the meaning here. This is the Latin : — bisque vel tertio idem passus natavit 
tandem super flumen. 



364 LITTLE WHELNETHAM MANOR. 

the accidents are real too. A pit is a very conspicuous feature at Ingham today, and 
apparently a very dangerous one to the Bury and Thetford road, which seems like to 
fall into it. The small Rookwood boy probably fell into the moat which still 
surrounds Great Whelnetham hall. That would account for the maidservant and his 
parents and the rake being so soon on the spot. 

Section 3. Little Whelnetham Manor. 

We have now done with the manor of Great Whelnetham and we come to that 
of Little Whelnetham. 

We have already seen that the abbot of Bury held of the King the undivided 
Whelnetham, and after the division he held Little Whelnetham, from 1086 and 
earlier to the dissolution of monasteries in 1536. I need not say anything about the 
abbey and abbots, but will simply ask. Who held Little Whelnetham of the abbot ? 

I have already said that the earliest proof that I have of Whelnetham having 
been divided into Great and Little is in 1230. 

De Cayley. 

The earliest mention of the manor of Little Whelnetham that I have seen is that 
in Fine No. 6, which I have printed at p. 277. The date is Easter 1282, the tenth 
year of Edward I. It is being sold and the price is six score marks of silver, /. e. 
jQ^o. The purchasers are Thomas and William Weyland, to whom I will come 
presently. The old owner who is selling is Thomas de Cayley, who is associated in 
the sale with Simon his brother and Johanna the wife of Alexander de Whelnetham. 
I have printed a tentative pedigree containing this Alexander and Johanna de 
Whelnetham at p. 311. I dont know whether Johanna was a de Cayley by birth, 
but I imagine that Philip and Alexander held the manor of Little Whelnetham of 
the Cayleys, who held it of the abbot of Bury, who held it of the king. 

With regard to the Cayleys I have nothing positive and definite to say. The 
Calendar of Suffolk Fines shows them and the Weylands having dealings together 
some thirty years earlier than this ; for in 1254 Osbert de Cayley purchased lands at 
Westerfield and Ipswich of Herbert Weyland. (Cal. p. 56.) NichoUs' Historic 
Peerage and G.E.C. give a Thomas de Cayley of Buckenham, son either of Adam or 
Osbert de Cayley, who was aged 22 in 1306, who was summoned to Parliament as 



THOMAS DE WEVLAND. 365 

a baron in 1309, and who died in 131 7 s.p. His widow, Margaret, was a daughter 
of Sir Walter de Norwich, and married secondly Robert, Earl of Suffolk. However 
this does not concern us much, and I shall not pursue the de Cayleys. 

De Weyland and Heirs. 

Thomas de Weyland, who has just been mentioned as purchasing us (the manor 
of Little Whelnetham) in 1282, is a known historical character, and not an utterly 
unknown one like Sir John de Whelnetham. It would no doubt be interesting to 
collect every item concerning him from contemporary chronicles, records and rolls of 
all sorts. But this volume is getting too thick, and for two reasons it is not absolutely 
necessary to do so. 

(i). It has more or less been done already. He is in the D.N.B., and after 
that a man has got into biographical dictionaries it is no more necessary to hunt him 
up than it is to send an expedition to discover America. That country has already 
been discovered and everybody now knows where it is. 

(2). His connection with Whelnetham was after all remote. It was merely one 
out of a great many manors in which he had invested his newly-gotten gains. He 
never lived here ; he probably never came here ; perhaps he no more knew where 
the place was than a portly and portwinely pluralist of the eighteenth century, doctor 
of divinity and court chaplain, knew where all his rectories and vicarages were. 

Giving up then any idea of collecting all that is to be found concerning him, I 
will simply turn to the D.N.B. and give a short summary of what is there. 

He was a native of Norfolk, a member of a family that possessed lands in that 
county. He became a clerk and subdeacon, but proceeded no further in divinity 
and turned to the law. About 1271 he became an itinerant justice, and in the earlier 
part of the reign of Edward I (who began to reign in 1272) he was employed in 
holding particular assizes, especially in the eastern counties. In 1274 he became a 
justice of the bench at Westminster, and in 1278 Chief Justice with a salary of 60 
marks a year. During the eleven years of his Chief Justiceship he lost no opportunity 
of building up a great estate. During the king's absence on the continent from 
1286 to 1289 his conduct became exceptionally scandalous. When the king returned 
in 1289 an outcry was raised against his judges. Thomas de Weyland was the first 
victim. In September the king ordered all his estates to be seized. He fled for 
sanctuary to the convent at Babwell, half a mile beyond the north gate of Bury St. 



366 LITTLE WHELNETHAM MANOR. 

Edmunds. The convent was watched, and as he did not come out within the forty 
days that were allowed he had to be starved out. No provisions were allowed to 
enter the house, and so he was compelled to come out. He was taken to the Tower 
of London. A choice of three punishments was offered him„ of which he chose to 
abjure the realm. He went to Dover with bare feet and head uncovered. Thence 
to France, and nothing more is known of him. 

In Proc. Suff. Arch. Inst., I, p. 229, the Rev. Charles Badhnm says that some 
years after his transportation to France, when death was drawing near, he desired 
that his heart, after his death, might be conveyed to England and interred within the 
walls of the Priory at Sudbury, and that this was done. I dont know what is the 
authority for this statement. 

To the above account I may add a few local notes from rolls and records that I 
have come across. Besides his purchase of the manor of Little Whelnetham at 
Easter 1282, he made other purchases here both before and after. 

In July, 1277, he obtained a messuage here and about 50 acres from Master 
William of Little Whelnetham, and at the same time granted them to said William 
and Matilda his sister for their lives. After their deaths the messuage and lands 
were to revert to him and then go to his own son, William de Weyland. This son 
William was intended to be his heir as far as Little Whelnetham was concerned, but 
I think it is clear that he did not survive his father. 

In February 1278 he obtained the advowson of Little Whelnetham from Robert 
de Bradfield and Agnes his wife, giving them in exchange for it 14 acres lying in a 
field in Little Whelnetham called le Ho. 

On Nov. 15, 1280, he had a grant of free warren in all his demesne lands in 
Little Whelnetham and other places named. (Charter Rolls.) 

At Easter, 1282, as already said, he obtained the manor, which was to go to his 
son William, and if William died without heirs then to another son John. We shall 
see presently that it did go to John. 

At Ascension tide, 1282, he obtained another messuage and over 50 acres in 
Little Whelnetham, which were the dower of Alice, widow of Philip of Little 
Whelnetham and mother or stepmother of Alexander and Robert. (See pedigree 
p. 311.) But there is more in this transaction than can be understood by the 
ordinary layman, because the price he pays for it is only a sparrowhawk ; and on 
Nov. 24, 1281, a close roll had been signed at Westminster ordering the sheriff of 






THOMAS t)E WEYLAND. SGY 

Suffolk to direct said Robert son of Philip to give up to Thomas de Weyland this 
very messuage and lands. Possibly this is one of the transactions that brought the 
judge into trouble. 

For these purchases in Little Whelnetham see Fines, Nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, at p. 275 
— 278 of this volume. 

The Calendar of Suffolk Fines shows him acquiring manors, advowsons and 
lands in Suffolk from 1270 to 1289, almost every year and sometimes two or three in 
a year. There is nothing after 1289, as we should expect. As his family history 
has not yet been very clearly made out, it may be as well to set down such Weylands 
as appear in that Calendar with their dates. 

Herbert and Beatrice his wife between 1239 and 1242. 

John, between 1249 and 1260. 

Nicholas and Juliana his wife between 1269 and 1279. 

Thomas, associated with various members of his family, between 1271 and 1289. 
The members of his family with whom he is enfeoffed in different fines are Margaret 
his wife, and John, Richard and William his sons. After his fall and disappearance 
we have — 

John and Mary his wife, between 1288 and 1309. 

Richard and John his son in 1296. — John son of Richard in 1316. 

Richard and Joanna his wife in 13 12. — William and Elizabeth his wife in 1315. 

Robert son of William in 1324. 

Robert, son of Herbert, and Isabella his wife in 1328 — 1332. 

Matilda daughter of Robert in 1342. — Thomas son of Robert in 1344. 

Isabella widow of Robert son of Herbert in 1344. 

Robert, knight, and Cecilia (Baldok) his wife in 1347. 

Edmund, son of Robert, knight, and Alianora his wife in 1347. 

From these entries, together with such as there may be among the Norfolk 
Fines, a pedigree might well be made out of several generations. By two marriages 
he had two families. When he fell his estates were forfeited ; but as he had taken 
the precaution of enfeoffing his wife and sons with some of his property it was not 
all lost. Only his second wife, Margaret, will be found enfeoffed above. Her 
maiden name was de Mose, a name we have already had in this volume. See p. 329. 



368 LITTLE WHELNETHAM MANOR. 

When he bought the manor of Little Whelnetham, it was settled on his son 
William and his heirs begotten, with remainder to John, brother of William, if 
William should die without heirs begotten. As it came to John we may safely 
assume that William died young. 

JOHN de Weyland succeeded to Little Whelnetham soon after the attainder of 
his father in 1289. For a year and a day after Thomas's attainder his lands belonged 
to the king, who granted them for that term to whom he would. That will explain 
the two following entries which I take from the Calendar of Close Rolls. 

20 Edward I. May 20, 1292. To the Sheriff of Suffolk. 

Order to cause Richard de Saxham to have seizin of an acre and rood of land 
and a rood and half of pasture in Little Whelnetham, as the king learns by the 
inquisition taken by the sheriff that the lands which Thomas de Wayland held who 
abjured the realm for felony have been in the king's hands for a year and a day, and 
that Thomas held them of Richard of Saxham, and that the abbot of St. Edmund's 
had the king's year, day and waste, and ought to answer to the king for the same. 

20 Edward 1. Dec. 2, I29I. To the Sheriff of Suffollc. 

Order to cause the abbot of St. Edmunds to have seizin of a messuage, 50 acres 
land, 4 acres wood, 3 acres meadow, 4 shillings yearly rent, in Little Whelnetham, 
as the king learns by inquisition taken by the sheriff that the premises which Thomas 
de Weyland who abjured the realm for felony held, have been in the king's hands 
for a year and a day, and that Thomas held them of the abbot, and that the abbot 
had the king's year and day, and ought to answer therefore. 

The year and the day having run their course we may assume that John de 
Weyland came to his own, though, perhaps, owing to his father's felony he had to 
establish his claims against opposition. A roll of 18 Edward I, a.d. 1290, shows 
him claiming two parts of the manor of Whelnetham, which must mean Little 
Whelnetham. And the abbot too put in his claim. Therefore, said the Court, let it 
be inquired into. (Plac. Abbrev. p. 222.) I suppose the inquiry was favourable to 
John. I can only find a few more allusions to him. 

On Oct. 4, 1301, a grant of free warren was made to him and his heirs in all his 
demesne lands in Clopton, Wantisden and Whelnetham. Signed at Dunipace. 
(Charter Rolls.) 



DE WEYLAND FAMILY. 369 



On Oct. 14, 1301, Henry Spygurnel and John de Byskele were appointed to try 
the persons who broke the houses of John de Weyland at Witnesham, Clopton, 
Blakeshale, Wantisden, Onehouse and Whehietham, cut down his trees and carried 
them away and the timber of his houses and other goods there and at Pettaugh. 
Signed at Dunipace. (Pat. Rolls.) 

On July 6, 1304, Robert de Ratford and Robert de Reydon were appointed to 
try the persons who entered the manors of John de Weyland at Wytnesham, Clopton, 
Blakeshall, Wantisden, Pethawe, Welhetham [sic], Onehouse and Middleton, threw 
down his houses, cut down his trees and carried away trees and timber of houses. 
Signed at Stirling. (Patent Rolls.) 

In May 1308 and in May 131 1 he presented to the rectory of Little Whelnetham, 
being described in the Bishop of Norwich's register as a knight. At p. 289 I have 
printed his inquisition post mortem, which was held in December 13 12. That gives 
us the date of his death within a month or so. 

RICHARD de Weyland was the son and heir of John, and was turned 22 years 
of age at the time of his father's death. So we learn from his father's inquisition post 
mortem. Therefore he was born 1290. Among Davy's MSS is a de Weyland 
pedigree, which makes out this Richard to have been a son of the unjust judge. 
But that is certainly wrong, as the inquisition proves. The judge had a son Richard, 
but this is not him. This is a grandson of the judge. I have nothing to say about 
him except that I think his life was a short one. He did not present to the rectory 
in 1318, and I imagine that he was then dead, not having reached the age of 30 
years. He left an only child, Cecily, and I imagine that Sir Thomas le Latimer who 
presented to the rectory in 13 18 was her guardian. 

The Heirs of de Weyland. 

CECILY, only child of Richard de Weyland. She married Bartholomew 
Burghersh jun., and carried her father's estates with her. We shall now for some 
little time be in the possession of great people who never came near us, mere drops 
in the oceans of their great possessions; and as they have all been D. N. Beed I shall 
not trouble to do much more than give their succession and their dates. 

BARTHOLOMEW Burghersh was a distinguished soldier, who took part in all 
the wars of Edward III and the Black Prince from 1339 to 1360. He was a son of 



370 LITTLE WHELNETHAM MANOR. 



Bartholomew Burghersh, also a distinguished soldier, who died in 1355. Cecily de 
Weyland was his first wife and died leaving one child, Elizabeth. He married 
secondly Margaret, sister of Bartholomew lord Badlesmere. He presented in right 
of his first wife to the rectory of Little Whelnetham in 1349 and 1359, and died in 
1369. 

ELIZABETH, only child of Bartholomew and Cecily Burghersh, married 
Edward le Despencer, and carried Little Whelnetham and the other Suffolk manors 
with her. This Edward was a son of Edward le Despencer, whose father and grand- 
father were the two notorious Hugh le Despencers, who had both been put to death 
in the last year of the reign of Edward II, 1326. He was a knight of the Garter and 
fought at Poictiers. Through his assign he presented to the rectory of Little 
Whelnetham in 1373, 137S) 1376. He died in 1375. I have printed a bit of his 
inquisition post mortem at p. 291, which shows that he held the manor and 
advowson of Little Whelnetham by right of his wife, and that Thomas their son and 
heir was then 2 years old. Elizabeth his widow survived him many years, and she 
presented to the rectory of Little Whelnetham in 1396. She died in July 141 1. 
(See p. 297.) 

THOMAS, son and heir of Edward and Elizabeth le Despencer, was born in 
1373. Losing his father at the age of 2 years, according to the vile system of that 
day he was given in wardship to Edmund Langley, earl of Cambridge, duke of York, 
fifth son of Edward III. From his father he inherited the barony of Despencer. 
He married Constance, the daughter of his guardian. He sided with Richard II and 
was created earl of Gloucester. He was afterwards degraded and imprisoned. In 
1400 he was beheaded at Bristol in obedience to the demand of the mob, and was 
buried at Tewkesbury. He left a son Richard, who died in 1414 aged 14, and there 
was another child yet unborn. She will be a daughter, and her name will be Isabel, 
and we shall meet with her again presently. So at the time when her husband was 
taken from her to the scaffold Constance had one child of a year old and another one 
yet unborn. As his mother, Elizabeth le Despencer, survived him, Thomas earl of 
Gloucester only had the reversion of this manor. 

The next owner of the manor is EDWARD, duke of York, son of Edmund, 
duke of York, who was guardian of the beheaded Thomas and father of the widowed 
Constance. He became possessed of it on the death of Elizabeth, lady le 
Despencer, in July 141 1, having had a grant of it for life from king Henry IV at the 



THE HEIRS OF DE WEYLAND. 371 

time of the attainder and execution of Thomas, earl of Gloucester. He was one of 
the few EngHshmen killed at the battle of Agincourt on Oct. 25, 1415. I have 
printed a good bit of his inquisition post mortem at p. 296, which shows clearly how 
the manor and advowson of Little Whelnetham passed. His heir was his nephew 
Richard, then 3 years old, son of his brother Richard, earl of Cambridge, who had 
just been beheaded, and (to anticipate) father of Edward IV. But we did not go to 
that heir, as we had been granted to the duke of York with remainder after his death 
to Richard Beauchamp de Bergavenny and Isabella his wife. 

The next owner, then, is ISABELLA, wife of Richard de Beauchamp, baron of 
Bergavenny. We have already met with her when she was yet unborn. She was the 
posthumous child of the beheaded Thomas, earl of Gloucester, by Constance his 
wife. She was therefore born in 1400 or 1401. To make matters confusing for 
them that should come after, she married two husbands in succession of exactly the 
same names, both Richard Beauchamp, cousins, the first being earl of Worcester, 
the second earl of Warwick. 

The first Richard Beauchamp was born in 1397, was baron of Bergavenny, 
married Isabella in July 141 1, was baron le Despencer in right of his wife, was 
created earl of Worcester in 142 1, and died of his wounds in April 1422. He left 
no children. 

The other Richard Beauchamp was born in 1381, succeeded his father as fifth 
earl of Warwick in April 1401, and married the widowed Isabella as his second wife 
in 1423. In 1426 being abroad he presented to the rectory of Little Whelnetham 
through his attorney, Nicholas Wimbish. In 1435 he had the right of presenting, 
which right he granted to lord and lady Audley. In 1430 we see lord and lady 
Warwick selling several manors in Suffolk, including Little Whelnetham. The price 
for the lot of them is ;^iooo. The purchasers named in the fine are, I presume, 
fictitious ones, the real purchasers being the Audleys. (See Fine No. 25, p. 287.) 
The earl of Warwick died at Rouen in 1439. 

We, I mean the manor and advowson of Little Whelnetham, have now left the 
Beauchamps, to whom we had come by inheritance from Thomas de Weyland, the 
unjust judge, and belong to the Audleys, who must be pursued. Before doing so I 
may just set down the eminent people who would have inherited us if we had not 
been sold. 



372 LITTLE WHELNETHAM MANOR. 

Richard, earl of Warwick, and Isabella, who sold us to the Audleys, left a son 
and daughter, viz. Henry and Ann. Henry married lady Cecilia Neville, daughter 
of Richard, earl of Salisbury : Ann married Richard Neville, son of the earl of 
Salisbury; i.e. brother and sister married sister and brother. Henry died in 1446 
aged 22 years, leaving an infant daughter to inherit all his titles and possessions, 
which infant daughter died in 1449. His sister Ann then became his heir, whose 
husband Richard, earl of Salisbury and Warwick, is known as the king maker. He 
was killed at the battle of Barnet in 147 1, and she died c. 1490. 

They had two daughters, of whom Isabel married George, duke of Clarence, and 
Ann married his brother Richard III. Ann had been betrothed to Prince Edward, 
son of Henry VI. For further particulars of all those persons, from the beheaded 
earl of Cambridge to the widowed Queen Ann, I will only refer to Shakespeare's 
plays of Henry V and Henry VI. 

Before going on to the new owners, the Audleys, it will be as well to set down 
in a tree the old owners from whom we are parting, from Thomas de Weyland, the 
unjust judge, to Isabel, the daughter of a father whom she never saw, the wife of two 
husbands of the same name, great granddaughter of a king, mother in law of a king- 
maker, grandmother of a queen. It is certainly curious that a man should be cast 
down so utterly as the unjust judge was, being degraded and banished as a felon, and 
yet should have such an array of descendants. 

It will also be as well to give another tree showing the connection between these 
old owners and the new ones, and the connection between both sets of owners and 
the Yorkist kings of England. It all turns upon Constance. It is she who links 
together and brings into the same tree (i) the York princes, (2) the descendants of 
the unjust judge to whom we have belonged, (3) the Audleys who have just now 
bought us. 

In the second of these two pedigrees mark how that everyone is killed. 



THE HEIRS OF DE WEYLAND. 



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374 LITTLE WHELNETHAM MANOR. 

Audley. 

Now we come to the AUDLEY family. And now we also come to the wars of 
the Roses, which cause great confusion ; and heads and estates are being tossed 
about like footballs in the football season, and attainders and confiscations make it 
difficult sometimes to see whose is whose. 

We have just seen that in 1435 James, lord Audley, and Eleanor his wife 
presented to the rectory of Little Whelnetham, not as owners of the advowson but 
by reason of a grant from Richard, earl of Warwick. But it is clear from what 
followed that that grant was only a preliminary to their becoming owners of the 
estate, by purchase or exchange or arrangement of some sort. Possibly they were 
the real purchasers in the fine of 1430 ; but if not they must have got it soon after- 
wards. We must look to see who James and Eleanor are. 

James Touchet, lord Audley, was born in 1399, was serving in the wars in 
France before he was out of his teens, and followed the dead body of Henry V in 
1422 from France to its resting place at Westminster. 

By his first wife, Margaret, daughter of William lord Roos, he had a son and 
heir John. 

His second wife was Eleanor, and she was the natural daughter of Edmund 
Holand earl of Kent, by Constance, daughter and sister of the dukes of York and 
widow of the beheaded Thomas, lord Despencer, earl of Gloucester. We have just 
seen that Little Whelnetham would have been the inherited estate of Constance's 
husband if he had not been beheaded in his mother's lifetime ; and so it is possible 
that its coming now into the possession of Eleanor, the daughter of Constance, was 
not entirely a matter of purchase ; or, if it was entirely a matter of purchase, that 
there was some sentiment in the matter which prompted that purchase. At any rate, 
however it came and whyever it came, it did come ; and Eleanor, lady Audley, the 
new owner is half sister to Isabella, lady Warwick, the old owner, both being 
daughters of the unfortunate Constance, granddaughter of Edward III. 

By this second marriage James, lord Audley, had three sons : viz. (i) Humphrey 
who follows : (2) Edmund, bishop in succession of Rochester, Hereford and 
Salisbury : (3) Thomas. 

James, lord Audley, was killed at the battle of Blore heath in 145 1. I saw last 
summer the stone which marks the spot where he fell. He was in command of the 



AUDLEY FAMILY. 375 



forces which had remained loyal to Henry VI. The commander of the Yorkists 
was Richard, earl of Salisbury, father of the earl of Salisbury who married his wife's 
half-sister's daughter. (See pedigree.) 

HUMPHREY, eldest son of James, lord Audley, by his second marriage, 
naturally succeeded to the Little Whelnetham estate, as it was in a certain sense his 
mother's inheritance. He dropped the name of Touchet and took that of Audley. 
He presented to the rectory of Little Whelnetham in 1463, 1467 and 1468. In May 
14 7 1 was fought the battle of Tewkesbury, fatal to the Lancastrian cause which he, 
like his father, supported. A contemporary paper, printed among the Paston Letters, 
gives a list (referring to this battle) of Ded in the Feld, and another list Thes be 
men that were heveded. This last list contains Mr. Awdeley, /. e. Sir Humphrey. 
He left two children John and Jane, both minors. What happened to the estate 
after Tewkesbury fight may be learnt from a petition to Parliament. 

John, lord Audley, son of James, lord Audley, by his first marriage and elder 
half-brother to Humphrey, supported the Yorkist cause, and so was on the winning 
side. From a patent roll dated at Westminster 6 Feb., 1475, ^ learn that he had 
presented a petition to the Parliament held at Westminster from 6 Oct. 1472 to 23 
Jan., 1475. 'I'he petition stated that Humphrey Audley, knight, brother to 
petitioner, committed divers offences against the king, and that therefore without the 
king's especial grace all his manors and lands would have been forfeited and his heirs 
disabled : that the king had intended to have rewarded certain persons with these 
manors, and that the petitioner had paid those persons 600 marks without receiving 
anything that had belonged to Humphrey : that Humphrey had issue, John and 
Jane. The petitioner asked that the king would grant to him the ward, keeping and 
marriage of said John during his nonage, with the keeping of the manors of Carlton, 
Midilton, Clopton, Cokefeld, Fennehall and Whellewetheham [sic], Co. Suffolk, which 
formerly belonged to Humphrey; and if said John died within the age of 21 years, 
that then he should have the ward and marriage of Jane, then within the age of 14 
years, with the said manors during her nonage ; and if during their nonages he 
should not receive the said sum of 600 marks above all the charges that he should 
bear, that then he should possess such manors till he had received it out of their 
issues. To this the Commons assented, and the king answered, Soil fait cum ill est 
desire. (Patent Rolls. Rolls of Pari. VI, 127.) 

If one is right in looking upon this John, lord Audley, as a greedy fellow, who 
had been hovering like a vulture over his brother's estate, who had been hoping to 



376 LITTLE VVHELNETHAM MANOR. 

get some gain to himself by his misfortunes, and who was vexed at the king's 
clemency towards the two small orphans, then one wishes that Commons and king 
had spurned his petition instead of assenting to it. But it is possible that what he did 
he did it to save the estate for his nephew. At any rate these proceedings in 
Parliament show clearly that the estates of Humphrey Audley who fell at Tewkesbury 
were not confiscated, but that they passed to his son John as soon as the uncle John 
had been repaid his 600 marks. Possibly the leniency shown by Edward IV to 
Humphrey's children may have arisen from the fact that Constance, the grandmother 
of Humphrey, was daughter of Edmund, duke of York. So they were all Yorkists 
in blood if not at heart. See preceding pedigree. 

JOHN AUDLEY, only son of Sir Humphry Audley, was probably born about 
1460, and would have had livery of his lands about 1480. In 1479 there was a 
vacancy in the rectory of Little Whelnetham, and it lapsed to the Bishop. In 1497 a 
John Audley of Suffolk was knighted by Henry VII at the foot of London bridge 
when he entered London after the battle of Blackheath. (Shaw's Knights of 
England.) This must be our John Audley. Blomfield says that in 1526 Sir John 
Audley was living at Swaffham in Norfolk, and he was followed there by several 
generations. 

He married Muriel, daughter of Sir Thomas and lady Elizabeth Brewse of 
Wenham in Suffolk, by whom he had a son Richard and others. In Dec. 1484 Lady 
Elizabeth Brewse presented to the rectory of Little Whelnetham. In 1487 there was 
another vacancy and it lapsed to the Bishop. Margery Brewse, a sister of Muriel, 
married John Paston, and so is to be often found in the Paston Letters. In one 
letter written in 1489 she mentions " rayn broder Awdley " being appointed a 
captain. (Letter 907.) 

At p. 287 I have printed a fine, which shows Sir John Audley and Muriel his 
wife selling the manor of Little Whelnetham for j[,20o. That was in July 1498. 
Who buys it I cant tell. One only sees feoffees, and must be thankful for being 
allowed to see who sells. I need not now follow the Audleys any further. 

We have now, in this year 1498, done with the wars of the Roses and the 
flinging about of heads and estates which were a part of them ; and we have done 
with the Audleys and with the heirs and connections of Thomas de Weyland, the 
unjust judge ; and we have done with the fifteenth century, and we have done with 
the Plantagenets. And now the Tudors are at the door, and the Reformation is not 



JERMYNS AND THEIR DESCENDANTS. 377 

far off, with all the changes in the ownership of land which it will bring about. So 
by the same move we pass on to new owners, a new century, a new dynasty and 
a new form of religion. » 

Jermyn of Rushbrooke and their descendants. 

One of the feoffees to whom Sir John Audley and Muriel his wife sold the manor 
of Little Whelnetham in 1498 was Robert Sexten. There is nothing to show that he 
was the real purchaser, but apparently he was so more or less, perhaps less. In the 
inquisition post mortem of Sir Ambrose Jermyn, 1577, it is said that Sir Ambrose 
held the manor of Little Whelnetham, which Robert Sexteyn had bought of John 
Audley and then passed on to him. (Muskett's S.M.F., II, 246.) But on the other 
hand Thomas Jermyn of Rushbrooke, who died in October 1504, mentions "my 
manor of litell Whelnetham ; " and his son. Sir Thomas Jermyn, father of Sir 
Ambrose, presented to the rectory of Little Whelnetham in 15 17. I think therefore 
it is clear that though Robert Sexten may have had a life interest in it, the real 
successors to the Audleys and to the heirs of Thomas de Weyland were the Jermyns. 
The Sextens were a Lavenham family, who had at this time intermarried with the 
Jermyns. 

On the strength, then, of Thomas Jermyn's will (printed in the Rushbrooke vol. 
of this series, p. 122), I shall set him down as successor to John and Muriel Audley, 
with just a flavour of Sexten about it. He left half a mark to each of the Whelnetham 
churches and died in October 1504. His son, Sir Thomas Jermyn, died towards 
the end of 1552. He mentions in his will "my manors of Weltham parva and 
Weltham magna." I have refused to allow that he had Weltham Magna, but I have 
no objection to his having Weltham Parva. These two Thomas Jermyns represent 
respectively the old religion that was passing and the new that was coming in : for 
the father in his will left money to the new work at Bury abbey while the son was a 
large purchaser of the lands which had been taken from that abbey. 

I have given a full account of all these Jermyns in the Rushbrooke volume of 
this series ; and I have just given their bare succession under Great Whelnetham 
manor. So I may now jump over one hundred and fifty years, and the Jermyn heads 
within them, and alight on the last Jermyn of Rushbrooke. 

This was Thomas, lord Jermyn, who died in 1703. He had thirteen children 
born to him, six boys and seven girls. Of the six boys only one got beyond his first 



378 LITTLE WHELNETHAM MANOR. 



year, and that one was killed at the age of 15 years. Of the seven girls five grew up 
and married, and were co-heiresses of the Jermyn estate. We saw that Great 
Whelnetham fell to the share of Merelina, who married successively Sir Thomas 
Spring and Sir William Gage. Little Whelnetham fell to the share of Mary, who 
married a wealthy colonist from Barbadoes, Robert Davers, whose father, Robert 
Davers, had made a fortune there, and then came home in the evening of his life to 
buy Rougham and to be baronetted. 

Little Whelnetham manor, therefore, passes from Thomas, lord Jermyn, to Sir 
Robert Davers, 2nd baronet, in right of his wife. The successive Daverses will be 
found duly recorded in the Rushbrooke volume of this series. It is enough to say 
here that Sir Robert died Oct. i, 1722, and Mary his wife ten days afterwards, he 
aged 69, she 59. 

Robert their son, third baronet, succeeded and died unmarried on May 20, 
1723, aged 39 years. 

Jermyn, his brother, fourth baronet, succeeded and died on Feb. 20, 1743, aged 
56. His wife was Margaretta Green from Drinkstone rectory. 

Robert, his son, fifth baronet, succeeded and was killed in North America in 
1763. He was not married. 

Charles, his brother, sixth baronet, succeeded and died unmarried on June 4th, 
1806, aged 69 to a day. 

His nephew, Frederick William Hervey, fifth earl of Bristol, afterwards first 
marquis, succeeded in right of his mother, Elizabeth, younger daughter of Sir Jermyn 
Davers and wife of Frederick Hervey, fourth earl of Bristol and Bishop of Derry. 
Lord Bristol on coming into possession of the Rushbrooke estate at once sold 
Rushbrooke hall and manor to Robert Rushbrooke. Little Whelnetham hall farm, 
occupied by Mr. Robert Carss, is in the Ickworth estate book till Michaelmas 1831, 
after which it is no longer there. I presume it was then sold to Mr. Orbell Oakes of 
Nowton Court, to whose descendant, Lieut.-Col. Oakes, it now belongs. 

The following pedigree will show the Jermyns and their descendants who have 
owned the manor, eleven generations in all. I pointed out in reference to the 
preceding pedigree how that we were all killed. I may point out in reference to 
this pedigree how that we all die quietly. It is rarer to be killed in this pedigree 
than it was to die in the last one. 



JERMYNS AND THEIR DESCENDANTS. 379 



No. 6. Jermyns and Heirs. 

Thomas Jermyn = (i) Katherine Eernard 
died Oct. 1504 j 

Sir Thomas Jermyn = (i) Ann Spring 
died 1552 I 

Sir Ambrose Jermyn = (i) Ann Heveningham 
died 1577 I 

Sir Robert Jermyn = Judith Blagge 
died 1614 I 

Sir Thomas Jermyn = Catherine Killegrew 
died Jan. 1645 I 



I I 

Thomas Jermyn = Rebecka Rodway Henry Jermyn, earl of St. Albans 

died Nov. 1659 I died Jan. 1684 

Thomas, lord Jermyn = Mary Merry 
died 1703 I 

Mary Jermyn = Sir Robert Davers 
died 1722 I died 1722 



I I 

Sir Robert Davers Sir Jermyn Davers = Margaretta Green 

died 1723 I d. 1743 

I \ \ r 

Sir Robert D. Sir Charles D. Mary Davers Elizabeth Davers = Fredk. Hervey, E. of Bristol 
killed 1763 died 1806 died 1805 died 1800 I died 1803 

Fred. Will. Hervey, Marquis of Bristol, 
died 1859 
sold Little Whelnetham c. 1831 

And now for the NUTSHELL, into which to put the owners of the manor of 
Little Whelnetham. 

Thomas de Cayley sells in 1282 

De VVeyland and their descendants 7 generations 1282 — 1430 

Audleys 3 generations 1430 — 1498 

Jermyns and their descendants 11 generations 1498 — 183 1 

Oakes 4 generations not out 1830 — 

That makes 25 generations for 630 years. But there is a good deal of over- 
lapping. 



380 CRUTCHED FRIARS AND CHAPEL OF ST. THOMAS. 



Part II. Chapter II. 



The Crutched Friars 

AND THE 

Chapel of St. Thomas the Martyr. 

A.D. 1274 — 1910. 



The traveller who passes out of Bury by its south gate, or rather by where its 
south gate used to be, and who sets his face towards London via Melford and 
Sudbury, when he reaches the fourth milestone from Bury will find himself going up 
a hill with a gentle and artificial slope through a modern-looking cutting like a railway 
cutting. And should he be curious enough to ask of the wayside stone-cracker. What 
call you this hill ? he will be told. Chapel hill. And when he is near to the top of it, 
he will see about fifty yards off on his right hand a small farm house which looks as 
if it wasn't built yesterday. And if he asks, What call you that farm ? he will be told, 
Chapel farm. 

That house is the subject of this chapter. It is what remains of the chapel 
dedicated to Thomas Becket and of the house possessed by the order of Crutched, 
Crouched or Crossed Friars, the three words being merely three different forms of 
the same word. 

When I say it is " what remains " of the chapel and house, I do not mean to 
imply that there was ever much more than there is now. It was a very small 
institution, and perhaps there never was much more building than one can see now. 

The full-page view that I give of it is from a drawing in the British Museum 
made in 1781 by John Carter the architect and draughtsman. It shows the south 




To face p. 381. 
HOUSE OF THE CRUTCHED FRIARS 

AND CHAPEL OF St. THOMAS (BECKET) 

IN THE PARISH OF LITTLE WHELNETHAM. 
From a drauiiig by John Carter in 1781. 



CRUTCHED FRIARS AND CHAPEL OF ST. THOMAS. 381 



and east sides. For the copy of that drawing which I here reproduce, I am indebted 
to my niece, Miss Patience Hoare. It shows that there was scarcely anything more 
standing then than there is now. The six small illustrations, showing every side of 
the building as it is now, are from photographs kindly taken for me by the Rev. 
Edmund Farrer, rector of Hinderclay. There is another pencil drawing of it in the 
British Museum. It is a drawing made by Buckler the artist on July 3, 1821, and is 
in a folio volume, vol. xxiii, containing architectural drawings by Buckler. The 
reference number is Add. MSS. 36388. It shows nothing different to what one can 
see now, and so I have not reproduced it. 

I have printed in Part I of this volume, p. 301 — 306, such original documents 
in the Public Record Ofifice as I could find to be there relating to this small chapel 
and religious house. And now I will tell the tale as I draw it from those documents. 
I am afraid it is a very meagre one. 

First, how early might this house have existed ? Dugdale and Tanner (or rather 
Tanner, as Dugdale only quotes him,) tell us that the Crossed or Crutched Friars 
first came to England in 1244, and had their first house at Colchester. Mathew 
Paris is their authority for this statement. At first they carried a cross fixed to a staff 
in their hands, but afterwards had a cross of red cloth upon their backs or breasts. 
Their habit was appointed by Pope Pius II to be of a blue colour. So they got their 
name, Cruciferi fratres in Latin, Crossed or Crutched friars in English, from the cross 
they bare. 

There could, therefore, have been no house of Crutched Friars here before 
1244. But the prominence which has always been given in its title to the chapel of 
St. Thomas, which prominence we seem to see to day in the name Chapel hill and 
Chapel farm, and not Priory hill or Priory farm, makes me wonder whether there may 
not have been a chapel on the spot dedicated to St. Thomas before the Crutched 
Friars came over to England. Thomas Becket, who is the St. Thomas to whom the 
chapel was dedicated, was murdered in Canterbury Cathedral on Dec. 29, 11 70. If 
some local magnate soon afterwards built a chapel in his memory, and if that chapel 
was handed over to the care of the Crutched Friars when they came over a few years 
later, then the chapel may be fifty years or so earlier than 1244. But of this I have 
no evidence. 

The title given to the house in some of the early documents that I have printed 
is a very cumbrous and awkward one. In two documents of 1343 and 1346 



382 CRUTCHED FRIARS AND CHAPEL OF ST. THOMAS. 

respectively the friars are called, The prior and brethren of the order of the Holy 
Cross of the chapel of St. Thomas the Martyr of Whelnetham. Life is not long 
enough to repeat such a title very often, and I shall simplify it into The Crutched 
Friars, or simpler still " We." 

It may be as well to set down in chronological order the different titles by which 
I find the chapel and house described in contemporary documents. I translate them 
into English. 

1274. The Prior of the Holy Cross of Little Whelnetham. 

1275. The Chapel of St. Thomas of Little Whelnetham. 
1293. The Prior of the Holy Cross of Whelnetham. 

1 33 1. The Prior and brothers of the order of the Holy Cross of Whelnetham. 

133 1. The Prior and Crutched friars of Whelnetham. 

1343, 1346. As mentioned above. 

1347. The Prior and Crutched friars of the chapel of St. Thomas the Martyr 
of Whelnetham. 

1540. The chapel of Chockesmythes. 

1599. The Crutched Friars. (Sir Robert Jermyn.) 

In his Notitia Monastica Tanner speaking of the Friars of Great [sic] Weltham 
says, " These we find often mentioned in the old wills by the names of Fratres S. 
Trinitatis or S. Crucis in Welnetham." I have not come across any other mention 
of the Trinity, and a vague reference to " old wills " is not worth much. 

Tanner tells us that having come to England in 1244 the Crutched Friars had 
their first house at Colchester. I may add that that made it easy for them to have a 
house at Whelnetham, for all along I find that Whelnetham is closely connected with 
that side of Essex, much more so than with the rest of Suffolk, A group of families 
living on one side or the other of the Suffolk and Essex boundary, and connected 
together by many marriages in successive generations, connected together the 
neighbourhood of Colchester and the neighbourhood with which we are dealing. So 
being at Colchester they might easily get an invitation or introduction to Whelnetham. 

Tanner and Dugdale also tell us that there were never in England more than six 
or seven houses of these Crutched Friars ; viz. Barham in the parish of Lynton in 
Cambridgeshire ; Colchester ; London, in the parish of St. Olave, Hart Street, near 



CRUTCHED FRIARS AND CHAPEL OF ST. THOMAS. 383 

the Tower ; Brackley, in Northants ; Oxford ; Whelnetham ; Guildford, a doubtful 
one ; Kildale in Cleveland in Yorkshire ; York city. Two of these houses I shall 
refer to presently, because one of them we annexed, and the other annexed us. 

1274. Next, having seen what might be our earliest date, we may see what is 
the earliest date when we have positive proof that a religious house had been started 
here. There are two patent rolls dated 1274 and 1275, only thirty years after these 
friars had first made their appearance in England. They are both records of disputes 
about tenements. How thankful we ought to be that people have always had such 
frequent disputes and law suits, because half of what we know of the past comes from 
the record of them. If they had lived in peace together we should not know half as 
much as we do. 

In 1274 the Prior of the Holy Cross of Little Whelnetham had a dispute with 
Robert de Bradfield about a tenement. And in 1275 Brother Henry of the chapel 
of St. Thomas of Little Whelnetham had a dispute about a tenement with Walter the 
rector of Great Whelnetham. (P. 301.) That makes a good beginning. It shows 
that we are quite alive and not to be trifled with. In both these suits it is we (by 
which I mean the religious house) who are the complainants and demand (aramiavit) 
the trial. Hands off! we say. 

1293. The next document is eighteen years later, viz. in 1293. (P. 302.) This 
also shows that we are quite alive and are enlarging our borders. One of the seven 
or eight houses enumerated just now as being all that the Crutched Friars ever had in 
England was at Bergham in the parish of Lynton and county of Cambridge. We 
now propose with the consent of its patron, Robert de Furneux, to annex it. What 
the exact result of annexing is to annexer or annexed I dont know, but I suppose 
the annexer gets the best of it. It becomes a cell to us, but that does not make one 
much wiser unless one understands all the details of religious houses. At any rate 
we propose to annex it. Before we can do so we must get leave of the king. Before 
he will give leave, the ofificial (called the county escheator) has to call a jury to decide 
whether this annexation will hurt the king or anybody else. This is called an 
enquiry ad quod damnum, i.e. What harm will it do? The jury decided that it 
would hurt the king to the amount of 12 pence a year. Thereupon the prior of 
Whelnetham found a well-disposed layman, who undertook for himself and his heirs 
and his lands for ever that they would be responsible for the payment of this yearly 
12 pence, so that the king should suffer no loss. I have not met with the record of 



384 CRUTCHED FRIARS AND CHAPEL OF ST. THOMAS. 

what happened after that, but I presume that the king was satisfied and that the 
annexation was allowed. 

133 1. The next document that I have met with is nearly forty years later, 1331. 
We are now looking to receive a benefaction. Robert de Bures of Acton, a member 
of one of those closely connected families who by their close connection with each 
other also closely connected the two sides of the Suffolk and Essex boundary, feels in 
August that his end is near, and he remembers that he can carry nothing away with 
him when he dies. He therefore asks leave of the king to give us (the friars) 240 
acres arable and 20 acres pasture lying in Acton and Waldingfield ; and in return we, 
two of us, are to pray daily for ever in our chapel at Whelnetham for his soul and the 
souls of his ancestors. 

Before this gift can be made the Statute of Mortmain, passed by Parliament in 
1279, requires that the escheator should call a jury to enquire ad quod damnum, i.e. 
What harm will it do. The jury met at Lavenham on August 13, 133 1, and found 
that it would not hurt the king or anybody. Accordingly a patent roll, signed by the 
king at Windsor on the following Oct. 23, granted leave for the gift to be made. 

But in the meantime Robert de Bures has died. He died in September. And 
so the leave is given to Andrew de Bures, his son, and Andrew's soul is added to the 
souls that were to be prayed for. But another change is made when the leave is 
granted. Instead of the condition being that the two chaplains should pray daily m 
the chapel at Whelnetham, now they are to pray daily in the church of the Crutched 
Friars in London. I presume that that shows that the house in London has annexed 
us. As we annexed Bergham so London has annexed us. The annexer is annexed. 
And I presume that Andrew de Bures was the cause of it. After that I doubt 
whether we can look upon him as a benefactor and whether we need pray for his 
soul. Tanner says that this house in London, near the Tower, was founded about 
1298, and that Adam [sic] de Bures gave to it the messuage and lands as specified 
in the documents I have been referring to. In this case ihe house was founded 
some years after that at Whelnetham, and we are annexed by a junior to ourselves. 
Adam is certainly a mistake of Tanner's for Andrew. 

1343. Twelve more years go by, and in spite of being annexed by London we 
still go on and acquire fresh lands. In 1343 we applied to the king for leave to 
acquire lands to the yearly value of 100 shillings. On Nov. i the king granted it 



CRUTCHED FRIARS AND CHAPEL OF ST. THOMAS. 385 



provided that enquiry was held and showed it could be done without loss to the 
Crown or anyone. 

1346. Two or three years after the last request the reason of it is made 
manifest. We have got another benefactor. Robert de Rookwood, whose family is 
another of the oft-connected families of the district, is minded to give us 60 acres 
arable lying in Cockfield, Stanningfield and Whelnetham. The jury meet at 
Henhowe on April 13, and decide that it will not hurt the king nor anyone else. 
And so on 9 May, 1347, the king signed at Reading a patent roll, whereby licence 
was given for the alienation in mortmain by Robert de Rokewode to the Prior and 
Crutched Friars of the chapel of St. Thomas the Martyr of Whelnetham of the 60 
acres aforesaid of the clear yearly value beyond the rent resolute of 12s. ..6d., in 
satisfaction of 20 shillings of the loo shillings yearly which they have had leave to 
acquire. (Cal. Pat. Rolls.) Apparently the land was not very good. The jury said 
that it was worth (over and above the rent resolute) two pence and a halfpenny per 
acre, and no more because the soil is sandy and weak (sabulosa et debilis). 

It is clear from this enquiry and from the patent roll that the being annexed by 
London has not taken from us our old title nor our power to acquire lands. But I 
imagme that the de Bures gift of 1331 went not to us but to our annexer. However, 
I suppose we cant say much, because we had previously annexed Bergham. 

1347 — 1535. So far the records have been mainly of gifts and benefactions, of 
chapel added to chapel and lands to lands. Now comes an interval of two hundred 
silent years, touching which I have found no records of any sort. There may be 
some, but they have escaped me. But perhaps there are none. We are such a very 
small body that perhaps nobody has thought of giving us anything. And if we have 
merely gone along day by day, not more than three or four of us if so many, keeping 
the lamp burning in our chapel, celebrating the masses and praying for the souls for 
whom we have to pray, not doing much good and not doing much harm, if that is all 
then there could not well be any records of us. At any rate I have met with none. 

1536. And now the long silence is rudely broken. The two hundred years, or 
to be exact the one hundred and ninety years since Robert Rokewood's benefaction 
that have gone by unrecorded, where have they brought us to ? To the reign of 
Henry VIII, and to the very year 1536 in which Parliament suppressed the lesser 
monasteries, whose revenues were below ;^2oo a year. As we had but a few acres, 



386 CRUTCHED FRIARS AND CHAPEL OF ST. THOMAS. 

only worth two pence halfpenny an acre because they were sabulosa et debilis, we 
certainly had not JQ200 a year, and so I suppose we went at once. 

Those who were at the Bury Pageant in the summer of 1907 cannot well have 
forgotten that wonderful scene in Episode VH, as perfect in its execution as in its 
design. We were made to see the fair in all its reckless gaiety and gladness, so that 
the very air and the very ground seemed to be alive with joys of a light and fleeting 
character. In a moment it all stopped, like the light of a candle blown out, and in 
its place we had a compact procession of silent monks, looking like solid blocks of 
petrified ink, black from head to foot, and with countenances to match their 
garments. 

That is the point we have now reached, and a document soon afterwards comes 
in to throw a little light upon us. 

1540. In March Anthony Rous of Dennington, near Framlingham, pays to the 
king's treasurer ;^i678, and in return he has several manors and divers lands granted 
to him. Amongst others he had " all the chapel of Chockesmythes, and one 
" messuage, one garden and one orchard adjacent to said chapel, containing in all 3 
" roods, and 13 acres arable and pasture, 2 acres meadow and 5 acres wood and all the 
" soil of the wood, in Great and Little Whelnethani and Bradfield Combust, which 
"lately belonged to the late dissolved Priory or house of Crossbearing Friars within 
" the city of London." That is us. St. Thomas the Martyr has altogether disappeared 
from our title, and in his place we have Chockesmyth. What Chockesmyth means I 
cant imagine. Whether or not it is a title of contempt that has been bestowed 
upon us during this last year or two, I dont know. This is the first mention of the 
name that I have seen, but as I have seen no mention of the chapel for two hundred 
years that does not show much. At any rate now our light is put out, our altar 
thrown down, and a small pension granted to us till our days are ended. 

It will be noticed that we are said to belong to the London house, so that the 
annexation by that house in 1331 deprived us, eventually at any rate, of our 
individuality. This London house of Crutched Friars, in St. Olave's, near Tower hill, 
was now valued at ;Q^2 .. 13 .. 4 a year, and granted to Sir Thomas Wyatt. 

I have noticed several instances of these big men at the time of the suppression 
of the monasteries buying lands wholesale and seUing them by retail. So it was now. 
The very next month after Anthony Rous had made his purchase he got leave to sell 
the chapel and its premises to John Skott and Joan Cokerell. The price is not 



CRUTCHED FRIARS AND CHAPEL OF ST. THOMAS. 387 



mentioned. I presume that Joan Cockerell was shortly going to change her name 
and become Joan Skott. 

1599. I do not know how long John Skott kept it after acquiring it in 1540. 
His neighbours, the Jermyns of Rushbrooke, were of a very acquiring and acquisitive 
nature at this time, and were just at that stage in their family history when the ruling 
passion is to get and to get on. A little later on they had passed that stage ; they 
had got and got on, and then they ceased to care, and what they had got began to 
go. Sir Robert Jermyn of Queen EHzabeth's reign had before him Sir Ambrose and 
Sir Thomas who got, and after him he had another Thomas and the rest who let go. 
He himself was the bridge or the link between the two. He both got and let go, for 
he built that large house. I feel pretty sure that one of these, perhaps Sir Robert, 
perhaps Sir Ambrose, got the chapel premises before the sixteenth century was out. 

Among the MSS of Lord Salisbury at Hatfield is a letter from Sir Robert 
Jermyn to Sir Robert Cecil. It is dated 24 Jan., 1599, "From the Crutched 
Friars." (Hist. MSS Hatfield IX, 38. See also Rushbrooke, p. 342.) Why he 
writes from there I dont know. But possibly the workmen kept him out of his new 
house at Rushbrooke, and so he found shelter in the house of the Crutched Friars 
which he had lately acquired. Otherwise I should have thought that the new house 
would have been finished before this. At any rate somewhere about now the old 
chapel of St. Thomas the Martyr, alias Chockesmyth, and the old house of the 
Crutched Friars, became Jermyn property, and Sir Robert Jermyn, a Protestant of 
Protestants, was lodging there. 

From the Jermyns it has passed to its present owner, Col. Oakes of Nowton 
Court, by some route or other which I have not found out. 

Benefactors. 

The name of the founder of this religious house has not come to light, but I 
have mentioned two benefactors, Robert de Bures and Robert de Rokewode, both 
living at Acton, near Bures, where Suffolk and Essex meet together. These are the 
only two benefactors that I know of. In the pre-Reformation wills of the dwellers 
round Bury there is often a small legacy to the friars at Babwell, but I have not 
come across one to the friars at Whelnetham. Tanner tells us vaguely that he had, 
but he unfortunately gives no particulars. It does not belong to this volume to give 
more than a very slight sketch of these two benefactors and of the families to which 
they belonged. 



388 CRUTCHED FRIARS AND CHAPEL OF ST. THOMAS. 

ROBERT DE BURES of Acton was a son of Robert de Bures, who died in 
1302 and has a brass memorial in Acton church. The son, our benefactor, was twice 
married. By his first wife, whose name I think was AHce, he had several sons who 
came into the world about the same time as the fourteenth century did, i. e. they were 
born in or about 1300. John was the eldest, but Andrew succeeded his father at 
Acton. It was Andrew who, as I have already pointed out, diverted the gift of land 
from us, the friars of Whelnetham, to the house of Crutched Friars in London. I 
therefore do not include him among our benefactors, and am very doubtful whether 
we need to pray for his soul. 

Another son of the second Robert de Bures was Michael de Bures, who at 
p. 342 was married to Mary, one of the daughters and co-heiresses of Sir John de 
Whelnetham. One wonders whether either of these two events helped on the other. 
Did the benefaction help on the marriage or did the marriage help on the benefaction? 
A son of that marriage was John de Bures de Whelnetham, who inherited the manor 
of Gteat Whelnetham from his mother, and who I imagine resided there. And a 
descendant of his must be Joan de Bures, a nun at Sr. Helen's in London in 141 7, 
relating to whom I have printed a curious document at p. 317. 

Robert de Bures, our benefactor, made a second marriage in or about 131 1. 
Her name was Hillary. Davy in one of his pedigrees gives them a family, but her 
inquisition post mortem distinctly says there was none. Robert de Bures died in 
September 1331, and Hillary in December, 1331. My authority for these statements 
are their inquisitions post mortem. 

Andrew de Bures, whom I do not acknowledge as a benefactor, died in 1360, 
and when Henry de Bures died in 1528 the name came to an end. 

ROBERT DE ROKEWODE was our other benefactor. I believe he succeeded 
his father Robert in 1333, and died in 1359. The Rokewodes were also at Acton at 
that time, and were connected by marriages with de Bures. It was not till 1358 that 
they acquired Stanningfield, and not till 1595 that they built Coldham. (Gage's 
Hengrave.) I have not looked into their history sufficiently to see which of this 
family it was who inherited the manor of Great Whelnetham, or who was the Robert, 
son of John, who tumbled into the moat at Great Whelnetham hall. (P. 363.) For 
more than one generation this may be said to their credit, that with the same 
devotion with which others have followed the winning cause which would bring 
wealth and promotion, they followed the losing and lost causes which could only 
bring suffering and loss. 



CRUTCHED FRIARS AND CHAPEL OF ST. THOMAS. 389 

The Building. 

And now at last we come to the building itself, though I have not much to say 
of It. It is in Little Whelnetham parish and so it was in 1274. But it is a completely 
isolated bit of Little Whelnetham, and all round it the land is in Great Whelnetham. 
The rest of Little Whelnetham lies right away on the other side of the London road 
and on the other side of a valley. How this came to be in Little Whelnetham I 
cannot say. But this occurs to me : — the abbot of Bury might have resisted the friars 
establishing themselves on land that was held by him : does this chapel occupy apart 
of those 40 acres which at the time of the doomsday survey were not held by the 
abbot but by the earl of Mortain ? See p. 228, 322. 

John Carter's drawing of 1781, which I have reproduced for this volume, shows 
the London road passing close by the house, so close that (as old inhabitants could 
till lately recollect) the driver of the passing coach could with his whip flick the 
pears off a pear tree that touched the house. If one looks at the ground itself one 
can see exactly where the road used to climb the hill, the present road from the foot of 
the hill on the Bury side to the foot of the hill on the Sudbury side being a modern 
cut. I think the alteration was made in or about 1836. If it had not been made 
then it would probably never have been made at all, for coaches, for whose benefit 
it was made, soon afterwards ceased to run. I find that Acts of Parliament were 
passed for the improvement of the road from Bury to Sudbury in the second, 
eleventh and forty first years of George III, i.e. 1762, 1771 and 1801 ; and then 
there was another act in the seventh year of George IV, /. e. 1826, which repealed the 
other three. Probably this improvement was the ultimate result of the last of these 
four Acts. 

As this chapel stood so close by the side of the London road, one wonders 
whether any of the kings of England on their way to Bury for Parliament or pleasure 
looked in to offer a gift at the altar of the murdered Archbishop. Who of all they 
that have gone by have looked in ? Was it nothing to you, all ye that passed by, 
that Thomas Becket was commemorated here? Humphry, the good duke of 
Gloucester, must have passed by it once, and I wonder if he looked in. We know 
the year, the month, the day of the month, the day of the week, the hour of the day, 
and even the weather, when he passed by. It was on Feb. 18, *' Shroffe-Sonedayes 
even," 1446. He had come from Lavenham and was on his way to attend Parlia- 
ment at Bury; and as he reached the south gate at Bury "about n on the clokke 



390 CRUTCHED FRIARS AND CHAPEL OF ST. THOMAS. 




No. 1. North Side. 




No. 2. South Side. 



CRUTCHED FRIARS AND CHAPEL OF ST. THOMAS. 391 

affore noon," it would have been about lo a.m. that he might have flicked off a pear 
from the pear tree. And as to the weather, the old chronicler tells us " it was a 
fervent coolde weder and a bytynge." With him there came four score horsemen. 
On the Thursday next he was dead, " He deyde sone appon 3 on the belle at 
"aftrenone, at his owne loggynge called Seynt Salvatoures, without the north gate: on 
" whose sowie God have mercy. Amen." (English Chron :, Camden Soc : p. it6.) 
We saw him on his bier at Bury pageant. Only the gateway of " his loggynge " still 
remains, and Mr. Gery-Cullum has lately done well to affix to it the heraldic shield 
of the good duke who died there. 

But to come to what is left of the chapel and appendant priory. I have 
examined it carefully with the help of Mr. Edmund Farrer. The chapel is now 
represented by a solitary and isolated buttress. Here it is in all its solitariness. It 
can also be seen in Nos. i and 2, and behind the tree in No. 4. 




No. 3. All that is left of the Chapel. 



392 CRUTCHED FRIARS AND CHAPEL OF ST. THOMAS. 

It can also be seen in Carter's drawing, but there it is not quite isolated, as a 
bit of the wall seems to be standing which connects it with the rest of the building. 
This buttress must have been a corner buttress, standing at the angle or junction of 
the south and east walls of the chapel. The bit of low wall, shown in Carter's 
drawing but not now standing, would have been the south wall of the chancel. The 
bit of low wall shown in my illustration No. i, with a lean-to roof on it, would 
be a bit of the south wall of the chapel. There is a doorway in it, now filled 
in, which would have opened into the chapel. That is all that is left above ground 
of the chapel of St. Thomas. Judging from the appearance of the ground it might 
have been about lo yards long by 7 yards wide. Of course excavations on a small 
scale would show the exact size of it, as the foundations are sure to be still there. 
I may add that in Carter's drawing the buttress is not quite right. It is there parallel 
to the buttress on the house, and looks as if it was on an east wall, whereas really it 
is at the corner formed by the junction of east and south wall, and so should be 
tilted round a little towards the left hand. 




No. 4. South East. 

With regard to the present farm house, it must represent the abode of the prior 
and brethren, who perhaps were never more than three or four in number. One 
cannot say much more than that there is Tudor work mixed with earlier work to be 
seen. The general appearance is, I think, Elizabethan. This would show that those 
who became possessed of it after the Reformation adapted it for its new uses. 



CHUTCHED FRIARS AND CHAPEL OF ST. THOMAS. 393 

Built into the outside of the east side of the house are about a score of wall- 
tiles. They can be seen in Carter's drawing, high up on the gable. There are also 
three or four built into the outside of the south side. Mr. Farrer tells me that he 
thinks only one (which occurs twice on the south side) is heraldic, the rest being 
merely ornamental. The heraldic one, which is rather worn, he thinks to be a 
grififin segreant within a bordure engrailed. The others have pomegranates, single 
roses, double roses, chevrons reversed, a Catherine wheel. The pomegranates might 
imply attachment to the cause of Catherine of Arragon. I think I have seen them 
somewhere at Coldham hall in Stanningfield, and as the Rookwoods of that place 
were benefactors to this priory, that seems to connect them with this tile. 




No. 5. South Side. 

In a notice of Little Wenham hall in Suff. Arch. Proc. XI, 73, Mr. Redstone 
mentions " the abundant use there of Flemish bricks, wall-tiles and bricks stamped 
with the cross crosslet of the Brewses." I presume those wall-tiles were like to these. 
We have already seen that Sir John Audley, who owned the manor of Little 
Whelnetham, married Muriel Brewse of Little Wenham, and that her mother, lady 
(Elizabeth) Brewse, presented to the rectory of Little Whelnetham in 1484. It 
seems tempting to try and find for the tiles here and those at Wenham a common 
author. But probably this is only an accidental coincidence. The tiles are found 
in both places simply because both places followed the fashion of the day in having 
them, and not because of any connection between their respective owners. These 



394 CRUTCHED FRIARS AND CHAPEL OF ST. THOMAS. 

tiles would be rather later than the time of Sir John Audley, and there is no reason 
to suppose that he had anything to do with the priory, though he possessed the 
manor. 

The ownership of this building down to the present year, 1910, I have shown. 
With regard to its history (apart from the ownership) since that day in January, 1599, 
when Sir Robert Jermyn sat down and wrote a letter in it to Sir Robert Cecil at 
Hatfield, I am afraid I can say nothing. It may for a time have been a small 
residential house, but I expect that it was not long before it became a farm-house. I 
have no means of identifying it with any of the houses named in the successive hearth 
tax lists at p. 222 — 227. But it can be seen in the Little Whelnetham rate-books 
of 1699 — 1768 at p. 235 — 237; and there it seems to be thrown in with the Hall 
farm, which was then occupied by the Garlands and Brooks successively. But I may 
have more to say about that in a future chapter. 




No. 6. South East. 



RECTORS OF GREAT WHELNETHAM. 395 



Part II. Chapter III. 



The Rectors. 



Section i. Great Whelnetham. Section 2. Little Whelnetham. 



The rectors have been extracted for me from the Norwich records by Mr. Fred. 
Johnson of Norwich. Sometimes the record of institution says that A.B. is instituted 
on the resignation or death or deprivation of CD., but not always. And when it does 
not say so, then one cannot be absolutely certain that there is not someone missing. 
When I put P.R.O. after an institution, that institution is missing from the Norwich 
records, and has been got from an institution book in the Public Record Office. The 
information from the Norwich records consists of the date of institution, ihe cause of 
vacancy, and the name of patron. 

Section I. Great Whelnetham. 

1230. ROBERT. There is no record of his institution at Norwich. I 
only know of him from the Patent Roll of Jan. 23, 1230, whereby King Henry III 
appointed justices to hear the dispute between Robert, parson of the greater 
Whelnetham, and Adam de Whelnetham chaplain and Jordan his brother. The 
dispute was as to whether some messuages and land in the greater Whelnetham 
belonged to the church of said Robert or were a lay fee of said Adam and Jordan. 
That entry is the earliest mention of a clergyman here that I have met with, and it is 
also the earliest mention of a Great Whelnetham. (See p. 309.) 

1275. WALTER. I only know of him from the action brought against 
him by Brother Henry of the Chapel of St. Thomas. (See p. 301, 383.) 



396 RECTORS OF GREAT WHELNETHAM. 

1325 to . NICHOLAS DE WHELNETHAM, acolyte. Instituted 

6 Ides November, 1325. Patron, Sir John de Whelnetham, knight. If Sir John had 
several sons he might be one of them. But I do not know that he had any, and so I 
imagine him to have been a nephew. Sir John had several brothers, one of whom 
was Nicholas. The date of this acolyte fits a son or nephew of Sir John. 

1346 to 1383. EDMUND DE RISBY. Instituted March 18, 1346. Patron, 
Sir John de Sutton, knight. I presume that Sir John presented in right of his wife, 
who was Margery, daughter and co-heiress of Sir John de Whelnetham. The Calendar 
of Suffolk Fines, p. 176, shows Edmund de Risby, chaplain, as one of the purchasers 
(I presume nominal) of the manor and advowson of Ampton in 1333. He remained 
here till his death in the early part of 1382. 

Mr. Frederick Johnson has been good enough to send me the following abstract 
of his will from Heydon Register, fo. 198, m the Norwich Office. 

In the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit. Amen. The 4th of the 
nones of March, a.d. 1380, Edmund, rector of the church of Quelnetham magna, 
do make my testament. My soul to God and my body to be buried in the 
chancel "ejusdem ville." For all my burial expenses and those of my seventh 
and thirtieth days I leave 30 shillings. To the Friars of Babwell 4 bushels 
of corn and a quarter of malt. To the chancel of Qwhelnetham I leave all the 
reed lying in said church (totum arundinem jacentem in domo predicti cancelli), 
and 10 shillings to cover said chancel. To the poor on my burial day 10 shillings. 
To Margaret my niece a cow and a calf. To Katherine my niece a cow and a 
calf. To said Margaret 2 quarters of corn and 2 quarters of malt and half my 
beds (or bedding ?). To Hugh my servant a counterpane, a quylte and two 
sheets. I make John atte Grene of Hausted and Margaret his wife and Hugh 
my servant my executors, and to them I leave all the residue. 

Proved 12 April, 1382, by John atte Grene and Hugh servant of the 
deceased. 

1383. REGINALD DE HALLE, presbyter. Instituted April 5, 1382. 
Patron, John de Bures, who had inherited the advowson from his mother, Mary 
wife of Michael de Bures, daughter and co-heiress of Sir John de Whelnetham. 
This rector made a very short stay. 

1383 to 1400. PHILIP DE KELSEY, presbyter. Instituted Jan. 9, 1383. 
Patron, Margery de Sutton, daughter of Sir John de Whelnetham. He resigned in 
1400, going to Wickhambroke by exchange with his successor. 



RECTORS OF GREAT VVHELNETHAM. 397 

1400 to 1402. THOMAS MAYSTER, presbyter. Instituted June 21, 1400, 
on the resignation of Philip de Kelsey, Patron, John de Bures de Whelnetham. 
He appears in several fines relating to land at Haverhill between 1404 and 1416, and 
I gather that that was where his family lived. Having come here by exchange from 
Wickhambroke, to which he had been appointed in 1392, he made another exchange 
in October, 1402, which took him to North Runcton, and directly he got there he 
went off by another exchange to Stoke near Eye. (Blomfield IX, 66.) 

1402 to 1403. GEORGE BOLOUR, chaplain. Instituted Oct. 9, 1402, 
on the resignation of Thomas Mayster. Presented by John Boys, Ralph 
Chamberlayn, Thomas Ocle, Clement Spyce and John Sumpteere, who I imagine to 
be trustees for a minor Rookwode. In 1385 he had been appointed to the rectory 
of Congham in Norfolk. In 1388 by exchange of livings he became rector of North 
Runcton. In 1402 another exchange brought him here. In 1403 yet another 
exchange carried him to West Lynn, where he stayed till 1418. (Blomfield VIII, 
388, 536, IX, 66.) Blomfield calls him Gregory, but Mr. Johnson assures me it is 
George in the Norwich records. 

1403 to . JOHN DE (or atte) STRETESEND, presbyter. Instituted 

April 5, 1403, on the resignation of Bolour. Presented by Sir William Burgate and 
Sir Andrew Boteler, knights, John Rokwode, William Rokwode and John Huberd, 
rector of the church of Burgate. He had been appointed to the rectory of West 
Lynn in 1399, from which place he came here by exchange. In 1413 he is one of a 
crowd of feoffees who are buying Coptoes messuage in Great Whelnetham. (See Fine 
No. 21, p. 284, and Coptoes.) 

,421 to . NICHOLAS FRERE DE WALSOKEN, presbyter. Insti- 
tuted April 15, 142 1. Patrons, William Raynford and Eleanor his wife. I presume 
that Walsoken in Norfolk was his native place. The Calendar of Bury wills contains 
one of Nicholas Fere, 18 July, 1426. If that is the rector, then there is a gap in my 
list. 

1441 to 1451. ROBERT SYxMONDS. Instituted March 29, 1441. Patron, 
William Rookwood esquire. He stayed here ten years and then resigned. 

1451 to . ROBERT FORTH. Instituted July 27, 1451, on the 

resignation of Robert Symonds. Patron, William Rookwood esquire. 

1455 to . THOMAS GARDEN YR. Instituted Oct. 31, 1455. Patron, 

Lawrence Raynford esquire. 



398 RECTORS OF GREAT VVHELNETHAM. 

to 1464. THOMAS MARVEK. There is no record of his institution 



at Norwich, and I only get his name from the record of his successor. He resigned 
in 1464, or perhaps 1464-5. 

1464 to 1476. THOMAS DALTON. Instituted Feb. 18, 1464, on the 
resignation of Thomas Marvek. Patron, Thomas Marvek, last rector. He resigned. 

1476 to 1484. THOMAS GARDENER. Instituted Nov. 11, 1476, on 
the resignation of Dalton. Patron, Sir Lawrence Reynforth knight. He came from 
Reydon by exchange with Dalton. I do not know whether he is the same Thomas 
Gardener as was here before, but he must be the same man as was rector of Little 
Whelnetham in 1479 — 1484. He resigned. 

1484 to 1512. MAGISTER JOHN IRBY. Instituted Oct. 12, 1484, on 
the resignation of Gardener. Patron, Sir Lawrence Reynforth. 

1512 to 1519. DOMINUS EGIDIUS WRIGHT. Instituted Jan. 4, 1512, 
on the death of Irby. Patron, Sir John Raynforth knight. He resigned. 

MAGISTER WILLIAM RICHERS. This is a doubtful rector. His 
institution is in the Institution book under 1515 without month or day. And in the 
institution of John Redmayne who follows he is ignored. So I doubt whether he 
was ever here. 

1519 to 1549. DOMINUS JOHN REDMAYNE. Instituted April 15, 
15 19, on the resignation of Giles Wright. Patron, Sir John Raynsforth. His name 
is also written Redman and Redmant. 

1549 to I554. JAMES BARWYCKE. Instituted Nov, 28, 1549, on the 
death of John Redman. Patron, Sir John Reynforth, knight. He was deprived in 
1554, but came back again in 1558 or 1559. Queen Mary had succeeded Edward 
VI in July, 1553, and died in November, 1558. It is therefore not very difficult to 
guess what were James Barwick's opinions on the burning questions of that day. No 
mass, said he, and out he went for saying so. But the mass is doomed and he will 
come back, 

1554 to 1558. ALEXANDER FASSET or FAWCET, Instituted Sept. 
14, 1554, on the deprivation of James Barwick, Presented by William Cockett and 
Edward Appleton, who had had a grant of the next presentation from Sir John 
Reynforth, knight. In March 1558-9 he was presented by Lady Drury to the 
rectory of Brockley, and was there till the middle of 1561. (Gage,) 



RECTORS OF GREAT WHELNETHAM. 399 

1558 to . JAMES BARWYCK. Instituted May 10, 1558, on the 

resignation of Alexander Fawcet. In the record of institution he is called rector of 
Groton, and Groton and Great Whelnetham are united for the time being. I rather 
expect that the year of his second institution should be 1559 instead of 1558, as 
Queen Mary did not die till November, 1558, and Alexander Fawcet was not 
instituted to Brockley till March 1558-9. 

There is a Libbeus Barwick having six children baptized here between 1577 and 
1584 ; and a Benjamin Barwick was married here in 1588. If Libbeus and Benjamin 
were his sons, it might be that his having taken to himself a wife had been the reason 
of his deprivation in 1554. "Suffolk in 1568" shows that he was still here then. 
Whether he was here till 1588 I cannot say. There is no entry of his burial in the 
register. Perhaps he was buried at Groton. 

1588 to 1619. RICHARD STAFFORD B.A. Instituted Oct. 17, 15S8. 
Presented by Jeremy Stafford of Gislingham, who had a grant from William 
Waldegrave of Smallbridge and Anthony Butler of Haughley, assign of said William 
Waldegrave. Ordained by the bishop of Norwich Jan. i, 1587. 

The note in the parish register which I have printed at p. 204, says that he came 
here in 1561 and was rector for 58 years. Dr. Herbert wrote that note 250 years 
ago, and Mr. Lord repeated it 150 years ago. But they were quite wrong, being 
misled by his signature at the foot of the pages which contains entries from 1561. 
That is a trap which people still fall into in spite of its age. 

Soon after his appointment, viz. in November, 1589, he was married here to 
Elizabeth Ban toft. These twelve children were baptized here between 1590 and 
161 3. The date in brackets is that of burial. 



James 1606-7. (1609.) 
Margaret 1607. (1620.) 
Abigail 1609. 
James 1613. 



Elizabeth 1590. (i593-) f Elizabeth 1599. 
Jeremy 1593-4. Robert 1601. 

Suzan 1595-6. William 1603. 

Richard 1597-8. I Ann 1604. 

The rector was buried here in June, 16 19. I presume it was his widow who 
was buried here in June, 1642, 

1619 to 1633. JOHN HEALEY. Instituted Oct. 29, 1619. (P.R.O.) 
Patron, Sir Thomas Jermyn. He was also at the same time rector of Rushbrooke. 



400 RECTORS OF GREAT WHELNETHAM. 

I think that this rector of Rushbrooke and Great Whelnetham must be the Jo. 
Healey whose name or initials is on the title page of these three volumes : — 

1. Epictetus his Manuall and Cebes his Table. 
Out of the Greeke originall by Jo. Healey. 
At London, Printed for Th. Thorpe 1610. 

2. St. Augustine of The Citie of God. 

With the learned comments of lo. Lod. Vives. 

Englished by J. H. 
Printed by George Eld, 16 10. 

3. Philip Mornay, Lord of Plessis, his Teares for the death of his sonne. 

Unto his wife Charlotte Baliste. 
Englished by John Healey. 
At London. Printed by G. Eld, dwelling in Fleete-lane, at the signe of 
the Printers Presse, 1609. 

I have looked at these volumes in the library of the British Museum. In No. 1, 
a tiny volume, and in No. 2, a folio, the translator simply translates, and shows no 
other sign of himself. The preface in both is by Th. Th. {i. e. Thorpe.) But in 
No. 3 the dedication is subscribed by Jo. Healey, and I print it here in full for the 
sake of such biographical information as may be in it. 

To my most honored and constant friend, Maister John Coventry. 

— Morality (worthye Sir) giveth us this instruction, that Fortitude is more 
— apparant in sustaining then in performing ; and Divinity assureth us that he that 
— endureth God's tryalls with a pacient humility and an humble patience, shall 
— thereby ascend a state most glorious. How much it behooveth both your selfe and 
— me to apply this cataplasme to our owne present estates, it is best knowne to us 
— both, who have thus long sayled in a deepe darke sea of misfortunes ; but as the 
— divine light shone unto Sire du Plessis in his deepest night of sorrows, and shewed 
— him the way to his wished rest, so let us light our torches at his, and out of these 
— his teares for the death of his onely sonne extract a Quintessence for the cure of 
— all our owne calamities. To this end have I presented them to you, perhaps in a 
— form unfited, yet no such (I am sure) as will return from you unaccepted. The 
— discourse of itselfe is a generall amulet, and being truly worne resisteth all the 
— infections of fortune. Take it then, and weare it. God may lend you sonnes, and 



RECTORS OF GREAT WHELNETHAM. 401 

— take them away againe at his unchangeable pleasure. Keep this Enchiridion 
— therefore at your elbowe upon all such occasions ; wherein you shall finde 
— desciphered both the passions of a loving parent and that restraint of them that 
— befitteth a religious Christian. Prenez en gre. 

Yours intirely Jo : Healey. 

The probability of this translator, Jo. Healey, being the same man as the rector 
of Whelnetham is increased by the following extracts which I take from the Journals 
of the House of Lords. 

Dies Sabbati. Jan, 23, 1640. Upon reading a petition of Sam. and Thomas 
Heily, sons of John Heily, late minister of Rushbrooke in Co. of Suffolk, "That the 
Archbishop of Canterbury [Laud] hath got into his possession a book of their father's 
compiling, which they desire to have restored," thereupon it was ordered that Mr. 
Maxwell doth shew the said petition to the Archbishop of Canterbury, who is to 
return an answer to this petition, and likewise the said book, upon Monday morning 
next. IV, 141. 

Die Lunje. Jan, 25. Mr. Maxwell returned the petition of Mr. Heily and the 
book, together with an answer from the Archbishop of Canterbury, That the book 
was delivered to him by the Bishop of Hereford, Dr. Lindsey, who told him in his 
judgment that there were some things in the book incoherent; and the House 
ordered, That the book be delivered to the owner. IV, 143. 

One wonders what this book was " with some things in it incoherent," and 
whether it has been published. The Archbishop's conduct strikes one as being very 
feeble. He takes something that is not his and refuses to give it up ; when found 
out he tries to put the blame on another bishop, just as a boy when caught always 
says that it was the other boy ; and then he finds a feeble justification of what he 
had done in the fact that somebody thought that there were some things incoherent 
in the book, as if an Archbishop might seize any book that anybody thought had 
things incoherent in it. However, the young Healeys got justice, and perhaps it was 
they who first exclaimed, Thank God, we have a House of Lords. 

Besides the three volumes mentioned above as Englished by J. H., I find in 
Lowndes' Bibl. Manual another translated work under John Healey ; viz. Discovery ' 
oj a new World, or, A description of South Indies hitherto u?iknow?i. By an English 
Mercury. Lowndes describes this as " a singular and humorous version of Bishop 



402 RECTORS OF GREAT WHELNETHAM. 

Hall's Mundus alter et idem." There is no date, but it appeared about 1608. A 
copy of this is also in the British Museum, but somehow I missed seeing it. Bishop 
Hall would have left Hawstead before John Healey came here, so that they could 
not have put their heads together in the studies of their neighbouring rectories. 

Since this last paragraph was printed I have received a book-catalogue from 
Francis Edwards of High Street, Marylebone, which contains a copy of this very 
work, priced 4 guineas. Mr. Edwards dates it circa 1644. The D. N. B., under 
Joseph Hall, says it appeared about 1608. 

John Healey must have been of a certain age before he was appointed to these 
two Suffolk parishes, which accounts for none of his children appearing in their 
registers of Baptisms. An Elizabeth Heiley was married at Rushbrooke to Thomas 
Clarke on March 24, 1630, who I suppose was his daughter. 

He was himself buried at Rushbrooke on April 4, 1633. I presume that he had 
resided m that parish. His appointment by a member of that very Protestant 
family, the Jermyns, the character of Hall's work which he translated, and the 
detention of his unpublished work by Archbishop Laud, unite in proclaiming him a 
strong anti-Romanist, and perhaps the " deepe dark sea of misfortunes " in which he 
says he had sailed may refer to some slight episcopal persecution that he may have 
undergone on that account. 

1633. THOMAS ALDRIDGE. Instituted October 8, 1633. Patron, Sir 
Thomas Jermyn. So say ihe Institution books at the P.R.O. Apparently he was 
now instituted to Whelnetham and Rushbrook, but being instantly afterwards 
presented to Bradfield St. Clare, he never held them. John Sellar's institution is 
distinctly said to be " on the death of John Healey," so I should have been justified 
had I omitted his name altogether. 

1633 to 1646. JOHN SELLAR M.A. Instituted Sept. 18, 1633, on the 
death of John Healey. Patron, Sir Thomas Jermyn. I have seen in the British 
Museum a tiny volume of 270 pages with this title page : — 

Five Sermons preached upon several occasions. By John Seller. 

London. Printed for John Clark, 
And are to be sold at his shop under St. Peter's church in Cornhill. 1636. 

The first sermon was preached before the king at Bagshow [sic] on Tuesday, 
Sept. 15, 1635. The second, before the king at Hampton Court on Sunday, Sept. 



RECTORS OF GREAT WHELNETHAM. 403 

27. ^635. The third, to the household at Whitehall on Nov. 29, 1629. The other 
two are not specified. As Sir Thomas Jermyn, who appointed John Sellar to 
Whelnetham rectory, was vice-chamberlain to the queen and comptroller of the 
royal household, this court preacher is very likely to have been our rector. 
Another sermon of about 60 pages, against halting between two opinions, preached 
at St. Martins in the fields by John Seller B.D., chaplain to George, Archbishop of 
Canterbury, and printed in 161 1, must be by an older man than our rector. 

In his Sufferings of the Clergy, 17 14, John Walker includes John Seller^ Great 
Welthaffi R. in his " List of some of the loyal and episcopal clergy who were 
sequestred, harrass'd and by other methods of persecution kept out or dispossess'd of 
or forced to relinquish their several preferments." But he gives no particulars whatso- 
ever. If he was turned out he must have died very soon after it, as he died in 1646. 
The register of burials has gaps at about that time, so that there is no entry of his 
burial. 

Six children were born to him and Mary his wife between 1636 and 1643, viz. 
Thomas, John, Charles, Henry, Mary and Samuel. John and Samuel died in 
infancy. Thomas must, I think, be the Bury brewer, who had a son Thomas, who 
was presented by Lord Bristol to the living of Sleaford. (See Bury Grammar School 

List.) 

1647 to 1681. WILLIAM HERBERT. Instituted Dec. 2, 1647. Patron, 
Sir Thomas Jermyn. (P.R.O.) I find this entry relating to his institution in the 
Journals of the House of Lords : — 

— Die Mercurii. 13 Jan, 1647, 22 Charles I. Ordered that Mr. Doctor Heath, 
— or his lawful deputy, are hereby authorized and required upon sight of this order 
— to give institution and induction unto William Herbert, clerk, M.A., to the rectory 
— of Weltham in Suffolk void by the death of Mr. Jo. Sellers clerk, the late incumbent, 
— said Mr. Herbert taking the National League and Covenant, and producing his 
— presentation thereunto under the hand and seal of the earl of Manchester, the 
— lawful patron pleno jure. VIII, 671. 

It would appear from that that Sir Thomas Jermyn had not much to do with 
the appointment The subscribers to the Solemn League and Covenant bound 
themselves to defend one another against all opponents ; to endeavour without 
respect of persons the extirpation of popery, prelacy, superstition, heresy, schism and 



404 RECTORS OF GREAT WHELNETHAM. 

profaneness ; to maintain the rights of parliament together with the king's authority ; 
and to bring to justice all incendiaries and malignants. Parliament having first 
subscribed it themselves in 1643 ordered it to be received by all who lived under 
their authority. 

William Herbert was a fellow of Trin. Coll., Cambridge, and D.D. I imagine 

he is the Herbert, S.T.P. per literas Regias 1661, who will be found in the 

Graduati Cantabrigienses. In 1662, 1663, he was preacher at St. Mary's church, 
Bury St. Edmunds, and he also held the livings of Little Whelnetham and Rougham. 
The Hearth tax return for 1674 shows him residing at Rougham. A daughter 
Suzan was baptized here in 1662, and a son John was baptized here in 1668. 

Dr. Herbert was buried here in Feb., 1 680-1, and Elizabeth his widow in 
September, 1686. I have printed his will at p. 265, wherein will be found mention 
of five children, William, John, Mary, Suzan and Elizabeth. Of these William and 
John went to Bury Grammar School, where they both got exhibitions, and thence to 
Trin. Coll., Cambridge, where William got a fellowship. 

i68i to 1724. JOHN BRUNDISH M.A. Instituted March 23, 1680-1, on 
the death of William Herbert. Presented by Margaret Brundish and Elizabeth 
Brundish, spinsters, executors of the will of Ann Brundish late of Felsham, widow, 
executor of the will of Thomas Brundish late of Felsham, deceased, clerk. I imagine 
that he was a son of Thomas Brundish, rector ot Felsham, who had bought for him 
the next presentation to this rectory. He was of Emanuel Coll., Cambridge, B.A. 
1671, M.A. 1675. On April 25, 1682, he was married here to Elizabeth Parker. 
Possibly she came from the neighbouring parish of Whepstead. 

Between June 1683 and July 1695 these his children were baptized here : 
Elizabeth, Ann, Mary, Thomas, John, Constantia, Benjamin. They will all be found 
in his will, which I have printed at p. 271. The boys went to Bury Grammar School, 
and their careers will be found recorded in my list of its scholars. A great grand- 
son, John Jelliand Brundish, has got into the D.N.B. simply and solely through his 
brilliant career at Cambridge, which led to nothing. 

He died July 3, 1724, aged 73 years, and she in March, 1725, aged 67 years. 
Both were buried here. The inscription on their tombstone will be found at p. 172. 

1724 to 1726. WILLIAM RUSHBROOKE. Instituted Dec. 19, 1724, 
on the death of John Brundish. Patron, Thomas Folkes esquire. He was of 



RECTORS OF GREAT VVHELNETHAM. 405 

Queen's College, Cambridge, B.A. 17 14. He only held this rectory for two years, 
and then became rector of Great Barton. There he remained for over 40 years, and 
died Jan. 16, 1768, aged 77 years. There is a fiat stone to his memory in Barton 
church. 

1726 to 1788. THOMAS LORD. Instituted Dec. 21, 1726, on the resigna- 
tion of William Rushbrooke. Patron, Thomas Folkes Esq. He was born in 1702. 
Pembroke Coll., Cambridge, B.A. 1724. 

In the Suffolk Poll Book for 1727 he is shown as residing at Whelnetham, but 
with his freehold in Bury St. Edmunds. There is also a Thomas Lord clerk residing 
at Shimpling and with a freehold there, which looks as if he had come from 
Shimpling. 

In the Culium church notes at Hardwick, which Mr. Gery CuUum has kindly 
allowed me to examine. Sir John Culium says that James Reeve of Lowestoft M.D. 
married — Folkes, daughter of Martin Folkes of Rushbrooke, who was grandfather 
of the late Martin Folkes, President of the Royal Society ; and that they had a 
daughter Elizabeth, who married Robert Lord gent., father to Rev. Mr. Lord, late 
rector of Great Whelnetham. And he refers to the burial of Mrs. Mary Lord, relict 
of Mr. Robert Lord, in 1764. 

Now that cannot be right. Sir John Culium ought to have known, as he 
evidently knew Thomas Lord, and he himself buried Mrs. Mary Lord. But still it is 
wrong, as I can say positively from having printed the Rushbrooke registers. James 
Reeve married Elizabeth Folkes of Rushbrooke in 1666, and Elizabeth their 
daughter was baptized there in 1667. The will of Martin Folkes who died in 1707, 
printed by Mr. Muskett in S. M. F. II, no, shows that this Elizabeth Reeve married 
Henry (not Robert) Lord, and she could not possibly have been the mother of 
Thomas Lord ; nor was she the Mrs. Mary Lord who was buried at Whelnetham 
in 1764 aged 75. 

Assuming that the Culium notes are right (as they probably are) in saying that 
Thomas Lord was the son of Robert, then he must have been the nephew of Henry 
and Elizabeth Lord. Mrs. Mary Lord, buried in 1764, could not have been his 
mother as there was only 1 1 years difference between their ages. She must have 
been his stepmother. 



406 RECTORS OF GREAT WHELNETHAM. 

This pedigree will put it plainly. The only thing in it wanting proof is the 
brothership of Henry and Robert Lord. It shows also the connection between the 
patron and the parson. 

Martin Folkes of Rushbrooke 
I died 1 67 1 



Martin Folkes Thomas Folkes Elizabeth = James Reeve Lord 



died 1707 



patron of Whel : 
died 1730 
I 



I I 

Martin Folkes Eliz. = SirT.Hanmer Eliz. = Henry Lord Robert Lord = (2) Mary 

Pres. Roy. Soc. b. 1667 | 

Thomas Lord 1702 — 1788 
rector of Whel : 

I have nothing to say of Mr. Lord and his long residence here. He has written 

an interesting note in the register about a great snow storm in January, 1767. This 

I have printed at p. 206. I see no sign of wife or family. After holding this rectory 

and that of Reydon in Suffolk for the long period of 61 years, (the register says 63 

years, which I cannot work out,) he died on Aug. 6, 1788, in his 86th year, and was 

buried here. 

1788 to 1809. ROBERT PHILLIPS. Instituted Sept. 29, 1788, on the 
death of Thomas Lord. Patron, Sir Thomas Charles Bunbury, baronet. He was 
son of John Phillips of Walsham St. Mary in Norfolk ; educated at Harrow and 
Christ's College, Cambridge; B.A. 1780; M.A. 1783. He was first curate of 
Cranworth ; from Sept. 1784 to Oct. 1788 vicar of Carbrooke; from Sept. 1786 till 
his death vicar of Kempston, all three in Norfolk. He was also chaplain in ordinary 
to the Prince of Wales. I do not think he was ever married. He died on Feb. 11, 
1809, in Pall Mall, London, aged 50 years, and was buried here. The inscription 
on his tombstone will be found at p. 164. His sister, Mary Phillips, was brought 
from Great Barton for burial here in 1849 ^g^d 89. 

1809 to 1816. JOHN CARTWRIGHT. Instituted May 23, 1809, on the 
death of Robert Phillips. Patron, Sir Thomas Charles Bunbury. He married Mary 
Wastell, sister of Rev. John Daniel Wastell, curate in charge of Risby. They had a 
daughter Mary Anne, baptized here in July 1813. In 18 16 Mr. Cartwright resigned 
the living. A tombstone in Risby churchyard tells us that he died in Oct. 1850 
aged 81, and Mary his wife in April 1840, aged 61. 

1816 to 1873. HENRY GEORGE PHILLIPS. Instituted Feb. 27, 1816, 
on the resignation of John Cartwright. Patron, Sir Thomas Charles Bunbury. Born 



RECTORS OF LITTLE VVHELNETHAM. 407 

in 1 79 1. He was the eighth of the thirteen children of John Phillips, who was for 
over fifty years surgeon to the royal household in London. His mother was a 
connection of Sir T. C. Bunbury, patron of the living. Robert Phillips, who was 
rector here 1788 — 1809, was his father's brother. Educated at Charterhouse and 
Emanuel Coll., Cambridge; B.A. 1814, M.A. 1817. In May, 1819, he was married 
at Newington to Frances, fourth daughter of Captain Thomas of Dover Place, Kent 
Road. Two years after his appointment to Whelnetham he was appointed to another 
Bunbury living, viz. Mildenhall, in 1818, but he resided here. After holding this for 
57 years and that for 55 years, he died in July, 1873, aged 81 years. The inscriptions 
on his, his wife's, and several of his children's tombstones, will be found at p. 165. 

1873 to 1899. JOHN JOSEPH BADELEY. Instituted in 1873 on the 
death of Henry George Phillips. Born in March, 1833. He was of Corpus Christi 
Coll., Cambridge. B.A. 1856. Wells Theol. Coll. 1856. Died Nov., 1899. 

1899 to 1902. GEORGE EDWARD BADELEY. Instituted in 1899 on 
the death of his uncle. Patron, himself. Now vicar of Wragby, near Wakefield, by 
exchange. 

1902 to . EDWARD HENRY SANKEY, M.A. Instituted Aug., 28, 

1902. Patron, Rev. George Edward Badeley. Oriel Coll., B.A. 1867. Cuddesdon 
Coll. He came here from Wragby by exchange with G. E. Badeley. 

Section 2. Little Whelnetham. 

,308 to . ROBERT DE STAUNFORD DE AYSHELDHAM. 

Instituted 9 Kalends of May, 1308. Patron, John Weyland, miles. 

131, to . NICHOLAS CANNARD DE CANTELE. Instituted 3 

Kalends of May, 13x1. Patron, John Weyland, miles. 

1318. THOMAS DE WYCKHAM. Instituted the day before the nones of 
May, 13 18. Patron, Thomas le Latimer, miles, for this turn. 

,3,8 to . JOHN DE RUGHAM [ROUGH AM]. Instituted 8 Ides 

of October, 1318. Patron, Thomas le Latimer, true patron. In 1327 there was a 
great attack made on Bury abbey by people from the town and neighbourhood. The 
mob was joined by many of the parish clergy and great damage was done. In 
" Suffolk in 1327 " I have printed from the Calendar to the Patent Rolls the names 
of 155 persons who were charged with taking part in this row. Among them was 
John, parson of Little Whelnetham. This is he. 



408 RECTORS OF LITTLE WHELNETHAM. 

1349 to 1359. THOMAS DE DODEWELL or BODEWELL. Instituted 
Sept. 7, 1349. Patron, Bartholomew le Burghers le fil, miles. 

1359 to 1373. WILLIAM DE FYNCHAM DE LAVENHAM. Insti- 
tuted May 12, 1359, on the resignation of Thomas de Bodewell. Patron, Bartholomew 
le Burghers miles. The patron, who presents in right of his wife Cecily de Weyland, 
is not le fil this time, as his father had died in 1355. 

1373 to 1375. ROBERT RIKKE. Instituted Oct. 26, 1373, on the resign- 
ation of William de Fyncham. Presented by John de Gildesburgh, assign of Sir 
Edward Despencer. 

1375- STEPHEN KYNNESMAN. Instituted Nov. 21, 1375, on the 
resignation of Robert Rikke. Patron, John de Gildesburgh. 

1376 to . ROGER BOZESWORTH. Instituted June 14, 1376. Patron, 

John de Gildesburgh. 

1396 to . JOHN WHELERE. Instituted Dec. 6, 1396. Patron, 

Elizabeth, lady le Dispencer. 

1426 to 1435. RICHARD CLERK DE SAXHAM MAGNA. Instituted 
Dec. 1 8, 1426. Presented by Nicholas Wimbish, attorney of Richard, earl of 
Warwick, in foreign parts. 

M35 to 1463. JAMES YORK. Instituted Dec. 20, 1435, on the death of 
Richard Clerk. Patrons, James, Lord Audley, and Elianor his wife, by grant from 
Richard, earl of Warwick. 

1463 to 1467. STEPHEN PARKER. Instituted June i, 1463, on the death 
of James York. Patron, Humphrey Audley. 

1467. ROBERT MAWE. Instituted May 12, 1467, on the death of Stephen 
Parker. Patron, Humphrey Audley esquire. 

1468. ROBERT LEYOTT. Instituted March i, 1468. Patron, Humphrey 

Audley esquire. 

1479 to 1484. THOMAS GARDENER. Instituted July 11, 1479. Pre- 
sented by the Bishop on lapse. This must be the same man as was rector of Great 
Whelnetham in 1476 — 1484, when he resigned. 

1484 to . EDWARD YOLANTYN. Instituted Dec. 21, 1484. Patron, 

Lady Elizabeth Brews. 



RECTORS OF LITTLE WHELNETHAM. 409 

1487 to 1 517. THOMAS HEGGE. Instituted Oct. 10, 1487. Presented 
by the Bishop, on lapse. 

1517 to . BARTHOLOMEW ARCHEBOLD. Instituted Feb. 2, 

151 7, on the resignation of Thomas Hedge. Patron, Thomas Jermyn. 

to 1556. GILBERT SIMPSON. There is no record of his institution 

at Norwich, but the valuation of churches made in 1535 shows that he was then 
rector. (See p. 232.) One also gets him from the record of his successor's institu- 
tion. And he was a witness to the will of John Bole made in April, 1534. (See 
p. 249.) Died 1556. 

1556 to . JOHN WRIGHT. Instituted May 21, 1556, on the death of 

Gilbert Simpson. Patron, Sir Ambrose Jermyn. On Jan. 11, 1587-8, was buried at 
Little Whelnetham John Weight clarke. Weight and Wright are so very much alike, 
and both John, that I cannot help suspecting them to be the same. In which case 
John W. was here 32 years. 

1588 to 1624. JAMES WOLFENDEN. Instituted Feb. 29, 1587-8. 
Patron, Sir Robert Jermyn. Between 1588 and 1608 these ten children were baptized 
here : 

Robert 1588. Susan 1594. Margaret 1601. John i6o8. 

Abigail 1590. James 1596. Sarah 1603. 

John 1592. Mary 1599. Ann 1605. 

The two Johns died in infancy. Abigail was married here in 16 13 to Daniel Snow, 
and Susan in 1622 to Thomas Marrett. John baptized at Great Whelnetham in 
1627 must be a grandson. 

He died in 1624, but there is no entry of his burial, probably from deficiency 
in the register. I have printed his will at p. 257. 

1624 to 1629. BEZALEEL CARTER. Instituted Dec. 10, 1624, on the 
death of James Wolfenden. Patron, Sir Thomas Jermyn. He was also rector of 
Cavenham in Suffolk. 

In writing the Denham volume of this series I came across Bezaleel Carter. He 
preached in his church at Cavenham a funeral sermon on the squire of Denham. 
Not knowing then that he was rector of Little Whelnetham and that I should come 
across him again, I gave a half-hearted account of him with copious extracts from the 

BB 



410 RECTORS OF LITTLE WHELNETHAM. 

funeral sermon. Had I known that he would have been wanted for this volume, I 
should have waited to give a whole-hearted account of him here, where he more 
properly should be found. 

However, I cannot give another account of him without repetition, and so I will 
merely say that he seems to have been an active man of the Puritan school. He 
loved a fight and had a flow of plain, vehement language. He preached a sermon at 
Clare on the text, "I beseech you brethren, mark them that cause division [etc.] and 
avoyd them." Romans XYi, 17. But it does not seem to me that he practised that 
text. He did not avoid them but he went for them. Two printed sermons of his 
in plain, unconventional language are in the British Museum library, one preached 
at Clare and printed in 1621, and the other, printed in 1618, was the funeral sermon 
alluded to. 

He was buried here in May 1629. I have printed his will at p. 259, from which 
some particulars as to his wife and children can be gleaned. 

1629 to 1645. ALEXANDER PISTOR. There is no record of his institu- 
tion at Norwich, but one gets his name from the record of his successor's institution. 
These three children born to him and Sarah his wife were baptized here : Alexander 
in 1635, buried in 1639 ; Ann in 1636 ; Mary in 1639. There may have been others 
between 1641 and 1660, during which time the registers are dumb. He had a son 
John born here in 1640 according to the record of his ordination at Norwich. He 
ceded the living in 1645, perhaps not voluntarily. There are no Pistors to be found 
in "Suffolk in 1568," and so I presume he was an importation by Sir Thomas 
Jermyn. He was afterwards rector of Bradfield St. George, and was still there in 
1674. His son John was rector of Claydon. (Suffolk in 1674.) 

,645 to . WILLIAM HERBERT M.A. Instituted May 8, 1645, o" 

the cession of Alexander Pistor. Patron, Sir Thomas Jermyn. We have already 
had him under Great Whelnetham, p. 403. I need only say here that whereas he 
held Great Whelnetham till his death in Feb. 1681, he certainly did not hold this 
after the Restoration. 

1645 to 1680=1. EDWARD AGAS or AGGAS. There is no record of 
his institution at Norwich. The entry of his burial in the register says that he 
had been rector over 35 years, so I start him from 1645, which gives William Herbert 



RECTORS OF LITTLE WHELNETHAM. 411 



a very short innings. But probably, wherever the jics may have been, WilHam 
Herbert was de facto rector till the Restoration. In Walker's list of sequestered or 
dispossessed clergy is this entry : — Aggas. Rushbrooh R. He afterwards got his 
livelihood {such as it was) by his fiddle. P. i86. But he was not instituted to 
Rushbrook till ten years after the Restoration, viz. in Oct. 1670. So it must have 
been Little Whelnetham that was sequestrated and not Rushbrooke. We may, then, 
imagine him playing his fiddle for a livelihood from 1645 to 1660, while William 
Herbert, who had taken the Solemn League and Covenant, enjoyed the revenue. 
Then immediately after the Restoration in 1660 he would have got into the rectory. 
He was certainly there in 1664, for in that year he paid hearth tax for four hearths. 
In 1670 he paid hearth tax for only three hearths, which looks as though he may 
have succeeded in hiding one of them when the tax-collector came round. In 1670 
he was presented to the rectory of Rushbrooke, and shifted to the rectory there, 
as in 1674 he pays hearth tax at Rushbrooke and not at Little Whelnetham. The 
registers being so very imperfect at this time one cannot see much of his family. 
His wife's name was Rachel, and David was the only child whose baptism appears, 
viz. in May 1663. A daughter, Rachel, was married here to John Hunt of Bradfield 
St. George, in October 1684. 

I can say nothing of him personally beyond the fact that he played the fiddle, 
and so there only remains to say that he was buiied here on Jan. 23, 1680-1. His 
age was 63. Rachel his wife had gone before in August, 1677. Her age was 52. 
The inscriptions on their tombstones will be found at p. 192. 

I may add a word as to his possible parentage. If presented to Little Whelne- 
tham in 1645, he would have been presented by Sir Thomas Jermyn. In 1670 he 
was presented to Rushbrooke by Henry Jermyn, earl of St, Albans, younger son of 
Sir Thomas. Sir Thomas held offices in the court of Charles I, that of Vice- 
chamberlain to Henrietta Maria being one of them. Lord St. Albans was the life- 
long servant and devoted friend of Henrietta Maria, who was the daughter of Henry 

IV. Now, in the catalogue of books in the British Museum are thirteen works 

all published between 1577 and 1622, mostly about 1590; they are all translations 
from the French, the translator being E. A. ; they are all works of the same character, 
dealing with French politics, Henry IV and so on. In the case of one of them, but 
only one, the B. M. catalogue identifies E. A. with Edward Agas. One would 
imagine, unless there is good reason for thinking otherwise, that if one is by Edward 



412 RECTORS OF LITTLE WHELNETHAM. 

Agas, all or most of the others were too. And then one might proceed to imagine 
that the Edward Agas, who was befriended by these two servants of the French-born 
English queen, was a son or grandson of the Edward Agas, who had translated all 
these works bearing on French politics and that queen's father, and that possibly they 
did so at her request. 

I find another Edward Agas contemporary with our rector, but it does not 
appear that they are one and the same man. In the C. S. P. is calendared a petition 
of 1653, Several parishioners of Wolsingham petition Sir Henry Vane and the other 
commissioners of Parliament to appoint Edward Agas, who has a living at Gainford, 
to the living of Wolsingham, as they are without a minister, and not to appoint 
George Shaw of Pittington, who has asked for it, as the whole parish " doth not at 
all affect him." These places are all in Co. Durham. 

1681 to 1722. ANTHONY AGAS M.A. Instituted July 25, 1681, on the 

death of Edward Agas, father of said Anthony. Patron, Henry, earl of St. Albans. 
He also succeeded his father as rector of Rushbrooke. He was of Queen's Coll., 
Cambridge, B.A. 1667. I see no sign of a wife or family. He died in Dec, 1721, 
aged 76 years, and was buried here. The inscription on his tombstone will be found 
at p. 192. 

I must not leave these two rectors of the name Agas without mentioning Agas 
lane, still so called. A public path leads straight from Rushbrooke village, past the 
hall, through the park, by the Waggon at Sicklesmere and so into the Bury and 
Sudbury road. At the Sicklesmere end it is enclosed by a hedge on each side and 
is a lane, and the lane is called Agas lane. But why their name was given to it one 
cannot say. 

1722 to 1724. EDWARD PEACH. Instituted June 27, 1722, on the 
death of Anthony Agas. Patron, Sir Robert Davers, baronet. He too was rector of 
Rushbrooke. He was of Trin. Coll., Cambridge, B.A. 1713. He resigned. 

1724 to 1726. JOHN SYMONDS. Instituted Aug. 19, 1724, on the 
resignation of Edward Peach. Patron, Sir Jermyn Davers, baronet. He was also 
rector of Rushbrooke for these two years, and of Horringer and Nowton from 1725 
to 1757. Having given a full account of him in the Horringer volume, I need not 
say more here. We have seen him at p. 359 holding a court as lord of the manor of 
Great Whelnetham in right of his wife. He died in October, 1757, aged 60, and was 
buried at Pakenham. 



RECTORS OF LITTLE WMELNETHAM. 413 



1726 to 1752. GARNHAM RAY. Instituted March 28, 1726, on the 
resignation of John Symonds. Patron, Sir Jermyn Davers, baronet. He was born 
at Bury St. Edmunds in March, 1702, being son of Orbell Ray, woolcomber. He 
went to Bury Grammar School, and thence to Trin. Coll., Cambridge. M.A. 1726. 
He was rector of Rushbrooke 1726 — 1733; Little Whelnetham 1726 — 1752; Bradfield 
St. George 1733 — 1771 ; preacher at St. Mary's, Bury, 1741, 1742. He died in Feb. 
1 771, aged 69, and was buried at Bradfield. 

1752 to 1763. JOHN PACK. Instituted Feb. 7, 1752, on the resignation 
of Garnham Ray. Patron, Sir Robert Davers, baronet. He was of Pembroke Coll., 
Cambridge, LL.B. 1744, a fellow of his College. He was buried here on the last 
day of March, 1763, aged 41 or 44. Tbe inscription on his tombstone will be found 
at p. 194. Possibly he was a son of William Pack, who died in May, 1767, aged 74, 
and has a flat stone in Troston church. 

1763 to 1766. THOMAS DAVERS. Instituted June 28, 1763, on the 
death of John Pack. Patron, Margaret Davers widow, of Bury St. Edmunds. He 
was baptized at Rushbrooke in November, 1738, being the fourth son of Sir Jermyn 
Davers. He went to Bury Grammar School and Hertford Coll., Oxford. In 1763 he 
was presented by his mother to the rectories of Stowlangtoft and Little Whelnetham. 
In June, 1766, he shot himself in the greenhouse of his mother's house on the Angel 
hill at Bury St. Edmunds, the house which for a short time lately was known as 
Pageant house. He was buried at Rushbrooke July 4, 1766, aged 27. He was not 
married. 

1766 to 1767. GEORGE ROGERS. Instituted Dec. 21, 1766, on the 
death of Thomas Davers. Patron, Sir Charles Davers, baronet. He was born at 
Bury c. 1741, being the son of Peter Rogers, silversmith. He went to Bury Grammar 
School, and thence to Trin. Coll., Cambridge, becoming a fellow of his college. He 
only held this rectory for about a year, but was rector of Horringer 1767 — 1784, and 
of Sproughton 1784 — 1835. Had he stayed here till his death he would have held it 
for exactly 69 years. The British Museum catalogue has a volume of five sermons 
preached by him, printed at Ipswich in 1792, and other editions in 1793, 1805, 1832. 
Also a single sermon on Christian Worship printed at Ipswich in 1790. 

In May, 1768, he was married at Horringer to Elizabeth, daughter of Edward 
and Suzan Drew of Horringer, and nine children were baptized there between 1769 
and 1783, and possibly there were others at Sproughton. (See Horringer.) 



414 RECTORS OF LITTLE WHELNETHAM. 

He died in December, 1835, aged 94 years, and was buried at Sproughton. 

1767 to 1796. ROGER COCKSEDGE. Instituted Feb. 26, 1767, on the 
resignation of George Rogers. Patron, Sir Charles Davers. He was of Queen's 
Coll., Cambridge. B.A. 1739. Chaplain to Archbishop Cornwallis. He was rector 
of Wordwell 1747 — 1750. Drinkstone and Ratllesden 1750 — 1763. He resigned 
Little Whelnetham on Lady day 1796, and died at Bury in March 1806 just under 
90 years of age. The inscription on his tombstone here will be found at p. 194. 

1796 to 1800. ROBERT DAVERS. Instituted April 14, 1796, on the 
resignation of Roger Cocksedge. Patron, Sir Charles Davers. He was baptized at 
Rushbrooke in July, 1771, being the second of the five sons of Sir Charles Davers 
by Madame Treice, He was at Bury Grammar School and Caius Coll., Cambridge. 
Then he was ordained and found rectories ready for him. He held 

Little Whelnetham 1796 — 1800 Bradfield St. George 1802 — 1853 

Nowton 1798 — 1802 Rushbrooke 1802 — 1853 

Rougham 1800 — 1853 Bradfield Clare 1815 — 1824 

He married Mary Ellis, daughter of Mrs. Ellis of the Half Moon at Bury St. 
Edmund's, by whom he had no family. He died in January 1853 aged 81 years, 
and was buried at Bradfield St. Clare, where there is a tablet to his memory. 

1800 to 1832. MARMADUKE WILKINSON. Instituted July 11, 1800, on 
the resignation of Robert Davers. Patron, Sir Charles Davers. He was the fourth 
son of John Wilkinson of Roehampton Park. Educated at Peterhouse, Cambridge, 
B.A. 1793. In Dec. 1792 he was married at Rushbrooke to Elizabeth, natural 
daughter of Sir Charles Davers, and so was brother-in-law to his predecessor. He 
was presented to the rectories of Nowton and Redgrave in 1802, and held them 
till his death. His six sons by two marriages will be found in my Bury Grammar 
School List. He resided at Redgrave, and died there in January, 1844, aged 74. 
His tombstone inscription is in Redgrave church. 

1832 to 1849. HENRY JOHN HASTED. Instituted Nov. 22, 1832, on 
the cession of Marmaduke Wilkinson. Patron, Marquis of Bristol. He was the only 
son of Rev. Henry Hasted, rector of Ickworth, Chedburgh and Horringer, and 
preacher at St. Mary's, Bury St. Edmunds. He was at Bury Grammar School and 
Magdalene Coll., Cambridge. He held the rectory of Bradfield Combust with Little 
Whelnetham till 1849. Then he was presented to Sproughton, where he died 
in 1880. 



CURATES AND STRAY CLERGY. 415 



1849 to 1878. CHARLES ROE. Instituted in August, 1849. Patron, 

Marquis of Bristol. He was the second son of John Roe of , Co. York. He 

matriculated at Trin. Coll., Oxford, in June 1828, aged 18. (Foster's Al. Ox.) He 
died here in April 1878. The inscription on his tablet will be found at p. 192. 

1878 to 1880. CHARLES SMYTH JOHNSTON. Instituted in 1878. 
Patron, Marquis of Bristol. Of Trin, Hall, Cambridge. B.A. 1868. Rector of 
Stanningfield 1872— 1875, Felsham 1875 — 1877, Sproughton 1880 — 1885. Now 
residing at Bradfield Combust hall, having purchased the estate of Arthur Young, the 
agriculturalist. 

1880 to 1894- JOHN WILLIAM HEIGHAM PHILLIPS. Instituted in 
1880. Patron, Marquis of Bristol. Born at Great Barton in Nov, 1851. His 
father, John South Phillips of Great Barton, was nephew of Henry George Phillips, 
rector of Great Whelnetham 1816— 1873. (See p, 406.) Educated at Bury 
Grammar School and Trin. Coll., Oxford. Died here in September 1894. His 
tombstone inscription will be found at p. 196. 

1894 — not out. ROBERT GIBSON. Instituted in 1894. Patron, Marquis 
of Bristol. Formerly head master of Sleaford Grammar School. Also rector of 
Rushbrooke, these two rectories being now united permanently. 



Section 3. Curates and Stray Clerg-y. 

I give here a list of such curates as I can see officiating in the two Whelnethams, 
with the dates of their doing so as far as I can make them out. I have added one or 
two who were not curates, but just came in to be married or buried. They are 
marked with an asterisk. 

Great Whelnetham. 
1665, 1666. Three children of WILLIAM SMYTH clerk are buried. He 
was probably curate to William Herbert, who was residing at Rougham. I think 
that this William Smyth was son of John Smyth, who was rector of Cockfield 
1625 — 1676. 

1667 to 1670. RICHARD AMES. In the Hearth tax return for 1670 
there is Mr. Amos Gierke paying for 4 hearths. I feel certain now that this is a 
transcriber's error, and means Mr, Ames, clerk. He was evidently occupying the 



416 CURATES AND STRAY CLERGY. 

rectory bouse as curate to William Herbert. In 1670 Richard Ames was presented 
by John Gipps to the rectory of Brockley, and there he was buried on Nov. 29, 1685. 
Two of his kindred were married here, Dorothy Ames in 1667, and William Ames 
in 1671. 

1725. RICHARD WILLIAMS, clerk, had a child baptized here. He was 
curate to William Rushbrooke. 

I754-* CHARLES MEREST, clerk, was married here, being a resident. 
Who he was will be found in the next chapter. 

1781.* REV. BENJAMIN BRUNDISH MARKER was buried here aged 
45. His mother, Constantia Marker, was a daughter of John Brundish, a former 
rector. See Tombstone No. 42, p. 172. 

These three that follow would be curates to Mr. Lord : — 

1770. LE GRICE. Probably Charles, rector of Thwaite from 1775 till 

his death in 1792 aged 50. 

1775 to 1777. ROGER COCKSEDGE. Son of Roger Cocksedge, rector 
of Little Whelnetham, He was rector of Wordwell from 1777 till his death in 1794. 

1777 to 1787. ROBERT EDWARD GARNHAM. He was a son of the 

headmaster of Bury Grammar School. He died June 1802 aged 50, and was buried 
at Nowton. 

These eight that follow were curates to Henry George Phillips : — 

1819 to 1821. THOMAS GREEN HICKMAN. Son of Rev. Thomas 
Hickman, Congregational minister at Lavenham. He was afterwards curate at St. 
Mary's, Bury. He died at Bury St. Edmund's in May 1878. He and his father were 
both buried here, aged 88 and 86 respectively ; also his mother aged 86, and his 
sister aged 79. See tombstone No. 96, p. 179. 

1822 to 1825. BENJAMIN PUCKLE had two children baptized here 
during his curacy. In 1825 he was appointed rector of Graffham, Hunts. 

1825 to 1829. JOHN GIBSON had two children baptized here during his 
curacy. 

1829 to 1831. FORSTER MAYNARD had one child baptized here. He 
was afterwards master of the King's Grammar School at Pontefract. 



CURATES AND STRAY CLERGY. 417 

1847, 1848. ALEXANDER JOHN ROGERS. I think he was afterwards 
a chaplain on the Madras establishment. 

1857, 1858. JOHN RABAN. 

1858, 1859. JOHN ACHESON. 

i860 to 1873. ALEXANDER SWINEY. He was afterwards rector of 
Bradfield St. Clare from 1873 till his death in 1908. 

Little Whelnetham. 

1588. JOHN WEIGHT clerke was buried. Perhaps a rector. 

1780 to 1792. ROGER COCKSEDGE jun. Son of the rector, whom he 
assisted. 

Those who follow, from 1803 to 1832, officiated during the incumbency of 
Marmaduke Wilkinson, who was non-resident. After 1813 they rented the present 
rectory, which had become vacant in 1813 by the death of Madam Treice. 

1803. JOSEPH SANDYS. I think he was brother and assistant of Francis 
Sandys, the architect of Ickworth, which was being built at this time. 

1804, 1805. FREDERICK HENRY BARNVVELL. A literary and anti- 
quarian clergyman living in Bury St. Edmunds. He died in October 1843, aged 73. 

1807, 1808. THOMAS GODFREY. Curate of Hawstead for 25 years, 
and vicar of Melton Mowbray. Died at Bury in 1832 aged 60. 

181 1, 1812. WILLIAM NEALE. 

1814, 1815. THOMAS GODFREY was renting the present rectory. 

1814 to 1819. THOMAS GERY CULLUM. He succeeded as eighth 
baronet in 1831, and died Jan. 1855. 

1818, 1819. EDWARD COLLYER. He was renting the present rectory. 

1820. HENRY HARVEY. He was renting the present rectory. 

1822 to 1831. SAMUEL HURRY ALDERSON. He had six children 
baptized while here. He rented the present rectory. Afterwards rector of Risby 
from 1839 till his death in 1863. The present rectory became the rectory in 1832. 



cc 



418 HALL AND ADVOWSON. 



Part II. Chapter IV. 



Great Whelnetham Hall and 

Advowson. 



Sometimes a lady goes out for a walk. She starts carrying a small bag, a purse 
and a few other loose articles. She gets back and finds that she is without some of 
them. She has dropped them somewhere on the road, she knows not where. So 
her poor husband is told to retrace her steps and find that which she has dropped. 

We too have been for a walk. At p. 323 we started to walk from a.d. 1250 to 
A.D. 1910. We started carrying the manor, the manor house or hall, and the 
advowson of Great Whelnetham. At p. 360 we got home. We were still carrying 
the manor, but we had dropped the hall and the advowson. Where are they ? And 
at p. 364 we took another walk. We started carrying the manor, hall and advowson 
of Little Whelnetham. At p. 379 we got home. We had the manor and the hall, 
but we had dropped the advowson. Where is it ? 

We must now do the work of the poor husband and go seek those things which 
have been dropped. The first thing is to find out how far are we sure that we had 
them with us, and where do we first miss them. 

GREAT WHELNETHAM HALL. Whereabouts between 1250 and 1910 
did we drop it ? Or in other words, when did it get separated from the manor ? 

We certainly had it all right with us till 1342, when Sir John de Whelnetham 
died. And I feel pretty sure that his grandson, John de Bures de Whelnetham, had 
it and lived in it, for the first de represents his family name, and the second de 
represents his abode. That brings us to about 1400, and we had not dropped it 
then. Then came Rookwoods as lords of the manor, and the story of that little 
Rook wood boy running away from his nurse and tumbling into the moat shows that 



HALL AND ADVOWSON. 419 

they had the hall and lived in it. Then in the sixteenth century we had Waldegraves, 
Drurys and Jermyns owning the manor in quick succession. And I can see no clear 
proof that they had the hall. I therefore suspect that one of them, while retaining 
the manor, parted with the hall. So probably we were carrying it up to about 1550, 
and about then we dropped it. But I can see no record of the sale. 

Next, where is it ? Who has got it ? 

The first owner that I can see after it has been parted from the manor is John 
Sache of Little VVhelnetham. Where he came from I dont know. He had a brother 
Thomas Sache, who married the widow of William Lucas of Horsecroft in Horringer, 
and who was buried at Horringer in 1661, but that is all that I know of his kinsfolk. 

John Sache was at Little Whelnetham in 1625, as is shown by a subsidy list, 
but that is his first appearance in a Little Whelnetham list. In the list for 1620 he is 
not there. The place which he filled in 1625 is filled in 1620 by Elizabeth 
Man wood, and in 15 So by Thomas Manwood. (P. 217 — 221.) I therefore imagine 
that he was a man of some means and not very young, when between 1620 and 1625 
he bought (if he did not inherit) a house in Liitle Whelnetham wherein he settled 
down ; and probably soon afterwards he bought Great Whelnetham hall. He may 
have bought the hall from Sir Thomas Jermyn, the lord of the manor, or it may have 
been separated from the manor some years before. In 1634 he was married a second 
time to Anne Davy widow. Which was his house in Little Whelnetham I cant say. 

Owing to gaps in the Little Whelnetham register of burials, there is no entry of 
his burial. But he made his will in October, 1645, and it was proved in February, 
1646. I have printed his will at p. 260. It enables one to leave off perhapsing and 
perhapsing. He there distinctly leaves " my capital messuage called Great Weltham 
hall " to Elizabeth his wife for her life, and then to Elizabeth his daughter, wife of 
Richard Gipps, for her life, and then to his grandson, John Gipps, eldest son of 
Richard and Elizabeth Gipps. 

Now we have picked up one of the things that had been dropped, though we 
dont know the exact spot where we dropped it. But we have found the hall all right, 
and will bring it home to this present year, 1910. 

John Sache has got it somehow or other about 1630. He dies in 1645, leaving 
it, after the deaths of his wife and daughter, to his grandson, John Gipps. The 
Gipps' family history is rather long, and so I will leave it for the next chapter, and 
will here only follow the hall. 



420 HALL AND ADVOWSON. 

Richard Gipps and Elizabeth his wife, daughter of John Sache, lived there. 
They were living there in 1640 and perhaps earlier. He died in 1661, and then 
came John his son. We see John paying hearth tax for it in 1664, 1670, and 1674. 
(P. 224.) It had eleven hearths, afterwards reduced to ten. 

John Gipps died in a good old age in June, 1 707, and then came his son, Sir 
Richard. He died in December, 1708, and by his will directed that everything 
should be sold. (P. 268.) So we part from the Gipps family. 

I have seen no record of the sale, but it is clear that the hall was bought by 
Charles Batteley not long after the death of Sir Richard ; and so we must look to 
see who he was. 

In the middle of the seventeenth century there was a very thriving apothecary in 
Bury St. Edmunds named Nicholas Batteley. His elder sons were coming into the 
world and sleeping quietly in their cradles whilst Crown and Parliament were 
fighting it out. They and their nephews fill more than two pages of my Grammar 
School list. The two eldest went from Bury Grammar School to Cambridge 
University, and their scholarly performances in after life have brought them into the 
D.N.B. A third, after retiring to Horringer from the business which his father had 
followed, had a very brief life in Parliament. 

But we are only concerned with Charles, the eighth and youngest, born in 1667, 
when the struggle was over. He had some post in London connected with the 
taxes. This I learn from a rather indignant letter written to him in September, 1703, 
by John, Lord Bristol. Within a few years of the death of Sir Richard Gipps in 
1708, he must have bought Great Whelnetham hall. I suppose he came to live 
there. At any rate he was buried here in May, 1722, and a tablet to his memory 
is in the chancel. (P. 164.) His wife was buried here thirty years later, 

Charles Batteley left three daughters, viz., Elizabeth, wife of James Brooker; 
Mary, wife of Richard Cox ; and Jane, wife of James Merest. Somehow or other 
I think the two sisters were got rid of, and it belonged solely to James and Jane 
Merest. 

James Merest was clerk assistant in the House of Lords, living in the parish of 
St. Margaret, Westminster. From 1723 to 1733 the Journals of the House of Lords 
have frequent entries concerning his petitions to the House and his complaints of 
the conduct towards him of William Cowper, the clerk of Parliaments. I have 



HALL AND ADVOWSON. 421 

printed his will at p. 315. It was made in June, 1740, with a small addition in July, 
1 741, soon after which I think he must have died. He was buried at Woking. 

James and Jane Merest had three sons, James, John and Charles. 

Charles was a clergyman, and was married here in July, 1754, to Elizabeth 
Wilkin of Mildenhall. 

James succeeded to the Whelnetham hall estate, and in 1780 sold it to William 
Church. The Merest family were afterwards at Soham in Cambridgeshire, and came 
to a not very brilliant end in the nineteenth century. See Bury Grammar School 
List. 

William Church, described as of St. Maries, Bury St. Edmunds, was married 
here in June, 1781, to Keziah Smith of this parish. I imagine he lived here, though 
I see no further sign of him in the registers. The Suffolk Poll Book for 1790 shows 
him living here then, and voting for Rous and Bunbury. In 1792 he sold the hall to 
John Le Grice of Bury St. Edmunds, since when it has been occupied by tenant 
farmers, who will be found in another chapter. 

John Le Grice died April, 1835, aged 91 years, and was succeeded by his son, 
Rev. Frederick Le Grice, vicar of Great Gransden, Hunts. He died on Jan. 25, 
1884, and was succeeded by his son, Colonel Frederick Swaine Le Grice, R.A., who 
died early in 1902. The estate is now vested in trustees, and so we reach the 
year 19 10. 

I must express my thanks to Messrs. Braikenridge and Edwards, the stewards 
of the estate, for sending me a schedule of title deeds, which has thrown light upon 
the last hundred years or so. 

GREAT WHELNETHAM ADVOWSON. Greatly encouraged by having 
picked up one of the articles which we had dropped, we will now seek the other, viz. 
the advowson. Starting with it in 1250 or thereabouts we certainly had it all the 
time till 1645. That is proved by the list of rectors and those who presented them. 
Very soon after that we must have dropped it, for from that lime the owners of the 
manor ceased to present. 

In 1680 John Brundish was presented by his relatives. I presume that one of 
the Jermyns in the middle of the seventeenth century must have sold it, and a 
Brundish must have bought it. Possibly they only bought the next presentation. At 
any rate after they had made one presentation, it was in the possession of Thomas 



422 HALL AND ADVOWSON. 

Folkes. Thomas Folkes presented in 1724, and for more than a hundred years after 
that it passed by inheritance, but in a curious sort of way, which must be explained. 

Thomas Folkes, born at Rushbrooke in 1654, was a younger son of Martin 
Folkes, who was a son of Martin Folkes. Both Martins occupied the Hall farm at 
Rushbrooke, and the elder one was land-steward to Sir Thomas Jermyn. Thomas 
Folkes was a lawyer and acted for the Jermyns, and was executor of the wills of 
Thomas, lord Jermyn, and his brother Henry, lord Dover. So it is quite possible 
that the advowson may have passed straight from the Jermyns to him, by sale or 
otherwise, and that the Brundishes only possessed the right of next presentation. 
Somewhere about 1704 Thomas Folkes bought Great Barton hall estate. His 
children all died young except Elizabeth, who was consequently the heiress of Great 
Barton and of the Great Whelnetham advowson. Thomas Folkes died in December, 
1730, and was buried at Great Barton. 

Elizabeth Folkes, his daughter and heiress, was the second wife of Sir Thomas 
Hanmer of Mildenhall in Suffolk and of Bettisfield in Flintshire. Very soon after her 
marriage off she went with someone, and saw Sir Thomas no more. But the marriage 
settlement was so drawn up that she could not take her property with her, as she 
wanted to do. It remained with Sir Thomas Hanmer. She died in March, 1741, 
and was brought to Barton for burial. 

Sir Thomas died in 1746. As the Folkes property, Barton and the advowson 
of Great Whelnetham, remained with him, so at his death it passed to his heir, who 
was his nephew, his sister's son. Rev. Sir William Bunbury of Stanny in Cheshire. 
That brought the Bunburys from Cheshire into Suffolk. 

Sir William Bunbury died in 1764, and was succeeded by his son. Sir Thomas 
Charles Bunbury, always called Sir Charles. He presented three times to Great 
Whelnetham rectory ; the two Phillipses, uncle and nephew, whom he presented, were 
in some way connected with his family. Sir Charles was first married to Lady Sarah 
Lennox, whose history is well known. He was married secondly by special licence 
in the parsonage at Great Whelnetham to Margaret Cocksedge. This was on Nov. 
21, 1805. He died in 1821, aged 81. 

Sir Charles was succeeded by his nephew (son of his brother, the caricaturist,) 
Sir Henry Bunbury. Sir Charles or Sir Henry Bunbury or both had disputes with 
Mr. Wing, father and son, of Mildenhall, about Mildenhall tithes. The Bunburys 



HALL AND ADVOWSON. 423 

won their case eventually, I am told, but in consideration of various circumstances 
one of them gave Mr. Wing junr. the advowson of Great Whelnetham. This was 
Frederick Wing, who in 1810 settled in Bury St. Edmund's, at 18 Hatter street, 
practised as a solicitor, and died there in September, 1864, aged 75. Soon after 
i860 Mr. Wing, who had never had a chance of presenting, sold the advowson for 
;^4ooo, of which ;j^2ooo was paid down and ;^20oo at the next vacancy. 

The purchaser was a relative of John Joseph Badeley, who was rector from 
1873 to 1899. The present owner of the advowson is Rev. George Edward Badeley, 
who was rector from 1899 to 1902. 

We have now picked up two of the dropped articles, and there is only one left. 

LITTLE WHELNETHAM ADVOWSON. We had it in 1278 when it was 
exchanged for 14 acres. We had it right up to 1832, when Lord Bristol sold the 
manor and hall ; and then, as he kept the advowson, it was separated from the 
other two. So in this case it is as if the lady had dropped her bag when within a 
hundred yards of her home. 

And now we have found all three articles, and can go on in good spirits to the 
next chapter. 






424 GIPPS FAMILY. 



Part II. Chapter V. 



Gipps Family. 



The surname Gipps or Gibbs is from a short form of Gilbert, and we have it in 
another form in the name of Gipson or Gibson. One cannot help thinking that 
Gippeswic or Ipswich is more likely to have got its name from a Gilbert than from 
the river Gipping. This last derivation seems to me to be absurd from whatever 
point of view you consider it. 

In Suffolk in 1327 there is but one representative of the name, viz. Robert 
Gibbe, a very small tax payer at Mendlesham. In Suffolk in 1524 there are about 
twenty, including several in and round Bury. In Suffolk in 1568 there are only these 
four : Henry at Ipswich ;^7; John at Fornham St. Martin ^^ ; John at Beighton 
;2^3 ; Thomas in the South ward of Bury St. Edmnnds ^^. I give the sums at which 
they were assessed, which show they were small folk. 

In the seventeenth century there was a well-to-do family of Gipps at Little 
Horringer hall, another at Great Whelnetham hall, and another at Bury. All these 
families were fond of the name Richard, which increases the difficulty of sorting and 
settling them. In the reign of Charles II there were two knights, Sir Richard of 
Little Horringer hall, and Sir Richard of Great Whelnetham hall. The knight of 
Great Whelnetham was a very keen genealogist, and has left a few MS notes on the 
Gipps family. But I do not see that these notes throw much light on his family or on 
the connection between his family and the other two. I think myself that the Gippses 
in the seventeenth century of Bury St. Edmunds and of Great Whelnetham were 
closely connected and of long standing in Suffolk ; but that the Gippses of Little 
Horringer had just come from London, and were only remotely, if at all, connected 
with the other two. 

I will first set down a few stray notes on Gippses of one sort or another. 



GIPPS FAMILY. 425 



GEORGE GIPPS. An inquisition was held after the death of George Gipps 
gent, in 1617. He held the manor of Fornham St. Genoveve, and the priory, divers 
lands and a water mill there ; lands and tenements in Great Whelnetham, Stanning- 
field and Bradfield ; a messuage in Coney Weston ; a messuage called ye Vine in 
the parish of St. Ethelburgha within Bishopsgate in London, and all the houses and 
stables on the east part of the alley by a capital messuage called the Peahen in that 
parish and in All Hallows ; lands in Rendham and Brusyard in Suffolk ; a messuage 
in St. Peter's at Colchester, and lands at Barking in Essex. He died Aug. 23, 1617, 
and Richard his son and heir was 31 years of age. 

This inquisition will of course be found among the public records, but I have 
taken this note of it from some MS notes by Sir Richard Gipps of Whelnetham 
which are now in the British Museum. Sir Richard adds that Thomas Covell told 
him that George Gipps was a grocer and lived in London. The Covells lived at 
Horringer in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. 

In the Calendar of State Papers are some documents relating to George Gipps, 
a merchant trading into Barbary, who had a partner named John Boldero. The date 
of the documents lies between 1580 and 1590. The conjunction of Gipps and 
Boldero shows without any doubt that they belonged to Bury and Fornham, and were 
probably first cousins. I imagine that this George Gipps is the same as he who 
Thomas Covell said was a grocer and lived in London. The present meaning of the 
word grocer is not exactly the same as it was, and there would be nothing inconsistent 
between a grocer in the old sense and a foreign trader. 

RICHARD GIPPS. Richard, son and heir of George, would (according to the 
inquisition) have been born in 1586, and I imagine that he is the Richard Gipps of 
London, gent, who was admitted to Grays Inn on July 3, 1598. (Foster.) And 
although his father had lands at Great Whelnetham, yet I feel pretty sure that they 
were not ancestors of the Gippses of Great Whelnetham hall whom I am trying to get 
into order. They must have been the ancestors of the Horringer Gippses. This Richard 
of Grays Inn must be the Richard who became judge of the Sheriffs Court in London, 
and whose burial on May 16, 1643, is recorded in Smyth's Obituary. (Camden Soc.) 
Richard, a son of the judge, settled at Little Horringer hall and was the father of Sir 
Richard Gipps of Horringer. (See Horringer vol. of this Series, p. 309). 



426 GIPPS FAMILY. 



HENRY GIPPS. Another note in the MS book of Sir Richard of Whelnetham 
mentions Henry Gipps of Bury, whose post mortem inquisition was held on April 13, 
1625. He held lands in Bury, Thurston, Bacton (which I think should be Beighton) 
and Tostock. He died Feb. 18, 1625, and Thomas his son and heir was then 28 
years old. Sir Richard adds that Richard Gipps of Bury, surgeon, was son of said 
Thomas. I presume that the surgeon himself told him so. There is a tombstone of 
Richard Gipps, surgeon, in St. Mary's church at Bury, which says that he was buried 
there on Jan. 3, 17 12 (17 13), and Mary his daughter on March 25, 17 14. 

At p. 263 I have printed the will of Richard Gipps, 1661, grandfather to Sir 
Richard of Whelnetham. He leaves a gold ring "to my cousin Richard Gipps, my 
brother's son." As Richard the Bury surgeon and Richard "my brother's son" are 
contemporaries, one would have expected them to be the same person. But 
according to pedigrees by Le Neve and Davy, Sir Richard's grandfather was a son of 
John who married Lucy Burridge. There was a John Gipps, alderman of Bury 
in 1607-8, who I suppose is the same John. 

RICHARD GIPPS. On June 22, i66r, a bill to enable trustees to sell certain 
lands and tenements in Suffolk and Norfolk for the payment of the debts of Richard 
Gipps Esq. who was a lunatic, and for providing portions for his younger children, was 
read a first time in the House of Commons, and having passed that house came up to 
the House of Lords and received royal assent on July 30. (Journals of Parliament. 
Stat, of the Realm.) Who this Richard is I dont know. 

RICHARD GIPPS. On 2 Feb., 1628-9, Richard Gipps, son and heir of 
Richard Gipps of Bury St. Edmunds, gent., deceased, was admitted to Grays Inn. 
(Foster.) I am puzzled as to who he is, but I think his father must be a brother of 
John Gipps the Alderman of Bury. And I think he must certainly be the Richard 
Gipps, of whose poetical talents, such as they were, two specimens remain. 

No. 3357 of the Ilarleian Collection, now in the British Museum, is a volume of 
manuscript poems beautifully bound in white vellum. On the title page we read : 
A HandfuU of Celestiall Flowers, 
viz. Divers selected Psalms of David (in verse) differently translated from those 
used in the Church. [Meditations etc.] Composed by divers worthie and 
learned gentlemen. Manuscrib'd by R. C. 

Then comes a dedication to Sir Francis Ashley by Ralph Crane, dated Dec. 
1632. Each translated Psalm has the author's name at the end of it. Several are 



GIPPS FAMILY. 427 



by Francis Davison, two by Christopher Davison, two by Richard Gipps, and a few 
others. Inside the cover is this inscription : 

Henrietta Holies her book 1708. Given by her father. 

Patience is a blessing 

Sent from Heaven. 

This Henrietta Holies was a daughter of John Holies, duke of Newcastle, and 
afterwards wife of Edward Harley, son of Robert Harley who made the great 
Harleian collection. 

No. 6930 of the Harleian collection is a volume bound in calf containing a 
manuscript copy of the above metrical translations of Psalms, without the dedication 
or the meditations. 

Francis Davison's share in this volume, and also that of his brother Christopher, 
has been printed. He was the author of "A Poetical Rhapsody," first published 
in 161 1. In an edition of the Rhapsody published in 1826, the editor included all 
the Psalms by the Davisons. In another edition,! 890, a small selection of Davison's 
Psalms was printed. But I do not think that Richard Gipps' have ever been 
printed. So here they are. 

Psalm I. 

1. He's bles'd that wicked councill nere obaies, 
Nor leades a careles life in sinners waies, 

Nor sitting in his chaire, full fraught with pride, 
Will scornefully the Righteous deride. 

2. But makes Gods holy lawes his soules delight, 
Recording them each day and every night : 

3. He shalbe like the fruitfuU tree which growes 
Upon a bank by which a river flowes, 

Whose leafife shall know no fall, whose fruit deceaves 
No hopefuU ownor but exceedes the leaves. 

4. But wicked men, as chaff from better corn 
With every puff of wind away is borne, 

5. So when the Judge of Heaven and Earth shall come 
To sitt in Judgment at the daie of Dombe, 

They shall not stand before his sight, But then 
Their sins shall sever them from Righteous men. 



GIPPS FAMILY. 



6. Thus ill men perish, God iheni not regardes, 

But knows all good mens wayes and them rewards. 

Rich. Gipps. 
Psalm 6. 

1. Do not correct me in thy wrath, O God, 
Nor in thy fury let me feile thy rod. 

2. For I am weake. Lord pittie me therefore. 
Lord, heale me for my very bones are sore. 

3. My Soule is troubled and hath much dismaied me ; 
But, Lord, how long wilt thou forbeare to aid me. 

4. O turne againe, and me tor pitty save, 
And my poore soule deliver from the grave. 

5. Shall dead mens bones to future ages blaze the ? 

Or hath the graves wide mouth a tongue to praise the ? 

6. Each night with morning I bedew my bed. 
And with salt teares my cowch is watered. 

7. My sight growes dym, mine eies are sunck to see 

My foes reisyre (?) and work my miserie. [sic. desire ?] 

8. But now ye workers of iniquitie. 

The Lord hath heard my crie ; depart from me. 

9. He heares my mournfuU lamentation, 

And will receive my supplication. 
10. He will confound my foes and vex them all, 
Shame and confusion shall them befall. 

Richard Gipps. 

Gipps of Whelnetham. 

Having disposed of these stray and wandering Gippses (I feel inclined to call 
them gipsies), whose place in the family tree I cannot fix, we now come to their 
relatives, the Gippses of Great Whelnetham hall. The first of these is RICHARD, 
who married Elizabeth Sache, daughter and heiress of John Sache of Little 
Whelnetham. Le Neve and Davy say that he was the son of John Gipps who 
married Lucy Burridge. (Le Neve's Ped. of Knights. Davy's MSS.) I dare say 
they are right, though I cannot prove it or disprove it. And I suppose that that John, 
his probable father, is the John Gipps who was alderman of Bury in 1607. 



GiPPS FAMILY. 429 



There was a Richard Gipps, alderman of Bury St. Edmunds, from whom there 
is a letter to the Council of State written in April, 1637. He says that he had sent 
for all the maltsters, being about 70 in number, and had read to them the letters from 
the Council, and they answered that they were willing to live under government 
according to law, but did not wish to be incorporated, most of them being of poor 
estate, and, if put by, their malting ofiflces would be of no use to them and they 
would be left destitute. (C. S. P.) That alderman cannot be the Richard of Bury 
who was father of the poet, because he was already dead in 1629. And as there 
must be a limit to the number of Richard Gippses in Bury, I imagine that this 
alderman is the Richard who married Elizabeth Sache. 

We have already seen that this Richard by his marriage with Elizabeth Sache 
became possessed of Great Whelnetham hall. John Sache in his will calls it " the 
manor of Great Weltham hall." It must not be confounded with the manor of Great 
Whelnetham, which was quite a different thing and not his. In fact it was not a 
manor at all, although it was what had been the chief house of the manor till it got 
separated from it. When and where this marriage took place I dont know. Probably 
a little before 1625 and just before John Sache came to Little Whelnetham. I have 
nothing to say of this Richard. He lived through the civil war and commonwealth, 
but which side he took I know not. I have printed his will at p. 263. It is dated 
August, 1659, and was proved Feb. 5, 1661. There is a gap in the parish register at 
this time, so that his entry of burial does not appear. But his mural tablet in the 
chancel says that he died Jan. 12, 1660, [i.e. 1660-1], aged 67. 

Three children are named in his will, and I do not know that there were any 
more : viz. 

John who succeeded him. See below. 

Mary. She married John Lurkin, I presume of Hunston. In the Brockley 
register is entered the burial of Elizabeth Lurkin, widow, on Dec. 28, 1679. As 
Brockley belonged to the Gippses this is likely to be her, and one wonders whether 
there is not a mistake somewhere in her christian name. 

Lucy. She married Humfry Moseley of Ousden, who died in 1663. There had 
been a Lucy Gipps married at Great Whelnetham to James Fayreclyffe in Sept. 1606, 
who I suppose was an aunt or something of the kind. Why she was married at 
Whelnetham I cant say. 

JOHN GIPPS, only son of Richard and Elizabeth. I suppose he was born 
c. 1620. He inherits Great Whelnetham hall and estate from his mother, and is the 



430 GIPPS FAMILY. 



first man of his family and name to whom it belongs. In 1660 he bought the 
neighbouring manor and advowson of Brockley. (Gage, p. 358.) 

Davy marries him firstly to Elizabeth, daughter of Z. Ford of Ipswich, and gives 
one child by this marriage, viz. Elizabeth, baptized at Coddenham May 15, 1649. I 
have no doubt this is right, though I dont happen to have come across any confirma- 
tion of it. 

His second wife was Mary, daughter of David Davidson of London, Alderman. 
The children of this marriage were all baptized at Great Whelnetham from 1658 to 
1665. His wife died at the birth of her youngest child, and was buried at Great 
Whelnetham on April 30, 1665. These are the children : — 

1. Mary. Baptized here May 6, 1658. She was married here on April 9, 
1678, to Edmund Coleman of Bury St. Edmunds. Their son, Edmund, was baptized 
here on Sept. 16, 16S0, and buried April 8, 1682. 

2. Richard. Baptized here Sept. 15, 1659. See below. 

3. Elizabeth. Baptized here Aug, 8, 1660. She married John Warren, rector 
of Boxford, who was succeeded as rector there by his son, Thomas Warren. They 
are represented in Suffolk to day by their lineal descendant. Rev. F. E. Warren, 
rector of Bardwell. My authorities for the Gipps and Warren marriage are Davy and 
Le Neve. This John Warren also held the rectory of Brockley, 1690 to 1726, being 
presented to it by his father-in-law in succession to John Gipps, who now follows. 

4. John. Baptized here Nov. 14, 1662. Rector of Brockley. A non-juror. 
Died Feb. 1726. His story would make rather a long interruption. So it will be 
found towards the end of this chapter, headed John Gipps, the non-juror. 

5. David. Baptized here Nov. 19, 1663. Buried here Jan. 16, 1667-8. 

6. Anna. Baptized here April 20, 1665. Married Robert Fiske of Thurston, 
according to Davy and Le Neve. The very full history of the Fiske family by Mr. 
Henry Fiske does not mention this marriage. But at p. 149 of that volume there is 
a Robert Fiske, son of William Fiske of Stiffkey, Norfolk, and grandson of Lieut.- 
Col. John Fiske of Clopton hall in Rattlesden, whom he succeeded there, who is of 
exactly the right date, and whose wife's name is left blank. I think he must be the 
man. His eldest son, Robert, was born in 1690 and succeeded to Clopton hall on 
the death of his father. 

John Gipps, the father of these six children, was buried here on June 5, 1707. 
Sixty two years having gone by since his grandfather, John Sache, appointed him an 




Sir RICHARD GIPPS, Knight, 
Of Great Whelnetham, 1659-1708. 
From an engraving by Smith, 1687. 



GIPPS FAMILY. 



431 



executor of his will, and fifty eight years since the birth of his first child, he must 
have been well over four score years. I have printed his will at p. 267. The yearly 
j^5 for the poor of Great Whelnetham, for the payment of which he charged two 
pightles, has been lost. He says that these two pightles were part of the lands that 
he had bought of Sir Richard Gipps of Horringer. That confirms my statement on 
p. . . . that though George Gipps had lands in Whelnetham, he was ancestor of the 
Horringer Gippses and not of those of Whelnetham. 

RICHARD GIPPS, elder son of John and Mary Gipps. Baptized here Sept. 
15, 1659, in the last days of the Commonwealth. He spent seven years at Bury 
Grammar school under Dr. Leeds, and then at the age of 16 years was admitted to 
Caius Coll., Cambridge, on Sept. 24, 1675. On Feb. 5, 1675/6, he was admitted to 
to Grays Inn. (Foster.) From this it would seem that his stay at the University 
was very short, and one hopes that he was not sent down. He did not take a degree. 
I presume that for the next few years he was living in London. In Nov. 1682 he 
was Master of the Revels at Grays Inn, which revels were sometimes attended by 
royalty. In Jan. 1683 he went in state to Whitehall to invite the king, queen and 
court to a masque to be held on Candlemas day, Feb. 2, at Grays Inn. (D. N. B. 
quoting Luttrell's diary.) The original copper plate for the ticket of admission to 
this masque is now at Hardwick, having been bought by Sir Thomas Gery Cullum 
from a pedlar who was selling old metal. His great grandson, Mr. Gery-Milner- 
Gibson-CuUum, has kindly lent me this plate, and here is the impression of it. 




///? <? 



thy/ 



LcuuiLcinaj'- ..A/'u//it at S of t/: C lock 



432 GIPPS FAMILY. 



On Nov. 27, 1682, he was knighted at Whitehall. (In his Knights of England 
Mr. Shaw has given the knighthood of Richard of Horringer to Richard of Whelne- 
tham, and vice versa. This error was started by Le Neve.) Not very long after this 
I presume that he married and settled down at Whelnetham, as from 1692 to 1700 
his children are being baptized there. 

His wife was Mary, daughter and heiress of Edward Giles of Bowden in Totness, 
who brought to him an estate in Co. Devon. I suppose he sometimes resided there. 
At any rate he was there in August, 1695. 

No. 6S09 in the Harleian Collection of MSS, now in the British Museum, 
contains some notes which seem to have been made for counsel by the solicitors of 
the defendants. The complainant was John WoUacott, by trade a tailor, living at 
Ashprington, Co. Devon. The defendants were Sir Richard Gipps, Thomas Hilley 
his gamekeeper, Christopher Farwell and Richard Copps, the one his servant and the 
other a constable. They were charged with breaking into the house of the plaintiff 
at Ashprington on Aug. 31, 1695, and taking away three bags, eighteen nets and 
two guns, of the value of ^40, to the damage to plaintiff of ^60. They pleaded not 
guilty. It was stated that Sir Richard Gipps was lord of the manor of Ashprington, 
and that he and his lady's predecessors had always had a fishery within the manor ; 
and that the complainant traded as a fisherman and fowler within the manor, and 
kept nets and guns contrary to statutes. What the result was I do not know. 

June, 1702. In the summer of 1702 Sir Richard had a desperate quarrel with 
his neighbour, John Hervey of Ickworth, afterwards earl of Bristol, which led to legal 
proceedings and to John Hervey being bound over to keep the peace. Among the 
letters of John Hervey which I have printed in three volumes of this series, are two 
very long ones which he wrote to his father-in-law. Sir Thomas Felton, in June and 
August 1702 respectively. In these letters he gives his version of what happened. 
I have also printed with them a document which I picked up from a London book- 
seller's catalogue (James Coleman) over forty years ago. The document contained 
the sworn depositions of William Covell of Horringer, who was present when the 
quarrel began. William Covell was the Ickworth steward, so that the accounts that 
we have of the matter are all one-sided. I need not print these documents over 
again, but will put the matter as shortly as I can in my own words. The documents 
will be found at length in Letter-books of John Hervey, I, p. 170 — 177. 

John Hervey had a farm at Bradfield Combust, which included a wood, partly 
lying in Great Whelnetham called Oxwell wood ; the farm house adjoins Bradfield 



GIPPS FAMILY. 433 



church on the south side. It had belonged to his father and grandfather before him. 
One day in April, 1702, two timber-trees in this wood were cut down and drawn by night 
out of the wood into an adjoining close which belonged to Sir Richard Gipps. Then 
one of Sir Richard's waggons brought the two trees to a place between Sir Richard's 
house and Great Whelnetham church, (I suppose about where the school is now 
standing,) and there they were wrought into a maypole and set up next day. Morris, 
who was tenant of the farm at Bradfield, told John Hervey that Sir Richard's own 
coachman and footboy, together with a carpenter named Willingham who was 
constantly employed by Sir Richard, were all employed about this maypole. 

So on June 8 John Hervey went to the house of Sir Richard at Whelnetham 
"out of pure good manners to acquaint him with it," and to ask him to do him 
justice in the matter. He look William Covell with him, and Rev. Mr. Pitches, 
rector of Hawstead, happened to be there too. What did Sir Richard do ? " He 
broke out into such a violent lunatic passion (which runs very high in his blood) as I 
yet never saw." Some high words passed between them. Insinuations of disloyalty 
to the crown were made on both sides. Of course as we only have the story as told 
by John Hervey and his steward, we see nothing but " pure good manners" on his 
part and " violent lunatic passion " on the part of Sir Richard. Possibly if we had 
Sir Richard's account of it, the pure good manners would have been with him and 
the violent lunatic passion with John Hervey. 

Legal proceedings followed. Sir Richard said he was in fear of being assaulted, 
and John Hervey had to give securities for his good behaviour. He makes these 
entries in his diary : — 

1702. July 21. Tuesday, I appeared at Bury Sessions to give security upon 
ye writt of supplicavit that Sir Richard Gipps sued out of Chancery against me. 
Mr. Macro and Mr. Grove were my sureties in ;^5oo each, myself in ;^iooo. Sir 
R. Davers moved I might give double those sums. 

1703. Feb. 18. My counsel moved Lord Keeper Wright to take oflF my 
security given upon and to discharge ye writt of supplicavit, which Sir Richard Gipps 
had prayd against me ; but Sir Richard makmg fresh affidavit of his fear, Lord 
Keeper continued us bound. 

In the calendar of MSS of the late Mr. John Henry Gurney of Keswick hall 
near Norwich is entered a volume of Miscellanea. Among its contents are these : 

EE 



434 GIPPS FAMILY. 



ff, 33 — 44. Depositions and other papers relating to a quarrel between Sir Richard 
Gipps knt. of Great Whelnetham hall and John Hervey of Ickworth, in 1702. 
(Hist. MSS Com.) This volume was formerly in the possession of Dr. Cox Macro, 
who died in 1767, and whose ancestor was one of the securities for John Hervey's 
keeping the peace, 

This quarrel, though nominally about a tree cut down for a maypole, was really 
a political one. It was not the pole but it was the politics. At least politics turned 
a small disagreement into a big one. Sir Richard was a Tory, John Hervey was a 
Whig. On the very morning of the day when John Hervey went to Whelnetham 
hall "out of pure good manners" and Sir Richard "broke out into such a violent 
lunatic passion as I yet never saw," Sir Richard had received a letter from London 
giving him notice that he was turned out of the commission of the peace. This, 
which apparently was done for political reasons, had not put him into a mood for 
hearing the complaints of his whig neighbour. 

We may now see him in another character. He was a very keen genealogist and 
antiquarian, and a collector of books and MSS. In the British Museum, Add. 
MSS, 20,695, is a small quarto volume beautifully written and entitled — 

ANTIQUITATES SUFFOLCIENCES, 
OR 

An Essay towards recovering some account of the Ancient Familys in the 

County of Suffolk. 

A short preface to the manuscript states that 

"The following collections were chiefly made by Sir Richard 
Gipps Knt. of Great Wheltham in Thedwestry Hundred ; a curious 
man and great searcher into Antiquity. Had he lived to put his last 
hand to them, we might have hoped for a good account of the most 
ancient familys in the county. But as he left only a rough draught of 
his design, and that very much mixed and confused, our hopes for the 
present at least are frustrated, and this book can be called no more 
than an essay. Sir Richard had taken notice of only 180 Familys in 
order; to which are added above 100 more, chiefly from such lights as 
he had left behind him." 

Whether Sir Richard's rough draught still exists I dont know. Nor do I know 
who is the author of the improved and enlarged edition of it in this manuscript volume. 



GIPPS FAMILY. 435 



But I imagine that it is his friend, Le Neve. These notices of Suffolk families 
are very skimpy, and strike me as being of very little use. But they must have 
entailed some labour, and, having regard both to the author and to the subject, the 
Suffolk Arch. Inst, did well to print them in full. They will be found in Vol. VIII, 
p. 121 — 214. Unfortunately there are in this printed version three large, long gaps, 
occuring at p. 168, 184, 194. The first is noticed by the editor of the volume. But 
of the second and third he seems to have been quite unconscious, and has printed 
right away as if nothing was missing or amiss. Consequently you have the half of 
one family tacked on to the half of another, and the second half of one sentence to 
the first half of another with a whole page missing that should have come in between. 
Miss Merelina Stanley was good enough to lend me a manuscript copy that she 
possessed of this manuscript, in which none of these gaps existed. I was therefore 
able to fill them up, though I do not see that the editor of the Arch. Inst. Proc. has 
thought it worth while to make any permanent correction of this error in any 
subsequent volume. 

Another copy of this work of Sir Richard's was made by Sir John Cullum of 
Hardwick. The Rev. G. Ashby writing from Barrow to Richard Gough on Dec. 17, 
1776, says : — 

" Sir John Cullum has nicely transcribed and made great additions 
to Sir Richard Gippes (I write without book) Suffolk Gentry : it fills a 
snug quarto on one side. He has also of his own painful collection 
two such volumes of Suffolk epitaphs ; so that these melted down with 
those in Weever and with ecclesiastical transcripts from the bishop's 
ofifice and the Suffolk Traveller would make a tolerable county history." 
(NichoUs' Literary Anecdotes, VII, 408.) 

But I very much doubt whether such a county history as is here proposed would 
now be looked upon as "tolerable." 

A thick folio volume in the Harleian collection. No. 4626, contains a number 
of MSS papers bound up together, mostly relating to Bury St. Edmunds. Of these, 
article 12, containing folios 180—296, belonged to Sir Richard. They contain a list 
of registers, cartularies and other MSS belonging to Bury abbey, saying where they 
are to be found : notes from charters, rolls, fines, inquisitions and other public records 
relating to various Suffolk parishes : some extracts from inquisitions relating to the 



436 GIPPS FAMILY. 



Gipps family. I have run through these rather hurriedly, but could not find much 
that threw light where I wanted light thrown. 

At folio 225 — 237 is a catalogue of books and MSS with occasional marginal 
notes. Among them is a MS entitled Vifa Sadochi et Tristrami Reg : Hiberniens : 
gallice, which has this marginal note : — Iste liber fidt Richardi Ducis Glocestrics. I 
could not be sure that this was a catalogue of the library at Whelnetham, otherwise I 
should have printed it in full. That he had a good library and that it was catalogued 
we know from a paper by Richard Gough printed in NichoUs' Literary Anecdotes, 
III, p. 608—693. 

Gough's paper is entitled, On the progress of selling books by (Catalogues. 
He says there were two kinds of catalogues of books, viz. auction catalogues and 
marked catalogues of retailers of libraries. Prices were at first fixed in the first leaf 
of each book ; afterwards transcribed from thence into the printed catalogue. " The 
" library of Sir Richard Gipps of Great Waltham \sic\ and Bury St. Edmunds was 
^^ sold in 1729 by T. Green, Spring Gardens, bookseller, with fixed prices. Query, if 
^'- not the earliest.''^ 

Sir Richard was occasionally visited at Whelnetham by John Strype, the 
ecclesiastical historian, whose long life of 94 years ended in 1737. These visits 
enable us to know of one picture that was hanging on the walls, viz. a portrait of 
Stephen Gardiner, bishop of Winchester. After alluding to the supposed illegitimacy 
of Stephen Gardiner, Strype says : — 

But he gave the coat of the Gardiners of Glemsford near Ipswich \ 
which was azure, a cross, or, charged with a cinquefoil, gules, pierced ; 
or rather, a rose (which I suppose was an addition granted him by the 
king,) between four griffins heads, erased, argent, languid, gules ; as I 
observed from an ancient picture of this prelate in the possession of 
my worthy friend. Sir Richard Gibbs [sic] of Wheltham in Suffolk 
knight. Upon the frame is writ his motto, Vana salus hominis. When 
that picture was taken of him, he was 53 years of age. He is repre- 
sented with a surplice close at the wrists, and a scarf over it, a square 
cap on his head, two great stoned rings upon his two forefingers, the 
one a ruby, the other a sapphire, and another small ring upon the little 
finger of his left hand. A severe black visage shaven close, and his 
eyebrows somewhat hanging over his eyes. Eccles. Mem. II. Part 1 1, 
p. 166. 



GIPPS FAMILY. 437 



And elsewhere after an allusion to Gardiner's origin and arms, he adds : — 

Yet have I seen a very good picture of him when bishop of 
Winchester, belonging to Sir Richard Gibbs of Wheltham in Suffolk, 
where his coat of arms varies, being within the garter, the see of Winton 
impaled with his own, which there is azure, a cross or, charged with a 
garland gules, between four griffins heads erased argent, languid of the 
third : which is the very coat of the Gardyners of Glemsford. But I 
suppose this was the error of the painter. Upon the frame is written, 
Vana salus hominis, which I take for his mottoe. The picture was 
drawn when he was of the age of 53. He is represented with a 
square cap on his head, his complexion swarthy, a severe face, shaved 
close, his eyelids somewhat hanging over his eyes, stone rings upon 
both his forefingers, habited in a white garment close at the wrists, 
with a tippet over it. Ecc. Mem. III. Part i. p. 449. 

Where is this portrait now? And where is the portrait of Sir Richard himself 
by Klosterman ? Those are the only two pictures that I know to have been hanging 
on the walls of his house. The portrait of himself was engraved by John Smith in 
1687. My reproduction of the engraving is from a copy at Moyses hall belonging to 
the Suffolk Arch. Inst. Mr. Chaloner Smith gives this account of the engraving and 
its three states in his British Mezzotinto Portraits. It will be seen that the Moyses 
hall engraving is in the first state. 

H.L., in oval, directed to right, facing towards and looking to 
front, long wig, robe, collar open with black ribbon passed through 
buttonholes. Under, in centre arms, motto, Sursum Sir Richard 
Gipps knt. I. Closterman pinx : I. Smith fee : et excudit. 

I. Before any description or arms. II. As described. 

III. Left hand added in front of robe. This is probably for the 
purpose of giving balance to the figure, which in the previous states 
appears as if it might fall forwaid to right. 

Of his MSS, some are now in the British Museum, some in the Bodleian, and 
a few which got into Dr. Cox Macro's collection are now in the possession of Mr. J. 
H. Gurney at Keswick hall near Norwich. 



438 GIPPS FAMILY. 



A letter from Rev. John Tanner, vicar of Lowestoft, to Rev. Mr. Burroughs, 
Fellow of Caius Coll., dated from London, Nov. lo, 1739, says : — 

Thank you for the account you sent me of books relating to the 
abbey of Bury, which was the thing I wanted. My brother had got an 
account of most of them before, so that I only added from yours, 
Books and papers in the evidence room at Bury. Sir Richard Gipps 
collections relating to Bury abbey I never heard of ; his collections 
concerning the county of Suffolk in general were given to my brother, 
and are among his MSS in the Bodleian library. My brother had 
likewise four quarto parchment registers relating to Bury abbey, which 
I believe were formerly Bishop Moore's, and were sent among his other 
MSS to the Bodleian library. NichoUs Literary Illustrations, III, 435. 

His wife Mary had been buried here in February, 1 702-3. He was himself buried 
here on the eve of Christmas day, 1708. His age was 49 years. There is no 
memorial to them in the church or churchyard. I have printed his will at p. 268. 
Everything everywhere is to be sold. Why Whelnetham hall was not left for his son 
to continue there one cannot tell. We have seen in the last chapter who bought it, 
and we have just seen that the books were iu a London bookseller's priced catalogue 
in 1729. Richard Gipps, his executor, is I suppose Richard Gipps the Bury surgeon, 
whose will I have printed at p. 270. 

These were his children, all baptized at Great Whelnetham. 

1. Richard. Baptized Aug. 16, 1692. See below. 

2. John Giles. Baptized Oct. 26, 1693. See below. 

3. Mary. Baptized April 22, 1697. She was still alive in June, 17x4, when 
she was mentioned in the will of Richard Gipps of Bury St. Edmunds. See p. 270. 
Probably she will be found in Norfolk. 

4. Edward George. Baptized Oct. 22, 1698. Buried here July 5, 1706. 

5. Agnes. Baptized Sept. 19, 1700. Buried here Oct. 12, 1701. 
RICHARD GIPPS, eldest son of Sir Richard. Bapt. August, 1692. He is 

pretty certam to have gone to Bury School, though there does not happen to be a 
record of it. He was admitted to the manor of Great Whelnetham at a court held on 
May 25, 1 7 14. On May 8, 17 13, he was married at Bradfield St. George to Elizabeth 
Gipps. I have not seen this register, but so says Davy. I presume that she was one 



GIPPS FAMILY. 439 



of the Bury Gippses. They then settled down at Brockley, where several children 
were born. Gage says that the sale of Brockley manor was begun in 1708, during 
the lifetime of Sir Richard, and completed in 1709, the advowson being retained. 
Sir Richard's will also shows this. His son Richard must, therefore, have rented the 
hall if it was the hall which he occupied. He does not seem to have been buried 
there himself, and I can say no more of him. Elizabeth Gipps widow was buried at 
Chevington on Jan. 28, 1747-8. I presume that was his widow, but cannot be sure. 

These are the children who appear in the Brockley registers, which the Rev. W. 
B. Nettleship has freely allowed me to search. They were all baptized there. Of the 
nine, seven died under 3 years of age. The other two I cannot follow. 

Mary. Baptized May 9, 17 14. 

Richard. Baptized June 24, 1715. Buried April 10, 17 16. 

Elizabeth. Baptized July — , 17 16. Buried Dec. 4, 17 17. 

John. Baptized Oct. 28, 1717. Buried Jan. 3, 1719. 

Edward George. No entry of baptism. Buried Sept. 6, 17 18. 

Richard. Baptized Jan. 6, 1 720-1. Buried Jan. 12, 1722-3. 

Agnes. Baptized July 8, 1722. 

George. Baptized Aug. 6, 1723. Buried April 10, 1726. 

Sarah. Baptized Nov. 12, 1724. Buried March 31, 1727, 

JOHN GILES GIPPS, second son of Sir Richard. Baptized here in October, 
1693. He went to school at Bury for four years under Reynolds and Randall. 
Then he was admitted to Caius Coll., Cambridge, in December, 171 1. B.A. 1715. 
In April, 1726, he was presented to the rectory of Brockley by his brother Richard 
Gipps, where two uncles, John Gipps and John Warren, had preceded him. He 
signs one page of the register containing entries in 1726, 1727, but that is the only 
sign of him there. In August, 1727, he was presented to the rectory of Chevington, 
and there he took up his abode. The Rev. A. K. White, rector of Chevington, has 
kindly allowed me to examine the Chevington registers, from which I learn as 
follows : — 

1727. Oct. 2. John Giles Gipps, rector of this parish, and Sarah Steward of 
Wheapstead [sic] were married by the Rev. Mr. Harvey, rector of Lawshall. 



440 GIPPS FAMILY. 



These four children of John Giles Gipps and Sarah his wife were baptized at 
Chevington : — 

1728. June 28. Sarah. By mere chance I came across her tombstone in 
Wickham Skeith churchyard, from which I learned that she married Edmund Craske, 
survived him and died in Jan., 1799, aged 70. 

1729. June 18. John Steward. Buried May 31, 1730. 

1731. July 10. Mary. Buried Sept. 31, 1731. 

1732. Dec. 26. Margaret. 

On Nov. 6, 1733, the rector himself was buried. He would have been just 40 
years of age. 

Soon afterwards one gets a glimpse of his widow. Among the letters of John 
Hervey, earl of Bristol, is one to the Bishop of Norwich, dated from Ickworth July 
17, 1734. He says— 

The widow Gipps being removed from Chevington to Risby, it 
was too late in ye evening on Sunday after I had spoken with her 
there to let your lordship know by that night's post that she hath not 
received any fruit from your charitable intercession on her behalf ; 
however, was as full of grateful expressions to me of your goodness 
as if she had. HI. p. 122. 
She was buried at Risby early in the year 1739 ; so I learn from the manuscript 
index to the Risby registers made by the Rev. E. Symonds, the late rector, and by 
him presented to the Suff. Arch. Inst. 

I may as well set down here the tombstones which I accidentally met with in 
Wickham Skeith churchyard. 

1. Sarah, relict of Edmund Craske and daughter of Rev. John Giles Gipps, 
rector of Chevington. Died Jan. 1799, aged 70. 

2. Edmund Craske died August, 1781, aged 41. 

3. Edmund Craske, over 73 years a resident in this parish. Born April 1767. 
Died June 1842. 

4. Martha relict of Edmund Craske and youngest daughter of Thomas 
Sheldrake of Brockford. Died Aug., 1855, aged 78. 

5. Charles, youngest son of Edmund and Martha Craske. Died April, 1855, 
aged 36. 



(>tPPS FAMILY. 441 



John Gipps the Nonjuror. 

We now go back a generation to John, younger brother of Sir Richard Gipps, 
He was the second son and fourth child of John and Mary Gipps. He was baptized 
here Nov. 14, 1662. He went to school at Bury for four years under Walker, and 
then to the Grammar School there for three years under Dr. Leeds. Then in July, 
1676, he was admitted to Caius Coll., Cambridge, aged 14. Scholar 1676 — 1682. 
Junior Fellow 1683 — 1687. LL.B. 1682. (Venn.) He was ordained deacon on 
Dec. 20, 1685, and in 1686 was presented to the rectory of Brockley. It is curious 
that he was presented to it by the Bishop of Norwich by reason of lapse. As his 
father, John Gipps, was patron, why did he let it lapse ? 

It was not long before his troubles began. In December, 1688, James II 
sought refuge in France. In February, 1689, William and Mary were proclaimed 
king and queen. In March, 1689, an oath of allegiance had to be taken by the two 
Houses of Parliament. A few persons refused it, including Archbishop Sancroft 
and eight bishops. Three of these bishops died that same year. The Act of 
Parliament required all ecclesiastical persons to take the oath before Aug. i, 1689. 
The penalty was suspension, and after six months' suspension there would come, if 
they still refused it, deprivation. So that those who did not comply before Feb. i, 
1690, would be deprived. When Feb. i came Sancroft and the five bishops were 
deprived, and about four hundred of the clergy went out with them. Amongst 
them, John Gipps, rector of Brockley. 

In Memoirs of the life of Mr. John Kettlewell, vicar of Coleshill, published in 
1 7 18, is printed in an appendix A letter from several oj the clergy of the Arch- 
deaconry of Sudbury in the Diocese of Norzvich, lying u?ider suspension, to their 
Diocesan, William, Lord Bishop of Norimch. 

We your Lordship's curates, neighbours to Dr. Bisby, lying under 
suspension and (which is worse) very hard censures from most we 
converse withal, and finding the time of our deprivation to be near at 
hand, do take the boldness to beg your Lordship's blessing and withal 
earnestly to crave your Lordship's paternal direction. 

They ask for instruction as to how they are to leave their respective 
cures, " whether voluntarily or stay till particular intruders thrust us 

FF 



442 GIPPS FAMILY. 



" out by pretext of law. As also which way to behave ourselves, to 
" preserve (if possible) the old Church of England." 

The letter is signed by — 

Stephen Newson, rector of Hawkedon. 
Thomas Ross, rector of Reed. 
John Owen, rector of Tuddenham. 
Samuel Richardson, curate of Little Bradley. 
William Giffard, rector of Great Bradley. 
John Gipps, rector of Brockley. 
Edward Pretty, rector of Little Cornard. 
Abraham Salter, vicar of Edwardstone. 
William Phillips, presbyter. 

The Bishop's answer is dated Jan. 6, 1690. He says, "Its the opinion of 
" eminent lawyers that the decree of deprivation doth not inure till a judicial sentence 
" passeth further upon us ; and therefore (if this opinion be good law) we may keep 
"our legal possessions till we be further sentenced and thrust out." 

In another appendix is printed a list of about 360 clergyman who refused to 
qualify themselves for holding office, though afterwards some of them did so, besides 
about go residents in the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge. The list of Suffolk 
clergy contains 22 names, headed by Dr. Nathaniel Bisby, rector of Long Melford, 
who is mentioned in the above letter. 

On July 12, 1690, John Gipps's successor at Brockley was presented by his 
father, who did not let it lapse this time. That successor was John Warren, I 
presume his brother-in-law, who held it till 1726, when another Gipps was ready 
for it. 

The Rev. W. B. Nettleship, rector of Brockley, has very kindly allowed me to 
examine the Brockley registers. There is not a sign of John Warren in them, and so 
I imagine that he resided at Boxford and never went near Brockley. It also appears 
that John Gipps continued to live there. I suppose he did not officiate, but at any 
rate he was there. The Brockley register contains these entries relating to his 
children : — 

1690. April 6. Baptized. Sarah daughter of John and Sarah Gipps. On 
Feb. 9, 1715-6, she was married at Brockley to William Lucas. I presume that this 
was a son of the last William Lucas of Horsecroft in Horringer. (See Horringer.) 



GIPPS FAMILY. 443 



1697. Sept. 30. Baptized. John son of John and Sarah Gipps. Born Sept. 
i6. Buried Dec. 30, 1698. 

1701. Aug. 17. Baptized. Christopher son of John and Sarah Gipps. 

1708. April n. Buried. Mary daughter of John Gipps clerk and Sarah his 
wife. 

And then after an interval come these entries. 

1725-6. Feb. 8. The Rever*^- Mr. John Gipps was buried. 

1732. Dec. 8. Sarah widdow of ye Leat Rev."*^ John Gipps. Buried. 

Who Sarah his wife was I do not know, but can only make a guess. In 
Brockley churchyard, near the church on the south side, is a tombstone with this 
inscription in beautifully-shaped letters : — 

She was of worthy extraction, her father (Mr. Pratt) having suffer'd 
not a little for his loyalty. She was by the Strutts of Hadleigh, her 
mother's relations, trained up when a child in the way wherein she 
should go, and when she was old she did not depart from it. 

That is the whole inscription, to which from the shape of the letters I should 
give the date of c. 1700. It occurs to me that this nameless tombstone may mark 
the grave of Sarah Gipps, in which case we have her maiden name. And this guess 
is supported by the fact that the very next stone to it, both being in the same row, 
has this inscription : — 

Here lyeth ye body of John Gipps, son of John Gipps clerk, 
who departed this life Dec. 26, 1698, aged 15 months. 
Remember thy Creator in the days of thy youth. Eccl. 

A little way off, near the chancel door, is a stone with this inscription : — 

Here lyeth ye body of Mary Gipps, daughter of John Gipps clerk, 
who departed this life April 8, 1708, aged 16 years. 

Watch ye therefore, for ye know not when the Master of the house cometh, 
at even or at midnight or at the cock crowing or in ye morning. 



444 GIPPS FAMILY. 



P.S. — I find that in such account as I have been able to give of the Gipps family I 
have not included the account of it given by Sir Richard himself, or his improver, in 
the work on Suffolk families described at p. 434. It does not throw the faintest ray 
of light on the history of the family before the time of Sir Richard, but still it ought 
not to be omitted. I therefore take it from the printed copy of that work in SufF. 
Arch. Inst. Proc. VIII, 164. 

GIPPS. This family was anciently seated at Ipswich ; but after- 
wards divided into 2 branches. Sir Richard Gipps, the collector of 
these antiquitys, was of the elder house and seated at Great Wheltham 
hall in Thedwestry Hundred, and marry'd an heiress in Devonshire, by 
whom he had a fine estate there. He was admitted of the Inner 
Temple, and appointed Master of the Revells upon an invitation of 
King Charles II to their Xtmass Festivals, by whom he was then 
knighted. He was possessed of the manors of Great Wheltham, 
Brockly and Rede, with divers other lands, his paternal estate ; but 
the estate is now sold. Sir Richard Gipps of Horningsheath in Thingo 
Hundred was of the younger house ; but sold his estate. Upon which 
his son, Richard Gipps Esquire, went into the army, and proved a 
brave officer ; but was basely discharged upon party-pique, and is now 
seated at Badley in Bosmere Hundred, — They bare az. a fess between 
6 stars or. 

I now give two pedigrees. The first is a tentative one, based on statements by 
Le Neve, Davy, Gage (Thingoe p. 253), Rev. J. S. Boldero in Memorials of the Past 
p. 46, added to a few suppositions of my own. The marriage of a Thomas Gipps 
with Mary Lanchester, both of Bury, took place at Fornham All Saints on June 19, 
1623. (Gage p. 263.) 

As I have connected the Bolderos with George Gipps the London grocer or 
Barbary merchant, and as I have made that George Gipps the ancestor of the 
Horringer Gippses, the top of this pedigree seems to point towards the common 
ancestor of the Gippses of Whelnetham and the Gippses of Horringer. Perhaps the 
two Sir Richards were about sixth cousins. 

The second pedigree showing the Gippses of Whelnetham is only tentative as 
far as the first generation or two is concerned. 



GIPPS FAMILY. 



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I give here three heraldic shields from drawings which Mr. Edmund Farrer was 
good enough to make for me. 

No. I is the Gipps shield as just described and as on the tombstone of Richard 
Gipps, 1660. (See p. 164.) No. i. 




No. 2 is Brokesborne. Gules, six eagles displayed or. 

No. 3 is Raynsforth. Gules, a chevron between three fleur de lys argent. The 
shield painted on the window over the sedilia (p. 455) bears Raynsforth impaling 
Brokesborne. How Brokesborne and Raynsforth come in will be found at p. 345 — 
354. No. 2. No. 3. 





448 A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 



Part II. Chapter VI. 



A Walk Round the Two Parishes. 



We will now walk round the two Whelnethams, and notice a few people, houses 
and things which we have not already noticed. The map which faces this page, 
which has been drawn for me by my brother, Col. C. R. W. Hervey, R.A., will show 
us where we are as we go along. 

SYDOLESMERE or SICKLES MERE. We come from Bury, leaving it by 
its south gate, and as soon as we get within the bounds of the parish we are at 
Sicklesmere. Sicklesmere is now the name of a hamlet or group of houses. But the 
name was not originally given to a group of houses, but to a mere or lake on the 
edge of which those houses were afterwards built. The lie of the ground shows 
exactly where that lake lay and what was its shape. It must have been a long 
narrowish one on the right hand side of the road as you stand with your back to 
Bury. The mere lay alongside of the stream, and sometimes now a very wet season 
will more or less put it back where it was. One would like to know why it was 
called Sicklesmere. I wont venture on any guesses, but will merely say that in most 
of the earliest documents it is Sydolesmere. I have seen Sykolesmere as early as 
1273, but till the sixteenth century inclusive it is generally Sydolesmere. Then 
Sigglesmere and Sicklesmere. But Sydolesmere seems to carry us back the nearest 
to its original name. 

At Sicklesmere two streams meet, the one rather larger than the other. The 
smaller one has come from Brent Bradfield, Bradfield Combust, Little Bradfield or 
Bradfield Manger, as it is variously called. In his Breviary of Suffolk, Reyce 
implies that the name is Burne (not Burnt) Bradfield from this burn or brook. But 
his editor, Lord Francis Hervey, does not favour the suggestion. If by chance it 



WELNETI1AM 

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,1 mile 
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(■] •• House a Moat 



A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 449 

were right, then combust would have come in after that the meaning of burn had 
been forgotten and when people thought it meant burnt. But if wrong, and if Brent 
Bradfield does mean burnt Bradfield, that burning must not be put down, as it often 
is, to the great destruction of Bury abbey property by the insurrection of 1327 j for 
I find the epithet Combust in a document of 1327, before there would have been 
time for the name to have become fixed. Perhaps the incendiaries were Danes 
before the Norman Conquest. 

The larger stream has come from near Rede, a hungry-looking place which 
keeps its ancient character as well as its ancient name, for reeds still abound there. 
After getting away from Rede it then for a little space forms the boundary between 
Horringer and Whepstead, where its course is overhung by willows that have not 
done weeping yet, though they must have been weeping there for five hundred years 
and more. Then passing through a wide valley it comes to Hawstead parish ; here 
near its left bank stood old Hawstead House, afterwards called Hawstead Place, 
whose gardens it skirted, setting them their bounds which they might not pass ; it 
still washes the roots of trees which Sir William Drury and his guest, Queen 
Elizabeth, might have seen ; then the valley contracts and it passes through it in an 
S like course, S after S and S after S, being there locally known as Hawstead Cranks ; 
and here from the rising ground on its right bank looks down upon it the old hall, 
now two or three roomy cottages, which was a hall long before the building of 
Hawstead house or the coming of the Drurys into Hawstead. Then passing through 
some meadows which once formed the mere, its course marked by a fine row of 
willows, it reaches the hamlet which we call Sicklesmere. 

Here the two streams meet and become one stream and flow on to Bury St, 
Edmunds. Just before getting into Bury a third joins them, which has come from 
Ickworth and has entered Bury at the old stone ford, where afterwards a bridge was 
built, which is now known as Stoneford or Stamford bridge. Being now quite big 
and in a town, of course the three streams which are now one must have a name, and 
so it was called the Lark, no man knows why or when. Having got a name away it 
goes to Brandon, where it loses its name and individuality in the Ouse. Away goes 
the Ouse to Lynn, where it in its turn loses its name and its individuality in the 
North Sea. So it seems that the fate of rivers is to flow on into a sort of socialism, 
which destroys nothing that is brought to it but only the name and individuality of 
that which brings it. 



450 A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 

AMERDOWN. We now return from the sea to Sicklesmere. On the 
(relatively) high ground on the left as you stand with your back to Bury is a field called 
Amerdown or Armerdown. I first meet with it in a Little Whelnetham rate-book in 
1722 as Amerdown. It soon afterwards gets to be written Armerdown. It seems to 
me that Amerdown may stand for an-mere-down, and may have been the name once 
of all that higher ground as it sloped down to the mere, and would mean the down 
or hill on (an) the mere. As different places with like circumstances may get the 
same name from those circumstances being like, so it will be as well to look about 
and see if one can find elsewhere the like circumstances and a like name ; /. e. a hill 
sloping down to a mere, or a village at the edge of a mere, and called Anmere or 
something like it. With little trouble I have found two instances and perhaps three. 

(i). In Flintshire is a very fine natural sheet of water with a village on the 
edge of it, and the name of that village is Hanmer, and from it the Hanmer family 
who belong to Flintshire get their name. There can be little doubt but that 
Hanmer means the village on (an) the mere. Of course the initial H is nothing. 
A breath can make it as a breath has made. 

(2). In Norfolk is a village called Anmer, this time without the H. This 
village also is the origin of a surname, which as often as not is written Amner or 
Ammer. Here again we have the village on (an) the mere. 

(3). Near Radstock, in the coal district of Somersetshire, is Ammerdown, the 
residence of Lord Hylton. It occurred to me that if in that hilly district this 
Ammerdown were a hill sloping down to a mere, then it would be very much like to 
Amerdown near Sicklesmere. On asking Lord Hylton how his house was situated 
he tells me that the house was built and a park enclosed by his ancestor, Mr. 
JoUiffe, in 1789, who took the name Ammerdown from a part of the down which he 
had enclosed. The whole down or hill extends for some miles, different parts of it 
being differently named, as Buckland down, Kingsdown and so on, Ammerdown 
being that part on which his ancestor built his house. In a survey of 1571 in his 
possession it was always written Amerdon. This Ammerdown or Amerdon was 
above the village of Kilmersdon, which village certainly took its name from a mere, 
Kil-mere-don. 

Fortified by these three analogies I think we may say that it is highly probable 
that the Amerdown that we are concerned with is " an mere down," the down or 
hill on the mere. 




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A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 451 



Next, we may look at Sicklesmere not as a mere but as a hamlet or home of 
men, and glance at some of the houses and their former occupiers. 

THE WAGGON. Its other name is the Rushbrooke Arms. But that is 
obviously a much more recent name, and it has not yet caught on amongst those who 
frequent the house. The first mention of the Waggon in the Little Whelnetham 
rate-book is in 1746, when Samuel Scutchy has just taken it. I think Isaac Wilson 
who died in 1731, and then his widow, had preceded Samuel Scutchy. He died in 
1756, and his widow married Thomas Rolfe, who died in 1769. After Rolfe came 
Robert Pearl, who afterwards went to Bury and died there in 1806. 

LITTLE WHELNETHAM PRESENT RECTORY. I call it so to 
distinguish it from the old rectory, which we shall reach further on. It is an old 
house, but it has only been the rectory since 1832. I suppose it is in the Hearth- 
tax lists at p. 224-227, and in the rate-book at p. 235-237, but I cannot identify it. 
The earliest notice that I can identify as belonging to it is in the laconic Journals 
of Hon. William Hervey. Under Friday, Oct. 27, 1769, he makes this entry : — 
To Sir Charles D avers at Riishbrooke ; Mr. Met calf of Hasted, Mr. Wilson near 
the toll gate. This means that he went to stay at Rushbrooke, and met there Mr. 
Metcalf of Hawstead and Mr. Wilson who lived near the toll gate. The house 
near the toll gate must mean the present rectory. Who Mr. Wilson was I dont know. 

The next occupant that I know of was Madam Treice, the mother of the eight 
children of Sir Charles Davers. Here she died in 181 3. This is shown by entries 
in the Ickworth estate books. Little Whelnetham having in 1806 become part of the 
Ickworth estate. Passing one day lately through Coney Weston, and happening to 
look into the churchyard, I unexpectedly lighted on her tombstone. I presume that 
was her native place, to which she had gone back when life was over. These names 
were on the stones that stood side by side : — 

John Traice. Died July 1761, aged 53. 

Ann Traice, his wife. Died Feb. 1773, ^ged 58. 

Frances Traice. Died Dec. 25, 1813, aged 64. 

After her death, from 1814 to 1832, it was rented at ;2^2o a year by the 
successive curates of Little Whelnetham during the non-residence of the rector, 
Marmaduke Wilkinson. These were T. Godfrey, CoUyer, Harvey, Samuel H. 



452 A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 

Alderson. (See p. 417.) In 1832 it was handed over by Lord Bristol to the new 
rector, Rev. H. J. Hasted, and since then it has been the rectory house, though I 
believe never formally conveyed. The grounds have been enlarged on either side ; 
on the one side by the inclusion of a large chalk pit, and on the opposite side by 
the inclusion of the site of two cottages. I have examined the ground by the old 
chalk pit, but cannot make out whether it has been scarped or not for purposes of 
defence. At one time I thought it might be the castle or earthwork from which 
Thomas de Castell in 1327 got his name. (See p. 211.) But now I am doubtful 
about it. Between the garden of this house and the road is a wall to hold the 
garden up. Low down in this wall, at the end furthest from Bury, are some worked 
free stones, whose date seems to me to be Norman. I presume they have come from 
the church. 

WASH FARM. On the opposite side of the road to the present rectory stands 
an old L shaped house with a mediaeval look about it, of which I give a representa- 
tion. I think it must certainly be the tenement called Sydolesmers, which was one 
of those charged in 141 7 with the payment of 100 shillings yearly to Johanna de 
Bures, a nun. (See p. 318.) And it must be the tenement in Sidolesmere mentioned 
in the will of Sir William Drury, who died in 1557, as having belonged to his father. 
Sir Robert Drury, who died in 1535. (P. 357). And it is in the inquisition of 
Henry Drury who died in 1587. I can say no more of it except that it is now the 
property of Lord Bristol. Whether it was a purchase made by John, Lord Bristol, 
when he was admitted into the manor at a court held in October, 1704, or whether 
it came to the Ickworth estate in 1806 with the Rushbrooke estate and was kept 
when a part of that estate was sold, I do not know. 

The Ickworth estate books show that in 181 2 it was occupied by John Girton, 
who is described as nursery man. He died in 1813. His widow Elizabeth in 1815 
married Lieutenant Samuel Hogg of Bury St. Edmund's, who died two months 
afterwards aged 33 years. The widow, Elizabeth Hogg, continued there till her 
death in Feb. 1857 aged 74. Since then I think the farm has been merged in that 
of Nowton hall, and the old house occupied as cottages. 

The following advertisement seems to belong to one of the houses at Sicklesmere, 
judging from the allusion to the county river absurdly so called. Possibly it is the 
one hidden by the huge barns of Wash farm, so that I have only at the eleventh 
hour become aware of its existence. 




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A WALK ROUND THE tWO PARISHES. 453 

From the Suffolk Mercury. Monday, March 3, 1728/9. 

A farm to be lett or sold lying in Welnetham, and to be entered 
upon at Ladyday, consisting of about 23 acres of freehold meadow 
joining to the county river, and about 3 acres of copyhold land, 
whereon the house stands, with the privilege of a very large common of 
some hundreds of acres, with the privilege of about 40 or 50 acres of 
half year meadow lying near the said house, with liberty to turn in as 
many beasts as you will except sheep ; likewise the liberty to fish and 
fowl. Enquire of Mr. Nowton or of George Dabby near the said 
house ; but the owner hopes to be there on the 6th or 7th instant. 

I may add that the best place from which to see how the old mere lay is from 
two or three hundred yards down the narrow lane called Nowton or Hawstead lane, 
formerly also called Ickworth lane, which turns out of the turnpike road at 
Sicklesmere bridge. The foliage of the trees that mark the course of the stream as 
seen from this lane make it deserve a visit from an artist. 

We have now done Sicklesmere. Three roads now lie before us, running more 
or less southwards. The right hand one leads to Great Whelnetham and on to 
Stanningfield and Lawshall ; the left hand one leads to Little Whelnetham and on 
to Felsham and Hadleigh ; the middle one leads past the old house of the Crutched 
friars to Bradfield Combust and on to Melford, Sudbury and London. Of these 
three we will take the right hand one that leads to Great Whelnetham. We shall 
come back by the middle one, and then start off again along the left hand one. 

We climb the hill and come to the school, which was built on a bit of waste 
ground in 1842. I think this must be the spot where the maypole was set up in 
1702, as mentioned at p. 433. Here turning to the right we come to the church. 

GREAT WHELNETHAM CHURCH. On seeing it one at once asks. Why 
no tower ? There does not seem ever to have been a tower. Why not ? Davy 
says. The steeple is doivn. But I can see no sign that it ever was up. As a rule 
churches without towers were not parish churches with full rights ; they were chapels 
or daughter churches. But one cannot see that Great Whelnetham church could 
ever have been subordinate to any other church. So I must leave the question 
unanswered. 

Next, the dedication. For a supposed dedication to St. Thomas the Martyr 
(Thomas Becket) there is no authority whatsoever. The chapel of the Crutched 



454 



A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 



friars was dedicated to St. Thomas, but that has got nothing to do with the parish 
church. Most of the pre-Reformation wills that I have seen mention the church 
without any dedication. But the will of John Pery in 1462 seems to imply a 
dedication to the Virgin Mary. (P. 239.) In the will of John Bunne, 1462, is a 
bequest to the altar of St. Mary of Whelnetham Magna (p. 240), but as there were 
two altars in the church this is not conclusive. 

I have pointed out at p. 229 that the entry in Doomsday book seems to point 
to the existence then of two churches in Whelnetham as there are now. So we at 
once look to see what signs there may be of this Norman church. Alas, in 19 10 
there are none. But Davy visited it on August 27, 1829, and made some notes 
which are now among his MSS in the British Museum. And therein he says : 
The arch behveen the ?iave and chancel is a round one with plain head moulding. 
So there was then a bit of Norman architecture left. But since then, probably in 
1839, this Norman chancel arch has been removed, and a pointed one, much higher 
than the Norman one would have been, has been put in its place. 

But we must not begin in the middle of the church. We must begin at one 
end or the other, and so we will step into the chancel. 

The east window is a four-light window of the late Perpendicular style of 
architecture, c. 1500, or later. Davy says that when he visited it in 1829 there were 
ni It the arms of de Whelnetham, viz. Or on a fess az. 3 plates. But this is now 
gone. However, Mr. Edmund Farrer has made me a drawing of this shield, which 
I reproduce. No. 4. 




A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHESi. 455 

On the north side of the chancel are three early English lancet windows, whose 
date might be somewhere from 1200 to 1270. 

On the south side is the double piscina and the three sedilia with round pillars, 
as shown in the illustration opposite. These also are of the early English style. In 
Davy's time the piscina was hidden by wainscoat, but he guessed that it was there 
and he was right. I cannot help thinking that the existence of these sedilia shows 
something that we have not got hold of. You dont see them in every church, and 
when they are there I believe that there is generally a particular reason for their 
being there. Is there a particular reason in this case, and if so, what is it ? Their 
date about coincides with the coming of the Crutched friars to Whelnetham. 

In the window over the sedilia are the Brokesborne and Raynsford arms, which 
Davy mentions as being in the nave. These arms on two separate shields will be 
found at p. 447. The windows on the south side of the chancel are of the Perpendi- 
cular style of architecture. 

On the north wall of the chancel is a moulding of early English work, not 
running along the \\hole length of it but only for about 3^ yards as near as possible 
in the middle, with returned ends. On the south wall is a similar moulding starling 
from the sedilia and going westwards ; but the chancel door, which must therefore 
be a later insertion, has broken into it, so that we do not get the west return. A 
little bit of this moulding can be seen in the illustration just under the window. It 
is difficult to see what is the meaning of this moulding, and why it begins and leaves 
off where it does on the north side. But I believe that, if stared at long enough and 
intelligently enough, it might be made to tell its tale. 

Now we step into the nave. As I have already said, the arch between chancel 
and nave was a round Norman arch in 1829, and of course low, but is now high, 
pointed and of the nineteenth century. And I take it that this removal of a Norman 
arch, which told its tale of when a church was built and which was sanctified by 
seven centuries, and this substitution of a new one, were part of the " improvements " 
carried out in 1839. Davy says that on the south side of the old Norman arch was 
an opening with an arch, which ivas perhaps the way up to the rood loft. My 
impression is that the way to the rood loft is always on the north side, but perhaps I 
am wrong, or perhaps there are exceptions. Davy says that on the north side is 
another arch, partly enclosed and partly filled up : the part enclosed has a sort of screen 
of this form. He then gives a drawing of the screen, which is most useful, as we can 



456 



A Walk round the two i^AkisHES. 



recognize it as being the stone which is now built into the porch. It was evidently 
taken from its original place and built into the porch when the old chancel arch was 
removed. I here give an illustration of it, but cannot suggest any meaning for it. 





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On the south side of the nave is another double piscina in the decorated style of 
architecture, c. 1270 — 1370, showing that there was a second altar. Perhaps this 
was put up by Dame Margery de Sutton, who died in 1384. (P. 348.) Over this is 
a two-light window in the decorated style. There seems to have been another window 
west of it, but this is now filled up. All the clerestory windows seem to be of much 
later date. 

On the north side of the nave are two arches which must have led into a small 
side chapel. This I feel pretty sure was built by or for Sir John de Whelnetham, 
who will be found at p. 325 — 341. In Davy's time these two arches were filled up, 
but in 1839 they were opened and the present side chapel built. I presume that the 
original side chapel had fallen or been pulled down, and that the present one is much 
deeper than the original one. Davy says that he saw a coffin lid in the church with a 
cross upon it adjoining the north wall. He gives a drawing of the cross, which I am 
sorry I could not copy. The cross is the whole length of the lid, the shaft springing 
from a pedestal with three steps and finishing with the ends enclosed in a circle. I 
very strongly suspect that this was the lid of the coffin of Sir John de Whelnetham, 
who we know was buried here in or near 1342. I cannot see it anywhere now. 



A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 457 

Davy says that in a window on the north side are the arms, which he describes, 
of Brokesborne and Rainsford. I think Davy sometimes writes north when he 
means south, and I think he has done so here, as there is no window on the north 
side except the small clerestory windows, nor could be ; and perhaps he also did so 
when describing the two small openings on either side of the old chancel arch. 
These arms are now in a window over the sedilia in the chancel. 

At the west end is a small window, which may be the top of an earlier window 
cut short when the gallery was erected. The gallery was removed in the time of the 
Rev. J. J. Badeley. 

The roof of the nave is very plain, but seems to follow the lines of a roof of the 
decorated style. 

The north doorway has been built up. Its character and date from the inside 
do not correspond with that from the outside. Inside, a very depressed arch seems 
to show late perpendicular work. Outside, it seems to be much earlier, decorated. 
And so also with the south door. 

The font is an octagon, the panels on six sides being adorned with a rose, and 
on two sides with a blank shield. The font cover is Jacobean. The pulpit, which 
stands quite low, has the appearance of being made up in Wardour Street. The 
panels seem to be of different dates and styles. One, apparently of the first half of 
the sixteenth century, has on it what looks like the king in a pack of playing cards, 
and the king is ot the Henry VIII type. Other panels look to be of a later date, but 
not what is called Jacobean. In the modern vestry is a small Jacobean communion 
table. 

Coming outside we see a small south porch, which shows no sign of having been 
put up before the eighteenth century. The stone built into its east side I have 
already noted. 

At the west end is a small wooden turret which holds a bell. An inscription on 
a board in the vestry says : — 

1749. This belfry zvas erected at the expence of James Merest. 

I have not been up to it, but take the inscription on the bell from Dr. Raven's 
Church Bells of Suffolk : — H. P. made 1695. R- ^- churchwarden. H. P. is Henry 
Pleasant of Sudbury. R. G. is Sir Richard Gipps. 

GG 



458 A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 

Till 1842 when the present school was erected, the school was held in a lean-to 
room on the north side of the chancel, where it has left its mark. 

On the south side, at the east end of the wall of the nave, is carved a represen- 
tation of a flying serpent. One wonders whether this has any special meaning or 
local allusion. 

I said at p. 325 that if, when we got to the church, we found anything there of 
the date 1300 — 1350, we could put it down to Sir John de Whelnetham. Well, we 
have found some work of the decorated style of architecture which will about suit 
his date. A good deal of the work in the nave belongs to his time. The early 
English work in the chancel might have been done by the first Sir John. What 
they did with William Manning's money which he left in 1503 "to thatt thyng that 
is most necessary to be dooti in the chyrche of tnoche Whelnetham,^'' I cannot say. 
(P. 246.) 

I have now alluded to everything I can think of. I must acknowledge the 
great help I have received in going round the church from the present rector, Rev. 
E. H. Sankey. Davy's notes are of value as showing that there was till lately some- 
thing left of the Norman church ; and they have enabled us to say whence that 
stone in the porch came. I have not mentioned the memorials of the dead, as 
they will all be found at p. 164. But there was one ui the chancel. No. 5, whose 
inscription I could not then give, as the organ completely hid it. I had not then 
seen Davy's notes. In his time the organ was well out of the way in the west gallery, 
and I now find that he gives the inscription on that stone. So here it is : — 

Under this stone are deposited the remains of Robert Preckle, 
one of the burgesses of Bury St. Edmunds. Respected for his 
courtesy to those who were intimately acquainted with him. Beloved 
and dyed lamented August 6, 1771, aged 58 years. 

I know nothing about this Robert Preckle, nor why he came here for burial. 

Besides the Davy church notes in the British Museum there are at Hardwick 
Tom Martin's and the CuUum church notes. Mr. Gery CuUum has kindly allowed 
me to examme these, but they are mainly occupied with heraldic matters. Both 
describe the arms of de Whelnetham, Brooksbourn and Raynsforth, as painted in the 
church windows. Sir John CuUum gives the Bures shield from the south window of 
the chancel, to which last the Rev. F. H. Barnwell has added this note : — This 
window removed to Hengrave hall. F. H. B, Sir John also mentions in the east 



A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 459 

window several birds holding labels in their bills with Jesu help, Jesu pity, Jesu 
mercy, etc. These are now in the south chancel window. 

In the will of John Pery (p. 239) he leaves a cow to the reparation of the liber 
sacramentoriim of the church of St. Mary of Whelnetham. The Rev. F. E. Warren 
tells me that properly a liber sacramentorum was a missal of a date between a.d. 500 
and 1000 containing only the priest's part of what was said at mass; but that the 
term used loosely might mean any sort of office book. So we cant say exactly what 
this book was which needed a cow for its reparation. 

Leaving the church and walking on about 300 yards due west we come to 
COBDOES, COPTOES or COPDOES, but not Copdock as I have sometimes seen 
it written. Copdock is the name of a village in East Suffolk which has nothing to 
do with Copdoes. A great part of this old house, including the bit that overhangs, 
was pulled down in the summer of 1909. Luckily a photograph of it had been taken 
by Mr. Fred Watson of Bury St. Edmunds about twelve years ago ; and Mr. Ernest 
Upson of Sicklesmere was good enough to lend me his copy for Mr. Watson to 
reproduce, from which reproduction my illustration has been made. 

At p. 284 I have printed a fine, whereby William Copto and Agnes his wife sell 
to some feoffees or trustees two messuages and nearly 350 acres in all, lying in the 
two Whelnethams, Bradfield Combust, Stanningfield, Nowton and Hawstead. This 
was in July 1413, two years before the battle of Agincourt. The price paid was 100 
marks of silver, which amounts to ^^66 .. 13 .. 4. Feoffees are a great nuisance, 
because they prevent your seeing who is the real buyer for whom they are acting. 
But as one of these feoffees is Robert Gildesburgh, and as his heirs are mentioned 
and not the heirs of any of the other feoffees, I imagine he may have been the buyer. 
At p. 408 we see him presenting several times to the rectory of Litde Whelnetham 
as the assign of the lord of that manor, but I know nothing more about him. 
Amongst the other feoffees there were three clerks, one of whom was the rector of 
Great Whelnetham. 

At p. 242 I have printed the will of John Copto, who might be the son or 
grandson of William and Agnes. The date is November, 1469. He is living at 
High Easter in Essex, and there before long he is going to die and be buried. He 
leaves Johanna his wife an annuity of 12 marks {£,Z) from his messuages and lands 
in the two Whelnethams and other places just named. As they had been sold fifty 



460 A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 

years before, I dont understand how he could do that. But apparently he found 
some way of eating his cake and still having it. Or perhaps Robert de Gildesburgh 
was only mortgagee. I will leave that for a lawyer to explain. 

Enough has been said to show that the above illustration represents a messuage 
called Coptoes or Cobdoes from the family of Coptoe who once owned it, and that 
that family ceased to live there at about the time of the battle of Agincourt, all but 
five hundred years ago, and that probably soon after that they ceased for ever to have 
anything to do with it. And yet all through those five hundred years, during which 
no one has ever seen a Coptoe walking about Whelnetham, their name has clung to 
the old messuage, and still clings to it, so that if you ask any little child, however 
small. Where is Coptoes ? it will be able to tell you. 

I wish someone would explain why it is that in the case of one messuage or field 
the name of an early owner clings to it unchanged through successive generations ; 
he has given his name to it and nothing seems able to take it away ; while in the 
case of another messuage its name changes with each successive owner. I know a 
gate called Hamond's gate, because a family named Hamond once occupied the 
cottage that had to open it. No Hamond opens that gate now, no Hamond has 
opened that gate for seventy years, and yet it is still Hamond's gate. I know a 
cottage called Mordeboice cottage. No Mordeboice lives there now, no Mordeboice 
has lived there for more than three hundred and fifty years, and yet it is still 
Mordeboice cottage. Mordeboice was a blacksmith, and so were the Summerses 
who followed, and the Prykes who came after. And yet no one calls it Summers' or 
Prykes, but Mordeboice. Why is it sometimes so and sometimes not so ? 

Leaving this difficult question unanswered we must move on to see who are the 
succeeding owners of Coptoes. I suppose on the strength of the fine just alluded to 
we must say that Robert de Gildesburgh succeeded the Coptoes two years before 
Agincourt, 1413. I dont see it again till about 1560, when it is in the possession of 
Sir William Drury of Hawstead. This Sir William, who was in possession of 
Hawstead Place from 1557 to 1590, had probably inherited Coptoes from his grand- 
father. Sir William. (See pedigree at p. 358.) At any rate he had it and split it 
and sold it in two pieces. About 70 acres of wood, pasture and meadow he sold to 
his uncle Henry Drury of Lawshall. This is shown by the inquisition held after 
the death of Henry Drury in 1587, which I have printed at p. 298. The house and 
the rest of the lands were sold to Thomas Macro, who lived in it. This is shown by 



A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 461 

his willjwhich I have printed at p. 256. As the Macros both own it and live in it 
we must look to see who they are. 

MACRO FAMILY. In "Suffolk in 1327" there is no one of the name of 
Macro. If there was then anyone in Suffolk bearing the name, he was so small that 
the tax collector like an aviator passed over his head. In "Suffolk in 1524," the 
tax collector comes down lower, and hardly anyone is too small to escape him ; the 
meshes of his sieve are very fine and very few are able to pass through and escape. 
There the name will be found at Cockfield, Lawshall, Hawstead, Little Horringer, 
Risby and Little Saxham, all making their small contributions to the needs of Henry 
VIII, and all in our neighbourhood. The spelling is Makerow and MakeroUe. In 
" Suffolk in 1568," where the sieve is coarser again, where the aviator flies higher, and 
the subsidy does not reach so many as it did in 1524, there are only two, viz. Thomas 
Macrowe at Great Whelnetham and John Macrowe at Hawstead. I will leave John 
Macrow for the historian of Hawstead, and will proceed myself to tackle Thomas. 
Probably these were near akin. 

RALPH MACRO. The first Macro that I can see in Whelnetham is Ralph. 
At p. 212 — 214 we see him paying his share of the king's tax in 1523, 1542 lai 
1546. He is a small man but he steadily gets bigger. In 1523 his moveable goods 
were valued at ;^i : 6 : 8, in 1542 at £i, in 1546 at £(i. He died in August 
1568. His grand children were just then coming into the world, and as he had 
paid the king's tax in 1523, he could not have been much under 70 years of age, 
and may have been much over it. I assume that the Ralph of the three subsidies and 
the Ralph who died in 1568 are one and the same man, though it is possible that 
the Ralph of 1523 is the father. I have printed his will at p. 251, wherein he is 
described as yeoman. From it we learn the names of his two sons, viz. Thomas, 
whose wife's name was Ellen, and William. But the addition of a single letter to 
one word in the will would convert William from a son to a grandson, and I feel 
pretty sure that that letter ought to be added. So I shall call Thomas his only son. 

THOMAS MACRO. Eldest and probably only son of Ralph. As he, and 
not his father, paid the king's tax in 1566, I presume that Ralph had handed over 
the estate to him before his death. Apparently he loved sport, and was a sort of 
M.F.H. At a court held for the lord of the manor of Great Whelnetham on Nov. 
9, 1568, the jury said that Thomas Macro had the custody of the hounds (venaticos 
canes) within the manor, and that he hunted with them contrary to the statute and 



462 A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 

to the prejudice of the lady of the manor. Therefore he was to be fined. (Extracts 
from Court rolls in Davy MSS.) The manor at this time was in a confused state 
of ownership. The actual owner was Wenefrid Raynsford, who was a lunatic. But 
George Howard as her custodian, and Elizabeth, widow of Sir William Drury, also 
had something to do with it. 

Somewhere about this time Thomas Macro bought Cobdoes from the second 
Sir William Drury of Hawstead. If I do not misunderstand his will (p. 256) and 
the post mortem inquisition of Henry Drury (p. 298), Henry Drury bought 70 acres 
belonging to Cobdoes, and Thomas Macro bought the house and the rest of the 
land. I imagine that Thomas Macro did not now first move into it, but that he 
and his father had been occupying it, and that he now bought his. holding. 

I have nothing more to say of this sportsman and flourishing yeoman. Ellen, 
his wife, was buried in November 1597. He himself lived on till October 1623. 
As It was sixty-one years since his eldest son was born, and fifty seven years since he 
had paid a tax, he must have been well over 80 years of age. We shall see presently 
that this tenacity of life, which he had inherited from his father, was handed down 
to several generations of his family. 

By Ellen his wife he had these seven children : — 

1. William. Baptized here in April 1562. He died before his father, and 
was buried here in April, 1614, at the age of 52 years. His will is printed at p. 255. 
He is there described as a yeoman, but I strongly suspect him to have been bred 
for a lawyer or some such profession. The sword and the gold ring look as if they 
were meant for swagger in a town rather than for use in the pastures of Whelnetham ; 
and "the Dixionary and president book" (see p. 256n.) belong to the lawyer rather 
than to the yeoman. There is no mention in his vvill of wife or child. He mentions 
the charges to which he had put his father. This may refer to the superior 
education he had received to qualify him for his profession, or he may have been 
incapacitated by illness and came from town to his father's house to die. 

2. Thomas. Baptized in Oct. 1564. Buried May 157 1. 

3. Ralph. Baptized in Nov. 1567. Married Margaret Smyth in Sept. 1592. 
Had a son Ralph baptized in Feb. 1594-5, and two daughters, Suzan and Ann. He 
died just before his father, and was buried here in Aug. 1623. His daughter Ann 
had just been married to William Cpppin. 



A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 463 

4. Edward. Baptized in Sept. 1572. He succeeded his father at Coptoes j 
he paid ship money and other taxes in 1625, 1640, 1642, but I can see no more of 
him. There is a gap in the registers between 1640 and 1660, and I suppose he lies 
in that gap, 

5. Thomas. Baptized here August 1575. See below. 

6. Suzan. Baptized here in Oct. 1578. She married Thomas Clarke of 
Pakenham in April 1601. The first-born child, Suzan, was brought according to 
a common custom to the mother's home for baptism. Two other children, Thomas 
and Elizabeth Clarke, are mentioned in their grandfather's will. 

7. Anthony. Baptized in Oct. 1581. In Jan. 1625-6 John, son of Anthony 
Makro, is baptized at Little Whelnetham, which I suppose is his son. That is all I 
can see of him. 

Of all these six sons Thomas is the only one who clearly hands down the family 
name, success and longevity to a few succeeding generations. But before glancing at 
him and them I may mention that in "Suffolk in 1674" I find six several Macros 
living in six several houses at Glemsford, but all so poor that they received a 
certificate of poverty which exempted them from paying the tax on their one single 
hearth. Their names are Antony, Edward, George, John, Thomas and Widow. I 
cant help suspecting these to be representatives of one of the sons of Thomas, the 
well-to-do yeoman of Cobdoes. Possibly they were sons of Anthony or of Edward. 
Besides these I find in the same volume William Macro paying for two hearths at 
Great Saxham, and Widow Macro paying for four hearths at Thurston. 

THOMAS MACRO. Fifth son of Thomas Macro of Copdoes. Baptized here 
in Aug. 1575. In Feb. 16 14-5 he was married here to Suzan Brydon, who I think 
was a young lady of Bury St. Edmunds. He was a maltster of Bury St. Edmunds. 
He was buried there, at St. James', on July i, 1620, and Suzan his widow on June 
28, 1628. I have not seen the St. James' register for these two entries, but I take 
them from a paper on Cupola House by Mr. Samuel Tymms, printed in Suff. Arch. 
Inst. Proc, III, 375. The paper was printed in 1863. Mr. Tymms, writing on the 
Macros of Bury, worked backwards as far as he could go. He got back as far as the 
death of this Thomas the maltster in 1620, but there he stuck and could not get any 
backwarder. He could not say who he was or whence he came. " From what part 
of the country he came is equally uncertain," writes Mr. Tymms. I on the other 



464 A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 

hand, writing on the Macros of Whelnetham, worked forwards and got as far as the 
marriage of this Thomas, and there, but for Mr. Tymms, I should have stuck and 
been unable to go any forwarder. I walking forwards from Henry VHI and 
Whelnetham, Mr. Tymms walking backwards from Queen Anne and Bury, here at 
this Thomas in the reign of James I we met. Had I been before Mr. Tymms he 
would have got the benefit of me ; but as he was before me I get the benefit of him. 
I can take the entry of burial which he found at Bury and add it to the entries of 
baptism and marriage which I had found at Whelnetham, and so between us we get 
the whole man complete, baptism, marriage, profession and burial. What more can 
anybody want ? 

THOMAS MACRO. Born in 1615. Son of Thomas Macro the maltster. Fie 
carried on the business of an apothecary at the house in the Butter Market now 
known as Cupola house. He prospered greatly and was chief alderman of Bury 
in 1669 and 1682. His tombstone in St. James' church tells us that he died on 
Sept. 27, 1 701, aged 86 years. 

THOMAS MACRO. Born in 1649. Son of Thomas Macro the apothecary. 
He carried on the business of a grocer, and apparently druggist also, at Cupola 
house. He probably, says Mr. Tymms, built or fitted up the house as it now is. He 
prospered greatly in his business, was chief alderman of Bury in 1690 and 1699, and 
for a country house bought Little Haugh in the parish of Norton. This is he who 
has been mentioned at p. 433 as being one of the sureties for John Hervey's keeping 
the peace. He married Suzan, daughter of Rev. John Cox, rector of Risby. His 
tombstone in St. James' church tells us that he died May 20, 1737, aged 88. 

We have now got a long way from Whelnetham, and must go no further. I will 
only say that the only three sons of this last Thomas that I know of were all 
prosperous clergymen, who did well to themselves and got preferment. The second 
of them. Cox Macro, was a chaplain to George II, made a valuable collection of 
paintings, coins, books and manuscripts, decorated the house at Little Haugh with 
paintings by a Dutch artist, and died there in Feb. 1767, aged 84. (See Sufif. Arch. 
Inst. II, 279, III, 375. Bury Grammar School List.) 

I put here the Macros of Whelnetham and Bury into a pedigree, from the yeoman 
of Cobdoes, whose goods were valued at twenty six shillings, to the doctor of divinity, 
whose houses, books, manuscripts and coins were worth many thousands of pounds. 



A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 



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466 A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 

From these short notices of six successive generations, represented by Ralph, 
Thomas the yeoman, Thomas the mahster, Thomas the apothecary, Thomas the 
grocer, Cox, the first three being natives of Whelnetham, the last three of Bury, it 
will be seen that certain gifts were handed down from first to last. They had 
tenacity of life which made them live long, and tenacity of purpose which made 
them do well to themselves. They did well in country and in town. They 
prospered in farming and they prospered in trading. What the meadow began the 
counter carried on. And when they had made money, they neither hoarded it like 
soulless misers, nor squandered it like brainless spendthrifts. They lived long 
and saw good days. Of the six, the first was a septuagenarian, and I dont know 
how much more ; the third died under 50 years of age, but the other four were all 
octogenarians. They have all gone now and their name with them. The Denham 
volume of this series shows a good many of the name in that parish between 1750 
and 1850, but I do not know that they were of the same family. 

And now to go back to Coptoes. Edward Macro, elder brother of Thomas 
the maltster who migrated to Bury, was there in 1642, but at some time between 
then and 1670 he and his name completely disappear from it. Whether the civil 
war had anything to do with this disappearance I cannot say ; or perhaps they were 
of that nature that they could not do well to themselves ; nor can I say what family 
succeeded them there. The house must be in the hearth tax lists for 1670 and 
1674, but I cannot say which it is. 

Jumping over about a hundred years, I find it in the possession of Sarah 
"Wake. She died here in July 1818 aged 65. From her it passed by inheritance 
to the Upson family, Mr. Upson being her nephew. James Upson was buried here 
in Feb. 1784 aged 45 : his wife had died in Jan. 1783 aged 42 years, fheir son, 
James Upson, was, I presume, the nephew who inherited Copdoes. He married 
Charlotte Wright in Dec. 1823, and died in Sept. 1844 aged 68 years. His son, 
Henry James Wake Upson, was baptized in Oct. 1826, and died in May 1883, 
whose son, Ernest Upson, now living at Sicklesmere, lent me the photograph from 
which my view of the house has been reproduced. Towards the end of the nine- 
teenth century the Upsons sold it to Mr. Meakin, formerly of Bury St. Edmunds, 
now of Romford. He sold it to Mr. Richard Cropley of Little Whelnetham, the 
present owner. Now we have done Copdoes and move on. 

NETHER HALL. Another 300 yards, still going westward, will bring us to 
Nether Hall. Of this I should like to be able to say something, but cannot. I 



A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 467 



think it may represent one of the very early messuages, Walshams or Carbonells, but 
I cannot say for certain. 

In the Hearth tax h'sts at p. 224—226 it will be seen that John Gipps, father of 
Sir Richard, has two good-sized houses; the one with 10 or 11 hearths, which he 
occupied himself, must have been the hall, which we shall reach presently ; the other 
had 9 hearths. I dont at all know where this other house was, but possibly it was 
this Nether hall that we have now come to. The hearth tax was paid by occupiers, 
not by owners, so we see that in 1664 that other house was occupied by Charles 
Beauly. Of him I know nothing and he only made a short stay here. In 1670 it 
was empty, and so John Gipps had to pay the tax himself. In 1674 it was occupied 
by Mr. Bridgman. This I take to be William Bridgman who had four children 
baptized between 1671 and 1675, and who I suppose is the steward Bridgman buried 
in May 1679. I suppose he was John Gipps' steward. As John Gipps did not die 
till 1707, and as his son, Sir Richard, seems to have been living here for many years 
before that, possibly one of them occupied this second house, which may have been 
Nether hall. 

It now belongs to Colonel Oakes of Nowton Court, having been bought (I think) 
by his grandfather, Mr. Henry James Oakes, who died in 1875. I think that the 
previous owners were the Metcalfes of Hawstead. It was occupied by several 
successive generations of the Bird family, the last of whom, John Bird, was there till 
1870. To him succeeded Cornelius Denny, who died in August 1890 aged 67 
years. His widow is living there now. 

AN OLD SITE. Leaving Nether hall we get back into the way, part lane, part 
drift, which has led from the school, past the church to Coptoes, and which will lead 
on till it joins the hard road just before that road comes upon Hawstead green. 
Long may this drift continue ! But I see signs of an intention to break it up. If 
this is legal one can say nothing. If not legal it ought not to be allowed. 

After getting back into the drift we follow it a little distance towards Hawstead 
till we come to a narrow overgrown drift turning out of it on the right hand side. 
We follow this other drift for about two hundred yards and we come to a desolate 
waste space, where a few bushes and flowers and fruit trees (without fruit) show that 
there once was a garden. Here stood a very old house, in which James Clarke died 
in 1874 aged 71 years, and then it was pulled down. I have a strong suspicion that 
this represents one of the mediaeval messuages, either Walshams or Carbonells. 



468 A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 

Alexander de Walsham will be found in the list for 1327, and the Carbonells we have 
met with in the annals of Sir John de Whelnetham. This farm is now merged in 
that of Nether hall, and is the property of Col. Oakes. I think that it also had 
previously belonged to the Metcalfes of Hawstead. 

BROOKE or BROCKS GREEN. Leaving the melancholy site of the 
departed house, with its flowers and shrubs running wild which once were the objects 
of care, we get back into the original drift, and follow it till it comes into the hard 
road a few hundred yards from Hawstead green. Here is Brocks green or Brooke 
green. Of course the green is gone and only the name remains. I dont know 
whether it is called from the brock or badger or from the brook which here runs 
across the road. In the will of John King, 1569, it is called brocks green. See 
p. 252. 

BELL'S HILL. We have now done with the drift, and we follow the hard 
road, not towards Hawstead green but in the opposite direction, back towards 
Whelnetham. It climbs a hill. Bell's hill, and by the road side near the top stands 
what has been a sm.all farm house, apparently built early in the eighteenth century. 
Probably it takes its name from Thomas Bell, who was bringing his children to the 
font from 1707 to 17 17, and who was buried here in 1740. He may have been the 
first occupier of it. 

GREAT WHELNETHAM RECTORY. Coming on and turning to the left 
at the top of the hill, instead of to the right which would take us to Stanningfield, we 
arrive at the rectory, standing well off the road in the middle of its own grounds. I 
have nothing to say of the house, and have already given a chapter to its successive 
occupiers. There is no reason to suppose but that it occupies what has been the 
site of the rectory from time immemorial. But various additions and alterations 
make it difficult to give it any dates. It must speak for itself. A few hundred yards 
from it, at the boundary of the glebe lands, is what is called in the Tithe commutation 
terrier, the grove and moat, 2 acres, 30 perch. Locally this is called the gazebo. 
I imagine that it may have been laid out in the eighteenth century, when they made 
foolish things of that sort. Mr. Lord was a well-to-do man. Perhaps he made it. 
The rectory is plentifully supplied with moat-like fish ponds, some of which may be 
mediaeval. 

I must not omit to say that in Tom Martin's manuscript notes at Hardwick he 
says that in ye Parsonage tfi the hall window is a shield which he proceeds to 




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A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 469 

describe, being the arms of Raynsford impaling Brokesborn. This is not there now. 
Tom Martin saw it there on Feb. 3, 1696-7. 

GREAT WHELNETIIAM HALL. From the rectory we go across the road 
and soon reach the hall. I have shown in Chapter I who were the owners of it while 
manor and hall went together, and in Chapter IV who were the owners of it after 
that it had been separated from the manor. There does not remain much more to 
be said about it. The house is surrounded on all four sides by a fine moat crossed 
by a bridge. It is a lath and plaster building with no great pretensions, and I do not 
know that there is anything earlier than the time of John Sache who acquired it 
about 1620. The entrance on the south side seems to have led into a long low hall, 
which is now partitioned off into three rooms. Perhaps here Sir Richard Gipps had 
his library and hung the two portraits that I have mentioned at p. 437. The hearth 
tax lists for 1664, 1670, 1674 show that it had eleven, afterwards ten, hearths. I 
will give the list of its occupiers since its owners ceased to occupy it. 

William Church, as already said, bought it in 1780, lived there and sold it again 
in 1792. He seems to have gone to Bury St. Edmunds, as a stone in the churchyard 
there records his death on Feb. 14, 1799, aged 64 years, and that of Kezia his wife 
on Dec. 19, 1822, aged 79 years. 

The next owner was John Le Grice of Bury St. Edmunds, solicitor, whose family 
still own it. In November 1792 it was leased for 9 years to Samuel Fenton, which 
lease was renewed from time to time. Samuel Fenton was the first of his name and 
family to come here, but a little later on several of the farms in the parish were 
occupied by one or another of them, whose tombstones will be found in the church- 
yard. I believe they came from Chevington. Samuel Fenton married Lucy Beales, 
and his children Alfred, Elizabeth and Frederick were baptized here from 1793 to 
1800. The elder ones were born before he came here. One of these was Lucy, 
who married Samuel Snape at the Manor Farm. Samuel Fenton died in September 
1827 aged 73. 

John Fenton, son of Samuel, succeeded his father at the Hall farm. He had 
one child baptized here, John Ellis Fenton, in Feb. 1830. He died in Oct. 1857 
aged 68. 

John Ellis Fenton, son of John Fenton, was only here for a very short time. 

George Creed, son of John Stevens Creed of Bury St. Edmunds, followed the 
Fentons and was here from 1858 to 1866. He was for forty-four years surgeon to the 



470 A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 

West Suffolk Militia. He died at Bury in Nov. 1868 aged 69, and was brought here 
for burial. His tombstone is at p. 181. It was he who put up the verandah on the 
south side, which one would like to see taken away again. 

Harry Thompson, son of John Thompson of Bury St. Edmunds, china merchant, 
was here from 1866 to 1881. He is now farming at Barton Mills. 

Arthur Symonds came next and was here from 1881 till his death in June 1901. 
His widow is now living here. 

Leaving the hall farm and going southwards across a field or two we come upon 
a hard road which has turned out of the Bury and Sudbury road, has climbed the 
hill, and having passed through Cock's green reaches Skipper's farm, beyond which 
it does not go. 

SKIPPER'S FARM. This stands on the edge of the parish looking towards 
Lawshall. That accounts for the fact of its being a part of the Lawshall and Liver- 
mere estate. In 1798 Nathaniel Lee Acton owned it, from whom it passed by 
inheritance to Sir William Middleton, and now belongs to Lord de Saumarez in 
right of his wife. It does not look to me to represent a mediaeval messuage, but 
rather to be a farm that had its beginning in the eighteenth century. And as there 
were Skippers in the parish towards the end of that century, perhaps it was they 
who first occupied it, and so it got their name. The court rolls of Great Whelnetham 
manor in 1686 mentions a Skipper's close of 3 acres in Bradfield Combust, whose 
east head abutted on the road leading from Whelnetham to Bury. 

In 1798 and for some years afterwards the Reeman family occupied this farm. 
John Reeman, who occupied it in 1798, died in 1825 aged 79. William Reeman, 
who was occupying it in 1836, died at Lawshall in 1849 ^ged 72. 

OXLEY, OX WELL or OX ALL WOOD. Following a footpath that leads 
from Skipper's farm towards Bradfield Combust we come to the site of Oxley or 
Oxwell wood, where the two trees were cut down for a maypole, as told at p. 432. 
This wood was in the parish of Great Whelnetham, though part of the farm at 
Bradfield Combust. This farm, whose house adjoins the south side of Bradfield 
churchyard, was I believe sold by Lord Bristol in 1827, John Green being then the 
tenant. I believe it was bought by Mr Carss who was then occupying Little 
Whelnetham hall, who afterwards sold it to Rev. H. J. Hasted, rector of Little 
Whelnetham and Bradfield Combust. He about 1850 sold it to Mr. Arthur Young 



A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 471 

of Bradfield Combust hall, who stubbed up the wood. That estate is now owned by 
Rev. C. S. Johnston. 

PARTRIDGE, PATTERICH or PATRICK FAMILY. Not very far from 
Oxley wood was the humble abode of a branch of this family with its variously-spelt 
name. We cant go to the door, because I do not think the house is standing, unless 
it is represented by Skipper's farm. But I may set down a few notes on them. 

1. In 1523 William Partridge paid tax on the labour of his hands, because he 
had nothing else or nothing greater on which to pay, which labour was valued at ^\ 
a year. In 1526 he witnesses the will of William Goddard and receives a legacy of a 
cow and a calf. (P. 247.) 

2. In 1566 and 1580 William Partridge, I presume a son of the preceding 
William, paid tax on the value of his moveable goods, which were valued at ^^3. 
His wife's name was Margaret. In December 1586 he was buried here. His will 
was proved at Bury St. Edmunds, and an abstract of it has been printed in Mr. 
Muskett's Suffolk Manorial Families, II, 397. He left 3s. .. 4d. to the poor of Great 
Whelnetham. Apparently he had no children. He is described as the elder and 
husbajidman. 

3. Shortly before 1580 John Partridge, a native of Bradfield St. Clare, settles 
down in Great Whelnetham. He is mentioned in the will of William (note 2), but 
it is not clear what the relationship was between them. Possibly brother, perhaps 
nephew. (Perhaps is a slightly stronger word than possibly.) This John buried an 
infant son, Edward, in 1578, and between 1579 and 1603 he had ten more children 
by his two wives baptized here. Their names were Prudence, John, Dorothy, 
Elizabeth, Thomas, Robert, Henry, Suzan, Bridget, Thomasin. The marriages of 
Prudence, Suzan and Thomasin will be found in these registers. Of the sons, Robert 
and John stayed at Whelnetham, Thomas went to Hawstead and Henry to 
Livermere. 

John, the father of these ten children, was buried here in August 1624. His 
will was proved at Bury, and an abstract of it has been printed in Mr. Muskett's 
S.M.F., II, 399. He gave the house wherein he dwelt and the yard belonging to it 
to Thomasin his wife for her life, and after her death to Robert his son, who in 
course of time was to pay 40 shillings a piece to John, Thomas, Henry, Prudence, 
Dorothy, Bridget, Suzan and Thomasin, his (testator's) children. 



472 A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 

4. Robert was the third son of the above-mentioned John (note 3), though his 
father's will seems to have turned him into an eldest son. Baptized here in 1591 he 
is among the tax payers of 1640 and 1642. Owing to the registers being defective 
at the time of his death there is no entry of his burial; but his will is at Somerset 
House, proved in December 1659. He is described as of Great Wheltham, yeoman. 
I believe he left no children. 

5. John, eldest brother of the above Robert, was baptized here in 1582. I 
suppose he is the father of Suzan 1620, John 1623, and Rachel 1627, and I suppose 
it is he who was buried in June 1627. But it is possible that the three children 
belong to John of note 7, and that the John baptized in 1623 is the John of Note 8. 

Now we go to another branch living in Great Whelnetham at the same time. 
What the connection is between the two is not clear. 

6. In August 1626 William Partridge was buried here leaving an only son 
John. Whose son this William was is not clear. He must be the William whose 
existence made the William of note 2 to be called senior. 

7. John, the only son of the above William (note 6), succeeded his father and 
was admitted into the manor of Great Whelnetham at a Court Baron held Oct. 17, 
in the 3rd year of Charles I (1627). He is among the tax payers of 1639 and 1642. 
The registers being defective one cannot see exactly when he was buried, but this 
extract from the court rolls of Great Whelnetham manor shows him handing over his 
estate to his son John in 1649, when probably his end was not far off. 

I May, 1649. Court Baron. Robert Malty ward steward. At 
this court John Paterick cus. ten. rendered up one cottage and 3-J acres, 
parcel of two pieces of meadow plotts, (one abutting on Whelnetham 
moor and the other on a pightle called Death's heath and partly on the 
lord's demesne land,) and also the pightle called Death's heath 4^ acres 
next the manor wood called Oxwell on the east. These premises and 
cottage John lately had and took to him and his heirs on the death of 
his father William Paterick, as only son and next heir of said William, 
at the court held 17 Oct. in 3 year of Charles i [1627], to the use of 
him, said John, for his life, and after his death to the use of his eldest 
son John and that son's wife Elizabeth, and after the death of the 
survivor of them to the use of the right heirs of John Paterick the son. 
Whereupon they [John and Elizabeth] did fealty and were admitted 
tenants. 



I 



A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 473 

This extract is among the papers of the Rev. William Symonds, to whom I am 
indebted for it. 

8. John, the son of the above John (note 7), succeeded on the resignation of 
his father in 1649. The above extract shows that his wife's name was Elizabeth, and 
the registers show three children baptized, viz. Margaret in 1643, John in 1645, 
Elizabeth in 1647. I presume it is he who paid hearth tax for two hearths in 1664 
1670, 1674, and who was buried here in November 1682. 

9. A full moon always jumps up in the east at the exact moment when the 
sun has gone down in the west. So at the moment when the last-mentioned John 
disappears in the register of burials, up jumps Geoffry Partridge bringing children 
into the register of baptisms. I imagine that he has come to fill the empty house. 
He may be a son of that John, whose baptism does not appear in consequence of 
the defective state of the registers at the time (c. 1650) when he would have been 
baptized. This Geoffry brings children to be baptized from 1683 to 1700. Their 
names are Suzan, Geoffry, Abigail, George and Francis. He is buried here in 
January 1705, his widow followed him in 1728, and then the Partridges of Great 
Whelnetham are all gone. Their stay had lasted two hundred years and I know not 
how much more, as the William of 1523 may have had predecessors here. During 
all that time they made no permanent advance in worldly estate, but rather went 
back. I am inclined to think that their house (or one of them) may have been on 
the site of Skipper's farm ; and if that site then, as now, belonged to the Livermere 
estate, that would account for one or two younger Partridges settling at Livermere. 

This is an unsatisfactory account of them in spite of the assistance received 
from Mr. Muskett's S. M. F. and from information given me by Mr. Charles 
Partridge jun. 

CRASKE'S COTTAGE. Coming along the road from Skipper's farm we come 
presently to a large old thatched cottage, now uninhabited and on its very last legs. 
There are deeds relating to it from 1732 onwards. In 1814 it belonged to Edmund 
Craske, but he was just mortgaging it and then losing it. I suppose this is he who 
in 1815 married Suzan Race and who died in 1820 aged 45 years. Whether he was 
a descendant of the Edmund Craske who married a daughter of Rev. John Giles 
Gipps I dont know. (See p. 440.) It is now part of the Le Grice estate. 

COCK'S GREEN. We are now at Cock's green. The green is now repre- 
sented by the grass margin to the road, as the illustration shows. But I suppose it 

HH 



474 A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 

has been larger and has gone the way of other greens. It must have got its name 
from some member of the Cock family. There was an Adam Cok among the tax 
payers of 1327. After a long interval we see a John Cock among those of 1582, who 
was buried in 1594. Between 1610 and 1622 there was a William Cock who had 
had seven children baptized here, viz. George, William, Thomas, John, James, 
Elizabeth and Faith. William Cooke in my list of tax payers in 1620 must I think 
be a misreading, and must be this William Cocke. Then comes an interval during 
the civil war and commonwealth, in which there seem to have been none of them 
here. Then after the restoration of Charles II in 1660 they reappear. They are 
then living on this same road half way down the hill at what is now called Copy 
farm, which we shall reach presently. Whether Cocks green got its name from those 
before that interval or from those after it, I cannot say. 

COCK'S GREEN FARM. This house with thatched roof (shown in the 
illustration) is about 250 yards from Craske's cottage. In 1654 it was a small 
freehold estate belonging to the Howe family. I gather from the list of tax payers 
that the Howes may have first got it between 1580 and 1620. It is very probable 
that they succeeded the Cock family, though I have no proof of it. In that case 
-Cock's green would have got its name not later than Queen Elizabeth's reign. At 
any rate the Howes had it from 1650, perhaps from before 1620, till about 1730. 
I imagine that they occupied it, and that it is the house with three hearths for which 
Widow Howe paid hearth tax in 1670 and 1674. 

About 1730, after having been mortgaged, James Sturgeon became possessed of 
it. I do not know who these Sturgeons were. They did not live in the parish. James, 
Philip and Lucy are their names as occurring in various deeds and indentures of 
mortgage relating to it from 1740 to 1780. 

In 1 78 1 it passed from Philip and Elizabeth Sturgeon to John Le Grice of Bury 
St. Edmunds, solicitor, whose descendants now own it. (Le Grice title deeds.) 

Now for the occupiers. Before James Sturgeon bought it in 1730 it had been 
occupied by its owners, the Howes. Since 1730 it has been a farm. The first 
farmers (using the word farmer in its proper sense as one who rents) were the Elys, 
who deserve a note if only on account of the patriarchal ages which they reached. 
In three successive generations there were John and three Jonathans, whose 
respective ages were 88, 80, 93, 84. These are figures and more than figures. They 
are certificates of character and testimonials of worth. Without knowing anything 




o 



A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 475 

more we instinctively read into those figures a record of sober industry and simple 
God-fearing piety. But of course it is always possible to read wrong. 

T. The first of them is Jonathan Ely, who died in March 1780 aged 88 years. 
His wife had been buried in May, 1777, aged 82 years. Where he had come from 
I cannot say, but apparently he came in after his children had been born. He seems 
to have had a son Jonathan. 

2. Then there is John, perhaps younger brother of the above Jonathan. He 
had five children baptized here from 1736 to 1749, viz. John, John, Mary, Thomas 
and Jonathan. His wife's name was Diana. (Curiously there had been a Diana, 
daughter of William Ely, baptized at Little Whelnetham in April, 1625.) Diana 
died in 1776, and John in 1786 aged 80 years. Both were buried at Little 
Whelnetham, where perhaps they had come from. 

3. Then there is another Jonathan, who probably was son of the first 
Jonathan. His wife's name was Mary, and between 1762 and 1769 he baptized 
these four children here, Betty, Newport, Rose and Anne. Anne is called in the 
register " the tenth child living," so that six more must have been born before he 
came into the parish. This Jonathan died in 18 18 aged 93, and Mary his wife in 
1803 aged 72. 

4. Newport Ely, son of the above Jonathan, was married here (i) to Mary 
Allen in 1790, who died in 1794; (2) to Elizabeth Crick in 1795. These three 
children were baptized here, viz. Newport in 1791, John in 1793, Elizabeth in 1795. 

In 18 18 the farm was leased to Jeremiah Fenton, and some of the Elys seem 
to have gone to Bury, but continued to be brought here for burial. Jonathan Ely 
of Bury was buried here in Nov. 1831 aged 84. He must have been the son of the 
second Jonathan, and apparently left the farm on the death of his father in 18 18. 
It is not quite clear whether all these four occupied this farm, but between them 
they certamly did from 1736 or earlier to 1818. Where Newport Ely went to I 
know not. 

Jeremiah Fenton had a lease of it in 18 18, I presume on the death of the nona- 
genarian Jonathan Ely. But he lived lower down the road at Copy farm. From 
about 1830 to about 1850 Robert Warren had it, in whose time there was a fire. 
He left the parish before his death. 

COPY FARM. Leaving Cocks green and following the road down the hill we 
come to this farm. The house is a most unpicturesque and unharmonious mixture 



476 A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 

of old and new. In 1670 and 1674 we find Richard Cock paying hearth tax for 
three hearths, and I think this must be the house, or at least it must represent the 
house, in which those three hearths were. This Richard Cock had no children 
baptized here, nor is there any entry of his burial nor of his wife's ; from which, 
perhaps, one may infer that he came here after his children were born and that he 
went a\vay to die. And this inference is strengthened by indentures of Feb. 1699 
between Richard Cock and Cecilia his wife and Richard son of Richard Cock on the 
one part, and John Cock and Elizabeth his wife on the other part (Le Grice title 
deeds.) I dont know what was the relationship between Richard and John, but I 
imagine that Richard now went out and John came in. 

King George I succeeded Queen Anne on Aug. i, 17 14. A certain number of 
people refused to take the oath of allegiance to him. A list of them, county by 
county, was printed in 17 15, reprinted in 1745 and again in 1862. From the 
reprint of 1862 I learn that John Cock of Great Whelnetham was one of them. The 
annual value of his estate was set down at ;^28. This must be he who had 
succeeded Richard Cock. 

I meet with him again a little later on. Letters used to be issued by the sovereign 
licensing a collection in all churches for some particular object. These were called 
briefs, and what was collected was often entered in the parish register. I have printed 
several long lists of them in some of the volumes of this series. The East Anglian 
N. & Q. has printed a list of briefs upon which collections were made in North 
Walsham church. Amongst those who had obtained a brief was John Cock of Great 
Whelnetham towards his loss of ;^309 ■. 5 .. 7 by fire. The collection was made on 
March 29, 1719, and brought in 10 shillings. I. 347. 

This plan of getting briefs is not altogether gone out. Certainly in Somerset- 
shire, when a poor man loses a horse or cow, he always goes to the clergyman and 
asks him to write him a brief, which he then carries round from house to house. I 
have been asked to write one scores of times, but always refused. However, there 
was never any difficulty in finding someone else who would. 

On November 4, 1720, was buried John Cock. This must be the nonjuror and 
the sufferer from fire, and that appears to be the end of his family as far as this parish 
is concerned. 

The ownership during the remainder of the eighteenth century I have not made 
out Mery clearly. I think before long Charles Day owned it, and was succeeded by 



A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 477 

Charles Dunham. The Dunhams owned it in 1798. After some manoeuvres which 
I cant follow John Benjafield of Bury St. Edmunds had a short innings from 1812 
to 1 81 6, and then the Le Grice family acquired it, who still have it. (Le Grice title 
deeds.) 

Since the Cocks ceased to possess it it has been occupied as a farm, and has for 
some time been known as Copy farm. Elizabeth Chandler occupied it in 1798, who 
in 1800 was married to John Gosling of Shimpling. In 1819 Messrs. MuUey had a 
lease of it for twelve years. 

In 1836, and I dont know how much earlier, Jeremiah Fenton was occupying 
it. I take it that he was a brother of the original Samuel Fenton at the Hall farm. 
In 1803 he was married to Christian Cooke of this parish, he being described as of 
Chevington, He was buried here in July, 1843, aged 61. 

MANOR FARM. Leaving Copy farm the road soon brings us into the 
turnpike road from Bury to Sudbury. Going a few yards towards Sudbury we 
come to a farm called Manor farm. This was bought in 1873 by Mr. Henry James 
Oakes from Rev. J. W. Wenn, and now belongs to Col. Oakes of Nowton Court. 
How the Wenns inherited it will be seen at p. 359, 360. The first occupier that I 
know of was Samuel Snape, who married in 1808 Lucy, daughter of Samuel Fenton 
of the hall farm, and who was buried here in June, 1832, aged 50. After him came 
Samuel Fenton, No 2. I do not know how far back this farm goes. It has not 
any appearance of antiquity about it. I imagine that it is simply called Manor farm 
because it belonged to the lord of the manor. If the Hall farm had belonged to 
the lord of the manor, then it would never have got this name. 

This farm house stands at the fork of two roads. One is the turnpike road to 
Sudbury and London, which at this spot begins to go up the hill on which St. 
Thomas' chapel and the house of Crutched friars stood. The other road goes 
round the hill, and by going round avoids it, and comes into the turnpike road 
again about a mile further on at Bradfield Combust. This other road runs along- 
side the brook mentioned at p. 448, from which it is called Water lane. Water 
lane is mentioned in the will of John Bole or Bull, 1534. See p. 249. Into Water 
lane there runs another road that has come from Rougham and Rushbrook and is 
still known as London lane. This London lane is mentioned in the will of Sir 
Robert Jermyn, 16 14. It and Water lane will together join the Bury and Sudbury 
road at Bradfield Combust. 



478 A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 

Leaving Manor farm and coming along the road towards Bury we reach the 
Eagle. This looks as modern as it can, but it has a pedigree. The Eagle is 
mentioned in a Great Whelnetham manor roll for 1765. I do not know that it stood 
where the present one does. 

Without stopping at the Eagle we come on towards Bury, and very soon see a 
gravel pit and a plantation on our left. Here Roman remains have been found. I 
leave them for the next chapter, merely tying a knot in my pocket handkerchief that 
they may not be forgotten. 

A few more yards and then we reach the spot where we had the three roads to 
choose between. We chose the right hand one, we have returned by the middle 
one, and now there only remains to follow the left hand one. It goes up the hill, 
crosses the railway, which has caused its original course to be altered, and brings us 
to 

LITTLE WHELNETHAM CHURCH. This stands high and commands a 
good view towards Bury. Ecton's Thesaurus, 1754, sets down the church as 
dedicated to St. Mary. The modern directories and clergy lists give St. Mary 
Magdalene. As I have not come across any mediaeval authority for the dedication 

1 will not set down any. But probably Ecton is right, as he lived before the time 
when the clergy began to invent dedications. 

As we know from the entry in Domesday book that there was a church here 
when that book was compiled, our first question naturally is. Is there anything still 
to be seen of that Domesday or Norman church ? The answer. Yes, comes before 
we get into the church and as soon as we have entered the churchyard ; for a little 
to the east of the east end of the present church we see a low semi-circular ruin, about 

2 feet high. This is the apse or semi-circular end of the Norman (possibly Saxon) 
church which is alluded to in Domesday book. Whether this bit was left accidentally 
or designedly when the church was taken down, and (if designedly) what was the 
design, it is difficult to say. I should imagine that there might have been some 
reason for leaving it, which a close examination of all the facts bearing upon it might 
discover. How it has continued to remain there through five or six centuries, 
during which it must have been a useless ruin encumbering the ground, seems almost 
a miracle. It would have been so easy for the sexton to put his pick into it and get 
it out of the way, and no one would have said anything if he had done so. However, 
the miracle has happened and there it is, and now, I suppose, it is safe except from 




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A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 479 

Time. Apparently the mortar is good, the weather is kind, there are no children 
playing about it, and so it does not shrink. Mr. Johnston, who was rector here thirty 
years ago, and Mr. Hasted, whose recollections of it go back seventy years, both tell 
me that it looks about the same as it did. 

One may occasionally find a Norman church with an apse at the east end, but 
one may go into ten thousand churchyards and not find a ruin of an apse left as this 
one has been. And yet I cannot find that the Suff. Arch. Institute has said anything 
about it. The only allusions to it that I have come across are in Davy's MSS and in 
a volume published by the Cambridge Camden Society. 

Davy visited the church and made his notes (now in the British Museum) on 
Aug. 27, 1829. He says : — 

" At a short distance from the chancel are the remains of a 
circular building, about one half the circle still appearing a little above 
the surface of the churchyard ; it is not exactly eastward of the 
chancel, but inclines a little to the south, an ash tree growing in it, and 
a table monument is also placed within it." 

Apparently it did not occur to Davy that it was the remains of an apse or else 
he has expressed himself badly. It was not a circular building of which half the 
circle is left, but it was a semi-circular building of which the whole semi-circle is 
left. 

A volume entitled, A few hi?iis on the practical study of ecclesiastical architecture, 
was published for the Cambridge Camden Society, 4th ed. in 1843. It says that the 
early Basilican arrangement is confirmed by the fact of several Saxon churches 
having had semi-circular apses, as the ruined church called the Minster near Bungay, 
Worth in Sussex, Brixvvorth, " and the very remarkable remains still visible to the 
east of Little Whelnetham church." P. 5. This book was published at a time when 
things were called Saxon which would not be called Saxon now. 

This ruined apse tells us that the Norman church was wholly pulled down or 
tumbled down, and that a new church was built nearly, but not exactly, on its site. 
The illustration facing this page shows that the old apse was not quite in a line with 
the present church, so that the whole of the old church must have been pulled down 
(except this bit of the apse) and rebuilt on partly fresh ground. 

The question next arises. When was that done ? And that question can only 
be answered by going into the church and finding out what is the date of the oldest 



480 A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 

part of it. The date of the old church being pulled down and the date of the oldest 
part of the present church must be about the same. 

Walking straight up to the chancel, we find in it an east, north and south window. 
The tracery of all three looks to be modern, but it is all in the Decorated style of 
architecture and probably a copy of what was there before. If so, that gives us a 
date from about 1270 to 1370. 

On the south wall is a piscina with what seems to be a round arch. Davy 
describes it as a large piscina with a plain nearly round arch. If this is a bit of 
Norman work, as it seems to be, it may have come from the old demolished church. 
Near it is a bracket, and on the north wall is an ambry. 

The communion table stands on a stone, in one corner of which a cross can be 
seen. This stone was put here in 1880, when the church was being restored during 
the incumbency of iMr. Johnston. It was thought by the architect, Mr. Drayton 
Wyatt, to be the old altar. Davy says that in 1829 there was at the north door part 
of a white stone, having a small cross cut at two of the corners, probably the original 
cover of the altar. I presume that that is the stone now under the communion table, 
but am not sure. The above-mentioned Hints, printed by the Cambridge Camden 
Society in 1843, gives a list of over twenty altar stones then known to exist. That 
list includes one at Little Whelnetham. Since that volume was printed I have 
witnessed the discovery of another one in Wedmore church, Co. Somerset. In 1880, 
when the chancel floor of that church was being lowered, we found it buried under 
the stone on which the communion table stood. It had probably been buried there 
in Queen Elizabeth's reign, when stone altars were ordered to be removed. We had 
stone legs made for it and set it up again in a void place, where it can be seen. It 
was a much larger and finer stone than this at Whelnetham. 

Inside the communion rails are two chairs of Jacobean or seventeenth century 
work. They are richly carved, each chair having the representation of a scene upon 
it, which I have not identified. 

Between the nave and chancel is the lower part of a wooden screen, I presume 
of the fifteenth or early sixteenth century. On the south side of the high chancel 
arch is a bracket with mutilated column, which seems to have no sense where it is 
now and which I suppose has been built in there during the nineteenth century. 

We are now in the nave. We see two four-light windows on each side, all four 
windows exactly alike in the Perpendicular style of architecture. — On the south wall, 



A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 481 

under the most eastern of the two windows, is a stoup (?), which seems to belong to 
an early date and does not look to be in its original position. Is it another relic of 
the demolished Norman church ? — The font is an octagon, the panels being filled 
with roses, a blank shield and a shield with a cross. — The bench ends are very good, 
and I presume their date may be from about 1270 to 1370. — The pulpit is gone. 
Davy described it in 1829 as standing in N.E. corner^ octagofi, of oak, neat and plain. 
The lectern, a wooden eagle, now serves for a pulpit. This eagle was given by Mr. 
Hasted, who was rector from 1832 to 1849. His son. Rev. H. Hasted, tells me that 
he recollects it standing in the hall of the rectory before it went into the church. 

The roof has some finely-carved whole-length figures in it, and I regret that I 
have not had some of them reproduced, as they may be portraits and might throw 
light on the rebuilding of the church in the fourteenth (?) century. Apparently they 
and the bench ends underwent restoration in 1842. Among the Davy MSS is a letter 
to Davy from J. W. Darby, dated 18 Oct., 1842. He says : — 

" I visited last week Little Whelnetham, and found them restoring 
as I sent you word, carving poppy heads etc. in the church at this time. 
The corbels supporting knees of roof of nave have been restored, and 
heads and hands to the whole-length figures looking down on the 
congregation." 

The Rev. H. Hasted also tells me that he recollects the church restoration in 
1842 and seeing the faces of figures being carved. 

The north and south doorways are in the Perpendicular style. The north 
doorway has been built up. 

Now we come to the tower. Its west window is in the Decorated style of 
architecture, which gives us a date from about 1270 to 1370. The chest contains 
what once must have been a huge thick folio volume containing the works of John 
Jewel, Bishop of Salisbury, printed by John Norton, London, 161 1. The clasps are 
gone and a good many pages are gone, but there is still enough left to satisfy a very 
large appetite for theological literature. One hopes that care will be taken to 
preserve this fragment from further damage. It is a relic of a wonderful state of 
things, when a book of this sort could be ordered to be placed in churches, and it 
could be thought that the parishioners would go in and study it. 



482 A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 

Three bells hang in the tower. Davey says two, which must be a slip on his 
part. I take the inscriptions from Dr. Raven's Church Bells of Suffolk, 1890. A 
legacy to the ringers will be found in the will of John Bole at p. 249. 

The treble is from an unknown foundry, whose whereabouts and founder's name 
have puzzled the authorities on bells. (See Raven's Suffolk and L'Estrange's 
Norfolk Bells.) The date is supposed to be somewhere about 1450. This is the 
inscription in Longobardic characters : — 

Me Margarete campanam dicite lete. 

The second bell is inscribed : R. B. IT IE 1614 ID. Dr. Raven gives no 
explanation of this. 

The tenor is inscribed R. G. 1671. This is from the foundry of Robert Gurney 
of Bury St. Edmunds. Dr. Raven says, Some of his bells are detestable. "Suffolk 
in 1674" shows that his house of five hearths was somewhere in St. Mary's parish. 

In the Journals of Hon. William Hervey is this entry : — 

1 78 1, Nov. 13, Tuesday. Went to Coldham where I stayed two nights; and 
on Thursday went to Rushbrooke, Sir Thomas Gage riding with me as far as Little 
Weltenham, where we got to the top of the tower of the church. 

Before leaving the tower perhaps I ought to say that in 1855 Messrs. Parker 
published Architectural fiotes ofi the Churches of Suffolk, part of a work dealing with 
the whole of England. The notes were written by various architects. The note on 
Little Whelnetham, which bears the initials of Mr. William Caveler, architect, 
speaks of the tower as Early English with a Decorated two-light on west side. The 
ivy which is now allowed to blot out this tower makes it impossible 'o say what 
were the signs of E. E. work which he saw. And the note is so miserably thin and 
hurried, (not the slightest notice being taken of the unique apse or of the roof and 
bench ends) that I have treated it as useless. When an eminent man does a thing 
in a tearing hurry, the thing done partakes of his tearing hurry and not of his 
eminence, and so it is not as well done as it would have been if done by less 
eminence with less tearing hurry. People generally are apt to forget that, and 
sometimes the eminent man forgets it himself. 

Now we come outside the church. There is a red brick porch of the sixteenth 
century, with a niche over the arch. I presume that the niche shows it to have been 
built before (say) 1540. Perhaps one of the Jermyns built it. As they were building 
at Rushbrooke hall, they may have spared a few bricks for this porch. 



A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 483 

On the south side of the chancel, near the chancel door, is a so-called leper's 
window, about 20 inches long by 10 inches wide, square headed, low down, and 
with iron bars. — The chancel has two corner buttresses, and two on the north side 
and two on the south side. These last four I take to be modern, added in 
consequence of bulging walls. — In the east wall of the nave, above the chancel, it 
will be seen that a good many red tiles have been used in the building, as also in 
the tower. 

We have now been round the church inside and outside, and have put a rough 
date to its different parts by noting the styles in which they were built. How does 
that answer the question, When was the old Norman church, of which only the ruined 
apse remains, pulled down, and when was the new church put up in its stead ? The 
piscina in the chancel and the stoup (?) in the nave, if Norman work, may have been 
rescued from the demolished church and used again in the new one, so that their 
evidence as to date is nothing. Of the early English style, which followed the 
Norman style and prevailed (roundly) from 1180 to 1270, I can see no sign, and so 
we may suppose that the old church was then still standing. Of the Decorated style, 
which followed the early English style and prevailed (roundly) from 1270 to 1380, 
we see signs in the chancel windows, the bench ends and the west window of the 
tower. And so we may suppose that the old church was pulled down or tumbled 
down somewhere in the fourteenth century, and that its successor, the present church, 
was then built ; and ever since then that ruined apse has been squatting there a ruin 
and a fragment. The work in the nave in the Perpendicular style shows that late in 
the fifteenth century the new church was altered or restored. 

Now bearing in mind that the architecture of the new church seems to say that 
it was built and the old one pulled down somewhere between 1270 and 1380, we 
may look to the succession of the lords of the manor and see who of them within 
those dates is likely to have done this thing. Of course it might have been done 
without them, but it is not unlikely to have been done more or less by them. They 
will be found at p. 364 — 379. Thomas de Wayland, the unjust judge who was 
attainted in 1289, was so much occupied in acquiring that he probably had not time 
for spending. But I cant help thinking that his great great granddaughter, Elizabeth, 
wife of Edward le Despencer, is not an unlikely person to have done it. During her 
widowhood of 36 years, 1375 — 141 1) she may have had time and inclination to think 
about it. With regard to the roof of the nave and the possible portraits in carved 
wood which it contains, one would like to have its date fixed as nearly as may be, 



484 



A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 



and then it might be found out whether those figures can represent some of the royal 
persons mentioned at p. 373. With regard to the Perpendicular work in the church, 
which Mr. Caveler calls " late and poor," that might belong to the time of the 
Audleys, or it might have been done by the Jermyns who succeeded them in about 
1500. 

Davy describes nine monumental stones in the church, of which Nos. i — 7 were 
in the chancel and Nos. 8, 9, in the nave. Of these, Nos. i — 4 are still there and I 
have printed them at p. 192. Nos. 5 — 9 are all gone, and I can only take them from 
the Davy MSS. 

5. (A small piece of broken freestone much worn.) .... Cornish . . . 1658. 

6. (Another small stone on N. side of No. 5 ) . . . Mary Cornish widow . . . 

7. On N. side of No. 6 a coffin lid adjoining the wall, white, nothing on it. 

8. Near the font, part of a black coffin lid. 

9. At entrance into steeple, part of another, white. 

In A Concise Description of Bury St. Edt?mttds and its Environs, 1827, the two 
Cornish stones are mentioned with the addition of the date of Mary Cornish's death, 
viz. Dec. 17, 1660. There is a gap in the registers at this time, so that their burials 
do not appear there. 

At p. 193 — 203 will be found all the inscriptions on the tombstones in the 
churchyard. On the reverse side of No. 41, the stone of Robert and Mary Girling, 
will be found a shield with the Girling arms. I give here a reproduction of that 
shield from a drawing made for me by Mr. Edmund Farrer. That shield represents 




A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 485 

all the heraldry that is to be found in Little Whelnetham church or churchyard. I 
have not gone into the family history of this Robert Girling, who died in 1790, but I 
take it that no great possessions accompanied this fine shield. I gather from the 
hst of tenants of Great Whelnetham manor (printed further on) that he had a small 
shop built on the lord's waste. 

LITTLE WHELNETHAM HALL. Leaving the churchyard we come 
immediately to the hall, which adjoins it. With regard to the house, it has been so 
altered and added to that it is impossible to make anything of it. I have been shown 
into every single room, from the attic above to the cellar below, and can only say 
that the later additions have all but squeezed out the older parts. There is no sign 
of a moat, which is rather strange. The view from the grounds is very good. I 
must leave the illustration of it to speak for itself. 

And now for those who have dwelt within it. Of the pre-Reformation owners 
of this manor very few can have been resident. John de Weyland and Richard de 
Weyland may have been so from somewhere about 1290 to 1320, but after them 
came a long succession of great people who had many and greater houses elsewhere. 
The post-Reformation owners, viz. Jermyns and Daverses from about 1500 to 1806, 
would not have wanted to reside here because they had Rushbrooke hall only a mile 
off. I therefore imagine that for the last four hundred years or more the hall or 
chief house of the manor has been occupied by someone who rented and farmed the 
land round it. I will try to set them down. 

At p. 210 — 227, and again at p. 235 — 237, I have printed several lists of the 
tax payers and rate payers of Little Whelnetham, but it is not easy to put them in 
their respective dwelling-places. At p. 249 I have printed the will of John Bole or 
BoUe, under which spelling we scarcely recognize our old friend in top boots, John 
Bull, whose portrait on walls is so familiar at election times. This will gives a 
possible clue to where he and some others lived. Its date is 1534. At that time 
there were no highway rates, but people sometimes left money by will for the repair 
of highways. John Bole leaves 40 shillings " to the hye waye betwyxte Wheltome 
hall gate and the elmon : slowe." I dont suppose that people left money to repair 
roads at other people's gates, and so I suppose that he himself lived at " Wheltome 
hall;" and as he is described in his will as "of lytyll Wheltham " that must mean 
Little Whelnetham Hall. Elmon : slowe must be a slough, perhaps with elm trees 
growing round it. This road from the hall gate to the slough might be the road 



486 A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 

leading down the hill to Sicklesmere, where one can imagine there might be a slough ; 
or it might be the lane that goes past the old rectory into London lane. That lane 
is certainly a slough at this present moment (19 lo), as I have found to my cost. 

Now, supposing that this will shows that John Bole occupied Little Whelnetham 
hall, it enables us to identify that house in some of the lists of tax payers. We have 
a list for 1523. (P. 213.) This John BoUe heads it, he being valued at ;^3o in 
moveables and paying a shilling in the pound. The list for 1542 includes Elizabeth 
Bull widow. That may be John BoUe's widow, though in his will he calls her Isabel. 
The lists for 1542 and 1546 are headed by Mr. Skott. George Skott sen. was 
executor to John BoUe's will, and George Skott jun. had the reversion of "my 
tenement being copye lyinge in litill Wheltham by the heywaye after the discease 
of Isabel my wiffe." This seems to fix George Skott in the house formerly occupied 
by John BoUe, so that if the one was at the hall the other was too. But we have 
seen at p. 386 that there was at this time John Skott in possession of the chapel of 
St. Thomas. So it is not quite clear which Mr. Skott this is and why there are not 
two in the list. In the list for 1566 Skott is gone and I cannot make a guess as to 
who is at the hall. 

In 1580 there is a Thomas Manhood or Manwood, who is represented in 1620 
by Elizabeth Manwood, and in all the lists from 1625 to 1642 by John Sache. I 
imagine that these occupied the hall. When I mentioned at p. 419, 428, that John 
Sache of Little Whelnetham bought Great Whelnetham hall and left it to his 
grandson, John Gipps, I did not then know where in Little Whelnetham John Sache 
lived. Nor do I now, but only make this suggestion. 

Coming next to the hearth tax lists for 1664, 1670, 1674, the largest house is 
that occupied by Philip Ward, who paid for 8 hearths. I imagine that is the hall. 
In 1708 only three burials are recorded ; viz. in June Philip Ward aged c. 72 years ; 
in August Ann Ward, his widow ; in December Philip Ward, his son, aged c. 27 years. 
After that we see no more Wards here. They were wiped out. 

So far I have been guessing. Bull, Skott, Manwood, Sache, Ward, may have 
been there from 1500 to 1700, but I cannot be sure. One or more or all of them 
may have been elsewhere in the parish. But now we come to certainties. 

James Frost is in the rate book from 1700 to 1736, and certainly occupied the 
hall farm. He was buried at Great Whelnetham in January 1736, and his widow in 
the following month. 



A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 487 

Then came John Garland, entered in the rate book as being charged " for ye 
hall farm." He also rented the Parsonage and the Chapel. He was there from 1738 
to 1757. 

Then comes Jacob Brook in 1758. I presume he belonged to the family of 
Brook or Brooks, which for a hundred years or so was at Horringer and Westley. 
Jacob Brook was buried here in January 1797 aged 85 years. But apparently he 
gave up the hall farm soon after 1780. 

Then comes George Biddell between 1780 and 1783, as I infer from the registers. 
He was here till his death in November 1799 aged 71 years. Of his family, an 
extremely good specimen of a Suffolk yeoman's family, I will give some account. 

BIDDELL FAMILY. There are two separate and distinct names from either 
of which the surname Biddell might come and from one of which it must come ; 
viz. (i) Bidwell, the name of a place, and (2) Bedel or Beadle, meaning an ofiScial. 

(i) Bidwell. There is a hamlet so called in Bedfordshire, from which (or from 
some other place like-named) a surname Bidwell has arisen ; and it would be in 
perfect accordance with the unwritten rules that govern the changes that names 
undergo if Bidwell sometimes became Biddell. Plenty of parallel instances might 
be given. An original Biddell could not well become Bidwell, but an original 
Bidwell could quite well become Biddell. Bidwell or Bedewell seems always to 
have been a surname in Suffolk. In "Suffolk in 1327" I find two persons called 
de Bedewell at Nettlestead and one at Henley. In "Suffolk in 1524 " there is one 
at Assington. In "Suffolk in 1566" there is one at Wickhamskeith. In "Suffolk 
in 1674 " there is one each at Freston, Rickinghall, Stanton, Bacton and Gislingham. 

(2) Bedel or Beadle. The Anglo-Saxons had an official called the bydel. In 
mediaeval English the form bydel gave way to the French form bedel. In modern 
English bedel in its turn has given way to beadle, except at the two old Universities, 
where an official is still called the esquire-bedel. The bydel or bedel, now beadle, 
had different shades of meaning, a herald, a town crier, a messenger of justice or 
otherwise, and so on. A writer in a.d. 1200 speaks of John the Baptist as Christ's 
bedel. In Coverdale's translation of the Bible, 1535, when Nebuchadnezzar had set 
up the golden image, " the bedell cried out with all his might." Dan. Ill, 4. (See 
N. E. D.) From this official (I dont mean from the particular one who cried out 
with all his might in the time of Nebuchadnezzar) have no doubt come most of the 
surnames written Bedel, Beddle, Biddell and so on. In the Suffolk volumes just 



488 A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 



mentioned, I find of this name in 1327 none, in 1524 none, in 1566 none, in 1674 
three, viz. at Rushmere, Southtown and Woodbridge. As those three are all right 
away in East Suffolk, it looks as if the family that I am now going to deal with had 
not yet come into Suffolk. 

To pass from generalities to particulars. In June 1739 Thomas Bedell (so spelt 
in the register) was buried at Bradfield St. George. By Elizabeth his wife he had 
had ten children. This spelling of his name makes it more than probable that the 
name was from the official, bedel, and not from the place, Bidwell. I cannot say 
anything more of this Thomas as to his parentage and place of birth. 

There is a tradition in the Biddell family, which tradition existed towards the 
end of the eighteenth century, that Thomas was descended from Bishop Bedell. But 
I do not see how that is possible. Bishop Bedell belonged to a family at Black 
Notley in Essex. He was at Bury St. Edmunds and then at Horringer from (with 
an interval) 1602 to i6i6, and then promotion carried him to Ireland. In the life 
of him, probably written by his son William, printed by the Camden Society in 1872, 
the editor has gone carefully into the matter of his descendants, and seems to make 
it certain that there are none in the male line. Of the Bishop's three sons, only 
William, rector of Rattlesden, had sons. Of William's four sons, none had sons. 
Two settled and died in Ireland ; two died unmarried at Rattlesden, viz. John, rector 
of Rattlesden, in 1672, and James, who had a house there, in 1682 aged 31. As far 
as dates go, Thomas of Bradfield St. George, who died in 1739, might be the son of 
James ; but James' will at Bury St. Edmunds shows that he died unmarried and left 
his house at Rattlesden to his sister Agnes, who died there unmarried in March 
1694. 

But though the tradition may not be perfectly true it is not to be altogether 
poohpoohed. Like many other traditions it may have a germ of truth. Thomas 
and the Bishop may have had a common ancestor. Thomas or his father may have 
come out of Essex and have been of the same race as the Bedells of Black Notley. 

Of the ten children of Thomas Bedell, or Biddle as it got to be written later on, 
we are here only concerned with the youngest, George. But I imagine that two 
others were John and James, both mentioned on tombstones in Bradfield St. George 
churchyard; and another may be Thomas, who was married at Horringer in 1756, 
had several children baptized there, and was buried there in 1793. His name is 
always written in the Horringer register Bedell, Beddell or Beddle. 



I 



A WALK ROUND THE TWO PARISHES. 489 

George, youngest son of Thomas and Elizabeth Bedell, was baptized at Bradfield 
St. George in October 1728, and was married there in October 1761 to Elizabeth 
Webb of Brettenham. From his children's birthplaces I imagine that he farmed at 
Rougham for some years, and that between 1780 and 1783 he came to Little 
Whelnetham hall farm, then belonging to Sir Charles Davers of Rushbrooke. There 
he died in November 1799 aged 71 years. Elizabeth his widow died in April 18 16 
aged 81 years. Both were buried at Bradfield St. George. In that churchyard there 
are eleven Biddell tombstones in two rows, one of which stones has the names and 
dates of George and Elizabeth. 

These are the names of their eleven children : — 

1. Amy, Born at Bradfield St. George in June 1762. Died unmarried in May 
1809 aged 46 years. One of the eleven tombstones is hers. 

2. Elizabeth. Born at Bradfield St. George in Sept. 1763. Married John 
Blencowe of Rugby. He died at Stoke by Nayland in April 1839 aged 77, and she 
in Jan. 1850 aged 86. Both were buried at Little Whelnetham, and have stones in 
that churchyard. (P. 202.) 

Of the children of John and Elizabeth Blencowe, two daughters, Jane and Lucy, 
have tombstones in Little Whelnetham churchyard. (P. 202, 203.) A son, Arthur, 

married Wolton and had two daughters who married two brothers, Manfred and 

William Biddell. (See below.) Another son, William, had a son George Blencowe, 
who now represents the firm of Biddell and Blencowe, auctioneer