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Full text of "The Greek anthology"

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THE LIBRARY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 




ENDOWED BY THE 

DIALECTIC AND PHILANTHROPIC 

SOCIETIES 



PA3611 
,A2 
1915 
v.3 



UNIVERSITY OF N.C. AT CHAPEL HILL 



00014508204 



This book is due at the LOUIS R. WILSON LIBRARY on the 
last date stamped under "Date Due." If not on hold it may be 
renewed by bringing it to the library. 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://www.archive.org/details/greekanthology03pato 



THE LOEB CLASSICAL LIBRARY 

EDITED BY 

E. CAPPS, pii.n., ll.i>. Τ. Ε PAGE, litt.d. 
W. II. D. ROUSE, litt.d. 



THE GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

III 



first printed 1015. 
Btprinttd 1925. 



THE GREER 
ANTHOLOGY 

WITH AN ENGLISH TRANSLATION BY 
W. R. Ρ ΑΤΟ Ν 



IN FIVE VOLUMES 



III 






A3- 
V,3,c.l 




LONDON : WILLIAM HEINEMANN 
NEW YORK : G. P. PUTNAM'S SONS 

MCMXXV 



Printed in Great Britain. 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 
BOOK IX. — TUB DECLAMATORY EPIGRAMS 1 

GENERAL INDEX 449 

INDEX OF AUTHORS INCLUDED IN THIS VOLUME . . . 454 



Ο 

Cr 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



BOOK IX 

THE DECLAMATORY 
AND DESCRIPTIVE EPIGRAMS 



This book, as we should naturally expect, is especially 
rich in epigrams from the Stephanus of Philippus, the 
rhetorical style of epigram having been in vogue during the 
period covered by that collection. There are several quite 
long series from this source, retaining the alphabetical order 
in which they were arranged, Nos. 215-312, 403-42.3, 541- 
562. It is correspondingly poor in poems from Meleager's 
Stephanus (Nos. 313-338). It contains a good deal of the 
Alexandrian Palladas, a contemporary of Hypatia, most of 
which we could well dispense with. The latter part, from 
No. 582 onwards, consists mostly of real or pretended in- 
scriptions on works of art or buildings, many quite unworthy 
of preservation, but some, especially those on bathe, quite 
graceful. The last three epigrams, written in a kiler hand, 
do not belong to the original Anthology. 



ΑΝΘΟΛΟΓΙΑ 

Θ 
ΕΠΙΓΡΑΜΜΑΤΑ ΕΠΙΔΕΙΚΤΙΚΑ 

1.— ΠΟΛΤΑΙΝΟΤ 2ΑΡΔΙΑΝΟΤ 

ΑορκάΒος άρτιτόκοιο τιθηνητήριον ουθαρ 
εμπΧεον ήμϋσαν Λ πικρός ετυψεν εχις. 

ι•εβρος δ' ίομιγή θηΧην σπάσε, και το ΒυσαΧθες 
τραύματος εξ όΧοου πικρον εβροξε γάλα. 

αΒην δ' ήΧΧάξαντο, καϊ αντίκα νηΧεί μοίρη, 
ην επορεν ηαστήρ, μαστός άφεϊΧε 'χάριν. 

2.— ΤΙΒΕΡΙΟΤ IAAOTSTPIOT 

Κ,εμμάΒος άρτιτόκου μαζοΐς βρίθονσι ηάΧακτος 

η φονίη Βακετων ίον ενήκεν εχις' 
φαρμαγβεν δ' ίω μητρός γάλα νεβρος άμήΧξας 

χείΧεσι, τον κείνης εξεπιεν θάνατον. 

3.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ, οϊ 8ε ΠΛΑΤΩΝ02 

Έ,ίνοΒίην καρνην μ€ πάρεργο μενοις εφντευσαν 
παισϊ ΧιθοβΧητου παίηνιον ενστογίης. 

1 I write so : ci lovaa. MS. 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



BOOK IX 

. THE DECLAMATORY 
AND DESCRIPTIVE EPIGRAiMS 

1.— POLYAENUS OF SARDIS 

A cruel viper struck the nursing udder of a doe 
which had newly calved as it hung down full of milk. 
Her fawn sucked the teat contaminated by poison, 
and from the fatal wound imbibed bitter milk charged 
with venom ill to cure. Death was transferred from 
mother to child, and at once by pitiless fate the breast 
bereft the young one of the gift of life that it owed 
to the womb. 

2.— TIBERIUS ILLUSTRIUS 

A viper, the most murderous of noxious beasts, 
injected her venom into the udder, swollen with milk, 
of a doe that had just calved, and the kid, sucking 
its mother's poisoned milk, drank up her death. 

3. — ΑΝΤΙ PATER, by some attributed to PLATO 

They planted me, a walnut-tree, by the road-side 
to amuse passing boys, as a mark for their well-aimed 



β 2 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

πάντας δ' άκρεμόνας τε και εύθάλέας όροδάμνους 
κέκΚασμαι, πυκιναΐς χερμάσι βαΧλομένη. 

δένδρεσιν εύκάρποις ουδέν π\έον η yap έ'γωγε 5 

δυσδαίμων ες ε μην νβριν εκαρποφόρουν. 

4.— ΚΤΛΛΗΝΙΟΤ 

Ή πάρος εν δρυμοισι νοθης ζείδωρος οπώρης 
άγρας, θηροβότου πρέμνον έρημοσύνης, 

όθνειοις οζοισι μετέμφυτος, ήμερα θάΧΧω, 
ουκ εμον ημετέροις κ\ωσϊ φέρουσα βάρος. 

ποΧλή σοι, φυτοερηέ, πόνου χάρις• είνεκα σεΐο δ 

άχρα,ς εν εύκάρποις δένδρεσιν εγγράφομαι. 

5.— ΠΑΛΛΑΔΑ 

"Οχνη, χειρός έμής >γ\υκερος πόνος, y μεν εφ ύγρω 
φΧοιω φύΧλον εδησα θέρει• πτόρθος δ επί δένδρω 
ριζωθείς δένδροιο τομτ}, και καρπόν άμείψας, 
νέρθε μεν άχράς ετ εστίν, ΰπερθε δ άρ εύπνοος οχνη. 

6.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Άχρας εην θήκας σεο χερσι μυριπνοον οχνην, 
δένδρω πτόρθον ένεις' σην χάριν εις σε φέρω. 

7.— ΙΟΤΛΙΟΤ ΠΟΛΤΑΙΝΟΤ 

Ει και σευ ποΧυφωνος αεί πίμπΧησιν άκουάς 
ί) φόβος ευχόμενων, ή χάρις εύξαμένων, 

Ζεΰ Χχερίης εφεπων Ιερόν πεδον, αλλά και ημέων 
κ\υθι, καϊ άψευδεϊ νεϋσον υποσχεσιη, 

ήδη μοι ξενίης είναι πέρας, εν δε με πάτρη 5 

ζώειν, των δοΧιχών παυσάμενον καμάτων. 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 4-7 

stones. And all my twigs and flourishing shoots are 
broken, hit as I am by showers of pebbles. It is no 
advantage for trees to be fruitful. I indeed, poor 
tree, bore fruit only for my own undoing. 

4.— CYLLENIUS 

I, the wild pear-tree of the thicket, a denizen of 
the wilderness where the wild beasts feed, once 
bearing plenty of bastard fruit, have had foreign 
shoots grafted on me, and flourish now no longer 
wild, but loaded with a crop that is not my natural 
one. Gardener, I am deeply grateful for thy pains, 
owing it to thee that I now am enrolled in the tribe 
of noble fruit-trees. 

5.— PALLADAS 

This pear-tree is the sweet result of the labour of 
my, hand, with which in summer I fixed the graft in 
its moist bark. The slip, rooted on the tree by the 
incision, has changed its fruit, and though it is still 
a pyraster 1 below, it is a fragrant-fruited pear-tree 
above. 

6. — By the Same 

I was a pyraster ; thy hand hath made me a frag- 
rant pear-tree by inserting a graft, and I reward thee 
for thy kindness. 

7.— JULIUS POLYAENUS 
Zeus, who rulest the holy land of Corey ra, though 
thy ears be ever full of the fears of suppliants or 
the thanks of those whose prayers thou hast heard, 
yet hearken to me, too, and grant me by a true 
promise that this be the end of my exile, and that I 
may dwell in my native land, my long labours over. 
1 The wild pear-tree. c 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

8.— TOY ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Έλπίς άεϊ βιότον κΧεπτει χρόνον η πυμάτη Be 
ηως τα,ς πολλά? εφθασεν ασχολίας. 
J. Α. Pott, Greek Love Songs and Epigrams, ii. p. 86. 

9.— TOY ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Πολλά/α? εύξαμενω μοι άει θυμήρες εδωκας 
τεκμαρ ακύμαντου, Ζεΰ πάτερ, εύπΧοιης' 

&ωης μοι και τούτον ετι πΧόον, ήδε σαώσαις 
ήδη, και καμάτων ορμισον εις λιμένας. 

οίκος καϊ πάτρη βιότον χάρις' α'ι Be περισσαϊ 5 

φροντίδες άνθρώποις ου βίος, αλλά πόνος. 

10.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ ΘΕΣΣΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩΝ 

[ΙουΧυπος είναΧίη ποτ επι προβΧήτι τανυσθεις 

ηεΧίω ψύχειν ποΧΧον άνηκε πόδα• 
ούπω δ' ην πετρη ϊκελος χρόα, τοΰνεκα και μιν 

αίετος εκ νεφεων οξύς εμαρψεν ίδών 
πΧοχμοΐς δ' ε'ιΧιχθεΙς πεσεν εις άΧα δύσμορος' η ρ α 5 

άμφω καϊ θήρης ήμβροτε καϊ βιότου. 

11.— Φ1ΛΙΠΠΟΤ, ο'ι δε ΙΣΙΔΩΡΟΤ 

Υϊηρος ό μεν ^υίοις, ό δ' άρ ομμασιν αμφότεροι δε 

εις αυτούς το τύχης ενδεές ηράνισαν. 
τυφΧος ηαρ Χιπόγνιον επωμάδιον βάρος αϊρων 

ταΐς κείνου φωναΐς άτραπον ωρθοβάτεί' 
πάντα δε ταΰτ εδίδαξε πικρή πάντοΧμος άνώγκη, 5 

άΧΧήΧοις μερίσαι τούΧΧιπες εις τεΧεον. 

6 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 8-n 

8. — By the Same 

Hope ever makes the period of our days steal away, 
and the last dawn surprises us with many projects 
unaccomplished. 

9. — By the Same 

Often when I have prayed to thee, Zeus, hast thou 
granted me the welcome gift of fair weather till the 
end of my voyage. Give it me on this voyage, too ; 
save me and bear me to the haven where toil ends. 
The delight of life is in our home and country, and 
superfluous cares make life not life but vexation. 

10.— ANTIPATER OF THESSALONICA 

An octopus once, stretched out on a rock that pro- 
jected into the sea, extended his many feet to let 
them bask in the sun. He had not yet changed to 
the colour of the rock, and therefore a sharp-eyed 
eagle saw him from the clouds and seized him, but 
fell, unhappy bird, entangled by his tentacles, into 
the sea, losing both its prey and its life. 

11.— PHILIPPUS or ISIDORUS 

One man was maimed in his legs, while another 
had lost his eyesight, but each contributed to the 
other that of which mischance had deprived him. 
For the blind man, taking the lame man on his 
shoulders, kept a straight course by listening to the 
other's orders. It was bitter, all-daring necessity 
which taught them all this, instructing them how, 
by dividing their imperfections between them, to 
make a perfect whole. 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

12.— ΛΕΩΝΙΔΟΤ 

ΎυφΧος άΧητενων χωλον πόδας ηερταζεν, 

ομμασιν άΧΧοτρίοις άντερανιζόμενος. 
άμφω δ' ημιτελείς προς ενός φύσιν ηρμόσθησαν 

τουλΧιπες άΧληλοις άντιπαρασχόμενοι. 

13.— ΠΛΑΤΩΝΟΣ ΝΕΩΤΕΡΟΤ 

' Ανερα τις Xnroyutov υπέρ νώτοιο Χιττανγης 
ήρ€, πόδας χρήσας, όμματα χρησάμενος. 

13β.— ΑΝΤΙΦΙΛΟΤ 

"Αμφω μεν πηροί καϊ άλήμονες, άλλ' 6 μεν όψεις, 
ος δε βάσεις' άλΧου δ' άΧΧος υπηρεσίη• 

τυφΧος yap χωλοΐο κατωμάδιον βάρος αϊρων 
άτραπον οθνείοις ομμασιν ακροβατεί. 

η μία δ' άμφοτεροις ηρκει φύσις' εν yap εκάστω δ 
τούΧΧιπες άλληΧοις εις όλον ήράνισαν. 

Η.— ΑΝΤΙΦΙΛΟΤ ΒΤΖΑΝΤΙΟΤ 

AiyiaXov τεvάyεσσιv υποπλώοντα λαθραίη 

ειρεσίη Φαίδων εϊσιδε πουΧυπόδην 
μάρψας δ' ώκύς εριψεν επι χθόνα, πριν περί χείρας 

πΧεξασθαι βpύyδηv όκτατόνους έλικας• 
δισκενθεις δ' επι θάμνον ες οικία δειλά Xayωov ) 5 

ε'ιΧηδον ταχινού πτωκος εδησε πόδας' 
εΐΧε δ' άΧούς' συ δ' αεΧπτον έχεις yέpaς άμφοτερωθεν 

aypWi χ^ρσαίης, πρεσβυ, και είναΧίης. 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 12-14 

12.— LEONIDAS OF ALEXANDRIA 

The blind beggar supported the lame one on his 
feet, and gained in return the help of the other's 
eyes. Thus the two incomplete beings fitted into 
each other to form one complete being, each sup- 
plying what the other lacked. 

13.— PLATO THE YOUNGER 

A blind man carried a lame man on his back, 
lending him his feet and borrowing from him his 
eyes. 

13b.— ANTIPHILUS OF BYZANTIUM 

Both are maimed and strolling beggars ; but the 
one has lost the use of his eyes, the other the support 
of his legs. Each serves the other ; for the blind 
man, taking the lame one on his back, walks gingerly 
by the aid of eyes not his own. One nature supplied 
the needs of both ; for each contributed to the other 
his deficiency to form a whole. 

14. — By the Same 

Phaedo saw an octopus in the shallows by the 
beach oaring itself along in secret, and seizing it, 
he threw it rapidly on land before it could twine its 
eight spirals tightly round his hand. Whirled into 
a bush it fell on the home of a luckless hare, and 
twirling round fleet-footed puss's feet held them 
bound. The captured was captuver, and you, old 
man, got the unexpected gift of a booty both from 
sea and land. 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



Ιδ.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 



Αύτο το πυρ καυσειν διζήμενος, ούτος, ό νύκτωρ 
τον καΧόν Ίμβίρων Χυχνον άναφ\ο Γ γίσαι, 

δεΰρ" απ έμής ψυχής άψον σέΧας• ενδοθι yap μου 
καιόμενον ποΧΧην εξανίησι φλόγα. 

16.— ΜΕΛΕΑΓΡΟΤ 

Ύρισσαϊ μεν Χάριτες, τρεις δε <γ\υκυττάρθ€νοι 7 Ωραϊ 
τρεις δ' έμέ θηΧυμανεΐς οίστοβοΧούσι ΙΙόθοι. 

η yap τοι τρία τόξα κατηρτισβν, ως άρα μέλΧων 
ουχί μίαν τρώσειν, τρεις δ iv εμοϊ κραδίας. 

17.— ΓΕΡΜΑΝΙΚΟΤ KAI2APOS 

Οΰρ€ος εξ ΰπάτοιο λαγώς πέσε ν ες ποτέ βένθος, 
εκπροφυ^/εΐν μεμαως τρηχυν οδόντα κυνός• 

άλλ' ούδ' ώ<? ηΧυξε κακόν μόρον αύτίκα yap μιν 
εΙνάΧιος μάρψας πνεύματος ώρφάνισεν. 

εκ πυρός, ως αίνος, πεσες ες φXoya' η ρά σε δαίμων 5 
κήν άΧϊ κήν γέρσω θρέψε κύνεσσι βοράν. 

18.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Έλ κυνός εϊΧε κύων με. τι το ξένον; εις εμέθΡ)ρες 

i>ypo\ καϊ πεζοί θυμόν εχουσιν ε να. 
Αιθέρα Χοιπόν εχοιτε, Xayoi, βατόν. άΧΧά φοβούμαι, 

Ουρανέ• καϊ συ φέρεις άστερόεντα κύνα, 
το 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 15-18 

15. — Anonymous 

(Probably on a Picture of Love) 

Thou who seekest to set fire itself ablaze, who 
desirest to light thy lovely lamp at night, take thee 
light here from my soul, for that which is afire within 
me sends forth fierce flames. 

16.— MELEAGER 

The Graces are three, and three are the sweet 
virgin Hours, and three fierce girl Loves cast their 
arrows at me. Yea, verily, three bows hath Love 
prepared for me, as if he would wound in me not 
one heart, but three. 

17.— GERMANICUS CAESAR 

Once a hare from the mountain height leapt into 
the sea in her effort to escape from a dog's cruel 
fangs. But not even thus did she escape her fate ; 
for at once a sea-dog seized her and bereft her of life. 
Out of the fire, as the saying is, into the flame didst 
thou fall. Of a truth Fate reared thee to be a meal 
for a dog either on the land or in the sea. 

18. — By the Same 

On the Same 

One dog captured me after another. What is 
strange in that ? Beasts of the water and beasts of 
the land have like rage against me. Henceforth, ye 
hares, may the sky be open to your course. But I fear 
thee, Heaven ; thou too hast a dog among thy stars. 

11 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

19.— ΛΡΧΙΟΤ ΜΙΤΤΛΗΝΑΙΟΤ 

Ο πρϊν άεΧΧοπόΒων Χάμ-^τας πΧεον Αιετος ίππων, 

6 πριν ύπαϊ μίτραις κώΧα καθαψάμενος, 
ον Φοίβου χρησ μωΒος άεθΧιον έστεφε ΤΙνθώ, 

ορνύμενον πτανοΐς ώκυπέταις ϊκεΧον, 
καϊ Νεμέη βλοσνροϊο τιθηνητειρα Χέοντος, 5 

ΤΙΐσά τε, και Βοίας ηόνας 'Ισθμός €χων, 
νυν κΧοιω Βειρην πεπεΒημενος, οία γαΧινω, 

καρπον εΧα Αηοΰς οκριόεντι Χίθω, 
ϊσαν μοΐραν έχων ΉρακΧεΊ• και yap εκείνος 

τοσσ άνύσας ΒουΧαν ζεύγΧαν εφηρμόσατο. 10 



20.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Ό πρϊν έπ* 'ΑΧφειω στεφανηφόρος, ώνερ, 6 το πριν 
Βισσάκι κηρυχθείς ΚασταΧίης παρ ύΒωρ, 

6 πρϊν εγώ Νβμέη βεβοημενος, ό πρϊν eV Ισθμω 
πώΧος, ό πρ\ν πτηνοις Ισα Βραμων άνεμοις, 

νυν ότε γηραιός, γνροΒρόμον ήνίΒε πετρον δ 

Βινεύω, στεφεων ύβρις, εΧαυνόμενος. 

21.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Χοί, πατρϊ %εσσαΧίη πωΧοτρόφε, μέμψιν άνάπτω 
ΥΙηγασος, ως άΒίκου τέρματος ηντίασα• 

ος ΐΐυθοΐ, κήν Ισθμω εκώμασα, κηπ\ Νεμειον 
'Lava, και ΆρκαΒικούς ηΧυθον άκρεμόνας• 

νυν Βε βάρος πετρης ΝισυρίΒος εγκυκΧον έλκω, 5 

Χεπτύνων Δηούς καρπον απ' άσταχύων. 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 19-21 

19.— ARCHIAS OF MYTILENE 

" Eagle/' who once outshone all fleet-footed horses; 
about whose legs chaplets once hung ; he whom 
Pytho, the oracular seat of Phoebus, once crowned 
in the games, where he raced like a swiftly flying 
bird ; he whom Nemea, too, the nurse of the grim 
lion, crowned, and Pisa and Isthmus with its two 
beaches, is now fettered by a collar as if by a bit, 
and grinds corn by turning a rough stone. He suffers 
the same fate as Heracles, who also, after accomplish- 
ing so much, put on the yoke of slavery. 

20. — Anonymous 

On the Same 

I, Sir, who once gained the crown on the banks of 
Alpheius, and was twice proclaimed victor by the 
water of Castalia ; I, who was announced the winner 
at Nemea, and formerly, as a colt, at Isthmus ; I, 
who ran swift as the winged winds — see me now, 
how in my old age I turn the rotating stone driven 
in mockery of the crowns I won. 

21. — Anonymous 

I, Pegasus, attach blame to thee, my country Thes- 
saly, breeder of horses, for this unmerited end of my 
days. I, who was led in procession at Pytho and 
Isthmus ; I, who went to the festival of Nemean 
Zeus and to Olympia to win the Arcadian olive-twigs, 
now drag the heavy weight of the round Nisyrian * 
mill-stone, grinding fine from the ears the fruit of 
Demeter. 

1 Nisyros, a volcanic island near Cos, famous for its mill- 
stones. 

13 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

22.— ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΤ ΘΕΣΣΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩΝ 

Νηδύϊ βριθομενην δάμαΧιν Αητω'ίΒι κονρη 
στήσαν νηο κόροι θύμα γαριζόμενοι, 

ης άιδην μελΧοντα προεφθασεν εύστοχος ώΒίς, 
πέμφθη δ' εις ayeXyv TeKvoyove.lv άφετος. 

η θεός ώΒίνων yap επίσκοπος οΰδ' εΒίκαζεν 
τικτούσας κτείνειν, ας iXeetv εμαθεν. 

23.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ 

Τειαρότης" Αρχιππος, ό'τ' εκ νονσοιο βαρείης 

άρτι Χιποψνχεων ερρεεν εις άι'Βην, 
είπε τάδ' υ'ιήεσσιν " Ίώ φίλα τέκνα, μάκελλαν 

και τον άροτρίτην στέρξατέ μοι βίοτον 
μη σφαΧερής αινείτε πόνον στονόεντα θαλάσσης, 

καϊ βαρύν άτηρής ναυτιΧιης κάματον. 
όσσον μητρυιης yλυκεpωτέpη επλετο μήτηρ, 

τόσσον αλός πολιής yala ποθεινοτέρη" 

24.— ΛΕΩΝΙΔΑ ΤΑΡΑΝΤΙΝΟΤ 

"Αστρα μεν ήμανρωσε και ίερα κνκλα σελήνης 

άξονα Βινήσας εμπνρος ηέΧιος• 
νμνοπολους δ' ayeX^bv άπημάλΒυνεν "Ομηρος, 

Χαμπρότατον Μουσών φέyyoς άνασγό μένος. 

25.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Γράμμα τόδ' Άρήτοιο Βαήμονος, 6ς ποτέ λεπτή 
φροντΊΒι Βηναιονς αστέρας εφράσατο, 



Μ 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 22-25 

22.— PHILIPPUS OF THESSALONICA 

The temple servants destined as an acceptable 
sacrifice to Latona's daughter a heifer big with 
young ; but happy birth-pangs anticipated her ap- 
proaching death, and she was sent to the herd to 
bear her child in freedom. For the goddess who 
presides over child-bed deemed it not right to slay 
creatures in labour, having learnt to pity them. 

23.— ΑΝΤΙ PATER 

The husbandman Archippus,when, smitten by grave 
sickness, he was just breathing his last and gliding to 
Hades, spoke thus to his sons : " 1 charge you, dear 
children, that ye love the mattock and the life of a 
farmer. Look not with favour on the weary labour 
of them who sail the treacherous waves and the 
heavy toil of perilous sea-faring. Even as a mother 
is sweeter than a stepmother, so is the land more 
to be desired than the grey sea." 

24.— LEONIDAS OF TARENTUM 

As the burning sun, rolling his chariot-wheels, 
dims the stars and the holy circle of the moon, so 
Homer, holding on high the Muses' brightest torch, 
makes faint the glory of all the flock of singers. 

25.-— By the Same 

This is the book of learned Aratus, 1 whose subtle 
mind explored the long-lived stars, both the fixed 

1 Aratus of Soli (ctrc. 270 B.C.) author of the Φαινόμενα and 
Αιοσημΰα. 

15 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

άπΧανεας τ αμφω και αΧήμονας, όισιν εναργής 

ίΧΧόμενος κύκΧοις ουρανός ενδέδεται. 
αίνείσθω δε καμων έργον μέγα, καϊ Αιος είναι 5 

δεύτερος, όστις εθηκ άστρα φαεινότερα. 

26.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ ΘΕΣΣΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩΝ 

Τα'σδβ θεογΧωσσους 'Ελικών έθρεψε γυναίκας 

νμνοις, καϊ Μακεδών ΤΙιερίας σκόπελος, 
ΥΙρήξιΧΧαν, Μοίρώ, Άνύτης στόμα, θηΧυνΌμηρον, 

Αεσβιάδων Σαπφώ κόσμον εύπΧοκάμων, 
Ήρινναν, ΎεΧεσιΧΧαν άγακΧεα, και σε, Κόριννα, 5 

θονριν Άθηναιης ασπίδα μεΧψαμεναν, 
Νοσσίδα θηΧύγΧωσσον, ιδε γΧυκυαχεα ^Ιύρτιν, 

πάσας άενάων εργάτιδας σεΧίδων. 
εννέα μεν Μούσα? μέγας Ουρανός, εννέα δ' αύτας 

Ταΐα τεκεν, θνατοϊς άφθιτον εύφροσύναν. 10 

27.— ΑΡΧΙΟΤ, οι δε ΠΑΡΜΕΝΙΩΝ02 

Εύφημος γΧώσσί] παραμείβεο ταν ΧάΧον 'Ηχώ, 
κού ΧάΧον ην τι κΧύω, τοΰτ άπαμειβομεναν. 

εις σε γαρ ον συ Χεγεις στρέψω Χόγον ην δε σιωπάς, 
σιγήσω, τις εμεν γΧώσσα δικαιοτερτ]; 

28.— ΠΟΜΠΗΙΟΤ, οι δε ΜΑΡΚΟΤ 
ΝΕΩΤΕΡΟΤ 

Ε6 καϊ ερημαίη κεγυμαι κόνις ένθα Μυκήνη, 
ει και άμαυροτερη παντός ΙδεΙν σκοπεΧου, 

] Of these lyric poetesses known as the nine Lyric Muses 
Praxilla of Sicyon nourished in the fifth century B.C., Moero 
of Byzantium in the fourth century, Telesilla of Argos in the 

16 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 26-28 

stars and the planets with which the bright revolving 
heaven is set. Let us praise him for the great task 
at which he toiled ; let us count him second to Zeus, 
in that he made the stars brighter. 

26.— ANTIPATER OF THESSALONICA 

These are the divine-voiced women that Helicon 
fed with song, Helicon and Macedonian Pieria's 
rock : Praxilla ; Moero ; Anyte, the female Homer ; 
Sappho, glory of the Lesbian women with lovely 
tresses ; Erinna ; renowned Telesilla ; and thou, 
Corinna, who didst sing the martial shield of Athena; 
Nossis, the tender-voiced, and dulcet-toned Myrtis — 
all craftswomen of eternal pages. Great Heaven 
gave birth to nine Muses, and Earth to these nine, 
the deathless delight of men. 1 

27.— ARCHIAS or PARMENION 

Heed well thy speech as thou goest past me, Echo 
who am a chatterbox and yet no chatterbox. If I 
hear anything I answer back the same, for I will 
return to thee thy own words ; but if thou keepest 
silent, so shall I. Whose tongue is more just than 
mine? 

28.— POMPEIUS or MARCUS THE 
YOUNGER 

Though I, Mycenae, am but a heap of dust here in 
the desert, though I am meaner to look at than any 

sixth century, Corinna of Tanagra (some of whose work has 
recently been recovered) in the fifth century, and Myrtis of 
Anthedon a little before Pindar whom she is said to have in- 
structed. Anyte and Nossis are represented in the Anthology. 

17 
VOL. III. C 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

Τλου τις καθορών κΧεινην πόΧιν, ης επάτησα 
τείχεα, καϊ ΐίριάμον πάντ εκένωσα Βόμον, 

γνωσεται 'ένθεν όσον πύρος εσθενον. ει Βέ με γήρας 5 
ύβρισεν, αρκούμαι μάρτυρι XlaioviBy. 

29.— ΑΝΤΙΦΙΛΟΤ ΒΤΖΑΝΤΙΟΤ 

Τόλμα, νεών αρχηγέ (συ yap Βρόμον ηύραο πόντου, 
κα\ ψυχας άνΒρων κέρΒεσιν ήρεθισας), 

οίον ετεκτηνω ΒόΧιον ξύΧον, οίον ενήκας 
άνθρωποις θανάτω κέρΒος εΧεγχόμενον ; 

ήν όντως μερόπων χρύσεον γένος, el γ' άπο χέρσου 5 
τηΧόθεν, ώς ΆιΒης, πόντος άπεβΧεπετο. 

30.— ΖΗΛΩΤΟΤ, οι Βε ΒΑ220Τ 

ΈκΧάσθην επι γης άνέμω πίτυς' ες τι με πόντω 
στέλλετε ναυηγον κΧώνα προ ναυτιΧιης; 

31.— ΖΗΛΩΤΟΤ 

Ές τι πίτυν πεΧάγει πιστεύετε, γομφωτήρες, 

ης ποΧύς εξ ορέων ρίζαν εΧυσε νότος; 
αϊσιον ουκ εσομαι πόντου σκάφος, εχθρον αηταις 

ΒένΒρεον εν χέρσω τας άΧος οΙΒα τύχας. 

32.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Άρτιπαγή ροθ'ιαισιν επί κροκάΧαισί με νήα, 
καϊ μήπω χαροπού κύματος ανάμεναν, 

ούΒ' άνέμεινε θάΧασσα' το δ' άγριον επΧημμυρεν 
γεύμα καϊ εκ σταθερών ηρπασεν ηϊονων 

οΧκάΒα ταν ΒειΧαιον ^άεϊ κΧόνος, γ γε τα πόντου 5 
χεύματα κην χέρσω Χοίγια κήν πεΧάηει. 

ι8 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 29-32 

chance rock, he who gazes on the famous city of 
Ilion, whose walls I trod underfoot and emptied all 
the house of Priam, shall know thence how mighty 1 
was of old. If my old age has used me ill, the testi- 
mony of Homer is enough for me. 

29.— ANTIPHILUS OF BYZANTIUM 

Adventure, thou inventor of ships (for thou didst 
discover the paths of the sea, and didst excite men's 
minds by hope of gain), what treacherous timbers 
didst thou fashion ; what lust for gain, oft brought 
home to them by death, hast thou instilled into 
men ! Of a truth the race of mortals had been a 
golden one, if the sea, like hell, were viewed from 
the land in dim distance. 

30.— ZELOTUS or BASSUS 
I am a pine-tree broken by the wind on land. 
Why do you send me to the sea, a spar shipwrecked 
before sailing ? 

31.— ZELOTUS 
Why, shipwrights, do ye entrust to the sea this 
pine, which the strong south-wester tore up by the 
roots from the mountain side ? I shall make no lucky 
hull at sea, I, a tree which the winds hate. On land 
I already experienced the ill-fortune of the sea. 

32. — Anonymous 
I was a newly-built ship on the surf-beaten beach, 
and had not yet touched the grey waves. But the 
sea would not be kept waiting for me ; the wild flood 
rose and carried me away from the firm shore, an 
unhappy bark indeed ... to whom the stormy waves 
were fatal both on land and at sea. 

c 2 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

33.— ΚΤΑΛΗΝΙΟΤ 

Ούηώ ναΰς, κα\ ό'λωλα• τι δ' αν ττΧεον, εϊ βυθον 
eyvatv, 

ετΧην; φευ, ττάσαις όΧκάσι μοίρα κΧύΒων. 

34.— ΑΝΤΊΦΙΛΟΤ ΒΤΖΑΝΤΙΟΤ 

Μυρ/α με τρίψασαν άμετρητοιο θαλάσσης 
κύματα, καϊ γερσω βαιον ερεισαμενην, 

ώΧεσεν ούγϊ θάλασσα, νέων φόβος, άλλ' εττϊ <γαίης 
'Ήφαιστος, τις ερεϊ ττόντον άττιστότερον; 

ένθεν εφυν άττόΧωΧα' τταρ ήϊόνεσσι δε κεΐμαι, 5 

γερσω την ττεΧάηευς ελπίδα μεμφομενη. 

35.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

"Αρτι μ€ ττηηνυμενην ακάτου τρόττιν έσπασε <γείτων 
πόντος, κην χέρσω εις εμε μηνυμένος. 

36.— 2ΕΚΟΤΝΔΟΤ 

'ΟΧκάς αμέτρητου πελάγους άνύσασα κεΧευθον, 
καϊ τοσάκις χαροποΐς κύμασι νηξαμενη, 

ην ο μεΧας οΰτ Κύρος εττόντισεν, ούτ επί- χερσον 
ηΧασε χειμερίων aypiov ο18μα ΝότωϊΛ 

εν ττυρϊ νυν ναυη^ος iyco •χθονϊ μεμφομ άττίστω, 5 
νυν άΧος ημέτερης ύδατα διζομενη. 

20 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 33-36 

33.— CYLLENIUS 

Before I was a ship I perished. What more could 
I have suffered if I had become familiar with the 
deep ? Alas, every bark meets its end by the waves ! 

34.— ANTIPHILUS OF BYZANTIUM 

After I had traversed innumerable waves of the 
limitless sea, and stood firm for a season on the land, 
I was destroyed not by the sea, the terror of ships, 
but on shore by fire. Who will say that the sea is 
the more treacherous of the two? It was the earth 
on which I came into being that destroyed me, and 
I lie on the beach, reproaching the land for the fate 
I expected from the sea. 

35. — By the Same 

I am the newly-fashioned keel of a ship, and the 
sea beside which I lay carried me off, raging against 
me even on land. 

36.— SECUNDUS 

I, the ship which had traversed the paths of the 
limitless ocean, and swum so often through the gray 
waves; I, whom neither the black east wind over- 
whelmed nor the fierce swell raised by the winter 
south-westers drove on shore, am now shipwrecked 
in the flames, and reproach the faithless land, in sore 
need now of the waters of my sea. 

21 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 
37.— ΤΤΛΛΙΟΤ ΦΛΑΚΚΟΤ 

E15 πηγην ίπώννμον Ησυχίας 

α. Ιζ,ιγησας άρυσαι. β. Τίνος οννεκα ; α. Μ^κετ' 
άρυου. 
β. Ύευ χάριν; α. \\συγίης ηΒύ XeXoy%a ποτόν. 
β. ΑύσκοΧος ή κρήνη. a. Υεύσαι, και ράΧΧον ερε ΐς με 
ΒνσκοΧον. β. Λ Ω πικρον νάματος, α.* Ω,ΧαΧιής. 

38.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Et μεν άνηρ ήκεις, άρνσαι, ξένε, τΓ;σδ' από πηγής• 
el Βε φύσει μαΧακός, μη με π'ιης πρόφασιν. 

άρρεν iyco ποτόν είμι, κ αϊ άνΒράσι μουνον αρέσκω' 
τοις Be φύσει μαΧακοΐς η φύσις εστίν νΒωρ. 

39.— ΜΟΤ2ΙΚΙΟΤ 

Ά Κνπρις ^ίούσαισΐ' " Κοράσια, ταν ΑφροΒίταν 
τιματ , η τον' Ερων ΰμμιν εφοπΧισομαι. ' 

γαι Μούσα* ποτϊ Κ,ύπριν "'Άρει τα, στωμύΧα ταύτα' 
ήμΐν δ' ου πετεται τούτο το παιΒάριον." 

40.— ΖΩ2ΙΜΟΤ ΘΑ2ΙΟΤ 

Ου μόνον νσμίνησι καϊ εν στονόεντι κυΒοιμω 
ρύομ άρειτόΧμου θνμόν Άναξιμένους, 

άΧΧα και εκ πόντου, όπότ εσγισε νήα θάΧασσα, 
ασπίς, εφ' ημέτερης νηξάμενον σανίΒος. 

ειμί Βε κην πεΧά<γει και επι γθονος εΧπϊς εκείνω, 5 
τόι* θρασύν εκ ΒιπΧών ρυσαμενη θανάτων. 

1 This seems to be a vindication of the fountain of 
Salmacis near Halicarnassus, the water of which had the 
reputation of making men effeminate. 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 37-40 

37.— TULLIUS FLACCUS 

On a Fountain called Quiet Fount 

A. " Draw water from me in silence." B. " Why ? " 
A. "Stop drawing." B. " Wherefore ? " A. "Mine 
is the sweet drink of Quiet." B. "You are a dis- 
agreeable fountain." A. "Taste me and you will see 
I am still more disagreeable." B. "Oh what a bitter 
stream ! " A. " Oh what a chatterbox ! " 

38. — Anonymous 

If thou art a man, stranger, draw water from this 
fountain ; but if thou art effeminate by nature, on no 
account drink me. I am a male drink, and only 
please men ; but for those naturally effeminate their 
own nature is water.' 

39.— MUSICIUS 

Cypris to the Muses : " Honour Aphrodite, ye 
maidens, or I will arm Love against you." And the 
Muses to Cypris : " Talk that twaddle to Ares. Your 
brat has no wings to fly to us." 

40.— ZOSIMUS OF THASOS 

On the Shield 2 of one Anaximenes 

Not only in combats and in the battle din do I 
protect the spirit of valiant Anaximenes ; but in the 
sea, too, when the waves broke up his ship, I was a 
shield to save him, clinging to me in swimming as if 
I were a plank. On sea and land alike I am his hope 
and stay, having saved my bold master from two 
different deaths. 

2 Presumably in this and the following epigrams a shield 
made of leather or wicker is meant. 

23 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

41.— ΘΕΩΝ02 ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΕΩ2 

Η παρος αντιπάΧων επιήρανος ασπίς ακόντων, 
y) φόνων στυγνού κνμα φέρουσα μόθου, 

aypiov ούδ' ore πόντος επί κΧόνον ηΧασε φωτί, 
καϊ πικρή ναυτεων επΧεθ* άΧιφθορίη, 

συζυ^ίης άμίΧησα' καΧόν δε σε φόρτον άγουσα, 
ναι φίΧος, ευκταίων άχρις εβην Χιμενων. 

42.— ΙΟΤΛΙΟΤ ΛΕΩΝΙΔΟΤ 

Έίίν ενϊ κινδύνους εφυ^/ον δύο ΜυρτίΧος οπΧω, 
τον μεν, αριστεύσας• τον δ\ επινηξά μένος, 

άργέστης οτ έδυσε νεως τρόπιν ασπίδα δ' εσχον 
σωθείς κεκριμενην κύματι καϊ ποΧεμω. 

43.— ΠΑΡΜΕΝΙΩΝ02 ΜΑΚΕΔΟΝΟΧ 

' Αρκεί μοι χΧαίνης Χιτον σκεπας, ούδε τραπεζαις 
δουΧεύσω, Ίύουσεων άνθεα βοσκόμενος. 

μισώ πΧοΰτον άνουν, κοΧάκων τροφόν, ούδε παρ* 
όφρύν 
στησομαΐ' ο'δ' οΧίγης δαιτός εΧευθερίην. 

44.— 2ΤΑΤΙΛΛΙΟΤ ΦΛΑΚΚΟΤ <οι δε> 
ΠΛΑΤΩΝΟΣ TOT ΜΕΓΑΛΟΤ 

~Κρυσον άνηρ εύρων εΧιπε βρόχον αύτάρ ό χρυσον 
ον Χίπεν ούχ εύρων ήψεν ον εύρε βρόγον. 

24 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 41-44 

41.— THEON OF ALEXANDRIA 

I, the shield that erst protected from the foemen's 
shafts and resisted the bloody wave of horrid war, 
not even then, when the sea in wild tumult swept 
on my master, and the mariners perished miserably, 
betrayed my comrade, but bearing thee, a noble bur- 
den indeed, my friend, went with thee even to the 
haven for which thou didst pray. 

42.— JULIUS LEONIDAS 

I, Myrtilus, escaped two dangers by the help of 
one weapon ; the first by fighting bravely with it, 
the second by swimming with its support, when the 
north-west wind had sunk my ship. I was saved 
and now possess a shield proved both in war and on 
the waves. 

43.— PARMENION OF MACEDONIA 

The simple covering of my cloak is enough for me ; 
and I, who feed on the flowers of the Muses, shall 
never be the slave of the table. I hate witless 
wealth, the nurse of flatterers, and I will not stand 
in attendance on one who looks down on me. I 
know the freedom of scanty fare. 

44.— STATYLLIUS FLACCUS, by some 

ATTRIBUTED TO PLATO 

A man finding gold left his halter, but the man 
who had left the gold and did not find it, hanged 
himself with the halter he found. 

25 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

45.— 2ΤΑΤΤΛΛΙΟΤ ΦΛΑΚΚΟΤ 

Χρυσον άνηρ 6 μεν εύρεν, 6 δ' ώΧεσεν ων ο μεν εύρων 

ρίψεν, 6 δ' ούχ εύρων Χυγρον εδησε βρόχον. 

S. Τ. Coleridge, Poelical and Dramatic Works, 1877, ϋ. 
374, a version made for a wager, as a tour deforce in brevity. 
cf. Ausonius, Epig. 22 ; Wyatt, Epig. 26 ; and Prof. W. J. 
Courthope, History of English Poetry, vol. ii., p. 58 n. 

46.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ ΜΑΚΕΔΟΝ02 

ΐΐηρος άπαις, ή φέγγος ίδεΐν η παΐδα τεκέσθαί 

εύξαμένη, δοιής εμμορεν εύτυχίης' 
τίκτε γαρ •\εύθύς άεΧπτα μετ ου ποΧύ, και τριποθητου 

αύτήμαρ ηΧυκερον φέγγος εσειδε φάους. 
"Αρτεμις άμφοτέροισιν επήκοος, η τ ε Χοχείης δ 

μαία, και άργενιών φωσφόρος η σεΧάων. 

47.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Τον Χύκον εξ ίδιων μαζών τρέφω ουκ εθέΧουσα, 
άΧΧά μ αναγκάζει ποιμένος αφροσύνη. 

αυξηθείς δ' υπ εμού, κατ εμού πάΧι θηρίον εσταΐ' 
η χάρις άΧΧάξαι την φύσιν ου δύναται. 

48.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Ζευς κύκνος, ταύρος, σάτυρος, χρυσός δι? έρωτα 
Αιβης, Ευρώπης, 'Αντιόπης, Αανάης. 

49.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Έλ-π-Ι? καϊ συ, Τύχη, μέηα χαίρετε• τον Χιμέν εύρον 
ούδεν εμοί χ ύμΐν παίζετε τους μετ εμέ. 

1 Artemis in her quality of Moon-goddess restored the 
light to the woman's eyes. Artemis, of course, presided 

26 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 45-49 

45.— STATYLLIUS FLACCUS 

One man found the gold and the other lost it. He 
who found it threw it away, and he who did not find 
it hanged himself with the dismal halter. 

4G.— ANT1PATER OF THESSALONICA 

A blind and childless woman, who prayed that she 
might either recover her sight or bear a child, gained 
both blessings. For not long after she was brought 
to bed, as she never had expected, and on the same 
day saw the sweet light of day for which she had 
longed with all her heart. Both her prayers were 
heard by Artemis, the deliverer in child-bed and the 
bearer of the white-rayed torch. 1 

47. — Anonymous 
On a Goat that suckled a Wolf 

It is not by my own will that I suckle the wolf 
at my own breast, but the shepherd's folly compels 
me to do it. Reared by me he will become a beast 
of prey to attack me. Gratitude cannot change 
nature. 

48. — Anonymous 

Through love Zeus became a swan for Leda, a bull 
for Europa, a satyr for Antiope, and gold for Danae. 

49. — Anonymous 
Farewell, Hope and Fortune, a long farewell. I 
have found the haven. I have no more to do with 
you. Make game of those who come after me. 

over child-birth too because she was Moon-goddess ; but that 
is beside the point here. 

27 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



50.— MIMNEPMOT 



Ύην σαυτου φρένα τέρπε• δυσηΧε^εων δε ποΧιτών 
αΧΧος τίς σε κακώς, άΧΧος άμεινον ερεΐ. 

51.— ΠΛΑΤΩΝΟΣ 

Αιών πάντα φέρει' δοΧιχος χρόνος οϊδεν άμείβειν 
οΰνομα καϊ μορφην και φύσιν ήδε τύχην. 
Α. Esdaile, Lancing College Magazine, April, 1910. 

52.— ΚΑΡΠΤΛΛΙΔΟΤ 

Ίχθύας άηκίστρω τις απ γόνος εΰτριχι βάΧΧων 

εΐΧκυσε νανηγον κράτα Χιποτριχεα. 
οίκτείρας δε νεκυν τον άσωματον, εξ άσιδήρου 

χειρός επισκάπτων Χιτον έχωσε τάφον. 
εύρε δε κευθόμενον χρυσού κτεαρ. η ρα δικαίοις 5 

άνδράσιν εύσεβίης ουκ άπόΧωΧε χάρις. 

53.— ΝΙΚΟΔΗΜΟΤ, οι δε ΒΑΣ20Τ 

Ιπποκράτης φάος ην μερόπων, καϊ σώετο Χαών 
εθνεα, και νεκύων ην σπάνις elv αιδη. 

54.— ΜΕΝΕΚΡΑΤΟΤΧ 

Τήρας επάν μεν άπη, πάς εύχεται• ην δε ποτ εΧθη, 
μέμφεται• εστί δ' άει κρεϊσσον όφειΧόμενον. 

55.— ΛΟΤΚΙΛΛΙΟΤ, οι 8k ΜΕΝΕΚΡΑΤΟΤ2 
2ΑΜΙΟΤ 

Ει' τις <γηράσας ζην εύχεται, άξιος εστί 
ηηράσκειν ποΧΧών εις ετεων δεκάδας, 

*8 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 50-55 

50.— MIMNERMUS 

(A r oi an Epigram, but a Couplet from an Elegy) 

Rejoice thy own heart, hut of thy ill-disposed 
countrymen one shall speak ill of thee and another 
well. 

51.— PLATO 

Time brings everything ; length of years can 
change names, forms, nature, and fortune. 

52.— CARPYLLIDES 

A man, angling on the beach with a hook attached 
to a fine hair line, brought to shore the hairless head 
of a shipwrecked man. Pitying the bodiless corpse, 
he dug a little grave with his hands, having no tool, 
and found there hidden a treasure of gold. Of a 
truth then righteous men lose not the reward of 
piety. 

53— NICODEMUS or BASSUS 

Hippocrates was the light of mankind ; whole 
peoples were saved by him, and there was a scarcity 
of dead in Hades. 

54.— MENECRATES 

Everyone prays for old age when it is still absent, 
but finds fault with it when it comes. It is always 
better while it is still owing to us. 

55.— LUCILIUS or MENECRATES OF SAMOS 

If anyone who has reached old age prays for life, 
he deserves to go on growing old for many decades. 

29 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

56.— ΦΙΛ1Ι1ΠΟΤ ΘΕΣΣΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩΝ 

Έβρον ®ρηϊκίου κρυμώ πεπεδημένον ύδωρ 

νήπιο? είσ βαίνων ουκ εφυγεν θάνατον 
ες ποταμον δ' ήδη \ayapov μενον ίχνος όΧισθών, 

κρνμω τους άπαΧούς αυχένας άμφεκάρη. 
καϊ το μεν εξεσύρη Χοιπον δέμας• ή δε μένουσα 

οψις ανάγκα ίην είχε τάφου πρόφασιν. 
δύσμορος ής ώδϊι α διείΧατο πυρ τε καϊ ύδωρ' 

αμφοτέρων δε δοκών, ούδενός εστίν οΧως. 

57.— ΠΑΜΦΙΛΟΤ 

Ύίπτε παναμέριος, ΐΐανδιονϊ κάμμορε κούρα, 
μυρομένα κεΧαδεϊς τραυΧα δια στομάτων; 

ή τοι παρθενίας πόθος 'ίκετο, τάν τοι άπηύρα 
®ρηΐκιος Ύηρεύς αίνα βιησάμενος; 

58.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ 

Και κραναάς ΒαβυΧώι>ος επίδρομον άρμασι τείχος 

καϊ τον eV ΆΧφειω Ζάνα κατηνγασάμην, 
κάπων τ αιώρημα, καϊ 'HeXtoto κοΧοσσόν, 

καϊ μέγαν αίπεινάν πυραμίδων κάματον, 
μνάμά τε ^ΛαυσωΧοΐο πεΧώριον αλλ' οτ εσεϊδον 

1 Αρτέμιδος νεφέων άχρι θέοντα δόμον, 
κείνα μεν ημαύρωτο ^δεκηνιδε 1 νόσφιν ΌΧυμπου 

"ΑΧιος ουδέν πω τοΐον έπηυηάσατο. 

1 Of the proposed emendations, Harberton's καϊ ήν, 15e 
seems the best (I doubt if it is right) : I render so. 

3° 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 56-58 

56.- PHILIPPUS OF THESSALONICA 

The child, treading on the frozen stream of 
Thracian Hebrus, did not escape death ; but when 
he slipped into the river, now less solidly frozen, 
his tender neck was cut through by the ice. The 
rest of his body was carried away, but the head 
which remained on the ice gave of necessity cause 
for a funeral. Unhappy she whose offspring was 
divided between fire and water and seeming to 
belong to both, belongs not wholly to either. 1 

57.— PAMPHILUS 

To the Swallow 

Why, unhappy daughter of Pandion, dost thou 
mourn all day long, uttering thy twittering note ? 
Is it that regret is come upon thee for thy maiden- 
head, which Thracian Tereus took from thee by 
dreadful force ? 

58.— ΑΝΤΙ PATER 

On the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus 

I have set eyes on the wall of lofty Babylon on 
which is a road for chariots, and the statue of Zeus 
by the Alpheus, and the hanging gardens, and the 
colossus of the Sun, and the huge labour of the high 
pyramids, and the vast tomb of Mausolus ; but when 
I saw the house of Artemis that mounted to the 
clouds, those other marvels lost their brilliancy, and 
I said, " Lo, apart from Olympus, the Sun never 
looked on aught so grand." 2 

1 cp. Book VII. No. 542. 

2 For the seven wonders of the world see note on Bk. VIII. 
No. 177. 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

59.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ 

Τέσσαρες αιωρουσι τανυπτερύγων επί νώτων 

Νΐκαι ίσηρίθμους υίέας αθανάτων 
ά μεν Άθηναίαν ποΧεμαΒόκον, α δ' ' ΑφροΒΊταν, 

ά Be τον 'ΑΧκείΒαν, ά δ' άφόβητον 'Αρη, 
σεΐο κατ εύόροφον γραπτον τέ<γος' ες δβ νέονται 

ούρανόν, ω 'Ρώμας Ταΐε πάτρας ερυμα. 
θείη άνίκατον μεν ό βουφάγος. ά Be σε Κύπρις 

evyapov, εΰμητιν ΤΙαΧΧάς, άτρεστον "Αρης. 

60.— ΔΙΟΔΩΡΟΤ 

Πύργος οδ' ειναΧίης επί γοιράΒος, ούνομα νήσω 
ταύτον έχων, όρμου σύμβοΧόν είμι Φάρος. 

61.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Γυμνον ΙΒοΰσα Αάκαινα παΧίντροπον etc ποΧέμοιο 
παϊΒ' ebv e'9 πάτραν ώκύν ιέντα πόΒα, 

άντίη αίξασα Βι ήπατος ήΧασε Χόγχαν, 
dppeva ρηξαμένα φθόγγον επι κταμένω' 

" 'ΑΧΧότριον Σπάρτας, είπεν, γένος, ερρε προς 
άΒαν, 
epp\ επεί εψεύσω πατρίΒα κα\ γενέταν." 

62.— ΕΤΗΝΟΤ Α2ΚΑΛΩΝΙΤΟΤ 

Πεΐνοι, την περίβωτον εμέ πτόΧιν, "ίΧιον Ίρην, 
την πάρος εύπνργοις τειχεσι κΧηζομενην, 

αιώνος τεφρή κατεΒηΒοκεν αλλ' εν Όμήρω 
κεΐμαι χαΧκείων ερκος έχουσα πυΧών. 

ούκέτι με σκάψει Ύρωοφθόρα Βούρατ 'Αχαιών, 
πάντων δ' 'ΈιΧΧήνων κείσομαι εν στόμασιν. 



32 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 59-62 

59.— ANTIPATER OF THESSALONICA 
Four Victories, winged, hold aloft on their backs 
as many of the immortals. One uplifts Athena in 
her warlike guise, 1 one Aphrodite, one Heracles, and 
another dauntless Ares. They are painted on the 
fair dome of thy house, and mount to heaven. Ο 
Caius, 2 bulwark of thy country, Rome, may Heracles, 
the devourer of oxen, make thee invincible ; may 
Cypris bless thee with a good wife, Pallas endue 
thee with wisdom, and Ares with fearlessness. 

60.— DIODORUS 
I, this tower on the rock in the sea, am Pharos, 3 
bearing the same name as the island and serving as a 
beacon for the harbour. 

61. — Anonymous 
The Spartan woman, seeing her son hastening 
home in flight from the war and stripped of his 
armour, rushed to meet him, and driving a spear 
through his liver, uttered over the slain these words 
full of virile spirit : " Away with thee to Hades, 
alien scion of Sparta ! Away with thee, since thou 
wast false to thy country and thy father ! " 

62.— EVENUS OF ASCALON 
Strangers, the ash of ages has devoured me, holy 
Ilion, the famous city once renowned for my towered 
walls, but in Homer I still exist, defended by brazen 
gates. The spears of the destroying Achaeans shall 
not again dig me up, but I shall be on the lips of all 
Greece. 

1 i.e. Minerva Bellatrix. 

2 Caius Caesar, the nephew and adopted son of Augustus. 

3 The lighthouse of Alexandria. 

b 33 

VOL. III. D 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

63.— Α2ΚΛΗΠΙΑΔΟΤ 

Αυδί) καϊ yevos είμϊ και οΰνομα' των δ' άπο Κόδρου 
σεμνότερη πασών είμϊ δι ' Αντίμαχοι». 

τις yap εμ ουκ ηεισε; τις ουκ άνεΧεξατο Αυδήν, 
το ξυνον Μουσών y ράμμα και 'Αντιμάχου; 

64.— Α2ΚΛΗΠΙΑΔΟΤ, οι δέ ΑΡΧΙΟΤ 

Αύται ττοιμαίνοντα μεσημβρινά μήΧά σ€ Μοΰσαί 

εδρακον εν κραναοΐς οΰρεσιν, Ησίοδε, 
και σοι καΧΧιττετηΧον, ερυσσάμεναι ττερϊ πάσαι, 

ωρεξαν δάφνας ίερον άκρεμονα, 
δώκαν δε κράνας ΈΧικωνιδος ενθεον ύδωρ, 5 

τό πτανοΰ ττωΧου ττρόσθεν εκοψεν ονυξ' 
ου συ κορεσσάμενος μακάρων y£vo<; kpya τ€ μοΧπαΐς 

και yevos αρχαίων ky ραφές ημίθεων. 

65.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Γ?7 μεν εαρ κόσμος ττοΧυδενδρεον, αίθερι δ' άστρα, 
Έλλάδί δ' ηδε χθων, οΐδε δε τη ττόΧεϊ. 

66.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ ΣΙΔΩΝΙΟΤ 

Μναμοσύναν εΧε θάμβος, οτ εκΧυε τάς μεΧιφώνου 
Χαπφοΰς, μη δεκάταν Μοΰσαν εχουσι βροτοί. 

1 The mistress of Antimachus, one of whose most celebrated 
poems was an elegy on her. 

2 i.e. than those of the most noble lineage. 

34 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 63-66 

63.— ASCLEPIADES 

Lyde l is my name and I am of Lydian race, and 
Antimachus has made me more noble than any 
descendant of Codrus. 2 For who has not sung me, 
who has not read Lyde, the joint work of the Muses 
and Antimachus ? 

64.— ASCLEPIADES or ARCHIAS 

The Muses themselves saw thee, Hesiod, feeding 
thy sheep at mid-day in the rugged hills, and all 
drawing 3 round thee proffered thee a branch of holy 
laurel with lovely leaves. They gave thee also the 
inspiring water of the Heliconian spring, that the 
hoof of the winged horse 4 once struck, and having 
drunk thy fill of it thou didst write in verse the 
Birth of the gods and the Works, and the race of 
the ancient demigods. 

65. — Anonymous 

Leafy spring adorns the earth, the stars adorn the 
heavens, this land adorns Hellas, and these men 
their country. 

66.— ANTIPATER OF SIDON 

Mnemosyne was smitten with astonishment when 
she heard honey-voiced Sappho, wondering if men 
possess a tenth Muse. 

3 I venture to render so : it is exceedingly improbable that 
(ρυσσάμΐναι is corrupt. 

4 Pegasus. 

35 
d 2 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



67.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 



^,τηΧην μητρυιής, μακράν \ίθον, έστεφε κούρος, 
ώς βίον ήΧΧά-χθαι καϊ τρόπον οίομενος' 

η δε τάφω κλινθεΐσα κατεκτανε παϊΒα πεσούσα. 
φεύγετε μητρνιής καϊ τάφον οι πρόγονοι. 

68.— ΑΛΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Μητρυιαί προηόνοισιν άεϊ κακόν ούΰε φιΧούσαι 
σώζονσιν Φαί8ρην ηνώθι καϊ ΊππόΧυτον. 

69.— ΠΑΡΜΕΝΙΩΝΟΧ ΜΑΚΕΔΟΝ02 

^Ιητρυιής δύσμηνις άεϊ χόλο?, ούο' έρ ερωτι 
ήπιος' οιδα πάθη σώφρονος ΙπποΧύτου. 

70.— ΜΝΑΣΑΛΚΟΤ 

ΎραυΧα μινυρομενα, TlavSiovl παρθένε, φωνα, 

Ύηρεος ου θεμιτών άψαμενα Xeyifov, 
τίπτ€ παναμεριος γοάεις ανά 8ώμα, χεΧιδόν; 

πάνε , επεί σε μένει και κατόπιν δάκρυα. 

71.— ΑΝΤΙΦΙΛΟΥ ΒΤΖΑΝΤΙΟΤ 

ΚΧώνες άπηόριοι ταναής δρυός, εΰσκιον ϋψος 
άνδράσιν άκρητον καύμα φυΧασσομενοις, 

εύπεταΧοι, κεράμων στε<γανώτεροι, οΙκία φαττών, 
οικία τεττί^ων, ενΒιοι άκρεμόνες, 5 

κήμε τον ϋμετεραισιν υποκΧινθεντα κόμαισιν 
ρνσασθ\ ακτινών ήεΧίου φυγάδα. 

36 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 67-71 

67. — Anonymous 

The boy was crowning his stepmother's funeral 
stele, a tall column, thinking that in changing life 
for death she had changed her character. But it 
came down on the tomb and killed him. Stepsons, 
avoid even the tomb of your stepmother. 

68. — Anonymous 

Stepmothers are always a curse to their step- 
children, and do not keep them safe even when 
they love them. Remember Phaedra and Hip- 
poly tus. 

69.— PARMENION OF MACEDONIA 

A stepmother's spite is ever mordant, and not 
gentle even in love. I know what befel chaste 
Hippolytus. 

70.— MNASALCAS 

Ο daughter of Pandion with the plaintive twit- 
tering voice, thou who didst submit to the unlawful 
embraces of Tereus, why dost thou complain, swallow, 
all day in the house ? Cease, for tears await thee 
hereafter too. 

71.— ANTIPHILUS OF BYZANTIUM 

Overhanging branches of the spreading oak, that 
from on high shade well men seeking shelter from 
the untempered heat, leafy boughs roofing closer 
than tiles, the home of wood-pigeons, the home of 
cicadas, Ο noontide branches, guard me, too, who lie 
beneath your foliage, taking refuge from the rays of 
the sun. 

37 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



72.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ 



Εύκολο? Ερμείας, ω ποιμένες, εν he. yaXaKTi 
χαίρων και Βρυ'ίνω σπενΒομένοις μέΧιτι• 

αλλ' ούχ ΉρακΧέης• eva he κτίΧον ή παγυν αρνα 
αιτεί, καϊ πάντως ev θύος e/cXeyeraL. 

αλλά Χύκους e'ipyei. τι he τό πΧέον, el το φυΧαγθέν 5 
ό'λλυταί εϊτε Χύκοις, ε'ίθ* ύπο τού φυΧακος; 

73.— ΑΝΤΙΦΙΛΟΤ ΒΤΖΑΝΤΙΟΤ 

Έ,ύβοϊκού κόΧποιο παΧ^ίνητε θάΧασσα, 
irXayKTOV νΒωρ, Ihiois ρεύμασιν άντίπαΧον, 

ηεΧ'ιω κήν νυκτϊ τετα^/μενον ες τρις, απιστον 
ναυσϊν 'όσον πέμπεις χεύμα havetζόμevov' 

θαύμα βίου, θαμβώ σε τό μνρίον, ου δέ ματεύω δ 
σην στάσιν αρρήτω ταύτα μέμηΧε φύσει. 

74.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

, Aypός Ά'χαιμεν'ώον ηενόμην ποτέ, νυν δε "Μενίππου• 
καϊ πάΧιν εξ ετέρου βήσομαϊ εις έτερον. 

και yap εκείνος εγειν μέ ποτ ωετο, καϊ πάΧιν ούτος 
ο'ίεται• είμι δ' οΧως oύhεvός, άΧΧά Ύύχης. 

75.— ΕΤΗΝΟΤ ΑΣΚΑΑΩΝΙΤΟΤ 

Κήν με φάyτ]ς επι ρίζαν, 'όμως ετι καρποφορήσω 
οσσον επισπεϊσαι σοί, τpάyε ) θυομένω. 

3» 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 72-75 

72.— ANTIPATER 

Hermes, ye shepherds, is easily contented, rejoic- 
ing in libations of milk and honey from the oak-tree, 
but not so Heracles. He demands a ram or fat lamb, 
or in any case a whole victim. But he keeps off the 
wolves. What profits that, when the sheep he protects 
if not slain by the wolf is slain by its protector ? 

73.— ANTIPHILUS OF BYZANTIUM 

Ο alternating flood of the Euboean gulf, vagabond 
water, running contrary to thy own current, how 
strong but inconstant a stream thou lendest to the 
ships, changing its direction regularly thrice by day 
and thrice by night ! Thou art one of the marvels 
of life, and I am filled with infinite wonder at thee, 
but do not seek the reason of thy factious course. 
It is the business and the secret of Nature. 

74. — Anonymous 

I was once the field of Achaemenides and am now 
Menippus', and I shall continue to pass from one 
man to another. For Achaemenides once thought 
he possessed me, and Menippus again thinks he 
does ; but I belong to no man, only to Fortune. 

75.— EVENUS OF ASCALON 

(The Vine speaks) 

Though thou eatest me to the root, billy-goat, I 
will yet bear fruit enough to provide a libation for 
thee when thou art sacrificed. 

39 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



76.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ 



Αισσάν εκ βροχί&ων ά μεν μία πίονα κίχΧαν, 
ά μία δ' ίππεία κόσσυφον εϊΧε πά<γα.' 

αλλ' ά μεν κίχΧας θαΧερον Βεμας ες φάος ΉοΟ? 
ούκετ άπο πΧεκτάς ήκε ΒεραιοπεΒας, 

ά δ' αύθις μεθεηκε τον ιερόν, ην αρ άοιΒών 
φειΒω κήν κωφαϊς, ξεΐνε, Χινοστασιαις. 

77.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ ΘΕΣΣΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩΝ 

ΥΙριομενα κάΧΧει ΥανυμήΒεος είπε πο& "Ηρα, 
θυμοβόρον ζάλου κεντρον έχουσα νόω' 

" "Αρσεν πυρ ετεκεν Ύροία ΔΦ roiyap εγω πυρ 
πέμψω επί Ύροία, πημα φέροντα ΤΙάριν 

ήξει δ' ΎΧιάΒαις ουκ αετός, άλλ' επι θοιναν 
ηύπες, όταν Δαναοί σκύΧα φερωσι πόνων. 

78.— ΛΕΩΝΙΔΟΤ [ΤΑΡΑΝΤΙΝΟΤ] 

Μη μεμψΐ) Ρ άπεπειρον άεϊ θάΧΧουσαν οπωρην 
άχράΒα, την καρποϊς πάντοτε βριθομένην. 

όππόσα yap κΧαΒεωσι πεπαίνομεν, άΧΧος εφέΧκεΐ' 
όππόσα δ' ωμά μένει, μητρϊ περικρέμαται. 

79.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

ΑύτοθεΧης καρπούς άποτεμνομαι, άΧΧα πεπείρους' 
πάντοτε μη σκΧηροΐς τύπτε με χερμαΒίοις. 

μηνίσει καϊ Βάκχος ενυβρίξοντι τα κείνου 
epya' Αυκούρ^ειος μη Χαθετω σε τύχη. 

4θ 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 76-79 

76.— ANTIPATER OF SIDON 

Of two snares one caught a fat thrush, and the 
other, in its horsehair fetters, a blackbird. Now 
while the thrush did not free its plump body from 
the twisted noose round its neck, to enjoy again the 
light of day, the other snare let free the holy black- 
bird. Even deaf bird-snares, then, feel compassion 
for singers. 

77.— ANTIPATER OF THESSALONICA 

Hera, tortured by the beauty of Ganymede, and 
with the soul-consuming sting of jealousy in her 
heart, once spoke thus : " Troy gave birth to a male 
flame for Zeus ; therefore I will send a flame to fall 
on Troy, Paris the bringer of woe. No eagle shall 
come again to the Trojans, but vultures to the feast, 
the day that the Danai gather the spoils of their 
labour." 

78.— LEONIDAS OF ALEXANDRIA 

(This and the two following are Isopsepha) 

Do not, master, find fault with me, the wild pear- 
tree, ever loaded with unripe fruit. For the pears 
which I ripen on my branches are pilfered by another 
than yourself, but the unripe ones remain hanging 
round their mother. 

79. — By the Same 

Of my own will I let my fruits be plucked, but 
when they are ripe. Stop throwing hard stones at 
me. Bacchus too will wax wrath with thee for doing 
injury to his gift. Bear in mind the fate of Lycurgus. 

4i 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



80.— TOY ΑΥΤΟΥ 



\]άντιες άστερόεσσαν όσοι ζητείτε κεΧευθον, 

ερροιτ, είκαίης ψευΒοΧόγοι σοφίης. 
ύμέας αφροσύνη μαιώσατο, τόλμα δ' ετικτεν, 

τΧήμονας, ούΒ* ΙΒίην είΒότας άκΧειην. 

81.— ΚΡΙΝΑΓΟΡΟΤ 

Μη εϊττης θάνατον βιοτής ορον είσϊ καμονσιν, 

ώς ζωοΐς, άρχαϊ συμφορεων ετεραι. 
άθρει Νικίεω Κωοι» μόρον ηΒη εκείτο 

eiv άΐΒη, νεκρός δ' ηΧθεν υπ ήεΧιον 
άστοϊ yap τύμβοιο μετοχΧίσσαντες οχήας, 

εϊρυσαν ες ποινάς τΧημονα Βυσθανεα. 

82.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΥ ΘΕ2ΣΑΑΟΝΙΚΕΩΧ 

Μ?;δ' οτ eV άηκύρης, oXofj πίστευε θαΧάσση, 
ναυτίΧε, μη& εϊ τοι -πείσματα χέρσος εχοί. 

και yap "Ιων ορμώ ενι κάττττεσεν ες Βε κόΧνμβον 
ναύτου τας ταχινάς οίνος εΒησε χέρας. 

φεΰ<γε χοροιτυπίην εττινηίον εχθρός Ίάκχω 
πόντος' Ύνρσηνοϊ τούτον εθεντο νομον. 

83.— ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΤ 

Νηος εττενγομένης ώκνν Βρόμον άμφεχόρευον 
^βεΧφΐνες, πελάγου? ίχθυφά<γοι σκύΧακες. 

1 Tyrant of Cos late in the first century B.C. We have 

coins with his head and numerous inscriptions in his honour. 

3 Grotius renders as if it were 5ισθαν4α "twice dead," but 

42 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 80-83 

80. — By the Same 

Ye prophets who explore the paths of the stars, 
out on you, ye false professors of a futile science ! 
Folly brought you to the birth, and Rashness was 
your mother, ye poor wretches, who know not even 
your own disrepute. 

81.— CRINAGORAS 

Tell me not that death is the end of life. The 
dead, like the living, have their own causes of suf- 
fering. Look at the fate of Nicias of Cos. 1 He had 
gone to rest in Hades, and now his dead body has 
come again into the light of day. For his fellow- 
citizens, forcing the bolts of his tomb, dragged out 
the poor hard-dying 2 wretch to punishment. 

82.— ANTIPATER OF THESSALONICA 

Trust not, mariner, to the fatal sea, even when 
thou art at anchor, even when thy hawsers are fast 
on land. For Ion fell overboard in the harbour, and 
his active hands, fettered by the wine, were useless 
for swimming. Shun dances and carousal on board 
ship. The sea is the enemy of Bacchus. Such is 
the law established by the Tyrrhene pirates. 3 

83.— PHILIPPUS 

The dolphins, the fish-eating dogs of the sea, were 
sporting round the ship as she moved rapidly on her 

the meaning of Ιυσθανία is that they, so to speak, prolonged 
his agony as if he were still alive. 

g Who captured Dionysus and were turned into dolphins 
by him as a punishment. See Homeric Hymn vii. 

43 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

καπροφόνος Be κύων θηρσίν κείνους ίκεΧώσας 
Βύσμορος, ως επί yrjv εις βυθον εξέθορεν. 

ώ\ετο δ' άΧΧοτ ρίης θήρης χάριν ου yap εΧαφρος 5 
πάντων earl κυνων 6 δρόμος εν TreXayei. 

84.— ΑΝΤΙΦΑΝΟΤΣ 

Ν^ό? άΧιστρεπτου ifKayKrbv κύτος εΊΒεν eir ακτής 
μηΧοβότης, βΧοσυροϊς κύμασι συρόμενον, 

χείρα δ' επερριψεν το δ' επεσπάσατ ες βυθον άΧμης 
τον σωζονθ ' ούτως πασιν άπηχθάνετο' 

vavijybv δ' 6 νομεύς εσχεν μόρον. ω Βι εκείνην δ 
και Βρυμοϊ χήροι πορθμίΒα και Χιμένες. 

85.— ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΤ ΘΕ22ΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩ2 

Ν?}α μεν ωΧεσε πόντος, εμοϊ δ' επορεν πάλι Βαίμων 
πΧαζομενω φύσεως νήα ποθεινοτερην 

πατρός ίΒών yap iyco Βεμας εις εμε καίριον εΧθόν, 
μουνερετης επεβην, φόρτος όφειΧόμενος. 

ηyayεv εις Χιμενας Βε καΧ εσπειρεν Β\ς ό πρεσβυς, 5 
νηπιον εν ya'ir), Βεύτερον εν πε\άyει. 

86.— ΑΝΤΙΦΙΛΟΤ 

ΐlaμφάyoς ερπηστης κατά Βώματα Χιχνοβόρος μυς, 
οστρεον άθρήσας χείΧεσι πεπταμενον, 

πώyωvoς Βιεροϊο νόθην ώΒάξατο σάρκα• 
αύτίκα δ' όστρακόεις επΧατά^ησε Βόμος, 

άρμόσθη δ' οΒύναισιν ό δ' εν κΧείθροισιν άφύκτοις 5 
Χηφθεϊς αύτοφόνον τύμβον επεσπάσατο. 

44 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 84-86 

course. A boar-hound, taking them for game, dashed, 
poor fellow, into the sea, as he would have dashed on 
land. He perished for the sake of a chase that was 
strange to him ; for not all dogs are light of foot in 
the sea. 

84.— ANTIPHANES 

A shepherd saw the straying hull of a sea-tost 
boat carried along shore by the fierce waves. He 
seized it with his hand, and it dragged its saviour 
into the deep sea, so bitter was its hatred of all 
mankind. Thus the shepherd met with the fate of 
a shipwrecked mariner. Alas ! both the woods and 
the harbour are put in mourning by that boat. 



85.— PHILIPPUS OF THESSALONICA 

The sea destroyed my boat, but Heaven bestowed 
on me, as I was carried hither and thither, a more 
welcome natural boat. For seeing my father's body 
coming to me opportunely, I climbed on it, a solitary 
oarsman, a burden which it was its duty to bear. 
The old man bore me to the harbour, thus giving 
life to me twice, on land as a babe and again at sea. 

86.— ANTIPHILUS 

An omnivorous, crawling, lickerish mouse, seeing 
in the house an oyster with its lips open, had a bite 
at its flesh-like wet beai'd. Immediately the house 
of shell closed tightly with a clap owing to the pain, 
and the mouse, locked in the prison from which there 
was no escape, compassed for himself death and the 
tomb. 

45 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

87.— MAPKOT ΛΡΓΕΝΤΑΡΙΟΤ 

~Μηκ€τι νυν μινύριζβ παρά Βρυι, μηκβτι φώνει 

κΧωνος eV ακρότατου, κόσσυφβ, κβκΧιμβνος• 
ε-χθρόν σοι τό&€ hevhpov ^eiyeo δ , άμπεΧος ένθα 

άντέΧΧει ηΚαυκων σύσκιος ere πβτάΧων 
κάνης ταρσον epeiaov iirl κΧάΒον, άμφί τ έκβίνη 5 

μέΧπε, Xiybv προγβων Ικ στομάτων κ£\α8ον. 
Βρϋς jap eV ορνίθεσσι φβρβι τον άνάρσιον Ιξόν, 

α δε βότρυν OTkpyei δ' υμνοποΧους ϋρομιος. 

88.— ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΤ ΘΕ^ΧΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩΧ 

Μεμφομένη Βορέην έττβπωτώμην birep αΧμης' 

irvel yap εμοι Ηρήκης ήπιος ούδ' άνεμος. 
άΧΧά μ€ την μέλίγηρυν άηΖόνα Βέξατο νώτοις 

δεΧφίν, καϊ πτηνήν πόντιος ήνιόγει. 
πιστοτάτω δ' έρέτη πορθμευομβνη, τον άκωπον 5 

ναύτην τη στομάτων OeXyov iyco κιθάρη. 
ειρεσίην $€Χφϊν€ς ael Μούσησιν άμισθον 

ηνυσαν ου ^εύσττ;? μύθος Αριονιος. 

89.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Αίμον οϊζυρην άπαμυνομένη πoXύyηpως 
Νί/ϊώ συν κούραις rjKpoXoyei στάχυας• 

ώΧβτο δ' 4κ θάΧπους' τη δ' €Κ καΧάμης συνέριθοί 
νήσαν πυρκαϊην άξυΧον άσταχύων. 

μη νεμέσα, Αήμητερ, άπο χθονος el βροτον ουσαν 5 
κοϋραι τοις γαι?;? σπέρμασιν ημφιεσαν. 

1 Philomela, before she was changed into a nightingale 
46 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 87-89 

87.— MARCUS ARGENTARIUS 

No longer warble, blackbird, by the oak-tree, no 
longer perch on the highest branch and call. This 
tree is thy enemy ; hie thee to where the vine mounts 
with shady green leaves. Set thy feet on its branch 
and sing by it, pouring shrill notes from thy throat. 
For the oak bears the mistletoe which is the foe of 
birds, but the vine bears grape-clusters ; and Bacchus 
loves songsters. 

88.— PHILIPPUS OF THESSALONICA 

I, the honey-voiced nightingale, was flying over 
the sea, complaining of Boreas (for not even the 
wind that blows from Thrace is kind to me), 1 when 
a dolphin received me on his back, the sea-creature 
serving as the chariot of the winged one. Borne by 
this most faithful boatman, I charmed the oarless 
sailor by the lyre of my lips. The dolphins ever 
served as oarsmen to the Muses without payment. 
The tale of Arion is not untrue. 

89. — Bv the Same 

Ancient Nico, fending off distressful famine, was 
gleaning the ears of corn with the girls, and perished 
from the heat. Her fellow-labourers piled up for 
her a woodless funeral pyre from the straw of the 
corn. Be not wrathful, Demeter, if the maidens 
clothed a child of Earth in the fruits of the earth. 

had suffered at the hands of her Thracian brother-in law 
Tereus. 

47 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

90.— ΑΛΦΕΙΟΤ ΜΙΤΤΛΗΝΑΙΟΤ 

Νηών ωκυπόρων ος €%€ΐς κράτος, ϊππΐ€ δαϊμον, 
καϊ μ^αν Κύβοίης άμφικρ€μή σκόπβΧον, 

ούριον εύχομένοισι δίδον πΧόον "Apeo? άχρις 
€9 πόλίΐ', 4κ %υρίης πβίσματα Χυσαμβνοις. 



91.— ΑΡΧΙΟΤ ΝΕΩΤΕΡΟΤ 

'Έιρμη Κωρυκίων ναίων πόΧιν, ω άνα, χαίροις, 
Έρμη, καϊ Χιττ} προσ^Χάσαις οσί?]. 

92.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ ΘΕΣΣΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩΝ 

Άρκβΐ τεττίγας μβθύσαι δρόσος• άΧΧά πιόντβς 

άβίδειν κύκνων elal ^β^ωνότβροι. 
ως καϊ αοιδός άνήρ, ζβνιων -χάριν, άνταποδονναι 

ύμνους εύβρκταις οϊδβ, παθών oXiya. 
τούνεκά σοι ττρώτως μεν αμείβομαι' ην δ' εθεΧωσιν 

Μοί/σαι, ποΧΧάκι μοί κείσεαι iv σεΧίσιν. 

93.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Αντίπατρος ΤΙείσωνι yevedXiov ώπασε βίβΧον 
μικρην, iv δε μιτ} νυκτϊ πονησάμενος. 

ϊλαος άΧΧα δέχοιτο, καϊ αίνήσειεν άοιδόν, 
Ζευς μέγας ώ? ολιγω πειθόμενος Χίβάνω. 

91.— ΙΣΙΔΩΡΟΤ ΑΙΓΕΑΤΟΤ 

ΤΙονΧυπον ά<γρενσας ποτέ Ύΰννιχος, εξ άΧος είς γήν 
ερριψεν, δείσας θηρος ίμαντοπεδην. 

48 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 90-94 

90.— ALPHEIUS OF MITYLENE 

To Poseidon 

Lord of horses, who hast dominion over the swift 
ships and the great precipitous rock of Euboea, grant 
a fair passage as far as the city of Ares 1 to thy 
suppliants who loosed their moorings from Syria. 

91.— ARCHIAS THE YOUNGER 

Hail ! Hermes, the Lord, who dwellest in the city 
of the Corycians, and look kindly on my simple 
offering. 

92.— ANTIPATER OF THESSALONICA 

A little dew is enough to make the cicadas tipsy, 
but when they have drunk they sing louder than 
swans. So can the singer who has received hospi- 
tality repay his benefactors with song for their little 
gifts. Therefore first I send thee these lines of 
thanks, and if the Fates consent thou shalt be often 
written in my pages. 

93. — Bv the Same 

Anti pater sends to Piso for his birthday a little 
volume, the work of one night. Let Piso receive it 
favourably and praise the poet, like great Zeus, whose 
favour is often won by a little frankincense. 

94.— ISIDORUS OF AEGAE 

Tynnichus once caught an octopus and threw it 
from the sea on to the land, fearing to be enchained 
by the creature's tentacles. But it fell on and twined 
1 i.e. Rome. 

49 

VOL. III. Ε 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

άλλ' 6 <y εφ' υπνώοντα πεσων συνεδησε Χα<γωόν, 
φευ, τάχα θηρευτας άρτι φυηόντα κύνας. 

άηρευθεϊς ηγρευσεν 6 δ' είς άΧα Ύύννιχος ίχθύν 5 
ηκε πάΧιν ζωόν, Χύτρα Χαγωον έχων. 

95.— ΑΛΦΕΙΟΤ ΜΙΤΤΛΗΝΑΙΟΤ 

Χειμερίαις νιφάδεσσι παΧυνομένα τιθάς όρνις 

τέκνοις εύναίας άμφεχεε πτέρυγας, 
μέσφα μιν ουράνιου κρύος ωΧεσεν η yap εμεινεν 

αίθριος, ουρανίων άντίπαΧος νεφεων. 
ΥΙρόκνη καϊ MyjSeia, κατ "Αώος αίδεσθητΒ δ 

μητέρες ορνίθων epya διδασκόμεναι. 

96.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ ΘΕ22ΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩ2 

' Αντιγενης 6 Γελωο? έπος ποτέ τούτο θυγατρί 

είπεν, δτ' ην ήδη νεύμενος εις Άίδην' 
" ΐίαρθενε καΧΧιπάρηε, κόρη δ ε μη, 'ίσχε συνερ -yov 

ηΧακάτην, άρκεύν κτήμα πενητι βίω• 
ήν δ' iktj εις ύμεναιον, 'Αχαιΐδος ήθεα μητρός 5 

χρηστά φύλασσε, πόσει προίκα βεβαιοτάτην." 

97.— ΑΛΦΕΙΟΤ ΜΙΤΤΛΗΝΑΙΟΤ 

'Ανδρομάχης ετι θρηνον άκούομεν, εισέτι Ύροίην 
δερκόμεθ' εκ βάθρων πάσαν ερειπομενην, 

και μόθον Αίάντειον, ύπο στεφάνη τε πόΧηος 
εκδετον εξ Ίππων "Έ,κτορα συρόμενον, 

Μ.αιονίδεω δια μούσαν, ον ου μία πατρίς άοιδον 5 
κοσμείται, <γαίης δ' άμφοτερης κΧίματα. 

5° 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 95-97 

itself round a sleeping hare that, poor thing, had 
just escaped from the hounds. The captive became 
captor, and Tynnichus threw the octopus back alive 
into the sea, taking the hare as its ransom. 1 

95.— ALPHEIUS OF MITYLENE 

A domestic hen, the winter snow-flakes falling 
thick on hei•, gathered her chickens safely bedded 
under her wings till the cold shower from the sky 
killed her ; for she remained exposed, fighting against 
the clouds of heaven. Procne and Medea, blush 
for yourselves in Hades, learning from a hen what 
mothers ought to be. 

96.— ANTIPATER OF THESSALONICA 

Antigenes of Gela, when he was already on his 
road to Hades, spoke thus to his daughter: " Maiden 
with lovely cheeks, daughter mine, let thy spindle 
ever be thy fellow-worker, a possession sufficient for 
a life of poverty. But if thou enterest into wedlock, 
keep with thee the virtues of thy Achaean mother, 
the safest dowry thy husband can have." 

97.— ALPHEIUS OF MITYLENE 

We listen still to the lament of Andromache ; still 

we see Troy laid in ruins from her foundations and the 

battle-toil of Ajax, and Hector bound to the chariot 

and dragged under the battlements of the town — 

all through the verse of Maeonides, the poet whom 

not one country honours as its own, but all the lands 

of two continents. 

1 cp. No. 14. 

51 
ε 2 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

98.— 2ΤΑΤΤΛΛΙΟΤ ΦΛΑΚΚΟΤ 

Οίδιποδες δισσοί σε, και ΥίΧεκτρη βαρύμηνις, 

και δείπνοις εΧαθε\ς Άτρεος 'ΗεΧιος, 
αΧΧα τ€ πουΧυπαθεσσι, Ί,οφόκΧεες, άμφι τύραννοι? 

άξια της Τ^ρομίου βύβΧα χοροιτυπίης, 
ταγον επϊ τραηικοίο καττ/νεσσαν θιάσοιο, 5 

αύτοΐς ηρώων φθεηξάμενον στόμασι. 

99.— ΛΕΩΝΙΔΟΤ ΤΑΡΑΝΤΙΝΟΤ 

ΊξαΧος εύπώ^ων αιηος πόσις εν ποθ 1 άΧωτ} 
οϊνης τους άπαΧούς πάντας εδαψε κΧάδους. 

τω δ' έπος εκ >γαίης τόσον άπυε' " Ketpe, κάκιστε, 
<γναθμοΐς ήμετερον κΧήμα το καρττοφόρον 

ρίζα yap εμπεδος ούσα πάΧιν ηΧυκυ νέκταρ άνήσει, 5 
οσσον επισπεϊσαι σοι, τρά^ε, θυομένω." 

100.— ΑΛΦΕΙΟΤ ΜΙΤΤΑΗΝΑΙΟΤ 

Αητους ώδίνων Ίερη τροφε, την άσάΧεντον 
Αί^αίω Κρονίδης ώρμίσατ εν πεΧά^/ει, 

ου νύ σε δειΧαίην, μα, τεούς, δέσποινα, βοήσω, 
δαίμονας, ούδε λόγοί? εψομαι 'Αντιπάτρου' 

οΧβίζω δ', 'ότι Φοΐβον εδεξαο, καϊ μετ "ΟΧυμπον 5 
'Αρτεμις ουκ αΧΧην ή σε Χεγει πατρίδα. 

101.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Ηρώων oXiyai μεν εν ομμασιν, αϊ δ' ετι Χοιπαϊ 
πατρίδες ου ποΧΧω γ' αίπύτεραι πεδίων 



52 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 98-101 

98.— STATYLLIUS FLACCUS 

Thy two Oidipodes and the relentless hate of 
Electra, and the Sun driven from heaven by the 
feast of Atreus, and thy other writings that picture 
the many woes of princes in a maimer worthy of the 
chorus of Dionysus, approved thee, Sophocles, as the 
chief of the company of tragic poets ; for thou didst 
speak with the very lips of the heroes. 

99.— LEONIDAS OF TARENTUM 

The nanny-goat's nimble, bearded spouse once in 
a vineyard nibbled all the tender leaves of a vine. 
The vine spoke thus to him from the ground : " Cut 
close with thy jaws, accursed beast, my fruitful 
branches ; my stem is entire, and shall again send 
forth sweet nectar enough to serve as a libation for 
thee, goat, when thou art sacrificed." 1 

100.— ALPHEIUS OF MITYLENE 

To Delos 

Holy nurse of Leda's babes, whom Zeus anchored 
immovably in the Aegean main ! I swear, gracious 
lady, by thy own gods, that I will not call thee 
wretched or follow the verses of Antipater. 2 I deem 
thee blessed in that thou didst receive Phoebus, and 
that Artemis, after Olympus, calls no land her father- 
land but thee. 

101. — By the Same 

Few are the birth-places of the heroes that are 
still to be seen, and those yet left are not much 

1 cp. No. 75. a See No. 408 below. 

53 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

οϊην καϊ σε, τάΧαινα, παρερχόμενός γε Μ,υκήνην 

ε<γνων, αιποΧίου παντός έρημοτέρην, 
αίποΧικον μήνυμα• γέρων δε τις, " Η ποΧύχρυσος," δ 

είπεν, "ΚυκΧώπων τ^δ' επέκειτο πόΧις." 

102.— ΑΝΤΩΝΙΟΤ [ΑΡΓΕΙΟΤ] 

Η πρϊν ε'γώ ΥΙερσήος άκρόπτοΧις αίθερίοιο, 
η πικρον ΐΧιάδαις αστέρα θρεψαμένη, 

αίποΧιοισιν εναυΧον έρημαίοισιν άνεϊμαι, 
τισασα ΤΙριάμου δαίμοσιν οψέ Βίκας, 

103.— ΜΟΤΝΔΟΤ ΜΟΤΝΑΤΙΟΤ 

Η ποΧύχρυσος εγώ το πάΧαι πόΧις, ή τον ' ΑτρειΒών 

οίκον απ ουρανίου Βεξαμένη γενεής, 
η Ύροίην πέρσασα θεόκτιτον, η βασίΧειον 

άσφαΧες ΕΧΧήνων ουσά ποθ^ ημιθέων, 
μηΧόβοτος κεΐμαι καϊ βούνομος 'ένθα ΧΙυκήνη, 5 

των εν εμοϊ μεγάλων τουνομ εγουσα μόνον. 
"\Xiov α Νεμέσει μεμεΧημένον, ει γε, Μυκήνης 

μηκέθ* όρωομένης, έσσί, καϊ εσσι πόΧις. 

104.— ΑΛΦΕΙΟΤ ΜΙΤΤΛΗΝΑΙΟΤ 

"Αργό?, 'Ομηρικέ μύθε, και Ελλάδος• lepbv οΰΒας, 
και χρυσέη το παΧαι Τίερσέος άκρόποΧι, 

έσβέσαθ^ ήρωων κείνων κΧέος, οι ποτέ Ύροίης 
ήρειψαν κατά γης θειόΒομον στέφανον. 

αλλ' η μεν κρε'ισσων εστίν πόΧις• αϊ δέ πεσουσαι 5 
Βείκνυσθ* ευμΰκων αύΧια βουκοΧίων. 

54 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 102-104 

higher than the soil. So, as I passed thee by, did I 
recognise thee, unhappy Mycenae, more waste than 
any goat-fold. The herds still point thee out, and 
it was an old man who said to me, " Here stood once 
the city, rich in gold, that the Cyclopes built." 

102.— ANTONIUS 

On the Same 

I, once the stronghold of sky-mounting Perseus, I, 
the nurse of the star 1 so cruel to the sons of Ilium, 
am left deserted now to be a fold for the goat-herds 
of the wilderness, and at length the spirit of Priam is 
avenged on me. 

103.— MUNDUS MUNATIUS 

I, Mycenae, the city once so rich in gold, I who 
received into my Avails the house of the Atreidae, 
sons of Heaven, I who sacked Troy that a god built, 
I who was the secure royal seat of the Greek demi- 
gods, lie here, the pasture of sheep and oxen, with 
naught of my greatness left but the name. Well 
hath Nemesis borne thee in mind, Ilion, since now, 
when Mycenae is no longer to be seen, thou art, and 
art a city. 

104.— ALPHEIUS OF MITYLENE 

Argos, thou talk of Homer, and thou holy soil of 
Hellas, and thou stronghold of Perseus once all 
golden, ye are perished, and with you the light of 
those heroes who once levelled the god-built battle- 
ments of Troy. Now Troy is a city more powerful 
than ever and you are fallen and are pointed out as 
the stalls of lowing cattle. 

1 Of the Atridae. 55 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



105.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 



ΈκΧάσθην άνέμοισι πίτυς. τι με τβύγ^τε νήα, 
ναυηηων ανέμων χερσόθι ηευσαμέναν, ι 

106.— ΛΕΩΝΙΔΑ [ΤΑΡΑΝΤΙΝΟΤ] 

ΌΧκάδα πυρ μ έφλεξε, τόσην άλα μετρήσασαν, 
εν χθονί, τη πεύκας εις έμέ κειραμένη, 

f)v πέλαγος Βιέσωσεν, eV γόνος' άλλα θαλάσσης 
την εμέ γειναμένην ευρον άπιστοτέρην. 

107.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Ύην μικρήν μ€ Χέγουσι, καϊ ουκ ϊσα ποντοπορεύσαις 

ναυσϊ Βιϊθύνειν άτρομον εύπλοΐην 
ουκ άπόφημι δ' εγώ' βραχύ μεν σκάφος, άλλα θα- 
λασσή 

παν ϊσον ου μέτρων η κρίσις, άλλα τύχης, 
έστω πηΒαΧίοις ετέρη πλέον άλλο yap άΧλη { 

θάρσος' εγώ δ εϊην Βαίμοσι σωζόμενη. 

C. Merivale, in Collections from the Greek Anthology, 1833, 
p. 134. 

108.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Ό Ζευς προς τον "Ερωτα• " Βέλη τα σα πάντ 
άφέλούμαι" 
χω πτανος• " Βροντά, καϊ πάλι κύκνος 6trg. u 

109.— ΙΟΤΛΙΟΤ ΔΙΟΚΛΕΟΤ2 

Ουκ ο*δ' etre σάκος Χέξαιμί σε, την επι πολλούς 
αντιπάλους πιστην σύμμαχον ώπλισάμην, 
1 cp. No. 30 above. 
56 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 105-109 

1 05. — Anonymous 

I am a pine tree broken by the wind. Why make 
a ship of me who tasted on land the ship-wrecking 
gales ? 

106.— LEONIDAS OF ALEXANDRIA 

I am a ship that, after I had traversed so many 
leagues of sea, the fire burnt on the land that had 
stripped herself of her pine-trees to build me. I, whom 
the sea spared, perished on the shore. I found her 
who bore me more faithless than the sea. 1 

107.— By the Same (?) 

They call me the little skiff, and say that I do not 
sail so well and fearlessly as the ocean ships. I do 
not deny it ; I am a little boat, but small and great 
are all the same to the sea ; it is not a matter of size, 
but of luck. Let another ship have more rudders - ; 
one puts his trust in this and another in that, but 
may I be saved by the grace of God. 

108. — Anonymous 

Said Zeus to Love : " I will take away all your 
darts." Said the winged boy : " Thunder at me if 
you dare and I will make a swan of you again." 

109.— JULIUS DIOCLES 

I know not whether to call thee a shield, thee, the 
faithful ally with whom I armed myself against many 



1 For imitations of this see Nos. 34, 36, 398. 

2 Large ships had several. 



57 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

είτε σε βαιον εμοϊ πόντου σκάφος, η μ από νηός 

οΧΧυμένης κόμισας νηκτόν eV ήϊόνας. 
"Αρεος εν πόΧεμοις βφνγον χόΧον, εν τε θαΧάσστ} 5 

Νηρήος' συ δ' άρ ης οπΧον εν αμφότεροι. 

110.— ΑΛΦΕΙΟΤ ΜΙΤΤΛΗΝΑΙΟΤ 

Ου στέργω βαθυΧηΐους άρούρας, 
ουκ οΧβον ποΧύχρυσον, οία Τύγης. 
αυτάρκους εραμαι βίου, Μακρινέ' 
το Μΐ]θεν yap ayav ayav μ€ τέρπει. 

111.— ΑΡΧΙΟΤ ΜΙΤΤΛΗΝΑΙΟΤ 

©ρήϊκας αίνείτω τις, οτι στοναγεύσι μεν υΐας 
μητερος εκ κόΧπων προς φάος ερχόμενους, 

εμπαΧι δ' όΧβίζουσιν όσους αιώνα Χιπόντας 
άπροϊδης Κ.ηρών Χάτρις εμαρψε Μόρος. 

οι μεν yap ζώοντες aei παντοία περώσιν 6 

ες κακά, τοι 8ε κακών ευρον άκος φθίμενοι, 

112.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ ΘΕ22ΑΑΟΝΙΚΕΩ2 

Τρις δέκα με πνεύσειν και δις τρία μάντιες άστρων 
φασίν έμοϊ δ' αρκεί και δεκάς η τριτάτη• 

τούτο yap άνθ ρώποις βιοτής ορός' ή δ' ετι Ι τούτοις 
Νέστορι\ και Νέστωρ δ' ήΧυθεν εις ά'ιδην. 

1 1 3.— ΠΑΡΜΕΝΙΩΝΟΧ 

Οι κόρις άχρι κόρου κορέσαντό μου• αλλ' εκορέσθην 
άχρι κόρου καυτός τους κόρις εκκορίσας. 

58 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 110-113 

foes, or rather my little sea boat, since thou didst 
support me swimming from the doomed ship to the 
shore. In war I escaped the wrath of Ares, and on 
the sea that of Nereus, and in each case thou wast 
my defence. 

110.— ALPHEIUS OF MITYLENE 

I crave not for deep-soiled fields nor wealth of 
gold such as was Gyges'. 1 I love a self-sufficient life, 
Macrinus. The saying "naught in excess" pleaseth 
me exceedingly. 

111.— ARCHIAS OF MITYLENE 
We should praise the Thracians because they mourn 
for their children when they issue from their mothers' 
wombs to the light, while on the other hand they 
bless those on whom Death, the unforeseen servant 
of the Fates, lays his hand. For the living ever pass 
through every kind of evil, but the dead have found 
the medicine of all. 

112.— ANTIPATER OF THESSALONICA 

The astrologers foretold that I would live thrice 
ten and twice three years, but I am satisfied with 
the three decades. For this is the right limit of 
men's life. Longer life is for Nestor, and even Nestor 
went to Hades. 2 

113.— PARMENION 

The bugs fed on me with gusto till they were 
disgusted, but I myself laboured till I was disgusted, 
dislodging the bugs. 3 

1 King of Lydia. 2 op. vii. 157, an imitation of this. 

3 The play on words cannot be reproduced. 

59 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 
114.— TOY ΑΥΤΟΥ 



ΙΙαιδος άφ υψηλών κεράμων υπέρ άκρα μέτωπα 
κύπτοντος (Μοίρα νηπιάχοις άφοβου), 

μητηρ έξόπιθεν μαζω μετέτρεψε νόημα' 
δϊς 8ε τέκνω ζωην εν κεχάριστο γάλα. 

11 δ.— ΑΛΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Άσπίδ' ΆχιΧλήος, την"Έ>κτορος αίμα, πιουσαν, 

Ααρτιάδης Δαναών ηρε κακοκρισιγ 
ναυηηου δε θάλασσα κατέσπασε, και πάρα τύμβον 

Αϊαντος νηκτην ώρμισεν, ουκ Ιθάκη. 

115β.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Καλά Ώοσειδάων δίκασεν ποΧν μάΧλον Άθήνης' 
******* 

και κρίσιν ΈλΧήνων στυ^ερην απέδειξε θάλασσα, 
καϊ "ϋαλαμίς απέχει κυδος όφειλόμενον. 

116.— ΑΛΛΟ 

' Ασπίς εν αΙηιαΧοϊσι βοά, καϊ σήμα τινάσσει, 
αυτόν σ εκκαλέουσα, τον άξιον άσπιδιώτην 
"Έγρεο, παΐ ΎεΧαμώνος, έχεις σάκος Αίακίδαο." 



1 The shield was awarded to Ulysses and this led to Ajax 
6o 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 114-116 

114. — By the Same 

A child was peeping down from the very edge of 
a high tiled roof (Death has no fears for little 
children), when its mother from behind turned away 
its attention by showing it her breast. Thus one 
fount of milk twice bestowed life on her child. 

115. — Anonymous 

On the Shield of Achilles Λ 

The son of Laertes gained by the unjust judgment 
of the Greeks the shield of Achilles that had drunk 
the blood of Hector. But when he suffered ship- 
wreck the sea robbed him of it, and floated it ashore 
by the tomb of Ajax and not in Ithaca. 

15b. — Anonymous 

On the Same 

Poseidon's judgment was far more admirable than 
Athena's .... The sea proved how hateful was 
the decision of the Greeks, and Salamis possesses 
the glory that is her due. 

1 1 6. — Anonymous 

On the Same 

The shield cries aloud by the shore and beats 
against the tomb, summoning thee, its worthv bearer : 
" Awake, son of Telamon, the shield of Achilles is 
thine." 

killing himself. When Ulysses was shipwrecked the shield 
is said to have come ashore in Salamis, the home of Ajax. 

61 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

117.— ΣΤΑΤΤΛΛΙΟΤ ΦΛΑΚΚΟΤ 

ΐίενθιμον ηνίκα πατρϊ ΤίοΧυξείνης υμεναιον 

ήνυσεν ογκωτου ΙΙύρρος ύπερθε τάφου, 
ώδε ποΧυκΧαύτοιο κόμας Χακίσασα /capi'jvov 

Κισσηϊς τεκεων κΧαυσε φόνους Εκάβη• 
"ΐΐρόσθε μεν άξονίοις φθιτον εΐρυσας "Έικτορα 

δεσμοΐς' 5 

νυν Be ΐΙοΧυξείνης αίμα δέχτ] φθίμενος• 
Α,ιακίδη, τι τοσούτον εμη ώδύσσαο νηδυΐ; 

παισϊν εφυς γαρ εμοϊς ήπιος ού8ε νεκυς. 

118.— [ΒΙΤΣΑΝΤΙΝΟΤ] 

"Ω μοι εγών ήβης και γήραος ούΧομενοιο' 
του μεν επερχομένου, της δ' άπονισαμενης. 

119.— ΠΑΛΛΑΔΑ 

ΕΓ τις άνηρ άρχων εθεΧει κοΧάκων άνέχεσθαι, 
ποΧΧους εκδώσει τοις μιαροις στόμασιν 

ώστε χρη τον άριστον, άπεχθαιροντα δικαίως, 
ως κόΧακας μισεΐν τους κοΧακευο μένους. 

120.— ΛΟΤΚΙΑΝΟΤ 2ΑΜΩΣΑΤΕΩ2 

ΦαΰΧος άνηρ πίθος εστί τετρημενος, εις ίν άπάσας 
άντΧών τάς χάριτας, εις κενόν εξεχεας. 

121.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

"ϊ,πάρτας καϊ "ΣαΧαμΐνος εγώ φυτον άμφήριστον 
κΧαίω δ' ηϊθεων εξοχρν ή προμάχων. 



62 



y 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 117-121 

117.— STATYLLIUS FLACCUS 

When Pyrrhus on his father's high-piled tomb 
celebrated in his honour the mournful wedding of 
Polyxena, thus did Cissean Hecuba bewail the murder 
of her children, tearing the hair from her tear-worn 
head : " Once thou didst drag dead Hector tied to thy 
chariot wheels, and now thou art dead thou acceptest 
the blood of Polyxena. Achilles, why is thy wrath 
so sore against the fruit of my womb ? Not even in 
death art thou gentle to my children." 

1 18. — Anonymous 

Alas for youth and hateful old age ! The one 
approaches and the other is gone. 

119.— PALLADAS 

If a man who is a ruler choose to put up with 
flatterers, he will sacrifice many to their vile mouths ; 
so the best men, in righteous hatred, should detest 
the flattered as much as the flatterer. 

120.— LUCIAN 

A bad man is like a jar with a hole in it. Pour / 
every kindness into him and you have shed it in 
vain. 

121. — Anonymous 
On the Hyacinth 
I am a plant for which Sparta and Salamis dispute, 
and I mourn for either the fairest of youths or the 
stoutest of warriors. 1 

1 i.e. either for Hyacinthus or for Ajax. The flower was 
supposed to bear the initials AI or T. 

63 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

122.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ, οι δε ETHNOT 

Άτθϊ κόρα μεΧίθρεπτε, \ά\ος λάλοι/ άρπάξασα 
reTTiya πτανοΐς δαϊτα φέρεις τέκεσιν, 

τον λάλοι/ ά \α\όεσσα, τον εύπτερον ά πτερόεσσα, 
τον ξένον ά ξείνα, τον θερινον θερινά; 

κούχϊ τάχος ρίψεις; ου yap θέμις, ούδε δίκαιον, 
όΧΧυσθ' ύμνοπόΧους ύμνοπόΧοις στόμασιν. 



123. <ΛΕΩΝΙΔΟΤ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΕΩΣ> 

Έ« θοίνης φάος εσχεν επ άχράδα μηκάς Ιουσα, 
εκ δ' εφάνη τυφΧην μηκέτ έχουσα κόρην 

δισσών την ετέρην yap εκέντρισεν οξύς άκάνθης 
όζος. Γδ' ά>ς τέχνης δένδρον ivepyorepov. 



124.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 
Ποΐ Φοΐβος πεπόρευται; "Αρης άναμ'^νυται Δάφνη. 

125.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

<8)αρσαΧέοι Κ,εΧτοι ποταμω ζηΧημονι 'Ρννω 
τέκνα ταΧαντεύουσι, και ου πάρος είσι τοκήες, 
πρ\ν πάιν άθρησωσι ΧεΧου μένον ΰδατι σεμνω. 
αϊψα yap ηνίκα μητρός όΧισθήσας δια κοΧπων 
νηπ'ιαχος πρώτον ττροχέει δάκρυ, τον μεν άείρας 
αυτός eV άσπίδι θηκεν έον ττάϊν, ούδ' ά\εyίζει, 
οΰπω yap yεvέτao φέρει νουν, πριν y επαθρήση 

1 We are told by Aelian that goats when suffering from 
64 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 122-125 

122. — Anonymous, by some assigned to EVENUS 
To a Swallow 
Honey-nurtured child of Athens, is it a prattling 
cicada that thy prattling self has caught and carries 
for a feast to thy winged brood ? Dost thou, the 
chatterer, prey on the chatterer ; thou, the winged, 
on the winged ; thou, the guest of summer, on the 
guest of summer ? Wilt thou not drop it at once ; it 
is neither meet nor just that singers should perish 
by mouths skilled in song. 

123.— LEONIDAS OF ALEXANDRIA 

(Isopsepkon) 
A she-goat rushing to browse on a wild pear re- 
covered her sight from the tree, and lo ! was no 
longer blind in one eye. For the sharp thorn pricked 
the one eye. See how a tree benefited more than 
the surgeon's skill. 1 

124. — Anonymous 
On a Man cutting a Laurel with an Axe 
Where has Phoebus gone ? Mars is on too close 
terms with Daphne. 

1 25. — Anonymous 
The brave Celts test their children in the jealous 
Rhine, and none regards himself as being the child's 
father until he sees it washed by that venerated river. 
At once, when the babe has glided from its mother's 
lap and sheds its first tears, the father himself lifts 
it up and places it on his shield, caring naught for 
its suffering ; for he does not feel for it like a father 

dimness of sight caused by suffusion, themselves prick the 
eye with a thorn. 

65 
VOL. III. F 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

κεκριμένον Χουτροΐσιν ελεγζιγάμου ποταμοΐο• 
ή δέ μετ είλείθνιαν eV άΧγεσιν άΧγος βοούσα 
μήτηρ, ει και παιδος άΧηθέα οίδε τοκί]α, 10 

εκδέχεται τρομέουσα, τι μήσεται άστατου ύδωρ. 

126.— ΑΔΕΣΠΟΤΟ Ν 

TiVa? αν €*ποι λογούς Κλυται/χνί^στρα Ορίστον μέλλοντος 
αντην σφάζαι. 

ΤΙή ξίφος ιθύνεις; κατά γαστερος, ή κατά μαζών; 
<γαστηρ ήδ' έΧόχευσεν, άνεθρέψαντο δε μαζοί. 

127.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Αν περιΧειφθ?] μικρόν εν άγγεσιν ηδέος οϊνον, 

εις οξύ τρέπεται τούτο το Χειπομενον 
ούτω άπαντΧτ)σας τον όλον β'ιον, εις βαθύ δ' έΧθών 
γήρας, 6 πρεσβύτης γίνεται όξύχοΧος. 

128.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Έιϊρττε δράκων, και επινεν ύδωρ' σβέννυντο δε πηηαί, 
και ποταμός κεκόνιστο, και ην ετι διψαΧεος θήρ. 

129.— ΝΕ2ΤΟΡ02 

ΈΧρπε το μεν, το δ' εμεΧΧε, το δ' ην ετι νωθρον εν 

evvfi' 
αύτάρ ο διψήσας ποταμω ύπέθηκε γένειον. 
πάς δ' άρα Κηφισός εϊσω ρέεν άργαΧέον δέ 
άνθερεών κεΧάρυζε. κατερχομένου δέ ρεέθρον, 
Κηφισον κώκυον όλωΧότα ποΧΧάκι Νύμφαι. 5 

1 Nestor of Laranda wrote Metamorphoses in verse and we 
66 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 126-129 

until he sees it judged by the bath in the river, the 
test of conjugal fidelity. The mother, suffering new 
pangs added to those of childbirth, even though she 
knows him to be the child's true father, awaits in 
fear and trembling the pronouncement of the incon- 
stant stream. 

1 26. — Anonymous 
(Wkal Clytaemnestra might have said when Orestes 

was about to kill her) 
Where dost thou direct thy sword, to my belly or 
my breasts ? This belly brought thee forth, these 
breasts nurtured thee. 

127. — Anonymous 
If a little sweet wine remains in a vessel, this 
remnant turns to vinegar. So the old man who has 
quite emptied life and has reached the depth of eld 
becomes sour-tempered. 

128. — Anonymous (but probably from the same 

poem as the following) 
The dragon crept down and drank water. The 
sources were exhausted and the river became dry 
dust, and still the brute was athirst. 

129.— NESTOR 1 
Part of it was crawling, part of it was about to 
crawl, and the rest was still torpid in its lair. But 
it thirsted and put its jaws in the stream. Then all 
Cephisus ran into them, and horrid gurgling sounded 
in its throat. As the water sunk, often did the 
nymphs lament for Cephisus that was no more. 

have here extracts from this poem. See also Nos. 364 and 
537. We do not know what this story of the dragon was. 

67 
r 2 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



130.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 



Παλλάδος ειμί φντόν Βρόμιου τι με ΘΧίβετε κΧώνες; 
άρατε τους βότουας' παρθένος ου μεθύω. 

131.— ΑΑΗΛΟΝ 

Ούρεσιν εν ΰοΧιγοϊς βΧωθρην πίτυν ΰετιός με 

ττρόρριζον γαίης έξεκύΧισε νότος' 
ένθεν ναΰς ηενόμην, άνεμοις πάλιν οφρα μάχωμαι. 

άνθρωποι τόΧμης ου ποτέ φειδόμενοι. 

132.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Έ,ωφροσύνη και 'Έρως κατεναντίον άΧΧ7)Χοισιν 

εΧθόντες ψυχάς ώΧεσαν αμφότεροι' 
Φαίδρην μεν κτεινεν πυρόεις πόθος ΊπποΧύτοιο• 

ΊππόΧυτον δ' ά<γνη πεφνε σαοφροσύνη. 

133.— ΑΔΗΑΟΝ 

Ει τις άπαζ ηήμας πά\ι Βεύτερα Χεκτρα Ζιώκει, 
ναυηηος πΧώει Βις βυθον άρ<γαΧεον. 

134, 135.— ΑΑΗΛΟΝ 

Έλπιτ, καϊ συ Ύύχη, μεηα γαιρετε' την oSbv ευρον 
ούκετι <γάρ σφετεροις επιτέρπομαι. ερρετε άμφω, 
οΰνεκεν εν μερόπεσσι ποΧυπΧανεες μάΧα εστέ. 
οσσα yap άτρεκεως ουκ εσσεται, ΰμμες εν ήμΐν 
φάσματα, ως ΰπνω, εμβάΧΧετε, οΐάτ εόντα. 5 

ερρε κακή ^Χηνη, ποΧυώουνε' ερρετε άμφω. 

68 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 130-135 

1 30. — Anonymous 

(The Olive-tree speaks) 

I am the plant of Pallas. Why do you clasp me, 
ye branches of Bacchus ? Away with the clusters ! 
I am a maiden and drink no wine. 

131. — Anonymous 

I was a sturdy pine on the mountain ridge, and 
the rainy south wind tore me up by the roots. Then 
out of me was built a ship to fight again with the 
winds. Ye men, ye never flinch from aught. 

132. — Anonymous 

Chastity and Love, meeting in the lists, both de 
stroyed life. Her burning love for Hippolytus slew 
Phaedra, and his pure chastity slew Hippolytus. 

1 33. — Anonymous 

If one who has once been married seeks another 
wife, he is like a shipwrecked sailor who sets sail 
again on the dreadful deep. 

134, 135. — Anonymous 

Hope and Fortune, a long farewell to you both ! 
I have found the way. I no longer take delight in 
aught of yours. Away with both of you ! for ye lead 
men far astray. Ye present to our minds, as in 
visions of sleep, things that never shall really be, as 
if they were. Away with thee, poor puppet, mother 
of many woes ; away with you both ! Make sport, 

69 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

παίζοιτ , etye θεΧοιτε, όσους εμεί) ύστερον οντάς 
εΰροιτ ου νοεοντας Όπερ θέμις εστί νοήσαι. 
άτρεκεως μάΧα πάσι πΧάνη ΐνχη εστί βροτοΐσιν 
εστί yap άδρανέη, το δ' επιπΧεον ουδέ πεΧουσα. 10 
ypd^ τίς; οίδε θεός' τίνος εϊνεκεν; οΐδε και αυτός. 

136.— ΚΤΡΟΤ 

Αϊθε πατήρ μ εδίδαζε δασύτριχα μήΧα νομεύειν, 
ως κεν ΰπό πτεΧε-ρσι καθήμενος, ή υπό πέτρης 
συρίσδων καΧάμοισιν εμάς τερπεσκον ανίας. 
ΥΙιερίδες, φει^ωμεν έύκτιμένην πόΧιν αΧΧην 
πατρίδα μαστεύσωμεν. άπayyεXέω δ' άρα πάσιν 5 
ως όΧοοί κηφήνες έδ7]Χήσαντο μεΧίσσας. 

137.— ΓΡΑΜΜΑΤΙΚΟΤ 

τινό? ημιζήρον προς Αδριανον τον βασιΧία 

"Ημισυ μου τέθνηκε, το δ' ήμισυ Χιμός iXiy^r 
σώσόν μου, βασιΧεΰ, μουσικόν ήμίτονον. 

Προς ον ο βασιλβυς ΑΔΡΙΑΝ02 άπεκρίνατο 
' αμφότερους αδικείς καϊ ΥίΧουτεα καϊ Φαέθοντα' 
τον μεν ετ είσορόων, του δ άποΧειπόμενος. 

138.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

*Ην νέος, άλλα πένης• νυν yηpώv πΧούσιός είμι, 
ω μόνος εκ πάντων οικτρός εν άμφοτέροις• 

ός τότε μεν χρήσθαι δυνάμην, όπότ* ούδε εν ε\*χον, 
νυν δ' οπότε χρήσθαι μή δύναμαι, τότ εχω. 

1 This Byzantine poet is said to have written the lines 
when he was exiled by the Emperor Theodosius. 

70 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 136-138 

if you will, of whomever ye find after me, whose 
mind dwells on things he should not think of. Of 
a truth Fortune is a delusion for all mortals ; for she 
is without force, and mostly even without being. — 
Who wrote this, God knows. Why? Himself only 
knows. 

136.— CYRUS 

Would that my father had taught me to shepherd 
fleecy flocks, so that, sitting under the elms or piping 
under a rock, I might cheer my sorrows with music. 
Let us fly, ye Muses, from the stately city, and seek 
another home. I will announce to all that the 
pestilent drones have done mischief to the bees. 1 

137. A CERTAIN HALF-STARVED GRAMMARIAN 

το the Emperor Hadrian 

The half of me is dead, and starvation is subduing 
the other half. Save, Sire, a musical semitone of me.'-' 

The Emperor's Reply thereto 

Thou dost wrong both Pluto and the Sun by looking 
still on the latter and failing to go to the former. 



1 38. — Anonymous 

I was once young, but poor ; now I am old I am 
rich. I alone of mortals was miserable both in youth 
and age. When I was able to use riches I had 
nothing, and now, when I cannot use them, I have 
them. 

3 i.e. half at least of my learned self. 

71 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



139.— ΚΛΑΤΔΙΑΝΟΤ 



Μαχλά? εϋκροτάΧοισιν άνευάζουσα γορείαις, 
δίζυγα παΧΧομενοισι τινάημασι γαΧκον άράσσεί' 

******* 
της μεν ύποκΧεπτων πόΧιην τρίχα, γείτονα μοίρης. 
ήΧεμάτοις άκτΐσι -χαράσσεται όμματος avytj• 5 

ψευδόμενον δ' ερύθημα κατεγραφεν άχροος αιδώς, 
ayXaty στίψασα νόθη κεκαΧυμμενα μήΧα. 

140.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

"Κδρην χαΧκεόπεζον £πϊ προθύροις ΈΧικώνος 
ειστηκει θεράπων τις υπέρ νώτοιο μεμαρπώς, 
ovS* εθεΧεν μογεοντι πορεΐν επίβαθρον άοιδής' 
τοΰνεκά μεν θώρηζε νόον ποΧύμητις ανάγκη. 

141.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Κ,οινη τταρ κΧισίη Χηθαργικος ηδε φρενοπΧηξ 
κείμενοι, άΧΧηΧων νοϋσον άπεσκέδασαν. 

εξεθορε κΧίνης yap ό τοΧμηεις υπό Χύσσης, 
και τον άναίσθητον παντός ετυπτε μεΧους. 

πΧηγαι δ' άμφοτεροις εγενοντ άκος, αϊς ό μεν αυτών 5 
εγρετο, τον δ' νπνω πονΧνς εριψε κόπος. 

142.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Κρημνοβάταν, δίκερων, Νυμφών ηγήτορα Τίάνα 
άζόμεθ\ ος πέτρινου τούδε κεκηδε δόμου, 

ΪΧαον εμμεναι άμμιν, όσοι Χίβα τήνδε μοΧοντες 
άενάου πόματος, δίψαν άπωσάμεθα. 

1 Probably a library or hall of a literary institute 

72 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 139-142 

139.— CLAUDIANUS 

The wanton, accompanying her dance with shrill 
shrieks and castanets, beats the brazen clappers to- 
gether with quivering movements. Her grey hair, 
the harbinger of death, is concealed by . . . She 
tortures her eyes to dart ineffectual flashes ; her false 
colour is sicklied o'er by the pallor of shame ; while 
a fictitious splendour clothes her hidden breasts. 

140. — By the Same 

A serving -μλν stood in the porch of Helicon x 
bearing on his shoulders a brazen-footed stool he had 
seized, and would not give it to me, tired as I was, 
to sit on and recite. Therefore ingenious necessity 
sharpened my wit to deal with the situation. 2 

141. — Anonymous 

A man in a lethargy and a maniac lying in one bed 
ridded each other of their respective maladies. For 
the one, made daring by his madness, leapt from the 
bed and belaboured the insensible man all over. 
The blows cured both, waking up the one, and his 
great exertion throwing the other into a sleep. 

142. — Anonymous 

We do worship to horned Pan, the walker on the 
crags, the leader of the Nymphs, who dwelleth in 
this house of rock, praying him to look with favour 
on all us who came to this constant fountain and 
quenched our thirst. 

2 What he means is a mystery to ns. The circumstances 
must have been known to the public. 

73 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



143.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ 



Αιτος τοι Βομος ούτος (επει παρά κύματι ττη^ω 

ΐΒρυμαι νοτερής Βεσπότις ηϊόνος), 
άλλα φιΧος' ποντω yap επϊ πλατύ Βειμαίνοντι 

χαίρω, και ναύταις εις εμε σωζομενοις. 
ιΧάσκευ την Κύπριν £<γω Βέ σοι ή εν ερωτι δ 

ούριος, ή χαροπω πνεύσομαι εν ireXayei. 

144.— ΑΝΤΤΗΣ 

ΚύττριΒος ούτος ο χώρος, επεϊ φί\οι> επΧετο τηνα 
αίεν απ ηπείρου Χαμπρον όρήν πελα^/ος, 

όφρα φίΧον ναύτησι τεΧη πΧοον άμφι Βε πόντος 
Βειμαίνει, Χιπαρον Βερκόμενος ξόανον. 

145.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

'ΕιΧθων εις άϊΒην, 6τ€ Βη σοφον ήνυσε ηήρας, 

Διο<γ€ΐ>ης ο κύων Κροΐσον ιΒών eyeXa, 
καϊ στρώσας ο ykpwv το τριβώνιον £γγύς εκείνου, 

του ποΧύν εκ ποταμού χρυσόν αφυσσαμενου, 
ειπεν " Έμοί. και νύν πΧε'ιων τόπος• οσσα yap εΐχον, 5 

πάντα φέρω συν εμοί• Κροίσε, συ δ' υύΒεν έχεις.' 
Ausonius, Epigr. 54. 

146.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Ελπίδα και Νέμεσιν Έιΰνους πάρα βωμον ετευξα, 
την μεν, '(ν εΧπίζης• την Β\ ίνα μηΒεν εχης. 

1 Pactolus. 
74 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 143-146 

143.— ANTIPATER OF SIDON 

Simple is this my dwelling (beside the big waves 
am 1 enthroned, the queen of the sea-bathed beach), 
but dear to me ; for I delight in the sea, vast and 
terrible, and in the sailors who come to me for safety. 
Pay honour to Cypris, and either in thy love or on the 
gray sea I shall be a propitious gale to bear thee on. 



144.— ANYTE 

This is the place of Cypris, for it is sweet to her 
to look ever from the land on the bright deep, that 
she may make the voyages of sailors happy ; and around 
the sea trembles, looking on her polished image. 



1 45. — Anonymous 

Diogenes the cynic, on his arrival in Hades, after 
his wise old age was finished, laughed when he saw 
Croesus. Spreading his cloak on the ground near 
the king, who once drew great store of gold from 
the river, 1 he said : " Now, too, I take up more room 
than you ; for all I had I have brought with me, but 
you, Croesus, have nothing." 

146. — Anonymous 

I, Eunus, have set up Hope and Nemesis by the 
altar, the one in order that thou mayst hope, the 
other that thou mayst get nothing. 2 

2 The epigram seems to be facetious. The dedicator whose 
name means " benignant : ' really had a spite against mankind. 

75 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

147.— ΑΝΤΑΓΟΡΟΤ ΡΟΔΙΟΤ 

Ω ϊτε Δή μητρός προς άνάκτορον, ω ϊτε, μύσται, 
μη δ' ύδατος προχοας δείδιτε χειμερίους. 

τοΐον yap ΆενοκΧής fo Έϊείνιδος άσφαΧες ύμμιν 
ζεύημα δια πΧατεος τοΟδ' εβαΧεν ποταμού. 

148.— ΑΛΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Τον βίον, ΉράκΧειτε, ποΧυ πΧέον ηπερ ό'τ' εζης 

Βάκρυε' νυν ό βίος εστ εΧεεινότερος. 
τον βίον άρτι <γεΧα, Δημόκριτε, το πΧεον ή πριν 

νυν 6 βίος πάντων εστί 'γεΧοιότερος. 
εις ύμεας δε καϊ αυτό? ορών, το μεταξύ μεριμνώ 5 

πω? άμα σοϊ κΧαύσω, πώς άμα σοι γελάσω. 

149.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ 

ΕΓχεν ^ Αριστείδης 6 βοκέρριος ουκ άπο ποΧΧών 
ποΧΧά, μιής δ' δϊος και βοος εύπορίην. 

άλλα yap ούδ' ό πένης εφυ^ε φθόνον ηματι δ' αύτώ 
θήρες οίν, την βοΰν δ' ωΧεσε δυστοκίη. 

μισησας δ' άβΧηχες επαύΧιον, άμματι πηρης 5 

εκ ταύτης βιοτην άχράδος εκρεμασεν. 

150.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

ΐίΧοΰτος Αριστείδη δάμαΧις μία καϊ τριχόμαΧΧος 
ην οϊς' εκ τούτων Χιμον εΧαυνε θύρης. 

ημβροτε δ' αμφοτέρων άμνην Χύκος, εκτανε δ' ώδις 
την δάμαΧιν πενίης δ' ώλετο βουκόΧιον. 

πηροδέτω δ' 6 y Ιμάντι κατ αύγενος άμμα Χυηώσας, 5 
οικτρός άμυκήτω κάτθανε παρ καΧύβη. 



7 6 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 147-150 

147.— ANTAGORAS OF RHODES 
Hie ye, hie ye, ye initiated, to the temple of De- 
meter, fearing not the winter floods. So safe a hridge 
for you hath Xenocles, the son of Xeinis, thrown 
across this broad river. 1 

148. — Anonymous 
Weep for life, Heraclitus, much more than when 
thou didst live, for life is now more pitiable. Laugh 
now, Democritus, at life far more than before ; the 
life of all is now more laughable. And I, too, looking 
at you, am puzzled as to how I am to weep with the 
one and laugh with the other. 

149.— ANTIPATER OF THESSALONICA 

Aristides the . . . had not much from many 
sources, but his fortune was one ewe and one cow. 
Yet, notwithstanding his poverty, he escaped not 
Envy, and in one and the same day wild beasts killed 
the sheep and a difficult birth the cow. Hating the 
sight of his yard, in which the sound of bleating 
was silent, he hanged himself by the strap of his 
wallet from this wild pear-tree. 

150. — By the Same 
All the wealth of Aristides was one heifer and 
one fleecy sheep. By their means he kept famine 
from the door. But he lost both ; a wolf killed the 
sheep and the cow perished in labour. His poor 
stock was gone, and noosing his neck in the strap of 
his wallet, the wretched man died close to his cabin, 
which no longer echoed to the sound of lowing. 

1 The bridge was over the Cephisus on the road to Eleusis. 
Xenocles' services in building it are mentioned in an inscription. 

77 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

151.— TOY ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Που το περίβΧεπτον κάΧΧος σέο, Δω/κ Κόρινθε; 

πού στεφάναι πύργων, πού τά πάΧαι κτεανα, 
πού νηοι μακάρων, πού δώματα, ττοΰ δε δάμαρτες 

Σισύφιαι, Χαών θ' αϊ ποτέ μυριάδα; 
ούδε yap ούδ' ίχνος, ποΧυκάμμορε, σεϊο ΧεΧειπται, 5 

πάντα Be συμμάρψας έξίφα^/εν πόΧεμος. 
μούναι απόρθητοι Νΐ]ρηϊδες, Ώκεανοΐο 

κοΰραι, σων άχεων μίμνομεν άΧκυόνες. 

152.— ΑΓΑΘΙΟΤ 2ΧΟΑΑ2ΤΙΚΟΤ 

"Αδε ποθ Λ ά κΧεινα Ώριάμου πόΧις, αν άΧαπάξαι 
'ΕΧΧάνων δεκάτης ουκ ετάΧασσεν άρης 

άμφαδόν, άλλ' ΐπποιο κακόν ξύΧον. αΐθε δ' Έπείός 
κάτθανε πριν τεύξαι δουρατέαν παγίδα. 

οΰ yap αν, Ατρειδάν 6poφηφάyov αναμένων πυρ, δ 
ούτω εφ' άμετεροις Χάεσιν ηριπόμαν. 

153.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 
*ίϊ 7τόλί, πή σεο κείνα τα τε'ιχεα, πή πο> ύοΧβοι 

νηοί; πή δε βοών κράατα τεμνομένων; 
πή ΤΙαφίης άΧάβαστρα, κ αϊ ή π ay χρυσός εφεστρίς; 

πή δε Ύpιτoyεvoύς δείκεΧον ενδαπίης; 
πάντα μόθος χρονίη τε χύσις και Μοίρα κραταιή 5 

ηρπασεν, άΧΧοίην άμφιβαΧοΰσα τύχην. 
και σε τόσον νίκησε βαρύς φθόνος' αλλ' άρα μοΰνον 

οΰνομα σον κρύψαι καϊ κΧεος ού δύναται. 
78 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 151-153 

151.— ANTIPATER OF SIDON 

Where is thy celebrated beauty, Doric Corinth ? 
WHere are the battlements of thy towers and thy 
ancient possessions ? Where are the temples of the 
immortals, the houses and the matrons of the town 
of Sisyphus, and her myriads of people ? Not even 
a trace is left of thee, most unhappy of towns, but 
war has seized on and devoured everything. We 
alone, the Nereids, Ocean's daughters, remain in- 
violate, and lament, like halcyons, thy sorrows. 

152.— AGATHIAS SCHOLASTICUS 

On Troy 

I am the once famous city of Priam, which not the 
ten years' Avar of the Greeks succeeded in sacking 
by open force, but the cursed wooden horse. Would 
that Epeius had died ere he had wrought that wooden 
trap. For never then had the Greeks lit the fire 
that licked my roofs, never had I sunk down on my 
foundations. 

153. — By the Same 

On the Same 

Where are those walls of thine, Ο city, where thy 
temples full of treasure, where the heads of the oxen 
thou wast wont to slay ? Where are Aphrodite's 
caskets of ointment and her mantle all of gold ? 
Where is the image of thy own Athena ? Thou hast 
been robbed of all by war and the decay of ages, and 
the strong hand of Fate, which reversed thy fortunes. 
So far did bitter Envy subdue thee ; but thy name 
and glory alone she cannot hide. 

79 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



154.— TOY ΑΥΤΟΥ 



ΐΧήκοις, ποΧιου~χε. σε μεν χρυσαυγέι νηώ, 

ώς θέμις, α τΧάμων "Ιλίος ηηασάμην 
άλλα συ μ€ προΧεΧοιπας εΧώριον αντί δε μηΧου 

πάσαν άπεδρεψω τείγεος ά^Χαίην. 
άρκιον ην θνάσκειν τον βουκόΧον el jap άθεσμος 5 

επΧετο, τάς πάτρας ουκ άΧιτημα τόδε. 

155.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Et μεν από Σπάρτης τις εφυς, ξένε, μη με <γεΧάσσης• 

ου <yap εμοί μούνη ταύτα τεΧεσσε Ύύχη. 
ει δε τις εξ Άσίης, μη πενθεε• Δαρδανικοϊς yap 

σκηπτροις Αΐνεαδών πάσα νενευκε πόΧις. 
el he θέων τεμένη καϊ τείγεα και ναετήρας 5 

ζηΧημων δη'ίων εξεκενωσεν άρης, 
ειμί πάΧιν βασιΧεια. συ δ\ ώ τεκος, άτρομε '"Ρώμη, 

βάλλε καθ' ΈΧΧΐ)νων σης ξυ<γόδεσμα δίκης. 

156.— ΑΝΤΙΦΙΛΟΤ ΒΤΖΑΝΤΙΟΤ 

Δερκεο τον Τροίας ]δεκετη Χόχον εϊσιδε πώΧον 

εύόπΧου Δαναών εηκυον ήσυχίης. 
τεκταίνει μεν Έπειός, Άθηναίη δε xeXevet 

έργον ΰπεκ νώτου δ' Έλλά? όλα δύεται. 
η ρα μάταν άπόΧοντο τόσος στρατός, εΐ προς άρηα 5 

ην δόΧος Άτρείδαις εσθΧότερος ποΧεμου. 
8ο 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 154-156 

154. — By the Same 

On the Same 

Have mercy on me, Athena, protectress of the 
city. I, wretched Ilion, as was meet, worshipped 
thee in thy temple resplendent with gold. But thou 
hast abandoned me to the spoilers, and all for the 
sake of an apple hast stripped all the glory from my 
walls. Better had it been for the cowherd, Paris, to 
perish, for if he broke the law, it was not his coun- 
try's crime. 

155. — By the Same 

On the Same 

If thou art a native of Sparta, stranger, mock me 
not ; for I am not the only one that Fortune hath 
used thus. But if thou art from Asia, mourn me 
not ; for every city now bows beneath the Trojan 
sceptre of the house of Aeneas. If the envious 
sword of thy enemies hath emptied the temples of 
my gods, and my walls, and my streets, yet am I 
again a queen, and do thou, undaunted Rome, my 
child, set on the Greeks the yoke of thy just rule ! 

156.— ANTIPHILUS OF BYZANTIUM 

Look on the ambush that took Troy after ten 
years ; look on the horse whose belly was big with the 
armed and silent Greeks. Epeius is building it and 
Athena is ordering the work, and all Hellas is emerg- 
ing from beneath its back. Of a truth in vain did so 
great a host perish, if stratagem was more helpful to 
the Atreidae in the Avar than open battle. 

81 
vol. in. α 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



157.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 



Ύίς θεον είπεν Έρωτα; θεού κακόν ούδεν 6 ρώ μεν 

kpyov 6 δ ανθρώπων αίματι μειδιάει, 
ου θοον εν παΧάμαις κατέχει ξίφος; ήνί&' > άπιστα 

της θειοδμήτου σκΰΧα μιαιφονίης. 
μητηρ μεν συν παίδι κατεφθιτο• αυταρ eV αυτοίς 

ποίνιμος εκτεινεν φώτα Χιθοκτονίη. 
και ταΰτ ούτ "Αϊδος, ούτ "Αρεος, έργα δ' "Ερωτος 

Χενσσομεν, οΐς παίζει κείνος 6 νηπιακός. 

158.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

At τρισσαί ποτέ παίδες εν άΧΧήΧαισιν επαιζον 

κΧήρω, τις πρότερη βήσεται εις αίδην 
και τρϊς μεν χειρών εβαΧον κύβον, ήλθε δε πασών 

ες μίαν η δ' ε^εΧα κΧήρον όφειΧόμενον. 
εκ τε Γ γεος <yap άεΧπτον επειτ ώΧισθε πεσημα 

δύσμορος, ες δ' αίδην ηΧυθεν, ώς εΧαχεν. 
άψευδης 6 κΧήρος, ότω κακόν ες δε το Χώον 

ούτ εύχαι θνητοϊς εύστοχοι, ούτε χέρες. 

159.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΊΌΝ 

Κρανίον εν τριόδοισι κατοιχομενου τις εσαθρών 

εικόνα την κοινην ουκ εδάκρυσε βιον 
δεξιτερην δ' ερριψεν επί χθόνα, καϊ Χίθον ηκεν, 

κωφον μεν δοκεοντ , άΧΧα πνέοντα δίκης, 
οστεον ώς yap επΧηζεν, άφηΧατο, καϊ τον άφεντα 

πηρωσεν, 'γΧνκερου βΧεμματος όρφανίσας. 
καϊ πάΧιν εις αίδην εκοΧάζετο, την ίδιην δε 

εκΧαυσεν χειρών εΰστοχον άφροσύνην. 



82 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 157-159 

157. — Anonymous 
Who said Love was a god ? We see that no work 
of the gods is evil, but he smiles at the blood of men. 
Does he not bear in his hand a sword swift to slay ? 
Look at the incredible trophies of this deed of blood 
prompted by a god. The mother, with her child, 
lies slain, and on their bodies the man stoned by sen- 
tence of the law. This that we see is not the work 
of Hades or of Ares, but the work of Love. This is 
how the boy plays. 1 

158. — Anonymous 
Three girls once drew lots for fun, who first should 
go to Hades. Thrice they threw the die, and the 
cast of all fell on one. She made mockery of the 
lot, which nevertheless was her true destiny. For, 
unhappy girl, she slipped and fell from the house-top 
afterwards, as none could have foreseen, and went to 
Hades even as the lot had lighted on her. A lot 
tells no falsehood when it is an evil one ; but as for 
better chance neither the prayers of mortals nor their 
hands can attain it. 

1 59. — Anonymous 
One, seeing at the cross-roads the skull of a dead 
man, wept not at the presentation of the fate common 
to all men, but stooping, picked up in his right hand 
a stone and threw it at the skull. The stone, a dumb 
thing in appearance, yet breathed vengeance ; for, 
hitting the bone, it bounded off and blinded the 
thrower, robbing him of his sweet sight. Until his 
death he was punished, and bewept his foolish ex- 
cellence of aim. 

1 Jealousy would appear to have been the motive of the 
crime. 

83 

G 2 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



160.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΊΌΝ 



'Ηρόδοτο? Μούσα? ύπεδεξατο' τω δ' άρ 1 έκαστη 
άντϊ φιΧοξενίης βίβΧον έδωκε μίαν. 

161.— ΜΑΡΚΟΤ ΑΡΓΕΝΤΑΡΙΟΤ 

'Ησίοδου ποτέ βίβΧον εμαΐς υπο χερσιν εΧίσσων 
ΐΐύρρην έξαπίνης είδον επερχομενην 

βίβλον δε ρίψας επί yrjv χερί, τοΰτ εβόησα' 
"'Kpya τι μοι παρέχεις, ω ykpov Ησίοδε;" 
J. Α. Pott, Greek Love Songs ami Epigrams, i. p. 96. 

162.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

"Ημην άχρεΐον κάΧαμος φυτόν εκ yap εμεΐο 
ου σΰκ , ου μήΧον φύεται, ου σταφυλή- 

άλλα μ άνηρ εμύησ ελικωνίδα, λεπτά τορήσας 
γείλεα, και στεινον ρουν ογετ ευ σά μένος. 

εκ δε του εΰτε π'ιοιμι μελαν ποτόν, ενθεος οία, 5 

πάν έπος άφθ^κτω τάδε ΧαΧώ στόματι. 

163.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Έ /c πυρός Ίλιακού δοράτων μέσον ήρπασεν ήρως 

Αινείας, οσιον παιδί βάρος, πάτερα' 
εκλαγε δ' Άpyείoις• " Μη ψαύετε' μικρόν ες αρη 

κέρδος 6 γηράλεος, τω δε φεροντι με η /α." 

164.— ΑΔΗΑΟΝ 

Ύίς σε, Δικαιοσύνη, βροτος ήκαγεν; — Οδτο? ό κλέπτης 
ενθάδε με στήσας, ούδεν έχων προς ε με. 

1 His history is in nine books. 
84 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 160-164 

1 60. — Anonymous 

Herodotus entertained the Muses, and each, in 
return for his hospitality, gave him a book. 1 

161.— MARCUS ARGENTARIUS 

As I was turning over the pages of a volume of 
Hesiod, I suddenly saw Pyrrhe approaching. Throw- 
ing the book on the ground I exclaimed : " Why 
should I be bothered by your works, 2 old Hesiod ? " 

162. — Anonymous 
On a Pen 

1 was a reed, a useless plant, bearing neither figs, 
nor apples, nor grapes ; but a man initiated me into 
the mysteries of Helicon, fashioning thin lips for me 
and excavating in me a narrow channel. Ever since, 
when I sip black liquor, I become inspired, and utter 
every variety of words with this dumb mouth of 
mine. 

1 63. — Anonymous 

Through the hail of spears from the flames of Troy 
the hero Aeneas bore off his father, a holy burden 
for a son, calling to the Argives : "Hands off! The 
old man is no great gain in war, but a great gain to 
his bearer." 

164. — Anonymous 

"Justice, who hath vexed thee?" — " This thief 
who set me up here, but had nothing to do with me." 

2 There is a play on the title Works and Days of ono of 
Hesiod's poems. 

85 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

165.— ΠΑΛΛΑΔΑ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΕΩΣ 

Όργη του Διός εστί γυνή, πυρός άντιδοθεΐσα 

δώρον, άνιηρόν του πυρός άντίδοτον. 
άνδρα γαρ εκκαίει ταΐς φροντίσιν ήδέ μαραίνει, 

καϊ γήρας προπετες τί] νεότητι φέρει. 
οι)δ' 6 Ζευς αμέριμνος έχει χρυσόθρονον "Ηρην 5 

ποΧΧάκι γοϋν αυτήν ρίψεν απ' αθανάτων, 
ήέρι καϊ νεφέΧησι μετηορον οίδεν ' Ομηρος, 

καϊ Αία συγγράψας τη γαμέτη χόΧιον. 
ούτως ούδέποτ earl γυνή σύμφωνος άκοίτη, 

ούδε και iv χρυσέω μιγνυμένη δαπέδω. 10 

166.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Πάσαν "Ομηρος έδειξε κακήν σφάΧερήν τ€ γυναίκα, 
σώφρονα και πόρνην, άμφοτέρας όΧεθρον. 

εκ yap της ΈΧένΐ]ς μοιχευσαμένης φόνος ανδρών, 
καϊ δια. σωφροσύνην ΤΐηνεΧόπης θάνατοι. 

Ίλίά? οΰν το πόνημα μιας χάριν εστί γυναικός' 5 

αύτάρ Όδυσσείη ΤΙηνεΧόπη πρόφασις. 

167.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Ό Ζευς άντϊ πυρός πυρ ώπασεν άΧΧο, γυναίκας. 

είθε δε μήτε γυνή, μήτε το πυρ εφάνη' 
πυρ μεν δη ταχέως καϊ σβέννυται• ή δε γυνή πυρ 

άσβεστον, φΧογερόν, πάντοτ άναπτόμενον. 

168.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

ΛΙήνιν ού\ομένην γαμετήν ό τάΧας γεγάμηκα, 
καϊ πάρα της τέχνης μήνιδος άρξάμενος. 

1 He refers to the story told by Hesiod how Zeus punished 
Prometheus for stealing fire by prompting him to create woman. 

86 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 165-168 

165.— PALLADAS OF ALEXANDRIA 

Woman is the wrath of Zeus, given to men in the 
place of fire, a grievous exchange. 1 For she burns 
up and withers man with care, and brings hasty old 
age on youth. Even Zeus does not possess Hera of 
the golden throne unvexed ; indeed he hath often 
cast her out from the immortals to hang in the mist 
and clouds ; Homer knew this, and hath described 
even Zeus as being wrath with his wife. Thus never 
is a woman at concord with her husband, not even 
when she lies beside him on a floor of gold. 

166. — By the Same 

Homek shows us that every woman is wicked and 
treacherous ; be she chaste or a whore, in either case 
she is perdition. Helen's adultery caused the murder 
of men, and Penelope's chastity caused death. All 
the woes of the Iliad were for the sake of one woman, 
and Penelope was the cause of the Odyssey. 

167. — By the Same 

Zeus, in place of fire, bestowed another fire, woman. 
Would that neither woman nor fire had come into 
being ! Fire, it is true, is soon put out, but woman 
is a fire unquenchable, flaming, ever alight. 

168. — By the Same 

I, unhappy man, have married a wife who is " per- 
nicious wrath," and my profession, too, obliges me to 
begin with "wrath." 2 Oh, man of much wrath, 

2 u Wrath " being the first word of the Iliad, which as a 
grammarian he had to read. 

87 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

ωμοί έγω ποΧύμηνις, 'έχων ΒιχόΧωτον ανάγκην, 
τέχνης γραμματικής και γαμέτης μάχιμης. 

169.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Μήνις ΆχιΧΧήος και έμοϊ πρόφασις γεγένηται 
ονΧομενης πενίης γραμματικευσαμένω. 

εϊθε Be συν Δαναοΐς μ€ κατέκτανε μήνις εκείνη, 
πρϊν χαΧεπος Χιμος γραμματικής όΧέσει. 

άΧΧ ϊν άφαρπάξη Ί$ρισηί&α πριν 'Αγαμέμνων, 
την 'Είλένην δ' 6 ΤΙάρις, πτωχός εγώ γενόμην. 

170.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

ΝηΒύν άναίσχυντον στιβαροΐς ησχυνα Χογισμοΐς, 
σωφροσύνη κοΧάσας εντερον άργαΧέον 

ει γαρ 'έχω τον νουν επικειμενον νψόθι γαστρός, 
πώς μη νικήσω την υποτασσομένην; 

171.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

"Οργανα Μ,ουσάων, τα ποΧύστονα βιβΧία πωΧώ, 
εις ετέρας τέχνης 'έργα μ€τ€ρχόμ€νος. 

ΏιερίΒες, σώζοισθε- Χόγοι, συντάσσομαι υμιν 
σύνταξις γαρ εμοι και θάνατον παρέχει. 

172.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

'ΈιΧπίΒος ούΒέ Τύχης 'έτι μοι μέΧει, ούΚ άΧεγίζω 
Χοιπον της απάτης' ηΧυθον εις Χιμένα. 

ειμϊ πένης άνθρωπος, εΧευθερί^ he συνοικώ' 
ΰβριστην πεν'ιης πΧοντον αποστρέφομαι. 

1 The wrath of Achilles is called "pernicious " by Homer. 
88 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 169-172 

forced to consort with wrath in two things, my call- 
ing as a grammarian and my combative wife ! 

169. — By the Same 

The wrath of Achilles was the cause of pernicious * 
poverty to me too, since I adopted the profession of a 
grammarian. Would that that " wrath " had killed me 
with the Greeks, before the bitter hunger of grammar 
had put an end to me. But all to let Agamemnon 
run away with Briseis, and Paris with Helen, I have 
become poor. 

170. — By the Same 

I chastened my shameless belly by severe reason- 
ing, correcting the troublesome gut by temperance. 
Indeed, if my intellect is in a higher place than my 
belly, how can I fail to subdue the inferior one of the 
two? 

171. — By the Same 

I am selling the implements of the Muses, the 
books that have made me groan so much, now that I 
am taking to another profession. Farewell, ye Muses. 
I bid thee good-bye, Learning, for syntax is the 
death of me. 2 

172. — By the Same 

I care no longer for either Hope or Fortune ; their 
deceit is now of no account to me ; I have reached 
the haven. I am a poor man, but freedom is my 
house-mate, and I turn "my back on wealth which 
insults poverty. 

1 There is a play on " syntassomai," I bid farewell, and 
"syntax." 

89 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



173.— TOY ΑΥΤΟΥ 



Άρχη γραμματικής πεντάστιχός εστί κατάρα' 

πρώτος μην ι ν έχει• δεύτερο? ονΧο μένην, 
και μετά δ' ονΧομένην, Δαναών πάΧιν άΧγεα ττοΧλά' 

6 τρίτατος ψ ν χα ς εις Άιδην κατάγει• 
τον δε τ€ταρταίου τα εΧώρια καϊ κννες αργοί' 5 

πέμπτον δ οιωνοί, καϊ χόλο? ε'στι Διό?. 
πω? ονν γραμματικός δύναται μετά πέντε κατάρας, 

καϊ πίντε πτώσεις, μη μέγα πένθος εχειν; 

174.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Ένθάδε παιδενονσιν οσοις κεχόΧωτο "Ζάραπις, 

τοΐσιν άπ' ονΧο μένης μηνιδος άρχομένοις' 
ένθα τροφός κατά μήνα φέρει μισθον αετ' ανάγκης, 

βνβΧω καϊ χάρτη δησαμένη πενίην 
ώς δέ κάπνισμα τιθεϊ παρά τον θρόνον, ώς παρά 

τνμβον, 5 

τον μικρόν χάρτην, τον παραριπτόμενον. 
κΧέπτει δ' εζ ολίγον μισθού, και χαΧκον αμείβει, 

κα\ μόΧιβον μίσγει, και το εθος δέχεται. 
el δε τί? εις ενιαντον άγοι χρνσοϊο νόμισμα, 

ένδεκάτω μηνί, πριν προφέρειν, μετέβη, 10 

άγνώμων τε φανείς, και τον πρότερον Sic τυράς 

γραμματικον στερεσας μισθον οΧον ετεος. 

175.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

ΚαΧΧίμαχον πωΧώ και ΤΙίνδαρον, ηδέ και αύτάς 
πτώσεις γραμματικής, πτώσιν έχων πενιης. 



9° 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 173-175 

173. — By the Same 

The beginning of grammar 1 is a curse in five lines. 
The first has the word " wrath/' the second " per- 
nicious," and after that "many woes " of the Greeks ; 
the third "leads down souls to Hades"; to the 
fourth belong "spoil" and "dogs"; to the fifth 
" birds " of ill-omen and the " anger of Zeus." How, 
then, can a grammarian avoid having many sorrows 
after five curses and five cases (falls) ? 

174. — By the Same 

The teachers here are those men with whom 
Sarapis is angry; they start from " pernicious wrath." 
Here the nurse brings, perforce, the fee once a month, 
tying up the wretched pittance in byblus and paper, 
and puts the contemptible little paper, like a pinch 
of incense, by the master's seat, as if by a tomb. 
She steals some of the small fee and changes the 
coins, substituting leaden ones, and she receives her 
commission. If any one agrees to pay a gold coin 
for a whole year, he changes his teacher in the 
eleventh month before paying up, and is so ungrate- 
ful as to make fun, too, of his former master after 
robbing him of a whole year's fee. 

175. — By the Same 

I sell Callimachus and Pindar, and all the cases in 
the grammar, being myself a sore case of poverty. 

1 i.e. the first five lines of the Iliad, which was the regular 
text-book. 

91 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

Δωρόθεος yap εμην τροφίμην σύνταξιν εΧυσε, 
π pea βείην κατ' εμού τήν ασεβή τέλεσα?. 

άλλα σύ μου πρόστηθι, %εων φίΧε, μη8ε μ εάσγς 5 
σννΒεσμω πενίης τον βίον εξανύσαι. 

176.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

ΚκΧήθην πάρα, σου του ρήτορος' ει δ' άπεΧείφθην, 
τήν τιμήν α,πεγω, και πΧεον είμι φίΧος. 

ούοε yap ή ψυχή το φayεtv κρίνουσα yeyitfev, 
άΧΧα μόνον τιμής αισθομενη τρέφεται. 

177.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Αϊαντος πάρα τύμβον άταρβήτοιο παραστας 

Φρύξ ήρωι κακής ήρχεν επεσβοΧίης' 
" Αϊας δ ονκετ εμιμνεν" 6 δ' avTeyeyayvev ενερθε' 

" Μίυ,νεν" ό δ' ούκετ ετΧη ζωος άποφθίμενον. 

178.— ΑΝΤΙΦΙΛΟΤ ΒΤΖΑΝΤΙΟΤ 

Ώς πάρος ΆεΧίου, νυν Καίσαρος ά 'Ρόδο? ειμϊ 
νάσος, Ισον δ' αύχω φεyyoς άπ' αμφοτέρων. 

ήδη σβεννυμεναν με via κατεφώτισεν άκτίς, 
"ΑΧιε, καϊ παρά σον φεyyoς εΧαμψε Nepa>i\ 

πώς εϊπω τίνι μάΧΧον όφείΧομαι; ος μεν εΒειξεν δ 
εξ αΧος, ος ο ηοη ρυσατο ουομεναν. 

1 Dorotheus appears to have been his former employer. 
He appeals to his friend Theo, the celebrated grammarian. 
In "syntaxis" ( = salary) he plays on the grammatical sense 
of the word (= syntax). 

92 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 176-178 

For Dorotheus has cut off the salary that supported 
me, sending this impious message of complaint 
against me. But, dear Theo, protect me, and do not 
let me end my days in conjunction with poverty. 1 



176. — By the Same 

I was invited to dinner by you, the orator, and if 
I failed to come I have the honour you paid me, and 
am still more your friend. For my heart does not 
rejoice in appreciation of viands, but is nourished 
only by the honour it tastes. 

177. — Anonymous 

A Phrygian, standing by the tomb of dauntless 
Ajax, began thus to insult the hero : " But Ajax no 
longer stood firm." 2 Then he from underground 
cried : " He stood firm." At which the living man 
fled in terror from the dead. 

178.— ΑΝΤΙ PHILUS OF BYZANTIUM 

I, Rhodes, who once was the Sun's island, am now 
Caesar's, and I boast of equal light from each. Then 
when I was near extinguished, Ο Sun, a new ray 
illuminated me, and Nero's 3 light shone beside thine. 
How shall I say to which I owe most ? The one 
brought me to the light from the depths, and the 
other saved me as I was sinking. 



2 Iliad, xv. 717. 

8 The epigram probably refers to the stay of Tiberius at 
Rhodes, like No. 287 below. 

91 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

179.— ΛΕΩΝΙΔΑ [TAPANTINOT] 

ΐοζοβόΧον τον Έρωτα τις εξεσεν εκ Χιβανωτού, 
τόν ποτέ μηδ* αυτοί) Ζηνος άποσχόμενον; 

όψε ποθ* 'Ή,φαίστω κβΐται σκοπός, ον καθοράσθαι 
επρεπεν ουκ ά,ΧΧως ή ττυρϊ τυφόμενον. 

180.— ΠΑΛΛΑΔΑ 

Τύχη καπηΧεύουσα πάντα τον βίον, 

άσυηκεραστον την φύσιν κεκτημένη, 

καϊ συ<γκυκώσα καϊ μεταντΧούσ^ αύ πάλιν, 

καυτή κάπηΧος έστι νυν τις, ου θεά, 

τέχνην Χαχοΰσα την τρόπων επαξίαν. 5 

181.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 
\\.νεστ ράφησαν , ώς όρώ, τα πράγματα, 
καϊ την Ύύχην νυν δυστυχούσαν εϊδομεν. 

182.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 
Και, συ Τύχη δέσποινα, τύχην ατυχή πόθεν εσχες; 

η παρέχουσα τύχας πώς άτυχης γεγοί-α?; 
μάνθανε καϊ συ φερειν τα σα ρεύματα, καϊ συ διδάσκον 

τάς ατυχείς πτώσεις, ας παρέχεις ετέροις. 

183.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 
Και συ Τύχη Χοιπόν μεταβαΧΧομένη καταπαίζου, 
μηδέ τύχης της σης ύστατα φεισαμένη' 

94 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 179-183 

179.— LEONIDAS OF ALEXANDRIA 

Who carved of frankincense the bowman Love, 
him who of old spared not Zeus himself? At length 
he stands a mark for Hephaestus, 1 Love who ne'er 
deserved to be seen suffering aught else but con- 
sumption in the flames. 

180— PALLADAS 

(This and the three following are written on the subject oj 
a Temple of Fortune converted into a Tavern.} 

Fortune, who pliest thy trade through all our life, 
whose nature is like untempered wine, thou who art 
ever mixing and pouring from vessel to vessel, now 
hast thou too become a tavern-keeper instead of a 
goddess, a calling suitable to thy character. 

181. — By the Same 

Things are turned topsy-turvy as I see, and we 
now see Fortune in misfortune. 

182. — By the Same 

And thou, Lady Fortune, how has evil fortune 
befallen thee ? How hast thou, who givest us good 
fortune, become unfortunate ? Learn thou, too, to 
support thy own changes of tide, learn to suffer the 
unhappy falls which thou sendest to others. 

183. — By the Same 

And of thee too, Fortune, they make mockery now 
thou art changed, and at the end thou hast not even 

1 i.e. he runs the risk of being burnt as frankincense. 

95 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

ή πρϊν νηόν έχουσα, καπηΧεύεις μετά γήρας, 
θερμοδότις μερόπων νύν αναφαινομένη. 

νυν όσίως στενέ και συ τεόν πάθος, άστατε δαΐμον, 5 
την σήν, ώς μερόπων, νΰν μετάγουσα τύχην. 

184.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Πίνδαρε, Μουσάων Ιερόν στόμα, καϊ ΧάΧε ζ,ειρήν, 

ΒακχυΧίδη, Σαπφούς τ ΑίοΧίδες χάριτες, 
•γράμμα τ Άνακρείοντος, Όμηρικόν 6ς τ' από ρεύμα 

εσπασας οίκείοις, 'Στησίχορ', εν καμάτοις, 
η τε Σιμωνίδεω ηΧυκερή σεΧίς, ήδυ τε ΥΙειθοΰς, δ 

"\βυκε, και παίδων άνθος άμησάμενε, 
καϊ ξίφος ' ΑΧκαίοιο, το ποΧΧάκις αίμα τυράννων 

εσπεισεν, πάτρης θέσμια ρυόμενον, 
θηΧυμεΧεϊς τ' 'Αλκμάνος άΐ]$ονες, ιΧατε, πάσης 

άρχην οι Χυρικής και πέρας εστάσατε. 10 

185.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

ΆρχιΧόχου τάδε μέτρα καϊ ήχήεντες 'ίαμβοι, 
θυμού καϊ φοβερής ιός επεσβοΧίης. 

186.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ ΘΕ22ΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩ2 

ΒίβΧοι Άριστοφάνευς, θειος πόνος, αϊσιν Άχαρνεύς 
κισσός επϊ χΧοερήν πουΧυς έσεισε κόμην. 

ηνίο* όσον Αιόνυσον €χει σεΧις, οία δε μύθοι 
ήχεύσιν, φοβέρων πΧηθόμενοι χαρίτων. 

ώ καϊ θυμον άριστε, καϊ Ελλάδο? ήθεσιν ισα, 5 

κωμικέ, καϊ στύζας άξια και γελάσας. 



9 6 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 184-186 

spared thy ολμι fortune. Thou who hadst once a 
temple, keepest a tavern in thy old age, and Ave see 
thee now serving hot drinks to mortals. Justly 
bewail thine own mischance, fickle goddess, now that 
thou reversest thine own fortune like that of mortals. 

184. — Anonymous 

Pindar, holy mouth of the Muses, and thou, Bac- 
chylides, garrulous Siren, and ye, Aeolian graces of 
Sappho ; pen of Anacreon, and thou, Stesichorus, 
who in thy works didst draw off Homer's stream ; 
honeyed page of Simonides, and thou, Ibycus, who 
didst cull the sweet bloom of Persuasion and of the 
love of. lads ; sword of Alcaeus, that didst often shed 
the blood of tyrants, defending his country's laws, 
and ye nightingales of Alcman, singing ever of 
maidens ; look kindly on me, ye authors and finishers 
of all tyric song. 

1 85. — Anonymous 

These be the verses and sonorous iambics of Ar- 
chilochus, the venom of wrath and terrible invective. 

186.— ANTIPATER OF THESSALONICA 

These are the volumes of Aristophanes, a divine 
work, over which the ivy of Achamae shook in pro- 
fusion its green locks. Look how the pages are 
steeped in Dionysus, how deep-voiced are the 
dramas full of terrible grace. Ο comic poet, high of 
heart, and worthy interpreter of the spirit of Hellas, 
hating what deserved hate, and mocking where 
mockery was due ! 

97 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

187.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Αύται σοι στομάτεσσιν άνηρείψαντο μεΧισσαι 
ποικίΧα ^Ιουσάων άνθεα δρεψάμεναί' 

αύται και Χάριτες σοι δωρήσαντο, Μένανδρε, 
στωμύΧον εύτνχίην δράμασιν ενθεμεναι. 

ζώεις εις αιώνα' το δε κΧεος εστίν 'Αθήναις 5 

εκ σεθεν ουρανίων άπτόμενον νεφεων. 

188.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

'Ατθίδος εύγΧώσσου στόμα φερτατον, ού σέο μείζον 
φθεημα ΥίανεΧΧήνων πάσα κέκευθε σεΧίς' 

πρώτος δ' εις τ ε θεόν και ες ούρανόν όμμα τανυσσας, 
θειε ΤΙΧάτων, ήθη και βίον ηύηάσαο, 

Έ,ωκρατικώ "ϊ,άμιον κεράσας μυκτήρι φρόνημα, 5 

κάΧλιστον σεμνής σήμα Βιχοστασίης. 

189.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

'Έλθετε προς τέμενος ταυρώπιδος ayXabv 'Ήρης, 
Αεσβίδες, αβρά ποδών βήμαθ' εΧισσόμεναι, 

ένθα καΧον στήσασθε θεή γρρόν ΰμμι δ' άπάρξει 
Σαπφώ χρνσείην χερσϊν έχουσα Χνρην. 

όΧβιαι όρχηθμοΰ ποΧνγηθεος' ή <γΧυκύν ΰμνον δ 

είσαΐειν αυτής δοζετε Κ.αΧΧιοπΐ)ς. 

190.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Αεσβιον Ήρίννης τόδε κηρίον ει δε τι μικρόν, 
αλλ' οΧον εκ Μουσεων κιρνάμενον μεΧιτι. 

οι δε τριηκόσιοι ταύτης στίχοι ίσοι Όμήρω, 
τής και παρθενικής εννεακαιδεκετευς' 



98 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 187-190 

187. — Anonymous 
The bees themselves, culling the varied flowers of 
the Muses, bore off the honey to thy lips ; the Graces 
themselves bestowed their gift on thee, Menander, 
endowing thy dramas with fluent felicity. Thou livest 
for ever, and Athens from thee derives glory that 
reacheth to the clouds of heaven. 

188. — Anonymous 
Most exquisite utterer of the eloquent Attic 
tongue, the whole volume of Greek letters contains 
no voice greater than thine. Thou first, divine 
Plato, didst contemplate morals and life, directing 
thy gaze to God and Heaven. Mingling the loftiness 
of Pythagoras with the irony of Socrates, thou wast 
the loveliest monument of their solemn strife. 

189. — Anonymous 
Ye ladies of Lesbos, hie ye, whirling as ye foot it 
delicately, to the splendid sanctuary of bull-faced 
Hera, there to dance a lovely measure to the goddess ; 
and for you Sappho, holding her golden lyre, shall 
strike up the tune. Ye are blessed, indeed, in that 
dance's delight ; verily ye shall deem that ye listen 
to the sweet hymning of Calliope herself. 

1 90. — Anonymous 

On Erinna's poem "The Spindle" 1 

This is the Lesbian honeycomb of Erinna, and 

though it be small, it is all infused with honey by 

the Muses. Her three hundred lines are equal to 

Homer, though she was but a child of nineteen 

1 Only four lines are preserved, sufficient to show that 
it was not a narrative poem but a poem of sentiment. 

99 
η 2 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

η και 67Γ ηλακάτη μητρός φόβω, ή και έή) ίστω 5 
εστήκει Μουσεων λάτρις εφαπτομένη. 

~απφω δ' Ήρίννης οσσον μελέεσσιν άμείνων, 
"Ηριννα Σαπφούς τόσσον εν έξαμέτροις. 

191.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Ουκ αν ev ημετέροισι πόλυγνάμπτοις λαβυρίνθοις 
ριμΒίως προμόλοις ες φάος, αϊκβ τύχης' 

τοίους yap ΤΙριαμϊς Κασσάνδρη φοίβασε μύθους, 
άγγελος ούς βασιλεΐ εφρασε λοξοτρόχις. 

εΐ Be σ€ φίλατο Καλλιόπη, λάβ€ μ" ες 'χέρας' el Be 5 
νήϊς εφυς Μουσέων, χερσι βάρος φορέεις. 

192.— ΑΝΤΙΦΙΛΟΤ ΒΤΖΑΝΤΙΟΤ 

α. At βίβλοι, τίνες εστί; τι κεύθετε; β. Θυγα- 
τέρες μεν 
Μαιονίδου, μύθων δ' Ίστορες 'ΐΧιακών 
α μία μεν μηνιθμον 'Αχιλλέος, έργα τε χειρός 
Έκτορέας, Βεκέτους τ αθλα λέγει πολέμου• 
ά δ' ετέρα μόχθον τον ΌΒυσσέος, άμφί τε λέκ- 
τροις 5 

χηρείοις άγα,θάς Βάκρυα ΤΙηνελόπας. 
α. "Ιλατε συν ^>\ούσαισΐ' μεθ* υμετέρας yap άοιΒάς 
είπεν εχειν αΙών ενΒεκα ΤίιερίΒας. 

193.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Ε is την Ιστορίαν Φιλοστοργίου 

Ίστορίην ετέλεσσα θεού χαριτεσσι σοφησι, 
πράγμο,τ άληθείης ποικίλ* υφηνάμενος. 

1 We possess this long iambic monologue, a store of the 
most recondite learning. 
ioo 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 191-193 

years. Either plying her spindle in fear of her 
mother, or at the loom, she stood occupied in the 
service of the Muses. As much as Sappho excels 
Erinna in lyrics, so much does Erinna excel Sappho 
in hexameters. 

191. — Anonymous 
On Lycophron s " Cassandra " 1 

Not easily, being in my labyrinth of many turn- 
ings, shalt thou find thy way to the light, if at all. 
So ill to read is the prophetic message that Cassandra, 
Priam's daughter, tells here to the King in crooked 
speech. Yet, if Calliope love thee, take me up ; but 
if thou art ignorant of the Muses, I am a weight in 
thy hands. 

192.— ANTIPHILUS OF BYZANTIUM 

A. " Ye books, who are ye, what do ye contain ? " 
B. " Daughters of Maeonides, and we tell the tales 
of Troy ; one, the wrath of Achilles and the deeds 
of Hector's hands, and all the struggles of the ten 
years' war ; the other, the labours of Ulysses and 
the tears of good Penelope by her widowed couch." 
A. "I worship you and the Muses ; for after your 
sohg the world could say it possessed eleven Pierian 
sisters." 

193. — Anonymous 

On the History of Philostorgius 2 

By the grace and wisdom of God I completed my 
History, weaving into it the varied facts of truth. 

2 An Arian ecclesiastical historian, whose work being 
heretical ia of course lost. 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



194.— ΑΛΛΟ 



Γράμματα δώδεκ έχει ΦΙΛ02ΤΟΡΠ02, οΰνομα κα\όν. 
Ύούνεκα δη κατά γράμμα Χογους άνεγράψατο τούτους, 
άρξάμενος πρώτου άπο γράμματος, είτεν εφεξής' 
καΐ δια της αυτών αρχής εον οΰνομα γράψας. 

195.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Κωνσταντινιάδης 'ΑσκΧηπώς άστυ γεραίρων 
γράψεν 'Αναζαρβοΰ πάτρια κυδαΧίμης. 

196.— ΜΑΡΙΝΟΤ ΝΕΑΠΟΛΙΤΟΤ 

Ει? τον βίον Πρόκλου 

Άθανάτοισι θεοΐς κεγαρισ μένα πάντοτε ρεζων 
καϊ τάδ' eV εύσεβεοντι νόω συνέγραψε ΜαραΌ?. 

197.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Και τόδε &ης ζαθέης κεφαλής περιώσιον έργον, 
ΧΙρόκΚε μάκαρ, πάντων βρετας εμπνοον οττι Μαρΐνον 
αθανάτων, μεροπεσσι βοηθοον εύσεβεεσσιν, 
άντϊ τεής ιερής κεφαΧής ψυχοσσοον ά\καρ . . 
κάΧλιπες, ος βιοτην θεοτερπεα σειο Χιγαίνων 5 

γράψε τάδ' εσσομενοις μνημηϊα σών άρετάων. 

198.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Νόννος εγώ' Τίανος μεν εμη πολις' εν Φαρίη Be 
εγχεϊ φωνηεντι γονάς ήμησα Τιγάντων. 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 194-198 

194. — Anonymous 

On the Same 

The fair name Philostorgius contains twelve letters, 
and therefore I wrote as many books, the first be- 
ginning with the first letter, and so on, thus by the 
initial letter of each writing my name. 

195. — Anonymous 

Asclepius, the son of Constantinus, celebrating his 
city, wrote the ancient history of famous Anazarba. 

196.— MARINUS OF NEAPOLIS 

On the "Life of Prochts" 

Marinus, who ever doth works pleasing to the 
gods, wrote this, too, with pious intent. 

197. — By the Same 

Proclus of blessed memory, this, too, is an excel- 
lent deed on the part of thy divine self, that as a 
saviour and protector of souls in place of thy divine 
self thou hast left Marinus, the living image of all 
the immortals, the help of pious men. He, pro- 
claiming the story of thy life, with which God was 
well pleased, wrote this book as a record of thv 
virtues for posterity. 

198. — Anonymous 

I am Nonnus ; my native city was Panopolis, but 
in Alexandria I mowed down by my vocal sword the 
children of the giants. 1 

1 i.e. in that part of his Dionysiaca which describes the 
battle between Dionysus and Typhoeus. 

103 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



199.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 



Διοί' Όρειβασίοιο, τον άθανάτην δια τέχνην 
ττοΧΧάκι δειμαίνουσα μίτους άνεβάΧΧετο Μοίρη, 

200.— ΛΕΟΝΤ02 ΦΙΛΟΣΟΦΟΤ 

ΒίβΧος μηχανική• Κ,υρίνος δέ μιν εκπόνησε, 
ΜαρκέΧΧου <γνωτοϊο συνερχομένου κατά μόχθον. 

201.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Θέσφατα μαντωης Φοιβηιδος ορηια τέχνης 
άστροΧό^ων Παύλος μ" εδιδάξατο κύδιμος άνήρ. 

202. — ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Βίβλος Θεωρός καϊ ΙΙρόκΧου, των ττανσόφων 
βίβΧος πόΧου τε και γθονος φέρει μέτρα. 
Θέων πόΧον μέν, καϊ ΤΙρόκΧος μετρεϊ -χθόνα- 
ΤΙρόκΧος μεν ουν γήν, καϊ Θέων μετρεϊ ττόλον. 
άμφω δ' επίσης των επαίνων άξιοι, 5 

άμφω δ' άμοιβην των Χόηων τετεΰχατον. 
Θέων ΉρόκΧου yap Χαμβάνων σοφάς θέσεις, 
δείκνυσι ταύταις τους δρόμους των αστέρων 
ΐΙρόκΧος δε δείξεις του Θέωνος Χαμβάνων, 
ταύταις άναΧύει καϊ ττροβάΧΧει τάς θέσεις. 10 

αλλ,', ώ σοφή ξυνωρι, χαΐρέ μοι Χίαν 
γαίροις Θέων άριστε, πάνσοφον κάρα, 
6 νυν ττυκάζων την ' Αλεξάνδρου ττόΧιν 
χαίροις δε καϊ σύ, ΤΙρόκΧε, του Χαρπηδόνος 
άριστον αίμα τοις οΧοις βοώμενον. 15 

104 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 199-202 

199. — Anonymous 

This is the work of divine Oribasius, 1 whom Fate 
feared owing to his immortal ai't, and oft deferred 
cutting his life-thread. 

200.— LEO THE PHILOSOPHER 

The book of mechanics, the work of Cyrinus, his 
friend Marcellus participating in the task. 

201. — By the Same 

Paulus, famous among the astrologers, instructed 
me in the divine mysteries of Phoebus' prophetic 
art. 

202. — By the Same 

The book of Theo and Proclus the all-wise. The 
book exhibits the measurements of the Heavens and 
the Earth. Theo measures the Heavens and Proclus 
the Earth, or rather Proclus measures the Earth and 
Theo the Heavens. Both are worthy of equal praise, 
and both of them gave and took their respective 
arguments ; for Theo, assuming the learned propo- 
sitions of Proclus, demonstrates by these the courses 
of the stars ; while Proclus, assuming the demonstra- 
tions of Theo, resolves and propounds his positions 
by their aid. All hail, learned pair ! Hail, most 
excellent Theo, learned in every science, now adorn- 
ing the city of Alexandria ! And thou too, Proclus, 
hail, best scion of the race of Sarpedon 2 and universally 
acclaimed ' 

1 The celebrated physician. 

8 Because he was Lycian. 

I°5 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

203.— ΦΩΤΙΟΤ, οι Βε ΛΕΟΝΤΟΣ 

"Ερωτα πικρόν, άλλα σώφρονα βίον 

ο Κ,Χειτοφώντος ώσπερ έμφαινα λόγο?• 

ό Αευκίππης Βε σωφρονεστατος βίος 

απαντάς εξίστησι• πώς τετυμμενη, 

κεκαρμενη re teal κατηχρειωμενη, 6 

τό δη μεηιστον, τρϊς θανουσ εκαρτερει. 

εϊπερ Be καϊ συ σωφρονεΐν θεΧεις, φίΧος, 

μη την πάρερηον της γραφής σκοπεί θεαν, 

την τοΰ λόγου δε πρώτα συνΒρομην μάθε• 

νυμφοστοΧεΐ yap τους ποθουντας εμφρόνως. 10 

204.— ΑΓΑΘΙΟΤ ΧΧΟΛΑΣΤΙΚΟΤ 

Mr/ με τον ΑΙάντειον άνοχμάσσειας, όΒΐτα, 

πέτρον, άκοντιστην στηθεος Έκτορεου. 
ειμί μεΧας τρηχύς τ€• σι» δ' εϊρεο θεϊον'Όμηρον, 

πώς τον ΤΙριαμίΒην εξεκΰΧισα πέΒω. 
νυν Be μόΧις βαιόν με παροχΧίζουσιν άρούρης 5 

άνθρωποι, 'γενεής αισχρά ΧευγαΧεης. 
άΧΧά με τις κρύψειεν ΰπο χθονός• αΙΒεομαι <yap 

παί'γνιον ούτιΒανοΐς άνΒράσι γινόμενος. 

205.— ΑΡΤΕΜΙΔΩΡΟΥ ΓΡΑΜΜΑΤΙΚΟΤ 

ΈωκοΧικαΙ Μοΐσαι σποράΒες ποκά, νυν δ' άμα πάσαι 
εντϊ μιας μάνΒρας, εντϊ μιας ά<γελας. 

206.— ΕΤΠΙΘΙΟΤ ΑΘΗΝΑΙΟΤ 

2τι'£αντο5 την Καθόλου 

ΎαυτοΧό'γων κανόνων φευ πΧηθΰος, ήΒ> άϊΒήΧων 
ξυσμάων, Χεπτος τάς εχάραξε Βόναξ. 

ιοΟ 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 203-206 

203.— PHOTIUS or LEO THE PHILOSOPHER 

On the Romance " Clitophon and Leucippe" l 

The story of Clitophon almost brings before our 
eyes a bitter passion but a moral life, and the most 
chaste conduct of Leucippe astonishes everyone. 
Beaten, her head shorn, vilely used, and, above all, 
thrice done to death, she still bore all. If, my friend, 
you wish to live morally, do not pay attention to the 
adventitious beauty of the style, but first learn the 
conclusion of the discourse ; for it joins in wedlock 
lovers who loved wisely. 

204.— AGATHIAS SCHOLASTICUS 

Do not heave me up, traveller; I am Ajax's stone 
with which he smote Hector's breast. Black am I 
and rough, but ask divine Homer how I sent Priam's 
son rolling in the dust. Now with difficulty men, 
the degenei'ate sons of a wretched age, lever me up 
a little from the field. But let someone hide me in 
the ground ; I am ashamed to be made the toy of 
worthless men. 

205.— ARTEMIDORUS THE GRAMMARIAN 

The bucolic poems were once scattered, but are 
now all in one fold, in one flock. 

206.— EUPITHIUS OF ATHENS 

On finishing the Punctuation and Accentuation of 

Herodian s " Universal Prosody " 
Oh for the number of rules all saying the same 
thing, and scarcely visible scratches, the work of my 

1 The romance by Achilles Tatius which we possess. 

107 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

ομματά μευ κεκμηκε, τίνων, ράχις, Ινίον, ώμοι' 
της ΚαθόΧου δε φέρω την οδύνην καθόΧου. 



207.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Μητιν Έπικτήτοιο τεω ενικάτθεο θυμω, 
οφρα κεν εισαφϋκηαι ες ουράνιους κενεώνας, 
ψυχην ύψικέΧευθον εΧαφρίζων άπο γαίης. 



208.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Ό? κεν 'Επικτήτοιο σοφην τεΧεσειε μενοινήν, 
μειδιάει, βιότοιο γαΧηνιόων ivl πόντω, 
καϊ μετά ναυτιΧίην βιοτησιον εισαφικάνει 
ούρανίην άψϊδα καϊ άστερ'ιην περιωπην. 



209.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Απο ιξίντον προς στρονθίον 

Ύίπτε μετοκΧάζεις πωτωμενη όζον απ όζου; 
τοΐα καϊ άΧΧη ερεζε, καϊ ου φύ^εν ίζοφορηας 
ημέτερους δόνακας, περί δε πτερά, πυκνά βαΧουσα 
ηΧυθε τεγνήεντα, καϊ ουκ εθεΧουσα, προς άνδρα. 

210.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Έις βίβΧον Τακτικών Όρβικίον 

Αερκεό μοι κρατερών καμάτων εηκύμονα βίβΧον, 
ην πύρος Αδριανός μεν άναξ εγεν εν ποΧεμοισι, 
κρύψε δ' άερΎΐη χρονον άσπετον εγγύθι Χηθης. 
άλλ' ΰπο καρτερόχειρος 'Αναστασίου βασιΧηος 

ιο8 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 207-210 

fine pen ! My eyes ache, my wrist, my back, my 
neck and shoulders, and I feel universally the pain 
of the "Universal." 

207. — Anonymous 

On the " Manual " of Epictetus 

Store up in thy heart the counsel of Epictetus, 
that thou mayest enter into the heavenly recesses, 
thy soul wafted up from earth to mount to the 
skies. 

208. — Anonymous 

On the Same 

Whoever puts in practice the wise reflections of 
Epictetus, smiles, sailing calmly on the sea of life, 
and after this life's voyage reaches the vault of 
heaven and the watch-tower amid the stars. 

209. — Anonymous 

A Fowler to a Bird 

Why art thou so restless, skipping from bough to 
bough ? There was another bird who did the same 
and escaped not my limed reeds, but, though sore 
against its will, fell fluttering violently into the hand 
of the crafty fowler. 

210. — Anonymous 

On the " Tactics " of Orbicius 

Look on me, the book pregnant with vigorous toil, 
the book that the Emperor Hadrian had by him 
in his Avars, but which for ages lay disused and nearly 
forgotten. But Anastasius, our powerful emperor, 

109 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

ήΧυθον 65 φάος αύθις, ίνα στρατιτ)σιν άρήξω. 5 

οίδα γαρ άνδροφόνου καμάτους ποΧεμοιο διδάσκειν 
οιδα δε πώς ματ εμεϊο και εσπερίης άΧος άνδρας 
και ΤΙερσας όΧεσεις, καϊ αινομόρους Σαρακηνούς, 
και θοον ιπποκεΧευθον άρειμανεων <γενος Ούννων, 
πετράων τ εφύπερθεν άΧυσκάζοντας Ίσαύρους. 10 
πάντα δ ύπο σκήπτροισιν Άναστασίοιο τεΧεσσω, 
Όν και Ύραίανοΐο φαάντερον yyayev αιών. 

211.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Παιήων, Χειρών, ΆσκΧηπιός, 'Ιπποκράτης τβ' 
τοις δ' επι Νίκανδρος π ροφερεστερον εΧΧαχεν εύχος. 

212.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Φάρμακα ποΧΧα μεν εσθΧα μεμιημενα, ποΧΧά δε 

Χνγρά 
Νίκανδρος κατεΧεξεν, επισταμένος περί πάντων 
ανθρώπων, η <γάρ ΐίαιήονός εστί <γενεθΧης. 

213.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Καϊ ΚοΧοφών άρίδηΧος ενι πτοΧίεσσι τετυκται, 
δοιονς θρεψαμενη παΐδας άριστον όους, 

πρωτότοκον μεν'Όμηρον, άτάρ Νίκανδρον έπειτα, 
αμφότερους Μούσαί? ούρανίησι φίΧους. 

214.— ΛΕΟΝΊΌ2 ΦΙΛ020ΦΟΤ 

Ύη των Χόγων σου κο^χυΧη, ΤΙορφύριε, 
βάπτεις τα χε'ιΧη, καϊ στοΧίζεις τάς φρενας. 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 211-214 

brought me to light again, that I might help his 
campaigns. For I can teach the labours of murderous 
war ; and I know how, with me, thou shalt destroy 
the men of the western sea, and the Persians, and 
the doomed Saracens, and the swift cavalry of the 
warlike Huns, and the Isaurians taking refuge on 
their rocky summits. I will bring all things under 
the sceptre of Anastasius, whom time brought into 
the world to outshine even Trajan. 

211 . — Anonymous 

On Nicmider 

Apollo, Chiron, Asclepius, and Hippocrates. After 
these Nicander won the highest praise. 

212. — Anonymous 

On the Same 

" Many drugs that are good when compounded and 
many that are baneful " did Nicander enumerate, 
" knowing better than all other men. For verily he 
came of the race of the Healer." x 

2 1 3. — Anon ν mous 

On the Same 

Colophon, too, is conspicuous among cities, for she 
nursed two sons of supreme wisdom, first Homel- 
and afterwards Nicander, both dear to the heavenly 
Muses. 

214.— LEO THE PHILOSOPHER 

Porphyry, with the purple 2 of thy discourse thou 
dyest the lips and clothest the mind in splendour. 

1 Partly made up of verses from Odyssey, iv. 299 ff. 

2 There is a play on the name. 

11 1 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

215.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ ΜΑΚΕΔΟΝ02 

Ate! θηλυτερησιν ύδωρ κακόν 'Ελλήσποντος, 

ξεΐνε' Κ\6ονίκΐ]ς πεύθεο Δυρραχίδος. 
ττλωε γαρ 69 %ηστον μετά, νυμφών iv δε μελαιντ) 

φορτίδι την "ΕΧλης μοΐραν άπεπΧασατο. 
Ήροϊ δειλαίη, συ μεν άνερα, Δψμαχος δε 5 

ννμφην, iv παύροις ώλεσατε σταδιοις. 

216.— ΟΝΕ2ΤΟΤ ΚΟΡΙΝΘΙΟΤ 

Άρμονίης Ίερον φήσεις <γάμον άλλ άθεμιστος 

Οιδίποδος. \εξεις ' Άντνγόνην όσίην 
άλλα κασίηνητοι μιαρώτατοι. άμβροτος Ινώ• 

άλλ' Άθάμας τ\ήμων. τειχομεΧης κιθάριγ 
άλλ' αύΧος δύσμουσος. ϊ'δ' οί>9 εκεράσσατο Θι')βτ} 5 

δαίμων, εσθΧα κακοϊς δ' εΐ9 hf εμιξεν ϊσα. 

217.— ΜΟΤΚΙΟΤ 2ΚΕΤΟΛΑ 

Α<' χίμαροι, τι ποτ αρα τα μεν θύμα και τιθύμαΧλα 
λείπετε και χΧοερην αιηίνομον βοτάνην, 

jvpa δ' ε'π' άλλ^λαί9 σκιρτήματα yaupa τίθεσθε 
άμφϊ τον ΰΧιβάτην άΧΧομεναι Νόμιον; 

ουκ άπο TTvy μαχίης άποπαύσετε; μή πον απεχθής 5 
άντήστ) κορννη χειρός απ αίπόΧικής. 

218.— ΑΙΜΙΛΙΑΝΟΤ ΝΙΚΑΕΩ2 

Άβολε χειμερίου με κατέκλυσε κύματα πόντου 
δειΧαίην, νεκύων φόρτον άμειψαμένην. 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 215-218 

215.— ANTIPATER OF MACEDONIA 

Ever, stranger, is the water of Hellespont cruel to 
women. Ask Cleonike of Dyrrhachium. For she was 
sailing to Sestos to meet her bridegroom, and in the 
black ship she met with £he same fate as Helle. 
Poor Hero, thou didst lose a husband, and Deimachus 
a bride, in the space of a few furlongs. 

216.— HONESTUS OF CORINTH 

(cp. Nos. 250, 253) 
You will cite the holy marriage of Harmonia, but 
that of Oedipus was unlawful. You will tell me of 
Antigone's piety, but her brothers were most wicked. 
Ino was made immortal, but Athamas was ill-fated. 
The lyre built the Avails by its music, but the strains 
of the flute were fatal to them. 1 So did Heaven 
compound the destiny of Thebes, mixing good and 
evil in equal portions. 

217.— MUCIUS SCAEVOLA 

Ye goats, why, deserting the thyme and spurge 
and all the green pasture that is yours, do ye start 
leaping round and round, wantonly butting at each 
other, prancing round shepherd Pan, the denizen of 
the forest? Give over that boxing, or the crook ye 
detest may find its way to you from the goat-herd's 
hand. 

218.— AEMILIANUS OF NICAEA 

Ah ! would that the waves of the wintry sea had 
engulfed me, wretched ship that I am, my load of 
living men now changed for one of corpses. I am 

1 Thebes is said to have been destroyed by Alexander to 
the accompaniment of the flute-player Ismenias. 

113 
VOL. III. I 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

αίΒεομαι σωθεϊσα. τί μοι ττΧεον ορμον ίκεσθαι, 
Βενομενΐ) φωτών πείσματα Βησομενων; 

Υ^ωκυτοΰ με Xeyotre βαρν σκάφος' ώλεσα φώτα?, 5 
ώΧεσα• ναυη^οΐ δ' είσ\ν εσω Χιμενος. 

219.— ΔΙΟΔΩΡΟΤ 2ΑΡΔΙΑΝΟΤ 

Αίγιβότου ^κύροιο Χιπων ττεΒον ΊΧιον επΧω 
οίος Άχίλλ€ΐδ?7? πρόσθε Νεοπτόλεμος, 

τοϊος εν ΑίνεάΒΐ]σι Νέρων άηος άστυ 'Ρεμοιο 
νεΐται, eV ωκυρόην ®ύβριν άμειψάμενος, 

κούρος ετ apriyeveiov έχων χνόον. άλλ' ο μεν ε^χει *> 
θυεν ο δ' άμφοτεροις, και Βορϊ καϊ σοφίτ]. 

220.— ΘΑΛΛΟΤ ΜΙΛΗΣΙΟΤ 

Ά χλοερά ττΧατάνιστος Γδ' ώ? έκρυψε φιΧεύντων 

opyia, τάν Ίεράν φυΧΧάΒα τεινομενα. 
άμφϊ δ' αρ άκρεμόνεσσιν εοϊς κεχαρισμενος ώραις 

ήμερίΒος Χαρής βότρυς άττοκρεμαται. 
ούτως, ώ πΧατάνιστε, φνοις' χΧοερά δ' άπο σείο 5 

φνΧΧας άεϊ κεύθοι τους ΤΙαφίης ετάρους. 

221.— ΜΑΡΚΟΤ ΑΡΓΕΝΤΑΡΙΟΤ 

Αύγάζω τον άφνκτον εττ\ σφραγιΒος 'Ερωτα 

χερσϊ Χεοντείαν άνιοχενντα βίαν, 
ως τα μεν μάστιγα κατ ανχενος, α Βε χαΧινονς 

ενθύνεΐ' ποΧΧά δ' άμφιτέθηΧε χάρις, 
φρίσσω τον βροτοΧοι^όν 6 yap καϊ θήρα Βαμάζων 5 

aypiov, οι)δ' oXiyov φείσεται άμερίων. 

1 How the whole crew of the ship had perished we are not 
told. 



ii4 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 219-221 

ashamed of being saved. What doth it profit me to 
come to harbour with no men in me to tie my haw- 
sers ? Call me the dismal hull of Cocytus. I brought 
death to men— death, and they are shipwrecked 
inside the harbour. 1 

219.— DIODORUS OF SARDIS 

As, in days of old, Neoptolemus, the son of Achilles, 
sailed to Troy from the goat-pastures of Scyrus, so 
among the sons of Aeneas doth their leader Nero 2 
return to the city of Remus, entering from the sea 
swift-flowing Tiber, a youth with the first down on 
his cheeks. The other's force was in his spear alone ; 
this youth is strong both in battle and in the schools. 

220.— THALLUS OF MILETUS 

See how the green plane-tree hides the mysteries 
of the lovers, canopying them with its holy foliage, 
and about its branches hang the clusters of the sweet 
vine, the season's delight. So, plane tree, mayest 
thou ever flourish, and may thy green foliage ever 
hide the comradeship of Aphrodite. 

221.— MARCUS ARGENTARIUS 

I see upon the signet-ring Love, whom none can 
escape, driving a chariot drawn by mighty lions. One 
hand menaces their necks with the whip, the other 
guides the reins ; about him is shed abundant bloom 
of grace. I shudder as I look on the destroyer of 
men, for he who can tame wild beasts will not show 
the least mercy to mortals. 

2 Probably the son of Germanicus. 

1 2 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

222.— ΛΝΤΙΦΙΛΟΤ BTZANTIOT 

Άνερα θηρ, χερσαίου ό πόντιος, άπνοον εμπνους, 

άράμενος Χοφιής vypbv ύπερθε νεκυν, 
εις ψαμάθους εκόμισσα. τι Βε πΧεον; εξ άΧός εις yrjv 

νηξάμενος, φόρτου μισθον ε~χω θάνατον 
δαίμονα δ' άΧΧΐ]Χων ήμείψαμεν ή μεν εκείνου 5 

χθων εμε, τον Β από γης εκτανε τουμον ΰΒωρ. 

223.— BIANOPOS 

ΑγγεΧίην παρ Ζηνός επεϊ φερεν ήεροΒίνης 

αίετός, οίωνών μοΰνος ενουράνιος, 
ουκ εφθη τον Κρήτα' θοην δ' επετείνατο νευρήν, 

πτηνόν δ 6 πτερόεις ιός εΧεηίσατο. 
Ζηνος δ' ούτι Δίκην εΧαθεν μόνος• εμπεσε δ' όρνις 5 

άνΒρί, τα δ' εύστοχίης άνταπετισε βεΧη. 
αυγενι δ' ιόν επηξεν, όν ηπατι κοίμισεν αυτός' 

εν 8ε βεΧος Βισσών αϊμ επιεν θανάτων. 

224.— ΚΡΙΝΑΓΟΡΟΤ 

Alya με την εΰθηΧον, όσων εκενωσεν άμολγεί"? 

ούθατα πασάων πουΧυ<γαΧακτοτάτην, 
<γευσάμενος, μελιηοες επεί τ εφράσσατο πϊαρ 

Καίσαρ, κήν νηυσϊν σύμττΧοον είρηάσατο. 
ηξω δ' αύτίκα που καϊ ες αστέρας' φ <yap επεσχον δ 

μαζον εμόν, μείων ούδ' 'όσον Αί<γιοχου. 



ιιό 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 222-224 

222.— ANTIPHILUS OF BYZANTIUM 

(A Dolphin speaks) 
Ι τουκ on my back the dripping corpse and bore 
it to the beach ; the beast saved the man, the sea 
creature that of the land, the living the dead. But 
what did it avail me ? I swam from sea to land, 
and receive death as payment for my porterage. We 
interchanged destinies. His land slew me, 1 and my 
water slew him who belonged to the land. 

223.— BIANOR 
(cp. No. 265) 
As the eagle who circles on high, who alone among 
the birds is an inmate of Heaven, was bearing a 
message from Zeus, he eluded not the Cretan, but 
the archer drew his swift-shooting bow, and the 
winged arrow made the bird its victim. But he did 
not, alone among men, escape the justice of Zeus. 
The bird fell on the man, and he paid dear for the 
sureness of his arrow's aim. The eagle pierced his 
neck with the arrow which had found a resting-place 
in its own heart, and one missile drank the life-blood 
of two. 

224.— CRINAGORAS 

I am the good milch-goat with udders yielding 
more than any the milk-pan ever drained, and Caesar, 
when he had tasted the richness of my milk, sweet 
as honey, took me with him even on the ship to be 
his fellow-voyager. Some day I think I shall even 
reach the stars, for he to whom I gave suck from my 
breast is by no means inferior to the Aegis-bearer. 

1 The dolphin seems to have been carried on to the beach 
and left high and dry. 

117 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



225.— ONESTOT 



Άσω7Π9 κρήνη καϊ Π??γασι<>, ΰΒατ άΒεΧφά, 
'ίππου και ποταμού Βωρα ποΒορρα'/έα• 

χω μεν eKoyfr ΕΧικώνος, 6 Βε φλέβας 'Ακροκορίνθου 
επΧηξ\ ω πτέρνης εις ίσον εύστοχίη. 

226.— ΖΩΝΑ 2ΑΡΔΙΑΝΟΤ 

At δ' ayere ξουθαϊ σιμβΧψ'Βες \άκρα μεΧισσαι 

φερβεσθ' ήε θύμων ρικνά περικνίΒια, 
ή πετάλας μάκωνος, ή άσταφιΒίτιΒα ρώγα, 

η ΐον, ή μάΧων χνουν επικαρπίΒιον 
πάντα περικνίξασθε, και ayyea κηρώσασθ€, 5 

οφρα μεΧισσοσόος Ώαν επικυψέΧιος 
ye\)OTi]Tai το μεν αυτός, ό δε βΧιστηρίΒι χειρ\ 

καπνώσας βαιην κΰμμι Χίπη μερίδα. 

227.— ΒΙΑΝΟΡ02 

Άκταίην πάρα, θινα Βιαυ^/εος ενΒοθεν αΧμας 

Ιχθύα πουΧυπόδην εδρακεν ίχθυβόΧος• 
νηχομενω δ' επόρουσε και εξ άΧός ήκ επι χερσον 

άpπάyδηv, αγ/^ς• δεσμον υποφθάμενος. 
αύταρ ο δισκηθεις κατακαιριος εμπεσε δειΧω 5 

πτωκι ταχύς' σχοίνω κειτο yap υπναΧεος. 
τον Be χυθείς περί πάντα πεΒήσατο, φωτι δ' υπ* 
αγρης 

εμβυθ'ιης ^ρη χερσόθεν ηντίασε. 

228.— ΑΠΟΛΛΩΝΙΔΟΤ 

, AyyεXLης ηκουσεν άνω'ίστου Μ,εΧίτεια, 
υίεα συν φόρτω κύματι κρυπτόμενον 

ιι8 






BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 225-228 

225.— HONESTUS 
Asopis fount and Pegasis are sister springs, the 
one a river-god's 1 gift, the other a horse's, both gush- 
ing forth at a blow of the foot. The horse cut the 
veins of Helicon, the river those of Acrocorintb. 
How equally happy the heel's aim in each case ! 

226.— ZONAS OF SARDIS 
Hie ye, ye tawny hive-bees, to feed on . . . or the 
crinkled leaves of the thyme, or the petals of the 
poppy, or the sun-dried berries of the vine, or violets, 
or the down that covers the apple. Take a pick at 
all, and mould your waxen vessels so that Pan, the 
saviour of the bees and keeper of the hives, may have 
a taste himself, and the beeman, smoking you out 
with his skilled hand, may leave a little portion for 
you also. 

227.— BIANOR 
(cp. No. 1 4) 
A fisherman spied an octopus in the transparent 
water by the sea-beach, and rushing upon it as it 
swam, snatched it and threw it on the land to avoid 
being caught by his prey. Round and i*ound it 
whirled, and by a happy chance lighted on a timorous 
hare that was lying half asleep among the rushes. 
It spread all over her and fettered her, and the man 
by means of his booty from the sea gained fresh 
booty from the land. 

228.— APOLLONIDES 
Melitea received the unlooked for news that her 
son, with his cargo, had been engulfed in the waves, 

1 Asopus. Pegasis is Castalia, cp. No. 230. For this 
origin of springs, cp. Theocr. Id. vii. 5. 

H9 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

ήϊόσιν δ' επικεΧσαν άΧίκΧυστον δέμας α,ΧΧου 
Βύσμορος οικείης σύμβοΧον είδε τύχης, 

υίέα δ' ώ<? έστειλε. Δίων δ' επί νηος άθ ραύστου 
ηΧυθεν εύκταίης σώος άπ' εμπορίης. 

μητέρες ώς άνισου μοίρης Χάχον ή μεν άεΧπτον 
ζωον έχει, κείνη δ' οψεται ού$ε νεκυν. 

229.— ΜΑΡΚΟΤ ΑΡΓΕΝΤΑΡΙΟΤ 

Άρχαίη σύνΒειπνε, καπηΧικά μέτρα φιΧεΰσα, 
εύΧαΧε, πρηύηεΧως, εύστομε, μακροφάρυξ, 

αίεν εμής πενίης βραχυσύμβοΧε μύστι, Xayvve, 
ηΧθες όμως ύπ εμην χεΐρά ττοτε χρόνιος. 

aW οφεΧες καϊ άμικτος ανύμφευτος τε τταρείης, 
άφθορος ώς κούρη προς πόσιν ερχόμενη. 

230.— ΟΝΕ2ΤΟΤ 

' Αμβαίνων 'Ελικώνα μεγαν κάμες, άλλ' εκορεσθης 
ΤΙηγασίδος κρήνης νεκταρεων Χιβάδων 

οΰτως καϊ σοφίης πόνος όρθιος' ην δ' άρ* eV άκρον 
τέρμα μόΧγς, άρύση ΤΙιερίδων χάριτας. 

231.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ [2ΙΔΩΝΙΟΤ] 

Αύην με πΧατάνιστον εφερπύζουσα καΧύπτει 
άμπεΧος' όθνείη δ' άμφιτεθηΧα κόμη, 

ή πριν εμοϊς θαΧεθουσιν ενιθρέψασ όρο&άμνοις 
βότρυας, ή ταύτης ουκ άπετηΧοτερη. 

Ι20 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 229-231 

and seeing the symbol of her own misfortune in the 
corpse of another which the sea had washed up on 
the beach, the unhappy woman gave it burial as if 
it were her son's. But Dion, his ship undamaged, 
returned in safety from a voyage that had met all 
his hopes. What diverse fortune befel the two 
mothers ! The one holds alive the son she never 
hoped to see, the other shall not even see her son 
dead. 

229.— MARCUS ARGENTARIUS 
(cp. Book V., No. 135) 
My ancient boon-companion, friend of the vintner's 
measures, sweet babbler with the gentle laugh, pretty 
mouth and long neck, my flagon, ever knowing the 
secret of my poverty but contributing little to relieve 
it, I have waited for thee long, but I hold thee now. 
Would I had thee unmixed and unwedded, 1 coming 
like a maiden undefiled to her husband. 

230.— HONESTUS 

Thou wert sore tired by the ascent of great 
Helicon, but didst drink thy fill of the sweet waters 
of the spring of Pegasus. Even so the labour of 
study is up-hill, but if thou attainest the summit 
thou shalt quaff the pleasant gift of the Muses. 

231.— ANTIPATER OF THESSALONICA 

I am a dry plane-tree covered by the vine that 

climbs over me ; and I, who once fed clusters from 

my own branches, and was no less leafy than this 

vine, now am clothed in the glory of foliage not my 

1 The Greek word means also " unwatered." 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

τοίην μεντοι έπειτα τιθηνείσθω τις εταίρην, 6 

ήτις άμείψασθαι καϊ νεκυν οίδε μόνη. 

232.— ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΤ ΘΕΣΣΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩΝ 

Άδριακοΐο κύτους Χαιμος το πάΧαι μβΧίγηρυς, 
ηνίκ έγαστροφόρονν Έακχιακα,ς χάριτας, 

νυν κΧασθεΙς κειμαι νεοθηΧεϊ καρτερον ερκος 
κΧηματι, προς τρυφερην τεινομενω καΧύβην. 

αιεί τοι Έρομίω Χατρεύομεν η yepabv yap 5 

φ ρου ρου μεν πιστώς, ή νέον εκτρεφομεν. 

233.— ΕΡΤΚΙΟΤ 

Ανά τοι εκτάμνοντι yepavSpva, κάμμορε Μίνδων, 

φωΧας άραχναίη σκαιον έτυψε πόδα, 
νειόθεν άντιάσασα' χύδην 8" εβρυξε μεΧαίνη 

σηπεδόνι χΧωρην σάρκα κατ άστρα^άΧους. 
ετμηθη δ' από της στίβαρον <γόνυ, καϊ σε κομίζει 5 

μουνόποδα βλωθρής σκηπάνιον κότινου. 

234.— ΚΡΙΝΑΓΟΡΟΤ 

"Αχρι τεΰ, α δείΧαιε, κεναΐσιν επ 1 εΧπίσι, θυμέ, 

πωτηθεϊς ψυχρών άσσοτάτω νεφέων, 
άλΧοις αλλ' ε'π' όνειρα δια'γράψεις άφενοιο; 

κτητον yap θνητοίς ούδε εν αύτόματον. 
Μουσεων άλλ' eVt δώρα μετερχεο• ταύτα δ' αμυδρά 5 

εϊδωΧα ψνχής ηΧεμάτοισι μεθες. 

235.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

"Αγχουρθ£ μεyάXaι κόσμου χθόνες, ας δια NetXo? 
πιμπΧάμενος μεΧάνων τέμνει απ Αιθιόπων, 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 232-235 

own. Such a mistress let a man cherish who, unlike 
her kind, knows how to requite him even when he 
is dead. 

232.— PHILIPPUS OF THESSALONICA 
I am the neck of an Adriatic wine-jar, once honey- 
voiced when I bore in my belly the gift of Bacchus. 
But now I am broken I stand here as a strong support 
for a newly-planted vine which reaches up to climb 
over this delicate arbour. Ever do I serve Bacchus ; 
either I guard him faithfully in his old age, or i - ear 
him in his youth. 

233.— ERYCIUS 

As thou wast cutting the dry roots of old trees, 
unhappy Mindon, a spider nesting there attacked 
thee from beneath and bit thy left foot. The venom, 
spreading, devoured with black putrefaction the fresh 
flesh of thy heel, and hence thy sturdy leg was cut 
off at the knee, and a staff cut from a tall wild olive- 
tree supports thee now on one leg. 

234.— CRINAGORAS 

How long, wretched soul, upborne by empty hopes 
nigh to the cold clouds, shalt thou build thee dream 
upon dream of wealth ? Naught falls of its own 
accord into the possession of man. Pursue the gifts 
of the Muses, and leave these dim phantoms of the 
mind to fools. 

235. — By the Same 

On the marriage of Cleopatra (daughter of Antony and 

Cleopatra) with Jnba, King of Nwnidia 

Great bordering regions of the world which the full 
stream of Nile separates from the black Aethiopians, 

123 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

άμφότ€ραι βασιΧηας εκοινώσασθε <γάμοισιν, 
εν <γένος Αιγύπτου καϊ Αιβύης θεμεναι. 

εκ πατέρων εϊη παισϊν πάΧι τοΐσιν άνάκτων 5 

εμπεδον ηπείροις σκήπτρον eV άμφοτέραις. 

236.— ΒΑΣΣΟΤ ΛΟΛΛΙΟΤ 

"Αρρηκτοι Μοιρών πυμάτην εσφρά^ισαν 'όρκοι 
τω Φρνγϊ πάρ βωμω την ΤΙριάμου θνσίην. 

άΧΧα σοι, Αινεία, στόλος Ιερός ΊταΧον ήδη 
ορμον έχει, πάτρης φροίμιον ούρανίης. 

ες καΧον ώΧετο πύργο? ό Ύρώϊος- ή yap iv οπΧοις 5 
η^βρθη κόσμου παντός ανασσα πόΧις. 

237.— ΕΡΤΚΙΟΤ 

α. ΈουκόΧε, προς τω ΙΙανός, ό φήγινος, είπε, κοΧοσσος 
ούτος, οτω σπένδεις το yXάyoς, εστί τίνος; 

β. Τ ω ΧειοντοπάΧα Ύιρυνθίω. ου 8ε τα τόξα, 
νήπΐ€, και σκυτάΧην aypieXaiov όρης; 
χαίροις 'ΑΧκείδα ΖαμαΧηφά<γε, καϊ τάδε φρουρεί 5 
αΰΧια, κήξ οΧί<γων μυριόβοια τίθει. 

238.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ 

Βούπαις ώπόΧΧων τόδε χάΧκεον epyov Όνατα, 

ayXa'tys Αητοΐ καϊ Διϊ μαρτυρίη, 
ούθ' οτι τήσΒε μάτην Ζευς ήρατο, χ&τι κατ αΐνον 

όμματα καϊ κεφαΧην ayXaw 6 Κροι>ί8ης. 
ού&'ΊΙρη νεμεσητον εχεύατο χαΧκον Όνατάς, 5 

ον μετ 'ΕίΧειθυίης τοΐον άπεπΧάσατο. 

1 Heracles. 

2 The reference is to Horn. II. ii. 478, a verse which seems 
to have become proverbial. 

124 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 236-238 

ye have by marriage made your sovereigns common 
to both, turning Egypt and Libya into one country. 
May the children of these princes ever again rule 
with unshaken dominion over both lands. 

236.— BASSUS LOLLIUS 

The inviolable oath of the Fates decreed that final 
sacrifice of Priam slaughtered on the Phrygian altar. 
But thy holy fleet, Aeneas, is already safe in an 
Italian harbour, the prelude of thy heavenly home. 
It Λvas for the best that the towers of Troy fell ; for 
hence in arms arose the city that is queen of the 
world. 

237.— ERYCIUS 

A. " Herdsman, tell me by Pan whose is this 
colossal statue of beech-wood to which thou art 
pouring a libation of milk." B. "The Tirynthian's 1 
who wrestled with the lion. Seest thou not his bow, 
simpleton, and his club of wild olive ? All hail to 
thee, calf-devouring Heracles, and guard this fold, 
that, instead of these few, my cattle may be ten 
thousand." 

238.— ANTIPATER OF THESSALONICA 

Apoi.lo is a big boy here in this bronze work of 
Onatas which testifies to the beauty of Leto and 
Zeus, and proclaims that not idly did Zeus love her, 
and that, even as the saying is, the eyes and head of 
the son of Cronos are glorious. 2 Not even Hera will 
be displeased with this bronze which Onatas moulded 
to such beauty by the help of Ilithyia. 3 

3 The statue is regarded as the child of the artist. This 
statue of Apollo was at Pergamus (Paus. viii. 42, 7). 

125 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



239.— ΚΡΙΝΑΓΟΡΟΤ 



ΒίβΧων ή yXufcept) Χυρικών εν τεύ~χεϊ τώδ<• 
πεντάς αμίμητων epya φέρει Χαρίτων. 

δώρον δ' εις Ιερην Άντωνίη ήκομεν ηώ, 
κάΧΧευς καϊ πραπίδων εξοχ ενβγκαμεντ}. 

240.— ΦΙΛΙΠΓΙΟΤ 

Βαίόν άποπΧανίην Χιπομητορα παΐδα ΚαΧύπτρης 

κριός εΧιζόκερως θεΐνε θρασυνόμενος. 
κάπρος δ' ΉράκΧειος άπορρηξας άπο δεσμών, 

ες νηδυν κριού πάσαν έβαψε ykvvv 
ζωην νηπιάγω δ' εγαρισσατο. αρ f άπο'Ήρης 5 

Ή ρακΧεης βρεφεων ωκτισεν ηΧικίην; 

241.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ 

ΒουκόΧος επΧεο, ΦοΊβκ, ΤΙοσειδάων δε καβάΧΧης, 
κύκνος Ζευς, 'Άμμων δ' ώμφιβοητος όφις, 

χοί μεν επ ήϊθεας, συ δε παιδικός, οφρα Χάθοιτε' 
εστε yap ου πειθούς εύνεται, άΧΧα βίης. 

Έ^ύayόpaς δ' ων χαΧκος άτερ δοΧου αύτος ivapyrjs 5 
πάντας καϊ πάσας, ου μεταβαΧΧό μένος. 

242.— ΑΝΤΙΦΙΛΟΤ ΒΤΖΑΝΤΙΟΤ 

ΓΧαυκος ό νησαίοιο διαπΧώουσιν όδ>;γό? 

πορθμού, καϊ %ασίων εντροφος alyiaXav, 
πόντου άροτρευτηρ επιδέξιος, ούδ\ οτ εκνωασεν, 

πΧαζομενΎ) στρωφών πηδάΧιον παΧάμη, 

1 Probably a boar about to be sacrificed to Heracles. 

2 Apollo became a herd for the sake of Admetus, Poseidon 

126 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 239-242 

239.— CRINAGORAS 

The sweet company of the five lyric poets united 
in this volume offer the work of the inimitable 
Graces. We come on her festal morning to Antonia, 
supreme in beauty and mind. 

240.— PHILIPPUS 

A ram with crumpled horns was rushing fiercely 
to butt Calyptra's little boy, who had strayed from 
his mother, when the boar of Heracles, 1 breaking his 
tether, buried his tusks in the ram's belly and gave 
the child its life. Is it because he remembers Hera's 
cruelty that Heracles pities children of tender age ? 

241.— ANTIPATER OF THESSALONICA 

You were a neat-herd, Phoebus, and Poseidon was 
a nag, Zeus was a swan, and famous Amnion a snake 2 
(they did it for the sake of girls, but you, Apollo, 
were after a boy), all to conceal your identity ; for 
you all enjoy by force and not by persuasion. Eva- 
goras, however, being made of brass, 3 need practise 
no deceit, but in his own form, and without any trans- 
formation, possesses all and every of either sex. 

242.— ANTIPHILUS OF BYZANTIUM 

Glaucus, brought up on the shores of Thasus, he 
who conducted those crossing by ferry to the island, 
skilled ploughman of the sea, who even when he was 
dozing guided the rudder with no uncertain hand, the 

a horse for that of Demeter, Zeus a swan for Leda, Amnion 
a snake to lie with Olympias and beget Alexander. 
3 i.e. having plenty of coin. 

127 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

μυριετης, άΧ'ιοιο βίου ράκος, ούδ\ ότ εμεΧΧεν 
Θνήσκειν, έκτος εβη <γηραΧεη<; σανίδος' 

rot δε κεΧυφος εκαυσαν επ άνερι, τόφρ ό yepaios 
•πΧωστ) επ οικείης εις άίδην ακάτου. 

243.— ΛΠΟΛΛΩΝίΔΟΤ 

Γήθησαν 7Γβρϊ παιδος Άριστίπποιο τοκήες, 
καϊ κΧαύσαν μούρης δ ημαρ εν άμφοτερης. 

εύτε yap αιθόμενον δόμον €κφυ<γ€ν, ίθυ κεραυνού 
Τιευς κατά οι κεφαΧής άσττετον ήκε σεΧας. 

τούτο δ' έπος τοτ εΧεξαν όσοι νεκυν ωδύροντο• 
"Ώ ττυρϊ δαιμονίω τΧήμον όφειΧόμενε." 

244.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Αειματόεις εΧάφων κεραος Χόχος, ευτε κρυώνεις 

πΧησαν ορών κορυφάς γιόνεαι νιφάδες, 
δείΧαιαι ποταμοϊσιν εφώρμισαν, εΧπίδι φρούδοι 

•χΧιήναι νοτεροϊς άσθμασιν ώκυ yovv. 
τάς δε περιφράξας εχθρός ρόος άθρόον άφνω 

χειμερί}] στυγερού δήσε ττάηοιο πέδη. 
πΧηθύς δ' ακρότερων άΧίνου θοινήσατο θήρης, 

ή φύ Γ γεν άρπεδόνην ποΧΧάκι καϊ στάΧικα, 

245.— ΑΝΤΙΦΑΝΟΤ2 

Δύσμοιρων θαΧάμων επι παστάσιν ούχ Ύμεναιος, 
αλλ' Άίδ?79 εστη ττικροηάμου Π6τάλ?;9. 

δείματι yap μούνην ττρωτόζυ^α Κύπριν αν ορφνην 
φεύ-γουσαν, ξυνον παρθενικαΐσι φοβον, 

φρουροδόμοι νηΧεΐς κύνες εκτανον ην δε γυναίκα 
εΧπϊς ίδεΐν, άφνως εσ'χρμεν ούδε νεκυν. 

128 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 243-245 

old man of countless years, the battered remnant of a 
seafarer, not even when he was on the point of death 
quitted his old tub. They burnt his shell on the top 
of him, that the old man might sail to Hades in his 
own boat. 

243.— APOLLONIDES 

The parents of Aristippus both rejoiced and wept 
for their son, and one day saw both his good and evil 
fate. When he had escaped from the burning house, 
straightway Zeus launched at his head the all-powerful 
name of his thunderbolt. Then those who bewailed 
the dead spoke this word : " Unhappy boy, reserved 
by Fate for the fire of Heaven ! " 

244. — By the Same 

A timid troop of horned deer, when the frozen 
mountain tops were covered by the snow clouds, 
sought refuge, poor creatures, in the river, setting 
off there in the hope of wanning their swift limbs 
in the moist exhalations of the stream. But the 
unkind stream, shutting them in all of a sudden, 
imprisoned them in odious fetters of wintry ice. A 
crowd of countrymen feasted on the unsnared game 
that had often escaped the net and its stakes. 

245.— ANTIPHANES 

By the unhappy marriage -bed of Petale at her 
bitter bridal stood Hades, not Hymen. For, as she 
fled alone through the darkness, dreading the first 
taste of the yoke of Cypris — a terror common to all 
maidens — the cruel watch -dogs killed her. We had 
hoped to see her a wife and suddenly we could hardly 
find her corpse. 

129 

vol. m. κ 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

246.— MAPKOT ΑΡΓΕΝΤΑΡΙΟΤ 

ϊίθραύσθης, ή&εΐα παρ οινοπόταισι Χάηυνε, 

νη&ύος εκ πάσης χευαμενη Βρόμιον. 
τηΧόθε ηάρ Χίθος εις σε βαρΰστονος, οία κεραυνός, 

ου Διός εκ -χειρών, ύλλά Αιώνος εβη. 
ην οε γέΧως επί σοϊ καϊ σκώμματα πυκνά, τυπείσης, 5 

καϊ ποΧυς εξ ετάρων γινόμενος θόρυβος, 
ου θρηνώ σε, Χάηννε, τον εύαστήρα τεκοΰσαν 

Ί5άκχον, επεϊ ^,εμεΧη καϊ συ πεπόνθατ ίσα. 

247.— ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΤ 

ΈύθηΧή πΧάτανόν με Νότου βαρυΧαίΧαπες αυραι 

ρίζης εξ αυτής εστορεσαν δαπέδοίς' 
Χουσαμενη ϋρομίω δ εστην πάΧιν, ομβρον έχουσα 

χείματι καϊ θάΧπει του Διός ήδύτερον. 
όΧΧυμενη δ' έζησα' μόνη 8ε πιοΰσα Αυαΐον, δ 

άΧΧων κΧινομενων, ορθότερη βΧεπομαι. 

248.— ΒΟΗΘΟΤ TOT ΕΛΕΓΕΙΟΓΡΑΦΟΤ 

Ει τοΐος Διόνυσος ες Ιερόν ήΧθεν "Ολυμπον, 
κωμάζων Αηναις συν ποτέ και Έ,ατύροις, 

οίον ό τεχνηεις ΤϊυΧάδης ώρχήσατο κεΐνον, 
ορθά κατά τραγικών τεθμια μουσοπόΧων, 

παυσαμενη ζήΧου Διός αν φάτο σύγγα/χο? Ήρη• 5 
" Έψεύσω, Έ,εμεΧη, Τδάκχον εγώ δ' ετεκον." 



ΐ3ο 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 246-248 

246.— MARCUS ARGENTARIUS 

Thou art broken, sweet flagon, dear to the wine- 
bibbers, and hast shed from thy belly all the liquor 
of Bacchus. For from afar fell on thee, with a dread- 
ful crash, a stone like a thunderbolt hurled by the 
hand, not of Zeus (Dios), but of Dion. And when 
it smote thee there was much laughter and many 
gibes, and a great noise among the company. I do 
not lament thee, flagon, who didst give birth to 
Bacchus the crier of Ehoe, for thy fate has been the 
same as Semele's. 1 

247.— PHILIPPUS 

I am a fine plane-tree that the furious blasts of the 
south wind uprooted and laid low on the ground. 
But after a bath of wine I stand again erect, vivified 
both in summer and winter by a rain sweeter than 
that of heaven. By death I lived, and I alone, after 
drinking the juice of Bacchus which makes others 
bend, am seen to stand straighter. 

248.— BOETHUS, THE WRITER OF ELEGIES 

If Dionysus had come revelling with the Maenads 
and Satyrs to holy Olympus, looking just as Pylades 
the great artist played him in the ballet according to 
the true canons of the servants of the tragic Muse, 
Hera, the consort of Zeus, would have ceased to be 
jealous, and exclaimed : " Semele, thou didst pretend 
that Bacchus was thy son ; 'twas I who bore him." 

1 The flagon is said to have given birth to Bacchus by 
spilling the wine, as Semele when smitten by the thunderbolt 
spilt the child from her womb. 

131 
κ 2 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



249.— MAKKIOT 



Εύπ&αΧον yXavKav avahevhpaha τάνό€ τταρ άκραις 

i&pvdels Χοφιαΐς Tlav οδ' έπισκοπέω. 
el δε σε πορφύροντος έ'χεί πόθος, ω παροδΐτα, 

βοτρυος, ου φθονέω γαστρι χαριζομάνω' 
ην δε xepl ψαύσης κΧοπιη μόνον, αντίκα δέξη 5 

οζαΧέην βάκτρου τήνό€ καρηβαρίην. 

250.— ΟΝΕΣΤΟΤ 

Έστ?;^ εν φόρμιγγι, κατηρ€ΐφθην δέ συν αύΧω 
<$})βψ </>ε0 Μούσης ΖμπαΧιν άρμονίης' 

κωφά δε μοι Kelrai λιγ^ο^ελγεα Xetyava πύργων, 
π&τροι μουσοδόμοις rei%eaiv αύτόμοΧοι, 

σης χ€ρός, 'Αμφίων, άπονος χάρις' €πτάπυΧον yap 5 
πάτρην ίπταμίτω Τ€ΐχισας ev κιθάρη. 

251.— ΕΤΗΝΟΤ ΓΡΑΜΜΑΤΙΚΟΤ 

'Εχθίστη Μούσαις σeXtδηφά'ye, Χωβή -reipa 
φωΧάς, aei σοφίης κΧέμματα φερβομενη, 

τίπτ€, ^Χαινόχρως, ίεραΐς ψι']φοισι Χοχάζη, 
σίΧφη, την φθον€ρην eiKova πΧαττομβνη; 

φ€ύ<γ άπο Μ,ουσάων, ϊθι τηΧόσβ, μη$ όσον οψβι 5 
βάσκανον \iv ψήφω δόξαν έπεισα'γά'γης. 

252.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Έ? βαθυν ηΧατο NelXov απ* οφρύος όξίις όδίτης, 
ηνίκα Χαιμάργων εϊδε Χνκων ά'γέΧην. 

132 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 249-252 

249.— MACCIUS 

I am Paii; and established here at the top of the 
hill I keep watch over this leafy, green, climbing vine. 
If thou desirest my ripe fruit, traveller, I grudge it 
not, if it is to gratify thy belly ; but if thou layest 
thy hand on me for the sake of robbery only, thou 
shalt straightway feel on thy head the weight of this 
knobbed staff. 

250.— HONESTUS 

(cp. Nos. 216, 253) 
I, Thebes, rose at the sound of the lyre, and sunk 
in ruins at that of the flute. Alas for the Muse that 
was adverse to harmony ! They now lie deaf, the 
remains of my towers, once charmed by the lyre, the 
stones that took their places of their own accord in 
the muse-built walls, a gift that cost thee, Amphion, 
no labour ; for with thy seven-stringed lyre thou 
didst build thy seven-gated city. 

251.— EVENUS 

Page-eater, the Muses' bitterest foe, lurking de- 
stroyer, ever feeding on thy thefts from learning, 
why, black bookworm, dost thou lie concealed among 
the sacred utterances, producing the image of envy ? 
Away from the Muses, far away ! Convey not even 
by the sight of thee the suspicion of how they must 
suffer from ill-will. 

252. — Anonymous 

Quickly the traveller, when he saw the pack of 
greedy wolves, leapt from the bank into the deep Nile. 

133 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

αλλά μιν άγρεύσαντο δι ύδατος• εβρυχε δ' άλλο? 

άΧΧον, έπουραίω δήγματι δραξάμενος. 
μακρά γεφυρώθη δε Χύκοις βυθός, έφθανε δ' άνδρα 5 

νηχομένων θηρών αυτοδίδακτος άρης. 

253.— ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΤ ΘΕ^ΑΑΟΝΙΚΕΩΣ 

Έν Θήβαις Κάδμου κΧεινος γάμος, άλλα μυσαχθης 

Οιδίποδος• τελετάς Έΰϊος ήσπάσατο, 
ας γεΧάσας ΤΙενθεύς ώδύρατο• τείχεα χορδαΐς 

εστη, καΐ Χωτοΐς εστενε Χυόμενα' 
'Αντιόπης όσίη, χαΧεπη δ ώδις 'λοκάστης• 5 

ην , \νω φιΧόπαις, άλλ' άσεβης ' Αθάμας. 
\οίκτρόν del πτοΧίεθρον ί'δ' ως εσθΧών περί ®ήβας 

μύθων καϊ στυγνών ηρκεσεν ίστορίη. 

254.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Ή πυρι -πάντα τεκουσα ΦιΧαίνιον, η βαρυπενθης 

μήτηρ, ή τέκνων τρισσον ίδούσα τάφον, 
άΧΧοτρίαις ώδϊσιν έφώρμισα• ή yap εωΧπειν 

πάντως μοι 'ζησειν τούτον ον ουκ ετεκον. 
η δ' εύπαις θετόν υ'ιον avt'jyayov άΧΧά με δαίμων 5 

ήθεΧε μηδ' άΧΧης μητρός εχειν χάριτα. 
κΧηθεϊς ημέτερος yap άπέφθιτο• νυν δε τεκούσαις 

ήδη και Χοιπαΐς πένθος εγώ yiyova. 

255.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Ήρίθμει ποΧύν οΧβον 'Αριστείδης ό πενιχρός 
την οϊν ώς ποίμνην, την βόα δ' ώς άγέΧην 

134 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 253-255 

But they continued the chase through the water, each 
holding on by its teeth to another's tail. A long 
bridge of wolves was formed over the stream, and 
the self-taught stratagem of the swimming beasts 
caught the man. 

253.— PHILIPPUS OF THESSALONICA 

Splendid in Thebes was the marriage of Cadmus, 
but that of Oedipus was abominable. Bacchus wel- 
comed the orgies which Pentheus, having ridiculed, 
bewailed. The walls arose to the music of strings, 
but groaned as they crumbled to the flute's. Holy 
were the birth-pangs of Antiope, but locasta's heavy 
with doom. Ino loved her child, but Athamas was 
impious. The city was always famous (?). See how 
for good or evil History always had plenty to tell 
of Thebes. 

254. — By the Same 

I, Philaenis, who bore children but to feed the 
funeral pyre, the mother weighed down bv grief, 
who had seen the burial of three, sought refuge in 
the fruit of another womb ; for, indeed, 1 was confi- 
dent that the son I had not borne myself would live. 
So, though I had given birth to so many, I brought 
up an adopted son. But Fate would not allow me to 
possess even the gift of another mother; for no sooner 
was he called mine than he died, and now I have 
become a cause of mourning even to other mothers. 

255. — By the Same 
(cp. No. 150) 
Needy Aristides reckoned his possessions as great ; 
his one sheep was a Hock, his one cow a herd. But 

135 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

ήμβροτε δ' αμφοτέρων άμνήν Χυκος, εκτανε δ' ωδϊς 
την δάμαΧιν, πενίης δ ώλετο βουκοΧιον 

πηροδέτω δ' ο y* Ίμάντι κατ αυχενος άμμα πεδήσας 5 
οικτρός άμυκήτω κάτθανε παρ καΧυβη. 

256.— ΑΝΤΙΦΑΝΟΤΣ 

'Ήμισυ μεν ζώειν εδόκουν en, κείνο δ' εφυσεν 
εν μόνον αίπυτάτου μήΧον eV άκρε μονός• 

ί) δε κύων δένδρων καρποφθόρος, ή πτιΧόνωτος 
κάμπη, καϊ το μόνον βάσκανος εζέφαηεν. 

ο Φθόνος εις ποΧύν ojkov άπέβΧεπεν ος he τα μικρά 5 
πορθεί, καϊ τούτου χείρονα δει με Xeyeiv. 

257.— ΑΠΟΛΛΩΝΙΔΟΤ 

Ή Καθαρή (Νύμφαι yap επώνυμον εξοχον αΧΧων 

κρήνη πασάων δωκαν εμοϊ Χιβάδων), 
Χηϊστής οτε μοι παρακΧίντορας εκτανεν άνδρας, 

καϊ φον'ιην ίεροΐς ΰδασι Χούσε χέρα, 
κείνον άναστρέψασα ηΧυκύν ρόον, ούκέθ* οδίταις 5 

βΧνζω• τις yap έρεΐ την Καθαρήν ετι με; 

258.— ΑΝΤ1ΦΑΝΟΤ2 ΜΕΓΑΛΟΠΟΛΙΤΟΤ 

Ή πάρος εύνδροισι Χιβαξομένη προχοαΐσι, 
πτωχή νυν νυμφών μέχρι καϊ εις σταγόνα• 

Χυθρώδεις yap εμοΐσιν ένίψατο νάμασι χείρας 
άνδροφόνος, κηΧΐδ' ΰδασιν εyκepάσaς• 

εξ ου μοι κοΰραι φύyov ήΧιον, " ΈιΙς ενα Βάκχον," 5 
είπουσαι, " νύμφαι μισ^{όμεθ\ ουκ ες "Αρη. ' 

136 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 256-258 

he lost both ; a wolf killed the ewe, and the cow died 
in calving. So that the stock of his poor farm was 
gone, and the luckless man, noosing his neck in the 
strap of his wallet, perished by his shed that no 
longer echoed to the sound of bleating. 

256.— ANTIPHANES 

I thought that half of me was still alive, and that 
half produced one single apple on the highest branch. 
But the brute that ravages fruit-trees, the hairy backed 
catei'pillai•, envied me even the one, and ate it up. 
Envy's eyes are set on great wealth, but the creature 
who lays waste a little substance I must call worse 
even than Envy's self. 

257.— APOLLONIDES 

I, the Pure Fountain (for that is the name the 
Nymphs bestowed on me above all other springs), 
when the robber had slain the men who were reclin- 
ing beside me, and washed his bloody hands in my 
sacred water, turned back that sweet stream, and no 
longer gush for travellers ; for who will call me 
"The Pure" any longer? 

258.— ANTIPHANES OF MEGALOPOLIS 

I who once gushed with abundance of sweet water, 
have now lost my nymphs 1 even to the last drop. For 
the murderer washed his bloody hands in my water, 
and tainted it with the stain. Ever since the maidens 
have retired from the sunlight, exclaiming, " We 
nymphs mix with Bacchus alone, not with Ares." 

1 My water. 

137 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

259.— ΒΙΑΝΟΡΟΣ 

'Ήριπεν εξ άκρης Βόμος αθρόος, αλλ* επϊ παιΒΪ 
νηπιάχω Ζέφυρου ποΧΧον εΧαφρότερος' 

φείσατο κουροσύνης καϊ ερείπιον. ώ μεηάΧαυχοι 
μητέρες, ωΒίνων καϊ Χίθος αισθάνεται. 

260.— ΣΕΚΟΤΝΔΟΤ ΤΑΡΑΝΤΙΝΟΤ 

Ή τό πάλαι Ααϊς πάντων βεΧος, ούκετι Ααις 
αλλ' ετεων φανερή πάσιν εγώ Νεμεσις. 

ου μα Κύπριν (τί Βε Κύπρις εμο'ι y ετι, πΧην όσον 
όρκος;) 
ηνώριμον ούδ' αυτή ΑαίΒι Ααϊς ετι. 

261.— ΕΠΙΓΟΝΟΤ ΘΕΣΣΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩΣ 

Ή πύρος εύπετάΧοισιν εν οίνάνθαις νεάσασα, 
καϊ τέτανων βοτρύων paya κομισσαμενη, 

νυν ούτω ηραιοΰμαι. ΐ'δ' 6 χρόνος οία Βαμάζει* 
καϊ σταφυΧη <γήρως αισθάνεται ρυτΊΒων. 

262.— ΦΤΛΙΠΠΟΤ ΘΕΣΣΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩΝ 

Ήρίθμουν ποτέ πάντες 'ΑριστοΒίκην κΧυτόπαιΒα 

εξάκις ώΒίνων άχθος άπωσαμενην 
ηρισε δ' εις αυτήν ΰΒωρ χθονί• τρεις yap οΧοντο 

νούσω, Χειπόμενοι δ' ημυσαν εν πέΧάγει. 
αίεϊ δ' η βαρύΒακρυς, επϊ στήΧαις μεν άηΒών, 

μεμφομενη Βε βυθοις άΧκυονϊς βΧεπεται. 

263.— ΑΝΤΙΦΙΛΟΤ ΒΤΖΑΝΤΙΟΤ 

Ή ηραΰς Έ,ύβούΧη, οτε οι καταθύμιον ην τι, 
Φοίβου τον προ ποΒών μάντιν άειρε Χίθον, 

ιλ8 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 259-263 

259.— BIANOR 

The house fell in from top to bottom, but much 
more lightly on the infant son of Zephyrus. Even a 
ruin spared childhood. Ο ye boastful mothers, see 
how even stone feels maternal affection. 

260.— SECUNDUS OF TARENTUM 

I, Lais, who was once the love-dart that smote all, 
am Lais no longer, but a witness to all of the Nemesis 
of years. No, by Cypris ! — and what is Cypris to me 
now but an oath ? — Lais is no longer recognisable 
to Lais herself. 

261.— EPIGONUS OF THESSALONICA 

I, the vine who once was young and clothed in 
leafy shoots, I who bore bunches of swelling grapes, 
am now as old as you see. Look how Time overcomes 
us ! Even the vine's clusters know the wrinkles of 
old age. 

262.— PHIL1PPUS OF THESSALONICA 

All once counted Aristodice to be a proud mother, 
for six times had she been delivered of her womb's 
burden. But water vied with earth in afflicting her ; 
for three sons perished by sickness, and the rest 
closed their eyes in the sea. The tearful woman is 
ever seen complaining like a nightingale by the rrrave- 
stones, and upbraiding the deep like a halcyon. 1 

263.— ANTIPHILUS OF BYZANTIUM 

Old Eubule, whenever she had set her heart on 
anything, used to pick up the nearest stone at her 

1 See the stor} 7 of Ceyx and Alcyone in Ovid (Metam. xi.), 
finely rendered by Dryden. ι ?ο 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

■χείρεσι πειράζουσα' καϊ ην βαρύς, ήνίκα μη τι 
ήθεΧεν el δε θεΧοι, κουφότερος πετάλων. 

αύτη δε πρήσσουσα τό οι φίΧον, ήν ποθ* άμάρτη, 5 
Φοίβω τας άνισους χείρας επεηράφετο. 

264.— ΑΠΟΛΛΩΝΙΔΟΤ, οι δε ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΤ 

θάμνου ποτ άκρους άμφϊ κΧώνας ή μένος 

τεττιζ πτερω, φΧί'γοντος ήΧιου μέσου, 

νηούν ραπίζων, ΒαίΒαΧ* αύτουργω μεΧει 

ηδύς κατωρ^άνιζε της ερημιάς. 

Κρίτων δ\ ό πάσης ιξοερ^ος ΤΙιαΧεύς 5 

θηρης, άσαρκου νώτα δουνακεύσατο. 

τίσιν δ' ετισεν εις yap ηθάδας πάγας 

σφαΧεϊς άΧάται παντός ιμείρων πτερού. 

265.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Ίοτυπης Δ<09 όρνις ετίσατο Κρήτα φαρέτρης, 

ούρανόθεν τόξω τόξον αμυνόμενος• 
κεΐνον δ' ευθύς άκοντι παΧιν<δρομεοντι κατεκτα> 

ηεριος, πίπτων δ' εκτανεν ώς εθανεν. 
μηκετ εφ? ύμετεροις άψευδεσι Κ,ρήτες όϊστοΐς 5 

αύχειθ*' ύμνείσθω καϊ Διο<? εύστοχίη. 

266.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ 

"Ιμερον αύΧησαντι ποΧυτ ρητών δια Χωτών 
είπε Χι^υφθόγγω Φοίβος επί ΤΧαφύρω' 



ΐ4θ 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 264-266 

feet, as being Apollo's prophet, and try it in her hand. 
Whenever she did not want a thing, it was heavy ; 
but if she wanted it, it was lighter than a feather. 
But she acted as it pleased her best, and if she came 
to grief she set down the unfairness of her hand's 
judgment to Phoebus. 1 

264.— APOLLONIDES or PHILIPPUS 

The cicada used to sit on the highest boughs of 
the shrubs, and in the burning noon-tide sun, beating 
its belly with its wings, by the sweet variations of 
its self-wrought strains filled all the wilderness with 
music. But Criton of Pialia, the fowler who disdains 
no kind of game, caught this fleshless thing by its 
back with his limed twig. But he suffered punish- 
ment ; for his daily craft now plays him false, and 
he wanders about not catching even a feather. 

265. — By the Same 
(pp. No. 223) 
The bird of Zeus, pierced by an arrow, avenged 
himself on the Cretan for his archery, returning 
arrow for arrow from heaven. With the returning 
shaft it slew the slayer at once from the sky, and 
falling, killed as it died. No longer boast, ye Cretans, 
of your unerring arrows ; let the deadly aim of Zeus, 
too, be celebrated. 

266.— ANTIPATER 

Phoebus spoke thus of the sweet musician Gla- 
phyrus when he breathed the spirit of love from his 

1 This mode of seeking the counsel of the gods as to 
contemplated actions is mentioned also by Dio Chrysostom 
{Or. xiii. p. 419). 

141 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

" Μαρσύη, βψβΰσω reov eiipepa, τους yap Άθήνης 

αύΧούς e/c Φρυηίης ούτος βλ?;ί'σατο• 
el be συ τοιούτοι? τότ eviwuees, ουκ αν "Ύαγνις 6 

την eVt Μαίανδρο) κΧαΰσε ΒύσαυΧον epiv. 

267.— ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΤ ΘΕΣΣΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩΝ 

Ίκαρίην πΧώων [πρώην] άΧα, νηος οΧισθων 
Δάμις ο Νικαρετον KUinreaev eh πίΧαγος. 

ποΧΧα πατήρ δ' ηράτο προς αθανάτους, καϊ 65 ύδωρ 
φ0€γγ€θ\ ύπ€ρ τίκνου κύματα Χισσομ€νος. 

wXeTO δ' οίκτίστως βρυ-χθ€Ϊς άΧί• Kelvo he πατρός 5 
eKXvev άράων ούδε πάΧαι πέΧα^ος. 

268.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ ΘΕΣΣΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩΝ 

Κρήσσα κύων εΧάφοιο κατ ϊγνιον eBpape Τοργώ, 
έγκυος, άμφ<π4ρην"Αρτ€μιν €ύξαμέ"νη' 

τίκτε δ' άποκτ€ΐνουσα' θοη δ' Ιπενευσεν ΕΧευθω 
άμφω, εύα^ρίης δώρα και εύτοκιης' 

και νυν evvea παισι διδοΐ yaXa. φεύγατε, Κρήσσαι ft 
Κ€μμά$€ς, έκ τοκάΒων τέκνα Βι8ασκόμεναι. 

269.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Κ,Χασθείσης ποτέ νηος ev ΰδατι δήριν WevTO 
δισσοϊ ΰπίρ μούνης μαρνάμενοι σανιδος. 

τύψε μεν ' Ανταγόρης ΐίεισίστρατον ου νεμεσητον, 
ην yap ύπερ ψυχής• αλλ' εμεΧησε Αικτ], 

1 Hyagnis (according to one version at least, but rp. 
No. 340) was the father of Marsyas. Marsyas having found 

142 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 267-269 

pierced Hute : " Marsyas, thou didst lie concerning 
thy invention, for this man hath stolen Athena's flute 
from Phrvgia. If thou hadst then breathed into 
such as this, Hyagnis had never wept for the contest 
by the Maeander in which the flute was fatal." 1 

267.— PHILIPPUS OF THESSALONICA 

Sailing of late on the Icarian sea, Damis, the son of 
Nicaretus, slipped from the deck and fell into the sea. 
Sore did his father pray to the immortals, and_ call 
on the water, beseeching the waves for his son. But, 
devoured by the sea, he perished miserably. That 
is a sea that of old, too, was deaf to a father's 
prayers. 2 

268.— ΑΝΤΙ PATER OF THESSALONICA 

Gorgo, the Cretan bitch, being in pup, was on the 
track of a hind, and had paid her vows to both 
Dianas. As she killed the deer she littered, and 
quickly did the Deliveress grant both prayers, that 
for success in the chase and that for an easy labour. 
Now Gorgo gives milk to nine children. Fly, ye 
Cretan deer, learning from the force of mothers in 
travail what their young are like to be. 

269. — By the Same 

When the ship was dashed to pieces two men 
strove with each other in the water, quarrelling for 
one plank. Antagoras struck Pisistratus. It was not 
inexcusable, for his life was at stake, but Justice was 

the flute which Athena, after inventing it, threw away in 
disgust, claimed to be its inventor. 

2 i.e. to the prayers of Daedalus for his son Icarus. 

143 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

νήχε δ' ό μεν, τον δ' ειΧε κύων αλός. ή παναΧάστωρ δ 
κηρών oύδ , υ^ρω παύεται εν TreXdyei. 

270.— ΜΑΡΚΟΤ ΑΡΓΕΝΤΑΡΙΟΤ 

Κωμάζω, χρύσειον ες εσπερίων χορόν άστρων 
Χεύσσων, ουδ' άλλων Χαξ έβάρυν όάρους• 

στρεψας δ' άνθόβοΧον κράτος τρίχα, την κεΧαδεινην 
πηκτίδα μουσοπόΧοις χερσϊν έπηρεθισα. 

καϊ τάδε δρών εύκοσμον 'έχω βίον ούδε yap αυτός 5 
κόσμος άνευθε Χύρης επΧετο καϊ στεφάνου. 

271.— ΑΠΟΛΛΩΝΙΔΟΤ 

Καϊ πότε δη νηεσσ άφοβος πόρος, είπε, θάΧασσα, 
el και εν άΧκυόνων ήμασι κΧαυσόμεθα, 

άΧκυόνων, αις πόντος del στηρίξατο κύμα 
νήνεμον, ως κρϊναι χερσον άπιστοτέρην; 

άΧΧα καϊ ηνίκα μαία και ωδίνεσσιν άπήμων δ 

αύχεΐς, σον φόρτω δΰσας 'Αριστομένην. 

272.— BIANOPOS 

ΚαρφαΧέος δίψει Φοίβου Χάτρις ευτε γυναικός 
ειδεν υπέρ τύμβου κρωσσιον όμβροδόκον, 

κΧάγξεν υπέρ χείΧους, άΧΧ ου <γένυς ήπτετο βυσσοΰ. 
Φοίβε, συ δ' εις τέχνην ορνιν εκαιρομάνεις• 

χερμάδα δε "[ψαΧμών σφαΐρον πότον άρπαηι χείλει 5 
έφθανε μαιμάσσων Χαοτίνακτον ύδωρ. 

1 κόσμοι has the two senses of "order, propriety" and 
"the Universe." The constellations are Lyra and Corona 
Borealis. 

2 The halcyon days were fourteen days near the winter 

144 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 270-272 

concerned. The one swam on, but the other was 
seized by a shark. She, the all-avenger, does not 
cease from vengeance even in the watery deep. 

270.— MARCUS ARGENTARIUS 

I keep revel, gazing at the golden dance of the 
stars of evening, nor do I rudely disturb the converse 
of others. Tossing my hair that scatters flowers, 
I awake with musical fingers the deep-toned lyre. 
And in doing so I lead an orderly life, for the order 
of the universe itself lacks not a Lyre and a Crown. 1 

271.— APOLLONIDES 

And when then, tell me, Sea, shalt thou give safe 
passage to ships, if we are to weep even in the days 
of the halcyons, the halcyons for whom the deep has 
ever lulled the waves to so steady a calm that they 
deem it more trustworthy than the land ? 2 Even now, 
when thou boastest of being a nurse stilling the 
pangs of child-birth, thou hast sunk Aristomenes 
with his cargo. 

272.— BIANOR 

When a crow, the minister of Phoebus, parched 
with thirst, saw on a woman's tomb a pitcher con- 
taining rain-water, it croaked over the mouth but 
could not reach the bottom with its beak. But, thou, 
Phoebus, didst inspire the bird with opportune art- 
fulness, and, by dropping pebbles in, it reached in its 
eagerness with its greedy lips the water set in motion 
by the stones. 3 

solstice which were supposed to be always calm and in which 
the halcyon was supposed to build its nest on the waves. 

3 Though line 5 is hopelessly corrupt there is no doubt of 
the sense. The anecdote is told by Pliny and Plutarch. 

MS 

VOL. HI. L 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



273.— TOY ΑΥΤΟΥ 



Καύματος εν θάμνοισι λαλίστατο? ήνίκα τεττιξ 
φθεηζατο δίγλώσσω μεΧπόμενος στόματι, 

Βουνακόεντα Κρίτων συνθεις ΒόΧον, εϊΧεν άοιΒον 
ηερος, ουκ ΙΒίην ιζοβόΧών μεΧετην. 

άξια δ' ούχ όσίης θήρης πάθεν ου <γάρ έ'τ' άΧΧων 
ττηζατ eV ορνίθων εΰστοχον ως πρϊν άηρην. 

274.— ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΤ 

Και τον άρουραΐον <γνρήτομον αύΧακα τέμνει 
μηροτυπεΐ κεντρω πειθομενη ΒάμαΧις' 

και μετ άροτροπόνους ζεύηΧας πάΧι τω νεοθηΧεΐ 
πινομενη μόσχω δεύτερον ά'λγο? έχει. 

μη ΘΧίψης αύτην 6 <γεωμόρος' ούτος 6 βαιος 
μόσχος, εαν φείση, σοϊ τρέφεται ΒαμάΧης. 

275.— ΜΑΚΗΔΟΝΙΟΤ 

Κάττρον μεν χερσω ΚόΒρος εκτανε• την Βε ταχεΐαν 
είν άΧι και χαροποΐς κύμασιν εϊΧ* εΧαφον. 

ει δ' ην κ αϊ πτηνη θηρών φύσις, ούδ' αν εν αϊθρη 
την κείνου κενεην 'Άρτεμις εΙΒε χέρα. 

276.— ΚΡΙΝΑΓΟΡΟΤ 

Αώπος άποκΧύζουσα πάρα κροκάΧαισι θαΧάσσης 
χερνητις, Βιερού τυτθον ύττερθε πάηου, 

χερσον επεκβαίνοντι κατασττασθεΐσα κΧύδωνι, 
ΒειΧαίη πικρού κύμ επιεν θανάτου' 

πνεύμα δ' ομού πενίη άπεΧύσατο. τις κ ενϊ νηι 
θαρσήσαι πεζοΐς την άφύΧακτον αΧα; 

146 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 273-276 

273. — By the Same 
{pp. No. 264) 
While the never silent cicada was singing on the 
bushes in the heat with its double-tongued mouth, 
Crito contrived with his limed reeds to catch the 
songster of the air, no proper victim of his craft. 
But he got his deserts for his impious capture, and 
was no longer successful as before in the snares he 
set for other birds. 

274.— PHILIPPUS 

The young cow, obeying the goad that pricks her 
thighs, cuts the recurring furrows of the field, and 
again, after her ploughing-labour under the yoke, 
suffers fresh pain in suckling her newly-born calf. 
Do not drive her hard, husbandman. This little calf 
of hers, if you spare the mother, will grow up for 
you and become a steer. 

275.— MACEDONIUS 

Codrus killed the boar on land, and the swift deer 
he took in the blue waves of the sea. Were there 
beasts with wings too, Artemis would not have seen 
him empty-handed even in the air. 

276.— CRINAGORAS 

The serving-woman washing clothes on the sea- 
beach, a little above the wet rocks, was swept off, 
poor wretch, by a breaker which flooded the shore, 
and she drunk the bitter wave of death. She was in 
one moment released from life and from poverty. 
Who in a ship shall brave that sea from which even 
those on land are not protected ? 

147 
l 2 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



277.— ΑΝΤΙΦΙΛΟΤ 



Ααβροπόδη χείμαρρε, τι δη τόσον ώδε κορύσστ), 

πεζον άποκΧείων Ιχνος όδοιπορίης; 
η μεθύεις ομβροισι, καϊ ου Νύμφαισι Siavyes 

νάμα φέρεις, θοΧεραΐς δ' ήράνισαι νεφεΧαις. 
οψομαι r /εΧίω σε κεκαυμενον, 'όστις e\ey%etv 

καϊ ηόνιμον ποταμών καϊ νόθον οίδεν ύδωρ. 

278.— BIANOPOS 

λάρνακα πατρώων ετι Χειψανα κοιμίζουσαν 
νεκρών χειμάρρω παις ϊδε συρομενην 

και μιν ά~χος τόΧμης επΧησατο, χεΰμα δ' αναιδές 
είσεθορεν, πικρην δ' ήΧθ^ επί συμμαχίην. 

όστεα μεν yap εσωσεν άή> ύδατος, άντϊ δε τούτων 
αύτος υπό βΧοσυροΰ γεύματος εφθάνετο. 

279.— ΒΛΣ20Τ 

Χηθαίης άκάτοιο τριηκοσίους οτε ναύτας 
δεύτερον εσχ Αίδ>;?, πάντας άρηϊφάτους, 

" Έ,πάρτας 6 στόλο?," ειπεν " ϊ'δ' ως πάΧι πρόσ- 
θια πάντα 
τραύματα, και στερνοις δήρις ενεστι μόνοις' 

νυν <γε μοθου κορεσασθε, και εις εμον άμπαύσασθε 
ΰπνον, άνικάτου δήμος 'RvvaXiov.' 

280.— ΑΠΟΛΛΩΝΙΔΟΤ 

ΑαίΧιος, Αύσονίων υπάτων κΧεος, εϊπεν άθρήσας 
Έύρώταν " Χπάρτης χαίρε φεριστον ύδωρ." 



148 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 277-280 

277.— ANTIPHILUS 

Why, torrent, in thy furious march dost thou lift 
thyself up so high and shut off the progress of travel- 
lers on foot ? Art thou drunk with the rain, and no 
more content with a stream the Nymphs make trans- 
parent ? Hast thou borrowed water from the turbid 
clouds ? One day I shall see thee burnt up by the 
sun, who knows how to test the water of rivers, 
distinguishing the true from the bastard. 

278.— BIANOR 

A boy saw carried away by the torrent a coffin in 
which rested still the remains of his parents. Sorrow 
filled him with daring and he rushed into the ruthless 
stream, but his help cost him sore. For he saved the 
bones indeed from the water, but in their place was 
himself overtaken by the fierce current. 

279.— BASSUS 

When, for the second time, 1 Hades received from 
the bark of Lethe three hundred dead, all slain in 
wai•, he said : " The company is Spartan ; see how 
all their wounds are in front again, and war dwells 
in their breasts alone. Now, people of unvanquished 
Ares, hunger no more for battle, but rest in my 
sleep." 

280.— APOLLONIDES 

Laelius the distinguished Roman consul said, look- 
ing at the Eurotas, " Hail ! Sparta's stream, of rivers 

1 "Flie first time was the battle of Thyreae. See Index to 
vol. ii. 

149 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

Μουσάων δ' επι χείρα βαΧων ποΧυίστορι βίβΧω, 
εΙΒεν υπέρ κορυφής σύμβοΧον εύμαθίης' 

κίτται, μιμηΧον βιότου πτερόν, εν σκιβροΐσιν 5 

α/γκεσι παμφωνων μεΧπον απο στομάτων. 

ώρμηθη δ' επί ταΐσι. τι δ' ου ζηΧωτος 6 μόχθος, 
ει και πτηνά ποθεί * * *. 

281.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Ή,ννον όπηνίκα θαύμα κατεΊΒομεν Άσί-ς απασα, 
πωΧον €7τ' άνΒρομεαν σάρκα φριμασσόμενον, 

%ρηίκίης φάτνης ποΧιος λόγο? εις Ιμον όμμα 
ηΧυθε' Βίζημαι Βεύτερον ΉρακΧεα. 

282.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ ΜΑΚΕΔΟΝ02 

Άεΐνοι, παρθένος είμϊ το ΒενΒρεον είπατε Βάφνης 
φείσασθαι Βμώων χερσιν ετοιμοτόμοις• 

άι>τ\ δ' εμεΰ κομάρου τις οΒοιπόρος ή τερεβίνθου 
Βρεπτεσθω χθαμαΧην ες χύσιν ου yap €κάς' 

αλλ' άπ 1 εμεΰ ποταμός μεν όσον τρία, του δ' άπο 

πηηων δ 

νΧη πανθηΧης Βοία, πεΧεθρ άπεχα, 

283.— ΚΡΙΝΑΓΟΡΟΤ 

Οΰρεα ΤΙυρηναΐα και αί βαθυά<γκεες "ΑΧπεις, 
αΐ 'Ρήνου προχοάς εγγύς άποβΧεπετε, 

1 I suppose that by uttering or citing a fragment of Greek 
verse Laelius gave an indication of his taste for study 
in which the magpies encouraged him to persevere. But not 
too much reliance should be placed on this interpretation of 
the obscure epigram. 

150 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 281-283 

noblest far." Having thus set his hand to the erudite 
book of the Muses, he saw over his head a token of 
learning. The magpies, birds that imitate human 
life, were calling from the leafy dells in all their 
various tongues. By' them he was encouraged ; and 
how can the labour not be enviable if even the birds 
desire (to find expression for their thoughts) ? x 

281. — By the Same 

When all Asia witnessed the common marvel the 
colt furious to feed on flesh of men, the grey-grown 
legend of the Thi'acian stable " came before my eyes. 
I am in search of a second Heracles. 

282.— ANTIPATER OF MACEDONIA 

Strangers, I, whom you take for a tree, am a 
maiden. 3 Bid the slaves' hands that are prepared to 
cut me spare the laurel. Instead of me, let travellers 
cut to strew as a couch boughs of arbutus or tere- 
binth, for they are not far away. The brook is about 
a hundred yards away from me, and from its springs 
a wood containing every kind of tree is distant about 
seventy yards. 

283.— CRINAGORAS 

Ye Pyrenees and ye deep-valleyed Alps that look 
down from nigh on the sources of the Rhine, ye are 

2 The horses of Diomede, King of Thrace, which he 
used to feed on human flesh. They were carried off by 
Heracles. 

3 Daphne, pursued by Apollo and changed into a laurel to 
save her chastity. 

I5 1 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

μάρτυρες ακτινών, Υερμανικος ας άνετειλεν, 
άστράπτων Κ,εΧτοΐς πουλύν ενυάλιον. 

οι δ' άρα Βουπήθησαν άολλέες• ei7re δ' Ένυω 5 

"Αρεϊ' " Ύοιαύταις χερσιν οφειλόμεθα." 

284.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Οίου<? άνθ' οίων οίκήτορας, ω ελεεινή, 

εύραο. φευ μεγάλης 'ΚλλάΒος άμμορίης. 

αντίκα καϊ γαίης χθαμαλωτερη είθε, Κόρινθε, 
κεΐσθαι, καϊ Αιβυκής ψάμμου ερημότερη, 

ή τοίοις Βιά πάσα παλιμπρήτοισι Βοθεΐσα 5 

θλίβειν αρχαίων οστεα "Βακχιάδων. 

285.— ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΤ ΘΕΣΣΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩΝ 

Ούκετι πυργωθείς 6 φαλαγγομάχας επί Βήριν 

άσχετος όρμαίνει μυριόΒους ελεφας, 
αλλά φόβω στείλας βαθνν αυχένα προς ζυγοΒεσμους, 

άντυγα Βιφρουλκεΐ Καίσαρος ουρανίου, 
εγνω δ' ειρήνης καϊ θήρ χάριν όργανα ρίψας 6 

"Αρεος, εύνομίης άντανάγει πάτερα. 

286.—ΜΑΡΚΟΤ ΑΡΓΕΝΤΑΡΙΟΤ 

'Όρνι, τί μοι φίΧον υπνον άφήρπασας; ήΒύ Βε Τίύρρης 

εϊΒωΧον κοίτης ωχετ άποπτάμενον. 
η τάΒε θρεπτρα τίνεις, οτι θηκά σε, Βύσμορε, πάσης 

ωοτόκου κραίνειν εν μεγάροις αγέλης; 
ναϊ βωμον καϊ σκήπτρα ΣαράπιΒος, ούκετι νυκτός 5 

φθεγξεαι, άλλ' έξεις βωμον ον ώμόσα/.ιεν. 

1 This refers to the re-colonisation of Corinth hy Julius 
Caesar, a measure usually praised. The colonists were 

152 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 284-286 

witnesses of the lightning that Germanicus flashes 
forth as he smites the Celts with the thunderbolts of 
war. In masses the foe fell, and Enyo said to Ares, 
" It is to such hands as these that our help is due." 

284. — By the Same 

What inhabitants, Ο luckless city, hast thou re- 
ceived, and in place of whom ? Alas for the great 
calamity to Greece ! Would, Corinth, thou didst lie 
lower than the ground and more desert than the 
Libyan sands, rather than that wholly abandoned to 
such a crowd of scoundrelly slaves, thou shouldst vex 
the bones of the ancient Bacchiadae ! 1 

285.— PHILIPPUS OF THESSALONICA 

No longer does the mighty-tusked elephant, with 
turreted back and ready to fight phalanxes, charge 
unchecked into the battle ; but in fear he hath 
yielded his thick neck to the yoke, and draws the 
car of divine Caesar. The wild beast knows the 
delight of peace ; discarding the accoutrement of 
war, he conducts instead the father of good order. 

286.— MARCUS ARGENTARIUS 

Why hast thou, chanticleei•, robbed me of beloved 
sleep, and the sweet image of Pyrrha has flown away 
from my bed ? Is this my recompense for bringing 
thee up and making thee, ill-starred fowl, the lord of 
all the egg-laying herd in my house ? I swear by 
the altar and sceptre of Serapis, no more shalt thou 
call in the night, but shalt lie on that altar by which 
I have sworn. 

freedmen ; Crinagoias speaks of them as if they were 
slaves (παλίμπρητοι = often sold). 

153 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



287.— ΑΠΟΛΛΩΝΙΔΟΤ 



Ό πρ\ν εγώ 'Ροδίοισιν άνεμβατος (epos όρνις, 

ό πρ\ν Κερκαφίδαις αίετος ίστορίη, 
υψιπετή τότε ταρσον ανα πΧατυν ηερ" άερθεϊς 

ήΧυθον, Ήβλιου νήσον 6τ είχε Νέρων 
κείνου δ' αύΧίσθην ενϊ δώμασι, χειρι συνήθης 

κράντορος, ου φεύ-γων Ζήνα τον εσσόμενον. 

288.— ΓΕΜΙΝΟΤ 

Ουτο? ό Κεκροπίδ-ησι βαρύς Χίθος "Αρεϊ κεΐμαι, 
ξεΐνε, ΦιΧιππείης σύμβοΧον ηνορέης, 

υβρίζων Μαραθώνα και άγχιάΧου Έ,αΧαμΐνος 
ερηα, ΛΙακηδονίης ε<γχεσι κεκΧιμενα. 

όμνυε νυν νεκυας, Αημόσθενες' αύταρ εγωγε 
και ζωοΐς εσομαι και φθιμενοισι βαρύς. 

289.— BASSOT 

ΟύΧόμεναι νήεσσι Κ,αφηρίδες, αϊ ποτέ νόστον 

ωΧεσαθ' 'ΚΧΧήνων και στόΧον ΊΧιόθεν, 
πυρσός οτε ψεύστας χθονίης δνοφερώτερα νυκτός 

ηψε σεΧα, τυφΧη δ' εδραμε πάσα τρόπις 
■χοιράδας ες πέτρας, Ααναοΐς πάΧιν "ΙΧιος αΧΧη 

επΧετε, και δεκετους εγθ ρότεραι ποΧεμου. 
και την μεν τότ' επερσαν ανίκητος δε Κ,αφηρεύς. 

ΝαύπΧιε σοι χάρμην ι Έλλας εκΧαυσε δάκρυ. 

1 conj. Eldick : σοϊ yap παρ MS. 

1 Son of the Sun and legendary founder of Rhodes. 

2 Just before Tiberius' recall from Rhodes (a.d. 2) an eagle 
was said to have perched on the roof of his house (Suet. 
Tib. c. 14). 

154 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 287-289 

287.— APOLLONIDES 

I, the holy bird, who had never set foot in Rhodes, 
the eagle who was but a fable to the people of Cer- 
caphus, 1 came borne through the vast heaven by my 
high-flying wings, then when Tiberius was in the 
island of the Sun. In his house I rested, at the beck 
of my master's hand, not shrinking from the future 
Zeus. 2 

288.— GEM I Ν US 

I, this stone, heavy to the Athenians, am dedicated 
to Ares as a sign of the valour of Philip. Here 
stand I to insult Marathon and the deeds of sea-girt 
Salamis, which bow before the Macedonian spear. 
Swear by the dead now, Demosthenes, but I shall bo 
heavy to living and dead alike. 3 

289.— BASSUS 

Ο rocks of Caphereus, fatal to ships, which de- 
stroyed the fleet of the Greeks on their home-coming 
from Troy, then when the lying beacon sent forth a 
flame darker than the night of hell, and every keel 
ran blindly on the sunken reefs, ye wei'e another 
Troy to Greece and more deadly than the ten years' 
war. Troy indeed they sacked, but Caphereus was 
invincible. Nauplius, then did Hellas weep tears 
which were a joy to thee. 4 

8 Supposed to be on a trophy erected by Philip II. to 
celebrate his victories over the Athenians. No such trophy 
ever existed. The reference is to Dem. De Cor. 208. 

4 Nauplius, to revenge the death of his son Palamedes, 
lured the Greek navy by a false beacon on to the rocks of 
Caphereus iu Euboea. 

155 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

290.— ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΤ ΘΕΣΣΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩΝ 

"Οτ' £ξ αητον Αίβυος, £κ ζαοΰς Νότου 

σννεζοφώθη πόντος, £κ Be νειάτων 

μυγών βυθϊτις ψάμμος εξηρεύ^ετο, 

ιστός Be πάς ωΧισθεν εις άΧος πτύγας, 

φορτις δ' εσνρετ £ς αιΒαν πΧανωμενη, 5 

άρω^οναντας δαίμονας Ανσίστρατος 

εΧιπάρησεν οι Be τω νεωκόρω 

μοννω θάΧασσαν aypiav εκοίμισαν, 

291.— ΚΡΙΝΑΓΟΡΟΤ 

Ουδ' ην ^Ωκεανός πάσαν πΧήμμνραν eyeiprj, 

ονΒ' ην Τερμανίη Vrp'ov άπαντα πίη, 
'Ρώμης ουδ' οσσον βΧάψει σθένος, άχρι κε μίμνη 

Βεζια σημαίνειν Κ,αίσαρι θαρσαΧέη. 
ούτως yal iepal Ζηνος Βρνες εμπεΒα ρίζαις 5 

εστάσιν, φυΧΧων Β ανα γεουσ* άνεμοι. 

292.— ΟΝΕ2ΤΟΤ 

Παίδων ον μεν εκαιεν Άριστιον, ον δ' εσάκουσε 

ναυηηόν Βισσον δ' άΧηος έτηξε μίαν. 
αίαΐ μητέρα Μοίρα ΒιειΧετο, την ϊσα τεκνι 

και πνρϊ καϊ πικρώ νειμαμενην ΰΒατι. 

293.— ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΤ ΘΕΣΣΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩΝ 

Ποι/λυ ΑεωνίΒεω κατιΒών Βέμας αντοΒάϊκτον 
"Β,ερξης εγΧαίνον φάρεϊ πορφυρέω• 



& 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 290-293 

290.— PHILIPPUS OF THESSALONICA 

When with the blasts of the Libyan wind, the 
fierce Sirocco, the sea grew dark and belched up the 
sand from her profoundest depths, when every mast 
had fallen into the hollow of the deep and the lost 
merchant ship was drifting to Hades, Lysistratus 
called on the gods who help mariners, and they, for 
the sake of the temple ministrant alone, lulled the 
savage waves. 

291.— CRINAGORAS 

( Written after a reverse of the Roman arms in 

Germany) 

Not though Ocean arouses all his floods, not though 

Germany drinks up the whole Rhine, 1 shall the might 

of Rome be shaken as long as she remains confident 

in Caesar's auspicious guidance. So the holy oaks of 

Zeus stand firm on their roots, but the wind strips 

them of the withered leaves. 

292.— HONESTUS 

Aristion was burning the corpse of one son when 
she heard the other was shipwrecked. A double 
grief consumed a single heart. Alas ! Fate divided 
this mother in two, since she gave one child to fire 
and the other to cruel water. 

293.— PHILIPPUS OF THESSALONICA 

Xerxes, looking on the great frame of self-slain 
Leonidas, clothed it in a purple cloak. Then Sparta's 

1 i.e. not though the Germans become so numerous that 
they drink up the Rhine, aa Xerxes' army drunk up whole 
rivers. 

157 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

κηκ νεκύων δ' ηχησεν ό τάς Έ,πάρτας πο\ύς τ/ρω?• 
" Ού δέχομαι προδόταις μισθόν όφειλόμενον 

ασπίς εμοϊ τύμβου κόσμος μέηας' άίρε τά ΐίερσών 5 
χηζω κείς ά'ίδην ώς Αακεδαιμόνιος." 

294.— ΑΝΤΙΦΙΛΟΤ ΒΤΖΑΝΤΙΟΤ 

α. " ΐίορφυρέαν τοι τάνδε, Αεωνίδα, ώπασε χΚαιναν 

"Ξέρξης, ταρβήσας ερηα τεάς άρετάς. η 
β. " Ου δέχομαι' προδόταις αυτά χάρις, ασπίς 
εχοι με 
καϊ νέκυν ό πλούτος δ' ουκ εμον εντάφιον." 
α. "'Αλλ' εθανες' τι τοσόνδε καϊ εν νεκύεσσιν 
απεχθής 5 

ΥΙερσαις;" β. "Ου θνάσκει ζαλος ελευθερίας." 

295.— BIANOPOS 

Πωλοϊ^, τον πεδίων αλλ' ούχ ά\6ς ίππευτήρα, 

νη'ι διαπΧώειν πόντον άναινόμενον, 
μη θάμβει χρεμεθοντα καϊ εν ποσϊ Χάξ πατεοντα 

τοίχους, καϊ θυμω δεσμά βιαζόμενον. 
άχθεται ει φόρτου μέρος έρχεται' ου yap επ άΧΧοις 5 

κεΐσθαι τον πάντων επρεπεν ώκύτατον. 

296.— ΑΠΟΛΛΩΝΙΔΟΤ 

Έ,κύΧΧος, οτε "Β,έρξου δοΧιχος στόλος ΈΧΧάδα πάσαν 

ηΧαυνεν, βυθίην εΰρετο ναυμαχίην, 
Νηρηος Χαθρίοισιν ύποπΧεύσας τενάηεσσι, 

καϊ τον άπ αηκΰρης ορμον εκειρε νέων. 
αυτανδρος δ' επι <γήν ώλίσθανε ΐίερσϊς άναυδος 5 

όΧΧυμενη, πρώτη πείρα Θεμιστοκλέους. 

1 Scyllus and his daughter are said to have performed this 
i S 8 " 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 294-296 

great hero called from the dead : " I accept not the 
reward due to traitors. My shield is the best orna- 
ment of my tomb. Away with the Persian frippery, 
and I shall go even to Hades as a Spartan." 



294.— ANTIPHILUS OF BYZANTIUM 

A. "Xerxes gave thee this purple cloak, Leonidas, 
reverencing thy valorous deeds." B. " I do not 
accept it ; that is the reward of traitors. Let me be 
clothed in my shield in death too ; no wealthy funeral 
for me ! " A. " But thou art dead. Why dost thou 
hate the Persians so bitterly even in death?" 
B. "The passion for freedom dies not." 

295.— BIANOR 

The horse, accustomed to gallop over the plain and 
not over the waves, refuses to sail across the sea on 
the ship. Do not wonder at his neighing and kicking 
the sides of the vessel, and angrily trying to free 
himself from his bonds. He is indignant at being 
part of the cargo ; for the swiftest of all creatures 
should not depend on others for his passage. 

296.— APOLLONIDES 
Scyllus, when Xerxes' huge fleet was driving all 
Greece before it, invented submarine warfare. De- 
scending into the hidden depths of the realm of 
Nereus, he cut the cables of the ships' anchors. 1 The 
Persian vessels, with all their crews, glided ashore 
and silently perished — the first achievement of 
Themistocles. 

exploit when the Persian fleet was off Mt. Pelion (Paus. 
x. 19, 2). 

159 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



297.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ 



Στέλλει» €7r' Κύφρήτην, Τιηνος τβκος' εις σε jap 
ήδΐ) 

ηωοι ΤΙαρθων αύτομοΧουσι πόδβς. 
στέλλει», αναξ• δήεις δε φόβω κεχαΧασ μένα τόξα, 

Καισα /j• πατρώων δ' άρξαι αττ έντοΧεων 
Ρώμην δ', ώκβανω πβριτέρμονα πάντοθεν, αυτός 

πρώτος άνβρχομένω σφράηισαι ηέΧιω. 



298.— ΑΝΤΙΦΙΛΟΤ 

'ί,κίπων με προς νηόν άνηηαηεν, οντά βεβηΧον 

ου μούνον τελετ//9, άλλα και ήεΧιον 
μύστην δ' αμφοτέρων με Θεαι θύσαν οίδα δ' εκείνη 

νυκτϊ και όφθαΧμών νύκτα καθηράμενος. 
άσκίπων δ' ei9 άστυ κατεστιχον, opyia Δηους 5 

κηρύσσων γλώσσ?;•? ομμασι τρανότερον. 

299.— ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΤ ΘΕΣΣΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩΝ 

Ταύροι πρηϋτενοντες, άροτρευτηρες άρούρης, 
είν άΧΪ τους ηα'ιης άντεχομεν καμάτους• 

αΰΧακα την άσίδαρον iv ΰδασιν εΧκομεν άμφω, 
μακροτόνων σγο'ινων αμμα σαηηνόδετον 

ιγθύσι δ' εκ σταχυών Χατρεύομεν. α TaXaepyol• 5 
ηδη κην πεΧά^ει καρπον άροΰσι βόες. 

300.— ΑΔΔΑΙΟΤ 

Ύαύρω φρικαΧεον νάπος εκβαινοντι Αοβ?ίρον 
ΥΙευκεστης ΐππω καρτερος ήντίασεν. 

1 6ο 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 297-300 

297.— ANTIPATER OF THESSALONICA 

(Probably addressed to Gains Caesar when sent by 
Augustus to the East in the year 1 b.c.) 

Hie thee to the Euphrates, son of Zeus ; already 
in the East the feet of the Parthians hasten to desert 
to thee. Hie thee on thy way, Ο prince, and thou 
shalt find, Caesar, their bow-strings relaxed by fear. 
But base all thou dost on thy father's instructions. 
The Ocean is Rome's boundary on every side ; be 
thou the first to seal her domination with the rising 
Sun. 

298.— ANTIPH1LUS 

Mv staff guided me to the temple uninitiated not 
only in the mysteries, but in the sunlight. The god- 
desses initiated me into both, and on that night I 
knew that my eyes as well as my soul had been 
purged of night. I went back to Athens without a 
staif, proclaiming the holiness of the mysteries of 
Demeter more clearly with my eyes than with my 
tongue. 

299.— PHILIPPUS OF THESSALONICA 

We meek-necked oxen, the ploughers of the field, 
endure in the sea the labour of the land. We both 
draw in the water a furrow not cut by iron, the long 
ropes attached to the seine. We toil now for fish? 
not for corn. Ah, long-suffering creatures ! Oxen 
have begun to plough the sea too for its fruits. 

300.— ADDAEUS 

Valiant Peucestes encountered on horseback the 
bull as it issued from the dreadful dell of Doberus. 

161 

VOL. III. Μ 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

άΧΧ ο μεν ώρμήθη πρηων άτε• του Β άπαΧοΐο 

ΤΙαιονίΒα Χόγχην ηκε Βια κροτάφου' 
συΧήσας κεφαΧής Βε ΒιπΧοΟν κέρας, αίεν i/eeivos 5 

ζωροποτών εχθρού κόμπον έχει θανάτου. 

301.— ΣΕΚΟΤΝΔΟΤ 

Ύίπτ€ τον όγκητην βραΒύπουν ονον άμμιγ εν ΐπποις 

'γυρον άΧωειναΐς εξεΧάατε Βρόμον; 
ούχ άΧις, όττι μύΧοιο περίδρομον άχθος ανάγκη 

σπειρηΒον σκοτόεις κυκΧοΒίωκτος ίνω; 
αλλ' ετι καϊ πώΧοισιν έρίζομεν. ή ρ' ετι Χοιπον δ 

νυν μοι την σκοΧιην αύχένι <γαΐαν άρουν. 

302.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ 

Τό βρέφος Έρμώνακτα Βιεχρήσασθε μέΧισσαι 
(φευ κύνες) ερπυστην, κηρία μαιόμενον 

ποΧΧάκι δ' εξ υμεων εψισμενον ώΧέσατ\ αίαϊ, 
κέντροις. ει δ' όφίων φωΧεά μεμφόμεθα, 

πείθεο ΑυσιΒίκη καϊ 'Αμύντορι μ7]Βέ μεΧίσσας δ 

αινεΐν κάκειναις πικρον ενεστι μέΧι. 

303.— ΑΔΔΑΙΟΤ 

Ύη βαιη ΚαΧαθίνη υπο σκυΧάκων μογεούση 

Λ^τωις κονφην εύτοκίην επορεν. 
μούναις ου τι >γυναιξιν έπηκοος, άΧΧα καϊ αύτας 

συνθήρους σώζειν "Αρτεμις οίΒε κύνας. 

304.— ΠΑΡΜΕΝΙΩΝ02 

Ύον <γαίης καϊ πόντου άμειφθείσαισι κεΧεύθοις 

ναύτην ηπείρου, πεζοπόρον πεΧάγους, 
εν τρισσαΐς Βοράτων έκατοντάσιν εστε<γεν άρης 

Σπάρτης, αίσχύνεσθ\ ούρεα καϊ πεΧάγη. 

102 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 301-304 

Like a mountain it rushed at him, but with his 
Paeonian spear he pierced its tender temples, and 
having despoiled its head of the pair of horns, ever 
as he quaffs the wine from them boasts of his enemy's 
death. 

301.— SECUNDUS 
Why do you drive me, the slow-footed braying 
ass, round and round with the threshing horses? Is 
it not enough that, driven in a circle and blindfolded, 
I am forced to turn the heavy millstone ? But I 
must compete with horses too! Is the next task in 
store for me to plough with my neck's strength the 
earth that the share curves ? 

302.— ΑΝΤΙ PATER OF THESSALONICA 
Bees, ye savage pack, ye killed baby Hermonax 
as he was creeping to jour hive in quest of honey. 
Often had he been fed by you, and now, alas ! ye 
have stung him to death. If we speak evil of ser- 
pents' nests, learn from Lysidice and Amyntor not to 
praise hives either. They, too, have in them bitter 
honey. 

303.— ADDAEUS 
To little Calathina, in labour with her puppies, 
Leto's daughter gave an easy delivery. Artemis 
hears not only the prayers of women, but knows 
how to save also the dogs, her companions in the 
chase. 

304.— PARMENION 

On the Battle of Thermopylae 

Him who, transforming the paths of land and 

ocean, sailed over the dry land and marched on the 

sea, three hundred valiant Spartan spears resisted. 

Shame on you, mountains and seas ! 

163 
μ 2 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

305.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΥ 

Τδατο? άκρήτου κβκορημβνω ay%i παραστάς 
χθιζον €μοι λέξεων Βάκχος έ'λε^ε τάδε• 

" Είίδεί•» άξιον ϋπνον άπεγθομενων 'Αφροδίτη• 
6ΐ7Γ€ μοι, ω νήφων, πβύθεαι Ιππολύτου; 

τάρβζΐ, μη τι πάθης ivaXiyKiov." ως ό μίν πιττών 5 
ωχετ'• έμο\ δ' άπο της ούκέτι τερπνόν ύδωρ. 

306.— ΑΝΤΙΦΙΛΟΤ 

ΎΧοτόμοι παύσασθε, νέων χάριν, ούκετι πεύκη 

κύματος, άΧΧ" ήδη ρινός επιτροχάει• 
•γόμφος δ' ούδ' έ'τί χαΧκος εν όΧκάσιν, ουδέ σίδηρος, 

άλλα Χίνω τοίχων άρμονιη δεδεται. 
τας δ' αύτάς ποτέ πόντος έχει νέας, άλλοτε γαία 5 

πτυκτον άμαζιτην φορτον άειρομένας. 
'Apyco μεν προτέροισιν άοίδιμος• άλλα Έ,αβίνω 

καινοτέρην πήξαι Π αλλά? ένευσε τρόπιν. 

307.— ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΤ 

Φοΐβον άν ην α μεν η Δάφνη ποτέ, νυν άνέτειΧεν 
Καίσαρος εκ βωμού κΧώνα μεΧαμπ έταΧον 

εκ δέ θεού θεον ευρεν άμεινονα' Αητοΐδην yap 
εχθήρασα, θεΧει Ζήνα τον Αίνεάδην. 

ρίζαν δ' ουκ άπο γης μητρός βάΧεν, άXX , άπο πετρης. 5 
Καίσαρι μη τίκτειν ουδέ Χιθος δύναται. 

1 Boats made of hides, used from primitive times by the 
natives of Portugal, are stated to have been introduced 
among the Romans at a somewhat earlier date than this 
epigram (Cass. Dio, 48, 18). 

164 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 305-307 

305.— ANTIPATEU OF THESSALONICA 

I had drunk my fill of untempered water, when 
Bacchus yesterday, standing by my bed, spoke thus : 
" Thou sleepest a sleep worthy of them whom Aphro- 
dite hates. Tell me, thou temperate man, hast thou 
heard of Hippolytus ? Fear lest thou suffer some 
fate such as his." Having so spoken he departed, 
and ever since then water is not agreeable to me. 



306.— ANTIPHILUS 

Cease working, ye woodcutters, at least as far as 
concerns ships. It is no longer pine-trees that glide 
over the waves but hides. Ships are no longer built 
with bolts of bronze or iron, but their hulls are held 
together with flaxen cords, and the same ship now 
floats on the sea and now travels on land, folded to 
be mounted on a carriage. Argo was formerly the 
theme of song, but Pallas has granted to Sabinus to 
build a still more novel keel. 1 

307.— PHILIPPUS 

Daphne, who once refused Phoebus, now uprears 
her dark-leaved bough from the altar of Caesar, 
having found a better god than that former one. 
Though she hated the son of Leto, she desires Zeus 
the son of Aeneas. She struck root not in the Earth, 
her mother, but in a stone. Not even stone can 
refuse to bear offspring to Caesar. 2 

2 The inhabitants of Tarragona announced to Augustus 
that a palm (not as here a laurel) had sprung from his altar : 
"That shows how often you light fires on it " said he. 

165 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



308.— BIANOPOS 



Φωρες or elva\ioi Ύυρσΐ)νίΒος άγχόθι δίνης 
φορμικτάν ακάτου θήκαν ύπερ βύθιον, 

αντίκα μιν κιθάρη Χιγυαχέϊ Βέζατο ΒεΧφϊν 
σύνθροον, €Κ Be βυθού νήχετ έρυσσάμενος, 1 

μέχρις eV 'Ισθμον £κε\σ€ Υ^ορίνθιον. άρα θάλασσα 5 
i -χθύς ανθρώπων e\ye δικαιότερους; 

309.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ 

Χ.€ΐμέριον καίουσαν έφ' έστίη άνθρακα Fopya) 

την <γρηνν βροντής έξβπάταξε φόβος' 
πνεύμονα Be ψυχθεΐσα κατήμυσεν. ην άρα μέσση 

Υηρως καϊ θανάτου Χειπομένη πρόφασις. 

310.— ΑΝΤΙΦΙΛΟΤ ΒΤΖΑΝΤΙΟΤ 

ψηγ/χ άπνρον χρυσοΐο σιΒηρείων υπ οΒόντων 
ρινηθέν, Αιβυκής κουφότερον ψαμάθου, 

μΰς οΧΐΎος βαρύ Βεϊπνον έΒαισατο• πάσα Be νηΒύς 
συρομένη βραΒύπουν θήκβ τον ωκύτατον. 

Χηφθεϊς δ' έκ μεσάτης άνετέμνετο κΧέμματα γα- 
στρος' 6 

^9 άρα κην άλογο*?, \ρυσί, κακού πρόφασις. 

311.— ΦΙΛΙΠΠΌΤ ΘΕ^ΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩΧ 

Ώκείαις έΧάφοισι κύων ίσάμιΧλα Βραμούσα 
€<γκυος ή\κώθη παιΒοπορον <γενεσιν 

1 I write ΐρυσσάμ^νος for ίλισσόμ(νο5. 
ι66 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 308-311 

308.— BIANOR 
On Anon 
When the sea-robbers near the Tyrrhene surges 
cast the lyre-player into the sea from the ship, a 
dolphin straightway received him, together with the 
sweet-voiced lyre to whose strains lie sung, and 
swum, saving him from the deep, till it landed on 
the Isthmus of Corinth. Had the sea, then, fish 
which were juster than men ? 

309.— ANTIPATER OF THESSALONICA 

As Gorgo was lighting the coals on her hearth in 
winter, the fearful noise of the thunder terrified the 
old woman. Chill seized her lungs and she dropped 
dead. So then she had been spared with Eld on the 
one side and Death on the other, either ready to 
take her on any pretext. 

310.— ANTIPHILUS OF BYZANTIUM 

A little mouse devoured some unfired gold-dust, 
the scrapings of the file's iron teeth, lighter than 
the sands of Libya. It proved a heavy meal for him ; 
for his belly, trailing with the weight, made the 
swift creature slow-footed, and so he was caught and 
cut open, and the stolen treasure extracted from his 
inside. Even to brutes, gold, thou art the cause 
of evil. 

311.— PHILIPPUS OF THESSALONICA 

A bitch, that vied in swiftness with the deer, was 
wounded, when heavy with young, in her generative 



167 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

πάσα δε συηκατέμυσε κατουΧωθεΐσα χρόνοισιν. 

ήδη δ' η τοκετών ωριός ην βάσανος• 
ποΧΧά δ' επωρύουσαν άνηρ εσιδηροτόμησεν, 

και σκυΧακες φίΧιοι νηδύος έξέθορον. 
'Αρτέμιδος ΧεΧυται Χοχίων χάρις• εμπαΧι ο'"Α.ρης 

ήρκται μαιοΰσθαι γαστέρα θηΧυτέραις. 

312.— ΖΩΝΑ 2ΑΡΔΙΑΝΟΤ 

^Ωνερ, τάν βαΧάνων τάν ματέρα φείδεο κόπτειν, 
φείδεο• ηηραΧέαν δ' εκκεράϊζε πίτυν, 

ή πεύκαν, ή τάνδε ποΧυστεΧεχον παΧίουρον, 
ή πρΐνον, η τάν αυαΧέαν κόμαρον 

τηΧόθι δ' ϊσχε δρυός πέΧεκυν κοκύαι yap εΧεξαν 
άμϊν ώς πρότεραι ματέρες εντϊ δρύες. 

313.— ΑΝΤΤΉ2 ΜΕΛΟΠΟΙΟΤ 

"Ιζευ άπας υπο καΧά δάφνας ευθαΧέα φύΧΧα, 
ωραίου τ άρνσαι νάματος άδύ πομα, 

οφρα τοι ασθμαίνοντα πόνοις θέρεος φίΧα γυΐα 
άμπαύσης, πνοιη τυπτόμενα Ζέφυρου. 

314.— ΤΗ2 ΑΥΊΉ2 

Έρμάς ταδ' εστακα παρ ορχατον ηνεμόεντα 

εν τριόδοις, ποΧιάς εγγύθεν άϊονος, 
άνδράσι κεκμηώσιν έχων άμπαυσιν όδοΐο• 

■ψνχρον δ' άχραές κράνα ^ύποϊάχει. 1 

W. Η. D. Rouse, An Echo of Greek Song, p. 62. 

1 ίίδαιρ ιτροχΐΐΐ Hermann, which I render. 
i68 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 312-314 

organs. The scab of the wound in a short time 
entirely closed the orifice, and the pains of labour 
were at hand. But a man operated on her, terribly 
though she howled, and the dear little ones leapt 
forth from her womb. The gracious aid of Artemis 
in labour is a thing of the past, and Ares, on the 
other hand, has begun to practise midwifery. 

312.— ZONAS OF SARDIS 

Refrain, sirrah, from cutting the oak, the mother 
of acorns ; refrain, and lay low the old stone-pine, 
or the sea-pine, or this rhanmus with many stems, or 
the holly-oak, or the dry arbutus. Only keep thy 
axe far from the oak, for our grannies tell us that 
oaks were the first mothers. 1 



313.— ANYTE 

Sit here, quite shaded by the beautiful luxuriant 
foliage of the laurel, and draw sweet drink from the 
lovely spring, that thy limbs, panting with the labours 
of summer, may take rest beaten by the western 
breeze. 

314. — Bv the Same 

Here stand I, Hermes, in the cross-roads by the 
wind-swept belt of trees near the grey beach, giving 
rest to weary travellers, and cold and stainless is the 
water that the fountain sheds. 



1 Referring to the legend that men were sprung from oaks 
or rocks, cp. Odyss. xix. 163. 

169 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



315.— NIKIOT 



"Ιζευ ΰπ αίγείροισιν, επει κάμες, ενθάδ\ όδΐτα, 
και πίθ' άσσον ιών πίδακος ημετέρας' 

μνασαι δε κράναν καϊ άπόπροθι, α ι επι Γίλλω 
Χΐμος άποφθιμενω παίδι παριδρύεται, 

316.— ΛΕΩΝΙΔΟΤ ΤΑΡΑΝΤ1ΝΟΤ 

*ίϊ τάνδε στείχοντες άταρπιτόν, αϊτέ ποτ αγρούς 

δαμόθεν, αϊ'τ' άπ αγρών νεΐσθε ποτ άκρόποΧιν, 
αμμες όρων φύΧακες, δισσο\ θεοί, ών 6 μεν, Έρμας, 

οίον όρής μ, οντος δ ατερος, 1\ρακΧέης• 
αμφω μεν θνατοΐς εύακοοι, άλλα ποθ αυτούς — 5 

αϊ ξύνά 2 παραθής ά-χράδας, εγκεκαφιν 
ναι μαν ωσαύτως τους βότρυας, αϊτέ πεΧονται 

ώριμοι, αϊτέ χύδαν ομφακες, εύτρεπικεν. 
μισεω ταν μετοχάν, ούδ' ηδομαι' άλλ' 6 φέρων τι, 

άμφίς, μη κοινά, τοις δυσϊ παρτιθέτω, 10 

και Χεγέτω' "Ύϊν τούθ , ΗράκΧεες" άΧΧοτε, "Τούτο 

Έ/)/ζα•" καϊ \ύοι ταν εριν αμφοτέρων. 

317.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

α. Χαι/?ω τον Χακόρυζον ορών θεον εις το φάΧανθον 
βρεγμ ύπο ταν οχνάν, αίπόΧε, τυπτόμενον. 

β. ΑίπόΧε, τούτον εγώ τρϊς επύγισα' τοι δε τραγίσκοι 
εις εμε δερκόμενοι τα,ς χιμάρας εβάτενν. 



1 §. Hecker : hv MS. 
' I write ξύνα for τώμαι. 



l -JO 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 315-317 

315.— NICIAS 

Sit here under the poplar trees, traveller, for thou 
art weary, and come near and drink from my fountain. 
When thou art far away bethink thee of the spring- 
near which stands Simus' statue beside his dead son 
Gillus. 

316.— LEONIDAS OF TARENTUM 

Ο ye who pass along this road, whether ye are 
going from town to the fields or returning to the 
city from the country, we two gods here are the 
guardians of the boundary. I, as you see me, am 
Hermes, and this other fellow is Heracles. 1 We both 
are gracious to mortals, but to each other — save the 
mark ! If anyone offers a dish of wild pears to both 
of us, he bolts them. Yes, and indeed, likewise 
grapes ; whether they are ripe ones or any quantity 
of sour ones, he stows them away. I detest this 
method of going shares, and get no pleasure from 
it. Let whoever brings us anything serve it separ- 
ately to each of us and not to both, saying, " This is 
for thee, Heracles," and again, "This is for Hermes." 
So he might make up our quarrel. 

317. — Anonymous 

Hermaphroditus. " Goatherd, I love seeing this 
foul-mouthed god struck on his bald pate by the 
pears." Silenus. "Goatherd, hunc ter inivi, and the 
young billy-goats were looking at me and tupping 
the young nanny-goats." Goal herd. "Is it true, 

1 The "term" set up on the boundary of the city and 
country (cp. Plat. Hipparch. 228 d.) had on one side the face 
of Hermes and on the other that of Heracles. 

171 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

7. Όντως σ , 'ΚρμαφρόΒιτε, πεπύγικεν; α. Ου μα, 
τον 'Κρμαν, 5 

αίπυΧε. β. ΝαΙ τον Τ1άν\ αίπόΧε, κάπνγεΧών. 

318.— ΛΕΩΝΙΔΟΤ 

Ίίνμάραθον πρηωνα και εύσκάνδικα ΧεΧογχώς, 
Έρμη, και ταύταν, α φίΧος, αιηίβοσιν, 

και ΧαχανηΧό<γω εσσο και αίγινομήϊ προσηνής' 
έξεις και Χαχάνων καϊ <γΧά<γεος μερίδα. 

319.— ΦΙΛΟΞΕΝΟΤ 

ΎΧηπόΧεμος 6 Μυρεύς Έρμάν άφετήριον έρμα 

ιροδρόμοις θηκεν παις ό ΪΙοΧυκρίτεω, 
οις Βεκ άπο σταδίων εναγώνιον άΧΧά πονεΐτε, 

μαΧθακον εκ γονάτων οκνον άπωσάμενοι. 

320.— ΛΕΩΝΙΔΟΤ ΤΑΡΑΝΤΙΝΟΤ 

Έ2πέ ποκ Ευρώτας ποτϊ ταν Κύπριν " *Η Χάβε τεύχη, 
η 'ξιθι τάς Ίίπάρτας' ά πόΧις όπΧομανεΐ." 

ά δ' απαλοί; <γεΧάσασα, " Κ,αϊ εσσομαι αίεν άτευχής" 
είπε, " και οικήσω ταν Λακεοαιμονιαν." 

χάμΐν Κ,ύπρις άνοπΧος• άναιΖεες οΐ&ε Χε<)ονσιν 5 

ΐστορες, ώς άμΐν χα θεός οπΧοφορεΐ. 

321.— ΑΝΤΙΜΑΧΟΤ 

Ύίπτε, μόθων άτΧητος, ΈνναΧίοιο ΧεΧογχας, 
Κ.νπρι; τις ό ψεύστας στυγνά καθάψε μάτην 



\Ί2 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 318-321 

Hermaphroditus, that he did so?" Hermaphroditus 
" No, goatherd, I swear by Hermes." Silenus. " I 
swear by Pan I did, and I was laughing all the 
time." 

318.— LEONIDAS OF TARENTUM 

Dear Hermes, whose are this hillside rich in fennel 
and chervil, and this goat-pasture ? Be kind both to 
the gatherer of herbs and to the goatherd, and thou 
shalt have thy share of both the herbs and the milk. 

319.— PHILOXENUS 

Tlepolemus of Myra, the son of Polycrites, set me 
up here, Hermes, presiding deity of the course, a 
pillar to mark the starting point in the holy races of 
twenty stadia. Toil, ye runners, in the race, banishing 
soft ease from your knees. 

320.— LEONIDAS OF TARENTUM 

Eurotas said once to Cypris, " Either arm thyself 
or go out of Sparta. The town has a craze for arms." 
She smiled gently and replied, " I will both remain 
always unarmed and continue to dwell in the land of 
Lacedaemon." Our Cypris is unarmed as elsewhere, 
and these are shameless writers who declare that 
with us even the goddess bears arms. 1 

321.— ANTIMACHUS 

Why, Cypris, hast thou, to whom the toil of war 
is strange, got thee these accoutrements of Ares ? 
What falsifier fitted on thee, to no purpose, this 

1 There undoubtedly was an armed Aphrodite at Sparta, 
and it is difficult to see the exact point of this epigram. 

173 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

εντεα; σοϊ yap Έρωτες εφίμεροι, a re κατ εύναν 
τερψις, καϊ κροτάΧων θηΧυμανεϊς οτοβοι. 

Βούρατα δ' αίματόεντα κάθες' ΎριτωνιΒι δια 5 

ταύτα• συ δ' εύχαίταν εις 'Ύμεναιον ϊθι. 

322.— ΛΕΩΝ1ΔΟΤ ΤΑΡΑΝΤΙΝΟΤ 

Ουκ εμα ταύτα Χάφυρα• τίς 6 θρ^κοϊσιν άνάψας 

"Αρηος ταύτας τάν άχαριν χάριτα; 
άθλαστοί μεν κώνοι, αναίμακτοι Be ηανώσαι 

άσπίΒες, άκΧαστοι δ' α'ι κΧαΒαραϊ κάμακες. 
αίΒοΐ πάντα πρόσωπ ερυθαίνομαι, εκ Βε μετώπου 5 

ΊΒρώς πιΒύων στήθος επισταΧαει. 
παστάΒα τις τοιοΐσΒε καϊ άνΒρειώνα και αύΧαν 

κοσμείτω και τον νυμφίΒιον θάΧαμον 
"Αρευς δ' αίματόεντα Βιωξίπποιο Χάφνρα 

νηον κοσμοίη' τοις yap άρεσκομεθα. 10 

323.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ 

Τι? θετό μαρμαίροντα βοά^/ρια; τις δ' άφόρυκτα 

Βούρατα, καϊ ταύτας appay^^ κόρυθας, 
άηκρεμάσας "Αρηϊ μιάστορι κοσμον ακοσμον; 

ουκ άπ' εμών ρίψει ταύτα τις οπΧα Βόμων; 
άπτοΧέμων τ«δ' εοικεν εν οίνόπΧηξι τεράμνοις 5 

πΧάθειν, ου θρακών εντός ΈνυαΧιου. 
σκύΧά μοι άμφίΒρυπτα, καϊ οΧΧυμενων αΒε Χύθρος 

άνΒρών, εϊπερ εφνν ό βροτοΧο^ος "Αρης. 

324.— ΜΝΑ2ΑΛΚΟΤ 

Ά σνρ^ξ, τι μοι ώΒε παρ , Aφpoyεvειav 6 ρούσας; 

τιτττ' άπο ποιμενίου χείΧεος ωΒε πάρει; 
ου τοι πρώνες έ'#' ώδ' οΰτ αγ /tea, πάντα δ "Ερωτες 

καϊ ΐΐόθος• ά δ' aypia ΧΙούσ εν ορει νέμεται. 

174 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 322-324 

hateful armour ? Thou delightest in the Loves and 
the joys of the bridal bed, and the girls dancing 
madly to the castanets. Lay down these bloody 
spears. They are for divine Athena, but come thou 
to Hymenaeus with the flowing locks. 

322.— LEONIDAS OF TARENTUM 

These spoils are not mine. Who hung this un- 
welcome gift on the Avails of Ares ? Unbruised are 
the helmets, unstained by blood the polished shields, 
and unbroken the frail spears. My whole face reddens 
with shame, and the sweat, gushing from my fore- 
head, bedews my breast. Such ornaments are for 
a lady's bower, or a banqueting-hall, or a court, or a 
bridal chamber. But blood-stained be the cavalier's 
spoils that deck the temple of Ares ; in those I 
take delight. 

323.— ANTIPATER OF SIDON 

Who hung here these glittering shields, these un- 
stained spears and unbroken helmets, dedicating to 
murderous Ares ornaments that are no ornaments ? 
Will no one cast these weapons out of my house ? 
Their place is in the wassailing halls of unwarlike 
men, not within the Avails of Enyalius. I delight in 
hacked trophies and the blood of dying men, if, 
indeed, I am Ares the Destroyer. 

324.— MNASALCAS 

Why, Ο pipe, hast thou hied thee here to the 
house of the Foam-born? Why art thou here fresh 
from a shepherd's lips ? Here are no more hills and 
dales, naught but the Loves and Desire. The moun- 
tains are the dwelling of the rustic Muse. 

175 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



325.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 



Πρϊν μεν άΧικΧυστου πέτρας ενϊ βένθεσιν ημαν 

εύαΧδές πόντου φύκος επεννυμένα' 
νυν δε μοι ίμερόεις κόΧπων εντοσθεν ίαύει 

Χάτρις εϋστεφάνου Κύπριδος αβρός 'Έρως. 

326.— ΛΕΩΝΙΔΟΤ ΤΑΡΑΝΤΙΝΟΤ 

Υ1ετρ?]ς εκ Βίσσης ψυχρόν κατεπάΧμενον ύδωρ, 
χαίροις, και Νυμφέων ποιμενικά ξόανα, 

πίστραι ι τε κρηνεων, και εν ύδασι κόσμια ταύτα 
ύμεων, ω κούραι, μυρία τεγγόμενα, 

χαίρετ' ' ΑριστοκΧεης δ' οδ' οδοιπόρος, ωπερ άπώσα 5 
δίψαν βαψάμενος τούτο δίδωμι γέρας. 

327.— ΕΡΜΟΚΡΕΟΝΤ02 

^ύμφαι εφυδριάδες, ταις 'Έφμοκρεων τάδε δώρα 
εϊσατο, καΧΧινάου πίδακος αντίτυπων, 

χαίρετε, καϊ στείβοιτ έρατοΐς ποσϊν υδατοεντα 
τόνδε δόμον, καθαρού πιμπΧάμεναι ποματος. 
J. Α. Pott, Greek Love Songs and Epigrams, ii. p. 57. 

328.— ΔΑΜΟΣΤΡΑΤΟΤ 

Νύμφαι Νηϊάδες, καΧΧίρροον at τόδε νάμα 
χεΐτε κατ ούρείου πρωνος απειρεσιον, 

ύμμιν ταύτα πόρεν Ααμόστρατος ΑντιΧα υιός 
ξεσματα, και δοιών ρινά κάπρων Χάσια. 

1 So Unger : πίτραι MS. 
176 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 325-328 

325. — Anonymous 

On a Shell with an image of Love carved inside it 

Of old I dwelt in the depths on a sea-washed rock 
clothed in luxuriant seaweed, but now in my bosom 
sleeps the delightful child, tender Love, the servant 
of diademed Cypris. 

326.— LEONIDAS OF TARENTUM 

Hail, thou cold stream that leapest down from the 
cloven rock, and ye images of the Nymphs carved by 
a shepherd's hand ! Hail, ye drinking troughs and 
your thousand little dolls, 1 ye Maidens of the spring, 
that lie drenched in its waters ! All hail ! And I, 
Aristocles, the wayfarer, give you this cup which I 
dipped in your stream to quench my thirst. 

327.— HERMOCREON 

Ye Nymphs of the water, to whom Hermocreon 
set up these gifts when he had lighted on your 
delightful fountain, all hail ! And may ye ever, full 
of pure drink, tread with your lovely feet the floor 
of this your watery home. 

328.— DAMOSTRATUS 

Ye Naiad Nymphs, who shed from the mountain 
cliff" this fair stream in inexhaustible volume, Darao- 
stratus, the son of Antilas, gave you these wooden 
images and the two hairy boar-skins. 

1 Otherwise called κοροκόσμια, votive images of the Nymphs. 
cp. Plat. Phaedr. 230 b. 

177 

VOL. HI. Ν 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

329.— ΛΕΩΝΙΔΟΤ TAPANTINOT 

Νύμφαι εφυΒριάΒες, Αωρου yevos, άρΒεύοιτε 
τούτον ΎιμοκΧεους κάττον επεσσύμεναι• 

καϊ yap Ύιμοκ\εης ύμμιν, κόραι, αιεν ο καπευς 
κάπων εκ τούτων ωριά Βωροφορεΐ. 

330.— ΝΙΚΑΡΧΟΤ 

α. Κ,ράνας εύύΒρου πάρα νάμασι καϊ πάρα Νύμφαις, 

εστασεν με Έ,ίμων, Πάνα τον α^ιπόΒην. 
β. Ύεύ Βε γάριν; α. Αέξω τον όσον ποθεεις άπο 
κράνας 
καϊ πίε, καϊ κοί\αν κάΚπιν εΧων άρυσαι' 
ποσσϊ Βε μη ποτϊ νίπτρα φερειν κρυστάΧλινα 
Νυμφάν 5 

Βώρα, τον νβρισταν εις εμε Βερκόμενος. 
β. Ώ σεμν — α. Ου Χεξεις έτερον \6yov, άλλα παρέ- 
σεις 
πυ«/ίξαΐ' τούτοις χρώμαι 6 ΤΙάν νομίμοις. 
ην Be ποιης ι επίτηΒες, εγων πάθος, εστί καϊ ά'λλα 
τεχνα' τω ροπά\ω ταν κεφαΧαν Χεπομες. 10 

331.— ΜΕΛΕΑΓΡΟΤ 

At Νύμφαι τον Τ&άκχον, ότ εκ πυρός ήΧαθ' 6 κούρος, 

νίψαν ύπερ τεφρής άρτι κυΧιόμενον. 
τούνεκα συν Νύμφαις Βρόμιος φι\ος' ην Βε νιν εί'pyης 

μίσyεσθaι, Βέξη πύρ ετι καιόμενον. 
1 So Reiske : πίνης MS. 

1 i.e. dost bathe thy feet. 
178 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 329-331 

329.— LEONIDAS OF TARENTUM 

Ye water Nymphs, children of Dorus, water dili- 
gently this garden of Timocles, for to you, Maidens, 
doth the gardener Timocles bring ever in their season 
gifts from this garden. 

330.— NICARCHUS 

A. "I am goat-footed Pan, whom Simo put up by 
the clear waters of the spring." B. "And why?'* 
A. " I will tell thee. From the fountain drink as 
much as thou wilt, and take this hollow pitcher, too, 
and draw. But offer not the crystalline gifts of the 
Nymphs to thy feet to bathe them. Seest thou 
not my menacing form?" B. "Revered god — " 
A. "Thou shalt not speak another word, but shalt 
let me take my will of thee. Such is the custom of 
Pan. But if thou dost it l on purpose, having an in- 
clination for the penalty, I know another trick. I 
will break thy head with my club." 

331.— MELEAGER 

On Wine and Water 

The Nymphs washed Bacchus when he leapt from 
the fire above the ashes he had just been rolling in. 2 
Therefore Bacchus is thy friend when united with 
the Nymphs, but if thou preventest their union thou 
shalt take to thee a still burning fire. 

2 He was born when his mother Semele was consumed by 
the lightning. 

179 

Ν 2 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

332.— ΝΟΧ2ΙΔ02 [ΛΕ2ΒΙΑΣ] 

ΈΧθοΐσαι ποτι ναόν ίδώμεθα τάς Άφροδίτας 
το βρετας, ώς γ^ρυσω διαδαΧόεν τεΧεθει. 

είσατό μιν ΙΤοΧυαρχίς, επαυρομενα μάΧα πυΧΧαν 
κτήσιν απ οικείου σώματος ά^Χαίας. 

333.— ΜΝΑ2ΑΛΚΟΤ 

Στώμεν άΧιρράντοιο πάρα, χθαμαΧαν γβόνα f πόντου, 
δερκόμενοι τέμενος Κ,ύπριδος ΈιναΧίας, 

κράναν τ αίγείροιο κατάσκιον, ας άπο νάμα 

ξουθαϊ άφύσσονται χείΧεσιν άΧκυονες. 

J. Η. Merivale, in Collections from the Greek Anthology, 
1833, p. 112. 

334.— ΠΕΡ20Τ 

Κάμε τον εν σμικροϊς oXiyov θεον ην επιβώστ]ς 
εύκαίρως, τεύξη' μη μεγάΧων δε yXi -χου. 

ώς ο τι δημοτερων δύναται θεός άνδρϊ πενεστη 
δωρεΐσθαι, τούτων κύριος είμι Ύύγων. 

335.— ΛΕΩΝΙΔΟΤ ΤΑΡΑΝΤΙΝΟΤ 

'ΎΧοφόρου τωγάΧμαθ', οδοιπόρε, ΜικκαΧίωνος• 
Έρμης, άλλ' (δε τον κρηηυον ύΧοφόρον, 

ώς εζ οίζνρής ηπίστατο δωροδοκήσαι 
εργασίης' αίεν δ' ώ '<γαθός εστ άβαθος. 

336.— ΚΑΛΛΙΜΑΧΟΤ 

"Ηρώς Αίετίωνος επίσταθμος ΆμφιποΧίτεω 
ϊδρυμαι μικρω μικρός επί προθύρω, 

1 He was a god worshipped in company with or in place of 
Priapus. 

180 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 332-336 

332.— NOSSIS 

Let us go to the temple to see the statue of 
Aphrodite, how cunningly wrought it is of gold. 
Polyarchis erected it, having gained much substance 
from the glory of her own body. 

333.— MNASALCAS 

Let us stand on the low beach of the sea-washed 
promontory, gazing at the sanctuary of Cypris of the 
Sea, and the spring overshadowed by poplars from 
which the yellow kingfishers sip with their bills the 
running water. 

334.— PERSES 

If at the right season thou callest upon me too, 
little among the lesser gods, thou shalt get thy wish, 
but crave not for great things. For I, Tychon, 1 have 
in my power to grant only such things as the people's 
god may give to a labouring man. 

335.— LEONIDAS OF TARENTUM 

The two statues, wayfarer, are the gift of the wood- 
man Miccalion ; but look, Hermes, how the excellent 
woodman from his wretched calling managed to give 
gifts. The good man is always good. 

336.— CALLIMACHUS 

I, the hero 2 who guard the stable of Aeetion of 
Amphipolis, stand here, small myself and in a small 
porch, carrying nothing but a wriggling snake and a 

2 The name of the hero is not given. He complains that 
though the guardian of a stable he was not mounted, but 
the last couplet is corrupt and very obscure. 

181 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

Χοξον οφιν real μοΰνον εγων ξίφος' άνδρϊ ^ιπείωι 
θυμωθεις πεζον κάμε παρωκίσατο. 

337— ΛΕΩΝΙΔΟΤ ΤΑΡΑΝΤΙΝΟΤ 

Έύάγρει, Χαηόθηρα, και ει πετεεινά διώκων 

ίξευτης ηκεις τοΰθ' ΰπο δισσον ορός, 
κάμε τον ύΧηωρον άπο κρημνοΐο βοασον 

ΤΙάνα• συναηρεΰω καϊ κυσι καϊ καΧάμοις. 

338.— ΘΕΟΚΡΙΤΟΤ 2ΤΡΑΚΟΤ5ΙΟΤ 

Έ,υδεις φυΧΧοστρώτι πεδω, Δάφνι, σώμα κεκμακος 
άμπαύων στάΧικες δ' άρτιπα^εϊς αν ορη. 

aypevei δε τυ II άρ, καϊ ο τον κροκόεντα ΤΙρίηπος 
κισσον εφ> Ίμερτώ κρατι καθαπτόμενος, 

άντρον εσω στείχοντες όμόρροθοι. αλλά τύ φευ^ε, 5 
φεΰ^ε, μεθεϊς ύπνου κώμα καταργόμενον. 

339.— ΑΡΧΙΟΤ ΜΤΤΙΛΗΝΑΙΟΤ 

"Εν ποτέ παμφαίνοντι μεΧαν πτερον αίθέρι νωμών 
σκορπίον εκ <γαίης είδε θορόντα κόραξ, 

ον μάρψων ώρουσεν 6 δ' άιξαντος επ ουδας 
ου βραδύς εύκεντρω πέζαν έτυψε βεΧει, 

χαϊ ζωής μιν άμερσεν. ί'δ' ώς ον ετευχεν far άΧΧω, 5 
εκ κείνου τΧήμων αύτος εδεκτο μόρον. 

340.— ΔΙΟΣΚΟΡΙΔΟΤ 

Αυλοί του Φρυγος ερηον 'Ύάγνιδος, ήνίκα Μήτηρ 
ιερά τάν Κ,υβεΧοις πρώτ ανέδειξε θεών, 

καϊ προς εμον φώνημα καΧην άνεΧύσατο γα'ιταν 
εκφρων Ίδαίης άμφίποΧος θαΧάμης' 

ΐ82 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 337-340 

sword. Having lost his temper with .... he did 
not give me a mount either when he put me up beside 
him. 

337.— LEONIDAS OF TARENTUM 

Good sport ! thou who comest to the foot of this 
two-peaked hill, whether hunting the hare or in 
pursuit of winged game. Call on me, Pan the ranger 
of this forest, from the rock, for I help both hounds 
and limed reeds to capture. 

338.— THEOCRITUS 

Thou sleepest, Daphnis, resting thy wearied body 
on a bed of leaves, and thy stake-nets are new set on 
the hill. But Pan hunts thee, Pan and Priapus, the 
saffron-coloured ivy twined on his lovely head. Intent 
on one purpose they are entering the cave. But 
fly ; dispel the gathering drowsiness of sleep and fly. 

339.— ARCHIAS OF MYTILENE 

A raven plying his black wings in the pellucid 
sky, saw once a scorpion emerging from the ground, 
and swooped down to catch it ; but the scorpion, as 
the raven dashed down to the ground, was not slow 
to strike his foot with its powerful sting, and robbed 
him of life. See how the luckless bird met with the 
fate he was preparing for another by means of that 
other. 

340.— DIOSCORIDES 

The double flute was the work of Phrygian Hy- 
agnis at the time when the Mother of the gods first 
revealed her rites on Cybela, and when the frantic 
servant of the Idaean chamber first loosed his lovely 

i83 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

ει δε ΚεΧαινίτης ττοιμην ττάρος \ονπερ άείσας 5 

εηνώσθη, Φοίβου /ceivbv εδειρεν 1 ερις. 

341.— ΓΛΑΤΚΟΤ 

α. Νύμφαι, πευθομένω φράσατ άτρεκες, el παρο• 
δενων 
Δάφνις τας Χενκάς ώδ' ανετταυσ' ερ'ιφους. 
β. Nat ναι, ΤΙάν σνρικτά, καϊ εις al'yeipov εκείναν 
σοι τι κατά φΧοιον <γράμμ εκοΧαψε Χεγειν 
" ΤΙάν, ΤΙάν, προς ΜαΧεαν, προς ορός Ψωφίδιον 

*ΡΧ €υ '„ , , 5 

ίξονμαι." α. Νύμφαι, χαίρετ' eya) δ' υπάγω. 

342.— ΠΑΡΜΕΝΙΩΝ02 

Φημί ποΧνστιχίην επιγράμματος ου κατά Μούσα? 

είναι, μη ζητεϊτ εν σταδίω δόΧιχον 
πόΧΧ* άνακυκΧούται δοΧιχος δρόμος• ev σταδίω δε 

οξύς εΧαννόμενος πνεύματος εστί τόνος. 

343.— ΑΡΧΙΟΤ 

Ανταΐς σνν κίγΧαισιν νπερ φραημοΐο διωχθείς 

κόσσυφος ήερ'ιης κόΧπον εδν νεφεΧης. 
και τάς μεν σννοχηδον άνέκδρομος ώχμασε θώμι<γξ, 

τον δε μόνον ττΧεκτών άνθι μεθηκε Χίνων. 
Ιρον άοιδοπόΧων ετυμον γένος, η άρα ποΧΧην δ 

και κωφαϊ πτανών φροντίδ' εχουσι irayai. 

1 I write tSapev for e5ei£ev. I cannot restore 1. 5 satisfac- 
torily, but it is evident that Dioscorides disputes or does not 
recognise the story that Marsyas was son of Hyagnis. Mar- 
syas was flayed by Apollo for daring to match his flute with 
Apollo's lyre. 

184 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 341-343 

locks to my notes. But if the shepherd of Celaenae 1 
was known earlier as a better player, his strife with 
Phoebus flayed him. 

341.— GLAUCUS 

A. " Nymphs answer me truly, if Daphnis on his 
road rested here his white goats." B. " Yes, yes, 
piper Pan, and on the back of that poplar tree he 
cut a message for thee : ( Pan, Pan, go to Malea 2 ; to 
the mountain of Psophis. I shall come there.' " 
A. "Farewell, Nymphs, I go." 

342.— PARMENION 

An epigram of many lines does not, I say, conform 
to the Muses' law. Seek not the long course in the 
short stadion. The long race has many rounds, but 
in the stadion sharp and short is the strain on the 
wind. 

343.— ARCHIAS 

{cp. No. 76) 
A blackbird, di'iven over the hedge together with 
field-fares, entered the hollow of the suspended net. 
The cords from which there is no escape caught and 
held fast the whole flock of them, but let the black- 
bird alone go free from the meshes. Of a truth the 
race of singers is holy. Even deaf traps show fond 
care for winged songstei's. 

1 Marsyaa. 3 The Arcadian town of that name. 

185 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

344.— ΛΕΩΝΙΔΑ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΕΩ2 

Ήν οπότε ηραμμαϊσιν ε μην φρένα μοΰνον ετερπον, 
οΰδ' οναρ εύηενεταις γνώριμος ΊταΧίδαις• 

άΧΧα τανυν πάντεσσιν εράσμιος' όψε yap εηνων 
όππόσον Ούρανίην ΚαΧΧιοπη προφέρει. 

345.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

ΟύΒε τοσόνδ' Άθάμας επεμήνατο παιδί Αεάρχω, 
οσσον ό Ί\1ηδείης θυμός ετεκνοφόνα, 

ζήΧος επει μανίης μείζον κακόν ει δε φονεύϊ) 
μήτηρ, εν τ'ινι νυν π'ιστις ετ εστί τέκνων; 

346.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Alav οΧην νήσους τε διϊπταμένη συ χεΧιδών, 
Μηδείΐ]ς <γραπτΐ) πυκτίδι νοσσοτροφεΐς• 

εΧπη δ' όρταΧίχων π'ιστιν σεο τήνδε φυΧάξειν 
Κολχίδα, μηο ιδίων φεισαμενην τεκεων; 

347.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Ου μόνον ευάροτον βόες οϊδαμεν αύΧακα τεμνειν, 
άλλ' ϊδε κηκ πόντου νηας εφεΧκόμεθα' 

epya yap ειρεσίης δεδιδά<γμεθα' καϊ συ, θάΧασσα, 
δεΧφϊνας yairj ζευξον άροτροφορεϊν. 

348.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Ό σταφυΧοκΧοπ'ιδας Έκατώνυμος εις 'Αίδαο 
εδραμε, μαστιχθείς κΧήμαιΊ φωριδίω. 



1 86 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 344-348 

344.— LEONIDAS OF ALEXANDRIA 

{This and the following ones are Isopsephe.) 
There was a time when 1 gave pleasure to myself 
alone by lines, and was not known at all to noble 
Romans. But now I am beloved by all, for late in 
life I recognised how far Calliope excels Urania. 1 

345. — By the Same 
The fury of Athamas against his son Learchus 2 was 
not so great as the wrath that made Medea plot her 
children's death. For jealousy is a greater evil than 
madness. If a mother kills, in whom are children 
to place confidence ? 

346. — By the Same 
After flying, swallow, across the whole earth and 
the islands, thou dost rear thy brood on the picture 
of Medea. Dost thou believe that the Colchian 
woman who did not spare even her own children 
will keep her faith to thy young? 

347. — By the Same 
We oxen are not only skilled in cutting straight 
furrows with the plough, but, look, we pull ships out 
of the sea too. For we have been taught the task of 
oarsmen. Now, sea, thou too shouldst yoke dolphins 
to plough on the land. 

348. — By the Same 
Hecatonymus, the stealer of grapes, ran to Hades 
whipped with a stolen vine-switch. 

1 By " lines " in 1. 1 he means astronomical and geometri- 
cal figures. He has abandoned these for lines of verse, the 
Muse of Astronomy for the Muse of Poesy. 

2 Athamas killed his son in a fit of madness. 187 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

319.— TOY ΑΥΤΟΥ 

"Ύδατα σοι Κ,οτίΧεια ηενέθΧιον ημαρ όρωντι, 
Καίσαρ, επιβΧυζοι σωρον άκεσφορίης, 

οφρα σε κόσμος άπας πάππον . . . αύγάζηται, 
ώς πατέρα τρισσής εΐσιδεν εύτοκίης. 

350.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

"Ητ/Οίά μοι βύβΧων χιονώδεα 1 συν καΧάμοισιν 
πέμπεις, ΝειΧορύτου δώρον άπο προβοΧής. 

μουσοπόΧω δ άτεΧή, Διονύσιε, μηκέτι πέμπε 
opyava' τις τούτων χρήσις άτερ μέλανος; 

351.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Αυσίππης 6 νεο'γνος άπο κρημνού παις έρπων 

Άστυανακτείης ήρχετο δνσμορίης' 
η 8ε μεθωδη<γησεν άπο στέρνων προφέρονσα 

μαζόν, τον Χιμοΰ ρύτορα και θανάτου. 

352.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

ΝεΐΧος εορτάζει πάρα, Θύμβριδος Ιερόν ΰδωρ, 
εύξάμενος θύσειν Καίσαρι σωζομένω- 

οι δ' εκατόν βουπΧηΎες εκούσιον αύγένα ταύρων 
τρμαξαν βωμοΐς Ούρανίοιο Αιός. 

353.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Και Xoyov Ιστορίτ) κοσμούμενον ηκρίβωσας 
και βίον εν φιΧίτ), Τίάππε, βεβαιότατον. 
1 So Toil ρ : άτονώδία MS. 

1 The Caesar is Vespasian, the three children Titus, 
Domitian, and Uomitilla. Cutiliae, now Contigliano, is in 
the Sabine territory. 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 349~353 

349. — By the Same 

Caesar, 1 may the baths of Cutiliae on this thy birth- 
day gush for thee in abundance of healing, so that 
all the world may see thee a grandfather as it has 
seen thee the father of three fair children. 



350. — By the Same 

Thou sendest me thin sheets of byblus, snowy 
white, and reed pens, gifts from the headland that 
the Nile waters. Do not, Dionysius, send another 
time imperfect gifts to a poet. What use are these 
without ink ? 

351. — By the Same 
(cp. No. 114) 

Lysippe's baby, creeping over the edge of a pre- 
cipice, was on the point of suffering the fate of 
Astyanax. But she turned it from its path by holding 
out to it her breast, that thus was its saviour from 
death as well as from famine. 

352. — By the Same 

The Nile 2 keeps festival by the holy wave of Tiber, 
having vowed a sacrifice for Caesar's deliverance. 
A hundred axes made the willing necks of as many 
bulls bleed at the altars of Heavenly Zeus. 

353. — By the Same 

Pappus, thou hast both strictly composed a work 
adorned with learning, and hast kept thy life strict in 

2 i.e. the Egyptians. If the Emperor was Nero, the 
sacrifice was to celebrate his deliverance from his mother's 
plots by her death. 

189 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

τούτο δ' έορτάζοντι yeveUXiov ηριηένειαν 
δωρον 6 ΝειΧαιεύς πέμπει άοι&οπολος. 

354.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Λ Ον ποΧεμος ΒεΒιώς ουκ ώ\εσε, νυν υπο νούσου 
θ\ίβομαι, εν δ' ίδίω τηκομ οΧος ποΧέμω. 

άλλα 8ιά στέρνων ϊθι φάσ^ανον ως yap άριστενς 
θνήξομ άπωσάμενος και νόσον ως πόΧεμον. 

355.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Ούράνιον μίμημα γενεθΧιακαΐσιν iv ώραις 
τοντ άπο NeiXoyevovs Βέξο Αεωνίδεω, 

Τίοππαία, Αιος εύνι, Χεβαστιάς' εναδε yap σοι 
δώρα τα καϊ Χέκτρων άξια και σοφίης. 

356.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

ΟΓγί^/χεν έζ έτέρης πόμα πίδακος, ώστ άρνσασθαι 
ξεΐνον μουσοπόΧου ypάμμa Αεων'ιδεω• 

δίστιχα yap ψήφοισιν ισάζεται. άλλα συ, Μ,ώμε, 
εξιθι, κεις έτερους όξύν οδόντα βάλε. 

357.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Τέσσαρες εισιν άyώvες αν Ελλάδα, τέσσαρες Ιρο'ι, 
οι δύο μεν θνητών, οι δύο δ' αθανάτων 

Ζηνός, Αητοίδαο, ΐΙαΧαίμονος, Άρχεμόροιο. 
αθΧα δε των, κότινος, μήΧα, σέΧινα, πίτυς. 

Turned into Latin by Ausonius, Edog. vii. 20. 

1 i.e. Nero. 
190 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 354-357 

firmity of friendship. The Egyptian poet sends thee 
this gift to-day when thou dost celebrate thy natal 
morn. 

354. — By the Same 

I, whom war dreaded and slew not, am now afflicted 
by disease, and waste away by intestine warfare. 
Pierce my heart then, sword, for I will die like a 
valiant soldier, beating off disease even as 1 did war. 

355. — Bv the Same 

Ρορραελ Augusta, spouse of Zeus, 1 receive from the 
Egyptian Leonidas this map of the heavens on thy 
natal day ; for thou takest pleasure in gifts worthy 
of thy alliance and thy learning. 

356. — By the Same 

We open another fountain of drink to quaff from 
it verses of a form hitherto strange to Leonidas. 
The letters of the couplets give equal numbers. But 
away with thee, Momus, and set thy sharp teeth in 
others. 

357. — Anonymous 

There are four games in Greece, two sacred to 
mortals and two to immortals : to Zeus, Apollo, 
Palaemon, and Archemorus, and their prizes are 
wild-olive, apples, celery, and pine-branches. 2 

2 The games are the Olympian, Pythian, Isthmian, and 
Nemean ones. The crown of pine was the Isthmian pine, 
the celery the Nemean. The Pythian apples (instead of 
laurel) are mentioned by other late writers. 

191 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



358.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 



Ει' με Πλάτων ού <γράψε, Βύω ijevovro ΐΐλάτωνες. 

Σωκρατικών ούρων άνθεα πάντα φέρω' 
αλλά νόθον μ ετεΚεσσε ΤΙαναίτιος. ος ρ ετέΧεσσε 

καϊ ψνχην θνητην, κάμε νοθον τεΧεσει. 

359.— Π02ΕΙΔΙΠΠΟΤ, οι Βε ΠΛΑΤΩΝΟΣ 
TOT ΚΩΜΙΚΟΤ 

Τίοίην τις βιότοιο τάμη τρίβον; ειν ayoprj μεν 

νείκεα καϊ χαΧεπαϊ πρήξιες' εν Be Βόμοις 
φροντίΒες• εν δ' άγροϊς καμάτων αλί?• εν Βε θαΧάσση 

τάρβος' επϊ ξείνης Β\ ην μεν εχης τι, Βεος' 
ην δ' άπορης, άνιηρόν. έχεις ηάμον; ονκ αμέριμνος 5 

εσσεαΐ' ου <γαμέεις; ζης ετ ερημότερος• 
τέκνα πόνοι, πηρωσις άπαις βίος' αϊ νεοτ7]τες 

άφρονες, α'ι ποΧιαϊ δ' εμπαΧιν άΒρανέες. 
ην άρα τοΐν Βισσοΐν ενός αΐρεσις, η το γενέσθαι 

μηΒεποτ, η το θανεϊν αυτίκα τικτόμενον. 10 

Sir John Beaumont, reprinted in Wellesley's Anthologia 
Polyylotta, p. 133. 

360.— ΜΗΤΡΟΔΩΡΟΤ 

ΤΙαντοίην βιότοιο τάμοις τριβον ειν ayopfj μεν 
κύΒεα καϊ πινυταϊ πρήξιες• εν Βε Βομοις 

άμπαυμ• εν δ' άγροΐς Φύσιος χάρις• εν Βε θαΧάσστ) 
κερΒος. επϊ ξείνης, ην μεν εχης τι, κΧεος• 

ήν δ' άπορης, μόνος οΙΒας. έχεις ηάμον; οίκος 
άριστος 5 

εσσεται• ου γαμεεις; ζης ετ ελαφρότερος. 



192 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 358-360 

358.— Anonymous 
On Plato s « Phaedo" 
If Plato did not write me there were two Platos, 
for I have all the flowers of the Socratic dialogues. 
But Panaetius made me out to be spurious. He 
who made the soul out to be mortal will make me 
spurious too. 1 

359.— POSIDIPPUS or PLATO, THE 
COMIC POET 

What path of life should one pursue ? In the 
market-place are broils and business difficulties, and at 
home are anxieties ; in the country there is too much 
labour, and at sea there is fear. In a foreign land 
there is apprehension if you possess anything, and if 
you are ill off, life is a burden. You are married ? 
You won't be without cares. You are unmarried ? 
You live a still more lonely life. Children are a 
trouble, and a childless life is a crippled one. Youth 
is foolish, and old age again is feeble. There is then, 
it seems, a choice between two things, either not to 
be born or to die at once on being born. 

360.— METRODORUS 
Pursue every path of life. In the market place are 
honours and prudent dealings, at home rest ; in the 
country the charm of nature, and at sea profit ; in a 
foreign country, if you have any possessions, there is 
fame, and if you are in want no one knows it but your- 
self. Are you married ? Your house will be the best 
of houses. Do you remain unmarried ? Your life is 

1 We have Cicero's testimony that Panaetius difl not accept 
the doctrine of the Phaedo. He does not, however, say that 
he pronounced it spurious. 

193 
VOL. III. Ο 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

τέκνα πόθος, άφροντις άπαις βίος• αί νεότητες 
ρωμαΧέαι, ποΧίαϊ δ' εμπαΧιν εύσεβέες. 

ουκ άρα των δισσών έΐ'ός αΐρεσις, ή το γενέσθαι 

μηδεποτ, ή το θανειν πάντα γαρ εσθΧα βίω. 10 

361.— ΛΕΟΝΤΟΣ ΦΙΑΟΞΟΦΟΤ 

Χίήτερ ε μη δύσμητερ, άπηνεα θυμον έχουσα, 
\ίην άγθομαι εΧκος, 6 μ€ βροτος ούτασεν άνηρ 
νύκτα δι όρφναίην, οτε θ' εύδουσι βροτοϊ άΧλοι, 
γυμνός άτερ κόρυθός τε και άσπίδος, ούδ' εχεν εγγος. 
πάν δ' ύπεθερμάνθη ξίφος αΐματί' αντάρ έπειτα 5 
ούρόν τε προέηκεν άπήμονά τε Χιαρόν τε. 

362.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Ίμερόεις 'ΑΧφειε, Δίός στεφανηφόρον ύδωρ, 
δ? δίά Υίισαίων πεδίων κεκονιμενος έρπεις, 
ήσύχιος το πρώτον, επην δ' ες πόντον ϊκηαι, 
οξύς άμετρήτοιο πεσών υπό κύμα θαΧάσσης, 
ννμφίος αύτοκεΧευθος εών όχετηγός ερώτων, 5 

ες ΈικεΧην Άρέθουσαν επείγεαι υγρός άκοίτης. 
ή 8ε σε κεκμηώτα και ασθμαίνοντα Χαβυύσα, 
φύκος άποσμήζασα και άνθεα πικρά ΘαΧάσσης, 
'χείλεα μεν στομάτεσσι συνήρμοσεν οία δε νύμφη 
νυμφίον άμφιγυθεϊσα περίπΧοκον ηδεϊ δεσμω 10 

κείμενον εν κόΧποισιν ΌΧύμπιον εύνασεν ύδωρ. . . . 
και φονί$ ραθάμιγγι Χιβάς κατεκίρνατο πηγή. 
ούδε Χυρακοσίης ετι σοι μεΧεν ίμερος εύνής' 

1 The wild-olive trees which furnished the crowns for the 
Olj'inpic festival. 

194 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 361-362 

yet lighter. Children are darlings ; a childless life is 
free from care. Youth is strong, and old age again 
is pious. Therefore there is no choice between two 
things, either not to be born or to die ; for all in life 
is excellent. 

361.— LEO THE PHILOSOPHER 

(\4 Homeric Cento) 
My cruel-hearted mother, an evil mother to me — 
it pains me much, the wound that a mortal man 
inflicted on me — in the dark night when other 
mortals sleep — naked, without a helmet and shield, 
nor had he a spear — and all his sword was bathed in 
hot blood — but afterwards he sent forth a gentle and 
harmless gale. 

362. — Anonymous 

Delightful Alpheus, stream that nourishest the 
crowns of Zeus, 1 winding with thy muddy water 
through the plain of Pisa, tranquil at first, but when 
thou readiest the sea plunging eagerly under the 
waves of the vast main, now made a bridegroom 
conducting the current of his love in a self-made 
channel, thou dost hie to Sicilian Arethusa to be 
her watery bed-fellow. Then she, taking thee to 
her tired and panting, wipes off the weed and the 
bitter flowers of the sea, and joining her lips to thine, 
clasping like a bride thy Olympian stream in the 
sweet bonds of her embrace, lulls thee to sleep lying 
in her bosom. . . . and 2 thy limpid fount was defiled by 
showers of blood, and no longer was thy heart filled 
with desire for thy Syracusan love, but thou didst 

2 There are evidently some lines missing. The remainder 
refers to some barbarian invasion of the Peloponnese. 

I9S 

o 2 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

πορφυρέη δ' ανέκοπτες ύΒωρ ττεττιεσμένον αίΒοΐ, 
φειΒόμενος καϊ ττόντον ομού καϊ Χέκτρα μιήναι. 15 
ττοΧΧάκι δ' εύναίων ούρων βεβιη μένος όρμη, 
αυτήν ες φιΧότητα χυτής άΧόχοιο ττερήσας, 
έστήκεις άχραντον όρων Αρεθούσιον ύΒωρ• 
ή Βέ σε τταπταίνουσα ΤΙεΧωριάΒος κατά, ττετρης 
Βάκρνσι κυμαίνοντα, κατοικτε'ιρουσα καϊ αύτη 20 

εύειΒής 'Αρέθουσα φίλους άν€κοτττ€το μαζους, 
καϊ Βρόσος οία ρόΒοισιν ετήκετο• μυρομένω Be 
ΓΙνσαίω ττοταμώ Έ,ικεΧή ττροσεμύρετο πιγγη. 
ούΒε ί\ίκΐ)ν εΧαθεν ττανΒερκέα φοίνιος άνηρ 
ΈΧΧάΒος άμώων άγαμον στάχυν, ω εττι ττοΧΧαι 25 
ηρώων άΧοχοι, μινυώρια τέκνα τεκούσαι 
μαψιΒίως ώΒΐνας άνεκΧαύσαντο γυναίκες. 

363.— ΜΕΛΕΑΓΡΟΤ 

Χείματος ήνεμόεντος άπ' αιθέρος οίχομένοιο, 

ττορφυρεη μείΒησε φερανθεος είαρος ώρη. 

γαία Βέ κυανέη χΧοερήν έστέψατο ττοίην, 

καϊ φυτά θ7]Χησαντα νέοις έκόμησε ττετήΧοις. 

οι δ' άτταΧήν ττίνοντες άεξιφύτου Βρόσον ΉοΟ? 5 

Χειμώνες ηεΧοωσιν, άνοιηομενοιο ροΒοιο. 

χαίρει και σύριοι νομευς εν ορεσσι Χιηαίνων, 

και ττοΧιοίς έριφοις έττιτερπεται αιποΧος αι^ών. 

ήΒη Βε ττΧώουσιν έπ ευρέα κύματα ναύται 

π voir} άπημάντω Ζέφυρου Χίνα κοΧττώσαντος, 10 

ήΒη δ' εύάζουσι φερεσταφύΧω Αιονύσω, 

άνθεϊ βοτρυόεντος έρεψάμενοι τρίχα κισσού. 

epya Βέ τεχνήεντα βοηηενέεσσι μεΧίσσαις 

καΧα μεΧει, καϊ σίμβΧω εφημεναι εργάζονται 

Χευκά ποΧυτρήτοιο νεόρρυτα KaXXea κηρού. 15 

196 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAM 363 

hold back thy waters, repressed by blushing shame, 
saving from pollution the sea and thy bridal bed ; 
yet, often compelled by thy longing for nuptial in- 
tercourse, wouldst thou pass the sea to thy beloved 
liquid bride and stand gazing at the stainless water 
of Arethusa. And the lovely Arethusa, looking on 
thee surging with tears from the Pelorian rock, 1 
would pity thee and beat her breasts, and melt like 
the dew on roses, the Sicilian fount responding to 
the lament of the river of Pisa. But he did not 
escape the eye of all-seeing Justice, that man of 
blood who mowed down the unwedded harvest of 
Greece, whereat many wives of the heroes wept 
for the short-lived children to bear whom they had 
suffered in vain. 

363.— MELEAGER 

Windy winter has left the skies, and the purple sea- 
son of flowery spring smiles. The dark earth garlands 
herself in green herbage, and the plants bursting 
into leaf wave their new-born tresses. The meadows, 
drinking the nourishing dew of dawn, laugh as the 
roses open. The shepherd on the hills delights to 
play shrilly on the pipes, and the goatherd joys in his 
white kids. Already the mariners sail over the broad 
billows, their sails bellied by the kindly Zephyr. 
Already, crowning their heads with the bloom of 
berried ivy, men cry evoe ! to Dionysus the giver of 
the grape. The bees that the bull's carcase gene- 
rates 2 bethink them of their artful labours, and seated 
on the hive they build the fresh white loveliness of 
their many-celled comb. The races of birds sing 

1 The N.E. cape of Sicily. 3 cp. Vergil, Georg. iv. 555. 

197 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

πάντη δ' ορνίθων yever) Χιγύφωνον άείδει, 
αλκυόνες περί κύμα, χελιδόνες άμφϊ μέλαθρα, 
κύκνος eV όχθαισιν ποταμού, και υπ ά'λσοί αηδών, 
ει δε φυτών χαίρουσι κόμαι, καϊ yala τεθηλεν, 
συρίζει 8ε νομεύς, καϊ τέρπεται εΰκομα μήλα, 20 

καϊ ναΰται πλώουσι, Αιώνυσος δε χορεύει, 
καϊ μέλπει πετεεινά, καϊ ώδίνουσι μελισσαι, 
πώς ου χρη καϊ άοιδόν εν είαρι καλόν άεΐσαι; 

364.— ΝΕΣΤΟΡΟΣ ΑΑΡΑΝΔΕΩΣ 

^.πείσατε μοι, Μούσαι, λιηυρην εύτερπέα φωνην, 
ηδύν από στομάτων Έ\ικωνίδος ομβρον άοιδής. 
άσσοι yap προχεουσιν αοιδοτοκου πόμα πηyής, 
υμετέρων επέων λ^υρη τέρπονται άοιδη. 

365.— ΙΟΤΛΙΑΝΟΤ ΚΑΙΣΑΡΟΣ 

' Αλλοις όρόω δονάκων φύσιν. ηπου απ άλλης 
χάλκείης τάχα μάλλον άνεβλάστησαν άρούρης, 
aypioi, ούδ άνεμοισιν ύφ* ήμετέροις δονεονταΐ' 
αλλ,' από ταυρείης προθορών σπήλυyyoς άήτης 
νερθεν εύτρήτων καλάμων ύπο ρίζαν οδεύει' 5 

και τις άνηρ άyέpωχoς έχων θοά δάκτυλα χειρών, 
ΐσταται άμφαφόων κανόνας συμφράδμονας αυλών 
οΐ δ' άπαλόν σκιρτώντες άποθλίβουσιν άοιδην. 

366.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Αποφθέγματα των ίπτα. σοφών 

'Επτά σοφών ερέω κατ έπος πό\ιν, ούνομα, φωνην. 
Μετρον μεν Κλεόβουλος ό Αίνδιος εϊπεν άριστον 

198 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 364-366 

loud everywhere : the kingfishers hy the waves, the 
swallows round the house, the swan by the river's 
brink, the nightingale in the grove. If the foliage 
of plants rejoices, and the earth flourishes, and the 
shepherd pipes, and the fleecy flocks disport them- 
selves, and sailors sail, and Dionysus dances, and the 
birds sing, and the bees bring forth, how should a 
singer too not sing beautifully in the spring? 

364.— NESTOR OF LARANDA 

Pour for me, Muses, a draught of clear delightful 
song, the rain of Heliconian melody sweetened by 
your lips. For all for whom is shed the drink of the 
fountain that gives birth to poets delight in the clear 
song of your verses. 1 

365.— THE EMPEROR JULIAN 
On an Organ 
I see a new kind of reeds. Are they, perchance, 
the wild product of some strange brazen soil ? They 
are not even moved by our winds, but from a cave 
of bull's hide issues a blast and passes into these 
hollow reeds at their root. And a valiant man with 
swift fingers stands touching the notes which play in 
concert with the pipes, and they, gently leaping, 
press the music out of the pipes. 

366. — -Anonymous 
Sayings of the Seven Sages 
I will tell you in verse the cities, names, and say- 
ings of the seven sages. Cleobulus of Lindus said 
that measure was best ; Chilon in hollow Lacedaemon 

1 Evidently a fragment. 

199 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

Χιλων δ' iv κοίΧη Αακεδαίμονι, Τνώθι σε αυτόν, 
ος δε Κόρινθον εναιε Χόλου κ ρατέειν ΐίερίανδρος. 
Υίιττακός, Ουδέν ay αν, ος εην γένος εκ λίυτίλτ;- 
νης. 5 

Τέρμα δ' όραν βίότοιο, Χό\ων ίεραΐς iv 'Αθήναις. 
Ύούς πΧέονας κακ'ιους δε Βία? άπέφηνε ΤΙριηνεύς. 
I&yyvifv φεύγειν δε ΘαΧής ΝιΧήσιος ηύδα. 

367.— ΛΟΤΚΙΑΝΟΤ 2ΑΜ02ΑΤΕΩ2 

Τον πατρικόν πΧοϋτον νέος ων ®ήρων ό Μενίππου 

αίσχρώς eh ακρατείς εξέχεεν δαπανάς• 
άλλα μιν Έιύκτήμων, πατρικός φίΧος, ως ενόησεν 

ηδη καρφαΧέη τειρόμενον πενί-η, 
και μιν δακρυχέων άνεΧάμβανε, και ποσιν αυτόν 5 

θήκε θυγατρός έής, πόΧΧ' eVi μείΧια δούς. 
αύταρ επεϊ Θήρωνα περί φρένας ήΧυθε πΧούτος, 

αύτίκα ταΐς ανταΐς ετρέφετ εν δαπάναις, 
γαστρϊ χαριζόμενος πάσαν χάριν ου κατά κόσμον, 

τί} θ' υπό την μιαράν γαστέρα μαργοσύνη. 10 

οϋτως μεν %ήρωνα το δεύτερον άμφεκάΧυψεν 

ούΧομένης πενίης κύμα πάΧιρρόθιον. 
Έίύκτήμων δ' εδάκρυσε το δεύτερον, ούκέτι κεΐνον, 

άλλα θυγατρός έής προίκα τε και θάΧομον. 
εγνω δ' ως ουκ εστί κακώς κεχρημένον άνδρα 15 

τοις ιδίοις είναι πιστόν εν άΧΧοτρίοις. 

368.— ΙΟΤΛΙΑΝΟΤ ΒΑ2ΙΛΕΩ2 

Τι? πόθεν εις Διόνυσε; μα yap τον άΧηθέα Έάκχον, 
ου σ' επιγιγνώσκω' τον Διός οίδα μόνον. 

κείνος νέκταρ οδωδε' συ δε τράγου, η ρά σε ΚελτοΙ 
τΐι πενίτ) βοτρύων τεϋξαν απ' άσταχύων. 

2 0Q 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 367-368 

said "Know thyself;" and Periander, who dwelt in 
Corinth, " Master anger ; " Pittacus, who was from 
Mytilene, said " Naught in excess ; " and Solon, in 
holy Athens, " Look at the end of life " ; Bias of 
Priene declared that most men are evil, and Thales 
of Miletus said "Shun suretyship." 

367.— LUCIAN 

Thbro, the son of Menippus, in his youth wasted 
his inheritance shamefully on prodigal outlay ; but 
Euctemon, his father's friend, when he saw that he 
was already pressed by parching poverty, strove with 
tears to cheer him, and gave him his daughter to 
wife with a large dowry. But when wealth got 
the better of Thero's wits, he began to live again in 
the same extravagance, satisfying disgracefully every 
lust of his vile belly and the parts beneath it. Thus 
the returning wave of baneful poverty buried Thero 
the second time, and Euctemon wept a second time, 
not for Thero, but for his daughter's dowry and 
bed, and learnt that a man who has made ill use 
of his own substance will not make honest use 
of another's. 

368.— THE EMPEROR JULIAN 

On Beer 

Who and whence art thou, Dionysus ? For, by 

the true Bacchus, I know thee not : I know only 

the son of Zeus. He smells of nectar, but thou of 

billy-goat. Did the Celts for lack of grapes make 

201 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

τω σε χρη καΧεειν Δημήτριον, ου Διόνυσον, δ 

πυρογενή μαΧΧον καϊ Ίάρόμον, ου Βρόμιον. 

3G9.— ΚΤΡΙΛΛΟΤ 

ΥΙάγκαΧόν εστ επίγραμμα το δίστιχον ην δε παρεΧθγς 
τους τρεις, ραψωδεΐς, κούκ επίγραμμα Χεγεις. 

370.— ΤΙΒΕΡΙΟΤ ΙΛΛΟΤ2ΤΡΙΟΤ 

Ου κύνες, ου στάΧικές με κατήνυσαν, ουχί κυνηγοί 

δορκάδα' τον δ' άπο γης είν άΧΪ πΧήσα μόρον. 
εξ ΰΧης πόντω γαρ ενεδραμον είτα με πΧεκταϊ 

εΧξαν eV αίγιαΧούς δικτυβόΧων παγίδες. 
ηΧιτον η χερσοιο μάτην φυγάς• ούδ' αδίκως με δ 

εΐΧε σαγηνευτής τάμα, Χιπούσαν ορη. 
ούποτ άγρης, άΧιήες, ετ άστογον οΐσετε χείρα, 

χερσω και πεΧάγει κοινά πΧέκοντες ύφη. 

371.— ΑΛΗΛΟΝ 

Αίκτυον εκθρώσκοντα ποΧύπΧοκον άρτι Χαγωον 

σεύε κύων θερμοϊς ϊχνεσιν ώκυπόδην. 
τρηχυν ό δ' εκνεύσας ταχινως πάγον, ες βαθύ πόντου 

ήλατ άΧυσκάζων κύμα παρακτίδιον. 
είνάΧιος τον δ' άιψα κύων βρυχηδον οδούσιν δ 

μάρψε. κυσιν τΧημων ην άρ οφειΧομενος. 



1 "Bromus" is the Gi'eek for oats ; Bromius is a common 
title of Dionysus, derived probably from " bromus " = noise. 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 369-371 

thee out of corn ? Then thou shouldst be called 
Demetrius, not Dionysus, being born of corn, rather 
than of the fire, and Bromus l rather than Bromius. 

369.— CYRILLUS 

An epigram of two lines has every merit, and if 
you exceed three lines it is rhapsody, not epigram. 

370.— TIBERIUS ILLUSTRIS 

1 am a fawn slain by no dogs, or stake-nets, or 
huntsmen, but in the sea I suffered the fate that 
threatened me on land. For I rushed into the sea 
from the wood, and then the netted snare of the 
fishermen dragged me up on the beach. I was wrong 
in flying, and all in vain, from the shore, and de- 
servedly was taken by the fisherman after I had 
deserted my hills. Never again, fishermen, shall 
your hands be unsuccessful, since you now knit web? 
that serve both for sea and land. 

371. — Anonymous 

(cp. No. 17 J.) 

A hound was pressing hotly on a swift-footed hare 
that had just freed itself from the toils of the net. 
The hare, rapidly turning away from the rough hill, 
leapt, to avoid the dog's jaws, into the deep water 
near the shore, where a sea-dog with one snap caught 
it at once in his teeth. The poor hare was evidently 
destined to be dog's meat. 

In irvpoyevri, "wheat-born," there is a play on irvpoyevrj, 
" fire-born." 

203 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

372.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Αεπτον ΰφηναμενα ραΒινοΐς υπο ποσσιν άράγνα 
rirriya σκοΧιαΐς ενΒετον είχε Trayaa. 

αλλ' ου μαν Χεπταΐσιν επαιάζοντα ποΒίστραις 
τον φιΧαοιΒον ΙΒών παιΒα παρετρόχασα• 

Χύσας δ' εκ βρογίΒων άπεκούφισα, καϊ τόδ' ελεξα' 5 
" %ώζου μουσείω (pOeyyo μένος κεΧάΒω." 

373.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Ύίπτε μ€ τον φιΧερημον άναιΒέϊ ποιμένες ay ρ η 

reTTiya Βροσερών εΧκετ άπ' άκρεμόνων, 
την Νυμφών παροΒΐτιν άηΒόνα, κήματι μεσσω 

ουρεσι καϊ σκιεραΐς ξουθα ΧαΧεΰντα νάπαις; 
ήνίΒε και κίχΧην καϊ κόσσυφον, ήνίΒε τόσσους 5 

ψαράς, άρουραίης άρπαγας εύπορίης• 
καρπών ΒηΧητήρας ελεΐν θέμις' οΧΧυτ εκείνους' 

φυΧΧων καϊ χΧοερής τις φθόνος εστί Βράσου; 

374.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

'Αεναον Καθαρήν με πάρεργο μενοισιν όΒίταις 

ττηγην άμβΧύζει yειτovεoυσa νάπψ 
πάντη δ' ευ πΧατάνοισι καϊ ήμεροθηΧεσι Βάφναις 

εστεμμαι, σκιερην ψυχομένη κΧισίην 
τοΰνεκα μη με θερευς παραμείβεο' Βίψαν άΧαΧκών δ 

άμπαυσον παρ εμοϊ καϊ κόπον ήσυγίη. 
J. Α. Pott, Greek Love So7ig3 and Epigrams, ii. p. 136. 

375.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Τις ποτ άκηΒέστως οίνοτρόφον ομφακα Βάκχου 
άνηρ άμπεΧίνου κΧήματος έξεταμεν, 

204 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 372-375 

372. — Anonymous 

The spider, that had woven her fine web with her 
slender feet, had caught a cicada in her crooked 
meshes. But when I saw the little songster lamenting 
in the fine toils I did not pass hastily by, but freeing 
him from the nooses, I comforted him and said : 
" Be saved, thou who callest with the musical voice." 

373. — Anonymous 

Why, shepherds, in wanton sport, do you pull 
from the dewy branches me, the cicada, the lover of 
the wilds, the roadside nightingale of the Muses, 
who at midday chatter shrilly on the hills and in the 
shady copses ? Look at the thrushes and blackbirds ! 
Look at all the starlings, pilferers of the country's 
wealth ! It is lawful to catch the despoilers of the 
crops. Slay them. Do you grudge me my leaves 
and fresh dew ? 

374. — Anonymous 

From the neighbouring grove I, ever-flowing Pure 
Fount, gush forth for passing travellers. On all sides, 
well canopied by planes and softly blooming laurels, 
I offer a cool resting-place under the shade. There- 
fore pass me not by in summer. Dispel thy thirst 
and rest thee, too, from toil in peace beside me. 



375. — Anonymous 

What man thus carelessly plucked from the vine- 
branch the unripe grapes of Bacchus that nurse the 

205 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

χείΧεα δε στυφθεις από μιν βάΧεν, ώς αν όδίταις 

εϊη νισσομενοις ημιδακες σκύβαΧον; 
εϊη οι Διόνυσος άνάρσιος, ola Χυκούρ^ος 5 

οττι \μιν αύξομέναν εσβεσεν εύφροσύναν. 
τούδε yap αν τάχα τις δια πώματος η προς άοιδας 

ηΧυθεν, η yoepov κάδεος εσχβ Χύσιν. 

376.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Ύίπτε με την άνέμοισιν άΧώσιμον, ηΧεε τεκτον, 
τήνδε πίτνν τεύχεις νήα θαΧασσοπόρον, 

ουδ' οίωνόν εδεισας; 6 τοι Βορεης μ εδίωξεν 
iv χθονί' πώς ανέμους φεύξομαι iv πεΧι'^ει; 

377.— ΠΑΛΛΑΔΑ 

Τάνταλος ούδεν ετρω<γ€' τινασσομενων yap ύπερθεν 

καρπός ύπερ κεφαΧής αύτον εφευyε φυτών, 
και δια τούτο τροφής κεχρημενος ήττον εδίψα' 

el δε καϊ €τρω<γεν σύκα π έπαινο μένα, 
και βραβύΧους καϊ μήΧα, τι τηΧίκον άνοράσι νεκροΐς 5 

δίψος από χΧωρών γίνεται ιίκροδρύων; 
ημείς δ' εσθ'ιομεν κεκΧημενοι άΧμυρα πάντα, 

χεννια, και τυρούς, χηνός άΧιστα Χίπη, 
όρνια και μόσχεια' μίαν δ' επιπίνομεν αύτοΐς. 

πάσχομεν ούκούν σεύ, ΎάνταΧε, πικρότερα. 10 

378.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Άνδροφόνω σαθρον πάρα τειχίον ύπνώοντι 

νυκτός επιστήναι φασι %άραπιν όναρ, 
και χρησ μωοήσαι' " Κατακείμενος ούτος, άνίστω, 

και κοιμώ μεταβάς, ώ τάΧας, άΧΧαχόθιϊ' 

2θ6 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 376-378 

wine, and when his lips were drawn up by the taste 
threw them away, half-chewed refuse for travellers 
to tread on ? May Dionysus be his foe, because, like 
Lycurgus, he quenched good cheer in its growth. 
Haply by that drink had some man been moved to 
song, or found relief from plaintive grief. 



376. — Anonymous 

Why, foolish carpenter, dost thou make of me, the 
pine-tree that am the victim of the winds, a ship to 
travel over the seas, and dreadest not the omen ? 
Boreas persecuted me on land ; so how shall I escape 
the winds at sea ? 

377.— PALLADAS 

Tantalus ate nothing, for the fruit of the trees 
that tossed over his head ever eluded him, and owing 
to this, being in want of food, he was less thirsty ; 
but suppose he had eaten ripe figs, and plums, and 
apples, do dead men get so very thirsty from eating 
fresh fruit? But we guests eat all sorts of salted 
dishes, quails and cheese and goose's fat, poultry and 
veal, and on the top of all drink only one glass. So 
we are worse off than you, Tantalus. 

378. — By the Same 

They say that Sarapis appeared in a dream by 
night to a murderer who was sleeping under a de- 
cayed wall, and thus spoke as in an oracle : " Arise, 
thou who liest here, and seek, poor wretch, another 
sleeping place." The man awoke and departed, and 

207 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

δ<? δε ΒινίτνίσθΐΙς μετέβη, το δε σαθρον εκείνο 5 

τειχίον εξαίφνης ευθύς εκείτο χαμαι. 
σώστρα δ' εωθεν εθυε θεοϊς χαίρων ο κακούργος, 

ηδεσθαι νομίσας τον θεον άνδροφονοις. 
αλλ' 6 Έ,άραπις 'έχρησε πάλιν, δια νυκτός επιστάς' 

" Κ,ήδεσθαί με δοκεΐς, άθΧιε, των άδικων; 10 

el μη νυν σε μεθήκα θανεϊν, θάνατον μεν άΧυττον 

νυν έφυγες, σταυρω δ' ϊσθι φυΧαττομενος? 

379.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Φασι τταροιμιακως' " Και/ ύς δάκοι άνδρα ττονηρόν 
άλλα τόδ' ούχ ούτω φημϊ ττροσήκε Χέ<γειν 

άλλα " Δάκοι καν ύς αγαθούς καϊ άπράγμονας άνδρας, 
τον δέ κακόν δεδιως δήξεται ούδε δράκων. 

380.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Ει κύκνω δύναται κόρυδος τταραττΧησιον αδειν, 

τοΧμωεν δ' ερίσαι σκωττες άηδονίσιν, 
ει κόκκυξ τεττιγος ερεϊ Χιγυρώτερος είναι, 

Ισα ττοεϊν καϊ ε'γώ Παλλαδιω δυναμαι. 

381.— ΟΜΗΡΟΚΕΝΤΡΩΝ 

Εις Αίανδρον και Ηρώ 

Άκτη επί προύχουση, εττϊ ττΧατει ΚΧΧησποντω, 
παρθένος αΐδοίη ύπερώϊον εισαναβάσα 
ττύργω εφειστηκει γοοωσα τε μυρομενη τε• 
χρύσεον Χυχνον έχουσα, φάος ττερικαΧΧες εττοίει, 
κεΐνον οίο μένη τον κάμμορον, εϊ πόθεν εΧθοι 5 

νηχόμενος — καϊ Χαΐτμα τάχισθ άΧος έκπεράασκε 

2θ8 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 379-381 

immediately the rotten Avail fell to the ground. The 
evil-doer rejoiced, and in the morning sacrificed to the 
gods in thanks for his escape, thinking that Sarapis 
is pleased with murderers. But Sarapis appeared to 
him again at night, and prophesied thus to him : 
" Wretch, dost thou think that I protect criminals ? 
If I did not let thee be killed now, it is that thou 
now hast escaped a painless death ; but know that 
thou art reserved for the cross." 



379. — Bv the Same 

The proverb says, " Even a pig would bite a bad 
man ; " but I say that we should not say that, but 
" Even a pig would bite simjxle unmeddlesome men, 
but even a snake would be afraid to bite a bad man." 



380. — Anonymous 

If a lark can sing like a swan and if owls dare 
compete with nightingales, if a cuckoo asserts he is 
more sweet-voiced than a cicada, then I too can 
equal Palladius. 

381.— A HOxMERIC CENTO 

On Hero and Leander 

On a projecting shore on the broad Hellespont a 
modest maiden, having mounted to an upper chamber, 
stood in the tower lamenting and wailing. Holding 
a golden lamp she gave beautiful light, brooding on 
that unhappy man, would he come or not swimming. 
— And he swiftly passed across the depth of the sea, 

209 

VOL. HI. Ρ 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

νύκτα δι άμβροσίην, ore #' εύδουσι βροτοι άλ\οι• 

ρόγθει yap p,e<ya κύμα ποτϊ ξερον ηπείροιο. 

οσσαι yap νύκτες τε καϊ ημεραι eKyeyaaai, 

παρθένος ήίθεός τ οαρίζετον ά\λή\οισιν, 10 

εις εννην φοιτώντε, φί\ους Χήθοντε τοκήας, 

οι Χηστον καϊ "Αβυδον έχον και δϊαν Άρίσβην. 



382.— ΟΜΗΡΟΚΕΝΤΡΩΝ 

Ό πρώτος Ηχουξ άκουσας 

*Ω φίΧοι, ήρωες Δαναοί, θεράποντες "Αρηος, 
ψεύσομαι, ή ετυμον έρέω; κεΚεται δε με θυμός, 
aypov επ εσχατιής, οθι δένδρεα μακρά πεφύκει, 
ναίει εύπΧόκαμος δεινή θεός αύδηεσσα, 
ή θεός, ι)ε yvvi'y τοϊ δε φθέyyovτo καΧεΰντες. 
ει δε φθεyζaμέvoυ του ή αύδήσαντος άκούστ}, 
αντις άριζήΧως ει ρη μένα μυθo\oyεύει. 
αλλά τίη τοι ταύτα διεξέρχεσθαι έκαστα; 
την δ' ούτ άθρήσαι δύναμ άντίον, ούτε νοήσαι. 
όπποΐόν κ εΙπ\]σθα έπος, τοϊον κ επακουσαις. 

383.— MHNES ΑΙΓΤΠΤΙΩΝ 

Πρώτο? %ωθ εδάη δρεπάνην επί βότρυν εyείpειv. 
ίχθυβοΧοισι Φαωφϊ φέρει πανδήμων aypi]v. 
ϊΐΧηϊάδων φαίνουσαν Άθύρ τεκμαίρεται ώρην. 
Χοιάκ σπειρομένων σταχυών δείκνυσι yεvέθ\ηv. 
Ύνβϊ δε πορφύρεον βουΧηφόρον el μα τιταίνει. 
σημαίνει πΧωτήρσι Μ,εχειρ πΧόον άμφιπο\εύϊ\ν. 
"Αρεος 6π\α φέρειν Φαμενωθ δείκνυσι μαχηταις. 
είαρινών Φαρμουθϊ ρόδων πpωτάyyε\oς εστί' 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 382-383 

through the ambrosial night when other mortals 
sleep, for a great wave surged towards the dry land 
of the continent. For as many days and nights as 
pass, the young man and maiden converse with each 
other, going to bed together without the knowledge 
of their dear parents, who inhabit Sestos, and Abydus, 
and divine Arisbe. 

382. — Another 

0?i the Theme "He who Jirst heard Echo" 

Friends, Danaan heroes, servants of Ares, shall I 
lie or speak the truth, as my heart bids me ? At 
the utmost border of the land where the tall trees 
grow lives a fair-haired dreadful goddess gifted 
with speech, either a goddess or a woman, and they 
called aloud on her. If she hear one call or speak, 
she excellently repeats what was spoken. But why 
narrate all this to thee in detail ? Only I cannot 
look on her face or perceive her. Whatever kind of 
word thou speakest the like shalt thou hear. 

383.— THE EGYPTIAN MONTHS 

First Thoth learnt to uplift the hook to prune the 
grapes ; Phaophi brings to fishermen a catch of every 
variety ; Athyr indicates the date of the appearance 
of the Pleiads ; Choiac shows the birth of the sown 
crops ; Tybi displays the purple robe ; x Mecheir 
bids sailors prepare for a voyage ; Phamenoth trains 
warriors in the use of arms ; Pharmouthi is the first 
1 i.e. the consuls are then elected. 

211 
p 2 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

\j]ia δ' αύανθεντα ΤΙ α χω ν Βρεπάνησι φυΧάσσεί' 
ενκάρπον Βε ΥΙαννι προάγγεΧός εστίν οπώρης' 10 
καϊ σταφυΧην κατέχων εύάμπεΧός εστίν Έπη φι' 
καϊ Μέσο pi Ναλοίο φέρει φυσίζοον ΰΒωρ. 

384.— ΜΗΝΕ2 ΡΩΜΑΙΩΝ 

Έ£ εμεθεν Χνκάβαντος νπηεΧίοιο θύρετρα, 

Ανσονίης <θ'> χ νψος Βερκεται Ήε'λίο?. 
αντάρ εγώ θαμινησι γύην νιφάΒεσσι Βιαίνω, 

τευχών είαρινής εγκυον άγΧαιης. 
άρχετ "Αρης απ' εμεϊο, καϊ άνθεα και γΧάγος ηΒύ' 5 

ϊση δ' είκοστω ηματι νύξ τεΧεθει. 
εντύνοι τήμόσΒε φυτοσκάφος, ερνεα τάμνων, 

ρίζη επ 1 άγροτερη ήμερον άκρεμόνα. 
οιγεται άρτι θάλασσα' εφοπΧιζοιτε Be νήας• 

ωριον άκΧυστων έκτος άγειν Χιμενων. 10 

μβσσάτιος ρόΒου είμϊ καϊ άργεννοΐο κρίνοιο, 

και ξανθής κεράσου βρίθομαι άκρεμόσιν. 
Καρκίνον Ήελίο? μετανίσσεται' άστάχυας Be 

καρφαΧεους κε'ιρει γειοπόνος Βρεπανη. 
κρίνω ε'γώ Δηω και άχυρμιάς' εν Be Αεοντι 15 

άτρεκεα τεΧεθει χεύματα ΝηϊάΒων. 
βρίθω εγώ σταφυΧη, βρίθω Β επι πάση οπώρη' 

αύθις δ' ίσοπαΧης γίνεται ηματι νύξ. 
τις δε κ εμεϊο πεΧοι γΧυκερωτερος, ος μεθυ χεύω, 

Χηνω επει κατάγω ϋάκχον απ οινοπεΒου; 20 

e'i τοι ' Αθηναίης πελει ερνεα, ωριον ηΒη 

καρπον άποθΧίβειν, μνήστιν εχειν καμάτων, 
παύσασθαι νειοΰ κεΧομαι• γΧαγόωντι γαρ ηΒη 

σπερματι ριγεΒανη πηγνΧις άντιάσεΐ. 
1 I insert 0*. 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAM 384 

herald of the roses of spring ; Pachon keeps for the 
sickle the ripened corn ; Payni is the herald of fruit- 
ful autumn ; Epephi, who blesses the vine, holds a 
bunch of grapes ; and Mesori brings the vivifying 
water of Nile. 

384.— THE ROMAN MONTHS 

January: From me opens the door of the solar 
year and the sun looks on the supreme magistrates 
of Italy. 1 February : I wet the land with thick 
snowflakes, making it pregnant with the splendour 
of spring. March : Mars begins from me, and 
flowers and sweet milk, and on my twentieth day 
night and day are equal. April : Let the gardener 
now cut shoots and graft tame branches on wild 
stems. May : Now the sea is open ; equip the 
ships ; it is time to sail them out of the untroubled 
harbours. June : I am half way between the rose and 
white lily, and I am heavy with branches of yellow 
cherries. July : The Sun crosses Cancer, and the hus- 
bandman with his sickle cuts the ripe ears. August : 
I separate the corn from the straw, and in Leo the 
fountains of the Naiads are at their purest. September: 
I am heavy with grapes and all kinds of fruit, and 
again night and day become equal. October : Who 
can be sweeter than me, who pour forth wine when 
I bring Bacchus from the vineyard to the press ? 
November : If thou hast Pallas' olive-trees it is time 
to press the fruit and remember thee of labour. 
December : I bid thee cease from ploughing the 
fallow land, for the frosts will injure the milky 
seeds. 

1 The consuls. 

213 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 
385.— 2ΤΕΦΑΝΟΤ ΓΡΑΜΜΑΤΙΚΟΤ 

Άκρόστιχα eh την Ίλιάδα κατά ραψωδιαν 

"Αλφα λιτά? Χρυσού, Χοιμον στρατού, εχθος άνάκτων, 

Β/)τα δ' ονειρον έχει, άγορήν, και νήας αριθμεί. 

Υάμμα δ' αρ άμφ' 'Ελένης οϊοις μάθος εστίν άκοίταις. 

Δέλτα θεών άγορή, όρκων χύσις, άρεος αρχή. 

Ει, βάΧΧει Κυθέρειαν "Αρηά τε Ύυδέος υιός• 5 

Ζήτα δ' άρ' Ανδρομάχης και "Κκτορός έστ υαριστύς. 

τ Ητα δ', Αία? ποΧέμιζε μόνω μόνος "Εκτορι δίω. 

Θ?}τα, θέων ayopt), Ύρώων κράτος, ' Ε,κτορος ευχος. 

έξεσίη δ' ΆχιΧήος άπειθέος εστίν Ιώτα• 

Κάππα δ' άρ αμφοτέρων σκοπιαζέμεν ήΧυθον 

άνδρες. 10 

Αάμβδα δ\ άριστήας Δαναών βάΧον 'Έκτορος άνδρες. 
ΜΟ Ύρώων παΧάμησι κατήριπε τείχος Αχαιών. 
NO δε, ΤΙοσειδάων Ααναοΐς κράτος ώττασε Χάθρη. 
Ξι, Κρονίδην Χεχέεσσι συν ΰπνω τ ήπαφεν'Ήρη. 
Ου, Κ,ρονίδης κεχόΧωτο ΐίοσειδάωνι και "Hpy. 15 

Πι, ΐϊάτροκΧον επεφνεν άρήϊον "Κκτορος αιχμή. 
'Ρω, Δαναοί Ύρώές τε νέκυν περί χείρας εμισηον. 
%1<γμα, Θετι? ΆχιΧήϊ trap Ηφαίστου φ^.ρεν οττΧα' 
Ύαΰ δ\ άπέΧηγε χόΧοιο, και εκθορε δΐος ΆχιΧΧεύς. 
*Τ, μακάρων ερις ώρτο, φέρει δ' επί κάρτος 

Άχαιοΐς. 20 

Φι, κρατερώς κατά χεύματ εδάμνατο Τρώας ' ΑχιΧ- 

Χεύς. 
Xt δ' άρα, τρϊς περί τείχος άηων κτάνεν "Έικτορ* 

ΆχιΧΧεύς' 
"Ψϊ, Ααναοΐσιν άηώνα διδούς ετέΧεσσεν ΆχιΧΧεύς. 
τ ί1, Τίριάμω νέκυν υΐα Χαβών ηέρα δώκεν ΆχιΧΧεύς. 

214 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAM 385 

385.— STEPHANUS THE GRAMMARIAN 

Contents of the Books of the "Iliad" 

Alpha contains the prayers of Chryses, the plague 
in the army and the quarrel of the kings. Beta has 
the dream and the Council, and numbers the ships. 
Gamma is the single combat for Helen between her 
husbands. Delta the Council of the gods, the break- 
ing of the oaths, and beginning of the fight. In 
Epsilon the son of Tydeus wounds C'vtherea and 
Ares. Zeta is the converse between Hector and 
Andromache. In Eta Ajax fights in single combat 
with divine Hector. Theta is the Council of the gods, 
the Trojans' victory, and Hector's boast. Iota is the 
embassy to stubborn Achilles. In Kappa men go out 
from both sides to reconnoitre. In Lambda Hector's 
men wound the chiefs of the Greeks. In My the 
Achaeans' wall falls by the hands of the Trojans. In 
Ny Poseidon secretly gives victory to the Greeks. 
In Xi Hera befools Zeus by love and sleep. In Omi- 
cron Zeus is enraged with Poseidon and Hera. In Pi 
the spear of Hector slays warlike Patroclus. In Ro 
the Greeks and Trojans are engaged round the corpse. 
In Sigma Thetis brings arms to Achilles from He- 
phaestus. In Tau divine Achilles leaves off his wrath 
and dashes forth. In Ypsilon there is strife among 
the gods, but it brings victory to the Greeks. In 
Phi Achilles subdues the Trojans at the river by his 
might. In Chi Achilles slays Hector after chasing 
him thrice round the Avail. In Psi Achilles celebrates 
the games he gives the Greeks. In Omega Achilles 
accepts presents and gives up to Priam his son's 
body. 

215 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



386.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 



Ά Κ,ύπρις πρωαν ηυμνάν σ εβόασεν ιδοΰσα• 
" Φευ, φευ, πώς σταγόνων εκτοθεν Ουρανίων, 

ζαΧώσας ώδϊνα %αΧάσσας, ό θρασύς α,ΧΧαν 
Νείλο? άπο ^Χυκερών Κύπριν ανήκε βυθών; 

387.— ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟΤ KAI2APOS, οι δε ΓΕΡΜΑ- 
ΝΙΚΟΤ 

' Έικτορ, Αρήϊον αίμα, κατά χθονος ει που ακούεις, 
χαίρε, καϊ άμπνευσον βαιον ύπερ πατρίδος. 

"ΐΧιον οικείται κΧεινη πόΧις, άνδρας έχουσα 
σου μεν άφαυροτερους, αλλ' έ'τ' άρηϊφίΧους' 

Μυρμιδόνες δ' άπόΧοντο. παρίστασο, και λεγ' 

Ά^ίλλεΐ 5 

%εσσαΧίην κεϊσθαι πάσαν ύπ' Αίνεάδαις. 

388, 389 

Προς ταντα νπέγραψΐ στρατιώτης' φα.σΐ δι. Τραϊανού (ΐναι. 

%άρσυνοΐ' ου <γαρ εμής κόρυθος Χεύσσουσι μέτωπον. 

Είτα τον Βασιλέως ίπαινέσαντος, και γράψαντος " \η\ωσόν 
μοι τις eT," άντίγραψεν 

Έίμϊ μεν εύθώρηκος ΈνυαΧίου ποΧεμιστής• 
είμϊ δε καϊ θεράπων ΈΧικωνίου ΆπόΧΧωνος, 
αύτοϊς εν πρώτοισι ΧεΧε<γμένος άσπιδιώταις. 

390.— ΜΕΝΕΚΡΑΤΟΤ2 SMTPNAIOT 

ΥΙαισιν επϊ προτεροις ήδη τρίτον εν πυρί μήτηρ 
θεϊσα, καϊ άπΧήστω δαίμονι μεμφομενη, 

1 For the birth of Aphrodite from the blood of Uranus see 
Hesiod, Theog. 188 ff. 

2l6 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 386-390 

386. — Anonymous 

Cypris, of late, on seeing thee naked, exclaimed : 
" Oh ! Oh ! look how impudent Nile, envying the 
sea's parentage, has, without the blood of Uranus, 1 
sent up another Cypris from his sweet depths." 

387.— THE EMPEROR HADRIAN, 
Or, as others state, GERMANICUS 

Hector of the race of Ares, if thou hearest where'er 
thou art under ground, hail ! and stay a little thy 
sighs for thy country. Ilion is inhabited, and is a 
famous city containing men inferior to thee, but still 
lovers of war, while the Myrmidons have perished. 
Stand by his side and tell Achilles that all Thessaly 
is subject to the sons of Aeneas. 2 

388, 389 

Under the above a soldier {some say Trajan) wrote : 
" They are bold, for they look not on the face of my 
helmet." 3 When the Emperor praised this and wrote 
" Reveal who you are," he replied : I am a soldier 
of cuirassed Mars and also a servant of Heliconian 
Apollo, chosen among the first men-at-arms. 

390.— MENECRATES OF SMYRNA 

A mother who had laid on the pyre her third 
child after losing the others too, reviling insatiate 



2 Troy was restored by Julius and Augustus. 

3 II. xvi. 70. Achilles is the speaker. 



217 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

τέτρατον άλγος έτικτε, καϊ ουκ άνέμεινεν άδήΧους 
εΧπίδας, εν δε πνρϊ ζωόν εθηκε βρέφος, 

"Ου θρέψω" Χέξασα' "τί yap πΧέον; Αϊοΐ μαστοί 5 
κάμνετε' κερδήσω πένθος άμοχθότερον." 

391.— ΔΙΟΤΙΜΟΤ 

Ύάν ηβαν ες άεθΧα πάΧας ησκησε κραταιάς 

άδε Ποσειδώνος καϊ Διός ά γενεά, 
κείται δέ σφιν άγων ου χάΧκεος άμφι Χέβητος, 

αλλ' όστις ζωάν οΐσεται η θάνατον. 
'Ανταίου το πτώμα' πρέπει δ' ΊϊρακΧέα νικαν 5 

τον Διός. \\ργείων ά πάΧα, ου Αιβύων. 

392.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Ει' τις άπάγζασθαι μεν όκνεΐ, θανάτου Β' επιθυμεί, 
εξ Ιεράς ΥΙόΧεως ψυχρόν νδωρ πιέτω. 

393.— ΠΑΛΛΑΔΑ 

ΟύδεΙ? και καθαρός και μείΧιχος ήΧυθεν άρχων 
ev yap ένος δοκέει δόγματος άντίπαΧον 

το γ\υκύ του κΧέπτοντος, ΰπερφιάΧου δε το άγνόν. 
όργανα τ?)ς αρχής ταύτα δυ εστί πάθη. 

394.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Χ/ουσε, πάτερ κοΧάκων, οδύνης και φροντίδος υιέ, 
καϊ το εχειν σε, φόβος' και μη εχειν σ , οδύνη. 

395.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

" Ώς ουδέν γΧύκιον ης πατρίδος," ειπεν 'Οδυσσεύς• 
εν γαρ τοις Κίρκης εκχυτον ουκ εφαγεν, 

2ΐ8 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 391-395 

Death, on giving birth to a fourth sorrow would not 
wait, nourishing uncertain hope, but threw the child 
alive in the fire. " I will nob rear it," she said. 
" What profits it ? My paps, ye toil for Hades. I 
shall gain mourning with less trouble." 

391.— DIOTIMUS 

This son of Poseidon and the son of Zeus trained 
their youthful limbs for stubborn wrestling bouts. 
The contest is no brazen one for a caldron, but for 
which shall gain death or life. Antaeus has got the 
fall, and it was fit that Heracles, the son of Zeus, 
should win. Wrestling is Argive, not Libyan. 1 

392. — Anonymous 

If anyone is afraid of hanging himself, but wants 
to die, let him drink cold water from Hierapolis. 

393.— PALLADAS 

No magistrate ever came here who was both clean- 
handed and mild ; for the one principle seems an- 
tagonistic to the other. Mildness is a virtue of the 
thief, and purity a virtue of the proud. These 
qualities are the two instruments of government. 

394. — By the Same 

Gold, father of flatterers, son of pain and care, 
it is fear to have thee and pain not to have thee. 

395. — By the Same 

Odysseus said "nothing is sweeter than a man's 
fatherland," 2 for in Circe's isle he never ate cheese- 
1 Antaeus was Libyan. 2 Odyss. i. 34. 

219 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

ου μόνον ει καϊ καπνον άποθρώσκοντ ενοησεν ί 
εϊπεν αν οίμώζ€ΐν καϊ Βεκα ΤίηνεΧόπαις. 

396.— ΠΑΤΛΟΤ ΣΙΛΕΝΤΙΑΡΙΟΤ 

Όρθριος ευπΧεκτοιο Χίνου νεφοειΒεϊ κόΧπω 
εμπεσε συν κί~χ\η κόσσυφος ηΒυβοας. 

καϊ τάν μεν πανάφυκτος εΧε βρόχος' ώκυ δ' άπεπτα 
εξ ορνιθοπεΒας ωΒος ερημοφίΧας. 

η τάχα που τριμάκαιρα φιΧα^ρετις ορνιν άοιΒον 5 
"Αρτεμις εύμόΧπω Χυσεν άνακτι Χύρης. 

397.— ΠΑΛΛΑΔΑ 

Φεΰγε Αάκων ποτέ Βήριν υπαντιάσασα he μητηρ 

είπε, κατά στέρνων αορ άνασχομενη• 
" Ζώων μεν σεο μητρϊ διαμπερές αίσχος άνάπτεις, 

καϊ κρατερής Σπάρτης πάτρια θεσμά Χύεις' 
ην Βε θάνης παΧάμησιν εμαΐς, μητηρ μεν ακούσω 5 

Βύσμορος, αλλ' εν εμη πατρίΒι σωζόμενη." 

398.— ΙΟΤΛΙΑΝΟΤ ΑΠΟ ΤΠΑΤΩΝ 
ΑΙΓΤΠΤΙΟΤ 

ΌΧκάς ΰΒωρ προφυηουσα ποΧνφΧοίσβοιο θαΧάσσης 
εν γθονος άγκοίναις ώΧετο μητριάσιν. 

Ίσταμενην yap πυρσός επεφΧεγε• καιομενη Βε 
Βυσμενεων υΒάτων συμμαχίην έκάΧει. 

399.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

'HiXiov νίκησε τεος νόος ήΒύ φαεινών, 

αίεν απαστράπτων βροτοφεγγεα πάνσοφον αϊηΧην, 

ηΒυφαη, γαρίεσσαν, άπαστράπτουσαν άΧυπως. 

220 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 396-399 

cake. If he had seen even the smoke curling up 
from that/ he would have sent ten Penelopes to the 
deuce. 

396.— PAULUS SILENTIARIUS 
(cp. No. 343) 
One morning a sweet-voiced blackbird, together 
with a field-fare, fell into the cloud-like bag of the 
well-knit net. The field-fare was caught in the noose 
from which there is no escape, but the songster of 
the wilderness flew swiftly away from the trap. It 
would seem that blessed Artemis, the huntress, re- 
leased the singing-bird for the sake of the sweet- 
voiced lord of the lyre. 

397.— PALLADAS 

A Spartan once was flying from the battle, and 
his mother, uplifting a sword to smite his breast, 
exclaimed : " If thou livest, thou dost fix on thy 
mother eternal disgrace, and dost violate the inherited 
laws of mighty Sparta. But if thou dost perish by 
my hand, they will call me an unlucky mother, but 
saved from disgrace together with my country." 

398.— JULIAN, PREFECT OF EGYPT 

A ship that had escaped the waters of the boisterous 
sea, perished in the arms of its mother the earth. 
For fire consumed it where it lay motionless, and as 
it burnt it called for the aid of its foe the water. 

399. — Anonymous 

Thy mind, by its sweet light, conquered the sun, 
ever flashing forth soft brilliance of wisdom to illu- 
minate mortal s, a pleasant and painless splendour. 
1 cp. Odyss. i. 58. 

221 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

400.— ΠΑΛΛΑΔΑ 

Οταν βλέπω σε, προσκυνώ, καϊ τους λόγοι/ς, 
της παρθένου τον οίκον άστρωον βΧέπων 
εις ουρανον <γάρ εστί σου τα, πράγματα, 
'Υπατία σεμνή, των Χόγων εύμορφία, 
ά-χραντον άστρον της σοφής παιδεύσεων. 5 

401.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Ή φύσις έξεΰρεν, φιΧίης θεσμούς αηαπώσα, 
των άποδη μουντών opyava συντυχίης, 

τον κάΧαμυν, χάρτην, το μέΧαν, τα 'χαράγματα χειρός, 
σύμβοΧα της ψνχής τηΧόθεν άχνυμένης. 

402.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 
Τω ναοίς βρίθοντι πόση σπάνις επΧετο τύμβου. 

403.— ΜΑΚΚΙΟΤ 

Αύτος άναξ εμβαινε θοώ πηδήματι, Χηνου 

Χακτιστής, έργου δ' ?)y£o νυκτερίου, 
Χεύκωσαι πόδα ηαΰρον, επίρρωσαι δε χορείην 

Χάτριν, υπέρ κούφων ζωσάμενος γονάτων 
εύηΧωσσον δ' όχέτευε κενούς, μάκαρ, ες πιθεώνας 5 

olvov έπι ψαιστοΐς και Χασίτ) χιμάρω. 

404.— ΑΝΤΙΦΙΛΟΤ 

*Α καΧον αύτοπόνητον εν αιθέρι ρεύμα μεΧισσών, 
καπΧαστοι 'χειρών αύτοπαηεις θαΧάμαι, 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 400-404 

400.— PALLADAS 

Revered Hypatia, 1 ornament of learning, stainless 
star of wise teaching, when I see thee and thy dis- 
course I worship thee, looking on the starry house 
of the Virgin ; for thy business is in heaven. 



401. — By the Same 

Nature, loving the duties of friendship, invented 
instruments by which absent friends can converse, 
pens, paper, ink, handwriting, tokens of the heart 
that mourns afar off. 

402. — Anonymous 
On Pompey tlie Great 
In what sore need of a tomb stood he who possessed 
abundant temples ! 

403.— MACCIUS 
To Dionysus 

Enter the vat thyself, my lord, and tread leaping 
swiftly ; lead the labour of the night. Make naked 
thy proud feet, and give strength to the dance thy 
servant, girt up above thy active knees, and guide, 
Ο blessed one, the sweet-voiced wine into the empty 
casks. So shalt thou receive cakes and a shaggy 
goat. 

404.— ANTIPHILUS 

Ah ! lovely is the liquor of the bees, self-wrought 
in the ether, and the cells self-moulded and not 

1 The celebrated heroine of Kingsley's novel. Palladas 
compares her to the constellation Virgo. 223 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

προίκιος ανθρώπων βιότω χάρις, ούχϊ μακεΧΧας, 
ου βοος, ου γαμψών Βευομενα δρέπανων, 

ηαυΧού δε σμικροΐο, τόθι ηΧυκύ νάμα μεΧισσα 5 

πηγάζει σκηνευς δαψιΧες εξ oXtyov. 

χαίροιτ εύαγεες, καϊ iv άνθεσι ποιμα'ινεσθε, 
αιθέριου πτηναϊ νεκταρος εργάτιδες. 

405.— ΔΙΟΔΩΡΟΤ 

Άδρήστειά σε Βία, καϊ ίχναίη σε φυΧάσσοί 
παρθένος, ή πολλοί"? ψευσαμενη, Νέμεσις. 

δείδια σον τε φυής ερατόν τύπον, ήδε σά, κούρε, 
δήνεα, θεσπεσίης καϊ μένος ηνορεης, 

καϊ σοφίην, καϊ μήτιν επίφρονα. τοιάδε τέκνα, 5 
Δρούσε, πεΧειν μακάρων πευθόμεθ* αθανάτων. 

406.— ΑΝΤΙΓΟΝΟΤ ΚΑΡΤΣΤΙΟΤ 

Άργυρέΐ] κρηνίς με, τον ούκετι μακρά βοώντα 
βάτραχον, οινηραΐς εσχεν υπό σταγόσιν 

κεϊμαι δ' εν Νύμφαις, κείναις φίΧος, ούδε Αυαίω 
εχθρός, υπ* αμφοτέρων Χουόμενος σταγόσιν. 

όψέ ποτ εις Αιόνυσον εκώμασα. φεύ τίνες νδωρ 5 
πίνουσιν, μανίην σώφρονα μαινόμενοι. 

407.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ [2ΙΔΩΝΙΟΤ] 

Δμώϊον Ίπποκράτευς εθανε βρέφος, ες πΧατύ πόντου 
χεΐΧος ηειτοσύνης ερπύσαν εκ καΧνβης, 

1 Probably Drusus the son of Germanicus and brother of 
Nero. 

224 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 405-407 

with hands ; a gift unrequited to the life of men, 
needing no mattock, or oxen, or crooked sickle, but 
only a little vessel into which the bee pours forth 
the sweet stream in abundance from its tiny body. 
Hail ! ye pure creatures ; pasture on the flowers, ye 
winged makers of ethereal nectar. 

405.— DIODORUS 

May holy Adrasteia preserve thee, and Nemesis, 
the maiden who treadeth in our track, she who has 
cheated many. I fear for thy body's lovely form, Ο 
youth ; for thy mental gifts and the strength of thy 
divine courage, for thy learning and thy prudent 
counsel. Such we are told, Drusus, 1 are the children 
of the blessed immortals. 

406.— ANTIGONUS OF CARYSTUS 
On a figure of a Frog placed in a Crater 
I am a frog, now no longer croaking continually, 
placed under the shower of wine from the silver 
spout. 2 I lie in the water, whose friend I am, but 
no enemy to Bacchus, and I am washed by the drops 
of both. Too late in life I went revelling to 
Dionysus. Alas for those who drink water: they 
are mad but with a temperate madness ! 3 

407.— ANTIPATER OF THESSALONICA 

The slave-child of Hippocrates, having crept from 
the neighbouring cottage to the broad edge of the 

2 The spout of the silver vessel from which the wine was 
poured. 

3 Antigonus suggests that he, too, like the frog, had learnt 
wisdom and become a better poet since he had become a 
wine-drinker. 

225 

VOL. III. Q 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

πλεΐον επει μαζών επιεν ποτόν. cppe θάλασσα, 
η βρέφος ως μήτηρ ψεύσαο Βεξαμενη. 

408.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ 

Ειΐθε μ€ παντοίοισιν ετι πΧάζεσθαι άήταις 

η Αητοΐ στήναι μαϊαν άΧωομενη' 
ουκ αν χητοσύνην τόσον εστενον. οι εμε 8ειλι']ν, 

οσσαις 'Ε,ΧΧήνων νηυσϊ παραπΧεομαι, 
ΔήΧος ερημαίη, το πάλαι σέβας, όψέ πη Ήρη 5 

Αητοΰς, αλλ' οίκτρην τήνΰ επεθηκε 8ίκην. 

409.— ΑΝΤΙΦΑΝΟΤ2 

Ει' τίνα μη τέρπει λωτοί) ~\χελυ ς, 1 ή γλυκύς ήχος 
ψαλμών, ή τρίμερων νεκτάρεος Έίρόμιος, 

ή πεύκαι, κώμοι, 2 στέφανοι, μύρα, Χιτα δε Βειπνών 
λαθροπόΒας τρώκταις χ^ρσΧ τίθησι τόκους, 

ούτος εμοϊ τεθνηκε f περί μνήστιν 8ε παρερπω 5 

νεκρόν, ες άΧΧοτρίονς φειδόμενον φάρνγας. 

410.— ΤΟΤΛΛΙΟΤ ΣΑΒΙΝΟΤ 

Ί,μίνθος, ό παντοίης Βαιτός λίχνος, ού8ε μυάηρης 
8ειλος, ο κάκ θανάτου κερΒεα λτ)ζόμενος, 

νευροΧάΧον Φοίβου χορ8ην θρίσεν ή δ' επί πήχυν 
εΧκομενη θηρος λαιμόν άπεβρόχισεν. 

τόξων εύστοχίην θαυμάζομεν ος 8ε κατ εχθρών δ 
ή8η και κιθάρην εΰστοχον οπλον έχει. 

1 μελό* Reiske, and I render so. 

2 So Toup : Kovpot MS. 

226 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 408-410 

sea, died of drinking more than it had drunk at the 
breast. Out on thee, Sea, who didst receive the baby 
as a mother, and didst deceive it ! 

408. — By the Same 

Would I had continued to stray at the will of all 
the winds that blow, rather than be fixed firm to help 
wandering Leto in her labour : I should never have 
had to lament such solitude. Alas, poor me, how 
many Greek ships now sail past deserted Delos, once 
so revered ! Hera has taken this late but terrible 
vengeance on Leto. 1 

409.— ΑΝΤΙ PHANES 

If there be one who does not take delight in the 
strains of the flute and the sweet sound of harp- 
playing, or in nectareous wine, oldest of the old, or 
in torches, revels, garlands, and scent, but who takes 
a frugal supper and stores up with greedy hands the 
fruits of stealthy-footed usury, to me he is dead, 
and I pass by the . . . corpse, who hoards for the 
weasands of others. 

410.— TULLIUS SABINUS 

A mouse once, lickerish of every kind of food and 
not even shy of the mouse-trap, but one who won 
booty even from death, gnawed through Phoebus' 
melodious lyre-string. The strained chord springing 
up to the bridge of the lyre, throttled the mouse. 
We wonder at the bow's good aim ; but Phoebus 
uses his lyre, too, as a weapon wherewith to aim well 
at his enemies. 

1 Delos remained desert after its destruction by Mithri- 
dates' admiral. 8ee No. 100, a reply to this epigram. 

227 
Q 2 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

411. — MAIKIOT 

'Ήλλα/ίτ' εζαπίνης Κ.ορνΐ]Χιος, ούδ' ετι Χιτω 

τέρπεται ημετέρω μουσοχαρεΐ βιότω• 
κουφής δ' αιωρείται άπ έΧπιδος' ούκέτι δ' ημείς 

οι πόρος, άλλ' έτέρης έΧπίδος εκκρεμαται. 
εϊκωμεν, ψνχή' πεπαΧαίσμεθα, μηδέ βιάζον δ 

εις έδαφος τέχνης κείμεθ' υπ' άρ<γυρεης. 

412.— ΦΙΑΟΔΗΜΟΤ 

"Ηδ?; και ρόδου εστί, και ακμάζων ερέβινθος, 

καϊ καυΧοϊ κράμβης, ^ωσύΧε, πρωτοτόμου, 
και μαίνη ^ζαΧαηεΰσα, καϊ άρτιπαηής άΧίτυρος, 

και θριδάκων ουΧων άβροφυΡ] πέταΧα. 
ημείς δ' ουτ' ακτής επιβαίνομεν, οντ εν άπόψει 5 

<γιιόμεθ\ ώς αίεί, ^,ωσύΧε, το πρότερον; 
και μην ' Αντι<γένης καϊ Έάκχιος εχθές επαιζον 

νυν δ' αυτούς θάψαι σήμερον έκφέρομεν. 

413.— ΑΝΤΙΦΙΛΟΤ ΒΤΖΑΝΤΙΟΤ 

Ή τερεβινθώδης οΧιηάμπεΧος οιά τε βαιη 
νησίς, άλλ' όμαΧη πάσα καϊ άστύφεΧος• 

αϊ δ' άηχου, μεηάΧαι τε και εύρεες, άλλ' επι πουΧύ 
τρηχεΐαΐ' μεηεθει τούτο περισσότεραι. 

καρποΐς, ου σταδίοισιν ερίζομεν ουδέ <yap αύΧαξ 5 
Αιγύπτου Λιβύης ψάμμου επιστρέφεται. 

414.— ΓΕΜΙΝΟΤ 

Η παΧιουρος εγώ, τρηχύ ζυΧον, οΰρος εν έρκει* 
τι? μ άφορον Χεξει, την φορίμων φύΧακα; 

1 i.e. avarice. 
228 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 411-414 

411.— MAECIUS 

Cornelius is changed all of a sudden, and is no 
longer pleased with our simple literary life, but de- 
pends on light hope. We are not the same as before 
to him, but the hope on which he hangs is another. 
Let us give in, my heart ; we are thrown ; seek not 
to resist; it is a silver fall 1 that has laid us on the 
ground. 

412.— PHILODEMUS 

It is already the season of the rose, Sosylus, and of 
ripe chick-peas, and the first cut cabbages, and smelts, 
and fresh salted cheese, and the tender leaves of 
curly lettuces. But Ave do not go up to the pleasaunce 
or sit on the belvedere, Sosylus, as Ave used. Yet 
Antigenes and Bacchius were sporting but yesterday, 
and to-day we carry them to their graves. 

413.— ANTIPHILUS OF BYZANTIUM 

The terebinth island 2 has few vineyards, being 
small, but is all flat and not rugged. The islands 
near it are large and broad, but for the most part 
rough, and superior in this only, their size. We 
compete for crops, not for furlongs, just as the corn- 
fields of Egypt take no count of the sands of 
Libya. 

414.— GEMINUS 

1 am the rhamnus, a thorny shrub used as a fence. 
Who shall say I am unproductive when I protect the 
fruitful crops ? 

2 One of the small islands of the Prinkipo group in the sea 
of Marmara. 

229 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

415.— ΑΝΤ1ΦΙΛΟΤ BTZANTIOT 

"Ημην καϊ προπάροιθί συνεμπορος άνερι κερΒους, 

ην'ικα Βημοτέρην Κύπριν ivavroXoyet' 
κεΐθεν καϊ συνεπηξεν εμην τρόπιν, οφρα μ€ Χεύσστ) 

Κ,ύπρις, την άπο yr /ς είν άΧΪ ρεμβομένην. 
εστίν εταίρειος μεν εμοι στόλος, είσι Βε Χεπτα 5 

κάρπασα, και Χεπτον φύκος υπέρ σανίΒων. 
ναυτίΧοι, αλλ' ay ε πάντες εμής επιβαίνετε πρύμνης 

θαρραΧεως• ποΧΧούς οΙΒα φερειν ερέτας. 

416.— ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΤ ΘΕΣΣΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩΝ 

Ή ναϋς απ' ερ^ων Κ,ύπριΒος ηομφουμενη, 

προς τον γενάρχην πόντον ήΧυθον θεού' 

άνηρ yap ώρης μ έμπορος τεκτηνατο, 

καΧεσας Έταίρην ειμί yap πάσιν φίΧη. 

εμβαινε θαρρών μισθον ουκ αιτώ βαρύν. 5 

εΧθόντα Βέχομαι πάντα' βαστάζω ξένον 

άστόν τ'• επι ya^ κην βυθω μ ερεσσετε. 

417.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ 

θηρευτην Αάμπωνα Μίδου κννα Βίψα κατεκτα, 
κα'ιπερ υπέρ ψυχής ποΧΧα πονησάμενον. 

ποσσϊ yap ώρυσσεν νοτερον πέΒον, αλλά τό νωθες 
πίΒακος εκ τυφΧής ουκ ετάγυνεν υΒωρ' 

πίπτε δ' ατταυδί/'σα?" η δ' εβΧυσεν. η άρα, Νύμφαι, 5 
Αάμπωνι κταμενων μήνιν εθεσθ* εΧάφων. 

1 The word also means seaweed. 
230 






BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 415-417 

415.— ANTIPHILUS OF BYZANTIUM 

On a Ship built from the Profits of a Brothel 

I was formerly, too, my master's partner in his 
lucrative trade, when the crew he collected consisted 
of public votaries of Cypris. From those profits he 
built my keel that Cypris might see me, a product 
of the land, tossing on the sea. My rig befits a lady 
of pleasure ; I wear dainty white linen, and on my 
timbers lies a delicate dye. 1 Come, sailors, confi- 
dently mount on my stern. I can take any number 
of oarsmen. 2 

416.— PHILIPPUS OF THESSALONICA 

On the Same 
I am a ship built from the business of Cypris, and 
betake me to the sea that gave birth to that goddess; 
for the man who made me was a merchant of beauty, 
and christened me Courtesan, for I am friendly to 
all. Board me confidently ; I don't demand a heavy 
fare ; I receive all comers. I carry both natives and 
foreigners ; you can row me either on land or in the 
sea. 

417.— ANTIPATER OF THESSALONICA 

Lampo, Midas' hound, died of thirst, though he 
toiled hard for his life. For with his paws he dug 
into the damp earth, but the lazy water would not 
hasten to gush from the hidden source. He fell 
exhausted, and then the spring burst forth. Is it, 
Nymphs, that ye were wrath with Lampo for all the 
deer he had killed ? 

2 In this and the next epigram some of the phrases are 
equivocal, with an obscene bye-meaning. 

231 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



418.— TOY ΑΥΤΟΥ 



"Ισχετε χείρα μυΧαΐον, άΧετρίδες' εύδετε μακρά, 

κην ορθρον TrpoXeyy <γήρυς άΧεκτρυόνων 
Δηω yap Νύμφαισι χερών επετε'ιΧατο μόχθους• 

αϊ δε κατ άκροτάτην άΧΧομεναι τροχιην, 
άξονα δινεύουσιν ό δ' άκτίνεσσιν έΧικταΐς 6 

στρωφα Νισυρίων κοΐΧα βάρη μυΧάκων. 
^/ευόμεθ^ αρχαίου βιότου πάΧιν, ει δίχα μόχθου 

δαίνυσθαι Αηοΰς epya διδασκόμεθα. 
J. Α. Pott, Greek Love Songs and Epigrams, ii. p. 55. 

419.— ΚΡΙΝΑΓΟΡΟΤ 

Κήν μυχον Έρκυναϊον, η ες πύματον ΧοΧόεντα 
βΧθη καϊ Αιβυκών κράσπεδον 'Εσπερίδων 

Καίσαρ ό π ονΧυ σεβαστός, άμα κΧεος εϊσιν εκείνω 
πάντη. ΤΙυρήνης ύδατα μαρτύρια' 

οισι yap ούδε πέριξ δρυτόμοι άπεφαιδρύναντο, δ 

Χουτρά καϊ ηπείρων εσσεται αμφοτέρων. 

420.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ 

Μη κΧαίων τον "Ερωτα δόκει, ΎηΧεμβροτε, πείσειν, 
μηο^ oXiyrp παύσειν ύδατι πυρ άτενές. 

χρυσός "Ερωτος άεϊ παιώνιος' εσβεσθη δε 
ούδε τότ εν ποΧΧω τικτόμενος πeXάyει. 

421.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ ΜΑΚΕΔΟΝ02 

Νήσοι ερημαΐαι, τρύφεα χθονός, ας κεΧαδεινός 
ζωστηρ Αιγαίοι» κύματος εντός έχει, 

1 The Hercjmian forest was in Germany, Cape Soloeis on 
the west coast of Morocco. 

232 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 418-421 

418.— By the Same 
On a Water-mill 
Cease from grinding, ye women who toil at the 
mill ; sleep late, even if the crowing cocks announce 
the dawn. For Demeter has ordered the Nymphs to 
perform the work of your hands, and they, leaping 
down on the top of the wheel, turn its axle which, 
with its revolving spokes, turns the heavy concave 
Nisyrian mill-stones. We taste again the joys of the 
primitive life, learning to feast on the products of 
Demeter without labour. 

419.— CRINAGORAS 

With most august Caesar, even if he go to the 
depths of the Hercynian forest or to extreme Soloeis x 
and the western edge of Libya, goeth everywhere 
glory. The waters of the Pyrenees 2 testify it. They 
in which not even the neighbouring wood-cutters 
washed, shall now be baths for two continents. 

420.— ANTIPATER OF THESSALONICA 

Think not, Telembrotus, to persuade love by tears, 
or with a little water to put out so stubborn a fire. 
Gold is ever the medicine of love, and not even 
then when he was born on the deep sea 3 was he 
quenched. 

421. — By the Same 
On the Cyclades 
Ye desert islands, crumbs of land, which the sound- 
ing cincture of the Aegean wave confines, ye have 

2 Probably Dax (Aquae Augustae). 

3 Love is assumed to have been born from the sea like his 
mother. 

233 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

—ίφνον εμιμήσασθε και αύχμηρην ΦοΧέγανδρον, 
τΧημονες, άρχαίην δ' ώλεσατ' ά^Χαίην. 

η ρ υμάς εδίδαξεν ενα τρόπον ή ποτέ Χευκη 5 

Δήλο?, ερημαίου δαίμονος άρξαμενη. 

422.— ΑΠΟΛΛΩΝΙΔΟΤ 

"Προ•? παίδων" είπεν "ηουνάζομαι, ην με θανοΰσαν 
στείΧης, μη σπ είσαι δεύτερα φίλτρα άγαμου. ' 

εϊπεν 6 δ' εις ετερην εσπούδασεν. αλλά ΦίΧιννα 
Διογένην Χήθης τισατο καϊ φθιμενη• 

νυκτϊ yap εν πρώτη θάΧαμον σγίισε μήνις άφυκτος, 5 
ώς μη Χεκτρον ίδεΐν δεύτερον ηελιον. 

423.— BIANOPOS 

Χάρδιες αϊ το πάλαι Γύγου ποΧις, αι τ ΑΧναττον 

βάρδιες, αϊ βασιΧεΐ ΤΙερσΙς εν Άσιάδι, 
αΐ χρυσώ το παΧαιον επΧινθωσασθε μέλαθρον, 

όλβον ΤΙακτωΧού ρεύματι δεξάμεναι• 
νυν δη οΧαι δύστηνοι ες εν κακόν άρπασθεΐσαι, 5 

ες βυθον εξ αχανούς χάσματος ηρίπετε, 
ϋούρα καϊ εις ΈΧίκην ι κεκΧυσμεναν αϊ δ' ενϊ χερσω 

Έ,άρδιες εμβυθίαις εις εν έκεισθε τεΧος. 

424.— ΔΟΤΡΙΔ02 ΕΛΑΙΤΟΤ 

'Hepiat νεφελαι, πόθεν ύδατα πικρά πιονσαι 
νυκτϊ συν άστεμφεΐ πάντα κατεκΧύσατε; 

ου Αιβύης, 'Κφεσου δε τα μυρία κείνα ταΧαίνης 
αύΧια καϊ μακάρων εξ ετεων κτεανα. 

1 καϊ ίσ' 'Ελίκη Boissonade, which I render. 

234 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 422-424 

followed the example of Siphnus and squalid Phole- 
gandrus, poor islands, and lost your ancient splendour. 
Delos, of a truth, once so brilliant, has taught you her 
ways, Delos who first of you all was condemned to 
solitude. 1 

422.— APOLLONIDES 

u By our children," she said, " I implore thee, if 
thou layest me out dead, enter not a second time 
into the loving bond of wedlock." She spoke, but 
he hastened to take another wife. Yet Philinna, 
even dead, punished Diogenes for forgetting her. 
For on the first night the wrath from which there is 
no escape laid their chamber in ruins, so that the sun 
never shone on his second marriage. 

423.-— BIANOR 

Sardis, once the city of Gyges and Alyattes ; Sardis, 
who wast for the great king a second Persia in 
Anatolia ; thou who didst build thee of old time a 
hall of golden bricks, winning wealth from the stream 
of Pactolus ; now, ill-fated city, enveloped all of 
thee in one disaster, thou hast fallen headlong into 
the depths, swallowed by the fathomless cavern. 2 
Bura and Helice 3 too were engulfed by the sea, but 
thou, Sardis, the inland city, hast met with the same 
end as these which rest in the deep. 

424.— DURIS OF ELAEA 

Clouds of the heavens, whence drunk ye bitter 
waters, and in league with unbroken night deluged 
all ? This is not Libya, these countless dwellings and 
the wealth of many prosperous years, but unhappy 

1 cp. No. 408. 2 For this earthquake see Tac. Ann. ii. 47. 
3 Cities on the coast of Achaea. 

235 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

που Βε σαωτηρες τότ€ Βαίμονες ετραπον όμμα; 

αίαϊ την ΊάΒων πόΧΧον άοιΒοτάτην. 
κείνα Βε κύμασι πάντα κυΧινΒομενοισιν ομοΐα 

εις α,Χα συν ποταμοί? εΒραμε πεπταμενοις. 

425.— ΙΩΑΝΝΟΤ TOT ΒΑΡΒΟΤΚΑΛΛΟΤ 

"Αδ' εγω ά τΧάμων άποΧις πόΧις, άμμι^α νεκροίς 
ενναεταις κ€Ϊμαι, α, παναποτμότατα. 

"Ηφαιστος μ' εΒάμασσε μετά κΧονον Έννοσιγαίου. 
φευ, άπο τοσσατίου κάΧΧεος ειμί κόνις. 

άΧΧα π αραστείχοντες εμαν στοναχήσατε μοίραν 
σπείσατε ϋηρυτω Βάκρυ καταφθιμενα. 

426.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

ΐΐοΰ τεΧέθει Κύπρις ποΧιηόχος, οφρα νόηση 
ενΒιον ειΒώΧων την πριν εΒος Χαρίτων; 

τύμβος άταργύτων μερόπων ποΧις, ης νπο τεφρην 
αί Έερόης ποΧΧαϊ κείμεθα χιΧιάΒες. 

<γράψαθ' ενός καθύπερθε Χίθου, φίΧα Χείψανα 
φώτων 
"Ί$ηρυτος ηοερη κείται ΰπερ ΒαπέΒων." 

427.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Ναυτίλε, μη στησης Βρόμον όΧκάΒος εινεκ εμείο• 
Χαίφεα μη Χύσης' χέρσον οράς Χιμενα. 

τύμβος οΧη ηενόμην έτερον δ' ες άπενθεα χώρον 
Βουπήσεις κώπη νηος επερχόμενης. 

τούτο ΐΙοσειΒάωνι φίΧον, ξεν'ιοις τε θεοίσιν 
γαίρεθ' άΧιπΧανέες, χαίρεθ^ όΒοιπΧανεες. 

1 The destruction of old Ephesus by flood took place in 
the reign of Lysimachus (circ. 290 B.o.)• 

236 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 425-427 

Ephesus. 1 Whither, then, were the eyes of the Saving 
deities turned ? Alas for the most besung of all 
Ionian cities ! All, like rolling waves, has been swept 
to sea by the floods. 

425.— IOANNES BARBUCALLUS 

Here I lie, the luckless city, no longer a city, with 
my dead inhabitants, most ill-fated of all towns. 
After the Earth-shaker's shock Hephaestus consumed 
me. Alas, how excellent my beauty who now am 
dust ! But as ye pass by bewail my fate, and let fall 
a tear for destroyed Berytus. 2 

426. — By the Same 

Where is Cypris, the keeper of the city, that she 
may see her who was once the seat of the Graces 
become the dwelling-place of spectres ? The city is 
the tomb of dead men who had no funeral ; under 
her ashes we, Beroe's many thousands, rest. Engrave 
on one stone above her, ye dear survivors : " Berytus 
the lamented lies low on the ground." 

427. — By the Same 

Stop not thy ship's course, mariner, because of 
me ; lower not thy sails ; thou seeest the harbour 
dry. I am but one tomb. Let some other place that 
knows not mourning hear the beat of thine oars as 
thy ship approaches. This is Poseidon's pleasure and 
that of the Hospitable 3 gods. Farewell seafarers, 
farewell wayfarers ! 



8 Destroyed by earthquake in 554 a.d. 
8 i.e. who formerly welcomed strangers. 



237 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

428.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ ΘΕ22ΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩ2 

Soi με, Θρηϊκίης σκυΧηφόρε, Θεσσαλονίκη 
μήτηρ η πάσης πέμψε Χίακηδονίης. 

αείδω δ' υπο σοϊ δεδμημένον "Αοεα ϋεσσών, 
οσσ έδάην πολέμου π'άντ άναλεξά μένος. 

αλλά μοι ώς θεός εσσο κατήκοος, ευχόμενου δε 
κλύθι. τίς ες Μούσα? ούατος άσχολίη; 

429.— ΚΡΙΝΑΓΟΡΟΤ 

Τον σκοπον Έ,ύβοίης άΧικύμονος ησεν ' Άρίστω 
ΝαύπΧιον εκ μοΧπής δ' ό θρασύς εφΧε^όμην. 

ό ψεύστης δ' ύπο νύκτα Καφηρείης άπο πέτρης 
πυρσός εμην μετέβη δυσμόρον ες κραδιην. 

430.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Της οϊος <γενεη μεν Άγαρρική, ^έντος Άράξεω 

νδωρ πιΧοφόροις πίνεται Άρμενίοις• 
χαΐται δ', ου μήΧοις άτε που μαλακοί επί μαλλοι, 

ψεδναϊ δ', ά<γροτέρων τρηχύτεραι χιμάρων. 
νηδύς δε τριτοκεΐ ανά πάν έτος, εκ δε <γάΧακτος 

θηλή αεί μαστού πλήθεται ούθατίου' 
βληχη δ' άσσοτάτω τερένης μυκηματι μόσχου' 

άλλα <γαρ άΧΧοιαι πάντα φέρουσι γεαι. 

431.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Eis κλέπτην ίνρόντα σπάθην χρυσην 
Και χρυσον φιλέω καϊ δηίον άρεα φευ^ω. 

1 Piso conducted operations against the Thracians from 
2 3 8 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 428-431 

428.— ANTIPATER OF THESSALONICA 

(Addressed to L. Calpurnius Piso) 

Thessalonica, the mother of all Macedonia, sends 
me to thee, despoiler of Thrace. I sing thy conquest 
of the martial Bessi, collecting all that I learnt about 
the war. 1 But be thou, like a god, attentive to me, 
and listen to my prayers. What occupation is there 
which can deny an ear to the Muses ? 

429.— CRINAGORAS 

Akisto sung of Nauplius, the watchman of sea- 
beaten Euboea, and the song set me on fire, valiant 
as I am. The flame of that false beacon shown 
in the night from the rock of Caphereus caught 
my ill-fated heart. 2 

430. — By the Same 

This sheep is a native of Agarra, where the felt- 
capped Armenians drink the water of Araxes. Its 
fleece is not, like a sheep's, composed of soft wool, but 
thin-haired and rougher than a wild goat's. Every 
year it bears triplets, and the teats of its udders are 
always full of milk. Its bleating resembles most 
the lowing of a tender calf, for diverse lands bear 
all things different. 

431. — Anonymous 
On a Thief who found a Gold Sword 

1 both love gold, and I shrink from hostile Ares. 

B.C. 11 to B.C. 8. Antipater sends him a poem on the war, 
begging him to read it. 

2 An imitation of Dioscorides (v. 137). 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

432.— ΘΕΟΚΡΙΤΟΤ 

*il δείΧαιε τύ Svpai, τί roi πΧεον, ει κατατάξεις 

δάκρυσι διγΧ7]νως ωπας οδυρόμενος; 
οϊ-χεται ά γίμαρος, το καΧον τεκος, οϊχετ ες αδαν 

τραχύς yap χαΧαϊς άμφεπίαξε Χυκος' 
α'ι δε κύνες κΧαγγεύντι. τί τοι πΧεον, άνίκα τήνας 5 

οστ'ιον ονδε τέφρα Χείπετ' άποιχομενας; 

433.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Αής, ποτϊ τάν Μοισάν, διδυμοις αύΧοισιν άβΐσαι 

άδύ τί μοι; κή^ω πακτίδ άειράμενος 
άρξευμαί τι κρεκειν 6 δε βωκόΧος εηηΰθεν ασεϊ 

Αάφνις, κηροδέτω πνεΰματι μεΧπόμενος. 
εγγύς δε στί/^τες Χασιαύχενος ενδοθεν άντρου 5 

ΐΐάνα τον αίηιβάταν όρφανισωμες ύπνου. 

434.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

"Αλλος ό Χίος• εγω δε Θεόκριτος, ος τάδ' eypaijra, 
εϊς άπο των ποΧΧών ειμί Έ,υρακοσίων, 

υιός Ώραξαγόραο περικΧειτής τε ΦιΧίννης• 
^Ιουσαν δ' όθνείαν ου tw εφεΧκυσάμαν. 

435.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

' 'Αστοί? καϊ ζείνοισιν ϊσον νέμει άδε τράπεζα' 
θεϊς άνεΧευ, ψήφου προς Xoyov ερχόμενης. 

αΧΧος τις πρόφασιν Χε<γετω• τα δ οθνεϊα Κάικος 
■χρήματα καϊ νυκτός βουΧομενοις αριθμεί. 

1 An orator and sophist of the fourth century B.C. 

2 It Ϊ8, of course, the banker himself who irpbs \oyov 

240 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 432-435 

432.— THEOCRITUS 

Ah ! poor Thyrsis, what use crying out thy two 
eyes ? The kid is gone, the little dear ; it is gone 
to Hades, for the cruel wolf caught it in his claws. 
The dogs bay, but what use is that now when it is 
gone, and neither bone nor dust of it left ? 



433. — By the Same 

By the Muses, wilt thou play something sweet to 
me on the double flute? and I will lift up my harp 
and begin a tune, and the herd Daphnis shall stand 
close by and make music with the breath of the 
wax-joined pipe. Standing there hard by, inside the 
cave shaggy with hanging greenery, let us bereave 
Pan the goat-mounter of sleep. 

434. — By the Same 
Prefixed to a collection of Theocritus' irorks 
The Chian Theocritus l is another, but I, the Theo- 
critus who wrote these poems, am one of the many 
Syracusans, the son of Praxagoras and noble Philinna. 
I admitted no verse that is other than genuine. 

435. — By the Same 

This bank pays citizen and foreigner alike. With- 
draw what you deposited, the reckoning couuters 
meeting their liabilities. 2 Let others find pretexts 
for not paying; Caicus pays money deposited with 
him on demand, even at night. 

ίρχίται, not his reckoning counters (or, as we should say, 
his books). 

241 
vol. in. η 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

436. — Έν %νρακονσαις εγράφησαν 

'Αρχαία τωττόΧΧωνι τάναθ ήματα 
υπηρχεν η βάσις δέ τοις μβν είκοσι, 
τοις ο' €7ττά, τοις δέ ττέντβ, τοις δέ δώδεκα, 
τοις δέ διηκοσίοισι νεώτερη ϊ'/δ' ενιαυτοΐς' 

τοσσόσδ' αριθμός χ έξεβη μετρούμενος. . . 5 

437.— ΘΕΟΚΡΙΤΟΤ 

Ύήναν ταν Χαύραν, όθι ταϊ δρύες, αιττόΧε, κάμψας, 

σύκινου εύρησεΐς άρτι^Χυφες ξόανον, 
τρισκεΧες, αύτόφΧοιον, άνούατον αλλά φάΧητι 

τταιΒο'γόνω δυνατόν Κ,ύττριδος k'pya τεΧεΐν. 
ερκος δ' εύίερον ττεριδεδρομεν άεναον δε 5 

ρεϊθρον άττο σπιΧάδων ττάντοσε τηΧεθάει 
δάφναις κ αϊ μύρτοισι και εύώδει κυπαρίσσω, 

ένθα -πέριξ κεχυται βοτρυόπαις ε'Χικι 
άμττεΧος' ειαρινοϊ δε \ί , γ^υφθό'γγοισιν άοιδαΐς 

κόσσνφοι άχεΰσιν ττοικιΧότραυΧα αεΧη' 10 

ξουθαϊ δ' άδονίδες μινυρίσμασιν άνταχεΰσαι 

μεΧπουσι στόμασιν ταν μεΧί^ηρυν 6ττα. 
εζεο δη τηνεΐ, καϊ τω χαριεντι. ΥΙριάπω 

εΰχου άποστέρξαι τους Δάφνιδός με πόθους, 
κεύθύς άττορρεζαι χιμαρον καΧόν. ην δ' άνανεύη, 15 

τοΟδε τυχών εθέΧω τρισσα θύη τεΧεσαΐ' 
ρεξώ yap δαμάΧαν, Χάσιον τράηον, άρνα τον ϊσχω 

σακ'ιταν νεύοι δ' εύμενεως υ θεός. 

438.— ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΤ 

ΤϊωΧοτόμοι μύρμηκες, ό <γής στρατός, ην'ικ ετενδε 
ηειομόρου μεΧιχρην σμηνοδόκου χάριτα, 
1 αριθμός Wilamowitz : yap νιν. 
242 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 436-438 

436. — An Inscription from Syracuse 

The votive offerings to Apollo were old, but as for 
the base it is in one case twenty, in another seven, 
in another twelve, and in this last case two hundred 
years later ; for so the figures work out when 
counted. 

437.— THEOCRITUS 
Goatherd, on turning the corner of that path 
where the oaks are, thou shalt find a newly carved 
image made of a fig-bough, three forked, with the 
bark still on, without ears, but able with its genera- 
tive phallus to do the work of Aphrodite. Round it 
is a most holy hedge, and a perennial stream issuing 
from the rocks feeds on all sides abundance of laurel, 
myrtle, and sweet-scented cypress, round which curl 
the tendrils of the vine, mother of the grape. In 
spring the shrill song of the blackbirds echoes here 
with its varied notes, and the brown nightingales 
pour from their throats their honeyed voice in response. 
Sit here and pray to kind Priapus to make me fall 
out of love with Daphnis, and sacrifice at once to 
him a fine kid. But if he grants the prayer I will 
offer him in return three sacrifices. I will kill him 
a heifer, a shaggy billy-goat, and the stalled lamb I 
have. May the god be benevolent and grant it. 

438.— PHILIPPUS 

When the burrowing ants, the army of the earth, 
nibbled at the rustic bee-keeper's sweet dainty, the 

243 
r 3 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

μηνίσας 6 πρεσβυς, ες ύδατα κρωσσόν εβαψεν, 
ενθάδε τους από <γής ου δοκέων πεΧάσειν. 

οι δε νέας κάρφας άχυρίτιδας άντιφέροντες, 5 

αύτοκυβερνήται προς κύτος έτρόχασαν. 

η ρα φίΧη <γαστηρ και βαιοτάτους άνέπεισεν 
εκ χθονός εις Νύμφας καινότατους ερέτας. 

439.— ΚΡΙΝΑΓΟΡΟΤ 

Hpeypa πάΧαι Χαχναϊον, ερημαΐόν τε κέΧυφος 
όμματος, άγλωσσου & άρμονίη στόματος, 

ψυχής ασθενές ερκος, άτυμβεύτου θανάτοιο 
Χείψανον, ειυόδιον δάκρυ παρερχομένων, 

κεΐσο πέΧας πρέμνοιο τταρ άτραπόν, οφρα <μάθη 
τις> 5 

άθρήσας, τι πΧεον φειδομένω βιότου. 

440.— Μ02ΧΟΤ 2TPAKOT2JOT 

Ερως δραπέτης 

Ά Κύπρις τον "Ερωτα τον υ'ιέα μακρόν έβώστρεί' 
" Έιϊ τις ένϊ τριόδοισι πΧανώμ,ενον ειδεν "Ερωτα, 
δραπετίδας εμάς εστίν ό μανυτας <γ£ρας έξεΐ. 
μισθός τοι τό φίΧαμα το Κύπριδος' ην δ' ay ay ης νιν, 
ου γυμνόν τό φίΧα/ια, τύ δ , ω ξένε, και πΧέον εξείς. 5 
εστί δ' ό παις περίσαμος' εν είκοσι πάσι μάθοις νιν. 
χρώτα μεν ου Χευκός, πυρϊ δ' εϊκεΧος• όμματα δ' αυτού 
δριμύΧα καϊ φΧο<γόεντα• κακαϊ φρένες, άδύ ΧάΧημα' 
ου yap ίσον νοέει καϊ φθεγ^εται• ως μεΧι φωνά' 
ην δε χοΧα, νόος εστίν άνάμερος• ήπεροπευτάς, 10» 
ούδεν άΧαθεύων, δοΧιον βρέφος, aypia παίσδει. 
εύπΧόκαμον τό κάρανον έχει δ' Ιταμόν τό πρόσωπον. 

244 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 439-440 

old man in anger set the jar in a dish of water, 
thinking that, being creatures of the land, they 
would not get to it. But they, setting up fresh 
stalks of straw against it, quickly found their way, 
without anyone to steer them, to the vessel. So 
their dear belly induced even these tiny creatures to 
migrate from earth to water, the very newest variety 
of boatmen. 

439.— CRINAGORAS 
On a Skull 
Once hairy crown, deserted shell of the eye, 
fabric of the tongueless mouth, feeble fence of 
the brain, relic of the unburied dead, set by the 
wayside to draw a tear from passers-by, thou liest 
there by the path near the tree-trunk, that looking 
on thee we may learn what profit there is in being 
thrifty of life. 

440.— MOSCHUS 
Fugitive Love 
Cvpris cried loudly her lost son Love. " If any- 
one hath seen Love straying in the cross-roads, 
he is my fugitive child, and the informer shall be 
rewarded. The reward is a kiss from Cypris ; and 
if you bring him, not a mere kiss, stranger, but 
something besides. The boy is easily recognisable ; 
you could tell him among twenty. His complexion 
is not pale, but like to fire. His eyes are piercing 
and aflame. Evil is his heart, but sweet his speech, 
for what he has in his mind he speaks not. His 
voice is like honey, but if he grow wrath his spirit 
cannot be tamed. A cozener he is, never speaking 
the truth ; a cunning child, and the games he plays 
are savage. Plenty of hair on his head, and he has 

*45 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

μικκυΧα μεν τηνω τα χερύΒρια, μακρά Be βάΧΧεί' 
βάΧΧει δ' εις 'Αχέροντα καϊ Άίδεω βασιΧήα. 
γυμνός μεν τό ye σώμα, νόος Be οι εμπεπύκασται• 15 
καϊ πτερόεις όσον όρνις εφίπταται αλλοτ' eV αΧΧως 
άνερας ηΒε γυναίκας, επι σπΧάγχνοις Be κάθηται' 
τόξον έχει μά\α βαιόν, νπερ τόξω Be βεΧεμνον 
τυτθον έοΐ το βεΧεμνον, ες αιθέρα δ' άχρι φορειται' 
και χρνσεον περί νώτα φαρέτριον ενΒοθι δ' εντϊ 20 
τοι ττικροϊ κάλαμοι, τοις ποΧΧάκι κάμε τιτρώσκει. 
πάντα μεν άγρια, πάντα' ποΧυ πΧεον ά Βαϊς αύτω 
βαια Χαμπάς εοΐσα, τον "ΑΧιον αύτον άναίθει. 
ην τν y εΧης τήνον, Βησας aye, μηΒ' εΧεήσης• 
κήν ποτ ϊΒης κΧαίοντα, φυΧάσσεο μή σε πΧανήση' 25 
κην γεΧάη, τν νιν εΧκε• καϊ ην εθεΧη σε φιΧάσαι, 
φεύγε' κακόν το φίΧαμα, τα χείΧεα φάρμακόν εντι. 
ην Be Χεγη, Λάβε ταύτα, χαρίζομαι οσσα μοι οπΧα, 
μη τν θίγης πΧάνα Βώρα' τα yap πυρϊ πάντα βε- 
βαπται" 

441.— ΠΑΛΛΑΔΑ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΕΩ2 

Ύον Δώς εν τριόΒοισιν εθαύμασα χάΧκεον νια, 
τον πριν εν εύχωΧαΐς, νυν παραριπτόμενον. 

οχθησας δ' άρ" εειπον " 'ΑΧεξίκακε τρισεΧηνε, 
μηΒέποθ' ηττηθείς, σήμερον εζετάθης" 

ννκτι Be μειΒιόων με θεός προσέειπε παραστάς' 5 

" Καιρώ ΒονΧεύειν και θεός ων εμαθον." 

442.— ΑΓΑΘΙΟΤ 2ΧΟΛΑΧΤΙΚΟΤ 
ΜΤΡΙΝΑΙΟΤ 

Τριπεύς τις μογεεσκεν eV ίχθύσι• τον δ' εσιΒουσα 
εύκτέανος κούρη θυμον έκαμνε πάθω, 

246 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 441-442 

a most forward face. His hands are tiny, but they 
shoot far ; they shoot as far as Acheron and the King 
of Hades. Naked is his body, but his mind is wrapped 
up well. Like a winged bird he flies to one man and 
woman after another, and perches on their vitals. 
He has a very small bow, and on the bow an arrow ; 
little is his arrow, but it flies even to heaven. He 
bears a golden quiver on his back, and in it are the 
bitter shafts with which he often wounds even me. 
All about him is savage, all, and worst of all his 
torch ; it is but a little brand, and sets fire to the 
Sun himself. If you catch him, bring him bound 
and have no mercy on him. If you see him crying, 
mind he does not take you in ; and if he smiles, drag 
him ; and if he wants to kiss you, run away, for his 
kiss is evil and his lips are poison. And if he says 
'Take these, I give you all my weapons,' touch not 
the deceitful gifts, for they are all dipped in fire." 

441.— PALLADAS OF ALEXANDRIA 

On a Statue of Heracles λ 
I marvelled seeing at the cross-roads Jove's brazen 
son, once constantly invoked, now cast aside, and in 
wrath I said : " Averter of woes, offspring of three 
nights, thou, who never didst suffer defeat, art to-day 
laid low." But at night the god stood by my bed 
smiling, and said : " Even though I am a god I have 
learnt to serve the times." 

442.— AGATHIAS SCHOLASTICUS 
A fisherman was toiling to catch fish when a 
wealthy girl, seeing him, felt the pangs of love. 

1 The statue had doubtless been cast down by the 
Christians. 

247 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

και μιν θήκε σύνευνον 6 δ' εκ βιότοιο πενιχρού 

δεζατο παντοίης oyKOV ά<γηνορίης. 
η δε Τύχη <γε\όωσα παρίστατο, καϊ ττοτϊ Κ,ύπριν, 5 

" Ο ν τεος ούτος ay ων, άλλ' εμάς εστίν," εφη. 

443.— ΠΑΤΛΟΤ 2ΙΛΕΝΤΙΑΡΙΟΤ 

Μί; ποτέ κοιΧηνης ΐΐαφίτ) νόον αντίτυπου yap 
ευθύς άποθρώσκει κουφός "Ερως κραδίης. 

οίστρος όλισθήεσσαν έχει φύσιν ην τις όϊστου 
άκρον e\r) φ\ο<γβροΰ, δυεται εντός οΧος. 

εΧπίδι μη θελξης φρένα μαχλάδι• ηυιοβόρον yap δ 
πυρ ύποριπίζει, θυμον εφεΧκομενη. 

444.— ΕΡΑΤ02ΘΕΝΟΤ2 2ΧΟΛΑ2ΤΙΚΟΤ 

Καλά τά παρθενίης κειμήλια' παρθενία] δε 
τον βίον ωλεσσ* αν πάσι φυλασσόμενη. 

τοΰνεκεν εύθέσμως άλοχον λάβε, και τίνα κόσμω 
δος βροτον άντϊ σεθεν φε^ε δε μαχλοσΰνην. 

445.— ΙΟΤΛΙΑΝΟΤ ΑΙΓΤΠΤΙΟΤ 

"ΗθεΧε μεν βασιλεύς σε βοηθόον εισέτι πεμπειν 
άστεσι τειρομένοις δευομενων μερόπων, 

Ύητιανε χρύσειε• συ δ' εν βιότοιο yaXi'jvrj 

πατρίδα και κΧήρον σον προβεβουΧας εχειν, 

αύξων σων πpoyόvωv κτέρας ενδικον αρχομένων yap 5 
πΧουτον οτι στυyεεις σύνθ ρονος οϊδε Αίκη. 

446.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Ήδεα πάντα κελευθα \άχεν βίος' άστεί μεσσω 
εύχος, εταιρεΐαι• κρυπτά δόμοισιν άχη• 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 443-446 

She made him her husband, and he exchanged his 
poverty for a life boasting of every luxury. Fortune 
stood by smiling, and said to Cypris : " This is not 
your achievement, but mine." 

443.— PAULUS S1LENTIARIUS 

Open not the recesses of thy mind to Aphrodite, 
for light Love at once rebounds from a heart that is 
hardened. The nature of passion is insinuating ; if 
one receives the tip of the flaming arrow, the whole 
of it penetrates. Flatter not thy mind with lascivious 
hope, for it attracts the spirit and fans the consuming 
fire. 

444.— ERATOSTHENES SCHOLASTICUS 

Fair are the treasures of virginity, but if it were 
observed by all it would put an end to life. There- 
fore live in lawful wedlock, and give a mortal to the 
world to replace thee ; but avoid lechery. 

445.— JULIANUS OF EGYPT 

Golden Tetianus, the Emperor wished to send you 
again to the distressed cities which had need of you ; 
but you preferred a peaceful life, keeping to your 
home and inheritance, and increasing the righteously 
acquired fortune of your house. For Justice, en- 
throned beside you, knows that you loathe to touch 
wealth won from those you rule. 

446. — By the Same 
(cp. No. 360) 
All the paths of life are pleasant. In the middle 
of the city there are fame and society ; at home our 

249 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

άγρος τέρψιν ayei, κερΒος ττ\όος, άΧλοΒαπη •χθων 
ηνωσιας• εκ Βε ηάμων οίκος όμοφρονεει, 

τοις Β' ΐνγάμοις άφροντις αεί βίος• ερκος ετύχθΐ] 5 
ττατρϊ τεκος, φροΰΒος τοις άγόνοισι φόβος• 

ηνορεην νεότης, πο\ιη φρενας olSev όπάσσαι, 
ένθεν θάρσος έχων ζώε, φύτευε ηενος. 

447.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 
Μ ήτηρ υΐα Χιπόντα μάχην μετά ττότμον εταίρων 

εκτανεν, ωΒίνων μνήστιν άνηναμενη. 
και yap ηνήσιον αίμα Βιακρίνει ΑακεΒαίμων 

ά\κί) μαρναμενων, ού yeverj βρεφεων. 

448.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Ερώτησις Ομήρου 
"Ανδρες άπ ΆρκαΒίης αΚιήτορες, η ρ εγομεν τι; 

Άνταπόκρισις Αρκάδων 
"Οσσ' ελομεν \ιττόμεσθ\ οσσ ονχ ελομεν φερόμεσθα. 

449.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Τύ'ας αν £i7roi λογούς Ερως ίρων 
Ύίς ττυρϊ πυρ εΒάμασσε; τις εσβεσε λαμττάΒι ττνρσόν; 
τις κατ εμής νευρής ετερην ετανύσσατο νευρήν; 
καινός "Ερως κατ "Ερωτος εμω μένει ισοφαρίζει. 



250 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 447-449 

griefs are hidden. The country has its delights, sea- 
voyages give profit , and foreign countries acquaint- 
anceships. Marriage produces domestic concord, 
while the unmarried life is ever free from cai*e. A 
child is his father's defence, while the childless are 
quit of fear. It is the virtue of youth to give us 
courage, that of hoary hairs to give us wisdom. 
Therefore be of good heart, and live and produce 
offspring. 

447. — By the Same 

A mother, banishing the memory of her pangs, 
killed her son who abandoned the field after the 
death of his comrades. For Sparta distinguishes 
purity of race by warriors' bravery, not by children's 
birth. 

448. — Anonymous 

Homer's Question 

Fishermen from Arcadia, what have we? 

The Answer 

We left what we caught and carry what we did 
not catch. 1 

449. — Anonymous 

What Love would say if he were in love 

Who is this that overcame fire by fire, who quenched 
a torch with a torch ? Who drew another bow against 
mine ? A new Love by my might contends on equal 
terms with Love. 

1 i.e. lice. 

2 5' 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

450.— ΦΙΛΗΜΟΝ02 

Ει rat? άΧηθείαισιν οι τεθνηκότες 
αίσθησιν είχον, άνδρες ως φασίν τίνες, 
άπη^ξάμην αν, ώστ' ιδεΐν Έιύριπίδην. 

451.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Ύίνας αν ίΓποι λόγους πρυς ΐΐρόκνην την άδΐλφην Φιλομηλη 

So? με ττόσις κακοερηος ενι σττηΧυγγι βαθείη 
μουνώσας βαρύττοτμον, εμην άπεκερσε κορείην 
arvyva 8ε μοι ττόρεν εδνα ττόΧυτΧητοιο ^άμοιο' 
γΧώσσαν εμην εθερισσε, καϊ εσβεσεν εΧΧάδα φωνήν. 

452.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Ε is τό αυτό 

Χαίρε, ΤΙρόκνη, παρά σεΐο κασιγνήτης ΦιΧομήΧης, 
γαίρειν ει τόδε y εστίν εμού δε σοι άΧηεα θυμού 
ττέπΧος άπαγγείΧειε, τά μοι Χυηρος ωττασε Ύηρεύς, 
ός μ ερξας βαρύττοτμον εν ερκεσι μηΧονομήων, 
πρώτον παρθενίης, μετέπειτα δ' ενόσφισε φωνής. 

453.— ΜΕΛΕΑΓΡΟΤ χ 

Αύτος ό βούς Ικέτης επιβώμιος, αιθέριε Zey, 

μνκάται, ψνχην ρυόμενος θανάτου. 
άΧΧά μέθες, Κρονίδη, τον άροτρέα• και συ <γάρ αύτος 

πορθμεύς Έ*ύρώπης ταύρος, άναξ, εβένου. 

1 The lemma of this epigram is " What Meleager would 
say if an ox lowed when it was about to be sacrificed to 
Zeus." There can be little doubt that it is really by Meleager. 

252 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 450-453 

450.— PHILEMON 

Spoken by Philemon about Euripides 

If the dead in truth had use of their senses, as 
some say, Ι would have hanged myself to see 
Euripides. 

451. — Anonymous 

What Philomela mould say to her Sister Procne 

Thy wicked husband shut me up, ill-fated that I 
am, alone in a deep cave, and took my maidenhead. 
An abominable present he made me on this my 
calamitous marriage, cutting off my tongue and 
quenching Greek speech in me. 

452. — Anonymous 

On the Same 

Thy sister Philomela, Procne, wishes thee well if 
this be well-wishing. Let the robe tell thee the 
suffering of my heart which savage Tereus inflicted 
on me. 1 Shutting me up, luckless maid, in the shep- 
herd's fold, he deprived me first of virginity and 
next of speech. 

453.— MELEAGER 

Zeus who dwellest in heaven, the ox itself, a 
suppliant at thy altar, lows, begging to be saved 
from death. Release the plougher, son of Cronos ; 
for thou thyself, Ο king, didst become a bull to 
bear Europa across the sea. 

1 She wove a robe and told her story to her sister by the 
voice of the nepnis or weaving-comb. 

253 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

454.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

TiVas av £t7rot λόγου? Καλλιόπη cis Τΐωργιον 
Ούτος εμος γενετής γνήσιος, ου Κρονίδης. 

455.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Τινας αν €ΐ7τοι λόγους Απόλλων π€ρΙ Ομηρου 
"Άειδον μεν ε<γών, (χάρασσε δε θείος "Ομηρος. 

456.— ΑΛΛΟ 

ΤΙασιφάη προς τον Ερωτα 

Ει ποθεειν μ* εδίδαξας εν ούρεσι ταυρον άΧήτην, 
μυκηθμόν με δίδαξον, ότω φίΧον άνδρα καΧεσσω. 

457.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Τι αν €ΐποι Αχιλλίυς τρωθίντος Α-γαμΑμνονοζ 

"Εγι/ω? νυν, Άγάμεμνον, εμον φθισήνορα θυμόν 
εγνως εν σταδίησιν όσον σθένος "Άκτορός εστί. 
νυν yap πάντες οΧοντο τετ} ποΧυπημονι Χώβη• 
σοϊ δ' αύτω μέγα πήμα φάνη, θανάτοιο χερειον. 
αφροσύνης κακά, έργα και άσχετα πενθεα πάσχεις, 5 
ος πάσιν Δαναοϊσιν άρήιον ερκος ετύχθης. 

458.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Τι αν ci7roi Όδυσσ€υξ cVi/?as της 'Ιθάκης 

Χαΐρ' 'Ιθάκη• μετ άεθΧα, μετ αΧηεα πικρά θαΧάσσης 
άσπασίως τεον ουδας Ίκάνομαι, οφρα νοήσω 

254 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 454-458 

454. — Anonymous 
What Calliope would say to George 
This man, not Zeus, is my true father. 

455. — Anonymous 
What Apollo would say about Homer 
The song is mine, but divine Homer wrote it down. 

456. — Anonymous 

Pasiphae to Love 

If thou hast taught me to love a bull that roams 
over the mountains, teach me to low so that I may 
call my dear husband. 

457. — Anonymous 

What Achilles would say if Agamemnon were wounded 

Thou knowest now, Agamemnon, my man-destroy- 
ing wrath ; thou knowest how great is Hector's 
strength in hand-to-hand combat. For all have now 
perished owing to thy insult fraught with disaster, 
and a greater woe, worse than death, has come upon 
thee. Thou sufferest the evil and intolerable sorrow 
due to thy folly, who wast the defence in battle of 
all the Greeks. 

458. — Anonymous 

What Ulysses would say on landing in Ithaca 

Hail, Ithaca ! After all my labours and the bitter 
woes of the sea, right glad am I to reach thy soil, in 

2 55 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

Λαερτην, αΧοχόν τε και άγΧαον υίεα μοΰνον 

σος γαρ έρως κατεθεΧξεν εμον νόον. οίδα καϊ αυτός, 

" ώς ούδεν γΧυκιον ης πατρίδος ούδε τοκήων. 5 

459.— ΑΛΛΟ 
Τι άν €ΐ7τοι Άχιλλίυς όρων τον 'Οδυσσέα iv ά?>η 
Άτρεκεως πάντων ποΧυμήχανός εστίν 'Οδυσσεύς* 
ζωος ΐών ενόησεν α μη θέμις εστίν ίδεσθαι, 
νερτεριον κευθμώνα καϊ α,Χγεα πίκρα θανόντων, 
πως ο ετΧη πρόΧιπειν ίερον φάος; ή τίς ανάγκη 
ηγαγεν ουκ εθεΧοντα; δοΧων άκόρητος ετύχθη 5 

εν χθονϊ και πεΧάγεσσι καϊ εν νεκύεσσιν 'Οδυσσεύς. 

460.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Τι αν euroi Άχιλλευς όρων τα όπλα κΐίμίνα 

Μήτερ, τεύχεα ταύτα καϊ άγΧαα δώρα κομίζεις 
αγχεμάχω σεο παιδί, τα μη πάρος εδρακεν άνηρ' 
όΐδα δε νυν οτι Παλλάς εφ' "Εκτορι χβϊρα κορύσσει 
ημετερην, και Ύρωσιν άεικεα Χοιγον εγείρει. 

461.— ΑΛΛΟ 

TiVas a j/ ίίποι λόγους 6 Πυρρό? ίπιβας Tpoias 
Μόχθος εμού γενετήρος άμύμονος ου τεΧος εύρεν 
αύτάρ εγώ Ύρώεσσι φόνον πάντεσσι κορύσσων 
ηΧυθον ηνορέη γαρ ύπερτερον εύχος άείρω, 
και ΤΙρίαμον βασιΧήα, καϊ ους προΧέΧοιπεν ΆχιΧ- 

Χεύς, 
πάντας όμου κατά μώΧον εμον μένος όιδεν οΧεσσαι, 5 
καϊ Ύροίης πτοΧ'ιεθ ρον άρηίον εζαΧαπάξω, 
και Ααναοΐς δεκέτηρον εμον δόρυ μόχθον άνύσσει. 

256 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 459-461 

hope to see Laertes and my wife and glorious only 
son. Love of thee soothed my heart ; I myself 
know that "nothing is sweeter than a man's country 
and his parents." 

459. — Anonymous 
What Achilles would say on seeing Ulysses in Hades 1 

Of a truth Odysseus is the most resourceful of 
men. Alive he looks on what it is not allowed to 
see, the infernal recesses and the bitter pains of the 
dead. How did he venture to leave the holy light? 
Did some necessity bring him here against his will ? 
Odysseus never has his fill of cunning devices on 
earth, on the sea, and among the dead. 

460. — Anonymous 
What Achilles would have said when he saw the Armour 
lying before him 2 
Mother, thou bringest to thy valiant son this 
armour, a glorious gift such as no man ever looked 
on. Now I know that Pallas arms my hand against 
Hector, and prepares disgrace and death for the 
Trojans. 

461. — Anonymous 
What Pyrrhus would say on entering Troy 
The labour of my noble father was not completed, 
but I have come, preparing slaughter for all the 
Trojans ; for I glory more exceedingly in my valour, 
and my might is capable of destroying in battle 
King Priam and all that Achilles left alive. The 
warlike city of Troy will I sack, and my spear shall 
complete the ten years' labour of the Greeks. 

1 See Od. xi. 467 seq. 2 See II. xix. 12 seq. 

257 



GREEK ANTHOi.OGV 



462.— ΑΛΛΟ 






Τίνας αν €?7T0i λόγους Λτ/ίδάμεια τον ΤΙνρρον πορθησαντος 
την Ύροίαν 

ΐΐάσαν εμής κραδίης -χαΧεττην άπέπαυσας άνίην, 
υμετέρου yεvετ ήρος Άχιλλεο? ε'ίνεκα πότμου, 
ον Ύροίη στονόεσσα κατεκτανεν. αλλά συ ττάσαυ 
"λΧιον εξαΧάτταξας' εεΧδομενοισι δ' Άχαιοϊς 
άφθιτον ώττασας ευχος, ο μη δεκετηρος ενυους 
ττασιν μαρναμένοις Δαναοϊς χρόνος ευρεν άνύσσαι. 

463.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Τι' αν enrol "Εκτωρ όρων τόν Αχιλλέα eV τοις όπλοις 

ΙΙηΧείδην κοτεουσα ττάΧιν θώρηξεν 'Αθήνη 
εντεσιν άθανάτοις. ή piytov εσσεται aXyos 
αϊνομόροις Ύρώεσσι, καϊ "Κκτορι, καϊ γενετήρι, 
ότπτόταν εντεα ταύτα θεός ττόρεν άνερι τωδε. 

464.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Τι αν €ΐ7τοι Πάρις τρωθίντος Μενελάου 

"Ερρετε οι ξύμπαντες, eXey^ee^, Αί^ιαΧήες, 
άρτι θανών Μενέλαος εμον μ^α κϋδος άεξει. 

46δ.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Τι'νας αν «ιποι λο'γους Αλ#αια παρακαλούσα τον Μελέαγρου 

Ύεκνον εμόν, yεvεης εττιΧηθεαι, οΰδ' άXεyίζη 
πατρίδος όΧΧυμένης, βριαρην δ' άπόειπες άκωκήν, 
αισχυνών Καλυδώνα καϊ Οίνέα καϊ ναετήρας. 

258 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 462-465 

462. — Anonymous 

What Deidamia would say when Pyrrhus had 
sacked Troy 

Thou hast made to cease all the heavy woe of my 
heart for the fate of thy father Achillea, whom 
mournful Troy slew. To the Greeks who were 
eager for it thou hast given the undying glory which 
the ten years of war could not accomplish for the 
whole host of the Danai. 

463. — Anonymous 

What Hector would say when he saw Achilles 
in the Armour 

Athena in her wrath has again clothed the son of 
Peleus in immortal mail. Some worse woe shall befall 
the unhappy Trojans and Hector and his father, 
since the goddess gave this man this armour. 

464. — Anonymous 

What Paris would say when Menelaus was wounded l 

Out on you all, ye craven Argives ! Menelaus is 
dead now and gives me greater glory. 

465. — Anonymous 

What Althaea, entreating Mcleagcr, would say 2 

My son, thou forgettest thy family and heedest 

not thy country's fate. Thou hast cast aside thy 

strong sword, putting Oeneus and Calydon and her 

people to shame. 

1 See II. iv. 104. 2 See II. ix. 584 seq. 

2 59 
s 2 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

466.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Τινα$ αν £ΐ7τοι λόγου? Αλκηστις, του Άτμητου £€ΐ'£αντος 
λέοντα και κάπρον €is τό όχημα 

'Ηνορέης κΧυτα ερηα τεην έστεψαν άττήνην, 
καϊ ννμφην βοοωσιν άριστοπονοις νμεναίοις. 

467.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Ttvas αν €t7roi λόγους ό Πάλεις άκονων ότι άττόμαχόζ 
«ττιν Αχιλλίυς 

ΤΙηΧιά&ες σκοπιαί, κονροτρόφοι, είπατε παιδί, 
ον Πείρων έδίδαξεν άριστενειν ενϊ χάρμη, 
μήνιν άπορρΐψαι και Xoiyiov εχθος Άχαιοΐς. 

468.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Τινας αν (ΐποί Xoyovs η Ήρα άποθεωθ^ντος Ηρακλέους 

Σ% αρετής ίδρώτι καΧην άπεδωκεν άμοιβην 

σος γενετής, " Ή ρακΧες , επει πόνος άσπετον εύχος 

άνδράσιν οίδεν άγειν μετ' άπείρονα κύκΧον άεθΧων. 

469.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Εις τό αυτό 

Σοι χάριν εξετεΧεσσε πόνος και άθεσφατος ίδρώς, 
χώρον εχειν ποΧύοΧβον, ον ου πάρος εΧΧαχεν άνήρ. 

470.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Τι αν £ΐ7Γ0ΐ Αχιλλευς προς τόν Αιαντα φιλκ»θήναι 

Ου θέμις εν φθιμενοισιν εχειν κότον ό'λγεα <γαίης 
καΧΧείψας άγάπαζε τεόν φίΧον ον yap 'Οδυσσεύς 



20θ 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 466-470 

466. — Anonymous 

What Alcestis would say when Admctus yoked a 

Lion and Boar to his Chariot x 

Great deeds of valour crowned thy chariot, and 
with excellently composed wedding hymns men 
celebrate thy bride. 

467. — Anonymous 

What Peleus would say on hearing that Achilles 

absented himself from the Battle 

Ye peaks of Pelias, who nursed him, tell my son, 
whom Chiron taught to be first in battle, to cast oil 
his wrath and fatal enmity to the Greeks. 

468. — Anonymous 
What Hera would say when Heracles was deified 
Thy father, Heracles, has well rewarded thy valiant 
toil, since labour can bring to men unsurpassable 
renown after an infinite round of labours. 

469. — Anonymous 
On the Same 

Labour and immense toil procured thee the favour 
of occupying a blessed seat that no man reached 
before thee. 

470. — Anonymous 
What Achilles would say to reconcile Ajax with Ulysses 

It is not permitted to nourish ill-will among the 
dead. Now thou hast escaped the sorrows of earth, 
love thy friend ; for Odysseus did not sin against 

1 Pelias had promised his daughter Alcestis to whoever 
could do thia. 

261 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

ήΧιτεν εις σε θεΧων, βριαρη 8ε σ' επεφνεν Άθήνη, 
Ζευς τε πατήρ, καϊ Motpa, καϊ ήεροφοϊτις ^Έψιννς. 
aWe 8ε τενχεα ρΐψεν ες άΧμνρα βενθεα πόΐ'του t 

Βία Θέτί?, καϊ νεϊκος άπεσβεσε σεΐο μενοινης. 

471.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Τινας αν ειποι λόγους Νέστωρ άκουσας 'Οδυσσέα 
£7ταΐ'€λί/όντα 

Έσσ'λό? άνήρ (fiuye πόντον άπηνεα καΧ μετά μόχθον 
ες πάτρην άφίκανεν, εμού Be κε φερτερος εϊη, 
ευ ΒεΒαως πτόΧιάς τε και ήθεα καϊ νόον άνΒρών. 

472.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Εις τον αυτόν 'Οδυσσέα 

Πολλά καμων νοστησεν άνηρ τΧήθυμος ΌΒνσσενς, 
αλλ' εμπης κΧεος εσχεν ανά γθόνα καϊ κατά πόντον 
άνΒράσιν εσσομενοισιν αεί πτοΧίπορθος ΌΒνσσεύς. 

473.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Τινας αν enrol λόγους ό Αγαμέμνων καθοπ\ισθίντο<ί 
Αχιλλεως 

"Ιλίος όφρυόεσσα κατήριπεν, άρτι 8ε πάσαν 
ΧηϊΒίην Δαναοΐσι θεός πόρεν, όππότ' ΆχιΧΧεύς, 
μήνιν άπορρίψας, φθισήνορα χείρα κορύσσει. 

474.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Τι' αν εΐττοι Ειδυ#ε'α 18ονσα την Ελίνην ev Φάρω 

Οικτείρω σον κάΧΧος, επει Διός εσσι ^ενεθΧη. 
είσοροω yap άγαΧμα Βιοτρεφές' άτρεκεως 8ε 

202 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 47i~474 

thee of his own will, but the strong hand of Athena 
killed thee, and Father Zeus, and Fate, and the 
Erinys that walks in darkness. Would that divine 
Thetis had east the armour into the salt depths of 
the sea, stilling the strife of thy heart. 

471. — Anonymous 
What Nestor would say on learning of Ulysses' return 
The good man has escaped the merciless sea, and 
after toil has reached his fatherland, and he must be 
my better, as he has become well acquainted with 
cities and customs and the minds of men. 

472. — Anonymous 
On Ulysses 
It was after much toil that long-suffering Odys- 
seus came home ; yet Odysseus, the sacker of cities, 
surely has great fame on land and sea among men of 
future times. 

473. — Anonymous 
What Agamemnon would say when Achilles was armed 
Beetling Ilion is fallen, and God has given it a 
prey to the Greeks now that Achilles has cast off his 
wrath and arms his murderous hands. 

474. — Anonymous 
What Idothea would say on seeing Helen in Pharos * 
I pity thy beauty, since thou art the child of Zeus. 
For I see a god-nourished form, and verily thou wast 

1 According to the story followed by Euripides in his 
Helena, the real Helen was in Egypt during the Trojan war. 

263 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



Ύρωσί τε και Ααναοΐσι μάχη Βεκετηρος ετύχθης. 
•που Αιος αι^ιόχοιο, τεοΰ ηενετήρος, άρωγαί; 
εμπης δ ερχεο θάσσον, άττήμονα νόστου εΧούσα 
Ειίδοθεης ίότητι, κακής επι νώτα θαΧάσσης. 



475.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Τινας αν «ποι λογούς Ελ(νη όρώσα τον Meve'Aaov και τον 
Πα'ριοα μονομαχονντας 

Ευρώπης Άσίης τε δορισθενέες βασιΧήες, 
νμΐν άμφοτεροισιν επί ξνρού ίσταται ακμής, 
τις Κ€ν εμε τΧηθυμος εΧοι δύστηνον άκοίτης' 
Ζευς Βε πατήρ Βικάσειεν, ανευθε Βε Κύπρος ενείης, 
μη παΧιν άΧΧος εΧη με ^αμοκΧόπος, αίσχος 
Άχαιοΐς. 

476.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Τι αν £?7Γ0ΐ Εκτωρ, του Πάτροκλου μη $υνηθ(ντο<; 
/3αστάσαι το δόρυ Αχιλλί'ως 

Έζημίωσας ασθενών τον 'Έκτορα' 
φέρεις yap ημΐν εΧΧιπή σκνΧεύματα. 

477.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Τί αν 617ΓΟΙ η Θίτις, του Ύηλίφου σκ(λισθύτος υπο της 
άμττίΧου 

"ΑμπεΧε, τί πράξωμεν, 'όταν Δαφναΐος ΆπόΧΧων 
πτ ορθόν εμον κΧίνη hi 'ΑΧεξάνδροιο βεΧεμνων; 



1 See //. iii. 324 seq. 
264 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 475-477 

the cause of the ten years' war between Greeks and 
Trojans. Where is the help of aegis-bearing Zeus 
thy father? But go soon on thy way, making, by 
the kindness of Idothea, a safe voyage home over 
the back of the cruel sea. 



475. — Anonymous 

What Helen would say on seeing the Combat between 
Paris and Menelaus 1 

Ye warlike kings of Europe and Asia, for both of 
you it stands upon a razor's edge, which of you long- 
suffering men shall take unhappy me to wife. Let 
Father Zeus decide, but without Aphrodite's help, 
lest another thief of wedded women steal me, a 
disgrace to Greece. 

476. — Anonymous 

What Hector would say when Patroclus could not 
lift the Spear of Achilles 

Thy weakness has defrauded Hector, for thou 
bringest me defective spoils. 

477.— Anonymous 

What Thetis would say when Telephus was tripped 
up by the vine' 2 

Vine, what shall I do when Daphnaean Apollo lays 
low my vine-branch by the arrow of Alexander? 

2 Telephus, tripped up by a vine-branch, was overtaken 
and slain by Achillea. Thetis here foretells the death of 
Achilles. 

265 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



478.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Τι αν £ΐποι δ Ήρίαμος, του ΕλίΊου δίδοντος βονΧην τοις 
Έλλ?;σιν, Γνα Χηφθη Τροία 

Τα δώρα Χαμπρα προσφέρεις τη ττατρίδι. 



479.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Τι αν εΐποι ΤΙερσενς μετά την άναίρεσιν τοΰ κι/τους, της 
Ανδρομέδας μη θεΧονσης αντυν λαβείν 

—εΐο νόον ττέτρωσεν άμείΧιχα δέσμια ττέτρης, 
και Χίθον εκτεΧεσειε τεον δέμας όμμα Μεδούσης. 



480.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Τι άν εΐποι Ιπποδάμεια μετά την άναιρεσιν του Οινόμαου, 
Πέλοπος μη θεΧησαντο<; αντην λαβείν 

α. Άπεστράφης νυν, ως Χαβων έξουσίαν 
β. ταύτη yap ου πέφυκε συντρέγειν "Έρως• 
'Έρως yap άΧΧην ανταμείβεται τρίβον. 



481.— ΙΟΤΛΙΑΝΟΤ 2ΧΟΑΑ2ΤΙΚΟΤ 

Βραδυτερον παρελθόντος 

Έσπέριός μ εδάμασσεν ομού και ττρώϊος ΰπνος, 
ος μεν εττιβρίσας, ος δε με μη κα\έσας• 

ων εξ αμφοτέρων 6 μεν έρρέτω, ος δε παρείη 
ΪΧαος, ώράων μέτρον επισταμένος. 



266 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 478-481 

478. — Anonymous 

What Priam would say when Helen advised the 
Greeks how to take Troy 

Splendid is the gift thou offerest thy country. 



479. — Anonymous 

What Perseus would say after slaying the Monster, 
when Andromeda refused him 

The cruel fetters of the rock have turned thy heart 
to stone, and now let the eye of Medusa turn thy 
body, too, to stone. 

480. — Anonymous 

What Hippodamia would say after the Death of 
Oenomaus if Pelops refused to marry her 

Hippodamia. Thou turnest thy back on me now 
thou hast liberty to enjoy me. Pelops. Yea, for Love 
does not go hand in hand with such liberty. Love 
walks in another path. 

481.— JULIANUS SCHOLASTICUS 

(When he came too late to lecture) 

Both evening sleep and morning sleep overcame 
me, the latter having been too heavy and the former 
not having invited me. Let morning sleep begone 
and evening sleep come in kindly wise* knowing the 
just number of hours. 

267 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

482.— ΛΓΑΘΙΟΤ SXOAASTIKOT 

ΟύτιΒανοϊ μερόπων, ει καϊ μέγα ρεξαμεν έργον, 

ούτινος εις μνήμην Βηρον επερχόμεθα• 
οι δ' άβαθοι, κήν μηΒεν, άναπνεύσωσι Βε μοΰνον, 

ως Αίβυς εΐπεν άνήρ, τουτ άΒάμαντι μένει. 
Βήποτε yap Ζήνωνα ποΧισσοΰχον βασιΧήα, 6 

παίγνιον άφράστων εκτεΧεοντα κύβων, 
τοίη ποικιΧυτευκτος εΧεν θέσις, ευτ άπο Χευκοΰ, 

του και οπιοθιΒίην εις όΒον ερχομένου, 
επτά μεν έκτος εχεν, μίαν εϊνατος' αύτάρ 6 σούμμος 

Βισσάς άμφιέπων Ισος εην Βεκάτω• 10 

ός re πεΧει μετά σοΰμμον εχεν Βύο, μουνάΒα δ' άΧλην 

ψήφον την ττν μάτην άμφιεπεσκε Βίβος. 
ά\\α μεΧας Βισσας μεν εν ογΒοάτω Χιπε χωρώ 

και τοσσας ετέρας ες θεσιν ένΒεκάτην 
άμφϊ ΒνωΒέκατον Βε Βιεπρεπον εϊκεΧοι άΧΧαι, 15 

και τρισκαιΒεκάτω ψήφος εκείτο μια' 
ϊίζυγες \\ντίγονον Βιεκόσμεον άλλα καϊ αύτω 

Ισος εμιμνε τύπος πεντεπικαιΒεκάτω, 
οκτωκαιΒεκάτω πανομοίϊος• εισέτι δ' άΧΧας 

είχεν ΒιχθαΒίας τετρατος εκ πυμάτου. 20 

αύτάρ άναξ Χευκοΐο Χαχων σημήϊα πεσσού, 

και την εσσομενην ου νοεων παγίΒα, 
τριχθαΒΊας άΒόκητα βαΧων ψηφϊΒας απ ηθμού, 

πύργου Βουρατεου κΧίμακι κευθομενη, 
Βοία καϊ εξ καϊ πέντε κατήγαγεν αυτ'ικα δ' οκτώ 25 

άζυγας ειχεν 6\ας πρόσθε μεριζομένας. 
τάβΧην φεύγετε πάντες, επεϊ και κοιρανος αύτος 

κείνης τάς αΧόγους ούχ ύπάΧυζε τυχας. 

1 The game seems to have borne some resemblance to this, 
but is obscure. White's eight singles are obviously produced 

268 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAM 482 

482.— AGATHIAS SCHOLASTICUS 

We Mortals of no account, even if we perform 
great deeds, do not survive long in the memory of 
anyone ; but as for the great, if they do nothing, if 
they only breathe, as the Libyan said, it is engraved 
in adamant. For instance Zeno, the lord and emperor 
of our city, while in the middle of a game played 
with the capricious dice, found himself in this com- 
plicated position : when of the white men who were 
on their way back, the sixth line contained seven, 
the ninth one, and the tenth and summus two each, 
while the line after the summus had two, and the last 
piece was on the divus. Black had two on the eighth 
line, and as many on the eleventh ; on the twelfth 
were two, and one on the thirteenth. There were 
two on Antigonus and also on the fifteenth and 
eighteenth, and the fourth line from the last (the 
twentieth) also had two. It was the king's turn to 
play for White, and not seeing the trap in store for 
him, he cast the three dice from the wooden box 
with its hidden ladder, and threw two, six, and five, 
so that at once he had eight single pieces in all 
which had formerly been next others (?). Avoid 
backgammon, 1 as the king himself did not escape 
from its blind chance. 



by the break-up of the three pairs, the single on the " divus " 
for some reason not being moved forward. 

269 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

483.— ΑΛΗΑΟΝ 

Eac φον'ιων ΙΙερσών φόνιον φυτον ijyaye Τίερσεύς, 
παιδί (~)εoyvώστoυ του θανάτου πρόφασιν. 

484.— ΠΑΛΛΑΔΑ 

\\σκον των ανέμων εΧαβέν ττοτ€ δώρον 'Οδυσσεύς 
πόντον έπιπΧειων χρήμα yap ην τι peya. 

,ίλλ' εμος Αίολο? ούτος έχων άνεμώΧιον ητορ, 
ορνεον εκπέμπει των ανέμων "/εμίσας. 

πνεύματα μοι πτερόεντα, φίΧος, ναι πνεύματα 

πέμπεις• 5 

ου δύναμαι δε φα^/εΐν ΘΧιβομένους άνεμους. 

485.— ΗΛΙΟΔΩΡΟΤ 

Ύάν Ρ)έτιν άείδω, χρυσοέθειρα θέτιν, 
Νηρέος άθανάταν είναΧίοιο κόραν, 
τάν Δί09 έννεσίτ] Π?;λει yημaμέvav, 
ταν άΧος ayXatav, άμετέραν ΥΙαφίην' 
α τον δουριμανή, τον ο' 'Αρεα πτολέμων, 5 

Ελλάδος άστεροπάν, έξέτεκεν Xayόvωv 
δϊον ΆχιΧΧήα, του κΧέος ούράνιον 
τω ΰπο ΐΐύρρα τέκεν παϊδα ΝεοπτυΧεμον, 
περσεποΧιν Ύρώων, ρυσίποΧιν Δαναών. 
ίΧήκοις ήρως άμμι ΝεοπτόΧεμε, 10 

οΧβιε, ΐΐυθιάδι νυν χθονί κευθόμενε' 
δέχνυσο δ εύμενέων τάνδε θυηποΧίην, 
παν δ' άπέρυκε δέος υμετέρας πόΧιος. 
τάν Θέτιν άείδω, χρυσοέθειρα Θετίΐ/. 

270 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 483-485 

483. — Anonymous 
On a Child who was poisoned by Peach l Kernels 
From the murderous Persians Perseus brought 

back a murderous fruit which caused the death of 

Theognostus' child. 

484.— PALLADAS 

Odysseus once, when sailing on the sea, received 
as a gift a bag of winds — a very valuable thing. 
But this my Aeolus of the windy heart sends me a 
fowl stuffed with wind. You send me winged winds, 
my friend, yes wind, and I can't eat compressed air. 

485.— HELIODORUS 

(From his Aethiopica, iii. 2) 
I sing Thetis, golden-haired Thetis, the immortal 
daughter of the sea-god Nereus, who by the counsel 
of Zeus wedded Peleus, the glory of the sea, our 
Aphrodite, her who bore from her womb the raging 
spearman, the Ares of Avar, the lightning of Greece, 
divine Achilles, whose glory reaches to heaven. By 
him Pyrrha bore Neoptolemus, the sacker of Troy 
and saviour of Greece. Be gracious unto us, blessed 
hero Neoptolemus, now lying in Delphian earth ; 
receive favourably this sacrifice and ward off all fear 
from our city. Thetis I sing, golden-haired Thetis. 

1 = Peisicuin malum. 

271 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



486.— ΠΑΛΛΑΔΑ 



Ύην Χαπάραν, την αυτός άποσφί-γξας αποπέμπεις, 
ευρεν ό παις Χύσας φύσαν ύπηνεμιον. 

487.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Βρώματά μοι χοίρων συκιζομενων προεθηκας, 
ξηρών, διψαΧέων, Κυπρόθεν ερχομένων. 

αλλ' εμε συκωθεντα μαθών η σφάξον ετοίμων, 
ή σβεσον εκ ΰίψης νάματι τω Κ,υπρίω. 

488.— ΤΡΤΦΩΝ02 

Ύερπης εύφόρμιγγα κρίκων σκιάδεσσιν άοιδάν 
κάτθαν \ενοστησας iv Αακεδαιμονίοις, 

ουκ άορι πΧηγείς, ούδ' εν βεΧει, άλλ' ενϊ σύκω 
■χείΧεα. φευ' προφάσεων ουκ απορεί θάνατον. 

489.— ΠΑΛΛΑΔΑ 

Γραμματικού θυ-γάτηρ ετεκεν φιΧότητι μνγεΐσα 
παώίον άρσενικόν, θηΧυκόν, ούΒετερον. 

490.— ΗΛΙΟΔΩΡΟΤ 

ΤΙαντάρβην φορεουσα πυρός μη τάρβει ερωήν 
ρηϊ&ίως Μοίραις και τάδόκητα πεΧει. 

491.— ΘΕΩΝΟΧ 

Μονόστιχον eis την ίβΒομάοΌ. 
Ζευς, "Αρης, ΐΐαφίη, ΧΙήνη, Κρόνος," ΗΧιος, Έρμης. 

1 A sort of haggis. 

2 A citharoedus. Someone threw a fig into his mouth as 
he was singing, and this killed him. 

272 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 486-491 

486.— PALLADAS 

When my slave untied the paunch 1 you sent me, 
after tying it up yourself, he found it to be a bellows 
full of air. 

487. — By the Same 

You served me the food of fig-fattened pigs from 
Cyprus, dry and thirst-provoking. But when you 
find me sufficiently fig-fattened, either kill me at 
once or quench my thirst with Cyprian wine. 

488.— TRYPHO 

Terpes, 2 harping beautifully at the Carneian feast 
of tabernacles, died . . . among the Lacedaemonians, 
not wounded by a sword or a missile, but by a fig 
on the lips. Alas ! Death is never at a loss for 
occasions. 

489.— PALLADAS 

A grammarian's daughter, having known a man, 
gave birth to a child which was masculine, feminine, 
and neuter. 

490.— HELIODORUS 

(From his Aelhiopica, viii. 11) 
When wearing the stone Pantarbes (Fear-all), fear 
not the force of fire. The unexpected 3 is easy for the 
Fates. 

491.— THEON 

A Monostickon on the Days of the Week 

Jove, Mars, Venus, Moon, Saturn, Sun, Mercury. 

* i.e. the paradox that the stoue is called " Fear-all," and 
yet fears not fire. 

273 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

492. <Ε£ς σκΐνη> στρατιώτου 

Κεΐτο δ' ομού σάκος, εγχος, <άκων>, θώρηξ, κόρυς, 
ϊππος. 

493.— ΑΛΛΟ 

'Ασπίς, τό£α, βελεμνα, κόρυς, ξίφος, άλκιμον εγχος. 

494.— ΑΛΛΟ 
Ίό?, τόξα, σάκος, κυνεη, δόρυ, φάσγανα, θώρηξ, 

495.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

'Ελλάδος ενναετήρες, άμεμφεες ήγεμονηες, 
μηκετι πιστά φεροιτε δολοφρονεουσι γυναιξί, 
θηλυτερη μ εδάμασσε, τον ου κτάνε &ήϊος"Έ>κτωρ. 

496.— ΑΘΗΝΑΙΟΤ 

Ω Έ,τοϊκών μύθων ειδήμονες, ω πανάριστα 
δόγματα ταΐς ίεραϊς ενθεμένοι σελίσιν, 

τάν άρετάν ψυχάς αγαθόν μόνον άδε yap ανδρών 
μούνα καϊ βίοτον ρύσατο και πόλιας. 

σαρκός δ άδυπάθημα, φίλον τέλος άνδράσιν άλλοις, 5 
ή μία των Μνήμης γνεσε θυγατέρων» 

497.— KPATHTOS 

'Έιρωτα παύει Χιμάς' ει δε μή, χρόνος, 
εάν δε μηδέ ταύτα την φλόγα σβέσΐ), 
θεραπεία σοι το λοιπόν ηρτήσθω βρόχος. 
Sayers, in Wellesley'e Anthologia Polyglotta, p. 187. 
274 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 492-497 

492. — Anonymous 
On a Soldier's Arms 
Together lay shield and sword, arrows, cuirass, 
helmet, horse. 

493. — Anonymous 
Another 
Shield, bow and arrows, helmet, sword, strong 
spear. 

494, — Anonymous 

Another 
Arrow, bow, shield, helmet, spear, sword, cuirass. 

495. — Anonymous 
(Spoken by Agamemnon) 
Dwellers in Greece, noble chieftains, place no 
trust any longer in perfidious women. A woman 
overcame me, whom my foe Hector slew not. 

496.— ATHENAEUS 

Hail ! ye who are learned in the Stoic lore, ye 
whose holy pages contain the very best of doctrines, 
that virtue is the soul's only good. This is the only 
doctrine that saves the lives and cities of men. But 
indulgence of the flesh, an end dear to others, is only 
approved by one of all Mnemosyne's daughters. 1 

497.— CRATES 

Hunger puts an end to love, or if not hunger, 
time. But if neither of these put out the fire, the 
only cure left for you is to hang yourself. 

1 i.e. Erato. 

275 
τ 2 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



498.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 



Mr; θάπτειν τον άθαπτον, εα κυσϊ κύρμα γενέσθαι• 
γή πάντων μήτηρ μητροφθόρον ου δέχετ άνδρα. 



499.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Χιγάλέως φέρεται ποΧιός χρόνος' άΧΧα παρέρπων 
και φωνας κΧέπτει φθεγγομένων μερόπων, 

και μη φαινόμενος τους φαινομένους αφανίζει, 

καΐ μη φαινομένους εις φανερόν προφέρει. 5 

ώ ζωής αόριστος εν άνθρώποισι τεΧευτη, 
ημαρ επ η μα ρ αεί προς ζόφον ερχομένων. 

500.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Μηκέτι κΧηρονόμους ονομάζετε φέγγος ορώντας' 
τους δ' αποθνήσκοντας κΧηρονόμους Χέγετε. 

οι νυν κΧηρονόμοι νέκυες μέγα κέρδος εχουσι, 
την άναχώρησιν του μογερού βιότου. 

501.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Την πόΧιν οι νέκυες πρότερον ζώσαν κατέΧειψαν 
ημείς δε ζώντες την πόΧιν έκφέρομεν. 

502.— ΠΑΛΛΑΔΑ 

Κ,ονδίτου μοι δει. το δε κονδΐτον πόθεν εσγεν 
τοΰνομα; της φωνής εστί yap άΧΧότριον 

της των 'ΈιΧΧήνων ει 'Ρωμαϊκώς δε καΧεϊται, 
αυτός αν είδείης, 'Τωμαϊκώτατος ων. 

σκεύασον οΰν μοι τούτο' το γαρ κατέγον με νόσημα 5 
του στομάχου χρήζει τούδε, Χέγουσι, ποτού. 

276 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 498-502 

498. — Anonymous 
On a Persian 
Bury not the unburied ; leave him to be the prey 
of dogs. Earth, the mother of all, will not receive 
the man who denies the bed of his mother. 

499. — Anonymous 

Grey Time goes along in silence, but as he creeps 
by he steals the voices of speaking men. Himself 
unseen, he makes the seen unseen and brings the 
unseen to light. Ο undetermined end of the life of 
men who day by day advance towards the dark ! 

500. — Anonymous 

No longer call the living heirs, but call the dead 
heirs. The dead are now heirs, and gain a great 
inheritance, depai - ture from this wretched life. 

501. — Anonymous 
On an Earthquake 
The dead used to leave the city alive behind them, 
but we living now carry the city to her grave. 

502.— PALLADAS 

I require "conditum." 1 Where did " conditum " 
get its name from ? for it is alien to the Greek 
tongue.• If it is a Latin word you will know, who 
are such a good Latin scholar. Prepare it for me, 
then, for the malady of the stomach from which I 
suffer requires this drink, I am told. 

1 Wine spiced with honey and pepper. 

277 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

503.— TOY ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Ουκ αλόγω? εν διζύφοις δύναμίν τίνα θείαν 
είναι εφην. χθες <γοΰι> ^δίζυφον εν χρον'ιψ 

ήπιάΧφ κάμνοντι τεταρταίω περιήψα, 
και yeyovev ταχέως, οία κρότων, ΰηιής, 

504.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 
Ε is τά? Μούσα? 
ΚαΧΧιόπη σοφίην 7)ρωίδος εύρεν άοιδής• 
Κλ«ώ καΧΧιχορου κιθάρης μεΧιηδεα μοΧττήν 
Έ^ύτερίΓη τραηικοϊο χορού ττοΧνηχέα φωνήν 
ΝίεΧττομενη θνητοϊσι μεΧίφρονα βάρβιτον εύρε• 
Τερψιχόρη χαρίεσσα πόρεν τεχνημονας αύΧούς' δ 
ύμνους αθανάτων 'Ερατώ ττοΧυτερττεας εύρε' 
τέρψιας όρχηθμοϊο ΤΙοΧύμνια ττάνσοφος εύρεν 
[άρμονίην ττάσησι ΤΙοΧύμνια δώκεν άοιδαΐς'] 
Ούρανίη ττόΧον εύρε και ουρανίων χορον άστρων 
κωμικον εύρε %άΧεια βίον και ηθεα κεδνά. 10 

505.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Εις τα? αυτά? 

Ουκ ϊδε Ύερψιχόρην ό ζωγράφος, άλλ' ΰττο τεχνας 
ψεύδεται όφθαΧμούς δείκεΧον άτρεκίη. 



ΕΙ' ττοτε τερψινόοιο, φίΧος, φόρμιγγος ακούσης, 
την 'Ερατώ θαύμαζε τόσης ειδήμονα τέχνης. 

Έίύτερπη δονάκεσσι ττοΧυτρήτοισι Χι<γαίνει, 
πνεύμα σοφής όχετηγον επισττεί ρούσα μεΧίσσης. 



278 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 503-505 

503. — By the Same 

I was not wrong in saying that there is a divine 
virtue in dizyphi. 1 The other day at least I applied a 
dizyphos to one suffering from a chronic quartan ague, 
and he became at once as fit as a dog-tick. 



504. — Anonymous 
On the Muses 
Calliope discovered the art of heroic verse ; Clio 
the sweet music of the lyre which accompanies the 
dance ; Euterpe the sonorous voice of the tragic 
chorus ; Melpomene found for mortals the honey- 
toned barbitos, and charming Terpsichore gave us 
the artful Hute ; Erato invented cheering hymns to 
the gods ; learned Polymnia the joys of the dance ; 
Urania discovered the pole and the dance of the 
stars of heaven, and Thalia the plots and good moral 
teaching of comedy. 

505. — Anonymous 
On the Same 
The painter never saw Terpsichore, but owing to 
his art the image deceives our eyes by its truth. 



If, my friend, you ever hear the lyre that cheers 
the heart, admire Erato, who possesses such skill. 



Euterpe shrills on perforated reeds, scattering on 
them and forcing through them the spirit of the 
skilled bee. 

1 An unknown word, but possibly another form of ζίζυφον, 
the fruit of the jujube-tree, 

279 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

Κ,ωμικον άμφιεττω Θάλεία μελό?, epya Βε φώτων 
ουχ οσίων θνμίιΧησι φιλοκροτάΧοισιν άθύρω. 



Έιίκόνα σης σοφίης ποτιΒερκεο' ΚαΧΧιόπης jap 

εικόνα στ) κραΒίη Χάμβανε την σοφίην. 10 



Ααφνοκόμοις Φοίβοιο τταρα τριττόΒεσσι ττόΧενω 
Κ,Χειώ, μαντοσύνης Μούσα και Ίστορίης. 



Ονρανίη ψήφοιο θεορρήτω τινϊ μετρώ 
άστρώην εΒίΒαξα τταΧινΒίνητον ανάγκην. 

Έ,κεπτεο γαΧκεόφωνον εττισττ έργου σαν άοιΒην 15 

ΜεΧπομένην, ερατής ΐστορα εύεπίης. 



Xiyay, φθεγγομένη τταΧάμης θεΧξίφρονα τταΧμόν, 
νεύματι φωνήεσσαν άπαγγεΧΧουσα σιωττην. 

506.— ΠΛΑΤΩΝΟΣ 

Έννεα τάς Μούσας φασίν τίνες' ώς οΧι<γώρως' 
ήνίΒε καΐ %αττφω Αεσβόθεν η δεκάτη. 

507.— ΚΑΛΛΙΜΑΧΟΤ 

'Ησίοδου τό τ άεισμα και ο τρόπος• ου τον άοιΒών 
εσχατον, άλλ' όκνέω μη τό μεΧιχρότατον 

των επεων 6 ΖοΧεύς άττεμάξατο. χαίρετε, Χεπταϊ 
ρήσιες, Άρήτον σύμβολον άγρυπνίης. 



1 This refers to pantomime or, as we should now call it, 
"ballet." 

280 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 506-507 

I, Thalia, am concerned with comic verse, and I 
present in play, on the scene that loves the casta- 
nets, the actions of immoral people. 



Look on the image of thy wisdom ; for thy heart 
should conceive Calliope's image to be wisdom. 



I, Clio, dwell by the laurelled tripods of Phoebus, 
the Muse of piOphecy and history. 



I, Urania, through calculations revealed by God, 
teach the recurring necessity of the stars' motions. 



Look on Melpomene, skilled in lovely eloquence, 
giving force to brazen-voiced epic song. 



I, Polymnia, am silent, but speak through the 
entrancing motions of my hands, conveying by my 
gestures a speaking silence. 1 

506.— PLATO 

Some say the Muses are nine, but how carelessly ! 
Look at the tenth, Sappho from Lesbos. 

507.— CALLIMACHUS 
On the Phaenomena of Aratus 
The rhythm and the manner are Hesiod's. He of 
Soli took as a model not the worst of poets, but, I 
am afraid, the most honeyed of his verses. 2 Hail ! 
delicate phrases, the monument of Aratus' sleepless 
nights. 

2 It is difficult to see the point, but I do not venture to 
adopt Toup's μ^ <οΰ>, "not the most honeyed." The refer- 
ence is to Hesiod, Works and Days, 383 seq. 

281 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

508.— ΠΑΛΛΑΔΑ 

Οταν σεΧη τις ήμεραν iSeiv καΧήν, 

συντνγχάνων σοι γίνεται καΧήμερος• 

τουναντίον he και τις ει θεΧοι -παθείν, 

μη συντυγων σοι γίνεται κακήμερος. 

509.— [ΛΤΣΙΣΤΡΑΤΟΤ] 

Κωλίαδε? he γυναίκες ερετμοισι φρνξουσιν. 

510.— ΑΑΗΑΟΝ 

Γήμε Κριτωνιανος με, Έ,υΧων ετεκνωσεν εκΧήθην 
ΜεΧτίνη• πΧάσθην avhpos εμού τταΧάμαις. 

511.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Χιονέην τρίγα ΤΙαιηων εκεΧευε με χρυσω 
haιhάXXειv ά<γανοφροσύνη, ετεΧεσσα hi χαίρων, 
οννεκεν εξ έμεθεν τόhε οι θνμήρες εκρινεν. 

512.— ΑΔΗΑΟΝ 
Ets βίβλον 
Κύμενεως ΤΙρώτοιο hεhε<y μένος opyia βίβΧον 
ΦιΧοπόνου <γραφί&εσσι heheiypeva βενθεα μύθων, 
κοιράνου Αύσονίοισι hιhάσκaXε, ιΧαος εϊης. 

513.— ΚΡΙΝΑ ΓΟΡΟΤ 

Δράμασιν εν ποΧΧοΐσι hιέ^Γpeπες, οσσα Mεvavhpoς 
εηραφεν, η Μουσέων συν μίτ} η Χαρίτων. 

1 From Herodotus, viii. 96. Colias was near Salamis, and 
the prophecy is said to have been made long before the 
battle. 2 Critonianus was a sculptor. 

282 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 508-513 

508.— PALLADAS 

If one wishes to enjoy a happy day, meeting you 
makes his day a good one ; but if one wishes the 
contrary, not meeting you makes it a bad one. 

509.— LYSISTRATUS THE SEER 
The women of Colias shall cook with oars. 1 

5 1 0. — Anonymous 

Critonianus married me, Solon begat me, my name 
was Meltine, I was moulded by the hands of my 
husband. 2 

511. — Anonymous 

Asclepios ordered me in his kindness to adorn his 
grey locks with gold, and I gladly did it, since he 
deemed this service on my part to be pleasing to 
him. 3 

512. — Anonymous 

On a Book 

Teacher of the ruler of Rome, be gracious to me, 
accepting kindly the mysteries of the book of Protus, 
the deep words revealed by the pen of Philoponus. 4 

513.— CRINAGORAS 
On an Actor 
Thou didst excel in the many dramas that Me- 
nander, with one of the Muses or one of the Graces, 
wrote. 

3 A dedication to Aesculapius after a cure. 

4 Protus appears to be author, Philoponus the scribe of 
the book, but all is mysterious. 

283 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

514.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Έ? ηάμον ευ ξέσσεν ι με νεοζεύκτοιο ΊΊροκίΧΧης 
τον νυμφών ΘαΧαμοις αίέν άειδόμενον, 

εύξάμενος raBe Μήνις ό κωμικός• "*Ώ 'Ύμέναιε, 
ερ~χεο και νύμφη καϊ ηαμέοντι φίλο?." 

515.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Ύρεΐς είσ α! Χάριτες' συ &ε 8η μία ταΐς τρισι ταύταις 
γεννήθης, ΐν εχωσ* α'ι Χάριτες Χάριτα. 

516.— ΚΡΙΝΑΓΟΡΟΤ 

""Έ,ρδοι την εμαθεν τις," οπού καϊ υπ* "Αλττ/α? 
άκρας 

Χηϊσταϊ Χασίαις άμφίκομοι κεφαΧαΐς, 
φωρής άτττομενοι, φυΧακας κυνας ώδ' άΧέονταΐ' 

χρίονται νεφροΐς ττΐαρ επεστιν όσον, 
ψευδόμενοι ρινών όξύν στίβον. ώ κακόν εΰρεΐν δ 

ρηίτεραι Αιγύων μητιες ή άηαθόν. 

517.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ ΘΕΣ2ΑΛΟΝΙΚΟΤ 

Όρφεύς θήρας έπειθε, συ δ 'Ορφέα' Φοίβος ενίκα 
τον Φ/ουγα, σοϊ δ' ε'ίκει μεΧπομένω, ΓΧάφνρε, 

οΰνομα και τέχνης και σώματος, ου κεν Άθήνη 
ερριψεν Χωτούς τοια μεΧιζομένη, 

οία συ ποικιΧοτερπές' άφνπνώσαι κεν άκούων δ 

αυτός ΤΙασιθέης ' Ύπνος εν ά<γκαΧισιν. 
1 I write ΐΐ ξίσσΐν for t(ev£ev. 

1 cp. v. 146. 

2 In the year 27 B.C. Crinagoras accompanied Augustus on 
his journey to Spain, passing through Liguria, 

28 4 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 514-517 

514. — Anonymous 

I am the god who is always chanted in the chambers 
of brides, and Menis, the comic actor, polished me 
well for the wedding of newly -married Procilla, and 
sent me with this prayer : " Go, Hymenaeus, in 
friendly wise, to both bride and bridegroom." 

5 1 5. — Anonymous 

The Graces are three, and thou art one born for- 
these three, that the Graces may have a Grace. 1 

516.— CR1NAGORAS 

" Let every man ply his own trade," indeed. 
Under the high Alps the shock-headed robbers, when 
they have a job in hand, thus avoid the watch-dogs. 
They grease themselves thickly with kidney-fat to 
deceive the dogs' keen scent. It is more ready in 
devising evil than good, the Ligurian mind. 2 

517.— ANTIPATER OF THESSALONICA 

Orpheus charmed beasts and thou charmest Or- 
pheus. Phoebus vanquished the Phrygian, 3 but he 
yields to thee when thou playest, Glaphyrus — the 
name 4 suits both thy art and thy person. Athena 
would never have thrown the flute away 5 had she 
made such music as thou, master of varied delight. 
Sleep himself, lying in Pasithea's arms, would awake 
if he heard thee. 

3 Marsyas. * = refined. 

5 Athena invented the flute, but threw it away in disgust 
as playing it disfigured her. 

285 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

518.— ΑΛΚΑΙΟΤ MESSHNIOT 

ΧΙακννου τείχη, Zeu 'ΟΧνμπιε' πάντα ΦιΧίππω 
άμβατά' χαΧκείας κΧεΐε πνΧας μακάρων. 

χθων μεν 8η καϊ πόντος νπο σκήπτροισι ΦιΧιππου 
Βέδμηταΐ' Χοι,πά δ' ά προς "ΟΧυμπον οδό?. 

519.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

ΤΙίομαι, ω Ληναΐε, ποΧύ πΧεον ή πίε ΚνκΧωψ 
νηδύν άνΒρομεων πΧησάμενος κρεάων 

πίομαι. ώς οφεΧόν ye και kytcapov εχθρού άράξας 
βρί^μα ΦιΧιππείης εξεπιον κεφαΧης' 

οσπερ εταιρείοιο πάρα, κρητήρι φόνοιο 5 

ιγεύσατ, iv άκρητω φάρμακα χευάμενος. 



520.— ΑΛΛΟ 

1 ΑΧκαίου τάφος ούτος, ον εκτανεν ή πΧατνφυΧΧος 
τιμωρός μοιχών γης θνγάτηρ ράφανος. 

521.— ΑΛΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Ε is 2απφώ πάρα των "Μουσών 

Ουκ άρα σοι ye οΧιζον επί κΧεος ώπασε ΧΙοΐρα 

ηματι, τω πρωτω φως ϊΒες άεΧίου, 
Έ,απφοΐ' σοϊ yap ρήσιν ενεύσαμεν άφθιτον ειμεν, 

συν he πατήρ πάντων νεύσεν epισφάpayoς' 
μεΧψη δ' εν πάντεσσιν άοίδιμος άμερίοισιν, 

ούδε κΧντάς φάμας εσσεαι ήπεΒανά. 

1 The epigram is of course ironical. Alcaeus, as the next 
epigram shows, was the bitter enemy of King Philip V. 

286 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 518-521 

518.— ALCAEUS OF MESSENE 

Heighten thy walls, Olympian Zeus ; all is ac- 
cessible to Philip : shut the brazen gates of the gods. 
Earth and sea lie vanquished under Philip's sceptre : 
there remains the road to Olympus. 1 

519. — By the Same 
(Addressed to King Philip, son of Demetrius) 
I drink, Bacchus, I drink ; yes, deeper than the 
Cyclops drunk when he had filled his belly with the 
flesh of men ; would I could dash out the brains of 
my foe and drain Philip's skull to the dregs, Philip 
who tastes of the blood of his friends as he carouses, 
pouring poison into the wine. 2 

520. — Anonymous 
On Alcaeus (probably by his enemy King Philip) 
This is the tomb of Alcaeus who was killed by 

the broad-leaved daughter of earth, the radish, 

punisher of adulterers. 

521. — Anonymous 
The Muses to Sappho 
No little fame, Sappho, did Fate grant thee on the 
day thou didst first see the sun. For we consented 
that thy utterances should be immortal, and the 
Father of all, the Thunderer, approved. All men 
shall sing thee, and thou shalt not lack glorious 
report. 



2 Philip is said to have poisoned Aratus, among others, in 
this manner. 

. 287 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

522.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

' 1\ίάς, ω μεηα έργον, ΌΒνσσ&ης τε το σώφρον 
γράμμα, το καϊ Ύ ροίτ) θήκεν ϊσην Ίθάκην, 

τον μ€ ηεροντ αΰξοιτ e'<? αεί νέον η <γαρ Όμι)ρου 
σειρην υμετέρων ρεϊται άττο στομάτων. 

523.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Καλλί07Γ?7 ττοΧύμυθε μεΧισσοβότον 'ΕΧικώνος, 
τίκτε μοι αΧΚον "Ομηρον, εττεϊ μόΧεν ά,ΧΧος Άχίλ- 
Χευς. 

524.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 
Υ/λιό9 €19 Διόνυσον 

ΜεΧπωμεν βασιΧήα φιΧεύϊον, Έ,ίραφιώτην, 
άβροκόμην, aypoiKOV, άοίδιμον, άγΧαόμορφον, 
Βοιωτόν, Βρόμιον, βακχεντορα, βοτρυογαίτην, 
γηθόσυνον, ηονοεντα, γιγαντοΧετην, <γεΧόωντα, 
Διογένη, Siyovov, Βιθυραμβογενή, Διόνυσον, 5 

Έιύϊον, εύγαίτην, ενάμπεΧον, εηρεσ'ικωμον, 
ζηΧαιον, ζάγοΧον, ζηΧήμονα, ζηΧοΰοτήρα, 
ήπιον, ήΒνπότην, ή&νθροον, ήπεροπήα, 
θνρσοφόρον, %ρήϊκα, θιασώτην, θυμοΧεοντα, 
ΊνδοΧετην, Ίμερτόν, ιοπΧόκον, ίραφιώτην, 10 

κωμαστην, κεραόν, κισσοστεφανον, κεΧαδεινόν, 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 522-524 

522. — Anonymous 

Iliad, thou great work, and Odyssey, chaste poem, 
that hast made Ithaca Troy's equal, make me, the 
old man, grow in eternal youth ; for from your lips 
Hows the Siren song of Homer. 

523. — Anonymous 

Calliope, eloquent goddess of Helicon the pasture 
of bees, bear me a second Homer, since a second 
Achilles has come. 



524. — Anonymous 

A Hymn to Dionysus (containing his Epithets in 

Λ Iphabetical Order) 

Let us chant the king who loves the call of Euhoe, 

the King Eiraphiotes, 1 
Tender-haired, rustic, much besung, fair of form, 
Boeotian, Bromius, reveller, with vine-leaves in his hair, 
Merry, productive, slayer of giants, the laugher, 
Son of Zeus, twice-born, son of the Dithyramb, 

Dionysus, 
Euius, with lovely locks, rich in vines, awaker of revels. 
Jealous, very wrathful, envious, bestower of envy, 
Gentle, sweet drinker, sweet-voiced, cozener, 
Thracian, thyrsus-bearing, boon-companion, lion- 
hearted, 
Slayer of Indians, desirable, twiner of violets, hiero- 

phant, 
Reveller, horned, ivy-crowned, noisy, 

1 The meaning of this epithet is quite unknown. 

289 
VOL. III. V 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

Ανδόν, Χηναΐον, ΧαθικηΒέα, Χυσιμεριμνον, 
μύστην, μαινόΧιον, μεθνΒώτην, μυριόμορφον, 
νυκτεΧιον, νόμιον, νεβρω&εα, νεβρώόπεπΧον, 
ξυστοβόΧον, ξυνόν, ξενοΒώτην, ξανθοκάρηνον, 15 

opyiXov, οβριμόθυμον, ορέσκιον, ονρεσιφοίτην, 
πουΧνττότην, ττΧα^κτηρα, ποΧυστεφανον, ποΧύκωμον, 
ρηξίνοον, ραΒινόν, ρικνώΒεα, ρηνοφορήα, 
σκιρτητόν, Χάτυρον, ΣεμεΧη^ενετην, ΧεμεΧήα, 
τερπνόν, τανρωττόν, ΎυρρηνοΧετην-, ταχύμηνιν, 20 

ύπνοφόβην, vypov, νμενήϊον, ΰΧήεντα, 
φηρομανή, φρικτόν, φιΧομειΒέα, φοιταΧιώτην, 
•χρυσόκερων, γαρίεντα, γαΧίφρονα, χρυσεομίτρην, 
ψυχοπΧανή, ψεύστην, ψοφομήΒεα, ψνχοΒαϊκτήν, 
ώριον, ωμηστην, ώρειτροφον, ώρεσίδονπον. 25 

μεΧπωμεν βασιΧήα φιΧεύϊον, Έΐραφίώτην. 

525.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 
Y/Ai'os €ts Απόλλωνα 
"Τμνεωμεν ΥΙαιανα μεηαν θεον ' ΆπόΧΧωνα, 
άμβροτον, ά^Χαόμορφον, άκερσεκόμην, άβροχαίτην, 
βριθΰνοον, βασιΧήα, βεΧεσσιχαρή, βιοΒώτην, 

ηηθόσυνον, <γεΧόωντα, <γνγαντό\έτην, γλνκύθνμον, 

290 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAM 525 

Lydian, lord of the wine-press, dispel ler of care, 

Healer of sorrow, mystic, frenzied, giver of wine, 
thousand-shaped, 

God of the night, shepherd-god, fawn-like, clothed 
in fawn-skin, 

Spear-thrower, common to all, giver of guests, yellow- 
haired, 

Prone to anger, stout of heart, lover of the mountain 
shade, wanderer on the mountains, 

Deep drinker, wanderer, wearer of many garlands, 
constant reveller, 

Mind-breaker, slender, wrinkled, clad in sheep-skin, 

Leaper, satyr, son of Semele, 

Jovial, bull-faced, slayer of Tyrrhenians, swift to wrath, 

Chaser of sleep, liquid, hymeneal, dweller in the woods, 

Mad for wild beasts, terrible, laughter-loving, wan- 
derer, 

Golden-horned, graceful, relaxer of the mind, golden- 
filleted, 

Disturber of the soul, liar, bent on noise, tearer of the 
soul, 

Seasonable, eater of raw flesh, nurtured on the moun- 
tains, making clamour on the mountains. 

Let us chant the King who loves the call of Euhoe, 
the King Eiraphiotes. 

525. — Anonymous 

A similar Hymn to Apollo 

Let us hymn Paean the great god, Apollo ; 
Immortal, gloriously formed, unshorn, soft-haired, 
Stern-hearted, king, delighting in arrows, giver of 

life, 
Joyous, laughing, slayer of giants, sweet-hearted, 

291 
υ 2 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

Aioyevrj, ΔιοπαιΒα, ΒρακοντοΧίτην, Βαφνο^ηθη, 5 

evXaXov, εύρνβίην, εκατηβόΧον, ζΧπιΒοΒώτην, 
ζωοηονον, ζάθεον, Ζηνόφρονα, ζηΧοΒοτηρα, 
ηπιον, ήΒυεπή, ήΒνφρονα, ηττώγβίρα, 
θηροφόνον, θαΧερόν, θεΧξίφρονα, θεΧηεσίμυθον, 
Ιαφετην, ιμερτόν, ίήϊον, ίττποκορνστήν, 10 

κοσμοττΧοκον, Κ,Χάριον, κρατβρΰφρονα, καρττοηέ- 

νβθΧον, 
AijToyevP], Χαρόν, Xvpoy>)0ea, Χαμπετόωντα, 
μυστιττόΧον, μάντιν, μεηαΧήτορα, μνρώμορφον, 
νευρογαρη, voepov, νηπβνθεα, νηφαΧιήα, 
ξυνοχαρή, ξυνόν, ξυνόφρονα, ξυνοΒοτήρα, 15 

οΧβιον, όΧβιοβργόν, 'ΟΧνμπιον, ούρεσιφοίτην, 
πρηύν, πανΒερκή, παναττήμονα, πΧουτοΒοτήρα, 
ρυσιττονον, ροΰόχρουν, ρηξήνορα, ρηξικέΧβνθον, 
σνγαΧόβντα, σοφόν, σεΧαη^ενετην, σωτήρα, 
τερ^ίγορον, Τιτάνα, τεΧεστορα, τιμήεντα, 20 

υμνα^όρην, ΰττατον, ΰψαύχενα, νψήεντα, 
Φοΐβον, φοιβάζοντα, φιΧοστεφανον, φρει>ο Γ /ηθή, 
■χρησμα'γόρην, χρύσεον, χρνσόχροα, χρυσοβεΧεμνον, 
ψαλμοχαρή, ψάΧτην, ψενσίστνγα, ψυχοΒοτήρα, 
ωκύττον, ώκυεπή, ωκυσκοπον, ώρεσιΒώτην. 25 

νμνέωμεν ΤΙαιάνα μίγαν θεον ' ΑπόΧΧωνα. 

20)2 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAM 525 

Son of Zeus, slayer of the dragon, lover of the laurel, 
Sweet of speech, of ample might, far-shooter, giver 

of hope, 
Creator of animals, divine, Jove-minded, giver of zeal, 
Mild, sweet-spoken, sweet-hearted, gentle-handed, 
Slayer of beasts, blooming, charmer of the spirit, soft 

speaking, 
Shooter of arrows, desirable, healer, charioteer, 
Weaver of the world, Clarian, strong-hearted, father 

of fruits, 
Son of Leto, pleasant, delighting in the lyre, resplen- 
dent, 
Lord of the mysteries, prophet, magnanimous, thou- 
sand-shaped, 
Lover of the bow-string, wise, stiller of grief, sober, 
Lover of community, common to all, taking thought 

for all, benefactor of all, 
Blessed, making blessed, Olympian, dweller on the 

hills, 
Gentle, all-seeing, sorrowless, giver of wealth, 
Saviour from trouble, rose-coloured, man-breaker, 

path-opener, 
Glittering, wise, father of light, saviour, 
Delighting in the dance, Titan, initiator, revered, 
Chanter of hymns, highest, stately, of the height, 
Phoebus, purifier, lover of garlands, cheerer of the 

spirit, 
Utterer of oracles, golden, golden-complexioned, 

gol d en-arrowed, 
Lover of the lyre, harper, hater of lies, giver of the 

soul, 
Swift-footed, swift-voiced, swift of vision, giver of 

seasons. 
Let us hymn Paean the great god, Apollo. 

293 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

526.— ΑΛΦΕΙΟΤ ΜΙΤΤΛΗΝΑΙΟΤ 

KXete, θεός, με^άλοιο πύΧας άκμητας ΌΧύμπον 
φρουρεί, Ζεΰ, ζαθεαν αιθέρος άκρόποΧιν. 

ηδη yap καϊ πόντος ύπέζευκται δορϊ Ρώμης, 
και χθων ούρανίη δ' οΐμος er εστ άβατος. 

527.— XPH2MOS 

ΎΧήθι Χέων άτΧητα παθών τετΧηότι θυμω' 
ουδείς ανθρώπων αδικών τισιν ουκ αποτίσει, 

528.— ΠΑΛΛΑΔΑ 

Εις τον οίκον Μαρίνης 

Χριστιανοί yεyaώτες ^ΟΧυμπια δώματ έχοντες 
ενθάδε ναιετάουσιν άπημοι ες' ουδέ yap αυτούς 
χώνη φόΧΧιν αηουσα φερεσβιον εν πυρι θήσει. 

529.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 
Ές κΧινάριον πόρνης άπο δάφνης 
Αεκτρον ενός φέρουσα Χεκτρον ποΧΧοΐσιν ετύχθην. 

530.— ΑΔΗΑΟΝ 

Εις άρχοντα άναξιον 

Ουκ εθελουσα Τύχη σε πpoηyayεv, αλλ' "να δείξη, 
ώς οτι καϊ μέχρι σοι) πάντα ποιεΐν δύναται. 



1 Imitated from No. 518, which cp. 

2 v. 26 : given in a dream to Hipparchus. 



294 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 526-530 

526.— ALPHEIUS OF MYTILENE 

Shut, Ο god, the tireless gates of great Olympus ; 
keep, Ο Zeus, the holy castle of heaven. Already 
sea and earth are subdued by the Roman arms, but 
the path to heaven is still untrodden. 1 

527.— ORACLE FROM HERODOTUS 2 

Lion, with long-suffering heart, bear the unbear- 
able. No evil man shall escape punishment. 

528.— PALLADAS 

On the House of Manna 

The inhabitants of Olympus, 3 having become 
Christians, live here undisturbed ; for here they 
shall not be put on the fire in the melting-pot that 
produces necessary small change. 

529. — Anonymous 

On the Bed of a Harlot made of Laurel 

I who fled the bed of one, 4 am made a bed for 
many. 

530. — Anonymous 

On an Unworthy Magistrate 

Fortune did not willingly give you advancement, 
but to show that her omnipotence reaches even as 
low as you. 



3 Bronze statues of the heathen gods. 

4 Daphne fled from Apollo to preserve her chastity. 



295 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

531.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Ets Ισαυρου? 
Αΰραις ίσα θέονσιν, όθεν Χάγρν οΰνομα τούτο. 

532.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Eis κολόκννθον 

EtVe μοι, ω κοΧόκυνθβ, τίνος χάριν ςίσίτι καϊ νυν 
ου σικύων εφάνη Siepbv yevos, ου κοΧοκύνθων. 

Ο κολόκνιθος irpos ταύτα 

Ζηνος επομβρήσαντος ίπεκΧυσθησαν άρουραι, 
ήμ€Τ€ρην δ' άΐκουσαν ετί κρύπτουσι η€νίθΧην. 

533.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Ets τον από κοντοί κατ ερχόμενο ν θηριομάχην 

Κ,οντον άνηρ κατεττηξε, Βέμας δ' ει? aepa ρίψας 
ίδνώθη ττροκάρηνος, aveypopevoio δ' ΰττερθβν 
θηρος υττερκατίβαινβν έϋστρέπτοισι πό$€σσιν• 
ουδέ Χάβεν Χαοϊ δε pey Χαγρν €κφυye δ' άνηρ. 

534.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Eis "Άρτ€/Αΐν 
"Αρτεμις ΊΒρώουσα TrpoayyeXos εστί κυΒοιμοΰ. 

535.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Κίσσω pev Διόνυσος ayaXXeTai, alytSc δε Ζευς, 
οι ναέται ζείνοις, ή δέ 7τόλί? ναεταις. 

296 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 531-535 

531. — Anonymous 

On the Isaurians 

They run equal to the winds ; hence their name. 1 

532. — Anonymous 

To a Pumpkin 

Tell me, pumpkin, why even so late as this the 
watery tribe of cucumbers and pumpkins has not 
appeared. 

The Pumpkin s Reply 

Zeus rained heavily and flooded the fields, which 
still hide our race against our will. 

533. — Anonymous 

On a Beast-fighter who escaped by means oj a Pole 

A man fixed a pole on the ground, and throwing 
himself into the air made a somersault, and with his 
nimble feet passed over the back of the beast that 
was rushing at him. It failed to catch him ; the 
people applauded loudly and the man escaped. 

534. — Anonymous 
On Artemis. 
Artemis, sweating, forbodes war. 

535. — Anonymous 

Dionysus glories in ivy, Zeus in the aegis, the 
inhabitants of this city in their hospitality, and the 
city in her inhabitants. 

1 Jsos, equal ; aura, wind. 

297 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

536.— ΑΛΛΟ 
Είς Αλφΐών ποταμόν 
"Αβροχον εν πεΧά^εσσι δί.' ύδατος επΧεεν ύδωρ. 

537.— ΝΕΣΤΟΡΟΣ ΝΙΚΑΕΩΧ 

Ύίπτε με θρυΧησαντες εμην άπεπανσατ άοιδην; 
Ιππεύς Ίππεύειν εδάη, καϊ αοιδός άείδειν 
ην δε τις ίππεύειν δεδαως εθεΧησιν άείδειν, 
αμφοτέρων ημαρτε, καϊ Ιπποσύνης και άοιδής. 

538.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 
"E^ei τα κδ' -γράμματα 
Άβροχίτων δ' 6 φύΧαξ θηροζ^γοκαμψιμετωπος. 

539.— ΑΛΛΟ 
' Ο/χοιον 
' Αβρός δ' iv προ-χραϊς ΚύκΧωψ φθογγάζετο μύρμηξ. 

540.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Μη ταχύς Ηρακλείτου eV όμφαΧόν εϊΧεε βίβλον 
τονφεσίου• μάΧα τοι δύσβατος άτραπιτός. 

ορφνη καϊ σκότος εστίν αλάμπετον ην δε σε μύστης 
είσα^/ά^η, φανερού Χαμπρότερ ?}εΧιου. 

541.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΥ 

Θειογίνης ΤΙείσωνι τα τεχνήεντα κύπεΧΧα 
πέμπει' γωρούμεν δ' ούρανον αμφότερα• 

1 He means that his detractors know nothing of poetry 
and should confine themselves to matters they understand. 

298 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 536-541 

536. — Anonymous 
On the River Alpheius 
Water in the sea travelled through water without 
getting wet. 

537.— NESTOR OF NICAEA 

Why did you make a disturbance and stop my 
song? A rider has learnt how to ride, and a singer 
how to sing. But if one who has learnt riding wants 
to sing, he is a failure in both riding and singing. 1 

538, 539. — Anonymous 

These Nonsense Verses each contain all the Letters oj 
the Alphabet. 

540. — Anonymous 

Do not rapidly unfold to the end of the roll 2 the 
book of Heraelitus the Ephesian. The path is very 
difficult, and all is mist and unilluminated darkness ; 
but if one initiated introduce you, it is clearer than 
the bright sun. 

541.— ΑΝΤΙ PATER OF THESSALONICA 

Theogenes sends to Piso 3 -the skilfully wrought 
bowls, and both of us together contain the heavens. 



2 = Latin umbilicus. 
> See No. 428. 



299 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

Βοία yap εκ σφαίρης τετμήμεθα, και to μεν ηρών 
τους νοτίους, τό δ' έχει τείρεα τάν ϋορέτ). 

άλλα συ μηκετ "Αρητον εττίβΧειτε' Βισσά yap 

άμφοΐν 5 

μέτρα ττιων άθρεις πάντα τα φαινόμενα. 

542.— ΚΡΙΝΑΓΟΡΟΤ 

®άρσει καϊ τετταρσι ΒιαττΧασθέντα προσώττοις 
μυθον καϊ τούτων ypa\frai ετι ττΧεοσιν 

οΰτ€ σε. yap Χείψ-ουσι, ΦιΧωνίΒη, ούτε ΒάθυΧΧον, 
τον μεν άοιΒάων, τον Βε χερών χάριτες. 

543.— ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΤ 

ΦεσσαΧίης εύϊτητος 6 ταυρεΧάτης χορός άνΒρών, 
χερσιν άτευχητοις θηρσϊν όπΧιζόμενος, 

κεντροτυττεϊς πώΧους ζεΰξε σκιρτήματι ταύρων, 
άμφιβαΧεϊν σττεύΒων πλέγμα μετωττίΒιον 

άκρότατον δ' ες y -ην κΧίνας άμα κεύροττον άμμα 5 

θηρος την τόσσην εξεκύΧισε β'ιην. 



544.— ΑΔΔΑΙΟΤ 

'ΧνΒην βηρυΧΧόν με Τρύφων άνεττεισε ΥαΧηνην 
είναι, καϊ μαΧακαΐς χερσιν ανήκε κόμας• 



1 i.e. each is a perfect hemisphere. 

2 Bathyllus was a celebrated pantomime-dancer. Philo- 
nides, it would seem, sung his pieces himself. In these 
pieces one singer and one dancer took all the different parts, 
which, of course, were played one after the other. 

300 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 542-544 

We are both carved out of a sphere, 1 and one of us 
contains the southern constellations, the other the 
northern. No longer consult Aratus, for if you empty 
us both you see all the Phaenomena. 



542.— CR1NAGORAS 

Never fear, Philonides ; write a piece composed 
for four parts or even more ; for neither your singing 
nor the motions of Bathyllus' hands shall be lacking 
in grace. 2 

543.— PHILIPPUS 

The well-mounted troupe of bull-fighters from 
Thessaly, armed against the beasts with no weapons 
but their hands, spur their horses to run alongside 
the galloping bull, bent on throwing round its neck 
the noose of their arms. At the same time pulling 
it towards the ground by thus hanging themselves 
at the end of its neck and weighing down its head, 
they roll over even such a powerful brute. 3 

544.— ADDAEUS 

On a Figure of Galeae cut by Tryphon 4 

Tryphon coaxed me, the Indian beryl, to be Galene, 
the goddess of Calm, and with his soft hands let 

3 It is implied, of course, that the man throws himself off 
his horse. In Heliodorus (x. 30) the man is described as 
throwing his arms round the bull's neck and burying his 
face between its horns, and this seems to be what is meant 
here. 

* A famous gem-carver, some of whose work we possess. 

301 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

ήνί8ε teal χείλη νοτερην Χειοΰντα 1 θάλασσαν, 
και μαστούς, τοΐσιν θεληω άνηνεμίην. 

ην 8ε μοι η φθονερή νεύση Χίθος, ώς iv ίτοίμω δ 

ώρμημαι, <γνώση καϊ τάχα νηχο μενην : 

54δ.— ΚΡΙΝΑΓΟΡΟΤ 

Καλλίμαχου το τορευτον έπος τόδε' δη yap eV αύτώ 
ώνηρ τους ^Ιουσέων πάντας έσεισε κάλους. 

άειδει 8 Ε,κάλης Te φιλοζείνοιο καΧιην 
καϊ Θησεΐ Μαραθών ούς επεθηκε πόνους, 

του σοϊ καϊ νεαρον χειρών σθένος είη άρέσθαι, δ 

ΜαρκεΧλε, κλεινού τ αλνον Χσον βιότου. 

546.— ΑΝΤΙΦΙΛΟΤ 

ϋην πρύμνη Χαχετω με ποτέ στιβάς, αϊ θ* υπέρ αυτής 

ηχεΰσαι ψακάδων τύμματι διφθερίδες, 
καϊ πυρ εκ μυΧάκων βεβιημενον, ή τ επί τούτων 

χύτρη, και κενεός πομφολύ^ων θόρυβος, 
και κε ρνπώντ εσίδοιμι διηκονον ή 8ε τράπεζα 5 

έστω μοι στρωτή νηος ΰπερθε σανίς' 
8ος Χάβε, καϊ ψιθύρισμα το ναυτικόν είχε τύχη τις 

πρώην τοιαύτη τον φιλόκοινον εμε. 

547.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Τά ίΐκοσι Τ€σσαρα στοιχεία 

Ύρηχύν δ' υπερβάς φρα^μον εξήνθιζε κΧώψ. 

1 So Jacobs : -π\ύοντα MS. 
302 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 545-547 

down my hair. Look at my lips smoothing the liquid 
sea, and my breasts with which I charm the windless 
waves. Did the envious stone but consent, you would 
soon see me swimming, as I am longing to do. 



545.— CRINAGORAS 

With a copy of Callimachus' Hecale 1 

This chiselled poem is Callimachus', for in it he 
let out every reef of his Muse. He sings the hut of 
hospitable Hecale, and all the labours that Marathon 
imposed on Theseus. May the young strength of 
Theseus' hands be thine, Marcellus, 2 and a life of 
equal renown. 

546.—ANTIPHILUS 

Once in a way let my couch be on the ship's poop, 
the weather-cloths above sounding with the blows of 
the spray, the fire breaking out from the stones, 3 and 
the pot upon them bubbling with empty noise. Let 
my eyes be on the unwashed cabin boy, and let my 
table be the first plank of the deck that offers ; and 
a game of "Give and take" and the gossip of the 
sailors. The other day this happened to me, who 
love to be at hail fellow all round. 

547 
Similar to Nos. 538, 539 

1 Hecale was an old woman who entertained Theseus at 
Marathon when he went to combat the Marathonian bull. 

2 The nephew of Augustus, whose early death Virgil 
bewails. J Within which it is built. 

3°3 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

548.— BIANOP02 

Kovpov άποπλανίην επιμάζιον Έρμώνακτα, 
φευ, βρέφος ά>ς άΒίκως εϊλετε βου^ενέες. 

ΐ^νοίησεν 6 Βειλός ες ύμέας οία μέλισσας 
ελθών αϊ δ' εχεων ητε χερειότεραι• 

άντϊ Βέ οι θοίνης ενεμάξατε φοίνια κέντρα, δ 

ω πικραί, γλυκερής αντίπαλοι χάριτος. 

549.— ΑΝΤΙΦ1ΛΟΤ 

α. Κ,ρηναΐαι λιβάΒες, τι πεφεύ<γατε; πού τόσον ΰΒωρ; 

τις φλοξ άενάους εσβεσεν ηελίου; 
β. Αάκρυσιν Άηρικολαο τετρύμεθα' παν δ' όσον ημϊν 

ην ποτον η κείνου Βιψάς έχει σποΒιή. 

550.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ 

ΚΧεινην ουκ άπόφημι• σέ yap προπάροιθεν εθηκαν 

κ\τ)ζεσθαι πτηνοί, Ύήνε, ΥϊορηϊάΒαι. 
άλλα καΐ ^Ορτυηίην είχε κλέος, οΰνομα δ' αυτής 

ηρχετο 'Ριπαίων άχρις Ύπερβορεων. 
νυν 8ε συ μεν ζώεις, ή δ' ουκέτι' τις κεν εωλπει 5 

οψεσθαι Ύήνου Αήλον ερημοτέρην; 

551.— ΑΝΤίΦΙΛΟΤ 

Καλχαδών Βύστηνον ερωδιόν έχθρα, κολάζει' 
τεΰ χάριν ό προδότης όρνις άεϊ λέγεται, 

f Φοίβος έρεϊ' τενα^/Ιτιν δτ' εις άλα κωλον ελαφρον 
στήσας, -ψ-αμμίτην Βόρπον "\έθημολό^ει, 

1 Zetes and Calais, slain in Tenos by Heracles. 

2 For the desert condition of Delos, see No. 408. Ortygia 

3©4 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 548-551 

548.— BIANOR 
Ye children of the ox, how wrong of you to kill 
Hermonax, the straying baby boy ' The poor child, 
in the innocence of his heart, went to you thinking 
you were bees, and you proved worse than vipers. 
Instead of giving him a dainty feast you drove your 
murderous stings into him, bitter bees, contrary in 
nature to your sweet gifts. 

549.— ANTIPHILUS 

A. Ye streams of the fountain, why have ye fled ? 
Where is all that water gone ? What fiery sun has 
extinguished the ever-runnng spring? B. We are 
exhausted by tears for Agricola ; his thirsty dust has 
absorbed all the drink we had to give. 

550.— ΑΝΤΙ PATER OF THESSALONICA 

I say not, Tenos, that thou art not famous, for of 
old the winged sons of Boreas 1 got thee renown. 
But Ortygia was celebrated too, and her name reached 
to the Rhipaean Hyperboreans. But now thou livest 
and she is dead. Who would have expected to see 
Delos moi'e desert than Tenos ? 2 

551.— ANTIPHILUS 

Calchedon hates and punishes the ill-omened 
heron. Phoebus will tell for what reason it is always 
called the traitor-bird. When in the shallow sea 
standing on its thin shanks it was picking up its food 

was an old name of the island. For the story of the annual 
first-fruits brought to Delos by the Hyperboreans see 
Herodotus iv. 33. 

3°5 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

δυσμενεες τότ εβησαν επί πτόΧιν άντιπερηθεν, 
oyfre διδασκόμενοι πεζοβατεΐν πεΧα^ος. 

βάΧΧετε δη κακόν ορνιν, επεϊ βαρνν η par ο μισθον 
εκ δη'ίων, κόχΧους καϊ βρύον, ό προδότης. 

552.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ 

Καϊ Μακεδών ό σίδηρος iv άορι, καϊ τα προς άΧκην 
της απ ' ΆΧεξάνδρον χειρός επισταμένος, 

Πείσων, σην ποθεων ίκόμην χέρα' τούτο δε φωνώ' 
" Χαίρων δεξιτερην ενρον όφειΧομενην. ' 

553.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Αευκάδος αντί με Καίσαρ, ι δ' Άμβρακίης εριβωΧου, 

©υρρείον τε πεΧειν, αντί τ ' Ανακτορίου, 
Άρ^/εος ΆμφιΧόχου τε, καϊ όππόσα ραίσατο κύκΧω 
άστε επιθρώσκων δουρομανης πόΧεμος, 

είσατο ^ικόποΧιν, θείην πόΧιν άντϊ δε νίκης 
Φοίβος άναξ ταύτην δέχνυται Άκτιάδος. 

554.— ΑΡΓΕΝΤΑΡΙΟΤ 

Αάθριος ΉράκΧεια καΧών υπό χείΧεσιν Ι-Χκεις 
κείνο' πάΧαι κατά σου τούτ εβόησε πόΧις. 

πώς ετΧης αίσχος ρεξαι κακόν; η σε βιαίως 
ειΧκνσέ τις θαΧερών δραξάμενος πΧοκάμων ; 

ή σοϊ τοΰνομα τερπνόν αφ' ΉρακΧήος εχούση, 
μάχΧε, φιΧεΐν Ήβην κεκριται ηιθεων; 

1 The incident alluded to in this epigram is quite unknown, 
and the whole looks like a legend made up to account for the 
bad name this bird had at Chalcedonl Such popular ex- 

306 ' 






BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 552-554 

from the sand, then the foemen crossed to the city 
from opposite, learning at length to pass over the 
sea on foot. Stone the wicked bird, for it got from 
the enemy a heavy reward — conchs and seaweed, 
the traitor. 1 

552.— ΑΝΤΙ PATER OF THESSALONICA 

A sword made of Macedonian steel and taught 
valiance by the hand of Alexander, I come, Piso, 2 
longing for thy hand, and thus I greet thee : " I 
rejoice to find the right hand for which fate re- 
served me." 

553.— PHILIPPUS (?) 

On the Foundation of Nicopolis by Augustus 

To replace Leucas, and fertile Ambracia, and Thyr- 
reum, and Anactorium, and Amphilochian Argos, and 
ail the surrounding cities that the furious onslaught 
of war destroyed, Caesar founded me, Nicopolis, a 
divine city. Phoebus receives this reward for the 
victory of Actium. 

554.— MARCUS ARGENTARIUS 

Clam, Heraclea, pulchris juvenibus ore morigeraris. 
For long all the town says it of you. How do you 
venture to do such a shameful thing ? Did anyone 
catch you by your beautiful hair and force you to it ? 
Or is it because your pretty name is derived from 
Heracles that in your depravity you choose to kiss 
his wife Hebe (pubem juvenum). 

planations of local superstitions are legion. The last couplet 
is, of course, playful and ironical. 
2 cp. No. 428. 

3°7 
x 2 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

555.— ΚΡΙΝΑΓΟΡΟΤ 

Νήσον την, el και με περνγράψαντες Υεχουσιν 

μβτρησαι, βαιήν, επτά μόνον σταδίου*;, 
εμπης καϊ τίκτουσαν far αύλακα ττΐαρ αρότρου 

όψει, καϊ παντός κάρπιμον άκροΒρύου, 
καϊ ποΧΧοΐς euaypov υπ 1~χθύσι, καϊ υττο μαίρη 5 

βύάνεμον, Χιμενων τ ήττων άτρεμίη, 
άγχόθι Κορκύρης Φαιηκίδος. άλλα ^εΧάσθαι 

*[τω επ' εωρίσθην, τοΰτ εθεμην όνομα. 

556.— ΖΩΝΑ 

Νύμφαι εποχθίΰιαι, Νηρηίδες, εΐ'δετε Δάφνιν 
χθιζόν, ετταχνιδίαν ώς άπεΧουσε κονιν, 

υμετεραις Χιβάδεσσιν οτ ενθορε σειριόκαυτος, 
ήρεμα φοινιχθείς μα,Χα παρη'ίδια. 

είπατε μοι, καΧός ην; ή εγώ τρά-γος ουκ άρα κνάμαν δ 
μοννον £<γυνώθην, αλλ' ετι καϊ κραδιαν; 

557.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ 

Ό σταδιεύς Άρίης ό ΜενεκΧεος ου κατεΧε η /χει 
Περσε'α, σον κτίστην, Ταρσέ Κ,ίΧισσα ποΧι. 

τ οίοι yap παιδος τττηνοϊ πόδες' ονδ αν έκεινω 
ούδ' αύτος ϊίερσεύς νώτον έδειξε θέων. 

ή yap ε'φ' ύσπΧη^ων ή τέρματος είδε τί? άκρου 5 

ηίθεον, μέσσω δ ου ποτ' ενϊ σταδιω. 

3θ8 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 555-557 

555.— CRINAGORAS 

On the Isla?id of Sybota l 

I am an island, small, seven stadia long, though 
the geographers neglected (?) to measure me ; but 
still you will see that when I am ploughed I give 
birth to fat crops, and that I am rich in every kind 
of fruit, and have plenty of fish to catch, and cool 
breezes in the dog-days, and the gentleness of un- 
ruffled harbours. I am near Phaeacian Corcyra. So 
that I might be made fun of, I took this name of 
which I am highly proud. 

556.— ZONAS 

Pan is ike Speaker 

Nereids, Nymphs of the shore, you saw Daphnis 
yesterday, when he washed off the dust that lay like 
down on his skin ; when, burnt by the dog star, he 
rushed into your waters, the apples of his cheeks 
faintly reddened. Tell me, was he beautiful ? Or 
am I a goat, not only lame in my legs but in my 
heart too ? 

557.— ANTIPATER OF THESSALONICA 

Tarsus, Cilician city, the runner Aries, son of Mene- 
cles, does not disgrace even Perseus, thy founder. 
Such are the boy's winged feet that not even Perseus 
would have shown him his back in the race. The 
youth is seen only at the start and the finish, never 
in the middle of the course. 

1 Pig-pasture. 

S09 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

558.— EPTKIOT 

Ό τράγος 6 ΚΧήσωνος bXav δια πάννυγον ορφναν 
αΐ'γας άκοιμάτονς θήκε φριμασσόμενος' 

όδμα yap μιν έτυψε Χύκον χιμαροσφακτήρος 
τηΧόθι, πετραίαν αύΧιν ανερχομένου' 

μβσφα κύνες κοιτάς άνε^/ερμονες έπτοίασαν δ 

θήρα μεγαν rpayivovs δ' ύπνος εμυσε κόρας. 

559.— ΚΡΙΝΑΓΟΡΟΤ 

Πλους μοι eV ΊταΧίην εντύνεται• ες yap εταίρους 
στεΧΧομαι, ων ήδη δηρόν άπειμι χρόνον. 

διφεω δ' τ'^ητήρα περίπΧοον, ος μ επί νήσους 
ΚυκΧάδας, άρχαίην τ άξει επί Χχερίην. 

συν τι μοι αΧΧα Ήίενιππε Χάβευ φιΧος, ΐστορα 

κύκΧον 5 

ypάψaς, ω πάσης ίδρι yεωypaφίης. 

560.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

'Ρ^ηΧη πασών ενοσι χθονός, είτε σε πόντου, 
είτ* άνεμων αίρει ρεύμα τινασσόμενον, 

οικία μοι ρύευ νεοτευχεα• δεΐμα yap οΰπω 
άΧΧο τόσον ya^ οιδ' εΧεΧιζομενης. 

561.— ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΤ 

Τις σε πάyoς δυσερημος, άνήΧιος, εξεθρεψεν 

Ήορραίου Ί,κυθ'ιης, αμπεΧον aypiaBa; 
η Κελτών νιφοβΧήτες αεί κρυμώδεες "ΑΧπεις, 

της τε σιδηροτόκου βώΧος Ιβηριάδος; 
η τους όμφaκόpayaς iyeipao, τους άπεπάντους 5 

βότρυας, ο'ί στυφεΧήν εξέχεον OTayova. 

310 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 558-561 

558.— ERYCIUS 

Cleson's billy-goat through the livelong night kept 
the she-goats awake with his snorting and jumping, 
for he had caught from afar the scent of a goat- 
slaying wolf that was approaching the fold built on 
the cliff. At length the dogs awakened from their 
bed, frightened away the huge beast, and sleep closed 
the eyes of the goats. 

559.— CRINAGORAS 

I am getting ready to sail to Italy, for I am on my 
way to my friends from whom I have been absent 
for so long. I am in search of a navigator to conduct 
me and bring me to the Cyclades and ancient Cor- 
cyra. But I beg for your help too, my friend Me- 
nippus, author of the learned circular tour x and versed 
in all geography. 

560. — Bv the Same 

Earthquake, most dread of all shocks, whether 
thou art aroused by the upshaken currents of the sea 
or of the winds, spare my new-built house, for I 
know not yet any terror to equal the quivering of 
the earth. 

561.— PHILIPPUS 

What desert, sunless hill of Northern Scythia 
nourished thee, wild vine ? Or was it the eternal 
ice of the snowy Celtic Alps or the iron-bearing soil 
of Spain — thee, who didst bear the sour grapes, the 
unripened clusters — that yielded this harsh juice ? 

1 A " periplus " of the Mediterranean in three books. 

311 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

δίζημαι, Av/coepy€, τεας χέρας, ως άπο ρίζης 
κλήματος ώμοτόκου βΧαστον οΧον θέρισες, 

562.— ΚΡΙΝΑΓΟΡΟΤ 

"Ψιττακος 6 βροτό'γηρνς, άφεις Χνγοτενχεα κύρτον, 

ήΧιθεν ες δρυμούς άνθοφυεί πτερυγι. 
alei δ' εκμεΧετων ασπάσμασι Καίσαρα κΧεινόν, 

ούδ αν ορη Χήθην "p/ayev ούνοματος• 
^εδραμε δ' ωκυδίδακτος άπας οιωνός, βρίζων 

τις φθήναι δύναται, δαίμονι χαΐρ' ενεπειν. 
Όρφευς θήρας επεισεν εν οΰρεσι• και δε σε, Καίσαρ, 

νυν άκεΧευστος άπας όρνις άνακρεκεται. 

563.— ΛΕΩΝΙΔΑ 

Ύ6ν φιΧοπωριστην Αημόκριτον ην που εφεύρες, 
ώνθρωπ\ clyyeiXov τούτο το κονφον έπος, 

ώς η Χευκοόπωρος εγώ και εφώριος ήδη 
κεινω συκοφορώ τάς άπνρους άκοΧους' 

σπευσάτω, ουκ όχυρην yap εχω στάσιν, εϊπερ 
οπώρην 
άβΧήτου 1 χρήζει δρεψαι απ άκρεμόνος. 

564.— ΝΙΚΙΟΤ 

ΑίοΧον ιμεροθαΧες εαρ φαινουσα, μεΧισσα 
ξουθά, εφ' ώραίοις ανθεσι μαινόμενα, 

χώρο ν εφ 1 ηδύπνοον πωτωμένα, 'ipya τίθευ συ, 
οφρα τεος πΧήθτ) κηροπαγης θάΧαμος. 

"A" in Collections from the Greek Anthology, 1833, 
p. 142. 

1 I write ο,βΑ-ητον for ακράτου. 
312 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 562-564 

I seek for thy hands, Lycurgus, to tear up by the 
roots the whole plant of that vine, the mother of 
crude fruit. 

562.— CRINAGORAS 

The parrot that talks with human voice, taking 
leave of his wicker cage, flew to the woods on his 
many-coloured wings, and ever assiduous in greeting 
famous Caesar, did not forget that name even in the 
mountains. All the birds, sharpening their wits to 
learn, strove among each other which should be the 
first to say "Chaire" 1 to the god. Orpheus made 
the beasts obey him in the hills, and now every 
bird tunes its voice for thee, Caesar, unbidden. 

563.— LEONIDAS 

If thou findest anywhere Democritus the lover of 
fruit, give him, Sir, this light message : that this is 
my season, the white-fruited fig-tree, and I bear for 
him the bread that wants no baking. Let him make 
haste, for my position is not secure, if he would 
pluck the fruit from my branches before they are 
stoned. 

564.— NICIAS 

Bee, that revealest the presence ot many-coloured 
spring in her delightful bloom ; yellow bee, revelling 
in the prime of the flowers ; fly to the sweetly- 
scented field and busy thyself with thy work, that 
thy waxen chambers may be filled. 



1 Hail. 

313 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



565.— ΚΑΛΛΙΜΑΧΟΤ 



*H\#e Θεαίτητος καθαρην ohov el δ' επι κισσον 
τον τεον ούχ αύτη, Βάκχε, κέΧευθος ayei, 

άΧλων μεν κήρυκες επι βραχύν οΰνομα καιρόν 
φθέγξονται, κείνου δ' Έλλα? άεί σοφιαν. 

566.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Μικρή τις, Αιόνυσε, καΧα πρήσσοντι ποιητή 
ρήσις' 6 μεν " Νικώ" φησϊ το μακροτατον 

ω δε συ μη πνεύσης ενδεξιος, ην τις ερηται, 

" Πω? εβαΧες; " φησί, " ΧκΧηρα τα yiyvopeva." 

τω μερμηρίξαντι τα μήνδικα τούτο yevoiTO 
τούπος' εμοι δ', ώναξ, η βραγυσυΧΧαβιη. 

567.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ 

Ή καϊ €τ εκ βρέφεος κοιμωμενη Άντιοδημις 

πορφυρε'ων, ΤΙαφίης νοσσίς, επί κροκύδων, 
ή τακεραΐς Χεύσσουσα κόραις μαΧακώτερον ύπνου, 

Αύσιδος άΧκυονίς, τερπνόν άθυρμα Μέθης, 
υδατίνους φορεουσα βραχίονας, η μόνη οστούν 

ου Χάχεν (ην yap οΧη τούν ταΧάροισι yaXa), 
ΊταΧίην ήμ€ΐψ€ν, 'ίνα πτοΧεμοιο καϊ αιχμής 

άμπαύστ) Ύώμην μαΧθακίνη γάριτι. 

568.— ΔΙΟΣΚΟΡΙΔΟΤ 

ΑύΧιν 'ApiaTayopeco και κτήματα μυρίος αρθείς, 
NetXe, /act' είκαίης εξεφόρησας όδοΰ. 

1 Theaetetus was seemingly a dramatic poet who worked 
on new lines and had not been successful. 

314 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 565-568 

565.— CALLIMACHUS 

Theaetetus walked in an untrodden l road, and if 
this path does not lead, Bacchus, to thy ivy, the 
heralds shall call the names of others for a brief 
season, but Hellas shall proclaim his wisdom for 
ever. 

566. — By the Same 

A successful poet, Dionysus, is a man of few words. 
The most he says is "I conquer." But he whom thy 
auspicious gale favours not, if he be asked " What 
luck?" says "Things go hard with me." Let such 
phrases be his who broods on fancied injustice. But 
mine, Ο Lord, be the few syllables. 

567.— ANTIPATER OF SIDON (?) 

Antiodemis, the nursling of Aphrodite, who from 
her babyhood slept on purple cloth, the glance of 
whose melting eyes is softer than sleep, the halcyon 
of Lysis, 2 the delightful toy of Methe, whose arms 
flow like water, who alone among women has no 
bones at all (for she was all cream-cheese), has 
crossed to Italy, that by her softening charm she 
may make Rome cease from war and lay down the 
sword. 

568.— DIOSCORIDES 

Nile, rising in vast volume, thou hast carried away 
in thy random course the farm of Aristagoras and 

2 Lysis was the originator of a particular style of merry 
song, the singers of which were called Lysiodi. 

315 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

αυτός δ' οίκείης 6 yepoov επενήξατο βώΧου 

ναυη>γό<ί, πάσης ελπίδος όλλυμενης, 
j€ltovo<; ήμίθρανστον eV αΰλιον, "Ώ ποΧύς, εϊπας, 5 

μόχθος εμάς, ποΧιής τ epya περισσά χερός, 
ύδωρ πάν eyev€o0e• το δε <γ\νκύ τούτο γεωργοί"? 

κϋμ επ hpwTayopr)v έδρα με πικρότατον." 



569.— ΕΜΠΕΔΟΚΛΕΟΤΣ 

Ήδη yap ποτ ε'γώ yεvόμηv κούρος τε κόρη τε, 
θάμνος τ', οιωνός re καϊ εξ αλός εμπυρος Ιχθύς. 



*Ω φίΧοι, οι μέγα άστυ Kara ξανθού y Aκpάyavτoς 
ναίετ αν άκρα πόλιος, aya0wv μελεδημονες epyrov, 
χαίρετ• ε'γώ δ' ύμμιν θεός άμβροτος, ούκετι θνητός, 5 
πωλεύμαι μετά πάσι τετιμενος, ωσπερ εοικεν, 
ταινίαις τε περίστεπτος στεφεσίν τε θαλείοις. 



570.— ΦΙΛΟΔΗΜΟΤ 

"Β,ανθώ, κηρόπλαστε, μυρόχροε, μονσοπρόσωπε, 

εΰλάλε, διπτεpύyωv καλόν ^αλμα ΤΙόθων, 
ψηλόν μοι χερσϊ δροσιναϊς μνρον " Έι> μονοκΧίνω 

δει με Χιθοδμητω δΐ] ποτέ πετριδίω 
εύδειν άθανάτως πονΧνν χρόνον•" αδε πάΧιν μοι, 

Άανθάριον, ναι, ναι, το yXvKV τούτο μέλος, 
[ουκ άίεις, ώνθρωφ\ ό τoκoyXvφoς; εν μονοκΧίνω 

δει σε βιούν αιεί, δύσμορε, πετριδίω.] 1 

1 Rightly excluded by Kaibel as a late interpolation. 
316 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 569-570 

all his possessions. But the old man himself, aban- 
doning all hope, swam, clinging to a clod of his own 
land, to his neighbour's half-destroyed farm, saying : 
" Ο long toil and useless work of my aged arms, ye 
are all become water, and this wave so sweet to 
farmers was the bitterest of floods for Aristagoras." 

569.— EMPEDOCLES 

{From his book " On Nature ") 

I have been a boy and a girl, a shrub, a bird, and 
a warm-blooded fish of the sea. 1 * 



(From his " Purifications ") 

Hail ! my friends who dwell in the citadel of the 
great city, yellow Agrigentum, observei*s of righteous- 
ness. Know that I, no longer a mortal, but an im- 
mortal god, sojourn here honoured by all as is meet, 
crowned with fillets and flowery garlands. 



570.— PHILODEMUS 

Xantho, modelled of wax, with scented skin, with 
a face like a Muse's, sweet-voiced, fair darling of 
the twin-winged Loves, play to me with thy scent- 
bedewed hands. " I must lie and sleep for long, 
dying not, on a single bed cut out of stone." Sing 
it to me again, Xantho dear ; yea ! yea ! sing me 
that sweet song. [Dost thou not hear it, man who 
amassest interest of moneys ? On a single bed cut 
out of stone thou shalt live for ever, unhappy wretch.] 

1 Empedocles held the doctrine of metempsychosis. 

3 r 7 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 






571.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 
Ets τονς Ivvia λυρικούς 

"ΕκΧα'γεν εκ %ηβών μεηα Τίίνδαρος' έπνεε τερπνά 

ήδυμεΧεϊ φθόγγω μούσα Σιμωνίδεω• 
λάμπει Στησίχορος τε καϊ "Ιβυκος' ην y\v/ev<; 
Αλκμάν 

Χαρά, δ' από στομάτων φθε^ζατο ΈακχυΧίδης' 
ΥΙειθώ Ανακρειοντι συνεσπετο• ποικίΧα δ' αύδά 5 

Αλκαίος ίκύκνω Αέσβιος ΑιοΧίδι. 
ανδρών δ' ουκ ενάτη Σαπφώ πεΧεν, αλλ' ερατεινά!? 

εν Μούσαις δεκάτη Μούσα καταγράφεται. 

572.— ΛΟΤΚΪΛΛΙΟΤ 

" Μουσάων ΈΧικωνιάδων άργωμεθ^ άείδειν*' 

έγραφε ποιμαίνων, ώς λόγο?, Ησίοδος. 
''Μήνιν άειδε, θεά" καϊ ""Ανδρα μοι εννεπε, Μούσα" 

είπεν Όμηρείω ΚαΧΧιόπη στο μάτι• 
κάμε δε δει γράψαι τι προοίμιον. άλλα τι 'γράψω, 5 

δεύτερον εκδιδόναι βιβΧίον αρχόμενος; 
" Μούσαι ΌΧυμπίάδες, κονραι Διός, ουκ αν εσώθην, 

ει μή μοι Καίσαρ χαΧκόν έδωκε Ν4ρων." 

573.— ΑΜΜΙΑΝΟΤ 

Μη συ γ' eV άΧΧοτρίης, ώνθρωφ\ ϊζοιο τραπέζης, 

ψωμόν όνείδειον ηαστρϊ γαριζό μένος, 
άΧΧοτε μεν κΧαίοντι καϊ εστυηνωμενω όμμα 

συ<γκΧαίων, καύθις συν <γεΧόωντι ^εΧών, 
ούτε συ >γε κΧαυθμού κεχρημενος, ούτε <γεΧωτος, δ 

και κΧαιωμιΧίη, καϊ γεΧοωμϊλίη. 

3ΐ8 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 571-573 

571. — Anonymous 

On the Nine Lyric Poets 

Pindar screamed 1 loud from Thebes, the Muse of 
Simonides breathed delight with her sweet-strained 
voice, Stesichorus and Ibycus shine, Alcman was 
sweet, and Bacchylides' lips uttered dainty song, 
Persuasion attended on Anacreon, Lesbian Alcaeus 
sings varied strains on the Aeolian . . . But Sappho 
was not the ninth among men, but is tenth in the list 
of the lovely Muses. 

572.— LUCILIUS 

"Let us begin our song from the Heliconian 
Muses" ; so Hesiod wrote, 2 they say, while he kept 
his sheep. " Sing, Ο goddess, the wrath," and 
" Tell me, Muse, the man," said Calliope by the 
mouth of Homer. Now I have got to write a proem 
of some sort. But what shall I write now I am 
beginning to publish this second book ? " Olympian 
Muses, daughters of Zeus, I should not have been 
saved unless Nero Caesar had given me money." 

573.— AMMIANUS 

Sit not, Ο man, at another's table indulging thy 
belly with the bread of reproach, now weeping with 
the weeper and the sour-countenanced, and now 
laughing with the laugher, sharing both laughter 
and tears when thou hast no need of either. 

1 He is compared to an eagle as elsewhere. 
* Theog. 1. 1. 

3 IQ 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



574. — <ΑΛΛΟ> 



Ήμάξευσα κα\ αυτός 6 τρισδύστηνος'Άναξις 

τούτον δύσζωον κού βίοτον βίοτον. 
ου μην ττοΧΧον εττϊ χρόνον ηΧασα' Χα,ζ δε πατ7]σας 

Χυσσώδη ζωήν, ήΧυθον εις Άί'δεω. 

575.— ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΤ 

Ουρανός άστρα τάχιον άττοσβεσει, η τάχα νυκτός 

ήεΧιος φαιδρην όψιν άπεργάσεται, 
καϊ <γΧυκύ νάμα θάλασσα βροτοΐς άρυτήσιμον εξει, 

καϊ νεκυς εις ζωών γωρον άναδράμεται, 
ή ττοτε Μ,αιονίδαο βαθυκΧεες ουνομ Όμηρου δ 

Χηθη γηραΧέων άρττάσεται σεΧίδων. 

576.— ΝΙΚΑΡΧΟΤ 

ΥΙαρθενε Ύ ρποηενεια, τι την Κύττριν άρτι μ€ Χνπεΐς, 
άρπάξασα δ' εμον δώρον έχεις παΧάμτ}; 

μεμνησαι το πάροιθεν iv Ίδαίοις σκοττεΧοισιν 
ως ΤΙάρις ου σε καΧην, άΧΧ εμ εδο^μάτισεν. 

σον δόρυ καϊ σάκος εστίν εμον δε το μήΧον υττάρ- 

, Χ€ ϊ „ , „ < ν , δ 

αρκεί τω μηΧω κείνος ο πριν ποΧεμος. 

577.— ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΤ 

ΟΖδ' οτι θνατος εγώ και εφάμερος' αλλ' όταν άστρων 
μαστεύω ττυκινας αμφίδρομους εΧικας, 

ούκετ επιψαύω γαίης ττοσιν, αλλά τιαρ αύτω 
Ζανι θεοτρεφεος πίμπΧαμαι άμβροσίης. 
Α. J. Butler, Amaranth and Asphodel, p. 47. 

320 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 574 -577 

574. — Anonymous 

I, too, thrice unhappy Anaxis, carted along the 
burden of this weary life that is no life. Yet I did 
not pull it for long, but spurning from me this 
distraught life I went to Hades. 

575.— PHILIPPUS 

Heaven shall sooner quench its stars and the sun 
make bright the face of night ; the sea shall sooner 
provide sweet water for mortals to draw, and the 
dead return to the land of the living, than oblivion 
of those ancient pages shall rob us of the glorious 
name of Homer. 

576.— NICARCHUS 

On a Statue of Athena holding an Apple. Aphrodite 
speaks 

TRiTo-born maiden, why dost thou vex me now 
by grasping in thy hand my prize of which thou 
hast robbed me. Thou rememberest how formerlv, 
amid the rocks of Ida, Paris pronounced me fairest, 
not thee. Thine are the spear and shield, but mine 
is the apple. For the apple that old war was surely 
enough. 

577.— PTOLEMAEUS 

I know that I am mortal, a creature of a day ; but 
when I search into the multitudinous revolving 
spirals of the stars my feet no longer rest on the 
earth, but, standing by Zeus himself, I take my fill 
of ambrosia, the food of the gods. 

3 21 

VOL. III. γ 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 
578.— ΛΕΟΝΤΌ2 ΦΙΛ020ΦΟΤ 

Ets τά κωνικά ΑττολΧωνιον 

Ών ήοε βίβΧος ένδον ώδίνω, φίΧε, 

βαθύς χαρακτηρ καϊ περισκεΧης ayav' 

δεϊται κοΧυμβητου δε πάντως ΔηΧίου. 

ει δ' αν κυβιστήσει τις εις εμούς μυχούς 

καϊ πάν μεταΧΧεύσειεν ακριβώς βάθος, 5 

Γ /€ωμ€τρών τα πρώτα Χηψεται ykpa, 

σοφός δ' άναμφίΧεκτος είσκριθησεται. 

τούτων δε μάρτυς £<γγυητής τ€ ΙΙΧάτων. 

579.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Ιίχήμα παΧαιοτάτων ανδρών κηρύκιον άθρει, 
Θρινακίης οίκιστά Κορίνθιε, 6ς ποτ έπινες 
άμφιβόητα ρεεθρα Χυρηκοσίης Άρεθούσης. 

580.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Ε is τους Ρωμαίων μήνας 

Μην υπάτων πρώτος. 6 δε δεύτερος αΰΧακα τίμν€ΐ. 
ό τρίτος Αύσονίων yeverjv επί μώΧον ejeipei. 
τετρατος ayyeXXei ροδοδάκτυΧον εϊαρος ώρην. 
€Ϊμϊ ρόδων yev&i^. καϊ εγώ κρίνα Χευκά κομίζω, 
ούτος άμαΧΧοδέτης. τά δ' εμά πτερά ΝεϊΧον eyeipei. 5 
ούτος ερισταφύΧω πεφιΧημενος επΧετο 13άκχω. 
τεύχω δ' olvov eyu> μεΧιηδέα, χάρμα βροτοΐσι. 
δαΐτα φέρω χαρίεσσαν ες οννομα φωτός εκάστου, 
φορμιζειν δεδάηκα και ύπνώοντας eyeipeiv. 

1 A proverb used of anything very difficult. 

2 By his insistence on the study of geometry. 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 578-580 

578.— LEON THE PHILOSOPHER 

On the Conic Sections of Apollon'ius 

Deep, reader, and exceeding hard is the character 
of the things wherewith this book is big, and it has 
every need of a Delian diver. 1 But if one dive into 
its depths and investigate accurately every recess, 
he shall gain the first prize in geometry, and be pro- 
nounced indisputably a learned man. Plato is witness 
and security for this. 2 

579. — By the Sari ε 

Look, Corinthian founder of Sicily, who once didst 
drink the famous waters of Syracusan Arethusa, upon 
the herald's staff as shaped by men of old time. 3 

580. — Anonymous 
On the Roman Months 
The consuls' month is first, the second cuts the 
furrow, the third rouses the Italians to war, the fourth 
announces the rosy-fingered season of spring. I, Mav, 
am the mother of roses. I, June, bring white lilies. 
This, July, is the binder of sheaves. August's wings 4 
make the Nile rise. This, September, is dear to 
Bacchus, rich in grapes. I, October, make honeyed 
wine, a delight for men. I, November, bring a joyful 
banquet to every man. 5 I, December, teach men to 
play on the lyre and to awaken sleepers. 6 

8 What the connection is between the herald's staff and 
Syracuse no one has explained. 

1 The Etesian winds, which were supposed to cause the 
rising of the Nile. 

6 Probably olive oil. 6 At the Saturnalia. 

323 
γ 2 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

581.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Ύοξότα, ΤΙιερίδων μεΰεων, εκατηβόΧε Φοίβε, 
είπε κασιγνήττ), κρατερούς ίνα θήρας εηείρτ), 
οσσον επιψαύσαι μερόπων Βεμας, οσσον άΰσαί 
Χαών τερπομενων lepbv στόμα' μηΒε νοήσω, 
Ζηνος μειΧιχίοιο Χαχών θρόνον, άνέρος οίτον. 

582.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Αρμενίων τάδε φύΧα καϊ άΧκιμον έθνος Ιβήρων, 
Χριστού ζήΧον έχοντες εκούσιον ες ζνγον ηΧθον, 
θεσμω ύποΒρήσσοντες ανίκητων βασι,Χήων. 

583.— ΛΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 
Eis ®ονκν&ί8ην 
Ώ φίΧος, εΐ σοφός εϊ, Χάβε μ ες γέρας' el Βε <γε 
πάμπαν 
νήϊς εφυς Μουσεων, ρΐψον α μη νοέης. 
είμϊ yap ου πάντεσσι βατός• παύροί δ' αηάσαντο 
%ουκυΒίΒην 'ΟΧόρον, ΚεκροπίΒην το γένος. 

584.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Έιΰνομον, ωποΧΧον, συ μεν οισθά με, πως ποτ ενικών 
Χπάρτιν 6 Αοκρος εγώ• πευθομενοις δ' ενέπω. 

1 Planudes says Leo. 2 i.e. God. 

3 2 4 






BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 581-584 

581. — Anonymous 

On a Beast-fight in the Theatre 

(The words are put in the mouth of the Emperor 1 ') 

Bowman, lord of the Muses, far-shooter Phoebus, 

tell thy sister to arouse the mighty beasts just enough 

for them to touch men's bodies lightly and make the 

people cry out for pleasure in holy tones. Let me 

not, who sit on the throne of Jove 2 the Merciful, 

look upon a man's death. 

582. — Anonymous 

These Armenian tribes and the doughty Iberian 
people, full of zeal for Christ, came willingly under 
the yoke, submitting themselves to the law of our 
invincible emperors. 3 

583. — Anonymous 
On Thucydides 
My friend, if thou art learned, take me in thy 
hand ; but if thou art ignorant of the Muses, cast 
away what thou canst not understand. I am not 
accessible to all, but the few admire Thucydides, 
son of Olorus, by birth an Athenian. 

584. — Anonymous 
On the Statue at Delphi of Eunomus the Lyre-player* 
Thou knowest, Apollo, how I, Eunomus the Locrian, 
conquered Spartis, but I tell it for those who ask me. 

3 Probably inscribed on a picture of the Armenians' and 
Georgians' embassy to Constantine, accepting Christianity. 
* cp. VI. 54. 

325 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

αίόΧον εν κιθάρα νόμον εκρεκον, εν Βέ μεσεύσα 

ωΒα μοι χορΒαν πΧάκτρον άπεκρέμασεν. 
και μοι φθόγγου ετοΐμον όπανίκα καιρός άπτ/τει, δ 

et? άκοας ρυθμών τώτρεκές ουκ ενεμεν 
και τις άττ αύτομάτω κιθάρας επί πήχυν επιπτας 

τέττιξ επΧηρου τούΧΧιπές αρμονίας, 
νεύρα yap εξ ετίνασσον 6Θ' έβΒομάτας Βέ μεΧείμαν 

-χορΒάς, τ αν τούτω γήρυν εκιχράμεθα' 10 

προς yap έμάν μεΧέταν ό μεσαμβρινος ούρεσιν ωΒος 

τήνο το ποιμενικον φθέγμα μεθηρμόσατο, 
καϊ μέν ore φθέ~/γοιτο συν άψύχοις τόκα νευραΐς 

τω μεταβαΧΧομένω συμμετέπιπτε θρόω. 
τουνεκα συμφωνώ μεν 'έχω 'χάριν ος Βέ τυπωθείς 15 

■χάΧκεος υμετέρας εζεθ' υπέρ κιθάρας. 

585.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 
Εις μισάωρων ϊχον Αφροΰίτην καϊ 'Ερωτας 

Τέσσαρες είσιν "Ερωτες' 6 μεν οτέφος άμφικαΧύπτει 
μητρός εής• 6 Βέ χεΐΧος έχει ποτϊ πίΒακι μαζου• 
οι Βέ Βύω παιζουσι παρ ϊχνεσιν εϊμα Βέ κρύπτει 
μηρω γείτονα χώρον οΧης γυμνής ' ΆφροΒίτης. 

586.— ΚΟΜΗΤΑ ΧΑΡΤΟΤΛΑΡΙΟΤ 

α. Είπε νομεΐι, τίνος εισϊ φυτών στίχες; β. Αί μεν 
εΧαΐαι, 
Παλλάδος• αί Βέ πέριξ 7]μερί8ες, Έρομίου. 
α. Και. τίνος οι στάγυες; β. Δημιμερος. α. "Ανθεα 
ποίων 
εισϊ θεών; β. "\ϋρης καϊ ροΒέης ΤΙαφίης. 
α. ΤΙαν φίΧε, πηκτίΒα μίμνε τεοΐς επί χείΧεσι 

σύρων δ 

Ή^ώ yap δί;εί? τοΓσδ' ενϊ θειΧοπέΒοις. 
326 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 585-586 

I was playing on the lyre an elaborate piece, and in 
the middle of it my plecti-on loosened one chord, 
and when the time came to strike the note I was 
ready to play, it did not convey the correct sound to 
the ear. Then of its own accord a cicada perched 
on the bridge of the lyre and supplied the deficiency 
of the harmony. I had struck six chords, and when 
I required the seventh I borrowed this cicada's voice ; 
for the midday songster of the hillside adapted to 
my performance that pastoral air of his, and when 
he shrilled he combined with the lifeless chords to 
change the value of the phrase. Therefore I owe a 
debt of thanks to my partner in the duet, and wrought 
in bronze he sits on my lyre. 

585. — Anonymous 
On a Disk with a Relief of Venus and Loves 
Here are four Loves. One fits the garland to his 
mother's brows, one has his lips at her bosom's 
fountain, two play at her feet, and the robe covers 
the place that is next to the thighs of Aphrodite, 
otherwise wholly undraped. 

586.— COMETAS CHARTULARIUS 

A. Tell me, shepherd, whose are these rows of 
plants? B. The olive-trees belong to Pallas and the 
vines round them to Dionysus. A. And whose is the 
corn ? B. Demeter's. A. To what gods do the 
flowers belong ? B. To Hera and rosy Aphro- 
dite. A. Dear Pan, stay here and ply the pipe 
with thy lips, for thou shalt find Echo on this 
sunny slope. 

327 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 
587.— ΕΤΤΟΛΜΤΟΤ ΙΛΛΟΤ2ΤΡΙΟΤ 

Ε is θίρμοχνιην 

Βάκχω καϊ Νύμφαις μέσος ϊσταμαι• εν δε κυπέλλοις 
αΐεϊ τόνδε χέω τον π αραΧειττ ό μενον . 

588.— ΑΛΚΑΙΟΤ 

Οίοι» 6ρτ}ς, ω ξεΐνε, το χαλ,κεον εικόνι \ημα 

ΚΧειτομάχου, τοίαν Έλλ«9 εσβϊδε βίαν 
άρτι <γάρ αίματόεντα χερών άπεΧύετο ττυ^γμάς 

εντεα, καϊ yop -γω μάρνατο ττα^κρατίω' 
το τρίτον ουκ έκονισεν επωμιδας, άλΧα, τταΧαίσας 5 

άτττώς, τους τρισσους λσθμόθεν elXe πόνους, 
μουνος δ' ΈΧΧάνων τόδ' βχει <γέρας• ίτττάπυΧοι δε 

®ηβαι και <γενετωρ εστεφεθ' Έρμοκράτης. 

589.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Ε is άγαλμα Hpas θηλαζονσης τον Ήρακλέα 

Αυτήν μητρυιην τεχνησατο' τουνεκα μαζον 
εις νοθον ο ττΧάστης ου προσεθηκε γάλα. 

590.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Ets άγαλμα Ηφαίστου και Αθήνας και Έρίχθίως 

" Ή τέχνη συνάηειρεν α μη φύσις " είττεν ό πΧάστης, 
" μήτερ νόαφι τόκων, νυμφίε νόσφι γάμ,ωι/." 



1 It stood between the bowl of wine and the jar of water, 
and was used for filling the cups from both. 

328 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 587-590 

587.— EUTOLMIUS ILLUSTRIUS 

On a Vessel for pouring Hot Water or Wine 

I stand between Bacchus and the Nymphs, and 
ever pour into the cups that of which there is too 
little. 1 

588.— ALCAEUS 

Even as thou seest, stranger, his stout heart in the 
bronze image, so Hellas saw the might of Clito- 
machus. 2 For when he had put off the blood-stained 
cestus from his hands, he straightway fought in the 
fierce pancratium. In the third event he fouled not 
his shoulders in the dust, but wrestling without a 
fall won the three contests at Isthmus. Alone among 
the Greeks he gained this honour, and seven-gated 
Thebes and his father Hermocrates were crowned. 

589. — Anonymous 

On a Statue of Hera suckling Heracles 

A true stepmother did the sculptor render. There- 
fore he added no milk to the breast that was not 
kindred. 

590. — Anonymous 

On a Group of Hephaestus, Athena, and Erechtheus 3 

" Art united that which Nature did not," said the 
sculptor. " Ο mother without birth and bridegroom 
without marriage '" 

2 See Pausanias vi. 15. 

3 i.e. Erichthonius. The epigram alludes to the very gross 
story of the circumstances of his birth. 

3 2 9 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 
591.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

ΈΙς άγαλμα A/kos και Αφροδίτης 

"Αρεα καϊ ΐϊαφίην 6 ζωγράφος εις μέσον οίκον 
άμφπτεριπΧέγδην <γέ η /ραφεν αμφότερους' 

εκ θυρίοος δε μοΧων Φαέθων ποΧυπάμφαος αϊγΧη 
εστη άμηχανόων αμφότερους σκοπέων. 

ηέΧιος βαρύμηνις εως τίνος; οΰδ' έττϊ κηροΰ 5 

ηθεΧεν αψύχου τον χοΧον έξεΧάσαι. 

592.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Εις ασπίδα πΐρπχονσαν την γε^ναν του Ί,ωτηρος 

*Ω 'πόσον εύήθης ό ζωγράφος, ottl "χαράσσει, 
κοίρανον ειρήνης άσπίΒι τικτομενον. 

593.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Εις άγαλ/Λα Μ^δει'ας 

Οΐκτον όμοΰ καϊ Χύσσαν ετήτυμον ενθεος άνηρ 
μαρμάρω έ<γκατέμιξε, βιαζομένην δ' ύπο τέχνης 
Χαϊνεην ΜήΒειαν οΧης εμνησεν άνίης. 

594.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Ζωγράφε τάν μορφα,ν άττομάξας, αΧΘ" εν\ κηρω 
καϊ Λ^νχάν ε&άης ^ωκρατικαν βαΧεειν. 

595.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 
Ei's εικόνα ΑπίλλοΟ 
. . . αύτος εαυτόν εν είκόνι γράψεν ΑττεΧΧής. 
33° 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 591-595 

591. — Anonymous 

On a Group of Ares and Aphrodite 

The painter in the interior of the house painted 
Ares and Aphrodite embracing each other. The 
bright Sun, coming in through the window, stood in 
astonishment as he gazed on them both. Till when 
shall the heavy wrath of the Sun endure ? He 
would not banish his anger though it fell only on 
lifeless wax. 1 

592. — Anonymous 

On a Shield representing the Birth of Christ 

Ηολν simple was the artist to engrave the birth of 
the Prince of Peace on a shield ! 

593. — Anonymous 

On a Statue of Medea 

The inspired hand infused into the marble both 
pity and fury, and made the stone Medea, under the 
empire of his art, remember all her griefs. 

594. — Anonymous 

On a Picture of Socrates 

Painter, who hast reproduced the form of Socrates, 
would thou couldst have put his soul into the wax ! 

595. — Anonymous 
On a Picture of Apelles 
Apelles painted himself in the picture. 
1 Used in encaustic painting. 

331 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

596.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Ε ?9 εικόνα Χίΐ'λωνος 

ΎόνΒε δοριστεφανος Σπάρτα ΧείΧωνα φύτευσεν, 
ος των επτά Σοφών πρώτος εφυ σοφία. 



597.— ΚΟΜΗΤΑ ΣΧΟΑΑΣΤΙΚΟΤ 

Έν Άναζάρβω 

Νωθρός εγώ τεΧεθεσκον απ ίξύος ες πόδας άκρους 

της πριν ενερηείης δηρόν άτεμβό μένος, 
ζωής καϊ θανάτοιο μεταίχμιον, "Αϊδι <γβίτων, 

μοννον άναπνε'ιων, τάΧλα 8ε πάντα νεκυς. 
άΧΧα σοφός μ€ ΦίΧιππος, ον εν <γραφίδεσσι δοκεύεις, δ 

ζώ^ρησεν, κρυερην νουσον άκεσσάμενος' 
αΰθις δ' ' Αντωνΐνος, άπερ πάρος, ev χθονί βαίνω, 

και ποσϊ πεζεύω, καϊ οΧος αισθάνομαι. 



598.— ΘΕΟΚΡΙΤΟΤ 

Ύόν τώ Ζανος ό'δ ύμιν ν'ιον ώνηρ, 
τον Χειοντομάχαν, τον όξύγειρα, 
πράτος τών επάνωθε μονσοποιών 
ΤΙείσανΒρος σννέγραψεν ουκ Κ,αμείρου, 
'χοσσους εξεπόνασεν ειπ άεθΧους' 
τούτον δ' αυτόν ό Βάμος, ως σάφ εί8ί}ς, 
εστασ ειθάδε χάΧκεον ποησας, 
ποΧΧοΐς μησιν οπισθε κηνιαυτοϊς. 

332 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 596-598 

596. — Anonymous 

On a Picture of Chilon 

Sparta, glorious in war, gave birth to this Chilon, 
who was first in wisdom of the seven sages. 



597.— COMETAS SCHOLASTICUS 

In Anazarba of Cilicia 

I was paralyzed from the hips to the soles of my 
feet, long deprived of my former activity, half-way 
between life and death, near to Hades, breathing 
only, otherwise an utter corpse. But skilled Philip- 
pus, whom you see in the picture, saved me, healing 
my chilling sickness ; and now I, Antoninus, again 
tread on the earth and walk with my feet, and have 
feeling in every part. 



598.— THEOCRITUS 

This man, Pisander of Camirus, first among the 
poets of old time, wrote of the son of Zeus, the lion- 
fighter, the nimble-handed, and told of all the labours 
he accomplished. Know that the city, after many 
months and years, set his very self up here in 
bronze. 



333 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

599.— TOY ΑΥΤΟΥ 

θάσαί τον ανδριάντα τούτον, ω ζενε, 
σπουδα, καϊ Χε η /\ επάν ες οίκον ενθης, 

"Ανακρέοντος εΐκόν είδον iv Τεω, 

των προσθ' εϊ τί περισσον ωδοποιού." 

προσθεϊς δε χώτι τοις νεοισιν άδετο, 5 

e/}et9 άτρεκεως οΧον τον άνδρα. 

600.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

'Ά Τ6 φωνα Δώριος, χωνηρ 6 ταν κωμωδίαν 

εύρων Επίχαρμος, 
ώ Βάκχε, χάΧκεόν νιν άντ άΧαθινού 

τ\ν ώδ' ανέβηκαν 
τοϊ Συρακόσσαις ενίδρυνται, πεΧωρίσ ra πόΧει, 6 

oV άνδρϊ ττοΧίτα• 
σοφών εοικε ρημάτων μεμναμενους 

τεΧεΐν επίχειρα' 
ποΧΧά yap ποττάν ζόαν τοις παισϊν είπε χρήσιμα• 

με η /άΧα χάρις αύτω. 10 

601.— ΑΑΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Το ξόανον το περισσον ' ' Χεξιμενης Άφροδίτα 

εΐσατο, της πάσης ναυτιΧίης φύΧακι. 
χαϊρ ' , ω πότνια Κυπρί, δίδουσα δε κερδεα, πΧοΰτον 

άρμενον, 6ΐδ?/σ6ί9 ναΰς ότι κοινότατον. 

1 It will be noticed that the metre of the second and fourth 
distichs differs from that of distichs 1, 3, 5. 

334 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 599-601 

599. — By the Same 

Look well on this statue, stranger, and tell on thy 
return home : " I saw in Teos the statue of Anacreon, 
a song-writer most excellent of those of old." And 
adding that he took delight in young men, thou 
shalt exactly describe the whole man. 

600. — By the Same 

Doric is my tongue and Doric this man who in- 
vented comedy, Epicharmus. Bacchus, to thee as to 
a citizen, did they who dwell in Syracuse, mightiest 
of cities, dedicate him in bronze. Belike, mindful 
of his wise sayings, they paid him this guerdon. For 
many things useful for life he said to its children. 
Great thanks to him ! x 

601. — Anonymous 

This passing fair statue did Aeximenes erect to 
Aphrodite, the protectress of all navigation. Hail, 
sovereign Cyj^ris ! and if thou givest gain and welcome 
wealth thou shalt learn that a ship is most ready to 
go shares. 2 

a i.e. Aphrodite will get her share. 

335 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

602.— ETHNOT ΑΘΗΝΑΙΟΤ 

"Α ποτέ παρθενικαΐσιν ίΧασκομενα παΧάμησιν 

ΚύπριΒα, συν πεύκαις και yapov εύξαμενα, 
κουριΒίους ηΒη θαΧάμω Χύσασα χιτώνας, 

άνΒρος αφαρ μηρών έζεΧόγευσα τύπους' 
νυμφίος εκ νύμφης Be κικΧήσκομαι, εκ δ' <Αφρο- 
Βίτης> 

ν Αρεα και βωμούς εστεφον ΉρακΧεους. 
%ήβαι Ύειρεσίην eXeyov ποτ€' νυν Βε μ€ ΧαΧκις 

την πάρος iv μίτραις ησπάσατ εν γΧαμύΒι. 

603.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ 

IleVre Διωνύσοιο θεραπνΊΒες αΐΒε Έ,αώτεω 

έντννουσι θοάς k'pya χοροστασίης• 
ά μεν άερτάζουσα Βεμας βΧοσυροΐο Χεοντος, 

ά Be Λ,υκαονιον καΧΧικερων εΧαφον, 
ά τριτάτα δ' οίωνον εύπτερον, ά Be τέταρτα 

τύμπανον, ά πέμπτα 'χαΧκοβαρες κρόταΧον 
πάσαι φοιταΧέαι τε παρηόριόν τε νόημα 

εκπΧαηεες Χνσσα Βαίμονος εύϊάΒι. 

604.— Ν022ΙΔ02 

®αυμαρετας μορφαν ό πίναξ εχεί' ευ ye το ηαΰρον 
τεύζε τό #' ώραΐον τάς ά^ανοβΧεφάρου. 

σαίνοι κεν σ' εσιΒοϊσα καϊ οικοφυΧαξ σκυΧάκαινα, 
Βεσποιναν μεΧάθρων οίομενα ποθορήν. 

605.— ΤΗ2 ΑΥΤΗ2 
Ύον πίνακα ξανθάς Καλλώ Βόμον εις ΆφροΒίτας 
εικόνα ηρα^αμενα πάντ άνεθηκεν ϊσαν. 



336 






BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 602-605 

602.— EVENUS OF ATHENS 

I who once supplicated Cypris with my maiden 
hands and, waving torches, prayed for marriage, after 
I had loosed my nuptial dress in the bridal chamber, 
suddenly saw spring from my thighs the marks of 
manhood. Now I am called a bridegroom instead of 
a bride, and crown the altars of Ares and Heracles 
instead of those of Aphrodite. Thebes once told of 
Tiresias, and now Chalcis greets in a chlamys her 
who formerly wore the snood. 



603.— ANTIPATER OF SIDON 

These five votaries of Dionysus the Saviour are 
entering upon the rapid dance. One lifts on high the 
body of a grim lion, another an antlered Arcadian 
stag, a third a bird with lovely plumage, a fourth a 
kettle-drum, and the fifth a heavy brazen clapper. 
All are frenzied and distraught by the bacchic fury 
of the god. 1 

604.— NOSSIS 

This is the picture of Thaumareta. Well did the 
painter render the bearing and the beauty of the 
gentle-eyed lady ! Thy little house-dog would fawn 
upon thee if it saw thee here, thinking that it looked 
on the mistress of its home. 

605. — By the Same 

Callo had her portrait made exactly like herself, 
and hung the picture in the house of fair-haired 

1 Possibly on the famous group of Thespian women by 
Praxiteles, which Mummius transferred to Rome. 

337 

VOL. III. Ζ 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

ώς άγανως εστακεν ιδ' ά χάρις άΧίκον ανθεί, 
χαιρετώ' ου τίνα jap μέμψιν έχει βιοτας. 

606.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΊΌΝ 
Eis λοντρόν 

Λ Ην το πύρος φιΧεεσκεν"Αρης, σκοπίαζεΚυθείρην 
ενθάΒε Χουομενην νάμασι φαιΒροτάτοις' 

Βερκεο νηχομενην μη ΒείΒιθι• ου yap Άθηνην 
τταρθενον είσοράας, οΐάτε Ύειρεσι,ας. 

607.— ΑΛΛΟ 

At Χάριτες Χούσαντο' άμειψάμεναι Βε λοετρον 
Βώκαν εων ρεθεων ΰΒασιν ayXatijv. 

608.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Ή τοΐον Κυθέρειαν ΰΒωρ τεκεν, ή Κυθέρεια 
τοΐον τεΰξεν ΰΒωρ, ον χρόα Χουσαμενη. 

609.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Ύών Χαρίτων τόΒε Χοντρον αθύρματα' κ αϊ yap εκείνας 
μοΰνας εσω τταίσΒειν τ ας Χάριτας Βεχεται. 

609α.— ΑΛΛΟ 

'Όντως Βη Χαρίτων Χουτρον τόΒε' ούΒε yap α,ΧΧους 
ιτΧείους χωρήσαι τούτο τριών Βύναται. 

610.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Μικρά μεν k'pya τάδ' εστίν, έχει δ' ήΒεϊαν οττώπην, 
ώς ρόΒον εν κήποις, ως ϊον εν ταΧάροις. 

338 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 606-610 

Aphrodite. How gentle she looks standing there ! 
Look how fresh is the hloom of her charm ! All 
hail to her ! for there is no fault in her life. 

606-640 are all Inscriptions on Baths 

606. — Anonymous 

Look at Cytherea whom Ares once loved, bathing 
here in the limpid stream. Look at her swimming, 
and fear not. It is not maiden Athena that you see, 
as Tiresias did. 

607. — Anonymous 

The Graces bathed here, and to reward the bath 
they gave to the water the brightness of their limbs. 

608. — Anonymous 

Either such water gave birth to Cytherea, or 
Cytherea, by bathing in it, made the water such. 

609. — Anonymous 

This bath is the playground of the Graces, for it 
only admits the Graces to sport within it. 

609a. — Anonymous 

This is really the Graces' bath, for it cannot contain 
more than three. 

610. — Anonymous 

This is a little work, but beautiful to look on, like 
a rose in a garden or a violet in a basket of flowers. 

339 
ζ 2 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

611.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Έϊ> μικρω μεγάλη Χουτρω χάρις, εν δ' εΧαχίστω 
νάματί Χουομενοις ηδύς επεστιν Έρω?. 

612.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Ως δενδρον βραχύφυΧΧον, έχει δ' ηδεϊαν οδωδήν, 
ούτως Χοντρά τάδε μικρά, μεν, άλλα φίλα. 

613.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Ε Σ? τό λοντρον Μαρίας 

Της Μαρίης τό Χοετρον ίδών νπεδάκρυε Μώ/ζο?, 
ειπών, "Ώς Μαρίην, καϊ σε παρερχόμεθα" 

614.— ΛΕΟΝΤΙΟΤ 2ΧΟΛΑΣ/ΠΚΟΤ 

Ets λοντρον μικρόν παρακίίμΐνον τω Τιΐνξιππω 

Μ τ) νεμεσα, Ζεύξιππε, παραντέΧΧοντι Χοετρω• 
καϊ μεγάΧην παρ "Αμαξαν ερωτύΧος ηδύ φαείνει. 

615.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Εί? λοντρον iv ^pvpvy 

Χώρος, τις μερόπων σε Χιπανγεα το πριν εόντα 
πΧονσιον εν φέγγει θήκατο Χονομενοις ; 

τίς δε και αίΟαΧόεντι ρνπω πεπαΧαγμένον άρτι, 
κεΐνον άϊστώσας, φαιδρον έδειξε δόμον; 

φρην σοφή ώς πάσιν θεοδωρίας, ως ετεον δη 
καν τούτω καθ α ρ ην δεικνύμενος κραδίην 



34θ 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 611-615 

611. — Anonymous 

There is great charm in a little bath. Sweet love 
looks on those who bathe in the tiniest stream. 



612. — Anonymous 

As a myrtle has little leaves, but sweet-scented, 
so this bath is small, but dear. 

6 1 3. — Anonymous 

On the Bath of Maria 1 

Momus 2 wept when he saw the bath of Maria, ex- 
claiming : " I have to leave you un visited, as I leave 
Maria." 

614.— LEONTIUS SCHOLAST1CUS 

On a small Bath next that called Zeuxipptis 

Be not wrath, Zeuxippus, with this bath that arises 
next thee. The little star called Erotylus shines 
sweetly though next the Great Bear. 

615. — Anonymous 

On a Bath at Smyrna 

Thou building, who of mortals made thee, who 
wast formerly dim, rich in light for bathers, and 
who, cleaning away the smoky grime that befouled 
thee, brightened thee thus ? It was wise Theodorus 
who in this truly, as in everything, showed the clean- 
ness of his heart. He being the treasurer and father 

1 The Empress, wife of Honoriua. 

2 The god of fault-finding. 

341 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



ος yap εών πόλιος κτεάνων ταμίης τε 'πατήρ τε, 

κερδεσιν εξ αυτών ουκ εμίηνε χέρας. 
άλλα θεός φιλόπατριν, ερισθενες, άφθιτε Χριστέ, 

πήματος αυτόν άτερ σώζε τεη παΧάμη. 10 

616.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Ένθάδε Χουσαμενων Χαρίτων ποτέ, θεσκεΧα πεπΧα 
βαιος "Ερως έκλεψε, καϊ ωχετο' τας δ' έ'λί7τ' αυτού 
^υμνάς, αίδομένας θυρεών εκτοσθε φανήναι. 

617.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Εις βαλανεΐον ψνχρόν 

Γον ττοταμόν, βάλανεύ, τις ετείχισε; τις βαΧανεΐον 

την κρήνην -ψευδώς τήνδε μετωτόμασεν; 
Αίολος Ίπποτάδης φίλος άθανάτοισι θεοϊσιν 

ώδε μετοικησας ψ/α^/ε τους άνεμους, 
προς τί δε καϊ σανίδες δύο τοις ποσ\ν α'ίδ υπό- 
κεινται; 5 

ου δια την θερμην, της χιόνος δ' ένεκα. 
Φρίξου καϊ Νάρκης ούτος τόπος, άλλ' επί'γραψον 

" Τω μεσορϊ Χούσαι' πνεΐ yap εσω Ιάορεας. 

618.— ΑΛΛΟ 
E!s erepov λοντρον iv Ένζαντίω 

Αωτον ερεπτομένους προτέρων ου ψεύσατο μύθος' 
πίστιν αληθείης τούτο το Χουτρον ε-χει. 

ει yap άπαξ καθαροΐσι Χοέσσεται ΰδασιν άνήρ, 
ου ποθεει πάτρην, ουκ εθελει yεvετaς. 

1 Horn. Od. χ. 2. 
34» 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 616-618 

of the city's possessions, did not stain his hands by 
gain derived from them. Mighty Christ, immortal 
God, keep by Thy hand this patriot out of the reach 
of misfortune. • 



6 1 6. — Anon ymous 

Here once when the Graces bathed, little Eros 
stole their immortal raiment and went off with it, 
leaving them naked and ashamed to appear outside 
the door. 

6 1 7. — Anonymous 

On a too cold Bath 

Who walled round a river, bathman ? Who falsely 
styled this fountain a bath? iC Aeolus, son of Hip- 
potas, dear to the immortal gods," l brought the winds 
here from their home. And why are these two 
planks placed here for the feet? Not for warmth, 
but for freezing. This is the place of Shivering and 
Frost-bite. Write thereon : " Bathe here in August, 2 
for the north wind blows ever within." 

618. — Anonymous 

On a Bath in Byzantium 

The old story of the lotus-eaters 3 is no falsehood. 
This bath confirms its truth. For if a man once 
bathe in these pure waters he does not regret his 
country or desire his parents. 

2 Mesori is the Egyptian name of August. 
8 Horn. Od. «. 94. 

343 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 
619.— ΑΓΑΘΙΟΤ ΣΧΟΛΑΣΤΙΚΟΤ 

Eis trepov λουτρον ίν Βυ£αντιω 

Νυν eyvoov, Κυθέρεια, πόθεν νίκησαν αγώνα, 
την πριν ' ΑΧεζάνΒρου ψήφον υφαρπαμενη. 

ενθάΒε yap τέγγουσα τεόν Βεμας, ευρες iXey^ai 
"Ηρην Ίναχίοις χεύμασι Χουσαμενην. 

νίκησεν το Χοετρόν εοικε Βε τούτο βοώση ί 

Παλλά?• " Ένικήθην ΰΒασιν, ου ΤΙαφίη." 

620.— ΠΑΤΛΟΤ ΣΙΛΕΝΤΙΑΡΙΟΤ 

Ει? λουτρον διδυ/Λον, ev ώ λούονται και γυναίκ£5 και ανδρός 

"Αγχί μεν εΧπις έρωτος• εΧεΐν δ' ουκ εστί <γυναϊκα<;' 
είρξε πυΧις ΤΙαφίην την μ€^ά\ην 6Χί<γη. 

αλλ' εμπης γΧυκύ τούτο' ποθοβΧήτοις yap eV k'pyoi<; 
εΧπις άΧηθείης εστί μεΧιχροτέρη. 

621.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Eis cTtpov Χοντρόν 

"Οσσαις θηΧυτεραις εστίν πόθος {εστί Βε πάσαις), 
Βεϋρ ϊτε, φαιδρότερης τευξόμεναι 'χάριτος. 

χ?; μεν ενονσα πόσιν, τέρψει πόσιν η δ' ετι κούρη 
ότρυνεει πΧείστους εΒνα πορεΐν Χε-χεων 

η Be φέρουσα πόρους από σώματος, εσμόν εραστών 5 
εξει επϊ προθύροις, ενθάΒε Χουσαμένη. 

622.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Ε is τό αυτό 

Είτε σε κουριΒίης άΧόχου yXυκυς ίμερος ϊσχει, 
Χούεο, φαιδρότερος ττ)Βε φανησόμενος• 

344 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 619-622 

619.— AGATHIAS SCHOLASTICUS 

On a Bath in Byzantium 

Now I know, Cytherea, how thou didst conquer 
in the contest, stealing the vote of Alexander. It 
was here thou didst dip thy body, and so didst find 
means to overcome Hera who had bathed in the 
streams of Inachus. 1 It was the bath that won, and 
I fancy Pallas cried out thus : " I was conquered by 
the water, not by the Paphian." 

620.— PAULUS SILENTIARIUS 

On a Double Bath in which Men and Women Bathed 

Near is the hope of love, but one cannot catch the 
women. A little door shuts out great Cypris. But 
yet this is sweet ; for in the matter of amorous desire 
hope is sweeter than reality. 

621. — Anonymous 

Such women as have desire to please (and ye all 
have) come here, and ye shall win brighter charms. 
She who has a husband will give her husband plea- 
sure, and the unmarried girl will stir many to offer 
her marriage. And she who makes her living by her 
body, if she bathe here, will have swarms of lovers 
at her door. 

622. — Anonymous 

If sweet desire for thy wedded wife possess thee, 
bathe here, and thou shalt appear to her brighter. 

1 At Argos. 

345 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

εϊτε σε μισθοφόρους εττϊ μαχλάδας οίστρος opivec, 
Χήψη, κού δώσεις, ένθάδε Χουσάμενος. 

623.— ΚΤΡΟΤ ΠΟΙΗΤΟΤ 

Ει? έτερον (νμορφον 

Κ,υπρις συν Χαρίτεσσι καϊ νίέϊ χρυσοβεΧέμνω 
ενθάδε Χουσαμενη, μισθον 'έδωκε ■χάριν. 

624.— ΛΕΟΝΤΙΟΤ 2ΧΟΛΑΣΤΙΚΟΤ 

Eis έτερον λουτρό ν παρακειρενον τω Βημοσίω ε'ν Βυζαντίω 

Αεί ματ ο μ€ ξννοΐο παρά ττροθύροισι Χοετροΰ 
αστός άνήρ, αρετής εϊνεκεν, ουκ έριδος. 

κείνο μελοι πΧεόνεσσιν iyoo δ' ολίγοις τε φίΧοις τε 
εντύνω προχοάς καϊ μύρα καϊ χάρπας. 

625.— ΜΑΚΗΔΟΝΙΟΤ ΤΠΑΤΟΤ 

Εις έτερον λοντρόν εν Ανκίοίς 

ΪΙιστότατος μεροττων τις εοι ττυΧαωρος έμεΐο, 
κρίνων Χουομένων καιρόν εσηΧνσίης, 

μη τίνα Νηϊάδων τις έμοΐς ένϊ γεΰμασι ηυμνην, 
■ί) μετά καΧΧικομων Κυπριν ϊδοι Χαρίτων 

ουκ εθελων " Χαλεττοι δε θεοί φαίνεσθαι εναργείς" 
τις <γάρ Όμηρείοις άντιφεροιτο Χόγοις; 

626.— ΜΑΡΙΑΝΟΤ 2ΧΟΛΑΣΤΙΚΟΤ 

Ε ί? έτερον λουτρον όνομαζόμενον Έρωτα 

Μητέρα Κ,ύπριν εΧουσεν "Ερως ττοτε τωδε Χοετρ'ω, 
αύτος ΰποφΧέζας Χαμττάδι καΧον ύδωρ. 

346 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 623-626 

Or if lust drive thee to mercenary and depraved 
women, bathe here, and thou shalt be paid instead 
of paying. 

623.— CYRUS 

Cvpris with the Graces and her golden-arrowed 
boy bathed here and gave grace in payment. 



624.— LEONTIUS SCHOLASTICUS 

On another Bath next the Public Baths in Byzantium 

A citizen built me at the gate of the public bath 
for excellence, not for competition. Let that serve 
many ; I supply water and scent and charm to an 
intimate few. 

625.— MACEDONIUS THE CONSUL 

On another Bath in the Lycian Quarter (?) 

Let my doorkeeper be the most faithful of men, 
keeping careful note of the time at which bathers 
enter me, lest anyone against his will see one of the 
Naiads naked in my waters, or Cypris with the long- 
haired Graces : " For hard are the gods to him who 
sees them manifestly." l Who would dispute Homer's 
dictum ? 

626.— MARIANUS SCHOLASTICUS 

On another Bath called Love 

Love once bathed his mother Cypris in this bath, 
himself warming its lovely water with his torch. Ah, 
1 Horn. 11. xx. 131. 

347 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

ίδρως δ' άμβροσιοιο χυθείς χροος άμμνγα Χευκοϊς 

ΰδασι, φευ ττνοιής οσσον άνήψεν εαρ• 
ένθεν αεί ροδόεσσαν άναζείουσιν άϋτμήν, 6 

ως ετι της χρυσής Χουομενης ΤΙαφίης. 

627.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 
Ε is τό αυτό 

Ταδ' ύττο τας πλατάνους άπαΧω τετρυμενος ΰττνω 
ευδεν "Ε/?ω?, Νύμφαις Χαμπάδα τταρθεμενος. 

Νυ/χφαί δ' ά\\ή\τ]σι, " Ύι μεΧΧομεν; αϊθε δε τούτω 
σβεσσαμεν," ειπον, " όμοΰ ττΰρ κραδίης μερόπων." 

Χαμττας δ' ως εφΧεξε καϊ ύδατα, θερμον εκείθεν 5 

Νύμφαι Έρωτιάδες Χουτ ρογοευσ ιν ύδωρ. 

J. Α. Pott, Greek Love Songs and Epigrams, i. p. 113; 
expanded by Shakespeare, Sonnets, cliii, cliv. 

628.— ΙΩΑΝΝΟΤ ΓΡΑΜΜΑΤΙΚΟΤ 

Ei's το δημόσιον λοντρον το καλονμΐνον "Ιππον iv 
'Αλεξάνδρεια 

Ιπποι/ εϋρρείτην χρονίτ} μάστιηι δαμεντα 
χρυσείω ττοΧύοΧβος άναξ ήγειρε χαΧινω. 

629.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Ε is έτερον 

Αϊθε σε, Πίνδαρε, μάΧΧον εμοΐς εκάθηρα ρεεθροις, 
καί κεν άριστον ΰδωρ τουμον εφησθα μόνον. 



348 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 627 629 

what a scent of spring had the sweat that ran from 
her ambrosial body mixing with the clear, white 
water ! Henceforth from it ever bubbles a vapour 
smelling of roses, as if golden Cypris "were still 
bathing. 

627. — By the Same 

Here under the plane-trees tired Love lay softly 
sleeping, having entrusted his torch to the Nymphs. 
Said the Nymphs among themselves : " Why not do 
it at once ? Would that together with this we could 
put out the fire in men's hearts." But it was the 
torch that set fire to the water, and henceforth the 
Love-Nymphs pour forth here hot water for men 
to bathe in. 

628.— JOANNES GRAMMATICUS 

On the Public Bath at Alexandria called the Horse 

Our blessed sovereign aroused with a golden bit 
the fair-flowing Horse which long scourging had 
laid low. 1 

629. — By the Same 

Would, Pindar, that I rather than others had 
washed thee in my stream. Then thou wouldst have 
called my water alone best. 2 

1 The meaning is that the Emperor spent money on re- 
storing the bath. 

2 Referring to the beginning of Olymp. i. "Water is best." 

349 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 
630.— ΛΕΟΝΤΙΟΤ ΣΧΟΛΑ2ΤΊΚΟΤ 

Εις θ(ρμα τα βασιλικά 

Θερμά τάδ' άτρεκεως βασιΧήία' τήν8ε yap αύτοΐς 
οι irplv άηασσάμζνοι θήκαν εττωνυμιην. 

ου yap ύπο βροτέω ττυρϊ θάλπεται ayXaov ϋ8ωρ, 
αυτόματη 8ε λίβας τίκτεται αίθομενη' 

ού8ε ρόου ψυχρού ποτιΒεύεαι άμφϊ Χοετρά, δ 

αλλ' οίον ποθεεις, τοΐον ύπεκφερεται. 

631.— ΑΓΑΘΙΟΤ 2ΧΟΛΑ2ΤΙΚΟΤ 

Εις τα θ(ρμ<ί τα Αγαμ€μνόνΐΐα iv ^,μνρνη 

Χώρος εγώ Δαναοΐς μεμελημενος, ένθα μολόντες 

της ΤΙο8αλειρείης εξεΧάθοντο τέχνης, 
ελκεα yap μετά 8ήριν εμοϊς άκεσαντο ρεεθροις, 

βαρβαρικής Xόyχης Ιον άπωσάμενοι. 
ένθεν άεξήθην οροφηφορος• άντ\ 8ε τιμής' δ 

την ' Ά^αμεμνονέην ευρον επωνυμίην. 

632.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Εις έτερα θ(ρμά 

Χθων μυχάτων yυάXωv κριΧωμασιν άέναον πυρ 
εστ αν εχη, φλοξίν δε περιζείη κρυφίαισιν, 
άτμος άνω βαίνων εις αιθέρα θερμός, ενερθεν 
ΘΧιβόμενος, πυριθαλπες επεύyετaι ίκμάσιν ν8ωρ. 

633.— ΔΑΜΟΧΑΡΙΔΟΧ ΓΡΑΜΜΑΤΙΚΟΤ 

Ε is λουτρόν 

"Wpy και ΐΐαφιη και Παλ,λάδί τούτο Χοετρον 
ως ττοτε το χρυσούν ηρεσε μήΧον eyeiv 

καϊ τάχα της μορφής κρίσις εσσεται ου ΐΐάρις αύταΐς, 
είκών δ' άpyυφεoις νάμασι 8εικνυμενη. 

35° 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 630-633 

630.— LEONTIUS SCHOLASTICUS 

On the Royal Hot Baths 
These are really the royal hot baths, for our fathers, 
admiring them, gave them this name. By no mortal 
fire is the bright water warmed, but the spring is 
born hot of its own accord. Nor dost thou require 
a cold stream for the bath, but tempered as thou 
dost desire it, it gushes forth. 

631.— AGATHIAS SCHOLASTICUS 

On the Hot Baths of Agamemnon near Smyrna x 
I am a place beloved by the Danai, coming to which 
they forgot the art of Podalirius. 2 For after the battle 
they healed their wounds in my stream, expelling the 
poison of the barbarian spear. Hence I grew great 
and came to bear a roof, and as a token of fame 
received the name of Agamemnon. 

632. — Anonymous 

On other Hot Baths 

While Earth in her inmost recesses has perpetual 

fire and boils with hidden flames, the hot vapour, 

ascending to the air owing to the pressure from 

below, belches forth streams of water heated by fire. 

633.— DAMOCHARIS GRAMMATICUS 

This was the bath of Hera, Cypris, and Pallas, 
when they were eager to get the golden apple. And 
perhaps now Paris will not be their judge, but their 
image reflected in the silver flood. 

1 Still existing and so called. 

2 The two sons of Asclepius, Podalirius and Machaon, 
were the surgeons of the Greek army before Troy. 

3S 1 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



634.— ΑΛΛΟ 



"Ωμοσαν αί Χάριτες φερεανγεα κοίρανον αϊ^/Χης 
ενθάΒε ναιετάειν ή πάρα, rfj ΥΙαφίτ). 

635.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Δάφνης εύπετάΧοιο φερώνυμόν εστί Χοετρόν. 

636.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Ύουτο ίΒών τό Χοετρον 6 πάνσοφος ειπεν "Ομηρος' 
" Νηπενθ^ς άχοΧόν τε, κακών επίΧηθον απάντων." 

637.— ΑΛΛΟ 

ΈνθάΒε Χουσαμενη Βεμας άμβροτον αντίκα Κύπρις 
Βεΐξεν 'AXef -άνδρω, καϊ άεθΧιον ηρπασε μήΧον. 

638.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Αί τρεις 'Ορχομενού Χάριτες το Χοετρον ετευξαν 
τούνεκα γωρησαι τεσσάρας ου Βύναται. 

639.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Κύπρις, 'Έρως, Χάριτες, Νύμφαι, Διόνυσος, 
ΆπόΧΧων 
ωμοσαν άΧΧηΧοις ενθάΒε ναιετάειν. 

640.— ΑΛΛΟ 

' Αθάνατοι Χούονται άνοιηομενου βαΧανείου, 
πεμπττ) δ' -ημίθεοι, μετέπειτα Βε πήματα πάντα. 



35 2 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 634-640 

634. — Anonymous 

The Graces swore by the radiant lord of light 
rather to dwell here than with Cypris. 

635. — Anonymous 
This bath bears the name of the leafy laurel. 

636. — Anonymous 

It was on seeing this bath that sagest Homer 
said: "Allaying grief and anger, bringing oblivion 
of all evil." l 

637. — Anonymous 

After bathing her divine limbs here, Cypris 
straightway showed herself to Alexander, and carried 
off the prize of the apple. 

638. — Anonymous 

The three Graces of Orchomenus made the bath, 
and therefore it has not room for four. 

639. — Anonymous 

Cypris, Love, the Graces, the Nymphs, Dionysus, 
and Apollo swore to each other to dwell here. 

640. — Anonymous 

The immortals bathe when the bath is first opened, 
at the fifth hour the demi-gods, and later all the 
rubbish. 

* Horn. Od. iv. 221. 

353 

VOL. III. A A 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 
641.— ΑΓΑΘΙΟΤ SXQAA2TIKOT 

Eis -γίφνραν τοΰ %ayyapiov 

Και συ μεθ' Έσπερίην ύψαύχενα, καϊ μετά "Μήδων 
εθνεα και πάσαν βαρβαρικην άγεΧην, 

Σαγγάριε, κρατερησι ροας άψΐσι πεδηθεις, 
ούτω εδουΧώθης κοιρανικη παΧάμη• 

ό πριν δε σκαφεεσσιν άνεμβατος, 6 πριν άτειρής, 5 
κβϊσαι Χαϊνεη σφιγκτος άΧυκτοπεδη. 

642.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 
Eis σωτήρια ev Σμυ/οη; iv ττροαστ€ΐω 

ΤΙάν το βροτών σπατάΧημα, καϊ η ποΧύοΧβος εδωδή 

ενθάδε κρινομένη την πριν οΧεσσε χάριν, 
ο'ι γαρ φασιανοί τ€ καϊ ίχθύες, αϊ θ' υπέρ ϊγδιν 

τρίλιες, η Τ€ τόση βρωματομιξαπάτη 
γίνεται ενθάδε κόπρος' άποσσεύει ο άρα γαστηρ 5 

όππόσα πειναΧεη δεξατο Χαυκανίη. 
όψε δε <γινώσκ€ΐ τις, ότ άφρονα μήτιν άείρων 

χρυσού τοσσατίου την κόνιν επρίατο. 

643.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 
Eis το αυτό 

Ύί στενάχεις κεφαΧην κεκακωμένος; ες τι δε πίκρα, 
οίμώζεις, μεΧεων πάγχυ βαρννομενων; 

ες τί δε γαστέρα σεΐο ραπισμασιν άμφιπατάσσεις, 
εκθΧίψαι δοκεων μύστακος εργασίην; 

μόχθων τοσσατίων ου σοι χρέος, εί πάρα δαιτϊ 5 

μη του αναγκαίου πουΧύ παρεξετάθης. 



354 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 641-643 

641.— AGATHIAS SCHOLASTICUS 

On a Bridge over the Sangarius 

Thou too, Sangarius, after proud Italy and the 
peoples of the Medes, and all the barbarian host, 
art thus enslaved by the hand of our prince, 1 thy 
stream fettered by strong arches. Thou who wast 
formerly impassable to boats and indomitable, liest 
gripped in bonds of stone. 

642. — By the Same 

On a Latrine in the Suburbs of Smyrna 

All the extravagance of mortals and their expen- 
sive dishes excreted here have lost their previous 
charm. The pheasants and fishes, and the mixtures 
pounded in the mortar, and all that variety of kick- 
shaws, become here dung. The belly rids itself of 
all that the ravenous gullet took in, and at length a 
man sees that in the pride of his foolish heart he 
spent so much gold on nothing but dust. 

643. — By the Same 

On the Same 

Why do you moan with the headache and groan 
bitterly for the heaviness you feel all over, and keep 
on smacking your belly, thinking to force out the 
work of your jaws ? You would never have had all 
this trouble and labour if you had not largely ex- 
ceeded yourself at table. When you are lying there 
* Justinian. 

355 

A A 2 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

αλλ' επί μεν στιβάδος φρονέεις μέγα, και στόμα 
τέρπεις 

βρώμασιν, εύτυχίην κείνα Χογιζόμενος• 
ένθάδε δ' άσχάΧΧεις• μούνη 8' άΧιτήματα Χαιμοΰ 

η γαστηρ τ'ινει ποΧΧάκι τυπτομένη. 10 

644.— ΤΟΥ ΛΥΤΟΥ 
Eis τό αυτό 

Εδγε μάκαρ τΧήθυμε γεωπόνε' σοι βίος αίει 

μίμνειν καϊ σκαπάνης aXyea καϊ πενίης• 
Χιτά Be σοι καϊ δείπνα, καϊ εν ζυΧογοισι καθεΰδεις, 

ύδατος έμπΧήσας Χαιμον άμετροπότην. 
εμπης άρτίπος εσσί, και ένθάδε βαια καθεσθεις δ 

αντίκα γαστέρα σην θήκας έΧαφροτάτην 
ουδέ καταλήγεις ίερην ράχιν, ουδέ τι μηρούς 

τνπτεις, αυτομάτως φόρτον άρωσάμενος. 
τΧημονες οι πΧουτούντες ίδ' οι i κε'ινοισι συνόντες 

οΐς πΧέον άρτεμίης εναδεν είΧαπίνη. 10 

645.— ΜΑΚΗΔΟΝΙΟΤ ΤΠΑΤΟΤ 

ΎμώΧω υπ' άνθεμόεντι, ροην πάρα Μαίονος "Έ,ρμου, 

Χάρδιες, ή Ανδών εζογός είμι ποΧις. 
μάρτυς iyco πρώτη γενόμην Διός• ου <γάρ έΧεγχειν 

Χάθριον υια 'Pet;? ηθεΧον ημέτερης, 
αύτη καϊ Βρομίω ηενόμην τροφός' εν δε κεραυνω 5 

εδρακον εύρυτέρω φωτϊ φαεινομενον 
πρώταις δ' ημετέρησιν εν ορηάσιν οίνας οπωρη 

ούθατος εκ βοτρύων ξανθον άμεΧξε >γάνος. 
πάντα με κοσμησαντο• ποΧύς δε με ποΧΧάκις αίων 

άστεσιν οΧβίστοις εύρε με<γαιρομένην. 10 

1 I write so : iroi MS. 
356 






BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 644-645 

guzzling you have a high opinion of yourself, and 
delight your palate with the viands, deeming that 
happiness. But here you are in distress, and your 
belly only gets many smacks to pay for the sins of 
your gullet. 

644. — By the Same 

On the Same 

Blest are you, long-suffering labourer ! You have 
only to put up, all your life, with the pains of hoeing 
and poverty. Simple are your meals, and you sleep 
in the woods, after satisfying your throat's vast thirst 
for water. Yet you are perfectly sound, and sitting 
here for a few moments lighten your belly. You 
don't rub down the lower part of your spine, or beat 
your thighs, but you get rid of the burden naturally. 
They are in evil case, the rich and those who associate 
with them, whom feasting pleases more than sound 
health. 

645.— MACEDONIUS THE CONSUL 

I am Sardis, the chief city of Lydia, who stand 
under flowery Tmolus, by the stream of Maeonian 
Hermus. I witnessed first the birth of Jove, for I 
refused to betray the secretly born son of my own 
Rhea. It was I, too, who nursed Bacchus, and I saw 
him shining with broader flame in the lightning- 
flash. First in my fields did Autumn, the giver of 
wine, milk from the udder of the grape-cluster the 
golden juice. Everything combined to adorn me, 
and old Time often saw me envied by the most 
flourishing cities. 

35-7 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

646.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Ει? Ίΐράκλΐίαν την Πόντου 

Ει πόΧιν ΉρακΧήος όμώννμον οισθα και άΧΧην, 
ϊσθι με την πόντου μηδέν άτιμοτερην. 

647.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Εις την 'Ρώμην 

Ρώμη παμβασίΧεια, το σον κΧεος οΰποτ οΧεΙται' 
Νίκη yap σε φυγείν άπτερος ου δύναται. 

648.— ΜΑΚΗΔΟΝΙΟΤ ΤΠΑΤΟΤ 

Ε ?5 οίκον iv Κ.ιβί>ρα 

Άστο? εμοϊ και ξεΐνος άει φίΧος' ου yap ερευναν 
Tt9» πόθεν, ήε τίνων, εστί φιΧοξενίης. 

649.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 
Ει? τό αυτό 

Εύσεβίη το μεΧαθρον άπο πρώτοιο θεμειΧου 

άχρι και ΰψηΧούς r^yayev εις ορόφους, 
ου yap απ άΧΧοτρίων κτεάνων Χηΐστορι χαΧκω 

όΧβον άοΧΧίζων τευξε Μακηδόνιος- 
ούδε Χιπερνήτης κενεω και άκερδέϊ μόγθω 5 

κΧαΰσε, δικαιοτάτου μισθού άτεμβόμενος. 
ώ? δε πόνων αμπανμα φυΧάσσεται άνδρϊ δικαίω, 

ώδε και εύσεβεων έργα μένοι μερόπων. 

358 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 646-649 

646. — Anonymous 

On the Pontic Heraclea 

If you know of another city with the same name, 
Heraclea, know that I, the Pontic one, do not rank 
beneath it. 

647. — Anonymous 

On Rome x 

Rome, queen ot the world, thy fame shall never 
perish, for Victory, being wingless, cannot fly from 
thee. 

648.— MACEDONIUS THE CONSUL 

On an Inn in Cibyra 

Native alike and foreigner are ever dear to me, 
for it is not the business of hospitality to enquire 
who, whence, and whose son. 

649. — By the Same 

On the Same 

Piety built up this house from its foundations to its 
lofty roof. For Macedonius did not build it out of 
wealth gained by despoiling with the sword the pos- 
sessions of others, nor did he weep, a pauper, over 
an empty and profitless labour, deprived of the 
return justly due to his outlay. As rest from labour 
awaits the just, so may the works of pious men 
survive. 

1 i.e. Constantinople. 

359 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 
650.— ΛΕΟΝΤΙΟΤ 

Είς οίκον κζίμζνον μίσον τον Ζςνζίππον και του Ιππικοί 

'Κν μεν τί) Ζεύξιππον ε~χω πέλας, ηδύ Χοετρόν 
εκ δ' ετερης Ίππων "χώρον άεθΧοφόρων. 

τους ρα θεησάμενος, και τώδ ενι χρώτα Χοεσσας 
δευρο καΐ άμπνευσον δαιτϊ παρ ημετερί]• 

και κ€ πάΧιν σταδίοις ποτϊ δε'ιεΧον ώριος εΧθοις, 
εγγνθεν £<γγνς ιών <γείτονος εκ θαΧάμου. 

651.— ΠΑΤΛΟΤ 2ΙΛΕΝΤΙΑΡΙΟΤ 

Ει? οίκον νφηλον iv Βυ£αντιω 

Ύρισσόθεν εισορόω ποΧυτερπέα νώτα θαΧάσσης, 
πάντοθεν ήματίω φεγγεϊ βαΧΧόμενος' 

ei9 εμε yap κροκόπεπΧος όταν περικίδναται Ήώ<?, 
τερπομενη, στε'ιγειν προς δύσιν ουκ εθεΧει. 

652.— ΙΟΤΛΙΑΝΟΤ ΑΠΟ ΤΠΑΤΩΝ 
ΑΙΓΤΠΤΙΟΤ 

Eis οίκον επίπίδον 

"Ωρρ άναψνχω θέρεος, καϊ γε'ιματι θάλπω, 
τούΧΧιττες ώράων εξ εμέθεν παρέχων. 

653.— ΑΓΑΘΙΟΤ 2ΧΟΛΑΣΊΊΚΟΤ 

Eis οίκον κύμζνον kv ΰφ(ΐ iv Βυ£αντι'ω 

" Ύής 'Αρετής ιδρώτα θεοί προπάροιθεν εθηκαν," 
εννεπεν Άσκραϊος, δώμα τόδε προΧε^ων. 



36ο 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 650-653 

650.— LEONTIUS 

On an Inn situated between the Zeuxippus l and the 
Hippodrome 

On the one side I have close by me the Zeuxippus, 
a pleasant bath, and on the other the race-course. 
After seeing the races at the latter and taking a bath 
in the former, come and rest at my hospitable table. 
Then in the afternoon you will be in plenty of time 
for the other races, reaching the course from your 
room quite near at hand. 

651.— PAULUS SILENTIARIUS 

On a High House in Constantinople 

From three sides I view the pleasant expanse of 
the sea, struck by the sunlight from all quarters. 
For when saffron-mantled Dawn envelops me, she is 
so pleased that she has no wish to go on to her 
setting. 

652.— JULIAN, PREFECT OF EGYPT 

On a House situated on Level Ground 

In summer I cool you and in winter I keep you 
warm, supplying from myself the deficiencies of the 
seasons. 

653.— AGATHIAS SCHOLASTICUS 

On a House situated on a Hill in Constantinople 

" The gods set toil before virtue," - said the poet of 
Ascra, speaking prophetically of this house. For 

1 See title of Book II. It was both a gymnasium and 
bath. 2 Hea. Works and Days, 2S9. 

361 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

κΧίμακα yap ταναην περόων κεκαφηότι ταρσω, 

Ιδρωτι πΧαδαρην άμφεδίηνα κόμην 
ΰψόθι δ' είσενόησα θαΧασσαίην περιωπην. 

ναι τάχα τής 'Αρετής πιστότερου ι θάΧαμος. 

654.— ΙΟΤΛΙΑΝΟΤ ΑΠΟ ΤΠΑΤΩΝ 
ΑΙΓΤΠΤΙΟΤ 

Εις άφνλακτον οίκον 

ΚερδαΧεους δίζεσθε δόμους, Χηίστορες, ά\\ου<ί• 
τοϊσδε yap εστί φύΧαξ εμττεδος ή πενίη. 

655.— ΑΛΗΛΟΝ 

Ε ι? τον τρικλινον της Μαγναΰρα? 

ΌτραΧεως τοΧυττευσαν τόνδε δόμον βασιΧήες, 
αιχμήν όΧβοδότειραν από στανροϊο Χαχόντες, 
αυτός άναξ ΉρακΧής συν Κωισταντίνω υϊϊ. 

656.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Εις τον οίκον τον ίττίΧΐ-γόμΐνον Χαλ /ojv iv τω Παλάτια), ό 
έκτισε Αναστάσιο? βασιλεύς 

Οίκος ' Άναστασίοιο τυραννοφόνου βασιΧήος 
μοΰνος ύπερτέΧΧω πανυπείροχος άστεσι <γαίης, 
θαύμα φέρων ττάντεσσιν, εττεϊ κοσμήτορες ερ^ων 
ύψος όμοΰ μήκος τε καϊ άπΧετον εύρος ίδόντες, 
άσκεπες εφράσσαντο πεΧώριον ερηον εάσαι• 
άΧΧα ττοΧυκμήτοιο Χαχων πρεσβήϊα τέχνης 

1 I write πιστότερον for -πιστότατοι'. 

1 Lit. panting. 
362 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 654-656 

after mounting the long flight of steps with ex- 
hausted * feet, my hair was all soaked with sweat ; 
but from the summit I looked on the fine view of 
the sea. Yea ! perhaps a good room is a surer 
possession than virtue (?). 



654.— JULIAN, PREFECT OF EGYPT 

On an Unguarded House 

Seek other more profitable houses, ye robbers, for 
Poverty constantly keeps guard over this. 

655. — Anonymous 
On the Banqueting Hall of Magnaura 
This house was diligently completed by the em- 
perors on whom the Cross bestowed a beneficent 
power, Heraclius and his son Constantine. 2 

656. — Anonymous 

On the House called Ckalce* in the Palace built by 
Anastasius 

1 am the house of Anastasius, the emperor, slayer 
of tyrants, 4 and I alone far excel all cities of the 
Earth. I am a cause of wonder to all, since 
the architects, seeing my height, length, and vast 
breadth, were minded to leave the huge pile un- 
roofed ; but skilled Aetherius, the most eminent 

2 Constantine III. shared the purple with his father 
Heraclius \vhom he succeeded 641 a.d. 

3 Lit. "The Bronze Gate." The name was transferred to 
the whole building which formed the vestibule of the palace. 

4 The Isaurian robber chiefs. 

3 6 3 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

Αιθέριος ποΧυϊδρις εμην τεγνήσατο μορφήν, 
άχράντω βασιΧήϊ φέρων πρωτάγρια μόχθων, 
ένθεν άπειρέσιον μέγεθος περί παντι τιταίνων, 
Αύσονίης νίκησα βοώμενα θαύματα γαίης. 10 

ειζον άρειοτεροισι, χάρις Καπετωλιδο? αύΧής, 
ει και χάλκείων ορόφων άμαρύγματα πέμπεις• 
κρύψον αμέτρητων μεγάρων στεινούμενον αύΧαΐς, 
Τίέργαμε, φαιδρυν άγαλμα τεόν, 'Ρουφίνιον ά,Χσος• 
μτ]8έ τανυπΧεύροισιν άρηρότα, Κύζικε, πέτροις 15 
Αδριανού βασιΧήος άμεμφέα νηον άείσεις. 
ου μοι ΤΙυραμίδων ίκέΧη κρίσις, ουδέ Κ,οΧοσσού, 
ουδέ Φάρου• μεγάΧην μοΰνος δ' υπερέδραμον ΪΧην. 
αυτός εμός σκηπτουχος 'Ισαυροφόνον μετά νίκην 
-χρυσοφαές μ ετέΧεσσεν έδέθΧιον Ήριγενείης, 20 

πάντη τετραπόρων ανέμων πεπετασμένον αύραις. 

657.— ΜΑΡΙΑΝΟΤ 2ΧΟΑΑ2ΤΙΚΟΤ 

Εις το παλάτιον %οφιανων 

Όππόθι τεμνόμενης χθονός άνδιχα πόντον ανοίγει 
πΧαγκτος άΧικΧύστων πορθμός eV ηϊόνων, 

χρύσεα συΧΧεκτρω τάδ ανάκτορα θήκεν άνάσση 
τη ποΧυκυδιστη θείος αναζ Σοφίη. 

άξιον, ώ 'Ρώμη μεγαΧοκρατές, άντ'ια σεΐο 6 

κάΧΧος απ' Ευρώπης δέρκεαι εις Άσίην. 

658.— ΠΑΤΛΟΤ 2ΙΛΕΝΤΙΑΡΙΟΤ 

Εν τω μ€γάλω Ποαιτωριω καλλωπισθέντι 

Κ,όσμον Ίουστϊνος βασιΧευς ρυπόωντα καθ ήρας 
και τα μέγιστα Αίκης ηγΧάϊσεν τεμένη• 

1 Quite unknown. The Ruflnus referred to is probably 
the celebrated minister of Theodosius (circ. 400 a.d.). 

3 6 4 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 657-658 

master of that laborious art, devised my shape, lay- 
ing the first-fruits of his toil before our stainless 
emperor. Therefore, stretching on all sides my 
vast bulk, I surpass the celebrated wonders of the 
Italian land. Beauty of the Capitolian hall, give 
place to thy betters, even though thy roof of bronze 
dazzles the eye. Hide, Pergamus, thy splendid 
ornament, the grove of Rufinus, 1 narrow now beside 
the halls of this limitless palace ; and thou, Cyzicus, 
no longer sing of thy noble temple of Hadrian 
standing fast on the long cliff. The pyramids are 
not capable of vying with me, or the colossus, or 
the Pharus ; I alone surpass a great legion of build- 
ings. My prince himself, after his victory over the 
Isaurians, completed me, the house of the Dawn, 
shining with gold, on all sides exposed to the breezes 
of the four winds. 

657.— MARIANUS SCHOLASTICUS 

On the Palace, called Sophiariae 
Where the land is cut in two by the winding 
channel whose shores open the way to the sea, our 
divine emperor 2 erected this palace for his most il- 
lustrious consort Sophia. O, far-ruling Rome, 3 thou 
lookest from Europe on a prospect in Asia the beauty 
of which is worthy of thee. 

658.— PAULUS SILENT1ARIUS 
On the Great Praetorium when newly decorated 
The Emperor Justin, 4 clearing away its begrimed 
decorative work, brightened up the chief Law Court, 



8 Justin II. (565-578 a.d.). 3 i.e. Constantinople. 
4 The same. 



3 6 5 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



σοϊς δε πόνοις, Δομνΐνε, κατηφεα νύκτα διώκεις 
€Κ Θέμιδος μεγάρων, εκ βιοτής μεροπων. 

659.— ΘΕΑΙΤΗΤΟΤ ΣΧΟΛΑ2ΤΙΚΟΤ 



Ει 



is το αυτό 



Ω? aya06v και παις επι yt'jpai• φαιδρότερους yap 
Δομνΐνος θαΧάμονς μητρός ετευξε Δίκης. 

Χάμπω iyoo δια παιδός, ό παις δι εμεϊο φαείνει' 
κύδεα δ' άΧΧηΧοις άντιχαριζόμεθα. 

660.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Εις την βασιΧικην των παιδΐντηρίων iv Βυζαντίιρ 

Χώρος εγώ θεσμοϊσιν άνειμενος' ενθάδε ττψ/η 
άφθονος Αύσονίων εκκεχυται νομίμων, 

ή πάσιν τεταται μεν άείναος, ηϊθέοις δε 
ενθάδ' ^ειρομενοις πάντα δίδωσι ρόον. 

661.— ΙΟΤΛΙΑΝΟΤ ΑΠΟ ΤΠΑΤΩΝ 
ΑΙΓΤΠΤΙΟΤ 

Eis βήμα. του σοφιστον Kpartpov 

Δένδρον ε'γώ μακαριστόν, επεϊ ποτέ μεσσοθεν ύΧης 
Ίστάμενον Xiyvpols ετρεφόμην άνέμοις, 

ορνίθων επίβαθρον εύθροον άΧλά σιδηρω 
ετμή^ην, κΧηρω κρείσσονος εύτνχιης' 

άντϊ yap ορνίθων, Κρατεροί) κρατεροΐς υπο μύθοις 5 
άρδομαι, εύμούσοις χεύμασι τηΧεθάον. 



3 66 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 659-661 

and thou, Domninus, 1 by thy labours, expellest 
melancholy night from the halls of Themis and the 
life of mortals. 



659.— THEAETETUS SCHOLASTICUS 

On the Same 

What a blessing is a child in our old age ! Dom- 
ninus has made the courts of me, mother Justice, 
brighter. I shine through my child, and my child 
through me, each bestowing our glory on the other 

660. — Anonymous 

On the Basilica of the Schools in Constantinople 

I am a place dedicated to Law. Here gushes forth 
an abundant fount of Roman Jurisprudence which 
runs perennially for all, and gives its whole stream 
to the youth here assembled. 

661.— JULIANUS, PREFECT OF EGYPT 

On the Chair of the Sophist Craterus 

I am a tree peculiarly blessed ; for, once, standing in 
the middle of the forest, I was nurtured by the shrill 
winds and was the tuneful seat of birds, but I was 
felled by the axe to gain still better foi'tune. For 
now I am watered by the powerful (crateros) speech, 
not of the birds, but of Craterus, and flourish, fed by 
this stream of eloquence. 

1 The architect» 

367 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

662.— ΑΓΑΘΙΟΤ ΣΧΟΛΑ2ΤΙΚΟΤ 

Χώρο? iyco το πριν μεν εην στυηερωπος ίδεσθαι, 

πηΧοδόμοις τοιχοις άμφιμεριζομενος. 
ενθάδε δέ ξείνων τε και ενδαπίων καϊ aypottcfov 

νηδύς επε^δούπει Χνματα χευομένη. 
άλλα πατήρ μ€ πό\ηος εναΧλάξας Wyadia 1 ; 5 

θήκεν άρίζηΧον τον πριν άτιμοτατον. 

663.— ΠΑΤΛΟΤ SIAENTIAPIOT 

Ets κήπον παράλιον 

Πόντος νποκΚνζει χθονος έδρανα' πΧωτα δέ χέρσου 

νώτα θαΧασσαίοις αΧσεσι τηΧεθάει. 
ώς σοφός όστις εμιξε βυθον χθονί, φύκια κήποις, 

Νηϊάδων προχοαϊς χενματα Νηρειδων. 

664.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 
Εις το αυτό 

Έι>0αδ' εριδμαίνουσι τίνος πΧεον επΧετο χώρος, 

Ννμφαι Ναϊάδες, Νηρεϊς, Άδρνάδες• 
ταΐς δε θεμιστεύει μεσάτη Χάρις, ου δε δικάζειν 

οίδεν, επει ξννην τέρψιν 6 χώρος έχει. 

665.— ΑΓΑΘΙΟΤ 2ΧΟΛΑ2ΤΙΚΟΤ 

Εις το αντο 

Έιϊξον εμοϊ Δάφνης ιερόν κΧετας, εκτοθι πόντου 
κείμενον, άγραύΧου κάΧΧος ερημοσυνης. 



368 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 662-665 

662.— AGATHIAS SCHOLASTICUS 

On the same as 642 Jf. 

I am a place formerly hideous, divided by brick 
walls, and here the bellies of strangers, natives, and 
countrymen thunderously relieved themselves. But 
Agathias, the father of the city, transformed me and 
made me distinguished instead of most ignoble. 

663.— PAULUS SILENTIARIUS 

On a Garden by the Sea 

The sea washes terraji?-ma, and the expanse of the 
dry land is navigable and blooms with marine foliage. 
How skilled was he who mingled the deep with the 
land, sea-weed with garden plants, the floods of the 
Nereids with the founts of the Naiads ' 

664. — Bv the Same 
On the Same 
Heke the Naiads, Nereids, and Hamadryads dis- 
pute as to who has the best title to the property. 
The Grace in their midst sits as judge, but cannot 
give judgment, as its charm is common to all. 

665.— AGATHIAS SCHOLASTICUS 

On the Same 

Give way to me, thou holy hill of Daphne, 1 lying 
far from the sea, thy beauty but that of rustic solitude. 

1 The celebrated park near Antioch in Syria. See Gibbon, 
chap, xxiii. 

309 
VOL. III. Β Β 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

ενθάΒε γαρ Νύμφαι ΒενΒρίτιΒες, αϊ τ ενϊ πόντω 

ΝηρειΒες ξυνην θεντο συνη\υσίην 
άμφ' εμε yap μάρναντο' Βίκασσε Βε Κυανοχαίτης, δ 

και με τταρ 1 άμφοτέραις μεσσον εθηκεν ορον. 

666.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

ΕΣ? κηπον "Ερωτα προσαγορΐνόμΐνον 

Ου μέγας ούδ' ο Έρως, αλλ' εύχαρις' ώς και εγώ τοι 
ου μέγας εν κηποις, άλλα γεμω χαρίτων. 

667.— ΑΡΑΒΙΟΤ 2ΧΟΛΑΣΤΙΚΟΤ 

Eis ττροάστίΐον 

"ΎΒασι και κήποισι κα\ άλσεσι και Διονύσω 
καϊ πόντου π~λήθω γείτονος ευφροσύνη. 

τερπνά Βε μοι γαίης τ€ καϊ εξ αλός άλλοθεν άλλος 
καϊ γριπεύς όρεγει Βώρα καϊ αγρονόμος. 

τους δ' εν εμοι μίμνοντας ή ορνίθων τις άείΒων, 5 

ή γλυκύ πορθμήων φθέγμα παρηγοράει. 

6G8.— ΜΑΡΙΑΝΟΤ 2ΧΟΛΑ2ΤΙΚΟΤ 

Εϊ? προαστίων όνομαζόμίνον "Ερωτα iv Άμασεία. 

Ή καλόν άλσος Έρωτος, οπού κα\α ΒίνΒρεα ταύτα 

πρηύς επιπνε'ιων άμφιΒονεϊ Ζέφυρος' 
ήχι και ερσηεις άμαρύσσεται άνθεσι λειμών, 

που~λύν ίοστεφάνων κόσμου άνεις καλύκων 
και γλυκερής τρίστοιχος επεμβαΒόν άλλος επ άλλω 5 

μαστός άναθλίβει χεύματα ΝαϊάΒος' 
όππόθι ΒενΒρήεντα γέρων παρανηχεται ^\ρις 

χώρον, ΆμαΒρυάΒων ενΒιον άβροκόμων, 

37° 






BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 666-668 

For here the tree Nymphs and the Nereids of the 
sea established their common meeting place. When 
they quarrelled over me, Poseidon was judge, and 
pronounced that I was to be a border -land open to 
both. 

666. — Anonymous 

On a Garden called Eros 

Eros is not big, but he is pretty. So I am not 
great among gardens, but am full of charm. 

667.— ARABIUS SCHOLASTICUS 

On a Suburban Pleasaunce 

I am rich in waters, gardens, groves, vineyards, 
and the generous gifts of the neighbouring sea. 
Both the fisherman and the husbandman offer me 
pleasing presents from sea and land, and those who 
rest in me are soothed either by the song of birds or 
the sweet call of the ferryman. 

668.— MA RI ANUS SCHOLASTICUS 

On a Suburban Park in Aviasia called Eros 

Verily it is lovely, the grove of Eros, where these 
beautiful trees are stirred by the gentle breath of 
Zephyr, where the dewy meadow is bright with 
flowers, sending up a wealthy show of purple-fringed 
cups, while the roses of three fountains in a line 
one after the other spout forth the streams of the 
sweet Naiad. Here Jris, the ancient river, swims 
past the woods, resort of the soft-haired Hamadryads, 

371 

Β Β 2 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

καϊ Χιπαρής εΰβοτρυν αν opyaSa καρπός έΧαίης 
θάΧΧει ερισταφυΧων πάντοσε θειΧοπέδων 10 

αϊ δε πέριξ ΧαΧα^εΐισιν άηδόνες' ος δε μεΧιζει 
άντωδον τέττιξ φθέηματος άρμονίαν. 

αλλά τον άκΧήϊστον όπως, ξένε, μή μ€ παρεΧθτ)ς 
τόνδε δόμον, Χιτής δ' άντίασον ξενίης. 

669.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 
Ε is το αύτο 

Δβΰρ' ϊθι, βαιόν, όδιτα, πεσών υπο δάσκιον άλσος, 

άμπαυσον καμάτου ηνία ποΧυπΧανεος, 
•χΧωρον όπου πλατάνων αύτορρυτον ες μέσον ύδωρ 

καΧα ποΧυκρούνων εκπρορεει στομάτων 
όππόθί πορφυρεης ύπερ αύλακος είαρι θάΧΧεί 5 

ύγρον ϊον ροδέΐ] κιρναμενον καΧυκι. 
ηνίδε πώς δροσεροΐο πεδον Χειμώνος ερεψας 

εκχυτον εύχαίτης κισσός επΧεξε κόμην. 
ενθάδε και ποταμός Χασίην παραμείβεται ογθην, 

πεζαν νποξύων αύτοφντοιο νάπης. 10 

οντος 'Έρως• τι <ydp άΧΧο καϊ επρεπεν ούνομα χώρω, 

πάντοθεν Ιμερτών πΧηθομενω Χαρίτων; 

670.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Έν ^μνρνΎ] £is μωλον rfj θαΧάττγ) *πι.κ(ίμ€νον, iv ώ Ιστι 
και υΒρέιον 

α. Ύίς βυθον ηπείρωσε; τίς εν ροθίοισιν ετευξεν 
άκτην άμφιρύτην Χάεσι μαρμαρέοις; 
τίς δ' ενϊ κύμασι τεΰξε ποτον πΧωτηρας άφύσσειν, 
αυτών εκ νηών γερσ\ν άρυομένους; 

β. Ούτος 6 ποικιΧόμητις άνηρ Ήενέτιος άμύμων, 5 
κτίσμασι νικήσας Θησέα και Πέλοπα. 

37 2 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 669-670 

and in the fruitful vineyard the fat berries of the 
olive-trees flourish everywhere above the great 
clusters of raisins set out to dry. Around sing the 
nightingales, and the cicada hymns an answering 
harmony. Do not, stranger, pass by my open 
gate, but enter the house and partake of my simple 
hospitality. 

669. — By the Same 
On the Same 
Come here for a little, traveller, and reclining in 
the greenwood shade rest thy limbs from thy long 
and toilsome journey. Here amongst the plane-trees 
the fresh streams of water running at its will leap 
forth beautifully from many-mouthed fountains. 
Here in spring the soft violets mixed with roses 
empurple the ground. Look how, engarlanding the 
fresh meadow, the luxuriant ivy twines its flowing 
hair. The river runs between its foliaged banks, 
grazing the base of the self-sown grove. Such is 
Eros. What other name would be appropriate 
for a place replete in every way with charm and 
loveliness ? 

670. — Anonymous 
On a Mole in Smyrna on which there was a Cistern 
A. Who made the deep dry land, who amid the 
surges built out of marble a shore washed on both 
sides by the sea ? And who enabled the sailors to 
obtain water in the midst of the waves, drawing it 
with their hands even from the deck ? B. This 
resourceful man, noble Venetius, who surpassed 
Theseus and Pelops l by his creations. 

1 It is difficult to see why these names are selected. They 
were both, of course, founders of cities. 

373 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

671.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Ε ίς φάρον iv τβ avrrj πόλ« 

α. Τις τόσον epyov ετευξε; τις ή πόλις; ή το 
yepas τί; 
β. 'Αμβρόσιος ΜυΧασεύς τον φάρον ανθύπατος. 

672— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Είς την αυτήν πόλιν 

Έλ τραφερής πάσης άΧιτέρμονα κύκΧον όδευσες, 
ου ποτέ μοι τίνα γωρον άρείονα τούδε νοήσ€ΐς, 
θεσκεΧον οίον ετευξεν άyaκXυτός 'Ιωάννης, 
κυδαίνων βασίΧειαν οΧης γθονός' εκ ροθίων yap 
τερπωΧην άκόρητον iv άστεϊ θηκεν Όμηρου. 

673.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Εις την αυτήν πόλιν, (Ις τόπον τινά 
ΊπποΧύτρ και τοΰτ ΆσκΧηπιός ώπασεν epyov. 

674— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Έν τω φάρω 'AXe£av8ptias 

ΤΙύ^ος iya> ναύτησιν αΧωομενοισιν άρή'γων 
ειμί, ΤΙοσειδάωνος άπενθέα πυρσον άνάπτων, 
και μ€ πεσεΐν μέΧΧοντα βapυyδoύπoισιv άήταις 
στήσεν εοΐς καμάτοις Αμμώνιος, ος βασιΧήος 
εστί πατήρ' κείνω 8ε μετ aypia κύματα ναυται 
χείρας άερτάζουσιν, άτε κΧυτω Έννοσηαίω. 

1 This must allude to a mole or something similar. 
374 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 671-674 

671. — Anonymous 

On a Lighthouse in the same City 

A. Who executed so great a work ? What is his 
city and what his office ? B. Ambrosius of Mylasa, 
the proconsul, built the lighthouse. 

672. — Anonymous 

On the same City 

Though thou journeyest over the sea-bound circle 
of the whole dry land, thou shalt nowhere see a 
place superior to this which renowned Ioannes, glori- 
fying her the queen of all this land, has made so 
admirable ; for from the sea itself 1 he won unceasing 
delight for Homer's city. 

673. — Anonymous 
On a Place in the same City 
Asclepius did this work, too, for Hippolyta. 2 

674. — Anonymous 

In the Pharos at Alexandria 

I am the tower that helps straying mariners, light- 
ing up the blaze of Poseidon's comforting torch. Am- 
monius, who is the father of our emperor, 3 re-erected 
me by his labour when, borne down by the loud- 
roaring gales, I was about to fall. To him the sailors, 
escaped from the wild waves, lift up their hands as 
to the glorious Earth-shaker. 

2 The meaning is quite obscure. 
8 i.e. a patrician of Constantinople. 

375 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

675.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Ε U τον φάρον iv Σμύρνη 

Μ,ηκέτι δειμαίνοντες άφεγγεα νυκτός όμίχΧην, 
eh εμε θαρσαΧεως πΧώετε, ποντοπόροι. 

πάσιν άΧωομένοις τηΧανγεα δαΧον άνάπτω, 
των ΑσκΧηπιαδών μνημοσύνην καμάτων. 

676.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Ε is 7τη•γην iv τω ΟΧνμπω opd 

Ύαΐς ΤΙρούσης Ννμφαις νποείκομεν άλλα καί αύται 

κρέσσονες ημε'ιων χαίρετε Ilf θιάδες' 
αϊ δ' αΧΧαι πάσαι μετά ΐΐύθια και μετά ΤΙρουσαν 

ήμετέραις Ννμφαις εϊξατε Νηϊάδες. 

677.— ΑΓΑΘΙΟΤ 2ΧΟΛΑ2ΤΙΚΟΤ 

Ets οίκον iv Βυ£αντια> 

Ύεΰξε μβ πολλά καμων Μονσώνιος οίκον άγητον 
τηΧίκον, άρκτωοις άσθμασι βαΧΧόμενον. 

εμπης ουκ άπεειπεν άφβγγεα δώματα Μοίρης, 
αλλά με καΧΧείψας iv γβονΧ ναιετάει. 

καί ρ ό μεν εις οΧίηην κείται κόνιν η 8ε περιο ση £ 
τερψις επί ξείνοις άνδράσιν εκκέχνμαι. 

678.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 
Έν κώμη της Σμύρνης 

Οίον ετΧης καί τούτον, ΆγακΧείδη, μεηαν αθΧον, 

θυμω τοΧμητη κΰδος άριστον εΧών 
νύμφης άρχαίης ϋάσσης ποΧυκα^κεα γώρην 

νδασι καί Χουτροϊς θήκας άφνειοτέρην. 

37^ 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 675-678 

675.— Anonymous 

On the Lighthouse at Smyrna 

Sail to me fearlessly, ye mariners, no longer dread- 
ing the rayless gloom of the night. For all wandei*ers 
burns my far-flashing torch, keeping alive the memory 
of my builders the Asclepiadae. 1 

676. — Anonymous 

On a Fountain in the Asiatic Mount Olympus 

I yield to the Nymphs of Prusa, and salute, too, 
those of the Pythian 2 waters as my superiors. But 
let the whole company of Naiads after Pythia and 
after Prusa give way to my Nymphs. 

677.— AGATHIAS SCHOLASTICUS 

On a House in Constantinople 

Musonius built me with great labour, this large and 
imposing house, exposed to the north wind's blasts. 
Yet did he not avoid the dark house of Fate, but 
abandoning me he dwells underground. In a narrow 
bed of earth he lies, and I, his chiefest delight, am 
given up to strangers. 

678. — Anonymous 
On a Village near Smyrna 

What a great and laborious work is this, too, that 
thou hast achieved, Agaclides, gaining great glory 
by thy daring ! Thou hast enriched this parched land 
of the ancient Nymph Bassa with water and baths. 
1 The medical guild at Smyrna. 2 In Bithynia. 

377 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

679.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 
Εν Ασσω 

ΤΙάσα μεν Άξιόχω πόλις εύχεται' άλλο yap άλλης 
πήμα παραστείχων, ώς θεός, ήκεσατο' 

έξοχα Βε κραναη ρόον ύδατος ώττασεν "Ασσω, 
πολλών πετραων σκληρά μέτωπα τεμών. 

μηκετι φεύγετε πάντες άποπρο θέοντες, όοΐται* δ 

πλημμυρώ ψυχροΐς ύΒασιν Άξιόχου. 

680.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Ei's παραθαλάσσιου κήπον, iv ω ην και λουτρόν, ίν 
Αντιόχαα 

Ύάς τρεις μοι Χαρίτα? λεύσσεις, ξένε' ΪΙοντομέΒων yap 
ηείτονος εκ πόντου την μίαν ειρηάσατο' 

την δ ετερην ετελεσσε φυτών εύκαρπος άλωή• 
την δ' ύπολειπομενην τούτο το λουτρον έχει. 

681.— ΛΕΟΝΤΙΟΤ 2ΧΟΛΑ2ΤΙΚΟΤ 

Εις κόγχην Ζχονσαν Αφρο&ίτην 

*Α μεηα σοι, Διόνυσε, χαρίζομαι• εις εμε Κ,ύπρις 
λούεται' εξ αυτής σοι τα κύπελλα φέρω. 

682.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 
Ε is τον τετράπλΐνρον κίονα τον ίν Ίππο&ρόμω 

Κ,ίονα τετράπλευρον, άει χθονϊ κε'ιμενον άχθος, 
μοΰνος άναστήσαι ΘευΒόσιος βασιλεύς 

τολμήσας, Τίρόκλον επεκέκλετο, και τόσος εστη 
κίων ήελίοις εν τριακονταούο. 

1 The inscription is still preserved in situ. 
37» 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 679-682 

679. — Anonymous 

On an Aqueduct at Assus 

All cities worship Axiochus, for, on his progress, 
like a god he has healed the ills of each. Especially 
on rugged Assus did he bestow running water, cutting 
through the hard face of many rocks. No longer 
run off to a distance, all ye travellers. I overflow 
with the cold water of Axiochus. 

680. — Anonymous 

On a Sea-side Garden at Antioch in which was a Bath 

Thou seest in me the three Graces, stranger. 
Poseidon wrought the one from the neighbouring 
sea, the second is the work of my garden rich in 
produce, and the remaining one is supplied by this 
bath. 

681.— LEONTIUS SCHOLASTICUS 

On a Shell with a Carving of Aphrodite 

It is a great favour I grant thee, Dionysus. Cypris 
bathes in me, and from her I bring thee the cup. 

682. — Anonymous 
On the Obelisk in the Hippodrome 1 

It was only the Emperor Theodosius who under- 
took to raise the foui'-sided column which had ever 
lain a burden on the earth. He committed the task 
to Proclus, 2 and so great a column stood erect in 
thirty-two days. 

8 The prefect of the city. 

379 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



683.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 



Άλφεό? άρρεν ΰδωρ, ' Αρεθούσιόν εστί τό θΡ/Χυ• 
και ιγάμον ευρεν Έρως, κιρναμενων υδάτων. 

684.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Ει? την iv Ύαφω τη νήσω κρηνην 

Ωκεανού θυηάτηρ και Ύηθΰος είμι Νυχεία 
κρήνη• ΎΊ)\€βοαι γαρ με τόδ' ώνόμασαν 

Νύμφαις μεν προχεω Χουτρόν, θνητοΐσι δ' ΰ^ε'ιην 
θήκ€ δε μ€ ΤΙτερεΧας fi'o<? 'ΈνναΧίου. 

685.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Eis Κα//.οίριναν ττ^ν Ιν 2ικ«λ<α λί/χνην 

Μ.η κ'ινει Κ,αμάριναν, ακίνητος <γαρ άμείνων, 
μη τγοτ€ κινήσας την με'ιονα μείζονα θείης. 

686.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Eis την πνΧην την άνατολικην της Θεσσαλονίκης 

Ήνορε7]ς όΧετήρα ύττερφιάΧου ΈαβυΧώνος 
καϊ σεΧας άκτεάνοιο δίκης ΒασίΧειον υπάρχον, 
ζεϊνε, νόω σκίρτησον, ίδών εφύττερθε πυΧάων. 
εύνομίης ττοτι χώρον άριστο^ενεθΧον οδεύεις, 
βάρβαρον ου τρομεεις, ουκ άρρενας άρρενοκοίτας. 
οττΧα Αάκων, συ δε τείχος έχεις βασ'ιΧειον α^αΧμα. 

1 One of the Echinades islands at the mouth of the 
Adriatic. 

a The first line alone is elsewhere cited as the response of 
Apollo when the people of Camarina asked him if they 
should drain the marsh near their city. 

3 As the terms of the epigram suit the emperor Basil I., 

380 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 683-686 

683. — Anonymous 
On Alpheus and Arelhusa 
Alpheus is a male water, Arethusa a female, and 
Love accomplished their marriage by mixing the 
waters. 

684. — Anonymous 

On the Fountain on the Island Taphos 1 

I am the fountain Nyehea, daughter of Ocean and 

Tethys, for so the Teleboae named me. I pour forth 

a bath for the Nymphs and health for mortals. It 

was Pterelas, the son of Ares, who placed me here. 

685. — Anonymous 
On Camarina the Sicilian Lake 2 
Move not Camarina, for it is best unmoved, lest, 
if thou move it, thou make the lesser greater. 

686. — Anonymous 
On the Eastern Gate of Thessalonica 
Exult in thy heart, stranger, when thou seest 
above the gate the prefect Basil, 3 destroyer of the 
valour of insolent Babylon and light of incorrupt jus- 
tice. Thou goest to the place of good government, 
the mother of excellent sons. Thou hast no need 
to fear the barbarian or sodomites. 4 The Spartan 
for a wall has his arms, and thou a royal statue (07 
the statue of Basil.) 

who concpiered the Arabs in Mesopotamia and was cele- 
brated as a legislator, it probably refers to him in spite of 
the title " Prefect" given him. 

4 i.e. the Arabs. The Greeks at the time charged the 
Oriental nations with this vice. There is no reference to 
measures for its suppression. 

38l 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

687.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Μορφας 6 γράψας, ηθελον και τους τρόπους• 
άνεσειρασε δέ μου την ορεζιν η τέχνη. 
καλεί δέ μ ' Αλέξανδρον εύλαλον, φίλος, 

688.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Εις πύλην του "Αργούς 

Ύήνδε πύλην λάεσσιν εϋξέστοις άραρυιαν, 
άμφότερον, κόσμον τε πάτρη και θάμβος όδίταις, 
τεΰξε Κ,λεης Κλ6αδα>> αφανής πόσις εύπατερείης, 
Λερναίων άδυτων περιωσιος όρ Γ γιοφάντης, 
τερπόμενος δωροισιν άηασθενέων βασϊληων. 5 

689.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Eis την Ευγενίου πόρταν iv Βν£αντιω 

Ούτος Ιουλιανός λαοσσόα τείγεα πήξας, 
στήσε τρόπαιον, έής σύμβολον ά'γρυπνίης, 

σφάζειν άντιβιους εχθρούς άπάνευθε μενοινών, 
η πόλεως προπάροιθ' εκκροτέειν πολέμους. 

690.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Eis πόρταν την ίπιλεγομένην ζυλόκερκον ίν Τίνζαντίω 

θευδόσιος τάδε τείχος αναξ, καϊ ύπαρχος Έωα? 
Κωνσταντίνος ετευξαν εν ημασιν έξήκοντα. 

1 In this line it seems to be the portrait which speaks. 
382 



, BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 687-690 

687.— Anonymous 
On a Painting 

1 who painted the form would fain have painted 
also the character, but the limits of art checked my 
eagerness. Call me eloquent Alexander, my friend. 1 

688. — Anonymous 

On the Gate of Argos 

This gate, built of polished stone, both an ornament 
for Argos and an object of admiration for travellers, 
was erected by Cleadas, the husband of gentle and 
noble Clea. He was the excellent hierophant of the 
sanctuary of Lerna, and enjoyed the generosity of 
powerful monarchs. 2 

689. — Anonymous 

On the Gate of Eugenius in Constantinople 

This Julian 3 who built the walls that protect the 
city erected the trophy in memory of his vigilance. 
He studied rather to slay his enemies at a distance 
than to stir up war before the city. 

690. — Anonymous 

On the Gate called Χι /locercus at Constantinople 

Theodosius 4 the emperor and Constantine, prefect 
of the East, built this wall in sixty days. 

2 A stone from Argos, now at Oxford, has the dedication, 
also in verse, by this Cleadas of his father's statue. 

3 No doubt the Emperor. 4 The Younger (a.d. 408-450). 

383 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

691.— ΑΛΛΟ 

E's πόρταν τον Ρησίου ev Βυ£αντίω 

Ήμασιν εξήκοντα φιΧοσκήτττρω βασιΧήϊ 
Κωνσταντίνος ύπαρχος εδείματο τείχεϊ τείχος. 

692.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Βιβιανοΰ τόδε έργον, ον άντοΧίαι δνσιες τβ 
μεΧττουσιν γεραρώς εΐνεκεν εννομίης. 

693.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Ύόνδε Ύνχης ανεγείρε δόμον Δημΐ]τριος άρχος, 
την ττόΧιν οίκτείρας, ως ττάϊς Ίερίον 

αυτού και βονΧη ταδ* εδείματο, ούτε πόΧηος 
ούτε τι δημοτεροις χρήμασιν, αλλ* ιδίοις. 

694.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Ε is καμαραν 
ΜεσσαΧινοΐο γόνος τάδε θεσκεΧον έκτισε τόξον. 

695.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Εις λίθον άκοίτονον 

Όρας το κάΧΧος οσσον εστί της Χίθον 
εν ταϊς άτάκτοις των φΧεβών εύταξίαις. 

696.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 
Ε is άι^ΐδα iv Ty βασιλική ίν Ένζαντίω 

Ύετραπόροις άψΐσι ττόΧιν Θεόδωρος εγείρας, 
άξιος εστί ττόΧιν και τετρατον ηνιοχεΰσαι. 

3»4 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 691-696 

691. — Anonymous 
On the Gate of Rkesius at Constantinople 
In sixty days Constantine the prefect built this 
strengthening wall for his sceptred sovereign. 

692. — Anonymous 
On some Building 
This is the work of Vivianus, of whom East and West 
sing with honour because of his just government. 

693. — Anonymous 
On a Temple of Fortune 
Demetrius the governor erected this temple of 
Fortune, feeling compassion for the city, like the 
son of Hierius he was. He built it on his own 
initiative, not the city's, and at his own, not at the 
public expense. 

694. — Anonymous 
On an Arch 
The son of Messalinus built this magnificent arch. 

695. — Anonymous 
On the Stone Acoetonus 
You see what great beauty lies in the disorderly 
order of the veins in the stone. 

696. — Anonymous 
On the Portico of the Basilica in Constantinople 
Theodorus, 1 having built for the city four porticos, 
deserves to govern the city a fourth time. 
1 In the reign of Theodosius II. 

385 
VOL. HI. C C 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

697.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Εις έτερον μέρος της αύτη? άι/αδο? 

"Επρεπε σοι, Θεόδωρε, Τύχης εύκίονα νηον 
έργον κοσμήσαι θαύματι τοσσατίου, 

δώρα τε κυδήεντα πορεϊν χρυσάσπιδι 'Ρώμη, 
η σ"Τπατον τενξεν, και τρισεπαρχον όρα. 

698.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Μόψον τήνδ' εσορας κΧεινην πόΧιν, ην ποτ€ μάντις 
δείματο, τω ποταμω κάλΧος ύπερκρεμάσας. 

699.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Ε Ϊ5 πηγην δνομαζομίνην Ολυμπιάδα 

"Ενθεν 'ΑΧεξανδρος Μακεδών πίεν άγΧαον ύδωρ' 
μητρός δ' είπε γάΧακτι πανείκεΧα ρεύματα πηγής, 
η καϊ 'ΟΧυμπιάδος πόρεν ούνομα, σήμα δε τούτο. 

700.— 2ΙΜΩΝΙΔΟΤ 

Γράψε ΉοΧύγνωτος, θάσιος γένος, ' ΑγΧαοφώντος 
υιός, περθομενην ΊΧίου άκρόποΧιν. 

701.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Εις ναον τον Διός κτισθεντα πάρα των Κεκροπιδων 

Αντου Ζηνος οδ' οίκος επάξιος' ούδ' άν"Ολνμπος 
μεμψεται ονρανόθεν Ζήνα κατερ-χόμενον . 

1 The same as the Basilica. 9 a.d. 399. 

386 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 697-701 

697. — Anonymous 

On another part of the same Portico 

It beseemed thee, Theodoras, to adorn the columned 
temple of Fortune l by such a wonderful work, and to 
give splendid gifts to Constantinople, city of the 
golden shield, which made thee consul 2 and sees thee 
for the third time prefect. 

698. — Anonymous 

On the City of Mopsuestia 

You look on this famous city of Mopsus, 3 which the 
seer once built, hanging its beauty over the river. 

699. — Anonymous 

On a Fountain called Olympias 

From this fountain Alexander of Macedon drank 
splendid water, and said its streams were like his 
mother's milk. Hence he named it Olympias, as 
this stone testifies. 

700.— SIMONIDES 

Polygnotus of Thasos, the son of Aglaophon, 
painted the sack of the citadel of Troy. 4 

701. — Anonymous 

On the Temple of Olympian Zeus at Athens 

This house is worthy of Zeus. Not even Olympus 
would blame Zeus for descending here from heaven. 

3 A mythical seer who had an oracle here and elsewhere 
in Cilicia. 
* On the Lesche of the Cnidians at Delphi. 

387 
c c 2 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

702.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Εις τό αυτό 

Κεκροπίδαι Δά τόι>δ' 'έθεσαν δόμον, ως άπ ΌΧύμπον 
νισσόμενος ποτι ydv, άΧΧον "ΟΧυμπον εχοι. 

703.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Ύεάρου ποταμού κεφαΧαϊ ύδωρ άριστον τε και 
κάΧΧιστον παρέχονται πάντων ποταμών καϊ eV 
αυτά? άπίκετο εΧαύνων επϊ Έ,κύθας στρατον άνηρ 
κάΧΧιστος καϊ άριστος πάντων ανθρώπων Ααρεΐος 
6 'Ύστάσπεος, ΙΙερσέων τε καϊ πάσης της ηπείρου 5 
βασιΧεύς. 

704.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Τήκει καϊ πέτρην 6 ποΧύς χρόνος- άλλ' αρετάων 

Άσ κΧηπιοδότου το κΧέος άθάνατον, 
όσσα καϊ οία πόρεν <γερα πατρίδι• τοις επϊ πάσι 

καϊ τάδε μετρείσθω κοϊΧον έρεισμα θόΧου. 



705.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Δώρον Ύερμησσοΐο δικασπόΧίης χάριν αγνής' 
Έιύσίβιος θεράπων θήκε θεώ τό γέρας. 



706.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ 

Δένδρεον ιερόν ειμί• παρερχόμενός με φυΧάσσευ 
πηιιαίνειν άΧγώ, ξείνε, κοΧουομένη. 



388 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 702-706 

702. — Anonymous 
On the -Same 
The Athenians set up this house to Zeus, so that, 
descending from Olympus to earth, he might find 
another Olympus. 

703 
An Extract from Herodotus (iv. 91) 
The sources of the river Tearus supply the best 
and most beautiful water of any river, and to these 
came, leading his army against Sardis, the most 
beautiful and best of all men, Darius, son of Hystas- 
pes, king of Persia and all the continent. 

704. — Anonymous 
On a Rotunda l 
Long time wears out even stone, but immortal is 
the renown of the good deeds of Asclepiodotus in 
giving so many and such splendid gifts to his native 
place. Now in addition to them all should be reckoned 
this hollow structure with its dome. 

705. — Anonymous 

This gift, received from the city of Termessus 2 in 
recognition of his upright jurisdiction, Eusebius dedi- 
cates to the god whose servant he is. 

706.— ANTIPATER OF THESSALONICA(P) 

I am a holy tree. Beware of injuring me as thou 
passest by, stranger, for I suffer pain if I am muti- 

1 At Aphrodisias in Caria. The stone has been found. 

2 In Lycia. 

389 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

μεμνεο, παρθενιος μοι επι φΧόος, ούχ άπερ ώμαΐς 
άχράσιν αιγείρων τίς γένος ούκ εδάη; 

ει δε περιδρύψτ)ς με παρατραπίην περ εούσαν, 5 

δακρύσεις" μεΧομαι και ξυΧον Ήελίω. 

707.— ΤΤΛΛΙΟΤ ΓΕΜΙΝΟΤ 

Ε ι/χ ι μεν εν ποταμοί?, πεΧάγει δ' ίσα μέτρα διώκω, 
~%τρυμών, 'Ημαθίης το <γΧυκερον πέλα-γος' 

βένθος ομού και αρονρα δι" ύδατος' ή yap εγείρω 
ομπνιακων χαρίτων ηδύτερον τρίβοΧον. 

εστί καϊ Ήμαθίης γόνιμος βυθός' αμμι δε, ΝεΐΧε, 5 
κρείσσων εσθ' 6 φέρων τον στάχυν, ούχ 6 τρέφων. 

708.— ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΤ 

"Εζευξ* ΈΧΧήσποντον ο βάρβαρος άφρονι τόΧμτ), 

τους δε τόσους καμάτους πάντας εΧυσε χρόνος' 
άΧΧά Δικαιάρχεια διηπείρωσε θάΧασσαν, 

καϊ βυθον εις χέρσου σχήμα μετεπΧάσατο' 
Χάα, βαθύ στήριγμα, κατερρίζωσε πεΧωρον, δ 

χερσι Τιγαντείαις δ' εστασε νερθεν ύδωρ. 
ην άX , άεϊ πΧωειν διοδευομενη δ' νπο ναύταις 

άστατος, εις πεζούς ώμοΧόγησε μένειν. 

709.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Έ,ύρώταν ως άρτι διάβροχον εν τε ρεεθροις 
εϊΧκυσ* 6 τεχνίτ7)ς εν πυρϊ Χουσάμενον 

1 Tho daughters of the Sun continued to weep for their 
brother Phaethon until turned into poplars. 

2 The inhabitants made a kind of sweet bread from the 
seeds of this plant (trapa nutans) ; it is still used in some 

39° 






BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 707-709 

lated. Remember that my bark is still virginal, not 
like that of savage wild pear-trees. Who does not 
know what the race of poplars is like ? If thou dost 
bark me, as I stand here by the road, thou shalt 
weep for it. Though I am but wood, the Sun cares 
for me. 1 

707.— TULLIUS GEMINUS 

I am reckoned among rivers, but rival the sea in 
volume, Strymon, the fresh-water sea of Thrace. 
I am both a deep stream and a field yielding crops 
through my water, for water-chestnuts sweeter than 
the fruits of Demeter rise from me. 2 The depths, too, 
are productive in Thrace, and we deem, Nile, that 
the bearer of the crop is superior to its feeder. 

708.— PHILIPPUS 

The barbarian bridged the Hellespont in his daring 
folly, but Time dissolved all that labour. Now Dicae- 
archia has made the sea a continent, and given the 
depths the form of dry land. She fixed firmly in 
the depths a vast supporting structure of stone, and 
with the hands of the Giants made the water beneath 
stand still. We could always sail over the sea, but 
insecure as it was for sailors who travelled on it, it 
has now promised to remain secure for foot-travellers. 3 

709.— By the Same 

On the Bronze Statue of the Eurotas by Euty chides 

The artist moulded Eurotas fresh fi-om his bath of 
fire, as if still wet and immersed in his stream. For 

places for the purpose, and has, in fact, been introduced as a 
food-plant into American rivers. 
3 cp. Book VII. 379, of which this is an imitation." 

391 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

πάσι yap εν κωΧοις ύδατούμενος άμφινενευκεν 
εκ κορυφής ες άκρους υδροβατών ονυνας. 

ά δε τέχνα ττοταμω συνεπήρικεν α τις ο ττείσας 
-χαΧκον κωμάζειν ύδατος ΰγρότερον; 

710.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 
Ε is τας iv Μεμφει πυραμίδας 

Όσσαν εττ ΟύΧυμττω καϊ ΙίηΧιον ύψωθεντα 

ψευδής ίστορίης ρήσις άνεττΧάσατο• 
Πυραμίδες δ' ετι νυν ΝείΧωίδες άκρα μέτωπα 

κΰρουσιν χρυσεοις άστράσι ΤίΧηϊάδων. 

711.— ΖΗΝΟΒΙΟΤ ΓΡΑΜΜΑΤΙΚΟΤ 

Αύτην Τραμματικην 6 ζωγράφος ήθεΧε <γράψαι• 
Βίκτορα δε γράψας, "Ύον σκοπόν" είπεν, "εχω.' 

712.— ΜΗΤΡΟΔΩΡΟΤ 

Αυτόν 'latavvrjv 6 ηερων οτ εδεξατο θεσμός, 
είπεν άνηβήσας• " Αΰθις εγω σε, Σόλων." 

713.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Ε is την Μνρωνοζ βονν 

Βοίδιόν ειμί Μύρωνος, επί στηΧης δ' α,νάκειμαι. 
βουκοΧε, κεντήσας εις άγεΧην μ άττα^ε. 

714.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Ύίτττε, Μύρων, με το βοίδιον ενταυθοΐ παρά βωμοΐς 
εστασας; ουκ εθεΧεις είσαηεμεν μεηαρον; 

392 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 710-714 

all his limbs are pliant and liquid as water, and he 
moves flowingly from his head to the tips of his 
ringers and toes. Art vied with the river. Who was 
it that coaxed the bronze statue to riot along more 
liquidly than water? 

710. — Anonymous 

On the Pyramids in Memphis 

Legend invented the false story of Ossa and Pelion 

mounted on Olympus. But even yet the Egyptian 

pyramids reach the golden Pleiads with their summits. 

711.— ZENOBIUS THE GRAMMARIAN 

The painter wished to depict Grammar herself, 
and having painted Victor, said : " I have attained 
my end." 

712.— METRODORUS 

When Law in her old age had been visited by 
Joannes, she said, rejuvenated : " Solon, I have you 
again with me." 

713-742 are all on Myron's celebrated Statue of a 
Heifer. It stood originally in the Agora at Athens, 
bid was transferred to the Temple of Peace at Rome 

7 1 3. — Anonymous 

I am Myron's little heifer, set up on a base. Goad 
me, herdsman, and drive me off to the herd. 

714. — Anonymous 

Why, Myron, didst thou set me here by the altars ? 
Wilt thou not lead me into the house ? 

393 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



7 1 5.— AN AKPEONTOS 

ΒουκόΧε, ταν ayi\ap πόρρω νέμε, μη το Μυρωνος 
βοίδιον ώς εμπνουν βονσϊ συνεξεΧάσφς. 

716.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Βοίδιον ου χοάνοις τετυπωμενον, αλλ' ύπο γήρως 
■χαΧκωθεν σφετερη ψεύσατο χειρϊ Μύρων. 

717.— ΕΤΗΝΟΤ 

'Ή τό Βέρας χάΧκειον ο\ον βοϊ ταδ' επίκειται 
εκτοθεν, ή ψυχην ένδον 6 χαλκός έχει. 

718.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Αύτος ερεΐ τάχα τοΟτο Μύρων "Ουκ επ\ασα ταύταν 
ταν δάμαΧιν, ταύτας δ' εΐκόν άνεπλασάμην." 

719.— ΛΕΩΝΙΔΟΤ 

Ουκ επ\ασεν μ€ Μύρων, εψεύσατο' βοσκομεναν δε 
εξ άγελα? ελάσας, δησε βάσει Χιθίνω. 

720.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ ΣΙΔΩΝΙΟΤ 

Et μη μου ποτϊ τάδε Μύρων πόδας ηρμοσε πέτρα, 
άΧλαις αν νεμόμαν βουσϊν όμου δάμαΚις. 

721.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Μόσχε, τί μοι \α Γ γόνεσσι προσερχεαι; τίπτε δε μυκα; 
ά τεχνα μαζοϊς ουκ ενεθηκε <ya\a. 

394 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 715-721 

715.— ANACREON (?) 

Herdsman, pasture thy herd far from here, lest 
taking Myron's heifer to be alive thou drive it off 
with the rest. 

716. — By the Same 

Myron pretended this heifer to be the work of 
his hands, but it was never formed in the mould, but 
turned into bronze owing to old age. 

717.— Ε VENUS 

Either a complete hide of bronze clothes here a 
real cow, or the bronze has a soul inside it. 

718. — By the Same 

Perhaps Myron himself will say this : u I did not 
mould this heifer, but its image. 

719.— LEONIDAS 

Myron did not mould me ; he lied ; but driving 
me from the herd where I was feeding, he fixed me 
to a stone base. 

720.— ANTIPATER OF SIDON 

If Myron had not fixed my feet to this stone I 
would have gone to pasture with the other cows. 

721. — By the Same 

Calf, why dost thou approach my flanks, and why 
dost thou low ? The artist put no milk in my udder. 

395 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



721a.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 



Ή βοΰς i£ άρότου νέον ήΧνθε, καϊ δια τοΰτο 
όκνεϊ, κονκ εθεΚει βήμ επίπροσθεν ayeiv. 

722.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ 

Ύάν δάμαΧιν, βουφορβέ, παρέρχεο, μηδ' άπάνενθε 
σνρισδτ)<ς• μαστω πόρτιν άπεκδέχεται. 

723.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Α μοΧιβος κατέχει με καϊ ά \ίθος• ε'ινεκα δ' αν σεΰ, 
πλαστά Μύρων, Χωτόν καϊ θρύον εδρεπόμαν. 

724.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

' Α δάμα\ις, δοκέω, μυκησεταΐ' η ρ ο ΤΙρομηθεύς 
ουγι μόνος, ττΧάττεις εμττνοα καϊ συ Μύρων. 

72δ.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Βοΰν ιδίαν 7ΓΟΤ6 βουσϊ Μύρων μιγθεϊσαν εξητεί' 
εύρε μό\ις δ' αύτην, τάς βόας εξεΧάσας. 

726.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Ά βονς α Ύίκτονσ άπο ^αστέρος επΧασε τάν βονν 
ά δε Μνρωνος χεϊρ ου ττΧάσεν, άλλ' ετεκεν. 

727.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Κα! χαΧκή περ εουσα ΧάΧησεν αν ά κεραη βοΰς, 
€Ϊ οι σττΧάηγνα Μύρων ένδον ετεχνάσατο. 

396 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 721A-727 

721a. — Anonymous 

The cow has just returned from ploughing, and 
owing to that is lazy and will not advance. 

722.— ANTIPATER 

Pass by the heifer, cowherd, and whistle not to her 
from afar. She is expecting her calf to suckle it. 

723. — By the Same 

The lead and stone hold me fast, but, otherwise, 
thanks to thee, sculptor Myron, I would be nibbling 
lotus and rushes. 

724. — By the Same 

I think the heifer will low. Of a truth it is not 
Prometheus alone who moulds living creatures, but 
thou too, Myron. 

725. — Anonymous 

Myron was looking for his own cow among the 
others, and found it with difficulty by driving the 
rest away. 

726. — Anonymous 

The cow, its mother, moulded this heifer giving 
birth to it, but the hand of Myron did not mould it, 
but gave birth to it. 

727. — Anonymous 

The horned cow would have spoken, though made 
of bronze, if Myron had worked entrails inside it. 

397 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

728.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ 

Ά δάμαΧις, δοκεω, μυκησεταΐ' ην δε βραδύνη, 
χα\κος ό μη νοεων αίτιος, ουχί Μύρων. 

729.— ΑΛΛΟ 

ΤΙηκτόν μοί τις άροτρον επ ανχενι καϊ ζνγα θεσθω' 
ε'ίνεκα yap τεχνας σεϊο, Μύρων, άρόσω. 

730.— ΔΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΤ ΒΙΘΤΝΟΤ 

"Ην μ εσίδτ) μόσχος, μυκήσεταΐ' ην δε ye ταύρος, 
βήσεταΐ' ?)ν δε νομεύς, εις ayiXav εΧάσει. 

731.— ΑΛΛΟ 

*Ωδε Μύρων μ έστησε το βοίδιον οι Be νομήες 
βάΧλονσίν με Χίθοις, ως άποΧειπόμενον. 

732.— ΜΑΡΚΟΤ ΑΡΓΕΝΤΑΡΙΟΤ 

ΒονκόΧον ήν εσίδης τον εμόν, ξένε, τοντ έπος αύτω 
άπον, οθ* ο πΧάστης ώδε μ εδησε Μύρων. 

733.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Ύάν βοΰν τάνδε Μύρων, ξεϊν, επΧασεν, αν οδε μόσχος 
ως ζωσαν σαίνει, ματερα δερκόμενος. 

734.— ΔΙΟΣΚΟΡΙΔΟΤ 

Ύαΰρε, μάτην επί μόσχον επείyεaι• εστί yap άπνους' 
άλλα σ' ό βουπΧάστας εξαπάτησε Μύρων. 

398 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 728-734 

728.— ANTIPATER 

The heifer, I think, will low, and if it delays it is 
the fault of the senseless bronze, not Myron's. 

729. — Anonymous 

Let someone attach me to the solid plough and 
put a yoke on my neck, for as far as depends on thy 
art, Myron, I will plough. 

730.— DEMETRIUS OF BITHYNIA 

If a calf sees me, it will low ; a bull will mount 
me, and the herdsman drive me to the herd. 

731. — Anonymous 

Myron placed me, the heifer, here, but the herds- 
men throw stones at me thinking I have strayed. 

732.— MARCUS ARGENTARIUS 

Stranger, if thou seest my herdsman, give him 
this message, that the sculptor Myron tied me up 
here. 

733. — Anonymous 

Stranger, it was Myron who moulded this cow, on 
which this calf fawns as if it were alive, taking it for 
its mother. 

734.— DIOSCORIDES 

In vain, bull, thou rushest up to this heifer, for it 
is lifeless. The sculptor of cows, Myron, deceived 
thee. 

399 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



735.— ΑΛΛΟ 



Σεΐο, Μύρων, ΒαμάΧίΐ παρακάτθανβ μόσχος αΧαθείς, 
καϊ γάλα πιστεύων γαΧκον βσωθεν €%€ΐν. 

736.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Φευ συ Μύρων, ττΧάσσας ουκ εφθασας' άλλα σε 
χαΧκός, 
πρϊν ψυχην βαΧύβιν, βφθασε ττη^νυμενος. 

737.— ΑΛΛΟ 

ΧαΧκείαν τύπτεις ΒάμαΧιν μέγα σ ήπαφε τζχνα, 
βουκόΧε' τάν ψυχάν ου προσέθηκε Μύρων. 

738.— ΙΟΤΛΙΑΝΟΤ ΑΠΟ ΤΠ ΑΡΧΩΝ 
ΑΙΓΤΠΤΙΟΤ 

Έι> βοϊ ταδ' Ιμάχοντο Φύσις καϊ ττότνια Ύέχνα' 
άμφοτεραις δέ Μύρων Ισον οπασσε yepa<>' 

Βερκομενοις μεν yap Φυσιος κράτος ηρττασε Ύεγρα" 
αύτάρ έφατττομένοις ή Φύσις εστί φύσις. 

739.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Ήπαφε και σε μύωπα Μύρων, οτι κεντρην ερείΒεις 
•πΧευραϊς χαΧκοχύτοις α,ντιτύποιο βοός. 

ου νεμεσις δε μύωττι• τί yap τόσον; ει ye και αυτούς 
όφθαΧμούς νομέων ηττερόττευσε Μύρων. 

740.— ΓΕΜΙΝΟΤ 

Ή βάσις ή κατέχουσα τό βοΊΖιον, fj πεπέΒηταΐ' 

ην δ' άφεθτ) ταύτης, φεύζεται εις άγελί/ν. 
4οο 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 735-740 

735. — Anonymous 

A calf died beside thy heifer, Myron, deceived 
into thinking that the bronze had milk inside. 

736. — Anonymous 

Alack ! Myron, thou didst not have time to 
complete thy casting, but the bronze hardened 
before thou couldst put life into it. 

737. — Anonymous 

Thou strikest the bronze heifer. Art deceived 
thee much, herdsman : Myron did not add life. 

738.— JULIAN, PREFECT OF EGYPT 

Nature and Queen Art strove in the matter of 
this cow, and Myron gave to each a prize of equal 
value. When one looks at it Art robs nature of 
her superiority, but when one touches it Nature is 
nature. 

739. — By the Same 

Myron deceived thee too, gadfly, that thou plungest 
thy sting into the hard flanks of the bronze cow. 
But the gadfly is excusable. What wonder ! when 
Myron deceived even the eyes of the herdsmen. 

740.— GEMINUS 

It is the base to which it is attached that keeps 
back the heifer, and if freed from this it will run off 

401 

VOL. III. D D 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

μυκάται yap ό γαΧκός' ϊδ ώς εμττνουν ο τεγνίτας 
θήκατο' καν ζεύξης άΧΧον, ϊσως άρόσει. 

741.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

ΧάΧκεος ης, επί σοι δε γβωτόμος εϊΧκεν άροτρου 
καϊ ζυγόδβσμα φέρων, ψευδόμενα δάμαΧι. 

άΧΧα ΧΙύρων τέχνα ττανυ-πάρογος, 6ς σε δι" ερ^ων 
εμττνουν, ως τίνα βουν ερ-γάτιν είρηάσατο. 

742. <ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΤ> 

"Ατταιρε μου τενοντος, ω ηεωττόνε, 

Χέτταδνα, καΐ σίδαρον αύ\ακερ<γάταν 

■χαΧκον yap άμων ουκ εσάρκωσεν Μύρων, 

τεγνα δε ζωπόνησεν όψιν εμττνοον, 

ως ττοΧΧάκις με κάττομυκάσθαι θεΧειν 5 

εις £pya δ' ουκ εΐασε, ττροσδήσας βάσει. 

743.— ΘΕΟΔΩΡΙΔΑ 

ΘεσσαλαΙ αϊ βόες α'ίδε' παρά προθύροισι δ' Άθάνας 

εστάσιν, καΧον δώρον, Ίτωνιάδος' 
ττάσαι χάΧκειαι, δυοκαίδεκα, Φράδμονος k'pyov, 

και ττάσαι γυμνών σκύΧον άπ 'ΥΧΧυριων. 

744.— ΛΕΩΝΙΔΟΤ 

'Ωγινόμοι Έώσων καϊ ΈίμαΧος, ol TroXoaiyoi, 
οία βαθυσχίνων, ω ξένε, \τταροΧκίδαν 

Έ.ρμα τυρευτήρι καϊ εύ Γ γΧαγι τον ~£ΐμάραργον 
γαΧκεον εύπώγων ώδ' άνεθεντο rpdyov. 



402 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 741-744 

to the herd. For the bronze lows. See how much 
alive the artist made it. If you yoke a fellow to it, 
perhaps it will plough. 

741. — Anonymous 

Thou wast bronze, deceptive heifer, and the hus- 
bandman came up to thee dragging a plough and 
carrying a yoke. He far excels all other artists, 
Myron, who by his labour made thee alive, just like a 
labouring cow. 

742.— PHILIPPUS 

Take off from my neck, husbandman, the collar, 
and free me from the iron furrow-cutter ; for Myron 
did not make my bronze into flesh, but his art gave 
me the aspect of being alive, so that often I even 
wished to low. He did not, however, let me go to 
work, but tied me to a base. 

743.— THEODORIDAS 

These cows are Thessalian, and by the gates of 
Itonian Athena x they stand, a beautiful gift, all of 
bronze, twelve in number, the work of Phradmon, 
all wrought from the spoil of the naked Illyrians. 

744.— LEONIDAS 

The goatherds Soson and Simalus, rich in goats, 
stranger, seeing that they come from . . . dense with 
lentiscs, dedicated here to Hermes, the giver of 
cheeses and milk, this brazen, bearded goat, the 
lord of the flock. 

1 Her temple was between Pherae and Larissa in Thessaly. 
cp. Book VI. 130. 

403 
D D 2 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

745.— ΑΝΤΤΗΣ 

Θάεο τον Έρομίου κεραον τράηον, ώς ά'γερώχως 
όμμα κατά Χασιάν <γαΰρον έχει 'γεννών, 

κυδιόων ότι οι θάμ εν οΰρεσιν άμφί iraprjSa 
βόστρυχον εις poheav Ναί'9 εδεκτο χέρα. 

746.— ΠΟΛΕΜΩΝΟΣ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ 

Εις δακτυλιον 

Επτά βοών σφραγίδα βραχύς Χίθος ειχεν "ασπίς, 
ώς μίαν, ώς πάσας εμπνοα δερκομενας. 

<αϊ τάχα καν ^άπερεψε τα βοίδια' νυν δέ κεκΧειται 
r V XP V<T V μάνδρα το βραχύ βουκόΧιον. 

747.— ΠΛΑΤΩΝΟΣ 

Εικόνα πέντε βοών μικρά Χίθος ειχεν ΐασπις, 

ώς ήδη πάσας εμπνοα βοσκομένας. 
και τάχα καν απέφευγε τα βοίδια' νυν δε κρατείται 

τη χρυσή μάνδρη το βραχύ βουκόΧιον. 

748.— ΠΛΑΤΩΝΟΣ ΝΕΩΤΕΡΟΤ 

Ε is Διόνυσον γίγλνμμίνον iv άμΐθυστω 

Ή Χίθος εστ αμέθυστος, εγώ δ' ο πότης Αιόνυσος' 
η νήφειν πείση μ, η μαθέτω μεθύειν. 

1 If not corrupt, it must mean that they were represented 
one standing behind the other, only the heads of six showing. 

404 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 745-748 

745.— ANYTE 

Look on the horned goat of Bacchus, how haughtily 
with saucy eye he looks down on his flowing beard, 
exulting that often in the mountains the Naiad, 
caressing his cheeks, took those locks in her rosy 
hand. 

746.— KING POLEMO 

On a Ring 

This little jasper stone has a seal of seven cows 
looking like one, 1 and all looking at us as if alive. 
Perhaps the cows would have run away, but now the 
little herd is confined in the golden pen. 

747.— PLATO 

The little jasper stone is carved with five cows all 
looking alive as they feed. Perhaps they would run 
away, but now the little herd is confined in the 
golden pen. 

748.— PLATO THE YOUNGER 

On Dionysus carved on an Amethyst 

The stone is amethyst, 2 but I am the toper 
Dionysus. Either let it teach me to be sober, or 
learn itself to get drunk. 

s t.e. "against drunkenness." 

405 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 
749.— OINOMAOT 

Ε is Ερωτα iv κανκιω yeykvpfxevov 

Ει> κυάθω τον 'Κρωτα τίνος χάριν; άρκετον οΐνω 
αίθεσθαι κραόίην μη πνρϊ πυρ επαηε. 

750.— ΑΡΧΙΟΤ 

Είς βόας iv δακτνλίω 

Ύας 8οΰς καϊ τον Χασπιν ίδών περϊ yeipl δοκήσεις 
τας μεν αναπνειειν, τον ύε χλοηκομεειν. 

751.— ΠΛΑΤΩΝΟΣ ΝΕΩΤΕΡΟΤ 

A σφραηϊς υάκινθος• 'Απόλλων δ' εστ\ν iv αυτί) 
καϊ Αάφνη• ποτέρου μάΧΧον 6 Αητο'ίδας ; 

752.— ΑΣΚΛΗΠΙΑΔΟΤ, nvh δε ΑΝΤΙ- 
ΠΑΤΡΟΤ ΘΕ22ΑΛΟΝΙΚΕΩΣ 

Ειμί Μέθη το γΧύμμα σοφής γερός, εν δ' άμεθύστω 
^ε^Χυμμαΐ' τέχνης δ' ή Χίθος άΧλοτρίη. 

άλλα Κ,Χεοπάτρης Ιερόν κτεαρ' εν yap άνάσσης 
χειρϊ θεον νηφειν καϊ μεθύουσαν έδει. 

753.— ΚΛΑΤΔΙΑΝΟΤ 

Ε 15 κρνσταΧλον tvSov νδωρ Ζχονσαν 

Χ,ιονεη κρύσταΧΧος υπ άνερος ασκηθείσα 
δεϊξεν άκηρασίοιο παναιοΧον εικόνα κόσμου, 
ούρανον άηκας έχοντα βαρύκτυπον ενδοθι πόντον. 



4θ6 



BOOK IX EPIGRAMS 749-753 

749.— OENOMAUS 

On Love carved on a Bowl 

Why Love on the bowl ? It is enough for the 
heart to be set on fire by wine. Add not fire to fire. 

750.— ARCHIAS 

On Cows carved on a Ring 

Looking at the cows and the jasper on my hand, 
you will fancy that the cows breathe and the jasper 
puts forth grass. 

751.— PLATO THE YOUNGER 

The stone is Hyacinthus, 1 and on it are Apollo and 
Daphne. Of which was Apollo rather the lover ? 

752.— ASCLEPIADES or ANTIPATER OF 
THESSALONICA 

I am Drunkenness, the work of a skilled hand, but 
I am carved on the sober stone amethyst. The stone 
is foreign to the work. But I am the sacred possess- 
ion of Cleopatra : on the queen's hand even the 
drunken goddess should be sober. 

753.— CLAUDIANUS 

On a Crystal enclosing Water 

The snow-white crystal, fashioned by the hand of 
man, showed the variegated image of the perfect 
universe, the heaven, 2 clasping within it the deep- 
voiced sea. 

1 Jacinth. 2 Because it was spherical. 

407 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



754.— TOY ΑΥΤΟΥ 



α. Είπ aye μοι, κρύστα\\ε, Χίθω πεπυκασμένον ΰδωρ, 
τίς πήξεν; β. ΐίορέης. α. *Η τίς έλυσε; β. Νότος. 

755— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 
Eis ϋΕκυλλαΐ' χαλκην 

lit μη χαΧκος εΧαμττεν, έμάνυε δ' έργον άνακτος 
εμμεναι *\\φαίστου δαιδαΧέοιο τέγνας, 

αύτην αν τις Έ,κύΧΧαν ό'ίσσατο τηΧόθι Χεύσσων 
έστάμεν, εκ πόντου γαΐαν άμειψαμέναν 

τοσσον εττισσειει, τοσσον κότον άντία φαίνει, δ 

οίον από πεΧάγευς συγκΧονέουσα νέας. 

756.— ΑΙΜΙΛΙΑΝΟΤ 

ΐέχνας ε'ίνεκα σεΐο και ά Χίθος οϊδε βρυάζειν, 
ΊΊραξίτεΧες• Χΰσον, καϊ ττάΧι κωμάσομαι. 

νυν δ' ήμΐν ου γήρας ετ αδρανές, άλλ' 6 ττεδητάς 
ΧειΧηνοΐς κώμων βάσκανός εστί λίθος. 

757.— 2ΙΜΩΝΙΔΟΤ 

Ιφίων τόδ' έγραψε Κορίνθιος, ουκ ενι μωμος 
γερσίν, επεϊ δόξας έργα πολύ προφέρει. 

758.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Κίμων έγραψε την θύραν την δεξιάν 
την δ' εξιοντων δεξιαν Διονύσιος. 

4ο8 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 754-758 

754. — By the Same 

A. Tell me, ice, water frozen into stone, who froze 
thee. B. Boreas. A. And who melted thee ? B. The 
South Mind. 

755. — Anonymous 

On Scylla in Bronze* 

Unless the bronze glistened and betrayed the 
work to be a product of Hephaestus' cunning art, 
one looking from afar would think that Scylla herself 
stood here, transferred from sea to land, so threaten- 
ing is her gesture, such wrath does she exhibit, as if 
dashing ships to pieces in the sea ! 

756.— AEMILIANUS 

{A Silenus speaks) 

As far as it depends on thy art, Praxiteles, the 
stone could wax wanton. Let me loose and I will 
join in the revel again. It is not that my old age is 
feeble, but the fettering stone grudges the Sileni 
their sport. 

757.— SIMONIDES 

Iphion of Corinth painted this. There is no fault 
in his hand, since the achievement far excels the 
expectation. 

758. — By the Same 

Cimon painted the door on the right, and Dionysius 
that on the right as you go out. 

1 Probably in the Hippodrome at Constantinople. 

409 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

759.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 
ΕΓ9 Χίθος, αρμ, ίΧατήρ, ίπποι, ζνγόν, ηνία, μάστιξ. 

760.— ΑΛΛΟ 
Et9 Χίθος, άρμ , έΧατήρ, πωΧοι, ζν-γός, ηνία, Νίκη. 

761.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Eis βότρνν £Κ χρωμάτων 

Μικρού κατέσχον τον βότρνν τοις δακτύΧοις, 
ύπεραπατηθβις rfj 6ea των χρωμάτων. 

762.— ΑΒΛΑΒΙΟΤ ΙΛΛΟΤΣΤΡΙΟΤ 

Eis δίσκον Άσκληπίάδον 

'Ήφαιστο 1 ; μ ετίΧζσσε καμων χρόνον άλλα Κνθείρη 
ανδρός eov θαλάμων είλετο Χαθριδιως, 

Άγχίση δ' βπορεν κρνφίης μνημηϊον εννής' 
και μ ΆσκΧηπιάδης evpe παρ Κ,Ινεάδαις. 

763.— ΙΟΤΛΙΑΝΟΤ ΑΠΟ ΤΠΑΡΧΩΝ 
ΑΙΓΤΠΤΙΟΤ 

Ε ι? αρχοντικοί' nekeKvv 

Λ Ηι> μ€ν άΧιτραίνης, π&Χβκυν βΧεφάροισι SoKevew 
ην Be σαοφρονέρς, apyupos Βίμι μόνον. 



4ΐο 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 759-763 

759. — Anonymous 

Of one stone are chariot, charioteer, horses, yoke, 
reins, whip. 

760. — Anonymous 

Of one stone are chariot, charioteer, horses, yoke, 
reins, and Victory. 

761. — Anonymous 

On a Painting of a Bunch of Grapes 

I was almost grasping the cluster in my fingers, 
more than deceived by the sight of the colours. 

762.— ABLABIUS ILLUSTRIUS 

On the Quoit of Asclepiades 

Hephaestus wrought me with long labour, but Cy- 
therea took me secretly from her husband's chamber 
and gave me to Anchises as a souvenir of their stolen 
intercourse. Asclepiades found me among the de- 
scendants of Aeneas. 1 

763.— JULIANUS, PREFECT OF EGYPT 

On a Magistrate's Axe 

If thou art guilty of crime, thy eyes see here an 
axe, but if thou art innocent, I am only silver to 
thee. 

1 i.e. the Romans. Who Asclepiades was we do not know. 
It looks as if he were an exceptionally lucky collector of 
antiquities. 

411 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 
764.— ΠΑΤΛΟΤ 2ΙΛΕΝΤΙΑΡΙΟΤ 

Ε t5 κωνωπ€ωνα 

Ού βριαρόν τίνα θήρα, κα\ ου τίνα πόντιον ίχθύν, 

ού πτερον ά<γρεύω πΧε^μασιν ήμετεροις, 
αλλά βροτούς εθεΧοντας• άΧεξητειρα he τέχνη 

άνερα μυιάων κεντρον άΧευόμενον 
εκ θαΧίης άβρώτα μεσημβριάοντα φυΧάσσει, 5 

ούδεν άφαυροτέρη τείχεος άστυόχου. 
ύπνου δ άστυφεΧικτον αγω χάριν άΧΧα καϊ αυτούς 

δμώας μυιοσόβου ρύομαι άτμενίης. 

76δ.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 
Ets τό α ντο 

ΚαΧΧνγάμοις Χεκτροις περικίδναμαι' είμϊ 8ε κεδνής 
δίκτυον ού Φοίβης, αλλ' άπαΧής Παφίης. 

άνερα δ' ύπνώοντα μίτω ποΧύωπι καΧύτττω, 
ζωοφόρων άνεμων ούδεν άτεμβόμενον. 

766.— ΑΓΑΘΙΟΤ 2ΧΟΛΑ2ΤΙΚΟΤ 

Ε ι? τό αυτό 

ΤίΧε-γμασι μεν σκοπός εστί περισφίγξαι πετεηνών 

εθνεα καϊ ταχινούς ενδοθεν όρταΧίχους• 
αύταρ εγώ σευειν επιτερπομαι, ούδε καΧύπτω 

ενδοθεν, άΧΧ εΐρ'γω μάΧΧον επεί'γομενους. 
ούδε με τις Χησειε, και ει βραχύς επΧετο, κώνωψ 5 

ημέτερης διαδύς πΧε^μα Χινοστασίης. 
ορνεά που σώζω' μερόπ^σσι δε Χεκτρα φυΧάσσω. 

η ρά τις ημείων εστί δικαιότερος; 

412 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 764-766 

764.— PAULUS SILENTIARIUS 

On a Mosquito Net 

No powerful beast, or fish of the sea, or bird do I 
catch in my meshes, but men willing to be caught. 
My defensive art, in no wise inferior to a city's Avail, 
keeps a man who would avoid the sting of flies 
uneaten as he takes his siesta after the midday meal. 
I bring him the gift of undisturbed slumber, and 
save the slaves themselves from their service of 
chasing the flies away. 

765. — By the Same 

On the Same 

I am hung round wealthy bridal beds and am the 
net, not of the huntress Artemis, but of the tender 
Queen of Paphos. I cover the sleeper with a many- 
meshed web, so that he in no way loses the life-giving 
breeze. 

766.— AGATHIAS SCHOLASTICLS 

On the Same 

It is the office of nets to surround the winged 
tribes and enclose their quick brood ; but I take 
pleasure in chasing them away and do not cover them 
round, but rather keep them off when they attack. 
Not a single mosquito, however small, will manage 
to get through the fabric of my net. One may say 
that I save from death the winged creatures while 
I guard the beds of men. Can anyone be more 
righteous than I am ? 

413 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

767.— TOY ΑΥΤΟΥ 
Ε is τά/3λαν 

Έζόμενος μεν τηδε παρ evXaiyyi τραπεξη 
παίγνια κινήσεις τερπνά βοΧοκτυπίης. 

μήτε 8ε νίκησαν μεγαΧίζεο, μήτ άποΧειφθεις 
άχνυσο, την οΧίγην μεμφόμενος βοΧίδα. 

καϊ yap επί σμικροισι νόος διαφαίνεται ανδρός, 5 

και κύβος άγγεΧΧει βενθος εχεφροσύνης. 

7G8.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Ε is το αυτό 

Παίγνια μεν τάδε πάντα' Τύχης δ' ετερότροπος όρμη 
ταΐς άΧόγοις ταύταις εμφερεται βοΧίσιν 

καϊ βροτεου βιότου σφαΧερον μίμημα νοήσεις, 
νυν μεν υπερβάΧΧων, νυν δ άποΧειπόμενος. 

αίνεομεν 8η κεΐνον, ος εν βιότω re κύβω τε δ 

γάρματι και Χύπτ) μετρον εφηρμόσατο. 

769.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 
Ε Σ? το αυτό 

Tot? μεν πρηύνόοις τάδε παίγνια, τοις δ' άκοΧάστοις 
Χύσσα καϊ άμπΧακίη καϊ πόνος αυτόματος. 

άΧΧά συ μη \έξτ)ς τι θεημάγον ύστατος έρπων, 
μη$ άναροιβδήσης ρινοβόΧω πατάγω. 

δει yap μήτε πονεΐν εν άθύρμασι, μήτε τι παίζειν 5 
εν σπουδΐ)' καιρώ δ' ϊσθι νεμειν το πρέπον. 



4Μ 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 767-769 

767. — By the Same 

On a Draught-board 

Seated by this table made of pretty stones, you 
will start the pleasant game of dice-rattling. Neither 
be elated when you win, nor put out when you are 
beaten, blaming the little die. For even in small 
things the character of a man is revealed, and the 
dice proclaim the depth of his good sense. 

768. — By the Same 

On the Same 

These things are all play. The shifting current of 
Fortune is pictured in these unreasoning dice, and, 
now a winner, now a loser, you will perceive in them 
the unstable image of mortal life. We praise him 
who in life and in play imposes a limit on his joy 
and grief. 



769. — By the Same 

On the Same 

To men of gentle disposition this is play, but to 
those lacking in self-restraint it is madness and 
wandering of the wits and self-imposed pain. If 
you come in last, speak no word of offence to God, 
nor boil over and snort loudly. One should neither 
give oneself trouble in a matter of play, nor play in 
serious matters. Learn to allot to the hour what 
befits it. 

415 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 
770.— ΓΙΑΤΛΟΤ ΣΙΛΕΝΤΙΑΡΙΟΤ 

Eis ττοτήριον οίκαας θυγατρος παρθένου 

ΧεΐΧος Άνικήτεια το χρύσεον εις εμε τβ'γγεί* 
άλλα τταρασχοίμην και πόμα νυμφίΰιον. 

771.— ΙΟΤΛΙΑΝΟΤ ΑΠΟ ΤΠΑΡΧΩΝ 

Ε is φιάλην Ζχονσαν κινονμίνονς ίχθνα.'ϊ 

, 'Οι^τω9 ΈΙάκχον έ'δεκτο ®ετις' νυν μύθος Ομήρου, 
οψε μεν, αλλ' ευρεν πίστιν ετητυμιης. 

772.— ΦΩΚΑ ΔΙΑΚΟΝΟΤ 

E?s φιάλην ίν Υ} συνάγονται τα περιττά 

Οίνοχόω φίΧον είμϊ μόνω Βέπας, ούνεκεν αυτω 
Βάκχον άοΧλίζω τον ττεριΚειττόμενον. 

773.— ΠΑΛΛΑΔΑ 

Χ,αΧκοτύπος τον 'Έρωτα μεταΧλάξας εποησ€ 
Trfjavov, ουκ άΧό^ως, ούτι καϊ αυτό φ\εηει. 

774.— ΓΛΑΤΚΟΤ ΑΘΗΝΑΙΟΤ 

Ά Βάκχα ΤΙαρία μεν, ενεψύχωσε δ' 6 γΧύπτας 
τον \ίθον• άνθρώσκει δ' ως βρομιαζομενα. 

ω Έ,κόττα, ά θεοττοώς <άπιστον> εμήσατο τεχνα 
θαύμα, χιμαιροφόνον θυιάδα μαινομεναν. 

4ΐ6 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 770-774 

770.— PAULUS SILENTIARIUS 

On a Cup belonging to his own Unmarried Daughter 

Anicetia moistens her golden lips in me, and may 
I give her the bridal draught too. 

771.— JULIAN, PREFECT OF EGYPT 

On a Cup on which Swimming Fish were chased 
or painted 

Thetis ] real]}* received Bacchus : at length the 
truth of Homer's story 2 is confirmed. 

772.— PHOCAS THE DEACON 

On a Cup in which the Leavings are collected 

I am dear to the cup-bearer alone, because I collect 
for him the wine that is left. 

773.— PALLADAS 

The smith transformed Love into a frying-pan, 
and not unreasonably, as it also burns. 

774.— GLAUCUS OF ATHENS 

The Bacchante is of Parian marble, but the sculptor 
gave life to the stone, and she springs up as if in 
Bacchic fury. Scopas, thy god-creating art has pro- 
duced a great marvel, a Thyad, the frenzied slayer 
of goats. 

1 i.e. the sea. - Horn. II. vi. 136. 

417 

VOL. ΠΙ. Ε Ε 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 



77ό.— TOY ΑΥΤΟΥ 



Ή Βάκχη KpoviSijv Σάτνρον 6ero' εις δε χορβίαν 
θρώσκ€ί μαινόμενων ώς βρομιαζόμενος. 

776.— ΔΙΟΔΩΡΟΤ 

Ζενξι&ος η χροιή τ ε και ή χάρις' iv δε' με μικρή 
κρυστάΧΧφ το καΧον BaiSaXov Αρσινόη 

ηράψας τοντ επορεν ^ίατυρήϊος. ειμί δ' άνάσσης 
είκών, και 쀕γά\ης Χείπομαι οϋδ' oXiyov. 

777.— ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΤ 

"Ιδ' ώς 6 πώΧος χαΧκοδαι&άΧω τεχνα 

κορωνιών εστηκε• δριμύ yap βΧεπων 

νψαυχενίζει, και διηνεμωμένας 

κορυφής εθείρας ονρίωκεν ες δρόμον. 

δοκεω, χαΧινούς ει τις ήνιοστρόφος 5 

εναρμόση ηίνυσσι κάπικεντρίση, 

6 σος πόνος, Αύσιππε, και παρ ελπίδα? 

τάχ εκδραμεϊται' τα τεχνα, yap εμπνέει. 

778.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Ταϊαν την φερεκαρπον οσην έζωσε περίχθων 

ωκεανός μεγάΧω Καισαρι πειθομενην, 
καΐ γΧανκήν με θαΧασσαν άπηκριβωσατο Καρπω 

κερκίσιν ίστοπονοις πάντ απομαξαμενη' 
Καίσαρί δ' Ίακείνου χάρις ηΧθομεν ην yap άνάσσης 5 

δώρα φερειν τα. θεοΐς και πριν όφειΧόμενα. 

1 Zeus disguised himself as a Satyr in order to possess 
Antiope at the Bacchic revels. 

418 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 775-778 

775. — By the Same 

The Bacchante has made the son of Cronos a Satyr, 
and he rushes to the frenzied dance as if he were in 
Bacchic fury. 1 

776.— DIODORUS 

The colour and the beauty is worthy of Zeuxis ; but 
Satyreius painted me on a little crystal and gave the 
pretty miniature to Arsinoe. I am the queen's own 
image, and no whit inferior to a large picture. 



777.— PHILIPPUS 

Look how proudly the art of the worker in bronze 
makes this horse stand. Fierce is his glance as he 
arches his neck and shakes out his wind-tossed mane 
for the course. I believe that if a charioteer were 
to fit the bit to his jaws and prick him with the spur, 
thy work, Lysippus, would surprise us by running 
away ; for Art makes it breathe. 



778. — By the Same 
On a Tapestry 
In me Carpo, imitating all by her shuttle's labour 
at the loom, depicted accurately all the fruitful land, 
encompassed by Ocean, that obeys great Caesar, and 
the blue sea as well. I come to Caesar as a present 
. . . ., for it was the queen's duty to offer the gift 
long due to the gods. 2 

2 i.e. to the emperors. The corrupt word in I. 5 (or possibly 
καρ -irbi in 1. 3, where καρπω is a conjecture) conceals the clue 
to the identity of the queen. She was probably Oriental. 

419 

Ε Ε 2 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

779.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Ει? βάσίν τον ωρολογίου τον cis την άι/άδα την κίΐμίνην 
cis την βασιΧικην 

Αώρον Ίουστίνοιο τυραννοφόνου βασιΧήος 
καϊ Χοφίης άΧό-χον, φέγγος έΧευθερίης, 

ώράων σκοπίαζβ σοφον σημάντορα χαΧκον 
αυτής etc μονάδος μέχρι δυω&€κάδος, 

οντινα συΧηθίντα Δίκης θρόνου ηνιογεΰων 
ehpev 'ΙουΧιανος χερσϊν άδωροδόκοις. 



780.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Ε is ωρολογιον 

Ώρανον ά χωροϊσα σοφά, Χιθος, ά δια, τυτθον 
<γνώμονος άελίω παντ\ μερισδομίνα. 

781.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Eis κάγκελον οικίας 

*Hv κΧείσης μ', aveojya' teal ην οϊξης μ έπικΧύσεις. 1 
τοΐος ίων τηρεΐν σον δόμον ου δύναμαι. 

1 I write μ' iwtK\daeis for μ« nXfiaets μ«. 



1 i.e. " the Sun," but the phrase is obscure. I suppose it 
means " Sun, who now shinest on a free state," and refers to 
the same matter as the epithet " tyrannicide." 

2 Justin II. The title "tyrannicide" refers to the sup- 
pression of some real or fancied usurper. 

420 






BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 779-781 

779. — Anonymous 

On the Base of the Sun-dial in the Arch of the 
Basilica 

Look, Light of Freedom, 1 on this gift of our 
emperor Justin, 2 the tyrannicide, and his wife 
Sophia, this skilled bronze indicator of the hours 
from one to twelve. It had been stolen, and 
Julianus the Praetorian Prefect recovered it with 
incorruptible hands. 

780. — Anonymous 
On a Sun-dial 

This is the learned stone which contains all the 
heavens, and which a little regulator adapts to every 
position of the sun. 3 

781. — Anonymous 

On the Lattice of a House 

If you shut me I am open, and if you open me 
you will shut me. Being such, I cannot guard your 
house. 4 

3 It was so regulated that it was adapted to every day in 
the year, each day — from sunrise to sunset — containing 
twelve hours. What was the mechanism ? 

4 A very silly epigram. The lattice, having holes in it, is 
open when shut and shut when open, ae the light no longer 
comes through it. 

421 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 
782.— ΠΑΤΛΟΤ 2ΙΛΕΝΤΙΑΡΙΟΤ 

Είς wpoXoyiov 
Ί&νθα6€ μιστυΧΧουσι Βρόμον ΦαεθοντίΒος αϊγΧης 

άνερες ώράων άμφϊ ΒυωδεκάΒι• 
νΒασι δ' ηεΧιοιο ταΧαντεύονσι κεΧεύθους, 

ες πόΧον εκ γαίης μητιν ερεισάμενοι. 

783.— ΑΛΗΛΟΝ 

Ε t9 Έιρμαφρόΰιτον iv λουτρά Ίστάμ^νον 

Άνορασιν Ρ,ρμής ειμί, γυναιξί 8ε Κύπρις ορωμαν 
αμφοτέρων 8ε φέρω σύμβοΧά μοι τοκεων. 

τοΰνεκεν ουκ άλογω? με τον ΈρμαφρόΒιτον εθεντο 
άνΒρογύνοις Χουτροϊς παΐΒα τον άμφίβοΧον. 

784.— ΑΑΗΛΟΝ 

Ei's λουτρον μικρόν 

Μη νεμεσα βαιοΐσι• χάρις βαιοΐσιν οττηΒεϊ• 

βαιος καϊ ΐΐαφίης εττΧετο κούρος "Ερως. 

R. G. McGregor, The Greek Anthology, p. 47 ; Τ. P. 
Rogers, in The Greek Anthology (Bohn), p. 131. 

785.— ΑΛΗΛΟΝ 

Είς καμάραν τον φόρου προς την Βύσιν 

"Μήνας χρύσεον έργον εΒείματο ττάσιν όΒίταις, 
κυΒαίνων τττοΧίεθρον εριχρύσων βασιΧήων. 

786.— ΑΛΛΟ 

ΎόνΒε καθιΒρύσαντο θεω περικαΧΧεα βωμόν, 
Αευκής καϊ ΙΙτεΧεου μεσσον ορον θέμενοί 

422 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 782-786 

782.— PAULUS SILENTIARIUS 

On a Water-clocjc 

Here men divide the course of bright Phaethon 
into twelve hours and measure the sun's path 
by water, lifting up their minds from earth to 
heaven. 

783. — Anonymous 

On a Hermaphrodite which stood in a Bath 

To men I am Hermes, but to women appear to be 
Aphrodite, and I bear the tokens of both my parents. 
Therefore not inappropriately they put me, the 
Hermaphrodite, the child of doubtful sex, in a bath 
for both sexes. 

784. — Anonymous 
On a Small Bath 
Revile not small things. Small things possess 
charm. Cypris' son, Eros, was small too. 

785. — Anonymous 

On a Vaulted Chamber on the West Side of the Forum 

Μ en as built the golden structure for all travellers, 
glorifying the city of our kings rich in gold. 

786. — Anonymous 
The inhabitants erected to the god this beautiful 
altar, placing it here as a sign to mark the boundary 

423 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

ενναεται, χώρης σημήϊον άμμορίης δε 

αυτός άναξ μακάρων εστϊ μέσος Κ,ρονίδης. 

787.— 2ΩΦΡΟΝΙΟΤ ΠΑΤΡΙΑΡΧΟΤ 

Ε is τόπον ini^tvovptvwv 

Ό πριν άΧωόμενος καϊ άνεστιον ϊχνος εΧαύνων, 
εϊτ αφ 1 όδοιπορίης, εϊτ από ναντιΧίης, 

ένθάδε νυν προσιων στήσον, ζενε, σον 7τόδα δεΰρο, 
ναιετάειν εθεΧων, οίκον ετοιμον έχων. 

ει δε με και τις ετενξεν άνακρινέοις, ποΧιήτα- 5 

ΈνΧόγιος, Φαρίης άρχιερεύς αγαθός. 

788.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

ΌΧβιον άνθρώποισιν έχει φάος άμβροτος αιών 

σγσιν υπ* εννεσι^ς, εύγενέτειρα Τύχη. 
νεύματι yap σω πάντα φέρει κΧεος ώ ποτέ χαρί 

δεξιτερτ} παρέχης αυχένα θεσπέσιον. 
τούτω και βασιΧήες άμύμονες αρμόζονται, δ 

καϊ Χορίων άγεΧης αμβροτοι ηγεμόνες' 
και νήες Χιμένεσσι σαώτερον άμπανονται 

σην δι άρηγοσύνην σωζόμεναι πεΧάγεί' 
και πόΧιες χαίρουσιν άκύμονες, ι)δε τε Χαοί, 

και θαΧερών πεδίων Χε'ιμακες άμβρόσιοι. 10 

τοΰνεκα σον θεράποντα προς οΧβιον άθρησασα 
***** 

789.— ΑΔΕ2ΠΟΤΟΝ 

Ύεκτονά με σκοπίαζε σοφών κοσμήτορα μύθων, 
ιθύνοντα τέχνην εύεπίης κανόνι. 



4 2 4 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 787-789 

of Leuce and Pteleus. The arbiter of the divi- 
sion is the king of the immortals himself, Cronus' 
son. 1 

787.— SOPHRONIUS THE PATRIARCH 

On a Guest-house 

Stranger, who formerly on your arrival by land or 
by sea wandered about with homeless feet, approach 
now and stay your steps here, where, if you wish to 
dwell, you will find a lodging all ready. But if you, 
citizen, demand who made me, it was Eulogius, the 
good bishop of Alexandria. 



788. — Anonymous 

Under thy rule, noble Fortune, the blest life of 
men enjoys the light of prosperity. For at thy nod 
all things bring glory to him whom thou permittest 
to caress thy divine neck with his right hand. To 
thy will illustrious kings bow, and the blest leaders 
of the learned company. Ships, too, rest safer in 
harbour, saved at sea by thy help, and cities enjoy 
tranquility, and peoples, and the ambrosial meads 
of the verdant plain. Therefore looking on thy 
servant . . 

789. — Anonymous 

On a Rhetor 

Look on me, the adorner of learned discourse, who 
direct my art by the rule of eloquence. 

1 From Demosth. vii. 39. The places are in the Thracian 
Chersonese. 

425 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

790.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ 

Ti9 ποκ άπ' ΟύΧύμποιο μβταγαγε παρθενεώνα, 
τον πάρος ούρανίοις εμβεβαώτα Βόμοις, 

ες πόΧιν Άν&ρόκΧοιο, θοών βασίΧειαν Ιώνων, 
ταν Βορϊ καϊ Μούσαις αίπυτάταν "Ι^φεσον; 

η ρα συ φιΧαμενα, Ύιτυοκτόνε, μεζον \)Χύμπου 
ταν τροφον, εν ταύτα, τον σον εθευ θάλαμον. 

791.— ΑΠΟΛΛΩΝΙΔΟΤ 

Μητρϊ περιστεφεος σηκου, Κυθερεια, θαλασσή 
κρηπΐδας βυθίας οϊδματι πηξαμένη' 

'χαίρει δ' άμφϊ σε πόντος, επι ζεφύροιο πνοησιν 
αφρόν υπέρ νώτου κυάνεον <γεΧάσας. 

εΐνεκα δ' εύσεβίης, νηοΰ #' ον εηείρατο σεΐο 

ΐΐόστουμος, αύχήση μεζον, ^αφΧοισι ΐΐάφου, 1 

792.— ΑΝΤΙΠΑΤΡΟΤ 

Νικίεω πόνος ούτος• άειζώουσα Νεκυία 

■ησκημαί πάσης ηρίον ήΧικίης' 
δώματα δ' ΑίΒωνήος ερευνήσαντος Όμηρου 

ηεηραμμαι κείνου πρώτον απ αρχετύπου. 

1 The poem is very corrupt. The MS. has in 1. 1 nepi- 
arptipea. σ-ηκον. In 1. 4 Jacobs corrects to άβρον . . . κυανίου 
and I render so, but the aorist ye\daas can scarcely be right. 

426 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 790-792 

790.— ANTIPATER 

On the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus 

Who was it that transported the maiden's chamber, 
that once stood in the celestial palace, from Olympus 
to Ephesus the city of Androclus, the queen of the 
Ionians, swift in battle, most excellent in war and 
letters ? Was it thyself, slayer of Tityus, who, 
loving thy nurse l more than Olympus, didst set thy 
chamber in her ? 

791.— APOLLONIDES 

On a Temple of Aphrodite built in the Sea 

Cytherea, who hast established in the depths of 
the flood the foundations of the sanctuary encinctured 
by thy mother the sea, around thee the sea rejoices, 
its blue surface smiling gently under the breeze of 
Zephyr. Because of this act of piety, and thy temple 
which Postumus erected, thou shalt boast thee more 
than because of Paphos. 

792.— ANTIPATER 

On the Picture of Ulysses' descent to Hell 

This is the work of Nicias. I am painted here an 
ever-living City of the dead, the tomb of every age. 
It was Homer who explored the house of Hades, and 
I am copied from him as my first original. 

1 According to one story Artemis was born, not at Delos, 
but at a place called Ortygia near Ephesus. 

427 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

793.— ΙΟΤΛΙΑΝΟΤ ΑΠΟ ΤΓΙΑΡΧΩΝ 
ΑΙΓΤΠΊΊΟΤ 

Εις την Μι'ρωνος βονν 

ΤΙορτιν τιρ'δβ Μύρωνος ΙΒών, τάχα τούτο βοήσεις' 
"Ή φύσις άττνοός εστίν, ή εμττνοος εττΧετο τέχνη.' 

794.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Είς το αντο 

ΒουκόΧε, 7Γ η ττροθέειν με βιάζεαι; ϊσχεο νυσσών 
ου yap μοι τέχνη καί τόδ' οττασσεν εχειν. 

795.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Εις τό αυτό 

*Η χαΧκόν ζώωσε Μύρων σοφός, η τάχα ττόρτιν 
χάΧκωσε ζωαν εξ ά<γέΧας ερύσας. 

796.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Εις τό αυτό 

Πλαστά Μύρων, σεο ττόρτιν όΒοιπόρος ηΧθεν 
εΧάσσων 
χαλκού 8ε ψαύσας, φώρ κενός εξεφάνη. 

797.— ΤΟΥ ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Εις τό αυτό 

Εισορόων με Χεων χαίνει στόμα, χερσϊ Β' άείρει 
yelOTrovos ζεύ^Χην, αγρονόμος κορύνην. 

428 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 793-797 

793.— JULIAN, PREFECT OF EGYPT 

On Myron's Heifer 

Looking on this heifer of Myron's you are like 
to cry out : " Either Nature is lifeless, or Art is 
alive." 

794. — By the Same 

On the Same 

Neat-herd, whither dost thou force me to advance ? 
Stop from goading me. Art did not bestow motion 
on me too. 

795. — By the Same 

On the Same 

Skilled Myron either made the bronze alive or 
drove off a live heifer from the herd and made it 
into bronze. 

796. — By the Same 

On the Same 

Sculptor Myron, a traveller came to drive off thy 
heifer, and feeling the bronze turned out to be a 
futile thief. 

797. — By the Same 

On the Same 

A lion when he sees me opens his mouth wide, the 
husbandman picks up his yoke and the herd his 
staff. 

429 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

798.— TOY ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Ε£ς το αυτό 

ΎΧήθι, Μύρων τέχνη σε βιάζεται• άπνοον έργον, 
εκ φύσεως τέχνη' ου yap φύσιν εΰρετο τέχνη. 

799.— ΑΔΉΛΟΝ 

Έν τώ πορφνρω κίονι τώ όιτι «ϊς τό Φιλαδελφιο/ 

Έιύνους μεν βασιΧεΐ ΜουσήΧιος' έργα βοώσιν 
δημόσια' σθεναρην πράγματα ττίστιν έχει. 

Μονσεΐον 'Ρώμη δ' εχαρίσσατο, και βασιΧήος 
εικόνα θεσπεσίην εντός έγραψε δόμων, 

τιμήν μουσοττόΧοις, ττόΧεως χάριν, εΧττίδα κούρων, 
οπΧα δε τ/;9 aperfjs, χρήματα τοις άγαθοϊς. 

800.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Εν τω αΰτω 

Ταύτα Χόγοις άνέθηκεν εκών ΜουσήΧιος έργα, 
■πιστεύων καθαρώς ώς θεός εστί Χογος. 

801.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Εν τώ αντω 

Μουσείου τά μεν αυτός ετεύξατο, ποΧΧα. δε σώσας 
εστώτα σφαΧερώς, Ίδρυσεν άσφαΧεως. 

1 A place so called because the statues of the sons of 
Constantine the Great stood there. 

43° 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 798-801 

798.— By the Same 

On the Same 

Bear with it, Myron : Art is too strong for thee : 
the. work is lifeless. Art is the child of Nature, for 
Art did not invent Nature. 

799. — Anonymous 

On the Porphyry Column in the Philade/phion x 

Museuus is a well-wisher of the Emperor. Public 
works proclaim it ; the force of facts is strong. He 
presented Constantinople with a Museum and with a 
splendid painting of the sovereign inside, an honour 
to poets, an ornament of the city, the hope of youth, 
the instrument of virtue, the wealth of good men. 

800. — Anonymous 

On the Same 

These works did Muselius cheerfully dedicate to 
words, 2 in pure belief that God is the Word. 

801. — Anonymous 

On the Same 

He built parts of the Museum himself, and other 
parts which were in danger of falling he saved and 
set them up firmly. 

a Literature. 

431 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

802.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Εις εικόνα Μαρκιανοί) βασιλέως 

λίορφην τήν& όράας ζωώ ενάλίγκιον ΐππω, 
Μαρκιανον φορεοντι, βροτών βασιλήα ηενεθλης• 
δεξιτερην δ' ετάνυσσε, θεοντα 8ε πώλον επείγει 
Βυσμενεος καθύπερθεν, ότις κεφαλή μιν άείρει. 

803.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Εις εικόνα 2οφίας Αύγουστος εν τη είσόδω του Ζΐνξίππου 

Αύσονίων Βεσποιναν 'Ιουλιανός πολιούχος 
ώς σοφίης μεστην άνθετο την Χοφίην. 

804.— ΑΛΑΟ 

Ε ?5 στ>/λτ;ν Ίονστίνον βασιλέως 

Ίονστίνον κατά χρέος τον Βεσπότην 
'Ιουλιανός ύπαρχος, ώς εύερ^ετην. 

805.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Είς στν^λ^ν "Αρεως κ€\ωσμΐνην ε'ν Θράκη 

Είσόκε θούριος ούτος επί χθονϊ κεκλπαι 'Άρης, 
ούποτβ ©ρηϊκίης επιβήσεται εθνεα Υότθων. 

806.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Εις ώρολογιον 

Κ^πο? εην 68ε χώρος' άπο σκιερών 8ε πετήλων 
νυκτοφανης τελεθων εσκεπεν ηελιον. 

432 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 802-806 

802. — Anonymous 

On a Portrait of the Emperor Marcian 

Thou seest this shape, like a live horse, carrying 
Marcian, ruler of the race of men. His right hand 
is outstretched and he spurs on the galloping horse 
above a foeman, who seems to support its weight on 
his head. 

803. — Anonymous 

On a Portrait of the Empress Sophia at the Entrance 
of the Bath Zeuxippus 

Julian, the prefect of the city, dedicated here 
Sophia (Wisdom), the queen of the Italians, as being 
herself full of wisdom. 

804. — Anonymous 
Oh a Column with a Statue of the Emperor Justin 

Julian the prefect dutifully set up here the statue 
of Justin his master and benefactor. 

805. — Anonymous 

On a Stele of Ares partly buried in Thrace 

As long as this fierce Ares rests on the ground the 
peoples of the Goths shall never set foot in Thrace. 

806. — Anonymous 

On a Sun-dial 

This place was once a garden, and the shade of 
the leaves shutting out the sun made it like night. 

433 

VOL. III. F F 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

νυν δε παναιηΧήεντα καϊ εΰδιον εύρε τε\εσσαι 
'Sipyios αυτόπτης μυστιπό\ος Τριάδος, 

ένθα Χίθος στατος ούτος άειδίνητον ανάγκην 
επτάκις ayyeWei άντυηος ούρανίης. 

807.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Μηχανική Φαέθοντα βιάζεται άρμονικοϊσι 
ηνώμοσιν άηρεΰειν τον δρομον ?;ελίοιτ 

βαιος δ' άμφιεπει Χίθος άντυηας 'Ηριγενείης 
ώρονόμω σοφίη και σκιόεντι τυπω. 

Sepyiou άρχιερήος επουρανίησιν εφετμαις 
τοϋτο συνειρηάσθη έργον επιχθονιων. 



808.— ΚΤΡΟΤ ΑΠΟ ΤΠΑΤΩΝ 

Ε is την Μαξιμύ'ου οΐκίαν 

Αείματο Μαξιμίνος νεοπηγεος ενδοθι 'νώμης, 
αύταϊς ηίόνεσσι θεμειΚια καρτερά πηζας. 
ά<γ\αιη δε μοι άμφϊς απειρεσιη τετανυσται. 
τη καϊ τη καϊ όπισθεν εχω τπολ,ιν άλλα και άντην 
πάνθ* όρόω ηαίης Έιθυνηΐδος άγλαά έργα. 5 

ημετεροις δ' ύπενερθεν ερισθενεεσσι θεμέθΧοις 
πόντος αλός προχοησι κυ\ίνδεται εις άλα δΐαν, 
τόσσον επιψαύων, όπόσον χθονος άκρα διήναι. 
ποΧλάκι δ' εξ εμεθεν τις εον μέγα θυμον ιάνθη 
βαιόν ύπερκύψ~ας, επεϊ εϊσιΒεν άΧλ,οθεν ά\\α, 10 

δενδρεα, δώματα, νήας, ά\α, πτόΧιν, ήερα, γαΐαν. 
434 






BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 807-808 

But now Sergius, the patriarch, who hath seen with 
his eyes and reveals the mysteries of the Holy 
Trinity, contrived to make it bright and sunlit. 
Here this fixed stone seven times 1 announces the 
eternal and fixed revolutions of the vault of heaven. 



807. — Anonymous 

On the Same 

The mechanic art compels Phaethon by means of 
dials ruled in due measure to direct aright (?) the 
course of the sun. A small stone governs the circle 
of Aurora by its skilled division into hours and by the 
shadow's mark. This work of mortals was constructed 
by the heavenly command of Sergius the patriarch. 

808.— CYRUS THE CONSUL 

On the House of Maximinus 

Maximinus built me in the newly constructed 
Rome, fixing my secure foundations actually on the 
beach. Infinite beauty extends itself around me. 
To right, left, and behind me lies the city, but facing 
me I see all the beauties of the Bithynian coast. 
At the foot of my most strong foundations the salt 
current rolls to the lovely sea, just touching the land 
in front of me enough to wet its edge. Often a man 
leaning out from me slightly has greatly rejoiced his 
heart, seeing in all directions different things : trees, 
houses, ships, sea, city, sky, and earth. 

1 Seemingly this means " by seven lines dividing the dial 
into six equal parts." 

435 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

809.— TOY ΑΥΤΟΥ 

Eis άγαλμα Πινδάρου 

ΤΙίνδαρον ιμερόεντα παρ νδασι Κύρος εγείρει, 
οΰνεκα φορμίζων εϊπεν "'Άριστον ν δ ω ρ. 

810.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Ούτος Ίουστΐνος ^,οφίη σχεδόν αμφότεροι δε 
χρύσεον έργον ετευξαν άπ Άσσυρίοιο θριάμβου. 

811.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Φαιδρον Ιουστινιανός άναξ εμε χωρον εγείρει, 
Ήελ,ιω παρέχων θάμβος άνερχομίνω. 

ούποτε γαρ τοιούτον επί χθονος εδρακε κάΧλος 
ύψόθεν ούρανίην οΐμον επερχόμενος. 

812.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Είς Ίουστίνον 

Θείον Ίουστΐνον, καθ άρον φρου ρήτορα θεσμών, 
Δομνίνος καθαροί? εν προθύροισι Δίκης. 

813.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Ε is 2οφιαν αυτοί) γυναΓ /ca 

Ύης Σοφίης τόδ' ά<γα\μα Δίκης προπάροιθε θυράων 
ου 'yap άνευθε δίκης έπρεπε την σοφίην. 

1 Olymp. 1. 1. 
43 6 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 809-813 

809. — By the Same, 

On a Statue of Pindar 

Cyrus set up Pindar beside the water, because 
singing to the lyre he said, " Water is best." 1 

810. — Anonymous 

This is Justin next Sophia. Both made the golden 
work after their Assyrian triumph. 2 

811. — Anonymous 

Justinian, the emperor, built me the bright house, 
a marvel for the sun to view at his rising. For never 
before when he mounted his celestial path did he 
see such beauty on earth. 

812. — Anonymous 
On Justin 

Domninus in the pure portals of Justice erected 
the statue of divine Justin, the pure guardian of 
Law. 

813. — Anonymous 

On Sophia his Wife 

This statue of Sophia stands before the gates of 
Justice, for wisdom should not be apart from justice. 

2 The Persian war, which, after all, was not very suc- 
cessful. 

437 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

814.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 
Ε is λουτρόν 

Νύμφαι Νηϊάΰες, μ€τανάστιοι, ούχ άμα πάσας 

είξειν ώϊόμην χεύμασιν ήμετεροις' 
ει δε τόσην το Χοετρόν έχει χάριν, ούδεν όνήσει 

6 φθόνος, ει Νύμφαι πάν άπεΧειπον ύδωρ. 

815.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Έ,εϊνε, τι νυν σπεύδεις όρόων άκεσώδυνον ύδωρ; 
ευφροσύνης το Χοετρόν άπορρύπτει μεΧεδωνας* 
μόχθον εΧαφρίζει• τόδε yap ποίησε Μιχαί']Χ, 
ος κρατερής βασιΧηϊ'δος αύΧής ηγεμονεύει. 

816.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Είς μινσωριο}' των Ενβονλον 

Άι>τια ΎηΧεμάχοιο καϊ εγγύθι ΤΙηνεΧοπείης 
τ'ιπτε, ποΧυφράδμων, ποΧνταρβέα χείρα τιταίνεις; 
ουκ ερεει μνηστήρσι τεόν ποτέ νεύμα τιθήνη. 

817.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Ε is ΙνΖυτην 

Έι> τη τραπεζη των αχράντων θυμάτων 
πάθη τνθεντων των ύπερ Χριστού γράφω' 
ούσπερ γαρ αιτώ προς σκεπην εχειν ΤΙέτρος, 
φρικτού τεθεικα τοις σκεπάσμασιν τόπου. 

1 The spring supplying the bath had failed. It is difficult 
to see how, as the epigram implies, the bath could retain its 
charm in the absence of water. 

438 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 814-817 

8 1 4. — Anonymous 

On a Bath 

Naiad Nymphs, ye truants, I never thought you 
would all quit my streams. But if the bath pos- 
sesses such charm, Envy will accomplish naught, even 
though the Nymphs desert all the water. 1 

8 1 5. — Anonymous 

On Another 

Stranger, why dost thou quicken thy steps now, 
when thou seest the water that cures pain ? This 
is the bath of joy ; it washes away care, it lightens 
labour. It was built by Michael, the prefect of the 
Imperial Palace. 

816. — Anonymous 

On a Dish belonging to Eubulus 

In presence of Telemachus and near Penelope, 
why, wise Odysseus, dost thou stretch out thy hand 
in terror ? 2 Thy nurse will never tell the suitors of 
thy gesture. 

817. — Anonymous 

On an Altar-cloth 

On the table of the immaculate sacrifice I depict 
the passions of those sacrificed for Christ. For those 
whom I beg to have as protectors have I, Peter, put 
in the covering of the dread place. 



2 i.e. signing to the nurse not to reveal who he is. Od. 
xix. 479. 

439 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

818.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Ε is δίσκον άλλον iv τω αύτώ 

Και ΐίετρος άλλος, τόζ> τάφον του Κ.υρίον 
τον ζωοποιον είσιΒεΐν μη συμφθάσας, 
έγλυψα Βίσκον, μνήματος θείου τύπον, 
iv ω το Χριστού σώμα κύψας προσβλέπω. 

819.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Ε is ποτήριον iv τω αίτω 

Κράτη ρ νοητός πνεύματος θείου βλύσει 
κατανύξεως ρουν έγχέα ταϊς καρΒίαις. 

820.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Ε is εισοδον της Ήριας 

Ύοΰτον 'Ιουστινιανός ayatcXia δείματο χωρον, 
ϋ&ατι και ηαίη κάΧλος επικρεμάσας. 

821.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Ε is το α ντο 

Κοίρανοι, ύμετέρην άρετην κάρτος τε καϊ ερ<γα 
αύΒήσει χρόνος αίεν, εως πόλος αστέρας ελκρ. 

822.— ΑΛΛΟ 

Ε is μινσώριον Ιχον ιβ' ζώδια και erepa 

Άργύρεος πόλος ούτος, οπη Φαέθοντα Σελήνη 
δερκεται αντιτύπων πιπ~λαμένη φαεων 



44° 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 818-822 

818. — Anonymous 

On a Disc 

I, another Peter, not having survived to see the 
life-giving tomb of the Lord, carved this disc repre- 
senting the Holy Sepulchre, in which, bending low, 
I see Christ's body. 

8 1 0. — Anonymous 

On a Cup 

I, the mystic cup, by the Aoav of the Holy Spirit 
pour into the heart a stream of repentance. 

820. — Anonymous 

On the Entrance of the Heraeum 1 

Justinian built this magnificent house, a thing of 
beauty to overhang land and water. 

821. — Anonymous 

On the Same 

Princes, Time will always proclaim your virtue, 
power, and great deeds, as long as the stars move in 
heaven. 

822. — Anonymous 

On a Dish with the Twelve Signs of the Zodiac 

This is the silver heaven where the Moon gazes 
on the Sun, full herself of his reflected splendour, 

1 On the Asiatic bank of the Bosporus. It is described by 
Gibbon, chap. xl. Nos. 663 aud 664 above may refer to its 
gardens. 

44 1 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 

άπΧανεες δ' βκατβρθβ /ecu άντιθεοντες άΧήται 
άνδρομ&ης ηενβής πάσαν ά<γουσι τύχην. 



823.— ΠΛΑΤΩΝΟΣ 

Σίγάτω Χάσιον Δρυάδων Χέπας, οι τ άπο πέτρας 
κρουνοί, και βληχη πουΧυμι^/ης τοκάδων, 

αυτός inel σύριγγι μεΧίζεται εύκελάδω ΙΙάν, 
ΰ^ρον tets ζευκτων χείλος υττίρ καλάμων 

αϊ δε πέριξ θαλεροΐσι χορον ποσϊν εστήσαντο 

"Τδριάδες Νύμφαι, Νύμφαι Άμαδρυάδες. 

W. Η. D. Rouse, An Echo of Greek Sony, p. 49; Δ. J. 
Butler, Amaranth and Asphodel, p. 47. 



824.— EPTKIOT 

Έ,υστοχα θηροβολεΐτε, κυναηεται, οι ποτϊ ταύταν 
ΤΙανος 6ρ€ΐώτα νισσομενοι σκοπιάν, 

aire Χίνοις βαίνοιτε πεποιθότες, a'ire σιδάρω, 
aire και ιξευταΧ Χαθροβόλω δόνακί' 

κάμε τις υμε'ιων επιβωσάτω' οιδα ποδάηραν 
κοσμεΐν, κάί Χόγχαν, και Χίνα, καϊ καλάμους. 



825.— ΑΔΗΛΟΝ 

Eis 6λκον ύδατος ήρεμα και δίχα ηχον φ€ρόμ(νον, Ιν ω 
άγαλμα Πανό? ΐστατο 

ΊΤάνά με τον Βυσερωτα και εξ υδάτων φύγει/ 'Ηχώ. 
442 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 823-825 

while on either side the fixed stars and the planets 
that move contrary to them woi'k the whole fortune 
of the race of men. 



823.— PLATO 

Let the cliff clothed in greenery of the Dryads 
keep silence, and the fountains that fall from the 
rock, and the confused bleating of the ewes newly 
lambed ; for Pan himself plays on his sweet-toned 
pipe, running his pliant lips over the joined reeds, 
and around with their fresh feet they have started 
the dance, the Nymphs, Hydriads, and Hamadryads. 



824.— ERYCIUS 

Hunters, who come to this peak where dwells 
mountain Pan, good luck to you in the chase, whether 
ye go on your way trusting in nets or in the steel, 
or whether ye be fowlers relying on your hidden 
limed reeds. Let each of you call on me. I have 
skill to bring success to trap, spear, nets, and reeds. 



825. — Anonymous 

On a Machine for drawing Water which worked 
noiselessly, on which stood an image of Pan 

Echo fled from the waters, too, to escape me, Pan, 
her unhappy lover. 

443 



GREEK ANTHOLOGY 
826— ΠΛΑΤΩΝΟΣ 

Εις ^,άτυρον κρήνη (φ(στωτα, και Ερωτα κα^υδο^τα 

Τον Έρομίου Χάτυρον τεχνήσατο δαιδαΧέη χειρ, 
μούνη θεσπέσιων πνεύμα βαΧούσα Χίθω. 

ειμί δε ταΐς Νύμφαισιν όμέψιος' αντί δε του πριν 
πορφυρέου μέθυος Χαρον ΰδωρ προχέω. 

εύκηΧον δ' 'ίθυνε φέρων πόδα, μη τάχα κούρον 
κίνησης, άπαΧω κώματι θεΧ'γόμενον. 

827.— ΑΜΜΩΝΙΟΤ 

Εί? το αυτό 

ΚΙμϊ μεν εύκεράοιο φίΧος θεράπων Διονύσου, 

Χείβω δ' αργυρίων ΰδατα Ναϊάδων 
θεΧ<γω δ' ηρεμεοντα νέον περί κώματι παϊδα 



444 



BOOK IX. EPIGRAMS 826-827 

826.— PLATO 

On a Satyr standing by a Well and Love Asleep 

A cunning master wrought me, the Satyr, son of 
Bacchus, divinely inspiring the monolith with breath. 
I am the playmate of the Nymphs, and instead of 
purple wine I now pour forth pleasant water. Guide 
thy steps here in silence, lest thou disturb the boy 
lapped in soft sleep. 

827.— AMMONIUS 

On the Same 

I am the dear servant of horned Dionysus, and 
pour forth the water of the silver Naiads, soothing 
the young boy who rests asleep . . . 



445 



INDEXES 



GENERAL INDEX 



Achilles, 457, 459, 460, 463, 467, 
470, 473 ; shield of, eps. on, 
115-116 

Achilles Tatius, ep. on his romance 
203 

Admetus, 466 

Aeneas, 236 ; ep. on, 163 

Aesculapius, dedication to, 511 

Agamemnon, 473, 495 ; baths of, 
near Smyrna, 631 

Agarra, town in Susiana, 430 

Agricola, 549 

Ajax, 470 ; eps. on, 177, 204 

Alcaeus of Lesbos, 184, 571 

Alcaeus of Messene, ep. on, 520 

Alcestis, 466 

Alcman, 184, 571 

Alexandria, 628 

Althaea, 465 

Alpheius, river, 362, 526, 683 

Amasia in Pontus, 668 

Ammon, father of Alexander, 241 

Amphion, Thebes built by, 216, 250 

Anacreon, 184, 571 ; statue of, 599 

Anastasius I. emperor(491-518 a.d.) 
210, 656 

Andromeda, 479 

Animals, eps. on : Ants, 438 ; Ass, 
301 ; Bees, 302, 404, 548 ; Birds, 
singing, 76, 87, 88, 343, 396; 
Bookworm, 251 ; Cicada, 264, 
273, 372, 373 ; Cock, 286 ; Cow, 
22, 274; Crow, 272; Dog, 83, 
268,303,311,417; Dolphin, 222; 
Eagle and Octopus, 10 ; Ele- 
phant, 285 ; Goat, 123, 224, 745 ; 
Goat and Wolf, 47 ; Hare and 
Octopus, 14, 94, 227 ; Hare and 
Shark, 17, 18, 371 ; Hen, 95 ; 



ANTH. III. 



Heron, 551 ; Horse, 19, 20, 21, 
295; Mouse. 86, 310, 410; Night- 
ingale and Dolphin, 88 ; Oxen, 
299, 347, 453 ; Parrot, 562 ; 
Raven, 339 ; Swallow, 57, 70, 
122, 346 ; Sheep, peculiar breed, 
from Susiana, 430 ; Wolves, 252 

Antaeus and Heracles, 391 

Antimachus, ep. on his Lyde, 63 

Antioch, 680 

Antonia, niece of Augustus, 239 

Anyte, 26 

Apelles, portrait of. by himself, 595 

Aphrodite, shrine of, 143, 144, 333, 
791 ; statue of, 332, 601 ; picture 
of Ares and, 591 ; dedication to, 
324 ; armed at Sparta, 320, 321 

Apollo, hymn to, 525 ; statue of, 238 

Apolloniu3, mathematician, 578 

Aquae Augustae (Dax), 419 

Aratus, eps. on his Phaenomena , 
25, 107 

Archilochus, ep. on his works, 185 

Ares and Aphrodite, picture of, 591 

Arethusa, fountain in Sicily, 362, 
083 

Argos, 688 

Arion, ep. on, 308 

Aristophanes, ep. on his works, 
186 

Arsinoe, queen of Egypt, 776 

Artemis Lochia, 46 

Assus, 679 

Athamas, 345 

Athena, statue of, 576, 590 ; Itonia, 
temple of, 743 

Athens, 701, 702 

Augustus, 224, 248, 291, 307, 419, 
562 



449 



Ο Ο 



GENERAL INDEX 



Bacchylidee, 571 

Basil I. emperor (867-886 A.D.), 686 

Baths, eps. on, 606-640, 814, 815 

Bathyllus, pantomime dancer (Au- 
gustan age), 542 

Beer, ep. on, 368 

Bervtus, destroyed by earthquake, 
425-427 

Bessi, Thracian tribe, 428 

Bull-flght, ep. on, 543 

Boats made of hides, 306 

Bridge over the Cephisus, 147 ; over 
the Sangarius, 641 

Caius Caesar, 59, 297 
Calchedon, 551 
Callimachus, his Heeale, 545 
Camarina in Sicily, 685 
Celts, custom of, 125 
Cephisus, bridge over, 147 
Chilon, picture of, 596 
Cibyra in Phrygia, 648, 649 
Cimon, painter, 758 
Cleopatra, queen of Egypt, 752 
Cleopatra, daughter of the above, 

235 
Clitomachus, pancratiast, 588 
Clocks and Dials, eps. on, 779, 780, 

782, 806, 807 
Clytaemnestra, ep. on, 126 
Constantine in. emperor (641 A.D.), 

655 
Constantinople, 614, 618, 619, 624, 

625, 650, 651, 653, 655-660, 677, 

681, 689, 690, 691, 696, 697, 799, 

808, 820 ; ep. on, 647 
Corcyra, 7 
Corinna, poetess, 26 
Corinth, eps. on, 151, 284 
Courtesan, dedication by, 332 
Croesus and Diogenes, 145 
Cyclades, 420 
Cyzicus, temple of Hadrian at. 656 

Dancing girl, ep. on, 139 
Daphne, near Antioch, 665 
Daphnis (mythical shepherd), 338, 

341, 433, 437, 556 
Deidamia, 462 

Delos, eps. on, 100, 408, 424, 550 
Demeter, mysteries of, 298 
Democriius and Heraclitus, 148 
Dicaearchaea ( = Puteoli), 708 
Diogenes and Croesus, 145 



Dionysius, painter (5th cent. B.C.), 

758 
Dionysus, hymn to, 524 ; prayer to, 

403 
Divination by stones, 263 
Doberus in Macedonia, 300 
Draught-board, eps. on, 767-769 
Drusus, son of Germanicus, 405 

Earthquakes, eps. on, 423, 425- 

427, 501 
Echo, eps on, 27, 382 
Ephesus, destruction of by flood, 

424 ; eps. on Artemision at, 58, 

790 
Epicharmus, statue of, 600 
Epictetus, eps. on his Manual, 207, 

208 
Epigram, nature of, 342 
Erichthonius, statue of, 590 
Erinna, poetess, 26 ; ep. on, 190 
Eros, 157, 420, 440, 449, 626, 627 ; 

statues etc. of, 15, 221, 325, 585, 

749, 773, 826 
Eunomus, lyre-player, 584 
Euripus, the, ep. on, 73 
Eurotas, rive t in Laconia, 280 ; 

statue of, 709 
Eutycliides, sculptor (circ. 300 B.C.), 

709 

Fountains, eps. on, 37, 38, 225, 
258, 313-315, 326-330, 333, 374, 
549, 676 

Fortune, 134, 135, 180-183 

Gaius, see Caius 
Germanicus, 283 
Grammarians, sorrows of, 168-175 

Harmonia, wife of Cadmus, 216 

Hector, 463, 476 

Hecuba, ep. on, 117 

Helen, 474, 475, 478 

Hephaestus, statue of, 590 

Hera, 468, 469 ; statue of, 589 

Heraclea Pontica, ep. on, 646 

Heracles, 72, 468, 469 ; statue of, 
316, 441 ; fighting with Antaeus, 
391 ; boar sacred to, 240 

Heraclitus, the philosopher, ep. 
on, 540 ; Democritus and, 148 

Heraclius, emperor (610-641 A.D.), 



450 



GENERAL INDEX 



Hermaphroditus, 317 ; statue of, 

783 
Hermes, 72 ; dedication to, 744 ; 

prayei to, 91 ; statue of, 314, 

316, 319, 335 
Hero and Leander, 381 
Herodotus, ep. on, 160 
Hesiod, ep. on, 64 
Hierapolis in Phrygia, 392 
Hippocrates, ep. on, 53 
Hippodamia, 480 
Hippolytus and Phaedra, ep. on, 

132 
Homer, eps. on, 24, 97, 192, 455, 

522, 575; see Iliad 
Horn of bull used as cup, 300 
Hunters eps. on, 275, 337 
Hyacinth, ep. on, 121 
Hyagnis, father or rival of Marsyas, 

266, 340 
Hymenaeus, 514 
Hypatia, 400 

Ibycus, lyric poet (6th cent. B.C.), 

184, 571 
Idothea, 474 

Iliad, headings of the Books, 385 
Inns, eps. on, 648, 649, 787 
Iphion of Corinth, painter (5th cent. 

B.C.), 757 
Iris, river in Pontus, 668 
Isaurians, 531 

Juba, King of Numidia, 235 

Julian, emperor, 689 

Justin II. emperor (565-578 A.D.) 

779, 804, 810, 812 
Justinian, emperor (527-565 A.D.), 

641, 811, 820 

Lais, the famous courtesan, 260 

Latrines, eps. on, 642-644, 662 

Leander, see Hero 

Leonidas, King of Sparta, 293, 294 

Ligurians, character of, 516 

Love, see Eros 

Lycophron, ep. on his Cassandra, 

191 
Lyde, see Antimachus 
Lyric poets, the nine, 184, 571 

Marcellus, nephew of Augustus, 545 
Marcian, emperor (450-457 A.D.), 
802 



Maria, empress, wife of Honorius, 

613 
Marriage, dispraise of, 133, 168 
Medea, picture of, 346 ; statue of, 

593 
Meleager of Calydon, 465 
Menander, ep. on, 187 
Menelaus, 467, 475 
Menippus, author of Periplus, 559 
Methe (Drunkenness), figure of, 752 
Mill (water), ep. on, 418 
Moero, poetess, 26 
Months, Egyptian, 383 ; Roman, 

384, 530 
Mopsuestia in Cilicia, 698 
Mosquito net, eps. on, 764-766 
Muses, eps. on, 504, 505 
Mycenae, eps. on, 28, 101-103 
Myron (5th cent. B.C.), his statue of 

a heifer, 713-742, 793-798 
Myrtis, poetess, 26 

Nauplius, father of Palamedes, 289 

429 
Neoptolemus, 461, 462 
Nero, emperor, 352, 572 
Nero, son of Germanicus, 219 
Nestor, 471 
Nicander and his poems, eps. on, 

211-213 
Nicias, painter (4th cent. B.C.), 792 
Nicias, tyrant of Cos, 81 
Nicopolis, ep. on, 553 
Nonnus, ep. on his Dionysiaca, 198 
Nossis, poetess, 26 
Nymphs, dedications to, 326-328 

Obelisk in Hippodrome, Con- 
stantinople, 682 
Onatas, sculptor (5th cent. B.C.), 238 
Orbicius, ep. on his Tactics, 210 
Organ, ep. on, 365 
Oribasius, ep. on his works, 199 

Pan, 338, 341, 823, 824; ep. on, 
142 ; guardian of a vine, 249 

Panaetius, Stoic philosopher (3rd 
cent. B.C.), 358 

Paris, 464, 475 

Pasiphae, 456 

Patroclus, 476 

Peleus, 467 

Pelops, 480 

Pen, ep. on, 162 

Pergamus, 656 



451 



ο β 2 



GENERAL INDEX 



Perseus, 479 

Pharos, the lighthouse at Alexan- 
dria, eps. on, 60, 674 
Philip Π. of Macedon, 288 
Philip v. of Macedon, 518, 519 
Philomela, Procne and Tereus, 451 

(see Itylus in index to vol. I) 
Philostorgius, eps. on his History, 

193, 194 
Phradmon, sculptor (5th cent. B.C.), 

743 
Pindar, 184, 571 ; statue of, 809 
Pisander, epic poet (7th cent. P.C.), 

statue of, 598 
Piso, L. Calpuraius, 93, 428, 541, 

552 
Plato, ep. on, 188 ; ep. on his 

Phaedo, 358 
Poetesses, ep. on, 26 
Polygnotus, painter (5th cent. B.O.), 

700 
Pompey, 402 

Poppaea, wife of Nero, 355 
Porphyry ,neo-platonist philosopher, 

ep. on, 214 
Poseidon, prayer to, 90 
Praxilla, poetess, 26 
Praxiteles, 756 ; his group of 

Thespiades, 603 
Priam, 478 

Priapus, 338 ; prayer to, 437 
Proclus and Theo, ep. on, 202 ; life 

of, by Marinus, 196, 197 
Procne, see Philomela 
Prusa in Bithynia, 676 
Psophis in Arcadia, 341 
Pterelas, mythical King of Taphos, 

684 
Pylades, pantomime dancer (age of 

Augustus), 248 
Pyramids, ep. on, 710 
Pyrrhus, see Neoptolemus 

Rhine, 125 
Rhodes, 178, 287 

Sages, the seven, 366 
Sangarius, bridge over, 641 
Sappho, 26, 184 ; eps. on, 66, 189, 

506, 521 
Sarapis, 378 
Sardis, ep. on, 645 ; destruction of 

by earthquake, 423 
Satyr, statue of, 826, 827 



Scopas, sculptor (4th cent. B.O.J, 774 

Scylla, statue of, 755 

Scyllus, the diver, 296 

Ships, eps. on, 29-36, 82, 105-107, 

131,218,376,398,415, 416 
Shipwrecks and accidents at sea, 

40-42, 84, 85, 222, 228, 267, 209, 

271 276, 292 
Silenu's, 317 ; statue of, 756 
Simonides, 184, 571 
Skull, ep. on, 439 
Smyrna, 670-673, 675, 678 
Socrates, picture of, 594 
Sophia, empress, wife of Justin II. 

657, 803, 810, 813 
Sophocles, ep. on, 98 
Spartan, the runaway, 61, 397, 

447 
Stepmother, eps. on, 67-69 
Stesichorus, 184, 571 
Strymon river, 707 
Sybota, island, 555 

Taphos, island, 684 

Tarsus, 557 

Teleboae, ancient inhabitants of 

Taphos, 684 
Telephus, 477 
Telesilla, poetess, 26 
Tenos, 550 

Terebinth island in Propontis, 413 
Tereus, see Philomela 
Termessus in Lycia, 705 
Thasos, 242 

Thebes, eps. on, 216, 250, 253 
Theo and Proclus. ep. on, 202 
Thermopylae, battle of, 279, 304 
Theocritus, parentage of, 434 
Theocritus of Chios, 434 
Theodosius I. emperor (379-395 

Α.υ.), 682 
Theodosius II. enperor (408-450 

A.D.), 690 
Thessalonica, 428, 686 
Thetis, 477, 486 
Thucydides, ep. on, 583 
Tiberius, 178, 287 
Treasure, buried, ep. on, 44, 45, 

52 
Trees, eps. on, 3-6, 71, 78, 79, 

130, 231, 247, 256, 282, 312, 414, 

563,661, 706 
Troy, epe. on, 62, 104, 162-165, 

3S7 



45 2 



GENERAL INDEX 

Tryphon, gem-carver, 544 Xenocles, architect, 147 

Tychon, lesser god, 334 Xerxes, 293, 294 

Ulysses, 458, 459, 470-472 Zeno, emperor (474-491 A.D.), 482 

Zeus, prayer to, 7, 9 ; temple of, at 
Vespasian, 349 Athens, 701, 702 ; as a Satyr, 

Victory, statues of, 59 775 

Vine, eps. on, 75, 99, 249, 261 Zeuxippus, gymnasium at Con- 

stantinople, 614, 650 
Women, abuse of, 165-167 



453 



INDEX OF AUTHORS INCLUDED IN THIS 
VOLUME 



Μ — Wreath of Meleager 
Ph = Wreath of Philippus 
Ag = Cycle of Agathias 

(For explanation of these terms, v. Introduction to vol. i. page v.) 



Ablabius Illustrius (Ag) 762 
Adaeus of Macedonia (Ph), 300, 303, 

544 
Aemilianus of Jiicaea (Ph), 218, 756 
Agathias Scholasticus (6th cent. 

A.D.), 152, 153, 154, 155, 204, 442, 

482, 619, 631, 641-644, 653, 662, 

665, 677, 766—769 
Alcaeus of Messene (M, 3rd cent. 

B.C.), 518, 519, 588 
Alpheius of Mitylene (Ph, Augustan 

age), 90, 95, 97, 100, 101, 104, 110, 

526 
Ammianus (1st cent. a.d. ?), 573 
Ammonius (date unknown), 827 
Anacreon (M, 6th cent. B.C.), 715 (?), 

716 (?) 
Antagoras of Rhodes (3rd cent. B.C.) 

147 
Antigonus of Carystus (Ph, 3rd 

cent. B.C.), 406 
Antimachus (M, 5th cent. B.C.), 321 
Antipater of Sidon (M, 1st cent. 

B.C.), 23 (?), 58, 66, 76, 143, 151, 

323, 567, 603, 720, 721, 722, 723, 

724, 728, 790, 792 
Antipater of Thessalonica (Ph, 

Augustan age), 3, 10, 26, 46, 59, 

72, 77, 82, 92, 93, 96, 112, 149, 

150, 186, 215, 231, 238, 241, 266, 

268, 269, 282, 297, 302, 305, 309, 



407, 408(?), 417, 418, 420, 421, 

428, 517, 541, 550, 552, 557, 706, 

752 (?) 
Antiphanes of Macedonia (Ph, 

Augustan age), 81, 245, 256, 258, 

409 
Antiphilus of Byzantium (Ph, 1st 

cent. A.D.), 13B, 14, 29, 34, 35, 71, 

73, 86, 156, 178, 192, 222, 242, 

263, 277, 294, 298, 306, 310, 404, 

413, 415, 546, 549, 551 
Autonius of Argos (Ph), 102 
Anyte (M, 4th cent. B.C.), 144, 313 

314, 745 
Apollonides (Ph. 1st cent. A.D.), 228, 

243, 244, 257, 264 (?), 265, 271, 

280, 281, 287, 296, 408 (?), 422, 

791 
Arabius Scholasticus (Ag) 667 
Archias of Mytilene (Ph ?, date un- 
known), 19, 111. 339, 343 (?), 

750 (?) 
Archias of Antioch (Ph, 1st cent. 

B.C.), 27 (?), 64 (?), 91, 343 (?), 

750 (?) 
Artemidorus, the grammarian (3rd 

cent. B.C.), 205 
Asclepiades (M, 3rd cent. B.C.), 63, 

64 (?), 752 
Athenaeus, writer of epigrams (date 

uncertain), 496 



454 



INDEX OF AUTHORS 



Bassus, Lollius (Ph), 30 (?), 53 (?) 

236 279 289 
Bianor (Ph), 223, 227, 259, 272, 273, 

278, 295, 308, 423, 548 
Boethus, elegiac poet (Ph), 248 

Callimachus (M, 3rd cent. B.C.), 

336, 507, 565, 566 
Carphyllides or Carpyllides (M), 52 
Claudianus (Byzantine poet), 139, 

140, 753, 754 
Cometas Chartularius (Ag), 586, 

597 
Crates, the Cynic philosopher (4th 

cent. B.C.), 497 
Crinagoras (Ph, Augustan age), 81, 

224, 234, 235, 239, 276, 283, 284, 

291, 419, 429, 430, 439, 513, 516, 

542, 545, 555, 559, 560, 562 
Cyllenius (date unknown), 4, 33 
Cyrillus (date unknown), 369 
Cyrus (Ag), 136, 623, 808, 809 

Damocharis Grammaticus (Ag), 633 

Damostratus (M), 328 

Demetrius of Bithynia (2nd cent. 

B.o. ?), 730 
Diodes, Julius (Ph), 109 
Diodorus of Sardis (Ph, 1st cent. 

A.D.), 60, 219, 405, 776 
Dioscorides (M, 2nd cent. B.C.), 340, 

568, 734 
Diotimus of Miletus (M), 391 
Duris of Elaea (4th cent. b.o. ?), 

424 

Empedocles, 569 

Epigonus of Thessalonica (Ph), 261 
Eratosthenes Scholasticus (Ag), 444 
Erycius (Ph, 1st cent. B.C.), 233, 

237, 558, 824 
Eupithius of Athens (3rd cent. 

A.D. ?), 206 
Eutolmius Illustrius (Ag). 587 
Evenus of Ascalon (Ph), 62, 75, 

122(?), 251, 602(?), 717, 718 

Flaccus, see Statylllus 

Geininue (Ph), 288, 414, 707, 740 
Germanicus Caesar, 17, 18, 387 (?) 



Glaucus of Nicopolis (Ph ?), 341 
Glaucus of Athens (date unknown), 

774 
Hadrian, 137, 387 (?), 402 
Heliodorus, author of the Ethiopica, 

485, 490 
Hermocreon (M), 327 
Honestus of Corinth (Ph), 216, 225, 

230, 250, 292 

Isidorus of Aegae (Ph), 11 (?), 94 

Joannes Barbucallus (Ag), 425, 426, 

427, 628 (?) 
Julian, the emperor, 365, 368 
Julianus, Prefect of Egypt (Ag), 
398, 445, 446, 447, 481 (?), 652, 
654, 661, 738, 739, 763, 793-798 

Leon, the philosopher (Byzantine), 

200, 201, 202, 203(?), 214, 361, 

578, 579 
Leonidas of Tarentum (M, 3rd cent, 

B.C.), 24, 25, 99, 107, 316, 318, 

320, 322, 326, 329, 335, 337, 563. 

719, 744 
Leonidas of Alexandria (1st cent. 

A.D.), 12, 42. 78, 79, 80, 106, 123, 

179, 344-356 
Leontius Scholasticus (Ag), 614, 

624, 630, 650, 681 
Lucian, 120, 367 
Lucilhis (1st cent. A.D.), 55 (?), 572 

Macedonius Consul (Ag), 625, 645, 

648, 6491 
Maecius, Quintus (Ph), 249, 403, 411 
Marcus Argentarius (Ph). 87, 161, 

221, 229, 246, 270, 286, 554, 732 
Marcus the younger (Ph), 28 (?) 
Marianus Scholasticus (Ag), 626, 

627, 657, 668, 669 
Marinus of Neapolis (5th cent. A.D.), 

196, 197 
Meleager (1st cent. B.C.), 16, 331, 

363, 453 
Menecrates of Smyrna, or Samos 

(M), 54, 55 (?), 390 
Metrodorus (date uncertain), 360, 

712 
Mimnermus (7th cent. B.C.), 50 



ι No. 275, a poem from the Wreath of Phllippus, cannot be by Mace- 
donius, and the name is corrupt. 



455 



INDEX OF AUTHORS 



Mnasalcas (M, 4th cent. B.C.), 70, 

324, 333 
Moschus of Syracuse (3rd cent. B.C.), 

440 
Mundus Munatius (Ph), 103 
Mucius, see Scaevola 
Musicius (probably corrupt — the 

epigram is elsewhere attributed 

to Plato), 39 

Nestor of Laranda (2nd cent. A.D.), 

129, 304, 537 (?) 
Nicarchus (M), 330, 576 
Nicias (M, 3rd cent. B.C.), 315, 564 
Nicodemus (date unknown), 53 (?) 
Xossis (M, 3rd cent. B.C.), 332, 604, 

605 

Oenomaus (date unknown), 749 

Palladas of Alexandria (Ag, 5th 
cent. A.D.), 5, 6, 119, 165-176, 
180-183, 377-379, 393-395, 397, 
400, 401, 441, 484, 486, 487, 489, 
501. 502, 503, 508, 528, 773 

Pamphilus (M), 57 

Parmenion of Macedonia (Ph), 27(?), 
43, 69, 113, 114,304, 342 

Paulus Silentiarius (Ag, 6th cent. 
A.D.), 396, 443, 620, 651, 658, 663, 
664, 764, 765, 770, 782 

Perses (M, circ. 300 K.C.), 334 

Philemon, the comic poet (4th cent. 
B.C.), 450 

Philippus of Thessalonica (2nd cent. 
A.D. ?), 11 (?), 22, 56, 83, 85, 88, 
89, 232. 240, 247, 253, 254, 255, 
262, 264(?), 267, 274, 285, 290, 
293, 299, 307, 311, 416, 438, 543, 
553, 561, 575, 708, 709, 742, 777, 
778 

Philodemus, the Epicurean (Ph, 1st 
cent. B.C.), 412, 570 

Pliilostorgius (Christian writer), 
193 194 

Philoxenus (M), 319 



Phocas Diaconus, 772 

Photius, the Patriarch (9th cont. 

A.D.), 203 (?) 
Plato (M, 4th cent. B.C.), 3 (?), 

44(?), 51, 506, 747,823,826 
Plato Comicus, 359 (?) 
Plato Junior (date unknown), 13, 

748, 751 
Polemon, King of Pontus (1st cent. 

B.C.), 746 
Polyaenus, Julius, of Sardis (Ph, 

1st cent. B.C.), I, 7, 8, 9 
Pompeius (Ph), 28 (?) 
Posidippus (M, 3rd cent. B.C.), 

359 (?) 
Ptolemaeus (uncertain which), 577 

Sabinus, Tullius (Ph), 410 
Scaevola, Mucius (Ph), 217 
Sectindus of Tarentum (Ph), 36, 

260, 301 
Simonides (M, 5th cent. B.C.), 700, 

757, 758 
Sophronius, Patriarch of Jerusalem 

(7th cent. A.D.), 787 
Statyllius Flaccus (Ph), 37', 43, 45, 

98, 117 
Stephanus Grammaticus, 385 

Tliallus of Miletus (Ph), 220 
Theaetetus Scholasticus (Ag), 659 
Theocritus, 338, 432-437, 598, 599, 

600 
Theodoridas (M, 3rd cent. B.C.), 743 
Theon of Alexandria (5th cent. A.D.) 

41, 491 
Tiberius Illustrius (Ag ?), 2, 370 
Tryphon (date unknown), 488 

Zelotus (date unknown), 30 (?), 31 
Zenobius Grammaiicus, 711 
Zonas (Diodorus) of Sardis (Ph, 

1st cent. B.C.), 226, 312, 556 
Zosimus of Thasos (date unknown), 

40 



1 Statyllius should be restored for the Tullius of the MS. 



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