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Full text of "The Guide post"

Title: The Guide post, v. 1 7 

Place of Publication: Bellefonte, Pa. 

Copyright Date: 1940 

Master Negative Storage Number: MNS# PSt SNPaAg019.4 



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JANUARY 



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PENNSYLVANIA COOPERATIVE 
POTATO GROWERS ASSOCIATION 

INCORPORATED 




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Dr. Nixon Comments On 



CLETRAC MODEL H is the 
only agricultural crawler trac- 
tor in a price range comparable 
with a rubber-tired wheel trac- 
tor. Three widths— 31", 42" and 
68" — make this tractor adap- 
table for all row crop as well as 
for general farming. With 
"High Clearance" and mount- 
ed-on equipment Cletrac Model 
H can be used for fitting the 
soil, planting, cultivating, and 
harvesting. 

Whether it is in mud, muck, 
snow or on steep hills, here's a 
tractor that is a class by itself 
with traction for all farm con- 
ditions. 



THE GENERAL is a tractor 
that's cheap to operate—easy to 
service— and at a price no more 
than that of 2 of 3 good work 
animals. 

It gives you everything you 
could want in a tractor on 9 out 
of 10 farms. You can plow from 
^ to 10 acres per day. You can 
cultivate from 10 to 25 acres per 
day. The General also has a 
power take-off for pickers and 
combines; you have 20 belt 
horse-power for silo fillers, 
small threshers, etc. It's a BIG 
tractor in everything but cost. 



CLETRAC TRACTORS 



14 to 95 h.p. 



GASOLINE OR DIESEL 



THF ri^EVEL AND TRACTOR COMPANY - Cleveland, Ohio 

Wdfe nlf e and^^^^ below and mail for complete in/o^--t^-^^^ 
S General : -: Check here .... if you want complete details of 
Model H also. I farm .... acres. 



The Eye is not the Market 



Mr. Fred W. Johnson wrote in March, 
1937, as follows: "I think most men will 
agree with me when I say that business 
today has become too taut, and tense 
and serious. Buying and selling pota- 
toes has never been anything more than 
a strictly business transaction with a 
dash of worry and the hope of a small 
profit, and little else. As I write this 
little message to my friends out on the 
farms in Pennsylvania, I am wondering 
whether we may not unconsciously have 
come upon something even more in- 
teresting, and helpful, than just a bet- 
ter method of marketing the annual po^ 
tato crop of this great Commonwealth. 

"I am wondering whether we may not 
be setting up a new type of business 
transaction, in which personal contact, 
pride of product, and friendly under- 
standing will replace some of the age 
old practice of concentrating exclusive- 
ly on quality and price as between sell- 
er and buyer." (The eye is the market? ) . 

"Certain it is that in the past year 
there have been some very remark- 
able changes. Pennsylvania potatoes no 
longer are just potatoes to the distribu- 
tor. Shipments are beginning to bring 
with them an acquaintanceship with the 
grower, something of his personality, 
and a clear understanding of his proJD- 
lems. It is still a business transaction, 
but with more of the warmth of human 
touch, which is just what all business 
needs today. 

"It has been my good fortune to at- 
tend all of the meetings of the Joint 
Conference Committee of the Associa- 
tion, and several of the annual conven- 
tions. Always my conviction has been 
strengthened that here, at last, is some- 
thing that will put a firmer foundation, 
and a fresh infusion of faith, into tho 
business affairs of men." 

Of course, this is said in a nice way, 
which is characteristic of Mr. Johnson. 
He anticipated over two years ago what 
has actually come to pass. Namely, that 
pleasure can be had in selling potatoes. 
Pennsylvania potato growers long since 
learned the down right pleasure that 
comes from producing a beautiful crop. 
I have only found a few wno really en- 
joyed disposing of this crop. What with 
bad checks, heckling over "price at the 
barn" — with or without the bags — 



or anxiously awaiting the "returns" on a 
load, oft times wondering if and how 
much would have to be sent to pay the 
freight — there is little wonder that dis- 
couragement almost overwhelmed many 
growers. I do not want to do business 
with a man if I get no pleasure out of 
transacting the deal, whether in the pur- 
chase of a hat or a pair of shoes or the 
sale of a car of potatoes. 

Well we find, in the last analysis, that 
acquaintanceship is a big factor in de- 
terminig whether there will be pleasure 
in the deal — in other words, confidence, 
straight shooters, equal footing. 

The man who can grow a good crop of 
potatoes is entitled to honor and respect. 
For, after all, farm products are created 
new wealth. The potato crop is "cre- 
ated" annually out of carbon, hydrogen, 
and oxygen, plus a dash of minerals. 
Nothing is left any worse off as a result 
of producing this crop. It could be a 
permanent source of wealth. Pennsyl- 
vania's natural resources were ages and 
ages in forming. Her forests are gone, 
her minerals are being exploited — con- 
verted into cash and called profit. Did 
it ever occur to you that if Pennsylvania 
imported all her oil, and gas, all her coal, 
and all her lumber, she would not be 
the "empire" she is today. 

In fact, Pennsylvania will be a deso- 
late waste if products of the soil are also 
exploited. You say when will this oc- 
cur? When is not so important. What is 
mankind's duty to mankind is more im- 
portant. 

A stream cannot rise above it's source. 
Neither can industry and agriculture 
rise above it's leadership. There is a job 
for every citizen of this Commonwealth 
if we are sincerely caring for the pre- 
sent and planning intelligently for the 
future. The men who attend the Joint 
Conference Committee meetings can 
testify to the fact that Pennsylvania po- 
tato growers are honored and respected 
by he representatives of the food distri- 
butors. Furthermore, the food distribu- 
tors are men quite similar to the rest 
of us, and are a pleasant crowd to con- 
fer with. Furthermore, that while buy- 
ing and selling potatoes is, and always 
will be, a business proposition, we have 
gone a long way through the Joint 
Conference and what it stands for, in 



*v- 



THE GUIDE POST 



January, 1940 



January, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



making the deal a pleasant one. You 
know as well as I that the members ot 
this conference would lose their right 
arm, so to speak, rather than betray the 
confidence, which has been built up in 
this short time. And the end is not yet! 

The worst mankind has to fear is de- 
feat and extermination; the best man- 
kind has to hope for is to become a step- 
ping stone on the road to higher things. 
One of these stones which has been 
firmly placed is confidence. Confidence 
that the pack will be right; (The only 
mistake here, when there is one, comes 
from lack of knowledge or mechanical 
factors, and not from the heart). Con- 
fidence that the price will be commen- 
surate with supply and demand as based 
on a standard of grade and quality. Con- 
fidence that the deal is honest; Confi- 
dence, that, when right, we will stand 
by it ,when wrong, we will help right it. 
The same careful thought is indispensa- 
ble whether for economical production, 
economical distribution, to the end that 
producer and consumer shall escape de- 
feat and extermination. 

It ought to be clear to anyone fa- 
miliar with the facts that the farm is no 
place to establish prices. On the farm 
surplus labor is converted into cash and 
called profit. Soil fertility is often sold 
and called profit. Almost everythmg 
that grows on the farm is surplus. I had 
several wagon loads of apples on the 
farm this year that was surplus. Even 
ten cents a bushel would have brought 
ten cents more a bushel than I got. How 
can a surplus commodity be sold at a 
a profit? How can any farm commodity 
be sold at a profit when it comes to the 
place of "Please buy. Mister." 

No, it looks like, as Mr. Johnson said, 
"we may be setting up a new type of 
business transaction, in which personal 
contact, pride of product, and friendly 
understanding, will replace some of the 
age old practices . . . that here at last is 
something that will put a firmer founda- 
tion and a fresh infusion of faith into 
the business affairs of men." 

At any rate — 

Tis a lesson you should heed. 

Try, try again; 

If at first you don't succeed. 

Try, try again; 

Then your courage should appear, 

For, if you will persevere. 

You will conquor, never fear; 

Try, try again. 



Once or twice though you should fail. 

Try, try again; 

If you would at last prevail. 

Try, try again; 

If we strive, 'tis no disgrace 

Though we do not win the race. 

What should you do in the case? 

Try, try again. 

If you find your task is hard, 

Try, try again; 

Time will bring you your reward. 

Try, try again. 

All that other folks can do. 

Why, with patience, should not you? 

Only keep this rule in view: 

Try, try again. 

Or said in another way: — 

If you think you're beaten, you are, 
If you think you dare not, you don't. 
If you'd like to win but you can't. 
It's almost a cinch that you won't; 
For out in the world you'll find, 
Success begins with a fellow's will — 
It's all in the state of mind. 

Full many a race is lost 
'Ere even a step is run, 
And many a coward has failed, 
'Ere even his work's begun. 
Think big and your deeds will grow 
Think small and you'll fall behind. 
Think you can and you will. 
It's all in the state of mind. 

If you think you're outclassed, you 

are 
You've got to think high to rise. 
You've got to be sure of yourself 
Before you can win a prize. 
Life's victories don't always go 
To the stronger or faster man. 
For soon or late the man who wins. 
Is the man who thinks he can — 
It's all in the state of mind. 



THINK AND ACT 



KNOWS GENTLEMEN 

"Mr. Jones," a man asked his tailor, 
"how is it you have not called on me for 
my account?" 

"Oh, I never ask a gentleman for 
money." 

"Indeed. How, then, do you get on if 
he doesn't pay?" 

"Why," replied the tailor, "after a 
certain time I conclude he is not a gen- 
tleman, and then I ask him." 

Montreal Star 



Timely Observations and Suggestions 

L. T. Denniston, Associati07i Field Representative 



FOUR STATEMENTS OF FACT: HOW 
WOULD YOU SOLVE THEM? 

(1) Thousands of Pennsylvania po- 
tato growers actually begging for sales 
yet 10,000,000 to 12,000,000 bushels of 
potatoes from other states or producing 
areas are sold in Pennsylvania markets 
annually. 

(2) Pennsylvania potatoes of equal 
or superior quality constantly quoted 
and sold in the so called market places 
under prices of potatoes from other 
states or producing areas. 

(3) Pennsylvania potatoes in the mar- 
kets in feed, fertilizer, and all other 
kinds of bags. 

(4) Growers for ever in competition 
with themselves, selling 5c per bushel 
or hundredweight less to make the sale, 
— worse even than this, believing the 
intinerant buyer who says, "I can get 
No. I. potatoes from John Jones for 95c 
per hundred," when actually the mar- 
ket is 95c per bushel. 

PENNSYLVANIA SEED POTA- 
TOES: While in Erie, Butler, Somerset, 
Cambria, and Potter County during the 
past two weeks I saw over 100,000 bush- 
els of good Pennsylvania grown seed in 
storage. All of this seed was in good 
storage and was keeping exceptionally 
well. There should be no reason why 
any Pennsylvania grown seed, worthy 
of the name "Good Seed" certified or 
otherwise, should not find a ready buy- 
er, provided the owner by some means 
lets a sufficient number of growers in 
the immediate territory or to the south 
of him know that it is available. An- 
nouncements in meetings, small news- 
paper ads in local papers, post cards to 
a well distributed mailing list and other 
means have proven very effective. This 
is salesmanship. 

Returning to my desk last week I had 
in my mail a copy of the Certified Seed 
Growers of the State from my good 
friend K. W. Lauer of the Bureau of 
Plant Industry. This list will give you the 
names of growers, their address, coun- 
ty, variety of seed grown, acres grown. 



and available supplies. Last year at the 
Farm Show we distributed a large num- 
ber of these bulletins to growers from 
the Booth of Potato Interests. We will 
be glad to make them available to grow- 
ers from the Association Booth this year 
if my friend Lauer will see that we have 
a supply. 

SHIPPING AND TRUCKING THE 
PENNSYLVANIA BLUE LABEL 
PACK INTO BORDER STATE MAR- 
KETS: I am asked a good many times 
why we are moving Pennsylvania Po- 
tatoes into border State markets such as, 
Cleveland, Akron, Youngstown and oth- 
er points in Ohio; Wheeling, Fairmont, 
Morgantown and Wellsburg, West Vir- 
ginia; Cumberland, Hagerstown and 
Baltimore, Maryland; etc. First of all, 
because these markets are asking for the 
Blue Label Pack. Second, because 
enough premium is paid to justify the 
longer haul. Third, movement into 
these more distant markets is generally 
from areas of concentrated production 
or where over supplies exist. By re- 
moving a few cars, distress stock, by rail 
or truck the local market can often be 
materially strengthened. 

This movement into border State 
markets, which is acquainting the buy- 
ers in these markets with Pennsylvania 
Quality Potatoes, will be more fully ap- 
preciated by Pennsylvania Growers 
when we hit a year of normal or over 
production. 

MARKETING DURING JANUARY, 
FEBRUARY, AND MARCH: Irrespec- 
tive of price or price outlook Pennsyl- 
vanai Growers, who have potatoes in 
storage will profit by moving potatoes 
freely through January, February, and 
March. Let us look at all sides of the 
picture. Factors for consideration are: 
increased shrinkage, sprouting, spring 
work getting under way, early potatoes 
on the market from the Southern States, 
and old stock from the Northern States 
taking preference on the markets due to 
superior market condition. Growers 
with good storage can take exception 

{Continued on page 18) 



THE GUIDE POST 



January, 1940 



January, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



THE GUIDE POST 

Published monthly by the Pennsylvania 
Cooperative Potato Growers, Inc. - 



OFFICERS 

P. Daniel Frantz, Coplay President 

J. A. Donaldson, Emlenton, Vice-Pres. 

E. B. Bower, Bellefonte, 

Sec'y-Treas. and Gen. Mgr. 



DIRECTORS 

Jacob K. Mast Elverson, Chester 

P. Daniel Frantz Coplay, Lehigh 

L. O. Thompson. . .New Freedom, York 

John B. Schrack Loganton, Clinton 

Roy R. Hess Stillwater, Columbia 

Ed. Fisher Coudersport, Potter 

J. C. McClurg Geneva, Crawford 

J. A. Donaldson, R.l, Emlenton, Venango 

Evan D. Lewis 

R. 5, Johnstown, Cambria 

Annual membership fee $1.00. This in- 
cludes the Guide Post. 

All communications should be ad- 
dressed to E. B. Bower, Secretary-Treas- 
urer and General Manager, Bellefonte, 
Pennsylvania. 



1940 

We all have an equal partnership 
with time. Let us, in the New Year, do 
our portion toward making the partner- 
ship successful. 

Let us maintain an open mind, but 
not so open that convictions go out as 
fast as they come in. 



The annual meeting of the 
members of the Pennsylvania Co- 
operative Potato Growers' Associ- 
ation, Incorporated will be held in 
Room F, Farm Show Building, 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania on 
Tuesday Morning, January 16, 
1940 at 9:00 o'clock. 

All Association members are 
urgently requseted to be present. 

E. B. BOWER, Secretary. 



TAKING INVENTORY 

In this month of January most of us, 
by fixed habit, take an inventory of 
stock in hand, strike a balance between 
Assets and Liabilities, and call the dif- 
ference Net Worth. 

The Net Worth of the individual, in 
terms of today, is recorded by the serv- 
ice he is rendering to the human beings 
about him. 

A thousand years ago a man's idea of 
upright life was the saving of his own 
soul, and the farther from his kind he 
went, the farther from normal human 
activities he removed himself, and the 
more cussedly worthless he made 
himself, the more he was looked up to. 

But even in that day there were men 
impelled by the Divinely human instinct 
to do things — and who left implanted in 
those with whom they came in contact, 
the thought of a more lasting good than 
things of the flesh. 

These were the men who carried on 
the race. Today's ideal of usefulness as 
a standard of human efficiency is the 
result of evolution — the survival of 
those who have held the fittest ideals. 

So the man who takes inventory of 
his character resources in the year of 
grace 1940 will reckon his Net Worth in 
terms of his value — not to his own self- 
ishness, not to the selfish saving of his 
soul — but the value of his activities to 
his fellow-citizens. 

He will say to himself: "Am 1 living 
the life of a healthy animal to give my 
nervous system suffient staying power? 
Am I getting up enough steam in the 
boiler to deliver power at the draw- 
head? 

"Do I look upon my work as an oppor- 
tunity to express myself in terms of pro- 
ductiveness, or as a means of keeping 
me and my family out of the poor house? 
Is it merely the spoon wherewith I feed 
myself, or is it a trowel used in building 
my character into the great House of 
Humanity? Will those who come after 
me work better, more happily and effi- 
ciently through ways I have discovered? 
Will my task hereafter be held in higher 
respect because I did it nobly?" 

"Do I 'fill the unforgiving minute with 
sixty seconds worth of distance run?' 
Am I giving humanity 'Value Received' 
for all it has given me, by direct inheri- 
tance in health, intellect and capacity, 

(Continued on page 8) 



POTATO CHIPS 



Farm Show time again, and as usual, 
the potato industry will take a foremost 
part as one of the principal agricultural 
enterprises of one of the largest agricul- 
tural states at the world's largest indoor 
exposition. Because it has been an off- 
year for Pennsylvania potato produce 
tion, should not appreciably alter the 
quality of and interest in the exhibits 
and meetings arranged oy Pennsylvania 
growers. 

O 

A new record in hunting licenses was 
made in the State during the past deer 
season when 175,000 sportsmen laid 
down enough of the filthy green for a 
chance to shoot or to be shot at. Coud- 
ersport, in the heart of Potter County, 
famous for deer as well as for spuds, 
was actually overrun with hunters. 
Additional lodgings could not be found 
within 25 miles of the town. Many 
potato growers were successful in secur- 
ing their raw meat on the hoof but 
others returned home with nothing but 
the experience. 

There may be others who did just as 
well, but at least, we know of three 
Pennsylvania growers who during re- 
cent weeks have shipped Blue Labels of 
exceptionally high quality. The grow- 
ers who rate this month's honorable 
mention are R. W. Lohr, of Boswell, 
Evon Abraczinskas, of Catawissa, and 
Jacob Mast, of Elverson. 

The following editorial from a leading 
Pennsylvania newspaper has nothing to 
do with spuds, but is of interest to all 
who love the Keystone State: "Penn- 
sylvania's government, which is spend- 
ing oodles each year to attract tourists, 
persists in defeating this effort by splat- 
tering its own billboards all over the 
Commonwealth. It's latest offense is to 
promote it's sponsored Job Program by 
using billboards. It has done the same 
thing in this and earlier advertisements 
to "promote" safety and emphasize 
health precautions. 'The best experts on 
highway safety agree that the billboard 
is safety's worst enemy. Instead of en- 
couraging drivers to keep their eyes on 
the highways, these billboard sponsors 
seek to divert the motorist's attention. 
This is not the billboard's only offense. 
It spoils scenery for which motorists in 



this and other states go miles to see and 
it disfigures countryside and mountain. 
Government should be the very last to 
be engaged in such an enterprise, no 
matter how admirable it's particular 
cause may be." 

O 

'Tis said there are many lots of po- 
tatoes in Pennsylvania cities being 
tagged "Unclassified" since the State 
enforcement men have been active. 
Many of these are out-of-state spuds 
too, since the present interpretation of 
the Marking Law puts the responsibility 
on the dealers who offer for sale or sell 
potatoes improperly marked. 

And speaking of quality reminds me 
that in all my days I never recall a sea- 
son when the market quality (including 
small size) was as bad as the 1939 crop, 
over the entire Eastern United States. 
It's my belief that the price level would 
be considerably higher right now if it 
were not for the large volume of off- 
grades and Size B tubers which have 
flooded principal markets since harvest. 

O 

Regardless of whether you are figur- 
ing the market value of tobacco, pota- 
toes, eggs, pumpkins, cocoanuts or 
"what have you" there are two sets of 
factors which determine this value, 
neither of which can be denied or laugh- 
ed off with a jest — appearance and 
utility. To the grower who says appear- 
ance is not a factor of value because you 
can't eat it, the wholesalers, retailers 
and consumers in no uncertain terms 
proclaim through decreased purchasing 
prices, "Says you!" 

Few of us realize how rapidly the 
Green Mountain has taken hold in East- 
ern Pennsylvania in recent years, par- 
ticularly in Lancaster and Chester 
Counties. Last season's crop was not of 
high quality because late rains caused 
the tubers to be rough in texture and 
irregular in shape. However, the 
Mountains have generally yielded large 
crops of good quality and have done 
much to establish Eastern Pennsylvania 
as a section capable of producing qual- 
ity spuds. 

(Continued on page 22) 



'.''1^87 



ml-* 



8 



THE GUIDE POST 



January, 1940 



January, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



9 



TAKING INVENTORY 

(Continued from page 6) 

by racial inheritance in education, en- 
vironment and opportunity?" 

All of our wealthy heritage of finely 
organized body and keenly intelligent 
mind, of opportunity in a highly-organ- 
ized society with its millions of chan- 
nels, leading to success — we must count 
as Liabilities until we have converted 
them into Assets. 



A LITTLE MORE AND A 
LITTLE LESS 

A little more deed and a little less creed, 
A little more giving and a little less 

greed; 
A little more bearing other people's 

load. 
A little more Godspeed's on the dusty 

road; 
A little more rose and a little less thorn, 
To sweeten the air for the sick and 

forlorn; 
A little more song and a little less glum, 
And coins of gold for the uplift of the 

slum; 
A little less kicking the man that is 

down, 
A little more smile and a little less 

frown; 
A little more Golden Rule in marts of 

trade, 
A little more sunshine and a little less 

shade; 
A little more respect for fathers and 

mothers, 
A little less stepping on the toes of 

others; 
A little less knocking and a little more 

cheer, 
For the struggling hero that's left in the 

rear; 
A little more love and a little less hate, 
A little more of neighborly chat at the 

gate; 
A li-ttle more of the helping hand by you 

and me, 
A little less of this graveyard sentimen- 
tality; 
A little more of flowers in the pathway 

of life. 
A little less on coffins at the end of the 

strife. 




KING SPUD 

"We praise all the flowers in fancy. 

Sip the nectar of fruit 'ere they're 
peeled 
Ignoring the common old 'tater 

When, in fact, he's the King in the 
field. 

Let us show the old boy we esteem him. 

Sort of dig him up out of the mud: 
Let's show him he shares our affection. 

And crown him with glory — "King 
Spud!" 



A JUMP AHEAD 



A dollar pays membership in the 
Association, and also brings you month- 
ly the GUIDE POST. 



A candidate for the police force was 
being verbally examined. 

"If you were by yourself in a police 
car and were pursued by a desperate 
gang of criminals in another car doing 
40 miles an hour along a lonely road, 
what would you do?" 

The candidate looked puzzled for a 
moment. Then he replied, "Fifty." 

L. & N. Magazine 
See us at the Farm Show. 



THE MARKET OUTLOOK 



by the Observer 



In the November issue of the Guide 
Post the "Outlook" reported "condi- 
tions indicate a steady market until late 
in the winter when prices may advance 
slowly." As of late December, the mar- 
ket has advanced during the past two 
months little, if any, on hundreds, and 
only a cent or two on paper pecks. 

How do conditions shape up for the 
next several months, when the market- 
ing of Pennsylvania potatoes will be 
heavier? A few healthier factors are 
entering the picture not readily ap- 
parent two months ago, although con- 
tinued unseasonable warm weather and 
an oversupply of off-grade supplies may 
still have a depressing effect. 

Carlot shipments, track holdings in 
principal cities, and stocks in city deal- 
er's hands, have all been light during 
the present marketing season. Buyers 
have bought on a hand-to-mouth basis, 
a truck load or two at a time, rather 
than many carloads. The extremely 
mild and open winter from coast to 
coast has made conditions ideal for this 
system of purchase. This slow demand 
has been further augmented by a U. S. 
market which, for size, and market 
quality is reported to be "worse than 
in years." Market sales indicate this 
poor quality in a greater than normal 
spread between lowest and highest quo- 
tations. A difference of as much as 80c 
to 90c a hundred between fair quality 
*'Unclassifieds" and best U.S. No. 1 stock, 
as has been common at Philadelphia and 
Pittsburgh this season, is greater than 
usual. In other words, high quality 
packs are scarce and becoming more 
scarce, while there continues to be a 
plentiful supply of inferior packs. 

The final government report dropped 
the 1939 crop of the 30 late states a mil- 
lion bushels from the November report 
to 297 million bushels, only half a mil- 
lion greater than the 1938 crop. When 
one considers that the market is 25c a 
hundredweight higher now than a year 
ago, even with a crop slightly larger, 
it is apparent that there is considerable 
underlying strength in the present mar- 
ket. With increased purchasing power, 
most commodity prices have been ad- 
vancing except food stuffs. It is prob- 
able that prices of foods, including po- 
tatoes, will also strengthen durmg the 
coming months. A nation-wide cold 



wave of any appreciable duration would 
not only curtail truck shipments to 
strengthen the demand, but would also 
increase consumer demand. 

Growers in all producing sections of 
the nation continue to hold for higher 
prices than most dealers can pay and 
turn the stocks at a profit. As already 
mentioned, high quality tubers seem to 
be scarce, and therefore, should warrant 
holding for higher prices although 
stocks of poor quality will not only show 
greater shrinkage, but can be expected 
to advance less sharply on the strength- 
ening market. 

Therefore, in summary, a rising pota- 
to market seems more predictable than 
a month or two ago, particularly if cold- 
er weather develops and particularly for 
well graded stock of high quality. 



Fred Bateman, Conducts 

Experiments in South 

Many Pennsylvania potato growers, 
who plan to travel South this winter to 
visit the various potato districts there, 
will be interested in observing some of 
the experiments which Fred H. Bate- 
man, of York, Pennsylvania, is conduct- 
ing there, in potato culture. 

Mr. Bateman is now located at Home- 
stead, Florida, where he is constantly 
in contact with potato growers from all 
parts of the country. 

He writes us that he is looking for- 
ward to visits from his fellow Pennsyl- 
vanians, all of whom know him well for 
his work in this State direct with grow- 
ers and his adaption of his Iron Age 
machinery for use on Pennsylvania 
farms. 



Visitor — "Why does the whistle blow 
for a fire?" 

Got— "It doesn't blow for the fire; 
it blows for the water. It already has 
the fire." 

U. S. S. Reina Mercedes Gallion 

O 

Patronize your advertisers. 



10 



THE GUIDE POST 



January, 1940 



The Old Eagle Tree 



In a distant field, stood a large tulip 
tree, apparently of a century's growth, 
and one of the most gigantic. It looked 
like the father of the surrounding for- 
est. A single tree of huge dimensions, 
standing all alone, is a sublime object. 

Ot the top of this tree, an old eagle, 
commonly called the "Fishing Eagle," 
had built her nest every year, for many 
years, and, undisturbed, had raised her 
young. A remarkable place to choose, 
as she procured her food from the ocean, 
and this tree stood full ten miles from 
the seashore. It had long been known 
as the "Old Eagle Tree." 

On a warm sunny day, the workmen 
were hoeing corn in an adjoining field. 
At a certain hour of the day, the old 
eagle was known to set off for the sea- 
side, to gather food for her young. As 
she this day returned with a large fish in 
her claws, the workmen surrounded 
the tree, and, by yelling and hooting, 
and throwing stones, so scared the poor 
bird that she dropped her fish, and they 
carried it off in triumph. 

The men soon dispersed, but Joseph 
sat down under a bush near by, to watch, 
and to bestow unavailing pity. The bird 
soon returned to her nest, without food. 
The eaglets at once set up a cry for 
food, so shrill, so clear, and so clamorous 
that the boy was greatly moved. 

The parent bird seemed to try to 
soothe them; but their appetites were 
too keen, and it was all in vain. She 
then perched herself on a limb near 
them, and looked down into the nest in 
a manner that seemed to say, "I know 
not what to do next." 

Her indecision was but momentary; 
again, she poised herself, uttered one or 
two sharp notes, as if telling them to 
"lie still," balanced her body, spread her 
wings, and was away again for the sea. 

Joseph was determined to see the re- 
sult. His eye followed her 'till she grew 
small, smaller, a mere speck in the sky, 
and then disappeared. What boy has 
not thus watched the flight of the bird 
of his country! 

She was gone nearly two hours, about 
double her usual time for a voyage, 
when she again returned, on a slow, 
weary wing, flying uncommonly low, in 
order to have a heavier atmosphere to 
sustain her, with another fish in her 
talons. 



On nearing the field, she made a cir- 
cuit round it, to see if her enemies were 
again there. Ending the coast clear, she 
once more reached the tree, drooping, 
faint, and weary, and evidently nearly 
exhausted. Again the eaglets set up 
their cry, which was soon hushed by the 
distribution of a dinner, such as, save 
the cooking, a king might admire. 

"Glorious bird," cried the boy, "what 
a spirit! Other birds can fly more swift- 
ly, others can sing more sweetly, others 
scream more loudly; but what other 
bird, when persecuted and robbed, when 
weary, when discouraged, when so far 
from the sea, would do this? 

"Glorious bird! I will learn a lesson 
from thee today. I will never forget, 
hereafter, that when the spirit is de- 
termined it can do almost anything. 
Others would have dropped, and hung 
the head, and mourned over the cruelty 
of man, and sighed over the wants of the 
nestlings; but thou, by at once recover- 
ing the loss, hast forgotten all. 

"I will learn of thee, noble bird! I 
will remember this. I will set my mark 
high. I will try to do something, and to 
be something in the world; I will never 
yield to discouragements." 



Every life is its own excuse for being, 
and to deny or refute the untrue things 
that are said of you is an error of judg- 
ment. All wrong recoils upon the doer, 
and the man who makes wrong state- 
ments about others is himself to be 
pitied, not the man he vilifies. It is 
better to be lied about than to lie. At 
the last no one can harm us but our- 
selves. 



He 



s> 



No man lives without jostling and 
being jostled; in all ways he has to elbow 
himself through the world, giving and 
receiving offense. 

— Carlyle 



A FOUR SIDED FIGURE 

Wife: "You know, I suspect that my 
husband has a love affair with his sten- 
ographer." 

Maid: "Oh! I donH believe it. You 
are only saying that to make me jeal- 



ous. 



>> 



L. & N. Magazine. 



January, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



11 



OVER THE PICKING TABLE 



by Inspector Throwout 



Befo^^^ t^^ same wind two ships pass, 
one going one way, and one the other. 
You cannot control the winds, but you 
can control the rudder, and it is the rud- 
der that counts. 

4i « « 

An elderly pair were making their 
first visit to a New York playhouse. 

"Well, Sarah," remarked the old gen- 
tleman, at the conclusion of the first act, 
"don't you think we'd better be a- 
leavin?" 

"Why, no, Hiram! The show ain't half 
over yet." 

"Well, it says on this here program 
that three days elapse between the first 
and second acts, and I'm darned if I want 
to set here that long." 

♦ « 4( 

Figure it out — and see 

If twelve persons were to agree to 
dine together every day, but never sit 
exactly in the same order around the 
table, it would take them 13,000,000 
years at the rate of one dinner a day, and 
they would have to eat more than 379,- 
000,000 dinners before they could get 
through all the possible arrangemnts 
in which they could place themselves. 

• • • 

"Mary," said the head of the house one 
morning,"! called Jimmy four times and 
he didn't answer, so I turned down the 
covers on his bed and gave him a good 
spanking." 

"Oh, John, how could you? That 
means I'll be hunting for a new cook!" 

"How's that?" 

"Jimmy stayed all night at Smith's 
and the cook slept in his bed last night." 

Hi * * 

"Now, professor, you have heard my 
daughter sing; tell me what I ought to 
do with her?" 

"Sir, if I told you what you ought to 
do with her the law would hold me as 
an accessory." 

>:! >:< >:« 

Marks— "Why do you allow your wife 
to run up such big bills?" 

Parks — "Because I'd sooner have 
trouble with my creditors than with her 
—that's why." 



Put away $1.37 each day with com- 
pound interest and in 50 years you will 
have $145,000.00 



>!t 



3!t 



Winks (sitting in a game of poker) — 
"If I win tonight I'm going to buy my 
wife the latest fad in furniture." 

Blinks— "What is that?" 

Winks — "A tango dresser." 

Blinks— "What is it like?" 

Winks — "All legs and no drawers." 



« « 



A few conquer by fighting but it is 
well to remember that more battles are 
won by submitting. 



<( 



sH 



* 



Dont' kick — 

When you get a bad shave or haircut. 
Neither lasts long. 

When you have a bad meal set before 
you. You may get over it before the next 
meal, even if you eat it, and you don't 
have to eat it. 

When you find you're going to die 
poor. They haven't begun making pock- 
ets in shrouds yet. 

When your health goes back on you. 
Life isn't very long anyway, and a 
healthy man dies just as dead as a sick 
one. 

When you discover a mean streak in 
your neighbor. He has to stay with that 
mean streak day and night, and you 
don't. 

When you can't pay all your debts at 
once. Y'our creditors would a great deal 
rather get the money in driblets than 
not at all. 

When your wife isn't in a good humor. 
She is partially balancing the books 
against some of your numerous disa- 
greeable spells that you never make 
note of. 

When you are caught by a swindler. 
It is merely proof that you need some 
information and wisdom that he was 
willing and able to sell you at his own 
price. 

When you find that you can't have 
everything your own way. If you were 
to get all you think you want you'd 
find you wanted just that much more. 

(Continued on page 22) 



r 



12 



THE GUIDE POST 



January, 1940 



The Fight Against the Potato 



What would we do without the 
potato? None is so poor that he cannot 
afford to eat it. None is so rich that he 
can afford to distain it. If all the potato 
plants of Europe should suddenly per- 
ish and prove irreplaceable, a large 
part of the population would have to 
starve or emigrate. 

Yet, the people fought the potato as 
though it were the plague when it was 
first introduced into Europe. They were 
used to the plague and regarded it as 
proper punishment for their sins, but 
the potato, coming from the wild west 
of America, was new, and therefore to 
be feared. 

Sir Francis Drake is supposed to have 
brought the potato to England in 1586, 
having perhaps taken the tubers in the 
course of one of his privateering cruises, 
from some Spanish vessel, together with 
other less valuable booty, such as gold 
and gems. Anyhow, he is credited with 
it by the Germans, who erected a monu- 
ment in his honor at Offenburg in 1845, 
and struck off a memorandum for the 
British admiral as the savior of Ger- 
many in 1916, when a big potato crop 
enabled them to hold out another year. 

But such honors always come by slow 
freight. It took people a hundred years 
or more to learn that potatoes were good 
for them to eat. In the eighteenth cen- 
tury they fed them to their pigs and 
cattle, which, not having the prejudices 
of rational men, took them readily. The 
Germans then fed their prisoners of 
war on potatoes, and it happened that 
one of the men was a French chemist, 
Parmentier, who, having been captured 
in 1758, was held a prisoner in Hanover 
for five years and had to live largely on 
potatoes. One would have thought he 
would have acquired a distaste for them, 
but, on the contrary, when he was re- 
leased, he urged his countrymen to 
cultivate the potato as a vegetable thai 
"in Times of Necessity can be substi- 
tuted for Ordinary Food." But the 
French, even though starving, would not 
eat potatoes, until finally Parmentier 
persuaded the king and queen to taste 
some and wear a bouquet of the blos- 
soms. The people, seeing that the king 
and queen were not poisoned, consented 
to sample them for themselves. 

In 1728, an attempt was made to intro- 
duce potatoes into Scotland but they 



were denounced from the pupit on two 
contradictory counts: that they were 
not mentioned in the Bible, and so not 
fit food for Christians, and that they 
were forbidden fruit, the cause of 
Adam's fall. They were accused of 
causing leprosy and fever. 

In England the effort of the Royal 
Society to promote the cultivation of 
the potato was suspected to be a con- 
spiracy of capitalists to oppress the 
poor. The labor leader, William Cor- 
bett said, *'It has become of late the 
fashion to extol the virtues of potatoes 
as it has been to admire the writing of 
Milton and Shakespeare," and he de- 
clared the working-men ought not to 
be induced to live on such cattle food. 

When the British army was sent to 
fight in Flanders— not in 1914, but a 
hundred years before— they acquired 
two shocking habits: they learned to 
eat potatoes: The monks of Bruges 
had introduced potato cultivation by 
compelling their tenants to pay part of 
their dues in potatoes. The farmers, 
seeing that the monks throve on them 
began to save out some of the crop for 
their own use. 

In Germany, our own Benjamin 
Thompson, having become Count Rum- 
ford, in Bavaria, undertook to clean the 
beggars out of Munich. When he had 
rounded them up he had to feed them, 
and being a student of dietetics, he de- 
cided that potato soup was the cheapest 
and most nutritious food he could find. 
But he had to smuggle the potatoes into 
the kitchen secretly; otherwise he would 
have had a hunger strike in the poor- 
house. 

And so, thanks to the initiative of 
scientists, kings and monks, and to the 
involuntary assistance of pigs, prisoners, 
and paupers, the world got the inestim- 
able benefit of potatoes. 

I wonder what we are fighting today 
as wrong-headedly and vainly as pota- 
toes were fought by our forefathers? 

— taken from *'Chats on Science'' 
hy Edwin E. Slosson, Ph. D. 

— Contributed hy J, A. Donaldson, 



PLENTY OF POTASH 



Many potato growers will recall the critical shortage of 
potash salts brought about by the last war, when this coun- 
try was dependent upon importations which were sud- 
denly and completely terminated. The situation is now 
radically different. Potash supplies are adequate. Dur- 
ing the intervening years, discovery of potash deposits in 
this country has led to the development of a domestic 
industry capable of expansion to meet the requirements of 
American agriculture. 

Make sure that your 1940 potato fertilizers contain 
plenty of potash. Potatoes are greedy feeders on this plant 
food. They remove from the soil more potash than nitro- 
gen and phosphoric acid combined. For a good crop, soil 
and fertilizer must supply at least 200 lbs. of available 
potash (KoO) per acre. 

Ask your county agent or experiment station how much 
your soil will supply. Your fertilizer dealer or manufac- 
turer will tell you how little it will cost to make up the 
difference. 



Renew Your membership. 



Write us for free information and 
literature on the profitable fertiliza- 
tion of other crops. 




American Potash Institute, Ina 

Washington, D. C. 



Investment Building 



^MSPS^""^^ 






14 



THE GUIDE POST 



January, 1940 



State's High Yield for 1939 




^.4 



Above is shown a porlion of the Champion yield acre of potatoes grown by John J. 
Daniel, head farmer at the Hershey Industrial School, Hershey, Pennsylvania, in 
Dauphin County, and left to right, Mr. Daniel, Dauphin County Agent, A. S. Fro- 
mbeyer, and Henry Hitz. ^ , , j i. 

This acre produced 687.5 bushels of fine quality Green Mountains, as checked by 

Mr. Frommeyer. , , , , , .. x- 

This acre was planted double row, 6"x8"x30 , and was broadcasted at planting time 
with 600 pounds of 7 — 21 — 21 fertilizer. Three additional applications of 200 pounds 

each of 7 21 — 21 fertilizer were added during the growing seasons. 

It was sprayed weekly with 4 — 4 — 50 Bordeaux, and was irrigated after July 1st. 
This yield is outstanding — not only for this year in Pennsylvania, but is proof of 
what CAN be done in potato culture. 



BUY A RUBBER SPOOL GRADER THAT 
CLEANS POTATOES AS IT GRADES . . . 

The Bean Rubber Spool Grader is the Rubber Spool Grader that cleans 
while it grades. The rubber spools or spines on the grading spools do a good 
job of cleaning your potatoes. At the same time these spines add much to 
the sizing accuracy when compared to smooth spools. There is no substitute 
for the accuracy, cleaning and gentle handling of potatoes of the Bean Rub- 
ber Spool Grader. 




The Bean Rubber Spool combined Grader and Cleaner is made in 

ihree sizes 

1. No. 102 Hand— 100 to 150 bu. per hour. 

2. No. 103 Intermediate— 150 to 250 bu. per hour. 

3. No. 203 Warehouse — 400 to 500 bu. per hour. 
One of the above models will meet any requirement. 

ELEVATORS, SORTING TABLES, BAGGERS 
Bean offers a complete line of wood roller elevators, rubber roll clean- 
ing elevalors, various lengths and widths of wood roller, ^^^ber roller or 
rubber belt sorting tables and regular 2 or 4 bag baggers or 15 and 60 pound 
paper baggers. 

PENNSYLVANIA GROWERS APPROVE THE 

BEAN RUBBER SPOOL POTATO GRADER 

Because of the speed and accuracy and gentle handling of potatoes 

over the Bean Rubber Spool Grader the growers of Pennsylvania accept 

till Ihl final word in potato grading for accurate clean packages of pota- 

toes that sell. 

ASK FOR 1939 POTATO GRADER CATALOG NO. GP. 

John Bean Mfg. Co. 



Division Food Machinery Corporation 



LANSING 



MICHIGAN 



V 



16 



THE GUIDE POST 



January, 1940 



PROGRAM 



Twenty-third Annual Meeting 



of the 



Pennsylvania Cooperative Potato Growers' 
Association, Incorporated 

(Room F, Farm Show Building) 



HARRISBURG, PENNSYLVANIA 
JANUARY, 15-19, 1940 



Tuesday Morning, January 16, 1940. 

9:00 A.M. Annual Meeting of the membership of the Association. 
Room F, Farm Show Building. 

Tuesday Afternoon, January 16, 1940. 

Room F, Farm Show Building. 

1:30 P.M. President's Address — Accomplishments of the Associ- 
ation— P. Daniel Frantz. 

a. Projecting the Future — J. A. Donaldson, Vice- 
President. 

b. Round Table Discussion on Potato Equipment. — 
Prof. R. U. Blasingame, Head, Department of Agri- 
cultural Engineering, The Pennsylvania State 
College. 

Tuesday Evening, January 16, 1940. 

Farm Show Building Cafeteria. 

6:30 P.M. Potato Growers' Banquet. 

Toastmaster, Miles Horst, Field Editor, the Pennsyl- 
vania Farmer, Palmyra, Penna. 

a. Fun and Frivolity 

b. Presentation of Medals of Award and Certificates 
of Merit. 

c. Presentation of 400-Bushel Club Medals. 

d. Address — Hon. Robert R. Lewis, President Judge, 
55th Judicial District, Coudersport, Penna. 



January, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



17 



Wednesday Morning, January 17, 1940. 

Room F, Farm Show Building. 

9:30 A.M. Marketing. 

Discussion Leader, L. Wayne Arny, James G. Lamb 
Company, Advertising, Philadelphia, Penna. 

a. C. F. H. Wuesthoff, Vocational Agricultural Super- 
visor, Warren, Penna. — Informal discussion. 

b. R. W. Lohr, Grower and Association Contact Man, 
Boswell, Penna. — Informal Discussion. 

c. J. C. Jacobsen, Farm Machinery Dealer, Girard, 
Penna. — Informal Discussion. 

d. Address — C.B. Denman, National Association of 
Food Chains, Washington, D. C. 

Wednesday Afternoon, January 17, 1940. 

Room F, Farm Show Building. 

1:30 P.M. Round Table. 

Discussion Leader, L. T. Denniston, Association Field 
Representative. 

Topics Pertinent to the Potato Industry. 

a WHAT VARIETY SHOULD WE PLANT? Is the 
Russet On the Way Out? Is the Katahdin the 
Answer? Seed Sources. New Seedling Varieties. 

b. STOPPING SOIL EROSION. Strip Farming for 
Potatoes. Rotations. Soil Building versus Soil 
Depleting Crops. New Cover Crops. Trends in 
Fertilizers and Fertilization of Potatoes. 

c ADAPTING CULTURAL PRACTICES TO NEW 
VARIETIES. When and How to Plant. The 1940 
Spray Program. Cultivation When Dry and During 
Heat Periods. 

d. NEW IDEAS IN STORAGE CONSTRUCTION. 
Preventing Mechanical Injuries. New Ideas in 
Grades, Grading and Packaging. Future Packages 
for Potatoes. Satisfied Customers. How to Get the 
Greatest Percent of the Consumers' Dollar. 

These and other vital problems confronting the 
grower and the industry will be discussed. Growers, 
men from The Pennsylvania State College, the 
State Department of Agriculture, and Representa- 
tives of other public and private agencies are invited 
to participate in the discussion. 

Do you know that a dollar pays a membership in the Association, — 
and you get the GUIDE POST too? 



*r 



18 



THE GUIDE POST 



January. 19*0 



THINK AND ACT 

(Continued jrom page 5) 
and market in competition with tlie 
Northern stock on equal footmg. 

There is every indication that a lot 
of potatoes in common storage will be 
sprouting freely by January or Febru- 
ary. This can be attributed to the hot 
weather during the latter Part^ he 
growing season, warm fall and digg ng 
season, and moderate weather during 
the early winter. Serious shrinkage on 
<;iich stock will set in earlier than usual 
and sprouting means extra labor in con- 
ditioning and grading for market. 

These are my personal views on this 
situation. I welcome an fxp'ression^f 
views held by others on this very im 
portant question. 

WIRE WORMS, SCAB, STEM END 
ROT AND MUD: I have worked on the 
Sng of a good number of fine crop 
in recent weeks where the ]ob of grad 
ng and making a good pack has been 
made difficult by dumping a load or two 
ofThe crop injured by wire worms, scab, 
stem end rot or plastered with mud into 
Sin. This could have been avoided a 
Hiosine time. I know of one car tnai 
wffrelected in the market because the 
Tower was compelled to finish the car 
from a part of the bin where the pota- 
loef showed one of the above defects 
Thi<5 was both unfortunate and costly, i 
know of another grower who lost a good 
slle because he had dumped several 
loads of injured stock on the face of his 
nile You can profit by these costly ex- 
periences if you can imagine yourself 
in their position. 

THE POTATO GROWERS STA- 
TTONERY- I have hurridly pulled out 
of my files'a number of letters that por- 
tray a business side to this jnatter of 
beine Potato Growers. The prmtea 
Sings on the letters I have before me 
are something as follows: 

THE BROWN FARM 

Potatoes and General Farm Products 

New Bethlehem, Pa. 

HARMONY HILL FARM 

Walter S. Bishop 

Doylestown, Pa. 

THOMAS S. BUELL 

Selected Seed Potatoes 

■from the 

Heart of Northern Michigan 

Elmira, Michigan 



THOMAS DENNISTON & SONS 

Willow Grove Farm 

Quality Potatoes, Seed and Table Stock 

Slippery Rock, Pa. 



BROADACRES 

Inc. 

Producers of Produce 

Brookville Pennsylvania 



MARA ALVA 

Potato Farms 

Smithville, Ohio 



Printed stationery is not expensive. 
Any of these growers will tell you that 
it is a great satisfaction to have and use 
their own letterhead. A number of those 
above have designs or cuts to portray 
their farm or product, which cannot be 
shown here in print. Printed stamped 
envelopes removes the "always out ot 
stamps" problem. 

Why not designate your Potato Farm 
as a business enterprise by having an at- 
tractive printed stationery? See your 
local printer. He will be glad to help 
you, and if you know him to be an hon- 
est one, will not overcharge you. 

STEM END DISCOLORATION 
FROM A MARKETING VIEWPOINT: 
To me this is the most difficult, provok- 
ing, tuber defect with which the potato 
grower has to contend in grading and 
packing, whether it be in Pennsylvania, 
Maine, Idaho, or elsewhere. It is a hid- 
den defect for which no satisfactory 
means of detection or elimination has 
been found. Some may say, "plant dis- 
ease free or certified seed and you won t 
have it." Ther are many cases, where 
the grower has been using his seed over 
too long, where this will suffice. There 
are other growers, some of our best, who 
will testify that this is not enough. 

It is my observation during the past 
three years of working with growers in 
grading, packing, and marketing that 
stem end discoloration and rot continues 
to get worse in storage each month until 
the potatoes are all out in the spring. 
Some have intimated that it is easier to 
remove the affected tubers after they 
have been in storage for a time as the 
ends will be sunken by then. It is my 
observation that during the same period 
those tubers only slightly affected will 
now be more severely damaged. So this 
doesn't work. I have come to the con- 

(Continued on page 20) 



January, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



19 



ON ALL COUNTS 

IT'S MAINE CERTIFIED SEED 

QUALITY IS THERE: Proof of the prolific yields to be expected 
from Maine Certified Seed Potatoes is seen in the fact that they show 
a producing average of 50 bushels per acre above the State's own 
high tablestock production. 

VOLUME IS THERE: This year 22,700 acres of Maine Seed Pota- 
toes were Certified by the State Department of Agriculture. Whether 
your needs are for bushels or carlots, Maine Certified Seed Shippers 
can fill them. 

PROTECTION IS THERE: Two Department of Agriculture inspec- 
tions of the growing fields, a third at digging time, and a fourth dur- 
ing grading, give every assurance of strong, disease-free stock. 

EXPERIENCE IS THERE: Maine adopted its Seed Potato program 
in 1914. Thus for 25 years, under the alert supervision of our Maine 
Extension Service and the Maine Department of Agriculture, Maine 
Seed Stock growers have developed an industry that has grown to an 
annual volume of over 5,000 cars of America's finest seed stock. 

PERFORMANCE IS THERE: Today Maine Seed Stock growers 
ship to customers in 23 States and to many foreign countries— their 
repeat orders, attesting satisfaction with Maine Seed Stock. 

VARIETIES ARE THERE: This year's avaUable varieties include 
Mountains, Chippewas, Katahdins, Bliss, Spaulding Rose, Irish Cob- 
blers, Russets and others. 

THE SERVICE IS THERE: Inquiries handled promptly. All orders 
whether large or smaU given prompt shipment. Allow 2 to 3 days to 
load a car under our watchful inspection methods. 



Write or wire for a copy of "Potatoes Inspected and Certified in 
Maine. 1939" with list of Maine Seed Potato Growers. Copies of 
Field Inspection Reports also available upon request. 



MAINE DEVELOPMENT 
COMMISSION 

PRODUCTS DIVISION 
AUGUSTA, MAINE 



slP^^i 



tAM^ 



TIFIEO 



SEED 



ot^ 



TOtS 



20 



THE GUIDE POST 



January, 1940 



T 



THINK AND ACT 

(Continued irom page IS) 

elusion, if at all possible, when a Rrow- 
erer knows his crop has a Percentage of 
SloTation. that he will be b^ te^"^" 
move it during or as soon ajter oiggins 
as practical. I ^aje seen ven. ^w cf^^s 
whpre crops snowing ai^v^^*^ ^ ^^r. 
Zonld not, at digging time and for a rea- 
Tonable time thereafter, grade to a good 
Commercial pack Many of these sam^c 
crops would have to later be pacKea uu 
classified. r,,-,T-r< 

r.r,TATO ACTIVITIES AT THE 
FARM SHOW AND HOW TO GET THE 
fi^SiT OTIT OF THEM: For the first 
ETn°the^h?story of the Farm Show 
wT have succeeded in gettmg all the 
potato activities under one roof. The 

%a\^o'nTot^h ^he^Kc^^tn k^^nt^^^ 
Ka^Kyc'ationalMeetin^^^^^^^^^ 

rf Bln^u^et^^Urirbe^M^n V 
Fa?m Show Building. There are many 
reasons why this should meet with the 
hearty approval of all growers and their 

"^ Fh-st of all plan to attend the Show 
and renew you? acquaintance with your 
fallow growers from other parts of the 

State 

Tf a member of the State Potato Grow- 
„r= A.,?ociation by all means attend the 
Annual Meeting; Tuesday forenoon 
JanuaiT 16th, and express yourself on 
Se various problems confronting your 

Association. 

Buv yourself a Pennsylvania Baked 
Potato and tell your friends about it. 



THIS MATTER OF GRADING AND 
PUTTING UP A QUALITY PACK., i 
know of no grower who has gwen mori 
thought and who more fully appreciates 
thi^ nroblem than President P. D. 
FrLntz. A number of ideas expressed 
here were at his suggestion. 

This machine we call a "potato Grad- 
er" is simply a sizer, not a grader. 

In shovelling Potatoes onto the grad- 
er remember you are shovelling pota 
toes (human food) not coal. 

Check vour grader or sizer to make 
sure that the tubers are not being in- 
jurld by some sharp corner, rolls, or 
otherwise. . 

The Grade Supervisor in charge 
should familiarize himself with the 
stockpile (the potatoes to be graded) , 
should determine the sped (how fast 
the potatoes are to be fed onto the ma 
chine), and how many men (or women) 
are to work over the picking table If 
the scales for weighing are accurate and 
have been properly /et allowing lor 
shrinkage we are ready to begin aciuai 
gradtg Grading is a human eem^^^^^^ 
and requires a good eye, .intellisence 
alertness, speed, and consistency. One 
who qukkly tires and becomes careless 
has no business on the picking table. If 
it is found that one man can handle the 
nicking off he should have no other duty 
what ever to perform. If it requires two 
men to pick off neither of them should 
be cha'^ged with any other duty. If two 
or more men are required at any par- 
ticular time on the picking table on a 
gfven run of potatoes, tlieir full undivid- 
ed attention is essential all the time. 



Pav us a call at the Association Booth 
«nd direct other growers there for Mem- 
berships and Subscriptions to the Gmde 
Post. ,, ^. 

Attend the Educational Meetings 
Tuesday afternoon and all day Wed- 
nesday in Room F, Farm Show Building, 
Second Floor. 

The Banquet Tuesday "'ght— A tur- 
key dinner on the platter with all the 
frimmings. Plenty of fun and I predict 
asC an address as you will hear dur- 
ing the entire week of the Show. 

Take plenty of time to study changes 
and improvements in potato equipment. 

Finally watch your eats ( better eat 
another Baked Potato), your rest your 
sleep and as Dr. Rittenhour used to say 
your output. 



Be sure that you have good light, par- 
ticularly over the grader or sizer. 

It is well to check the scales occasion- 
ally especially when packing consumer 
packs. Dirt, sitting unlevel,. or rough 
use often changes their efficiency The 
man weighing has the second most im- 
portant job to the Grade Supervisor 
Potatoes from storage that are dry and 
clean should be packed 15 pounds 5 to 7 
ounces, if damp or slightly dirty a little 
more tolerance should be allowed-l& 
pounds 9 to 11 ounces and if wet and 
dirty they should not be packed at all. 
The bushel pack should be weighed at 
61 pounds. 

Whether Pecks, Bushels or Hundreds, 
the pack should be kept clean dry, ancf. 
safe from frost or freezing until deliver- 
(Continued on page 22) 



2 Rows or 10 Rows . 
Spray With a Har<iie 




-For Ihe big jobs the Hardie Tractor 
Trailers are universally popular. 




-Hardie combination row crop and 
orchard sprayers are built in a wide 
variety of sizes and styles. 




Hardie gives you the most mod- 
ern sprayer for the job you 
have to do. The biggest outfits 
in the fields are Hardies. Hardie 
provides equally dependable 
and efficient sprayers for small 
acreages and under glass opera- 
tions. Write for the Hardie 
Row Crop Catalog and learn 
about up-to-date row sprayers. 
Sold and serviced by leading 
local dealers everywhere. The 
Hardie Mfg. Company, Hudson, 
Mich. 



See the Hardies at the 
Pennsylvania Farm Show 




22 



THE GUIDE POST 



January. 1940 



THINK AND ACT 

(Continued jrom page 20) 

ed to the Warehouse, Store, or Con- 
sumer. 

The Grade Supervisor should use 
every opportunity, stopping the opera- 
tion occasionally if in doubt, to check a 
few bags on grade, not guessing, but ac- 
tually weighing the tubers scored and 
computing the percent. It requires very 
few individual tubers to a peck bag to 
equal 6%. 

If the pack shows too much mechanic - 
al injury, growth crack, second growth, 
or some other discernible defect it 
means those on the sizer or picking table 
should exercise more care. If the pack 
contains too high a percentage of stem 
end discoloration, wire worm, hollow 
heart or some similar hidden defect 
there is but one thing to do, inform the 
grower and advise that the crop or this 
particular bin be packed in a lower 
grade. 



ers to the advantages of greater use of 
potatoes in the diet. Only throng Vf: 
vertising can the potato industry hold 
its own in the terrifPic struggle m the 
food industries for the consumer s dol- 

^^^' —"Bill Shakespud" 



"POTATO CHIPS" 

(Continued jrom page 7) 

Kurv Lauer, Chief seed potato certi- 
fier, has recently issued a most instruc- 
tive report of the 1939 certification in 
Pennsylvania. Copies may be secured 
free by addressing the Department of 
Agriculture, at Harrisburg. Among 
many interesting facts disclosed in the 
report, we find that in 16 counties, 92 
Pennsylvania growers had 800 acres 
certified last year, which yielded 183,- 
166 bushels; that 8 varieties were certi- 
fied of which 58% were Russets, 14% 
Nittanys, 10% Katahdins, 9% White 
Rurals, 4% Penningans, 2% Bliss, 1% 
Chippewas and less than 1% Cobblers. 
The most significant fact disclosed is 
that only slightly over half of the pota- 
toes certified were Russets, although in 
very recent years nearly all were of that 

variety. 

O- 

Have previously mentioned here the 
vital need for greater advertising of 
potatoes. Maine and Idaho have secured 
remarkable results through their cam- 
paigns. If each Pennsylvania grower 
were assessed only one cent a bushel, a 
quarter million dollar fund would result 
yearly. This would go a long way to- 
ward educating Pennsylvania consum- 



OVER THE PICKING TABLE 

(Continued jrom page 11) 

When the other fellow gets the best 
of the trade. Just think how good the 
other fellow must feel, and be sympa- 
thetically happy. 

When you find that your competitor 
is selling potatoes at a better price than 
you are. The reason probably is that 
"he packs his in a Blue Label container 
and you can do the same. 

<: * * 

The world is blessed most by men who 
do things, and not by those who merely 

talk about them. 

— James Oliver 



Warning Against Mismarking by 
Potato Shippers 

Washington, D. C, Dec. 29.— Shippers 
who mark and sell potatoes in interstate 
commerce as U. S. No. 1 when they do 
not meet the requirements of the grade 
are violating the misbranding provi- 
sions of both the Perishable Agricul- 
tural Commodities Act and the Foods, 
Drugs and Cosmetic Act, the Agricul- 
tural Marketing Service wraned this 
week. 

It has been called to the attention of 
the service that some dealers quote mis- 
branded potatoes that have not been 
officially inspected at lower prices than 
are being obtained for inspected stock. 
This would seem to indicate that the 
shippers in question recognize that the 
potatoes do not grade U. S. No. 1 al- 
though they are so marked. 

Further claims have been presented 
that when buyers object to the quality 
of these potatoes upon arrival, the ship- 
pers readily grant allowances. This is 
an additional indication that the ship- 
pers have little faith in their potatoes 

(Continued on page 26) 




MR. SPUD SAYS : 

"I like my food 



GRANULATED 



because I can digest it so easily. It's 
readily soluble — furnishes plenty 
of plantfood from infancy to ma- 
turity." 



r 



^de DAVCO GRANULATED FERTILIZER 



So easy to apply - distributes uniformly 
Many members of the Pennsylvania Potato Growers' Association find 
DAVCO GRANULATED ideal for growing Potatoes. We hope others will 
benefit this year by using Davco. 

VISIT OUR BOOTH NO. 449 AT THE FARM SHOW 

The Davison Chemical Corporation 

Baltimore, Md. 



POTATO GROWERS it pays to use certified seed 

HIGHER QUALITY — LARGER YIELDS — MORE PROFIT 



VISIT OUR 

BOOTH AT 

THE FARM 

SHOW 




LOOK FOR 
THE SIGN 

OF 
QUALITY 



WE OFFER A DEPENDABLE SUPPLY OF CERTIFIED 

RUSSET RURALS IRISH COBBLERS g^NT^ACS ^^"^^^^ 

KATAHDINS CHIPPEWAS PONTIACS 

Michigan Potato Growers Exchange, Inc. 

TWENTY-ONE YEARS OF SUCCESSFUL POTATO MARKETING 

^KTNTTT I.V MICHIGAN 

CADILLAC 



i;V.^ft 



24 



THE GUIDE POST 



January, 1940 



Firm Foundation for Farmer Urged 

Food Induslry Nation's Largest; Its Success Depends Wholly on 

Efficiency of Demand, Supply 
By WILLIAM PARK— President, American Stores Co. 



As we stand on the threshold of a new 
year, it is quite human and natural to 
face the rising sun with renewed hope, 
courage and determination. It is also 
proper that we should pause and look 
back to see if our past activities have 
contributed anything for the betterment 
of our country and its citizens. 

But reviewing our past experiences, 
we are better equipped to make practi- 
cal, constructive plans for the future. 

The food industry is the largest and 
most important industry in our Nation. 
Approximately one-fifth of the gamful- 
ly employed population is engaged in 
the production, processing, manufactur- 
ing, transporting and selling of food 
products. 

As consumers, every man, woman 
and child has a vital interest in the food 
industry. They expect and have a right 
to demand that efficiency be practiced 
by everyone connected with the indus- 
try. They expect foods to be brought 
from the producers to them with the 
smallest possible loading of expense 
consistent with the high standard of 
w^ages prevailing in the industry. 

The producer on the other hand is 
entitled to efficient, economical handling 
of his products, and a return which will 
reimburse him for his effort. 

America's greatest producer is the 
farmer. He is the one to whom we, in 
the great metropolitan areas, must look 
for food and to a large extent for cloth- 
ing. He is one of our biggest customers 
and must be prosperous to be a good 
customer. Fundamentally we realize 
that the retail food business depends on 
general prosperity, which cannot be 
achieved without agricultural prosper- 
ity. 

All too often when nature brings 
abundant crops to farmers, the result is 
disastrous. Year aftre year emergencies 
have arisen in agriculture which des- 
troyed market valuess and lowered the 
farmer's income below his cost of pro- 
duction. Generally these emergencies 
are the result of abundant crops or 
some situation which forces a particular 
commodity on the market more rapidly 



than it can be consumed by normal de- 
mand. This is a challenge to the coun- 
try's distribution system. 

For many years individual food chains 
including the American Stores Co., have 
given aid to producers in their own 
operating territories to help market 
seasonal surpluses, but this effort was 
local and not co-ordinated over other 
areas. 

Early in 1936 peach growers faced a 
critical situation with canneries holding 
inventories of six an done half million 
cases of canned peaches. Preliminary 
offers for the 1936 crop, because of this 
large carry -ver, were $15 a ton although 
it costs considerably in excess of this 
figure to raise peaches. Faced with this 
seemingly certain loss, the peach grow- 
ers appealed to chain stores for help: 
the only organized group of distributorc 
they could reach quickly and that offer- 
ed promise of assistance. 

The idea of a co-ordinated national 
plan to aid agriculture had been con- 
sidered by chain operators for some 
time. The peach growers' appeal pre- 
sented the opportunity to try it. 
Through the National Association of 
Food Chains, 34,000 chain food stores 
entered a Nation-wide sales campaign 
in April and May of 1936. The result 
was an increase in the sale of canned 
peaches sufficient to liquidate the sur- 
plus, a reduction of June 1 inventory to 
one of the lowest on record and a price 
of $30 per ton wsa paid farmers for their 
new crops. Instead of certain losses, 
producers realized hundreds of thou- 
sands of dollars profit. 

That was the inception of the agricul- 
tural program of the chain food stores 
which has become a permanent part of 
their business activity. It is a program 
in which the American Stores Co. has 
co-operated from the start. We are 
proud to have been a part in this form 
of practical farm relief. 

Since the peach campaign the food 
chains have co-operated with the agri- 
cultural producers at their request on 
nearly 100 different occasions. Com- 
(Continited on page 28) 






USE 

WHITEROGK 

Lime and Limestone 

Products for all 

AGRICULTURAL 
LIMING PURPOSES 

Write for Prices 
and Full Particulars 





Whiterock Quarries 

Bellefonte, Pa. 



Seal of 
Approval 



— since the day of bustle - 
skirts and high-button shoes, 
Dempwolf Fertilizers have 
been helping Pennsylvania 
farmers raise finer, money- 
crops. 

In 1940 use Dempwolf Fertil- 
izers for a better yield in 
every field. 

Send for our new 1940 de- 
scriptive, illustrated folder. 
It costs nothing. 

York Chemical Works 

YORK, PA. 



THE POTATO GROWER'S CHOICE 

Deep working teeth, shaped to a perfect spiral, dig like a Pjo^jre^tm^ the PERFECT SEED BED potato 
growers like. Plowed under cover is shredded and strewed THROUGH the plowed *»^P*h /he HI-BAR 
WEED HOG creates a moisture reservoir that means money in the hank. Famous WHH24 teeth carrj 
an unusual guarantee. 



BABCOCK HI-BAR WEED HOG 

pletelv FLEXIBLE tillage tool with extra high frame and under slung tooth bars Gives 
e; freedom from clogging: a fast, thorough worker that lowers field costs. See it at the 



Is a com 

clearance 

PRODUCTS SHOW spaces 106 and 107 



Gives greater 
FARM 



Only 

BABCOCK 

makes the 

HI-BAR 

WEED HOG 




Ask for folder 
WH-8 

also 

Babcock 

Remote 

Control 

HD Spring 

Tooth Harrow 

and 

Babcock 
High frame 

SPECIAL 

Spring Tooth 

Harrojv 



BABCOCK MANUFACTURING CO. 

Leonardsville, New York 



26 



THE GUIDE POST 



January, 1940 



JANUARY IS THE MONTH TO BOOST 

MEMBERSHIP DRIVE 
Give This Drive Your Support! 



The membership drive is making 
some little progress, and we are looking 
for some substantial results durmg the 
current month. 

Several fine contributions gave 
prompt replies to our recent solicitation, 
as follows: 
A. T. Blakeslee, two new members: 

William Altemose, Monroe County 

Russell Altemose, Monroe County 

George D. Denninger, one new member: 

Chas. H. Anangst, Northampton 

County 

Dr. E. L. Nixon, one new member: 

Louis Bailey, Centre County 
S. E. McCune, one new member: 

E. B. Tussing, Columbus, Ohio 
Roy R. Hess, one new member: 

Chas. Jessick, Columbia County 
Jos. D. Young, one new member: 

Harry Gallant, Erie County 
J. C. McClurg, two new members: 
Homer Waring, Crawford County 
L. A. McMichael, Crawford County 

Then too, regular renewals have been 
coming' in steadily, including these re- 
cent ones: 

T. McDonald Patterson, Lancaster 

rCounty 
Ulysses L. Moyer, Berks County 
S. E. Mc McCune, & Son, New Wat- 

erford, Ohio 
K. K. McCreary, Lawrence County 
Harwood Martin, Honeoye Falls. 

New York 
A. C. Ramseyer, Smithville, Ohio ^ 
Biron E. Decker, Erie County 
George D. Henninger, Northampton 

County 
A. L. Larson, McKean County 
Clark B. Moyer, Northumberland 

County 
Norman J. Kline, Lehigh County 
Walter S. Bishop, Bucks County 



David A. Miller, Lehigh County 
Port Alleghany, F. F. A., McKean 

County 
J. C. Brubaker, Lancaster County 
W. O. Lichtenwalner, Lehigh 

County 

Very gratifying it is when former old 
members come back to the Association 
or brand new ones join unsolicited— 
we had four of these this month: 

Wayne G. Dubble, Lebanon County 
J. Paul Kimmel, Armstrong County 
John K. Heebner, Montgomery 

County 
Russell Byler, Lawrence County 

All in all, we are progressing but we 
still need a hand. Yon't you send in 
your new member? 



Warning Against Mismarking 
By Potato Shippers 

(Continued from page 22) 

meeting the grade requirements. The 
service warns such potato shippers, as 
well as shippers of other fruits and veg- 
etables, that they may expect disciplin- 
ary action with possible revocation ot 
their licenses if evidence of deliberate 
misbranding is obtained. Action will 
also be taken against brokers who nego- 
tiate sales and make representations 
that potatoes are of a specified grade, 
when they are aware that the potatoes 
do not meet requirements of that grade. 

It is not necessary to have a federal- 
state inspection certifficate to mark and 
sell potatoes as U. S. No. 1, but marking 
or tagging as U. S. No. 1 when they do 
not make the grade is not permissible. 
This applies to both table and seed stock. 
From the nature of the Departments 
announcement, it appears that it does 
not intend to clamp down on all ship- 
ments which fail to make grade but that 
it does plan to take action aaginst ship- 
pers who deliberately misbrand. 



Modern Marketing Methods 
Call for Paper Bags 

Attractively Printed Bags Bring Repeat Orders 

HAMMOND Betterbags 

Combine High Grade Printing with 
Essential Strength and Quality 




Hammond Bag & Paper Company 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Paper Bags for Lime, Limestone, Fertilizer, Flour, Feed and Potatoes 



Potato 
Machines 



Make Money for Potato Growers 

Eureka Potato Machines take hard work out of potato growing. 
Th«y reduce time and labor costs. They assure btgger yields. 



Potato PUntcr 

One man machines 
doing five operations in 
one. Overtwenty-two 
years' success. 



Traction Sprayer 

Insures the crop. Sires. 
4 or 6 rows. 60 to 100 
gallon tanks. Many 
stylet of booms. 



PoUte Cutter 

Cuts uniform seed. 
Operates with both 
har.db free for feed- 
irg, 

Ridinfl Mulcher 

Brenks crusts, mutches soil, and 
kills weeds when potato crop is 
rcung and tender. 8. 10 and 12 
fl.aifcs. Many other uses. with 
Of without teedinftattachment 
AH «•ac^»f.•s in •lie* near you. Send for complete cafa/orfuo 



Potato Digger 

Famous for getting all the 
potatoes, separating and 
standing hard use. With or 
without engine attachment 
or tractor attachment. 




Used by many 

of the most 

successful 

growers in 

Pennsylvania 

and elsewhere 



See our 

display at 

Harrisburg 

Farm Show 



BLOCKS 
106 and 107 



EUREKA MOWER CO., Utica, New York 



28 



THE GUIDE POST 



January, 1940 



\ 



National Certified Seed Potato Crop Is Next to Largest 



Government Estimates Production This 

Year at 13,798 Bushels Compared 

With 11,262,000 Bushels Last Year 



Washington, D. C, Jan. 5.— The 1939 
crop of certified seed was the second 
largest on record and totaled 13,798,000 
bushels, the Agricultural Marketing 
agencies in 16 states. The record crop 
was grown in 1937, when 15,485,000 
bushels were certified. The 1938 crop 
of 11,262,000 bushels was slightly be- 
low average. The 1933-37 average was 
11,596,000 bushels. 

The Irish Cobbler is the most popu- 
lar, the figures show, about 30 per cent 
of the total certified being this variety. 
Green Mountain was next with 21 per 
cent, followed by Bliss Triumph with 19 
per cent. Other varieties with the per 
cent certified are as follows: Katahdin, 
6 per cent; Chippewa, 5 per cent; White 
Rose, 4 per cent; Netted Gem, 3 per 
cent; and all others, 12 per cent. 

Some of the minor varieties havo 
made rapid gains in the last year, how- 
ever. The largest increases over a year 
ago in the quantities certified were re- 
ported for Chippewa, White Rose, and 



FIRM FOUNDATION 

FOR FARMER URGED 

(Continued from page 24) 

modities assisted cover every producing 
area of the country and range from 
citrus fruits to eggs, domestic beef to 
dried fruits, turkeys to butter. 

The program has been extended in 
many ways. It includes a plan to relieve 
local or sectional distress where Nation- 
wide action is unnecessary. For 
example, our company has co-operated 
with the Pennsylvania potato growers 
to market their crop by selling Pennsyl- 
vania potatoes to consumers at reason- 
able prices for the benefit of Pennsyl- 
vania producers. We have also co-oper- 
ated with the New Jersey Farm Bureau 
in helping to move surplus crops of 
sweet potatoes and seasonal vegetables. 

CO-OPERATION URGED 

The program includes encouragement 
to farmers to form strong co-operative 
marketing associations in the interests 



Katahdin. The Chippewa and Katahdin 
varieties are gaining in favor in the 
southern commercial early potato sec- 
tions. 

Production this year in 16 states ex- 
ceeds that of last year, whereas in ten 
other states it is smaller. Increases in 
the number of bushels certified in 1939 
are by states in the following order: 
Maine, Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, 
Washington, South Dakota, Oregon, 
New Jersey, Vermont, Pennsylvama, 
Louisiana, Tennessee, Wisconsin, North 
Carolina, New Mexico, and New Hamp- 
shire. Decreases in 1939 occur in this 
order: North Dakota, Michigan, Min- 
nesota, Idaho, New York, Utah, Mon- 
tana, California, Maryland and Ken- 
tucky. 

It is estimated that about 18 per cent 
of the 1939 production of certified seed 
potatoes had been sold up to December 
1, compared with about 13 per cent last 
year and about 15 per cent in 1937. 

Prices offered to growers on Decem- 
ber 1 varied very much, according to 
varieties and states of production. They 
averaged 99c a bushel, compared with 
85c last year and 63c in 1937. 



of better distribution. We also work 
with 4-H Clubs in our territory, those 
fine groups of young people who are 
learning agriculture in practical ways. 
Last year our company bought many 
prize 'cattle raised by 4-H members as 
an encouragement to them, paying 
premium prices and featuring the meat 
in our stores at reasonable consumer 
prices. 

All this is good business. The chain 
stores find it a profitable merchandising 
venture. Producers' markets are stab- 
ilized and farmers receive a profit for 
their products, or in some particularly 
distressing circumstances where profits 
are impossible, prices are kept from go- 
ing to ruinous levels. Consumers bene- 
fit because the existence of a surplus 
subpject to orderly distribution, gives 
a fine quality product at reasonable 
prices. 

This inherent soundness is the only 
basis for a permanent program. Every- 
one benefits, no one is hurt. To my mind 

(Continued on page 30) 



i 



Visit Our Exhibits 
Penna. Farm Show 

EUREKA POTATO MACHINERY 

Spaces Nos. 106-107 

BOGG'S POTATO GRADERS 

Spaces Nos. 325-326 

MESSINGER DUSTERS 

Spaces Nos. 118-119-124-125 

CUTAWAY DISC HARROWS 

Spaces Nos. 40-41 

CHAMPION POWER DIGGERS 

One and Two-Row 

CHAMPION IRRIGATION PIPE 

An Investment, Not an Expense 

Space No. 666 

You will find "MAC" and RAY 
Spaces. Nos. 106-107 

S. E. McCUNE & SON 

Wholesale Distributors 
NEW WATERFORD, OHIO 



PROTECT YOUR POTATO 
CROP BY USING 

WASHINGTON 

Powdered and Pebble 

SPRAY LIME 

Packed in 180 Pound Drums 
Net Weight 

A Rotary Kiln Product Insur- 
ing Perfect Slacking and Com- 
plete Satisfaction. 
Washington Spraying Hydrated 
Lime for Dusting Requirements 
325 Mesh in 50 Pound Paper 
Sacks. 

Ask the Growers Who Have 
Used Washington; They Are 
Easy to Find. 

The Standard Lime 
and Stone Company 

First Nafl Bank Bldg:., Baltimore, Md. 

N. E. DiETRiCK, Sales Rep. 



BLUE 

LABEL 

PACKERS 



have learned that poor seed is 
expensive. Roughs, culls, and dis- 
coloration, caused by inferior seed, 
increase the amount of unprofit- 
able *'throw-outs." New seed, 
particularly Russet direct from its 
native soil and climate of North- 
ern Michigan, is unexcelled in 
vigor and assures minimum grad- 
ing waste. The saving in sorting 
alone will pay the difference in 
planting costs. 




APPROVED \ 



MAINE 

Cobblers — Mountains 

Katahdins — Chippewas 

MICHIGAN 
Russels — Mountains 

We again invite you to visit 
our booth at the Harrisburg 
Show, make it the place to 
meet your friends, inspect 
our Show samples and car- 
lot grading. Ask for prices. 

"Every hag must be right** 

Dougherty Seed Growers 

Williamsport Penna. 



■■.;:'■ ■■';« 






30 



THE GUIDE POST 



January, 1940 



FIRM FOUNDATION FOR 
FARMER URGED 

(Continued from page 28) 

it is evidence of what American business 
on its own initiative can do to meet its 
problems. 

On behalf of every man and woman 
connected with our company, I can say 
that we are all proud to have participat- 
ed in these efforts and feel that we have 
contributed to the betterment of two 



groups of friends — the producers and 
the consumers. We lay our plans for the 
future optimistically, counting on the 
integrity and ability of our people and 
on the blessing of Almighty God. 

(Reprinted from Phila. Inquirer. 
Jan. 2, 1940) 

-O- I 

Members Visit the exhibits of our 
advertisers. They may have something 
worthwhile your seeing. 



Don't tell the public about yourself or your product unless 
you can measure up to all you tell them. 

LET'S GET TOGETHER 

ALBERT C ROEMHILD 

POTATO COMMISSION MERCHANT 
122 Dock Street Lombard 1000 Philadelphia 



Protect Your Potato Crop by using 

"BeU-Mine Lime" 

for Spraying and Dusting 

Use "Bell-Mine" Pulverized Lime in any formula where "quick lime" or "stone 
lime" is specified. Use "Bell-Mine" hydrated Lime in any formula 

where "hydrated lime" is specified. 



Other "Bell-Mine" pro- 
ducts for the farm in- 
clude "Bald Eagle" 
Hydrate, an exception- 
ally active soil sweet- 
ener, and "Alfalfa" Pul- 
verized Limestone, a 
finely pulverized high 
calcium stone. 




"Bell-Mine" Pulverized 
Lime is packed in 80 lb. 
paper bags and 180 lb. 
(net) steel drums with 
tight friction lids. 

"Bell-Mine" Hydrated 
Lime is packed in 50 lb. 
special paper bags. 



t|^nrrr^ttqr»tt( 



BELLEFONTE DIVISION 

Executive Offices: 219 N. Broad Street Philadelpliia 

"BELL-MINE" PLANT BELLEFONTE, PA. 



CERTIFIED 

NITTANY — RED BLISS — PENNIGAN 

WHITE RURAL and RUSSET 

SEED POTATOES 

Also Rogued and Selected Seed Potatoes of High Quality 
Seed potatoes grown and packed by Potter County Seed Potato 
Growers' Association are also for sale through the Pennsylvania 
Farm Bureau agencies. 

POTTER COUNTY SEED POTATO 
GROWERS' ASSOCIATION 

Coudersport, Pennsylvania 
Don Stearns, Pres. F. E. Wagner, Sec'y. 



pENNSYLVmA PoT/ITO QlPO\^ERsJ^ECIPE: 



Plant good seed, fertiuze, 

SPRnV THOROLY, PROVIDE 
PROPER MOI5TURB*^flNDDIG 

^'^" OK CHAMPION 

Bf?Uf5E- PROOF, E/i5Y RUNNING, 
SHORT TURNING, CONTROLLED 
ELEV/ITOR, Cf)5TER NHEEL DIGGERS 








^^^ 










OK CHftMPION- ^g QQ ONE ROW 

/ % \rs/ITH PNEUM/^TIC TIRES, RIGID HITCH, 
\ SPRING LEVEf^ LITT, OIL TEMPERED 
ELEVfiTOR' WEBS TIMKEN BE/iRING5, 
/ ' I HY^TT BEftRINGS, RDJU3Tf^BLE ■Z>0 ra 
4^ INCH ROWS. FIT /iNV TRffCTOR. 
" % <HE NORLD'5 BEST JDIGGERS. 



, V •PROMIDE 1^0\5TUR^ WITH' 

-J I OKCHf\nPlOH \R\?\GPaiOH SYSTEMS. 

D\ST^\QUTED BH- LOEGLER * LflDD, BUEF/iLO, NY- SEN^CUNE. NEW ^f^TEREORD, 

CHPinpioN Corporation 

A-Z^Zi ^^^^^s^.r. n^^ HAMMOND IND. 



4733 Sheffield /iVF. 



Farm Show Space 666 






Meet Us At The 
Harrisburg Farm Show 



No matter whether the 
price of potatoes next sea- 
son is up or down, as the 
result of efforts at crop 
control, or because of in- 
sects, blight, drought, or 
anything else, it will be 
advantageous for any po- 
tato grower to start right 
by planting his crop with 
the 



mMC£ 

Potato Planter 



The Band-way method 
of fertilizer application is 
a part of the Iron Age Po- 
tato Planter, and exten- 
sive tests over a period of 
years have shown that no 
other method of fertil- 
izer application produces 
yields as large. And of 
course, in the matter of 
the nearest approach to 
100% accuracy and uni- 
formity of spacing, the 
Iron Age Planter is still in 
a class by itself. 

By the way, have you 
yet traded in that one-row 
planter for a two-row Iron 
Age? Remember, it is one 
sure way of helping to 
reduce your production 
costs next year. 

See your dealer, 

or write us for 

literature 




A. B. FARQUHAR CO., Limited 



322 DUKE STREET 



I 



YORK, PENNSYLVANIA 



/; /A) M W^ A 




VOLUME XVII Ap 2 5 



NUMBER 2 






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FEBRUARY 



1940 




ppJsliAJied lui the 

PENNSYLVANIA COOPERATIVE 
POTATO GROWERS ASSOCIATION 



INCORPORATED 







t^" 






■;f?.- 



The jront cover picture shows Amos 
S. Eberly's Outstanding field of pota- 
toes, at New Holland, Penna., at dig- 
ging time last fall This field yielded 
the Champion Yield for 1939. Crops of 
this size and type can only he grown 
with good seed. 



1 



Dr. Nixon Comments On — 

Ideas Obtained at the Farm Show 



Do you know — 

That there are more turtles in the 
South American waterways than in all 
the remaining streams of the earth; 

That 500 species of humming birds 
are known to science, and each and 
every one of these is a resident of the 
Western hemisphere (North and South 
America); not a single member of this 
extraordinary group is found in any 
part of the old world? 

That the smallest of the humming 
birds is but little larger than a bumble 
bee? 

That one half of the fresh water in 
the entire earth is in our five Great 
Lakes? 

That it is not how old you are but 
how you are old? 

That some men grow under responsi- 
bility, others only swell? 

That there were economic dust bowls 
before the plows broke the plains? 

That high hopes rode in the covered 
wagons, but there were graves beside 
all the trails? 

That the truth is, there probably 
never was a golden age — the hour of 
trial and decision has never been far 
away in America? 

That the original settlers had to deal 
with the wilderness and the Indians. 
They fought two major wars with the 
French. How did America's prospects 
look after the Revolutionary War? Yet, 
here we are in the midst of plenty, 
wrestling with mere unemployment? 

That William Pitt, British Prime Min- 
ister said in 1783, "There is scarcely any- 
thing around us but ruin and despair." 

That Disraeli, in 1849 said, "In in- 
dustry, commerce and agriculture there 
is no hope." 

That Lord Shaftesbury said in 1848, 
"Nothing can save the British Empire 
from shipwreck." 

It is not these prophets of doom that 
we should heed; it is not the content- 
ment of our ancestors that we should 
imitate. It is their courage and resolu- 
tion that we need. They lived, worked, 
had their glowing and happy moments, 



and passed on a heritage compounded of 
achievement and unfinished business. 
They met their problems and did their 
chores, and did not know the end of the 
story nor do we. 

— That John Schrope, our philospher 
potato grower, commenting on "after 
they are mashed, who can tell?" said 
"now I am not so sure." 

— That there is not another state in 
the union which can grow a better po- 
tato than Pennsylvania, when judged 
in the skillet. 

— That you can "drink to me only 
with thine eyes" but you can't eat that 
way. 

— That it was expressed to me per- 
sonally, by the slender ladies, by the 
tall ones, by the short ones, and espe- 
cially by the fat ones that these Penn- 
sylvania baked potatoes "are irresis- 
tible." Again, quality in the skillet. 

— What a lot of housewives need is 
information on how to really cook and 
prepare potatoes. 

— That it takes more than fire and 
water to make most vegetables pali- 
table. 

— That some vegetables are eaten raw 
other than by cows? — Did you ever try 
a glass of cold water instead? 

— That the greatest need is the truth 
about food and food values in the diet of 
the masses, and not so much bombard- 
ment on the mysticisms of this, that and 
the other thing bursting with health. 

— That a bushel of potatoes at $1.00 
will go farther towards building brawn, 
and bone, besides satisfying the craving 
for a hungry family than any other com- 
modity which can be purchased bar- 
ring none — liquid or solid, and baked 
potatoes are bursting with health too, 
and you can't eat enough of any other 
kind to make you sick, yea, and in 
addition, regardless of how many you 
eat, they won't give you diabetes, acido- 
sis, high blood pressure, or indigestion, 
and you won't have scurvy, and they 
are satisfying too! 

Try this out with any other thing 
whether fish, fowl, fruit or vegetable — 
compare the cost — experience the re- 
sult. 



THE GUIDE POST 



February, 1940 



February, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



Did you know, — 

—That the Russet potato is the most 
resistant variety to scab that has yet 
been tested? 

Let me admonish you to be careful 
about a too extensive planting of any 
white skinned variety until you have 
tested it for scab under your own con- 
ditions. You can bet your bottom dollar 
that if you have had any scab with 
Russets, you will have much more with 
the white skins, and sometimes it will 
be disastrous. 

Did you know, — 

— That potato growing is not much 
different from manufacturing? If an 
individual or company sets out to pro- 
duce automobiles, a factory is construc- 
ted and equipped with tools peculiar to 
the manufacturing of automobiles— 
They do not equip it with tools which 
are designed for the construction of 
locomotives. So also must the potato 
grower set out to equip his farm with 
the tools peculiar to the production of 
potatoes. When and if lime mitigates 
against potato production by creating a 
scab condition, then a more judicious use 
of lime is necessary. When and if a 
rotation of crops mitigates against the 
most economical potato production — 
however desirable such a crop rotation 
may be for other purposes, then an 
adaptation of crop rotation is necessary 
for the potato grower. In other words, 
the paramount issue of the potato grow- 
er is not crop rotation, or how much 
pasture or hay one can grow, but the 
economical production of potatoes. It 
ought to go without saying that this 
means, freedom from scab, wire worms, 
grubs and what not. 

The potato grower cannot fool around 
trying to manufacture potatoes when 
his plant is better equipped to supply 
fish bait, hogfeed or cow pasture. Be 
satisfied only with the rotation which 
everything considered, is best adapted 
to the most economical production of 
potatoes on your own farm. 

Did you know, — 

— That the fundamental principles of 
storage construction are first, tempera- 
ture control, and second, humidity or 
moisture control. For those growers who 
want to keep potatoes late this Spring, 
it is important that the storage be 
cooled down while the temperature is 
yet cold on the outside. Seventy degrees 
on the outside will not reduce the tem- 



perature on the inside below seventy. 
Opening vents and doors when the tem- 
perature is high on the outside only 
raises the temperature on the inside. 
When you get the temperature down, 
close the storage and keep it closed. 

Did you know, — 

— That a ground floor and a straw 
loft is the most practical, fool-proof 
method yet devised for maintaining the 
proper humidity in potato cellars? 

Did you know, — 

— That potatoes in storage need cold 
air a thousand times more than they 
need fresh air? If the fresh air cannot be 
cold, then do not admit it. The air had a 
thousand times better be stagnant and 
cold (36 to 40 degrees) than be fresh and 
warm (70-75 degrees). A lot of pretty 
good storages are ruined in the Spring 
by leaving the doors and vents open. 
Did you ever observe, in the care of cold 
storages, how the attendant slips 
through a narrow opening and quickly 
closes the door after him? He has an 
artificial way in which to create cold, 
while the only sources of cold for the 
common storage are the outside atmos- 
phere, when it is cold enough and the 
stored up cold of the inside. The longer 
potatoes are to be stored in the Spring, 
the more the inside cold must be con- 
served, because the outside temperature 
in the Spring soon becomes higher than 
the inside. 

Did you know, — 

— That there are a lot of practical 
minds at work on the improvement and 
adaptations of potato equipment? Why 
the expression, practical minds? Prati- 
cal means capable of applying know- 
ledge or theory to practice. No one 
knows better what is hoped to be accom- 
plished in the various operations of po- 
tato production and handling than the 
men who grow and handle them day 
after day, year after year. 

I had my eyes opened to this fact 
over at Mr. Ramseyers'. I often wonder- 
ed what his men, who had worked with 
potatoes so long and so extensively, 
thought about. When given a chance to 
express themselves, it was amazing how 
many things they had thought through 
to the end. They applied knowledge to 
practice, and it worked. There are a lot 
of young fellows with less opportunities 
to acquire the theories of potato produc- 
tion whose heads are capable of more 

(Continued on page 26) 



Timely Observations and Suggestions 

L. T. Denniston, Association 
Field Representative 



. 



I 






WARREN COUNTY PIONEERS: 
I am writing these notes from the Ex- 
change Hotel, Warren, Pennsylvania. 
It seems fitting that I might give credit 
to a group of pioneers in this northern 
County with whom I am to meet to- 
morrow. The Warren County Potato 
Growers Association is one of the 
youngest and one of the smallest asso- 
ciations in numbers in the State. But 
what they lack in age and numbers is 
more than made up in aggressiveness 
and determination to succeed. By hold- 
ing fast to fundamental principles of 
production and marketing adopted by 
their association I predict continued 
growth and success. Starting from 
scratch two years ago this group to date 
this season has graded, packed and 
marketed over 20 cars, and 60 truck 
loads of Pennsylvania Blue Label 
Pecks. I believe in giving credit where 
credit is due. The spark plug back of 
this progress and success has been 
Henry Wuesthoff, County Vocational 
Agricultural Supervisor. Like the 
quarterback of the football team, Henry 
could not have done this alone. Much 
credit must go to his fellow workers who 
pulled together for the common good 
and unselfish success of all. 

MARKET QUOTATIONS: There 
seems to me to be considerable room for 
improvement in the manner in which 
potato quotations are given. I have be- 
fore me a daily paper from one of our 
metropolitan areas quoting Maine pecks 
at ,"33 to 35 cents per peck, poorer 29 
to 30 cents per peck." I have authen- 
tic information to the point that the 
movement in this particular market 
was and has been practically nil at the 
33 to 35 cent price. The facts are, this 
is a 2J inch minimum pack. The market 
for a premium pack at the best is lim- 
ited. The question we want to know 
and the one that should concern our 
growers is at what price are the people 
being fed? At what price in other 
words, can a good volume of potatoes 
be moved? We often read, "Pennsyl- 
vania U.S.No.l $1.50 per cwt. few $1.70 
per cwt." How many is a few? Could 
the report not qualify why the $1.70 
price? Growers should bear in mind 
that Produce Street Quotations are 



sales prices, not purchase prices paid 
the grower which are always a lower 
figure. 

I may be out of order in suggesting 
that there might be improvement in 
Market Reports but the fellow from 
a distance can often see better than 
the fellow who has his nose on the 
grind stone. 

CHECKING FIELDS FOR SCAB: 
Hundreds of growers who are contem- 
plating turning to the growing of some 
white skinned variety are scared of the 
scab problem. Those who have experi- 
enced it can testify how serious a bad 
case of scab can be. I firmly believe 
that more of our growers should be 
growing or getting ready to grow a 
white skinned potato. Many markets 
prefer them, some even to the point of 
paying a premium. I know of no "cure 
all" for scab. Many growers undoubted- 
ly will have to stick to the Russet or a 
similar resistant variety. These grow- 
ers need not feel disheartened for there 
will always be a market for good Rus- 
sets and the time may not be so far 
distant when certain markets may be 
paying a premium for them. 

In checking fields for susceptibility 
to scab on a white skinned variety we 
used to advise planting a row or two of 
the white variety through the field. 
While working on hundreds of crops in 
trading and packing for market this 
fall and winter I have a better sugges- 
tion where the grower is strictlv a com- 
mercial grower and not in the seed 
business. Secure a few bushels of the 
white potatoes and cut a tuber or two , 
into each crate or planter hopper at 
planting time. This will give you white 
potatoes throughout the field which 
may vary greatly due to former field 
arrangements, fence rows, or different 
soil treatment. You will have two fine 
opportunities to study the results and 
decide whether you want to risk plant- 
ing a White potato in this field two or 
three years hence. These are at digging 
time and during the grading and pack- 
ing of the crop. But you say, "they will 
be mixed". This need not worry you 
for if the difference in appearance is 
great you can easily and quickly pick 



mm 



6 



THE GUIDE POST 



February, 1940 



off the White ones when grading and 
on the other hand if it should be diffi- 
cult to determine one from the other 
it will make no difference to the buyer 
nor the consumer. If you cannot tell 
them apart, everything else being equal, 
you might best stick to the Russet. 

POTATO SPRAY RINGS: Potato 
spray rings were the means of introduc- 
ing potato spraying in a great many 
communities in Pennsylvania back 
around 1920. Most of these rings passed 
out of existence with the greater num- 
ber of the growers purchasing their own 
sprayers as the years passed by. The old- 
est continuously operated ring of the 
early period was that operated in the 
Horsham Community of Montgomery 
County. I will long remember eating 
chicken and chestnuts with the mem- 
bers of this group at the friendly home 
of John Park. 

A few years ago my good friend O.T. 
Grazier, Vocational Agricultural Super- 
visor, Oakland, Md., a Pennsylvanian by 
birth and at heart, at least a firm be- 
liever in Pennsylvania Potato Spray 
methods, modernized the spray ring 
idea by setting up two cooperative 
spray rings among the farmers of his 
community. Two modern sprayers were 
purchased and put in the field under 
the care of two experienced or capable 
operators. These rings have been suc- 
cessful. During the past year four such 
modernized rings were in operation in 
Potter County, Pennsylvania. 

Information as to equipment, costs, 
manner of operation, and success of 
these rings can be secured by writing 
County Agent Bert Straw, Agricultural 
Extension Association, Coudersport, 
Pa. or Kyle Alexander, Farm Security 
Administration, State College, Pa. 

CAMP POTATO: Like many of you 
. growers during this cold weather the 
Camp is in hibernation. In the spring 
it will stir from this slumber and be a 
most active enterprise. With thousands 
of seedlings to be planted, ground to be 
cleared and fitted, landscaping to be 
done, roads to be completed and numer- 
ous other imporvements there will be 
ample opportunity to not only visit the 
camp but plenty of chance for growers, 
youth groups, and friends of the indus- 
try to become active participators in 
Camp Potato activities. As an active 
member of the Association you own a 
share in Camp Potato that has an actual 
value of at least $5.00. Those who have 



participated in the erection, develop- 
ment, and activities of the Camp value 
their share at many times this amount. 

FUTURE POTATO PRICES: I am 
asked almost every day what I thmk of 
future potato prices. I am not a prophet. 
I stated very clearly in the last issue of 
the Guide Post that I thought Pennsyl- 
vania Growers should move their pota- 
toes yet in storage freely during Jan- 
uary, February, and March. I have not 
changed my opinion. Growers who se- 
cured 25 and 26 cents per peck at dig- 
ging time or shortly thereafter, are as 
well off as those getting 28 or 29 cents 
per peck now, and those getting 28 to 29 
cents now are as well off as they will 
be at 30 to 31 cents a few months from 
now, "if" the price should advance to 
this figure. We will not be packing 
Blue Labels after March except from a 
limited number of unusually good stor- 
ages that will insure good condition 
stock not only to the distributor but for 
the consumer who will be purchasing 
them. 

POTATOES FREEZING IN TRAN- 
SIT: I have often heard it said and no 
doubt you have too, that potatoes will 
not freeze in transit so long as they are 
on the move. This is not true. I talked 
with a grower last week who was as- 
suming that they would not freeze 
packed in paper. This is not true either. 
It is true that they will not freeze as 
quickly in paper as in burlap but this 
should not lessen the shipper's precau- 
tion to prevent freezing in transit or at 
any other time. Growers packing dur- 
ing the coming weeks should watch for 
possible frost bitten or frozen spots in 
their bins. Even though you do not see 
any wet or broken down tubers it will 
be well to cut a few tubers from suspec- 
ted spots as chilled or frost bitten tub- 
ers do not always break down but will 
show gray to dark flesh and be unfit 
for market or seed. 



"My lad, do you know what becomes 
of little boys who use bad language 
when playing marbles?" 

"Yes, sir, they grow up and play golf". 

New West Trade 



Landlady— "I don't allow any games 
of chance here". 

Student— "This isn't that sort of a 
game. My friend here hasn't a chance". 

Cincinnati Post 



February, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 






, 






POTATO CHIPS 



The Farm Show of 1940 is now his- 
tory. The attendance record of 1939, 
which was swelled by the inauguration, 
was not surpassed. Apparently the 
Farm Show, growing so rapidly through 
adolescence, has finally reached the full 
stature of maturity. Further growth, if 
any, will be gradual rather than rapid. 
A 

As usual, the potato meetings were 
well conducted, interesting and well at- 
tended. Was especially impressed 
with the last session capably handled 
by "Denny." At which many problems 
of production, storage, varieties and 
marketing were discussed by growers, 
extension men, and others. A few of the 
more important points brought out at 
this meeting might be listed as follows: 

1. Pennsylvania growers use 3,000,- 
000 bushels of seed potatoes a year but 
produce only 200,000 bushels of certified 
seed annually. Possibilities are excel- 
lent for the much greater production 
and use of Pennsylvania certified seed. 

2. Rye grass as a rapid grower has 
wonderful possibilities as a cover crop, 
particularly for fall growth to prevent 
erosion of fallow fields during the 
winter. 

3. The two-year rotation cuts down 
the potato yield perceptably but is the 
surest cure for wire-worm infestation. 

4. That the Katahdin is rapidly 
growing in popularity, particularly in 
Southeastern Pennsylvania. It has 
yielded well and gives a large percent- 
age of U.S.No.l quality tubers. 

5. Storages of straw ceiling insulation 
type are being built in increasing num- 
ber in Pennsylvania. That a number of 
principles of insulation, convection and 
ventilation are important to consider in 
construction, so it is wise to consult 
William Peterson, of the Extension Ser- 
vice for expert advice before proceedmg 

to build. ^ . ^ 

6. A word of wisdom from A. C. 
Ramsever, of Smithville, Ohio, to the 
effect that most growers know the iron- 
clad rule for growing one acre of pota- 
toes successfully, and that to grow 1,000 
acres properly, you just multiply by 
1,000. 

k 

Heard someone say at the banquet 
that if the cafeteria manager would 
have turned off the coffee percolators 



and brought in the State Highway De- 
partment road scrapers, it would have 
been easier to hear the speakers. For 
all the noise, however, it was good 
turkey that brother Lohr sent from Som- 
erset County, and very kind remarks 
which Miles Horst made about the 
GUIDE POST. The many other remarks 
were mighty good, and worth straining 
a little to hear. 

¥ 

Believe this month's bouquet for high 
quality potatoes should go, jointly, to 
Robert Getz and Roger Meckes, of Al- 
brightsville, who, together, furnished 
those bakers. Austin Blakeslee, also of 
the Poconos, had his share in these 
packs, having washed them for baking 
use, and I mean, he really washed them 
clean! 



Studies of potatoes on the Chicago 
market to determine whether it would 
be practicable to revise the present U.S. 
standards so they may carry through to 
consumers have gotten well under way. 
One phase of the survey is the follow 
through of potato quality from producer 
to consumer through all stages of 
handling, and another phase, the deter- 
mination of retailer and consumer pre- 
ferences for varieties, grades and con- 
tainers. It will be interesting to note 
the results of this study since the potato 
grades have never taken much account 
of the consumers' viewpoint. 

A 

With many unforeseen factors con- 
trolling the fall price of potatoes un- 
known at the time of planting, and the 
possible risk each Spring that potato 
prices will be less than a buck a bushel 
in the fall, it behooves potato growers 
to get the yield per acre way up there 
by every known method of improved 
production. In other words, don't buy a 
crop failure when you buy your seed! 

A 

Reliable information has reached us 
that the Hastings potato section of 
North Florida which heretofore has 
largely planted Spaulding Rose potatoes 
has this year planted between 75 to 90 
percent Katahdins. 

A 

What next in packaged foods? Re- 
cently saw shoe-string style french- 

(Continued on page 18) 



::,:.%- ;,iiA.-M-.^ :,^ _^^ 



»« --•^■iV.-Wf.* 



8 



THE GUIDE POST 



February, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 

Published monthly by the Pennsylvania 
Cooperative Potato Growers, Inc. 

OFFICERS 

J. A. Donaldson, Emlenton . . President 
Roy R. Hess, Stillwater . . . .Vice-Pres. 

E. B. Bower, Bellefonte, 

Sec*y-Treas. and Gen. Mgr. 



DIRECTORS 

Jacob K. Mast Elverson, Chester 

P. Daniel Frantz Coplay, Lehigh 

Hugh McPherson Bridgeton, York 

John B. Schrack Loganton, Clinton 

Roy R. Hess Stillwater, Columbia 

Ed. Fisher Coudersport, Potter 

Charles Frey North Girard, Erie 

J. A. Donaldson, R.l, Emlenton, Venango 
R. W. Lohr Boswell, Somerset 

Annual membership fee $1.00. This in- 
cludes the Guide Post. 

All communications should be ad- 
dressed to E. B. Bower, Secretary-Treas- 
urer and General Manager, Bellefonte, 
Pennsylvania. 



Days of February 

Winter has yet brighter scenes— he 
boasts 

Splendors beyond what gorgeous sum- 
mer knows; 

Which come, when the rains 

Have glazed the snow, and clothed the 
trees with ice; 

While the slant sun of February pours 

Into the bowers a flood of light. 

—William Cullen Bryant. 



IMPORTANT TOPICS TO COME 
IN THE MARCH ISSUE 

Seed and Root Bed Preparation 
Seed, Seed Cutting and Planting 
Fertilizers and Potato Fertilization 



J. A. Donaldson Elected Ass'n 

President at Annual Meeting 

Roy Hess Chosen Vice-President 

and E. B. Bower Renamed 

Secretary-Treasurer 



Good Night 

Mary—** John, John, get up! The gas 
is leaking". 

John — ''Oh , put the pan under it and 
come to bed." — Cincinnati Post 



J. A. Donaldson, of Emlenton, Ven- 
ango County, was chosen by the Board 
of Directors of the Association to pre- 
side over Association activities durmg 
the coming year. President Donaldson 
succeeds P. Daniel Frantz, of Coplay, 
Lehgih County, to this position. 

At the same meeting, Roy R. Hess of 
Stillwater, Columbia County, elected to 
the Board last year, was chosen Vice 
President, succeeding Mr. Donaldson 
who held that postion in 1939. 

E B. Bower, of Bellefonte, was re- 
named the Association Secretary and 
Treasurer, the position for which he 
was chosen in 1936. 

New members to the Board of Direc- 
tors were chosen during the Annual 
Meeting, as follows: For the Eastern 
District, Hugh McPherson, of Bridge- 
ton, York County, replacing L. U. 
Thompson, whose three-year term ex- 
pired; For the Western District, Charles 
Frey of North Girard, Erie County, to 
replace J. C. McClurg, of Geneva, Craw- 
ford County, whose three-year term ex- 
pired' For the Central District, Ed 
Fisher, Coudersport, Potter County, ^yas 
reelected to the Board, his term having 
expired; and R. W. Lohr, of Boswell, 
Somerset County, was also chosen a 
Director for the Western District to 
complete the unexpired term of Evan 
D. Lewis, of Johnstown, Cambria Coun- 
ty, who resigned from the Board. 
(Continued on page 10) 



MESSAGE— TO THE MEMBERSHIP 

It is with a feeling of confidence that 
we enter into a new year of activities 
in the potato industry of Pennsylvania. 

Anyone who attended the meetings of 
the Potato Growers' Association at the 
State Show at Harrisburg could not fail 
to be impressed by the wonderful pro- 
gress that has been made by the or- 
ganization. 

Not only were the financial affairs 
found to be in a healthy condition, but 
an expression of Good Will and Fellow- 
(Continued on page 14) 



February, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



i 



Notes From the Farm Show 



It is most gratifying to the Manage- 
ment and the Officers to report that the 
Annual Business Meeting of the Asso- 
ciation on Tuesday Morning, January 
16th. Room F. Farm Show Building 
was the most largely attended of any 
Annual Business Meeting in the history 
of the Association. 



aic :|c sjc :)( 4c >ic 



Seats were at a premium, with many 
people standing, during the Educational 
Meetings Tuesday afternoon and 



throughout Wednesday. There was no 
lag in interest and growers were free to 
express themselves in the Wednesday 
afternoon Round Table Discussions. We 
wish to thank in behalf of the Associa- 
tion all those who cooperated and took 
part in these Educational Meetings. 

4l % 1(1 4c 3|C 9|C 

More than 300 joined the Annual 
Banquet Festivities, held in the Main 
Cafeteria, Second Floor of the Farm 
Show Building. Music was furnished by 




A snap of the usual crowd gathered about the Association Baking Booth at the 
Farm Show to enjoy Pennsylvania Baked Potatoes. 



the Fawn Twp. High School Orchestra, 
Fawn Grove, York County, with C. 
Nancy Bowman as leader. Miles Horst, 
Field Editor of the Pennsylvania Farm- 
er did the usual good job as toast- 
master. Introductions, presentation of 
certificates of merit and medals of 
award, presentation of "400 Bushel 
Medals and the address of the evenmg 
by Judge Robert R. Lewis, Potter 
County were features of the program. 

The popularity of the Baking Booth 
increases each year. Nearly forty thou- 



sand (37,750) potatoes is a lot of spuds 
yet with Ed. Fisher as manager and a 
capable hard working crew back of the 
counter the supply of 37,750 bakers was 
exhausted by 6 P.M. Friday evening. 
Contrary to the thought of a few, this is 
not a money scheme. It is a practical, 
economical way of showing the public 
that Pennsylvania Potatoes are good. 
Expenses for floor space, potatoes, but- 
ter, labor, gas and electricity, laundry, 
and many incidental items run high. 
(Continued on page 16) 



10 



THE GUIDE POST 



February, 1940 



Should Potatoes Be Good to Eat? 



by C. L. Fitch 



(Editors Note: This article was clip- 
ped from the April 1 1939 issue of the 
New York Packer, and gives some real 
constructive thought on the continued 
controversy on ''What Shall We Raise? ) 

At the meeting, last December of the 
Potato Association of American at Rich- 
mond, Va., we had a cooking test. For 
that test we had the kitchen of a great 
down town church. The cooks were for 
that job the best in the country. 

All varieties under trial were Aroos- 
took grown. We had Green Mountains 
for our standard of high qual ty. They 
were mealy-too mealy fo^ hoiling-and 
they were white and glistening. Their 
odor was that mildly Pleasant and sweet 
fragrance that all or nearly all such po- 
tatoes have, and that no hard or waxy or 
unripe potatoes have— they have an 
earthy acrid odor and taste. 

We had jammed together in that kit- 
chen many if not most 9f the techncial 
servants of the potato industry of the 
United States. For comparison with the 
Green Mountains we had the following 
new varieties produced by the breeders 
of the United States Department of 
Agriculture: Sebago, the high yielding 
blight and scab resistant late Potato , the 
Earlaine, the new early sort; the Chip- 
plwa, the beautiful, high yielding mid- 
season sort that is having a tremendous 
Expansion in use, and if ^Y ^^lemory 
serves me right, some Katahdins, the 
beautiful later sort of the same parent- 
age at the Chippewa. 

None of these sorts could have been 
classed for general use as comparable for 
a moment in table quality to the Green 
Mountain, nor to the Russet Burbank 
from Idaho. None of the new sorts would 
I compare in table quality to the Cob- 
blers— grown on peat, silt and muck that 
we have used at our house for ten years, 
and are using at this time. 

In my own judgment — a judgment 
which some of the men with whom I 
am associated do not share— the danger 
in various places in the country that 
growers may stampede to these new and 
beautiful sorts is a threat to potato con- 
sumption and to profits. A man may be 
attracted to a boarding house because 
the landlady is stylish and handsome, but 
in the long run most of the boarders will 
be found at the tables where the eats are 
good. Sales of Chippewas may be easy 



to make but in the long run, people will 
eat fewer hard cooking raw flavored po- 
tatoes than they will of white mealy 
fragrant kinds. Is there not a danger 
that in crowding great quantities of 
handsome hard Chippewas onto the 
market, we shall persuade millions of 
families that potatoes are not so good to 
eat, as we used to think? 

It was a good thing to show growers, 
and taxpayers and Congressmen that 
planned breeding could produce beauty 
and health and yield and might be ex- 
pected to produce earliness, resistance 
to scab, and high table quality. However, 
I personally, devoutly hope that growers 
will not stampede to any potato inferior 
in table quality to the superb mountains 
and Gems. I hope that the U. S. men will 
introduce no more new sorts unless they 
are of top table quality, or are resistant 
to scab, or both. In my judgment a stam- 
pede to Chippewas would be a large net 
damage to potato consumption. 

J. A. DONALDSON ELECTED 

(Continued jrom page 8) 

The Secretary's office wishes to ex- 
tend to the new Board members, Messrs. 
McPherson, Frey and Lohr hearty wel- 
come to the Directorate, and assure 
them, as well as the entire Board, of full 
cooperation in all matters pertaining to 
the advancement of the Association and 
the potato industry of the States as a 

whole. , . . 

We also acknowledge and appreciate 
the wholehearted cooperation of Messrs. 
Thompson, McClurg and Lewis during 
their terms as Directors of the Associa- 
tion, and thank them for ourselves and 
the entire membership for their unsel- 
fish and loyal service to the Association. 
Their many fine contributions will be 
long remembered throughout the potato 

industry. j. -n ^: 

To P. Daniel Frantz, our past Presi- 
dent, we pay tribute for wise counsel, 
fine leadership and Association boost- 
ing. His contribution, both as President 
and a member of the Board, will not be 
forgotten either. 

For our new officers, it's congratula- 
tions! These men were chosen wisely, 
on their own merits, and their leader- 
ship cannot but help carry the Associ- 
ation to new and greater successes. 
(Continued on page 12) 



February, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



11 



■ 



OVER THE PICKING TABLE 



by Inspector Throwout 



While scientists were learnedly ex- 
plaining why the thing could never be 
done, they were interrupted by some- 
body's doing it. 



A good word every 
Now and then 

Is relished by the 
Wisest men. 

A word of praise will 
Make you feel 

As though you'd had a 
Good, square deal. 

It's funny that a 

Kindly word 
Beats all the music 

Ever heard. 

They may not mean it, 
But they would. 

If they knew of its 
Power for good. 



again admitted— this time, covered only 
with confusion. "Ah, that's better, 
said the doctor, "now then, what s the 
matter?" "Nothing at all, Doctor, an- 
swered the girl timidly and blushingly; 
"I only called to collect your subscrip- 
tion to the Charitable Aid Society." 



Chicago society women are daffy 
over "eurthmy", which means noiseless 
dancing in a costume composed of a 
union suit. Maybe they think this is a 
new stunt, but we've seen it done at 
the burlesque shows for twenty years. 



A New York man is seeking a divorce 
because his wife hasn't spoken to hini 
for eleven years. Get in line, men! 
Don't crowd! 



Said a robust young maiden named Peg, 
Whose shape was somewhat like an egg 
"Those law makers are 
Too fussy, by far— 

What's the odds if a man sees my 
elbow?" 



It is the invariable rule in the office 
of a famous New York specialist that all 
patients shall undress for examination 
before entering his consulting room. 
This saves a lot of his high-priced time. 
One day, when the doctor rang his bell 
to indicate to the attendants that he was 
ready for the next patient, the door 
opened and in stepped a remarkably 
pretty young woman— fully dressed. 
The peppery-tempered old specialist 
immediately flew into a rage. What 
do you mean by coming in here like 
that?" he demanded. "Go and take 
your clothes off— quick"! "But Doctor 
—began the girl, with a deep blush. 
"Don't talk! I've no time to waste. Go 
out and strip, at once"! ordered the 
Doctor, ringing the bell for another 
patient. In a half hour, the gurl was 



You rarely meet a girl who is so fond 
of music that she won't play the piano. 



It always makes a woman feel good 
to see an installment collector ringing a 
neighbor's door-bell. 



A retentive memory may be a good 
thing, but the ability to forget is the 
true token of greatness. 



Brook Farm disbanded because the 
man at the head of it had no head for 
business, nor did he have the capacity 
to select a man who had. But it s fail- 
ure" was a success, in that it was a rot- 
ting log that nourished a bank of violets. 



If you are defamed, let time vindi- 
cate you— silence is a thousand times 
better than explanation. Explanations 
do not explain. Let your life be its own 
excuse for being— cease all explana- 
tions and apologies, and just live your 
life. By minding your own business, 
you give others an opportunity to mind 
theirs; and, depend upon it, the great 
souls will appreciate you for this very 
thing. I am not so sure that absolute, 
perfect justice comes to everybody in 
this world, but I do know that the best 
way to get justice is not to be too anxious 
about it. As love goes to those who do 
not lie in wait for it, so does the great 
reward gravitate to the patient man. 

A 

Life is beautiful, and for all we know, 
death is just as good. And death, science 
shows, is in itself, a form of life. The 
(Continued on page 18) 



12 



THE GUIDE POST 



February, 1940 



Seed Potato Certification 

K W LAUER, Plant Pathologist 
Bureau of Plant Industry Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture 

borne disease. As far as we know this 



The seed potato inspection and certi- 
fication report for 1939 shows there 
were 183,166 bushels of seed potatoes 
certified last year compared with 173,- 
454 bushels in 1938. A difference of al- 
most 10,000 bushels more for 1939. 

There was a decrease of 1.2% in the 
amount of Russets certified last year 
over the amount certified in 1938 but m 
White Rurals there was an increase of 
18 8%. The Pennigan variety, however, 
is included with the White Rurals smce 
this is a white skin variety with many 
of the white rural characteristics. We 
certified 45.1% more Pennigans in 1939 
than were certified in 1938. Nittany's 
showed a decrease of 9.5% and the 
Katahdins an increase of 63.2 from 6.411 
bushels certified in 1938 to 26,286 bu- 
shels in 1939. 

There appears to be a strong demand 
for Pennsylvania certified Katahdins 
again this year. This demand has been 
increasing each year since this variety 
was first grown in Pennsylvania. While 
the Russet is still widely grown in 
Pennsylvania the demand for seed of 
this variety appears to be on the de- 
cline. Demand for the Nittany has also 
shown a steady increase since this var- 
iety was first introduced several years 
ago. 

During 1939 we certified seed potatoes 
in Bradford, Butler, Cambria, Erie, 
Lancaster, Lehigh, Northampton, Perry, 
Potter, Somerset, Sullivan, Warren and 
York counties. We inspected 1208.25 
acres and certified 799.25 acres. This is 
the highest acreage certified during any 
one year since the work was started in 
1920. 

The crop this year is very uniform, 
smooth and comparatively free from 
scab. Growing conditions during last 
summer were generally dry, resulting 
in a crop of tubers that show very little 
second growth and over size. Because 
of the unfavorable growing conditions 
the yield per acre was the lowest since 
1930 when we produced 207.7 bushels 
per acre compared with 229.2 bushels 
in 1939. 

Growers are cautioned to select their 
seed with care this year because of the 
Bacterial Ring-Rot which is a seed- 
disease does not live over winter in 



the soil under our Pennsylvania condi- 
tions. It is carried over and spread, 
however, through the seed. 

Fields found infected with this dis- 
ease in Pennsylvania are refused cer- 
tification. Seed stocks have also been 
rejected where the disease was found 
in potato fields grown on the same 
farm for table use. Growers buying 
Pennsylvania Certified seed can feel 
that they are buying seed from sources 
that are free from this dangerous and 
destructive disease. 

Varieties certified in bushels during 
1939: 

Russet Rural 106,518 



White Rural 

Pennigan 

Nittany 

Cobbler 

Katahdin 

Bliss Triumph 

Chippewa 

Total 



18,039 

7,710 

26,286 

760 

17,390 

4,307 

2,156 

183,166 



Growers wishing to secure a list of 
Pennsylvania certified seed potato 
growers can do so by writing to the 
Department of Agriculture, Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania. 



J. A. DONALDSON ELECTED 

(Continued from page 10) 
Problems pertinent to the potato in- 
dustry were discussed at the Annual 
Meeting, among them plans for furth- 
ering the interest in this publication, 
and constructive criticism of the mar- 
keting plan and the producer-distribu- 
tor relationship. 

As regards the Distributors, the mem- 
bership unanimously reaffirmed their 
opposition, expressed at the 1939 An- 
nual Meeting, to t he proposed Patman 
federal Anti-Chain Store Bill, and 
passed a resolution accordingly. 

The report of the Secretary-Treas- 
urer was unanimously approved by the 
membership, with no little enthusiasm. 
This report showed unprecedented pro- 
gress in all lines of Association activity, 
including increase in potatoes market- 
ed, Association income, Association 
membership, increased assets, and all 
finances accounted for, with no bills 
owing. 



February, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



13 



) 



Grower to Grower Exchange 

The rate for advertising in this column is a penny a word, minimum cost 25 cents, 
payable with order. (10% reduction when four or more insertions are ordered at 
one time.) Count name and address. Send ads to reach the GUIDE POST, Crider's 
Exchange Building, Bellefonte, Penna., by the 20th of te month previous to publi- 
cation. 



QUALITY SEED POTATOES: 

Russet Rurals, White Rurals, Cobblers 
and Nittanys. Certified Seeds and one 
year from certified. All grown from 
northern foundation seed. Ideal stor- 
age. All seed will be graded and packed 
in Association bushel paper bags. I am 
purchasing a new eight row sprayer, 
therefore am offering for sale a six row 
used power sprayer. Thomas Dennis - 
ton. Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania. 
(Butler County.) 

AVAILABLE: 

Copies of Dr. E. L. Nixon's book, "The 



Principles of Potato Production," $1.25 
per copy. Write for your copy today, to 
Association office, Bellefonte, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

WANTED TO BUY: 

Good used six-row sprayer. Will con- 
sider four-row if priced right. Write 
Box No. 22, care the GUIDE POST. 

FOR SALE OR TRADE: 

Good three-ton truck. Will trade on 
good used potato equipment. Whafs 
offered? Write Box No. 20, care the 
GUIDE POST. 



Growers ! Use This Column ! 

If You Have Anything To BUY or SELL, Let THE GUIDE POST 
Advertsie It For You! 



It is not so much the quality of a man^s 

mind as the quantity of his courage 

that carries him through. 

ALBERT C. ROEMHILD 

POTATO COMMISSION MERCHANT 
122 Dock Street Lombard 1000 Philadelphia 



i 



14 



THE GUIDE POST 



February, 1940 



MESSAGE TO THE MEMBERSHIP 

(Continued jrom page 8) 

ship among the growers and the Dis- 
tributors was everywhere apparent. 

With matters shaping themselves in 
this way, we cannot do otherwise but 
have a healthy growth during the com- 
ing year. 

We wish to thank all members of the 
Association for their loyal support m the 
past, and welcome all new members m- 
to the fold, hoping that they may find 
as much pleasure and profit m traveling 
together with us as we have found in 
the past. 

Sincerely 

J. A. Donaldson, President 



MY MOTHER'S BIBLE 

This book is all that's left me now. 

Tears will unbidden start, — 
With faltering lip and throbbing brow, 

I press it to my heart. 
For many generations past 

Here is our family tree; 

My Mother's hands this Bible clasped, 

She, dying, gave it me. 

Ah! Well do I remember those 

Whose names these records bear; 
Who round the hearth-stone used to 
close. 

After the evening prayer, 
And speak of what these pages said 

In tones my heart would thrill! 
Though they are with the silent dead. 

Here are they living still! 

My father read this holy book 

To brothers, sisters, dear; 
How calm was my poor Mother's look, 

Who loved God's word to hear! 
Her angel face, — I see it yet! 

What thronging memories come! 
Acrain that little group is met 

Within the walls of home! 

Thou truest friend man ever knew, 

Thy constancy I've tried; 
When all were false, I found Thee true. 

My counselor and guide. 
The mines of earth no treasures give 

That could this volume buy. 
In teaching me the way to live, 

It taught me how to die. 



Have you anything to Buy?— To Sell? 
To Swap? Use the GROWER EX- 
CHANGE! 



Certificate of Merit and 
Medals of Awards 

Judge Robert R. Lewis, President 
Judge of the 55th. Judicial District, Pot- 
ter County, who delivered a most in- 
spiring address at the Associations An- 
nual Banquet during the Farm Show 
was the recipient of a Certificate of 
Merit and Medal of Award from the 
Association. This was an expression of 
appreciation from the potato growers 
of the State and particularly the Associ- 
ation Membership of the long continued 
interest and loyalty of Judge Lewis in 
the potato grower's problems and the 
Association's program for fostering the 
best interests of the Industry Judge 
Lewis has always given freely of his 
time, sound judgment and counsel, and 
has been a most ardent supporter of 
Camp Potato, having deeded the prop- 
erty on Which the Camp is located 
to the Association as an outright gift. 
We can think of no one more deserving 
of the honor bestowed upon him tnan 
the Potato Grower's friend, the congen- 
ial Judge from Potter County. 

Two other Certificates of Merit and 
Medals of Award were presented during 
the Show. They went to Robert B. 
Keith, Mifflin County, and Joseph Cos- 
grove, Erie County, two N.Y.A boys 
who were members of Camp Potato 
during 1938 and 1939. The inscription 
on the Certificates presented to these 
young men reads, 'Tor maintaining sin- 
cerity, stability, and industry under 
unfavorable circumstances." In recog- 
nition the qualities thus shown by these 
voung men we express a faith in all 
youth and shall not falter from the 
original conception of fostering a Youth 
Movement as a part of Pennsylvania s 
Potato Program. 

These boys so signally honored by the 
Association will be given ample oppor- 
tunity to prove further the worthiness 
to be so recognized. We trust that they 
will bear in mind that any breach of the 
faith we have placed in them will re- 
flect not only on themselves but on 
other youth in whom we place our faith 
as well. Both of these young men will 
be found in Potter County next spring 
in the employ of Ed Fisher where they 
will have an opportunity to learn more 
of the fundamental principles and prop- 
er adaptations of modern potato pro- 
duction. 



i 



f 



HAVE YOU CHECKED 
YOUR 1940 PLANS? 



Have you checked with your county agent or experiment 
station to make sure that your plans for fertilizing potatoes 
this year are in line with their latest fertilizer recom- 
mendations for potatoes? Experiment stations frequently 
change their recommendations as a result of their in- 
vestigations and the adoption of new standardized high 
analysis fertilizer grades. The increasing importance of 
fertilizers well balanced with potash to produce the desired 
plant growth and yield of high quality potatoes is being 
emphasized. 

Analyses high in potash which are proving popular in- 
clude: 5-10-10 and 5-10-12 in the Mid-Atlantic States; 4-8-10 
and 8-16-20 in New England; and 3-9-18 and 3-12-12 in the 
Midwest Rates of application depend upon the plant food 
available in the soil and the high plant-food requirement 
of the expected yield. To guard against potash deficiency, 
plan to apply enough fertilizer to supply at least 200 lbs. of 
actual potash per acre. You will be surprised when your 
fertilizer dealer tells you how little extra it will cost. 



Write us for additional information 
and free literature on the profitable 
fertilization of crops. 




American Potash Institute, Inc. 

Washington, D. C. 



Investment Building 









16 



THE GUIDE POST 



February, 1940 



NOTES FROM THE FARM SHOW 

(Continued from page 9) 

Exhibits in the Potato Show by the 
Future Farmers and the 4H Club Mem- 
bers continue to show improvement 
from year to year. The Grand Cham- 
pion Exhibit of the Show was exhibited 
by Ford Kingsley, a Future Farmer 
from Dushore, Sullivan County, inis 
is the second successive year that Ford 
Kingsley has carried off the Grand 
Prize We salute you, Ford Kingsley. 



Honors for being Pennsylvania s 
High Yield grower with irrigation for 
1939 was conferred upon John J. Dan- 
iels, Farm Superintendent of the Her- 
shey Industrial School, Hershey, Dau- 
Industrial School, Hershey Dauphin 
phin County. His yield was 687.5 bushels 
on an officially measured acre. The acre 
was planted double row, 6 by 8 by 
30" A 7-21-21 fertilizer was used, week- 
ly applications of 8-8-100 bordeaux was 
applied, and several irrigations after 
July 1st were made. 




The Polato Growers Banquest in Progress 
the group present. Can you find yourself 

The Association Headquarters Booth 
was one of the busiest booths on the 
floor of the show throughout the week 
with private and group conferences, the 
writing of memberships, and the han- 
dling of the potato sales. More member- 
ships were written than at any previous 
Show and by far a greater number of 
growers contacted their Association 
through their officials and officers. 

Several thousand copies of the Pic- 
torial Folder edited by Potato Interests 
portraying Pennsylvania's Potato In- 
dustry and its future, the Pennsylvania 



at the Farm Show, showing a portion of 
in it? 

Certified Seed List, and other literature 
was passed out to growers and their 
friends from the Association Booth dur- 
ing the week. 

4l ||C i|l 4( 4i t 

The approximate 40,000 baked pota- 
toes served from the Baking Booth were 
dripping with over 1000 pounds of but- 
ter and well sprinkled with 75 pounds of 
salt and 15 pounds of pepper. Some 
one remarked that it was a good thing 
that they were served on paper plates 
and wooden forks, for who would want 
to wash 40,000 plates and forks. 
(Continued on page 20) 






SEND TO MAINE 

FOR HIGH-YIELD 

SEED POTATO STOCK 



Doesn't it stand to reason that Maine Seed Potato Grow- 
ers, with generations of specialized experience in the 
raising of potatoes, should produce the very finest 
Certified Seed Stock available anywhere? 

Isn't there conclusive evidence that Maine Certified 
Seed Stock is preferred to any other in the fact that our 
Seed Potato Industry annually ships over 5,000 cars to 
over 23 States and foreign countries? 

Send to Maine for strong, high-yield, disease-resisting 
stock vsrhether your needs are in bushels or carlots. 
Almost every important variety is available here. 

This year over 22,700 acres of Maine Seed Potato 
Stock v\rere Certified after four field and grading inspec- 
tions by the Maine Department of Agriculture. The qual- 
ity is there— in quantity to fill any seed stock need. 

• • • 

Write or wire for a copy of "Potatoes Inspected and Certified in 
Maine. 1939" with a list of Maine Certified Seed Potato Growers. 
Copies of Field Inspection Reports are also available upon request. 



MAINE DEVELOPMENT 
COMMISSION 

PRODUCTS DIVISION 
AUGUSTA, MAINE 



sT^T!: 



tA^\^ 






18 



THE GUIDE POST 



February. 1940 



POTATO CHIPS 

(Continued from page 7) 

fried potatoes put up in an attractive 
glass container tightly sealed which the 
housewife can purchase for a dime^ To 
Hav I read of a new packaged potato 
pro^dictlor "making -ashed potatoes 
The Dotatoes are shredded, dehydrated 
and packed in attractive cellophane 
bags When placed in boiling water for 
nvf minutes, the shreds are ready to be 
whipped into mashed potatoes. Ana 
they say they're real good!. 

* 

The government ^port °f potato 
stocks on hand January 1st, 1940 was 
somewhat higher than expected, prob 
ably due to the fact that relatively high 
prices since harvest has led to the 
Ireater sales of size B and of f -grade 
tubers than usual, less sold to livestock 
and fewer consumed on farms. The total 
US. stocks on hand for 1940 and some 
previous years are as follows: 



pewas and Katahdins than for Green 
Slountains, and 60 to 65c more for tjiem 
than for Rurals, but that s what tne ae 
mand from the Cleveland housewives, 
hotels and restaurants and other con- 
suming groups is doing, There are onb^ 
two ways to answer this: either Katah 
din and Chippewa quality is "ot as bad 
as most people believe, or else the pre- 
slnTday consumers don't give a hoot for 
inherent cooking quality but they will 
pay a premium for attractive appear- 

ance. 



— •- 



Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 



1, 1940- 
1, 1939- 
1, 1938- 
1, 1937- 
1, 1936- 
1, 1935- 



-103,318,000 bu. 
-103,550,000 bu. 
-113,155,000 bu. 
- 85,418,000 bu. 
-106,127,000 bu. 
-123,739,000 bu. 



According to a recent release of the 
Agricultural Marketing Service, there 
^improvement in the planting of good 
seed In 1938, growers reported that 
70.2% of seed used was home-grown 
In 1939, this had dropped to 68%, ana 
now the report of intentions to plant in 
1940, indicates an additional drop to 
65%. Still too much poor seed being 
used in Northern states, fPf^^^^^ly ^^^.^ 
you consider that nearly 100% of all 
southern potatoes must be grown from 
sMpped in seed, which makes the per- 
centage of home-grown seed used m 
Pennsylvania and other northern 
stages much higher than he average of 
65% reported for the total U. S. 1940 in- 
tended plantings. 

*: 

There's a story in today's Cleveland 
market quotations which I quote as fol- 
ISwtfro^i the V-S. Market News Ser- 
vice: "Maine Katahdins 2.35 -2.40, Chip- 
npwas 2 35, Green Mountains, 2.10, 
^S Russet Rurals, 1.75- L85, Idaho 
Russet Burbanks, 2.15- 2.25". Surely if 
potato growers were purchasing pota- 
toes for their own tables, they wouldnt 
pay 25 to 30c more a hundred for Chip- 



Pennsylvania had a reported 6 775,000 
bushels of potatoes stored on January 
1st of this year compared with 6 017,00^ 
bushels on January 1st, 1939, and 7 002 - 
000 bushels on January 1st, 1938. inese 
increased holdings were to be expe^ed 
as growers in the State have not been 
anxious to sell at prevailing PJices and 
iudfiing from the present market condi- 
tions they have not been unwise. 
However, the market is already high, 
and offers strong resistance to further 
price advances, and therefore the usual 
sound procedure of selling out the re- 
maining crop gradually on satisfactory 
Sfe?s which come along is more to be 
commended than to hold everythmg ex- 
peXg sharp advances which may not 
materialize. __^,^.^^ Shakespud". 



OVER THE PICKING TABLE 

(Continued jrom page 11) 

man who lives well is the one who is 
willing to go or to stay. And the man 
who is willing to go or stay, stays quite 
a while. John Calvin and John Knox 
had a deal to do with devising and for- 
mulating a religion of sorrow, and each 
died old at fifty-seven. Unfortunately, 
they took themselves seriously, at- 
tempting to say the final word. And 
anyone who does this is suffering from 
arterio-sclerosis of his think-cells. Lite 
is fluid; and nothing is permanent but 
change. 



Abraham Lincoln was as ]ust and 
generous to the rich and well-born as 
to the poor and humble— a rare thing 
among politicians. 



-A — 



Lincoln once said, '1 don't think much 
of a man who is not wiser today than 
he was yesterday." 




MONEY 
CROP! 



that's just about the most 
important word in potato 
growing, isn't it? And if you 
want to remove all doubt 
about the correct fertilizer 
to use - order Dempwolf's. 
It isn't what we SAY it will 
do - it's what growers tell us 
it HAS DONE for them. 
This year - use Dempwolf 
Fertilizers - A better Yield 
in Every Field - since 1870. 
Send for a copy of the 1940 
I Fertilizer Booklet. 

York Chemical Works 

YORK, PA. 






Whiterock 

Pulverized 

Limestone 

Besides being swift in action, it 
maintains its high solubility until 
every bit of sour soil has been neu- 
tralized. 

Sweetens sour soil! 

Loosens clay soil! 

Tightens sandy soil! 

Order your WHITEROCK now! 
Don't wait until mid-season! 




Whiterock Quarries 

Bellefonte, Pa. 




Certified 

SEED 
POTATOES 

NORTHERN MICHIGAN 
RUSSETS 

Fully Certified: Rigidly inspected 
seed produced in the proven section best 
known as a dependable source for this 
variety. The same uniform certified 
seed grade typical of our product. 

Special Tag: Economical source for 
profitably lanting all new seed. This 
stock includes crops of some of our 
best fields, but even moisture caused 
irregular shape. All certification in- 
spections the same as Fully Certified 
except for type. 




Cobblers 
Katahdins 



MAINE 

— Mountains 

— Chippewas 



Field selection of certified cr9ps 
eliminates most of the risk i" accepting 
eeed from a large producing section A 
dependable source from a definitely 
high rating grower permits confident 
plfnting. Katlhdins and Chippewas of 
this class are becoming scarce. 

Write or wire us for infor- 
mation and prices on your 
requirements for spring 
planting. 

"Every bag must be right** 



Doughertq Seed Growers 




Williamsport 



Penna. 



20 



THE GUIDE POST 



February, 1940 



NOTES FROM THE FARM SHOW 

(Continued jrom page 16) 

Members of the Baking Booth crew 
were as follows: Manager, Ed. Fisher, 
Coudersport, Potter County; Joseph 
Young, Clearfield County; Roy Thomp- 
son, Pete Bair, Joe Renko, Wm. Hart 
James Rossman, John Gordonier, Carl 
Thompson, Earl Swanson, Jerry Brigg- 
lea, Don Van Wegen, Walter Wren, Carl 
Graybill, Milford Clark and Clarence 
Crandall, all of Potter County; Benja- 
min Bailey and Walter Krieger of York 
County; and Charles J. Egnestz of 
Harrisburg. 

The most revolutionary piece of po- 
tato equipment to be shown for the first 
time was the digger arrangement 
worked out by William Templeton, 
Mercer County. In a few words it com- 
bines the potato digger directly with 
the power unit, eliminating wheels and 
numerous other attachments. William 
Templeton is a Mercer County potato 
grower who has tried to simplify the 
most difficult operation connected with 
potato growing. Potato growers will 
watch with much interest the develop- 
ment of this idea and its practical appli- 
cation to their digging problem. 

The Baking Potatoes were washed 
and packed in the Association Blue 
Label Bushel Bags by Austin Blakeslee, 
Blakeslee, Pa. Mr. Blakeslee has the 
only grower-owned and operated pota- 
to washer in the State. Not only did Mr. 
Blakeslee wash the Bakers and pack 
them, he did it without charge as an 
expression of his interest and coopera- 
tion in the Association's Program for the 
betterment of the Potato Growers and 
the Industry of the State. 

i|e 9|e 9|( >i< >K >|( 

Potato Machinery and Equipment 
Exhibits were numerous and we were 
particularly impressed with the fine 
spirit prevailing among the various 
dealers. We congratulate them on the 
high standard of business ethics under 
the keenest kind of competition for the 
potato growers business. Seed dealers 
report an increase in seed potato con- 
tacts and sales. This is as it should be, 
as the success of thousands of Pennsyl- 
vania potato growers will depend on the 
purchase and planting of new disease 
free seed for the 1940 crop. Many more 
will wish they had made such purchases 



when they come to dig, grade, and mar- 
ket next fall and winter. 



The Baking Potatoes were secured 
from Robert Getz, Albrightsville (Poco- 
no Mountains) Carbon County. Rodger 
Meckes a neighbor of Mr. Getz supplied 
20 bushel of this supply. They were 
Rural Russets whose baking quality has 
never been questioned when properly 
grown under favorable conditions. The 
Pocono Mountains is one of the places 
in the State that is peculiarly favorable 
for their production. 

:|c 9|c He >)( 4: * 

It came from many sources that the 
Potato Growers had two of the most at- 
tractive and distinctive signs on the 
floor of the Show. These were two large 
electric signs, one over the Association 
Booth, PENNSYLVANIA POTATO 
GROWERS; the other over the Baking 
Booth PENNSYLVANIA BAKED 
POTATOES. 

^e :ic 9i( >N ><< * 

Pennsylvania made Potato Chips 
were on sale at a dozen or more booths 
on the floor of the Show. Needless to 
say that these chips were made from 
Pennsylvania potatoes. Authentic fig- 
ures show that more than 500,000 bush- 
els of Pennsylvania potatoes are made 
into tasty chips annually. By labora- 
tory checks and by actual trial runs in 
chipping, the Chipping people report 
that Cobblers, and Katahdins are satis- 
factory early in the season but do not 
make a desirable chip late in the storage 
period. White Rurals and Russet Rur- 
als are in greatest demand by the chip- 
pers during winter and spring months. 

)tC>|( l|C 9|C 9|C H( 

One of the most direct, definite and 
to the point discussions during the week 
was that given by A. C. Ramseyer on 
spraying. In brief Mr. Ramseyer said, 
"if you know how to do a good job of 
spraying one acre, it is not difficult to 
spray 1000 acres, for you simply multi- 
ply the one acre by a thousand. Mr. 
Ramseyer has not deviated one bit from 
the original teaching as to lime, time of 
making the first sprays, number of 
nozzles, nozzle adjustment, timeliness 
of application, pressure, etc. He is not 
a man to sacrifice any detail that will 
add to efficiency or success. 



Bean Potato Sprayers 




CUT SPRAYING COSTS INCREASE YIELDS .SPRAY FASTER 
BETTER QUALITY . NO WORRIES . MAKE MONEY 

SPRAY WITH HIGH PRESSURE 

No grower is safe unless he sprays with high pressure. High pressure 
protects you against excessive spraying costs, low yield, delays in spray- 
ing, poor quality and loss of money. , T • ^ *u 

Decide today to investigate high pressure spraying and eliminate the 

obsolete low pressure system. • ^ ^ • ^ 

Bean line of high pressure potato sprayers offer a variety of price and 
sizes that will meet your requirements, that you can afford to invest in, 
and that will come back to you in savings in a larger and better crop. 




Have you found your new member 
to the Association? 



RUBBER SPOOL GRADER 

Cleans as it grades. Does not bruise or cut the potatoes All grading is 
doS on rulbef Much more accurate and when you are finished grading 
you have a fine looking pack that will sell. 

Investigate this Grader at once. 

John Bean Mfg. Co. 



Division Food Machinery Corporation 



LANSING 



MICHIGAN 



J 



22 



THE GUIDE POST 



February, 1940 



Membership Drive Shows Considerable Gain 



During the month of January, a very 
substantial gain was made on the Asso- 
ciation membership rolls, and not witn- 
out considerable help from members 
who were doing their bit to enter the 
name of a neighbor non-member. 

Dozens of one-time members, away 
from the Association dunng recent 
years, also came back to the fold m the 
past month. 

The Association office sincerely re- 
grets that all of the contributors were 
not noted during the Farm Show be- 
cause of the great rush there of gettmg 
names on the record. Many contribu- 
tors brought their new members right 
to the Association booth, and modestly 
failed to have us note the contribution. 
So to all those contributors whose names 
we do not list, our hearty congratula- 
tions for a fine job. 

Names of a number of contributors 
were taken, however, and these are list- 
ed, with sincere appreciation. We be- 
lieve that many of these listed contri- 
buted more than what we are crediting 
them for here, but we can only list those 
that have been noted. 

Leroy Eberly, of New Holland, Lan- 
caster County, gave the Association 
drive its most substantial boost, by 
bringing five new members to the Asso- 
ciation. , ^, 

Elam S. King, of Atglen, Chester 
County, also sent two new Association 

members. 

Jacob K. Mast, of Elverson, Lancaster 
County, also contributed two new mem- 
bers, to add to the many he has already 
enrolled in the past. ^ ^, • 

G. Douglas Jones, of Cleveland, Ohio, 
a continual and loyal supporter of the 
Association turned in two new mem- 
bers during the Farm Show. 

E. R. Spory, of Boswell, Somerset 
County, also gave two new members not 
before on the rolls. 

F V. Rohe, of Dushore, Sullivan 
County, rounded up another two new 

memberships. ^,^ • u* -n r-o,^ 

Robert Getz, of Albrightsville, Car- 
bon County, also contributed two new 
members and is looking for more. 

The following, then, in compliance 
with the request issued by the manage- 
ment at the Annual Meeting,— a fine 
list of loyal supporters— each turned in 
their one new member: 



William Beam, Morgantown, Berks 

County „ 1 r^ * 

Morris S. Kriebel, Barto, Berks County 
C. E. Kemmerer, Bethlehem, North- 
ampton County , , . ^ ^ . 
Clinton Geiger, Neffs, Lehigh County 
Roger Meckes, Albrightsville, Carbon 

County ^.^ _ ,. 

R. B. Stutzsman, Homer City, Indiana 

County _ . , 

J. C. McClurg, Geneva, Crawford 

County .„ _- , 

Oscar Hostetter, Thomasville, York 

County ^ _ 

Philip C. Antes, Williamsport, Lycom- 
ing County , . , ^ X 
J.R.Fetterolf, Kempton, Lehigh County 
J. Hansen French, Collegeville, Mont- 
gomery County 
Joseph H. Fisher, Boswell, Somerset 

County ^ _ ^, 

Don Stearns, Coudersport, Potter 

County ^ T u-^u 

Fred Zimmerman, Kempton, Lehigh 

County , ^ . ^ 4. 

A. C. Harwood, Wattsburg, Erie County 
Harlan Phelps, Liberty, Tioga County 
Ed Fisher, Coudersport, Potter County 
J. M. Lukehart, Puxsutawney, Jefferson 

County ^ ^ X 

E G. Ifft, Franklin, Venango County 
H C. Stockdale, Ravenna, Ohio 

The entire membership joins in 
thanking the above men for their coop- 
eration, and in welcoming this fine list 
of new members into the Association: 
(Some of these are not literally new to 
the Association, but have been away 
from the Association for several years, 
and then returned to the rolls) . 

Berks County : 

Andrew G. Kriebel, Hereford, Penna. 
John P. Moyer, Bally, Penna. 
Harvey Schenkler, Kutztown, Penna. 

Bradford County: 

H. N. Cobb, Towanda, Penna. 

Bucks County : 

Fred P. Fisher, Quakertown, Penna. 

Charles Truscott, Perkasei, Penna. 

Butler County : 

Roy C. Ferguson, Valencia, Penna. 

Cambria County: 

George Benshoff, Johnstown, Penna. 

Stenzle Gittings, Ebensburg, Penna. 

(Continued on page 24) 




W 



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111 



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and 
Raw Bone Manures 

Dependable Quality for over 83 years - Farm, Factory or 

Warehouse Delivery 



Oldest Brands 

In 

AMERICA 




BAUGH & SONS CO. 

20 S. Del. Ave. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



House of BAUGH" founded in 1817 




POTATO GROWERS it pays to use certified seed 

HIGHER quality - LARGER YIELDS - MORE PROFIT 



TWENTY - ONE 

YEARS OF 

SUCCESSFUL 

POTATO 

MARKETING 




LOOK FOR 
THE SIGN 

OF 
QUALITY 



WE OFFER A DEPENDABLE SUPPLY OF CERTIFIED 



RUSSET RURALS 
KATAHDINS 



IRISH COBBLERS 
CHIPPEWAS 



GREEN MOUNTAINS 
PONTIACS 



Michigan Potato Growers Exchange^^nc. 

CADILLAC 



IL 




24 



THE GUIDE POST 



February, 1940 



MEMBERSHIP DRIVE SHOWS 

CONSIDERABLE GAIN 

(Continued from page 22) 

Carbon County: 

W D. Musser, New Bethlehem, Penna. 
George Seigworth, Strattonville, Penna. 
Elmer T. Meckes, Albrightsville, Penna. 

Chester County : 

Samuel R. Chalfont, Dowington, Penna. 
Frank H. Ellis, 3rd, Elverson, Penna. 
Gates C. Gilmore, Westtown, Penna. 
Elam B. Kauf f man, Parkesburg, Penna. 
Valentine King, Cochranville, Penna. 
Laurence Ritter, Atglen, Penna. 
Henry K. Umble, Parkesburg, Penna. 

Clarion County: 

Grover Delp, New Bethlehem, Penna. 

Clinton County : 

George G. Ramm, Lock Haven, Penna. 

Columbia County : 

Harold Leiby, Berwick, Penna. 

John Petro, Catawissa, Penna. 

Crawford County: 

T R. Cain, Conneaut Lake, Penna. 

D L. Crum, Meadville, Penna. 

Oscar Swaney, Meadville, Penna. 

Cumberland County: 

Mark R. Basehore, Mechanicsburg, 

Ppnna 
S D Barehore, Mechanicsburg, Penna. 
J. B. Hulton, Mechanicsburg, Penna. 

Dauphin County : 

Kenneth Beachley, Harrisburg, Penna. 

Hyles Hagy, Harrisburg, Penna. 

K. W. Lauer, Harrisburg, Penna. 

Erie County : 

John Barsukoff, Albion, Penna. 

W G. Harwood, Wattsburg, Penna. 

Sam Kitcey, Albion, Penna. 

Mrs. F. G. Mohring, North Girard, 

Penna. ^ , ^ 

Harold Osborne, Waterford, Penna. 
Chas. L. Weislogel, Fairview, Penna. 
Indiana County: 
H S. Lute, Barnesboro, Penna. 
S. Quay Overdorff, Indiana, Penna. 

Jefferson County : 

Dr. J. M. Lukehart, Punxsutawney, 

Penna. _ 

Mike Harrick, Punxsutawney, Penna. 

Lancaster County : 

Elmer Bucher, Ephrata, Penna. 

F. S. Bucher, Lancaster, Penna. 

Casper S. Eberly, Ephrata, Penna. 

Cyrus B. Ferguson, Kirkwood, Penna. 

Irvin Graybill, Stevens, Penna. 

E. K. Hess, Akron, Penna. 

Paul S. Hiestand, Marietta, Penna. 



J. Earl Martin, Mt. Joy, Penna 
Jeremiah Martin, New Holland, Penna. 
Tobias Martin, East Earl, Penna. 
Aaron Nolt, Bird-in-Hand, Penna. 
Millard Schoup, Elverson, Penna. 
J. Carlton Schult, Elizabethtown, 

Penna. _ 

Jesse Stoltzfus, Elverson, Penna. 

Lebanon County: 

H L. Basehore, Annville, Penna. 

Lyle Beahm, Annville, Penna. 

Andrew Klinefelter, Lebanon, Penna. 

Irwin Krall, Lebanon, Penna. 

J Mark Kreider, Lebanon, Penna. 

Meyer Milling Company, Lebanon, 

Penna. _ 

Howard Winters, Cleona, Penna. 

Mrs. Sally Zug, Myerstown, Penna. 

Lehigh County: 

Frank Tressler, Conyngham, Penna. 

Lycoming County: 

T C. Barnfield, Nisbet, Penna. 

E. J. Waltz, Montoursville, Penna. 

Mercer County: 

Robert T. Elder, Grove City, Penna. 

Northampton County : 

Fred D. Achenbach, Pen Argyl, Penna. 

Dr E J. Balliet, Northampton, Penna. 

Harold Fehnel, Bath, Penna. 

Albert C.Garr, North Pen Argyl, Penna. 

V A Houston, Northampton, Penna. 

C' E. Kemmerer, Bethlehem, Penna. 

Joseph E. Kemmerer, Bethlehme, 

Penna 
Russell S. Uhler, Bangor, Penna. 
Laurence C. Wotring, Pen Argy, Penna. 

Potter County : 

Earl Hyde, Millport, Penna. 

Schuylkill County: 

Elvin Huntzinger, Hegins, Penna. 

Earl C. Mengel, Orwigsburg, Penna. 

Arlen F. Seltzer, Ringtown, Penna. 

Lloyd Snyder, Valley View, Penna. 

Somerset County : 

O. D. Barnett, Boswell, Penna. 

N. L. Diehl, Somerfield, Penna. 

H. H. Glessner, Berlin, Penna. 

Oscar Good, Boswell,Penna. 

Lester J. Lohr, Boswell, Penna. 

Peck Brothers, Meyersdale, Penna. 

John S. Rhoades, Stoyestown, Penna. 

Sullivan County: 

Joseph D. Murphy, Dushore, Penna. 

Susquehanna County: 

Mrs. F. E. Woodruff, Montrose, Penna. 

Tioga County : 

Edward Comstock, Morris, Penna. 

Venango County: 

Floyd Rice, Diamond, Penna. 

(Continued on page 26) 



COCKSHUTT DISC PLOWS 

The famous "No. 31" COCKSHUTT Disc 
Plow with overhead beam is used and recom- 
mended by leading potato growers in Penn- 
sylvania and elsewhere. Three to six discs 
24" to 28". S K F bearings. Unusually LIGHT 
draft. 




ALL Dlows are regularly equipped with spring release hitch. Well known 
Jo^atrgrTwers havelouVthe COCKSHUTT No. 31 d^^^/^^^^*^^^^^ 
solution to their plowing problem. Write for folders and names of users 
you know? Also No. 1 COCKSHUTT Disc Plow with two discs for smaller 

^'^^^' Sold by all dealers of the EUREKA Mower Co., Utica, N. Y. 



DUANE H NASH 



District Representative 



Haddonfield 



New Jersey 



Modern Marketing Methods 
Call for Paper Bags 

Attractively Printe d Bags Bri ng Repeat Orders 

HAMMOND Betterbags 

Combine High Grade Printing with 
Essential Strength and Quahty 




Hammond Bag & Paper Company 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Paper Bags for Lime. Limestone. Fertilizer. Flour. Feed and Potatoes 



26 



THE GUIDE POST 



February, 1940 



I 



DR. NIXON COMMENTS ON IDEAS 
OBTAINED FROM FARM SHOW 

(Continued jrom page 4) 
than merely preventing their bodies 
from raveling out if given a chance. 

Did you know, — 

— That consistancy and conformity 
are the hobgoblins of little minds? Who- 
so would be a designer of potato equip- 
ment must be a nonconformist. A rever- 
ence for the way it was always done is 
the other terror that scares us from self- 
trust. 

Confusus say, couldn't hear speakers 
at convocation (opening night at the 
State Show). 

Confusus say, announcers voice plain- 
ly heard all other nights. 

Confusus say, better let announcers 
make agricultural speeches. 

Confusus say, political speeches no 
matter. 

Confusus say, if convocation night to 
be feature night, let it be heard. 



evidence of the disease, but the tubers 
still may be contaminated. 

From the evidence accumulated, by 
the department's Bureau of Plant In- 
dustry the principal means of spreading 
the disease is through te seed stock. 
Although it may also be carried on the 
hands, old bags, graders, planters and 
other equipment, including cellars and 
storage bins in which infected tubers 
were stored. 



WATCH SEED STOCK ! 
POTATO GROWERS TOLD 

Watch Seed Stock Potato Growers Told 

According to the State Department 
of Agriculture the Bacterial ring-rot dis- 
ease that was brought into Pennsyl- 
vania several years ago on seed potatoes 
has caused losses up to 30% fo the crop. 
It has become so serious in some sections 
of the country that the potato acreage 
and production has declined as much 
as 50%. This disease is undoubtely the 
most serious of any that the Pennsyl- 
vania potato industry has had to face 
for many years. 

The department cautions Pennsylvan- 
ia potato growers to make a thorough 
study of their seed source even though 
the seed stock they have been buymg 
has been certified. No seed is certified 
in Pennsylvania that is grown on farms 
where plants or tubers infected with 
bacterial ring-rot as been found, even 
though the diseased tubers were found 
in table potatoes. This regulation is not 
being followed in all other states that 
are supplying Pennsylvania with cer- 
tified seed potatoes, although it is gen- 
erally required that the stocks under 
certification be entirely free from this 
disease. Such stocks may not show any 



MEMBERSHIP DRIVE SHOWS 

CONSIDERABLE GAIN 

{Continued from page 24) 

Warren County: 

Richard D. Abbey, Warren, Penna. 
W. Lecant Alcorn, Corry, Penna. 
Neils Chrsitensen, Columbus, Penna. 
J. P. Fenstermacher, Warren, Penna. 
Carl Garber, Torpedo, Penna. 
Howard Garber, Torpedo, Penna. 
Stanley Laurence, Warren, Penna. 
W. C. Leofsky, Spring Creek, Penna. 
A. P. Lindell, Russell, Penna. 
Lottsville, Milling Company, Bear Lake, 

Penna. 
Allen Marsh Kinzua, Penna. 
Ellis L. Martin, Torpedo, Penna. 
Gerald R. Owens, Warren, Penna. 
C. V. Pierce, Torpedo, Penna. 
J. H. Reagle, Columbus, Penna. 
Rouse Hospital, Youngville, Penna. 
Carl Spelling, Bear Lake, Penna. 
Ralph Way, Russell, Penna. 
C. R. York, Warren Penna. 
Westmoreland County: 
George G. Connor, Jeanette, Penna. 
York County : 

Roy D. Dubs, Hanover, Penna. 
V. A. Flinchbaugh, Red Lion, Penna. 
Frank W. Knerr, Bridgeton, Penna. 
Eli Williams, York, Penna. 

Out of State : 

Harry S. Buhrman, Smithsburg, Mary- 
land 
H. A. Warne, Ridgefield, N. J. 
W. E. Flock, Allentown, N. J. 
Irvin Rohe, Syracuse, N. Y. 
H. J. Evans, Georgetown, N. Y. 
Curtis L. Cook, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Jay Saxton, Avoca, New York 
Arthur Jackson, Vandalia, Ohio 
John K. Graham, Adams Mills, Ohio 
John M. Davis, Coshocton, Ohio 
W. H. Matthews, Salem, Ohio 
Edward Switlinski, Hudson, Ohio 
A. L. Keller, Morgantown, West 

Virginia 
E. F. Schiele, Racine, Wisconsin 



.. 




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The Iron Age Automatic 
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Adjustable for seed ranging 
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VOLUME XVII ..pr^'MiNT STMiOH 



NUMBER 3 



aTATE. 



COLUtCt, 



PA. 



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MARCH 



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PuMldved ^ the 

PENNSYLVANIA COOPERATIVE 
POTATO GROWERS ASSOCIATION 

INCORPORATED 



^>k««'-»^% 




QUALITY IN THE HILL.-The aim of the 
potato grower should be a good yield of uniform 
quality tubers. Uniform quality of well shaped 
tubers is influenced by the kind of seed you 
plant-plant good seed of an adapted variety; 
condition of the soil-provide an abundance of 
humus, well distributed with the soil; depth of 
planting-the seed pieces should be 3 to 4 inches 
below the level; proper cultivation and thorough 
spraying. If these principles and practices are 
adhered to, a profitable crop of potatoes can be 
grown even under adversity. 



Potato Seed Fundamentals 

by J. B. R. Dickey, Agronomist, The Pennsylvania State College 



One of the principal foundation stones 
of a good crop of potatoes is good seed. 
If the seed is not right, or not handled 
rightly, the grower is handicapped from 
the start and cannot expect 100 per cent 
results no matter how favorable soil, cul- 
ture and weather conditions may be. 
Good seed, of course, assumes seed free 
from disease, preferably seed grown in 
the north or at high altitudes where 
freedom from disease and the essential 
vigor of a crop naturally best adapted 
to cool, moist weather are most easily 
maintained. Seed one year removed 
from certification may be satisfactory 
it certified seed is not obtainable or be- 
yond the grower's financial reach. If 
one-year-removed seed is to be planted 
it is a safer and more satisfactory 
proposition if produced in the more 
northern and higher altitude counties 
where summers are not so hot and dry. 

Variety 

Cobblers still seem to be the most 
satisfactory early variety and the Nit- 
tany Cobbler is popular. Other early 
varieties have not gained much of a 
place in Pennsylvania. The Chippewa is 
rather early, but later than the Cobbler. 
It is a beautiful, smooth, white potato, 
but is susceptible to scab. It has been 
subject to some storage troubles but is 
worth trying for medium early market. 

The Katahdin has risen rapidly in 
popularity but like Cobblers and Chip- 
pewas is susceptible to scab. It is smooth 
and white and seems remarkably free 
of second growth, growth cracks and 
hollow heart. Excellent appearance 
has overcome its somewhat question- 
able cooking quality. The potato chip 
industry seems to have serious trouble 
in using Katahdins after cold weather 
sets in. The Katahdin makes less vine 
growth than the Rurals, which may be 
a decided advantage. It tends to set 
close to the surface so should be planted 
deep and sometimes requires ridging to 
prevent sunburn. Being free from se- 
cond growthi there is not the same rea- 
son for delaying planting of Katahdins 
as with the Rurals and Green Moun- 
tains. 

White or Russet Rurals may still be 
the safest variety for the average grow- 
er in spite of their well-known faults. 
If one's market is prejudiced against 



Russets the next best bet may be a good 
white Rural. The Rurals and Russets 
seem the best keepers and most popular 
with the chip industry. 

There are a few new varieties which 
may have promise but most of them 
are not in commercial production and 
not tried out under our conditions. 

Storage 

Good seed should have the first set 
of sprouts just nicely visible at planting 
time. Sprouted seed has lost vigor and 
is apt to make too many stems per hill, 
especially if seconds are planted. One 
cannot keep seed potatoes properly in 
the average house cellar, and certainly 
not in one with a furnace. To delay 
sprouting requires low temperature in 
the storage, (below 40°). This is often 
hard to maintain as the weather warms 
up outside. A well-insulated cellar 
serves two purposes; namely, prevent- 
ing freezing and maintaining low tem- 
perature in spring. When the storage 
starts to warm up and the potatoes be- 
gin to sweat and sprout in March, 
much might often be done by open- 
ing everything up on days, (and nights) , 
when the outside temperature is low- 
er than the inside temperature, but 
not enough below freezing to make 
it dangerous. By opening everything 
up on such cool bright days and letting 
the wind blow through one can dry 
out a lot of moisture and lower the 
temperature several degrees. When out- 
side temperatures are higher than in- 
side the storage should be kept shut 
tightly. Keep a thermometer in the stor- 
age where a large volume of potatoes 
are stored in a very small space. There 
is need for some change of air to pre- 
vent smothering and internal discol- 
oration; otherwise, ventilation is largely 
a matter of controlling temperature 
and removing excess moisture. 

Unless one has a really good storage 
the best way to keep seed potatoes is 
in a properly arranged pit. Pitting is 
especially good where one wants to hold 
seed in a dormant condition for late 
planting. They will often come out in 
May with the eyes just started. It is no 
use to tell how to pit potatoes now, but 
your County Agent can give you di- 
rections next fall. If done, it must be 
done right. 



THE GUIDE POST 



March, 19-30 



When planting is to be delayed tiU 
late May and the storage is so warm 
that seed is sprouting rapidly- s°""^ 
good may bo done by spreading the 
fubers out into as much light as possible. 
This tends to -ake short stocky sprouts 
which are not broken off, rather tnan 
Tong white, brittle sprouts. Turning and 
otherwise moving the tubers also may 
help, but large-scale operations of this 
sort are of course rather impractical. 

Time of Planting 

Early potatoes should be planted as 
early as possible in order to make maxi- 
nium growth before dry, hot weather 
stops development. When to plant the 
ma?n crop is something of a gamble 
Highest yields in a favorable season will 
fesult from rather early planting and 
growth continued as long as possible. 
With Rurals and Green Mountains early 
planting often leads to ill-shaped tubers 
ff August drought and heat check but 
do not entirely stop growth. In an ex- 
periment at State College on time of 
planting during the last two seasons, 
when the late summer continued dry, 
the earliest planted potatoes made the 
best yield and the lowest percentage ot 
small tubers. In the three p™^.s 
years, however, planting in late May 
lave iust about as large total yieMs and 
usually the most salable crops^ Planting 
after June 1st always reduced both the 
total and the percentage of No. 1 stocK. 
The yield and grade with Rurals went 
down more rapidly than with Green 
Mountains after June 1st. Where the 
season is longer, planting after June Is 
may not reduce returns so rapidly, but 
some growers are certainly over-doing 
the late planting idea. 



Depth of Planting 

This is most important, especially 
with Katahdins which set shallow. Po- 
tatoes planted 3 or ^^mches below the 
level of the field will develop better, 
and more normally, will escape sun- 
burn as well as some of the other things 
which reduce quality, and will almost 
invariably make better yields. Deep 
planting depends largely on deep soil 
preparation. No planter will put the 
seed deeper than the soil has been torn 
up with something such as a good spring 
harrow run as near plow depth as pos- 
sible. 

Seed Cutting 

The safest and simplest plan is ordi- 
narily to get the seed into the ground 



'' '"<ia^dr often'resul f^^^^^^ 
fhe 'planTer'boxlull of cut seed over the 
noon hour Seed cut long ahead may be 
corked or callused over by holding it 
fn crates or baskets for about a week 
n a room with high humidity and high 
emperature (about 70°). Few have faci- 
ftTes for doing this. The best place to 
cork it over is in the warm, moist soil. 
Once dr^ed off a cut surface will never 
grow a callus. The callus stops excess 
drying and resists rots ]ust as does the 
natural skin. Callused seed will with- 
stand adverse conditions much the 
same as will small potatoes planted 
whole. Cut seed held in bags or large 
piles will soon heat and spoil. 

Seed pieces should be chunky, with 
as little cut surface as possible. One 
and one-half ounce pieces are about as 
large as high priced seed makes econom- 
ically practicable since U jounce seed 
planted 32" x 12" will require about 24 
bushels of seed per acre. 

Small tubers, li to U or 2 inches, will 
make good seed if they have the other 
necessary qualifications, but the prac- 
tice of selling the No. I's and planting 
the No 2's will not work unless the No. 
I's would have made good seed. Seed 
smaller than U inches is too small to be 
satisfactory, though it is sometimes 
used. "Seconds" will stand more ad- 
verse weather in the ground but may 
best be planted a little farther apart m 
the row to give room for the several 
stems often produced. Tubers li to 2 in 
size may be cut in half for the sake of 
economy, but when seed is cheap all 
seconds are best planted whole. 

If one does not have, or cannot get, 
good seed in good condition, or if he is 
not able to care for it or plant is prop- 
erly, it may be more profitable to sell 
the seed as table stock rather than to 
invest the other expenses and labor in- 
volved in trying to grow a crop where 
poor stands, lack of vigor and other 
factors are almost bound to reduce yields 
and profits below cost of production. 
Poor seed is always poor economy. 



When ansewering an advertisement, 
please favor us by mentioning that you 
saw the advertisement in the GUIDE 
POST- 



March, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



Timely Observations and Suggestions 

L. T. Denniston, Association 
Field Representative 



You are only a spud to me 

Brown skin and eyes that can't see; 

On a hotel menu 

You're given your due. 
Though you're only a spud to me. 

Yes, you're only a spud to me, 
Despite your swell family tree; 

Creamed, fried or baked. 

Your taste can't be faked. 
For you're only a spud to me. 

While you're only a spud to me. 
Your names lend you dignity; 

"Lyonaise" on one day. 

The next, rissolee, 
Still you're only a spud to me. 

Shucks, you're only a spud to me. 
Disguised at times though you be; 

As "au gratin" or boiled, 

My tongue's seldom foiled, 
Since you're only a spud to me. 

Aw, you're only a spud to me. 
In France you're a ''pomme de terre", 
gee, 

"An apple of earth" 

Arouses my mirth, 
'Cause you're only a spud to me. 

G'wan, you're only a spud to me. 
From Idaho, Maine or the Quaker State; 

Whether "new" or just mashed, 

Or even brown-hashed, 
Sure, you're only a spud to me. 

Oh, you're only a spud to me. 
But at meal-time I hail you in glee; 

You may arrive "diced". 

Or even come "sliced". 
You're still just a spud to me. 



CAUSES OF POOR STANDS.— That 
good seed results in better stands and 
increased vigor is a well established 
fact. A good stand of vigorous plants 
is one of the first steps toward a good 
yield. It costs no more to prepare the 
root bed, to plant, to fertilize, to spray, 
to cultivate and dig an acre with a good 
stand than it does the acre with a poor 
stand. The use of good seed has taught 
many an otherwise careless grower to 
give more attention to seed storage, cut- 
ting, preparation of the root bed, plant- 
ing, placement of fertilizer, cultivation 
and spraying. Some of the more com- 



mon causes of "poor stands" are listed 
below. With the approach of planting 
season it will be well to read these over 
carefully and have them in mind as the 
planter starts down across the field 
some weeks from now. 

1. Poor seed — Disease free seed is the 
first step towards good stands of vigor- 
ous plants. 

2. Poor storage— Storage should be 
such as to prolong dormancy and in no 
way allow for sprout or tuber injury 
such as heating or freezing. 

3. Careless cutting— Each seed piece 
should be blocky and contain at least 
one eye. Cutters, whether they be the 
simple knife or of the mechanically 
operated type, are no more fool proof 
than the man who operates them. Cheap 
labor is often the most expensive in the 
end on this job. 

4. Seed pieces too small — Seed pieces 
should not be less than an ounce in 
v/eight and for economy should not ex- 
ceed two ounces. Small whole seed is 
more certain of giving a good stand 
than small cut seed. 

5. Exposing cut seed to hot sun — The 
idea is to plant and cover seed as it is 
cut. 

6. Careless planting — Straightness of 
rows and proper depth are important. 
Planters are not foolproof. The operator 
should be of fair to good intelligence. 
Keep the hopper well supplied with 
seed and fertilizer, check the shoe and 
cover discs for dragging clods or other 
obstructions. Do not spill fertilizer in 
the potato hopper. 

7. Defective planter — See that the 
planter is in proper adjustment. Make 
your planter do your planting as you 
desire it done. Be the boss of the 
planter; don't allow the planter to boss 
you. 

8. Fertilizer injury — Fertilizer should 
not come in direct contact with the seed. 
Modern planters are giving more at- 
tention to fertilizer distribution or 
placement. 

9. Planting too shallow or too deep — 
Seed should be planted from three to 
four inches below the level of the soil. 



^*;-;'';--'5-;;:''^--rt 















PREPARATION OF THE ROOT BED 



March, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 








With the approach of planting season, the potato grower should give most serious 
^«cirfrratiorto the preparation of the root bed. Plowing or working the soil too 
r* ^r too drv are nSr conducive to good planting conditions and may result 
^ unfavorable worScond^ of the%oil for the remainder of the season. 

Loosenesfand d^^^^^^^ soil for planting are desired. The litter or organic mal- 

hr^hould be we^^^ throughout the depth of the soil . The above pic- 

ures taken on tl^e farm ^^ Evan D. Lewis, Johnstown Cambria County show a 
mist ideal roo" bed and planting conditions. Note the loose friable conditions of 
^^fsc^^r^ie dlstrfbution of organic matter, depth of planting and the ideal condi- 
tion of the field after planting. (Photographed by Martin Myers). 



As you start to plant, level off a short 
space and see if you are planting the 
proper depth. 

10. Root bed too fine or too compact — 
The ideal root bed is one that is loose 
but fairly coarse. Work the soil up 
rather than down. Pulverizing or com- 
pacting the soil should be avoided. 

11. Failure to open soil after planting 
— Open the soil with the weeder or 
harrow as soon after each rain as pos- 
sible. 

12. Harrowing too deep after plant- 
ing — Harrowing out seed after planting 
is mostly due to too shallow planting. 
The springtooth harrow is an elegant 
tool for breaking the soil where seed is 
planted the proper depth. 

SOME FIGURES ON THE VALUE OF 
PLANTING GOOD SEED— The follow- 
ing figures were presented by my father, 
Thomas Denniston, Slippery Rock, But- 
ler County. He is an ardent follower 
of the principles of potato production 
laid down by Terry, Fritch, and Nixon. 
The figures given here are not from an 
idle dream of theory, but are based on 
numerous checks and records over a 
period of years. 

•1 find very little difference in the 
yield or quality of the crop produced 
from the very best northern grown dis- 
ease-free-seed and that produced from 
seed one-year-removed from a good 
northern source. However, under my 
conditions (Northern Butler County), 
to use the seed longer means an ever 
decreasing yield of inferior quality. 

A number of years ago I came to the 
conclusion that it payed me well to 
plant nothing but the best of northern 
seed. This seed on the average cost 
me $12. per acre more than local seed. 
Let us compare this new disease-free- 
seed with seed two-years-removed 
which on the average I find will not 
give within 50 bushels per acre as high 
a yield. Let us assume yields of 400 bu. 
and 350 bu. per acre respectively for the 
two sources of seed. It is my exper- 
ience that I can secure 80% U. S. No. 1. 
potatoes on the direct northern seed as 
against 70% U. S. No. 1. on the local 
two-year seed. The 20% off grade stock 
in the former will run on the average 
IS':; seconds, 5% pick outs The 30% 
off grade in the latter will run 20 , 
seconds and 10% pick outs. 

Now let us assume that potatoes are 



$1. per bushel for U. S. No. 1. stock 
and assume that pick outs and seconds 
are each worth $.60 per bu. But one 
thing we must take into account, with 
good storage, I can get as much (for 
seed) for my number 2's or B's out of 
my new northern seed as I do for the U. 
S. No. 1. or $1. per bushel. 

Now let us compare the two on the 
basis of these facts. 

Northern disease-free-seed: 

Total yield 400 bu. 

Yield U. S. No. 1 320 

Yield U. S. No. 1 Size B 60 . . . 

Yield pick outs 20 ... 

Total receipts 

Less additional seed cost. 



• • • • 



$320. 

60. 

12. 
.$392. 

12. 
$380. 



Local seed: 



bu. 

$245. 
42. 
21. 
$308. 
seed $72. 



Total yield 350 

Yield U. S. No. 1 245 

Yield U. S. No. 1 Size B. 70 

Yield pick outs 35 

Total receipts 

Difference in favor of northern 

I have not been troubled during these 
years with stem end discoloration of 
which we hear so much and of which 
so many growers are complaining. 
Whether the continued policy of plant- 
ing nothing but the best northern seed 
is responsible for my being free of this 
trouble I do not know. I am firmly con- 
vinced that by planting good seed and 
giving the best care and culture pos- 
sible we can grow as good potatoes as 
can be grown anywhere in the country. 

ON BUYING SEED POTATOES— Here 

are a few guiding questions to ask your- 
self when it comes to buying seed for 
planting the 1940 crop:— 

1. Was the seed I am about to buy 
produced in a proven seed area, or at 
least no older than one-year-removed 
from such a proven area? 

2. Were the fields in which it was 
produced thoroughly rogued during 
the growing season to remove diseased 
plants? (or) Was the seed planted so 
free of disease and from a recognized 
foundation-seed-source so as to insure 
a very low disease content? 

3. Was the seed carefully harvested 
and stored under favorable conditions 
conducive to preserving its vitality, 
keeping it dormant and firm for plant- 
ing? 

(Continued on page 20) 



8 



THE GUIDE POST 



March, 194U 



March, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



9 



THE GUIDE POST 

Published monthly by the Pennsylvania 
Cooperative Potato Growers, Inc. 

OFFICERS 

J. A. Donaldson, Emlenton ..President 
Roy R. Hess, Stillwater . . . .Vice-Pres. 

E. B. Bower, Bellefonte, 

Sec'y-Treas. and Gen. Mgr. 



DIRECTORS 

Jacob K. Mast Elverson, Chester 

P. Daniel Frantz Coplay, Lehigh 

Hugh McPherson Bridgeton, York 

John B. Schrack Loganton, Clinton 

Roy R. Hess Stillwater, Columbia 

Ed. Fisher Coudersport, Potter 

Charles Frey North Girard, Erie 

J. A. Donaldson, R.l, Emlenton, Venango 
R. W. Lohr Boswell, Somerset 

Annual membership fee $1.00. This in- 
cludes the Guide Post. 

All communications should be ad- 
dressed to E. B. Bower, Secretary -Treas- 
urer and General Manager, Bellefonte, 
Pennsylvania. 



Days of March 

WARNING 

I looked out over my garden 

And saw a gray chicadee 
Eating the purple berries 

On a dark green cedar tree— 

A friendly cedar tree. 

I thought he seemed to listen, 
And like the dripping sound 

The melting snow was making, 
To something underground- 
Some listener underground. 

It may be some one answered 
With words I do not know 

(I've never heard a crocus bulb 
Stir under the soft snow- 
Under the melting snow). 

But bulbs and roots are waiting 
And hear the melting song; 

In musical slow numbers 
It says: ''It will not be long- 
It will not be very long." 

— Louise Driscoll. 



OUR PRESIDENT SAYS— 

Siens of Spring are all about us these 
days-Snow is melting and runnmg 
offfMaple sugar is in the m^^ing; and 
Robins are returnmg to the farms 
again; but the surest and best sign we 
see of Spring as we journey among the 
potato growers of Pennsylvania are 

the old potato Pla^,^/^^^f;\^^fu^c^ 
from under the chalf piles on the back 
of the barn floors, cleaned up and check- 
ed over for new parts needed. What s 
that*^ Should have been done last year 
before putting the planters away? 
Granted! But better done now than 
waiting until the seed is half cut and 
the ground all ready. 

Good potato growers are also busy 
spreading out the seed pile so sprouting 
may be held to a minimum, as they 
know that many careless people lose 
a good percentage of their Prospective 
crops before they even plant them by 
using badly sprouted seed. 

And what a contented feeling we 
have as we look over our storage and 
think how simple it was to sell our last 
year's crop. Just a matter of packing 
in Blue Label pecks, writing the State 
Office at Bellefonte to sell them, truck- 
ing them to market, and getting direct 
our check back, in full, in only a few 
days. 

What a fortunate lot of people we 
Pennsylvania Potato Growers are. 

J. A. Donaldson, President. 

NEW USES FOR POTATOES 

The National Farm Chemurgic Coun- 
cil in a recent news bulletin, issued 
February 10, 1940, published the follow- 
ing interesting information on new uses 
for potatoes: 

"Potatoes may occupy a prominent 
place in the life of man, but they prom- 
ise to become increasingly important 
through the experiments of Herman C. 
Nielsen, an industrial research chem- 
ist who has produced some twenty-four 
by-products from them in the labor- 
atory maintained in the basement of 
his summer home at Trufant, Michigan. 
"Included in the articles produced 
are starch, flour, flakes, crumbles, water 
paste, acoustic plaster, pancake flour, 
imitation stone, plastic wood, wall 
board, floor tiles, wall finish, cloth siz- 
ing, paper glaze, wall paper cleanser, 
caustic potash, gin and cologne spirits. 
(Continued on page 13) 



The Life Story of a Seed Potato 



by A. Certified Spud 



The story of how I came to be classed 
as a certified spud started one spring 
day when I was scooped up from a po- 
tato bin and cut into pieces, trucked out 
to a field on top of a mountain and 
planted. This really wasn't as bad as I 
thought it would be, because I was 
planted in nice soft ground where I 
could get lots of food and moisture. 

In a short time I started to grow and 
in less than two weeks I peeped through 
the ground. During all this time I was 
cultivated and my bed kept in a loose 
and refreshing condition. 

It seemed after I developed my first 
leaves life was just one blamed thing 
after another. If it wasn't the sprayer 
or cultivator it was the cold steel teeth 
of the weeder scratching past me. I felt 
bad the first time this happened and 
found it was only the beginning of this 
weeding business and each time the 
weeder passed over me I felt sure that 
my end had come. The weeder did me 
no injury however, and I soon learned 
that it scratched out all the small weeds 
that were trying to get started and rob 
me of my food supply. This gave me a 
better chance until finally I grew to 
such a size that I shaded the ground 
around me and weeding was no longer 
necessary. 

When i came through the ground 
about the time you could see that rny 
brother spuds and I were planted in 
rows I received my first baptism of 
spray that kept the blight spores and 
insects from attacking me. This spray- 
ing operation kept up quite regularly 
until the frost killed all my leaves. I 
got so that I really enjoyed the fine mist 
from the sprayer since it refreshed and 
cleansed me during the hot days in July 
and August. ^, , 

My trials and tribulations really got 
under way, however, when I reached a 
height of about ten inches. At that time 
an expert from the State College Exten- 
sion Service came along with the county 
agent and a fellow that called himself 
a potato roguer. They stopped :mc[ex- 
an.ined me and the expert pointed to 
one of my brothers and said he has leat- 
roll or mosaic or something like tnai. 
The roguer pulled him out and rtucK 
him in a bag and carried him out of the 
field. These fellows made a study ot 
our health and diseases and about, every 



two weeks the roguer came through 
and pulled out those of my brothers 
who were ailing or diseased and carried 
them away. 

One day during late August another 
fellow came along who wasn't very im- 
posing but as soon as he stopped to look 
at me I knew he understood his s^juds. 
This person I could tell was a scientist. 
When he saw how vigorous r.nd sound 
I was he decided he wanted one of the 
members of my family to cross with a 
wild potato that he brought to Pennsyl- 
vania from South America. He saw 
that I was from a prolific family so he 
selected my Grandad and crossed him 
with this wild South American senorita. 
This damsel had color and the vigor of 
youth in her veins. While it was too 
much for Grandpa, for he nassed out of 
the picture after the cross \^'as made, it 
sure made me feel good to think that a 
member of my family should be select- 
ed by this "Potato Wizard" for a re- 
search project at Camp Potato to start 
a new family of spuds. 

The fellow that really gave me the 
jitters though was the state -.aspector 
from the Department of Agriculture at 
Harrisburg. He was the first to come 
aroimd and examine me and the last 
one to look at my leaves before they 
were frosted. He always carried a rec- 
ord book under his arm and a pencil 
over his ear. The first time he examin- 
ed me was before the roguer came 
through. He felt at my leaves and no- 
ticed how smooth and velvety they were. 
As he walked along he frequently 
made notes on my health. On each side 
of the field in which I grew he looked 
over the fence for other potatoes that 
might be diseased and in this way con- 
taminate the pure blood that flowed 
through my veins. After the second ro- 
guing he came around again making 
further examinations on my thrift and 
vigor as well as the care and attention 
that had been given to me. After the ro- 
guer gave me the final once over the 
inspector came through again and while 
he did not find any disease he pulled up 
several of my brothers and sacrificed 
them, as he said to my boss, on the altar 
of science. Each one of these brothers 
was cut up and examined for internal 
discoloration. After this inspection he 
(Continued on page 22) 






10 



THE GUIDE POST 



March. 1940 



A Short Story in Fundamentals 

(Editor's note: A True incident of the 1938-1939 Season. Names are fictitious) 



*'Maw, I just can't let these potatoes 
go for 40c to that huckster, Reuben 
Goldberg. He says the market is off 
five cents, but 45 was too low for the 
last load." 

''No Paw, it doesn't seem right to let 
all your potatoes go for less than it cost 
to raise them. You grew such nice ones 
last summer, too. I hoped these last 
ones would bring more money and not 
less." 

Following this conversation between 
farmer John Brickter and his wife a car 
drove in the lane, a man alighted, came 
over to John and his wife, and intro- 
duced himself as Mr. Spool of the State 
Department of Agriculture. 

'Is this Mr. Brickter? Glad to know 
you— and Mrs. Brickter too. Was ad- 
vised by the County Agent that you had 
about 500 bushels of potatoes left which 
the truckers were "stealing." With a 
little closer grading than the truckers 
require, believe you can realize more 
for your stock if you pack in the state 
association bag." 

Mr Brickter was interested in the 
idea of grading closer for a greater re- 
turn and asked a number of questions 
of Mr Spool relative to the grades, cur- 
rent market quotations and the proper 
method of packing potatoes to comply 
with the best trade practices and the 
Potato Law. 

Following Mr. Spool's visit, farmer 
Brickter called Mr. Bower at Bellefonte 
for some labeled bags and for an order 
to deliver 1000 pecks to the warehouse 
of a nearby retail distributor. When 
the bags arrived in a few days he pro- 
ceeded to pack the potatoes according 
to instructions of the local inspector, 
who was called in to assist. The spuds 
were graded and trucked ten miles to 
the receiving station. 

A few days later John came in from 
the mail box with the morning paper 
and other mail in his hand. He was 
busy examining one particular letter as 
he sauntered along. Then he started a 
quicker pace and bursting into the 
kitchen, exclaimed "Well, Maw here's 
the check for those potatoes, $240.00 it 
amounts to. It says here they brought 
24c a peck, that is 96c a bushel. Had no 



idea when I talked with Mr. Bower on 
the phone that they were bringing that 
much. That's more than twice what 
Goldberg offered and I can get 60c a 
hundred for the pick-outs." 



WHAT I LIVE FOR 

I live for those who love me, 

Whose hearts are kind and true; 
For the Heaven that smiles above me. 

And awaits my spirits, too. 
For all human ties that bind me. 

For the task my God assigned me, 
For the bright hopes left behind me, 

And the good that I can do. 

I live to learn their story, 

Who suffered for my sake; 
To emulate their glory, 

And follow in their wake; 
Bards, patriots, martyrs, sages. 

The noble of all ages. 
Whose deeds crown History's pages» 

And Time's great volume make. 

I live to hail that season, 

By gifted minds foretold. 
When men shall live by reason, 

And not alone by gold; 
When man to man united. 

And every wrong thing righted. 
The whole world shall be lighted. 

As Eden was of old. 

I live for those who love me, 

For those who know me true; 
For the Heaven that smiles above me. 

And awaits my spirit, too; 
For the cause that needs assistance, 

For the wrongs that need resistance, 
For the future in the distance. 

And the good that I can do. 

—from McGuffey's Readers 



A mule we find, 

Two legs behind 
And two we find before. 

We stand behind 

What the two behind 
Before. 

(Contributed by J. K. Mast who warns, 
stay away from mules!) 



March, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



11 



1 



POTATO CHIPS 



In winter I am stern and strong 
My thoughts are cold and high 
My intellect is thawing now 
Three cheers for spring say I! 

The above ditty, not because spring is 
here, but because a few bright days and 
birds singing outside the bedroom win- 
dow of an early morning starts up that 
old hankering in the old bones for 
spring. 



down on his meat and bun orders, took 
down his advertising signs, and no 
longer bothered to stand out on the 
highway to sell his hot dogs. And his 
hot dog sales fell almost overnight. 

"You're right, son," the father said to 
the boy. "We certainly are in the mid- 
dle of a great depression." 



Much has been written about the 
"Bacterial ring rot" or "Bacterial soft 
rot" but another blast from this column 
will do no harm. The disease spreads 
with the seed and the cutting knife is an 
important means of spreading the bac- 
teria from diseased to healthy tubers. 
That means small tubers which do not 
have to be cut will make better planting 
stock in case of any doubt. Better not 
to have any doubt, however, by secur- 
ing seed stock from sources known to be 
absolutely free from contamination. 

From "Feedstuff" comes the follow- 

Origin of a Depression 

There was a man who lived by the 
side of the road and he sold hot dogs. 

He was hard of hearing, so he had no 
radio. 

He had trouble with his eyes, so he 
read no newspapers. 

But he sold good hot dogs. He put 
signs up on the highway, telling how 
good they were. 

He stood on the side of the road and 
cried, "Buy a hot dog, mister?' And 
people bought. 

He increased his meat and bun orders. 
He bought a bigger stove, to take care 
of his trade. He finally got his son home 
from college to help him. 

But then something happened. His 
son said, "Father, haven't you been lis- 
tening to the radio? Haven't you been 
reading the newspapers? There s a big 
depression on. The European situation 
is terrible. The domestic situation is 
worse. Everything's going to pot. 

Whereupon the father thought, ''Well, 
my son's been to college, he reads the 
papers and he listens to the raf ^^^^^^^ 
ho ought to know." So the father cut 



Sometimes one hears the statement 
that buyers don't regard grades in buy- 
ing produce. Fact of the matter is that 
456,000 carloads of produce— nearly half 
a million mind you— were packed ac- 
cording to the U. S. grades and certified 
by shipping-point inspectors in 1939. 
That's about half of all the produce 
grown so the buyers are considering 
grades to a remarkable degree. 

Although many investigators have 
studied the factors affecting the cooking 
quality of potatoes, many confusing re- 
sults have occurred. Everyone doesn't 
agree on what constitutes "Good cook- 
ing quality" so we don't even all start 
from the same place. But be that as it 
may most people prefer potatoes to cook 
mealy and on that basis we find the fol- 
lowing to be pretty well agreed on by 
the experimenters: 

1 Fertilizer applications can be var- 
ied to maintain both high quality and 
yield. 

2 High potash ratios decrease cooking 
quality while high phosphorus ra- 
tios improve quality and increase 
yields slightly. 

3. Small amount of boron in the ferti- 
lizer seems to improve the appear- 
ance of the potatoes, but does not im- 
prove cooking quality. 

4 Climatic and soil conditions are 
probably more important than fer- 
tilizer ratios in affecting quality. 

The cooperative movement offers the 
best defense for the continuation of de- 
mocracy. This movement by returning 
savings to farmers raises their purchas- 
ing power. Dictators thrive on the 
breakdown of the economic structure 
which breaks down when the purchas- 
ing power of the people fails. Support- 
ing the cooperative movement guar- 
antees support for our democratic in- 
stitutions. 



12 



THE GUIDE POST 



March, 1940 



Increased sales of certified seed to 
South America from the United States 
and Canada are forseen this year by the 
U. S. Dept. of Agriculture. Certified 
seed stock purchased for Argentma in 
recent years has mostly been imported 
from Canada, Denmark, The United 
States, The Netherlands and Estonia. 
Because that from the U. S. and Canada 
has been most satisfactory and because 
of the hostilities in Europe it is expected 
that few if any potatoes will be import- 
ed from Europe and that imports from 
the U.S. and Canada will be used almost 
entirely for the 1939-40 crop. This will 
be a sizeable factor for the U.S. certified 
seed growers who shipped only 32,000 
bushels to Argentina during the entire 
1938-39 season and have shipped more 
than 200.000 bushels to date this season. 



The U. S. Dept. of Agriculture reports 
that from present indications, a 1940 
crop of potatoes of 384,000,000 bushels 
may be expected with average yields. 
Since there has been a decline in per 
capita consumption the production most 
likely to result in parity prices is about 
360,000,000. Therefore, barring unusual 
weather conditions there may be ap- 
proximately 25,000,000 bushels more 
than will bring satisfactory returns to 
growers. 



Those who did not read the article on 
Pennsylvania certified seed by K. W. 
Lauer in the March issue of the "Penn- 
sylvania Co-op Review" should get to 
see a copy. The historical and current 
facts about this essential state service 
arc related in a most interesting style. 



getting nation-wide attention. Hardly 
a day goes by when inquiries do not 
come by mail from points near and far 
about these activities. In a few days 
recently, requests for information were 
received at the Bellefonte office from 
many points in Penna. and from North 
Carolina, Canada, New York, Ohio, and 
the New Jersey State College of Agri- 
culture, which requested a complete set 
of the 1939 "Guide Posts" and full par- 
ticulars about Camp Potato. 



Was interested to know that Roger 
Meckes of Albrightsvillc, who furnished 
some of the baking potatoes at the 1940 
Farm Show, is, besides being a large 
producer of potatoes, quite a factor in 
the Christmas tree trade in Eastern 
Penna. cities. Mr. Meckes travels to the 
wilds of Canada each year where he 
purchases as many as 65 carloads of 
Christmas trees yearly, which are sold 
in Philadelphia and other Eastern 
Penna. markets. That's quite a nice 
little sideline, I'd say! 



The Pennsylvania Potato Program, 
Camp Potato, the "Guide Post" and oth- 
er activities of the Pennsylvania Coop- 
erative Potato Growers Assn. are really 



Which brings to mind that Dr. Nixon 
recently addressed the New Jersey po- 
tato growers at their annual meeting at 
Trenton, where he discussed activities 
of the Marketing Program and Camp 
Potato before an interested audience. 



Have received word that fruit grow- 
ers of New Jersey have during the past 
winter carried on successfully a direct 
apple selling campaign, patterned some- 
what along the same lines as the Penna. 
Potato Program. In fact it has proved 
so successful that fresh vegetables such 
as corn, peas, beans, and asparagus may 
be added to the program next summer. 



Governor Lehman of New York State 
recently made the following statement: 

"Great Progress has been made in co- 
operative buying and selling by farmers 
during the past decade. Farmer-owned 
co-operatives are for the most part in 
sound condition and rendering a great 
service to producer and consumer alike. 
I have repeatedly expressed my confi- 
dence in cooperative action for farmers 
and my belief that most of the problems 
of agriculture will ultimately be solved 
by farmers themselves working togeth- 
er in cooperative associations. The State 
through legislation should continue to 
do whatever it can to strengthen this 
movement." 



Sometimes deliveries of Blue Labels 
are accepted by retail distributors, even 
though not up to the grade specifica- 
tions, whereby the growers may feel 
that he has gotten away with something. 
That's not the right attitude as con- 
tinued deliveries of inferior quality 
where the best quality is represented 
will kill any marketing program or es- 
tablished brand or trade-mark deader 
than the old "Dodo Bird." 

"Bill Shakespud." 



March, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



13 






POTATO OUTLOOK 



By the "Observer' 



Strange as it may seem the potato 
market has weakened a little in the 
past month, yet the market is funda- 
mentally stronger. That sounds like 
a contradictory statement which may 
require further explanation. During 
the month of February the going quota- 
tions in the Philadelphia market de- 
clined 10 to 15c a cwt. and were slightly 
lower in Pittsburgh and at principal 
producing sections of the country. Al- 
so, during the month, the visible supply 
of potatoes available to the first of May 
decreased considerably more than nor- 
mal. Shipments during February con- 
tinued heavy to further deplete the sup- 
ply of the late crop, while the severe 
cold spell in the south delayed the early 
crop to the extent that no worth-while 
competition from that source may be 
expected before May 1st. Ordinarily 
the volume of the early crop begins to 
be heavy enough by the middle of 
March to have a considerable bearing 
on the market level. During 1939, 6,406 
cars of new potatoes where shipped 
prior to May 1st, while in 1938, 10,716 
cars moved. To March 1st, this year, 
only 700 cars of new potatoes have 
moved, and, because of the set-back be- 
cause of freezing temperatures in Flori- 
da, Texas, Louisianna, Alabama and 
Mississippi no heavy volume is expect- 
ed from southern states until the late 
crop is pretty well out of the way, early 
in May. 

Shipments from Maine, which were 
slow early in the season, have picked up 
so that to date they are only 1000 cars 
below the same time last year. Idaho, 
Colorado, New York. North Dakota, 
Washington and Nebraska shipments 
all exceed those of last year to March 
1st with Minnesota running slightly be- 
low last year and Michigan shipments 
much less. With heavy shipments reg- 
ularly from most heavy producing 
states, the market has held remarkable 
strength, probably because the trade 
realizes the available supply of old 
stock cannot last much longer and be- 
cause the competition from the new 
cannot be much of a factor for nearly 
two months. The seed potato market 
has been active with demand strong, 
particularly for certified stock on which 
a shortage has developed. This always 
affects the table stock market, since 



better quality table stock is then divert- 
ed into the seed market. The increased 
demand for certified seed stock this 
year has been due to a number of 
causes. First, the 1939 production was 
not large, second, a normal increase in 
the use of certified seed each year, third, 
the cold wave in the south which froze 
much seed in storage or just planted 
and fifth, greatly increased shipments 
to South America because of war con- 
ditions in Europe. 

It does not necessarily follow that it 
will pay everyone to hold all stocks an- 
ticipating an extremely high market 
late in the season. The market is al- 
readv at a higher level than a year ago 
(about 50c a cwt.) which means greater 
resistance to rapid or substantial price 
advancements. Also greater sale of 
size B and off ^rade stock may be ex- 
pected, than if the market were at a 
lower level, to further increase the 
available market supply. In other 
words, conditions look quite favorable 
for a stronger market late in the season, 
although a sufficient advance to offset 
heavy losses from late storing are not 
assured, or at least may be considered 
very speculative. 

NEW USES FOR POTATOES 

(Continued jrom page 8) 

He also discovered that the probable 
reason for lots of potatoes turning 
black or discoloring in cooking is that 
they are grown on land deficient in 
potash. Apply fertilizer of high potash 
content, he says, and plow under green 
manure crops. 

"He believes the by-products could 
be produced economically from pota- 
toes in surplus and low-price years. 
Potato growers will look forward to the 
time when such markets are available 
to them." 

(This clipping through the courtesy 
of G. Douglas Jones, of Cleveland, O.) 

Smiling Out Loud 

"Willie, you know you musn't laugh 
in the classroom." 

"I know, ma'am, but I was smiling 

and the smile burst." .. ^ . 

. Cincinnati Post 









tji 






14 



THE GUIDE POST 



March, 1940 



Ohio Marketing Meeting of Unusual Interest 



President J. A. Donaldson, Director 
Ed Fisher, General Manager, b. B- 
BoWer, and the writer, in connection 
with another matter, incidentally sat n 
on an open meeting of an Ohio Potato 
Growers Association last week. 

A phenominal thing occurred in this 
meeting which had never happened in 
all the meetings of a similar nature in 
Pennsylvania. 

First, an actual consumer, who was 
interested only from a consumer s view- 
point, spoke extemporaneousl.y on the 
quality of potatoes put up in the Ohio 

^^i^S, fpttato dealer who purchases 
outright large quantities of Ohio pota- 
toes spoke extemporaneously on the 
marketing of potatoes from his view- 

^°Third two large chain store rcpre- 
sentSes,"who purchase and distribute 
large quantities of potatoes spoke ex- 
temporaneously in favor of identified 
consumer packages. 

Fourth, growers who had actual ex 
peHence in packing and selling identi- 
fied consumer packs spoke extempor- 
aneously in favor of marketing their po- 
tatoes in this manner. 

And finally, a grower who had, as ne 
saw a good market for his potatoes put 
no "Farmer's grade" in any kind of bag 
Z /-sTburllp preferred) spoke ex- 
temporaneously against consumer pack- 

^^fhe only other channel of trade not 
represented at this meeting was the 
commission merchant. 

Here we witnessed the aims and as- 
r^irntfonrof the representatives of every 
Ee o the potato industry from the 
S, nHucer to the consumer, inclusive. 
^ The significant thing was that even 
the consumer did n°t complain that he 

• ^ tnn much for his identified con- 
Lmer package. He did infer, however, 
fh^t he had been over sold on the pack- 
aee He indicated that the tubers in the 
nackaees were not as large and smooth 

S=r^fwSThe-g%^u^n^°.^rn|^ 

Hl^saTdfhie'Jerrsmall tubers in the 
"fckage How small, and how many? 
?«?K»n i^ a tuber small? Everything is 

^^/♦?vf savs Einstein. All tubers are 
relat ve, says tms elephants, 

small when comparea w ^ „\ ^ 
This package was ^ G^ate Way orana 
and I'll bet my bottom dollar tnai mt 



tubers in the package were up to the 
minimum set for this grade The moral 
^ d^not over sell the identified pack- 
aee The aim is an attractive, practical 
nick economical for the consumer to 
^rrchase°"economical for the produce^ 
to pack, and a pleasure for the distri 
butor to sell, and purchased at a stand- 
ard price for a standard article commen- 
surate with supply and demand. 

The potato buyer, or speculator, im- 
plied one philosophy, that of Purchas- 
fng as°ow as possible and selling as high 
Vi Dossible. This is a one-sided phil- 
oIoDhv for the grower is in no position 
?o barter Potatoes are a surplus on 
every potato growers' farm; cash is a 
deficiency. "A surplus commodity can- 
norbrso^d at a profit to the consumer^ 
Hence, the tendency is for he grower 
to under-price his crop, out of sheer 
pressure from creditors, fear of losing 
a sale ienorance, or because he is out 
Smarted There is one service the specu- 
S renders and that is the tendency 
to remove surplusses from congested 

^Tnd now to the grower who always 
haV a "good" market: "I don t have to 
(?rade the eye is the market, i aon i 
have to sell an adopted brand; my brand 
^s\' 4-8-7'burlap sa\k. I always go ri^h^ 
along with my load and sell it to my 
customer. Personality enters into the 
Hoal " There is no standard price lor 
such an unstandardized package or such 
an unstandardized Personality. This 
system of bartering has been in opera 
tion a great many years. It is at its oesi 
''South of the Border." As a system of 
marketing, it thrives best among the 
ignorant, and of course, can only oper 
ate in deficiency Producing areas 

The problem still remains, how can 
food be produced and distributed to the 
consumer so that both the producer 
and the consumer may live. /hen one 
group is in dire need of fpod, and the 
other group has over-production star 
?ng thim in the face.-Reported by Dr. 
E. L. Nixon. 



Well Fed 

Harold— "You say you were once cast 
away on a desert island entirely with- 
out food? How did you live?" 

Charles— "Oh! I happened to have an 
insurance policy in my pocket and I 
found enough provisions in it to keep 
me alive 'till I was rescued." 



March, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



15 



\ 



OVER THE PICKING TABLE 



by Inspector Throw-out 



The banker was giving the local 
minister a lecture on business methods, 
scoring the clergy in general for mis- 
management. 

*T suppose you are right," comment- 
ed the minister, "but I have yet to 
learn of the Bishop closing any of the 
churches." 



"That's the name it goes by in these 
hills," said the native. 

"You ought to rechristen it," said the 
traveler. "It tastes like bottled sun- 
stroke." 



->- 



A grapefruit is a lemon that had a 
chance and took advantage of it. 



They sat within the parlor dim 
and this is what she said to him: 
"George, dear if you can not behave 
I wish you'd go and get a shave." 



Mark Twain once debated polygamy 
with a Mormon. The Mormon clainied 
polygamy was perfectly moral and de- 
fied Mark to cite any passage of Scrip- 
ture which forbade it. 

**Well," said Twain, "how about that 
passage 'that tells us no man can serve 
two masters?" 

. ^ 

"What's a necessary evil, Pa?" asked 
a ten-year old boy. 

"One we like so much we don t care 
about abolishing it, my boy," the wise 
father replied. 

"Seest thou a man dilligent in his 
business? He shall stand before kmgs 
—But the other fellow will be found 
sitting with the queens. 

George Bernard Shaw is known to be 
a past master at the ready retort and a 
young lady who was conversing with 
him tells this one. They were watching 
a group of children when she felt moved 
to remark: , ,„ 

"What a wonderful thing is youth! 

"Yes, and what a crime it is to waste 
it on children." 

If you don't like the work you are 
doing be frank with your superiors and 
tell them so, because through your ne- 
glect your fellow mortals will suffer. 

"And they call that stuff moonshine," 
the mountain traveler exclaimed after 
his first drink. 



"No," said the editor, "we cannot use 
your poem." 

"Why?" asked the poet. "Is it too 

long?" , , 

"Yes," hissed the editor.^^ "It's too 
long, too wide and too thick." 

There are twenty-four hours in every 
day. And they belong to everybody. 
What one man does with them and 
what some other man does with them 
makes all the difference between a big 
success, a little success or a failure. 
> 

Don't feel sorry for yourself. Feel 
sorry for the folks who have to live with 
you. 



There are two kinds of men that will 
always have more or less trouble un- 
derstanding women — married men and 

single men. 

> 

A cross the cut the other day 

A naughty breeze came playing, 

And ruffled high a shortened skirt. 

The silk hose displaying. 

Reform has settled on the land — 

We mustn't smoke or chew; 

Nor take a drink or shake a shim 

Nor watch the burlesque. 

For naughty things will all be banned 

And scarce be those who sinned. 

Yet fervently we raise this wish — 

Please leave a little wind. 



It isn't the man who smiles that counts, 
When everything goes dead wrong, 
Nor is it the man who meets defeat, 
Singing a gay little song; 
The song and the smile are well worth 

while, 
Provided they aren't a bluff, 
But here's to the man who smiles and 

sings, 
And then— PRODUCES THE STUFF. 

4 < 

There are meters of voice 
And meters of tone; 
But the best of all meters 
Is meet'er alone. 

(Continued on page 26) 



16 



THE GUIDE POST 



March, 1940 



Grower to Grower Exchange 

cation. 



QUALITY SEED POTATOES: Russet 
Rurals, White Rurals, Cobblers and 
Nittanys. Certified Seeds and one year 
from certified. All grown from north- 
ern foundation seed. Ideal storage. All 
seed will be graded and packed in Asso- 
ciation bushel paper bags. I am pur- 
chasing a new eight row sprayer, there- 
fore am offering for sale a six row used 
power sprayer. Thomas Denniston, 
Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania. (Butler 
County.) 

AVAILABLE: Copies of Dr. E. L. Nix- 
on's book, "The Principles of Potato 
Production," $1.25 per copy. Write for 
your copy today, to Association office, 
Bellefonte, Pennsylvania. 

SPRAYER: One ten-row Bean truck 
sprayer, five hundred gallon capacity. 
Sprayer complete without truck. If in- 
terested, write Lynn Sill, R. F. D. No. 3, 
Corry, Penna. (Erie County) 

SEED POTATOES: Seconds grown 
from Potter County disease-free foun- 
dation seed stock. Rural Russets. Free 
from blight, stem-end discoloration and 
other injury. Firm and vigorous sprouts 
assured due to being well stored, Will be 
well graded and packed in bushels or 
100 lbs. Price reasonable, $1.50 per hun- 
dred for one year from certified, $1.10 
per hundred for two years from certi- 
fied. Contact Lynn Sill, R. F. D. No. 3, 
Corry, Pa. 

DIGGER FOR SALE: One single row 
take off digger. Good repair. Will sell 
reasonably. Write Dr. E. L. Nixon, 
State College, Penna. 



SPRAY BOOM FOR SALE: John Bean 
Spray boom. Complete without nozzles. 
10 row. Good condition. Will sell cheap. 
Ed. Fisher, Coudersport, Pa. 

PICKER.PLANTER FOR SALE: 2- 

Row automatic Picker-Planter. Iron 
Age. Good condition. Write for details. 
J. A. Donaldson, R. D. No. 1, Emlenton, 
Penna. (Venango County). 

SEED POTATOES: Rural Russets and 
Chippewas, U. S. No. 1, and U. S. No. 1, 
Size B, or seconds. Free from stem end 
discoloration and other blemishes. Con- 
tact Robert Getz, Albrightsville, Penna. 
(Carbon County) 

SPRAYER FOR SALE: 4 or 6 row en- 
gine or power take-off sprayer. If in- 
terested, write J. A. Donaldson, R. F. D. 
No. 1, Emlenton, Penna. (Venango 
County) for details. 

PLANTER FOR SALE: Two-row Iron 
Age automatic Planter; picking attach- 
ments. In perfect condition. Will sell 
reasonably. Contact Ed. Fisher, Coud- 
ersport, (Potter County) Penna. 

SPRAYER FOR SALE: Horse drawn 
traction sprayer 4-Row boom. Good 
condition. Write J. A. Donaldson, R. F. 
D. No. 1, Emlenton, (Venango County) 
Penna. 

SEED POTATOES FOR SALE: U. S. 

No. 1, Size B Russets and Nittany Cob- 
blers. 90c a bushel. Contact Ivan Mil- 
ler, R. F. D. No. 3, Corry, (Erie County) , 
Penna. 



HAVE YOU CHECKED 
YOUR 1940 PLANS? 



Have you checked v^ith your county agent or experiment 
station to make sure that your plans for fertilizing potatoes 
this year are in line with their latest fertiUzer recom- 
mendations for potatoes? Experiment stations frequently 
change their recommendations as a result of their in- 
vestigations and the adoption of new standardized high 
analysis fertilizer grades. The increasing importance of 
fertilizers well balanced with potash to produce the desired 
plant growth and yield of high quality potatoes is being 
emphasized. 

Analyses high in potash which are proving popular in- 
clude: 5-10-10 and 5-10-12 in the Mid-Atlantic States; 4-8-10 
and 8-16-20 in New England; and 3-9-18 and 3-12-12 in the 
Midwest. Rates of apphcation depend upon the plant food 
available in the soil and the high plant-food requirement 
of the expected yield. To guard against potash deficiency, 
plan to apply enough fertilizer to supply at least 200 lbs. of 
actual potash per acre. You will be surprised when your 
fertilizer dealer tells you how little extra it will cost. 



Write us for additional information 
and free literature on the profitable 
fertilization of crops. 




flmerican Potash Institute, Inc, 



Investment Building 



Washington, D. C. 



*#g!wi>i<:<l 



18 



THE GUIDE POST 



March, 1940 



Membership Drive Continues Gain with Help 

from Loyal Supporters 



Jacob K. Mast, of Elverson (Chester 
County, and Robert Getz, of Albrights- 
ville (Carbon County), share honors 
this month for contributing the most 
new members to the Association. Each 
of these boosters forwarded the Asso- 
ciation office six new members These 
two men, during the course of the Asso- 
ciation drive, have continuously boosted 
and sought new members for the Asso- 
ciation Both have sent in dozens dur- 
ing the period, and we thank them for 
ourselves and the membership. 

Four fine boosters tied for second 
place this month, when each contributed 
fwo new members. These supporters 
are A J. Henninger, Allentown (Le- 
high County), Wayne A. Hindman, 
Corsica, (Clarion County) -J- A- Don 
aldson, Elmenton (yenango County ) , 
and Norman C. Strohl, Lehigh ton, (Car- 
bon County). All of these men too 
have many times in the past contributed 
To Ihe Association, and their new mem- 
bers are greatly appreciated. 

Warren C. Bond, of Kempton (Berks 
County) , located his new member dur- 
ing the month, as did Hiram A. Frantz, 
of Coplay (Lehigh County) and Frank 
Lindner, of Ringtown, (Schuylkill 
County). These, too, are most grate- 
fully acknowledged. 

Several new members came to the 
Association unsolicited, and renewals, 
fecent and long past due former mem- 
bers came in steadily during the month 
to top any previous membership renew- 
a° during the month of March since the 
ooenine of the present Association office 
""^lacKd every one of these renewed 
members is heartily welcomed back to 
I5ie Association, though space does not 
permit listing them. 

Many of you members have still to 
find your new member for the Associa- 
^on. It is not too late to dp so. Find one 
anS mail his name and his membership 
fee to the Association office today. 

From the contributions of the month, 
we have the pleasure of greetmg the fol- 
lowing new members: 
Amos K. King, Gordonville, Lancaster 

S. K°"Knig, Gordonville, Lancaster 
County 



Isaac Beiler, Elverson, Lancaster 

T evi BeUer Elverson, Lancaster County 
Efmefammerman, East Earl, Lancaster 

John^°Schreiner, Ephrata, Lancaster 

Frank°"sSeitzer, Lehighton, Carbon 

William" Baumbardner, Kunkletown, 

Monroe County 
Robert Shupp, Kunkletown, Monroe 

Earnest"ia-eger, Kunkletown, Monroe 

Walter^Kibler, Albrightsville, Carbon 

County . , , ... „„„ 

Nathan Altemose, Albrightsville, Car- 
bon County 
W. H. Smith, Catasauqua, Lehign 

County T u;«u 

Herbert E. Ralston, Allentown, Lehigti 

County ^, 

C. D. Anderson, Lickingville, Clarion 

C. A?^Sdgworth, Lickingville, Clarion 

County ^ , 

E F Stuck, Fertigs, Venango County 
Ernest Atwood, Kent, Ohio 
Eugene E. Christman, Lehighton, Car- 
bon County r-^^Kr^n 

Alton F. Smith, Palmerton, Carbon 

RaySond^^M. Greenwalt, Kempton, 

Berks County t u- v, 

George Rabenold, Coplay, Lehigh 

Robert A. Dresher, Ringtown, Schuyl- 
kill County ^ , 
F R Zerf oss, Dallas, Luzerne County 
Alfred Rice, Dallas, Luzerne County 



"A truth that's told with bad intent- 
Beats all the lies you can mvent 

William Blake 



*'God knows, I'm not the thing I 
should be. Nor am I even the thing 1 

could be — " ^ ^ ^ _ 

Robert Burns 



"All the world is queer save thee and 
me and even thou art a little queer. 
' Robert Owen 



Bean Potato Sprayers 



I 




CUT SPRAYING COSTS INCREASE YIELDS .SPRAY FASTER 
BETTER QUALITY . NO WORRIES . MAKE MONEY 

SPRAY WITH HIGH PRESSURE 

No grower is safe unless he sprays with high pressure. High pressure 
protects you against excessive spraying costs, low yield, delays in spray- 
ing, poor quality and loss of money. J T • . 4U^ 

Decide today to investigate high pressure spraying and eliminate the 

obsolete low pressure system. - j. t - ^ 

Bean line of high pressure potato sprayers offer a variety of price and 
sizes that will meet your requirements, that you can afford to invest in, 
and that will come back to you in savings in a larger and better crop. 




RUBBER SPOOL GRADER 

riPans as it grades. Does not bruise or cut the potatoes All grading is 
done ^ruUef Much more accurate and when you are fimshed grading 
you have a fine looking pack that will sell. 

Investigate this Grader at once. 

John Bean Mfg. Co. 



Division Food Machinery Corporation 



LANSING 



MICHIGAN 



I 



20 



THE GUIDE POST 



March, 1940 



TIMELY SUGGESTIONS ^,^,,^ 

AND OBSERVATIONS 

(Continued from page 7) 

4. Is the variety I am about to buy 
one adapted to my soil and climatic 
conditions? 

5. Is the grower or agency from 
whom you are buying dependable and 
reliable? Is his word good? Have you 
reason from past experience to trust 
him or do you have reliable references 
to this point? 

So much of the success or failure of 
the 1940 crop depends on the seed you 
plant that you cannot afford to gamble 
or take a chance on an unknown source, 
seed that may be run out or badly di- 
seased, seed that has lost its vitality by 
being poorly stored, a variety unadapt- 
ed to your soil or climate, or chance 
dealing with an undependable or un- 
reliable seed grower or agency. 




;^. ;^ 






^m- 



-El/Ni 



K». 






This Planter Is Hitched Too High. 
(Note discussion here on means of 
planting proper depth.) 

ON PLANTING DEPTH— There are 

five major factors involved in failure 
to plant seed at the proper depth: 

1. Seed bed too firm or compact. 

2. Planter tongue hitched too high. 

3. Lack of proper planter adjustment. 

4. Worn out opening discs or shoe. 

5. Failure of grower to check depth 
of planting. 

If the seed bed is too firm or compact 
it will not matter how properly the 



tongue is hitched, how correctly the 
planter is adjusted or how new the 
opening discs or shoe may be, you will 
not do a good job of planting. The only 
satisfactory way to correct this situa- 
tion is to replow before planting. 

You will find a picture appearing on 
this page showing a planter hitched too 
high. As you can see this raises the 
opening discs almost out of the ground 
on this particular planter. There is 
more danger of the hitch being too high 
on a tractor hitch as it is hard to realize 
where the point of the tongue would 
be if it were there. There is need of a 
rule for making the planter tractor 
hitch as to height. One thing sure, if 
the opening discs are not doing their 
job the hitch is too high. 

All modern makes of planters have 
adjustments, (to the front of the open- 
ing discs or shoe), for lowering the 
opening attachment. If the hitch is not 
too high and you still are not getting 
proper depth you may need to change 
this adjustment. 

There are thousands of planters over 
the State on which the opening discs 
and shoes are badly worn, in many 
cases worn out. New discs are not ex- 
pensive if you can realize the good 
they will do in helping to reduce sun- 
burn, and assuring a higher yield of 
better shaped tubers. A worn shoe can 
be put in good condition by having 
your local black-smith or welder, weld 
iwo or three inches to it. If dirt is con- 
tinually running over the sides of the 
shoe thereby preventing or interfer- 
ing with the proper spacing or depth of 
the seed you should (first) make sure 
that the opening discs are doing their 
job of really opening the furrow and, 
(second) check the condition of the 
shoe and if badly worn weld a piece to 
it. 

Before completing the first round 
with the planter this season get off and 
level the ground behind the planter and 
measure, not guess, the deoth of the 
seed. If the seed is less than 3 inches 
below the level you are planting too 
shallow. Recommendations on depth 
of planting based on tests and records 
has been 3 to 3i inches on heavy soils 
and 3i to 4 inches on the lighter soils. 

ON SELLING SEED— By March each 
year a lot of seed growers over the 
State become anxious as to whether or 
not all their seed is going to find a mar- 
ket. There are thousands of growers 
(Continued on page 22) 




Low Cost 
High Returns 



— is the shortest way to say 
"Dempwolf Fertilizers — for 
Potatoes." Large, profitable 
crops are produced only 
when the potato plant main- 
tains a vigorous, continuous 
growth. 

Dempwolf Fertilizers help 
to insure this — and, since 
1870, have given potato 
farmers A Better Yield in 
Every Field. 

York Chemical Works 

YORK, PA. 



Farmers who know the value of 
using only the best Spraying and 
dusting hydrate obtainable use 

^^MICRO-MESH" 

—it stays in suspension better in 
the spray tanks and covers more 
leaf surface in etiher spraying or 
dusting operations. 

Use Micro-Mesh this season. Also 
you can spray to advantage with 
our 325 Mesh Hydrated Lime. 




Whiterock Quarries 

Bellefonte, Pa. 



NORTHERN MICHIGAN 
RUSSET 

SEED 
POTATOES 

Fully Certified: The safe and de- 
pendable late variety that seed 
source tests show will outyield 
and better resist scab than any 
other. Grown and shipped direct 
from its native soil and climate 
which demonstrations have prov- 
en unexcelled for vigorous foun- 
dation stock. Uniform typey tub- 
ers graded to ten ounces which 
guarantees economical planting. 




APPROVED \ 



Special Tag: Of definite interest 
to growers packing "Blue Labels" 
or U. S. No. I's, since lower price 
permits planting all new seed, 
which, with average moisture, 
fully decreases amount of "throw- 
outs" sufficiently to make this 
practice profitable. Includes crops 
of some of our best fields. Irregu- 
lar shape due entirely to uneven 
moisture. Graded to ten ounces, 
no roughs or culls. All certifica- 
tion inspections the same as Fully 
Certified except for type. 

Write or wire us for infor* 
mation and prices on your 
requirements for spring 
planting. 

'*Every bag must be right" 

Dougherty Seed Growers 

Williamsport Penna. 




22 



THE GUIDE POST 



March, 1940 



TIMELY SUGGESTIONS _^,^„^ 

AND OBSERVATIONS 

(Continued from page 20) 

who need good seed and thousands of 
them who would buy if the seed was 
more readily available to them. We 
have not yet arrived at a workable sys- 
tem of seed distribution for our own 
growers. The bulk of the seed sold in 
Pennsylvania from outside sources is 
is sold, not just offered. Modern sales 
methods are used. These sales methods 
involve: A good product properly grad- 
ed and packed, advertising, publicity, 
market and grower contacts, informa- 
tion on price, information on storing, 
handling and delivery, and a follow up 
on the part of the seed grower as to 
satisfied or dissatisfied customers. 

The movement of any product is de- 
pendent on getting it before the public. 
This can be accomplished by exhibits 
and displays of the product, personal 
agents calling on prospective buyers, 
personal letters or cards carrying a 
sales story, posters or pamphlets giving 
sales information, ads in local and 
trade papers or journals, and coopera- 
tion with or selling through local or 
state agencies who are operating in 
potential sales areas. 

It goes without saying that satisfied 
customers as to quality of product and 
price goes a long way to continued 
sales of seed potatoes. I know of a 
grower who has kept a complete list of 
all seed buyers over the past 12 years. 
By letting these buyers know what he 
has for sale, grading and packing in 
clean bushel paper bags and selling at 
a reasonable premium above table 
stock in his area, he has been able to 
move his entire crop at the storage each 
year. 



THE LIFE STORY 

OF A SEED POTATO 

(Continued from page 9) 

had a long talk with my boss which 
didn't interest me very much since I 
was getting sleepy, although as I dozed 
off into my dormant state I wondered if 
I ever would be called a certified spud. 
As I lay dozing there in the soil one 
day I faintly heard the put- put-put of a 
tractor passing over me. All of a sud- 
den I w^as heaved out of the ground and 
carried over a potato digger that jarred 
me around somewhat but which did 
me no harm since my boss had padded 



the digger with rubber. After being so 
unceremoniously yanked out of the 
ground I thought my end had come for 
sure, but after I was placed in a dark 
cool storage with my brothers I im- 
mediately dozed off into my dormant 

state again. 

After remaining dormant until spring 
I heard my brothers whispering one 
day about some person that was looking 
us over. I whispered to my brother ask- 
ing who this fellow was. He told mo 
that he overheard my boss say it was 
the state inspector giving us a tmal 
health examination before we were to 
be graded and sacked in new bags tor 
shipment as certified seed. This fe.low 
picked me up and I thought I was about 
to be tossed aside when he said to my 
boss, "Now there's a fine looking spud , 
and placed me back in the bin. That 
really made me feel good and I con- 
cluded the state inspector wasn't such 
a bad egg after all. He picked out a few 
of my unfortunate brothers however 
who had opened their eyes too early and 
said "They had sprouted and lost their 
vigor and vitality". These he said with 
a few others that had worms and scab 
or were otherwise unsound should be 
cast aside when we were graded. Since 
I was sound of body I was accepted for 
certification. This made me feel so good 
I chanted and boasted, 

Through the summer I grew 
All thrifty and green 
With leaves that reflected 
A soft velvet sheen. 
From a family of spuds 
With a pedigree of wealth 
I grew to maturity 
With vigor and health. 
I was carefully grown 
With pure lines in my blood 
So the inspector he said 
I'm A CERTIFIED SPUD. 

K. W. Lauer 



Passing the Time 

A girl and an elderly woman were 
waiting for the other members of the 
party to arrive. 

*'Have a cigarette?'* ask the girl, of- 
fering her case. 

The older woman looked at her in ex- 
treme annoyance. 

"Smoke a cigarette!" she cried, indig- 
nantly. "Good gracious, I'd rather kiss 
the first man who came along!" 

"So would I," retored her companion, 
"but have one while you're waiting." — 
Montreal Star. 



"As you sow, so shall you reap." 
Don't fear "Stem End Discoloration" in your potato crop. 
Don't fear "Ring Rot" (Bacterial Wilt) in your crop. 
No "Ring Rot" has been discovered in Potter County. 
Plant your fields with this seed and reap a Profitable Crop. 



Russet Rurals 
White Rurals 
Pennigan 



Nittany Cobblers 
Katahdin 
Chippewa 
Red Bliss 



POTTER COUNTY FOUNDATION 
SEED POTATO ASSOCIATION 

COUDERSPORT, PA. 



Don Stearns, Pres. 



F. E. Wagner, Sec'y. 



THE ROW SPRAYER TO FIT YOUR JOB 




Truck-mounted outfits. Tractor Trailers, 
engine-powered sprayers in all sizes. Com- 
bination row crop and orchard rigs. 



# Write for the new Hardie 
Row Crop Sprayer Catalog, 
which shows and describes the 
most advanced outfits for field 
work in all sizes and styles for 
2 to 10 rows. See how much 
more you get for your money 
when you select a Hardie. 
Sold and serviced by leading 
dealers. The Hardie Mfg. Com- 
pany, Hudson. Mich. 




POTATO GROWERS 

USE 

the GUIDE POSTS 

GROWER to GROWER EXCHANGE 

Have You Anthing to Buy, Sell or Swap? 

If you have ,The GUIDE POST, will do your buying and selling 
for you in its Classified Advertising Department. 

Rales: Penny a word, minimum cost, 25 cents, payable with 
order. 10% reduction when four or more insertions 
are ordered at one time. 

Dates: Always send ads to reach us on the 20th of the month 
previous to publication. 



Give This Department a Try ! 






write 



THE GUIDE POST 



CARE 



Pennsylvania Cooperative Potato 



Growers' Association, Inc 



BELLEFONTE, PENNA. 



9 








Agrico is Manufadured Only by 
THE AMERICAN AGRICULTURAL CHEMICAL CO. 



f 



Baltimore, Md, 



Buffalo, N. Y. 



Carteret, N. J. 






26 



THE GUIDE POST 



March, 1940 



OVER THE PICKING TABLE 

(Continued jrom page 15 ) 

The "boss" is that man who comes 
too early when we are late and too late 
when we are early. 



The modern youth to attract the girls, 
puts gasoline on his handkerchief in- 
stead of perfume. 



The encouraging thing about the fu- 
ture is that there is so much of it. 

>— . 



To love and win is the best thing. To 
love and lose is the next best. 



Husband (driving past a braymg 
mule): "Relative of yours, I suppose?" 
Wife: "Yes, by marriage." 



Lots of flappers are in their last laps 
now. 



Manhood, not scholarship, is the first 
aim of education. 



They called the darky boy "Prescrip- 
tion" because they had such a hard time 
keeping him filled. 



If you have nothing to do, don't do it 
here! 



The more a man accomplishes the less 
time he has to talk about it. 



INSPECTOR'S TRAINING 

SCHOOL SCHEDULED 

FOR MARCH 20-21 

Announcement has been made by D. 
M. James, Supervising Inspector, that 
an Inspector's Training School will be 
held at State College, Penna., on March 
20th and 21st. 

The purpose of the school is to fit 
prospective inspectors for the work 
they take up when qualified and li- 
censed. 

Mr. Robert Bier, Supervising Inspec- 
tor for the Shipping Point Inspection 
Service throughout the United States 
will assist with the school. 

Most of the classes will be held with 
the aid of illustrated slides and movies 
in color. 

No charge is made for tuition to this 
school. 



"And better had they ne're been born, 
Who read to doubt, or read to scorn." 

Sir Walter Scott 

"When you rise in the morning, form 
a resolution to make the day a happy 
one to a fellow creature." 

Sydney Smith 

"The greatest pleasure I know is to 
do a good action by stealth, and to have 
it found out by accident." 

Charles Lamb 



"Imitation is the sincerest flattery." 

Charles Colton 

Have you secured your new member 
for the Association? 



Today Is The Tomorrow You Were Doing 

So Much Worrying Abouf 

Yesterday 

ALBERT C. ROEMHILD 

POTATO COMMISSION MERCHANT 
122 Dock Street Lombard 1000 Philadelphia 



Modern Marketing Methods 
Call for Paper Bags 

Attractively Printed Bags Bring Repeat Orders 

HAMMOND Betterbags 

Combine High Grade Printing with 
Essential Strength and Quality 




Hammond Bag & Paper Company 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Paper Bags for Lime, Limestone, Fertilizer, Flour, Feed and Potatoes 



Potato 
Machines 



Make Money for Potato Growers 

Eureka Potato Machines take hard work out of potato growing. 
They reduce time and labor costs. They assure bigger yields. 



Potato Cutter 

Cuts uniform seed. 
Operates with both 
hands free for feed- 
ing. 

t 
Riding Mulckcr 



Potato Planter 

One man machines 
doing five operations in 
one. Over twenty-two 
years' success. 



Traction Sprayer 

Insures ihecrop. Sires, 
4 or 6 rows. 60 to 100 
gallon tanks. Many 
styles of booms. 



_ __ __^ Potato Dicfcr 

Bieakscrusts.'mulchessoil.and Famous for 8«»»'"K "" ^j^* 

Villsweedswhen potato crop i^ •'"^•'^"w"!?" Wi.tor 

young and tender. 8. 10 and 12 standmg hard use With or 

ft si.Ss. Many other uses.with without engine attachment 

or without seedingattachment or tractor attachment. 

Allmmchine, in m,»ck ne*ryoii. Send for complete caflo^ue 




Used by many 

of the most 

successful 

growers in 

Pennsylvania 

and elsewhere 



Distributors of 

BABCOCK 

WEED HOG 

The Ideal Tool 

To Make Deep 

Seed Beds for 

Potatoes 



EUREKA MOWER CO., Utica, New York 



r 



28 



THE GUIDE POST 



March, 1940 



Survey Early Southern Potato Situation 

Condensed jrom report hy A. E. Mercker, 
In Charge, Potato Programs, Agricultural Adjustment Administration 

Washington, D. C. 



ALABAMA— About 200 acres planted 
before freeze of January 26th, when 25 
to 40 percent, of seed pieces were frozen. 
Planting began again February 8th, with 
200acres, and continued through to Feb- 
ruary 28th at the rate of 1,000 to 1,500 
acres per day. The most important vari- 
ety planted was the Bliss Triumph. 
There was a tendency for growers to in- 
crease their acreages. Planting and soil 
conditions were generally good. 

MISSISSIPPI— The acreage probably 
is the same as 1939. 

FLORIDA— Yields of matured crops 
estimated at about 60-70 bushels per 
acre, but vary from 200-225 bushels on 
the earliest planting to 20-40 bushels on 
the latest plantings. The shippmg sea- 
son is now in progress, and will continue 
to about April 15th, providing potatoes 
keep well in the ground. 



REICHARD'S 
ANIMAL BASE 

FERTILIZERS 

Grow Bigger and 
Better Crops 




Distributors for 

Orchard Brand 

Spray Materials 

Nichols Bluestone 

Robt A. Reichard, Inc. 

19th & Lawrence Sts. 
Allentown, Pa. 



In the Hasings section of Florida about 
12 000 acres were planted between late 
December and February 3rd. The freeze 
of January 22nd froze the early planted 
acreage. On February 15th the early 
January plantings were coming through 
the ground and it appears that all of this 
acreage will be ready for harvest at 
about the same time, or April 10-20. 
Very few shipments are expected before 
this date. 

GEORGIA— Acreage here is greater 
than in former years, and consists large- 
ly of Bliss and Cobbler plantings of seed, 
with few other varieties. Planting be- 
gan February 19th. 

SOUTH CAROLINA— Planting here 
was delayed, not starting until Febru- 
ary 19th. A few acres were planted 
earlier, but had to be replanted on ac- 
count of heavy rains. There was a 12- 
15% increase in acreage. 

NORTH CAROLINA — Plantings 
throughout the various sections ranged 
from February 12th to early March. Re- 
duced acreages were noted in some sec- 
tions, while others showed increases, 
making no great change in the total 
state acreage. 

VIRGINIA— Eastern Shore, Virginia, 
began planting in a very small way the 
week of February 26th to March 2nd. In 
the Norfolk section, planting was begun 
genreally beginning March 4th. 

LOUISIANA — Twenty per cent in- 
crease on seed planted, with plantmg 
still going on. 



Not a Chance to Go Wrong 

*'Are you sure," an anxious patient 
physican, "that I shall recover? I heard 
that doctors sometimes go wrong in their 
diagnosis, and have treated patients for 
pneumonia, who afterward died of ty- 
phoid fever." ,, 

"That may be true of some doctors, 
said the physician, "but if I treat a man 
for pneumonia, he dies of pneumonia.' 

Truck Traffic News 






ON ALL COUNTS 

IT'S MAINE CERTIFIED SEED 



QUALITY IS THERE: Proof of the prolific yields to be expected 
from Maine Certified Seed Potatoes is seen in the fact that they show 
a producing average of 50 bushels per acre above the State's own 
high tablestock production. 

VOLUME IS THERE: This year 22,700 acres of Maine Seed Pota- 
toes were Certified by the State Department of Agriculture. Whether 
your needs are for bushels or carlots, Maine Certified Seed Shippers 
can fill them. 

PROTECTION IS THERE: Two Department of Agriculture inspec- 
tions of the growing fields, a third at digging time, and a fourth dur- 
ing grading, give every assurance of strong, disease-free stock. 

EXPERIENCE IS THERE: Maine adopted its Seed Potato program 
in 1914. Thus for 25 years, under the alert supervision of the Maine 
Department of Agriculture, Maine Seed Stock growers have devel- 
oped an industry that has grown to an annual volume of over 5,000 
cars of America's finest seed stock. 

PERFORMANCE IS THERE: Today Maine Seed Stock growers 
ship to customers in 23 States and to many foreign countries— their 
repeat orders, attesting satisfaction with Maine Seed Stock. 

VARIETIES ARE THERE: This year's available varieties include 
Mountains, Chippewas, Katahdins, Bliss, Spaulding Rose, Irish Cob- 
blers, Russets and others. 

THE SERVICE IS THERE: Inquiries handled promptly. All orders 
whether large or small given prompt shipment. Allow 2 to 3 days to 
load a car under our watchful inspection methods. 

V V V 

Write or wire for a copy of "Potatoes Inspected and Certified in 
Maine, 1939" with a list of Maine Certified Seed Potato Growers. 
Copies of Field Inspection Reports are also available upon request. 



MAINE DEVELOPMENT 
COMMISSION 

PRODUCTS DIVISION 
AUGUSTA, MAINE 



sT^tt 



NlM^i 



SEED 



ot^ 



TOES 



r 



30 



THE GUIDE POST 



March, 1940 



ROBERT W. LOHR & SON 
BoswelL Penna. 



Now offering 6,800 bu. Pennsyl- 
vania Certified Seed Potatoes 
Grown from best Michigan seed 
stock in the high altitude and cool 
climate of Somerset County. 
Graded to standard grades and 
packed in new 100 lb. burlap bags, 
bearing the seal of inspection of 
the Pennsylvania Department of 
Agriculture. 

The price will be reasonable. Also 
offering 1,200 bu. Katahdin seed 
potatoes. Not certified, but of 
good quality, grown from certi- 
fied seed. 



WARNING 



• • • 



Potatoes in storage in some sec- 
tions of the State are sprouting 
prematurely and are already 
showing the formation of new 
small tubers while yet in the bin. 
Such potatoes are unfit for plant- 
ing as they will give poor stands 
and a high percentage of weak 
spindly plants — resulting in un- 
satisfactory yields. This warning 
is given so that you can be on the 
look-out for this condition from 
now until planting time. The cause 
of this condition is a heat factor, 
either during the growing season, 
or while the potatoes are in stor- 
age. 



Food Most Tempting 

When Served In 

Festive Dress 

Latest news jrom the culinary front fea- 
tures a decorative type of patty shell 
made of crisp potato chips. 

A new discovery stirs the pride and 
enhances the reputation of a famous sci- 
entist or explorer. Yet few people real- 
ize that among the most exhilarating 
and practical scenes of action where new- 
discoveries are being made daily — and 
by women — are family kitchens. 

One clever woman with a wide social 
and professional life, noticed that cer- 
tain choice foods were usually served in 
pastry patty shells. But these pastries 
were too rich for many tastes and many 
diets, especially since an increasing 
number of moderns are omitting pastries 
of all kinds from their diets. So she 
searched for a light, easily -digestible 
patty shell, and devised a new process 
for making cups of fine potato chips. 

The potato chips are fitted together 
like the petals of a flower, so the cups 
are decorative as well as delicious. 
French and festive, these patties are ex- 
tremely practical. Known as Jeanne s 
Gourmet Cups, they may now be bought 
in stores of a high-class grocery cham 
as well as from their inventor at a very 
moderat price. 



"You've plenty of nerve, Rastus. The 
idea of stealing my chickens and then 
trying to sell them to me." 

"Well, Boss, I thought you'd pay a 
better price of these chickens since you 
raised 'em yo' self. You'd know what 
you wuz buying." 

A girl may wear a golf outfit when 
she can't play golf, and a bathingg suit 
when she can't swim, but, when she 
puts on a wedding gown, she means 
business- Melville Job Order 



Gentleman (At the police Station) 
"Could I see the man that was arrested 
for robbing our house last night?" 

Desk Sergeant: "This is very irregular. 
Why do you want to see him?" 

Gentleman: "I want to ask him how 
he got in without awaking my wife." 

Bagology 



I 




%rs rtt^"^ 



'Band placement of ferHllzer gives high efficiency 
D from small amounts . . but it does not meet the 
needs of the crop throughout the season. 

Tkt crop* from mld-seosoA oii« n—d% pfonf 
food ill f lie bpffom of fhe f urrow-sf ice, wAtre f ftt 
roofs do mosf of f fceir feeding in hof, dry weof her. 

In the absence of manure, you can provide that plant 
food most effectively by plowing down GRANULAR 
'AERO' CYAN AMID, or a mixed fertilizer, the nitro gen 
r.$ whigh i« derived fro m *AERO" CYANAMIP. 

GRANULAR 'AERO' CYANAMID Feeds 
the Crops Evenly Throughout the Season 

***" WntTB FOR iWLiT P')66 



\,^- AMERICAN CYANAMID COMPANY 

^^ 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 



I 






VISION 



PLANTIHG SEASON COMING 



Are You Ready 
With Your 



IRONASE 



^ 







Planting potatoes Dec. 15th in Florida on farm of D. P. Blake 
near Goulds. One of the many appreciated Iron Age plant- 
ers used there. This one was brought 2700 miles from 
North Dakota by owner in order to have crop correctly 
planted — will travel another 2700 miles back home to plant 
another crop this season. 



Planter shown is a good planter but 
the 1940 Model is still better. Pick- 
ers are smoother running — Life of 
fertilizer belt mountings are in- 
creased and repairs simplified — 
Heavier gangs and facility for ad- 
justments of drawbars for proper 
alignment of planting shoe. Avail- 
able equipment for applying ferti- 
lizer by the Hi-Lo and Hi-Lo Un- 



equal Quantity methods and other 
valuable improvements. 

IRON AGE planters /it the re- 
quirements of every potato growing 
area. Many different styles and 
modifications from which to choose. 
This partly explains their great 
popularity wherever potatoes are 
grown. 



Write for new catalogue just issued 

A. B. FARQUHAR CO., Limited, 322 DUKE ST., YORK, PA. 



J 
I 



I, 



i 



i 






/ 9) M ?^) 9?}^ 2. 




VOLUME XVII 

THE PENf^SYlVANiA STATE COLLti 



NUMBER 4 




APRIL 



I940 




PiJsiiAJdsd luf. ike 

PENNSYLVANIA COOPERATIVE 
POTATO GROWERS ASSOCIATION 



INCORPORATED 




Dr. Nixon Comments on — Food and the Farm 



IT TAKES AN ENTIRE LEAF SUR- 
FACE TO MAKE A MAXIMUM TUBER 
PRODUCTION. EVERY SPOT, HOLE, OR 
BURNED EDGE ON THE LEAF LESSENS 
STARCH PRODUCTION IN THE SAME 
RATIO THAT THE SIZE OF THE DE- 
FECT BEARS TO THE ENTIRE LEAF 
SURFACE, THEREBY REDUCING TU- 
BER PRODUCTION OR YIELD. 

THOROUGH SPRAYING IS ESSEN- 
TIAL TO AN ENTIRE LEAF SURFACE 
AND MAXIMUM POTATO YIELDS IN 
PENNSYLVANIA. 



i 



(This article was used as a basis for 
discussion at a Joint Conference Com- 
mittee Meeting, held April 11, 1940 at 
Pittsburgh.) 

Did you know that approximately 30 
per cent of the U. S. dollars go to pur- 
chasing food? Our processes of obtain- 
ing and preparing food are essentially 
the same as they were 25 centuries ago. 
Our methods have improved but not 
changed. Food manufacturing is listed 
as a 10 billion dollar business, yet no 
one manufactures any food. True, an 
unattractive hog is cut into attractive 
chops and unusable wheat grains are 
ground in to flour but this is prepara- 
tion, not manufacture. The leaves of 
plants manufacture food. The magni- 
tude of their work far exceeds the en- 
ergy expended in all the industries of 
the world. The leaves accomplish this 
work so quietly that most people are 
scarcely conscious of it. This work 
easily ranks as the leading wonder of 
the world. The action of the energy 
of sunlight on green leaves converts or 
combines carbon dioxide (the breath of 
animals, for example) with water from 
the soil into carbohydrates (food). This 
is done so easily by plants, yet it re- 
quires the energy expressed by a tem- 
perature of approximately 2500 degrees 
Fahr. to decompose carbon dioxide into 
its elements, carbon and oxygen. Yet 
how woefully extravagant is nature as 
a food maufacturer when one considers 
that only about two per cent of this 
radiant energy which falls on the leaves 
of plants is utilized in manufacturing 
foods (carbohydrates). 

This extravagance on the part of na- 
ture seems to be the more striking when 
one appreciates that only one-sixth of 
the ingoing corn stays on the hog as 
usable human food. Even the lazy old 
cow spreads five-sixths of the raw ma- 
terial fed her over the barnyard in 
order to return one-sixth as edible solids 
in the form of milk for human consump- 
tion. Beef and sheep are five times 
worse. Only one part in 30 of their food 
is returned as meat. The laying hen is 
a little more of a human benefactor for 
one part of her food in 20 will return in 
the form of eggs. 

There is little wonder that it takes 50 
million people to raise five pounds of 
food per day for each of our 125 million. 



If there is any place for technical im- 
provements and labor-saving it is in the 
production and distribution of farm 
commodities. If agriculture ever be- 
comes recognized as an industry like 
other industries and is conducted ac- 
cordingly, it will mean a revolution in 
rural sociology and a new concept of 
farm economics. 

Average farming has been little above 
the mere subsistence level for 50 cen- 
turies. Despite all the agricultural edu- 
cation, we are still in the agricultural 
dark ages. What makes a plant grow? 
Even if we start with a seed, saying 
nothing about how life is mysteriously 
enclosed in its dead coat, no one can 
tell what makes it go on from there. 
When the expanding rootlets wean the 
young plant away from its mother seed 
and it starts out to gather its own nour- 
ishment, a process has begun about 
which we know but little more than did 
the Indians of Colonial times. 

Why is farming not a profitable busi- 
ness? It usually pays liberally in milk, 
eggs, potatoes and apples. These com- 
modities are surpluses on the farm. Con- 
verting them efficiently into cash is the 
major farm problem of American agri- 
culture. In the solution of this problem 
is where the farmer needs the most help. 
When farm commodities are sold below 
the cost of the labor that goes into 
their production, everybody loses. The 
place to wreck prices of farm commodi- 
ties is at the farm or at any other place 
where a great surplus exists. 

It is the farmer's business to produce, 
but every crop and every animal is a 
gamble with plenty of odds against win- 
ning. In addition to this, farm wastes in 
this country total about a billion tons 
a year. The utilization of every possible 
product and by-product of the farm 
would revolutionize farm income. Meat 
packers found out long ago that every 
part of the pig but the squeal could be 
used profitably. No business can be 
maintained by just selling off the cream. 
In addition to loin, there are the ribs. 
In agriculture only the shortest distance 
from producer to consumer will permit 
the full utilization of by-products and 
waste-products and thus bring agricul- 
ture onto a sound business basis. The 
most forward step that has yet been 

(Continued on page 26) 



THE GUIDE POST 



April, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 

Published monthly by the Pennsylvania 
Cooperative Potato Growers, Inc. 



OFFICERS 

J. A. Donaldson, Emlenton . . President 

Roy R. HesS/ Stillwater . . . .Vice-Pres. 

E. B. Bower, Bellefonte, 

Sec'y-Treas. and Gen. Mgr. 



DIRECTORS 

Jacob K. Mast Elverson, Chester 

P. Daniel Franlz Coplay, Lehigh 

Hugh McPherson Bridgeton, York 

John B. Schrack Loganton, Clinton 

Roy R. Hess Stillwater, Columbia 

Ed. Fisher Coudersport, Potter 

Charles Frey North Girard, Erie 

J. A. Donaldson, R.l, Emlenton, Venango 
R. W. Lohr Boswell, Somerset 

Annual membership fee $1.00. This in- 
cludes the Guide Post. 

All communications should be ad- 
dressed to E. B. Bower, Secretary-Treas- 
urer and General Manager, Bellefonte, 
Pennsylvania. 



DAYS OF APRIL 

The time of sweet renewing is at hand, 
When nature's thoughts flow upward 
from her heart; 
Nor music thrills from all the birdling 

band, 
While floods of green across the mea- 
dows start. 

Grace Griswald 



Forty Years Ago 

I've wandered through the village, Tom 

I've sat beneath the tree, 
Upon the school-house play-ground, 

That sheltered you and me; 
But none were left to greet me, Tom, 

And few were left to know, 
Who played with me upon the green, 

Just forty years ago. 

The grass was just as green, Tom, 

Barefooted boys at play 
Were sporting, just as we did then. 

With spirits just as gay. 



But the master sleeps upon the hill, 
Which, coated o'er with snow, 

Afforded us a sliding place, 
Some forty years ago. 

The old school-house is altered some; 

The benches are replaced 
By new ones very like the same 

Our jack-knives had defaced. 
But the same old bricks are in the wall. 

The bell swings to and fro; 
It's music's just the same, dear Tom, 

'Twas forty years ago. 

The spring that bubbled 'neath the hill, 

Close by the spreading beech. 
Is very low; 'twas once so high 

That we could almost reach; 
And kneeling down to take a drink. 

Dear Tom, I started so, 
To think how very much I've changed 

Since forty years ago. 

Near by that spring, upon an elm. 

You know, I cut your name, 
Your sweetheart's just beneath it, Tom; 

And you did mine the same. 
Some heartless wretch has peeled the 
bark; 

'Twas dying sure, but slow 
Just as that one whose name you cut. 

Died forty years ago. 

My lids have long been dry, Tom, 

But tears came in my eyes; 
I thought of her I loved so well. 

Those early broken ties; 
I visited the old church-yard, 

And took some flowers to strew 
Upon the graves of those we loved 

Just forty years ago. 

Some are in the church-yard laid, 

Some sleep beneath the sea; 
And none are left of our old class 

Excepting you and me. 
And when our time shall come, Tom, 

And we are called to go, 
I hope we'll meet with those wc loved 

Some forty years ago. 



Shoeless, he climbed the stairs, open- 
ed the door of the room, entered, and 
closed it after him without being de- 
tected. Just as he was about to get into 
bed, his wife, half -aroused from slum- 
ber, turned and said sleepily: 

*'Is that you, Fido?" 

The husband, telling the rest of the 
story, said: "For once in my life I had 
real presence of mind. I licked her 
hand." 



vWr,':'".--,;' ■ 






April, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



The Modernized Spray Ring 



by L. T. Denniston 



"Profitable potato spraying in Penn- 
sylvania had its beginning in 1918. Pre- 
vious to 1918, spraying, where practiced 
at all, was done with but little attention 
to the three dominating factors in mod- 
ern spraying — time, manner and mater- 
ial. Haphazard methods during this 
early period, such as 3 or 4 sprays per 
season, low pressure, little attention to 
boom adjustment, and lack of standard 
spray materials, were uncertain and sel- 
dom showed a profit." To which we add, 
'Neither would such methods or prac- 
tices show a profit in 1940.' The days 
of the bucket and the paddle, the knap 



sack sprayer, or what have you, are in 
the past. 

Thousands of growers have forgotten 
and thousands of others never knew 
the conditions prevailing previous to 
1918. Bugs, blight, low yields and rot- 
ten potatoes were having their day. The 
task of selling the idea of a new and 
added farm practice, requiring cash out- 
lay for what were very costly machines 
for the grower of that day, was not easy. 
Even the best growers were skeptical 
and wanted proof that the new venture 
would pay. Thousands of growers did 




The spray equipment used in conneclion with the first modernized potato spray 
ring set up by O. T. Grazier, Oakland, Maryland. 



not have the prices while hundreds who 
did, would not part with it. In order to 
carry the gospel into all parts of the 
state, into all potato growing communi- 
ties, growers who could not be reached 
individually were called into small 
groups and encouraged to pool their 
interests and funds on a community 
basis. Thus came into being the Spray 
Rings of 1918 and the years immediately 
following. 



You ask, did it pay? Let us quote a 
few figures. The average yield over 
Pennsylvania previous to 1920 was un- 
der 100 bushels per acre. Let us com- 
pare with this the average yield of 
growers who sprayed according to rec- 
ommendations during the ten years im- 
mediately following the initiation of the 
spray program. The average yield of 

(Continued on page 26) 



THE GUIDE POST 



April, 1940 



The Production of maximum yields of high quality potatoes is dependent 
on the planting of good seed. 



*::-f^' 




The seed in the above picture is the product of five healthy adjacent hills. They 
grew under favorable soil and climatic conditions in a proven seed area — Potter 
County, Pennsylvania. The parent seed was of good foundation stock produced 
on the same farm the previous year under the practice of careful, thorough mass 
roguing. The variety is Rural Russet, and the potatoes in the picture are progeny 
of the "Irway" strain, seed of which has been propagated by the above method in 
Potter County, free of disease, for over a quarter of a century. 



Hnnouncement 



We Are Pleased to Announce the Removal 

Of the Association Office from the 

Criders' Exchange Building 

to the 

MASONIC TEMPLE BUILDING 

21 North Allegheny Street 

BELLEFONTE, PENNSYLVANIA 

Telephone 618 

PENNSYLVANIA COOPERATIVE POTATO 
GROWERS' ASSOCIATION, INC. 



April, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



POTATO CHIPS 



The coldest Easter on record with the 
temperature 8 degrees colder than on 
last Christmas, heavy snow-storms and 
temperature near zero late in March 
all indicate a late spring with soil mois- 
ture high and spring planting of po- 
tatoes delayed. When this is read, 
however, about the middle of April, po- 
tato planting should be well along in 
the southern counties. With all plant- 
ings in southern states also delayed and 
with subsequent piling-up of new pota- 
toes on the markets next summer, later 
than usual maturing of Pennsylvania 
potatoes should not be amiss looking 
market-wise. 

* * >K 

The marketing season for the Penn- 
sylvania 1939 crop is nearly completed. 
Looking back over the season it appears 
to have been quite satisfactory. Prices 
averaged about 20c a bushel higher than 
a year ago which gave growers who had 
any kind of yields fair returns — nothing 
phenominal but quite satisfactory. The 
marketing of Blue Labels advanced con- 
siderably in western counties where 
yields were good and slid back in some 
eastern counties where yields and quali- 
ty were not up to normal. Some year — 
possibly in 1940 — all sections of the State 
may have better than average yields 
and then look out for a flood of Blue 
Labels. The trade wants more than 
have been available and when produc- 
ing sections of the State can hit on all 
fours together the volume will be much 
heavier than any season to date. 

♦ :!> * 

As of late March the reports of the 
early-crop potato deals may be sum- 
marized as follows: 

1. Car lot shipments continue very 
light. Only 80-85 cars of new potatoes 
a week but should be several hundred 
a day at this season. 

2. Hastings section several weeks late 
and will not start shipping before April 
15th-20th. 

3. Texas late but prospects favorable 
and harvesting to start April 10-15th. 

4. Alabama very late with car lot 
shipments not due before late April. 

5 Louisiana is one to three weeks 
late and shipments to start about May 
5 to 10th. 



6. Mississippi two weeks late. 

7. California reports no car lot ship- 
ments expected before May 1st. 

8. Georgia & So. Carolina had cold, 
wet planting weather to retard the work 
with some seed rotted in ground and 
harvesting to be one to two weeks late. 

9. North Carolina, Virginia, & Mary- 
land reporting planting progressing 
rapidly and probably all in by April 1st. 

)ic HC HC 

The March citation for best quality 
Blue Labels might well be awarded to 
Raymond Howell of Bloomsburg and to 
Andrew Seyfert of Lebanon. Both these 
packers marketed potatoes during the 
month which would be a credit to any 
brand. It is stock of this kind that boosts 
the demand for Pennsylvania potatoes. 
Likewise it takes only a few out-of- 
grade spuds, improperly marked, to cut 
the demand back to the same place it 
was 5 years ago. It is up to the Pennsyl- 
vania growers to decide which they 
want. The market is theirs for the effort 
but will not be reserved through any di- 
vine right of Pennsylvania ownership 
or consumer sentimentality about buy- 
ing Pennsylvania products — unless they 

measure up! 

« * ♦ 

I recall a survey made some few years 
ago by the Maine Bureau of Markets 
which disclosed that a large proportion 
of all complaints about market quality 
of Maine potatoes came from mechani- 
cal injury. This is now further borne 
out by the statements of the Pennsyl- 
vania enforcement agents who say the 
most serious and general factor of mis- 
branded stock is nothing but injury due 
to rough handling. Some day potato 
growers will learn that spuds should be 
handled with kid gloves to get the best 
returns out of the crop. 

* ♦ ♦ 

Almost from under the shadow of the 
black fist of Nazidom, the arch-enemy 
of cooperatives, comes the following by 
Victor Serwy writing in "Belgian Co- 
operator." "If cooperation today is still 
a great unknown it is only the fault of 
the cooperative organizations them- 
selves, which have scarcely emerged 
from their background, or extended 

(Continued on page 24) 



. . .. .cr^' 












The guide post 



April, 1940 



Preserving the Vitality of Seed 



The production of good seed with 
proven vitality, certified or otherwise, 
is of fundamental importance to the 
success of the individual potato grower 
and Pennsylvania's Potato Industry as 
a whole. 

The preservation of seed vitality until 
the seed is planted is of equal impor- 
ance if high yields of good quality pota- 
toes are to be produced by the grower 
from the planting of such seed. 

The picture below shows three bush- 
els, all three of which were grown un- 
der identical conditions from the same 
disease-free foundation seed stock. At 
the time they were placed in storage 
we can assume that the potatoes in each 



crate were of equal vitality or promise 
of producing high yields of good qual- 
ity. 

The crate on the left was stored in a 
house cellar in which a furnace was 
used during the winter, the center 
crate was stored in a cellar without a 
furnace, and the one on the right in a 
modern potato storage. The storage 
period was the same for each lot (7 
months) October 1st to May 1st. Each 
lot was carefully checked, photograph- 
ed, and planted under identical condi- 
tions on May 2nd. The results of the 
checks for shrinkage, sprouting, stand, 
vigor of plants, and yield checks taken 
in the fall are recorded in the table be- 
low. 







Observalions and 
Records 

Tuber shrinkage . . 
Sprout shrinkage . 



Total Shrinkage . . . 
Length of sprouts . . 
Tuber condition. . . 
Stand (per 100 ft.) . . 



House Cellar 
With Furnace 



10 lbs. or 16.7 % 



5 lbs. or 8.3% 



Vigor of plants 

Yield per acre 



15 lbs. or 25% 



7.2 inches 



Badly shriveled 



20 plants 



Weak and spindly 
48.1 bushels 



House Cellar 
Without Heat 



3 lbs. or 5% 



2 lbs. or 3.3% 



5 lbs. or 8.3% 



2 inches 



Slightly shriveled 
102 plants 



Retarded, few 
weak stalks 



323.2 bushels 



Modern Under- 
ground Storage 



1.3 lbs. or 2.3% 



Trace 



1.3 lbs. or 2.3% 



Trace 



Firm 



105 plants 



Came up first vig- 
orous 



342.4 bushels 



April, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



« 



OVER THE PICKING TABLE 



By INSPECTOR THROW-OUT 



"If I cut a beefsteak in two," asked 
the teacher, "and then cut the halves in 
two, what do I get?" 

"Quarters," returned the boy. 

"Good. And then again." 

"Eights." 

"Correct. Again." 

"Sixteenths." 

"Exactly. And what then?" 

"Thirty-seconds." 

"And once more?" 

"Hamburger," cried the boy impa- 
tiently. 

^D 

It was in one of the "ten, twent, 
thirt" vaudeville houses where moving 
pictures are shown. An Oriental act 
had been concluded and incense filled 
the house. 

"Usher," complained a pompous man 
in an aisle seat, "I smell punk." 

"That's all right," whispered the ush- 
er confidentially, "Just sit where you 
are, and I won't put anyone near you." 

^D 

Faith is the pencil of the soul that 
pictures heavenly things. 

a 



On certain days when pa gets home 
(The days he's paid I mean) 

Ma meets him at the door, and then 
We see a touching scene. 

^D 

You cannot repent too soon, because 
you do not know how soon it may be 
too late. — Fuller. 

^D 

Teacher: "How many different sex 
are there?" 

Jimmy: "Three! Male sex, female 
sex, insects." 

-D 

They were on their honeymoon and 
were staying at one of Chicago's well- 
known hotels. The bride had been out 
shopping, and coming back to the hotel 
hurried to the room she believed was 
hers and rapped gently. 

"Sweetie! Sugar plum! Let your 

honey in!" 

A great bass voice came through the 
closed door: "Madam! This is no candy 
shop! This is a bath room!" 



A false prophet always wants a full 
profit. 

'D 

The Weather 

What is it moulds the life of men? 

The Weather! 
What makes some black and others tan? 

The Weather! 
What makes the Zulu live in trees, 
And Congo natives dress in leaves, 
While others go in fur and freeze? 

The Weather! 
What makes the summer warm and 
fair? 

The Weather! 
What causes winter underwear? 

The Weather! 
What makes us rush and build a fire? 
and shiver near the glowing pyre — 
And then on other days perspire? 

The Weather! 
What makes the cost of living high? 

The Weather! 
What makes the Libyan desert dry? 

The Weather! 
What is it man in every clime 
Will talk about till end of time? 
What drove our honest pen to rhyme? 

The Weather! 

U 



Woman: "A rag, a bone and a hank of 
hair." 

Man: "A jag, a drone and a tank of 



air. 



j> 



-D- 



It is easy enough to love your neigh- 
bor if she is a pretty girl. 

a 

As it was: If you have ambition, go 
West, young man, go West. 

As it is: If you lack ambition, take 
Yeast, young man, take Yeast. 

^n 



It is not the greatness of a man's 
means that makes him independent, so 
much as the smallness of his wants. — 
Cobbett. 

D 



The political bee that buzzes in many 
a bonnet is a hum-bug. 

(Continued on page 22) 



10 



THE GUIDE POST 



April, 1940 



A remarkable field of early "Red Bliss" growing on the farm of M. L. Van- 
Wegen, Coudersport, Poller Counly. 




That the "Red Bliss," sensitive to various soils and climatic conditions, grows so 
profusely and gives heavy sets and high yields is additional evidence of the adap- 
tability of this area to the development, propogation, and maintenance of disease 
free foundation seed stock. "Red Bliss" now grown in this area contains far less 
disease than did the parent stock imported into the area several years ago. Mass 
roguing has been the basis of propagation and maintenance. 



WARNING 

A late spring, which seems to 
have finally arrived, is certain to 
interfere with the seasonable 
planting of the early potato crop. 
There will be an inclination on 
the part of many growers to get 
into their fields before they are fit. 

T. B. Terry, in reporting his 40 
years' experience as a potato 
grower staled that his worst crop 
failures were due to attempting 
to rush the season by plowing 
when the land was not yet fit. 

Terry said, "Loose, mellow land 
is wanted for best results." This 
holds as true today as Terry found 
it to be in 1890. You cannot cre- 
ate loose, mellow soil by plowing 
or working it loo wet. Once the 
damage is done, by plowing or 
working the soil too wet, there is 
no way of correcting it during the 
current season. 



MEMBERSHIP DRIVE 

CONTINUES SUCCESSFUL 

Good loyal supporters continued to 
reinforce the Association files with new 
grower members from all sections of 
the State, and also from foreign states 
during the past month. 

Leading in contributions was L. O. 
Thompson, of New Freedom, York 
County, former Director and Associa- 
tion supporter of long standing. Mr. 
Thompson sent a long list of renewals, 
and seven new York County members. 

Thomas B. Buell, of Elmira Michigan, 
who has boosted the Association for 
many years, contributed three new 
members, along with two renewals. 

Vice-President Roy R. Hess, of Still- 
water, Columbia County, never fails to 
make this column, and his contributions 
are always substantial. This month 
they were three new members. 

Former Director J. C. McClurg, of 
Geneva, Crawford County, also is listed 
regularly in this report, and his contri- 
butions too, are most substantial. This 

(Continued on page 16) 



April, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



11 



Five Essentials of Marketing 

As presented in The First Prize Demonstration at the 1940 farm Show by the 
future farmers of the Newton-Ransom School, Clarks Summit, Lackawanna 
County, under the direction of vocational instructor, P. R. Bartholme. 



Up to the present time the spot-light 
of American Agriculture has been very 
brightly focused upon the phase of 
Agriculture termed production. Pro- 
duction! Production! Production! As a 
result we have learned to successfully 
grow our crops to a point which seems 
to be very near the maximum. It is not 
at all uncommon to raise 450 to 550 bu. 
of potatoes per acre, 25 to 30 tons of cab- 
bage per acre, 20 tons of tomatoes per 
acre, 600 bu. of apples per acre, and so 
on. But the question arises now— and 
a question which has so far received 
insufficient attention and study — "Now 
that we have all these products on our 
hands, how are we going to get rid of 
them and make a profit?" In more 
simple words, "How are we going to 
market them?" as an answer to this 
problem there are certain factors which 
are indispensable to the successful mar- 
keting of farm products. These princi- 
ples of successful marketing are simple 
— just rules of common sense, the appli- 
cation of which requires some exper- 
ience and a considerable degree of skill. 
There are but five essentials and we 
shall endeavor to clearly point them 
out to you. 

First: Positive identification of product: 

Regardless of what is being sold, 
whether automobiles or potatoes, wash- 
ing machines or apples, the most im- 
portant essential to successful and pro- 
fitable marketing is positive identifica- 
tion and preferably a form of indentifi- 
cation which remains on the product 
until it is consumed. One of the very 
great advantages the manufacturers of 
automobiles enjoy over the producers of 
other products is that they can iden- 
tify their products in such a manner 
that not only does the identity continue 
until the user buys, but everybody can 
see what kind and how old the car is a 
person is driving. Unless some way is 
found to identify the ( 1 ) source of pro- 
duct, (2) the organization which pro- 
duces, (3) the firm or individual, there 
is not much use in trying to work out a 
successful marketing system which will 
prove of the greatest profit to the pro- 
ducers. Let us examine the identifying 



characteristics of the Pa. Potato Grow- 
ers' Association. Due to the character 
of the product it is impossible to mark 
it, thus making the identification a pack- 
aging problem. 

First — a very plain and outstanding 
trade mark; Second, the source of the 
product; Third — the association which 
puts it on the market. This type of 
identification fulfills these requirements 
satisfactorily. 

One of the reasons why Pacific coast 
apples sell on the Atlantic coast is that 
the Pacific coast growers identify their 
apples. The growers on the Atlantic 
have not done so to the same degree but 
are coming more and more to realize this 
must be done if there is to be a satisfac- 
tory market. The Pacific coast nut 
growers went to considerable expense 
in the effort to discover a satisfactory 
way of identifying the nuts they g^o^y. 
In the end they succeeded and it is 
easier to sell those nuts at a price higher 
than would have been possiblie without 
identification. 

Breakfast food manufacturers have 
packaged their foods in small individual 
packages for use in restaurants and ho- 
tels toward the end that when they are 
served they will carry their identity 
with them to the persons who eat them. 
The first problem, therefore, in all mar- 
keting is to find the most satisfactory 
method of identifying the product. In 
some cases this is a packaging problem. 
In other cases it is a problem of discov- 
ering a way of providing a distinguish- 
ing mark or design on each item, for 
example stamping the trade mark on 
nuts. 

2. Uniform quality: 

After this problem has been solved 
and not until it is, comes the problem 
of quality. The quality should be that 
which will appeal to those to whom it 
is desired to sell. If the market is the 
high grade exclusive one, the quality 
must be high. If it is desired to sell the 
maximum volume then the quality must 
be that which will appeal to the largest 
possible number of people. After the 
standard of quality has been determined 






•' :i-'l^': 



12 



THE GUIDE POST 



April, 1940 






it is necessary to maintain it just as 
uniform as is possible to make it. The 
identifying mark or package which is 
used becomes a liability rather than an 
asset unless the quality is maintained 
uniform. 

A local farmer has illustrated this 
point very well. Here is a bu. of Mac- 
intosh apples. No. 2 size, of a very 
good and uniform quality, packed in a 
fancy package. He has built up a trade 
which will pay a premium price for this 
product and there is a greater demand 
than he can supply. Also, he puts up 



a full bushel of the same kind of apples, 
No. 1 size, of a slightly less uniform 
size and quality, in the same type of 
package and packaged the same way, 
but receives the same price of $.75 for 
each of the two packages. The demand 
for both grades is such that he can sell 
all he has of both. He attributes his 
success in building up this trade to the 
maintenance of a uniform quality which 
meets the requirements of his custom- 
ers. Here we have a cross sectional view 
of each of these two packages. Notice 
particularly the uniformity of quality. 




The demonstration, "Five Essentials of Marketing" as given by the F.F.A. boys 
of Newton-Ransom School during the 1940 farm Show. 



Suppose, for example, potatoes are be- 
ing packaged and sold under trade mark. 
The sizes of packages are such that the 
retailer sells them in the packages. Each 
package provides a definite identifica- 
tion of the producers of those potatoes. 
If every package contains potatoes of the 
same size and quality, then the trade 
mark assures people of just what they 
can expect in regard to quality and 
size when they buy these potatoes. If 
it is what they want they are going to 
buy more and more of these trade 
marked potatoes and the chances are 
they will be willing to pay more for 
them than they are for the run of the 
mill potatoes. 



However, let one package contain po- 
tatoes of mixed sizes, another large po- 
tatoes, and another small ones, let the 
quality vary and the kind of potatoes 
also and people learn very soon that the 
trade mark means that they never know 
what they are going to get when they 
buy one of those packages. 

The result is that they would buy less 
and less of the trade marked potato. 
Most of the money and the time which 
has been spent for the marketing plan 
would be wasted for the simple reason 
that not sufficient attention has been 
given to quality and uniformity. 

(Continued on page 13) 



April, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



13 



I 



r 



Potatoes Are Last But Not Least 



Fifty boys carried eight different 
kinds of farm enterprises for vocational 
agricultural projects at Liberty, Tioga 
County, Pennsylvania last year, 1939. 

The kinds of projects carried were: 
small fruit, which included strawberries 
and raspberries; swine, which included 
sows and litter projects, and pigs for 
fattening; vegetable gardening; corn for 
grain; dairy calves; poultry; oats; and 
potatoes. 

After all projects had been completed 
and summarized, an analysis was made 
to determine the amount of profit re- 
turned per unit of production for each 
type of project. A table showing the 
relative returns for each type of project 
per unit of production is as follows: 





Returns per Unit 


Type of Project 


oj Production 


Small fruit 


$ 6.41 


Swine 


7.32 


Vegetable gardening 


15.34 


Corn (for grain) 


48.67 


Dairy calves 


51.57 


Poultry 


76.77 


Potatoes 


127.83 



A unit of production is considered as 
a certain size in order to require a cer- 
tain amount of time and effort— the 
same amount for each type of project. 
For example, a unit of potatoes required 
approximately the same amount of time 
and effort to care for them as was re- 
quired for the care of a unit of corn, or 
a unit of poultry, etc. 

In the small fruit or raspberry and 
strawberry projects these boys received 
the lowest returns or $6.41 for their ef- 
forts and time (or unit of production). 
The boys carrying potatoes on the other 
hand, had returned to them for the same 
amount of time and effort, $127.83. This 
happens to be 19.9 almost 20 times as 
much profit received by the boys who 
carried fruit. 

Projects in corn and dairy calves re- 
turned less than half as much for the 
same amount of time and effort as did 
potatoes. Potatoes returned about 1.6 
times as much as did poultry. It must 
be kept in mind, however, that this was 
a poor year for poultry. 

In spite of drought this year in this 
mountainous section of Liberty, Tioga 



County, Pennsylvania, potatoes proved 
to be the best bet for the boys. 

Reported by: Jesse Cutler 

Vocational Agricultural Supervisor. 



BEWARE! 

It has come to our attention that 
there are a number of agents in 
the state recommending and pro- 
moting various potato seed treat- 
ing solutions, dips, or what have 
you. To our knowledge there is 
no evidence experimental or other- 
wise, to show that these materials 
will return anything to our grow- 
ers when used under Pennsyl- 
vania conditions. There have been 
many cases over the past 25 years 
reported by growers where such 
materials have done severe injury. 
This may have been due to the 
materials themselves, the chemi- 
cal content in many cases being 
little known, or due to failure of 
following the tedius and exacting 
procedure prescribed in the rec- 
ommendations for their use. 

The use of clean seed (free of 
scab and rhizoc) by the grower 
will remove any need for seed 
treatment and return a greater net 
profit at harvest time. 



FIVE ESSENTIALS OF MARKETING 

(Continued from page 12) 

There are comparatively few farm 
products for which the farmer could 
not obtain better prices and the mar- 
keting of which he can not keep more 
securely within his control if farmers 
organized for the purpose of producing 
the most popular quality, maintaining 
uniformity of that quality and then 
identifying the products with a distinc- 
tive trade mark. 

Third: The right distribution plan: 

The third essential in marketing is 
distribution. That means where and bv 
whom the products are to be sold. Are 
they to pass through the hands of the 



!'):'!<■; 



14 



THE GUIDE POST 



April, 1940 



wholesalers and then on to the retailer 
before they get to the hands of the con- 
sumer? Are they to be sold directly to 
the retailer, or are they to be sold di- 
rectly to the consumer? All three o^ 
these different plans have been tried in 
practice. In some cases one works best 
and in some cases another. The quan- 
tity produced has a bearing upon which 
plan will work best. If the quantity is 
relatively small and there is an ample 
market for all that is produced in a near- 
by city it may prove best to sell it direct- 
ly to the consumer. Again it may prove 
more profitable to sell directly to the 
dealers. This problem of distribution 
needs to be given careful study before 
any plan is adopted. 

Let us examine the setup of the Penna. 
Potato Growers Association which is op- 
erating very successfully throughout 
this and other states. In general the 
working plan of the association is as fol- 
lows: 

The association is made up of potato 
growers all over the state, and so the 
potatoes put out by the association may 
come from almost any section of the 
state, depending upon conditions. The 
headquarters is located in Bellefonte, 
Pa. Any member has the privilege of 
packaging his potatoes in the associa- 
tion packages providing his product 
meets the requirements and passes in- 
spection of the association. This may 
be accomplished something as follows: 
PerhaDS it can be best illustrated by a 
hypothetical example. Grower members 
located in Potter county, have about 
70,000 bushel of potatoes to market. An 
inspector is sent to that area by the 
association who rigidly inspects and su- 
pervises the grading and packaging of 
the product. Then, when they are ready 
to be distributed, one of two methods 
may be employed. The central office 
has an order to fill in that general area 
and orders them shipped directly to that 
buyer which is generally a chain store 
or other retailer: or they may be ship- 
ped to a central storage where they are 
held until they are needed to fill orders 
in various markets. This brings a maxi- 
mum prite to the farmer for his pota- 
toes, by reducing the number of chan- 
nels and processes through which it 
would usually go. 

Fowrth: Right amount and kind of 
advertising: 

Closely allied with the system of dis- 
tribution adopted is advertising. An 
individual, a group, or a corporation 



may produce absolutely uniform, popu- 
lar quality, positively identify it, adopt 
the very best distributing plan and still 
not get anywhere. After all, this has 
been done it is necessary to tell people 
about it, to advertise, and to create a de- 
mand for what has already been done. 
That advertising must make people want 
what is being offered them and want it 
in sufficient quantities to absorb all that 
is produced. 

The type of advertising done depends 
upon the distribution. If the total out- 
put is going to be sold in a single city, 
then the advertising must be confined 
to that city. If it is going to be sold over 
all the nation, it follows that national 
advertising will be called for. If it is 
being sold in just one section the adver- 
tising must be confined to that section. 

Various methods of advertising may 
be listed something as follows: 

a. Roadside stands — Suitable for a 
small amount of produce to market — 
right on the farm. 

b. Radio very well adopted to either 
seasonal or yearly supplies of produce. 
Very timely. 

c. Magazines — ^Usually adopted to 
sectionally or nationally distributed 
products. Good examples are "Doje 
Pineapple" and "Purina Feeds." 

d. Newspapers — Well suited to local 
and seasonal advertising. 

e. Signs and Billboards — Usually best 
adopted to local advertising. 

Fifth: Maintenance of an ample supply 
capacity : 

Just as soon as advertising is started 
another problem arises which may not 
have existed before and that is an 
assured supply great enough to meet 
the demand created by advertising. 
Many a firm has suffered great loss by 
not keeping the advertisement to the 
supply. Thus, it is absolutely neces- 
sary to first assure an adequate supply 
capacity. Either it must be produced at 
home or it must be provided from othej* 
sources equally as good. Second, thfs 
supply must be of the quality demanded 
by the trade to which it caters. Inferior 
quality produce placed on the market 
will ruin several years, hard and patient 
effort to place a first class product on the 
market. Third — Adequate Storage, to 
fulfill the demand from the program of 
advertising used. The supply required 
to be placed in storage will vary with 
conditions, but there must absolutely be 

(Continued on page 18) 



i 






SOIL-BUILDERS or 
SOIL-ROBBERS ? 



f 



If the so-called soil-building crops are removed from the 
soil, either as pasture or hay, they rob the soil of more min- 
erals than are lost in a high yield of a soil-depleting crop. 
This is due to the high mineral content of grasses and 
legumes v^hich are classified as soil-building or soil-con- 
serving crops. 

In applying fertilizers, the high phosphate and potash re- 
quirements of grasses and legumes should be kept in mind. 
If any of the crop is removed from the soil to meet emer- 
gency forage needs, even more liberal amounts of minerals 
should be used on the following crop. 

Consult your county agent or experiment station about the 
fertility of your soil and your cropping system. Make sure 
that your fertilizer dealer or manufacturer sells you a fer- 
tilizer containing plenty of potash to meet the needs of 
your crop. You will be surprised how little extra it costs. 



1 



i 



1^ 



Write us for free information and 
literature on the profitable fertiliza- 
tion of potatoes and other crops. 




f 



American Potash Institute, Inc. 



Investment Building 



Washington, D. C. 



16 



THE GUIDE POST 



April, 1940 



The "Early Nittany" growing at the summit of the Allegheny Moun- 
tains, Potter County, Pennsylvania. 












■^^>>^:':<-<>y-'< 



-* #-^ 







The "Nittany" is the most outstanding new potato variety developed in Pennsyl- 
vania in 50 years. It has been amply proven that seed of the "Nittany" can be 
more easily propagated and maintained, free of disease, in Pennsylvania's proven 
seed areas than any other early maturing variety. It has been proven to be pe- 
culiarly adapted to commercial production throughout Pennsylvania and other 
areas of comparable soil and climate. 

The above field grown by Everett Blass, at the high headwaters of the Allegheny, 
Genesee, and Susquehanna Rivers, near the site of "Camp Potato," showed only 
a trace of degenerative disases. Starting as a seedling in 1925 the "Nittany" has 
been propagated and maintained in this area, as disease free seed stock, by care- 
ful and thorough mass roguing. 



MEMBERSHIP DRIVE 

CONTINUES SUCCESSFUL 

(Continued from page 10) 

month, along with numerous renewals, 
he sent three new members. 

Ivan Miller, of Corry, Erie County, 
whose contributions last year consti- 
stuted an amazingly long list, is back 
with us again with three new members, 
one fellow Erie Countian and two Ohio- 
ans. 

Dr. E. L. Nixon, of State College, in- 
fluenced two new prospective members 
to take out memberships. 

A. J. Henninger, of Allentown, down 
Lehigh way, who has been sending new 
members in as fast as he can locate 
them — and he is locating quite a few — 
found one more this month. 

Jacob Mast, of Elverson, Lancaster 
County, also regularly an Association 
booster, added another member to his 



long list of contributions this past 
month. 

Harvey Saylor, of Fullerton, in Le- 
high County, new in the drive, located 
his new member this month. 

We' thank all these men for these 
substantial contributions, and welcome 
the following new members into the 
Association: 

M. V. Runkle, Felton, York County 
C. C. Gable, Felton, York County 
Ervin J. Keeny, New Freedom, York 

County 
R. F. Flinchbaugh, Windsor, York 

County 
J. W. Smith, Laurel, York County 
M. M. Hartman, York, York County 
C. W. Manifold, Bridgeton, York 

County 
George Stromer, New Buffalo, Mich- 
igan 
Carl Griswold, Elmira, Michigan 
Miles Brown, Elmira, Michigan 
(Continued on page 18) 



1 






"As you sow, so shall you reap." 

Don't fear "Ring Rot" (Bacterial Wilt) in your crop. 
No "Ring Rot" has been discovered in Potter County. 
Plant your fields with this seed and reap a Profitable Crop. 



Russet Rurals 
White Rurals 
Pennigan 



Nittany Cobblers — Size 2 
Katahdin — sold out 
Chippewa — sold out 
Red Bliss 



POTTER COUNTY FOUNDATION 
SEED POTATO ASSOCIATION 

COUDERSPORT, PA. 



Don Stearns, Pres. 



F. E. Wagner, Sec'y. 



Bob Hamilton, Sr. 



Bob Hamilton. Jr. 



HAMILTON & COMPANY 

Ephrata — Penna. 

WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS 

Eastern Pennsylvania, Delaware & Maryland 
VAC-A-WAY SEED AND GRAIN CLEANERS AND GRADERS 

Hand power or electric. Farm and Commercial sizes. 

Exclusive Distributor for Pennsylvania. — Sold in every County. 
O.K. CHAMPION POTATO DIGGERS 

One or two row with power take-offs and Caster Wheels. 

Received 1939 Gold Medal Award from the Pennsylvania Potato 

Growers Association. 
TRESCOTT FRUIT GRADERS AND SIZERS 

Various units for any required capacity. 
TRESCOTT VEGETABLE CLEANERS 

For Lima Beans, Tomatoes, Cucumbers, Peppers, etc. 
O.K. CHAMPION TRANSPORTABLE IRRIGATION PIPE 

Light weight, quick coupling and complete Ime of fittmgs. 

Save your crops and increase the yield. Moves over your farm like 

rain 
PUMPS,* SPRINKLERS, MOTORS AND ENGINES , ^ ^ , 

A complete irrigation system can be installed quickly and at a ow cost 
where water is available. Our Irrigation Engineering Service will gladly 
furnish you with an estimate. For information, please write to the above 
address or you are welcome to visit our warehouse located on Poplar btreet 
in Ephrata, Lancaster County, Pa., where all of the above items are on 
display. 



18 



THE GUIDE POST 



April, 1940 



V. >,V «1f-*' 



FIVE ESSENTIALS OF MARKETING 

(Continued from page 14) 

enough produce in storage to meet the 
demand set up. 

It is just as important not to over ad- 
vertise as it is to advertise sufficiently. 
Advertising should be geared to create 
a good demand for all that can be pro- 
duced but not to create so great a de- 
mand that it can not be met, while at 
the same time maintaining the standard 
of quality which has been set up. 

Summarizing : —The principles of 
successful marketing are simple. They 
are just rules of common sense. Their 
application requires a certain amount of 
experience and a considerable degree of 
skill. Left out steps or miss-applied 
steps always prove costly. 

First— Positively identify the product. 

Second— Produce and maintain a 
good uniform quality. 

Third— Work out the right kind of 
distribution plan. 

Fourth— Employ the right amount 
and kind of advertising. 

Fifth— Maintain an ample supply 
capactiy. 



MEMBERSHIP DRIVE „«^^,„ 

CONTINUES SUCCESSFUL 

(Continued from page 16) 
Frank Beshline, Stillwater, Columbia 

County -n r^ 1 

Holland McHenry, Orangeville, Col- 
umbia, County 
Myron Edwards, Benton, Columbia 

County 
T. S. Ingram, Corry, Erie County 
Earl Livingston, Conneaut Lake, 

Crawford County 
W. I. Brown, Meadville, Crawford 

County 
Alton Miller, Corry, Erie County 
J. E. Miller, Columbiana, Ohio 
S. B. McClure, East Palestine, Ohio 
John Wettstine, Hazleton, Luzerne 

County 
J. Edward Johns, Massillon, Ohio 
Jacob Deck, Allentown, Lehigh Coun- 
ty 
Chas. D. Wolf, Quincey, Franklin 

County 
Iron A. Long, Now Tripoli, Lehigh 

n 

Liberty of thought is the life of the soul. 
— Francois M. A. Voltaire 



THE CHILD'S WORLD 

"Great, wide, beautiful, wonderful 

world, 
With the wonderful water round you 

curled. 
And the wonderful grass upon your 

breast, — 
World, you are beautiful drest. 

"The wonderful air is over me, 

And the wonderful wind is shaking the 

tree; 
It walks on the water, and whirls the 

mills, 
And talks to itself on the tops of the 

hills. 

"You friendly Earth! how far do you go 
With the wheat fields that nod, and the 

rivers that flow; 
With cities and gardens, and cliffs and 

isles. 
And people upon you for thousands of 

miles? 

"Ah, you are so great, and I am so small, 
I tremble to think of you. World, at all: 
And yet, when I said my prayers, to-day, 
A whisper inside me seemed to say, 
'You are more than the Earth, though 

you are such a dot: 
You can love and think, and the Earth 

can not!'" 

n 



Doubts are more cruel than the worst 
truths. — Jean Baptiste Molier 



CAUTION 

Potatoes in storage in some sec- 
tions of the State are sprouting 
prematurely, and are already 
showing the formation of new 
small tubers while yet in the bin. 
Such potatoes are unfit for plant- 
ing as they will give poor stands 
and high percentage of weak 
spindly plants — resulting in un- 
satisfactory yields. This warn- 
ing is given so you can be on the 
look-out for this condition from 
now until you plant. The cause 
of this condition is a heat factor, 
eitlier during the growing season, 
or while the potatoes are in stor- 
age. 







MR. SPUD says: 

"The more potatoes you grow per acre 
the more plantfood you use. 

"A 400 bushel crop of potatoes removes 
from the soil 353 pounds of plantfood." 

USE 



DAVCO 



VMM MMMMA U. S »M WV 



GRANULATED 



FERTILIZER 

It's Readily Soluble — It Distributes Evenly 

Restores depleted soil fertility — USE DAVCO 

1500 lbs. of 4-8-8 supplies 300 lbs. of plantfood 
1800 lbs. of 4-8-8 supplies 360 lbs. of plantfood 

ASK YOUR AGENT FOR DAVCO 

THE DAVISON CHEMICAL CORPORATION 

BALTIMORE. MD. 



Motor truck- 
mounted 
Hardies are 
supplied with 
and without 
power take-off 




• The big 10-row truck-mounted, 
truck-powered Hardie Row Crop 
Sprayer is doing a splendid and 
economical job for the large acre- 
age operator. For those whose 
needs require row sprayers of an- 
other model and size, Hardie builds 



a wide variety to spray 2 to 10 rows 
—Tractor Trailers, engine -power- 
ed and traction outfits. Sold and 
serviced by leading local dealers. 
Write for the Hardie Row Crop 
Sprayer Catalog. The Hardie Mfg. 
Company, Hudson, Mich. 







20 



THE GUIDE POST 



April, 1940 



Grower to Grower Exchange 

The rate for advertising in this column is a penny a word, "^i^jJ^J^J^^L^oUL^^^^ 
payable with order. (10% reduction when four or ^^^ore^ ^"^^.^^^^^^^ 
one time.) Count name and address. Send ads to reach the GUIDE POST, Mason c 
Temple Building, Bellefonte, Penna., by the 20th of the month previous to publi- 
cation. 



QUALITY SEED POTATOES: Russet 
Rurals, White Rurals, Cobblers and 
Nittanys. Certified Seeds and one year 
from certified. All grown from north- 
ern foundation seed. Ideal storage. All 
seed will be graded and packed in Asso- 
ciation bushel paper bags. I am pur- 
chasing a new eight row sprayer, there- 
fore am offering for sale a six row used 
power sprayer. Thomas Denniston, 
Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania. (Butler 
County.) 

AVAILABLE: Copies of Dr. E. L. Nix- 
on's book, "The Principles of Potato 
Production," $1.25 per copy. Write for 
your copy today, to Association office, 
Bellefonte, Pennsylvania. 

SPRAYER: One ten-row Bean truck 
sprayer, five hundred gallon capacity. 
Sprayer complete without truck. If in- 
terested, write Lynn Sill, R. F. D. No. 3, 
Corry, Penna. (Erie County) 

SEED POTATOES: Seconds grown 
from Potter County disease-free foun- 
dation seed stock. Rural Russets. Free 
from blight, stem-end discoloration and 
other injury. Firm and vigorous sprouts 
assured due to being well stored. Will be 
well graded and packed in bushels or 
100 lbs. Price reasonable, $1.50 per hun- 
dred for one year from certified, $1.10 
per hundred for two years from certi- 
fied. Contact Lynn Sill, R. F. D. No. 3, 
Corry, Pa. 

DIGGER FOR SALE: One single row 
take off digger. Good repair. Will sell 
reasonably. Write Dr. E. L. Nixon, 
State College, Penna. 



SPRAY BOOM FOR SALE: John Bean 
Spray boom. Complete without nozzles. 
10 row. Good condition. Will sell cheap. 
Ed. Fisher, Coudersport, Pa. 

PICKER-PLANTER WANTED: 2- 

Row automatic Picker-Planter. Iron 
Age. Good condition. Send for details. 
J. A. Donaldson, R. D. No. 1, Emlenton, 
Penna. (Venango County). 

SEED POTATOES: Rural Russets and 
Chippewas, U. S. No. 1, and U. S. No. 1, 
Size B, or seconds. Free from stem end 
discoloration and other blemishes. Con- 
tact Robert Getz, Albrightsville, Penna. 
(Carbon County) 

SPRAYER WANTED: 4 or 6 row en- 
gine or power take-off sprayer. Write 
J. A. Donaldson, R. F. D., No. 1 Emlen- 
ton, Penna. (Venango County) 

PLANTER FOR SALE: Two-row Iron 
Age automatic Planter; picking attach- 
ments. In perfect condition. Will sell 
reasonably. Contact Ed. Fisher, Coud- 
ersport, (Potter County) Penna. 

SPRAYER WANTED: Horse drawn 
traction sprayer 4-Row boom. Good 
condition. Write J. A. Donaldson, R. F. 
D. No. 1, Emlenton, (Venango County) 
Penna. 

SEED POTATOES FOR SALE: U. S. 

No. 1, Size B Russets and Nittany Cob- 
blers. 90c a bushel. Contact Ivan Mil- 
ler, R. F. D. No. 3, Corry, (Erie County) , 
Penna. 

DIGGER FOR SALE: Eureka single 
row, powered with eight horse Nova 
engine. Has dug 40 acres. Also, 4 row 
Eureka riding weeder. Will sell rea- 
sonable. Write, Barrie Wilson, R. F. D. 
4, Union City, Pa. Erie County. 



Bean Potato Sprayers 




CUT SPRAYING COSTS .INCREASE YIELDS .SPRAY FASTER 
BETTER QUALITY . NO WORRIES . MAKE MONEY 

SPRAY WITH HIGH PRESSURE 

No grower is safe unless he sprays with high pressure. High pressure 
protects you against excessive spraying costs, low yield, delays in spray- 
ing, poor quality and loss of money. 

Decide today to investigate high pressure spraying and eliminate the 
obsolete low pressure system. 

Bean line of high pressure potato sprayers offer a variety of price and 
sizes that will meet your requirements, that you can afford to invest in, 
and that will come back to you in savings in a larger and better crop. 




RUBBER SPOOL GRADER 

Cleans as it grades. Does not bruise or cut the potatoes. All grading is 
done on rubber. Much more accurate and when you are finished grading 
you have a fine looking pack that will sell. 

Investigate this Grader at once. 

John Bean Mfg. Co. 

Division Food Machinery Corporation 
LANSING MICHIGAN 



22 



THE GUIDE POST 



April. 1940 



REICHARD'S 

ANIMAL BASE 

FERTILIZERS 

Grow Bigger and 
Better Crops 




Distributors for 

Orchard Brand 

Spray Materials 

Nichols Blueslone 

Robt A. Reichard, Inc 

19th & Lawrence Sts. 
Allentown, Pa. 



Potato Growers' Slogan— 
"When in Doubt, SPRAY" 

with 

Whiterock Micro-Mesh 

or 

Whiterock 325 Mesh 

Write for particulars 




Whiterock Quarries 

Bellefonte, Pa. 



OVER THE PICKING TABLE 

(Continued from page 9) 
Fond Mother: "Dorothy, if yo^ ^^e 
bad you won't go to heaven. Don t you 

^Tmle^Dorothy: "Well, I've been to the 
circus and the Chautauqua already. I 
can't expect to go everywhere. 

. .a 

-Mother, what is a Dry Martini?" 
"Heavens on Earth, child! 
''Oh!" 

-n 

Said the teacher to Willie: , 

♦'Why, Willie, what are you drawing? 

"I'm drawing a picture of God. 

"But, Willie, you mustn't do that, no- 
body knows how God looks." 

WilHe smiled confidently. 

"Well," he said, "they will when I 
get this done." 



^D- 



She: "I've got a job as dairy maid in a 
chocolate factory." 
He: "What do you do? 
She: "Milk chocolate.'* 



hD- 



We used to be scared to death when a 
man reached for his hip-pocket. Now 
we are tickled to death. — C.O.D. 



n- 



Lots of men would leave their footprints 
Time's eternal sands to grace. 

Had they gotten mother's slipper 
At the proper time and place. 

^D 

Electrician's wife (to incoming spouse). 

"Whatt's the meter? Wireyou insul- 
ate''" 

Electrician: "Sh! Couple 'a vam- 

peres, m'dear." 

.D 

It costs a lot to live these days. 

More than it did of yore; 
But when you stop to think of it. 

It's worth a whole lot more. 

»D 7 1 f 

There are substitutes for almost 

everything— -except work and sleep. 

.Q 

Quit hanging crepe on tomorrow's 
door; expected troubles always look big, 
but ten to one they never happen. 






"Acres More Spray Before 




Throwing the Disc Away' 



IT'S ALL IN THE HOLE 

Jennings' Hardened Steel (Rust Proof) Spray Discs 

Keep Your Pressure Up, Waste Less Material 

Last Two or Three Times Longer and Cost 

No More Than the Average Soft Disc 

WHERE TO BUY 

The following well known Penna. Dealers stock the Jennings line and will 
be glad to serve you. 



County 

ADAMS 

ERIE 

LANCASTER 

LEHIGH 

POTTER 

UNION 



Name 

George F. Hoffman 
J. Jacobsen & Son 
A. B. C. Groff 
J. M. Snyder & Son 
E. R. Blass 
J. L. Rietz 



City 

Bigerville 

Girard 

New Holland 

Neffs 

Coudersport 

Lewisburg 



OUT OF STATE DISTRIBUTORS 



Potato Growers Co-operate 

Gould & Smith 

H. J. Evans 

•^G & H Supply Co. 

* Servicing Western Pa. & Ohio 



Eaton, Colorado 

Presque Isle, Maine 

Georgetown, N. Y. 

Mansfield, Ohio 






Buy Jennings' Hardened Steel Discs From Your Dealer, 

If He Will Not Supply You, Order Direct 

But Accept No Substitute 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 

A Disc For Every Size Nozzle 

A Hole For Every Purpose 



Lloyd E. Jennings 




Sozners, Conn. 



MARK 



24 



THE GUIDE POST 



April, 1940 






■ "-V r,V.,_ 



POTATO CHIPS 

(Continued from page 7) 

their missionary work to all classes of 
society. Too many cooperative leaders 
imagine the movement will win adher- 
ents by its virtues alone and be accept- 
ed like an economic and moral destiny. 
They are mistaken. The world is only 
conquered by effort. It is through ac- 
tion that the movement will advance 
and be able to render the services right- 
ly expected of it." 

>!■ ♦ « 

It is common practice to sit back to 
take our blessings and privileges as 
they come and scarcely consider our 
responsibilities and our duties to shoul- 
der our portion of the load to improve 
agricultural conditions, marketing prac- 
tices, democratic processes or condi- 
tions of welfare for mankind in general 
— if you will. Fortunately through all 
the ages there have been a few not sat- 
isfied to sit back, but who have been 
willing not only to shoulder their own 
responsibility but to carry others along 
with their good works. In other words 
what has the marketing program done 
for the Pennsylvania potato industry 
and how much of that good is due to any 
effort of yours? Since the program 
started in 1936 nearly 100 million bush- 
els of Pennsylvania potatoes have been 
grown and marketed. If the effect of 
the Program has been only to raise the 
average price one cent a bushel, a cold 
million bucks has been the resulting 
benefit to Pennsylvania Potato Grow- 
ers. However, the average price has 
been increased much more than one 
cent a bushel. Through the price rais- 
ing effect of the Program at numerous 
times, in many of the heaviest produc- 
ing counties, the general price level of 
all stocks has been raised from 10 to 20c 
a hundred. How many of us are coop- 
erating for the benefit of all and how 
many are just riding along enjoying the 
benefits produced by others? 

« * * 

F. J. Stevenson, Senior Geneticist of 
the U. S. D. A. reports a new variety 
which is very promising and very re- 
sistant to late blight — called the Sebago. 
This was a result of crossing Chippewa 
and Katahdin. This variety has done 
very well in Wisconsin, but will be tried 
in many other sections before it is re- 
leased. In a seedling test in Somerset 
County last year the first specimen of 
late blight found in the plot was on Se- 
bago — the plot was well sprayed so 



that no material damage was done to 

any. 

♦ * ♦ 

An occasional glimpse into the prac- 
tices of some of our brother spud grow- 
ers might not be amiss. Probably one 
of the most respected of any in the 
State is none other than our own vice- 
president, Roy Hess, of Stillwater. And 
if you haven't seen Roy's farmstead, 
his spacious tho modest home, his com- 
modious well-kept barn and other farm 
buildings, his rolling acres of fertile 
fields had better treat himself to an eye- 
full and visit the Hess menage about 12 
miles north of Bloomsburg and 2 miles 
south of Benton, and Roy doesn't have 
all his eggs in the potato basket either. 
He is reported to be one of the largest 
growers of cannery peas in the State 
with a viner on his farm which annually 
threshes the peas from about 200 acres. 
More power to you, Roy. It is men like 
you who make agriculture a vocation 
rather than an avocation. 

* * * 

The A. & P. Chain Stores have re- 
ported they purchased nearly $100,000,- 
000 worth of fruits and vegetables from 
growers last year. The report stated 
that potatoes had the second largest in- 
creased sales of any crop over the pre- 
vious year, this amounting to 36%. 

♦ 41 4> 

Those who have held their potatoes 
this late may still wonder how the mar- 
ket will act during late April and early 
May. Anyone who predicts produce 
prices really puts himself out on a limb 
so without stating opinions or without 
making any predictions the facts seem 
to indicate a shortage of spuds during 
this 4 week period. Carlot shipments 
from the entire country have gradually 
been falling off from a weekly total of 
more than 6,000 cars to 5,400 a decline 
of 600 cars a week. Stocks are pretty 
well cleaned up in a number of states 
so that shipments should decline even 
more rapidly until the new crop begins 
to move. This early movement will 
hardly be a noticeable factor on the 
market until about the middle of May. 
At this time last year Florida and Texas 
were shipping a couple of hundred cars 
a day. This year they have shipped to- 
gether about 1,000 cars to date. Flori- 
da is now shipping 10 to 30 cars a day 
and Texas none at all. What will the 
market for late stocks do between now 
and the middle of May? Your guess is 
as good anyones! 

"Bill Shakespud" 



-► 



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Potato Cutter 

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Ridinc Mulcher 

Breaks crusts, miilrhea soil, and 
kills weeds when potato crop is 
young and tender. 8, 10 and 12 
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Potato Planter 

One man machines 
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Traction Sprayer 

Insures the crop. Sires. 
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Potato Digger 

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26 



THE GUIDE POST 



April, 1940 



THE MODERNIZED SPRAY RING 

(Continued from page 5) 

those who sprayed in 1918 was 142 bush- 
els per acre; in 1919 it was 169 bushels; 
in 1920, 258 bushels; in 1921, 233 bushels; 
1922, 220 bushels; in 1923, 257 bushels; 
in 1924, 230 bushels; in 1925, 256 bushels; 
in 1926, 306 bushels; and in 1927, 288 
bushels. To those who might say that 
this increase in yield was due to im- 
provement on the part of the grower to 
adhere to other practices, it is admitted 
that there were other improvements, 
especially in the use of better seed. But 
that spraying played a major role, let us 
go down the same years and check the 
average increased yield directly due to 
spraying. In 1918, it was 34.8 bushels 
per acre; 1919, 42.9 bushels; 1920, 74.7 
bushels; 1921, 74.3 bushels; 1922, 66 
bushels; 1923, 58 bushels; 1924, 66.6 
bushels; 1925, 78 bushels: 1926, 103 bush- 
els, and 1927, 136.7 bushels per acre. 

With favorable yields and favorable 
prices during the above mentioned 
years, thousands of growers began to 
buy their own sprayers. New spray 
companies came into the picture with 
new and improved machines. This 
movement toward new individually 
owned sprayers reached its peak during 
the period from 1927 to 1930. During 
the succeeding years the transition from 
traction and horse drawn power outfits, 
to truck mounted, and truck and trac- 
tor power take-off machines, on the part 
of the large growers, took place. 

By 1930, the original spray rings were 
definitely on their way out, and by 1935, 
with very few exceptions, they ceased 
to exist. About this time, or a few years 
earlier, O. T. Graser, Vocational Agri- 
cultural Supervisor, at Oakland, Mary- 
land, a Pennsylvanian by birth and so 
inclined in potato thought, became in- 
terested in doing something construc- 
tive for the few potato growers of his 
community. After a series of enthu- 
siastic potato meetings, Graser got the 
growers and farmers of the community 
together, and organized what should be 
credited as being the first modernized 
potato spray ring. A modem truck 
mounted spray rig was purchased by 
the group and a competent operator 
hired to do the spraying for the growers 
for the season. A picture of the spray 
outfit and the spray plant accompanies 
this article. Later, a second group was 
organized and a similar outfit put into 
operation. 



During the past year, four community 
potato spray groups were organized in 
Potter County, Pennsylvania, with the 
idea of setting up and operating on the 
spray ring plan. With Agricultural Ex- 
tension assisting in the organization of 
the groups and acting in an advisory 
capacity, and the Farm Security Admin- 
istration cooperating in the financial ar- 
rangements, the four groups were set 
up with modern tractor power take-off 
spray outfits and competent operators 
secured or employed to spray for each 
group for the season. From all reports, 
the operation of these rings proved both 
practical and economical. 

There is a very definite need in many 
communities throughout the state for 
organizing and putting into operation 
practical and economical community 
spray ring units if many of the smaller 
growers in these communities are to 
remain in the potato business. Modern 
spray outfits that will do the right kind 
of a job are capable of spraying many 
times the acreage grown by many of 
these smaller growers. Spray equip- 
ment corrodes or rusts out as fast as it 
wears out. Maximum use of the equip- 
ment is good economy, but this is not 
possible with the small grower on an 
individual basis. 



DR. NIXON COMMENTS ON 

FOOD AND THE FARM 

(Continued from page 3) 

taken by American agriculture in short- 
ening the path of converting farm 
products into cash was taken by the es- 
tablishment of the Joint Conference 
Committee made up of organized Penn- 
sylvania potato producers and organ- 
ized distributors, whose function it is, 
first, to determine standard grades high 
enough to meet exacting demands for 
all practical consumer acceptance and 
yet low enough to make the best of our 
local crops. Second, to adopt and trade- 
mark distinctive practical and attractive 
packs of sizes to meet the widest efficient 
market demands. Third, to set up ma- 
chinery by which the adopted brands 
will be guaranteed to the consumer and 
economically distributed. Fourth, to sit 
down and sanely look at all angles of 
the problem with the hope that we may 
set up a new type of business transac- 
tion; that here at last is something that 
will put a firmer foundation and a fresh 
infusion of faith, into the business af- 
fairs of men. 



T 






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ith C\jL€it 



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Iron Age power take- 
off sprayer with ex- 
rlusive "Compak" 
folding: boom for 6, 8, 
or 10 rows. Rubber- 
tired wheels at slight 
extra cost if desired. 



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heart of all Iron Age 
sprayers. Horizontally 
designed for working 
pressures up to 1000 
lbs. per square inch. 
Slower speed for long- 
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11. 20. and 37 gallons- 
per-minute sizes. 



HIGH PRESSURE SPRAYING 





^yOU can make more money from 
/ your potatoes if you kill their twin 
enemies — insects and fungi. But only 
high pressure atomization gets the best 
results from your fungicide or insec- 
ticide. 

Formerly available only to large 
growers, IRON AGE now makes high 
pressure spraying possible for all 
growers. Low cost 6 and 10 gallons- 
per-minute sizes with any pressures up 
to 600 pounds per square inch. One 
just right for every grower. 

With Iron Age High Pressure spray- 
ing you'll find potato profits go up — 
spraying costs go down, for high pres- 
sures make every drop of fungicide or 
insecticide do a far better job. 



Write for 

Sprayer 

Manual 40 



IRONAQE 



Row 

Crop 

Sprayers 






^/ /A/ /// ^//^ A 




IP 2111 



NUMBER 5 



-^ 




MAY 



I9AO 






V\.#^l%- 



CMMfU 



PmdidJied Im tke 

PENNSYLVANIA COOPERATIVE 
POTATO GROWERS ASSOCIATION 



A. B. FARQUHAR CO., LTD. — 334 Duke St. — YORK, PENNA. 




INCORPORATED 




Timely Observations and Suggestions 

L. T. Denniston 
Association Field Representative 



We subscribe to the lour basic principles of potato production: 

1. Good Seed 

2. An abundance of Humus. 

3. Thorough Spraying. 

4. Vision, or Potato Mentality. 

Which of these are the more important? The answer is all four. 
In the words of Hiawatha, "Useless one without the other." 
However, spraying has done more to revolutionize potato grow- 
ing in Pennsylvania than any other practice. It has: 

Increased yields. 

Im.proved quality. 

Eliminated rot. 

Standardized row widths. 

Encouraged planting of straight rows with equal distance 
between them. 

Established pride in potato growing — by eliminating the 
chance of disease from heat and blight. 

To the potato grower a well sprayed field portrays more than a 
bed of roses or a fine painting. After all, a well sprayed potato 
field simulates an oil painting more than anything else, if you 
appreciate it. 




CONDITIONING THE SPRAY RIG: 
The value of Pennsylvania's 1939 potato 
crop exceeded $25,000,000.00. For a 
grower who had a fair to a good crop 
it was a satisfactory and profitable sea- 
son. The sprayer plays a major part in 
the success or failure of the grower and 
his crop. With 10,000 sprayers in opera- 
tion in the State, representing an invest- 
ment of close to $5,000,000.00, it is of ut- 
most importance that we give some 
thought to the care and repair of these 
machines. 

Aim for Efficiency 

Efficient operation of the sprayer will 
lower the cost of spraying, also the cost 
of potato production, and make proper 
application of the spray material easier. 
The spray rig will not operate efficiently 
unless all working parts are in proper 
condition. Too often the sprayer is taken 
to the field for the first spraying and 
then the operator discovers that it must 
be adjusted, cleaned, and repaired be- 
fore spraying can be done. If this job is 
done beforehand, delays will be avoided, 
and performance will be improved. 

Time to Check the Sprayer 

Make plans now to check, adjust and 
repair your sprayer, if you have not al- 
ready done so. Bear in mind that there 
may be delay in securing needed re- 
pairs. Rainy days provide an ideal time 
for going over the sprayer. Be sure to 
check the engine, grinding valves and 
the replacement of piston rings if neces- 
sary. The engine often becomes so badly 
worn that it does not produce full power. 
Remember that the power unit is an 
essential part of your spray rig if it is 
to operate efficiently. 

On Cleaning Parts 

The checking of the sprayer should 
start with a thorough cleaning, includ- 
ing the removal of sediment and scale 
in the tank. Check all screens care- 
fully and replace with new screens if 
holes appear. This will save much time 
at the nozzles. Corroded screens may 
be cleaned by soaking overnight in vine- 
gar. A solution composed of one pint 
of muratic acid to ten parts of water 
may also be used. The parts should re- 



main in the muratic acid solution just 
long enough to remove the corroded ma- 
terial and then must be thoroughly 
washed with water. Sprayer valves, 
valve seats, and nozzle parts may be 
cleaned by the same method. 

Replacing Parts 

Sprayer valves, valve seats, cylinder 
walls and pistons should be checked for 
wear and corrosion. Worn or pitted 
parts should be replaced. Do not ne- 
glect the relief valve. The wise operator 
will keep a full set of each of the fol- 
lowing parts on hand: pump leathers 
or rings, valves, valve seats, nozzle 
strainers, tank strainers, discs, extra 
whirl plates, and hose connections. 

Oiling and Greasing 

Inspect all oil holes and grease cups, 
removing sediment or hardened grease. 
It may be necessary to use kerosene or a 
penetrating oil to loosen hardened 
grease and dirt. Apply penetrating oil 
to spray boom joints and work until 
they move freely. CONDITION YOUR 
SPRAYER IN THE SHED. DONT 
WAIT UNTIL IT GOES TO THE 
FIELD. 

CARE OF SPRAY MATERIALS: 
Spray materials are often rendered 
practically useless by being stored in 
damp, wet places. Lime especially is 
susceptible to permanent damage. The 
lids of the drums should be kept tight 
to prevent air slaking the lime in stor- 
age. 

Lime and Blue Stone Supplies 

A minimum supply of 100 pounds 
each, of lime and bluestone per acre 
should be secured for the season*s 
spraying. In other words, for ten acres, 
1000 pounds of lime and 1000 pounds of 
bluestone should be secured. Growers 
should know where additional spray 
materials can be secured quickly during 
the season at reasonable prices. 

THE SPRAY PLANT: The spray 
plant is an essential part of the spray 
equipment. The ideal plant is one that 
is simple, convenient, and that provides 
an adequate water supply for the sea- 
son. 



,1 



THE GUIDE POST 



May, 1940 



The Permanent Plant 

The permanent spray plant is advis- 
able only when it can be conveniently 
located in relation to all fields in the 
potato rotation. Owing to its perman- 
ency, it can be somewhat more elaborate 
and besides serving its major function 
as a spray plant, can be so constructed 
as to provide seasonal or permanent 
storage for materials or equipment. It 
is an advantage, where such a plant can 
house the tool shed or work bench for 
making adjustments or repairs quickly 
during the spraying season. 

The Movable Spray Plant 

The movable type of spray plant has 
the advantage that it can be convenient- 
ly placed in accordance with the loca- 



tion of the potato field as the season 
demands. It may require additional 
initial expense in piping water to the 
location, but since water can be piped 
cheaper than it can be hauled, this is 
not only advisable but good economy. 

Incidental Equipment 

The plant should also be equipped 
with at least one steel drum for lime, a 
wooden barrel for blue stone, stirring 
tools, pails, and a large filling hose or 
gravity valve for rapid filling of the 
spray tank. Growers should be observ- 
ant, and use some thought in construct- 
ing the plant so as to save tinae, labor 
and expense, as you are planning for a 
season's job. Smaller growers will do 
well to visit and carefully observe the 











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No particular make or lype of sprayer is required, but it should be capable of 
applying a minimum of 100 gallons of spray per acre at not less than 250 pounds 
pressure. Records show that a pressure of 300 to 400 pounds is more desirable 
since greater increases have been obtained and results are more consistent within 
these limits. 



set-up of larger growers who have of 
necessity, been forced to plan so as to 
save time, and secure the greatest pos- 
sible efficiency. 

On Securing Lime 

Many growers are loading their 
empty lime drums on their truck and 
going direct to the lime plants and hav- 
ing them refilled for their season's sup- 
ply of spray lime. Larger growers are 
cooperating with many of the smaller 
growers in bringing them their supplies 
on the same load. This often helps both 
parties, making up a full load and lay- 
ing down the season's lime supply to 



the smaller grower at the lowest possi- 
ble cost. Some communities could well 
afford to get a group together on such a 
plan to an advantageous saving to all 
parties. Incidentally, if you are making 
a trip to one of Bellefonte's lime plants, 
as many of you do, why not make a call 
at the Association office. Masonic Tem- 
ple Building, directly across from the 
Post Office? You wil] be most welcomed, 
and if there is anything we can do, we 
will be at your service. 

THE PURCHASER OF A NEW 

SPRAYER: A great number of new 

(Continued on page 14) 






4- 



I 



May, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



Cultivating, Planting, Harvesting and Preserving 

the Potato Crop 

Written in 1846 by Charles P. Bosson 
Quoted by Dr. E. L. Nixon with Appropriate Comments 



"It was not till 1771 and 1772, that 
the practice of cultivating potatoes as 
a field crop began to acquire support- 
ers; but at that time all the grain crops 
failed and the famine which ensued 
led to the discovery that proper and 
sufficient nourishment might be deriv- 
ed from those very potatoes which had 
hitherto only been regarded as a luxury, 
just as well as from bread. Still its 
cultivation did not exceed the wants of 
man himself. It was not till a later pe- 
riod that the practice of giving the 
refuse and surplus to the cattle began 
to creep in. But it was thus gradually 
discovered that potatoes might advan- 
tageously be cultivated as food for live 
stock. Bergen, in his "Introduction to 
the Management of Live Stock," was 
the first to recommend the practice of 
this cultivation on a large scale, and 
the use of a kind of horn hoe to save 
manual labor. At the present day 
(1846) it appears scarcely credible that 
the extreme utility of this plant should 
have so long remained unknown, and 
that so much difference of opinion 
should have existed on the propriety 
of raising it on extensive tracts of land. 

"By means of the marking plough, 
or furrower, lines or small furrows, 
are traced at right angles, or obliquely, 
to the direction which the plough is 
to take. Five persons are then station- 
ed at equal distances on the line of the 
plough, each having assigned to him 
the space which he is to plant. One 
plough traces the furrow, which is im- 
mediately set with potatoes; two other 
ploughs then follow, and the potatoes 
are set in the furrow traced by the third. 
It will be understood that the persons 
who set them will have to go from one 
side to the other, each one keeping 
within his alloted space. Each potato 
is set at the point of intersection of the 
line traced by the marker, with the fur- 
row formed by the plough. It is of im- 
portance that the potatoes be set as 
close as possible to the perpendicular 
side of the furrow, and not on that 
where the slice has been turned over; 
for, in the former position, the potato 



is more likely to remain in its place, 
and not be disturbed by the horse's foot. 



"The best ploughmen must be em- 
ployed to trace the furrow in which the 
potatoes are set; first, to ensure that the 
furrow may be of a proper and uniforni 
depth, — three inches on a heavy, and 
four or five on a sandy soil. If the la- 
borers are well practiced, three ploughs 
and five planters will finish eight acres 
per day. 

"A week after the setting, the ground 
is harrowed, an operation by which a 
few weeds are destroyed. Great num- 
bers of them afterwards spring up. 
Nothing more, however, is done to get 
rid of them till the potatoes are about 
to spring up and some of them just be- 
ginning to show their leaves above the 
ground. The extirpator is then passed 
lightly over the whole surface of the 
field. This may be done without fear 
of hurting the potatoes. The whole of 
the weeds are thus destroyed. The soil 
is left in this state till all the potatoes 
have come up, and is then harrowed to 
level it. After this harrowing, the pota- 
toes are as clean as if they had been 
carefully weeded, so that it only re- 
mains to pass the horse-hoe or cultiva- 
tor over them. 

"The first cultivation is performed 
with the small hoe, and should be giv- 
en in the direction followed by the 
marking plough or furrower; the sec- 
ond must be performed by the horn-hoe 
and in the direction of the plough. This 
will be sufficient in the greater number 
of cases. If a few weeds should have 
escaped here and there, by growing 
close to the potatoes, it will cost but lit- 
tle labor to pull them up while yet in 
flower. 

"By these operations the cultivation is 
completely finished before harvest 
time, and nothing remains to be done 
for them till they are ready for taking 
up. 

"When the soil is tenacious and ex- 
posed to humidity, I prefer the follow- 
ing method of cultivation: 

(Continued on page 10) 



1 



THE GUIDE POST 



May, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 

Published monthly by the Pennsylvania 
Cooperative Potato Growers, Inc. 

OFFICERS 

J. A. Donaldson, Emlenton . . President 

Roy R. Hess, Stillwater Vice-Pres. 

E. B. Bower, Bellefonte, 

Sec*y-Treas. and Gen. Mgr. 



DIRECTORS 

Jacob K. Mast Elverson, Chester 

P. Daniel Franlz Coplay , Lehigh 

Hugh McPherson Bridgeton, York 

John B. Schrack Loganton, Clinton 

Roy R. Hess Stillwater, Columbia 

Ed. Fisher Coudersport, Potter 

Charles Frey North Girard, Erie 

J. A. Donaldson, R.l, Emlenton, Venango 
R. W. Lohr Boswell, Somerset 

Annual membership fee $1.00. This in- 
cludes the Guide Post. 

All communications should be ad- 
dressed to E. B. Bower, Secretary-Treas- 
urer and General Manager, Bellefonte, 
Pennsylvania. 



DAYS OF MAY 

Now May, with life and music, 
The blooming valleys fills. 

And rears her flowing arches, 
For all the little rills. 

— Bryant. 



Meddlesome Matty 

Oh, how one ugly trick has spoiled 

The sweetest and the best! 
Matilda, though a pleasant child. 

One grievous fault Dosscssod. 
Which, like a cloud before the skies, 

Hid all her better qualities. 

Sometimes, she'd lift the teapot lid 

To peep at v/hat was in it; 
Or tilt the kettle, if you did 

But turn your back a minute. 
In vain you told her not to touch, 

Her trick of meddling grew so much. 



Her grandmamma went out one day, 

And, by mistake, she laid 
Her spectacles and snuffbox gay, 

Too near the little maid; 
"Ah, well," thought she, "I'll try them 

As soon as grandmamma is gone. 

Forthwith, she placed upon her nose 

The glasses large and wide; 
And looking round, as I suppose 

The snuffbox, too, she spied; 
"Oh, what a pretty box is this! 

I'll open it," said little miss. 

"I know that grandmamma would say, 

'Don't meddle with it, dear;' 
But then she's far enough away, 

And no one else is near; 
Beside, what can there be amiss ^^ 

In opening such a box as this?" 

So, thumb and finger went to work 

To move the stubborn lid; 
And presently, a mighty jerk 

The mighty mischief did; 
For all at once, ah! woeful case! 

The snuff came puffing in her face. 

Poor eyes, and nose, and mouth, and 
chin 

A dismal sight presented; 
And as the snuff got further in, 

Sincerely she repented. 
In vain she ran about for ease, 

She could do nothing else but sneeze. 

She dashed the spectacles away, 

To wipe her tingling eyes; 
And, as in twenty bits they lay. 

Her grandmamma she spies; ^^ 

"Heyday! and what's the matter now? 

Cried grandmamma, with angry brow. 

Matilda, smarting with pain. 
And tingling still, and sore. 

Made many a promise to refrain 
From meddling evermore; 

And 'tis a fact, as I have heard, 

She ever since has kept her word. 

i|(>|ci|c>|c«>|c4:>|i 

First Boomer — You fellows have no 
git-up about you at all. Why don't you 
have photographs of your town taken, 
like we did? Are you ashamed of it? 

Rival Boomer — Naw, that ain't the 
reason at all. I want you to understand, 
young fellow, that our town don't stand 
still long enough to be photographed. 



May, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



i 



T 



POTATO CHIPS 



Word reaches us that 33 potato grow- 
ers have organized an association in 
West Virginia to grade and market their 
potatoes in branded bags cooperatively. 
Sort of sounds familiar, doesn't it? The 
depression has brought farmers 
throughout the nation closer together to 
solve their common problems. 

__o— O— O— 

Speaking at the annual meeting of the 
Land O' Lakes Creameries, Inc., A. G. 
Black, Governor of the Farm Credit 
Administration, declared that "Agricul- 
tural Cooperation" helps to strengthen 
the position of the farmer as an indi- 
vidual capitalist and private property 
owner. The cooperative associations 
give their patrons a greater degree of 
democratic participation than is usual 
in the ordinary corporate form of bus- 
iness organization. They work toward 
lower costs, better quality, better con- 
trol of surplus and generally towards 
higher incomes for their members. In 
doing this, they inevitably improve con- 
ditions for non-members as well. 

__o— o— o— 

Believe that Governor Black has 
something there! The critics of agricul- 
tural cooperation throw up a smoke- 
screen by crying ^'Communism. liut, 
as Governor Black states, the coopera- 
tive movement is more democratic than 
corporate business itself. In fact so 
democratic that the first things abolish- 
ed in countries where dictators take the 
reins of governmental control are the 
cooperatives. 

_o— O— O— 

Idaho was the first potato state to use 
the 10-lb consumer sack. For a number 
of reasons I believe the other states will 
come to the 10-lb sack in place of the 15- 
Ib quite rapidly. First, more consumers 
will pay 25c for a 10-lb sack of spuds 
than will pay 35c for a 15-lb sack al- 
though the first is the more expensive 
purchase. If you don't believe that ask 
your corner grocer. Second, for cash- 
and-carry, 15-lb sacks of potatoes ap- 
ples, flour or anything else are a little 
too heavy for the housewife to carry. 
Third, the modern family is not as large 
as in Grandpa's day and the storekeep- 
ers say that the average purchase of 
spuds is about 8 to 10-lbs. Fourth, when 
potatoes get high-priced many families 



refuse to purchase a 40c or 50c item 
where they will purchase one for 30c to 
35c. 

__o_o— O— 

The Cornell Daily Sun prints the fol- 
lowing as defining the various "Isms." 

Socialism — You have two cows. You 
give one to your neighbor. 

Communism — You have two cows. 
You give both cows to the government 
which gives you the milk. 

Fascism — You have two cows. You 
keep the cows and give the milk to the 
Government which sells part of it back 
to you. 

New Dealism — You have two cows. 
The government kills one, milks the 
other and pours the milk down the sew- 
er. 

Naziism — You have two cows. The 
government shoots you and takes both 
cows. 

Capitalism— You have two cows. You 
sell one and buy a bull. 

_o_o— o— 

A representative from the New Jer- 
sey potato industry recently visited 
several of the largest Blue Label pack- 
ers in Pennsylvania to find out "what 
makes the clock tick." It was stated 
that a marketing program is being 
planned for New Jersey with a large 
movement of potatoes to be packed in 
peck bags. 

_o_o— o— 

Since Capitalists cannot eat all their 
profits, but use them to promote produc- 
tion, the outcome is more work, greater 
wages paid, more goods produced and 
more goods purchased when capital is 
not taxed to death. The befuddling of 
these results by economists has been the 
source of envy and even hate when 
neither was justified. 

_o— o— o— 

Understand that Doc. Nixon made a 5 
minute speech on potato breeding at 
the Pennsylvania State Council of Co- 
operative's meeting at State College re- 
cently. The Doctor admitted this was 
the shortest speech he ever made and a 
very difficult proposition to turn off the 
makings of a really excellent talk just 
as he was beginning to get hot. 
(Continued on page 18) 



8 



THE GUIDE POST 



May, 1940 



Director Ed. Fisher and His Crew Hold Pow-wow 

Up Allegheny Mountain Way 



Like the Indians of but a few cen- 
turies ago, in preparation for warring 
with neighboring tribes, Ed. Fisher 
called his braves (potato working crew) 
together on Wednesday evening April 
24, for a pow-wow on the coming potato 
war of cutting seed, mixing fertilizer, 
preparation of the root bed, planting, 
cultivating, spraying, etc. 

This unusual meeting, the first of its 
kind to my knowledge, was preceded as 
was true in Indian times by a feast, 



(chicken dinner), Ed's treat to his men. 
The whole idea met with such approval 
that these warring braves voted to con- 
tinue the occasion at stated intervals 
throughout the season. 

Ed's idea,— and a good one,— was to 
have his men appreciate why he insisted 
on certain jobs being done according to 
instructions. Why a deep root bed? 
Why care in handling triple strength 
fertilizer? Why plant seed deep? And 
many more things. With his entire crew 




Amonq those present at the Fisher Po jv-wow were. Back row, left to right, Harry 
Kiehl Mervin Hanes, Joe O'Neil, Bob Keith, V. Renko, Carl Thompson, Roy Thomp- 
son, and L. T. Denniston; Front row, left to right, Ed. Fisher, Joe Renko, Clarence 
Crandall, and C. Smith. 



of twelve men present, these and other 
equally important points were discuss- 
ed, questions asked and answered, until 
the hour grew late. One must admire 
Ed's expression, that ''aside from grow- 
ing a good crop of potatoes this season 
and succeeding seasons, you men must 
do all you can to do the job better not 



only on my account but so that you \yill 
be ready when the time comes to strike 
out on your own." 

I shall look forward with much inter- 
est to future meetings and, should I say 
ox roasts, with this group during the 

season _ 

— L. T. D. 



'r 



^ 



T 



May, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



9 



Let This Serve To Remind- 



some Authentic Figures on Spraying 
In Pennsylvania 

The first potato spray demonstrations 
based on modern potato spraying meth- 
ods as we know them today in Pennsyl- 
vania were conducted in 1918 under the 
supervision of Dr. E. L. Nixon. Durmg 
the year 32 demonstrations were con- 
ducted in 12 counties. The results of 
these demonstrations were as follows: 

Average yield per acre sprayed 

142 bu. per acre 

Average increase per acre 

34.8 bu. per acre 

Average percent increase 

32.2 percent 
Average number sprays per 
season 5 times 

By improving the spray equipment, 
the method, time, and number of appli- 
cations, and improvement of other prac- 
tices by the growers the results of 161 
demonstrations ten years later, 19Z», 
showed results as follows: 

Average yield per acre sprayed 

^ ^ 304.2 bu. per acre 

Average increase per acre 

^ ^ 131.2 bu. per acre 

Average percent increase 

^ 75.8 percent 

Average number sprays per 
season 12.8 times 

That the results of 1928 were not of 
chance or due to any peculiar condition 
is evidenced by 331 demonstrations 
during the succeeding five years or 
from 1928 to 1932 the results of which 
were as follows: 

Average yield per acre sprayed 

^ 284.6 bu. per acre 

Average increase per acre 

^ 93.1 bu. per acre 

Average percent increase 

^ 53.9 percent 

Average number sprays per 
season 11.5 times 

The following is from the November 
1926 Guide Post: — 

•♦Everybody is conceding the fact that 
this, the ninth year, again proves the 
potato sprayer to be the most important 
piece of machinery in Pennsylvania po- 
tato fields. Greater increases in yield 
have been secured than ever before. In 
addition to this, late blight rot, m spite 



of excessive wet weather, has been con- 
trolled completely. The tubers from 
these fields have gone into storage, wet 
and plastered with mud, but no rot has 
developed. This is further evidence that 
if the tops do not blight, the tubers will 
not rot. It has taken a super charge of 
mentality to cause the grower to keep 
them sprayed a season like the one ]ust 
closed. Of course the usual nuniber 
maintained that, 'it rained all the tinje 
and I was unable to get them sprayed. 
Yet Jacob Wile, Montgomery County, 
managed to make 13 or 14 applications; 
Reuben Ringer, Lehigh County, suc- 
ceeded in getting 13; Robert Getz, Car- 
bon County, came through with 8 appli- 
cations; Ray Briggs, Luzerne County, 
made 16' Pennsylvania State College, 
Centre County, 10; M. S. Van Wegen 
Potter County, 10; Thomas Denniston & 
Sons, Butler County, 10; Clark Pollock. 
Indiana County, 9 applications; and A. 
J. Snyder, Lehigh County, 12 applica- 
tions. 

"It is significant that the average 
yield of these ten nien with a total of 
198 acres, averaged better than 435 
bushels per acre over their entire acre- 
age. Spraying made over 200 bushels 
pir acre increase in several of these 
fields." 

The Experience of John Bachman, 
Northampton County, 1927: — 

"John R. Bachman of Hellertown, 
Northampton County, says he learned 
his lesson on the value of spraying. He 
grows 35 acres of potatoes and this year 
fprayed for the first time. He left one 
a?re unsprayed-along came the bhght 
and killed the potato vines on this acre, 
early in August. This acre yielded 
229 bushels per acre. In this same field 
he dug from a single acre 621.4 bushels 
of potatoes. The entire acre was dug 
and weighed in the presence of some 
400 visitors." 

Harvey Baum, Hilltown, Bucks 
County reported in 1927 that where he 
sprayed 14 times we had sound potatoes 
but where we missed on account of rain 
our crop was cut at least one-third and 
here we had some blight rot. 

(Continued on page 22) 



10 



THE GUIDE POST 



May, 1940 



CULTIVATING, HARVESTING 

PLANTING 

(Continued from page 5) 

"The soil having been well prepared, 
lines crossing transversely are traced 
with the marking plough, and the pota- 
to set at each intersection. The plant- 
ing goes on much more quickly in this 
way. One man can easily plant three 
acres per day. The small horse-hoe is 
then passed close to each row, and cov- 
ers it with earth. When weeds sprmg 
up, they are destroyed by passing the 
large horse-hoe in the same direction, 
an operation which is performed 
whether the potatoes have come up or 
not. When the potatoes have grown 
up to a certain height, the banks or 
edges formed by the hoe in the last cul- 
tivation are cut transversely with the 
large hoe; another and final cultivation 
is perhaps given in the direction of the 
first. 

"The advantages presented by this 
method when applied to an agrillaceous 
soil are very striking. The potato is 
surrounded on all sides by light earth, 
and dung heaped around it. It is pre- 
served from any excess of moisture that 
might injure the crop, because it is 
placed above the bottom of the furrow 
by which the water drains off. The soil 
in which it rests is also thoroughly 
warmed by the sun. But this method 
is recommended for those soils only in 
which potatoes might sufter from ex- 
cess of moisture, as a sharpish frost at- 
tacking the potatoes before they are 
gathered might penetrate too deeply in- 
to the ridges. 

"When the earth has been laid up for 
the last time, and the potatoes begin to 
blossom, they must be left quiet; for it 
is then that the young tubers are form- 
ed. 

"Some persons have recommended 
that the flowers be cut off, in order to 
increase the growth of the tubers; but 
the recommendation is absurd. Cullen, 
of Edinburgh, observed some time ago 
that the developrnent of the tubers 
keeps pace with that of the flowers; and 
experiments especially directed to this 
point have uniformly shown that the 
crop is much injured by the removal 
of the flowers. 

"Cullen also tried the effect of cut- 
ting off the leaves as fast as they grew; 
the consequence was that the potatoes 



produced no tubers, but merely filamen- 
tous roots. The experiments of Ander- 
son, showing the injury occasioned to 
potatoes by the hasty removal of their 
leaves, are conclusive against this prac- 
tice. 

"The digging of the crop has always 
been looked upon by great cultivators 
as the most difficult part of this branch 
of husbandry, and has been the main 
cause of their unwillingness to under- 
take it on a large scale. This fear has, 
however, greatly diminished; it has, in- 
deed, been found, that the getting in 
may be performed with greater expedi- 
tion and facility than has formerly been 
thought possible. They are taken up 
by means of a mattack, or potato hoe. 
When they are planted, according to my 
method, one man with such an instru- 
ment can easily prepare work for 
twelve pickers. In this manner, pota- 
toes can be taken up with less work 
than with the plough. 

"In gathering potatoes, I make use of 
boxes, which hold about thirty bushels, 
and are placed on wagons. In one side 
of these boxes is an opening, which 
shuts by means of a sliding door. When 
the boxes arrive at the barn the door 
is opened and a kind of gutter adapted 
to the opening, and along this gutter the 
potatoes descend to the place intended 
for them. 

"Potatoes dug in dry weather may 
with safety be placed immediately in 
a cellar, or store-house, protected from 
frost; but the place in which they are 
kept must be left open, to afford a free 
circulation of air, till cold weather 
comes on. But if the potatoes are raised 
in damp weather, it is better to spread 
them out on a floor, and let them dry 
there. 

"A point of great importance is to 
cover heaps over with a layer of straw, 
at least six inches thick. This layer of 
straw should be thickest near the 
ground; it should there extend beyond 
the heap of potatoes, so as completely 
to prevent the access of frost. The straw 
should be well filled at the summit and 
angles, and the whole covered up with 
earth. It is not, indeed, the earth which 
protects the potatoes from frost; this 
effect is produced by the straw, which 
prevents the radiation of heat from 
them; but the earth should be closely 
pressed to prevent the air getting 

(Continued on page 11) 



May, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



11 



i 






T 



OVER THE PICKING TABLE 

by Inspector Throw-out 



1 



Even though you work for a large 
corporation, somebody knows your real 
worth, appreciates your honest endeav- 
ors, and has you in mind for better 
things. 

:;{ :|s iln i\i 4i ^ ^ t' 

The sick man had just come out of a 
long delirium. 

"Where am I?" he said feebly, as he 
felt the loving hands making him com- 
fortable. "Where am I? In Heaven? 

"No, dear," cooed his devoted wife. "I 
am still with you." 

******** 

"What can be more sad than a man 
without a country?" feelingly asked the 
high school teacher of her class. 

"A country without a man," respond- 
ed a pretty girl just as feelingly. 

******** 

Husband-One night while you were 
away I heard a burglar. You should 
have seen me going down the stairs 
three steps at a time. 

Wife (who knows him)— Where was 

he, on the roof? 

******** 

One trouble with the world is that 
laziness is seldom fatal. 

* * * * * ::: * * 

The abuse of Privilege the failure to 
reeard thy neighbor as thyself, is sow- 
in! weed seed to choke the growth of 

progress. 

*****>:<** 

A cynic is a man born out of his sta- 
tion, — or shamed out. 

* ****** * 

Dearest, I love you. Since the dawn 
of creation, since the birth of the world, 
since the beginning of time and lonfi be- 
fore watches were made, I have known 
and loved you. Darling, will you be 
mine? 

O Tom, this is so sudden! 

******** 

There are two kinds of folks who 
won't ever cut much ice. One kind can t 



do as they are told. The other kind can't 
do anything else. 

******** 

A tree toad loved a she toad 

That lived up in a tree; 

She was a three-toed tree toad 

But a two-toed toad was he. 

The two-toed tree toad tried to win 

The she toad's friendly nod. 

For the two-toed tree toad loved the 

ground, 
That the three-toed tree toad trod. 
But vainly the two-toed tree toad tried, 
He could not please her whim, 
In her tree toad bower, with her V-toed 

power 
The she toad vetoed him. 



CULTIVATING - HARVESTmG- 

(Continued jrom page 10) 

through the straw. Earth which has no 
consistence and easily crumbles is, 
therefore, unfit for the purpose; if no 
other can be obtained, some kind ot 
covering must be placed over it. 

"A precaution very necessary to be 
observed, is not to close the heaps com- 
pletely in autumn so long as the wea- 
ther continues warm. A small quantity 
of air must be allowed access through 
the top till the frost comes on; a vent 
will thus be afforded for vapors which 
rise from the heap. Covering the heaps 
with dung is always useless and often 
mischievous. 

"When a thaw comes on it is prudent 
to open the heaps a little at the top, to 
permit the escape of vapor." 

Commenting on this article, one is im- 
pressed with how much fact or fancy 
the author had to draw on. 

It is a matter of historical record, 
back in the 1700's that famine was fre- 
quent in Europe due to grain crop fail- 
ure Famines would be more common 
in this modern day, except that people 
have learned not to live by bread alone 
—in other words, the dietary habits of 
people, like the Robin, change. If he 
only ate worms, when the worms dis- 
appear— famine— so he changes over to 
cherries. 

(Continued on page 20) 



12 



THE GUIDE POST 



May, 1940 



May. 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



13 



Highlights of Profitable Potato Spraying 



■If takes an entire leaf surface to make maximum tuber pro- 
duction. 

-Diseases and insects attack potato foliage ttiereby reducing 
tuber production and yield. 

-Thorough spraying which controls diseases and insects, and 
stimulates potato foliage development has given Pennsylva- 
nia's leading potato growers increases of 100 to 200 bushels 
per acre. 

-Spraying should begin as soon as the rows can be followed 
and three applications should be made at not exceeding 7- 
day intervals. 

-Then spraying should be continued at weekly to 10-day inter- 
vals throughout the season with more frequent spraying dur- 
ing periods of intense heat or prolonged wet periods which 
are favorable to blight. Two sprays within a week may be 
necessary during periods particularly favorable to late blight. 

-There can be no set rule as to the number of sprays required 
during the season. In a general way, 9 to 12 applications 
have returned the greatest profit. 

-Continue spraying at least until the tops are three-fourths 
dead, or until the crop is mature. 

-No particular make or type of sprayer is required, but it 
should be capable of applying a minimum of 100 gallons of 
spray per acre, at not less than 250 pounds pressure. Records 




i 



i 



1 



show that a pressure of 300 to 400 pounds is more desirable 
since greater increases have been obtained and results are 
more consistent within these limits. 

—Proper boom and noozle adjustment with three nozzles per 
row, properly spaced so that the spray envelops the entire 
plant, are essential to obtain complete coverage. 

—The most effective and economical material for spraying po- 
tatoes is home-made Bordeaux mixture (8-8-100). That is. 
Eight pounds of copper sulphate (blue stone), eight pounds of 
stone lime, and 100 gallons of water. 

—The use of a high grade of burnt lump lime in preparing the 
spray has consistently given better foliage coverage, resulted 
in increased yields, and shown much less wear of essential 
sprayer parts, such as pump and nozzles, than have other 
forms of lime in preparing the spray. 

—Arrange a simple, convenient spray plant with an adequate 
water supply for the season's spraying. 

—Keep all running or working parts of the sprayer well oiled or 
, greased when in use. 

—Check the job of spraying from time to time to make certain 
that not a single detail Is being neglected or overlooked. 
Check the results as well. Study the plants and how they 
react to the spray program. Compare your sprayed field with 
unsprayed rows or patches in your community. 









14 



THE GUIDE POST 



May, 1940 



TIMELY OBSERVATIONS 

AND SUGGESTIONS 

(Continued from page 4) 

sprayers are being purchased this 
spring. This is as it should be. Costly 
as they seem to the purchaser, it is one 
of the best investments and best assur- 
ances of satisfactory, profitable potato 
yields for 1940 that the grower can 
make. Most of the new outfits are 
power machines and this also is as it 
should be. A rule set down as early as 
1931, stated that power machines should 
be equipped with a minimum engine ca- 



pacity of horse power per row and a 
pump capacity equivalent to twice the 
number of rows. In other words, an 
eight row sprayer should be equipped 
with at least an 8 horse motor, and a 
pump that will deliver a minimum of 16 
gallons per minute. We know of a great 
number of new machines that have been 
purchased and still more to be purchas- 
ed and only in two cases have the ma- 
chines secured failed to measure up to 
these requirements. If you are the 
purchaser of a new machine, make sure 
that you understand its operation and if 
in doubt, contact your company. 




Sprayed vs. Unsprayed. 
Tuber production stops when foliage dies. The unsprayed 
area in "the center of this picture died prematurely. The rest 
of the field was thoroughly sprayed. Adjacent rows, sprayed 
and unsprayed, showed a difference of over 200 bushels per 
acre. 



A SCREECH OR A WHISTLE IS A 
CALL FOR GREASE: However, the 
efficient operator does not wait for the 
screech or whistle. His oil can or 
grease gun are constantly in use. We 
might take a lesson on this point from 
the railroad engineer who checks and 
cares for his locomotive. Did you ever 
notice, how at each stop, the engineer 
has his oil can, with its long snout, con- 
stantly busy ? For what purpose? For 
safety and efficiency. The locomotive 
has an important job, but is of little 
more importance to the success of the 
railroad than the potato sprayer is to the 
success of the potato grower. Oil holes 
and grease cups are meant for oil and 
grease, not for dirt. You had better 
give some definite instructions to your 



men on this point if you are not person- 
ally operating the equipment. Another 
point, the best clean oil and grease are 
none too good for such costly equipment 
as the potato sprayer. 

CHECKING THE SPRAY JOB: Us- 
ing one of Dr. Nixon's expressions, 
''Spraying is like painting a house: the 
job is not complete unless the entire 
surface is covered." So potatoes are not 
well sprayed unless they are thoroughly 
covered. It should be your job and much 
to your interest to make careful checks 
on the job being done from time to time 
during the season. This is important, 
whether you are doing the job person- 
ally, or whether some one else is doing 

(Continued on page 20) 



X 



Better Potatoes- 
Use More Potash 



; 



Potato profits depend upon increased yields and more No. 
Ts per acre. Potash is the most important plant food for 
keeping plants growing vigorously and manufacturing 
starches and sugars. Leading growers are using at least 
1076 potash in their potato fertilizer. In the Midwest 18% 
potash in a 3-9-18 analysis is being adopted widely. 

Your soil and application of fertilizer should make avail- 
able to your potato crop at least 170 pounds of actual potash 
per acre— the amount necessary for a 300-bushel yield. 
Consult your county agent or experiment station regarding 
your requirements. See your fertilizer dealer or manu- 
facturer about fertilizers high in potash. You will be sur- 
prised how little it costs to give your potatoes more potash. 



Write us for additional information 
and free literature on the profitable 
fertilization of crops. 




fimerican Potash Institute, Inc, 

Investment Building Washington, D. C. 



KCS 



16 



THE GUIDE POST 



May, 1940 



May, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



IT 



Grower to Grower Exchange 

cation. 



QUALITY SEED POTATOES: Russet 
Rurals, White Rurals, Cobblers and 
Nittanys. Certified Seeds and one year 
from certified. All grown from north- 
ern foundation seed. Ideal storage. All 
seed will be graded and packed in Asso- 
ciation bushel paper bags. I am pur- 
chasing a new eight row sprayer, there- 
fore am offering for sale a six row used 
power sprayer. Thomas Denniston, 
Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania. (Butler 
County.) 

AVAILABLE: Copies of Dr. E. L. Nix- 
on's book, "The Principles of Potato 
Production," $1.25 per copy. Write for 
your copy today, to Association office, 
Bellefonte, Pennsylvania. 

SPRAYER: One ten-row Bean truck 
sprayer, five hundred gallon capacity. 
Sprayer complete without truck. If in- 
terested, write Lynn Sill, R. F. D. No. 3, 
Corry, Penna. (Erie County) 

SEED POTATOES: Seconds grown 
from Potter County disease-free foun- 
dation seed stock. Rural Russets. Free 
from blight, stem-end discoloration and 
other injury. Firm and vigorous sprouts 
assured due to being well stored, Will be 
well graded and packed in bushels or 
100 lbs. Price reasonable, $1.50 per hun- 
dred for one year from certified, $1.10 
per hundred for two years from certi- 
fied. Contact Lynn Sill, R. F. D. No. 3, 
Corry, Pa. 



DIGGER FOR SALE: One single row 
take off digger. Good repair. Will sell 
reasonably. Write Dr. E. L. Nixon, 
State College. Penna. 

SPRAY BOOM FOR SALE: John Bean 
Spray boom. Complete without nozzles. 
10 row. Good condition. Will sell cheap. 
Ed. Fisher, Coudersport, Pa. 

PICKER-PLANTER WANTED: 2- 

Row automatic Picker-Planter. Iron 
Age. Good condition. Send for details. 
J. A. Donaldson, R. D. No. 1, Emlenton, 
Penna. (Venango County). 

SEED POTATOES: Rural Russets and 
Chippewas, U. S. No. 1, and U. S. No. 1. 
Size B, or seconds. Free from stem end 
discoloration and other blemishes. Con- 
tact Robert Getz, Albrightsville, Penna. 
(Carbon County) 

SPRAYER WANTED: 4 or 6 row en- 
gine or power take-off sprayer. Write 
J. A. Donaldson, R. F. D., No. 1 Emlen- 
ton, Penna. (Venango County) 

PLANTER FOR SALE: Two-row Iron 
Age automatic Planter; picking attach- 
ments. In perfect condition. Will sell 
reasonably. Contact Ed. Fisher, Coud- 
ersport, (Potter County) Penna. 

SPRAYER WANTED: Horse drawn 
traction sprayer 4-Row boom. Good 
condition. Write J. A. Donaldson, R. F. 
D. No. 1, Emlenton, (Venango County) 
Penna. 






Membership Drive Slows-But Continues 



Though few contributions have come 
into the "membership box" this month, 
we have a few fine ones to acknowledge. 

Leading this month in contributions 
are the Beck Brothers, of Liberty (Tioga 
County), who also have been leaders 
throughout the drive. Their contribu- 
tions comprised three new members. 

Next was super-supporter, Ed. Fisher, 
of Coudersport, (Potter County), with 
two more new members to add to his 
very very long list. 

John B. Glase, of Danielsville, 
(Northampton County) contributed one 
fellow Northamption as his new mem- 
ber. 

A. C. Ramseyer, Ohio booster from 
Smithville, contributed his new member 
for the Spring season, to add to his 
numerous boosts of past months. 

Ivan Miller, of Corry (Erie County), 
who sends in new members as fast as we 
can get them in the files, found us an- 
other one this month. 



Then Joseph D. Young, of La Jose 
(Clearfield County), added to his many 
new members with one more. 

Also, several new members came into 
the fold this month unsolicited by any of 
our members. 

We are plesaed to have the following 
new members in our group: 

Miss Ruth Passmore, Mahaffey, Clear- 
field County. 

J. B. Wylie, Wooster, Ohio. 

Richard Mansfield, Coudersport, Pot- 
ter County. 

Carl Thompson, Roulette, Potter 
County. 

H. C. Trask, Waterford, Erie County. 

L. N. Keller, Bendersville, Adams. 
County. 

Ray Durstine, Lock Haven, Clinton 
County 

B. F. Hebe, Liberty, Tioga County 
Chas. Bower, Liberty, Tioga County 
Verus Krotzer, Liberty, Tioga County.. 
John D. Levan, Kempton, Berks. 
N. C. Oplinger, Bath, Northampton 
County. 



For The Small Acrcase Grower 




Low priced engine-powered and traction 
outfits in a wide variety of styles and sizes. 



• The small acreage grower, as 
well as the largest operator in com- 
mercial vegetable culture, gets the 
most advanced sprayer built when 
he selects a Hardie. Write for the 
Hardie Row Crop Sprayer Catalog 
and see how Hardie builds 2-row 
sprayers just as advanced as the 
sensational big 10-row motor truck 
and Tractor Trailer Hardies. Sold 
and serviced by leading local deal- 
ers. The Hardie Mfg. Company, 
Hudson, Mich. 




18 



THE GUIDE POST 



May, 1940 






POTATO CHIPS 

(Continued from page 7) 

This month's citation for best quality 
Blue Label's should be awarded to L. R. 
Friedline of Jennerstown. That these 
potatoes were of excellent quality and 
grade was shown by the demand. Fried- 
line could have sold many more of these 
spuds if he had them, but they went like 
hot cakes. 

_o_o_o— 

On the other hand what a few inferior 
potatoes can do to a good trade-marked 
package was called to my attention re- 
cently. A storekeeper in the state had a 
good trade worked up for Blue Label 
potatoes. His potato sales had increased 
from 20 to 25 pecks a week to 50 or 60. 
Over a two year period complaints on 
the quality of Blue Labels were minor 
in number and seriousness. But some- 
time during the winter some loyal and 
cooperative (?) member of the Assn. 
believed he would use the good name of 
the Blue Label trade-mark to help him 
dispose of a lot of spuds with heavy 
stem-end discoloration. He sold his 
spuds all right but the result was that 
this store and some others, which he 
delivered to, have trouble now selling 
any Blue Label pecks and total potato 
sales have dropped back to where they 
were three years ago. 

__o— O— O— 

In the October issue of the Atlantic 
monthly is a well written article about 
the average small American farmer, 
about his problems, his blessings and his 
relationship to our present-day society. 
The author, Mr. P. A. Waring asks the 
question, "Can a small farm-a family 
farm business be made to pay its way?" 
His answer is that small farms can sur- 
vive if farmers can integrate their small 
work units with the centralization and 
collectivation of the rest of our econ- 
omy. The answer lies in cooperatives 
for collective bargaining and trading, 
according to Mr. Waring. 

__o— O— O— 

Tests made by John Daniels at Her- 
shey indicate that potash deficiency may 
have considerable bearing on the inter- 
nal black discoloration after cooking, 
which has discredited Russets during 
the past few years. In commenting on 
these experiments, B. A. Rockwell says 
that under average soil conditions. 



where there has been a tendency to ex- 
cessive vine growth, a 1-3-3 ratio merits 
serious consideration. Where soil nitro- 
gen is adequate and potash low, a top 
dressing of potash in addition to that 
supplied in the basic mixture may be 
good practice. The quality and appear- 
ance after cooking of these Russets was 
restored to normal by the Hershey tests 
of added potash. 

_o__o_o— 

Will be interesting to note the results 
obtained by Buckeye Smith of Wil- 
liamsport, Penna. in his new project of 
irrigating 100 acres of potatoes with 
water obtained from the springs on his 
farm. Sufficient water is the best crop 
insurance against the dry seasons we 
have been having of late and the regular 
supply of moisture made possible 
through irrigation assures not only 
higher yields but also more uniformly 
high quality. 

_o__o— o— 

For years loss leader selling of pota- 
toes has been recognized by potato 
growers as a serious evil, costing the in- 
dustry many thousands of dollars an- 
nually. The Maine Potato Growers and 
Shippers Committee has taken formal 
action toward the eradication of this 
practice by authorizing it's executive 
Committee to report all future cases to 
the Federal Trade Commission, with the 
request that immediate investigation be 
made. 

_0— o— o— 

Some indication of varietal trends in 
potato planting may be noted in the re- 
port from Maine, the largest source of 
potato seeds in the nation. In the 1936- 
37 season 51% of Maine seed sold con- 
sisted of Cobblers. This dropped to 42% 
for the present season. Green Mountain 
sales have increased from 15% of the 
total to 17%. Chippewas have increas- 
ed from 1% to 7%. Katahdins jumped 
from 3% to nearly 10% and during the 
same period Spaulding Rose and Bliss 
Triumph have dropped very sharply. 

_o_o_o_ 

As this is written early in May the 
potato market for old potatoes is strong 
and advancing while the market for the 
new crop is weak and easing off. The 

(Continued on page 20) 



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HAMILTON & COMPANY 

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EPHRATA, PA. 

Distributors for Eastern Pennsylvania 
Delaware & Maryland 



20 



THE GUIDE POST 



May, 1940 



TIMELY OBSERVATIONS 

AND SUGGESTIONS 

(Continued from page 14) 
it. A poor job may be due to improper 
mixing of materials, improper amounts, 
improper nozzle adjustment, poor or 
careless driving on the part of the oper- 
ator, or too big a hurry to do the job or 
to get through early. There can be no 
excuse for missed rows, parts of rows, 
areas or even a few plants. Eliminating 
such areas as might be missed may mean 
the difference between a losmg fight 
with late blight and not having it at all. 
Better run an extra tank if you are m 
doubt. The double spray will not be loss 
but gain anyhow, and the doubtful area 
safely protected. 



LET THIS SERVE TO REMIND 

(Continued from page 9) 

A summary of the "400 Bushel Club" 
for the years from 1925 to 1934 as to 
yields in relation to spraying showed 
the following: 

400 bushel yields received 10.1 sprays 
500 bushel yields received 11.7 sprays 
600 bushel yields received 13.3 sprays 
10 High Yields received 14.6 sprays 

State Record Yield received 13. sprays 

The average pressure for the growers 
making 400 bushels was 302 lbs. for 
those making 500 bushels it was 345.1 
lbs for the 600 it was 347.6 lbs. for the 
ten high yields it averaged 360 lbs. and 
H J Walton & Son, Chester County, 
although applying 13 sprays used a 
pressure of 400 lbs. 

1930 will be remembered by Pennsyl- 
vania potato growers as a drought year. 
This was the year we prayed for rain on 
our way back from Maine. Yet the 
average increased yield in demonstra- 
tions over the State from apply mg 12.3 
sprays was 77.3 bushels per acre or an 
increase due to efficient spraymg of 54.4 
percent. 

"In the face of the 1930 drought Perry 
Davis & Son, Butler County, reported an 
increase of 103 bushels per acre from 
spraying or a yield of 232 bushels where 
sprayed as against a yield of 129 bushels 
where unsprayed. On the grading of 
the potatoes from the two plots it was 
found that 186 bu. of the 232 where 
sprayed were of first market grade or 
80.2 percent.; whereas, only 64 bu. of the 
(Continued on page 22) 



CULTIVATING — HARVESTING 

PLANTING 

(Continued jrom page 11) 

It took a great fight to induce people 
to eat potatoes. Famine, however, was 
more of a persuader than the soldiers of 
France or the edicts of Emperors. Hea- 
ven forbid that we be forced to live on 
spinach! 

In some parts of Southern New York 
state and Northern Pennsylvania, po- 
tatoes are still planted "both ways." 
Probably this is the origin of the ex- 
pression, "a hill of potatoes." 

It was a fortunate thing back in that 
early day that the potato was not parti- 
cular as to the method. "Whether they 
planted me drill-wise or dribbled me in. 
to me it is exactly the same." 

The rule for weeding, regardless of 
what this author stated, is to run the 
weeder weekly, or after each rain, if 
twice a week. 

He says the first cultivation is per- 
formed with a small hoe. — Wish we had 
this implement! The horn-hoe would be 
still more interesting! 

I believe the most important cultiva- 
tion is the "blind one," that is, going 
through deeply between the rows be- 
fore the weeder or harrow is ever used. 

You will note Mr. Bosson says, "pull 
a few weeds." The fact is, if you do the 
trick right, you will not need to pull 
any, and this can all be done on a large- 
scale basis by the proper and judicious 
use of the weeder. 

You notice, he used the world "agrill- 
acious." Look this word up in the dic- 
tionary and see if it is your soil type. 
(Continued on page 22) 



POTATO CHIPS 

(Continued from page 18) 

daily shipments and market supply are 
not heavy, so that if business conditions 
had been more nearly normal, a very 
frisk market would have resulted. Deal- 
ers anticipate a heavy supply of new po- 
tatoes soon to be crowding into the mar- 
kets, so have been purchasing on a 
hand-to-mouth basis. Best old potatoes 
have realized as high as $2.60 a cwt. on 
some eastern markets, which is high 
priced spuds in any language and it may 
take more buying demand than has been 
apparent recently to get them much 

higher. 

"Bill Shakespud." 



SPRAY 



WITH 




FOR BEST RESULTS 

Use 

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Whilerock High Calcium 

Quadruple Separated 

Superfine Spray Hydrate 

or 

Whiterock Micro-Mesh 

They lead the field in Spray limes 

Write 

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Bellefonte, Pa. 



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FERTILIZERS 

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Better Crops 




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Spray Materials 
, Nichols Bluestone 

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Machines 



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Eureka Potato Machines take hard work out of potato growing. 
They reduce time and labor costs. They assure bigger yields. 



PQtato Cutlar 

Cuts uniform seed. 
Operates with both 
hands free for feed- 
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a 
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Breaks crusts, mulches soil, and 
kills weeds when potato crop is 
young and tender. 8, 10 and 12 
ft. sites. Many other uses, with 
or without seeding attachment 

All mmchinma in 



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One man machines 
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Traction Sprayer 

Insures thecrop. Sires. 
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Potato Digger 

Famous for getting «11 the 
potatoes, separating and 
standing hard use. With or 
without engine attachment 
or tractor attachment. 





Used by many 

of the most 

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jt 






■m^i 



11 



THE GUIDE POST 



May, 1940 



LET THIS SERVE TO REMIND 

(Continued from page 20) 
129 where unsprayed were of equal 
grade or only 49.6 percent. In securing 
these results Mr. Davis made 17 appli- 
cations at an average pressure of better 
than 350 lbs." 

Volumes more could be written but let 
these records suffice to remind you as a 
grower what can be accomplished in 
1940 if you adhere strictly to the prin- 
ciples and practices followed by these 
growers. These accomplishments were 
not made by compromising, but rather 
by strict adherence to teachings that 
were well conceived, made practical and 
definitely put into operation. The three 



principles were: TIME of spraying, 
MANNER of spraying, and MATERI- 
ALS with which to spray. Time of spray- 
ing involves the making of the first 
sprays as soon as the plants are up, fre- 
quent sprays during the season, weekly 
to ten day intervals and oftener if 
weather conditions are unusually wet or 
dry, and finally continuing spraying un- 
til the crop is mature. Manner of spray- 
ing has to do with the spray equipment, 
the number of nozzles per row, boom 
adjustment, pressure, etc. Material re- 
fers to the spray itself, the proper slak- 
ing of lime, the dissolving of blue stone, 
the mixing of the spray or filling of the 
sprayer. 




dk 







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^'■ 















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■^»i: 



'■' ^^,.*"■■ 










Early Sprays are of Vital Importance. 
You must "wake up when you get up" if you are to keep ahead of blight, 
insects and heat. Making early sprays when the plants are yet small as 
shown in the above picture is, "waking when you get up." 



CULTIVATING — HARVESTING 

PLANTING 

(Continued from page 20) 

It is possible that the reason the Ru- 
ral potato yield poorly is because it is, 
as he says, "Uniformly shown that the 
crop is much injured by the removal of 
the flowers." Here is conclusive proof, 
long before experiment stations were 
established, that — "No leaves, no tubers 
— half a crop of leaves — half a crop of 
tubers." Conversely, this was pretty 
good proof of the value of spraying, if 
spraying maintained the leaf surfaces. 

How many farmers who grow pota- 



toes in Pennsylvania quote this article 
when they say that "digging the crop 

has always been looked upon as 

the most difficult of this branch of hus- 
bandry and has been the main cause of 
their unwillingness to undertake it on 
a large scale"? 

You will note, also, that the method 
of hauling in from the field antedates 
Mr. Ramseyer by almost 100 years. 

Even his ideas of storage are not so 
far off in that he recommended the use 
of straw over the top of the potatoes 
which could as easily be the forerunner 
of the modern straw loft. After all, 
everything is relative! 



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designed for working 
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HIGH PRESSURE SPRAYING 





njOM can make more money from 
/ your potatoes if you kill their twin 
enemies — insects and fungi. But only 
high pressure atomization gets the best 
results from your fungicide or insec- 
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Formerly available only to large 
growers, IRON AGE now makes high 
pressure spraying possible for all 
growers. Low cost 6 and 10 gallons- 
per-minute sizes with any pressures up 
to 600 pounds per square inch. One 
just right for every grower. 

With Iron Age High Pressure spray- 
ing you'll find potato profits go up — 
spraying costs go down« for high pres- 
sures make every drop of fungicide or 
insecticide do a far better job. 



Write ^or 

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Crop 

Sprayers 



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inM^HMlL 



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^^HHb\LV4/V^ 




^ 2 1 '41 



NUMBER 6 












i;^**«:'""^" 



"CAMP POTATO" ISSUE 



JUNE 



I940 



#^^1%' 



caowfM 



PuMuUed ku the 

PENNSYLVANIA COOPERATIVE 
POTATO GROWERS ASSOCIATION 



X>^>«»KV^^, 



IMWC 




INCORPORATED 




"CAMP POTATO 



vr> 




TiAPf HAiui ueisTniinuitcorr 



Maintained By 

PENNSYLVANIA CO-OPERATIVE POTATO 
GROWERS' ASSOCIATION 

Incorporated 
BellefontG/ Pa. 



"CAMP POTATO" was established to provide facilities for The Penn- 
sylvania State College in its program of breeding, developing and proving 
new varieties of potatoes. 

A larger conception in its establishment is to kindle the everlasting fire 
in our youth to achieve. 

Still another conception is that "Camp Potato" epitomizes in the hearts 
of Pennsylvania Potato Growers— Unselfishness, Enthusiasm, Integrity, 
and Vision. 



RULES OF "CAMP POTATO' 



"Camp potato" is maintained by the Pennsylvania Cooperative Potato 
Growers' Association, and is contributed to by its many friends and staunch 
supporters. It is the desire of every one that the camp serve the best in- 
terests of the Potato Industry of Pennsylvania. Therefore, the following 
suggested regulations will be rigorously enforced: — 

1. Every group must leave the camp grounds and camp buildings clean, 
sanitary, and in an orderly condition. 

2. No spitting on the floor or walls will be tolerated. 

3. No smoking on the balcony at any time. 

4. No intoxicating beverages allowed to be used on the camp grounds by 
any group at any time. 

5. No defacing of buildings or camp property will be tolerated. 

6. Gam^bling will not be permitted in any form. 

7. Work and play but no foolishness. 







^^Camp Potato" Opened for Season 



On Monday, June 3rd, "Camp Potato" 
was officially opened for the 1940 sea- 
son, in the presence of the Future 
Farmers of America organization from 
Oakland, Maryland, and many other 
visitors, including a large number of 
Potter County growers. 

The Potter County Potato Growers' 
Association, in connection with the 



opening of the camp, held a meeting 
of their Association at the camp, with 
many of the visitors present, including 
former President, Walter S. Bishop, of 
Doylestown, and former Director, John 
Bachman, of Hellertown, Penna. 

B. Allen Rockwell, of the Hershey 
Estates, officiated in the planting of the 
first potato for the 1940 season, and he 




The technique of cross-pollinating potatoes. From the seeds procured from these 
pollinations, over 3,000 new seedlings were propogateed and planteed on June 
4th. These boys get a real kick out of this type of activity. 



also planted Dr. Nixon's 100,000th new 
seedling. 

It was a fine lot of boys who came to 
the camp from Oakland, Maryland, and 
they did a splendid job in assisting with 
the seedling work. They planted, by 
hand, a total of 1391 seedlings. 

At almost bedtime Tuesday (the 4th), 
the Hepburn Chapter of the Future 
Farmers of America, of Lycoming Coun- 
ty, consisting of fifteen boys, arrived at 



the camp, and the next day, ten more 
Lycoming boys were present. 

These boys continued the good work 
begun by the Maryland group — and as 
a result, seven acres of seedlings were 
planted during the first week — all by 
hand. 

"Camp Potato" will be the show place 
in Pennsylvania this year for anyone 
with the remotest interest in potatoes. 
Any growers who have not seen it have 



THE GUIDE POST 



June, 1940 



June, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



surely missed a real experience — and 
those who have, will be amazed to see 
its many improvements. 

Though this is a "Camp Potato" issue, 
we could give here-again, the history 
of the Camp — how the lumber for it was 
acquired from the Federal Government 
in the form of a C. C. C. Camp, at Ridg- 
way, Penna., and how this latter camp 
was razed, transported and re-erected 



as "Camp Potato" at Coudersport by 
the efforts alone of the growers who 
gave their time and energy to it — and 
how it progressed — with contributed 
funds, labor and gifts, to its present 
state. But all of you have helped it and 
watched it grow, and repetition here 
seems unnecessary. However, pictured 
in this issue are many "Camp Potato" 
shots which pictorially show the growth 
of this project. 



l;.:<■:■x■.v<■x<■^^ ' 



.:..■ j>.->»y.:-:--<' .■;.-;:yv^,. 



, <5 ^If^'X^ 



fX-S. *-> Mi--.-. %'W'-*^**^ 14. "^vW 




The tool shed, packing house, and storage combined at "Camp Potato." 
This potato storage, growers will be interested to know, kept the potatoes in 
lOOVr condition. 38 seedling varieties that were placed on the storage test in 
bins of approximateely 25 bushels each came out the past week (June 3rd) as 
firm and crisp as the day they were put in. It is interesting, however, to note the 
difference in keeping qualities of different varieties. Some had as much as one 
and one half bushels storage rot — some not a single tuber rot. They were all 
placed in the storage at the same time. 



Mr. Muddle — "Where did you get 
these cigars?" 

Mr. Clafflin — "A friend of mine sent 
them from Cuba." 

Mr. Muddle — "Your friend certainly 
knows the ropes down there." 



Recruiting Sergeant — "What's yer 
name and what branch of the service 
d'ye want to be in?" 

Perkins (who stammered) — Pup-p- 
p-p-p-pup-pu — ." 

R. S. (writing)— "Can't speak English 
and wants to join a machine gun outfit." 



t 



Early History of the " Camp Potato " Site 



(Editor's Note: This letter was turn- 
ed over to the Association office by Dr. 
E. L. Nixon, who received it from Mr. 
B. J. Butler, of Hornell, New York. Mr. 
Butler lived at the "Camp Potato" site 
many years ago, and visited it recently. 
The sugar tree referred to stands about 
100 yards from the road in the large field 
on the back farm. We have decided to 
let this tree stand, though it occupies a 
productive piece of soil for potato grow- 
ing.) 

"When we were at "Camp Potato," I 
suggested I might write something of 
my boyhood days which were spent on 
the site where your project is located. 
I will do the best I can, but I am afraid 
that will not be much. 

"But first I wish to thank you for 
the courtesy shown me by you and your 
staff at "Camp Potato," especially for 
your kind consideration in the preser- 
vation of the treasured maple tree. 

"This tree was planted by grand- 
mother Butler during the Civil War, 
and stands a living monument to those 
who settled there when that was a vast 
wilderness and have long smce passed 
on. 

"The Butler farm, located on the very 
top of Denton Hill contained about one 
hundred and seventy eight acres, and at 
one time about ninety acres of this was 
under cultivation. 

"Having been cleared for the most 
part before and shortly after the Civil 
War, in which grandfather Butler serv- 
ed four years and three months. 

"At that time the road coming from 
Coudersport ended on our farm, but 
eventually was continued to Galeton, 
and later was traveled quite extensively 
as it was the shortest route between 
Coudersport and Galeton. 

"I will not try to give any dates of 
early activities, as I was not born until 
1888, so my memory only dates back to 
about 1894. At that time there was an 
old log school house located at the in- 
tersection of the old Denton Hill road 
and the Billy Lewis road. 

"This school was replaced at about 
that time by a one-room frame struc- 
ture, but was used but very little as the 



only other pupils moved away and I 
became the only pupil in the district, 
and it was decided, after about two 
years' controversy, to send me to an- 
other school. 

Later, however, other people moved 
into the district with large families of 
children, and the school was put into 
operation but not until after I had left 
school, and was discontinued about 1909. 

"At my earliest recollection of life on 
Denton Hill, there were five farms, three 
fair sized, under cultivation. Just north 
of 'Camp Potato' in what was then the 
Haines farm; the Wambold farm was 
where 'Camp Potato' is located; the 
Blanchard place was located near the 
site of the old schoolhouse; the Nisbit 
farm was located about one half mile 
south of the Denton Hill road and on 
the west side of the Billy Lewis road. 
These farms, while not as large as ours, 
all had fair buildings on them. 

"Two other small farms, now almost 
completely covered with second growth, 
lie just east of the Billy Lewis road 
and nearly opposite the Nisbit farm. 
These were known as the Palmiteer lots 
settled by two brothers who answered 
the call of their country in '61, and never 
came back. 

"Farming on Denton Hill thirty or 
forty years ago proved to be anything 
but profitable, due to the long distance 
from market and the poor roads. Most 
of the land was very stoney and thous- 
ands of loads of stone were removed 
from the fields before the ground could 
be cultivated to any degree of satisfac- 
tion. Stone piles border nearly every 
field. 

"Picking stone is the first work I re- 
member doing, and my arms are about 
four inches longer than normal from 
pulling the plow back and setting it 
again each time it hit a boulder. 



"As time went on, farming became 
more or less a side issue. Lumbering, 
while not too profitable, afforded a 
source of revenue during the winter 
months, and early in the twentieth cen- 
tury, when lumbering activity in the 
immediate vicinity was at its height 
very little farming was carried on, and 
soon these farms became so run down 

(Continued on page 24) 












THE GUIDE POST 



June, 1940 




Mr. Roland Benjamin, of the Farm Bureau Coooerative Association, digging the 
hrst hill of potatoes, 105 days after Mr. Fred Bateman, of the A. B. Farquhar 
Company, had planted it at "Camp Potato." This hill unit, which turned out to 
have 14 tubers, has been labelled "Farm Bureau," and was planted in its en- 
tirety as a unit on June 3rd of this year. 




Planting the first hill of potatoes ever planted at "Camp Potato '^ in 1939 This 
ceremony was repeated on June 3rd, 1940, when B. Allen Rockwell' of tho hI^cW 
n^rfnM*^"' ^?-* ^^^^ P^^^^^^ the first hill for the sekson but pirn/eV 
000th seedling to be developed in the breeding urogram Mr Fred BatPm^^^^ ]^^U 

in^rg"?."^""'*" "' *^' -^'*'*" '"^"^*^^' P^''^^'"^^ th?s ceremony Tot t^hftiXoTato 



June. 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 







Judge Robert R. Lewis presenting the title of "Camp Potato to Waller S. Bishop, 
President of the Potato Growers' Association in 1938. Below, Camp Potato as 
it appeared at the time of this dedication. The picture on the front cover page will 
show the improvements. 











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8 



THE GUIDE POST 



June, 1940 



t* 



THE GUIDE POST 

Published monthly by the Pennsylvania 
Cooperative Potato Growers, Inc. 



OFFICERS 

J. A. Donaldson, Emlenton . . President 

Roy R. Hess, Stillwater Vice-Pres. 

E. B. Bower, Bellefonte, 

Sec'y-Treas. and Gen. Mgr. 



DIRECTORS 

Jacob K. Mast Elverson, Chester 

P. Daniel Frantz Coplay, Lehigh 

Hugh McPherson Bridgeton, York 

John B. Schrack Loganton, Clinton 

Roy R. Hess Stillwater, Columbia 

Ed. Fisher Coudersport, Potter 

Charles Frey North Girard, Erie 

J. A. Donaldson, R.l, Emlenton, Venango 
R. W. Lohr Boswell, Somerset 

Annual membership fee $1.00. This in- 
cludes the Guide Post. 

All communications should be ad- 
dressed to E. B. Bower, Secretary-Treas- 
urer and General Manager, Bellefonte, 
Pennsylvania. 



DAYS OF JUNE 

What charm, what tenderness so subtly 
sweet, 

What joyous spirit and what radiant 
presence — 

Of all things bright and lovable the 

essence — 
Oh, June is here! The world is all com- 
plete! 



0hitmvp 



James L. Zellers 

Members of this Association will be 
grieved to learn of the passing, on April 
11th, of James L. Zellers, of Stewarts- 
town, Hopewell Township, York Coun- 
ty, who was an outstanding agricultural 
leader and prominent potato grower, 
known throughout the State. He died, 
following a brief illness, in the York 
Hospital, of strepticocci blood stream 
infection. 



James L. Zellers was born August 9, 
1876, the only child of William and 
Esther Anderson Zellers, at his late 
home in Hopewell Township, which was 
purchased by his grandfather, Levi Zel- 
lers, in 1826, and had been in the family 
ever since. 

He attended the Public Schools of 
Hopewell Township, and later the 
Stewartstown Academy. 

He was married to Mary Jane Patter- 
son, who survives him with one daugh- 
ter, Miss M. Hazel Zellers, who is Mathe- 
matics Instructor in the Stewartstown 
High School. 

James L. Zellers was an ideal leader 
in his community and his passing is a 
great loss to the community which he 
served. 

His activities were many. He was a 
member of the Stewartstown Presby- 
terian Church, President of the Carlisle 
Production Credit Association, Presi- 
dent of the York County Potato Grow- 
ers' Association, Past President of the 
York County Extension Association 
a member of the Lion's Club, a Charter 
member of the Knights of Pythians, 
Stewartstown, Chairman of the Civic 
Improvement Commission, Stewarts- 
town, and a Director of the Agricultural 
Association of Stewartstown. 

He was engaged in general farming 
and raised hundreds of turkeys each 
year. He was outstanding in York Coun- 
ty potato production problems, and a 
leader in all progressive movements of 
the Potato Growers' Association. For 
example, he was one of the instigators 
of the initial spray program in his Coun- 
ty, as shown by this excerpt from an 
account of this endeaver in 1919: 

'In the spring of 1919, a Potato Grow- 
ers' meeting was held at Stewartstown. 
At this meeting. Dr. E. L. Nixon, for 
the first time, discussed the merits of 
potato spraying to York County farmers. 
As a result, five cooperative spray rings 
were organized. There constituted the 
largest acreage in membership in- 
volved in community spraying in the 
United States. These were located at 
Red Lion, Brogueville, Stewartstown 
and New Park. Two groups were organi- 
zed at Stewartstown. The five groups 
included 69 growers who planted a total 
of 387 acres of potatoes during that 
season. Mr. J. L. Zellers was chairman 
(Continued on page 30) 



June, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



9 



Dr. E. L. Nixon Severs Connection with College -™ 
Accepts New Post with Penna. Chain Store Council 



Dr. E. L. Nixon, on May 13th tender- 
ed his resignation, to be effective July 
1st, to The Pennsylvania State College, 
where he had been a member of the 
staff for 23 years, and simultaneously 



accepted a position as Agricultural 
Counselor to the Pennsylvania Cham 
Store Council. 

In his new work, Dr. Nixon will cor- 
relate marketing activity for the agri- 




Dr. E. L. Nixon 



cultural groups in the State with the 
Food Distributors. Though this enter- 
prise will include all phases of agricul- 
ture Dr. Nixon will in no way lessen 



his interest or assistance to the potato 

industry of the State. In this capacity, 

his work in the breeding program will 

(Continued on page 14) 









10 



THE GUIDE POST 



June, 1940 



m 




June, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



11 



Dedicaion of "Camp Potato." 
"Camp Potpto" was dedicated in August, P3?. with over 1.000 Pennsylvania grow- 
ers and their friends in attendance. Many changes have occured since this picture 
was taken in both t e : rounds end buildings, but no changes in the hearts of the 
potato growers. 




1 



"Camp Potato" in the Early Stages of Erection. 
The lire place was constructed but the chimney not completed in this photo. Where 
the tractor and scraper are at work is now the flag-stone covered assembly room. 



Edinboro F. F. A. Will Grow 202 Potato Varieties 

A Cooperative Class Project 

by BiRON E. Decker 
County Adviser, Erie County Vocational Agriculture 



Norman P. Manners, Supervisor of 
Vocational Agriculture, received a re- 
quest form the County Vocational Ad- 
viser pertaining to an invitation to par- 
ticipate in a State research problem. 
This request was relayed from Dr. E. L. 
Nixon, of the Pennsylvania State Col- 
lege, known as Pennsylvania's Potato 
King. 

''Would you be interested in planting 
a test plot of 202 varieties of potato seed- 
lings?" 

"Yes — sure." 

As easy as that, and Edinboro will be 
the scene of much activity and much sci- 
entific procedure. Mr. Manners was not 
familiar with the details of the plan, 
but he is alert. He immediately realized 
the possibilities of a major enterprise 
such as this in lending itself to the 
present and future as a means of furn- 
ishing scientific information which can- 
not be obtained otherwise. He knew 
it would be valuable as a means of 
spreading enthusiasm relative to the 
production of quality potatoes. Basic- 
ally, the science involved will apply to 
all farm crops, hence the experiment 
will broaden the knowledge of every 
vocational pupil in Erie County, since 
the boys will undoubtedly visit the pro- 
ject several times. 

It will mark the second venture into 
the potato industry for Edinboro, and 
on the same field which in 1933 pro- 
duced the first certified seed potatoes 
to be grown by vocational agricultural 
pupils in Pennsylvania. This step alone 
has been responsible for the produc- 
tion of many acres of high quality po- 
tatoes on a high yielding basis. 

Cream from 75,000 Varieties 

These 202 seedling variety selections 
are the cream from over 75,000 seed- 
lings grown from seed, and are to be 
planted in three widely separated areas 
in Pennsylvania. Edinboro has been 
given the opportunity to accept this 
Drivilege— and true to tradition, it has 
been so ordered. There will be ten 
pounds of each variety. Some of the 



potatoes will be yellow, a few will be 
pink outside and inside; there will be 
blue potatoes, white potatoes, russet 
potatoes, and many other colors as 
well as shape variations. These pota- 
toes will be planted by hand. 

Planting 

C. W. Billings, of Edinboro, a loyal 
vocational agricultural enthusiast, and 
the one chiefly resDonsible for the de- 
velopment of the department at Edin- 
boro will donate the use of two acres 
of his best soil adjoining Route 6N. It 




Biron E. Decker 

will be conveniently situated, thus en- 
abling visitors to view the progress. A 
new Iron Age planter will be used in 
the planting. The rear disc will be re- 
moved, thus leaving the trench open for 
hand planting. The reason for the use 
of the planter is two-fold. It will fer- 
tilize and open the rows at the same 
(Continued on page 19) 




June, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



13 






I 



POTATO CHIPS 

Our capable director and past presi- crop is mostly cleaned "f- Wat<:h out f or 

dent P D Frantz may not have been the tobaggon slide a little later. How- 

entirelv responsible for Congress scrap- ever, when every southern state from 

n?nrtL Patman Inti-chain-store bill, the Gulf to the Mason and Dixon line 

but his testimony before the Senate will come in almost together. Fortuna e 

committee was a big help toward that that the Pennsylvania crop will be late 

end In his sincere and matter-of-fact this year as present indications point 

manner "P D " told the venerable gen- toward too much competition from 

Uemen who comprise the most respected many states until late summer or early 

body of legislators in the world, what fall. 

the ordinary dirt farmer thinks about U 

legislation aimed to kill the chains. He SHORT SAD STORY 

stated that the selling of fram products EXPENSE ACCOUNT 

direct to these large distributors not Advertisine for girl 

only moves larger volumes expeditously 5- 1 Advert^^'ng ^'^^^ $ .50 

but also with a greater net return o the g.^l^^S - „ew steno'. .65 

growers. He stated that to return 10 om wppU'-! salarv for 

methods of distribution entirely through 5- 8 Week s salary 

local buyers hucksters peddlers and ^_%^^^^f^f^J^,^^^^^^^y^^, 3.00 

commission houses ^°" '^.^f iSan 5-11 Candy - for wife 75 

step backward ^^^ that the Amencan j. ^.^^ stenographer. . . 6.25 

farmers would much rather progress. ^_^^ ^^^^,^ ^^^^^^ ^^^ 

D stenographer 20.00 

The hearings also brought out the fact 5-17 Picture show tickets for self 

thit the whole trend of modern farming f "d w.f e . .^^^ . • .80 

Is toward mass production which must 5-18 Theatre Uckets sell ana 

be matched by a system of mass distn- ?^^"°S'^P7jr ' -j^g .75 

bution. The chain ^tor^s ha^.| deveiope^ 5-19 Candy ^^for^w^ife . . . . . . ... ^^^^ 

that and whether we approve or not tne ^^^^^^ ^^^ ^.^^^^ ^.^^ 

sumer is rapidly waking up, if anyone stenograpner 

should ask you. □ 

□ Word from North Carolina and the 

^^of.. r^rnHnrt is Eastern Shore indicates the finest pros- 

An interesting new po^ato^P^^^^^^ Jast ^^^ ^ ^^^^ ^^ excellent quality 

being used by the Byrdjmarctici^^^ potatoes from those early shipping 
dition. This product made by drying a P^^ yields from 
mixture of ^ boiled po a oes kim^^^^^^ other sect\ons of the south already ship- 
milk and salt is called skim milKpoxaio indicate larger production than 
wafers. This ^ood product won a p ace PJ^g^^^^^^^^/,,,! Jr. If these high yields 
on the expedition because otiign^ continue to be harvested progressively 
weight and because it will not get ran ^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^^^^ ^ope can be had for 
cid as no fat is present. ^^^ market maintaining a very saiisfac- 

__- -O- tory position, unless some very marked 

Missed mv guess of what the peak and unusually strong consumer demand 
nri^e for p^fa toes would be this spring should develop to take increased sup- 
by two bits a bag. They reached $2.75 a plies. 

hundred with a few in some markets a U 

little higher, but last winter I predicted Confucious DID say, "What the su- 

thev might reach $3.00. The market for ^.^qj. ^^^^ seeks is in himself ; what the 

the new crop stays up well, as expected, ^^^^^ ^^^n seeks is in others. And many 

since the heavy movement from the (Continued on page 30) 
south has been delayed and the laie 



14 



THE GUIDE POST 



June, 1940 



DR. E. L. NIXON SEVERS 

CONNECTION WITH COLLEGE 

(Continued from page 9) 
be enlarged— not curtailed; his assis- 
tance to the Association marketing pro- 
gram will be increased with full 
approval of his superiors, and he will 
be permitted to give the Pennsylvania 
potato growers and their Association 
unlimited help in planning and execu- 
ting meetings and programs without 
being hampered in any way. 

Dr. Nixon's decision to take this new 
position was greatly influenced by an 
Open Letter written to him by the 
Board of Directors of the Association, 
urging his acceptance of the position 
offered him by the Chain Store Council, 
for the contribution it would make to 
the Agriculture of the State. This letter 
was as follows: 

"AN OPEN LETTER TO DR. E. L. 
NIXON: 

''Representing the potato growing in- 
dustry of Pennsylvania, we respectfully 
address you on the subject of your con- 
tinued interest in our well-being, and 
active cooperation in our efforts to 
solve problems of vital importance to 
the future prosperity of our members, 
their families, and the communities in 
which we live. 

"We wish, therefore, to advise you 
that at a special meeting of the Board 
of Directors of the Pennsylvania Co- 
operative Potato Growers' Association, 
Inc., your status and the need of our in- 
dustry were exhaustively discussed, and 
the following action unanimously taken: 
"Whereas, Due to certain policies of 
The Pennsylvania State College and 
the State Department of Agricul- 
ture which prevent the most useful 
and the most practical contribution 
on the part of their specialists, par- 
ticularly in the field of marketing, 

and 

"Whereas, Neither agency is amen- 
able to rendering this needed ser- 
vice, notwithstanding the repeated 
efforts on the part of the Associa- 
tion. 

"Therefore, Be It Resolved, That in 
the judgement of the Board of Di- 
rectors of the Pennsylvania Co- 
operative Potato Growers' Associa- 
tion, Inc., Dr. E. L. Nixon of The 
Pennsylvania State College, could 



render his greatest contribution to 
the Potato Industry of Pennsylvan- 
ia, by accepting and adopting the 
plan as set forth by the Pennsyl- 
vania Council of Chain Stores. 
"Be It Further Resolved, That this not 
be construed as giving advice or 
counsel on his present personal or 
financial relationship. 

Very sincerely yours, 

Pennsylvania Cooperative Potato 

Growers' Association, Inc. 

By the Board of Directors: 

J. A. Donaldson, President 

Roy R. Hess, Vice-President 

P. Daniel Frantz 

Jacob K. Mast 

H. C. McPherson 

John B. Schrack 

Ed. Fisher 

Chas. H. Frey 

Robert W. Lohr" 

That Dr. Nixon heeded this call from 
the leaders of our industry, despite his 
23 years' affiliation with the College, is 
unquestioned proof of his continued en- 
thusiasm for the uplift of the potato 
program and the uplift of Agriculture 
generally and his desire to serve the 
program through whatever agency pro- 
vides the best facilities for his coopera- 
tion. 

Dr. Nixon is so well known to the 
members of this Association, through his 
extensive potato program and the per- 
sonal manner in which it was conducted, 
that little of the life and work of this 
man is unknown, so we will give only 
a brief resume of it. 

Dr. Ernest Leland Nixon was born in 
the little Hamlet of Mount Pleasant, 
Ohio, a village of 200 souls, on the border 
line of Hocking and Vinton Counties, 
a little over 50 years ago, in abject 
poverty, comparable to the poorest in 
the country today. Here he spent his 
boyhood and here, under the most try- 
ing circumstances, he acquired his ele- 
mentary education. 

Then, under equally adverse condi- 
tions, he entered Ohio Northern Uni- 
versity and there spent nine ten-week 
terms, between jobs of various kinds. 
He completed his preparatory work 
here, taught school, and entered Ohio 
University in 1908, from which he re- 
ceived his degree in 1912. 

(Continued on page 20) 



June, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



15 



Some Observations at ''Camp Potato'' 

by O. T. Graser, Voc. Supt., Oakland, Maryland 



The two-day stopover and participa- 
tion in the official opening of "Camp 
Potato" on June 3rd was part of the five- 
day annual tour of thirty-five boys of 
Oakland Chapter F. F. A., Maryland, 
which this year took them to Niagara 
Falls, New York. 

Upon arriving at the camp, in the late 
evening, the boys were amazed at the 
huge building with all its accommoda- 
tions, including a roaring fire in a large 
stone fire-place. Cots with mattresses 
were readily accepted by the boys in- 
stead of sleeping in a tent as during the 
first several days of their trip. 

With kitchens and equipment avail- 
able, it was possible for the ladies at 
the camp to satisfy the appetites of the 
boys. 

A survey of the camp by the boys with 
its kitchens, office, individual rooms, 
balcony, showers and toilets further in- 
dicated the completeness of the ar- 
rangement. 

The meeting of Potato Growers As- 
sociation of Potter County with the 
boys emphasized the spaciousness of the 
building, for the entire group required 
only the use of a part of the building. 

After traveling all day Saturday 
through a downpour of rain, no one ex- 
pected to plant potatoes on Monday 
morning. However, when we looked 
out on Monday morning at 5:30, what 
should we see but the camp Cletrac run- 
ning, and Dr. Nixon and Mr. Denniston 
making measurements in preparation 
for planting the seedlings in the ex- 
perimental plots. Nowhere that I know 
of could ground be satisfactorily worked 
so quickly after heavy rains. The soil 
lends itself so well to potatoes that after 
fertilizer had been added and furrows 
opened with a planter— from which the 
covering discs had been removed— that 
the boys covered seed pieces by merely 
pushing soil over with their feet. 

Only the sight of a deer— seen by one 
boy— could cause many of the other 
boys to leave a partially eaten piece ot 
Mrs. Hindman's fine raisin pie in order 
to get a better look. Deer might cause 
some damage in Potter County, but to 
these boys they were a rare sight, une 



fellow reports that later in the day he 
got a clear, close-up snapshot of a deer. 
Time will tell! 

The other part of the camp site (the 
large farm) offers fine possibilities, not 
only for space for the multiplication of 
promising seedlings, but in addition, 
may be a source of revenue to the As- 
sociation over and above that required 
for the maintenance of experimental 
and educational work now going on. 

Two days and nights spent there on 
the mountain top in Potter County 
among its natural wonders and its scenic 
beauty shall be a treasure among the 
memories of these thirty-five Maryland 
boys. In this treasure chest of memories 
will also be that of making friends with 
fine personalities such as Dr. Nixon, Mr. 
Bower Mr. Denniston, and with potato 
growers Ed Fisher, Walter Bishop, and 
John Bachman. Who can tell to what 
height the good inspirations gotten from 
these men may encourage these boys 
to attain? 

''Camp Potato" is, in my opinion, a 
small measure of exemplification of the 
pioneering and cooperative spirit char- 
acteristic of the Pennsylvania Coopera- 
tive Potato Growers' Association. I be- 
lieve these boys have caught something 
of that spirit. May the organization 
never lack leadership of the type that 
has pointed the way to the lofty heights 
attained, so that other boys and other 
generations may enjoy the benefits ot 
the inspirations, the information, and 
the associations which have, on this visit, 
been ours to appreciate and enjoy. 

(Editor's Note: The observations 
above were graciously contributed, for 
our use, by Mr. Graser, a leader in much 
fine pioneering work in Maryland, tal- 
lowing his visit to ''Camp Potato with 
his group of thirty-five fine boys. During 
their two-day visit at the camp, these 
boys contributed much to the breeding 
program by assisting in the planting 
of the seedlings. 

Those who enjoyed the trip were O. 
T Graser, Paul Welch, George Lohr, El- 
wood Bevans, Howard Durst, James 
Baker, Harold Gnegy, David Bowman, 

(Continued on page 30) 



16 



THE GUIDE POST 



June, 1940 



OVER THE PICKING TABLE 



by Inspector Throwout 



So live that the key of memory may 
unlock remembrance of acts you would 
not forget. 

* • * 

The fighting may stop on the battle- 
field, but the ending of war will be in 
the human heart. 



The careless man's unlucky, 
No matter where you find him. 

One careless step, and then his friends 
Are walking slow behind him. 

• • • 

It was in the classroom of an East 
Side New York public school. The teach- 
er looked at the group of eager faces and 
asked: "Who can tell me what is a 
stoic?" 

Only one hand went up. 

*'Does only Abie know what is a 
stoic? Well, tell them Abie." 

"Please teacher, a stoic is a boid what 
brings babies." 

* • • 

He sipped the nectar from her lips 
As 'nrath the moon they sat 

And wondered if another guy e'er drank 
From a mug as sweet as that! 



If You Want to be Loved 

Don't contradict people, even if you're 
sure you're right. 

Don't be inquisitive about the affairs 
of even your most intimate friends. 

Don't underrate anything because you 
don't possess it. 

Don't believe anyone else is happier 
than you. 

Don't conclude that you have never 
had any opportunities in life. 

Don't believe all the evil you hear. 
Don't repeat gossip, even if it does in- 
terest the crowd. 

Don't jeer at anybody's religious be- 
lief. Learn to hide your aches and pains 
under a pleasant smile. Few care 
whether you have earache, headache or 
rheumatism. 



Learn to attend to your own busi- 
ness — a very important point. 

Do not try to be anything else but a 
gentleman or gentlewoman, and that 
mean's one who has consideration for 
the whole world, and whose life is gov- 
erned by the Golden Rule. "Do unto oth- 
ers as you would be done by." 

• • • 

Think often of your friends: but talk 
about them rarely— and then, only of 
their virtues. 

• • • 

A man is your friend when, knowing 
your sins, he can keep a closed mouth. 

• • • 

Down on the depot platform. 
Bathed in the bleak wintry breeze; 
Shy, long ago, of its contents, 
With nothing inside to freeze; 
Shorn of its former glory, 
Tapped of its last amber dreg; 
Bungless, beerless and friendless, 
Stands an empty old eight-gallon keg. 

• • • 

In a small village in Ireland the moth- 
er of a soldier met the village priest, who 
asked her if she had had any news. 
"Sure, I have," she said. "Pat has been 
killed." "Oh, I am sorry," said the 
priest. "Did you receive word from the 
War Office?" 

"No," she said. "I received word 
from him himself." 

The priest looked perplexed, and 
said; "But how is that?" 

"Sure," she said, "here is the letter; 
read it for yourself." 

The letter said: "Dear Mother — I am 
now in the Holy Land." 

• • • 

The way some men answer a tele- 
phone reminds us of the way a bull dog 
greets a stranger. 

• • • 

"There are a number of us who creep 

into the world to eat and sleep. 
And know no reason why we're born 
Save only to consume the corn. 
Devour the cattle, flesh and fish, 
And leave behind an empty dish." 



June, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



17 



\ 



Association Bags and Photographs Again 

Featured at the Electrical Farm 

In New York World^s Fair 



I 

I 



With no small amount of pride can 
members of this Association visit the 
Electrical Farm at the New York 
World's Fair, and see there, for the se- 
cond year, the entire side wall covered 
with fine enlargements of pictures of 
Pennsylvania potato growers' farms, 
fields and packing houses — all showing 



A little lad was telling his friends 
that he worked at a blacksmith's. 

"But you're not big enough to shoe 
horses," said one of his friends. 

"No," he replied. "I shoe flies." 

• • • 

"Business is business," but men are men. 

Toiling and working, dreaming, 
Toiling with pencil or spade or pen, 

Roistering, planning, scheming, 
"Business is business," but he's a fool 

Whose business has gone to smother 
His faith in men and the Golden Rule, 

His love for a friend or brother. 
"Business is business," but life is life; 

Though we're all in the game to win 

it, 
Let's rest sometimes from the heat and 
strife 
And try to be friends a minute. 
Let's seek to be comrades now and 
then. 
And slip from our golden tether; 
"Business is business," but men are men 
And we're all good pals together. 

• • • 

A woman was overheard recently 
phoning these astounding instructions to 
the meat market: "Well, I'll take a 
small roast — and if I'm not at home 
when your boy gets here, tell him to 
stuff it through the key hole." 

• • • 

A man is loyal when, first, he has 
some cause to which he is loyal; when, 
. second, he willingly and thoroughly de- 
votes himself to this cause; and when, 
thirdly, he expresses his devotion in 
some substantial and practical way, by 
acting steadily in the service of his 
cause. 

— JOSIAH ROYCE 



outstanding operations, in the Pennsyl- 
vania potato industry. And at the same 
time, see the Association trade-marked 
Blue Label bags in use for all packing 
demonstrations given, many times daily, 
before the hundreds of thousands of 
visitors to the Farm. All of this for the 
second season. 

The prominence of this display and 
the enormity of its advertising value 
to Pennsylvania potatoes cannot be 
minimized. The Association has there 
a display for which other similar Asso- 
ciations would gladly pay $500.00 or 
more a month, and we have been given 
it, gratis, for the principles upon which 
we are founded alone. Even the Long 
Island package is conspicuous by its 
absence — and practically in its own 
back yard. 

Each member of this Association 
should make a visit to this Electrical 
farm and our display first, ahead of 
everything when he visits the Fair. You 
will be gratified and pleased. 

As our friend, Ed. Malley remarked, 
"It's a Blitzkrieg for the Pennsylvania 
potato growers!" 



Lecturer (in low voice) — "I venture 
to assert there isn't a man in this audi- 
ence who has ever done anything to pre- 
vent the destruction of vast forests." 

Man in audience (timidly) — "I've 
shot woodpeckers." 

They talk about a woman's sphere, as 

though it had a limit, 
Why, there's not a place in earth or 
heaven, there's not a task to man- 
kind given, 
There's not a blessing or a woe, there's 

not a whispered yes or no. 
There's not a life, or death, or birth, 
there's not a feathers weight of 
worth 
Without a woman in it. 

—Kate Fields. 



18 



THE GUIDE POST 



June, 1940 



June, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



19 



Lycoming County Vocational Agriculture Students 
Assist in the Breeding Work and Visit 

'' Camp Potato " 

by Chas. D. Carey, 
County Supervisor, Lycoming County Vocational Agriculture 



For the second year, Lycoming 
County Future Farmers have cooperat- 
ed with the Pennsylvania Potato Grow- 
ers' by planting trial plots of the more 



promising of the new seedling varieties 
developed under the direction of Dr. E. 
L. Nixon. The Jersey Shore and Hep- 
burnville Chapters have been most ac- 
tive in this program. 



f»V'^ 




Seedling Nursery Plot al "Camp Potalo." 
Here grew over 8,000 prospective new varieties developed from seed balls. In 
the process of elimination, almost from the time of birth, over half are elimi- 
nated due to disease susceptibility; fifty percent, of those remaining are elimi- 
nated because of poor yield or misshapen tubers. Finally, if half a dozen are 
left out of 8,000, one would consider the project successful. "Camp Potato" will 
have a finer selection of promising new varieties on display this season than 
ever before. In fact, there are several varieties that are now multiplied up to 
50 bushels or more which have outstanding promise. 



This year, the Jersey Shore Chapter 
has planted, on their leased 20 acre farm 
near Jersey Shore, about U acres of 
these new varieties and will make a 
complete report on them. 



Last year, a display of the new varie- 
ties at the Lycoming County Fair arous- 
ed considerable favorable comment. 
(Continued on page 26) 



EDINBORO F.F.A. WILL GROW 202 

POTATO VARIETIES 

(Continued from page 11) 

time. The rear disc covers the row. 
Twelve hundred pounds of 8-24-24 fer- 
tilizer will be applied on the two acres. 
On one side of the row the fertilizer 
will be placed below the potato, while 
the other side will drop the fertilizer 
above the potato. This alone has been 
found to increase the yield by approx- 
imately 40 bushels per acre. The po- 
tatoes will then be planted and covered 
by hand. Markers will bear numbers 
which will correspond to a chart bear- 
ing the same number on each row. The 
varieties have not received names be- 
cause many will never become com- 
mercially prominent. Few will be se- 
lected as desirable, but already one 
variety has been discovered which has 
yielded as high as 900 bushels per acre. 
The location of this row will remain a 
strict secret for obvious reasons. The 
fact has been cited here as an example 
of the possibilities of such an experi- 
ment. 

The necessary supervision of this pro- 
ject will be given personally by Dr. Nix- 
on and Mr. L. T. Denniston. Again the 
boys will have available a vast fund 
of experiences in these persons co- 
operating. Much of this information 
will remain in Erie County. As many 
as 500 visitors are expected to visit the 
project. Tours will probably pass 
through the county enroute to other 
places of interest, and many of these 
will, undoubtedly, inspect the project. 

True to Type? 

The shape of a tuber is no indication 
that it will yield similar tubers. Pota- 
toes are as unpredictable as the weather. 
Once a variety has been discovered and 
established, it will yield uniform pota- 
toes, but the shape will not yield to ac- 
curate selection such as all long or all 
round potatoes. Such characteristics 
must be dominant and this is one of the 
facts which the experiment will prob- 
ably indicate. 

Hand Work and Spraying 

Throughout the summer a large per- 
centage of the work will be done by 
hand. An occasional machine cultiva- 
tion will be put into practice, but hand 
work will be the chief mode of culture. 
Spraying, of course, will come at regu- 



SPRAY 






WITH 




FOR BEST RESULTS 

Use 

Whiterock Lump and Pebble Lime 
Whiterock High Calcium 

Quadruple Separated 

Superfine Spray Hydrate 

or 

Whiterock Micro-Mesh 

They lead the field in Spray limes 

Write 

Whiterock Quarries 

Bellefonte, Pa. 



lar intervals. Harvesting will be the 
major problem. Each variety will be 
hand dug and weighed carefully into 
separate sacks. From the facts collect- 
ed at this time, additional selections will 
be made for future plantings. Few will 
be retained for these future plantings. 

Potato Industry Gaining 

The potato industry of North West- 
ern Pennsylvania is below the total 
acreage of a generation ago. It is now 
gaining slowly. North Western Penn- 
sylvania must eventually become the 
leading potato area in the State. Con- 
ditions are ideal in the area. Pennsyl- 
vania imports nearly ten million bushels 
of potatoes annually. The food dis- 
tributors would purchase more pota- 
toes should they be able to get them in 
greater quantity. Pennsylvania pota- 
toes, properly grown and graded, will 
receive preference to many of the dis- 
tantly imported varieties. 

Finally 

Vocational agricultural pupils, as well 
as their instructors, are always anxious 
to cooperate with all agencies in the 
promotion of improved agricultural 

(Continued on page 28) 



20 



THE GUIDE POST 



June, 1940 



.■^:.-.:.::v.rr.*v.S^.x 



DR. E. L. NIXON SEVERS 

CONNECTION WITH COLLEGE 

(Continued from page 14) 

For two years afterwards, then, he 
was connected with the Ohio Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station, at Wooster, 
Ohio. 

In 1915, he procured his Masters' 
Degree from Ohio University, and later 
that year entered Columbia University, 
where he received his Doctorate, in 
recognition of his scientific genius, and 
was elected to Sigma Xi, the honorary 
scientific society, and also as a Fellow in 
the American Association for the aa- 
vancement of science. 

By accident— or Providence— which- 
ever— to the everlasting appreciation ot 
many potato growers in Pennsylvania, 
Dr Nixon was employed as Extension 
Pathologist at The Pennsylvania State 
College in 1917, and has remained with 
this institution ever since. 

Here, as a practical farmer himself, 
and a clear thinking scientist, he adopt- 
ed scientific facts to farm conditions in 
such a complete manner that the most 
humble farm in the country is in posi- 
tion to receive the benefits. 

He saw where the State's 80 bushel 
potato average acre yield presented an 
excellent opportunity, as a fertile field 
of effort, and he plunged into his task 
and developed the modern methods of 
profitable potato production to replace 
the age-old traditional methods. 

During the period from 1918 to 1928, 
he traveled the length and breadth of 
the State — and into a dozen other states 
in the American potato growing belt, 
spreading the gospel of "potato men- 
tality," speaking at 2,452 meetings, and 
personally reaching three-quarters of a 
million farmers. Through his teachings, 
he increased the average yield from 80 
bushels per acre in 1918 to 130 bushels 
in 1928. He stressed the necessity of 
Good Seed and secured the first carload 
of foundation seed to be shipped into 
Pennsylvania from Michigan. He inau- 
gurated an extensive spray program 
which began in 1918 with 196,000 gal- 
lons of Bordeaux Mixture and increased 
to 125,000,000 gallons in 1928. Dr. Nixon 
personally mixed, in demonstrations, 
over a million gallons of spray mixture 
during the period. 



In 1922, Dr. Nixon established the 400- 
Bushel Potato Club which gave im- 
proved morale and brought dignity and 
pride to thousands of farms. In its first 
seven years, this Club honored 801 
growers who produced 400 or more bu- 
shels per acre. 

During these years it was Nixon's 
amazing ability to adopt principles and 
practices to meet conditions as he saw 
them in the field. 

He put technical science to work in the 
interests of farm practices and adopted 
or invented machinery to meet the 
needs as they arose. He developed and 
brought into general use a suitable spray 
boom which is now used wherever po- 
tatoes are sprayed. He created demand 
for better planters and diggers and when 
the program required the extensive use 
of legumes, he fathered that practice. 

His teachings have brought innumer- 
able benefits to American agriculture, 
and above all, have established confi- 
dence in a movement, in an institution, 
and in a science that has revolutionized 
agriculture and agricultural thought. 

His genius of making adaptations for 
the production of potatoes, in the devel- 
opment of a new spray boom, in the 
improvements of planters (deep-plant- 
ing-shallow-covering), adaptation of 
tractors and culivators to potato culture, 
and seed sources and varieties most 
profitable to the industry fulfilled the 
problem of production — and when the 
biggest stumbling block to the industry 
crept upon us — and the public agencies 
through their specialists failed to fill 
the niche to efficiently and economically 
dispose of our product — he came for- 
ward with the new boom of distribution. 
The present, well-known program 
which was unanimously adopted by the 
Food Distributors and the Potato Grow- 
ers' Association came from the pen of 
Dr. Nixon. 

In 1928, Dr. Nixon was transferred 
from the Extension Service to go into 
research in the field of Pathology, and in 
these years following, has worked re- 
lentlessly in a breeding program of great 
magnitude, in an effort to propagate the 
potato for Pennsylvania. During the 
past month. Dr. Nixon's 100,000th potato 
seedling was planted on the "Camp 
Potato" site — which camp was the frui- 

(Continued on page 28) 



' 



» 




The Champion Twins No. 444 2'Tow power diggers -easily 

dig 15 to 25 acres per day. 

Less LABOR COSTS Cleaner POTATOES 
with OK Champ ion POTATO DIGGERS 



# Here's the result of 40 
years of experience — OK 
Champion No. 444— a 2-row 
potato digger built for use 
with any tractor, even me- 
dium sized "20'\ Holds its 
place on side hills — turns in 
extremely short radius. 
Streamlined— electrically 
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Spring balanced levers. 

Adjustable from 30" to 42" 
—rigidly attached to tractor. 
Weighs less than 2,000 lbs. 




O K Champion digs cleaner — f aster- 
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Write for Circular 





No. 888 OK Champion one -row power 
diggers with same features as No. 444. 

OK Champion MOVABLE IRRIGATION 

Takes Dry Years Out of Farming 

Defeat drought— raise more and better yields per 
acre O K Champion movable irrigation has in- 
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Soon pays for itself in more No. I's-less culls. Costs 
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^tm m m mm «V V 



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^> .i% 



22 



THE GUIDE POST 



June, 1940 






Grower to Grower Exchange 

The rate for advertising in this column is a penny a word, minimum cost 25 cents, 
payable with order. (10% reduction when four or more insertions are ordered at 
one time.) Count name and address. Send ads to reach the GUIDE POST, Masonic 
Temple Building, Bellefonte, Penna., by the 20th of the month previous to publi- 
cation. 



AVAILABLE: Copies of Dr. E. L. Nix- 
on's book, "The Principles of Potato 
Production," $1.25 per copy. Write for 

your copy today, to Association office, 
Bellefonte, Pennsylvania. 

DIGGER FOR SALE: One single row 
take off digger. Good repair. Will sell 
reasonably. Write Dr. E. L. Nixon, 
State College, Penna. 

SPRAY BOOM FOR SALE: John Bean 
Spray boom. Complete without nozzles. 
10 row. Good condition. Will sell cheap. 
Ed. Fisher, Coudersport, Pa. 



SPRAYER WANTED: 4 or 6 row en- 
gine or power take-off sprayer. Write 
J. A. Donaldson, R. F. D., No. 1 Emlen- 
ton, Penna. (Venango County) 

SPRAYER WANTED: Horse drawn 
traction sprayer 4-Row boom. Good 
condition. Write J. A. Donaldson, R. F. 
D. No. 1, Emlenton, (Venango County) 
Penna. 



Membership Drive Report 



Yes, we are still pushing hard for new 
members to the Association, and some of 
our men are still pulling for us toward 
this end. 

Roy R. Hess, our Vice-President from 
Stillwater, Columbia County, and a 
real rib in the back-bone of this drive, 
leads, by far, this month with 18 new 
memlDers. Think of it! This is a phe- 
nominal contribution. 

J. A. Jones, of Bath, Northampton 
County, was another leader this month, 
having sent in three new members from 
his county. 

Charles H. Frey, Director of North 
Girard, Erie County, too, had three new 
members this month. 

J. C. McClurg, former Director from 
Geneva, Crawford County, consistently 
prominent in this drive, added two more 
new members to his very long list. 

Then a few more interested growers 
came into the Association unsolicited. 

All of this helps a lot — and it is ap- 
preciated. We only hope to see them 
keep on coming. If your new member 
hasn't yet materialized, we assure you 
he will still be welcomed to this group 
when he does. 

We enthusiastically greet the follow- 
ing new members to the Association: 



Sam Houck, Elysburg, Col. Co. 

Victor Rupp, Elysburg, Col. Co. 

Jacob Leisenring, Bear Gap, Col. Co. 

Chas. M. Rarig, Catawissa, (iol. Co. 

Bruce Bittner, Catawissa, Col. Co. 

Elmer Levan, Catawissa, Col. Co. 

David L. Adams, Elysburg, Col. Co. 

Calvin B. Adams, Elysburg, Col. Co. 

Robert Miller, Catawissa, Col. Co. 

Carl Fritz, Benton, Col. Co. 

Thos. Benjamin, Benton, Col. Co. 

William Fritz, Benton, C!ol. Co. 

Chas. Sandt, Easton, Northampton Co. 

Stephen Dest, Nazareth, Northampton 
Co. 

Homer Snayburger, Orefield, North- 
ampton Co. 

John L. Robertson, Girard, Erie Co. 

Edward Jones, Girard, Erie Co. 

Frank Hunter, North Girard, Erie Co. 

Wm. Holabaugh, Conneaut Lake, 
Crawford Co. 

Anthony Rendulic, Conneaut Lake, 
Crawford Co. 

Ralph Heidler, Fairview, Erie Co. 

Harold Johnson, Port Allegany, Mc- 
Kean Co. 

W. M. Makowski, Elysburg, Col. Co. 

C. D. Hornberger, Elysburg, Col. Co. 

Wm. H. Dimmick, Elysburg, Col. Co. 

Clarence Kreischer, Catawissa, Col. 
Co. 

Walter Kuziak, Catawissa, Col. Co. 

Howard M. Johnson, Catawissa, Col. 
Co. 



Th 



ere Is 




Ti 



me 



To Apply Potash 



Potatoes are greedy feeders on potash and remove from 
the soil more of this plant-food element than both nitrogen 
and phosphoric acid combined. If at planting time you did 
not apply fertilizer containing enough potash to insure 
profitable yields, there is still time to apply more. Side- 
dress with muriate of potash at the rate of 100-200 lbs. per 
acre. The fertilizer should be placed along the row about 
3 inches from the plant and down 2 or 3 inches in the soil. 

Potash not only increases the yield of potatoes, but is 
the plant food which has the greatest influence on improv- 
ing the quality. For a good crop of No. I's, at least 200 lbs. 
of actual potash (K^O) must be available in the soil. To 
make sure just what your soil will supply in the way of 
available plant food without the use of fertilizer, see your 
county agent or experiment station about having your soil 
tested. Then see your fertilizer dealer. You will be sur- 
prised how little it costs to use enough potash for profitable 
yields. 



If we can be of any help to you, 
please write us for free information 
and literature on kow to fertilize 
your crops. 




flmerican Potash Institute, Inc. 



Investment Building 



Washington, D. C. 



24 



THE GUIDE PO'=^T 



June, 1940 



EARLY HISTORY OF THE 

"CAMP POTATO" SITE 

(Continued from page 5) 
that only one or two were inclined to 
stay and carry on farming as activities 
elsewhere seemed much more profit- 
able. So, one by one, these farms be- 
came more or less abandoned. 

Father died in 1903 and mother died 
in 1907, and shortly after that I left the 
farm, returning only on rare occasions. 

"But I always dreamed of the day 
when I might see some public institu- 
tion or other permanent enterprise lo- 
cated there. My hopes were first height- 



ened a number of years ago by the con- 
struction of the Roosevelt Highway, 
and in more recent years, by C.C.C. ac- 
tivities. 

"But little can I say that would ex- 
press my gratitude when I learned, a 
year or so ago, of the establishment of 
'Camp Potato.' No more fitting tribute 
could be paid to those early settlers 
who struggled for the mere existence 
while clearing this land, and then passed 
on — and are all but forgotten — than the 
carrying on of a project such as yours. 

Yours very sincerely 

B. J. Butler" 




The Big Plow at Work 

A 22 inch furrow of virgin soil upside-down — ^Ihe first step in preparing "Camp 
Potato" fields for the seedling plantings. Those who visit the camp this summer 
will be amazed to see the fields to the left of the camp which were in trees this 
time last year, now planted to potatoes. There will be over 6,000 seed varieties 
in this field. 



ERIE COUNTY OUTLOOK 

Director Chas. H. Frey, of Girard, re- 
ports that in both Erie and Crawford 
County the bulk of the early varieties 
have had a little too much early rain 
and have been somewhat weedy be- 
cause they have been too wet to work. 



Few late potatoes have been planted 
(by June 14th), but are now being plant- 
ed ten days to two weeks late, where 
soils are sufficiently dry. 

In many sections of these counties the 
season has been more dry, and here the 
Cobblers and Chippewas are looking 
and growing fine. 



EUREKA LOW TANK SPRAYERS 




The Eureka has the latest in Sprayer developments, designed by men with long 
Sprayer experience. 

Equipped with or without engines and with power take-off for high pressures. 
Supplied with various styles of spray booms and with spray guns for fruit. 

Endorsed by leading growers. 

EUREKA MOWER CO., Utica, N. Y.. 



Modern Marketing Methods 
Call for Paper Bags 

Attractively Printed Bags Bring Repeat Orders 

HAMMOND Betterbags 

Combine High Grade Printing with 
Essential Strength and Quality 




Hammond Bag & Paper Company 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Paper Bags for Lime, Limestone, Fertilizer, Flour, Feed and Potatoes 









26 



THE GUIDE POST 



June, 1940 



LYC. CO. VOC. AG. STUDENTS 

ASSIST IN BREEDING WORK 

(Continued from page 18) 

Previous to 1940, a few Lycoming 
County Future Farmers had visited 
"Camp Potato." This year, on learning 
that most of the experimental work was 
to be concentrated at the camp, it was 
planned to have groups from all the 
nine chapters of Future Farmers in 
Lycoming County visit "Camp Potato" 
sometime during the season. 

To date, three chapters have had 
groups make this worth-while excur- 
sion, comprising 25 boys, 15 from Hep- 
burnville, and 5 each from Montours- 
ville and Montgomery. 

By first-hand active participation, 
they have learned of some of the varied 
activities at the camp, have learned 
something of plant breeding work, and 
have had an enjoyable outing at the 
same time. 

All in all, it is a fine and profitable 
trip for any group to make, with just 
the right mixture of work, learning and 
play. • 

(Editor's Note: Mr. Carey's three 
groups of Lycoming County Future 
Farmers visited "Camp Potato" during 
the opening week of the camp, and these 
boys took part in the planting of many 
hundreds of seedlings. The complete list 
of boys in these three groups includes: 
In the Hepburn Chapter: — Russell 
Beach, Glenn Beach, Willard Dangle, 
Meredith Ludwig, Floyd Ulman, Arthur 
Ulman (father of Floyd) William Um- 
stead, William Beach, Allen Isbell, Rich- 
ard Horn, Bruce Bartley, and CJeorge 
Seitzer, all of Cogan Station; Don Lud- 
wig and Robert Bower, both of Hep- 
burnville, and their instructor, D. E. 
Woomer, of Williamsport. In the Mont- 
gomery Chapter: — Robert Tallman, 
Harold Johnson, John La Forme, of 
Montgomery, and Stanley Feoster, of 
Allenwood. Luther C. Rahauser, Ad- 
viser for this group, of Montgomery. In 
the Montoursville Chapter: — Herbert 
Hoover, Montour; Clayton Garver, Carl 
Wetzler and Mark Harrison, of Mon- 
toursville; and Chas. D. Carey, County 
Adviser, Williamsport.) 



ALLEN SELL, NEFFS, DIES 

Allen Sell, outstanding local Associa- 
tion Grade Supervisor and member of 
the Association, died at his home at 



Neffs, Penna., on June 1st, of a com- 
plication of diseases, following an illness 
of several months' duration. 

Mr. Sell, the late son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Fred N. Sell, of Schnecksville, was 26 
years, 6 months and 7 days old at the 
time of his death, and is survived by 
his wife and two small daughters, 
Carolyn, aged 6, and Catherine, aged 2. 

Mr. Sell was raised in Lehigh County, 
and for a number of years was employed 
by the Trexler Farms, at Schnecksville. 
For the past four years he had been em- 
ployed by Mr. Clinton J. Geiger, at 
Neffs, and it was in this position that he 
became a Grade Supervisor on Decem- 
ber 10th, 1936. 

Mr. Sell was a Deacon at the Heidel- 
burg Church at Saegersville, Penna. 

The Association deeply regrets his 
untimely death, and expresses deep 
sympathy to his bereaved family. 

DEATH TAKES JENS JACOBSEN 

It was with profound sorrow that 
members of this Association and their 
staff, learned of the death, on May 13th, 
of Jens Jacobsen, of Girard, Penna. 

Mr. Jacobsen was a dealer in farm 
machinery and a blacksmith, and his 
sympathies and endeavors were always 
exercised in the interests of agriculture 
and the farm. 

It was the farmers' privilege to work 
with him at his best and to share his 
friendship through it all, and his service 
to Erie County potato growers had much 
to do with the advancement of the in- 
dustry in his locality. 

We extend our heartfelt sympathy to 
those for whom his passing will leave 
a place impossible to fill. 



Jiggs: If a man married a widow by 
the name of Elizabeth, who had one 
child, what does he have? 

Briggs: I don't know. What does he 
have? 

Jiggs: A second hand Lizzie and a 
runabout. 

Every man carries with him the world 
in which he must live. 



1 




SPRAYING is a battle of grim necessity — a 
fight to protect what you grow against insidi- 
ous attacks from bugs, blights, insects and fungus 
pests. The tiny foe is merciless — your spray 
equipment must not fail. Whatever your spray 
requirements, it pays to remember that MYERS 
Spray Pumps are thoroughly practical fighting tools, 
built to exactly fit the job for which they are in- 
tended. Three generations of American growers 
have learned to depend on MYERS sprayers for 
effective, reliable, economical service. The MYERS 
line is the largest and most complete in the world. 
It includes everything from the biggest power spray 
rigs down to the smallest hand outfits. Catalog 
free on request. 

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IV/SI'^^ Iff Ip) ^S ' ' P>"«P Builders Since 1870" 

UVU M l&lr^^9 : flp^^=^ 



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Gun sprayers, boom sprayers and 
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powered, tractor powered, trac- 
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sprayers. "Wheeled sprayers, sta- 
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sprayers, knapsack and com- 
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Send free information on items checJccd „.„„,. ^-„i« 

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Name. 



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i^if^ 



28 



THE GUIDE POST 



June, 1940 



DR. E. L. NIXON SEVERS 

CONNECTION WITH COLLEGE 

(Continued from page 20) 

tion of his dreams for such a place for 
the breeding work. 

In 1932, Dr. Nixon was given the 
unique distinction of being made an 
honorary member of the Philadelphia 
Society for the Promotion of Agricul- 
ture, the oldest agricultural society in 
America. 

Since those first days, back in 1917, 
Dr. Nixon has heeded the call of every 
need in the potato industry of Pennsyl- 
vania, having only the rural peoples' 



interests at heart. It is not surprising, 
then that he accepted this new post 
which encourages him to further his 
activity in their behalf, and render one 
of his greatest service to his constituen- 
cy. 

Hundreds of growers who have fol- 
lowed him, and who have endorsed his 
program, in toto, and who owe to him 
the successes they have enjoyed from 
his patient preachments, join the staff 
and Directors of this Association in 
wishing him every happiness and oppor- 
tunity in his new work, and in thanking 
him for his sincerity and loyalty in mak- 
ing this change in their behalf. 




A few of the more prominent new seedling selections. You will notice that 
some are considerably elongated while others are oval or disc shaped or spheri- 
cal like a baseball. This group of potatoc^s was placed before growers and con- 
sumers and records made as to preferences for culinary purposes. In breeding 
potatoes, not only any shape but almost any color or combination of color can 
be had. In addition to this, there is a great range of quality when placed in the 
skillet. 



SPRAY and DUST 



with 



t 



MILLARD MODERN LLMES 



Rotary Kiln Products 



Crop Protection 



Service 



Reasonable Cost 



H. E. MILLARD 



Phone 7-3231 



Annville, Pa. 




# Engine-equipped sprayers 
to spray from 2 to 10 rows; 
Tractor Trailers powered by 
tractor engine for 4 to 10 rows; 
truck-mounted row sprayers 
with and without truck power 
take-off for 8 to 10 rows. There 
is a specialized Hardie row 



sprayer for your particular job 
whatever your acreage may- 
demand. Sold and serviced by 
leading dealers everywhere. 
Write for the Hardie Row Crop 
Sprayer Catalog. The Hardie 
Mfg. Company, Hudson, Mich. 



EDINBORO F.F.A. WILL GROW 

POTATO VARIETIES 

(Continued from page 19) 

technique. Vocational education is a 
practical type of education whereby 
the pupil has an opportunity to par- 



ticipate and actually earn as he learns. 
This is a favorable factor since we are 
striving to become economically effi- 
cient, and socially fitted to assume our 
proper relationship within the com- 
munity. The Future Farmers of Ameri- 
ca are now at work. 



ent^^ SPRAYERS 



30 



THE GUIDE POST 



June, 1940 



JAMES L. ZELLERS 

(Continued from page 8) 

of one of the Stewartstown groups 
which included sixteen growers who 
had a total of IOV2 acres. This group 
purchased a traction sprayer coopera- 
tively. The number of applications var- 
ied from two to five. Only three growers, 
W. O. H. Keesey, W. B. Kearns, and 
J. P. O. Keesey, sprayed their crop five 
times. The average increase per acre, 
as a result of spraying, for the entire 
group was 27 bushels, or 24.8%. Mr. 
Zellers was chairman of this group and 
the total membership included the fol- 
lowing: 

"J. L. Zellers, C. M. Johnson, C. 
A. Webb, C. W. Liggitt, J. W. Lanius, 
John Fulton, Russell Hersey, Howard 
Fishel, H. P. Stitely, E. J. Sweitzer, J. 
P. O. Keesey, W. B. Kearns, J. C. Trout, 
W. O. H. Keesey and Foster Keesey. 

"The spraying was done by C. H. Gor- 
man, who was then a student at The 
Pennsylvania State College. Each grow- 
er furnished his team to spray his own 
crop and to transport the sprayer to the 
next growers* farm. Home-made Bor- 
deaux made up on the formula 8-8-100 
was used exclusively for spraying. The 
average application was about 100 gal- 
lons per acre. At least four unsprayed 
rows were left in each field to be used 
as a basis for determining the amount 
of increased yield due to spraying. At 
the end of the season, some of these 
unsprayed rows were dug for compari- 
son with an equal area of sprayed rows. 
In addition to a monthly wage rate, 
which was paid to the man operating 
the equipment, he also received a bonus 
on the number of bushels per acre of 
increased yield on each farm." 

Funeral services were held from Mr. 
Zellers' late home at Stewartstown, on 
April 14, 1940, with the Rev. Chas. B. 
Roley, of Calvary Methodist Church, 
Stewartstown, officiating, with the text, 
*'God is Love." 

The membership joins the staff in an 
expression of deep sympathy to the 
members of the family of the deceased. 



SOME OBSERVATIONS AT 

"CAMP POTATO" 

(Continued from page 15) 

Roy Dahlgren, Lawrence Sines, Calvin 
White, Merle Swartzentruber, Harlen 



POTATO CHIPS 

(Continued from page 13) 

years later our own Horace Greely made 
the following classic statement along 
the same vein of thought; "Fame is va- 
por, popularity an accident, riches take 
wings, those who cheer today will curse 
tomorrow, only one thing endures — 
character." 



■D- 



"DAFFYNITIONS" 

RECESSION — A time in which you 
tighten up your belt. 

DEPRESSION — A time in which you 
have no belt to tighten. 

PANIC — A time when you have no 
pants to hold up. 

ARCHIVES — Place where Noah kept 
his bees. 

BORE — A man who talks about him- 
self when you want to talk about your- 
self. 

BUTTRESS — A female goat. 

CANNIBAL — One who loves his fel- 
low men. 

COLLEGE EDUCATION — Some- 
thing which never hurts anybody who 
is willing to learn something afterwards. 

CONSULT — To seek another's ap- 
proval of a course already decided upon. 
FLIRT — A hit-and-run lover. 
CYPHER — A bottle that squirts. 
OASIS — A futile spot in a desert. 
SENATOR — Half horse, half man. 

STETHOSCOPE — A spy-glass for 
looking into people's chests with your 
ears. 

POLITICAL ECONOMY — The sci- 
ence which teaches us to get the great- 
est benefit with the least amount of 
honest labor. 

MONOTONY — Christians are allow- 
ed only one wife. 

"Bill" Shakespud 



Stall, John Fitzwater, Billie Welch and 
John Schlorsnagle, all of Oakland, 
Maryland; Harold Beckman, Junior 
Reckman and Wells Bioy, of Swanton, 
Maryland; Jasper F. Bowman, of Crel- 
lin, Maryland; and William Truban and 
Walter Cooper, of Garmania, West 
Virginia.) 



Bean Potato Sprayers 




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^ BETTER QUALITY . NO WORRIES . MAKE MONEY 

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prSecfs you ag^nst excessive spraying costs, low yield, delays in spray- 

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^'^ttllnrorSp-ssuTe potato sprayers offer a variety of price and 
sizes that will meet your requirements, that you can afford to invest m, 
and that wTll come back to you in savings in a larger and better crop. 




(ii 



1 



RUBBER SPOOL GRADER 

Cleans as it grades. Does not bruise or cut the potatoes All grading is 
done on rubbef Much more accurate and when you are fimshed grading 
you have a fine looking pack that will sell. 

Investigate this Grader at once. 

John Bean Mfg. Co. 



Division Food Machinery Corporation 



LANSING 



MICHIGAN 



\ 









30 



THE GUIDE POST 



l^tei 



June, 1940 



JAMES L. ZELLERS 



(Continued from page 8) 

of one of the Stewartstown groups 
which included sixteen growers who 
had a total of IOV2 acres. This group 
purchased a traction sprayer coopera- 
tively. The number of applications var- 
ied from two to five. Only three growers, 
W. O. H. Keesey, W. B. Kearns, and 
J. P. O. Keesey, sprayed their crop five 
times. The average increase per acre, 
as a result of spraying, for the entire 
group was 27 bushels, or 24.8%. Mr. 
Zellers was chairman of this group and 
the total membership included the fol- 
lowing: 

"J. L. Zellers, C. M. Johnson, C. 
A. Webb, C. W. Liggitt, J. W. Lanius, 
John Fulton, Russell Hersey, Howard 
Fishel, H. P. Stitely, E. J. Sweitzer, J. 
P. O. Keesey, W. B. Kearns, J. C. Trout, 
W. O. H. Keesey and Foster Keesey. 

"The spraying was done by C. H. Gor- 
man, who was then a student at The 
Pennsylvania State College. Each grow- 
er furnished his team to spray his own 
crop and to transport the sprayer to the 
next growers' farm. Home-made Bor- 
deaux made up on the formula 8-8-100 
was used exclusively for spraying. The 
average application was about 100 gal- 
lons per acre. At least four unsprayed 
rows were left in each field to be used 
as a basis for determining the amount 
of increased yield due to spraying. At 
the end of the season, some of these 
unsprayed rows were dug for compari- 
son with an equal area of sprayed rows. 
In addition to a monthly wage rate, 
which was paid to the man operating 
the equipment, he also received a bonus 
on the number of bushels per acre of 
increased yield on each farm." 

Funeral services were held from Mr. 
Zellers' late home at Stewartstown, on 
April 14, 1940, with the Rev. Chas. B. 
Roley, of Calvary Methodist Church, 
Stewartstown, officiating, with the text, 
"God is Love." 

The membership joins the staff in an 
expression of deep sympathy to the 
members of the family of the deceased. 



POTATO CHIPS 

(Continued from page 13) 

years later our own Horace Greely made 
the following classic statement along 
the same vein of thought; "Fame is va- 
por, popularity an accident, riches take 
wings, those who cheer today will curse 
tomorrow, only one thing endures — 
character." 



SOME OBSERVATIONS AT 

"CAMP POTATO" 

(Continued from page 15) 

Roy Dahlgren, Lawrence Sines, Calvin 
White, Merle Swartzentruber, Harlen 



■Q 



"DAFFYNITIONS" 

RECESSION — A time in which you 
tighten up your belt. 

DEPRESSION — A time in which you 
have no belt to tighten. 

PANIC — A time when you have no 
pants to hold up. 

ARCHIVES — Place where Noah kept 
his bees. 

BORE — A man who talks about him- 
self when you want to talk about your- 
self. 

BUTTRESS — A female goat. 

CANNIBAL — One who loves his fel- 
low men. 

COLLEGE EDUCATION — Some- 
thing which never hurts anybody who 
is willing to learn something afterwards. 

CONSULT — To seek another's ap- 
proval of a course already decided upon. 

FLIRT — A hit-and-run lover. 

CYPHER — A bottle that squirts. 

OASIS — A futile spot in a desert. 

SENATOR — Half horse, half man. 

STETHOSCOPE — A spy-glass for 
looking into people's chests with your 
ears. 

POLITICAL ECONOMY — The sci- 
ence which teaches us to get the great- 
est benefit with the least amount of 
honest labor. 

MONOTONY — Christians are allow- 
ed only one wife. 

"Bill" Shakespud 



Stall, John Fitzwater, Billie Welch and 
John Schlorsnagle, all of Oakland, 
Maryland; Harold Beckman, Junior 
Reckman and Wells Bioy, of Swanton, 
Maryland; Jasper F. Bowman, of Crel- 
lin, Maryland; and William Truban and 
Walter Cooper, of Garmania, West 
Virginia.) 



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Investigate this Grader at once. 

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CMWfAS 



JULY • I940 

PuJduked luf, ike 

PENNSYLVANIA COOPERATIVE 
POTATO GROWERS ASSOCIATION 




INCORPORATED 




I 



SUMMER ACTIVITIES 



99 



Open House At "CAMP POTATO 

State- Wide Meeting 

AUGUST 21st 



SOUTH EASTERN FIELD DAY— JULY 30th 

Hugh McPherson farm, Bridgeton (York County) 9:00 A.M. 
Jacob K. Mast farm, Elverson (Chester County) 9:00 A. M. 
Hershey Estates, Hershey, Penna., 12:00 Noon. 

EASTERN FIELD DAY— JULY 3l8t 
Robert Getz farm, KresgeviUe, (Monroe County) 9:00 A. M. 
Harry K. Roth farm, Moorestown, (Northampton County) 11 A. M. 

NORTH BRANCH FIELD DAY— AUGUST Ist 
A. D. Knorr farm, near Numidia (Columbia County) 9: 00 A. M. 

CENTRAL FIELD DAY— AUGUST 2nd 
John B Schrack farm, Loganton (Clinton County) 9:00 A.M. 

Future Farmers of America farm, . x , , «« a n/r 

Jersey Shore (Lycoming County) 11 : 00 A. M. 

SOUTH WESTERN FIELD DAY— AUGUST 13th 

Claud Bauermaster farm, Berlin (Somerset County) 9:00 A. M. 

WEST CENTRAL FIELD DAY— AUGUST 14th 
Yahner Brothers farm, Patton (Cambria County) 9:00 A.M. 
P.L.Leiden farm, St. Lawrence (Cambria County) 10:00 A.M. 

WESTERN FIELD DAY— AUGUST 15th 

J A Donaldson farm, Emlenton (Venango County) 9:00 A.M. 
Thos. Denniston farm, Slippery Rock (Butler County) 12: 00 Noon. 

NORTH WESTERN FIELD DAY— AUGUST 16th 

Erie County Future Farmers of America Seedling Project on the 

C. W. Billings farm, Edinboro (Erie County) 9:00 A. M. 

JUNIOR POTATO GROWERS— BOYS AND GIRLS 

Ages 9-14 inclusive— at "CAMP POTATO" 

AUGUST 18lh-2l8t 

SONS OF POTATO GROWERS 

Ages 18-80 inclusive at "CAMP POTATO" 

AUGUST 21st to 26th 

Detailed description oj activities on pages 16 and 17. 

All times given are Eastern Standard Time. 



Dr. Nixon Comments on Practical Potato 

Storage Construction 

It took 19 bags of cement to construct 19 bags of cement .$16.00 

"Camp Potato. ^^ 2^ 4's— 12 ft. long 30.00 

It took four nine hour days of ten j j^^g ^f ^^jjs 4.00 

men (including myself) to lay the walls, g„ ^^ diameter, cut from the 

erect the rafters, sheet and roof the ^^'^„P ^s 

storage— in other words to construct , ^j gter for plates, 

the storage complete not countmg the ^S^ft^poles b^ m^a^^^ 

excavation. , jj j «^-,, 

open market was: — ""^ ^'^ 



^ 




'^'om-ym 



-™— -^^^pv ^vmp^ ^9WtF ^^^V^J^^Hv «Hug^ -M^^ ^^ II I II I ^^ ^^ ^^ ^W^ ^■r ^MP ^^B 4^ml .— Z:---^ ^ ^^ ^^HR-**!* ^» «* ^ „ ^L» 



^ Mil Mil mt '^^'^^"^^"^^^^rvi^-^^.mmm 



"''««w«s? 








PUrina the straw in olace on the storage of Everett Blass, Coudersport, Potter 
Coun?v As y?u wilTnote this job was done before the roof was put on. This saved 
Srlnd uVor n doubtful\f he will need to replace the straw for six or eight 
yeTrs^ the storage is allowed to dry out thoroughly during the summer. 



Total needed cash outlay— $220. and 
no cents, but some sense. 

What did it construct? The storage 
at "Camp Potato" holds nicely 12,000 
bushels of potatoes— and it's cost, pay- 
ing for everything (exclusive of the 
excavating) at the market price would 
barely cross the three hundred dollar 
mark. 



There has been so much mysticism put 
in storages and storage construction 
along the line of impracticalities that 
potato growers have been scared away 
from building storages— yet this is one 
of the most vital needs of the industry 
today. 

(Continued on page 26) 






THE GUIDE POST 



July, 1940 



July, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 







The straw loft storage on the farm of Austin Donaldson, near Emlenton. Venango 
Sunt A practical and economical storage that keeps potatoes in ideal condition 
for packing and for market. 





Interior view of the Austin Donaldson storage showing construction. Second hand 
lumber can be utilized in construction as there is no excess moisture to cause rapid 
rotting of rafters and other parts. 



Timely Observations and Suggestions 

L. T. Denniston 
Asssociation Field Representative 



This is the first of July. Pennsyl- 
vania potato crop prospects are equal to 
if not better at this date than any year 
since 1927. There are exceptions to this 
in some sections and with individual 
growers but if the State as a whole is 
taken into account the above statement 
will hold its ground. Stands in general 
are good even to including the small 
garden and farm patch. Stands to the 
East will average better than those m 
the Western Counties. There are a few 
wet areas in some fields that did not sur- 
vive the heavy rains or wet conditions 
during or immediately following plant- 
ing There are a few fields where the 
stands are thin but here again these 
are the exception. 

Moisture and growing conditions were 
nearly ideal for rapid growth, most too 
ideal, during June. Due to the moist 
cool conditions it is doubtful if potatoes 
have ever bloomed as prolifically in 
Pennsylvania as they have this year. 
Another reaction to the cool moist con- 
ditions has been the early rapid setting 
of tubers. 

Just as surely as crop conditions are 
so favorable as of July 1st do we face 
disaster if we should have a continua- 
tion of wet conditions through July. 
This will bring with it a Late Blight 
epidemic that will mean disaster to 
many a field and trying circumstances 
to even the best grower unless a real 
job has been done in applying the first 
sprays. An old saying passed down 
from some years back has it that, three 
inches of rain fall during July will be 
followed by Late Blight." We now face 
July with having had anywhere from 
three to five inches of rain fall in ail 
parts of the state during the month ot 
June Growers who are wise will be 
making up, during these early days ot 
Julv for failure due to wet conditions or 
otherwise to make the needed sprays 
during past weeks. 

Still another serious situation may 
face us. Just the opposite of the above. 
It can be equally disastrous to many 
a grower. Dry and hot. There is an- 
other old saying that I heard repeated 
a number of times last week— one ex- 
treme is generally followed by another. 
Due to the rapid succulent growth of the 



tops during the past weeks it would 
take some time for many plantings to ad- 
just themselves to such a changed con- 
dition. Here is a place where deep plant- 
ing will show its worth as such planted 
fields will not suffer so severely. Fields 
containing an abundance of humus will 
also come through better. The grower 
can help by refraining from deep cul- 
tivation if dry and hot is to be the order 
of the day. 

In either event, continued wet or dry 
and hot, thorough spraying is in order 
and will pay the best dividend of any 
operation from now until digging time 
It might be well to add that dry hot 
weather is no time to pull weeds out ot 
the potato rows. 

FUTURE FARMERS JUDGE SEED 
POTATOES: In spite of a most busy 
time in carrying forward the program of 
the Association, particularly the plant- 
ing of seedlings at Camp Potato, we 
found time to arrange the annual seed 
potato judging contest for the Future 
Farmers Annual Conference at State 
College, June 12th. The following letter 
from Henry S. Brunner, head of the de- 
partment of agricultural education is 
an expression of appreciation to the As^ 
sociation for its assistance. Also listed 
below are the first ten winners in the 
contest. A number of these boys are 
sons of prominent potato growers and 
members of the Potato Growers Associ- 
ation. 

My dear Mr. Denniston: 

Enclosed you will find check for 
$9 50 in accordance with the ac- 
count you rendered for expenses of 
conducting the Future Farmers po- 
tato judging contest. 

Please be assured that we are 
very grateful to you and the As- 
sociation for assistance in this work. 
Your willingness to go to the trouble 
to make these arrangements is 
worth much more than we could re- 
pay in dollars and cents. The con- 
test is one of the most satisfactory 
we have and we sincerely hope that 
we may count upon your continued 
assistance. 

Very truly yours, 

Henry S. Brunner 



6 



THE GUIDE POST 



July, 1940 



t 



July, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



The ten winning contestants were as 
follows: 

Lester Kline, Washington Twp., Vo- 
cational School, Franklin County; John 
Rubisch, Ebensburg Vocational School, 
Cambria County; Paul Orner, Sugar 
Valley Vocational School, Clinton 
County; John Pardee, Cambridge 
Springs Vocational School, Crawford 
County; W. Cougher, Polk Twp. Voca- 
tional School, Monroe County; Clair 
McCarl, Stoneboro Vocational School, 
Mercer County; John Heckert, Lower 
Mahoney Vocational School, North- 
umberland County; Paul Mosteller, 



Stoney Creek Twp. Vocational School, 
Somerset County; John Yarmosh 
Green-Dreher Vocational School, 
Wayne County; Sherman Barnes, New 
Enterprise Vocational School, Bedford 
County. 

NATIONAL POTATO CHIP INSTI- 
TUTE MEETS AT BEDFORD: I as- 
sume that all potato growers have at 
some time eaten freely of delicious po- 
tato chips. A good percentage of grow- 
ers no doubt have heard or know of cer- 
tain brands or packs put up by a certain 
manufacturer. I doubt however, if few 
growers have any idea to what extent 




The first step— the olanting of the seedlings— 202 of them— by the Erie County 
F F A. under the supervision of Norman P. Manners. Left to right are: Lawrence 
Hermann, Samuel Lewis, Harold Mack, Aaron McCombs, Supervisor Manners and 
Joseph Whiteman. 



the potato chip industry has developed 
in recent years. While it is true that 
Pennsylvania is a leader in the business 
of chip making with a number of the 
largest plants in the entire country, yet 
the manufacture of tasty potato chips is 
nation wide in scope with large factories 
scattered throughout the country. 

On June 14th and 15th the National 
Potato Chip Institute an organization 
made up of Potato Chip Manufacturers 
held their Summer Convention at Bed- 
ford Springs, Pa. The meeting was well 
attended and packed full of intensely in- 
teresting discussion. A discussion of 
Pennsylvania's Potato Program as it is 
being carried forward by the State Po- 



tato Growers Association was well re- 
ceived by the group, particularly the 
aims and efforts of the Camp Potato pro- 
ject in working for new and better po- 
tato varieties. A contribution has since 
been received by the Association from 
the Chip Institute as an expression of 
their interest and support of this work. 

Some of the more vital problems com- 
ing before the conference were: Pure 
Food Laws, Salesmanship, Advertising, 
Packages and Packaging, Distribution, 
Problem of the Chiseler, Potatoes Suit- 
able for Chipping, and Problems of Or- 
ganization. 

(Continued on page 24) 



t 



POTATO CHIPS 



The potato market has been weaken- 
ing of late because of shipments of from 
800 to 1100 cars a day, which is more 
than the terminals can absorb regularly, 
in addition to truck shipments, without 
a weakened demand. Shipments of all 
new potatoes to July first is slightly 
greater than during the previous year 
to the same date, which because of the 
late start of the season in all sections has 
meant a gradual catching up this year. 
It would be impossible to suppose that 
the market would be anything but con- 
siderably lower when the Pennsylvania 
crop is ready (digging a few early plant- 
ed stock in Lancaster County now) to 
be harvested in commercial quantities, 
unless some unusual condition should 
set in over a widespread area to reduce 
prospects considerably. 

Although some growers report pota- 
toes all growing to vines with few po- 
tatoes setting, the prospects look very 
favorable for a large c^op of good 
quality in Pennsylvania— EXCLPiii 
is a year when everything is all set for 
the worse dose of Blight that we ever 
experienced for the growers who do not 
spray properly or sufficiently. So far 
it has been a year of luxuriant growth 
of plant growth and that also means 
luxuriant growth of diseases. Scab on 
fruit trees as well as other fungus dis- 
eases and rots of fruit, vegetable and 
plant growth is reported to be much 
more common than usual this year. A 
word to the wise is sufficient. Don t be 
caught napping. Keep the old sprayer 
working overtime and leave no stone 
unturned in doing a thorough job. 

Quitters never win; winners never 
quit, cooperate— remember the banana; 
every time it leaves the bunch it gets 
skinned. 

Did you ever know how much fer- 
tility a 300 bushel yield of potatoes took 
out of your soil? According to the 
American Potash Institute a 300 bushel 
yield will reduce the fertility of an acre 
by 125 lbs. of nitrogen, 35 lbs. of phos- 
phoric acid, and 170 lbs. of potash A lack 
of potash is indicated by a dark green 
color, which looks attractive, but a light, 
brighter green is more indicative of the 
properly balanced plant ration. 



We read the item in the last issue of 
the Guide Post about Doctor Nixon re- 
signing from the State College staff with 
a feeling that the College has lost a man 
very difficult to replace and that the 
Pennsylvania potato industry has gain- 
ed the greater services of the Doctor, 
even though his new title happens to be 
some high-faluting thing about "Agri- 
cultural Counsel for the Pennsylvania 
Chain Store Assn." Any one who knows 
the Doc also knows that potatoes are 
his first and foremost love and that the 
potnto industry will not be neglected. 



Recently looking over a Chicago paper 
and ran across an editorial which struck 
me as having considerable more to it 
than the ink with which it was printed. 
It may be a little too long to be called 
a CHIP but is well worth printing here. 
"Despite a couple of unfavorable court 
decisions in its tangle with the Federal 
Trade Commission, A & P seems to have 
struggled through a fair-to-middling 
sort of a year. Its sales for the 12 -month 
period ending February 29, 1940 were 
$990,358,339 as compared with only 
$878,972,184 for the preceding year- That 
in the vernacular is quite a hatful of 
lettuce. 

What about profits? Well, A & P kept 
out of the red all right. After paying 
taxes, allowing for depreciation and 
meeting other charges there was $18,- 
663,571 left. The year before profits 
were $15,883,783. Not too bad a record. 

Naturally A & P will be attacked on 
the strength of the huge sales and 
profits. The "octopus" will be pictured 
as more menacing than ever before. 
There'll be talk of captive dollars 
squeezed out of a thousand small towns 
being dragged in chains, may we say to 
Wall Street. For it's still a cardinal sin 
in the eyes of a considerable number of 
people to grow big and be successful. 

In the meantime it may be found that 
so-called independents in the groceries 
field grew stronger and sold a bigger 
part of all the groceries sold last year 
than they had merchandised before. The 
last decade has seen a revolution in food 
distribution methods in this country, 

(Continued on page 20) 



8 



THE GUIDE POST 



July, 1940 



t 



July, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



9 



THE GUIDE POST 

Published monthly by the Pennsylvania 
Cooperative Potato Growers, Inc. 

OFFICERS 

J. A. Donaldson, Emlenton . . President 
Roy R. Hess, Stillwater . . . .Vice-Pres. 

E. B. Bower, Belief onte, 

Sec*y-Treas. and Gen. Mgr. 



DIRECTORS 

Jacob K. Mast Elverson, Chester 

P. Daniel Franlz Coplay, Lehigh 

Hugh McPherson Bridgeton, York 

John B. Schrack Loganton, Clinton 

Roy R. Hess Stillwater, Columbia 

Ed. Fisher Coudersport, Potter 

Charles Frey North Girard, Erie 

J. A. Donaldson, R.l, Emlenton, Venango 
R. W. Lohr Boswell, Somerset 

Annual membership fee $1.00. This in- 
cludes the Guide Post. 

All communications should be ad- 
dressed to E. B. Bower, Secretary-Treas- 
urer and General Manager, Bellefonte, 
Pennsylvania. 



DAYS OF JULY 

For each and every joyful thing, 
For twilight swallows on the wing, 
For all that nest and all that sing, — 



• !■• .».• 



For fountains cool that laugh and leap. 
For rivers running to the deep, 
For happy, care-forgetting sleep, — 

For stars that pierce the sombre dark, 

For morn, awaking with the lark, 

For life new-stirring 'neath the bark, — 

For sunshine and the blessed rain, 
For budding grove and blossomy lane. 
For the sweet silence of the plain, — 

For bounty springing from the sod, 
For every step by beauty trod, — 
For each dear gift of joy, thank God! 

— Florence Earl Coates 



Plan to Attend Summer 
Activities of the Association 

The most intensive program of sum- 
mer meetings, outings and tours ever yet 
scheduled for a single season for Penn- 
sylvania growers is given m this issue 
of the GUIDE POST. 

These meetings have been planned 
entirely for your benefit and pleasure, 
and have been scheduled with great 
care, in order that each grower will have 
a sectional meeting near enough to his 
own farm that he will not need to miss 
it. 

By all means, go over the program to- 
day, and set aside the days on which 
meetings will be held near you, so that 
you can be present — without fail. 

Without question, then, all members 
should definitely reserve Wednesday, 
August 21st, irrespective of their section, 
for the State-wide Open House at 
"Camp Potato." You owe it to yourself 
and your families to visit the Camp on 
this occasion. It is being planned as the 
highlight in the history of the Camp. 

At this early date (July 16th) pro- 
grams for none of these meetings are 
entirely filled, but by their respective 
dates, we assure you they will provide 
you with full days of profitable pleasure. 

Make these dates now! And see your 
fellow-members from the entire State at 
"Camp Potato" on August 21st. 



Will You Have a 
Four Hundred Bushel 

Acre This Year? 

With the Pennsylvania crop of pota- 
toes fast becoming an actuality, we here 
at the Association office are beginning to 
wonder how many growers this year 
will make a 400-Bushel acre yield or 
better. 

It is not too early for you growers to 
give this possibility for your own yield 
some serious thought, and to familiar- 
ize yourself again with the Association 
regulations for the administration of 
the Club. 

(Continued on page 28) 



T, 



Comments by Doctor Nixon on ''Harry and 

the Guide Post" 



(From McGuffeifs Third Reader) 



There are a large number of Pennsyl- 
vania potato growers who are menjbers 
of the Association and readers of the 
GUIDE POST, who do not know how or 
why the Association paper got its name. 
Well, the idea came from the poem en- 
titled "Harry and the Guide Post 
found in McGuffey's Third Reader, 
which was first published in 1857. 

As I quote the verses, I would like 
with your permission, to write a few of 
the thoughts and ideas that they bring 
to mind. You, no doubt, will have 
others. Ponder on them. It will do you 
good. Note the word picture in the first 
verse: 

"The night was dark, the sun was hid 
Beneath the mountain gray. 
And not a single star appeared 
To shoot a silver ray." 
(Note the action in the second verse 
—the stage is getting all set). 

(2) 

"Across the heath the owlet flew 
And screamed along the blast 
And onward with a quickened step 

Benighted Harry passed!" 
(An owl does not scream— it hoots. 
How do you explain this? Why did Har- 
ry quicken his step? Scared? And when 
scared, look how it effects one, as the 
next two verses indicate) : 

(3) 
"Now in the thickest darkness plunged 
He groped his way to find 
And now he thought he spied beyond, 
A form of horrid kind." 

(4) 

"In deadly white it upward rose 
Of cloak and mantle bare, 
And held its naked arms across 
To catch him by the hair. 
(Did you ever get scared?) 

"Poor Harry felt his blood run cold 

At what before him stood 

But then, thought he, no harm, I m 
sure 

Can happen to the good." 

(Boy if he had set out to run, this 
would have ended the story) . But: 



(6) 



"Calling all his courage up 
He to the monster went, 
And eager through the dismal gloom, 
His piercing eyes he bent." 
(With rain and weeds and blight, it 
takes all our courage— If you run, that 
ends the story.) 

(7) 

"And when he came well nigh the ghost 
That gave him such a fright 
He clapped his hands upon his sides 
And loudly laughed outright." 

(Ninety-five per cent of our worries 
never come to pass. There is no excel- 
lence without great labor, however. The 
admonition to lean on the Lord was in- 
tended for the weary, not the lazy. Some 
of our worst ghosts turn out to be our 
greatest benefactors, as with Harry in 
the next verse) : 

(8) 
"For 'twas a friendly guide-post stood, 
His wandering steps to guide 
And thus he found that to the good 
No evil should betide." 
(And do we learn our lesson as well 
as Harry did?) 

(9) 
"Ah, well, thought he, one thing I've 
learned 
Nor soon shall I forget 
Whatever jrightens me again 
ril march straight up to ?t. 
And when I hear an idle tale — 

(It rained all times, patch got weedy, 
blight got in. I found that you do not 
have to do this, that and the other 
thing- I got by with three sprays, low 
pressure, hydrated lime, dust, poor 
seed, corn stalks, and what not!) 

(10) 
"And when I hear an idle tale, 
Of a monster or a ghost, 
I'll tell of this, my lonely walk 

And one tall, white GUIDE POST." 

(Have you got your new member? 
The GUIDE POST was established for 
his and your good. When right we will 
stand by it, and when wrong we will 
help right it.) 






10 



THE GUIDE POST 



July, 1940 



July. 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



11 



OVER THE PICKING TABLE 



hy Inspector 

Give me the money that has been 

spent in war, and I will clothe every 

man, woman and child in an attire of 

which kings and queens would be 

proud. I will build a schoolhouse in 

every valley over the whole earth. I will 

crown every hillside with a place of 

worship consecrated to the gospel of 

peace. 

— Charles Summer 

• • • 

We have committed the Golden Rule 
to memory; let us now commit it to life. 

We have preached brotherhood for 
centuries; we now need to find a ma- 
terial basis for brotherhood. Govern- 
ment must be made the organ of Fra- 
ternity — a working-form for comrade 
love. 

Think on this — work for this. 

— Edwin Markham 

• • • 

Despise not any man, and do not 
spurn anything; for there is no man that 
has not his hour, nor is there anything 
that has not its place. 

• • • 

*1 know better than to make 
speeches," Pat O'Malley once remark- 
ed. "I am reminded of the famous doc- 
tor who once said: 

'Speeches are like babies — easy to 
conceive but hard to deliver!' " 

• • • 

A Scottish farmer, being elected to 
the school board, visited the village 
school and tested the intelligence of the 
class by the question: 

"Now boys can any of ye tell me what 
naething is?" 

After a moments silence, a small boy 
in the back seat rose. 

"It's what ye gi'd me the ithcr day fer 
holding yer horse." 

• • • 

The old idea of romance: The country 
boy goes to the city, marries his em- 
ployer's daughter, enslaves hundreds of 
his fellow humans, gets rich, and leaves 
a public library to his home town. 

The new idea of romance: To undo 
some of the mischief done by the old 
idea of romance. 



Throwout 

Folks who never do any more than 
they get paid for, never get paid for any 
more than they do. 

• • • 

Man, like Deity, creates in his own 
image. 

When a painter paints a portrait he 
makes two — one of himself and one of 
the sitter. 

If there is a sleazy thread in your 
character you will weave it into the 
fabric you are making. 



Would you have your name smell 
sweet with myrrh of remembrance and 
chime melodiously in the ear of future 
days, then cultivate faith, not doubt, 
and give every man credit for the good 
he does, never seeking to attribute base 
motives to beautiful acts. Acts count. 



The farmer took the man out to the 
field and started him at plowing behind 
two horses. 

Two hours later, the new farmhand 
returned to the house, utterly exhaust- 
ed. The farmer asked him how he was 
getting along. 

"Not getting along at all," snapped 
the new man disgustedly; "how do you 
expect me to hold a plow with two big 
horses trying to pull it away from me 
all the time?' 



i»» 



Among the hybrids the Marx Brothers 
plan to raise on their farm is corn 
crossed with typewriters, producing an 
ear with a little bell attachment which 
will ring when you've reached the end. 

• • • 

A man somewhat the worse, or the 
better, for drink, entered a barber shop 
in a genial mood. 

"What will you have?" asked the bar- 
ber. 

"Oh, give me a haircut, and have one 
yourself," was the generous reply. 

(Continued on page 30) 






Official Regulations and Instructions for Administering 

Pennsylvania's 400-Bushel Club 



The original 400-Bushel Potato Club 
organized in 1922, the first of its kind in 
the United States, contributed much to- 
ward making a real reputation for Penn- 
sylvania. After its abandonment, sev- 
eral years ago, the potato growers began 
to more fully appreciate the stimulus 
it had created for putting into operation 
all the sound cultural practices, so nec- 
essary to produce a quantity, quality 
crop of potatoes, was lacking; that the 
enthusiasm, the fine competitive spirit 
and the good fellowship which such 
competition creates were greatly dimin- 
ished, urged the Association to take 
steps to revive the club. 

Therefore, pursuant to a resolution 
passed by the Board of Directors at a 
meeting held March 24, 1937, reading in 
part as follows: "That the Pennsylvania 
400-Bushel Potato Club be revived, as 
an Association project; that rules for 
certification of eligible membership be 
promulgated by the Association, elimi- 
nating all summary documents, which 
action was subsequently approved by 
the Association at the annual meeting 
held January 17, 1939, reading in part as 
follows: "That regulations be promul- 
gated by the Association and the recom- 
mendation that medals should be given 
to all who earned them, so long as a 
member of the Association, and begin- 
ning at such time as the Association of- 
fice was in position to finance same 
The following regulations and instruc- 
tions for administering Pennsylvania s 
400-Bushel Club are hereby promul- 
gated: 

1 Any Pennsylvania potato grower 
is eligible to make application to Qualify 
for membership in Pennsylvania s 400- 
Bushel Club and to have an acre of po- 
tatoes officially checked. 

2 No summary documents or reports 
shall be required from any grower. 

3 Requests for applications must be 
made to the State office of the Associa- 
tion' O^ , 1^ *u 

a From persons designated by the 
Association residing in the same 
county as the applicant, as desig- 
nated in five (5). 

4 All applications must be signed by 
the applicant in his or her own hand 



writing, in space provided for that pur- 
pose on the application. 

5. The following persons may make 
the official check: 

a. County Agent 

b. County Vocational Supervisor 

c. Vocational Agricultural Instruc- 

d. A competent person designated 
by the Association 

6. Applications for 400-Bushel Club 
membership must be forwarded to the 
office of the Pennsylvania Cooperative 
Potato Growers' Association, Inc., Belle- 
fonte, Pennsylvania. 

In order to be admitted to Club mem- 
bership or be awarded the 400-Bushel 
Club Medal, all applications must reach 
the Association office on or before De- 
cember 1st of each year. 

7 No grower will be awarded the of- 
ficial 400-Bushel Club Medal, unless the 
applicant is: 

a. A member of the Association in 
good standing, for the current 
year in which the application is 

filed, or ^ ,. A 

b. Becomes a member of the As- 
sociation prior to or at the time ot 
filing his or her application: that 
is, not later than December 1st, of 
each year. 

8. The Association will award to 
every grower who has been properly 
qualified and who has met all the above 
requirements, a suitable medal, for the 
following achievements: 

a. A grower who produces 400 or 
more bushels of potatoes on a 
measured acre, without or with 
irrigation, the regular 400-Bushel 
Club Medal. 

b. A grower who produces 500 or 
more bushels of potatoes on a 
measured acre. Medal to be suit- 
ably engraved to designate this 
accomplishment. 

c. A grower who produces 600 or 
more bushels of potatoes on a 
measured acre. Medal to be suit- 
ably engraved to commemorate 
such a feat. 

(Continued on next page) 






12 



THE GUIDE POST 



July, 1940 



Regulations for Checking Yield of Potatoes 

for 400-Bushel Club 



Hints on Locating Best Acre: 

Determine by lay of land, by sampling, 
knowledge of the grower, and character 
of vine growth, where the probable high 
yielding acre lies. 

A few preliminary checks made by 
digging and weighing the potatoes from 



50 ft. of row at different points in the 
acre will reveal fairly accurately 
whether a 400, 500, 600, or 700 bushel 
yield is to be checked. The following 
table gives the necessary pounds from 
50 ft. of row to indicate a yield of 400, 
500, 600, or 700 bushels per acre: 



Length of 


Width of 


400 


500 


600 


700 


check 




row 


bushels 


bushels 


bushels 


bushels 


50 ft. of row 


28 inch rows 


64.4 lbs. 


80.5 lbs. 


96.6 lbs. 


112.7 lbs. 


50 " " " 


29 




66.7 •' 


83.3 " 


100.0 " 


116.7 " 


50 " " " 


30 




69.0 " 


86.2 *' 


103.5 " 


120.7 " 


50 " " " 


31 




71.2 " 


89.0 " 


106.8 " 


124.6 •' 


50 " '' " 


32 




73.5 " 


91.8 " 


110.2 '' 


128.6 " 


50 " " " 


33 




75.7 " 


94.5 '' 


113.5 *' 


132.4 " 


50 " " " 


34 




78.0 " 


97.5 " 


117.0 " 


136.5 " 



Regulations for Checking Acre: 

1. The acre to be checked shall be 
made up of any number of continuous 
equal length rows. 

2. To qualify for a 400 or 500 bushel 
yield at least one tenth of the acre must 
be dug and this area shall include the 
two outside rows of the acre. Equally 
spaced intermediate rows shall be in- 
cluded in the check so that not more 
than ten consecutive undug rows will 
be left in any portion of the acre. 

3. To qualify for a 600 or 700 bushel 
yield the entire acre shall be dug and 
weighed. 

4. Selection of rows to be dug may in- 
clude rows adjacent to, and rows not 
adjacent to sprayer wheel tracks. A 
proportionate number of each shall be 
dug. The number of rows adjacent to, 
and not adjacent to sprayer wheel tracks 
will vary with the size of the spray boom 
used. 

5. Accuracy in measuring and mark- 
ing the acre to be dug, in weighing and 
computing the yield shall be the re- 
sponsibility of the checking Supervisor. 
The Supervisor will consult with and 
check with the grower, who in turn will 
be responsible for providing sufficient 
help and asssitance in digging and 
weighing the potatoes. 



6. All applications, either for Club 
membership or to have the 400-BUSHEL 
MEDAL awarded, (including official 
yields) must be forwarded to the office 
of the Pennsylvania Cooperative Potato 
Growers' Association, Inc., Bellefonte, 
Pennsylvania NOT LATER THAN DE- 
CEMBER FIRST OF EACH YEAR. Ap- 
plications may be forwarded either by 
the grower or the Official Supervisor. 



OFFICIAL REGULATIONS 
AND INSTRUCTIONS 

FOR 400-BUSHEL CLUB 

(Continued from last page) 

d. A grower who produces 400 or 
more bushels of potatoes on a 
measured acre for five (5) con- 
secutive years. A special gold 
medal will be suitably engraved 
to designate this accomplishment. 

e. A grower who produces 700 or 
more bushels of potatoes on a 
measured acre (without irriga- 
tion), a special gold medal will be 
suitably engraved to commemo- 
rate the achievement. 

9. All awards will be made by the As- 
sociation during its sessions held at the 
Pennsylvania Farm Products Show, 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania during the 
month of January of each year. 



July, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



13 



Record of Official Application for Having An 

Acre of Potatoes Checked and/or for 

Qualifying for Membership in 

Pennsylvania's 400-Bushel 

Club 



_19. 



Gentlemen: In accordance with the regulations and instructions promulgated by 
the Association for administering Pennsylvania's 400-Bushel Club 



I, 



.of 



(Signature of applicant in own hand writing) (Post office) 

j^ P J) ^ , Pennsylvania have requested and had 

(County) 

an acre of potatoes checked by . -— ; — ; ^"° "^^ 

dii dK,ic ux p .7 (Name of Official Supervisor) 

performed this service as evidenced by his official report appearing below. I 
understand that any grower who has an acre of potatoes o^^^^i^y j^^^^^^^^^^ 
makes the required yield, thereby becomes a bona fide member of Pennsylvania s 
SSshel Club (see Regulation 1) . It is understood, however, that in order for 
t Club me^^^^^^^ awarded the Official 400-Bushel Club Medal applicable to 

his c^ass Sulation 8) that Regulation 7, parts a. and b., must be fully complied 
with. 

Check one- ( ) I am a member of the Pennsylvania Cooperative Potato 
UhecK one. ^ ; Growers' Association, Inc., in good standing for the current 

( ) I apply hereby for membership in the Association, and my 
dollar membership fee is attached to this application. 

AS A MATTER OF HISTORICAL RECORD: 

In view of the many new varieties being introduced, this yield was made 



Recognizing the possibilities of other 



with . —— ; — 

improvements or 'i?inrvaS\he following departure from the usual practices 

was used: 



OFFICIAL RECORD: , , , 

As suoervisor in the checking of an acre of potatoes for the above named ap- 
As suP*^'^Y " .iA, thnt T have nerformed that serv ce and the yield as stated 

phcant I. hereby cen.fythat^ hav^epertorniea ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ conditions set 

?o'r\Tin th*^ SuatroTaTd iAs'truct^ns, that the Official Association 400-Bushel 
Club Medal, applicable to his class, be awarded as a mark of distmction. 



Yield per acre: 



.bushels. 



Date checked: 



19. 



(Signed) 



Official Supervisor 



-^m^' 



14 



THE GUIDE POST 



July, 1940 



Julv, ]940 



THE GUIDE POST 



15 



Notice to All Local Association Grade Supervisors: 

Change of Supervisor Stamp 



In compliance with a ruling unani- 
mously approved by the Joint Confer- 
ence Committee at its session in Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania, on April 10, 1940, 
the old type local grade supervisor's 
stamp, which has been in use since 1936, 
and which type is now in your posses- 
sion, HAS BEEN REVOKED. This ac- 
tion was taken because this type stamp 
was not clearly legible when imprinted 
on association potato bags. 

To replace this old type unsatisfactory 
stamp we will issue to each grade super- 
visor, a new more legible stamp in ex- 
change for the one now in your posses- 
sion, without any additional cost. Will 
you please mail in to this office your pre- 
sent stamp and we will return immedi- 
ately a new one in exchange. 

Below we show a facsimile of the de- 
sign which will be printed on the bottom 
of all association bags and the exact size 
and type of figures on the new stamp, 




which in the future will be imprinted 
within the outline of the Keystone, as 
shown. 

Pennsylvania Cooperative Potato 

Growers' Association, Inc. 

E. B. Bower, General Manager 



Making the Wheels 

Go Round 

That is what Joe Glick, his good wife 
Mrs. Glick and daughter Mary helped to 
do at Camp Potato during the opening 
days last month and for two weeks fol- 
lowing. The Association Management 
and those responsible for the success of 
Camp Potato and its many activities for 




Joe Glick, Mrs. Glick and daughter 
Mary who snent two weeks at Camp 
Potato assisting with Camp activities 
and the planting of the thousands of 
seedlings. This contribution was made 
possible by Director J. K, Mast. 

the season will ever be indebted for the 
contribution of these people which was 
made possible by Director J. K. Mast, 
Lancaster County. 

The jobs were many, the tasks not 
light, yet they were all done with good 
spirit and narry a grumble. Plowing, 
disking, pulling stones and stumps, 
picking stones and roots, planting, cut- 
ting seed, etc. were the order of the 
day, and some days included all of 
these. 

Expert in handling equipment, Joe 
was indispensible in assisting the man- 
agement at the Camp in making the 
(Continued on page 20) 



) 



4 



I 



ATTENTION 

Important Notice to All Growers Desiring to Participate 
In the Association 1940-1941 Potato Making Program 



Pursuant to a ruling unanimously 
adopted by the Joint Conference Com- 
mittee at its session held in Pittsburgh, 
Pa., April 10th, the following associa- 
tion trade-marked bags have been 
eliminated, as standard packages, for 
the coming season: 

The Red Label 60-pound, U. S. No. 1 
Size B; the Green Label 60-pound, U. S. 
Commercial and the Orange Label 60- 
pound, U. S. No. 2. 

During the same session the advisa- 
bility of establishing a new pack which, 
with the use of the Blue Label 15 and 60- 
pound pack; the Red Label 15-pound 
pack and the Unclassified 60- pound 
pack and the Unclassified 60-pound 
of their entire crop more efficiently and 
economically, was discussed. 

There was general agreement by the 
members in favor of establishing a new 
pack. The chairman appointed a special 
committee of growers and distributors 
to work out the necessary details as to 
grade, design, etc. 

The special committee met at Har- 
risburg. Pa., on May 17th, and unani- 
mously recommended and agreed that 
the grade should be U. S. Commercial 
and the container a 15-pound paper 
bag. The design to be used should in- 
clude the Keystone with the word 
'ECONOMY'; the words PACK and PO- 
TATOES, and that it should be desig- 
nated as the ECONOMY PACK. In this 
design the Keystone is printed in solid 
green, to meet the requirements of Act 
275, and all lettering and trimming in 
black. 

This design was submitted to the 
members of the Joint Conference Com- 
mittee for consideration and final ap- 
proval. 

The grade and design has been un- 
animously approved and is now in the 
hands of the bag manufacturer. We 
hope to have samples of this bag avail- 
able to show at all the District Field 
Meetings and also at the State-wide 
Field Meeting to be held at "Camp Po- 
tato" on August 21st. 



Bag Prices, 1940, 1941 Crop 
Marketing Season 

Your management feels that progress 
of a beneficial nature has been made 
since July 1st, 1936, in the matter of an 
efficient bag set-up, in which price re- 
ductions, to participating growers, has 
been the order of the day. 

We had looked forward, not without 
reasonable hope of success, to again 
make Association trade-marked bags 
available at a substantial saving to the 
growers over that of last season, as well 
as establishing additional distributing 
points for the convenience of all those 
desiring the service. 

However, since there have been con- 
tinual price advances on wood pulp and 
paper since the war in Europe began, 
wood pulp and paper now is selling at al- 
most twice the price of a year ago, this 
same time, and the price of paper having 
jumped 40% since August 1939, further 
reduction on the price of our bags would 
be economically unsound. 

We feel gratified, in view of the fore- 
going unavoidable circumstances and 
conditions that, a drastic increase will 
not be necessary and that only a com- 
paratively slight increase will be re- 
quired to insure sufficient revenue to 
maintain the Association potato mar- 
keting program and to give efficient and 
ecromkal service to Participating 
growers and also to carry on other As- 
sociation activities. 

Below we publish the bag prices and 
regulations governing the deal for the 
coming season. These prices are guaran- 
teed for the entire crop marketing 
period, 1940-1941. This feature alone is 
of inestimable value to our cooperators 
because bag manufacturers, generally, 
refuse to guarantee prices for longer 
periods than three months, even in nor- 
mal times. 

May we again call your attention to 

the fact that we have graduated the 

prices in order to bring the cost of bags, 

in which the lower grades of potatoes 

(Continued on page 18) 



1 



^^ 



^'ri-i,-:'--; 



16 



THE GUIDE POST 



July, 1940 



* 

Summer 

A considerable number of potato growers' Field Meetings have been 
scheduled in the most accessible areas to the largest number of growers 
so that every grower can have the advantage of attendmg at least one 
meeting. 

The purpose of these meetings is to acquaint the growers with the 
most useful information which pertains to the business of potato g^owmg 
As many fields adjacent to the points of assembly will be visited, as 
time permits. 

Potato growers' problems will be discussed at the various places and 
many thing! of value to the growers will be pointed out by experts who 
know their field. It is good to know that Dr. Nixon plans to be present at 
all of these meetings. 

THE OPEN HOUSE AT ^'CAMP POTATO", which will be a state- 
wide meeting will be held at the camp, at Coudersport, on August 21st An 
all day, full program is being arranged, and lunch will be served at the 
Camp. Be there at 9: 00 A.M. sharp, and plan to stay all day. 

THE SOUTH EASTERN FIELD DAY will be held as a triangular 
affair, the day's activity beginning with one group ^^f ^^^1^:!^^^^^ 
McPherson farm at Bridgeton (near Stewartstown) , York County and 
another group at the Jacob K. Mast farm, at Elverson, both at 9.00 A.M. 
July 31st, where new potato seedlings will be observed ^^der test and 
comparison. The two groups then will join at Hershey, at 12:00 Noon 
where the Hershey experiments will be gone over and a pleasant outing 
enjoyed in the Hershey Park. Other fields of interest will be visited en- 
route. 

THE EASTERN FIELD DAY, on July 31st, will begin at the Robert 
Getz farm, one mile east of Kresgeville, on Route No. 209, at 9:00 A.M. 
Here 202 seedling varieties are being tested and 65 acres of potatoes being 
grown on a reclaimed farm. From here the next stop will be made at the 
farm of Harry K. Roth, 2 miles east of Moorestown, in Northampton 
County, where 12 new varieties are being tested and compared. From 
here, visits may be arranged to adjacent potato areas in neighboring 
Lehigh County. 

THE NORTH BRANCH FIELD DAY will meet on August 1st, at the 
farm of A D. Knorr, 10 miles south of Bloomsburg, on Route No. 42, near 
Numidia, Columbia County, at 9:00 A.M. Twelve new varieties are on 
test and comparison here, and other nearby interesting fields will be 
visited. 

THE CENTRAL FIELD DAY will begin at the farm of John B. 
Schrack, near Loganton, Clinton County, at 9:00 A.M., August 2nd. Seed- 
hngs under experimentation here will be seen, and also 65 acres of com- 
mercial potatoes. The group will continue on to Jersey Shore, then, where 
on the Future Farmers of America farm, where the Lycoming County 
Vocational students are conducting the seedUng test for this section, 19 
seedling varieties will be seen on test. 



^ 



July, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



17 



Activities 

THE SOUTHWESTERN FIELD DAY will assemble on August 13th, 
at the farm of Claude Bauermaster, near Somerset, at the junction of 
Routes No. 219 and 31, where the Future Farmers of America of Somer- 
set County have 200 new seedling varieties under test. Other fields will 
be visited in this vicinity as time permits. 

THE WEST CENTRAL FIELD DAY will be held August 14th, as- 
sembling at 9:00 A.M. at the Yahner Brothers farm at Patton, Cambria 
County, where their 200 acres will be studied. From here the group will 
proceed to the P. L. Leiden farm St. Lawrence, where 19 new seedhngs 
are on test. 

THE WESTERN FIELD DAY will assemble on August 15th at the 
farm of Association President J. A. Donaldson, on Route No. 38, south of 
Nickleville, in Venango County. From here the tour will proceed to the 
farm of Thomas Denniston, 2 miles south of Slippery Rock. At each of 
these farms new storages can be observed as well as the new seedling 
varieties under experimentation. 

THE NORTHWESTERN FIELD DAY will be held August 16th, at 
Edinboro, Erie County, where on the farm of C. W. Billings, on Route No. 6 
North, just outside Edinboro, the Future Farmers of America of Erie 
County have planted 200 new seedUng varieties, and they will make it 
worth your while to attend this meeting. 

JUNIOR POTATO GROWERS — BOYS AND GIRLS will be the 
guests of ''Camp Potato" from August 18th to 21st. Boys and girls must be 
from 9 to 14 years old. Expert attendants will be on hand to teach the 
youngsters industry, thrift, and wholesome fun. It is clear that the ac- 
commodations are limited— for 50 youngsters at the outside, so it must be 
first come, first served. The total cost while at the camp will be 50c per day 
per child. Parents bringing the children to the camp should plan on ar- 
riving for Sunday evening supper (August 18th) and bring for each child 
two blankets, and if desired, bed linen. Comfortable cots and mattresses 
will be provided. If the parents who accompany the children desire to 
stay overnight (Sunday) there will be ample sleeping space if own bed- 
ding is supplied. Parents meals will be served Sunday night and Monday 
morning at 20c a meal, if we know in advance you will be there. Let your 
reservation for your eligible children come to the Association office at 
once. Remember, first come, first served. 

SONS OF POTATO GROWERS (Ages 18 to 80 inclusive) will be the 
guests of ''Camp Potato'^ from August 21st to 26th. Thirty-six is the limit 
for this party, therefore your reservation should come in promptly. Again 
first come, first served. Those who take this vacation can arrive at the 
Camp on August 21st for the Field Day and remain through this period 
Meals will be served for this group beginning on the evening of August 
21st, and continuing through the period at 20c per meal. (All you can eat) . 
This group, too, must supply its own blankets, and bed linen if desired. 
We will furnish the beds— and the water! 



18 



THE GUIDE POST 



July, 1940 



IMPORTANT NOTICE TO ALL 
GROWERS DESIRING TO 
PARTICIPATE IN THE AS- 
SOCIATION 1940-1941 PO- 
TATO MARKETING 

PROGRAM 

(Continued from page 15) 

will be packed, in line with the returns 
on such potatoes and not penalize the 
grower. In other words, there is no dif- 
ferential made to the Association in 
prices on bags, all are of the same 
weight basis and quality whether used 
for packing unclassified potatoes, the 
medium grades or the top grades. The 
Association takes a reduction in it's 
commission on bags used to pack the 
lower grades, absorbing this loss in or- 
der that the growers net return might 
be more nearly equalized. 

All previous bag quotations are here- 
by withdrawn. 

Effective August 1st, 1940, the follow- 
ing prices, on the Association trade- 
marked paper potato bags, will prevail: 

Specifications: 

15-pound bags, two wall 60/50-110 
Weight, Natural Kraft. 

60-pound bags, two wall 70/70-140 
Weight, Natural Kraft. 

60-pound bags, three wall 50/50/50- 
150 Weight, Natural Kraft. 

Prices Quoted are Per 

Blue Label, 15's (2- 

Red Label, 15's (2- 

Economy Pack, 15's (2- 

Blue Label, 60's (2- 

Blue Label, 60's (3- 

Unclassified, 60's (2- 

The above prices are for delivery to 
any point in Pennsylvania and include 
the wire loop ties and the commission to 
the Association. 

Grade Symbols. Printing and 
Nomenclature: 

Blue Label, 15's (Keystone Blue, red 
trim) 15-pounds Net-U. S. No. 1. 

Red Label, 15's (Keystone Red, green 
trim) 15-pounds Net-U. S. No. 1, Size B. 

Economy Pack, 15's (Keystone Green, 
black trim) 15-pounds Net-U.S. Com- 
mercial. 

Blue Label, 60's (Keystone Blue, red 
trim) 60-pounds Net-U. S. No. 1. 



1000 : 


Delivered 


wall) 


$18.00 


wall) 


$17.50 


wall) 


$17.00 


wall) 


$45.50 


wall) 


$48.75 


wall) 


$38.50 



Unclassified, 60's (Black Letters) 60- 
pounds Net-"UNCLASSIFIED POTA- 
TOES." 

Legality: 

The size of printing, lettering and no- 
menclature on the Association trade- 
marked bags meets all the requirements 
of Act 275, approved May 28th, 1937, 
and the rules and regulations promul- 
gated by the Secretary of Agriculture 
for administering the Act. ADDITION- 
AL TAGGING OR PRINTING IS UN- 
NECESSARY. 

Bag Orders 

All orders for Association trade- 
marked paper potato bags must clear 
through the office of the Association, 
Bellefonte, Pennsylvania. NO EXCEP- 
TIONS WILL BE MADE TO THIS 
REGULATION. 

Packing 

All bags are bundled, wrapped and 
tied. The 60-pound bags are packed 100 
to the bundle; the 15-pound, 250 to the 
bundle. BUNDLES CANNOT BE BRO- 
KEN. 

Delivery 

All bags will be shipped either by 
rail or truck whichever is most efficient 
and economical to all concerned. 

Terms 

All Association bags are shipped on a 
C.O.D. basis, (No exceptions). When 
bags are forwarded by rail, shipments 
will be made sight draft attached to bill 
of lading; when shipments go forward 
by truck arrangements must be made by 
the consignee to settle for same at desti- 
nation, either by check or in cash. 

Payment 

When bags are shipped sight draft 
attached to bill of lading, pay only the 
amount of the draft when same corres- 
ponds with the number of bags ordered 
and if in accordance with the above 
price schedule. 

When bags are delivered by truck, 
pay either by check or in cash. Indi- 
vidual or company checks will be ac- 
cepted by the tucking company handling 
the shipment. IN NO INSTANCE PAY 
ANY ADDITIONAL COLLECTION, 
FREIGHT OR TRUCKING CHARGES. 
Prices quoted are delivered. 

Should any irregularities occur, con- 
tact the Association office at once. 



It Pays to Learn 

-PLANT LANGUAGE- 

Plants, of course, cannot talk. However, many of them 
by definite signs will indicate what they are looking for in 
the way of plant food. Potatoes, for instance, will show 
their need for potash with leaves that have an unnatural, 
dark green color and become crinkled and somewhat 
thickened. Later on, the tip will become yellowed and 
scorched. This tip-burn then will extend along the leaf 
margins and inward toward the midrib, usually curUng 
the leaf downward and resulting in premature dying. 

It pays to watch for these signs, but it is a far better 
practice never to give them a chance to appear. They are 
signs of extreme potash starvation and long before they 
appear, the potash content of your soil may be so low as 
to greatly reduce the yield and quality of your crop. If 
you do not know just how fertile your soil is, see your 
county agent or experiment station about having samples 
of it tested. Then plan a fertihzer program which will re- 
store and maintain a plant-food content which will bring 
you the greatest profits. For a good crop of No. 1 potatoes, 
soil and fertilizer must supply at least 200 lbs. of available 
potash (K.jO) per acre. Your fertilizer dealer will tell you 
how little it costs to apply enough potash. 



If we can be of any help to you, 
please write us for free information 
and literature on how to fertilize 
your crops. 




American Potash Institute, Inc 



Investment Building 



Washington, D. C. 






20 



THE GUIDE POST 



July, 1940 



Field Notes 



I spent two days last week going over 
A. C. Ramseyers' potato plantation in 
Ohio. He has had very wet conditions. 
The stand is very good considering, 
though not quite up to par. He is getting 
his spraying done, however, with the 
use of a truck mounted sprayer — a 700 
gallon tank mounted on the largest rub- 
ber tires available. It is interesting how 
these large tires roll over the soft dirt. 



It just shows how a blind pig occasion- 
ally gets an acorn — When someone sug- 
gested to Mr. Ramseyer that he reverse 
the fan blades and blow the air out in- 
stead of sucking the spray material in 
the "pig got the acorn" — for it worked! 



Saw 200 acres of Potter County Nit- 
tanys recently, and actually found but 
two diseased plants — believe it or not! 



Mr. Ramseyer appreciates two haz- 
zards that may overtake him this season. 



Deep 
cultivating 
should J\/at 
be practiced 
during dry 
hot days of 

July and 
early August 



First, if the weather conditions continue 
wet, the danger from late blight is in- 
creasing hourly. If it turns dry and 
hot, spraying is equally as important. 
There will be more weeds in potato 
patches this year than for a number of 
years. This applies to the entire state of 
Pennsylvania, and is more the case in 

Ohio. 

— Dr. E. L. Nixon 



John H. Richter, Association member 
and owner of the beautiful Benvenue 
Farms, located at Duncannon, Penna., 
(near Amity Hall) has recently instal- 
led an irrigation system on his farm de- 
signed so that 36 acres of potatoes are 
irrigated in 12 hours with one inch of 
water, which system is movable by one 
man. 

Results attained through irrigation 
on many fields have been most interest- 
ing, and it will be of real interest to 
watch for the success of Mr. Richter's 
''rain" system, and the benefits expected 
of it in yield. Growers who have watch- 
ed with interest Mr. Richter's outstand- 
ing potato fields from year to year may 
find real pleasure in inspecting this new 
irrigation system. 

— R. J. Hamilton, 

Ephrata, Penna. 



Columbia County potatoes are looking 
nice and have a good stand. Two spray 
rings are operating in the County, one 
in the Southwestern part and one in the 
Northern end of the County. 



M. P. Whitonight, former Director and 
Vice-President of the Association, of 
Bloomsburg, Penna., recently enjoyed 
the fine distinction of seeing his five 
sons all become members of the Wil- 
liamsport Consistory in Masonry in one 
day. The whole Whitenight group 
(father and five sons) were pictured on 
this day in the Bloomsburg Daily news- 
paper. Mr. Whitenight is well known 
throughout the State, and a great boost- 
er of the Association and its program. 
He raises 100 acres of potatoes annually, 
and he markets them all through the 
Association. 

— Roy R. Hess 

Stillwater, Penna. 



i 




The Champion Twins No. 444 2-row power diggers — easily 

dig 15 to 25 acres per day. 

Less LABOR COSTS Cleaner POTATOES 
with OK Champion POTATO DIGGERS 



• Here's the result of 40 
years of experience — OK 
Champion No. 444— a 2-row 
potato digger built for use 
with any tractor, even me- 
dium sized **20". Holds its 
place on side hills — turns in 
extremely short radius. 
Streamlined— electrically 
welded one-piece frames. 
Spring balanced levers. 

Adjustable from 30" to 42" 
—rigidly attached to tractor. 
Weighs less than 2,000 lbs. 

Write for Circular 




O K Champion digs cleaner — faster — 
with light draft. 



1 




No. 888 OK Champion one -row power 
diggers with same features as No. 444, 

OK Champion MOVABLE IRRIGATION 

Takes Dry Years Out of Farming 

Defeat drought — raise more and better yields per 
acre. O K Champion movable irrigation has in- 
creased potato yields up to 250% more per acre. 
Soon pays for itself in more No. I's — less culls. Costs 
as low as $10 per acre. Ask for irrigation circular. 

CHAMPION CORPORATION HAMM^NriNmANA 




22 



THE GUIDE POST 



July, 1940 



Grower to Grower Exchange 

The rate for advertising in this column is a penny a word, minimum cost 25 cents, 
payable with order. (10% reduction when four or more insertions are ordered at 
one time.) Count name and address. Send ads to reach the GUIDE POST, Masonic 
Temple Building, Bellefonte, Penna., by the 20th of the month previous to publi- 
cation. 



AVAILABLE: Copies of Dr. E. L. Nix- 
on's book, "The Principles of Potato 
Production," $1.25 per copy. Write for 
your copy today, to Association office, 
Bellefonte, Pennsylvania. 

DIGGER FOR SALE: One single row 
take off digger. Good repair. Will sell 
reasonably. Write Dr. E. L. Nixon, 
State College, Penna. 

SPRAY BOOM FOR SALE: John Bean 
Spray boom. Complete without nozzles. 
10 row. Good condition. Will sell cheap. 
Ed. Fisher, Coudersport, Pa. 

SPRAYER WANTED: 4 or 6 row en- 
gine or power take-off sprayer. Write 
J. A. Donaldson, R. F. D., No. 1 Emlen- 
ton, Penna. (Venango County) 



Vac-A-Way Seed Cleaners 
Hand power or electric 
Farm & Commercial sizes 

(Exclusive Distributor for Pa.) 

Trescott Fruit Graders 

Various units for any capacity 

Kleen-Line Electric Fencer 
Kills Weeds— Holds Stock 

OK Champion Potato Diggers 
1 or 2-Row Power Diggers 
Caster Wheels-Rubber Tires 
Streamlined with electric weld- 
ed one piece frames 
Digs 15 to 25 acres per day 

Write for Circular and 
Name oj Dealer 

HAMILTON & CO. 

EPHRATA, PENNA. 

Wholesale Distributors for 

Eastern Pennsylvania 
Delaware and Maryland 



SPRAYER WANTED: Horse drawn 
traction sprayer 4-Row boom. Good 
condition. Write J. A. Donaldson, R. F. 
D. No. 1, Emlenton, (Venango County) 
Penna. 

POTATO EQUIPMENT FOR SALE: 

One two-row Cletrac Avery Cultivator 
complete, one two-row Cletrac Avery 
Weeder, one Killifer Disc Harrow with 
24" blades, all slightly used. Good condi- 
tion. Reasonable. If interested, write W. 
J. Braddock, c/o Wheeling Bronze Cast- 
ing Company, Wheeling, W. Va. 

PLANTER WANTED: 2 row Iron-Age 
Picker Type. Can also use good used 
grader and Digger. Write Ray Salmon, 
Waterford, Erie County, Penna. 



WARNING 



Blight will be upon us 
if moist to wet condi- 
tions prevail during 
the coming weeks. • 

Thorough spraying 
now should be the or- 
der of the day not after 
blight is upon you. 



i 



i«rdii*iiiMakB 



SPRAY and DUST 



with 



MILLARD MODERN LIMES 



Rotary Kiln Products 



Crop Protection 



Service 



Reasonable Cost 



H. E. MILLARD 



Phone 7-3231 



Annville, Pa. 



Modern Marketing Methods 
Call for Paper Bags 

Attractively Printed Bags Bring Repeat Orders 

HAMMOND Betterhags 

Combine High Grade Printing with 
Essential Strength and Quality 




Hammond Bag & Paper Company 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Paper Bags for Lime, Limestone, Fertilizer, Flour, Feed and Potatoes 



24 



THE GUIDE POST 



July, 1940 



TIMELY OBSERVATIONS 
SUGGESTIONS — 

DENNISTON 

(Continued from page 6) 

THERE IS MUCH TO SEE IN PENN- 
SYLVANIA: How many of you have 
seen the new AMOCO sign with the pic- 
ture of the Capitol Dome and the in- 
scription, "There is much to see in Penn- 
sylvania."? Besides stating a fact or self 
evident truth, which many of ur do not 
fully appreciate, this is smart aavertis- 
ing. As Pennsylvania potato growers 
we should ever be striving to broaden 
our knowledge of and appreciation of 
not only our own community and 
County but of the hundreds of other 
communities and sections of this great 
Commonwealth. 

Brooks, rivers, wooded hills and 
mountains are so common place with 
most of us, because we were born and 
grew up among them, that we seldom 
take time to think or appreciate what 
they mean to our agriculture and more 
specifically to us as potato growers. To 
some these brooks, rivers, wooded hills 
and mountains mean recreation, fishing, 
hunting, camping, boating, all of which 
is a great natural and human asset to 
our state and her people. They are a 
great aid in commerce, supplying 
natural resources, transportation, pow- 
er, and the raw material for hundreds 
Of ' industries and the manufacturing of 
thousands of products. 

And what do these brooks, rivers, 
wooded hills and mountains mean to the 
potato grower? Well, where do you go 
during leisure moments on the hot days 
of summer? To the shade of the old oak, 
the maple or the hemlock. Take away 
these babbling cool brooks, and wooded 
hills or mountains and this would be a 
hot desolate country side. We too would 
have the heat of the middle west plains 
where potato production is dependent 
on irrigation and water supply not too 
certain. We would have dust storms, 
tornadoes, and cyclones. Industry would 
not be here nor would our markets. We 
would have no seed industry with all 
seed of necessity being imported. 

And so there is much to see in Penn- 
iylvania. There is much to be thankful 
for. In these trying days for so many 
peoples of the world we are privileged 
to live here in peace, and in what we 
term the pursuit of happiness. We owe 
it to ourselves and others to do our best 



what ever the task for we have little 
reason to shirk or grumble. 

S. S. KESGIE CHAPTER FUTURE 
FARMERS PLANT POTATOES: The 
following members of the S. S. Kesgie 
Chapter and Vocational Students of the 
Polk Township School, Monroe County 
answered an emergency call "to arms," 
Wednesday, July 3rd: Luther Getz, 
Warren Griffith, Raymond Krome, Ellis 
Bartholomew, Wilmer Bartholomew. 
Walter Beer, Wayne Smale, Sterling 
Sherer. This was not a call to meet an 
enemy but a call to do a constructive 
task, the planting of 202 Seedling Po- 
tato Varieties. This planting had been 
delayed a number of weeks due to other 
pressing work on the part of the As- 
sociation. Although the date is quite 
late, in fact the latest I have ever planted 
potatoes, we will in an experimental 
way get all the information we desire. 
We will have ample chance to study the 
foliage under Monroe County climatic 
conditions and ample chance to get a 
check on soil reaction and tuber shape. 

We appreciate the cooperation of Mr. 
Harold Davis, Vocational Agricultural 
Instructor, Polk Township School for 
his assistance in sending out the call 
to the above boys who stuck to the 
task until finished. The acre of land on 
which the plot is planted was provided 
by Robert Getz, long a member of the 
State Potato Growers Association and 
a willing cooperator. He will see that 
the plot is properly cultivated and 
sprayed during the season. Fertilizer 
was donated by two neighboring grow- 
ers, Homer Shupp, Effort; and Switz- 
gable Brothers, Broadheadsville. Mr. 
William High, Effort, a large potato 
grower and long an active member of 
the State Association showed his in- 
terest by assisting with the planting 
during a most busy day of potato spray- 
ing, cultivating, and harvesting on his 
own farm. 

A FEW ITEMS OF INTEREST: The 
thousands of seedlings at Camp Potato 
were all planted ten days ahead of 
schedule of previous years. 

The Association office is already re- 
ceiving inquiries on marketing the 1940 
crop. 

There are twelve major seedling 
plantings over the State and from re- 
cent inspection they are all showing 
up well at this time. 

(Continued on page 28) 




SPRAYING is a battle of grim necessity — a 
fight to protect what you grow against insidi- 
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pests. The tiny foe is merciless — your spray 
equipment must not fail. Whatever your spray 
requirements, it pays to remember that MYERS 
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effective, reliable, economical service. The MYERS 
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It includes everything from the biggest power spray 
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'^^^L'-'2i^i-'- ' 









26 



THE GUIDE POST 



July, 1940 



DR. NIXON COMMENTS ON 
PRACTICAL POTATO 
STORAGE CONSTRUCTION 

(Continued from page 4) 

Take the concrete slab, for example, 
over the entire top of the storage. The 
cost of this slab is five or six times that 
of the rest of the entire storage, and the 
concrete slab is just dead wrong. The 
concrete floor is also dead wrong. 

There are three vital points in stor- 
ages: First, temperature control, sec- 



ond, humidity or moisture control, and 
third, low cost construction. 

I have touched on the latter above, 
and for those who are interested in this, 
a day at "Camp Potato" will reveal how 
a 12,000 bushel capacity storage can be 
constructed for $300. cash outlay, be- 
lieve it or not. 

The first vital point — namely tem- 
perature control, revolves around two 
principles, sufficient insulation to with- 
stand low temperatures, and manipula- 
tion of the storage, while filling in the 




The straw loft storage on the farm of Joe Schwabenbauer, Elk County. The walls 
were layed up with stone since stone was readily available. Some of Pennsylvania's 
finest Blue Label Pecks have been packed from this storage during the past two 
seasons. A little landscaping will complete this job and Joe has this in mind« how- 
ever he is very busy right now growing this years fine potato cron. 



fall and during the early winter. Pota- 
toes piled deep in the storage while hot 
will not keep well. They should be al- 
lowed to cool as they are filled in. Pota- 
toes cool rapidly if given a chance. On 
the other hand, potatoes are good insu- 
lators of heat and cold. Neither will 
penetrate much beyond a layer a foot 
deep. Heat goes up so that the top of the 
pile is always warmer than the bottom. 
The best potatoes from any storage are 
those which lie right on the ground even 
if there are ten feet of potatoes above 



them. The reason is that here both the 
moisture and the temperature are the 
nearest ideal. 

The ideal temperature for potatoes is 
around 45-50 degrees Fahrenheit. Stor- 
ages may be manipulated so that they 
may get down lower than this in cold 
weather but such temperatures cannot 
be maintained when the outside tem- 
perature rises, except artificially. 

It is obvious that opening storages 

(Continued on page 28) 



[ 



YOUR EXTRA PROFIT 

FROM THE USE OF A BEAN RUBBER SPOOL GRADER 

WILL PAY FOR IT 




3 CAPACITY SIZES OF BEAN GRADERS 

• YOU DON'T LIKE BRUISING 

• YOU DON'T LIKE CUTTING 

• YOU DON'T LIKE INACCURACY 
IN YOUR POTATO GRADING 

..YOU DON'T GET IT.. 

WITH A BEAN RUBBER SPOOL GRADER 
OUR CATALOG SHOWS YOUR WAY TO PROFIT 

John Bean Mfg. Co, 



LANSING 



MICHIGAN 



28 



THE GUIDE POST 



July, 1940 



DR. NIXON COMMENTS ON 
PRACTICAL POTATO 

(Continued from page 26) 

when the outside temperature is higher 
than the inside only raises the inside 
temperature. It is obvious that the re- 
verse is also true. Consequently in the 
fall, open the storage on cold days to 
get the temperature down to the desir- 
able point, and in the spring leave it 
closed as tight as possible to conserve 
the cold. 

The idea that potatoes need a change 
of air is hocus-pocus. If they are hot 
they need to be cooled. Of course, they 
should not freeze. 

The other vital point in storages men- 
tioned above is humidity. Potatoes need 
alniost a saturated atmosphere. No 
moisture should condense to such an 
extent that it drips on the potatoes. The 
straw loft is the most fool-proof con- 
struction yet devised for maintaining 
the proper humidity. In addition to 
this, it is the cheapest insulation against 
(Continued on page 20) 



TIMELY OBSERVATIONS 
SUGGESTIONS — 

DENNISTON 

(Continued jrom page 24) 
We had a white frost at Camp Po- 
tato on the morning of June 13th. Who 
said it wasn't a cool place to grow pota- 
toes? 

Wayne and Mrs. Hindman, resident 
managers of Camp Potato report nu- 
merous visitors day to day. The Camp is 
open to inspection by potato growers 
md their friends at all times. 

I have been rushing this article so 
that Miss Sloop can get away on a much 
deserved vacation. We all wish her a 
whale of a good time and that she re- 
turns with what it takes to put millions 
of pecks of Pennsylvania potatoes over 
to the distributors and consumers dur- 
ing the fall and winter. 

Nixon was telling me yesterday how 
dumb we all were that no one had 
thought to reverse the fan on the truck 
of our truck mounted sprayers so as lo 
blow the spray out rather than suck it 
into the radiator and engine. This came 
from a novice. 

For the first time in 12 years I have a 
row of potatoes in my garden. It is one 
of the promising seedlings and Barbara, 
nine, and Carol, four, are watching it 
grow and the tubers form with a great 
deal of interest. 



Mrs. Kepler here in Centre County, 
better known as one of our good potato 
growers, had an unusual crop of straw- 
berries. Her potato fields are looking 
good too. 

Reports coming in from Maine are that 
it has been exceedingly wet through- 
out Aroostook County the great Maine 
potato belt. 

A recent report has reached us that 
Ohio our good neighbor to the west has 
set up a potato marketing plan pattern- 
ed very much after our Pennsylvania 
program. 

I received in the mail today a letter 
from the Graham County, Safford, Ari- 
zona, Chamber of Commerce asking for 
information on our Pennsylvania Pota- 
to Program, particularly Camp Potato 
and the Marketing Program. 

A large number of field meetings and 
summer activities are being announced 
in this issue of the Guide Post. Talk 
these over with your fellow growers, 
your neighbors and friends and plan on 
attending one or more of them. They 
will bring much of interest and im- 
portance to potato growers. 

There are potato growers in your 
community who should be getting the 
Guide Post. Show them your copy and 
give them a sales talk on becoming an 
Association Member. 



WILL YOU HAVE A 400- _^ ^ „ 
BUSHEL ACRE THIS YEAR 

(Continued from page 8) 
In this issue of the GUIDE POST are 
printed full particulars concerning the 
Club, including the regulations and in- 
structions for the Club set-up, the regu- 
lations required in the checking of 
yields, and the complete record form 
which must be submitted following the 
determination of your yield. 

Many growers who have not acquaint- 
ed themselves with the regulations of 
this Club have consequently failed to be 
given 400-Bushel Club membership 
though actually they have produced the 
necessary yield. Don't let this happen 
to you. 400-Bushel Club membership is 
indeed a signal honor — and it is a goal 
which we hope you are all striving to 
gain this 1940 season. 

A facsimile of the medal for this hon- 
or appears on the front cover. Though it 
looks good there, in gold it will be a 
good deal more handsome on your 
watch chain. 



If / 'H ' ' ""^j^ ■" ■.■""-■''"'I 



THE COMING WEEKS ARE 

IMPORTANT TO YOUR 

POTATO CROP 

PROTECT THIS CROP 
UNTIL HARVEST 

with 




It Pays to Irrigate 

The K Champion Way 






LIME 

Especially processed for | 
Spraying and Dusting I 

Write for prices and I 

particulars I 

Whiterock Quarries 

Bellefonte, Pa. 




The same pipe is used to irrigate 
acre after acre. 

We invite vour irrigation prob- 
lems, will plan your system and 
furnish an estimate. 

HAMILTON & CO. 

Specialists In Irrigation 
EPHRATA, PENNA. 

Distributors for Eastern Penna. 
Delaware & Maryland 



r^^^ Potato Digg 



ers 




They Get the Potatoes with Least Cost and in 
Best Marketable Condition. 

Require Fewest Repairs 

u- u ^^^^vH fnr Inne service and low cost. Growers report digging 150 

continuous elevato-nd^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^, 

Adapaieo^ior ^^ ^.^^^^^^ ^^g^^^ attachments. 

Write for catalog. 

EUREKA MOWER COMPANY 

UTICA. N. Y. 



30 



th£ guide post 



July, 1^40 



POTATO CHIPS ^ 

(Continued jrom page 7) 

That revolution came because it had to 
come. If independent merchants hadn t 
changed many of their methods, aping 
the successful chains, they would have 
been entirely unable to compete with 
the corporate chains and thence out of 
business by now. A & P founded the 
modern system of mass distribution oi 
food products in this country. A & P 
along with Safeway, American, Kroger, 
First National and others taught the in- 
dependents countless lessons in skillful 
merchandising. They brought the vol- 
untary chains into existence by creating 
an urgent need for them. 

Competition being what it is, A & P 
has been charged with all sorts of 
crimes, misdemeanors and blunders. 
Possibly it has been guilty of plenty of 
offences. Possibly it has driven out com- 
petitors with its low prices. Possibly it 
has made life miserable for processors 
and manufacturers with its tremendous 
bargaining power. The A & P has been 
incredibly short-sighted at times and 
100 per cent wrong in some of its judg- 
ments. So what? The octopus has been 
right nine times out of ten or it never 
could have grown into the giant it is 
today." 

If the rules of the game are fair who 
will deny the right of a Babe Ruth to 
sock the ball over the fence as often as 
he can? By the same token who will 
deny the right of a capable manufac- 
turer to make a satisfactory margin of 
profit in a vear? Our present problem 
is not to find new sources of taxation so 
that the unfit and misfits can live in 
comparative luxury; but to offer such 
security and reward to enterprise, that 
men of foresight and ability will be en- 
couraged to proceed full steam ahead. 

''Bill Shakespud" 

DR. NIXON COMMENTS ON 

PRACTICAL POTATO 

(Continued from page 28) 
heat or cold yet devised. It has put 
storage construction within the reach 
of the smallest potato grower. It is also 
good for the apple and vegetable grower 
where high humidity and constant tem- 
peratures may be had by proper man- 
ipulation. It's only weakness is that in 
warm weather its temperature cannot 
be gotten any lower than the natural 
soil of the storage itself except by arti- 
ficial means. By a little manipulation, 



however, it will keep potatoes well from 
September to May inclusive — very 
creditable in the climate of Pennsyl- 



vania. 



OVER THE PICKING TABLE 

(Continued from page 10) 
In a trial before a justice of the peace 
to determine the ownership of an auger, 
a witness, noted more for his enthusiasm 
than for his veracity, was asked if he 
recognized the tool in question. 

"Know that auger?" the witness ex- 
claimed. ''Why, I've known that auger 
since it was a gimlet.'* 

CHEMICAL LIME COMPANY, 
INC., BELLEFONTE, DONATES 
LIME FOR "CAMP POTATO" 

The Chemical Lime Company, Inc., 
of Bellefonte, recently donated to 
"Camp Potato," 2| tons of spray lime 
and 2 tons of hydrated lime for use in 
the potato project at the Camp. This 
is a very worthwhile gift and is greatly 
appreciated by the membership and the 
management, and is proving a great 
help in the production of the potatoes at 
the Camp. 

Two other of Bellefonte's fine lime 
companies, the Warner Company and 
Whiterock Quarries, have made similar 
valuable contributions in the past to the 
"Camp Potato" project. 



MAKING THE WHEELS 

GO ROUND 

(Continued jrom page 14) 

wheels go round so that all of these 
tasks could move forward to com- 
pletion. Mrs. Glick in turn was indis- 
pensible in assisting Mrs. Hindman with 
the first large group of boys (from 40 to 
60 Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, 
June 3, 4, and 5). During the latter 
days of the two weeks that they were 
in Camp she could be found at the 
storage cutting potatoes which made it 
possible to keep up with the planter. 

There were jobs for Mary too and 
she performed them creditably. To 
these people we say, "You are always 
welcome at Camp Potato." They will 
not soon forget the deer, the June frost 
at the Camp, the fire-place at night, the 
good eats, the bear in the second hollow, 
eating ice cream across in New York, the 
bag of Special Seedlings — Very early^ 
the thousands of small bags of seed- 
lings, all of which were planted in good 
season. 



"Acres More Spray Before 




Throwing the Disc Away' 



1 



IT'S ALL IN THE HOLE 

Jennings' Hardened Steel (Rust Proof) Spray Discs, 
Keep Your Pressure Up, Wastes Less Material. 

Lasts Two or Three Times Longer and Costs 

No More Than the Average Soft Disc 

BUY from any of the following well known and friendly Penna. Dealers, 
they have stocks and will be glad to serve you. 



COUNTY 

ADAMS 

BERKS 

ERIE 

LANCASTER 

LEHIGH 

POTTER 

SCHUYLKILL 

SOMERSET 

UNION 



NAME 

George E. Hoffman 
Schlonker Motor Co. 
J. Jacobsen & Son 
A. B. C. Groff 
Shipman's Feed Store 
E. R. Blass 
John E. Huntsinger 
Joseph H. Fisher 
J. L. Rietz 

Growers Attention 



CITY 

Bigerville 

Kutztown 

Girard 

New Holland 

Williamsport 

Coudersport 

Higgins 

Boswell 

Lewisburg 



CPCC Make this simple and pratical test at my expense, put my "Black 
■ "^^^ Diamond" discs in your booms along side the disc you are using, 

and under the same mix of material and pump pressure, let the 

discs speak for themselves. 

Samples Are Yours For The Asking And You Are Under 

No Obligation 

Satisfaction Absolutely Guaranteed 

Buy From Your Dealer— If He Will Not Supply You, Order Direct 

But Accept No Substitute 

A Disc For Every Size Nozzle — A Hole For Every Purpose 



Lloyd E. Jennings 




Soxners, Conn. 



MARK 



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HjOVi can make more money from 
i .your potatoes if you kill their twin 
enemies — insects and fungi. But only 
high pressure atomization gets the best 
results from your fungicide or insec- 
ticide. 

Formerly available only to large 
growers, IRON AGE now makes high 
pressure spraying possible for all 
growers. Low cost 6 and 10 gallons- 
per-minute sizes with any pressures up 
to 600 pounds per square inch. One 
just right for every grower. 

With Iron Age High Pressure spray- 
ing you'll find potato profits go up — 
spraying costs go down, for high pres- 
sures make every drop of fungicide or 
insecticide do a far better job. 



V^rxte. for 

Sprayer 

Maniuil 40 



IROMAQE 



Row 

Crop 

Sprayers 



A. B. FARQUHAR CO., LTD. — 334 Duke St. — YORK, PENNA. 



<y ///y /// ^A A 



VlHHSUV4/V^ 




NUMBER 8 



LIBRARY 

SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 

AND EXPERIMENT STATIOK 



/•I 



1,4 




ii 



AUGUST • I940 






^#n%,: 



CMWFM 



PuMldJied lui the. 

PENNSYLVANIA COOPERATIVE 
POTATO GROWERS ASSOCIATION 



INCORPORATED 










■■■f-V^.Y- 



1' 



The packing scene on the front cover was photographed 
on the farm of Frank Bausch, of Fairview, during the 1939 
season — it is illustrative of the activity on hundreds of 
Other Pennsylvania farms during a marketing season — 
and Blue Labels are the more popular brand packed as 
the years go along. 









Marketing Program Holds Big Promise 

for Season 



The Association marketing program 
is now ready again to serve participat- 
ing potato growers with the right sort of 
a potato market, and it promises to do 
more than ever before to popularize 
Pennsylvania potatoes. 

With the adoption of the ''Economy 
Pack" which will merchandise, with 
profit, in the consumer (fifteen pound 
package, potatoes of ^ S. Commercia 
quality, millions more bushels of Penn- 
sylvania potatoes will be available to 
the trade-marked package than ever be- 



fore. 

This step was taken with great confi- 
dence and buyers are expecting tnat, 
through the use of this brand supplies 
will be sufficiently abundant through- 
out the season to give the brand a real 
advertising push and put it over the top. 

The elimination of the Red Label (U. 
S. No. 1, Size B), the Green Label (U.b. 
Commercial) and the Orange Label (U. 
i^No. 2) packs in the sixty pound u^^^^^ 
will also improve the workability of tne 




E R Spory, Outstanding Somerset Grower 
give the right reputation. 

marketing plan. The Red and Green 
^bet will be packed only in peck units 
i^H will therefore, reach the consumer 
^^ necked The Orange label, never a 
luc?ess will be completely elimmated 
Is the Unclassified sixty-pound pack 
will absorb all potatoes which would 
make the Orange label grade. 

The Association bag deal has been 
worked out most successfully, in view 
of the extreme advances m prices of all 
materials used in the manufacture of 



and Packer puts up Blue Labels which 



baes The Association bags are avail- 
abfe to participating growers at prices 

scarcely higher than during the 1939-40 
selson-while most bag P^ces have al- 
most doubled themselves in the year 
These prices, too, are guaranteed for the 
entire crop marketing season. This fea- 
ture alone is of inestimable value to our 
cooperators because bag manufacturers, 
generally, are refusing to guarantee 
prices for longer periods than three 
months, even in normal times. 
(Continued on page 5) 






THE GUIDE POST August. 1940 

THE GUIDE POST heat affect^otato crop 

^"SfraTv^ta^V^^ro^wTs!^^^^^^^^^ ^Here is no doubt that the 13 day hot 

neriod of late July— a record breaker 

OFFTCERS for all time-has removed millions of 

OFFICERS I, ohpls of potatoes from the State. 

J A. Donaldson, Emlenton . .President bushels oi poia 

Roy R. Hess. Stillwater . . . .Vice-Pres. Garden patches anduncared for farm 

- n 11 t^^t^ r.ptrhp«i have gone almost completely 

E. B. Bower Beneipnte ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ patches ^ha ^. g^^^ ^^ 

L- member that almost 60 percent of Penn- 

DIRECTORS sylvania's acreage is still grown on the 

T-r«hKMast ..Elverson, Chester farm patch. 

?Dan?e'l^ranVz'.:. Coplay. Lehigh Reliable information ind -^^ ^"^f, 

Hugh McPherson Bridgeton, York Blight is active - New York ta^e^^U 

John B. Schrack Loganton Chnton ha^^^^n found m Gentry ^^y . ^ 

Roy R. Hess Stillwater. Columbia ^^^^''^^^^^J^^ie damabe in several 

Ed. Fisher Coudersport, Potter ° ^^^g j^ania Counties so that the look- 
Charles Frey North Girard. Erie ^^ ^^^ bumper Pennsylvania potato crop 

J. A. Donaldson, R.l, Emlenton, Venango j^ not yet in the bag. A 1°* of things can 

R. W. Lohr Boswell. Somerset happen between now and then. 

Annual membership fee $1.00. This in- ^hat is most feared is long continued 

eludes the Guide Post. drought through August an^ Sepjf ""h 

All communications should be ad- ^er. On the other hand, l°"g^^°"tf "f_° 

dressed to E. B. Bower, Secretary-Treas- ^.^j^ through August is almost as ais 

urer and General Manager, Bellefonte, ^gtrous. 
Pennsylvania. ^^^^^^^^ ^^^^j^ ^^^ ^^ -^ too big a 

^ T-» • J ^ C hurry to get the early crop on the mar- 

Our President Says:- ket-when there is no market. Re- 

Aueust 5 1940 member, a surplus commodity cannot be 
August D, IJW ^^^^ ^^ ^ p^^^^ ggjj.j^g potato-s in the 

As we wind up the first half of the g^^^ ^^^ jg ^ke selling sand to tne 
scheduled potato tours of the present ^^^ r^,^^ ^^.^ sand— too much pota- 

season, the lines of the old song. The 

Bear Went Over the Mountain to See '•"'==■• 

What He Could See" comes to our mind. 

Day after day we view fine fields of 
Pennsylvania potatoes, each one appear- dothine merchant's son asked him 

ing to be as fine as can be produced yet . ^^^.'"^'""hicT "Veil I will show you," 

when we go "over the other side of the to define ethics, veil i w .y 

^,,v^+r,;K> '' thorp are more fields to see said the latner. j^uppuist; tx m^y ^ 

^n that sidfand^ who can tell which into the store, buys a lot of goods and 

fields ti produce the best? pays me ten dollars too much when she 

Each county we visit we all feel is goes out. Then ethics comes in!-- 

the best p^ace to live and grow potatoes, Should I or should I not tell my Part 

until we arrive at the next one— and ner?" 
new preferences must be formed! But 

the most blessed thing about good old • • • 

Pennsylvania is that the people who 

have the will to go forward and pro- ugQj,j.y^ y^^^ you'll have to go round to 
duce a good crop of spuds can do so any- ^^^ ^^^^ g^^^ » 

where in the State. 

So we say again— what a fortunate "Oh! but we're the Berrys. 

lot of people we Pennsylvania potato ^^^ ^^^,^ ^^^^ .^ ^^^,^^ ^^^ ^^^,^ ^^^^^ 

growers are. ^^ ^ Donaldson. You can't go thru this gate." 



August, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



.T 



; 



MARKETING PROGRAM HOLDS 
BIG PROMISE FOR SEASON 

(Continued jrom page 3) 

The Association bag prices, too, are 
graduated in order to bring the cost of 
bags in which the lower grades of po- 
tatoes are packed in line with such po- 
tatoes. The Association is taking a 
reduction in its commission on these 
bags for the lower grades, absorbing 
the loss in order that the growers' net 
return might be more nearly equahzed. 

The marketing program is set to go! 
Pennsylvania Potato Growers' Associa- 
tion trade-marked potatoes are no long- 
er the exception in prominent potato 
markets. The Association pack is 
known to buyers, to store-men, to hotel 
chefs and to the housewife. The popu- 
larity the pack is enjoying was brought 
about by sheer hard work— and it is up 
to us to increase this. 

A fine list of cooperating growers have 
given us the sort of pack that has made 
the reputation and we are looking to- 
ward them and you to continue this 
practice. 





Pennsylvania Blue Labels are fast be- 
coming a by-word in grocery stores and 
large hotels. 

Many of you are still not familiar 
with the program, and many would like 
to be If you want to market your po- 
totoes through the Association let us 
hear from you, and we will see that you 
are supplied with all the information 
and help you will need to do so. Let s 
this year really pack potatoes in Associ- 
ation trade-marked bags. 



p Daniel Frantz, too, puts up the sort of 
Tpack that makes for distributor-con- 
sumer demand. 



Forms change, but nothing dies. 
Everything is in circulation. Men as 
well as planets, have their orbits. Some 
have a wider seeing than others, but 
just wait and they will come back. 

• • • 

The average woman sees only the 
weak points in a strong man, and the 
good points in a weak one. 



6 



THE GXJIDE_POST_____ 



August, 1940 



August, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



OVER THE PICKING TABLE 



by Inspector Throwout 



At a party in Hollywood, onf o^*^ 
stunts was to ask each guest to write 
his or her own epitaph and when called 
upon, to get up and read what they had 
written. A much-married movie actress 

sitting besides Will Rogf'-^ ^f f , J^ 
didn't know what to write WiU sai^^i 
"If you will read it just as I write ix, i 
wm do it lor you." This is what she 
read: "At last she sleeps alone. 

* • * 

The actions of men are the best in- 
terpreters of their thoughts. 

• • * 
A oroud young father telegraphed the 

news"^ of his^ happiness to his brother in 
ihZp words- "A handsome boy has 
comi t"my house and claims to be your 
nephew. We are doing our best to 
give him a proper welcome. 

The brother, however, failed to see 
the point and wired back: "l have no 
nephew. The young man is an im- 
poster.*' 

• * * 

A critic is a stowaway on the flight 
of someone else's imagination. 

• • • 

Coffin linings cost more now As a 
matter of economy, one should pay more 
attention to the brake Immgs. 

• • • 

A tourist traveling through the Texas 
panhandle got into conversation with 
an old settler and his son at a filling 
station. 

"Looks as though we might have 
rain," said the tourist. 

"Well I hope so," replied the native, 
"not so much for myself as for my boy 
here. I've seen it rain." 

• * • 
"You have been conspicuous in the 

halls of legislation, have you not?" 
asked the beautiful young woman. 

"Yes Miss," answered Senator Haines 
blandly. "I think I have participated m 
some of the richest hauls that legisla- 
tion ever made." 



Samuel Johnson described a common 
thought vividly-'l am very fond of the 
company of ladies. I like their beauty, 
S their delicacy, I like their vivacity, 
and I like their silence. 

• • • 

A doctor in a deaf and dumb institute 
invited his friend who lived nearby to 
attend a dance for the inmates, explain- 
ing that no talking would be necessary 
a Request for a dance being extended by 
a smile and a bow. 

On arriving he saw a very Pretty girl, 
did the smile and bow and they danced. 
The trouble was that he could think 
of no way of excusing himself, so they 
danced and danced. 

After five dances, a young man ap- 
proached the pair and asked the younf 
lady, "How about giving me another 
dance?" 

"Just as soon as I get rid of this dum- 
my without hurting his feelings. 

• • • 

Goldberg went around the o.^ce all 
morning with a frowning warned look 
and every few minutes he would plunge 
his hand into one of his pockets. His as- 
sistant noticed that he looked in all but 
one pocket. 

Questioned, he admitted that he had 
lost his billfold. 

"Why not take a look in that inside 
pocket?" 

"My boy, I'm that afraid! If I look 
and it ain't there, I'll drop dead. 

• • • 

"When I look at this congregation," 
said the preacher, 'T ask myself, 'Where 
are the poor?' And then, when I look at 
the collection, I say to myself, Where 
are the rich?' " 

• • • 

Wilt thou take her for thy pard, 

For better or for worse: 
To have to hold to fondly guard 

Till hauled off in a hearse? 

(Continued on page 8) 



7 



/ 



Membership Drive Brings More 

New Recruits 



Lack of space in the July issue of the 
Guide Post prevented publication ot 
membership contributions during the 
several weeks previous to publication. 
The July new members are, therefore, 
listed here, with the more recent ones. 

Ray J. Salmon, Vocational Agricul- 
tural Adviser from Waterford, Erie 
County, contributed three new mem- 
bers, through the aid of his boys, the 
Future Farmers of Waterford. 

Paul Yahner, outstanding Cambria 
County grower and packer of Blue 
Labels, enrolled two fellow Cambria 
Countians. 

Vice-President Roy Hess— who sel- 
dom fails to locate at least several Co- 
lumbia County growers a ni^nth for 
membership, found two more to add to 
his lengthy list. 

Director Chares H. Frey of North 
Girard, Erie County, enlisted one new 
member during the month. 

W. E. Eshelman, Vocational Agricul- 
ture Supervisor at Knoxville, Tioga 
County, enrolled one new meniber at 
?he sime time he renewed ^^l^^^^lf^^^ 
for his fine lot of students the Chatan 
esque Future Farmers of America. 

Joseph D. Young, enthusiastic boost- 
er of the Association program, from La 
lose Clearfield County, who is regu- 
S in our debt for his membership 
Sibutions, has added one more this 
month. 

T niiiv; Bailev a Centre County boost- 
er who Sa^'Grade Supervisor on the 
E ' L Nixon farm, personally enlisted 
his new member to the Association. 

Ivan Miller, of Corry, Erie County, 
who has contributed fifty times his due 
Thare of new Association members add- 
Id one more to his list this month. 



Lynn Fromm, well known lime sales- 
man and Association booster from 
Benefonte, picked up his contribution 
to the drive during his recent travels m 
Columbia County. 

Clinton Geiger, of Neffs Lehigh 
County, found his new member in his 
own community, and enlisted him. 



President J. A. Donaldson, of Emlen- 
ton, who is continuously on the watch 
for prospective members, enrolled one 
Clarion County friend this month. 

These men have each given their As- 
sociation the right kind of a push— and 
the Association management appreci- 
ates their loyal support and help. 

Other new members have come into 
the Association family, too, during re- 
cent weeks, these either by their own 
initiative and interest, or through the 
direct or indirect solicitation of a mem- 
ber of the Association staff. 

Whatever way they have come to us, 
all new members are most welcomed, 
and we are at their service. 

Complete lists of recent new members 
includes: 

Carl Eliason, Waterford, Erie County 
Archie Proctor, Waterford, Erie County 
Dr. C. K. Barton, Erie, Erie County 
Clair Cunningham, Patton, Cambria 

County 
Otto Cunningham, Patton, Cambria 

County 
Harold Hartman, Benton, Columbia 

County 
David Floyd, Benton, Columbia County 
Dixon Ward, East Springfield, Erie 

County 
Forrest B. Schoonover, Knoxville, Tioga 

County 
Clair Westover, La Jose, Clearfield 

County 
Glenn Alexander, State College, Centre 

County 
Boyd Spencer, Corry, Erie County 
C. F. Abbott, Espy, Columbia County 
Steve Dubetsky, Weatherly, Carbon 

County 
Harry I. Clymer, Elverson, Chester 

County 
Albert E. Lutz, Kutztown, Berks County 
Elmer W. Miller, Somerset, Somerset 

County 
Wendell Irons, Linesville, Crawford 

County 
William N. Duck, Millheim, Centre 
County 

(Continued on page 20) 






^fijsaff' 






8 



THE GUIDE POST 



August, 1940 



August, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 






THE SPIDER AND THE FLY 



<« > 



i( 



''Will you walk into my parlor?" said 
thespider to the fly; 
Tis the prettiest little parlor that 
ever you did spy. . 

The way into my parlor is up a windmg 

stair* 
And I have many pretty things to show 

when you are there." 
O no, no," said the little fly, "to ask me 

is in vain, . 

For who goes up your winding stair 

can ne'er come down again." 

"I'm sure you must be weary with soar- 
ing up so high; 
Will you rest upon my little bed? saia 
the spider to the fly; 

"There are pretty curtains drawn 
around, the sheets are fine and 

And if' you like to rest awhile, I'll 

snugly tuck you in." 
"O no, no," said the little fly, "for I've 
often heard it said, , 

They never, never wake again, who 
sleep upon your bed." 

Said the cunning spider to the fly, 
"Dear friend, what shall I do, 

To prove the warm affection I've al- 
ways felt for you? 

I have within my pantry, good store ot 
all that's nice; 

I'm sure you're very welcome; will you 

please to take a slice?" , . , . 
"O no, no!" said the little fly, "kind sir, 

that can not be." 
"I have a little looking-glass upon my 
parlor shelf, 

If you'll step in one moment, dear, you 
shall behold yourself." 
"I thank you, gentle sir," she said, for 
what you're pleased to say, 

And bidding you good morning, now, 
I'll call another day." 

The spider turned him round about, 

and went into his den, 
For well he knew the silly fly would 
soon be back again: 
So he wove a subtle web, in a little 

corner, sly. 
And set his table ready to dine upon 

the fly. 
Then he went out to his door again, 

and merrily did sing, 
"Come hither, hither, pretty fly, with 
the pearl and silver wing: 



Your robes are green and purple; 

there's a crest upon your head; 
Your eyes are like the diamond bright, 

but mine are dull as lead." 

Alas, alas! how very soon this silly 
little fly. 

Hearing his wily flattering words, 
came slowly flitting by. 

With buzzing wings she hung aloft, 
then nearer and nearer drew. 

Thinking only of her brilliant eyes, 
and green and purple hue; 

Thinking only of her crested head- 
poor joolish thing! At last. 

Up jumped the cunning spider, and 
fiercely held her fast. 

He dragged her up his winding stair, 

unto his dismal den. 
Within his little parlor, but she ne er 

came out again! ^ . , . 

And now, my dear young friends, who 

may this story read. 
To idle, silly, flattering words, I pray 

you, ne'er give heed; 
Unto an evil counselor, close heart, and 

ear and eye, 
And take a lesson from the tale ot the 

Spider and the Fly. 



OVER THE PICKING TABLE 

(Continued from page 5) 

Wilt thou let her have her way. 

Consult her many wishes; 
Make the fire every day 

And help her wash the dishes? 

Wilt thou comfort and support 
Her father and her mother. 

Aunt Jemima and Uncle John, 
Three sisters and a brother? 

And his face grew pale and blank. 

It was too late to jilt; 
As through the chapel floor he sank, 
He said, "I wilt." 

• • • 

A woman's heart, like the moon, is 
always changing, but there is always a 
man in it. 

• • • 

Any woman can keep a secret 'till she 
meets another woman. 

(Continued on page 20) 



\ 



Summer Activities Program Well Under Way 



The first series of Association District 
meetings were held, on schedule, from 
July 30th through August 2nd, success- 
fully, with good crowds in attendance 
in most instances 

The South-eastern Field Day, a trian- 
gular affair which had groups assemb- 
ling at Director Hugh McPherson s 
farm, at Bridgeton, and Director Jacob 
Mast's farm, at Elverson, began the pro- 
gram. Dr. E. L. Nixon assembled the 
York County group, with the heU) of 
Mr. McPherson, consisting of approxi- 
mately 80 persons, and went over the 
McPherson fields with the group. Here 
on the McPherson farm, in a section 
where many early fields have succumb- 
ed from the dry, hot weather, the fields 
were in green, thrifty condition, partly 
due to late planting, but more especially 
to the fact that they were more ideally 
cared for under adverse conditions than 
any other field viewed during the en- 
tire week's travel to the various other 
meetings. 

While Dr. Nixon and his group gath- 
ered in York County, General Manager 
Bower, met with the Chester and Lan- 
caster County groups at the Mast farm. 
Here were seen the experimental plots 
entrusted to Mr. Masts' care which 
showed definite promise. Also Mr. 
Mast's fields, approximating 150 acres, 
were viewed, and appeared in wonder- 
ful condition. 

The farm of Amos S. Eberly, at New 
Holland, was also visited, and here, too, 
was great promise for a fine crop. 

The York and Lancaster groups, then, 
met at Hershey Park, at noon, and en- 
ioved a pleasant outing there, in addi- 
Uon to viewing the Hershey Estates 
potato fields and the thriving breedmg 
project in process there. 

The Eastern Field Day was held on 
Tulv 31st with the first group gathering 
ir\le Robert Getz farm at K-sgevil^ 
■Wor^ was seen another of the experi 
Sa7plotrand the Getz fields Then 
pnroute other outstanding Pocono 
Mountain fields were visited, .including 
those of Roger Meckes, at A brightsville, 
and A T. Blakeslee, at Blakes ee Also 
here in the Poconos ^yere pointed out 
hundreds of acres of land, unusual in 
potato potentialities, as suitable sites 
for further expansion. 



This group then traveled down into 
Northampton County, to the Harry K. 
Roth farm, at Nazareth, and saw there 
still another of the seedling plots in 
wonderful shape, as well as the Roth 
fields, in the best of condition. With a 
large number of Lehigh growers here, 
the group traveled into neighboring Le- 
high County, to there see some outstand- 
ing fields, including those of Earl Hun- 
sicker, at Bath, Director P. Daniel 
Frantz, at Coplay, and Roy Wotring, at 
Schecksville. Mr. Wotring's niodern 
potato storage was also examined with 
considerable interest. 

The North Branch Field Day conven- 
ed at the farm of A. D. Knorr, in Colum- 
bia County, near Numidia, on August 
1st with a sizable group of growers on 
hand to view the experimental plots on 
test there, as well as Mr. Knorr s fine 
acreage, and his well constructed mod- 
ern storage. The Ellis Artley fields were 
then seen, and an interesting mieeting 
held on the site of the Columbia County 
Agricultural Extension varietal plots. 
The M. P. Whitenight farm was also 
seen, and the group then toured to the 
farm of Director Roy Hess, at btUi- 
water, where beautiful fields were seen 
and Mr. Hess' fine barn potato storage 
inspected. 

Lunch for this group was served in a 
Numidia grove by the Ladies Aid bo- 
ciety of Numidia, and was reported by 
all as the best ever. 

Throughout Columbia County condi- 
tions were on the dry order. There was 
evident need of rain and cooler weather, 
and some fields seen had already suf- 
fered from lack of them. 

Lynn Fromm, Bellefonte lime sales- 
man and Association booster, assisted 
the handling of the Columbia County 
meeting by bringing the Whiterock 
Quarries broadcasting car to the tour. 
The Central Field Day began, August 
2nd at Director John B. Schrack's farm, 
at Loganton, Clinton County, where 
were both good fields of commercial po- 
tatoes and an interesting and promising 
experimental plot. Then the group 
moved to Jersey Shore, Lycoming 
County, to view the progress of the ex- 
perimental project being conducted 
there by the Lycoming County Future 
Farmers of America. While at Jersey 
(Continued on page 18) 



10 



THE GUIDE POST 



August, 1940 



Dr. Nixon Writes on 

Field 

There are four things that ought to 
come out of any such occasion. The first 
is, ''Vision to see." Do not go to a field 
meet with a spirit of criticism. Vision, 
you know, has been defined as the 
mystic window through which genius 
beholds the future. If you will let 
them, someone may open the shutter of 
your window so that you may see. 

The second is, "Faith to believe." It 
takes a lot of faith when prices are low 
and weather hazards are great. But you 
know that the admonition to lean on the 
Lord was intended for the weary, not 
the lazy. Faith without work is dead. 

The third is ''Courage to do." You 
know courage has been defined as that 
quality of mind which enables one to 
encounter difficulties with firmness or 
without fear. 



■Why A Pennsylvania 
Day? 

The fourth is ''Enthusiasm." You know 
enthusiasm has been defined as eleva- 
tion of fancy or order of mind. Nothmg 
was ever attained without it. 

You will observe that all four of these 
concepts come from within. They can- 
not be put on like a hat or a pair of 
overalls. They are contageous— passed 
from one to another. 

So why a Pennsylvania All-State 
meeting? We all need to catch some- 
thing! 

When the grower withdraws from the 
group it is the first sign of internal de- 
cay. Like a banana, when you are 
separated from the 'bunch' you are 
skinned. There are many examples of 
this. 

'As a man thinketh, so is he. As he 
continueth to think, so he becomes'. 



Grower to Grower Exchange 

The rate for advertising in this column is a penny a word, minimum cost 25 cente, 
payable with order. (10% reduction when four or ^.^re msertions are ord^ 
one time.) Count name and address. Send ads to reach the GUIDE POST, Masonic 
Temple Building, Bellefonte, Penna., by the 20th of the month previous to publi- 
cation. 



POTATO EQUIPMENT FOR SALE: 

One two-row Cletrac Avery Cultivator 
complete, one two-row Cletrac Avery 
Weeder, one Killifer Disc Harrow with 
24" blades, all slightly used. Good condi- 
tion. Reasonable. If interested, write W. 
J. Braddock, c/o Wheeling Bronze Cast- 
ing Company, Wheeling, W. Va. 

PLANTER WANTED: 2 row Iron-Age 
Picker Type. Can also use good used 
grader and Digger. Write Ray Salmon, 
Waterford, Erie County, Penna. 

AVAILABLE: Copies of Dr. E. L. Nix- 
on's book, "The Principles of Potato 
Production," $1.25 per copy. Write for 
your copy today, to Association office, 
Bellefonte, Pennsylvania. 



SOLD 

DIGGER FOR SALE: One single row 
take off digger. Good repair. Will sell 
reasonably. Write Dr. E. L. Nixon, 
State College, Penna. 
SPRAY BOOM FOR SALE: John Bean 
Spray boom. Complete without nozzles. 
10 row. Good condition. Will sell cheap. 
Ed. Fisher, Coudersport, Pa. 



It may make a difference to all eter- 
nity whether we do right or wrong to- 
day. — James Freeman Clarke 

The man ready to meet opportunity 
half-way is most likely to become ac- 
quainted. 



I 



It Pays to Learn 

-PLANT LANGUAGE- 

Plants, of course, cannot talk. However, "^^"y ^J ^h^JJ 
by definite signs will indicate what they are looking f or m 
the way of plant food. Potatoes, for instance, will show 
their need for potash with leaves that have an unnatural 
dark green color and become crinkled and somewhat 
thickened. Later on, the tip will become yellowed and 
scorched This tip-burn then will extend along the leaf 
r^argins and inward toward the midrib, usually curlmg 
the leaf downward and resulting in premature dying. 

It pays to watch for these signs, but it is a far better 
nractS never to give them a chance to appear. They are 
s'gn o1 extreme potash starvation and long before they 
appear, the potash content of your soil may be so low as 
?o preatly reduce the yield and quality of your crop. If 
you do not know just how fertile your soil is, see your 
coLy agent or experiment station about having samp es 

of it tested. Then plan a fertilizer ^'^^\^\^l'''^.'^'^'Z 
store and maintain a plant-food content which will bring 
vou the greatest profits. For a good crop of No. 1 potatoes, 
son and fertilizer must supply at least 200 lbs. of available 
potash (K.0) per acre. Your fertiUzer dealer will tell you 
how little it costs to apply enough potash. 



If we can be of any help to you, 
please write us for free information 
and literature on how to fertihze 
your crops. 



means 

lUorePtofit 



flmerican Potash Institute, Inc, 



Investment Building 



Washington, D. C. 




T 



12 



THE GUIDE POST 



August, 1940 



August, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



13 



"CAMP POTATO" OPEN HOUSE, "CAMP POTATO" 

AUGUST 21, 1940 



The entire forenoon will be devoted to personally conducted tours of 
inspection about "Camp Potato." 

Those who have not been there since a year ago will be impressed 
with the improvements that have taken place during the year on the 
grounds and buildings. 

There are ample facilities in the picnic grounds for basket lunches 
and parties. 

Any who are interested in wood-craft will have an opportunity to 
take the long trail through the impenetrable forest where it is almost dark 
at noon-time, led by expert foresters. 

There is a collection of finer seedling potatoes this year at the Camp 
than ever assembled before. 

The new 12,000 bushel potato storage, costing barely $300.00, is open 
for inspection. 

At the noon hour, sandwiches, potato salad, coffee and ice-cream will 
be served from the Camp kitchen at reasonable cost. No one will need to 
go hungry for want of food or price. 

The big spring is flowing an abundance of cool, refreshing mountain 
water. 

The Junior Potato Growers, who will complete their three-day camp 
outing there on the 21st, will provide entertainment. 

It is the best judgement of all concerned that it is not advisable to 
run an all county tour for all those in attendance, because such tours are 
unwieldy. Those who head the tours are ready to leave, actually, before 
the last ones can unload. However, complete facilities will be made to 
conduct smaller groups to points of interest, including any of Potter Coun- 
ties' fine seed fields, as requested or desired. 

No set speeches will be tolerated on this occasion. However, such 
orators as the Directors and the Manager will be present to take care of 
any emergencies along this line. If anyone in the audience is observed, 
bursting to orate, he will be given the opportunity for brief remarks. (We 
suspect that Dr. Nixon will get his chance this way!) 



> 



I 



i 



Things to see at "Camp Potato": — 

Ten-odd thousand seedling varieties. 

Historic soils from Maine to Michigan by way of Pennsylvania and 
Ohio, with potatoes growing in them. 

Two hundred seventy acres of wild land belonging to the Camp, 
thirty acres in potatoes. 

Fifty-five deer have been seen in one single drove this summer; one 
bear has been seen— but no rattlesnakes. You may see some of these. 

Four hundred acres of rogued seed potatoes. 

Forest trails through the largest continuous forest area in Pennsyl- 
vania, which completely surrounds "Camp Potato". 

Those who are cooperating in the development of "Camp Potato": 

Pennsylvania Cooperative Potato Growers' Association, Inc. 
Potter County Foundation Seed Potato Growers' Association 
Pennsylvania Farm Bureau Cooperative Association 
Pennsylvania Chain Store Council 

G. L. F. 

Hershey Estates 

American Potash Institute, Inc. 

Future Farmers of America 

Machinery and Implement Manufacturers and Supply Concerns: 

Cleveland Tractor Company 

John Bean Manufacturing Company 

A. B. Farquhar Company, Ltd. (Iron Age Division) 

Champion Corporation 

Warner Company 

Chemical Lime Company, Inc. 

Whiterock Quarries, Inc. 

The Davison Chemical Corporation 

Many individuals 









! 



14 



THE GUIDE POST 



August, 1940 



POTATO CHIPS 



With the machinery all geared up for 
the new marketing season, enthusiasm 
for the program is running a new high. 
Growers who never participated in it 
before are eager to learn the plan, and 
buyers from all points are intimating 
their interest in handling the Associa- 
tion pack at the earliest date it is avail- 
able. 

O 



Director Ed. Fisher — the Association's 
long distance ice cream consumer — 
showed Eastern potato growers just 
how ice cream should be eaten when he 
attended the first series of District po- 
tato meetings. Ed's first serving, you 
know, is a mere full quart of any flavor 
you want to name, and he is not known 
to shy away from refills! 

O 



Samuel D. Gray, Northeast Manager 
for the American Potash Institute, Inc., 
of Washington, D. C, who is conducting 
some interesting experiments on fer- 
tilizer applications in conjunction with 
the various seedling plots over the State, 
was in attendance at most of the District 
meetings in the East to check the de- 
velopments of his tests. Though it is 
too early now to predict results, we 
should find, on these Pennsylvania 
proving plots, some interesting facts. 
Mr. Gray is a truly enthusiastic friend 
to the Pennsylvania potato industry, 
and his work in the breeding program 
is breeding good for all time. 

O 



''Farmers live today by Faith, hope 
and parity," said a practical man writ- 
ing in the Cooperative Cotton News of 
California. 



-O- 



General Manager Eb Bower has a 
tendency to get lost regularly when he 
visits Columbia County. Back in 1936, 
in company with former President Wal- 
ter S. Bishop, he failed to follow direc- 
tions to a meeting place, and arrived 
finally, at the proper destination, hours 
late for the meeting. Then several 
weeks ago, following a Columbia 
County meeting (which he managed to 
find through more luck than good man- 
agement) he suggested that Columbia 



native, Director Roy Hess, ride with him 
to a nearby grove where lunch was be- 
ing served — undoubtedly to be sure he 
would get there. Director Hess readily 
agreed, forthwith relaxed, and failed to 
give any directions. As a result, they 
missed their turn, and nearly — their 
lunch! 

O 

Ralph Snyder, President of the Wi- 
chita Bank for Cooperatives, writes the 
following on cooperation in the Cooper- 
alive Digest: 

"Jealousy of the success of our fel- 
low workers who have, through closer 
application to their work, or perhaps 
have been endowed by Nature with 
more ability, or possibly on whom "Lady 
Luck" may have smiled more favorably, 
is a factor in all human effort and affect 
cooperative work possibly more than 
other endeavors. 

"Personal ambition on the part of offi- 
cials, employees or members has blight- 
ed many a bright prospect for successful 
cooperative enterprise. It has a qual- 
ity that is to be commended — and yet 
when it dominates ones thoughts and 
actions, becomes a dangerous thing. If 
one can only remember that the greatest 
success for the enterprise means the 
most success for the participant,, and 
that no one who really renders a good 
service need be solicitous of due credit 
and compensation being given him, per- 
sonal ambition ceases to become a men- 
ace to success." 

These are words of wisdom, and ap- 
plicable to us all. 

O 

The first car of Blue Label potatoes 
for the 1940-41 crop season moved to 
market early this month and was pack- 
ed by Vogel & Nissley, of Lancaster, 
Penna., in their elaborately equipped 
packing house — which is something of 
a show-place in the potato industry. The 
purchaser of this first car was the Pitts- 
burgh Division of the Atlantic Commis- 
sion Company, Inc., which buyer seldom 
hesitates when given the opportunity 
to purchase Pennsylvania Blue Labels. 

(Continued on page 18) 



7 



! 









1 




The Champion Twins No. 444 2 -row power diggers— easily 

dig 15 to 25 acres per day. 

Less LABOR COSTS Cleaner POTATOES 
with OK Champion POTATO DIGGERS 



• Here's the result of 40 
years of experience — OK 
Champion No. 444— a 2-row 
potato digger built for use 
with any tractor, even me- 
dium sized **20'\ Holds its 
place on side hills — turns in 
extremely short radius. 
Streamlined— electrically 
welded one-piece frames. 
Spring balanced levers. 

Adjustable from 30" to 42" 
—rigidly attached to tractor. 
Weighs less than 2,000 lbs. 



1 




O K Champion digs cleaner — faster — 
with light draft. 



"' 1 



V/rhe for Circular 





No. 888 O K Champion one-row power 
diggers with same features as No. 444, 

OK Champion MOVABLE IRRIGATION 

Takes Dry Years Out of Farming 

Defeat drought— raise more and better yields per 
acre. O K Champion movable irrigation has in- 
creased potato yields up to 250% more per acre. 
Soon pays for itself in more No. I's— less culls. Costs 
as low as $10 per acre. Ask for irrigation circular. 

4733 Shefiield Ave. 



CHAMPION CORPORATION hammond. iNPiANk 



16 



THE GUIDE POST 



August, 1940 



Official Regulations and Instructions for Administering 

Pennsylvania's 400-Bushel Club 



As many new grower-members are 
not familiar with the regulations for 
the 400-Bushel Club, we are repeating 
these instructions and the necessary in- 
formation. 

The following regulations and instruc- 
tions for administering Pennsylvania's 
400-Bushel Club have been promul- 
gated: 

1. Any Pennsylvania potato grower 
is eligible to make application to qualify 
for membership in Pennsylvania's 400- 
Bushel Club and to have an acre of po- 
tatoes officially checked. 

2. No summary documents or reports 
shall be required from any grower. 

3. Requests for applications must be 
made to the State office of the Associa- 
tion, or 

a. From persons designated by the 
Association residing in the same 
county as the applicant, as desig- 
nated in five (5). 

4. All applications must be signed by 
the applicant in his or her own hand 
writing, in space provided for that pur- 
pose on the application. 

5. The following persons may make 
the official check: 

a. County Agent 

b. County Vocational Supervisor 

c. Vocational Agricultural Instruc- 
tor 

d. A competent person designated 
by the Association 

6. Applications for 400-Bushel Club 
membership must be forwarded to the 
office of the Pennsylvania Cooperative 
Potato Growers' Association, Inc., Belle- 
fonte, Pennsylvania. 

In order to be admitted to Club mem- 
bership or be awarded the 400-Bushel 
Club Medal, all applications must reach 
the Association office on or before De- 
cember 1st of each year. 

7. No grower will be awarded the of- 
ficial 400-Bushel Club Medal, unless the 
applicant is: 

a. A member of the Association in 
good standing, for the current 
year in which the application is 
filed, or 



b. Becomes a member of the As- 
sociation prior to or at the time of 
filing his or her application: that 
is, not later than December 1st, of 
each year. 

8. The Association will award to 
every grower who has been properly 
qualified and who has met all the above 
requirements, a suitable medal, for the 
following achievements: 

a. A grower who produces 400 or 
more bushels of potatoes on a 
measured acre, without or with 
irrigation, the regular 400-Bushel 
Club Medal. 

b. A grower who produces 500 or 
more bushels of potatoes on a 
measured acre. Medal to be suit- 
ably engraved to designate this 
accomplishment. 

c. A grower who produces 600 or 
more bushels of potatoes on a 
measured acre. Medal to be suit- 
ably engraved to commemorate 
such a feat. 

d. A grower who produces 400 or 
more bushels of potatoes on a 
measured acre for five (5) con- 
secutive years. A special gold 
medal will be suitably engraved 
to designate this accomplishment. 

e. A grower who produces 700 or 
more bushels of potatoes on a 
measured acre (without irriga- 
tion) , a special gold medal will be 
suitably engraved to commemo- 
rate the achievement. 

9. All awards will be made by the As- 
sociation during its sessions held at the 
Pennsylvania Farm Products Show, 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania during the 
month of January of each year. 



Regulations for Checking Acre: 

1. The acre to be checked shall be 
made up of any number of continuous 
equal length rows. 

2. To qualify for a 400 or 500 bushel 
yield at least one tenth of the acre must 
be dug and this area shall include the 
two outside rows of the acre. Equally 



August, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



17 



I 



spaced intermediate rows shall be in- 
cluded in the check so that not more 
than ten consecutive undug rows will 
be left in any portion of the acre. 

3. To qualify for a 600 or 700 bushel 
yield the entire acre shall be dug and 
weighed. 

4. Selection of rows to be dug may in- 
clude rows adjacent to, and rows not 
adjacent to sprayer wheel tracks. A 

proportionate number of each shall be 
dug. The number of rows adjacent to, 
and not adjacent to sprayer wheel tracks 
will vary with the size of the spray boom 
used. 

5. Accuracy in measuring and mark- 
ing the acre to be dug, in weighing and 
computing the yield shall be the re- 
sponsibility of the checking Supervisor. 
The Supervisor will consult with and 
check with the grower, who in turn will 
be responsible for providing sufficient 
help and asssitance in digging and 
weighing the potatoes. 

6. All applications, either for Club 
membership or to have the 400-BUSHEL 
MEDAL awarded, (including official 
yields) must be forwarded to the office 
of the Pennsylvania Cooperative Potato 
Growers' Association, Inc., Bellefonte, 
Pennsylvania NOT LATER THAN DE- 
CEMBER FIRST OF EACH YEAR. Ap- 
plications may be forwarded either by 
the grower or the Official Supervisor. 



"It is not the seed sown, but the men- 
tal soil, that determines what growth 
will be. The American mind simply does 
not provide the receptive soil in which 
ideas detrimental to it can flourish." 

W. J. Cameron 



"Your honor," said the foreman of the 
jury, "this lady is suing this gent for 
ten thousand dollars for a stolen kiss." 

"Correct," responded the judge. "You 
are to decide if it was worth it." 

"That's the point, your honor. Could 
the Jury have a sample?" 

• • • 

A peanut sat on a railroad track 

It's heart was all a'fiutter 
The 3:45 came rumbling fast 

Toot! Toot! Peanut Butter. 






For 



# Economical 

# Practical 

# Successful 

FALL LIMING 
- USE - 
WHITEROCK 

PULVERIZED 

LIMESTONE 




Write for prices and 
particulars 

Whiterock Quarries 

Bellefonte, Pa. 



On Display At 

"Camp Potato" 
August 21st 

Don't Fail To Inspect 

The NEW Scale for 

Weighing Pecks 

Sure, It's h 

DETECTO-GRAM 

Jack Grimison Will Be There 
In Person To Explain It To 
You— and To Take Your Order 



18 



THE GUIDE POST 



August, 1940 



August, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



19 



Mm 



mw^ 



Pennsylvania Potatoes in the Pantry 



r-*- 




The housewife is now familiar with the Association brand and is buying it from 
choice. 



SUMMER ACTIVITIES PROGRAM 
WELL UNDER WAY 

(Continued from page 9) 

Shore, the group visited the William W. 
Hayes farm, and witnessed one of the 
finest crops in Pennsylvania in the mak- 
ing. 

In view of the extreme pressure of 
work on all potato farms at this time of 
the year, and the terrific temperatures 
of the week of July 28th, the first four 
District Meetings were well attended 
and most worthwhile. 

There were evidences of real cooper- 
ation, too, which were unsolicited, but 
very welcome. For instance. President 
J. A. Donaldson traveled from his busy 
farm in Venango County into the South- 
eastern sections, and spent the entire 
week assisting with the whole series of 
meetings. Director Ed. Fisher, too, 
spent the week away from Potter 



County, and had three of his men with 
him. Likewise, Director Jacob Mast, 
and two of his men, following his own 
meeting, traveled along to the balance 
of the meetings to lend his support, as 
did Directors Hugh McPherson, P. Dan- 
iel Frantz and Roy Hess. When it is 
appreciated what a sacrifice it is for 
these Association builders to leave their 
work, to assist Association activities 
without remuneration, it is indeed im- 
portant to appreciate what service 
they are rendering their fellow men. 

The Association management is deep- 
ly indebted to the various growers who 
acted as hosts to their neighboring grow- 
ers on the occasions of these various 
meetings, and for the splendid cooper- 
ation they gave in all instances pertain- 
inEf to the conduct of the meetings. 

The second series of District Meetings 
will have been held by the time you 
read this, but as yet. the report of them 
is only that they hold great promise. 



! 



POTATO CHIPS 

(Continued from page 14) 
Distributors who are backing the 
Association marketing program are 
looking interestedly for the appearance 
of the new Association "Economy Pack." 
In it, they see the opportunity to handle 
larger quantities of Pennsylvania pota- 
toes than heretofore and a chance to ad- 
vertise the "Economy" potato to a posi- 
tion of popularity in all markets. Their 
confidence in this plan to further utilize 



Pennsylvania's crop to merchandising 
will prove a decided boon to the hun- 
dreds of growers who will not have 
quantities of Blue Label stock, giving 
them a right price for a fair consumer 
pack, and at the same time, enhance the 
value of the good Blue Label packs. 

O 

There is no question today that the 
Pennsylvania Potato Marketing Pro- 
gram is right, with a capital R. When 
(Continued on page 20) 



THE MAN WHO GETS AHEAD USES HIS HEAD . . . 

• Not to Explain Why it Can't Be Done 

• But to Figure Out a Way to do it 

ALBERT C. ROEMHILD 
Potato Commission Merchant 



Lombard 1000 



122 Dock Street 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



AN INVITATION 

THE POTTER COUNTY 
FOUNDATION SEED POTATO GROWERS' ASSOCIATION 

Cooperating with the 
PENNSYLVANIA COOPERATIVE POTATO GROWERS' ASS'N 

Cordially Invites 
ALL PENNSYLVANIA POTATO GROWERS WHO ARE ATTENDING 

THE STATE-WIDE "CAMP POTATO" OPEN HOUSE ON 

AUGUST 21st 

To See the Potter County Seed Fields - All Visitors are 
Welcomed and Cars Will Be Available for Inspection Tours 

SEE PENNSYLVANIA'S OUTSTANDING SEED 

IN THE MAKING 

THE POTTER COUNTY FOUNDATION SEED 
POTATO GROWERS' ASSOCIATION 






F. E. WAGNER, Secretary 



DON STEARNS. President 



20 



THE GUIDE POST 



August, 1940 



MEMBERSHIP DRIVE BRINGS 
MORE NEW RECRUITS 

(Continued from page 7) 

Uriah Sweitzer, Knox, Clarion County 
Kermit Roth, Neffs, Lehigh County 

Easton Potato Chip Company, North- 
ampton, Northampton County 

Snyder's Bakery, Hanover, York County 

Judson Kerr & Brothers, Inc., Philadel- 
phia, Philadelphia County 

John E. Cain Company, Cambridge, 
Mass. 

Winslow Chip Company, Marblehead, 
Mass. 



OVER THE PICKING TABLE 

(Continued jrom, page 8) 

The customer was wrathy. 

It was in the market place. 
He waved his hands excitedly 

And angry was his face; 
He shook his fist beneath the nose, 

Of the poor market man. 
And I could hear his irate words 

Deny this if you can, 
I came to buy potatoes here, 

I bought a sackful, too. 
Why are all the big ones on top 

That's what I'm asking you? 
On top they were so nice and big. 

Beneath they are so small. 
So tell me what the reason is 

Or I'll kick down your stall. 
The vegeteer was much contrite 

And humbly made reply, 
"You see those came from Iowa 

Where things grow mighty spry. 
So fast things grow in that rich soil, 

One scarcely can believe 
The tales we hear about that state 

'Tis so hard to conceive. 
They start to dig potatoes there 

At least, they tell me so 
But ere they get a sackful picked 

The last ones larger grow. 
And so, you see, the ones you bought 

Were larger much on top 
Because they were the last ones dug 

And growing didn't stop." 
The customer just shook his head 

And nothing had to say — 
I wonder if that merchant lied, 

Or do things grow that way. 

• • • 

Some people think the only reason it 
does'nt rain is because they have for- 
gotten to thunder. 



Jimmy was looking at the picture of 
the prophet Elijah, ascending to Heaven 
in a chariot of fire. When he saw the 
halo above Elijah's head, he cried, "OH, 
mother, look! He's carrying an extra 
tire." 



POTATO CHIPS 

(Continued from page 19) 

it was begun, in '36, some of us knew it 
was right — and lots of us were skeptics. 
But as this program begins its fifth year, 
and agricultural groups in various and 
sundry agricultural fields other than 
potatoes, and dozens of foreign states 
with potato problems, seek the essence 
of our plan to do a similar project as 
ours, something has been proved. As 
an example of the widespread interest 
in this Association's plan, we all might 
look to Ohio this winter, and observe 
the Ohio Potato Growers operating a 
program set up with ours as a pattern. 
O 

if you have felt, — as you have read 
these items— something lacking— you 
have been right. It is "Bill Shakespud'* 
himself. He is enjoying a well deserved 
vacation, and you have a poor substitute 
standing in for him. But perhaps the 
psychology of this let-down is good, for 
all the better will you appreciate, come 
September, when "Bill" is back on the 
job, what a good job he does for you the 
year 'round. 

O 

"Bill Shakespud" would have includ- 
ed here some appropriate observances 
on market conditions. But your humble 
substitute is hardly qualified to do this 
— and to hazard a guess might prove 
unwise; even disastrous. However, it 
is a fair bet that "Bill" would caution 
conservatism at this time in the disposal 
of early crops, for it is obvious, even to 
the writer, who wouldn't be knowing 
much about the whole thing, that the 
final outcome of the later crop is indefi- 
nite enough that there is no reason to 
expect that prices will not advance any 
above their present low. 

O 

Truth of the matter is, we are now 
to the point where we are just trying 
to fill up space — and there is a limit to 
everything! 

"Small Potato" 

(Pinch-hitting for "Bill Shakespud." 



YOUR EXTRA PROFIT 

FROM THE USE OF A BEAN RUBBER SPOOL GRADER 

WILL PAY FOR IT 




3 CAPACITY SIZES OF BEAN GRADERS 

• YOU DON'T LIKE BRUISING 

• YOU DON'T LIKE CUTTING 

• YOU DON'T LIKE INACCURACY 
IN YOUR POTATO GRADING 

..YOU DON'T GET IT.. 

WITH A BEAN RUBBER SPOOL GRADER 
OUR CATALOG SHOWS YOUR WAY TO PROFIT 

John Bean Mfg. Co. 



LANSING 



MICHIGAN 



22 



THE GUIDE POST 



August, 1940 



Bag Prices for 1940-41 Season 



1000 ] 


Delivered 


wall) 


$18.00 


wall) 


$17.50 


wall) 


$17.00 


wall) 


$45.50 


wall) 


$48.75 


wall) 


$38.50 



In order that all growers have com- 
plete information on bags and bag 
prices, repetition of the bag set-up is 
made from the July Guide Post. 

Effective August 1st, 1940, the follow- 
ing prices, on the Association trade- 
marked paper potato bags, will prevail: 

Specifications: 

15-pound bags, two wall 60/50-110 
Weight, Natural Kraft. 

60-pound bags, two wall 70/70-140 
Weight, Natural Kraft. 

60-pound bags, three wall 50/50/50- 
150 Weight, Natural Kraft. 



Prices Quoted are Per 

Blue Label, 15's (2- 

Red Label, 15's (2- 
Economy Pack, 15's (2- 

Blue Label, 60's (2- 

Blue Label, 60's (3- 

Unclassified, 60's (2- 



The above prices are for delivery to 
any point in Pennsylvania and include 
the wire loop ties and the commission to 
the Association. 

Unclassified, 60's (Black Letters) 60- 
pounds Net-*'UNCLASSIFIED POTA- 
TOES." 

Legality: 

The size of printing, lettering and no- 
menclature on the Association trade- 
marked bags meets all the requirements 
of Act 275, approved May 28th, 1937, 
and the rules and regulations promul- 
gated by the Secretary of Agriculture 
for administering the Act. ADDITION- 
AL TAGGING OR PRINTING IS UN- 
NECESSARY. 

Bag Orders 

All orders for Association trade- 
marked paper potato bags must clear 
through the office of the Association, 
Bellefonte, Pennsylvania. NO EXCEP- 
TIONS WILL BE MADE TO THIS 
REGULATION. 



Packing 

All bags are bundled, wrapped and 
tied. The 60-pound bags are packed 100 
to the bundle; the 15-pound, 250 to the 
bundle. BUNDLES CANNOT BE BRO- 
KEN. 

Delivery 

All bags will be shipped either by 
rail or truck whichever is most efficient 
and economical to all concerned. 

Terms 

All Association bags are shipped on a 
C.O.D. basis, (No exceptions). When 
bags are forwarded by rail, shipments 
will be made sight draft attached to bill 
of lading; when shipments go forward 
by truck arrangements must be made by 
the consignee to settle for same at desti- 
nation, either by check or in cash. 

Payment 

When bags are shipped sight draft 
attached to bill of lading, pay only the 
amount of the draft when same corres- 
ponds with the number of bags ordered 
and if in accordance with the above 
price schedule. 

When bags are delivered by truck, 
pay either by check or in cash. Indi- 
vidual or company checks will be ac- 
cepted by the tucking company handling 
the shipment. IN NO INSTANCE PAY 
ANY ADDITIONAL COLLECTION, 
FREIGHT OR TRUCKING CHARGES. 
Prices quoted are delivered. 

Should any irregularities occur, con- 
tact the Association office at once. 

• • • 

The act of contemplation creates the 
thing contemplated. 

n 



DO GOOD TO THY FRIEND TO 
KEEP HIM, TO THY ENEMY TO GAIN 
HIM. 

— Benjamin Franklin. 



-n- 



Quarrels would not last long if the 
fault was only on one side. 

— ^La Rochefoucauld 



SPRAY and DUST 

with 

MILLARD MODERN LIMES 

Rotary Kiln Products 



Crop Protection 



Service 



Reasonable Cost 



H. E. MILLARD 



Phone 7-3231 



Annville, Pa. 



Ql4e/S ^ Potato Diggers 




They Get the Potatoes with Least Cost and in 
Best Marketable Condition. 

Require Fewest Repairs 

Many years high record for long service and low cost. Growers report digging 150 
and more acres without repairs. Supplied in several lengths and widths; with 
continuous elevator and various attachments, as desired. 

Adapated for use with tractor, power take-off, and 
with or without engine attachments. 
Write for catalog. 

EUREKA MOWER COMPANY 

UTICA. N. Y. 









Potato Growers Profit from 

KID GLOVE Performance 



"Were it not for the splen- 
did work performed by 
my IRON AGE Kid Glove 
two-row digger, equipped 
with rubber tires, I would 
have lost 25,000 bushels of 
potatoes. No other digger 
could dig my potatoes in 
the wet condition of 
my muck soil. 

— R.H. 




Because IRON AGE Kid Glove 
Potato Diggers are designed for 
the work to be done — and will 
perform well under unfavorable 
conditions — some of our users 
lell us where other makes fail 
entirely. Kid Glove users are en- 
thusiastic about their perform- 
ance. Especially constructed to 



Double Row, 
Single 60-inch Apron 

Has no more parts than 

single row with 27 inch 

apron. 



prevent mechanical injury to the 
tubers. Kid Glove Diggers quick- 
ly pay for themselves by turning 
out more U. S. No. 1 potatoes per 
acre. If you are a profit-minded 
grower, investigate Kid Glove's 
money-making features. 



Write for Complete Information 



A. B. FARQUHAR CO., LTD. 



333 DUKE STREET 



YORK. PENNA. 



m EXPERIMENT STATiOM 
PENNSYLVANIA STATE COllfW 

STATE COLLSOF. P" 




PENNSYLVANIA COOPERATIVE 
POTATO GROWERS ASSOCIATION 



INCORPORATED 




4 

"More *V Per Acre 

-That's Where Agrico Counts!" 

Sa)f Leading Potato Growers, 
from Maine to Minnesota 

MORE No. One's — that's where potatoes pay off! It's those 
extra bushels of clean, smooth, uniform potatoes that mean 
extra cash income to the grower. And that's the basis on which 
we ask you to consider Agrico, the Nation's Leading Fertilizer. 
Wherever good potatoes are grown, from Maine to Minnesota, 
leading farmers have proved, clearly and convincingly, that Agrico's 
extra crop- producing efficiency means EXTRA yields . . . EXTRA 
quality . . . EXTRA cash profit. There's a reason — several reasons, 
in fact — why crop results on farm after farm show such outstand- 
ing records with Agrico: (1) There's an 
Agrico specially formulated to grow po- 
tatoes—made to do this one job and 
do it better; (2) Agrico is **made to 
measure" for local soils and growing 
conditions; (3) Agrico contains all the 
needed plant foods, in just the right 
balance. 

Use Agrico on your own farm and 
profit by the difference it makes in yield 
and above all in the quality of the crop. 

Agrico is Manufactured ONLY by 

The AMERICAN AGRICULTURAL CHEMICAL Co. 

Baltimore, Md. Buffalo, N. Y. 
Carteret, N. J. 

THERE'S A BRAND OF AGRICO FOR EACH CROP 



Timely Observations and Suggestions 

L. T. Denniston 
Association Field Representative 





\ 



AGRICO 



THE NATION'S LEADING 
FERTILIZER 



Crop Conditions 

Another harvest season has rolled 
around. By the time this issue of the 
Guide Post reaches your mail box the 
greater portion of the Pennsylvania 
early crop will be out of the ground and 
into storage or into market. Digging of 
the late crop will be under way, with 
harvest in full swing by October first. 
Taking the State as a whole, there were 
a number of good crops of early pota- 
toes, but many more poor ones. 

It is convenient to blame weather for 
the failures, however, it would be well 
for many growers who feel they had 
failures to check up on themselves, and 
make a real effort to grow a crop of 
potatoes m spite of the weather. As you 
look back now, how about the seed you 
planted? Was it free of disease? From 
a proven source? Well stored to pre- 
serve it's vitality? And last, but not 
least, was it planted 3 to 4 inches below 
the level in a deep, loose seed bed filled 
with an abundance of humus? Did you 
run the weeder early and often on every 
opportunity, or did you complain that it 
rained all the time and that you were 
unable to cultivate and hence let the 
weeds get the better of you? Did you 
begin spraying as soon as you could see 
the rows, spraying weekly or oftener 
thereafter, or did you wait until the 
tops were a foot to knee high, and only 
thereafter when you weren't busy at 
something else? T. B. Terry, for fifty 
years a leading potato grower in this 
country, repeated over and over in his 
institute lectures and wrote in his book 
on potato culture that the only real crop 
failure he had was in a wet season. 

The late crop, as of this writing (Sep- 
tember third), promises many fine 
crops throughout the State. Moisture 
conditions are ideal in most sections, 
and counting on the average moisture 
for September, I predict many 400 and 
500 bushel yields spread pretty well 
over the State. Unless growers are on 
the job, blight could easily overtake 
many of these fine late crops and spell 
disaster. Do your part, however, and 
the crop is as good as in the bag — Blue 
Labels, we hope. 



Markets and Marketing 

Markets have been reported as 
draggy, dull and what not over a period 
of better than two weeks, yet Miss 
Sloop, here at the office, is at this mo- 
ment confirming shipments by rail and 
truck to Philadelphia, and Baltimore 
at 19^c per peck, and to Pittsburgh at 
23c per peck. Such a market cannot 
be counted a failure at this season of 
the year. Like growing the crop, too 
many growers are looking for some- 
thing better than they are getting with- 
out doing anything about it. Don't fail 
to note that 19^c is almost 80c per 
bushel, and 23c is 92c per bushel. This 
is not price cutting, this is upholding 
the market. This is the aim always of 
the Association and deserves the ever 
increasing support of the growers. Do 
not expect the Association to do the im- 
possible, unless you add your weight to 
the cause. 

Hundreds of new growers will be set- 
ting themselves up during the coming 
weeks to market all of their crop the 
Association way. Hundreds more wil] 
be trying the Association way for the 
first time by planning to market a por- 
tion of their crop. We do not hesitate to 
predict that all of these growers will 
be boosters for the program before the 
1940-41 marketing season is over. 

Why not be one of these new packers? 
Is it lack of equipment? New, expensive 
equipment is not necessary. Let us show 
you how to use your present equipment 
to do the job. 

Is it lack of a local grade supervisor 
in your community? Let us know if 
this is the case, and we will see that one 
is properly trained and licensed for 
you or your community. 

Is it lack of confidence that you can- 
not put up a Blue Label of No. 1 grade? 
Let us check your crop, and show you 
how it would grade. If it is not practical 
to put up Blue Labels, then it can be 
packed in the new Economy pack. 

Is it because you think it is a tedious 
job to pack potatoes in peck paper bags? 
Ask those who have been packing, be 






*HE GUIDE POST 



September, 1^40 



they large or small growers, and the 
answer will be the same! 

Give us a chance to answer your many 
questions. Give us a chance to show you 
and your neighbor how very simple this 
program is in its working. We never 
own or speculate with your potatoes. 
We do not receive or handle your 
money. We do try to get you the best 
possible price for them and to have a 
market open for them when you desire 
to sell. As a Pennsylvania potato grow- 
er, this is your program. Our job is 
simply one of supervision and manage- 
ment. 
Selecting Seed Potatoes 

Hundreds of Pennsylvania potato 
growers, vitally interested in seeing 
for themselves the fields from which 
they will secure next j'^ears' seed for 
planting, are journeying into Potter 
County, and a few other scattered points 
in the State, into Michigan, and Maine. 
"Camp Potato" has done more to stimu- 
late this interest on the part of the 
growers than any other half dozen rea- 
sons. The potato growers of this State 
will be forever indebted to the State of 
Michigan and the State of Maine for 
supplying good seed over a period of 
years and making this seed available in 
quantity. It was not so much a sales pro- 
gram on the part of these states, or on 
the part of growers or agencies, but 
rather that they supplied the demand 
for good seed which was required in 
the sound potato program of Dr. E. L. 
Nixon and his co-workers in Pennsyl- 
vania over a period of twenty years. 

With the favorable climate and soil 
of the upper Allegheny Plateau Penn- 
sylvania could have supplied much of 
this seed over this period had its grow- 
ers caught the vision and set out to 
create a seed industry 20 years ago. 
These favorable climatic and soil con- 
ditions still prevail, and it has been 
amply proven that good seed can be 
consistently produced in these upper 
reaches of the Allegheny Plateau. We 
believe it is good economy, practical, 
and to the best interest of our growers 
and industry that every encouragement 
be given to a sound seed industry within 
our own State. If Michigan and Maine, 
as the two principal states supplying 
Pennsylvania from without, continue to 
meet the demand of the growers by 
supplying seed that gives a good ac- 
count of itself, and at a price the grow- 



ers can afford to pay, this trade built 
up over the past 20 years need not suf- 
fer. 

It requires approximately 3,000,000 
bushels of potatoes, good seed or other- 
wise, to plant Pennsylvania's annual 
crop. It is estimated that around 500,- 
000 bushels of disease free seed is im- 
ported by our growers annually. Al- 
though the figure fluctuates, it is safe 
to say 1,000,000 bushels of good seed, 
one year or more removed from disease 
free stock, is planted annually. This 
accounts for 1,500,000 bushels. What of 
the other 1,500,000 bushels planted an- 
nually? The greatest need in the seed 
industry today is a practical, economic- 
al system of distribution for seed. 

Don't Let Your Sprayer Freeze 

It will be many weeks after you re- 
ceive this issue of the Guide Post un- 
til killing frosts and light freezes are 
upon us. The sprayer must still be in 
use on green growing crops throughout 
September to play safe against the 
danger of a late attack of blight. If the 
sprayer is standing out on one of these 
late September or early October frosty 
mornings, you are apt to find you have 
a welding job on your hands, or even 
have the expense of a new pump staring 
you in the face. Water in the cylinder 
chambers will freeze more quickly than 
otherwise. Either store the sprayer dur- 
ing the latter weeks of the season, cover 
the pump well, or drain it. 

You may be neglecting some other 
potato equipment that should be under 
cover. Most potato equipment rusts out 
faster than it wears out, especially in 
the case of the smaller grower. 

Arrange the Storage for 
Safety and Efficiency 

I have seen more storages under con- 
struction and others being arranged 
and rearranged for safety and efficiency 
for handling potatoes this year than in 
any other year in the history of the 
potato program. 

Among the new storages the straw 
loft construction is most common, and 
from the experience of those already 
using such storages, this cannot be far 
wrong. Potatoes of a much more con- 
sistent condition, as to keeping, rot, 
moisture, etc., were packed from these 
storages during the past two seasons 
than from any other construction. 

(Continued on page 18) 



September, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



,. 



Open House at ^Camp Potato" Draws Big 
Crowd of Growers and Friends 



*'Open House''— not only for a day, 
but for a week— at "Camp Potato" wel- 
comed her founders, builders and own- 
ers, Pennsylvania's potato growers, to a 
varied program of activities, stretching 
from Saturday, August 17th, through to 
Saturday, August 24th. 

Things started in a quiet enough way 
Saturday afternoon, on the 17th, but 
the tempo kept increasing by evening, 
and through Sunday, until Monday 
morning, when roll was called, it re- 
vealed that 40 rollicking, energetic sons 
and daughters, aged 9 to 14, of potato 
growers were in camp for a three-day 
stay. To this number were added 15 
adults, some performing one or another 
of many assigned tasks and making 
themselves responsible for keepmg the 
pent up energy of these youngsters in 
tow and others visitors at the Camp. A 
full report of the activities of this group 
appears elsewhere in this issue, so let s 
get on with the story. 

The Big Day — Wednesday, August 
21st: Before the frost had all melted 
away (We did have frost that morning 
and more the following Saturday morn- 
ing) the first arrivals were on the scene. 
It wasn't a case of the early bird getting 
the worm, for worms are scarce on 
frosty mornings. It seems as though 
those who come early stay longest, for 
a number of these early comers stayed 
over, not only for the day, but over 
night Like the swallows, they kept 
coming; some left as the day wore on, 
but always more came. And so the 
records show that 1200 to 1500 growers 
sons and daughters, and friends visited 
the Camp for the big day. Some of these 
were in the group which stayed over 
for the following three days — which 
proved most active, for this stay-over 
group accomplished much at the Camp. 
The program for the big day began 
with an inspection of the Camp and 
Camp property, with emphasis placed 
on the many imrovements there since 
the last Field Day at the Camp a year 
ago. More significant among these im- 
provements were weatherboarding the 
outside of the Camp with beautiful as- 
bestos shingles, addition of a comfort- 
able residence— the quarters now oc- 



cupied by Mr. and Mrs. Wayne A. Hind- 
man and daughter, Connie, resident 
managers of the Camp, completion of a 
10,000 bushel storage which has proven 
the most practical and economical addi- 
tion to the Camp property, clearing and 
breaking of 25 acres of land — now 
planted to seedling potatoes. There were 




"Camp Polato" never had a sign worthy 
of its dignity and importance until last 
month. Director Jacob K. Mast, felt the 
need of a sign so intently that he had the 
sign pictured above erected and attrac- 
tively painted, and donated it to the 
Camp. This, indeed, is a worthy gift. 

many minor improvements which have 
added to the Camp and propery as a 
whole, but too numerous to mention 
here. It is hoped that by August, 1941 
we can point to a number of additional 
improvements now planned, that will 
be equally or even more impressive to 
the Camp's visitors. Have yourself 
ready— as an Association member and 
Camp owner you may be called upon 
to help. 

Dr. Nixon spent the greater part of 
the forenoon showing and explaining 
seedling plots. Those who were in on 

(Continued on page 16) 



6 



THE GUIDE POST 



September, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 

Published monthly by the Pennsylvania 
Cooperative Potato Growers, Inc. 

OFFICERS 

J. A. Donaldson, Emlenton . . President 

Roy R. Hess, Stillwater Vice-Pres. 

E. B. Bower, Bellefonte, 

Sec*y-Treas. and Gen. Mgr. 



DIRECTORS 

Jacob K. Mast Elverson, Chester 

P. Daniel Frantz Coplay, Lehigh 

Hugh McPherson Bridgeton, York 

John B. Schrack Loganton, Clinton 

Roy R. Hess Stillwater, Columbia 

Ed. Fisher Coudersport, Potter 

Charles Frey North Girard, Erie 

J. A. Donaldson, R.l, Emlenton, Venango 
R. W. Lohr Boswell, Somerset 

Annual membership fee $1.00. This in- 
cludes the Guide Post. 

All communications should be ad- 
dressed to E. B. Bower, Secretary-Treas- 
urer and General Manager, Bellefonte, 
Pennsylvania. 



Special Information for 

Grade Supervisors 

Beginning with this issue of the 
Guide Post, a page, or two, when neces- 
sary, to be headed PUTTING PENN- 
SYLVANIA POTATOES IN THE BAG, 
will be devoted to information of timely 
and vital interest to all Grade Super- 
visors. This is to be permanent, with a 
space in each issue given over to in- 
struction, notices, pointers and new 
ideas, and items of interest to these men. 

The ever increasing number of grow- 
ers packing and marketing through the 
Association program recognize the im- 
portant task being performed by these 
men to them, as packers, to the commu- 
nities which they serve, and to the in- 
dustry of the State. 

We have contended, from the begin- 
ning of this program, that this task can 
be most practically and economically 
done by men properly trained within 
the local community where their serv- 
ices could be quickly had by the grower 



or packer, and at a wage conforming 
with the farm wages in their communi- 
ties. 

We have contended that men capable 
of being qualified to do the job are to be 
found in these local communities, that 
their training and employment in the 
work is good, not only for the men so 
trained and employed, but for the com- 
munity as well, in dollars and cents, in 
pride and increased potato knowledge. 

That we have not been far wrong in 
this conception is attested to by the fact 
that not a single grower has asked for 
the discontinuance of a Grade Super- 
visor employed by him, nor has a single 
Grade Supervisor employed by a 
grower, asked to be dropped from the 
list. We have, much to our regret, found 
it necessary to revoke the license of 
several men. Two of these have come 
back for retraining and asked to be re- 
licensed. 

We recognize the need of uniform 
supervision of the Grade Supervisors 
and their work, and will do all in our 
power to see that this supervision is 
given. 

Meetings are now being planned 
whereby all of the 200 or more Super- 
visors throughout the State will be 
contacted and additional ones trained 
for growers and communities where 
their services are desired. 

All Grade Supervisors should look 
forward to each issue of the Guide Post 
and the new page as announced here, 
with a thought of keeping up to date 
and improving the services they are 
rendering. 



The Weather 

We have made several very fine trips 
around the State of Pennsylvania, as 
well as into Ohio and New York this 
summer. We have seen many potato 
fields, potato storages and many other 
things of interest. And it has been in- 
spiring to make new contacts and re- 
new old ones. 

One of the biggest thrills we got was 
when we saw the Pocono Mountains. It 
was then that I wanted to 'phone back 
to Potter County and tell the boys there 
to load up the big breaker plow and a 
Cletrac and start at once to meet us 

(Continued on page 22) 



September, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



. 



Tour of Potter County Seed Fields 

Well Attended 



\ 



Starting from "Camp Potato" follow- 
ing the noon-day program for the Open 
House on August 21st, between three 
and four hundred potato growers par- 
ticipated in the tour of Potter County 
seed fields, which was under the direc- 
tion of the Potter County Seed Growers' 
Association, with County Agent Bert 
Straw as leader, accompanied by J. B. 
R. Dickey, O. D. Burke and R. B. Don- 
aldson, of State College. 

The first stop of the tour was at the 
fields of Everett Blass, where 60 acres 
of Early "Nittanys" and Russet Rur- 
als were inspected. The season being 
unfavorable for early potatoes in the 
Potter County area (too cold and wet 
during the early part of the season, 
and from this into hot weather), the 
"Nittanys" showed a light yield. The 
quality, however, is good, free of dis- 
ease, clean, bright tubers, and a high 
Dercentage of seed of a size desired by 
many growers. The Russet Rurals 
showed good type, with P^o^^^e of good 
yields typical of the many fields in the 
county. 

Though a stop was not made, enroute 
to the Blass farm from ''Camp Potato 
the fine fields of Foster Blough includ- 
ing Bliss Triumphs, Nittanys and Rus- 
set Rurals were observed. 

From the point of the stop at the 
Blass fields could be seen the beginning 
of three great river drainage systems-- 
the Allegheny, which winds its way 
North and Westward into the Ohio at 
Pittsburgh, and thence into the Missis- 
sippi and the Gulf of Mexico; the Gen- 
esee, which flows North and East into 
the St. Lawrence and the uult oi &i. 
Lawrence; and the Susquehanna, which 
flows South and East mto the Chese- 
peake Bay. 

The second stop of the tour was made 
at the farm of Tom Neef e, where a fine 
field of Chippewas was examined The 
yield was not heavy, but indicated ex- 
cellent quality. A demonstration test 
plot was examined at this stop which 
compared different practices for the 
benefit of Potter County growers.. 

The' tour then proceeded to the largest 
seed field in the County, on one of the 



A C. Ramseyer farms, under the man- 
agement of Ed. Fisher, Association 
Director for the North Central Coun- 
ties. The tour drove the full length of 
the field— 100 acres, planted to Penni- 
gan, Russet Rurals, Chippewas and 
Bliss Triumph. No stop was necessary 
at this point, as the sight of this large 
field, well cared for from planting, cul- 
tivating and spraying sufficiently ad- 
vertised not only itself but Potter 
County seed growing and Potter County 
seed as a whole on a commercial scale. 
The final stop of the tour was at the 
farm of Barnett & Sons, who have done 
much to foster a commercial seed de- 
velopment in Potter County. Their 
field comprises 200 acres of Russet 
Rurals, Pennigans, Nittanys and Katah- 
dins. With the exception of the Nittanys, 
which due to the season, as previously 
stated, all of this acreage gave promise 
of excellent yields and all varieties in- 
cluding Nittanys showed excellent 
quality of clean, smooth tubers. 

The fields visited gave the visiting 
growers a good cross section picture of 
the 1250 acres of seed being grown by 
members of the Potter County Founda- 
tion Seed Potato Growers' Association. 
A list of these growers, their addresses, 
and varieties grown follows: Barnett 
& Sons, Coudersport— Pennigan, Russet 
Rural, Nittany, Katahdin; L. L. Leete, 
Genesee — Pennigan, Russet Rural; 
James Furman, Genesee — Nittany, 
White Rural, Russet Rural; A. C. Shoop, 
Coudersport— Nittany, Chippewa, Rus- 
set Rural; Art Mattison, Coudersport— 
Pennigan, Russet Rural; Don Stearns, 
Coudersport— Pennigan, White Rural; 
Walter Metzger, Coudersport — Russet 
Rurals; Walter Leete, Genesee— Russet 
Rurals; Ed. Fisher, Coudersport— Nit- 
any, Pennigan, Bliss Triumph, Russet 
Rural, Chippewa, White Rural; Foster 
Blough, Coudersport — Nittany, Bliss 
Triumph, Russet Rural; Everett Blass, 
Coudersport— Nittany, Chippewa, Kat- 
ahdin, Russet Rural; Lyle Tarbox, Ulys- 
ses—White Rural, Russet Rural; Leigh 
Neffe, Coudersport — Chippewa; Tom 
Neffe, Coudersport— Chippewa; Merle 
Jacobs, Coudersport — Russet Rurals; 

(Continued on page 18) 



8 



THE GUIDE POST 



September, 1940 



OVER THE PICKING TABLE 



by Inspector Throwout 



People who know little are usually- 
great talkers, while men who know 
much say little. 

— Jean Jacques Rousseau 

• • • 

What you keep by you may change 
and mend, but words once spoken can 
never be recalled. 

• • • 

He: "You only kiss me now when you 

want money." 

She: "Good gracious John, isn't that 

often enough?" 

jf Jf ^ 

Men who get rich quick must do it 
on other people's money. There is no 
other way. 

• • • 

Baby — An alimentary canal with a 
loud voice at one end and no responsi- 
bility at the other. 

• • • 

"So, she's dumb, is she? Say, she's so 
dumb she thinks the organ grinder 
works for the monkey because the mon- 
key collects the money." 

• • • 

"I think I'll go to Virginia for my 
health," said the ailing actor. 

"Well, Virginia has cured a lot of 
hams, you know." 

• • • 

Possibly you won't win, even if you 
try — but you will positively fail if you 
do not try. 

• • • 

One invariable result of war is the 
rich get the shekels and the poor get 
the shackels. It also knocks the L out 
of glory. 

• • • 

Remember the week-day to keep it 
holy. 

• • • 

Armistices are agreed upon only for 
the sake of getting into the other's camp 
to find out what is going on. 



We shall never get the right idea of 
work until we see at the bottom of it is 
public service. 

• • • 

A militarist is a man who is always 
willing to lay down your life for his 
country. 



DOBBINS BROTHERS TO 
HANDLE LOWER GRADES 

IN PITTSBURGH AREA 

A contract has been executed with 
DOBBINS BROTHERS. 2014 PIKE 
STREET, PITTSBURGH, PA., for the 
movement of the lower grades of pota- 
toes in the Pittsburgh marketing area 
as during the 1939-40 season. 

The commission of a commission mer- 
chant is 10 7c. Of this 10% deducted by 
the sales agent, 3% will be refunded by 
him to the association upon completion 
of the sale. This 37 refund in turn has 
been deducted from the price of all As- 
sociation bags used for the lower grades, 
in order to bring the price of the con- 
tainer more nearly in line with the grade 
of potatoes being packed and sold. In 
other words, the 3% refund is turned 
back to the growers. 

By the elimination of competition on 
the Association pack of Red Labels (U. S. 
No. 1, Size B); Green Label (U. S. Com- 
mercial) ; also Unclassified in 60 -pound 
paper, which is accomplished by giving 
but one concern in each market the ex- 
clusive sale of these packs, the highest 
net returns are assured to the grower, 
while at the same time, identified pota- 
toes are better established in the mar- 
kets. 

The above mentioned concern has al- 
ready established a real demand for the 
Association pack in Pittsburgh. 

Confine the movement of the above 
mentioned trade-marked packs to the 
concern mentioned and thereby help 
yourself and the Association in its at- 
tempts to again popularize Pennsylvania 
potatoes in her own markets. 

Also confine delivery of potatoes to 
the above house in the lower grades 
only. 



September, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 






1 



Growers Show Active Interest In 
Western Field Days 



i 



Starting at the farm of Claud Bauer- 
master, near Berlin, Somerset County, 
on Tuesday, August 13th, a series of 
tours and meetings were conducted over 
Western Pennsylvania during the suc- 
ceeding four days. Attendance on the 
various tours and stops ranged from 50 
to 150, with good interest shown at all 
points by those participating. 

The outstanding point of interest in 
the Somerset tour was the plot of 200 
new seedling varieties now under trial 
on the Bauermaster farm, being grown 
under the supervision of Mr. Bauer- 
master and the Somerset County Future 
Farmers. These seedlings, as well as all 
other seedlings seen at the various stops 
during the next four days, were de- 
veloped at "Camp Potato." Growers 
showed an intense interest in the prom- 
ise shown by a large number of these 
new seedlings. 

The tour proceeded from the Bauer- 
master farm to the farm of Joe Fisher, 
who was one of the original packers of 
Blue Labels, near Windber. Over 100 
acres of promising Russet Rurals and 
Katahdins were seen at this stop, with 
this entire acreage having been plantea 
with seed grown by members of the Fet- 
ter County Foundation Seed Potato As- 
sociation. 

From the Fisher farm the group pro- 
ceeded to a beautiful picnic grove near 
Boswell for lunch, for a demonstration 
in grading and packing of Blue Labels, 
and a speaking program. Lester Lohr, 
President of the Somerset County i^o- 
tato Growers Association, presided over 
the meeting. Mr. Lohr is the son of Rob- 
ert Lohr, present Association Board 
Member, and for a number of years 
President of the State Association. 

The program included a well stated 
explanation of Association activities 
and marketing plans for the fall season 
by General Manager, E. B. Bower, a 
timely discussion of what the marKei- 
ing program had meant to the Columbia 
County growers, by Vice-President, Roy 
R. Hess, and a timely and well received 
address by Dr. E. L. Nixon on his re- 
lationship to the potato growers and 
the industry in his new position as Agri 



cultural Counselor for the Pennsylvania 
Store Council. 

Following the meeting, the group 
proceeded to the fine fields of Mr. Lohr, 
where additional seedlings were in- 
spected. 

Growers and friends were present 
from Somerset, Cambria, Centre, Co- 
lumbia, Dauphin, Bedford, Indiana and 
Mercer Counties, and two other import- 
ant potato growing states, Florida and 
North Dakota. 

Cambria County Meeting 
jor the Central Area 

Wednesday, August 14th, started with 
a meeting at the farm of Yahner Broth- 
ers, near Patton, who have been steady 
packers of fine Blue Labels for the past 
two seasons. Although the season had 
been dry here, thorough spraying, 
which was in process when the first ar- 
rivals appeared, was holding a good 
foliage development on the 200 acres 
seen at this stop. 

With Vice-President Roy Hess of- 
ficiating, Mr. Bower was again called 
upon to discuss the Association program 
and the plans for the present marketing 
season. J. K. Mast, Director from Lan- 
caster County, and Ed. Fisher, Director 
from Potter County, both explained the 
favorable functioning of the marketing 
program in their sections during the 
past seasons. Dr. Nixon held forth for 
a full hour on his interest in the growers 
and the further advancement of the 
Pennsylvania potato industry, and the 
urgency of Pennsylvania's holding her 
place with competing producing areas 
and other states. 

A tour formed at this point to go to 
the seedling test plot on the farm of P. 
L. Leiden, at St. Lawrence. Here 19 
seedlings, all of which showed promise 
of a good yield except one, were seen. 
Many of the growers marveled at the 
excellent appearance of quality shown 
by a number of those dug. This was the 
scene of further timely discussions by 
growers, with Dr. Nixon in the center 
of the ring. 

Fom the Leiden farm, the tour pro- 
ceeded to the Yahner Homestead, where 
a most delightful lunch was served un- 



-K#^ 



10 



THE GUIDE POST 



September, 1940 



September, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



11 



der the shade trees by Mrs. Yahner and 
the Yahner girls. 

A digging demonstration and a dis- 
cussion of grades and packing Blue 
Labels, and the New Economy pack fol- 
lowed in order after lunch. 

Growers and friends were present 
from the following counties: Lehigh, 
Centre, Lancaster, Clearfield, Potter, 
Mercer, Cambria, Somerset and Co- 
lumbia. 

Venango-Butler Meeting for 
the West Central Area 

Thursday morning, August 15th, be- 
gan with early arrivals pulling in at the 
farm of President J. A. Donaldson, near 
Emlenton, Venango County. The meet- 
ing got under way with the inspection 
of a planting of seedlings, the seed being 
one year removed from "Camp Potato". 
A number of these varieties produced 
over 400 bushels per acre on the Don- 
aldson farm a year ago. Another item 
of interest to growers at this stop was 
a good stand of sweet clover seeded 
with soy beans. 

The tour proceeded to the adjoining 
farm of Austin J. Donaldson, brother of 
President J. A. Donaldson, where a 
new straw-loft storage was inspected. 
Mr. Donaldson reported unusual suc- 
cess in holding potatoes in ideal condi- 
tion for packing throughout the winter, 
as well as holding potatoes already 
packed for market without loss of 
weight or breakage of the bags. 

Additional stops before noon included 
a new farm put into operation by Presi- 
dent Donaldson and operated largely by 
one of the future potato growers, his 
son; the farm of Mr. Hendershot, who 
grows and packs Blue Labels, near by 
at a view of the big bend on the Alle- 
gheny River; and a short stop at the 
farm of Mr. E. F. Redfoot, near Harris- 
ville. Mr. Redfoot has been growmg 
and packing Blue Label quality pota- 
toes for several years. 

The afternoon was spent at the Tom 
Denniston farm, south of Slippery Rock, 
across in Butler County. Here an in- 
spection of a plot of 10 seedlings showed 
an unusual set, and promise of a good 
yield and excellent quality. A digging 
demonstration in Nittanys, grown from 
seed secured from the Potter County 
Seed Growers Association, and yield- 
ing 250 bushels per acre, was followed 
by the grading and packing of Blue 



Label bushels in the cool, roomy storage 
on the Denniston farm. 

Preceding the speaking program, 
held under the shade of two large ap- 
ple trees, Mr. Denniston treated the 
entire crowd to a watermelon feast by 
rolling out six immense watermelons. 

President Donaldson presided over 
the meeting, and General Manager 
Bower presented the Association pro- 
gram and marketing plans for the sea- 
son in creditable manner. Directors Hess 
and Mast each spoke briefly on the op- 
eration of the program in their areas, 
and the success it had been in marketing 
potatoes for the growers. 

Growers and friends were present at 
one or more stops from the following 
counties: Centre, Butler, Lawrence, 
Mercer, Potter, Erie, Lehigh, Lancaster, 
Columbia, Allegheny, Venango, and 
Clarion. 

Erie County Meeting jor 
the North-East Area 

An extensive planting of around 200 
seedlings on the C. W. Billings farm, on 
the shore of Edinboro Lake, southern 
Erie County, was the gathering point 
Friday morning, August 16th. The plot 
here was planted by the Edinboro Fu- 
ture Farmers, under the direction of 
Norman P. Manners, Vocational Agri- 
cultural instructor. The plot showed a 
most careful job had been done by these 
future farmers — some to be potato 
growers, of course — under the direction 
of their instructor. 

Following a check over of the plots, 
which revealed a number of very prom- 
ising varieties, a short period was taken 
for discussion, with Field Representa- 
tive, L. T. Denniston, explaining how 
this community had been known to pro- 
duce high quality potatoes and could 
and should market the Association way 
to hold this reputation and create a 
permanent potato business for the 
growers. 

A tour formed from the Billings farm, 
proceeding to Girard for lunch, and 
then to the fields of Frank Barney, near 
by. Practices in this area along the 
shore of Lake Erie were new to grow- 
ers from down state, and they came 
forth with many questions. Mr. Barney 
grows over 300 acres in the Girard area 
with approximately an equal acreage 

(Continued on page 18) 



1 






NOTICE TO 

HUNTERS 

Arrangements have been 
made to make "Camp Potato" 
available to all Association 
members and their guests dur- 
ing the deer hunting season. 

Sleeping cots, mattresses, 
and pillows are available. 
Blankets, bed linens, and other 
accessories must be furnished 
by applicants. 

The use of all alcoholic bev- 
erages is strictly probibited, 
and Association members shall 
be responsible for the proper 
conduct of their guests. 

The cost will be $1.50 per 
day, per person, all meals in- 
cluded, and reservations 
should be made early by con- 
tacting 



Mrs. Wayne Hindman 
''Camp Potato'' 

Coudersport, Penna. 
First come — First served 



PACK 

POTATOES 

IN PAPER! 

IT'S THE WAY OF 
MODERN 

MERCHANDISING 

Attractively Printed Paper 
Bags Bring Greater Returns 
to the Grower. 

HAMMOND 
BETTERBAGS 

Combine High Grade Printing, 
Strength and Quality 

HAMMOND 
BETTERBAGS 

Will Bring You Repeat Orders 




Hammond Bag & 
Paper Co. 

WELLSBURG, W. VA. 

Bags for 

Lime, Limestone, Fertilizer, Flour, 

Feed and Potatoes 



12 



THE GUIDE POST 



September, 1940 



September, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



13 



Putting PennsylvaniaPotatoes in the Bag 

ATTENTION— GRAJE SUPERVISORS 



PROGRESSI VENESS : 

1. He who progresses is familiar with current events and topics of general 

interest. (Potato topics and events) 

2. He takes a critical attitude toward his work, methods, and results achieved. 

(Grading and packing potatoes) 

3. He seeks carefully for plans to strengthen his work. (So as to better serve 
the growers, the community, and the Association) 

These oints embody the thought back of devoting a page or two of each issue of 
the Guide Post to problems of the Grade Supervisor. We are mterested m pro- 
gress—so are you. We are interested in improving the work, methods and results 
achieved— so are you. We are interested in strengthening the work you are doing, 
hence we are interensted in your welfare, the growers and the community whicn 
you serve — so are you. 

THE POTATO SIZER: 

Association packs have been put up on all kinds of sizers, even by hand. Factors 
entering into the type of equipment needed to do the job are; the amount of potatoes 
to be packed, labor, time, and the amount of potatoes desired to be moved by the 
grower. The program is so geared as to serve the grower with ten bushels ot potatoes 
as well as the grower with ten thousand bushels or more. It is not practical or 
necessary for the small grower to equip himself with expensive sizing equipment. 
It is however, practical and economical for the larger grower to modernize His 
sizing, grading, packing, and storage equipment. Efficiency is needed, is essential. 

The sizer is in no sense a grader. Grading is still a human factor. 

The sizer however, in order to do its task properly demands some attention and 
in this the Grade Supervisor can give or council with the packer or grower in seeing 
that it is done. 

1. Oil or grease is the life of any machine. 

2. See that the machine is level. 

3. Check from time to time to see that it is sizing properly. If 2" is the minimum 
size desired see that it is not cheating the grower or the buyer. 

4. If potatoes are being bruised, cut, or crushed see if this cannot be prevented 
by adjustment or repair. 

5. Study the position of the sizer in relation to the pile of potatoes to be graded 
and relocate if necessary so as to save steps, and efficiency in grading and packing. 

6. Clean up around the sizer and the grading room. This is a sign of a careful 
packer. 

LET THERE BE LIGHT: 

Good light is essential to doing a good pob of grading. If electric current is not 
to be had, a hot shot battery or a gas jet lamp or lantern may be used but be sure 
that each of the latter are kept up to par. 

The light should be so placed as to give uniform light over the sizer or picking 
table. Shadows may come from the sizer itself or from the graders as they stand 
at the side of the machine. These must be avoided or overcome if you are to be 
efficient. Cheap shades can serve a real purpose in cutting down sharp glaring light 
where electricity is used. A couple of extension cords are a real asset in giving 
proper light for weighing, and in the bin in addition to the light over the sizer. 
"Let there be light." 



1 



KEEP THE PACK CLEAN: 

The Grade Supervisor can do much in seeing that the pack is kept clean. This 
begins with storing of the bags before they are packed through until they are de- 
livered to the Warehouse or Stores. Excessive moisture is certain to collect dust and 
result in smeared bags. Dirty hands in filling or crimping the bags does not result 
in a clean pack. Proper racking or piling of the pack is another point where clean- 
liness can be assured. If the pile is not properly stacked it may fall over and result 
in not only soiled bags but broken ones as well. If you are piling or racking against 
a wall, start the first bottom row out a foot from the wall. Each succeeding layer 
should be a little closer to the wall which will result in the pile leaning to the wall 
with no danger of falling over. The bottom of the bag should be to the wall with 
all tied ends facing toward the one doing the piling. They will pile better this way 
and are easier to load. Paper or an old tarpolin spread over the pile when througn 
packing will catch dust and shed any water that may drip onto the bags from above. 

CHECK YOUR SCALES: 

Weight is as important as grade. Scales should be checked from time to time. 
Check them against scales that you know to be accurate. Your County or adjoin- 
ing City sealer of weights and measure will call at your farm when in your section 
and check your scales free of charge. Do not expect him to make a special trip to 
do this but I am sure he will cooperate if you give him an apportunity. Do not 
expect the seal or check he makes to last for ever. 

A potato under the scales will often throw them off, dirty or unlevel scales will 
often result in inaccuracy. 

A block of metal of which you know the accurate weight ^^^^es a good item 
with which to check the scales from time to time. A bag of potatoes (fry when 
packed will do the job if used for only a day or two and then rechecked by ac- 
curatTscales, but you must remember that potatoes will in time lose weight. 

NOTES OF INTEREST: 

Grade Supervisor Joseph Young, LaJose, Clearfield Co. has recently purchased 
a siz?/l^?hTeTxpec{s to^^^^ farm to ^-m in se^ growers^^ 

community. He reports a good crop in prospect in his area. We are glad to hear 
this as this community was hard hit by drought a year ago. 

Grade Supervisors who have not returned their old stamp, should do so at once 
The new S which >^^^^^^ in use this season will be forwarded without cost by 
return mail with instructions on how it is to be used. 

Five new Grade Supervisors were trained and licensed in Warren County 
during iugu^t and are now at work grading and packing potatoes in this area. 

credited with such items or notes in a following issue on tnis page. 



14 



THE GUIDE POST 



September, 1940 



Membership Drive Makes Enormous Gains 



During the past month, more mem- 
berships were taken in the Association 
than in any previous month during the 
year, excepting of course, January, 
when most growers renew their mem- 
berships at the Farm Show. 

Of the large number of memberships 
paid, many were new ones, never be- 
fore in the Association, and many ot 
these came unsolicited. 

However, there were some very fine 
and substantial membership contribu- 
tions, too, which we acknowledge: 

Vice-President Roy R. Hess, of Still- 
water, always on the job seeking new 
members, and a very large contributor 
to our drive, added six new menibers to 
the fold, four from his county, Colum- 
bia, and one each from Luzerne and 
Lackawanna Counties. These are most 
appreciated. 

Ray J. Salmon, enthusiastic booster 
vocational instructor, from Waterford, 
Erie County, who also has contributed 
to the drive before, enlisted four more 
new members during the month, all 
from Erie County. This, too, is real 
boosting. 

John G. Reiniger, of Stoney Creek 
Mills, Berks County, too, located four 
fine new members and enlisted these. 
Cooperation? Well, we should say! 

Former Vice-President M. P. White- 
night, of Bloomsburg, secured his new 
member to the Association from his own 
county. Mr. Whitenight's long list of 
generosities to the Association, in all 
its endeavors, is something well known 
and appreciated by all of us. 

Frank Bausch, of Fairview, Erie 
County, enthusiastic Association packer 
and booster, found another new member 
in his local community, and enrolled 
him. This is not Mr. Bausch's first new 
member contribution, either. 

Joseph D. Young, of La Jose, Clear- 
field County, who has so frequently con- 
tributed to the drive that we are kept 
busy keeping track of him, brought his 
most recent new member right up to the 
"Camp Potato" Open House, and had 
him signed up officially. 

C. K. Phillips, Association packer 
from New Bethlehem, Clarion County, 
enrolled a potato growing friend from 



Luzerne County during the Couders- 
port get-together. This is not his first 
boost to the drive. 

T. S. Ingram, of Corry, another Erie 
County booster, sent in a new member- 
ship for a nearby Crawford County 
grower, much to the gratification of the 
Association. 

Carl Spelling, of Beal Lake, an en- 
thusiastic packer from Warren County, 
enrolled his new member from his own 
community. This help is appreciated, 
no end. 

Ora Gibbons, of Corry, Erie County, 
secured his new member too this 
month, from his county. This contribu- 
tion, as the others, shows the real co- 
operative spirit. 

In addition to the personalized con- 
tributions, 28 new members came into 
the Association on their own. 

All in all, it was a very good month 
in the drive, and we are honored and 
pleased to have with us the following 
new men: 

O. D. Coon, Clarks Summit, Lacka- 
wanna County 

M. N. Koch, Huntington Mills, Lu- 
zerne County _ 

Daniel G. Lindermuth, Catawissa, 

Columbia County 

Delbert Hoagland, Catawissa, Colum- 
bia County 

Mervin L. Mensch, Catawissa, Co- 
lumbia County 

A. M. Gregowrvig, Numidia, Colum- 
bia County 

Carl Hunt, Waterford, Erie County 

Leroy G. Lewis, Waterford, Erie 
County 

M. L. Port, Waterford, Erie County 

John Boleratz, Jr., Union City, Erie 

County , ^ 

Arthur Shultz, Reading, Berks Coun- 
ty , ^ X 
Walter Ritter, Oley, Berks County 

Adam Gaul, Lorane, Berks County 

Clarence Ritter, Stoney Creek Mills, 
Berks County 

Hoffman Brothers, Bloomsburg, Co- 
lumbia County 

Ralph Hammer, Fairview, Erie Coun- 
ty 

Joseph Dolges, Mahaffey, Clearfield 

County 

(Continued on page 16) 



« 

Preparing for the 
September Round-up 

September is "Round-up" time for the potato grower. 
As the grov^ing season nears an end, potatoes fill out into 
the sizes and shapes v^hich mean price differences on grad- 
ing tables. Did you prepare for this "round-up" by making 
plenty of potash available to your crop throughout the 
season, with enough left over to put the finishing touches 
on the tubers? 

Potash is the quahty element in potato fertilizer. In addi- 
tion to increasing yields, it rounds out the tubers and in- 
sures a greater percentage of No. I's. It also improves cook- 
ing quality of the potatoes. In sections where there is 
danger of injury from early frost, plenty of potash has 
proved a protection. 

When planning your fertilizer program for next season's 
crop, make sure that your soil and fertihzer will make at 
least 200 lbs. of potash (KoO) per acre available to your 
potatoes. If you do not know just how much plant food 
your soil will provide, your county agent or experiment 
station will make soil tests for you. Your fertilizer dealer 
will tell you how httle extra it costs to apply enough potash 
to insure high yields and good quaUty. 



If we can be of any help to you, please 
write us for free information and 
literature on how to fertilize your 
crops. 




American Potash Institute, Inc 



Investment Building 



Washington, D. C. 






i 



16 



THE GUIDE POST 



September, 1940 



September, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



17 



OPEN HOUSE AT "CAMP 

POTATO" DRAWS BIG 
CROWD OF GROWERS 
AND FRIENDS 

(Continued from page 5) 

this examination were enthusiastic 
about what they saw and are 100% for 
the continuation of the work, at the 
Camp under Dr. Nixon's leadership for 
the betterment of the individual grower 
and the industry of the state. 

The big plow was put to work be- 
hind the Camp's Model E Cletrac to 
show how new land is brought under 
cultivation for the first time in 20 some 
years. Some 25 acres of land on the 
Camp property will be so plowed yet 
this fall. 

An irrigation demonstration, made 
possible by the courtesy of Robert J. 
Hamilton, of Ephrata, Penna., with 
the O.K. Champion demonstration truck 
of the Champion Corporation, of Ham- 
mond, Ind. held the attention of hun- 
dreds of growers during the noon hour. 

Whiterock Quarries, of Bellefonte, 
Pennsylvania, was represented at the 
meeting with members of their organi- 
zation and with their display and ex- 
hibit car. We are grateful to them for 
providing music from this car during 
the entire day, and for the use of their 
speaking amplifier during the noon-day 
program. 

The day for the Open House was ideal 
— neither too hot nor too cold; not too 
wet, nor too dry. This was reflected by 
the fine paternal spirit of the crowd and 
the groups gathered together here and 
there throughout the day. Following 
the program, several hundred growers 
joined the tour of Potter Counties' fine 
seed fields, which hundreds more ling- 
ered and visited at the Camp well into 
the evening. 

Potatoes growing in steel drums filled 
with three bushels of soil each, brought 
in from thirty two different growers' 
farms, representing 25 counties of Penn- 
sylvania, and 4 states, drew the at- 
tention of the hundreds of visitors 
throughout the day. We will dwell upon 
this unique set-up and project in a 
story in a later issue of the Guide Post. 
A well planned and worked out ex- 
hibit by the Potter County Foundation 
Seed Potato Growers' Association was 
not only attractive but interesting to the 



many growers who are interested in 
Potter County seed potatoes. The ex- 
hibit consisted of a half bushel of each 
of the seven varieties grown commer- 
cially for seed in the county, including 
Russet Rurals, White Rurals, Pennigan, 
Nittany, Bliss Triumph, Chippewa and 
Katahdin. The name of each grower 
was listed above each exhibit and a map 
of the growers' farm was displayed. 

A delicious and abundant lunch was 
served at the Camp under the joint 
management of the Camp, with Mrs. 
Hindman in charge, and the women 
of the Potter County Seed Potato or- 
ganization, with Mrs. Ed. Fisher in 
charge. Mrs. Fishers' energetic com- 
mittee included: Mrs. M. L. VanWegen, 
Mrs. Everett Blass, Mrs. Tom Neefe, 
Mrs. Milo Freeman, Miss Marie Free- 
man, Mrs. E. L. Nixon, Mrs. William 
Roberts, Mrs. Joseph Click, Miss Ernes- 
tine Nixon, and Mrs. Hindman and Mrs. 
Fisher. 

A short program followed the lunch 
hour, with President J. A. Donaldson!, 
in charge. The Junior Campers per- 
formed several stunts for the group, 
and President Donaldson introduced 
Association officials. Directors and visit- 
ors. Short addresses were made by Dr. 
S. W. Fletcher, Dean of the School of 
Agriculture, The Pennsylvafnia State 
College, W. S. Hagar, Deputy Secre- 
tary of Agriculture, Pennsylvania De- 
partment of Agriculture, Harrisburg; 
J. W. Gannaway, United State Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, Washington, D. 
C; Donald Stearns, President of the 
Potter County Foundation Seed Potato 
Association; and Dr. E. L. Nixon, Agri- 
cultural Counselor, Pennsylvania Chain 
Store Council. 



MEMBERSHIP DRIVE MAKES 

ENORMOUS GAINS 

(Continued from page 14) 

Waldron Frederick, Conyngham, Lu- 
zerne County 

Arthur Davis, Spartansburg, Craw- 
ford County 

Ludwig Michael, Bear Lake, Warren 
County 

Ralph Schuler, Cranesville, Erie 
County 

C. T. Dewalt, Easton, Northampton 
County 

(Continued on page 18) 



AN IRRIGATION DEMONSTRATION 




% 






Hundreds of visitors to "Camp Potato" on August 21st, witnessed the interesting 
irrigations demonstration put on through the courtesy of R. J. Hamilton, of 
Ephrata, Penna., with the O. K. Champion irrigation demonstration truck. 



HARVEST 

of the 

1940 PENNSYLVANIA 
POTATO CROP 

Will Reveal 
Some Outstanding Yields 

If you have a yield, don't fail 
to have it checked for the 

400-BUSHEL CLUB 

If you are not fully acquainted 
with the requirements, write 
the Association Office. 

Masonic Temple Building 

Bellefonte, Penna. 

immediately 



O.K. Champion 

Movable 

Irrigation Systems 

At any time during the next 
few months, we will be glad to 
plan a complete irrigation sys- 
tem for your use in 1941. 

Please Write Us Now for 
Information 

HAMILTON & CO. 

Specialists In Irrigation 
EPHRATA, PENNA. 

Distributors for Eastern Penna. 
Delaware & Maryland 



M 



f 



18 



THE GUIDE POST 



September, 1940 



TIMELY OBSERVATIONS 

AND SUGGESTIONS 

(Continued from page 4) 
Where growers had any trouble from 
frost or heating during the past winter, 
now is the time to correct the trouble 
before the present crop goes into stor- 
age. 

A storage should be more than a hole 
in the ground. If that is all that is de- 
sired, it would probably be cheaper to 
pit them. The storage should provide 
ample grading and packing room. I 
have seen a number of growers during 
recent weeks constructing, on the face 
of their present storage, an insulated 
shed with provision for heat during cold 
weather. This is practical and eco- 
nomical for efficient handling of the 
crop. Growers are finding additional 
bin divisions a good move in order to 
separate off-grade or injured stock 
which many are separating in the field 
at digging time. 

What of Wire Worm, 
Grub, Scab and Mud? 

All of these show up and make the 
packing of Blue Labels difficult. In 
most fields these various injuries or 
problems are confined to certain spots 
or areas. It is economical, practical and 
smart to locate these spots when dig- 
ging, and pick them separately and 
dump them into a separate bin. A small 
sheet of paper, with a stone or a little 
dirt to hold it from blowing away is 
the most practical way of marking the 
confines of such areas when digging. The 
same paper can be torn into smaller 
pieces to mark the top of the bags or 
crates after picking, so that they can be 
loaded together when drawing the po- 
taotes from the field. 



TOUR OF POTTER COUNTY 
SEED FIELDS 

WELL ATTENDED 

(Continued from page 7) 

Ed. Grose, Coudersport — Russet Rural; 
Paul Hamilton, Genesee — Russet Rural; 
George Hamilton, Genesee, Russet Rur- 
al; M. L. VanWegen, Coudersport — 
Pennigan, Bliss Triumph, Kathadin, 
Russet Rural; Lafe Littlefield, Couders- 
port — Russet Rural; William Scott, 
Coudersport — White Rural; Milford 
Clark, Coudersport — Russet Rural; 



Pete & Allen, Coudersport— Pennigan; 
Roy Thompson, Coudersport— Penni- 
gan; Milo Freeman, Coudersport— Rus- 
set Rural; Lew Blough, Coudersport— 
Russet Rural, Katahdin, Nittany; Fran- 
cis Way, Coudersport — Russet Rural; 
Roselle Leete, Coudersport— Pennigan; 
W. N. Currier, Genesee— Russet Rural; 
Straley Brothers, Germania — Russet 
Rurals; L. C. Traub, Germania— Nittany, 
Russet Rural; and L. Watkins, Ulysses- 
Russet Rurals. 



GROWERS SHOW 

ACTIVE INTEREST IN 

WESTERN FIELD DAY 

(Continued from page 10) 

across in New York State, near Findley 
Lake. 

Good things are often held until the 
last, and so said Directors Hess and 
Mast of the weeks' trip when the tour 
proceeded to the fine fields (over 500 
acres) of Ivan Miller and Lynn Sill, 
near Union City and Corry. Most 
pleased at seeing these fields were per- 
haps Messrs. Blass, VanWegean and 
Stearns from Potter County as much of 
this acreage was planted with Potter 
County seed. Top growth was luxuri- 
ant and a promise of a real crop at har- 
vest time was evident. These, too, will 
be Blue Labels when the time rolls 
around. 

Growers at one or more stops during 
this days' travel represented Potter, 
Lehigh, Centre, Crawford, Erie, War- 
ren, Columbia and Lancaster Counties. 



MEMBERSHIP DRIVE MAKES 

ENORMOUS GAINS 

(Continued from page 16) 

Charles W. Klopp, Bernville, Berks 
County 

George V. Kutz, Kutztown, Berks 
County 

Perry Davis & Son, Prospect, Butler 
County 
J. L. Welsh, Lamartine, Clarion County 

H. C. Kreitz, Cambridge Springs, 
Crawford County 

W. S. Hagar, Harrisburg, Dauphin 
County 

Fairview Boro Twp. Joint H. S., Fair- 
view, Erie County 

W. C. Westcott, Union City, Erie 
County 



September, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



19 



Albion H. S., Albion, Erie County 

Manville Ward, East Springfield, Erie 
County 

C. F. Salen & Sons, Edinboro, Erie 
County 

Bob Hamilton, Jr., Ephrata, Lancaster 

County 

R. J. Masbit, Evon Valley, Lawrence 

County 



Lee McComb, Hillsville, Lawrence 

County 

Geo. W. Rockwell, Sunbury, North- 
umberland County 

R. C. Crocby, Coudersport, Potter 

County 

John W. Bittinger, Hummels Wharf, 

Snyder County 

(Continued on page 22) 



A Monument Is Never Raised To The Fellow 

Who Never Had To Overcome Difficulties 

ALBERT C. ROEMHILD 

Commission Merchant 

122 DOCK ST. PHILADELPHIA Lombard 1000 



^^i^e£a. Potato Digg 



ers 




EUREKA NO. 5480 POTATO DIGGER 

Operates from Tractor Power Take Off 
Heavy duty construction. Low up keep. 



Get the potatoes 
with least cost. Re- 
quire few repairs 
and have unusually 
long life because of 
construction and 
material used. Re- 
sult of more than 40 
years' experience 
making Diggers. 



The Eureka is also available with engine mounted on Digger, and in Traction. 

horse drawn styles. 

Write for catalog. 

EUREKA MOWER COMPANY 

UTICA. N. Y. 






20 



THE GUIDE POST 



September, 1940 



Junior Potato Growers Enjoy ^^Camp Potato" 



Junior Potato Growers, boys and girls, 
aged 9 to 14, inclusive, 40 strong, were 
"Camp Potato" campers from August 
18-21st. 

These youngsters enjoyed a real out- 
ing with a varied program of construc- 
tive, helpful work and energetic play. 
They weeded seedling plots, assisted 
with the new road, worked toward the 
completion of the camp basement — and, 
of course, served on K. P. duty. They 
enjoyed group play in various sports, 
including baseball, table tennis, and long 
walks in the woods away from the Camp. 
They spent exciting evenings at the 
Camp around the large fire-place sing- 
ing and enacting plays and skits. And 
did they eat! 

Never before had the camp been host 
to a finer group in cooperation and spirit. 
These sons and daughters of potato 
growers will be welcomed back enthus- 
iastically come another camp period for 
Juniors. 

The youngsters included in the camp 
group were: Pat Leiden, Joseph Leiden, 
Francis Westrick, and Dennis Johnston, 
of Cambria County; Harold VanWegen, 
Connie Hindman, David Stearns and 
Robert Brock, of Potter County; Donald 



Patterson, Jr., Thomas Ferguson, Mary 
Rhoades, Milford Mast, Albert Mast, 
Oliver Mast, of Lancaster County; Bar- 
bara and Carol Denniston, and Nicky 
Nixon, of Centre County; and Charles 
Phillips, Ellsworth Phillips, and Jane 
Hindman, of Clarion County. 

Also, Kenneth Donaldson, Venango 
County; Emma Lou Spory, Lester Lohr, 
Robert Lohr, of Somerset County; Carl 
Spelling, Jr., of Warren County; Harriet, 
Sara Ann, Frank, Jack and Billy 
Thompson, of York County; Jim Frey, 
John Robertson, Bob Frey and Howard 
Godfrey, of Erie County; Earl and Ralph 
Miller, of Lehigh County; and Arden 
Ramseyer and Dean Schrock, from 
Ohio. 

Adults on hand during this outing in- 
cluded Dr. and Mrs. E. L. Nixon, and 
daughter Ernestine, Mr. and Mrs. L. T. 
Denniston, Erma Sloop, Harry Keil, Mr. 
and Mrs. Wayne Hindman, and Mrs. 
William Roberts. In addition to this 
"staff", there were a number of visiting 
adults, including Mr. and Mrs. Joe Glick, 
Mrs. Ellen Jane Grafton, Jacob K. Mast, 
Ralph Miller, and P. J. Yahner, who 
spent time with the children at the 
Camp. 



Grower to Grower Exchange 

The rate for advertising in this column is a penny a word, minimum cost 25 cents, 
payable with order. (10% reduction when four or more insertions are ordered at 
one time.) Count name and address. Send ads to reach the GUIDE POST, Masonic 
Temple Building, Belief onte, Penna., by the 20th of the month previous to publi- 
cation. 



POTATO EQUIPMENT FOR SALE: 

One two-row Cletrac Avery Cultivator 
complete, one two-row Cletrac Avery 
Weeder, one Killifer Disc Harrow with 
24" blades, all slightly used. Good condi- 
tion. Reasonable. If interested, write W. 
J. Braddock, c/o Wheeling Bronze Cast- 
ing Company, Wheeling, W. Va. 

PLANTER WANTED: 2 row Iron-Age 
Picker Type. Can also use good used 
grader and Digger. Write Ray Salmon, 
Waterford, Erie County, Penna. 



AVAILABLE: Copies of Dr. E. L. Nix- 
on's book, "The Principles of Potato 
Production," $1.25 per copy. Write for 
your copy today, to Association ofHce, 
Bellefonte, Pennsylvania. 

FOR SALE: Two-row Oliver potato dig- 
ger with power take-off and power lift. 
Price, $125.00. Come and see it work. 
William W. Hayes, Jersey Shore, (Ly- 
coming County), Penna. 



f 



^^mm^^m^^ 



YOUR EXTRA PROFIT 

FROM THE USE OF A BEAN RUBBER SPOOL GRADER 

WILL PAY FOR IT 




\\ 



3 CAPACITY SIZES OF BEAN GRADERS 

• YOU DON'T LIKE BRUISIHG 

• YOU DON'T LIKE CUTTING 

• YOU DON'T LIKE INACCURACY 
IN YOUR POTATO GRADING 

..YOU DON'T GET IT.. 

WITH A BEAN RUBBER SPOOL GRADER 
OUR CATAWG SHOWS YOUR WAY TO PROFIT 

John Bean Mfg. Co 



LANSING 



MICHIGAN 




11 



THE GUIDE POST 



September, 1940 



SONS OF POTATO GROWERS 
AT "CAMP POTATO" 

Sons of potato growers — aged 18 to 80 
— stayed over at "Camp Potato" follow- 
ing the Open House for a 3-day outing 
and busy work program. 

It would take a man, present through- 
out the three days, to fully describe the 
experiences. However, reports have it 
that a good time was had by all, and 
much good work was accomplished. 

Those present included Harold Hen- 
inger, Robert Henninger, Ralph Miller, 
Ralph Miller, Jr., and Earl Miller, of 
Lehigh County; J. K. Mast, Oliver Mast, 
Milford Mast, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Click, 
and Mary Rhoades, of Lancaster Coun- 
ty; William Bailey, Ben Bailey, L. T. 
Denniston, Harry Keihl, and Dr. and 
Mrs. E. L. Nixon, of Centre County; 
Frank and Harold McNeese, of Law- 
rence County; Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
Denniston, of Butler County; Joseph D. 
Young, of Clearfield County; and Ed. 
Fisher, and Joe O'Neil, and the Hind- 
mans, of Potter County. 

In addition, on the 22nd, the Camp was 
visited by two F. F. A. groups from Ly- 
coming County, which groups enjoyed 
a day and a night at the camp. Among 
these were: 

Hughesville Future Farmers, of Pic- 
ture Rocks, with their instructor, J. D. 
Ryburn, were: Leon Eichenlaub, George 
Murray, Herbert Hoffman, Gordon Kep- 
ner, Nile Kepner, Charles Long, George 
Long, Clive McCarty, Dale Shaner, 
Harry McClain, Wilford Frantz, Walter 
Bartlow, Robert Fry, Charles Bower, 
Kenneth Glidewell, Lester Gordner, Guy 
Green, Elwood Guisewhite, Carl Hard- 
ing, Harley Houseknecht, Mitchell Mil- 
ler, Daniel Reese, Archie Shaner, Leroy 
Shaner, Alvin Smith, Lee Smith, and 
Donald Temple. 

The Montoursville Chapter Future 
Farmers, accompanied by Chas. D. 
Carey, Vocational Supervisor, and L. J. 
Burgert, an exchange teacher in agri- 
culture from Honolulu, Hawaii, includ- 
ed: Max Robbins, Clayton Gower, Her- 
bert Hoover, Mark Harrison, and Rich- 
ard Warfield, also a teacher. 



Everlasting life will be yours if you 
deserve it — your present belief or dis- 
belief does not effect the issue. But make 
sure of this: if you are to be great in 
Heaven, you have got to begin to be a 
great soul here. 



MEMBERSHIP DRIVE MAKES 
ENORMOUS GAINS 

(Continued from page 19) 

C. W. Hendershot, Emlenton, Ven- 
ango County 

Burt J. Peffer, Bliss, New York 

Robert Dunn, West Henrietta, New 
York 

Fred Litchard, Wellsville, New York 

Asa S. Whipple, Northville, Michigan 

I. A. Gashaw, Somerset, Somerset 
County 

Morris M. Miller, Somerset, Somer- 
set County 

E. H. Shaulis, Holsopple, Somerset 
County 

Somerset Farm Bureau Coop. Assn., 
Somerset, Somerset County 

G. H. Walker, Berlin, Somerset Coun- 
ty 



THE WEATHER 

(Continued from page 6) 

there and break up land for a new po- 
tato ranch. 

The thing that starts everything and 
is most talked about is the weather. It 
is too hot, too dry, too cold, too wet, too 
cloudy, too windy, too calm. If people 
would spend as much time and energy 
talking the marketing program for all 
farm produce as they do about the 
weather, we sure would go and do 
things in a big way. The sad part about 
it is that we can do nothing about the 
weather, but the bright part is that we 
can do something about the marketing 
program. 

Let's all get together and wear a 
sunny smile — in spite of any weather, 
and pack and market potatoes the As- 
sociation way. — Ed. Fisher 



Association Bag Prices 

Prices Quoted are Per 1000 Delivered 



Blue Label, 
Red Label, 
Economy Pack, 
Blue Label, 
Blue Label, 
Unclassified, 



15's (2-wall) 
15's (2-wall) 
15's (2-wall) 
60's (2-wall) 
60's (3-wall) 
60's (2-wall) 



$18.00 
$17.50 
$17.00 
$45.50 
$48.75 
$38.50 



The above prices are for delivery to 
any point in Pennsylvania and include 
the wire loop ties and the commission to 
the Association. 



T 




\ 



I 



I 



_N THE FALL of the year — after producing a cash 
crop— your soil does not contain enough available 
nitrogen to produce a first-class cover crop. 

It will pay you to broadcast GRANULAR 'AERO' 
CYAN AMID — 21% nitrogen and 70% lime — at 
the rate of 150 pounds per acre before sowing rye. 

GRANULAR 'AERO' CYANAMID supplies 
available nitrogen and grows bigger cover crops. 
Bigger cover crops make more humus. 



r #^ AMERICAN CYANAMID COMPANY 

^^m!^ 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 



T 



Potato Growers Profit from 

KID GLOVE Performance 



'Were it not for the splen- 
did work performed by 
my IRON AGE Kid Glove 
two-row digger, equipped 
with rubber tires, I would 
have lost 25,000 bushels of 
potatoes. No other digger 
could dig my potatoes in 
the wet condition of 
my muck soil.' 




Because IRON AGE Kid Glove 
Potato Diggers are designed for 
the work to be done — and will 
perform well under unfavorable 
conditions — some of our users 
tell us where other makes fail 
entirely. Kid Glove users are en- 
thusiastic about their perform- 
ance. Especially constructed to 



Double Row, 
Single 60 inch APRON 

Has no more parts than 

single row with 27 inch 

apron. 



prevent mechanical injury to the 
tubers. Kid Glove Diggers quick- 
ly pay for themselves by turning 
out more U. S. No. 1 potatoes per 
acre. If you are a profit-minded 
grower, investigate Kid Glove's 
money-making features. 



Write jor Complete Information 



A. B. FARQUHAR CO., LTD. 



333 DUKE STREET 



YORK. PENNA. 



j/ f) m f» v» s 




PENNSYLVANIA COOPERATIVE 
POTATO GROWERS ASSOCIATION 



INCORPORATED 




A 



<^ 



Digging the 100,000th seedling at 
"Camp Potato." The actual digging 
was done by S. D. Gray, American Po- 
tato Institute Inc., of Washington D. C, 
in the presence of Association and 
"Camp Potato" officers' representa- 
tives of the Penna. Farm Bureau, and 
potato growers visiting and participa- 
ting in the harvest of seedlings at the 
camp. 



r 

i 



4. 



Timely Observations QC Suggestions 

L. T. Denniston, Association Field Representative 



4. 



Recent Meetings — This is October 
14th. We have just completed a series 
of eight meetings — four in the East and 
four to the West with Association Grade 
Supervisors, and growers. Activities at 
these meetings included training of ad- 
ditional Grade Supervisors, grading and 
packing potatoes for market, discussion 
of timely topics on marketing of interest 
to all growers, digging of new seedling 
varieties developed at Camp Potato, and 
inspection of fine crops of potatoes to be 
packed as Association Blue Labels for 
Pennsylvania distributors and consum- 
ers. Over 600 Grade Supervisors, grow- 
ers and Future Farmers participated in 
these meetings. The interest was more 
intense than at any meeting staged since 
the initiation of the Association Program 
four years ago. A full report of the meet- 
ings staged in the East appears else- 
where in this issue. Speaking in behalf 
of the Association Management we wish 
to thank the following growers for their 
splendid co-operation in making the 
meetings in the West a real success — P. 
L. Leiden, St. Lawrence, Cambria Coun- 
ty, Claud Bowermaster, Berlin, Somer- 
set County, Claud Sherry, Strattonville, 
Clarion County, and C. W. Billings, 
Edinboro, Erie County. We also wish 
to thank growers and other individuals 
for their efforts in publicising the meet- 
ings. This is wholesome helpful co-op- 
eration. 

Activities at Camp Potato — ^Harvest 
season is on at Camp Potato the same as 
on any other potato farm. It has been a 
grand race however, to see whether we 
would dig the most potatoes or the deer. 
It looks like a fifty-fifty race. Thanks to 
the co-operation of different groups of 
Farm Bureau Members and individual 
growers from different parts of the 
State— the fine plot directly above the 
storage was harvested without serious 
damage during the first week of Oc- 
tober. 

Weight checks made on a number of 
the fine new varieties seen in this plot 
during Field Day, August 21, showed 
yields well over 400 bushels per acre. 
Digging will be completed this week 
and I have no doubt Director Ed. Fisher 
as usual is coming to the rescue to see 



that we get under the wire before the 
first severe freeze. 

Future Farmers Assist in Harvesting 
Seedling Plots — To learn about potatoes 
you must not only get into the harness 
but into the potato patch. Such is the 
spirit with which a number of Future 
Farmer Supervisors, Instructors and 
their students entered into the harvest- 
ing of seedling plots during recent weeks. 
Education in the long run, is experi- 
ence. Information can be had by dili- 
gent use of the eye and the ear, but 
experience comes from use of the hands. 
These men and their boys do not need 
compliments — they have already been 
well paid in educational information for 
their labors, but we want them to know 
we appreciate their fine co-operation. 

Groups taking part in these activities 
during recent weeks are as follows: C. L. 
Dewey and 30 boys "Spud Growers 
Chapter Future Farmers, Coudersport, 
Potter Co., Oct. 1st and 4th. E. A. Rice 
and 20 boys, Jersey Shore Chapter Fu- 
ture Farmers. Jersey Shore, Lycoming 
County, Oct. 2nd. G. F. Dye, J. C. Bil- 
lick, Arthur Myers, H. T. Hartshorn, R. 
W. Lohr, G. R. Oellig, F. J. La Vinge and 
W. D. Igoe and 60 boys, Somerset Coun- 
ty Future Farmers, Somerset County. 
B. E. Decker, Norman Manners, Roscoe 
Coblentz, and Roy J. Salmon, and 60 
boys, Erie County Future Farmers, Erie 
County. In addition to these groups 
from York County and Monroe County 
will be participating in similar work 
during the coming week. 

Favorable Digging Season Insures 
Clean Potatoes — ^With only moist to dry 
digging conditions over most parts of 
the state potatoes are going into storage 
comparatively free of dirt and mud. This 
makes grading and packing much easier 
and enables the grower to put up a much 
more satisfactory and attractive pack. 
Where conditions were dry, unless 
growers took this into account and ad- 
justed their diggers for said conditions, 
it will have resulted in more mechan- 
ical injury. This should be remembered 
when you do the grading and packing 
shatter bruised tubers from contact 
with the digger or from falling on stones 
results in heavy waste in paring. I have 



THE GUIDE POST 



October, 1940 



seen a good many cut in some crops and 
but few of these should find their way 
into the graded pack. 

News Bulletin No. 4 — Pennsylvania 
Soy Bean Association — The following 
paragraph from a recent bulletin of the 
Pennsylvania Soy Bean Association is 
worth reading several times. To me this 
is sound thought and reasoning. 

PLAN: 

"If you want to convert crops into 
cash you will have to determine how 
to find a market for your products, not 
just any old market but one that will 
pay highest returns. Too often the farm- 
er is forced to beg the dealer or his 
housewife to buy and this is the weak- 
est kind of sales approach. Proper sales 
approach and good markets call for an 
organization which will create a fair 
price and provide contacts with the 
proper buyers. Also, it is about high 
time that these buyers realize that the 
future of their business depends upon 
the welfare of the farmer. In other 
words if the buyers treat the farmer 
fairly and squarely, more goods will be 
sold in rural districts. 

There must first be an organization 
of the farmers set up to produce and 
sell a particular crop and second there 
must be co-operation between this or- 
ganization and the buyer." 

We may have some interesting news 
in the near future on this question. In 
the meantime, if you have a problem in 
which we can be of assistance commun- 
icate with us. 

Have You — ? 

Drained the spray pump? 

Shut off the light from the potato pile? 

Shut out the rats and caught the ones 
already in the storage? 

Oiled the sizer in preparation for 
grading and packing? 

Checked your scales to make sure they 
are correct? 

Have you secured a new member for 
the Association? 

Attended one of the grading, packing, 
and marketing meetings staged by the 
Association? 

Have you packed any Blue Labels to 
prove to us, the distributors and the con- 



sumer that you and other Pennsylvania 
growers have good potatoes? 

Do you lead or drive your hired help? 

Checked your truck bed for protrud- 
ing nails or bolts? 

Made yourself a simple, convenient 
speedy rack or table on which to tie 
peck bags? 

Do you have a local Grade Supervisor 
in your community? 

Did you know that Maine has a big 
crop of fine quality potatoes. To hold 
'our markets against this competition 
Pennsylvania growers must put up a 
good grade and pack. 

Did you know that some of our grow- 
ers left half of their crop in the field 
due to Bacterial Ring Rot. 

Have you paid a visit to the Associa- 
tion office Masonic Temple Building, 
Bellefonte. Wou will be welcomed with 
a SMILE. 



Another Time 

As two brokers passed the Ziegfield 
Theatre, out stepped one of those rav- 
ishing, alluring Follies beauties. 

"I feel like taking her out again," 
whispered one. 

"Have you had her out?" asked the 
other. 

"No— but once before I felt like it." 

— Vesta Vamp 



Firm Grip 

Barber— "What's the matter? Ain't 
the razor takin' holt?" 

Victim — "Yeah, its taking holt all 
right, but it ain't letting go again." 

— Bagfology 

• • • 



Customer — "Do you have anything 
for gray hairs?" 

Conscientious Druggist — "Nothing 
sir, but the greatest respect." 



• • • 



Irate Parent: "I'll teach you to make 
love to my daughter." 

Gob: "I wish you would, old boy. I'm 
not making much progress." 



October, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



1 



I 



Sources of Pennsylvania Certified Seed Potatoes 

K. W. Lauer 
Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture 



Interest in the growing of certified 
seed potatoes is apparently on the in- 
crease in Pennsylvania. There were 
1875 acres of potatoes entered for in- 
spection and certification this year com- 
pared with 1208.5 acres in 1939. Last 
year about 33.0% of the acreage entered 
was refused certification compared with 
approximately 50.0% of the acreage re- 
jected so far this year. 

All the field inspections have been 
completed and as soon as the crop is 
dug a final bin inspection will be made. 
Some potato growers like to place their 
orders for seed in the fall so we are 
listing all those growers whose fields 
passed the field inspection requirements 
as a guide to those buyers who wish to 
contact any growers of certified seed. A 
final list of growers will be issued by 
the Pennsylvania Department of Agri- 
culture as soon as the final bin inspec- 
tion has been completed. 

When placing orders for certified seed 
it should be kept in mind that we do 
not regard potatoes as being fully certi- 
fied unless they bear the certification 
tag of the Department of Agriculture 
at the time they are delivered to the 
buyer. The Blue Certification tag of the 
Department is attached to the bags when 
they are inspected for grade just prior 
to shipment. 

Potatoes are often sold as having 
passed all the inspection requirements 
except for grade. While such potatoes 
may give good results when planted we 
frequently find the sale of such pota- 
toes leads to misunderstanding between 
the buyer and seed grower. The buyer 
frequently expects to receive potatoes 
that were graded just the same as certi- 
fied seed that carries the blue certifica- 
tion tag. 

We expect to have close to 900.0 acres 
of certified seed in this state by the 
time our final inspections are completed. 
This will compare with 799.25 acres cer- 
tified in 1939. 

Growers of Seed Potatoes in Pennsyl- 
vania for 1940 whose stocks have passed 
all Field Inspection (not bin inspection) 
requirements for certification: 



Bradford County— G. L. Allen, Wy- 
sox, Katahdin, 9.0 acres. Fox Chase 
Farms, Towanda, Russet, 8.0 acres. 

Butler County — Thomas Denniston, 
Slippery Rock, Nittany, 2.0 acres; Thom- 
as Denniston, Slippery Rock, Russet, 4.5 
acres. 

Cambria County — Charles Holtz, 
Hastings, Russet, 1.5 acres; V. A. Holtz, 
Hastings, Mason, .25 acre; V. A. Holtz, 
Hastings, Russet, 1.5 acres; Mrs. Alex. 
Strittmatter, Ebensburg, Russet, 1.0 
acre; Paul Yahner, Patton, Russet, 50.0 
acres. 

Carbon County — Robert Getz, Al- 
brightsville. Russet, 15.0 acres. 

Crawford County— D. L. Crum, Mead- 
ville. Russet, 3.0 acres. 

Erie County — Harry Peterson, Union 
City, W. Rural, 1 acre; John Robinson, 
Wattsburg, Russet, 1.0 acre; Wm. Rob- 
inson, Wattsburg, Russet, 2.0 acres. 

Indiana County — James A. Patterson, 
W. Lebanon, Russet, 11.0 acres; Chas. C. 
Pollock, Marion Center, Russet, 3.5 acres, 
acres. 

Lackawanna County — W. W. Cool- 
baugh & Son, Clark Summit, Russet, 3.0 
acres; Francis Nesavich, Lake Ariel, R. 
3, Russet. 1.0 acres. 

Lehigh County — Clarence Peters, 
New Tripoli, Russet, 5.5 acres; Robert E. 
Peters, Germansville, Russet, 5.5 acres; 
Trojan Powder Company, Allentown, 
Russet, 11.0 acres. 

Northampton County — ^Willow Brook 
Farms, Catasauqua, Russet, 20.0 acres. 

Perry County — Chas. Beaver & Son, 
Millerstown, W. Rural, 9.0 acres; Lewis 
E. Beaver, Millerstown, W. Rural, 2.0 
acres. 

Potter County— L. W. Angood, Ul- 
ysses, Russet, 3.0 acres; Geo. Barnett & 
Sons, Coudersport, Russet, 60.0 acres; 
Geo. Barnett & Sons, Coudersport, Nit- 
tanv, 49.0 acres; Geo. Barnett & Sons, 
Coudersport, Katahdin, 11.0 acres; Geo. 
Barnett & Sons, Coudersport, Pennigan, 
20.0 acres; Everett Blass, Coudersport, 

(Continued on page 18) 



6 



THE GUIDE POST 



October, 1940 



jTHE GUIDE POST 

Published monthly by the Pennsylvania 
Cooperative Potato Growers, Inc. 



OFFICERS 

J. A. Donaldson, Emlenton . . President 

Roy R. Hess, Stillwater Vice-Pres. 

E. B. Bower, Bellefonte, 

Sec'y-Treas. and Gen. Mgr. 



DIRECTORS 

Jacob K. Mast Elverson, Chester 

P. Daniel Frantz Coplay, Lehigh 

Hugh McPherson Bridgeton, York 

John B. Schrack Loganton, Clinton 

Roy R. Hess Stillwater, Columbia 

Ed. Fisher Coudersport, Potter 

Charles Frey North Girard, Erie 

J. A. Donaldson, R.l, Emlenton, Venango 
R. W. Lohr Boswell, Somerset 

Annual membership fee $1.00. This in- 
cludes the Guide Post. 

All communications should be ad- 
dressed to E. B. Bower, Secretary-Treas- 
urer and General Manager, Bellefonte, 
Pennsylvania. 



Crop Reports as of 
October 7th 



The September crop estimate re- 
leased as of September 15 indicated a 
total crop for the Country of 383,172,000 
bushels as compared with an estimate 
of 374,314,000 bushels last month and 
364,016,000 bushels harvested a year ago. 
This increase was largely in the North 
Central States. Maine and New York 
just about held their own while Penn- 
sylvania showed a slight increase. Maine 
shows a crop estimate around 7,000,000 
bushels above last year with a crop of 
good quality in view. Harvesting was 
about 50 9r complete as of October 1. 

Idaho anticipates one of its best crops 
in history but harvest has been delayed 
by wet weather and continued growth 
of the vines without a killing frost. 

September was favorable for in- 
creased yields in Colorado with a crop 
now in prospect comparable with that of 
a year ago. 



The most distressing element in the 
Eastern market is the large crop of Cob- 
blers in New Jersey and Long Island 
which are carrying over far beyond the 
normal marketing period for these acres. 
In view of this carry over in New Jersey 
and Long Island, a good crop in Maine, 
and a total crop of around 20,000,000 bu- 
shels in excess of a year ago, the price 
outlook for the 1940-41 marketing season 
would not appear too bright. 

The October crop report which will 
be due around October 15, should give 
us a better and more complete picture 
of the situation. 

In the mean time, Pennsylvania grow- 
ers who do not have ample safe storage 
should be marketing in a steady orderly 
manner. If you have not marketed the 
Association way a call or a letter will 
bring you an explanation of how you 
may secure the services of the Associa- 
tion in moving a portion or all of your 
crop. 



Some Of The Things The Potato 
Marketing Program Will Do For 
Pennsylvania's Growers And The 

Industry 

RETURN a greater net profit — than any 
other honest legitimate way of mar- 
keting the crop. 

INCREASE the farm price— to all grow- 
ers. 

IDENTIFY Pennsylvania Quality Pota- 
toes — to the distributors and the con- 
sumers. 

REGAIN and hold our markets — by 
meeting the competition from other 
states and producing areas. 

LEAD to more orderly distribution and 
marketing — through provision for 
more adequate storage and wider 
market distribution. 

ASSIST food distributors in perfecting 
a method of merchandising potatoes — 
in line with the sale of other food pro- 
ducts, in clean, attractive, consumer 
sized packages. 

PROTECT the public against deception 
— and assure the consumer greater 
food value for his potato dollar. 

ASSURE the grower full confirmation 
price-eliminating the possibility of 

(Continued on page 14) 



October, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



I 



The Association Marketing Program 

It Is Simple Of Operation And It Works 



Any potato grower in the State of 
Pennsylvania who has potatoes to mar- 
ket can market them through the As- 
sociation Marketing Program by meet- 
ing the simple, practical, and economical 
requirements on which the program is 
founded and operates. These require- 
ments were arrived at by Potato Grow- 
ers who are interested in their potato 
business and the industry as a whole in 
Pennsylvania, the Food Distributors, 
and Consumers. 

The Association Office, Masonic Tem- 
ple, Bellefonte, Pa. receives innumer- 
able inquiries by letter, post card, tele- 
phone, wire and personal calls on how 
the program operates, how potatoes 
must be graded, packed, sold, etc. We 
offer here many of the questions com- 
ing to our desk along with a brief sim- 
ple answer. 

Must I be a member of the Pennsyl- 
vania Cooperative Potato Growers 
Association, Inc., in order to market my 
potatoes through the Association Mar- 
keting Program? 

No. Any potato grower residing in 
Pennsylvania, be he large or small, can 
market his potatoes through the As- 
sociation by meeting the grade, package, 
and sales requirements. 

Can I become a member of the State 
Potato Growers Association? 

Any potato grower or any one in 
Pennsylvania's Potato Industry can be- 
come a member of the Association by 
paying $1.00 per year to E. B. Bower, 
Secretary-Treasurer, State Potato 
Growers Association, Masonic Temple 
Building, Bellefonte, Pa. You will re- 
ceive the Guide Post monthly contam- 
ing timely information on producing 
seed, spraying, marketing, etc. 

If I become a member of the Penn- 
sylvania Potato Growers Association 
must I then sell all or a part of my crop 
through the Association? 

No. Members of the Association are 
under no obligation to sell through the 
Association Marketing Program. 



Does the Association sell potatoes by 
the hundred in hundred pound burlap? 

No. The Association sells only in 
paper bags of peck and bushel size. 

In what grades must I pack if I de- 
cide to sell through the Association? 

The Association will move potatoes 
during the 1940-41 marketing season in 
the following grades and packs: U. S. 
No. 1. (two inch minimum, 16 ounce 
maximum size) packed in Blue Label 
Pecks and Blue Label Bushels, U. S. 
No. 1. Size B. (one and one half to two 
or two and a quarter inch maximum 
size) packed in Red Label Pecks, U. S. 
Commercial (one and seven eights to 
16 ounce maximum size) packed in 
Economy Pack Pecks, Unclassified (no 
grade specified, used for pick outs and 
off grade crops) . 

How do I secure Association trade 
marked bags? 

By getting in touch with your local 
community or county contact man or 
by contacting the Association office, 
Masonic Temple Building, Bellefonte, 
Pa. 

Who can I get to assist in packing my 
crop? 

A local Grade Supervisor who has 
been trained and licensed by the As- 
sociation to supervise packing. If there 
is no local Grade Supervisor in your 
community we will be glad to train one 
for you and your neighboring growers. 

How much will I have to pay for the 
services of a local Grade Supervisor? 

This is a local matter. In most cases 
the prevailing farm wage in the com- 
munity in which the local Grade Super- 
visor is employed. In view of the train- 
ing these men have had, involving time 
and cost of travelling to and from meet- 
ings, and the importance of the task 
they are performing we feel that they 
are entitled to the maximum farm wage 
of the community or a bonus over the 
regular pay of the grading crew. 

(Continued on page 12) 



I 



8 



THE GUIDE POST 



October, 1940 



Putting Pennsylvania Potatoes in the Bag 

ATTENTION — GRADE SUPERVISORS 

Initiative and Originality: 

1 The ''Grade Supervisor" perceives or sees the many new problems that 
arise from day to day in packing potatoes but uses his initiative and originality 
to Quickly solve them. (Where to set the grader for efficiency and convenience, 
how to get the best light, how to load different trucks and cars, etc.) 

2 He seeks the best information on problems he cannot readily solve from 
experienced operators or instructors. (This office stands ready at all times to help 
in solving such problems for any or all Grade Supervisors.) 

3. He makes his findings or solutions to problems known to others. (Potato 
growers and other Grade Supervisors.) 

4 The efficient Grade Supervisor has definite plans for doing the job at hand 
or for successfully carrying out activities he must direct. (Actual grading and 
packing, supervising the packing operations for other growers, supervising the 
loading of trucks or cars for market, etc.) 

Tuber Defects: 

It is not essential but will help if the Grade Supervisor is familiar with all 
causes of tuber defects. The important and essential thing that the Grade Supervisor 
must know, is whether the tuber is a No. 1 or a throw-out. (This comes from proper 
instruction, study, and experience.) The grade and weight must be right. 

2. Surface or seen defects: 

a. Scab — surface or pitted. 

b. Insect injury — wire worm, grub worm, other insect injuries. 

c. Rots— blight, stem rot, scald or heating, frost or freezing, bacterial ring rot, 
other soft rots. 

d. Growth defects, growth cracks, second growth, odd-shaped tubers. 

e. Sun-burn or greening. 

f. Caked, dirty or soiled tubers. 

g. Mechanical injuries — cuts, bruises, shatter or air cracks, 
h. Rough skin — due to S9il reaction. 

i. Under size and over size, 
j. Sprouted. 

2. Internal or hidden defects: ,*^ 

a. Stem-end discoloration. 

b. Hollow heart. 

c. Internal browning. 

d. Internal or surface rots that do not break the skin. 

e. Bruises and cracks. 

f. Insect injuries — wire worm, etc. 

g. Sun-burn or greening, 
h. Shrivelled or soft. 

(IJote — The eye should be capable of detecting surface defects. Cutting by a 
knife is essential to detect or determine the severity of internal defects.) 

We expect the Grade Supervisor to see that — 

The grade is right. 

The weight is correct. 

The bags are kept clean. 

That all hags are properly stamped. 



October, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



^^ 



"POTATO CHIPS" 



i 



The September first crop report esti- 
mated 23,875,000 bushels of potatoes for 
Pennsylvania, compared with 22,440,000 
bushels in 1939; the total for the country 
was placed at 383,000,000 bushels com- 
pared with 374,000,000 last year. But the 
9,000,000 bushels increase still depends 
largely on fall weather in the principal 
producing states. Serious frosts — or 
heavy rainfall, causing decay during late 
digging, could cut this figure consider- 
ably by the first of November. On the 
other hand, favorable weather through- 
out digging might increase the 1940 esti- 
mate still more. 

Many people lack initiative, enthus- 
iasm, vision and foresight. The others, 
though not as numerous as the former 
group, are those who make this old 
world a better place to live in. 

The potato marketing law — Act 275 — 
was "enforced" last year by the State 
Department of Agriculture without the 
conviction of a single flagrant violator. 
This would indicate that Pennsylvania 
growers are now familiar with this 
marking law and are complying with its 
requirements. This compliance will un- 
questionably react favorably for the 
growers who have faithfully adhered to 
this legislation when packing the Asso- 
ciation properly marked branks. Act 275 
is a good piece of legislation which, when 
properly enforced, can do no end of good 
for the entire industry. 

This season we should see a greatly 
increased steady supply of Pennsylvania 
potatoes moving to market in peck t igs 
—both Blue Labels and Green Labels, 
and we miqht see a fairly favorable 
price level throughout the season, held 
firm by increasing consumer demand in 
spite of an abundant supply. But without 
supposition, or attempts at crystal gaz- 
ing, both of which are dangerous any 
way, we know the sound way for Penn- 
sylvania growers to market their 1940 
crop is by shipping in an orderly manner, 
a regular supply of well-graded, attrac- 
tively packed spuds, which will be a 
credit to the industry, satisfactory to the 
consumer, and good business for the 
grower. 

Congressman Luther Patrick, of Ala- 
bama, tells an appropriate yarn, which 
goes something like this: 



"This fellow was going down the road, 
driving a team of oxen and he popped 
a lizard here and he popped a grasshop- 
per there. Finally he came to a hornets 
nest, suspended from a tree, and the 
little boy with him said, 'Why don't you 
get after them babies?' The man said: 
'Them babies is organized.' " 

The Green Label, or "Economy" peck 
will need introduction to the Pennsyl- 
vania consuming trade, but packers 
and buyers alike look to it as one of the 
answers probed for in the depths of the 
Association marketing plan. The Econ- 
omy peck is the possible outlet for many 
Pennsylvania crops which, because of 
minor defects, do not economically grade 
up to a Blue Label, but which do fall in- 
to' this U. S. Commercial grade with a 
moderate amount of culling. This pack, 
which will not command the premium 
price of the "Blues" should, neverthe- 
less, outsell the Pennsylvania partly 
graded barnyard packs, which, like pov- 
erty, will always be with us. There is a 
large group of consumers who have be- 
come bargain hunters; and the peck of 
spuds which sells for a few cents less— 
but is acceptable in quality, might con- 
stitute "the bargain I bought today" to 
tell neighbor Mrs. Jones about. 

"You" is a word we use commonly; — 
and also which we give certain special 
meanings— but, in terms of cooperative 
thinking, the Idah-Best News, pubhshed 
by the Idaho Egg Producers, this little 
word has new great proportions: "While 
'You' is singular, 'You' is, also, plural. 
♦You' in the plural, really working to- 
gether, can accomplish things that are 
remarkable. You know that! 

Some men have thousands of reasons 
why they cannot do what they want to, 
when all they need is one reason why 
they can.— Dr. W illis W hitney 

In a single issue of the Packer (Octo- 
ber 5, 1940) the potato situation is most 
adequately described in these headlines: 
"Maine Potato Crop Larger Than m 
1939"; "Idaho Expects Best (Potato) 
Crop in its History"; "Potato Prospects 
in Nebraska Show Big Improvement ; 
"Ideal Weather in Colorado Raises Pota- 
to Estimates"; "Potato Crop in Pennsyl- 
(Continued on page 16) 



10 



THE GUIDE POST 



October, 1940 



Crop Conditions in Maine and Michigan 



Editor's Note: P. E. Dougherty, of 
Williamsport, visited the potato fields of 
Aroostock County, Maine and Northern 
Michigan in early September and has 
forwarded us the following reports ot 
conditions in these sections: 

"The early growing season was simi- 
lar to that of Pennsylvania and Ohio, 
however, the cool, wet spring delayed 
planting but shghtly and effected stands 
only on very limited areas of scattered 
low fields. Rain-fall during June and the 
first half of July was somewhat above 
normal, but not sufficient to retard vme 
growth. Some sections needed addition- 
al moisture during last July and August 
for best yields. Reporting bureaus ad- 
vise an increased planting this season 
of about 7000 acres. Yield should exceed 
that of last year by fifteen barrels per 
acre, indicating another fifty million 
bushel production for the state. 

"Records furnished by the State De- 
partment of Agriculture, following first 
inspection, lists an increased acreage of 
all varieties of certified seed except 
Green Mountains. The heaviest increase, 
as has been the case for the past three 
years, being Katahdins and Chippewas. 
Sebagoes and Houmas, two of the newer 
varieties, are meeting with favor, es- 
pecially with Maine table stock growers 
and are being certified now in rather 
large acreages. A striking feature of the 
certified crops generally is the unusual 
vigor and uniform vine growth. Disease 
readings are comparatively low, but 
vary as to source of foundation stock 
and roguing. 

"Certified Cobbler fields, depending on 
date of planting, are now gradually 
ripening. Hand digging shows a heavy 
set, but indicates seed will run medium, 
however, larger than last year, with 
lower yield of Size B stock. Chippewa 
fields, with somewhat greener vines, will 
likewise dig a larger run of seed with 
lower percentage of the smaller grade. 
The vines of Certified Katahdins are still 
green. Hand digging, depending on lo- 
cation in the County, shows slightly less 
than average set, with size of No. 1. 
Grade varing from medium to large and 
fewer Size B's. 

"There is no evidence that a high per- 
centage of seed fields will be rejected on 
further inspection. Barring the develop- 
ment of some unusual condition, supply 



of all varieties should be sufficient to 
meet full demands." 

And of the conditions seen in Michi- 
gan, Mr. Dougherty reports:— "The 
growing season to date has been near 
ideal for even stands, thrifty growth of 
vines, and heavier than usual set of tu- 
bers. Type is unusually good, with no in- 
dication of second growth. Size of tubers 
varies according to time of planting and 
fertility. The early planted stock natur- 
ally shows more size and maturity than 
the late fields which need at least twenty 
days without frost to produce better than 
average yields. 

"Fields generally are practically free 
of disease. Roguing has not been much 
of a problem as only a limited amount 
of disease has developed. The most ser- 
ious trouble during the season was the 
slightly more than usual amount of 
blackleg. There is no evidence of bac- 
terial wilt or any serious disease either 
in certified or table stock fields. Our 
growers realize the high standards of 
their seed can be maintained only by 
constant roguing and are doing a 
thorough job of eliminating all abnormal 
plants with tubers from fields. The 
roguings continue as long as vines are 
growing. 

"The general appearance of our fields 
with uniformly vigorous vine growth, 
low disease content and indications for 
good yields of typey, clean, medium- 
size stock allows us to anticipate ship- 
ping a dependable volume of proven 
quality Certified Russets grown in a 
section which we belive to be second to 
none for the production of foundation 
seed of this variety." 



What is a cynic? A man who knows 
the price of everything and the value 
of nothing. — Oscar Wilde. 



Once a year the neighborhood boys 
from the slums are taken for an outing 
up the Hudson River where they can 
bathe to their hearts' content. As one 
little fellow was getting into the water, 
a friend observed: 

"I say, Tommy, aren't you dirty?" 
"Yes," replied Tommy, "I missed the 
boat last year." — Florida Citrus. 



October, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



11 



7 

1 



Growers and Grade Supervisors Show 
Keen Interest in Meetings 



Two hundred and fifty growers and 
Grade Supervisors took part in four 
meetings conducted by the Association 
in Eastern Counties during the week of 
September 23-27th. These meetings were 
requested in the areas in which they 



were held and met with the enthusiastic 
approval of the growers. The attendance 
was most gratifying to the Association 
Management when we realize the meet- 
ings were held at an exceedingly busy 
time for the potato grower. 




Fred inaalls, John Hall— sophomores. Dale Jackson, Lyall Niver, «^c*^aj^/®?l"®/' 
r^^on GUbert— Fres^^ The following members not appearing in the picture 

Harry Tauscner. 



The meetings were for the purpose of 
explaining the Marketing Program for 
the 1940-1941 season, checkmg on pres- 
ent licensed Grade Supervisors, trammg 
of additional Grade Supervisors for com- 
munities where growers desire to mar- 
ket, and to not only demonstrate but 
actually size, grade, package and inspect 
potatoes put up for market. Four addi- 
tional such meetings are scheduled m 
Western growing areas during the pres- 
ent week, October 8-1 1th. 



Additional meetings will be scheduled 
in other sections during coming weeks 
as requested. We already have a number 
of additional requests for such meetings. 

The first meeting in the East was at the 
farm of J. K. Mast, Elverson, Lancaster 
County, with growers and Grade Super- 
visors present from the following coun- 
ties: Lancaster, Berks, Chester, Bucks, 
Lebanon, and Centre. In addition to the 

(Continued on page 20) 



12 



THE GUIDE POST 



October, 1940 



OVER THE PICKING TABLE 



by Inspector Throwout 



The Dairymen's League News printed 
this story, originating in Atlanta, Ga.: 

"An agitated ruralist asked at the in- 
formation desk in the state capital build- 
ing: 'Where kain I find the veteran de- 
pa'tment?' 'Veteran depa'tment? Which? 
World War or Confederate?' T kaint tell 
you, suh, but I knows this, she's a mighty 
sick cow'." 

• • • 

The Dairymen also recently ran this — 
a tall one! 

"Yes, sir," said the new hand, "when 
that bull chased me, I jumped for a limb 
twice as high as my head, but I missed 
it " 

"Tough luck, old man." 

"I missed it going up," the new man 
continued, "but I grabbed hold coming 
down." 

• • • 

An Irishman and a Scotsman went into 
a hotel for refreshment, and were asked 
to sign their names and nationality. 

The Irishman signed: "Irish — and 
proud of it." 

The Scotsman signed: "Scotch — and 
fond of it." 

• • • 

Sympathy is what one girl offers an- 
other in exchange for details. 

• • • 

A fellow got on the subway at the 
Pennsylvania station and observed a 
man across the aisle, who was reading 
his newspaper intently while on his left 
shoulder sat primly a fine pigeon. On his 
right shoulder sat stolidly another pi- 
geon. A third perched on top of his head. 
As station passed station the man con- 
tinued to read his newspaper and the 
pigeons sat. 

Our observer had intended to get off 
for home at 96th Street, but was too curi- 
ous about the passenger across the aisle 
to leave. When the train was nearing 
125th, he felt he couldn't stay with it 
much longer, so went over to the man, 
touched his arm gently and said, "Say, 
what are those pigeons doing on your 
shoulder" 

"Oh, them?" the man spoke over his 
newspaper. "I don't know. They got on 
at Blecher Street." 



"Aunt Maria," ancient colored maid 
at Randolph-Macon Women's College 
since its founding, has the welfare of the 
students at heart. She was recently over- 
heard admonishing a taxi driver who 
was waiting at the door for his passen- 
ger: 

"Man, yo-all take good cayuh of ouah 
Chilluns, cause dey way wahyuds so 
easy!" 

• • • 

The object of teaching a child is to 
enable him to get along without his 
teacher. 

• • • 

Do not dump your woes upon people — 
keep the sad story of your life to your- 
self. Troubles grow by recounting them. 

• • • 

How To Win An Argument 

The way to convince another is to state 
your case moderately and accurately. 
Then scratch your head, or shake it a 
little, and say that is the way it seems 
to you, but that of course you may be 
mistaken about it; which causes your 
listener to receive what you have to say, 
and as like as not turn about and try to 
convince you of it, since you are in doubt. 
But if you go at him in a tone of posi- 
tiveness and arrogance you only make 
an opponent of him. 

— Benjamin Franklin 



The world has always acted on the 
principle that one good kick deserves 
another. 

• • • 

Do unto others as though you were the 
other. 



A "PILL-BOX," MAYBE? 

Jane: "Whenever I get down in the 
dumps I buy myself a new hat." 

Sally: "So that is where you get them.'* 



AS YOU LIKE IT 

A gossip is one who talks to you about 
others; a bore is one who talks to you 
about himself; and a brilliant conversa- 
tionalist is one who talks to you about 
yourself. — Dairymen's League News. 



October, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



13 






Grower to Grower Exchange 

The rate for advertising in this column is a penny a word, minimum cost 25 cents, 
payable with order. (10% reduction when four or more insertions are ordered at 
one time.) Count name and address. Send ads to reach the GUIDE POST, Masonic 
Temple Building, Bellefonte, Penna., by the 20th of the month previous to publi- 
cation. 



FOR SALE: Bean No. 103 Potato Grader, 
bought new this fall. Used very little. 
$225.00. A. T. Blakeslee, Blakeslee, 
(Monroe County) , Penna. 

POTATO EQUIPMENT FOR SALE: 

One two-row Cletrac Avery Cultivator 
complete, one two-row Cletrac Avery 
Weeder, one Killifer Disc Harrow with 
24" blades, all slightly used. Good condi- 
tion. Reasonable. If interested, write W. 



J. Braddock, c/o Wheeling Bronze Cast- 
ing Company, Wheeling, W. Va. 
PLANTER WANTED: 2 row Iron-Age 
Picker Type. Can also use good used 
grader and Digger. Write Ray Salmon, 
Waterford, Erie County, Penna. 
AVAILABLE: Copies of Dr. E. L. Nix- 
on's book, "The Principles of Potato 
Production," $1.25 per copy. Write for 
your copy today, to Association office, 
Bellefonte, Pennsylvania. 



THE ASSOCIATION MARKETING 
PROGRAM 

(Continued from page 7) 

What is the cost of the Association 
trade marked paper bags? 

The price of bags is as follows: Blue 
Label Pecks: $18.00 per thousand; Blue 
Label Bushels (two walled bag) ; $45.50 
per thousand, (three walled bag) : $48.75 
per thousand; Red Label Pecks: $17.50 
per thousand; Economy Pack Peck: 
$17.50 per thousand.; Uuclassified Bu- 
shels: $38.50 per thousand. 

Where do I get the wire ties and the 
twister for tying the bags? 

The wire ties come with each bag 
shipment. The twisters for tying can 
be had by contacting or ordering from 
the Association Office, Masonic Temple, 
Bellefonte, Pa. 

I have a crop of potatoes that show 
some stem end discoloration. Should 1 
pack them Blue Label Pecks? 

No. A crop showing any appreciable 
percentage of stem-end should be pack- 
ed U. S. Commercial, Economy Pack 
Pecks, or if too bad should be packed 
Unclassified. 

I would like to pack and sell 2,000 Blue 
Label Pecks. Who should I contact to 
make the sale? 

Your local Community or County 
Contact Man. If there is no Contact Man 
in your area then contact the Associa- 
tion Office, Bellefonte Pa. 



If I decide to market through the As- 
sociation to what market am I likely to 
have to make deliveries? 

In so far as possible the nearest mar- 
ket to you. If the local market is con- 
gested thereby demoralizing the price 

(Continued on page 16) 



HARVEST 

of the 

1940 PENNSYLVANIA 
POTATO CROP 

is revealing 
Some Outstanding Yields 

If you have a yield, don't fail 
to have it checked for the 

400-BUSHEL CLUB 

If you are not fully acquainted 
with the requirements, write 
the Association Office. 

Masonic Temple Building 

Bellefonte, Penna. 

immediately 









14 



THE GUIDE POST 



October, 1940 




Sample tubers of Iwo of the most promis- 
ing seedlings harvested at "Camp Pota- 
to/' October 3rd. Many other new seed- 
lings harvested on above date were 
equally promising. Growers from vari- 
ous parts of the state, present for the 
digging, were enthusiastic about these 
seedlings and whole-heartedly back of 
the continuation of the project. 



Frisks of the Frost 

From McGuffey's Fourth Reader — 

Editor's Note: This is one of the finest 
word pictures, in poetry, in the language. 
Try reading it aloud to members of the 
family. Or better yet let the best reader 
in the family read it aloud. It requires 
the proper inflection on pauses to bring 
out clearly the full meaning. Try com- 
mitting it to memory. How friskish have 
you known the frost to be? Kill one 
neighbor's potatoes or leave another un- 
touched. Frost will split a mountain, 
upset a building. It is both useful and 
harmful. 

The Frost looked forth one still, clear 

night, 
And whispered, ''Now I shall be out 

of sight; 
So through the valley, and over the 

height, 
In silence I'll make my way; 
I will not go on, like the blustering 

train. 
The wind and the snow, the hail and 

the rain, 
Who make so much bustle and noise 

in vain, 
But I'll be as busy as they." 

Then he flew to the mountain, and 

powdered its crest; 
He lit on the trees, and their boughs he 

dressed 
In diamond beads; and over the breast 
Of the quivering lake, he spread 
A coat of mail, that need not fear 



The downward point of many a spear 
That hung on its margin, far and near. 
Where a rock could rear its head. 

He went to the window of those who 

slept. 
And over each pane, like a fairy, crept. 
Wherever he breathed, whenever he 

stepped, 
By the light of the moon were seen 
Most beautiful things; there were 

flowers and trees; 
There were bevies of birds, and 

swarms of bees; 
There were cities with temples and 

towers and these 
All pictured in silver sheen. 

But he did one thing, that was hardly 
fair; 

He peeped in the cupboard, and find- 
ing there 

That all had forgotten for him to pre- 
pare, 

"Now just to set them a-thinking, 

I'll bite this basket of fruit," said he, 

"This costly pitcher I'll burst in three; 

And the glass of water they've left for 
me 
Shall "Tch-Tch-Tch" to tell them I'm 

drinking." 



THE POTATO MARKETING PRO- 
GRAM WILL DO THESE THINGS FOR 
YOUR INDUSTRY 

(Continued from page 6) 

rubber checks and extending the buy- 
er long doubtful credit. 

PROVIDE a market service — including 
the attractive Association trade mark- 
ed bags, to all growers small or large 
without discrimination as to cost. 

INSPIRE growers to achieve — better 
yields of improved quality through 
the use of new varieties, good seed, 
proper spraying, improvement of soils, 
and careful attention to details in 
growing, harvesting, storing, and mar- 
keting the crop. 



Not Surprised 

Binks — "Do you know that your wife 
is going about telling everybody that 
you can't keep her in clothes?" 

Banks— "That's nothing. I bought her 
a home, and I can't keep her in that." 



» 



» 



Plenty of Potash 
For Good Potatoes 



Potash is more necessary to the agriculture of the United 
States now than ever before, according to the Bureau of 
Mines of the U. S. Department of the Interior. The Bureau 
states that it is gratifying to find that the virtual stoppage 
of imports in late 1939 causes none of the anxious fore- 
boding that gripped American farmers in 1914, and that 
today our expanded needs can be met from domestic 
sources. Therefore Americaia potato farmers are assured 
of plenty of potash for their plantings next spring. 

If your harvest this year has been unsatisfactory, you 
will wish to start checking up now on your soils and fer- 
tilization practices to see if you are using enough potash 
to get the larger yields and greater percentage of No. I's 
which this necessary plant food insures. For a good crop 
of first grade potatoes, soil and fertilizer must supply at 
least 200 lbs. of available potash per acre. Your county 
agent or experiment station will help you check soils and 
fertilizer practices. Your fertihzer dealer will tell you how 
little it costs to apply enough potash. 



If we can be of any help to you, please 
write us for free information and 
literature on how to fertilize your 
crops. 




American Potash Institute, Inc 



Investment Building 



Washington, D. C. 



I 



16 



THE GUIDE POST 



October, 1940 



THE ASSOCIATION MARKETING 
PROGRAM 

(Continued from page 13) 

you may be asked or encouraged along 
with other growers to make deliveries 
to a more distant market. Cooperation 
in such a plan leads to better prices in 
the local market and a greater return 
for your crop over the season. Often 
times a greater net return can be had in 
the more distant market over and above 
the cost of delivery. 

I understand all bags must be stamped. 
How do I get one of these stamps? 

Stamps are only issued to qualified 
and licensed Grade Supervisors. 

Should I pack potatoes before offering 
them to the Association for sale or 
should I make the offering and begin 
packing when the sale is confirmed? 

It is not advisable to pack ahead of 
sales. Begin packing when you are as- 
sured they will move into market. 

There are a number of stores in my 
community that would like to have my 
potatoes in peck bags. Could I pack 
them in the Association trade marked 
bags and service these stores? 

This is entirely possible, however, it 
is important that you make the set up 
with these stores through or with the 
knowledge and sanction of the Associa- 
tion. 

How do I get word of local meetings 
being staged by the Association to train 
local Grade Supervisors? 

Let the Association Office, Masonic 
Temple, Bellefonte, Pa. know of your 
interest and you will be informed of any 
and all meetings staged in your section. 

I have no grader but have several 
hundred bushels of potatoes I would like 
to sell through the Association. How can 
I participate? 

By grading by hand, borrowing a 
grader, or by hauling your potatoes to 
a grower who will cooperate with you 
in packing. In any of these cases you 
will need the services of a local Grade 
Supervisor to make sure that the grade 
and weight is right. 

Is any particular type of scales re- 
quired for packing pecks? 

No, but be sure the weight is correct. 
Pecks packed from clean dry potatoes 



POTATO CHIPS 

(Continued from page 9) 

vania is Over Last Year"; "New York 
State Potato Prospects Favorable*'; *To- 
tato Crop Much Larger in Maine"; "Mi- 
chigan Shippers Report Expect Produc- 
tion Same or Increased Over 1939" — and 
others, too numerous to list. But, it adds 
up to one certain total: lots and lots of 
good potatoes this winter. 



Food prices held remarkably stable 
during the first year of the European 
war, the Bureau of Agricultural Ec- 
onomics reported in a recent statement. 
Prices rose sharply at the outbreak of 
the war, but subsequently declined. 
Farm, wholesale and retail prices in Au- 
gust, 1940, were lower than in Septem- 
ber, 1939 — the first month of the war — 
and only slightly higher than in the 
months immediately preceding the be- 
ginning of the war. 

The following bit of poetry, gleaned 
from the Cooperative Digest, is more 
truth than poetry: 

HORSE SENSE 

In shooing flies or hauling freight, 
It's wiser to cooperate, 
For better jobs are sooner done, 
If two take hold and work as one. 

Now* that's a truth all horses know, 
They learned it centuries ago, 
When days are hot and flies are thick 
Co-operation does the trick. 

One tail on duty at the rear 
Can't reach the fly behind the ear; 
But two tails, if arranged with craft 
Give full protection, fore and aft. 

Though fools pursue a lonely course. 
Let wise men emulate the horse. 
To make a burden half as great. 
Use horse sense and co-operate. 

— from the "Eggsaminer." 

"Small Potato" 
Pinch-hitting for Bill Shakespud. 

for immediate delivery should be pack- 
ed 5 to 7 ounces over 15 lbs. When pack- 
ing from fresh dug or otherwise damp 
potatoes with some dirt they should be 
7 to 9 ounces over 15 lbs. Potatoes that 
are wet dirty or muddy should not be 
packed but allowed to dry so that they 
will clean in grading and be dry when 
packed. Be sure that your scales are 
right. 



I 



ti 



EQUITABLE 



Pane/i Baa 



i 



COMPANY 

INCORPORATED 



I 



^Specialists in the manufacture of 

POTATO SACKS 

and All Other Types of Heavy Duty 
Pasted Bottom Paper Sacks 

♦Specialists because . . . 

We operate our own paper mill, and control every 
step to the finished paper bag, giving Equitable cus- 
tomers these three important advantages: uniform 
high quality, rehable service, and economy in price. 
Our art and research departments (a gratis service 
to Equitable customers) assure you of a well designed 
bag, efficiently suited to your particular needs. 

PROMPT Deliveries 

RELIABLE Quality 

ECONOMICAL Prices 



4700 Thirty-first Place. Long Island City. N> Y. 
Paper Mills at Orange. Texas 



18 



THE GUIDE POST 



October, 1940 



SOURCES OF PENNSYLVANIA 

CERTIFIED SEED POTATOES 

(Continude jrovfi page 5) 

Katahdin, 2.0 acres; Everett Blass, Coud- 
ersport, Nittany, 22.0 acres; Everett 
Blass, Coudersport, Russet, 26.0 acres; 
F. D. Blough, Coudersport, Russet, 18.0 
acres; F. D. Blough, Coudersport, Nit- 
tany, 6.0 acres; L. G. Blough, Couders- 
port, Nittany, 2.0 acres; L. G. Blough, 
Coudersport, Katahdin, 2.0 acres; L. G. 
Blough, Coudersport, Russet, 18.0 acres; 
Milford Clark, Coudersport, Russet, 2.0 
acres; J. A. Furman, Genesee, Russet, 
9.0 acres; J. A. Furman, Genesee, W. 
Rural, 2.0 acres; J. A. Furman, Genesee, 
Nittany, 3.0 acres; Ed. L. Gross, Couders- 
port, Russet, 3.6 acres; Paul Hamilton, 
Genesee, Russet, 21.0 acres; Fred 
Hughes, Genesee, Russet, 3.5 acres; 
Merle Jacobs, Coudersport, Russet, 14.0 
acres; H. and Taylor Jones, Shingle- 
house, W. Rural, 6.0 acres; C. S. Ladd 
and Son, Ulysses, Katahdin, 5.0 acres; 
L. L. Leete, Genesee, Russet, 5.0 acres; 
Walter S. Leete, Genesee, Russet, 5.0 
acres; Lafe Littlefield, Coudersport, 
Russet, 4.0 acres; Arthur Mattison, 
Coudersport, Pennigan, 5.5 acres; Ar- 
thur Mattison, Coudersport, Russet, 2.0 
acres; Arthur Metzger, Roulette, Russet, 
4.0 acres; Walter Metzger, Roulette, 
Russet, 4.0 acres; Leigh N. Neefe, Coud- 
ersport, Chippewa, 1.5 acres; Thos. J. 
Neefe, Coudersport, Chippewa, 14.5 
acres; W. S. Olmstead, Coudersport, 
Russet, 7.5 acres; Louis Perkins, 
Shinglehouse, W. Rural, 5.0 acres; W. E. 
Saringer, Coudersport, W. Rural, 0.5 
acre; W. E. Sarginger, Coudersport, 
Katahdin, 1.0 acre; Will Scott, Couders- 
port, W. Rural, 6.0 acres; A. C. Shoop, 
Coudersport, Russet, 27.0 acres; A. C. 
Shoop, Coudersport, Nittany, 6.0 acres; 
A. C. Shoop, Coudersport, Chippewa, 
4.0 acres; P. R. Smith, Ulysses, Russet, 
31.0 acres; P. R. Smith, Ulysses, Houma, 
10.0 acres; P. R. Smith, Ulysses, Katah- 
din, 31.0 acres; Robert Smith, Ulysses, 
Katahdin, 1.0 acre; Robert Smith, Ulys- 
ses, Russet, 1.5 acres; Leon Spencer, 
Ulysses, Katahdin, 6.0 acres; Stearn- 
stead Farms, Coudersport, Pennigan, 
7.0 acres; Stearnstead Farms, Couders- 
port, W. Rural, 6.6 acres; Straley Bros., 
Germania, Russet, 6.0 acres; Lyle Tar- 
box, Ulysses, W. Rural, 18.0 acres; Lyle 
Tarbox, Ulysses, Russet, 6.0 acres; L. C. 
Traub, Galeton, Russet, 2.7 acres; L. C. 
Traub, Galeton, Katahdin, 1.0 acre; 



L. C. Traub, Galeton, Nittany, 2.0 acres; 
M. L. Van Wegen, Coudersport, Katah- 
den, 2.0 acres; M. L. Wegen, Coudersport, 
Russet, 4.0 acres; H. N. Watkins and G. 
L. Tarbox, Ulysses, Russet, 15.0 acres; 
H. N. Watkins and G. L. Tarbox, Ulysses, 
W. Rural, 3.0 acres; F. W. Way, Couders- 
port, Russet, 8.0 acres. 

Somerset County — Wm. H. Barnett, 
Somerset, Russet, 2.0 acres; C. R. Bauer- 
master, Berlin, R. 2, Katahdin, 1.0 acre; 
C. R. Bauermaster, Berlin, R. 2, Mason, 
3.0 acres; O. W. Beachley, Somerset, R. 
5, Pennigan, 9.0 acres; O. W. Beachley, 
Somerset, R. 5, Mason, 10.0 acres; Bird 
Bros., Meyerdale, R. 3 Katahdin, 7.0 
acres; Harry Braugh, Rockwood, R. 3, 
Mason, 3.0 acres; Jos. H. Fisher, Boswell, 
Russe, 17.0 acres; Jos. H. Fisher, Bos- 
well, Katahdin, 10.0 acres; Frank Hand- 
werk, Berlin, R. 3, Mason, 2.0 acres; Jay 
Hauger, Berlin, Mason, 4.0 acres; C. J. 
Hoffman, Berlin, R. 2, W. Rural, 2.5 
acres; A. R., Knepper, Berlin, R. 2, Ma- 
son, 4.0 acres; Howard Powell, Hoovers- 
ville. Russet, 1.25 acres; Howard Powell, 
Hooversville, W. Rural, 2.0 acres; Syl- 
vester Powell, Hooversville, Mason, 2.5 
acres; J. C. Reimen, Berlin, R. 2, Mason, 
10.0 acres; Glenn Sadler, Somerset, R. 5, 
Mason, 3.0 acres; Clyde Walker, Berlin, 
R. 5, Mason, 3.0 acres; Gladen Walker, 
Somerset, R. 5, Mason, 10.0 acres. 

Sullivan County — Stafford Randall, 
Dushore, Russet, 4.5 acres; F. V. Rohe, 
Dushore, Russet, 4.0 acres. 

Warren County — C. F. Camp, Tor- 
pedo, Russet, 3.0 acres; R. H. Duntley & 
Son, Cory don. Russet, 5.0 acres; John 
Jensen, Bear Lake, Russet, 10.5 acres; 
John Jensen, Bear Lake, Chippewa, 5.0 
acres. 

Wyoming County — D. M. Bartron, 
Tunkhannock, Russet, 11.0 acres. 

York County — J. E. Mundis, Windsor, 
Cobblers, 8.0 acres; Clarence Striewig, 
Glen Rock, Katahdin, 4.0 acres; Clarence 
Striewig, Glen Rock, Russet, 5.0 acres. 



Serious 

Man — (to small son of one of his 
workmen who has met with an acci- 
dent) . "When will your Dad be fit for 
work again?" 

Boy — "Can't say for certain, but it 
will be a long time?" 

Man— "What makes you think that?" 

Boy — " *Cause compensations* set in." 

— Santa Fe Magazine 



ti 



October, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



Id 



ip 



t4 



NOTICE TO 

HUNTERS 

Arrangements have been 
made to make "Camp Potato" 
available to all Association 
members and their guests dur- 
ing the deer hunting season. 

Sleeping cots, mattresses, 
and pillows are available. 
Blankets, bed linens, and other 
accessories must be furnished 
by applicants. 

The use of all alcoholic bev- 
erages is strictly probibited, 
and Association members shall 
be responsible for the proper 
conduct of their guests. 

The cost will be $1.50 per 
day, per person, all meals in- 
cluded, and reservations 
should be made early, accom- 
panied by the fee for the days 
reserved, by contacting 



Mrs. Wayne Hindman 
''Camp Potato" 

Coudersport, Penna. 
First come — First served 



PACK POTATOES 

IN PAPER 

irS THE WAY 
OF MODERN 
MERCHANDISING 

Attractively Printed Paper 
Bags Bring Greater Returns 
to the Grower. 

HAMMOND 
BETTERBAGS 

Combine High Grade Printing, 
Strength and Quality 

HAMMOND 
BETTERBAGS 

Will Bring You Repeat Orders 




Hammond Bag & 
Paper Co. 

WELLSBURG, W. VA. 

Bags for 

Lime, Limestone, Fertilizer, Flour, 

Feed and Potatoes 



wm. 



20 



THE GUIDE POST 



October, 1940 



GROWERS AND GRADE 

SUPERVISORS SHOW KEEN 

INTEREST IN MEETINGS 

(Continued from page 11) 
discussion and work with growers and 
present supervisors present, seven new 
Grade Supervisors were qualified for 
Lancaster, Chester, Berks, Lebanon, and 
Bucks Counties. 

The second meeting was at the Harry 
Roth farm, Nazareth, Northampton 
County. The digging of a seedling and 
Fertilizer (Potash treatments) Test Plot 
added to the interest of this meeting. The 
attendance was beyond expectations 
with 85 growers and Grade Supervisors 
in attendance. In addition to the instruc- 
tions to growers and present supervisors 
a class of 14 entered the Grade Super- 
visor training. In view of the number, 
the time for ample instruction, grading, 
packing and inspection for each candi- 
date and the interest shown, it was 6 
P. M. Tuesday evening before the final 
gong was rung down on this meeting. 

Thursday was a wet, rainy, cold day 
but the fine storage on the farm of A. D. 
Knorr and Son, Numidia, Columbia 
County, gave comfortable shelter to one 
of the largest and most interested crowds 
of the week. Here, too, we had the largest 
turn-out of present licensed supervisors 
from Columbia, Luzerne, Northumber- 
land, Wyoming and Centre Counties. 
Twenty-four supervisors and candidates 
in addition to a large number of growers 
took part in the discussion and work 
which also lasted well into the evening. 
Seven new Grade Supervisors were 
qualified, several of whom are already 
supervising the packing of Blue Labels 
for market. 

The final meeting was at the farm of 
Robert Aten, Macungie, Lehigh County. 
Those in attendance represented Lehigh, 
Schuylkill, Berks, and Centre counties. 
Although the attendance was smaller, 
the interest was good and we are con- 
fident those present were well repaid for 
there was ample time for instruction, 
grading, packing, and inspection for the 
class of 11 candidates. Five new Grade 
Supervisors were qualified, three of 
whom will operate in entirely new com- 
munities in packing and selling pota- 
toes through the Association. 

The Management wishes to thank the 
four growers, Messrs. Mast, Roth, Knorr, 
and Aten, for making available their 
equipment and rooms for the meetings 
and expresses its appreciation for the 
assistance given by individuals and or- 
ganizations for publicizing the meetings 
in their communities. 



Membership Drive 

The Association membership drive 
slowed considerably during the past few 
weeks, and few contributing members 
had part in what gain was made, but 
however small, all gains are in the right 
direction — and appreciated. 

"Camp Potato" manager, Wayne A. 
Hindman, led the drive with two new 
memberships, secured from **Camp Po- 
tato" visitors from way down east. 

John Schrope, well known to the As- 
sociaiton membership as the "Potato 
Growers' Philosopher", from Hegins, 
Schuylkill County, secured his new 
member. 

Morris Kriebel, of Barto, Berks 
County, who has been a faithful con- 
tributor throughout the drive, enrolled 
a new member from Montgomery 
Couixtv. 

Lynn Sill, of Corry, Erie County 
large packer of Blue Labels, and con- 
stant booster, signed up one of his 
neighbors for membership. 

Harry F. Roth, of Northampton 
County, and a real cooperator, enrolled 
one of his neighbors also, in his com- 
munity of Nazareth. 

A number of other new members 
signed themselves up to help increase 
the months' Association growth. 

All of these new members we heartily 
welcome into our ranks: 

Eilus O. Saylor, Easton, Northampton 
County. 

Herbert K. Dries, Fleetwood, Berks 
County. 

Francis Coleman, Hegins, Schuylkill 
County. 

Owen S. Gerhard, Palm, Montgomery 
County. 

Clinton Mathews, Corry, Erie County. 

Harvey Schaffer, Nazareth, North- 
ampton County. 

Howard Waring, Linesville, Crawford 
County. 

H. B. Leighty, Newry, Blair County. 

George Hamilton, Genesse, Potter 
County. 

Wheeler Smith, Nescopeck, Luzerne 
County. 

Eugene Fetterman, Catawissa, Colum- 
bia County. 

(Continued on page 22) 




YOUR EXTRA PROFIT 

FROM THE USE OF A BEAN RUBBER SPOOL GRADER 

WILL PAY FOR IT 




3 CAPACITY SIZES OF BEAN GRADERS 

• YOU DON'T LIKE BRUISING 

• YOU DON'T LIKE CUTTING 

• YOU DON'T LIKE INACCURACY 
IN YOUR POTATO GRADING 

..YOU DON'T GET IT.. 

WITH A BEAN RUBBER SPOOL GRADER 
OUR CATALOG SHOWS YOUR WAY TO PROFIT 

John Bean Mfg. Co. 



LANSING 



MICHIGAN 




-i-i<li"'f';.''>'i' 



22 



THE GUIDE POST 



October, 1940 



DOBBINS BROTHERS HAND- 
LING LOWER GRADES IN 
PITTSBURGH AREA 

A contract has been executed with 
DOBBINS BROTHERS, 2014 PIKE 
STREET, PITTSBURGH, PA., for the 
movement of the lower grades of pota- 
toes in the Pittsburgh marketing area 
as during the 1939-40 season. 

The commission of a commission mer- 
chant is 10%. Of this 10% deducted by 
the sales agent, 3% will be refunded by 
him to the association upon completion 
of the sale. This 3% refund in turn has 
been deducted from the price of all As- 
sociation bags used for the lower grades, 
in order to bring the price of the con- 
tainer more nearly in line with the grade 
of potatoes being packed and sold. In 
other words, the 3% refund is turned 
back to the growers. 

By the elimination of competition on 
the Association pack of Red Labels (U.S. 
No. 1, Size B); Green Label (U.S. Com- 
mercial); also Unclassified in 60-pound 
paper, which is accomplished by giving 
but one concern in each market the ex- 
clusive sale of these packs, the highest 
net returns are assured to the grower, 
while at the same time, identified pota- 
toes are better established in the mar- 
kets. 

The above mentioned concern has al- 
ready established a real demand for the 
Association pack in Pittsburgh. 

Confine the movement of the above 
mentioned trade-marked packs to the 
concern mentioned and thereby help 



yourself and the Association in its at- 
tempts to again popularize Pennsylvania 
potatoes in her own markets. 

Also confine delivery of potatoes to 
the above house in the lower grades only. 



Association Bag Prices 

Prices Quoted are Per 1000 Delivered 



Blue Label, 
Red Label, 
Economy Pack, 
Blue Label, 
Blue Label, 
Unclassified, 



15's (2-wall) 
15's (2-wall) 
15's (2-wall) 
GO'S (2-wall) 
60's (3-wall) 
60*s (2-wall) 



$18.00 
$17.50 
$17.00 
$45.50 
$48.75 
$38.50 



The above prices are for delivery to 
any point in Pennsylvania and include 
the wire loop ties and the commission to 
the Association. 



MEMBERSHIP DRIVE 

(Continued from page 20) 

Elmer O. Achnebach, Pen Argyl, 
Northampton County. 

Clarence C. Sherry, Strattonville, 
Clarion County. 

J. Lewis Williams, Uniontown, Fay- 
ette County. 

Ward McCall, New Bethlehem, Clar- 
ion County. 

H. F. MacCallum, Buffalo, New York. 

George R. Pietch, Binghamton, New 
York. 



It isn't what you know but how well you know 
how to use what you know that really counts. 

ALBERT C. ROEMHILD 

Potato Commission Merchant 

122 Dock St. PHILADELPHIA Lombard 1000 



"More 1' Per Acre 

-That's Where Agrico Counts!" 

Say Leading Potato Growers, 
from Maine to Minnesota 

MORE No. One's - that's where potatoes pay off! It's those 
extra bushels of dean, smooth, uniform potatoes that mean 
extra cash income to the grower. And that's the basis on which 
we ask you to consider Agrico, the Nation's Leading Fertilizer. 
Wherever good potatoes are grown, from Maine to Minnesota, 
leading farmers have proved, clearly and convincingly, that Agrico s 
extra crop-producing efficiency means EXTRA yields . . . EXTRA 
Quality . .EXTRA cash profit. There's a reason - several reasons, 
in fact - why crop results on farm after farm show such outstand- 
mfact wny p _ j^g records with Agrico: (1) There's an 

Agrico specially formulated to grow po- 
tatoes — made to do this one job and 
do it better; (2) Agrico is "made to 
measure" for local soils and growing 
conditions; (3) Agrico contains all the 
needed plant foods, in just the right 
balance. 

Use Agrico on your own farm and 
profit by the difference it makes in yield 
and above all in the quality of the crop. 

Agrico is Manufactured ONLY by 

The AMERICAN AGRICOLTURAL CHEMICAL Co. 

Baltimore, Md- Buffalo, N. Y. 
Carteret, N. J- 

There's a brand of agrico for each crop 






AGRICO 



THE NATION'S LEADING 
FERTILIZER 



VISION 




This Picker Picked 

i;527J50 

Seed Pieces! 



THE LONG LIVED 
PICKER OF THE 

IRONAQE 

AUTOMATIC 
POTATO PLANTER 



This picker was taken from 
the first Four Row Iron Age 
Potato Planter made, and 
sold to A. C. Ramseyer, 
Smithville, Ohio. 

The Iron Age Automatic 
Picker is simple, durable, de- 
pendable, accurate and 
harmless to seed. 

Adjustable for seed ranging 
in size from ^ to 4 ounces. 
These pickers are almost hu- 
man in their ability to pick a 
piece of seed every time the 
picker arm passes through 
the seed chamber. Each pick- 
er arm resembles a mechan- 
ical hand in its precise hand- 
ling of the seed. 

An exclusive IRON AGE 
FEATURE. 



A. B. FARQUHAR CO., 

Limited 
322 Duke St., York. Pa. 




/; M) M m f( 



VlHHSUV44ij^ 





NOVEMBER • I940 

PidMldJted Im ike 

PENNSYLVANIA COOPERATIVE 
POTATO GROWERS ASSOCIATION 

INCORPORATED 




A new Nixon-developed Seedling yielding 
615 bushels per acre on the farm of Associa- 
tion Director, Hugh McPherson, Bridgeton, 
York County. In the foreground holding 
the large vigorous top is the Association 
Secretary-Treasurer and General Manager, 
E. B. Bower, and Mr. McPherson. The dig- 
ging of the Seedling Plot and Grade Super- 
visor Training school was held on Oct. 25th, 
and was participated in by 86 interested 
growers and friends. 



i 



DR. NIXON WRITES ON: ™ 

The Influence of Weather on the Prevalence 

of Potato Diseases 



There are now three diseases of the 
potato which react so closely to weather 
conditions that they might be thought 
of as being caused by the weather itself. 

It has been only a few generations 
since it was shown by the aid of the 
microscope that definite organisms (bac- 
teria and fungi) were the cause of many 
of the diseases of plants and animals. 

However, careful observers over the 
years have associated certain weather 
changes with epidemics of disease. 

For example, late blight of potatoes 
has been associated with wet weather 
long before it was found to be caused 
by mildew. 

The mildew which causes the disease 
known as late blight is a frail little or- 
ganism that could not thrive for long 
when exposed to hot drying winds, but 
under wet conditions will completely 
kill a potato field in a short time. 

Fortunately the mildew, which causes 
late blight, is controlled by proper spray- 
ing under any weather conditions. By 
correlating the rainfall and certain other 
measures inaugurated with almost un- 
canny accuracy. 

Another disease which comes under 
the category of the weather is stem 
rot, stem-end discoloration, or blue 
stem. There is no specific or causal 
organism associated with this potato 
malady. It follows a high soil tempera- 
ture, when associated with a certain 
stage of development of the potato plant. 
Sometimes two weeks difference in the 
time of planting is responsible for the 
presence or absence of this trouble, it 
can be completely controlled by keeping 
the soil temperature below 60 degrees at 
the "critical" stage in the development 
of the plant. There is no relationship in 
the amount of stem-end discoloration 
resulting in planting affected or unaffec- 
ted seed. In other words it is not trans- 
milted in the seed. Apparently all varie- 
ties are equally susceptible when ex- 
posed to identically the same conditions 
at the "critical" stage of development of 
the plant. The Russet potato has recently 
^in the last several years— become very 



unpopular due largely to stem-end dis- 
coloration. This state-wide malady is 
definitely associated with a cycle of hot 
weather and accompanying high soil 
temperature at the critical stage of the 
plant development. It is significant that 
the Russet potato, this present season, 
having cool weather at the critical stage 
of growth has produced a large crop of 
high quality potatoes quite free of stem- 
end discoloration. While most of the evi- 
dence sited above is circumstantial, con- 
trolled experiments in soil temperature 
control just completed prove that 
when the soil temperature reaches 80 
degrees for short periods of certain 
stages in the development of the plant, 
stem-end discoloration invariably oc- 
curs. On the other hand, when the soil 
temperature was maintained at tempera- 
tures below 60 degrees no stem-end 
discoloration occurred. 

It is evident that a low soil tempera- 
ture whether the result of climatic 
conditions or of any other cause, con- 
trols this potato malady. In the experi- 
ment referred to above circulating ice 
water was used to maintain a low soil 
temperature. While this would not be a 
practical procedure for the potato 
grower, it did, never the less, Prove that 
stem-end discoloration is a result of high 
soil temperatures, conversely is preven- 
ted with low soil temperature. Anything, 
therefore, that the g^o^yer can do to 
lower soil temperatures like deep Plant- 
ing, incorporating on abundance of hu- 
mus in the soil, shading the ground by 
training the vines down the rows with 
the weeder, using Northern to North- 
eastern slopes, planting early varieties 
early, all are beneficial. Certain climatic 
conditions, obviously beyond the control 
of man, are the biggest factors in stem- 
end discoloration. Unlike late blight this 
trouble is not controlled by spraying. 

The third disease which is attracting 
considerable attention is the compara- 
tively new one, known as bacterial wilt 
or ring rot. This is another disease which 
reacts very closely with certain weather 
conditions at critical stages m the de- 
velopment of the potato plant, unlike 
(Continued on page 22) 



k 



! '■rr'i":;'; 



THE GUIDE POST 



November, 1940 






THE GUIDE POST 

Published monthly by the Pennsylvania 
Cooperative Potato Growers, Inc. 

OFFICERS 
J. A. Donaldson, Emlenton . . President 
Roy R. Hess, Stillwater . . . .Vice-Pres. 

E. B. Bower, Belief onte, 

Sec'y-Treas. and Gen. Mgr. 



DIRECTORS 

Jacob K. Mast Elverson, Chester 

P. Daniel Franlz Coplay, Lehigh 

Hugh McPherson Bridgeton, York 

John B. Schrack Loganton, Clinton 

Roy R. Hess Stillwater, Columbia 

Ed. Fisher Coudersport. Potter 

Charles Frey North Girard, Erie 

J. A. Donaldson, R.l, Emlenton, Venango 
R. W. Lohr Boswell, Somerset 

Annual membership fee $1.00. This in- 
cludes the Guide Post. 

All communications should be ad- 
dressed to E. B. Bower, Secretary-Treas- 
urer and General Manager, Bellefonte, 
Pennsylvania. 

I 



I Do Not Grieve 

by Myrtle Vorst Sheppard 

Why should I grieve 

That the summer is gone; 

That brown leaves cover the aging lawn? 

Why should I grieve, 

When our hearth is warm, 

And I can sit in the curve of your arm, 

Watching the play of the yellow flames? 

He is a fool who blames 

His discontent on the autumn rains 

There is no season for happiness. 

Joy does not vanish when summer 

wanes. 
Love loves a hearthstone no less 
Than the lanes, 

Lit by a silvery moon from above. 
It is the heart that has never known love 
That foolishly grieves 
When the summer leaves! 

— From National Home Monthly 



Seven Million Bushels of Maine 

Seed Stock Quality Certification 

Label in 1940 

E. L. Newdick, Chief 

Maine Division Plant Industry 

Issues Certification Report 

AUGUSTA, Me., Nov. 14. —The Maine 

Department of Agriculture, through its 

Chief of Division of Plant Industry, E. L. 

Newdick, has announced that State of 

Maine Certified Seed Potatoes will be 

available this season in good volume and 

great variety. He reports that 26,873 

acres have been certified, which qualifies 

them for the famous Maine "Blue Label" 

and the total yield as given in his final 

certification report totals over 7,000,000 

bushels. 

Release of the certification report 
shows that there was an increase in all 
varieties except Green Mountains, the 
heaviest increases, following the trend 
of the past three or four years, being in 
Katahdins, Chippewas, Sebagoes and 
Houmas, as well as in miscellaneous va- 
rieties. The quantities and varieties re- 
ceiving field certification are as follows: 

Green Mountains 8026 acres 

Irish Cobblers 8630 

Katahdins 6203 

Chippewas 2217 

Sabagoes 61 li 

Houmas 182 

Others 975i 

A feature of this year's crop, accordmg 
to the Department, is the vigor and uni- 
formity of the vine growth, the high 
yields of the tubers themselves and their 
uniform size and bright color. 

The increase in Maine's seed potato 
acreage this year is traceable to the 
splendid demand that seed growers en- 
joyed last season. In addition to in- 
creased business done with domestic 
growers over a widening territory, an 
increased demand was also developed 
in the export field with particularly 
heavy takings from South American 
countries. This export business is re- 
flected in the increase of acreage of some 
of the newer potato varieties which seem 
better adapted to growing conditions and 
planting dates in these newer territories 
that Maine growers are now serving. 

To qualify for the Blue Certification 
Label of the Maine Department of Agri- 
culture all seed acreage must pass two 
field inspections during the growing sea- 
son, many plantings more frequently, in 
addition to further inspections at the 
time of digging and as potatoes are in 
storage. 



(t 
(( 
it 

n 
it 



November, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



i 



,1 



Association Meetings in Late October Well Attended 



Five Association meetings staged in 
the East, South-east and central areas 
were participated in by 236 growers and 
friends during late October. These 
meetings were held as follows: Clemon 
Smith Farm, Nescopeck, Luzerne Coun- 
ty, Maurice Getz Farm, Kresgeville, 
Monroe County, Snyder & Sons, Equip- 
ment Warehouse, Neffs, Lehigh County, 
Hugh McPherson Farm, Bridgeton, York 
County, and Glenn McCloskey Farm, 
Zion, Centre County. Activities at these 
meetings included discussions of market- 
ing problems, training of Association 
Grade Supervisors, and grading and 
packing potatoes in Association trade- 
marked bags for market. Seedling plots 
were dug at two of the meetings, on the 
Getz farm, Monroe County and on the 
McPherson farm, York County. 

Thirty-one new Association Grade 
Supervisors were trained at these meet- 
ings with eight present licensed Grade 
Supervisors in attendance and assisting 
with grading and packing Blue Pecks. 
The Association Management was assis- 
ted in the training of these new Grade 
Supervisors at four of the meetings by 
R B. Donaldson, Department Agricul- 
tural Economics, State College and D. 
M James, State Bureau of Markets, 
Harrisburg. The Association was repre- 
sented by E. B. Bower, Secretary-Trea- 
surer and General Manager, and L. i. 
Denniston, Association Field Represen- 
tative, who were in charge of the meet- 
ings and the various activities. 



k 



Tuesday morning, October 22nd was 
the coldest morning of the season and 
this, coupled with the fact that many 
growers were not finished digging before 
even colder weather would arrive un- 
doubtedly cut into the attendance at the 
first meeting. Those present helped this 
meeting along by. the interest they 
showed in the training, grading, and 
packing work. 

Wednesday morning, October 23rd, the 
meeting got under way early with the 
Sng of "Camp Potato" developed 
seldlings at the Getz farm.m Monroe 
County. The Management wishes to ex- 
nress its appreciation of the fine coopera- 
tion given here by Harold E. Davis and 
his Vocational students of the Kresge- 
ville Chapter of Future Farmers. Thirty 
of the most promising seedlings out of 
200 were selected for further study and 
trial. A number of these created keen 



interest on the part of the growers pres- 
ent, due to their smoothness, shape and 
tuber characteristics. The meeting con- 
tinued throughout the day with keen 
interest shown in grading, instruction, 
and packing. 

In Lehigh, on Thursday, the growers 
were slow to gather but when activities 
got under way, a total of 43 growers and 
friends took part in the meeting. Mr. 
Snyder set up a full line of potato sizers, 
scales, etc., used by growers in grading 
and packing potatoes. 

Digging of the seedling plot at the Mc- 
Pherson farm, York County, began 
shortly after 7 A. M. Friday. Here again 
the Management wishes to give credit 
to Future Farmer groups represented 
by the Fawn Grove Vocational School, 
York County, under Mr. Wm. V. God- 
shall, and the Millheim Vocational 
Group, Centre County under Mr. Bright. 
The high-light of the harvest of this plot 
was a high yield of one of the more 
promising seedlings developed by Dr. 
Nixon at '*Camp Potato". It yielded 615 
bushels per acre. The Grade Supervisor's 
school brought growers and candidates 
from York, Centre, Somerset and Lacka- 
wanna Counties. Eleven candidates pas- 
sed successfully in the training, and have 
been licensed by the Association. 

On Tuesday, October 29th an unex- 
pected attendance of 43 growers and 
friends attended and took part in a meet- 
ing at the Glenn McCloskey Farm, near 
Zion, Centre County. After some grader 
alterations, the meeting got under way 
with the packing of Blue Label Pecks 
and the training of Grade Supervisors. 
This was the start of grading out a 2500 
bushel crop of Cobblers grown by Mr. 
McCloskey. Seven new Grade Supervi- 
sors were trained at this meeting for 
Centre and surrounding Counties. 

The Association wishes to thank the 
Smith Brothers, Clemon and Wheller, 
Maurice Getz and Robert Getz, J. M. 
Snyder & Sons, Hugh McPherson, and 
Glenn McCloskey for their fine coopera- 
tion in making equipment and meeting 
room available for the above meetings. 



The worst bankrupt in the world is the 
man who has lost his enthusiasm. 

Cooperative Cotton Gin 



THE GUIDE POST 



November, 1940 



November, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



Putting Pennsylvania Potatoes in the Bag 

Attention — Grade Supervisors 

Enthusiasm and Optimism: 

1. The Grade Supervisor should be thoroughly convinced of the es- 
sential worth of the v^ork he is doing. (Grading, packing, and local inspec- 
tion of Pennsylvania potatoes) . 

2. He should show a whole-hearted purpose in the performance of ac- 
tivities. (Grading, packing, and local inspection of Pennsylvania potatoes) . 

3. By teaching and by example he should encourage others to believe 
in the proper grading, packing, and local inspection of Pennsylvania 
potatoes. 

Test Your Own Efficiency. 

When you became a Grade Supervisor you took some very definite 
instruction on grades, grading and packing of potatoes. To determine your 
ability to do the work of a Grade Supervisor you were given an examina- 
tion which you must have passed or you would not have been licensed by 
the Association to do this job. 

Now that you are on the job, how efficient are you? Be Fair and Honest 
with yourself and see how you rate on the following ten questions. 

1. Are you making the grade right? Are the growers you are servicing 
having any rejections in the markets? 

2. Are you packing proper weight? Are growers whom you serve 
having trouble on short weight? Do you check the scales from time to 
time when in the process of packing? Are you allowing sufficient over- 
weight for shrinkage — 6-8 ounces on dry potatoes, 8-9 ounces on freshly 
dug or moist potatoes, and do not pack wet or muddy stock. 

3. Do you have abundant light over the sizer or picking table? Is the 
light properly shaded so as to cut off the glare? Do you move this light so 
as to be in proper position when you move the sizer? 

4. Have you seen to it that all bags are stamped? Are you stamping 
them so that the number is legible? 

5. Are you seeing to it that bags are kept clean before and after being 
packed? 

6. Do you make a careful examination of the stock pile before start- 
ing to pack? Do you cut for stem-end, hollow heart, wire worm and other 
hidden defects? 

7. Do you inspect the packs from time to time when packing to see 
if they are in grade? In doing so, do you look for both seen (cut) and for 
hidden defects? 

8. Do you suggest to the grower how packing can be made more plea- 
surable and efficient? Do you check to see that the sizer is in proper work- 
ing condition? 

9. Are you constantly seeking additional information to improve your 
efficiency? Do you attend Association meetings when called in or near 
your community? 

10. Are you enthusiastic, interested, or indifferent toward the work of 
a Grade Supervisor? 



i 



Arsenal in the Potato Bin 



The Tuber is FiUing its Greatest Role 
in History, as a Food and as a Base for 
War Products. 

NEW YORK — The German official 
wireless, in a broadcast heard in New 
York, October 20th, said that the British 
were dropping bags of Colorado beetles 
to destroy the German Potato crop.— 
(News Item) 

Ten thousand years of human history 
look down upon the potato as it now 
assumes a cardinal role as a determmant 
of the war in Europe. Since Europe s war 
of the ideologies will affect, m its out- 
come, other de facto wars, the once 
humble tuber now stands at one of hu- 
manity's fateful crossroads and threatens 
to dictate just where the irrational two- 
legged animal wiU go from here. 

The worst news that the British Min- 
istry of Economic Warfare and blockade 
authorities have received in many 
months was the report that capricious 
nature elected this year to bestow an 
especially bountiful potato harvest upon 
Germany. For this single German potato 
crop— approximately five times as large 
as th^t of the United States— means that 
the current war will be a long one, bar- 
ring the sudden collapse of one of the 
belligerents. 



l 



The potato, which has already turned 
Europe's fate several times since it was 
introduced there from America today 
steps into its greatest role-not so much 
as a food product, though i^^ that ^^ut 
as a base for production of numerous 
items which Germany "^fyj^.^^ 
anxiously require as » result of the 
blockade The German chemical indus- 
trv l^e that of the United States, is al- 
ready geared to produce alcohols, motor 
sS industrial starches, from which 
f variety of chemical P/oducts may be 
prepared, and plastics, of which the Ger 
mins are already making numerous air- 
plane parts, from potatoes. 

Moreover, according to the Office of 
Foreign Agricultural Relations of the U. 
S Department of Agriculture, the Ger^ 
mans have developed n^f,f ^ for usm^^^ 
potatoes— particularly culls and residues 
from other processes-as succulent wm- 
ter feed for livestock. 
This may be of utmost significance as 

an^xplSion for the tr^^f^.^^ark 
stock from conquered Holland, DenmarK 



and parts of France to Germany, where 
they may be fattened on potato proaucts 
instead of the meal cake and other im- 
ported feed and fodder which the British 
blockade has cut off. 

Though necessity is the mother of in- 
vention, Germany's ''providential pota- 
to crop makes invention possible, it 
German airplanes, largely built of pota- 
toes, begin flying over England and using 
potato fuel, from potatoes and their tat 
from potato-fed animals, then will the 
potato have reached its highest estate. 

The quasi-savage "Indians" of the 
Andes Mountains (who first developed 
the potato as a food product, gave it to 
Spanish conquistadores who took it to 
Spain, which sent it to Florida to nourish 
Spanish garrisons whose officers gave it 
to British colonists in Virginia where Sir 
Thomas Herriot, one of Sir Walter 
Raleigh's company, found it and took it 
to Europe) would no doubt be entranced 
if they could have lived to see the fate 
of their potato. 

The potato, as a matter of fact, was for 
many decades the control value of emi- 
gration from Europe. It governed the 
rate of settlement of America The 
United States, in particular, would have 
been settled much more rapidly than t 
was if it had not sent the Potato to Eu- 
rope. When potato crops were good in 
Europe the people remamed on their 
lands; when potato crops bailed they 
flocked to America, especially from the 
Germanic states and Ireland 



The first real check to potato cultiva- 
tion came in 1842 when the now well- 
known potato disease, Phytophthora 
fnfestans (late blight) made its appear- 
ance in Germany. It w^^ s??,^,^/,^^^^^^ 

Canada and the U^^.^^^^^lf ; then in 
it appeared in the Isle of Wight, then in 
Sand and by 1846 it had. spread to 
most of Europe. A great famine m Ire- 
land followed and it vfas feared the pota- 
to would become extinct. 

Then appeared one of the great ro- 
mances of science, today remembered 
^the hur^ble "Bordeaux Mixture "now 
wirtpiv used on other crops as well as 
poSes During the height o .the Irish 
Famine, which almost depopulated Ire- 
land as thousands fled to America the 
efficacy of sulphate of copper and lime 
(Continued on page H) 



8 



THE GUIDE POST 



November, 1940 



OVER THE PICKING TABLE 



by Inspector Throwout 



Teacher: "Edward, give me three col- 
lective Nouns." 

Eddie: "Fly paper, waste basket and 
garbage can." 

• • • 

"Now children," said the Sunday 
school teacher, 'T have told you the story 
of Jonah and the whale. Willie you may 
tell us what the story teaches. Yes m, 
said Willie, the bright-eyed son of the 
pastor. "It teaches that you can t keep a 
good man down." 

• • • 

Any system can be defeated by one 
single man who places himself out of 
harmony with it. 

• • • 

The best preparation for good work to- 
morrow is to do good work today; The 
best preparation for life in the hereafter 
is to live now. 

• • • 

There are three kinds of friends: those 
who love you; those who are indifferent 
to you; and next friends who are those 
people who want something that is 
yours. 

• • • 

Optimist 

"I want to grow some trees in my gar- 
den. Can you sell me a few seeds?" in- 
quired Mrs. Newly wed. 

"Certainly, Madam," replied the clerk. 
He fetched her a packet. 

"Can you guarantee these?" she asked. 

"Yes, Madam, we can." 

"Will the trees be tall and thick in the 
trunk?" 

"They should be. Madam." 

"And quite strong at th eroots, I sup- 
pose?" 

"Oh, yes. Madam." 

"Very well. I'll take a hammock also." 

— Bagology. 

• • • 

Jim: (at 2 A. M.) "Hey, Bill, didn't the 
landlord say this was a feather bed?" 

Bill: "Sure, that's what he said. 

Jim: "Well, change places with me. Its 
my turn to be on the feather." 



"Who yuh shovin'?" 
"Dunno, what's your name?'* 

• • • 

Doctor: "I'm sorry, my boy, but I can't 
seem to diagnose your case. However, I 
think it's drink." 

Patient: "That's all right, Doc. I'll 
come back when you're sober. 



A woman was buying groceries. 

"I want some grapes for my sick hus- 
band," she said. "Do you know if any 
poison has been sprayed on these? 

"No Ma'am," answered the grocer, 
you'll have to get that at the druggist's." 



A saucy damsel speeding through traf- 
fic found herself stopped by an officer. 

"Hey, "growled the cop, "where's the 
fire?" 

"That shouldn't worry you," said the 
girl. "You're no fireman." 



A young woman walked into a rail- 
road ticket office in Chicago and asked 
for a ticket to New York. 

"Do you wish to go by Buffalo." asked 
the ticket agent. 

"Certainly not!"^^ she replied. "By 
train, if you please." 



As you enter a certain small western 
town a bill-board is posted at the road- 
side reading: 

4,076 people died last year of gas 
29 inhaled it 
47 put a light to it, and 
4,000 stepped on it. 

• • • 

A grower we know took several dif- 
ferent trips with a bushel of potatoes to 
a nearby housewife. When he had de- 
livered the last bushel, the woman asked 
for his bill. After much thought, he gave 
her this bill. 

"Three comes and three goes at two 
bits a went— $1.50" 



November, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



i 



Edinboro Potato Experiment 

by Norman P. Manners, Supervisor 



i 



It is a pleasant sensation to come to 
the end of a growing season and find 
that a service has been rendered co hu- 
manity. Here, at Edinboro, that service 
takes the form of a contribution in co- 
operation w ith the Pennsylvania Potato 
Growers Association, in helping to pro- 
duce an experiment that shall, in future 
vears, prove its value to the local grow- 
ers by givhsg to them some outstanding 
varieties of potatoes adaptable to this 

climate. -n. -c, a 

The many boys of the Edinboro F.F.A. 
are not the only members of that great 
Future Farmer organization who gave 
freely of time and labor. At various 
times during the growing season teach- 
ers and boys were to be found visiting 
the seedling plot. Following are some 
of the Future Farmer groups who aided 
the Edinboro group in making the plot 
outstanding in North-Western Pennsyl- 
vania Potato History; Roscoe Coblentz 
Ind boys of West Springfield ; From West 
Millcreek, Jeffrey Payne and F.F.A ers 
Roy Fordyce and his boys from North 
East; Waterford responded with Ray 
Salmon and his boys; Biron Decker had 
boys from all over the County visit quite 
frequently; The County Supervisor of 
Crawford county, Dave Crum cooper- 
ated 100% at all times. Many of his local 
supervisors spent happy hours in deter- 
mining the most productive potato varie- 
^es Jess Whitney of Spartansburg, 
Lance of Linesville, Mowry of Conneaut- 
ville, and Terrill of Cambridge Springs 
had boys present at digging time to help 
turn out the crop. 

Pictures of the seedlings were taken 
by the author and Mr. Decker from 
time to time during the entire experi- 
ment, from the day the potatoes were 
planted until harvested. Many compari- 
sons were made to determine the most 
resistant varieties in relation to diseases 
and heat. Of the one-hundred and 
ninety-two varieties grown forty-five 
were saved for next years planting. 

The forty-five varieties saved ^yill be 
stored in a potato cellar, but before 
storing they will be weighed, tagged and 
bagged so that the same means of iden- 
tificltion will be carried through from 
beginning to end. The remammg varie- 
ties of the original one-hundred and 
ninety-two were turned over to tne 
Etoboro F.F.A. The local boys have 



graded the potatoes, placed them in Blue 
Label bags and put them on the local 
market. At the present time those pota- 
toes are selling at seven cents a peck 
more than local potatoes in the town 
stores. 



Editors Note: The above is a brief re- 
port of the seedling varieties experiment 
conducted by Future Farmers of North- 
eastern Pennsylvania under the direc- 
tion of Biron E. Decker and Norman P. 
Manners, in cooperation with this As- 
sociation. 

With further reference to this project, 
Mr. Decker has written us the following:. 

Edinboro, Penna. 
November 5, 1940 

"Mr. E. B. Bower, Manager, 

The Pennsylvania Potato Growers 

Association, 

Bellefonte, Pennsylvania 

"Dear Mr. Bower: 

"I think it proper and fitting that I 
should express my personal appreciation 
for the splendid cooperation which your 
organization has given Erie County by 
way of making available the 192 varie- 
ties of seedling potatoes for experi- 
mental purposes. 

"It would be impossible to tell you how 
manv people have visited the test plot 
but the number would be unbelieveable. 
Vocational Agricultural Supervisors rep- 
resenting a large area.of North Western 
Pennsylvania have visited the experi- 
ment. Many vocational pupils have also 
had the opportunity of ^^specting the 
project and they did so We have a set 
of color slides which were taken 
throughout the progress of the project. 
ThTs material will be used as the occa- 
sion warrants. . , , . 

"Hundreds of farmers visited the plot 
esoecially the more progressive potato 
lrowe?s It was a treat to have the plot 
Eed so convenient to growers who 
have annually grown more than J'O"" 
acres of potatoes. They too have co- 

°%SKtion should go to C W Bil- 
lines who made his farm and a full hne 
of fhe most modern potato equipment 
available to the Edinboro F.F.A. for use 

°" 'Laltl'bl' most important locally, we 

should all recognize the splendid work 

(Continued on page is) 



10 



THE GUIDE POST 



November, 1940 



Future Fanner Groups Support Association Program 



The following Chapters, Supervisors 
and members of Future Farmer groups 
have participated in various activities of 
fhe Association during the season We 
wish to express our appreciation ot tne 
fine cooperation given by these Super- 
visors and their students. We are confi- 
dent that their time spent in these 
projects, along with the combined out- 
ings at "Camp Potato were profitably 
solnt Educational instruction, work 
and recreation were combined in most 
of these activities. If, by any chance we 
have missed any group we would appre- 
ciate having it drawn to our attention. 
Oakland Maryland ChapterO. T. Gra- 
zier, Supervisor: 36 members.^ Plant- 
ing seedlings at "Camp Potato 
Hepburn Chapter, Lycoming County. D. 
E. Woomer, Supervisor: 15 niembers. 
Planting seedlings at "Camp Potato 



Montgomery Chapter, Lycoming Coun- 
ty. Luther C. Rahauser Supervisor: 5 
members. Planting seedlings at Camp 
Potato" 

Montoursville Chapter, Lycoming Coun- 
ty. Charles D. Carey, Supervisor: 15 
members. Planting seedlings at Camp 
Potato" 

Conneautville Chapter, Crawford Coun- 
tv Kenneth Mo wry. Supervisor: 6 
members. Care of seedlings at Camp 
Potato." 

Glennville Chapter, York County. Earl 
W Hetrick, Supervisor: 15 members. 
Care of seedlings at "Camp Potato 

Loganton Chapter, Clinton County. Geo. 
S. Mumma, Supervisor. 15 members. 
Care of seedlings at "Camp Potato 

(Continued on page 20) 




Tubers Infecled with Bacterial Ring Rot. Infection is not confined to any par- 
ticular part of the tuber. Rot or break down most commonly begins at the eyes 
or the stem end of the tuber. 



November, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



11 



; 



I 



I 



"POTATO CHIPS" 



The eovernment potato estimate, re- 
leased November 15th, boosted the pro- 
duction prospect for the 1940 crop by 
S 000 bushels over the October 1st 
estimate. On the basis of reported yields 
^er^cre, total production of potatoes for 
the 1940 season is estimated at 393,931,- 
000 bushels compared with 364 016,000 
bushels in 1939. The estimated yied per 
acre for the United States is the highest 
of record. 

All of this proves that there are plenty 
of potatoes to be sold this winter. 



Many very outstanding potato yields 
are being reported to the Association of - 
fici in application for membership in the 
Pennsylvania 400-Bushel Potato Club. 
Other yields are known to have been 
hprvested that have not been reported. 
If one of these is yours. Make it known 
offidaUy. without'fail, by December 1st. 

* * * 

"Together" is the most inspiring word 
in the English language. Keepmg to- 
'^ether mfans Progress; coming to 
gether means begmnmg; working 
together means success. 

—Edward Everett Hale. 



Mrs. Wayne Hindman at "Camp Potato 
will take your reservation — and taKe 
good care of your lodging needs— if you 
write her soon. 



The best thing about obstacles is that 
thev make us prove ourselves to our- 
selves Some of life's keenest satisfac- 
tion comes from doing things we thought 
we couldn't do.— Henry Ford. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Dr. Nixon is a very busy nian these 
davs During the past couple of months, 
Ms activities have been varied and great 
With farmers' cooperatives he has been 
at work with problems concerning 
plaches, apples, Potatoes cabbages, 
milk grapes, grape ]uice, maple syrup. 
He haf solved many general marketing 
problems, made . many speeches and 
driven day and night. 

With all other work, however, Dr. Nix- 
on as promised, gave the potato industry 
his enthusiastic and consistent help^ In a 
two-month period, actually, Dr^ Nixon 
eave the potato program 21 valuaDie 
fays harvesting seedlings, workmg out 
Setfng problems and givmg general 
valuable assistance. 



I 



Department of Agriculture Inspectors 
under the supervision of D. M. JaHle'^, 
wrrhPen checking Pennsylvania Blue 
Si potatoes in various Pennsylvanm 

markpts and their reports are mighty 

r/ouraging Especially encouran'Sg 
that this year, with competition running 
\^iah airpadv for all markets, the pacK 
Sis rorrTgh? Will not have a "home.'' 

» • • 

There never was a person living who 
dil anythfng worth doing that did not 
receive more than he gave, 
receive _Henry Ward Bucher. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 



of bitterness or self -pity. 

—James Gordon Gilkey. 

• * * 

jim-"Money talks, I tell you." 
Dandy-"Yes, But it never gives itself 

away." 

* * * 

There was a jumble sale i" the vUlage 
and a villager who was helping walkea 
UD to the organizer. „ 

"There, I think I've done very weU, 
she said proudly. „ 

"I've sold everything m that room. 

.'Goodness!" exclaimed the organizer, 
"that was the cloak roon.^^^^^^ q^„,,. 



m-f3:Tr~-'i\'-^-r .-.' 




m--'~»rr. 






14 



THE GUIDE POST 



November, 1940 



November, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



15 



Membership Drive 



nurinfi the past month the drive for 
new members has not brought in many 
contributions, but some have been sent 
and a number of new members have ^ 
come to the Association unsolicited. 

WUliam W. Hayes, of Jersey Shore, 
contributed membership for a fellow 
Lycoming Countian. 

T S Hummer, from the Luzerne Coun- 
ty AgeSffice', at Wilkes-Barre sent m 
a new member. 

R R Walker, member from Edinboro, 
Erie County, enlisted a new member 
from his own community. 

p G Niesley, Columbia County Agent, 
forwarded membership for one of his 
constituency. 

John N. Stoltzfus, of Parkesburg, 
Chester County, sent in one new member 
from his county. 

J C. Jacobsen, Erie County booster, 
enlisted a member from his community. 
A L. Hacker, County Agent from 
Allentown, Lehigh County, sent mem- 
bership for one of his constituency. 

As a result of the the drive, with the 
contributors and the new members who 
applied themselves, we welcome the 
following new members: 

C. L. Shipman, Williamsport 
Ray Riggs, Nescopeck 
Paul Woods, Edinboro 
Elmer Tyson, Catawissa 
David High, Atglen 
Maurice Gabel, Girard 
Granville Krause, Slatington 
William P. Campbell, Centre Hall 
Norman P. Manners, Edinboro 
Morris B. Freedline, Somerset 
Robert F. Whitehill, Somerset 
Miss Frances Cumberland, Nazareth 
Raymong Howell, Bloomsburg 
Chester-Delaware Farm Bureau Co- 
operative Association, West Chester 
Lawrence D. Smale, Kunkletown 
E. H. Deller, York 
WilUam H. Fritz, York 
Fred S. Shearer, York 



One Is Enough 

"Have an accident?" asked the fellow 
who arrived too late at the scene of a 
motor car wreck. 

"No, thanks." replied the victim as he 
picked himself up; "I've just had one. 
—California Grocer Advocate 



1939-40 Maine Potato Deal 
A Twenty Million Dollar Industry 



Cash Income to Potato Growers 
Increases 25% in 1939-40 Over 
the Previous Shipping Season 



AUGUSTA, Me., Nov. 7.--The Mame 
Development Commission has .lust re- 
leased for publication their annual esti- 
mate on the cash income received by 
Maine's potato growers during the past 
shipping season. This study which is 
prepared annually by the Research De- 
Dartment of Brooke, Smith, French & 
^orr^nce, Inc., of New York, Maine's 
merchandising and advertising counse- 
lors estimates the income received by 
Mainf growers during the 1939-40 ship- 
ping selson at $19,403,080.00 which tops 
bv nearly $8,000,000.00 above the esti- 
mated income for the 1937-38 crop. 

The estimated average price per bar- 
rel received by Maine g/owers m the 
lQ'^9-40 deal was $2,035; for the 1938-39 
seLon $r499, and for the 1937-38 season 
$ 897 This reflects an increase last sea- 
son of $ 53 per barrel over 1938-39 and of 
$113 per barrel over the 1937-38 average 
price. 

It is stated in authoritative advertising 
circles that no national or semi-national 
merchandising and advertising program 
is being operated at a lower percentage 
of income received for the Maine crop as 
is the program of the Maine Develop- 
ment Commission now starting its fourth 
year. 



"When I look at this congregation, 
said the preacher, 

"I ask myself, 'Where are the poor? 
and then, when I look at the collection, I 
say to myself, 'Where are the rich? 

• • • 

*'That lawyer of mine has a nerve! 

*'Why so?" 

-Listen to this item in his bill: "For 
waking up in the night and thinking 
over your case — $5.00." 



"You have only yourself to please," 
said a married friend to an old bachelor 

"True, ''replied he,'' but you, cannot 
tell what a difficult task I find it. 



Bacterial Ring Rot 



\ 



I 




The same five tubers appearing elsewhere in this issue «»d«^^^^^ with^ ac- 
le^rial Wng Rot.\he tubers have been cu^m half to how *h a attentive 
|?a=a^r\rt?fe%Tca fl^fe w^lt P^p'l.Tood pacU if infection of the crop « 
not loo great. " 



NotWng is what you generally get when 
you think you are getting something 

for nothing. 

ALBERT C ROEMHILD 



122 Dock St. 



Commission Merchant 

PHILADELPHIA Lombard 1000 



16 



THE GUIDE POST 



November, 1940 



Grower to Grower Exchange 

The rate for advertising in this column is a penny ^d^^f^S"*^ 'e° orferelf at 
payable with order. (10% reduction when four o^J^^^^^^^^T^J^posT. Masonic 
d^^r^^irrBSfefo'Se!^^^^^^^^^ -nth previous to publi- 

cation. 



FOR SALE: Bean No. 103 Potato Grader, 
bought new this fall. Used very little. 
$22500. A. T. Blakeslee, Blakeslee, 
(Monroe County) , Penna. 
FOR SALE: Choice seed potatoes grown 
from Certified Seed. Our potatoes were 
sprayed every seven days. Yields up to 
600 bushels per acre. Cobblers or Rural 
Russets. Write W. W. Hayes, Jersey 
Shore, Lycoming County, Penna. 
AVAILABLE: Pistol-Grip Twisters for 
tying paper bags, $1.25. Write the As- 
sociation Office, Belief onte, Penna. 

OFFICIAL POTATO TAGS AVAIL- 
ABLE: The Association Office has made 
available with a local printer. Official 
Potato Tags, for use on plain potato 




sacks as required by law. If needed, 
wrUe Association Office. We will prmt 
accordingly, at cost. 

AVAILABLE: Spring Return Tying 
Tools, for tying paper bags, P'^^- ^^f^^ 
Association Office has stocked a few of 
these for your convenience. 

PLANTER WANTED: 2 row Iron-Age 
Picker Type. Can also use good used 
grader and Digger. Write Ray Salmon, 
Waterford, Erie County, Penna. 

AVAILABLE: Copies of Dr. E. L. Nix- 
on's book, "The Principles of Potato 
Production," $1.25 per copy. Write for 
your copy today, to Association office, 
Belief onte, Pennsylvania. 

vania Potatoes is equal to the best when 
properly graded and packed. Dieticians 
of our Institutions, Hotels, and Restau- 
rants can and do attest to their cooking 
quality and flavor. The complaint of all 
these groups has been, and still Jf on the 
part of some of them, the inability to 
secure a well graded, standardized, 
clean, attractive pack of Pennsylvania 
Potatoes. Your Association through the 
Marketing Program is lending i* "^nr- 
ing efforts toward changing this un- 
favorable standing of our Potato In- 
dustry for the benefit of Pennsylvania s 
individual growers and the Industry of 
the State as a whole. We appreciate the 
ever increasing favorable expression on 
the part of growers, distributors, and 
consumers in these efforts. 



COOKING PENNSYLVANIA 

QUALITY POTATOES 
Buyers, distributors, and consumers 
freely admit that the quality of Pennsyl- 



A Few Things Worth Striving For 

Productive employment for the family 
and others in the community. 

Better education for members ot tne 

family. . «^/i -PnvTi- 

Modern home conveniences and turn 

ishings. . _^„x 

Practical uptodate farm equipment. 
Attractive home and farm surround- 

^^Fuller participation in community af- 
fairs. 

(Continued on page 18) 



Plenty of Potash 
For Good Potatoes 



1 



Potash is more necessary to the agriculture of the United 
States now than ever before, according to the Bureau ot 
Mines of the U. S. Department of the Interior. The Bureau 
states that it is gratifying to find that the virtual stoppage 
of imports in late 1939 causes none of the anxious fore- 
boding that gripped American farmers in 1914, and that 
today our expanded needs can be met from domestic 
sources. Therefore American potato farmers are assured 
of plenty of potash for their plantings next sprmg. 

If your harvest this year has been unsatisfactory you 
will wish to start checking up now on your ^oils and fer- 
tilization practices to see if you are using enough potash 
to get the larger yields and greater percentage of No^ 1 s 
which this necessary plant food insures. For a good crop 
of first grade potatoes, soil and fertilizer -st -ppl^^^^^ 
IP^^t 200 lbs of available potash per acre. Your county 

?1 or experiment station will help you check soils and 
r^Ler pracUces. Your fertilizer dealer will tell you how 
little it costs to apply enough potash. 



If we can be of any help to you. please 
wrile us for free information and 
Utertture on how to fertilize your 
crops. 



means 

moreProfit 




flmerican Potash Institute, Inc. 

Washington, D. C. 
Investment Building 




18 



THE GUIDE POST 



November, 1940 



DOBBINS BROTHERS HAN- 
DLING LOWER GRADES IN 
PITTSBURGH AREA 

A contract has been executed with 
DOBBINS BROTHERS, 1014 ^^^^^ 
STREET, PITTSBURGH, PA., for the 
movement of the lower grades of pota- 
toes in the Pittsburgh marketmg area 
as during the 1939-40 season. 

The commission of a commission mer- 
chant is 10%. Of this 10% deducted by 
the sales agent, 3% will be refunded by 
him to the association upon completion 
of the sale. This 3% refund m turn has 
been deducted from the price of all As- 
sociation bags used for the lower grades, 
in order to bring the price of the con- 
tainer more nearly in line with the grade 
of potatoes being packed and sold. In 
other words, the 3% refund is turned 
back to the growers. 

By the elimination of competition on 
the Association pack of Red Labels (U.S. 
No. 1, Size B); Green Label (U.S. Com- 
mercial); also Unclassified in 60-pound 
paper, which is accomplished by giving 
but one concern in each market the ex- 
clusive sale of these packs, the highest 
net returns are assured to the grower, 
while at the same time, identified pota- 
toes are better established in the mar- 
kets. 

The above mentioned concern has al- 
ready established a real demand for the 
Association pack in Pittsburgh. 

Confine the movement of the above 
mentioned trade-marked packs to the 
concern mentioned and thereby help 
yourself and the Association in its at- 
tempts to again popularize Pennsylvania 
potatoes in her own markets. 

Also confine delivery of potatoes to 
the above house in the lower grades only. 



Association Bag Prices 

Prices Quoled are Per 1000 Delivered 



Blue Label, 
Red Label, 
Economy Pack, 
Blue Label, 
Blue Label, 
Unclassified, 



15's (2-wall) 
15's (2-wall) 
15's (2-wall) 
60's (2-wall) 
60's (3-wall) 
60's (2-wall) 



$18.00 
$17.50 
$17.00 
$45.50 
$48.75 
$38.50 



The above prices are for delivery to 
any point in Pennsylvania and include 
the wire loop ties and the commission to 
the Association. 



A Few Things Worth Striving For 

(Continued jrom page 16) 
Annual vacation trip for members of 
the family. 
Protective insurance — personal and 

property. 

Pride in a farm business enterprise. 

Contributions to the advancement of 
the industry of which you are a part. 



EDINBORO POTATO 

tuiJN aurvKj EXPERIMENT 

(Continued from page 9) 
recently terminated by the Edinboro 
FF A., under the able and untiring ef- 
fort of Norman P. Manners, who directed 
the activity of the boys during the time 
which they promoted the seedling po- 
tato test plot for the Pennsylvania Potato 
Growers Association. 

-Mr Manners and I both agree that 
this project was probably one of the most 
educational enterprises which North 
Western Pennsylvania has ever been 
able to present as a school and com- 
munity enterprise for the public in gen- 
eral. 

ARSENAL IN THE POTATO BIN 

(Continued jrom page 7) 
in combatting the disease was discover- 
ed, and this, under the name of Bordeaux 
Mixture, greatly helped to preserve the 
potato as we know it. 

The potato today is one of the basic 
food products of the white race. It repre- 
seS per cent of the food of European 
and English speaking peoples. In^*^^ 
United States average consumption is 
between three and four bushels per per^ 
son per year, but in Europe it is as h^|^ 
as 25 per cent of the food of European 
and English speaking peoples. 

As a food product, and now aj:hemi^^^ 
product, the potato undoubtedly s one ot 
the most striking products evf P^o 
duced from the soil. Its chemical struc 
ture is such that it can f ven be used as a 
detector of radio signals and indeed, in 
lone emergencies, has so been usea. /v 
good s^Il needle 'stuck into a sound po- 
tato and needle and potato connected in 
(Continued on page 20) 



YOUR EXTRA PROFIT 

FROM THE USE OF A BEAN RUBBER SPOOL GRADER 

WILL PAY FOR IT 




7 



3 CAPACITY SIZES OF BEAN GRADERS 



• YOU DON'T LIKE BRUISING 

• YOU DON'T LIKE CUTTING 

• YOU DON'T LIKE INACCURACY 
IN YOUR POTATO GRADING 

..YOU DON'T GET IT.. 

1,/fTw A RFAN RUBBER SPOOL GRADER 
OmCATAWG SHOWS YOVH WAY TO PROFIT 

John Bean Mfg. Co. 



LANSING 



MICHIGAN 




20 



THE GUIDE POST 



November, 1940 



I ARSENAL IN THE POTATO PAN 

i (Continued jrom page 18) 

Precisely the same manner that a crystal 
detector is connected, will pick up radio 
signals which may be heard over an 
earphone. 

I Potatoes had to be rushed to Alaska 
during the Gold Rush days to save entire 
Speditions from the disease of scurvy. 
bS today the Russians are growing po- 
tatoes in their far northern outposts, 
both Russia and the United States have 
^developed strains of potatoes which will 
grow in thin Arctic soils and ripen rapid- 
ly during the brief sub-polar summer. 
Their value in the Arctic, as everywhere 
else, resides in the fact that they are one 
of our principal sources of carbohydrate. 
Thev also contain mineral salts, some 
nrotein, and small quantities of vitamin 
ABC and G. Although the protem 
quantity is of excellent quality. 

The above supplies at least one reason 
for the extraordinary sturdiness ot the 
German and Irish peoples. DepartmeM 
of Agriculture experts have found that 
a pound of baked potatoes and half a 
Dint of whole milk constitute a perfect 
food combination which, ^loreover, may 
be used by obese persons who don t want 
to get any fatter. 

Germany also uses large quantities of 
potato flour. Her armies today are sup- 
plied not only with potato flour, but 
with dried potatoes for general service 
in the army messes. In the United States 
dried potatoes are finding steadily ex- 
panded acceptance. Many restaurants 
have found that they can produce quick 
batches of fine mashed potatoes by the 
use of dried potatoes, a little skim milk, 
butter and seasoning. 

Since up to 20 per cent of the potato 
production of the world usually is com- 
posed of culls (diseased and frozen pota- 
toes) a great effort is now under way in 
Germany, Great Britain, Ireland and the 
United States— to obtain the full value 
from the culls in various chemical by- 
products. 

The latest successful effort in the 
United States to utilize culls has been 
featured by utilization of waste dairy 
products in combination with the cull 
potatoes. The U. S. Bureau of Dairy In- 
dustry has devised a new food article 
from skim milk and cull potatoes. The 
potato and skim milk mixture, with a 
little sale added, is made into wafers 
chips, sticks or croutons, and oven dried 
to crispness. 



In Germany, as in the United States, 
the study of the potato engages many 
phases of chemistry and micro-biology, 
soils, fertilizers, insecticides, bacteria- 
cides, thermal effects and economics. No 
angle is overlooked, for the potato is 
important to warfare and life m C^er- 
many, and there is more than casual 
significance in a report that potato bugs 
are being dropped from the skies on the 
potato fields of an enemy nation, as a 
new "weapon of destruction. 

Reprinted from The Philadelphia Rec- 
ord, October 20, 1940. 



FUTURE FARMERS GROUP 

SUPPORT ASSN. PROGRAM 

(Continued jrom page 10) 

Hughesville Chapter, Lycoming Coun- 
ty. J. D. Ryburn, Supervisor: 27 mem- 
bers. Care of seedlings at "Camp Po- 
tato" 

Kresgeville Chapter, Monroe County. 
Harold E. Davis, Supervisor: 20 mem- 
bers. Planting, care, and harvesting 
seedlings on Monroe County plot. 

Numidia Chapter, Columbia County. J. 
E. Atherton, Supervisor: 20 members. 

(Continued on page 22) 






All Applications for 

Membership 

in 

The Pennsylvania 

400 - Bushel 

Potato Club 

Must be in 
The Association Office 

by 
DECEMBER L 1940 

If you have had a yield, prop- 
erly checked, and do not have 
the proper blanks, write for 
them today. 



MODERN 
MERCHANDISING 



requires 



'1 

i 



Potatoes 



Attractively Printed, Strong, 
Quality 



HAMMOND 
BETTERBAGS 

Will Sell Your Spuds 
in Style 



Hammond Bag & 
Paper Co. 

WELLSBURG. W. VA. 

Bags for 

Lime. Limestone. Fertilizer. 

Flour. Feed and Potatoes 



CERTIFIED 

SEED 
POTATOES 



Maine — 



Irish Cobblers 
Green Mountains 
Katahdins 
Chippewas 

Favorable weather and increased 
acreage of most varieties resulted 
in a higher total yield tl^a." ^^^^^^ 
vear. Size of tubers, depending on 
Spacing, averages larger causing a 
heavier sort when g'^ding to seed 
requirements. Disease readings are 
markedly lower, especially on 
Sops planted with fresh tuber unit 
foundation slock. 



APPROVED 

Michigan -Rural Russets 

Gieen Mountains 

Growing season was near ideal 
for Iven stands, thrifty growth of 
lor *^^" j\„_:er than usual set. 
V^ds were well rogued and prac- 
««Uv^rll of disease. Type and 
sizfof tubers indicate croPS will 
grade a high percentage of clean, 
dependable seed. 

Sel«t«l wWl. «r»wln« b. th. 
Mi .nd .cc«.t«l on y when 
meetinc •" reaairement.. Wnte 
or wire n» for price.. 

Dougherty Seed Growers 
Waiiamsport, Pennsylvania 



22 



THE GUIDE POST 



November, 1940 



THE INFLUENCE OF WEATHER ON 
PREVALENCE OF POTATO DISEASE 

(Continued from page 3) 



late blight it is not controlled by spray- 
ing. Like most other bacterial plant 
parasites, this disease will probably not 
be controlled except by the use of resis- 
tant or immune varieties. This disease 
behaves in all respects just like tire 
blight of pears and apples 

They both spread most rapidly when 
the plants are most vigorous. 

Neither will spread when the plants 
are dormant. Both operate most vigor- 
ously and spread most rapidly during 
periods of high humidity and heat. 

Neither will spread under excessively 
dry conditions. The organisms which 
cause fire blight of pears and apples and 
bacterial wilt of potatoes live oyer in 
their respective host tissues or, m the 
case of the latter, will live over in old 
bags, and perhaps a lot of other places. 

Anyone who has inoculated soy beans 
using the soil method can appreciate the 
ease with which the soy bean plant is 
infected with the bacteria which will 
cause the well-known nodules. 

It is just as easy and as simple with a 
bacterial disease of the potato--a little 
dust here, a little mud there. The inside 
of most potato planters is coated witn 
mud, piles of dirt are shoveled from be- 
neath the graders, both capable of mak- 
ing as thorough a job of infecting pota- 
toes as the soil particles carry the inocu- 
lum for soy beans. , , ^ ^ . i -ix 
Except for the fact that bacterial wilt 
of the potato is kept in check by certain 
weather conditions and inherent varie- 
tal resistance the potato industry would 
be in a precarious condition. As it is, 
growers will simply have to put up with 
another hazard in growing the more 
susceptible varieties depending on cer- 
tain coincidences in weather conditions 
and plant development. Disease-free 
seed sources will become fewer and 
farther between if any are left. While the 
Katahdin Variety has been the most 
seriously affected, there are other varie- 
ties as much or more susceptible. The 
Chippewa and Nittany, and in some lo- 
calities the Katahdin, were dead before 
the optimum conditions for spreading 
occurred. There are excellent prospects 
for resistant varieties to this serious 
maladv. In the meantime, we can only 
hope that the coincidence of optimum 
weather conditions for serious infection 
will not occur with such severity or fre- 
quency as to disturb our chances of some 
profit from our potato crop. 



FUTURE FARMER GROUPS 

SUPPORT ASS'N PROGRAM 

(Continued from page 20) 
Grade Supervisors School Columbia 
County. 
Fawn Grove Chapter, York County. Wm. 
V. Godshall, Supervisor: 25 members. 
Harvesting seedlings and York County 
Grade Supervisor school. 
Millheim Chapter, Centre County. Ray 
Bright, Supervisor: 8 members Har- 
vesting seedlings, and attending York 
and Centre County Grade Supervisor 
Schools. 
Coudersport "Spud Growers" Chapter, 
Potter County. C. L. Dewey, Super- 
visor: 30 members. Harvest of seed- 
lings at **Camp Potato" 
West Springfield Chapter, Erie County. 
Roscoe Coblentz, Instructor Work at 
the Edinboro (Erie County) Seedling 
plot. 
West Millcreek Chapter, Erie County. 
Jeffrey Payne, Instructor. Work at the 
Edinboro plots. 
North East Chapter, Erie County; Roy 
Fordyce, Instructor; Assistance in iLd- 

inboro plots. „ . ^ * -d^,, 

Waterford Chapter, Erie County, Ray 
Salmon, Instructor. Active participa- 
tion in Edinboro plot. 
Crawford County Chapters, under the 
supervision of D. L. Crum, of Mead- 
ville, including Spartansburg, Lines- 
ville, Conneautville, and Cambridge 
Springs, under leadership of Instruc- 
tors Whitney, Lance, Mawey and Ter- 
rill. Assisted with digging of 192 
varieties on plots at Edinboro, Erie 
County. 

Over 200 boys participated in the 
planting, care, and harvest of the Somer- 
set County seedling plot on the C. K. 
Bauermaster farm, at Somerset, ra. 
These boys were members of the follow- 
ing Future Farmer Chapters: 
Berling-Brothersvalley Chapter, W. D. 

Igoe, Instructor 
Boswell Chapter, Franklin La Vigne 

Instructor ^ n- ^ ir. 

Conemaugh Chapter, Galen Oelling, In- 
structor 

Meyersdale Chapter, H. J. Hartshorn, 
Instructor 

Shade Chapter, Arthur Myers, Instruc- 

Stonycreek Chapter, Robert Lohr, Jr., 

Instructor 
Somerset Chapter, J. C. Bulick and E. 

W. Cleeves, Instructors 



J 






J 



"More *P Per Acre 

-That's Where Agrico Counts!" 

Say Leading Potato Growers, 
from Maine to Minnesota 

m a-nniT No One's -that's where potatoes pay off! It's those 

l«.4ta» fannmhav. proved, •='»''^»"'' ^^^S ! . EXTRA 

-"^.r^-'^^'Ju'^t. SwIS^n - .v„a. ,easo„s, 
quality . . . EXIKA casn prout. outstand- 

?n fact -why crop results on fannafter^ar^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^,^ ^^ 

Agrico specially formulated to grow po- 
tatoes-made to do this one job and 
do it better; (2) Agrico is ''«n''d^^« 
measure" for local soils and growing 
conditions; (3) Agrico co^tams all the 
needed plant foods, in just the right 

balance. 

Use Agrico on your own farm and 
nrofit by the difference it makes m yield 
and a^ve aU in the quality of the crop. 

Agrico is Manufactured ONLY by 

The AMERICA MRICOLTURAL CHEMICAL Co. 





AGRICO 



Baltimore, Wld. Buffalo, N. Y. 
Carteret, N- J- 



ililERE'S A BRAND OF AERICO FOR EACH CROP 



THE NATION'S LEADING 
FERTILIZER 









VISION 




IRON AGE FLASH .••• IRON AGE FLASH 



Watch for important 

IRONM 

Potato Planter 

\ 

Announcement 

on this page next month 



K M M W^'A 



^tHHS^LV4yV^ 




NUMBER 12 



ih 6 -'40 









* \ 



^NOWlfcHCE 






»- vi%i flH 




5 5 u»5. mr- 



"Say It With Blue Labels'' 



^ 1 * 



^t^o 



fS^ 



tefflaia 



XNOWl.tP''' 



Rw^f^' 



A. B. FARQUHAR CO. Limited 
322 Dulce St. - Yorl(, Pa. 



FLASH . . . IRON AGE FLASH* • • IRON AGE 




3 




DECEMBER • I940 

PuUaked kf> ike 

PENNSYLVANIA COOPERATIVE 
POTATO GROWERS ASSOCIATION 

INCORPORATED 



l^\^\M(i;ij 




DR. NIXON WRITES ON : - 

"The Spirit Which Prevails at Christmas Should 
Become the Stones of the Corner" 






A flower unblown; a book unread; 
A tree with fruit unharvested; 
I A path untrod; a house whose rooms 
§ Lack yet the heart's divine per- 
Sj fumes; 

h A landscape whose wide border lies 
% In silent shade 'neath silent skies; 
$. A wondrous fountain yet unsealed; 
I A casket with its gifts concealed— 
g This is the Year that for you waits 
§ Beyond tomorrow's mystic gates. 

i5 —Horatio Nelson Powers 



"The spirit which prevails at Christ- 
mas should become the stones of the 
corner" — : 

We do not have to be rich to be gen- 
erous, and most of us are rich in the 
possessions which make generosity pos- 
sible. If he has the spirit of true gen- 
erosity — a pauper can give like a prince. 

"Be useful where thou livest that they 
may both want and wish thy pleasing 
presence still; 

Find out men's wants and will, 

And meet them there. 

All worldly joys go less than the one 
joy of doing kindness." 

Washington wrote in 1791: 

"Because land is cheap, much ground 
has been scratched over and none cul- 
tivated and improved as it ought to have 
been." 

This, too, is applicable to the social, 
political, economical and industrial 
heritage of America today. 

Oliver Goldsmith wrote: 
"111 fares the land, to hastening ills a 

prey. 
Where wealth accumulates, and men 

decay; 
Princes and lords may flourish, or may 

fade; 
A breath can make them, as a breath has 

made 
But a bold peasantry, their country's 

pride 
Whence once destroyed, can never be 
supplied." 
It has been said, "The farm is the 
foundation of society." 

"The nation that is strongest is the 
one that is most self-reliant." 

"No country in the world is or can 
be as self-reliant as the United States." 

In 1815 William Hazlitt, one of the 
greatest of essayists said: 

"The present is an age of talkers and 
not of doers, and the reason is that the 
world is growing old. We are so far 
advanced in the arts and sciences that 
we live in retrospect and dote on past 



achievements. The accumulation of 
knowledge has been so great that we are 
lost in wonder at the height it has 
reached instead of attempting to climb 
or add to it, while the variety of ob- 
jects distracts and dazzles the looker-on. 
What niche remains unoccupied? What 
path untrod? What is the use of doing 
anything unless we could do it better 
than all those who have gone on be- 
fore us? And what hope is there of 
this?" 

Think, when this was written, in 1815 
lighthouses were lighted by tallow can- 
dles; smallpox, typhoid fever and "con- 
sumption" were regarded as the visita- 
tion of God with which it was impious to 
interfere. The germ theory of disease 
was not within sixty years of birth. 
There were no steamships or railroads, 
no telephones, no friction matches and 
only in our time has wireless and the 
radio come into existence. Depressions 
were known then as now and their 
cause and cure are in the same status as 
the "plague" and human diseases were 
in 1815 — a visitation of God. 

The survival of Ihe fittest must be ir- 
revocably basic in all creation. Truth 
may lose a battle but it will win in the 
war. Goodness, justice, law, order, 
truth, love and the Golden Rule will in 
the end prevail — this is the inevitable 
Cosmic Destiny. 

Here is a battle front for those — the 
youth of our land — for whom it has been 
said, there is nothing to do. Tennyson 
said, 

"I doubt not through the ages 

one increasing purpose runs 

And the thoughts of men are 

widened 
with the process of the Sun." 

Paradoxically as it seems there is "too 
much Potatoes," too much Milk, too 
much Cabbage, too much Wheat, too 
much Meat, too much Labor, too much 
Oil, too much Gas, too much Furniture 
... too much everything on the one 

hand. 

(Continued on page 18) 



THE GUIDE POST 



December, 1940 



December, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



THE GUIDE POST 

Published monthly by the Pennsylvania 
Cooperative Potato Growers, Inc. 

OFFICERS 

J. A. Donaldson, Emlenton ..President 
Roy R. Hess, Stillwater . . . . Vice-Pres. 

E. B. Bower, Bellefonte, 

Sec'y-Treas. and Gen, Mgr. 



DIRECTORS 

Jacob K. Mast Elverson, Chester 

P. Daniel Frantz Coplay, Lehigh 

Hugh McPherson Bridgeton, York 

John B. Schrack Loganton, Clinton 

Roy R. Hess Stillwater, Columbia 

Ed. Fisher Coudersport, Potter 

Charles Frey North Girard, Erie 

J. A. Donaldson, R.l, Emlenton, Venango 
R. W. Lohr Boswell, Somerset 

Annual membership fee $1.00. This in- 
cludes the Guide Post. 

All communications should be ad- 
dressed to E. B. Bower, Secretary-Treas- 
urer and General Manager, Bellefonte, 
Pennsylvania. 



The Dying Soldiers™ 

From McGuFFEYS Readers 

A Waste of land, a sodden plain, 

A lurid sunset sky 
With clouds that fled and faded fast 

In ghostly phantasy; 
A field upturned by trampling feet, 

A field uppiled with slain. 
With horse and rider blent in death 

Upon the battle- plain. 

The dying and the dead lie low; 

For them, no more shall rise 
The evening moon, nor midnight stars, 

Nor daylight's soft surprise. 
They will not wake to tenderest call, 

Nor see again each home. 
Where waiting hearts shall throb and 
break 

When this day's tidings come. 

Two soldiers, lying as they fell 

Upon the reddened clay — 
In daytime foes; at night, in peace 

Breathing their lives away! 



Brave hearts had stirred each manly 
breast. 

Fate only made them foes; 
And lying, dying side by side, 

A softened feelmg rose. 

"Our time is short," one faint voice said, 

"Today we've done our best ^^ 

On different sides; what matters now. 

To-morrow we shall rest! 
Life lies behind, I might not care 

For only my own sake; 
But far away are other hearts, 

That this day's work will break. 

"Among New Hampshires snowy hills, 

There pray for me to-night 
A woman, and a little girl ^^ 

With hair like golden light; 
And at the thought, broke forth at last 

The cry of anguish wild, 
That would no longer be repressed— 

"O God! my wife, my child!" 

"And," said the other dying man, 

"Across the Georgia plain. 
There watch and wait for me, loved ones 

I ne'er shall see again. 
A little girl, with dark, bright eyes. 

Each day, waits at the door; 
Her father's step, her father's kiss. 

Will never greet her more. 

"Today we sought each other's lives, 

Death levels all that now; 
For soon before God's mercy-seat 

Together we shall bow. 
Forgive each other while we may; 

Life's but a weary game. 
And, right or wrong, the morning sun 

Will find us, dead, the same." 






^1 



The dying lips the pardon breath; 

The dying hands entwine; 
The east ray fades, and over all 

The stars from heaven shine; 
And the little girl with golden hair. 
And one with dark eyes bright, 
On Hampshire's hills and Georgia's 
plain 

Were fatherless that night! 



Good Advice 

A naval officer writes:— "Should a 
husband praise the good traits of other 
women so his wife may imitate them.' 
The answer is No — not unless he has 
been ordered, immediately, on a long, 
long cruise. — Kansas City Star 



The Potato Grower's Inventory 

L. T. Denniston, Association Field Representative 



Most business houses around the first 
of the year make a complete check of 
stock or supplies on hand. Looking at 
potato growing as a business, it occur- 
red to me that it would be at least in- 
teresting if not helpful, to a lot of us 
to take a look at the equipment, sup- 
plies, and services necessary or helpful 
to successful commercial potato produc- 
tion. I find you cannot do this without, 
"sticking your neck out," so to speak, 
but I am willing to go through with it 
for the sake of argument and discussion 
for I know some good will come of it. 

In submitting the following list of 
items, no doubt some of importance 
have been omitted. This is not inten- 
tional, but due to the inability to picture 
all items in the short time devoted to 
making up the list. I trust that no young 
beginners or future potato grower will 
be frightened by a long list of equip- 
ment essential or helpful in attaining 
success for I know of no potato grower 
who has all the items listed below. 
"Circumstances alter cases" — this is 
quoted from a story in McGuffeys 
Reader. There are many circumstances 
altering the case as to whether you need 
this tool and how many of them are 
actually necessary. 

For the sake of separating the more 
essential items I submitted this list to 
three prominent successful growers ask- 
ing them to designate all items of v/nich 
they, in their operation, must have or 
have the service. Due to a difference of 
opinion and to the nature of this set-up, 
as growers, they naturally were not in 
full agreement on all items. In all, 129 
of the 159 items listed were checked by 
one or more of the three growers as be- 
ing essential. Thinking of these growers 
as A, B, and C, grower A checked 108 
items as essential to his operations, 
grower B 118 items, and grower C, 113 
items. This is very close. However, the 
same three growers were in agreement 
on only 92 items as being essential. I 
have numbered the 92 items on which 
growers A, B, and C, agreed as essen- 
tial. This does not make them essential 
to you in your operation nor does it 
eliminate many other articles not so 
numbered as being important but gives 
you an interesting reaction on the part 
of your fellow grower. How would you 
list them? (Since writing this article I 



checked the list with my father, Thomas 
Denniston, Butler County, whom many 
of you know personally, and it was in- 
teresting to find that he had 126 of the 
items listed). 

Axe 

Anvil 

Arsenate (for insects) 

1. Barrels (lime and blue stone) 

2. Brace and bits 

3. Buckets (water lime and blue stone) 

4. Brushes (paint) 

5. Blue stone 

6. Bags (picking and marketing) 

7. Bolts (assortment machine, carriage 
and stone) 

Bag holder (for pickouts) 
Bolt cutter 

8. Brooms (floor) 

9. Baskets, crates or buckets( picking) 
Block and tackle (or service of) 

10. Bill heads (for billing sales) 

11. Brushes (bristle and wire) 

12. Blow torch (or service of) 
Brusher (potato) 

13. Cotter pins (assortment of) 
Crowbars 

14. Cultivators 
Cutter (potato) 
Center punches 

15. Chisels (metal or wood cutting) 

16. Chains (pulling and tie) 
Combine (grain and bean or service 

of) 
Conveyers (bin filling or loading) 

17. Car (business) 
Counter (loading) 

18. Cash or credit 
Dies and taps 

19. Digger (potato) 

20. Drill (grain and bean) 
Draw knife 

21. Drill press (or service of) 
Desk and files (office) 

22. Extension cord and light 

23. Emery wheel, grind stone or hones 

24. Electric Current (light and power) 

25. Fertilizer 
26! Files (flat, round and rat tail) 

Fire extinguisher 

27. Flares (truck-road) 
Forge and tools 

28. Fuel tanks (gas and oil) 

29. Funnels 
First aid kit 
Forks (potato digging) 
Fan belt (extra truck and tractor) 
Flash light 



THE GUIDE POST 



December, 1940 



30. 
31. 
32. 
33. 
34. 

35. 

36. 

37. 



38. 
39. 



Gasoline engine 

Grease (gear and cup) 

Grease guns 

Gasoline cans 

Grader (potato or service of) 

Gasoline 

Hatchet , . .. ^ 

Hammers (clean and rivetmg) 

Hose (spray plant) 

Hose (extra sprayer) 

Hoes (weed) 

Harrow (disk) 

Harrow (deep tillage) 

Horse power 

Harness 

Hay and Grain 

IZrancI IfaMity (auto and truck) 
Insurance (workman's compensa- 

Iron (strap and angle) 

Irrigation system 

Tsck 

Knives (potato cutting) 

Knife sharpener 

Kerosene 

Knife (pocket) 

Letterhead and envelopes 

Level 

Lime spreader 

Lumber (assortment of) 

Lanterns (gas or kerosene) 

Lime mixing spud 

Light shade (grader) 

Lime 

Magneto service 

Motor repair service 

Market or service 

Nails (assortment of) 

Nozzle disks and plates (extra) 

Nicotine sulphate (for insects) 

Needle (bag sewing) , , , . .. . 

Oil (tractor, truck and lubricating) 

Oil (penetrating) 

Oil cans 

Pick and maddock 

Pliers (grip) 

Pliers (cutting) 

Post maul 

57. Plows 

Plow points (extra) 

58. Punches (assortment) 
Punch (leather or belting) 

59. Pipe (assortment) 

Pipe cutter . 

60. Pipe threading dies (or service of) 

61. Pipe reducers (assortment of) 

62. Paint 

63. Planter (potato) 
Pressure gauge (tire) 
Pump (water-spray plant) 

64. Pump packing (extra) 
Pump valves (extra) 

65. Pump repair service 



40. 
41. 



42. 



43. 

44. 
45. 
46. 
47. 
48. 
48. 
50. 
51. 

52. 
53. 
54. 
55. 

56. 



Rivets (assortment of) 
Rawhide (mending) 

66. Rope and twine (assortment of) 

67. Saw (carpenters) 

68. Saw (back and extra blades) 

69. Scales 

70. Shovels (dirt) 

71. Shovels (scoop) 

72. Shovel or fork (potato) 

73. Screws (assortment wood and 

metal) 

74. Screw driver 

Scythe (grass or brush) 

75. Seed potatoes 

76. Seed (grass, gram, beans) 

77. Seeder (grass) 
Sledge (stone) 
Shears (tinners) . 

78. Sprayer (potato or service of) 

79. Storage (potato) . 

80. Storage (machinery and equipment) 
Square 

Sand paper 

Stove (oil, gas, coal or wood) 

Straw (bedding) 

Tile drain pipe 

Tire pump 

81. Tractor 

82. Truck 
Tractor light 

83. Tool shed and bench 
Thermometers 
Tanks (spray plant) 

84. Tarpaulins 

85. Tape measure or rule 

86. Twister (bag tying) 

87. Vice ^ . ^ 
Vulcanizing kit (or service) 

Wheel barrow 

88. Work clothes 

89. Wrenches (assortment of) 
Wire (phable tying) 

90. Weeder (potato) 

91. Washers (lock and steel— assort- 

ment of) 
Washer (potato) 

92. Welding outfit (or service of) 

Note:— The writer will appreciate a 
letter or card from any grower or indi- 
vidual listing additional items deemed 
by them as being essential or especially 
helpful to the potato business. 



John— "My wife has the worst habit 
of staying up until one and two o'clock 
in the morning, and I can't break her 
of it." 

Joe— "What does she do all that 
time?" 

John — "Waits for me to come home.** 



December, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



^TOTATO CHIPS'' 



Always with us — like death and taxes 
— is the question — "Which is the best 
variety to grow for highest yields?" A 
variety test on the farm of Ellis Artley, 
near Catawissa, showed the following 
yields during the past season: 

Pennigon 380.8 bushels 



Russets 
Houma 
Katahdins 
Chippewa 



346.6 bushels 
321 bushels 
312.8 bushels 
288.2 bushels 



Seems as if the Surplus marketing ad- 
ministration could very well discontinue 
the purchase of Pennsylvania apples — 
of which there is no surplus — but 
rather a short crop and turn to the re- 
moval of some of the surplus potatoes 
from the market. 

♦ ¥ * 

Anyone who had the opportunity to 
see the digging of "Doc." Nixon's seed- 
lings at the various locations in the State 
this fall has no doubt been impressed 
with a number of new varieties of very 
good promise. We will not mention any 
by number here but will leave that for 
"Doc." to do himself, but it looks as if 
*'Doc." now has several new varieties 
which are worthy of introduction into 
commercial channels. 

» * ♦ 

The potato market has shown a little 
stronger undertone of late. Possibly after 
some of the barn-floor stocks get cleaned 
up, which must find homes before cold 
weather, the market may be a little 
healthier. However, no run-away prices 
may be looked for this season. Just too 
many potatoes in Maine, Michigan, New 
York, Wisconsin, Idaho, and Pennsyl- 
vania — not to mention a dozen other les- 
ser potato states— for a strong upward 
moving market this season. 

¥ Jf ^ 
"Busy people do more work, read 
more, live longer and have a better time 
than those with more leisure on their 
hands. We are so constituted that when 
we have nothing to do life becomes dull 
and uninteresting. A lot of folks who 
think they are very busy are only ac- 
complishing a small part of what they 
might do if they were more efficient. 

jf Jf ¥ 
Did you ever know that different va- 
rieties of potatoes freeze at different 



temperatures? Russets, for instance, can 
stand a temperature of 281" but a Cob- 
bler freezes at 291°. Freezing tempera- 
tures of some other varieties are, Green 
Mountain 28^, Bliss Triumph 29 1/5° 
and Spaulding Rose 29 T- The average 
freezing temperature of 18 varieties test- 
ed was 28.9°. 

• • * 

John Milton many years ago made the 
following statement which is just as true 
today as it was then. "There is nothing 
that makes men rich and strong but that 
which they carry inside of them; wealth 
is of the heart, not of the hand. A good 
man is the ripe fruit which our earth 
holds up to God." 

• • • 

The distribution of Blue Label pota- 
toes continues to expand to greater dis- 
tribution areas. This season shipments 
have been made to Cleveland, to many 
other Ohio cities, to markets in western 
New York, Baltimore, and to other cities 
in New York, and Maryland. 

• • • 

The Producers Cooperative Exchange, 
one of the largest egg auction Coopera- 
tives in Pennsylvania, has recently start- 
ed to pack "Blue Labels" as an added 
service to its members who raise pota- 
toes in addition to poultry. Glad to see 
this live group of poultrymen take ad- 
vantage of the marketing facilities of the 
brother-Cooperative of potato growers. 

• • • 

According to Mrs. Pauline B. Mack of 
The Pennsylvania State College and of 
national renown for research work in 
Home Economics, approximately 10% of 
the average food expenditure is money 
spent for the lowly spud. People with 
incomes of less than $1000, who are not 
on direct relief, are the heaviest users of 
potatoes, 28% of their entire food bud- 
get being spent for potatoes. 

• • • 

"Diggers injure about one tenth of the 
potato crop," according to the state in- 
spectors in Michigan. Never heard what 
this damage amounts to in Pennsylvania 
but probably not a bit less than in the 
Wolverine state, and a lot higher than it 
has any right to be. Guess you've heard 
growers, who have off grade potatoes try 
(Continued on page 14) 



8 



THE GUIDE POST 



December, 1940 



December, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



Grower to Grower Exchange 

X- • ^ • +v,ie r>niiimn IS a oennv a word, minimum cost 25 cents, 

cation. 

FOR SALE: Bean No. 103 Potato Grader, 
bought new this fall. Used very little. 
$225 00. ^ T. Blakeslee, Blakeslee, 
(Monroe County) , Penna. 

FOR SALE: Choice seed potatoes grown 
from Certified Seed. Our Potatoes were 
sorayed every seven days. Yields up to 
fino bushels per acre. Cobblers or Rural 
KeTs W^^^^^^ W. W. Hayes, Jersey 
Shore, Lycoming County, Penna. 

AVAILABLE: Pistol-Grip Twisters for 
lying paper bags, $1.25. Write the As- 
sociation Office, Bellefonte, Penna. 

POTATO PLANTER FOR SALE: Two- 
row Iron Age potato planter in good con- 
dmon $175 00 WilUam W. Hayes, Jersey 
Shore, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania. 

AVAILABLE: Spring Return Tying 
Tools, for tying paper bags, f -J^- |^^^ 
Association Office has stocked a few of 
these for your convenience. 

PLANTER WANTED: 2 row Iron-Age 
Picker Type. Can also use good used 
grader and Digger. Write Ray Salmon, 
Waterford, Erie County, Penna. 

AVAILABLE: Copies of Dr. E. L Nix- 
on's book, "The Principles of Potato 
Production," $1.25 per copy. Write for 
your copy today, to Association office, 
Bellefonte, Pennsylvania. 



OFFICIAL POTATO TAGS AVAIL- 
ABLE: The Association Office has made 
available with a local printer, Official 
Potato Tags, for use on plain potato 
sacks, as required by law. If needed, 
write Association Office. We will print 
accordingly, at cost. 

CERTIFIED SEED POTATOES FOR 
SALE: Grown from the best of Northern 
Certified Seed Stock. Katahdins and 
Russets. U. S. No. I's and seconds. Grown 
in Somerset's high cool climate. Free of 
fohage and tuber diseases. Price reason- 
able at storage or delivered in truck 
loads. Joe Fisher, Boswell, Somerset 
County, Pennsylvania (storage 5 miles 
east of Johnstown on Windber road). 

PLANTER AND DIGGER FOR SALE: 

A used two-row new type Iron Age 
picker Planter; a two-row Kid Glove 
digger. Both in good condition at a 
price you can afford to pay. Contact Joe 
Fisher, Boswell, Somerset County, Penn- 
sylvania. 

GRADERS FOR SALE: 2 — No. 102p 
John Bean rubber roll potato graders 
complete with electric motor; like new; 
used one year; 1-No. 3 used Boggs po- 
tato grader; excellent condition; 1— No. 
6 large capacity Boggs potato grader 
complete with electric motor; new chains 
last Spring. J. Jacobsen & Son, Girard, 
Pa. Farm Equipmen Sprayers and 
Graders. 



Potato Wart Control 



As a result of the intensive activities 
bv the Department of Agriculture m the 
control of potato wart, the diseaso has 
been prevented from spreading to any 
commercial potato farms m this otate. 
Secretary John H. Light has announced. 
The disease has been confined to gardens 
in a few areas where control measures 
are constantly being enforced by De- 
partment agents. 

During this season a section in Oni- 
lena, Cambria County, comprising 16 
abandoned gardens, was added to the 
quarantined area. Agents of the Depart- 



ment destroyed all growth and spaded 
the land in co-operation with the land 
owners. In line with the course pursued 
in attempting to eradicate the disease, 
the agents will plant those gardens to 
an immune variety of potatoes next 
Spring. After the harvesting of the crop 
the soil will be treated and the following 
Spring a variety of potatoes known to 
be a susceptible to the disease will be 
planted which will show if the land is 
still infested. This course will be follow- 
ed for three years during which inspec- 
(Continued on page 12) 






Putting Pennsylvania Potatoes in the Bag 

Attention -— Grade Supervisors 



Aggressiveness: 

It wins football games — an aggressive 
little team often beats an indifferent big 
team. 

It wins major battles and often deter- 
mines the final outcome of wars — the lit- 
tle country with a well trained small 
aggressive army can win major battles 
and change the outcome of wars. 

Aggressiveness isn't, "tearing your 
hair." It isn't "picking a fight." It comes 
from having a purpose, an aim, a goal. A 
good purpose, a good aim, or a good goal. 
One worth striving for, worth achieving, 
yes worth fighting for. 

The potato grower, to be successful, 
must have it. He must combine it with 
knowledge, good experience, proper 
equipment and good common sense. 

You, as a Grade Supervisor, must have 
it, and must also combine it with knowl- 
edge, experience, and use good common 
sense. You should be striving not only 
for your own personal success — this 
worthy goal will be attained if you suc- 
cessfully serve your employer, the grow- 
er, or growers of your community, the 
Association which trained and licensed 
you, for the benefit of this great Penn- 
sylvania Industry in which you are play- 
ing an important part. 

Some Things To Do: 

1. I repeat— see that all bags are prop- 
erly stamped, that the grade and weight 
are maintained, that the pack is kept 
clean. This requires constant checking of 
weight and scales, and inspection of the 
pack when grading. Remember you are 
serving the grower, the Association (the 
success or failure of a program), the dis- 
tributor whose future orders depend on 
satisfied customers, and the consumer 
who is entitled to the grade and weight 
specified on the bag. 

2. Report to your employer, the local 
contact man handling the Association 
deal, the Association or its officials, cir- 
cumstances or problems on which you 
are in doubt or unable to solve. 

3. If you know of a store, group of 
stores, or a dealer who is interested in 
handling the Association pack or might 
be an outlet for additional sales report 
this at once to your local contact man or 
forward the information to the Associa- 
tion office, Bellefonte, Pennsylvania. 




The Blue Label Peck reaches the 
consumers kitchen. With the right pota- 
toes in the bags, as shown here, the cus- 
tomer will be a repeat buyer on shopping 
day. These potatoes were packed by P. 
D. Frantz, Copley, Lehigh County. 

« 

4. On a day when you are not busy- 
visit and study the set of a leading 
grower and packer in your section or an 
adjoining county, (or) Accompany a 
shipper with his shipment into a leading 
market and study how the distributor 
handles this important food in serving 
the buying public. 

5. If and when you are within acces- 
sible distance of the Association office, 
Masonic Temple (across from the Post 
Office), Bellefonte, Pennsylvania, drop in 
and see for yourself how this program 
and deal functions. You will be more 
than welcome. 



The pathway to success is in serving 
humanity. By no other means is it pos-. 
sible, and this truth is so plain and 
patent that even very simple folk recog-. 
nize it. 



10 



THE GUIDE POST 



December, 1940 



OVER THE PICKING TABLE 



by Inspector Throwout 



A tramp, coming down a country road 
in England, stoped a moment in Medi- 
tation before a sign on which was 
written. "George and the Dragon 

He entered the tavern to whicn the 
sign was affixed and asked for the land- 
lady. 

"Noble lady", he began, ''have you a 
meal and some old clothes to spare for 
a poor, hungry man? 

%ot for the likes of you. Now go! 
she said sternly. Then, seeing he desired 
to get another word with her. Well .' 

"Then please. Ma'am, could I speak to 

George?" 

• • • 

A fellow was tearing up the road at 
80 miles an hour when a cop pulled up 

beside him. , , „„ 

"Where's the fire, buddy? ,. ^ ,, 
"I'm so sorry, officer", replied the 

speeder. "I realize I was going a little 

too fast." ^ ^ 

"You weren't going too fast, you were 
flying too low," the cop came back. 

• * • 
At Christmas, play and Make good cheer 
For Christmas comes but once a year. 

• • • 
When tillage begins, other arts follow. 
The farmers, therefore are the founders 
of human civilization. 

if if ^ 

"Your potatoes cost more than they 
used to," complained the buyer. 

"Yes", replied a grower, known well 

°"When a grower is supposed to know 
the botanical name of what he is raising, 
and the zoological name of the insect 
that eats it, and the chemical name ot 
what will kill it, somebody s got to pay. 

¥ jf * 
Remorse is the form that failure takes 
when it has made a grab and got nothing. 

• • • 
Mutual Aid 

In every country and every language, 
whither it is called 'la cooperation 
Kooperationen," -genossenchafts- 
wesen", "Samarbejde," or ^'oswestoi- 
minta" co-operation ^eans mutual a^^ 
among the common people for their mu- 
tual benefit^^^ Co-operative Builder 



"Life is a foreign language: All men 
mispronounce it." 

• • • 
"Who was the first man?" asked the 

teacher of Billy. ^, ^ ^ 

"George Washington was the first 
man. He was first in war, first in peace, 
and first in the hearts of his country- 
men." 

"Oh, No.", said the teacher. 

"Adam was the first man". . 

"Oh well, teacher, if you want to bring 
in foreigners, you may be right", con- 
ceded Billy. 

• • • 
Sentry: "Halt! Who's there?" 
Voice: "American" 

Sentry: "Advance and recite the second 
verse of the *Star Spangled Banner . 
Voice: "I don't know it." ^^ 
Sentry: "Proceed, american. 

• • • 

"They wrote, in the old days, that it 
is sweet and fitting, to die for one s 
country. But in modern war. there is 
nothing sweet nor fitting in your dying. 
You will die like the dog for no good 

reason. 

— Hemmingway 

• • • 
A recession is a period in which you 
tighten up your belt. 
A depression is a time in which you have 

no belt to tighten. , , u ia ..r. h'c 

When you have no pants to nola up, ii s 

a panic. 

• • • 
We need to sit "loose":— 
One trouble with many of us white 

folks is that we haven't developed a 
working philosophy like that ^ the fat 
negro cook down in Houston. Texas. 

She was asked what was the secret of 
her calmness and freedom from care. 
Her reply was thorough and complete. 

"Well, h'its disaway. When I sits I sits 
loose! An' when Ah stah'ts to worry, I 
falls asleep." 

• • • 

Those who dream by day are congni- 
zant of many things which escape those 
who dream only by night. 

• • • 
Bounty always receives Part of its 

value from the manner in which it is 
bestowed. 



December, 1940 



THE GUIDE POST 



11 



A young woman and a handsome farm 
lad were walking along a country road 
together in the evening. The farm lad 
was carrying a large pail on his back, 
holding a chicken in one had, a cane in 
the other, and leading a goat. They came 

to a dark lane. , . , . ,, , 

Said the girl: "I'm afraid to walk here 

with you. You might try to kiss me." 
Said the farm lad: "How could I with 

all these things I'm carrying?" 

"Well, you might stick the cane in the 

ground, tie the goat to it, and put the 

chicken under the pail." 

— Equity Union Exchange 



God rest you, Merry Innocents, 
While innocence endures. 
A sweeter Christmas than we to ours 
May you bequeath to yours. 

— Countee CuUen 

• • • 

Doubt whom you will, but never your- 
self. _ 

— ^Boyer 

• • • 

The victory of success is half won when 
one gains the habit of work. 

— Bolton 




Here is good utilization of the Potato Growers^^^^^^ 

^^oS;ar^ennr^^^^^^ 5^1iils%'^ l^t'A^^ grol and has good 

^as^ to Sv^^^^^ have added to the value of his property. 



When you define liberty you limit it, 
and when you limit it, you destroy it. 

— Whitlock 

Every man naturally persuades him- 
self that he can keep his resolutions: 
Nor is he convinced of hi simbicility but 
by length of time and frequency of ex- 
periment! _saxnuel Johnson 

• * * , . A. 

Believe me, every man has his secret 
sorrows, which the world knows not; 
and oftentimes we call a man cold when 
he is only sad. ^Longfellow 



I would rather be sick than idle. 

— Senoca 

• • * 

Great spenders are bad l^^^/^^^^j^^.^ 

jf ^ ^ 

Teacher— "James, why do we call 
English our Mother tongue?" 

James— "Because Mother uses it more 

than Father." 

• • * 
"Inspector Throw-out" wishes, one and 




12 



THE GUIDE POST 



December, 1940 



Education for Character or Are We Educated 

Lester K. Ade, President 
State Teachers College, Mansfield, Pennsylvania 



1. Do I keep myself physically fit, or 
am I usually below par? 

2. Am I capable of earning a living for 
myself, or am I dependent on the 
earnings of another? 

3. Am I constantly doing my work bet- 
ter and better through study, or am I 
like a machine? 

4. Are my social interests constantly 
widening, or does human welfare 
mean less and less to me? 

5. Am I keeping old friends and mak- 
ing new ones, or is the circle of my 
friends constantly growing smaller? 

6. Am I indignant at social wrongs, or 
have I settled down to let the world 
wag as it may? 

7 Am T suitable as a life partner for 
another, or would living day by day 
with me prove disappointing? 

8. Am I tolerant of opinions different 
from my own, or do I regard those as 
wrong-headed who differ from me? 

9. Do I stand for the welfare of hu- 
manity, or do I put myself and my 
little group against the world? 

10. Am I loyal to good causes, or is my 
loyalty limited to family and 
friends? 

11. Do I love nature, or am I blind to 
her wonders and beauties? 

12 Do I prize tne creative more than 
the possessive, or is possession my 
measure ot value? 

13. Are my opinions based on evidence, 
or on emotional attitudes? 

14. Am I careful in expressing judg- 
ments, or hasty? 

15. Can I truly call mine a happy life, 
or have I missed the way? 

16. Can I enjoy a vacation, or am I tied 
to my work? 

17 Have I the courage to do right 
against, odds, or do I follow the line 
of least resistance? 

18 Do I feel at ease in the presence of 
my superiors, or am I awkward and 
embarrassed? 

19 Can I make something with my 
hands like .an artist or a craftsman 



or are my hands just the ends of 
my arms? 
20 Do I sense my kinship with all men 
and with God, or is religion a mean- 
ingless thing to me? 

Submitted by Ed. Fisher, 
Coudersport, Pa. 

Editor's Note: President Ade's quest- 
tionaire may offer some good sug- 
gestions jor some really fine New Years 
Resolutions. If not, some valuable food 
for thought. 



POTATO WART CONTROL 

(Continued from page 8) 

tions are made and if after that time 
there is no evidence of the disease the 
quarantine originally placed on the area 
will be lifted. 

During the next season about 100 
gardens in which the disease has been 
found will be test planted by the De- 
partment. When the disease is found the 
area is spot treated and kept under in- 
spection for a minimum period 9f tour 
years. After that time periodic inspec- 
tions are made to prevent a possible 
recurrence of the disease. 

Inspection is also made by the agents 
during the Fall and Winter months of 
all seed potatoes in those areas and po- 
tatoes which are found to be diseased 
or of a prohibited variety are ordered 
to be witheld from planting. 

The wart has been confined to small 
areas in Cambria, Schuylkill, Carbon, 
Clearfield, Somerset, Luzerne and Sulli- 
van counties. 



Every year college deans pop the rou- 
tine question to their undergraduates: 
"Why did you come to college?" 

Traditionally, the answers match the 
questions in triteness. 

However, last year one University of 
Arizona co-ed unexpectedly confided^^ 
"I came to be went with, but I am t yet! 



Do You Know How Much 
POTASH Goes Off Your 
Farm in a Year's Harvest ? 



Everything sold off the farm reduces its fertility. If you 
had a good crop of potatoes this past fall, more potash than 
nitrogen and phosphoric acid combined v^ent out of the 
soil with them. To grow a good crop of No. Ts, soil and 
fertilizer must supply at least 200 lbs. of available potash 
(actual KoO) per acre. Your fertilizer last spring may have 
supplied this amount— if not your soil is poorer by the dif- 
ference. 

Consult your county agent or experiment station about 
the amounts of potash needed to grow the crops you plan 
for 1941 and how much your soil will supply. See your 
fertilizer dealer early. He will tell you that there is plenty 
of potash on the market and show you how little extra it 
will cost to apply enough for greater returns on your invest- 
ment. Make more money in 1941. 



T 



Write us for our free illuslraled book- 
let on how much plant food crops use. 



means 

niorePtofit 



flmerican Potash Institute, Inc. 

Washington, D. C. 



Investment Building 



I 



m^ 



14 



THE GUIDE POST 



December, 1940 






'4 ■"*, :•.»<! 



"POTATO CHIPS" 

(Continued jrom page 7) 

to justify the poor quality by stating 
"That's the way God grew *em. W^ may 
be able to blame the Almighty for the 
lack of rainfall, the excessive heat or the 
early freeze but at least we know He 
didn't set the potato digger too shallow. 

• • • 
One of the finest tributes to the co- 
onerative movement ever spoken were 
the words of Charles W. Holman, Secre- 
tarv of the American Institute of co- 
operation. He said, "I look forward to 
the production of a new farm leader- 
ship in this nation— a leadership capable 
in mind, trained in technique and adroit 
in business strategy. I look forward to 
the development of a finer, abler body of 
master cooperators, living on the f amis 
of this nation, owning and controlling m 
truly democratic manner the great eco- 
nomic instruments of sale, purchase and 
credit necessary to their existence. Out 
of such development will come the long- 
sought American farm ideal— a better 
and richer way of living. 

• • • 
The truth may hurt sometimes but it 
is better to have than a sugar coated pill, 
so let the chips fall where they may. 
Some of our Blue Label, packers have 
continued to make deliveries of off-grade 
tubers, even after being rejected on 
earlier deliveries. This has made it neces- 
sarv for some of the distributors to re- 
fuse any more deliveries froni certain 
growers or packers but they will accept 
other marks. This is not as it should be 
and will eventually mitigate against 
everyone. The Blue Label belongs to all 
our members and when you defile its 
good name you not only hurt yourself 
but also every other potato grower in 
the state is injured by your neglect. 

• • • 
Did vou ever notice how easy it is to 
tear down a big building? How much 
longer it took to put the building to- 
gether piece by piece than to rip it down, 
I whole floor at a time. And how many 
more of us tear down than build up. 



The value of advertising is forcefully 
displayed by the Maine potato publicity 
campaign. At a cost of 3 mills per grow- 
ers' dollar of sales (the lowest cost on 
record for such a campaign) the Maine 
growers realized 22% more cash for their 
tubers. 



In 1940 Maine growers received 18 mil- 
lion dollars for 37 thousand carloads, 
while in 1939, when they shipped 3 thou- 
sand more cars, they received 4 million 
dollars less return. In 1938 when they 
shipped 13 thousand more cars they only 
received 10 million dollars or only 60% 
of the 1940 returns. It really pays to ad- 
vertise! 



Department of Agriculture 
Is Checking 

Proper grade labeling of all potatoes 
in closed packages sold in this State is 
now being checked by the Department 
of Agriculture, it is announced. The Po- 
tato Marketing Law makes compulsory 
the branding or tagging of all closed 
packages of potatoes packed, transpor- 
ted, or offered for sale or sold in this 
State. The Department also points out 
that an error on the part of the grower 
or shipper in marking the package does 
not relieve the dealer from responsibility 
under the law. 

Checking the grades and grade label- 
ing is being carried on by the Depart- 
ment at both shipping points and 
terminal markets. 



A young woman of West Chester, 
Pennsylvania, whose fiance has disap- 
peared, asked the Clerk of Courts to 
give her a hunting license in exchange 
for her marriage license.— Indianapolis 

News 

• • * 

The old lady entered the butchers' 
shop with the light of battle in her eyes 

*T believe that you sell diseased meat 
here," she accused the butcher. 

"We do worse," blandly replied the 
shop-keeper. 

"What do you mean, worse ? 

The butcher put a finger to nis lips. 
"The meat we sell is dead,'* he confided 
in a stage whisper. 

• • • 

A pompous physician who was in- 
clined to criticize others was watching 
a stone-mason build a fence for his 
neighbor, and thought the mason was 
using too much mortar. He said, Jim, 
mortar covers up a good many mistakes, 
does it not?" 

"Yes, doctor," replied the mason, "and 
60 does the spade." 



Michigan Potato Growers Exchange, Inc. 

EXTENDS TO YOU OUR CUSTOMERS AND FRIENDS 

A VERY MERRY CHRISTMAS and a 

HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR 






Prosperity is the Re- 
sult of Success 

Success is The Result 
of Good Business Judg- 
ment 




Good Business Judg- 
ment in Growing Pota- 
toes Begins With Good 
Seed 

Chief Petoskey Certi- 
fied Seed is The Finest 
Seed The Market Af- 
fords 



WE OFFER SUBJECT TO PRIOR SALE 
IRISH COb'SleS^™ „SpPEWAS GREEN MOUNTAINS 

RUSSET RURALS nrkNTTttr«; 

KATAHDINS WHITE RURALS PONTIACS 

Michigan Potato Growers' Exchange,^lnc.^^ 

CADILLAC 




Plan To Meet With Your Association 

At The FARM SHOW 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

January 20—24. 1941 



The fellow who sits and waits for his ship to 
come in, is likely to find on its arrival that it's 
a hardship. . • • 

ALBERT C. ROEMHILD 

Potato Commission Merchant 

122 Dock St. PHILADELPHIA Lombard 1000 






16 



THE GUIDE POST 



December, 1940 



Lecturers and Essayists on Potato Culture in 

Pennsylvania in 1895-1918 



Editors Note : We publish here a list of 
growers and individuals who were lec- 
turers, and essayists on potato culture in 
Pennsylvania during the period Jrom 
1895 to 1918. It is our purpose to honor 
and pay tribute to these men, many oj 
whom gave freely of their time and 
energy for the betterment of their fel- 
low growers and the industry. In the 
light of present day knowledge un- 
doubtedly many of these early lecturers 
and writers were mistaken in their ideas 
and conclusions, but such mistakes as 
there may have been, were of the head 
and not of the heart. On the other hand, 
many of these men if now living, would 
see their ideas which were frowned 
upon by others growers of their time 
and even by our Agricultural Expert- 
mentations, in common practice today. 
T B Terry, Hudson, Ohio, was unques- 
tionably the most outstanding individual 
of the group. A keen thinker and a close 
observer, Terry, gave us many of the 
principles underlying modern potato 
hilture in Pennsylvania as we know it 
today. . ' • • 

Agee Alva Chessire, Ohio and State 
College, Centre Co., Pa. 
Potato Culture. 
Beardslee, R. L. Warrenham. Bradford 
Co., Pa. 
Potato Culture. 
Bisbing, Randall Minsi, Monroe Co., Pa. 

Potato Culture. 
Barber, R. W., White Springs, Union Co., 

Pa. 
Experience With Potatoes. 

Burg, P. W. Wrightsville, York Co., Pa. 

How to Grow Potatoes. 

Berry, W. G., Houstonville, Washington 

Co., Pa. 
Potato Culture. 
Brown, Hon. Gerald C, Yorkana, York 
Co., Pa. 
The Potato and Its Culture. 
Critchfield, Hon. N. B., Jennerstown, 
Somerset Co., Pa. 
Potato Culture. 
Chapman, C. E., Perueville, N. Y. 
Potato Pointers— Methods of Produc- 
tion. 
Potato Culture. 



How To Grow Potatoes For Nine Cents 

Per Bushel. ^ ^ i.- 

Potato Planters— Methods of Culti- 
vation. 
Cooper, Calvin, Bird-In-Hand, Lancas- 
ter Co., Pa. 
Potato Growing. 
A Practical Talk On Potato Culture. 

Comfort, H. W., Fallington, Bucks Co., 

Pa. 
Potato Culture. 
Engle, Henry M., Marietta, Lancaster 
Co., Pa. 
Potato Culture. 
Hill, W. F., Westford, Crawford Co., Pa. 

Potato Culture. 
Hutchison, G. G., Warriors Mark, Hunt- 
ington Co., Pa. 
Potato Culture. 
Hiller, Casper, Conestoga, Lancaster 
Co., Pa. 
Potato Culture. 
Johnson, W. B. K., Allentown, Lehigh 
Co., Pa. 
Potato Culture. 
Jennings, J. T., New Milford, Susque- 
hanna Co., Pa. 
Growing And Marketing Potatoes. 

Kern, D. N., Shimersville, Lehigh Co., 
Pa. 

Potato Culture. 
McCowan, Howard G., Geigers Mills,; 
Bucks Co., Pa. . I 

Potato Culture. 
Martin, Dr. J. Myers, Mercersburg, 
Franklin Co., Pa. , 

Potato Culture. 
Moore, Hon. Frank N., North Orwell, 
Bradford Co., Pa. 
Potato Culture. j 

Northrup, H. W., Glenburn, Lackawan- 
na Co., Pa. 
Potato Culture. 
Richards, Isaac, Toughkenamon, Chest- 
er Co., Pa. 
Potato Culture. 
Thompson, O. D., Town Hill, Luzerne 
Co., Pa. : 

Potato Culture. 
Weidner, A. I., Arendsville, Adams Co., 

Pa. 
Potato Culture. 

(Continued on page 18) 



PACK 

POTATOES 

IN PAPER! 

IT'S THE WAY OF 
MODERN 

MERCHANDISING 

Attractively Printed Paper 
Bags Bring Greater Returns 
to the Grower. 

HAMMOND 
BETTERBAGS 

Combine High Grade Printing, 
Strength and Quality 

HAMMOND 
BETTERBAGS 

Will Sell Your Spuds in Style 




Hammond Bag & 
Paper Co. 

WELLSBURG, W. VA. 

Bags for 

Lime, Limestone, Fertilizer, 

Flour, Feed and Potatoes 



Certified 

SEED 
POTATOES 

Complete records now show our 
certified fields have produced a 
good yield of even sized, clean seed. 
Considering the foundation stock 
of each crop, and with growers at- 
tentive to prescribed cultural 
methods and storage conditions, we 
feel confident our spring shipments 
will please exacting purchasers. 




MAINE 
Cobblers — Mountains 
Katahdins — Chippewas 

Leading growers are now mak- 
ing their selections of particular 
crops. Early purchases and exports 
of Katahdins and Chippewas mdi- 
cate an active market on the m- 
creased production. 

MICHIGAN 
Russets — Mountains 
These varieties will undergo a 
heavy sort due to unfavorable 
weather late in the growing season 
and supply will not be plentiful. 
Type and size are more pleasing 
than for the past several years and 
shipping tonnage will carry usual 
high quality. 

Dougherty Seed Growers 

Williamsport Penna. 



18 



THE GUIDE POST 



December, 1940 



THE SPIRIT WHICH KlEVAILS^^g 

(Continued jrom page 3) 
Another paradoxical picture stares 
one in the face. There are not enough 
blankets to go around, not enough chairs 
to sit on, not enough milk to mamtain 
the health and stamina of our popula- 
tion, not enough rugs to walk on, not 
enough of any of the vital necessities 
^f they could only be gotten to those 
who need them. Here is a wholly un 
explored field waiting for a Sir Isaac 
Newton, a Charles Darwin, a James 
Watt, a Christopher Columbus. 

Too much evil, too much injustice, too 
much lawlessness, too much untruthful- 
ness, too much hate, too much do unto 
others, but do it first." 

What a little it would take to place 
these items on the credit side of the led- 
ger . just one word often would 
Change a lie to the truth, hate to love, 
injustice to justice. 

McGuffey in his reader Paraphras^^^^^ 
the Fifth, Sixth and Seventh Chapters 
of St. Matthews as follows: 



The Sermon on the Mount 

"And seeing the multitude, he went 
up into a mountain: and when he was 
set, his disciples came unto him. Ana 
he opened his mouth, and taught them 
saying. 
Blessed are the poor in spirit, 

For their's is the kingdom of heaven. 
Blessed are they that mourn 

For they shall be comforted. 

Blessed are the meek 

For they shall inherit the earth. 
Blessed are they which do hunger 
And thirst after righteousness 
For they shall obtain mercy 
Blessed are the pure in heart 

For they shall see God. 
Blessed are the peacemakers 

For they shall be called the Children 
of God 
Blessed are they which are persecuted 
for righteousness sake 
For their's is the kingdom of heaven. 
Blessed are ye when men shall revile 
you and persecute you 
And say all manner of evil against you 
falsely for my sake. 
Rejoice and be exceedingly glad. 
For great is your reward in heaven. 



Beware of false prophets, which come 
to you in sheep's clothing, 
but inwardly they are ravening 
wolves. Ye shall know them by 
their fruits. Do men gather grapes 
of thorns, or figs or thistles? 
Therefore, all things whatsoever ye 
would that men should do to you, 
do ye even so to them; for this 
is the law and the prophets. 
And it came to pass, when Jesus had 
ended these sayings the people 
were astonished at His doctrine; 
For He taught them as one hav- 
ing authority, and not as the 
scribes. 
McGuffey's version of the Lord's 
Prayer: 

Our Father in heaven 

We hollow Thy name 
May Thy kingdom holy 
On earth be the same 
Give to us daily 

Our portion of bread 
It is from Thy bounty 

That all must be fed. 
Forgive our transgressions 

And teach us to know 
The humble compassion 
That pardons each foe 
Keep us from temptation 
And weakness and sin 
And thine be the glory 
Forever 

Amen. 



LECTURERS and ESSAYISTS 

(Continued jrovfi page 16) 
Comfort, H. W., Fallington. ^ucks^Co., 

Potato Culture. 
Commercial Potato Growing. 
Baker, P. S., State College, Center Co., 

Pa. ^^91^> 

Potatoes— General Culture. 

Potatoes — Improvement. 
Mattern, J. A., Fleming, Center Co., Pa. 

Potato Culture. 
Cherrington, Ira C, Catawissa, Colum- 
bia Co., Pa. 

Seed Potatoes & Preparation oi tne 

Seed Bed. . 

Potato Insects & Diseases & Their 

Control. 

Cooper, H. P., State College, Center Co., 

Pa 
Potatoes— Varieties, Cultures, etc. 

(ContiniLed in next issue) 



Hardie Plus Features Are 
Like the Frosting on the Cake 

# The plus features in the Hardie 1941 line of rov\^ sprayers in- 
clude a new square tubular axle easily and quickly adjusted to 
row width and ground clearance, the new Hardie ''Levelrite" 
boom providing quick center leveling and instant raising or 
lowering of nozzles on either side, the new Hardie quick-clean- 
ing pressure line strainer, and many other valuable advance- 
ments that mean more profit and more convenience for the 
grower of row crops. 

Write for catalog showing many models and sizes with engine 
drive, motor truck take-off. Tractor Trailers and traction op- 
erated for spraying 2 to 10 rows. The Hardie Mfg. Company, 
Hudson, Mich. 





This new 4-row Hardie Tractor 
Trailer is specially engineered 
and built for use with all makes 
of standard tractors. Available 
in different sizes, equipped with 
150-gallon or 200-gallon steel 



tank as desired. Many other 
models for spraying 4 to 10 
rows. Fully streamlined. Take- 
off shaft equipped with safety 
guard. 




PUMPOlHAT IS COMPLETELY LUBRICATED 







20 



THE GUIDE POST 



December, 1940 



Grading Improves 

a'^%nfo 'cl ?h'l Potato Grade Labehn| 
Act report that practically all marKeis 
ta the^State show Potatoes of be^^ter 

^'^■^ft ^%" ^d"e^7ncf lorPersylv^'anil 
Sa"oes'l gSr"'han in former years. 
In commenting on this marked im- 
provement, Secretary Light stated that 

\\ t'^ou,^ ctnclr eS actionTy 
iSs SitiaflTand thr^^^^ 
Association working with the Depart 
ment of Agriculture aM the State Col 
lege Extension Service. He jurtner 
declared that the continuation and ex- 
rlnsion of this cooperative effort to 
further these great marketing improve- 
mentf will do much to strengthen and 
^abilize the potato industry in this 
State. 

Ppnnsvlvania has for years been one 
of^thrpri^cipal potato Produ-ing states 
and with the Progress being made m 
grading and labeling this State s pro 
ducts Ire meeting with constantly in- 
creased demands. 



of Markets of the Department of Agri- 
culture have assisted these local groups 
in this marketing program. 

Numerous reports received at the De- 
partment of Agriculture indicate that 
the reputation of Pennsylvania potatoes 
is improving considerably over recent 
vears, due in large part to the determ- 
ination of Pennsylvania potato growers 
to improve their market quality and to 
their cooperative marketing efforts. 

The work of the Federal-State In- 
spectors from the State Bureau of Mar- 
kets has increased considerably this 
season, indicating a larger volume of 
properly graded Pennsylvania potatoes 
is being marketed than in any previous 
year. The inspectors report consistently 
greater grower returns for the well- 
Iraded shipments over the prices being 
paid for "partly-graded" stock sold to 
hucksters or local buyers. 



Increase Shown 

Manv new growers in important coun- 
tie^ of Pennsylvania, realizing that the 
highest market returns are often re- 
cefved for graded potatoes shipped m 
from other states, are setting up coopera- 
tivf grading and marketing organiza- 
tions in an effort to improve demands 
for high quality Pennsylvania potatoes 
for sale through the Association for the 
first time this year. 

The Association has sponsored nu- 
merous potato grading demonstrations 
^nd Grade Supervisor schools during 
this season throughout the State to edu- 
cate these Pennsylvania producers to 
?he requirements of acceptable market 
oualitv The extension specialists of 
State College and officials of the Bureau 



Define Quantity 

As a result of numerous inquiries 
received by the Department of Agricul- 
[ure f rom growers of and dealers in farm 
m-oducts regarding the legal quantity 
coSed in a bushel, a further explana- 
tion of the regulations has been issued 
by the Department. 

In selling potatoes, apples, onions, and 
other fruits and vegetables in the origi- 
nal standard container, the legal volume 
is measured by cubic volume and not 
by weight. This change was made by the 
pLrage of the Volume Bushel Bill by 
?he Legislature in 1937, which specified 
that only after the contents of the ori- 
linal package have been broken must 
fhe contentf be sold by weight rather 
thin by volume. It is further stated by 
Department officials that in the sale of 
apples there is a variation in the weight 
of a full bushel, depending upon the 
variety and size of the fruit. Apples will 
virv in weight from 40 to 48 pounds 
Ilthough thi legal weight of a bushel 

in this State is 45 pounds. 

In answering the inquiry of what con- 
stitutesT legal bushel, the Department 
explains that a basket containing 2^1 5a4^ 
cubic inches, or 32 quarts of dry mea 
sure? packed level full, contains a legal 
bushel of fruit or vegetables regardless 
of the weight. 



YOUR EXTRA PROFIT 

FROM THE USE OF A BEAN RUBBER SPOOL GRADER 

WILL PAY FOR IT 




3 CAPACITY SIZES OF BEAN GRADERS 

• YOU DON'T LIKE BRUISING 

• YOU DON'T LIKE CUTTING 

• YOU DON'T LIKE INACCURACY 
IN YOUR POTATO GRADING 

..YOU DON'T GET IT.. 

WITH A BEAN RUBBER SPOOL GRADER 
OUR CATALOG SHOWS YOUR WAY TO PROFIT 

John Bean Mfg. Co. 



LANSING 



MICHIGAN 






22 



THE GUIDE POST 



December, 1940 



RAY D. HEWES 

The potato industry of the entire 
country has lost a leader. One whose 
frankness, sincerity, and honesty, whose 
devotion and loyalty to the industry 
during a twenty-year period, uplifted po- 
tato culture throughout the nation by the 
improvement of agricultural technique 
and the development of increasingly 
finer seed potatoes. 

Ray Delmar Hewes, of Presque Isle, 
Maine, Treasurer and Seed Department 
Manager of Aroostook Potato Growers', 
Inc., and authority on the production of 
seed potatoes, was killed almost in- 
stantly when accidentally struck by a 
stray bullet, on November 17th, when 
returning from a hunting trip at Ash- 
land, Maine. 

The tragedy brought to a close the 
full and fruitful life of a proven leader 
in many fields, but potato growers, 
whose advancement and uplift traced 
directly from his knowledge and lead- 
ership can feel most keenly the great 
loss. All Pennsylvania growers do not 
know the depth of his foot-prints in 
Pennsylvania soil, but all have shared 
the good of his endeavors. 

Mr. Hewes was not only concerned 
with good seed for better potatoes for 
the nation; he was interested in all prob- 
lems touching the industry's advance- 
ment. He was vitally interested in the 
Pennsylvania Association marketing 
plan, progress of which he followed 
monthly in the GUIDE POST, to which 
he was for many years a subscriber. 

Hosts of Pennsylvanians mourn his 
passing, and join in an expression of deep 
sympathy to his widow, Mrs. Esther 
Oilman Hewes, and his son, Edgar. 



Association Bag Prices 

Prices Quoted are Per 1000 Delivered 



Blue Label, 
Red Label, 
Economy Pack 
Blue Label, 
Blue Label, 
Unclassified, 



15's (2-wall) 
15's (2-wall) 
15's (2-wall) 
60's (2-wall) 
60's (3-wall) 



$18.00 
$17.50 
$17.00 
$45.50 
$48.75 
$38.50 



60's (2-wall) 

The above prices are for delivery to 
any point in Pennsylvania and include 
the wire loop ties and the commission to 
the Association. 



THE 



Annual Meeting 



of the 

Membership of the 
Association 

Will be held in Room F 

FARM 

Show Building 

Harrisburg, Penna. 
on Tuesday, 

January 21, 1941 

at 6:00 P. M. 

As a portion of 

an interesting 

Annual Program 

planned for the 

Association 

You are urged 
to be present. 

E. B. Bower, 
Secretary 



equit^leH 



COMPANY 

INCORPORATED 






♦Specialists in the manufacture of 

POTATO SACKS 

and All Other Types of Heavy Duty 

Pasted Bottom Paper Sacks 

♦Specialists because . . . 

We operate our own paper mill, and control every 
step to the finished paper bag, giving Equitable cus- 
tomers these three important advantages: uniform 
high quality, reUable service, and economy in price. 
Our art and research departments (a gratis service 
to Equitable customers) assure you of a well designed 
bag, efficiently suited to your particular needs. 

PROMPT Deliveries 

RELIABLE Quality 

ECONOMICAL Prices 



4700 Thirty-first Place, Long Island City, N. Y. 
Paper Mills at Orange, Texas 



IRONASE 



Announces 




The New Convertible 

HI-SPEED or TWIN-ROW Potato Planter 

obtained with this new planter because lb picKer 
aSnot") are equipp/with the famous Ir^^^^^ 
improved Multi-Way adjustable pickers. Result ^^^ 
lower planting cost with more accurate high speed 
planting. 

TWIN-ROW— With Staggered Automatic Feed 

^Convertible to Twin-Row or vice versa at any time 
this planter enables the grower to plant more closely 
and obtain larger yields Twin-Row planting is ac- 
?omph hed at normal .speeds by applying divided 
s3s, shoes and exten non disc bearings to the new 
H°Speed Planter. Se^ds are planted in staggered 
positions in rows 4" apart at desired spacing. 

Write for your copy of the New Hi-Speed Planter Bulletin 

A. B. FARQUHAR CO. Limited, YORK PA.