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Full text of "A guide to architecture in Southern California"

LOS ANGELES COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART 




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A Guide to 



Architecture 

in Southern California 



Los 

Angeles 
County 
Museum 
of Art 




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SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 

General map of southern California Indicating the 14 basic areas 



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KRAMER JUNCTION 




B 1,1. Rosen House. Brentwood Heights, Los Angeles. 1962. 
Craig Ellwood (photo: Julius Shulman) 



Alhambra J 3 

Altadena J 4 

Arcadia K 

Avalon (Catalina Island) H 

Banning N 3 
Bel Air B3 
Bell E12 

Berkeley Square E4 
Beverly Hills B6 
Boyle Heights E10 
Brentwood B2 
Brentwood Heights B1 
Burbank 17 

Carpinteria L3 
Chapman Woods K 
Chatsworth 12 
Claremont N3 
Compton E13 
Coronado M6 

Del Mar M 2 

Eagle Rock J1 
Elysian Park E9 
Encino 14 
Escondido M1 
Exposition Park E3 

Gardena F 
Garden Grove H 
Glendale 17 

Griffith Park D1;D2; D3; D4; 
D5 

Highland Park J 2 
Hollywood C1;B7;D1 
Hollywood Hills C1 
Hope Ranch L1 

Inglewood E2 

Lancaster I 3 

LaJolla M2 

Long Beach G1; G2 

Maiibu A1 
Manhattan Beach F 
Monrovia K 
Monteclto L3 
Montrose I 8 

Naples G2 
Newport Beach H 2 
North Hollywood 15; 16 



Northridge 12 

Oceanside M 1 
Ojai L4 

Pacific Palisades A 2 
Palms B7 
Palm Springs N1 
Palos Verdes F 
Paradise Cove A1 
Pasadena J 4 
Point Loma M3 
Pomona N3 
Powers Place E5 

Rancho Santa Fe M 2 
Riverside N2 

San Diego M3; M4; M5 
San Fernando City 1 3 
San Fernando Valley I 
San Gabriel J 3 
San Juan Capistrano M 1 
San Marino J 4 
San Pedro F 
Santa Barbara L2 
Santa Monica A3 
Sherman Oaks 1 4 
Sierra Madre K 
Silver Lake D3; D4; D5 
South Pasadena J 4 
Studio City i 5 

Torrance F 
Trancas Beach A 1 
Tujunga I 8 

Universal City I 6 

Van Nuys I 4 
Venice A3 
Ventura L4 
Vernon E11 

Watts E11 
West Covina K 
Westwood B4 
Westchester F 
Whittier K 
Wilmington F 
Woodland Hills 11 

Zuma Beach A1 



David Gebhard is an Asso- 
ciate Professor of Art and 
Director of the Art Gallery, 
University of California, 
Santa Barbara. 
Robert Winter is an Asso- 
ciate Professor and Chair- 
man of the Department of 
the History of Civilization, 
Occidental College, Los 
Angeles. 



A Guide to 



// 



Architecture 

in Southern California 



David Gebhard 
Robert Winter 



Tine Los Angeles County Museum of Art 1965 



The privacy of those occupying the building listed in this 
Guide should be respected at all times. Arrangements may 
often be made to visit specific buildings by contacting the 
office of the architect. 



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lOS WMT^^ r^v.^'r^f ?.it,<.nff!f (31: /^fff 

LC3 /„_ 

Copyright 1965 

Los Angeles County Museum of Art 

Printed in Western Germany by Briider Hartmann, Berlin 

Copies of this guide may be obtained from the Publication Department 
of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 5905 Wilshire Boulevard, 
Los Angeles, California 90036 



Contents 



Cities and districts listed in Guide 1 

Introduction 7 

Acknowledgement 8 

Preface 9 

Architecture in Southern California 10 

Readings 19 

Listing title of Buildings 23 

Santa Monica, Area A 23 

West Los Angeles, Area B 29 

Hollywood, Area C 45 

Griffith Park, Area D 52 

Downtown, Los Angeles, Area E 62 

Palos Verdes, Area F 81 

Long Beach, Area G 83 

Newport Beach, Area H 87 

San Fernando Valley, Area I 90 

Pasadena, Area J 102 

Arcadia, Area K 113 

Santa Barbara, Area L 116 

San Diego, Area M 126 

Palm Springs— Riverside, Area N 138 

Index of architects 145 



Introduction 



The publication of "A Guide to Architecture in Southern California" by the 
Los Angeles County Museum of Art is the culmination of a desire to 
lead people to a better knowledge and understanding of all of the art of 
this region. Painting, sculpture and allied arts traditionally have been 
removed from their original environments and housed in the many 
museums of the world, but architecture must remain on location. The 
best of it has the capacity to create Its own total environment even when 
the age that produced It has passed. This publication, specifically de- 
signed for the pocket or glove compartment, is a first attempt to document 
and locate some of the best existing examples before they are destroyed 
by a rapidly expanding megalopolis. The Guide will be enriched from time 
to time, incorporating new buildings and single dwelling units which were 
either not complete at the time of publication or which have not even 
yet found their way to the drawing board. 

It is our hope that this publication will have wide use, and that it will 
enrich the knowledge and aesthetic experience of those who turn to it. 

Richard F. Brown 

Director 

Los Angeles County Museum of Art 



Acknowledgements 



While the authors must, of course, assume full responsibility for thej 
Guide, It could never have been produced without the active help and; 
support of a number of individuals. Esther McCoy has been a continual'; 
source of encouragement and help in obtaining material for the Guide.j 
Julius Shulman has most generously opened his extensive photographic; 
archives to the authors, and he has provided many of the photographs usedi 
in this Guide. Marvin Rand has provided photographs, and he has brought! 
to the attention of the authors a number of historic and contemporary! 
buildings which are included in this Guide. Randell Makinson of thei 
University of Southern California has contributed from his great fund o1 
knowledge about Charles and Henry Greene. Various members of the 
local Chapters of the American Institute of Architects have contributed : 
especially Carleton Winslow Jr., and Ray Girvigian of the Southern California 
Chapter. Thanks must go as well to Jay Frierman of U.C. LA. for opening 
his files of Los Angeles architecture to the authors. Charles S. Popejl 
Supervising Architect, Historic Structures of the U.S. Department of the 
Interior provided extensive information, especially relating to the older 
buildings of the area. Kenneth Ross, Director, and Curt Opiiger, Art Co- 
ordinator of the Municipal Art Department of the City of Los Angeles, 
furnished material from the Los Angeles Cultural Heritage Board. Photo- 
graphs and information pertaining to many historic buildings were kindly 
supplied by the Title Insurance and Trust Company of Los Angeles, o1 
San Diego and of Santa Barbara; by the Security National Bank of Los 
Angeles, by Thomas Owen of the Los Angeles Public Library. 
The manuscript has been edited and typed by Mrs. Patricia Gebhard, and 
the maps have been prepared by Arietta Wiedmann. Others who have conn 
tributed and given encouragement to the publication of this Guide are: 

Richard Carrott, University of California, Riverside 

Alice Erving, Montecito 

Howard and Jean Fenton, Montecito 

Albert Frey, AIA, Palm Springs 

Alfred Moir, University of California, Santa Barbara 

John August Reed, AIA, Los Angeles 

Sim Bruce Richards, AIA, La Jolla 

Whitney R. Smith, AIA, Pasadena 

John Woodbridge, AIA, San Francisco 
Finally our thanks must go to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 
especially to its Director, Richard Brown, and to Henry Hopkins, Curator 
of Education, for their support of this project. 



8 



I 



Preface 



It Is the Intention of the authors to give a broad cross-section of the variety 
of architecture to be found in Los Angeles and throughout Southern 
California. Our main Interest is in those buildings which critics and archi- 
tects have considered to be significant. But we have also tried to indicate 
the representative and the scandalous as well as the beautiful. It Is our 
hope that the listing of buildings which follows reflects a catholic taste, 
whatever the subtle prejudices that may have slipped In from time to time. 
The buildings Included In the Guide have been heavily weighted to the 
modern period, especially the years from 1935 to the present. This Is due 
not simply to a caprice upon the part of the authors, but because they 
strongly feel that a large percentage of Southern California's most signlf- 
llcant buildings were produced at this time. The authors have reluctantly 
eliminated from the Guide a number of well-known key monuments which 
have been so changed through later remodelings that their original quality 
Is no longer apparent. They have as well refused to list those buildings 
which are really minor works of the most famous of the architects, Frank 
Lloyd Wright, Richard Neutra, R. M. Schlndler and others. 
One of the most difficult problems facing the authors was how to present 
the material in a logical fashion. Anyone who is acquainted with Southern 
California will surely sympathize with this organizational problem faced 
by the authors of this Guide. The City of Los Angeles spreads out like a 
fungus growth across an immense area. Islands of architectural interest- 
usually a single building, sometimes a group of buildings— occur almost 
9verywhere In this vast piece of real estate, surrounded by miles of dull 
repetitive structures. What to do with this problem? 
Our decision has been to put such things In geographic areas that seem 
related. We have divided Southern California Into 14 areas, which are 
abeled A through N. Each of these major areas in turn has been broken- 
^jown Into smaller geographic districts, which are numbered consecutively 
NiXh'm each area. Finally each building has been given a number within 
■:he specific district. Thus, a typical entry in this Guide will contain three 
designations: the first, a letter, refers to the general area; the second, a 
'lumber. Indicates the district; the third, also a number, refers to the spe- 
cific building. Detailed maps Indicating the location of the specific build- 
; ngs have been provided for almost every major district contained in this 
3ulde. In the case of some of the buildings a brief comment Is made after 
he entry. Following the listings is an index of architects. 



Architecture in Soutliern Caiifornia 






"The health-seeker who, after suffering in both mind and body, after vainly 
trying the cold climate of Minnesota and the warm climate of Florida, 
after visiting Mentone, Cannes, and Nice, after traveling to Cuba and 
Algiers, and noticing that he is losing ounce upon ounce of his flesh, that 
his cheeks grow more sunken, his appetite more capricious, his breath 
more hurried, that his temperature is no longer normal, ... turns with a 
new gleam of hope toward the Occident." So wrote Walter LIndley and 
J. P. Widney in their popular California of the South, first published In 
1888. The view of Southern California as a mecca for the American way of 
life has persisted unabated to the present as the daily influx of new citi- 
zens aptly attests. Smog and freeways notwithstanding, this glorification 
entails just enough reality to retain a firm hold on those who remain andj 
become a permanent part of the scene. 
What is it which attracts a person to Southern California? On the surface 
the obvious answer Is the mild climate which permits a type of indoor^ 
outdoor life not readily available elsewhere In the country. But In reality! 
climate is only part of the answer. One suspects that the real, underlying^ 
attraction is the unreserved commitment to a material way of life, for Lod 
Angeles certainly displays the fullest, most open embrace of materialism! 
to be found in America, or for that matter, perhaps in any place in theij 
world. It Is this governing element of materialism — the acquisition of ob 
jects and the blatant display of them — which most offends visitors to the| 
area. Probably the strong reaction which many have to Southern Califor-i 
nia is due to the Internal conflict which the visitors themselves havd 
between their desire to express the same materialism and the equally 
strong urge to put on a pretense that there are other more significant 
values. 

As one would expect, the architecture developed in Southern California — 
at least from the late nineteenth century to the present — has perfectly 
mirrored this atmosphere of materialism. Since It has been the individualj 
and his material wants which have dominated the scene, it has naturally 
been the Individual house, more than any other form of building, which 
has occupied the attention of architects and clients. Even today, with the 
great number of large apartment, office, and educational buildings beingji 
contracted in Southern California, It is the design of the free standing 
individual house which reveals the high and low point of its architecture, k 
The quality of California architecture has, like its style of life, always beerf 
noted with admiration, disguised by suspicion. In the late nineteenth anCi 
early twentieth centuries, eastern intellectual circles, already touched bv| 

10 



enthusiasm for Colonial architecture, discovered in the Spanish missions 
and adobe buildings a style at once exotic and, at the same time, con- 
sistent with their zeal for indigenous forms. Between 1905 and 1915 the 
"Mission" craze was followed by a discovery that the wood-sheathed 
California bungalow was, with adaptations, the answer to a dream of an 
architecture for the common man. In the late teens and through the 
twenties they recognized the vigor of the Spanish Colonial Revival. Then, 
with the importation of the International style in the 'thirties, the critics 
could not entirely overlook the fact that the first monuments of advanced 
European ideas in America were Schindler's Lovell Beach House in New- 
port Beach and Richard Neutra's Lovell House in the Hollywood Hills. 
The recognition of Southern California was always reluctant, even con- 
descending. It was also usually superficial in its realization of the subtle- 
ties of the Californians, especially in the later phases where, very impor- 
tantly, Rudolph Schindler's buildings were passed off as simply watered 
down versions of the work of Neutra and of Frank Lloyd Wright, when, in 
fact, Schindler's buildings reveal a most amazing and complex gathering 
together of the major elements of the new architecture. 
;The general public's acceptance of Californian ideas was more wide- 
spread and enthusiastic. Never accepting the extremism of Neutra, Schind- 
ler or even Wright, the American people wholeheartedly embraced the 
1 bungalow, the ranch house, and, in recent times, the type of living in- 
Ivolved in tract housing. California has always been the projection of 
American ideals and has embodied in its institutions, sonfietlmes flagrantly, 
fthe aspirations of the American people. It is no wonder that California 
i building should influence American standards since it has always been 
the furthest projection of American materialism — or idealism! The two 
I concepts have not been mutually exclusive in America or in California 
^but, in a rather strange fashion, fully compatible. 

(California architecture has, recognized or not, been American architec- 

Iture, following in the American tradition. During the nineteenth and early 

twentieth centuries, the buildings of Southern California reflect, as in all 

'the provinces, whatever happened to be the current fashion in New York, 

i Boston or Chicago-given the cultural lag involved in establishing any 

i particular style thousands of miles from its source. Thus, there are or 

(one should say in these days of "urban renewal" and freeways) were 

examples of Greek Revival, the Tuscan or Italian vogue, the Gothic Re- 

•vival, the Mansard-roofed Second Empire style, the Queen Anne Revival, 

iRichardsonian Romanesque and the Shingle style in Its various applica- 

11 



tjons. The Neo-Classicism of McKim, Mead and White also exerted an 
influence, although not to the degree found elsewhere in the country. 
These nineteenth century Southern California concoctions certainly showed 
variations from their eastern archetypes, but they were not basically dif- 
ferent from examples found elsewhere. 

In the wave of nationalism which occurred at the turn of the century, 
architects in the east, searching for an indigenous style, found it in the 
Colonial period and played with eighteenth and nineteenth century forms, 
developing a Colonial Revival which has ebbed and flowed ever since. 
The influence of this revival was, of course, felt in Southern California, 
and Shingle style and Georgian buildings were erected in all parts of the 
area, whatever the illogic of their contiguity with un-colonial palm trees. 
Yet the Colonial Revival had an odd ramification in Southern California. 
In searching for roots, California Yankee architects and clients also dis- 
covered their own presumed heritage in the Missions which without excep- 
tion were, like the Spanish culture, decaying If not ruined. The result was 
the restoration of the missions and a nationwide interest in the project. 
But an even more interesting development was the Mission Revival In \ 
domestic and public architecture. The Mission style, however phoney its 
origins and however naive and crude to the point of brutal Its forms, wasj 
nonetheless of great importance in Southern California architecture. On 
the one hand, its suggestion of Spanish detail indicated the treasure 
trove of Iberia and heralded the Spanish Colonial Revival of the late 
'teens and 'twenties when, with the stimulus of the San Diego Fair of 
1915, Churrigueresque, Plateresque and even Moorish architecture was 
drawn upon, sometimes with confidence and fine effect. The successful 
Los Angeles firm of Morgan and Walls was only one of the many firms 
introducing the more elaborate details of Spanish architecture. But there 
were other men, more restrained in their use of decoration and more ex- 
perimental in their deploying of masses, who stood out from the Hispanic 
herd. Unquestionably the most talented of these was George Washington 
Smith whose designs, such as the Heberton house in Montecito (1916) 
and the Bryce House in Hope Ranch (1926), were informal, showed an 
attention to harmony with the site, and were highly abstract in compo- 
sition. 

But the Spanish Colonial Revival had another highly Interesting phase 
which tended toward an elimination of detail and a stress on pure form. 
A minor contribution to this tendency was the modest popularity of the 
Pueblo Revival, that peculiar amalgamation of Pueblo Indian architecture 

12 



with Spanish and Yankee forms and uses, which sprang from the Rio 
Grande Valley. But the greatest contribution toward a movement for sim- 
plification was the Mission style itself. Although usually awkward and 
often highly ornamented, there was a hint, in the solid massing and mainly 
plain surfaces, of ideas curiously paralleling similar abstractions in Europe 
at the same time. As the historian, Talbot Hamlin, was to point out many 
years after the fact, the breadth and scale of Mission style buildings "give 
to their simplicity a peculiar kind of quiet monumentality." It was, indeed, 
this quiet monumentality which Irving Gill, one of Southern California's 
most important and least influential architects, discovered in the Mission 
Revival and which he pursued in his essays in simplification and abstrac- 
tion. Paring away detail and accenting the broad white surfaces with deep 
arches and other recesses. Gill developed a style which, in its contrast 
i of light and shade, reflects the special potential of Southern California's 
I climate and atmosphere for visual effect. 

While Gill was a prophet without honor and had little direct influence on 
' California architecture, the message of simplicity inherent in the Mission 
style was not entirely lost in Southern California architecture. Close in 
spirit to the "quiet monumentality" of the Mission style was the work of 
Francis T. Underhill of Santa Barbara. His houses, such as his Peabody 
House in Montecito (1917), had their direct source of inspiration in the 
provincial town and farm houses of Spain and Mexico. And there are 
many other indications that the lesson of abstraction was effective. 
Yet, co-existent with this abstraction, and perhaps more in the American 
tradition, was the prevailing eclecticism of most Southern California 
architects In the early twentieth century. Especially since World War II, 
the most "advanced" circles of criticism have recognized that within the 
use of eclecticism there can be originality and even genius. Exactly con- 
temporaneous with the bold experiments of Gill was the mixture primarily 
of Mission style. Oriental and Swiss Chalet forms which the brothers 
Charles and Henry Greene of Pasadena put together in a series of roman- 
tic essays, the most picturesque and elaborate of which are the Blacker 
'and Gamble houses (1906 and 1908 respectively) in Pasadena and the 
Pratt House (1909) in Ojal. In these houses Tiffany glass, oriental rugs. 
Craftsman furniture and Japanese temple decoration were melded into 
an art which, while usually not strong on organic unity, was nevertheless 
full of imaginative expression. Moreover, the Greenes, by emphasizing 
horizontals in the lines of their houses, particularly in widely spreading 
roofs, and by carefully organizing house lines with garden designs by 

13 



means of verandahs and long pergolas, wedded house to nature In a way 
that would make Andrew Jackson Downing applaud with delight. In thisi 
respect, only their contemporary, Frank Lloyd Wright, could equal them. 
As In most of the country, the period of the 1920's was not a creative one.: 
Interest In GUI's work declined and the Greene's partnership broke up,( 
leaving the field of architecture to men of lesser genius whose buildings,; 
however ostentatious, were without the distinction of the pre-war era., 
Somehow the seriousness of the earlier period was lost In the Hardingi 
era. A grand exception to this generalization is the work of an outsider,, 
Frank Lloyd Wright, who never forgot that architecture was a mission. Itl 
was a happy accident that caused Wright, while he was designing the! 
Imperial Hotel in Tokyo, to become acquainted with the Barnsdall sisters, 
for whom he built the Hollyhock House (finished 1920) which still stands; 
at the corner of Sunset Boulevard and Vermont In Los Angeles. Through! 
the Barnsdalls he got commissions from other residents of the area andi 
designed for them pre-cast concrete-block houses, the most photogenic 
being the Millard House ("La MIniatura," 1923) In Pasadena and the most* 
Interesting for the development of Interior space being the Freeman] 
House (1924) in Hollywood. The supervision of the construction of these'! 
houses and even certain design elements were done by his son Lloydl 
Wright, whose Independent work in the 1920's was another exception tol 
the prevailing mediocrity of the period. His concern with a highly complex| 
manipulation of Interior space was well developed In the Taggart House| 
(1922-24) In Los Angeles and the Derby House (1926) In Glendale. I 

As If to prove that from Wright all blessings flow, F. L.W. also Introducedj 
two other Immigrants to Los Angeles who were to bring real excellence! 
to the area — R. M. Schindler and Richard Neutra. Of the two Austrians,| 
Schindler was the closest to Wright In his romantic personalism In design^ 
and use of space. Nevertheless, his close acquaintance with the experi-| 
ments in abstraction going on in his native Europe brought him to a style) 
very different from Wright's. After helping to supervise Wright's Barnsdallj' 
project, Schindler established his own practice In Los Angeles and Inl 
1926 created at Newport Beach the Lovell Beach House, certainly one oli 
the marvels of architecture in America. And Schindler continued to pro4 
duce masterpieces of great Ingenuity until his death In 1953, all of themS 
characterized by a multitude of Ideas not always fully carried out but cer4^ 
talnly stimulating. In fact his greatest charm is a quality of Improvisation! 
never quite completed. Schindler houses can go on and on, and we wish! 
they had! |^ 

14 



Where, like Gill, Schindler was admired in the breach, Richard Neutra, on 
the other hand, is without doubt the most influential Los Angeles architect 
from the 1930's to the present. The steel-framed Lovell House (1929) is 
one of those very few buildings in America which deserve to be called 
monuments, for it is a fully developed and unified conception of the Inter- 
national style. In the 1930's Neutra continued to grow with a stress on the 
unity of exterior and interior space, which made him a leader in the new 
architecture. In the period up to the beginning of World War II, he created 
a series of buildings, ranging from metal houses like that for Von Stein- 
berg (1936) in Chatsworth, wood sheathed houses like that for Nesbitt 
(1938) In Los Angeles, to his apartment houses such as the Strathmore 
(1938) and the Landfair (1938), both in Los Angeles. 
It was Neutra, moreover, who gave inspiration to younger men who, in or 
out of his office, advanced and made variations upon Neutra's ideas of 
space and design. In a brief period of six or seven years emerged the 
careers of Harwell H.Harris, Gregory Ain, Raphael Soriano, Thornton Abell, 
John Lautner, Whitney R. Smith, A. Quincy Jones and J. R. Davidson, all 
influenced by Neutra as well as other purveyors of Internationalism. While 
these architects cannot be thought of as representing a single point of 
view, still their work shared a vitality which enlightened the areas where 
they built their houses. Hovering over the activity of the period was the 
good angel of Arts and Architecture (then called California Arts and Ar- 
chitecture) which, under the editorship of John Entenza, advanced the 
:ause of the new architecture. 

Since the war these architects have continued along the lines of their 
earlier work, joined by Gordon Drake, Thornton Ladd and, for a moment 
three buildings in Los Angeles), Charles Eames. More recently Craig Ell- 
vood and Pierre Koenig have emerged as architects whose work repre- 
sents a continuation of the movement established by Schindler and 
Jeutra. 

Vithout wishing to question the integrity of individual architects, it would 

;eem that at present the momentum of ideas established in the late '20's 

md '30's has run down. The tradition of the new, which Los Angeles has 

leretofore maintained, no longer dominates the architectural scene, 

hough individual buildings of great quality continue to appear. It may be 

.lioted that genius is always rare and renaissance still rarer. Yet this does 

[ijot explain the creative hiatus of the present. Part of the explanation may 

hje, we suspect, in the violent upward mobility of a city where social and 

iconomic change make confused consumers insecure and therefore easy 

15 



marks for people who sell taste rather than art. Moreover, the exigencies 
of the mass society, the need for building in a hurry, the impersonality ot 
the larger architectural firms, all these mitigate against the seriousness; 
with which architecture was pursued in the early part of the century and 
which was revived in the late '20's by Schlndler and Neutra. Architecture 
today can be seen less as a cause in which men's whole lives may be 
changed than a means of efficient and sometimes gaudy packaging o1 
goods. 

If the mass society is at the root of the problem, then it would seem thai 
the solution of the problem must deal with the mass, not as a mobocrac> 
(as Frank Lloyd Wright, echoing Thorstein Veblen used to say) but as 
an educated and educable populace in which the springs of sensitivity 
to great buildings may have been diverted but are not dry. 
The interest in architecture, especially among the young, is today greater 
than ever. A building may be the subject of debate-even picketing. 
It is to buildings then that we direct your attention. 



A Note on the Readings 



At the present time, there is no book or even a brief magazine article 
which presents a history of the architecture of Los Angeles or the rest of 
Southern California. In fact it has only been in the past 10 to 15 years that 
a glance has been cast at the architectural past of the region. An excep- 
tion to this was Talbot Hamlin's "California Whys and Wherefores," pub- 
lished in Pencil Points (Vol.22, May, 1944, pp. 339-344), an issue comme- 
morating the meeting in Los Angeles of the American Institute of Archi- 
tects, and Paul Robinson and Walter Reichardt's Residential Architecture 
in Southern California (1939). 

Our present awareness of Southern California architectural heritage has 
been due almost to a one-woman crusade upon the part of the critic and 
historian, Esther McCoy. Mrs. McCoy began her work through articles 
in the "Home Magazine" of the Los Angeles Times in the late 1940's. She 
later expanded into the exhibition field and, with other members of the 
Los Angeles Architectural Panel and the Los Angeles County Museum of 
Art, she organized an exhibition of the work of R. M. Schindler, of Irving 
3ill and a revealing exhibition entitled "Roots of Contemporary California 
Architecture." Through numerous articles published here and abroad, 
through such pioneering studies as her Five California Architects, Richard 
NIeutra, and Modern California Houses: Case Study Houses, 1945—1962, 
she has made America and the world aware of California's tremendous 
:ontribution to 20th century architecture. 

She was aided In her effort by two guides which were published during 
the 1950's, Frank Harris and Weston Bonenberger's A Guide to Contem- 
Dorary Architecture in Southern California (1951), and Douglas Honnold's 
Southern California Architecture 1769—1956 (1956); and by the writings of 
Harold Kirker (California's Architectural Frontier, 1960), and Randell Mak- 
nsons's research on the architecture of the brothers Charles and Henry 
3reene ("Greene and Greene" in Five California Architects, 1960, by 
Esther McCoy). Today several younger scholars such as John L. Connolly 
in his unpublished M. A. Thesis, University of Southern California [1962] 
\ Survey of Nineteenth Century Building in Los Angeles) are revealing seg- 
nents of this past which have remained unknown to the present time. 
To obtain a broad, catholic view of the architecture of the region one must 
humb through the pages of the numerous magazines which have been 
and still are devoted to the architecture of Southern California. These in- 
clude Arts & Architecture (which has gone under a variety of titles in the 
Dast, Pacific Coast Architect, California Arts & Architecture), the popular 
Tiagazine Sunset, the recent and short-lived Western Architect & Engineer, 

17 



The Architectural Digest and such little known magazines as California-, 
Southland and The Arroyo Craftsman. Articles about Southern California; 
architecture have appeared over the years in such national magazines ass 
the Craftsman, Architectural Record, and Progressive Architecture (earlieri 
Pencil Points). The late 18th and early 19th century Mission and Adobe 
architecture has been studied in more detail than any other period, and a 
number of references are Included in the following bibliography. For illus- 
trations of 19th century architecture the best sources are guides to the 
area and picture books published for almost every community. lnforma-| 
tion and, In some cases, drawings of numerous 19th century buildings are) 
to be found In the Historic American Survey reports, examples of which 
may be found in all of the larger libraries in Southern California. 



■ 



Readings 



Austin, John C. 
1905. Architecture in Soutliern California. Los Angeles. 

Baer, Kurt 

1963. Arciiitecture of the California Missions. University of California Press, Berkeley 

Baum, George C. 
1919. "The Spanish Mission Type" in Saylor, Henry H. Architectural Styles for Coun- 
try Houses. Robert H. McBride & Co., New York 

Baylis, Douglas and Parry, Joan 
1956. California Houses of Gordon Drake. Reinhold Pub. Corp., New York 

Burdette, Robert J. (Ed.) 
1960. Greater Los Angeles and Southern California. The Lowes Publishing Co., Los 
Angeles 

iCalifornia Historical Landmarks 

I Division of Beaches and Parks, State of California 

Calvert, Frank 

c. 1900—1905. Homes and Gardens of the Pacific Coast, Vol. 2: Los Angeles. Beaux 
I Arts Society Publishers, Lake Washington (Seattle) Washington 

Connolly, John L. 

j 1962. A Survey of the Nineteenth Century Building in Los Angeles. Unpublished 
M. A. Thesis, University of Southern California, Los Angeles 

Davis, Charles F. 
1929. Picturesque Monrovia. Post Printing and Binding Co., Pasadena 

Flood, Frances B. 
1941. A Study of Architecture of the Period 1868—1900 Existing in Los Angeles in 1940. 

Unpublished M. A. Thesis, University of Southern California, Los Angeles 

Gebhard, David 

1964. "Architecture in Los Angeles." Art Forum, Vol. 2, Summer, pp. 10-11 

telrey, Elmer 
1905. "Architecture in Southern California." Architectural Record. Vol. 17, Jan., pp. 1-17 

Hamlin, Talbot F. 
1941. "California Whys and Wherefores." Pencil Points, Vol. 22. May, pp. 339-344 

Hamlin, Talbot F. 
1936. "What Makes it American: Architecture in Southwest and West." Pencil Points, 
Vol. 20, Dec, pp. 763-776 

Hannaford, Donald R. 
1931. Spanish Colonial, or Adobe Architecture of California 1800-1850. Architectural 
Book Publishing Co., Inc. 

■i, 

Harris, Frank and Bonenberger, Weston 
1951. A Guide to Contemporary Architecture in Southern California. Foreword by 
Arthur B. Gallion. Watling & Co., Los Angeles 

19 



Honnold, Douglas 

1956. Southern California Architecture 1769—1956. Reinhold Publishing Corp., Newf 
York 

Hume, H. (Compiler) 
1902. Los Angeles Architecturally. Los Angeles 

Kirker, Harold 

1960. California's Architectural Frontier. Huntington Library, San Marino 

Lancaster, Clay 
1958. "American Bungalow." Art Bulletin, Vol. 40, Sept., pp. 239-253 

Lancaster, Clay 
1963. The Japanese Influence in America. Walton H. Rawls, New York 

Lane, Jonathan 

1961. "The Period House of the Nineteen-Twenties." Journal of the Society of. 
Architectural Historians, Vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 169-178 

Le Berthon, J. L. 
1904. Our Architecture: Morgan and Walls, John Parkinson, Hunt and Edgar. Los 

Angeles 

Lewis, Oscar 

1957. Here lived the Californians. Reinhardt & Co., Inc., New York 

Lindley, Walter and Widney, J. P. 
1888. California of the South. D. Appleton & Co., New York 

Long Beach Museum of Art 

1957. Arts of California — 1: Architecture. Introduction by Jerome Allan Donson; 
Catalogue for an Exhibition organized by the Long Beach Museum of Art. Long 
Beach 

Los Angeles 
1941. A Guide to the City and its Environment. Writer's Program of the W. P. A.,| 
American Guide Series. Hastings House, New York 

Los Angeles: First Annual Report 

1963. Cultural Heritage Board, City of Los Angeles, Los Angeles 

Los Angeles Investment Co. 
1909. Bungalows and Cottages in Southern California. Los Angeles 

Los Angeles County Museum of Art 

1962. Simon Rodia's Tower in Watts. Introduction by Paul Laporte: Catalogue for an 
Exhibition organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Los Angeles 

McCoy, Esther 
1953. "A vast hall of light: The Bradbury Building, 1893." Arts & Architecture. Vol. 10 
April, pp. 20-21, 42-43 

McCoy, Esther 

1958. Irving Gill 1870—1936. Catalogue for an Exhibition organized by the Los Angeles 
County Museum. Los Angeles 

20 



McCoy, Esther 
1960. Five California Arcliitects. Reinhold Publishing Corp., NewYorl< 

iVicCoy, Esther 

1960. Riciiard Neutra. George Braziller, inc., NewYorl< 

iVIcCoy, Esther 

1961. "Wiishire Boulevard." Western Architect and Engineer, Vol. 222, Sept., pp. 
25-51 

McCoy, Esther 

1962. Modern California Houses: Case Study Houses 1945—1962. Reinhold Publishing 
Corp., New York 

McPherson, W. H. 

1873. Homes in Los Angeles City and County and Description Thereof, Witli Stretches 
! Of the Four Adjacent Counties. Mirror Book and Job Printing Establishment, Los 

Angeles 

McWilliams, Carey 
1946. Southern California Country. Duell, Sloan & Pearce, New York, especially pp. 
144-146, 354-362 

Mills, James (Compiler) 
1960. Historic Landmarlcs of San Diego County. San Diego Historical Society, San 
Diego 

Neff, Wallace 
1964. Architecture of Southern California. Rand McNally, Chicago 

Newcomb, Rexford 
1927. The Spanish House for America. J. B. Lippincott Co., Philadelphia 

Nordhoff, Charles 
1878. California for Pleasure and Residence. Harper & Brothers Publishers 

Pasadena the Crown of the Valley 

1893-94. Pasadena Board of Trade, Pasadena 

IPatterson, Tom 

1964. Landmarks of Riverside. Press-Enterprise Co., Riverside 

Rey, Felix 
1924. "A tribute to the Mission Style." Architect & Engineer, Vol. 79, Oct., pp. 78 ff. 

Robinson, Paul and Reichardt, Walter 

1939. Residential Architecture in Southern California. Southern California Chapter, 
\ A. I. A., Los Angeles 

Sanford, Trent Elwood 
1950. The Architecture of the Southwest. W. W. Norton & Co., Inc., New York 

iSchuyler, Montgomery 
1908. "Round About Los Angeles." Architectural Record, Vol. 24, Dec, pp. 430-440 

21 



Scott, Hunter D. 
1929. "American-Indian Architecture: California's Contribution to a new style of' 
Arctiitecture." California Arts & Architecture, Vol. 36, Aug., pp. 31-33 

Sexton, Randolph William 
1927. Spanish Influence on American Architecture and Decoration. Brentano's, New 
York 

Staats, H. Philip 
1929. California Architecture In Santa Barbara. Architectural Book Publishing Co., 

Inc., New York 

Thompson and West 

1880. History of Los Angeles County California. (Originally published in Oakland.) 
1959. Reproduction of the original edition with an introduction by W. W. Robinson. 
Howell-North, Berkeley 

University of California, Santa Barbara 
1963. Four Santa Barbara Houses 1904—1917. Introduction by David Gebhard: Cata- 
logue for an Exhibition organized by the Art Gallery, University of California, Santai 
Barbara 

University of California, Los Angeles 
1959. Richard Neutra. Introduction by Frederick S.Wight: Catalogue for an Exhibition 
organized by the Art Galleries, University of California, Los Angeles. Los AngelesI 

Wight, Peter B. 

1918. "The Residential Architecture of Southern California." The Western Architect,! 
Vol. 27, Oct., pp. 91-94 ff. 

Williams, Florence 
1914. "Bungalows of Southern California." House Beautiful. Vol. XXXVI, June, pp. 
10-18 

Withey, Henry F. 
1956. Biographical Dictionary of American Architects. New Age Publishing Co./ 
Giendale 

Young, Robert B. 
1905. Architecture of Robert B.Young. Le Berthon, Los Angeles 



22 



Listing title of Buildings 



AREA A 

i, 
Venice, Santa Monica, Pacific Palisades, Mallbu and Zuma Beach. 

I Santa Monica today is rapidly cinanging from a pleasant residential and 
beach resort community to an apartment city. A decade or so ago one 
could find many streets lined with one and two story shingle bungalows, 
I early Mission revival houses and many examples of the Spanish Colonial 
1 revival. One of the streets still worth visiting, especially for a glimpse of 
I the residential architecture of the years 1910 through the 1930's is Adelaide 
I Drive between Ocean Avenue and 7th Street. Nearby at 934 2nd Street is 
■ a good example of a small Mission revival house, built around 1905. Venice, 
just south of Santa Monica, was originally laid out in the early years of 
the century as a West Coast version of its Italian namesake. Its miles of 
I canals were meant to have been lined with replicas of Venetian palaces, 
I but the scheme never materialized. Instead Venice developed as the Coney 
Island of the Los Angeles Area. A few houses, buildings and romantic 
bridges are still to be found. Santa Monica Canyon, just north of the city 
boundary (now included In Pacific Palisades) contains many early modern 
houses of the 1930's. The coast from Zuma Beach to Santa Monica in- 
cludes (almost always hidden from view) numerous Post World War II 
beach houses, some of which are extremely noteworthy. 



23 



A1 



A1 SANTA MONICA AREA MALIBU BEACH DISTRICT 



1 Berns House 1951 

31654 W. Broad Beach Rd., 
Trancas Beach 
Gordon Drake 

Regrettably, Drake did not do a 
great number of buildings before 
his untimely death, and of those 
he did do, few remain in their 
original condition. The Berns 
house is not only in good con- 
dition, but it was one of Drake's 
best works. 
See plate 64 

2 LeBrun House 1963 

6339 Bensall Dr., Zuma Beach 
Thornton M. Abell 



3 Lyndon House 1950 

2280 Cliffside, Paradise Cove 
Maynard Lyndon 

4 Pierson House 1961 
24554 Malibu Rd., Malibu 
Craig Ellwood 

5 Hunt (Beach) House 1955 
24514 Pacific Coast Hwy., 
Malibu 

Craig Ellwood 

6 McHugh House 1957 
22050 Pacific Coast Hwy., 
Malibu 

William S. Beckett 



24 



A2 



A2 SANTA MONICA AREA WEST PACI FI C PALI SAD ES Dl STR I CT 



CASTBLLAMAR. 
PR 

TO VENTURA-^lS^-^^^-i 



N 
i 



BREVE WY 




REVELLO OR 
1 ^ SUNSET BLVD. 



PACIFIC COAST HWV 




BIENVENEPA 



TO 

PACIFIC 
PALISAPES 



TO 

PACIFIC 
PALISAPES 



A2 SANTA MONICA AREA WEST PACIFIC PALISADES DISTRICT 



1 Beagles House 1963 
17446 Revello Dr. 
Pierre Koenig 

An excellent example of the work 
of the architect which reflects a 
classical, highly intellectual ap- 
proach to design. 

2 "Southdown Estates" Houses 
1952 

16310 Akron St. 

A. Quincy Jones and Frederick 

E. Emmons 



One of a group of "Project" 
houses in the area designed 
by a firm which has long been 
actively involved in "builders" 
houses. 

St. Matthew's Episcopal Church 

1953 

1030 Bienveneda 

A. Quincy Jones and Frederick 

E. Emmons, original church by 

Carleton Winslow, Sr., 1942. 

See plate 68 



25 



A3 



A3 SANTA MONICA AREA PAC I Fl C PALI SADES SANTA MONICA 



US.IOfa 

TO 

SUNSET 
BLVP 



CAPRI PR 
AMALFIPR 
SORRENTO PR 
CAPRI PR 




CHANNEL RD 
ENTRADA PR 



VENICE 
BLVP. 



26 



A3 



A3 SANTA MONICA AREA PACI FI C PALI SADES 



1 Emmons House 1954 
661 Brook Tree Rd. 

A. Quincy Jones and Frederick 
E. Emmons 
See plate 69 

2 Elton House 1951 
635 Hightree Rd. 
Craig Ellwood 

3 Case Study House (Bailey) 
1946-48 

219 Chautauqua Blvd. 
Richard J. Neutra 
Neutra's use of wood as an ex- 
terior sheathing for this house is 
a direct continuation of his Pre- 
World War II Mcintosh house 
and the well known Nesbitt 
House. 

4 Eames House 1949 
203 Chautauqua Blvd. 
Charles Eames. 

Though the materials, the struc- 
ture and even the forms are 
completely mechanical and 
machine-like, the character of 
this famous house is highly 
warm and personal. 
See plate 57 

5 Entenza House 1950 
201 Chautauqua Blvd. 
Charles Eames and Eero 
Saarinen 



The only example of Saarinen's 
work in Southern California 
See plate 62 

6 West House 1948 
199 Chautauqua Blvd. 
Rodney Walker 

7 Malcolmson House 1937 

on the corner of Channel Rd. 
and Mesa Rd. 
Richard J. Neutra 
At present in rather poor con- 
dition and also rather badly 
remodeled, but it still retains 
something of its original form 
on the Channel Rd. elevation. 

8 Entenza House 1937 
475 N. Mesa Rd. 
Harwell Hamilton Harris 

This small hillside house pre- 
sents Harris' only essay in the 
International style. 
See plate 46 

9 Bradbury House before 1923 
102 Ocean Way 

John Byers (Edia Muir, Assoc.) 
Byers made his early reputation 
with houses such as this which 
were constructed of actual 
adobe. 
See plate 26 

10 Haines House 1951 
247 Amalfi Dr. 
Thornton M. Abell 



27 



A3 



11 Abell House 1937 
469 Upper Mesa Rd. 
Thornton M. Abell 
See plate 45 

12 Haines House 1943 
477 Upper Mesa Rd. 
Thornton M. Abell 

13 Case Study House 1950 
1080 Ravoli Dr. 
Raphael S. Soriano 

The first of the series of steel 
frame Case Study Houses. 
See plate 60 

14 Kingsley Houses 1946 
1620 and 1630N.Amalfi Dr. 
J. R. Davidson 

15 Stothart House (Phillips) 1937 
2501 La Mesa Dr. 

J. R. Davidson 

SANTA MONICA 

16 Byers Office Building c. 1923 
246 26th St. 

John Byers (Edia Muir, Assoc.) 
A workable yet highly romantic 
solution to the problem of a small 
office building. 

PACIFIC PALISADES 

17 Ullman House 1955 
800 Woodacres Rd. 
Thornton M. Abell 



SANTA MONICA 

18 Byers House c.1917 

547 7th St. i 

John Byers | 

The first house by the architect 
who became closely associated 
with the Spanish Colonial Revi-| 
val of the 20's and the Periodi 
houses of the 1930's. This firsti 
house is very Maybeckian, un- 
derstandably a response of the 
architect to his earlier experi- 
ence in the Bay area. j 

19 Miles Memorial Playhouse 
C.1926 

Between 7th and 8th Strs., 
North of Wilshire Blvd. 
John Byers (EdIa Muir, Assoc.) 

20 Horatio West Court 1919 
126HollisterAve. 
Irving Gill 



VENICE 

21 Mar Vista Houses 1948 
Beethoven, Moore and Meier 
Sts. at Marco PI. 
Gregory Ain, Joseph L. Johnson 
and Alfred W. Day 



28 



AREA B 

West Los Angeles, including Brentwood, Westwood, Bel Air, Beverly Hills, 
West Hollywood, the Santa Monica Mountains, and the Palms district. 

i Even as recently as the beginning of the century this area was rural In 
[character, being devoted to farming and ranching; a trip from downtown 
jLos Angeles to the ocean at Santa Monica took one through miles of 
I open country. The address of the Mission style Beverly Hills Hotel in these 
j early days was simply "mid-way between Los Angeles and the Ocean." 
1 Since the mid 1920's the northern section of this region, extending from 
Brentwood to West Hollywood, has become the really "posh" residential 
area of Los Angeles. Street after street in Westwood and in Beverly Hills 
is filled with ostentatious houses which aptly convey the material wealth 
of their occupants, and in most cases a corresponding lack of taste. 
When these houses are really flamboyant or "way-out," as in the Spadina 
House (by Henry Oliver, 1925) and the small Gate Lodge at 1808 Angelo 
Dr., they convey a quality of delight and humor. But far too many of these 
houses are meant to be taken seriously. Beverly Hills itself is an encyclo- 
pedia of the Spanish Colonial revival and the American Colonial and 
English Half-timber revivals of the 1920's and 1930's. Just southeast of the 
corner of Wilshire and San Vicente is Carthage Circle, a rather exotic, but 
well planned version of the Spanish Colonial revival shopping center. Scat- 
tered throughout the area, especially in the Santa Monica Mountains and 
in the Hollywood Hills are pre and post World War II houses by Neutra, 
iSchindler, Harris, Ellwood and Koenig.The business districts of Westwood 
and of Brentwood Park provide good illustrations of southern California's 
approach to city planning during the 1920's. 



29 



B1 



B1 WEST LOS ANGELES AREA NORTH BRENTWOOD DISTRICT 




TO PACIFIC 
PALISADES 



ROCKINGHAM AVE 



TO SAN VICENTE BLVD 



30 



B1 



B1 WEST LOS ANGELES AREA NORTH BRENTWOOD DISTRICT 



1 Rosen House 1962 
910Oakmont Dr. 

Craig Ellwood and Associates 
See Front Cover 

2 Rex House 1949 

1888 Mandeville Canyon Rd. 
Edia Muir 
See plate 59 

3 Sperry House 1953 

2090 Mandeville Canyon Rd. 
William Wurster, Bernardi and 
Emmons 
See plate 68 

4 Brown House 1955 
10801 Chalon Rd. 
Richard J. Neutra 

5 Seidel House 1960 

2727 Mandeville Canyon Rd. 
Pierre Koenig 

6 Sturges House 1939 
449 Skyeway Rd. 
Frank Lloyd Wright 

It could well be argued that 
Wright's greatest works date 
from the years 1935 to 1940 and 
that the hovering Sturges house 
is one of them. 
See plate 52 

7 Herman House 1948 
650 Bonhill Rd. 
Carl L. Maston 



8 Mutual Housing Association 
Community 1947-1950 

717, 727, 738, 743 Hanley Ave. 
Whitney Smith, A. Quincy Jones, 
and Edgardo Contini 
A large and remarkable co- 
operative project of Individual 
houses by several of Los Ange- 
les' most important architectural 
figures. Although many of the 
houses have been remodeled, 
one can still gain a good Idea 
of the general layout of the com- 
munity as a whole. 

9 Shoor House 1952 
12213 DeerbrookLn. 
William S. Beckett 
See plate 66 

10 Leslie House 1950 
525N.SaltairAve. 
Thornton M. Abel! 

11 Goss House 1950 
11751 CrescendaSL 
Milton Caughey 

12 Nordlinger House 1948 
11492 Thurston Circle 
A. Quincy Jones 

13 Winans Apartments 1948 
850 Moraga Dr. 

A. Quincy Jones 



31 



B2 



B2 WEST LOS ANGELES AREA SOUTH BRENTWOOD DISTRICT 



TO 

SAN DIEGO 

FWY 




MORENO 

BRENTWOOD ^'^^ 
TER 



SANTA MONICA BL VD 



32 



B2 



B2 WEST LOS ANGELES AREA SOUTH BRENTWOOD DISTRICT 



1 Case study House no. 1 1 
(Cron House) 1945 

540 S. Barrington Ave. 
J. R. Davidson 

2 Shairer House 1949 
11750 Chenault St. 

Gregory Ain, Joseph L Johnson 
and Alfred W. Day 

3 Sawtelle Veterans' Center 

On the corner of Wilshire Blvd. 
and Sawtelle Blvd. 
Domiciliary Building 1889 
Peters and Burns 
Chapel 1900 
J.Lee Burton 

There are very few Queen Anne 
or Shingle style buildings still 
standing in Los Angeles. The 
three story dormitory is a per- 
fect example of the Queen Anne 
style. The nearby Chapel repre- 
sents the intrusion of the Colo- 
nial revival in California. 
See plate 10 

4 Abell Office Building 1954 
654S. Saltair Ave. 

' Thornton M. Abell 



Completely closed off to the 
street with drafting room and 
offices opening onto an interior 
garden court 



5 Drucker Apartment House 1940 
On the corner of Gretna Green 
Wy. and Dunoon Ln. 

J. R. Davidson 
See plate 53 

6 Newfield House 1961 
250 S. Burlingame Ave. 
Thornton M. Abell 
See plate 77 

7 Nesbitt House 1942 
414 Avondale Ave. 
Richard J. Neutra 

The Nesbitt house marks an 
early excursion on the part of 
the architect into warm, non- 
machine materials. 



8 Johnson House before 1923 
201 S. Rockingham Ave. 
John Byers (Edia Muir, Assoc.) 



33 



B3 



B3 WEST LOS ANGELES AREA BEL AI R Dl STRICT 



BEVERLY \15 

CLENPr^W ^SEABURYLN 

_ BASIL LN 

SCENARIO- ^ 

LN " y^TUPELOLN 



'tHRYSANTHEMUMl 
LN 



MONTIUNE 
' LN 




ST PIERRE 
RP 



TO BEVERLY 
HILLS 



BEVERLY GLEN 
BLVD 



CASHMERE 
ST 



WARNER 
AVE 



TO WESTViOOD 
VILLAGE 



34 



B3 



B3 WEST LOS ANGELES AREA BELAIR DISTRICT 



1 Galli-Curci House 1938 
201 Tilden Ave. 
Wallace Neff 

2 Tischler House 1949-1950 
175 Greenfield Ave. 
R.M.Schindler 

A late Schindler house which 
utilizes an entire roof of seml- 
translucent plastic. 
See plate 59 

3 Beck House 1951 
952 Roscomare Rd. 
Thornton M. Abel! 

4 Chappell House 1948 
800 Tarcuto Wy. 

A. Quincy Jones 

5 Rabinowitz House 1960 
2262 Stradella Rd. 

J. R. Davidson 



6 Healy House 1949- 
565 Perugia Wy. 
Lloyd Wright 



•1952 



7 Anderson House 1951 
621 Perugia Wy. 

Douglas Honnold and John Rex 
See plate 64 

8 Gross House 1949 
218StradaCortoRd. 
William S. Beckett, Sumner 
Spaulding and John Rex 



9 Curtis (Noyes) House 
1949-1950 

111 Stone Canyon Rd. 
Raphael S. Soriano 

10 University of California at 
Los Angeles 

Kindergarten and Experimental 
School 1957 
10636 Sunset Blvd. 
Richard J. Neutra and 
Robert E. Alexander 



11 Case Study House no. 16 1951 
1811 Bel Air Rd. 

Craig Ellwood 

12 Johnson House 1948 
10280 Chrysanthemum Ln. 
Harwell Hamilton Harris 



13 Bernatti House 1947 
1025 N. Beverly Glen Blvd. 
Rodney Walker 

14 Lohrie House 1940 
1648 Beverly Glen Blvd. 
Rodney Walker 

15 Sommer House 1941 
2252 Beverly Glen PI. 
Rodney Walker 

See plate 54 



35 



B4 



B4 WEST LOS ANGELES AREA WESTWOOD DISTRICT 



TO 

SUNSET B LVD 



TO 
BEL AIR 
COUNTRY CLUB 



TO 

BEVERLY 

HILLS 



TO 

SANTA 

MONICA 




^.x'«^^' 



36 



B4 



B4 WEST LOS ANGELES AREA WESTWOOD DISTRICT 



1 Emerson Junior High Scliool 
1938 

1650 Selby Ave. 

Richard J. Neutra 

A pioneering work in the field 

of school architecture. 

2 Blampin Apartments 1947 
1874 Pandora Ave. 

Carl L. Maston 



Strathmore Apartments 1938 
11005 Strathmore Dr. 
Richard J. Neutra 
This and the nearby Landfair 
Apartments are two of Neutra's 
most Important pre-World War II 
buildings. Although now 25 years 
old, they still are as handsome 
and as functional as ever. 
See plate 47 



3 Greenberg House 1949 
10525 Garwood PI. 
Richard J. Neutra 

4 University of California at 
Los Angeles 
RoyceHall 1929 

405 Hilgard Ave. 

George B. Allison and Allison 

(George W. Kelham, 

Supervising Architect) 

A rather free transcription from 

San Ambrosio in Milan 

5 Perpetual Savings Bank 1962 
On the corner of Wilshire Blvd. 
and Glendon Ave. 

Edward D. Stone 



7 Elkay Apartments 1948 
638, 642 Kelton Ave. 
Richard J. Neutra 

8 Kelton Apartments 1939 
646 and 648 Kelton Ave. 
Richard J. Neutra 

9 Landfair Apartments 1938 
On the corner of Ophir Dr. 
Landfair Ave. 

Richard J. Neutra 



and 



10 Sheets Apartment House 1957 
10901 Strathmore Dr. 
John Lautner 



37 



B5 



B5 WEST LOS ANGELES AREA NORTH BEVERLY HILLS DISTRICT 



TO SAN FERNANDO 
VALLEY 



BOWMONE 
PR. 



KOTH DELL 
TER 




COLDWATER 
CANYON 
OR 



TO 

BEVERLY HILLS 



LAUREL CANYON 
BLVP 



SWEETIE RAVE 

SANTA MONia 
BLVP 



TO 

L0SANGELE5 
COUNTRY CLUB 



TO 
W.LOS ANGELES 



38 



B5 



B5 WEST LOS ANGELES AREA NORTH BEVERLY HILLS DISTRICT 



1 Maston House 1963 
8707 St. Ives Dr. 
Carl L. Maston 

2 Wayne House 1950 
1365 Londonderry PI. 
Alvin Lustig 

3 Dann House 1951 
1369 Londonderry PI. 
J. R. Davidson 

See plate 65 

4 Ries House 1950 
1404 Miller Dr. 

R. M. Schlndler 

5 Wolff House 1963 
8530 Hedges PI. 
John Lautner 

6 Pollto House 1939 
1650 Queens Rd. 
Raphael S. Soriano 

A two story residence dominat- 
ed by an abstract composition 
of thin stucco walls, bands of 



windows and cantilevered bal- 
conies with thin horizontal par- 
apets. 
See plate 50 

7 Sunset Towers Apartments 1929 
8358 Sunset Blvd. 

Leiand A. Bryant 
"Moderne" 

8 Jones House and Studio 1938 
8661 Nash Dr. 

A. Quincy Jones 

9 Case Study House no. 21 1958 
9036 Wonderland Park Ave. 
Pierre Koenig 

See plate 75 

10 Janson House 1949 
8704 Skyline Dr. 

R. M. Schlndler 

11 Rodakiewicz House 1937 
9121 AltoCedroDr. 

R. M. Schlndler 
See plate 45 



39 



B6 



B6 WEST LOS ANGELES AREA BEVERLY HILLS DISTRICT 



HAZEN DR 
'BOWMONT PR 

CHEROKEELN 
01 LC REST PR. 



L~^, YOAKUM DR 

I ) '' 

/ BEVERLY \ 
IMI 




TO WEST 
HOLLYWOOD 



WILSHIREBLVD 



SANTA MONICA 
BLVP 

TO SANTA 
MONICA 



PICO B LVD 



TO WEST LOS ANGELES 



40 



B6 



B6 WEST LOS ANGELES AREA BEVERLY H I LLS DISTRI CT 



1 Spadina House 1925 

On the corner of Carmelita Ave. 

and Walden Dr. 

Henry Oliver 

A perfect fairy tale stage set 

translated into a house. 

See plate 32 

2 Colby Apartments 1950 
1312 Beverly Green Dr. 
Raphael S. Soriano 

A two story apartment house, 
with each apartment containing 
Its own outside living area. 
See plate 62 

3 All Saints Episcopal Church 
1925 

On the corner of Santa Monica 
Blvd. and N. Camden Dr. 
Roland E. Coate 
The extensive areas of plain, 
uninterrupted walls and the 
restrained historical detail of 
this church show how close the 
Spanish Colonial revival was to 
the "new" architecture then 
developing in Europe. 



Grey here utilized the then pop- 
ular Mission style for this ram- 
bling hotel structure. It has been 
much added to and remodeled 
since Its original construction. 
See plate 17 

6 Brown House 1950 
902 N. Roxbury Dr. 
Craig Ellwood 

7 Case Study House 1947 
9945 Beverly Grove Dr. 
Rodney Walker 

8 Hale House 1949 
9618 Yoakum Dr. 
Craig Ellwood 
See plate 60 

9 Oppenheimer House 1956 
1024 Summit Dr. 
William S. Beckett 

10 Adelman House 1958 
1035 Summit Dr. 
Thornton M. Abell and 
O'Neil Ford and Associates 



4 Frank Perls Gallery c.1948 
350 N. Camden Dr. 
Alvin Lustig 



11 Quen House 1954 
1211 Laurel Wy. 
Thornton Ladd and John Kelsey 



5 Beverly Hills Hotel c.1912 
9600 Sunset Blvd. 
Elmer Grey 



12 Osherenko House 1949 
1005 N.Alpine Dr. 
J. R. Davidson 



41 



B7 



B7 WEST LOS ANGELES AREA WEST HOLLYWOOD DISTRICT 



SUNSET ^ 
BLVD SBLOCKS 




42 



B6 B7 



13 English House 1949 
1261 Lago Vista Dr. 
Harwell Hamilton Harris 

The low projecting roofs and 
cantilevered sections of this 
house tie it closely to Its site on 
top of a hill which commands a 
wide view of Los Angeles. 

14 Case Study House no. 18 
1956-1958 
1129MlraderoRd. 
Craig Ellwood 

Ellwood has designed three 
steel Case Study Houses, of 
which this is the latest. The 



second of his Case Study 
Houses has been so remodeled 
that it is not included in this 
Guide. 
See plate 73 

15 Miller House 1948 
1634GilcrestDr. 

Gregory Ain, Joseph L. Johnson 
and Alfred W. Day 

16 Rourke House 1949 
9228 Hazen Dr. 
Richard J. Neutra 
See plate 58 



B7WESTL0SANGELESAREA WEST HOLLYWOOD DISTRICT 



1 Wright House 1928 
858 N. Doheny Dr. 
Lloyd Wright 



3 Herman Miller Show Room 
1949 

8810 Beverly Blvd. 
Charles Eames 



2 Beckett Office 1950 
9026 Mel rose Ave. 
William S.Beckett 
See plate 63 



4 Hailey Building 1953 
506 S. San Vicente Blvd. 
Craig Ellwood 

A remodeling of an older build- 
ing. 



43 



B8 



B8 WEST LOS ANGELES AREA PALMS DISTRICT 

25'''' ST — 

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B8 WEST LOS ANGELES AREA PALMS DISTRICT 



1 Apartment Building 1955 
10567 National Blvd. 
Carl L. Maston 

The apartments completely close 
themselves off from the outside 
and open up to inner court gar- 
dens. 



2 Southern Pacific Railroad 
Station (The Palms) 1888 
On the corner of National Blvd. 
and Vinton Ave. 



3 Strauss-Lewis House 1940 
3131 Queensbury Dr. 
Raphael S. Soriano 
See plate 53 

4 Rocha House 1865 
2400 Shenandoah St. 

5 Baldwin Hills Village 1941 
5300 Rodeo Rd. 

Robert E. Alexander, Wilson, 
Merrill and Johnson 
A classic in the realm of a Ian 
planned community. 



44 



AREAC 

Central Hollywood, southern Hollywood Hills and the central Wilshire 
Boulevard region. 

Architecturally, the famous intersection of Hollywood Boulevard and 
Vine Street is of little interest, either from the point of view of modern 
architecture or from that of the exuberant days of the 1920's and 1930's. 
Exceptions to this would be the fantasy of Grauman's Chinese Theater 
and the Egyptian Theater, both on Hollywood Boulevard; Lescaze's C.B.S. 
Building, a pre World War II classic of modern architecture; the Pan Pacific 
Auditorium which is a perfect period piece of moderne architecture; and 
Wurdeman and Becket's highly successful and influential Prudential 
Building on Wilshire Boulevard. The hills above Hollywood boast several 
of Frank Lloyd Wright's concrete block houses of the 1920's and many 
residences designed by Soriano, Lautner, Maston, Abell and others. Also 
to be found in the area are some of the finest early works of Schindler, 
Neutra, Gill and Ain. Here and there one will find individual (or even 
blocks of) interesting buildings: an entire street in the 5300 block of West 
Cresta Court of wood bungalows, and even buildings with a decided Sulli- 
vanesque flair, such as a residence located at the corner of De Longpre 
Avenue and Gower Street. 



fc: 



45 



CI 



CI HOLLYWOOD AREA NORTH 




LACIENEGABLVD 



46 



CI 



CI HOLLYWOOD AREA NORTH 

1 Chemosphere House 1960 
7776 Torreyson Dr. 

John Lautner 
See plate 76 

2 Granstedt House 1938 
7922 Woodrow Wilson Dr. 
Harwell Hamilton Harris 

3 Shulman House 1950 
7875 Woodrow Wilson Dr. 
Raphael S. Soriano 

See plate 63 

4 Bell House 1940 

7714 Woodrow Wilson Dr. 
John Lautner 

In character, this pre-World 
War II house by Lautner shares 
many similarities with the con- 
current work of Harris, Ain and 
others. 

5 Garred House 1949 
7445 Woodrow Wilson Dr. 
Milton Caughey 

See plate 57 

6 Carling House 1950 

Pacific View Dr. and Hockey Tr. 
John Lautner 

7 Druckman House 1942 
2764 Outpost Dr. 

R. M. Schlndler 



8 Wolff House 1960 
2400 Carmen Crest Dr. 
Thornton Ladd and 
John F. Kelsey 

9 Koosis House 1940 
1941 Glencoe Wy. 
Raphael S. Soriano 

10 Freeman House 1924 
1962 Glencoe Wy. 
Frank Lloyd Wright 
Although not as well known as 
the Millard house, the Freeman 
house is probably Wright's most 
successful pre-cast concrete 
block house. The living, dining 
and kitchen space are on the 
level with the street, with the 
sleeping area below. 

See plate 30 

11 Pike House 1952 
6675 Whitley Terrace 
George Vernon Russell 

12 Egyptian Theater 1922 
6712 Hollywood Blvd. 
Meyer and Holler 

What is more logical than the 
exotic Egyptian style for a Holly- 
wood motion-picture palace? 

13 Grauman's Chinese Theater 
1927 

6925 Hollywood Blvd. 
Meyer and Holler 



47 



C2 



C2 HOLLYWOOD AREA SOUTH 



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3 



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AVE 

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48 



CI C2 



The stage-set character of the 
architecture makes it difficult to 
appreciate the well organized 
plan of the theater with its large 
open forecourt. 

14 Erilk House 1952 
1757 Curson Ave. 
R. M. Schindler 

15 Kun House 1938 and 1950 
7947 Fareholm Dr. 
Richard J. Neutra 

16 Turker House 1950 
8010 Fareholm Dr. 
R. M. Schindler 

17 Storer House 1923 
8161 Hollywood Blvd. 
Frank Lloyd Wright 



C2 HOLLYWOOD AREA SOUTH 

1 Gerwin-Ostrow Office Building 
1960 

760 N. La Cienega Blvd. 
Craig Ellwood and Associates 

2 Dodge House 1916 
950 N. Kings Rd. 
Irving Gill 

Gill turned the house away from 
the street so that the major 
rooms looked out on the ter- 
race, the garden and the Holly- 



The interior space of this house 
is dominated by a central two 
story living room which opens 
out onto terraces, both front 
and rear. 
See plate 28 

18 Harasta House 1948 
8480 Hillside Ave. 
Carl L. Maston 

19 Case Study House no. 22 1959 
1635 Woods Dr. 

Pierre Koenig 
See plate 76 

20 Maston House 1948 
1657 Marmont Ave. 
Carl L. Maston 
See plate 56 



wood Hills beyond. The precision 
of his approach to detailing can 
be fully experienced in this 
house. 
See plate 22 

3 Reif House 1951 
906 N. Kings Rd. 
Aaron Green 

4 Schindler House 1921 
833 N. Kings Rd. 

R. M. Schindler 



49 



C2 



In his own house, Schindler ex- 
perimented with tilt slab con- 
crete walls, the space between 
each slab filled with glass. All 
rooms of the house open 
through sliding doors to private 
court yards. 
See plate 24 

5 Carson-Roberts Building 1959 
8322 Beverly Blvd. 

Craig Ellwood 
See plate 75 

6 CBS Television City 1952 
7800 Beverly Blvd. 
William Pereiraand 
Charles Luckman 

7 Pan Pacific Auditorium 1935 
7600 Beverly Blvd. 

Walter Wurdeman and 

Welton Becket 

Streamlined modern of the mid 

1930's. 

See plate 42 

8 Rancho La Brea House (Also 
known as the Rocha House) 
1828 

6301 W. 3rd St. 
Restored in the 1920's by 
John Byers. 

9 Prudential Insurance Co. 1948 
5757 Wilshire Blvd. 

Walter Wurdeman and 
Welton Becket 



The Prudential Building repre- 
sents no great innovation as 
a building, but its siting, with 
gardens and walls and Its set- 
back from Wilshire have been 
admirably handled. 

10 Buck House 1934 
8th and Genesee Sts. 
R. M. Schindler 

11 Dunsmuir Apartments 1937 
1281 S. Dunsmuir Ave. 
Gregory Ain 

Each apartment is two stories! 
high; on the ground level the 
living space of each apartment 
opens onto Its own patio. 
See plate 46 

12 Beckman House 1938 
357 N. Citrus Ave. 
Gregory Ain 

13 Egyptian Revival Apartment 
House 1926 

747 N.Wilcox 
J. M. Close 

The builder-architect of these 
Egyptian revival apartments built 
similar structures in other parts 
of the city. A few other examples 
being: Ahmed Apartments, 5616 
Lexington Ave. (1925); Karnak 
Apartments, 5617LaMiradaAve. 
(1925); Osiris Apartment, 430 8. 
Union Ave. (1926). 



50 



C2 



14 Morgan House 1917 
626 N. Arden Blvd. 
Irving Gill 

An inexpensive single story 
house, similar in spirit to his 
Lewis Courts in Sierra Madre. 

15 Garden Apartments 1927 
5128 W.Marathon St. 
Richard J. Neutra 

It is amazing to note that these 
concrete apartments were built 
as early as 1927. 
See plate 35 

16 Santa Monica Blvd. School 
1921-1923 

5748 Santa Monica Blvd. 

Parker Wright 

An early poured concrete school 

building which is still modern in 

feeling. 



17 CBS Radio Building 1937-1938 
6121 Sunset Blvd. 
William Lescaze and 
E.T. Heitschmidt 
The CBS building remains as 
one of the few classics of the 
new architecture of the 1930's 
which is not dated. 
See plate 47 



18 Court Yard Apartments 1952 
1570 Labaig Ave. 
Craig Ellwood 

As their name implies, these 
apartments are oriented a round 
their own interior gardens. As 
in all of Ellwood's work, it is 
the structure which establishes 
the aesthetic form of the build- 
ing. 
See plate 67 



51 



D1 



AREA D 



East Hollywood, Griffith Park and Silver Lake Districts. 



In many ways this region of Los Angeles is one of the most fascinating; 
for its streets around Silver Lake constitute a virtual Neutra Oasis, while 
the hills around provide one with numerous houses by Schindler, Ain, 
Lloyd Wright and Soriano. Barnsdall Park contains Frank Lloyd Wright's 
famous Hollyhock house of 1920, and north of the Park just off Waverly 
Drive is the Anthony house, the only extant Maybeck building to be found 
In the Los Angeles area. Buildings of the Spanish Colonial revival tradi- 
tion abound, key examples being the Vinmont house of Coate, Krotona 
Court by Requa, and the wonderful Southwest Museum building by Hunt 
and Burns, the approach to the building being through a Mayan entrance.i 
tunnel and elevator placed in the hillside. i 



^i 



D1 GRIFFITH PARK AREA EAST HOLLYWOOD DISTRICT 



1 Krotona Court 1914 
2130 Vista Del Mar Ave. 

Frank Mead and Richard Requa 
Remodeled into apartments and 
renamed "The Goldwater Patio 
Villas." 

2 Mosk House 1933 
2742 Hollyridge Dr. 
Richard J. Neutra 

3 Klelhaer Memorial Chapel 1963 
1717N. GramercySt. 
Carleton Winslow, Jr. and 
Warren Waltz 

See plate 78 



4 Novarro House 1928 
5609 Valley Oak Dr. 
Lloyd Wright 

Bizarre in its details and color 
ing, this house is actually ex 
tremely rational In its plan and 
organization of planes. 
See plate 36 

5 Ernst House 1937 

5670 Holly Oak Dr. . 

Gregory Ain * 

An unusual pre-World War I 
house by Ain, similar in many 
ways to Schindler's work of th€ 
late 1920's and early 1930's. 



52 



D1 



D1 GRIFFITH PARK AREA EAST HOLLYWOOD DISTRICT 



BBACHWOOD f:'^%^''^' 



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MOOR: 



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6RIFFITH PARK 




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VALLEY 
HOLLY WOOP 

Fwr 



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6 Edwards House 1936 
5642 Holly Oak Dr. 
Gregory Ain 

The enclosed spaces of this 
house are situated around a 
series of walled enclosures 
which provide complete privacy 
from the street. 



•1924 



7 Taggart House 1922- 
5423 Black Oak Dr. 
Lloyd Wright 

One of Lloyd Wright's simplest 
yet most picturesque buildings 
carefully related to the hill to 
which it clings. 
See plate 25 



53 



D2 



D2 GRIFFITH PARK AREA WEST 



TO 

SAN FERNANDO 

VALLEY 



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SANCTUARY 



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54 



D2 GRIFFITH PARK AREA WEST 



D2 



Barnsdal! Park 

on the corner of Hollywood Blvd. 
and Vermont Ave. 
Barnsdall ("Hollyhock") House 
1917-1920 
Frank Lloyd Wright 
Barnsdall Studio Residence A 
1920 

Frank Lloyd Wright 
Barnsdall Gallery 1956 
Frank Lloyd Wright 
The Hollyhock House, Wright's 
first essay in Los Angeles, shows 
the influence of his interest in 
Pre-Columbian Building. It Is 
only the largest in a complex of 
buildings erected and projected 
for the large Barnsdall Estate. 
Of the other buildings, only the 
Studio Residence A (1920) re- 
mains in anything like its orig- 
inal condition, incidentally in a 
very different style from the 
main building. The lamp posts 
and garden buildings of the 
estate are by R. M. Schindler. 
The Studio is a Prairie Style 
building now used as a hand- 
craft center for young people. 
See plate 23 

Sowden House 1926 

5121 Franklin Ave. 

Lloyd Wright 

Built around an inner court 

which originally contained an 

elaborate fountain, the building 



is entered through a cavelike 
opening which is certainly strik- 
ing. 
See plate 34 

3 Vinmont House c. 1926 
5136 Los FelizBlvd. 
Roland E. Coate 

A characteristic Spanish Colo- 
nial revival house by an archi- 
tect who specialized not only in 
this mode, but who built equally 
well in the English Tudor and 
Colonial revival styles. 

4 Moore House 1964 
4971 Bonvue Ave. 

Craig Ellwood and Associates 

5 Skolnik House 1952 
2567 Glendower Ave. 
R.M. Schindler 

6 Ennis House 1924 
2607 Glendov^er Ave. 
Frank Lloyd Wright 
Variously called a mausoleum 
and a palace, this is certainly 
the most monumental of Wright's 
western experiments with con- 
crete block construction. 

See plate 29 

7 Griffith Observatory and 
Planetarium 1935 
Griffith Park (South) 

John C. Austin and F. M. Ashley 
A fine example of WPA Moderne 
with murals Inside to match. 



55 



D3 



D3 GRIFFITH PARK AREA EAST 



TO 

GRIFFITH PARK 
OBSEgVATORY 

A 

COMMONWEALTH 
CANYON 



GRIFFITH PARK 
BLVP 



GOLDEN STATE 
FWYTOBURBANK 




V 

ELYSIAN 

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56 



D3 



D3 GRIFFITH PARK AREA EAST 

1 Schlessinger House 1952 
1901 Myra Ave. 
R.M.Schindler 

2 Elliot House 1931 
4237 Newdale Dr. 
R.M.Schindler 

3 Gogol House 1938-1939 
2190TalmadgeSt. 
Raphael S.Soriano 

The house was placed close to 
the street, which allows room 
for its living area to open out to 
the rear. 

4 Anthony House 1927 
Waverly Dr., just north of 
Rowena 

Bernard Maybeck 
A romantic extravaganza barely 
visible from the street. Included 
because it is one of the two 
well authenticated Maybeck 
buildings left in Southern Cali- 
fornia. 
See plate 35 



5 Griffith Park Girls Camp 1949 
north of Los Feliz Blvd. and 
Griffith Park Blvd. 
Whitney R. Smith, Wayne R. 
Williams and Edgardo Contini 
(Smith &Williams— supervising 
architects) 

6 Level! House 1929 
4616 Dundee Dr. 
Richard J.Neutra 

Without question, this house to- 
gether with Schindler's Lovell 
Beach house at Newport Beach 
are the greatest monuments of 
the International style In South- 
ern California. The Lovell house 
with its open free flowing plan, 
its modern materials and struc- 
tural form firmly established 
Neutra's world reputation. 
See plate 40 

7 Schrage House 1951 
2620 Commonwealth Ave. 
Raphael S.Soriano 



57 



D4 



D4 GRIFFITH PARK AREA WEST SILVER LAKE DISTRICT 



WAVERLY DR 




17 

■AVEHEL9T 

HERKIMER 
ST 

KENILWORTH 

7 BLOCKS \ ' 

MORENO-p, ,^ 
M {^^ISj^ARMSTRONEAVE 

' 15 m. 




RESERVOIR 



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58 



D4 



D4 GRIFFITH PARK AREA WEST SILVER LAKE DISTRICT 



1 Mcintosh House 1937 
1317 Maltman Ave. 
Richard J. Neutra 

One of the earliest wood-sheath- 
ed houses by Neutra. The nar- 
row plan with the garage, sleep- 
ing and service areas in front 
and living area to rear takes 
full advantage of the narrow lot 
and the view over the city. 

2 Lipetz House 1935 
1834 N.Dillon St. 
Raphael S.Soriano 



A pre World War II wooden 
house with simple forms which 
one would normally not associ- 
ate with the work of this archi- 
tect. 

8 Silvertop House 1957 
2138MicheItorenaSt. 
John Lautner 

Unquestionably this house, 
which is still unfinished, Is the 
architect's most exotic expres- 
sion of form and structure. 
See plate 73 



3 Westby House 1938 
1805 Maltman Ave. 
R.M.Schindler 

4 Falk Apartments 1939 
3631 Carnation Ave. 
R.M.Schindler 

5 Sachs Apartments 1928 
1811-1813 Edgecliff Dr. 
R.M.Schindler 

See plate 37 

6 Daniel House 1939 
1856MlcheltorenaSt. 
Gregory Ain 

See plate 51 

7 Lautner House 1939 
2007 Micheltorena St. 
John Lautner 



9 Oliver House 1933 
2236 Micheltorena St. 
R.M.Schindler 

One of the most publicized and 
influential of Schindler's early 
modern houses of the 1930's. It 
was work such as this which 
established modern architecture 
in Southern California. 
See plate 41 

10 Herman House 1939 
2323 Micheltorena St. 
Gregory Ain 

An extremely economical house 
of limited floor space. It is closed 
off from the street and is lighted 
by a central skylight and sliding 
glass doors which give access 
to the rear living porch. 
See plate 52 



59 



D4 D5 



11 Orans House 1940 
2404 Micheltorena St. 
Gregory Ain 

12 Wilson House 1938 
2090 Redcliff St. 
R.M.Schindler 

13 Dorste House 1940 
2035 Ken i I worth Ave. 
R.M.Schindler 

14 Wall<er House 1936 
2100 Kenilworth Ave. 
R.IVI.Schindler 

See plate 44 



15 Van Patton House 1936 
2320 Moreno Dr. 
R.M.Schindler 



16 Avenel Housing 1948 
2839-45 Avenel St. 
Gregory Ain, Joseph L. Johnson 
and Alfred W. Day 



17 McAlmon House 1936 
2721 Waverly Dr. 
R.M.Schindler 
See plate 43 



D5 GRIFFITH PARK AREA EAST SILVER LAKE DISTRICT 



1 Presley House 1946 
2115 Fargo St. 
Gordon Drake 

Regrettably there are very few of 
this architect's buildings which 
remain unaltered. The Presley 
house retains some, although 
certainly not all (as photographs 
Indicate), of its original quality. 
Gordon Drake's own house, one 
of his most interesting works, 
has been drastically changed 
since his death in 1953. 

2 Yew House 1957 
2226 Silver Lake Blvd. 
Richard J. Neutra and Associates 



3 Treweek House 1949 
2250 Silver Lake Blvd. 
Richard J. Neutra and Associates 

4 Reunion House 1949 
2440 Earl St. 

Richard J. Neutra and Associates 

5 Flavin House 1958 
2218 Argent PI. 

Richard J. Neutra and Associates 

6 Sokol House 1950 

on the corner of Silver Lake 

Blvd. and Earl St. 

Richard J. Neutra and Associates 



60 



D5 



D5 GRIFFITH PARK AREA EAST SILVER LAKE DISTRICT 



ROWBNA 
BLVP 



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PJt 



GLENDALE 
FWY 
GOLDEN STATE II 
FWY. TO II 
^BURBANK 




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OR. 

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'ALLESANDRO ST 



BAXTERST 
FARGO ST 



7 Neutra House 1933 
2300 Silver Lake Blvd. 
Richard J. Neutra 
Burned 1963; rebuilt 1964. The 
house is being rebuilt at present 
along the basic lines of the orig- 
inal. The main living area and 
terrace were on the second floor 
in order to gain a view of the 
lake. 



8 Howe House 1925 
2422 Silver Ridge Ave. 
R.M.Schindler 

At first glance this house Is un- 
obstrusive, though closer obser- 
vation brings out the fascinating 
batten and concrete construc- 
tion. 



61 



AREA E 

Central Los Angeles, including tiie downtown section, Boyle heights 
Huntington Park, Bell, Watts, Compton, Inglewood. 

As we have noted earlier, one of the problems in putting together this 
guide was how to determine what constituted Central Los Angeles. We 
have not really solved the problem as the map shows, but we hope that 
we have been helpful. 

The first impression the newcomer has of the business district is that it 
Is mainly freeway. In fact, the impression is almost correct. Moreover it 
has never been clear whether the freeways are supposed to get cars 
through the city or into it, and the general mediocrity of the architecture 
that exists seems to reflect this Indecision. Yet this mediocrity too easily 
obscures some of the really unusual qualities of the area. No one, for in- 
stance, could suspect from the dull exterior of the Bradbury Building that 
its interior "hall of light" is one of the great pieces of Victoriana. Some 
people have actually missed (or shrugged off) the visual treat of the Rich- 
field Building and the wooden Martz Flats nearby. It is hoped that the 
selections in this guide will convince even the citizen of Westwood that 
he should go downtown some day. 

Farther out — in this case south — one can obtain a good notion of the 
turn-of-the-centuryage of magnificence in domestic architecture by visiting 
Chester Place, near the corner of Figueroa and West Adams In the Uni- 
versity of Southern California area. Farther west one can find an excellent 
bungalow area of the 1920's in the streets which parallel Western Avenue. 
We especially recommend Gramercy Drive and St. Andrews Place in the 
two blocks north and south of Olympic where the architecture of the 
common man may be viewed in almost proof condition. Slightly earlier 
bungalows are located in the two blocks north and south of Wilshire on 
Coronado. 

Otherwise it is difficult to see a great deal in a hurry. Better spend the 
day in this area. Incidentally the light is perfect on the Watts Towers 
about four o'clock. 



62 



El E2 



El DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES AREA PLAYA DEL REY 

1 




TO 
SAN DIEGO FWY 



BELTON PR. 
NARDIAN 

\ ALTAVAN 

ALTERNATE ^'^f 
U.S. 101 

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OR 



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63 



El E2 E3 



El, E2 DOWNTOWN LOS ANG ELES AR EA 

LOYOLA UNIVERSITY AND INGLEWOOD AREAS 



1 Loyola University Theater 1963 
7101 W. 80th St. 
Edward D. Stone 



1 Hyde Park Congregational 
Church 1901 
6501 Crenshaw Blvd. 
An anonymous white clapboard 
church with a spatially Interest- 
ing interior. 



E3 DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES AREA EXPOSITION PARK AREA 



1 University of Southern California 
Research Institute on Communist 
Strategy and Propaganda 1964 
on the corner of Exposition 
Blvd. and University Ave. 
Thonton Ladd and 

John F. Kelsey 
Ahmonson Center 1964 
on the corner of Exposition 
Blvd. and Hoover St. 
William Pereira and 
Associates 

2 St. Vincent's Church 1923 

on the corner of Figueroa and 
West Adams Blvd. 
Albert C.Martin 
See plate 26 

3 Stimson House 1891 
2421 S. Figueroa 
Attr. Carroll H. Brown 

A marvelously flamboyant 
brownstone pile, combining 



Richardson Romanesque and 
Neo-Gothic forms into a single 
structure. 
See plate 10 

Shrine Civic Auditorium 
1925-1926 

665 W.Jefferson Blvd. 
John C.Austin and Frederic 
M.Ashley 

The Spanish Colonial Revival 
with a Moorish tinge. The audi- 
torium is a real tour de force, 
especially the ceiling. 

Laughlin House 1907 

666 W. 28th St. 
Irving Gill 

Wilson House c. 1895 

7 Chester PI. 

The design of this house has 

been attributed to the owner's 



64 



i 



E3 



E3 DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES AREA EXPOSITION PARK AREA 



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65 



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wife, but it is doubtful that a 
lay person could have produced 
such a knowing version of the 
Mission revival coupled with a 
vast array of Sullivanesque or- 
nament. 

Doheny House 1898 

8 Chester PI. 

A late example of "General 

Grant Gothic." Fine houses of 

the same period all around in 

fine condition. 



8 Apartment House c.1900 
2342 Scarff St. 

A similar Colonial revival apart- 
ment house is located at 815 
9th St. 

9 Wilson House c. 1903 
1200 W.Adams Blvd. 
Sumner Hunt and Edgars 

10 Touriel Medical Building 1950 
2608-10 Santa Barbara Ave. 
Raphael S.Soriano m 



E4 DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES AREA BERKELEY SQUARE DISTRICT 



1 Lukens House 1940 
3425 W. 27th St. 
Raphael S. Soriano 

2 House c.1900 

on the corner of 24th St. and 
Arlington Ave. 

3 Scott House c.1900 
1910 Harvard Blvd. 
Frank M.Tyler 

An Italian design with qualities 



of the Moorish architecture in- 
corporated. 

4 Los Angeles Philanthropy and 
Civic Club c.1900 

1419 S.Wilton PI. 
Mission revival. 

5 Multiple Dwellings 1936 
on the corner of 9th St. and 
S. Hobart Blvd. 

Milton J. Black 
1930's Moderne. 



66 



E4 



E4 DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES AREA BERKELEY SQUARE DISTRICT 



QTH 


ST 


ANMARINO 


ST 


OLYMPIC 




BLVD 





WESTERN 




6 BLOCKS 




SANTA MONICA FW/ 



WESTERN 
AVE 



JEFFERSON BLVD 



67 



E5 



E5 DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES AREA POWERS PLACE DISTRICT 




I 



E5 DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES AREA POWERS PLACE DISTRICT 



1 American National Red Cross 
Chapter Headquarters 1939 
1200 S.Vermont Ave. 
Sumner Spaulding and John Rex 
A characteristic pre World War 
II version of California's con- 
tribution to the International 
style. Wood frame, covered with 
stucco, band windows, its form 
simple and unpretentious. 



2 House 
1507 and 1509 S. Hoover St. 
C.1900 

There are a number of houses 
in Los Angeles which reveal Sul- 
llvanesque ornament. In almost 
every example this ornament 
was thought of in connection 
with Islamic architectural forms. 
See plate 13 



68 



E5 E6 



3 House c. 1900-1906 
1501 S.Hoover St. 

A highly successful version of 
the Mission style. 

4 House C.1885 

818 Bonnie Brae St. 
This house is notable particu- 
larly for its front elevation which 
is undoubtedly the most man- 
nered design of its period In 
this area. But the observer 
should also note the very great 
quality of the carving under the 



eaves, on the porch and else- 
where. In fact, we take this op- 
portunity to comment on the 
general distinction of the wood- 
carvers' art in this area. 
See plate 11 

House C.1890 
1036-8 Bonnie Brae St. 
Chateau in wood. A number of 
unusual items of the same era 
are to be found on this and pa- 
rallel streets nearby. 
See plate 11 



E6 DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES AREA NORTHEASTERN 



TO 

HOLLYWOOD FWY 



WBSTMORE 
LAND ST 




TO 

HAKBORFWY 



69 



E6 E7 



E6 DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES AREA NORTHEASTERN 



1 Tishman Building 1956 
3325 Wilshire Blvd. 
Victor Gruen and Assoc. 

2 Northwestern IVIutual Fire 
Association Building 1950 
621 S.Westmoreland Ave. 
Richard J. Neutra 

3 Bullocks-Wilshire Department 
Store 1928 

3050 Wilshire Blvd. 

John Parkinson and Donald 

Parkinson 

The same American version of 

Parisian moderne as one finds 

expressed in the Sunkist und 

Richfield Buildings. 

See plate 36 



4 Banning House 1912 

503 S. Commonwealth Ave. 
Irving Gill 
Badly altered. 

5 Virgil Apartments 1950 
315 S.Virgil Ave. 

Carl L. Maston 

6 Hill House 1914 
201 S.CoronadoSt. 
Albert R.Walker and 
John T.Vawter 

A very successful wood shingled 
California bungalow by a firm 
that built many similar houses 
in Los Angeles and neighboring 
communities during the decade 
1910-1920. Coronado Street 
abounds In examples of the 
California bungalow. 



E7 DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES AREA DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES 



1 St. Joseph's Church 1901 
218 E. 12th St. 

Late Victorian Gothic. 

2 Mayan Theatre Before 1928 
1040 S.Hill St. 

Morgan, Walls and Clements 
Los Angeles expressed a rash 
of "archaeologically-orlented" 
exotic styles during the 1920's. 



Mayan and Mexican pre-Colum- 
bian architecture formed the 
major sources of this inspira- 
tion. 

3 OneWilshire (Office Building) 
1964 

On the corner of Grand Ave. 
and Wilshire Blvd. 
Skidmore, Owings and Merrill. 



70 



E7 



E7 DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES AREA DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES 



HILL ST 
BROADWAY 
MAIN ST 

LOS ANGELES ST- 
SANTEEST 




12 ''ST 

WST 



WITMERSr 

LUCAS AVE 

BIX EL ST 

\H BOYLSTON ST 
^ 1 

^ — ^HARBOR FWY 

FIGUEROA ST 
FLOWER ST 
HOPE ST 

BUNKER HILL A^E 

H GRAND AVE 

OLIVE ST 
HILL ST 
BROADWAY 
SPRING sr 

2'^ST 



4 Martz Flats 1898 
744-760 W. 7th St. 
Attributed to Julius W. Krause 
An example of the Queen Anne 
revival version of Colonial ar- 
chitecture. 

See plate 11 

5 Fine Arts (Havenstrite) 
Building 1925 

811 W. 7th St. 



Albert R.Walker and 

Percy Eisen 

Elaborate sculptural detail on 

first floor. Interesting lobby. 

6 Richfield Building 1929 
555 S. Flower St. 
Morgan, Walls and Clements 
Few cities can boast such a 
perfect example of 1920 mo- 
derne. Its black and gold ex- 



71 



E7 



terior was derived from similar 
work in New York by Raymond 
Hood and others. 



7 Sunkist Building 1935 
707 W. 5th St. 
Albert R.Walker and 
Percy Eisen 

A better than average example 
of art moderne. The Board Room 
inside with Its murals is very 
dignified. 



8 Los Angeles Public Library 1925 
630 W. 5th St. 

Bertram Goodhue (Carleton 
M.Winslow, Sr., supervising 
architect) 

Goodhue continued his earlier 
search for a new "modern" 
style In this building. The plan 
and the basic form of the build- 
ing were still Beaux Arts, its 
plain surface and severe de- 
tailing were reminiscent of the 
work which Irving Gill had pro- 
duced a decade and more be- 
fore. The building abounds in 
a stylized version of Egyptian 
sculpture and moderne decora- 
tion and wall paintings. 
See plate 31 



9 Foy House 1873 
633 S. Witmer Ct. 
Bracketted style, fairly rare in 
Los Angeles. 

10 Scholts Advertising Building 
1937 

1201 W. 4th St. 
Richard J.Neutra 

11 "The Castle" House C.I 880's 
325 S. Bunker Hill Ave. 

One of the very few pieces of 
Victorian architecture left on 
Bunker Hill. It used to have a 
Mansard roof on its tower. 

12 Angel's Flight 1901 
3rd and Hill Sts. 

This funicular railway communi- 
cating between the business 
district and a sadly destroyed 
residential area called Bunker 
Hill Is a charming example of 
early Los Angeles street furni- 
ture. 

13 Bradbury Building 1893 
304 S. Broadway 
George H.Wyman 
See Back Cover 

This tour de force of iron deco- 
ration, mounting stairways and 
two open elevators is certainly 
one of the surprises of the down- 
town area. 



72 



E8 



E8 DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES AREA CIVIC CENTER-OLVERA ST. 



BEAUPRY 



MAIN ST 



OLVBRAST 




FIGUEROA 1 GRANP 
ST\ \ \A\/E 



ALAMEDA Sr 



FLOWER 
ST 



I^ILL X 



73 



E8 



E8 DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES AREA CIVIC CENTER-OLVERA ST. 



1 St. Vibiana Cathedral 1876, 
facade 1923 

2nd and S. Main Sts. 
Attributed to Ezra F. Kysor and 
W. H. Mathews 

A building of historical impor- 
tance, greatly remodelled. 

2 Mirror Building 1860 
145 N. Spring St. 
Characteristic of mid Victorian 
building in Los Angeles. 

3 City Hall 1926-1928 

On the corner of Temple and 
Main Sts. 

John C.Austin, John Parkinson 
and Albert C.Martin 
Architecturally of little Interest, 
but an Important visual land- 
mark in downtown Los Angeles. 

4 Masonic Temple 1858 
416 N. Main St. 

First Masonic Lodge in Los An- 
geles. A two story mid-Victorian 
building of no great distinction. 

5 Merced Theater 1869 
420 and 422 N. Main St. 
First theater in Los Angeles. 
See plate 7 

6 Pico House 1868 
430 N. Main SL 
Attributed to Ezra F. Kysor 
First three-story building in Los 
Angeles. 

See plate 7 



7 Old Plaza Fire House 1884 
Old Plaza at Los Angeles St. 
Now a museum. 

8 Plaza Church 1822, facade 1861 
535 N. Main SL 

With many 19th century addi- 
tions and 20th century restora- 
tions. Remarkable primarily for 
historical reasons. 

9 Avila House 1818 
14 01 vera SL 
Much restored. 

10 La Casa Pelanconi 1855 
33-35 Olvera St. 

First brick house in Los Angeles. 
Now a restaurant. 

11 New Hall of Records Building 
1962 

320 W. Temple 
Richard J. Neutra, Robert 
E.Alexander, Douglas Honnold 
and John Rex 

12 Department of Water and Power 
1963-1964 

Temple and Flower Sts. 
Albert C. Martin and Assoc. 

13^ West Temple Apartments c. 1880 
1012 W. Temple SL 
A mansarded, bilious green 
structure very close to the 4- 
way interchange of the freeway. 
A traffic stopper. 
See plate 8 



74 



E9 



E9 DOWNTOWN 

LOS ANGELES AREA 
ELYSIAN PARK AREA 



TO JUNCTION WITH 
GOLDEN STATE FWY 



%Z 




6LEN0ALE 
BLVD 



ELYSIAN 
PARK 



E9 DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES AREA ELYSIAN PARK AREA 



1 Southall House 1938 
1855 Park Dr. 
R.M.Schindler 

2 Springer House 1940 
2223 Park Dr. 

John Lautner 

3 Ross House 1938 
2123 Valentine St. 
Rapiiael S. Soriano 
See plate 48 



4 Fellowship Park House and 
Studio 1936 

2311 Fellowship Parkway 
Harwell Hamilton Harris 
This house is a simple pavilion 
consisting of a single open 
space used for living, dining 
and sleeping, and a small pull- 
man kitchen and bath-dressing 
room at one end. The walls are 
sliding doors and panels which 
could be opened or completely 
removed. 



75 



E10 



E10 DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES AREA BOYLE HEIGHTS 



TO 
BLYSIAN PARK 



)^^J^ LINCOLN 
'^"^ PARK 




OVERPASSES 
SANBERNADINOFWY 
1MIT0 
BROOKLYN AVE 



w 

u.s.Hwyioi 

SANTA AHA FWY 




MICHIGAN AVE 



TO n 

COMMERCE 



76 



E10 Ell 



E10 DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES AREA BOYLE HEIGHTS 



1 House C.1885 
1926 Johnston St. 

A delightful concoction in a 
locale not famous for its archi- 
tecture. French Empire style 
with a mansard roof. 

2 Los Angeles Jewish Community 
Center Building 1937 

2317 Michigan Ave. 
Raphael S. Soriano 



3 Hollenbeck Home for the Aged 
1896 

573 S. Boyle Ave. 
Morgan, Walls and Clements 
A large Mission revival struc- 
ture by a firm later to be known 
for its contribution to a revival of 
Spanish Colonial architecture. 



Ell DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES AREA VERNON-WATTS AREA 



1 Watts Towers 1921-1954 
1765 E. 107th St. 
Simon Rodia 

How suggestive that Los Ange- 
les' great contribution to fantas- 
tic architecture should be made 
out of junk. Rodia rivals the 
Barcelona architect, Antonio 
Gaudi, in his use of broken tile, 
china and 7-up bottles plastered 
on a lacework of walls and 



towers constructed of concre- 
te occasionally reinforced by 
chicken wire. Rodia said he 
wanted to do something big. He 
did it. 
See plate 24 



2 Bethlehem Baptist Church 1944 
4900 S. Compton Ave. 
R.M.Schindler 



77 



E11 



Ell DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES AREA VERNON-WATTS AREA 



10 BLOCKS TO 
EXPOSITION PARK 



N 

1 



43 



TH 



48 



TH 



"W^ 



CENTRAL 
AVE 



O 



59 



TH' 



15BL0CKS'- 



ST 



PL 



ST 



COMPTON 
AVE 



HOOPER 
AVE 



56 



TH 



OLIVE ST 



•ST 



3M/ 




CLOVIS 
AVE 



! 1 1 I I I 



ST 



n I I I I 



LONG BEACH 
AVE 



MM l / - 



M il l t 



COMPTON 
AVE 



/ A CENTURY 



BLVD 



16BL0CKS 



HARBOR 
FWY 



CLOVIS 
AVE 



IMPERIAL 



n 

TO 

SAN PEDRO 
LOS ANGELES HARBOR 



11 BLOCKS- 




CENTRAL 
AVE 



^ 



COMPTON 
BLVD 



HWY 



3y2MI TO 
LONGBEACHFWr 



78 



E12 DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES AREA BELL-COMMERCE AREA 



E12 



ATLAHTIC 



jU^CTlOtj 




«>sSS>ir' 




,JlSS.m 



5BL0CKS- 



AVB 



OTIS ArLAHjrl^ 



cA IT LAKE 
^^ AVE 



FLORENCE AVE 




13BL0aS 



LONO^BEACH 



79 



E12 E13 



E12 DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES AREA BELL-COMMERCE AREA 



1 Corona Avenue School 1935 
Bell Ave. at Bear Ave. 
Richard J.Neutra 

An early open-air school with 
the enclosed space of the class- 
rooms combined with the ex- 
teriorthrough sliding glass walls. 

2 U. S. Royal Tire Co. (originally 
Samson Tyre and Rubber Co.) 
1929 



5675 Telegraph Rd. 
Morgan, Walls and Clements 
The unusual "Babylonian" fa- 
pade of this building is in keep- 
ing with the Samson Tyre and 
Rubber Company's original slo- 
gan "Strong as Samson." The 
plant was enlarged in the same 
architectural style in 1931. 



E13 DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES AREA COMPTON 



1 Angeles Abbey 1928 
1515 E. Compton Blvd. 
Hugh R. Davies 
An exotic example of the is- 



lamic revival inspired by the 
Hollywood stage set. The later 
Abbey of Flowers was added in 
1931 by Clarence Aldrich. 



E13 DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES AREA COMPTON 



23AA1/ 
TO IMPERIAL HWY 



LONG BEACH 
BLVD 



ROSECRANSAVE 




3 

BLOCKS 



yam. 



BRADFIELD 
AVE 

i 



■14BL0CKS- 



BOWEN \TEMPLE 
AVE AVE 



\ 



LONG 
BEACH 
FWYJI 

TO 
LONG BEACH 




80 



AREAF 

El Segundo, Manhattan Beach, Redondo Beach and Palos Verdes, 
Torrance and Gardena. 

The southwestern section of Los Angeles is on the whole as visually de- 
pressing as the southern area of the city. The ocean beach from El Se- 
gundo through Redondo Beach should be a wonderful area, but it is not. 
The inland area of Torrance and Gardena Is a confused mixture of facto- 
ries and residences. Before the Second World War much of this low area 
was laid out in beautifully cultivated truck gardens, but there are very few 
of these left. The Palos Verdes hills today provide the only visual relief in 
this section of the city. The coast line around the Palos Verdes peninsula 
is unquestionably one of the most handsome in Southern California. Ar- 
chitecturally there are a few gems here and there, but the general level 
is exceedingly low. Like San Clemente and Rancho Santa Fe, Palos Verdes 
Estates was initially laid out as a Spanish Colonial revival city during the 
1920's. In Manhattan Beach is a bank by Craig Ellwood and at Portuguese 
Bend is Lloyd Wright's well-known chapel. 

As the port of Los Angeles, San Pedro and adjacent Wilmington com- 
pensate for their architectural dullness by the visual excitement which 
one encounters in any large port. On the hillside above San Pedro is the 
famous Channel Heights Housing Project laid out by Neutra at the begin- 
ning of the Second World War. Wilmington boasts the finest example of 
the Greek revival in southern California, the Banning house built in 1864. 



81 



F PALOS VERDES AREA GARDENA 



1 Goldwater Apartments 1964 
3212 El Segundo Blvd. 

Carl L. Maston 
See plate 80 

2 Great Western Savings and 
Loan Assoc. (Gardena Office) 
1962 

2501 W. Rosecrans 
Skidmore, Owings and Merrill 
See plate 79 

TORRANCE 

3 Pacific Electric Station 1916 
1800-1900 block Gramercy St. 
Irving Gill 

PALOS VERGES 

4 Ekdale House 1948 
3500 E. Palos Verdes Dr. 
John Rex 

See plate 56 

5 Beckstrand House 1941 
1700 Via Monte Mar 
Richard J. Neutra 

6 Wayfarer's Chapel 1949 
Portuguese Bend at Abalone 
Lloyd Wright 

See plate 58 

SAN PEDRO 

7 Channel Heights Public Housing 
1942 

Western Ave. and 25th St. 
Richard J. Neutra 



, 



8 Seaman's Center Building 
1956-1962 
11th and Beacon St. 
Carleton Winslow, Jr., 
Warren Waltz, Andrew Joncich 
and William Lusby 

9 Sepulveda House 1853 
700 block Channel St. 

WILMINGTON 

10 Drum Barracks 1850 
1053 and 1055 Cary Ave. 
An example of the late Greek' 
revival as it began to merged 
into the Tuscan or Bracketted^ 
style of the mid 19th century. ' 
See plate 5 

11 Banning House 1864 
Lakme Ave. and M. St. 
The best extant example of the 
late Greek revival to be found 
in Southern California. 

See plate 6 

MANHATTAN BEACH 

12 South Bay Bank 1956 
1800 Sepulveda Blvd. 
Craig Ellwood 

See plate 72 

WESTCHESTER 

13 Westchester Branch Post Office 
1957 

8635 Kitty Hawk Ave. 
Craig Ellwood 



82 



AREA G 

Long Beach. .. 

In the late 1880's Long Beach along with Santa Monica developed as a 
resort city. Like its sister coastal city it had its own elegant, rambling 
Shingle style hotel. The city continued to be simply a pleasant coastal 
city, fundamentally residential in character until the discovery of oil in 
1921. Along with adjacent San Pedro and Wilmington, Long Beach ac- 
quired all the hallmarks of an industrial city. With the Initial completion of 
the artificial San Pedro Harbor in the late 1930's, the city became even 
more an amusement resort and haven for sailors. Much of Ocean Boule- 
vard was formerly lined with turn-of-the-century houses, but most of these 
have been replaced by apartment houses. The Naples district In east 
Long Beach was, like Venice, laid out with canal-like waterways. It has a 
pleasant overall unity, not often found in the coastal communities of 
Southern California. There are only a few examples of interesting archi- 
tecture in Long Beach, a house by the Greene brothers, a pre World War II 
house by Soriano and several recent buildings by the firm of Killingsworth, 
Brady and Associates. 



r- 



83 



G1 



G1 LONG BEACH AREA LONG BEACH DISTRICT 




WARD LOIN RO 



■29BL0CKS 




LONG BEACH 
MUNICIPAL 
AIR PORT 



LAKEWOOP 
BLVP 



TO IVILMINGTON- 



N 

I 



/ 



WILLOW ST- 



SBLOCKS 



STEARNS ST- 




U.S. 101 
■PACIFIC COAST- 
HWY 




ALAMITO. 
CIRCLE 



lOSCO/OTES 

6ALEAN0 ST 
ATHERTON ST 



PACIFIC COAST 
HWY^ 



TO 

NEWPORT 
BEACH 



84 



G1 G2 



G1 LONG BEACH AREA LONG BEACH DISTRICT 



1 Los Cerritos House 1844 
4600 Virginia Rd. 
JVIonterey style; 

Don Juan Temple, Builder. 

2 Office of Killingsworth, Brady, 
and Assoc. BIdg. 1955 

3833 Long Beach Blvd. 
Killingsworth, Brady, and Assoc. 

3 Cambridge Investments, 
Inc. BIdg. 1960 

> 324 E. Bixby Rd. 

Killingsworth, Brady, and Assoc. 



4 Duffield Lincoln-Mercury 
Agency 1963 
1940Lakewood Blvd. 
Killingsworth, Brady, and Assoc. 

5 Tichenor House 1904 
(not on map) 

852 E. Ocean Blvd. 
Charles and Henry Greene 



G2 LONG BEACH AREA NAPLES DISTRICT 



1 Kimpson-Nixon House 1939 
380 Orlena Ave. 
Raphael S. Soriano 
See plate 51 



2 Opdall House 1957 
5576 Vesuvian Wk. 
Killingsworth, Brady, and Assoc. 



3 CaseStudy House no.25 1963 
82 Rivo Alto Canal 
Killingsworth, Brady, Smith, and 
Assoc. 

Located on one of the small 
canals of the Naples area. The 
interior rooms all open to a two 
story interior courtyard. 
See plate 80 



85 



G2 



G2 LONG BEACH AREA NAPLES Dl STRICT 



OR LENA AVE 




TO 
OCEANS LVD 



TO 
NEV^ PORT 
BEACH 



86 



AREAH 

Newport Beach, Catalina Island, Santa Ana and Anaheim. 

Newport Beach represents exactly what one would normally think of as 
a California Coastal Community with its wide sandy beaches, Its beautiful 
yacht basin and its white stucco houses. Overlooking the beach is one of 
the great monuments of the 20th century International style in the United 
States, the Lovell Beach house, designed in 1926 by Schindler. A second, 
important building by Schindler, the Wolfe house (1928), is situated on the 
hill above Avalon on Catalina Island. Going inland, the only object of real 
interest is Disneyland in Anaheim. 



li 



87 



HI H2 



HI NEWPORT BEACH AREA ANAHEIM 



TO LOS ANGELES 



\ 



U.S. Mm 101 

SANTA ANA 

Fwr 



WESTST 
1 




1 
TO 

SANTA ANA 



SYCAMORE 
ST 



- CENTER 
ST 

-BROADWAY 



t 



H2 NEWPORT BEACH AREA 



TO 

HUNTIN6T0. 
BEACH 



U.S.101 
COAST Hwr 




NEWPORT 
BLVD 



BALBOA 
BLVP 



WESTCLIFFOR 




TO 

LACUNA 
BEACH 



20r'^^^^„^lMQCKrr. 



88 



HI NEWPORT BEACH AREA 



HI H2 



ANAHEIM 

1 Pioneer House 1857 
Sycamore and West Sts. 
Built by George Hansen, leader 
of German Utopian Cooperative 
which he founded in Anaheim. 



CATALINA ISLAND 

4 Wolfe House 1928 
(not on map) 
Avalon 

R. M. Schindler 
See plate 38 



NEWPORT BEACH 

2 Lovell Beach House 1926 
1242 Ocean Ave. 

R. M. Schindler 
See plate 33 

3 Mariners Medical Arts Center 
1963 

1901 Westcliff Dr. 
Richard J. Neutra and 
Associates 



GARDEN GROVE 

5 Garden Grove Church 1962 
(not on map) 
12141 Lewis St. 
Richard J. Neutra and 
Associates 



89 



AREA I 

San Fernando Valley: San Fernando, Burbank and Glendale. 



I 



The region north of the Ventura Freeway was devoted to citrus and other 
orchard production until after the Second World War. Now, as elsewhere 
around Los Angeles, its lands are sprouting housing tracts In all direc- 
tions. Much of the residential development of the northern slope of the 
Santa Monica and Hollywood Hills took place in the late 1930's. Here one 
will find houses by Schindler, Ain, Harris and Walker. There are as well 
several interesting adobe structures and the romantic remains of the San 
Fernando Mission. In Tujunga will be found Bolton Hall (1913) by George 
Harris, a perfect summation of the ideals of the Craftsman movement. On 
Chevy Chase Dr., above Glendale, is a little known pre-cast concrete 
block house of the mid 1920's by Lloyd Wright. For those who wish to 
confirm their view of Los Angeles as "Hollywood land," a tour through 
Forest Lawn Memorial Park (just east of Griffith Park off of the Ventura 
Freeway) is a must. 



f 



90 



II SAN FERNANDO VALLEY AREA WOODLAND HILLS 



II 



CRAFTSMAN 



SCHOOLCRAFT 




HARTLANDST 
VANOWENST 
'WELBYWY 
MELBAAVE 

HAYNES ST 



q5 

5 1 16 BLOCKS 

5^ 5<j| r^ 



.V>aV^^ 








'3 



VENTURA 
AVE \ 



VENTURA FV/Y 
TO E NCI NO 



■LUBAOAVE 
COLLIER ST 



K- 



OUAKERTOWNAVE 



TO 
VENTURA 



MULHOLLAND 
DR 



11 SAN FERNANDO VALLEY AREA WOODLAND H I LLS 



1 Leonis House 1875 
23537 Calabasas Rd. 
Monterey style additions made 
later by Miguel Leonis. 

See plate 7 

2 Shadow Ranch House 
1869-1872 

22633 Vanowen St. 



Surrounded by relatively ancient 
eucalyptus trees, said to be 
oldest in Southern California. 

3 Van Dekker House 1940 
5230 Penfield Ave. 
R. M. Schindler 



91 



12 



12 SAN FERNANDO VALLEY AREA 

CHATSWORTH-NORTHRIDGE DISTRICT 



SANTA ( 

SUSANA LIMEKILN 

A VE CANYON 

JORDAN ^^ 
VASSAR /AVE 

AVE^^^ \ DEVONSHIRE \ST 

2MI 



CRAGGY 



SYLVIA 
AVE 



1 



LEMARSH5T- 
ROMARST 
MAYALLST 



■LASSEN ST 





'^/2MI' 



RESEDA 
8 LVD 



WILBUR 
AVE 



OWENSMOUTH 
AVE 



TAMPA 
AVE 



T0PAN6A 

CANYON 

BLVD 



TO 
U.S.101 
VENTURA FWY 



2MI 



N 



PARTHENIA ST 

BRYANT ST 
NAPA ST 
MALPEN ST 

CHASE ST 

CANBYAVE 
ROS CODE BLVD 



PARTHENIA 




DARBY 
AVE 



I 

TO 

US.101 
VENTURA FWY 



92 



12 13 14 



12 SAN FERNANDO VALLEY AREA 

CHATSWORTH-NORTHRIDGE DISTRICT 



1 Hyde Park Congregational 
Church 1901 

10051 Topanga Canyon Blvd. 
Frame in late Victorian Gothic. 
See plate 12 

2 Von Sternberg House 1936 
10000 Tampa Ave. 



Richard J. Neutra 
See plate 44 

3 Blue Ribbon Tract Houses 1954 
On the corner of Chase St. and 
Darby Ave. 
Smith and Williams 
See plate 70 



13 SAN FERNANDO VALLEY AREA 
SAN FERNANDO CITY 

1 Andres Pico House c. 1834 
10940 Sepulveda Blvd. 
Two-story adobe brick building. 
See plate 4 

2 San Fernando Mission 1818 
15151 San Fernando Mission 
Blvd. 

See plate 3 



3 Lopez House 1878 

On the corner of Pico St. 
Mac I ay Ave. 

LANCASTER 

4 Western Hotel 1874 
(not on map) 

557 W. Lancaster Blvd. 
Erected by Gilroy family. 



and 



14 SAN FERNANDO VALLEY AREA 
ENCINO-SHERMAN OAKS 

1 Daugherty House 1946 
4635 Louise Ave. 

R. M. Schindler 

2 Rancho de los Encinos 1849 
16756 Moorpark St. 

3 Smith House 1948 
15435 Varden St. 
Rodney Walker 

4 Foster House 1950 
4235 Las Cruzes Dr 



John Lautner 
See plate 61 

5 Singleton House 1959 
15000 Mulholland Dr. 
Richard J. Neutra 

VAN NUYS 

6 The Torrington Manufacturing 
Co. (Western Division) 1953 
16300 Roscoe Blvd. 

Marcel Breuer 

(Craig Ellwood, Supervision) 



93 



13 



13 SAN FERNANDO VALLEY AREA SAN FERN AN DO CITY 



TO LANCASTER (4) 



TO 
JUNCTIONWITH 
GOLDEN STATE 
FWY 




GOLDEN STATE FWY 
TO N.HOLLYWOOD 



94 



14 SAN FERNANDO VALLEY AREA ENCi NO - SH ERM AN OAKS 



14 



\ 



.^. 



y^HITE OAKS AYE 



MARGATE ST 



TO 

SAHfERNANOO 



SAN DIEGO 



TO 

SHERMAN 
OAKS 




SAND/EGO 
fWY 

TO SANTA S AUG US AVE 
MONICA 






PARK'LN JahGELES ^ 
CIR K-y FIRS OEPT 



95 



15 



15 SAN FERNANDO VALLEY AREA STUDIO CITY 



I 

LAUREL CANYON 
BLVP 



SHERMAN OAKS^>^^ 

MOORPARKSf^ 



US.101 VENTURA FWY 




TO 

SHERMAN 
OAKS 



VAN 
NOORP 
AVE-^ 



TO JUNCTION OF 

VENTURA FWY 

AND 
HOLLYWOOD 

FWY 



TUJUNGA 
AVE 



TO 

■HOLLYWOOI^ 
FWY 



POTOSI 
AVE 



TO 
HOLLYWOOD 



AMANDA DR 



96 



15 16 



15 SAN FERNANDO VALLEY AREA STUDIO CITY 



1 Stevens House 1941 
3642 Alta Mesa Dr. 
Rodney Walker 

2 Presberger House 1945 
4255 Agnes Ave. 

R. M. Schindler 

3 Campbell Hall School 1951 
4717 Laurel Canyon Blvd. 
A. Quincy Jones and 
Frederick E. Emmons 



4 Gold House 1945 
3758 Reklaw Dr. 
R. M. Schindler 

5 Goodwin House 1940 
3807 Reklaw Dr. 

R. M. Schindler 

6 Lechner House 1948 
11600 Amanda Dr. 
R.M. Schindler 



6 SAN FERNANDO VALLEY AREA 

UNIVERSAL CITY- MAGNOLIA PARK 



1 Blair House 1938 
3762 Fredonia Dr. 
Harwell Hamilton Harris 

2 Kallis House 1947 
3580 Multiview Dr. 
R.M. Schindler 

3 Hay House 1939 
3132 Oak Crest Dr. 
Gregory Ain 

See plate 50 

4 Hollywood Guild and 
Union Office Building 1948 
2760 N. Cahuenga Blvd. 



Gregory Ain, Joseph L.Johnson, 
and Alfred W. Day 

5 Berger House 1939 
3156 Lake Hollywood Dr. 
Richard J. Neutra 

6 McFadden House 1948 
10152 Toluca Lake Ave. 
J. R. Davidson 

7 Adolph's Office Building 1953 
1800 W. Magnolia Blvd. 
Raphael S. Soriano 

See plate 69 



97 



16 



16 SAN FERNANDO VALLEY AREA 

UNIVERSAL CITY-MAGNOLIA PARK 



MYERSS^^ 




TO 

NORTH HOLLYWOOD 



REGAL 

SKYHILL ^^ -^FREPON/A 
PRi ) ^ J PR 



MULTIVIEW 
PR \^.2 




GLEN PR 
ELLINGTON PR, 



MULHOLLANP 



TO 
HOLLYWOOD 



98 



17 SAN FERNANDO VALLEY AREA BURBAN K - GLENDALE 



i GOLDEN STATE FWY 

TO BRIGHTON 

SUN VALLEY 



BU EN AVISTA 



DOROTHY 
PR 




COLUMBUS 
ST 



TO 
BURBANK 



SAN FERNANDO 
DR 



12BL0CKS 

TO 
STOCKERST 



N 



MILFORD 



LEXINGTON- 



ALEXANDER ST 
-ST 



PR — 12 BLOCKS 

CITY OF 
GLENDALE 




TO 
OAKMONT 
COUNTRYCLUB 

\ 
VERDIGO 
RD 

NARANSA 
DR 



ADAMS 
ST 




■ANDREWS PR 



QiiBiMi 




CASCADIA DR 
PR 



LEITH pRURY^ 
RO LN 



LAIRPDR 



99 



17 18 



17 SAN FERNANDO VALLEY AREA BURBAN K - G LENDALE 



1 Bauer House 1938 
2538 E. Glenoaks Blvd. 
Harwell Hamilton Harris 
(Carl Anderson, Associate) 

2 San Rafael House (Casa Adobe 
deSan Rafael) 1865 



1330 Dorothy Dr. 
Restored 1932. 

3 Derby House 1926 
2535 Chevy Chase Dr. 
Lloyd Wright 
See plate 34 



18 SAN FERNANDO VALLEY AREA TU J UNGA - MONTROSE 



1 Leavitt House 1948 
1919Bayberry Dr. 
A. Quincy Jones and 
Frederick E. Emmons 
Variation on same house in 
same area: Fuller House, 3068 
E. Chevy Chase Dr., Glendale 
(1948-1949); Kett House, 1709 
Golf Club Dr., Glendale (1948- 
1949). 



2 CaseStudy House no. 15 
1945-1948 

4755 Lasheart Dr. 
J. R. Davidson 

3 Bolton Hall 1913 
10116 Commerce Ave. 
George Harris 

See plate 18 



100 



18 SAN FERNANDO VALLEY AREA TUJ UNG A - MONTROSE 



\ 

APPERSON ST 



CITY OF 
TUJUNGA 




ALTA 



LASHEART 



^ BVlp 



CANYAPA 0R\2 ^^pf!)^n^^ 



5MI 




INDIANAVE 



CITY OF 
MONTROSE 




FOOTHILL BiyP 

^i^^ 12Bl6cks 

8 BLOCKS '^''S"" 



VERDIGO 
RP 



BLVD 

FERN- 
SIDE OR 

ENCINAS 

^^ CITY OF 
LA CANADA 




MENLO DR 



MONTECITODR 

1 
'BAY BERRY OR 



VERDIGO 
RD 



101 



AREA J 

Pasadena, Altadena, South Pasadena, San Marino, Alhambra, San Gabriel, 
Eagle Rock and Highland Park. 

This area Includes several late 19th century towns which have grown to 
the point that It Is difficult to recognize their original character. Pasadena, 
in spite of great social and economic change, remains as an entity. Though 
its southeastern fringe merges with wealthy San Marino, no visible signs 
exist, except for the discrete ones that the cities have erected on their 
surveyed borders. Pasadena began as a sleepy Mexican town which, 
following the conventional California pattern, was brought to life by the 
Yankee Invasion of the late 19th century. Its social life, if not Its reason 
for being, centered on the vast resort hotels of which only the Green 
remains In anything like its original state. Other grand hotels which for- 
merly dominated the Pasadena scene were the Raymond Hotel, the first 
of which was a wooden second Empire style building, designed In 1882 
by J. H. LIttlefleld; later replaced in 1901 by a Mission style building; the i 
Hotel Maryland, built in 1902 from plans of John Parkinson; the PIntoresca 
and later the Huntington. 

Colorado Boulevard Is the main street of the town and preserves to this 
day some of the characteristics of its midwestern prototype, though the 
line of shops, fine stores and churches Is now modestly being Invaded by 
high-rise. The monumental Civic Center lying to the north and south of 
Colorado Is testimony to the genteel tradition which persists In Pasadena. 
Certain vestiges of the early magnificence are left on Orange Grove 
Boulevard and contrast with the middle-class "Victorian" neighborhood | 
to the northeast. 

Architectural buffs will be most Interested In the section west of Orange 
Grove along the Arroyo Seco, especially the little community of houses 
by the Brothers Greene on Arroyo Terrace with the Gamble, James Cul- , 
bertson and Irwin houses very near. Pasadena also has several fairly, 
well-preserved bungalow courts, the ones at 151 West Walnut Street and 
at 264 North Garfield being most interesting. South and east of the busi- ; 
ness district is an area which includes much interesting Spanish Colonial ' 
revival work along with Stockbroker's Tudor and many Greene and 
Greene houses. 



102 



J1 PASADENA AREA EAGLE ROCK DISTRICT 



J1 



^/U 



^^ 



BLLENWOOO 
PLACE\ 



G^SNDAL 




LANGDALf 



COLORADO BLVP 




EAGLB 
ROCK 



WEST DALE 

CAMPUS RP 
•3 

OCCIDENTAL 
COLLEGE 




FIGUEROA 



EVERGREEN- 



POPPY PEAK^ 
PR 



J1 PASADENA AREA EAG LE ROCK Dl STRI CT 



1 Lowes House 1923 
325 Ellenwood Dr. 
R. M. Schindler 
See plate 27 

2 Mason House 1916 
2434 Langdale Ave. 
Irving Gill 

3 Occidental College 1913-1936 
1600 Campus Rd. 

Myron Hunt 

(with H. C. Chambers) 

Buildings in central campus are 



by Hunt, one of Frank Lloyd 
Wright's early draftsmen. Re- 
gionalized classical. 

4 Eagle Rock Playground 
Clubhouse 1953 

1100 Eagle Vista Dr. 
Richard J. Neutra and Assoc. 

5 Laing House 1935 
1642 Pleasant Wy. 
Harwell Hamilton Harris 
See plate 43 



103 



J2 



J2 PASADENA AREA HIGHLAND PARK DISTRICT 



PASAL\ 



AVE 4-3 




<ifFlGUEROA 
MARMION I // ST 



CENTER ARROW 
SHOULD POINTTO 



104 



J2 



J2 PASADENA AREA HIGHLAND PARK DISTRICT 



1 Birtcher-Share House 1942 
4234 Sea View Lane 
Harwell Hamilton Harris 
See plate 54 

2 Hinds House 1951 
3940 San Rafael Ave. 
Richard J. Neutra 

3 Mauer House 1947 
932 Rome Dr. 
John Lautner 

4 Southwest Museum 1912 
Museum Dr. and Marmion Wy. 
Sumner P. Hunt and 

Silas R. Burns 



5 Lummis House (El Alisal) 
1896-1910 

200 E. Ave. 43 
Charles F. Lummis 
Of unusual significance, if not 
beauty, since Lummis, editor of 
The Land of Sunshine Magazine, 
was an influential enthusiast for 
Missions and Indians, both en- 
thusiasms remarkably evident in 
his "Craftsman" House. Teddy 
Roosevelt helped wash dishes 
in the "cocina," modeled on a 
Mission kitchen. 

6 Queen Anne revival House 
c.1880's 

Figueroa St. at Ave. 45 



105 



J3 



J3 PASADENA AREA ALHAMBRA-SAN GABRIEL DISTRICT 



1 Cajal House 1907 
1350 S. Fremont 
Credited to its first owner, 
A. J. Cajal 



2 Ortega-Vigare Adobe 
1792-1805 



616 S. RamonaSt. 
Oldest adobe in region. 

3 Mission San Gabriel Arcangel 
Original Cliurch 1771; 
completed 1800 
Mission Dr. and Junipero St. 
See plate 2 



J3 PASADENA AREA ALHAMBRA-SAN GABRIEL DISTRICT 




106 



J4 PASADENA AREA PASADENA DISTRICT 



J4 



MBHOOCINO LN 




107 



J4 



J4 PASADENA AREA PASADENA Dl STRICT 



1 Ladd House 1949 
1280 Glen Oaks Blvd. 
Thornton Ladd 

2 Ladd Studio 1950 
1085 Glen Oaks Blvd. 
Thornton Ladd 

See plate 61 

3 Bradley House 1941 
1155NithsdaleRd. 
Whitney R. Smith 

4 Perkins House 1955 
1540 Poppy Peak Dr. 
Richard J. Neutra 
See plate 71 

5 Church of the Angels 1889 
1100 Ave. 64 

Ernest A. Coxhead 
Before moving to the Bay Area 
Coxhead built a number of 
buildings of interest In the Los 
Angeles area. Few of them still 
remain. This church with its 
fascinating interior is one of the 
best preserved of his work In 
the area. 



6 Case Study House 1947 
71 1 San Rafael Ave. 
Kemper Nomland and 
Kemper Nomland, Jr. 



7 Crowell House 1952 
949 S. San Rafael Ave. 
Whitney R. Smith and 
Wayne R.Williams 

8 Kubly House 1964 
215 LaVeredaRd. 
Craig Ellwood and Assoc. 

9 Millard House 1923 
945 Prospect Crescent 
Frank Lloyd Wright 
See plate 28 

10 Hawkes House 1905 
408 Arroyo Terrace 
Charles and Henry Greene 

11 Neill House c.1905 
400 Arroyo Terrace 
Charles and Henry Greene 

12 White Sisters House 1902 
370 Arroyo Terrace 
Charles and Henry Greene 

13 Greene House (Charles) 1901 
368 Arroyo Terrace 
Charles and Henry Greene 

14 Irwin House 1903-1908 
240 N. Grand Ave. 
Charles and Henry Greene 
Being reconditioned by new 
owners, Mr. and Mrs. Allen 
O. Smith, this is one of the 
most eccentric creations of the 
Greenes-mainly Charles. 

See plate 14 



108 



J4 



15 Culbertson House (James) 1902 
235 N. Grand Ave. 

Charles and Henry Greene 
Altered, but beautiful door and 
bay window (1907) remain. 

16 Gamble House 1908 
4 Westmoreland PI. 
Charles and Henry Greene 
See plate 16 

17 Cole House 1906 

2 Westmoreland PI. 
Charles and Henry Greene 

18 Pasadena Public Library 1925 
285 E. Walnut St. 

Myron Hunt and H. C. Chambers 
See plate 32 

19 Pasadena City Hall 1925-1927 
100 N. Garfield Ave. 

John Bakewell, Jr. and 
Arthur Brown, Jr. 
Pasadena's contribution to Civic 
Center planning in Spanish Neo- 
Baroque style. 

20 First City Bank 1961 
123 S.Lake Ave. 

Thornton Ladd and John Kelsey 

21 Pasadena Playhouse 
1924-1925 

37 El Molino Ave. 
Elmer Grey 



22 Green Hotel 1889-1902 
50 E. Green St. 

Original building, 1889, designed 
by F. L. Roehrig; second section 
designed in 1902 by John Par- 
kinson. 



23 Robinson House 1906 
195 S.Grand Ave. 
Charles and Henry Greene 

24 Ford House 1907 
215 S.Grand Ave. 
Charles and Henry Greene 

25 Johnson House 1948 
535 S. Grand Ave. 

Gregory Ain, Joseph L.Johnson, 
and Alfred W. Day 

26 House c.1900 
637 S. Grand Ave. 
John C.Austin 

Based on Lycian House. Similar 
houses occur throughout the 
greater Los Angeles Area. Two 
other examples in nearby Sierra 
Madre are located at 592 Man- 
zanita Ave. and at 550 Sierra 
Madre Blvd. 

27 Neighborhood Church, Millikan 
Religious Education Building 
1956 

S. Pasadena Ave. and 
W.California Blvd. 
Whitney R. Smith and 
Wayne R.Williams 



109 



J4 



Original Church built in 1887, in 
the Shingle style. The Education 
Building is a fine example of 
fusing old and new without 
compromising either. 

28 Greene House (Henry) 1904 
146BellefontaineSt. 
Charles and Henry Greene 

29 Williams House 1951 
579 Garden Ln. 
Whitney R. Smith and 
Wayne R.Williams 

30 Dunham House 1956 
495 Madeline Dr. 
Carl L. Maston 

31 Pitcairn House 1906 
289 W. State St. 
Charles and Henry Greene 

32 "Prospect Houses" 1948 
543 and 545 Prospect Ln. 
Evera Van Bailey and 
William Grey Purcell ? 

33 Flores Adobe 1837, 
completed 1850's 
1804 Foothill St. 

34 Pasadena Ice Co. 1901 

S. Arroyo just north of Glenarm 
Charles and Henry Greene 

35 Bullocks Pasadena Department 
Store 1947 

401 S. Lake St. 
WalterWurdeman and 
Welton Becket 
See plate 55 



36 California Institute of Techno- 
logy, Beckman Auditorium 1963 
Constance St. and 

S. Michigan Ave. 
Edward D. Stone 

37 Octagonal House c.1880 
85 S. Allen Ave. 

Built by Gilbert Longfellow 

38 Crocker House 1909 
979 S. El Molino Ave. 
Charles and Henry Greene 

39 Grey House c.1912 
1372 S. El Molino Ave. 
Elmer Grey 

Grey's early designs In Califor- 
nia continued the experimental 
work which both he and Myron 
Hunt had produced in Chicago 
under the influence of Sullivan 
and Wright. His own house in 
Pasadena Is a successful essay 
in what could be thought of as 
the California version of the 
Arts and Crafts. Its plan was a 
development out of the Queen 
Anne Shingle style; its simple 
stucco surfaced walls and na- 
turally treated wood detailing 
are a result of the influence of 
English architecture. 

40 Blacker House 1906 
1177 Hillcrest Ave. 
Charles and Henry Greene 
(really Charles alone) 

One of the two greatest Greene 



110 



J4 



and Greene houses (the other, 
the Gamble House). 
See plate 14 

41 Culbertson House (Cordelia) 
1911 

1188 Hillcrest Ave. 
Charles and Henry Greene 
See plate 18 

42 Hurschler House c.1949 
1200 Hillcrest Ave. 
Gregory Ain 

The houses of Gregory Ain, 
especially examples such as 
this, have had a decided effect 
on American architecture. The 
informal plan, with enclosing 
walls and carport, represents a 
demonstration of the Interna- 
tional style in Southern Cali- 
fornia. 

43 Freeman House c. 1914 
1330 S. Hillcrest Ave. 
Arthurs. Heineman 

44 Hanish House 1951 
940 Hillcrest PI. 
Henry Eggers and 
Walter W.Wilkman 



SAN MARINO 

45 Neff House 1929 
1883 Orlando Rd. 
Wallace Neff 
See plate 39 



46 Huntington Gallery and Library 
1910; 1920 

Stratford and Oxford Rds. 
Myron Hunt 
(with H. C. Chambers) 



47 El Molino Viejo c.1812 
1120 Old Mill Road 



SOUTH PASADENA 

48 Miltlmore House 1911 
1301 S. Chelten Wy. 
Irving Gill 

One of the most beautiful of the 
Gill houses; notable for what he 
called his "green rooms;" per- 
golas still covered with vines. 

49 Offices for the Community 
Facilities Planners 1959 
1414 Fair Oaks Ave. 
Whitney R. Smith and 
Wayne R.Williams 

50 Packard House 1924 
931 N. Gainsborough Dr. 
R. M. Schindler 

See plate 30 

51 The Stuart Company 1958 
3300 Block E. Foothill Blvd. 
Edward D. Stone 



111 



J4 



ALTADENA 



LOS ANGELES COUNTY 



52 Lowe House 1934 
596 E. Punahou St. 
Harwell Hamilton Harris 
(Carl Anderson, Associated) 



55 Knapp House 1939 
(not on map) 
1801 North County Ln. 
Garrett Van Pelt 



53 Case Study House no. 20 1958 
2275 N. Santa Rosa Ave. 
Conrad Buff, Calvin Straub and 
Donald Hensman 

54 Beard House 1935 
1981 Meadowbrook Ln. 
Richard J. Neutra 



112 



AREAK 

Sierra Madre, Arcadia, El Monte, Baldwin Park, Covina, Azuza and 
Glendora. 

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries much of the land east of Los 
Angeles was utilized for orchards, vineyards and farming. Most of the 
towns In the area were established during the economic boom of 1887. 
Today with urban sprawl and smog, it is on the whole a visually depress- 
ing region. A few of the northern communities. Sierra Madre, Monrovia 
and Arcadia, have been able to retain some of their original rural charm. 
Monrovia's Aztec Hotel by Stacy-Judd is one of the most exotic examples 
of the Pre-Columbian revival buildings of the 1920's still to be found in 
southern California. On the hillside above Sierra Madre and Monrovia one 
will discover many one and two story wood shingled bungalows of the 
period 1905-1915, and Spanish revival and even Pueblo revival houses of 
the 1920's. A representative group of these houses can be seen on High- 
land Place, between Foothill Boulevard and Lotone Street in Monrovia. 
On the grounds of the Los Angeles County Arboretum is located the 
perfect example of Victoriana - the Baldwin Guest House and nearby 
Coach House. Also on the grounds of the Arboretum is the mid 19th cen- 
tury Hugo Reid Adobe. 



113 



K ARCADIA AREA SIERRA MADRE 



HBRMOSA 



:2 



CARTER AVE 

-4 ALEGERIAAVE 




LAUREL AYE- 



SIERRA MAORE BLVD. 



m. TRAIL AVE 



MICHILLINPA 
BLVD. 



ORANGE GROVE AVE 



BALDWIN AVE 



FOOTHILL BLVD. 



GRANOVIEW 
AVE 



SANTA ANITA 
AVE 



8, 



ROSE/HEAD 
BLVD 



COLORADO ST 



L. A. ARBORETUM 7 *5 




COLORADO 



ST 



MA6N0LA 
AVE 



HUNTINGTON 



PR 



K ARCADIA AREA 



SIERRA MADRE 

1 Baldwin House (now Anoakia 
School for Girls) 1910 
701 W. Foothill Blvd. 
Arthur Benton 



Contains elaborate Tiffany 
chandeliers. 

2 Mulville House 1949 
580 N. Hermosa Ave. 
Harwell Hamilton Harris 



114 



3 Church of the Ascension 1888 
N. E. Corner Baldwin and 
Laurel Aves. 

Attributed to Ernest A. Coxhead 

4 Lewis Courts 1910 

Mt. Trail and Allegria Sts. 
Irving Gill 

In this project Gill provided in- 
dividual terraces and an en- 
closed porch or loggia for each 
of the small two bedroom cot- 
tages. The open area In the 
center contained a central per- 
gola and croquet court. 



MONROVIA 

8 Aztec Hotel 1925 
W. Foothill Blvd. at 
N. Magnola Ave. 
Robert B. Stacy-Judd 
A wild and enjoyable version of 
the Pre-Columbian revival of the 
1920's. The architect, Stacy- 
Judd, wrote several fascinating 
articles explaining and defend- 
ing his use of "Mayan" archi- 
tectural forms. See "Maya Ar- 
chitecture" in the Pacific Coast 
Architect, Vol. XXX, Nov. 1926, 
pp. 26-31. 



ARCADIA 

5 Reld House after 1841 
301 N. Baldwin Ave. (Arboretum) 
Restored in 1961 to its "original" 
condition. 



CHAPMAN WOODS 

9 Case study House 1947 
(not on map) 
857 Chapea Rd. 
Sumner Spaulding and John Rex 



6 Baldwin Guest Cottage 1881 
301 N. Baldwin Ave. (Arboretum) 
A.A.Bennett 

A fanciful Queen Anne or East- 
lake extravaganza, beautifully 
restored and maintained. The 
adjoining coach house is more 
interesting architecturally than 
the house. 
See plate 9 

7 Baldwin Coach House 1879 

301 N. Baldwin Ave. (Arboretum) 
A. A. Bennett 



WEST COVINA 

10 St. Martha's Episcopal Church 
1956-1962 (not on map) 
520 S. Lark Ellen 
Carleton Winslow, Jr. 



WHITTIER 

11 Krause House 1950 
(not on map) 
8513 La Sierra Ave. 
Raphael S. Soriano 



115 



AREA L 

Santa Barbara, Montecito, Ventura, and Ojai. 

Over the years the name of Santa Barbara has become synonymous with 
the Spanish Colonial revival and with the ideal of closely controlled city 
planning. The acknowledged master of this style, George Washington 
Smith, had his office in Montecito, and from 1916 through 1930 he design- 
ed a multitude of buildings for this community and for Santa Barbara. In 
downtown Santa Barbara are situated two of the really great monuments 
of the Spanish Colonial revival, the Santa Barbara Courthouse and the 
Fox Arlington Theatre. A walk through the central part of downtown Santa 
Barbara and a visit to one of the many estates in Montecito will indicate 
better than encounters elsewhere what these Spanish Colonial revivalist 
architects were seeking to accomplish. In addition to its many restored 
19th century adobe houses and its famous Neo-classic Mission Church, 
Santa Barbara and nearby Montecito contain one of the finest early Cali- 
fornia bungalows, "La Chiquita" by Francis Underbill, the first building 
of Frank Lloyd Wright on the West Coast, the Stewart house, and an ex- 
cellent Maybeck, the Bingham house. Santa Barbara, too, has long en- 
joyed a reputation for luxurious resort hotels. The first of these was the 
Shingle style Arlington (1876) and later the Mission revival Potter Hotel, 
designed in 1901 by John Austin. Neither of these exist today, but a good 
Indication of the Spanish Colonial revival version of the fancy resort hotel 
can be gained by visiting the Santa Barbara Biltmore, designed In the 
1920's by Reginald Johnson. 

Ojai is of interest for its Spanish Colonial revival town planning by Mead 
and Requa, and its houses by the Greene brothers, by Elmer Grey, Neutra, 
Harris and Rodney Walker. In addition to its Mission, Ventura's Thompson 
Boulevard is still lined In part with a wide array of turn-of-the-century.; 
carpenter versions of the Queen Anne revival. 



116 



L1 



LI SANTA BARBARA AREA HOPE RANCH 



STATE 



VIA PRESADA 

1. 

^VIA 
'HIERBA 



LACUMBREi 
GOLFAND 

AAGumX ^^n^JfFI HWY 101 SO 
Ulanc^}^ ^^^^ I SANTA BARBARA 




TO SANTA 
BARBARA 



BENDITA 



SIIVESTRERD 

SONR/ENTE RP 
'3 

CUERVO AVE 



117 



LI L2 



LI SANTA BARBARA AREA HOPE RANCH 



1 Eaton House 1963 
800 Via Hierba 
Wallace Neff 
See plate 79 



Bryce House 1924 

1555 Roble Dr. 

George Washington Smith 

This large house is oriented 

around three interior court- 



yards; terraces and pergolas 
project off to all sides. 

Lansburgh House 1958 
4070 Sonriente Rd. 
Robert Garland 

Composed of a series of three 
pavilions connected by glass 
passages. The central living 
hall serves as a passage and 
as an area for formal dining. 



L2 SANTA BARBARA AREA SANTA BARBARA 



1 Hunt-Stambach House 
late 19th century 
404 W. Montecito St. 
A. P. Barber 
See plate 6 

2a Fernald House 1862 
412 W. Montecito St. 
A 19th century Queen Anne 
house with much Gothic detail. 

2b Trussel-Winchester House 1854 
412 W. Montecito St. 

3 De la Guerra House 1826 
11-19 E. De la Guerra St. 

4 Meridian Studios 1923 

E. De la Guerra, between Ana- 
capa and Santa Barbara Sts. 
George Washington Smith 
These small studios are grouped 
around an intimate irregularly 
shaped central courtyard. 



5 Covarrubias-Fremont House 
1817 
715 Santa Barbara St. 



6 Cristobal (Ramirez) House 1825 
835 Laguna St. 



7 El Paseo 1922-1923 
Canon Perdido and 
Anacapa Sts. 
James Osborne Craig 
(Completed by Mrs. James 
Osborne Craig and Carleton 
Winslow, Sr.) 

Without question one of the 
most successful of the court- 
yard shopping centers of the 
1920's. Several historic 19th 
century buildings are included 
in the complex. 
See plate 25 



118 



L2 SANTA BARBARA AREA SANTA BARBARA 



L2 




TALLANTRD 



TREASURE DR 
\13 



^ 



^6 ^ ^ ^ 

^ i ^ ^ '^JL^f "^^''^^^ 
^ MISSION^ (y^l^YONRE) 



LOSOLIVOS- 
ST 



PEDREGOSA 
ST 




MISSION 
PLAZA 



Pl/^za'^ ALAMEA \ MJ 
RUBIO%^ PADRE }hV^^ 
I W^ SERRA ^5 



PROSPECT 
^•MVE 

LAGUNA \\ 

GRAN PAVE 






MISSION RIDGE 
\RD 

PO^RRP 
'16 



SOLA ST 

VICTORIA ST 

-ANAPAMUST 

FIGUEROAST 

CARILLOST 
■CANONPERPIDOST 
DELAGUERRAST 
ORTEGA ST 



DOi/fR 



ARBOLAPORP 



LASALTURAS 
RP 



H//Y101 SO 
MONTECITO 



119 



L2 



8 Lobero Theatre 1922-1924 
33 E. Canon Perdido St. 
George Washington Smith 

9 Hill-Carrillo House 1826 
11-15 E.Carrillo St. 

10 Santa Barbara County 
Courthouse 1929 
Anacapa and Figueroa Sts. 
William Mooser and Co. 

One could almost say that this is 
the monument of the Spanish 
Colonial revival style in Southern 
California. 
See plate 38 

11 Fox Arlington Theatre 1929 
1317 State St. 

Edwards and Plunkett 
Thetheatre proper is approached 
through a long colonnaded ar- 
cade with narrow gardens to 
each side. Two pedestrian 
streets containing small shops 
lead off the theatre entrance. 
See plate 39 

12 Mission Santa Barbara 1786; 
1815-1820 

Los Olivos and Laguna Sts. 
Many restorations. 
See plate 1 

13 Samarkand (originally Boy's 
School, later Hotel, now Hospital 
and Retirement Home) 1915 
2663 Treasure Dr. 

J. C. Pool 



A building by a local Santa Bar- 
bara architect which is remark- 
ably similar to the concurrent 
work of Irving Gill. 

14 Bentz House 1911 
1741 Prospect Ave. 
Charles and Henry Greene 

15 Burke House 1922-1923 
1849 Mission Ridge Rd. 
George Washington Smith 
This two story town house faces 
a small formally laid out walled 
garden. The living and dining 
rooms open to a terrace which 
enjoys a view over the city and 
ocean below. 

16 Slavin House 1957 
1322 Dover Rd. 
Richard J. Neutra 
See plate 74 

17 Kelly House 1915 
1111 Mission Ridge Rd. 
Hudson Thomas 

A rare building by this Bay Area 
contemporary of Bernard May- 
beck. In plan, the house is "V" 
shaped, the entrance being in 
the center, the living room to 
one side and the dining room 
and service wing to the other. 
The interior of the "V" is occu- 
pied by a brick terrace which 
enjoys a superb view of the 
mountains. 
See plate 19 



120 



L3 SANTA BARBARA AREA MONTECITO 



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121 



L3 



L3 SANTA BARBARA AREA MONTECITO 



1 Crematorium, Santa Barbara 
Cemetery 1924-1925 
Cabrillo Blvd. 

George Washington Smith 

2 Santa Barbara Biltmore Hotel 
1926 

1260 Channel Dr. 

Reginald Johnson 

A large rambling hotel in the 

Spanish Colonial revival style, 

Many of the public rooms open 

onto courtyards and terraces. 

3 Underhill House (La Chiquita) 
1904-1905 

Hill Rd. (no street number) 
Francis T. Underhill 
The California bungalow at Its 
best; In its plan, its use of large 
glass areas, it well equals the 
work of the Greene brothers. It 
is now part of the Santa Barbara 
Biltmore and its interior has 
been divided into two apart- 
ments. 
See plate 13 

4 Bliss House 1916 
300 Hot Springs Rd. 
Carleton M.Winslow, Sr. 

The Churrigueresque design of 

this house is a direct outcome 

of the San Diego Exposition of 

1915. 

See plate 22 



5 Heberton House 1916 
240 Middle Rd. 

George Washington Smith 
Smith's first house in California. 
Placed close to the road in a 
European fashion. The living 
and dining rooms open to a ter- 
race and small formal garden 
beyond. 
See plate 21 

6 Bear House 1955 
1125 High Rd. 

Thornton Ladd; studio added by 
Robert Garland, 1961. 
The main space In this house 
may be utilized as a single open 
area or divided into living, din- 
ing and study-guest areas. The 
new story and a half studio has 
been placed to the rear and 
sympathetically tied to the rest 
of the house. 
See plate 71 

7 Stewart House 1909-1910 
196 Summit Rd. 

Frank Lloyd Wright 
Frank Lloyd Wright's first house 
on the West Coast. It utilized his 
open and cruciform plan, domi- 
nated by a centrally placed two 
story living room. 
See plate 17 

8 Peabody House 1917 
2056 Eucalyptus Hill Rd. 
Francis T. Underhill 



122 



L3 



An early version of the Spanish 
Colonial revival. Although re- 
modelled to house the Center 
for the Study of Democratic In- 
stitutions, one can still experi- 
ence the original characteristics 
of the house. Also see the lower 
service buildings, hidden below 
the entrance terrace and drive. 



9 Jefferson House (Mira Flores) 
1921-1922 
21 Ridge Rd. 
Reginald D.Johnson 



10 Fenton House 1959 
750 Hot Springs Rd. 
John Henderson 
A perfect marriage of exterior 
and interior space. The garden 
is as much a part of the total 
architecture as the enclosed 
space of the house. 
See plate 72 



11 Steedman House 1922-1925 
1387 E.Valley Rd. 
George Washington Smith 
This house and its gate lodge 
are a classic example of Smith's 
work. The house and its grounds 
are one of the best preserved 
of his buildings, and the house 
still contains its original fur- 
nishings of the 1920's. 
See plate 31 



12 Erving House 1953 
650San YsidroRd. 

Lutah M. Riggs (Arvin Shaw, 
designer) 

The high glass peak of this 
house was planned to give a 
view of the mountains. The 
house is separated from the 
drive-entrance by the carport 
and an entrance patio. 
See plate 67 

13 Bingham House 1917 
699 San YsidroRd. 
Bernard Maybeck 
See plate 23 

14 FourAttached Suburban Houses 
1958 

1516-1526 E.Valley Rd. 
Thornton M. Abell 
Although connected and treated 
as a single unified design, each 
of these houses is entirely self- 
contained. Each contains nu- 
merous terraces and enclosed 
patios which provide complete 
privacy. 

15 Tremaine House 1948 
1636 Moore Rd. 
Richard J. Neutra 

The Tremaine house well illus- 
trates Neutra's ability to retain 
the precision of man-made 
forms, but at the same time to 
fully integrate the house into its 
landscape. 



123 



L3 L4 



16 Ortega House nnid-19th century 
29 Sheffield Dr. 

A two story and balconied Mon- 
terey style house. 

17 All Saints by the Sea Church 
1900 

83 Eucalyptus Ln. 
Arthur Benton 



19 Tuttle House 1962 
885 Toro Canyon Rd. 
Paul Tuttle 

This small house situated high 
on the ridge of a hill comprises 
a single room, used for living, 
dining, sleeping, and working. 
See plate 78 



18 Vedanta Temple (Vedanta 
Society of Southern California) 
1955 

901 Ladera Ln. 
Lutah M. Riggs 
See plate 70 



CARPINTERIA 

20 Dangerfield Beach House 1955 
3605 Padaro Ln. 
Paul Tuttle 



1 



L4 SANTA BARBARA AREA OJAI 



1 Ojai Town Center 1916-1917 
Ojai 

Frank Mead and Richard Requa 
A desire to replan and to unify 
the townscape was one of the 
many influences which came 
out of the San Diego Exposi- 
tion of 1915. In Ojai the town 
name was changed from Nord- 
hoff; the older wooden stores 
were remodeled and a new post 
office and other structures were 
built by the San Diego firm of 
Mead and Requa. 



2 Moore House 1952 
512 N. Foothill Rd. 
Richard J. Neutra 

3 Ladd House 1913 
818 N. Foothill Rd. 
Charles and Henry Greene 

4 Pratt House 1909 
1330 N. Foothill Rd. 
Charles and Henry Greene 
This house represents one of 
the high points in the career of 
the Greene brothers. The quality 



i 



124 



L4 



of its detailing and of its original 
furnishings are equalled only by 
the Gamble and the Blacker 
house in Pasadena. The plan of 
the Pratt house is one of the 
most imaginative ever developed 
by the Greenes. 

5 Walker House 1957-1958 
Rancho Dr. 
Rodney Walker 
See plate 74 



6 Wyle House 1947 
1964 Rancho Dr. 
Harwell Hamilton Harris 
See plate 55 

VENTURA 

7 Mission San Buenaventura 1782 
Main and Figueroa Sts. 

8 Camulos House mid 19th 
century 

2 mi. east of Piru on Hwy 126 

9 Gould House 1924 
End of Lynn Dr. 
Charles and Henry Greene 



125 



.1 



1 

(J 



AREA M 

San Diego, Coronado, La Jolla, Del Mar, Rancho Santa Fe, Oceanside, 
Escondido, San Clemente, and San Juan Capistrano 

Like downtown Los Angeles, San Diego retained until very recently many 
wonderful examples of 19th century Victoriana. Most of these have now 
been pulled down to make way for urban renewal projects and for free- 
ways. Still, a drive through the National City district of southern San 
Diego, between Harbor Drive and Harbison Ave. will reveal numerous 
19th century wooden houses. San Diego (actually Coronado) boasts the 
only remaining monument of the great Shingle style resort hotels which 
used to abound in Southern California: the Hotel del Coronado, designed 
in 1888 by James W. Reid and Merritt Reid. San Diego and La Jolla are 
also a mecca for those interested in the pioneer-modern buildings of 
Irving Gill. Balboa Park still retains many of the buildings originally con- 
structed for the Exposition of 1915. It was this interpretation of the Spanish 
Churrigueresque by Bertram Goodhue and Carleton Winslow, Sr., which 
gave the great impetus to the Spanish Colonial revival in southern Cali- 
fornia. It was in the later 1920's that two entire communities, San Cle- 
mente and Rancho Santa Fe, were laid out as "Spanish Villages." While 
in truth, neither community conveys anything approaching the visual 
quality of a Spanish or Mexican town, they do reveal some excellent city 
planning ideas. Lilian Rice's row of court-yarded town houses in central 
Rancho Santa Fe (designed c. 1923— 24) pose a fine solution for the urban 
house. The region from San Juan Capistrano to San Diego includes a 
number of late 18th and early 19th century Mission churches and adobe 
houses. 



126 



M1SAN DIEGO AREA OCEANSIDE 



Ml 



BUS 101 



PJTMAR 
AVE 



HWyi01 NO 

HORNE LOS ANGELES 

ST 



\ 




MISSION AVE 

i^^ST 
TOPEKAST- 

MICHIGAN 
AVE 



MISSION 

SAN LUIS REY 
A 4MI 
PALA MISSION 
20 Ml 



DIVISION AVE 



SAN DIEGO FREEWAY 
SO SAN DIEGO 



M1SAN DIEGO AREA 
OCEANSIDE 

1 Kindergarten 1931 
Division and Center Aves. 
Irving Gill 

2 Oceanside City Hall (Police, 
Fire Stations) 1929 

704, (714) Third St. 

Irving Gill 

All of the buildings have been 

badly remodeled. 

3 Mission San Luis Rey de Francia 
1815 (not on map) 

4 mi.due east of Oceanside on 
State Hwy. 76 
See plate 3 



Pala Mission (Chapel of 
San Antonio de Pala) 1815 
(not on map) 

20 ml. due east of Oceanside on 
State Hwy. 76 



SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO 

Mission San Juan Capistrano 
1776; Chapel 1777 (not on map) 
Ortega Hwy. and Camino 
Capistrano 

The Imposing church was de- 
stroyed by several earthquakes, 
though the ruins are very ro- 
mantic. The chapel fared better. 



127 



Ml M2 



6 Garcia House c.1880's 
(not on map) 

Camino Capistrano between 
38840 and 38830 

A late, much remodeled, two 
story, balconied version of the 
Monterey style. 
See plate 8 



M2SAN DIEGO AREA LAJOLLA 

1 Pueblo Ribera Courts 1923 
230 Gravilla St. 
R.M.Schindler 

See plate 27 

2 Octagonal House c. 1905-1915 
230 Bonair St. 

There are several of these very 
interesting six and eight sided 
houses to be found in the San 
Diego area. 

3 Sherwood House 1925-1928 
7040 Neptune PI. 

George Washington Smith 
This Is the only house in the 
San Diego area by this master 
of the Spanish Colonial revival. 

4 Bishop's School for Girls 

La Jolla Blvd. and Prospect St. 

Bentham Hall 1909 

Irving Gill; remodeled by Louis 

Gill C.1920 

ScrippsHall 1910 

Irving Gill 



ESCONDIDO 

7 Wood House 1911 (not on map) 
455 E. 5th St. 

John Lloyd Wright ■ 

The first house of John Lloyd 
Wright in California. 



{ 
\ 



GilmanHall 1916 
Irving Gill j 

Low tower with dome c.1920 
Louis Gill 

Recreation Building c.1920 
Louis Gill 

Chapel and Tower 1916 - 

CarletonWinslow, Sr.; tower 
originally designed in 1916, built 
according to the original 
scheme in 1930. 
CummingsHall 1959-1960 
Robert Mosher and Roy Drew 
The buildings at this school pro- 
vide a good picture of archi- 
tecture In Southern California 
over the past 50 years; starting 
with Irving Gill's pioneering mo- 
dern work, through the overtly 
eclectic buildings of Carleton 
Winslow, Sr., to the conscious 
attempt by Mosher and Drew to 
fit their building into the existing 
structures. 
See plate 21 



128 



M2SAN DIEGO AREA LA JOLLA 



M2 



SALK INSTITUTE FOR 
BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 




T0 14 



T0RREYPINE5 
RO 



RUE PEANNE 



129 



M2 



5 La Jolla Community Center 1914 
600 block Prospect St. 

Irving Gill 

It was in this building that Gill 
employed the tilt slab method 
of concrete construction. The 
walls were poured into the forms 
laid on the ground and when 
dry were tilted Into place. 

6 La Jolla Women's Club 1913 
Corner of Draper Av. and 
Silverado St. 

Irving Gill 

Certainly one of Gill's most sig- 
nificant buildings. Here one can 
experience Gill's purity of ex- 
pression of the basic form of 
the cube and the arch. 
See plate 19 

7 Catholic Church (Mary Star of 
the Sea) 1937 

Corner of Girard Ave. and 

Kline St. 

Carleton WInslow, Sr. 

8 Robinson House 1929 
1600 Ludington Ln. 
Lilian J. Rice 

Lilian Rice is regrettably little 
known outside the San Diego 
area. In certain ways her work 
parallels that of Maybeck and 
of William Wurster. This wood 
shathed house contains an ex- 
citing interior space, arranged 
on a variety of different levels. 

9 Lek House 1942 
1600 Mecca Dr. 
Harwell Hamilton Harris 



10 Wright House 1951 
7821 Hillside Dr. 
John Lloyd Wright 
See plate 65 

11 Bailey House 1907 
1962 Princess St. 
Irving Gill 

See plate 15 

12 Compton House 1948 
Opposite no. 2 Roseland Dr. 
John Lloyd Wright 

13 Case Study House (Triad) 1960 
Ruede Anne 

Killingsworth, Brady and Smith 
See plate 77 

14 The Salk Institute for Biological 
Sciences (Salk Research 
Center) 1963 (not on map) 
1001 La Jolla Scenic Dr. 
Louis I.Kahn 

When completed this complex 
of buildings will certainly be- 
come an outstanding architec- 
tural monument for the West 
Coast. 

15 Wright House 1947 (not on map) 
420 Serpentine 

John Lloyd Wright 

DEL MAR 

16 McPherson House 1947 
(not on map) 

101 Nob 

John Lloyd Wright 

Originally planned as a Studio. 



130 



M2 M3 



17 Rancho de Santa Fe Town 
Houses C.1 923-1 924 
(not on map) 
Paseo Delicias between 
La Grande and El Tordo 
Lilian J. Rice 

Rancho Santa Fe, along 
nearby San Clemente, 



with 
was 



planned as a new community 



in Spanish style. The general 
scheme for Rancho Santa Fe 
was by the San Diego architect 
Richard S. Requa. Lilian Rice's 
row of connected town houses 
close to the center of the town 
represents an excellent ap- 
proach to urban planning. 
See plate 29 



M3SAN DIEGO AREA POINT LOMA 

OLD SAN DIEGO 

MISSION BAY 
STATE PAKK 



DUMASST 



CHATWORTH 
POINTLOMA IBLVP 
AVE\ y NIMITZ 

BLm 



TALBOT ST 

JENNINGS 
ST 



WARNERST 




SILVER GATE 
AVE 



131 



M3 M4 



M3SAN DIEGO AREA POINT LOMA 



Price House c. 1910-1912 
3202 Elliot St. 

There are a number of houses 
in the San Diego area which 
were obviously inspired by the 
midwestern work of Sullivan, of 
Wright, and of George Maher. 

Other examples nearby are at: 
3279 Homer 
3120 Goldsmith 
2704 Evergreen St. 



2 Richard House 1952; add. 1964 
3360 Harbor View Dr. 

Sim Bruce Richards 
See plate 66 

3 Octagonal House c. 1900 
3636 Dupont St. 

Originally one of a group of 
houses built for a school foun- 
ded by Catherine Tingley. This 
house was moved to its present 
site in 1931. 



M4SAN DIEGO AREA OLD SAN DIEGO 



1 Pedrona House c. 1840's 
2616 San Diego Ave. 

2 Lopez House c. 1835 
3890 Twiggs St. 

3 Church of the Immaculate 
Conception "The Adobe 
Chapol" 1858; rebuilt 1937 
3950 block Conde St. 

An instance of the Southwestern 
Territorial style in Southern 
California. The wood detailing 
around the doors and windows 
was inspired by the much earlier 
eastern Greek revival. 
See plate 5 



4 Whaley House 1856-1857 
2482 San Diego Ave. 
Restored 1956. 

5 Estudillo House ("Ramona's 
Marriage Place") c.1827 
4000 Mason St. 

Like most California adobes the 
present appearance of this house 
is the result of 20th century 
restoration and addition. 
See plate 4 



6 Casa de Pico Motel 
2754 Calhoun St. 
Richard Requa 



1939 



132 



M4 



M4SAN DIEGO AREA OLD SAN DIEGO 

\ PACIFIC 



SAN DIEGO 
RIVER 



WALLACES? 

/ 

MASON ST 



TWIGGSSTl 

HARNEYST 

CONDEST^ 
I / 

ARTISTA ST 




INFERSr 

8 



/ 



SAN DIEGO 
/ AVE 



BALBOA 
PARK 



An early and highly successful 
motel; the central space is re- 
served for a garden and the 
automobile has been kept out 
of the interior of the complex. 
See plate 49 



7 Bandini House 1829 
corner of Mason and 
Calhoun Sts. 



8 Garrillo House c.1810 
2700 block on Juan St. 

9 Junlpero Serra Museum 
1928-1929 

Presidio Park 

William Templeton Johnson 

Probably the architect's best 

work in the Spanish Colonial 

revival idiom. 

See plate 37 



133 



M5 



M5SAN DIEGO AREA BALBOA PARK, SAN DIEGO 



RANDOLPHS! 

•'1 TO 

OLDSANDIEGO 

WASHINGTON ST 




12. 

2MI TURN OFF NO FAIRMONT A 
1Mi TO MISSION SAN DIEGO 
PEALCALA 



PANAM 
PLAZA 



FERRY 

TOCORONADO 
\ 
\ 



134 



M5 



M5SAN DIEGO AREA BALBOA PARK, SAN DIEGO 



Golden West Hotel 1913 
720 4th St. 

John Lloyd Wright (in associa- 
tion with Harrison Albright) 
The young John Lloyd Wright 
designed this reinforced con- 
crete hotel in 1913, as well as a 
house in nearby Escondido. 



Santa Fe Railroad Station 1915 
corner of Kettner Blvd. and 
West Broadway 
Bakewell and Brown 



Christian Science Church 1904 

3rd. Ave. and Ash St. 

Irving Gill 

Mainly of interest for its use of 

materials and for its details. 



6 Klauber (Hugo) House 1908 
2626 6th St. 
Irving Gill 
See plate 16 



7 Klauber (Melville) House 1907 
3060 6th St. 
Irving Gill 



8 Lee House no. 4 1912 
3367 Albatross St. 
Irving Gill 

Other Gill houses on Albatross 
St. are: Gill House, 3109 Alba- 
tross (1904); Lee House no. 2, 
3353 Albatross SL (1905); Teats 
House no. 3, 3307 Albatross St. 
(1922). 
See plate 15 



4 Panama-California Exposition 
1915 

EI Prado St., Balboa Park 
Bertram Goodhue (Carleton 
Winslow, Sr., supervising 
architect) 

Important in inspiring a Churri- 
gueresque revival. 
See plate 20 



5 Christian Science Church 
2nd Ave. and Laurel St. 
Irving Gill 



1909 



9 Teats House no. 2 1912 
3415 Albatross St. 
Irving Gill 



10 Burnham House 1906 
3565 7th St. 
Irving Gill 

Other nearby Gill houses are: 
Lee House no. 1, 3378 7th SL 
(1905); Cosbitt House, 3326 7th 
SL (1906); Lee House no. 3, 3574 
7th SL (1906); Teats House no.1. 
3560 7th St. (1906). 



135 



M5 M6 



11 Francis W. Parker School 1913 
4201 Randolph St. 
William Templeton Johnson 
An early example of the open 
air school building in Southern 
California. The "stripped" ar- 
chitecture of the building is si- 
milar to the concurrent work of 
Irving Gill. 



12 Mission San Diego de Alcala 
1813 (not on map) 
U. S. Hwy. 80, 2 mi. to Fairmont, 
then North 
See plate 2 



M6SAN DIEGO AREA 



CORONADO 

1 Wilde Flats 1919 

Corner of Palm Ave. and D St. 
Irving Gill 

The design of this building and 
that of the Horatio West Apart- 
ments in Santa Monica well 
illustrate how close Gill was 
to the International Style which 
developed during the 1920's. 

2 Christian Science Church 1929 
Corner of C Ave. and 8th St. 
Irving Gill 

3 Thompson House 1912 
1156 Isabella Ave. 
Irving Gill 

4 Tutt House 1905 
519 Ocean Blvd. 
Irving Gill 



5 Hotel del Coronado 1888 
1500 Orange Ave. 
James W. Reid and Merritt Reld 
Shingle style monument of re- 
sort architecture. The only large 
19th century wooden resort ho- 
tel still standing in Southern 
California. Recent remodelings 
have somewhat marred the ori- 
ginal character of the building. 
See plate 9 

MISSION BAY AREA 

6 Aquatic Control Center (City 
Administration Office) 1961 
(not on map) 

Mission Bay Park, Quivira Basin 
(no street number) 
Sim Bruce Richards 

7 ZLAC Rowing Club 1929 
(not on map) 

1111 Pacific Beach Dr. 
Lilian J. Rice; new boat house 
by Sim Bruce Richards 1963 



136 



M6SAN DIEGO AREA 



M6 



SANQIEGO 



FERRY 




5ANDIE60 
BAY 



137 



AREA N 

Palm Springs, Riverside, San Bernardino, Redlands, Claremont and 
Pomona. 

Much of the recent architecture in Palm Springs is as empty and flam- 
boyant as that of Los Angeles. There are, though, a few significant ex- 
amples of modern architecture in the city: especially the pre and post 
World War II work of Albert Frey and John Clark, two important Neutra 
houses, the Miller house of 1938 and the Kaufmann house of 1947. The 
Mission Inn, Riverside (designed and built during the years 1890 to 
1901 by Arthur Benton and added to for several decades), has long been 
considered the great monument of the Mission revival style. Actually the 
Mission Inn embodies a potpourri of architectural ideas, ranging from 
such daring modern innovations as exposing the reinforced concrete 
wall to the Churrigueresque like space of its northwest wing. Next to the 
Inn, at the corner of 7th St. and Orange Ave, is another version of the 
Mission revival, the Riverside Public Library (designed by Burnham and 
Bliesner in 1903). The exterior fronts of many stores in downtown River- 
side were remodeled in the Mission and Spanish Colonial revival styles 
during the 1920's. One of Southern California's most perfect version of 
the Parisian Beaux Arts classical buildings is the Riverside County Court- 
house, designed around 1903. Magnolia Avenue as far out as La Sierra 
Avenue and the Mt. Ribidoux and Evan Lake areas include some fine 
residences dating from the last years of the 19th century to the 1930's. 
A similar array of houses may also be seen in the hills around San Ber- 
nardino and in nearby Redlands. Pomona is one of the few cities in 
Southern California which has rebuilt its downtown area into a successful 
pedestrian mall. 



138 



N1 PALM SPRINGS- RIVERSIDE AREA PALM SPRINGS 



N1 




ROCHE LLE 
E.VIA Oil VERA 

E.VIAESCUELA 



VIA NORTE 



N. VIA 
4 BLOCKS MIRALESEE 



N.PALM 
CANYON 



% 



PASEO EL MIRADOR 
.3 
■TACHEVAHPR 

■EL ALAMEDA 

'TAMARISK RD 

■GRAN VI A 



7. 



PAUSAPES 

r-7" 



N. 
5BL0CKS 

8 



IN PI AN AVE 



4 5 



W.TAHQUITZPR 



AVE N I PA 
CABALLEROS 



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10BL0CKS 

) 

S PALM CANYON 
(OR 



9. 



■ PALO VERPE AVE 

■OCOTILLOAVE 

■M0R0N6ORD 



STATE H^Y III 



139 



N1 



N1 PALM SPRINGS-RIVERSIDE AREA PALM SPRINGS 



1 Miller House 1938 
2311 N. Indian Ave. 
Richard J.Neutra 
See plate 48 

2 Kaufmann House 1947 
470 W. Vista deChino 
Richard J. Neutra 



in Southern California. The 
building has been so drastically 
changed, for example the two 
interior courts are now enclosed 
rooms, that it is difficult to fully 
appreciate the character of the 
original design. 
See plate 42 



3 Katherine Finchy School 1949 
Tachewah Dr. between Via 
Miraleste and Avenida 
Caballeros 

John P. Clark, Albert Frey and 
Robson C. Chambers 

4 Frey House 1941 
1150 Paseoel Mirador 
John P. Clark and Albert Frey 
Living room addition, 1947; 
second floor, 1954. 

5 Clark House 1939 
1200 Paseoel Mirador 
John P. Clark and Albert Frey 
See plate 49 

6 Samson Building 1934 
756 N. Palm Canyon Dr. 
A. Lawrence Kocher and 
Albert Frey 

Probably the most pure and at 
the same time workable ex- 
ample of the International style 



7 Frey House 1963-1964 
686 Palisades Dr. 
Albert Frey and ^ 

Robson C. Chambers 
A house built climatically for 
the hot desert area of Palm 
Springs. Both the frame and 
sheathing of the house are of 
metal. 



8 Oasis Hotel 1923 
125 S. Palm Canyon Dr. 
Lloyd Wright 

If one goes into the central 
courtyard it is still possible to 
experience the tower and a few 
other details of Lloyd Wright's 
original building. 



Purcell House 1933 
252 0cotillo Ave. 
William Gray Purcell and 
Evera Van Bailey 
See plate 41 



140 



N2 



^2 PALM SPRINGS -RIVERSIDE AREA RIVERSIDE 



Bettner House early 1880's 
8193 Magnolia Ave. 
A well preserved Shingle style 
house containing Colonial re- 
vival detailing. 



2 Priestley Hall House 
("Rockledge") c.1890 
2812 Ivy St. 

Like many late 19th century 
designs, this house contains 
such an array of borrowed 
ideas that it belongs to no 
single style. 



Union Pacific Railroad Station 
1904 

7th and Vine Sts. 
An example of the Mission re- 
vival style much utilized by the 
Union Pacific and Santa Fe 
Railroads in California and in 
the Southwest. 



4 Riverside Public Library 1903 
3581 7th St. 

Burnham and Bliesner; 
west wing added by 
G.Stanley Wilson, 1921 
The original competition an- 
nouncement for the library 
stated: "While the Library Board 
does not wish to limit the com- 



petition to any particular style 
of architecture, except perhaps 
to call attention to the fact that 
there seems to exist in this 
community a general sentiment 
in favor of the Moorish or Mis- 
sion Style..." 1902. 

5 Mission Inn 
1890-1901 and later 

7th St. between Main and 

Orange Sts. 

Arthur Benton 

The Monument 

of the Mission style. 

See plate 12 

6 De Vine House c.1890 
4475 12th St. 

A characteristic Queen Anne 
house of the 1890's. 



7 Jarvis House 1887, 
1914 modernized 
12th St. and Redwood Dr. 
A 19th century Queen Anne 
house which was very success- 
fully remodeled in 1914 and has 
remained unchanged down to 
the present day. 



8 Riverside Mausoleum c. 1915 
On the corner of Pine and 
14th Sts. 



141 



N2 



N 2 PALM SPRINGS -RIVERSIDE AREA RIVERSIDE 



TO RIVERSIDE 



VAN BUREN 



BLVD 



N. '^'■'''■^' U.S.91 



TYLER AVE 





< ^/ POLKST 



\^/ JONESAVE- 
BURGEST 



SKOFSTADST- 



LA SIERRA AVE 



NYE AVE 




RIVERSIPE ^^llTf /^ 
FWY ^ ^^ 

TO SANTA ANA 



This Egyptian revival building 
contains some excellent ex- 
amples of early 20th century art 
glass. 



9 Mission revival House 
after 1903 
4205 Lemon St. 



142 



N2a 



N2a PALM SPRINGS- RIVERSIDE AREA RIVERSIDE 



cmfmr ^^" '^" 9'" ^"' ^- 

REDWOOD DR ^ 

PINE ST 
CEOARSf^-"^ 



RllU)^101 MARKETS! 

TO SANTA ANA ^'^^^ALMOND 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 t t 1 1 I 1 1 I 1 1 I I 




A/ ORANGEST- 

LEMONST 

LIME ST 
MULBERRYST 



VICTORIA AVE 



MYRTLE 
^AVE 



10 Riverside County Courthouse 
1903 

4050 Main St. 
Burnham and Bliesner 



Additions of 1930 and 1946. 
A good Beaux Arts Classical 
revival building already old 
fashioned when it was built. 



143 



N3 



N 3 PALM SPRINGS -RIVERSIDE AREA CLAREMONT 



CLAREMONT 

1 Harvey Mudd College 1961 
Columbus Ave. and 12th St. 
Edward D. Stone 

POMONA 

2 Polomares House c.1854 
491 E. Arrow Hwy. 

This adobe house was restored 
in 1939. 

3 First Baptist Church, 
Education Building 1963 
521 North Gary Ave. 
Everett L.Tozier 



BANNING 

Purcell House 1932 
1639 San Gorgonio 
William Gray Purcell and 
Evera Van Bailey 
A small cottage by one of the 
major figures of the early 20th 
century Prairie School in the 
Midwest. The entire garden wall 
of this house slides open to 
completely unite interior and 
exterior space. , 



I 



( 



144 



PLATE 1 




12,12. Mission Santa Barbara. Santa Barbara. 1786; 1815-20 (photo: authors) 



PLATE 2 








1 










l^igk*^ 


^^ 




J 3,3. Mission San Gabriel Arcangel. Original church: 1771; completed in 1800 
(photo: C.1904; Title Insurance & Trust Co., Los Angeles) 

M 5,12. Mission San Diego de Alcala. San Diego. 1813 
(photo: Title Insurance & Trust Co., San Diego) 










PLATE 3 




M 1,3. Mission San Luis Rey de Francia. East of Oceanside. 1815 
(photo: c. 1900; Title insurance & Trust Co., Los Angeles) 

I 3,2. San Fernando Mission. City of San Fernando. 1818 
(photo: Cultural Heritage Board, City of Los Angeles) 






jfi?iK"*niwtltMiH5.inii«^*«:^*^K«^ 



UkA 









M 4,5. Estudillo House. San Diego, c. 1827 

(photo: early 1900's; Title Insurance & Trust Co., San Diego) 

I 3,1. Andres Pico House. City of San Fernando, c.1834 
(photo: Cultural Heritage Board, City of Los Angeles) 



I 



r^. 



tt'SmfmmmtmimKm 



PLATE 5 




F 10. Drum Barracks. Wilmington. 1850 

(photo: Cultural Heritage Board, City of Los Angeles) 



M 4,3. Church of the Immaculate "The Adobe Chapel." 
San Diego. 1858 (photo: authors) 




PLATE 6 




L2,1. Hunt-Stambach House. Santa Barbara. Late 19th century 
A. B. Barber (photo: authors) 



F11. Banning House. Wilmington. 1864 (photo: authors) 







MC--A XX''%.\^i^^^?:'^WlC 



PLATE 7 




I 1,1. Leonis Adobe. Woodland Hills, San Fernando Vally. 1875 
(photo: Cultural Heritage Board, City of Los Angeles) 

E 8,6. Pico House (building to left). Los Angeles. 1868. Attr. Ezra F. Kysor 
E8,5. Merced Theatre (building to right). Los Angeles. 1869 (photos: authors) 




PLATE 8 




M 1,6. Garcia House. Capistrano. c. 1880's (photo: authors) 




E 8,13. West Temple Apartments 
Los Angeles, c. 1880 
(photo: Cultural Heritage Board 
City of Los Angeles) 



il 



i 1 *«t »%*»» 



PLATE 9 




K 6. Baldwin Guset Cottage. Arcadia. 1881. 
A. A. Bennett (photo: autiiors) 



M 6,5. Hotel del Coronado. Coronado (San Diego). 1888. James W. Reid and Merritt Reid 

(photo: 1897; Title Insurance & Trust Co., San Diego) 








pH|iinnuuHtiHt.u.- 



ipw 



^^IfetMJ. it**^ 



xm^-^^xf^^sm^^ft-i ri I I- ^ I ^ 











'i<- 



PLATE 10 




E 3,3. Stimson House. Los Angeles. 1891. 
Attr. Carroll H. Brown (photo: C.Winslow) 



B 2,3. Sawtelle Veteran's Administration Center (Barracks). Los Angeles. 1901 
Peters and Burns (photo: C.Winslow) 



<^S»L 




nr 



•/*■ 



"'-^L.^ 



-»**- 




PLATE 11 




E 7,4. Martz Flats. Los Angeles. 1898. Attr. Julius W. Krause (photo: authors) 



E 5,5. House. Los Angeles, c. 1890 (photo: authors) left 
House. Los Angeles, c.1885 (photo: authors) right 




PLATE 12 




N 2,5. Mission inn. Riverside. 1890-1901, 
Arthur Benton (plioto: autliors) 



I 2,1. Hyde Parl< Congregational Cliurcli.Chatsworth, San Fernando 
Valley. 1901 (photo: Cultural Heritage Board, City of Los Angeles) 




PLATE 13 




E 5,2. House. Los Angeles, c. 1900 (photo: authors) 



L 3,3. Underhill House. Montecito. 1904-05. Francis T. Underhill (photo: authors) 



r.*^ '. .- 



feS^, 






"^Wl ^ ■lllAi#&: 



^ ^* i '^ 



^v-^*'* '*& 



">.^i/4'^ 




PLATE 14 




J 4,14. Irwin House. Pasadena. 1906. Charles and Henry Greene (photo: Julius Shulman) 



1 



J 4,40. Blacker House. Pasadena. 1906. Charles and Henry Greene (photo: Marvin Rand) 




""^SKMiMMnK 



PLATE 15 



M 2,11. Bailey House. 

La Jolla. 1907. 

Irving Gill 

(photo: Marvin Rand) 




M 5,8. Lee House No. 4. San Diego. 1912. 
Irving Gill (photo: Esther McCoy) 




J.^ 



!>--* 





M 5,6. Klauber, (Hugo) House. San Diego. 1308. Irving Gill (photo: Marvin Rand) 




J 4,16. Gamble House. 
Pasadena. 1908. 
Charles and Henry Greene 
(photo: Marvin Rand) 



! 



PLATE 17 




L 3,7. Stewart House. Montecito. 1909-1910. Frank Lloyd Wright (photo: authors) 



B6,5. Beverly Hills Hotel. 

Beverly Hills. 1912. 

Elmer Grey 

(photo: c. 1918, 

Security National Bank 

of Los Angeles) 




PLATE 18 




J 4,41. Culbertson (Cordelia) House. Pasadena. 1911 
(photo: Marvin Rand) 



Charles and Henry Greene 



I 8,3. Bolton Hall. Tujunga. 1913. George Harris 
(photo: Cultural Heritage Board, City of Los Angeles) 




PLATE 19 




M 2,6. La Jolla Women's Club Building. La Jolla. 1913. Irving Gill (photo: Esther McCoy) 



L2,17. Kelly House. Santa Barbara. 1915. Hudson Thomas 

(photo: authors) 




PLATE 20 




;j;;^cw..:S -awaai. 









M 5,4. Panama-California Exposition, Balboa Park. San Diego. 1915. Bertram Goodhue, 
with Carleton M. Winslow, Sr. (photo: 1915; Title Insurance & Trust Co., San Diego) 




M 5,4. Panama-California 

Exposition. Balboa Park. 

San Diego. 1915. 

Bertram Goodhue, 

with Carleton M. Winslow. Sr. 

(photo: 1915; 

Title Insurance & Trust Co., 

San Diego) 



PLATE 21 







M 2,4. Gilman Hall, Bishop's School for Girls. La Jolla. 1916. 

Irving Gill (photo: Esther McCoy) 



L 3,5. Heberton House. Montecito. 1916. George Washington Smith (photo: authors) 








PLATE 22 




L 3,4. Bliss House. Montecito. 1916. Carleton M.Winslow, Sr. 



C 2,2. Dodge House. Hollywood, Los Angeles. 1916. Irving Gil 
(photo: Julius Shulman) 




siiiUL 



PLATE 23 




L 3,13. Bingham House. Montecito. 1917. Bernard Maybeck. 

(photo: Frank Goad) 

D 2,1. Barnsdall (Hollyhock) House. Griffith Park District, Los Angeles. 1917-1920. 
Frank Lloyd Wright (photo: Cultural Heritage Board, City of Los Angeles) 




PLATE 24 




C 2,4. Schindler House. Hollywood, Los Angeles. 1921, 
R. M. Schindler (photo: Esther McCoy) 




E 11,1. Watts Towers. 

Los Angeles. 1921-1954. 

Simon Rodia 

(photo: Cultural Heritage Board, 

City of Los Angeles) 



PLATE 25 




L 2,7. El Paseo. Santa Barbara. 1922. James Osborne Craig (photo: authors) 



D 1,7. Taggart House. Griffith Park District, Los Angeles. 1922-24. 

Lloyd Wright (photo: authors) 




PLATE 26 




iT 





A 3,9. Bradbury House. Santa Monica. Before 1923. John Byer (photo: Berne, 1920's) 



E3,2. St. Vincent's Church. Los Angeles. 1923. Albert C. Martin (photo: C.Winslow) 




PLATE 27 




M 2,1. Pueblo Ribera Courts. La Jolla. 1923. R. M. Schindler (photo: W. P. Woodcock) 



J 1,1. Lowes House. Eagle Rock, Los Angeles. 1923. 
R. M. Schindler (photo: Viroque Baker) 



PLATE 28 




C 1,17. Storer House. 
Hollywood Hills. 
Los Angeles. 1923. 
Frank Lloyd Wright 
(photo: Julius Shulman) 



J 4,9. Millard House. Pasadena. 1923. Frank Lloyd Wright (photo: Julius Shulman) 




PLATE 29 




M 2,17. Town Houses. Rancho Santa Fe. c.1923— 24. Lilian J. Rice (photo: authors) 



D 2,6. Ennis House. Griffith Park District, Los Angeles. 1924. 
Frank Lloyd Wright (photo: Julius Shulman) 
















PLATE 30 





h'ri 



f^' 









n^'^^'' ■■ ' 



C1,10. Freeman House. Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles. 1924. 
Frank Lloyd Wright (photo: Julius Shulman) 




J 4,50. Packard House. 
San Marino. 1924. 
R. M. Schindler 
(photo: Viroque Baker, 
C.1930) 



PLATE 31 




L3,11. Steedman House (Gardner's Cottage-Gate House). Montecito. 1922-25. 

George Washington Smith (photo: authors) 



E 7,8. Los Angeles Public Library. Los Angeles. 1925. Bertram Goodhue, 
with Carleton Winslow, Sr. (photo: Mott Studios; C.Winslow) 




PLATE 32 




J 4,18. Pasadena Public Library. Pasadena. 1925. IVIyron Hunt 
and H.C.Chambers (photo: authors) 



B6,1. Spadina House. Beverly Hills. 1925. Henry Oliver (photo: authors) 




PLATE 33 




H 2. Lovell Beach House. Newport Beach. 1926. R. M. Schindler 



PLATE 34 




I 7,3. Derby House. Glendale. 1926. Lloyd Wright 
(photo: authors) 



D 2,2. Sowden House. Griffith Pari< District, Los Angeles. 1926. 
Lloyd Wright (photo: authors) 




PLATE 35 




D 3,4. Anthony House. Griffith Park District, Los Angeles. 1927. 
Bernard Maybeck. (photo: James N. Doolittle) 

C 2,15. Garden-Apartments. Hollywood, Los Angeles. 1927. 
Richard J. Neutra (photo: Julius Shulman) 




PLATE 36 




E6,3. BuIIocks-Wilshire 
Department Stone. 
Los Angeles. 1928. 
John Parkinson and 
Donald Parkinson 
(photo: C. Winslow) 



D 1,4. Novarro (Samuels) House. Griffith Park District, Los Angeles. 
Lloyd Wright (photo: authors) 



1928. 




PLATE 37 




M 4,9. Junipero Serra Museum. Presidio Park, San Diego. 1928-29. 

William Tempieton Johnson (piioto: authors) 



D 4,5. Sachs Apartments. Silver Lake District, Los Angeles. 1928. 

R. M. Schindler (photo: 1930's) 




PLATE 38 




H 2,4. Wolfe House. Avalon, 
Catalina Island. 1928. 
R. M. Schindler 



L 2,10. Santa Barbara County House. Santa Barbara. 1929. 
William Moser and Co. (photo: authors) 




PLATE 39 




WH.« 


1 


1 




1 


iM 




gH 
















.: -. ^ ■ 



L2,11. Fox Arlington Theatre. Santa Barbara. 1929. 
Edwards and Plunkett (photo: authors) 






J 4,45. Neff House. 

San Marino. 1929. 

Wallace Neff (photo: c. 1938) 



i 







PLATE 40 




D 3,6. Lovell House. Griffith Park District, Los Angeles. 1929. 
Richard J. Neutra (photo: Julius Shulman) 



PLATE 41 




N 1,9. Purcell House. Palm Springs. 1933. William Gray Purcel 



and Evera Van Bailey 
(photo: C.1933) 



D 4,9. Oliver House. 

Silver Lake District, 

Los Angeles. 1933. 

R. M. Schindler 

(photo: 0.1939) 





PLATE 42 




N 1,6. Samson Building. Palm Springs. 1934. A. Lawrence Kocher and Albert Frey 
(photo: 1934) 



C 2,7. Pan Pacific Auditorium. Los Angeles. 1935. Walter Wurdeman and 
Welton Becket (photo: authors) 




PLATE 43 




J 1,5. Laing House. Pasadena. 1935. Harwell Hamilton Harris 

(photo: Dapprich, c. 1937) 

D 4,17. McAlmon House. Silver Lake District, Los Angeles. 1936. R. M.Schindler 

(photo: Julius Shulman, c. 1937) 




*^,., 



i^^*i»>^ 



PLATE 44 




I 2,2. Von Sternberg House. Northridge, San Fernando Valley. 1936. Richard J. Neutra 
(photo: Julius Shulman, c.1937) 

D 4,14. Walker House. Highland Park District, Los Angeles. 1936. 
R. M. Schindler (photo: Julius Shulman) 




PLATE 45 




A 3,11. Abell House. Pacific Palisades. 1937. Tiiornton M. Abel! (photo: Haveman) 



B5,11. Rodakiewics House. Beverly Hills. 1937. R. M. Schindler 




PLATE 46 




A 3,8. Entenza House. Pacific Palisades. 1937. Harwell Hamilton Harris 
(photo: Dapprich, c. 1937) 



C 2,11. Dunsmuir Apartments. Los Angeles. 1937. R. M. Schindler 
(photo: Julius Shulman, 1940) 










*-^*^j 



r^»^A 



Sfc. "^^^r^. 



^#^ 



■I#li^,' 






PLATE 47 




C 2,17. CBS Radio Building. Los Angeles. 1937-38. William Lescaze and 

E.T. Heitschmidt (photo: authors) 

B 4,6. Strathmore Apartments. Westwood, Los Angeles. 1938. Richard J. Neutra 

(photo: Luckhaus, c. 1938) 










PLATE 48 




E 9,3. Ross House. 
Los Angeles. 1938. 
Raphael S. Soriano 
(photo: Julius Shulman, 1938) 



N 1,1. Miller House. Palm Springs, 
(photo: Julius Shulman, c.1938) 



1938. Richard J. Neutra 




n-. 



PLATE 49 




M 4,6. Casa de Pico Motel. San Diego. 1939. 
Richard Requa (pinoto: autliors) 



1,5. Clark House. Palm Springs. 1939. John P.Clark and Albert Frey (photo: authors) 



■j^- 



^:%^^''i 



f- 



/ 



^m,.y^^ ■ 



am 



'M 



\ 







PLATE 50 




B 5,6. Polito House. Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles. 1939. Raphael S. Soriano 
(photo: Julius Shulman, 1940) 




I 6,3. Hay House. 

North Hollywood, 

Los Angeles. 1939. 

Gregory Ain 

(photo: 

Julius Shulman, c. 1940) 



PLATE 51 




D 4,6. Daniel House. Silver Lake District, Los Angeles. 1939. 

Gregory Ain (photo: Julius Shulman, 1939) 



G 2,1. Kimpson-Nixon House. Long Beach. 1939. Raphael S. Soriano 

(photo: Julius Shulman, 1940) 




PLATE 52 




D 4,10. Tierman House. Silver Lake District, Los Angeles. 1939. Gregory Ain 
(ph(Dto: Julius Shulman, 1939) 

B 1,6. Sturges House. Brentwood Heights, Los Angeles. 1939. Frank Lloyd Wright 
(photo: Julius Shulman) 












mwW^^'^> 



gl|/|S$^, 



■W^Sr 



W^ 



PLATE 53 




B 8,3. Strauss House. Los Angeles. 1940. Raphael S. Soriano (photo: Julius Shulman) 



B 2,5. Drucker Apartment House. Brentwood, Los Angeles. 1940. J. R. Davidson 

(photo: Julius Shulman) 




PLATE 54 




B3,15. Sommer House. Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles. 1941. 
Rodney Walker (photo: Julius Shulman) 

J 2,1. Birtcher-Share House. Highland Park Area, Los Angeles. 1942. 
Harwell Hamilton Harris (photo: c.1942) 



PLATE 55 




L4,6. Wyle House. Ojai. 1947. Harwell Hamilton Harris (photo: authors) 



J 4,35. Bullocks Pasadena Department Store. Pasadena. 1947. 
Walter Wurdeman and Welton Becket (photo: Julius Shulman) 




-^ 



.■^^4ii*' i^i 









;ir '»* 



il«M.rjiimiiiiii;UiMl 



jjjiyJri. ' 












PLATE 56 




F 4. Ekdale House. Palos Verdes. 1948. John Rex 




C 1,20. Maston House. 
Hollywood Hills, 
Los Angeles. 1948. 
Carl L. Maston 
(photo: Julius Shulman) 



PLATE 57 



A 3,4. Eames House and Studio. 

Pacific Palisades. 1949. 

Charles Eames 

(photo: Julius Shulman) 




C1,5. Garred House. Hollywood, Los Angeles. 1949. Milton Caughey 

(photo: Julius Shulman) 




PLATE 58 




B 6,16. Rourke House. Beverly Hills. 1949. Richard J. Neutra 
(photo: Julius Shulman) 



F 6. Wayfarers Chapel. Palos Verdes. 1949. Lloyd Wright 
(photo: Julius Shulman) 




PLATE 59 






*/t-.:^^ 



> -/i. 










^^^^..^^*^»^-/~ 






'.J.'SliP' :;■ 



B 1,2. Rex House. Brentwood Heights, Los Angeles. 1949. Edia Muir 



B 3,2. Tischler House. Bel Air District, Los Angeles. 1949-50. 

R. M. Schindler (photo: authors) 




PLATE 60 




B 6,8. Hale House. Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles. 1949. Craig Ellwood 
(photo: Jason Hailey) 



A 3,13. Case Study House. Pacific Palisades. 1950. Raphael S. Soriano 




PLATE 61 




4,4. Foster House. Sherman Oaks, San Fernando Valley. 1950. John Lautner 

(photo: Julius Shulman) 



J 4,2. Ladd Studio. Pasadena. 1950. Thornton Ladd (photo: Julius Shulman) 







PLATE 62 




B 6,2. Colby Apartments. Los Angeles. 1950. Raphael S. Soriano 
(photo: Julius Shulman) 



A 3,5. Entenza House. Pacific Palisades. 1950. Charles Eames and Eero Saarinen 
(photo: Julius Shulman) 




PLATE 63 



C 1,3. Shulman House. 

Hollywood Hills, 

Los Angeles. 1950. 

Raphael S. Soriano 

(photo: Julius Shulman) 




B 7,2. Beckett Office Building. Los Angeles. 1950. William S. Beckett 

(photo: Julius Shulman) 



,x. 



X.,- 









PLATE 64 




A 1,1. Berns House. Malibu. 1951. Gordon Drake (photo: Julius Shulman, 1953) 

B 3,7. Anderson House. Bel Air, Los Angeles. 1951. Douglas Honnold and John Rex 
(photo: Julius Shulman) 















'< ^w^: 



7^ 



x" 







PLATE 65 




B 5,3. Dann House. West Hollywood, Los Angeles. 1951. J. R. Davidson 

(photo: Julius Shulman) 



y/l 2,10. Wright House. 
La Jolla. 1951. 
John Lloyd Wright 
(photo: authors) 




• PLATE 66 




B 1,9. Shoor House. 
Brentwood, Los Angeles. 1952. 
William S. Beckett 
(photo: Julius Shulman) 




M 3,2. Richards House. 
Point Loma, San Diego. 
Sim Bruce Richards 
(photo: John Hartley) 



1952. 



PLATE 67 




C2,18. Courtyard Apartments. Hollywood, Los Angeles. 1952. Craig Ellwood 

(photo: Marvin Rand) 



L3,12. Erving House. Montecito. 1953. Lutah M. Riggs (Arvin Shaws, designer) 

(photo: A. Erving) 




PLATE 68 




A 2,3. St. Matthew's 
Episcopal Church. 
Pacific Palisades. 1953. 
A. Quincy Jones 
and Frederick E. Emmons 
(photo: Julius Shulman) 




B 1,3. Sperry House. Brentwood Heights, Los Angeles. 1953. William Wurster, 
Bernardi and Emmons (photo: Julius Shulman) 




PLATE 69 




I 6,7. Adolph's Office Building. Burbanl<. 1953. Raphael S. Soriano 

{photo: Julius Shulman) 

A 3,1. Emmons House. Pacific Palisades. 1954. A. Quincy Jones and 

Frederick E. Emmons (photo: Julius Shulman) 






PLATE 70 




I 2,3. Blue Ribbon Tract Houses (Reseda Tract). Northridge, San Fernando Valley. 1954. 
Smith and Williams (photo: Julius Shulman) 




L3,18. Vedanta Temple. 
Montecito. 1955. 
Lutah M. Riggs 
(photo: authors) 



PLATE 71 



J 4,4. Perkins House. 

Pasadena. 1955. 

Richard J. Neutra 

(photo: Julius Shu iman) 




L3,6. Bear House. 

Montecito. 1955. 

Thornton Ladd 

(photo: authors) 




PLATE 72 




L 3,10. Fenton House. 
Montecito. 1959. 
John Henderson 
(photo: authors) 



F 12. South Bay Bank. Manhattan Beach. 1956. Craig Ellwood (photo: Marvin Rand) 



"V^^-"' ' ^^ 




PLATE 73 



t 




B 6,14. Case Study House No. 18. Beverly Hills. 1956-58. Craig Eliwood 

(pinoto: IVIarvin Rand) 



D 4,8. "Siivertop" House. Silver Lake District, Los Angeles. 1957. John Lautner 

(photo: Julius Shulman) 




PLATE 74 



ifc^xo. .. ..•. 




L2,16. Slavin House. Santa Barbara. 1957. Richard J. Neutra (photo: Julius Shulman) 




L 4,5. Walker House. 
Ojai. 1957-58. 
Rodney Walker 
(photo: authors) 



PLATE 75 



C 2,5. Carson-Roberts 

Building. 

Los Angeles. 1959. 

Craig Ellwood 

(photo: Marvin Rand) 




B 5,9. Case Study 
House No. 21. 
Hollywood Hills, 
Los Angeles. 1958. 
Pierre Koenig 
(photo: Julius Shulman) 




PLATE 76 




C 1,19. Case Study House No. 22. Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles. 1959. Pierre Koenig 
(photo: Julius Shulman) 



C1,1. "Chemosphere" House. Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles. 1960. John Lautner 
(photo: Julius Shulman) 





f,^ " ^Y 






PLATE 77 




M 2,13. Case Study House (Triad). La Jolla. 1960. Killingsworth, 

Brady and Smith (photo: Julius Shulman) 

B 2,6. Newfield House. Brentwood, Los Angeles. 1961. Thornton M.Abell 

(photo: Julius Shulman) 




1^- 






•*r '^ 



PLATE 78 







L3,19. Tuttle House. Montecito. 1962. Paul Tuttle (photo: authors) 



D 1,3. Kleihaer Memorial Chapel. Hollywood Beverly Christian Church. Hollywood, 
Los Angeles. 1963. Carleton Winslow, Jr. and Warren Waltz 




r"- 




T. 




mtmmmmitmmmmmmmMmmmmmmmm>>'fiff(*'iiMimmmik 






PLATE 79 




F 2. Great Western Savings and Loan Association (Gardena Office). Gardena. 1962. 

Skidmore, Owings and Merrill (photo: Jack Laxer) 



L 1,1. Eaton House. Hope Ranch, Santa Barbara. 1963. Wallace Neff 
















PLATE 80 



%^■^ 




G 2,3. Case Study 
House No. 25. 
Naples area, Long Beach. 
1963. Killingsworth, 
Brady, Smith and Assoc, 
(photo: Julius Shulman) 




F 1. Goldwater Apartments. 

Gardena. 1964. 

Carl L. Maston 

(photo: Julius Shulman) 



University of California at Los Angeles, Royce Hall, Westwood, 

Los Angeles, 1929 

(Allison and Allison; George W. Kelham, Supervising Architect) 



A 


3. 


11 


B 


2, 


4 


B 


6, 


10 


B 


3. 


3 


L 


3, 


14 


A 


3, 


12 


A 


3, 


10 


A 


1, 


2 


B 


1. 


10 


B 


2, 


6 


A 


3, 


17 



Index of Architects 



Abell, Thornton M. (b. 1906) 
Abel! House, Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles, 1937 
Abel! Office, West Los Angeles, Los Angeles, 1954 
Adelman House, Beverly Hills, 1958 
(Thornton M. Abell and O'Neil Ford and Assoc.) 
Beck House, Beverly Glen, Los Angeles, 1951 
Four Attached Surburban Houses, Montecito, 1958 
Haines House no. 1, Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles, 1943 
Haines House no. 2, Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles, 1951 
LeBrun House, Zuma Beach, 1963 
Leslie House, Brentwood, Los Angeles, 1950 
Newfield House, Brentwood, Los Angeles, 1961 
Ullman House, Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles, 1955 

Ain, Gregory (b. 1906) 
(Ain, Johnson and Day) 

Avenel Housing, Silver Lake District, Los Angeles, 1948 D 4, 16 

(Ain, Johnson and Day) 

Beckman House, Los Angeles, 1938 

Daniel House, Silver Lake District, Los Angeles, 1939 

Dunsmuir Apartments, Los Angeles, 1937 

Edwards House, Silver Lake District, Los Angeles, 1936 

Ernst House, Silver Lake District, Los Angeles, 1937 

Hay House, North Hollywood, Los Angeles, 1939 

Hollywood Guild and Union Office Building, Universal City District, 

Los Angeles, 1948 

(Ain, Johnson and Day) 

Hurschler House, Pasadena, c. 1949 

Johnson House, Pasadena, 1948 

(Ain, Johnson and Day) 

Mar Vista Houses, Venice, 1948 

(Ain, Johnson and Day) 

Miller House, Beverly Hills, 1948 

(Ain, Johnson and Day) 

Orans House, Silver Lake District, Los Angeles, 1940 

Shalrer House, Brentwood, Los Angeles, 1949 

(Ain, Johnson and Day) 

Tierman House, Silver Lake District, Los Angeles, 1939 D 4, 10 

Alexander, Robert E. (b. 1907) 
(Alexander, Wilson, Merrill and Johnson) 
(See also Neutra and Alexander) 

Baldwin Hills Village, Los Angeles, 1941 
(Alexander, Wilson, Merrill and Johnson) 

Allison, George B. (b. 1904) 
(Allison and Allison) 



c 


2, 


12 


D 


4, 


6 


C 


2, 


11 


D 


1. 


6 


D 


1. 


5 


1 


6, 


3 


1 


6, 


4 


J 


4. 


42 


J 


4. 


25 


A 


3, 


21 


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6, 


15 


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4, 


11 


B 


2, 


2 



B 8, 5 



B 4, 4 



145 



Ashley, Frederic M. 
(see Austin and Ashley) 

Austin, John C. (b. 1870) 

City Hall, Los Angeles. 1926-28 E 8, 

(Austin, Parkinson and Martin) 

Griffith Observatory and Planetarium, Griffith Park, Los Angeles, 1925 D 2, 

(Austin and Ashley) 

House, Pasadena, c. 1900 J 4, 

Shrine Civic Auditorium, Los Angeles. 1925-26 E 3, 

(Austin and Ashley) 



Bakewell, John, Jr. (b. 1872) 
(Bakewell and Brown) 

Pasadena City Hall, Pasadena, 1925-27 J 4, 

(Bakewell and Brown) 

Santa Fe Railroad Station, San Diego, 1915 M 5, 

(Bakewell and Brown) 

Barber, A. P 

Hunt-Stambach House. Santa Barbara, 1886 L 2, 

Becket, Welton (b. 1902) 
(see Wurdeman and Becket) 

Beckett, William Sutherland (b. 1921) 

Beckett Office, Hollywood District. Los Angeles, 1950 
Gross House, Bel Air, Los Angeles, 1949 
(Beckett, Spaulding and Rex) 
McHugh House, Malibu, 1957 
Oppenhelmer House, Beverly Hills, 1956 
Shoor House, Brentwood, Los Angeles, 1952 

Bennett, A. A. (1825-1890) 

Baldwin Coach House, Arcadia, 1879 
Baldwin Guest Cottage, Arcadia, 1881 

Benton, Arthur (1859-1927) 

All Saints by the Sea Church, Montecito, 1910 
Baldwin House, Sierra Madre, 1910 
Mission Inn, Riverside, 1890-1901 and later 

Black, Milton J. 
Multiple Dwellings, Los Angeles, 1936 E 4, 

Bliesner 

(see Burnham and Bliesner) 

Brady, Jules E. (b.1908) 

(see Killingsworth, Brady and Smith) 

146 



B 


7, 


B 


3. 


A 


1. 


B 


6, 


B 


1. 


K 




K 




L 


3. 


K 




N 


2. 



Breuer, Marcel (b. 1902) 

The Torrington Manufacturing Co. (Western Division) Van Nuys, 

Los Angeles. 1953 I 4, 6 

(Craig Ellwood, Supervision) 

Brown, Arthur, Jr. (1874) 
(see Bakewell and Brown) 

Brown, Carroll H. (1863-1920) 
Stimson House, Los Angeles, 1891 E 3, 3 

Bryant, Leiand A. 
SunsetTowers Apartments, Beverly Hills, c. 1929 B 5, 7 

Buff, Conrad, III (b.1926) 
(Buff, Straub and Hensman) 

Case Study House no. 20, Altadena, 1958 J 4, 53 

(Buff, Straub and Hensman) 

Burnham, Franklin P. (d. 1909) 
(Burnham and Bliesner) 

Riverside County Courthouse, Riverside, 1903 N 2, 10 

(Burnham and Bliesner) 

Riverside Public Library, Riverside, 1903 N 2, 4 

(Burnham and Bliesner) 

Burns, Silas R. (1855-1940) 

(see Peters and Burns; also Hunt and Burns) 

Burton, J. Lee 
Sawtelle Veterans' Center, Chapel, Brentwood, Los Angeles, 1900 B 2, 3 

Byers, John W. (b. 1875) 

Bradbury House, Santa Monica, before 1923 A 3, 9 

(Edia Muir, Associate) 

Byers House, Santa Monica, c. 1917 A 3, 18 

Byers Office Building, Santa Monica, c. 1923 A 3, 16 

(EdIa Muir, Associate) 

Johnson House, Brentwood Park, Los Angeles, before 1923 B 2, 8 

f (EdIa Muir, Associate) 

Miles Memorial Playhouse, Santa Monica, c. 1926 A 3, 19 



Caughey, Milton H. (b.1911) 

Garred House, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1949 C 1, 5 

Goss House, Brentwood Heights, Los Angeles, 1950 ,. B 1, 11 

Chambers, H. C. (b. 1885) 

(see Myron Hunt; also Hunt and Chambers) 

147 



Chambers, Robson C. (b. 1919) 

(see Frey: Frey and Chambers; Clark, Frey and Chambers) 

Clark, John P. (b. 1905) 

(see Frey: Clark and Frey; Clark, Frey and Chambers) 

Close, J. M. 
Egyptian Revival Apartment House, Los Angeles, 1926 C 2, 

Coate, Roland E. (b.1890) 

All Saints Episcopal Church, Beverly Hills, 1925 B 6, 

Vinmont House, Griffith Park District, Los Angeles, c. 1926 D 2, 

ContinI, Edgardo 
(see Whitney R. Smith) 

Coxhead, Ernest A. (1863-1933) 

Church of the Angels, Pasadena, 1889 J 4, 

Church of the Ascension, Sierra Madre, 1888 K 

Craig, James Osborne (d. 1922) 

El Paseo, Santa Barbara, 1922 L 2, 

(completed by Mrs. James Osborne Craig and Carleton Winslow, Sr.) 



Davidson, J. R. (b. 1888) 

Case Study House no. 11 (Cron House), Brentwood, Los Angeles, 1945 B 2, 

Case Study House no. 15, La Canada, Los Angeles, 1945—48 I 8, 

Dann House, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1951 B 5, 

Drucker Apartment House, Brentwood, Los Angeles, 1940 B 2, 

Kingsley Houses, Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles, 1946 A 3, 

McFadden House, Universal City, Los Angeles, 1948 I 6, 

Osherenko House, Beverly Hills, 1949 B 6, 

Rabinowitz House, Brentwood, Los Angeles, 1960 B 3, 

Stothart House (Phillips), Santa Monica, 1937 A 3, 

Davies, Hugh R. 

Angeles Abbey, Compton, Los Angeles, 1928 E 13, 

(Clarence Aldrich, additions, 1931) 

Day, Alfred W. 

(see Ain: Ain, Johnson and Day) 

Drake, Gordon (1917-1952) 

Berns House, Trancas Beach, 1951 A 1, 

Presley House, Silver Lake District, Los Angeles, 1946 D 5, 

Drew, Roy (b. 1923) 
(see Mosher and Drew) 

148 



Eames, Charles (b. 1907) 
(Eames and Saarinen) 

Eames House, Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles, 1949 A 3, 4 

Entenza House, Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles, 1950 A 3, 5 
(Eames and Saarinen) 

Herman Miller Show Room, West Los Angeles, Los Angeles, 1949 B 7, 3 

Edwards, William A. (b. 1889) 
(Edwards and Plunkett) 

Fox Arlington Theatre, Santa Barbara, 1929 L 2, 11 

(Edwards and Plunkett) 

Eggers, Henry L. 
(Eggers and Wilkman) 

Hanisch House, Pasadena, 1951 J 4, 44 

Eisen, Percy (1886-1946) 

(see Walker [Albert R.] and Eisen) 

Ellwood, Craig (b. 1922) 

Brown House, Beverly Hills, 1950 

Carson-Roberts Building, West Hollywood District, Los Angeles, 1959 

Case Study House no. 16, Bel Air, Los Angeles, 1951 

Case Study House no. 18, Beverly Hills, 1956-58 

Court Yard Apartments, Hollywood District, Los Angeles, 1952 

Elton House, Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles, 1951 

Gerwin-Ostrow Building, Los Angeles, 1960 

(Craig Ellwood and Associates) 

Hailey Building, Hollywood, Los Angeles, 1953 

Hale House, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1949 

Hunt (Beach) House, Malibu, 1955 

Kubly House, Pasadena, 1964 

(Craig Ellwood and Associates) 

Moore House, Griffith Park District, Los Angeles, 1964 

(Craig Ellwood and Associates) 

Pierson House, Malibu, 1961 

Rosen House, Brentwood Heights, Los Angeles, 1962 

(Craig Ellwood and Associates) 

South Bay Bank, Manhattan Beach, 1956 

The Torrington Manufacturing Co. (Western Division) Van Nuys, 

Los Angeles, 1953 

(Marcel Breuer, Architect; Craig Ellwood, Supervision) 

Westchester Branch Post Office, Westchester, Los Angeles, 1957 

Emmons, Donn (b. 1910) 

(see Wurster, Bernardi and Emmons) -^ 

Emmons, Frederick E., Jr. (b. 1907) 
(see Jones and Emmons) 

149 



B 


6. 


6 


C 


2, 


5 


B 


3. 


11 


B 


6, 


14 


C 


2. 


18 


A 


3. 


2 


C 


2. 


1 


B 


7, 


4 


B 


6, 


8 


A 


1. 


5 


J 


4. 


8 


D 


2. 


4 


A 


1. 


4 


B 


1, 


1 


F 




12 


1 


4. 


6 


F 




13 



Ford, O'Neil (b.1904) 
(see Thornton M. Abell) 

Frey, Albert (b. 1903) 

(Kocher and Frey; Clark and Frey; and Frey and Chambers) 

Catherine FInchy School, Palm Springs, 1949 N 1, 3 

(Clark, Frey and Chambers) 

Clark House, Palm Springs, 1939 N 1, 5 

(Clark and Frey) 

Frey House, Palm Springs, 1941, 1947, 1954 N 1, 4 

(Clark and Frey) 

Frey House, Palm Springs, 1963-64 N 1, 7 

(Frey and Chambers) 

Samson Building, Palm Springs, 1934 N 1, 6 

(Kocher and Frey) 

Garland, Robert (b. 1926) 
(see also Thornton Ladd) 

Lansburgh House, Hope Ranch, Santa Barbara, 1958 L 1, 3 

Gill, Irving (1870-1936) 
Bailey House, La Jolla, 1907 
Banning House, Los Angeles, 1912 
Bishop's School for Girls, La Jolla 
Bentham Hall, 1909 
Gilman Hall, 1916 
Scripps Hall, 1910 
Burnham House, San Diego, 1916 
Christian Science Church, San Diego, 1904 
Christian Science Church, San Diego, 1909 
Christian Science Church, Coronado, 1929 
City Hall, Fire and Police Station, Oceanside, 1929 
Dodge House, West Hollywood, Los Angeles, 1916 
Horatio West Court, Santa Monica, 1919 
Kindergarten, Oceanside, 1931 
Klauber House (Hugo), San Diego, 1908 
Klauber House (Melville), San Diego, 1907 
La Jolla Community Center, La Jolla, 1914 
La Jolla Women's Club, La Jolla, 1913 
Laughlin House, Los Angeles, 1907 
Lee House no. 4, San Diego, 1912 
Lewis Courts, Sierra Madre, 1910 
Mason House, Eagle Rock, Los Angeles, 1916 
Mlltimore House, South Pasadena, 1911 
Morgan House, Hollywood, Los Angeles, 1917 
Teats House no. 2, San Diego, 1912 
Thompson House, Coronado, 1912 
Torrance Pacific Electric Station, Torrance, 1916 
Tutt House, Coronado, 1905 
Wilde Flats, Coronado, 1919 

150 



M 


2. 


11 


E 


6. 


4 


M 


2, 


4 


M 


5, 


10 


M 


5. 


3 


M 


5, 


5 


M 


6, 


2 


M 


1, 


2 


C 


2. 


2 


A 


3. 


20 


M 


1. 


1 


M 


5. 


6 


M 


5. 


7 


M 


2, 


5 


M 


2, 


6 


E 


3. 


5 


M 


5. 


8 


K 




4 


J 


1. 


2 


J 


4, 


48 


C 


2. 


14 


M 


5. 


9 


M 


6, 


3 


F 




3 


M 


6, 


4 


M 


6. 


1 



Gill, Louis (b. 1885) 
Bishop's School for Girls, Low tower with dome, La JoIIa, c. 1920 M 2, 4 

Goodhue, Bertram (1869-1924) 

Los Angeles Public Library, Los Angeles, 1925 E 7, 8 

(Carleton M. Winslow, Sr., Supervising Architect) 

Panama-California Exposition, San Diego, 1915 M 5, 4 

(Carleton M. Winslow, Sr., Supervising Architect) 

Green, Aaron 
Reif House, West Hollywood, Los Angeles, 1951 C 2, 3 

Green, Aaron 
(Greene and Greene) 

Bentz House, Santa Barbara, 1911 

Blacker House, Pasadena, 1906 

Cole House, Pasadena, 1906 

Crocker House, Pasadena, 1909 

Culbertson House (Cordelia), Pasadena, 1911 

Culbertson House (James), Pasadena, 1902 

Ford House, Pasadena, 1907 

Gamble House, Pasadena, 1908 

Gould House, Ventura, 1924 

Greene House (Charles), Pasadena, 1901 

Greene House (Henry), Pasadena, 1904 

Hawkes House, Pasadena, 1905 

Irwin House, Pasadena, 1906 

Ladd House, Ojai, 1913 

Neill House, Pasadena, c. 1905 

Pasadena Ice Co., Pasadena, 1901 

Pitcairn House, Pasadena, 1906 

Pratt House, Ojai, 1909 

Robinson House, Pasadena, 1906 

Tichenor House, Long Beach, 1904 

White Sisters House, Pasadena, 1902 

Greene, Henry (1870-1954) 

(see Charles Greene: Greene and Greene) 

Grey, Elmer (1871-1963) 

Beverly Hills Hotel, Beverly Hills, 1912 B 6. 5 

Grey House, Pasadena, c. 1912 J 4, 39 

Pasadena Playhouse, Pasadena, 1924—25 J 4, 21 

Gruen, Victor (b. 1902) 
Tishman Building, Los Angeles, 1956 E 6, 1 

151 



L 


2, 


14 


J 


4, 


40 


J 


4, 


17 


J 


4. 


38 


J 


4. 


41 


J 


4. 


15 


J 


4. 


24 


J 


4, 


16 


L 


4. 


9 


L 


4, 


13 


J 


4. 


28 


J 


4, 


10 


J 


4. 


14 


L 


4. 


3 


J 


4. 


11 


J 


4. 


34 


J 


4, 


31 


L 


4. 


4 


J 


4. 


23 


G 


1. 


5 


J 


4. 


12 



Harris, George (b. 1867) 
Bolton Hall, Tujunga, Los Angeles, 1913 I 8, 

Harris, Harwell Hamilton {b.1903) 

Bauer House, Glendale, 1938 I 7, 
(Carl Anderson, Associate) 

Birtcher-Share House, Eagle Rock, Los Angeles, 1942 J 2, 

Blair House, Los Angeles, 1938 I 6, 

English House, Beverly Hills, 1949 B 6, 1 

Entenza House, Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles, 1937 A 3, 

Fellowship Park House, Elysian Park District, Los Angeles, 1936 E 9, 

Granstedt House, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1938 C 1, 

Johnson House, Beverly Glen, Los Angeles, 1948 B 3, 1| 

Laing House, Pasadena, 1935 J 1, 

Lek House, La Jolla, 1942 M 2, 

Lowe House, Altadena, 1934 J 4, SJ 
(Carl Anderson, Associate) 

Mulville House, Sierra Madre, 1940 K 

Wyle House, Ojai, 1947 L 4, 

Heineman, Arthur S. 
Freeman House, Pasadena, c. 1914 

Heltschmldt, Earl T. (b. 1894) 
(see Lescaze and Heitschmldt) 

Henderson, John (b.1926) 
Fenton House, Montecito, 1959 L 3, 

Hensman, Donald C. (b. 1922) 
(see Buff, Straub and Hensman) 

Holler 

(see Meyer and Holler) 

Honnold, Douglas (b.1901) 

(see John Rex: Honnold and Rex) 

Hunt, Myron (1868-1952) 
Huntington Gallery and Library, San Marino, 1910, 1920 J 4, * 

(with H. C. Chambers) 

Occidental College, Eagle Rock, Los Angeles, 1913-1936 J 1, 

(with H. C. Chambers) 
Pasadena Public Library, Pasadena, 1925 J 4, " 

Hunt, Sumner P. (b. 1865-1938) 

(Hunt and Burns; also Hunt and Edgars) 

Southwest Museum Building, Highland Park District, Los Angeles, 1912 J 2, 

Wilson House, Los Angeles, c. 1903 E 3, 

(Hunt and Edgars) 

152 



L 


3. 9 


L 


3. 2 


M 


4. 9 


M 


5.11 



Johnson, Joseph L. (b. 1911) 
(see Ain: Ain, Johnson and Day) 

Johnson, Reginald D. (1882-1952) 

(see also Alexander, Wilson, Merrill, and Johnson) 

Jefferson House (Mira Flores), Monteclto, 1921-22 
Santa Barbara Biltmore Hotel, Monteclto, 1926 

Johnson, William Templeton (b. 1905) 

Junipero Serra Museum, San Diego, 1928-29 
Francis W. Parker School, San Diego, 1913 

Jones, A. Quincy (b. 1913) 
(Jones and Emmons) 

Campbell Hall School, Studio City, Los Angeles, 1951 I 5, 3 

(Jones and Emmons) 

Chappell House, Bel Air, Los Angeles, 1948 

Emmons House, Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles, 1954 
I (Jones and Emmons) 
I Jones House and Studio, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1938 

Leavitt House, Montrose, 1948 

(Jones and Emmons) 

Mutual Housing Association Community, Brentwood, Los Angeles, 1947-50 

(Smith, Jones and Contini) 

Nordlinger House, Bel Air, Los Angeles, 1948 

St. Matthew's Episcopal Church, Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles, 1953 

(Jones and Emmons) 

(Original church by Carleton M. Winslow, Sr., 1942) 

"Southdown Estates" Houses, Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles, 1952 

Winans Apartments, Crestwood Hills, Los Angeles, 1948 

Kahn, Louis I. (b.1901) 

Salk Institute for Biological Sciences, La Jolla, 1963 M 2. 14 

Kelsey, John Field (b, 1925) 
(see Ladd and Kelsey) 

Killingsworth, Edward A. (b. 1917) 
(Killingsworth, Brady and Smith) 

Cambridge Investments, Inc. Building, Long Beach, 1960 G 1, 3 

(Killingsworth, Brady and Associates) 

Case Study House no. 25. Naples District, Long Beach, 1963 G 2, 3 

(Killingsworth, Brady and Smith) 

Case Study House (Triad), La Jolla, 1960 M 2, 13 

(Killingsworth, Brady and Smith) 

Duffield Lincoln-Mercury Agency, Long Beach, 1963 G 1, 4 

(Killingsworth, Brady and Associates) 

Office of Killingsworth, Brady and Associates Building, Long Beach, 1955 G 1, 2 

(Killingsworth, Brady and Associates) 

Opdall House, Naples District, Long Beach, 1957 G 2, 2 

(Killingsworth, Brady and Associates) 

153 



B 


3. 


4 


A 


3. 


1 


B 


5. 


8 


1 


8. 


1 


B 


1, 


8 


B 


1, 


12 


A 


2, 


3 


A 


2, 


2 


B 


1. 


13 



A 


2. 


^\ 


B 


5, 


9 


C 


1. 


19 


B 


1. 


5 


E 


8. 


6 


E 


8, 


1 



Kocher, A. Lawrence (b. 1885) 
(see Frey: Kocher and Frey) 

Koenig, Pierre (b. 1925) 

Beagles House, Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles, 1963 
Case Study House no. 21, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1958 
Case Study House no. 22, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1959 
Seidel House, Brentwood Hills, Los Angeles, 1960 

Kysor, Ezra F. (1835-1907) 

Pico House, Los Angeles, 1868 

St. Vibiana Cathedral, Los Angeles, 1876 

(Kysor and Mathews) 



Ladd, Thornton (b.1924) 
(Ladd and Kelsey) 

Bear House, Monteclto, 1955 L 

First City Bank, Pasadena, 1961 J 

(Ladd and Kelsey) 

Ladd House Pasadena, 1949 J 

Ladd Studio, Pasadena, 1950 J 

Quen House, Beverly Hills, 1959 B 6, 11 

(Ladd and Kelsey) 

University of Southern California, Research Institute on Communist 

Strategy and Propaganda, Exposition Park District, Los Angeles, 1964 E 

Wolff House, Hollywood, Los Angeles, 1960 C 

(Ladd and Kelsey) 

Lautner, John (b. 1911) 

Bell House, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1940 
Carling House, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1950 
"Chemosphere" House, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1960 
Foster House, Sherman Oaks, Los Angeles, 1950 
Lautner House, Silver Lake District, Los Angeles, 1939 
Mauer House, Highland Park District, Los Angeles, 1947 
Sheets Apartment House, Westwood, Los Angeles, 1947 
"Silvertop," Silver Lake District, Los Angeles, 1957 
Springer House, Elysian Park District, Los Angeles, 1940 
Wolff House, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1963 

Lescaze, William (b. 1896) 
(Lescaze and Heitschmidt) 

CBS Radio Building, Hollywood, Los Angeles, 1937-38 C 2, 17 

Luckman, Charles (b. 1909) 
(see Pereira and Luckman) 

154 



c 


1, 


4 


c 


1. 


6 


c 


1, 


1 


1 


4, 


4 


D 


4. 


7 


J 


2, 


3 


B 


4, 


10 


D 


4. 


8 


E 


9, 


2 


B 


5, 


5 



Lummis, Charles F. (1859-1929) 
Lummis House (El Alisal), Highland Park, Los Angeles, 1896—1910 J 2, 5 

Lustig, Alvin (1915-1955) 

Frank Perls Gallery, Beverly Hills, c.1948 B 6, 4 

Wayne House, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1950 B 5, 2 

Lyndon, Maynard (b. 1907) 
Lyndon House, Malibu, 1950 A 1, 3 



Martin, Albert C. (1879-1960) 

(see Austin, Parkinson and Martin for the Los Angeles City Hall) 

Department of Water and Power, Los Angeles, 1963-64 
St. Vincent's Church, Los Angeles, 1923 

Maston, Carl Louis (b. 1915) 

Apartment Building, West Los Angeles, Los Angeles, 1955 
Blampin Apartments, Westwood, Los Angeles, 1947 
Dunham House, Pasadena, 1956 
Goldwater Apartment, Gardena, 1964 
Harasta House, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1948 
Herman House, Brentwood Heights, Los Angeles, 1948 
Maston House, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1948 
Maston House. Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1963 
Virgil Apartments, Los Angeles, 1950 

Maybeck, Bernard (1862-1957( 

Anthony House, Griffith Park District, Los Angeles, 1927 
Bingham House, Montecito, 1927 

Mead, Frank 
(Mead and Requa) 

Krotona Court, East Hollywood District, Los Angeles, 1914 
Ojai Town Center, Ojai, 1916-17 

Meyer 

(Meyer and Holler) 

Egyptian Theater, Hollywood, Los Angeles, 1922 
Grauman's Chinese Theater, Hollywood, Los Angeles, 1927 

Mooser, William, I! (b.1869) 
(William Mooser and Co.) 

Santa Barbara County Courthouse, Santa Barbara, 1929 L 2, 10 

Morgan, Octavius (1850-1922) 

(Morgan and Walls; also Morgan, Walls and Clements) i 

Hollenbeck Home for the Aged, Boyle Heights, Los Angeles, 1896 E 10, 3 

(Morgan and Walls) 

155 



E 


8,12 


E 


3. 2 


B 


8, 1 


B 


4. 2 


J 


4,30 


F 


1 


C 


1.18 


B 


1. 7 


C 


1,20 


B 


5, 1 


E 


6. 5 


D 


3, 4 


L 


3.13 


D 


1. 1 


L 


4. 1 


C 


1.12 


C 


1, 13 



Richfield Building, Los Angeles, 1928 E 7, 6 

(Morgan, Walls and Clements) 

Mayan Theatre, Los Angeles, before 1929 E 7, 2 

(Morgan, Walls and Clements) 

U.S. Royal Tire Co. (Originally Samson Tyre and Rubber Co.) 

Los Angeles, c. 1928-29 E 12, 2 

(Morgan, Walls and Clements) 

Mosher, Robert (b. 1920) 
(Mosher and Drew) 

Bishop's School, Cummings Hall, La Jolla, 1959-60 M 2, 4 

Muir, Edia (b. 1906) 
(see also John Byers) 

Rex House, Brentwood Heights, Los Angeles, 1949 B 1, 2 



Neff, Wallace (b. 1895) 

Eaton House, Hope Ranch, Santa Barbara, 1963 L 1, 1 

Galli-Curcl House, Westwood, Los Angeles, 1938 B 3, 1 

Neff House, San Marino, 1929 J 4, 45 

Neutra, Richard J. (b. 1892) 

(Associates: Benno Fischer, Serge Koschin, John Blanton, Egon Winkens; 

also Neutra and Alexander) 

Beard House, Altadena, 1935 

Beckstrand House, Palos Verdes, 1941 

Berger House, Universal City District, Los Angeles, 1929 

Brown House, Bel Air, Los Angeles, 1955 

Case Study House (Bailey), Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles, 1946—48 

Channel Heights Public Housing, San Pedro, 1942 

Corona Avenue School, Bell, Los Angeles, 1935 

Eagle Rock Playground Clubhouse, Eagle Rock, Los Angeles, 1953 

(Neutra and Associates) 

Elkay Apartments, Westwood, Los Angeles, 1948 

Emerson Junior High School, West Los Angeles, Los Angeles, 1938 

Flavin House, Silver Lake District, Los Angeles, 1958 

(Neutra and Associates) 

Garden Apartments, Hollywood, Los Angeles, 1927 

Garden Grove Church, Garden Grove, 1962 

Greenberg House, Westwood, Los Angeles, 1949 

Hinds House, Highland Park, Los Angeles, 1951 

Kaufmann House, Palm Springs, 1947 

Kelton Ave. Apartments, Westwood, Los Angeles, 1939 

Kun House, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1938 and 1950 

Landfair Apartments, Westwood, Los Angeles, 1938 

Lovell House, Griffith Park District, Los Angeles, 1929 

Malcolmson House, Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles, 1937 

156 



J 


4. 


54 


F 




5 


1 


6. 


5 


B 


1. 


4 


A 


3. 


3 


F 




7 


E12, 


1 


J 


1. 


4 


B 


4, 


7 


B 


4. 


1 


D 


5. 


5 


C 


2, 


15 


H 




5 


B 


4. 


3 


J 


2, 


2 


N 


1. 


2 


B 


4, 


8 


C 


1. 


15 


B 


4. 


9 


D 


3. 


6 


A 


3. 


7 



D 


4. 


1 


N 


1. 


1 


L 


4. 


2 


D 


1. 


2 


B 


2. 


7 


D 


5, 


7 


E 


8. 


11 


E 


6, 


2 


J 


4, 


4 


D 


5. 


4 


B 


6. 


16 


E 


7. 


10 


1 


4. 


5 


L 


2. 


16 


D 


5 


6 


B 


4. 


6 


L 


3. 


15 


D 


5 


3 



Mariners Medical Arts Center, Newport Beach, 1963 H 

(Neutra and Associates) 

Mcintosii House, Silver Lake District, Los Angeles, 1939 

r/lijler House, Palm Springs, 1938 

Moore House, Ojai, 1952 

Mosk House, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1933 

Nesbitt House, Brentwood Park Los Angeles, 1942 

Neutra House, Silver Lake District, Los Angeles, 1933,1964 

New Hall of Records Building, Civic Center, Los Angeles, 1962 

(Neutra and Alexander; Honnold and Rex) 

Northwestern Mutual Fire Association Building, Los Angeles, 1950 

Perkins House, Pasadena, 1955 

Reunion House, Silver Lake District, Los Angeles, 1949 

(Neutra and Associates) 

Rourke House, Beverly Hills, 1949 

Scholts Advertising Building, Los Angeles, 1937 

Singleton House, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1959 

(Neutra and Associates) 

Slavin House, Santa Barbara, 1957 

Sokol House, Silver Lake District, Los Angeles, 1950 

(Neutra and Associates) 

Strathmore Apartments, Westwood, Los Angeles, 1938 

Tremalne House, Montecito, 1948 

Treweek House, Silver Lake District, Los Angeles, 1949 

(Neutra and Associates) 

University of California at Los Angeles Kindergarten and 

Elementary School, Westwood, Los Angeles, 1957 B 3, 10 

(Neutra and Alexander) 

Von Sternberg House, Northridge, 1936 I 2, 2 

Yew House, Silver Lake District, Los Angeles, 1957 D 5, 2 

(Neutra and Associates) 

Nomland, Kemper, Jr. (b. 1919) 
(Nomland and Nomland) 

Case Study House, Pasadena, 1947 J 4, 6 

Nomland, Kemper (b. 1892) 
(see Nomland and Nomland) 



Oliver, Henry 
Spadina House, Beverly Hills, 1925 B 6, 1 



Parkinson, Donald B. (1895-1945) 

(see Parkinson and Parkinson; also Austin, Parkinson and Martin 

for Los Angeles City Hall) 

157 



Parkinson, John (1861-1935) 
(also Parkinson and Parkinson) 

Buliocks-Wilshire Department Store, Los Angeles, 1928 E 6, 

(Parkinson and Parkinson) 
Green Hotel (Second Section), Pasadena, 1902 J 4, 23 

(original building by F. L. Roehrig) 

Pereira, William (b. 1909) 
(Pereira and Luckman) 

CBS Television City, Hollywood, Los Angeles, 1952 C 2, e 

(Pereira and Luckman) 

University of Southern California, Ahmanson Center, Exposition Park 

District, Los Angeles, 1964 E 3, 1 

(Pereira and Associates) 

Peters, Luther (d. 1921) 
(Peters and Burns) 

Sawtelle Veterans' Center, Domiciliary Building, Brentwood, 1889 B 2, 5 

(Peters and Burns) 

Plunkett, J.J. (d.1946) 
(see Edwards and Plunkett) 

Pool, J. C. 
Samarkand Hotel, Santa Barbara, 1915 L 2, 1J 

Purcell William G. (b. 1880) 
(Van Bailey and Purcell) 

"Prospect Houses," Pasadena, 1948 J 4, 31 

(Van Bailey and Purcell) 

Purcell House, Palm Springs, 1933 N 1, 1 

(Van Bailey and Purcell) 

Purcell House, Banning, 1939 N 3, * 

(Van Bailey and Purcell) 



Reid, James W. (1851-1943) 
(Reid Brothers) 

Hotel Coronado, Coronado, 1888 M 6, i 

(Reid Brothers) 

Reid, Merritt 

(see Reid Brothers) 

Requa, Richard S. 

(see also Mead and Requa) 

Casa de Pico Motel San Diego, 1939 M 4, ( 

Krotona Court, East Hollywood District, Los Angeles, 1914 D 1, 

(Mead and Requa) 

Town Center, Ojal, 1916-17 L 4, ' 

(Mead and Requa) 

158 



B 


3. 


7 


K 




9 


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4 


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8. 


11 


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2. 


8 


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17 


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7 


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6 


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2 


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6, 


7 


L 


3. 


12 


L 


3. 


18 



Rex, John (b. 1923) 

(Honnold and Rex; also Sumner Spauiding and John Rex; and 
William Beckett (Spauiding and Rex) and Neutra and Alexander. 
Honnold and Rex) 

Anderson House, Bel Air, Los Angeles, 1951 

Case Study House, Chapman Woods, Los Angeles, 1947 

Ekdale House, Palos Verdes, 1948 

New Hall Records of Building, Civic Center, Los Angeles, 1962 

(Neutra and Alexander; Honnold and Rex) 

Rice, Lilian J. (1888-1938) 

Robinson House, La Jolla, 1929 

Rancho de Santa Fe Town Houses, Del Mar, c. 1923-24 

ZLAC Rowing Club, Mission Bay Area, San Diego, 1929 

Richards, Sim Bruce (b. 1908) 

Aquatic Control Center, Mission Bay Area, San Diego, 1961 

Richards House, Point Loma, San Diego, 1952 

ZLAC Rowing Club, Mission Bay Area, San Diego, 1963 

Riggs, Lutah M. (b.1896) 

Erving House, Montecito, 1953 

(Arvin Shaw, designer) 

Vedanta Temple, Montecito, 1955 

Rodia, Sam (b. c. 1880) 
Watts Towers, Watts, Los Angeles, 1921-1954 E 11. 1 

Roehrig, Frederic Louis (b. 1857) 
(Roehrig and Locke) 

Green Hotel (First Section), Pasadena, 1889 J 4, 22 

Russell, George Vernon (b. 1905) 
Pike House, Hollywood, Los Angeles, 1952 C 1, 11 

Saarinen, Eero (1910-1961) 
(see Eames) 

Schindler, R. M. (1887-1953) 

Bethlehem Baptist Church, Los Angeles, 1944 E 11, 2 

Buck House, Hollywood, Los Angeles, 1934 C 2, 10 

Daugherty House, Encino, 1946 I 4, 1 

Dorste House, Silver Lake District, Los Angeles, 1940 D 4, 13 

Druckman House, Hollywood, Los Angeles, 1942 C 1, 7 

Elliot House, Silver Lake District, Los Angeles, 1931 D 3, 2 

Eriik House, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1952 C 1, 14 

Falk Apartments, Silver Lake District, Los Angeles, 1939 D 4, 4 

Gold House, Studio City District, Los Angeles, 1945 I 5, 4 

Goodwin House, Studio City District, Los Angeles, 1940 I 5, 5 

Howe House, Silver Lake District, Los Angeles, 1925 D 5, 8 

159 



F 




2 


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3 


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1. 


2 


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2. 


15 


L 


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1 


L 


3. 


5 


L 


2. 


8 


L 


2. 


4 


M 


2, 


3 


L 


3. 


11 



1 6. 2 1 


1 5, 6 


H 2 


J 1. 1 


D 4,17 


D 4, 9 


J 4,50 , 


1 5, 2 


M 2, 1 


B 5,11 


B 5, 4 


D 4, 5 


C 2, 4 


D 3, 1 


D 2. 5 


E 9, 1 ' 


B 3. 2 


C 1,16 


1 1. 3 


D 4.15 


D 4.14 


D 4, 3 


D 4.12 


H 2, 4 > 



Janson House, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles. 1949 B 5, 10 

Kallis House, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1947 

Lechner House, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1948 

Lovell Beach House, Newport Beach, 1926 

Lowes House, Eagle Rock, Los Angeles, 1923 

McAlmon House. Silver Lake District, Los Angeles, 1936 

Oliver House, Silver Lake District, Los Angeles, 1933 

Packard House, San Marino, 1924 

Presburger House, Studio District, Los Angeles, 1945 

Pueblo Ribera, La Jolla, 1923 

Radakiewicz House, Beverly Hills, 1937 

Ries House, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1950 

Sachs Apartments, Silver Lake District, Los Angeles. 1928 

Schindler House, Hollywood, Los Angeles, 1921 

Schlesinger House, Silver Lake District, Los Angeles, 1952 

Skolnik House, Griffith Park District, Los Angeles, 1952 

Southall House, Elysian Park District, Los Angeles, 1938 

Tischler House, Westwood. Los Angeles, 1949-50 

Turker House, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1950 

Van Dekker House, Canoga Park, Los Angeles, 1940 

Van Patten House, North Highland Park, Los Angeles, 1936 

Walker House. North Highland Park. Los Angeles, 1936 

Westby House, Silver Lake District. Los Angeles, 1938 

Wilson House, Silver Lake District, Los Angeles, 1938 

Wolfe House, Avalon, Catalina Island, 1928 

Shaw, Arvin B 

(see Lutah M. Riggs) 

Skidmore, Owings and Merrill (Louis Skidmore (1897-1962); Nathaniel 
A, Owings (b.1903); John O.Merrill (b. 1896) 
Great Western Savings and Loan Association, (Gardena Office), 
Gardena, 1962 
One Wllshire, Los Angeles, 1964 

Smith, George Washington (1876-1930) 
Bryce House, Hope Ranch. Santa Barbara. 1924 
Burke House, Santa Barbara, 1922-23 

Crematorium, Santa Barbara Cemetery, Santa Barbara, 1924-25 
Heberton House, Montecito, 1916 
Lobero Theatre, Santa Barbara, 1922-24 
Meridian Studios, Santa Barbara, 1923 
Sherwood House, La Jolla, 1925-28 
Steedman House, Montecito, 1922-25 

Smith, Waugh (b.1917) 

(see Killlngsworth, Brady and Smith) 

Smith, Withney R. (b. 1911) (also Smith and Williams) 
Blue Ribbon Tract, Northridge, San Fernando Valley, Los Angeles, 1954 i 2, 3 

Bradley House, Pasadena, 1941 J 4, 3 

160 



J 4. 7 
D 3. 5 



4.29 



Crowell House, Pasadena, 1952 

(Smith and Williams) 

Griffith Park Girls Camp, Griffith Park District, Los Angeles, 1949 

(Smith, Jones and Contini, Architects and Engineers; Smith and Williams 

Supervising Architects) 

Mutual Housing Association Community, Brentwood, Los Angeles. 1947-50 B 1 8 

(Smith, Jones and Contini) 

Neighborhood Church, Milllkan Religious Education Building, 

Pasadena, 1956 ' j 4 27 

(Smith and Williams) 

Offices for the Community Facilities, South Pasadena, 1959 J 4 49 

(Smith and Williams) 

Williams House, Pasadena, 1951 j 

(Smith and Williams) 

Soriano, Raphael S. (b. 1904) 
Adolph's Office Building. Burbank. 1953 
Case Study House, Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles, 1950 
Colby Apartments, West Los Angeles, Los Angeles, 1950 
Curtis (Noyes) House, Bel Air. Los Angeles, 1949-50 
Gogol House, Griffith Park District, Los Angeles, 1938-39 
KImpson-Nlxon House, Naples District, Long Beach, 1939 
Koosis House, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1940 
Krause House, Whittier, 1950 

LIpetz House, Silver Lake District, Los Angeles, 1935 
Los Angeles Jewish Community Center Building, Los Angeles, 1937 
Lukens House, Los Angeles, 1940 
Pollto House, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1939 
Ross House, Los Angeles, 1938 

Schrage House, Griffith Park District, Los Angeles, 1951 
Shulman House, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1950 
Strauss-Lewis House. West Los Angeles, Los Angeles, 1940 
Touriel Medical Buildings, Los Angeles, 1950 

Spaulding, Sumner (b. 1892) 

(see also William Beckett and John Rex) 

American National Red Cross Chapter Headquarters. Los Angeles. 1939 
Case Study House. Chapman Woods. Los Angeles, 1947 

Stacy-Judd, Robert B. (b. 1884) 
Aztec Hotel, Monrovia, 1925 K 8 

Stone, Edward D. (b. 1902) 

California Institute of Technology, Beckman Auditorium, Pasadena, 1963 J 4, 36 

Harvey Mudd College, Claremont, 1961 N 3, 1 

Loyola University Theater, Westchester, Los Angeles, 1963 E 1,' 1 

Perpetual Savings Bank, Westwood, 1962 B 4, 5 

The Stuart Company, Pasadena, 1958 j 4,' 51 

161 



1 6, 


7 


A 3, 


13 


B 6. 


2 


B 3. 


9 


D 3, 


3 


G 2, 


1 


C 1, 


9 


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11 


D 4, 


2 


E10. 


2 


E 4, 


1 


B 5, 


6 


E 9, 


3 


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7 


C 1, 


3 


B 8, 


3 


E 3, 


10 


E 5. 


1 


K 


9 



Straub, Calvin C. (b.1921) 
(see Buff, Straub and Hensman) 



Thomas, Hudson 
Kelly House, Santa Barbara, 1915 



L 2,17 



Tozier, Everett L. (b. 1920 
First Baptist Church, Education Building, Pomona, 1963 N 3. 3 

Tuttle, Paul (b.1918) 
Dangerfield Beach House, Carpenteria, 1955 L 3, 20 

Tuttle House, Montecito, 1962 ^ ^' ^^ 



E 4, 3, 



L 3, 3 
L 3, 8 



Tyler, Frank M. 
Scott House, Los Angeles, c.1900 

Underhill, Francis T. (1863-1929) 
Underbill House (La Chiquita), Montecito. 1904-05 
Peabody House, Montecito, 1917 

Van Bailey, Evera (b.1903) 
(see William G.Purcell) 

Van Pelt, Garrett 
Knapp House, Pasadena, 1939 ^ ^' ^ 

Vawter, John T. 

(see Walker and Vawter) 

Walker, Albert R. 

(Walker and Vawter; also Walker and Eisen) 

Fine Arts (Havenstrite) Building, Los Angeles, 1925 

(Walker and Eisen) 

Hill House, Los Angeles, 1914 

(Walker and Vawter) 

Sunkist Building, Los Angeles, 1935 

Walker, Rodney (b. 1910) 
BernattI House, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1917 
Case Study House, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1947 
Lohrie House, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1940 
Smith House, Sherman Oaks, 1948 
Sommer House, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1941 
Stevens House, Studio City, Los Angeles, 1941 
Walker House, Ojai, 1957-58 
West House, Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles, 1948 

162 



E 


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5 


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6, 


6 


E 


7, 


7 


B 


3, 


13 


B 


6, 


7 


B 


3, 


14 


1 


4, 


3 


B 


3. 


15 


1 


5, 


1 


L 


4, 


5 


A 


3, 


6 



I 



Walls, J. A. 

(see Morgan and Walls) 

Waltz, Warren 

(see Carleton Winslow, Jr.) 

Wilkman, Walter W. 

(see Eggers and Wilkman) 

Williams, Wayne R. 
(see Smith and Williams) 

Winslow, Carleton M., Sr. (1876-1946) 

Bishops School, Chapel and Tower, La Jolla, 1916 M 2, 4 

Bliss House, Montecito, 1916 L 3, 4 

Catholic Church (Mary Star by the Sea), La JolIa,1937 M 2, 7 

Los Angeles Public Library, Los Angeles, 1924 E 7, 8 

(Bertram Goodhue, Architect; Carleton M. Winslow, Sr., 
Supervising Architect) 

Panama-Pacific Exposition, San Diego, 1915 M 5, 4 

(Bertram Goodhue Architect; Carleton M. Winslow, S., 
Supervising Architect) 

Winslow, Carleton, Jr. (b.1919) 

Kleihaer Memorial Chapel, Hollywood Beverly Christian Church, 

Hollywood, Los Angeles, 1963 

(Winslow and Waltz) 

Seaman's Center Building, San Pedro 

(Winslow, Waltz, Joncich and Lusby) 

St. Martha's Episcopal Church, West Covina, 1956-62 

Wright, Frank Lloyd (1869-1959) 

Barnsdall (Hollyhock) House, Griffith Park District, Los Angeles, 1917-20 

Barnsdall Gallery, Griffith Park District, Los Angeles, 1956 

Barnsdall Studio Residence A, Griffith Park District, Los Angeles, 1920 

Ennis House, Griffith Park District, Los Angeles, 1924 

Freeman House, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1924 

Millard House, Pasadena, 1923 

Stewart House, Montecito, 1909-10 

Storer House, Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, 1923 

Sturges House, Brentwood Heights, Los Angeles, 1939 

Wright, John Lloyd (b.1892) 

Compton House, La Jolla, 1948 

Golden West Hotel, San Diego, 1913 

(in association with Harrison Albright) 

McPherson House, Del Mar, 1947 

Wood House, Escondido, 1911 ^ 

Wright House, La Jolla, 1951 

Wright House, Del Mar, 1947 

163 



D 


1. 


3 


F 




8 


K 




10 


D 


2, 


1 


D 


2, 


1 


D 


2. 


1 


D 


2. 


6 


C 


1. 


10 


J 


4. 


9 


L 


3, 


7 


C 


1. 


17 


B 


1. 


6 


M 


2. 


12 


M 


5. 


1 


M 


2. 


16 


M 


1. 


7 


M 


2, 


10 


M 


2. 


15 



Wright, Lloyd (b. 1890) 

Derby House, Glendale, 1926 

Healy House, Bel Air, Los Angeles, 1949-52 

Novarro House, Griffith Park District, Los Angeles, 1928 

Oasis Hotel, Palm Springs, 1923 

Sowden House, Griffith Park District, Los Angeles, 1926 

Taggart House, Griffith Park District, Los Angeles, 1922-24 

Wayfarers Chapel, Palos Verdes, 1949 

Wright House, Beverly Hills, 1928 

Wright, Parker 
Santa Monica Blvd. School, Hollywood, Los Angeles, 1921-23 

Wurdeman, Walter (1913-1949) 
(Wurdeman and Becket) 

Bullocks Pasadena Department Store, Pasadena, 1947 

(Wurdeman and Becket) 

Pan Pacific Auditorium, Hollywood, Los Angeles, 1935 

(Wurdeman and Becket) 

Prudential Insurance Co., West Los Angeles, Los Angeles, 1948 

(Wurdeman and Becket) 

Wurster, William W. (b. 1895) 
(Wurster, Bernardi and Emmons) 

Sperry House, Brentwood Heights, Los Angeles, 1953 B 1, 3 

(Wurster, Bernardi and Emmons) 

Wyman, George H. (b.1860) 
Bradbury Building, Los Angeles, 1893 E 7, 13 



$ 2 1714 



JL 



1 


7, 


3 


B 


3, 


6 


D 


1. 


4 


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1. 


8 


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2. 


2 


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6 ! 


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9 



164 



N3 LOS ANGELES SECTIONS A-K 




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E 7,13. Bradbury Building. Los Angeles. George H. Wyman. 1893 



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Los 

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Museum 
of Art