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LIBRARY OF CONGRESS. 



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UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 



GULF CITY 



COOK BOOK 



COMPILED BY 



The Ladies of the St. Francis Street 
METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH, SOUTH, 

MOBILE, ALABAMA. 






"We may live without poetry, music, rind art; 
We may live without conscience, and live without heart; 



We may live without friends; we may live without books; 



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But civilized man can not live without cooks. 
He may live without books, — what is knowledge but grieving? 
He may live without hope, — what is hope but deceiving? 
He may live without love, — what is passion but pining? 
But where is the man that can live without dining?" 

— Lucile. 



dayton, ohio: 

United Brethren Publishing House. 

1878. 






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Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1878, by the 

Ladies of the St. Francis Street M. E. Church, South, Mobile, Alabama, 

In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington. 



Stereotyped, Printed, and Bound at the 

United Brethren Publishing House, 

DAYTON, OHIO. 



CONTRIBUTORS. 



Mrs. D. C. Anderson. 
" Wm. L. Baker. 
" Leslie E. Brooks. 
" J. Curtis Bush. 
" Henry Barnewall. 
" R. C. Cunningham. 
" Dr. Wm. P. Crawford. 
" Wm. P. Carter. 
" George Coster. 
" J. C. Calhoun. 
" Wm. Cox. 
" James W. Campbell. 
" Alexander Carr. 
" George B. Clitherall. 
" Jno. Douglas. 
" A. DuMont. 
Miss V. W. Dorman. 
Mrs. Jonathan Emanuel. 
" C. K. Foote. 
" A. M. Fosdick. 
" , M. S. Foote. 
" John Gaillard. 
" S. Goodall. 
" Henry Goldthwaite. 
" H. N. Gould. 
" J. R. Gates. 
" H. Gets. 
" Chas. W. Gazzam. 
" J. D. Goodman. 
" Peter Hamilton. 
" T. A. Hamilton. 
" Ann T. Hunter. 
Miss Mary E. Hodges. 
Mrs. F. R. Hill. 

Jefferson Hamilton. 

Alfred Irwin. 

Geo. A. Ketchum. 

Wm. Kelly, Sr. 

Thomas King. 

L. W. Lawler. 

T. T. A. Lyon. 



Mrs. 


A. J. Leslie. 


tt 


James F. Lyon. 


Miss 


Josephine Long. 


Mrs. 


Wm. G. Little. 


« 


Robert Middleton. 


ii 


James B. Malone. 


" 


Chas. F. Moore. 


" 


Alfred R. Murry. 


tt 


R. F. Manly. 


" 


Daniel McNeil. 


tt 


A. M. Punch. 


" 


Henry Pope. 


tt 


H. E. Pease. 


«i 


J. W. Phares. 


(( 


A. Proskauer. 


( i 


A. A. Payne. 


a 


Geo. B. Preston. 


tt 


Thomas H. Price. 


ft 


A. M. Quigley. 


Miss 


Fannie Quigley. 


Mrs. 


F. A, Ross. 


(< 


John Reid. 


tt 


John K. Randall. 


i i 


Frank S. Stone. 


<( 


Wm. A. Smith. 


<< 


Joseph Seawell. 


ci 


Peter Stark. 


<< 


Henry A. Schroeder 


tt 


C. C. Sherrard. 


a 


Sidney Smith. 


ii 


Henry Sossaman. 


a 


M. T. Sprague. 


tt 


Robert H. Smith. 


tt 


Douglas Vass. 


" 


Wm. T. Webb. 


" 


N. Weeks. 


Miss 


S. B. Waring. 


Mrs 


L. M. Wilson. 


" 


A. G. Ward. 


tt 


B. Ward. 


tt 


R. L. Watkins. 



GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 



SOUPS. 



In making good soup it is necessary to observe only a few 
points. Beef is the best meat for this purpose, but mutton 
or veal will answer. Cold water should always be used at 
first, and only in sufficient quantity to prevent burning, until 
the strength or juice of the meat is extracted. Allow one 
pound of meat to one quart of water. Three or four hours 
are required to cook soup well; generally three hours' sim- 
mering, and one hour boiling after the vegetables and sea- 
soning are put m. Thickening, such as rice, vermicelli, 
macaroni, or durnpling, should be put in last. Vegetables 
should be nicely chopped. 

OKRA SOUP. 

Take a shank-bone, or about three pounds of beef, and 
boil in three quarts of water until tender, skimming when 
necessary. Add one quart of chopped okra, one pint of pre- 
pared tomatoes, one onion cut fine, and pepper and salt to 
taste. If desired, four hard-boiled eggs may be cut up and 
added before serving. This soup should boil three or four 
hours. Three or four ears of grated corn are an improve- 
ment. 

CORN SOUP. 

Cat and scrape about twelve ears of corn. Boil the cote 
about half an hour in one quart, then remove, and add the 



GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 



corn. Boil half an hour, and add two quarts of sweet milk. 
Season with pepper, salt, and butter, and thicken with one 
table-spoonful of flour that has been dissolved in a little of 
the milk. Let all boil about fifteen minutes, then pour over 
the yelks of three eggs, which have been well beaten in the 
tureen. 

TOMATO SOUP. 

To about two pounds of fresh beef or shank-bone, put three 
quarts of water, and season with pepper and salt. When 
boiled and skimmed, add one quart of ripe tomatoes that 
have been skinned and quartered, a large onion cut up fine, 
and a little thyme. Boil until the tomatoes are all dissolved. 
It may be thickened with rice, flour, or vermicelli. 

TOMATO SOUP WITHOUT MEAT. 

To one quart of prepared tomatoes, cooked and seasoned as 
for table use, add a salt-spoonful of soda, and one quart of 
milk, boiled and thickened to the consistency of drawn but- 
ter, with two table-spoonfuls of flour. Mix and strain into 
the tureen. Serve immediately. 

GREEN-PEA SOUP.— NO. I. 

Put two pounds of veal, lamb, or beef, and a quarter of a 
pound of fat salt pork sliced thin, into two quarts of water. 
Set it over a moderate fire, and when it boils skim it clear. 
Add a quart of shelled peas, and a dozen small new Irish po- 
tatoes, well scraped. Cover closely for an hour, or until the 
peas are tender; then add half a tea-cup of sweet butter 
with a heaping tea-spoonful of flour worked into it. Pepper 
and salt to taste. 

GREEN-PEA SOUP.— NO. 2. 

Take about four quarts of peas, shell and boil the pods in 
about as much water as you want soup. When the sweet- 
ness is extracted, strain the water, return to the kettle and 



soups. 7 

add the peas. Boil three quarters of an hour; then add one 
tea-cup of milk, thickened with a tea-spoonful of flour and 
two or three young onions, cut fine and fried in butter. On 
serving, add the yelks of three eggs, beaten in a little cream 
or butter. Season with pepper and salt. 

SPLIT-PEA SOUP. 

Put one pint of split peas into two quarts of water. Boil 
until you can mash them, which will be in about two hours, 
then pass through a sieve. Pour the liquor and the peas 
back into the pot, and add boiling water to make it of proper 
consistency, one small spoonful of lard, or a small slice of 
bacon, and salt and cayenne pepper to taste. If not as thick 
as you desire, thicken with a little flour. Boil until done. 
Toast some bread, cut it in small pieces, put them in the 
tureen, and pour the soup over them. 

VEGETABLE SOUP WITHOUT MEAT. 

Slice a few onions and fry brown ; add as much flour as is 
needed to thieken a pint of water. When nearly done add a 
dessert-spoonful of butter, stir quickly, and add one pint of 
water and one pint of milk. Toast to a veiy light brown a 
couple slices of bread, and crush into the soup. Cover up 
for a few minutes. Just before serving, add two hard-boiled 
eggs, chopped fine. 

VEGETABLE SOUP FOR WINTER USE. 

One bushel of skinned tomatoes, one peck of okra cut up, 
six red peppers without the seeds, two dessert-spoonfuls of 
ground black pepper, four table-spoonfuls of salt. Cook all 
together until it is a thick marmalade. Put up hot in close 
jars for winter use. When wanted for table, add beef-water 
in quantities to suit the family taste, adding seasoning or 
not, as you choose. Of course, some additional boiling will 
be needed to thoroughly incorporate the water. 



GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 



SCOTCH BROTH. 

On four pounds of good beef pour one gallon of cold water. 
When this boils add one half pint of coarse barley. Then 
prepare and add one fourth of a small cabbage, four carrots, 
two parsnips, four turnips, one and a half pints of Irish pota- 
toes; these should all be chopped fine before adding. Three 
quarters of an hour before serving, add one good-sized onion, 
cut fine, a sprig of parsley, and pepper and salt to taste. 
This should cook at least four hours. A pint of green peas is 
a great improvement, to be added with the onion, parsley, etc. 

OX-TAIL SOUP. 

Cut up two or three ox-tails, separating them at the joints. 
Put them in a stew-pan with one and a half ounces of butter, 
two carrots cut in slices, one stalk of celery, two turnips, a 
quarter of a pound of lean ham cut in pieces, a tea-spoonful of 
whole pepper, a sprig of parsley and thyme, and half a pint 
of cold water. Stir over a quick fire to extract the flavor of 
the herbs, then pour on three quarts of water. Simmer 
four hours, or until the tails are tender, skimming well. 
Strain the soup, reserving the ox-tails. Stir in a little flour 
for thickening, a wine-glass of Madeira wine, one of catchup, 
and a half stalk of celery, previously boiled Put the pieces 
of ox-tail into the strained soup, boil a few minutes, and 
serve. 

CHICKEN SOUP. 

Cut up one chicken and boil in three quarts of water till 
the strength is extracted. Then add two table-spoonfuls of 
rice, a sprig of parsley and thyme, and salt and pepper to 
taste. Before serving, add two hard-boiled eggs, chopped 
fine, and if the chicken is not fat, a table-spoonful of butter. 

OYSTER SOUP.— NO. i. 
Take one hundred oysters, with two quarts of the liquor 



soups. 9 

strained. Boil until the oysters begin to curl; then add two 
table-spoonfuls of butter, mixed with one table-spoonful of 
flour. Season to taste with pepper, salt, and allspice. Serve 
with slices of toasted bread or broken crackers. 

OYSTER SOUP.— NO. 2. 

To two quarts of strained oyster-liquor, boiling, add one 
hundred oysters, with salt and pepper to taste. Let all boil 
together till the edges of the oysters curl, skimming con- 
stantly. Kemove the oysters to the tureen, and thicken the 
soup with one table-spoonful of flour, rubbed in two table- 
spoonfuls of melted butter. Boil in a separate vessel — to pre- 
vent curdling — one quart of sweet milk, and pour in the 
tureen, pouring in the soup last. 

TURTLE SOUP. 

Take a turtle weighing eight or ten pounds, cut its head 
off and let it drain. Take it from the shell, select the liver 
and other parts used, being careful to remove the gall. 
Quarter the turtle, lay it in a pan, pour boiling water over it, 
then scrape it clean and cut the claws off; then lay it in cold 
water, wash it thoroughly, and wipe dry. Put into a soup- 
kettle one large table-spoonful of lard, and four of flour. Let 
it fry until the flour is brown; add to it a medium-sized 
onion, chopped fine. Cut the meat into small pieces and fry, 
as you would chicken, in lard and flour, for a short time. 
Put all into the kettle, adding one gallon of water; boil 
slowly until reduced one half. When the meat is tender add 
spices as follows: One small table spoonful of cinnamon, 
one tea-spoonful of mace, and twelve or fifteen cloves, beaten 
fine; also, thyme, parsley, salt, and pepper, both cayenne 
and black. Then add one tumbler of Madeira, and one-half 
tumbler of claret. If the turtle has eggs, put them in about 
fifteen minutes before the soup is served. When ready to 



10 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

serve, add the juice and rind of one lemon. Gopher is an 
excellent substitute for turtle. 

MOCK-TURTLE SOUP. 

Take about two pounds of beet, lamb, fowl, pig's-head, or 
tongue; any of these kinds of meat will make good soup. 
Boil the meat well, take it .out, cut it in small pieces, and 
put back into the soup. Season it with one tea-spoonful of 
mace, one of cloves, one of cinnamon, one dozen of whole 
black pepper, one small onion, chopped fine. Grind the 
spices before adding them. Brown one tea-cup of flour to 
thicken the soup; burn two table-spoonfuls of sugar, and 
add, with six hard-boiled eggs, the yelks being rubbed fine, 
and one tea-cup of tomato catchup. Boil all these ingredients 
until done, and just before serving add a glass of claret or 
other wine. Put the soup on as soon after breakfast as pos- 
sible. 

GRAVY SOUP. 

Boil your soup-meat until tender, then chop it fine. (Beef- 
steak "left over" is better than meat, and does not require 
to be boiled.) Brown two table spoonfuls of flour with a tea- 
spoonful of butter. Cut up two onions into it, add your 
meat, and enough of the pot-liquor to moisten it (if beef-steak 
is used, moisten with water); let it fry ten minutes, then re- 
turn to the soup-pot. Cut up three carrots, three turnips, and 
one can of tomatoes, very fine, and put them into the soup. 
Boil two eggs hard, and add, a quarter of an hour before 
dishing, a salt-spoonful of ground mace and a tea-spoonful 
of ground cloves. Before sending to table add a tumbler 
and a half of claret. Serve with rice. 

CLAM SOUP. 

Open the clams by putting them in a pot with a little 
water, and steaming them until the shells begin to pail, 



SOUPS. 11 

when they can be taken out with ease. Boil them well, and 
when they have been chopped fine add enough of the liquor 
to make them taste well, a lump of butter rolled in flour, two 
crackers rolled fine, a tea-spoonful of mace, and half that 
quantity of cayenne pepper. When ready to be served, add 
a tea-cup of sweet cream. 

EGG-BALLS FOR SOUP. 

Take the yelks of eight eggs, boiled hard, and mash them 
smooth with a little flour, salt, and the yelks of two raw 
eggs. Mix well together, roll into balls, and drop into boil- 
ing water. 

RED-FISH SOUP. 

One large table-spoonful of lard, and the same of flour, put 
in a soup-pot to brown ; two large onions, some thyme and 
parsley chopped up fine and put in with the gravy of lard 
and flour. Let them brown a little; add one can of tomatoes 
(or one quart of fresh ones). Pour on two quarts of water, 
and let it boil. For a four-o'clock dinner put this dn at 
noon, and let it boil until half an hour before dinner ; then 
have a small red-fish (or any coarse-grained fish) sliced in 
pieces, about half the size of your hand. Put in the fish 
with one large lemon, sliced, one table-spoonful of whole 
allspice, salt, red, and black pepper, and a little more than a 
pint of claret. Serve with rice. 

CUBION. 

Stir into two table-spoonfuls of hot lard sufficient flour to 
brown it, and red and black pepper to taste. Then add 
eight onions, sliced, a large bunch of parsley chopped fine, a 
little thyme, and one quart of tomatoes. Let these cook fif- 
teen minutes, stirring all the time ; then add two quarts of 
boiling water, and boil slowly for three hours. Three quar- 
ters of an hour bef ne serving a Id one quart of claret, one 



12 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

table-spoonful of whole allspice, and one large lemon, sliced 
thin. Cut your red-fish in pieces about three or four inches 
square, bones and all, and half an hour before serving put it 
it in and let it boil until dinner. Serve with rice, as gumbo. 
Salt to taste. 

DAUPHINE SOUP. 

Place in a stew-pan half a pint of water, half a pint of lean 
ham, six apples, one onion, two cloves of garlic, one carrot, 
one turnip, and a knuckle of veal. Boil briskly over a quick 
fire, stirring occasionally. Let all cook until the bottom of 
the stew-pan is covered with a brownish glaze; then add 
three table-spoonfuls of curry-powder, one of curry-paste, 
and half a pound of flour. Mix well, and pour on a gallon 
of water; add a table-spoonful of salt, and half as much 
sugar. Let all boil up once; then remove to the back of the 
stove, and let simmer two and a half hours, skimming off the 
fat as it rises. Strain into the tureen and serve. 

GUMBO. 

Fry two fowls, old ones are best, with parsley, onions, pep- 
per, salt, and lard or bacon. Put these into the pot with 
water sufficient for the soup, and boil until the flesh drops 
off the bone. Just before taking off the fire, add your oys- 
ters, and a few minutes after a table- spoonful of gumbo pow- 
der, or file' ; scraps of ham or fried sausage are an improve- 
ment. The gumbo does not requh-e boiling after the file' is 
put in. 

OKRA GUMBO. 

Cut up one chicken, sprinkle with flour, and fry till brown ; 
then add one onion and one quart of okra, both chopped 
fine, and fry with the chicken. Pour on three quarts of 
boiling water, and one pint of prepared tomatoes, and pepper 
and salt to taste. Boil three hours and serve with rice. 



soups. 13 

The chicken, okra, a*nd onion should be fried in the vessel in 
which the soup is made, and in a porcelain or tin-lined ves- 
sel, as iron discolors the okra 

CRAB GUMBO. 

Take one dozen large crabs, one cup of butter, and two or 
three onions. Wash the crabs, taking care to get them free 
ti-om sand; take off the feelers and gills and divide the crabs 
into quarters; brown the onions in the butter with two ta- 
ble-spoonfuls of flour. Put in the crabs with about a hand- 
ful of chopped ham. Fill up the pot with three quarts of 
cold water. Just before serving sift in about two table-spoon- 
fuls of file'. Do not let it boil after the file' is put in. Serve 
with rice. 

OYSTER GUMBO. 

Cut up a chicken, sprinkle with flour, and fry in the ves- 
sel in which the gumbo is made. When the chicken is 
nearly done, chop an onion and fry with it. Pour on this 
three quarts of boiling water and let it boil slowly till the 
flesh leaves the bones; then add the liquor from the oysters, 
salt and pepper to taste, two table-spoonfuls of tomato catch- 
up: let this boil a short time, then add one hundred oys- 
ters, and allow them to boil only five minutes. When taken 
from the fire, and before pouring into the tureen, sprinkle 
in two table-spoonfuls of file' or sassafras powder. 

TO PREPARE FILE 7 FOR GUMBO. 

Gather sassafras leaves as late as possible in the season, 
before they turn red. Put them in the shade and open air 
to dry. When perfectly dry pound them, sift the powder, 
bottle it, and keep tightly corked. 

GUMBO CHOU. 

Boil the cabbage, take out and chop very fine, sprinkle 
with a little flour and put into hot lard with water enough 



14 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

to keep from burning. Add one pint of oysters and oyster- 
liquor, one tea-cup of tomatoes, salt and pepjJer to taste. Just 
before dishing add three table-spoonfuls of molasses. Serve 
with rice boiled dry. 

GOPHER SOUP. 

For a large gopher take two table-spoonfuls of lard, five 
of flour, and one onion, chopped fine. Put the lard in the 
pot in which the soup is made, and when it is boiling hot 
add the flour ; when it is nicely browned add the onion and 
fry quite brown. Then put the meat in, fry fifteen minutes, 
then add three or four quarts of boiling water. About an 
hour and a half before serving, season with thyme, parsley, 
a little mace, cinnamon, cloves, allspice. * The spices should 
be beaten and tied up in a bag, and the bag removed before 
serving. If there are gopher eggs put them in half an hour 
before dinner. Just before serving add one pint of Madeira, 
two of claret. This soup requires four hours' gentle boiling. 
Season with salt and pepper after adding the boiling water. 
The wine is a^great improvement, but the soup is very nice 
without it. 



FISH, CRABS, ETC. 15 



FISH, CRABS, ETC. 



BOILED COD-FISH AND BUTTER-SAUCE. 

Put it in cold water, and boil gently fifteen minutes. 
Serve with drawn butter, and garnish with hard-boiled eggs. 

BOILED RED-FISH. 

Tie a large, solid fish in a domestic bag, and lay it in a 
long baking-pan on top of the stove, with enough water to 
cover it. Let it boil half an hour, turning it over carefully, 
that both sides may be well done. Serve with butter-sauce, 
for which take three table-spoonfuls of butter and one of 
sifted flour. Mix the flour and butter together, and have 
ready about a pint of boiling water. Stir the butter and 
flour in while boiling, being careful not to let lumps form. 
Boil four eggs hard ; when cold, slice over the fish, seasoning 
well with black pepper and salt; then pour the sauce over 
the whole. 

STEWED FISH, WITH OYSTERS 

Cut the fish in pieces two inches thick. Put in a stew-pan 
a quarter of a pound of butter, a table-spoonful of flour, one 
onion minced fine, a little parsley and celery. Let this come 
to a boil; then add the fish, one pint of oyster liquor, the 
juice of a lemon, pepper and salt. Stew quickly, shaking 
the pan frequently. When nearly done, add two dozen oys 
ters. Cook five minutes longer. Keep the pan well covered. 
to retain the flavor. 



16 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 



FISH "COURT BOUILLON." 

Cut up a large fish and take out the bones; pour over it a 
cup of vinegar. Chop one onion and some parsley ; fry these 
in hot lard, with red and black pepper, a table-spoonful of all- 
spice, a dozen pounded cloves, and three blades of mace. 
Pour into this a pint of tomatoes. Place the whole into a 
sauce-pan, and let it simmer slowly. Three quarters of an 
hour before dinner put the fish in, with a large spoonful of 
butter. Serve with crusts of toast around the dish. 

BOILED FISH. 

Having cleaned the fish thoroughly, wipe dry, and sprinkle 
with salt and pepper. Broil on a gridiron, over hot coals. 
When ready to serve, pour over the fish melted butter into 
which the juice of a lemon has been squeezed. Garnish the 
dish with sliced lemon. Fish to be broiled must be opened 
down the back. 

FRIED FISH WITH SAUCE. 

Cut a red-fish or large trout in pieces four inches square. 
Season with salt and pepper, then roll each piece in corn- 
meal. Fry to a light brown in boiling-hot lard. 

Sauce for the Fish. — Take the yelks of twelve hard- 
boiled eggs, creamed with a table-spoonful of sweet-oil, one 
of mustard, and a tea-spoonful of salt, half a cup of vinegar, 
and Worcestershire sauce or walnut catchup. Add three or 
four pickled cucumbers cut up fine. Place the fish around 
the edge of the dish, antt the sauce, which must be quite stiff, 
in the middle. 

FRIED RED SNAPPER. 

Cut in thin slices from the bone. Brown four or five crack- 
ers, and roll them very fine. Beat well three or four eggs, 
and season them with salt and pepper. Have your lard 
ready, very hot. Dip the slices in the egg first, and then in 



FISH, CRABS, ETC. 17 



the cracker. Have ready some parsley and butter, to make 

the gravy after the fish is taken out. 

» 
STEWED FISH. 

Eed fish or snapper is the best fish to cook in this way: 
Brown some flour in hot lard, and fry in it one onion sliced, 
one clove of garlic, and two table-spoonfuls of prepared 
tomatoes. Put in the fish cut in pieces, and half a pint of 
water, or just enough to cover the fish. Cook slowly for half 
an hour. Do not stir much, or it will break the fish. Season 
with pepper and salt. Just before taking up, add one half 
tumbler of claret wine. 

MARY'S FISH— CUBION. 

Cut a red-fish or red snapper in pieces and fry brown. In 
a separate vessel, cut up and fry one onion and two cloves of 
garlic; when brown, add two table-spoonfuls of flour, one 
pint of prepared tomatoes, a little pepper, salt to taste, one 
table-spoonful of Worcestershire sauce, and half a dozen 
whole cloves. Let this simmer for half an hour, then mix in 
half a pint of wine. Pour over the fried fish, and serve im- 
mediately. 

BAKED FISH— NO. 1. 

Make a dressing of light bread, seasoned with butter, pep- 
per, salt, and onion chopped fine. Fill the fish with this; 
then put in a pan, sprinkle with flour, and put on a little but- 
ter, pepper, and salt. Cover with tomatoes, and bake slowly. 
Pour half a pint of water into the pan, and baste occasion- 
ally. 

BAKED FISH.— NO. 2. 

Make a stuffing as you would for veal or poultry, with 

plenty of onions. Mix with it slices of fried salt pork, and 

pour on a pint of tomato catchup. Take part of the stuffing 

and put into the fish; pour the remainder over the fish. 

2 



IS GULF CITY cook BOOK. 

Bake tor one hour, if an ordinary sized fish ; it larger, bake 
longer, 

BAKED RED SNAPPER, OR SHEEP'S-HEAD. 

Take two or three Irish potatoes, boil, then mash them 
with two table spoonfuls of butter, a small onion out very fine, 
blaok pepper, and salt to taste. Salt the tish, put it in a 
baking-pan, ami stuff it with the potato dressing; sprinkle 
a little Hour over it. Put in the pan with the tish two table- 
spoonfuls of butter, two deserl Bpoonfuls of sweet-oil, a dozen 
tomatoes Blioed (or halt a can oi' prepared tomatoes), and a 

tea OUp Of Water. Bake in a moderate oven until done. 
When the tish is done, slice over it three hard boiled eggS. 

Stir into the gravy a table-spoonful oi' tomato oatohup, and 

one oi' Worcestershire Bauoe. Tour over the tish, and it is 
ready tor the table, 

FISH A LA CREME.— NO. I. 

Take any kind of tish hoiled. Hick the tish to pieces, tak- 
ing out all bones; plaoe in a baking-dish. Heat together a 
spoonful oi' butter and a Utile Hour; pour on this a pint of 
boiling cream, stir smooth, and season with salt and pepper, 

adding, if you oboose, the yelks oi' two eggs, well beaten. 

Tour over the fish, grate a little eheese over the top, and 
hake twenty minutes, 

FISH A LA CKKMK.-No. 2. 

Boil a firm tish, piek it to pioees, removing the bones. 
Mix one pint of eream, or rich milk, with two table-spoon- 
fuls oi flour, a quarter oi' a pound oi' butter, salt, and one 
onion cut tine. Set it on the tire, and stir until it is the 
thickness oi' custard. Pill a baking-dish with alternate 
layers oi' tish, powdered cracker, and cream, using four crack- 
ers. Hake twenty minutes. 



FISH, CRABS, ETC. 19 



TURBOT A LA CREME. 

Take four pounds of fish, for a large party; boil it with 
plenty of salt in the water. Take out all the hones, remove 
the skin, and flake the fish off. Boil a quart of cream ; while 
boiling, stir in three large table-spoonfuls of flour perfectly 
smooth, add a bunch of parsley, three fourths of an onion, 
to flavor the cream; but when boiled take both out. Clarify 
a quarter of a pound of butter, and add to the cream after it 
is boiled, with a little cayenne pepper. Then butter a bak- 
ing-dish, and put in first a layer offish, then a layer of sauce, 
and repeat until the dish is full, making the sauce come on 
top. Strew over the top a thick layer of bread-crumbs. 
Bake half an hour. Garnish with egg and parsley. 

SCALLOPED FISH. 

Free the fish from the bones, and cut up in small pieces, 
with chopped onions, parsley, salt, and pepper. Beat two 
eggs well with one table-spoonful of catchup. Mix all together, 
and put in a baking-dish, with three slices of bacon over it. 
Bake a short time, and serve with melted butter. 

CHOWDER.— NO. i. 

Boil half a pound of salt pork, cut it into slips, and cover 
the bottom of a pot with some of them ; then strew in some 
sliced onions. Have ready a largo fresh fish, cut it in large 
pieces, and lay part of them on the pork and onions, season- 
ing with pepper and salt. Then cover it with a layer of 
biscuit or cracker that has been soaked in milk or water; and 
on this put a layer of sliced potatoes. Then put a second 
layer of pork and onions, fish, cracker, etc., and continue 
this till the pot is nearly full, finishing with soaked crackers. 
Put in about one and a half pints of cold water, cover the 
pot closely, set it on the stove, and let it simmer about an 
hour. Then skim it, and turn it out in a deep dish. Leave 
the gravy in the pot until you have thickened it with a bit of 



20 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

butter rolled in flour, some chopped parsley, and a table- 
spoonful of Worcestershire sauce. Give it one boil up, and 
pour in the dish. 

FISH CHOWDER.— NO. 2. 

Take a red or any other firm fish, cut it in pieces about 
three inches square; one pound and a half of salt pork cut 
m thin slices; one dozen and a half of Irish potatoes, and 
the same of tomatoes, both sliced thin ; half a dozen onions 
cut fine, and one dozen hard crackers broken in small pieces. 
Take a large pot, put a layer of pork on the bottom, then a 
layer each of fish, potatoes, tomatoes, onions, and crackers. 
Sprinkle each layer with a little salt, black pepper, and flour. 
Repeat the layers of pork, fish, potatoes, etc., until all are 
used. Fill with hot water until it covers the whole. Put 
the pot on the fire, and let it boil thirty minutes; then add 
a pint of claret and boil five minutes longer. The chowder 
will then be ready for the table. 

FISH-PUDDING. 

Take three pounds of fresh fish, boil in the evening, take 
out the bones, mince the fish quite fine. In the morning, 
make a sauce of one pint of milk, three eggs, throe table- 
spoonfuls of flour, one table-spoonful of butter, a tea-spoonful 
of salt, the same of black pepper. Boil all together, and 
mix with the fish. Put all in a pudding-dish, and bake half 
an hour. Serve hot. 

HOW SALT FISH SHOULD BE FRESHENED. 

Mackerel, or any other salt fish, should be soaked in fresh 
water, with the flesh side down, as the salt falls to the bot- 
tom. If the skin is down, the fish comes out nearly as salty 
as when put in. 

FRESH FISH-BALLS. 
Pick clear of bones fish left from a dinner. Mix with this 



FISH, CRABS, ETC. 21 



as much bread-crumbs as fish, season nicely with pepper and 
salt, add one or two well-beaten eggs, and fry in hot lard. 
Eat with salad-dressing. » 

COD-FISH BALLS.— NO. i. 

Soak the cod in cold water in the morning, or over night. 
Change the water, and let it scald for an hour. Then boil 
five or six minutes. Chop very fine, and mix well with po- 
tatoes, using equal quantities of fish and potatoes, and ad- 
ding butter, pepper, and milk, to soften. Make in small 
cakes and fry in lard. 

COD-FISH BALLS.— NO. 2. 

If intended for breakfast, soak the fish in cold water over 
night. Do not boil. In the morning take it from the water 
and place near the fire, where it may become warm while 
taking off the skin and picking the fish in small bits from 
the bone. Have boiled, meantime, some good Irish potatoes, 
— say about six or eight, for a good-sized fish. Take off the 
skins and mash while hot, with the fish adding a large 
table-spoonful of butter and one egg beaten. If too dry 
to make into balls, add a little sweet cream. Season with 
a little pepper. Make up into balls about the size of a bis- 
cuit. Roll them in flour, and fry in hot lard sufficient to 
swim the balls. When done, they will be a light brown. 

FRIED EELS. 

Cut the eels in pieces about four inches long. Beat some 
eggs, seasoning with pepper and salt to taste. Dip the 
pieces of eel in the egg, then in bread or cracker crumbs, 
and fry in hot lard. 

STEWED CRABS.— NO. 1. 

Scald the crabs, cut the bodies into four parts, pick the 
meat out of the claws. Take the yelks of two hard-boiled 



22 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

eggs, and rub them smooth in a desert-spoonful of vinegar. 
Koll some butter in flour; mince a small onion very fine. 
Put the crabs and these ingredients, with salt and pepper to 
taste, into a stew-pan. Cover them with about a pint of 
water, and let them cook slowly. When served, garnish the 
dish with sippets of toasted bread. 

STEWED CRABS.— NO. 2. 

Boil a dozen crabs, and pick them out, being careful not 
to leave a particle of shell with the crabs. Take a cup about 
three fourths full of butter, one large onion, one pod of red 
pepper. Fry the onion and pepper in the butter, with two 
table-spoonfuls of flour, browning them nicely. Put in the 
crab, stir up well, add half a pint of water, and black pepper 
and salt to taste. Let it stew gently ten or fifteen minutes. 
A couple of tomatoes chopped and added to this stew is an 
improvement. 

STEWED CRABS.— NO. 3. 

Take one dozen crabs well picked from the shell after be- 
ing boiled. Boil one pint of fresh milk, with a tea-spoonful 
of finely-chopped onion, one table-spoonful of butter, salt, 
red and black pepper to taste, a pinch of mace, allspice, and 
one nutmeg grated, the whites of four hard-boiled eggs chop- 
ped fine, the yelks of the same rubbed smooth with a little 
milk. When this boils, add flhree or four table-spoonfuls of 
powdered crackers, and cook until the onions are quite done. 
Then put in half a pint of fresh cream and the crabs. Let 
all boil together, a few minutes only. Serve with lemon- 
juice and sherry wine to your taste. It is necessary to stew 
quickly all the time. If too thick, add either milk or cream, 
whichever is most convenient. 

FRICASSEED CRABS. 
Boil and pick out the crabs; put them into a dish with 
black pepper, mustard, a small onion, thyme, and a large 



FISH, CRABS, ETC. 23 



spoonful of butter with a tea-spoonful of flour rubbed into it. 

Add a tea-cup of water, grate bread-crumbs over them, and 

bake. 

t 

CRAB OMELET. 

Take six or eight crabs. Prepare them by boiling and 
picking from the shell. Chop one onion fine, and fry it 
brown; then take it out of the pan. Then beat as if for cake 
six eggs ; chop very fine one slice of ham and a small bunch 
of parsley. Put all together and stir well. Have the lard 
out of which you have taken the onion hot, and put in it the 
crab, egg, etc., stirring all until heated through. Just before 
taking off the fire, stir in a table-spoonful of butter. Roll it 
up as you would an egg omelet. 

MOCK TERRAPIN. 

Take half a calf 's-liver, season and fry brown ; hash it, but 
not too fine. Dash thickly with flour, and add one tea- 
spoonful of mixed mustard, a pinch of cayenne pepper, the 
same of cloves, two hard-boiled eggs chopped fine, a large 
table-spoonful of butter, one tea-cup of water. Let all boil 
two or three minutes, then add a wine-glass of wine. Cold 
veal may be used, if liver is not liked. 

STEWED TERRAPIN.— NO. I. 

Boil six diamond-back terrapins whole, for about fifteen 
minutes ; then take them out, pressing the liquor from them. 
Skim and strain the liquor. Cut the terrapins up, cleaning 
the entrails and removing the gall. Then put back into the 
liquor, and boil until done. Add the dressing, consisting of 
six wine-glasses of fine sherry, one pound of butter, one 
quart of cream, half a pound of flour well sifted, the yelks of 
six hard-boiled eggs, cayenne pepper and salt. Boil ten 
minutes, add lemon to taste, and serve. 



24 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

STEWED TERRAPIN.— NO. 2. 

Cut open your terrapin, take out the eggs, cut oft' the feet 
and legs; wash in pure water, then scald the legs and rub 
off the outer skin. Stew till tender, keeping the sauce-pan 
tightly covered; put in the eggs ten minutes before it is 
dished. .Fry two onions and three spoonfuls of flour in one 
of lard. Pour the terrapin and gravy on this, seasoning 
with salt and pepper to taste. Before serving, add spices, 
two spoonfuls of whisky, four spoonfuls of wine. Garnish 
the dish with lemon cut in slices. 

TERRAPIN AU GRATIN. 

Terrapin well cooked in a little water, with onion, salt, and 
pepper. Then put it in the upper shell, with a spoonful of 
butter, a little mace, grated cracker on top with an egg well 
beaten. Bake until brown. Serve with lemon. 

SHRIMP STEWED WITH TOMATOES. 

Take one can of shrimps, one can of tomatoes; add salt, 
pepper, and butter to your taste, then stew twenty minutes 

SHRIMP SALAD. 

Boil the shrimps in salt-water, and remove the shells. Then 
make a dressing of the yelks of four hard-boiled eggs, cream- 
ed until smooth, one fourth of a tea-spoonful of cayenne pep- 
per, one tea-spoonful of black pepper, two table-spoonfuls oi 
mustard, and one of salt, one tea-cup of vinegar, two table- 
spoonfuls of olive oil. When thoroughly mixed, pour over 
the shrimp. This dressing will do for crabs also. 

TO POT SHRIMPS. 

Let the fish be freshly boiled, then shell them. Melt down 
with a gentle degree of heat some good butter; skim and 
pour it clear of sediment into a porcelain sauce-pan. Add a 
small quantity of salt, mace, nutmeg, and cayenne pepper. 



FISH, CRABS, ETC. 25 

When these have just simmered for three or four minutes, 
throw in the fish; toss them in the butter, that, they may be 
well covered with it; let them heat through by the side of 
the fire, but by no means allow them to boil. Turn them 
into shallow dishes, and press them down into the butter. 
Should they not be well covered, pour a little more over 
them. Shrimps, one pint; butter, four or -five ounces; mace, 
nutmeg, pepper, and salt to taste 

For fish and turtle soup, and crab gumbo, see Soup De- 
partment. 



26 GULF CITY COCK-BOOK. 



OYSTERS. 



FRIED OYSTERS.— No. I. 

Select large oysters, drain and spread on a cloth to absorb 
all moisture. Beat well two or three eggs, and season them 
with pepper and salt. Roll some crackers, and dip the oysters 
in the egg and then in the crumbs, then again in the egg 
and cracker crumbs. Drop into boiling lard, sufficient to 
cover them, and cook till of a light brown. 

FRIED OYSTERS.— No. 2. 

Drain large oysters and lay on a napkin. Beat well two 
eggs, and season with pepper and salt. Dip one oyster at a 
time first in the egg and then in corn-meal. Drop in boil- 
ing lard and fry a light brown. 

OYSTER LOAVES. 

Cut off carefully the end of a loaf of baker's bread, reserv- 
ing the end; scoop out the crumb inside the loaf, leaving the 
crust entire. Fill the loaf with hot oysters, fried as in No. 
1, leaving room for slices of pickle. Carefully replace the 
end cut off. If the oysters are hot, and the loaf well cover- 
ed, they can be carried quite a distance, or eaten some time 
alter being prepared, without getting cold. This is nice for 
a hasty lunch or a late supper. One dozen oysters will fill 
an ordinary sized loaf. 

FRENCH STEWED OYSTERS. 
Drain fifty large oysters, and strain the liquor into a stew- 



YSTERS. 27 

pan, seasoning with mace, half a pint of sherry wine, and 
the juice of two lemons. When this comes to a boil, stir well 
and skim; put in the oysters, not allowing them to boil as 
much as in an ordinary oyster stew. 

FRANK'S STEWED OYSTERS. 

For one hundred oysters take one pound of butter. Drain 
the oysters, put the butter in a sauce-pan, or chafing-dish, 
and when it is hot add the oysters, seasoning them highly 
with black pepper and salt. Let them stew gently until 
done. Break up about half a dozen crackers in small pieces, 
and sprinkle on top. Serve immediately. 

STEWED OYSTERS.— No. I. 

Take fifty oysters, and all of the liquor; one pint of new 
milk, one tea-cup of sweet cream, two table-spoonfuls of 
flour with one of butter creamed with it, one dessert-spoon- 
ful of black pepper, and a very little cayenne. Salt to the 
taste just before dishing. 

STEWED OYSTERS.— No. 2. 

Take one hundred oysters and sti*ain the liquor to remove 
any fragments of shell. Measure the liquor, and take an 
equal quantity of sweet milk ; boil them in separate vessels. 
To the oyster liquor add a tea-cupful of cracker crumbs, salt 
and pepper to taste, and a large table-spoonful of butter. 
When this has boiled a few minutes add the oysters, which 
will require about five minutes to cook. Pour in a dish, and 
add the boiling milk last. 

STEWED OYSTERS.— No. 3. (For a Pie.) 

Put the oysters in their liquor on the fire. When they 
come to a scald take off and put in a sieve to drain. Strain 
some of the liquor; add butter, flour parsley, and mace; heat 
and put the oysters in it. For soup, use all the liquor, if 



28 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

needed,- and boil a little milk in a separate vessel, and add 
after dishing. 

OYSTER PATTIES. 

Line a small patty-pan with puff-paste, and bake a light 
brown. When done, fill with oysters stewed as in No. 3. The 
patties should be served and eaten as soon as prepared, as 
the gravy soaking in the pastry will make it moist and 
heavy. 

OYSTER PIE. 

Butter a dish and spread rich pastry on the sides, but not 
on the bottom. Season the oysters with butter, pepper, and 
salt, and place them in the lined dish, with sufficient liquor 
to fill it. Over the top, sprinkle three hard-boiled eggs, chop- 
ped fine, and bread or cracker crumbs. Cover the whole 
with pastry, and bake in a quick oven. 

OYSTER FRITTERS.— No. i. 

Take one pint of milk, two well-beaten eggs, and flour to 
make a smooth but rather thin batter. Season with pepper 
and salt. Stir in fifty large oysters; drop a spoonful of bat- 
ter into boiling lard, having one or two oysters in each 
spoonful; cook brown, turning carefully to cook on both sides.. 

OYSTER FRITTERS.— No. 2. 

Beat two eggs very light; stir in two table-spoonfuls of 
cream, three table-spoonfuls of flour, and pepper and salt to 
taste. Dip the oysters in this batter, and fry in boiling 
lard. 

MINCED OYSTERS. 

Take fifty oysters chopped fine; add one table-spoonful of 
chopped parsley, one of butter, one tea-spoonful of black 
pepper, six eggs well beaten, and enough crackers rubbed 
fine to make it the proper consistenc}^ to roll into balls. Fry 
quickly in boiling lard. 



YSTERS. 29 

. OYSTER SAUSAGE. 

Take three or four dozen large oysters; cut them fine, and 
put in a colander to drain. Chop a small onion, and some 
thyme and parsley very fine. Melt a table-spoonful of butter, 
and pour it on the oysters, after taking them from the colander 
and putting them on a dish ; season with salt and pepper. 
Roll eight large soda-crackers and mix with the other ingre- 
dients; beat two eggs and rub them in with the oysters and 
crackers. Add enough flour to roll into balls, and fry, like 
sausage, in veiy little lard or butter. 

BROILED OYSTERS. 

Drain and dry large .oysters. Have ready an oyster broil- 
er, hot and well-buttered, to prevent sticking. Season the 
oysters and broil well on both sides. Serve in a hot dish, 
with plenty of butter. 

SCALLOPED OYSTERS. 

Spread cracker crumbs on the bottom of a buttered baking- 
dish; place on these a layer of oysters, with pepper, salt, and 
hits of butter. Make alternate layers of crumbs and seasoned 
oysters till the dish is full, having a layer of crumbs on top. 
Make an incision in the center and pour in one well-beaten 
egg. Use butter only, and no oyster liquor. Brown nicely 
in a hot oven. 

OYSTERS WITH FRICASSEED CHICKEN. 

Fry the oysters in bread or cracker crumbs, and egg, a 
light brown. Lay them on the fricasseed chicken, and pour 
a thick-drawn butter-sauce over the whole. 

A NICE WAY TO COOK OYSTERS. 

Procure some nice, large, deop shells, cleanse thoroughly, 
and keep for the purpose. Open the oysters, place one in 
each shell, with a little of the water, a pinch of salt, and 



30 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

black pepper; grate a little Italian cheese over each. Cook 
in the oven of a stove. 

MACARONI AND OYSTERS. 

Boil a quarter of a pound of macaroni in salt-water until 
tender, then drain. Butter an earthen dish, and put in a 
layer of macaroni, then a layer of oysters, sprinkling on the 
oyster layer pepper, salt, and bits of butter, and on the mac- 
aroni layer bits of cheese. Make alternate layers of maca- 
roni and oysters, till the dish is full, having a layer of oys- 
ters on top. Sprinkle cracker crumbs over the whole. Bake 
in a quick oven until brown. # Fifty oysters will be sufficient 
for this quantity of macaroni. 

STEAMED OYSTERS. 

Turn the oysters into a steamer over a pot of boiling 
water; let them steam for half an hour, stirring occasionally. 
Serve in a hot dish with pepper, salt, and plenty of butter. 

PICKLED OYSTERS.— No. I. 

Take one hundred fine, large oysters; drain the liquor 
from them and strain it, to remove all fragments of shell. 
Boil the liquor with one tea-spoonful of salt; when boiling 
drop in the oysters, allowing them to be only well scalded, 
not boiled. Remove the oysters, and add to the liquor one 
pint of strong vinegar, one tea-spoonful of black mace, two 
dozen whole cloves, two dozen whole black pepper, and two 
dozen allspice. Let the liquor, vinegar, and spices come to 
a boil, and when the oysters are cold pour it over them. 
These are for immediate use. If wanted to keep some time, 
allow the oysters to boil, and double the proportions of 
spices and vinegar. 

PICKLED OYSTERS.— No. 2. 
Boil the oysters slightly; then strain the liquor, and to one 



O YSTEKS. 31 



cup of vinegar put two cups of oyster liquor, cloves, allspice, 
mace, pepper, and salt to taste. Boil the liquor, spices, and 
vinegar, and pour over the oysters. When cold they are 
ready for use. 

OYSTER SOUPS AND GUMBO. 

See Soup Department. 



32 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK 



MEATS, POULTRY, ETC. 



TO BOIL A HAM. 

Proceed inversely as with a soup-bone, since in the latter 
you wish to extract the juice, whereas in the ham you would 
preserve them. Hence the appropriateness of the directions 
given in chemical lectures to a class of embryo house-keepers, 
by Prof. Darby, of prophylactic notoriety. His directions 
are: "Have the pot of water boiling before putting in the 
ham with the skin on. The boiling water instantly coagu- 
lates the albumen, which prevents the escape of the juice." 
Keep the pot boiling constantly for four hours, if it is a ten- 
pound or twelve-pound ham, or longer for a larger ham. Do 
not allow the sight of a protruding bone to induce you to 
take it off too soon. When thoroughly done, remove from the 
pot and take off the skin. The essence which oozes out will 
be jellied when cold, and very nice, while the ham itself is 
tender and delicious, in every respect superior to the less 
boiled ham. 

TO BOIL FRESH-PORK HAM. 

Take sufficient boiling water to cover the ham. Put in 
this two quarts of salt, one half cup of dark molasses or 
brown sugar, a handful of whole black pepper, saltpeter the 
size of a large pea. Put the ham in this boiling mixture, and 
boil until thoroughly done, which will probably be when the 
meat leaves the knuckle-bone. Let this cool in the water in 
in which it is boiled, as all corned meats should. 



MEATS, POULTRY, ETC. 33 

BAKED STUFFED HAM. 

Take a ham, wash well, put in a pot of hot water, and let 
it boil three hours. When nearly cold, take off the skin. 
Make a rich dressing of one loaf of baker's bread, three large 
onions chopped fine, one large table-spoonful of butter, one 
tea-spoonful of celery-seed, one of ground sage, and one of 
thyme; salt and pepper to your taste (a good deal of pepper); 
cook as you would dressing for a turkey. Make deep in- 
cisions in the ham, and fill them with the dressing in such a 
way that each slice may have some of the dressing in it. 
Two eggs well beaten and mixed with cracker crumbs, spread 
over the ham; and sprinkle brown sugar over this. Bake 
slowly for two and a half or three hours, basting frequently 
with the juice which runs from the ham. 

BAKED HAM. 

Soak the ham twenty-four hours, changing the water once 
or twice. Then skin and trim the ham. Take a quarter of 
a pound of fresh pork chopped very fine, two table-spoonfuls 
of pulverized sage, one table-spoonful of black pepper, one 
tea-spoonful of cloves, allspice, and cinamon combined, one. 
onion chopped very fine. Moisten the mixture thoroughly 
with pepper-vinegar. Then, with a sharp knife make the 
incisions in the ham, starting toward the large end of the 
ham. Make one incision on the under side. Fill them with 
the stuffing. Put in the pan for baking. Sift well over with 
flour ; and if the pan is deep, fill half full with water. Baste 
as you would a fowl. It will take from three to four hours 
to bake, according to the size. 

ROAST PIG.— No. i. 

Take a pig of about eight or ten pounds; clean well, leav- 
ing on the head and feet. Make a stuffing of bread, two 
eggs, one table-spoonful of butter, sage, thyme, onion chop 
ped, and pepper and salt. Stale bread is best. Soften with 

3 



34 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

water, and put in a frying-pan, with a table-spoonful of lard 
to brown, mixing in the eggs, butter, and seasoning. When 
brown, stuff the pig and sew up the opening. Truss with 
the front legs bent backward and the back legs forward. 
Kub the pig with lard, and baste frequently. Cook till thor- 
oughly done, and make the gravy (after removing the pig) 
by adding a little water thickened with flour, and the liver 
and heart of the pig (which have been cooked in the pan 
with it) chopped fine and mixed in. Serve in a gravy-dish. 

ROAST PIG.— No. 2. 

Shave off all the hairs, or burn them off with a white-hot 
poker, using it carefully and quickly enough not to burn the 
skin. Dress the pig, saving the heart, liver, and kidneys, 
which you must wash, slice, fry in a very little fat, and then 
chop fine. Wash the pig; dry it well with a clean cloth; 
stuff it with the following force-meat; sew it up; tie or 
skewer the legs in place ; tie up the ears and tail in buttered 
papers, to prevent burning, and put it into a dripping-pan, 
with the following vegetables: Half a medium-sized carrot, 
one onion, a few sprigs of parsley, and a bay-leaf. Brush 
the pig thoroughly with salad-oil or melted butter. Put it 
into a hot oven until the crackling is set, basting it every fif- 
teen minutes. A medium-sized pig will cook in from two to 
two and a half hours. 

Stuffing for it. — Fry together two ounces of sweet drip- 
pings or butter, half an ounce of chopped parsley, and about 
four ounces of chopped onion; season with one level table- 
spoonful each of powdered sage, thyme, and salt, and a level 
tea-spoonful of pepper. Soak half a pound of dry bread in 
tepid water for five minutes, then wring it dry in a towel. 
Add it to the onion and herbs, stir it until it is scalding hot, 
add the fried liver, the yelks of two eggs, and half a pint of 
boiling milk or water, and stuff the pig with it. Wash eight 
firm apples ; cut them across the middle, but not down from 



MEATS, POULTRY, ETC. 35 

the stein to the blossom; scoop out the cores, and bake only 
until tender, but not broken down. Peel and core eight 
more apples; stew them with a little sugar and the rind of a 
lemon. When perfectly tender, pass them through a sieve, 
and fill the halves of apple with this pure'e. Set them around 
the pig on a platter, and put a small lemon or sprig of holly 
in its mouth. 

i SAUSAGE. 

In making sausage, allow one third fat to two thirds lean. 
Grind through a sausage-grinder, and season to taste with 
pepper, salt, and powdered sage-leaves. Make in small cakes, 
and fry without lard. 

BAKED SAUSAGE-MEAT. 

A medium-sized loaf of bread, eight pounds of beef, four 
pounds of fresh pork ground in a sausage-grinder, one table- 
spoonful of cloves, one large onion chopped fine, a small 
quantity of sage, one table-spoonful of whisky or brandy, 
pepper and salt to taste; cut up some red pepper; mix well 
before placing in pans; insert strips of fresh pork about two 
two inches long, and about an inch apart. Bake about four 
hours; do not take out until perfectly cold; slice crosswise. 
This will keep good some time. 

FRENCH SAUSAGES. 

Chop very fine, or pound in a mortar, equal parts of cold 
fowls, cream, dried bread-crumbs, and boiled onions; season 
them with salt, pepper, and nutmeg to taste ; put them into the 
neck, — skins of poultry, — tying the ends, and .fry them as 
you would fry sausages. 

FRICADELS. 

Mix well the following ingredients : Half a pound each 
of sausage-meat, dried bread-crumbs soaked in warm water 
and squeezed dry in a towel, one ounce of onion chopped fine, 



36 • GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

two eggs, one level dessert-spoonful of salt, and half a level 
tea-spoonful of pepper. Eoll in the shape of corks, using a 
little flour to keep them from sticking to the hands, and fry 
brown in plenty of smoking-hot fat. Serve on toast. Any 
other minced meat may be substituted for the sausage-meat. 

PAN HAMS. 

Take hog's head and feet; boil them until the meat falls 
from the bones; withdraw them from the liquor, which 
strain and return to the vessel. Chop the meat very fine ; sea- 
son with pepper, salt, spice, onions chopped fine, thyme, sage, 
and parsley. Add all to the liquor, adding a sufficient quan- 
tity of corn-meal to make a stiff mush. Let it boil ten min- 
utes, stirring all the time. Pour into a deep pan ; when cold, 
•cut in thin slices and fry. 

PIG'S-FEET FRIED. 

Have the feet well cleaned, and boiled until quite tender 
Split them, and lay in vinegar to pickle them. When ready 
to cook, have a batter made of an egg, flour, and water; pep- 
per and salt to the consistency of pudding-batter. Fry in 
hot lard. 

SMOKED MEAT ON TOAST. 
I 
Take a cold, smoked tongue or ham that has been well 

boiled; grate it on a coarse grater, or mince it fine. Mix it 
with cream and beaten yelk of an egg, a little pepper, and 
let it simmer over the fire. Prepare some nice slices of but- 
tered toast; lay them in a dish that has been heated, and 
cover each slice with the meat mixture, which should be 
spread on hot. Place on the table in a covered dish. A 
nice dish for breakfast or tea. 

DEVILED HAM. 

Slice some ham very thin ; sprinkle with cayenne and black 
pepper; broil until well down; place in a dish, and pour 



MEAT, POULTRY, ETC. 37 

over it the following sauce, quite hot : Three table-spoonfuls 
of butter, one of vinegar, one of mustard, and one of Wor- 
cestershire sauce. 

ROAST BEEF. 

The surloin is the best piece of beef for roasting. Rub 
over the meat a little lard, and put in a baking-pan with the 
bone side down. When half done, sprinkle with pepper, salt, 
and flour, and baste frequently with the drippings. To make 
the gravy, remove the meat, and if there is not sufficient 
juice, add a little water and thicken with flour; season with 
pepper and salt to taste. Serve the gravy in a gravy-dish. 

BOEUF S A LA MODE. 

Have a round of beef six inches thick. Take one and a 
half pounds of fresh fat bacon; cut in square pieces one 
fourth of an inch thick and four inches long. Then take one 
half ounce of allspice, one half ounce of cloves, and one 
ounce black pepper ; grind together. To this add a small 
quantity of parsley, thyme, and three small pieces of garlic, 
all cut up fine. Roll the pieces of meat in the seasoning, 
and insert them in the round on both sides. Make incisions, 
and pour the remaining seasoning all over, adding a suffi- 
cient quantity of salt, — say two ounces. Let it stand eight 
hours before cooking. In cooking this, have a close vessel, 
with top to fit (an oven preferable) ; put in a spoonful of lard 
made hot. Place in the round, sprinkled with flour, two 
large onions cut up, and another spoonful of lard. Cover 
closely, and let it cook in its own juice four hours, turning 
it once. 

HUNTER'S ROUND. 

Rub well into a round of beef weighing forty pounds three 
ounces of saltpeter, and let it stand five or six hours. Pound 
three ounces of allspice, one of black pepper, and mix that 



38 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 



with twenty pounds of salt and seven or eight pounds of 
brown sugar. Eub the beef well with this mixture, and pack 
it down to stay fourteen days. Scrape off the spices ; place 
it in a deep pan, cover it with a common paste, and bake 
from eight to ten hours. When cool, wrap it in a linen cloth, 
and keep it in a cool place. Nothing nicer for lunch. This 
will keep well for several weeks. 

SPICED BEEF. 

Take a round of beef and rub it well with saltpeter; take 
out the bone in the middle, and fill the opening with salt. 
Bind the round in shape, or put it in a bucket or some vessel 
that fits rather close. Let it stand for three days ; it will 
make its own brine. Then take one spoonful of powdered 
spice, one of black pepper, and one of brown sugar; rub the 
beef well with it. Then, after standing three days, rub it 
again with the spices, etc. After standing a week or ten 
days it will be ready for use. 

TO COLLAR A FLANK OF BEEF. 

Get a nice flank of beef, rub it well with a large portion of 
saltpeter and common salt. Let it remain ten days ; then 
wash it clean, take off the outer and inner skin with the 
gristle; spread it on a board, and cover the inside with the 
following mixture: Parsley, sage, thyme chopped fine, pep- 
per, salt, and pounded cloves. Kollit up; sew a cloth over it, 
and bandage that with tape; boil it gently five or six hours. 
When cold, lay it on a board without undoing it; put anoth- 
er board on the top with a heavy weight. Let it remain 
twenty-four hours; take off the bandages; cut thin slices 
from each end. 

CORNED BEEF. 

To six gallons of water add nine pounds of pure salt, three 
pounds of brown sugar, one quart of molasses, three ounces 
of saltpeter, and one ounce of pearlash. When the water is 



MEATS, POULTRY, ETC. 39 

ready to receive the rest of the material, pour in the salt- 
peter only, and when dissolved, and the water boiling, dip 
your beef piece by piece into the boiling saltpeter-water, 
holding it for a feiv seconds only in the hot bath. When the 
beef has all been immersed and become quite cool, pack it in 
the case where it is to remain. Then proceed with your 
pickle as first directed, and, when perfectly cold, pour it upon 
the meat, which should be kept down by a cover and stone. 

BEEFSTEAK SMOTHERED. 

Have the lard hot in the pan; put in the steak; season 
with pepper, salt, and sifted flour. Put a layer of onions and 
a layer of tomatoes; pour on a little water; then cover with 
another pan, and let it cook until nearly done. Take off the 
cover, and let it brown. 

FRIED BEEFSTEAK.— No. i 

Surloin steaks are much the best for frying or broiling. 
Lay the steak in a frying-pan of hot lard or butter, after it 
has been dredged with flour and well sprinkled with pepper. 
Turn it frequently, until both sides are brown. When nearly 
done, sprinkle with salt. If onions are desired, slice enough 
of them to cover the steak, and fry with the meat. After 
taking the meat out, add a cup of boiling water, and thicken 
with brown flour for gravy. 

FRIED BEEFSTEAK.— No. 2. 

If the steak is not very young and tender, beat it slightly. 
Beat the yelks of two eggs, seasoned with salt and pepper; 
dip the steak in the egg. and then sprinkle over it cracker 
crumbs. Fry in hot lard. 

STUFFED STEAKS BAKED. 

Have a rich dressing as for turkey or sausage-meat, and 
take two steaks an inch thick each; place the dressing be- 
tween them, and secure the dressing by serving them togeth- 



40 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

ex. Have a wire frame rather smaller than the pan to be 
used; place the steaks on the frame, having previously pre- 
pared them with salt and pepper. Place a few bits of lard 
on the top of the steaks, a sufficient quantity of water in the 
pan, and bake; baste often; flour as usual for roasting or 
baking. 

HOW TO COOK A BEEFSTEAK. 

The vessel in which it is to be cooked must be wiped dry ; 
place it on the stove, and let it become hot. Season your 
steak with salt and pepper; then lay it in the hot pan, and 
cover as tight as possible. When the raw meat touches the 
heated pan, of course it will adhere, but in a few seconds it 
will become loosened and juicy; turn the steak frequently, 
but be careful to keep covered. When nearly done, lay a 
piece of butter upon it; and if you want much gravy, add a 
table-spoonful of strong coffee. In three minutes the steak 
will be ready for the table. 

Mutton-ohops may be cooked the same way ; but they re- 
quire a little longer cooking. An excellent gravy can be 
made from them by adding a little cream, thickened with a 
small quantity of flour, into which, when off the fire and 
partly cool, stir the yelk of an egg well beaten. 

BEEF-CAKES. 

Pound some beef that is under-done with a little fat bacon 
or ham; season with pepper, salt, and onions. Make into 
small cakes, and fry them a little brown. Serve them in good 
gravy. 

FORCE MEAT-BALLS 

Mix with half a pound of veal chopped very fine, one half 
pound of pork chopped fine ; season with salt, pepper, a lit- 
tle parsley minced, one table-spoonful of curry-powder, the 
yelk of one egg, a tea- cud of bread-crumbs, softened with 



MEATS, POULTRY, ETC. 41 

cream or milk. They should be made in small balls, and 
fried in hot lard. 

DRY HASH. 

Take cold fresh meat of any kind that has been previously 
cooked ; cut very very fine ; mix with two boiled Irish pota- 
toes well mashed, one egg, one onion minced fino. Season 
with pepper and salt. Put in a dish and bake. 

HASH WITH GRAVY. 

Cut up your cold meat in pieces half an inch thick ; put it 
to stew with half a pint of water, one onion, one Irish pota- 
to chopped fine, one table-spoonful of lard, one table-spoonful 
of flour, pepper and salt to taste, and a little butter. Cook 
until the potato and onion are done. Serve with the gravy. 

BEEF-HEELS. 

Put the feet in hot water, with wood ashes sufficient to 
make a lye; let them stand in this until the hoof is soften- 
ed, so as to pull off; put in cold water and boil until it leaves 
the bones. Take out and put in a bowl ; season with pepper 
and salt, while warm. Take a large spoonful, roll in batter 
or in flour, and fry in hot lard. 

BOILED MUTTON. 

Put a leg of mutton into a boiler, with sufficient hot water 
to cover it; boil steadily; skim well, and keep covered by 
adding hot water. Allow fifteen minutes to every pound 
weight. Do not put in the salt until the meat is nearly done. 
Serve with egg-sauce, and a tea-cup of capers stirred in. If 
capers can not be obtained, cucumber pickles chopped fine is 
a good substitute. 

• ROAST MUTTON. 

A roast of mutton should have lard or butter rubbed over 
it, and when half done a spoonful put in the pan; salt and 



42 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 



pepper also. If it is a leg, it is improved by cutting gashes 
and filling them with a dressing made of bread- crumbs, pep- 
per, salt, two eggs, butter or lard. When nearly done, 
dredge it with flour and baste frequently. Send to the table 
with its own gravy, slightly thickened with browned flour. 

FRIED MUTTON-CHOPS. 

Beat some eggs; season with pepper and salt; roll crack- 
ers fine. Dip the mutton-chops one by ono in the egg, then 
in the cracker crumbs. Fry in hot lard. 

Mutton-chops fried in bread-crumbs, laid on macaroni with 
slices of bread fried between, make a pretty dish. 

HASHED MUTTON. 

Cut thin slices of cold mutton, fat and lean; flour these; 
have ready an onion boiled in two or three spoonfuls of water ; 
add a little gravy and the seasoned meat; let it get hot, but 
not enough to boil. Serve in a covered dish. Instead of 
onion, a clove, a spoonful of jelly, one half glass of port wine, 
will give venison flavor, if the mutton is good. 

AN IRISH STEW. 

Take mutton-chops; cover well with water ; let them come 
to a boil ; pour off the water ; add more. Take a lump of but- 
ter the size of an egg, two table-spoonfuls of flour, a tea-cup 
of milk, with pepper and salt to taste; also a few Irish po- 
tatoes and one small onion. Boil until the potatoes are done. 

VEAL LOAF. 

Three and a half pounds of the finest part of lean and fat 
of a leg of veal chopped very fine, three soda-crackers rolled 
fine, two eggs, a piece of butter the size of an egg, a tea- 
spoonful of salt, one of pepper, a thick slice of salt pork 
chopped fine. Mix all together; put bits of butter and 
grated bread-crumbs over it. Bake two hours. Put some 



MEATS, POULTRY, ETC. 43 

Witter in another pan, and set in it the one containing the loaf. 
Bake two hours. To be eaten when cold. Cut in thin slices. 

RICH AMELLA. 

Mince your cold veal in a chopping-bowl, leaving out the 
stringy part. Put into a frying-pan a tea-cupful or more of 
milk or sweet cream, into which stir, when hot, a tablespoon- 
ful of butter and flour well mixed together; then add the 
chopped veal. Add a small piece of onion and thyme, or 
parsley chopped very fine ; heat it well through ; sprinkle 
over it a little mace. This is delicious for breakfast, and can 
be used for patties. 

PRESSED VEAL OR BEEF. 

Three pounds of veal knuckle well broken; boil in a little 
water until very tender; pick the meat to pieces, free from 
gristle and bone. Season the broth highly ; add a little 
lemon-peel; butter in plenty ; mix with the meat; add enough 
bread-crumbs to thicken ; put into molds. Eat when cold. 

VEAL OLIVES. 
Slice as large pieces as you can get from a leg of veal. 
Make a stuffing of grated bread, butter, a small onion cut 
very fine, a tea-spoonful of salt, a little black pepper, and 
spread over the slices of veal; beat an egg and put over the 
stuffing ; roll each slice up tightly, and tie with a thread ; stick 
a few cloves in them; grate bread-crumbs thickly over them, 
after they are put in the skillet with butter, and onions chop- 
ped fine. When done, lay them on a dish, make your gravy, 
and pour over them. Take the threads off, garnish with hard- 
boiled eggs, and serve. Cut the olives in slices. 

CONFEDERATE VEAL. 

Take two pounds of the round of white veal; beat a little ; 
salt well; add plenty of red and black pepper; flour it well, 
and then lard it. Chop fine, parsley, thyme, carrot, and a 



44 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 



little celery; spread these over as a paste; then grate the rind 
of a lemon over it. After squeezing the juice of a lemon 
over it, roll it up, tie it with a cord, sprinkle with flour, and 
fry until it is a light brown ; then add one tea-cup of mush- 
rooms. After pouring enough boiling water over it to make 
considerable gravy, let it simmer down; then add one table- 
spoonful of Worcestershire sauce. 

VEAL CUTLETS. 

1. Broiled. — When properly trimmed, they may be im- 
proved as directed for veal. Salt and pepper both sides; 
spread a little melted butter on both sides, also, by means 
of a brush ; place them on before or under the fire ; baste 
now and then with melted butter; turn over one, two, or 
three times, and when rather overdone, serve with a maitre 
d' hotel sauce spread all over. This way of serving them is 
sometimes called au naturel. 

2. With Crumbs. — When trimmed, dip them in egg beat- 
en with salt, pepper, and chopped parsley ; roll them in. bread- 
crumbs, and then broil and serve them as the above, with a 
maitre d' hotel. 

3. Fines Herbs. — Broil the chops as above, either with 
or without crumbs, and serve them with sauce aux fines 
herbes. 

4. With Mushrooms. — When broiled and dished, sur- 
round them with a garniture of mushrooms, and serve warm. 
When there are several cutlets on the dish, and placed all 
around, overlapping, the garniture may be put in the middle 
of the chops. 

FRIED VEAL-CUTLETS. 



Pepper and salt two pounds of veal, sliced from the leg and 
cut in pieces half the size of your hand. Make a batter of 
two eggs and a little milk well beaten together. Have a tea- 
cupful of bread or cracker crumbs, and dip each piece of veal, 



MEATS, POULTRY, ETC. 45 

first in the egg batter, and then in the crumbs, and fry quick- 
ly in boiling lard. 

VEAL OMELET. 

Three pounds of raw veal ; four slices of salt pork chopped 
fine; three eggs; two table-spoonfuls of cream or milk ; four 
powdered crackers. Season with thyme, one tea-spoonful of 
pepper, one of salt, half a nutmeg. Form into a loaf, and 
bake two or three hours in a slow oven. Baste with a little 
butter melted in hot water. Cut in thin slices for the table. 

WELTON VEAL. 

Boil four eggs hard; slice them, and line a dish. Then 
place a layer of raw veal cut thin. Mix chopped ham with 
one egg and sage for the next layer ; then another of sliced 
veal, and so on, till the dish is full. Don't forget to salt and 
pepper to taste. Cover with aflat cover; put a weight on 
top to press; steam four hours. To be eaten cold, cut in 
thin slices. 

VEAL BOUILLI. 

Take about six pounds of fat veal, and cut in pieces about 
the size for stewing; sprinkle with flour, and fry brown. In 
the same vessel cut up and fry one onion and two pods of 
garlic; then add one pint of prepared tomatoes, one tea- 
spoonful of pepper, and the same of salt. When nearly done, 
cut up and add a sprig of parsley. This will require two 
and one half or three hours slow cooking. 

STUFFED CALF'S-HEAD. 

Put on your calf s-head to boil, with two sets of feet, either 
calf 's-feet or hog's-feet. When perfectly tender, split the 
head on the under side, and carefully remove the bones, not 
breaking the skin ; also, take the bones from the feet, and 
chop fine. Season to your taste with pepper, salt, a little 
onion, or any other seasoning you may fancy. Then stuff 



46 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

the skin and put it in nice shape in the baking-pan ; then 
return it to the stove and let it remain until a light brown; 
then make a dressing of hard-boiled eggs, butter, and the 
brains of calf 's-head. Serve with the head. 

VEAL SWEET-BREAD. 

Take two fresh sweet-breads; parboil them a few min- 
utes; then lay them in cold water. Beat the yelks of two 
eggs; grate some cracker crumbs. When the sweet-breads 
are cold, wipe them dry; then dip them in the egg, and then 
in the crumbs ; then cook them with a little butter, pepper, 
and salt, to a nice brown. Make a gravy by adding a little 
veal gravy to that in which they have been cooked, and the 
juice of a lemon. Toast thin slices of bread, and dip in this 
gravy and lay on the sweat-bread. 

FRIED SWEET-BREADS.— No. i. 

Parboil them a few minutes, then drop them in cold water; 
skin them ; roll them in a little flour, and fry moderately in 
boiling lard, seasoned with salt and pepper. .Remove them 
from the fire, and stir into the gravy a little flour and hot 
water. When this boils, add a wine-glass of wine or catch- 
up. 

FRIED SWEET-BREADS.— No. 2. 

Scald them in salt and water; take out the stringy part; 
then put them in cold water for a few moments; dry them in 
a towel; roll some crackers or bread-crumbs'; dip the sweet- 
bread in the yelk of an egg beaten; roll in the cracker, and 
fry brown in butter. When they are done, put them on a 
dish. Pour into a frying-pan a large cup of sweet cream, a 
little pepper and salt, and a little green parsley chopped fine: 
dust in a very little flour, and when it boils up, pour it over 
the sweet-breads and send to the table hot. 



MEATS, POULTRY, ETC. 47 

A PIE OF SWEET-BREAD AND OYSTERS. 

Boil the sweetbreads tender; season with pepper and salt ; 
make a gravy with the water in which they were boiled, add- 
ing half a cnp of butter, the yelks of two eggs, and a table- 
spoonful of flour. Line the dish with puff-paste ; have the 
same quantity of oysters as of sweet-breads; lay the oysters 
in first; cover with sweet-breads, and fill the dish with gravy ; 
put on the top crust, and bake slowly until done. 

STEWED SWEET-BREADS. 

Prepare them by parboiling and letting them remain a few 
minutes in cold water, to whiten them. Stew in oyster-liquor 
until tender; then take them off and remove the gristle, and 
season with salt and pepper, a few oysters, and a large table- 
spoonful of butter. Pour on buttered toast. 

Toast that is placed in the bottom of a dish upon which 
stews or gravies are to be poured, should be trimmed of the 
crust and dipped for a few minutes in hot water. 

BAKED SWEET-BREAD. 

Boil it half an hour; then throw it in cold water, to plump 
out ; roll it in eggs and bread-crumbs, seasoned with salt and 
pepper. Lay them in the pan, put a lump of butter on each, 
and bake them. 

FRIED LIVER. 

Put in a frying-pan some slices of bacon, and fry out the 
grease, or a large spoonful of lard. Cut the liver in thin 
slices; season with pepper and salt; dredge with flower, and 
fry a good brown. It will require a longer time to cook than 
most meats. After taking up the liver, pour a little boiling 
water to the grease in which the liver has been fried, and 
sprinkle in a little flour to thicken the gravy. Let it boil 
up, and pour over the liver. 



48 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

BEEF-KIDNEYS FRIED. 

Kemove all the fat and skin from the kidneys; cut in thin 
slices; mix with cayenne pepper, salt, parsley, "and onion 
chopped fine ; dredge with flour, and fry in hot lard. When 
the kidneys are taken out, add to the gravy a wine-glass of 
wine, a little lemon-juice, and a tablespoonful of butter. 

KIDNEYS STEWED. 

Take a set of kidneys and put in a stew-pan, with one half 
pint of water, two table -spoonfuls of butter, three onions 
sliced thin, pepper and salt, and a spoonful of flour. 

TO BOIL SMOKED TONGUE. 

Soak in cold water all night; put to boil in a pot of cold 
water. Boil gently for four or five hours. When done, peel 
and trim. 

BAKED TONGUE WITH TOMATO-SAUCE. 

Parboil a fresh tongue in salt-water until done enough to 
peel. Make a sauce of about one dozen ripe tomatoes, one 
large onion, black pepper, and salt; stew fifteen or twenty 
minutes. Put the tongue in a baking-pan, pour over it the 
sauce, and bake a nice brown. 

STEWED BRAINS. 

Scald a set of brains, to draw off the skin and blood. Put 
the brains in a stew-pan, with just enough water to keep 
them from burning. Season with a large table-spoonful of 
butter; pepper and salt to taste. When done, stir in one 
table-spoonful of cream or milk, with one table-spoonful of 
flour. 

BRAINS FRIED. 

Scald a set of brains, to take out the blood. Season with 
salt and pepper, and put in hot butter. When nearly done, 



MEATS, POULTRY, ETC. 49 

break in a vessel six eggs, and turn in the frying-pan with 
the brains; cook a few minutes, stirring all the time. 

FRIED TRIPE. 

Cut in slices after being well boiled; dip each piece in 
thin batter, and fry in hot lard. It may be fried without 
batter; dredge with a little flour. Serve without gravy. In 
frying, lay the rough side down first. 

STEWED TRIPE. 

After the tripe is boiled tender, cut in small pieces an inch 
scpuare. Make a dressing of cream or milk, one table-spoon- 
ful of butter, pepper, and salt; dredge a little flour in it; one 
small onion chopped. Stir these all together ; put in the 
tripe one table-spoonful of curry-powder, and stew for twen- 
ty minutes. 

ROAST TURKEY. 

Cut three large-sized onions fine; take about half a loaf of 
bread, soak it in water, then squeeze the water from it. 
Put in a frying-pan two heaping table-spoonfuls of boiling 
lard; put the onion in, and when nearly done add the bread, 
and fry until perfectly brown. Season with two table-spoon- 
fuls of butter; red and black pepper and salt to taste; a little 
sage may be used. Then put in about thirty or forty oysters, 
after the water has been drained off. Salt and pepper your 
turkey; put it in a baking-pan; then stuff it with the above 
mixture; sprinkle a little flour over it, two table-spoonfuls of 
lard, and the water that has been drained from the oysters, 
with about a pint of water. Baste the turkey often, and 
cook brown. 

TO ROAST GOOSE. 

Pick, draw, and singe the goose well. Cut off its head 
and neck. Take off the feet and legs at the first joint; also, 
take off the wings at the first joint. Stuff with a dressing 
4 



50 GULF OITY COOK-BOOK. 

made of bread-crumbs, seasoned highly with sage, onion, 
pepper, salt, and butter. Cover the breast with buttered pa- 
per, to preserve it from scorching, and roast to a fine brown. 
It will require from two hours to two hours and a half in 
roasting. Baste it well with butter, and a little while before 
it is done remove the paper and allow the breast to brown. 
Serve with apple-sauce. 

WILD DUCKS 

Prepare your dressing as you would for any other fowl, 
with the addition of more onion. Dry the ducks, sprinkle 
with salt and pepper, and roll in flour. Take three or four 
whole onions, put all in a pan with hot lard; turn frequently, 
until brown; add water enough to cover the fowls. Cook 
until there is just enough liquor left for the gravy. 

CANVAS-BACK DUCKS. 

Have the ducks wiped dry, and stuffed as any other fowl. 
Rub over them lard, pepper, and salt, and roast about an 
hour. Make a gravy by stirring slowly in a sauce-pan the 
giblets of the ducks rolled in butter, flour, and as little water 
as possible. Before sending to the table a little lemon-juice 
squeezed over them is an improvement. 

MOCK DUCK. 

Take a flank steak, make a dressing, the same as for 
ducks, spread it on the steak, then roll and tie tight with a 
string, to keep the roll in shape; lay it in a pan with a little 
water and lard, sprinkled with pepper and salt. Bake in the 
oven of the stove. 

SALMIS OF COLD GAME, GOOSE, OR DUCK. 

Put into a sauce-pan a piece of butter rolled in flour ; let it 
molt, but not brown; add half a glass of broth, the same of 
red wine, two whole shallots, and a bunch of mixed herbs,— 



MEATS, POULTRY, ETC. 51 

to be taken out before serving, — pepper and a little salt; boil 
together for half an hour. Cut up the game or duck warm, 
but do not boil it in this sauce, and add the juice of half a 
lemon. Garnish the bottom of the dish with fried slices of 
bread, and put the game upon it. Pour the sauce over it 
and serve. 

BIRD-PIE. 

Take about eight doves, and make a stuffing of bread and 
onions. Stuff each bird, then put into a stew-pan about a 
table-spoonful of lard, and a dessert-spoonful of flour; let it 
brown perfectly; cut a small onion very fine, and fry it, add- 
ing the birds, which should fry awhile before putting a pint 
of water over them, and let them boil until done. Take 
them out; add about two dozen oysters, with a little of the 
oyster- water, to the gravy, a table-spoonful of butter, salt, 
black pepper, allspice, and nutmeg; then line a baking-dish 
with pastry, put the birds in with the gravy, and cover it 
over with pastry and bake. 

SQUABS. 

Squabs are in the best condition to eat when fully feather- 
ed. Broil on hot coals, seasoned with melted butter, pepper, 
and salt. Serve on toast. A pie made of squabs, as you 
would make chicken-pie, is an excellent dish. 

BOILED CHICKEN. 

For boiling, choose a fat fowl. Fill the breast with force- 
meat or stuffing, and tie carefully round the body, or secure 
by sewing, which should be removed before sending to the 
table. Put it in hot water, and boil gently till done. Serve 
with drawn butter-sauce, in which three or four hard-boiled 
eggs have been chopped. This sauce can be made orna- 
mental by chopping one boiled beet fine, and mixing with it. 
Pour part of the sauce over the chicken, to garnish it, and 
put the remainder in a sauce-boat, to be served out as dished. 



52 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

CHICKEN POT-PIE. 

Cut up a chicken at the joints, — as for frying. Make a 
rich dough or crust ; place in the bottom of a pot, or large 
sauce-pan, a layer of the chicken, pepper, salt, bits of butter, 
and strips or squares of the dough; then place another layer 
of chicken, and over all put a crust of the dough in which an 
opening is left to pour a little water as the pie becomes too 
dry. Cover the pot closely, and cook about an hour and 
three quarters. 

CHICKEN-PIE WITH EGGS. 

To one chicken, six hard-boiled eggs, and one cup of but- 
ter. Cut the chicken as for frying; parboil in sufficient 
water, — in which you put a little salt, — to cook it tender. 
Line a baking-pan with puff-paste ; put in a layer of chicken, 
then a layer of the eggs, with bits of the butter; sprinkle 
well with black pepper and salt to your taste, then another 
layer of chicken, eggs, butter, and pepper, until all are in 
the pan ; cover the whole with the water in which the 
chicken was boiled ; add a top crust and bake. 

BROILED CHICKEN. 

Cut the chicken open in the back, and lay it in salt-water 
for an hour, to extract all the blood ; then wipe quite dry with 
a napkin or towel, and lay on a hot gridiron, over clear 
coals. Have in a pan some melted butter and pepper, with 
which to baste while broiling. . Brown the chicken on both 
sides, and when dished pour over it the remainder of the 
melted butter. Only young and tender chickens should be 
used for broiling. 

TO COOK AN OLD CHICKEN. 

Wash carefully and fill with buttered bread-crumbs, sea- 
soned with pepper, salt, and thyme; put in a pot with a 
tight-fitting cover, with about a pint of water ; turn often, and 
cook two hours, or until tender. 



MEATS, POULTRY, ETC. 53 

TO FRY CHICKEN. 

Beat two eggs, to which add a little milk ; pepper and salt 
your chicken, dip it in the eggs and milk; then roll in pow- 
dered crackers, and fry in lard or butter until brown. 

CHICKEN N A LA MANGE. 

Cut a raw chicken into two parts. Put half a tea-cup of 
sweet-oil in a sauce-pan; let it get hot; put your chicken in, 
and fry it brown on both sides; add a small onion, or a quar- 
ter of garlic, chopped with parsley, to suit the taste; dredge 
with flour, and fill the sauce-pan with water, so as to cover 
the chicken. Cover it very close, and stew inside the stove 
until done. Fry a dozen eggs on both sides, and serve with 
the chicken. 

CHICKEN FRICASSEE. 

Prepare a chicken; cut it into small pieces, put them into 
a sauce-pan, with half an onion, a small piece of mace, salt 
and pepper to taste, root celery ; let all boil slowly until the 
chicken is tender and cooked, without falling to pieces, the 
water simmered away. Just before serving, beat up the 
yelks of two eggs; pour to them the broth of the chicken, 
hot, and stirring well; pour it back upon the chicken, but do 
not let it boil, or it will curdle. 

FRICASSEE CHICKEN WITH APPLE. 

Dress and disjoint a fowl. Place it in a deep kettle, with 
sufficient water to cover it, and a little salt. When quite 
tender pour off the liquor and brown nicely in salt pork fat. 
Thicken the gravy and season with pepper. To one good- 
sized chicken take eight tart apples, wipe, halve, and take 
out the cores. Set them over the chicken, skin side down, 
then pour on the gravy, cover tightly, and let them cook 
ten minutes, or till tender. Serve the apple upon a sep- 
arate dish, and eat as sauce. If the gravy needs butter, add 



54 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

it after the apple is taken out. Young turkeys are nice pre- 
pared in this way. 

. POUL^ET ^A LA MARANGE. 

Fry the chicken in lard, brown as for gumbo, with onion. 
Of course, the chicken must be cut. When well done put it 
in a stew-pan and cover it with water. Let it simmer slow- 
ly j season with pepper, salt, butter, and a box of mushrooms. 
Garnish the dish with toast and eggs fried on both sides ; or 
if you prefer, you may use pastry-cakes. A little wine, red 
or white, a few olives, with seed taken out. Some pickle and 
parsley is nice to garnish the dish. Very nice made of cold 
turkey. 

A NICE WAY TO COOK CHICKEN. 

Prepare a nice frying-size chicken ; season with salt and 
pepper; fry in batter a nice brown. Lay on a dish in which 
you are going to serve. Make a sauce of five or six large 
tomatoes, chopped, a small onion, a little cream, pepper and 
salt, stewed for five or ten minutes. Pour over the chicken, 
and serve hot. 

CHICKEN V A LA BRUNSWICK. 

Take two fat young chickens; cut them up, not too fine. 
Put into a good-sized sauce-pan one table-spoonful of lard, one 
of butter ; brown two table-spoonfuls of sifted flour into the 
lard and butter, with an onion chopped fine. Salt and pep- 
per your chicken to taste. Slice three or four pieces of salt 
pork or fat from a ham; fry it with the lard, butter, flour, and 
onion. Have ready, peeled and cut fine, one quart of new 
Irish potatoes, one quart of tomatoes, one of Lima beans, one 
of green peas, one of green corn, and a glass of good claret 
wine. First, bi*own the flour, then add the onion, then the 
chicken, then the vegetables, with just enough boiling water 
to cover the ingredients; let it boil until done. Just before 



MEATS, POULTRY, ETC. 55 

taking up add the wine: let it stay about ten minutes. Stir 
well, and serve hot, 

JELLIED CHICKEN. 

Take one large chicken, or two small ones; boil them in a 
quart of water until tender. Cut off the meat, put the skin 
and bones back into the liquor and boil it down to a pint of 
jelly — about three quarters of an hour. Chop up the meat 
of the chicken and pound it fine; add to it a tea-spoonful of 
powdered mustard, one of salt, one of butter, a little pepper, 
and half a tea-cupful of the liquid jelly, from which you must 
strain the bones and skin; the remainder of the liquid jelly 
pour into the bottom and let it cool. Put the pounded 
chicken in a sauce-pan, and warm it, so that all the ingredi- 
ents may be thoroughly mixed; then let it cool, and spread 
it on the top of the jelly, in the mold. Set the mold in a 
cool place. When wanted to use, set the mold, for an in- 
stant, in hot water, and turn out like blanc-mange' . 

TURKEY GELATINE. 

Chop fine and separately the meat of a cold turkey, some 
sliced ham, four hard-boiled eggs, and some mustard pickles, 
and put them in a mold in alternate layers. Place the rem- 
nants and bones in a stew-pan, with some thyme, mace, pep- 
per, half an ounce of isinglass, and enough water to cover, 
and allow it to boil gently and thoroughly. When done, 
strain it through a sieve and pour on the chicken in the 
mold. Turn out when cold. Chicken may be used instead 
of turkey, if desired. 

BRUNSWICK STEW. 

At ten o'clock put on two slices of fat bacon, and one onion 
cut fine, and boil one hour. Then put on two quarts of to- 
matoes, skimmed, or mashed well, and boil one hour; then put 
in a large pod of red pepper, and two chickens, cut as for 



56 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 



frying, and stew until two o'clock; then put in one cup of 
butter, and stale bread-crumbs for gravy. Add two ears of 
corn, first boiled and cut from the cobs, some Irish potatoes, 
mashed; salt to taste, and serve hot. A squirrel could be 
used instead of chicken. 

"TO COOK A CHICKEN LIKE TARRAPIN." 

Boil a fine, fat, young chicken; when done and warm, cut 
all the meat from the bones, in small pieces, as for chicken- 
salad. Put into a stew-pan with one gill of boiling water; 
then stir together, until perfectly smooth, one quarter of a 
pound of butter, one tea- spoonful of flour, and the yelk of a 
hard-boiled egg. Add to the chicken half the mixture at a 
time ; pepper and salt to taste. After letting it simmer ten 
minutes, add a wine-glass of sherry or Madeira. Add spice 
and mushroom; catchup to taste. 

PILLAU. 

Boil one pint of rice in as much water as will cover it. 
When boiled, put in a chicken with one onion, a blade of 
mace, some whole pepper, and salt. When it is boiled suf- 
ficiently put the fowl in a dish, and pour the rice in it. A 
small piece of bacon boiled with the rice, and then taken 
out, adds to the flavor. Boil several eggs hard, and slice 
over the chicken. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

The lean of chicken, free from skin, minced finely with a 
little ham and stale broad-crumbs. The proportions will be 
six table-spoonfuls of meat, two of bread-crumbs, very fine, a 
shade of nutmeg, pepper, half a tea-spoonful of onions, a tea- 
spoonful of minced parsley; put all on with half a pint of 
stock — your sou]) for dinner will answer. When it comes to 
a boil mix a couple of eggs, well beaten, and some cream, 
and stew until it thickens. Spread it out on a dish to cool ; 



MEATS, POULTRY, ETC. 57 

shape like an egg. Roll in crumbs, and throw them into 
very hot lard, and fry quickly. Serve on a napkin with 
parsley. Brains stewed with the above is a great improve- 
ment. Veal croquettes are made in the same way. 

TO MAKE CROQUETTES. 
Take cold chicken or veal, with slices of ham, fat and lean ; 
chop them together very fine, and add a set of brains, mashed 
very fine also. Mix with stale bread, grated and seasoned to 
your taste ; knead all well together, until it resembles sausage- 
meat. Make up in little balls; dip them in the yelks of eggs 
beaten; cover them quickly with grated bread, and fry them 
a light brown. 

JAM BOLAYA. 

Have the lard hot, put in flour, cook to a light brown, 
with a medium-sized onion. Take the giblets, neck, small 
part of the wings and feet of your chicken, and put in the 
lard; add half a tea-cup of prepared tomatoes, two dozen 
oysters, with their liquor, pepper and salt to taste; put in 
nearly a pint of rice, one table-spoonful of butter; stir fre- 
quently when nearly done ; set back on the stove and let 
steam. 

VENISON V A LA MODE. 

Remove the bone from the haunch, and make a large 
quantity of force-meat, or stuffing of bread-crumbs, bits of 
pork, an onion minced fine, a small piece of celery, or celery, 
seed, parsley, and sage. Season with pepper and salt to 
taste. Press in the stuffing till the hole left by the bone is 
filled. Sew up the opening and spread over it nice lard; 
pepper and salt to taste. Cook well done; take out the 
meat, stir in a dessert-spoonful of flour, a wine-glass of wine; 
let it boil up once, and serve in a sauce-bowl. 
HAUNCH OF VENISON. 

A good haunch of venison will take three or four hours to 



58 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

roast. It being a dry meat it would be well to cover it with 
a paste made of flour and water, until nearly done; cover 
this with a thick piece of paper, tied on. Baste the paper 
well with butter, to keep it from catching on fire. When 
this is removed baste well with the drippings seasoned with 
salt, pepper, and a little browned flour sprinkled over. But- 
ter or lard may be necessary to afford sufficient gravy. 
This meat should be accompanied with a tart jelly. 

VENISON STEAKS. 

Cut the steaks about an inch thick, sprinkle with flour, fry 
in hot lard or butter. Season with salt and pepper when 
half done; turn frequently. Take out the steak when done, 
stir a little flour in the pan, and pour enough hot water on 
to make sufficient gravy. Let it boil up; then pour in a 
wine-glassful of wine, and pour over the steak. 

ANOTHER WAY TO COOK VENISON STEAKS. 

Put it in a well-covered pun, and heat it thoroughly with- 
out water. Take it out, and when cool enough to handle 
press it, so as to extract all the juice. Mix with the juice a 
table-spoonful of butter, pepper, salt, a little mustard, vine- 
gar, and walnut catchup, and put on the stove until they are 
well mixed. Eeturn the steak to the covered pan, and pour 
the gravy over it and cook gently till done. It will not take 
much time, as the meat is partially cooked. This method is 
equally good for beefsteak. 

BARBECUE. 

To barbecue any kind of meat is simply to broil it. When 
you wish to cook a whole mutton, or any other animal, have 
a large pit dug in the ground, and several hours before cook- 
ing make a good fire of oak-wood, and let it burn to a bed of 
coals. Place over the top of this pit strips of dry wood, upon 
which you place your meat. Make a sauce of butter, vine- 



MEATS, POULTRY, ETC. 59 

gar, mustard, salt, pepper, catchup, and baste the meat fre- 
quently; use a stick with a piece of cloth tied on the end, to 
baste with. To cook meat in this way requires constant at- 
tention. Turn the meat often. A smaller piece of meat can 
be cooked in the same manner, on a gridiron, over hot coals. 

SQUIRREL STEWED. 

Skin them very carefully, \o as not to allow the hair to 
touch the flesh ; this can be done by cutting a slit under the 
throat, and as you pull it off, turn the skin over, so as to in- 
close the hair. Cut the squirrel in pieces (discard the head), 
and lay them in cold water; put a large table-spoonful of lard 
in a stew-pan, with an onion sliced, and a table-spoonful of 
flour; let fry until the flour is brown, then put in a pint of 
water, the squirrel seasoned with salt and pepper, and cook 
until tender. When half done put in some strips of nice 
puff-paste and a little butter. 

SQUIRREL BROILED. 

Broil over hot coals, and baste frequently with melted but- 
ter, pepper, salt, and a little vinegar. Rabbits should be 
prepared in the same manner as squirrels. 

TO COOK FROGS. 

Put the hind legs in salt and water over night. Wipe 
them dry with a cloth; sprinkle a little flour over them, and 
fry in hot lard to a light brown; or, they can be rolled in egg 
and cracker-dust before frying. 

FROGS STEWED. . 

Skin, boil five minutes, throw into cold water, and drain as 
above. Put in a stew-pan two ounces of butter, for two dozen 
frogs; set it on the fire, and when melted lay the legs in ; 
fry two minutes, tossing now and then; then sprinkle on 
them a tea-spoonful of flour; stir with a wooden spoon ; add 



60 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

two sprigs of parsley, one of thyme, a bay- leaf, two cloves, 
one of garlic, salt, white pepper, and half a pint of white 
wine; boil gen tl} 7 till done, dish the legs, reduce the sance 
on the fire, strain it, mix in it the yelks of two eggs; pour 
on the le°;s and serve them. 



EGGS. (jl 



EGGS. 



BOILED EGGS. 

Put eggs into boiling water. If you wish the whites set, 
boil two minutes; if you wish the yelks set, boil three min- 
utes; if for a salad it will require ten minutes. 

TO POACH EGGS. 

Break into a vessel of boiling water as many eggs as will 
cover the bottom; best not to touch. Let them cook until 
the whites are set. Take up with a perforated skimmer, 
pour melted butter over them, and dust with pepper and 
salt. They are nice served on toast. 

TO SCRAMBLE EGGS. 

Break the eggs into a bowl, and stir in salt and pepper. 
Put a good piece of butter in a frying-pan, and when it is 
hot pour in the eggs, stirring all the time ; a few minutes 
will be sufficient. Grated ham is an improvement. 

EGG-TOAST. 

Boil one tea-cup of milk, thickened with a little flour or 
corn-starch, and one table-spoonful of butter; stir in your 
eggs that have been seasoned with salt and pepper, cook un- 
til the whites are set. Pour over buttered toast while hot 

OMELET. 

Beat six eggs very light — the whites to a stiff froth, the 
yelks to a smooth batter. Add to the yelks a small cup of 



62 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

milk, pepper, and salt; lastly, stir in the whites lightly. 
Have ready in a hot frying-pan a good lump of butter; when 
it hisses pour in the mixture gently and set over a clear 
fire. It should cook in ten minutes. To be eaten as soon 
as cooked, as it will fall. 

SHIRRED EGGS. 

Take as many saucers or small earthen plates as are re- 
quired for each person. Break into each two eggs, being 
careful not to break the yelks, and place in a well-heated 
stove to bake, the whites only to be done, the yelks half 
done. They are to be eaten out of the saucers, and sea- 
soned to taste at the table. 

FRIED EGGS. 

Break the eggs in hot lard with a little salt and pepper. 
It is best to break the eggs in a saucer before putting in the 
frying-pan, as some may not be good. Do not turn them 
over. Serve with fried ham. 

BAKED EGGS. 

Boil one dozen eggs until perfectly hard, then put in cold 
water; shell, and divide the egg in half, remove the yelk 
and mash up smooth, add a few bread-crumbs, season with 
butter, pepper, and salt. Fill the whites of eggs with this 
dressing; grate a cracker over the top, and bake to a light 
brown. 

STUFFED EGGS. 

Boil the eggs hard ; put in cold water. Cut out the small 
end of the eggs, take out the yelks, put in a bowl, and mash 
well, with. a small onion and a little celery chopped fine, four 
spoonfuls of cream, black pepper and salt to taste, and .one 
table-spoonful of butter; stuff the whites with the mixture 
and bake in a quick oven. 



EGGS. 63 

OMELET SOUFFLE'. 

Half a cup of sugar, half a cup of butter, one cup of flour, 
one pint of milk; mix well together, set it on the fire and 
stir until it thickens, then add the yelks of five eggs, well 
beaten, and set aside to cool. Beat the whites of the -eggs 
to a stiff froth, mix well in the above. Put in a pudding- 
dish well buttered, and bake in a tolerably hot oven. Eat 
warm, with or without sauce. 

OMELET WITH HAM. 

Six eggs beaten separately, season with pepper and salt ; 
add grated ham, and fry in small cakes in boiling butter. 

PICKLED EGGS. 

Scald one quart of vinegar, with a half dozen cloves, one 
dozen allspice, one tea-spoonful of pepper, one table -spoonful 
of flour of mustard. Pour this over one dozen hard-boiled 
eggs that have been shelled and placed in a jar. When eggs 
are boiled hard and are intended to be used when cold, they 
should be thrown immediately into cold water, to keep them 
from becoming discolored. 

EGG-BALLS FOR SOUP. 

Kub the yelks of three or four hard-boiled eggs to a smooth 
paste, with a very little butter and salt; add to these two 
raw ones, beaten light, and enough flour to hold the paste 
together. Make into balls, with floured hands, and set in a 
cool place until just before your soup is taken off, when put 
in carefully and boil one minute. 

EGGS A LA CR^EME 

Hard-boil twelve eggs ; slice them in thin rings ; have ready 
a plateful of grated bread-crumbs. In the bottom of a large 
baking-dish place a layer of the crumbs, then one of the 
eggs; cover with bits of butter, and sprinkle with pepper and 
salt. Continue thus to blend these ingredients until the 



64 GUL* CITY COOK-BOOK. 

dish is full, having the crumbs on the top. Over the whole 
pour a large tea-cupful of cream, and brown nicely in a 
moderately heated oven. • 

TO TEST EGGS. 

Put them in water; if the large end turns up they are not 
fresh. You can depend on any egg that will lay on the 
side in water and not float. 

FRIED EGG-TOAST, OR DUTCH TOAST. 

Slice bread, and butter it; beat five or six eggs very light, 
and dip into them each slice of bread, and fry in hot butter; 
pepper and salt to the taste just as you take from the fire. 
Serve hot. 



SALADS. 65 



SALADS. 



CHICKEN SALAD.— No. I. 

• Dressing. — Twelve hard-boiled eggs; rub the yelks in one 
tea-cupful of olive-oil, two table-spoonfuls of ground mustard, 
one tea-spoonful of ground pepper, one table-spoonful of 
Worcestershire sauce, one half tea-cupful of tomato catchup, 
one half tea-cupful of vinegar, three good-sized pickles, chop- 
ped fine, and salt to taste; two stalks of celery chopped, and 
if this can not be obtained use a small head of cabbage, well 
chopped, and celery-seed as a substitute. The above will 
answer for one chicken, which should be well boiled, freed 
from bones, and chopped; mix all together and cut up the 
whites of the eggs fine ; mix a part with the salad, and strew 
a portion over the top. 

CHICKEN SALAD.— No. 2. 

For about one pound of chicken, after it is minced, use six 
or eight eggs, boiled hard; separate the yelks and whites; 
mash the yelks to a smooth paste, in five or six table-spoon- 
fuls of sweet olive-oil, or the same of melted butter if pre- 
ferred ; add to this a tea spoonful of pepper, and the same of 
salt, two even table-spoonfuls of dry mustard, a half tumbler- 
ful of good vinegar, one table-spoonful of sugar. Stir these 
all together ; mince half as much white lettuce as there is 
chicken, and the same of white,' tender celery. If celery can 
not be obtained, use a little extract of celery and more let- 
tuce. Mix these well with the meat, using a wooden or sil- 
ver fork. The whites of the eggs may be minced and mixed 

5 



66 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK 

with it, or reserved to garnish the salad-dish, by cutting them 
in rings; add the sauce just before serving. A few small 
white lettuce-leaves, trim very nicely. 

CHICKEN SALAD.— No. 3. 

To each chicken allow ten eggs ; chop the whites very fine ; 
mix thoroughly with the chicken, rub to a smooth paste the 
yelks and allow half a tea-spoonful each of mustard, black 
pepper and salt, a sufficient quantity of vinegar to make it 
palatable; also one table-spoonful of oil, or the same quan- 
tity of melted butter. Celery to be used according, to taste. 

DRESSING FOR CHICKEN SALAD, 

Yelks of four eggs, beaten well, one tea-spoonful of sugar, 
one salt-spoonful of cayenne pepper, two tea-spoonfuls made 
mustard, six table-spoonfuls salad-oil, five of celery- vinegar ; 
stir all well and put in a sauce-pan, boil three minutes, stir- 
ring all the time; when cold pour over chicken salad. 

LOBSTER SALAD. 

To a can of lobsters make a dressing of one tea-spoonful 
of salt, one tea-spoonful of pepper, one table-spoonful of 
mixed mustard, four table-spoonfuls of olive-oil, four table- 
spoonfuls of good vinegar, the yelks of three hard-boiled 
eggs, rubbed smooth. Garnish with lettuce. 

POTATO SALAD. 

Peel and slice four boiled potatoes; chop fine half small 
onion, one bunch celery, and the whites of three hard-boiled 
eggs. The yelks mix with salt, pepper, mustard, oil, and 
vinegar to taste. 

IRISH-POTATO SALAD. 

Take a couple of cold potatoes, cut fine, with half a raw 
onion; put sweet oil, pepper, salt, and vinegar upon them. 



SALADS. 67 

TOMATO AND POTATO SALAD. 

Slice four tomatoes, four Irish potatoes, cold, and one 

onion. Make a layer of potatoes, then onions and tomatoes, 

alternating, until all are used; pour over this a dressing as 

for potato salad, and when ready to use place on top a lump 

of ice. 

ITALIAN SALAD. 

Soak in water six herrings for one hour; skin and bone 

them ; cut up six boiled Irish potatoes, six onions, six apples. 

six hard-boiled egg$>, half pound of cold veal or fowl, half 

pound salt anchovies; chop fine and mix together with four 

table-spoonfuls of capers, and half dozen pickles, and one • 

dozen olives; add three table-spoonfuls of olive-oil, pepper, 

and vinegar to suit. Place on a dish and ornament with 

olives, the yelks and whites of eggs, parsley, capers, and red 

beets. 

SOLFERINO. 

Equal quantities of grated ham, mashed boiled Irish pota-*"" 
toes, peeled raw tomatoes, chopped fine, and a little chopped 
onion. Then make a sauce of drawn butter, mustard, and 
vinegar; pour over immediately. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

One tea-cupful of vinegar, one dessert-spoonful of butter 
two table-spoonfuls of sugar, one dessert-spoonful of mustard, 
half tea-spoonful of salt, one egg, half tea-cupful of milk. The 
vinegar, butter, and sugar put on and let come to a boil, the 
other ingredients beat together ; add to the vinegar after it 
cools a little, then put on the fire and boil to the thickness of 
cream. Add table-oil, according to taste. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

Take half a tumbler of vjnegar, one table-spoonful of but- 
ter, one tea-spoonful of sugar, one tea-spoonful of salt, one 
tea-spoonful of mustard. Put it all on the fire and let it 



68 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

come to a boil; then stir in quickly two eggs, beaten well, the 
whites and yelks beaten separately, and very light; take off 
immediately. Serve when cold. 

SALMON SALAD. 

If the salmon salad is made of the fish preserved in cans, 
drain it from the oil, and mince the meat fine; cut up one 
third as much lettuce or celery. For one box of salmon boil 
four eggs hard, lay them in cold water a few minutes, shell 
and separate the whites and yelks, and lay the whites aside. 
Mash the yelks smooth with two table-spoonfuls of sweet 
olive-oil or one tea-cupful of sweet milk or cream; add one 
tea-cupful of vinegar, one table-spoonful of sugar, one tea- 
spoonful of salt, two or more tea-spoonfuls of fine mustard, 
pepper to the taste, and .toss lightly over the meat with a 
silver fork. Ornament with the leaves of the celery, or with 
curled parsley, and the whites of eggs, cut in rings. 

OYSTER SALAD. 

Take half a gallon of fresh oysters, the yelks of four hard- 
boiled eggs, one raw egg, well whipped, two spoonfuls salad- 
oil, or melted butter, two tea-spoonfuls of salt, two tea-spoon- 
fuls of black pepper, two tea-spoonfuls made mustard, one 
tea-cupful of good vinegar, nearly as much celery as oysters ; 
cut up very fine, drain the liquor from the oysters and throw 
them into hot vinegar, on the fire; let them remain until 
they are plump, but not cooked. Then put them at once 
into clear cold water. This gives them a nice, plump look ; and 
they will not then shrink and look small. Drain the water 
from them and set them in a cool place ; mash the yelks very 
fine, rub into it the salt, pepper, and mustard, then the oil, a 
fe>v drops at a time. When smooth add the beaten eggs 
and then the vinegar, a spoonful at a time. Mix oysters, 
celery, and pickle; sprinkle in salt to taste; then pour dress- 
ing over all. 



SALADS. 69 

SALAD CREAM. 

Take the yelks of three fresh eggs, and whisk them well up 
with ten grains of cayenne pepper; then take one ounce of 
mustard, salt one dram and a half, salad-oil half an ounce; 
mix well with half a pint of the best vinegar, and then add 
the two lots together; shake them well and you will have an 
excellent mixture, which will keep for twelve months. 

COLD SLAW. 

Two eggs, one table-spoonful of butter, or olive-oil, one ta- 
ble-spoonful of sugar, one cupful of vinegar, one table-spoon- 
ful of mixed mustard and pepper; put into a tin bucket, and 
cook in a kettle of hot water. Be careful not to let it curdle. 
Cut cabbage very fine; salt it, and pour on the dressing 
when cold. 

WARM SLAW. 

Pour boiling water over the cabbage, and cut up very fine ; 
melt butter with cream or milk; mix pepper, salt, mustard, 
and vinegar ; pour over hot 

HOT SLAW. 

Cut the cabbage very fine, and lay in cold water; prepare 
a dressing of one tumbler of vinegar, one table-spoonful of 
mustard, one tea-spoonful of black pepper, one table-spoonful 
of olive-oil, or a large table-spoonful of butter, and one tea- 
spoonful of salt. Put the mixture on the fire, and when hot 
stir in the cabbage; cook a few minutes. Serve hot. 

CELERY SLAW.— No. i. (Fine.) 

Take half a head of cabbage and three bunches of celery, 
chopped fine. Mix well one cup of vinegar, lump of butter 
the size of an egg, yelks of three eggs, tea-spoonful of mus- 
tard, one of salt, one of pepper, and two of sugar; heat this 
mixture on the stove till it thickens, stirring constantly; 



70 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

when cold add two table-spoonfuls of sweet cream, and pour 
over the cabbage and celery. 

CELERY SLAW.— No. 2. 

Take half a head of cabbage, two bunches of celery, and 
three hard-boiled eggs ; chop cabbage, celery, and whites of 
eggs fine. Dressing. — Mix the yelks of eggs with two tea- 
spoonfuls of sugar, two of mustard, one of pepper, one of salt, 
and vinegar sufficient to moisten. 

DRESSING FOR SLAW. 
Beat lightly two eggs; then take half a pint of vinegar, 
one table-spoonful of butter, half a table-spoonful of flour; 
boil all together until as thick as custard, stirring constantly. 
Add pepper, salt, and vinegar to taste; pour, when cold, 
over the cabbage. 

HAM SANDWICHES. 

Cut bread into thin slices, and butter nicely; spread on a 
little mustard, very thin; lay a slice of boiled ham between 
two of bread; or, if you choose, cold tongue, grated. 

SANDWICHES. 

Chop old ham very fine, or grate it; beat an egg thor- 
oughly, mix some ground mustard, let half a pint of vinegar 
come to a boil, stir in the egg and mustard, and mix with 
the ham. After buttering thin slices of bread spread on this 
mixture. 

HAM TOAST. 

Take a quarter of a pound of lean ham chopped fine, the 
yelks of three eggs well beaten, half a pound of butter, two 
table-spoonfuls, of cream, and a little red pepper; stir this 
over the fire until it thickens, and then spread on hot toast. 

DEVILED TURKEY. 
Take half a cup of tomatoes, one table-spoonful of catchup, 



SALADS. 71 

one tea-spoonful of dry mustard, one table-spoonful of butter, 
and a little red pepper; pour this hot over the turkey after 
it is broiled. 



SAUCES FOR FISH AND MEATS. 



SAUCE WITH OYSTERS FOR FISH 

To one pint of strained oyster-liquor add one goblet of 
claret, the juice of half a lemon, a blade of mace, and one 
table-spoonful of butter thickened with a table- spoonful of 
flour; when this is scalding hot add half a pound of butter 
stirring all till it melts; then add twenty oysters, let scald, 
not boil, and serve. 

FISH-SAUCE. 

Cream the yeiKs of four eggs in a table-spoonful of vine- 
gar; salt and pepper to taste. Add half a pound of butter, 
and place on the fire till it thickens; do not let it get too 
hot, or it will curdle. » 

SAUCE FOR FISH. 

Take the yelks of six hard-boiled eggs and cream them 
with sweet-oil, mustard, walnut catchup, Worcestershire 
sauce, salt, pepper, and vinegar to taste. Pickle chopped 
fine improves it. 

TARTAR-SAUCE. (For Boiled or Baked Fish.) 

Put into a small sauce-pan the yelks of two eggs, a des. 
sert-spoonful of vinegar, and a pinch of salt; whip up this 
mixture as quick as possible ; when the whole forms a sort 
of cream add two dessertspoonfuls of oil and a tea-spoonful 
of mustard, which must be well mixed previously, a pinch of 
parsley minced fine, and a little cayenne pepper. The oil 



72 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

should be put in drop by drop, to mix perfectly. Heat thor- 
oughly, not boil. 

SAUCE PIQUANT. (For Fried Fish.) 

Take three table-spoonfuls of sweet-oil, one of vinegar, one 
tea-spoonful of mixed mustard, some fine salt, some onion 
minced fine, chopped pai*sley, bright red pepper-pods cut up 
into small pieces. All these ingredients should be beaten 
well together and poured over the fish as it comes hot out 
of the frying-pan. 

MAYONNAISE. 

Place in the bottom of a salad-bowl the yelk of one raw 
egg, a tea-spoonful of salt, the same of dry mustard, a salt- 
spoonful of white pepper, as much red pepper as can be taken 
on the point of a pen-knife, and the juice of half a lemon ; 
mix these ingredients with a wooden salad-spoon, until they 
assume a creamy-white appearance; then add, drop by drop, 
three gills of salad-oil, stirring the mayonnaise constantly; 
if it thickens too rapidly, thin with the juice from the second 
half of the lemon. Add gradually four table-spoonfuls of 
tarragon vinegar. Two spoonfuls of cream is an improve- 
ment. Keep cool until wanted for use. 

VENISON-SAUCE. 

One pint of currant jelly, three fourths of a pound of but- 
ter, four table -spoonfuls of brown sugar, one table-spoonful 
of ground mace and allspice, and one pint of wine. Boil till 
it thickens. 

MINT-SAUCE FOR LAMB. 

Three table-spoonfuls "of chopped mint, three table-spoon- 
fuls of brown sugar, half pint of vinegar, and a salt-spoonful 
of salt; stir well until the sugar is dissolved. Do not heat. 

CRANBERRY-SAUCE. 
To a quart of ripe cranberries add half a pint of water, 



SALADS. 73 

stirring frequently; when soft, mash well; when done, stir in 
a pound of sugar ; let it boil up once, as much cooking 
after the sugar is put in will cause the sauce to- be dark ; 
pass through a sieve. Makes a beautiful jelly when cold. 

MUSHROOM-SAUCE. 

Take a pint of mushrooms; remove the outside skins if 
fresh, if canned they are ready for use; stew them slowly in 
milk or cream, seasoning with pepper, salt, and a spoonful 
of butter rolled in flour; stew them until they are tender, 
stirring them with a silver spoon. This sauce served with 
beefsteak or chicken boiled is very good. 

CAPER-SAUCE. 

Melt a quarter of a pound of butter with a table-spoonful 
of flour; add a pint of sweet milk, let it come to a boil ; sea- 
son with salt and pepper, then add a tea-cup of capers, and 
four eggs boiled hard and minced fine. Cucumber pickles 
well minced, make a nice substitute. This is a nice sauce 
fbr boiled meats. 

ONION-SAUCE.— No. i. 

Put six sliced onions in a sauce-pan, with three table- 
spoonfuls of butter, one tea-spoonful of salt, same of sugar, 
and half a tea-spoonful of ground pepper; cook slowly till it 
thickens to a pulp, stirring constantly; then add one pint of 
milk, thickened with one table-spoonful of flour. Boil till 
about as thick as drawn butter. Strain through a coarse 
sieve and serve. 

ONION-SAUCE.— No. 2. 

Slice one onion, fry slightly in two table-spoonfuls of but- 
ter, in which one tea-spoonful of flour has been stirred ; pour 
into this one tea-cupful of sweet milk and a little chopped 
parsley; cook a few minutes; pour over three hard-boiled 
eggs, minced fine. A very nice sauce for fish or boiled 
meats. 



74 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

CELERY-SAUCE. 

Cut two heads of celery into small pieces; put them into a 
pint of water, boil until tender, then add one half tumbler of 
cream, salt, pepper, and a small lump of butter rolled in 
flour; let the whole stew gently five minutes. To be eaten 
with boiled fowls. 

TOMATO-SAUCE. 

Remove the skin by pouring boiling water over them, chop 
them up and put them in a stew-pan, cook thoroughly, strain 
through a sieve, add a heaping table-spoonful of butter, pep- 
per, and salt to taste, and half a tea-spoonful of allspice; put 
it in the stew-pan and let cook slowly till it thickens. Use 
sugar instead of pepper, if preferred. 

HORSE-RADISH SAUCE. 

Mix together one dessert-spoonful of mustard, two table- 
spoonfuls of vinegar, and three table-spoonfuls of cream; 
season with salt and grated horse-radish to suit the taste. 

CURRY-POWDER. 

Pound fine and mix three ounces of coriander seeds, three 
of tui*meric, one of vinegar, one of black pepper, one of mus- 
tard, one quarter of an ounce of cinnamon, the same of cay- 
enne pepper, and cumin-seed. Keep this powder in a bottle 
with a glass stopper. 

TO MELT BUTTER. 

Take four ounces of good butter ; rub into it one table- 
spoonful of flour, one table-spoonful of water, a little salt; set 
the vessel in another of boiling water; shake it until the but- 
ter begins to boil. Do not place the pan containing the but- 
ter on the fire, as it is easily reduced to oil, and will be much 
impaired. This ma}' be seasoned with any kind of herbs; a 
litttle more water is needed when herbs are used. Take 
parsley, boil for a few minutes, drain off the water, mince 



SALADS. 75 

fine, and stir in the butter when it begins to draw. This 
sauce is fine for all boiled meats and fowl. 

DRAWN BUTTER. 

Take half a pint of boiling water, two tea-spoonfuls of 
flour, two ounces of butter; mix flour and butter till smooth; 
stir into the hot water and salt to taste. 

EGG-SAUCE. 

Make like drawn butter, with the addition of three eggs, 
boiled hard and chopped fine. Serve this with fish. 

BROWNING SUGAR.— (For Soups and Sauces.) 

Take half a pound of sugar, and put just water enough to 
wet it; pour in a vessel and simmer slowly, stirring all the 
time, until it is a light-brown color; add one ounce of salt 
and water to the consistency of sirup, boil a few minutes, 
taking off the scum. Keep in a bottle. Before putting in 
the soup or sauce stir in the quantity you intend using in a 
cup of the broth. 



76 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 



VEGETABLES. 



ASPARAGUS. 

Tie in bunches of about twenty-five each, and evenly as 
possible ; throw in warm, salted water, and boil quickly for 
twenty minutes. When done, take up with a skimmer and 
lay on buttered toast. Serve with drawn butter or cream 
sauce. 

burr Artichokes. 

The burr should be boiled in hot water, with a little salt, 
until tender, which you can ascertain by pulling out a leaf; 
if it leaves the burr easily, it is done. To be eaten with 
melted butter or oil, pepper, and vinegar 

STRING BEANS. 

String the beans by breaking off the ends and pulling the 
fibrous thread on each side. If old, it is best to break them 
in two, besides stringing. As they are strung, throw them 
into cold water until ready to be cooked. Put them in boil- 
ing water, with a little salt, and cook till tender, which will 
take about an hour. Drain them, and season with butter, 
pepper, and cream; return to the sauce-pan and cook a min- 
ute. 

Another way to cook beans is to boil with a small piece of 
salt pork. The meat should be half done before putting in 
the beans, and also skim while cooking. 



VEGETABLES. 77 



LIMA OR BUTTER BEANS. 

Shell and wash them in cold water; put in enough boil- 
ing water tq cover them, with a little salt; boil for half an 
hour; pour off the water, and season with butter and pepper. 
If they are a little old, add a small pinch of bi-carbonate of 
soda. 

TO BAKE DRY BEANS. 

Soak them over night in cold water; put them to boil in 
enough of cold water to cover them well ; let th.em boil two 
hours. Drain off the water, season with salt and pepper, 
and put in a dish to bake ; place in the center of the beans 
a tsmall piece of salt pork that has been boiled in another 
vessel, and bake half an hour. 

BRUSSELS SPROUTS. 

Soak in water a short time, and wash it clean; boil in salt- 
water. When done, strain and fry in a table-spoonful of 
butter, in which has been browned a table-spoonful of flour, 
and a small onion cut fine; add pepper and salt to taste. 

BEETS. 

Wash them well ; be careful not to cut the top too close to 
the beet, or break off the ends, as this will allow both the 
color and sweetness to escape ; boil one hour. When done, 
drop in cold water and rub off the skin, and slice very thin. 
Dress with melted butter or salad-oil, pepper, and salt; serve 
hot. They are more commonly dressed in vinegar, salt, and 
pepper, when cold. Old beets will take two hours to boil. 

CABBAGE. 

This vegetable, when properly cooked, will not disagree with 
the most delicate stomach. An eminent physician taught me 
how to have it prepared. It is simply to change the water 
two or three times while cooking; but be sure to have the 



78 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

water well drained each time, and a kettle of boiling water 
at hand to replace that which has been thrown off. Change 
the first water about half an hour after boiling, and so on as 
many times as you wish. Put the meat into the last water. 

ANOTHER WAY. 

Quarter a large cabbage, and lay in enough cold water to 
cover it for two or three hours; then have enough boiling 
water to well cover the cabbage, and plunge it in. One 
hour's cooking is sufficient. Put in a little salt before taking 
up, and serve with drawn butter. 

CABBAGE ^ETOUFE'. 

Take a white-head cabbage; make two incisions across the 
head deep enough to cleanse it; wash it clean ; then shake 
the water from it ; strew between each leaf nice sausage- 
meat, and tie up with strips of white cloth, to keep it in 
shape. Have ready a very large spoonful of lard in a pot 
large enough to contain the cabbage ; brown some flour, and 
when boiling' put in the cabbage; cover closely. After 
twenty minutes withdraw the potto a more gentle heat; sim- 
mer for two hours; salt and pepper to taste; serve whole. 

STUFFED CABBAGE. 
I 
Take a good-sized, very hard head of cabbage, lay back 

half a dozen of the outside leaves, and cut a square out of 
the center of the cabbage; put back this square, and tie the 
leaves firmly around it; then plunge the cabbage in boil- 
ing, salted water; let it boil till quite done, and remove 
from the water. Make a stuffing as for turkey; take out the 
square from the cabbage, and chop with this dressing. Fill 
the cabbage and place in a pot, with one pint of cream or 
rich milk and two table spoonfuls of butter. Let all simmer 
till most of the milk is absorbed. 



VEGETABLES. 79 

HOT DRESSING FOR CABBAGE COOKED WITHOUT MEAT. 

Beat together the yelks of two eggs, two table-spoonfuls 
of brown sugar, four table-spoonfuls of vinegar, a large ta- 
ble-spoonful of butter, and pepper and salt to taste. Stir well 
in a sauce-pan till it boils ; then add a cup of milk.or cream. 
Pour hot over the cabbage, and serve. 

CORN-PATTIES. 

Take six ears of boiled corn ; cut off from the cob by di- 
viding the grains and scraping after cutting; season with 
pepper and salt. Mix with the yelks of four eggs well beaten, 
two table-spoonfuls of flour; whisk the whites to a stiff froth, 
and stir in lastly. Drop one table-spoonful at a time in hot 
lard, and fry a light brown on both sides. 

FRIED CORN. 

Cut the corn from the cobs, and put in a frying-pan with 
one half tumbler of water to a quart; let it stew a short time, 
as it will be more tender; then stir in pepper and salt and a 
table-spoonful of lard, and fry a very light brown. 

GREEN-CORN PUDDING. 

Take twelve ears of green corn and grate it; add a quart 
of sweet milk, a quarter of a pound of fresh butter, four eggs 
well beaten, pepper and, salt to the taste. Stir all well to- 
gether and bake one hour in a buttered dish. 

SUCCOTASH. 

Boil the corn and beans in separate pots until done ; then 
cut and scrape the corn from the cob, and to every measure 
of beans allow two of corn; mix them; season with milk, 
butter, pepper, and salt. Boil up once, and serve 

GREEN-CORN PUDDING, WITH CHICKEN. 

Boil six large ears of corn ; slice the grains off, commenc- 
ing with a very thin coat of the outer grains. Boil a spring 



80 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

cbicken until quite tender; salt, pepper, and flour each piece 
of the chicken. Beat four eggs with a small cup of butter, a 
spoonful of pepper and salt; add to the corn, making a thick 
batter with the top of the chicken- water; place the batter in 
a large, buttered baking-dish ; lay the floured pieces of chick- 
en carefully down into the batter; sift a little flour over the 
top of the batter, but not on the sides of the dish. Bake it 
uTitil the bottom, sides, and top are a light brown. 

CARROTS. 

Carrots should be boiled in salt-water until they can be 
pierced by a straw. The water should then be poured off, and 
the carrots stewed a few minutes in melted butter and cream. 

CAULIFLOWER. 

Wash it clean ; peel the stem, wrap it in muslin, and boil 
in salt-water one hour,; make butter or egg sauce. Egg 
Sauce. — Beat two table-spoonfuls of butter until it foams; 
stir with it the yelks of four eggs; add half a table-spoonful 
of flour, and stir it while boiling in some of the liquor of the 
cauliflower. 

CAULIFLOWER OMELET. 

Take the white part of a boiled cauliflower, after it is cold, 
and chop it very small; mix with a sufficient quantity of 
well-beaten egg, to make a very thick batter; then fry it in 
fresh butter, and serve hot. 

EGG-PLANT FRIED. 

Boil in water until perfectly done, first" peeling it ; mash 
well, and stir into it when cool one egg, one table-spoonful 
of butter, one table-spoonful of flour to one plant; season 
with salt, pepper, and onion cut fine, if desired; fry in cakes. 
The batter should be soft enough to drop with a spoon. 



VEGETABLES. 81 



ANOTHER WAY. 

Peel the egg-plant ; parboil ten minutes ; cut in slices cross- 
wise; season with salt and pepper. Beat up one egg; dip the 
slices in the Qgg, then in cracker crumbs. Fry a light brown 
in boiling lard. Egg-plants prepared in this way, and fried 
in batter, are equally nice. 

BAKED EGG-PLANT. 

Cut the egg-plant lengthwise; take out the inside, and 
mix it with nearly as much bread-crumbs, one egg, pepper, 
and salt; fry the mixture in hot butter; return to the shells, 
and bake half an hour. 

GRITS. 

Pick over and wash nicely ; allow twice as much water as 
grits; season with salt, and boil till done. Cold grits can be 
nicely utilized by slicing, and dipping the slices in a beaten 
egg in which there is mixed a little flour, and fry in hot lard. 

Another. — Soften the cold grits with warm water. Mix 
with eggs, a little butter,' salt, and milk, and bake in a but- 
tered dish. 

HOMINY. 

Wash thoroughly through two or three waters, and boil 
three or four hours, allowing twice the quantity of water to 
that of hominy. Just before it is done, season with salt' 
Place a small lump of butter in a deep dish, and pour the 
hominy over it. 

MUSHROOMS. 

Cut off the stems, peel off the skins, and put in a stew-pan, 
with a little salt and water; cook about half an hour; add 
butter, pepper, and thicken with a little flour. Boil five min 
utes, and serve on toast or over steak. It is safest to stir 
with a silver spoon, as any toad-stools, which are poisonous, 
will turn the spoon dark. 
6 



82 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

BROILED MUSHROOMS. 

Wash, stem, and peel off the skins of the mushrooms; put 
them on the gridiron over hot coals, with the hollow side up; 
sprinkle a little pepper, salt, and butter on each one; cook a 
few minutes, but do not turn. 

STEWEO OKRA. 

Wash the okra in cold water, and cut it in thin slices cross- 
wise. To one pint of cut okra cut up one small onion, one 
table spoonful of flour, and fry in a frying-pan in which some 
slices of pork have been fried, or a large table-spoonful of 
lard. Scald and peel six tomatoes, and stir in the mixture. 
Cook until all are done. 

TO BOIL OKRA. 

Okra should be young and tender. Cut off the stems and 
the tip of the small end ; boil till tender, but not long enough 
to cause it to fall to pieces ; pour over melted butter, seasoned 
with salt and pepper. 

FRIED OKRA. 

Boil the okra in salt-water until tender; mash it up, and 
stir in one egg, pepper, salt, and flour enough to hold to- 
gether. Take up a large spoonful, and fry in hot lard. 

ONIONS. 

Onions boiled in milk, instead of water, are rendered more 
delicate and improved in flavor. Lot the milk boil ; add a 
little salt. Peel the onions, and put them in the boiling milk, 
and let them boil half an hour, or until well done. Drain 
them in a colander ; put them in a warm dish, and pour a 
little melted butter over them; sprinkle with black pepper. 

STEWED ONIONS. 

Slice your onions; have ready in your frying-pan a table- 
spoonful of lard. When it is hot, put in the onions ; let them 



VEGETABLES. 83 

fry a few minutes; pour in about half a cup of hot water or 
milk; sift over the top about a tablespoonful of flour; cover 
closely, and let it stew gently until the onions are done. Sea- 
son with pepper and salt. 

ONION OMELET. 

Six large onions boiled quite done; mash, and season with 
pepper, salt, one table-spoonful of butter, one half cup of 
sweet milk, and one egg. Bake five minutes. 

FRIED ONIONS. 

Peel and slice the onions ; season with pepper and salt to 
taste ; fry in boiling lard to a light brown. 

ONION PUDDING. 

One and a half cups of chopped onions, one cup of sweet 
milk, one slice oft light bread, two eggs, one large spoonful 
of butter, pepper and salt to taste. Bake in a pudding-dish. 
Cabbage pudding in the same proportions, substituting cab- 
bage for onions. 

PARSNIPS. 

Wash and scrape them; cut in halves or quarters, accord- 
ing to the size; boil them until tender, — about half an 
hour. Season with butter, salt, and pepper. 

PARSNIP FRITTERS. 

Boil the parsnips until tender; mash and pass them through 
a colander; stir in one well-beaten egg and enough flour to 
make it hold together. Season, and fry in hot lard. 

FRIED PARSNIPS. 

Boil until tender; slice them lengthwise; dip in batter, and 
fry brown in hot lard. 

PLANTAINS. 
Cut your plantains lengthwise, and put them in a pan; 



84 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

cover with sugar, and let them stand for several hours, so 
that they will absorb the sugar. Fry in a spoonful of butter. 

POTATOES. 

The best way to cook Irish potatoes is to put them in just 
enough boiling water to cover them, leaving the skins on. 
Let them boil steadily till done. When nearly done, put in 
a little salt; remove the skins while hot, and just as you are 
going to send to the table, pour over melted butter. A very 
poor potato cooked in this way, and pressed, while hot, in a 
coarse cloth, will be mealy ; and if mashed with a little butter, 
cream, or milk, you can not tell it from the best. Potatoes 
should not be served in a covered dish, as the condensing of 
the steam makes them clammy. 

ANOTHER WAY. 

Tare the potatoes very thin, as the best of the potato is 
near the skin ; put in sufficient boiling water, salted, to cover 
them. When done, pour off the water, allowing them a lit- 
tle hard, and set back on the stove to dry, with the cover of 
the vessel removed, to aid evaporation, or a towel over the 
top, to absorb vapor. Boil half an hour. 

NEW POTATOES. 

Eub off the skins with a coarse towel in cold water ; put 
them in boiling water; cook twenty minutes; drain off the 
water, sprinkle with a little pepper and salt, and pour over 
melted butter or cream. 

ANOTHER WAY. 

Skin, wash, and dry some new potatoes ; melt some butter 
in a stew-pan ; when it is quite hot, put the potatoes in it ; 
simmer them slowly, turning them occasionally. When done, 
take them up and place them in another stew-pan, with suf- 
ficient fresh butter to form a sauce; shake them over the fire 



VEGETABLES. 85 



merely till the butter is melted. Put them in a dish and 
pour the butter over them, and sprinkle with a little salt. 

POTATOES A LA CRE'ME. 
Put into a sauce-pan about two ounces of butter, a small 
table-spoonful of flour, some parsley chopped fine, salt, and 
pepper; stir these together; add a wine-glass of cream, and 
set it on the fire, stirring continually until it boils. Cut some 
boiled potatoes into slices, and put them into the sauce-pan 
with the mixture; boil up once, and serve hot. 

POTATO BALLS.— No. i. 

Two cups of mashed potatoes, one cup of grated ham, two 
well-beaten eggs, two table-spoonfuls of cream or milk, one 
table-spoonful of butter ; salt and pepper to taste. Make in- 
to balls, roll in flour, and fry in boiling lard. This is a good 
way to utilize cold potatoes; and it is a nice breakfast-dish. 

POTATO BALLS.— No. 2. 

Boil the potatoes; peel, and mash smooth, with one egg 
and a little flour, to keep it in form; add a little salt, pepper, 
and butter, and fry in boiling lard. 

BAKED POTATO. 

Boil the potatoes, and mash, with one egg, one table-spoon- 
ful of butter, and two table-spoonfuls of cream or milk. Bake 
quickly. 

Potatoes roasted in a very hot oven are both healthy and 
palatable. 

POTATOES MASHED WITH ONIONS. 

Prepare some boiled onions by putting them through a sieve, 
and mix them with potatoes. Regulate according to taste, 
seasoning with butter, pepper, and salt. 

MASHED POTATOES AND TURNIPS. 
Boil Irish potatoes as in No. 2; mash, and season. Boil 



GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 



turnips ; mash, and season. Allow two thirds potatoes and 
one third turnips ; mix well, and add cream or milk to taste. 
This is an excellent dish, if nicely prepared. 

TO FRY SARATOGA POTATOES. 

Pare and cut Irish potatoes very thin; put them in cold 
water to soak over night. When ready, take them out of 
the water and wipe them dry, as they will not brown if they 
are not well dried. Have your lard about as you would for 
frying doughnuts, dropping in about two handfuls at a time, 
Stirling all the time, so that they will brown evenly. The 
quicker they are cooked, — so that they do not burn, — the 
better they are. Add a little salt when you take them out 
of the fat 

GREEN PEAS. 

Shell and wash the peas; cook in hot water enough to cov- 
er them for twenty minutes. When nearly done, add salt ; 
take them up clear of water. Season with butter, and, if 
desired, add a little cream. 

GREEN PEAS WITH MINT. 

Put the peas in cold w.ater to boil, with a little salt. Add 
one sprig of mint, one dessert-spoonful of sugar. When 
done, take out the mint, drain off the water, and season with 
butter and pepper. 

This is an English method of cooking peas. 

FRIED FIGS. 

Have large, ripe figs ; peel, and cut in half the long way 
of the fruit ; fry in a pan of hot butter, leaving the flat side 
of the fig up. Fry a light brown, and after dishing sprinkle 
with brown sugar. These are almost, if not quite, equal to 
fried plantains. 



VEGETABLES. 87 



TO BAKE LARGE, YELLOW CUCUMBERS. 

Cut off each end, carefully scrape out the inside, and peel 
them. Make a force-meat of beef or veal, onions, a part of a 
clove of garlic, pepper, and salt; roll in flour, and fry in hot 
lard; add a little water, and let it cook over a slow fire. By 
cooking slowly, it will make its own gravy. 

TO BOIL RICE 

Wash one pint of rice, and put in one and one half pints 
of boiling water, with one tea-spoonful of salt. When this 
boils up two or three times, set back where it will boil gently. 
Do not stir after setting back. 

RICE CROQUETTES. 

Half a cup of rice, one pint of milk, two table-spoonfuls 
of sugar, three eggs, one table-spoonful of melted butter, 
grated peel of a lemon, and a little salt. Soak the rice one 
or two hours in enough warm water to cover it; drain it al- 
most dry; put in the milk; steam until tender; add the 
sugar, butter, and salt; beat the eggs to a stiff froth and add 
to the mixture; cook five minutes; add the lemon-peel, and turn 
all on a buttered dish. When cold, flour your hands and roll 
in oval-shaped balls; dip them in well-beaten eggs and crack- 
er crumbs, and fry in boiling lard. 

BOILED SWEET-POTATOES. 

Wash and boil as Irish potatoes, but without peeling. When 
done sufficiently to pierce with a straw, take up and peel ; if 
large, cut in two the long way; put in a covered dish, and 
pour over them melted butter. Very new sweet-potatoes 
should always be boiled, as they are not sufficiently juicy or 
sweet to bake. 

BAKED SWEET-POTATOES. 

Wash, and bake in the oven with the skins on. When 



88 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

done, serve without peeling. When roasting beef or pork, 
peeled sweet-potatoes laid in the same pan around the meat, 
and allowed to cook in the gravy, are very nice. When 
cooked in this way, the potatoes, if large, should be cut 
through the length, so as to get thoroughly done, 

SLICED AND BAKED POTATOES. 

}>oil sweet-potatoes nearly done, peel, and cut in slices; 
put a layer of potatoes, bits of butter dotted over them, and 
sprinkle them well with sugar; add another layer of pota- 
toes, butter, and sugar, until the dish is full enough. Add 
very little water, and bake. 

TO FRY SWEET-POTATOES. 

Parboil the potatoes, peel, cut in slices, and fry to a nice 
brown in boiling lard. They can be fried without boiling, 
though it will require a longer time, and more lard or butter. 

TO STEW SALSIFY, OR VEGETABLE OYSTERS. 

Wash the roots nicely, parboil, and scrape off the outer 
skin; cut in thick slices, and put into a stew-pan, with water 
enough to cover it well; add a little salt and pepper; cook 
until quite tender. Then pour off the water; put in a large 
table-spoonful of butter; thicken with a little flour. A table- 
spoonful of cream improves it very much. A table-spoonful 
of vinegar added gives a pleasant flavor. Serve hot. Car- 
rots and parsnips may be prepared in the same way, leaving 
out the vinegar. 

SALSIFY PATTIES. 

Wash and scrape the roots; boil until quite tender; mash 
well; make a batter of one egg, a tea-cupful of flour, half a 
table-spoonful of butter, a little salt and pepper, and a little 
milk. Stir this into the salsify, and drop a large spoonful in- 
to boiling lard. Fry brown. 



VEGETABLES. go. 



SPINACH. 

Wash thoroughly through two or three waters ; boil in 
salted water for fifteen or twenty minutes; then drain in a 
sieve. Put in a sauce-pan, with butter and pepper to taste; 
warm through, and serve with hard-boiled eggs sliced. 

BOILED SQUASH. 

Peel, cut, and boil the squash in salted water till tender. 
Drain and mash smoothly, seasoning with pepper and butter. 

ANOTHER WAY. 

Peel, and cut the squash in small squares of about an inch. 
Put a table-spoonful of butter in a stew-pan ; when heated, 
throw in the squash and cover tight; stir occasionally, and 
when nearly done add pepper and salt to taste. 

SQUASH-FRITTERS. 

Boil the squash ; mash smooth, with butter and pepper, 
adding a little flour and a well-beaten egg. Make in little 
cakes, and fry in hot lard. 

FRIED SQUASH. 

Peel and slice thin and evenly. Dip each slice in egg 
which has been seasoned with pepper and salt; then dip in 
bread or cracker crumbs, and fry in hot lard. 

ANOTHER WAY. 

The slices of squash may be dipped in batter, and fried in 
hot lard. When prepared in either of the above way3, it is 
almost impossible to distinguish it from egg-plant. 

MASHED TURNIPS. 

Peel, and boil in boiling water, with a little salt, until ten- 
der; drain them carefully from the water, mash smooth, and 
season with butter, pepper, and salt to taste. 



90 GULF GITY COOK-BOOK. 

WHOLE TURNIPS. 

Peel, and boil in salted water till tender; drain off the 
water, and add cream, butter, pepper, and salt to taste. 

TOMATOES. 

Pour scalding water over them, and let them remain in it 
a few minutes, or until the skins will come off easily. When 
peeled, put them in a stew-pan, with a little salt and butter, 
and stew them half an hour; add a little bread-crumbs or 
grated cracker. If sugar is not used, add a little black pep- 
per. 

SCALLOPED TOMATOES. 

Peel them; cover the bottom of a deep dish with them ; put 
salt, pepper, and butter on them; then add a layer of bread- 
crumbs or rolled cracker; then another layer of tomatoes, 
and a layer of crumbs, until the dish is filled; cover the top 
with crumbs. If sugar is desired, leave out pepper. Bake 
half an hour. If canned tomatoes are used, drain off the 
fluid before using. 

STUFFED TOMATOES. 
Select large and firm tomatoes; cut a very thin slice off the 
end opposite the stem; carefully take out the seeds and juice, 
so as not to break the tomato. Mix with the seeds and juice 
stale bread-crumbs or rolled cracker, salt, pepper, or sugar 
if preferred, two table-spoonfuls of butter. Then fill each 
tomato with the stuffing, place them in a deep baking-dish, 
aud cover them with a thin layer of the above mixture, and 
sprinkle dry crumbs on top. Bake from one half to three 
quarters of an hour, according to the size of tomato. 

BROILED TOMATOES. 

Cut them in thick slices; place them on a well-buttered 

broiling-iron, over a clear fire, having previously sprinkled 

with salt and pepper. Have ready a warm dish, place them 

in it, and pour melted butter on them. Serve them quite hot. 



VEGETABLES. Ql 



BAKED TOMATOES. 

Wash and cut the tomatoes in halves; take out the seeds. 
To six large tomatoes take half a pint of bread-crumbs, one 
onion chopped fine, one ounce of butter ; pepper and salt to 
taste. Fill the cells with the dressing; tie the halves togeth- 
er; bake in a pan with an ounce of butter and one gill of 
water; when soft, cut the thread and serve. 

FRIED TOMATOES. 

Wash and cut in halves ; take out the seeds ; season with 
pepper and salt, and fry slowly until soft. 

SPANISH WAY TO COOK TOMATOES. 
Peel a dozen ripe tomatoes, and fry them in butter, with 
two or three sliced green peppers; sprinkle on a little salt; 
add an onion, and cook well together. 

EGGS AND TOMATOES. 
Peel the skins from twelve large tomatoes. Put four spoon- 
fuls of butter in a frying-pan; when hot, add one large onion 
chopped fine; let it fry for a few'minutes , add the tomatoes, 
and when nearly done, six eggs well beaten. 

MACARONI AND TOMATOES. 
Boil one half pound of macaroni in milk or water, and in 
a separate vessel stew one quart of tomatoes. Chop the to- 
matoes, and beat them up with two eggs, a table-spoonful of 
butter, and salt and pepper to taste. Mix all with the mac- 
aroni, and bake. 

BAKED MACARONI. 
Boil one half pound of macaroni till tender; strain off the 
water, and put in a deep dish, — buttered to prevent its stick 
ing, — with layers of grated or finely-cut cheese, butter, pep- 
per, and salt, alternating with layers of the macaroni. Fin- 
ish with the cheese layer on top. Bake till a nice brown — 
about twenty minutes or half an hour. 



92 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK* 

MACARONI WITH EGGS. 
Boil till tender one half pound of macaroni ; drain off the 
water ; beat well two eggs, and mix in the macaroni. But- 
ter a dish, and put in alternate layers of macaroni and eggs, 
and grated cheese, pepper, and salt. Pour over all about half 
a tea-cup of milk. Bake till a good brown. • 



BREAD, BISCUIT, ETC. 93 



BREAD, BISCUIT, ETC. 



MILK YEAST FOR BREAD. 

Boil one pint of milk and half a tea-spoonful of salt. When 
the milk is cool, stir in enough flour to make a batter as thin 
as cream; keep it in a warm place; it will require about six 
hours to rise. To make up in bread, add flour until it is a 
soft dough; then mix one table-spoonful of lard, and let rise 
again for half an hour. Bake in a moderate oven. 

TO MAKE HOP YEAST. 

Pour a pint of cold water on a table-spoonful of hops; let 
it boil a short while ; strain the tea from the hops ; make a 
batter of flour and water, and mix with the tea; let it boil 
again. When cool, stir in meal as long as you can do so. 
with a spoon ; add two yeast cakes or a cup of yeast ; let it rise 
Then work in flour uptil it is stiff enough to roll ; cut out in 
cakes, lay on a dish, and dry in the shade. 

TO MAKE STOCK YEAST. 

Put one ounce of hops into a quart of boiling water; boil 
two minutes; strain enough of the tea on a half pound of 
flour to make a stiff paste. When well mixed, put in the 
balance of the hop tea; let this cool, and add half a pint of 
stock yeast. This will keep three days in warm weather, and 
a week in winter. 

TO MAKE THE FERMENT FOR BREAD. 

Wash three Irish potatoes, and boil (with skins on) in a 



94 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

quart of water until soft; use half a pound of flour; mash 
the potatoes, and rub them well into the flour. Make a paste 
the same as for stock yeast; then, with the potato tea and 
cold water, make this cool enough to bear the hand in it. 
Now add one half pint of stock yeast, and let it stand six or 
eight hours to rise. When this has risen and fallen, make 
the sponge for bread. Strain one pint of this ferment through 
a colander; add to this one pint of water, and make a soft 
batter of flour. Let this sponge rise four hours; add salt to 
make your bread; mold, and let it rise, and bake. 

ROLLS AND LIGHT BREAD. 

Take three pints of unsifted flour, and at noon have boiled 
a large Irish potato; while the potato is boiling, dissolve the 
half of a gem yeast-cake in a coffee-cup of lukewarm water. 
Take one of the three pints of flour, and sift it into a bowl; 
mash the potato quickly and very smoothly, and while hot ; 
put it into the pint of flour, and mix potato and flour well 
together with the hand; add a tea-spoonful of sugar and a 
small tea-spoonful of salt. Now pour onto this the cup of 
dissolved yeast; beat this batter well with a spoony cover 
this bowl of hatter, and place it where it will keep moderately 
warm. About eight o'clock at night, sift the other two pints 
of flour on the biscuit-board, leaving out a very little to 
knead the dough in the morning. Then take a table-spoon- 
ful of lard (not very heaping) ; mix it into the flour, adding 
another tea-spoonful of sugar and a tea-spoonful of salt. 
.Now pour the batter into this* flour, and knead the doiigh well ; 
put this dough into a jar or bowl that has a cover. Early 
next morning knead this dough over; make into rolls, and 
set to rise for breakfast. If this recipe is exactly followed, 
it can not fail. 

POTATO YEAST. 

Grate four Irish j>otatoes ; scald well in a quart of boiling 



BREAD, BISCUIT, ETC. 95 

water half a tea-cup of sugar, and the same quantity of salt ; 
put the mixture in a glass or stone jar, with a little yeast to 
make it rise; cork well, and keep it in a warm place the first 
day, or until it ferments. For two quarts of flour, use half 
a tea-cup of this yeast. It will keep for two weeks. 

LIGHT ROLLS. 

One quart of flour, a large spoonful of yeast, the same 
quantity of lard ; mix with warm water to a soft dough ; cover 
well, and let it rise all night in a warm place. Make out in 
rolls in the morning. They will rise in twenty minutes. 
Bake in a moderate oven. 

PARKER-HOUSE ROLLS. 

Two quarts of sifted flour, one pint of cold boiled milk, 
one table-spoonful of white sugar, one tea-spoonful of salt, 
half a pint of baker's yeast, and one large table-spoonful of 
lard. Make up sponge about three o'clock in the afternoon ; 
if quite light, about ten o'clock it will be ready to make into 
a dough. Knead well and let stand all night. It will be 
ready in the morning to mold into rolls. They rise and 
bake in a very little time. 

POTATO YEAST. 

Peel and boil one dozen good-sized Irish potatoes in one 
gallon of water till soft; mash them through a seive. Boil 
one handful of hops in the same water the potatoes were 
boiled in, and strain them into the mashed potatoes. Beat 
it well together; then add half a tea-cup of salt, half a tea- 
cup of sugar, and stir it well. After it becomes perfectly 
cold, add one yeast-cake, dissolved in a little of the hop-water. 
In two days it will be ready for use. Always stir it well be- 
fore using. 

BREAD. 

Make the bread with the above yeast as follows : Use three 



96 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

pints of flour; into one quart rub a table spoonful of lard, 
with a little salt. To one tea-cup of yeast add one egg, if 
you have it, and one table-spoonful of sugar ; stir well together, 
and pour into the quart of flour. Work it up with luke- 
warm water, adding by degrees the other pint of flour. 
Knead it till the dough is perfectly smooth, but not too stiff. 
In the morning, make out rolls. If the dough should be too 
soft, add a little more flour. 

SWISS ROLLS. 

Make a batter of one pint of flour, one cake of yeast dis- 
solved in lukewarm water, a large Irish potato, if convenient; 
when risen, two quarts of flour, one table-spoonful of lard 
and one of sugar, two eggs, and half a table-spoonful of salt. 
Pour in the yeast, rub the dough smooth, and set it to rise 
again. When well risen, make it into splits as follows: Koll 
out the dough half an inch thick; baste top with butter; 
cut out the size of a biscuit; lay one on the top of the other, 
and set it to rise. Just before baking, beat an egg and baste 
the top of each. 

POCKET-BOOKS. 

Beat the yelks of four eggs with two dessert-spoonfuls of 
sugar; then add one tea-cup' of sweet milk, with one large 
yeast-cake dissolved in it ; flour enough to make a stiff batter. 
Lastly, add the whites, after beating them to a stiff froth ; 
let rise. When very light, add one table-spoonful of butter; 
also one of lard. Sift the flour, and make a soft dough ; let 
it rise again, then make your pocket-books in the following 
manner: Work out the dough with a little more flour; roll 
in pieces about five inches long and three wide ; spread very 
little butter on one end; sprinkle with flour; fold like a 
pocket-book, put them to rise, and when risen bake. 

LIGHT BREAD. 

One quart of flour, one pint of boiled fresh milk, one ta- 



BREAD, BISCUIT, ETC. 9,7 

ble-spoonful of lard, one table-spoonful of sugar, tea-spoonful 
of salt, three table-spoonfuls of yeast dissolved in a little 
water; put the sugar and salt in the water. As soon as the 
milk boils, put it in a bowl to cool, and put in the lard. 
When quite cool, mix all and set it away to rise over night. 
Next morning work in a pint or more of flour, into which 
put one tea-spoonful of soda ; make into rolls or loaves, and 
set to rise again ; then bake. 

EXCELLENT GRAHAM BREAD. 

One quart of corn-meal, one pint of Graham flour, one cup 
of sour milk, one cup of molasses, one tea-spoonful of soda, 
one tea-spoonful of salt, and bake three hours. 

GRAHAM ROLLS. 

Boil two pounds of Irish potatoes, and mash through a 
colander; add to this one pint of water, one half cupful of 
yeast, and enough Graham flour to make a stiff dough. Set 
to rise all night, and in the morning mold into small cakes; 
let rise again, and then bake. Nice Graham rolls. 

GRAHAM GEMS. 

One cup of wheat flour, one cup of Graham flour, two eggs, 
two cups of fresh milk, half tea-spoonful of salt. G.rease 
and heat the pans very hot. Bake about half an hour. 

GRAHAM BREAD.— No. i. 

To one quart of lukewarm water add one tea spoonful of 
salt, two of brown sugar, and yeast as for flour bread; thick- 
en to a batter with sifted Graham flour, and let it rise until 
morning. Then add one half pint of new milk, one fourth 
tea-cup of molasses, one third teas]50onful of soda, a small 
piece of lard, and sufficient Graham flour to mold soft. Put 
into deep tins, and let rise. As soon as little cracks come on 
the top, put into a hot oven and bake one third longer than 
flour bread. This bread is better not to mold very much. 
7 



98 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

GRAHAM BREAD.— No. 2. 

To three pints of sifted Graham meal add one pint of sour 
milk or buttermilk, four table-spoonfuls of molasses, soda to 
sweeten the milk, a small piece of shortening, and a tea- 
spoonful of salt. Mold, and bake in a deep tin. 

MILK-YEAST BREAD.— (Excellent.) 

To one pint of boiling new milk add one pint of lukewarm 
water, one tea-spoonful of salt, two of sugar, and one tea-cup 
of fine cornmeal. Add the cornmeal first, then flour enough 
to make quite a stiff batter; place in a jar or pitcher, and 
put it where it will be kept more than milk-warm; stir oc- 
casionally until it begins to rise. It will then be ready to 
mold in less than half an hour. Mold soft, place in deep tins, 
and at once begin to heat the oven, as it rises very quickly. 
The sponge should be ready to mold in five hours. 

RYE BREAD. 

One pint of rye flour, one of cornmeal, one table-spoonful 
of lard, one tea-spoonful of salt, "one tea-cup of good yeast; 
mix with water enough to make a stiff dough; knead well; 
set to rise. When well risen, knead again and form into 
loaves. 

RUSK.— No. 1. 

One quart of flour, one cup of yeast, one of milk, one of 
brown sugar, three eggs, one nutmeg, two table- spoonfuls of 
butter; rub the sugar, butter, and nutmeg in the flour, then 
add the eggs well beaten, next the yeast and milk. Make 
the dough at night, and if more flour is necessary, add it next 
morning. Make into rolls ; let them rise a second time, and 
bake. 

RUSK.— No. 2. 

Beat an egg and a spoonful of sugar well ; add a half pint 
of well-risen yeast; then add another well-beaten egg, a largo 



BREAD, BISCUIT, ETC. 99 

cuj) of sugar, and one of butter; sift in sufficient flour to 
make a soft dough, and let rise till very light. Mold the rusk 
as you would rolls; fill the pan with them barely touching, 
and when well risen bake in a quick oven. 

SALLY LUNN. 

One quart of flour well beaten with three eggs, one cup of 
milk, half cup of butter, one tea spoonful of salt, one of soda, 
and two of cream of tartar ; dissolve the soda in a little warm 
water ; rub the cream of tartar thoroughly into the dry flour; 
put in the salt, slice the butter into the milk, and dissolve 
over a gentle fire, adding to it the flour. Mix all well, to the 
consistency of pound-cake, then bake in a pan as you would 
cake. 

HEALINGSPRINGS SALLY LUNN. 

To three well-beaten eggs add one table-spoonful of butter, 
one of sugar, one pint of sweet milk, one half tea-cup of 
yeast; mix in one and a half pounds of flour; let it rise; 
then beat up again ; and if too soft, beat in a little more 
flour. It should be the consistency of muffin batter. Make 
it up at night tor morning. 

CREAM-OF-TARTAR BISCUIT. 

Stir into one quart of flour two tea-spoonfuls cream of tar- 
tar, a little salt, one table-spoonful of butter or lard, with 
enough milk or water to make a soft dough. A table-spoon- 
ful of cream will improve them. They do not need much 
working. 

BISCUITS. 

One quart of flour, one table-spoonful of butter or lard, 
soda the size of a pea, mixed with milk or water, well worked, 
will make fifteen good biscuits. 

One heaping pint of flour, one tea-spoonful of salt, a piece 



100 GULF GITY COOK-BOOK. 



of lard the size of a walnut, one half tea-cup of new milk, 
and the same quantity of cold water. This makes a stiff, 
dry dough. It must be beaten or worked until it is perfectly 
elastic, then made into biscuits or rolled thin for crackers. 

BISCUIT WITH YEAST. 

Boil two large potatoes, and mash them while warm; put 
in one tea-spoonful of sugar, one of salt, a dessert-spoonful 
of lard, one cup of yeast or a yeast cake ; thicken with flour 
to a thick dough. In the morning, work in a little more 
flour; puncture with a fork, and let rise. 

YEAST-POWDER BISCUIT. 

Three quarters of a pound of flour, four ounces of butter 
and lard mixed, one table-spoonful of yeast-powder. Eub 
the yeast-powder, salt, lard, and butter into the flour dry 
until well mixed; then add two gills of water; work very 
little, and bake in a quick oven. 

CREAM BISCUIT. 

To three coffee-cups of sifted flour add one cup of sweet 
cream, two tea-spoonfuls of yeast-powder, a little salt; mix, 
and mold as little as possible to get the dough in shape. 
Bake in a brisk oven. Should the cream be thin, melt a 
piece of butter and pour into it, as rubbing shortening into 
the flour makes the dough less spongy. 

NICE BISCUIT-ROLLS FOR TEA. 

Make a nice biscuit dough, roll it out until it is about one 
eighth of an inch thick, butter it, then sprinkle well with 
sugar; begin at one end, as for jelly-cake, and roll; cut in 
pieces one and a half or two inches long; then bake. 

SPLIT BISCUIT. 

Two eggs, one pint of milk, two iron-spoonfuls of yeast, 
one table -spoonful of sugar, one of butter and lard mixed ; 



BREAD, BISCUIT, ETC. 101 

put in flour enough to make a soft dough; add a little salt; 
cover close to rise. Next morning, put on pastry-board and 
work it; roll it out half an inch thick, and cut them out with a 
biscuit-cutter. Put a piece of butter about the size of a pea 
in the center of each one, and put another biscuit on the top; 
grease your pan, and put your biscuits in an inch apart, and 
grease each one of them on the top; set in a warm place 
to rise. This recipe will amply repay any one for their 
trouble. 

ST. JAMES BREAD.— (Very Nice.) 

One pint of flour, one pint of milk, two table-spoonfuls of 
lard (even full), two table-spoonfuls of sugar, two tea-spoon- 
fuls of yeast-powder, or a little soda and sour milk; mix the 
yeast-powder in the flour; beat the sugar and the yelks of 
the eggs together; add the whites well beaten; alternate 
flour and milk, putting in a little at a time; melt lard and 
pour in the batter. Bake in muffin-molds or baking-pans. 
Serve hot. 

BELL FRITTERS. 

Put into a stew-pan a piece of butter the size of an egg; 
pour over it a pint of boiling water, and set it on the stove 
until ready to come to a boil; then stir in a pint of flour, 
making a smooth paste; stir constantly until as thick as 
mush. When milk-warm, stir in one egg at a time until five 
are added; put in a little salt; make into small balls, and 
drop into boiling lard ; fry until a light brown. 

BREAKFAST PUFFS. 

Take one pint of milk, one pint of flour, two eggs, a lump 
of butter the size of an egg, and a little salt; place the flour 
in a bowl; put the butter in the center of the flour; break 
in the eggs, and knead thoroughly; then gradually add the 
milk, so as to make a smooth batter. The puffs may be bak- 



102 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

ed in a cast-iron pan with small divisions, or small patty-pans. 
These should be heated, buttered, and filled about two thirds 
full. Place in a quick oven. They take but a few minutes 
to bake. 

COLONNADE PUFFS. 

Put in one quart of milk two well-beaten eggs, with very 
thin batter and a little salt. Grease the cup thoroughly; put 
half full, and bake in a quick oven. 

TURN-OVERS. 

To two pints of flour add three well-beaten eggs, a table- 
spoonful of sugar, and a little salt; work it well, and put it to 
rise. In the morning, work in a small table-spoonful of but- 
ter ; make into thin cakes, and turn half edges, not quite 
meeting. 

PAPOOS.— (Good.) 

One cup of flour, one cup of milk, one egg, and one tea- 
spoonful of salt. Bake in a quick oven in rings. 

HOMINY BREAKFAST-DROPS. 

Mix three table-spoonfuls of boiled hominy with two of 
flour, and half tea-spoonful of salt. Dissolve one table- 
spoonful of butter in a gill of milk, and pour it on the hom- 
iny ; add flour enough to roll this into cakes, and cut out 
like biscuits. Bake quickly 

DECEPTIONS. 

Take the yelks of three eggs and the white of one worked 
up with as much flour as will make it as thick as biscuit- 
dough. Beat well; it must be very light. Divide in small pieces 
and roll very thin; have ready a skillet of boiling lard ; put 
one in at a time, and turn as soon as done ; then take out 
and put on a sifter or dish, and sprinkle sugar on them. 



BREAD, BISCUIT, ETC. 103 

BANNOCKS. 

Take four tabic spoonfuls of meal, and dissolve in a little 
milk or water to a liquid ; pour in a pint of boiling milk ; 
add a little salt and a small piece of butter. When cold, beat 
up two eggs and stir them in ; grease little muffin-pans, and 
bake in a quick oven. Very nice for breakfast. 

CRUMPETS.— No. I. 

One quart of flour, two tea-spoonfuls cream of tartar sifted 
in the flour, two eggs beaten separately very light, one spoon- 
ful of salt, one quart of milk, and a tea-spoonful of soda dis- 
solved in some of the milk, and put in last. Bake in round 
cakes to cover the bottom of a plate. Butter them, while hot, 
with melted butter. 

CRUMPETS.— No. 2. 

Beat the whites of two eggs with two table-spoonfuls of 
yeast; mix in one pound of flour; put a lump of sugar in a 
pint of warm milk; rub all together until free of lumps; let 
it stand near .the fire until well risen. Bake in small cake- 
pans. 

MUFFINS.— No. 1. 

One quart of flour, two eggs beaten very light, one pint of 
milk, one table-spoonful of butter, one tea-spoonful of salt, 
one yeast-cake. Make up at night to rise; when risen, drop 
the batter from the spoon, first dipping the spoon in water 
to prevent sticking. Let rise in muffin-pans, and bake 
quickly. 

MUFFINS.— No. 2. 

Two eggs beaten lightly, a table-spoonful of butter, a pint 
of flour, half a cup of milk, one tea-spoonful of yeast-powder, 
a little salt. The same will do if you use yeast instead of 
yeast-powder, and let rise. 



104 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

CREAM MUFFINS. 

One tumbler of cream, one of flour, a little salt, two eggs, 
— the whites and yelks beaten separately. Bake quickly in 
patty-pans. These are excellent. 

ST. CHARLES MUFFIN-BREAD. 

One pint of meal, one pint of butter-milk, two eggs, one 
table-spoonful of butter (measure, and then melt), one half tea- 
spoonful of soda dissolved in the milk, a little salt. Bake in 
pans or rings. 

MUFFINS WITHOUT EGGS. 

One jiint of sweet or sour milk, one half pint of flour, one 
tea-spoonful of soda, two tea-spoonfuls cream of tartar, one 
half tea-spoonful of salt. Beat well, and bake quickly. 

WAFFLES.— No. i. 

To one pint of milk add two eggs, one pint of flour, a large 
table-spoonful of lard, a tea-spoonful of salt, and a tea-spoon- 
ful of carbonate of soda dissolved in the milk. 

MRS. E.'s RECEIPT FOR WAFFLES.— No. 2. 

One pint of milk, one pint of flour, two eggs, two large 
spoonfuls of melted lard, and half tea-spoonful of salt. 

WAFFLES.— No. 3. 

One pint of milk, half tea-spoonful of salt, flour enough to 
make it the consistency of cream, one tea-cup of boiled rice 
mashed into a smooth paste, with a table-spoonful of buttor. 
Beat the whites of the eggs very light, and stir in just before 
baking. 

WAFFLES.— No. 4. 

Into one quart of flour sift one tea-spoonful of* soda and 
one of salt. Then take one egg, one tea-spoonful of butter, 
and one table-spoonful of flour creamed together. Then add 



BREAD, BISCUIT, ETC. 105 

the sifted flour, and sufficient butter-milk to make a good 
waffle-batter. 

SWEET-POTATO WAFFLES. 

Two table-spoonfuls of mashed potatoes, one of butter, one 
of sugar, four of flour, a pint of milk, and a tea-spoonful of 
salt, well beaten together. Bake in waffle-irons. 

WAFERS. 

Put in a quart of sifted flour, two cups of butter; wet this 
with a tumbler of water, into which a tea-spoonful of salt 
has been dissolved ; work very little; cut in small pieces; 
and if two large after closing the irons, trim the edges. 

CRACKERS. 

Rub eight ounces of butter into two pounds of flour, one 
tea-spoonful of salt, two of soda, and milk enough to make a 
stiff dough; beat it with a rolling-pin until it blisters ; roll 
out thin, and cut with a tumbler; bake about fifteen minutes. 
They may be returned to the oven after they are all baked, 
and it will make them crisp. 

CRACKNELS. 

Take a quart of flour, half a nutmeg grated, the yelks of 
four eggs beaten with four spqonfuls of rose water; mix all 
to a stiff paste with cold water; rub in a pound of butter; 
make into cracknel shapes; put them into boiling water, and 
boil until they swim; take them out, and put them in cold 
water. When hardened, lay them out to dry, and then bake 
them in tin plates. 

DUKE'S BUCKWHEATS. 

Sift together one quart of buckwheat flour and one tea- 
cupful of cornmeal; add one table-spoonful of sugar, one 
tea-spoonful of salt; dissolve a table-spoonful of yeast-cake in 
epid water, and mix with the flour into a stiff batter, using 



106 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

tepid water; let rise all night in a warm place. Before cook- 
ing, add a half tea-spoonful of soda, and then thin the batter 
to the proper consistency. 

BUCKWHEAT CAKES 

One pint of buckwheat mixed at night with a yeast-cake. 
In the morning, add one pint of buckwheat, a little milk, a 
tea-spoonful of soda, one egg, two table-spoonfuls of molasses. 

FRENCH TOAST. 

Beat four eggs very light, and stir them into a pint of cold 
rich milk. Slice some nice baker's bread; dip the slices into 
the eggs and milk, and then lay them into a skillet of hot 
lard and fry brown ; sprinkle a little powdered sugar over 
them when taken out — and a little cinnamon also, if that 
spice is liked. Serve while hot. If nicely prepared, this is 
an excellent dish for breakfast or tea. 

CREAM TOAST. 

Boil one quart of milk ; stir in a table-spoonful of butter 
and a little salt; take two table-spoonfuls of corn-starch or 
flour mixed with a little milk; pour it into the quart of milk, 
and let it boil a few minutes. Have ready the toasted bread 
on a dish, and pour the boiling mixture on it; send to the 
table hot. 

FLANNEL CAKES.— No. I. 

One pint of fresh milk, a table-spoonful of butter melted, 
four eggs (the whites and yelks beaten separately), one spoon- 
ful of yeast, or a small piece of yeast-cake dissolved in a 
spoonful of tepid water. Put this in with the yelks, and 
thicken with a quart of flour. Lastly, after the whites are 
beaten, mix them with the butter and milk; then mix all to- 
gether, and beat hard ; set it a few hours to rise; season with 
salt to suit the taste. 



BREAD, BISCUIT, ETC. 10' 



FLANNEL CAKES.— No. 2. 



Four eggs, one pint of sour cream, one pint of water, one 
pint and a half of flour, one tea-spoonful of baking-powder 

sifted with the flour, a tea-spoonful of salt. 

FLANNEL CAKES.- No. 3. 

One pint of nice clabber, one pint of flour, a piece of but- 
ter or lard the size of an egg, a tea-spoonful of soda stirred 
in the milk, two eggs, and a tea-spoonful of salt. Beat the 
eggs separately, and stir in the whites last. Very good. 

BREAKFAST CAKES. 

Take a saucerful of stale bread-crumbs, and mix with a 
tea-cupful of milk; add three eggs, and flour sufficient to 
make a good batter, a tea-spoonful of yeast-powders, a half 
tea-spoonful of salt. Bake immediately. 

BATTER-CAKES. 

Put a half tea-spoonful of lard in a pint of sifted meal ; 
pour over this enough boiling water to thoroughly moisten 
it; add one quart of flour, a half tea-spoonful of salt, and 
enough sour milk to make a good batter, a half tea-spoonful 
of soda dissolved in sour milk, and one well-beaten egg. 

CORN-CAKES. 

One pint of sifted cornmeal, one tea-spoonful of salt, two 
spoonfuls of butter, four table-spoonfuls of cream, two eggs 
well beaten; add milk until it is a thin batter. Bake in 
pans. 

OWENDON CORN-BREAD. 

Two cups of boiled hominy; while hot, mix with it a large 
table-spoonful of butter or lard; next add a pint of milk 
stirred in gradually, a half pint of cornmeal, and four w.ell- 
beaten eggs. The batter should be the consistency of rich 
boiled custard ; if thicker, add more milk. Bake with a 



108 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

good deal of heat at the bottom of the oven, and not too 
much at the top, so as to allow it to rise. The pan ought to 
be a deep one, to allow for rising. It has the appearance, 
when cooked, of a batter-pudding. 

RICE CORN-BREAD. 

One pint of boiled rice, one pint of cornmeal, one ounce 
of butter, two eggs, one pint of sweet milk; beat the eggs 
very light; then add the milk and melted butter; beat the 
rice until perfectly smooth, and then add the eggs and milk. 
Lastly, add the cornmeal; beat all together very light, and 
bake in a quick oven. 

CORN-BREAD. 

Three eggs beaten separately, two cups of sour milk or 
butter-milk, one tea-spoonful of soda dissolved in boiling 
water, one table-spoonful of white sugar, one tea-spoonful of 
salt, and corn-meal enough to make a thin batter. Bake in 
a quick oven. 

THE FAMOUS ST. CHARLES INDIAN-BREAD. 

Beat two eggs very light; mix alternately with them one 
pint of sour milk or butter-milk, one pint of fine cornmeal; 
melt one table-spoonful of butter, and add to the mixture. 
Dissolve one tea-spoonful of soda or salaratus in a small 
quantity of the milk ; then beat all hard, and bake in a quick 
oven. 

SWEET-POTATO CORN-BREAD. 

One quart of cornmeal, a half pint of milk, half a pound 
of sweet-potatoes, half a pound of butter, one pound of brown 
sugar, and eight eggs. Boil and mash the potatoes ; rub tl e 
butter and sugar to a cream, and add them to the potatoes; 
next beat the eggs well, and stir them in the mixture; then 
add the milk, and then the meal. Beat all well together, 
and bake in a pan in a moderate oven. 



BREAD, BISCUIT, ETC 109 

PLAIN CORN-BREAD. 

Mix the meal with cold water to a stiff dough ; salt to suit 
the taste ; shape with the hand in small cakes or loaves. Do 
not bake too long, or the crust will be too hard. 



110 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 



GENERAL DIRECTIONS FOR CAKE. 



Cake, to be nice, should be made of the best materials. 
Butter and eggs should both be fresh. Some persons enter- 
tain the mistaken notion that butter which can not be eaten 
on bread will do very well for cake. On the contrary, the 
baking increases the bad flavor. It is a good plan to wash 
the butter in clear water before using it. The whites and 
yelks of the eggs should be beaten to a stiff froth, separately. 
Brown sugar will answer for some kinds of cake, if free from 
lumps and creamed well with the butter. When soda is 
used, dissolve before adding to the general mixture. Butter 
the baking-pan well, covering the bottom with buttered 
white paper. In cake-baking much of the success depends 
on the oven, which should be well and evenly heated before 
the cake is put in ; and never allow the heat to diminish, or 
the cake will fall, — except fruit-cake, which should remain 
in the oven, while it cools Mown gradually. Avoid moving 
the cake while baking, as it tends to make it heavy. When 
the cake is done it will leave the sides of the pan. It is a 
good plan to put a pan filled with warm water on the top 
range of the stove after the cake rises, as it prevents burning 
or cooking too fast. To prevent browning too fast, lay a pa- 
per over the top of the cake. Avoid any contact of draft 
while baking. 

FRUIT-CAKE.— No. i. 

One pound of sugar, one pound of butter, one pound of 
flour, twelve eggs, three pounds of raisins, three pounds of 



GENERAL DIRECTIONS FOR CAKE. \\\ 

currants, two pounds of citron, three pounds of almonds, 
chopped, not too fine, one ounce of allspice, one ounce of cin- 
namon, one pint of brandy, half pint of rose-water, three ta- 
ble-spoonfuls of cloves, and two nutmegs. The fruit should 
be dredged with sifted flour, before putting it in the batter, 
to prevent its sinking; stir in lightly. Put white paper in 
the bottom of pans — grease well with butter; then put in a 
layer of batter and a layer of citron, until the pans are full. 

FRUIT-CAKE.— No. 2. 

Toast pound-cake, roll very fine, and sift it; use one pound 
of this instead of flour, one pound of butter, one pound of 
white sugar, one dozen eggs, three pounds of raisins, two 
pounds of currants, one pound of citron, one pound of al- 
monds blanched and chopped, not very fine, half a tumbler 
of good sherry or Madeira wine, half a tumbler of French 
brandy, one nutmeg, half a tea-spoonful of cloves, half a tea- 
spoonful of allspice, and half a tea-spoonful of cinnamon. 

FRUIT-CAKE.— No. 3. 

One pound of butter, one pound of sugar, ten eggs, — leav- 
ing out four whites, — one pound of flour, two pounds of rai- 
sins, stoned and chopped fine, two pounds of currants, three 
quarters of a pound of citron, half a cup of molasses, half a 
cup of sour cream, one gill of brandy, one ounce nutmeg, 
half ounce of cloves, half ounce of cinnamon, half ounce of 
allspice, half a tea-spoonful of soda. This makes one large 
loaf. Bake five hours. 

WEDDING-CAKE. 

Five pounds of flour, four pounds of sugar, three and one 
half pounds of butter, three dozen eggs, leaving out four 
whites, six pounds of washed and well-dried currants, two 
pounds of seeded raisins, two pounds of citron, two ounces 
of mace, one ounce of cinnamon, one ounce of cloves, one 
cup of molasses, one tea-spoonful of soda, two wine-glassfuls 



112 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

of good brandy. Cream the butter and sugar, then add the 
'thoroughly beaten eggs; molasses, brandy, and spices should 
then be added. Stir the flour in gently. The fruit should 
be well rubbed in flour extra from the five pounds. Citron 
should be sliced thin and set in two or three thick layers, as 
the dough is put in the pans. Bake gently three or four 
hours. 

WHITE FRUIT-CAKE.— No. i. 

One pound of sugar, one pound of citron, one pound of 
flour, half pound of butter, twelve eggs, yelks and whites 
beaten separately, two grated cocoa-nuts, one pound of 
blanched almonds, split, two tea-spoonfuls cream of tartar, 
and one tea-spoonful of soda. 

WHITE FRUIT-CAKE.— No. 2 

Twelve eggs, one pound of butter, one pound of sugar, one 
pound of flour, two pounds of citron — some sliced, and some 
chopped fine; two pounds of blanched almonds, two grated 
cocoa-nuts, one wine-glassful of wine, one table-spoonful of 
mace, one table-spoonful of cinnamon, and two tea-spoonfuls 
of yeast-powder. Do not bake as long as black fruit-cake. 

WHITE FRUIT-CAKE.— No. 3. 

One pound of flour, one pound of butter, one pound of 
sugar, one pound of grated cocoa-nut, one pound of citron 
cut in small slices, one pound of almonds blanched and cut 
fine, one pound of English walnuts, and twelve eggs. 

LOAF-CAKE. 

Ten eggs, with three whites left out, one pound of sugar, 
one pound of butter, one pound of flour, one pound of citron, 
two pounds of currants, two table-spoonfuls cinnamon, one 
tea-spoonful of cloves, four grated nutmegs, one cup of mo- 
lasses, and one wine-glass of brandy. Use the whites for 
frosting. 



GENERAL DIRECTIONS FOR CAKE. \\% 



CUP FRUIT-CAKE. 

Four cups of flour, one and a half cup of sugar, one half 
cup of molasses, four egge, one large cup of butter, one pound 
of currants, one pound of raisins, one half pound of citron, 
one half tea-spoonful of soda, half tea-spoonful of cloves, 
half tea-spoonful cinnamon, half tea-spoonful spice, and one 
half tea-cup of wine, or water. 

POUND-CAKE.— No. i. 

One pound of flour, one pound of eggs, one pound of sugar, 
and one pound of butter. Cream the butter and flour together 
till perfectly light. Beat the eggs separately, beating the 
sugar with the yelks ; then add alternately the whites and 
creamed butter. Lastly, add one table-spoonful of lemon- 
juice, and one tea-spoonful of extract of lemon. Bake 
quickly. 

POUND-CAKE.— No. 2a 

Twelve eggs, one pound of butter, one pound of sugar, one 
pound of flour. Flavor with extract of lemon or vanilla, to 
taste. » 

POUND-CAKE.— No. 3. 

Ten eggs, one pound of white sugar, one pound of flour, 
three quarters of a pound of butter, and the juice of one 
lemon. Kub the butter and sugar to a cream. Sift the 
flour, adding one tea-spoonful of yeast powder. Beat the 
yelks of the eggs and add them to the butter and sugar; 
then put in the juice of the lemon. Stir the whites to a stiff 
froth ; then add the flour and whites alternately. Beat all 
together well. Bake one hour in a quick oven. 

POUND-CAKE.— No. 4. 

Ten eggs, one and quarter pound of flour, one pound of 
butter, one pound of sugar, one quarter ounce of ammonia 
dissolved in a gill of water. 



114 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

POUND-CAKE.— No. 5. 

Ten eggs, one pound of flour, one pound of sugar, three 
quarters pound of butter, one wine-glass of brandy, one nut- 
meg, one tea-spoonful of mace. Cream the butter, and rub 
in half the flour; add bi'andy, nutmeg, and mace. Beat the 
yelks of the eggs, and add the sugar ; then the well-beaten 
whites and the remainder of the flour alternately. When 
thoroughly mixed, beat all half an hour. 

POUND-CAKE.— No. 6. 

Beat separately six eggs, one pound of sugar, half pound 
of butter, one pound of flour, one pint of sweet milk, one tea- 
spoonful of soda, and two of cream of tartar. 

WHITE POUND-CAKE. 

One pound of flour, one pound of white sugar, three fourths 
pound of butter washed and worked to a cream; ten eggs, 
leaving out three yelks; one half cup of cream — if sour stir in 
a little soda to sweeten. Flavor with vanilla or extract of 
almonds. 

CORN-STARCH CAKE. 

One quarter of a pound of corn-starcb, one quarter of a 
pound of flour, half a pound of butter, one half pound of 
sugar, and the whites of eight eggs. Rub one tea-spoonful 
cream of tartar in the flour, dissolve one half tea-spoonful 
of soda in a small quantity of sweet milk, and put in last. 

SPONGE-CAKE.— No. 1. 

Beat the yelks of ten eggs, with one pound of sugar, then 
add the whites of the eggs, well beaten. Stir in a little over 
a half pound of flour, and bake with a moderate fire. Never 
beat after the flour is added. 

SPONGE-CAKE.— No. 2. 
Nine eggs, one pound of sugar, and half a pound of flour. 



GENERAL DIRECTIONS FOR CAKE. H5 

Flavor with the juice and grated rind of one lemon. Beat 
the eggs separately, and stir in the flour a little at a time. 
Add an extra table spoonful of flour. 

SPONGE-CAKE.— No. 3. 

One pound of powdered sugar, twelve eggs, one pound two 
ounces of flour. 

SPONGE-CAKE.— No. 4. 

Take as many eggs as you please, the weight of the eggs 
in sugar, half their weight in flour. 

WHITE SPONGE-CAKE. 

Take the whites of twenty eggs, two and one half cups 
of sugar, one and one half cups of flour, one cup of corn- 
starch, and two tea-spoonfuls cream of tartar. Whip the eggs 
as light as possible ; sift in the sugar, then the flour, corn- 
starch, and cream of tartar mixed together. Flavor to taste. 

BOILED SPONGE-CAKE. 

Seven eggs, three fourths of pound of sugar, half pound of 
flour; flavor to suit the taste. Pour two wine-glasses of 
water on the sugar, and boil till it feathers from the spoon. 
Have the whites and yelks well beaten ; mix them and pour 
on them the boiling sugar, stirring briskly ; beat until cold, 
and add the flour. 

HOT-WATER SPONGE-CAKE. 

Four eggs, three light cups of flour, two cups of sugar, 
half tea-spoonful of soda, and one tea-spoonful cream of 
tartar; add one half cup of boiling water just before baking. 

CHEAP SPONGE-CAKE. 

Three eggs beat with one cup and a half of sugar ; add one 
cup of flour, beat three minutes, one half cup of milk, add 
one cup of flour with one tea-spoonful of yeast-powder. Fla- 
vor to taste. 



116 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

SPONGE-CAKE. 

Twelve eggs, the weight of ten in sugar and six in flour, 
Flavor with lemon. Bake the cake in a paste of ryemeal or 
Graham meal — the fine siftings of wheat-bran, mixed with a 
little flour, to make it roll, is just as good. Line the pan as 
for 'a meat pie; slightly butter the crust before putting in 
the batter. This will leave no crust upon the cake, and 
will prevent it from drying, if the cake is to be kept any 
length of time. 

LADY-FINGERS. 

One pound of sugar, one pound two ounces of flour; flavor 
to suit the taste ; sixteen eggs — beat yelks and sugar together, 
and beat the whites to a stiff froth ; stir in flour lightly, and 
never beat any mixture long after adding the flour, as it 
toughens it. Make a funnel-shaped bag of canvas, insert a 
tube (tin will answer) half inch in diameter, in the small 
end. Use this bag to shape your lady-fingers on the 
paper, then dust them lightly with powdered sugar. 
After they are done and cool, wet the paper, and they will 
come off easily; this will moisten the lady-fingers; stick two 
together, back to back, while moist. 

GOLD-CAKE.-No. I. 

Beat the yelks of eight eggs, very light, and mix with 
them one cup of sugar and three fourths cup of butter, pre- 
viously stirred to a cream. Add two cups of sifted flour, 
half a tea spoonful of soda dissolved in half a cup of sweet 
milk; when well mixed stir in one tea-spoonful cream of tar- 
tar. Flavor to taste, 

GOLD-CAKE.— No. 2. 

One pound of sugar, one pound of flour, three fourths 
pound butter, yelks of fourteen eggs. Work the butter and 
sugar well together, then add the eggs after being well 
beaten, one tea-spoonful of yeast-powder, then the flour. 



GENERAL DIRECTIONS FOR CAKE. WJ 

When well mixed, add the grated rind and juice of two 
lemons. 

SILVER-CAKE.— No. i. 

. One pound of white sugar, three fourths pound flour, half 
pound of butter, whites of fourteen eggs. Beat the sugar 
and eggs till it looks like icing; cream the butter and 
flour well together; then mix with the icing. When well 
mixed add two tea-spoonfuls of yeast-powder, dissolved in 
wine. Flavor to taste. 

SILVER-CAKE.— No. 2. 
Two cups of white sugar, two and a half cups sifted flour, 
half cup of butter, three fourths cup sweet milk, half tea- 
spoonful soda, dissolved in the milk, one tea-spoonful cream 
of tartar, and the whites of eight eggs. Flavor with peach, 
vanilla, or rose-water. Stir the butter and sugar to a cream; 
add the eggs beaten stiff, then the flour, and the milk and 
soda. Stir the whole several minutes, then add the cream 
of tartar and essence. 

SILVER-CAKE— No. 3. 

Whites of twelve eggs, three cups of white sugar, one and 
a half cup of butter, four and a half cups flour, and one 
fourth cup sour cream. Dissolve one tea-spoonful of soda in 
a table-spoonful of boiling water, two tea-spoonfuls cream of 
tartar, sifted in the flour; stir the butter and flour together; 
beat the eggs to a stiff froth ; then add the sugar and beat it 
well ; stir in the butter and flour and cream all together 
well. Flavor with peach; put the soda in last. 

DELICATE-CAKE.— No. 1. 

The whites of fourteen eggs, one pound of pulverized white 
sugar, one pound of flour, three quarters of a pound of but- 
ter. Beat the butter and sugar together, add the flour alter- 



118 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

nately with the eggs; a half cup of sweet milk. Bake 
quickly. 

DELICATE-CAKE.— No. 2. 

One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, three cups of flour, 
half cup of sweet milk, the whites of eight eggs, two tea- 
spoonfuls cream of tartar, and one tea-spoonful of soda. Fla- 
vor to taste. 

LADY-CAKE.— No. 1. 

The whites of eighteen eggs, one pound of sugar, one 
pound of butter, one and one fourth pounds of flour, one ta- 
ble-spoonful grated sweet almouds, and three tea-spoonfuls 
of extract of rose. 

LADY-CAKE.— No. 2. 

'Whites of six eggs well beaten, four tea-cups of sifted 
flour, one cup of butter, one cup of sweet milk, two cups of 
white sugar, one tea-spoonful of soda, and two tea-spoonfuls 
cream of tartar. If sour milk is used, leave out the cream 
of tartar. 

CUP-CAKE.— No. 1. 

Six eggs, three cups of sugar, five light cups of sifted flour, 
one heaping cup of butter, one cup of milk and water, — two 
thirds milk and one third water, — and a tea-spoonful of yeast- 
powder. Flavor to taste. 

CUP CAKE.— No. 2. 

One cup of butter and three of sugar worked to a cream, 
a half wine-glassful of wine, five eggs beat separately, one 
tea-spoonful of soda sifted with five cups of sifted flour, a 
little nutmeg, and lastly a cup of sour cream. Bake in 
round tins, in a moderately quick oven. Fruit may be 
added if desired. Frost while the cake is warm, and it will 
keep some time without becoming stale. 



GENERAL DIRECTIONS FOR CAKE. H9 

CUP-CAKE.— No. 3. 

One cup of butter, one cup of sweet milk, two of sugar, 
three of flour, four eggs, and one tea-spoonful of yeast-pow- 
der. Flavor with extract of vanilla. 

CREAM CUP-CAKE. 

Four cups of flour, two cups of sugar, three cups of cream, 
and four eggs. Beat well and bake in square tin-pans, and 
when cold cut in squares. Bake in a quick oven. 

WHITE CUP-CAKE. 

One large coffee-cup of cream or very rich milk — best when 
sour, one cup of fresh butter, four cups of sifted flour, and 
two cups of sugar. Stir the butter and sugar together until 
quite light, then by degrees add the cream alternately with 
half the flour. Beat five eggs separately, veiy light, and 
stir alternately with the remainder of the flour. Add essence 
of lemon, and lastly, a tea spoonful of soda. 

CUP CHOCOLATE-CAKE. 

Six eggs, three cups of powdered sugar, four cups of flour, 
one cup of milk, one and one half cups of grated chocolate, 
one tea-spoonful of yeast-powder. 

COFFEE CUP-CAKE. 

One cup of cold, strong coffee, one cup of sugar, one cup 
of molasses, one cup of stoned raisins, one cup of butter, five 
cups of flour, one tea-spoonful of soda, one tea-spoonful of all- 
spice, and one tea spoonful of cinnamon. 

JELLY-CAKE. 

Use cup-cake recipe, and bake in jelly-cake pans. When 
partially cold spread a layer of jelly or marmelade alternat- 
ing with cake-layers, till it is the thickness desired. Let a 
layer of cake be on top. 



120 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK, 

ROLL JELLY-CAKE. 

Four eggs, one cup of flour, one tea-spoonful cream of tar- 
tar, half tea-spoonful of soda, one cup of sugar, and a pinch of 
salt. This will make two cakes. Spread thin on long tins } 
and bake. When baked, turn from the tins; spread jelly 
quickly over the cake while warm, and roll immediately. 

LEMON JELLY-CAKE. 

Six eggs, two cups of sugar beaten well together, three 
cups of sifted flour, a small pinch of salt, eight table-spoon- 
fuls of cold water and three tea-spoonfuls of yeast-powder. 
Bake in jelly-cake pans, in a quick oven. Filling for above. — 
Three eggs, one cup of sugar, two lemons, juice and grated 
rinds, one tea-cupful of water thickened to the consistency 
of rich cream, with flour. Let all boil together, and when 
cool spread between the cakes. 

SPONGE LAYER-CAKE. 

One coffee-cup of sugar, one coffee-cup of flour, one tea- 
spoonful of yeast-powder, or one tea-spoonful cream of tar- 
tar, half tea-spoonful of soda, one table-spoonful of milk, and 
two eggs. Bake in thin pans, as for jelly-cake. Filling for 
ca ke. — One pint of milk, one large table-spoonful of corn-starch, 
the yelks of three eggs; boil and flavor with vanilla. The 
whites of eggs save for merangue. When this is cold, lay 
alternate layers of cake and the filling. The merangue is 
made by beating the whites of the three eggs with a small 
cup of pulverized white sugar; flavor with vanilla, and add 
a little citric acid to make it stiff and white; beat well. Lay 
this on the top cake, and put it in the oven to get hard, but 
not brown. Then put this on the others for the top layer. 

MOUNTAIN-CAKE. 

Six eggs, one pound and a half ounce of flour, half pound of 
butter, two tea-spoonfuls cream of tartar sifted in the flour, one 



GENERAL DIRECTIONS FOR CAKE. 121 

tea-cupful of sweet milk, one tea-spoonful of soda dissolved 
in a little boiling water, to be added last. Bake in' jelly- 
pans. When cold, put the following mixtures between the 
layers of cake. Beat the whites of two eggs, dampen one 
pound of white sugar with the milk of a cocoa-nut, and make 
this into hot icing, and thicken with grated cocoa-nut. 
Spread this on the cake, as for jelly-cake. 

CHOCOLATE-CAKE.— No. i. 

Half cup of butter, one cup of milk, two cups of sugar, 
three cups of flour, four eggs, one tea-spoonful of soda, and 
two of cream of tartar. Bake in jelly-pans. Mix one cup of 
grated chocolate, one cup of sugar, one and a half cups of 
milk, and one egg. Boil until as thick as custard ; when 
cool, flavor with vanilla ; spread between layers of cake, as 
in jelly-cake. 

CHOCOLATE-CAKE.— No. 2. 

Two cups of sugar, one small cup of butter, four eggs — leav- 
ing out the whites of two, one cup of milk, three and a half 
cups of flour, one tea-spoonful cream of tartar, and half tea- 
spoonful of soda. Bake in jelly-cake pans. Prepare a filling 
to put between the layers of cake. Six table-spoonfuls of 
grated chocolate, whites of two eggs not beaten, one and a 
half cups of powdered sugar, and one tea-spoonful of vanilla. 
Mix the eggs and chocolate in a bowl; set the bowl in hot 
water on the stove, and stir the mixture until smooth and 
shining; then add sugar and vanilla. 

COCOA-NUT-CAKE.— No. 1. ' 

Twelve eggs, — whites only, — one pound of sugar, half 

pound of butter, half pound of cocoa-nut, three fourths pound 

of flour. 

COCOA-NUT-CAKE.— No. 2. 

One coffee-cup of butter, two eoffee-cupB of powdered sugar, 
three coffee-cups of flour, ten eggs, one tea-spoonful cream of 



122 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

tartar, one half tea-spoonful of soda, and one cocoa-nut 
finely grated. Stir the hutter and sugar together till it be- 
comes creamy, then add the whites of the eggs, beaten to a 
stiff froth ; next the yelks, beaten very light. Then stir in 
one cup of flour, then the soda, dry; then another cup of 
flour and the cream of tartar, dry; then the last cup of flour 
followed by the cocoa-nut stirred in very lightly. Put in 
the oven without delay. This cake requires very careful 
baking. 

ANGEL'S FOOD. 

Grate one cocoa-nut, one pound of grated chocolate ; take 
the whites of four eggs and one pound of powdered sugar ; 
let it cook as in boiled icing. When it begins to rope take 
half of it and mix with all the chocolate; the other half mix 
with the cocoa-nut, reserving enough of the nut to sprinkle 
on top of the cake. Have either pound or cup cake 
baked in jelly- cake pans. Put a layer of cake, chocolate, 
then cake, then cocoa-nut, cake, jelly, &c, till it is the size 
desired. 

ORANGE-CAKE. 

Two cups of sugar, three cups of flour, half cup of water or 
milk, the yelks of five eggs and the whites of three, one tea- 
spoonful of yeast-powder, and grated rind of an orange. 
Bake in jelly-cake tins. Filling for above. — The whites of 
two eggs well beaten with one pound of pulverized sugar, 
and the juice of the orange. Spread this icing between and 
on top of the cake. Lemon may be used instead of orange, 
if preferred. 

CREAM-CAKES. 

Haifa pound of butter, one pound of flour, tea-spoonful of 
sugar, half tea spoonful of salt; rub them smoothly together, 
and stir into one quart of boiling milk ; stir constantly 
over the fire, till it clears from the kettle; set aside to cool. 



GENERAL DIRECTIONS FOR CAKE. 123 

When cool break in ten eggs, stirring well; add a small tea- 
spoonful of soda in half a cup of cream. Drop on buttered 
pans; shape with the hands in turban form, and rub a beaten 
egg over them with a feather. Bake moderately twenty 
minutes ; when done, open one - side with a knife and fill with 
the following custard: One pint of water, one quarter 
pound of butter, and three quarters pound of flour. Put the 
butter in the water; while boiling, stir in the flour smoothly ; 
then pour out to cool. Beat in ten eggs, one at a time. 

CREAM-CAKES FOR DESSERT. 

A pint of cold water or milk, three fourths pound of flour, 
and one fourth pound of butter. Boil the butter and milk 
together; while boiling, add the flour. When cool, add ten 
eggs and a small tea-spoonful of soda. Bake in jelly-pans. 
Cream for cakes. — One quart of milk, two cups of sugar, one 
cup of flour, and four eggs. Boil part of the milk and flour 
together; then add cold milk and eggs, and boil a few min- 
utes. Flavor with lemon. 

CREAM-CAKES. 

One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, three cups of flour, 
one cup of milk, four eggs, a tea-spoonful of lemon, — or any 
extract desired, — and a table-spoonful of yeast-powder. 
Bake in jelly-pans. Make a custard of one pint of milk, two 
eggs, a half cup of sugar, a table- spoonful of corn starch, and 
a piece of butter the size of an egg. When cold, place be- 
tween the cakes as you do jell}-. 

BOSTON CREAM-CAKES. 

Half pound of butter, three fourths pound flour, eight eggs, 
and one pint of water. Stir the butter into the water, which 
should be warm; set it on the fire in a sauce-pan, and slowly 
bring to a boil, stirring it often. When it boils, put in 
the flour and boil one minute, stirring all the while; take 



124 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

from the fire, turn into a deep dish, and let it cool. Beat the 
eggs very light and whip into this cooled paste, first the 
yelks then the whites. Drop in a great spoonful upon but- 
tered paper, taking care not to let them touch or run into 
each other, and bake ten minutes in a quick oven. Cream 
for filling. — One quart of milk, four table-spoonfuls of corn- 
starch, two eggs, two cups of sugar; wet the corn-starch 
with enough milk to work it into a smooth paste. Boil the 
rest of the milk ; beat the eggs, add the sugar and corn-starch 
to them, and so soon as the milk boils pour in the mixture 
gradually, stirring all the time until smooth and thick. 
Drop in a tea-spoonful of butter, and when this is mixed in 
set the custard aside to cool. Then flavor with vanilla or 
lemon: Pass a sharp knife lightly v around the puff; split 
them, and fill with the mixture. 

MARBLE-CAKE.— No. i. 

Dark. — Yelks of seven eggs, two cups of brown sugar, one 
cup of butter, one cup of molasses, five cups of flour unsifted 
one cup of milk, one tea-spoonful of soda, cloves, nutmeg 
cinnamon, and allspice; dissolve the soda in molasses. 

Light. — Whites of seven eggs, two cups of white sugar, 
one cup of butter, three cups of flour, half cup of milk, one 
tea-spoonful cream of tartar, half tea-spoonful of soda. Put 
alternately about a handful of each, or any way the taste 
may dictate to be prettily marbled. A part of the light may 
be colored with cochineal, and put in with the light and dark 
with good effect. 

MARBLE-CAKE.— No. 2. 

The White. — Two cups of white sugar, one cup of butter, 
one of sweet milk, four of flour, whites of eight eggs well 
beaten, one tea spoonful cream of tartar, and one half spoon- 
ful of soda, cream, butter, and sugar; add milk; then flour, 
with cream of tartar in it, alternating with white of 
Qgg ; lastly, the soda well dissolved in a little of the milk. 



GENERAL DIRECTIONS FOR CAKE. J 25 

The Brown Part. — One large cup of brown sugar, half a 
cup of butter, two thirds cup of milk, two and a half cups of 
flour with a tea-spoonful cream of tartar rubbed into it, the 
yelks of eight eggs, half tea-spoonful of soda, two tea-spoon- 
fuls of powdered cloves, four of cinnamon, four of allspice, 
and one grated nutmeg. If not dark enough, add more cin- 
namon and spice. Drop the white batter first into the bake- 
pan, and then the brown, having the white to finish off on 

the top. 

. I 
SPICE-CAKE. 

Three eggs, one cup of butter, three cups of sugar, four of 
flour, one of milk, one tea-spoonful of yeast-powder, one 
table-spoonful of allspice, ginger, cloves, cinnamon, and half 
a nutmeg. 

MOLASSES SPICE-CAKE 

• One dozen eggs, one pound of butter, one pound of sugar, 
a pint of molasses, two pounds of flour, a wine-glassful of 
spices, and a tea-spoonful of soda. Mix like pound-cake. 

ALMOND-CAKE. 

Ten eggs, one pound of sugar, three quarters of a pound 
of butter, and three quarters of a pound of flour. Add half 
a pound of almonds, blanched and beaten fine, with a wine- 
glassful of rose-water. 

HICKORY-NUT CAKE. 

One cup of sugar, two eggs, two thirds cup of sweet cream, 
two cups of flour, one tea-spoonful of soda, and two cream of 
tartar; season with lemon or cinnamon extract, or with 
grated nutmeg. Bake on jelly-tins, enough for four layers. 
Filling beticeen the layers. — One cup of sweet, thin cream; put 
on a dish and bring to a boil ; dissolve a table-spoonful of 
corn-starch in new milk, and stir into the heated cream; 
cook a few minutes, then add to the cooked cream a pint of 



126 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

hickory-nut meats sliced finely. Spread between the layers 
of cake while warm; frost the top layer of cake. 

WASHINGTON-CAKE. 

Two and a half pounds of flour, one and a half pounds of 
sugar, six eggs, three fourths of a pound of butter, half a gill 
of milk, half a gill of brandy, half a pound of eitron, one nut- 
meg, one tea-spoonful of cloves, one of soda, one pound of 
raisins, And one pound of currants. 

QUEEN-CAKE. , 

One pound of sugar, one pound of flour, half pound of but- 
ter, five eggs, one gill of cream, one nutmeg, half tea-spoonful 
of soda, and two pounds of chopped raisins. 

IRENE-CAKE. 

Five cups of flour, two of butter, four of sugar, one of milk, 
one of wine, six eggs, one tea-spoonful of soda, one of cloves, 
one orange-peel, one pound of citron, and two pounds of 
washed currants. Beat the whites and yelks separately 

GRAHAM-CyVKE. 

One cup of sugar, one of sour cream, one egg, three cups 
of flour, soda, salt, and a little nutmeg. 

CORN-STARCH CAKE. 

Three fourths pound of butter, three fourths pound of 
sugar, six eggs, three fourths pound of corn-starch, and 
one fourth pound of flour. Beat into it one egg at a time. 
Flavor with lemon — a fresh lemon is best. 

BEVERLY-CAKE. 

Six cups of flour, three cups of sugar, one cup of butter, 
one cup of milk, half cup of molasses, four eggs, raisins, spice, 
a little salt, and a tea-spoonful of soda. 



GENERAL DIRECTIONS FOR CAKE. 127 

IMPERIAL-CAKE. 

One pound of flour, one pound of sugar, one pound of but- 
ter, one pound of raisins stoned and chopped, half pound of 
blanched almonds, one fourth pound citron, eight eggs, two 
wine-glasses of wine, and half tea-spoonful of mace. 

FRANCIS-CAKE. 

Six eggs, one pound of sugar, half pound of butter, one 
pound of flour, half pint of sweet milk, two tea-spoonfuls 
soda, dissolved in extra milk, just enough to dissolve it. The 
cream of tartar must be sifted dry into the flour; put the 
soda in just before cooking. Flavor with essence of lemon. 

CROTON SPONGE-CAKE. 

One pound of sugar, one pound of flour, half pound of but- 
ter, six eggs, one tea-spoonful of soda dissolved in a small 
tea-cupful of sweet milk, and two tea-spoonfuls cream of tar- 
tar sifted in flour. Bake quickly. 

MEASURE-CAKE. 

Three cups of sugar, six cups of flour, one and a half cuds 
of butter, six eggs, three tea-spoonfuls cream of tartar, one 
and a half tea-spoonfuls of soda, and one and a half cups of 
milk. 

SODA-CAKE.— No. i. 

Two and a half cups of sugar, one and a half cups of but- 
ter, one quart of flour, and seven eggs. After all are well 
mixed together, add a tea-spoonful of soda and two cream of 
tartar; dissolve each in half a cup of water. Bake in a 
quick oven ; flavor with essence of lemon, to your taste. 

SODA-CAKE.— No. 2. 

One and a half cups of sugar, one cup of milk, two table- 
spoonfuls of butter, two tea-spoonfuls cream of tartar, one 



128 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 



tea-spoonful of soda, three cups of flour, and two eggs ; re- 
serve the whites for merangue. Bake about an inch thick. 

CURRANT-CAKE. 

One and one quarter pound of sugar, one pound of butter 
twelve eggs, one quarter ounce of ammonia dissolved in a 
gill of water, two pounds two ounces of flour, and three quar- 
ters of a pound of washed and dried currants, put in just be- 
fore baking. 

PIPER-CAKE. 

Two eggs, half cup of butter, one cup of sugar, one cup of 
molasses, one cup of milk, three cups of flour, one tea- spoon- 
ful of cloves, half a nutmeg, and one tea-spoonful of soda. 

TURBAN-CAKE. 

Two cups of milk, two eggs, a little salt, and flour enough 
to make a batter. Bake in cups fifteen minutes. Nice for 
lunch or tea, hot. 

ONE-EGG CAKE. 

One egg, one cup of sweet milk, one and a half cup of 
sugar, three cups of flour, one table-spoonful of butter, and 
one tea-spoonful of yeast-powder. 

CAKE WITHOUT EGGS. 

Three pounds of flour, one and a half pounds of sugar, one 
and a half pound of butter, one and a half pound of raisins, 
one nutmeg, one table-spoonful powdered cinnamon, two gills 
of wine, and one half pint of yeast. Put the milk, butter, 
flour, and yeast together, and let rise before adding the other 
ingredients. 

TEA-CAKES.— No. i. 

Two eggs, one cup of sugar, one and a half table-spoonfuls 
of butter, two tea-spoonfuls cream of tartar, rubbed into the 



GENERAL DIRECTIONS FOR CAKE. 12<) 

dry flour, one ten-spoonful of soda, dissolved in a little milk; 
flour sufficient to roll into a soft dough. Flavor with grated 
nutmeg, or to taste. Bake in a quick oven. 

TEA-CAKES.— No. 2. 

hree eggs, one cup of butter, one tea-spoonful of salt 
three cups of sugar, one tea-spoonful of soda, one cup "of but- 
termilk, and flour sufficient for rolling. Flavor with cinna- 
mon or other extract. 

TEA-CAKES.— No. 3. 

One pound of sugar, six ounces of butter and lard together 
(mix well), half ounce crystals of ammonia dissolved in half 
pint of water, two pounds of flour, and two eggs. Flavor 
with grated nutmeg. 

SOFT TEA-CAKE. 

Five eggs, half pound of butter, half pound of sugar, one 
pound of flour, one wine-glassful of brandy, one nutmeg, one 
tea-spoonful of soda. To be dropped in with a spoon. 

FASCINATORS. 

One cup of butter, two of sugar, four eggs, one tea-spoonful 
of soda, two cream of tartar, and flour enough to stiffen ; roll 
very thin. Bake quickly 

SUGAR-CAKES WITHOUT EGGS. 

Three pounds of flour, one and a half pound of sugar, four- 
teen ounces of butter, a small tea-spoonful of soda or yeast- 
powder sifted with the flour, half pint of milk. Kub the 
the butter, sugar, and flour together ; then wet with the milk 
and roll out thin. Flavor to suit the taste. 

GINGER POUND-CAKE. 

Five cups of flour, five eggs, two cups of butter, two cups 
of sugar, two cups of molasses, two table-spoonfuls of ginger, 
9 



130 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK 

one of spice, one cup of sour milk, and one tenspoonful of 
soda. 

SOFT GINGER-CAKE.— No. i. 

Three cups of flour, one of sugar, one of molasses, one of 
butter, six eggs, two table- spoonfuls of ginger, one tea-spoon- 
ful of soda dissolved in sour milk or vinegar. Bake in a 
moderate oven. With sauce it makes a nice dessert. 

SOFT GINGER-CAKE.— No. 2. 

Five eggs, four cups of flour, two of sugar, one of milk, one 
of butter, one of molasses, two table-spoonfuls of ginger, one 
tea-spoonful of soda. 

. HARD GINGER-CAKE. 

One cup of butter, one of sugar, one of molasses, two of 
flour, five eggs, one table-spoonful of ginger, half a tea-spoon- 
ful of soda. 

GINGER-SNAPS.— No. 1. 

One pound of flour rubbed in one quarter pound of butter, 
three quarters pound of powdered sugar, one ounce ground 
ginger, and peel of a lemon. Work the ingredients well to- 
gether, and roll thin and cut in small cakes. Bake as tea- 
cakes. 

GINGER-SNAPS.— No. 2. 

One pint of molasses, one cup of butter, one cup of lard, 
half cup of buttermilk, one table-spoonful of soda, three eggt, 
and four table-spoonfuls of ginger ; add flour to make a mod- 
erately stiff dough. Roll the dough very thin, and cut with' 
a ring the size of a half dollar. 

GINGER-SNAPS.— No. 3. 

Half pound of butter, half pound of sugar, two and a half 
pounds of flour, one pint of molasses, one tea-spoonful of 
soda, and ginger to taste. Boil the molasses. 



GENERAL DIRECTIONS FOR CAKE. \§\ 



SUGAR GINGER-CAKES. 

• 

Two cups of sugar, one cup of butter, one tea-spoonful of 
soda, one cup of cold water, flour sufficient to roll out very 
thin ; ginger to the taste. 

CRULLERS.— No. i. 

Six eggs, one cup of butter, one nutmeg, two cups of sugar, 
one cup of sour milk, one half tea-spoonful soda, and flour 
enough to roll. Fry in hot lard. 

CRULLERS.— No. 2. 

One pound of sugar, eight eggs, half ounce crystals of car- 
bonate of ammonia dissolved in half pint of water, and two 
and a quarter pounds of flour. Flavor with lemon. Cut 
crullers in shapes to suit the fancy. Have the lard so hot 
that it will cease to bubble ; then fry the crullers a light 
brown. 

CRULLERS.— No. 3. 

Four eggs, one and a half quarts of flour, one cup of milk, 
two cups of sugar, a table-spoonful of butter, one nutmeg 
and two tea-spoonfuls of yeast-powder. . Have the lard boil- 
ing hot to fry them. 

CRULLERS.— No. 4. 

Two eggs, one cup of sugar, a small piece of butter, one 
and a half nutmeg, two cups of milk, two tea-spoonfuls cream 
of tartar and one of soda; flour to roll. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

One pint of yeast, one pint of water, two ounces of butter 
a tea-spoonful of soda, six ounces of sugar; flavor to taste; 
use sufficient flour to make a soft dough. Let this dough 
rise; roll out the doughnuts and permit to rise again; then 
fry. 



132 GULF GITY COOK-BOOK. 

SWEET WAFERS.— No. i. 

One egg, four table-spoonfuls of sugar, one table-spoonful 
of butter, four heaping table-spoonfuls of flour, made into 
batter and dropped into the irons. If the butter does not fur- 
nish salt enough, add a little. 

SWEET WAFERS.— No. 2. 

Three cups of flour, one cup of sugar, one cup of butter, 
one cup of rich cream, and a little nutmeg. 

SWEET WAFERS.— No. 3. 

Four eggs, three tea-cupfuls of flour, two cups of sugar, 
and one cup of butter. 

CHOCOLATE MACAROONS. 

Scrape fine half a pound of Baker's chocolate. Beat stiff 
the whites of four eggs, and stir into the eggs one pound of 
powdered sugar and the scraped chocolate, adding a very 
little flour. Form the mixture into small, thick cakes, and 
lay them, not too close, on a buttered tin, and bake them a 
few minutes. Sift sugar over them while warm. 

SUGAR-KISSES. 

The whites of four eggs whisked to a stiff froth, and stir in 
half a pound of sifted white sugar. Flavor to taste. When 
stiff drop it on white paper, the shape and size desired, an 
inch apart. The paper should previously be laid on a clean 
board, half an inch thick; and put them into a hot oven, and 
halve until they are a light brown. Slip them off the paper 
with a table-knife, and stick the broad edges of every two of 
them together ; and if pressed gently they will adhere. When 
finished they should be the size and shape of an egg. 

BOILED ICING. 
Dissolve one pound of loaf-sugar in a tea-cup of water, and 



GENERAL DIRECTIONS FOR CAKE. 138 

t. 
let it cook until it begins to rope. Try it frequently by dip- 
ping in a spoon. Have ready the whites of four eggs, beaten 
until they begin to froth; then pour the boiling sugar upon 
the eggs — pour slowly, beating constantly until perfectly 
white. Flavor with rose-water, or to taste. Add a little 
citric acid to whiten it. If the icing is too thin, put the bowl 
containing it in a large pan of boiling water, and place it 
upon the stove and let boil until perfectly thick. 

ICING. 

Beat the whites of four eggs to a stiff froth. . Stir in one 
pound of pulverized white sugar; then put on the stove in a 
fiat earthen dish, and cook until heated through, stirring all 
the time. Spread on your cake while the icing is hot, keep- 
ing the knife hot by dipping in hot water, which will make 
it perfectly smooth, having no ridges. 

COLD ICING.— No i. 

Whites of three eggs; when partially beaten stir in one 
pound of powdered sugar, and juice of one lemon; then beat 
till white and thick. Before icing tops of ca^kes rub them 
slightly with flour. Spread on the icing with a knife, dipping 
constantly in cold water to make the icing smooth. 

COLD ICING —No. 2. 

Four eggs, one pound of powdered sugar, and a very little 
acetic acid. 

CHOCOLATE ICING. 

Beat whites of four eggs, and when partly beaten add 
gradually one pound of powdered sugar and one full cup of 
grated chocolate. This is nice to spread between layer-cakes 
instead of jelly, using cup-cake recipe for the cake. 

CHOCOLATE CREAM. 
Mix one cup of grated chocolate, one cup of sugar, one and 



-134 G ULF CIT Y co OK-B O OK. 

a half of milk, and one egg together. Boil till thick as cus- 
tard, and flavor with vanilla. Spread between the cakes, as 
in cream-cakes. 



riES. 135 



PIES. 

GENERAL RULES FOR PASTRY. 

Pastry should be made on a cold, smooth substance, such 
as marble, mixing with a knife. It should be made quickly; 
much handling makes it heavy. Great nicety is required in 
wetting the paste, too little moisture rendering it dry and 
crumbly, while too much makes it tough and heavy. Keserve 
half of the butter and a fourth of the flour to be used in roil- 
ing out the paste. .Roll it out lightly, dredge with flour, and 
spread with butter; fold, and roll again, repeating the same 
three or four times, always rolling fast and pressing on light- 
ly. When you see the sui-face of the paste covered with 
blisters, you may be sure that it is a success; that is, if it is 
baked properly, for the quality of the paste depends much 
on the baking. The oven should be well and evenly heated 
before baking, and not allowed to cool. 

PUFF-PASTE.— No. i. 

One pound of flour, one pound of butter, one egg; mix the 
flour with two table-spoonfuls of butter, and make a dough 
with cold water and the egg; divide the remainder of the 
butter into six equal parts; roll the paste, and spread on one 
part of the butter, dredging it with flour; repeat until all 
the butter is rolled in. Great care is necessary to prevent 
the butter from bursting through. Handle as little as pos- 



136 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

sibie. It is improved by standing awhile on ice before bak- 
ing. 

PUFF-PASTE.— No. 2. 

One pound of flour, three quarters of a pound butter; rub 
into the flour two ounces of butter; then make a dough with 
cold water; then proceed to roll in butter and flour according 
to the general directions given above. 

PASTRY. 

One quart of flour, quarter of a pound of butter, quarter 
of a pound of lard ; make a dough of the flour and lai'd, 
using as little water as possible; roll it out lightly; dredge 
with flour; spread with butter in bits; fold and roll again; 
repeat until the butter is all used. 

PLAIN PASTRY. 

Three cups 01 flour, one cup of butter, one cup of lard, one 
cup of cold water. Mix with a knife; roll from you. This 
is enough for two pies, with crusts top and bottom. 

PLAIN PIE-CRUST. 

Nine ounces of lard, one pound of flour, a pinch of salt. 
Eub the lard and flour well together; add water sufficient to 
make a dough, and roll out into thin sheets. Bake in a quick 
oven. 

PASTRY FOR MEAT-PIES. 

One quart of flour, half pound of lard. Dissolve a tea- 
spoonful of soda in a cup of sour milk, and mix with a knife, 
stirring as little as possible. 

POTATO PASTE. 

Take equal quantities of mashed potatoes and sifted flour ; 
wet with sour milk, into which enough soda has been stirred 
to sweeten it. A little salt and butter may be added. Eoll 
out thin. This is nice for apple-dumplings or pot-pies. 



pies. 137 

BOILED APPLE-DUMPLINGS. 

Pare and core ten or twelve apples ; cover eacu apple sep- 
arately with potato-paste; tie up in thin cloths. Boil until 
tender. 

EXCELLENT APPLE DUMPLINGS. 

Mix well together one egg, one pint of buttermilk, one tea- 
spoonful of soda, salt, and flour enough to make a stiff batter. 
Into well-greased cups drop a small piece of butter, and into 
each cup an apple, quartered and cored and put together 
again ; pour the batter over each apple, and set the cups in a 
steamer over boiling warm, and steam them till done. Eat 
them with sauce. 

BAKED APPLE-DUMPLINGS. 

Pare, quarter, and core eight or ten apples ; roll out pieces 
of paste the size of a common saucer; place an apple upon 
each piece, and close the edges of the paste around the fruit; 
put the dumplings in a large dish ; pour over them a sauce 
made of one cup of butter and three cups of sugar well cream- 
ed together; flavor with nutmeg; bake one hour. Peach- 
dumplings may be made in the same way. 

POTATO FRITTERS 

Boil two large potatoes ; mash them fine; beat four ye-lks 
and three whites of eggs, and add to the above ; one large 
spoonful of cream, another of sweet wine, the juice of one 
lemon, and a little nutmeg. Beat this batter for half an 
hour at least. Put a good quantity of fresh lard in a stew- 
pan, and drop a spoonful of the batter at a time into it, and 
fry a light brown. Serve with sauce. 

ALTONA FRITTERS. 

Make a batter of eight eggs, half pint of milk, six large 
spoonfuls of sifted flour, one tea-spoonful of salt. Into this 
batter put half a dozen apples pared, cored, and cut in quar- 



138 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

tors ; let each piece of apple be well covered with the batter. 
Then put each piece into boiling lard, and fry a light brown. 
Serve with sauce. 

' SLICED SWEET-POTATO PIE. 

Parboil and slice t>vo medium-sized potatoes; put them 
into a deep pie-plate that has been previously lined with 
puff-paste; pour over the potatoes a sauce made of one cup 
ot sugar, half cup of butter, and one cup of boiling water; 
riuvor with a tea-spoonful of cinnamon, tea-spoonful of cloves 
and allspice mixed, and the juice and grated rinds of two 
lemons; cover with paste. Bake in a slow oven. 

SWEET-POTATO PIE. 

One pound of potatoes boiled and rubbed smooth, half 
pound of sugar, a small cup of cream, one fourth pound of 
butter, four eggs; nutmeg and lemon to suit the taste; bake 
in a crust. This quantity will make two large pies. 

IRISH-POTATO PIE. 

Two cupfuls of boiled potatoes nicely strained through a 
colander, one cup of butter, one of milk, two of sugar, six 
eggs; flavor with wine and nutmeg. Bake on pastry, or in 
a dish like a pudding. 

A DELICIOUS APPLE-PIE. 

Six apples of medium size, a tumblerful of crushed sugar, 
three table-spoonfuls of butter or two tumblerfuls of rich 
cream, six eggs, the juice and grated rind of one lemon ; peel 
the apples, and grate them ; cream the butter and sugar to- 
gether; beat the whites and yelks of the eggs separately; 
mix as for cake. Bake in paste. 

APPLE-PIE. 

Peel, core, and stew the apples until transparent ; pass 
through a sieve; sweeten to taste; add one cup of cream; fla 



pies. 139 

vor with lemon ; bake in puff-paste ; have ready the whites of 
lour eggs beaten to a stiff froth, with six table-spoonfuls of 
sugar ; flavor with lemon ; spread over the pies, return to the 
oven, and brown lightly. 

FRUIT-PIES IN VARIETY. 

Prepare and stew your fruit; sweeten to taste. They 
need no flavoring. Bake between thin crusts. Plums re- 
quire more sugar than any other fruit. Serve with cream. 

RHUBARB-PIE. 

Put the rhubarb in deep plates lined with pie-crust, with a 
thick layer of sugar to each layer of rhubarb. A little 
grated lemon-peel may be added. Place over the top a thin 
crust; press tight around the edge of the plate. Bake about 
an hour in a slow oven. Phubarb-pie must not be baked 
quick. 

DRIED-FRUIT PIE. 

Beat six eggs and six table-spoonfuls of sugar together; 
add one cup of milk and one table-spoonful of butter; have 
a cup of dried fruit, peaches or apples, stewed until very soft, 
and rubbed through a sifter; sweeten to taste, and add to 
the other ingredients; flavor with lemon. Bake in paste. 

DRIED-APPLE PIE. 

Soak the apples over night in warm water; stew in cider 
or water until tender. When cool, sweeten and flavor with 
the juice and grated peel of one lemon to every two pieces; 
add a table-spoonful of butter. 

COCOA-NUT PIE.— No. i. 

The well-beaten whites of six eggs; cream one fourth of a 
pound of butter with six table-spoonfuls of sugar; add one 
half pound of grated cocoa-nut; stir in the whites of the 



140 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

eggs ; flavor with a wine-glass of wine and a little rose-water. 
Bake in paste. 

COCOA-NUT PIE— No. 2. 

One cocoa-nut, six eggs, one pound of sugar, two ounces 
of flour, one ounce of butter ; beat the eggs well ; add the 
sugar, flour, and butter; beat all very light, and then add the 
grated cocoa-nut; flavor with lemon; fill the pastry; dubt 
powdered sugar on the top of the custard, and bake. 

COCOA-NUT CUSTARD. 

Eight eggs, one half pound of butter, one pound of sugar, 
one large cocoa-nut and the milk of it; cream the butter and 
sugar together; stir in the other ingredients; flavor with 
lemon. Bake in paste. 

ALMOND-PIE. 

One half pound of butter, one half pound of sugar beaten 
to a cream, six eggs beaten very light, a little rose-water, one 
half pound of blanched almonds pounded fine, with rose- 
water or brandy to prevent oiling. Mix all well, and bake 
in puff-paste. 

LEMON-PIE.— (Excellent.) 

The yelks of five eggs and the white of one; stir together 
with one half pound of sugar, one quarter of a pound of but- 
ter, the grated rind of three lemons and the juice of two, 
one table-spoonful of sifted flour mixed with a little water. 
Bake on paste in tin phtes before putting in the mixture; 
bake the paste until it turns white; pour in the custard and 
bake slowly. Use the four remaining whites for a marangue ; 
flavor with the juice of one lemon; put on top of pie when 
done, return to the oven, and brown lightly. Orange-pie 
may be made in the same way, using oranges instead of 
lemons. v 



rms. 141 

LEMON CREAM PIE. 

The jui.ce and grated peel of two lemons, f >ur eggs, one 
quarter of a pound of butter, one pound of sugar ; beat all 
well together ; place on the tire, and cook until it becomes the 
consistency of custard. Bake with under crust. 

LEMON-PIE. 

The yelks of six eggs, four tea-cupfuls of sugar, one table- 
spoonful of butter, two tea-cupfuls of milk, the juice and grat- 
ed rinds of four lemons, four table-spoonfuls of corn-starch 
or arrow-root; stir well together; bake on paste. When 
done, have ready the six whites, beaten to a stiff froth, with 
eight table-spoonfuls of pounded sugar; flavor with lemon, 
spread over the pies, return to the oven, and brown lightly. 

LEMON AND POTATO PIE. 

Three sweet-potatoes of medium size ; boil well and rub 
through a sifter; one pint of rich milk, one quarter pound 
of butter, one pound of sugar, the juice of three lemons and 
thegrated rind of one, the yelks of six eggs beaten well ; mix all 
well together, and bake in puff-paste. Use the whites for a 
marangue, and spread over the pies after they are cooked ; 
return them to the oven and brown. 

ORANGE-PIE. 

One half pound of butter and half a pound of sugar beat- 
en to cream, four eggs, whites and yelks beaten separately ; 
grate the rind of a sweet orange, and scrape the pulp from 
the inner skin, and stir with the butter, sugar, and eggs. 
Bake in puff paste. 

SOUR-ORANGE PIE. 

Three eggs, the whites and yelks beaten separately, half a 
pint of boiling water, one table-spoonful of corn-starch wet 
and cooked liked starch, three cups of brown sugar, one ta- 



142 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

ble-spoonful of butter, the juice of two or three oranges. 
Bake in an open shell. 

PUMPKIN-PIE. 

One cup of sugar, one cup of stewed pumpkin, two cups 
of sweet milk, three eggs; flavor with ginger, nutmeg, and 
lemon-peel. Bake in an open shell. 

MOLASSES-PIE. 

One cup of molasses, one cup of sugar, half cup of mi.k, 
three eggs, a table-spoonful of butter; flavor with ginger, 
orange, or lemon. Bake on paste. 

TRANSPARENT PIE.— No. i. 

One dozen eggs, whites and yelks beaten separately, one 
pound of sugar, one pound of butter. Mix the ingredients 
nicely, and place on the fire; stir gently until done; bake in 
puff-paste. Before putting in the mixture, bake the paste un- 
til it turns white. 

TRANSPARENT PIE.— No. 2. 

Beat eight eggs; put them into a sauce-pan with a pound 
of powdered sugar, one half pound of butter, and a little 
nutmeg. Mix well; set on the fire; stir constantly until it 
thickens; set aside to cool. Make a rich puff-paste, line a 
pie-dish with it, and spread on a layer of sliced citron or 
preserved ginger ; pour over the custard, and bake an hour 

in a moderate oven. 
1 

MINCE-MEAT. 

Two pounds of well-boiled beef or tongue chopped fine, to 
which add three pounds of raisins, three pounds of currants, 
one pound of citron chopped, the juice of six oranges with the 
peel chopped fine, one quart of preserved cranberries, four 
dozen pippin apples chopped, four table-spoonfuls of powder- 
ed cinnamon, three table-spoonfuls of allspice, six nutmegs; 



PIES. 143 

mix together and chop well. Put in a sauce-pan two pounds 
of butter, two pounds of sugar, three pints of cooking brandy, 
three pints of sweet cider; simmer this ten or fifteen min- 
utes, and pour over the mince-meat boiling hot; stir thor- 
oughly, and put away in stone jars until wanted. It is bet- 
ter to put in the apples fresh as you use the mince-meat. 
Three large ones to the pint. 

MOCK MINCE-MEAT. 

Three soda-crackers rolled fine, one cup of cold water, one 
half cup of molasses, half cup brown sugar, three quarters 
of a cup of melted butter, half cup of raisins seeded and 
chopped, half cup of currants, one egg beaten light, half ta- 
ble-spoonful of powdered cinnamon, one table spoonful of 
allspice and cloves mixed, one tea-spoonful of black pepper 
and salt mixed, half a glass of wine or brandy. 



144 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 



PUDDINGS. 



GENERAL RULES. 

In boiling puddings, mind that the cloth be perfectly clean. 
Dip it in hot water and dredge well with flour, by sifting 
the flour over it. When bagged, tie the string tight, leaving 
sufficient room in the bag for expansion by swelling. Flour 
and Indian puddings require muc'h room. Put the pudding 
in a pot of boiling water, placing an old plate on the bottom. 
Keep sufficient water in the pot to cover the pudding, being 
careful not to let the boiling cease one second. A tea-kettle 
of boiling water should be at hand to add as the water boils 
away. Dip the pudding into cold water immediately upon 
taking out, which prevents its adhering to the cloth. Make 
your pudding-bag of thick cloth ; if it is thin, it will admit 
the water and deteriorate the pudding. If you use a pud- 
ding-mold, grease well with butter from which the salt has 
been carefully washed. 

CONFEDERATE PUDDfNG. 

Eub thoroughly into* four tea-cupfuls of sifted flour one 

ea-cupful of suet shredded and chopped fine, one tea-cupful 

of raisins seeded and chopped, the same quantity of currants 

washed and dried the day previous, and one tea-spoonful of 

cinnamon ; stir into this one tea-cupful of molasses, and the 



PUDDINGS. 145 



same quantity of milk. Pour into a pudding-mold, and boil 
two hours. Eat hot, with sauce. 

BOILED CAKE-PUDDING. 

One pound of sugar, one pound of flour, half pound of 
butter, six eggs, one tea-cupful of milk, one tea-spoonful 
cream of tartar, half tea-spoonful of soda; sift the cream of 
tartar with the flour; mix the soda in the milk, and add it 
to the other ingredients when they are all mixed together. 
It is good with sliced citron, or raisins and currants. If plain, 
boil two hours; if with fruit, three hours. Serve with wine- 
sauce. 

MINISTER'S PUDDING. 

Three eggs, an equal weight of sugar and butter, and the 
weight of two eggs in flour ; cream the butter and sugar well 
together; beat the eggs, and mix with the butter and sugar, 
beating the whole to a stiff froth; then add the flour by de- 
grees, and the grated rind of a lemon. Pour in a mold, and 
boil gently for an hour. To be eaten with sauce. 

BOILED BATTER-PUDDING.— No. i. 

Nine eggs beaten until very light; then sift in a pint of 
flour ; add a tea-spoonful of salt ; lastly, add a quart of milk. 
Pour in a pudding-mold, and boil two hours. Eat with rich 
wine-sauce. 

BOILED BATTER-PUDDING.— No. 2. 

Eight eggs, eight table-spoonfuls of flour, one quart of 
milk. Boil one hour, and serve with sauce. 

ENGLISH PLUM-PUDDING. 

Eight eggs, one pound and a half of raisins, one pound of 
currants, one pound of brown sugar, one pound of bread- 
crumbs, one pound of suet chopped fine, half pound of citron, 
10 



146 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

or any candied fruit, quarter pound blanched almonds, one 
nutmeg grated, table-spoonful of powdered cinnamon, tea- 
spoonful of powdered cloves, tea-spoonful of powdered mace, 
the grated rind of a lemon, half pint of brandy, wine-glass 
of wine, wine-glass of rose-water. Put in a pudding-mold, 
and boil four hours. Pour brandy over the pudding, and 
bring to the table burning. Serve with sauce. 

AN EXCELLENT PLUM-PUDDING. 

One pint of bread-crumbs, one pint of flour, one pound of 
fresh suet chopped very fine, one pound of sugar, nine eggs, 
one pint of milk, half pint of wine and brandy mixed, one 
pound of raisins, one pound of currants, half pound of cit- 
ron chopped fine, one nutmeg, one table-spoonful of cinna- 
mon, one table spoonful of mixed spice and cloves, one tea- 
cupful of molasses. Dredge the fruit well with a portion of 
this flour to prevent its sinking to the bottom of the pan. 
Boil five hours according to the general directions. Serve 
with plum-pudding sauce. 

PLUM-PUDDING. 

One loaf of baker's bread sliced, buttered, .and cut into 
pieces one inch square ; put a layer of bread in the pudding- 
mold, and then a layer composed of raisins, citron, cloves, 
cinnamon, and nutmeg; then another layer of bread, then 
the fruit and spices, and so on until the mold is full. Then 
make a custard of five eggs, one quart of milk, and a cup 
and a half of sugar; pour the custard over the pudding, and 
boil six hours. Serve with sauce. 

STEAM-PUDDING. 

-One tea-cupful of raisins stoned and cut fine, one of beef- 
suet, one cup of molasses, one tea-spoonful of soda, one cup 
of milk, four cups of flour, a pinch of salt; cover close; keep 
over steamer for three hours. Serve with wine-sauce. 



PUDDINGS. 147 



REBEL PUDDING. 

One cup of molasses, half cup of butter, one cup of sweet 
milk, one tea-spoonful of ground cloves, the same of cinna- 
namon, two tea-spoonfuls of allspice, small tea-spoonful of 
soda dissolved in vinegar, enough flour to make a stiff batter. 
Boil four hours. 

SPONGE-CAKE PUDDING. 

Butter a mold well, and ornament it with dried cherries or 
raisins; then fill three fourths full with sponge-cake. Pour 
over this a custard made of half a pint of milk, two eggs, 
half a cup of sugar. Boil or steam for half an hour. Serve 
with wine-sauce. 

BOILED ALMOND-PUDDTNG. 

Blanch one pound of almonds ; beat them to a smooth 
paste, with two tea-spoonfuls of rose-water ; add one gill of 
wine, one pint of cream, one one gill of milk, one egg, one 
table-spoonful of flour. Boil half an hour. ■ Serve with 
sauce. 

FIG-PUDDING. 

One pound of figs peeled and chopped fine, quarter of a 
pound of suet chopped fine; dredge with flour; one pound 
of bread-crumbs, quarter of a pound of sugar, two eggs, one 
tea-cupful of milk ; mix all well together; boil four hours. 
Ornament the pudding with blanched almonds, and serve 
with wine or brandy sauce. 

BAKED ALMOND-PUDDING. 

Blanch one pound of almonds; beat them in a mortar to a 
smooth paste, with two tea-spoonfuls of rose-water; add one 
gill of wine, one gill of cream thickened with one large ta- 
ble-spoonful of bread-crumbs, half pound of sugar, seven 
eggs, and one nutmeg. Bake a light brown. 



148 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

QUEEN'S PUDDING. 

One quart of milk, one pint of bread-crumbs, one cup of 
sugar, yelks of four eggs, butter the size of an egg, and the 
grated rind of a lemon; pour in a pudding-dish, and bake. 
When done, spread over the top jelly or preserves; then beat 
the whites of four eggs to a stiff froth, with one cup of sugar 
and the juice of one lemon ; pour over the pudding, and 
bake a light brown. 

PRINCE ALBERT PUDDING. 

Half pound of bread-crumbs, half pound of sugar, half 
pound of butter, six eggs beaten separately, the juice of one 
lemon and grated rind of two, one wine-glass of brandy, 
four table-spoonfuls of any kind of preserves; bake in a 
moderate oven. Serve with wine-sauce. 

APPLE-PUDDING.— (Excellent.) 

Peel and core eight or nine apples of medium size; put 
them into a stew-pan, with half a tumbler of water, a wine- 
glass of wine, a heaped table spoonful of sugar, a little cin- 
namon, mace, and lemon-peel. Cover the pan, and stew 
slowly until the apples are tender ; take them up, and let 
them get cold. Fill the bottom of an earthen dish with the 
apples, and pour over them a rich custard made by beating 
together the whites and yelks of six eggs, with one quart of 
milk; sweeten to taste; bake in a moderate oven. Serve 
with solid or liquid sauce. • 

APPLE-PUDDING. 

Pare a>nd chop half a dozen good sour apples. Butter a 
pudding-dish, and put in a layer of gruted bread half an 
inch thick ; add small bits of butter; put in a layer of chop- 
ped apples, with sugar and nutmeg, and repeat until the dish 
is full. Pour over the whole a tea-cup of cold water, and 
bake thirty minutes. No sauce. 



PUDDINGS. 149 



BIRD'S-NEST PUDDING. 

Put into three pints of boiling milk six crackers pounded 
fine — stir in carefully, to prevent lumping; add a pint of 
raisins; boil a few minutes; set aside to cool, after which add 
five well-beaten eggs, and sugar to taste; peel and core eight 
or ten apples, place them in regular order in a pudding-dish, 
and pour over thenl the custard ; bake a light brown. Serve 
with sauce. 

A NICE APPLE-PUDDING. 

Butter a deep baking-dish, and fill it with alternate layers 
of thin slices of bread and butter and stewed apples. Pour 
over this a custard made of one pint of milk sweetened to 
taste, and the beaten yelks of four eggs. Bake in a moder- 
ate oven. Beat the whites of four eggs to a stiff froth, with 
eight table-spoonfuls of sugar; flavor with lemon or nutmeg; 
spread over the top of the pudding, return to the oven, and 
brown. 

TAPIOCA-PUDDING WITH APPLES. 

Five table-spoonfuls of tapioca, two quarts of water, one 
and one half cups of sugar, table-spoonful of butter, twelve 
large apples ; soak the tapioca in the water several hours ; 
then pare and core the apples, and place them in a pudding- 
dish, with two lemons sliced ; pour over the other ingredients, 
and bake until the apples are done. Serve with sweetened 
cream. A nice dish, cold for tea, served in a glass bowl. 

PEACH-PUDDING. 

Five eggs well beaten, five table-spoonfuls of flour, five of 
sugar, five of milk, two and a half spoonfuls of butter, wine- 
glass of brandy or wine* one soup-plate of peaches chopped 
fine. Bake, and serve with wine-sauce or sweetened cream. 

SWEET-POTATO PUDDING. 
Two tea-cupfuls of grated sweet-potatoes, one cup of but- 



150 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 



ter, one cup of brown sugar, one cup of cream, one wine- 
glass of wine and brandy mixed, one wine-glass of rose-water ; 
nutmeg and cinnamon to taste. Bake slowly. 

LEMON-PUDDING.— No. I. 

One and a half pounds of sugar, the juice and grated rind 
of three lemons, eight eggs, one cup of butter, table-spoon- 
ful of flour. Beat all well together. Bake as soon as pre- 
pared. 

LEMON-PUDDING.— No. 2. 

The juice and grated rinds of two lemons, five table-spoon- 
fuls of sugar, one table. spoonful of butter, one large Irish 
potato boiled and mashed, five eggs; add sufficient milk to 
make a thin batter. Bake in a moderate oven. 

TAPIOCA-PUDDING WITH COCOA-NUT. 

Soak over night three table-spoonfuls of tapioca in cold 
water ; pour oft' the water, and pour over the tapioca one 
quart of boiling milk, and boil ten minutes. Beat the yelks 
of four eggs with one cup of sugar and three table-spoonfuls 
of grated cocoa-nut; add to the boiling milk, and boil five 
minutes longer; pour in a pudding-dish; beat the whites of 
thi'ee eggs to a stiff froth, with half a cup of white sugar; 
spread this over the top of the pudding; sprinkle thick with 
cocoa-nut. Bake a light brown. 

TAPIOCA-PUDDING. 

Soak over night one tea-cupful of tapioca in a pint of 
milk. The next morning pour over the tapioca one pint of 
boiling milk, and add one cup of sugar, four well-beaten eggs, 
a wine-glass of rose-water, one table spoonful of butter, and 
a little nutmeg; pour in a pudding-dish, and bake half an 
hour. Sago may be prepared in the same way. 



PUDDINGS. 151 



RICE-PUDDING.— No. I. 

Boil four ounces of rice in a quart >-of milk until soft; stir 
in four ounces of butter; take it from the fire; add a pint of 
cold milk, two tea-spoonfuls of salt, and a grated nutmeg-. 
When it is lukewarm, beat four eggs with eight ounces of 
sugar, and stir it in, adding eight ounces of raisins. Pour 
the whole into a buttered pudding-dish, and bake forty-five 
minutes. 

RICE-PUDDING.— No. 2. 

Boil a cup of rice in a quart of milk until soft. When it 
is cooled a little, add the well beaten yelks of three eggs, two 
table-spoonfuls of butter, one cup of sugar, and a pinch of 
Bait; pour in a pudding dish, and bake; beat the whites of 
the eggs to a stiff froth with eight table-spoonfuls of sugar; 
flavor with the juice of a lemon ; spread this over the top of 
the pudding; return to the oven and brown. 

SPONGE-PUDDING. 

One fourth pound of flour, one fourth pound of sugar, one 
quart of sweet milk; boil these ingredients; then add one 
fourth pound of butter, and twelve eggs well-beaten. Stir 
all well together; pour in a pudding-dish ; place in a pan of 
hot water, and bake one hour. 

SOUFFLI PUDDING. 

Boil together one pint of milk and two table-spoonfuls of 
of flour, stirring to prevent burning; turn out to cool when 
done. Stir into the boiled milk ten table-spoonfuls of pow- 
dered sugar ; then add the yelks of the eggs well beaten ; 
half a wine-glass of sherry ; last, the whites of the eggs 
beaten very light. Bake in a deep dish thirty minutes 

CHAMBLISS PUDDING. 
Three eggs, one small cup of flour, one cup of sugar, two 



152 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

cups of sifted flour ; beat the yelks of the eggs with the su- 
gar; cream the flour and butter together; add the whites of 
the eggs and a desert-spoonful of yeast-powder. Bake in a 
quick oven. Serve with liquid sauce. 

DIXIE PUDDING. 

One cup of preserves, one cup of butter, one cup of sugar, 
half cup of flour, five eggs; cream the butter and sugar to- 
gether; add the flour and eggs well beaten; lastly, the pre- 
serves. Bake in a quick oven. Serve with sauce. 

A PLAIN PUDDING. 

Six eggs, six table-spoonfuls of sugar, six table-spoonfuls 
of butter, one cup of flour, one cup of milk ; beat well, and 
flavor with nutmeg or lemon. Bake in a moderate oven. 
Serve with wine-sauce. 

DELICIOUS PUDDING. 

Slice a sponge-cake; butter the slices, and put in a pud- 
ding-dish; pour over this a rich custard made of a pint of 
milk, four eggs, and a cup of sugar, Bake half an hour. 

CAKE-PUDDING. 

Put a layer of sponge-cake in a pudding-dish, and then a 
a layer of raisins, currants, and citron mixed (any kind of 
fruit — stewed apples are very good) ; another layer of cake, 
and so on until the dish is nearly full. Pour over this a 
custard made of a quart of milk and six eggs; sugar to taste. 
Bake a light brown. Serve with wine-sauce. 

INDIAN MEAL PUDDING. 

One pint of molasses, three well-beaten eggs, one teaspoon- 
ful of soda, one large spoonful of butter; stir in a sufficient 
quantity of boiled meal to make a thick batter; flavor with 
ginger. Bake a nice brown. Serve with liquid sauce. 



PUDDINGS. 153 



MOLASSES-PUDDING. 

Four eggs, three cups of flour, two cups of molasses, one 
cup of butter, one cup of milk, one tea-spoonful of soda dis- 
solved in milk; mix molasses, eggs, and butter; then add the 
milk and soda; lastly, the flour. Bake in a moderate oven, 
and serve with sauce. 

POOR AUTHOR'S PUDDING. 

Flavor a quart of new milk by boiling in it for a few min- 
utes half a stick of well-bruised cinnamon, or the rind of a 
small lemon ; add a few grains of salt, and sweeten to taste ; 
turn the whole into a deep basin. When it is quite cold, add 
six well-beaten eggs, and strain into a puddiug-dish; cover 
the top entirely with slices of bread free from crust, and half 
an inch thick; cut so as to join neatly, and butter on both 
sides. Bake in a moderate oven for half an hour. Simple, 
and very good. 

BIDDLE PUDDING. 

One pint of milk, four table-spoonfuls of flour, four eggs ; 
pour into a well-buttered pudding-dish, and bake twenty-five 
minutes. Bring it directly from the oven to the table, or it 
falls. Serve with sauce. 

TWO-EGG PUDDING. 

Two eggs, one cup of sugar, one table-spoonful of butter, 
one cup of milk, flour enough to make a stiff batter. Bake 
in a quick oven, and serve with wine-sauce. 

BUTTERMILK PUDDING. 

Three cups of buttermilk, one and one half cups of sugar, 
two cups of flour, half cup of butter, three eggs, tea-spoon- 
ful of sugar ; flavor with nutmeg. Bake a nice brown, and 
serve with sauce. 



154 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

One quart of milk, three ounces of chocolate boiled in the 
milk; flavor with two tea-spoonfuls of vanilla, and sweeten 
to taste. When cool, add the beaten whites of three and the 
yelks of six eggs. Bake in a moderate oven. Sweeten the 
three remaining whites, beat to a stiff froth, pile on the pud 
ding, and bake a light brown. 

POTATO-PONE 

One quart of grated sweet-potato, one cup of sugar or mo- 
lasses, two table-spoonfuls of butter. One table-spoonful of 
ginger, one tea'-spoonful of cloves and cinnamon mixed, half 
tea-cup of sweet milk, and a pinch of salt. Bake two hours 
and a half. 

CRACKER FRUIT-PUDDING. 

Mix six crackers pounded fine with one quart of boiling 
milk; add one table-spoonful butter, one tea-cup brown 
sugar, six eggs well beaten, half pound of raisins and cur- 
rants each. Bake in a moderate oven. Serve with wine- 
sauce. 

MACAROON-PUDDING. 

Butter a deep pudding-dish, and it with alternate layers of 
macaroons and preserves; pour over this white wine until 
the whole is perfectly saturated ; then add a rich custard 
made of a pint of milk sweetened to taste, and the well- 
beaten yelks of four eggs. Bake a rich brown. Beat the 
whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, with a cup of white sugar; 
spread this over the top of the pudding, and brown. 

SNOW PUDDING.— No. i 
TaKe a box of gelatine; pour on it a pint of cold water. 
When soft, add a quart of boiling water, the juice of four 
lemons, and half a pound of sugar; strain and put aside to 



PUDDINGS. 155 



cool ; when it begins to congeal, beat in the whites of six 
eggs whipj)ed to a stiff froth. It must be beaten until very 
Light, and well mixed. Pour into a mold, and set aside to 
congeal. Serve with syllabub. 

SNOW PUDDING.— No. 2. 

One box of gelatine dissolved in one pint of cold water; 
then add one pint of boiling water. When entirely dissolved, 
add a pint of good wine, half a pound of sugar, one nutmeg, 
and the juice of one lemon ; let come to a boil; then strain. 
Beat to a stiff froth the whites of six eggs, and mix with the 
jelly after it is partly congealed. Serve with a rich boiled 
custard. 

JELLIED APPLES. 

One pound of apples peeled and cored, one pound of sugar, 
and a pint of water; make a sirup of the sugar and water, 
and simmer the apples in it until the3 T can be pierced with a 
straw. Then take out the fruit in a glass bowl, and add half 
an ounce of gelatine to the sirup, and boil ten or fifteen min- 
utes. When the sirup is nearly cold, pour it over the apples, 
and let it congeal. Serve with syllabub. 



156 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 



SWEET OR PUDDING SAUCES. 



WINE-SAUCE. 

Two ounces of butter, two tea-spoonfuls ot flour, half pint 
of boiling water, one gill of wine, quarter of a pound of 
sugar, and half a nutmeg. Mix the flour and butter, pour in 
the boiling water, let it boil for a few minutes, then add 
sugar and wine. 

BOILED SAUCE. 

Dissolve three cups of loaf-sugar in two cups of water, and 
boil to a thick sirup. Flavor with ground cinnamon and 
grated nutmeg. 

HARD SAUCE. 

Stir to a cream one cup of butter and two of sugar ; add a 
wine-glass of wine or brandy, one tea-spoonful of essence of 
lemon. 

CREAM-SAUCE/ 

Kub together, till very light, half a pound of butter and 
the same quantity of sugar; add a well-beaten yelk of an egg 
and half of a goblet of wine. Warm through, stirring con- 
stantly. Flavor with nutmeg. 

MILK-SAUCE. 

In one cup of boiling milk dissolve two cups of loaf-sugar; 
add one quarter of a pound of butter, one wine-glassful of 
brandy, one wine-glassful of wine, and half a grated nutmeg. 



SWEET OR PUDDING SAUCES. 157 

PUDDING-SAUCE.— No. i. 

Beat to a cream oue cup of butter, and two of sugar ; place 
over the fire and stir constantly until dissolved; flavor with 
extract of lemon or wine. Pour in the sauce on a half tea- 
cup of any tart jelly; stirring thoroughly. 

PUDDING-SAUCE.— No. 2. 

Beat together four eggs and two cups of sugar ; add one 
pint of wine, lemon and cinnamon to taste. Heat thorough- 
ly, but do not let boil. 

PLUM-PUDDING SAUCE. 

One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, yelks of two eggs, 
and two table-spoonfuls of butter. Beat all well together, 
and add one wine-glassful of wine and one of brandy. Pour 
on all two tea-cupfuls of boiling water. Simmer well, but do 
not boil. 

APPLE-SAUCE. 

Pare, core, and quarter the apples, let them stew in just 
enough water to cook them without burning them; cook un- 
til perfectly soft; mash well, and when done stir in the 
sugar or any seasoning you may like. Lemon-peel or sliced 
lemon is a great advantage where the apples are not well 
flavored. Nutmeg is always agreeable. 

i 

SAUCE FOR FRUITS. 

Whisk one half pint of cream and a tea-cup of white sugar ; 
flavor with nutmeg. 

LEMON-SAUCE. 

Beat to a cream one cup of butter and two of white sugar; 

stir in the juice and grated rind of one lemon. Grate nutmeg 

on sauce. 

SAUCE. 

Three cups of sugar, one of cream, three table-spoonfuls of 
water. Boil, and when nearly done flavor to taste. 



I 

158 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 



ICES. 



ICE-CREAM.— No. I. 

Three pints of cream, three pints of raiik, nine eggs, one 
and a half pounds of white sugar; flavor to the taste. Put 
the sugar in the milk, and let it come to a boil; have the 
eggs whipped up lightly, whites and yelks together, and 
pour the boiling milk over it, stirring constantly to prevent 
curdling; then pour it into the pan and put on the fire and 
let it thicken. Stir all the time from the bottom, to keep 
from sticking to the pah. When cold, put in .two table- 
spoonfuls of vanilla and the cream. Freeze. For flavoring 
with lemon squeeze the juice and grate the rinds of four large 
lemons, and pour it over one and a quarter pounds of pow- 
dered loaf-sugar; let it stand until the sugar is dissolved, 
then strain and add to the cream, after it is in the freezer. 

ICE-CREAM.— No. 2. 

Two quarts and a half of milk, twelve eggs beaten together, 
two table- spoonfuls of sugar to each ■ egg, and' one table- 
spoonful of corn-starch. Beat sugar and eggs well together; 
pour on the boiling milk, and put back on the fire; simmer 
gently until of the desired consistency. Flavor when cold, 
and add a quart of sweetened cream. Freeze. 

QUEEN'S ICE-CREAM. 

Fifteen eggs, three pints of milk, sugar to the tase. Use 
only four yelks and all the whites; beat very light and make 
like any other custard. Do not use arrow-root or any thick- 



ices. 159 

ening. Have the same quantity of rich cream whipped very 
light ; flavor to taste, and freeze. 

ICE-CREAM WITHOUT EGGS. 

Two quarts of milk, two quarts of whipped cream, one 
pound of powdered sugar, one box of condensed milk, and 
vanilla to the taste. Freeze 

CHOCOLATE ICE-CREAM. 

Make ice-cream as in No. 2, and before freezing add eight 
table-spoonfuls of grated chocolate, dissolved in sufficient 
milk or water to make a smooth paste. 

STRAWBERRY ICE-CREAM. 

Sweeten and boil one gallon of sweet milk. Set it aside to 
cool ; when ready to freeze stir in a quart of cream, whipped 
to a froth. After the cream begins to freeze, stir in the juice 
of two quarts of strawberries that have been strained and 
sweetened. 

FROZEN. PEACHES. 

Make a rich custard, as for ice-cream ; when cold, put in a 
quart of ripe fruit that has been sweetened and mashed very 
fine. Freeze. Other fruits may be frozen in the same way. 

TUTTI FRUTTI ICE-CREAM. 

One pint of milk, one quart of cream, yelks of five eggs, 
beaten light with the sugar, three cups of sugar, one lemon- 
juice and grated peel, one glass of sherry, and one half pound 
of crystallized fruits chopped. Heat the milk to boiling, pour 
slowly over the eggs and sugar, beating all together well. 
Eeturn to the fire and boil until sufficiently thick. When 
cold, beat in the cream, and partly freeze before you stir in 
the fruit and wine. Then freeze hard. 

APPLE, QUINCE, AND PEAR CREAM. 
Take juicy fruit and boil till very tender ; mash and rub 



160 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

through a sieve. Stir into a rich custard, with the addition 
of cream well sweetened, and freeze. 

MACAROON ICE-CREAM. 

Make a custard of one quart of milk, four eggs, and sweet- 
en to your taste. When cool, add a quart of cream, sweet- 
ened and whipped light. Stir in two dozen macaroons, pow- 
dered very fine, and freeze. 

COFFEE FROZEN. 

Prepare the coffee as for the table ; add cream and sugar, 
making it sweeter than for the table. Freeze and serve in 
after dinner coffee-cups. 

COCOA-NUT ICE-CREAM. 

Make boiled custard, putting six eggs to a quart of milk. 
Just before freezing grate one cocoa-nut into half a gallon of 
custard. The milk of the cocoa-nut must not be used, nor 
cream, as it will be too rich. 

FROZEN PLUM-PUDDING. 

Two quarts of well-frozen ice-cream in a freezer, two 
ounces of raisins chopped, two ounces of currants, two 
ounces of citron cut very thin, one and a half ounce of 
chocolate grated fine, and one pint of Madeira wine. Put 
these ingredients into a stew-pan, and set it on the fire; let 
it stew slowly half an hour ; when cold, mix with the ice- 
cream, to which you may add one cup of strawberry pre- 
serves, one of peach, and one of cherries ; then let it freeze. 
Serve with whipped cream, flavored with vanilla or with 
maraschino. 

WHITE ICE-CREAM. 

Two quarts of fresh milk, twelve ounces of sugar, whites 
of eight eggs whipped, and two table-spoonfuls of arrow-root. 
Boil all together until thick as custard, and when cold add 
one quart of whipped cream. 



ICES. 161 

FROZEN BUTTERMILK. 

Strain the buttermilk through a thin cloth, so as to remove 
all lumps and particles of butter, add sugar until very, very 
sweet, and flavor with vanilla. Freeze as you would ice- 
cream. 

PINE-APPLE SHERBET, OR ICE. 

Take four pine-apples, pare them, and cut in thin slices ; 
put in a bowl with two pounds of loaf-sugar ; let it stand one 
hour, then separate the slices from the juice and pour over 
them three quarts of boiling water. When cold, strain 
through a coarse cloth, squeeze hard, then add the juice and 
freeze. 

PINE-APPLE SHERBET. 

Two cans of pine-apple; cut off the dark spots from the 
slices; chop very fine, and pour over it two quarts of boiling 
water; strain into this the juice; also, the juice of four lem- 
ons, five tea-cupfuls of white sugar, and just before freezing 
beat in the whites of six eggs, which have been whipped to a 
stiff froth. 

FROZEN CLARET. 

Make a sweet sangaree; flavor with lemon-juice and peel. 
Freeze. 

LEMON SHERBET. 

Make a rich lemonade of twelve lemons; straxi through a 
thick cloth and add the whites of six eggs beaten to a froth 
Freeze. 

ITALIAN SNOW. 

Make a lemonade, putting in as much sugar as the lemon- 
ade will dissolve; add the whites of twelve eggs to each 
quart. Freeze. 

ORANGE ICE. 

One dozen oranges, juice of two lemons, two quarts of 
11 



162 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

water, and sugar to the taste. Rind of four oranges grated 
on sugar. Freeze. 

BISQUE GLACE'.— No. i. 

Beat well together the yelks of eight eggs, and eight 
ounces of powdered sugar. Flavor one pint of good milk 
with vanilla, and boil it. Dissolve in a vessel set in hot 
water one and a half ounce of gelatine, and as soon as it is 
dissolved mix with the boiling milk; pour the boiling milk 
slowly on to the eggs and sugar, stirring all the time; when 
well mixed pass through a sieve and put in a very cold place 
to cool. This is called "apperiel," or preparation. Beat 
one pint of cream to a stiff froth, and when well beaten add 
it slowly to the mixture already prepared, which should be 
quite cold. To freeze, you must have a tin mold, either 
square or rectangular; fill this with little paper molds, which 
must fit the tin mold exactly in every part. Fill the little 
paper cases with the mixture, and cover the tin mold with a 
hermetically fitting top. In the bottom of a box made for 
the purpose, put about eight inches of pounded ice and coarse 
salt in alternate layers; in this place your tin mold of Bisque 
Glace' and another eight inches of ice and salt; cover the 
whole with a thick, heavy cloth, and let it stand six or eight 
hours. The box containing the ice and salt should have a 
small hole, to allow the escape of the water from the melted 
ice. When the mold is taken from the ice, wipe well before 
opening, to prevent any salt-water getting in. It is then 
ready to serve. 

BISQUE GLACE'.— No. 2. 

Take some pieces of broken sugar, and rub off the rind of 
four lemons; then pulverize the sugar and mix with half a 
pound of pulverized loaf-sugar, moistened with the juice of 
the lemons. Beat six eggs very light; stir them gradually 
into a quart of cream, in turn with the sugar and lemons. 



ices. , 163 

Have ready some stale sponge-cake, grated very fine; stir 
into the mixture until it is a thick batter, which must bo 
beaten until perfectly free from lumps. Put into a porcelain 
kettle, and let it boil up once, stirring it nearly all the time ; 
then freeze as ice-cream. 

CARAMEL ICE-CREAM.— No. i. 

One gallon of sweet cream, four tea- cups of powdered su- 
gar, and five table-spoonfuls of caramels. Caramels. — Put in 
a stew-pan one t'ea-cup of nice brown sugar, and half a cup 
of water. Stew over a hot fire till it burns a little. 

CARAMEL ICE-CREAM.— No. 2. 

Make a rich custard of one pint of milk and five or six 
eggs. Put two pints of brown sugar in a skillet, and stir 
constantly over a brisk fire until it is dissolved; do not let it 
burn. Stir into the custard while both are hot. When cold 
pour it into three quarts of cream well beaten. Freeze 



CREAMS, JELLIES, &c. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE.— No. i. 

Soak in a pint of fresh milk one box of Cox's refined gela- 
tine. Make a boiled custard of one pint of milk, two eggs, 
and one fourth pound of powdered sugar. Put the gelatine 
that is soaked in the milk on the fire, stirring constantly un- 
til it is dissolved. After it gets boiling hot strain into a 
large bowl. The custard may be strained into this as soon 
as it is made. Stand in a cool place, and have two pints of 
pure cream, with sugar enough to sweeten, whipped to a stiff 
froth; add this just before it congeals; flavor according to 
taste with vanilla or other extract. The whites of four or 
five eggs whipped to a stiff froth, and stirred very hard and 



164 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

rapidly into the Charlotte, after the cream has been put in, 
makes it very light and delicate. Have the mold lined with 
lady-fingers, and pour the Charlotte Kusse in just as it begins 
to congeal. Do not let the cake project above the Charlotte, 
as it would prevent its standing nicely when turned out. If 
the cakes should be too long cut them off evenly, and push 
the little ends into the surface. Unless the weather is cold, 
the mold should be placed on ice. In a few hours it will be 
ready to turn out on the stand, and ready to be served. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE.— No. 2. 

One quart of thick cream, one half pint of milk, one ounce 
of gelatine, whites of seven eggs, yelks of five eggs, twelve 
ounces of sugar. Dissolve the gelatine in the boiling milk; 
take off the fire, stir in the yelks, and then the sugar and the 
flavoring. When the custard is cold, but not congealed, stir 
in the cream, which has been beaten to a stiff froth, and 
lastly the whites of the eggs. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE— No. 3. 

Dissolve three fourths box of Nelson's gelatine in a pint of 
warm milk. Make a thick custard of one pint of milk, one 
fourth pound of powdered sugar, the whites of four eggs, and 
yelks of two. When done, add the gelatine, stirring all till 
cool; flavor with one tea-spoonful of vanilla. Whip three 
pints of cream, sweetened with powdered sugar, to a stiff 
froth, and add to the custard and gelatine. Do not whip 
after they are well mixed, but pour into a mold lined with 
lady fingers, or sliced sponge-cake. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE WITHOUT EGGS. 

Two thirds of a box of Cox's gelatine, dissolved in 

a tea-cup of sweet milk. Beat to a stiff froth one quart of 

sweet cream sweetened, and flavored with vanilla. After 

the gelatine is dissolved and cool, stir it into the cream and 



CREAMS, JELLIES, &v. \Q§ 



beat all well together. Put into a mold lined with lady- 
fingers. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

Beat separately the yelks and whites of five eggs. Add to 
the yelks three fourths pound of loaf-sugar, beat well. Soak 
in not quite a half a pint of water a half box of gela- 
tine, and put it on to boil. Whip very light one quart of 
cream. Flavor the custard. Pour the boiling water and 
gelatine over the yelks a,nd sugar, beating all the time. 
When cold enough, add the cream. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE WITHOUT CREAM. 

Haifa box of gelatine in a large cup of water, one pint of 
milk, one cup of sugar, and four eggs. Beat the yelks and 
sugar, stir into the boiling milk ; let this cook until nearly 
as thick as boiled custard, then add the gelatine. When 
nearly cold add the whites of the egg?, whipped to a froth. 
Flavor with vanilla. 

BLANC-MANC E. 

Boil a quart of milk and sweeten to the taste. Dissolve an 
ounce of isinglass or gelatine, and pour it into the milk ; at 
the same time remove the milk from the fire. When nearly 
cold flavor with vanilla and pour into a mold. Set it on ice 
to harden. 

CHOCOLATE BLANC-MANGE. 

In one pint of water dissolve one ounce of gelatine. Boil 
one quart of milk, four ounces of grated chocolate, and three 
fourths pound of sugar together for five minutes; then add 
the gelatine, and stirring constantly boil five minutes longer. 
Flavor with one tea-spoonful of vanilla, and pour into a 
mold. To be eaten with sweet cream. 

NEAPOLITAN BLANC-MANGE. 
One quart of milk, one ounce of gelatine, three ounces of 



16(5 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 



almonds blanched and pounded in a mortar with one table- 
spoonful of rose-water, to prevent oiling, and three fourths 
cup of sugar. Heat the milk to boiling, having previously 
soaked the gelatine in a cup of it for an hour. Put this in 
when the milk is boiling hot ; add the pounded almonds, and 
stir all together ten minutes before putting in the sugar. 
When the gelatine has dissolved, strain through a thin mus- 
lin bag, pressing it well to get. out the flavor of the almonds. 
There should be three or four bitter ones among them. Sep- 
arate the blanc-mange into four different portions. Into 
one part beat one large table-spoonful of chocolate wet with 
a very little boiling water, and rubbed to a smooth paste, for 
the brown ; beat into the other part a large table- spoonful of 
currant jelly for the pink (or currant or cranberry juice), 
yelk of an egg, beaten light for the yellow. Leave the 
fourth part uncolored. Return each part, except the fourth, 
to the fire, stirring until very hot, but not boiling. When 
cold and a little stiff, pour carefully into a wet mold, the 
white first, then the pink, next the yellow, and the chocolate 
last. Set in a cool place. Loosen, when firm, by dipping 
the mold in warm water for a moment, and turn out on your 
stand, when the order of colors will be reversed. Put a lit- 
tle vanilla with the chocolate. 

SYLLABUB.— No. i. 

Have a quart of very rich cream ; wash and wipe four 
lemons, and with a very sharp knife pare off the entire rind. 
Mix one half pint of Madeira wine with half pint of white 
sugar, powdered, and the lemon-peels; let it stand to extract 
the flavor of the lemons; then add it slowly to the cream, 
and whip up the whole. 

SYLLABUB.— No. 2. 

One quart of cream, the whites of four eggs, one glass of 
white wine, and two tea-cups of powdered sugar. Whip half 



CREAMS, JELLIES, &>c. 167 

the sugar into the cream ; the remainder into the eggs. Mix 
these, add the wine, and flavor to the taste. 

TO WHIP CREAM. 

Sweeten the cream with powdered white sugar; flavor 
with any extract, or with lemon or orange, by rubbing sugar 
on the peel. Set a bowl near with a sieve over it, then whip 
the cream, and as it rises to a froth take it off with a skim- 
mer, and put it into the sieve to drain; whip also the cream 
which drains off. If the cream is a little sour, it may be 
sweetened by adding a small quantity of soda. 

ALMOND-CREAM. 

Beat four ounces of sweet almonds, and a few bitter ones, 
in a mortar, with a tea-spoonful of water, to prevent oiling, — 
both having been blanched. Put the paste to a quart of 
cream, and add the juice of three lemons, and sweeten to the 
taste; beat it to a froth, which take off on the shallow part 
of a sieve. Fill glasses with some of the liquor and froth. 

IMPERIAL CREAM. 

Boil a quart of cream, with the thin rind of a lemon, and 
stir it until nearly cold. Have ready in a bowl or dish that 
you are going to serve it in, the juice of three lemons 
strained, with as much sugar as' will sweeten the cream, 
which pour into the dish from a large tea-pot, holding it 
high, and moving it about to mix with the juice. It should 
be made at least six hours before it is used; and a day is 
better. 

ITALIAN CREAM.— No. i. 

One quart of cream, two boxes of gelatine, one pound of 
sugar, yelks of ten eggs, and flavor the cream to the taste — 
strawberry flavoring is the nicest. Whip the -cream to a 
stiff froth. Beat the eggs very light, and mix in the sugar 
well; then pour in the cream. Dissolve the gelatine in suffi- 



168 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

cient warm water to cover it, and when it begins to congeal 
add it to the mixture. Pour all into the mold, and when 
stiff cover with grated cocoa-nut or syllabub, ornamented 
with bright jellies or preserves. 

ITALIAN CREAM.— Nc. 2. 

Three three pints of cream or milk, and sweeten with sugar 
to the taste ; flavor with vanilla, and add one paper of gela- 
tine. Stir constantly until it boils ; beat in the yelks of eight 
eggs, and stir them well into the boiling milk; strain it into 
a mold, and let it stand on ice five or six hours. Serve with 
sweetened cream. 

BAVARIAN CREAM.— No. 1. 

Take half a box of gelatine ; pour on it one pint of cold 
milk; when soft pour on a pint of hot milk, and sweeten to 
your taste. While this is congealing churn up a quart of 
rich cream ; sweeten and flavor to your taste. When the 
gelatine begins to thicken, beat in the syllabub, which must 
be churned very thick. You may add a little milk if the 
cream is too thick. Do not put in any of the thin part of the 
syllabub, as it will make it heavy. 

BAVARIAN CREAM.— No. 2. 

One quart of thick cream, one pint of milk, two eggs well 
beaten, half box of Cox's sparkling gelatine. First, pour a 
small cup of milk on the gelatine; let this stand while the 
cream is being whipped. Flavor the cream with wine and 
sugar, as you would syllabub. Put the pint of milk on the 
fire; as soon as it is hot pour the soft gelatine into it and 
immediately put in the beaten eggs. Stir them rapidly in 
until the custard is done. Pour out, sweeten and flavor with 
vanilla ; when cold, whip up the cream, and before the cus- 
tard congeals stir it rapidly in. 



CREAMS, JELLIES, &*c. 169 



SPANISH CREAM. 

Three pints of milk, one ounce of gelatine, six eggs, twelve 
table-spoonfuls of sugar. Beat the yelks and sugar together. 
Soak the gelatine in about half a pint of cold water, pour the 
boiling milk on the eggs and sugar, then stir in the gelatine; 
put it on the fire and let come to a boil, take off and place to 
cool; flavor with vanilla. When it commences to conceal 
stir in the whites, which have been beaten to a froth. 

RASPBERRY CREAM. 

Put two large table-spoonfuls of raspberry jam in a fine 
sieve, pour over, and work through one pint of cream, then 
whisk it until it thickens. Meanwhile dissolve half an ounce 
of gelatine, two ounces of white sugar in a tea-cup of milk, 
and add gradually to the cream. When quite thick turn 
into a mold. 

CHARLOTTE POLONAISE. 

Boil over a slow fire one and a half pints of cream. While 
it is boiling have ready six yelks ; stir them gradually into 
the boiling cream — take care to have it smooth and free from 
lumps. Let this mixture boil ten minutes, then divide it by 
putting into two sauce-pans. Mix into one pan six ounces of 
chocolate grated fine, two ounces of loaf-sugar, one fourth 
pound of macaroons broken fine. Put into the other pan 
one dozen bitter almonds, four ounces of shelled sweet 
almonds blanched and pounded, one ounce of citron cut 
fine, and four ounces of pounded sugar. Stir this in well; let 
it come to a boil and set aside to cool. Cut a large sponge- 
cake into slices half an inch thick; spread one slice thickly 
with chocolate cream, and one with almond cream. Do this 
alternately until all the cream is used up. Serve cold. 

AMBROSIA.— No. I. 
Eight or a dozen oranges peeled and sliced, one cocoa-nut 



170 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

•_ , 

grated, one pine-apple sliced. Alternate layers of each with 
sugar and wine. 

AMBROSIA.— No. 2. 

Alternate layers of sliced oranges and grated cocoa-nut, 
sugar sprinkled upon each layer of orange; have the top of 
cocoa-nut. 

APPLE-FLOAT. 

A quart of stewed apples mashed fine and passed through 
a fine sieve, sweetened with white sugar to the taste, flavored 
with vanilla or lemon — grating the rind in the apples if fla- 
vored with lemon. Stir in the well-beaten whites of four 
eggs. Beat until very light. Serve with rich cream ; or pile 
on glass bowl half filled with cream or rich custard. Very 
nice mixed with cream and frozen. 

APPLE ME'RINGUE. 

To three or four cups of nice mashed apples, add beaten 
yelks of two eggs, half cup of sugar, a little milk, one and a 
half table-spoonfuls of butter. Mix well and bake a few min- 
utes; when cold, spread evenly on top a me'ringue made of 
whites of eggs, beaten to a stiff froth and sweetened. 

PORCUPINE. 

Eight eggs to a pint and a half of milk. Take out four 
whites. Boil the milk and pour it on the beaten eggs. 
When just ready to boil take off and stir till cool, or it will 
curdle. Sweeten to taste, and flavor as you choose. Put a 
loaf of sponge-cake into a deep dish, soak thoroughly with 
wine, and then stick over it blanched almonds cut in pieces. 
Pour over the custard just before sending to the table. 

APPLE-SOUFFLE'. 

Twelve large apples, half pound of sugar, six eggs, one 
pint of milk, and one lemon. Pare and core the apples, stew 



CREAMS, JELLIES, &c. 171 

them with the lemon-peel and sugar until quite soft ; press 
through a sieve. Make a custard with the yelks of the eggs 
and milk. Half fill a pie-dish with the apples, and cover 
with the custard. Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff 
froth, and spread on the custard. Sift a table-spoonful of 
white sugar over all, and bake in a moderate oven for ten 
minutes. 

CATEAN POMMES. 

Boil in a pint of water one pound and a half of loaf-sugar, 
till it becomes a rich sirup. Weigh two pounds of apples 
after they have been peeled, cored, and cut small ; boil them 
in the sirup with the grated peel and juice of a large lemon, 
till they are reduced to a pulp; then put it into a mold. The 
following day serve it turned out in a glass dish, with a rich 
custard. 

BOILED CUSTARD. 

To each quart of milk allow five eggs and five table-spoon- 
fuls of sugar. Put the milk on the fire with half the sugar ; 
whip the whites to a stiff froth, and when the milk is scalding 
hot put it in the whites with a skimmer, and when partially 
set take them out. Have the yelks well beaten with the 
balance of the sugar, and put in the milk, stirring constantly 
till thick, to prevent scorching. When sufficiently thick 
take up and flavor to the taste. Serve in cups or glasses, 
laying the whites on the top, and grating nutmeg over it. 

BAKED APPLES. 

Pare, core, and cut in thin slices, sprinkle sugar between 
each layer and bake. They will be candied and excellent. 
Peaches and pears prepared in the same way are very nice. 

BAKED PEARS. 
Peel and core the pears, place them in a baking-dish, and 
fill the middle of each with brown sugar; also, strew sugar 



172 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

over the pan about an inch thick. The juice of lemon or 
orange-peel, or stick of cinnamon inserted in the center of 
each piece, will improve the flavor. Add enough water to 
dissolve the sugar. Bake until quite soft. Serve with cream 
or milk. 

TIPSY-CAKE.— No. i. 

Cut a sponge-cake through twice, to make three pieces; 
put layer upon layer in a dish, with wine and jelly between 
each piece; make a rich custard to pour over the whole. The 
above is a good way to utilize not only stale sponge-cake, but 
cup or pound cake. 

TIPSY-CAKE.— No. 2. 

Pour over a jelly-cake as much white wine as it will ab- 
sorb, and stick it all over with blanched sweet almonds. Serve 
with whipped cream. 

LEMON-JELLY 

One box of Cox's gelatine dissolved in one pint of cold 
water, the juice and rind of three lemons if large, four if 
small, one and three fourth pounds of loaf-sugar, three pints 
of boiling water, five wine-glasses of wine (sherry, cooking- 
wine, or Champagne). When nearly cold, strain and set 
aside to congeal. 

WINE-JELLY.— No. 1. 

One package of gelatine, one quart of water, three fourths 
of a pound of white sugar, four lemons, half pint of sherry 
or good Madeira wine, one ounce of mixed spice — cloves, all- 
spice, mace, and cinnamon. Put the gelatine, sugar, water, 
spices, juice and peel of the lemons into a brass or porcelain- 
lined kettle; set on the fire, stirring occasionally, until the 
gelatine is perfectly dissolved. Have ready the stiffly-beaten 
whites of two eggs, with which you have mixed a dozen or 
fifteen pieces of charcoal, each piece about the size of the end 



CREAMS, JELLIES, &>c, 173 

of your finger; empty the eggs and charcoal into the mixture 
on the fire; stir well, and just before it begins to boil add 
the wine. Kemove from the fire just as soon as it boils up 
once; let it stand in the kettle about five minutes, and 
then strain through a flannel jelly-bag until clear. If you 
wish to have it a beautiful amber color, drop in just before 
taking from the fire a few drops of liquid burned sugar. B} T 
using more or less of the burned sugar you can obtain any 
shade of amber you wish 

WINE-JELLY.— No. 2. 

To one pint of cold water add one ounce of gelatine, the 
juice and slices of two lemons; let it stand until the gelatine 
softens, and pour over one pint of boiling water, one full pint 
of loaf-sugar ; stir till thoroughly dissolved, and pour in. a 
pint of wine ; strain through a flannel-bag, and set aside to 
congeal. In this way jelly can be made with little time and 
trouble. 

JELLY AND FRUIT. 

Line a charlotte or jelly-mold with various kinds of fruit, 
such as stoned cherries, strawberries, pieces of peaches, etc., 
by dipping the fruit in jelly and sticking it to the sides. Ar- 
range in any design wished ; then fill the mold with wine- 
jelly, and place on ice. This makes a beautiful dish, if the 
fruit is arranged with taste. 

JELLY OF IRISH MOSS. 

Half an ounce of Irish moss, a pint and a half ©f fresh 
milk; boil down to a pint, and remove any sediment by 
straining. Add one tea-cupful of sugar; lemon-juice or 
peach-water to give an agreeable flavor. 

CALF OR HOG FOOT JELLY. 

Have four feet scalded and scraped ; split them, and boil 
them in a gallon of water until they have gone to pieces, and 



174 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

the liquor reduced to one half. Skim off all grease ; strain 
the liquor through a jelly-bag ; set aside to cool, when it will 
be a firm cake of jelly. To each quart allow a pound of su- 
gar, a pint of Madeira wine and a wine-glass of brandy, three 
sticks of cinnamon, juice and grated peel of four lemons, 
the whites of four eggs; boil twenty minutes ; do not stir; 
then add a tea-cup of cold water, and boil five minutes long- 
er. Strain through a flannel bag; but do not squeeze or press 
the bag, as it will render the jelly cloudy. 

MARASCHINO JELLY. 

Add to some nice, clear gelatine jelly maraschino enough 
to flavor it. Put the mold into a vessel, with ice and salt 
around it; then put the mold one fourth full of jelly; place 
in it as it cools a layer of Malaga grapes. When this is con- 
gealed, pour on some more jelly which is cold, but not con- 
gealed; then another layer of grapes; fill up the mold in 
this way. Serve when stiff. If in preparing it the jelly 
stiffens too rapidly, set it in warm water. Other kinds of 
fruit can be substituted lor the grapes. 



PAESER VES AND J EL L IES. 175 



PRESERVES AND JELLIES. 



In making preserves, procure firm, ripe fruit, as it is desir- 
able to have the natural flavor of the fruit, which can not be 
obtained from hard, unripe fruit. Use the best loaf-sugar; 
but if not convenient, good brown sugar will do by clarify- 
ing, which may be done by stirring in the sirup the whites 
of one or two eggs, carefully taking off the scum as it rises, 
until the sirup is clear. 

It is not well to expose the fruit long to the action of the 
sun, as it has a tendency, to toughen it. Have your jars well 
cleaned by washing in weak lye, or soda-water. Put your 
preserves in the jars hot, which may be done without risk by 
placing the jars on a towel folded in several thickness sat- 
urated with cold water. Cover the top with a paper cut to 
fit inside the mouth of the jars ; wet in brandy or whisky ; 
cork tightly. 

FIG PRESERVES. 

i 

Drop them in a weak salaratus-water, and let remain for 
fifteen minutes ; wipe them dry, and to a pound of figs allow 
three quarters of a pound of sugar. When the sirup has 
well boiled, put in the figs, and boil them untif they look 
clear; take out the fruit, and sun it for two hours; then re- 
turn to the sirup, and boil a little while before taking off. 

They may be flavored with either ginger, mace, cinnamon, 
or lemon. If lemons are used, do not put them in the boil- 
ing sirup, as that will make them hard. Slice them, take 
out the seeds, and put in a vessel with a very little water, 



176 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK, 

and boil until tender; then pour the lemon and the water in 
which it was boiled into the sirup. If lemons can not be ob- 
tained, use the oil of lemon, which should be put in when 
taken from the fire. 

TO PRESERVE BLUE FIGS. 

Peel, and throw into a solution of lime-water (one table- 
spoonful of air-slacked lime to half a bucket of water). Let 
them remain for nearly an hour; drain well. To every pound 
of figs add three quarters of a pound of white sugar. Slice 
lemons very thin ; take out the seeds, and strain in the pre- 
serving-kettle until tender; use as little water as will dis- 
solve the sugar; then put in the figs, and let them boil until 
cooked through. Seal up in jars while boiling hot. 

FIG MARMALADE. 

Use ripe figs; place them in cooking soda-water for a few 
minutes; wipe dry with a coarse cloth; then put them on to 
boil, with just water enough to cover them; boil until soft, 
mashing often. When soft, put three quarters of a pound of 
sugar to a pound of figs ; cook slowly ; stir frequently to 
prevent burning. Flavor with oil of lemon, or anything 
preferred. 

TOMATO PRESERVES. 

I 

The impression generally prevails that these preserves are 
very indifferent, but, if properly prepared, they will rival any 
fruit. Take half a bushel of ripe tomatoes; scald and peel, 
and as they' ai*e peeled plunge into cold water ; cut them in 
halves (across the tomato), so as to extract any seed; throw 
again in cold water, and when cleansed and thoroughly 
washed, weigh, allowing one pound of loaf-sugar to the same 
of fruit. Make a sirup of sugar and sufficient water ; when 
thick enough, add the tomatoes; cook slowly until done. Be 
careful when they are nearly done, or they will burn. Fla- 



FRESER VES AND JELLIES. 177 



vor with sliced lemon cut in the preserves when about half 
done. 

STRAWBERRY PRESERVES. 

Stem and wash the fruit carefully, and to every pound of 
fruit allow a pound of loaf-sugar. Put in a kettle a layer of 
fruit and a layer of sugar; let stand about an hour, and they 
will make sufficient juice without adding water. (Do not 
let them stand too long, or they will have a shrunken ap- 
pearance.) Boil until done, but not too fast. Blackberries 
may be preserved in the same way. 

BLACKBERRY JAM. 

Weigh the fruit, and press it through a colander. To 
every pound of berries add a little more than half a pound 
of sugar. Boil slowly until as thick as desired, stirring con- 
stantly. 

APPLE PRESERVES. 

Pare and slice your apples; weigh them and your sugar, 
allowing a pound of crushed sugar to a pound of fruit. In 
a stone jar place a layer of apples, then a layer of sugar, 
sprinkling every layer with enough water to moisten the 
sugar; let this stand all night. In the morning, remove the 
apples; put the sirup in a kettle, adding a little more water 
— enough to cook the apples. Clarify the sugar with the 
whites of two eggs; strain it, and return to the kettle; place 
on the fire; when nearly boing hot, put in the apples; give 
them a good scald, but do not allow them to remain long 
enough to break ; remove from the sirup, place them in dishes, 
and sun them until a little tough ; return to the sirup, boil 
a short time, and sun again; then return to the sirup, and 
boil until quite clear and the sirup is thick. Flavor with 
lemons sliced, or with ginger. Seal tight. 

CRAB-APPLE PRESERVES. 

Boil in clear water until the core can be easily removed. 
12 



178 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

A small tin tube is the best arrangement for taking out the 
cores. Make a sirup, allowing two pounds of sugar to one 
pound of fruit; put in the fruit and boil until clear; sun a 
short time, and boil again. 

PEAR PRESERVES. 

To one pound of pears put three quarters of a pound of 
sugar. Peel and quarter your fruit; then drop into the boil- 
ing sirup. After boiling awhile, take out and put in the sun ; 
then put in the sirup some race ginger, or cloves if liked ; 
return the fruit to the boiling sirup, and boil until done. 

PLUM PRESERVES. 

Have the plums nearly ripe ; allow a pound of sugar to a 
pound of fruit. Put the plums in a kettle of cold water, and 
let it heat gradually until it boils; pour off this water, and 
do not use it, as it will impair the flavor of the preserves. 
Make a sirup of the sugar and enough water to cook them in. 
When the sirup has boiled a few minutes put in the fruit, 
and let it boil until done. 

QUINCE PRESERVES. 

Pare and core the quinces, taking out the defective parts; 
cut in halves or quarters; place them in a preserving-kettle, 
with enough water to cover them; lay a plate over the top 
to keep in the steam, and boil until tender. Take out the 
fruit; strain the liquor, and retain it to make your sirup of, 
allowing a pound of sugar to the same of fruit. The weight 
should be taken before boiling the fruit. When the 3irup 
has boiled twenty minutes, and been well skimmed, put in 
the quinces, and boil half an hour.. Take them up, lay on a 
dish, and expose to the sun for an hour; then return the fruit 
to the sirup, and boil until done. 



PEESER VES AND JELLIES. 179 

QUINCE MARMALADE. 

Wash and quarter the quinces, taking out the cores, but do 
not pare ; put them in a kettle with sufficient water to stew 
them in; boil until soft; run through a sieve, and to each 
pound of this pulp put a pound of sugar. Eeturn to the 
kettle, cook slowly, and stir constantly until done. 

WATER-MELON PRESERVES. 

To a bucket of cold water add two handfuls of lime. Cut 
your rinds, either water-melon or cantaloup ; let it remain in 
the lime-water twenty-four hours, turning it often from the 
bottom. Take out of the lime-water, and soak in clear water 
to remove the lime, changing the water frequently. Scald 
in strong alum-water, with grape or butter bean-leaves, keep- 
ing the vessel well covered that the rind may have a good 
green color. Let them boil in this about ten minutes; then 
drop the rind in cold water; boil in a strong ginger-tea, 
making enough to cover the rind well, and long enough to 
impart a flavor of ginger to the rind. Make a sirup, using 
two pounds of white sugar to one pound of rind, and water 
sufficient to boil the rind until perfectly transparent.. Do 
not put in the fruit until the sirup boils; then cook slowly. 
The rind should be weighed as soon as cut. Sliced lemon is 
a great improvement; when not at hand, the oil of lemon 
may be used, but not until the preserves have been taken 
from the fire — while hot. 

PEACHES PRESERVED IN THEIR JUICE. 

Wash, wipe, and pare with a silver or fine steel knife ; halve, 
and remove the pits ; to each pound of the fruit use one half 
pound of the best loaf-sugar. Sprinkle a little sugar in a 
deep earthen bowl; then put in a layer of peaches; alternate 
with sugar until all are closely packed, covering the top with 
sugar, cover tightly, and set aside for ten or twelve hours. 
Pour all into a preserving-kettle ; let them come to a boil, and 



180 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

as fast as the pieces swell sufficiently take out with a silver 
spoon and place in a glass, air-tight, preserving-jar. As soon 
as the jars are filled, pour the boiling sirup over the peaches, 
filling the jars to the top ; seal at once, 

1 have kept peaches and other fruit prepared in this way 
perfectly good three and four years. 

PEACHES PRESERVED WHOLE. 

Take the large, white clingstones; pare evenly; to every 
pound of fruit allow a pound of powdered loaf-sugar ; place 
them in large earthen tureens, — a layer of fruit, and one of 
sugar ; let them remain over night ; then boil over a gradual 
fire until transparent; then pour the fruit and sirup into large 
dishes; place them in the sun until the sirup is almost a jelly 
and the fruit well cooked; put them in jars. See that no 
bubbles of air are left in the jars. Place a brandy paper on 
the top. Seal carefully. 

BRANDY PEACHES. 

Select ripe peaches, but not soft ; drop in lye or soda-water 
to remove the furze, and wipe with a coarse towel. Make a 
thick sirup, allowing a half pound of sugar to one of fruit, 
and one half pint of water. Put the peaches in the sirup, 
and boil five minutes. After taking the fruit out, if the sirup 
is too thin add more sugar, and boil until a thick sirup is 
made. Put the peaches in a jar, and to a measure of sirup 
put a measure of brandy, ond pour over the fruit. 

PEACH-CHIPS. 

Take ripe peaches; peel, and cut from the seed. Make a 
thin sirup; boil the peaches in this until they look clear; 
then lay them on a sieve to drain ; roll in dry brown sugar, 
and expose to the sun in dishes; change to dry dishes, and 
dip in sugar again until entirely dried and crystallized. The 
sirup may be kept and used for more peaches. 



PEESER VES AND JELLIES. 181 

PEACH-LEATHER. 

Prepare the peaches as you would to eat with milk; then 
strain through a sieve ; butter panes of glass and spread it 
out thin on them, and put in the sun. The second day turn 
it. 

PUMPKIN-CHIPS. 

Weigh equal quantities of sugar and pumpkin cut thin or 
shaved with a plane ; sprinkle the sugar over the pumpkin, 
and let it remain over night. It will not need any water. 
To every pound add one orange or lemon cut into thin slices. 
Some prefer ginger as a flavoring. Boil until the pumpkin 
is perfectly clear, and the orange-peel is soft; take all out, 
and lay on a dish in the sun for half an hour ; boil the sirup 
quite thick; then put the preserves back. 

WATER-MELON OR CITRON PRESERVES. 

Pare the rinds, and soak in salt-water one night, then in 
clear water until all the 3ak is extracted ; then scald in alum- 
water, with grape or butter- bean leaves, and a lump of alum 
the size of a hickory-nut; then throw in cold water; boil in 
clear water; then boil in ginger-tea. Make a sirup, allowing 
one pound of sugar to a pint of water. When the sirup 
boils, put in the fruit, and cook until tender and transparent ; 
then take out the fruit, and boil the sirup until thick. The 
above is for ten pounds of fruit. 

CANTALOUP PRESERVES. 

Select sound fruit; pare, and divide into quarters, and cut 
each quarter into several pieces ; take the seeds out carefully ; 
weigh the fruit, and to every pound allow half a pound of 
the best loaf-sugar. Put the fruit in a preserving-kettle, and 
boil in water for half an hour, or until quite clear; drain, 
and place them on a large dish ; put the sugar into the ket- 



182 'GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

tie, and add water enough to dampen the sugar; boil until 
quite clear; then add the fruit, and boil slowly until it be- 
comes almost transparent, and soft enough to allow a straw to 
pierce through without breaking. A few lemons sliced and 
boiled with the fruit in the sirup, and a few ginger-roots 
added to the sirup while boiling, will improve the flavor. 
Put the fruit in jars, and pour the boiling sirup over it. 

SOUR-ORANGE MARMALADE. 

Hasp the orange on a vegetable grater to remove the deep 
yellow. Then peel the oranges; quai'ter the peel, and boil 
until tender enough to pierce with a straw. While boiling, 
change the water three or four times, using each time boiling 
water. G-et all the pulp and juice free from the skin; pour 
over the seeds a pint of boiling water, and let it stand until 
jelly-like; pour this off, and save; pour more water on the 
seeds until all the jelly is extracted. Cut the peel into straw- 
like strips; weigh the peel, pulp, and jelly- water, and to each 
pound of this allow a pound of sugar. Boil all until jelly- 
like. 

ORANGE-PEEL PRESERVES. 

Put the peel in salt-water for twenty-four hours; then soak 
in clear water; boil in weak alum-water, then in clear water. 
Make a sirup of a pound of sugar to the same of peel, and 
boil until clear. 

SCOTCH-ORANGE MARMALADE. 

Take large, ripe oranges, and weigh them, and to each 
pound of fruit allow one pound of crushed sugar. Pare off 
the yellow rind of half the oranges, and put it over the fire ; 
cover tightly, and let it simmer slowly until tender. Grate 
off the yellow rind of the remaining oranges; quarter the 
fruit, squeeze out all the juice and pulp, a'nd remove the seeds 
and skin. To each pound of sugar add half a pint of cold 



PRESER VES AND JELLIES. 183 

water, and the white of one egg to every two pounds of su- 
gar; let the sugar stand until nearly dissolved; then boil 
slowly, and skim off what rises. Pound the boiled parings 
in a mortar, or chop them very fine, and turn into the sirup 
after it has become very thick; then boil ten minutes, stirring 
often; put in the juice, pulp, and grated rind, and boil for 
half an hour, or until transparent. Lemons can be mixed 
with the oranges — one to every fifteen — and a little more 
sugar added with good effect. 

This recipe makes the famous Scotch marmalade used so 
much for a breakfast dish. It is sold in all large groceries in 
cities, but can be made at home at much more reasonable 
rates. Try a little of it with good bread and butter for a 
dessert. dish, and you will not sigh for pie. 

PINE-APPLE PRESERVES. 

Pare and slice the fruit. Make a sirup of half a pound of 
sugar to a pound of fruit; when the sirup boils, put in the 
fruit, and let it remain until a little tender. Fill the jars 
with the hot fruit, and pour on the sirup. To be kept in air- 
tight jars. Prepared in this way, much of the flavor of the 
fruit is preserved. 

APPLE-JELLY. 

Wash and cut up the apples, leaving the cores ; put them 
in a kettle with enough water to cover; boil until tender; 
then strain through a flannel bag. If the apples are very 
tart, allow one pound of the best white sugar to a pint of 
sirup; then boil until it jellies, which maybe ascertained by 
trying in a cup of cold water. In case the apples are not 
tart, allow half a pound of sugar to a pint of sirup. Two 
lemons cut up and adde 1 to the fruit while boiling will im- 
part a pleasant flavor. In general, twenty minutes will be 
long enough to boil after the sugar is added. It will be more 
economical, and the jelly will be lighter, if only a small 



184 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

quantity is boiled after the sirup is mixed with the sugar — 
say a quart at a time. 

PLUM-JELLY. 

Have your plums thoroughly ripe; put them in a kettle, 
with two pints of water to half a bushel, three pints to a 
bushel; let them boil until done, stirring all the time. When 
they have all burst they are done, and should be poured 
slowly through a sieve. After all the juice has dripped out, 
strain it through a piece of flannel. To every pint of juice 
put one pound of loaf-sugar ; put it on, and let it boil until 
it jellies. 

Take the fruit that is left, and place on the fire, allowing a 
pound of sugar to the same of fruit, or a little more weight of 
sugar ; cook until done. This will make very nice marma- 
lade. 

GRAPE-JELLY. 

Pick and wash your grapes ; put them in a kettle, and to 
six pounds of fruit put half a pint of cold water. Place the 
kettle on the fire, and steam until the grapes have yielded 
their juices; then strain, and to each pint of juice add one 
pound of loaf-sugar. Cook fifteen or twenty minutes. 

QUINCE-JELLY 

Wash and cut up the quinces, taking out the cores; boil in 
clear water until tender; strain through a flannel bag, and 
to each pint of the liquid allow a pound of loaf-sugar. Boil 
until done. 



CANDY. 185 



CANDY. 



SUGAR-CANDY.— No. i. 

Six cups of sugar, two cups of water, one cup of vmegar, 
one table-spoonful of butter. Boil without stirring. Begin 
to pull it as soon as it can be handled, using only the fingers, 
and not the hands; pull rapidly. Do not grease the hands 
if you can pull it without. 

SUGAR-CANDY.— No. 2. 

Dissolve two pounds of loaf-sugar in two cups of water ; 
stir in one tea-spoonful cream of tartar, table-spoonful of ex- 
tract of vanilla, two table-spoonfuls of vinegar, and one full 
table -spoonful of butter. Do not stir the mixture after 
it boils, or it will sugar. When done, pull until white, hand- 
ling as little as possible. 

HOARHOUND CANDY. 

In one quart of water boil one package of dried hoarhound, 
as obtained from the druggist, till reduced to one pint. Strain 
this tea on four pounds of brown sugar; boil as sugar- candy, 
— without stirring, — and when nearly done, add a table- 
spoonful of butter. Pull very little. This is excellent for a 
cough. 

PEA-NUT CANDY.— No. 1. 

To two pounds of sugar add one tumbler of water, one 
talbe-spoonful of butter ; boil, stirring constantly. Just be- 



186 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

fore taking off, stir in a pint of parched and pounded pea- 
nuts (measure after prepared). Drop with a spoon upon 
buttered plate. 

PEA-NUT CANDY.— No. 2. 

Make sugar candy as No. 1, leaving out the vinegar. Do 
not stir it. When done, pour thinly upon buttered plates 
covered with parched pea-nuts from which the thin skins 
have been taken. 

COCOA-NUT CANDY. 

Dissolve two pounds of loaf-sugar in the milk of one large 
cocoa-nut; let it boil, and when nearly done stir in the 
grated cocoa-nut. This must be stirred constantly until 
done. Drop from a spoon on buttered dishes. 

COCOA-NUT DROPS. 

To a grated cocoa-nut add half the weight in sugar, and 
the white of one egg beaten to a stiff froth. Drop the mixt- 
ure in small cakes on buttered paper, and sift sugar over 
them. Bake them fifteen minutes in a slow oven. 

TAFFY. 

One pound of sugar, one quart of good molasses, half pound 
butter ; let this boil until nearly or quite done ; then stir in 
one grated cocoa-nut. Grease your biscuit-board, and pour 
the taffy on; then pour essence of lemon over it. When cold, 
take a large knife and cut in squares. 
ALMOND-TAFFY. 

One pound of sugar, quarter of a pound of butter, the 
grated rind of a lemon; boil until done; pour this in a dish 
sprinkled thickly with blanched almonds cut fine, but not 
pounded. When nearly cold, mark off with a buttered knife, 
but do not raise it until perfectly cold. 

CARAMELS.— No. 1. 
Two and half pounds of brown sugar in sufficient water 



CANDY. 187 

to dissolve it, quarter of a pound of butter; boil these to- 
gether or fifteen minutes, and add one and a quarter pounds 
of grated chocolate dissolved in have a pint of creamor milk; 
cook slowly one hour. Pour on buttered plates, and when 
nearly cold mark off in small squares. 

CARAMELS.— No. 2. 

One fourth jDOund of grated chocolate, one and a fourth 
pounds of brown sugar, one fourth pound of butter, one tea- 
cup of cream or milk; boil the whole briskly half an hour, 
stirring. Have ready buttered plates ; pour out on them, 
and when nearly cold mark off in small squares. 

HONEY CREAM-CANDY. 

Ten pounds of white sugar, with just enough water to dis- 
solve it. When neai'lydone, add a tea-cup of molasses; cook 
till well done; then add half a tea cup of butter. Flavor 
with oil of lemon to suit the taste. To prevent graining, 
put in a tea-spoonful cream of tartar. Pull rapidly, and 
handle lightly. 

MOLASSES-CANDY. 

Dissolve one cup of sugar in half a cup of vinegar; mix 
with one quart of molasses, and boil until it hardens when 
dropped from the spoon into cold water; then stir in a table- 
spoonful of butter, and one tea-spoonful of soda dissolved in 
hot water. Give one hard final stir, and pour into buttered 
dishes. Pull hard until white, using only the tips of the 
fingers. 

WHITE NOUGAT. 

Ten pounds of white sugar, half a gallon of strained honey, 
three pounds of blanched almonds, one table-spoonful of oil 
of lemon. After the sugar is melted and strained, cook until 
nearly done; have the honey boiling, and pour on the sugar 
in the kettle; set it on the fire again, and when it boils up 



188 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

well pour out on a greased marble ; add the oil of lemon. 
When cool enough to handle, turn it up and bleach on a can- 
dy-hook ; when white, take off and spread it out on the mar- 
ble, and sprinkle the blanched almonds all over it ; fold it up, 
and spread out again with more almonds. Continue work- 
ing it over the same way until ail the almonds are worked 
in ; then form into a long bar, and cut up in square pieces. 



CATCHUP, SAUCES, AND PICKLES. 189 



CATCHUP, SAUCES, AND PICKLES. 



VINEGAR. 

To eight gallons of water add one gallon of molasses and 
a half gallon of spirits. Put into a cask, shake well a few 
times, then add a pint of good yeast, or two yeast-cakes' 
Keep in a warm place ; in ten days slip a sheet of brown pa- 
per — which has been rolled up and dipped in molasses — into 
the bung-hole of the barrel. Cover the bung-hole with a 
piece of muslin until the vinegar is good ; then close it with 
a cork. 

EXCELLENT VINEGAR. 

Take four gallons of rain-water, one gallon of Louisiana or 
Florida sirup, and two yeast-cakes three inches square. 
Put these together in a jar. Do not exclude the air while 
fermentation is going on. A little sunshine on it will hasten 
the making of the vinegar. 

SPICED VINEGAR. 

To four gallons of strong vinegar add one pound of ginger, 
one dozen cloves, one ounce each of mace, nutmeg, black 
pepper, allspice, and red pepper ; also, a little turmeric, and 
one pound of grated horse-radish. The spices should be 
ground and inclosed in a muslin bag. It is better to make 
your spiced vinegar and keep it on hand ready for pickles, 
as it improves from standing. Prepare pickles in the usual 
way, and pour this vinegar over them. Pickles keep better 
when the vinegar is not boiled. 



190 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

TOMATO CATCHUP. (Good.) 

Cut any quantity of ripe tomatoes across the middle, put 
them in a large kettle, and let them simmer till soft; strain 
them first through a colander, then through a sieve. Boil 
the liquid again until the watery substance ceases to rise on 
the surface. To every half gallon of tomato-juice add one 
quart of vinegar, four table-spoonfuls of salt, two table-spoon- 
fuls each of black pepper and dxy mustard, one tea-spoonful 
of cayenne pepper, one tea-spoonful of whole cloves, and one 
clove of garlic. Boil again until it is thick. Cook and seal 
while hot. Use a porcelain kettle. 

TOMATO CATCHUP.— No. i. 
Take one bushel of ripe tomatoes, remove the stems, cut 
them into two pieces, and cook them in a porcelain kettle 
until they are tender; then strain them through a sieve; add 
half a gallon of white wine vinegar, four cloves of garlic well 
chopped, one pound of sugar, one table-spoonful each of all- 
spice, cloves, mace, — these must bo ground, — and one small 
cup of salt. Bring this mixture to a boil; when cool, bottle 
and seal well. 

TOMATO CATCHUP.— No. 2. 

Wash the tomatoes, cut them up, put them in a porcelain 
kettle, boil half an hour, and then strain them through a 
sieve. To four quarts of liquid add one. quart of vinegar, 
eight pods of green pepper, and two onions chopped fine, two 
table-spoonfuls each of ground black pepper and salt, two 
table-spoonfuls of whole cloves and allspice. Boil until it be- 
comes brown. Stir it well. 

CUCUMBER CATCHUP. 

Peel, grate, and squeeze through a cloth, until all the 
water is exhausted, one peck of full-grown cucumbers. 
Then add cider-vinegar, salt, pepper, and onion to taste. 



CATCHUP, SAUCES, AND PICKLES. 191 

Put in glass jars, pour a table-spoonful of olive-oil in each, 
and seal them well. 

PEPPER CATCHUP.— No. i. 

Take four dozen large red pepper-pods, three quarts of vin- 
egar, three table-spoonfuls of grated horse-radish, five onions 
andone clove of garlic. Boil until soft, and strain through a 
sieve. Then add two table-spoonfuls of black pepper, all. 
spice, mace, cloves, and salt. Boil again ten minutes; then 
bottle. Some add one quart of tomatoes and one cup of 
sugar. 

PEPPER CATCHUP.— No. 2. 

Take fifty large red peppers, one gallon of vinegar, and 
one table-spoonful of salt. Boil until the peppers are well 
done. Strain them through a sieve, getting as much pulp as 
possible. 

GRAPE CATCHUP. 

Take five pounds of grapes, boil and strain them through 
a colander; add to the grape-juice one pint of vinegar, two 
and a half pounds of sugar, one table-spoonful each of cinna- 
mon, cloves, allspice, pepper, and half a table-spoonful of 
salt. Boil again until the catchup is a little thick. 

FRENCH MUSTARD. 

One pound of Coleman's mustard, one half gallon of vine- 
gar, one half-pint bottle of Worcestershire sauce, and one 
tea-spoonful of salt. Mix these, then boil to the consistency 
of French mustard ; add to this, while boiling, one jar of 
French mustard. 

ITALIAN MUSTARD 

One large onion, one half-tumbler of water, one tea-spoon- 
ful each of brown sugar and black pepper, one half tea- 
spoonful of salt, and two table spoonfuls of mustard. Boil 
the onion, put the other ingredients in a cup, and add enough 



192 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

of the water in which the onion has been boiled, to mix 
them ; then add a little vinegar and a small glass of claret. 

CITRON SWEET PICKLE. 

Put the cut rind of water-melon in strong brine ; let it re- 
main nine days; then in strong alum- water twenty- four 
hours ; then in clear water twenty-four hours, changing the 
water several times. To one quart of vinegar add two and 
a half pounds of brown sugar, one table-spoonful of allspice, 
whole, and one tea-spoonful of cloves. Let these ingredients 
boil ; then add the fruit, and let it boil until you can easily 
stick a fork in it. ' 

BLACKBERRY SWEET PICKLE. 

To one pound and a half of half-ripe berries put one pound 
of sugar, one pint of vinegar, and spices to suit the taste. 
Boil twenty minutes. 

DAMSON PICKLE. 

Four pounds of fruit, one pound of sugar, and spices to the 
taste. Pour boiling vinegar over them nine mornings in 
succession. 

GERMAN PICKLE. 
To seven pounds of fruit take three pounds of sugar, one 
quart of cider -vinegar, one ounce each of cloves and mace. 
Let the vinegar and sugar come to a boil; pour this over the 
fruit ; repeat the process three mornings. Let it boil fifteen 
minutes, when the pickle will be ready for use. 

SWEET PICKLED FIGS— No. i. 

Pluck ripe, but not full-ripe figs, stems on. Put in a jar; 
sprinkle on salt — one half pound to a peck of fruit. Pour 
boiling water sufficient to cover figs, then let it stand twelve 
hours; then drain in a colander. If too salt, rinse with fresh 
water. Fill jars with the fruit, and pour over it hot boiling 



CATCHUP, SAUCES, AND PICKLES. 193 

vinegar that has had added to it, a pound of sugar to the 
gallon, and boiled. Put sticks of cinnamon and some cloves 
in the jar. 

SWEET PICKLED FIGS.— No. 2. 

Gather five quarts of figs, with stems. Let them be only 
half ripe. Put them in salt-water, and let them stand twelve 
hours. Dry them, then parboil in alum-water, using a piece 
of alum half the size of a nutmeg. Be careful not to let them 
break ; when soft, take them out and wash in three buckets of 
clear water, to take the alum out. Dry them well. Make a 
sirup with a pint of sti-ong vinegar, a very little water, and a 
pound of sugar. Flavor with mace and cloves. When the 
sirup has boiled well put the figs into it. Use glass jars. 
These pickles will keep for years. 

SWEET PICKLED PEACHES. 

Eemove the skin from the peaches by making a mixture 
of boiling water and concentrated lye. Put in the peaches 
and let them remain until the rough skin begins to dissolve. 
Have ready a pan of cold water to drop them in ; wash them 
thoroughly, then put them on dishes to dry. To each pound 
of peaches use one quarter of a pound of sugar, half a pint of 
white wine vinegar, two ounces of allspice, and one ounce 
each of cloves and mace. Put the vinegar, sugar, and spices 
in a kettle to boil ; then put the peaches in ; cook them until 
you can pass a straw through them. Be careful not to let 
them break in cooking. 

SWEET-PICKLE PEACHES. 

Take seven pounds of fruit, three pounds of sugar, and one 
pint of vinegar. When boiling, put in the fruit; add a few 
cloves, spice, and some cinnamon ; put these in a muslin bag. 
Boil twenty minutes. 
13 



194 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK'. 

SWEET PLUM PICKLE. 

To ten quarts of ripe plums use seven pounds of sugar, one 
pint of strong vinegar, half ounce each of allspice and mace, 
and two grated nutmegs. Make a sirup of the vinegar and 
sugar and spices. Pour this over the plums for three da}-s, 
taking care to have the jars well closed. The fourth day 
boil the fruit with the sirup, until it is almost a jelly. 

RIPE CANTALOUP PICKLE. 

To three pounds of fruit add two pounds of sugar, one and 
a quarter pints of vinegar, a dozen cloves, a piece of cinna- 
mon, four pieces of white ginger, a tea-spoonful each of cel- 
ery-seed and salt. Boil all together. 

MELON PICKLE. 

Take ripe cantaloups, peel and slice, drop into vinegar, and 
let it stand twelve hours. Take out, and to one gallon of 
vinegar add three pounds of sugar and one tea-cupful of 
cloves, spice, and cinnamon mixed. Boil this, and while 
boiling drop in the melon and let it remain ten minutes. 
Pour it off into a jar, and the next day boil the vinegar 
again and pour over the melon while hot. 

OIL MANGOES. 

Gather the melons a size larger than a goose-egg; cut a 
slit from the stem to the blossom, and take the seed carefully 
out; fill them with salt and let them remain two weeks, 
turning them over frequently. Then wash them in cold 
water two or three times, to remove all salt, and spread on 
dishes to dry. Stuffing. — Wash one pound of white ginger 
in boiling water; when soft, slice thin one pound of grated 
horse-radish, one pound of onions chopped fine, one pound 
of white mustard-seed, one ounce of mace, one ounce of nut- 
megs, two ounces of turmeric, and one handful of whole black 
pepper. Make these ingredients into a paste with a quarter 



CATCHUP, SAUCES, AND PICKLES. 195 

of a pound of dry mustard and a large cupful of olive-oil. 
Put a clove of garlic in each melon ; sew the melons up after 
stuffing, and pack in jars with the caps up. Strew some of 
the stuffing over each layer of mangoes, and cover with cold 
vinegar, adding another cup of olive-oil. Notice at intervals, 
and if needed add more vinegar. They should be kept in a 
dry place, and closely covered. 

PEPPER MANGOES. 

Gather your pepper when green. Cut a slit in each pep- 
per; take the seed out carefully and wash them. Pour weak, 
boiling brine over them, and let them stand four days; re- 
new the brine daily, and always have it boiling hot. Freshen 
the peppers, and stuff them with cabbage that has been chop- 
ped very fine, and seasoned with cinnamon, mace, and cloves 
that have been pounded fine, and with whole, white mustard- 
seed. After stuffing the peppers tie a cord around each one ; 
pack them in a jar and pour strong, boiling vinegar over 
them three weeks in succession. The last time add a small 
piece of alum to the vinegar. 

PEPPER MANGOES WITH OIL. 

Cut a slit in each pepper; take the seed out, and put the 
peppers in salt-water ; let them remain two days. Freshen 
the peppers and stuff them with the following mixture: 
Chop onions and pickled cucumbers very fine. Add a tea- 
cupful each of mustard and cabbage-seed, a tea-spoonful of 
dry mustard, and the same of black pepper ; also, one tea- 
cupful of sweet-oil. Sew the peppers up. Put them in a 
jar and pour boiling vinegar over tnem. 

CUCUMBER MANGOES. 

Prepare two gallons of cucumbers as you would other mel- 
ons for mangoes. Make stuffing of two pounds of sugar, a 
small piece of horse-radish grated, one and a half ounce each 



196 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

of white and black mustard-seed, and the same quantity of 
celery-seed. Mix well and stuff the cucumbers ; place them 
in a jar and pour on them five quarts of apple-vinegar, 
sweetened to taste. 

PEACH MANGOES. 

Gather one peck of clear-stone peaches before they are 
fully ripe. To remove the rough skin drop them in boiling 
lye, then in cold water; wash them in several waters, then 
wipe them dry. Cut the peaches on one side and remove 
the stone. Make the dressing of white-head cabbage chop- 
ped fine, half a pound of white mustard-seed, two table- 
spoonfuls each of allspice and grated horse-radish, one table- 
spoonful each of cloves, mace, and a little salt. Fill the 
peaches, put them in a jar, then cover well with boiling vin- 
egar. 

CUCUMBER PICKLE. 

Take small cucumbers; put them in a strong brine for 
forty-eight hours. Pour off the brine and wash the cucum- 
bers in cold water. Lay butter-bean leaves in the bottom of 
a kettle; put in the cucumbers, and cover them with water in 
which a piece of alum the size of a hickory-nut has been 
dissolved ; cover them closely with more leaves ; simmer 
slowly until the cucumbers are green. Drain the cucumbers. 
To every fifty allow four quarts of vinegar, one ounce each of 
ginger, allspice, cloves, cinnamon, black pepper, celery-seed, 
and a few small onions. Boil the vinegar and spices to- 
gether, pour over the cucumbers boiling hot, and simmer a 
few minutes. 

SPANISH PICKLE. 

One peck of cucumbers, one half peck of green tomatoes, 
four cabbages, three handfuls of onions, eight pods of green 
pepper — all these chopped fine; three quarters of a pound of 
white mustard-seed, a handful of bhick pepper, one ounce of 



CATCHUP, SAUCES, AND PICKLES 197 

celery-seed, a small tea-cup of each; mace and allspice. One 
pound of brown sugar, one pint of molasses, one table-spoon- 
ful of salt, and one gallon of vinegar. Mix these ingredients 
in a kettle, and let them simmer. Pour over the pickles. 

CABBAGE PICKLE.— No. i. 

Take on quart of finely- chopped onions, three table-spoon- 
fuls each of cloves, white mustard-seed, black pepper, celery- 
seed, and ground mustard, half a pound of brown sugar, and 
three quarts of strong vinegar. Simmer this compound until 
it begins to thicken. Pour it over one gallon of finely- chop- 
ped cabbage, and boil a few minutes. 

CABBAGE PICKLE.— No. 2. 

Take red or white cabbage ; remove the leaves from .the 
stalk, wash them thoroughly, put them in a wooden tray, 
and chop it fine; sprinkle well with salt, and let it stand 
twelve hours; then wash all the salt out of it, put it on trays 
or dishes to drain off the water. Put in a kettle a sufficient 
quantity of white wine vinegar, to cover the cabbage. Fla- 
vor with whole allspice ; when the vinegar comes to a boil 
put in the cabbage and let it boil three quarters of an hour. 
When cool, put it in air-tight jars. 

JERUSALEM ARTICHOKE PICKLE. 

Scrape the artichokes well and soak them several hours in 
brine. Boil together vinegar, allspice, cloves, celery-seed 
mustard-seed, mace, and black pepper, in quantities to suit' 
your taste. When boiling hot pour over the artichokes. 
Cover closely. 

WALNUT PICKLE. 

Select walnuts before the shells begin to harden. Make a 
strong brine of salt and cold water, using a quarter of a 
pound of salt to a quart of water; soak the walnuts in this a 
week, then put them in the sun until they turn black. Take 



198 



GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 



half a pound of mustard-seed, half ounce each of allspice, 
cloves, and mace, two ounces of black pepper, and four large 
spoonfuls of grated horse-radish. Boil all these ingredients 
in» one gallon of vinegar; pour over the walnuts, covering 
them entirely. Pickled walnuts improve with age. 

RAILROAD PICKLE. 

Take one peck of cucumbers, cut them in pieces one inch 
thick, and four onions sliced. Lay these in a kettle, adding 
the following ingredients : Three ounces of turmeric, two 
pounds of sugar, half a cup of black pepper, two table-spoon- 
fuls of dry mustard, one half ounce of mace, one cup of all- 
spice, and two table-spoonfuls of ginger. The spices must 
be ground. Cover well with vinegar. Cook two hours. 

CHOWCHOW. 

Take a peck of white cabbage and cut fine, three dozen 
onions sliced thin, sprinkle both with salt and let them stand 
twelve hours;. then press out the salt-water and spread them 
on dishes to' dry. For seasoning take a half box of mustard, 
two ounces of turmeric, a very little red pepper, half a pound 
of white mustard- seed, and a small piece of horse-radish. 
Beat the following spices fine, and add two table-spoonfuls 
of each : Cloves, mace, ginger, nutmeg, and celery-seed. Put 
cabbage and all the ingredients in a kettle, cover well with 
strong vinegar, and let it come to a boil. After taking from 
the fire add one pint of salad-oil. 

ONION PICKLE. 

Take small onions, peel and drop them into cold water to 
prevent changing color ; then drain them and boil them in 
equal parts of milk and water; drain "and cover with best 
vinegar. Season with red pepper and white ginger-root. 

MUSTARD PICKLE. 
After your fruit has been in brine, soak it in clear water 



CATCHUP, SAUCES, AND PICKLES. 199 



until the salt is out. Tako a kettle that holds a little more 
than a gallon ; put in the bottom a layer of grape-leaves. 
Sprinkle in pulverized alum, — apiece the size of a nutmeg, — 
a teaspoonful each of cinnamon, allspice, black and red pep- 
per; also, two table-spoonfuls of sugar, then a layer of fruit 
Continue these layers until you fill the kettle; cover with 
vinegar and let it simmer over a slow fire until green. Mix 
smoothly with vinegar five boxes of mustard, seven and a 
haif cups of sugar ; to this add one table-spoonful each of 
cloves, mace, allspice, celery-seed, cinnamon, turmeric, and 
four table-spoonfuls of salad-oil ; mix well. Drain off the 
first vinegar from your fruit, and pour this mixture over it. 
Allow the whole to boil a few minutes. In three weeks it 
will be ready for use. 

GREEN-TOMATO SAUCE. 

One peck of green tomatoes, twelve large onions ; slice 
them and lay on dishes, sprinkling each layer with salt. 
Set them aside for twenty-four hours. Drain them through 
a sieve until they are perfectly dry. Put them in a kettle and 
cover with strong vinegar. Let them simmer, but not boil, 
until quite tender. To flavor them, add one quarter of a pound 
of white mustard-seed, three pods of red pepper sliced thin, 
one ounce each of allspice, mace, cloves, black pepper, and 
celery-seed; also, three table-spoonfuls of sugar. After re- 
moving it from the fire add a half pint of brandy, and a half 
tea-cup of sweet-oil. 

PICKLE-SAUCE. 

Take six quarts of green tomatoes, two quarts of green 
pepper, and one quart of onions; slice them up separately, 
sprinkle them with salt, and let them stand two days. Then 
strain them from the brine;. add one gallon of vinegar, one 
tea-cup of sugar, one box of dry mustard, a half pound of 
white mustard-seed, two spoonfuls of each black pepper, cin- 



200 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

nanion, cloves, allspice, and mace. The spices must be 
ground. Boil fifteen minutes. 

REGENT PICKLE. 

Take two gallons each of cucumbers and cabbage, one pint 
of onions. Chop all these very fine; then add a quarter of a 
pint of salt, one pound of sugar, two table-spoonfuls each of 
allspice and cloves, five table-spoonfuls of dry mustard, one 
paper of celery-seed, and two gills of white mustard-seed. 
Mix all well, and put it over the fire a few minutes. Stir it 
constantly. 



BEVERAGES. 201 



BEVERAGES. 



TO PREPARE COFFEE.— No. i. 

Pick over the grains to remove all imperfect ones; wash, 
drain, and dry. Parch always on top of the stove, stirring 
constantly. In this way it is done rapidly and evenly. 
When a good brown, and just after taking off the stove, be- 
fore emptying from the pan, stir in a table-spoonful of butter; 
this quantity to two or three pounds of coffee. 

TO PREPARE COFFEE— No. 2. 

Scald the green coffee, and dry in the oven ; leave in till 
parched a good brown. When done, have the whites of one 
or two eggs beaten to a stiff froth ; stir in the coffee, and set 
back in the oven a minute to dry. Parched coffee should al- 
ways be kept in a close can or jar. 

HOW TO MAKE COFFEE. 

To every half pint of water allow one table-spoonful of 
ground coffee. Do not grind too fine, either for boiled or 
dripped coffee. 

TO MAKE TEA. 

First scald the tea-pot with boiling water. Allow a tea- 
spoonful of tea for each person, or each half pint of water. 
After putting the tea in the tea-pot, only pour on a little of 
the boiling water at first; allow to steep a few minutes, and 
then pour on the balance of the water. 



202 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

Hot or iced tea is best made of mixed tea — equal quantities 
of black and green. 

CHOCOLATE.— No. i. 

Mix two heaping table-spoonfuls of chocolate to a smooth 
paste with water. Stir in half a pint of water, and allow to 
boil five minutes; then add half a pint of milk. Serve hot. 

CHOCOLATE.— No. 2. 

Dissolve two squares of Baker's chocolate in a cupful of 
hot water; beat well the yelks of four eggs with six table- 
spoonfuls of sugar, and mix in the chocolate. Have boiling 
a quart of new milk; stir the mixture in the milk, and let 
boil a few minutes till it thickens. Serve very hot, and on 
the top of each cup lay a spoonful of the whites of the eggs 
beaten to a stiff froth. 

MILK-PUNCH.— No. 1. 

Stir in a glass of new milk one table-spoonful of white 
sugar, the same of brandy; grate nutmeg on the top. Milk- 
punch is generally prepared in this way for invalids. 

MILK-PUNCH.— No. 2. 

One glass of fresh milk (must be very fresh, or it will 
curdle), one egg beaten very light, with one table-spoonful 
of sugar. Mix with the egg and sugar one table-spoonful of 
brandy ; pour on the milk, and grate nutmeg on the top. 

HOT MILK-PUNCH. 



Beat together, very light, the yelks of two eggs and two 
table-spoonfuls of sugar ; add two table-spoonfuls of sherry 
wine or brandy, and pour over all one pint of boiling fresh 
milk, and grate nutmeg on it. Drink as hot as possible. 

CREAM NECTAR. 

Put into a porcelain kettlo three pounds of loaf-sugar, two 
ounces of tartaric acid, one quart of water ; set it on the 






BEVERAGES. 203 



fire; when warm, add the whites of two eggs beaten to a 
froth; stir it well for a few minutes, but do not let it boil. 
When cool, strain it, and add a tea-spoonful of essence of 
lemon, and bottle. Put two table-spoonfuls in a glass, fill it 
half full of cold water, and stir in one fourth tea-spoonful of 
soda. Drink while effervescing. 

CHAMPAGNE CUPS. 

Two bottles of champagne, two dessert-spoonfuls of white 
sugar, two bottles soda-water, a half lemon squeezed, a half 
lemon sliced, one wine-glass curacoa, a few sprigs of borage, 
and plentifully iced. Cut lemon very thin, and throw in the 
peel. 

CLARET CUP. 

Two bottles of claret, two table-spoonfuls of white sugar, 
two bottles of soda-water, half a lemon squeezed, half a lem- 
on sliced, two wine-glasses of sherry, one wine-glass of mar- 
aschino wine, or cordial ; use ice plentifully. Slice lemons 
thin, and throw in the peel. 

EGGNOG No. i. 

To each egg allow one table-spoonful of sugar and one ta- 
ble-spoonful of brandy or whisky; beat the eggs, whites and 
yelks together ; when partially beaten, add the sugar; then 
beat till very light; add the brandy last. When the eggs 
are beaten in this way it requires more time; but they are 
not so likely to separate. For an invalid, sherry wine is a 
delicate substitute for brandy. 

EGGNOG.— No. 2. 

Allow the same proportions as above. Beat the whites and 
yelks of the eggs separately, the whites to a stiff froth. For 
about twelve eggs beat very light a pint of sweet cream, and 
stir in just before eating. 



204 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

EGGNOG.— No. 3. 

To each egg allow one small wine glass of brandy, one ta- 
ble-spoonful of sugar; beat the whites and yelks separately. 
After beating the yelks well, gradually add the sugar, then 
the brandy; also allow about three wine-glasses of rum to 
about one dozen eggs; pour in the milk, as much as you like, 
— say a quart to a dozen eggs, — and last stir in the whites, 
when they are as light as they can be beaten. 

SHERRY-COBBLER. 

In a tumbler of lemonade stir in a wine-glass of sherry 
wine, and pounded ice. Sliced pine-apple may be put in if 
desired. 

A GOOD COCK-TAIL. 

Dissolve four square lumps of white sugar in one table- 
spoonful of water; add one small wine-glassful of whisky 
and one tea-spoonful of Boker's Bitters. Add ice. 

WHISKY PUNCH. 

Six quarts of water, one quart of strong green tea, two 
pounds of sugar, two dozen sliced lemons, two sliced pine- 
apples, one bottle extract of vanilla, one grated nutmeg, and 
one gallon of whisky. 

PRINCE REGENT PUNCH. 

Six quarts of water, one quart of strong green tea, two 
dozen lemons sliced, one gallon of whisky, one quart of 
curacoa cordial, two pine-apples sliced, and two pounds of 
loaf-sugar. Float strawberries over the top, if in season. 

ROMAN PUNCH. 
One gallon of water, one pint of wine, one pint of old rum, 
half pint of brandy, four lemons, and sweeten it well. Add 
more brandy if needed. Ice abundantly, or freeze. 



BEVERAGES. 205 



A PLEASANT DRINK, OR BEER. 

Three pounds of brown sugar, one and a half pints of mo- 
lasses, four ounces of tartaric, acid ; mix in two quarts of boil- 
ing water; strain it, and when cold it is fit for use. Take 
two table-spoonfuls for a tumbler two-thirds full of water ; 
add half a tea-spoonful of soda ; flavor with any extract you 
like, as you use it. 

CORN BEER. 

Two gallons of water, one quart of boiled corn well cooked, 
two quarts of molasses, a small quantity of ginger. Let it 
stand until ready for use, 

BLACKBERRY CORDIAL.— No. i. 

Boil the blackberries in a little water about fifteen min- 
utes; then strain them. To one quart of juice put three 
fourths of a pound of sugar; season with cloves, cinnamon, 
and allspice, and boil three quarters of an hour. To three 
quarts of the juice put in one quart of brandy. 

BLACKBERRY CORDIAL.— No. 2. 

To each quart of blackberry -juice add one pound of white 
sugar, half an ounce of cinnamon, one fourth an ounce of 
mace, two table-spoonfuls of cloves. Boil this mixture twen- 
ty minutes; strain, and when cold put to each quart a pint 
of French brandy. 

BLACKBERRY CORDIAL.— No. 3. 

Fill a demijohn with blackberries perfectly ripe, and pour 
on as much whisky or brandy as it will hold; spices to the 
taste — about a handful of cinnamon, two of allspice, and a 
dessert-spoonful of cloves to a five-gallon jar. Allow it to 
stand about three weeks, after which pour off the liquor, and 
sweeten to the taste. 



206 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

BLACKBERRY OR PEACH CORDIAL. 

Nearly fill your glass jars with fresh-gathered berries, or 
peaches cut up; fill up with whisky, and let it stand six 
months or more. Pour off the whisky, mash the berries well, 
strain, and put in their juice. Put sugar into a brass kettle, 
and cover with enough water to make a thick sirup ; tie in a 
piece of muslin some mace, cloves, and any other spices you 
wish ; drop in and boil fifteen or twenty minutes. Pour into 
the whisky, and bottle. 

MINT CORDIAL. 

After the mint is washed, bruise it slightly, and put in a 
stone jar or other vessel and cover it with whisky. Let it 
stand twenty-four hours; then strain, and to a quart of it 
put a pint of loaf-sugar. Bottle. 

CHERRY CORDIAL. 

Put cherries in your jar, and cover with whisky. Let it 
stand two weeks ; mash and strain through a cloth ; then 
add sugar to make a thick sirup. 

SCUPPERNONG WINE.— No. I. 

To one gallon of the juice of the grape add two pounds of 
white sugar. When the sugar is dissolved, pour into demi- 
johns or kegs, reserving a small quantity to fill up the demi- 
john, which must be kept well filled and uncorked until the 
wine ceases to ferment. The best plan is to fill them every 
morning. When fermentation ceases, strain it carefully and 
bottle it, being careful not to cork it too tightly. In drawing 
it for use, be particular not to shake the bottle, or the wine 
will mix with the lees and become muddy. 

SCUPPERNONG WINE.— No. 2. 

Press the juice from the grape, and to every gallon put 
three pounds of good sugar; put into an open-mouthed vessel, 
with a thin cloth over it, and let stand three or four days ; 



BEVERAGES. 207 



skim, and put in jugs, taking care not to cork tightly until 
the fermentation ceases. Set away for six or eight weeks ; 
then bottle for use. 

BLACKBERRY WINE.— No. i. 

Measure your berries, and bruise them. To every gallon 
add one quart of boiling water; let the mixture stand twen- 
ty-four hours, stirring occasionally. To every gallon put 
two pounds of sugar. Cork tightly, and let stand till the fol- 
lowing October, when it will be ready for use. 

BLACKBERRY WINE.— No. 2. 

Measure and bruise your berries, and to every gallon add 
one quart of boiling water ; let stand twenty-four hours, stir- 
ring occasionally. Strain off the liquor into an open vessel, 
to every gallon adding three pounds of good brown sugar. 
Let it remain open about ten days, skimming it frequently; 
then put it into jugs. Do not cork tightly. Let it remain 
so for three or four weeks, when fermentation will be over. 
Cork tightly. In the fall it will be ready for use. 

SOUR-ORANGE WINE.— No. 1. 

Peel the oranges; cut across in halves, and squeeze; strain, 
and to every gallon of juice add five gallons of water and 
twenty-five pounds of sugar. Ferment and bottle as you 
would other wines. Use for this the sour, not bitter-sweet 
orange. 

SOUR-ORANGE WINE— No. 2. 

Three quarts of water, one quart of orange-juice, three 
pounds of sugar, and the beaten white of an egg. 



208 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 



COMFORTS FOR THE SICK. 



" I own that nothing like good cheer succeeds. " 



Always endeavor to have the food for the sick as attractive 
in appearance as in taste. Prepare and serve in small quan- 
tities, as fresh as possible. Avoid consulting the patient as 
to what he would like to eat. Study all the peculiarities of 
the patient, and humor him whenever by so doing you do 
not interfere with the instructions of the physician. 

BEEF-TEA. 

About three pounds of lean, juicy beef cut in small pieces. 
Put in a strong bottle or wide-mouthed jar ; place the jar in a 
vessel of cold water, and put on the fire, with a weight on 
top to keep it down in the water, having previously corked 
it closely. Boil for three or four hours; pour off the tea, 
and season with salt. If desired, add one dozen allspice and 
half a dozen cloves before boiling. Any grease rising on the 
top must be carefully skimmed off. A small tin bucket closely 
covered, with a flat-iron placed on top as a weight, is an ex- 
cellent substitute for the orthodox bottle or jar, as in the old 
way the bottle is often broken by the heat just as it is ready 
to take up, and all the tea is lost. The bucket should be 
new, and very clean. 

HASTY BEEF-TEA. 
Cut up in very small pieces lean, juicy beef, and pour on 



COMFORTS FOR THE SICK. 209 

just enough cold water to prevent burning. Wutch closely 
to prevent scorching. When done, season with salt. If 
beef-tea is allowed to cool, any grease in it can be readily 
detected and taken oft". Heat only the quantity desired to 
give the patient at one time 

CHICKEN-ESSENCE. 

Take a whole small chicken or half of a large one; mangle 
it, so as to crush the bones; pour on it a pint and a half of 
cold water, and drop in three allspice. Place it over a fire, 
and notice what time it begins to boil ; allow it to continue 
boiling twenty five minutes, when the water will have ex- 
tracted all the strength of the chicken, and will be palatable 
to anybody after the addition of a very little salt. This is 
most nutritious, and has never been known to be distasteful 
to a sick person when well made and offered hot. A spoon- 
ful every hour will suffice for a very weak person, without 
other nourishment; yet it may be safely taken in larger- 
quantities, it the patient wishes it. 

CHICKEN-BROTH. 

Cut up half of a chicken, and pour on one quart of cold 
water. Place over the fire, and allow to boil slowly two 
hours. After boiling one hour, add a table-spoonful of rice; 
salt and pepper to taste. Skim carefully while boiling. 

MUTTON-BROTH. 

One pound of mutton or lamb cut in small pieces. Pour 
on this one quart of cold wSter, and allow it to boil till the 
meat falls to pieces; cover close while boiling; strain, and 
add a table-spoonful of rice and a little parsley or thyme , 
boil half an hour, stirring frequently; then add pepper and 
salt to taste, and four table-spoonfuls of milk. 

EGG-TEA. 

Beat one egg very light, with sufficient sugar to sweeten. 

14 



210 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

Pour on this a tumbler of boiling water and a wine-glass of 
sherry or other liquor, according to taste. After adding the 
water, etc., have another vessel ready, and pour the tea rap- 
idly and repeatedly from one vessel to the other to prevent 
curdling, , Drink warm. 

SOUP MAIGRE.. 

Take of butter half a pound; put it in a deep stew-pan, 
place it on a gentle fire till it melts, shake it about, and let it 
stand till it has done making a noise. Have ready six me- 
dium-sized onions peeled and cut up small; throw them in 
and shake them about. Take a bunch of celery cut in pieces 
about an inch long, a large handful of spinach cut small, and 
a little bundle of parsley chopped fine; sprinkle these into 
the pan, and shake them about for a quarter of an hour ; 
then sprinkle in a little flour, and stir it up. Pour into the 
pan two quarts of boiling water, and add a handful of dry 
bread-crust broken in pieces, a tea-spoonful of pepper, and 
three blades of mace beaten fine; boil gently another half 
hour; then beat up the yelks of two eggs, with a tea-spoon- 
ful of vinegar; stir them in, and the soup is ready. The or- 
der in which the ingredients are added is very important. 

EEG-SOUP. 

One pint of water, the yelks of two eggs, a lump of butter 
as large as a big walnut, sugar according to taste ; beat them 
up together over a slow fire, gradually adding the water. 
When it begins to boil, pour it backward and forward be- 
tween the sauce-pan and bowl till quite smooth and frothy 

BEEF AND CHICKEN TEA. 

Take one pound of lean beef, one half of a hen, boned ; 
pound together in a mortar; add one fourth of an ounce of 
salt; put in a stew-pan with two and a half pints of water; 
stir over the fire till boiling. Then add carrots, onions, leeks, 
and celery, cut fine. Boil half an hour; strain, and serve. 



COMFORTS FOR THE SICK. 211 



Beef-tea and broth should not be kept hot, but heated up 
as required It may be warmed, but never prepared in the 
sick-room, for nothing sets an invalid against food as much 
as cooking. 

NUTRIENT ENEMA. 
Take of beef-tea half a pint, and thicken it with a tea- 
spoonful of tapioca. Reduce one and three fourths ounces 
of raw beef to a fine pulp, pass it through a fine colander, 
and mix the whole up with twenty grains of acid pepsin and 
a dessert-spoonful of malt flour. It should have a bright rose 
tint, and exhale a rich meaty odor. Not more than a quarter 
of a pint should be used at a time, and that slowly. Thus 
frequent repetition is facilitated. If the pepsin and malt are 
not at hand, the other portion of the liquor may be adminis- 
tered alone. 

ANOTHER EGG-TEA. 

Beat the yelk of one egg with a dessert-spoonful of sugar; 
add a spoonful of brandy, stirring all the time. Grate in a lit- 
tle nutmeg, and pour on half a pint of boiling milk. 

EGGNOG. 
One egg well beaten with a dessert-spoonful of sugar; 
add one table-spoonful of brandy or wine and half a cup of 
cream. 

ICED EGG. 

Beat very light the yelk of one egg, with, a table-spoonful 
of sugar; stir in this a tumblerful of very finely-crushed ice ; 
add a table-spoonful of brandy and a little grated nutmeg. 
Beat well together, and drink immediately. 

BLANC-MANGE. 

Two table-spoonfuls of corn-starch thoroughly beaten with 
one egg. Stir this into a pint of milk when nearly boiling ; 



212 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

add a little salt, sugar, and flavoring to taste. Boil a few 
minutes, and pour into a mold to congeal. To be eaten with 
cream. 

BREAD-PUDDING.— No. i. 

Take of crumbs of bread two ounces, one third of a pint 
of new milk boiling hot ; pour the hot milk on the bread, 
and let it stand about an hour covered up ; then add the yelk 
of an egg well beaten ; then a tea-spoonful of rose or orange- 
flower water, a little nutmeg, and half an ounce of sugar. 
Beat all up together. Tie up and boil, or steam, or bake 
three quarters of an hour. 

BREAD-PUDDING.— No. 2. 

Pour half a pint of boiling milk over a French roll, and 
let it stand covered up till it has soaked up the milk. Tie 
lightly in a cloth, and boil twenty minutes. 

HARTSHORN JELLY. 

Boil half a pound of hartshorn shavings (not "raspings," 
which are adulterated with bone-dust), or an equal weight of 
ivory turnings, in three pints of water down to a pint; strain, 
and add three ounces of white sugar-candy and an ounce of 
lemon-juice. Heat up again to the boiling-point. As a va- 
riety in flavoring, white capri, moselle, or champagne may 
be used in quantity not exceeding two table-spoonfuls. 

ARROW-ROOT. 

Stir, into a pint of boiling milk a large table-spoonful of 
arrow-root well mixed with a little cold milk; boil it three or 
four minutes. Sweeten to taste, and flavor with nutmeg. 

ARROW-ROOT JELLY. 

Put into one pint of boiling water two table-spoonfuls of 
arrow-root previously dissolved in a little water; boil a few 



COMFORTS FOR THE SICK. 213 

minutes. After taking from the fire, pour in a wine-glass of 
sherry or Madeira wine. Sweeten and flavor to taste. 

SAGO JELLY. 

Put to soak over night one cupful of sago in a tumbler of 
cold water. In the morning, add one pint of boiling water 
and the juice and rind of one lemon; boil gently twenty-five 
or thirty minutes. Sweeten to taste; add a wine-glass of 
sherry, and set aside to congeal. 

CUSTARD AND TOAST. 

Beat together till very light one egg and a dessert-spoonful 
of powdered sugar; pour on this a cup of boiling milk, and 
stir till thick. When done, pour into a dish over a' slice of 
toasted bread. Grate on a little nutmeg. 

TOAST-WATER. 

Cut about a quarter of a pound of bread in thin slices, and 
toast an even brown, being careful not to burn. Put into a 
pitcher, and pour on three pints of boiling water. Cover till 
cool, and strain into another pitcher. Do not allow the toast 
to remain in the water after it is cold. 

GRUEL. 

Allow two table-spoonfuls of meal to one pint of water. 
Pour the water, cold, on the meal, a little at a time, stirring 
constantly to avoid lumps. When well mixed, boil one or 
two minutes; add salt to taste, and, if desired, sugar. Strain- 
ing after it is boiled is a decided improvement. Gruel made 
with milk instead of water is more nourishing and palatable. 

BARLEY WATER. 

Wash a table-spoonful of pearl-barley through several 
waters till perfectly clean, and put it in a jug or pitcher. 
Pub several lumps of sugar on a lemon to absorb all the oil, 
and throw into the jug with the barley. Peel the lemon, 



214 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

leaving as little of the white pulp on the rind as possible; 
put this also into the jug, and pour on boiling water till the 
vessel is full. In half an hour it is ready for use. This is a 
palatable beverage. 

FLAXSEED TEA. 

Put a tablespoonful of flaxseed in a pitcher, and pour on 
one pint of boiling water ; let stand till it thickens, and strain. 
Squeeze in the juice of a lemon, and sweeten to taste. This 
should be drank warm for colds or fevers, but cold and with- 
out the lemon-juice for bowel complaints. 

SLIPPERY-ELM WATER 

Is prepared by putting the bark in cold water, and allow- 
ing it to stand till it thickens; sweeten to taste. Benne-water 
is prepared in the same way from the leaves of the plant. 
Both are excellent for inflammation of the bowels. 

ORANGE-LEAF TEA. 

Thoroughly wash a large handful of orange-leaves, and 
put in a pitcher. Pour on a quart of boiling water, and cov- 
er closely. When well steeped, pour off and sweeten to taste. 
Drink while warm. An excellent fever-drink, and much 
used in yellow fever. 

WINE-WHEY. 

Stir into a pint of boiling milk one half pint of wine; let 
it boil one minute. Take from the fire, and let stand until 
the curd has settled ; then pour off the whey, and sweeten it 
with loaf-sugar. Lemon, vinegar, and alum whey are made 
in like manner. 

GUM-ARABIC WATER. 

Take one ounce of gum arabic, and pour on it a pint of 
boiling water; stir while dissolving; sweeten to taste. The 
juice of a lemon squeezed in is an improvement. This is giv- 
en to persons suffering from inflammation of the stomach. 



COMFORTS FOR THE SICK. 215 

APPLE-WATER. 

Pare and core one half dozen juicy apples, and bake them 
until quite soft; put thorn in a pitcher, and pour over enough 
hot water to make a pleasant drink; sweeten to taste. When 
cold, it is ready for use. 

BOILED FLOUR. 

Tie tightly in a close linen cloth one pound of flour. After 
tying, moisten with water, and dredge well with flour till a 
coating is formed to prevent the water entering the flour. 
Boil four or five hours, and let the flour remain tied in the 
cloth until it is cold. It will be a hard, solid lump, and is a 
substitute for arrow-root. Prepare by grating. Excellent in 
diarrhea or other bowel affections. 

DIET FOR INFANTS. 

Ms Prepared by Dr. J. F. Meigs.) 

Dissolve a piece of gelatine an inch square in half a gill 
of warm water; when dissolved, add a gill of milk; put on 
the fire, and when boiling add half a tea-spoonful of arrow- 
root or boiled flour-ball. When sufficiently boiled, take off 
the fii*e, and stir in two table -spoonfuls of sweet cream. This 
may be given to very young infants ; and as they grow older 
the food may be made stronger by using more milk and 

cream. 

PANADA. 

Toast nicely a slice of bread, and pour over it a h«t brandy 
toddy ; grate over it nutmeg. 

ANOTHER PANADA 

One ounce of bread-crumbs, once blade of mace, one pint 
of water ; boil without stirring till they mix and turn smooth ; 
then add a grate of nutmeg, a small piece of butter, a table- 
spoonful of sherry, and sugar according to taste. 

RICE FLUMMERY. 
Take rice in proportion to the quantity required; put it in 



216 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

a broad pan; cover with water; stir up together, and let 
stand twelve hours. Then pour off the water as long as it 
runs clear. Add fresh water, mix, and let stand twelve hours 
more. Repeat the same process a third time. When the 
rice has thus been macerated thirty-six hours, strain it through 
a hair- sieve and boil it, stirring it vigorously till it is quite 
thick. Pour it in a dish to cool, and eat it cold, vvith milk or 
a little wine and sugar. 

CRACKER AND CREAM 

A nicely-toasted cracker, with sweet cream poured over it, 
is delicate and nourishing for an invalid. 

TAPIOCA. 

Soak over night two table-spoonfuls of tapioca in two cups 
of water. In the morning, add .one pint of milk, sugar to 
taste, and a pinch of salt; simmer till soft, stirring frequent- 
ly. When dished, add a table-spoonful of wine, and grate 
over a little nutmeg. 

• LEMON-JELLY. 

One half box of gelatine dissolved in three gills of warm 
water, with a good half pint of loaf-sugar. Squeeze and 
slice two lemons, extracting the seeds, in three gills of water, 
and boil till the lemons are soft or their strength is extracted. 
Mix this with the gelatine and sugar, and strain ; set aside 
to congeal. To be eaten with cream. 

" SOFKY." 

To a quart of well-washed, well-beaten hominy put a gal- 
lon of cold water; keep it boiling steadily but slowly until 
the hominy begins to get soft. Then add good strong lye, 
sufficient to discolor a silver spoon when the mixture is stir- 
red with it. Mash the hominy with a spoon or roller, and 
let boil half an hour; then the liquor will be as thick as 
gruel. Take it off. and when you serve the liquor to the pa- 



COMFORTS FOR THE SICK. 0^7 

tient, add salt, sugar, milk, or wine. Do not mix or 'flavor 
more than the patient can eat at once, or about a tea-cupful. 
The lye should be made fresh from good wood-ashes. " Big 
hominy" should be used for making sofky, not grits. 

ALKALINE DRINK. 

Cut the rind of a lemon very thin, and put it in a jug with 
a table-spoonful of powdered sugar-candy. Pour on it a lit- 
tle boiling water, and, when it is dissolved, half a pint of 
Vichy water and half a pint of common water. 

MALT-TEA. 

Boil three ounces of malt in a quart of water. 

CLARET-CUP FOR INVALIDS. 

Half a bottle of claret to a bottle of soda-water. Half a 
dozen drops of sweet spirits of niter put into the jug first 
gives a fruity flavor. 

SAGE-TEA. 

Take half an ounce of leaves of green sage plucked from 
the stalks and washed clean, one ounce of sugar, quarter of 
an ounce of the outer rind of lemon-peel finely pared from 
the white; put them in two pints of boiling water; let them 
.stand near the fire half an hour; then strain. When the 
sage is dried, it must be used in rather less quantity than 
above mentioned. 

In the same manner, teas may be made of rosemary, balm, 
southern-wood, etc., and are convenient to prevent a thirsty 
patient taking too much tea and coffee when not good for 
him. The use of acid is also avoided. 

MASHED POTATOES. 

Boil one pound of potatoes with their jackets on till they 
are tender or brittle; peel therh, and rub them through a fine 
sieve. When cool, add a small tea-cupful of fresh cream and 



218 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

a little salt, beating the -puree up lightly as you go on till it is 
quite smooth, and warming it up gently for use. 

POTATO SURPRISE. 

Scoop out the inside of a sound potato, leaving the skin; 
attached on one side to the hole as a lid. Mince up fine the 
lean of a juicy mutton-chop, with a little salt and pepper 
put it in the potato, pin down the lid, and bake or roast. Be- 
fore serving (in the skin), add a little hot gravy, if the mince 
seems too dry. 



MEDICINAL. 219 



PLAIN CORN-BREAD. 



MEDICINAL. 



COUGH MIXTURES. 

Fifteen drops of oil of tar, half an ounce of balsam of fir, and 
alcohol sufficient to dissolve it. Boil one tea-cup of molasses 
for several minutes, and pour it in the above mixture, to- 
gether with a pint of the best whisky, and shake it until 
well mixed. Dose: A table-spoonful two or three times a 
day. 

ANOTHER. 

Take one ounce of hops, one pint of water, and one table- 
spoonful of flax-seed. Put all in a vessel and boil till reduced 
one half. Strain it off; add one half pint of molasses and one 
quarter of a pound of brown sugar. Boil till it becomes a 
thick sirup. Dose: One table-spoonful at a time. 

ANOTHER. 

Take one dime-package of hoarbound, put it in one quart 
of water, and boil down to a pint. Strain'and add one pint 
of honey or sirup, one stick of licorice, and boil down to a 
pint. When cool, thin to the proper consistency with whis- 
ky. Dose: A dessert-spoonful when the cough is trouble- 
some ; when very bad, add a little paregoric to the dose. 

ANOTHER. 

One pint of cider vinegar; drop in over night an unbroken 
egg, shell and all. In the morning beat it well till all is dis- 



220 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

solved ; then sweeten with loaf-sugar to the taste. Strain 
and bottle. Shake well before taking. Dose : A table-spoon- 
ful when the cough is troublesome. 

ANOTHER 

One ounce of elecampane and one ounce of comfrey-root 
soaked in one quart of water ; boil to a pint. Strain and add 
one pint of molasses or honey, and thin with one pint of 
good whisky. Boil one stick of licorice with it. When done, 
add half an ounce of sirup of squills, and half an ounce of 
paregoric. Give a table-spoonful every hour or two, or when 
the cough is troublesome. For a child, two tea-spoonfuls is a 
dose. This is perfectly harmless, and has never been known 
to fail in curing a cough. 

ANOTHEK. 

One pound of wet brown sugar, one table-spoonful of cook 
ing-soda and one of fine tar. Stir well together, and pour one 
pint of boiling water on it. Prepare at night, let it stand 
until morning, then pour off and bottle. Dose for an adult : 
One table-spoonful early in the morning. 

WHOOPING-COUGH SIRUP. 

One ounce each of boneset, slippery elm, stick licorice, 
and flax-seed. Simmer all together in one quart of water, 
until the strength is entirely extracted ; then strain and add 
one pint of molasses and half a pound of white sugar. Sim- 
mer all well together. When cold, bottle and cork tightly. 
This sirup is excellent for any bad cough. 

REMEDY FOR CROUP. 

A tea-spoonful of powdered alum, mixed with twice the 
quantity of sugar. Give as quickly as possible. This affords 
almost instantaneous relief. 



MEDICINAL. 221 



FOR HOARSENESS. 

To a pint of whisky put as much rock-candy as it will dis- 
solve. Dose : A tea-spoonful at a time. 

GARGLE FOR SORE THROAT. 

Make a tea of red-oak bark, with a little alum dissolved 
in it. 

ANOTHER. 

One tea-spoonful of chlorate of potash, dissolved in a tum- 
bler of warm water, is an excellent gargle. Swallowing a 
little of the mixture occasionally will be beneficial. 

ANOTHER. 

Make a strong sage-tea, and add one tea-spoonful of borax 
and one of alum. Make very sweet with honey. 

ANOTHER REMEDY. 

Take old bacon, roll it full of salt, and bind it on the 
throat. It will take all the inflammation out. Use alum- 
water to gargle the throat. If you have no bacon, mix lard 
and salt together, spread it on a flannel cloth, and apply to 
the throat. 

BINKERD'S SALVE FOR BURNS. 

Take of yellow wax, melted and strained, three ounces 
linseed-oil, raw, one and a half pints; tannic acid, half an 
ounce; bicarbonate bismuth, one dram; powdered opium, 
one scruple; carbolic acid, thirty drops. Take a common 
fruit-can, not oxidized, cleanse it thoroughly, melt the wax 
in it, then add the oil, keeping it very liquid by heat, stir- 
ring it vigorously all the while. After all the oil has been 
poured in, stir it for five or ten minutes; then set it off to 
cool, agitating it as before. When it begins to chill, add the 
tannic acid; later, put in the bismuth, opium, and carbolic 



222 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

acid. The quantity of oil must depend on the season ; less 
in summer and more in winter. 

FOR BURNS. 

Great relief is sometimes afforded in case of a burn by 
sprinkling thickly with carbonate of soda, and laying over 
this a soft linen cloth, saturated with water. 

Linseed-oil and lime-water, mixed in equal quantities, are 
also excellent for a burn. 

DR. W. H. PANCOAST'S LINIMENT. 

Camphor, one and a half dram; olive-oil, one ounce; aqna 
ammonia, one ounce ; tincture aconite root, one ounce ; oil 
origanum, one half ounce; laudanum, one half ounce. 

A GOOD LINIMENT. 

Gum camphor, one ounce ; chloroform, one fluid ounce ; 
tincture of aconite root,- half a fluid ounce ; tincture of arnica, 
two fluid ounces; soap liniment enough to make six fluid 
ounces. 

ANOTHER. i 

One pint of alcohol, two ounces of spirits ammonia, one 
ounce gum camphor, one half ounce tincture arnica, and one 
ounce of sweet-oil. 

CURE FOR FEVER AND AGUE 

Twenty grains of quinine, ten grains of blue vitriol, and 
five grains of opium. To be made into twenty pills. Dose — 
Two pills three times a day. 

ANOTHER. 

Twenty grains of quinine, twenty grains of peruvian bark, 
half a dram elixir of vitriol, in one pint of good whisky. 
Dose for an adult : Half a wine'-glassful three times each 
day. 



MEDICINAL. 223 



FOR DYSENTERY. 



One tea-spoonful of common salt, one of epsom salts, twen- 
ty drops of laudanum, fifteen drops of camphor, in a goblet 
of water. Dose: A dessert-spoonful every hour. 

VNOTI1ER. 

One table-spoonful of epsom salts, and one tea-spoonful of 
laudanum, in a tumbler water. 

FOR SUMMER-COMPLAINT IN INFANTS. 

One ounce sirup of rhubarb, one dessert-spoonful of pare- 
goric, one tea-spoonful of sup. carbonate of soda, well mixed. 
Dose : From ten to fifteen drops. 

HEADACHE. 

To cure a simple headache, immerse the feet in hot water 
and keep them there for twenty minutes. If the pain is se- 
vere, add two table-spoonfuls of dry mustard, keeping the 
water as hot as can be borne. 

Sick-Headache. — Two tea- spoonfuls of finely-powdered 
charcoal, drank in a half tumbler of water, will often give 
relief, when caused by superabundance of acid in the stom- 
ach. 

TO STOP VOMITING. 

A mustard plaster ; ' or a warm plaster made of toasted 
bread dipped in brandy, with nutmeg grated over it ; or a 
plaster made of all the spices pounded, and moistened with 
brandy ; either of these applied to the chest, will generally 
give relief. A julep made very strong with bruised mint is 
also good. 

ANOTHER. 

A tea-spoonful of carbonate of soda, a table-spoonful of 
spirits of lavender, in half a goblet of water. Take a spoon- 
ful frequently. 



224 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 



TO STOP BLEEDING. 

At the Nose. — Fold a piece of paper about as thick as 
your little finger, and about two inches long, and place be- 
tween your lips and gums, just under the nose. Keep it 
pressed tightly there by holding your finger on your lip, and 
it will generally relieve in a short time. 

At a Wound. — Mix equal parts of wheat flour and com- 
mon salt, and bind on with a cloth. 

ANOTHER. 

Take the fine dust of tea, or the scrapings of the inside of 
tanned leather, and bind it close upon the wound. After 
the blood has ceased to flow, laudanum may be applied ad- 
vantageously. 

FOR SPRAINED ANKLE. 

Make a poultice of flour and vinegar, of the consistency of 
pudding-batter, and bind on the ankle; keep wet with vine- 
gar, renewing when dry. Sit with the foot elevated. 

CURE FOR EARACHE. 

Take a bit of cotton batting, put upon it a pinch of black 
pepper; gather it up and tie it; dip it in sweet-oil, and in- 
sert it in the ear. Put a flannel bandage over the head to 
keep it warm. It will give immediate relief. 

ANOTHER. 

Take an onion and roast it well; pour on it a little lauda- 
num and sweet-oil. Put a few drops of the juice in the ear, 
and stop it with wool; bind the warm onion to it. 

FOR TOOTHACHE. 
A few drops of sodique, or oil of cloves, or creosote, or 
chloroform, on a piece of cotton, placed in the cavity of the 
tooth, will generally give relief. 



MEDICINAL, . 225 



FOR NIGHT-SWEAT. 

Make a strong tea of sage; strain and sweeten to the taste. 
A tumblerful taken before going to sleep will prevent the 
sweat common to very feeble persons. 

AN EXCELLENT ENEMA. 

One quart of warm water, one cup of molasses, one cup of 
table-salt, and a table-spoonful of lard. 

FOR FAINTING. 

If a person faints, place him on the flat of the back and 
give plenty of fresh air. Do not crowd around him. 

PLASTER FOR A RISEN BREAST. 

One table-spoonful of melted bees-wax, one table-spoonful 
of linseed-oil, one table-spoonful of sassafras-oil. 

ANOTHER. 

Take equal parts of bees-wax, mutton-suet, and camphor. 

FLAXSEED POULTICE. 

To make a poultice sufficiently large for the chest or stom- 
ach, stir into about one pint of boiling water sufficient flax- 
seed meal to thicken. Boil till thick and smooth, stirring 
constantly. Pour into a swiss-muslin bag, securing the 
opening so that the poultice will not escape. Apply as warm 
as can be borne. Lay over the poultices one or two thick- 
nesses of flannel, or a piece of oil-silk, to prevent the damp- 
ness reaching the clothing, and to retain the heat. 

TO MAKE A MUSTARD -PLASTER. 

For an ordinary plaster use one part flour and two parts 

mustard — say one table-spoonful of flour and two of mustard ; 

mix with a little warm water. If wanted to draw rapidly 

use no flour, and mix with vinegar or whisky. A plaster 

15 



226 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

made of mustard alone, and mixed with the white of an egg, 
will di*aw perfectly, and not produce a blister. 

Note. — This may be the contributor's experience, but it is 
not every one's. We know and have felt whereof we speak. 
After the plaster is spread lay a piece of this muslin over it, 
so that the plaster will not come in contact with the skin. 

CURE FOR BONE FELON. 

One table-spoonful of saltpeter, one of copperas, one of salt 
pulverized, mixed with a table-spoonful salt soap, one red 
onion roasted; mash all well together, making a poultice; 
apply to the felon, and let it remain a day. If it does not re- 
lieve entirely apply another the next day. 

ANOTHER. 

Take of blue flag-root and white hellebore, cut up very 
fine, equal parts ; boil them in milk and water. Hold the 
finger in this as hot as it can be borne, about fifteen minutes; 
then lay the hot roots on the felon, and let them remain 
about one hour. Eenew the application several times, or un- 
til the pain is removed. The above recipe has been proved 
by the contributor. 

ANOTHER. 

A small Spanish-fly blister applied in the first stages of the 
felon is said to be a certain cure. 

ANOTHER. 

Bathing the felon with tincture of lobelia sometimes gives 
great relief. 

TO CURE A STY ON THE EYE. 

Apply the rotten part of an apple as a poultice to the eye. 
It is both cooling and healing, and removes the inflammation. 



MEDICINAL. 227 



ANOTHER. 

Put a tea-spoonful of black tea in a small muslin bag. 
Pour on it just enough boiling water to moisten it; then put 
it on the eye pretty warm, and keep it on all night. If the 
sty is not removed in the morning, a second application will 
effect a cure. 

TO DESTROY WARTS. 

Dissolve as much common washing-soda as the water will 
take up. Wash the warts with this for a minute or two, and 
let them dry without wiping. Keep the water in a bottle, 
and frequently repeat the washing. 

ANOTHER. 

Lunar caustic carefully applied so as not to touch the skin, 
will destroy warts. 

CURE FOR CORNS. 

Mix smoothly together a tea-spoonful of pulverized indigo, 
the same of brown soap and mutton-suet. Spread on a piece 
of kid and apply to the corn. 

ANOTHER. 

Apply a good coat of gum-arabic mucilage to the corn, 
every evening on going to bed. 

LIP-SALVE. 

Spermaceti, virgin wax, and lard, one ounce each ; balsam 
of Peru, half an ounce; six sweet almonds, six fresh raisins, 
loaf-sugar the size of a hickory- nut. Melt over the fire and 
stir constantly. Strain when melted. 

FOR CHAPPED HANDS AND LIPS. 

Melt together equal quantities of sweet-oil, white wax, 
spermaceti, and mutton-suet. 



228 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 



ANOTHER. 

Take of honey any quantity, oil of sweet almonds sufficient 
to make a thin paste; rub the oil in gradually until well 
mixed. After washing the hands, and while still wet, take a 
small quantity and rub thoroughly on the parts affected; 
then wipe the hands dry. 

CURE FOR TETTER. 

One poke-root boiled to a strong decoction ; take one pound 
of the best loaf-sugar; boil with the poke-root to a thick 
sirup. Dissolve twenty grains of iodide of potash in a little 
water, and mix with the poke-root sirup. Dose : One table- 
spoonful three times a day. 

ANOTHER. 

Corrosive sublimate, one grain; oil of lavender, one dram; 
castor-oil, one dram ; alcohol, two ounces. Mix and apply 
externally. Do not let it get into the eyes or mouth. 

HAIR-TONIC. 

One half ounce tincture cantharides, tnree ounces of castor- 
oil, and one pint of alcohol. 

ANOTHER. 

One ounce of box-ax, one half ounce of gum camphor, beat- 
en up fine; pour on one pint of boiling water. When cool, 
it will be ready for use. 

ANOTHER. 

Sixty grains of quinine put into a quart of bay rum. 
GLYCERINE HAIR-TONIC. 

Glycerine, bay rum, each one ounce; tincture cantharides 
half an ounce; rose-water, four ounces; aqua ammonia, one 
fourth ounce. Mix. 



MEDICINAL. 229 

This tonic will stop the hair from falling out, will effectu- 
ally remove dandruff, and as a dressing will far surpass any 
of the pomatums or greasy preparations now in use. 

FOR BITE OF INSECTS. 
A lump of wet saleratus applied to the sting of a wasp, 
spider, or bee, will stop the pain almost immediately, and 
prevent all swelling of the part. 

ANOTHER. 

Tobacco, slightly moistened with water, and applied to the 
sting, will afford instant relief. 

ANTIDOTES FOR POISONS. 
Make the patient vomit by giving a tumbler of warm 
water with a tea-spoonful of mustard in it, and then send 
for the doctor. If if be necessary to act without the doctor, 
and the poison is arsenic, give large quantities of milk and 
raw eggs, or flour and water. If the poison is an acid, give 
magnesia and water, or chalk and water, and plenty of warm 
water besides. If it is an alkali, like potash, give vinegar 
and water, lemon juice, or some other safe acid. Always re- 
member the emetic first. If it be laudanum, strong coffee is 
a good thing to give until the doctor comes. Keep the pa- 
tient awake. 

CURE FOR COLDS IN THE HEAD. 

A snuff composed of the following ingredients: Hydro- 
chlorate of morphia, two grains; scacia powder, two drams; 
trisnitrate of bismuth, six drams. A. pinch of the powder in- 
haled through the nose five or six times a day will greatly 
alleviate a cold in the head. 

FOR A BRUISE. 
Mix sweet-oil and laudanum in equal quantities and apply 
to the bruise. It will relieve the soreness and prevent discol- 
oration. 



230 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



HOUSEKEEPER'S ALPHABET. 

Apples : Keep in a dry place, as cool as possible without 
freezing. 

Brooms: Hang up by the handle. 

Cranberries: Keep under water in cellar; change water 
monthly. 

Dish of hot water set in oven prevents cakes, etc., from 
scorching. 

Economize time, health, and means. 

Flour : Keep cool, dry, and securely covered. 

Glass : Clean with a quart of water mixed with a table- 
spoonful of ammonia. 

Herbs: Gather when beginning to blossom; keep in paper 
sacks. 

Ink-stains: Wet with spirits of turpentine; after three 
hours, rub well. 

Jam: Currant and red raspberry jam are excellent. 

Keep an account of all supplies, with cost and date of pur- 
chase. 

Love lightens labor. 

Money : Count carefully when you receive change. 

Nutmegs: Prick with a pin, and, if good, oil will come out. 

Orange and lemon peel : Dry, pound, and keep in corked 
bottles. 

Parsnips : Keep in the ground until spring. 

(Quicksilver and white of an egg destroy bed-bugs. 



MIS CELLANEO US. 231 



.Rice: Select large, with a clear, fresh look; old rice may 
have insects. 

Sugar: For general family use the granulated is the best. 

Tea: Equal parts of Japan and green are as good as En- 
glish breakfast. 

Use a cement made of ashes, salt, and water for cracks in 
the stove. 

Variety is the best culinary spice. 

Watch your back yard for dirt and bones. 

Xantippe was a scold; do not imitate her. 

Youth is best preserved by a cheerful temper. 

Zinc-lined sinks are better than wooden ones. 

GOOD YEAST-POWDER. 

Two pounds cream of tartar, one pound carbonate of soda, 
one pound of seconds of wheat; all well mixed and sifted. 
Put up in jars or tin boxes. 

PICKLE FOR BEEF. 

Six gallons of water, three pounds of brown sugar, one 
quart of molasses, nine pounds of coarse salt, four pounds of 
fine salt, one ounce of pearlash, and a small quantity of salt- 
peter. Put the meat in this mixture, and let it remain until 
the pickle becomes bloody; remove the beef, and boil the 
pickle until clear. When perfectly cold, return to the beef. 

PICKLE FOR HAM OR BEEF. 

To one hundred pounds of meat take seven pounds of coarse 
salt, four pounds of brown sugar, two ounces of saltpeter, 
one half ounce of soda, and four gallons of water. Boil and 
skim the mixture; when cold pour it upon the meat, which 
should have a weight placed on it to keep it down. 

TO KEEP EGGS. 

In order to keep well, they must be perfectly fresh when 
packed. Take a stone pot which will hold from two to three 



232 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 



gallons; pack the eggs close, sharp end down ; take one pint 
of unslaked lime, one pint of salt; dissolve in sufficient water 
to cover the eggs. When cold, pour over. Be sure the eggs 
do not float. They will keep all the year. 

ANOTHER WAY TO KEEP*EGGS. 

Have a cloth bag that will hold about one dozen eggs; im- 
merse them in boiling water for any time less than half a min- 
ute, and you can keep the eggs as long as you please. 

ESSENCE OF GINGER. 

Beat in a mortar three fourths of a pound of race ginger ; 
put in a jar, and pour over it one quart of best alcohol. Al- 
low it to stand three weeks; then strain and bottle. 

VANILLA EXTRACT. 

Five vanilla-beans cut up and two bruised; pour over these 
one half pint of alcohol. Allow it to steep till the strength 
is extracted, and bottle. 

TO MAKE CREAM. 

Mix two tea-spoonfuls of flour, the well-beaten yelks of 
two eggs, one tea-spoonful of sugar; pour on gradually one 
pint of boiling water, stirring constantly to prevent lumps. 
A small bit of butter is sometimes added. For coffee, beat 
the white of an egg to a froth ; pour the coffee gradually, that 
it may not curdle. 

TO REMOVE MILDEW. 

Wet the garment; soap well; scrape common chalk on the 
place until a thick paste is formed ; expose to the hot sun. 

ANOTHER WAY TO REMOVE MILDEW. 

Take two ounces of chloride of lime; pour on it one quart 
of hot water; then add three quarts of cold water. Steep 
the linen in this for twelve hours, when every spot will be 
removed. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 233 



ANOTHER WAY TO REMOVE MILDEW. 

Darby's Prophylactic Fluid is equally efficacious in remov- 
ing mildew and some kinds of fruits-tains. 

TO RENEW ALPACA. 

Black alpacas may be restored to their first beauty by using 
a thimbleful of borax dissolved in a pint of warm water, and 
put on with a nail-brush. 

TO TAKE OUT GREASE. 

One table-spoonful of alcohol and a tea-spoonful of harts- 
horn. 

TO REMOVE STAINS FROM SILK, LINEN, OR COTTO'N. 

, Four table-spoonfuls of spirits of ammonia, four of alcohol, 
and one of salt; shake the whole well in a bottle, and apply 
with a sponge or tooth-brush. This will remove ink, paint, 
fruit or acid stains. 

ANOTHER WAY TO REMOVE STAINS. 

Chloroform will remove paint from a garment, and often 
restore the original color. 

ANOTHER WAY TO REMOVE STAINS. 

Wine or fruit stains may be easily removed fi-om table 
linen by spreading it tightly over a bucket, before soap or 
cold water is applied, and pouring upon the stained portion a 
stream of boiling water from a kettle. Repeat the operation 
if necessary. 

FOR REMOVING GREASE, STAINS, ETC. 

Two ounces castile soap, four ounces aqua ammonia, two 
drams sal soda, three drams spirits of wine, three drams chlo- 
roform. Cut the soap fine, and dissolve with the sal soda in 
one pint of water; then add another pint of cold water and 
the other ingredients. 



234 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

TO WASH COLORED RIBBONS OR CRAVATS. 

Make a strong suds of cold water and toilet soap ; wash the 
ribbons thoroughly until clean; rinse in clean soap-suds. 
Sometimes it is necessary to rinse several times, always in 
suds. When partially dry, iron carefully between cloths, 
taking care to have the ribbon perfectly smooth. If care- 
fully done, the ribbon will look as good as new. 

TO SET COLORS IN CALICO. 

To a gallon of very warm (not boiling) water in a bucket 
add half a cup of spirits of turpentine. Put in the dress, 
and see that it is well covered with the mixture; let it soak 
half an hour or more. If convenient, dry it before washing. 
Most colors are made permanent by it. 

To set blue or green, a little alum should be added to the 
above mixture. 

HOW TO CLEAN BLANKETS. 

Put two large table-spoonfuls of borax and a pint of soft 
soap into a tub of cold water. When dissolved, put in a pair 
of blankets, and let them remain over night. The next day, 
rub them out, and rinse in two waters. Hang up to dry 
without wringing. This recipe will also apply to the washing 
of all kinds of flannel and woolen goods; also of lace cur- 
tains. Use cold water invariably. 

FOR CLEANSING WOOLENS. 

One fourth of a pound of white castile soap, one fourth of 
a pound of ammonia (three ounces), one ounce of ether, one 
once of spirits of wine. Cut the soap in small pieces, and 
heat in one quart of soft water until dissolved; then add four 
quarts of water and the other ingredients. Bottle, and keep 
well corked. 

TO KEEP FLANNEL FROM SHRINKING. 

Wash and rinse in cold water, and hang in the cold, dry 



MISCELLANEOUS. 235 



air. The garment will not shrink or thicken up, but will 
continue soft and thin to the last. Never use warm water. 

POMATUM. 

One heaping table-spoonful of lard, melted ; two of castor- 
oil ; two square inches of white wax. Perfume with berga- 
mot while cooling, and stir until cool. 

A GOOD TOOTH-WASH 

Dissolve two ounces of borax in three pints of boiling 
water, and before it is cold add one or two tea-spoonfuls of 
camphor, and bottle for use. A table-spoonful mixed with 
an equal quantity of tepid water, and applied daily with a 
soft brush, purifies the teeth, prevents formation of tartar, 
and induces a healthy action of the gums. 

TO REMOVE FRECKLES. 

Fifteen grains of borax, one ounce of lemon-juice, one 
dram of rock-candy. Mix all together, shaking occasionally 
till dissolved. 

TO REMOVE TAN AND SUNBURN. 

Six drams of powdered borax, three fourths of an ounce of 
pure glycerine, twelve ounces of rose-water ; mix, and use 
daily as a cosmetic. 

ANOTHER WAY TO REMOVE TAN AND SUNBURN. 

The irritation from sunburn may be allayed by washing 
with a solution of carbonate of soda and water. 

HOW TO SAVE YOUR SHOE-SOLES. 

Melt together tallow and common rosin in the proportion 
of two parts of the former to one of the latter, and apply the 
preparation hot to the solos of the boots or shoes, — as much 
of it as the leather will absorb. 



236 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK.. 



TO STIFFEN COLLARS. 

A little gum arable and common soda added to starch gives 
extreme stiffness and gloss to shirt-bosoms and collars. 

DURABLE STOVE-BLACKING. 

By adding a tea-spoonful of pulverized alum to half a 
package of stove-polish, wet with a little water, much time 
and labor will be saved. It should be applied when the stove 
is nearly cold, and rubbed with a dry brush until it is dry 
and shiny. 

TO CLEAN A BROWNED PORCELAIN KETTLE. 

Boil peeled Irish potatoes in it. The porcelain will be 
rendered nearly as white as when new. 

TO POLISH FLAT-IRONS. 

If they are rough or smoky, lay a little fine salt on a board 
and rum them well. It will smooth the irons, and keep them 
from sticking, . 

EGG STAINS FROM SILVER. 

To remove stains on spoons, caused by using them with 
boiled eggs, take a little common salt, moisten between the 
thumb and finger, and briskly rub the stain, which will soon 
disappear. 

FOR CLEANING KNIVES. 

Rub the knife with sliced Irish potato dipped in knife-brick, 
and ordinary stains will be easily removed. 

TO CLEAN MARBLE. 

Take two parts of common soda, one part of pumice-stone, 
and one part of finely-powdered chalk; sift through a sieve, 
and mix with water ; then rub it well over the marble. Aft- 
er a few minutes, wash the marble with cold water. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 237 



SWEEPING. 

Wet the broom about once a week in boiling soap-suds; it 
will last longer and sweep better. Sprinkle a handful of 
salt on the carpet while sweeping, and it will lessen the dust 
as well as brighten the colors. Moistened cornmeal sprinkled 
on the carpet while sweeping will have the same effect ; also 
tea-leaves. 

A GOOD PASTE. 

Make a paste of flour; boil as you would starch, only for a 
longer time, so that it will be quite thick and well cooked. 
To a pint of paste add, while boiling, a table-spoonful of pul- 
verized alum. 

SEALING FOR BOTTLES. 

Nineteen ounces of resin, one ounce of bees-wax. Color 
with Venetian red. 

WHITEWASH. 

Take a clean, tight barrel, and slake one bushel of lime by 
covering it with hot water. After it is slaked, add cold water 
enough to make it of the consistency of cream, or thick white- 
wash. Then dissolve in water one pound of sulphate of 
zinc (white vitriol), and add to the lime and water, with one 
quart of fine salt; stir wefl until the ingredients are well 
mixed. This wash is pure white. If a cream-colored wash 
is desired, add half a pound of yellow ocher. 

BRILLIANT WHITEWASH. 

Take half a bushel of unslaked lime; slake with boiling 
water, covering it during the process to keep in the steam. 
Strain through a fine sieve or strainer, and add a peck of 
salt previously well dissolved in warm water, three pounds 
of ground rice boiled to a thin paste, arfd stirred in boiling 
hot, half a pound of powdered Spanish whiting, and a pound 
of clean glue which has been previously dissolved by soak- 



238 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK . 

ing it well and then hanging it over a slow fire in a small ket- 
tle within a larger one filled with water. Add five gallons of 
hot water to the mixture ; stir well, and let it stand a few 
days covered from the dust. It should be put on quite hot; 
for this purpose, it may be kept in a kettle on a portable fur- 
nace. It is said that a pint of this mixture will cover a square 
yard of the outside of a house, if properly applied. Brushes 
more or less small may be used, according to the neatness of the 
work required. It answers as well as oil-paint for wood, brick, 
or stone, and is cheaper. It retains its brilliance for years, 
and is superior to all other whitewashes, for inside or outside 
walls. Coloring-matter may be put in, and the wash made 
of any shade you like. Spanish brown stirred in will make 
it red-pink, more or less deep according to the quantity. A 
delicate tinge of this is very pretty for inside walls. Finely 
pulverized common clay well mixed with Spanish brown 
makes a reddish stone-color. Yellow ocher makes a yellow 
wash ; but chrome yellow goes further, and makes a color 
generally esteemed prettier. Green must not be used ; the 
lime destroys the color, and it tends to make the whitewash 
crack and peel off. If you desire to clean a smoked wall and 
make it white, squeeze indigo plentifully through a bag into 
the water you use, before it is stirred into the whole mixture. 
If a larger quantity than five gallons is required, the same 
proportions should be observed. 

TO DESTROY BED-BUGS. 

Take one ounce of quicksilver; beat up in the white of one 
etri;: : apply with a feather. Be careful not to let it touch 
your finger-rings, or anything metallic, as the quicksilver 
will adhere to it. 

Another method of exterminating these repulsive insects 
is to take grease melted out of salt pork, and apply with a 
feather to every place where they can hide. Some persons 
use salt-water to wash the bedstead, and sprinkle salt in the 
cracks. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 239 



TO DESTROY RED ANTS. 

Take half a pound of flour of brimstone and four ounces 
of jxttask ; put them over the fire until united; then beat to 
a powder. Infuse a little of the powder in water, and wher- 
ever you sprinkle it the ants will die or fly the place. 

COCKROACH DESTROYER, y 

Finely-powdered borax sprinkled freely in the crevices, or 
wherever the roaches are found, will exterminate them. Con- 
tinue for a few weeks, repeating the sprinkling every few 
days. It will not fail. 

COLIC IN HORSES. 
Give one table-spoonful of chloroform in one pint of gruel. 
REMEDY FOR BOTTS IN HORSES. 

Make a strong decoction of tansy leaves in hot water. 
Drench the horse with about a quart of this. In about three 
hours follow with a dose of castor-oil — a small tea-cupful. 

REMEDY FOR SICK TURKEY. 

When young turkeys seem sick or drooping, give each one 
a small pill of tar, and after this a teaspoonful of brandy or 
whisky. 

TONIC FOR CHICKENS. 

The "Douglas Mixture" is a good constant tonic, and is 
made thus: One pound of sulphate of iron, two ounces of 
sulphuric acid, one gallon of water; mix, and dissolve. 
Dose: One to two tea-spoonfuls to a pint of drinking-water 
for chickens. 

WOUNDS IN CATTLE. 

These are quickly cured by washing several times a day 
with the yelks of eggs and spirits of turpentine. 



240 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 



TO OBTAIN A LARGE YIELD OF MILK. 

Give your cow three times a day water slightly warm and 
slightly salted, in which bran has been stirred at the rate of 
one quart to two gallons of water. You will find that your 
cow will gain twenty-five per cent immediately, and will be- 
come so fond of the diet as to refuse to drink clear water un- 
less very thirsty; but this mess she will drink at almost any 
time, and ask for more. The amount of this drink given is 
an ordinary water-bucketful at each time — morning, noon, 
and night. 

TO TAKE OUT VARNISH, TAR, AND PAINT. 

Spirits of turpentine, benzine, or butter, washing out after- 
ward with butter. 

To extract resin and turpentine stains; use best alcohol. 

TO CLEAN OIL-PAINTINGS. 

The following is taken from the New York Tribune, which 
in turn copied it from The Atlantic. It can be recommended, 
as it has been tried with most gratifying results : 

Pettenkofer, of Munich, discovered the process, and was 
awarded by the king of Bavaria with a gift of one hundred 
thousand francs. 

Wash the picture gently, if it is dirty on the surface, with 
water and a sponge, and wipe quite dry with a soft cloth. 
Then take a wad of cotton-wool in each hand, one wet with 
spirits of turpentine, and one dry, and gently rub the surface 
a bit at a time with the wet cotton, and dry it with the other, 
changing the cotton as often as it gets dirty. Then get a 
a box (made of wood for large pictures; card-board will an- 
swer for very small ones,) a little larger than the stretching- 
frame, and about three inches'and a half deep. On the bot- 
tom, inside, place a layer of cotton batting or coarse blotting- 
paper half an inch thick or less, and fasten it down with 
tacks or cross strings, so that it will remain in place when 



MISCELLANEOUS. 241 



the box is inverted. Lay the picture on the floor or a table, 
face upward Saturate the cotton or paper with strong al- 
cohol, making it quite wet, but not so as to drip; and then 
turn the box upside down over the picture. Being a little 
larger than the picture each way, the box will not touch it, but 
will rest with its edges on the table or floor.- The fumes of 
the alcohol will dissolve the varnish, penetrate the old coats 
of it, and clarify the whole. 

After the first quarter of an hour, it is well to raise the 
box a little, and make sure that the paper or cotton does not 
touch the picture, and that the alcohol is not dripping or 
running down. The box is to be replaced, and left for about 
an hour. When it is lifted off again, if the surface be as 
soft and even and the varnish as clear as when just applied, the 
operation is finished. If parts are still rough or clouded, the 
spirits should be renewed, and the box put on again for half 
an hour, or an hour more, and then the picture may be left 
to dry, like any newly-varnished one. It may be stood up 
while drying, as less likely to collect dust. 



\ 



FURNITURE POLISH. 



One pint spirits of turpentine, half pint of sweet-oil, three 
table-spoonfuls of vinegar, two table-spoonfuls of flour. 

COKER'S FURNITURE POLISH. 

Twenty one ounces of alcohol, one ounce of oxalic acid, two 
ounces of gum shellac, fourteen ounces of linseed-oil. two 
ounces of white resin, two ounces of gum benzine. Dissolve 
the gums and acids in the alcohol, and let it remain twenty- 
four hours; then add the linseed-oil. 

TO REMOVE WHITE SPOTS FROM FURNITURE. 

A hot shovel held over varnished furniture will take out 

the white spots. 
16 



942 GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 

TO CRYSTALLIZE GRASSES. 

Take one pound of the best alum, pound it quite fine, and 
dissolve it in a quart of clear water; but do not let it boil. 
Take a deep jar or pitcher, and suspend the grasses in it 
by a string from a stick laid across the top. When the solu- 
tion is milk-warm, pour it over the grasses, cover it up, and 
let it stand for twenty-four hours. Then take them out care- 
fully, and let them hang until perfectly dry. 

For blue crystals, use a saturated solution of sulphate of 
copperas in hot water. For yellow crystals, use the yellow 
prussiate of potash; for ruby, the red prussiate of potash. 

ERASIVE SOAP. 

Two ounces of aqua ammonia, one ounce of white shaving- 
soap, one tea-spoonful of saltpeter, one quart of soft water. 
This recipe is worth ten dollars annually to any family that 
will try it. The cost is trifling. 

GOOD HARD SOAP. 

Pour twelve quarts of soft water boiling upon five pounds 
of unslaked lime; then dissolve five pounds of washing-soda 
in twelve quarts of boiling water. Mix the above together, 
and let it stand from twelve to twenty-four hours for chemical 
action. Now pour off all the clear liquid, being careful not 
to disturb the sediment. Add to this three and a half pounds 
of clear grease and three or four pounds of resin. Boil this 
compound one hour, and pour off to cool ; then cut into bars. 

SOFT SOAP. 

To one pound of concentrated lye add three gallons of soft 
water. Let it stand ten or twelve hours; then boil a few 
minutes. Add thx-ee pounds of clear grease; boil until the 
mass is transparent, and all the grease has disappeared 



MISCELLANEOUS, 243 



Now add twelve gallons of soft water, boil a few minutes, 
and the soap will be ready for use. When cold it should be 
a perfect jelly. If too thick, add water until of the consist- 
ency desired. 



THE INDEX. 



245 



THE INDEX. 



Socps 5 

Corn 5 

Chicken 8 

Clam *. 10 

Cubion 11 

Dauphine 12 

Egg-balls for soup 11 

Gopher 13 

Gumbo 12 

Gumbo, Chou 13 

Gumbo, Crab 13 

Gumbo, Okra 12 

Gumbo, Oyster 13 

Gumbo, to prepare file' for 13 

Green Pea, No. 1 6 

Green Pea, No. 2 6 

Gravy 10 

Okra 5 

Oyster, No. 1 8 

Oyster, No. 2 9 

Ox-tail 8 

Red-fish 11 

Split Pea 7 

Scotch Broth 8 

Tomato 6 

Tomato, without moat 6 

Turtle 9 

Turtle, Mock 10 

Vegetable, without meat 7 

Vegetable, for winter use 7 

Fish. Crabs. Etc 15 

'A la Creme. No. 1 18 

>A la Creme, No. 4 18 

B-iled 16 

Baked. No. 1 17 

Baked. No. 2 17 

Halls, fresh 20 

Balls. Cod No. 1 21 

Balls. Cod. No. 2 21 

Cod, boiled 15 

Court Bouillon 16 

19 
20 
21 
22 
22 



Chowder, No. 1. 

Chowder, No. 2 

Crabs, stewed, No. 1 
Crabs, stewed, No. 2.. 
Crabs, stewed. No. 3. 



Crabs, fricasseed 22 



PAGE. 

Crab-omelet 23 

Cubion, Mary's 17 

Eels, fried. 21 

Fried, with sauce 16 

How freshened 20 

Pudding 20 

Red, boiled 15 

Red-Snapoer, baked 18 

Red Snapper, fried 16 

Stewed 17 

Stewed, with oysters 15 

Scalloped 19 

Shrimp, stewed with tomatoes 24 

Shrimp-salad 24 

Shrimp, to pot 24 

Terrapin, Mock 23 

Terrapin, stewed, No. 1 23 

Terrapin, stewed, No. 2 24 

Terrapin au Gratin 24 

Turbot a la Creme 19 

Oystkrs 26 

Broiled 29 

Fri.d, No. 1 26 

Fried. No. 2 26 

French, stewed 26 

Frank's, stewed 27 

Fritters, No. 1 28 

Fritters, No. 2 28 

Loaves 26 

Minced 28 

Macaroni and Oysters 30 

Nice way to cook 29 

Patties 28 

Pie 28 

Pickled, No. 1 30 

Pickled. No. 2 30 

Stewed, No. 1 7 

Stewed, No. 2 27 

Stewed, No. 3, for a Pie 27 

Sausage 29 

Scalloped 29 

Steamed. 3D 

. Soups and Gumbo 31 

With fricasseed chicken 29 

Meats, Poultry, Etc 32 

Beef, roast 37 

Beef, spiced 38 



246 



GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 



PAGE. 

Meats, Poultry. Etc.— Continued. 

Beef, corned 38 

Beef-cakes 40 

Beef-heels 41 

Beef, to collar a flank of. 38 

Beefsteak, how to cook 40 

Beefsteak, smothered 39 

Beefsteak, fried, No. 1 39 

Beefsteak, fried. No. 2 39 

Bceuf, 'a la mode 37 

Brains, stewed 48 

Brains, fried 48 

Bird-pie 51 

Brunswick Stew 55 

Barbecue 58 

Chicken, boiled 51 

Chicken Pot-pie 52 

Chicken Pie, with eggs 52 

Chicken, broiled 52 

Chicken, to cook an old one 52 

Chicken, to fry 53 

Chicken, v a la mange 53 

Chicken Fricassee 53 

Chicken, Fricassee, with apple 53 

Chicken, 'a la Brunswick 54 

Chicken, jellied 55 

Chicken, to cook like terrapin 56 

Chicken, nice way to cook 54 

Croquettes, to make 57 

Croquettes. Chicken 56 

Calf's-head, stuffed 45 

Ducks, Canvas-back 50 

Ducks, Mock 50 

Ducks, Wild 50 

Fricadels 35 

Force-meat Balls 40 

Frogs, to cook 59 

Frogs, stewed 59 

Goose, roast 49 

Ham, to boil 32 

Ham, fresh pork, to boil 32 

Ham, baked 33 

Ham, baked, stuffed 33 

Ham, deviled 36 

Hash, dry 41 

Hash, with gravy 41 

Hunter's Round 37 

Irish stew 42 

Jam Bolaya 57 

Kidneys, fried 48 

Kidneys, stewed 48 

Liver, fried 47 

Mutton, boiled 41 

Mutton, roast 41 

Mutton, hashed 42 

Mutton-chops, fried 42 

Pig, roast. No. 1 33 

Pig. roast, No. 2 34 

Pigs-feet, fried 36 

Pan Hams 36 

Pressed Veal or Beef 43 

Pie of Sweet-bread and Oysters 47 

Poulet 'a la marange 54 

Pillau 56 

Rich Amelia 43 

Squirrel, stewed 59 

Squirrel, broiled 59 



PACE. 

Sausage _ 35 

Sausage-meat, baked 35 

Sausage, French 35 

Stuffed-steaks, baked 39 

Sweet-bread, veal 46 

Sweet-bread, fried, No. 1 46 

Sweet-bread, fried, No. 2 46 

Sweet-bread, stewed 47 

Sweet bread, baked 47 

Salmis of cold game— goose or duck 50 

Squabs 51 

Smoked-meat on Toast 36 

Tongue, smoked 48 

Tongue, baked, with tomato sauce 48 

Tripe, fried 49 

Tripe, stewed 49 

Turkey, Roast 49 

Turkey Gelatine 55 

Veal Bouilli 45 

Veal, Confederate 43 

Veal Cutlets 44 

Veal. Cutlets, fried 44 

Veal Loaf 42 

Veal Olives ■• 43 

Veal Omelet 45 

Veal, Welton 45 

Venison, 'a la mode 57 

Venison, haunch of. 57 

Venison Steaks 58 

Eggs 61 

'A la creme 63 

Baked 62 

Boiled 61 

Balls, for soup 63 

Fried 62 

Egg-toast, fried 64 

Omelet 6] 

Omelet Souffle' 63 

Omelet, with ham 63 

Poached 61 

Pickled 68 

Scrambled 61 

Shirred 62 

Stuffed 62 

Toast 61 

To test 64 

Salads v 65 

Chicken, No. 1 .'. 65 

Chicken, No. 2 65 

Chicken, No. 3 66 

Chicken, dressing for 66 

Deviled Turkey 70 

Ham Toast 70 

Italian 67 

Lobster 66 

Oyster 68 

Potato 66 

Potato, Irish 66 

Solferino 67 

Salmon 68 

Sandwiches 70 

Sandwiches, Ham : 70 

Salad Cream 69 

Salad Dressing 67 

Slaw, cold 69 

Slaw, celery, No- 1 69 

Slaw, celery, No. 2 70 



THE INDEX. 



247 



PAGE. 

Salads.— Continued. • 

Slaw, dressing for 70 

Slaw, hot 69 

Slaw, warm 69 

Tomato and Potato 67 

Sauces FOR Fish and Metis 71 

Browning sugar for soups and 

sauoes 75 

Cranberry 72 

Caper 73 

Celery 74 

Curry Powder 74 

Drawn Butter 75 

Egg 75 

Fish 71 

For fish 71 

Horse-radish 74 

Mayonnaise 72 

Mushroom 73 

Mint, for lamb 72 

Onion, No- 1 73 

Onion, No, 2 73 

Piquant •• 72 

Tartar 71 

Tomato 74 

To melt butter 74 

Venison 72 

With oysters for fish 71 

Vegetables 76 

Asparagus 76 

Artichokes. Burr 76 

Beans, string 76 

Beans, dry, to bake •• 77 

Beets • 77 

Cabbage .77 

Cabbage, 'Etoufe 78 

Cabbage, stuffed 78 

Cabbage, hot dressing for 79 

Corn, fried 79 

Corn, green, pudding 79 

Corn, green, pudding, with chicken 79 

Corn Patties 79 

Carrots 80 

Cauliflower 80 

Cauliflower Omelet 80 

Cucumbers, large yellow, to bake.. 87 

Egg-plant, baked 81 

Egg-plant, fried 80 

Egg-plant, fried 81 

Ect r s and Tomatoes 91 

Figs, fried. 86 

Grits 81 

Hominy 81 

Macaroni, baked 91 

Macaroni, witfc eggs 92 

Macaroni and Tomatoes 91 

Mushrooms 81 

Mushrooms, broiled 82 

Okra, to boil 82 

Okra, fried 82 

Okra, stewed 82 

Onions 82 

Onions, fried 83 

Onion Omelet 83 

Onions, stewed- 82 

Onion Pudding 83 

Parsnips 83 



PAGE. 

Parsnips, fried S3 

Parsnip Fritters 83 

Plantains 83 

Potatoes si 

Potatoes, 'a la creme 85 

Potato Balls, No. 1 85 

Potato Halls. No. 2 85 

Potatoes, baked So 

Potatoes, mashed with onions 85 

Potatoes, mashed with turnips 85 

Potatoes, new s( 

Potatoes, Saratoga, to fry s,; 

Potatoes, Sweet, boiled S7 

Potatoes. Sweet, baked 87 

Potatoes, Sweet, sliced and baked... 88 

Potatoes, Sweet, to fry 88 

Peas, Green 86 

Peas. Green, with mint 86 

Rice, to boil 87 

Rice Croquettes 87 

Sprouts, Brussels 77 

Succotash 79 

Salsify, to stew 88 

Salsify Patties 88 

Spinach 98 

Squash, boiled 89 

Squash Fritters 89 

Squash, fried 89 

Turnips, mashed 89 

Turnips, whole 

Tomatoes 90 

Tomatoes, broiled 90 

Tomatoes, baked .11 

Tomatoes, fried 91 

Tomatoes, scalloped 90 

Tomatoes, stuffed 90 

Tomatoes, Spanish way to cook v)l 

Bread, Biscuit, Etc 93 

Bread 95 

Bread, light 96 

Bread. Graham, excellent 07 

Bread, Graham, No. 1 97 

Bread, Graham, No. 2 98 

Bread. Rye 98 

Bread. St. James liil 

Biscuit 99 

Biscuit, cream of tartar 99 

Biscuit, Cream 100 

Biscuit Rolls for tea ]00 

Biscuit, Split ioo 

Biscuit, with yeast ioo 

Biscuit, yeast powder '.100 

Bannocks ]03 

Buckwheat Cakes ."]06 

Buckwheats, Duke's ]05 

Cakes, Batter "iQ7 

Cakes, Breakfast .\§~l 

Cakes, Corn .'...107 

Cakes, Flannel, No. 1 ..!"l06 

Cakes, Flannel, No, 2 ...".107 

Cakes. Flannel, No. 3 ."'.".107 

Crackers- .....105 

Crack nells ."".".105 

Corn-bread ........108 

Corn-bread, Owendon ..107 

Corn-bread, plain ....109 

Corn-bread, Rice ...........108 



248 



GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 



PAGH. 

Bread, Biscuit, Etc.— Continued. 

Corn-bread, Sweet-potato 108 

Crumpets, No. 1 103 

Crumpets, No. 2 103 

Deceptions 102 

Ferment for bread 93 

Fritters, Bell 101 

Graham Gems 97 

Hominy Breakfast Drops 102 

Indian-bread, St. Charles 108 

Muffins, No. 1 103 

Muffins, No. 2 103 

Muffin Bread, St. Charles 104 

Muffins, Cream 104 

Muffins, without eggs 104 

Pa poos 102 

Puffs, Breakfast 101 

Puffs, Colonnade 102 

Pocket-books 96 

Bolls and Light-bread _ 94 

Rolls, Light 95 

Rolls, Parker House 95 

Rolls, Swiss 96 

Rolls, Graham 97 

Rusk, No. 1 98 

Rusk, No. 2 98 

Sally Lunn 99 

Sally Lunn, Healing Springs 99 

Turn-overs 102 

Toast, Cream 106 

Toast, French 106 

Waffles, No. 1 104 

Waffles, No. 2 104 

Waffles, No. 3- 104 

Waffles. No. 4 104 

Waffles, Sweet Potato 105 

Wafers 105 

Yeast, Hop 93 

Yeast, Milk, for bread 93 

Yeast, Potato 94 

Yeast, Potato 95 

Yeast, Stock :.... 93 

General Directions fob Cake 110 

Almond 125 

Angel's Food 122 

Beverly 126 

Cup, No. 1 118 

Cup, No. 2 118 

Cup. No. 3 119 

Cup, Cream 119 

Cup, Coffee 110 

Cup, Chocolate 119 

Cup, White 119 

Chocolate, No. 1 121 

Chocolate, No. 2 121 

ChocolateCream 133 

Cocoa-nut, No. 1 121 

Cocoa-nut^ No. 2 121 

Cream 122 

Cream 123 

Cream, for dessert 123 

Cream, Boston 123 

Corn-starch 114 

Corn-starch 126 

Cold, No. 1 116 

Cold, No. 2 116 

Currant 128 



PAGE. 

Crullers, No. 1., 131 

Crullers. No. 2 131 

Crullers, No. 3 131 

Crullers No. 4 „.131 

Delicate, No. 1 117 

Delicate, No. 2 ]1S 

Doughnuts. _ 131 

Fruit, No. 1 110 

Fruit, No. 2 HI 

Fruit, No. 3 Ill 

Fruit, Cup 113 

Fruit, White. No. 1 112 

Fruit, White, No. 2 112 

Fruit, White, No. 3 112 

Francis 127 

Fascinators 129 

Ginger, Soft, No. 1 130 

Ginger, Soft, No. 2 130 

Ginger, Hard 130 

Ginger, Sugar 131 

Ginger-snaps. No. 1 130 

Ginger-snaps, No. 2 130 

Ginger-snaps, No. 3 130 

Graham 126 

Gold, No. 1 116 

Gold, No. 2 116 

Hickory-nut 125 

Imperial 127 

Icing 133 

Icing, boiled 132 

Icing, cold, No. 1 133 

Icing, cold. No. 2 133 

Icing, Chocolate 133 

Irene 126 

Jelly 119 

Jelly, Roll 120 

Jelly, Lemon 120 

Lady, No. 1 US 

Lady. No. 2 118 

Lady-lingers 116 

Loaf 112 

Mountain 120 

Marble. No. 1 .' 124 

Marble. No. 2 124 

Measure. 127 

Macaroons, Chocolate 132 

One-egg 128 

Orange 122 

Piper 128 

Pound, No. 1 .' 113 

Pound. No. 2 113 

Pound, No. 3 113 

Pound, No. 4 113 

Pound, No. 5 114 

Pound, No. 6 114 

Pound. Ginger •. 129 

Pound, White 114 

Queen 126 

Sponge, No. 1 114 

Sponge, No. 2 IT.. 

Sponge. No. 3 1)5 

Sponge. No. 4 115 

Sponge 116 

Sponge, Boiled 115 

Sponge, Cheap 115 

Sponge, Hot-water .115 

Sponge, Croton 127 



THE INDEX. 



249 



PAGE. 

Cake.— Continued. 

Sponge Layer 120 

Sponge, White 115 

Spice 125 

Spice, Molasses 125 

Silver, No. 1 117 

Silver, No. 2.-. 117 

Silver, No. 3 117 

Soda, No. 1 127 

Soda, No. 2 127 

Sugar, without eggs 12^ 

Sugar ICisses 132 

Turban 128 

Tea, No. 1 128 

Tea, No. 2 129 

Tea, No. 3 129 

Tea, Soft 129 

Without eggs 128 

Wafers, Sweet. No. 1 132 

Wafers, Sweet, No. 2 132 

Wafers, Sweet, No. 3 ....132 

Washington 126 

Wedding Ill 

Pies 135 

Apple 138 

Apple, delicious 138 

Apple-dump lings, boiled 137 

Apple-duuiplings, baked 137 

Apple-duinplings, excellent 137 

Almond 140 

Custard Cocoa-nut 140 

Cocoa-nut, No. 1 '. 139 

Cocoa-nut, No. 2 140 

Dried-apple 139 

Dried- fruit 139 

Fritters, Altona 137 

Fritters, Potato 137 

Fruit, in variety 139 

General rules for nastry 135 

Lemon 140 

Lemon 141 

Lemon Cream 141 

Lemon and Potato 141 

Molasses 142 

Mince-meat 142 

Mince-meat, Mock 143 

Orange 141 

Pie-crust, plain 136 

Pumpkin 142 

Potato, Sweet 138 

Potato. Irish 138 

Potato-paste 136 

Puff-paste. No. 1 135 

Puff-paste. No. 2 136 

Pastry 136 

Pastry, for meat-pies 13S 

Pastry, plain 136 

Rhubarb 139 

Sour-orange 141 

Transparent, No. 1 142 

Transparent. No. 2 142 

Puddings 144 

Almond, boiled 147 

Almond, baked 147 

Apple 148 

Apple, excellent 148 

Apple, nice 149 



PAGE. 

Batter, boiled, No. 1 145 

Batter, boiled. No. 2 145 

Bird's-nest 149 

Biddle 153 

Butter- in ilk 153 

Confederate 144 

Cake. 152 

Cake, boiled 145 

Chambliss 151 

Chocolate 154 

Cracker Fruit 154 

Dixie. 152 

Delicious 152 

Fig 147 

General rules 144 

Indian Meal 152 

Jellied Apples 155 

Lemon, No. 1 150 

Lemon, No. 2 150 

Molasses 153 

Macaroon 154 

Ministers' 145 

Peach 149 

Plain 152 

Plum 146 

Plum, English 145 

Plum, excellent 146 

Poor Author's 153 

Potato-pone 154 

Prince Albert 148 

Queen's 148 

Kebel 147 

Rice, No. 1 151 

Rice, No. 2 151 

Snew, No. 1 154 

Snow, No. 2 155 

Steam •. ...146 

Sponge 151 

Sponge oaKe 147 

Sweet potato 149 

Souffli 151 

Two-egg 153 

Tapioca 150 

Tapioca, with apples 14'.' 

Tapioca, with cocoa-nut 150 

Sweet or Pudding Sauces 156 

Apple 157 

Boiled 156 

Cream 156 

For fruits 157 

Hard 156 

Lemon 157 

Milk 156 

Pudding, No. 1 157 

Pudding. No. 2 157 

Plum Pudding 157 

Sauce 157 

Wine 156 

Ices 158 

Bisque Glace', No. 1 162 

Bisque Glace', No. 2 162 

Coffee. Frozen- 160 

Cream, Apple, Quince, and Pear 159 

Frozen Claret 161 

Frozen Peaches 159 

Frozen Plum-pudding 160 

Frozen Buttermilk 161 



250 



GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 



Ices.— Continuod. 

Ice-cream, No. 1 

Ice-cream, No 2 

Ice-cream, Chocolate 

Ice-cream, Cocoa-nut 

Ice-cream, Caramel, No. 1., 
Ice-cream, Caramel, No- 2., 
Ice-cream, Macaroon. 



...158 
...158 
...159 
...160 
...163 
...163 
...160 

lee-cream, Queen's 158 

Ice-cream, Strawberry 159 

Ice-cream, Tutti-Frutti 159 

Ice-cream, without eggs 159 

Ice-cream, White 160 

Italian Snow 161 

Orange-ice 161 

Sherbet, Lemon 161 

Sherbet, Pine-apple 161 

. Sherbet. Pine-apple, or Ice 161 

Creams, Jellies, Etc 163 

Ambrosia, No. 1 169 

Ambrosia, No. 2 170 

Apple Float 170 

Apple Me'ringue 170 

Apple-Souffle 170 

Blanc-mange 165 

Blanc-mange, Chocolate 165 

Blanc-mange. "Neapolitan.... 165 

Boiled Custard 171 

Baked Apples 171 

Baked Pears 171 

Charlotte Russe 165 

Charlotte Russe, No 1 163 

Charlotte Russe, No 2 164 

Charlotte Russe, No. 3 164 

Charlotte Russe, without eggs 164 

Charlotte Russe, without cream 165 

Charlotte Polonaise 169 

Cream, Almond 167 

Cream, Bavarian, No. 1 168 

Cream, Bavarian, No. 2 168 

Cream, Imperial 167 

Cream, Italian, No. 1 167 

Cream, Italian, No. 2 168 

Cream, Raspberry 169 

Cream, Spanish 169 

Cream, to whip 167 

Gatean Pornmes 171 

Jelly. Calf or Hog Foot 173, 

Jelly and Fruit 173* 

Jelly of Irish Moss 173 

Jelly. Lemon 172 

Jelly, Maraschino 174 

Jelly, Wine, No. 1 172 

Jelly. Wine. No. 2 173 

Porcupine 170 

Syllabub, No. 1 166 

Syllabub. No- 2 166 

Tipsv cake, No. 1 172 

Tipsy-cake, No. 2 172 

Preserves and Jellies 175 

Apple 177 

Crab apple 177 

Canteloup 181 

Figs 175 

Figs, Blue 176 

Jam, Blackberry 177 

Jelly, Apple 183 



PAGE. 

Jelly, Grape 184 

Jelly, Plum ,...184 

Jelly, Quince 184 

Marmalade, Fig 176 

Marmalade, Quince 179 

Marmalade, Sour orange 182 

Marmalade, Scotch-orange 182 

Orange peel 182 

Pear 178 

Plum 178 

Pine-apple 183 

Peaches, Brandy ..ISO 

Peaches, in their juice 179 

Peaches, whole 180 

Peach-chips 180 

Peach- leather 181 

Pumpkin-chips LSI 

Quince 178 

Strawberry 177 

Tomato- 176 

Water-melon 179 

Water-melon or Citron 181 

Candy 185 

Cocoa-nut 186 

Cocoa-nut Drops 186 

Caramels, No. 1 186 

Caramels, No. 2 187 

floarhound 185 

Honey Cream 187 

Molasses 187 

Pea-nut, No. 1 185 

Pea-nut, No. 2 186 

Sugar. No. 1 185 

Sugar, No. 2 185 

Taffy 186 

Taffy. Almond 186 

White Nougat 187 

Catchup, Sauces, and Pickles 189 

Catchup, Cucumber 190 

Catchup, Grape 191 

Catchup, Pepper, No 1 191 

Catchup. Pepper, No. 2. 191 

Catchup Tomato good 190 

Catchup, Tomato. No. 1 190 

Catchup, Tomato, No. 2 190 

Chowchow 198 

Mustard. French 191 

Mustard, Italian 191 

Mangoes. Cucumber 195 

Mangoes, Oil 194 

Mangoes, with oil 195 

Mangoes, Pepper 195 

Mangoes, Peach 196 

Pickle, Blackberry, sweet 192 

Pickle, Citron, sweet -.192 

Pickle, Cucumber 196 

Pickle, Cabbage. No. 1 197 

Pickle. Cabbage. No. 2 197 

Pickle. Damson 192 

Pickle, German ...192 

Pickle. Jerusalem Artichoke 197 

Pickle, Melon 194 

Pickle. Mustard 198 

Pickle. Onion 198 

Pickle, Ripe Cantaloup 194 

Pickle, Railroad 198 

Pickle, Regent 200 



THE INDEX. 



251 



PAGE. 

Catchup, Sauces. Etc.— Continued. 

Pickle. Sweet Plum 194 

Pickle, Spanish 196 

Pickle. Walnut 197 

Pickled Figs, sweet. No. 1 -192 

Pickled Figs, sweet, No. 2 193 

Pickled Peaches, sweet 193 

Sauce, Green Tomato 199 

Sauce, Pickle 199 

Vinegar 189 

Vinegar, excellent 189 

Vinegar, Spiced 189 

Beverages 201 

Peer, Corn 205 

Coffee, No. 1 201 

Coffee, No. 2 201 

Coffee, how to make 201 

Chocolate, No- 1 202 

Chocolate, No. 2 202 

Cream Nectar 202 

Champaign Cups 203 

Claret Cup 203 

Coek-tail, good 204 

Cordial, Blaikberry, No. 1 205 

Cordial, Blackberry, No. 2 205 

Cordial, Blackberry, No. 3 205 

Cordial, Blackberry or Peach 206 

Cordial, Che-rry 20(5 

Cordial, Mint 20(3 

Egg-nog, No. 1 203 

Egg-nog. No. 2 _ 203 

Egg-nog. No. 3 204 

Punch, Milk. No. 1 202 

Punch. Milk. No. 2 202 

Punch, Milk, hot 202 

Punch, Prince Regent 204 

Punch, Roman 204 

Punch. Whisky 204 

Pleasant Drink, or Beer 205 

Sherry-cobbler, 204 

Tea, Xo make 201 

Wine, Blackberry, No. 1 207 

Wine, Blackberry, No. 2 207 

Wine, Scuppernong, No. 1 206 

Wine, Scuppernong, No. 2 206 

Wine, Sour-orange, No. 1 -....207 

Wine, Sour-orange, No. 2 ..207 

Comforts for the Sick 208 

Alkaline Drink 217 

Arrow-root 212 

Broth, Chicken 209 

Broth. Mutton 209 

Blanc-mange 211 

Claret-cup, for invalids 217 

Chicken-essence 209 

Custard and Toast 213 

Cracker and Cream 216 

Diet for Infants 215 

Kt:e-nog 211 

Flour, boiled 215 

Flummery, Rice 215 

•Gruel 213 

Iced Egg 211 

Jelly, Hartshorn 212 

Jelly, Arrow-root 212 

Jelly, Sago 213 

Jelly, Lemon 216 



PAGB. 

Nutrient Enema 211 

Panada 215 

Panada., another 215 

Pudding. Bread, No.l 2.12 

Pudding, Bread, No- 2 212 

Potato Surprise 218 

Potatoes, Mashed •••• ;\~ 

Sofky. ... 216 

Soup Maigre 210 

Soup, Egg I; 

Tapioca Jlfi 

Tea, Beef 203 

Tea, Bewf, hasty 208 

Tea, Beef and Chicken 210 

Tea, Egg 209 

Tea, Egg, another 211 

Tea, Flaxseed 214 

Tea, Orange leaf. 214 

Tea. Malt 217 

Tea. Sage 217 

Water. Apple ..215 

Water, Barley 213 

Water, Gum-arabic 214 

Water, Slippery-elm 214 

Water. Toast 213 

Wine- whey 214 

Mecicixal 219 

An excellennt enema 225 

Antidote for poisons 229 

Bruises 229 

Bite of inseets 229 

Bone-felon, cure for 226 

Bleeding, to stop l'24 

Burns 222 

Burns. Binkerd's Salve for 221 

Cough mixtures 219 

Croup, remedy for 220 

Corns, cure for 227 

Chapped hands and lips 227 

Colds in the head .229 

Dysentery 223 

Earache, cure for 224 

Fever and ague, cures for 222 

Fainting 225 

Gardes for Sore-throat 221 

Hoarseness 221 

Headache 223 

Hair tonics. 228 

Hair tonics, glycerine 228 

Lip-salve 227 

Liniment, good.. 222 

Liniment, Dr. Pancoast's 222 

Mustard Plaster, to make 225 

Night sweat 225 

Poultice, flaxseed .225 

Risen Breast, plaster for 225 

Sty on the eye, to cure 226 

Sprained ankle 224 

Summer-complaint in infants 223 

Toothache 224 

Tetter, cures for 228 

Vomiting, to stop 223 

Whooping-cough Sirup 220 

Warts, to destroy 227 

Miscellaneous _ 230 

Cleaning Knives _ 236 

Cleaning Woolens 234 



252 



GULF CITY COOK-BOOK. 



PAGE. | 

Miscellaneous.— Continued. 

Cockroach Destroyer ....239 

Colic in horses 239 

Durable Stove-blacking 236 

Essence of ginger 232 

Egg-stains from Silver 236 

ErasiveSoap 242 

Furniture Polish 241 

Furniture Polish, Coker's : 241 

Good yeast-powder 2^1 

Good paste 237 

Housekeeper's alphabet 230 

Hard Soap, good 242 

Pomatum 235 

Pickle, for beef 231 

Pickle, for ham and beef 231 

Remedy for botts in horses 239 

Remedy for sick turkey 239 

Soft-soap 242 

Shoe-soles, how to save 235 

Sweeping 237 

Sealing for bottles 237 

Tonic for chickens 239 

To keep eggs 231 

To keep eggs 232 

To make cream 232 

To remove mildew.. 232 

To take out grease 233 



FACE. 

To remove stains from silk, linen, 

and cotton 233 

To remove grease, stains, etc 233 

To wash colored ribbons 234 

To set colors in calico 234 

To keep flannel from shrinking 234 

To remove freckles 235 

To remove tan and sunburn 235 

To stiffen collars 236 

To clean a browned porcelain ket- 
tle 236 

To polish flat-irons 236 

To »lean marble 236 

To destroy bed-bugs 238 

To destroy red ants 239 

To obtain a large yield of milk 240 

To take out varnish, tar, and paint.240 

To clean oil-paintings 240 

To remove whito spots from furni- 
ture 241 

To crystallize grasses .242 

To renew alpaca 233 

To clean blankets 234 

Tooth- wash, good 235 

Vanilla Extract 232 

Whitewash 237 

Whitewash, brilliant 237 

Wounds in cattle 239 



AD VER TISEMENTS. 



Every Article that can be found in a First- Class Dry Goods Store. 

FITZGERALD & STEPHENSON, 

Importers, Jobbers, and Retailers in 

Foreign, Fancy; and Domestic 

DRY GOODS, 

North- West Corner of Dauphin and Joachim Streets, 
MOBILE, ALABAMA. 

B®° TERMS CASH. -&H J8®" SEND US A TRIAL ORDER. =KW 

GEO. COSTER. G. VAN ANTWERP. 

GEO. COSTER & CO. 

DEALERS IN 

DRUGS & MEDICINES 

Fancy Soaps, Brushes, Combs, Perfumery, Etc. 
No. 71 Dauphin Street, . . MOBILE, ALA. 

LANDRETH'S GARDEN SEEDS A SPECIALTY. 

W. G. LITTLE. J. B. WILKINSON. 

LITTLE, WILKINSON & CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

BACON, PORK, LARD, SUGAR, 

Coffee; Molasses, Flour, and Liquors, 

Nos. 58 and 60 North Commerce Street, 

MOBILE, ALA. 



AD VER TISEMENTS. 



ireat Southern IHusic-Itlouse 




J". HI. SItTOW\ 

102 & 104 Dauphin Street, - MOBILE, ALA. 

SOLE AGENT FOR THE SALE OF THE 

CELEBRATED PIANOS 

— of — 

Chickering & Sons, 

Steinway & Sons, 

Kranich & Bach, 

Mathushek Piano Co. 

And Emerson Piano Co. 

PRICES GREATLY REDUCED. 

$750 Pianos for - - $.500. 

$650 llanos for - - $375. 

$600 Pianos for - • $350. 

$500 Piano* for - - $275. 

All of the Above are Warranted for Seven Years. 



CABINET ORGANS. 

l*£a.soxi <Sc Ham j in. Organs, 

Felo\xT6et, 2Peltoxi cSs Co. Orgraaae, 

OlovLg-la. <£a "VT'a.rrexs. Oigazis, 

Htf*e-w Engrlaxia. ©xg-axs. Co. ©xgraxis. 

Priees from $SO to $300 for Organs. 



PICTURE -FRAMES, ALL KINDS MADE TO ORDER, 

As Cheap and Better than Northern Frames. 

hngravinjs, Oil- 'Paintings, Chromos, Picture- Cards, 

And EvcrtJiins In tlie .Picture Line. 

MUSICAL BOXES & MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS of all Kinds, 

SHEET HVLTTSIC -A-lTD 3VET7SICA.L WORKS. 

Every article soid at the Lowest Possible Price. 

Every Piano or Organ sold by me is warranted for seven years. 



AD VER TISEMENTS. 



E. O. ZADEK & CO., 

JEWELERS, 

WATCHES, DIAMONDS, 

SILVERWARE, PLATED WARE, 

OPERA-GLASSES, SPECTACLES, &c. 

Masonic Temple, - MOBILE, ALA. 

J. K. RANDALL, 

ESTABLISHED 1831. 

BOOKSELLER AND STATIONER, 

BLANK-BOOK MANUFACTURER, 

At the Old Established Store, No. "5 North Water Street, 

MOBILE, ALABAMA. 

iw, Medical, School, and Miscellaneous Books.' 



J". IF. IKIEJBIOIE, 



UF.ALKU IN 



English., French, and American 

DRY GOODS, HOSIERY, 

GLOVES, LACES, 
And Notions of Every Description* 

129 Dauphin St., Mobile, Ala. 



AD VER TISE ME NTS. 



SCRANTON, BARNEY & CO., 

io, 12, 14 & 16 North Commerce St., Mobile, Ala. 



IMPORTERS OF AND DEALERS IN 



Hardware, . Woodenware, Tinware, 

Grain-Cradles, Rope, Axes, Scythes, Coffee-Mills, Blacksmiths' Tools, 
Spades, Carpenters' Tools, Horseshoes, Mattocks, Shovels, Coop- 
ers' Tools, Babbit Metal, Sheet-Copper, Gin and Mill Gear- 
ing, Agricultural Implements, Brinley Plows, Carriage 
Materials, Turpentine Tools. Cooking and 
Heating Stoves, Etc., Etc. 



OTJE; STOVES 

Can not be surpassed for neatness of design and finish, durability, and the many requisites 
which make perfection. We have sold many hundreds of the COTTAGE COOKING 
STOVE, and all have given satisfaction. Besides, our best cooks are unanimously of the 
opinion that it can not be excelled. There is another consideration with the economical, 
that it is cheaper than any other of a similar grade. 



Scranton, Barney & Co.'s Cast Plows, No. 8, y 2 , 1, 



STEEL -FOIZ-X- rijO-WS- 



OILS, WHITE LEADS, ETC. 

Raw and Boiled Linseed Oil, Lard-Oil, Winter Strained, in quantities from 5 gallons up. 
White Lead in Kegs, Axle-Grease and Lubricating Oils, all of the purest qualities. 



Bar Iron, Nails, Guns, Bolting-Cloths, Castings, Fish- 
ing Tackle, Cutlery, Grindstones, Millstones. 

Railroad and Steam - Engine Supplies of Every Description, 

HERRING & FARREL'S CELEBRATED SAFES. 
COTTON TIES, Best, Cheapest, and Largest Stock in the South. 

FULL STOCK OF BLACKSMITHS' MATERIALS. 

Agents for Sugar-Mills and Evaporators, Straub's Corn and Wheat Mills, Mobile Wooden- 
ware Manufactory, the Daniel Pratt Gin Company's Gins, Boston Belting Company Belting 
and Vulcanized India Rubber, Faiibanks' Standard Platform and Counter Scales. 

In brief, we have every description of Goods necessary to make a complete stock of Hard- 
ware, etc. — it not the most so— of any to be found in the southern country, all of which will be 
sold at prices and on terms to suit the times. 

Our Stock Comprises the Largest and Cheapest Lot of Plows In the County, 



AD VER TISEMENTS. 



^SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ORDERS.^m 

2s£. ZE^OZDIDIT, 

DEALER IN 

STAPLE m FANCY DRY GOODS, 

Shawls, Silks, and Dress Goods, 

Zinens, Zaces, Embroideries, JVoolen Goods, Carpeting* 
Matting, Jr'indow- Shades, 

j$ Dauphin Street, bet. St. Emanuel and Royal, 
MOBILE, ALA. 

W. B. VAIL. L. C. VAIL. 

W. B. VAIL. & CO. . 

ESTABLISHED 1846. 

GROCERS & IMPORTERS, 

White Front Buildings, 

NOS. 70 and 72 DAUPHIN STREET, 

Mobile, Alabama. 

N. K. LUDLOW, 
Plumber, Gas and Steam Fitter, 

Water, Gas and Steam Goods of Every Description. 
Particular Attention Paid to Repairing Pumps and Driving Wells. 

Sole Agent. tor Fuller, Warren & Co.'s Double Oven Cooking Range, 
Ludlow' Patent Rust-Proof Drove Wells. 

No. 58 (Dauphin Street, Third door oelow (Royal, 

MOBILE, ALABAMA. 

eSj-Plumbing, Gas and Steam Fitting of all descriptions, neatly executed; Chandeliers, 
Pendants, Brackets, Water-Closets, Bathing-Tubs, and Pumps of all descriptions furnished 
at short notice. Particular attention paid to Cleaning, Repairing and Extending Gas Fix- 
tures, Introducing and Repairing Hydrants. Sheet Lead and Drove-Well Work. 

«Es?V2// work Guarantiedr&X 

n 



AD VER TISEMENTS. 



ESTABLISHED 1836. 

BROMBERG BROS. 

108 Dauphin SI., Mobile Ala., 

PIANOS, ORGANS, 

Musical Merchandise, Sheet-Music, 

Stationery , Fine Fancy. Goods, Foreign and Domestic Novelties, 
Society Goods, &*c. 

Special Department.— Drawing, Painting, and Wax-Flower 
Materials, and Decorative Goods of ail kinds. 

Thomas Henry. John Henry. 

THOMAS HENRY & SON, 

DIRECT FOREIGN IMPORTERS OF 

China, Glass, Queensware, 

TINWARE, &c. 

No. 29 ST. FRANCIS STREET, 

MOBILE, ALABAMA. 



BRISK & JACOBSON, 

MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN 

CLOTHING 

And Gents' Furnishing Goods, 

Corner Dauphin and Water Streets, 
MOBILE, ALA. 



AD VER TISEMENTS. 



3s^c::r,s. lloyd, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

j3il.k$, f\iBBojM5, Anli ^VIillijmery •C|ood$, 

85 and 87 St Francis Street, Cor. Joachim, 

NEARLY OPPOSITE P. H. PEPPER ft CO. MOBILE, ALA. 



Prompt Attention Given to all Kinds of Dress-Making. 
CHAMBERLAIN & CO. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 

Northern and Western Produce, 

Choice Green and Black Teas, 
Fine Old Brandies, Wines, Whiskies, &e. 

Ship, Family, and Boat Stores put up at Low Rates. 

Nos. 4 & 6 South Commerce St., MOBILE, ALA. 
I. C. DuBOSE & CO. 

WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS, 

No. 7 North Water Street, 
MOBILE, - - ALABAMA. 



AD VER TISEMENTS. 



COAL AND WOOD. 

All kinds, in quantities to suit, and sold at the. lowest prices, by 

A. C. BANNER $ CO. 

MOBILE, ALA. 



Lumber, 

Shingles, 

Fence-Posts, 

cross-ties, 

hewed timber, 
mast-sticks, 

SPARS, <fcc. 

FOB SALE BY 

A. C. BANNER & CO., Mobile, Ala. 



WHITE-OAK STAVES 

Bought all the year as they may come to market by 

A. C DANNER & CO. 

MOBILE, ALA. 



AD VER TISEMENTS. 



W. H. GARDNER. A.J. GILLESPIE. FRANK T. COPP- 

Gardner, Gillespie & Co. 
COTTOIT FACTORS, 

No. 38 North Commerce Street, MOBILE, ALA- 

No. SO Union Street. NEW ORLEANS, LA 

THOS. W. SIMS. JACOB P- BILLUPS. 

Sims 5 Bilhaps & Co. 
COTTON FACTORS. 

No. 42 North Commerce St., - MOBILE, ALA. 

L. W. LAWLER. W. L. BAKER. J. W. WHITING. 

Baker, Lawler & Co. 

COTTON FACTORS, 

40 NORTH COMMERCE ST., 
Establish^ 1844. MOBILE, ALA. 



AD VER TISEMENTS. 



Peter Stark, Prest. J. W. Whiting, Vice-Prest. L. C. Fry, Cashie r 

PEOPLE'S SAVINGS-BANK, 

MOBILE, ALA. 



PAID UP CAPITAL $160,000. 

XHSECTOES- 

J. W. Whiting, G. F. Werborn, I. B. Davis, D. T. Parker' 

W. J. Brainard, A. C. Danner, Peter Stark. 

COLLECTIONS SOLICITED. 

Remittances always made on day of Collection at Current Rate of Exchange. 



COTTON BROKER. 

NO 44 NORTH WATER ST., 

MOBILE, - ALABAMA. 

L. BREWER & CO., 



Corner Commerce and St. Louis Streets, 

MOBILE, ALA. 



AD VER Tib EVENTS. 



C. S. PARTRIDGE & CO. 

131 DAUPHIN STREET, 131. 

—DEALERS IN— 

J-^ouse-purnishing Qoods, 

—ALL KINDS OF— 

Culinary tirlicles,, Cream- Freezers, &c. 
The Champion Cook-Stove, FASHION. 



N. W. Cor. Dauphin and Conception Sts. t MOBILE, ALA. 



— DEALER IN — 



DRUGS, MEDICINES, CHEMICALS, 

Toilet and Fancy Articles, Patent Medicines, 
Brushes, Soaps, Perfumery. 



Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 



Fine Chemicals and Pure Drugs a Specialty. 

E. P. HERPIN & CO. 

Importers and Dealers in 



DRY GOODS, 

Nos. 105 and 107 Dauphin Street, 

& E. Corner Conception. MOBILE, ALABAMA. 



AD VER TISEMENTS. 



TIHUEJ J^GOttlSr cook:, 

MICA OR CAST FRONT. .FOR WOOD. 




With the experience gained during thirty-five years in the manufacture of nearly 
ONE MILLION STOVES, 

We claim to know what the people want, and how to make a Cooking Stove suited to their 
demands, and so have brought out 

THE ACORN COOKS, 

Which we pronounce the best Stoves for the money ever made. 

We know there are many Cheaper Stoves, some made of light castings, others of poor 
iron, and again, others badly constructed and mounted These soon crack, burn out, and 
are a constant trial and a vexation. Such Stoves are not comparable with out acorn cooks, 
which are made only of new iron, and Warranted to last for 25 years. Especial atten- 
tion is invited to our Ventilated Fire-Box Bottom, Fire-Back and Oven. The Acorns 
are the only Stoves made with this admirable arrangement, to prevent the over-heating of 
the oven under the fire-box, preserve the fire-back, keep the air in the oven fresh and free 
from steam and gases, and prevent the escape of all smell of cooking. This arrangement en- 
ables us to guaranty the sweetest bread, baked most quickly and economcally. We make 
the Stoves with the plain top, in which all the peculiar advantages are secured, also with the 
New Portable Low Copper Reservoir. That can be lifted out in a moment for cleaning 
or repairing, in which ten or fifteen gallons of water can be kept constantly hot, for all the 
uses of the kitchen. The Convenience of a Low Restrvoir can not be overestimated. 
Those who have been accustomed to using the old-fashioned high reservoir know how incon- 
venient it is to raise a pailful of water high enough to .pour into them, and will welcome this 
great improvement. A Large Hot Closet, which is also made of cast iron, is attached 
underneath the Reservoir. 

IRA W. PORTER & CO. 



S. E. Corner Water and St. Francis Sts., 



MOBILE, ALABAMA. 



AD VERTISEMENTS. 




JST. CRA1STE, 

No. 67 Dauphin St., MOBILE, ALABAMA. 

— DEALER IN— 

The Unrivalled 

Singer Sewing-Machine. 



Sold on Easy Terms, or a Liberal Discount 
for Cash. Genuine Needles for all kinds of 
Sewing-Machines, at Five Cents Apiece, or 
Fifty Cents per Dozen. Sewing-Machines 
of all kinds repaired, and work tully guaran- 
tied. fi=g*"Sewing-Silk, Spool-Cotton, Ma- 
chine-Oil, always on hand. 



S. MARCUS & SON, 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

Laces, Embroideries, While Goods, Crapes, Ribbons, 

Hosiery, Straw and Silk Goods, Worsteds, Flowers, 

Feathers, and Notions of every description. 



//4 and 7/6 Dauphin St., 



MOBILE, ALABAMA. 



DR. WM. DEASON, 



SURGEON DENTIST. 



No. 97 Dauphin Street, 



MOBILE, 



ALABAMA. 



ADVER TISEMENTS. 




Quattlebaum k Gelbke, 



Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 



OF AL.L KINDS. 
./Ko. /''•S Dauphin St., 

Mobile. - Alabama. 



A first-class Machine with a full set ot 

ssse " attachments, for $30.00. 



C. HANN & CO. 



—DEALERS IN— 



BOOTS and SHOES. 

53 AND 115 DAUPHIN ST., 

Mobile, - ■ Alabama. 



YOUNG BROTHEES, 

Plumbers, Gas and Steam Fitters, 

S W COR. DAUPHIN AND ST. EMANUEL STS., 
MOBILE, ALA. 



Drove-wells put down at Reasonable Rates. 



AD VER T I SEME NTS. 



MOBILE HAIE-STOEE, 

95 DAUPHIN STREET, kJOBILE, ALABAHJA. 

I keep on hand and make to order a full assortment of HUMAN-HAIR GOODS; 
also, composition de Jean Auge of Paris, the best hair tonic used. Parian, the finest beauti- 
fier of the complexion. Robares Ameoline, the famous blonde dye. Colognes, Creams, and 
Extracts. 

Ladies' Toilet Articles a Specialty. 

Braids made from Combings. Orders solicited and promptly attended to. 

Mrs. E. Quinn. 



GEO. B. PRESTON. ESTABLISHED 1840. A. S. STETSON. 

PRESTON & STETSON, 

Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealers in 

BOOTS, SHOES, and HATS, 

N. W. COR. ST. FRANCIS AND WATER STS., 

Office in Boston, 110 Summer St.] rVTofoilG Ala 

SIGN OE THE 3-OLIDE1T ELEPHAKT. 

JOS. PROSKAUER, 

Manufacturer of 

plain and JTancy (Randies, 



Pure and unadulterated, and warranted to keep in any climate. 

No. 15 Dauphin St., - MOBILE/ ALA. 



AD VER TISEMENTS. 



t. Mcdonald. wm. march. t. w. Mcdonald. 



McDonald, March & Co. 



-manufacturers of— 



Monumeijts, Torpbs, Gravestones, 

M^lISTTELS, etc 

Sidewalks Paved with Stone on Short Notice. 
ALL WORK GUARANTIED 

To be Fully up to Design and Specifications. 



Parties will do well to confer with us before making any contracts 
for Monuments or Stone-Work elsewhere. 



} Royal St., East Side, del. St. Louis and SI. Anthony Sis., 

MOBILE, .AJLjA.. 



AD VER TISEMENTS. 



M. FORCHHEIMER. FERD. FORCHHEIMER. 

M. FORCHHEIMER & CO., 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 



AND DEALERS IN 



WESTERN PRODUCE. 

21 & 23 N. Commerce, St. Mobile. Ala. 



AGENTS FOR ™\rZ™riT, Z^°- FLOUR. 



AND HIGHLAND CITY MILLS. 



THE ALABAMA 



Gold Life-lpsurance Corppagy. 

HOME OFFICE: 

34 St. Francis Street, - - MOBILE, ALA. 



ASSETS HALF A MILLION 

CAPITAL - $200,000 IN GOLD. 

Geo. W. Agnew. W. H. Scales. 

Agnew, Scales & Co. 

COTTON FACTORS & COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

No. 63 NORTH COMMERCE STREET. 
MOBILE, - ALABAMA. 



AD VER TISEMENTS. 



PRICE WILLIAMS. JAMES K. GLENNON. 

(Notary Public.) 

Williams & Glennon, 

NO. 60 ST. FRANCIS STREET, 
Opposite the Custom Howe, MOBILE, ALABAMA. 

REAL ESTATE AGENTS, BROKERS, AND AUCTIONEERS, 

BUY AND SELL ON COMMISSION 

united states, state, county, and city bonds, 

Fire and Life Insurance and Mining Stocks. 

B®°Special attention given to Auction Sales. 



L. M. MeKINNEY & CO. 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

Saddles, Harness, Bridles, Collars, Whips, 

Eobes, Blankets, Brushes, Combs, Fly-Nets, &c, 
TRUNKS REPAIRED AND COVERED. 

11 North Water St., - MOBILE, AliA 

THE PLACE TO BUY 
READY-MADE CLOTHING 

—IS AT THE— 

MAMMOTH CLOTHING HOUSE, 

M. P. LEVY & CO. 

Wos. 16. 18, and 20 X Water St., MOBILE, ALA. 



AD VER TISEMENTS. 



GEORGE F. WERBORN, 

NO. 143 DAUPHIN STREET, 

Furniture, Carpets, Upholstery, 

AND INTERIOR DECORATIONS. 



Very Latest Styles ^n_ Furniture Coverins 

East Lake and Queen ttfnne Tarlor, Library, <Dining, and 
<Bed-<Room Suits. 



RAW SILK MATERIAL, 

Latest Styles, a Beautiful Variety. 



PARLOR SUITS from $65.00 Upward, 

Bed-Room, Dining-Koom, and Library Furniture 

AT VERY LOW PRICES. 



CARPETS. 

S1.10. t 

Chain 

Every Variety of Rugs, Mats, and Stair Carpeting and Fitting. 



Tapestry Brussels $1.10, to 1.15, to 1.20, to 1.25 

Extra Three-Ply 1.30 

Extra Super 1.10 

Extra Double Cotton Chain 50 to 60 cts 



Richest and most varied assortment of Lace Curtains, 

3r:Eao3^£ $2.oc fe^2, :e>_a.ie2. -cr^^xr-ft-^ano. 

Cornices, Window*- Shades, and IZvery Novelty 
Appertaining to 'Pai'lor or Interior Household 
'Decoration, of the very best Quality, and 

Guarantied as Low as Anywhere. 



A D VEK T IS EM EN TS. 



JOHN DOUGLAS, 



Dry Goods, Laces I Embroideries. 



Florence Sewing- Machine Needles. 



121 DAUPHIN STREET* 



Mobile, - - Alabama. 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



014 489 437 6 





i~M £p 


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