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Full text of "A guide to the coins of Great Britain & Ireland, in gold, silver, and copper, from the earliest period to the present time, with their value"

Ex Libris 
C. K. OGDEN 




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A GUIDE TO 

THE 

coiisrs 



GREAT BRITAIN & IRELAND, 

IN 

GOLD, SILVER, AND COPPER, 

FROM THE EARLIEST PERIOD TO THE PRESENT TIME, 

WITH THEIR VALUE. 



BY THE LATE 

COL. W. STEWART THORBTJRN, 

MEMBER OF THE NUMISMATIC SOCIETY OF LONDON. 



SECOND EDITION. 



Illustrated with Facsimiles of Coins in Gold and Silver, and numerous 
other Plates in Gold, Silver, and Copper. 



LONDON : 
L. UPCOTT GILL, 170, STRAND, W.C. 



LONDON : 
t'tlivri:n BY ALFRED BRADLEY, \~(l vntAXD, W.I . 




In CDemoriam. 



LIEUT.-COLOWEL WILLIAM STEWART THORBURN 

Was the eldest son of the late James Thorbum, Esq., 
Barrister of the Inner Temple, and Mary Anne, daughter 
of William Stewart, Esq., of Shambellie. His paternal 
grandfather, the Rev. William Thorbnrn, was for more 
than fifty years Incumbent of Troqueer, Dumfries, with 
which district the family has been connected for many 
generations. Colonel Thorbnrn was born in 1838, and 
was educated at Dumfries and Edinburgh, and gave early 
promise of unusual abilities. He entered the Army in 
1858, as Ensign in the 1st Royals, was promoted Lieu- 
tenant, and, after some years' service, joined the Army 
Pay Department. He served in India, and different 
parts of the world, and rose through the various grades 
of his profession until he was promoted Lieut.-Colonel, 
in March, 1886, and selected for the onerous and respon- 
sible post of Chief Paymaster in Ireland. He was not, 
however, destined long to hold a position for which his 
thorough knowledge of financial affairs and his abilities 
had peculiarly fitted him. In the beginning of August, 
he was suddenly struck down by the rupture of a blood 
vessel in the lung, and, after a painful illness of ten weeks, 
died on October 18th, 1886, at Dalkey, near Dublin, in 
the prime of his useful and active life, aged forty-eight 
years. He leaves a widow and two daughters to mourn 
their irreparable loss. By his own wish, he is interred 



2015154 



at Malvem, beside his only son, who had died the previous 
year, aged fifteen. 

From a very early age Colonel Thorburn had devoted 
much of his leisure to the study of Numismatics, having 
formed the nucleus of his fine collection while still a boy 
at school. An old friend had given him some ancient 
Scottish coins, which had long been treasured in the 
family, and this had led the lad to inquire into the 
subject, in which he soon became deeply interested an 
interest which ended only with his existence. During 
his roving life of military service, and amidst the pressing 
duties of his profession, he never lost sight of his favourite 
pursuit. By degrees, here and there, as opportunity per- 
mitted, he formed his collection of English and Scottish 
Coins, the Stuart period especially occupying his at- 
tention. 

Already a Member of the Numismatic Society, he 
thoroughly acquainted himself with the subject in all 
its branches, and compiled the " Guide to the Coins of 
Great Britain and Ireland," which occupied his leisure 
hours for more than two years, and on which he bestowed 
the most painstaking study and minute research. . He 
was contemplating another and larger work on the same 
subject when his career was cut short by his untimely 
death, which was deeply mourned by his brother officers, 
and a large circle of friends, to whom his genial nature 
and high character had endeared him. 




TO 

JOHN EVANS, ESQ., D.C.L., LL.D., 

PRESIDENT OF THE NUMISMATIC SOCIETY, 

VICE-PRESIDENT OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY, 
F.S.A., F.G.S., F.S.A. SCOT., 

AUTHOR OF "COINS OF THE ANCIENT BRITONS," 

ETC., ETC., ETC., 

WHOSE LABOURS AND DISCOVERIES 

HAVE SO GREATLY ADVANCED 
THE SCIENCE OF NUMISMATICS, 

THIS VOLUME 

IS 
BY PERMISSION 

RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED. 



INTRODUCTION. 



THIS book has been prepared with the object of supplying, in a single 
volnme, a Guide to the Identification and Valuation of the Coins of 
England, Scotland, and Ireland, at once accurate, complete, and cheap. 
The standard works on the subject are so costly, and seme are so scarce, 
as to be out of the reach of the majority of collectors. Kuding'a 
"Annals of the Coinage of Great Britain and its Dependencies, from the 
Earliest Period of Authentic History to the Reign of Victoria," is the 
most comprehensive work. The last and best edition, in three quarto 
volumes, was published in 1840, two volumes consisting of text and one 
of plates. Mr. Cochran-Patrick's " Records of the Coinage of Scotland, 
from the Earliest Period to the Union," is the most recent work on that 
subject. It was published in 1875, in two quarto volumes, at ,5 5s., 
and contains sixteen beautiful plates, printed by the autotype process 
from photographs of the coins themselves, but descriptions of the coins 
figured are not given. As their titles indicate, these works are histories 
of the coinage, not descriptions of the coin-. 

Mr. Evans' exhaustive work on " The Coins of the Ancient Britons," 
Hawkins's "Silver Coins of England," second edition, 1876, and ita 
companion volnme, Kenyon's "Gold Coins of England," 1884, contain 
minute descriptions of the coins, and are models of painstaking research. 
As text-books they are indispensable to the student and advanced 
collector of early British, Saxon, and English coins. But as regards 
the coins of Scotland and Ireland, the works of Lindsay* are now, in 
some respects, out of date, and must be read by the light of recent dis- 
coveries. Especially is this true in the case of Irish coins, forty-five 
years having elapsed since the publication of Lindsay's "View of the 
Coinage of Ireland." Dr. Aquilla Smith, of Dublin, the greatest 
authority on the subject, has contributed to the proceedings of various 
learned societies papers which contain the result of his researches. The^e 
papers have not, unfortunately, been republished in a collected form, 
but the information given in them has been carefully embodied in this 
book, and a reference made to the particular volume in which each 
treatise may be found. I am indebted to Dr. Smith for valuable 
information most kindly given to me while engaged in preparing this 
account of Irish coins. 

* "A View of the Coinage of Scotland," 1 vol., 4to, 1845; "A Supplement t > the Coinage 
of Scotland," 1 vol., 4to, Iso9 : A second Supplement to the Coini^e or Scotland," 1 voL 
4W, lb6S; "A View of the Coinage 01 belanV 1 voL, Ito, Iwa. 



INTRODUCTION. vu 

In the following pagea will be found a description of every denomination 
nd issue of the coins of each reign, together with their correct weights, 
a knowledge of which is often most useful in identifying: a, coin or in 
determining whether a doubtful piece is genuine or not. By referring to 
the lists of coins here described, a collector will be able to ascertain what 
pieces are required to complete any particular series. 

Illustrations are given of such typical coins as teemed necessary to 
convey a general idea of the current coin of each monarch, and an Index 
to the Plates is added to facilitate reference. 

With regard to the valuation of coins, a few remarks may not be 
out of place. The late Mr. Hawkins considered it extremely difficult 
to give an accurate idea of the market value of coins, because the 
value is affected by a variety of circumstances ; for example, by the 
rarity of the piece, the demand for it amongst collectors at the moment 
when offered for sale, and especially by its state of preservation. 
Persons residing in the country, who have not the opportunity of 
attending sales or examining choice collections, are liable to deceive 
themselves and others with respect to the pecuniary value of coins. 
Referring to a paragraph in a newspaper or to a priced catalogue of 
some distinguished collection, they find that a certain coin has been 
sold for a certain sum, and immediately conclude that every piece of a 
similar description must be worth as much or perhaps more, not adverting 
to, or not being aware of, the circumstance that the unusual state of its 
preservation, or some accidental competition between rival collectors, has 
carried the price beyond ordinary limits. 

The pricea quoted in the following pages have been actually realised at 
sales of coins held in London and Edinburgh during the last thirty years. 
It is hoped that this information may aid coin collectors in their pur- 
chases and assist possessors of coins in forming an approximate idea 
of the value of their collections. Many of the sale catalogues consulted 
were courteously lent by Messr.*. Lincoln and Son, the well-known 
numismatists, of 69, New Oxford-street, London. A list of the more 
important sales, with their dates, will be found on a subsequent page. 

A hint may be given to the young collector as to the arrangement and 
preservation of his coins. They should be kept in a cabinet of mahogany, 
oak, or walnut-wood, having shallow trays pierced with circular spaces 
or holes to contain the coins. The trays should be made of mahogany, 
not of cedar, as it has been found that the surface of copper coins is 
injured by being kept in contact with cedar -wood. Under each coin should 
be placed a ticket with a description of the coin, and a reference to a 
catalogue in which should be recorded every particular, such as the date 
on which the coin was acquired, the name of the person from whom 
purchased, and the price. A coin from a well-known collection will 
always bring a higher price when sold than an equally fine specimen of 
which the antecedents are unknown. If it be necessary to clean copper 
or bronze coin?, a soft brush (say a very soft tooth brush) should be used, 
with plain soap and cold or tepid water, but no aoda. Having washed 
the coins carefully, they should be dried by being placed in boxwood 
sawdust ; then the sawdust should be brushed off with a very soft dry 
brush. The secret of success is not in the washing but in the drying 
process. The box containing the sawdust may be heated in an oven before 
being used, as sawdust will dry more quickly when hot than when cold. 



INTRODUCTION. 

The same sawdust, if kept free from dust and dirt, will last for several 
years. In the case of gold and silver coins a similar course may be 
followed for the removal of any adventitious dirt. It is scarcely 
necessary to add that on no account should coins be polished up or 
brightened. 

These introductory remarks cannot be concluded more fittingly than 
in the words of the eminent author of " The Silver Coins of England " : 
"It is quite unnecessary here to expatiate upon the pleasure or informa- 
tion to be derived from the study and collecting of coins, because it is 
presumed that all who refer to this volume have already felt some taste 
or fondness for the pursuit, and only want to have their way smoothed 
and course directed, that they may pursue it with pleasure and success. 
To the utilitarian, who demands an explanation of the use of the study of 
coins, it is in vain to attempt a reply ; the pursuit, it must be acknowledged, 
removes no physical necessities, supplies no animal wants ; it neither 
clothes the naked nor feeds the hungry ; its votaries are content with 
its affording them an agreeable and innocent occupation for their leisure 
hours, while at the same time it is illustrating and embellishing history, 
that old almanac, the contempt of modern economists, but the mine from 
which rich stores of wisdom and of knowledge are extracted by the sage 
and the philosopher." 



NUMISMATIC TERMS AND ABBREVIATIONS. 

Obv. Obverse: The head, or principal side of a coin, usually 
bearing the monarch's name or bust, as distinguished from 

Rev. Reverse. The under side, or back of a coin. 

m.m. Mint mark. A private character (frequently a cross) placed 
upon a coin in order to distinguish the coins of each particular issue or 
mintage. 

Weight. The weight of coins is given in Troy grains. 

The knowledge of what a coin ought to weigh is often most useful in 
determining whether a doubtful piece is genuine or not. 

N.B. When the bust on a coin is stated to be looking to the right 
or to the left, it is to be understood that it is looking to the spectator's 
right or left, not to the heraldic dexter or sinister. This is mentioned to 
prevent mistakes, there being no fixed rule. For example, a bust as in 
Plate X., Fig. 12, is described as being to the right. 



NOTE. The weights of the milled gold coins of Charles II., given at 
pages 40 and 41, are those of coins struck in and after 1670. Before 
that year the weights were in the proportion of 131-j-j- grains to the Guinea. 



A GUIDE TO THE 

VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 



EARLY BRITISH COINS. 



THE earliest English money (first coined between 200 and 150 B.C. is 
divided into two classes. 

(1) Uniiiscribed, or without any lettered inscription. 

(2) Inscribed, with lettered inscription in addition to various figures 
or devices. 

These coins are found in gold, silver, copper, and mixed metal, chiefly 
tin. They vary in weight, the gold from 25 to 117 grains ; silver, 40 to 
93 grains ; copper, 25 to 106 grains ; mixed metal, 17 to 35 grains. 

Some of the gold coins are of a very base standard. 



Uninscribed. 

GOLD. Obv., rude bust; rev., triple-tailed horse to right; 12s. 6d. 

Obv., convex, plain ; rev., horse with pellet and crescent under ; 
20s. to 30s. One, extremely fine (116^ grains), 5 5s. ; another 
(91 grains), 2 12s. 

SILVER. Obv., rude bust; rev., horse and emblems ; 2s. 6d. to 10s. 

COFFEE AND MIXED METAL. From Is. 

B 



12 TUB VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

Inscribed. 

Note. For convenience of reference these are arranged in alphabetical 
(not chronological) order. 

Addedomaros. 

GOLD. Obv., AD DOM, a horse to right ; rev., a star, with three 
crescents in centre (85 grains) ; very fine, <4 ; another, slightly 
differing (85 grains), '2 2s. ; a third variety, .4 19s. 

Antedrignis. 

GOLD. Obv., convex, an object like a fern leaf in the field; rev., 
ANTEDRIGV, triple-tailed horse to right, below a wheel ; 
very fine, 1. Another similar, but unevenly struck, .3 10s. 
Another, with faint traces of the letters, and of rude work, 10s. 

SILVER. Obv., rude head to right ; rev., AN with TEO above, 
triple-tailed horse to left ; jl Is. 

Bodvo (Boadicea?). 

GOLD. Obv., [BJODVO across a convex field : rev., triple-tailed 
horse to right, with wheel and ornaments ; .5. 

SILVEE. Obv., BODVOC, bare head to left ; rev., horse galloping to 
right, wheel and ornaments; .21. 

Cassivellaunus. 

GOLD. Obv., convex, a fern leaf ; rev., CATTI, above, a triple-tailed 
horse, below, a wheel; .2 16s. 

Cunobeline. 

GOLD. Obv., CVNOBELIN, within a curved exergual line, two 
horses galloping to the left ; above, a leaf, below, a wheel ; rev., 
CAMV. on a tablet, across an ornamental band ; extra rare and 
fine, 20 ; others, ^5 5s. to .2 2g. 

SILVER. Obv., CVNO, a winged male bust to right; rev., TASCIO, 
Sphinx squatting to left ; 4: 6s. ; another, 2 lie. 

COPPER. Obv., CVNO on a tablet, under youthful janiform heads; 
rev., CAMV on a tablet, under a sow resting against a tree ; 
.3 19s., -13 13s., and .40 10s. 

Obv., bust to the right, inscribed CVNOBELINVS REX; rev., 
a bull butting, TASC beneath ; .1 3s. (Fig. 160.) 

A well preserved specimen of each of the above two varieties, 
sold together, realised only 2 16s. 

Obv., CVNO on a tablet within a wreath ; rev., CAMV, horse 
trotting to right, fine work ; .16. 

Obv. CVNOB ELINI on two tablets, across the field; 
rev., a Victory seated to left, holding a patera ; fine and very 
rare, .1 9s. 

Obv., CVNO, head of Mercury to left; rev., TASC, Vulcan 
forging a helmet ; 10s. 

Other varieties, 6 Gs. to 2. 



EARLY BRITISH COINS. 3 

Dubnovellaunus. 

GOLD. Obv., D . . . OVIILLA, horse galloping to left; rev., two 

crescents in the centre of an ornamented band ; .4 ; others, 

varied, 1 Is. to ,3 12s. 
SILVER. Obv., DVBNO, laureate beardless head to left, wearing a 

tiara ; rev., a griffin, or Pegasus, galloping to right ; a star 

above and below ; 3 12s. 6d. 
COPPER. Obv., DVBN on a tablet, beneath a lion springing to the 

left ; rev., an animal to the right ; .1 Is. 

Zpaticcus. 

GOLD. Obv., EPATICCV, horseman with javelin and shield charging 
to right ; rev., TAS. CIP divided by an ear of bearded corn ; 
unique, .50. 

SILVER. Obv., EPATI, head of Hercules to right; rev., an eagle, front 
view, with wings expanded, standing on a serpent; ,4 14s. 

Eppillus. 

GOLD. Obv., EPPI, horse to right, below, a flower; rev., COM. F. 

within a circle on convex field ; 3 and Q 5s. 

SILVER. Obv., VIE. O., bare head to right; rev., EPPI, Capricorn 
to left, below, COM. F. ; of great rarity, .8 5s. 

Tasciovanus. 

GOLD. Obv., TASCIO EICON in two lines across an upright orna- 
ment composed of five lines ; rev., horseman to right, armed 
with sword and shield ; extra rare and fine, <10. 

Obv., TASC on a band across the field ; rev., Pegasus galloping 
to left ; extra rare and fine, 2 14s., .4 Is., and 7. 

SILVER. Obv., TASC on a tablet within a triple circle, the centre one 
beaded ; rev., horseman galloping to left, his body and legs pro- 
tected by a diamond-shaped shield ; <4. Another 3 Ga. 

COPPER. Obv., TASCIAVA, beardless bare head to right; rev., TAS, 
Pegasus to left ; fine and rare, 2. 

Verica. 

GOLD. Obv., COM. F. on a sunk tablet, across a convex field ; rev., 
horseman charging to right, above, VIE; below, BEX; very 
fine and rare (82 grains), .9 10s., ,9 12s., .9 17s. 6d. 
Another, almost similar, realised .8. 

SILVER. Obv., VEEICA COMMI. F. around a circular shield ; rev., 
"REX., a lion running to right, a crescent above ; unique, T. 

SILVER. Obv., [C]OM.F between two crescents on a convex field, 
encircled by pellets ; rev., lion or boar, a star above ; unique, 
.1 11s. 



SAXON COINS. 



The Sceatta. (The earliest coin of the Saxon period.) 

SILVER. Weight from about 8 to 20 grains. 

First type, with Eunic letters. 

Second type, with Roman letters. 

Type generally. Obv., a rude head or figure of a bird or 
beast ; rev., square beaded compartment. 

Value varies from 5s. to 20s. 
Note. There are gold Sceattae in the British Museum. 

KINGS OF KENT. 

Bgcberht, 765791. 

SILVER, Penny. Obv., EGCBEEHT, in outer circle, with EX, in mono- 
gram, within the circle ; rev., BABBA in the angles of a cross, 
with a diamond-shaped centre, including four pellets ; extra 
rare and very fine, .37 10s. ; another, .48. (Fig. 38 ) 

Eadbearlit, or Etlielberlit, surnamed Fraen, 794798. 

SILVER, Penny. Obv., EADBEABHT EEX in three lines across the 
field; rev., moneyer's name, across the field, with ornament 
beneath. (Fig. 39.) 

Cuthred, 798-805. 

SILVER, Penny. Obv., diademed bust to right, + CVDEED EEX 
CANT ; rev., +EABA. MONETA, a circle containing a cross, 
with a wedge in each angle ; 2 3s. ; poor, .1 7s. ; fine, <7. 

Penny. Obv., CVDEED EEX, in the centre a cross and 
pellets ; rev., EABA. within a tribrach ; .9. 

Baldred. 805 823. 

SILVER, Penny. Obv., +BELDEED EEX CANT., bust to right: 
rev., + SVEFNEED. MONET., and within a circle, DEVE. 
CITS. Dorovernia Civitas, Canterbury ; of great rarity and 
fine ; 69 ; another, ,33 10s. Weight, about 20 grains (Fig. 40.) 

Penny. Different moneyer ; ,48 ; another, ,11. 

Penny. Obv., + BELDEED EEX CANT., in the centre a 
plain cross : .20 5s. 

Penny. Obv., + BALDEED EEX CN., bust to right ; rev., 
+ DVNVN MONETA, cross moline in centre ; pierced, .8 15s. 



SAXON COINS. 

SOUTH SAXON. 

(No coins of this kingdom have been discovered.) 



MERCIA. 
Offa, 757796. 

SILVER, Penny. Weight, 18 to 20 grains. A great variety of types ; 
from 20 10s. to \ 4s.; one, described as "fine," sold for 
15s. (Figs. 41 and 42.) 

Obv., bust to right, + OFPA EEX ; rev., moneyer's name 
(Ciolhard) divided by a coiled serpent ; 13 13s. (Fig. 41.) 

Obv., king's name in the angles of a lozenge-shaped ornament, 
in centre, a circle and five pellets ; rev., ALH MVND (in two 
lines) ; .1 11s. (Fig. 42.) 

Cynethryth, Queen of Offa. 

SILVER, Penny. very rare. Obv., bust to right, EOBA ; rev., 
CYNETHRYTH EEGINA round the coin, in the centre the 
Mercian M in a circle of pellets ; ,50 5s. ; others, .23 10s. 
and .12 12s. ; one, described as " doubtful," realised only 5s. 
Weight, 18 to 20 grains. 

Coenwlf, 794-818. 

SILVER, Penny. Weight, 18 to 22 grains. Obv., generally the king's 
head; rev., the name of the moneyer ; from 15s. to ,8 2s. 6d. 

Ceolwlf I., 819. 

SILVER, Penny. Obv., + CEOLWLF EEX M., diademed bust to 
right ; rev., moneyer's name, surrounding a large A in centre ; 
.16 10s. ; another, 1 2s. Weight about 21 grains. 

Beornwlf, 82O 824. 

SILVER, Penny. Weight about 18 grains. Obv., bust to right ; rev., 
a cross crosslet within a circle ; .29; another, <26 ; others, 
.8, .41, and .50. 

Ludica, 824-825. 

SILVER, Penny. Weight, 19 to 22 grains. Types similar to those of 
Beornwlf. One, which realised .62 at the Cuff sale, is in the 
British Museum. 

Wiglaf, 825839. 

SILVER, Penny. Weight, 25i- grains. Of extreme rarity. Obv., king's 
name surrounding a cross, with a pellet in each angle; rev., 
moneyer's name in three lines. In British Museum, purchased 
in 1828, for B 10s. 

Another. Obv., nude bust to right, WIGLAF EEX M.; 
rev., cross crosslet, moneyer's name in the quarters ; .5!. 



6 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COIXS. 

Berhfrulf, 839-852. 

SILVER, Penny. Weight, 17 to 20 grains. Obv., generally bust to 
right, with name and title ; rsv., name of moneyer ; .1 6s. to 
10. 

Burg-red, 852874. 

SILVER, Penny. Common, from 5a. Obv., king's head to right, 
snrronnded by name and title ; rev., moneyer's name, with 
MONETA, in three lines. Weight, 16 to 21 grains. 

Ceolwlfll., 874. 

SILVER, Penny. Obv., diademed bust to right, with king's name ; 
rev., moneyer's name, and lozenge shaped ornament; Cuff sale, 
14 5s. ; same coin, Dymock sale, 27 ; Murchison sale, 
12 12s. 

Another. Rev., two seated figures holding a globe, behind 
them a Victory with expanded wings ; 81. 



EAST ANGLES. 

Beonna, about 750. 

SILVER, Sceatta. Extremely rare. Obv., the king's name in Kunic 
letters surrounding an annulet enclosing a pellet ; rev., + EFE 
in the angles of a cross; 19 5s., 23, and 52 10s. Weight, 
about 15 grains. (Fig. 43.) 

Eadvald, 819827. 

SILVER, Penny. Obv., the king's name and title in three lines ; rev., 
moneyer's name in a quatrefoil, of great rarity. A specimen, 
broken in halves, realised 1 6s. ; another, also broken, 5 5s. 

JEthelstan I., 828-837. 

SILVER, Penny. Weight, about 18 to 21 grains. Obv., rnde bust to 
left, with king's name around ; rev., cross crosslet, with 
moneyer's name ; 1 8a. to 2 14s. ; one, extra rare, 17. 

Ethelweard, 837 85O. 

SILVER, Penny. Weight, about 20 grains. Obv., without bust, king's 
name and title surrounding a cross crosslet ; rev., moneyer's 
name, in centre a cross with a pellet in each angle ; 7s. ; others, 
varied, from 1 to 3. 

Beorhtric, 85O 855. 

SILVER, Penny. Only three or four known, one in the British 
Museum. Obv., +BEOEHTRIC REX around a beaded circle 
enclosing the letter A ; rev., moneyer's name around a beaded 
circle enclosing a cross, with pellet in each angle. Weight, 
21 to 22 grains. 



SAXOX COIXS. 7 

Eadmund, 855870. 

SILVER, Penny. Weight, about 20 grains. Obv., king's name and 
title surrounding a cross; rev., moneyer's name, a cross, with 
a wedge in each angle, 7s. ; others, varied, 12a. to 36s. 

Ethelstan II. (Guthrum), 870-89O. 

SILVER, Penny. Obv., a small cross within the inner circle, surrounded 
by the king's name and title, the name being always blundered ; 
rev., the moneyer's name in two lines ; from 13s. to .3 10s. 



NORTHUMBERLAND. 

The coinage of this kingdom consisted of the STTCA, the SCEATTA, 
and the PENNY. 

The STTCA is of mixed metal, chiefly copper, weight about 19 grains, 
and peculiar to this kingdom. 

Ecgfrith, 6*70-685. 

COPPER, Styca. Obv., small cross surrounded by ECGFRID BEX; 
rev., an irradiated cross with the word L V X + in the angles, 
A few only known ; 20 and .51. (Fig. 161 J 

Aldfrid, 685705. 

SILVER, Sceatta. Obv., + ALFRIDU3, surrounding a pellet within a 
circle; rev., figure of a quadruped. Two known; one sold for 
25. Weight, 20 grains. 

Eadberht, 737758. 

SCEATTA OF BASE SILVER. Obv., king's name, variously spelt ; rev., 
similar to that of ALDFRID ; 10s. to 2 12s. 6d., and 3 19s. 

Moll EtMlwald, 759-765. 

A Sceatta and a Styca are the only coins kno^m. 

Alchred, 765774. 

SILVER, Sceatta. Same type a3 that of EADBERHT. Obv., king's 
name ; rev., animal. 

Elfwald, 779788. 

SILVER, Sceatta. Same type as preceding coin. Three specimens 
known ; one sold at 9 9s. 

I2anred, 808840. 

COPPER, Styca. Very common, various moneyers ; Is. to 2s. 
SILVER, Sceatta. Extra rare. 

.Ethelred II., 84O-848. 

COPPER, Styca. Very common, various moneyers, Is. to 2s. ; a rare 
type sold at 2 2s. 

Redulf, 844. 

OOPPEB, Styca. Various moneyers ; 2s. to 5s. 



8 THE VALUATION OP BRITISH COINS. 

Osbercht, 848867. 

COPPER, Styca. Not common, 3a. to 6s. 

Earl Sitric. 

SILVER, Penny. Only two known. One sold for .3 5a. Obv., 
SITRIC COMES in two lines, divided by three crosses ; rev,, 
SCELDFOR, between GVNDI BERTVS, across the field. 

Cnut (Cunetti), 883-90O. 

SILVER, Penny and Halfpenny. The latter not common. Obv., 
CNVT REX, crnciformly arranged ; rev., CVNNETTI. Penny, 
(20 to 22 grains), 5s. to 7s. ; halfpenny (8 to 9 grains), 10s. 
to 15s. 

Siefred, 90O. 

SILVER, Penny and Halfpenny. Ordinary type, similar to those of 
CNVT ; rev., EBIAICE CIVI, in fonr divisions, small cross. 
Penny, weight 20 to 22 grains ; 10s. Halfpenny, weight 
8 to 10 grains. 

Alwald, 9O1 905. 

SILVER, Penny. Only two known. One, obv., +ALVAL DVS, a 
cross with a pellet in two angles, within a circle ; rev., DNS 
DS REX in two lines ; sold for 4, 2s. Weight, 23 grains. 

Sitric, 921926. 

SILVER, Penny. Six known, all different. One variety has, obv., 
SITRIC CVNVNC A, surrounding a trefoil-formed ornament ; 
rev., ASCOL NONETRA, surrounding the Danish Standard. 

Eric, 927954. 

SILVER, Penny. Very rare. Obv., ERIC REX in two lines separated 
by a sword ; rev., small cross surrounded by RADVLP MEOI ; 
8 and .9 10s. ; one sold for.l 12s ; another variety, <11 
and ,16 5s. Weight, 18 to 19 grains. 

Begnald, 912-944. 

SILVER, Pennies. Weight, about 20 grains. All very rare, 1 15s. ; 
one, extra rare and fine, .24. 

Anlaf, about 941. 

SILVER, Pennies. Very rare. Obv., ANLAF CVNVNC, in centre the 
Danish raven ; rev., small cross in circle, and moneyer's name ; 
.4, 8, and .12 ; another variety, .13 10s. Weight, 14 to 22 
grains. (Fig. 44.) 

SAINTS. 
St. Edmund, about 900. 

SILVER, Penny. Common. Halfpenny, rare. Obv., the letter A, 
surrounded by the saint's name and title ; rev., moneyer's 
name, with cross in centre. Penny, 4s. to 6s. ; halfpenny, 15s. 
to 3. A very fine Penny, with title of "Martyr," realised 
2 13i. 



SAXON COINS. 

St. Peter, 9O5 941. 

SILVER. Pennies ; one Halfpenny (unique ?) is known. Obv., SCI. 
PETE. MO. divided by a sword ; rev., cross with pellet in each 
angle, EBRACET ; 10s. to 2. Weight, 16 to 21 grains. (Fig. 45.) 
St. Martin, 921942. 

SILVER, Pennies. Three varieties known, one has obv., SCI. MARTI. 
in two lines, a sword between pointing to the right ; rev., 
LINCOIA CIVIT, surrounding a large open cross enclosing a 
small one ; .6 10s. Weight, 17 to 18 grains. 

ARCHBISHOPS. 

Jaenberht (Canterbury), 763 79O. 

SILVER, Pennies. Weight, 18 grains. Very rare. The obv. has the 
Archbishop's name, without bust. 

Obv., +IENBERHT AREP, a flower or cross, with a wedee 
in each angle ; rev., OFFA REX in two liaes within ornamental 
compartments. Sold for 21, having previously realised ,105. 

Obv., IENBERHT AREP in three lines ; rev., OFFA REX, 
formed out of the carved e.ids of a cruciform ornament; <38. 

.SSthillieard (Canterbury), 790803. 

SILVER, Pennies. Very rare ; ,15 to ,36. No bust. 

Obv., AEDILHARD PONT surrounding a star of six 
points ; rev., OFFA REX MERC, with star in centre. Weight, 
18f grain.-*. 

Obv., AEDILHEARD AR. in outer circle, in centre EP ; 
rev., COENVVLF REX M. ; .36 and .15. 

Vulfred (Canterbury), 803830. 

SILVER, Pennies. Very rare ; ,1 14s. to .10 10s. 

Obv., front-faced portrait, + VVLFRED ARCHIEPIS. ; 
rev., SVVEFNERD MONET, with DRVR. CITS. (Dorovernice 
Civitatis) in inner circle ; ,10 10s. 

Obv., full-faced bust, surrounded by VVLFRED ARCHI- 
EPISCOPI ; rev., monogram in centre, SAEBERHT MONETA ; 
L 14s. Weight, 20 k grains. (Fig. 46.) 

Ceolnoth, (Canterbury), 830-87O. 

SILVER, Pennies. Weight, 17 to 21 grains. Obv., bust, usually full 
face (profile very rarely), name and title ; rev., moneyer's name; 
<! 5s. to 2 ; a rare variety, 11 7s. Gd. ; another, ,17 10s. 

Ethered (Canterbury), 871 89O. 

SILVER, Pennies. Obv., Bust to right, with name and title; rev., 
quatrefoil enclosing a circle over a cross. 

Only three known, one purchased by the British Museum 
for 26 10s. ; another sold for 4G ; weight, 22 grains. 

Flegmund (Canterbury), 891923. 

SILVER, Pennies. Weight, 21| grains. Without bust ; 2 10s. to 
.6 15s. 



10 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

Eanbald (York), 796. 

COPPER, Stycc?. 83. to 5s. Obv., name of Archbishop ; rev., name of 
moneyer. 

Vigmund (York), 831851. 

COPPER, Stycce. Is. 6d. to 2s. 6d. Obv. and rev. as above. 

Vulfhere (York), 854-895. 

COPPER, Stycee. 3s. to 4s. Obv. and rev. as before. 

WEST SAXONS. 
Egbert, 8OO-837. 

SILVER, Pennies. "Weight, abont 22 grains. "With and without bnst. 
Very rare, .5 to 10. One fine, but pierced, sold for ,1 9s. ; 
another, cracked, sold for 1 11s. 

Obv., + ECGBEOEHT REX surrounding a double monogram, 
possibly intended for Merciorum ; ??>., monejer's name with a 
cross crosslet in the centre ; a unique and extremely fine 
specimen, sold for .24 5s.; others, .15 10s. and .19. 

Ethel-wlf, 837-856. 

SILVER, Pennies. With and without bust. 10s. to 2 ; one, extra 
rare, .4 163. ; another, .6 2s. 6d. Weight, 22 grains. 

06r., EDELWLF EEX surrounding plain cross upon cross 
patonce ; rev., + OSMVXD. MONET A, and in the centre 
SAXONIORVM in three lines, very fine ; 3 4s. 

Ethelbert, 856-866. 

SILVER, Pennies. Bnst to right; 1 to ,2. 

Obv., + AEDELBEARHT REX, diademed bast ; rev, 
money er' s name, with MONETA surrounding a floral cross. 
This coin realised at different sales, 1, 9 9s., and 15. 
Weight, 20 to 24 grains. 

Ethelred I., 866-871. 

SILVER, Pennies. Weight, usually IS grains. Bust to right : rev., 
moneyer's name. 15s. to 2 ; one, extra rare and fine, 4 Gs. 

Alfred (The Great), 872901. 

SILVER. Pennies. Weight, abont 20 grains. With and without bust. 
Various types, .1 to 2 ; very rare varieties, .16 to <22. 
(Fig. 47.) 

SILVER, Halfpenny. Weight, 10 to 11 grains; 6s., 1 Ss. to ,14 5s. 
Edward the Elder, 9O1 925. 

SILVER, Pennies and Halfpennies. Pennies, with and without head ; 
weight about 21 grains ; various types, 7s. to 15s. ; extra 
rare varieties, .5 to .15. Halfpenny, without bust, weight, 
7 to 9 grains (only three known), .2 2s. and .10; one, extra 
fine, realised, at different sales, .21 5s., <23, and .10 10s. 



SAXOX COIXS. 11 

JEthelstan, 925-941. 

SILVER, Pennies. Weight, 22 to 24 grains. Without bust, 5s. to 15s. 
With bust, 10s. to .1 ; extra fine and rare, '2 to .6; one 
sold for .10 10s. (Fig. 48.) 

Edmund, 941-946. 

SILVER, Pennies. Weight, abonr, 24 grains. Type very similar to those 
of JEthelstan. Without bust, 5s. to 15s. ; with bust, <! to 2 ; 
rare variety, .6 2s. Gd. and .8. 

Eadred, 946-955. 

SILVER, Pennies. Weight, 22 to 24 grains. Without bust, 83. to 10s. ; 

extra rare, .4 ; with bust, ,1 10s. to 2 10s. ; one, 5 2s. Gd. 
SILVER, Halfpenny. (Unique ?) sold for .9 9s. 
Eadwig, 955959. 

SILVER, Pennies. Weight, under 24 grains. Without bust, 15s. to 

.1 I0a. ; one, extra rare, .5 2s. Gd. 



SOLE MONARCHS. 

Edgar, 959975. 

SILVER, Pennies. Weight, 20 to 24 grains. Without bust, 4s. to Gs. ; 
with bust, 2 to 3; one, extra rare, ,8 Ss. ; others, ,1G 10s. 
and <25. 

Edward II., the Martyr, 975978. 

SILVER, Pennies. Weight, 22 to 24 grains. With bust, <1 10s. to 
3 10s. One realised 1 5s. 

Ethelred II., 9781016. 

SILVER, Pennies of several types. Weight, 20 to 27 grains. Common 

varieties, 4s. to 8s. ; rare types, extra fine, 15s. to ,2 2s. 
Canute, 10161035. 

SILVER, Pennies. Weight, 12 to 24 grains. Bust, generally to left. 
Various types, 4s. to 8s. ; extra rare and fine, ,1 to 2. (Fig. 49.) 
Harold I., 1O35 1O40. 

SILVER, Pennies. Weight, about IS grains. With bust, 1 10s. to 2 ; 
a rare variety, 4e. 

Hartliacimt, 1O4O 1O42. 

SILVER, Pennies. Weight, about 18 grains. Very rare. Bust to 
right or left. .2 to .5; one, extra rare and fine, .10 5s.; 
another, ,11 15s. 

Edward the Confessor, 1042 1066. 

SILVER, Pennies. Weight, 15 to 28 grains. Common, 3s. Gd. to Gs. ; 
sovereign type, 10s. to .1 ; a scarce variety, .2 17s. 

Harold II., 1066. 

SILVER, Pennies. Weight, about 22 grains. Bust to right or lefh. 
13s. to 1 10s.; one, extra rare and fine, <2 10s. (Fig. 50.) 



ENGLISH COINS SINCE THE 
CONQUEST. 



William I. (the Conqueror), 10661087. 

SILVER, Pennies. (20 to 21 graina.) Obv., the king's name surrounding 1 
bust, crowned ; rev., an ornamented cross, encircled by the name 
of money er and mint. The names of about seventy places of 
mintage are known. 
The principal varieties are : 

1. Obv., profile to left, with sceptre ; 10s. to .1 ; one, extra fine, <3. 

(Fig. 51.) 

2. Bonnet type. Obv., front face, the crown having tassels ; 10s. to 

1 5s. 

3. Canopy type. Obv., front face, under a canopy ; 10s. to '2 ; one, 

extra fine, .5 2s. 6d. 

4. Obv., front face, a sceptre on each side, 10s. to 1 10s. ; extra 

fine, .1 19s. 

5. Obv , profile to right, with sceptre; 10s. to .1 10s. ; one extra fine, 

.6 15s. 

6. PAXS type, common ; Obv., front face, with sceptre ; rev., cross, the 

letters P A X S in the angles ; 2s. to 5s. 

William II. (Rufus), 1O87 11OO. 

SILVER, Pennies. (Over 21 grains.) Obv., king's name and bust, 
crowned ; rev., a cross, variously ornamented. 
The principal varieties are : 

1. Obv., front face, a star at each side ; 1 to 2. 

2. Obv., profile to right, with sword; <1 to 2. 

3. Obv., front face, with sword ; 10s. to 2. 

4. Obv., front face, with sceptre ; a star at left side of head ; 

10s. to .1 Wa. 

5. Obv., front face, without sword, sceptre, or stars ; 15s. to 2. 

6. Obv., front face, an annulet at each side; ^1 to .1 10s. ; one, 

extra fine, 2 11s. 
Henry I., 11OO 1135. 

SILVER, Pennies. (Ucder 22 grains.) The types are very various 
and difficult to describe. 
The principal varieties are : 

1. Obv., front face, between two annulets (resembling William II., 
No. 6), the king's name variously spelt; rev., cross flenry, sur- 
rounded by name of moneyer and mint ; .2 to 3 10s. ; one, 
extra fine, 7 2s. 6d. 



ENGLISH COINS. 13 

Henry I., 110O-1135. 

SILVER, Pennies continued. 

2. Obv., front face, crowned; rev., PAX across the field ; .1 to 2. 

A variety, same olv., but rev., tressure of eight arches, inclosing 
an annulet ; 2 2s. 

3. Obv., profile to left with sceptre ; rev., cross floury ; <! to 

.1 108. 

4. Obv., front face, or three-quarter face to left, with sceptre. The 

commonest variety of this king's money ; 10s. to 1. 

5. Obv., profile to left, with sceptre ; rev., cross, annulet in each 

angle ; 2 7s., .4 4s., .4 10s. 

G. Obv., profile to left, sceptre, head very large ; rev., small cross, 
within two concentric legends, one being the moneyer's name, 
the other that of the mint; ,5 2s. 6d. This is the only instance 
of a double legend on the rev. of an English penny. 

7. Obv., front face, sceptre, at left side of neck a small cross of four 

pellets, or a star ; .2 to <4 ; one, extra fine, 6 6s. 

8. Obv., profile to left, sceptre; rev., tressure of four sides; 2 to 

5 ; one, 1 7s. ; another, .8. 

9. Obv., front face, sceptre at right, and a star at lefb side of head ; 

rev., cross voided, floret in each angle ; 1 15s., ,10 15s. ; a 
very poor specimen realised only 3s. 

Robert, Earl of Gloucester (illegitimate son of Henry I.). 

SILVER, Penny. Obv., figure on horseback armed with a sword, conical 
hat, BODBERTVS . . ST . X; rev., cross patee upon a 
cross flenry, surrounded by various ornaments in place of a 
legend. Only two specimens, both imperfect, are known. One 
(16 grains), is in the British Museum ; the other (under 15 
grains), in the Pembroke Collection, realised 11 10s. 

Stephen, 11351154:. 

SILVER, Pennies (under 22 grains), of several types. The king's 

bust and name, variously spelt, on obv. 
The principal varieties are : 

1. Obv., front face, sceptre : rev., voided cross, within a tressure 

fleury ; 2 to .3. 

2. Obv., profile to right, sceptre ; rev., cross moline, the ends pierced 

and forming a tressure flenry. The commonest typo, 5s. to 1 ; 
one, extra fine, ,4. (Fig. 52.) 

3. Obr., same as No. 2, but flag instead of sceptre, and star in the 

field ; .5 12s. 6d., G 15s., ,10 10s., and .13. 

4. Obr., very rude profile to right, sceptre ; rev., cross voided, martlet 

in each angle; WHICHELINVS DEBBI ; 5 12s. 2d., 7, 
and 1 17s. Gd. 

Henry, Bishop of Winchester (illegitimate brother of Stephen). 

SILVER, Penny (16 grains). Obv., profile to right, crozier ; 
HENEICVS E?C. ; rev., STEPHANVS KEX. Unique. 



14 THE VALUATION O? BRITISH COIN'S. 

Stephen and Matilda, his Wife. 

SILVER, Penny (17 grains). Obv., two figures, standing, holding a 
standard between them, extremely rare; 8, l~, 18, and 
19. One, with a piece broken out, sold for .3 7s. ; another, 
also imperfect, realised .3 16a. 

Eustace, elder son of Stephen. 

SILVER, Pennies (16 to 19 grains). Struck while governor at York, 
very rare, and generally imperfect. 

1. Obv., a lion passant to right, EISTACHIVS; rev., ornamental 

cross; 10s., 7, 9 9s., .10 5s., and 12 10s. An im- 
perfect specimen sold for <! 2s. One, described as fine, 
realised only 1. 

2. Obi's, half length figure to right, holding 'a sword, conical head- 

dress, EVSTACIVS ; rev., cross ; .6 2s. 6d., .15, and .20 10a. 

William, second son of Stephen. 

SILVER, Pennies (15 to 16 grains). Two known. 

1. Obv., front face between two stars, LVILLEM DVO. 

2. Obv., front face, no stars, WILLELMVS ; rev., ornamental cross. 

Matilda (daughter of Henry I. and mother of Henry II.), the Empress. 

SILVER, Pennies (14 to 16J grains). Three known, supposed to have 
been struck by Matilda while at war with Stephen on behalf of 
her son. 

Obv., similar to Stephen's No. 2 ; IM.ERATR. = Imperatrix; 
rev., money er' a name and B (Bristol). 

Hoger, Earl of Warwick, 11231153. 

SILVER, Pennies (about 22 grains). Four known. Type like Stephen's 
No. 2. Obv., PEEEKIC = Werewic ; Struck in London, Lincoln, 
and Warwick, while au adherent of the Empress Matilda. 

Eenry II., 11541189. 

SILVER, Pennies (about 22 grains). Two issues. 

1. Obi 1 ., king's bust nearly full faced, sceptre in right hand, with 

name and title ; rev., cross potent, a small cross in each angle 
name of moneyer and mint. Usually very badly struck ; 2s. 6d. 
to 5s. ; extra fine, 1 to .2 6s. and .3. (Pig. 53.) 

2. Obv., king's head, front face, within inner circle, sceptre in right 

(rarely left) hand ; rev., double barred cross, small cross botone 
in each angle, surrounded by name of moneyer and mint ; 
Is. to 2s. 6d. (Pig. 54.) 

Richard I., 11891199. 

Xo English coins bearing the name of Richard are known. Daring his 
reign the coins struck in England were similar to those of his 
father, Henry II., whose name they bore. 

Silver Pennies, similar to Henry II.'s second issue, were struck at the 
Lichfield mint during the reign of Richard I. 



ENGLISH COINS. 15 

John, 11991216. 

No English coins bearing the name of John are known. Silver Pennies 
bearing the name of his father, Henry II., were issued daring 
John's reign. They are of neater workmanship and slightly 
smaller than those struck by Henry II. and Richard I. 

Henry III., 1216-1272. 

GOLD, Penny (-15 grains). Olv., king enthroned; rev., double cross, 
with a rose in each angle ; extremely rare; .41 10s., .130, 
140. (Fig. 1.) 

SILVER, Penny (22 grains). Two issues. (1) Type of Henry II.'s 
second issue ; (2) rev., long double cross ; Is. to 2s. Gd. 



Edward I., 12721307. 

GOLD. None. 

SILVER,* Penny (22 grains), Halfpenny, and Farthing. 

Pennies, struck at Berwick, Bristol, Canterbury, Chester, 
Durham, Exeter, Kingston(Hull), Lincoln, London, Reading, St. 
Edmondsbury, York, and by Robert de Hadley ; Is. to 2s. 6d. 
A rare variety, rev., VILLA BEREWICI, a bear's head in one 
of the angles ; 1 3s. ; another, VILLA RADINGY, an escallop 
in one angle : 1 Is. and 3. 

Halfpennies, struck at Berwick, Bristol, Lincoln, London, 
Newcastle, Reading, and York ; Is. 6d. to 2s. 6d. ; one, struck ac 
Berwick, two bears' heads in rev., 10s. ; one of Reading, .1 Is. 

Farthings. Struck at Berwick, Bristol, Lincoln, London, and 
York ; 2s. 6d. to 3s. 6d. ; one, of Berwick, two bears' heads on 
rev., 1 19s. ; one, of Lincoln, fine, 14s. 

PATTERN, Groat (86 grains). ,1 10s., 4,, o 2s. 6d., 7, 8 5s. 
A very poor specimen sold for 5s. (Fig. 55.) 

PATTERN, Penny (21 grains), showing neither shoulders nor mantle ; 
o 5s. (Fig. 56.) 

Edward II., 13O7 1327. 

GOLD. None. 

SILVER. Penny, Halfpenny, and Farthing. 

Penny (22 grains). Struck at Berwick, Bristol, Canterbury, 
Durham, London, Newcastle, St. Edmondsbury, and York ; Is. 
to 2s. 6d. 

Halfpenny (11 grains). London ; Is. 6d. to 2s. 6d. 
Halfpenny and Farthing (5 grains). Struck at Berwick : 
the two 18s. 

The PENNIES, HALFPENNIES, and FARTHINGS of Edward I., II., III., IV. Richard II. 
and III., Henry IV., V., VI,, and VII. (first and second issues), have on obv. the king's full 
faced bust crowned, surrounded by his name and titles, variously abbreviated, and on rrr, 
a long single cross extending to edge of the coin, with usually three pellets in each angle, 
encircled by name of mint following CIVITAS (cityj or VILLA (town) thus, 
CIVITAS LONDON, VILLA BRISfOLLIE. 



16 THE VALUATION OP BRITISH COINS. 

Edward III., 13271377. 

GOLD. Florin, Half Florin, Quarter Florin, Noble,* Half Noble, 
Quarter Noble. 

Florin (108 grains). Two known ; one sold for =113. 

Quarter Florin (27 grains). Extra rare. Obv., lion, 
crowned, standing on a helmet ; .130, .145, .170. (Fig. 2.) 

Noble (136J grains). Extremely rare. 

Quarter Noble (34i grains). 7 5a., .9, .10, .21. 

Noble (128^ grains). .1 8s., .1 12s., .3 6s., .4 Is., 
7 10s., .21 10s. 

Quarter Noble (32 grains).- 12s., 1, 1 7s. 

Noble (120 grains). .1 10s. to .2 5s. ; one, extra fine, 
.4 12s. 

Half Noble (60 grains) ^1 to .2 : one, extra rare and fine, 
7 15s. 

Quarter Noble (30 grains). 10s. to =1 ; a rare variety, 
.1 9s. and 2. 
SILVER. Groat,f Half Groat, Penny, Halfpenny, and Farthing. 

Groat (72 grains). London and York, Is. 6d. to 4s. ; one, of 
London, with Ron an M in rev. legend, sold for 2 11s. (Fig. 57.) 

Half Groat (36 grains). London and York, Is. 6d. to 2s. 6d. 
A very thick piece (321 grains) struck from the Half Groat die, 
.6, and .7 2a. 6d. 

Penny (20 to 22$ grains). Durham, London, and York, 
Is. 6d.to2s. 6d. 

Halfpenny (10 to 11 grains). London and Beading; Is. 6d. 
to 2s. 6d. ; one, Beading, with escallop, <1 Is. 

Farthing (5 to 5 grains). London and York ; 2s. 6d. to- 
3s. 6d. ; one (unique ?) of first coinage realised .1 2s. 

A Groat, Half Groat, and Penny, all struck at York, and extra 
fine, sold for 2 15s. 

A Groat, Half Groat, Penny, and Halfpenny, struck at London, 
realised 9s. 

Bichard II., 13771399. 

GOLD. Noble, Half Noble, Quarter Noble. 

Aoble (120 grains). With and without flag ; 2 10s. to 4 ; 
very fine, .5 2s. 6d., .6 2s. 6d., and .9 ; others have sold for 
.1 5s., 2, and 2 3s. 

* NOBLES or RIALS and HALF XOBLFS have on ofcr. the figure of the king or qneen 
crowned, in armour, standing in a ship, a sword in right hand, a shield in left, bearing the 
Royal Anns. The ret. has a tressure of eight curves, containing a cross fleury, until the 
second issue of Edward IV., when a sun of sixteen rays took the place of the cr. 

QUARTER XOBLES have on obt., the king's name and titles surrounding a shield of arms 
within a tressure, and on rtr., a tressure, with fleurs-de-lis and lions alternately in the 
angles, a cross fleury in centre. 

t Groats and Half Groats of Edward m., IV., and V. Richard II. and III., nnrt 
Henry IV., V., VI., and VII. (1st and 2nd issues) have on ofcr., full faced bust crowned, 
within a tressure, encircled by the King's name and title ; and on rev., a long cross extend- 
ing to edge of the coin, three pellets in each angle, surrounded by two circles. In the 
outer circle the motto POSVI DFVM, etc. ; in the inner circle the name of mint, as 
on the Penny. 



ENGLISH COINS. 17 

RICHARD II. CONTINUED. 
GOLD. Continued. 

Half Notte (60 grains). 1 10s. to <4; very fine, <6, 8, 
.9 5s., 10 10s., ,12, and .15. 

Quarter Noble (30 grains). .1 to 2 ; very fine, 2 Us., 
3, and .3 5s. 

A Noble, with flag, and Quarter Noble sold together for 
.1 14s. 

A Half and Quarter Noble, together, sold for ,1 Is. 
SILVER. Groat, Half Groat, Penny, Halfpenny, and Farthing. 

Groat (72 grains). Struck in London only ; ,1 to =1 10s., 
extra fine, 2 Us., 2 17s., and 3 5s. ; others, 8s., 11s., and 
16s. 

Half Groat (36 grains). Struck in London only; ,1 to 
1 10s. ; very fine, 1 18s., .3 3s., .3 10s., and .3 15s. ; poor 
specimens, 6s. to 10s. 

Penny (18 grains). Struck in Durham, London, and York ; 
4s. to 6s. ; very fine, 10s. 6d. ; others, 3 14s. and ,4 10s. 

Halfpenny (9 grains). London only, 2s. to 3s. 6d. 

Farthing (41- grains). London only; extra rare; 1 19s., 
2 10s., and 5 10s. 

A Groat, Half Groat, and two Halfpennies sold for 12s. 

Two Groats, twoTork Pennies, and a Half penny sold for <1 5s. 

A Groat, Half Groat, Penny (York), and Halfpenny, 1 5s. 

A Half Groat, Penny (York), and two Halfpennies, 1 10s. 

A Groat, Half Groat, Penny, and Halfpenny, 2 3s. 

Henry IV., 13991413. 

GOLD. Noble, Half Noble, Quarter Noble. 

Nolle, first issue (120 grains). .12 os. 

Noble, second issue (108 grains). 11, .14 5s., and .9 5s. 

Half Noble, first issue (60 grains). 

Quarter Noble, first issue (30 grains). <21 10s.; another, 

^ei is. 

Quarter Noble, second issue (27 grains). (Fig. 3.) 
SILVER. Groat, Half Groat, Penny, Halfpenny, and Farthing. 

Groat (60 grains). 10s., 13s., ,3 4s., .3 11s.; another 
realised only 8s. 

Half Groat (33 grains). <4 5s. ; ditto (27 grains), 4, 4s. 

Penny (15 to 18 grains). Durham, London, 2s., and York 
(18 grains), 8s., 11s., and 1. 

Halfpenny (5 to 12 grains). 12s. 6d. to 21s. ; London (Hi 
grains), ,1 6s. 

A London Penny (1G| grains) and Halfpenny (8 grains) 
together, 15s. 

Farthing (3f grains). 

Henry V., 14131422. 

GOLD. Noble, Half Noble, Quarter Noble. 

Noble (108 grains). d61 Is., .1 8s., 2; rare variety, .6 10s. 
Half Noble (54 grains). 10s. to .1 13s. 
Quarter Noble (27 grains). 10s. to .1. 





18 TEE VALUATION OP BRITISH COIXS. 

HENRY V. CONTINUED. 

SILVER. Groat, Half Groat, Penny, Halfpenny, and Farthing. 
Groat (60 grains). London, Is. 6d. to 3s. 6d. 
Half Groat (30 grains). London, 2s. to 4s. 
Penny (15 grains) Durham, London, and York, 2s. 6d. to 5s. 
Halfpenny (7 grains). London, Is. Gd. to 3s. (3d. 
Farthing (3J grains). 2s. 6d. to 3s. Gd. 

Henry VI., 14221461. 

GOLD. Noble, Half Noble, Quarter Noble. 

Noble (108 grains). .1 10s., 2, <3 12s., 4 5s. (Fig. 4.) 

Half Noble (54 grains). 17s., 2, 3 11s. ; York, 5 2s. 6d. 

Quarter Noble (27 grains). 10s. to 15s.,l 11s. 

A variety (unique P) : Obv., EXALTBITVK, &c. ; rev., 
king's name and titles, .1 16s. 
SILVER. Groat, Half Groat, Penny, Halfpenny, and Farthing. 

Groat (60 grains). London and York, Is. 6d. to 3s. 6d. 

Half Groat (30 grains). London and York, 2s. to 4s. 

Penny (15 grains). Durham, London, and York, Is. 6d. to 
3s. 6d. 

Halfpenny (7i grains). London and York ; 2s. Gd. to 5a. 

Farthing (3f grains). London and York ; 3s. Gd. to 5s. 6d. 

Henry VI. (restored), 1470. 

GOLD. Angel and Half Angel.* 

Angel (80 grains). .1. 2 5s., 3 IQs., 5, 7 2s. Gd. ; 
Bristol, 1, 5 17s. Gd., 1 15s., .10. 

Half Angel (40 grains). .30 10s., .31. 

SILVER. Groat (48 grains), London, 12s. ,15s., .1 63.; Bristol, .1 11s., 
16s., 2 11s. ; York, .1 Is., 18s. ; two (London and Bristol), 
both fine, 6s. 

Half Groat (24 grains). London, 6s.; York (20 grains), .9, 
Cuff sale, sold for 2 2s., Whitbourne sale; (19i- grains), 
19s., 2 2s. ; another, 5. 

A light Groat struck at London, and one at York, and a light 
Half Groat, York, sold together for .3 17s. 

Penny (12 grains). York, 2s. to 5s. 

Edward IV., 14611483. 

GOLD. Noble, Half Noble, Quarter Xoble, Angel, and Half Angel. 

Noble, first issue (108 grains). 

Noble, second issue (120 grains). .1 to 2 : Bristol, .1 :2~. : 
Coventry, 2 14s.; Norwich, .1 19s.; York, .3 10s., .4. 
(Fiff. 5.) 

Half Noble (60 grains). Bristol, \ 2s., .2 8s., .3, .3 10s., 
i ; London, 25s. to 35s. ; Norwich, .2 Gs. and 8 17s. Gd. ; 
York, 16s., 19s., .1 11s., 2, 3 12s. 

A Bristol Noble and Half Noble, both fine, sold for 2. 

* Angels and Half Angels have on o1>t., the Archangel Michael standing on a dragon 
and piercing it through the mouth with a spear, surrounded by the monarch's name and 
titles ; rep., a ship with cross for a mast, a shield of arms on the side of the shir. 



ENGLISH COINS. 19 

EDWAKD IV. CONTINUED. 
GOLD. Continued. 

Quarter Noble (30 grains). 10s. to 1 ; rarer types, 3 2s. 
and 1f 4s. 

Ana el (80 grains). 25s. to 35s., 3 3s. ; struck at Bristol, 
extra fine, .12. (Fig. 6.) 

Half Angel (40 grains). 15s. to 25s., 1 12s., 2 Cs. ; 
3 lie. ; one, extra fine, <7 15s. ; one, struck at Bristol, 
.4 2s. 
SILVEK. Groat, Half Groat, Penny, Halfpenny, and Farthing. 

Groat (60 grains). London, 10s. to 1 ; extra fine, 2 Is. 

Groat (48 grains). Bristol, Coventry, London, Norwich, and 
York, 2s. to 5s. 

Half Groat (30 grains). London, very rare, .4 2s., 5; (24 
grains), Bristol, Canterbury, London, Norwich, and York, 2s. 
to 5s. 

Penny (12 grains). Bristol, Canterbury, Durham, London 
(extra fine, <3 4s.), and York, 10s. to <2 4s. 

A Half Groat and Penny, both of Canterbury, 2 16s. ; three 
York Pennies, varied, ,1 13s. 

Halfpenny (7| to Si grains). London, extra fine, 14g. ; (6 
grains), Bristol, Canterbury, Durham, and London, 2s. to 3s. 6d. 

Farthing (about 3 grains). London. One of first issue 
(extra rare), and one of second issue, sold, together, for 2 11s. 

Edward V., April to June, 1483. 

GOLD. Angel (80 grains). m.m., rose and sun united; ,7 10s., 

9 15s., ,10. 
SILVEK.- Groat (48 grains). m.m., rose and sun united, 1 7s., 

1 10s. ; very fine, .3 4s. One, m.m., rose, reading EDWARD, 

.1 10s. ; another, same m.m., 8s. Two, m.m., boar's head and 

rose and sun united, sold, together, for <1 6s. 

Richard III., 14831485. 

GOLD. Angel, Half Angel or Angelet. 

Angel (80 grains). m.m., boar's head; 2, 4-, 5 2s. 6d., 
.7 15s., .10 5s. ; m.m., rose and sun, 1 8s., .1 2s., 
11 2s. 6d. ; m.m., rose, 5 2s. 6d., ,7 2s. 6d. ; m.m., sun, 
.6 12s. 6d. 

Angelet (40 grains). m.m., boar's head ; ,12, .13. 
SILVER. Groat, Half Groat, Penny, and Halfpenny. 

Groat (48 grains). London and York. London, 15s. to 25s.; 
very fine, 2 to .3. York, 1 Is. and .1 12s. 

Groat (37 grains). London, with high arched crown 
(unique?), 1 14s. 

Half Groat (24 grains). London, extremely rare. One sold 
for ,12, 2 19s., and .13 10s., at successive sales ; another, 
.15 5s. 

Penny (12 grains). Durham, London, and York. 

A Durham penny, poor, sold for 5s. ; fine, 17s. and .2 3s. 

A York penny, 9s., 2 S?., and 2 15s. ; two sold for 10s. 

A penny, m.m., Us, realised only 2s. Gd. 

c2 



20 TLIE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

RICHARD III. CONTINUED. 

SILVER. Continued. 

Halfpenny (6 grains). London, .1 5s. to 10 10s.; one 
realised, at successive sales, Q 15s., <10 10s., and ,4 lls. ; 
others, .1 5s., .3 16s., and .4. 

Henry VIZ., 1485 15O9. 

GOLD. First issue: Noble or Rial, Angel, Angelet. Second issue: 
Sovereign or Double Eial, Double Sovereign, Angel, Angelet. 

Noble (120 grains). Extremely rare, if not unique. 

Angel (80 grains). First issue, .5 15s. ; another, 1. 
Second issue, 13s. to 3 3s. A variety, legend on rev. same aa 
on sov., 3 12s., 1 4s. 

Angelet (40 grains). lls. to 2 13s. A variety, roses inter- 
spersed in legend, <5. 

Double Rial or Sovereign* (240 grains). Specimens have 
realised at various sales, 3 Is., .11 15s., <15, .20, <26, 
.30, .35, .37, and .39. (Fig. 7.) 

Double Sovereign (480 grains). Like the sovereign, but 
much rarer. 
SILVER. Shilling, Groat, Half Groat, Penny, Halfpenny, and Farthing. 

Shilling (144 grains). Obv., profile bust to right, crowned 
(the first instance of a true portrait on an English silver coin), 
HENEICVS DI. GEA. REX ANGLIE Z. FE. ; rev., royal 
arms on shield, quarterly, over a cross, POSVI, &c. 

A variety reads HENEIC. VII. Another, HENRIC. 
SEPTIM. (Fig. 58.) 

The prices realised at various sales were .6, .7 2s. 6d., 
.10, J612, and .21 5s. 

Groat (48 grains). First issue, London, front face, with 
open crown, 6s. to .1 10s. Second issue, London, front face, 
with high nrched crown, Is. 6d. to 3s. ; one, extra fine, 14s. 
Third issue, similar to the Shilling, profile bust to right, 
crowned, with, sometimes without, numerals, 2s. 6d. to 5s. ; 
very fine, 10s. (Fig. 59.) 

Variety, reading SEPTIM, 2 12s. and .12. 

Half Groats (24 grains) . Types similar to the Groat. First 
issue, Canterbury, London, and York, very rare, .3 4s., 
.3 12s. ; one (York) and a London Halfpenny sold, together, for 
1 12s. Second issue, Canterbury, London, and York, Is. 6d. 
to 2s. 6d. ; very fine, 5s. Third issue, with and without 
numerals, none reading SEPTIM known, 2s. to 3s. 6d. A 
unique variety, 2 lls. 

Penny (12 grains). First issue, Canterbury and York ; obv., 
front faced bust, open crown; rev., cross and pellets, with name 
of town; 13a. to .1, one, extra fine, 2 2s. Second issue, 
Canterbury ; obv., front face, high arched crown ; rev., cross 



Double Bials (of Henry VII. and VIII., Edward VI., Mary, Elizabeth, and James I.) 
have on obv., the monarch's name and titles, the king or queen enthroned; and on rev., a 
double rose, with plain shield of arms in centre, surrounded by the motto. 



ENGLISH COINS. 21 

HENRY VII. CONTINUED. 
SILVEK. Penny continued. 

and pellets ; extra rare : one, very fine, realised 5. Third issue, 
Durham, London, and York ; obv., king enthroned, HENRIC. 
DI GEA. EEX ANG. ; rev ., arms on shield ; 2s. to 5s. (Fig-. 60.) 

Halfpenny (6 grains). Similar to the penny of first and 
second issues, Canterbury, London, and York ; 5s. to 7s. 6d. 

A set (first issue) : Groat, Half Groat, Penny, and Half- 
penny, 1 Is. 

A set (second issue) : Groat, Half Groat, the rare Canterbury 
penny, and a halfpenny, all fine, sold for 18s. 

Farthing (3 grains). Second issue, only two known. 

Henry VIII., 15O9 1547. 

GOLD. Double Sovereign, Sovereign, Half Sovereign, Crown, Half 
Crown, Eose Noble or Eial, George Noble, Angel, Angelet, and 
Quarter Angel. 

Double Sovereign (480 grains). Obv., king enthroned, a port- 
cullis at his feet ; rev., a double rose. (Fig. 14.) 

Sovereign, first issue (240 grains). Similar to Double Sove- 
reign, 2 7s., 3 11s., d4, .5 2s. 6d., .6, 7, 9 9s., 
.10 15s., .14, .17. Second issue (200 grains). Obv., king 
enthroned, a rose at his feet ; rev., royal shield of arms, 
crowned, supported by lion and dragon ; ,13 13s., .16, .20, 
.33, .34 10s. Third issue (192 grains). Similar to second 
issue; 2 Is., 2 7s., 2 16s., 4 5s., .7 2s. 6d., .8, 
9 10s., .11 15s. 

Half Sovereign. Similar to Sovereign ; .1, .1 10a., 2 Is., 
.3, .3 16s., 5, 19 5s., .25. 

Crown, second issue (57i grains). Obv., a double rose, 
crowned, between the letters H.K., H.A., H.I., or H.R. encircled 
by HENEIC. VIII. EVTILANS EOSA SINE SPINA. ; 1 to 
1 10s ; extra fine, .2 2s. (Fig. 8.) 

Crown, or Quarter Sovereign, third issue (48 grains). 
Obv., double rose, crowned, between H. E. surrounded by 
HENEIG. 8. EOSA SINE SPINA; rev., shield of arms; 
.1 to .1 10s. 

Half Crown, second issue (28| grains). Almost same as 
Crown ; ,1 3s., two sold for 1 lls. ; a Crown and Half Crown 
together, 1 4s. Third issue (24 grains). Almost same ag 
rown ; 3 14s. 

Rose Noble, or Rial (120 grains). Similar type to EOES 
Noble of Edward IV. 

George Noble (71 grains). Obv., St. George on horseback 
spearing the dragon ; rev., similar to the Angel. One, very 
poor, 1 3s. ; another, 3 ; others, .8, 9 5s., .14, <20 10s., 
.23 5s., 2(i, 31, and .34. (Fig. 9.) 

Angel (80 grains). First issue, similar to Angel of 
Henry VII, but reading HENEIC. VIII. ; 15s., .1 Is., .1 3s., 
2 9s., 3 6s., and .4 6s. Second issue, similar to first issue, 
but reading HENEIC 8. ; 15s., 2 12s., 4, 10s., <5 5s. 



22 THE VALUATION O? BRITISH COINS. 

HENRY VIII. CONTINUED. 

GOLD. Continued. 

Angelet (40 grains). First issue, similar to the Angel ; 
.1 3s., 2 6s., 2 10s., 2 19s., .3 15s. Second issue, similar 
to the Angel ; 17s_, 18s., 2 6s., 2 11s. 

Quarter Angel (20 grains). Second issue only, similar to the 
Angel; 15s., J21 12s., 2 4s., 2 17s., .3 5s. 

SILVER.* Shilling or Testoon, Groat, Half Groat, Penny, Halfpenny, 
and Farthing. 

Shilling (120 grains). Obv., full-faced bust, HENEIC VIII., 
&c. ; rev., a large double rose, crowned, POSVI. &c. Ordinary 
specimens, 10s. to 1- others, 2, 3 2s., .4, .6 2s. 6d.; 
finest known, .16. (Fig. 61.) 

Shilling, struck at Bristol, 16s. 

Groat, first issue (48 grains). Obv., profile bust of 
Henry VII., but with VIII. ; rev., shield of arms ; 2s. 6d. 
to 5s. 

Groat, second issue (42- grains). Obv., young profile bust 
to right ; Is. 6d. to 2s. 6d. 

Groat, third, fourth, and fifth issues (40 grains). Bristol, 
Canterbury, London, and York. Obv., bust, almost full-faced, 
crowned ; Is. 6d. to 3s. 6d. 

Groat, fifth issue. Rev., EEDDE CVIQVE ; 11s., 17s., 
and J61. 

Half Groat, first issue (24 grains). Canterbury, London, 
and York. Obv., similar to Groat of first issue ; 2s. 6d. to 
3s. 6d. 

Groat and Half Groat, first issue, unusually fine, ,1 14s. 

Half Groat, second issue (21^ grains). Canterbury, London, 
and York. Obv., similar to Groat of second issue ; Is. 6d. to 
2s. 6d. 

Groat and Half Groat, second issue, unusually fine, <1 4s. 

Half Groats, third, fourth, and fifth issues (20 grains). 
Bristol, Canterbury, London and York ; Is. 6d. to 2s. 6d. 

Half Groat (fine silver), 2 11s. ; York, 11s. 

Half Groat, fifth issue. Rev., EEDDE CVIQVE, &c.; 
2 2s., Q 6s. 

Penny, first issue (12 grains). Canterbury, Durham, London, 
and York. Obv., king enthroned, HENEIC. DI. GEA., &c. ; 
rev., arms, with name of mint ; Is. 6d to 3s. 6d. 

Penny, second issue (10^ grains). Durham and London. 
Obv., king enthroned, H. D. G. EOSA SINE SPINA ; rev., 
arms and place of mintage ; Is. 6d. to 3s. 6d. 

Penny, third, fourth, and fifth issues (10 grains). Bristol, 
Canterbury, London, and York. Obv., full faced (or three- 
quarter faced) bust, mantled; rev., arms and place of mint- 
age ; Is. 6d. to 3s. 6d. 

Groat, Half Groat, and Penny. Bristol, ail fine, <1 16s. 

* Many pieces were struck in base silver, some being only four parts of silver to eight 
parts of alloy. The pieces of fine silver are rare, but the base coins (except the Shilling) 
are common. 



ENGLISH COINS. 23 

HENRY VIII. CONTINUED. 

SILVER. Continued. 

Halfpenny, first and second issues (5 to 6 grains). Canter- 
bury, London, and York. Obv., front faced bust, crowned ; 
rev., cross and pellets, with place of mintage ; Is. 6d. to 3s. 6d. 

A set (first issue) consisting of Shilling (fine silver), two 
Groats, Half Groat (Wolsey) and three others, Penny, and 
Halfpenny ; all fine, <1 Is. 

A set (second issue) comprising Shilling, Groat, four Half 
Groats, Penny, and Halfpenny; all fine, 1. 

Halfpenny, third coinage (5 grains). Canterbury, London, 
and York. Obv., front faced bust, mantled, with BOSA, &c., in 
legend; rev., cross with pellets, and name of mint; ls.6d. to3s.6d. 

Farthing, first issue (3 grains). Obv., portcullis, HENRIC. 
DI. GRA. REX ; rev., a cross, with a rose upon the centre, 
CIVITAS LONDON ; extremely rare, ,15 5s. 

Farthing, second issue (2 grains). Obv., portcullis, 
KVT1LANS EOSA ; rev., a rose upon the centre of a cross, 
HEN AG ; .4 4s., 5 2s. Gd. 

Edward VI., 15471553. 

GOLD. Treble Sovereign, Double Sovereign, Sovereign, Half Sovereign, 
Crown, Half Crown, Six-Angel Piece, Ange), Angelet. 

Treble Sovereign (508i grains). Obv., king enthroned, 
EDWARD VI., &c. ; rev., arms crowned, with supporters, IHS 
AVTEM, &o. 

Double Sovereign (480 grains). Obv., king enthroned; rev., 
large double rose, with arms in centre, IHESV., &c. Extremely 
rare, .77, .99, .165, and .175. 

Sovereign, third year (lG9i grains). Type of the Treble 
Sovereign, very rare; .5, ,6 8s. Gd., 7 10s., .8 2s. 6d., 
11, 12 10s. ; the finest specimen known, ,25 10s. (Fig. 11.) 

Sovereign, or Double Rial, fourth year (240 grains). Similar 
to the Double Sovereign, extremely rare ; <7, .20, .21 10s. 
The finest known, .90. 

Sovereign, sixth year (174f grains).* Obv., half-length figure 
of the king in armour in profile to right, crowned ; rev., arms, 
crowned, with supporters ; ,3 Is., .5 2s. 6d., .6, <7 10s. 
.8, .9 9s., .10. 

Half Sovereign,, first year (96 grains). Obv., king enthroned, 
EDWARD 6, D. G., &c. ; rev., sums, with supporters, IHS, 
AVTE, &c. ; 19s., 1 9s., 2 15s., .4. .5 10s., G, 9 15s. 

Half Sovereign, third year (84f grains), five types. Obv., 
bust in profile to right, bareheaded or crowned ; rev., oval shield 
of arms. On one variety is M.D.XLVIII, the first instance of a 
date upon a gold coin. 18s., 1 3s., <! 6s., 2 17s., 4, 12s. 
(Fig. 19.) 

* Sovereigns of Edward VI. (.last issue), Elizabeth, James I., Charles I., and Charles II. 
have on obv. the monarch's bust in profile to right or left, surrounded by name and titles ; 
and on rev., shield of arms crowned, usually with initial letters at sides of shield, 
encircled by a motto. Half Sovereign, Quarter Sovereign, and Eighth Sovereign are 
similar in type. 



4 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

EDWAJJD VI. CONTINUED. 

GOLD. Continued. 

Half Sovereign, sixth year (87J grains). Obv., half-length 
bust, crowned, in profile to right ; rev., shield of arms, crowned, 
between the letters E. R. ; 16s., .1 2s., 2 Is., .3, 4, as., 
8 5s., .12. (Fig. 10.) 

Crown, first year (48 grains). Obi'., rose crownel. between 
the letters E. R., encircled by RVTILANS ROSA, &c. ; rev., 
arms, crowned, between H. R., surrounded by DEI GRA., &c., 
unique, .50 ; another variety, also unique, .83. 

Crown, third year (42^ grains). Obv., bust in profile, to right, 
in armour, bareheaded ; rev., oval shield of arms, between the 
letters E. R. A variety has the bust crowned ; ,1 11s., .1 17s., 
2 7s., .3 Us., o, B 15s., 9, 10 10s. 

Crown, sixth year (43s- grains). Similar to Half Sovereign 
of sixth year; rev., SCVTVM FIDEI, &c. ; 14s., .1 15s., 
.4 4s., =85 10s., .11. 

Half Crown, first year (24 grains). Obv., arms crowned, 
between the letters E. R., legend EDWARD 6, &c. ; rev., a 
double rose crowned, between the letters E. R., RVTILANS, &c. 
Half Crown, third year (21-J- grains). Similar to the Crowns 
of third year; 2, 3 5s., <6 10s., 7 2s. 6d., .8 8s., 
.10 5s., .10 15s., .13. 

Half Crown, sixth year (2l- grains). Similar to the Crown 
of same year; 3 12s., .6 2s. 6d., .10 5s., 12 5s. 

A Crown and Half Crown, third year (cracked), sold together 
for .5 2s. 6d. 

Six-Angel Piece (240 grains). Unique, and supposed to be 
a pattern. 

Angel (80 grains). Similar to the second issue Angel of 
Henry VIII. ; .21 10s., .37, .41 10s., .59. 
Angelet (40 grains). Similar to the Angel. 

SILVJSB. Crown, Half Crown, Testoon, Shilling, Sixpence, Groat, 
Threepence, Half -groat, Penny, Halfpenny, Farthing. 

Crown, fifth year (480 grains), dated 1551, 1552, or 1553. 
Obv., king on horseback to the right, with date under the horse ; 
rev., arms. Ordinary specimens, 15s. to .1 10a. ; in very fine 
condition, 2 16s., 3 11s., .4, 5. 

Half Crown (240 grains). Similar to Crown, and same dates. 
Ordinary specimens, 15s. to ,1 10s. ; very fine, .1 16s., 2 11s., 
^3 11s., 5; the finest known, .9 5s. (Fig. 62.1 

Testoon, third year (80 grains). Obv., profile, crowned, to 
right; rev., oval shield of arms, dated MDXLIX. or MDL., the 
first instance of a date upon a silver coin; 4s. 6d. to 7s. 6d. ; 
very fine, .1, .1 15s., 2 2s., 3 3s. (Fig. 70.) 

Shilling, fifth year (96 grains). Obv., full-faced bust, crowned, 
the numerals XII (for twelve pence) on right side of bust; rev., 
square shield of arms; 4s. 6d. to 7a. 6d. ; extra fine, 12s., 
1 2s., l 11s. The finest known, .3 10s. 

Sixpence (48 grains). Similar to Shilling, but with VI (for 
sixpence) ; 3s. 6d. to 5s. 6d. ; a perfect example, ,4 13s. (Fig. 80.) 



v ->, 



ENGLISH COINS. 25 

EDWARD VI. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

Groat, first year (40 grains). Obv., profile, crowned, to 
right, EDWARD 6, &c. ; rev., arms, 1 to .1 10s.; a poor 
specimen, 7s. ; fine examples, <2, 3 4s., 6 6s., .14 10a., 
19, and .25 10s. 

Threepence, fifth year (24 grains). Similar to Sixpence, but 
with III (for 3 pence) at side of head ; 10s. to .1 ; very 
fine, .1 2s., .2 10s., 3 Is. ; poor specimens, 3a. 6d. to 5s. 

Half Groat, first year (20 grains). Similar to the Groat; 
25s. to 35s. ; very fine, 2, 2 12s. ; .3 7s. ; a poor 
specimen, 5s. 

Penny, first year (10 grains). Bristol and London. Obv., 
Profile, crowned, to right; rev., arms, with name of city; 18s., 
=1 10s., 2 3d., .3 4s., .4, 4, 12s., .5, .6 6s. ; a poor 
specimen, 5s. 

Penny, fifth year (8 grains). Fine silver, obv., king 
enthroned, as on Pennies of Henry VII. and VIII., nv., arms 
and CIVITAS LONDON ; 2 12s., .6 6s., 7 12s. 6d. 

Penny, base silver (8 grains). London and York. Ob v. 
full blown rose; rev., arms and name of city ; 3s. 6d. to 5s. 6d. ; 
others, 8s. Gd. and 10s. 6d. 

Two (London and York) very fine, together, .1 9s. 

Halfpenny, first year (62 grains). Bristol and London. Obv., 
profile, crowned, to right; rev., cross, with three pellets in each 
angle, and name of city ; only three or four known, 11, =14., 
one, imperfect, sold for 2 Is. 

A Crown, Half Crown, and Shilling, all fine, <! 9s. 

A Threepence and York Rose Penny, very fine, together, 13s. 

A Half Groat, Bristol Penny (bust), and a Rose Penny, to- 
gether, 3 5s. 

A London Groat, Canterbury Half Groat, and Bristol Penny, 
poor, <! 6s. 

Halfpenny, fifth year (11 grains) of base metal, similar to the 
Penny of base metal, but the rose is single, rev., CIVITAS 
LONDON. 

Farthing, fifth year (5| grains) of base metal. Obv., portcullis 
E. D. G., &c., rev, cross, with pellets, CIVITAS LONDON. 

Mary, 1553. 

GOLD. Sovereign, Rial, Angel, and Angelet. 

Sovereign, or Double Rial (240 grains). Obv., queen en- 

throned, legend ends with date, M.D.LIII ; rev., double rose, 

with small shield of arms in centre ; 4s to 6 ; others ,7 7s., 

8 8s., 9 15s.. 10 10s. Some have realised only 2 10s., 

? O ) .2 13s., 3, 3 3s., 3 11s. (Fig. 20.) 

Rial (120 grains). Obv., queen standing in a ship; .53, 
,63, .68, .71, and .80; one (cracked) realised .20 10s. 

Angel (80 grains). Type similar to Edward VI.'s ; <3 to ,4 ; 
very fine, .5, 8, and .9 12s. ; others have sold for .1 2s., 
.1 3s., 2 4s. 



26 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

MART. CONTINUED . 

GOLD. Continued. 

Angelet (40 grains). Similar to Angel; .5, 5 5s., .31, 
.35, and .51. 
SILVER. Groat, Half Groat, Penny. 

Groat (32 grains). Obv., profile to left, MARIA, D.G., &c. ; 
rev., arms, VERITAS TEMPORIS FILIA ; 2s. 6d. to 4s. 6d. ; 
very fine, 10s., 14s., 16s., and 21s. 

Half Groat (16 grains). Similar to Groat; .1 11s., .3 16s., 
.4 2s., .6, and .10 10s. 

Penny (8 grains). Obv., bust, M. D. G. EOSA SINE SPINA ; 
rev., arms, CIVITAS LONDON ; 4>, 9, 13 5s. ; one sold 
for only .1 ; a variety (unique), dated '53, realised ,11 11s. 

Penny, base silver (10 grains). Obv., rose; ISs. 

Philip and Mary, 15541558. 

GOLD. Angel, Angelet. 

Angel (80 grains). Similar to Mary's Angel, but reading 
PHILIP Z MARIA, &c. ; .2 6s., <3 3s., .6, 7, 3 15s., 
and .14. 

Angelet (40 grains). <10 5s. 
SILVER. Shilling, Sixpence, Groat, Half Groat, and Penny. 

Shilling (96 grains). Obv., basts of the king and queen face 
to face, a large crown above ; rev., oval shield of arms ; 5s. to 
15s. ; extra fine, .1 to '2 10s. ; an exceptional specimen 
realised .11 11s. (Fig. 63.) 

Sixpence (48 grains). Type similar to Shilling; 3s. 6d. to 
7s. 6d. ; extra fine, 15s. to 21s.; one sold for .1 13s. 

Groat (32 grains). Obv., bust of Mary, with legend PHILIP 
Z (or ET) MARIA. D. G. REX Z (or ET) REGINA; rev., 
POSVIMVS, etc.; 2s. 6d. to 5s.; very fine, 7s. 6d. to 10s.; a 
brilliant example, .1 15s. 

Half Groat (16 grains). Similar to the Groat, but very rare ; 
.1 Is., ,1 10s., 2 4s, ,3 16s., 4 8s, .5, .6. 

Penny (8 grains). Obv., bust of Mary, with legend P. Z. M. 
D. G. EOSA SINE SPINA; rev., arms; <! 5s., .1 10s., 
B 4s., .3 15s., .5 10s., .6, 7 10s., and .8 10s.; one sold, 
however, for 5s. only. 

A Half Groat and Penny, together, 2 7s. 

Penny, base silver (10 grains). Obv.. large double rose, with 
P. Z. M., etc.; rev., arms; 3s. 6*1. to 5s. Cd. ; one extra fine, 
17s. 

A lot, consisting of Shilling, Sixpence, Groat, and Rose 
Penny, realised .2 18s. ; a Shilling, Sixpence, and Groat, 
1 4s. 

Elizabeth, 15581603. 

GOLD. Hammered. Sovereign or Double Rial, Rial, Angel, Angelet, 
Quarter Angel, Pound Sovereign, Half Sovereign, Quarter 
Sovereign or Crown, One-eighth Sovereign or Half Crown. 
Milled Half Sovereign, Crown, Half Crown. 



ENGLISH COIXS. 27 

ELIZABETH. CONTINUED. 

GOLD. Continued. 

Sovereign or Double Rial (240 grains). <4 to 5 ; very fine, 
6 6s., 8 10s., =9 15s. ; others, 2 4s. and .3 10s. 

Rial (120 grains). Obv., queen in ship; 6 6s., .8 8s., 
W, 15, 17, IS, 20, 30 10s., and .32. 

Angel (80 grains). Ordinary type ; 1 5s. to 1 15s. First 
issue, 2 18s. to B 3s. 

Angelet or Half Angel (40 grains). 15s. to .1 10s. ; very 
fine, 1 18s. and 2 7s. 

Quarter Angel (20 grains). 15s. to 1 10s.; one, very fine, 
.3 10s. 

Angel, Angelet, and Quarter Angel, together, 2 Is. 

Pound Sovereign (174i*r grains). Obv., queen's bust to left, 
crowned; rev., shield of arms; =3 to 4> ; very fine, 5 5s., 
1 7s., and <10 2s. 6d. Same have sold for 1 Is.. 1 8s., 
2 3s., 2 10s., and 2 18s. 

Half Sovereign (87vr grains. 1 to 2 10?.; very fine, 
.3 9s., 5 12s. 6d., .8 10s., and ,9 15s. 

Quarter Sovereign (43?} grains). ,1 5s. to 2 10s.; very 
fine, ,3, 4 4s., and 5 2s. 6d. 

Eighth Sovereign (2151 grains). ,1 10s. to <3 ; very fine, 
.4, 4 8s., and ,5 5s. 

Half Sovereign, milled. .2 to <5; extra fine, 6 15s. and 
12 10s. 

Crown, milled. 4, 6 6s., 8 los., 9 9s., 10, 11, and 
15 15s. 

Half Crou-n, milled. ,2 8s., 2 10s., 3, =6 10s., 7 5s., 
9, 10 10s., and 11 2s. 6d. 

SILVER. Hammered. Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, Sixpence, Groat, 
Threepenny, Half Groat, Three-halfpenny, Penny, Three- 
farthings, and Halfpenny. Milled Shilling, Sixpence, Groat, 
Threepenny, Half Groat, and Three-farthings. 

Crown (464| grains). Obv., crowned bust to left ; 1 10s. 
to 3 ; extra fine, 4 6s., 5 15s., and <7 2s. 6d. 

Half Croicn (232^ grains). Obv., crowned bust to left; 1 to 
2 ; extra fine, 3, 3 11s., ,4 7s., 7 2s. 6d., and .9. (Fig. 64.) 

Shilling (96 and 92f grains), hammered. 2s. 6d. to 5s. ; one, 
extra fine, 1 13s. Milled 7s. 6d. to 15s.; extra fine, 1, 
2 6s., and finest known, 10 5s. 

Sixpence (48 and 46i grains), hammered. Is. 6d. to 3s. 
Milled 2s. 6d. to 5s. ; extra fine, 6s. 6d., 8s., 12s., and 18s. 

Groat (32 and 31 grains), hammered. 3s. to 5s. Milled 
5s. to 10s. ; extra fine, 1 6s., <1 15s., and 3 12s. 

Threepence (24 and 23^ grains), hammered. Is. to 2s. 6d. 
Milled 5s. to 10?. 

Half Groat (16 and 15 grains), hammered. Is. to 2s. 
Milled 7s. 6d. to 10s. A milled set of Groat, Threepence, and 
Half Groat, in finest state, realised 5 2s. 6d. 

Three Halfpenny (12 grains), hammered; 2s. 6d. to 5s.; very 
fine, 10s. 

Penny (8 and 7j grains) ; Is. to 2s. 



28 THE VALUATION OP BRITISH COINS. 

ELIZABETH. CON TINUED . 
SILVER. Continued. 

Three-Farthings (6 grains), hammered ; 2s. 6d. to 5s. ; 
milled, 10s. 

Halfpenny (4 grains), hammered ; 2s. to 4s. 

A hammered set of eleven pieces (Half Crown to Halfpenny) ; 
sold for ^1. 

A hammered set of ten pieces (Shilling to Halfpenny, includ- 
ing Half Groat, with and without dots), in extra fine condition, 
realised ,5 ; a similar set, very fine, <2 2s. ; a similar set, all 
well preserved, 19s. 

James I., 1603 1625. 

GOLD. First issue : Sovereign, Half Sovereign, Quarter Sovereign, 
One-eighth Sovereign. James I. Half Unit (Fig. 12). 

Second issue : Unit, Double Crown, British Crown, Thistle 
Crown, Half Crown. 

Third issue : Rose Rial, Rial or Noble, Angel, Angelet. 

Fourth issue : Thirty Shilling Piece, Spur Rial or 
Fifteen Shilling Piece, Angel, Laurel, Half Laurel, Quarter 
Laurel. 

Sovereign, first issue (nearly 172 grains). Obv., Bust to 
right, crowned ; rev., arms, I. R. at sides of shield ; .1 10s. 
to 2 10s. ; very fine, .3, .6 12s. 6d., and .10 10s. ; one sold 
for only 1 7s. 

Half Sovereign (nearly 86 grains). 1 10s. to 2 10s. ; extra 
fine, .4 8s., 5 7s. 6d., 7 12s., and .11 l'5s. 

Quarter Sovereign (nearly 43 grains). 1 to <1 10s. ; extra 
fine, '2 17s., .5 2s. 6d., and .9. 

One-eighth Sovereign (21J grains). Very rare, <2 12s., 
1 7s., and 8 8s. 

Unvt, second issue (nearly 155 grains). .1 10s. to 2 5s.; 
extra fine, ,3, <5, and .6 6s. 

Double Crown (over 77 grains). .1 5s. to <2 5s. ; extra 
fine, .3 3s. 

An Unit and Double Crown together sold for ,1 19s. 

A Double Crown and Half Crown realised .3 14s. 

British Crown (381 grains). 10s. to .1 ; extra fine, \ 5s., 
2 2s., and 2 HP. 

Thistle Crown, (31 grains). Obv., a double rose on its stalk, 
crowned, between the letters I. R., surrounded by IA. D. G. 
MAG. BR. F. ET. H. REX. ; rev., a thistle, crowned, between 
I. R., encircled by the motto TVEATVR VNITA DEVS ; 10s. 
to 1 ; others .1 12s. and <1 14s. 

Half Crown (19J grains). 10s. to .1 ; extra fine, 2 5s. 

A British Crown, Thistle Crown, and Half Crown sold 
for only 15s. 

Rose Rial, third issue (213^ grains). Obv., King enthroned; 
rev., large rose, with shield of arms in centre; 3 to .5; extra 
fine, ,5 10s., .6 12s. 6d., .9 10s., and .10 15s.; others have 
sold for 1 17s., 2, and 2 13s. 



ENGLISH COINS. 29 

JAMES I. CONTINUED. 

GOLD. Continued. 

Rial, or Nolle (106! grains). Very rare; 2 2s., .3 12s., 
.5 2s. 6d., .6 5s., .8, 8 17s. 6d.. .9 15s., 10, 12, 13, 
15, and ,25 10s. ; the finest known, ,32. 

Angel, first issue (711 grains). 1 to 2 ; very fine, ,3 5a., 
.3 10s., .4, 4: 18s. ; others have sold for 15s. and 18s. 

Angelet (351 grains). ,1 3s., ,1 12s., 1 18s., 2 17s., 
.4 10s., 5 7s. 6d., and <6 10s. 

Thirty Shilling Piece (194s grains). Obv., king, enthroned ; 
rev., a large shield of arms on a cross fleuree, over the shield 
XXX (for 30s., the value), 5 to ,7 ; extra fine, .8 15s., 
.9 10s., .10 5s., <12 10s., and .15; others have sold for 
2 Is., 2 6s., 2 12s., 3, 3 11s., and .4 14s. 

Spur Rial, or Fifteen Shilling Piece (97i\> grains). Obv., 
the Scottish lion sejant, crowned, standing behind the shield of 
arms; rev., a sun of sixteen rays; .5 2s. 6d., <6 2s. 6d., 
.10 10s., .13 5s., ^>14, ,15 10s., <20, and .27 ; one, pierced, 
sold for .4. (Fig. 13.) 

Angel, second 'ssue (641J grains). Very rare; 1 6s., 
.1 12s., 2 6s., 4, 9s., .9, 17 ; one, pierced, sold for ,1 Is. 

Laurel (140^ grains). Obv., bust to left, draped and 
laureated, with XX (for 20s.) behind the head ; ,1 10s. to 2 ; 
very fine, ,3 6s. and 4, 18s. 

Half Laurel (70k grains). Similar to Laurel, but with X for 
value ; <! to .1 10s. 

Quarter Laurel (35 grains). Similar to Laurel, but with V 
for value ; 10s. to 15s. 

A Laurel, Half, and Quarter, sold together for 2, 2 12s., 
3, and 5 5s. 

A Half Laurel and Quarter, very fine, sold together for <4 15s. 
SILVER. First issue. Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, Sixpence, Half 
Groat, Penny, Halfpenny. 

Second issue. Pieces of similar value and weight. 

The motto on the rev. of the Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, 
and Sixpence of first issue is EXVRGAT DEV>S, &c. ; and of 
second issue, QV^E DEVS CONIVNXIT, &c. 

Crown, first issue (464^ grains). 1 to <2 ; extra fine, 
3 11s., 3 15s., .6 2s. 6d., 7 7s., and .8 5s. 

Ha'f Crown (232$ grains). 1 7e., 2 2s., 2 15s., .4 49., 
.9 10s., .10 15s., .12, .15 5s., and .33 10s. ; the finest 
known,. .50 ; a poor specimen sold for 10s. only. 

Shilling (92f grains). 2s. 6d. to os. ; extra fine 2 16s., 
4, 15s., 5 5s., and 7 5s. 

Sixpence (46^ grains). 2s. to 5a. ; extra fine, 19s.; finest 
known, 4: 11s. 

Half Groat (15i grains). Obv., bust, with II. (for 2d.) 
behind head; rev., arms; Is. 6d. to 3s. 6d. 

Penny (7$ grains). Obv., bust, with I. (for Id.) behind head; 
rev., arms ; 2s. to 3s. 6d. 

Halfpenny (3f grains). Obv., portcullis; rev., cross and 
pellets; 2s. 6d. to 3s. 6d. 



30 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

JAMES I. CONTINUED. 

SILVER. Continued. 

Crown, second issue. .1 to 2; very fine, 2 158., 3 10s., 
.4 2s., .5 2s. 6d., 5 12s. 6d., and .10. 

Half Crown. 10s. to 15s. ; very fine, ^61 3s., .1 12s., 2 3s., 
2 10s., .4 12s., and .5 5s. 

Shilling. 2s. to 5s.; very fine, 16s., <! 7s., .1 11s., .2 2s., 
.3 11s., 3 15s., .4, .4 6s., and .4 17s. 6d. 

Sixpence. 2s. to 4s. ; very fine, 13s. to 19s. 

Half Qroat. Obv., rose crowned ; rev., thistle crowned, Is. 
to 2s. (Fig. 65.) 

Penny. Obv., rose, rev., thistle ; Is. to 2s. 

Halfpenny. Obv., rose, rev., thistle, without any legend; 2s. 
to 3s. 

A Crown and Half Crown (latter poor), first issue, ,3 12s. 

A Crown, Shilling, Sixpence, Half Groat, Penny, and Half- 
penny, first issue, <1 4s. 

A Shilling, Sixpence, Half Groat, Penny, and Halfpenny, 
first issue, .1 Is. 

A Sixpence, Half Groat, Penny, and Halfpenny, first issue, 
all fine, 2 6s. 

A Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, and Sixpence, second issue, 
very fine, 4~ 8s. 

A Crown, Half Crown, and Shilling, second issue, all with 
plume over the arms, 15s. 

A Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, Sixpence, Half Groat, Penny, 
and Halfpenny, second issue, <1 5s. 

A Shilling, Sixpence, Half Groat, and Penny, second issue, 6s. 

A Sixpence, Half Groat, Penny, and Halfpenny, second issue, 
all fine, 1 5s. 

Charles I., 16251649. 

GOLD. Three Pound Piece, Unit or Sovereign, Double Crown or Half 
Sovereign, Crown or Five Shilling piece, and Angel. 

OXFORD MINT. Three Pound Piece (420^ grains). Obv., half 
length bust to left, crowned, &c. ; rev., inscription, in three 
lines, EELIG. PEOT, &c., with date (1642, 1643, or 1C Hi 
below, surrounded by the motto EXVRGAT, &c. .4 to .6 ; 
extra fine, 6 10s., 1 2s. 6d., 7 10s., 8, 9 9s., .10 5s., 
.11, .12 15s., .15, and .17; some have sold for 3 7s., 
.3 11s., and .3 16s. 

Sovereign or Twenty Shilling Piece (140J- grains). Olu., 
profile bust to left, crowned, XX behind head for value: rev., 
similar to Three Pound Piece, dated 1642, 164:?, HHK 1645, 
or 1646 ; .2 to o ; others, .6 12s. 6d., .7, ,7 7s., 9, and 
.10 10s. ; some have realised only .1 3s., 1 5s., 1 7s., 
.1 9s., and 1 11s. 

Half Sovereign or Ten Shilling Piece (70^ grains). Similar 
to Sovereign, but X behind head for value ; 2 to <3 ; extra 
fine, r> 7s. 6d., .0, ,7 ; exceptional specimens, .40 and .43 ; 
one sold for only 1 3s. 



ENGLISH COINS. 31 

CHARLES I. CONTINUED. 

GOLD. Continued. 

TOWEK MINT. Three issues, distinguished by the king' a 
dreas. 

Unit, Broad, or Twenty Shilling Piece (140i: grains). Obv., 
bust to left, XX behind head; rev., shield of arms, square or 
oval, surrounded by motto FLOEENT CONCOEDIA EEGNA. ; 
.1 10s. to .3; extra fine, .3 12s., .4 63., 4, lls., .5 15s., 
7 5s., and 1 15s.; exceptional specimens, .12 12s., .14, 
and .21 ; some have sold for only ,1 2s. 6d. and .1 5a. 

Double Crown or Ten Shilling Piece (70 grains). Obv., 
Similar to Unit, but X behind bust ; rev., also similar to Unit, 
but motto CVLTOEES SVI DEVS PROTEGIT ; .1 to 2 ; 
extra fine, ^3, .3 lls., 4,, 6 2s. 6d., and .12 ; one sold 
for 12s. 

Crown or Five Shilling Piece (35g- grains). Similar to 
Double Crown, bat V behind head ; 10s. to 1 10s. ; others, 
1 16s, 3 3s., and .4 16s.; some have sold for 8s. and 
Ss. 6d. 

Angel (nearly 65 grains). Almost similar to Angel of 
James I.' s last issue, but the numeral X in the field; <2 to 
.4 ; extra fine, .4 10s., 6, 7, and <10. 

BRIOT'S MINT. Unit or Sovereign. Obv., profile bust to left, 
crowned, with a falling lace band, XX behind head ; rev., 
square garnished shield of arms with FLORENT, &c., a small 
B (for Briot) at end of legend on each side ; =3 to 5 ; extra 
fine, ,5 12s. 6d., G, G Gs., 7 10s,, .8 10s., .10 2s. 6d. 
and .11. 

Half Sovereign. Obv., similar to Sovereign, but X behind 
bust; rev., also similar, but motto CVLTOEES, &c., a small B 
at end of legends; 2 to 4>; others, <4 5s., .6 2s. 6d., 
7 15s., and S 15s. 

Crown or Five Shilling Piece. Similar to Half Sovereign, but 
V behind head ; .27 10s. 

Angel. Obv., nearly similar to the Tower Angel; rev., ship 
larger, a small B in front of the prow. 

BRISTOL MINT. Sovereign. Type similar to Oxford mint. 
BE, in monogram, for m.m. ; <16 15s. and ,29. 

Half Sovereiffn. Similar to Sovereign, m.m., BE in mono- 
gram, X behind bust ; .50. 

A Tower Sovereign and Half Sovereign sold together for 
.1 9s. A Tower Half Sovereign and Crown sold together for 
1 2s., 1 17s., and .3 15s. A Tower Angel and Crown sold 
together for 15s. and <1 Is. 

SILVER. Pound or Twenty Shilling Piece, Half Pound, Crown, Half 
Crown, Shilling, Sixpence, Groat, Threepenny, Half Groat, 
Penny, and Halfpenny. 

Pound (1858 grains). Struck at Oxford and Shrewsbury. 
Obv., King on horseback to left; rev., the declaration, EELIG. 
PEOT. LEG. ANG. LIBEE. PAE, in two lines across the 
field, XX with one or three plumes above, the date, usually 
1642, below. Some have 1644 OX. Legend round the piece, 



32 THE VALUATION OP BRITISH COIXS. 

CHARLES I. CONTINUED. 

SILVER. Continued. 

EXVRGAT, &c. 4 to ,6 ; extra fine, .6 15s., .7 15s., .8, 
.9 7s. 6d., .10, d13, .17, .19, ,20 5s. and ^25. Poor 
specimens have sold for <1 Is., .1 8s., .2, .2 11s., .2 19s., 
and .3 18s. 

A variety of fine work, the Declaration in three lines within 
a compartment, below 1644, OX. ; .10, .12 10s., .14, .15, 
,26 5s., .29 15s., and .37. 

half Pound (929 grains). Similar to the Pound, but X for 
value. Struck at Exeter, Oxford, and Shrewsbury. .2 to- 
.3 10s. ; extra fine, .4, 5 2s. 6d., .5 15s., .8, and 
.10 10s. ; inferior specimens, 15s., =1, .1 8s., and .1 12s. 

Crown (464 grains). Struck at the Tower; by Briot, at 
Exeter, Oxford, and Shrewsbury. Obv., king riding to left ; 
rev., varied, according to place of mintage. 

Tower. Rev., shield of arms. 15s. to .1 5?. ; very fine, 
.2, .3, .3 12s., .4, .4 11s., .5 2s. 6d. 

Briot. Distinguished by a small B ; <2 to <4 ; extra fine, 
5, 5 10s., .6, .6 10s. 

Exeter. Rev., arms, often with date 1644 or 1645; 15s. to- 
.1 10s. ; extra fine, .2 2a., 5 and .7 ; others, 6s., 9s., 12s. 

Oxford. Rev., Declaration, and V for value; .1 10s. to- 
^3 ; extra fine, .4 12s., .6 6s., and .7 7s. 

Shrewsbury. Like the Oxford ; .2 to <3 ; extra fine, <4 6s. 

A.&D- The Oxford Crown (1644), a Pattern by Rawlins (Fig. 66). 

Half Crown (232 grains). Struck at the Tower ; by Briot, 
at Aberystwith, Bristol, Chester, Exeter, Oxford, Shrewsbury, 
Weymonth, Worcester, and York. Obv., king riding to left ; 
rev., varied, according to place of mintage. (Fig. 68.) 

Tower. Rev., shield of arms, motto CHEISTO AVSPICE. 
REGNO. Ordinary specimens, 3s. 6d. to 6s. ; extra fine, 14s., 
.1 9s., .2, .2 13s., <3 3s., .3 12s. 6d., .4 12s., .5 7s. 6d., 
.5 12s. 6d., and .6 15s. (Fig. 68.) 

Briot. Like the Crown. Ordinary specimens, 7s. 6d. to 
.1 ; extra fine, .1 15s., .2, .3, .4, and .5 5s. 

Aberystwith. Rev., oval shield, with plume over it ; m.m., 
an open book or a crown, CHRISTO, &c. ; 10s. to .1 ; extra 
fine, .3 3s., .3 8s., and .3 11s. A variety is known with the 
Declaration on rev., and motto EXVRGAT, &c. 

Bristol Rev., Declaration, sometimes BR in monogram. 
10s. to .1 ; extra fine, 1 8s., .2 2s., 4, 6s., and .6 12s. 

Chester. CHST on obv. under the horse ; m.m., three gerbs 
or wheat sheaves, the arms of Chester ; rev., shield of arms or 
Declaration ; .1 to .3; others, .4, .4 7s. 6d., .6 7s. 6d., .7, 
and .17. 

Exeter. Rev., arms, or sometimes the Declaration, with 
EX below; m.m., generally a rose; ,1 10s. to .3; others, 
.3 10s., .3 14s., .4 4s., .6, ,7, ,21, .22 10s., and .32. 

Oxford. Rev., Declaration and date, 1642, 1643, 1644, 
1645, and 1646, with or without OX. ; 10o. to .1 ; others, 
.1 9s., .1 16s., 2 10e., .2 15s., .3 6s., and .4 7s. 6d. 



ENGLISH COINS. 33 

CHARLES I. CONTINUED. 
SlLVEE. Continued. 

Shrewsbury. Almost the same as the Oxford type. 

Weymouth. W under the horse ; 13s., 1 7s., and 
B 19s. 

Worcester. m.m., three pears, the arms of Worcester ; 
rev., arms, and motto CHEISTO, &c. ; =1 11s., .1 18s., 2 4s., 
2 10s., 3 16s., 6 2s. 6d., and .9 10s. 

York. m.m., a lion, passant guardant, sometimes EBOE 
under the horse. Ordinary specimens, 7s. to 1 ; others, 
.1 12s., 2 11s., .3, .3 15s., .4 15s., <5 7s. 6d., .6 2s. 6d. 
and <!! 12s. 6d. 

Combe-Martin. A Half Crown, said to be of thia mint, 
realised 5 12s. 

Shillings (92f grains). Struck at the Tower, by Briot, at 
Aberystwith, Bristol, Exeter, Oxford, Shrewsbury, and York. 
Obv., bust crowned to left (exceptionally to right), with XII, for 
value, behind the head, CAEOLVS, &c. 

Tower. Rev., shield of arms. Ordinary specimens, 2s. to 
5s. ; extra fine, 12s., 18s., .1 Is., .1 16s., 2, 3 5s., 3 12s., 
and 4- 8s. ; perfect specimens, in proof condition, ,5 5s., 
1 7s., .8 5s., and .9 2s. 6d. 

Briot. m.m., anchor, small flower, and letter B ; 10s. 
to .1. 

Aberystwilh. m.m., open book ; rev., shield of arms ; 5s. 
to 15s. ; extra fine, 2 3s. and <3 7s. 

Bristol. Rev., Declaration and date, 1643, 1644, or 1645, 
BE. in monogram below the date, or at the beginning of legend, 
EXVEGAT, &c. ; 10s. to <1. 

Exeter. Rev., arms, and date 1644 or 1645 at end of 
legend ; 5s. to 15s. ; extra fine, 1 12s. and <! 16s. 

Oxford. Obv., bust to left (on two coins to right); rev., 
Declaration with date, 1642, 1643, or 1644, sometimes OX 
below ; 5s. to 15s. ; extra fine, 1, 1 10s., and 2 13s. ; one, 
a brilliant proof, .10 5s. 

Shrewsbury. Like the Oxford Half Crown. 

YorJc. Rev., arms, EBOE (for Eboraci = York) either over 
or under the shield; m.m., a lion; 5s. to 15s.; extra fine, 
1 Is., 2 6s., ,2 19s., and .3 3s. 

Sixpences (46? grains). Type generally like that of the 
Shillings. Struck at the Tower, by Briot, at Aberystwith, 
Bristol, Exeter, Oxford, and York. 

Tower. Ordinary specimen, Is. 6d. to 3s. 6d. ; extra fine, 
7s. 6d., 11s., 13s., 2 4s., and one (pattern ? ) ,22. 

Briot. 3s. 6d. to 10s. ; extra fine, 18s. and ,1 7s. 

Aberystwith. 4s. to 10s. ; one, extra fine, .3 10s. 

Bristol. 5s. to 10s. 

Exeter. 5s. to 10s. 

Oxford. 5s. to 10s. 

York. 4s. to 8s. 



34 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

CHARLES I. CONTINUED. 

SILVER. Continued. 

Groats (31 grains). Of Aberystwith, Bristol, Exeter, and 
Oxford; obv., bust to left crowned, with IIII, for value, 
behind it. 

Aberystwith. A plume before the bust ; m.m., an open 
book or a crown ; 3s. to 7s. 

Bristol. m.m., BR in monogram ; 5s. to 10s. 

Exeter. m.m., a rose ; the date, 1644, before CAROLVS ; 
5s. to 10s. A Groat and Threepence, in brilliant condition, 
together realised 4 4s. 

Oxford. Rev., Declaration type; 4s. to 8s. : one, extra fine, 
.1 13s. 

Threepence (22 grains). Of Aberystwith, Exeter, Oxford, 
and York. Similar to the Groat, but with III, for value, behind 
the bust. 

Aberystwith. 2s. 6d. to 7s. 6d. 

Exeter. 5s. to 10s. 

Oxford. 3s. to 7s. A Threepence and Half Groat, 
together, sold for 2 19s. 

York. m.m., lion, EBOR above the shield of arms ; 5s. 
to 10s. 

Half Groats (15 grains). Struck at the Tower, by Briot, 
at Aberystwith, Bristol, Exeter, and Oxford. The value is 
indicated by II behind the bust. 

Tmver. First issue : obv., rose, crowned, C. D. G. ROSA 
SINE SPINA ; rev., rose crowned, IVS. THRONVM FIRMAT, 
or FERMAT ; Is. to 2a. 

Second issue : obv., crowned bust to left, with II, for value, 
behind it, CAROLVS and title ; rev., IVSTITIA., &c., with 
shield of arms ; Is. to 2s. 

Briot. m.m., a lozenge, a small B below the bust ; 5s. to 
10s. A Half Groat and Penny together realised .1 IG$. 

Aberystii-ith. Rev., plume ; 3s. to 7s. ; very fine, 10s. 6d., 
1 7s., and 1 10s. 

Bristol. Rev., Declaration, BR in monogram below; 4s. to 
8s. ; extra fine, .3 12s. to .3 18s. 

Exeter. Rev., arms, or a large rose; 5s. to 10s.; extra 
fine, .1 5s., .1 10s., 2 2s., and .2 11s. 

Oxford. Rev., Declaration and 1644, or 1644 with OX below 
it ; 3s. to 7. 

Penny (7k grains). Struck at the Tower, by Briot, at 
Aberystwith, Exeter, and Oxford. 

Tower. First issue : obv., rose, not crowned, C. D. G. 
ROSA, &c.; rev., rose not crowned, IVS, &c. ; Is. to 2s. 

Second issue : obv., bust to left, with I, for value, behind it, 
CAROLVS, &c. ; rev., arms, IVSTITIA, &c. ; Is. to 2s. 

Briot. Similar to his Half Groat, but I, for value, behind 
head. A Penny and Half Groat sold together for 1 16a. 

Aberystwith. Obv., bust, with I behind it ; rev., Prince of 
Wales' fe'athers, IVSTITL\, &c. ; 5s. to 10s. A perfect speci- 
men, 2 4s. 



ENGLISH COINS. 25 

CHARLES I. CONTINUED. 

SILVER. Continued. 

Exeter. Obv., bust, with I behind, as usual ; rev., rose, 
THEO. IVS FIRMAT, 1644; 1 10s., 2, 2 lls. 

Oxford. Obv., bust, with I, as usual ; rev., RELTG. PRO, 
&c., in three lines, three fleurs-de-lis above, 1644 below, 
EXVRGAT, &c. Extremely rare. One sold for 5, another is 
said to have realised 22 10a. One (pierced) sold, together 
with an Oxford Crown and Half Crown, in 1869, for 
2 Is. 

Halfpenny (3f grains). Tower, rose on each side; la. 
to 2s. 

Aberystwith. Obv., rose ; rev., plume. 10s. and .1. 
Sets of coins of the different Mints sold together have realised 
as under : 

Aberystwith. Half Crown, Shilling, Sixpence, Groat, Half 
Groat, and Penny, ,1 8s. ; Shilling, Sixpence, and Groat, 
1 13s. ; Shilling, Sixpence, Groat, Threepence, and four 
Half Groats, .2 16s. ; Threepence, Half Groat, Penny, and 
Halfpenny, with a Tower Rose Penny and Halfpenny, 16s. ; 
three Groats, Half Groat, Half Groat (Ich Dien), Penny, 
Rose Penny, and Halfpenny, 17s. 

Tower. Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, Sixpence, Half 
Groat (rose), Half Groat (bust), Penny (rose), Penny (bust), 
and Halfpenny, 19e. ; Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, Sixpence, 
Half Groat, and Penny, 17s. ; Half Crown, Shilling, Sixpence, 
Half Groat, Penny, and Halfpenny, .1 10s. ; Sixpence, Half 
Groat, Penny, and Halfpenny, 3 12s. ; Sixpence, Half Groat, 
and Penny, 2 14s. 

Briot. Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, and Sixpence, .1 3s.; 
Crown, Half Crown, Half Groat, and Penny, 7 ; Shilling, 
Sixpence, and Half Groat, 15s. and .1 3s. ; Shilling, Sixpence, 
Half Groat and Penny, ,1 5s. and .1 15s. ; Shillinor and Six- 
pence, 1 3s. and .3 12s.; Shilling, Half Groat, and Penny, 
.2 10s. ; Sixpence, Half Groat, and Penny, 17s. 

Bristol. Half Crown, Shilling, Sixpence, Groat, and Half 
Groat, 1; Shilling and Sixpence, .1 11s., .1 19s., and 
3 12s. ; a Shilling and Groat, 2 2s. ; a Shilling, Sixpence, 
Groat, and Penny, 17s. 

Exeter. Half Crown, Shilling, Sixpence, Groat, and Three- 
pence, 2 lls. ; Sixpence, Groat, Threepence, and Half Groat, 
lls.; Shilling, Sixpence, Groat, and Threepence, 2 ; Shilling 
and Sixpence, 2 14s. 

Oxford. Shilling, Sixpence, Groat, and Threepence, 
1 14s. 

York. Shilling, Sixpence, and Half Groat, ICs. ; Shilling, 
Sixpence, and Threepence, 19s. ; Shilling and Threepence, .1 ; 
Shilling and Sixpence, .1 6s. 

COFFER. Farthing (18 grains). Obi\, CAROLVS D. G. MAG. BR. 
two sceptres passed through a crown; rev., FRA. ET HIB. 
REX, a rose crowned ; m.m., star, or crescent ; 6d. to 
Is. 6d. (Fig. 166.) 

D2 



36 THE VALUATION OS BRITISH COLNS. 

CHARLES I. CONTINUED. 
English. Siege Pieces. 

GOLD. Ten Shilling Piece (66 grains). Struck at Colchester. Obv., 
incuse, a castle with flag flying, and in two lines, OBS : COL. 

16^48 ; rev., plain. 

SILVER. Struck at Beeston Castle, Carlisle, Colchester, Newark, 
Pontefract Castle, and Scarborough. 

Beeston Castle. Obv., a castle gateway, with value 
below. 

Two Shilling Piece (208 grains). Obv., /? 

Sixteen-pence (130 grains). Obv., * ?~; 12 12s., .20. 

Fourteen-pence (99 grains). Obv., K . 

Thirteen-pence (94 grains). Obv., . . 

Shilling (88 and 91 grains). Obv., ^ ; .13 13s. 

Eleven-pence (80 grains). Obv., . 
A piece of uncertain value, .4 2s. 6d. 

Carlisle. Three Shillings (246 grains). Octagonal, nearly 
round. Obv., under a large crown the letters C E between two 
anemones, below Ills ; rev., in three lines, OBS: GAEL. 1645, 
an anemone above and below ; .3 12s., Q 12s. 6d., .6 15s., 
1 7s. 6d., 7 10s., and <8 10s. 

Half Crown. Obv., C E and II .VI under a crown; rev., 
OBs CARL. 1645, in two lines ; 2 11s. and 2 12s. 6d. 

Shilling (80 grains). Obi-., under a large crown, C E, with 
XII below ; rev., as on Three Shilling Piece ; 16s., 1 Is., 
2 11s., 2 12s., .4 12s., j5, .5 ICs., <5 17s. 6d., .6 8s. 6d., 
and .8 12s. 6d. 

Colchester. Shilling (121 grains). Oblong, circular, and 
octagonal. Obv., a castle, legend Carolj Fortuna resurgam; 
2 SB., 2 15s., .3 12s., .4 12s., .5 2s. 6d., 1 15s., .8 5s., 
.9, .10, 11, and .15 10s. 

yei>: ark. Diamond shaped, with a pearl border along the 
edges. (Fig. 69.) 

Half Crown (128 grains). Obv., crown between C E, XXX 
below; rev., in three lines, OBS. NEWAEK 1646 ; 10s. to .1. 

Shilling (95 grains). As above, but XII for value ; 10s. to .1. 

Ninepence (70 grains). As above, but IX for value; 15s. to 
1 5s. 

Sixpence (38 grains). As above, but VI for value ; 15s. to 
.1 10s. 

Sets of the four pieces have realised, at different sales : 1, 
1 4s., .1 17s., 2 3s., .2 4s., 2 5s., 2 7s., .3 3s., .4 4s., 
4, 12s. 6d., and .5 12s. 6d. 



ENGLISH COINS. 37 

CHARLES I. CONTINUED. 

SILVER. Continued. 

Pontefract Castle. Diamond shaped and octagonal. 
Shillings (66 to 89 grains). Obv., C E under a crown, motto 
DVM SPIRO SPERO ; rev., the castle, at left side OBS, art 
right XII, with P above and C below, date 1648. Also a variety 
with hand issuing from side of castle, holding a sword ; 16s. to 
2; extra fine, 2 6s., .3 3s., 4,, 4, 6s., and 5 2s. Cd. 
(Fig. 70.) 

Two Shilling Piece (152 grains). Of similar type, ,10 2s. 6d. 
Scarborough. Irregularly-shaped pieces. 

Crown (292 grains). Obv., Castle, below it S ; .12 15s. and 
.30. 

Half Crown (219 grains). Obv., castle, with .. . ; rev., OBS 
Scarborough, 1645 ; 7 5s. and .15 5s. 

Two Shillinffs (208 grains). Obv., Castle, with .*? ; 1 5s. 
and .12 5s. 

One and Ninepenny Piece (134 grains). Obv., castle, with . . ; 
.8 2s. 6d. and .15 17s. 6d. 

Sixpence (43 grains). Obv., castle, with . ; 6 and .10. 

Pieces of unknown Mints, of irregular shapes : 

g 
Crown (426 grains). Marked under a castle. 

Sevenpence (53 grains). Marked 
Sixpence (49 grains). Marked . 
Fourpence (18 grains). Marked . 

The Commonwealth, 16491660. 

GOLD. Broad or Twenty Shilling Piece, Half Broad or Ten Shilling 
Piece, and Five Shilling Piece. 

Broad (140 grains). Obv., a plain shield, bearing St. 
George's cross, motto, THE COMMONWEALTH OF ENG- 
LAND ; rev., two shields conjoined, one bearing St. George's 
cross, the other the Irish harp, XX above, motto, GOD WITH 
VS, and date; 2 to 3; extra fine, .3 3s., .3 7*., <3 11s., 
and .4; others have sold for .1 5s., .1 8s., and 1 12s. 

A Broad and a Half Broad together sold for <! 16s. 

Ten Shilling Piece (70j grains). Similar to the Broad, but 
X, for value ; 2 to .3 ; extra fine, .3 3s., .3 8s., .4, and 
.4 2s. ; others only 12s., 14s., and 17s. 

A Ten Shilling and Five Shilling piece sold together have 
realised ,1 2s., .1 10s., and 3 12s. 

Five Shilling Piece (35^- grains). Also similar, but V, for 
value ; <! 5s. to 1 15s. ; extra fine, 2 2s., .2 10s., 2 16s., 
and <6 5s. ; one sold for only 18s. 

Sets of the Broad, Ten Shilling, and Five Shilling Pieces, 
extra fine, =4 and .5 10s. 



38 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

THE COMMONWEALTH. CONTINUED. 

SILVER. Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, Sixpence, Half Groat, Penny, 
and Halfpenny. 

Crown, (464 grains). Obv. and rev., similar to Broad, but V, 
for value; 1 10s. to .3; extra fine, ,3 3s., 3 5s., .4 15s., 
and .5 15s. ; two exceptional specimens realised respectively 
9 15s. and .15 10s. 

A Crown and Shilling sold together for 2 9s., while a 
similar lot at another sale realised only 19s. 

Half Crown (232 grains). Similar, but value II. VI.; 10s. 
to 1; very fine, <1 6s., .2 2s., .2 8s., and .3 14s.; an 
exceptional specimen, 1 15s. 

Shilling (92 grains). Similar, but value XII. ; 4s. to 10s. ; 
extra fine, 19s., .1 Is., <1 11s., and .2. (Fig. 71.) 

A Shilling and a Sixpence sold together realised, at different 
sales, 7s., 13s., .1 3s., and 2 2s. 

Sixpence (46 grains). Similar, but value VI. ; 4s. to 10s. ; 
exceptional specimens, <! and 2 12s. 

Half Groat (15.j grains). Similar, without motto or date, 
but value II. ; ordinary specimens, Is. to 2s. 

Penny (~\ grains). Similar to Half Groat, but I., for value ; 
ordinary specimens, Is. to 2s. 

Halfpenny (3j grains). Obv., shield bearing St. George's 
cross ; rev., single shield bearing the Irish harp, no legends or 
numeral; 2s. to 4s. 

A complete set of seven pieces (Crown to Halfpenny), in very 
fine condition, sold for 1 19s. and 2 2s. 

An extra fine set of six coins (Half Crown to Halfpenny) 
realised ,5. 

A Half Crown, Shilling, and Sixpence sold together for 
1 14s. 

A Half Groat, Penny, and Halfpenny, in the finest state, 
sold for ^2 4s. 

A Sixpence, Half Groat, Penny, and Halfpenny, not so fine, 
realised 1. 
COPPER. Farthings. Struck only as patterns. 

Oliver Cromwell, Protector, 16531658.* 

GOLD. Fifty Shilling piece, Broad or Twenty Shilling piece, and Half 
Broad or Ten Shilling piece. Dates, 1656 and 1658. 

Fifty Stirling Piece (3511 grains). Obv., lanreated bust to 
left, OLIVAR D.G., &c.; rev., shield of arms; first and fourth 
quarters, St. George's cross; second, cross of St. Andrew; third, 
the Irish harp : on an escutcheon of pretence, the Protector's 
arms, a lion rampant, motto, PAX QV.EEITVR BELLO ; edge 
inscribed; .41 10s., ,44, ,46, .51, .70,and 17; aspecimen, 

* For convenience of reference the coins bearing Cromwell's name are here given, 
although it is disputed that they were ever current money, and the coins of the Com- 
monwealth were being- struck and circulated at the same time. Hawkins, in "The Coins 
of England," does not even allude to these pieces. They are beautifully executed, and 
were coined by machinery. 



ENGLISH COIXS. 39 

OLIVER CROMWELL. CONTINUED. 

GOLD. Continued. 

not fine, and which had been cracked in striking, sold for only 
4, Is. in 1869. 

Broad (140 grains). Similar, being from same die, bnt 
edge engrailed ; 2 7s., 3 Vs., .4, .4 12s., 4, 18s., 
5 2s. 6d., 5 10s., <6 5s., 6 10s., 7, 7 10s., 8 8s., and 
.8 15s. 

Half Broad (70i grains). Similar to the Broad; ,4 5s., 
.5 2s. 6d., .9 15s., 10 15s., 11, 12, 14, 5s., 15, 16, 
17, 20, 21, and .2(5 10s. 

A proof, in gold (716 grains), struck from the Crown die, 
1658, sold for 31. 

SILVER. Crown, Half Crown, Two Shillings, Shilling, Ninepence, and 
Sixpence. Dates, 1656 and 1658. 

Crown (464 grains). Obv., laureated bust to left, OLIVAE 
D.G., &c. ; rev., arms as 011 the gold coin; edge inscribed; 
dated 1658. 

There are three varieties Simon's, Tanner's, and the Dutch 
Crown. 

Simon's. 2 10s., 2 12s. 6d., 2 14s., 3 5s., 3 15s., 
4, 4s., 5 2s. 6d., 5 12s. 6d., 1 10s., .9 9.-., 11, and 28. 
Tanner's. 4, 10s., 5 2s. 6d., .5 5s., 6 6s., 6 17s. 6d., 
7, 7 2s. 6d., and 7 12s. 6d. 

Dutch. 2 6s., 3 10s., 4, 4s., 5, 6 12a. 6d., 7 5s., 
8 5s., and 8 15s. 

Half Crown (232% grains) by Simon. Similar to the Crown, 
dated 1656 and 1658; edge inscribed ; 1 4s., 1 13s., 1 15s., 
1 19s., 2 2s., 2 6s., 2 10s., 3 3s., 3 5s., 5 2s. 6d., 
and 8 10s. (Fig. 72.) 

Two Shilling Piece (162 grains). Type similar to the Crown, 
dated 1658 ; edge plain ; 10, 15, 18 5s., and 25. 

Shilling (92f grains). Type similar to the Crown, dated 
1658, edge engrailed ; 1 Is., 1 63., 1 10s., 1 14s., 2, 
2 13s., 3, and Q 2s. 6d. 

Ninepence (various weights, 51 to 96 grains). Similar type, 
dated, edge engrailed or plain ; 1 16s., 2 2s., 2 10s., 
3 7s. 6d., 3 11s., 4,, 4, 7s., 4, lls., 5, 5 5s., 
5 12s. 6d., <6 6s., 6 15s., and 7 5s. 

Sixpence (46^ grains). The rarest of Cromwell's coins; edge 
engrailed ; ,31 and .35 ; a specimen, said to be a Sixpence, 
sold in 1869 for 5 2s. 66. 

Sets of the Crown, Half Crown, and Shilling, in fine cabinet 
condition, have sold for .3 18s., 4- 16s., 6, 6 15s., 7 5s., 
and 7 17. 6d. 

A Half Crown and Shilling realised 3 5s. and <4 14s. 
COPPER. Pattern Farthings. 

1. Obv., laureated bust to left, OLIVAE PEO ENG SC IEL ; rev., 

arms as before, CHAEITIE AND CHANGE ; 2 12s., 3 10s., 
3 16s., 5 7s. 6d., 6 5s., and 8 10s. (Fig. 162.) 

2. Obv., as before; rev., three pillars united, THVS VNITED 

INVINCIBLE ; 2 12s. (Fig. 163.) 



40 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

OLIVER CBOJIWELL. CONTINUED. 

COPPEE. Continued. 

3. Obv., as before; rev., a ship under sail to left, AND GOD 

DIRECT OVR COVES. (Fig. 164.) 

4. Obv., bust as before, OLIVER PRO ENG SCO & IRE ; rev., 

arms, CONVENIENT CHANGE, 1651. 

Charles II., 166O 1685. 

GOLD. Hammered. Broad or Twenty Shilling Piece, Half Broad or 
Ten Shilling Piece, and Five Shilling Piece. 

Milled. Five Guinea Piece, Two Guinea, Guinea, and Half 
Guinea. 

Hammered. Broad (1402- grains). Obv., lanreated bust to 
left, CAROLVS II. D.G. MAG. BRIT., &c. ; rev., arms, C. E. 
at aide, FLORENT CONCORDIA REGNA. 

First issue. Without numerals, for value, behind head ; 2 
to .3 10s. ; extra fine, .6, .6 12s. 6d., and S 2s. 6d.; others, 
only .1 5s., 1 11s., and .1 16s. 

Second issue. With XX, for value, behind head ; 2 to 
3 10s. ; extra fine. .3 17s. 6d., .5 2s. 6d., and .5 7s. 6d. ; 
one sold for.l 9s. (Fig. 15.) 

Half Broad (70i grains). Similar to Broad. 

First issue. Without numerals ; 2 to .3 ; extra fine, .8, 
.10 2s. 6d., and .14 10s. ; others, .1 2s. and .1 6s. 

Second issue. With X behind head ; .2 to .3 ; extra fine, 
3 11s., 2s. 6d., and ^9 ; one sold for .1. 
Five Shillings (35 j grains). Similar type. 

First issue. Without numerals ; l 10s. to 2 10s.; extra 
fine, 3 4s., .6 6s., .9 5s., .29 10s., and .34. 

Second issue. With V behind head ; 1 10s. to 2; extra 
fine, 3 10s., .3 18s., and b 2s. 6d. 

A Broad and Half Broad (without numerals) sold together 
for .1 17s. 

A Broad and Five Shilling Piece (without numerals) realised 
.5 10s. 

A Half Broad and Five Shilling Piece (without numerals), 
realised .1 8s. 

A Broad (with XX) and Five Shilling Piece (without V) sold 
for 7 7?. 

Milled.* Five Guinea Piece (647i grains). Obv., laureated 
bust to right, CAEOLVS II. DEI GRATIA; rev., four shields 
arranged in the form of a cross, &c.. MAG. BR. FRA. ET. 
HIB. EEX. and date ; edge inscribed DECVS ET TVTAMKX, 
&c. ; .6 10s. to 1 10s. ; extra fine specimens have realised : 
First. Plain under bust; .8 12s., .10 12s. 6d., and .11. 

* FIVE GUINEA PIECES of every reign from Charles II. to George II. have on 
o6c. bust of the sovereign to right or left, with name and titles ; and on rev., four shields 
arranged crosswise, +, each crowned, a sceptre in each angle, except those of William 
and Mary and George II., on which the arms are placed quarterly in a single shield. 
DOUBLE GUINEAS. GUINEAS, and HALF GUINEAS, are similar. 



ENGLISH COINS. 41 

CHARLES II. CONTINUED. 

GOLD. Continued. 

Second. Elephant under bust; .8 2s. Gd., .8 17a. Gd., 
.9 15s., and .21 10s. 

Some have sold for 5 6s., 5 8s., and 5 10s. 
Two Guinea Piece (258| grains). Similar, but edge milled, 
and not inscribed; 3 to 4; extra fine, <4 10s., .5 7s. 6d., 
6 6s., .6 12s. Gd., <7 2s. 6d., and .7 12s. 6d. 

Guinea (129f grains). Similar to the Two Guinea Piece ; 
1 10s. to 2 ; extra fine, 2 5s., 2 14s., 2 18e., =3 3s., 
and r o 2s. 6d. 

Half Guinea (64f grains). Similar to the Guinea; <! to 
.1 10s. ; extra fine, .1 15s., 2 2s., 2 9s., and 3 5s. ; others, 
12s., and 16s. 

A Double Guinea, Two Guineas, and Half Guinea sold for 
-i 18s. 

SILVER. Hammered. Half Crown, Shilling, Sixpence, Groat, Three- 
pence, Half Groat, Penny. 

Milled. Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, Sixpence, and Maundy 
Fourpence, Threepence, Twopence, and Penny. 

Hammered. Three issues : First, without numerals for value, 
or inner circle; second, with numerals, but without inner circle; 
third, with numerals and inner circle. Obv., crowned bust to 
left, name and title ; rev., CHRISTO AVSPICE EEGNO, shield 
of arms. 

Half Crown (232^ grains), first issue. 10s. to .1 ; extra fine, 
4, 4s., .5 10s., 7, 9 2s. 6d., and <19 10s. (Fig. 74.) 
Second issue. XXX behind head; 10*. to .1. 
Third issue. XXX behind head ; 7s. 6d. to 15s. ; extra 
fine, 1 7s., .9 2s. 6d., and .19 10s. 

Shilling (92J grains), first issue. 10s. to 15s. ; extra fine, 
.1 Is., .1 5s., .1 15s., c3, and 3 3s. 

Second issue. XII behind head; 10s. to 15s. ; extra fine, 
1 Is., 2 2s., and 3. 

Third issue. XII behind head ; 7s. 6d. to 10s. ; extra fine, 
.1 13s., 2 2s., and 2 16s. 

Sixpence (46 grains), first issue. 6s. to 10s. ; extra fine, 
1 12s. 

Second issue. VI behind head ; 6s. to 10s. ; extra fine, 18s. 
Third issue. VI behind head ; 6s. to 10s. ; extra fine, 18s. 
and 2 18s. 

A Shilling and Sixpence, first issue, extra fine, 3 17s. 6d. 
Half Groat (15i grains), first issue. Is. 6d. to 2s. Gd. 

Second issue. II behind head ; Is. to 2s. 
Penny (7% grains), first issue. Is. Gd. to 2s. 6d. 

Second issue. I behind head ; Is. to 2s. 

Groat (31 grains), third issue. IIII behind head ; 2s. to 
3s. Gd. 

Threepence (22i grains), third issue. III behind head; Is. Gd. 
to 2s. 6d. 

Half Groat (15 grains), third issue. II behind head ; Is. 
to 2s. 



42 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

CHARLES II. CONTINUED. 

SILVER (Hammered). Continued. 

Penny (7 grains) third issue. -I behind bead ; Is. to 2s. 

A very fine set (third issue) of Groat, Threepence, Half Groat, 
and Penny realised .1 2s. 6d. 

A set of Half Crown, Shilling, and Sixpence, firat issue, 
.1 18s. 

A set of Half Crown, Shilling, Sixpence, Groat, Threepence, 
Half Groat, and Penny, all of third issue, very fine, .2 7s. 

Milled. Crown (464^ grains).* Obv. t laureated bast to 
right, CAEOLVS II., &c. ; rev., four shields arranged in the 
form of a cross, MAG. BE. FEA., &c., with date (1662 to 
1684), lettered edge; 7s. 6d. to 15s. ; extra fine, 1 Is., <1 6s., 
1 10*., 2 2s., 2 10s., .3, 4s., and, an exceptional speci- 
men, .24 10a. 

Half Crown (232 grains). Similar to the Crown, dated 
from 1663 to 1684, inclusive, except 1665 and 1667, lettered 
edge; 5s. to 10s. ; extra fine, 12s., 17s., 1 10s., 1 19s., 
2 3s., and .2 11s. 

Shilling (92y grains). Similar to the Crown, dated 1663 to 
1684 inclusive, except 1664, 1665, 1666, 1667, 1669, and 1682, 
edge milled witb lines ; 2s. 6d. to 5s. ; extra fine, 7s., 14s., <1 Is., 
=1 9s., 2 2s., and 2 15s. 

Sixpence (46 grains). Similar to the Shilling, dated from 
1674 to 1684, inclusive ; 2s. 6d. to 5s. 

A Shilling and Sixpence, extra fine, 17s. 

Maundy Fourpence, Threepence, Twopence, and Penny. 
Obv., laureated bust to right. 

First issue, by Simon, numerals of value behind head, 
IIII, III, II, or I. Rev., arms in a shield, CHEISTO AYSPICE 
EEGNO, 4s. 6d. to 6s. 6d. the set. 

Second issue, by Eoettier, dated 1670 to 1684 ; 3s. to 6s. the set. 

Fourpence (31 grains). Rev., four C's interlinked, with crown 
above and date; Is. to 2s. 

Threepence (22 grains). Rev., three C's; Is. to 2s. 

Twopence (15 grains). Rev., Two C's ; Is. to Is. Cd. 

Penny (7i grains). Rev., one C. ; Is. to Is. 6d. 

A set, Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, and Sixpence, 13s. and 
.1 2s. 

A Crown, Half Crown, and Shilling, elephant and castle, 
1 8s. 

A Crown, Half Crown, and Shilling, elephant, 1666, 10a. 
and 13s. 

A Half Crown and Shilling, extra fine, 2 10s. 

COPPER. Halfpenny and Farthing. A pound, avoirdupois, was 
coined into forty halfpence or eighty farthings. 

* The Petition Crown, 16G3, a Pattern by Simon, is shown at Fig-. 67. On some 
CROWNS, dated 1662, there is a rote below the bust. An elephant, or elei.hant and 
cantlf, is placed below the king's bust on certain CROWNS, HALF CROWNS, ami 
SHILLINGS, made from silver imported by the African Company. Some HALF 
CROWNS, and SHILLINGS, made of silver from the Welsh mines, have a plume below 
the bust, and in centre of rev. 



ENGLISH COINS. 43 

CHABLES II. CONTINUED. 

COPPER. Continued. 

Halfpenny (175 grains). Obv., laureated bust to left in 
armour, CAEOLVS A CAEOLO ; rev., Britannia seated, a 
palm branch in right hand, a spear in left, BEITANNIA above, 
the date below; 1672, 1673, or 1675; Is. to 5s. 

Farthing (87 grains). Similar to the Halfpenny; dated 
1671 1675, and 1679 ; la. to 2s. 6d. ; inferior specimens, 
3d. to 6d. 
TIN. Farthing. 

Farthing (87 grains). Similar to copper Farthing, but 
without date on rev., in centre a stud of copper ; edge lettered, 
NVMMOEVM * FAMVLVS * 1684 ; or 1685; 2s. 6d. to 1. 

English. Siege Pieces. 

GOLD. Pontefract. 

Twenty Shilling Piete. Octagonal. 06 v., HANG: DEVS: 
DEDIT in two lines, a croTOn above, and 1648 below, encircled 
by CAEOL. II. D. G. MAG. B.F. ET H. EEX. ; rev., the castle, 
above it P.C. (for Pontefract Castle) on the left side OBS., a 
cannon issuing from right side, surrounded by POST MOETEM 
PATEIS PEO FILIO. 
SILVER. Pontefract. 

Shilling (about 70 grains). Octagonal, similar to the Twenty 
Shilling Piece described above ; 10s., 17s., 1 2s., 2 2s,; and 
an exceptionally fine specimen, .8 10s. (Fig. 73.) 

Shilling (about 70 grains). Octagonal. Obv., the castle, as 
described above, but the legend is CAEOLVS : SECVNDVS : 
1648 ; rev., C. E. under a crown, encircled by DVM : SPIEO : 
SPEEO ; 16s., 1, 1 2s., .1 12s., and .4 8s. 

The above two varieties, together, ,5 5a. 

Tames II., 16851688. 

GOLD. Five Guinea Piece, Two Guinea Piece, Guinea, and Half 
Guinea. Some pieces have an elephant and castle under tho 
bust. 

Weight. The same as the last issue of Charles II. 

Five Guinea Piece. Obv., laureated bust to left, IACOBVS II. 
DEI GEATIA ; rev., four shields arranged crosswise, edge 
lettered; ,6 10s. to 7 10s.; extra fine, .8 5s., .11 2s. 6d., 
and .15 10s. ; others, 5 6s., <5 10s., 5 12s. 6d., and 5 16#. 

Two Guinea Piece. Same as the Five Guinea Piece, but ed 
milled; .3 to .4; extra fine, .4 15s., 9, 9 17s. 6d., and 
.11 5s. ; others, 2 4s., 2 8s., and 2 12s. 

Guinea. Similar to the Two Guinea Piece ; 1 10s. to 2 2s. ; 
extra fine, 3 6s., ,3 10s., and 1 7s.; others, 1 2s. and 
1 3s. 

Half Guinea. Similar to the Guinea ; 1 to 1 10s. ; extra 
fine, .1 16s., 2 4s., 2 8s., 3 3s., 3 10s., <4 6s., and 
4i 10s.; others, 11s. and 16s. 

A Guinea and Half Guinea sold, together, for 1 13s. 



14 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COIXS. 

JAMES IT. CONTINUED. 

SILVER. Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, Sixpence, and Maundy Four- 
pence, Threepence, Twopence, and Penny. 

Weight. The same as the last issue of Charles II. 

Crown. Obv., laureated bust to left, IACOBVS II. DEI 
GRATIA; rev., four shields arranged crosswise, dated 1686, 
16S7, or 1688, edge lettered; 7s. 6d. to 15s.; extra fine, .1, 
1 5a., and .1 12*. 

Half Crown. Similar to the Crown, dated 1685 to 1688 ; 5s. 
to 10s. ; extra fine, .1 Is. and .1 7s. 

Sliillinq. Similar to the Crown, but edge milled with lines, 
dated 1685 to 1688 ; 3s. to 7s. 

Sixpence. -Similar to Shilling, dated 1686, 1687, or 1688 ; 
4s. to 7s. 6d. 

Maundy. Obv., laureated bust to left, IACOBVS II. DEI 
GRATIA ; rev., the numerals IIII, III, II, or I, crowned, and 
dated ; sets dated 1686, 16S7, or 1688 ; 3s. 6d. to 5s. 6d. 

Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, Sixpence and Maundy, the set, 
15s., 2, 3 4s., and <4 7s. 

Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, and Sixpence ; .1 3s., 2 8s., 
and 3 10s. 
COPPER. None. 
TIN. Halfpenny and Farthing. 

Halfpenny. Obv., laureated bust to right, IACOBVS 
SECVNDVS ; rev., figure of Britannia surroundnd hy the word 
BRITANNIA, edge inscribed NVMJIOSVM * FAMVLVS * 
1685 (or 1687); in the centre is a plug of copper; 2s. 6d. to 5s. 

Farthing. Similar to the Halfpenny, except that the bust is in 
armour and not draped, dated on edge 1CS4 or 1C35 ; 2->. 6d. to 5s. 

Fine specimens of the Halfpenny and Farthing, sold together, 
have realised 12s., 16s., 17s. and <1. 

William and Mary, 16891694. 

GOLD. Five Guinea Piece, Two Guinea Piece, Guinea, and Half Guinea. 

An elephant and castle is below the bust on some pieces. 

Weight. Same as the last issue of Charles II. 

Five Guinea Piece. Obv., busts of the king and queen to 
right, GVLIELMVS ET MARIA DEI GRATIA; rev., arms 
in a garnished shield, crowned, &c., edge lettered ; .6 10s. to 
7 10s. ; extra fine, 7 15s., .8, .8 8s., 9, and .13 10s. ; 
others, ,5 6s., .5 12s. 6d., and .5 15s. 

Two Guinea Piece. Similar to Five Guinea Piece, edge 
milled ; .3 to 4, ; extra fine, .4 5s., .4 19s., G, 7, and 
.10 ; others, 2 4s. and 2 7s. (Fig. 16.) 

Guinea. Similar to Two Guinea Piece ; 1 10s. to 2 ; extra 
fine, 2 7s., 2 11s., .3 10s., and .3 13s. ; others, .1 3s. and 
1 5s. 

Half Guinea. Similar to the Guinea ; .1 to .2 ; extra fine, 
2 6s., 2 12s., and 2 18s. ; others, 11s. and 12s. 

A Guinea and Half Guinea together, sold for .1 14s., 2 Is., 
3 Gi., and .3 10s. 



ENGLISH COINS. 45 

WILLIAM AND MART. CONTINUED. 

SILVEK. Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, Sixpence, and Maundy Four 
pence. Threepence, Twopence, and Penny. 

Croivn. Obv., busts to right; rev., four shields in form of a 
cross, in the angles W.M. in monogram; dated 1691 or 1692 ; 
10s. to ! ; extra fine, 1 7s., .1 14s., 2 8s., 2 13s., 3, 
and 3 19s. 

Half Crown. Obv., same as the Crown; rev., three varieties. 
First. Arms, quarterly, in a square shield, crowned; dated 
1689, and in one instance (unique ?) 1691 ; 3s. 6d. to 5s. 6d. ; 
extra fine, 13s. 6d. 

Second. Arms in a square shield, first and fourth quarters 
having the arms of England and France quarterly ; dated 1689 
and 1690 ; 4s. to 6s. 

Third. Arms arranged crosswise, like the Crown; dated 
1691, 1692, and 1693 ; 4s. 6d. to 7s. 6d. ; extra fine, 10s. (Fig. 75.) 

Shilling. Obv. and rev., as the Crown; dated 1692 and 
1693 ; edge milled ; 2s. 6d. to 5s. 

Sixpence. Same as Shilling; dated 1693 and 1694; edge 
milled ; 3s. Gd. to 6n. 6d. 

Maundy Sets. Obv., busts to right; rev., the figure 4, 3, 2 r 
or 1, crowned, and dated 1689 to 1694 ; 4s. to 7s. 

Crown, two varieties of Half Crown, Shilling, Sixpence, and 
Maundy ; the set 1, 1 10s., and 2 18s. 

Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, and Sixpence, <1 2s. 

Half Crown, Shilling, and Sixpence, all dated 1693, extra fine, 
.3 Is. 

Half Crown, Shilling, Sixpence, and Maundy, 8s., .1 6s., 
and .1 17s. 
TlN. Halfpenny and Farthing, a copper plug through the centre. 

Halfpenny. Obv., busts to right, GVLIELMVS ET MARIA; 
rev., figure of Britannia, with the word BRITANNIA, and on 
some pieces the date 1689 or 1691 below the figure ; edue 
lettered NVMMOEVM + FAMVLVS + 1689 +, or 1690, 1691, 
1692 ; 2s. 6d. to 5s. 

Farthing. Like the Halfpenny, dated both on edge and in 
exergue, 1690, 1691, or 1692 ; 2s. 6d. to 5s. 

Halfpenny and Farthing, together, 16s. Two Halfpennies 
and a Farthing, <! 4s. 
COPPEK. Halfpenny and Farthing. 

Halfpenny. S ; milar to tin Halfpenny, edge plain, date under 
Britannia, 1694 ; Is. to 5s. 

Two Halfpennies, very fine, and an Irish Halfpenny, sold for 
.1 12s. 

A Halfpenny, 1694, of bold work, extremely fine, realised 
7 10s. Another, 1694, of better work and brilliant condition, 
sold for 2. 

Farthing. Similar to the Halfpenny, but dated 1692, 1693, 
or 1694 ; Is. to 5s. 

A fine set, comprising a tin Halfpenny and Farthing, a copper 
Halfpenny and Farthing, and a Halfpenny and Farthing of 
William III., sold for .1 3s. 



46 THE VALUATION OP BRITISH COINS. 

William III., 16941702. 

GOLD. Five Guinea Piece, Two Guinea Piece, Guinea, and Half 
Guinea. 

On some pieces there is an elephant and castle below the 
bust. 

Weight. Same as last issue of Charles II. 

Five Guinea Piece. Obv., a laurpated bust of the king 1 to 
right, GVLtELMVS III. DEI GRA.; rev., four shields, 
arranged crosswise, edge lettered ; 6 10s. to 7 10s. ; extra 
fine, .8 10s., .9, .9 9s., .10, and <11. 

Two Guinea Piece. Same as Five Guinea Piece, but edge 
milled; .3 to .4; extra fine, .5 5s., 1 2s. 6d., and .9 5s.; 
others, 2 5s., 2 10s., and 2 15s. 

Guinea. Similar to Two Guinea Piece; <1 10s. to 2; 
extra fine, 2 10s., 3 12s., and 4 10s.; others, 1 2s. 
and .1 6s. 

Half Guinea. Similar to Guinea; 1 to 1 10s.; extra 
fine, 1 17s. 6d., 2 6s., and .2 10s. ; others, 12s., 14s., and 
18*. 

A Guinea and Half Guinea, together, realised ^62 and 
2 12s. 

SILVER. Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, Sixpence, and Maundy Four- 
pence, Threepence, Twopence, and Penny. 

Crown. Obv., laureated bust to right. GVLIELMVS III. 
DEI GRA. ; rev., four shields, arranged crosswise ; dated 

1695, 1696, 1697, or 1700; edge lettered; 6s. to 10s.; extra 
fine, 1, 1 2s., 1 15s., and .1 18s. 

Half Crown* Similar to Crown. There is a variety with 
elephant and castle under the bust, and another has a plume in 
each angle of reverse ; dates, 1696, 1G97, 1698, 1699, 1700, and 
1701 ; plain, 3s. 6d. to 6s. ; one, extra fine, .1. 

With elephant and castle, 14s., 1, and 1 14s. 

With plume, 19s., .1 10s., 2 5s., .3 4s., and .3 15s. 

A set, B, C, E, N, Y, and y, 2 10s. ; B, C, E, N, and y, 13s. 

A set, B and E, 1696, and B, C, E, N, and Y, 1697, B 4s. 

A set, B, C, E, N, and Y, with one of Tower Mint added, 
4, 14s. 

A brilliant specimen, Y, .3. 

Shilling. Similar to Crown, but edge milled ; dates, 1695, 

1696, 1697, 1698, 1699, 1700, and 1701 ; 2s. 6d. to 3s. 6d. 

A set, B, C, E, N, Y, and y, 1 4s. and 1 8s. Six 
specimens of country mints, extra fine, 5. 

With plume under bust, 13s., 17s., and <1 10s. 

Sixpence. Similar to the Shilling. Dates, 1695 to 1701, 
inclusive; plain, Is. to 2s. 6d. ; extra fine, 11s. 

With small plume under bust, ,1 16s. 

Country mints, 2s. 6d. to 4s. 6d. 

A set (B, C, E, N, Y, and y), 6a., 8s., 12a., and 15a. 

* HALF CROWNS, SHILLINGS, and SIXPENCES, issued at the country mints, 
have an initial letter under the bust : B (Bristol), C (Chester), E (Exeter), N (Norwich;, 
and Y or y (York). These pieces are rare in fine preservation. 



ENGLISH COINS. 47 

WILLIAM III. CONTINUED. 
SILVEK. Continued. 

A Crown, 1696, and two complete sets of Country Sixpences, 
1696 and 1697, <1 lla. 

Maundy Fourpence, Threepence, Twopence, and Penny. 
Obv., lanreated bust to right, with name; rev., the figure 
4, 3, 2, or 1 crowned; sets, dated 1698, 1699, 1700, and 1701. 
There is a Groat dated 1702. 

The set of four coins, 5s. to 7s. 6d. 
COPPER. Halfpenny and Farthing. 

Halfpenny. Obv., lanreated bust to ri?ht, GVLTELMVS 
TERT1VS ; rev., figure of Britannia, above it the word 
BRITANNIA; dates, 1695 to 1701, inclusive; edge, plain; 
worn specimens, 6d. to Is. 6d. One, dated 1701, extremely 
fine, sold for <! 11s. 

Farthing. Similar to the Halfpenny, and of the same dates. 
Worn specimens, 6d. to Is. 6d. 

A Halfpenny, 1699, very fine, and a Farthing, 1695, sold, 
together, for 17s. 

Anne, 1702 1714. 

GOLD*. Two issues, before the Union and after the Union : Five 
Guinea Piece, Two Guinea Piece, Guinea, and Half Guinea. 

Weight. Same as the last issue of Charles II. 

Five Guinea Piece. Obv., bust to left, the hair filletted, 
ANNA DEI GEATIA ; rev., four shields crosswise. A rose 
in centre of first issue, a star (of the Order of the Garter) in 
centre of second issue; edge inscribed DECVS, &c. ; .7 
to .8. 

Before the Union. Extra fine, .13, .14, .15, and .16; 
others, 5 11s., .6, .6 10s. 

After the Union. Extra fine, 7 12s. 6d., .8 10s., and 
.12 15s. ; others, 5 10s., and .6 15s. 

Two Guinea Piece, second issue only. Like the Five Guinea 
Piece, but edge milled ; .3 to ,4 ; extra fine, 4, 12s., 5, 
5 5s., .6 7s. 6d., and 7 15s. ; others, 2 5s., 2 8s., and 
2 10s. (Fig. 17.) 

Guinea. t Like the Five Guinea piece of both issues, but 
edge milled ; <1 10s. to 2. 

Before the Union. Extra fine, 2 8s., .3 7s., .3 17s., 
.5 7s. 6d., and ,10; others, .1 3s. and 1 5s. 

After the Union. Extra fine, 2 7s. .3, and 3 6s. 

Half Guinea. Similar to the Guinea of both issues ; 15s. 
to .1 5s. 

Before the Union. Extra fine, 1 11s., 2 3s., .3 5s., 
and .4. 

After the Union. Extra fine, 1 9s., .1 lls., 2 Is., and 
.2 14s. 

* All the pieces dated 1703 have VIGO below the bust, the gold from which they were 
coined having been taken from the Spanish galleons captured in Vigo Bay, 1702. 
t On some GUINEAS there is an elephant and castle below the bust. 



48 THE VALUATION* OF BRITISH COINS. 

ANNE. CONTINUED. 

SILVER.* Two issues, before and after the Union : Crown, Half 
Crown, Shilling, Sixpence, and Maundy Fourpence, Three- 
pence, Twopence, and Penny. 

Weight. Same as the last issue of Charles II. 

Crown. Obv., as Fivo Guinea Piece; rev., four shields cross- 
wise, the star of the Garter in centre ; edge inscribed DECVS, 
Ac. ; dates, 1703 VIGO, 1705 plumes, 1706 or 1707 roses and 
plumes; after Union, 1707 and 1708 plain, 1708 plumes, 1713 
roses and plumes; 7s. 6d. to 15s.; extra fine, 17s., ,1 5s., 
1 Us., 1 15s., 2 2s., and .3 5s. 

Half Crown. Like the Crown ; dates, 1703 VIGO, 1703 
plain, 1704 and 1705 plumes, 1706 and 1707 roses and plumes -. 
after Union, 1707, 1708, 1709, and 1713 plain, 1708 plumes, 
1710, 1712, 1713, and 1714 roses and plumes; 3s. 6d. to 6s.; 
extra fine, 8s. 6d., 10s. 6d., 13s. 6d., .1 Is., and .2 6s. 

Shilling. Like the Crown, but edge milled ; dates, 1702 to 
1714, inclusive, except 1706; 2s. to 3s. 6d. ; extra fine, 5s., 
7s., and 8s. 

Sixpence. Like the Shilling; dates, 1703, 1705, 1707, 1708, 
1710, and 1711; 2s. to 4s. 

Sets of Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, and Sixpence, with 
VIGO under bust, lls., 15s., .1 16s., .1 18s., and .4 Is. 

Similar sets, plain under bust, extra fine, plumes on rev., 
3 lls. ; roses and plumes, .3 10s. 

Maundy Fourpence, Threepence, Twopence, and Penny. 
Obv., bust to left, ANNA. DEI GEATIA; rev., the figure 
4, 3, 2, or 1 crowned, with date above. 

Sets, dated 1703, 1705, 1706, 17081710, and 1713, 4s. 
to 6s. 

There ia no penny of 1704, and no Penny or Fonrpence of 
1707. 

COPPEB. Farthing. Several varieties of Halfpence and Farthings 
were struck as patterns. 

Farthing. Obv., bust to left, ANNA DEI GEATIA; rev., 
figure of Britannia, the word BEITANNIA above, the date, 
1714, below ; 15s. to 1 5s. (Fig. 165.) 

George I., 17141727. 

GOLD. Five Guinea Piece, Two Guinea Piece, Guinea, Half Guinea. 
and Quarter Guinea. 

Weight. Same as the last issue of Charles II. 
Five Guinea Piece. Obv., laureated bust to right, 
GEOEGIVS, &c. ; rev., four shields crosswise; edge inscribed 
DECVS, &c. ; 7 to .8; extra fine, .8 10s., 9 10s., 10, 
7s. 6d., and 11 ; others, 5 7s., 5 12s. 6d., and 6 15s. 



* Some pieces, dated 1702 and 1708, have VIGO under the bust. Coins having plumei on 
the rev. were struck from Welsh silver; coins having rotes on rev. were struck from silver 
out of English Mints ; rote* and plumes, alternately, indicate the silver as being English 
and Welsh combined ; E, or E*, is placed below the bust on coins struck in Edinburgh. 



ENGLISH COINS. 49 

GEOKGE I. CONTINUED. 

GOLD. Continued. 

Two Guinea Piece. Similar to the Five Guinea Piece, but 
edge milled; <3 to ,4 ; extra fine, .4 10s., <5 5s., and 
5 10s.; others, 2 5s., 2 8s., and <2 11s. 

Guinea. Similar to Two Guinea Piece; 1 10s. to 2 ; 
extra fine, 2 7s., 2 18s., and .3 3s. 

The Prince Elector Guinea, .1 10s. to 2 12s. 

Half Guinea Similar to the Guinea ; 15s. to ,1 5s. 

Quarter Guinea (32J grains). Similar to the Guinea, but 
dated only 1718 ; 8s. 6d. to 15s. 

A Half and Quarter Guinea, together, sold for 16s., 1 15s., 
and 2 13s. 

A Guinea, Half, and Quarter, together, <3 3s. 

SILVER.* Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, Sixpence, and Manndy Four- 
pence, Threepence, Twopence, and Penny. 

Croi.cn. Obv., lanreated bust to right ; rev., four shields 
crosswise; edge inscribed; dates, 1716,1718, 1720, 1723, and 
1726 ; 12s. to <! ; extra fine, 1 3s. and ,1 15s. (Fig. 76.) 

Half Crown. Like the Crown ; dates, 1715, 1717, 1720, and 
1723 ; 6s. 6d. to 10a. 6d. ; extra fine, 18s. and ,1 4s. 6d. 

Shilling. Like the Crown, but edge milled ; dates, 1715 to 1727, 
inclusive ; Is. 6d. to 3s. 6d. ; extra fine, 6s. 6d. and 12s. 6d. 

With W.C.C. below bust, dates 1723 1726, 4s. to 8s. ; per- 
fect specimens, 1 12s. and 2 5s. 

Sixpence. Like the Crown; dates, 1717, 1720, 1723, and 1726 ; 
Is. 6d. to 3s. 6d. 

Sets : Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, and Sixpence ; extra fine, 
18s., 2 16s., and 2 18s. 

Set: Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, Sixpence, Manndy Half- 
penny, and Farthing (ten pieces), 1 10s. 

Maundy Fourpence, Threepence, Twopence, and Penny. 
Obv., bust ; rev., numeral, crowned. 

Complete sets are dated only 1723 and 1727 ; odd pieces of 
other dates. Sets, 5s. to 6s. 6d. 
COPPER. Halfpenny and Farthing. 

Halfpenny. Obv., laureated bust to right; rev., same as 
Anne's Farthing ; dates, 1717 to 1724, inclusive ; 6d. to 2s. 6d. 

Farthing.- Similar to Halfpenny ; 6d. to Is. 

George II., 17271760. 

GoLD.f Two issues : (First, with young head ; second, with old head). 
Five Guinea Piece, Two Guinea Piece, Guinea, and Half Guinea. 
Weight. Same as last issue of Charles II. 
Five Guinea Piece. Obv., laureated bust to left, 

* The Symbols on certain coins denote the source of the silver from which they were 
struck. S.S.C. stands for South Sea Company; W.C.C. for Welsh Copper Company, as 
also a PLUME and two C's interlinked. PLUMES indicate Welsh silver; ROSES, 
English silver; and ROSES and PLUMES, English and Welsh silver combined. 

t Pieces havin? E.I.C. below the bust were struck from gold of the East India Company 
those with LIMA ,the capital of Peru) were struck from gold captured by privateers. 



60 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

GEORGE II. CONTINUED. 
GOLD. Continued. 

GEOEGIVS II., DEI GEATIA ; rev., Arms in & single shield-, 
edge inscribed DECVS, &c. ; .6 10s. to 7 10s. 

Young head. Extra fine, S and .8 10s. ; others, 5 12s. 6d. 
and 6. 

Old head. Extra fine, .8 10s. and 9 5s. ; others, .5 10s. 
and 5 15s. 

Two Guinea Piece. Similar to the Five Guinea Piece, but 
edge milled ; 2 15s. to 3 15s. ; extra fine, i. (Fig. 18.) 

Guinea. Like the Two Guinea Piece ; .1 10s. to 2 ; extra 
fine, 2 10s. and 2 17s. 6d. 

Half Guiiiea. Like the Guinea; 15s. to 1 5s.; extra fine, 
2 Us.; an exceptional specimen, <7. 

SILVER (Two issues young and old head). Crown, Half Crown, 
Shilling, and Sixpence. 

Maundy money with young head only. 

Weight. Same as last issue of Charles II. 

Crown. Obv., lanreated bust to left; rev., four shields cross- 
wise ; edge inscribed. Dates, young head, Roses and Plumes, 
1732, 1734, 1735, 1736 ; Roses only, 1739 and 1741. Old head, 
Roses, 1743; LIMA, 1746; Plain, 1746, 1750, and 1751. lOa. 
to 15s. (Fig. 77.) 

Half Crown. Similar to the Crown. Dates, young head, Eoses 
and Plumes, 1731, 1732, 1734, 1735, 1736 ; Eoses 1739 and 
1741. Old head, Eoses, 1743, 1745; LIMA, 1745, 1746; Plain, 
1750 and 1751. 3s. 6d. to 6s.; one, extra fine, 13s. 

Shilling. Similar to the Crown, but edge milled. Dates, 
young head, Plumes, 1727, 1731 ; Eoses and Plumes, 1727, 1728, 
1729, 1731, 1732, 1734, 1735, 1736, 1737 ; Plain, 1728; Roses, 
1739 and 1741. Old head, Eoses, 1743, 1745, 1747; LIMA, 

1745, 1746; Plain, 1750, 1751, and 1758. Is. Gd. to 3d. 6d. ; 
one, extra fine, 10s. 

Sixpence. Similar to the Shilling. Dates, young head, Plumes, 
1728; Eoses and Plumes, 1728, 1731, 1732, 1734, 1735, 1736; 
Plain, 1728; Boses, 1739 and 1741. Old head, Eoses, 1743, 1745; 
LIMA, 1745, 1746 ; Plain, 1750, 1751, 1757, and 175S. Is. to 
3s. ; one, extra fine, 6s. 6d. 

Maundy Fourpence, Threepence, Twopence, and Penny. 
Obv., young head to left; rev., the figure 4, 3, 2, or 1 crowned, 
with date. 

Sets, dated 1729, 1731, 1732, 1735, 1737, 1739, 1740, 1743, 

1746, and 1760, 2s. 6d. to 4s. 

A set of three Crowns, three Half Crowns, three Shillings, 
three Sixpences, all different, and two Maundy sets (together, 
twenty pieces), 2 17s. 

Set: Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, and Sixpence; Eoses, old 
head, 2 6s. ; LIMA, .1 10s. 

COPPER (Two issues, with young and old head). Halfpenny and 
Farthing. 

Halfpenny. Obv., laureated bust to left, GEORGIV3 II. 
EEX; rev., the usual figure of Britannia, with the word 



ENGLISH COINS. '51 

GEORGE II. CONTINUED. 

COPPER. Continued, 

BRITANNIA, above, and date below ; dates, young head, 1729 
to 1739, inclusive ; old head, 1740 to 1754; Gd. to 2s. 
Farthing. Similar to the Halfpenny ; 6d. to Is. 

George III., 1*601820. 

GOLD.* Guinea, Half Guinea, Quarter Guinea, One-third Guinea or 
Seven Shilling Piece, Sovereign, and Half Sovereign. 

Guinea (1291 grains). Three issues. 

First issue: Obv., laureated bust to right, GEORGIVS III. 
DEI GRATIA ; rev., Arms in a square garnished shield ; dates, 
1761 to 1786, inclusive ; edge milled; .1 5s. to .1 10s. 

Second issue (the Spade Guinea) : Obv., laureated bust to 
right; rev., Arms in a pointed shield; dates, 17S7 to 1799, 
inclusive ; edge milled ; <1 5s. to .1 10s. 

Third issue : Obv., laureated bust to right ; rev., Arms in a 
plain shield within the Garter ; date, 1813 ; .1 10s. to 2. 

Half Guinea (64f grains). Three issues, corresponding to 
the Guineas. 

First issue : Dates, 1761 to 1786, inclusive ; 12s. 6d. to <1. 

Second issue: Dates, 1787 to 1800, inclusive; 12a. 6d. to .1. 

Third issue: Dates, 1801 to 1813, inclusive; 12s. 6d. to 
17s. 6d. 

Quarter Guinea (32^ grains). Similar to the Guinea of first 
issue; dated 1762 only ; 7s. Gd. to 15a. 

Seven Shilling Piece (43r grains). Two issues. 

First issue : Obv., lanreated bust to right, GEORGIVS III. 
DEI GRATIA; rev., a Crown, surrounded by MAG. BRI. FR. 
ET HIB. REX. and the date ; dates, 1797 to 1800, inclusive; 
Ss. Gd. to 12s. 6d. 

Second issue: Obv., similar to the preceding issue; rev., 
Cro*n, with date below, encircled by BRITANNIARUM REX 
FIDEI DEFEXSOR ; dates, 1801 to 1813, inclusive ; 8s. 6d. 
to 12s. Gd. 

Sovereign (123^ grains). Obv., laureated bust to right, date 
below, GEORGIUS III. D.G. BRITANNIAR. REX F.D.; rev., 
St. George and the Dragon, surrounded by the Garter ; edge 
milled ; dates, 1817, 1818, and 1820 ; ^1 2s. to 1 5s. 

Half Sovereign (61f grains). Obv., bust as on Sovereign, 
GEORGIUS III. DEI GRATIA, date under the bust ; rev., 
shield of Arms crowned ; dates, 1817, 1818, and 1820; 11s. to 
12s. 6d. 

SILVER. Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, Sixpence, Maundy Fourpence, 
Threepence, Twopence, and Penny, and Bank of England Tokens 
for Five Shillings, Three Shillings, and One Shilling and 
Sixpence. 

Croivn (436J grains). Obv., laureated bust to right ; rev., St. 
George and the Dragon ; dates, 1818, 1819, or 1820 ; 7s. 6d. to 15s. 

FIVE GUINEA PIECES, DOUBLE GUINEAS, FIVE POUND PIECES, and 
DOUBLE SOVEKEIGNS were struck as patterns only, not for currency. 

E 2 



52 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH CCIXS. 

GEORGE III. CONTINUED. 

SILVEK. Continued. 

Half Crown (218*- grains). Two varieties. 

First type : Obv., lanreated bust to right, with, bare shoulders ; 
rev., Arms in a garnished shield, surrounded by the Garter ac<3 
Collar of the Order ; dates, 1816 or 1817; 3s. 6d. to 6s. 

Second type : Obv., small bust, without shoulders ; rev., Arms 
in a plain shield surrounded by the Garter, the collar being 
omitted ; dates, 1817 to 1820, inclusive; 3s. 6d. to 6s. 

Shilling. Three varieties. 

First type (92f grains) :* Obv., laureated youthful bust to right ; 
rev., four shields arranged crosswise, star of the Order of the 
Garter in the centre ; date, 1763 ; 5s. to 10s. 

Second type (92jgrains). Obv., laureated older bust to right ; 
rev., four shields crosswise, a crown in the angles ; date, 1787 ; 
2s. 6d. to 3s. 6d. 

Third type (87 grains). Obv., lanreated old head to right ; 
rev., Arms in a garnished shield ; dates, 1816 to 1820, inclusive ; 
2s. to 3s. 

Sixpence. Two varieties. 

First type (46i grains). Similar to the Shilling of 1787, and 
of that date only ; Is. 6d. to 2s. 6d. 

Second type (43J grains). Similar to the Shilling of last 
issue, and dated 1816 to 1820, inclusive ; Is. to 2s. 

Maundu Money. Fourpence, Threepence, Twopence, and 
Penny. Four varieties. 

First type : Obv., like the Shilling of 1763 ; rev., 4, 3, 2, or 1, 
crowned. 

Sets, dated 1763, 1766, 1780, 1784, and 1786 (odd pieces of 
other dates, from 1762 to 1781 inclusive), 2s. 6d. to 3s. 6d. 

Second type: Obv., like the Shilling of 1787; rev., the 
numerals 4, 3, or 2 in written form, on the Penny 1 in printed 
form ; date, 1792 only ; 5s. to 6s. 

Third type : Obv., like the Shilling of 1787 ; rev., the Arabic 
numerals, 4, 3, 2, or 1 ; dates, 1795 and 1800 ; 3s. 6d. to 4s. 6d. 

Fourth type: Obv., like the Shilling of 1816, the date under 
the head ; rev., the figures 4, 3, 2, or 1 ; dates, 1816 to 1820, 
inclusive ; 3s. to 4s. 

Bank of England Tokens. Five Shillings, or Dollar 
(415 grains) : Obv., laureated bust to right ; rev., figure of 
Britannia seated, surrounded by a band inscribed FIVE 
SHILLINGS DOLLAR, the whole encircled by BANK OF 
ENGLAND, 1804 ; 6s. to 10s. (Fig. 78.) 

Three Shillings (227 grains). Two varieties ; 3s. 6d. to 4s. 6d. 

First type : 06 v., laureated bust in armour to right. 
GEORGIUS III. DEI GRATIA REX; rev., within an oak 
wreath, inscription BANK TOKEN 3 SKILL. 1811 (or 1812) 
in four lines. 

* This coin is known as the NORTHUMBERLAND SHILLING, having been struck 
(to the amount of 100 only) for the use of the Earl of Northumberland in Dublin, on his 
appointment as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. 



ENGLISH COINS. 53 

GEOKGE III. CONTINUED. 

SILVER. Continued. 

Second type. Obv., laureated bust, neck bare ; rev., a wreath 
of olive and oak leaves, with similar inscription ; dates, 1812 
to 1816, inclusive. 

One Shilling and Sixpence (113 grains). Two varieties, 
similar to the Three Shilling Pieces ; 2s. to 3s. 6d. 
COPPER. Twopenny Piece, Penny, Halfpenny, Farthing. 

Twopenny Piece (2oz. av.).* Obv., laureated bust to right ; 
rev., figure of Britannia. The rims are raised, the legend and 
date (1797) are in sunk or incuse letters ; Is. to 5s. 

Penny (loz. av.). Similar to the Twopenny; date, 1797; 
Is. to 2s. 6d. 

Penny. Dated 180C or 1807 ; obv., bust to right; rev., 
Britannia; edge milled ; Is. to 2s. 

Halfpenny. Three varieties ; Is. to Is. 6d. each. 

First type: Olv., bust to right in armour; rev., Britannia; 
dates, 1770 to 1775, inclusive. 

Second type : Obv., bust as on the Twopence ; rev., Britannia, 
and date, 1799. 

Third type : Similar to the Penny of 1806 and 1807. 

Farthing. Three varieties ; 6d. to Is. each. 

First type: Similar to first Halfpenny; dates, 1770 to 1775, 
inclusive. 

Second type : Similar to second Halfpenny of 1799. 

Third typo : Similar to third Halfpenny, and dated 1806 
and 1807. 

George IV., 18201830. 

GoLD.f Double Sovereign, Sovereign, and Half Sovereign. 

Double Sovereign (246 % grains). Obv., bust to left, 
GEOEGIUS IIII., &c. ; rev., St. George and the Dragon ; date, 
1823 ; edge inscribed : Z 10s. to 3 10s. 

Sovereign (123 grains). Two varieties ; <! 2s. to ,1 5s. 

First type: Obv., laureated bust to left, GEOEGIUS IIII., 
&c. ; rev., St. George and the Dragon; dates, 1821 to 1825, 
inclusive. 

Second type : Obv., GEOEGIUS IV., bust to left, with date 
(1826 to 1830, inclusive) below it; rev., arms in a garnished 
shield. 

Half Sovereign (61 grains). Three varieties. 

First type:--06u., like first Sovereign; rev., arms in a 
garnished shield, ANNO 1821 ; 15s. to 1. 

Second type: Obv., like the first type ; rev., arms in a plain 
shield, ANNO 1823 (1824 or 1825); 11s. to 12s. 6d. 

Third type : Obv., like second Sovereign ; dates, 1826, 1827, 
and 1838 ; 10s. 6d. to 12s. 

* A broad rim HALFPENNY and FARTHING, like the Twopenny and Penny, were 
struck as patterns, dated 1797 ; also a Farthinjr, with broad rim, dated 1798. 

t Pieces of FIVE SOVEREIGNS and TWO SOVEREIGNS, like the second type 
Sovereign, were struck as patterns. 



54 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

GKOEGE IV. CONTINUED. 

SILVER. Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, Sixpence, and Maundy Four- 
pence, Threepence, Twopence, and Penny. 

Crown (436^- grains). Obv., lanreated bust to left, 
GEORGIUS II1I. D.G., &c. ; rev., St. George and the Dragon ; 
dates, 1821 and 1822 (the Crown, dated 1820, was struck as a 
pattern); 8s. to 15s. 

Half Crown (218* grains). Three varieties. 

First type: Obv., like the Crown ; rev., Arms in a garnished 
shield, rose, shamrock, and thistle, ANNO 1820, 1821, or 1823 ; 
4s. to 6s. 

Second type : Obi\, like the crown ; rev., Arras in a plain shield, 
encircled by the Garter, ANNO 1823 or 1824 ; 4s. to 5s. 

Third type*: Obv., small bust, not laureated, to left, 
GEORGIUS IV., &c. ; dates, 1825, 1826, 1828, or 1829 ; rev., 
arms in a garnished shield, surmounted by a helmet ; 3s. 6d. 
to 4s. 6d. 

Shilling (87 grains). Three varieties. 

First type : Like the first Half Crown, 1821 ; 3s. to 4?. 6d. 

Second typo : Like the eecond Half Crown ; dates, 1823, 
1824, and 1825; 3s. to 4s. 

Third type : Obv., like the third Half Crown ; rev., a lion 
standing upon a crown; dates, 1825, 1826, 1827, and 1829; 
2s. 6d. to 4s. 6d. 

Sixpence (43f grains). Three varieties. 

First type : Like the first Shilling ; date, 1821 ; 4s. to 5s. 

Second type: Like the second Shilling; dates, 1824, 1825, 
and 1826; 2s. 6d. to 3s. 6d. 

Third type: Like the third Shilling; dates, 1826 to 1829, 
inclusive. 2s. 6d. to 5s. 

Maundy Money. Obv., bust similar to the Crown, 
GEORGIUS IIII., &c. ; rev., the figure 4, 3, 2, or 1, crowned; 
dates, 1821 to 1830, inclusive ; 3s. to 4s. 
COFPEB.f Penny, Halfpenny, and Farthing. 

Penny (291 grains). Obv., bust to left ; dated 1825, 1826, 
or 1827 ; rev., Britannia; Is. to 3s. 

Halfpenny (146 grains). Similar; dated, 1825, 1826, or 
1827; 6d. to Is. 

Farthing (73 grains). Two varieties ; 6d. to Is. each. 

First type : Obv., bust like that on the Crown ; rev., 
Britannia; dated, 1821, 1822, 1823, 1825, or 1826. 

Second type: Like the Penny ; dates 1826 to 1830, inclusive. 

William IV., 18301837. 

GOLD. Sovereign and Half Sovereign. (Double Sovereigns were 
struck as patterns.) 

Weight. Same as those of George IV. 

Sovereign. Obv., bust to right, GULIELMUS IIII., &c. ; 

* A CROWN, similar to this Half Crown, was struck as a pattern, 
t A HALF FARTHING (36J grains) and ONE-THIRD FARTHING (24J grains) 
were struck for Colonial use. 



ENGLISH COINS. 55 

WILLIAM IV. CONTINUED. 
GOLD. Continued. 

rev., shield of arms; below, ANNO and dates, 1831 to 1837 
inclusive ; .1 Is. to 1 3a. 

Half Sovereign. Similar to Sovereign ; dates, 1834 to 1839, 
inclusive ; 10s. 6d. to 12s. 6d. # 

SILVER.* Half Crown, Shilling, Sixpence, Groat, and Maundy 
Fourpence, Threepence, Twopence, and Penny. 
Weight. Same as those of George IV. 

Half Crown. Obv., bust to right, name and title ; rev., 
shield of arms on a royal mantle ; dates, 1831, 1834, 1835, and 

1836 ; 3s. 6d. to 5s. 6d. 

Shilling. Obv., similar to Half Crown; rev., the words ONE 
SHILLING in centre of a wreath; dates, 1831 and 1834 to 

1837 inclusive ; Is. 6d. to 2s. 6d. 

Sixpence. Obv., like the Shilling; rev., SIXPENCE within a 
wreath; dates as on Shilling; Is. to 2a. 6d. 

Groat (29 grains). Obv., as Sixpence; rev., figure of 
Britannia seated, FOUR PENCE above, date (1836 or 1837) 
below ; 9d. to Is. 6d. 

Maundy Money. Obv., bust to right, name and title ; rev., 
like that of George IV.' s Maundy money. Sets dated 1831 to 
1837, inclusive, 3s. to 4s. 
COPPER. f Penny, Halfpenny, and Farthing. 

Weight. As those of George IV. 

Penny. Obv., bust to right, GULIELMUS HIT. DEI 
GRATIA, date, below the head, 1831, 1831, 1836, or 1837 ; rev., 
similar to that of George IV. ; Is. 6d. to 3s. 

Halfpenny. Similar to the Penny ; Is. to Is. 6d. 

Farthing. Similar to the Penny ; 6d. to Is. 

Victoria, 1837. 

GOLD. Sovereign and Half-Sovereign. (Five Pound Pieces were 
struck as patterns.) 

Weight. As those of George IV. 

Sovereign. Two varieties. 

First type : Obv., bust to left, the date below, VICTORIA 
DEI GRATIA; rev,, shield of arms, BRITANNIARUM 
REGINA FID: DBF: 

Second type : Obv., bust to left, VICTORIA D : G : BRI- 
TANNIAR : REG : F : D : ; rev., St. George and the Dragon, 
date below. 

Half Sovereign. Similar to the first Sovereign. 

SILVER. Crown, Half Crown, Florin, Shilling, Sixpence, Groat, and 
Maundy Fourpence, Threepence, Twopence, and Penny. (Three 
Halfpenny Pieces were struck for Colonial use.) 

Weight. As those of George IV. 

Crown.* Obv., bust to left, the date below, VICTORIA DEI 

* CROWNS, dated 1831 and 1834, were struck as patterns only. Pieces of the value 
of THREE HALFPENCE were struck for Colonial circulation, 

t A HALF FARTHING and ONE-THIRD FARTHING were struck for Colonial use 
J A CROWN (like the Florin) was struck, as a pattern, in 1810, 1817, and 1853. 



vtvv 



56 THE VALUATION OF BBITISH COINS. 

VICTORIA. CONTINUED. 

SILVER. Continued. 

GRATIA ; rev., shield of Arms, BRITANNIARTJM, &c. ; edge 
inscribed; dates, 1844, 1845, 1846, 1847, and 1851 ; 7s. to 10s. 

Half Crown. Similar to the Crown ; edge milled ; dates, 
1839 to 1851, inclusive, 1862, 1864, and 1874 and subsequent 
years ; early dates, 3s. to 4s. 

Florin (174| grains). Two varieties. 

First type (the graceless florin) : Obv., crowned bust to left, 
VICTORIA REGINA, 1849 ; rev., four shields arranged cross- 
wise, ONE FLORIN, ONE TENTH OF A POUND; date 
1849 only ; 3s. to 4s. 

Second type : Bust as on first type, legend in old English 
characters, Victoria d : g : Brit : reg : f : d : and the date, in 
letters, mdcccli. ; dates 1851 and subsequent years. 

Shilling. Obv., bust as on the Half Crown, name and titles ; 
rev., ONE SHILLING within a wreath; dates, 1838 and 
following years ; early dates, Is. 6d. to 2s. 

Sixpence. Like the Shilling, except the word SIXPENCE on 
rev. ; dates, as on the Shilling ; early dates, Is. to Is. 6d. 

Groat. Obv., bust as on the Shilling: rev., like the Groat of 
Wm. IV.; dates, 1838 to 1851, and 1853 to 1856 inclusive; 
9d. to Is. 6d. 

Maundy Money. Obv., like the Groat ; rev., the figures, 
4, 3, 2, or 1 ; dates, 1838 and following years; 2s. 6d. to 3s. 6d. 

The Threepenny Piece has been issued in largo numbers aa 
ordinary currency. 
COPPER. Penny, Halfpenny, Farthing, and Half Farthing.* 

Weight. As those of George IV. 

Penny. Obv., bust to left, date below, VICTORIA DEI 
GRATIA; rev., figure of Britannia; dates, 1841, 1843 to 1849, 
1851 to 1859, inclusive ; 6d. to 2s. 

Halfpenny. Similar to the Penny; dates, 1S38, 1839, 1841, 
1843 to 1848, 1851 to 1860, inclusive; 6d. to Is. 

Farthing. Similar to Halfpenny; dates, 1S38 to I860, 
inclusive ; 6d. to Is. 

Half Farthing. Obv., bust; rev., the words HALF FAR- 
THING in two lines, a crown above and date beneath ; 6d. 
BRONZE. Penny, Halfpenny, and Farthing. (A One-third Farthing 
was struck for Colonial use.) 

Penny. -Obv., Laureated bust to left, VICTORIA D. G. 
BRITT. REG. F.D. ; rev., figure of Britannia, ONE PENNY 
above, date below ; dates, 1860 and subsequent years. 

Halfpenny. Like the Penny, but HALF PENNY on rev. ; 
dates as on Penny. 

Farthing. Like the Halfpenny, but FARTHING on rev.; 
dates as on Penny. 



* Pieces of ONE-THIRD OF A FARTHING and A QUARTER FARTHINU 

(18J grains) were struck for Colonial use. 



SCOTTISH COINS. 



AUTHORITIES differ as to the date of the earliest coinage of Scotland. 
Until the year 956 a large portion of the south of Scotland formed part 
of the Saxon Kingdom of Northumberland, whilst the western shores 
and the islands were governed by the Kings of Man and Norway. Some 
numismatists consider there is no reason to suppose that a Scottish 
coinage existed previous to the reign of David I., while others have 
appropriated coins to some of his predecessors. 

The earliest coins connected with Scotland are stated to be three Silver 
Pennies (of the Crux type of Ethelred II., 9781016), which have been 
attributed to Kings of the Hebrides, in the eleventh century. 

KINGS OF THE HEBRIDES. 

Sueno (supposed to be the father of Canute). 

SILVER, Penny (31 grains). Obv., rude head to left, with sceptre 
surmounted by three pearls, the legend being + EDEL REX, 
&c. ; rev., a short double cross in an inner circle, with the letters 
C E V + retrograde in the angles, surrounded by the inscrip- 
tion SVENO, &c. Sold for <! 9s. in 1867, and for 13s. in 
1875. 

Anegmund (probably intended for Ingfemund). 

SILVER, Penny (21| grains). Obv., ANEGMD, &c. ; rev., the moneyer's 
name and place of mintage. (See Fig. 81.) Sold for \ Is. in 
1867. 

Soinerled. 

SILVER, Penny (21 grains). Same type, with king's name on obv. 
Sold for 15s. in 1867, and for 17s. in 1875. 

KINGS OF SCOTLAND. 
Malcolm III., 1056. 

SILVER, Penny (23 grains). Obv., king's head full face, with crown 
fleury, a sceptre at each side, one sceptre having a cross at the 
top and the other a fleur-de-lis ; inscription + MA .... REX ; 
rev., a cross fleury, having a large pellet and a rose of annulets 
in the alternate angles. (See Fig. 82.) Unique. Sold for 7 10s. 
in 1859, and for ,27 in 1880. 



58 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

Donald VIII., 1093. 

A Silver Penny has been attributed to this king, but without any degree 
of certainty. Obv., a head with crown fleury to left, with 
sceptre, similar to the first coinage of William the Lion ; rev., a 
short cross with a large annulet and three dots in each angle, 
the legend being unintelligible. 

Alexander I., 1107. 

It is a matter of controversy whether any coins are known of this king, 
those formerly assigned to him being either blundered coins of 
David I. and William the Lion, or the short double-cross pennies 
of Alexander II. 

David I., 11241153. 

SILVER, Pennies (from 20 to 23 grains). Struck at Berwick and 
Roxburgh. 

Authentic Pennies of David I. are rare. They are well exe- 
cuted, the king's name and title being correctly given on the 
oby., and the name of the moneyer and mint in legible letters 
on the rev. Much more numerous are the rudely -executed coins 
of a similar type but with blundered legends, which some 
numismatists assign to the predecessors of David I., while 
others consider them to have been struck in imitation of the 
coins issued by that monarch. 

Penny. Obv., king's head to right with crown fleury, and 
sceptre, legend DA VI . . . . ; rev., cross fleury with a pellet in 
each angle, surrounded by the inscription + HVGO ON EOCH 
( = Hugo of Eoxburgh). (See Fig. 83.) 

Pennies struck at Roxburgh have sold for 13s., .1 15s., .10, 
and 10 10a.; others of uncertain mints for 3s., 4s , <1 8s., 
and 2. 

A Penny (unpublished) o&v., proSle to right with sceptre, 
+ DAVID. REX. ; and rev., a plain cross within a tressure of 
eight curves, a fleur-de-lia in each angle realised ,6 2s. 6d. 
in 1859, and .22 in 1880. 

Henry, Prince of Scotland (son of David I., created by Stephen, 

Earl of Northumberland). 

SILVER, Pennies (from 22 to 24 grains). Struck at Bamborough, or, 
according to some numismatists, at Berwick and Carlisle. 
(See Fig. 84.) 

Specimens have sold for 18*., 4, 5 12s. 6d., 7 7s., and 
26 10s. 

A Penny of David I. and one of Henry, Earl of Northumber- 
land, sold together for <3 2a., and a similar lot for .3 16s. 

Malcolm IV., 1153. 

A Penny, in type like those of David I., has been attributed to this 
king, but the correctness of this is disputed. It realised 1 7s. 
in 1867. 



SCOTTISH COINS. 59" 

William the Lion, 1165 1214. 

SILVER, Pennies (from 22 to 24 grains). Three issues. 

First issue. Struck at Berwick, Edinburgh, Perth, and Rox- 
burgh. 

Obv., + LE EEI WILAM, the king's head, with crown 
fleury, to left, with sceptre; rev., a single cro?s with a 
crescent and pellet in each angle, surrounded by the name of 
the moneyer and mint. (See Fig. 85.) 

Second issue. Struck at Edinburgh, Perth, and Roxburgh. 

Obv., king's head, crowned with pearls, to left, with sceptre ; 
rev., a short double cross, with a star in each angle, surrounded 
by name of moneyer and mint. (See Fig. 87). 

Third issue. Struck at Roxburgh only. Similar to the 
second issue, except that the king's head is turned to the right. 

A specimen (unique ?) of this issue, without the sceptre, sold 
for .10 10s. in 1875. 

The coins of the second issue are far more numerous than 
those of the first, while those of the third issue are very rare. 

There is, in the British Museum, a unique Penny ; obv., 
+ WILELMVS ; rev., a short single cross with a fleur-de-lis in 
each angle and legend + FOLPOLD . ON . RO. (= Roxburgh). 
(See Fig. 86.) It is doubtful whether this coin preceded the first 
coinage, or was struck between the first and second coinages. 

Another unique coin rev., a short cross potent (as Fig. 86) 
with five pellets in each of the angles realised =10 10s. in 1875. 

First issue. Four, varied, sold (1854) for 7s., and five for 9s. ; 
nine, varied (1875), .5 ; ten, ,5; and seven, ,2 12s. 

Second issue. Ten, varied (,1854), 12s. In 1875, two (unique) 
sold for ,5 ; nine, varied, ,6 ; and nine others =7 5s. 

Third issue. Nine, different (1854), 10s. In 1875 a Rox- 
burgh Penny, fine, realised 1 2s. ; and two Pennies, without 
place of mintage, .4 4s. 

Two Pennies of David I., and three, varied, of William the 
Lion, sold together (1859) for =3 2s. 

Six Pennies, varied, of William the Lion, sold together (1864) 
for 12s., and a like number for 19s. 

Alexander II., 1214-1249. 

SILVER, Pennies (about 21 grains). Struck at Roxburgh only. 

The rev. is like that of the second and third issues of William 
the Lion, but there are at least five varieties of obv. : 

1. Bare head to left, without sceptre (Fig. 88) ; 

2. Bare head to left, with sceptre ; 

3. Bare head to right, with sceptre ; 

4. Crowned head to right, with sceptre (Fig. 89) ; and 

5. Crowned head to left, with sceptre. 

The workmanship of these coins is bold, but the letters are 
generally ill formed, and the legend difficult to read. They 
are very rare. 

Fig. 88. Obv., -f ALEXSANDEREX ; rev., + ALAIN. 
ANNDRV. OF RO. 



60 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

ALEXANDER IT. CONTINUED. 

SILVER. Continued. 

Fig. 89. Obv., -f ALEXSANDER REX; rev., + ANDRV 
. . . CA . . . O. 

Specimens have realised 6 6s., 6 8s. 6d., .10 Wa., and 
.11 5s. 

Two, sold together (1859) for 5 5s., realised .16 in 1880. 

A poor specimen sold (1864) for 1 2s. only. 

Alexander III., 12491292. 

SILVER. Four coinages. 

First coinage. Pennies only (20 to 22 grains). Struck 
at Berwick, Glasgow, Lanark, Markinch (?) and Perth. 

Obv., bare head to right, with sceptre, ALEXANNDER 
REX ; rev., long double cross, a star of 6 points in each 
angle. (See Fig. 90.) 

In 1867, two Pennies sold together for .1 10s. 

In 1875, a Penny of Aberdeen realised .6 15s. ; one of 
Berwick, 5 10s. ; one of Lanark, 4- 4s. ; and one of Perth, 
.4. 

Second coinage. Pennies only (20 to 22 grains). Struck 
at Aberdeen, Perth, and Roxburgh. 

Obv., crowned head to right, with sceptre, ALEXANDER 
REX; rev., long double cross, as before, R . . . NALD ON 
ABE. (See Fig. 91.) 

In 1875, two Pennies (Aberdeen and Berwick) sold for 
1 3a. ; two Pennies (Aberdeen and Perth), 3 3s. ; and two 
(Edinburgh and Perth) for 7 5s. 

Third coinage. Pennies only (18 to 25 grains). Struck at 
Aberdeen, Berwick, Dunbar, Dundee, Edinburgh, Forres, 
Glasgow, Inverness, Lanark, Markinch, Montrose, Perth, Rox- 
burgh, St. Andrew's, and Stirling. 

Obv., crowned head to left, with sceptre ; rev., as before. 

In 1875, a Penny of Aberdeen sold for .3 ; one of St. 
Andrew's (or Annan ?), .10 5s. ; one of Dundee, 5 5s. ; one 
of Glasgow, 10 5s., another 10 10s. ; one of Inverness, 
.21 ; one of Montrose, 5 15s. ; one of Stirling, 4; four, of 
Dunbar, Perth, and Roxburgh, 3 5a. ; two (Aberdeen and 
Berwick). 1 3a. ; and three (Berwick and Roxburgh), 14s. 

In 1854, three Pennies (one of each coinage) sold together 
for 63. ; six Pennies, varied, for 5s. ; and another lot of seven 
Pennies realised 4s. 6d. 

In 1864, seven Pennies sold for 9s., and in 1879 two (Edin- 
burgh and Perth) realised .12 5s. 

Fourth coinage. Penny, Halfpenny,* and Farthing of very 
neat workmanship, having on the rev. a long single cross. 

There are no names of moneyera or mints on the long single- 
cross coins. The Pennies differ from each other chiefly in tho 

* HALFPENNIES and FARTHINGS were first coined In Scotland by Alexander III., 
apparently about the same date as that on which they were introduced into England. 
i.e., about 1279. 



SCOTTISH COINS. 61 

ALEXANDER III. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

number of points contained in the mullets* or stars on the 
rev. Beginning with four mullets of 5 points each 20 points, 
next three mullets of 5 points each and one of 6 points =: 
21 points, and so on ; the number of points increases by one 
until the maximum of 28 points is reached, by four stars of 
7 points each. 

Penny (20 to 22 grains). 

Obv., the king's head crowned to left, with sceptre, sur- 
rounded by ALEXANDER (sometimes ALEX3ANDEE) DEI 
GEpA, or GEAC, or GCIA ; rev., a long single cross, having a 
mullet or star in each angle, and EEX SCOTOEVM + (see 
Fig. 92), or, on some coins, ESCOSSIE EEX. 

Ordinary specimens are worth from Is. to 2s. each. 

In 1854, six sold for 4s., sixteen for 9s., and seventeen for 8s. 

In 1864, four Pennies and a Halfpenny sold for 8s., and four 
Pennies (one ESCOSSIE EEX) realised 8s. 

In 1875, eight Pennies, all different, sold for 1 ; three 
Pennies (one EEX ESCOSSIE, one DEI GEAC) sold for 
1 2s. ; a Penny, with two stars and two mullets each of 6- 
points, realised 1 Is. ; and a Penny, EEX ESCOSSIE, 
extremely fine, sold for .3 17s. Gd. 

Halfpenny (10 to 11 grains). 

Obv., like the Penny ; rev., EEX SCOTOEVM, usually with 
mullets of 6 points in two of the angles of the cross, the- 
other angles plain. Sometimes there is a star of 6 points in 
one angle, and a mullet of G points in the opposite angle. 

Farthing (5 to 5 grains). 

Obv., head as on the Penny, ALEXANDER EEX; rev., 
SCOTOEVM, with mullets of 6 points in all the angles of the 
cross. 

A variety, referred to below, is stated to have on obv. 
ALEXANDER DEI GEA, and on rev. SCOTTOEVM EEX. 

In 1854, a Halfpenny and three Farthings sold for 13s. 

In 1859, four Pennies (one ESCOSSIE REX), a Halfpenny, 
and a Farthing, sold for 1 2s., and the same coins, without 
the Farthing, but with an additional Penny, realised ,8 in 18SO. 

In 1861, a penny (ESCOSSIE EEX), a Halfpenny, and three 
Farthings, sold for 1 2s. 

In 1864, two Farthings, one (unpublished) having SCOT- 
TORVM EEX on rev., sold for 11s., and another Farthing 
realised 17s. Four Pennies and a Halfpenny sold together 
for 8s. 

In 1875, a Halfpenny sold for <4, and a Farthing for .20 10s. 

John Baliol, 12921304. 

SILVER. Penny and Halfpenny. No Farthings are known of this 



* The difference between MULLETS and STARS is, that the former are pierced or 
open in the centre. Stars are shown on the rev. of Fig. yi, and mullets on the rev. of 
V'g. U2. Stars are sometimes termed close mullets. 



62 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COIXS. 

JOHN BALIOL. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

Penny (about 22 grains). Similar in tjpe to the last coinage 
of Alexander III. 

Obv., IOHANNES . DEI . GRA; rev., REX SCOTORVM + 
(see Fig. 93). Some varieties have CIVITAS SANDRE ( =: 
St. Andrew's) on rev. ; and some have on obv. I . DI . GRA . 
SCOTORVM . RX, with CIVITAS SANDRE on rev. 

Ordinary specimens are worth from 4s. to 10s. each. 

In 1854, seven sold for 15s., two (like those last described) 
for 83., and two Pennies and a Halfpenny sold for 15s. 

Halfpenny (about 9 grains). Like the Penny. (See Pig. 94.) 

A variety has a mullet in each angle of the cross. 

In 1859, two Pennies and two Halfpennies (both varieties) 
sold for 17a. 

In 1864, four Pennies and a Halfpenny realised <! 3s. 

In 1875, five Pennies (REX SCOTORVM), varied, sold for 
.4 15s. ; and three Pennies (St. Andrew's) and a Halfpenny 
realised Q. 

Robert Bruce, 13061329. 

SILVER. Penny, Halfpenny, and Farthing. 

Penny (19 to 21 grains). 

Obv., ROBERTVS DEI GRA ; rev., SCOTORVM REX. 
(See Fig. 95). 

Halfpenny (9 grains). Same type ; very rare. 

Farthing (5 grains). Same type ; extremely rare. 

In 1854, five Pennies and a Farthing, very fine, sold for 16.-'. 

In 1859, a Penny, Halfpenny, and Farthing realised only 16s. 

In 1867, three Pennies and two Halfpennies sold for 2 Is. 

In 1875, two Pennies sold for .2 2s. ; a Halfpenny for .9 ; 
and a Farthing realised .42. 

David II., 1329-1371. 

GOLD. Noble. 

Noble. This is the earliest Scottish gold coin, and apparently 
struck in imitation of the contemporary English Nobles. 

Obv., the king in a ship, DAVID . DEI . GRA . REX . 
SCOTORVM ; rev., IHC . AVTEM . TRANCIENS . P . 
MEDIVM . ILLORVM . IBAT., cross fleury, within a double 
treasure of eight curves, a lion and crown in each angle. 

Three specimens only are known, all slightly different. One 
is in the British Museum, and two in private collections. 

One, for which Mr. Martin gave ^675, sold, in 1859, for 4il, 
and again, in 1880, for ,31. 
SILVER. Groat, Half Groat, Penny, Halfpenny, and Farthing. 

The earliest issue comprised the Penny, Halfpenny, and 
Farthing, having REX SCOTTORVM on rev. 

The subsequent issues, with the name of the mint (Aberdeen 
or Edinburgh) on rev., are considered by some numismatists to 
constitute two separate coinages distinguished by the size of 
the head on obv., the small head pieces having preceded those 



SCOTTISH COINS. 63 

DAVID II. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

with the large head. But this view is opposed on the ground 
that the weights of these coins indicate that their issue mast 
have been contemporaneous. 

Groat (72 and 61 grains). 

Obv., DAVID . DE[ . GEA . EEX . SCOTOEVM, king's 
head crowned to left, with sceptre, in a treasure of 6 or 7 
points ; rev., long single cross, with mullets of 5 points in the 
angles; in the outer circle, + DNS . PTECTOE . MS + 
LIBATOE MS, ( Dominus Protector Meus, Liberator Meus), 
and. in the inner circle, VILLA ABEEDON, or VILLA 
EDINBVEGH. 

Ordinary specimens, 3s. 6d. to 5s. 6d. 

A very fine Groat, Aberdeen mint, sold for 2 2s. 

Half Groat (36 and 30 grains). 

Obv., as on Groat; rev., + DNS . PEOTECTOE . MEVS, in 
outer circle; and VILLA ABEEDON, or EDINBVEGH, in 
inner circle. (See Fig. 96.) 

Ordinary specimens, 3s. 6d. to 5s. 6d. 

Penny (14 to 16 grains). 

Early issue. Obv., DAVID . DEI . GRACIA, crowned head 
to left, with sceptre (sometimes with only the head of the 
sceptre); rev., EEX . SCOTORVM + (or SCOTTOEVM), 
mullets of 6 points in the angles of the cross. (See Fig. 97.) 
2s. 6d. to 4s. 6d. 

Penny. Later issue. Obv., similar head, with sceptre, 
DAVID . DEI . GEA . E . SCOTOE., or DAVID . DEI . GEA . 
EEX . SC., or DAVID . EEX . SCOTOEVM; rev., VILLA 
ABEEDON, or VILLA EDINBVEGH, mullets of 5 points in 
the angles of the cross. 

Ordinary specimens, 2s. 6d. to 4s. 6d. 

Half penny. ^'Ka.rly issue. Obv., as early Penny ; rev., EEX . 
SCOTOEVM (or SCOTTOEVM), mullets of 5 points in two 
angles, and three pellets in the other angles of the cross. 

A specimen, described as being extremely fine and rare to 
excess, sold for .35 in 1875. 

Halfpenny. Later issue. Obv., as before ; rev., VILLA 
EDINBVEGH, mullets of 5 points in two angles, the other 
angles plain. 

Farthing (5 grains). Obv., DAVID . DEI . GEACIA, like 
early issue Penny; rev., EEX . SCOTOEVM, mullets of 5 
points in the angles of the cross. Extremely rare. 

Farthing (5 grains). A singular variety (unique?) has, on 
obv., + MONETA . EEGIS . D., and on rev., + AVID . 
SCOTTOE. 

Sold, in 1859, for .1 ; and again, in 1880, together with a 
Groat and Half Groat of Edinburgh, for .22. 

Coins of the various issues have realised the following prices : 
ABERDEEN mint : 

Groat and Half Groat, 4->. and 11 5s. 

Groat, Half Groat, and Penny, lls. and Q 6s. 



64 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

DAVID II. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

EDINBURGH mint : 

Groat, Half Groat, and Penny, 5a., 6s., 2, and 2 IGa. 
Half Groat and Penny, with a Penny of first issue, 5s. 
Groat, Half Groat, Penny, and Halfpenny, 2 5s. 
A lot, consisting of an Aberdeen and Edinburgh Groat, a 
Half Groat of Edinburgh, a Penny (first issue), a Penny of Edin- 
burgh, and a Halfpenny, realised 1 Is. 

A set, consisting of Groat, Half Groat, and Penny of 
Aberdeen, and Groat, Half Groat, and Penny, of Edinburgh, 
sold together for .3. 

Robert II., 1371 139O. 

GOLD. St. Andrew and Lion. 

St. Andrew (about 38 grains). 

Obv., x EOBEETVS : DEI GEACIA EEX SCOT., sur- 
rounding a shield containing the arms of Scotland, crowned; 
rev., + DNS . PTECTOE . MS . + . LBEEAT., the figure of 
St. Andrew, with his arms extended, between two fleurs-de-lis. 
(See Fig. 21.) 

Specimens have realised, at various times, 12s., <! 5s. Cd., 
1 12s., and .5 5s. 

Lion (from 19 to 33 grains). 

Obv., + EOBEETVS . DEI . G . EEX . SCOTO, arms of 
Scotland on a shield, not crowned ; rev., XPC* . EEGNAT . 
XPC . VINCT (or VINCIT), St. Andrew's cross, extending 
to the edge, between fleurs-de-lis and trefoils in opposite 
angles. The contractions of the legends on obv. and rev. 
vary somewhat in different specimens. 

Specimens have sold for 7s. 6d., <1, 2, 3 4s., .3 13s. 6d., 
.5 5s., and .8 10s. 

A Lion and St. Andrew, sold for <! 16s. in 1S54, realised 
.5 10s. in 1880. 

Two Lions and a St. Andrew, <4 15s. 
SILVER. Groat, Half Groat, Penny, and Halfpenny. 

Groats (60 to 50 grainsf). Struck at Dundee, Perth, and 
Edinburgh. 

Obv., EOBEETVS . DEI . GEA . EEX . SCOTTOEVM, 
surrounding a treasure of 6 points with trefoils in the external 
angles ; the king's head, crowned, to left, with sceptre, the 
letter B behind the head ; on some coins the B is omitted ; 
rev., + DNS . PTECTOE . MS. + LIBATOE . MS. in outer 
circle, and + VILLA x DVNDE in inner circle, a mullet of 5 
points in each angle. . (See Fig. 98.) 

Ordinary specimens, 3s. 6d. to 5s. 6d. 

* XPC. is a contraction of XPICTOC = ~S.fior'c;. 

t In 1373, fonrpence Scotch was equivalent to threepence English, and, in 1?82, Scottish 
money was still further reduced in weight, and was received in England as bullion only. 

I On a Half Groat of Dundee and on one of Edinburgh the treasure has 7 points; on the 
other Groats and Half Groats of Robert III the treasure has 6 points. 

i For BONAGIUS, the moneyer, a Florentine employed iu the Scottish mint. 



SCOTTISH COIXS. 65 

EGBERT II. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

Half Groats (30 to 23 grains). Struck at Dundee, Edinbvrgh 
and Perth. 

Obv., as the Groat; rev., usually + DNS . PROTECTOR . 
MEVS in outer circle, and + VILLA DVNDE (or EDIN- 
BVRGH, or DE PERTH) in inner cir<^~ 

Ordinary specimens, 3s. 6d. to 5s. 6d. 

Penny (16 to 14 grains). Struck at Dundee, Edinburgh, and 
Perth. 

Obv., + ROBERT VS . REX . SCOTOR., surrounding crowned 
head to left, with sceptre; rev., x VILLA x DVNDE (or 
EDINBVRG, or DE PERTH), a mullet of 5 points in each 
angle of the cross. 

Two Pennies and a Halfpenny of Edinburgh, and a Penny of 
Perth, ,2 2s. A Penny and Halfpenny, Edinburgh, lla. 

Halfpenny (7 to oi grains). Struck at Edinburgh and Box- 
burgh. 

Obv., + ROBERT VS . REX., head as before ; rev., like the Penny. 

Two Halfpennies, Edinburgh, ,1 2s. One, extra fine, 2 4s. 

A Groat, Half Groat, and Penny, all of Dundee mint, .1 5s. ; 
a similar set, of Perth, 4s. 6d., J61 lls., and 2 6s. ; another 
set of Perth, with a Groat of Edinburgh, 12s. 

A Groat and Half Groafc, both of Dundee, 30 10s. 

A Groat, Penny, and two Halfpennies, Edinburgh, 10s. 

A Groat, two Half Groats, Penny, and Halfpenny, Edinburgh, 
.3 5s. 

A Groat, Half Groat, Penny, and Halfpenny, Edinburgh, 13s. 

A Groat of Dundee, two Pennies of Perth, and two Half- 
pennies of Edinburgh, tis. 

A Groat and two Half Groats of Perth, two Pennies and three 
Halfpennies of Edinburgh, 14s. 

Groats of Dundee, Edinburgh, and Perth, Half Groats, Edin- 
burgh and Perth, a Penny and Halfpenny of Edinburgh, 2 18s. 

A Groat of Dundee and Perth, 9s., and, extra fine, 4- 4s. 

A Groat and two Half Groats of Perth, and a Penny and 
Halfpenny of Edinburgh, <3 6s. 

Robert III., 139O 14O5. 

GOLD. St. Andrew and Half St. Andrew. 

St. Andreiv (59i- to 61 grains). 

Obv.. arms of Scotland, crowned, surrounded by + RO- 
BERTVS . DEt . GRACIA . REX . 
- SCOTTORV.; rev., St. Andrew extended 
on his cross (reaching only to the inner 
circle), between two fleurs-de-lis, encir- 
cled by + XPC . REGNAT . XPC . VIN- 
CIT . XPC . IMPERAT. (See Fig. 22.) 

Another variety has the cross on rev. 
reaching to the edge of the coin, with 
the legend XPC . REGNAT . XPC . 
VINCT . XPC . IMP. (See figure in 
margin.) 




66 



THE VALUATION OF BKITIS1I COINS. 



BOBERT III. CONTINUED. 
GOLD. Continued. 

Specimens have sold for 17s., .1 la., 1 10s., 2 7s. 6d., 
2 12s. Gd., .3, .6 15s., and 9 9s. 
Half St. Andrew (about 33 grains). 

Obv., arms of Scotland, crowned, legend + BOBEETVS . DEI . 

GEA . EEX . SCOTOE. ; rev., + XPC . EEGNAT . XPC . 

VINCIT . XPC . IM., St. Andrew, with arms extended, between 

two fleurs-de-lis, his arms and feet extending 1 beyond inner circle. 

A specimen, sold, in 1854, for 12s., realised. .8 10s. in 1880. 

A variety, described as nnique, <31 ; and another, also 

unique, .50. 

A St. Andrew and Half St. Andrew, together, sold for .1 3s. 
and .5. 
SILVER. Groat, Half Groat, Penny, and Halfpenny. 

Groat (40 to 46 grains). Struck at- Aberdeen, Dumbarton, 
Edinburgh, Glasgow, Perth, and Eoxburgh. 

Obv., full-faced bust, crowned, in a treasure, 
surrounded by + EOBEETVS DEI GEA 
EEX SCOTOE. (see Fig. 99); rev., long 
single cross extending to edge, in outer circle 
-f DNS . PTECTOE . MS. + LIBATOE . 
MS., in inner circle VILLA EDINBVEGH (or 
other place of mintage), and 3 pellets in each 
angle of the cross. (See figure in margin.) 

The lesends vary somewhat in other speci- 
mens. The figure of the Glasgow Groat (given 
by Lindsay) shows the King's bust, in profile 
to the left, crowned, a sceptre in front and B 
Leliiud the head. Its authenticity is doubted. 
Ordinary specimens, 4s. to 6s. 

Groat, Aberdeen, 18s., .2 7s. 6d., .3 3s., 4, and .4 15a. 
Groat, Dumbarton, .6 2s. 6d. 

Groat, Edinburgh, 2a. 6d.. 3a., 5s., 8s., 11s., and .1 4s. 
Groat, Perth, 2s 6d. to 12s. 
Groat, Eoxhnrgh, .6 2s. 6d. 

Half Groat (19 to 22 grains). Struck at Aberdeen, Edinburgh, 
and Perth. Similar to the Groat. 
Ordinary specimens, 4s. 6d. to 6s. 6d. 

Penny (about 10 grains). Struck at Aberdeen, Edinburgh, 
and Perth. 

Obv., King's head, full-faced, crowned, surrounded by + EO- 
BEETVS . DEI . GEA.; rev., EEX . SCOTOBVM, cross 
with 3 pellets in each angle. 

A specimen, described as unique, 12s. 

Another type has on obv., + EOBEETVS . DEI . G . . . . X 
(o,- + EOBEETVS . EEX . SCOTOE); and, on rev., name of 
mint, as VILLA . EDINBVEGH. 

A fine specimen, 12s. ; one of Aberdeen, .1 12s. ; one of 
Edinburgh, .1 13s. 

Halfpenny (5 to 6 grains). Struck at Edinburgh and Perth. 
Of similar types to the Penny. 




SCOTTISH COINS. 67 

ROBERT III. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Con* inued. 

First type, with BEX . SCOTORVM on rev. 

Second type, with place of mintage, as VILLA . DE . PERTH, 
on rev. 

A specimen of Edinburgh, 2 2s., and one of Perth, ,26. 

A Groat, Half Groat, Penny, and Halfpenny, of Edinburgh, 
sold for 12s. in 1859, realised (with the addition of a Penny 
which cost 12s.) .8 8s. in 1880. 

A Groat, Half Groat, and Halfpenny, of Edinburgh, 11s. 

A similar set, of Perth, .1 11s. 
BILLON. Penny. 

Penny (about 10 grains). Struck at Aberdeen, Edinburgh, 
and Inverness. 

Obv., King's head, full-faced, crowned, with name and title ; 
rev., cross and pellets, with place of mintage, as VILLA . 
DE . EDINBVRG, or VILLA . INNERNIS. 

A variety is described as having 1 on obv., ROBERT VS . . El . 
REX . SCO., and on rev., ROB . DEI . GRA . REX. 

A specimen of Aberdeen, one of Edinburgh, and a Half- 
penny (?), 2 5s. 

A Penny of Inverness, 3 3s. 

James I., 14061438. 

GOLD. St. Andrew, Half St. Andrew, Lion, and Half Lion. 

St. Andrew (53 to 54 grains). Of similar type to that of 
Robert III., but with fleurs-de-lis in the field on both obu. and 
rev. ; the fleurs-de-lis on the reverse crowned. 

Obv., IACOBVS . DEI . GRA . REX . SCOTTORVM, the 
arms of Scotland crowned between two fleurs-de-lis ; rev., XPC . 
REGNAT . XPC . VINCIT . XP., St. Andrew, with nimbus 
on his head, extended on a cross which reaches to the edge 
of the coin, a fleur-de-lis crowned on each side of the Saint. 

Specimens have sold for 16s., 17s., 1, 2 7s. 6d., 2 17s., 
.11 5s., .13 13s., and ,28. One, very fine, sold for .15 in 1883. 

Half St. Andrew (26j grains). Differs from that of Robert 
III. in having the Saint extended on a cross, between two 
crowns. 

Olv., IACOBVS . D . GRA . REX . SCOTOR., arms of 
Scotland without crown; rev., legend as on the St. Andrew, 
a crown on each side of the Saint. 

Specimens have sold for 13s., .6, and ,26. 

Lion (50 to 53 grains). See Fig. 23. 

Obv., IACOBVS . DEI . GRACIA . REX . SCO., the arms 
of Scotland in a lozenge shield, a large crown above, fleurs-de- 
lis between some of the words ; rev., ni.m. a plain cross between 
two fleurs-de-lis, SALVVM . FAC . POPVLVM . TVVM., a 
St. Andrew's cross in centre of an ornament (termed an 
orle of six crescents) having flenrs-de-lis at the points, with 
a rose between. 

Specimens have realised 14s., los., 1 10s., 2 2s., ,3 3s., 
4, 7s., .4 10s., and .5 5s. 

F2 



68 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

JAMES I. CONTINUED. 
GOLD. Continued. 

Half Lion (25 to 26 (Trains). Type similar to the Lion. 

Obv., IACOBVS . DEI . GEACIA . E. or DEI . GEA . EEX.; 
rev., legend as on Lion. 

Specimens have sold for 16s., 17s., and .2 12s. 

A St. Andrew and a Lion aold together for .3 15s. and 5. 

Two Lions and a Half Lion, together, realised .4 12s. 

A Lion and a Half, Lion together, .1 3s. and 7. 

SILVEK. Groats only; struck at Edinburgh, Linlithgow, Perth, and 
Stirling. 

Groat (weight 28 to 36 grains ; in one instance, 41 grains). 

Obv., IACOBVS . DEI . TEACIA . EEX . SCOT., the King's 
head full-faced, crowned, with sceptre at his right, in a treasure ; 
rev., in outer circle DNS . PTECOTOE MS x LIBAT, in 
inner circle VILLA DE PEETH +, large cross with three 
pellets and a fleur-de-lis alternately in the angles. (See 
Pig. 100.) 

Except in minute details the rev. of the Groats of James I. 
is like that shown in Fig. 100. but several varieties of obv. are 
known. For example, with the sceptre at the King's left side ; 
a fleur-de-lis at side of the King's neck, and with the bust 
clothed. In a very rare variety the circles are formed of chain- 
work or annulets. 

Ordinary specimens, 4s. to 7s. Very fine, 16s. and ,1 4s. 

Seven, varied (4 Edinburgh, 1 Linlithgow, 1 Perth, and 1 
Stirling), sold for 19?., and five for 15s. 

One, with clothed bust,* realised 12s. 

Two Edinburgh Groats (one without sceptre and with bust 
clothed,* the other with sceptre to King's left), sold for ,4 6s. 

Two of Linlithgow realized 1 18s. One, very fine, <3 10s. 

Two of Perth, 18s. 

One of Stirling, 1 15s., and another of the same mint, 
,11 10s. 
BILLON. Penny and Halfpenny. 

Penny (11 to 15 grains). Struck at Aberdeen, Edinburgh, 
and Inverness. 

Obv., Kin?'s head full-faced, crowned, + IACOBVS . DEI . 
TEACI . EE. ; rev., cross and three pellets in each angle, 
+ VILLA . EDINBVEGH, or INNEENIS., or DE : 
AB .... EN. 

Aberdeen, very fine and presumed to be unique, 4 4-s. 

Edinburgh, fine and unique, .3. One, very fine, 3 10s. 

Inverness, fine, edges slightly broken, but unique, 4 4a. 

Halfpenny (5 to 8 grains). Struck at Edinburgh. 

Obv., large head, front face, crowned, x IACOBVS . . 
E . ., &c. ; rev., cross and pellet?, VILLA E . ., &c. (See 
Fig. 190.) 

Five specimens sold together in 1854 for 3s. ; and five, all 
varied, realised <1 7s. in 1875. 

* Groats with the bust clothed may more correctly be attributed to the first issue of 
James II. 



SCOTTISH COINS. 69 

James II., 1438-1460. 

GOLD. Lion, St. Andrew, and Half St. Andrew. 

Lion (46 to 53 grains). Type similar to the Lion of James I. 

There is a difficulty in assigning the Lions of James I. and II., 
but those which have, on rev., the mint mark of a crown may 
be ascribed to James II. with tolerable certainty. 

Specimens have realised 9s., 1 9s., 2 12s., 2 16s., 3, and 
.3 6s. 

St. Andreiv (47 to 53 grains). Two issues. 

Firstissw.Obv., IACOBVS . D . GRACIA . EEX . SCOTOR., 
arms of Scotland crowned, between two crowns, m.m. crown ; 
rev., SALVVM . FAC . POPVLVM . TVVM, St. Andrew on 
his cross reaching to the edge, a fleur-de-lis on each side. 

Another variety reads IACOBVS . DEI . GRA . REX . 
SCOTTORVM, and on rev. there is a nimbus round the Saint's 
head. 

Specimens have realised 18s., .1 13s., .1 16s., and .27 10s. 

Second issue. Obv., IACOBVS . D . GRACIA . REX . SCO., 
St. Andrew, bearing his cross in his hands, to left ; rev., 
SALVVM . PAC . POPVLVM . TVV . DNE., the arms of 
Scotland crowned, between two fleurs-de-lis, m.m., crown. 
(See Fig. 24.) 

Extremely rare, ,20 and ,30. 

Half St. Andrew (21 grains). In type, like the St. Andrew 
of first issue. 

Obv., IACOBVS . DEI . GRACIA . REX . SCO., the arms 
of Scotland crowned between two fleurs-de-lis, also crowned, 
m.m. crown; rev., SALVV1II . FAC . PFLV . TV . DN., St. 
Andrew on his cross between fleurs-de-lis crowned. 

A specimen sold in 1859 for 17s., and another in 1875 for .51. 
SILVER. Groat and Half Groat. Three issues. 

First issue. Groats only. Struck at Edinburgh, Linlithgow, 
and Stirling, between 1438 and 1451. 

Groat (28 to 35 grains). Same types of obv. and rev. as on 
the Groats of James L, but with the bust clothed. The worda 
are divided by two annulets, or, rarely, by two crescents. 

Two Groats of Edinburgh and one of Stirling sold for 17e. 

Five Groats of Edinburgh, 10s. ; and three, .1 3s. 

One Groat of Edinburgh, very fine, 10s. 

Second issue. Groats and Half Groats. 

Groat (52 to 57 grains). Struck at Aberdeen,* Edinburgh, 
Perth, Roxburgh, and Stirling, during and after 1451. 

These Groats are distinguished from the first issue by their 
weight, the omission of the sceptre on obv., and the ornaments 
in the alternate angles of the cross being crowns instead of 
fleurs-de-lis. (See Figr. 101.) 

Obv., IACOBVS . DEI . GRACIA . REX . SCOTORVM., 
m.m. crown, the King's head full-faced, crowned; rev., m.m. 
crown, in outer circle DNS . PTECTOR MS + LIBERATOR 

* Lindsay mentions Berwick as a place of mintage of this issue; but the town 
belonged to England in the reign of James II., and was not handed over to the Scots 
until 1461. It was recovered by .England in Uj>3. 



70 THE VALUATION OF BEITISH COINS. 

JAMES II. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

MS., and in inner circle VILLA EDINBVEG, a crown and 
three pelleta alternately in the angles of the cross. (See 
Fig. 101.) 

Groat of Aberdeen, extremely rare, =5 5s. 

Groat of Edinburgh, 6s., 14s. ; extra fine, .2 2s. and i 14s. 

Groat of Perth, fine, .6 6s. One, unpublished, ,9 5s. 

Groat of Roxburgh, possibly nniqne, very fine, .9 12s. 

Groat of Stirling, 13s. ; another, extra fine, <21 10s. 

Three Groats, Edinburgh, Perth, and Stirling, and a Half 
Groat of Edinburgh, sold together for .2 10s. 

Half Groat (28J- grains). Struck at Edinburgh only. 

Obv., IACOB . DEI . GRACIA . EEX . SCOTOR, m.m. 
cross, head like that on the Groat; rev., like the Groat. 

A specimen, described as fine and of excessive rarity, realised 
.6 12s. 6d. 

Two Groats of Edinburgh, a Half Groat, and two varieties of 
Billon Pennies, sold together for 12s. 

Third issue.* Groat. Struck at Edinburgh only. 

Groat (52 to 57 grains). 

Obv., King's full-faced bust crowned and clothed, IACOBVS . 
DEE . GRA . REX . SCOTTORVM, words divided by crosses, 
m.m. cross; rev., DNS . PTECTOR . ME. + LIBERATOR. 
ME., and in inner circle VILLA . EDINBVRG, m.m. cross 
before VILLA only. 

Two Groats of Edinburgh sold for .8. 

A Groat and a Billon Halfpenny sold together for <1 17s. 
BILLON. Penny and Halfpenny, Struck at Edinburgh. Like those of 
James I., but reading GRACIA instead of TRACIA. 

In 1883, three Pennies sold for 7s., one for 12s., and one for 
J18s. 

Halfpenny (Fig. 191) will be described under James IV. f 

James III., 14601488. 

GOLD. Unicorn, Half Unicorn, and Rider. 

Unicorn (58 to 59 grains). 

Obv., IACOBVS . DEI . GRA . REX . SCOTORVM, a 
nnicorn with crown on his neck supporting a shield of the 
arms of Scotland, a chain and ring nnder the fore feet, m.m. a 
cross ; rev., EXVRGAT . DES . ET . DISIPENT . IN1MICI . E, 
a flaming star on a cross fleury, m.m. cross. (See Fig. 25.) 

Specimens have sold for 12s., 14s. 6d., 19s., <! 4s., 1 6s., 
1 9s., 1 12s., .3 3s., 4, 10s., and .5. 

A variety, with rev. legend on both sides, realised 17s., ,1, 
J61 Is., .1 8s., 1 12s., 4: 4s., and .6 15s. 

Half Unicorn (28 to 30 grains). Type similar to the Unicorn. 



* This is Lindsay's arrangement, but its correctness has been questioned, antl this 
type has been considered as intermediate between the first and second issues above 
described. 

t The BILLOX coins with crowns and fli-nrg-de-Hit, originally assigned to James II., 
were transferred by Lindsay to James IV., under whose name they will be found 



SCOTTISH COINS. 71 

JAMES III. CoN-mitrsD. 
GOLD. Continued. 

Obv., IACOBVS . DEI . GEACIA . EEX . SCO.; rev., 
EXVEGAT . DS . ET . DIS1PT . INIMI . E., the legends 
being variously contracted. 

Specimens have realised 1 IB., 2, 2 2s., 2 15s., and 1 5s. 

A Unieorn and Half Unicorn sold together for 17s., 19s., 1, 
3 15s., .4 159., 5 5s., and .6 6s. 

A Unicorn and two Half Unicorns sold together for =21 15s. 

Rider (78 to 80 grain*). 

Obv., IACOBVS . DEI . GEA . EEX . SCOTOE., the King, 
with sword drawn, riding towards the right ; rev., SALVVM . 
FAG . POPVLVM . TVVM . DNE., arms of Scotland, crowned, 
on a cross which extends to the edge. (See Fig. 26). 

Specimens have sold for 15s., 17s., <! 2s., .1 5s., 1 8s., 
2 10s., 3, 3 10s., 4 4s., and .5. 
SILVKR. Groat, Half Groat, Penny, and Halfpenny. Six issues. 

First issue. Groat, Penny, and Halfpenny, with cross and 
pellets on rev. 

Groat (40 grains). 

Obv., IACOBVS . DEI . GEA . EEX . SCOTOEVM, m.m. a 
crown ; rev., DNS . PTECTOE . MS. + LIBEEATOE . MS., 
and in inner circle VILLA . EDINBVEG, m.m. a crown. 

Ordinary specimens, 5s. 6d. to 7s. 6d. 

Three Groats (and a Half Groat, later issue) sold for 15s. 

Penny (9 to 10 grains). 

Obv., IACOBVS . D . GEACIA . E., the King's bust, full- 
faced, crowned, m.m. a cross; rev., VILLA . EDINBVEGH., 
m.m. a cross. (See Fig. 103.) 

Halfpenny (5 grains). Same type as Penny. 

Obv., TACOVS . DEI . GEA . EEX . SC. ; rev., VILLA . 
EDINBVEGH.; m.m. on both sides, a cross. 

A specimen sold, in 1875, for l 12s. 

Second issue. Groats only. Struck at Berwick and Edin- 
burgh, having on rev. large mullets of six points, and pellets 
with annulets or small crosses between them. (See Fig. 102.) 

Groat (40 grains). 

Obv., + IACOBVS . D . GEA . EEX . SCOTOEVM., a small 
cross at each side of the head; rev., + DNS . PTECTOE . 
MS. + LIBETV., and in inner circle + VILLA . EDIN- 
BVEG.; m.m., on both sides, a cross. (See Fig. 102.) 

Three Groats sold for ^fil 15s. One, very fine, ,1 2s. 

Five Groats (of second and fourth issues), 1 Is. 

Third issue. Groat, Half Groat, and Penny, having on rev. 
small mullets of six points, and pellets without annulets or 
small crosses ; legends as before. 

Groat (38 to 40 grains). Struck at Berwick and Edinburgh. 

Obv., type and legend as on second issue Groat, but the King's 
crown is ornamented with five fleurs-de-lis of equal height. 

A Groat and Half Groat of Berwick, and a Groat of Edin- 
burgh, .6. 



72 



THE VALUATION OF BUITISH COINS. 



JAMES III. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

Three Groats (Berwick and Edinburgh), two Half Groats 
(Berwick and Edinburgh), two Pennies of Edinburgh, and a 
Halfpenny of Edinburgh, sold together for 1. 
A Groat of Berwick and Edinburgh, 2 3s. 
A Groat of Berwick, very fine, sold for ,5 2s. 6d. in 1883. 
Two Groats of Edinburgh, together, .1 lls. One Groat, 8s. 
Half Groat (20 grains). Struck at Berwick and Edinburgh. 
Same type as the Groat of this issue. 
A Groat and Half Groat of Edinburgh, 5 12s. Cd. 
Penny (8 to 10 grains). Struck at Edinburgh. 
Obv., full-faced bust, crowned, in a circle, surrounded by 
IACOBVS . DEI . GEA . R. ; rev., mullets and annulets in alter- 
nate angles of cross, VILLA . EDEINBEVR, or EDEINBOVR. 
Two Half Groats (Berwick and Edinburgh), four Pennies of 
Edinburgh, and two Billon Pennies, sold together for .1 2s. 

A Groat and Half Groat of Berwick, a Silver Penny, and a 
Billon Penny, together, 18s. 

Fourth issue. Groat, Half Groat, and Penny, all struck at 
Edinburgh, having on rev. mullets of five points and pellets. 
Groat (38 to 40 grains). M.m. invariably a cross crosslet. 
Obv., IACOBVS . DEI . GRA . REX . SCOTORM., full- 
faced bust with crown of five fleurs-de-lis of equal height ; rev., 
legends as before. 

Five Groats and a Half Groat, 13s. Two Groats, 8s. 
Half Groat (17 to 18 grains). 

Of similar type to the Groat ; m.m. cross crosslet. 
Penny (10 grains). 

Obv., IACOBVS . DEI . GRA . EEX . S., King's bust full- 
faced, crown with five fleurs-de-lis ; rev., cross, with mullets of 
five points and three pellets in alternate angles, m.m. a cross. 
Groat, Half Groat, and Penny, all fine, .3 4s. 
Two Groats, a Half Groat, and Penny, all fine, 4i 6s. 
Fifth issue. Groats only. Struck at Edinburgh, having on 
rev. a crown and three pellets in alternate angles of the cross. 
Groat (40 grains). 

Obv., IACOBVS . DEI . GEA . EEX . SCOTOE., King's 
bust, full-faced, the crown having five fleurs- 
de-lis of equal height ; rev., DNS . PTECTOE . 
MEVS . ET . LI, and in inner circle VILLA . 
EDINBVRG., m.m. cross crosslet. 

Groat, with clothed bust, unpublished, ex- 
tremely rare and very fine, .20. 

Sixth issue. Groats only.* Struck at Edin- 
burgh, having on rev. three pellets and an annu- 
let in two quarters of the cross, a crown and a 
fleur-de-lis in the other quarters. (See figure in 
the margin.) 




* Lindsay wrote, " Although I consider these coins to have been struck towards the end 
of the reign of James III., thtre .seems to be a possibility of their belonging to Jame IV., 
and of having been struck in his first year, or between the three-quarter face coins and 
those with Salcum Fac." 



SCOTTISH COINS. 73 

JAMES III. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

Groat (40 grains). 

Obv., IACOBVS . DEI . GRACIA . REX . SCOTO.; rev., 
DNS . PTECT . MEVS . ET . LEBA . M., in inner circle 
VILLA . EDINBEG., m.m. cross crosslet. 

Two Groats of this issue, and one of Berwick, <! 4a. 

Fine specimens have realised 2 5s., 3 5s., and one, un- 
published, ,10 5s. 

Five Groats, including one of this issue, sold for 18s. 
BILLON. Penny, Halfpenny, Farthing, Plack, and Half Plack. 

Penny (10 to 15 grains). Struck at Aberdeen and Edinburgh. 

Obv., IACOBVS . DEI . GRACIA . REX, usual head, an 
annulet at each side; rev., VILLA . DE . ABER., cross and 
pellets, an annulet in centre of cro^s, and after ABER. 

Others are similar to the Silver Pennies of James III. 

A Penny of Aberdeen, 1 11s. Three of Edinburgh, 15s. 

Halfpenny (5 to 9 grains) . Struck at Edinburgh. Same type 
as the Penny. 

Value from 2s. 6d. to 5s. eich. 

Farthing. A Black Farthing is attributed to James III., 
having on obv. I R, crowned, and on rev. St. Andrew's cross, 
with a crown in the centre, and E DIN, for Edinburgh. Struck 
in 1466. 

Plack (28 to 43i grains). Struck at Edinburgh. 

Obv., IACOBVS . DEI . GRACIA . REX . SCOTO., in a tres- 
sure of four leaves arms of Scotland, crowned, a crown at each 
side ; rev., VILLA + ED1NBVRGH, ornaments as on Fig. 192. 

Ordinary specimens, Is. to 2s. 

There is a variety, having a cross instead of a crown at each 
side of the arms, which has been attributed to James II. 

Half Plack (15 grains). Struck at Edinburgh. 

Type similar to the Plack. 

Specimens have realised 4s. and 1 3s. 

James IV., 14881514. 

GOLD. Unicorn, Half Unicorn, Rider, Two-thirds Rider, One-third 
Rider, St. Andrew, Two-thirds St. Andrew, and One-third St. 
Andrew ; also a Six-Angel Piece. 

Unicorn (60 grains). Of similar type to that of James III., 
but the numeral 4 follows the King's name, or XC is found 
under the hind legs of the unicorn, and the legend is composed 
of Roman letters. They are extremely rare. 

Obv., IACOBVS . 4 . DEI . GRA . REX . SCOTORVM., no 
ring or chain, words divided by small stars, m.m. crown ; 
rev., EXVRGAT . DEVS . Z . DISIPENT . 1NIMICI . EIV., 
words divided by email stars, no m.m. 

Another variety has the ring and chain, with XC, the words 
divided by three dots, m.m. crown on obv., small mullet on rev. 

Unicorn, with XC, <6 6s., and .10 10s. 

Ditto, with X only, .4 15s. 

Ditto, with numeral 4 after the King's name, j47. 



74 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

JAMES IV. CONTINUED. 
GOLD. Continued. 

A Unicorn, with XC, together with a Lion of James I., and a 
Half Unicorn of James III., realised .5 5s. 

Half Unicorn (30 grains). 

Of similar type to the Unicorn, but without the numeral. 

Specimens have sold for ,12 and <42. 

Rider (60 grains). 

Obv., IACOBVS . DEI . GRA . REX . SCOTTORVM, the 
arms of Scotland crowned ; rev., the King, with sword drawn 
in his left hand, riding to the left, SALV VM . FAC . POPVLVM . 
T WM . DOMINE. 

Specimens have realised ,4 10s., .5 5s., and .12 10s. 

Two-thirds Rider (36 to 40 grains). 

Of similar type to the Rider. 

Specimens have sold for .1 2s., .1 6s., JE1 18s., 3 9s., .5, 
.5 5s., and .6 15s. 

A Two-thirds Rider, with a Rider of James III., realised 
,5 17s. 6d. 

One-third Eider (about 20 grains). 

Similar to the Rider. 

Specimens have sold for .10 and .26. 

St. Andrew (about 78 grains). 

Obv., IACOBVS . DEI . GRA . REX . SCOTTORVM . IIII., 
arms of Scotland, crowned, between two fleurs-de-lis, stars 
between some of the words, m.m. crown ; rev., SALVM . 
FAC . PPLVV . TWM . DNE., St. Andrew, with nimbus on 
his head, extended on a cross reaching to the edge, a fleur-de- 
lis at each side, the words divided by stars, m.m. crown. 

Two-thirds St. Andrew (50J- to 52 grains). 

Similar to the St. Andrew. 

Specimens have sold for 9 9s. and .49. 

One-third St. Andrew (25 to 26 grains). 

Similar to the St. Andrew. 

A specimen sold for 1. 

A Two-thirds Rider (bought for 1 18s.) and a One-third Sb, 
Andrew (which cost 4) sold together, in 1880, for 32. 

Six Angel Piece (491 grains). 

Obv., IACOBVS . 4 . DEI . GRA . REX . SCOTORVM., 
the archangel standing on the dragon (as on the English 
Angel), stars between the words ; rev., SALVATOR . IN . 
HOC . SIGNO . VICISTI., a ship with three masts, to the 
mainmast is attached a shield bearing the arms of Scotland, 
I and 4 on either side above. 

Unique, and supposed to have been a pattern. 

The only specimen known is in the British Museum. 
. Groat, Half Groat, and Penny. Six issues. 

First issue. Groat (45? grains). 

Obv., the King's front-faced bust, crowned, in a tressure 
of twelve points, IACOBVS . DI . GRA . REX . SCOTOR, 
the words divided by double annulets, m.m. cross crosslet ; 
rev., m.m. cross crosslet, DNS . PROTECTOR MEVORVil. 



SCOTTISH COINS. 75 

JAMES IV. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

and in inner circle VILLA . EDINBRVG, a crown, and three 
pellets with an annulet, alternately in the angles of the 
cross. 

Specimens have realised 4* 4s. and .6. 

Second issue. Groat and Half Groat. 

Groat (38 to 48 grains). Struck at Aberdeen and Edinburgh. 

Obv., IACOBVS . DE . GRACIA . BEX . SCOTORV., the 
King's bust in a circle without treasure, three-qnarter-faced 
to left ; rev., DNS . PROTECTOR . M . ET . LIBERAT . M., 
and in inner circle VILLA . EDINBVR, a crown and three 
pellets alternately in the angles of the cross. (See Fig. 104.) 

Specimens of the Edinburgh mint, 3s. 6d. to 7s. 

A Groat of Aberdeen has sold for 2 10s. and 3. 

Half Groat (20 to 22 grains). Struck at Edinburgh only. 
Type similar to the Groat. 

A specimen sold for \. 

Three Groats and a Half Groat, 2. 

A Groat and Half Groat, extremely fine, 1 8s. 

A Groat of Aberdeen with a Groat and Half Groat of 
Edinburgh, 19s. 

Two Groats and a Half Groat, Edinburgh, ,1 5s. 

A Groat of Aberdeen and Groat of Edinburgh, with a Groat 
of the fifth issue, 16s. 

Third issue. Half Groat. 

Half Groat (22 grains). 

Obv., IACOBVS . DI . GRA . REX . SCOTORVM . Q., the 
King's bust fall-faced, crowned, in a tressnre, m.m. cross ; rev., 
DNS . PROTECTR . MEVS., and in inner circle VILLA 
EDINBVG, a crown and three pellets alternately in the angles 
of the cross, a fleur-de-lis on centre of the cross. 

A specimen, described as unique, sold for 13s. in 1859. 

Fourth issue. Groat, Half Groat, and Penny. 

Groat (38 grains). 

Obv., IACOBVS . DEI . GRA . REX . SCOTTORVM., words 
divided by trefoils, the King's full-faced bust, crowned, in a 
tressure, m.m. crown ; rev., SALVVM . FAC . POPVLV . 
TVV . D., and in inner circle VILLA . EDINBVRG., no m.m., 
a mullet of five points and three pellets alternately in the 
angles of the cross. 

Specimens have sold for 4s. 6d. and 2 10s. 

Half Groat (about 20 grains). 

Type similar to the Groat. (See Fig. 105.) 

A Groat and Half Groat, second issue, with a Groat of fourth, 
and one of fifth issue, sold together for 12s. 

Penny (about 10 grains). 

Obv., IACOBVS . DEI . GRA. REX . SCOTTO, m.m. crown, 
King's fnll-faced bust, crowned, in a circle ; rev., SALVV . 
FAC . PPLVV . TVV . DNE., no m.m., a mullet of five points 
and three pellets in alternate angles of the cross. 

Specimens have sold for 12s., 2 14s., <4 4s., and 5. 



76 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH C01X3. 

JAMES IV. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

Penny. Unique. 

Obv., similar to the preceding ; rev., pimilar legend, bat a 
crown and fleur-de-lis are in the alternate angles of the cross, 
as on Fig. 191. 

This coin, formerly in Mr. Lindsay's cabinet, sold in 1881 
for .10 15s. 

Fifth issue. Groat and Half Groat. 

Groat (36 to 40 grains). 

Type similar to fourth issue, but words divided by mullets, 
and letters QT, QRA, or IIII, placed at end of obi 1 , learend. 

A Groat, with QT, sold for .4. 

A Groat, with IIII, sold for 3 10s. and 4 15s. 

A Groat, with QRA, sold for .1 11s., .3 10s., and <4 5s. 

Half Groat (about 20 grains). 

Similar to the Groat. 

A specimen, with IIII, described as extra fine and of excessive 
rarity, realised .30. 

A Groat and Half Groab, together, sold for 1 Is. and .1 Cs. 

Sixth issue. Groat. 

Groat (31 grains). 

Obv., the King's head bearded, fall-faced, with flat crown, 
m.m. crown, IA.COBVS 4 . DEI . GRA . REX . SCOTORV. ; 
rev., EXVRGAT . DEVS . DISIPENI . I., and in inner circle 
VILLA . EDINBVRGH., a mullet of five points and three 
pellets in alternate angles of the cross. 

A specimen was sold for ,2 6s. in 1859, and for ^61 in 1875. 
BILLON. Penny, Plack. 

Penny (8 to 12 1 grains). 

Obv., IACOBVS . DEI . GRA . REX . SCOT., m.m. crown ; 
rev., VILLA . DE . EDINBVRG, a crown alternately with a 
fleur-de-lis in angles of cross. (See Fig. 191, which was 
formerly considered by Lindsay to be a Halfpenny of James II.) 

Penny (8 to 12 grains). Some have QT after the name of 
the mint. 

Seven sold for 2s. 6d., and three for 10s. 

Plack (24 to 29 grains). 

Similar type to the Plack of James III., but obu. m.m. a crown. 
On some specimens the figure 4 follows IACOBVS, while on 
others without the 4 the rev. has crowns and saltire crosses 
alternately in the quarters. 

Ordinary specimens, Is. to 2s. 

James V., 15141542. 

GOLD. Ecu or Crown, Ryal, St. Andrew, Bonnet Piece, Two-thirda 
Bonnet Piece, and One-third Bonnet Piece. 

Some of these pieces were coined from native Scottish gold. 
Ecu or Crown (53 grains).* 

* A piece of similar type and legend, but weighing &7S grains and supposed to be a 
pattern, is in the Advocates Museum, Edinburgh. 



SCOTTISH COINS. 77 

JAMES V. CONTINUED. 
GOLD. Continued. 

Obv., IACOBVS . 5 . DEI . GEA . EEX . SCOTORVM., the 
arms of Scotland crowned between two St. Andrew's crosses, 
m.m. a star of six points waved ; rev., CEVCIS . AEMA . 
SEQVAMVE, cross fleury, with cross in centre, a thistle- 
head in each angle, m.m. crown. (Rev. similar to Fig. 
29.) 

Specimens have sold for 13s.. 16a., 1 4s., <1 16s., 2 4s., 
2 19s., .3, .3 10s., .4 Sa., 6 6s., and <9 9s. 

Ryal (279 grains). Supposed to have been a pattern. 

Obv., IACOBVS . 5 . DEI . GEA . EEX . SCOTOE., the 
King's bust crowned to right, the letters CK behind the head; 
rev., VILLA . EDINBEVGH x , the arms of Scotland over a 
cross patee. (This coin much resembles Fig. 106.) 

St. Andrew. Supposed to be unique. 

Obv., IACOBVS . 5 . DEI . G . E . SCOTOEV . 1539., the 
arms of Scotland crowned, surrounded by a collar of thistle- 
heads and the letters SS, m.m. cross; rev., a St. Andrew's- 
cross, encircled by a crown, between I and E, a thistle-head 
above the crown, and a fleur-de-lis below it, legend HONOE . 
EEGIS . IVDICIVM . DILIGIT., m.m. crown. (See Fig. 
27.) 

Bonnet Piece (90 grains). Dated 1539 and 1540. 

Obv., IACOBVS . 5 . DEI . GEA . E . SCOTOE . 1.5.4.0., 
the King's bust, with bonnet, to right, m.m. St. Andrew's 
cross ; rev., the same legend as on the Si. Andrew, surrounding 
the arms of Scotland over a cross fleury, m.m. cross. (See 
Fig. 28.) 

Specimens have sold for 1C."., ,1 4s., 2, 2 7s., 2 10s., 
3 5s., 3 7s., ,4, 4 12s., 5 2s. 6d., .6 6s., ,6 15s., 7, 
7 5s., 7 7s., and 8 15s. 

Two-thirds Bonnet Piece (60 grains). Dated 1540. 

Obv., similar to the Bonnet Piece, IACOBVS . D . G . E . 
SCOTOEVM . 1.5.4.0, m.m. fleur-de-lis ; rev., same legend 
as on Bonnet Piece, the arms of Scotland crowned, between 
I and 5, m.m. cross. 

Specimens have realised .1 4?., 1 16s., 2 4s., .4, 
.10 10s., =18 10s., and .21 10s. 

One, which was sold in 1854 for 2 4s., realised ,21 10s. 
in 1880. 

One-third Bonnet Piece (30 grains). Dated 1540. 

Similar to the Two-thirds Bonnet Piece. 

Specimens have sold for 1 2s., ^83, .4 18s., and <41. 

Two (one fine, the other poor) were sold together in 1854 for 
4i 4s., and realised, in 18SO, the former <15 10s., and the 
latter ,7. 
SILVER. Groat, Half Groat, One-third Groat. Four issues. 

First issue. Groat and Half Groat. 

Groat (about 33 grains). 

Obv., IACOBVS . DEI . GEA . EEX . SCOTOEV., the King's 
bust, crowned, three-quarter face to right, in a treasure, the 




78 THE VALUATION 0? BRITISH COINS. 

JAMES V. CONTINUED. 

SILVER. Continued. 

words divided by mullets of six points, m.ra. cross, or cross 
crosslet; rev., VILLA . EDINBVEGH, or 
EDINBVE, a mullet of six points and a thistle- 
head in alternate angles of the cross, m.m. cross, 
or cross crosslet.* (See figure in margin.) 

7s., 14s., and 2 10s. One, very fine, .4 5s. 
Another, with the Half Groat, sold for .1 5s. 
Half Groat (14 to 16 grains). Similar to 
the Groat. 

A specimen realised 18s. 

A Groat and Half Groat of this issue, together 
with two Groats and two One-third Groats of the 
second issue, sold for 16s. in 1859, and for 5 17s. 6d. in 1880. 
Second issue. Groat and One-third Groat. 
Groat (38 to 43 grains). 

Obv., IACOBVS . 5 . DEI . GRA . EEX . SCOTOEV., in a 
circle, without tressure, the King's bust with arched crown, in 
profile, to right (on some specimens there are three points .'. 
behind the head), m.m. cross ; rev., OPPIDV . EDIXBVEGI, 
the arms of Scotland on a shield over a cross, the words are 
separated by three points. (See Fig. 106.) 
Specimens have realised from 3s. to 10s. each. 
One-third Groat (11 to 13 grains). 

Similar to the Groat. The words are separated by two 
points. 

Specimens have sold for 4s., 14s., and .1 13s. 
Third issue. Groat only. 
Groat (40 to 41 grains). 

Type generally similar to eecond issue, but the words on obv. 
are divided by two annulets. 

Specimens have sold for .1 9s., .5 5s., and 7 5s. 
Fourth issue. Groat only. 
Groat (40 grains). 

Type generally similar to the second issue, but the King's 
crown is double arched. The rev. has the words VILLA 
EDINBRVGH, which are divided by two annulets, with a St. 
Andrew's cross at the end of the legend. 

A specimen sold for 1 and .1 9s. One, extra fine, .3 15a. 
Two Groats of this issue, with a One-third Groat of second 
issue, sold together for 14s. 
BILLON. Penny, Plack, and Ha'f Plack. 
Penny (7 to 9 grains). 
Obv., IACOBVS . DEI . GEA . EEX . S., the King's head, 

* These Groats are extremely rude and ill-struck, and generally in bad preservation. 
Snelling suggested their belonging to James III., to whom they have been assigned by 
some recent authorities. No coin of James IV. has a mullet of six points on the rev., and 



SCOTTISH COINS. 79 

JAMES V. CONTINUED. 
BILLON. Continued. 

full-faced, crowned, m.m. cross ; rev., VILLA . EDINBVR., 
a foliated cross with trefoils in the angles, m.m. cross. 

Specimens have realised 15s., .1 2s., and ,1 8s. 

Plack (26 to 28 grains). 

Obv., IACOBVS . D . G . REX . SCOTOEVM, a thistle-head 
crowned between I and 5, m.m. cross ; rev., OPPIDVM . 
EDINBVRGI, St. Andrew's cross encircled by a crown, between 
two fleurs-de-lis, m.m. fleur-de-lis. (See Fig. 193.) 

There is a variety with an annulet over the King's initial, I. 

Ordinary specimens, from 6d. to Is. Eight sold for 2s. 

Half Plack (13 to 14 grains). 

Similar to the PJack. 

Specimens have sold for Is. ; extra fine, 10s., 15s., and 18s. 

Mary, 15421567. 

GOLD. Ecu, Lion, Half Lion, Ryal, Half Ryal, Ducat, and Crown. 

Ecu (53 grains). The only gold coins of this reign without 
date ; probably struck in 1542. 

Obv., MARIA . DEI . GRA . REGINA . SCOTORVM, 
the arms of Scotland crowned between two mullets of five 
points, m.m. mullet of five points ; rev., CRVCIS . ARMA . 
SEQVAMVR, cross fleury with a thistle-head in each angle, 
m.m. a crown. (See Fig. 29.) 

Specimens have realised <1 Is., 1 5s., <1 8s., ^84, and .4 15s. 

Lion (86 grains). Three varieties, two being dated 1553, and 
the third 1557. 

Ftfttvariety.Obv., MARIA . DEI . GRA . R . SCOTORVM, 
arms of Scotland crowned between the letters I. and G. (which 
stand for lacobus Gubernator James, Earl of Arran, then 
Governor of Scotland), m.m. cross ; rev., MARIA REGINA 
in cypher, crowned, between two cinquefoils, surrounded by 
DILIGITE . IVSTICIAM, 1553. 

Second variety. Obv., same legend, but G for GRA, and the 
arms between two mullets, no inner circle, rev., as in first 
variety, but I and G at side of cypher, and no inner circle. 

Third variety. Obv., same legend, but SCOTOR . REGINA . 
1557, and the arms between M and R; rev., same legend as in 
other varieties, but MARIA R in cypher between two Maltese 
crosses, no inner circle. 

Specimens have realised 1 9s., ^1 10s., <1 11s., <! 12s., 
JE1 13s., ,1 18s., 2, 4: 15s., 5, 5 10s., .0, and .6 10s. 

A Lion, dated 1553, obv., MARIA . D . G . SCOTORVM . 
REGINA., Scottish arms crowned between two cinquefoils, 
described as unique, sold for .105 in 1875. 

Half Lion (43 grains). Two varieties, dated 1543 and 1553. 

First variety. Obv., MARIA . D . G . R . SCOTORVM . 
1 . 5.4.3, the arms of Scotland crowned, m.m. cross ; rev., 
ECCE . ANCILLA . DOMINI, surrounding the letters M R. (in 
monogram) crowned, a star below, m.m. star wa?ed. Another 
variety has cinquefoils instead of stars. 



80 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

MART. CONTINUED. 
GOLD. Continued. 

Specimens have sold for .3 7s., 5 7s. GJ., JEG 2s. Gd., 
10 5a., and .13 13s. 

Second variety. Dated 1553. Like the Lion, first variety. 

Obv., MAEIA . D . G . E . SCOTORVM, the arms of Scot- 
land crowned between I and G; rev., same legend as on the 
Lion with 1553, but M. B. in cypher, crowned, between two 
cinqnefoils. 

Specimens have sold for 1, 1 133., 1 16s., <! 19s., 
B os., 4, 18s., 5, 5 10s., .5 15-.. .6 15s., and .8. 

Ri/al (115 grains). Dated 1555, 1557, and 1558. 

Obv., MAEIA . D . G . SCOTOE . EEGINA, the Queen's 
bust to left ; rev., 1VSTVS . FIDE . VIVIT . 1555, the arms of 
Scotland crowned. 

Specimens have realised .5 7s. 6d., .5 10s., .6, .6 2s. Gd., 
7 10s., .9, 9 5s., .13 10s., and .14. 

Half Ryal (57 grains). Dated 1555 and 1558. 

Specimens have sold for o 13*., .'3. .8 17s. Gd., .9 2s. Gd., 
!> 9s., and 24. A Dunfermline forgery, 14s. 

Ducat (120 grains). Dated 1558. 

Obr.. FEAN . ET . MA . D . G . E . E . SCOTOE . 
DELPHIN . YIEX. buata of Francis and Mary, face to face, 
with a crown over them ; rev., HOEVM . TVTA /FIDES . 1558., 
surrounding an elaborate cruciform ornament. 

This piece was considered by Lindsay to be a pattern. 

Crown. Dated 1561. 

Obv., MAEIA . DEI . GEA . SCOTOEVM . EEGINA . 1561 , 
a shield bearing the arms of France half effaced by those of 
Scotland, crowned; rev., EXVEGAT . DEVS . ET . DISCI- 
PENTVE . INIMICI . 1561., four M's crowned, with a thistle 
between each, a star of eight points in the centre. 

SILVEK. Testoon, Half Testoon, Nonsunt (sometimes termed a 
Quarter Testoon), Eyal, Two-thirds Eyal, and One-third Eyal, 
of various issues. 

According to Lindsay, the coins of Queen Mary form five 
distinct classes : 

1. Those struck before her marriage with the Dauphin in 

1558. 

2. Those struck during her marriage with that prince, 

dated 1558 to 1560. 

3. Those of her first widowhood, dated 1561 and 1562. 

4. Those struck during her marriage with Henry Darnley, 

dated 1565 to 1567. 

5. Those struck after the murder of Darnley, dated 1567, 

and in one instance 1566. 

There were aleo some pieces, termed Jettons, struck during 
this reign, which cannot be considered as current 
money. 

Testoon (66 to 68 grains). Dated 1553. 

Obv., MAEIA . DEI . GEA . E . SCOTOEVM., in a double 
circle the Queen's bust, crowned, to right ; rev., DA . PACEM . 



SCOTTISH COINS. 81 

MART. CONTINUED. 
.SILVER. Continued. 

DOMINE . 1553, the arms of Scotland crowned between two 
stars of five points. (See Fig. 107.) 

.1, 8 8s., .21 10s., and one, extra fine, .61. 

Half Testoon (33 grains). Dated 1553. 

Obv., MARIA . DEI . GEA . SCOTCH . EEGINA., the 
Queen's bust uncrowned to left ; rev., IN . IVSTICIA . TVA . 
LIBEEA . NOS . DNE . 1553, the arms of Scotland crowned 
between M . E. (See Fig. 108.) 

A specimen (now in the British Museum) realised at different 
sales .14 5s. and .31. 

Testoon (64 grains). Without date. 

Obv., MAEIA . DEI . G . SCOTOB . EEGINA., a large M 
crowned, between two thistle-heads also crowned (see obv. of 
Fig. 109, from which this coin differs in having a circle inside 
the legend and no date) ; rev., DELICIE . DNI . COE . 
HVMILE, the arms of Scotland with a crown over the shield 
(see rev. of Fig. 109, from which this coin differs in having no 
cross beneath the shield of arms, in the shield being crowned, 
and in having a circle inside the legend). 

Specimens have realised .1, .1 6s. 6d., 1 16s., .5 15s., 
and <15 5s. A very fine example sold for ,12 10a. in 1883, 
and another, also very fine, realised 7 5s. at the same sale. 

Testoon (115 grains). Dated 1555. 

Obv., MAEfA . DEI . G . SCOTOE . EEGINA., a large M 
crowned between two thistle-heads crowned ; rev., DILICI . 
DNI . COE . HVMILLE, the arms of Scotland, not crowned, 
placed above a cross potent, extending nearly to the edge. 
(See Fig. 109.) 

14s., 1, 1 16s., 2 2s., .4 6s., .5 15s., and .6. 

Half Testoon (57 grains). Dated 1555. 

Type similar to the Testoon of same date. 

Specimens have sold for 1 6s., 3 7s. 6d., and .4 15s. 

A Testoon and Half Teatoon sold together for 10s., 1 2s., 
and 1 15s. 

Testoon (about 95 grains). Dated 1556, 1557, and 1558. 

Obv., MAEIA. . DEI . G . SCOTOR . EEGINA . 1556, the 
arms of Scotland crowned between M . E, with (sometimes 
without) an annulet under each letter, m.m. cross ; rev., a 
cross potent with a plain cross in each quarter, surrounded by 
IN . VIETVTE . TYA . LIBEEA . ME . 1556. 

8s.. 9s M 10s., 12s. 6d., 16s., 18s., .1, and ,2. 

Half Testoon (about 46 grains). Dated 1556, 1557, and 155S. 
Similar to the Testoon of same date. 

.1, 1 2s., 1 5s., 1 8s., and 2 7s. 

Three Testoons and a Half Testoon together, 15s. 

Two Testoons and three Half Testoons tog-ether, 2 6s. 

Testoon (84 to 92 grains) of Francis and Mary. Dated 1558 
and 15-jD. 

Obv., FEAN . ET . MA . D . G . E . E . SCOTOE . D . 
D . VIEN., the arms of the Dauphin and those of Scotland over 

G 



82 THE VALUATION OP BRITISH COINS. 

MART. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

a cross potent, m.m. crown ; rev., FECIT . VTEAQVE . VNVM . 
1558, F . M. in monogram crowned, between two double-barred 
crosses, m.m. cross. 

10*.,13s.,.l,.l 2s., 1 5s., 1 8s. 6d.,l 13s., and 2 15s. 

Half Testoon (42 to 46 grains). Dated 1558 and 1560. 

Type similar to the above Testoon. 

A specimen realised 2. 

A Testoon and Half Testoon together, 1 9s. 

Nonsunt (about 23 grains), sometimes styled Quarter Testoon. 
Dated 1558 or 1559. 

Obv., FEAN . ET . MA . D . G . E . E . SCOTO . D . D . 
VIEN., F . M. in monogram crowned, between a dolphin and a 
thistle-head, both crowned ; rev., IAM . NON . SVNT . DVO . 
SED . VNA . CAEO. in a square compartment, between two 
doubled -barred crosses, a cross over and 1559 under. (See 
Fig. 196.) 

From 10a. to 15s. 

Oae, with a Testoin, 1558, sold for 18s. 

Three, varied, realised 13s. 

Testoon (92 grains). Dated 1560 and 1561. 

Obv., FEAN . ET . MA . D . G . E . E . FEANCO . SCOTOE . 
B. (sometimes Q), the arms of France and Scotland crowned 
between a plain cross and a saltire ; rev., VICIT . LEO . 
DE . TEIBV . IVDA . 1560., F . M. in monogram, between a 
fleur-de-lis and a thistle-head, both crowned. 

Two specimens bear the extraordinary date 1565. 

8s., 16s., .1 5s., 1 7s. 6d., 1 12s., 2 Bs., and 4, 12s. 6d. 

Half Testoon (46 grains). Similar to above. (See Fig. 110.) 

A specimen, extra fine, sold for 10s. ; others 12s. and 
,3 15s. 

Testoon and Half Teatoon together, .1 133. and .2 7s. 

Testoon (about 92 grains). Dated 1561 or 1562. 

Obv., MARIA . DEI . GEA . SCOTOEVM . EEGINA, the 
Queen's bust to left, in a small close cap, 1561 on a scroll 
below the bust; rev., SALVVM . FAC . POPVLVM . TVVM . 
DOMINE, the arms of France half effaced by those of Scotland, 
crowned, an M at each side, also crowned. (See Fig. 118). 

2 14s., 2 15a., .3 12s., .4, 4 4s., .4 8s., .4 10s., 
.4 16s., .5 12s. 6d., .5 15s., .6 15s., 1, 7 7s., .8, 
8 10s., J69, and .9 15s. 

A Testoon of 1561, with a Francis and Mary VICIT LEO 
Testoon, sold together for 2. 

Half Testoon (46 grains). Similar to above. (See Fig. 118.) 

1 Is., 4 10s., 5, 7, 8 2s. 6d., <9, .9 bs., 10, 
11 5s., .12, .15 10s., and .25. 

Ryal (470 grains) of Mary and Henry. Dated 1505, 1566 
and 'l 567. 

Obv., MAEIA . & HENEIC' DEI . GEA . E . & E . 
SCOTOEV., in a circle the arms of Scotland crowned between 
two-leaved thistles ; rev., EXVEGAT . DEYS . & DISSIPENT". 



SCOTTISH COINS. 83 

MART. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

INIMICI . EL, in a circle, a palm-tree crowned with a lizard 
creeping up its stem, a scroll in front of the tree inscribed 
DAT . GLORIA . VIRES., and underneath 1565, m.m. thistle. 
(See Fig. 117.) 

<! Is., .1 3s., .1 os., 1 I2a. 6d., 2 2s., and 2 5s. A 
rubbed specimen sold for 8s. in 1883. 

A Ryal and Two-thirds Ryal, together, 19s., 2 5s., and 
2 19s. 

Two-thirds Ri/ctl (316J- grains). Similar to the Ryal. 

3s., 11s., .1 2s., .1 7s., .1 15s., 2 4s., and 2 6s. 

One-third Hyal (151 grains). Similar to the Ryal. 

Specimens have realised 9s., 13s., and one, very fine, .1 18a. 

The Two-thirds and One-third Ryal together, .3. 

The set, Ryal, Two-thirds, and One-third together, .1 12s., 
,1 13s., and 2 9s. 

Ryal (470 grains) of Mary. Dated 1567. 

Obv., MARIA . DEI . GRA . SCOTORVM . REGIXA., 
similar type to the Ryal of Mary and Henry ; rev., also similar. 
(See Fig. 117.) 

1 OB., 2 3s., and a very fine example, 3 14s. 

The Ryal and Two-thirds Ryal together, 19s., .3 3s., and 
3 10s. 

Two-thirds Ryal (315 grains). 

Same type as the above Ryal. 

A fine example, .1 16s. 

The Two-thirds and One-third Ryal together, 1 7a. 

One-third Ryal (157 grains). 

Same type as the above. 

Specimens have sold for 3 15s. and ^84 4s. 

The Mary and Henry Ryal, together with the Mary Ryal, 
.143. 

The set of Mary Ryal, Two-thirds, and One-third Ryal, 
together, .1 Is. 

EILLOX. Plack, Half Plack, Penny, Hardhead or Lion, Nonsunt, and 
Bawbee. 

Plack (23 to 31 grains). Struck at Edinburgh and Stirling. 

Obv., MARIA . D . G . REGINA . SCOTORV., a thistle-head 
crowned between M and R, m.m. cross ; rev., OPPIDVM . 
EDIXBVRGL, a plain St. Andrew's cross through a crown, 
between two cinquefoils, m.m. fleur-de-lis. 

Ordinary specimens, from 6d. to Is. 

The Stirling Plack differs from that of Edinburgh in having 
on the rev. a cross potent, with small crosses in the angles, and 
OPPIDYM . STIRLINGI, m.m. crown. 

From Is. to 2s. 

Half Plack (10 to 17 grains). 

Type similar to the Plack, but no cinquefoils at aides of the 
crown ; a star in lower angle of the cross. 

Three, varied, 5s. 

The Plack and Half Plack together, 6s. 

G 2 



84 THE VALUATION OP BRITISH COINS. 

MART. CONTINUED. 
BILLON. Continued. 

Penny (about 9 grains), with bnst. 

Obv., MARIA . D . G . R . SCOTORVM, the Queen's bnst 
full-faced, crowned, m.m. cross or fleur-de-lis ; rev., OPPIDVM . 
BDINBVR., a foliated cross, with crowns and stars (sometimes 
fleur-de-lis) in alternate angles. 

Two sold for 16s., and two very fine specimens for .1 10s. ; 
also two others for ,3, one for =1, and another for 10s. 

Penny (8 grains), without bust. 

Obv., MARIA . D . G . SCOTOR . REGINA., cross potent 
with small crosses in the angles, m.m. pellet or cross potent ; 
rev., VICIT . VERITAS, 1556. (See Fig. 194.) 

A very fine specimen realised 15s., and another, 18s. 

Plack (32 grains). Dated 1557. 

Obv., MARIA . DE[ . G . SCOTOR . REGINA . 1557, the 
arms of Scotland crowned between M and R ; rev., SERVIO . 
ET . VSV . TEROR., an orle of four crescents with a crown in 
each and a cross in the centre, m.m. fleur-de-lis. 

These Flacks are frequently found countermarked with a 
heart and star, the badge of the Earl of Morton. 

Ten, varied, sold for 11s. 

Hardhead (12 to 15 grains). Dated 1555, 1556, 1557, and 
1558. 

Obv., MARIA . D . G . SCOTOR . REGINA., a large M 
crowned, m.m. cross potent ; rev., VICIT . VERITAS . 1558, 
lion rampant crowned. (See Fig. 195.) 

Nine, varied, with a Penny, 1553, sold for 1 12s. ; one, dated 

1558, with inner circle, realised 7s. 

Nonsunt (21 to 24 grains) of Francis and Mary. Dated 155S 
and 1559. 

Obv., FRAN . ET . MA . D . G . R . R . SCOTO . D . D . 
VIEN., F M in monogram crowned, between a dolphin and 
thistle-head, both crowned ; rev., IAM . NON . SVNT . DVO . 
SED . VNA . CARO. (See Fig. 196.) 

Ordinary specimens, 2s. 6d. to 5s. 

Hardhead (10 to 17 grains) of Francis and Mary. Dated 1558, 

1559, and 1560. 

Obv., FRAN . ET . MA . D . G . R . R . SCOT . D . D . 
VIEN., in the field F. M. in monogram, crowned, between two 
dolphins; rev., VICIT . VERITAS and date, a lion rampant 
crowned. 

On some specimens, dated '58, the name FRAN, is omitted, 
the legend beginning ET . MA. 

Many of these coins also bear the countermark of the heart 
and star. 

Seventeen, of '58, '59, and '60, sold for 5s. ; ten for Gs. ; and 
five, all fine, realised 7s. 

Bawbee* (very rare) of Francis and Mary. Dated 1559. 

Obv., FRAN . ET . MARIA . REX . REGINA . FRANCOR . 

* BAWBEES, Scottiee for Bas Pieces. 



SCOTTISH COINS. 85 

MART. CONTINUED. 
BILLON. Continued. 

SCOT., the arms of France and Scotland on separate shields 
under a large crown; rev., SIT . NOMEX . DNI . BENI- 
DICTVM . 1559, a cross formed of four flower-buds, having 
stars of seven points waved, and thistle-heads in alternate 
angles, m.m. cross. 

A very desirable set of the above, comprising Plack and 
Half Plack of Edinburgh, Plack of Stirling, Penny with bust, 
Penny with VICIT VERITAS, Plack of 1557, Hardhead, 
Nonsunt, and Hardhead of Francis and Mary (nine coins), sold 
for .1 Is. 

James VI., 1567-16O3. 

GOLD. Piece of .20 Scots, Noble, Lion, Two-thirds Lion. One- 
third Lion, Thistle Noble, Hat Piece, Eider, Half Eider, 
Sword and Sceptre Piece, and the Half Sword and Sceptre 
Piece. 

.20 Piece. (-1G7.V grains). Dated 1575 or 1576. 

Obv., IACOBVS . 6 . DEI . GEA . EEX . SCOTOE., in th 
exergue IN . VTEVNQVE . PARATVS . 1576., the King's bust 
crowned to the right, with sword in right hand and olive- 
branch in left ; rei\, PAECEEE . SVBIECTIS . & . DEBEL- 
LAEE . SVTERBOS., the arms of Scotland crowned. (See 
Fig. 30.) 

Specimens have sold for ,5. .5 I7a. Cd., 6, Q 12s. 6d., 
9 10s., 11, -20, 21, 35, and .35 10s. 

Noble (96 grains). Dated 1580. 

Obv., IACOBVS . DEI . GEA . EEX . SCOTOEVM, the 
King's bust with bare head to left, m.m. crown; rev., 
EXVEGAT . DE . ET . DISSIP . INIMICI . EIVS., the arms 
of Scotland crowned between 15 and 80, no m.m. (See 
Fig. 32.) 

Specimens have realised ,3, o 10s., .6 5s., 7 10s., .26, 
ar.d .30. 

Lion (80 grains). Dated 15S4, 1586 and 1588. 

Obv., POST . 5 . & 100 . PEOA . INVICTA . MANENT . 
HEC., a crowned lion sejant, full face, with sword in right paw 
and sceptre in left ; rev., DEVS . IVDICIVM . TVVM . EEGI . 
DA.. 1581., four crowned cyphers of I.E.. forming a cross, in 
the centre of which the letter S. (See Fig. 33.) 

Specimens have sold for ,1 10s., <1 15s., 2, 2 2a., 
j -2s. 6d., ,17 10s., and .30. 

Two-thirds Lion (52| to 53 grains). Dated 1585 and 1537. 

Type similar to the Lion. 

.15 10s., .25 10s., .35 10s., and ,201. 

One-third Lion (26 grains). Dated 1584. 

Type similar to the Lion. 

A specimen sold in 1875 for ,205. 

Thistle Noble (120 grains). Struck in 1590. 

Obv., IACOBVS . 6 . DEI . GEATIA . EEX . SCOTOEVM., 
a ship with a flag at each end, one bearing the letter I, the 



86 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COIXS. 

JAMES VI. CONTINUED. 
GOLD. Continued. - 

other the figure 6, and on the centre of the ship the arms of 
Scotland crowned, with a thistle under; rev., FLORENT . 
SCEPT . PUS . EEGNA . HIS . 10VA . DAT . XVMERAT . Q . 
(See Fig. 31.) 

.1 14s., 2 2s., 2 5s., 4, 4, 8s., .5, .6 2s. 6d., <G 10s., 
.7 10s., and .8. 

Hat Piece (69 grains). Dated 1591, 1592, or 1593. 

Obv., IACOBVS . 6 . D . G . E . SCOTOEVM, the King's 
bust with high-crowned hat to right, a thistle-head behind ; 
rev., TE . SOLYM . VEREOR . 1591., a lion sejant guardant 
to left, holding a sceptre erect, a cloud over with the word 
TEHOVAH in Hebrew letters. (See Fig. 35.) 

.1 8s., .1 14s., 2 6s., 2 11s., .5, 7 7s., 3, 9 9s., 
10, and .35. 

Rider (78 grains). Dated 1593, 1594, 1598, 1599, and 1601. 

Obv., legend as on the Hat Piece, the King in armour with 
sword in right hand, galloping to the right, a lion on the 
horse's caparison, date under, m.m. quatrefoil ; rev., the 
Scottish arms crowned, surrounded by SPEBO . HELIOBA., 
m.m. quatrefoil. (See Fig. 34.) 

1 la., .1 8s., 1 10s., .1 16s., .1 17s., 2 10s., 2 15s., 
.3, 3 10s., .3 16s., .4, 4 2s., 4 8s., 4, 10s., and .4 12s. 

Half Rider (39 grains). Dated 1593, 1594, 1595, 1599, and 
1601. Type similar to the Eider. 

3 19s., 4 4s., .4 10#., .6 63., 7, 1 15s., S, and 
.10 2s. 6d. 

The Eider and Half Eider, together, 2 I0a. 

Sword and Sceptre Piece (77 grains). Dated 1601, 1602, 
1603, and 1604.* 

Obv., legend as on the Hat Piece, the Scottish arms, crowned ; 
rev., SALVS . POPVLI . SVPEEMA . LEX, the sword and 
sceptre in saltire, between two thistle-heads, a crown over and 
the date below. (See Fig. 36.) 

18s., 1, 1 Is., 1 3s., 2 10?., and .4 10s. 

Half Sioord and Sceptre Piece (33 grains). Dated 1601 ant) 
1602. 

Type similar to the preceding piece. 

16s. and 1 2s. 

The Sword and Sceptre Piece and its Half, sold together. 
1 2s., 1 6s., .1 7s., .1 16s., 1 18s., .2 2s., 2 3s., and 
2 5s. 

SILVER. Sword Dollar, Two-thirds Sword Dollar, One-third Sword 
Dollar, Noble and Half Noble, Thistle Dollar, Half Thistle- 
Dollar, Thistle Noble, Half Thistle Noble, Quarter Thistle 
Noble, Forty Shilling, Thirty Shilling, Twenty Shilling, and Ten 

* Lindsay gives the figure of a Sword and Sceptre Piece, dated 1611, struck in silver, 
presumably as a pattern. This piece was in the possession of the late Mr. Cnff, and was 
old, at the sale of his collection in 1854, with live silver coins of this Kin?, for 15s. (Seo 
page 92). Another example of this pattern, with a Thistle Merk of 1G03, sold for &. 
mlS&i. 



SCOTTISH COIXS. 87 

JAMES VI. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Cont inu"d. 

Shilling Piece, Balance Merk, Half Balance Merk, Ten Shilling 
Piece with bare head, Five Shilling Piece, Half Crown Piece, and 
One Shilling Piece Scots, Thistle Merk, Half Thistle Merk, 
Quarter Thistle Merk", and Eighth of Thistle Merk. 

Sword Dollar (480 grains). Dated 1567, 1568, 1569, 1570, 
and 1571. Current for Thirty Shillings Scots. 

Obv., IACOBVS . 6 . DEI . GEAT1A . REX . SCOTORVM., 
the arms of Scotland, crowned, between I.E., both crowned ; 
rev., PRO . ME . SI . MEREOR . IN . ME., a sword erect, 
crowned, having a hand on the left of the sword pointing to the 
value XXX on the right side, and the date below. (See Fig. Ill, 
rev. of the One-third Sword Dollar.) 

Specimens have realised 12s., 13s., 14a., 1G<., 17a., 18s., .1, 
.1 7s., and 2 6s. 

Two-thirds Sword Dollar (320 grains).- Dates as above. 

Type similar to the Sword Dollar, but XX. on rev. for value, 
Twenty Shillings Scots. 

Specimens have sold for 14s., 15s., .1 3s., and 2 4s. 

The Dollar and Two-thirds, together, 17s. 

One-third Sword Dollar (160 grains). Dates as above. 

Type similar, but X for value, Ten Shillings Scots. (See 
Fig. 111.) 

Specimens have sold for lls., 13s., and .1 15s. 

The Dollar and One-third, together, 15s. and 2 2g. 

Sets of the three pieces have sold for ,1, .1 10s., 2 4-3., 
3, 3 3s., and .3 5s. 

Noble (about 103 grains). Dated 1572 to 1577 and 1580. 

Obv., same legend as on the Sword Dollar, the arms of Scotland 
crowned between 68; rev., SALVVM . FAC . POPVLVM . 
DNE. and the date, an ornamented cross with a star in centre, 
a crown in the first and third quarters, and a thistle-head in the 
others, ra.m. crosa. (See Fig. 112.) 

In some specimens, the thistle-heads are in the first and third 
quarters, and the crowns in the second and fourth quarters. 

Ordinary specimens, from 6s. to 10s. 

Half Noble (about 52 grains). Dated 1572, 1573, 1574, 1576, 
1577, and 1580. 

Similar to the Noble, but 3 4 at side of the arms. 

The Noble and Half, together, 6a., 8s., 9s., and .1 6s. 

Two Nobles and a Half, together, lls. 

Thistle Dollar (about 343 grains). Dated 1578 and 1579. 

Obv., IACOBVS . 6 . DEI . G . REX . SCOTORVM., 
the Scottish arms crowned; rev., NEMO . ME . IMPVNE . 
LACESSET . and date, a thistle uncrowned between I and R. 

Specimens have sold for .1 3s., <! 5s., .1 12s., .2, 
2 6s., 3 19s., ,4 5s., and an exceptional specimen .21 10s. 

Half Thistle Dollar (170 grains). Dated 1580 and 1581, 

Type similar to the Thistle Dollar, but dated 1580 or 1581, 
and with a crown over the thistle on rev. 

Specimens have realised <! Is., 2 15s., 7, and .36. 



88 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COIXS. 

JAMES VI. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

Thistle Noble (about 88 grains). Dated 1581. 

Type similar to the Half Thistle Dollar. 

A specimen, styled a Quarter Thistle Dollar, sold in 1875 for 
36. 

Half Thistle Noble (about 40 grains). Dated 1581. 

Type similar to the Thistle Noble. 

Quarter Thistle Noble (about 20 grains). Dated 1581. 

Type similar to the preceding. 

Forty Shilling Piece (480 grains). Dated 1582. 

Obi;., IACOBVS . DEE . GRATIA . REX . SCOTORVM., the 
King's bust in armour, crowned, to the left, with a sword in 
right hand ; rev., HONOR . REGIS . IVDICIVM . DILIGIT . 
1582., Scottish arms crowned between I R above XL S. 
(See Fig. 113, rev. of the XXX Shilling Piece.) 

Specimens have realised .13 5s., <15 15s., .20, .30 10s., 
.31 10s., and .85. 

Thirty Shilling Piece (360 grains). Dated 1582 to 1585. 

Similar to above, but XXX S., for value, Thirty Shillings 
Scots. (For rev. see Fig. 113.) 

Specimens have sold for 10s., 13s., 14s. 6d. ; and one, dated 
1585, for 4>. 

Two sold together for .6 10s., acd three for .3 12s. 

Twenty Shilling Piece (240 grains). Dated 1582 to 1584. 

Similar to above, but XX . S. 

One, very fine, 18s. 

Two sold together for '2 14s. 

The Thirty and Twenty Shilling Pieces, to?ether, 2 10. 

Ten Shilling Piece (120 grains). Dated 1582 to 1584. 

As above, but X . S. 

Two sold together for .6 7s. 6d. 

The Thirty and Ten Shilling Pieces, together, 17s. 

The Twenty and Ten Shilling Pieces, together, .1 Is. 

Sets (XXXa., XXs., and Xs. Pieces) have sold for .1 5s., 
1 6s., .1 8s., .1 11s., .1 17a., 2 2s., and 3. 

Balance Merk (72 grains). Dated 1591, 1592, and 1593. 

Obv., IACOBVS . 6 . D . G . R . SCOTORVM and date, the 
Scottish arms crowned between two thistle-heads ; rev., HIS . 
DIFFERT . REGE . TYRANNVS., a sword and balance. (See 
Fig. 114.) 

Ordinary specimens, from 7s. 6d. to 15s. One, dated 1593, 
sold for 4s. 

Two sold together for 1 10s.; and three, with a Half 
Balance Merk, realised 1. 

Half Balance Merk (35 grains). Dated 1591 and 1592. 

Type similar to the Balance Merk, but without the thistle- 
heads at side of the arms. 

A specimen sold for 15s., and another, extremely fine, realised 
.658. 

The Balance Merk and its Half sold together for .1 15s. and 
1 4s. 



SCOTTISH COINS. 89 

JAMES VI. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

Ten Shilling Piece, with bare head to right (98 grains). 
Dated 1593, 1594, 1595, 1598, and 1599. 

Obv., JACOB VS . 6 . D . G . R . SCOTORVM, the King's 
bust, bare-headed, in armour, to the right: rev., NEMO . ME . 
IMPVNE . LACESSIT, arid the date, surrounding a thistle with 
three heads crowned. (See Fig. 115.) 

From 6s. 6d. to 10s. 

A brilliant specimen, 1593, realised ,4. 

Two specimens sold together for 1, and two others for 15s. 

Five Shilling Piece, with bare head (49 grains). Dated 1593, 

1594, 1595, 1598, 1599. 
Similar to the preceding. 
From 4s. to 8s. 

Half Grown (Scots), with bare head (24| grains). Dated 1594, 

1595, 1598, 1599, and 1601. 
Similar to the preceding. 

One Shilling Piece (Scots), ivith bare head (about 9 grains). 
Dated 1594, 1595, 1596. 

Similar to the preceding. 

A specimen, much finer than usually met with, sold for 12a. 
in 1883. 

Two Ten Shilling Pieces, the Five Shillings, Half Crown, and 
Shilling, sold together for 8s. 

A fine set of the four pieces realised 15a. 

Thistle Merle (100 grain?). Dated 1601 to 1604. 

Obv., IACOBVS . 6 . D . G . R . SCOTORVM., the arms of 
Scotland crowned; rev., REGEM . IOVA . PROTEGIT and the 
date, a thistle with two leaves crowned. (See Fig. 116.) 

From 3s. 6d. to 5s. 6d. 

Two ppecimens sold together for ,1. 

Half Thistle Merk (50 graius). Dated 1601 to 1603. 

Similar to the Thistle Merk. 

Ordinary specimens, 2s. 6d. to 4s. 6d. 

A Thistle Merk and its Half, together, 2 10s. 

Quarter Thistle Mtrk (25 grains). Dated 1601 to 1604. 

Similar to the preceding. 

Ordinary specimens, 2s. 6d. to 4s. 6d. 

A Thistle Merk, its Half, and three Quarter-Merks, sold 
together for ,1 16s. 

A Thistle Merk, its Half and Quarter, 2. 

Eighth of Thistle Merk (12| grains). Dated 1601 and 1602. 

Similar to the pteceding. 

Ordinary specimens, 2s. 6d. to 4s. 6d. 

A set of the Thistle Merk, Half, Quarter, and Eighth, sold 
for 14s. ; and a similar set, but finer, sold for <1 17s. 

A Thistle Merk, two Quarter Merks, and two Eighth Merks, 
together, <! 10s. 

Mixed lots of some of the foregoing coins have sold as follows : 

A Sword Dollar and One-third, with a Noble and Half Noble, 
.1 ICs. 



90 TUB VALUATION OF BRITISH COIXS. 

JAMES VI. CONTINUED. 

SILVER. Continued. 

A Sword Dollar and One-third, with two Nobles and a Balance 
Merk, .1 19s. 

A Sword Dollar and Ten Shilling Piece, 1582, ^1 4s. 

A Noble and Half Noble, a Balance and Half Balance Merk, 
the bare-headed Ten Shillings, Five Shillings, Half Crown, and 
Shilling, with a Thistle Merk, Half, Quarter, and Eighth Thistle 
Merk (twelve coins), ,2. 

A Noble and Half Noble, with the bare-headed Ten Shilling, 
Five Shilling, Half Crown, and Shilling: Pieces, .1 8s. 
BILLON. Plack or Atkinson, Half Plack, Hardhead and Half Hard- 
head with lion on rev., Hardhead with arms on rev. , and Saltire 
Plack. 

Plack or Atkinson (20 to 28 grains). 

Obv. IACOB . 6 . (or IACOBVS) D . G . R . SCO, arms of 
Scotland crowned; rev., OPPID . EDINB, a thistle crowned. 
(See Fig. 197.) 

Ordinary specimens, Is. to 2s. each. 

Half Plack or Half Atkinson (12| grains). 

Type similar to the Plack. 

A good example, 7s. 

Extra fine specimens have sold for ,1 5s. and 2. 

Hardhead (about 22 grains), with lion on rev. 

Obv., IACOB . G . D . G . R . SCOTO., surrounding I . K. 
crowned, m.m. cross ; rev. VINCIT . VERITAS, a lion rampant 
crowned, with two point?. 

Ordinary specimens, 9c). to Is. 6d. 

Half Hardhead (about 12 grains), with lion on rev. 

Similar to the Hardhead, but the I . R. on obv. is in mono- 
gram, and there are no points behind the lion on rev. 

A very fine specimen, 12s ; another sold in 1883 for <2 5s. 

Hardhead (about 22 grains). With arms on rev. 

Obv., IACOB . 6 . D . G . R . SCO., surrounding I . R. crowned ; 
rev., the Scottish arms crowned, VINCIT . VERITAS. 

Ordinary specimens, Is. to Is. 6d. 

Saltire Plack (about 24 grains). 

Obv., IACOB . 6 . D . G . R . SCO., two sceptres in saltire, 
suppressed by a two-leaved thistle ; rev., OPPID . EDINB., 
in centre a lozenge with a thistle-head on each point. (See 
Fig. 198.) 

Specimens have sold for 9?., <1 10?., and .2 2s. 

A Saltire Plack and Half Hardhead, together, 7s. 

A Saltire Plack and three Hardheads sold for 5s. 
COPPER. Twopence and Penny. 

Tivopence (55 to 60 grain?). 

Obv., IACOBVS . 6 . D . G . R . SCOTORVM, the King's bust, 
bareheaded, to the right; rev., OPP1DVM . EDINBVRGI, 
three thistle-heads in centre. 

An exceptional specimen sold for ,3 in 1875. 

A specimen, described as being finer than usually met with, 
and four Hardheads, realised only 6s. in 1883. 



SCOTTISH COISS. 91 

JAMES VI. CONTINUED. 
COPPEE. Continued. 

Penny (about 30 grains). 

Obv., legend as on the Twopence, a large pellet behind, and 
a small pellet in front of the King's bust; rev., similar to the 
Twopence. (See Fig. 171.) 

An exceptional specimen sold for 5 10s. 

SCOTTISH COINS AFTER THE ACCESSION 
OF JAMES VI. TO THE THRONE OF 
ENGLAND. 

James I., 16O3 1625. 

GOLD. Unit or Sceptre, Double Crown, Crown, Half Crown, and 
Thistle Crown. 

These coins were struck in 1605-6-11-12 and 1613, and differ 
from the contemporary English coins in bearing, on the escutcheon, 
the arms of Scotland in the first and fourth quarters, the arms. 
of France and England quarterly in the second quarter, and 
the harp of Ireland in the third quarter. 

The weights of these pieces are the same as of James I.'s 
second English gold issue. 

Specimens have realised the following prices : 

Unit, .1 7s., .1 16s., and <lo 15s. 

Double Crown, 5 17?. 6d. and .30. 

Crown, .4 6s. and ,12. 

Half Crown, 12. 

A Half Crown and Thistle Crown, together, 1 15s. 

Thistle Crown. (See Fig. 37.) 

Specimens have sold for 8s. and 17s. 

It was intended that the coins of the two kingdoms should 
circulate in either country indiscriminately, but the propor- 
tionate value of the Scottish coins to the English was nominally 
as one to twelve, the gold piece worth 20s. in England passing 
in Scotland for ,12 Scots. 

SILVER. Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, Sixpence, Twopence, and 
Penny. 

First coinage. Struck between 1605 and 1610. 

These coins are very like the English issue, and were until 
recently classed as English coins. The Crown and Half Crown 
have m.m. thistle, " &" instead of ET in the legend, and a 
thistle in place of a rose upon the housings of the horse, although 
the arms on rev. are placed as on the English issue. 

Croii'n (464J: grains). Named in Scots money The 3 Piece. 

A very fine example, .3 14s. 

Half Crown (232i grains) or Thirty Shillings Scots. 

The Crown and Half Crown, together, 2 3?. 

Shillinff (92f grains) or Twelve Shillings Scots. 

The King's crown is ornamented by a lis between two crosses, 
whereas on the English Shilling the crown has a cross between 
two lis. 



92 THE VALUATION OP BRITISH COINS. 

JAMES I. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

Sixpence. Any with m.tn. thistle and having the crown 
ornamented as on the Shilling just described, and dated between 
1605 and 1610, are Scottish. 

Second coinage. After 1610. 

CrovmObv., I ACOBVS. D.G.MAG. BEIT. FEAN . & . HIB . 
EEX., a thistle-head orowned on the caparison of the horse, 
m.m. thistle-head ; rev., QV^ . DEVS . COXIVNXIT . NEMO . 
SEPAEET., on an escutcheon garnished the arms of Scotland 
in the first and fourth quarters, those of England quarterly 
with France in the second, and those of Ireland in the third ; 
m.m. thistle-head. 

From .1 03. to 2 I0a. 

Half Crown. Similar to the Crown. 

From 8s. 6d. to 15s. ; one, extra fine, .1 lls. 

The Crown and Half Crown, together, .1 lls. 

Shilling. Legend as on the Crown. 

Obv., the King's bust crowned to the right, XII behind, 
m.m. thistle-head; rev., similar to the Crowu, but the shield 
plain. 

From 3s. 6d. to 5s. 6d. 

Specimens sold in 1883 for 8s. and 13s. 

Sixpence. Similar to the Shilling, but VI behind the bust, 
and the date over tho shield. Sixpences only are dated. 

A Sixpence, dated 1619, supposed to be unique, sold for 
46a. 

Twopence. Current for Two Shillings Scots. 

Similar to Fig. 65, but m.m. thistle on both sides. 

Penny. Current for One Shilling Scots. 

As the Twopence, but no crown over the rose or thistle, m.m. 
thistle-head on both sides. 

The following pricas have been realised for lots of the above 
coins, sold together : 

Two Half Crowns (of the second issue), a Shilling, Twopence, 
and Penny, together with the silver pattern of the Sword and 
Sceptre Piece, 1G11 (referred to in the foot note on page 86), 
realised 15s. 

A Half Crown, Shilling, Penny and Halfpenny, .1 4s. 

A Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, and Sixpence, <! lls. 

A Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, Twopence, and Penny, 
.5 7s. 6d. 
COPPER. Hardhead or Bodle, and Half Hardhead. 

Hardhead (about 30 grains). 

Obv., 1 ACOBVS . D . G . MAG . BEIT., a three-headed 
thistle; rev., FRAX. A: HIB . EEX, lion rampant crowned, two 
points behind. (See Fig. 167, from which the points have been 
inadvertently omitted.) 

Some specimens read DEI . GRA. and FEAXCIE . ET 
HIBEEXIE . EEX. 

Ordinary specimens, from Is. to 2s. 

An exceptional specimen, 4s. 



SCOTTISH corns. 93 

JAMES I. CONTINUED. 
COFFEE. Continued. 

Half Hardhead (about 15 grains). 

Similar to the Hardhead, but only one point behind the lion. 
An extra fine specimen realised <7 in 1875 ; one sold for 
9 5s. ; one, described as being probably the finest known, sold 
for <3 5s. in 1883 ; and another, well preserved, realised 
only 17s. at the same sale. 

Charles I., 16251649. 

GOLD. First coinage. Sceptre or Unit, Half Unit, and Quarter Unit 
or Crown. 

/Second coinage, by Briot. Unit or Sovereign, Half Unit, 
Quarter Unit, and Eighth of the Unit. 

Sceptre or Unit, first coinage (15-1 grains). 

Similar to the Unit of James I., except that CAROLVS is 
substituted for JACOBVS. 

Specimens have sold for 1 los., <3 4s., and G 6s. 

Half Unit. As above. 

Specimens have sold for 16s. and <11 15s. 

Crown. As above. 

A Half Unit and Crown sold for 2 5s. 

Briot's Unit or Sovereign (155 grains). 

Obv., CAROLVS . D . G . MAG . BRITAN . FRAN . ET , 
HIB . REX., King's bust in armour, crowned, to the right, with 
sceptre in right hand and orb in left, thistle-head after the 
legend, a small B over the crown ; rev., HIS . PR2ESVM . VT . 
PROSIM., Royal arms crowned between C and R, both 
crowned. 

This is one of the finest coins ever struck. 

Specimens have sold for ,1 11s.. <! 13'.. 2 6s., 2 12s., 
2 14s., 2 los., 3 Is., .3 3-.. 3 5s., .3 10s., 4, 1 4s., 
.4 12s. 6d., .4 16s., ,6 and 3 8s. 

Briot's Half Unit (77 grains). 

Obv., CAR . D . G . MAG . BRIT . FRAN . ET . HIB . REX., 
the King's bust with flowing hair, crowned, to the left, and 
extending below the inner circle, small B under the bust ; rev., 
VNITA . TVEMVR, arms. &c., as on the Unit. Some specimens 
have a lozenge under the C and R. 

Specimens have realised 14s., ,1 Qs., 2 2s., 3 7s. 6d., ,4, 
4, 14s., and ,5 10?. 

Briot's Quarter Unit (38.V grains). 

Type similar to the preceding. 

Specimens have sold for lls., 1 10$. , 2 11s., 4> 8s., and 
5 10s. 

Briot's Eighth of the Unit (19 grains). 

Type similar to preceding, but some specimens are without 
the C and B, and on others the C and R are not crowned. 

Specimens have realised <1, <1 Is., 2 17s., 4, 15s., .5, 
and <G 10s. 

The Half, Quarter, and Eighth, together, ,13, 



04 THE VALUATION OP BRITISH COIXS. 

CHARLES I. CONTINUED. 

SILVER. Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, Sixpence, Twopence, and 
Penny, Noble, Half Noble, Quarter Noble, and Piece of Two 
Shillings Scots. 

Crown, first coinage. 

Exactly similar to the second coinage Crown of James I., bat 
CAROLVS for IACOBVS. 

Specimens have sold for 17s., .1 8s., and .4 15s. 

Half Crown, firat coinage. As above. 

Specimens have sold for 4s., Ss. 6d., 12s., 15s., 19s., and 
^1 5a. 

Crown and Half Crown, together. .5 2a. 6d. 

Shilling, first coinage. As above. 

From 4s. 6d. to 7s. 6d. 

Crown, Half Crown, and Shilling, together, 1 14g. 

Sixpence, first coinage. Dated 1625, 1632, 1633. Aa above. 

Shilling and Sixpence, together, ,5 15s. 

Half Crown, Shilling, and Sixpence, 11s. 

Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, and Sixpence, <1 12s. 

Twopence. 

Obv., C . D . G . EOSA . SINE . SPINA, a rose crowned, 
ro.m. thistle ; rev., TVEATVR . VNITA . DEVS., a thistle 
crowned, m.m. thistle. 

A specimen sold for 17a. in 1883. 

Penny. Similar to the above, but no crown over the rose 
and thistle. 

Crown, by Briot. Issued 1637. 

Obv., CAROLVS . D . G. MAGN . BRITANN . FRANC . ET 
HIBERN . REX., the King on horseback riding to the left, 
m.m. thistle ; rev., legend and type as those of the first Crown, 
bnt the arms crowned, m.m. thistle-head and small B at end of 
the legend. 

Specimens have realised .1 2s., .1 7a., 2, 3 3s., .3 7a., 
J64, and 4s. 

Half Crown, by Briot. 

Type similar to the Crown. 

Specimens have realised 4s., 10s., 12s.. 15s., 16s., 193., 
1 8s., 1 12s., .1 17s. 6d., .2 11s.. and .3 3s. 

Crown and Half Crown, together, .1 6s., .1 8s., and .1 10s. 

Half Crown, by Falconer.* 

Type similar to Briot's Crown, but in some specimens a 
email F is nnder the horse's feet. 

Specimens have sold for 81., 9s., .1 2s., and 2. 

Shilling, by Briot. 

Obv., CAR . D . G . MAG . BRIT . FRAN . ET . HIB . 
REX., the King's bnst to left, extending to edge of the piece 
below, XII behind, a small B at the end of the legend ; rev., 
arms on a plain shield crowned between C and R both crowned, 
a small B at the end of the legend. 

From 5s. to 1. 

* FALCONER, of the Edinburgh mint, was Briot's son-in-law. 



SCOTTISH COISS. 95 

CHARLES I. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

Shilling, by Falconer. 

Type similar to Briot's Shilling, but the bust is within 
the inner circle, and instead of the small B there is a small p 
either on obv. or on rev. over the crown. 

From 53. to 10s. 

A Half Crown and Shilling, together, .1 Is. 

Sixpence, by Briot, and also by Falconer. 

Type similar to the Shilling. 

Briot's Shilling and Sixpence, together, <1 16s. and 2 2s. 

Two Sixpences by Briot, with a Shilling by Falconer, sold 
for 8s. in 1883. 

Noble (48 to 55 grains), by Briot. Six Shillings and Eight- 
pence Scots Gfd. English. 

Obv., CAR . D . G . SCOT . ANG . FE . ET . HIB . B., the 
Kiiig's bust crowned to the left, extending to edge of coin 
below, VI . 8 behind the bust, a small B under the bust; rev., 
CHRISTO . AVSPICE . REGNO., arms crowned between C 
and R crowned, a small B over the edge of the crown. 

A variety has CAROL VS at full length, without the small B, 
or C R ; another is dated 1636 over the crown. 

Ordinary specimens, 3s. to 5s. 

Half Noble (24 to 30 grains), by Briot and Falconer. 

Obv., similar to the Xoble, but XL (for Forty Pence Scots = 
3Jd. English) behind the head; rev., SALVS . REIPVB . 
SVPREMA . LEX, a thistle crowned. 

On Briot's pieces there is a small B under the bust. 

Falconer's pieces have a small F over the crown on rev. 

There ia a rare variety with a thistle instead of XL behind 
the bust and, on rev., crowned arms as on the Noble. 

Ordinary specimens. Is. 6d. to 2s. 6d. 

A Xoble and Half Xoble (unpublished), sold together 
for 10s. 6d. 

Six varieties of the Half Xoble, four by Briot and two by 
Falconer, sold for 5s. 

Four varieties, one by Briot, and three by Falconer, 12s. 

Quarter Noble (9 to 13 grains). By Briot and Falconer. 

Obv., similar to the Halt' Noble, but XX behind the bust, for 
value twenty pence Scots = ld. English ; rev., IVS . THRONVM 
FIRMAT. Briot's pieces are distinguished by a small B, and 
Falconer's by a small F. 

Ordinary specimens, Is. to 2s. 

Scots Two Shilling Piece (11 to 16 grains) = 2d. English. 

Obv.. CAR . D . G . SCOT . AN . FR . & . HIB . R ., similar 
bust ; rev., IYST . THRONVM . FIRMAT., arms of Scotland 
crowned. 

Mixed lots of the preceding coins have sold as follows : 

A Xoble, two Half Nobles, three Quarter Xobles, and three 
Two Shilling Pieces, .1 Is. 

Two Shillings, a Sixpence, Noble. Half and Quarter Noble, 
and three Twopennies, .1 10a. 



96 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

CHAELES I. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

Half Crown, Shilling, Noble, Half Noble, Quarter Noble, and 
Half Groat, 17s. 

Two extra fine Shillings, two Nobles, and a Half Noble, 9s. 
Briot's Half Crown, Shilling, Half and Quarter Noble, 12a. 
COPPER. Hardhead and Half Hardhead. 

Hardhead, Bodle or Turner (about 27 grains). 
Same type as the Hardhead of James ( Fig. 167), but CAEOLVS 
for IACOBVS., two points behind the lion. 

Twelve specimens, varied, sold for 10s. in 1883. 

Half Hardhead (about 13 grains). 

Same type, but one point behind the lion. 

Charles II., 166O 1685. 

GOLD. None. 

SILVER. Four Merk Piece, Two Merk Piece, Merk, Half Merk, 

Dollar, Half Dollar, Quarter Dollar, Eighth of a Dollar, and 

Sixteenth of a Dollar. 

Four Merk Piece (about 412 grains), by Simon. Dated 1664, 

1665, 1670, 1673, 1674, and 1675. 

Obv., CAROLVS . II . DEI . GEA, King's bust laureate in 

armour to the right, a thistle over (sometimes under) the bust, 

on some coins a small F under the bust ; rev., MAG . BRI . FRA . 

ET . HIB . REX., the arms of Scotland, &c., on four shields in 

form of a cross, CC cyphered and crowned in each angle, 
in the centre for value. 

The value of the Merk being 13s. 4d. Sects, the Four Merk 
Piece was equivalent to '2 13s. 4d. Scots, represented by LIII . 4. 
= 53s. 4d. 

Specimens have sold for 11s., .1 lls., 1 16s., and ,1 18s. 

Two Merk Piece (about 206 grains). Dated 1664, 1670, 1673, 
1674, and 1675. 

V V VT 

Type similar to the above, but for value = 26s. 8d. Scots. 

o 

A very fine specimen, 2. Others. 7s. and 1. 

The Four Merk and Two Merk Pieces, together, 2 10a. 

Merk (about 103 grains). Dated 1664 to 1675 inclusive. 

Similar to the preceding, but with ^j l * for value. 

From Is. 6d. to 3s. 6d. 

Half Merk (about 51 grains). Dated 1664, 1665, 1668, 1669, 
1670-3, and 1675. , 

Similar to the preceding, but o for value. 

From Is. to 2s. 

Sets of the four pieces, 13s., 15s., and .1 2s. 

Dollar (about 416 grains). Dated 1676, 1679, 1680 to 1682. 

Obv., same legend as on the preceding coins, but the King's 
bust, laureate and clothed, is turned to the left ; rev., SCO . ANG . 
FR . ET . HIB . REX., the arms of Scotland, England, 
France, and Ireland, in form of a cross, a leaved thistle in 
each quarter, and two C's interlinked in centre. 



SCOTTISH COINS. 97 

CHARLES II. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

The Dollar passed for Fifty-six Shillings Coots, and the smaller 
pieces in proportion. 

Very fine examples, .2 53. , .3 18s., and ,30. Others, 8s., 
10s., 12s. 6d., and 14*. 

Half Dollar (about 208 grains). Dated 1675, 1676, and 1681. 

Similar to preceding. 

Ordinary specimens, from 6s. to 10s. Others, well preserved, 
13^. and 15$. 

A fine specimen, <1 os. One in perfect proof condition, <15. 

A Dollar and Half Dollar, together, in perfect preservation, 
sold in 1875 for .8 8s., but realised .45 (Dollar <30, Half 
Dollar <15) in 1882, as noted above. 

Quarter Dollar (about 104 grains). Dated from 1675 to 
16S2 inclusive. Similar type. 

Ordinary specimens, 2s. 6d. to 4s. 6d. 

Eighth of a Dollar (about 52 grains). Dated 1676, 1677, 
1679, 1680 to 1682. Similar type. 

Ordinary specimens, Is. 6d. to 3s. 6d. 

Sixteenth of a Dollar (about 26 grains). Dated 1677 to 1681. 

Obv., same type; bat rev. has a St. Andrew's cross with a 
crown in centre, and in the angles a thistle, rose, fleur-de-lis, and 
harp. 

Ordinary specimens, Is. 6d. to 3s. 6d. 

The Dollar, Quarter, Eighth, and Sixteenth, together, .1 10s. 

Sets of the five pieces, <! 5s. and 2 5s. 
COPPER. Turner, Half Turner, Bawbee, and Bodle. 

The Turner and Bodle were current for Twopence Scots, the 
Half Turner for One Penny Scots, and the Bawbee for Sixpence 
Scots. 

Turner (36 to 46 grains). 

Obv., CAR . D . G . SCOT . ANG . PRA . ET . HIB . E., in 
centre C R crowned ; rev., a leaved thistle, and motto NEMO . 
ME . IMPVNE . LACESSET. (See Fip. 169.) 

Some specimens have II over C. R., and others have the 
numerals after C. R. 

Half Turner (18 to 22 grains). 

Obv., CAR . D ..G . SCO . ANG . FR . ET . HIB . R., the 
numerals II between C and R crowned; rev., similar to the 
Turner. 

Bawbee (120 to 130 grain?). Dated 1677, 1678, and 1679. 

Obv., CAR . II . D . G . SCO . AN . FR . ET . HIB . R., 
King's bast laureate to left ; rev., NEMO . ME . IMPVNE . 
LACESSET, and date, surrounding a leaved thistle crowned. 
(See Fig. 170.) 

Bodle (about 44 grains). Dated 1G77 and 1678. 

Obv., CAR . II . D . G . SCO . ANG . FRA . ET . HIB . REX, 
a sword and sceptre in saltire under a crown; rev., NEMO, 
ifcc., a leaved thistle with date over. (See Fig. 168.) 

Three Bawbees and a Bodle, 8s. 

Three Bawbees and three Bodle?, 03. 



98 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

CHAKLES II. CONTINUED. 
COPPEK. Continued. 

A Bodle of 1678, 12s. Another, the finest known, ^1 12?. 
Four Turners, two Half Turners, three Bawbees, and a Bodle, 
from the Wingate collection, sold for 15s. 

James VII. (II. of England), 16851688. 

GOLD. None. 

SILVEE. Forty Shilling Piece and Ten Shilling Piece. 

A Sixty Shilling Piece was struck but never put into circula- 
tion. 

Forty Shilling Piece (286 grains). Dited 1637 and 1688. 

Obv., IACOBVS . II . DEI . GRATIA, the King's bust 
laureate to the right, 40 under ; rev., MAG . BRIT . FRA . ET . 
HIB . REX and date, the arms of Scotland, &c., crowned : on 
the edge NEMO . ME . IMPVNE . LACESSET . ANNO . 
BEGNI . QVARTO (or QVINTO). (See Fig. 119.) 

Ordinary specimens, 7s. 6d. to 10s. One, very fine, <1 lOa. 

Ten Shilling Piece (7H grains). Dated 1687 and 1688. 

Obv., similar to the Forty Shilling Piece, but 10, for vain", 
tinder the bust ; rev., MAG . BR, &c., but the arms arranged 
in form of a cross. (See Fig. 121.) 

Ordinary specimens, 2s. 6d. to 4s. 6d. 

Forty and Ten Shilling Pieces, together, 17s., 18s., and .1 4s. 

The Sixty Shilling Piece, dated 1688, similar to the Forty 
Shilling Piece, has sold for 16s., .1 4s., .1 16s., .1 18s., 
2 2s., 2 14s., 2 16s., 2 18s., 3 5s., i 2a., and .6 10s. 

The Sixty, Forty, and Ten Shilling Pieces, together, .1 10s. 
COPPER. None. 

William and Mary, 16881694. 
GOLD. None. 

SILVEE. Sixty Shilling Piece, Forty Shilling Piece, Twenty Shilling 
Piece, Ten Shilling Piece, and Five Shilling Piece. 

Sixty Shilling Piece (430 grains). Dated 1691 and 1692. 

Obv., GVLIELMVS . ET . MARIA . DEI . GRA., busts of 
the King and Queen to the left, 60 under ; rev., arms of Scotland, 
&c., crowned, and the date; on the edge PROTEGIT . ET . 
ORNAT . ANNO . REGNI . TEJiTIO (or QVARTO). (See 
Fig. 120.) 

Ordinary specimens, 8s. 6d. to 12s. 6d. Fine examples, 
1 10s., 3, and 3 12a. 

Forty Shilling Piece (288 grains). Dated 1690 to 1694, in- 
elusive. Type similar, but 40 under the busts. 

Ordinary specimens, 7s. 6d. to 10s. Fine examples, 16s., 
18s , .1 and 2. 

Twenty Shilling Piece (141 grains). Dated 1691, 1C93, and 
1694. Type similar, but 20 under the bust. 

A fine example dated 1693, sold for .4 in 1883. 

Ten Shilling Piece (72 grains). Dated 1690 to 1692 and 
1C94. Type similar, but 10 under the bust. 

Ordinary specimens, 2s. 6d. to 4s. 6J. 



SCOTTISH COINS. 99 

WILLIAM AND MART. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

The Sixty, Forty, and Ten Shilling Pieces, together, .1 15s. 

Five Shilling Piece (36 grains). Dated 1691 and 1694. 

Obi-., Similar to the preceding, but 5 under the busts ; rev., 
MAG . BE . &c., and the date, W M in cypher crowned. 
(For rev., see Fig. 122). 

Sets of the five pieces, .1 3s. and .1 7a. 
COFFEE. Bawbee and Bodle. 

Bau-lee (about 130 grains). Dated 1691, 1692, 1693, and 1694. 

Obv., GVL . ET . MAE, . D . G . MAG . BE . FE . ET . 
HIB . EEX . ET . REGIXA, the King's and Queen's busts to 
the left ; rev., as the Biwbee of Charles II. (See rev. of 
Fig. 170.) 

Bodle (ibout 44 grains). Dited 1G91 to 1694. 

Ordinary specimens, 9d. to la. 

Obv., D . G . MAG . BE . FE . ET . HIB . EEX . ET . 
RE OH X A, W M in cypher, crowned (very similar to the rev. of 
the Five Shilling Piece represented by Fig. 122) ; rev., as the 
Bodle of Charles II. (see rev. of Fig. 168). 

Three Bawbees and four Bodies sold for 7s. 

A Bawbee, very fine, and four Bodies, sold for 103. 

William III., 1694 17O2. 

GOLD. Pistole and Half Pistole. 

Pistole (106 grains). Dated 1701. 

Obv., GVLIELMVS . DEI . GEATIA., the King's bust 
laureate to the left, under it the San rising out of the waves ; 
rev., MAG . BEIT . FEA . ET . HIB . EEX . 1701, royal 
arms crowned between W and E, both crowned. 

Specimens have sold for ,1 Is., 2 10s., <3, <3 6s., .4 4s., 
and one, in 1875, for .5 7s. 6d., which was re-sold for .4 los. 
in 1883. 

Half Pistole (53 grains). Dated 1701. 

Similar to the Pistole, but no waves under the Sun. 

Specimens have sold for 11s., 1 12s., .1 13s., .2 12s., 
2 16s., B 4s., 3 12s., .4 4s., .4 11s., and .4 15s. 

The Pistole and Half Pistole together, .1 19s., 2 4s , 
7 15s., and .8 iSs. 

SILVER. Forty Shilling Piece, Twenty Shilling Piece, Ten Shilling 
Piece, and Five Shilling Piece. 

Weights same as those of William and Mary. 

forty Shilling Piece. Dated 1695, 1696, 1697, 1698, and 1699. 

Obv., GVLIELMVS . DEI . GEATIA, the King's bust 
laureate to tho left, 40 under the bust; rev., MAG . BEIT . 
FEA . ET . HIB . EEX, arms, &c. ; on the edge PEOTEGIT, &c. 

Ordinary specimens, 7s. 6d. to 10s. Fine examples, 16s. and 
.1 Is. ; one, extra fine, .3 10s. 

Twenty Shilling Piece. Dated 1695 to 1699, inclusive. 

Similar to the preceding, but 20 under the bust, and no in- 
scription on the edge. 

n 2 



100 TUB VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

WILLIAM III. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

From 5s. to 8s. 6d. Two, very fine, .1 Is. 

Ten Shilling Piece. Dated 1695 to 1699, inclusive. 

Similar to the preceding, but 10 under the bust. 

From 2s. 6d. to 4s. 6d. 

Sets of the three pieces, 10s. and 14s. 

The above three pieces, with Anne's Ten and Five Shilling 
Pieces, together, 17s. 

Five Shilling Piece. Dated 1G95, 1696, 1697, 1699, 1700, 
1701, and 1702. 

Obv., GVL . D . G . MAG . BE . FE . & . HIB . EEX, bust to 
left with 5 under it; rev., NEMO . ME . IMPVNE . 
LACESSET and date, a three-leaved thistle crowned. (See 
Fig. 123.) 

From Is. 6d. to 2s. 6d. Four fine examples, of different 
dates, 10s. 

A set of the Forty, Twenty, Ten, and Five Shilling pieces, 
sold for 10s. in 1883. 
COPPER. Bawbee and Bodle. 

Baivbee (120 to 130 grains). Dated 1695, 1696, and 1697. 

Obv., GVL . D . G . MAG . BE . FE . ET . HIB . EEX, 
King's bust laureate to the left ; rev., similar to the Bawbee 
of Charles II. (See Fig. 170.) 

Bodle (about 47 grains). Dated 1695, 1696, and 1697. 

Obv., same legend as on the preceding, a sword and sceptre 
in saltire with crown over ; rev., similar to the Bodle of 
Charles II., but the thistle is crowned. (See Fig. 168.) 

A Bawbee and three Bodies, together, 12s. 

Two fine Bawbees, and two Bodies (one with GVLIELMVS 
in full), 9s. 

A Bawbee and three Bodies of William and Mary, with, a 
Bawbee and three Bodies of William, sold together for 6s. in 
1883. 

Anne, 1702-1714. 

GOLD. None. 

SILVER. Before the Union, Ten Shilling Piece and Five Shilling Piece 
Scots. 

After the Union the following coins were struck at the Edin- 
burgh mint : Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, and Sixpence. 

Scots Ten Shilling Piece (70 grains). Equal to tenpence 
English, dated 1705 and 1706. 

Obv., ANNA . DEI . GEATIA, the Queen's bust to the left, 
a thistle on her bosom, 10 under it ; rev., MAG . BEIT . FEA . 
ET . HIB . EEG., arms of Scotland, &c., crowned, and date. 

From 2s. 6d. to 4s. 6d. 

A Ten Shilling and Five Shilling Piece, both reading ANNA 
DEI . GEATIA, sold for 8s. in 1883. 

A piece of Ten Shillings, with three of Fire Shillings, extra 
fine, sold for .1 8s. 



SCOTTISH COINS. 101 

ANNE. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

Scots Five Shilling Piece (35 grains). Equal to fivepence 
English. Dated 1705, 1706, and 1707. 

Obv., AN . D . G . MAG . BE . FE . & HIB . E, bast as on 
the preceding-, but 5 under it ; rev., similar to the Five Shilling 
Piece of William. (See Fig. 123.) 

Same pieces, dated 1705, have ANNA . DEI . GEATIA on obi: 

From Is. 6d. to 2s. Gd. 

The coins minted at Edinburgh after the Union were of the 
same design, standard, and value as the coins struck at the 
Eoyal Mint in London. They are distinguished by E or E* 
placed under the bust. 

The varieties of these pieces are : 

Crowns. 1707 E and 1708 E. 

Half Crowns. 1707 E, 1708 E, and 1709 E. 

Shillings. 1707E, 1707E*, 1708 E, 1703 E*, and 1709 E*. 

Sixpences. 1707 E, 1708 E, 1708 E*, and 1709 E*. 

The Sixpence, 1709 E*, is given on the authority of the sale 
catalogue of the collection of the Eev. Henry Christmas, 1864, 
Lot 833. 

They have realised the following prices : 

Crown, 63. 6d., 8s , 9s., 10s. 6d., 17s. 6d., 18s., and .1 5s. 

Half Crown, 4s., 5s. 6d., 6s., and 14s. 

Shilling, 4s. ; an exceptional specimen, 2 3s. 

Sixpence, 2s. 6d. Three, varied, all well preserved, sold for 
5s. 6d. in 1883. 

Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, and Sixpence, 1707 E, extra 
fine, .3 15s. 

Crown and Half Crown, 1708 E; Shilling, 1 70S E* ; and Six- 
pence, 1708 E* and 1709 E*, 13s. 

Crown and Half Crown, 1708 E ; Shilling,1708 E* and 1709 E* ; 
and Sixpence, 1708 E*, <3. 

Crown and Half Crown, 1708 E; Shillings, 1707 E, 1708 E, 
and 1708 E* ; and Sixpence, 1708 E*, 13s. 

Crown and Half Crown, 1707 E, ^1 Is. 

Half Crown. 1708 E, and Shillings, 1708 E and 1709 E*, 1. 

Shilling, 1707 E. and Sixpence, 1708 E*, .1 5s. 

Shilling, 1709 E*, and Sixpence, 1708 E*, sold together for 
5s. in 1883. 
COPPER. None. 



ADDENDA. 



The following prices of Scottish coins have been noted since the 
preceding pages were printed : 

David I. 

Penny. Berwick, d5 ; Eoseburgh, G, in 1883. 



102 



THE VALUATION OP BRITISH COINS. 



Alexander III. 

Pennies. Third coinage, sold in 1883 : 

Aberdeen, 2, 2 10s.. and .5 10s. ; Berwick, .1 2s. 

Dunbar, 8s. 6d. and 14s. ; Forres, .5 10s. ; Perth, 11s., and 
.1 2?.; St. Andrews, .5 5s. 

Halfpenny. Oae in 1832, 2 12s. ; one in 1883, .1 10s. ; 
another, fine, realized only 2s. 6d. 

Farthing. One, four mullets of six points, .10 10s., in 1883. 

John Ealiol. 

Penny. In 1882, Gs., 2 8s., and 2 12a. 
Halfpenny. In 1882, 2 ; in 1883, 12s., and .2 10s. 

Robert Bruce. 

Penny. In 1882, 11s. ; in 1883, 13s., 14s., 15s., ISs., .1 3s., 



and 1 17s. 



David II. 



Groat. Aberdeen, 19s. and B 14s. ; Edinburgh, 17s., 1 2s., 
and two unpublished, .2 10s., and 9*., each. 

Half Groat. Aberdeen, in 1882, 2 15s. 6d. ; in 1883, 6s., 
and 3 4s. Edinburgh, in 1883, three 7a., three 10s., one 14s., 
and one, 1 Is. 



Robert II. 



Robert 



St. Andrew. .6, and Lion, G 5s. in 1882. 
Halfpenny. Edinburgh, .3, and .1, in 1883. 
III. 

St. Andrew. 3 15s., 4 9s., 6, and 7 10s. 
Penny. Edinburgh, .6 2s. 6d. 

I. 

Half St. An<Jreio.32 11s., in 1883. 

Lion. In 1882, .3 14s., .4 15s, and .6 10s.; in 1SS3, 
.6 5s., and .7 10s. 

Half Lion. 5 5a. and .8 10s. 

Groat. Edinburgh, 2 12s.; Linlithgow, 1; and Stirling, 



James II. 

Lion. .6 5s. in 1882. 

Groat. Second coinage, Edinburgh, .4; and Stirling, .11, 
in 1883. 

James III. 

Rider. W 10s. : Unicorn, EXVRGAT, ,10 10s. 
Half Unicorn. 1 13s. 

Groaf. Edinburgh, 2 12s. ; Berwick, .5 7s. Gd. 
Black Farthing (coinage of 1466). 2 5s., and 2 153. 



James IV. 



Two-thirds St. Andrew. With mi., .33 12s. 
Tu-o-thirds Rider. S. 



SCOTTISH COINS. 103 

JAMES IV. CONTINUED. 

Unicorn. With X, .5 10s. 

Groat. Fifth issue, with IIII., Gs., and .1 16s. 

James V. 

Ecu. 26. Bonnet Piece, 1510, .9 19s., .6, .4 Gs., and 
.4 10s. in 1883. 

One-third Bonnet Piece. ,12. 
Groat. First coinage, fine, I 12s. 
One-third Groat. 3 8s., 1 2s., and 7s. 6d. 

Mary. 

Half Lion. 1543, 2S, and .17 17s. in 1883. 
Lion. 1553, 3 5s. 
Half Ryal. 1555, .14 10*. 
Testoon (undated COR HVMILE). .9 19s. 6d. 
Testoon. 1555, 3 6s. ; Half Testoon, 1555, 1 18a. 
Testoon (with portrait). 1561, .12 10s., .8 15s., and 1 12s. 
Ryal (Mary and Henry). 1565, <3 2s. ; and One-third Ryal, 
1565, 2 15s. 

Tu-o-thirds Ryal. 1566, 3 10s. ; 1567, .2 12s. 

Ryal (Mary *oia). 1 11s. 

Tu-o-thirds Ryal. 2 14s. 

Penny (with bast). A fine specimen, 5s. 

James VI. 

.20 Piece. 1576, .31, in 1883. 

Rider. 1593, 8 10s. ; 1594, 5 10s.; 1595, .1 14s. 
Sword and Sceptre 1601, <! 7s.; 1602, .1 4a. and 15s.; 
1603, .6 and .3. 

Half Sword and Sceptre 1601, 1 5s. and 10s. ; 1602, 13s. 
Quarter Unit, or Crown. Second coinage, .1 8s. 
Eighth of Unit, or Half Crown. Second coinage, 11s. 
Forty Shilling Piece. 1582, 29 8s. 
Half Hardhead (Lion on rev.). .3 15s. 

Charles I. 

Briot's Half Unit. A specimen, in beautiful metallic relief, 
realized 7, in December, 1883. 



IRISH COINS. 



PRIOR to the introduction of a regular coinage, Kings of gold, silver and 
brass, formed the earliest currency in Ireland. The late Sir William 
Betham established the fact that these Kings, as well as Fibulte of gold, 
at one time supposed to have been used merely as personal ornaments, 
not only passed as money in Ireland, but were graduated according to troy 
weight in multiples of the half-pennyweight or twelve grains. 

No Irish coins have been discovered which can be assigned to a period 
earlier than the arrival of the Danes in Ireland. Without attempt- 
ing to give a complete list of the coins attributed to the Danish Princes 
who ruled over the provinces of Dublin, Limerick and Waterford, from 
about the year 853 to 1177, when Prince John, son of Henry II., was 
appointed Lord of Ireland, a sufficient idea of the Hiberno-Danish coins 
may be formed from the following descriptions and accompanying 
illustrations. 

Simon's " Essay on Irish Going," and Lindsay's " View of the Coinage 
of Ireland," may be consulted for further details. 

An account of more recent discoveries will be found in the papers 
(referred to hereafter) by Dr. Aquilla Smith, of Dublin, the greatest 
authority on the subject. 



THE HIBERNO-DANISH KINGS. 
Kings of Dublin. 

Ifarsl., 870-872. 

SILVER. Penny. 

Penny (9 to 10J- grains). 

OZw., full face bearded, the legend is scarcely intelligible, the 
letters NND are supposed to stand for Normanornm Dyflin or 
Dominus, the other letters being intended for IMA CVNVNC ; 
rev., a long double cross, having a cross in one angle, a figure 
supposed to be a hand* in the opposite angle, and a pellet in 
each of the two remaining angles. (See Fig. 124) 

Lindsay valued this coin at 3s. 

* In a paper entitled " The Human Hand on Hiberno-Psni^h Coins," contributed to the 
'ilic Chronicle (\o\. iii., 3rd series, 1883). Dr. Aquilla Smith gives it as his opinion 
that the symbol, usually termed a 1m nd. which appears on the reverse of a large number 
of Hiberno-Danish coins (seeFijs. 124 and 127), is really a ''/'/ ////, having three, lour. or 
sometimes six Imves project 'ng Irom one side, and ihat the hand as a i-yml ol is mr<' on these 
coins. On a very few coins the tones of three human arms, lorearms. and hands, are repre- 
oented in the form of a tribia.h, while the bones of a hand are shown on a small number 
only. 



IRISH COINS. 105 

Anlaf IV., 962981. 

SILVER. Penny. 

Penny (28 grains). 

Obv., profile to left, inscription OELDFO, &c., or in modern 
characters OLAP . ItEX . DIbLI ; rev., long double cross. 
(See Fig. 125.) 

This coin was valued by Lindsay at .1 10s. 

The coins lepresented by Figs. 124 and 125 are commented 
upon in a paper, " When was Money first Coined in Ireland ? " 
by Aquilia Smith, Esq., M.D., M.B.I.A., contained in the 
Numismatic Chronicle, vol. ii., 3rd series, 1882. For reasons 
given at length in this paper, Dr. Smith is convinced that the 
coins attributed to Ifars I. belong to a period much later than 
the undoubted Dublin coins of Sihtric III., and that the coin 
(Fig. 125) attributed to Anlaf IV., was struck by Olaf I. of 
Sweden, 1015 1026. Dr. Smith considers that the chrono- 
logical series of the?e coins begins with Sihtrio III. of Dublin, 
the only Hiberno-Dauish King whose coins are known with 
certainty. Sihtric III. waa contemporary with Ethelred II., 
King of England. 

Sihtric III., 9891029. 

SILVER. Penny. Three types. 

First (21 to 23 grains). The King's head, with helmet, to 
left ; rev., long double cross, with moneyer's name and place of 
mintage. Some very rude specimens weigh only from 10 to 18 
grains. 

Second (18 to 27 grains). Bare head, with sceptre to left; 
rev., short double cross, C U V X in the angles. (Seo Fig. 126.) 

Third. Head to left, wearing a cap with two streamers or 
ribbons at back; rev., a small cross, surrounded by the legend. 

First type, from 3s. to Vs. 6d. Seven, all fine, sold for 14s. 

Second type, from 6s. to 8s. Specially tine examples have 
realised ^1 and .1 10s. 

Third type, extra rare, .1. 

Anlaf V., 10291034. 

SILVER. Penny. 

Obv., a cross surrounded by a rude attempt at the words 
ONLAF and DIFNLIN (= Dublin). (See Fig. 128.) 
Valued by Lindsay at 15s. 

Anlaf VI., 10411050. 

SILVER. Penny (16 to 18 grains). 

No head on obv. (See Figa. 129 and 130,) 
Valued by Lindsay at 10s. 

Ifars III., 105O 1054. 

SILVER. Penny (11 to 15 grains). Several types. 

Penny (13 grains). Obv., bare head to left ; rev., long double 
cross, a hand in two quarters, a cross and a pellet in two 
opposite quarters. (See Fig. 127.) 

Common type valued by Lindsay at 4s. 



106 THE VALUATION OF BRITISII COIXS. 

IFAES III. CONTINUED. 

SILVER. Continued 

Penny (11 grains). Obv., head with radiated crown to left, 
and inscription intended for E . 1FAKZ . N . DIFMX . DL, chat 
is King Ifars of the Northmen of Dublin ; nv , similar to a 
type of Edward the Confessor, legend + FREDXE . ON . 
EOFR, i.e., of York. (See Fig. 131.) 

Of the greatest rarity. Valned by Lindsay at .1. 

Penny. Obv., head with helmet to left, legend IF. CVNVNC. 
(See Fig. 132.) 

Extra rare, value 15s. 

Penny, without head. Value 103. 

Askill McTorquil, 11591171. 

SILVER. Penny (12 grains). 

Obv., rude head to left, legend ANCTL . COV reversed 
and retrograde, apparently intended for AZKIL COVNVNC. 
(See Fig. 133.) 

Lindsay says that this coin, which is very neatly executed, 
is remarkable for bearing, on the King's neck and also on the 
reverse, figures of the articles formerly supposed to be Fibulae, 
but which were varieties of the Sing Money previously referred 
to. 

Valned by Lindsay at 15s. 



Kings of Waterford. 

SILVER PENNIES, of similar type to the coins already described, were 
struck between 853 and 1036 by the Danish Kings of Waterford. 

Begnald II.. 10231036. 

SILVER. Pen ny . 

A coin assigned by Lindsay to this Prince i3 represented by 
Fig. 134. 

Mixed lots of theso Hiberno-Danish coins have realised the 
following prices : 

Nine sold for 6s. in 1864; seven sold for 5s. in 1854; and 
twelve sold for 12s. in 1881. 

Six of Sihtric, varied, 13s. ; and seven, similar, 14s. 

Two Crux Pennies of Sihtric III., five Dublin Pennies of Henry 
III., and a Waterford Penny of Edward L, sold for 18s. 

Ethelred and Canute, 9781035. 

SILVER PENNIES, bearing the names of Ethelred and Canute and place 
of mintage Dublin, are generally classed as Irish coins. These 
pieces are inferior in workmanship, and often in metal, to the 
English coins, and were, it is supposed, struck by Irish Kings 
in imitation of English money. 

The Ethelred coins are worth from 5s. to 10?. 

Lindsay valued coins bearing the name of CNVT, struck at 
Dublin, at ^3. One sold in 1824 for .3 8a. 



IRISH COINS. 107 



BRACTEATE COINS. 

These coins, illustrations of which are given in Figs. 135, 136, 137 and 
138', are very thin, weighicg, when perfect, not more than from seven to ten 
grains. They have a device struck on one side only, and no legend 
occurs on any of them. Lindsay considered them to have been copied 
from English coins, beginning with those of William the Conqueror and 
ending with these of John or Henry III., the probable period of their 
mintage being the early part of the thirteenth century. In Lindsay's 
opinion, they are genuine and unquestionable specimens of the coins of 
native Irish Princes. 

Few Bracteate coins had been found in Ireland until November, 1837, 
when a very large hoard was dug up near Fermoy. 

Fig. 135 (7 grains) has a long single cross with a small square in the 
centre and a large fleur-de-lis in each angle, and is apparently copied 
Irom the rev. of a Penny of Harold I. 

Fig. 136 (4 grains) is the only coin found at Fermoy which has a rude 
imitation of letters round the luargiu. The general design appears to be 
taken from the rev. of a Pax Penny of William I. 

Fig. 137 (7 grains) has long single cross with quatrefoil and trefoil 
alternately in angles, and may have been copied from a Penny of Henry I. 

Fig. 138 (4J grain.-) shows a somewhat intricate desigu, seemingly 
taken from two coins of Henry I. 

Value, Is. each. 



KINGS OF ENGLAND. 

John, as Lord of Ireland, 117^1193. 

SILVER. Halfpenny and Farthing. 

Halfpenny (ll grains). Struck at Dublin and Waterford. 
Obv., + JOHANNES . DOM . or DOMI, or DOMIN . (in oi,e 
instance DOMIN . IBER), surrounding a full-faced head in . 
circle (see Fig. 140) ; rev., a short double cross in a circle, with 
an annulet in each angle, enoircled by the name of the moneypr 
and mint, as ADAM ON . DWE ., NORMAN . ON . DWELI 
(= Dublin), MARC . ON . WATER ., WHILELMVS . ON . 
W T A . (= Waterford). 

One variety has on obv., JOHANNES . DO . ON . WA ., 
retrograde. 

Fine specimens, Dublin, 5s. ; Waterford, 10s. 

Farthing (4^ to ok grains). Struck at Dublin and Waterford. 

Obv., a lozenge, or large mascle, with ornamented points, in a 
circle of pellets, without any legend ; rev., a long single crosn 
extending nearly to the edge, having in each angle a letter, the 
four letters forming part of the moneyer's name, thus TOMA., 
ALEX , NICO., &c. 

From 5s. to 10s. 



108 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

JOHN. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

Patrick Farthing* (4 to 6 grains). Struck at Carrickfergus 
and Downpatrick by John De Curcy.f 

The type of the ob v. is almost identical on all the specimen? 
known, but there are three distinct types of rev. 

Obv., a short single cross within an inner circle, surrounded 
by + PATRICII ( Crux Patricii). 

Bev., first type, a short double cross, encircled by the legend 
+ GOANDQVRCI (= GOAN or JOANnes De CVRCI). 

Rtv., second type, a short double cross or a cross potent 
voided, in an inner circle, surrounded by + CRAGF or 
CRAGFEVF (= Carrickfergns). 

Rev., third type, a short single cross with a crescent in each 
angle, surrounded by + D' or DE . DVNO (~ Downpatrick). 
This type of rev. is very similar to that of the first issue of 
"William the Lion, (see page 59). 

Coins of the first type were probably struck between 1185 
and 1189. 

Value from 2s. Gd. to 5s. 

John, as King, 11991216. 

SILVER. Penny, Halfpenny and Farthirg. 

Penny (22grains). Struck atDublin, Limerick and Waterford. 

Obv., 1OHANNES . REX, in a triangle the King's bust full- 
faced, with crown fleury, sceptre in right hand, and a rose of 
five leaves at the King's lefc side ; rev., in a triangle a crescent 
having over it a blazing star, a small star in each angle of 
the triangle, legend the name of thy moneyer and mint, as 
WILLEM . ON. DIVE (=Divelin or Dublin) or ON . LIME 
(= Limerick) or ON . WAT ( Waterford). 

Dublin mint, from 3s. 6d. to 5s. Gd. 

Limerick mint, from 6s. to 7a. 

Waterford mint, from lOa. to <1 

Halfpenny (Hi grains). Struck at Dublin and Limerick. 

Obv.. the King's full-faced bust, in a triangle, a star in each 
angle, legend IOHAN (or IOHANNES) REX ; rev., in a triangle 
a crescent, with a cross above it, a star in each angle, with the 
name of moneyer and mint. (See Fig. 139.) 

Ditblin mint, about 5s. ; Limerick mint, about 10s. 

Farthing (5 grain?). 

Obv., IOHAN. RE, full-faced bust in a triangle, a small star 
in each angle ; rev., in a triangle a blazing star, with the name of 
the moneyer. 

From 5s. to 10s. 

Lindsay valued this coin at 5, and stated (in 1839) that only 
three specimens were known, one (the Rev. Mr. Martin's) having 
sold for .9 9#. At the sale of the Martin cabinet in 1859, the 

* A full account of these Farthings was first published by Dr. Aquilla Smith in Iho 
Numismatic Chronicle, 1WB. 

f John De Curcy, created Earl of Ulster by Henry II. in llsi, was constitute 1 solo 
Governor of Ireland in 118o. He was removed from that office in 119, .vhen he retir d U> 
his earldom, and finally quitted Ireland in 1^04. 



IRISH COINS. 109 

JOHN. CONTINUED. 
SILVER,. Continued. 

Farthing:, Halfpenny and Penny, head in a triangle, together 
with a full-faced Halfpenny and Mascle Farthing, realised 1 2s. 

Henry III., 1216 1272. 

SILVER. Penny and Halfpenny. 

Penny (22 grains). Struck at Dublin. 

Olv., HENEICVS . EEX . III. in a triangle, as on the Penny of 
John, the King's bust full-faced, with crown fleury, sceptre in 
right hand, a rose of five leaves to his left ; tev., a long double 
cross extending to the edge, with name of moneyer and mint 
in a circle, as DAVI . ON . DIVELI , or EICAED . ON . DIVE. 

From 2s. 6d. to 5s. 

Halfpenny (\\\ grains). Struck at Dublin. 

Similar to the Penny. 

This coin is described and figured by Simon, but Lindsay 
observed that it must be extremely rare, as he had never seen 
one, and was not aware of there being one in any collection. 
Nevertheless, Lindsay valued the coin at 7. No specimen is 
now known. 

Edward I., II., and III., 12721377. 

From the Eoyal Proclamations it would appear that a large 
quantity of money must have been struck in Ireland by 
Edward I. and III. No mode of distinguishing their coins 
has been approved of, but Lindsay was inclined to assign 
coins having the Roman N in the legend to Edward I. or II., 
and those with the English n to Edward III. The number of 
dots or pellets under the bust has been rejected as a criterion, 
as some coins have four dots and others none. 

SILVEU. Penny, Halfpenny and Farthing. 

Penny (22 grains). Struck at Cork, Dublin and "Waterford. 

Obv., EDW . E . ANGL . DNS . HYB ., the King's full-faced 
buat crowned, in a triangle, the base of which is above the King's 
head and the apex below the bust (see Fig. 141) ; rev., long 
cross with three pellets in each angle, as on the English Penny, 
with CIVITAS and the name of the place of mintage, as COK- 
CACIE, DVBLINIE. or WATEEFOE, sometimes VATEEFOE. 

Cork mint, 5s. to 7s. 6d. 

Dtiblin mint, 2s. 6d. to 5s. 

Waterford mint, 3s. to 6s. 

Penny (22 i- grains). Struck at Dublin and Waterford. 

Obv.,'+ EDW . E . ANGL . DNS . HYB ., no triangle, bust in a 
circle, as on the English Penny ; rev., as before. 

Dublin mint, 12s. One sold for 2 5s. in 1881. 

Waterford mint, 18s. 

Halfpenny (Hi grains). Struck at Cork, Dublin and Water- 
ford. 

Similar to the Triangle Penny. 

Dublin and Waterford mints, 3a. to 5s . 



110 THE VALUATION OP BRITISH COIXS. 

EDWARD I., II., AND III. CONTINUED. 
SILVER continued. 

Lindsay valued the Cork Halfpenny at .3, and stated that 
only three were known. 

Farthing (5 grains). Struck at Dublin and Waterford. 

Similar to the Halfpenny, but, on obv., E . E . ANGLIE . 

Dublin mint, 5s. to Gs. 

Waterford mint, 7s. 6d. to 10s. A fine specimen cf the 
Waterford mint sold for .1 6s. in 1873. 

A set, Penny, Halfpenny and Farthing, in brilliant preser- 
vation, sold for G?. in 1864. 

Richard II., 13*71399. 

No Irish coins of this King have been discovered. 
Eenry IV., 13991413. 

There is no record that any Irish coins were struck during 
this reign. 

Henry V., 1413-1422. 

Simon and other distinguished numismatists have assigned 
Irish coins to this King 1 , but Lindsay takes a different view, 
because, among other reasons, no records have been discovered 
which refer to an Irish coinage from the reign of Edward III. 
until the 38th year of Henry VI., 1459-CO. The coins 
assigned to Henry V. will be described cnder Henry VII. 

Henry VI., 14221461. 

SILVER. Gro-it and Penny. 

There are two varieties of the Penny, the first being similar 
to the English type. 

Penny, first issue (I2i grains). Struck at Dublin about 1425. 

Obv., + HENKICVS . DNS . HIBNIE . with an annulet at 
the end, front-faced bust, crowned, in a circle, a star of six 
points at the left side of the King's neck ; rev., long cross with 
three pellets in each quarter, C1VITAS . DVBLINIE. There 
is an annulet after CIVI. 

Note. The star at side of the neck and annulet in legend 
indicate that thi* coin might have been struck by Henry V. 

A specimen, now in the British Museum, sold for 1 17s. in 
1859 ; another specimen is known in a private collection. 

Groat (ibout 45 grains). Struck at Dablin, about 1460. 

Obv., an ooen crown, in a double treasure of twelve arches, 
no legend, (for type see Fig. 142) ; rev., long cross with three 
pellets in each angle, an annulet between the pellets in two 
quarters, eurronnded by the legend, in one circle only, 
<JI VITAS . DVBLINIE. 

A Groat and Penny, of similar type, sold for 8?. in 1854. 

A Groat, extremely fine, realised l 11s. in 1873. 

Penny, second issue (about 9$ grains). Struck at Dublin, 
about 1460. 

Similar to the Groat. 

Valued by Lindsay at 1 lOa. 



IRISH COINS. Ill 

HENRY VI. CONTINUED. 

COPPER. Patrick or Half Farthing, struck in 14GO. 

The standard weight was 7 graina, but specimens actually 
weigh 6, 7, 9 and 11 grains each. 

Patrick (7 grains). 

Obv., a small crown in a circle, surrounded by PATEIK, 
followed by an annulet and a small branch, which complete the 
circle ; rev., a broad plain cross, with P in one angle. 

A variety is known without the P on rev, 

Value, 5s. 

Edward IV.,* 14611483. 

SILVER. Double Groat, Groat, Half Groat, Penny, Halfpenny and 
Farthing. 

Seven coinages. 

First coinage. Groats, Half Groats, and Pennies, of the same 
stamp and standard as the coinage of the 38th year of Henry 
VI., were authorised to be struck in Dublin, Trim and Galway, 
and Half pence and Farthings in Dublin. Ten Groats were to be 
coined from a Tower ounce of 450 grains troy, which would 
give 45 grains to the Groat. Of this coinage the Groat and 
Penny of the Dublin mint only are DOW known. The earliest 
coin known from the mint of Trim was struck in 1467, and it 
does not appear that silver coins were ever made in Gal way. 
It is probable that the Half Groat was never struck, as Half 
Groats did not occur in either of the subsequent coinages, or 
previous to the fourth issue in 1467. The Halfpenny and 
Farthing are still to be discovered. 

Groat (38 to 44j grains). Struck at Dublin. 

06 v., a large crown in a double treasure of eight, nine, or 
ten arches, sometimes having suns or roses in the outer angles, 
no legend ; rev., long cross with pellets, those in alternate 
angles being joined by annulets, legend CIVITAS DVBLINIE. 
(See Fig. 142). 

These Groats may be distinguished from the similar type of 
Henry VI. by having fewer than twelve arches in the trest-ure 
which, incloses the crown, and having generally roses or suns 
roivid the tressure. 

Valued by Lindsay at \ 10s. 

Penny (9 to 12 grains). Struck at Dublin. 

Similar to the Groat, but without roses on dbv. 

A variety (10^ grains) has on obv., the crown in a beaded 
circle-, and on rev., CIVITAS . DVBLIN, no annulets between 
the pellets. 

Valued by Lindsay at 1 10s. One sold for 2 3^. 

Ano'her variety is without either a tressnre or circle of pellets 
on obv. 

Second coinage, of the 3rd year, 1463-4. 

The Groat should weigh 45 grains. 

* See Dr. Aqnilla Smith's paper on tlio Irish Coins of Edward the Fourth, published in 
th<? Transactions of the Royal Irish Ac.idemy, vol. xix.. 1840. Al-.o sje Sainthill's "Olla 
1'odrida," vol. ii., l"5;j. 



112 TUB VALUATION OP BRITISH COINS. 

EDWARD IV. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

Groat (about 40 grains). Struck at Dublin and Waterford. 

Obv., crown in a double treasure, snrrounded by the legend 
EDWARDVS . DI . GRA . DNS . HYBERNIE, m.m. a rose ; 
or cross floury ; rev., PO3YI, &c., in outer circle ; CIVITAS . 
DVBLINIE (or WATERFORD) in inner circle ; the pellets 
in angles of the cross are sometimes joined by annulets. 

OOB of Dublin mint sold for Qs. in 1854, and for .1 6s. 
in 1859 ; two sold for 1 2s. in 1881. 

One of Waterford mint sold for 8s. in 1854. 

Penny (9y grains). Struck at Dublin. 

Obv., crown in a dotted circle, surrounded by + EDWARD. 
DI . G . DNS . HYB. ; rev., long cross and pellets, CIVITAS . 
DVBLIN. 

Lindsay considered this coin unique, and valued it at .5. 

Penny. Struck at Wnterford. 

A fragment, the only specimen known, has on obv. the crown 
within a double treasure, with trefoils at its points ; rev., long 
cross and pellets, CIVITAS W. . . . 

Halfpence and Farthings were also ordered to be made at 
Warerford, but none have been discovered. 

No coins of this issue are known of the mints of Limerick or 
Trim. 

Third coinage, of the 5th year, 1465-6. 

Groat (28 grains). Struck at Dublin. 

Obv., a small cross on the centre of an expanded rose of five 
leaves, within a double treasure, a pellet in each of the outside 
angles, legend EDWARDVS . DEI . GRA . DNS . HYBERNI, 
m.m. rose; rev., POSVI, &c. in outer circle, CIVITAS . 
DVBLINIE, in inner circle ; within the inner circle a sun of 
sixteen rays, having an annulet or a rose in the centre, 
m.m. rose. 

Penny (8} grains). Struck at Dublin. 

Type similar to the Gtoat. 

Obv., EDVV . D . G . DNS . HYBERN, small cross in centre 
of a rose of nve leaves, within a circle ; rev., CIVITAS . 
DVBLINIE, surrounding a sun of sixteen rays, with a rose in 
the centre. 

Both extremely rare. Lindsay valued this Groat and Penny 
at 3 each. 

In 1859 a Groat and Penny sold together for 5s., and in 1864 a 
Penny (described as " extremely rare, but two or three known") 
realised 5s. 

A Penny of th^ type, but having, on rev., a sun of eleven 
rays, sold for <! 5s., in 1854. 

Fourth coinage, of the 7t,h year, 1467-8. Ordered to ba coined 
at Carlingford, Drogheda, Dublin, Galway, Limerick and Trim. 

At this time, consequent upon its great scarcity in Ireland, 
silver was raised to double the value it had in the last year of 
Henry VI. A coin called a Double (weighing 45 grains) was 
ordered to be struck and to pass current in Ireland for eight 



IRISH COINS. 113 

EDWARD IV. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

pence. Groats, Half Groats, Pence, Halfpence, and Farthings, 
were also ordered to be coined. Of the Dublin mint are known 
the Double Groat, Groat. Half Groat, and Penny ; of the 
Drogheda mint, the Donble Groat, Groat, and Penny ; and of the 
Trim mint, the Double Groat, Groat, and Half Groat. No coins 
of this issue struck at Limerick or Waterford have been dis- 
covered, and it does not appear that silver coins were ever 
minted in Carlingford or Gal way. 

Double Groat (about 45 grains). Those struck at Dublin, 
Drogheda, and Trim, only are known. 

Obv., EDWARDVS . DEI . GRA . DXS . HYBERN, full- 
faced bust, crowned, in a treasure, m.m. rose; rev., CIVITAS . 
DVBLINIE (or VILLA . DE . DROGHEDA or DE TRIM), 
surrounding a large sun of twenty-four rays, having a rose iu 
the centre. (For type of rev., see Fig. 143.) 

Valued by Lindsay at 1 10s. 

In 1854 a Double Groat (described as a Groat) of Drogheda 
sold for 1 5s. 

In 1859 one of Dublin realised 1 18s. ; in 1864 one sold for 
1 ; and in 1873 another sold for 4 Ga. 

These pieces are described as Groats in the sale catalogues, 
1854, 1859, and 1873. 

Groat (about 22 grains). Struck at Dublin, Drogheda, and 
Trim. 

Obv., similar to the Donble Groat, but legend contracted ; 
rev., similar to the Double Groat, CIVITAS . DVBLIN, or 
VILLA . DE . DROGHEDA, or DE TRIM, m.m. rose. (See 
Fig. 143). 

The Dublin Groat (described by Lindsay as a Half Groat) 
was valued by him at 2. 

The Trim Groat is unique. 

In 1854 a Dublin Groat sold for 1 3s., and in 1873 for 
4, Is. ; in 1859 one sold for ,1 8s. 

These coins were termed Half Groats in the sale catalogues. 

In 1859 a Groat and Half Groat (described as a Half Groat 
and Penny) sold for 15s. 

The Groat struck at Trim was valued by Lindsay, who 
termed it a Half Groat, at .5, and described as unique. 

Half Groat. Struck at Dublin and Trim. 

The Half Groat now appears for the first time in the Irish 
series. 

Half Groat (11 Grains). Struck at Dublin. 

Obv., ED WAR . D . G . D . HYBER, bust in a circle ; rev., 
CIVITAS . DVBLIN, same type as the Groat. 

The Half Groat of Dublin was valued by Lindsay (who styled 
it a Penny) at 2 10s. 

In 1854 one (described as a Penny) sold for .1 14s. 

Half Gioat (!! grains). Struck at Trim. Unique. 

Obv., EDWARDVS . DI . GRA . DNS . HYBE ; rev., VILLA . 
DE . TRIM. 



THE VALUATION OP BRITISH COIXS. 

EDWARD IV. CONTINUED. 
SILVEE. Continued. 

The following is the description of a coin weighing 14 grains, 
which may have been a pattern for a Half Groat of this coinage : 

Obv., + EDWAE . R . ANGL . D . HYB, bust in a circle ; 
rev., a large sun of ten rays, surrounded by C I VITAS .DVBLINI. 

Penny (5J grains). Strnck at Drogheda. 

Obv., the King's head in a beaded circle without a tressnre, 
+ EDWARD . D . G . DN ; rev., VILLA . DE . DROGH, sur- 
rounding a sun of twenty-four raya. 

Penny. Struck at Dublin. 

Similar to the preceding Penny, except that the sun on rev. 
has sixteen rays. 

Fifth coinage, presumably of the 10th year, 1470. 

Prior to the important issue of money of the English type 
(noticed as the sixth coinage) certain coins were struck at 
Drogheda and Dublin, which are not described in any of the 
public Acts. They are distinguished from the coins of the 
English type by having a rose in the centre of the cross on the 
rev., and no pellets in the angles. Groats, Pennies, and Half- 
pennies are known. 

By an Act of 1470, the coinage of 1467-8 was reduced to half 
its original value. The Groat issued in 1470 should, therefore, 
weigh 45 grains, and the smaller pieces in proportion, but the 
actual weight of the Groat varies from 27 to 32 grains. 

Groat (27 to 29 grains). Strnck at Drogheda. Of this type 
and mint no coins, except Groats, are known. 

Obv., crowned bust, within a double tressure, a sun at right 
side of the crown and a rose at left, a sun at left of the neck 
and a rose at right, EDWARDVS . DEI . GRA . DNS . HTBER ; 
rev., a long cross, extending to the edge of the coin, with a rose 
on its centre ; in outer circle, POSVI, etc. ; in inner circle, 
VILLA . DROGHEDA. 

In another variety the suns and roses at the sides of the 
crown and neck are transposed. 

Valued by Lindsay at 6s. In 1873, one sold for 11s. 

Groat (32 grains). Struck at Dublin. 

Almost similar to preceding Groat ; rev., CIVITAS . 
DVBLINIE. 

Valued by Lindsay at 3s. 6d. In 1854, a very fine specimen 
realised 15s. 

Penny (6 to 7 grains). Strnck at Dublin. 

Obv., bust in a circle, a sun at right side of crown, a rose at 
left ; rev., in one circle, CIVITAS . DVBLINIE. 

A variety has a sun to left of neck, and a rose to right. 
Value from 3s. to 5s. 

Halfpenny (about 3 grains). Struck at Dublin. 

Obv., full-faced bust, crowned, in a circle ; rev., long cross, 
with a rose in the centre, CIVITAS . DVBLIN. 

One specimen has a rose at each side of the neck ; another 
has a small cross at each side of the crown. 

Valued by Lindsay at 1. 



IRISH COINS. 115 

EDWARD IV. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

Some Dublin Pennies, probably coined at this time, are like 
those last described, except that they have roses and suns in 
the angles of the cross on rev. 

Penny (6 to 9 grains). 

Obv., crowned bust in a circle, snrronnded by the king's name, 
&c., and a rose and sun at sides of crown and neck ; rev., 
CIVITAS . DVBLIN ; in the quarters of the cross there are 
alternately two roses and a sun and two suns and a rose, instead 
of pellets as in the sixth coinage. 

A variety (9 grains) has : obv., EDW . . DI . GEA . EEX . 
NGI . T ; rev., CIVITAS . DVBLIN, and three stars in each 
angle of the cross. 

Henry VI. (restored), 1470. 
SILVER. Groat and Penny. 

Groat (26 to 31 grains). Struck at Dublin. 

Obv., full-faced bust with a broad and flat crown, within a 
treasure of nine arches, HENBICVS . DI . GBA . DNS . 
HYBEBNIE, m.m. plain cross, small saltire, four pellets, 
&c. ; rev., long cross and pellets, POSVI, &c., ia outer circle, 
CIVITAS DVBLINIE in inner circle, m.m. plain cross, trefoil, 
pierced cross, &c. 

These Groats are attributed to Henry VI., as struck in 1470, 
although no documentary evidence exists to prove that the King 
exercised his prerogatives in Ireland after his restoration. 
Throughout the legend on both sides the letter E is shaped like 
B, a peculiarity which marks the English light Groats of 
Henry VI., struck in 1470. The above Groats are further 
distinguished from those of a similar type of Henry VII. by 
having " Dominus Hibernie " for the King's title instead of 
"Epx Angl." 

Penny (5 grains). Similar to the fifth coinage of Edward IV. 

Obv., full-faced bust crowned in a dotted circle, HENBICVS . 
DNS . HIB., m.m. pierced cross ; rev., CIVIT, &c., a long plain 
cross with a rose on the centre, and no pellets in the quarters. 

Edward IV. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

Sixth coinage. Similar to the English type.* The order, given 
in the 10th year, 1470, directed that the reverse should be like the 
Calais Groats (see Fig. 144, Calais Half Groat), and that five 
sorts of silver coins, viz., Groats, Half Groats, Pennies, Half- 
pennies and Farthings, should be struck at Dublin, Drogheda 
and Trim. 

Waterford was recognised as a royal mint, but coins struck 
at Cork, Limerick, Youghal, Kineale and Kilmallock, were 

* In 1472 the English Groats, Half Groats, and Pennies of Edward III., Richard II., and 
Henry IV.. V., and VI., were ordered to pass in Ireland at livepence the Groat, and the 
smaller coins in proportion. In 1475 the value of these Groats was raided to sixpence ia 
Ireland, and the contemporary English Groat was to be current in Ireland lor fivepence. 

12 



116 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

EDWAED IV. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

declared unlawful. No coins are known of the last three 
places. 

The Groata should weigh nearly 44 grains, but are seldom 
more than 35 grains, and in 1473 the weight was reduced by law 
to a little over 32 grains. 

Groats. Struck at Cork, Drogheda, Dublin, Limerick, Trim, 
Waterford and Wexford. 

Obv., EDWAEDVS . DEI . GRA . DNS . HYBERNIE. (on 
one specimen ED WARD VS . DEI . GRA . REX . AGL . Z . 
FRA), full-faced bust, crowned, in a treasure ; rev., POSVI, &c., 
and in inner circle C I VITAS . DVBLINIE, rr WATERFORD, or 
CORCAGIE, or LIMIRICI, or VILLA . DE . DROGHEDA, or 
DE . TRIM, or WEIXFOR. 

A variety of the Drogheda Groat has the King's name spelt 
EDVARDVS, and a Limerick Groat has LIMERICI. 

There are two varieties of reverse : 

First, three pellets in each of the quarters of the cross. 

Second, three pellets in two of the quarters, and two pellets 
and a star (or a rose) in the other quarters. 

Some coins have a rose, sun, annulet, &c., at the sides of the 
head, and on the bust the letter G (for Germyn Lynch, the Master 
of the Mint), or L (for Limerick), and V or W (for Waterford). 

Lindsay valued these Groats as under : 

Cork, 1 10s. In 1854 one sold for .10, and another for 
.3 18s. 

Drogheda, 4s. to 6s. 

Dublin, 2s. 6d. to 3s. 6d. 

Limerick, 10s. 

Trim, 4s. 

Waterford, 3s. 

Wexford, 2. 

Half Groat (15 to 19 grains). Struck at Drogheda, Dublin, 
Limerick, Trim, and Waterford. 

Obv., EDWARD . DI . GRA . DNS . HYBER, full-faced 
bust, crowned, in a tressure ; rev., POSVI, &c., CIVITAS . 
DVBLIN, or LIMIRICI, or WATERFO., cross and pellets. The 
Limerick Half Groat has L on breast, a rose on each side of the 
bust, and two pellets and a rose in two quarters of rev. 

Dublin, 15s. 

Limerick, 1 10s. In 1854 a specimen, together with five 
Pennies struck at Dublin, Limerick and Waterford, sold for 
1 16s. 

Penny (6 to 10^ grains). Struck at Cork, Drogheda, Dublin, 
Limerick, Trim, and Waterford. 

Obv., EDWAR . DI . GR . DNS . HYBE, or IBERNIE (or 
EDWARD . REX . ANG . Z . FR), full-faced bust, crowned, in 
a circle ; rev., cross and pellets, CIVITAS . DVBLIN, or 
CORCAGIE, or LIMIRICI, or WATERFORD, or WATFOR, 
or VILLA . DE . DROGHEDA, or DE . TRIM. 

Some specimens have at each side of the bust, a small cross, 



IRISH COINS. 117 

EDWARD IV. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

an annulet, a pellet, a snn, a rose and star, a rose and snn, 
or a quatrefoil ; and on rev., a rose on centre of the cross, 
with three pellets in each quarter, and sometimes with a rose 
in two of the quarters. 

Drogheda, 7s. 

Dublin, 4s. 

Limerick, <1. 

Waterford, 10s. 

Halfpenny. Struck at Dublin. 

Obv., EDWA, &c., full-faced bust, crowned, in a circle; rev., 
long cross, a rose on the centre, and pellets in the angles. 

Farthing. None have been discovered. 

Seventh coinage, of the year 1478 -the Three Crowns* money 
(see Pig. 145) : Groat, Half Groat, Penny, Halfpenny, and 
Farthing. 

Groat (24 to 32 grains). Four varieties. 

First variety. Obv., REX . ANGL . FRANCIE, arms of 
England in a shield over across pommete ; rev., Three Crowns 
in pale, on a cross pommete, encircled by DOMINVS . 
HYBERNIE. 

Some (jroats of this sort have on the obv., at each side of the 
arms of England, a small shield bearing a saltire, the arms of 
Fitz Gerald, Earl of Kildare. and Lord Justice of Ireland, in 1479. 

On some specimens the Kildare arms appear in the form 
of the figure 8. The legend on rev. is DOMINOS . TBERN, 
and the Three Crowns are contained within a treasure of eight 
or nine points. 

From Is. 6d. to 2s. 6d. 

Second variety. Similar to the preceding, but on obv., REX . 
ANGLIE . FRANCI (or FRANCIE), and on rev., ET . REX . 
HYBERNIE, the crowns within a tressnre. 

From os. to 10s. 

Third variety. Similar to first variety, but DOMINVS . 
HYB ERNIE on obv. as well as on rev. 

From 2s. 6d. to 3s. 6d. 

Fourth variety. Similar to first variety, but ED WARD VS or 
ED WAR . REX . ANGLIE . FRANCI on obv. 

From 3s. 6d. to 4s. 6d. 

Half Groat (11 to 14|- grains). Four varieties. 

The Half Groats have no tressure on rev. 

First variety. Similar to the first Groafc. 

From 2s. to 3s. 

Second variety. Obv., like the second Groat, but CIVITAS 
DVBLIN on rev. 

From 3s. to 4s. 

Third variety. Similar to the third Groat. 

Only one H*lf Groat bearing the Fitz Gerald arms is known ; 
it has the word DOMINOS only on each side. 

* The THREE CROWNS in pale, nn ft field azure were the arms of Ireland from the 
reign of Bichard II. to that of Henry VHI. 



118 THE VALUATION OP BRITISH COINS. 

EDWARD IV. CONTINUED. 

SILVER. Continued. 

Fourth variety. Similar type, but EDWAED . DOM . HTBE . 
on obv., and CIVITAS . DVBLIN1E on rev. 

From 4s. to o.=. 

Penny (about 7 grains). Same type. 

Obv., BEX . ANGL . Z . FEANCIE or EEX . ANGL . FEANC ; 
rev., DOMINVS . HYBEEN, or DOMNV3 . HYBENIE. 

From 5s. to 10s. 

Halfpenny (5 grains). 

Of similar type to the Penny. 

Farthing (about 2 grains). 

Of similar type to the Penny. 

According to Lindsay, unique and worth 10s. 

BILLON. By an Act of the second year of Edward IV. (1461), a coin 
of copper mixed with silver was ordered to be struck at 
Dublin, having on obv., a cross with name of the place of 
mintage, and on rev., a crown, with suns and roses. No speci- 
men of this coinage is known to exist. 
COPPEB. Farthing. Three issues. 

First issue (10 grains). Struck about 1461. 

Obv., a crown, surrounded by roses and suns alternately in 
place of a legend ; rev., a cross, encircled by the legend 
CIVITAS DVBLINI, a sun between the words. 

Value, 5a. 

Second issue (9J- grains). Struck about 1463. 

Obv., PATEICIVS, full-faced bust of St. Patrick with mitre ; 
rev., long cross with broad ends, a sun in two quarters and a 
rose in the other two, surrounded by SALVATOE, suns and 
roses alternately between the letters in each quarter. 

Value, 10s. 

Third issue (10 grain*). Struck about 1467. 

Obv., EDWAEDVS . D., &c., Three Crowns, two above and 
one below, on a shield, in a dotted circle ; rev., long cross, 
CIVITAS . DVBLINIE surrounding a sun of sixteen rays, 
having a small rose on the centre. 

Value, 5s. 
BRASS. Half Farthing. Two issues. 

First issue (4J grains). Struck in 1463, and corresponding in 
type with the Silver Penny of the second coinage. 

Obv., a crown in the centre, surrounded by roses and crosses 
(the latter intended to represent suns) in place of a legend ; 
rev., a long single cross extending to the edge of the coin, with 
three pellets in each quarter ; legend obliterated. 

Second issue (3 grains). Struck in 1470, and corresponding 
with the Silver Penny of the sixth coinage. 

Obv., full-faced bast, crowned, in a circle ; rev., long cross, 
with pellets in the angles, and small strokes or lines in place of 
a legend. 

Unique, valued at 5s. 

Mixed lots of the coins of Edward IV. have sold as under : 

In 1854, at the Cuff sale, five Groats sixth issue, of Dublin, 



IRISH COINS. 119 

EDWAED IV. CONTINUED. 

Limerick and Waterford, a Groat of seventh issue, and two 
Dublin Pennies, sold for 9s. ; also seven Groats, varied, of the 
sixth issue, sold for 10s. ; and another lot of seven Groats sold 
for 8s. A lot of six coins, comprising Groats of Drogheda, Trim 
and Waterford, and Pennies of Dublin and Waterford, realised 
18s. 

In 1859, at the Martin sale, a Groat of Drogheda sixth issue, 
a Groat of seventh issue, with arms of Kildare, and a Dublin 
Penny of second issue, sold for IGs. ; another lot, comprising 
three Groats and a Half Groat of sixth issue, two Half Groats of 
seventh issue, and three Dublin Pennies, varied, realised 1 8a. 

In 1864, at the Christmas sale, a Groat of second and third 
issue, and two Half Groats, seventh issue, sold for 17s. ; a Groat 
of second, third and fourth issues, sold for 1 3s.; five Groats of 
sixth issue, and five Groats of seventh issue, all well preserved, 
realised <1 : two Half Groats of sixth issue, and four Half 
Groats of seventh issue, sold for 19s. 

In 1873, at the Bergne sale, two Groats of Dublin and Water- 
ford, and five Dublin Pennies, varied, sold for 11s. 

In 1881, at the Neligan sale, seven Groats, Dublin, Drogheda, 
Limerick, and Waterford, sold for 1 2s. ; and fourteen Groats, 
varied, sold for 1 5s. 

In 1881, at the Eeynell sale, a Double Groat of Dublin, and 
four Groats, one of first coinage and three of sixth coinage, 
sold for 2 2s. 

The following table shows the legal weight of the Groat at 
different periods during this reign : 



147073, 43i'r grains.* 
147379, 32* 
147983, 31 



1461 65, 45 grains 
146567, 36 
146770, 22i 

Edward V., April to June, 1483. 

SILVER. Groat. 

Groat (Three Crowns type). Struck at Waterford. 

06?;., shield with the arms of England within a tressnre of 
four arches, outside which, in each of the lower angles, is a 
small cross, legend EDW . . . &c. ; rev., the Three Crowns 
within a tressnre of nine arches, the letter E (in old English 
character) under the lowest crown, legend CIVITAS . 
WAT . . . 

Mr. Sainthill (" Olla Podrida," vol. ii.) thought it very 
probable that Groats of this type were coined during the short 
period that Edward the Fifth was on the throne. The E would 
be a marked distinction from his father's coinage, without 
occasioning the loss of any dies that might have been gunk. 

* It was enacted in 1470 that eleven Groats should make an ounce Troy ; c ach Gi oat should, 
therefore, weigh 43j 7 r grains. Dr. Smith pre umes that the Troy ounce was erroneously sub- 
stituted for that or the Tower, and consequently that the Groat of this year should weigh 
40 1 J grains. 



120 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

Richard III., 14831485. 

SILVER. Three coinages, similar to the fifth, sixth, and seventh 

coinages of Edward IV. 

First coinage. Groat and Penny. 

Groat (28% to 30 grains). Struck ab Drogheda, from an 
altered die of Edward IV. 

Obv., RICARDVS . DEI . GRA . DNS . HYB., full-faced bust, 
crowned, in a tressnre, a rose and sun alternately at each side 
of the head, m.tn. rose; rev., POSVI, &c., and in inner circle 
VILLA . DROGHEDA, a large rose on centre of the cross, no 
pellets. in the angles, m.m. rose. 

Valued by Lindsay at ,5. 

In 1854, one sold for .6 ; and another, not quite so fine, 
realised 1 8s. 

In 1859, one sold for ,1 11s. ; and in 1873, one sold for ,6 

Penny (about 8 grains). Struck at Drogheda. 

Obv., RIG., &c., full-faced bust, crowned, in a circle, rose and 
sun alternately at each side, m.m. rose ; rev., VILLA . 
DROGHEDA, a large rose on centre of the cross, no pellets in 
the angles. 

Valued by Lindsay at .1 10s. ; one sold for .1 Is. in 1864. 

Second coinage. Penny. 

Penny (7 grains). Struck at Waterford. 

Obv., RICARD . DNS . HYB, full-faced bust, crowned, in a 
circle; rev., CIVITAS .WATERFORD, a rose on the centre 
of the cross and three pellets in each of the angles. 

Valued by Lindsay at 15s. 

Third coinage. Groat. Two varieties. 

Groat (25J- to 3(H grains). First variety. 

Obv., RICAR . REX . ANGL (or ANGLE) FRANC, the arms 
of England on a cross pommete; rev., DOMINVS . HYBE11NIE, 
three crowns in pale on a cross pommete. 

Valued by Lindsay at <! 5s., in fine condition. 

In 1854, one sold for ,1 Is., and another for 19s. 

In 1859, a specimen, well preserved, realised 12s. 

Groat (22 grains). Seoond variety. 

Obv., RICARDVS . DEI . GRAIA . REX, the arms of 
England on a cross trefoil within a tressure of four arches; rev., 
CIVI . WATTOOKFOORD, three broad flat crowns of equal 
size in pale on a cross trefoil. 

A specimen, believed by Dr. A. Smith to be unique, is now 
in the Royal Irish Academy. 

In 1864, a Groat with bust, and one with the three crowns, 
sold together for .1 2?. 

Henry VII.,* 14851509. 

SILVER. Groat, Half Groat and Penny. Fonr coinages. 

First coinage. Obv., the arms of England ; rev., the Three 
Crowns. (See Fig. 145.) Of this coinage there are four 
varieties. 

* Pee Dr. A. Smith's Mrnoaraph on ih> "Irish Coins of Henry VII.," published in the 
"Transactions of the Royal Irish Academy,'' vol. xix., 1840. 



IRISH COINS. 121 

HENRY VII. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

Groat, first variety (24 to 29 grains). 

Obv., EEX . ANGLIE . FEANCIE (or FRANC) ; rev., 
DOMINVS . HIBERN . or HIBEENIE (or DOMINOS . 
YBEENIE), the letter h under the lower crown ; the Three 
Crowns within a beaded circle, or sometimes within a treasure. 
One specimen has the arms on obv., in a tressare of four arches 
within the beaded circle. 

Another has the Ficz Gei-ald arms on each side of the shield 
on obv. The letter li under the crowns distinguishes it from 
the similar coin of Edward IV. 

From 2s. to 3s. 6d. 

Groat, second variety (27 grains). 

Obv., DOMINVS, or DOMINOS, . HTBEENIE ; rev., same 
legend. 

From 5s. to 7s. 

Groat, third variety (30 grains), intermediate between the 
Groats of the second and fourth varieties. 

Obv. HENEICVS . DI . GEA.CIA; rev. DOMINOS YBEENIE, 
instead of the place of mintage. 

Groat, fourth variety (22 to 28 grains). Struck at Dublin and 
Waterford. 

Obv., HENEIC . DI . GEACIA; rev., CIVITAS . DVBLINIE, 
type as first variety. 

A Groat of Waterford (30 grains) has obv., HENEICVS . DI . 
GEACIA EEX, arms in a tressure of four arches ; rev., CIVITAS . 
WATERFOE . or WATEEFOED, the Three Crowns in a 
tressure of nine arches, with h. under the lower crown. 

The legends on other Waterford Groats vary from the 
preceding. 

Dublin Groat, 5s. to 10a. 

Waterford Groat, 2*. to 3s. 

Half Groat (13 to lo grains), first coinage. 

First variety. Similar to first variety Groat. 

Second variety.- Similar to fourth variety Groat, but without 
ll under the crowns. 

Obv., HENEICVS . DI . OEAI ; rev., CIVITAS . DVBBL . 

Another has obv., HENEIC . DOM . OBAE ; rev., CIVITAS . 
DVBLINIE. 

From 5s. to 7s. 

Penny (6 to 7 grains). Two varieties known, similar to the 
first and fourth varieties of Groats. 

First variety (G grains). 

Obv., arms of England in a circle of pellets, EEX . ANGLIE ; 
rev., the Three Crowns in a circle of pellets not quartered by a 
cross, DOMINVS . YRERNI, li under the crowns. 

Second variety (7 grain*). 

Obv., HENRICVS . EEX . AN. ; rev., CIVITAS . DVBLIN. 

Valued by Lindsay at 15s., in fine condition. 

In 1854, two Groats, a Half Groat and Penny, sold for 9s. 

Second coinage. Groat and Half Groat. 



122 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

HENRY VII. CONTINUED. 
SILVEE. Continued. 

Groat, second coinage (26 to 29 (trains). The bust with open 
crown in a treasure of six, seven, nine, eleven or twelve arches. 

Obv., HENRIC (or HENRICVS) DEI . GRACIA . REX . 
AGLI; rev., POSVI, &c., and in inner circle, CIVITAS . 
DYBLINIE, cross and pellets, sometimes h. in centre of cross. 

From 5s. to lOa. 

A Groat (32 grains) of the "Waterford mint is known. 

The legend, which is much defaced, appears to have been 

Obv., HENRIC . DEI . GRA . REX . ANGLI . FRANC; 
rev., POSVI, &c., and CIVITAS . WATERFORD. 

Half Groat, second coinage (16 grains). 

Obv., full-faced bust, with open crown in a treasure, 
HENRIC . DI . GRA . REX . ANLIE ; rev., POSVI, &c., 
CIVITAS . DVLIN, cross and pellets. 

In 1859, two Groats and a Half Groat, with open crown, 
together with five coins of Henry VIII., sold for 1. 13s. 

Third coinage. Groat, Half Groat, and Penny. 

Groat, third coinage (26 to 30 grains). The bust with double- 
arched crown in a tressure of four, six, seven, eight, nine or ten 
arches. 

Obv., HENRIC . DEI . GRA . REX . ANGL . FR ; rev., 
POSVI, &c., and CIVITAS . DVBLINIE. 

One variety is said to have a boar's head in centre of cross, 
and another has the letter li. 

From 3s. to 4s. 

Half Groat. Type of third coinage Groat. 

Obv., bust with double-arched crown, in a tressure of nine 
points; rev., POSVI, &c., CIVITAS . DVXLIN. 

Valued by Lindsay at 1 10s. 

Penny, third coinage (5 grains). 

Obv., h under a large double-arohed crown, HENR . . ; rev., 
CIVITAS, &c., cross with three pellets in each angle. 

Described by Lindsay as unique and valued at 3. 

Fourth coinage. Groats only. 

Groat (24 to 29 grains). The bust with flat crown in a 
beaded circle. 

These Groats were assigned by Simon to Henry V. 

Obv., HENRICVS . DI . GRA . REX . AGL, full-faced bust, 
crowned ; rev., POSVI, &c., in inner circle, CIVITAS . (sometimes 
SIVITAS) DVBLINE, or DVBLIN, or DVBL, cross and pellets. 

Some specimens have, on each side of the head, a oinquefoil, 
or quatrefoil, or a cross and annulet, or a small cross. 

From 3s. to 4s. 

In 1854, two Groats of this coinage with a Groat of Edward 
IV., first issue, sold for 10s. 
Henry VIII.,* 15O9 1547. 

SILVER. Groat, Half Groat, Sixpence, Threepence, Three Halfpence, 
and Three Farthings. Four types. 

See Dr. A. Smith's papei on the "Irish Coins of Henry VIII.," in the Xumismalis 
Chronicle, vol. six., new teries, 187a. 



IRISH COIXS. 123 

HENRY VIII. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

First iype, prior to 1541. Groat and Half Groat. 

Groat (35 to 38 grains). 

Obv., arms of England, crowned, on a cross fonrchy, 
HENRIC . VIII . D . G . E . AGL . Z ; rev., harp, crowned, 
between H and R, both crowned, FRANCE . DOMINVS . 
HIBERNIE. 

A variety (presnmably the first coinage of this King) omits 
the VIII. after HENEIC, and has GRA . REX. 

Similar Groats have, instead of h. R at side of the harp, 
h. A (for Henry and Anne Boleyn or Anne of Cleves), "h I (for 
Henry and Jane Seymour), and h. K (for Henry and Katherine 
Howard). 

From Is. 6d. to 2s. 6d. 

In 1854, six, varied, sold for 6s. ; five, varied, 8s. ; and seven, 
varied, 4s. 6d. 

Half Groat (19 to 21 grains). Same type as the Groat, with 
ll A, h, I, or h. K, at side of harp. 

A variety has 8 for VIII after HENRIC. 

Very rare ; valued by Lindsay, in fine condition, at 1 5s., 
1 10s., and .1 respectively. 

In 1854, a Groat and Half Groat, with H . A., both in fine 
preservation, sold for 10s. ; and a Groat and Half Groat with 
H . K., realised 9s. 

In 1864, three Groats, H . E ., H . A ., H . I., and a Half 
Groat, H . A., all very fine, sold for 13s. 

In 1873, three Groats, with H . A ., H . I., and H . K. at side 
of the harp, and a Half Groat, realised .1 11s. 

Second type, 1541. Groats only (35 to 39 5 grains), of base 
metal, 9oz. 6dwt. fine. 

Obv., same type as the preceding, HENRIC . VIII. DI . 
GEACIA . ANGLIE, arms of England ; rev., FRANCIE . ET . 
HIBERNIE . REX ., harp crowned between li R, both 
crowned. 

From 2s. 6d. to 3s. 6d., in fine condition. 

Third type, 1544. Sixpence, Threepence, Three Halfpenny 
and Three Farthing Pieces. Base metal, Soz. fine and 4oz. 
alloy. 

Sixpence (35 to 44 grains). 

Obv., the King's bust, nearly full-faced, crowned, HENRTC . 
8 . D . G . AGL . FRA . Z . HIB . EEX. (see Fig. 146) ; 
rev., CIVITAS . DVBLINIE, the arms of England on a cross 
fleury, m.m. harp, boar's head, sun, P, &c. 

From 2s. 6d. to 3s. 6d. 

Threepence (18 to 22 grains). 

Type similar to the Sixpence. 

From 3s. to 5s. 

Three Halfpenny Piece (9 to 11 grains). 

Same type; obv., H . D . G . ROSA . SINE . SPINE.; rev., 
CIVITAS . DVBLIN. <,r DVBLINIE. 

A variety reads SIN . SPI. 



124 TIIK VALUATION OF BRITISH COIN'S. 

HENRY VIII. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

One of these coins was valued at 2 by Lindsay, who supposed 
it to be "perhaps unique." 

In 1854, four Sixpences, two Threepenny and one Three-Half- 
penny Piece, sold for 8s. ; and a similar lot, but with one 
additional piece, also realised 8s. At the same sale, two 
Sixpences, a Threepenny and two Three-Halfpenny Pieces, 
together with three Groats of Henry VII., third coinage, 
eold for 7s. 

In 1859, a Sixpence, Threepence, and Three-Halfpenny Piece, 
with a Groat and Half Groat (H . A.), and also two Groats and 
a Half Groat of Henry VII., sold for 1 13s. 

In 1864, two Sixpences, very fine, two Threepencea, fine, and 
a Three-Halfpenny Piece, sold for 9s. ; and at the same sale a 
Sixpence, Threepence, and Three-Halfpenny Piece, all fine, 
realised 8s, 

In 1873, two Sixpences, a Threepence, and Three-Halfpenny 
Piece, all fine, sold for 1 9s. 

Three- Farthing Piece (5 grains). 

Similar type. Obi:, H . D . G . EOSA . SINE . SP. ; rev., 
CIVITAS . DVBLIN. 

Valued by Lindsay, as being unique, at 2. 

In 1859, this coin was sold for 2 11s. 

In 1864, one (probably the same) sold for 3. 

Fourth type, 1546. Sixpence only. Similar to Groat of 
second type. Very base metal, 4oz. fine silver to 8oz. alloy. 

Sixpence (34 to 40 grains). 

Obv., HENBIC . VIII. DI . GEACIA . AGLIE, the arms of 
England, crowned, on a cross fourchy ; rev., FBANCIE . ET . 
HIBERNIE . EEX . 37., harp crowned between h. and E, also 
crowned, m.m. fleur-de-lis on each side. 

A variety has obv., HENEIC . 8 . D.G . ANGL . FEANC; 
rev., W . ET . HIBERNIE . EEX . 38. (See Fig. 147.) 

The figures 37 and 38 in rev. legends of the preceding coins 
indicate the year of the King's reign in which they were 
struck. 

Another variety has ; ofcr., HENEIC . 8 . DEI . GEACIA . 
ANGLIE, and, rev., W . FEANCIE . ET . HIBERNIE . EEX. 

The W at beginning of rev. legend should correctly be WS in 
monogram, the initials of William Sherrington, Master of the 
Mint at Bristol, where these coins were struck. 

From 2s. 6d. to 3s. 6d. 

Edward VI., 15471553. 

Whether or not Irish coins were struck by Edward VI. is a moot point 
among numismatists. Lindsay thought it certain that money 
was coined in Ireland during this reign, although none had 
been discovered. "Have we no Irish coins of Edward VI.?" ia 
the title of a paper* by the Eev. Canon Pownall, who writes 

* Numismatic Chronicle, vol. i., third series, 1881. 



IRISH COINS. 125 

EDWARD VI. CONTINUED. 

thua : " We possess Irish coins of Henry VIII., although there 
was no Irish mint at work in Henry's time. And we are sap- 
posed to have no Irish coins of Edward VI., though it can bo 
shown that in hia reign the mint in Dublin was at work." The 
writer's opinion (in which, however, Dr. Aquilla Smith does 
not concur) is that the Testoons of Edward VI., dated 
1551 and 1552, with mint mark a harp (and probably also 
those of same date with mint mark a fleur-de-lis and a rose), 
were struck at Dublin. These Testoons are very base, although 
the coinage of free silver in England began in 1551. Hawkins 
observed* : "It is not easy to account for this date (MDLII.) 
on a base shilling, as the money of fine silver was certainly in 
circulation in the preceding year." But if these base Testoons. 
are detached from the English money of the same date and 
classed as Irish coins, nothing, in Canon Pownall's opinion,, 
remains to occasion surprise. 

Many of these pieces are only latten, and look as if they had 
not been even washed with silver. Those with mint mark harp. 
are of the basest sort, and were ordered, in the third year of 
Elizabeth, to pass for twopence farthing only. They vary in 
weight. One (74J grains), with m.m. harp on both sides, reads, 

Obv., EDWARD . VI . D. G . AGL . FRAN . Z . HB . REX ;. 
rev., TIMOR . DOMINI . FONS . VITE . M . DLII, the 
letters E and R on either side of the Arms. 
They are of the type shown in Fig. 79, except that the letter 31 
on rev. is of the Lombardic not the Roman shape. 

Mary.f 15531554. 

SILVER. Shilling, Groat, Half Groat and Penny. 

Shilling (90 to 96 grains). Dated 1553 and 1554. 

Obv., MARIA . D . G . ANG . FRA . Z . HIB . REGIN, or 
BEGIN A, or HIBE REGIN, crowned bust to the left, with neck- 
lace, a fleur-de-lis after Maria, and annulets between the words, 
m.m. annulet ; rev., VERITAS . TEMPORIS . FILIA . MDLIII, 
the harp crowned between M and R, also crowned. A fleur-de- 
lis after VERITAS, and annulets between the words. 

A variety has VERTAS and the date MDLIITI. 

Specimens have sold for 6s., 1 5s., 2 10s., and .4 4a. 

Tolerably well executed forgeries of the Shilling are met with 
occasionally ; they are readily known by the want of the flange 
or cross line at the base of the initial letters M . R on rev. 

Groat (about 32 grains). 

Similar to the Shilling, except that it is not dated. (See Fig. 
148.) 

Specimens have sold for 3 11s., .14 5s., and .29 10s. 

In Fig. 148 the fleur-de-lis after MARIA and the annuleta 
between the words are unfortunately omitted. 

" The Silver Coins of England," 2nd ed., p. 289. 

t See Dr. A. Smith's paper on the i" Irish Coins of Mary," published in the "Proceeding* 
of the Kilkenny Archaeological Society," vol. iii., l>00. 



126 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

MART. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

A forgery of the Groat has a pomegranate after the Queen's 
name, and the date MDLIII on rev. 

Half Groat (abont 16 grains). 

Obv., MAEIA . D . G . A . FE . Z . HIB . REGI, similar to 
the Groat. 

Valued by Lindsay at .4. 

A forgery of the Half Groat omits the crown over the harp 
on rev. 

A Groat and Half Groat of Mary, with a Shilling and five 
Groats of Philip and Mary, sold for 2 2s. (1881). 

Penny (8 grains). 

Same type as the Half Groat, but on obv., M . D . G . 
EOSA . SINE . SPIN. 

Described by Lindsay as nniqne, and valued at 7. 

In 1859 one sold for .3 10s. 

Philip and Mary, 15541558. 

SILVER. Shilling and Groat, of base metal, 3oz. silver to 9oz. alloy. 

In 1557 the circulation of the base English Eose-Pennies of 
Henry VIII. and Edward VI. was prohibited in England and 
restricted to Ireland. 

Shilling (144 grains). Dated 1555. 

Obv., PHILIP . ET . MAEIA . D . G . EEX . ET . EEGINA . 
ANGL, or ANG, busts of the King and Queen face to face, a 
crown over, the date 1555 below the busts, m.m. rose ; rev., 
POSVIMVS, &c., the harp crowned between P and M both 
crowned, mm. rose or portcullis. 

From 7s. 6d. to 10s., in good condition. 

These Shillings are seldom found in a fine state. 

Groat (48 grains). Dated 1555. 1556, 1557 and 1558. 

Similar to the Shilling, but the date is placed over the busts, 
with the crown between, thus, 15 55. 

From Is. 6d. to 2s. 6d. 

Two Shillings and a Groat, in fire condition, sold for 17s. ; 
a similar lot but not so good, sold for 10a. (1854). 

A Shilling and a Groat, both fine, sold for 12s. (1864). 

A Shilling and two Groats, realise^ 17s. (1873). 

A Shilling of Mary, a Shilling and Groat of Philip and Mary, 
with nine coins, varied, of Elizabeth and James I., sold for 
^1 5s. (1859). 

Elizabeth, 15581602. 

SILVER. Three coinages. 

First Coinage, 1558. Shilling and Groat of base metal, 3oz. 
silver to 9oz. alloy. 

Second Coinage, 1561. Shilling and Groat of good silver. 

Third Coinage, 1598. Shilling, Sixpence, and Threepence of 
base metal, 3oz. silver to 9oz. alloy. 



IRISH COINS. 127 

ELIZABETH. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Con tinned. 

Shilling, first coinage (144 grains). 

Obv., ELIZABETH . D . G . ANG . FEA . Z . HIB . EEG . 
or EEGI . or EEGINA, crowned bust to the left, m.m. rose ; 
rev., POSVI, &c., crowned harp between E and E also crowned, 
m.m. rose. 

From 3s. to 5s. 

Groat, first coinage (48 grains). 

Similar to the preceding Shilling. 

From 2s. 6d. to 3s. 6d. 

Shilling, second coinage (about 72 grains). Dated 1561. 

Obv., ELIZABETH . D . G . A . F . ET . HIBEENIE . EEG . 
or EEGI, crowned bust to the left in a dotted circle, m.m. 
harp ; rev.. POSVI, &c., a crowned shield, bearing three harps 
(two above, one below), the date, 1561, on each side of the 
shield, thus, 15 61. (See Fig. 149.) 

From 5s. to 7s. 6d. 

Groat, second coinage (about 24 grains). Dated 1561. 

Similar to the Shilling. 

Valued by Lindsay at 10s. 

Shilling, third coinage (72 to 88 grates). 

Obv., ELIZABE TH . D . G . ANG . FEA . ET . HIBEE . 
EEG . or EE, the arms of England on a shield, in a dotted circle, 
m.m. trefoil, star, &c. ; rev., POSVI, &c., the harp crowned. 

From 2s. 6d. to 5s. 

A very fine specimen realised <1 3s. in 1864. 

Sixpence, third coinage (38 to 47 grains). 

Similar to the preceding Shilling. 

From 2s. to 5s. 

Threepence (about 20 grains). 

Similar to the preceding Shilling. 

Valued by Lindsay at 12s. 

A specimen, with three other coins, was sold for 6s. in 1854. 
COPPER. Penny and Halfpenny. 

Penny (27 to 30 grains). Dated 1601 and 1602. 

Obv., ELIZABETH . D . G . AN . FE . ET . HIBEE . EE, 
the arms of England between E and E. m.m., star, cross, &c. ; 

rev., POSVI, &c., crowned harp between 1C 01, or 

16 02. 

From 6d. to Is. 6d. 

Halfpenny (about 15 grains). Dated 1601 and 1602. 

Similar to the Penny. 

From Is. to 2s. 6d. 

Mixed lots of Elizabeth's coins have realised the following 
prices : 

In 1854, a Shilling and Groat, first issue, *vith a Sixpence 
and Threepence, sold for 6s. 

A Shilling of third issue, with a Sixpence and Threepence, and 
two copper coins 1601 and 1602, sold for 8s. 

A Shilling and Groat of second issue, with two Shillings and 
a Sixpence of James I., sold for 11s. 



128 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

ELIZABETH. CONTINUED. 

In 1864, a Shilling, first issue, with a Shilling and Groat, 
second issue, all in fine condition, sold for 1 is. 

In 1873, a Shilling and Groat both 1561, and a Shilling 
without bust, the last two remarkably fine, sold for J24. 

In 1881, a Shilling, Sixpence and Threepence, and a copper 
Penny, sold for 11s. 

James I., 16031624. 

SILVER. Shilling and Sixpence ; two coinages, of 9oz. silver to 3oz. 
alloy. 

Shilling, first coinage (about 70 grains). 1603. 

Obv., IACOBVS . D . G . ANG . SCO . PEA . ET . HEB . 
REX., crowned bust to the right, m.m., bell or martlet; rev., 
EXVEGAT . DEVS . DISSIPENTVE . INIMICI, the harp 
crowned, m.m., as on obv. 

From 23. 6d. to 5s. 

Sixpence, first coinage (about 35 grains). 

Similar to the Shilling, but rev. legend is TVEATVR . 
VNITA . DEVS. 

From Is. 6d. to 3s. 6d. 

Shilling, second coinage (about 70 grains). 1604 to 1613. 

Obv., IACOBVS . D . G . MAG . BEIT . FEA . ET . HIB . 
EEX., same type as the preceding Shilling ; rev., HEXEICVS . 
ROSAS . EEGNA . IACOBVS., same type as the preceding 
Shilling, m.m. rose, martlet, cinqnefoil, or shell. 

From 2s. to 3s. 

Sixpence, second coinage (about 35 grains). 

Similar to the second coinage Shilling, but rev. legend 
TVEATVR . VNITA . DEVS. 

From Is. 6d. to 2s. 6d. 

COPPER. Farthing. There is a Half-farthing of similar type, supposed 
to have been struck as a pattern. 

Farthing (about 12 grains). Issued in 1613. 

Obv., IACO . D . G . MAG . BEI ; or BRIT., two sceptres, 
in saltire, through a crown ; rev., FEA . ET . HIB . EEX., 
harp crowned (see Fig. 174), various m.m. 

From 6d. to Is. 



Charles I., 16251649. 

No regal money, except the copper Farthing, was coined in 
Ireland during this reign. 

Siege Pieces were struck in gold, silver and copper. 
COPPER. Farthing. 

Farthing (6 to 10 grains). Struck in 1625. 

Obv., CAEOLVS . D . G . MAG . BEIT., two sceptres in 
saltire, through a crown, in an inner circle ; rev., FEAN . ET . 
HIB . EEX, harp crowned in an inner circle, various m.m. 

Another variety has, on obv., CARO . D . G . MAG . BEI . 



IRISH COINS. 129 

CHARLES I. CONTINUED. 

CoPi'ER. Continued. 

or BEIT., without the inner circle ; rev., FEA . ET . HIB . EEX, 
no inner circle. 

From 6d. to Is. 

The English Rose Farthing (described at page 35) was 
ordered to be struck in 1635 and to pass current equally in Eng- 
land and Ireland. 

Irish Siege Pieces, or Money of Necessity.* 

GOLD. Pistole. 

Dr. A. Smith, in the paper referred to below, observes that 
the fact of a coinage of gold having been issued in Ireland has 
only been established within the last few years, by the discovery 
of two or three pieces. These coins are stamped on each side, 

4 dw^t. 

,_ ' within a double circle which extends to the margin ; 

the inner circle is linear, the outer one beaded. 
SILVER. Inchiquin, Ormond, Kilkenny and Cork money. 

Inchiquin money, 1642. Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, Nine- 
pence, Sixpence, Groat, and Threepence, of very irregular 
shapes. 

Crown (464 grains). Two varieties. 

dw gr 

First. An irregular polygon, having 19 : 8 stamped in a circle, 
on both sides. 

Specimens have realised 2 2s., .3, .3 14s., .5, and 
.7 12s. 6d. 

A Crown (probably unique) on octagonal plate, stamped on 
both sides with the weight reversed, in an engrained circle, 
sold for ! 7 in 1881. 

Second. A nearly circular piece, having V.s. stamped on 
both sides. 

J61, 2 16s., .3 11s., and ,4 4s. 

Half Crown (232 grains). Two varieties. 

dw* g 

First. An irregular oblong, having 9 : 16. stamped, in a circle, 
on both sides. 

1 11s., 2 3s., 2 10s., 2 15s., .3, .3 5s., .5, and 
o 10s. 

S I) 

Second. An irregular oblong, having II VI in a circle, 
stamped on both sides. 

2, 2 18s., .3 Is., ,3 8s., and ,5. 

A Crown and Half Crown, both first variety, .13 ; ditto, both 
second variety, .10 10s. 

Shilling (93 grains). An irregularly shaped piece. 

dw gr 
Oliv., in a circle, 3 . '21, stamped on both sides. 

* See Dr. A. Smith's " Money of Necessity issued in Ireland in the Keiari of Charles the 
First," published in the Proceedings of the Kilkenny Archaeological Society, vol. iii., new 
eerier, 161. 

K 



130 THE VALUATION OP BRITISH COINS. 

IRISH SIEGE PIECES. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

2 15s., .3 3s., .3 7s., 4 7s., <4 10s., 4, 15s., 5 7s. 6d., 
and 6. 

A. Half Crown, first variety, and Shilling, sold together for 
8 in 1881. 

Ninepence (68 grains). Two varieties. 

First. An irregularly shaped piece, 
dw gr 

Obv. and rev., in a circle 2 : 20, stamped on both sides. 

One sold for 17s. in 1859. 

Second. Obv., as above ; rev., nine annulets within a circle. 

One sold for 27 in 1854. 

Sixpence (46 grains). Two varieties, 
d gr 

First. In a circle, 1 : "22, stamped on both sides. 

Specimens have sold tor 5, o 2s. 6J., 9 2s. 6d., and 
.10 10s. 

Second. Obv., as before ; rev., six large annulets. 

One sold for 1 Is. in 1859. 

A specimen, having obv. plain, and rev. six annulets, sold for 
.10 10s. in 1854. 

Groat (30 grains). Two varieties, 
dwt. g. 

First. In a beaded circle, 1 . 6. stamped on both sides. 

A specimen sold for .5 2s. 6d. in 1859, and another for 
8 12s. 6d. in 1881. 

Second. Obv., like the preceding, but rev., four large annulets. 

One sold for .10 15s. in 1854, and for .10 12s. 6d. in 1873. 

I 

Threepence (23 grains). Obv., 23 in a beaded circle ; rev., 
three large annulets. 

Described by Lindsay as being perhaps unique, and valued 
at 2. 

The only specimen known is in the British Museum. 

Forgeries of the Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, Sixpence, and 
Fonrpence, were manufactured in Dublin. They are very black, 
and were exposed to the fumes of burning sulphur for the pur- 
pose of giving them an an'ique appearance. 

Ormond Money,* 1643. Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, Six- 
pence, Groat, Threepence, and Twopence. f 

This money was ordered, by royal proclamation, to be current 
coin of Ireland. (For type, see Fig. 150.) 

Crown (449 to 464 graius). The exact weight should be 456 
grains. 

Obv , C . E. crowned, within a double circle, the outer one 

s 
beaded ; rev., V, in a double circle. 

.1 os., 2 3s., ,3 ls>., and .3 11s. 

' See Dr. A. Smith's paper on "The Ormonde Money," published in the Proceedings of 
the Kilkenny Arr'h eological Society, vol. iii.. 1 -:"(. 

T Simon and Lind-ay both mentun a Penny oi this money, but no authentic specimen is 
.known, and the Penny is not mentioned in the Kind's couim.^iuii, which directed what 
denominations should be coined. 



IRISH COIKS. 131 

IUISH SIEGE PIECES. CONTINUED. 

SILVER. Continued. 

Half Crown (225 to 247 grains). The weight should be 228 
grains. 

S D 

Similar to the Crown, but II VI on rev, 

From 15s. to 1 5s. ; one sold for 1 15s. in 1854. 

Shilling (82 to 88 grains). The weight should be 91 J grains. 
D 

Similar, but XII on rev. 

From 7s. 6d. to 15s. 

Sixpence (40 to 45 grains). The weight should be 45! grains. 
D 

Similar, but VI on rev. (See Fig. 150.) 

From 3s. 6d. to 7s. 6d. 

Groat (22 to 30^ grains). The weight should be 30 J grains. 
D 

Similar, but I1II on rev. 

From 5a. to 10s. 

Threepence ( 1 5 to 22 \ grains) . The weight should be 22 * grains. 
D 

Similar, but III on rev. 

From 5s. to 7e. Cd. 

Twopence (12f to 15 grains). The weight should be 151 grains. 
D 

Similar, but II on rev. 

From 7s. 6d. to 12s. 6d. 

Sets of the Ormond money have realised '2 3s., 2 6s., 
2 14s., 3 4s., 15s., .5 4s., and .6 11s. 

Kilkenny Money. Crown and Half Crown, coined in imitation 
of the Ormond Money, and the Blacksmith's Half Crown. 

Crown (353 grains). Known as the Rebel Crown. 

Obv., large cross in a plain circle, outside which ia a beaded 
circle, and between the circles a small star opposite one arm 

a 
of the cross ; rev., V within two circles, as on obv. 

Specimens have realised .3 10s., 4* Is., .4 15s., <5 7a. 6d., 
.1 10s., .8 5s., and ,10 10s. 

Half Crown (176 grains). The Eebel Half Crown. 

s D 

Obv., large cross in a double circle ; rev., II. VI, in a double 
circle. 

Specimens have sold for 12s., 5 15s., .6 2s. 6d., <6 5s., 
.10 10s., and .11 15s. 

Blacksmith's Half Crown (211 to 231 grains). Struck at 
Kilkenny, in November, 1642, by order of the Confederate 
Catholics, in imitation of the Tower Half Crown. Hawkins 
terms it the Blacksmith's Half Crown, on account of its extreme 
rudeness. The m.m. on obv. is a cross, and on rev. a harp. 

Cork Money. Shilling and Sixpence. 

Shilling (69 to 75 grains). An irregular octagon. 

Obv., in a circle, CORK with 1647 under it, in the centre of 
the coin is a dot or point ; rev., in a circle XII. 

2 2s. and .3. 

K 2 



132 THE VALUATION OP BRITISH COINS. 

IRISH SIEGE PIECES. CONTINUED. 

SILVER. Continued. 

Sixpence (34 to 37 grains). 

Obv., similar to the Shilling ; rev., in a beaded circle, VI. 

.1 12s., .1 15s., and 2 10s. 

A Shilling and Sixpence, together, sold for 2 Is. in 1859. 

A Shilling and two Sixpences sold for 7 5s. in 1881. 
COPPER and BRASS. Struck at Bandon, Cork, Dublin, Kilkenny, 
Kinsale, and Youghal. 

Bandon. Copper (31 grains) of an irregular octagon 
shape. 

Obv., the letters B . B . ( = Bandon Bridge, the ancient name 
of the town of Bandon) within a circle of small lozenges ; rev., 
three castles, one above and two below, within a circle as on 
obv. 

Cork. Pieces struck in brass were, it is supposed, coined 
about the same time as the Cork Shilling and Sixpence. 

First variety. Circular piece (57$ grains). 

Obv., the word CORKE under a crown ; rev., without legend or 
device. 

Valued by Lindsay at 3s. 

Second variety. Square piece (40 grains). 

Obv., the word CORK in a beaded circle ; rev., a rudely designed 
castle in a circle of small lozenges. 

Valued by Lindsay at 5s. 

Dublin Money will be found described at the end of this 
reign. 

Kilkenny. Copper Halfpence and Farthings were coined by 
order of the Confederate Catholics (October, 1642), who adopted 
the type and legends of the Copper Farthings of Charles I., 
issued in 1625. (See page 128.) 

These pieces are very rudely and imperfectly struck. 

Halfpenny (51 to 125 grains). The standard weight wa 
90 grains. 

Obv., CAROL VS (or CARO) . D . G . MAG . BRI., two 
sceptres in saltire through a crown, surrounded by two beaded 
circles; rev., FRAN . ET . HIBER . HEX., harp crowned 
between C and R within a beaded circle. 

Farthing. The standard weight was 45 grains. 

Type of the Halfpenny, legend CAEO or CAR . D . G . 
MAG . BRI, and FRA . ET . HIB . REX. 

Value from 2s. 6d. to 3s. 6d. 

Kinsale. A square copper piece (44 to 55 grains). 

Obv., the letters K . S. within a circle of pellets ; rev., 
a chequered shield, the arms of Kinsale, surrounded by 
pellets. 

Youghal. There are several varieties of these pieces, two- 
of which are as follows : 

First. Square piece (56 grains). 

Obv., Y . T ., with 1646 below, within a double circle ; rev., a 
ship with one mast within a double circle. 

Valued by Lindsay at 3s. 



IRISH COINS. 133 

IRISH SIEGE PIECES. CONTINUED. 

COPPER and BRASS. Continued. 

Second. Square piece (14 grains). 

Obv., the letters Y. T., with a bird above and 1646 below, all 
within a circle ; rev., a ship within a circle. 

Valued by Lindsay at 5s. 
Jhtblin Money. St. Patrick's Halfpenny and Farthing.* 

Halfpenny (130 to 148 grains). 

Obv., FLOREAT . REX, King David kneeling, playing on a 
harp, a crown over ; rev., ECCE . GREX., St. Patrick standing 
with a crozier in his left hand, and trefoil in his right, which he 
holds extended over people standing before him, at his left side 
a shield bearing the arms of Dublin, three castles. 

The crown over the harp is of a different metal to that of the 
coin, being brass upon copper or copper upon brass. (For obv., 
Bee obv. of Fig. 172.) 

From 2s. to 3s. 

According to Simon (" Essay on Irish Coins"), specimens of the 
preceding Halfpenny were struck in silver, which, he supposed, 
the Kilkenny Assembly intended should pass for Shillings. 

A proof in silver (unique) is now in the Royal Irish Academy. 

Farthing (77 to 102 grains). 

Obv., similar to the Halfpenny ; rev., QVIESCAT . PLEBS., 
St. Patrick standing with crozier in his left hand, and his right 
extended over reptiles, a church behind. (See Fig. 172.) 

From 6d. to Is. 

Commonwealth, 1649 166O. 

COPPER. Farthing (67 grains). 

Obv., A . CORKE . FARTHING, shield, bearing St. George's 
cross, between two branches ; rev., same legend, surrounding a 
harp. 

Valued by Lindsay afc 3s. 6d. 

Lindsay described a similar piece, weighing only 13 grains, 
which he valued at 5s. 

Charles II., 166O 1685. 

SILVER. Crown and Half Crown. Struck in Ireland previous to his 
Restoration. 

Crown (427 grains). 

Obv., CAR . II . D . G . MAG . BRIT., roses between the 
words, an imperial crown within a plain circle ; rev., FRA . ET . 

HYB . REX . F . D., &c., roses between the words, V in a 
plain circle ; m.m. on both sides, a fleur-de-lis. 

Specimens have sold for <! 11s., 3 4s., .3 7s., .3 15s., .4, 
5 2s. 6d., ,6 15s., .3 10s., and .17. 



134 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

CHARLES II. CONTINUED. 

SILVER. Continued. 

Half Crown (219 grains). 

Obv., similar to the Crown, bat a fleur-de-lis or a quatrefoil 

8 

between the words ; rev., same as the Crown, but II . VI within 
the circle. Simon's figure of this piece has nothing between the 
words. 

Specimens have realised ,53 3a., ,3 15s., J34, 5 5s., 5 10s., 
and 13. 
COPPER. Halfpenny and Farthing. 

Halfpenny (105 to 119 grains). Dated 1680 to 1684. 

Obv., CAEOLVS . II . DEI . GRATIA., the King's bust 
laureate to the right ; rev., MAG . BE . FRA . ET . HIB . 
R.EX., a harp crowned between the date, as 16 80. 

From Is. to 2s. 

Farthing (22 to 28 grains). Struck in 1660. 

Obv., CAROLVS . II . D . G . M . B., two sceptrea in 
saltire through a crown; rev., FRA . ET . HIB . REX., a 
harp crowned, m.m. fleur-de-lis. 

From Is. to 2s. 

James II.,* 16851688. 

SILVER. None. 

COPPER. Halfpenry (101 to 130 grains). Dated 1685 to 16S8. 

Obv., IACOBVS . II . DEI . GRATIA, bust laureate to the 
left ; rev., MAG . BR . FRA . ET . HIB . REX., harp crowned 
between the date, as 16 85. 

From Is. to 2s. 

GUM MONEY/,- Crown, Half Crown, Shilling, and Sixpence, 1689 
and 1690. 

Crown (150 to 245 grains). Dated 1690. 

Olv., IAC . II . DEI . GRA . MAG . BRI . FRA . ET . HIB . 
REX., the King in armour, on horseback, riding to the left, 
head bare but laureated, sword drawn ; rev., CHRISTO . 
VICTORE . TRIVMPHO, a large crown in the centre, the arms 
of England, Scotland, France, and Ireland, each in a crowned 
shield, arranged crosswise, the English arms between ANO and 
DOM, and the French arms dividing the date 16 90. (See 
Fig. 202.) 

The Crowns exhibit no variation of type or legend, but differ 
greatly in weight. 

From Is. to 2s. 6d. 

Half Crown. Two issues, dated 1689 and 1690, the firct 
being the heavier. 

Obv., IACOBVS . II . DEI . GRATIA, laureate bust to the 
left ; rev., MAG . BR . FRA . ET . HIB . REX., two sceptres 

* See Dr. A. Smith's yper on the Money of Xece3.-ity issued in Irelsnl in the reign ot 
James the Second. Xumismat'u: Chronicle, vol. x., 1870. 

T Made from old brass guns, broken bells, old copper, brass and pewter: worth from 3d. 
to 4d. the lb., but ordered to rasa current for from 5 to 10 sterling the i ound weight. 



IRISH COINS. 135 

JAMES II. CONTINUED. 

GUN MONEY. Continued. 

in saltire, through a crown, between I and R, XXX above the 
crown, the date being above the XXX, below the crown the 
name of the month in which the piece was issued. (See Fig. 
199.) 

The following dates occur : 

Large Half Crown (115 to 259 grains) : 1689, July, August, 
ditto (date under crown), September, October, 8ber, November, 
December, January, February, and March ; 1690, March, April, 
and May. None of June, 1GSS). 

Small Half Croivn (104 to 196 grains): 1690, April, May, June, 
July, August, September, and October. 

From Is. to Is. 6d. 

Shilling. Two issues, the first being the heivier, dated 1689 
and 1690. 

Rev., similar to the Half Crown (Fig. 199), but XII above 
the crown instead of XXX. The obv. is similar to the obv. of 
Fig. 201. 

Large Shilling (72 to 122 grains). Dated for every month 
of 1689, except April and May ; also dated 8ber, 9r, and lOr ; 
a variety of 9r has a castle below the bust. Dated 1690, March 
and April. 

SmaLL Shilling (66 to 105 grains). Dated 1690, April, May, 
June, July, August, and September. 

From 6d. to Is. 

Sixpence (44 to 65 grain?). Dated 1689 and 1690. 

Similar to the Shilling, but VI above the crown in place 
of XI I. 

Dated 1689, June, July, August, September, 7her, October, 
November, December, January, February, and March ; also 
1690, March, April, May, and June. 

From Is. to 2s. 

In 1864, a fine collection of Gun Money, comprising fifteen 
Crowns, twenty-six Half Crowns, fifty-eight Shillings, and 
eighteen Sixpences, all, with few exceptions, very fine, sold for 
5 5s. 

Proofs of the Gun Money were struck in gold and silver, 
and examples are in the British Museum and in private 
collections. 

The following prices have been realised : 

Proofs in Gold : 

Crown, .15 10s. 

Half Crown, .3 15s. 

Shilling, ,1 10s. and .6 10s. 

Sixpence, 18s. 

Proofs in Silver : 

Crown, ,3 3s., 4 6s., 5 10s., and .9 2s. Cd. 

Half Crown, .3 10s. 

Crown and Half Crown together, 11s. in 1859. 

Shilling and Sixpence together, ,1 lls. and '2 8s. 

Sixpence, 6a. 



136 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

JAMES II. CONTINUED. 

GUN MONEY. Proofs in Silver, continued. 

Crown, Half Crown, and Shilling:, .9 15s. (1880). 

Crown, Half Crown, and three Shillings, .5 15s. (1881). 

Half Crown, Two Shillings, and a Sixpence, 2 4s. (1854). 

Half Crown, Shilling, and Sixpence, 1 13s. (1864). 

Shilling, three Sixpences, and a copper Sixpence, .3 10a. 
(1881). 
WHITE METAL.* Groat, 1689. 

Groat (51 grains). Size of the Gnn Money Sixpence. 

Olv., IACOBVS . II . DEI . GRATIA, laureate bust to the 
left; rev., MAG . BE, . FRA . ET. HIB . REX, 1689, harp 
crowned between II IL 

Valned by Lindsay at 15s. 

PEWTER. Crown (two varieties), Penny (two varieties), and Halfpenny 
(three varieties). 

Crown (346 grains), first variety. Dated 1689. 

Obi-., the King in armour on horseback to the left, head bare, 
lanreated, in his right hand a drawn sword erect, legend 
IACOBVS . II . DEI . GRATIA, in large letters, a small circular 
piece of Prince's metal is inserted in the fore and hind quarters 
of the horse; rev., MAG . BR . FRA . ET . HIB . REX, 1689, 
in the centre a piece of Prince's metal, on which is stamped a 
large crown. 

This coin is in the British Museum, and seems to be a pattrn 
for a Crown piece. 

Crown (281 grains), second variety. Dated 1690. 

Similar to the Gun Money Crown (Fiz. 202), but on the edge 
the legend MELIORIS . TESSERA . FATI . ANNO . REGNI . 
SEXTO. 

Specimens have sold for .1 16s., .1 19s., .3 Is., .3 13s. 6d., 
4, 15s., 5 15s. 6d., .6 16s. 6d., and .13 15s. 

Penny (107 to 130 grains), first variety (size of the large 
Gun Money Shilling). Dated 1689 and 1690. 

Obv., similar to the Gnn Money Shilling ; rev., MAG . BR . 
FRA . ET . HIB . REX, 1689., harp crowned, a piece of 
Prince's metal in the centre. (Similar to Fig. 201.) 

From 5s. to 10s. 

Penny (95 grains), second variety. Dated 1690. 

D 

Obv., like obv. of Fig. 160, but 1 behind the head ; rev., 
MAG . BR . FRA . ET . HIB . REX., harp crowned between 
16 90., piece of Prince's metal in the centre. 

From 5s. to 10s. One sold for 2 Is. in 1859. 

Halfpenny (72 grains), first variety. Dated 1689 and 1690. 

Similar to the Penny, first variety, except that the King's 
hair ia short. 

From 3s. to 7s. 

Halfpenny (71 gra : ns), second variety. Dated 1690. 

Obv., IACOBVS . II . DEI . GRATIA., small bust to left, 

* See Dr. A. Smith's paper on the " Irish Pewter Coins of James II.," in the Proceed* 
ings of the Kilkenny Archaeological Society, vol. iii., IfUJ. 



IRISH COINS. 137 

JAMES II. CONTINUED. 

PEWTER. Continued. 

with short hair, a small ornament under the bust ; rev., legend 
as on first variety Penny, but the date is divided by the Crown, 
1690. 

From 3s. to 7s. 

Halfpenny, third variety. Probably struck at Limerick. 

Obv., IACOBVS . II . DEI . GRATIA., the King on horse- 
back, riding to the left, wearing a hat, and with drawn sword, 
two specks of brass upon the horse; rev., MAG . BR . FRA . 
ET . HIB . REX . 1689, two sceptres in saltire through a 
crown of brass, a lion over the crown, a harp under, the word 
HALF to the left of the crown, and PENNY to the right. (See 
Fig. 200.) 

Valued by Lindsay at 1, but no specimen is now known in 
any public or private collection. 
BRASS. Halfpenny, two varieties. 

Halfpenny, first variety. Dated 1690 (see Fig. 201). 

From 2s. to 3s. 

Halfpenny, second variety (about 87 grains). Dated 1691. 
Struck at Limerick, and called a HIBERNIA. 

Obv., similar to obv. of Fig. 201, but the bust clothed ; rev., 
HIBERNIA . 1691, the figure of Hibernia seated, the right 
hand upraised holding a cross, the left arm leaning upon a 
harp. 

Some of the former Gun Money Shillings were re-stamped 
with the above designs. 

From Gd. to Is. 

William and Mary, 16891694. 

COPPER. Halfpenny, dated 1690 to 1694. 

Halfpenny (106 to 116 grains). 

Obv., GVLIELMVS . ET . MARIA . DEI . GRATIA., 
busts of the King and Queen to the right ; rev., MAG . BR . 
FR . ET . HIB . REX . ET . REGINA., harp crowned, dato 
divided by the crown, thus 16 90. 

From 6d. to Is. 6d. 

William III., 1694-1702. 

COPPER. Halfpenny (106 to 116 grains), dated 1695 and 1696. 

Obv., GVLIELMVS . Ill . DEI . GRA., bust laureate to 
the right ; rev., MAG . BR . FRA . ET . HIB . REX., harp, 
crowned, dividing the date, thus 1695. On some pieces the 
bust is bare ; on others it is in armour. 

From Is. to 2s. 

Anne, 17O2 1714. 

No Irish money was struck in this reign. 



138 THK VALUATION OP BRITISII COINS. 

George I. f 1714-1727. 

COPPER. Halfpenny, two varieties, and Farthing. 

Halfpenny, first variety (108 grains). Dated 1722. 

Obv., GEOEGIUS . DEI . GEATIA . REX., laureated bust 
to the right; rev., as Fig. 176. 

From Is. to 2s. 

Halfpenny, second variety (96 to 120 grains). Dated 1722, 
1723, and 1724. 

Obv., as first variety ; rev., as Fig. 177. 

From 6d. to Is. 6d. 

Farthing (about 59 grains). Dated 1723 and 1724. 

Similar to the preceding Halfpenny. 

From Is. to Is. 6.1. 

A pattern Halfpenny is represented by Fig. 175. Dated 1722 
and 1723. 

George II., 17271760. 

COPPER. Halfpenny and Farthing, two varieties, with young and 
with old head. 

Halfpenny (about 134 grains). Dated, with younsr head, 
1736, 1737, 1738, 1741 1742, 1743, 1744, 1746, 1747, 1748, 
1749, 1750, 1751, 1752, 1753, and 1755 ; and, with old head, 
1760. 

Obv., GEORGIUS . II . REX., laureate bust to the left; 
rev., HIBERNIA and date, a harp crowned. (See Fig. 173.) 

The omission of DEI GRATIA from these coins caused much 
comment at the time. 

From 6d. to Is. 6d. 

Farthing (64 to 71 grains). Date^, with young head, 1737, 
1738, and 1744, and, with old head, 1760. 

Similar to the Halfpenny. 

From 6d. to Is. 6d. 

NOTE. In all the above coins the name is spelt GEORGIUS, 
from 1736 to 1746 inclusive, after that date GEORGIVS. 

VOCE POPULI* Halfpenny and Farthing, dated 1760. 

Halfpenny (about 109 grains). Dated 1760. 

Obv., laureate bust (supposed to be that of the young Pre- 
tender) to right, surrounded by VOCE . POPULI ; rev., female 
seated, looking to the left, a harp at her left tide, legend 
HIBERNIA, the date 1760 in exergue. 

One variety has the letter P (supposed to stand for Princeps) 
in front of the face, another has P under the bust, and a third 
variety has P on the rev. 

From 6d. to Is. 

Farthing (about 55 grains). Dated 1760. 

Similar to the Halfpenny. 

From Is. to Is. 6d. 

" Some account of the Voce Populi money is contained in Dr. Aqnilla Smith s paper, " On 
Copper Tokens issued in Ireland from 1728 to 1761." published in the Kilkenny Archoio- 
logical Society's Transactions, third series, vol. i., p. 417. 



iiusu COINS. 139 

George III., 1760-1820. 

SILVER. Bank of Ireland Tokens for Six Shillings, Thirty Pence, 
Ten Pence, and Five Pence, Irish. 

Six Shilling Token (415 grains). Dated 1804. 

Obv., GEOEGIUS . Ill . DEI. GEATIA . REX., lanreated 
bust in armonr to right; rev., BANK OF IRELAND TOKEN. 
Six SHILLINGS. 1804., Hibernia seated, looking to the left, 
with a palm-branch in her right hand, and the left leaning on a 
harp. (See Fig. 151.) 

From 6s. to 10s. 

Thirty Pence Token (192 grains). Dated 1808. 

Obv., legend and bust as on the first variety Ten Pence, with 
date 1808; rev., type as the Six Shilling piece, with legend 
BANK TOKEN encircling Hibernia, XXX PENCE IRISH 
in exergue. 

From 3s. 6d. to 4s. Gd. 

Ten Pence Token. Two varieties. 

First variety (G4 grains). Dated 1805, and 1806. 

Obv., GEOEGIVS . Ill . DEI . GEATIA, lanreated bust in 
armour to right ; rev., across the field in six lines BANK 
TOKEN TEN PENCE IEISH. 1805., edge milled. 

From Is. 6d. to 2s. 

Second variety (55 grains). Dated 1813. 

Obv., GEOEGIUS . Ill . DEI . GBATIA . REX., bust to 
right; rev., in a wreath of shamrock, BANK TOKEN 10 
PENCE IEISH 1813, in five lines, across the field, edge plain. 

From Is. 6d. to 2s. 

Five Pence Token (32 grains). Dated 1805 and 1806. 

Obv., similar to the Tenpence of same date ; rev., BANK 
TOKEN FIVE PENCE IEISH 1805., in six lines across the 
field, edge milled. 

From Is. 6d. to 2s. Gd. 
COPPER. Penny, Halfpenny, and Farthing. 

Penny (266 grains). 

Obv., GEOEGIUS . Ill . D . G . REX., bust to right ; rev., 
HIBEENIA, harp crowned, 1805. 

From Is. to 2s. 

Halfpenny. Two varieties. 

First variety (81 to 156 grains). Dated 17GS, 1769, 1775, 
1776, 1781, 1782, and 1783. 

Obv., GEOEGIVS . Ill . EEX, bust to right ; rev., HIBEENIA 
and date, harp crowned. 

From 1775 inclusive the name is spelt GEOEGIUS. 

From 9d. to Is. 6d. 

Second variety (134 grains). Dated 1805. 

Similar to the Penny. 

From 6d. to Is. 

Farthing (67 grains). Dated 1805 and 180G. 

Similar to the Halfpenny. 

From 6d. to Is. 

Pattern Pence and Halfpence were also struck, differing from 
the above. 




140 TUB VALUATION OP BBITISH COINS. 

George IV., 182O 1830. 

SILVER. None. 

COPPER. Penny and Halfpenny, dated 1822 and 1823. A Farthing, 
dated 1822, was struck as a pattern. 

Penny (261 to 266 grains). 

Obv., GEORGIUS . IV . D . G .EEX., laureated bust to left j 
rev., HIBERNIA, 1822 or 1823, harp crowned. 

From 2s. to 2s. 6d. 

Halfpenny (128 to 130 grains). 

Similar to the Penny. 

From 2s. to 3s. 

This coinage is the last of the Irish series, the currency of 
Ireland having been subsequently assimilated to that of Great 
Britain. 



COINS OF THE ISLE OF MAN. 



IN 1406, King Henry IV. bestowed upon Sir John de Sfcandley, or 
Stanley, the dominion of the Isle of Man, to be held of the Crown of 
England, on the presentation of a cast of falcons to the King at his 
coronation. After James, the seventh earl (celebrated in history as 
"the great Earl" of Derby), had been executed for bringing aid to 
King Charles II. before the battle of Worcester, the Island was granted 
to General Lord Fairfax, who held it until the Restoration, when, in 
1660, it was restored to Charles, the eighth earl, son of Earl James. 
James, the tenth earl, dying without issue in 1736, the lordship of Man 
devolved upon James, second Duke of Athol, a descendant of the Lady 
Amelia Stanley, youngest daughter of the seventh Earl of Derby. 

With a view to put an end to the contraband trade of the Island, its 
sovereignty and revenues were surrendered to the Crown in 1765 by the 
Duke of Athol, in consideration of the sum of .70, 000. 

The earliest coin issued in the Island was the token described below. 
A description of tokens does not come within the scope of this book, 
but this piece is mentioned because, by an Act of the House of Keys, it 
was ordered to be current as a legal tender in the Island. 

Copper money only was coined for the Isle of Man, but proofs of 
some of the pieces, and a few patterns, were struck in silver. 

John Murrey, 1668. 

COPPER. Penny. 

Obv., IOHN MVRRET /. 1668 as a legend round the words 
HIS . PENNY . I M., in three lines across the field ; rev., the 
Triune, or three legs (the feet pointing to the left), encircled by 
the legend QVOCVNQVE . GESSERES : STABIT. 

This piece is very small, the diameter being the same as that 
of a current Farthing of the present year. 

The Earl of Derby, 17O5 1733. 

SILVER. Pattern Piece (220 grains). 1705, struck in silver, lYn-in. in 
diameter. 

0?>v., the Stanley or Derby crest (eagle and child) under 
which is the Cap of Maintenance, and above the crest is the 
motto SANS . CHANGER; rev., the Triune (feet pointing 
to the right), surrounded by QUOCUNQUE . GESSERIS . 
STABIT. The edge is engrailed. (For type, see Fig. 183.) 



142 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

THE EARL OF DEKBT. CONTINUED. 

COPPER. Penny and Halfpenny, 1709. 

Penny. Obv., the Stanley or Derby crest (eagle and child), 
under which is the Cap of Maintenance, and above the crest the 
motto SANS . CHANGER ; rev., the Triune (feet pointing to 
the left) .surrounded by QVOCVNQVE . GESSERIS . STABIT. 

From 2s. to 5s. 

Halfpenny (80 grains). 

Of similar type to the Penny. 

From 3s. to 8s. 

These coins are of very rude execution, and were cast, not 
struck. On some pieces the date soems to be 1700, but this is 
owing to the incompleteness of the cast diminishing 1 the 9 to a 
cipher. 

Penny and Halfpenny, 1723. 

Obv.. the Stanley crest and motto ; rev., tho Triune (the feet 
pointing to the right), and motto QVOCVNQUE GESSERIS 
STABIT. 

Value 10s. to 15s. 

These were struck as patterns. The Halfpenny also occurs in 
silver. They were never legalised as coins, consequently never 
circulated as such. 

Penny, 1724. A pattern, supposed to be unique. 

Almost similar to the Penny of 1723. 

Penny, 1732. A pattern. 

Obv., the Stanley crest in high relief, the date divided, 17 
being at the head of the. child and 32 at the feet, a small 
branch, with six or eight leaves, at the head of the cradle ; 
rev., QUOCUNQUE IECERIS STABIT, between the limbs 
the initials I and D (for Jacobus Darbiensis, James, the tenth 
Earl) and the figure 1 denoting one Penny. The feet of the 
Triune point to the left. 

Penny and Halfpenny, 1733. 

Obv., the Stanley crest and motto, the date (not divided) 
below the Cap of Maintenance ; rev., the Triune, the feet 
pointing to the right, QUOCUNQUE . IECEEIS . STABIT., 
the initials I and D and figure for value (1 for One Penny and 
for a Halfpenny) between the limbs. (See Fig. 183.) 

The Penny (142 grains) is the size of the English Half- 
penny, and the Halfpenny (85 grains) is the size of the English 
Farthing. 

From 2s. to 5s. 

Proofs of these pieces were also struck in silver. 

The Duke of Athol, 1758. 

COPPEE. Penny and Halfpenny. 
Penny (172 grains). 

Obv., the monogram A D (Ahhol Dux) surmounted by a ducal 
coronet, the date 1758 below the monogram, no legend; rev., 
the Triune, feet pointing to the right, without initials or 
numeral, legend QUOCUNQUE . JECEEIS . STABIT. Edge 
plain. A proof in silver has the edge milled. (See Fig. 184.) 



COINS OF THE ISLE OP MAN. 143 

THE DUKE OP ATHOL. CONTINUED. 

COPPER. Continued. 

Halfpenny (117 grains). 

Similar to the Penny. 

Value, 2s. 6d. to 5a. 

Forgeries of this Penny and Halfpenny are not uncommon. 

George III., 17861813. 

COPPER. Penny and Halfpenny. Three issues : 1786, 1798, and 1813. 

Penny (246 grams), 1786. 

Obv., the King's head, laureate, to right, GEORGIVS III. 
DEI GRATIA., 1786 below the bust; rev., the Triune, feec 
pointing to left, QVOCVNQVE IECERIS STABIT. Edge 
milled with diagonal lines. 

Halfpenny (125 grains), 1786. 

Similar to the Penny. 

Value 2s. 6d. to 5s. 

Penny (330 grains), 1798. 

Obv., almost similar to the English Penny of 1797, the Kine's 
head, laureate, to right, legend and date incuse, GEORGIVS III . 
D: G . REX, 1798; rev., the Triune, legend incuse, QVO- 
CVNQVE IECERIS STABIT. 

Halfpenny (167 grains), 1798. 

Similar to the Penny, except that the name is spelt GEORGIUS. 

Value 2s. to 3s. 6d. 

Penny (312 grains), 1813. 

Similar, except the date, to the Penny of 1798. 

Halfpenny (155 grains), 1813. 

Similar to the Penny, the name spelt GEORGIVS as on the 
Penny. 

Value 2s. to 3s. 6d. 

George IV. 

No regal money was issued specially for the Isle of Man. 

William IV. 

No regal money was issued for the Isle of Man. 

Victoria, 1839. 

COPPER. Penny, Halfpenny, and Farthing. 

Penny (291 grains). 

Obv., the Queen's bust to left, legend VICTORIA DEI 
GRATIA, date 1839 below the bust; rev., the Triune, feet 
pointing to left, QVOGVNQVE IECERIS STABIT. 

Halfpenny (145 grains). 

Similar to the Penny. 

Farthing (72 grains). 

Similar to the Penny. 

The first and only issue of a Farthing in the Isle of Man. 

Set of the three pieces, 2s. 6d. to 5s. 



144 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

VICTORIA. CONTINUED. 

COPPER. Cont inued. 

In 1840 all coins bnt those of English type and coinage were 
suppressed by Act of Parliament. 

Mixed lots of these coins have sold as nnder : 

In 1854, Pence and Halfpence dated 1723, 1733, 1758, and 
1786 (nine coins, all very fine), sold for 13s. ; and eight others, 
all fine proofs, dated 1786, 1798, 1813, and 1839, realised 13s. 

In 1864, a set of sixteen copper coins, from 1709 to 1839, 
including a proof Halfpenny of 1786, all fine, told for 1 2a. 



COINS OF BRITISH COLONIES 
AND DEPENDENCIES. 



As supplementary to the preceding pages, a short account of some of the 
above-named coins may be useful to collectors. Only a limited number of 
coins are mentioned, as a complete descriptive list would fill a large 
volume. 

AFRICA. 
Sierra Leone Company. 

SILVER. Dollar, and pieces of Fifty, Twenty, and Ten Cents. Dated 
1791. 

Dollar. Olv., SIEEEA LEOXE COMPANY, a lion, in the 
exergue AFEICA (as obv. of Fig. 178) ; rev., as rev. of Fig. 178, 
but the word DOLLAR instead of PENNY. The other pieces 
are similar, with the requisite verbal alterations on rev. 
COPPER. Penny and Cent. Dated 1791. 

Penny. Obv. and rev. as Fig. 178- 

Cent. Smaller than the Penny, but of similar type, the word 
CENT being substituted for PENNY. 

A fine proof set of the above six coins, .1 Is. 

AMERICA. 
Carolina. 

COPPER. Halfpenny. 

Obv., an elephant, no legend ; rev., in six lines, GOD PEE- 
SEEVE CAEOLINA : AND THE : LOEDS : PEOPEIETOES 
1694. (See Fig. 179.) 

One sold for 4 8s. in 1859, and one for 4, 7s. in 18C4. 

Maryland. 

Money struck by Cecil, Lord Baltimore, as Proprietor of 
Maryland, to whom the Province was granted by a Charter 
dated 20th June, 1632. 
SILVER. Shilling, Sixpence, and Groat. 

Shilling (76 grains). Obv. + C^CILIVS : DNS : TEEB^l- 
MAEI2E &CT., profile bust to left, with head bare; rev. + 
CEESCITE : ET -. MVLTIPLICAMINI, arms of Lord Balti- 
more under a crown, with X to left and II. to right, for XII, 
the value. (See Fig. 153.) 

A specimen sold for .4 Is. in 1859. 

Sixpence (40 grains). Similar to the Shilling, excepting V-I. 
on rev. for value. 

One sold for .4 4s. in 1859. 

L 



146 THE VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

MARYLAND. CONTINUED. 
SILVER. Continued. 

Groat (26 grains). Similar, but I-V. for value on rev. 

One sold for i 18s. in 1859. 

Sets of the three coins sold for .11 5s. in 1854, ^5 5s. in 18G4. 
and 12 in 1882. 

The Shilling and Sixpence together sold for .3 13s. and 6s. 

The Shilling and Fourpence together realised <4 6s. in 1876. 
COPPER. Penny, believed to be unique. 

Obv., almost similar to the Silver Coins ; rev. + DENAKIVM : 
TERR2E-MAKLE : &c., two flags issuing out of a ducal coronet 
the crest of Lord Baltimore (see Fig. 180). 

Sold in London in 1859 for ^75, and in New York in 1882 
for 370 dollars. This coin is in the collection of Mr. L. G. 
Parmelee of Boston. 

Massachusetts. 

SILVER. Shilling, Sixpence, Threepence, and Twopence, struck at 
Boston. 

Shilling (72 grains). 1652. 

Olv., MASATHVSETS IN, The American pine or oak ; rev., 
NEW ENGLAND AN DOM , in the centre 1652, with XII 
below it. 

From 15s. to 1. Specimens have sold for 8s., 153., 21s., 
23s., and 25s. 

Sixpence (36 grains). 1652. 

Obi 1 ., almost similar to the Shilling 1 , but a different tree : 
rev., NEW ENGLAND ANO, with 1652 and VI in the centre. 
(See Fig. 152.) 

From 10s. to .1. 

Threepence (18 eraine). 1652. 

Obv., MASATHVSETS, a pine tree ; rev., NEW ENGLAND, 
in centre 1652, III. 

From 10s. to 1. 

Twopence (12 grains). 

Similar to above, but II on rev. 

From 10s. to .1. 

Sets of the four pieces have sold for 2, 2 6s., and ^62 16s. 

A Shilling, Sixpence, and Threepence sold together for ,1 10s., 
and Two Shillings (varied), Sixpence, and Threepence, . 

New England. 

SILVER. Shilling and Sixpence, struck about 1650. 

Shilling (72 grains). A circular piece, quite plain, except 
that close to the edge are the letters NE on the obv., and XII, 
for value, on the rev. 

Specimens have sold for ^2 4s., .2 6s., and 3 3a. 

Sixpence (36 grains). 

Similar to the Shilling, but with VI for value on the rev. 

Specimens have sold for 1 and .6 6s. 



COINS OF BRITISH COLONIES AND DEPENDENCIES. 147 

ENGLAND. CONTINUED. 
COFFEE. Halfpenny. , 

Obv., like obv. of Fig. 179 ; rev., in five lines, GOD : 
PEESEETE NEW ENGLAND. 1694. 
One sold for .15 15s. in 1859. 

Rosa Americana. 
GEORGE I. 

BATH METAL. Twopence, Penny, and Halfpenny (or more correctly, 
Penny, Halfpenny, and Farthing). Struck in 1722 and 1723, 
of a mixed metal resembling brass, known as Bath metal. 

First type. The Eose, not crowned. 

Twopence (otherwise Penny). 

Obv., laureate bust of King George I. to right. GEORGIVS. 
D : G : MAG : BE! : FEA -. ET : H1B : EEX; rev., a large 
Eose, uncrowned, with EOSA AMEEICANA. above it, and 
UTILE DULCI, on a label below. (See Fig. 203.) A rare 
variety has UTILE DULCI, without a label. 

Penny (otherwise Halfpenny). 

Obv., aa the preceding coin ; rev., aa Fig. 203, but with 
date, 1722, after EOSA AMERICANA, and UTILE DULCI, 
not on a label. 

A very fine specimen, .1 5s. 

Halfpenny (otherwise Farthing). 

Same type and date as the preceding coin. 

A fine set of the three coins sold for .3 11s. in 1864. 

Second type. The Eose, crowned as on Fig. 205, and dated 
1723. 

The three pieces have obi'., the King's bust laureated to 
right, GEOEGIUS . DEI : GEATIA . EEX . ; rev., as Fig. 205. 

A fine set of the three coins sold for 3 3s. in 1864. 
GEORGE II. 

A large piece, supposed to be a unique pattern, has obv., 
GEOEGIVS . II . D . G . EEX ., laureated bust to left, and 
rev. as Fig. 204. 

Barbadoes. 

COPPER. Penny and Halfpenny. 

Penny. Two varieties. 

First variety (oz.), 1788. Obv., as obv. of Fig. 179; rev. t 
BAEBADOES PENNY . 1788. A pineapple in the centre. 

It is stated that 5376 were struck. 

Second variety, 1792. (See Fig. 181.) 

Halfpenny. Similar. 

Weight. Thirty-nine pennies to 16oz. of copper, 39,000 
were coined ; seventy-eight halfpennies to 16oz. of copper, 
46,800 were coined. 

Bermuda. 

COFFER. Halfpenny, 1793. 

Obv., GEOEGIVS . Ill . D . G . EEX : the King's laureated 
bust to right; rev., a man-of-war in full sail to the left, above 
the ship BEEMVDA, dated in exergue 1793. (See Fig. 182.) 



148 TUB VALUATION OF BRITISH COINS. 

THE EAST INDIES. 
Elizabeth, 1600. 

The earliest coins struck by an English Sovereign for currency 
in India were authorised by Queen Elizabeth, in January, 1600. 
The Queen, when she incorporated the East India Company, 
would not permit it to transport Spanish coin to India, and 
determined to strike money for circulation in Asia, bearing her 
name and Royal Arms, in order that the Asiatics might respect 
her name and know her to be as great a Sovereign as the King 
of Spain. 

The weight of this coinaee was regulated by the weight of the 
Spanish piece of eight reals, and its half, quarter, and eighth. 

The pieces are now known as the Portcullis Money. 
SILVER. Crown, Half Crown. Shilling, and Sixpence. 

Portcullis Crown (425 grains). 

Obv., O : ELIZABETH . D : G : ANG : FRA : ET . HIBER : 
REGINA : the Royal Arms crowned, between E and R, also 
crowned ; rev., O : POSVI, &c., a large portcullis, crowned. 
The O at beginning of legend on both sides is the Mint 
mark, and indicates 1600, the date of the coin. (For type, see 
Fig. 154.) 

Specimens have sold for .1 17s., ^4 7a., .4 11s., .4 14s., 
5 5s., 6 17s. 6d., .9 2s. 6d., .9 7a. 6d., <10, and .12. 

Portcullis Half Crown (210gr.). 

Similar to the crown. (See Fig. 154.) 

Specimens have realised .1 8s., .4 5s., .4 10s., .6 17s. 6d., 
and .9. 

Portcullis Shilling (109gr.). 

Similar to the crown. 

Specimens have sold for ,1 12s., .1 14a., .3 19s., and 9 5s. 

Portcullis Sixpence (53gr.). 

Similar to the crown. 

Specimens have realised 2 3s., 3 5s., .3 17s. Gd., 4, Gs., 
and i 12s. 

A set of the four coins sold for 12 2s. 6d. in 1864. 

diaries II. 

SILVER. Rupee, Half Rupee, Fanam, and Half Fanam. 

Rupee. Bombay, 1678. 

Obv., THE RVPEE OF BOMBAIM, in three lines across 
the field, encircled by the legend BY AVTHORITY OF 
CHARLES THE SECOND 1678 (see Fig. 155) ; rev.. 
Royal arms, crowned, surrounded by the legend KING OF 
GREAT BRITAIN FRANCE AND IRELAND. 

Specimens have sold for 2 15s., 1, and 5 2s. 6d. 

Rupee. Bombay, without date. 

Obv., PAX DEO in two lines, encircled by the legend 
MONETA : BOMBAIENSIS ; rev., the Arms of the East India 
Company on a shield, surrounded by four branches. (See 
Fig. 156.) 

Specimens have sold for 2 14s. and <3. 



COINS OP BRITISH COLONIES AND DEPENDENCIES. 149 

CHABLES II. CONTINUED. 
SILVE R. Continued. 

Half Rupee. Similar to above. 

The above Eupee and Half Rupee sold together for .3 6s. 
in 1876. 

Rupee. Bombay. 

Obv., HON : SOC : ANG : IND : ORI surrounding a 
shield containing the arms of the East India Company ; rev., 
MON : BOMBAY ANGLIC EEGIMS A 7, in five lines 
across the field, encircled by the legend A : DEO : PAX : & 
INCREMENTVM : (See Fig. 157.) 

Specimens have realised 2 ]6s. and ,6 10s. 

Fanam. Bombay. 

Obv., two linked C'a with three pellets ; rev., an Indian 
figure. (See Fig. 158.) 

Half Fanam. Similar to above, but smaller. 

A Half Rupee, Fanam, and Half Fanam, sold together for 3 
in 1876. 
COPPEE. Pice. 

Obv., HON : SOC : ANG : IND : ORI, surrounding the 
inscription (in five lines) MOET BOMBAY ANGLIC REGIM 
A 9 ; rev., the arms, as in obv. of Fig. 157, encircled with 
the motto A : DEO : PAX : INCREMENTVM. 

James II. 

SILVER. Rupee. Bombay, 16S7. 

Type similar to Fig. 156, but with date, 1687, on obv. 
A specimen sold for .5 5s. in 1859. 

George II. 

COPPER. Pice. Bombay. 

Obv., a large crown, with G. R. above and BOMB, below ; 
rev., AVSPICIO REGIS ET SENATVS ANGLLffi. 1728. 

George III. 

SILVER. Half Pagoda and Half Dollar. 

Half Pagoda. Madras, 1808. 

Obv., HALF PAGODA, &c. In the centre a Pagoda (see 
Fig. 159) ; rev., inscription as on obv. in Tamil and Telugu 
characters. 

Half Dollar, or Two-Soolcoo Piece, for Fort Marlborough. 

Obv., 2 FORT MARLBRO 1784, in four lines across the 
field ; rev., an inscription in Persian characters. 

A specimen sold for <! 2s. in 1859. 
COPPER. Two Kapangs. Sumatra. 

Obv., UNITED EAST INDIA COMPANY . 1787 . , in 
centre the arms of the Company ; rev., in Persian characters, 
Do (i.e.. Two) Kapang, with Mohammedan date below. (See 
Fig 185.) 

Note. 400 Kapange=l Dollar. 



150 TOE VAI.UATIOV OF BRITISH COINS. 

GEORGE III. CONTINUED. 
COPPER. Continued. 

Pieces of XX, X, V, and I Cash. 

Twenty Cash, for Penang or Prince of "Wales' Island. 

Obv. t Arms of the East India Company, with date 1810 ; 
rev., Palo Penang. (See Fig. 186.) 

Twenty Cash, for Madras, 1803. 

Obv., Arms of East India Company, 1803 ; rev. (see Fig. 187;. 

Pieces of Ten and Five Cash are similar to the preceding 
coin, but proportionately smaller, and with value X or V, instead 
of XX. 

One Cash, for Madras, 1803. 

Obv., the Company's crest, under it 1803 ; rev., I cash. (See 
Fig. 188.) 
Ceylon. 

SILVER. Rupee (?) 

Obv., An elephant, beneath 1809 ; rev., CEYLON GOVERN- 
MENT, in the centre ) . 

COPPER. Piece of 48 to a Rupee ; also Double Stiver, Stiver, and 
Half Stiver. 

Piece of 48 to One Rupee. 1802. 

Obv., an elephant, beneath 1802 ; rev., CEYLON GOVERN- 
MENT, in the centre 48. 

Stiver. 1815. 

Obv., GEORGIUS III D : G : BRITANNIARUM REX, 
laureate bust to right ; rev., as Fig. 189. 

The Double Stiver and Half Stiver are of similar type and 
proportionate size. The three pieces correspond with the 
English Penny, Halfpenny, and Farthing. 



APPENDIX. 



ENGLISH JUBILEE COINAGE, 1887. 

Victoria. 

GOLD. Five Pound Piece. Obv., bust to left, wearing arched crown ; 
head draped: VICTORIA D : G : BEITT : REG : F : D: 
on truncation, J. E. B. (John Edgar Boehm) ; rev., St. George 
and the Dragon, underneath B. P. (Benedetto Pistrucci). Date, 
below, 1887; edge milled. <5 5s. 

Two Pound Piece. Same types as Five Pound Piece. Date, 
1887. 2 5s. 

Sovereign. Same types as Five Pound Piece. Date, 1887. 
Half Sovereign. Obv., bust to left, as on Five Pound 
Piece : VICTORIA DEI GRATIA ; rev., garnished, square shield, 
crown above arched. BRITANNIARUM REGINA FID : 
DBF: 187. 12s. 
SILVER. Crou-n. Similar types as Five Pound Piece. Date, 1887. 

Double Florin, or Four Shilling Piece. Obv., bust to left, 
&c., as on Half Sovereign ; rev., four crowned shields, arranged 
crosswise, with Star of the Garter in centre, and cantoned with 
four sceptres, two surmounted by orb, the others with thistle 
and harp : BRITT : REG : FID : DBF : Date, 1887. 

Half Crou-n. Obv., bust to left, &c., as on Half Sovereign; 
rev., square shield, with arched crown above, and surrounded by 
badge and collar of the Garter : BRITANNIARUM REGINA 
FID : DBF : Date, below, 1887. 

Florin. Same types as Double Florin. Date, 1887. 

Shilling. Obv., bust to left, as on Five Pound Piece : 
VICTORIA DE[ GRATIA BRITT : REGINA F : D : rev., 
square shield, with arched crown above, and surrounded by badge 
of the Garter. Date, below, 1887. 

Sixpence. Two varieties. 

First type. Obv., bust to left, as on Five Pound Piece : 
VICTORIA DEI GRATIA BRITT : REGINA F : D : rev., 
square shield, with arched crown above, and surrounded by 
badge of the Garter. Date, below, 1887. 3s. 

Second type. Obv., bust to left, &c., as on first type ; rev., 
within two branches of laurel and oak, arched crown above, 
SIXPENCE. Date, below, 1887. 

Threepence. Obv., bust to left, &a, as on Sixpence; rev., 
within two oak branches, mark of value 3 surrounded by 
arched crown and dividing date, ISS^. 

Individual specimens of silver coinage, 5 per cent, above 
current value. Sets, 18s. 6d. 



152 APPENDIX. 

In his Eighteenth Annual Report, the Deputy Master of the Mint says : 
" The only special feature of the coinage of the year 1887 was the issue 
of gold and silver pieces of new designs, which were first put into 
circulation on the 21st of June last, the day appointed for the celebration 
of the Jubilee of the Queen. The gold coinage executed was not large, 
and consisted entirely of coins of the new designs ; nor was the amount 
of bronze coined above the average. The silver coinage, on the other 
hand, was far larger than usual, the demand having been stimulated by 
the general wish to possess coins of the new issue. The total number of 
good pieces struck was 43,369,043, as against 46,628,573 in 1886, and 
their value, real or nominal, ,3,014,810 10s. 5d. The total number of 
good pieces of the Imperial coinage struck was 33,983.389, and their 
value .2,896,065 13s." 

Mr. Fremantle observes : " The issue of the new coins was received 
with some adverse criticism, but it may be observed that there has been 
a considerable demand for them on the part of the public, apart from the 
ordinary necessities of the circulation. Gold coins of all the authorised 
denominations, including the five-pound and two-pound pieces, were 
struck during the year, and the value of the five-pound pieces coined 
considerably exceeded .250,000. This is the more remarkable as during 
the whole of the present reign there had been no demand for either the 
five-pound or two-pound piece ; nor, indeed, had any dies been prepared 
for the latter coin. But very few pieces of either denomination being 
met with in circulation, it is evident that nearly the whole number 
issued must be hoarded as specimens. The number of sovereigns coined 
slightly exceeded one million. As has been the case in most preceding 
years, the Bank of England were the only importers of gold bullion for 
coinage, and, of the total amount delivered at the Mint for that purpose, 
,2.300,000 (or over eighty-one per cent.) consisted of light gold coin 
withdrawn from circulation and sent in for re-coinage. The silver 
coinage of the year included a new coin, the double-florin. With the 
exception of the florin, first issued in 1849, the double-florin is the only 
coin of a new denomination which has been added to the Imperial coinage 
during the present reign. The total amount of silver coinage struck 
during the year was =851,153, and the amount issued .909, 768, as 
against =430,798 in 1886. This is the largest issue of silver coin in any 
year since 1877, except 1883, when, owing to the suspension of all coinage 
during the greater part of the preceding year, the amount issued was over 
.1,220.000. The total amount of threepences issued during the year 
was 38,200. The demand for these coins in 1887 was considerably 
under that of recent years. Half-crowns of the nominal value of 
=208,225 were issued during the year, as against =130,695 in 1886, and 
the total amount of these pieces added to the circulation since their 
coinage was resumed in 1874 has been ,2,451, 710." 

Mr. Fremantle adds : " As the sixpence issued with the series of coins 
of the new designs in June last was thought to bear too close a 
resemblance to the half-sovereign, and apprehensions were expressed 
that the new coin might be gilded and fraudulently passed as a half- 
sovereign, it was decided to revert to the reverse of the sixpence in use 
since the beginning of the present reign, namely, a wreath formed of olive 
and oak branches, with the words ' six pence ' in the centre and the date 



APPENDIX. 153 

beneath. Her Majesty having been pleased to approve of the proposed 
change, a Royal Proclamation was issued on the 29th of November, 
giving currency to a coin with the design as altered." 

The following shows the denominations and amounts of silver coins 
of the new designs delivered to the Bank of England from the time of 
their first issue on the 21st of June, to the 31st of December, 1887: 
Crowns, .55,300; double-florins, 67,500; half-crowns, 115,400; 
florins, 97,000 ; shillings, 116,200 ; sixpences, 35,600 ; threepences, 
10,100 total, 497,100. So large an amount of silver coin as 
574,600 had not been delivered to the Bank for some years, an 
extraordinary demand having been caused by the issue of the new coins, 
of which nearly half a million were delivered to the Bank before the close 
of the year. The worn silver coin withdrawn from circulation by the 
Bank of England during the year was considerably above the average, 
having amounted to 280,000. 

An appended Memorandum by Mr. Hill. Superintendent of the Operative 
Department, says : " A novel feature in the work performed in this 
department during the past year was the casting of bars for coins of the 
new designs, namely, gold five-pound and two-pound pieces, and silver 
crowns and double florins, the amount of metal melted for these bars 
alone having been for the gold pieces, 424,803 ounces ; and for the 
silver, 1.511,851 ounces. The amount of gold melted for sovereigns and 
half-sovereigns, both of the design used from 1837 to 1887, and also of 
the new design, was 1,314.811 ounces. No less than 7,671,726 ounces, or 
235 tons of silver, were converted into bars for the Imperial coinage and 
for war medals. In addition to the above, 1,152,551 ounces of silver 
bullion were melted into bars for the various Colonial coinages, and 
26,165 ounces of fine silver for the Jubilee Medals. The total weight 
of silver melted during the year was 8,850,442 ounces, equivalent to 
271 tons, or 116 tons over the weight melted in the preceding year. 
The total number of pieces struck in the Coining Press Room was 
50,848,438, a decrease of nearly three millions and a half as compared 
with the number struck in 1886. The denominations were of 34 different 
kinds, and included the new five-pound piece, two-pound piece, crown, 
and double-florin." 



In 1888 all the silver coins were issued of the new type ; but no 
gold. 

The Maundy money used in 1887 was of the old types, but that issued 
in 1888 has the new bust of the Queen, as in the Five Pound Piece, 
but the legend is VICTORIA D : G : BRITANNIAR : REGINA F : D : 
on all pieces excepting the Threepence, which is the same as the 
current coin. 

The types of the copper coinage of 1887 and 1888 have not changed 
at all. 



LIST OF IMPORTANT SALES OF COINS 
FROM 1854, 

WITH THE TOTAL AMOUNTS REALISED. 



Cuff, J. D 


18 days ... 


1854 . 


.. 7054 





Dymock, Eev. T. F 


4 days 


1858 


.. 1928 19 


6 


Martin, Rev. J. W 


5 days 


1859 


... 2624 7 





Christmas, Eev. H 


6 days 


1864 


.. 1261 15 


6 


Murchison, Capt 


5 days . . . 


1864 


. 3523 8 





,, M 


3 days ... 


1866 


... 1419 16 





Lindsay, J 


4 days 


1867 


... 1260 3 





Whitbourn, E 


3 days . . . 


1869 


... 1074 11 


6 


Bergne, J. B. 


11 days ... 


1873 


.. 6102 13 





Wingate, J. (Scottish Coins) 


3 days . . 


1875 


... 3263 14 





Johnston, W. H 


5 days 


1876 


. . 2498 8 





Hawkins, E 


1 day 


1877 


348 11 





Moore, General Yorke 


3 days ... 


1879 


.. 2087 6 


6 


Wakeford, G 


2 days ... 


1879 


624 7 





Sparkes, Geo 


2 days ... 


1880 


... 3375 18 


6 


Price, Lake 


2 days 


1880 


... 1930 9 





Nobleman, A (Lord Hastings) 


5 days 


1880 


... 3958 19 





Young, J. Halliburton 


5 days 


1881 


... 3041 4 





Brice, W. (Duplicates) 


1 day 


1881 


580 11 





Eolfe, Eev. S. C. E 


1 day 


1882 


648 2 


6 


*Simpson, Geo. B 


3 days . . 


1882 , 


. 1487 5 





Wylie, Eev. G 


3 days . . . 


1882 


... 1137 15 





Montagu, H. (Duplicates) 


2 days ... 


1883 


... 1471 18 


6 


Mackenzie, Sheriff 


2 days ... 


1883 






*Hendry, D 


2 days 


1883 


... 1054 5 





Eoach, F 


3 days . . . 


1884 


.. 1242 15 


6 


Henderson, L 


1 day . . 


1884 


264 13 


5 


Bagot, Lord 


3 days ... 


1884 


... 1642 17 


6 


Whittal Collection (Part I.) ... 


8 daya ... 


1884 


... 3951 


6 


Ford, J. K. 


7 days ... 


1884 


... 4085 1 


6 


Kirk, A. W 


1 day 


1884 


733 16 


6 


Shepherd, Eev. E. J 


4 days ... 


188.-) 


.. 5301 3 


6 


Webb, H 


2 days ... 


1885 


323 9 


6 


Maynard, Eev. J 


1 day 


1885 


... 1142 7 





Fothergill, Eev. E 


3 days ... 


1885 


928 12 


6 


Nation, W. H 


4 days 


1885 


... 1282 14 






* These Sales were held in Edinburgh. 



LIST OF SALES. 155 



Whittal Collection (Part II.) 
Foljambe, F. J. S 
Middleton, J. H 
Montague, H. (Duplicates) ... 
Webster, W 


1 day 
1 day 
1 day 
3 days . 
4 days 


.. 1885 . 
.. 1885 . 
.. 1885 . 
.. 1886 . 
.. 1886 . 


.. .554 2 
476 9 
430 7 
.. 1165 9 
944 15 


6 

6 

6 


Domvile, Lady 
Ingram, J 


4 days 
2 days 


.. 1886 . 
. 1886 . 


.. 1682 12 
.. 1390 9 






Sanders, J 


3 days 


. 1886 . 


.. 1047 16 


6 


Murrell, B,. J 


1 day 


.. 1886 . 


.. 1413 15 


rt 


*Shorthouse, E 
Wyndham, C. W 
Williams, J 
White, G. W 


4 days 
2 days .. 
4 days 
5 days 


. 1886 . 
. 1886 . 
. 1886 . 
. 1887 . 


.. 1571 18 
.. 1037 4 
.. 2123 8 
. 1029 4 


6 
6 
6 
6 


Pownall, Archdeacon 
Fewkes, J. W 
Mayer, J. 


1 day 
6 days 
3 days 


. 1887 . 
. 1887 . 
1887 . 


517 4 
.. 1678 9 
.. 1394 1 


6 

6 


Archdeacon, an (Harrison) ... 
Kirby, T. B 


5 days 
4 days 


. 1887 . 
. 1888 . 


. 2313 15 
.. 1426 17 


6 














This Sale was held in Birmingham. All the other Sales were held in London, 
by Messrs. Sotheby, Wilkinson, & Hodge. 



The Sale of Coins collected by Col. THOBBUBN took place on the 6th, 
7th, and 8th July, 1887, at Messrs. SOTHEBY, WILKINSON, & HODGE'S 
sale-room, 13, Wellington Street, Strand, London. The number of 
Coins was over 4000 there were 457 lots and the sum total (gross 
amount) realised by the sale was ,1494 lla. 6d. The Coins were 
mostly in splendid preservation, and included Anglo-Saxon, Anglo- 
Gallic, Scottish and English gold, silver, and copper, some being of 
extreme rarity, and many in Mint state. Some of the highest prices are 
as follows : A Silver Penny of Alfred, 6 5s. ; Sovereign, Henry VIII., 
37th year, ,12: Sovereign, Edward VI., 3rd year, ,18; Sovereign, 
Queen Mary, 1553, ,10 10s. ; Portcullis Money Crown, Half-crown, 
Shilling, and Sixpence, Elizabeth, milled, 25 ; Pound piece, Oxford 
Mint, Charles I., ,15 ; Half Broad, Cromwell, Gold, 1656, ,32 5s. ; 
Pattern Crown, William IV., Silver, .23 ; Proof Set, Victoria, Silver, 
<30 ; Proof Sets of Copper Coins, Victoria, =14. 



Addedomaros .. 
^Ethelred II. .. 

/Ethelstan 
.Ethilheard 

Alchred 

Aldfrid 

Alexander I. .. 
II... 

ni. 



PAGE 
. 2 

. 7 

. 11 

9 

. 7 
. 7 
. 58 
. 59 
, 60 



Alfred 10 

Alwald 8 

Anegmund 57 

Anlaf (Saxon) 8 

IV. (Irish) 105 

V. 105 

VI. 105 

Anne (English) 47 

(Irish) 137 

(Scottish) 100 

Antedrigns 2 

Askill McTorqnil 106 

Athol, Duke of 142 

Baldred 4 

Baliol, John 61 

Baltimore, Lord 145 

Barbadoes 147 

Beonna 6 

Beorhtria 6 

Beornwlf 5 

Berhtnlf 6 

Bermuda 147 

Boadicea 2 

Bracteate Coins 107 

Bruce, Robert 62 

Bnrgred 6 



PAGE 

Canute (English) 11 

(Irish) 106 

Carolina 145 

Cassivellaunus 2 

Ceolnoth 9 

Ceolwlfl 5 

n e 

Ceylon 150 

Charles I. (English) 30 

(Irish) 128 

(Scottish) 93 

II. (East Indies) ... 148 

(English) 40 

(Irish) 133 

(Scottish) 96 

Cnnt (Northumbria) 8 

Coenwlf 5 

Commonwealth (English) ... 37 

(Irish) 133 

Cromwell, Oliver 38 

Cunetti 8 

Cunobeline 2 

Cnthred 4 

Cynethryth 5 

David 1 58 

II 62 

Derby, Earl of 141 

Donald VIII 58 

Dubnovellaunus 3 

Eadbearht 4 

Eadberht 7 

Eadmund 7 

Eadred 11 

Eadvald 6 

Eadwig 11 



INDEX. 



157 



PAGE 

Eanbald 10 

Eanred 7 

Ecgfritb. 7 

Edgar 11 

Edmund 11 

Saint 8 

Edward I. (English) 15 

(Irish) 109 

II. (English) 15 

(Irish) 109 

III. (English) 16 

,. (Irish) 109 

IV. (English) 18 

(Irish) Ill 

V. (English) 19 

(Irish) 119 

VI. (English) 23 

(Irish) 124 

,, the Confessor 11 

Elder 10 

Martyr 11 

Egbert 10 

Egcberht 4 

Elfwald 7 

Elizabeth (East Indies) 148 

(English) 26 

(Irish) 126 

Epaticcns 3 

Eppillns 3 

Eric 8 

Ethelberht, Prsen 4 

Ethelbert 10 

Ethelred 1 10 

II. (English) 11 

(Irish) 106 

EthelstanI 6 

II., Gnthrnm 7 

Ethelweard 6 

Ethelwlf 10 

Ethered 9 

Eustace 14 

Francis and Mary 80 

George I. (English) 48 

(Irish) 138 

(Rosa Americana) 147 

II. (East Indies) ... 149 

(English) 49 

(Irish) 138 

(Rosa Americana) 147 

HI. (East Indies) ... 149 

(English) 51 



PAGE 
... 139 
... 143 
... 53 
... 140 
... 143 
... 13 
... 11 
... 11 
Harthacnut 11 



George III. (Irish) ... 

(Manx)... 

IV. (English) 

(Irish) ... 

(Manx) 

Gloucester, Earl of... 

Harold I 

II. 



Henry 



I. 

II. 
III. 



IV. 

V. 

VI. 

VII. 



(English). 
(Irish) . 
(English) . 
(Irish) . 
(English). 
(Irish) . 
(English). 
(Irish) . 
(English). 

(Irish) 

VIII. (English) 

(Irish) 

,, Bishop of Winchester 
., Prince of Scotland ... 

Ifars I 

III 

Inscribed British Coins 

Irish Siege Pieces 

Jaenberht 

James I. (English) 

(Irish) 

II. (East Indies) 

(English) 

(Irish) 

I. (Scotland) 

II. 
III. 
IV. 
V. 
VI. 
VII. 

John (English) 
,, (Irish) 

,, Baliol 61 

Kent, Kings of 4 

Ludica 5 

Malcolm III 57 

IV 58 

Martin, Saint 9 

Mary (England) 25 



... 12 
... 14 
... 15 
... 109 
... 17 
... 110 
... 17 
... 110 
... 18 
110, 115 
... 20 
... 120 
... 21 
... 122 
13 
58 
104 
105 
2 

129 
9 
28 
128 
149 
43 
134 
67 
69 
70 
73 
76 
85 
98 
15 
107 



158 



INDEX. 



] 


[AGE 


Mary (Irish) 


125 


,, (Scotland) 


79 


,, and Henry (Darnley) ... 


81 


Maryland 


145 


Massachusetts 


146 


Matilda 


14 


Mercia, Kingdom of 


5 


Moll Ethilwald 


7 


Murrey, John (Manx) 


141 


New England 


146 


Northumberland, Kingdom of 


7 


Offa 


5 


Oliver Cromwell 


38 


Osbercht 


8 


Peter, Saint 


9 


Philip and Mary (English) ... 


26 


,, (Irish) 


126 


Plegmund 


9 


Rednlf 


7 


Regnald (Saxon) 


s 


II. (Irish) 


106 


Richard I 


14 


II. (English) 


16 


, (Irish) 


110 


III. (English) 


19 


, (Irish) 


120 


Robert II 


64 


, III 


65 


, Bruce 


62 


, Earl of Gloucester . . . 


13 


Roger, Earl of Warwick 


14 


Rosa Americana 


147 


St. Edmund 


8 


St. Martin 


9 


St. Peter 


9 


Saxons, West 


10 


South 


5 



PAGE 

Sceatta, the 4 

Siefred 8 

Siege Pieces, English ... 36, 43 

Siege Pieces, Irish 129 

Sierra Leone Company 145 

Sitric, Earl 8 

King 8 

Somerled 57 

South Saxons 5 

Stephen 13 

,, and Matilda 14 

Styca, the 7 

Sueno 57 

Tasciovanus 3 

Uninscribed British Coins ... 1 

Yerica 3 

Victoria (English) 55 

(Manx) 143 

Vigmund 10 

Vnlfhere 10 

Vulfred 9 

Warwick, Earl of 14 

West Saxons 10 

Wiglaf 5 

William the Conqueror 12 

., Lion 59 

Rufus 12 

Son of Stephen 14 

III. (English) 46 

(Irish) 137 

(Scottish) 99 

IV. (English) 54 

(Manx) 143 

and Mary (English) ... 44 

(Irish) ... 137 

(Scottish)... 98 

Winchester, Bishop of 13 



INDEX TO THE ILLUSTRATIONS, 

WITH A REFERENCE TO THE PAGES WHERE THE FIGURES ARE DESCRIBED. 



EMBOSSED PLATES. 

ANNE Silver ... Half Crown (1712), C, Plate VIIL, 

p. 48 

CHARLES I Gold ... Unit, D, Plate III., p. 31 

Silver ... Half Crown (Bristol), G, Plate 

VII., p. 32 

* : , ... Shilling (York), D, Plate V., p. 33 

... Sixpence (Oxford), F, Plate VII., 
p. 33 

* ., , ... Groat (Aberystwyth), E, Plate V,, 

p. 34 

*CHARLES II Gold ... Five-Guinea Piece, A, Plate II., 

p. 40 

* ... Guinea, B, Plate II., p. 41 

* ,, Silver ... Crown (rose below the bust), F, 

Plate V., p. 42 (also see Note) 

COMMONWEALTH Gold ... Twenty- Shilling Piece, E, Plate 

III., p. 37 

... Five-Shilling Piece, G, Plate III., 

p. 37 

CROMWELL ... Broad, F, Plate III., p. 39 

*EDWABD III ... Noble, A, Plate L, p. 16 

*EDWARD VI Silver ... Crown, A, Plate V., p. 24 

... Threepence, C, Plate VII., p. 25 

ELIZABETH Gold ... Angel, A, Plate III., p. 27 

, ... Quarter Angel, B, Plate III., p. 27 

* ., , ... Half Sovereign, C, Plate I., p. 27 

... Half Sovereign (Milled), C, Plate 
III., p. 27 

* ., Silver ... Sixpence (Hammered), C, Plate V., 

p. 27 

, ... Sixpence (Milled), D, Plate VII., 

p. 27 

GEORGE I Gold ... Guinea, A, Plate IV., p. 49 

,, ,, ... Quarter Guinea, B, Plate IV., 

p. 49 



160 



INDEX TO THE ILLUSTRATIONS. 



*GEOHGE II Gold ... Guinea (Old Head), D, Plate II., 

p. 50 

Silver ... Shilling (Old Head) ,E, Plate VIII., 

p. 50 

... Shilling (Young Head), D, Plate 

VIIL, p. 50 

*GEORGElIl Gold ... Guinea (1785), E, Plate II., p. 51 

... Guinea (last issue), C, Plate IV., 

p. 51 

* ., ... Half Guinea, G, Plate II., p. 51 

* ... Half Guinea (Spade), F, Plate II., 

p. 51 
., ... Seven Shilling Piece (second issue), 

D, Plate IV., p. 49 
... Quarter Guinea, E, Plate IV., 

p. 51 

* Silver ... Crown, B, Plate VI., p. 51 

,, ... Northumberland Shilling, F, 

Plate VIIL, p. 52 
... Sixpence (1787), C, Plate VI., p. 52 

* , ... Bank Eighteenpence Token (rev.), 

F, Plate VI., p. 53 

*GEORGE IV ... Half Crown (1821), D, Plate VI., 

p. 54 

* ., , ... Lion Shilling, E, Plate VI., p. 54 

*HENRTVII Gold ... Angel, B, Plate I., p. 20 

HENRY VIII Silver ... Groat (third issue), B, Plate VII., 

p. 22 

... Half Groat (first issue), A, Plate 

VII., p. 22 
*JAMES I Gold ... Double Real, D, Plate I., p. 28 

* ... Half Laurel, E, Plate I., p. 29 

Silver ... Sixpence (second, ssue), E, Plate 

VII., p. 29 

JAMES II ... Shilling, A, Plate VIIL, p. 44 

*MAEY ... Groat, B, Plate V., p. 26 

WILLIAM AND MARY ... ... Shilling, B, Plate VIIL, p. 45 
*WILLIAM III Gold ... Guinea, C, Plate II., p. 46 

* Silver ... Half Crown, A, Plate VI., p. 46 

*WILLIAM IV ... Half Crown, G, Plate VI., p. 55 

Those marked * are Facsimiles prepared from Coins lent by MESSRS. W. S. LINCOLN 
& SONS, London ; the others are from Coins lent by MESSRS. SPINK & SONS, London. 



TONED PLATES. 



JSTHELSTAN ... 

ALEXANDER II. 
ALEXANDER III. 
ALFRED 



Silver 



Penny, Fig. 48, p. 11. 

Pennies, Figs. 88, 89, pp. 59, 60 

Figs. 90, 91, 92, pp. 60, 61 

Fig. 47, p. 10 



ANEGMUND ... Penny, Fig. 81, p. 57 



INDEX TO ILLUSTRATIONS. 



161 



ANLAF (Northumbria) ... Silver ... Penny, Fig. 44, p. 8 

ANLAF IV. (Irish) ... Fig. 125, p. 105 

ANLAF V. (Irish) ... Fig. 128, p. 105 

ANLAF VI. ... Figs. 129, 130, p. 105 

ANNE Gold ... Two Guinea Piece, Fig. 17, p. 47 

,, Copper ... Farthing, Fig. 165, p. 48 

ASKILL MCTORQUILL ... Silver ... Penny, Fig. 133, p. 106 

BALDRED ., ... ,, Fig. 40, p. 4 

BALTIMORE, LORD ... Shilling, Fig. 153, p. 145 

Copper ... Penny, Fig. 180, p. 146 

BARBADOES ... Fig. 181, p. 147 

BEONNA Silver ... Sceatta, Fig. 43, p. 6 

BERMUDA Copper ... Halfpenny, Fig. 182, p. 147 

CANUTE Silver ... Penny, Fig. 49, p. 11 

CAROLINA Copper ... Halfpenny, Fig. 179, p. 145 

CHARLES I Silver ... Oxford Crown (Eawlins), Fig. 66, 

p. 32 

... Half Crown, Fig. 68, p. 32 

... Shilling (Newark), Fig. 69,* p. 36 

... (Pontefract), Fig. 70, p. 37 

... Sixpence (Ormond), Fig. 150, 

p. 131 

Copper ... Farthing, Fig. 166, p. 35 

... St. Patrick, Fig. 172, 

p. 133 

CHARLES II Gold ... Broad, Fig. 15, p. 40 

Silver ... Petition Crown, Fig. 67, p. 42 

... Half Crown (Hammered), Fig. 74, 

p. 41 

... Pontefract Shilling, Fig. 73, p. 43 

... Bombay Rupees, Figs. 155-157, 

pp. 148, 149 

... Fanam, Fig. 158, p. 149 

Copper ... Bawbee, Fig. 170, p. 97 

... Bodle, Fig. 168, p. 97 

,, ... Turner, Fig. 169, p. 97 

COMMONWEALTH Silver ... Shilling, Fig. 71, p. 38 

CROMWELL ,, ... Half Crown, Fig. 72, p. 39 

Copper ... Farthings, Figs. 162-164, p. 39 

DAVID I Silver ... Penny, Fig. 83, p. 58 

DAVID II ... Half Groat, Fig. 96, p. 63 

... Penny, Fig. 97, p. 63 

EADBEARHT ... Fig. 39, p. 4 

EAST INDIA COMPANY ... ... Half Pagoda, Fig. 159, p. 149 

... Copper ... XX and I Cash, Figs. 187, 188, 

p. 150 
,, ... ... Two Kapang, Fig. 185, p. 149 

... Penang XX Cash, Fig. 186, p. 150 

ECQFRITH ... Sty ca, Fig. 161,' p. 7 

EDWARD I Silver ... Groat (pattern), Fig. 55, p. 15 

" The R in reo. is turned in the wrong direction. 



162 INDEX TO ILLUSTRATIONS. 

EDWARD I Silver ... Penny (Dublin), Fig. 141, p. 109 

... Penny (Newcastle), Fig. 56, p. 15 

EDWARD III Gold ... Quarter Florin, Fig. 2, p. 16 

Silver ... Groat, Fig. 57, p. 16 

EDWARD IV Gold .. Rose Noble, Fig. 5, p. 18 

... Angel, Fig. 6, p. 19 

Silver ... Groats (Irish), Figs. 142, 143, 

pp. Ill, 113 
,, ... ... ... ... Three Crowns Money, Fig. 145, 

p. 117 

EDWARD VI Gold ... Sovereign, Fig. 11, p. 23 

... Half Sovereign, Fig. 19, p. 23 

,. ... Fig. 10, p. 24 

Silver ... Half Crown, Fig. 62, p. 24 

.. Testoon, Fig. 79, p. 24 

... Sixpence, Fig. 80, p. 24 

ELIZABETH , ... Half Crown, Fig. 64, p. 27 

... Portcullis Half Crown, Fig. 154, 

p. 148 

... Shilling (Irish), Fig. 149, p. 127 

FRANCIS AND MARY ... ... Half Testoon, Fig. 110, p. 82 
... Billon ... Nonsunt Fig. 196, p. 84 

GEORGE I Silver ... Crown, Fig. 76 * p. 49 

Copper ... Halfpenny (Irish), Figs. 175-177, 

p. 138 

... Rosa Americana, Fig. 203, p. 147 

GEORGE II Gold ... Two Guinea Piece, Fig. 18, p. 50 

Silver ... Crown, Fig. 77, p. 50 

Copper ... Halfpenny (Irish), Fig. 173, p. 138 

... Rosa Americana, Fig. 204, p. 147 

GEORGE III Silver ... Bank Dollar, Fig. 78, p. 52 

... Irish Six Shilling Token, Fig. 151, 

p. 139 

Copper ... Ceylon Stiver, Fig. 189, p. 150 

HAROLD II Silver ... Penny, Fig. 50, p. 11 

HENRY II ... ., (first coinage), Fig. 53, p. 14 

,, ... ,, (second coinage), Fig. 54, 

p. 14 

HENRY III Gold ... Fig. 1, p. 15 

HENRY IV ... Quarter Noble, Fig. 3, p. 17 

HENRY V ... Silver ... Half Groat (Calais), Fig. 144, 

p. 115 

HENRY VI Gold ... Noble, Fig. 4, p. 18 

HENRY VII ... Sovereign, Fig. 7, p. 20 

Silver ... Shilling, Fig. 58, p. 20 

... Groat (first issue), Fig. 59, p. 20 

... Penny (third issue). Fig. 60, p. 21 

HENRY VIII Gold ... Double Sovereign, Fig. 14, p. 21 

... Crown, Fig. 8, p. 21 

' The figure of the rev. is incorrect. The date should be 1716, and there should be a 
rose and a plume alternately in the angles of the cross formed by the shields. 



INDEX TO ILLUSTRATIONS. 



163 



HENRY VIII. 



HENRY OF SCOTLAND 

IFARS I 

IFARS III. 



Silver 



IRISH BRACTEATE COINS 
ISLE OF MAN ... 



JAMES I. 



Gold 



JAMES II. 



JAMES I. (Scotland) 
)> 

JAMES II. 

JAMES III. (Scotland) 


5! 

JAMES IV. ., 
JAMES V. ,, 

JAMES VI. ,, 



Gold ... George Noble, Pig. 9, p. 21 
Silver ... Shilling, Fig. 61, p. 22 

... Sixpence (Irish), Figs. 146, 147, 

pp. 123, 124 
Penny, Fig. 84, p. 58 

Fig. 124, p. 104 
Pennies, Figs. 127, 131, 132, 

pp. 105, 106 
Figs. 135-138, p. 107 
Penny and Halfpenny, Figs. 183, 

184, p. 142 

Half Unit, Fig. 12, p. 28 
... Spur Rial, Fig. 13, p. 29 
Silver ... Half Groat, Fig. 65, p 30 
Copper ... Farthing, Fig. 174, p. 128 
Silver ... Forty Shillings Scots, Fig. 119, 

p. 98 

... Ten Shillings Scots, Fig. 121, p. 98 
Gun Money Crown, Fig. 202, p. 13-i 

Half Crown, Fig. 199, p. 134 
Halfpenny, Fig. 201, p. 137 
Fig. 200, p. 137 
Lion, Fig. 23, p. 67 
Groat, Fig. 100, p. 68 
Halfpenny, Fig. 190, p. 68 
St. Andrew, Fig. 24, p. 69 
Groat, Fig. 101, p. 69 
Halfpenny, Fig. 191, p. 70 
Unicorn, Fig. 25, p. 70 
Eider, Fig. 26, p. 71 
Groat, Fig. 102, p. 71 

in the text, p. 72 
Penny, Fig. 103, p, 71 
Plack, Fig. 192, p. 73 
Groat, Fig. 104, p. 75 
Half Groat, Fig. 105, p. 75 
St. Andrew, Fig. 27, p. 77 
Bonnet Piece, Fig. 28, p. 77 
Groat, Fig. 106, p. 78 

,, in the text, p. 78 
Plack, Fig. 193, p. 79 
.20 Scots, Fig. 30, p. 85 
Thistle Noble, Fig. 31, p. 85 
Noble, Fig. 32, p. 85 
Lion, Fig. 33, p. 85 
Rider, Fig. 34, p. 86 
Hat Piece, Fig. 35, p. 86 
Sword and Sceptre, Fig. 36, p. 86 
Thistle Crown, Fig. 37, p. 91 
One-third Sword Dollar, Fig. Ill, 
p. 87 



Brass 

Peu-ter 

Gold 

Silver 

Billon 

Gold 

Silver 

Billon 

Gold 

Silver 



Billon 

Silver 

Gold 
Silver 

Billon 
Gold 



Silver 



164 INDEX TO ILLUSTRATIONS. 

JAMES VI. (Scotland) ... Silver ... Noble, Fig. 112, p. 87 

... Thirty Shillings, Fig. 113, p. 88 
... Balance Merk, Fig. 114, p. 88 
... Ten Shillings, Fig. 115, p. 89 
... Thistle Merk, Fig. 116, p. 89 
Billon ... Saltire Plack, Fig. 198, p 90 

... Plack, Fig. 197, p. 90 
Copper ... Hardhead, Fig. 167, p. 92 
... Penny, Fig. 171, p. 91 

JOHN Silver ... Halfpenny, Irish, Fig. 139, p. 108 

... Fig. 140, p. 107 

JOHN BALIOL Silver ... Penny, Fig. 93, p. 62 

, ... Halfpenny, Fig. 94, p. 62 

MALCOLM III Silver ... Penny, Fig. 82, p. 57 

MART (England) Gold ... Sovereign, Fig. 20, p. 25 

Silver ... Groat, Irish, Fig. 148, p. 125 

MART (Scotland) Gold ... Ecu, Fig. 29, p. 79 

Silver ... Testoon, 1553, Fig. 107, p. 80 
... Half Testoon, 1553, Fig. 108, p. 81 
... Testoon, 1555, Fig. 109, p. 81 
... Eyal, 1567, Fig. 117, p. 83 
... Half Testoon, 1561, Fig. 118, p. 82 
Billon . . . Penny, Fig. 194, p. 84 
... Hardhead, Fig. 195, p. 84 

MASSACHUSETTS Silver ... Sixpence, Fig. 152, p. 146 

OPFA ,, ... Pennies, Figs. 41, 42, p. 5 

PHILIP AND MART ... ... Shilling, Fig. 63, p. 26 

EEGNALD II ... Penny, Irish, Fig. 134, p. 106 

ROBERT BRUCE ... Fig. 95, p. 62 

EGBERT II Gold ... St. Andrew, Fig. 21, p. 64 

Silver ... Groat, Fig. 98, p. 64 

ROBERT III Gold ... St. Andrew, Fig. 22, p. 65 

... in the text, p. 65 

Silver ... Groat, Fig. 99, p. 66 

, ... in the text, p. 66 

SAINT PETER ... Penny, Saxon, Fig. 45, p. 9 

SIERRA LEONE COMPANY Copper ... Fig. 178, p. 145 



SIHTRIC III Silver 

STEPHEN 

VULFRED, ARCHBISHOP... 
WILLIAM I. 



Fig. 126, p. 105 
Fig. 52, p. 13 
Fig. 46, p. 9 
Fig. 51, p. 12 



WILLIAM III ... Five Shillings Scots, Fig. 123, 

p. 100 

WILLIAM THE LION ... ... Pennies, Figs. 85, 86, 87, p. 59 
WILLIAM AND MARY ... Gold ... Two Guinea Piece, Fig. 16, p. 44 
... Silver ... Half Crown, Fig. 75, p. 45 

... ... Sixty Shillings Scots, Fig. 120, 

p. 98 

... Five Shillings Scots, Fig. 122, 
p. 99 



PLATE I. 







A. Edward III., Noble. 
H. Henry VII., Angel. 
G. Elizabeth, Hammered Half-Sovereign. 



D. Jame." 1., Double Heal. 

E. James I., Half -Laurel. 



Ff<- W. S. LINCOLN <fc Sox, nf 



PLATE II. 









A. Charlw II., Five Guillen Piece. 

B. Charles II., Guinea. 
0. William III., Guinea. 

D. George II., Guinea, " Old Head." 



K. Geurge HI., Guinea, i. 

F. George III., Spade Half -Guinea. 

G. George III., Half-Guinea, 1S03. 



*e* Facsimiles prepared from Coiiig lent ':'. .S. LINCOLN cfc SON. M' London. 



PLATE III. 






A. Elizabeth, Augel. 

B. Elizabeth, Quarter-Angel. 

C. Elizabeth, Milled Half-Sovereign. 

D. Charles I., Unit. 



B. Commonwealth, Twenty-Shilling Piece. 

F. Cromwell, Broatl. 

G. Commonwealth, Five-Shilling Piece. 



/'<.-.',rtiVj prepared from. Coins lent ly Mwi-*. SPINK <fc SON, of Lctiul 



PLATE IV. 




B. 




A. 




A. 




C. 



A. George I., Guinea. 

B. George I., Qiiarter-Guinea. 

C. George III., Guinea, last issue. 



D. George III., Seven-Shilling Piece. 

E. George III., Quarter-Guinea. 



Facsimiles prepared from Coins lent by Mew?*. SPINK <fc SON, of London. 



PLATE V. 




A. K'hvaiil VI.. (,'i'owii. 

Ji. Mary, (>i 

C. Elizabeth, lliiiumered Si.\iH.-nce. 



1 1. Cliurles 1., York Sl.illiii^. 

E. Charles 1., Aberyrtwith Groat. 

F. Charles II., Crown, Knf: Wider 



/-,,;,;/,., prepared from Utun. \\". s. LINCOLN it J^ON, nf !.- 



PLATE VI, 




b . 

A. William III., Half-Crown. 

U. George III., Crown. 

C. George III.. Sixpence, li.-sT. 

D. George IV.. Half-Crown, " 



R George IV., Lion Shilling l.vJ'L 

F George III., Bank Eighteenpence lokcu. 

G. William IV., Half-Crown. 






W. 



t // 



PLATE VII. 








A. Henry VIII., Half-Groat, />./ ;.<*,' r. 

H. Henry VIII., Groat, third i*iif. 

C. Edward VI., Threl>ence. 

I). Kli/iilxjth, Milled Sixpence. 



K. .Tame* I., .Sixpence. 

F. Charles 1., Oxford Sixpence. 

G Charles I., Bristol Half-Crown. 



,.: /.(>;( ,7,-x j,,-fjnircd froxi. Coins k,>.( '>,>/ Messru. SI-INK <fe SON, <\j' Lnwl<>,>. 



PLATE VIII, 











A. Janir.s II.. Shilling. 

I!. William and Mary. ShilliiiL.-. 

'. Anne, Half-Crown. 

** F.-..'. 



D. George II.. Shilling, " Yrmiij* Head." 

E. George II., Shilling, "Old Bd." 

F. George III., " Northumberland " Shilling 



'/' /,-/,, t >'* /-,./ /,, M, *.*,:<. SI-INK dt Sox, c,f 



PLATE IX. 




1. Henry III., Gold Penny Page 15 

2. Edward III., Quarter Florin 16 

3. Henry IV., Quarter Noble ,, 17 

4. Henry VI.. Noble 18 

5. Edward IV., Noble (second issue) ... ,, 18 



6. Edward IV., Angel Page 19 

7. Henry VII., Sovereign ,, 20 

8. Henry VIII., Gold Crown 21 

9. Henry VIII.. George Noble 21 



PLATE X. 




10. Edward VI., Sovereign . Page 2S I 13. James I., Spur Rial .. Page 13 

11. Edward VI., Half Sovereign, ofic 14 14. Henry VIII., Double Sovereign 21 

12. James I., Half Unit (first issue) , 28 ' 



PLATE XI. 




15. Charles II., Broad Page 40 

16. William and Mary, Two Guinea 

Piece 44 

17. Anne, Two Guinea Piece, rev 47 



18. George II., Two Guinea Piece, 1729... Page 50 

19. Edward VI., Half Sovereign (third 

year) 23 

20. Mary, Sovereign or Double Rial, 1553 25 



PLATE XII. 




21. Robert II.. St. Andrew ... 

22. Robert III.. St. Andrew 

23. James I.. Lion 

24. James II.. St. Andrew ... 

25. James IIT., Unicorn . 

26. James III., Rider 



.Page 64 

65 
67 



27. James V.. St. Andrew 

28. James V., Bonnet Piece ... 

29. Mary, Ecu, rev 

30. James VI., 20 Scots. 1576 

31. James VI., Thistle Noble 



.Page 77 
.. 77 
. ,. 79 



PLATE XIII. 







31 James VI., Noble, 1580, obv 
3S. James VI., Lion ......... 

34. James VI., Rider 

85. James VI., Hat Piece, 1591 



Page 85 
85 
86 
86 



36. James VI., Sword and Sceptre 

Piece, 1601 Page 86 

37. James VI., Thistle Crown 91 



PLATE XIV. 




3ft. E&cberht. Penny Page 4 

39. Eadbearht, Penny 4 

40. Baldred, Penny ... 4 

41. Offa, Penny ,. 5 

42. Offa, Penny 5 

43. Beonna, Sceatta 6 



4t. Anlaf, Penny Page 8 

45. Saint Peter, Penny 9 

46. Vulf red. Penny 9 

47. Alfred, Penny 10 

48. ^thelstan. Penny 11 

49. Canute, Penny 11 



PLATE XV. 




50. Harold II., Penny ... Page 11 

51. William I., Penny 12 

52. Stephen, Penny ... 18 

53. Henry II.. Penny (first issue j 14 

54. Henry II., Penny (second issue) 14 

55. Edward I., Groat ... 15 



56. Edward I., Penny (Newcastle) Page 15 

57. Edward III., Groat , 16 

58. Henry VII., Shilling , 20 

59. Henry VII., Groat 20 

60. Henry VII.. Penny (third issue) 21 



PLATE XVI. 




61. Henry VIII., Shilling Page 22 

62. Edward VI., Half Crown, obv 24 

63. Philip and Mary, Shilling 26 

64. Elizabeth, Half Crown, obv 27 



65. James I. .Half Groat Page 30 

66. Charles I.. Oxford Crown, by 

Rawlins 32 

67. Charles II., Simon's Petition Crown 42 



PLATE XVII. 




68. Charles I., Half Crown Page 32 71. Commonwealth, Shilling Page 38 

69. Charles I., Newark Shilling .... ,,36 "it. Cromwell, Half Crown ,, 39 

70. Charles I., Pomefract Shilling 37 | 7S. Charles II., Pontefract Shilling 43 



'LATE XVIII. 




74. Charles II., Half Crown Page 41 

::.. William aud Mary, Half Crown 45 

76. Geortre I.. Crown (date should be 

1716 : 49 

77. George II., Crown, obv ,. 50 



78. Geortre III., Bank of England 

Dollar, rrv 

79 Edward VI., Testoon 

80. Edward VI., Sixpence 



Page 52 
,. 24 

,. 24 



PLATE XIX. 



% 



li 

3W : LV7KS&y 




81. Anegmund.Kin? of Hebrides, Penny Page 57 | 90, 91, 92. Alexander III., Pennies ..Pages ;6fl i. 61 
oa TLT_I_I_ TTT i^T cd ^1 j r I OA .Tnhn Tlaliol Pennv rage res 



82. Malcolm III., King of Scotland, 

83. David I., Penny 

84. Henry, Prince of Scotland, Penny 

85. 86, 87, William the Lion, Pennies .. 
88, 89, Alexander II., Pennies 



93. JohnBaliol, Pennv Page 62 

94. John Baliol, Halfpenny 

95. Robert Bruce, Penny 

96. David II., Half Groat, Edinburgh fi 

97. David II., Penny .. 63 



.ATE XX. 




98. Robert II.. Groat, ohv Page 64 

99. Robert III., Groat, ohn 66 

100. James I.. Groat, Perth 6 

101. James II.. Groat, Edinburgh fi 

KB. James III., Groat, Edinburgh 71 

Ifi3. James III., Penny 7 

104. James IV., Groat, Edinburgh 7o 



15 James IV., Half Groat, Edinburgh Page 7; 

106. James V., Groat. Edinburgh .. 7 

107. Mary, Tes^oon, 1553 ,. 

108. Mary, Half Testoon, obv ,. 8 

109. Mary, Testoon. 1555 .. 81 

110. Francis and Mary, Half Testoon, 

1560 R 



PLATE XXI. 




111. James VI.. One-third of Sword 

Dolla-. 1568. rev I'. 

Hi. .Tame* VI., Silver Noble. 157:!, rev.... 

113. James VI., Thirty Shillings Scots, 
i.x. m>. 

1U. James VI., Balance Merk, 1591, r-v. 

115. James VI ,Ten Shilling Scots, 1598, 

116. James VI.. "Thistle Merk, 1601, rev. 

117. Mary, Byal, 1567, rev 



tge87 
. 87 



,.9i James II.. Forty Shillings Scots. n>7 

120. William and Mary, Sixty Shillings 

Scots, ohv 

121. James II., Ten Shillings Scots, 

122. William aid Mary,' Five Shilling 

Piece, 1691. rev 

123 William III., Five Shillings Scots, 
1699 



PLATE XXII. 




124. Ifars I., King of Dublin Page 114 



125. Anlaf IV.. 

126. Sihtric III 

127. Ifars III.. 

128. Anlaf V., 

129. Anlaf VI.. 



105 



130. Anlaf VI.. King of Dublin .... 

131, 132, Ifars III., 



1OI, 1J-, U.MO J.J-J.., ,, ,, . ... 

105 133. Askill McTorquill, Kin? of Dublin 

105 134. Repnald II., King of VV'aterford ... 

105 135-13S, Irish Bracteate Coins 

105 I 139. John. Halfpenny, Dublin 



Page 105 
106 
Hi6 
106 
1"7 
108 



PLATE XXIII. 




140. John (Lord of Ireland). Half- 
penny, obv Page 107 

Ml. Edward I., Penny, obv 109 

14->. Edward IV., Groat, first coinage 111 

143. Edward IV.. Groat, fourth coin- 

age, r fv ., 118 

144. Henry V., Calais Half Groat .. ,115 

145. Edward IV., Type of the Three 

Crowns Money 117 



146. Henry VIII.. Sixpence, third 

type, obv Page 123 

147. Henry VIII., Sixpence, fourth 

type 124 

148. Mary, Groat, obv ,. 125 

149. Elizabeth, Shilling, second coin- 

age, rev , 127 

150. Charles I., Ormond Sixpence 131 



PLATE XXIV. 




ini. George III., Bank Token, Six 

Shillings, 1804 Page 139 

! 52. Massachusetts Sixpence, 1652 ,, 146 

1X5. Lord Baltimore's Maryland Shil- 
ling 145 

154. Elizabeth, Portcullis Half Crown 184 

155. Charles II., Bombay Rupee, 1687 148 



156. Charles II., Bombay Rupee, n.d., 

obv Page 148 

157. Charles IE., Bombay, East India 

Company 149 

158. Charles II., Bombay, Fanam 149 

159. Madras, Half Pagoda, 060 14U 



PLATE XXV. 






160. Cunobeline 

161. Ecgfrith Styca 

162 Cromwell, Farthing, obv. 
IBS. Cromwell, Farthing, rrv. 

164. Cromwell, Farthing, rev. 

165. Anne, Farthing 



.Pige 2 

7 



1<W. Charles I., Farthing 

167. James VI., Hardhead ... 
168 Charles II., Bodte, 1677 ... 

169. Charles II , Turner 

170. Charles II.. Bawbee, 1678 



..Page S5 
.. 92 
. 97 
.. ,. 97 
, 97 



>LATE XXVI. 




171. James VI., Penny Page 91 

172. Charles I., St. Patrick Farthing 183 

17S. George II., Halfpenny, 1736, rev. ... 138 

174. James I., Farthing 128 

175. George I., Pattern Halfpenny, 1722 188 

176. 177, George I., Pattern Half- 
pennies, rtvi , 138 



178. Sienna Leone Company, Penny, 



179. William and Mary, Carolina Half- 

penny ...... ................................... 

180. Lord Baltimore's Maryland Penny 



Page Its 



PLATE XXVII. 




181. Barbadoes Penny, 1792 Page 147 

182. George III., Bermuda Halfpenny, 

1793, rev. 117 

183. Isle of Man Halfpenny, 1733 . 142 

ISi. Isle of Man, Penny, 1758 142 

185. East India Co., Sumatra, Two 

Kapang 149 



186. Prince of "Wales' Island, Twenty 

Ca?h Page ISO 

187. Madras, Twenty Cash, 1803, rev. ... If* 

188. Madras, One Cash, 18< , IM 

189. George III., Ceylon Stiver, 1815, 

rev 150 



PLATE XXVII I. 








190. James I.. Halfnenny, billon Page 6S 

191. James II., Halfpenny, billon 11.71-, 

192. James HI.. Plack, billon 73 

193. James V., Plack, Edinburgh, billon , 79 

194. Mary, Penny, 1556, billon , 84 

195. Mary, Hardhead, 1558, billon , 81 



196. Francis and Mary, XONSUNT, 

1559, billon Page 84 

197. James VI., Plack or Atkinson, rev., 

billon 90 

198. James VI., Saltire Plack, billon ... 90 



3 LATE XXIX. 




199. James II., Gun Money Half- 

Crown, 1689, rev. 

200. James II., Pewter Halfpenny 

201. James II., Halfpenny, 1690, brass 

202. James II., Gun Money Crown. 

1690 ... 



Pag-e 135 
137 
' 137 



203. George I., American Twopence, 
rev., brass .................................. 

04. George II., American Twopence, 
ret'., brass .......................... ....... 

205. George I., American Penny, rev., 
brass .......................................... 



Page 147 




W. 8. LINCOLN X 

Old-Established Numismatists, 

69, NEW OXFORD STREET, LONDON, 

HAVE ON VIEW AND SALE A GREAT COLLECTION OF 

COINS * AND * MEDALS, 

COMPRISING: 

GREEK GOLD, SILVER, AND COPPER COINS. 
ROMAN GOLD, SILVER, AND BRASS. 
ANCIENT BRITISH AND ANGLO-SAXON COINS. 
ENGLISH SILVER, FROM WILLIAM I. TO PRESENT REIGN. 
ENGLISH GOLD COINS OF NEARLY EVERY REIGN, FROM 
EDWARD III. 

The following are a few of the English Silver Coins on View and Sale: 

Commonwealth Half -Groats', Is., Is. 6d., 

2s. 6d. 
Charles II. Crowns, 6s. 6d., 8s. 6d., 

12s. 6d. 
Charles II. set of four Maundy, 2s. 6d., 

3s. 6d., 5s. 

James II. Crowns, 7s. 6d., 8s. 6d., 12s. 6d. 
William and Mary Half-Crowns, 4s ,5s., 

7s. 6d. 
William III. Half -Crowns, 2s. 6d.,4s. 6d., 

6s. 

William III. Crowns, 7s., 8s. 6d., 10s. 
Anne Shillings, Is. 6d., 2s., 3s. 

,, Sixpences, Is., Is. 6d., 2s. 6d. 
George I. Shillings, Is. 6d., 2s., 3s. 
Georgo II. Is. 6 I., 2s., 2s. 6d. 
George HI. Crowns, 8s. 6d., 10s., 15s. 



William I. Peni 
Henry II. 
Henry III. 
Edward I. 
Edward II. 
Edward III. Gr 
Henry V. 
Henry VI. 
Edward IV. 
Henry VII. 
Henry VIII 


lies, 5s., 7s. 6d., 10s. 
Is., 2s., 2s. 6d. 
, Is. 6d.,2s. 6d., 3s. 6d. 
Is., Is. 6d., 2s. 6d. 
Is., Is. 6d., 2s. 6d. 
>ats, 2s., 3s., 4s. 
2s., 2s. 6d., 3s. 6d. 
Is. 6d.,2s. 6d.,3s. 6d. 
Is. 6d., 2s., 3s. 
2s., 3s., 3s. 6d. 
Is. 6d., 2s., 3s. 


Edward VI. Shi 
Elizabeth 
James I. 


ings, 2s., 3s. 6d., 5s. 
2s., is. 6d., 4s. 6d. 
2s., 3s., 4s. 



Charles I. Half-Crowns, 3s. 6d., 5s., 6. 
,, Shillings, Is. 6d., 2s. 6d., 3s. 6d. 



Can also supply some of the same Coins at Lower, Intermediate, and 
Higher Prices, and many other Denominations of Same and Other Re'gns; 



Tokens of the Seventeenth, Eighteenth, and Nineteenth 

Centuries ; 

American, Colonial, and Foreign Silver and Copper Coins; 
Silver and Bronze Medals of Eminent Men; 
War Medals, Decorations, and Commemorative Medals. 

All the above-named Coins and Medals are arranged in Cabinets, and separately 
priced in plain figures. Intending purchasers are invited to call and make their 
own selections, or bond Jide orders with prepayment will be promptly attended to. 



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Copies in Paper Covers, Is. 2d. Post Free. Cloth Gilt, 
2s. 3d. Post Free. 



ADDRESS- 

C. H. NUNN, Publisher, Bury St. Edmunds. 



COLLECTORS 

OF 

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Reliable Information as to any 
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ON WHOSK STAFF 18 

AN EMINENT NUMISMATIST. 

OFFICE : 17O, STRAND, LONDON. 





ATALOGUE of 

New & Practical 
BOOKS 



Published by 

L. UPCOTT GILL, 170, Strand, London. 



INDEX. 




Animals 

Book of the Goat. 15 

Book of the Pig, 20 

Book of the Rabbit, 21 

Breaking and Training Dogs, 12 

British Dogs, 13 

Diseases of Dogs, 13 

Diseases of Horses, 16 

Dogs used in Field Sports, 13 

Exhibition Account Books, 13 

Fancy Mice, 17 

Ferrets and Ferreting, 14 

Goat-keeping for Amateurs, 15 

Horse in Sickness, 16 

Horse-keeping for Amateurs, 16 

Kennel Diary, 17 

Notes on Pet Monkeys, 18 

Pig-keeping for Amateurs, 20 

Practical Dairy Farming, 12 

Rabbits for Prizes and Profit, 21 




Animals continued. 
The Collie, 12 
The Greyhound, 16 
The Guinea Pig, 15 
The St. Bernard, 22 

Art and Virtu 

All about Painting on China, 19 
Artistic Amusements, 7 
Decorative Painting, 19 
Easy Legato Studies for the 

Violin, 25 

English Pottery and Porcelain, 21 
Guide to English Pattern Coins, 

12 
Guide to the Coins of Great 

Britain and Ireland, 12 
Mirror Painting in the Italian 

Style, 18 

Practical Violin School, 25 
The Essentials of Perspective, 19 



Index continued on page 3. 



No. 2.1888. 







ALL PRICES FOR ALL PURSES. 
6d. MYRA'S JOURNAL. 

9d. MYRA'S JOURNAL (Ninepenny Panorama 
Edition). 

3d. MYRA'S THREEPENNY JOURNAL. 
Is. MYRA'S HALF-YEARLY BUDGET. 

Is. LE MONITEUR DE LA MODE (The 
Lady's Magazine). 

Is. MYRA'S SILKWORM SERIES: 

Profusely Illustrated, and bonnd in Coloured Wrapper, gilt edges. 

1. DRESSMAKING LESSONS. Fart I. - The Corsage. 

2. DRESSMAKING LESSONS. Part II. Skirts and 

Tunics. 

3. DRESSMAKING LESSONS. Fart III. The Polonaise. 

(In the Press.) 

4. ELEMENTARY NEEDLEWORK. 

5. POLONAISE LACE. 

6. ANTIQUE AND MODERN POINT LACE. (In the Press.) 

7. DEVONSHIRE, OR HONITON LACE. (In the Press.) 

8. MACRAME LACE. Part I. 

9. MACRAME LACE. Fart II. 

10. KNITTING LESSONS. 

11. CROCHET LESSONS. 

12. CROCHET EDGINGS. 

13. HARLEQUIN CROCHET. Introductory. Over 40 Designs. 

14. HARLEQUIN CROCHET. First Series Coloured Plates. 

(In the Press.) 

15. HARLEQUIN CROCHET. Second Series Coloured Plates. 

(In the Press.) 

16. HARLEQUIN CROCHET. Third Series Coloured Plates. 

(In the Press.) 

17. BERLIN WOOL WORK. 

18. FIRST EMPIRE COSTUMES AND COIFFURES. 

19. INDIAN OUTFITS. With Coloured Thermometrical Map 

of India. 

6d. MYRA'S DIARY. 

2/6. MYRA'S COOKERY BOOK. Second 
Edition in the Press. 

MYRA & SON, 39 & 40, Bedford St~Covent Garden. 



I NDE x continued. 



Bees and Birds- 
Amateur's Aviary of Foreign Birds, 
14 

Bees and Bee-keeping, 8 

Birds I have Kept in Years gone by, 9 

Book of Bee-keeping, 8 

British Cage Birds, 10 

Canary Book, 11 

Diseases of Cage Birds. 10 

Ducks and Geese, 13 

Exhibition Account Books, 13 

Fancy Pigeons, 20 

Fertility of Eggs Certificate, 14 

Foreign Cage Birds, 10 

Moore's Columbarium, 12 

Pheasant-keeping for Amateurs, 20 

Poultry Ailments and their Treat- 
ment, 21 

Poultry for Prizes and Profit, 21 

Sitting Hen Record, 23 

The Speaking Parrots, 19 

Gardening- 
Arboriculture for Amateurs, 8 
Bulbs and Bulb Culture, 10 
Cactus Culture for Amateurs, 10 
Cucumber Culture for Amateurs, 12 
Dictionary of Gardening, 15 
Ferns, Choice British, 14 
Garden Pests and their Eradication, 15 
Greenhouse Management for Ama- 
teurs, 15 
Hardy Perennials and Old-fashioned 

Garden Flowers, 16 
Lily of the Valley, 17 
Mushroom Culture for Amateurs, 18 
Orchids for Amateurs, 19 
Profitable Market Gardening, 17 
Pruning, Grafting, and Budding Fruit 

Trees, 21 
Rose Budding, 22 
Roses for Amateurs, 22 
Vegetable Culture for Amateurs, 24 
Vine Culture for Amateurs, 24 

General Literature- 
Character Indicated by Handwriting, 16 
Church Festival Decorations, 11 
( iuide to Degrees, 12 
Guide to the Legal Profession, 17 
Lessons in Shorthand, on Gurney's 

System (Improved), 22 
Library Manual, 17 
Practical Journalism, 17 
Shorthand Systems; Which is the 
Best? 23 

Guides to Places 

Land of the Broads, 9 
Mediterranean AVinter Resorts, 17 
Northern Watering Places of France, 

25 
Seaside Watering Places, 22 



Guides to Places continue^. 

The Upper Thames, from Richmond to 

Oxford, 24 

Tour in the States and Canada, 24 
Tourist's Route Map of England and 

Wales, 24 
Winter Havens in the Sunny South, 25 

Household- 
Artistic Fancy Work Series, 14 
Church Embroidery, 11 
Cookery for Amateurs, 12 
Dictionary of Needlework, 18 
Honiton Lace Book, 16 
Indian Outfits and Establishments, 16 
Practical Hints on Coffee Stall Manage- 
ment, 11 
Sick Nursing at Home, 23 

Mechanics- 
Bookbinding for Amateurs, 9 
Carpentry and Joinery for Amateurs, 11 
Firework-making for Amateurs, 14 
Model Yachts and Boats, 18 
Picture Frame Making for Amateurs, 20 
Practical Architecture, 8 
Practical Boat Building for Amateurs, 9 
Printing for Amateurs, 21 
Repouss^ Work for Amateurs, 22 
Toymaking for Amateurs, 24 
Tuning and Repairing Pianofortes, 20 
Turning for Amateurs, 24 
Working in Sheet Metal, 22 
Wood Carving for Amateurs, 25 

Natural History- 
Collecting Butterflies and Moths, 10 
Natural History Sketches among the 

Carnivora, 18 
Practical Taxidermy, 23 
Zoological Notes, 25 

Sports and Pastimes- 
Angling for Coarse Fish, 7 
Aflgling for Game Fish, 8 
Angling for Pike, 7 
Angling in Salt Water, 8 
Bazaars and Fancy Fairs, 8 
Bicycles and Tricycles of the Year, 8 
Boat Sailing for Amateurs, 9 
Book of Card Tricks, 11 
Book of the Ail-Round Angler, 7 
Games of Patience, 19 
Notes on Game and Game Shooting, 14 
Practical Boat Building and Sailing, 9 
Practical Fisherman, 14 
Practical Game Preserving, 14 
Practical Photography, 20 
Practical Trapping, 24 
Sea-fishing for Amateurs, 22 
Six Plays for Children, 20 
Skating Cards, 23 
Sleight of Hand, 23 

Theatricals and Tableaux Vivants for 
Amateurs, 23 



> 



** BOOKS OK HORSES. ** 

Now Ready, in Four Volumes, Imperial 8vo. 

CELEBRATED RACEHORSES OF THE PAST AND PRESENT CEN- 
TURIES, PORTRAITS OF. In strictly Chronological Order, commencing in 1702, 
and ending in 1870 ; together with their respective Pedigrees and Performances recorded in 
full. By T. H. TAUXTON, M.A., of Oxford. Price 6 6?. 

These volumes, handsomely bound, contain over 400 Portraits of Horses, and 
in the last volume a few of the prominent Owners and Jockeys of the period are 
added. The letterpress is in large and elegant type. The Portraits have been 
reproduced in facsimile from the best pictures obtainable. 

TXORSE RACING IN FRANCE : A History. By EGBERT BLACK, M.A. 

M.-MJ, Q vri i n,. 



O; UR 



14*. 
HORSES. By A. SAUNDERS. Illustrated. 8vo. 6s. 



Second Edition Now Ready. 



TTHE PYTCHLEY HUNT, PAST AND PRESENT! Its History, from its 
= P'oundation to the Present Day. With Personal Anecdotes, and Memoirs of the 
Masters and Principal Members. By H. O. NETHERCOTE, Esq., fifty years a Member of 
this famous Hunt. Illustrated by authorised Portraits, and a View of the old Pytchley 
Hall. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 8s. bd. ; and large-paper edition, crown 4to, extra cloth, 21s. 



Now Ready. Crown 8vo, boards (over 200 pages, with Index). Price 2s. 

PROFITABLE DAIRY FARMING. By H. M. UPTON. Contents: Chapter I. 
* Breed of Cows ; II. Farm Buildings ; III. Crops ; IV. Manure ; V. Food ; VI. Milk ; 
VII. Cream ; VIII. Butter ; IX. Analysis ; X. Estimates ; XI. Management ; XII. Tables ; 
XIII. Machines and Utensils. APPENDIX : I. Regulations as to Dairies, Cow-Sheds, and 
Milk-Shops. II. Sale of Food and Drugs Act. III. Sale of Food and Drugs Act Amend- 
ment Act, 1879; IV. Contagious Diseases (Animals) Act, 1886; V. Contagious Diseases 
(Animals) Acts ; VI. The Contagious Diseases (Animals) Act, 1886 (Circular). VII. The 
Dairies, Cow-Sheds, and Milk-Shops Order of 1885 ; VIII. A Bill for the Better Prevention 
of the Fraudulent Sale of Oleomargarine. 

" A practical and excellent handbook to the subject." Saturday Review. 



VALUABLE TO ALL INTERESTED IN ENGINES AND ENGINE-RUNNING. 
Now Ready, in One Volume, 4 to, 320 Pages, Price 1 11s. 6d., post free. 

T\/rODERN STEAM ENGINES. Illustrated by over 400 engravings. By JOSHUA 
4-Wffe ROSE, M.E. A Practical Book for Draughtsmen, Machinists, Engineers, and Steam 
Users. 

" A thoroughly good and instructive book : it bears many tokens of having been written 
by a practical man. The engravings are all excellent. The student and even the profes- 
sional engineer will find much in it worth study." Engineer. 

" This is a handsome volume, and gives full explanations of the construction of modern 
steam engines." Iron. 

Now Ready, Crown 8vo, cloth, 416 pages, Price 8s. 6d., post free. 

JL KEY TO ENGINES AND ENGINE-RUNNING : A Complete Guide to the 
== Care and Management of all kinds of Steam Engines and Boilers. By JOSHUA ROSE, 
M.E. Answers are given to the Questions asked in Engineers' Examinations. 

"Contains much that is both instructive and interesting. In the way of printing, 
paper, and illustrations, the book leaves nothing to be desired, and is well worth perusal." 
Marine Engineer. 

"The book is an excellent guide to the working and management of steam engines, 
nd therefore fulfils its title." Practical Engineer. 

CiTEAM BOILERS: A Practical Treatise on Boiler Construction and Examination. 
^* For the use of Practical Boiler Makers, Boiler Users, and Inspectors, and embracing 
in Plain Figures all the Calculations necessary in Designing and Classifying Steam Boilers. 
By JOSHUA ROSE, M.E., Author of "Modern Steam Engines," &c. Illustrated by 
73 Engravings. Demy 8vo, cloth, 12s. dd. 

The abore WorJiS can 1>c had jtost free bi/ sending Postal Order for the price 
to the J'liblishcru, 

Sampson Low, Marston, Searle & Rivington 

(LIMITED), 

St. Dunstan's House, Fetter Lane, London. 



Olf 



Near and Far : An Angler's Sketches of Home Sport and Colonial Life. By WM. SENIOR 
(" Red SpiBMr "), Angling Editor of the Field, Author of "Waterside Sketches," &c. Crown 
Svo, cloth, 6s. 

"The author is not merely an expert all-round angler, but is an all-round lover of Nature 
and he lia< the yery happy faculty of knowing how to describa what he sees and what he has 
done. He lias fished, and shot, and hunted, and communed with Nature the world over ; and 
he describes his adventures with a lightness and brightness of touch which to anyone who has 
in him the least love of Nature cannot but be irresistibly charming." Fishing Gazette, 

Floating Flies and How to Dress Them. A Treatise on the most Modern Methods 
of Dressing Artificial Flies for Trout and Grayling. With Full Illustrated Directions, and 
containing Ninety Hand-coloured Engravings of the most Killing Patterns, together with a 
few Hints to Dry-fly Fishermen. By FREDERIC M. HALFORD, "Detached Badger" of The 
Fielil, Member of the " Houshton Club," " Fly-Fishers' Club," &c. 
A large-paper edition, printed on Dutch hand-made paper, limited to 100 copies for England and 

50 for America, price 30s. Small-paper edition, demy 8vo, first .edition limited to 500 copies, cloth, 

15s., post free. 

The Sporting Fish of Great Britain, with Notes on Ichthyology. By 

H. CnoLMONDELEY-PENNELL.late Inspector of Sea Fisheries; Author of "Salmon and Trout," 
'Pike and other Coarse Fish," "The Modern Practical Angler," "The Angler-Naturalist," 
" The Book of the Pike," Editor of the late Fisherman's Magazine and Review. Illustrated 
by Sixteen Lithographs of Fish in Gold, Silver, and Colours. 

A large-paper edition, printed on Dutch hand-made paper, limited to 100 copies for England and 
50 for America, price 30s. Small-paper edition, demy Svo, first edition limited to 500 copies, price 15s. 

Modern Improvements in Fishing Tackle and Fish-Hooks. By H. CHOLMON- 

DELEY-PE.NNELL. Illustrated by 200 Wood Engravings. Crown Svo, limp, 2s. 
The American Salmon Fisherman. By HENRY P. WELLS, Author of " Fly-Rods and 

Fly-Tackle." Illustrated. 116 pp., small post Svo, cloth, price Gs. 
North-Country Trout Flies. By T. E. PRITT. With Coloured Plates of all the best 

Flies. Second Edition. Cloth, demy Svo, 10s. 6d. 
Fly-Rods and Fly-Tackle. Suggestions as to their Manufacture and Use. By HENRY 

P. WELL?. Illustrated. Small 4to, 361 pp., cloth extra, 10s. 6d. 
Waterside Sketches. By "BED SPINNER" (Wm. Senior). Imperial 32mo, boards, 

price Is., post free. 
Recollections of Fly-Fishing for Salmon, Trout, and Grayling. With Notes on 

their Haunts, Habits, and History. By EDWARD HAMILTON, M.D., F.L.S., &c. Illustrated by 

a Mezzotint Engraving by FRANCIS SEYMOUK HADEN, Esq., and other Woodcuts. Small post 

Svo, cloth extra, Os., post free. 
Salmon Problems. By J. W. WILLIS BUND. Boards, 2s. 6d. ; cloth, 3s. 6d. 

" One of the most important contributions to the literature of the salmon that has 

appeared." Fis/iing Gazette. 
An Amateur Angler's Days in Dove Dale. Being an Account of my Three Weeks' 

Holiday in July and August, ISSt. Imperial 3'2mo, fancy boards, Is., post free; limp leather- 
cloth, gilt edges, Is. 6d. 
An Angler's Strange Experiences. By COTSWOLD ISYS, M.A. Profusely Illustrated. 

Small tto, cloth extra. Second and Cheaper Edition, 3s. 6d., post free. 
How and Where to Fish in Ireland. By Hi REGAN. With Map and numerous 

Text Illustrations. Crown Svo, 3s. (id. 
A Book of the Running Brook : And of Still Waters. By Lady COLIN CAMPBELL. 

Foolscap Svo. An interesting little work, suited to the tastes of piscatorial sportsmen. 5s. 
Notes on Fish and Fishing. By J. J. MANLEY, M.A. With Illustrations. Crown Svo, 

cloth extra, 363 page-, leatherette binding, reduced from 10s. 6d. to 6s., post free. 
The Art of Trout Fishing on Rapid Streams. By H. C. CUTCLIFFE, F.R.C.S. 

Small post 8vo, cloth, price 3s. 6d., post free. 
Float-Fishing and Spinning in the Nottingham Style. By J. W. MARTIN, the 

" Trent Otter." Coloured boards, Illustrated, crown Svo, 2s. 6d., post free. New, Revised, 

and Enlarged Edition. 
British Angling Flies. By MICHAEL THEAKSTOX. Revised and Annotated by 

FRANCIS M. WALBRAN. With Woodcut Illustrations, and Plates of Natural Flies drawn 

from Life. Crown Svo, cloth, price 5s., post free. 
Fishing with the Fly. Sketches by Lovers of the Art. With Coloured Illustrations 

of Standard Flies, collected by C. F. ORVIS and A. NELSON CHENEY. Square Svo, cloth extra 

12s. 6d., post free. 

ESTABLISHED 1877. 
The Fishing Gazette. PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY, price 2d. Twenty large 

folio pages. Illustrated. Entirely devoted to Angling. If you do not know tb>> paper, send 

postcard with name and address (and ask for a specimen copy) to the Editor, R. B. MAHSTON, 

St. Dunstan's House, Fetter Lane, Fleet Street, London. 

LONDON : 

Sampson Low, Marston, Searle and Rivington 

(LIMITED), 

St. Dunstan's House, Fetter Lane, Fleet Street, E.G. 





{BfljHHP, 



Journal of t|p Ijonsp 




Published Every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. 



PRICE 2d. 



fi'fwtpaprr. 



CONTENTS. The plan of 
the journal is that it shall 
be a thoroughly practical 
and useful newspaper in every 
household, and with this end in 
view a great, variety of informa- 
tion is given, classified in Depart- 
ments according to the subject. 
Although the paper is pub- 
lished three times a week, the 
literary matter is so arranged 
that any one may be taken 
weekly without loss of interest, 
the three issues being virtually 
three distinct and separate 
weekly journals, which can be 
taken together or each by itself 
as is most convenient to the 
reader. 



ILLUSTRATIONS. Nume- 
rous Diagrams and more 
1 finished Illustrations, spe- 
cially drawn and engraved for 
THE BAZAAR, are given. 



DRAWING ROOM.-In this 
Department Art, Music, 
" Science, Amateur Theatri- 
cals, and such like, are included. 
Notices of the Art Galleries, 
Concerts, New Music, and the 
doings in the Scientific World, 
are given, as well as Practical 
Articles on New Art Work for 
Amateurs, Playing the Violin, 
Valuation of Paintings and En- 
gravings, and Correspondence, 
Questions and Answers on simi- 
lar matters. 

HALL. A large number of 
subjects are treated here, 
such as particulars of 
Holiday and Health Resorts, 
Photography, Cycling, the 
Keeping of Aviary Birds, Man- 
agement of Aquaria and Small 
Pets, Popular Natural History, 
Emigration, Games, Fishing, 
Ventriloquism, the Microscope, 
Cats, and Questions, Answers, 
and Correspondence on the same 
subjects. 

BOUDOIR. Fashions, Fancy 
Work of every kind, Dress- 
making, Millinery, Knit- 
ted Garments, New Materials, 
Etiquette, and other subjects 
which Ladies discuss in the 
Boudoir, form the feature of 
this Department. 



WORKSHOP.- Every 
branch of Mechanics for 
Amateurs is here treated 
in turn : Carpentry, Joinery, 
Metal Working, Turning, Lac- 
quering, Picture Cleaning, Carri- 
age-building, Making Scientific 
Apparatus, Furniture Making, 
Cabinet Work, Painting, Grain- 
ing, Recipes for various pro- 
cesses, and Questions and 
Answers for obtaining special 
information. The Articles are 
plain, practical, and to the 
point. 



TJOUSEKEEPER'S ROOM. 
I Papers on various points 

** in connection with the 
Decoration and Arrangement of 
Houses, Domestic Management, 
Little Dinners and Luncheons, 
Oriental Cookerjr for English 
Tastes, the Cooking of Special 
Dishes, Home Dyeing and 
Cleaning, and other matters of 
a similar kind, are found in 
this Department. These papers 
are reliable and exact, and use- 
ful in every household. 



GARDEN. The Cultivation 
of Hardy Garden Plants, 
Greenhouse Plants, Ferns, 
Hardy Orchids, Cacti, Flower- 
ing Shrubs, Roses, Fruit and 
Vegetables, is described in a 
plain and practical manner, and 
suited to the requirements of 
the ordinaay amateur. Present 
work in the Garden for future 
effect, and practical and season- 
able Notes on Bee-keeping, are 
also given. 



T IBRARY. Here are given 
Reviews of Books, Articles 
- 1 ' on the Leading Magazines, 
Discussions on Literary Topics, 
Papers on Collectors' Books, 
and other matters appertaining 
to the Library. 



/CURTILAGE. Dogs, Poul- 
try, Horses, Goat-keeping, 
^ Pigeons, Rabbits, Farm- 
ing for Amateurs, and such 
like, are treated in this Depart- 
ment. Here, as in all the other 
Departments, Questions and 
Answers from Correspondence 
form a useful feature. Prize 
Lists of Shows are also given. 



T7XCHANGE AND MART. 
M Selling, Buying, and 
* ' Exchanging amongst Pri- 
vate Persons is earned on 
through this Department, and 
to so great an extent is it 
used for this purpose, that 
the whole of a large Supple- 
ment is devoted to it This 
Supplement is divided into 22 
Departments, and these again 
are fully sub-divided for perfect 
ease of reference. A small charge 
of Id. for 3 words is made for 
entering a notice. 

TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Under this heading Re- 
plies are given, by a 
large Staff of Experts, to 
Questions on Law, Literature, 
Finance and Investments, Art, 
Bric-a-Brac, Cycling, Travel, 
Poultry, Pigeons, Pheasants, 
Dogs, Horses, Farming, Violin, 
Organ, Piano, e Cage Birds, 
Fashions, Fancy Work, Cook- 
ing, Practical Science, Sport, 
Housekeeping, Foreign Stamps, 
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Theology and Politics. 



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OF 



PRACTICAL HANDBOOKS 

PUBLISHED BY 

L. UPCOTT GILL, 170, STRAND, LONDON, W.C. 



AMUSEMENTS, ARTISTIC : Being Instructions in Colour- 
ing Photographs, Imitation Stained Glass, Decalcomanie, Queen Shell 
Work, Painting on China, Japanese Lacquer Work, Stencilling, 
Painting Magic Lantern Slides, Menu and Guest Cards, Spatter 
Work, Picture and Scrap Screens, Frosted Silver Work, Picture 
Cleaning and Restoring, Illuminating, and Symbolical Colouring. 
Illustrated. In cloth gilt, price 2s. 6d. " Practical, satisfactory in 
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ANGLER, BOOK OF THE ALL-ROUND. A Compre- 
hensive Treatise on Angling in both Fresh and Salt Water. In 
Four Divisions : I, Coarse Fish ; 2, Pike ; 3, Game Fish ; 4, Sea 
Fish. Each Division is complete in itself. By JOHN BICKERDYKK. 
With over 1 50 Engravings. In cloth, price <$s. _, also in Monthly 
parts, price jd. LARGE PAPER EDITION (200 copies only, signed and 
numbered), bound in Roxburghe, price 2is. to Subscribers. "Just the 
sort of treatise that the angling novice requires a code of simple, 
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ANGLING FOR COARSE FISH. Illustrated. > A very Complete and 
Practical Work on Bottom Fishing, according to the methods in use 
on the Thames, Trent, Norfolk Broads, and elsewhere. {Being 
Division I. of above work.} Price is. 

ANGLING FOR PIKE. A Practical and Comprehensive Work on 
the most Approved Methods of Fishing for Pike or Jack ; including 
an Account of Some New Tackles for Spinning, Live-baiting, and 
Trolling. Profusely Illustrated. (Being Division II. of above 
work.'] Price \s. 

** All Bfecrks Post Free. 



8 Published by L. UPCOTT GlLL, 

ANGLING FOR GAME FISH. A Practical Guide to both Wet and 
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ANGLING IN SALT WATER. A Practical Work on Sea Fishing 
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Boats ; together with Some Account of Hand- Lining. Over 50 
Engravings. (Being Division IV. of above work.} Price is. " It 
gives us great pleasure to call attention to this most interesting, 
practical, and valuable work" Fishing Gazette. 

ARBORICULTURE FOR AMATEURS: Being Instruc- 
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and Selections and Descriptions of those suited to Special Require- 
ments as to Soil, Situation, &c. By WILLIAM H. ABLETT, Author 
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ARCHITECTURE, PRACTICAL. As applied to Farm 
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fusely Illustrated with Diagrams and Plans. By ROBERT SCOTT 
BURN. In cloth gilt, price $s. " A valuable handbook for ready 
reference." -Journal of Forestry. 

BAZAARS AND FANCY FAIRS: A Guide to their 
Organisation and Management, with Details of Various Devices for 
Extracting Money from the Visitors. In paper, price is. " Most 
amusing. ... A better book cannot be purchased." Ladies' 
Journal. 

BEE-KEEPING, BOOK OF. A very Practical and Complete 
Manual on the Proper Management of Bees, especially written 
for Beginners and Amateurs who have but a few Hives. Fully 
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BEES AND BEE-KEEPING : Scientific and Practical. By 
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South Kensington. Vol. I., SCIENTIFIC. A complete Treatise on 
the Anatomy and Physiology of the Hive Bee. In cloth gilt, price 
TS. 6d. VOL. II., PRACTICAL MANAGEMENT OF BEES. In cloth 
gilt, price 8s. 6d. " This is a very interesting book. . . . The illustra- 
tions are admirable." The Saturday Review. 

BICYCLES AND TRICYCLES OF THE YEAR. 

Descriptions of the New Inventions and Improvements for the Present 
Season. Designed to assist intending purchasers in the choice of a 
machine. Illustrated. By HARRY HEWITT GRIFFIN. (Published 
Annually.) In paper, price is. " It is as comprehensive as could 
be desired. . . . We can readily testify to the strict impartiality 
of the author." The Field. 

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170, Strand, London, W.C. 



BIRDS I HAVE KEPT IN YEARS GONE BY. With 

Original Anecdotes, and Full Directions for Keeping them Success- 
fully. By W. T. GREENE, M.A., M.D., F.Z.S., &c., Author of 
" Parrots in Captivity," " The Amateur's Aviary " ; Editor of " Notes 
on Cage Birds," &c., &c. With COLOURED PLATES. In cloth 
gilt, price $s. " A prettier present for anyone who is fond of these 
household pets it would be difficult to find." Stock-keeper. 

BOAT BUILDING AND SAILING, PRACTICAL. 

Containing Full Instructions for Designing and Building Punts, Skiffs, 
Canoes, Sailing Boats, c. Particulars of the most Suitable Sailing 
Boats and Yachts for Amateurs, and Instructions for their Proper 
Handling. Fully Illustrated with Designs and Working Diagrams. 
By ADRIAN NEISON, C.E., DIXON KEMP, A.I.N.A., and G. 
CHRISTOPHER DAVIES. In one -vol., cloth gilt, price js. 6d. " A 
capital manual. . . . All is clearly and- concisely explained." The 
Graphic. 

BOAT BUILDING FOR AMATEURS, PRACTICAL. 

Containing Full Instructions for Designing and Building Punts, Skiffs, 
Canoes, Sailing Boats, &c. Fully Illustrated with Working Diagrams. 
By ADRIAN NEISON, C.E. New Edition, Revised and Enlarged, by 
DIXON KEMP, Author of "Yacht Designing," " A Manual of Yacht 
and Boat Sailing," c. In cloth gilt, price 2s. 6d. "A capital 
manual. . . . All is clearly and concisely explained." The Graphic. 

BOAT SAILING FOR AMATEURS. Containing Par- 
ticulars of the most Suitable Sailing Boats and Yachts for Amateurs, 
and Instructions for their Proper Handling, c. Illustrated with 
numerous Diagrams. By G. CHRISTOPHER DAVIES. Second Edition, 
Revised and Enlarged, and with several New Plans of Yachts. In 
cloth gill, price ^s. " We know of no better companion for the 
young yachtsman." Sporting Chronicle. 

BOOKBINDING FOR AMATEURS: Being Descriptions 
of the various Tools and Appliances Required, and Minute Instructions 
for their Effective Use. By W. J. E. CRANE. Illustrated with 156 
Engravings. In cloth gilt, price 2s. 6d. "A handy manual for the 
study of an interesting and important art." The Graphic. 

BROADS, THE LAND OF THE. By E. R. SUFFLING. 
"A capital guide to the angler, the yachtsman, or the artist." 
Scotsman. 

ILLUSTRATED EDITION. The most Complete Guide to 
the whole of the District embracing the Broads and their Water- 
ways of Norfolk and Suffolk that has yet been published, as it 
contains more practical and reliable information than is to be found 
elsewhere respecting Yachting, Fishing, Places of Interest, Archaeo- 
logical Remains, Natural Features of the Country, the Birds and 
Fishes found there, the Customs of the Natives, and other points 
concerning which Tourists desire to know. A good Map of the 
Broads, Rivers, Chief Roads, and Places named, printed in four 
colours, accompanies the work. Price 2s. 6d. 

V All Books Post Free. 



10 Published by L. UPCOTT GILL, 

CHEAP EDITION. A Cheap Edition of a reliable Guide to the 
Norfolk Broads, which would meet the requirements of the general 
Public, having been called for, the First Edition of the above Book 
has been issued in this form, but it has been embellished with some 
Plates of Characteristic Sketches taken on the spot by the well- 
known artist of Fishing and Waterside Subjects, Mr. J. TEMPLE. 
A good and clear Map, in black and white, is also given. In Illus- 
trated Cover, printed in colours, price is. 

BULBS AND BULB CULTURE: Being Descriptions, 
both Historical and Botanical, of the principal Bulbs and Bulbous 
Plants grown in this Country, and their chief Varieties ; with Full 
and Practical Instructions for their Successful Cultivation both In 
and Out of Doors. Illustrated. By D. T. FISH. In cloth gilt, in 
one vol., 4&$pp., price $s. " One of the best and most trustworthy 
books on bulb culture that have been put before the public." 
Gardeners' Chronicle. 

BUTTERFLIES AND MOTHS, COLLECTING: Being 
Directions for Capturing, Killing, and Preserving Lepidoptera and 
their Larvae. Illustrated. Reprinted, with Additions, from " Practi- 
cal Taxidermy." By MONTAGU BROWNE, Author of "Practical 
Taxidermy." In paper, price is. " One of the handiest little helps 
yet published." Excelsior. 

CACTUS CULTURE FOR AMATEURS: Being 
Descriptions of the various Cactuses grown in this country ; with 
Full and Practical Instructions for their Successful Cultivation. 
By W. WATSON, of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Profusely 
Illustrated. In cloth gilt, price $s. 

CAGE BIRDS, BRITISH. Containing Full Directions for 
Successfully Breeding, Rearing, and Managing the various British 
Birds that can be kept in Confinement. Illustrated with 
COLOURED PLATES and numerous finely cut Wood Engravings. 
By R. L. WALLACE. In cloth gilt, price los. 6d.; also in Monthly 
Parts, price jd. "Is calculated to be most useful." The Field. 

CAGE BIRDS, DISEASES OF: Their Cause, Symptoms, 
and Treatment. A Handbook which should be in the hands of 
everyone who keeps a Bird, as successful Treatment of Ailments 
depends on knowing what to do, and doing it promptly. By Dr. 
W. T. GREENE, F.Z.S. In paper, price \s. " No lover of birds 
should fail to possess himself or herself of the book." Nottingham 
Daily Guardian. 

CAGE BIRDS, FOREIGN. Containing Full Directions for 
Successfully Breeding, Rearing, and Managing the various 
Beautiful Cage Birds imported into this country. Beautifully Illus- 
trated. By C. W. GEDNEY. In cloth gilt, in two vols., price 8s. 6d.; 
in extra cloth gilt, gilt edges, in one vol., price QJ. 6d. "Full of 
information on every point." Public Opinion. 

PARROTS, PARRAKEETS, COCKATOOS, LORIES, and MACAWS : 
Their Varieties, Breeding, and Management. Illustrated. (Forming 
Vol. I. of "Foreign Cage Birds.") In cloth gilt, price y. 6d. 

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170, Strand, London, W.C. 11 

WAXBILLS, FINCHES, WEAVERS, ORIOLES, and other Small Foreign 
Aviary Birds : Their Varieties, Breeding, and Management. Beauti- 
fully Illustrated. (Forming Vol. IT. of "Foreign Cage Birds") In 
cloth gilt, price 5 s. 

CANARY BOOK. Containing Full Directions for the Breeding, 
Rearing, and Management of all Varieties of Canaries and Canary 
Mules, the Promotion and Management of Canary Societies and 
Exhibitions, and all other matters connected with this Fancy. By 
ROBERT L. WALLACE. Second Edition, Enlarged and Revised, 
with many new Illustrations of Prize Birds, Cages, &c. In cloth gilt, 
price S.T. ; with SPECIAL COLOURED PLATES, price 6s. 6d.; 
also in Monthly Parts, price jd. " This very comprehensive work 
.... which is one of a most practical character .... may be safely 
consulted by all canary fanciers." The Field. 

GENERAL MANAGEMENT OF CANARIES. Including Cages and 
Cage-making, Breeding, Managing, Mule Breeding, Diseases and 
their Treatment, Moulting, Rats and Mice, &c. Illustrated. (Forming 
Section L of the " Canary Book") In cloth, price 2s. 6d. 

EXHIBITION CANARIES. Containing Full Particulars of all 
the different Varieties, their Points of Excellence, Preparing 
Birds for Exhibition, Formation and Management of Canary 
Societies and Exhibitions. Illustrated. (Forming Section II. of 
the " Canary Book") In cloth, price zs. 6d. 

CARD TRICKS, BOOK OF, for Drawing-room and Stage 
Entertainments ; with an Exposure of Tricks as practised by Card 
Sharpers and Swindlers. Numerous Illustrations. By Prof. R. 
KUNARD. Illustrated Wrapper, price T.S. 6d. 

CARPENTRY AND JOINERY FOR AMATEURS. 

Contains Full Descriptions of the various Tools Required in the 
above Arts, together with Practical Instructions for their Use. By 
the Author of " Turning for Amateurs," &c. In cloth gilt, price 2s. 6d. 
" The best of the book consists of practical instructions." Iron. 

CHURCH EMBROIDERY: Its Early History and Manner 
of Working ; Materials Used and Stitches Employed ; Raised and 
Flat Couching, Applique, &c., &c., including Church Work over 
Cardboard. A practical handbook for Church Workers. Illustrated. 
In paper, price is. " It cannot fail to be useful and appreciated." 
Wef don's Ladies' Journal. 

CHURCH FESTIVAL DECORATIONS. Comprising 
Directions and Designs for the Suitable Decoration of Churches for 
Christmas, Easter, Whitsuntide, and Harvest. Illustrated. A useful 
book for the Clergy and their Lay Assistants. In paper, price is. 
" Much valuable and practical information." Sylvia! s Home Journal, 

COFFEE STALL MANAGEMENT, PRACTICAL 

HINTS ON, and other Temperance Work for the Laity. In paper, 
price \s. " A most valuable guide." The Queen. 

*$ All Books Post Free. 



12 Published by L. UPCOTT GlLL, 

COINS, A GUIDE TO ENGLISH PATTERN, in Gold, 
Silver, Copper, and Pewter, from Edward I. to Victoria, with their 
Value. By the REV. G. F. CROWTHER, M.A., Member of the 
Numismatic Society of London. Illustrated. In silver cloth, with 
gilt facsimiles of Coins, price $s. 

COINS OF GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND, A 

GUIDE TO THE, in Gold, Silver, and Copper, from the Earliest 
Period to the Present Time, with their Value. By the late Colonel W. 
STEWART THORBURN. Of immense value to collectors and dealers. 
27 Plates in Gold, Silver, and Copper, and Gold and Silver Coins 
in raised facsimile. In Monthly Parts, price "]d., or complete in gold 
cloth, with silver facsimiles of Coins, price js. 6d. "Such a book 
as this has never before been placed within the reach of the ordinary 
collector A model of careful and accurate work." The Queen. 

COLLIE, THE. A Monograph on the History, Points, and 
Breeding of the Scotch Collie. By HUGH DALZIEL. Illustrated. 
Demy &vo, price is.; cloth, 2s. 

COLUMBARIUM, MOORE'S. Reprinted Verbatim from 
the original Edition of 1735, with a Brief Notice of the Author. By 
W. B. TEGETMEIER, F.Z.S., Member of the British Ornithologists' 
Union. Price is. 

COOKERY FOR AMATEURS ; or, French Dishes for 
English Homes of all Classes. Includes Simple Cookery, Middle- 
class Cookery, Superior Cookery, Cookery for Invalids, and Breakfast 
and Luncheon Cookery. By MADAME VALERIE. Second Edition. 
In paper, price is. "Is admirably suited to its purpose." The 
Broad Arrow. 

CUCUMBER CULTURE FOR AMATEURS. Including 

also Melons, Vegetable Marrows, and Gourds. Illustrated. By 
W. J. MAY. In paper, price is. " Before entering on the culti- 
vation of cucumbers, melons, marrows, or gourds, we would 
recommend to their perusal Mr. May's handbook." Dublin Evening 
Mail. 

DAIRY FARMING, PRACTICAL. A Short Treatise on 
the Profitable Management of a Dairy Farm. Illustrated. By G. 
SEAWARD WITCOMBE. In paper, price is. 6d. "A mass of interest- 
ing material." The Field. 

DEGREES, A GUIDE TO, in Arts, Science, Literature, 
Law, Music, and Divinity, in the United Kingdom, the Colonies, 
the Continent, and the United States. By E. WOOTON, Author of 
"A Guide to the Medical Profession," &c. In cloth, price \^s. 
"Is a complete storehouse of educational information." The 
Graphic. 

DOGS, BREAKING AND TRAINING : Being Concise 

Directions for the proper Education of Dogs, both for the Field and 
for Companions. Second Edition. By "PATHFINDER." With Chapters 
by HUGH DALZIEL on Work of Special Breeds ; Trail or Drag 
Hounds ; Training Bloodhounds ; Defenders and Watch Dogs ; 

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170, Strand, London, W.C. 13 

Sheep Dogs Stock Tenders ; Life Savers Water Dogs ; Vermin 
Destroyers ; House Manners ; Behaviour Out of Doors. Illustrated. 
In cloth gilt, price 6s. 6d. " We strongly recommend a perusal of 
it to all who have to do with young dogs, whether for sport or as 
companions." Farmers' Gazette. 

DOGS, BRITISH : Their Varieties, History, Characteristics, 
Breeding, Management and Exhibition. By HUGH DALZIEL, 
Author of "The Diseases of Dogs," "The Diseases of Horses," &c.,- 
assisted by Eminent Fanciers. NEW EDITION, Revised and 
Enlarged. Illustrated with First-class COLOURED PLATES and 
full-page Engravings of Dogs of the Day. This will be the fullest 
and most recent work on the various breeds of dogs kept in England, 
and, as its Author is one of the first living authorities on the subject, 
its accuracy can be relied upon. Demy 8vo. In two Volumes ; 
Vol. I. Now Ready, price los. 6d.j also in Monthly Parts, price yd. 
" This admirable work .... is packed full of curious, interesting, 
and useful information." The Country Gentleman. 

DOGS USED IN FIELD SPORTS (Forming Vol. I. of "British 
Dogs"}. Containing particulars of the following, among other 
Breeds : Greyhound, Irish Wolfhound, Bloodhound, Foxhound, 
Harrier, Basset, Dachshund, Pointer, Setters, Spaniels, and 
Retrievers. SEVEN COLOURED PLATES and 21 full-page Engravings. 
In cloth gilt, price los. 6d. 

DOGS, DISEASES OF: Their Pathology, Diagnosis, and 
Treatment ; to which is added a complete Dictionary of Canine 
Materia Medica ; Modes of Administering Medicines ; Treatment in 
cases of Poisoning, and the Value of Disinfectants. For the use of 
Amateurs. By HUGH DALZIEL, Author of "British Dogs," &c. 
New, Revised, and greatly Enlarged Edition. In paper, price is. ; 
in cloth gilt, 2s. " Will enable anybody who keeps a dog to deal 
with cases of ordinary indisposition or injury." The Scotsman. 

DUCKS AND GEESE: Their Characteristics, Points, and 
Management. The only book on the subject of Domestic Water- 
fowl and their Proper Treatment. By Various Breeders. Splendidly 
Illustrated. In paper, price is. 6d. "A very desirable little work." 
The Queen. 

EXHIBITION ACCOUNT BOOKS. For use at all Dog, 

Poultry, Rabbit, and Cage Bird Shows. In Four Books, comprising : 
I. Minute Book ; II. Cash Book ; III. Entries Book; IV. Ledger. 
With Full Directions, and Illustrative Examples for Working them. 
N.B. The Set of Four Books is kept in Three Series: No. i, 
for Show of 500 Entries, 5^. the Set ; No. 2, for 1000 Entries, 7-r. 6d. 
the Set ; and No. 3, for 1500 Entries, 12^. 6d. the Set. Larger 
sizes in proportion. The books can be had separate. MlNUTE 
BOOK No. i, I.T. ; No. 2, is. $d. ; No. 3, 2s. CASH BOOK 
No. r, 2s. ; No. 2, 2s. 6d. ; No. 3, 4-r. ENTRIES BOOK No. i, 
T.S. ; No. 2, 2S. 6d. ; No. 3, 4$. Ledger No. i, 2s. ; No. 2, 2s. 6d. ; 
No. 3, 4s. . " Just what are wanted, for a set of these books will save 
a vast amount of labour and trouble." The Stock-keener. 

*** All Books Post Free. 



14 Published by L. UPCOTT GILL, 

FANCY WORK SERIES, ARTISTIC. A Series of Illus- 
trated Manuals on Artistic and Popular Fancy Work of various 
kinds. Each number is complete in itself, and issued at the uniform 
price of 6d. Now ready (i) MACRAME LACE (Second Edition) ; 
(2) PATCHWORK ; (3) TATTING ; (4) CREWEL WORK ; (5) APPLIQUE ; 
(6) FANCY NETTING. "Will prove a valuable acquisition to the 
student of art needlework." The Englishwoman's Rerriew. 

FERNS, CHOICE BRITISH. Descriptive of the most 
beautiful Variations from the common form, and their Culture. By 
C. T. DRUERY, F.L.S. Very accurate PLATES, and other Illus- 
trations. In cloth gilt, price 2s. 6d. 

FERRETS AND FERRETING. Containing Instructions 
for the Breeding, Management, and Working of Ferrets. Second 
Edition, Re-written and greatly Enlarged. Illustrated. In paper, 
price 6d. 

FERTILITY OF EGGS CERTIFICATE. These are 
Forms of Guarantee given by the Sellers to the Buyers of Eggs for 
Hatching, undertaking to refund value of any unfertile eggs, or to 
replace them with good ones. In books, with counterfoils, price 6d. 

FIREWORK-MAKING FOR AMATEURS. A most 

complete, accurate, and easily understood work on Making both 
Simple and High-class Fireworks. By Dr. W. H. BROWNE, M.A. 
Price 2s. 6d. 

FISHERMAN, PRACTICAL. Dealing with the Natural 
History, the Legendary Lore, the Capture of British Freshwater 
Fish, and Tackle and Tackle Making. Beautifully Illustrated. By 
J. H. KEENE. In cloth gilt, gilt edges, price IQS. 6d. " It is by a 
thoroughly practical angler. . . . Will form a valuable addition to 
the angler's library." Fishing Gazette. 

FOREIGN BIRDS, AMATEUR'S AVIARY OF ; or, 

How to Keep and Breed Foreign Birds with Pleasure and Profit 
in England. Illustrated. By W. T. GREENE, M.D., M.A., F.Z.S., 
F.S.S., &c., Author of "Parrots in Captivity," &c. In cloth gilt, 
price 3-y. 6d. "Is worthy of a hearty welcome from all breeders and 
keepers of foreign birds." Live Stock Journal. 

GAME AND GAME SHOOTING, NOTES ON. Mis 

cellaneous Observations on Birds and Animals, and on the Sport 
they afford for the Gun in Great Britain, including Grouse, Partridges, 
Pheasants, Hares, Rabbits, Quails, Woodcocks, Snipe, and Rooks. 
By J. J MANLEY, M.A., Author of " Notes on Fish and Fishing." 
Illustrated. In cloth gilt, $oopp., price ?s. 6d. " A thoroughly prac- 
tical as well as very interesting book." The Graphic. 

GAME PRESERVING, PRACTICAL. Containing the 
fullest Directions for Rearing and Preserving both Winged and 
Ground Game, and Destroying Vermin ; with other Information of 
Value to the Game Preserver. Illustrated. By WILLIAM CARNEGIE. 
In cloth gilt, demy 8vo, price 2is. "Mr. Carnegie gives a great 

.- All Books Post Free. 



i jo, Strand, London, W.C. 15 

variety of useful information as to game and game preserving. . . . 
We are glad to repeat that the volume contains much useful informa- 
tion, with many valuable suggestions The instructions as to 

pheasant rearing are sound, and nearly exhaustive." The Times. 
" It is practical, straightforward, and always lucid. The chapters on 
poaching and poachers, both human and animal, are particularly to 
the point, and amusing withal." The World. 

GARDENING, DICTIONARY OF. A Practical Encyclo- 
pasdia of Horticulture, for Amateurs and Professionals. Illustrated 
with upwards of 2000 Engravings. Edited by G. NICHOLSON, 
Curator of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew ; assisted by Prof. 
Trail, M.D., Rev. P. W. Myles, M.A., B. W. Hemsley, A.L.S., 
W. Watson, J. Garrett, and other Specialists. In 4 vols., large 
post \to. Vol. I., A to E, 552pp., 743 Illustrations ; Vol. II., 
F to O, 544pp., 811 Illustrations; Vol. III., P to S, 537pp., 564 
Illustrations. Vol. IV., T to Z, and Supplement of Pronouncing 
Dictionary, Indices to Plants for Special Purposes, &c. Illustrations. 
Price 1 5-r. each. Also in Monthly Parts, price is. "This important 
undertaking." Daily Telegraph. "The most complete work of its 
kind." Daily News. "The fullest information is given, and the 
illustrations, which are exceedingly numerous, are first rate." The 
World. 

GARDEN PESTS AND THEIR ERADICATION. 

Containing Practical Instructions for the Amateur to overcome the 
Enemies of the Garden. With numerous Illustrations. In paper, 
price is. " It is just the sort of book one would refer to in emer- 
gency." The Florist and Pomologist. 

GOAT, BOOK OF THE. Containing Full Particulars of the 
various Breeds of Goats, and their Profitable Management. With 
many Plates. By H. STEPHEN HOLMES PEGLER. Third Edition, 
Revised, Enlarged, and with additional Illustrations and Coloured 
Frontispiece. In cloth gilt, price 4^ 6d. " The best book we know 
on the subject." Chambers' 's Journal. 

GOAT-KEEPING FOR AMATEURS: Being the Practi- 
cal Management of Goats for Milking Purposes. Abridged from 
"The Book of the Goat," by H. S. HOLMES PEGLER. Illustrated. 
In paper, price \s, "We can conceive of no better book for anyone 
commencing to keep these valuable animals." Fanciers' Gazette. 

GREENHOUSE MANAGEMENT FOR AMATEURS. 

Descriptions of the best Greenhouses and Frames, with Instructions 
for Building them, particulars of the various methods of Heating, Illus- 
trated Descriptions of the most suitable Plants, with general and 
special Cultural Directions, and all necessary information for the 
Guidance of the Amateur. Second Edition, Revised and Enlarged. 
Magnificently Illustrated. By W. J. MAY. In cloth gilt, price ^s. 
"Ought to be in the hands of everybody." The Queen. 

GREYHOUND, THE. A Monograph on the History, Points, 
Breeding, Rearing, Training, and Running of the Greyhound. By 
HUGH DALZIEL. With Coloured Frontispiece. In cloth gilt, demy 

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16 Published by L. UPCOTT GILL, 

8v0, price 2s. txi. "As a rule, no authors are more egotistic than 
those who write on subjects connected with sport, but Mr. Dalziel 
is a brilliant exception. . . . Mr. Dalziel's summary of the points 
of a Greyhound is admirable, and young coursers would do well to 
learn it by heart. . . . The chapter on Breeding is one of the most 
interesting in the book." Saturday Review. 

GUINEA PIG, THE, for Food, Fur, and Fancy. Illustrated 
with Coloured Frontispiece and Engravings. An exhaustive book 
on the Varieties of the Guinea Pig, or Cavy, and their Management 
for Pleasure or Profit. By C. CUMBERLAND, F.Z.S. In doth gilt, 
price 2s. 6d. "Of great interest and practical value." Nottingham 
Daily Express. 

HANDWRITING, CHARACTER INDICATED BY. 

With Illustrations in Support of the Theories advanced taken from 
Autograph Letters of Statesmen, Lawyers, Soldiers, Ecclesiastics, 
Authors, Poets, Musicians, Actors, and other persons. Second 
Edition, Revised and Enlarged. By R. BAUGHAN. In cloth gilt, 
price 2s. 6d. " An amusing little book." Public Opinion. 

HARDY PERENNIALS and Old-fashioned Garden Flowers. 
Descriptions, alphabetically arranged, of the most desirable 
Plants for Borders, Rockeries, and Shrubberies, including 
Foliage as well as Flowering Plants. Profusely Illustrated. 
By J. WOOD. In cloth, price $s. " Seems particularly useful." 
Athenceum. 

HONITON LACE BOpK. Containing Full and Practical 
Instructions for Making Honiton Lace. With numerous Illustrations. 
In cloth gilt, price y. 6d. " We have seldom seen a book of this 
class better got up." Bell's Weekly Messenger. 

HORSE IN SICKNESS, THE, and How to Treat Him. 
Being the result of twenty-five years' experience amongst Cab and 
Omnibus Horses. By JOHN COCKRAM. Price 6d. "An excellent 
little book." The Morning Post. 

HORSE-KEEPING FOR AMATEURS. A Practical 
Manual on the Management of Horses, for the guidance of those 
who keep them for their personal use. By Fox RUSSELL. 
Price is. " This well-written record of intelligent observation upon 
horses." Live' Stock Journal. 

HORSES, DISEASES OF : Their Pathology, Diagnosis, and 
Treatment ; to which is added a complete Dictionary of Equine 
Materia Medica. For the use of Amateurs. By HUGH DALZIEL. 
In paper, price is. " Should be in the hands of every horse 
owner." Sporting Chronicle. 

INDIAN OUTFITS AND ESTABLISHMENTS. A 

Practical Guide for Persons about to Reside in India ; detailing the 
Articles which should be taken out, and the Requirements of Home 
Life and Management there. By an ANGLO-INDIAN. In cloth, price 

* All Books Post Free. 



170, Strand, London, W.C. 



2s. 6d. " Is thoroughly healthy in tone, and practical." Saturday 
Review. 

JOURNALISM, PRACTICAL : How to Enter Thereon and 
Succeed. A Manual for Beginners and Amateurs. A book for all 
who think of " writing for the Press." By JOHN DAWSON. In cloth 
gilt, price 2s. 6d. "A very practical and sensible little book." 
Spectator. 

KENNEL DIARY. A Register for Owners, Breeders, and 
Exhibitors of Dogs, wherein they can keep full particulars of their 
Studs in a convenient and comprehensive manner. It contains, in 
addition to a complete Gestation Table for the Year : i, Index 
Diary ; 2, Owner's Diaiy ; 3, Breeder's Diary ; 4, Diary of Pups ; 
5, Stud Diary ; 6, Exhibition Diary ; 7, General Diary ; 8, Pedigree 
Diary; 9, Receipts; 10, Expenditure; n, General Balance Sheet. 
In cloth, with Pockets for Certificates, price y. 6d. " The editor 
has left little room for improvement." Live Stock Journal. 

LEGAL PROFESSION, A GUIDE TO THE. A Prac- 
tical Treatise on the various Methods of Entering either Branch of 
the Legal Profession ; also a Course of Study for each of the 
Examinations, and selected Papers of Questions ; forming a Com- 
plete Guide to every Department of Legal Preparation. By J. H. 
SLATER, Barrister-at-Law, of the Middle Temple. Price 75. 6d. 
"Anyone who, before entering on either branch of the profession, 
desires information to determine which branch it shall be, will find a 
great deal here that will assist him." The Law Student's Journal. 

LIBRARY MANUAL, THE. A Guide to the Formation 
of a Library and the Valuation of Rare and Standard Books. 
By J. H. SLATER, Barrister-at-Law, Author of "A Guide to the 
Legal Profession." Second Edition. In cloth, \\2pp., price 2s. 6d. 
" A most excellent and useful handbook." Public Opinion. 

LILY OF THE VALLEY: All About It, and How to Grow 
It ; Forced Indoors and Out of Doors, in Various Ways. By 
WILLIAM ROBERTS. In paper covers, price 6d. " Lovers of these 
beautiful flowers will welcome this edition." Paper and Printing 
Trades' Journal. 

MARKET GARDENING, PROFITABLE. Adapted for 
the use of all Growers and Gardeners. By WILLIAM EARLEY, 
Author of " High-class Kitchen Gardening," &c. In cloth, price 2s. 
" Labour greatly assisted by a perusal of this work." North British 
Agriculturist. 

MEDITERRANEAN WINTER RESORTS. A Prac- 
tical Handbook to the Principal Health and Pleasure Resorts on the 
Shores of the Mediterranean. By E. A. R. BALL. With a Map and 
20 Illustrations. Fcap. 8vo, price js. 6d. 

MICE, FANCY: Their Varieties, Management, and Breedin 
Re-issue, with Criticisms and Notes by DR. CARTER BLAKE 
Illustrated. In paper, price 6d. " Goes thoroughly into the subject.'' 
Cambridge Chronicle. 

V All Books Post Free. 



18 Published by L. UPCOTT GILL, 

MIRROR PAINTING IN THE ITALIAN STYLE. 

A Practical Manual of Instruction for Amateurs. This highly 
decorative art has become very popular, but the execution is not 
always worthy of the design, in consequence of want of knowledge 
on the part of the artist ; this book will supply the deficiency. 
By Mrs. SHARP-AYRES. Price is. 

MODEL YACHTS AND BOATS: Their Designing, Making, 
and Sailing. Illustrated with 118 Designs and Working Diagrams. 
A splendid book for boys and others interested in making and rigging 
toy boats for sailing. It is the best book on the subject now pub- 
lished. By J. DU V. GROSVENOR. In leatherette, price ^s. " \Ye 
can safely commend the volume." The Graphic. 

MONKEYS, NOTES ON PET, and How to Manage Them. 
Profusely Illustrated. By ARTHUR PATTERSON. Cloth gilt, price 
2s. 6d. " It will be acceptable to those who desire the practical 
information it contains." The Field. 

MUSHROOM CULTURE FOR AMATEURS. With 
Full Directions for Successful Growth in Houses, Sheds, Cellars, 
and Pots, on Shelves, and Out of Doors. Illustrated. By W. J. 
MAY, Author of " Vine Culture for Amateurs," " Vegetable Culture 
for Amateurs," " Cucumber Culture for Amateurs." In paper, 
price is. " This excellent little book gives every direction necessary." 
Daily Bristol Times and Mirror. 

NATURAL HISTORY SKETCHES among the Car- 
nivora Wild and Domesticated; with Observations on their 
Habits and Mental Faculties. By ARTHUR NICOLS, F.G.S., 
F.R.G.S., Author of " Zoological Notes," " The Puzzle of Life." 
Illustrated by J. T. NETTLESHIP, C. E. BRITTAN, and T. W. WOOD. 
In cloth gilt, price $s. " This little volume is full of interest." 
Nature. 

NEEDLEWORK, DICTIONARY OF. An Encyclopedia 
of Artistic, Plain, and Fancy Needlework ; Plain, practical, 
complete, and magnificently Illustrated. By S. F. A. CAULFEILD 
and B. C. SAWARD. Accepted by H.M. the Queen, H.R.H. the 
Princess of Wales, H.R.H. the Duchess of Edinburgh, H.R.H. the 
Duchess of Connaught, and H.R.H. the Duchess of Albany. Dedi- 
cated by special permission to H.R.H. Princess Louise, Marchioness 
of Lome. In demy 4/0, 528^., 829 Illustrations, extra cloth gilt, 
plain edges, cushioned bevelled boards, price 2.1 s. ; with COLOURED 
PLA TES, elegant satin brocade cloth binding, and coloured edges, 
31 j. 6d. "This very complete and rather luxurious volume is a 
thorough encyclopaedia of artistic, plain, and fancy needlework. . . 
After being submitted to the severe test of feminine criticism, the 
'Dictionary' emerges triumphant. . . . The volume as a whole 
deserves no small commendation." The Standard. "This volume, 
one of the handsomest of its kind, is illustrated in the best sense of 
the term. . . . It is useful and concise in fact, it is exactly what 
it professes to be. ... This book has endured the severest test 
at our command with rare success." The Athena-um. 

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170, Strand, London, W.C. 19 

ORCHIDS FOR AMATEURS. Containing Descriptions of 
Orchids suited to the requirements of the Amateur, with full In- 
structions for their successful Cultivation. With numerous beautiful 
Illustrations. By JAMES BRITTEN, F.L.S., and W. H. GOWER. In 
doth gilt, price -js. 6d. A New and Enlarged Edition, in demy Svo, 
with COLOURED PLATES, in the Press. " The joint work of a 
competent botanist .... and a successful cultivator with the ex- 
perience of a quarter of a century." Gardener's Chronicle. 

PAINTING, DECORATIVE. A Practical Handbook on 
Painting and Etching upon Textiles, Pottery, Porcelain, Paper, 
Vellum, Leather, Glass, Wood, Stone, Metals, and Plaster, for the 
Decoration of our Homes. By B. C. SAWARD. In the new "Renais- 
sance" binding, price js. 6d. " Spared no pains to give useful infor- 
mation as to the various processes of decorative painting." Academy. 

PAINTING ON CHINA, ALL ABOUT. With Twelve 

Descriptive Lessons. The object of this little book is to teach, by 
easy, Progressive Lessons, all that a beginner requires to know about 
China Painting. By Mrs. CONYERS MORRELL. Second Edition. 
In paper, price <)d. 

PARROTS, THE SPEAKING. A Scientific Manual on the 
Art of Keeping and Breeding the principal Talking Parrots in 
Confinement. By Dr. KARL RUSS, Author of " The Foreign 
Aviary Birds," " Manual for Bird Fanciers," &c. Illustrated with 
COLOURED PLATES. In cloth gilt, price 6s. 6d.; also in 
Monthly Parts, price jd. " Here is all that can be desired ; the 
directions how to feed and how to keep foreign birds in health are 
given by the greatest authority living." Public Opinion. 

PATIENCE, GAMES OF, for one or more Players. A 
very clearly-written and well-illustrated Book of Instructions on How 
to Play no less than thirty-four different Games of Patience. By Miss 
WHITMORE JONES. Illustrated. Price is. "Will be welcome to 
many (invalids, brain-workers, and others) in search of quiet recrea- 
tion. The instructions are clear, and the illustrative diagrams quite 
to the purpose." Pictorial World. 

PERSPECTIVE, THE ESSENTIALS OF. With nume- 
rous Illustrations drawn by the Author. By L. W. MlLLERi 
Principal of the School of Industrial Art of the Pennsylvania 
Museum, Philadelphia. This book is such a manual as has long 
been desired for the guidance of art students and for self-instruction. 
It contains as much information about the science of Perspective 
as the artist or draughtsman ever has occasion to make use of, 
except under the most unusual conditions. The point of view 
throughout is that of the artist rather than the merely scientific 
theory of the art. The instructions are clearly set forth, free from 
all unessential or merely theoretical discussion, and the principles 
are vividly enforced by a large number of attractive drawings by 
the author, which illustrate every phase of his teachings. Price 
6s. 6d. " The study of the science is presented in an interesting and 
attractive form, and the book is well got up." Myra's Journal. 



*** All Books Post Free. 



20 Published by L. UPCOTT GILL, 

PHEASANT-KEEPING FOR AMATEURS. A Practi- 
cal Handbook on the Breeding, Rearing, and General Management 
of Fancy Pheasants in Confinement. By GEO. HORNE. Illustrated 
with Diagrams of the necessary Pens, Aviaries, &c., and a Coloured 
Frontispiece and many full-page Engravings of the chief Varieties 
of Pheasants, drawn from life by A. F. LYDON. Price y. bd. 

PHOTOGRAPHY, PRACTICAL: Being the Science and 
Art of Photography, both Wet Collodion and the various Dry Plate 
Processes. Developed for Amateurs and Beginners. Illustrated. By 
O. E. WHEELER. In cloth gilt, price 45. " Alike valuable to the 
beginner and the practised photographer." Photographic News. 

PIANOFORTES, TUNING AND REPAIRING. The 

Amateur's Guide to the Practical Management of a Piano without 
the intervention of a Professional. By CHARLES BABBINGTON. 
In paper, price 6d. "A very useful little book." Sylvia's Home 
Journal. 

PICTURE FRAME MAKING FOR AMATEURS. 

Being Practical Instructions in the Making of various kinds of 
Frames for Paintings, Drawings, Photographs, and Engravings. 
Illustrated. By the Author of " Carpentry and Joinery," &c. Cheap 
Edition, in paper, price is. " The book is thoroughly exhaustive." 
The Building World. 

PIG, BOOK OF THE. Containing the Selection, Breeding, 
Feeding, and Management of the Pig ; the Treatment of its 
Diseases ; the Curing and Preserving of Hams, Bacon, and other 
Pork Foods ; and other information appertaining to Pork Farming. 
By Professor JAMES LONG. Fully Illustrated with Portraits of Prize 
Pigs, by HARRISON WEIR and other Artists, Plans of Model 
Piggeries, &c. In cloth gilt, price los. 6d. ; also in Monthly Parts, 
price "]d. "This is assuredly a publication to be proud of. It goes 
a good deal further than any book on the subject which has been 
issued before, and, without being infallible, is well informed, well 
illustrated, and well written." The Field. 

PIG-KEEPING FOR AMATEURS. A Practical Guide 
to the Profitable Management of Pigs. By G. GILBERT (" Gurth "). 
In paper, price is. " Not merely a good deal of useful and practical 
information, but many bits of homely folk-lore." Spectator. 

PIGEONS, FANCY. Containing Full Directions for the 
Breeding and Management of Fancy Pigeons, and Descriptions of 
every known Variety, together with all other information of interest 
or use to Pigeon Fanciers. Third Edition, bringing the subject 
down to the present time. 18 COLOURED PLATES, and 22 
other full-page Illustrations. By J. C. LYELL. Cloth gilt, price 
los. 6d. ; also in Monthly Parts, price "jd. "No fancier, in our judg- 
ment, should be without a copy of the work." The Stock-keeper. 

PLAYS FOR CHILDREN, SIX. Written specially for 
Representation by Children, and Designed to Interest both Actors 
and Audience. With Instructions for Impromptu Scenery, Costumes 

V All Books Post Free. 



ijo, Strand, London, W.C. 21 

and Effects, and the Airs of the Various Songs. By CHAS. HARRISON, 
Author of "Amateur Theatricals and Tableaux Vivants." Price is. 
" We can heartily commend these six plays." Ladies' Journal. 

POTTERY AND PORCELAIN, ENGLISH. A Manual 
for Collectors : Being a Concise Account of the Development of the 
Potter's Art in England. Profusely Illustrated with Marks, Mono- 
grams, and Engravings of Characteristic Specimens. New Edition. 
In cloth gilt, price y. 6d. "The collector will find the work 
invaluable." Broad Arrow. 

POULTRY AILMENTS AND THEIR TREAT- 
MENT. A Book for the Use of all Poultry-keepers, describing the 
Causes, Symptoms, and Cure of Diseases affecting Domestic Fowl. 
By D. J. THOMPSON GRAY. In paper boards, price is. "We 
cannot too strongly advise all poultry-keepers to get a copy of 
this book, for it is the cheapest shilling's-worth we have seen for 
a long time." Farm and Home. 

POULTRY FOR PRIZES AND PROFIT. Contains: 
Breeding Poultry for Prizes, Exhibition Poultry, and Management 
of the Poultry Yard. Handsomely Illustrated. New Edition, Revised 
and Enlarged. By Professor JAMES LONG. In c loth gilt, price 3 s. 6d. 
" Should be in the hands of all breeders of poultry." The Stock-keeper. 

PRINTING FOR AMATEURS. A Practical Guide to the 
Art of Printing ; containing Descriptions of Presses and Materials, 
together with Details of the Processes Employed ; to which is added 
a Glossary of Technical Terms. Illustrated. By P. E. RAYNOR. 
In paper, price is. "Concise and comprehensive." The Figaro. 

PRUNING, GRAFTING, AND BUDDING FRUIT 

TREES. Illustrated with 93 Diagrams. A book which can be 
followed with advantage by amateur fruit growers. By D. T. FISH. 
In paper, price is. " One of the few gardening books that will 
suit everybody." Gardener's Magazine. 

RABBIT, BOOK OF THE. A Complete Work on Breeding 
and Rearing all Varieties of Fancy Rabbits, giving their History, 
Variations, Uses, Points, Selection, Mating, Management, &c., &c. 
NEW EDITION, Revised and Enlarged. Edited by KEMPSTER 
W. KNIGHT. Illustrated with Coloured and other Plates. One 
handsome vol., price i^s. (in the Press); also in Monthly Parts 
price jd. 

RABBITS FOR PRIZES AND PROFIT. Containing 
Full Directions for the Proper Management of Fancy Rabbits in 
Health and Disease, for Pets or the Market, and Descriptions of 
every known Variety, with Instructions for Breeding good specimens. 
Illustrated. By the late CHARLES RAYSON. In cloth gilt, price 
2s. 6d. " We have often had occasion to recommend this work." 
The Field. 

GENERAL MANAGEMENT OF RABBITS. Including Hutches, 
Breeding, Feeding, Diseases and their Treatment, Rabbit Coverts, &c. 



v All Books Post Free. 



22 Published by L. UPCOTT GILL, 



Fully Illustrated. (Forming Part I. of " Rabbits for Prizes and 
Profit?) In paper, price is. 

EXHIBITION RABBITS. Being descriptions of all Varieties of Fancy 
Rabbits, their Points of Excellence, and how to obtain them. 
Illustrated. (Forming Part II. of " Rabbits for Prizes and Profit?) 
In paper ) price is. 

REPOUSSE WORK FOR AMATEURS: Being the Art 

of Ornamenting Thin Metal with Raised Figures. By L. L. HASLOPE. 
Illustrated. In cloth gilt, price 2s. 6d. " It is thoroughly practical, 
is well illustrated, and contains the information that beginners 
require." Saturday Review. 

ROSE BUDDING. Containing Full Instructions for the Sue- 
cessful Performance of this interesting Operation. Illustrated 
Amateurs will find the information here given of great assistance. 
By D. T. FISH. In paper, price 6d. "Full, practical .... and 
contains many valuable hints." Garden. 

ROSES FOR AMATEURS. A Practical Guide to the 

Selection and Cultivation of the best Roses, both for Exhibition or 
mere Pleasure, by that large section of the Gardening World, the 
Amateur Lover of Roses. Illustrated. By the REV. J. HONYWOOD 
D'OMBRAIN, Hon. Sec. of the National Rose Society. Price is. 

ST. BERNARD, THE. A Monograph on the History, 
Points, Breeding and Rearing of the St. Bernard. By HUGH 
DALZIEL. Illustrated. Demy 8vo, price 2s. 6d.; cloth, $s. 6d. 

SEA-FISHING FOR AMATEURS. A Book of Practical 
Instructions on the Best Methods of Sea-Fishing from the Shore, 
Boats, or Jetties, with a very useful List of Fishing Stations, the 
Fish to be caught there, and the Best Seasons. By FRANK HUDSON. 
Illustrated. Crown 8-vo, price is. 

SEASIDE WATERING PLACES. A Description of 
nearly 200 Holiday Resorts on the Coasts of England and Wales, 
the Channel Islands, and the Isle of Man, including the gayest and 
most quiet places, giving full particulars of them and their attractions, 
and all other information likely to assist persons in selecting places 
in which to spend their Holidays according to their individual tastes ; 
with BUSINESS DIRECTORY of Tradesmen, arranged in order 
of the Towns. Sixth Edition, with Illustrations. In cloth, price 
2s. 6d. "The information it gives is of a decidedly practical and 
reliable nature." The Spectator. 

SHEET METAL, WORKING IN : Being Practical In- 
structions for Making and Mending Small Articles in Tin, Copper, 
Iron, Zinc, and Brass. Illustrated. Third Edition. By the Author 
of "Turning for Amateurs," &c. /// paper, price 6d. "Every 
possible information is given." The Reliqtiary. 

SHORTHAND, ON GURNEY'S SYSTEM (IM- 
PROVED), LESSONS IN : Being Instruction in the Art of Short- 
hand Writing as used in the Sen-ice of the two Houses of Parliament. 



V All Books Post Free. 



170, Strand, London, W.C. 23 

By R. E. MILLER, of Dublin University ; formerly Parlia- 
mentary Reporter ; Fellow of the Shorthand Society. In paper, 
price \s. " A very entertaining and able little book." Literary World. 

SHORTHAND SYSTEMS; WHICH IS THE BEST? 

Being a Discussion, by various English Authors and Experts, on the 
Merits and Demerits of Taylor's, Gurney's, Pitman's, Everett's, Janes', 
Pocknell's, Peachey's, Guest's, Williams', OdelFs, and Redfern's 
Systems, with Illustrative Examples. Edited by THOMAS ANDERSON, 
Author of " History of Shorthand," &c. This is a book which ought 
to be carefully read by every person who is about to take up the 
study of shorthand. In paper, price is. "Is certain to be very 
much appreciated." The Derby Mercury. 

SICK NURSING AT HOME : Being Plain Directions and 

Hints for the Proper Nursing of Sick Persons, and the Home 
Treatment of Diseases and Accidents in case of Sudden Emer- 
gencies. By S. F. A. CAULFEILD. In paper, price is. in cloth, 
price is. 6d. "A copy ought to be in every nursery." Society. 

SITTING HEN RECORD, THE. Forming a Convenient 
Record of all Eggs Set, and supplying, in a handy and concise form, 
Labels which can be readily attached to or above the Nest-boxes, 
showing at a glance the Number of Eggs under the Hen, the Variety, 
and when they should be brought off. Price 50 Forms, 6d. ; 100 
Forms, is. "Every breeder should provide himself with this useful 
little record." Poiiltry. 

SKATING CARDS: A Series of Cards, of convenient size 
for Use on the Ice, containing Clear Instructions and Diagrams 
for Learning the whole Art of Figure Skating. One of the cards, 
containing the figure to be learnt, is held in the hand whilst skating, 
so that the directions are read and acted on simultaneously. Tinted 
cards, gilt edges, round comers, inclosed in strong leather pocket book, 
price y. 6d.j or in extra calf, satin lined (for presentation), price 
$s. 6d. " An ingenious method . . . and the instructions are brief 
and clear." The Queen. 

SLEIGHT OF HAND. A Practical Manual of Legerdemain 
for Amateurs and Others. New Edition, Revised and Enlarged. 
Profusely Illustrated. By EDWIN SACHS. In cloth gilt, price 6s. 6d. 
"No one interested in conjuring should be without this work." 
Saturday Review. 

TAXIDERMY, PRACTICAL. A Manual of Instruction to 
the Amateur in Collecting, Preserving, and Setting-up Natural His- 
tory Specimens of all kinds. Fully Illustrated with Engravings of 
Tools, Examples, and Working Diagrams. By MONTAGU BROWNE, 
F.Z.S., Curator of Leicester Museum. New and Enlarged Edition. 
In cloth gilt, price 7$. 6d. " Throughout the volume is essentially 
practical." Daily Telegraph. 

THEATRICALS AND TABLEAUX VIVANTS FOR 

AMATEURS. Giving Full Directions as to Stage Arrangements, 
" Making-up," Costumes, and Acting. With Numerous Illustrations. 



All Books Post Free. 



24 Published by L. UPCOTT GILL, 

By CHAS. HARRISON. In cloth gilt, price 2s. 6d. " Will be found 
invaluable." Court Journal. 

TOUR IN THE STATES AND CANADA. Out and 
Home in Six Weeks. By THOMAS GREENWOOD. Illustrated. In 
cloth gilt, price 2s. 6d. "We can confidently recommend this 
book." The Literary World. 

TOURIST'S ROUTE MAP of England and Wales, 
The. Third Edition, thoroughly Revised. Shows clearly all 
the Main, and most of the Cross, Roads, and the Distances between 
the Chief Towns, as well as the Mileage from London. In addition 
to this, Routes of Thirty of the most Interesting Tours are printed in 
red. The Map is mounted on linen, so as not to tear, and is inclosed 
in a strong cloth case ; it is thus in a convenient form for the pocket, 
and will not suffer from ordinary fair wear and tear, as is the case with 
most maps. This is, without doubt, the fullest, most accurate, 
handiest, and cheapest tourist's map in the market. In cloth, 
price is. " Reliable and accurate ; ... an admirable companion 
to tourists and cyclists." The Tourist and Traveller. 

TOYMAKING FOR AMATEURS. Containing Instruc- 
tions for the Home Construction of Simple Wooden Toys, and of 
others that are Moved or Driven by Weights, Clockwork, Steam, 
Electricity, &c. Illustrated. By JAMES LUKIN, B.A., Author of 
" Turning for Amateurs," &c. In cloth gilt, price ^s. " A capital 
book for boys." Dispatch. 

TRAPPING, PRACTICAL: Being some Papers on Traps 
and Trapping for Vermin, with a Chapter on General Bird Trap- 
ping and Snaring. By W. CARNEGIE. In paper, price is. "Cleverly 
written and illustrated." Sportsman. 

TURNING FOR AMATEURS : Being Descriptions of the 
Lathe and its Attachments and Tools, with Minute Instructions 
for their Effective Use on Wood, Metal, Ivory, and other Materials. 
New Edition, Revised and Enlarged. By JAMES LUKIN, B.A. 
Author of "The Lathe and its Uses," &c. Illustrated with 144 
Engravings. In cloth gilt, price 2s. 6d. "Gives the amateur 
copious descriptions of tools and methods of working." The Builder. 

UPPER THAMES, THE ; From Richmond to Oxford. 
A Guide for Boating Men, Anglers, Picnic Parties, and all 
Pleasure-seekers on the River. Arranged on an entirely New 
Plan. Illustrated. In paper, price is. " One of the most useful 
handbooks to the River yet published." The Graphic. 

VEGETABLE CULTURE FOR AMATEURS. Con- 
cise Directions for the Cultivation of Vegetables so as to insure 
Good Crops in Small Gardens ; with Lists of the Best Varieties of 
each Sort. By W. J. MAY. In paper, price is. "None more 
simple and practically useful." The British Mail. 

VINE CULTURE FOR AMATEURS: Being Plain Direc- 
tions for the Successful Growing of Grapes with the Means and 

V AH Books Post Free. 






170, Strand, London, W.C. 25 

Appliances usually at the command of Amateurs. Illustrated. Grapes 
are so generally grown in villa greenhouses that this book cannot fail 
to be of great service to many persons. By W. J. MAY. In paper, 
price is. "Plain and practical." The Queen. 

VIOLIN, EASY LEGATO STUDIES FOR THE, for 

Home Students. A Supplement to " The Practical Violin School 
for Home Students." By J. M. FLEMING. In demy tfo, cloth gilt, 
price 3J. 6d. " We can cordially commend this work to the attention 
of teachers as well as students." The Graphic. 

VIOLIN SCHOOL, PRACTICAL, for Home Students. A 
Practical Book of Instructions and Exercises in Violin Playing, 
for the use of Amateurs, Self-learners, Teachers, and others. By 
J. M. FLEMING, Author of " Old Violins and their Makers." i vol., 
demy 4/0, cloth gilt, price 7s. 6d. ; also in Monthly Parts (including 
as Supplement " Easy Legato Studies "), price jd. " Can be heartily 
commended to students who wish to lay a solid foundation for good 
and artistic playing." Musical Standard. 

WATERING PLACES OF FRANCE, NORTHERN. 

A Guide for English People to the Holiday Resorts on the Coasts 
of the French Netherlands, Picardy, Normandy, and Brittany. By 
ROSA BAUGHAN, Author of " Winter Havens in the Sunny South," 
&c. In paper, price 2s. " We have pleasure in recommending this 
work." Coo&s Excursionist. 

WINTER HAVENS IN THE SUNNY SOUTH. A 

Complete Handbook to the Riviera, with a Notice of the New Station, 
Alassio. Splendidly Illustrated. BY ROSA BAUGHAN, Author of 
" The Northern Watering Places of France." /;/ cloth gilt, price 
2.s. 6d. "It is a model 'guide,' and supplies a want." The 
Field. 

WOOD CARVING FOR AMATEURS. Containing De- 
scriptions of all the requisite Tools, and Full Instructions for their 
Use in producing different varieties of Carvings. Illustrated. A 
book of very complete instructions for the amateur wood carver. 
In paper, price \s. "Will be found of great interest." Illustrated 
Carpenter and Builder. 

ZOOLOGICAL NOTES on the Structure, Affinities, Habits, 
and Faculties of Snakes, Marsupials, and Birds ; with Adventures 
among, and Anecdotes of, them. By ARTHUR NICOLS, F.G.S., 
F.R.G.S., Author of " Natural History Sketches." In walnut or 
sycamore, %vo, price 7s. 6d. From PROFESSOR RUSKIN. " I have 
just opened your proofs, and am entirely delighted by the glance 
at them. . . . The engraving of the cobra Mr. Babbage's is the 
only true drawing of it I ever saw." 



*f All Books Post Free 



26 Published by L. UPCOTT GlLL, 170, Strand, London, W.C. 

Books on the following subjects are in 
the Press. 

THE AQUARIUM. This will be a thoroughly practical book 
on both the Fresh - water and Marine Aquarium, and will be em- 
bellished with a great number of Original Illustrations of Weeds, Fish, 
Crustaceous Insects, &c., suitable for being kept in confinement. In 
every respect this work will be the most reliable of any yet pub- 
lished on the subject. The two Divisions the Fresh - water 
Aquarium and the Marine Aquarium will be issued separately for 
the convenience of those who are interested in only one branch of 
the subject. 

MODERN MAGIC. A Book of Conjuring for Amateurs. Well 
Illustrated. By PROF. R. KuNARD, Author of " The Book of Card 
Tricks." 

COLLECTOR'S EDITION OF THE "BOOK OF 

THE ALL - ROUND ANGLER." Printed on large antique 
paper, rough edges. Bound in Roxburghe. Only 200 copies issued, 
each being numbered and signed by the Author. Price to sub- 
scribers, 2 is. 

SKAT. A Book of Instructions on Playing the New Fashion- 
able Game of Cards, which is described by those who know it as 
"the Acme of all Card Games." Price is. 

POKER. A Practical Book of Playing this Fascinating Game 
with Success. Price is. 

A CLEAR COMPLEXION. 

PIMPLES, Black Specks, Sunburn, Freckles, and unsightly Blotches on" the 
Face, Neck, Arms, and Hands, can be instantly removed by using Mrs. JAMES'S 
HERBAL OINTMENT, made from herbs only, and warranted harmless. It imparts such 
a lovely clearness to the skin that astonishes everyone. Of all chemists, Is. IJd. A box 
(with directions) sent free from observation, post free, on receipt of 15 stamps to 

Mrs. A. JAMES, 268, Caledonian Road, London, N. 

LUXURIANT HAIR. 

EONG, FLOWING EYELASHES. EYEBROWS, &c., are QUICKLY 
PRODUCED by using JAMES'S HERBAL POMADE It is invaluable for the pro- 
duction of Whiskers, Beards, and Moustachios ; it causes the hair to grow on bald places 
and scanty partings. Of most chemists, Is. ; or a box of it sent free from observation, post 
free, for 15 stamps. 

Mrs. A. JAMES, 268, Caledonian Road, London, N. 



HAIR DESTROYER. 

SPILATORY Instantly Removes Superfluous 
, or Arms, -without Injury to the Skin. Of most chei 
use, free from observation, post free, for 15 stamps. 

Mrs. A. JAMES, 268, Caledonian Road, London, N. 



JAMES'S DEPILATORY Instantly Removes Superfluous Hairs from the 
Face, Neck, or Arms, -without Injury to the Skin. Of most chemists, Is. ; or sent, 
with directions for use, free from observation, post free, for 15 stamps. 



A Few Recipes for Household Use. 

TO MAKE A RICH PLUM CAKE. Take half-a-pound of butter and 
half-a-pound of white sifted sugar, beat these with the hand well together to 
a cream ; add four eggs, one at a time, and well beat each one with the butter 
and sugar ; lightly mix in one pound of flour, previously mixed with one tea- 
spoonful of BORWICK'S GOLD MEDAL BAKING POWDER, then lightly mix 
with the whole half-a-pound of sultanas ; bake at once thoroughly, in a quick 
oven. 

TO MAKE A GOOD PLAIN CAKE. Mix well together one pound 
of flour, two full teaspoonfuls of BOBWICK'S GOLD MEDAL BAKING POWDER, 
a little salt -and spice, and a quarter-of-a-pound of sugar; rub in a quarter- 
of-a-pound of butter, add six ounces of sultanas, two ounces of currants, 
and one ounce of candied peel ; moisten the whole with two eggs and half-a- 
teacupful of milk, previously beaten together ; bake in a quick oven very 
thoroughly. 

BORWICK's 



BAKING 
POWDER 



If BORWICK'S is not 
the best in the world, 
why has it gained' 
5 gold medals, 



Any housewife will 
answer : Because it 
makes the best 
bread.thelight- 
est pastry, and 
most tempt- 
ing cakes and 
puddings. Tell 
your grocer 
you must have 
f BOUWICK'S. 



TO MAKE BREAD. To every pound of flour add a heaped-up tea- 
spoonful of BOBWICK'S GOLD MEDAL BAKING POWDEB, with a little salt, 
and thoroughly mix while in a dry state, then pour on gradually about half- 
a-pint of cold water, or milk and water, mixing quickly but thoroughly into 
a dough of the usual consistence, taking care not to knead it more than is 
necessary to mix it perfectly ; make it into small loaves, which must bo 
immediately put into a quick oven. 

PUFF PASTE. Mix one pound of flour with a teaspoonful of BOBWICK'S 
GOLD MEDAL BAKING POWDER, then cut half-a-pound of butter into slices, 
roll it in thin sheets on some of your flour, wet up the rest with about a 
quarter-of-a-pint of water, see that it is about as stiff as your butter, roll it 
to a thin sheet, cover it with your sheets of butter, double it in a three 
double ; do the same five times ; it is then fit for use, or it may stand an hour 
covered over to keep the air from it. 

Tell your Grocers you must have BORWICK'S, 



KENNEL 
CHRONICLE. 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY, 1d. i* 

Yearly Subscription is Is. 6cl., Post Free. 

A Valuable Record for Dog Owners and Exhibitors, and a first-rate 

medium for Advertisements of all things relating to Dogs. A 

Circulation of over 10,000 Copies guaranteed. 

The Yearly Volumes of the " KENNEL CHRONICLE," 
neatly Bound in Cloth, 2s. 6d. each. 



Office: 170, Strand, London, W.C. 

^5 UPERIOR f PRINTING \ 

(Books, Circulars, Billheads, &c.), 

AT 

REASONABLE CHARGES, 

IS UNDERTAKEN AT 

................ .............*........._. 

ESTIMATES GIVEN. 

37, Surrey Street, Strand, 
London, W.C. 




Tnnrr flotinico 

lulLtl UttllbLtb 



Have been known for nearly 100 years to be the best 
which can be obtained : the best articles are, in the long run, always the cheapest. 




ROWLANDS' MACASSAR OIL 

Is the best and safest preserver and beautifler of the hair, and has a most 
delicate and fragrant bouquet. It contains no lead or mineral ingredients, and 
can also be had in 

A GOLDEN COLOUR 

for fair and golden-haired children, and people whose hair has become grey. 
Sizes : 36, 7 - ; 10 6, equal to four small. 

ROWLANDS' KALYDOR 

Is a most soothing emollient and refreshing preparation for the face, hands, 
and arms. It removes all freckles, tan, sunburn, sting of insects, prickly heat, 
chaps, redness, irritation and roughness of the skin, &c., produces a beautiful 
and delicate complexion, and renders the 

SKIN SOFT, FAIR, 

and delicate ; it is warranted free from any greasy or metallic ingredients. Sizes : 
4/6 and 8.6. Half-sized bottles at 2,3. 

ROWLANDS' ODONTO 

Is the best, purest, and most fragrant Tooth Powder; it prevents and arrests 
decay, strengthens the gums, gives a pleasing fragrance to the breath, and 
renders the 

TEETH WHITE AND SOUND. 

ROWLANDS' EUKONIA 

Is a pure and delicate toilet powder, free from any bismuth or metallic ingredients.. 
Sold in three tints, white, rose, and cream, 26 per box. Ask for 

ROWLANDS' ARTICLES, 

of 20, HATTOX GARDEN, LONDON, and avoid cheap, spurious imitations, under 
the same or similar names. 



Why many Persons Permanently Submit 

to the 




1 For every defect oj Nature 



Art, offers a remedij. 



GREY HAIR 



than attempt to Restore it. 

1st. Because the old fashioned and objectionable Hair Dyes dry up and spoil the Hair. 
2nd. Because the majority of " Hair Restorers " bring the users into ridicule by pro- 
ducing only a sickly yellow tint or dirty greenish stain, instead of a proper colour. 
The following Testimonials (of many hundreds received) declare the value of 

LATREILLE'S HYPERION HAIR RESTORER 






shine, or under glaring gasngni, me user can aime ueij- ueteunon in ever naving oeen grey, o 

remedy, while as a nourisher and strengthener of weak hair it has no equal. 
Price 3s. 6cL, sent in return for Postal Order or Stamps, by the Proprietors, 
Latrcille & Co., Kennington, London (Established Sij years at Wahcorth), or may 

of Chemists ; 



be had 



SPECIMEN TESTIMONIALS 



20, Royal George-street, Stockport, 

February 26, 1880. 

DEAR SIR, My hair went white through trouble 
und sickness, but one bottle of your Hyperion 
Hair Restorer brought it back to a splendid brown, 
as nice as it was in my young days. I am now forty 
years old, and all my friends wonder to see me 
restored from whit* to brown. You can make 
what use you like of this. Yours truly, 

(Mrs.) MARIA WOBTHIKGTON. 

132, High-street, Stourbridge, May 16, 1878. 
SIB, I find your Hyperion Hair Restorer is a 
first-class and "really genuine article, and is well 
worth the money. After using it thrice, my hair 
began to turn the natural colour, whereas before it 
was quite grey : it also keeps the hair from falling 
off, and I shall always recommend it to everyone I 
know. You are at liberty to publish this if you 
choose. Yours truly, (Mrs.) M. DAVIS. 

Thirsk, Yorks, January 26, 1876. 
DEAR Sim, I use your Hyperion Hair Restorer, 
and find it everything widen has been said in its 
favour. I am, dear Sir, yours truly, T. COATES. 

Porchester, near Fareham, Hants, Oct. 16, 1875. 

SIR, Please send me another bottle of your 
Hyperion Hair Restorer :it is better than any other 
restorer I have tried. Yours faithfully, 

(Mrs.) C. CHRISTIE. 




High-street, Corsham, Wilts, 

December 2, 1874. 

DEAR SIR, I enclose stamps f9r another bottle 
of your Hyperion Hair Restorer ; its clean qualities 
are sufficient to recommend it anywhere. 

Yours respectfully, E. MAYNABD. 

St. Heliers, Jersey, 

August 1, 187S. 

SIR, Please send me another bottle of your Hype- 
rion Hair Restorer : I bear willing testimony to its 
being very pleasant to use, both as to cl< 
and absence of disagreeable smell. 

Yours truly, F. D Lc.sio 

2, Fir-street, Sydenham, 

July 15, 187S. 

DEAR SIR, I am most happy to tell you that I 
have reason to commend your excellent Hyperion 
Hair Restorer, as it has already turned the grey 
hair of a person fifty-seven years old to its natural 
colour. Yours respectfully, 

T. WHATMORE. 

Si, Dewsbury-road, Leeds, 

May 28, 1873. 

DEAR SIR, I want half-a-dozen more bottles of 
your Hyperion Hair Restorer/some for friends and 
the remainder for myself ; it is the best restorer of 
grey hair to its natural colour. 

Yours truly, JAMES DAWSOH. 



V Be careful to ask for Latreille's Hyperion Hair Hestorer, as the manu- 
facturer is also proprietor of Latreille's Excelsior Lotion, which is a separate 
preparation, of universal repute for 25 years past, as a Producer of Hair. 




NOTHING E\ 7 ER INTRODUCED HAS BEEN FOUND TO EQUAL 

Latreille's Excelsior Lotion 

Celebrated among all classes of Society all over the World as the only Real Producer of 

WHISKERS AND MOUSTACHIOS, 

Remedy for Baldness, Weak and Falling Hair, <k, and Cnrer of Scurf or Dandriff. 



Price 2s. 6d. per Bottle. 

Can be had of any Chemist, through BARCLAY, SANGER, NEWBERY, EDWARDS, 

SUTTON, THOMPSON, HOVENDEN, MAW & Co., or any other Wholesale Chemist, or 

direct from the Proprietors, 

LATREILLE & CO., KENNINGTON, LONDON, S.E. 

(Established 25 years at Walworth), 
On remitting Postal Order or Stamps. 

CAUTION. Be careful to ask for Latreille's "Excelsior Lotion," and refuse anything 
else' that may be offered, as the enormous success, extending over twenty-five years, ha 
led to many useless imitations, which can only disappoint. The title " EXCELSIOR 
LOTION" is a registered Trade Mark, to copy which will incur crimfaal prosecution. 





Purveyors by Special Warrants to 
H.M. THE QUEEN 

and 
BY SPECIAL H.R.H. THE PRINCE OF WALES. 

APPOINTMENT. APPO.NTMENT. 

SPRATTS PATENT 

Meat "Fibrine" Vegetable 

DOG CAKES 

(WITH BEETROOT). 

BEWARE OF WORTHLESS IMITATIONS! 
SEE EACH CAKE IS STAMPED 

SPRATTS PATENT and a "X." 



COD LIVER OIL 




For Puppies after Distemper, and for Dainty Feeders and 
Sick or Pet Dogs. 

DISTEMPER POWDERS, WORM POWDERS, MANGE, ECZEMA, 

and EAR CANKER LOTIONS, TONIC CONDITION PILLS, &c. 

PAMPHLET ON CANINE DISEASES, 

And full List of Medicines, Post Free. 

Dog, Poultry, ^ Game Houses ^ Appliances. 

TO 



SPRATTS PATENT 

POULTRY MEAL. 

The Most Nutritious and Digestible Food for Chicks and Laying Hens (being 
thoroughly cooked). Samples Post Free. 

New Edition of " THE COMMON SENSE of POULTRY KEEPING," 3d.. Post Free. 

GRANULATED PRAIRIE MEAT, "CRISSEL." 

Price 258. per cwt. Takes the Place of Insect Life. 

" CARDIAC : " A TONIC FOR POULTRY. 

Price Is. per Packet, or 3s. per 71b. Bag. 



<3- .A. IMI IE 



SAMPLE A\D FULL PARTICULARS POST FREE. 

Extract from "THE FIELD ":" Thanks to Spratts Pheasant Meal and Crissel, I 
have reduced the cost a great deal, and reared a considerably greater average. With Spratts 
Food they require no custards, ants' eggs, or, in fact, anything from hatching till they are 
turned in coverts and eat corn." CAREFUL SPORTSMAN. 

"The Common Sense of Pheasant Rearing," 3d., Post Free. 

Spratts Patent, Limited, London, S.E. 



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Return this material to the library 

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