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Full text of "Handbook of the Beta theta pi in the forty-eighth year of the fraternity"

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LIBRAE 

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PREFACE. 

In every part of the Hand-Book the point of departure is the opening of the con- 
vention held at Cliicago in August, iSSi. The point at which the book closes is the 
middle of April, iS86. 

The lists of the members admitted within the period above described were first 
made up from the roll that is kept in the general secretaiy's office and were then 
submitted to the chapters for revision. The addresses and the record of distinctions 
were furnished by the present corresponding secretaries. Although no distinctions 
are mentioned except such as are considered important at the several colleges, never- 
theless, in accordance with the plan of the book, more distinctions are named than 
would have place in a catalogue of the whole fraternity. 

The notes prefixed to each chapter's roll were prepared by the editor and sent to 
the chapters for correction. In the paragraphs regarding fraternities in general, 
chapters are named in the order of original foundation. In the paragraphs regarding 
our own chapters, the lists of corresponding secretaries, of delegates to convention, 
and of other officers are, as a matter of course, limited to the period explained above. 

Although the whole of the book was prepared and edited by one person,* every 
one knows that a book like this must, in a very important sense, be the work of 
numerous hands. It is merely a compilation, and for materials it is largely indebted 
to records kept by corresponding secretaries, general secretaries, secretaiies of con- 
ventions, and secretaries of the board of directors. 

Etigeiie IVambaugh. 
Cincinnati, O., A25ril 21, 1S86. 



267915 



CONTENTS. 

Notes on the Recent History of Beta Theta Pi, - - - - i 

The Younger Members (A Catalogue of Members Admitted since the Convention of iSSi, 
with Notes as to Colleges and Chapters) — 
Amherst, - - - - - - - - - - 15 

Beloit, ___________ iS 

Bethany, __________ ig 

Boston, ___________ 20 

Brown, - - - - - - - - - - 2i 

University of California, --------23 

Centre, __________ 24 

Columbia, __________ 25 

Cornell, - - - -- - - - - - ^7 

Cumberland, __________ 29 

Denison, - - - - - - - - - - 31 

DePauw, __________ 32 

Dickinson, __________ ^^ 

Hampden Sidney, ------~~~35 

Hanover, __________ 36 

Harvard, ___________ 37 

Indiana University, _________ 38 

University of Iowa, _________ 39 

Iowa Wesleyan, _________ 40 

Johns Hopkins, __________ 41 

University of Kansas, --------43 

Kenyon, ________ ----44 

Madison, __________ 45 

Maine Slate College, _______-- 46 

University of Michigan, ________ 47 

University of Mississippi, ________ 49 

Northwestern, - - - - - - - - - 51 

Ohio State Univer.-.ity, _________ 52 

Ohio University, ---------.S3 

Ohio Wesleyan, ________-- 54 

University of Pennsylvania, -------- 5.S 

Randolph Macon, _________ ^6 

Richmond, ________-- 1^7 

Rutgers, ______--- --58 

St. Lawrence, - - - - -- - - - - S9 

Stevens, ______----- 60 

Union, _______--- 61 

Vanderbilt, - - - - - - - - - -.62 

University of Virginia, ________ 64 

Wabash, -----------6^ 

Washington and Jefferson, ________ 66 

Western Reserve --------- 6'j 

Westminster, _____----- 

University of Wisconsin, ________ 69 

Wi tenberg, _____-_--- 70 

Wooster, - - - - - - - - - - ~ 7^ 

Geographical Index to the Younger Members, ----- 73 

Alphabetical Index to the Younger Members, - - - - - 90 

Abbreviations, _____----- 97 



H£.nJ-Book of 1S56 



NOTES ON THE RECENT HISTORY OF BETA THETA PI. 



THE PURPOSE OF THESE NOTES. 

Beginning with the Chicago conven- 
tion of iSSi, these notes come down to 
the spring of i8S6. It must be understood, 
however, that they do not purport to be 
a history. A history, if constructed with 
due attention to perspective, ignores 
many events and discusses only the most 
important ; and, besides, a history gives 
great attention to causes and results. 
These notes, on the contrary, having no 
such ambitious design, do not attempt to 
make a selection of the most important 
events, and still less do they pretend to 
give discussions of sources and tenden- 
cies. Perhaps the time has not come 
when a good history of these recent 
years can be written; but, whether the 
time has come or not, these notes have a 
very different purpose. Many of the 
events of these few years will have no 
place in a history of the whole life of the 
fraternity ; and yet it is important that 
at the present and for some time to come 
our members keep in mind these very 
events, no matter how unimportant they 
may, by and by, appear ; for the same 
matters will probably come up again and 
again, and, in order that there may be in- 
telligent discussion and action, every one 
ought to know what has been our recent 
policy- Of course, a great deal can be 
learned from the minutes of the conven- 
tions; but there are very few complete 
sets. Besides, the minutes are published 
in such a shape that it is not always easy 
to learn at a glance just what was finally 
done by the conventions, for there is 
constant reference back and forth to ex- 
hibits. Accordingly, it is not improbable 
that the review here given of the recent 



conventions and of other events will be 
a convenience even to the possessors of 
full sets of minutes. The attempt has 
been to omit nothing that can conceivably 
be of interest, and when there has been 
any doubt as to the importance of matter 
the decision has been to include rather 
than to exclude. 

CONVENTION OF iSSl. 

The forty-second annual convention 
was held in Chicago on August 30th and 
31st and September ist, 18S1. The Grand 
Pacific Hotel was the headquarters. 
About two hundred and twenty-five 
meml.ers were present. The business 
meetings w'ere held in the Appellate 
Court room, a large and well-appointed 
apartment in one of the wings of the 
hotel. Thirty-four college chapters were 
represented, namely: Beloit, Bethany, 
Boston, BrowMi, California, Centre, Cor- 
nell, Denison, DePauw, Hampden Sidne}', 
Hanover, Harvard, Indiana, Iowa, Johns 
Hopkins, Kansas, Kenyon, Madison, 
Michigan, Northwestern, Ohio, Ohio 
Wesleyan, Pennsylvania, Richmond, St. 
Lawrence, Stevens, Virginia, Wabash, 
Washington and Jefferson, Western Re- 
serve, VVestminster, Wisconsin, Witten- 
berg, Wooster. The only college chapters 
not represented were Cumberland, Dick- 
inson, Iowa Wesleyan, Maine State, 
Mississippi, Randolph Macon, Rutgers, 
Trinity University, and Union. Delegates 
were present from seven alumni chapters, 
namely: Baltimore, Chicago, Cincinnati, 
Cleveland, Indianapolis, Richmond (Va.), 
and New York. 

Hon. Mark L. DeMotte was temporary 
chairman and W, B. Cady was temporary 



NOTES ON' THi! RECENT HISTORY OF BETA THETA PI. 



secretary. ■•Tbb"'pei"frianenfe x>flicers. were 
Chief Justice Alonzo P. Carpenter, of 
New Hampshire, president; E. H. Terrell, 
Guy C. Earl, Willoughbv N. Smith, D. 
E. Osborne, A. P. Hoyt, Harry F. Ehr- 
man, and C. D. Williams, vice-presidents; 
W. R. Baird, secretary; W. B. Cady, J. 
C. Hanna, and E. H. Ernst, assistant sec- 
retaries. O. R. Brouse was chairman of 
the committee on constitution and juris- 
prudence. E. H. Terrell was chairman of 
the committee on chapters and charters. 

The report of the general secretary. 
Rev. E. J. Brown, was an able and com- 
prehensive document, a fit conclusion to 
that conscientious officer's three years of 
laborious service. It gave a sketch of the 
fraternity's history for the academic year 
just ended and an account of the condi- 
tion and prospects of the several chapters, 
with a statistical table, which showed 
that during iSSo-Si there had been 356 
initiates and a total active membership of 
601. A feature of the table was the 
classifying of each chapter's prospects as 
"very good," "good," and "fair." The 
report laid before the convention the pe- 
tition from Columbia, suggested that leg- 
islation be had regarding alumni chap- 
ters, and presented a code of laws estab- 
lishing a general secretary's roll of new 
members. The report gave, at considerable 
length, the reasons why three petitions 
had been sent directly to the chapters, 
and said that in the future "all petitions 
for charters should be retained for the 
consideration of the convention, unless 
the circumstances of the petition them- 
selves inake it plainly exceptional." 

The board of directors, by W. F. Boyd, 
its secretary, presented a report that gave 
particular prominence to the work done, 
partly by order of the convention of 1S80 
and partly of the board's own motion, in 
investigating the condition of several 
chapters. Three chapters had been re- 
quested by the board, after careful inves- 
tigation by a special commissioner, to re- 
sign their charters, and had done so. 
This action of the board was unanimously 
approved by the convention. The report 
laid before the convention some papers 
regarding the condition and prospects of 
Trinity University. One of these papers 
was a report from the special commis- 
sioner appointed by the board to visit that 
chapter. On account of an emphatic 
protest from the chapter's alumni the 
board had decided not to suspend the 
charter. The papers were laid before the 



convention without recommendation. 
The convention withdrew the charter of 
the Trinity University chapter. Ohio 
University and Westminster chapters and 
Chicago alumni were the only chapters 
that voted in the negative. 

This convention granted formal char- 
ters, as required by the constitution, to the 
chapters that had been established since 
the last convention. The only new chap- 
ter chartered was Columbia. There was 
a petition from the University of Ne- 
braska which, on account of a defect in 
the papers, could not be put to a vote. 
The defect was that the sentiment of the 
three neighboring chapters had not been 
formally obtained. The following reso- 
lution was adopted: "Resolved, That 
the petition for a charter at the Uni- 
versity of Nebraska, which this conven- 
tion has not been able to act upon by 
reason of imperfection of the papers, 
shall, when put in constitutional shape 
for action through the general secretary, 
be immediately put to a vote of the chap- 
ters by the board of directors." No one 
called attention to the fact that this reso- 
lution was so worded as to take from the 
general secretary and the board the con- 
stitutional right and duty of determining, 
after thorough investigation, whether the 
circumstances of the case are so extraor- 
dinary as to warrant the adoption of the 
short way of treating petitions. The 
resolution was adopted in order to gratify 
the petitioners, who had long been 
waiting patiently, and who were likely to 
complain of a delay for which they were 
in no way responsible. Edwin H. Terrell 
wrote the resolution, and wrote it very 
hastily. In the carefully-prepared report 
of the committee on constitution and 
jurisprudence, written and presented by 
him as chairman of the committee, occurs 
the following passage, which had already 
been atlopted by the convention: "As 
the petition is not recommended by the 
two of the three nearest chapters to the 
site of the University of Nebraska, we 
refer the petition back to the convention 
as not ready to be acted upon. We 
recommend that the petition be retained 
by the general secretary until the proper 
recommendations have been secured, 
when it mav again be submitted to the 
fraternity." This latter wording is more 
careful, and is not open to any constitu- 
tional objection. The only objection to it 
was that it did not contain any sugges- 
tion that the petition might be sent. 



NOTES ON THE RECENT HISTORY OF BETA THETA PI, 



around the short way. So far as the 
recommendation went, the petitioners 
had no encourao;ement to hope that their 
petition would be acted upon before the 
next convention. When this fact was 
noticed. Terrell has*ly wrote the reso- 
lution oriven above. It is unfortunate that 
he did not copy the words of the recom- 
mendation which, as chairmnn of the 
committee on chapters and charters, 
he had made regarding^ another petition, 
namely, "That it be referred to the board 
of directors and general secretary for 
further investigation, to be submitted by 
them to a vote of the chapters as soon as 
possible under the emergency clause, if 
by them deemed advisable." This last is 
a very accurate piece of wording. Yet 
the loose and inaccurate wording of the 
hastily-drawn resolution has served as the 
model for subsequent recommendations; 
and in consequence one of the most care- 
ful of our fraternity jurists has become 
innocently responsible for a blunder that 
may, by and by, cause serious disagree- 
ment as to the right of a convention to 
limit the powers that by the constitution 
are given to the other branches of the 
government. 

Before the Chicago convention the 
legislative acts other than the constitu- 
tion itself had been called by-laws. The 
convention changed this name to laws, 
principally for the reason that by-laws is 
a term more appropriately given to the 
regulations of a chapter. The convention 
made no material changes in the laws 
already existing, but made several val- 
uable additions. It adopted the general 
secretary's suggestion regarding a roll of 
new members. The difficulty of preparing 
the catalogue of iSSi had suggested the 
advisability of keeping a roll upon which 
should be entered the name of each new 
member. The legislation adopted at 
Chicago on this subject has been very 
useful, and has not been altered. 

Six sections were adopted with refer- 
ence to alumni chapters, being the first 
legislation on that subject since the 
adoption of the present constitution. 
These sections have since been changed 
in manv points, but they are still, in most 
of the important matters, the basis of the 
whole law on alumni chapters. 

The first law upon dispensations was 
also adopted. As it is still in force, it 
may be important to know what were 
the reasons for its passage. It is some- 
times assumed that the law as to dispensa- 



tions gives to a chapter, with permission 
of the board, the power to initiate men 
who, in the absence of this law, \vould 
not be eligible. That is an error. So far 
as the constitution goes, any chapter may 
elect and initiate a student of any college 
whatever, and, provided the candidate be 
a student of some college, it is not neces- 
sary that he be a student of the college 
where the chapter is situated. The right 
to initiate students of other colleges had 
seldom or never been exercised by any 
chapter, but there were reports that the 
right had been exercised, and, therefore, 
the convention, wishing to place some 
restriction upon such initiations, passed 
the law forbidding a chapter to "elect or 
initiate any person not a student in some 
department of the institution in which 
the chapter is located," except "that in 
cases of obvious expediency the board of 
directors may grant a dispensation 
allowing the initiation of students in other 
institutions." 

The convention placed on record and 
recommended to the chapters the official 
seal used in 1S39. It is still the official 
seal of chapters. 

Three sections were adopted with refer- 
ence to jurisdiction, procedure, and penal- 
ties in cases of discipline. 

As these various additions to the laws 
were very important, and as the laws 
were now numerous and scattered, the 
board of directors and the general sec- 
retary were directed to collect all of the 
laws and to arrange and publish them in 
the form of a code. 

Besides making these important ad- 
ditions to the laws, the convention took 
action on many other matters of per- 
manent interest. It instructed the di- 
rectors to " take such measures as may to 
them seem most advisable to secure the 
co-operation of the leading college fra- 
ternities in a movement to discourage and 
abolish the practice of making com- 
binations for the purpose of affecting 
elections to college offices and honors." 
Unfortunately, this early movement in the 
direction of pan-hellenism came to noth- 
ing. Other votes that had little or no prac- 
tical result were that the directors- should 
enroll in a book the proceedings of all 
conventions since the organization of the 
fraternity and the proceedings of all 
future conventions; that there should be 
a standing committee on alumni chapters 
to encourage and stimulate the organizing 
of such chapters and to report to the next 



NOTES ON THE RECENT HISTORY OF BETA THETA PI. 



convention; that there should be a similar 
standing committee on chapter houses; 
and that William R. Baird be editor of a 
manual which should contain constitution, 
laws, record of conventions, lists of chap- 
ters, statistics, lists of prominent men, a 
short sketch of fraternity history, lists of 
rivals, and official documents. 

The convention voted that each jeweler 
to the fraternity must pay an annual 
royalty of fifty dollars. This is still the 
rule. 

This convention attempted to settle the 
question regarding initiating preparatory 
students. The Baltimore convention of 
1880, by a vote of 66 to 13, had resolved 
"That this convention emphatically re- 
affirms the requirements of our consti- 
tution permitting the initiation of mem- 
bers of undergraduate classes only, and 
demands that the chapters entirely aban- 
don the practice of initiating jDreparatory 
students or other ineligible persons." It 
will be noticed that that resolution was 
not, in form, at least, an attempt to leg- 
islate under the pretense of interpreting 
already existing law. The Baltimore 
doctrine was brought up at the Chicago 
convention. The committee on consti- 
tution and jurisprudence reported a reso- 
lution that "The sense of the convention 
is that the initiation of preparatory 
students be in every way discouraged." 
That mild resolution did not suit the con- 
vention, and instead it was, by a vote of 
38 to 5, resolved " That, in institutions 
having a preparatory department attached 
as a part of their collegiate system, the 
classes in which are under charge of and 
taught by the college professors, and are 
carried on the college catalogue, such 
preparatory department may be construed 
as coming within the constitutional desig- 
nation of undergraduate classes, until 
otherwise ordered by a general convention 
of the fraternity." As this resolution was 
disapproved by the next convention, 
there is no need of discussing what eflect, 
if any, this legislative interpretation had 
upon the constitution. 

There was universal regret that Rev. 
E. J. Brown, general secretary, and C.J. 
Seaman, song-book agent, refused to re- 
tain the offices that they had so long 
filled. The officers elected for the en- 
suing year were Eugene Wambaugh, 
general secretary; J. S. Goodwin and E. 
J. Brown, historiographers; Major W. C, 
Ransom, visiting officer; C. J. Seaman, 
catalogue agent; W. H. January, song- 



book agent; Dr. Thad. A. Reamy, W. F. 
Boyd, and O. R. Brouse, directors for 
three years. 

The literai'y exercises were held in 
Fairbank Hall, on tl^e evening of August 
30th. The orator was Rev. John Bascom, 
president of the University of Wisconsin. 
The poet was the Hon. W. F. Stone, one 
of the justices of the supreme court of 
Colorado. The banquet was had in the 
Grand Pacific Hotel on the evening of the 
31st. Gen. R. W. Smith presided. Re- 
sponses were made by Hon. Mark L. 
DeMotte, Dr. Theophilus Farvin, Col. C. 
C. Matson, Hon. Schuyler Colfax, Hon. 
A. P. Carpenter, Hon. John W. Herron, 
and Rev. J. Hogarth Lozier. Some of 
the music was furnished by the Beta 
Theta Pi quartette from the University of 
Michigan. Three hundred gentlemen 
and ladies were present. In every re- 
spect the banquet was the most successful 
ever enjoyed by the fraternity. 

The Chicago convention is to this day 
regarded by every one as the ideal con- 
vention. At some conventions there 
have been as many chapters represented, 
and at some the social features have been 
just as pleasant, but, taking everything 
into the account, the convention of 1881 
still stands at the head. 

1 88 1 -'83. 

During the year i88i-'83 the board of 
directors was constituted as follows: 
Hon. John W. Herron, president; W. F. 
Boyd, secretary; John I. Covington, R. 
Harvey Young, Sylvester G. Williams, 
Dr. Thad. A. Reamy, Major W. C. Ran- 
som, Dr. W. P. Watson, and O. R. 
Brouse. The board elected R. Harvey 
Young general treasurer, John I. Cov- 
ington editor of the magazine, and S. G. 
Williams, Willis O. Robb, and William 
R. Baird assistants. 

The board confirmed the general sec- 
retary's new division of the fraternity 
into districts and his appointment of 
chief assistant secretaries as follows: I., 
New England, John T. Blodgett; II., 
New York and New Jersey, W. R. 
Baird; III., Pennsylvania, Delaware, 
Maryland, District of Columbia, and 
West Virginia, Willoughby N. Smith; 
IV., Virginia, North Carolina, and South 
Carolina, Jas. G. Field, Jr.; V., Kentucky, 
Tennessee, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, 
Mississippi, and Louisiana, John A. 
Heron; VI., Ohio, Chas. H. Carey; VII., 



NOTES ON THE RECENT HISTORY OF BETA THETA PI. 



Indiana and Michigan, A. N. Grant; 
VIII., Illinois, Wisconsin, IVIinnesota, 
and Iowa, W. A. Hamilton; IX., the 
other states and territories, Scott Hop- 
kins. 

The number of chapters remained the 
same as the previous year — forty-three, 
Columbia taking the place of Trinity 
University. The Columbia chapter was 
established on October 3Sth, iSSi, by 
Harvey F. Mitchell, special commissioner. 
The petition from the University of Ne- 
braska was sent around in the short way 
by the general secretary and the board, 
as ordered by the convention. It was 
rejected. Petitions from Illinois Indus- 
trial University and Mercer University 
failed to obtain the approval of the 
neighboring chapters. Petitions from 
Pennsylvania College and several other 
institutions were discouraged, the very 
slightest investigation showing that it 
would be a waste of time to entertain 
them for an instant. A petition from 
Vanderbilt University was deemed by 
the board to be worthy of attention. The 
general secretary was instructed to visit 
the university and report the facts. The 
result was that, after meeting the peti- 
tioners, the chancellor of the university, 
and others, the general secretary reported 
that, although the petitioners were ex- 
cellent men, legislation hostile to frater- 
nities made it inexpedient to grant the 
charter. At this time the general sec- 
retary visited the Cumberland chapter, 
which had been for a year or two inactive 
and almost dead. Upon receivi^ the 
general secretary's report regarding Van- 
derbilt and Cumberland, the board 
granted a dispensation allowing the Cum- 
berland chapter to elect and initiate Van- 
derbilt students. The purpose was to 
strengthen Cumberland and to retain our 
influence at Vanderbilt. Both pin-poses 
were admirably served by this dispensa- 
tion. It should be known that this dis- 
pensation, like all others, was limited as 
to time, and was renewed from year to 
year. 

The laws adopted by the convention of 
iSSi compelled the alumni chapters to 
reorganize. Baltimore, Chicago, Cin- 
cinnati, Cleveland, Indianapolis, and 
Richmond (Va.) did so. There were also 
large re-unions at Providence, Indiana- 
polis, and Kansas City. 

The chief event of the year was the 
publication of the catalogue of 1881. This 
was given to subscribers in December. 



It was a vast advance upon our previous 
catalogues. The difKculties of the work 
performed by the editor, Chas. J. Seaman, 
and his two associates, William R. Baird 
and Edwin H. Terrell, can never be fully 
appreciated Their catalogue was our first 
attempt in the line of modern biograph- 
ical cataloguing, and will be of incal- 
culable assistance to all future editors. 

The magazine was even better than in 
previous years. It added to the old fea- 
tures a series of articles descriptive of 
various American colleges. The piece of 
work for which this volume of the maga- 
zine will be longest remembered is the 
suggestion of a pan-hellenic council. 
Tlflis suggestion originated with our fra- 
ternity, and Willis O. Robb is the person 
to whom the honor belongs. 

CONVENTION OF iSSs. 

The sessions of the forty-third annual 
convention were held at Cincinnati on 
August 39th, 30th, and 31st, 1882. The 
sessions of the first day were held at 
Melodeon Hall. The subsequent ones 
were held in the law school of the Cin- 
cinnati College. The convention had 
headquarters at the Gibson House. One 
hundred and eighty-five members were 
present. Thirty-one college chapters were 
represented, namely, Boston, Brown, 
Centre, Cornell, Denison, DePauw, 
Hampden Sidney, Hanover, Harvard, 
Indiana, Iowa, Kenyon, Madison, Maine 
State, Michigan, Mississippi, Northwest- 
ern, Ohio, Ohio Wesleyan, Randolph 
Macon, Richmond, St. Lawrence, Stevens, 
Union, Virginia, Wabash, Western Re- 
serve, Westminster, Wisconsin, Witten- 
berg, and Wooster. The college chapters 
not represented were Beloit, Bethany, 
California, Columbia, Cumberland, Dick- 
inson, Iowa Wesleyan, Johns Hopkins, 
Kansas, Pennsylvania, Rutgers, and Wash- 
ington and Jefferson. Chicago, Cincinnati, 
Cleveland, and Indianapolis alumni chap- 
ters were represented. 

The temporary officers were O. R. 
Brouse, chairman, and J. R. Moorehead, 
secretary. The permanent ofiicers were 
Hon. Will Cumback, president ; H. S. 
Babcock, W. E. Jobbins, H. S. Stetler, 
F. B. Clark, A. C. Downs, J. C. Hanna, 
J. E. Beal, W. A. Hamilton, and J. 
Wallace Childs, vice-presidents ; F. W. 
Shepardson, secretary ; J. A. Case and 
Wm. Iglehart, assistant secretaries. Gen. 
R. W. Smith was chairman of the 



NOTES ON THE RECENT HISTORY OF BETA THETA PL 



committee on constitution and jurisprud- 
ence; and Rev. E.J. Brown was chairman 
of the committee on chapters and charters. 

The general secretary's report detailed 
the year's history, named three chapters 
that were so weak as to need investigation, 
presented petitions from Colby University 
and Vanderbilt University, submitted a 
code that he had compiled in pursuance 
of the action of the convention of iSSi, 
and discussed several questions that had 
arisen in managing the roll. The report 
was accompanied by a map of the fra- 
ternity and by a table of statistics, which, 
besides giving the usual figures as to 
membership and initiations, classified our 
active members by classes and courtes 
and gave some figures regarding our 
rivals and regarding non-fraternity men. 

The figures for iSSi-'Sz were as fol- 
lows : 43 chapters ; 5S6 active members ; 
by classes, 134 seniors, 116 juniors, 136 
sophomores, 129 freshmen, 27 preparatory 
students, 44 post-graduate and profes- 
sional ; by courses, 340 classical, 155 
scientific, philosophical, and literary, 50 
technological, 11 medical, 23 law, 7 post- 
graduates ; 209 initiates. These figures 
are taken from the statistical table, which 
was like all those since prepared, except 
that it attempted to give some indication 
of college honors taken by our members 
and also to give the relative standing of 
our rivals at the various colleges. 

Letters of regret were read from numer- 
ous distinguished men. A letter was 
read from the University of California 
chapter, approving the petitions for 
charters. This was spread upon the 
minutes. A letter from Major Ransom 
was read and spread upon the minutes, 
giving the convention fatherly advice 
upon several subjects and especially op- 
posing the granting of one of the petitions 
for a charter. 

The Colby petition was rejected. The 
general secretary was ordered to submit 
the Vanderbilt petition to the chapters 
within two months after the convention. 
The three weak chapters mentioned in 
the general secretary's report were ad- 
monished that they must improve before 
the meeting of the next convention. 

The code, or compilation of laws edited 
by the general secretary, was approved. 
The constitution and laws were amended 
so as to provide for a convention assess- 
ment fund. This was, of course, subject 
to approval by the next convention, as 
constitutional amendments must be ap- 



proved by two conventions. A constitu- 
tional amendment making conventions 
biennial was also passed, subject to ap- 
proval by the next convention ; but the 
convention was really not in favor of the 
amendment, and adopted it only to please 
Gen. R. W. Smith and to give him an 
opportunity to have the amendment dis- 
cussed for a year and to have it finally 
acted upon in 18S2. The cases arising in 
the general secretary's management of 
the roll were disposed of by censuring 
the chapters that had been guilty of ir- 
regularities in initiating ineligible persons. 
The resolution of the convention of iSSi 
as to the initiation of preparatory students 
was repealed by a vote of 33 to 6 ; and 
regarding this subject no other action 
was taken. The convention had the ad- 
vantage of having before it an elaborate 
report upon this question, prepared by 
W. A. Hamilton at the request of the 
board of directors. The general secretary 
was instructed to publish his code, em- 
bodying in it the laws as amended by the 
convention. This was done immediately, 
the code being published as part of the 
minutes. 

Willis O. Robb, Eugene Wambaugh, 
and John T. Blodgett were appointed to 
confer with other fraternities with refer- 
ence to a pan-hellenic council. A com- 
mittee was appointed to revise the ritual 
and report to the next convention, and it 
was ordered that until the new ritual 
was adopted the chapters should confine 
themselves to the ritual adopted by the 
Baltimore convention or by previous con- 
ventions. As the new ritual has never 
been prepared, this last order is the law 
to this day. It was voted that William 
R. Baird be editor of the manual, with 
Ransom, Seaman, Babcock, Brouse, Robb, 
and Terrell as an advisory and revisionary 
committee. It was also ordered that the 
history prepared by John S. Goodwin be 
by him revised and completed, under the 
supervision of the board, and be then 
bound in substantial form and filed in the 
archives. 

The following officers were elected for 
the ensuing year : Eugene Wambaugh, 
general secretary ; John S. Goodwin and 
Rev. E. J. Brown, historiographers ; Chas. 
J. Seaman, catalogue agent ; W. H. 
January, song-book agent ; Major W. C. 
Ransom, visiting officer ; Hon. John W. 
Herron, John I. Covington, and Major 
W. C. Ransom, directors for three years. 

The literary exercises were held at 



NOTES ON THE RECENT HISTORY OF BETA THETA PL 



Melodeon Hall, on the evening of August 
39th. Gov. A. G. Porter, of Indiana, was 
the orator, and H. S. Babcock was the 
poet. Remarks were made by Hon. Will 
Cumback and by Hon. John Reily Knox, 
one of the founders of the fraternity. 
This convention had more than an average 
share of attention from our older members. 
During the regular sessions speeches were 
made by Gen. Durbin Ward, Governor 
T. T. Crittenden, of Missouri, and Dr. 
Ormond Beatty, president of Centre 
College. At the banquet responses were 
made by Hon. Will Cumback, Rev. L. 
G. Hay, Gen. R. W. Smith, Dr. E. E. 
Edwards, and D. G. Hamilton (reading 
a response written by Hon. Sidney 
Thomas, who was detained by sickness). 
A poem was read by H. S. Babcock. Dr. 
Thad. A. Reamy was the toast-master. 
A novel feature was the presence of a 
member of another fraternity, Hon. S. 

F. Hunt, who responded to the sentiment 
" The Pan-hellenic Council." This ban- 
quet was held at the Gibson House on 
the evening of August 31st. About two 
hundred gentlemen and ladies were pres- 
ent. Like the Chicago banquet, it was 
given at the expense of local alumni. It 
is probable that the great expense of these 
two banquets suggested the change since 
adopted, whereby the alumni are relieved 
from this burden. 

1882-83. 

During the year i882-'S3 the board of 
directors was constituted precisely as in 
the preceding year, except that Sylvester 

G. Williams became the secretary. The 
editors of the magazine were Willis O. 
Robb, Chas. M. Hepburn, W. C. Sprague, 
and W. R. Baird. The business managers 
were Frank M. Joyce and E. W. Run\ an. 

The division into districts remained as 
in the preceding year, except that West 
Virginia was transferred from District HI. 
to District IV. The chief assistant sec- 
retaries for the districts were I., John T. 
Blodgett ; II., E. D. W. Petteys ; HI., 
Willoughbv N. Smith; IV., W. C. White; 
v., A. C." Downs ; VI., J. C. Hanna ; 
VII., A. N. Grant ; VIII., W. A. Hamil- 
ton ; IX., Scott Plopkins. 

No new chapters were established. 
The Vanderbilt petitioners decided to wait 
another year, hoping that meanwhile the 
anti-fraternit}- law would be repealed. The 
dispensation allowing Cumberland chap- 
ter to initiate Vanderbilt students was 



continued. Petitions from Syracuse Uni- 
versity, Colby University, and Ohio State 
University failed to obtain the approval 
of the neighboring chapters. A dispensa- 
tion was granted to Ohio VVesleyan chap- 
ter allowing the initiation of the Ohio 
State University petitioners. The reason 
for this action was that the neighboring 
chapters joined in a request that there be 
this recognition of the persistent loyalty 
shown by the petitioners during the 
several years spent in fruitlessly working 
for a charter. Alumni chapters were 
established in Providence and New York. 
There were large reunions at Indianapolis 
and Providence. 

The magazine more that sustained 
the reputation of former years. The 
editorial articles were more elaborate than 
before, and had an excellent literary finish. 
The items regarding other fraternities 
were numerous. In fact, there was an 
improvement in every respect. The 
reason for the improvement was that 
there was a larger board of editors than 
before ; and, besides, the editors were 
relieved of the business management. 

This year was marked by an advance 
in the character of the magazines of most 
of the fraternities. The fraternity maga- 
zines were more numerous, better, and 
more liberal in exchanging with one 
another. This may have been a result of 
the general discussion of a pan-hellenic 
council. In accordance with a call issued 
by the editors of the Beta Theta Pi, a 
preliminary meeting of representatives of 
various fraternities was held at Philadel- 
phia on the 22d of February, 1S82, Willis 
O. Robb, the first advocate of the move- 
ment, representing us by appointment of 
the last convention. This meeting made 
arrangements for a pan-hellenic council 
to be held in 1S84. Several subjects for 
discussion were announced. Nothing 
ever resulted from these arrangements, 
except that since 1882 willingness to co- 
operate and kindly feeling towards one 
another have been much more noticeable 
than before. 

In Mav, 1882, the general secretary 
visited the chapters at Dickinson, Johns 
Hopkins, the University of Pennsylvania, 
Rutgers, Stevens, Columbia, Brown, Bos- 
ton, Harvard, ]Maine State, Union, Madi- 
son, Cornell, and St. Lawrence. Besides 
visiting these fourteen chapters, he met 
the Colby petitioners and visited Amherst. 
As the Amherst petition had not yet been 
actually signed, his presence at Amherst 



8 



NOTES ON THE RECENT HISTORY OF BETA THETA PL 



was kept a secret from the petitioners, 
and it is probable that our Amlierst mem- 
bers now learn for the first time that thev 
were carefully examined by the general 
secretary before their case was acted upon 
by the fraternity. It was necessary to 
make this investigation of Amherst thus 
early and secretly, because the petition 
was not to be signed until the under- 
graduate and alumni petitioners met at 
commencement, and, of course, a thorough 
examination could not be made between 
commencement and the convention. As 
every crowd of petitioners ought to be 
examined by an officer of the fraternity, 
the examination in this case had to be 
made before the petition was signed, un- 
less the whole matter was to be post- 
poned for one year. Care was taken, 
however, that the prospective petitioners 
should know nothing of the general 
secretary's presence, lest they should 
suppose that he had actually come all the 
way from Cincinnati to attempt to influ- 
ence them. 

CONVENTION OF 1S83. 

The forty-fourth annual convention 
met at Saratoga Springs on August 3Sth, 
29th, and 30th, 1SS3, with headquarters at 
Congress Hall. About eighty members 
were present. Twentv-three college 
chapters were represented, namely, Bos- 
ton, Brown, Centre, Columbia, Cornell, 
Denison, DePauw, Harvard, Indiana, 
Kansas, Kenyon, Madison. Maine State, 
Michigan, Northwestern, Ohio Wesleyan, 
Pennsylvania, St. Lawrence, Stevens, 
Union, Virginia, Western Reserve, Woos- 
ter. Therefore the college chapters not 
represented were Beloit, Bethan}', Cali- 
fornia, Cumberland, Dickinson, Hampden 
Sidney. Hanover, Iowa, Iowa Wesleyan, 
Johns Hopkins, Mississippi, Ohio, Ran- 
dolph Macon, Richmond, Rutgers, 
Wabash, Washington and Jefferson, VVest- 
minster, Wisconsin, and Wittenberg. The 
alumni chapters at Chicago, Cincinnati, 
Cleveland, New York, Providence, and 
Richmond, Va., sent delegates. 

The opening session was held at the 
hotel, but all of the other sessions were 
held at the City Hall, in the room of the 
supreme court. Willis O. Robb was the 
temporar}^ chairman and Richard Lee 
Fearn was the temporar}' secretary. The 
permanent officers were Major W. C. 
Ransom, president ; Chas. J. Seaman, S. 
G. Williams, and A. H. Flack, vice- 



presidents ; F. C. McMillan, secretary ; 
A. M. Dyer and R. L. Fearn, assistant 
secretaries. J. E. Heath was chairman of 
the committee on constitution and juris- 
prudence, and J. C. Bannister was chair- 
man of the committee on chapters and 
charters. 

The table of statistics presented with 
the general secretary's report showed for 
i8S3-'S3, 43 college chapters, with a mem- 
bership of 586; by classes, 114 seniors, 
123 juniors, 143 sophomores, 136 fresh- 
men, 14 preparatory, 58 post-graduate 
and professional ; bv courses, 330 study- 
ing for A. B., 148 S^ B., Ph. B., and Lit. 
B., :^i C. E. Agr., B., or other technologi- 
cal degrees, 10 M. D., 34 LL. B., 3 S. T. 
B., 10 post-graduate ; 329 initiates. 

The general secretary's report gave a 
review of the year's work and presented 
petitions from Vanderbilt, Emory, and 
Amherst. The Amherst petition was 
granted. The other two were refused. 

Several constitutional amendments 
were acted upon. The amendment sub- 
stituting biennial conventions for annual 
conventions came up for final action and 
was not adopted. The amendment creat- 
ing the convention assessment fund was 
adopted, and, having been approved 
by the preceding convention, became part 
of the constitution. An amendment pro- 
viding that conventions shall meet at Cin- 
cinnati not once in three years but once 
in four years received the approval of this 
convention and was referred to the next 
for final action. An important amend- 
ment making possible a change in the 
system of naming college chapters was 
also approved, subject to the action of 
the next convention, and the general 
secretary was instructed to prepare a 
system and submit it with his next annual 
report. 

To avoid all questions as to the force of 
laws not contained in the code, all laws 
passed previously to the adoption of the 
code were repealed. This convention 
made very insignificant additions to the 
laws, as distinguished from the constitu- 
tion. It was enacted that the total annual 
assessment for annual dues upon each 
alumni chapter should be $13; that the 
board should send an annual letter to the 
alumniof dead chapters ; and that alumni 
not members of alumni chapters should 
pay an annual assessment of one dollar. 
These laws, like the laws of 1882 creating 
the convention assessment fund, have not 
been enforced. 



NOTES ON THE RECENT HISTORY OF BETA THETA PI. 9 

Willis O. Robb, who had represented as in the preceding year. A slight change 

us at the preliminary pan-hellenic confer- was made in the method of selecting the 

ence, presented a report of the actions of chiefs. Formerly men of considerable 

that body. The convention appointed age and experience, generally alumni, 

delegates to represent us at the expected were selected. This year the method 

council. A committee was, as usual, ap- was changed, and choice was made of 

pointed to gather ideas as to alumni men who in the preceding year had been 

chapters and rej^ort to the next conven- efficient corresponding secretaries. Thus 

tion. It was also voted that the subscrip- it happened that several of the new chiefs 

tion price of the magazine ought to be were undergraduates. This change was 

$2 ; but, as every one knows, this recom- made in order to call attention to the im- 

mendation has never been followed. portance of the corresponding secretary's 

The officers elected for the ensuing year office and in order to reward those who 

were R. Harvey Young, William B. performed the duties of that office with 

Burnet, and Hon. Peleg Emory Aldrich, promptness and good judgment. This 

directors for three years ; Eugene Wam- principle of selecting chiefs is still fol- 

baugh, general secretary ; Chas. J. Sea- lowed. The chiefs of districts for the 

man, catalogue agent TW. H. January, year were : I., W. M. Mclnnes ; H., F. 

song-book agent ; John S. Goodwin, Dixon Hall ; IH., Howard S. Stetler ; 

historiographer ; and L. C. Hascall, IV., Norborne R. Clarke ; V., Chas. L. 

visiting officer. Jungerman ; VI., James A. Rohbach ; 

At the public exercises the oration was VII., James Albert Case ; VIII., H. P. 

delivered by Dr. C. N. Sims, chancellor Mozier ; IX., Chas. S. Wheeler. 
of Syracuse University. The banquet The board of directors was constituted 

was the first one given on the modern as follows : Hon. John W. Herron, presi- 

plan of finances, each man paying for his dent ; W. B. Burnet, secretary ; Dr. Thad. 

ticket. Owing to the very small number A. Reamy, W. F. Boyd, John I. Coving- 

of local alumni the attendance was not as ton, R. Harvey Young, O. R. Brouse, 

large as at most banquets. Willis O. Robb Major W. C. Ransom, and Hon. Peleg 

was master of ceremonies. Addresses Emory Aldrich. R. Harvey Young was 

were made by Major W. C. Ransom, general treasurer. Chambers Baird, Jr., 

John Reilv Knox, A. A. Ailing, Gen. was managing editor of the magazine and 

Gates P. 'Thruston, and Sylvester G. Chas. M. Hepburn, William R. Baird, 

Williams. and F. W. Shepardson were his associates. 

This convention, being held at a great The business management was in the 
summer resort, was tempted to give com- hands of F. M. Joyce, M. P. Drury, E. 
paratively little attention to business. It L- Martin, and S. S. Kauftmann. The 
managed, however, to attend to business magazine was changed to the present 
well, and to enjov itself also. The conven- form. Nine numbers were published, 
tion in a body enjoyed a coach ride to the making a total of four hundred and thirty- 
park and to Saratoga Lake, and made an two pages. When the size of the page 
expedition to Mt. McGregor. After the and the style of the typography are taken 
convention closed, many of the delegates into the account, it appears that the maga- 
went upon an excursion to Lake George zine gave more matter than has ever been 
and elsewhere. Indeed, the features of a given by our magazine or by any similar 
pleasure trip were noticeable even before o"e. It is more important to notice that 
the convention began ; for on the way to the magazine was also better than ever 
Saratoga a large party of delegates met before. The editorial department main- 
at Chautauqua" Lake, and then and there tained the standard of previous years, and 
formed the scheme of the Beta Theta Pi the improved typography seemed to raise 
alumni club-house at Wooglin. Thus it the standard of the other departments, 
happened that the Saratoga convention, However that may be, it is a fact that this 
though one of the smallest, is one of the volume saw a vast mnprovement in chap- 
most memorable. It is also memorable ter letters and in personal items. An in- 
as probably the only convention that has teresting feature was a series of " Frater- 
been successfully photographed. nity Studies " by Wm. R. Baird. There 

were also several valuable articles upon 

iSS^-'Sj. subjects not connected with fraternity 

work. This last was an experiment in 

During iSS3-'S4 the districts remained the direction of combining the functions 



10 



NOTES ON THE RECENT HISTORY OF BETA THETA PL 



of a literary magazine with those of a 
fraternity organ, after the fashion|proposed 
b}- Beta Theta Pi more than forty 3'ears 
ago. The experiment can never be more 
skillfully tried than it was in 1883-84, and 
no one could wish a greater literary 
success than the magazine was in that 
year ; but it appeared to be a fact that 
the subscribers to this magazine subscribe 
for it in order to obtain matter regarding 
our fraternity, other fraternities, and simi- 
lar subjects, and prefer to get their general 
literature elsewhere. Therefore, the semi- 
literary plan has been abandoned, and 
the ambition of subsequent editors has 
been the ambition of the earlier ones, 
namely, to. make a magazine that will 
give fraternity news and discuss fraternity 
subjects in a stvle that will not offend 
good taste. 

The Amherst chapter was established 
October 12th, 18S3. W. M. Mclnnes was 
the commissioner. The Vanderbilt peti- 
tion was also finally granted. The Van- 
derbilt anti-fraternity laws were repealed 
in November, 1883, and as soon there- 
after as possible the petition was sub- 
mitted to the chapters in the short way. 
The chapter was formally established on 
February 23d, 1884, Gen. Gates P. 
Thruston being the chairman of the com- 
mission appointed to take charge of the 
ceremonv. From the adjournment of the 
Chicago convention in 1881 to the meet- 
ing of the St. Louis convention in 1SS5, 
Amherst and Vanderbilt were the only 
charters granted. There was an analogy 
between the two cases. Each chapter was 
established after the petitioners had had 
prolonged experience in fraternity mat- 
ters. The Amherst petitioners had for five 
years been a local society called the Torch 
and Crown, and had demonstrated their 
ability to succeed in the face of the oldest 
fraternities. Many of the Vanderbilt men 
had for two years been members of our 
fraternity, initiated at Cumberland under 
dispensations ; and they had been main- 
taining something, like a chapter organiza- 
tion. They were strong and had shown 
that even when opposed by anti-fraternity 
laws it was easyifor them to get excellent 
men. Neither at Amherst nor at Vander- 
bilt did we run any risk of finding that 
our petitioners did not know how to 
manage a fraternity. Another similarity 
between the two institutions was that 
each was in the first rank. 

Alumni chapters were established at 
Boston and Wheeling. Minor matters 



were petitions from Syracuse University, 
Central University, the University of 
Georgia, and the Southwestern Presby- 
terian University. None of these obtained 
the approval of the neighboring chapters. 

In 1884 the new song-book was pub- 
lished by the song-book agent, W. H. 
January. It was larger than the previous 
collections, and contained the music scores 
in full. 

The most memorable event of the year 
was the perfecting of the club-house 
scheme. Enough stock was taken to 
make the scheme a success, the ground 
was bought, and the association was in- 
corporated in Ohio as the Beta Theta Pi 
Alumni Club, with headquarters at Cleve- 
land, Most of the credit is due to Chas. 
J. Seaman, who was enthusiastically 
seconded by Edwin H, Terrell and W. 
K. L. Warwick. In the spring the club- 
house was built on the club's grounds, at 
Wooglin on Chautauqua Lake. The place 
for holding the convention of 1884 was 
Cleveland ; but the board of directors, at 
the request of all concerned, changed the 
place to Wooglin. 

CONVENTION 0¥ 18S4. 

The forty-fifth annual convention was 
the first one held in a building belong- 
ing to the fraternity. The convention 
met in the Beta Theta Pi alumni club- 
house, at Wooglin, on Chautauqua Lake, 
New York, on August 19th, 30th, 21st, 
and 22d, 1884. About one hundred mem- 
bers were present. Thirty-seven college 
chapters were represented, namely, Am- 
herst, Bethany, Boston, Brown, California, 
Centre, Columbia, Cornell, Denison, De 
Pauw, Hampden Sidney, Harvard, In- 
diana, Iowa, Johns Hopkins, Kansas, 
Kenyon, Madison, Maine State, Michigan, 
Northwestern, Ohio, Ohio Wesleyan, 
Pennsylvania, Randolph Macon, St. Law- 
rence, Stevens, Union, Vanderbilt, Vir- 
ginia, Wabash, W\ashington and Jefferson, 
Western Reserve, Westminster, Wiscon- 
sin, Wittenberg, and Wooster. Seven 
college chapters were not represented, 
namely, Beloit, Cumberland, Dickinson, 
H;)nover, Iowa Wesleyan, Mississippi, 
Richmond, and Rutgers. The alumni 
chapters at Chicago, Cincinnati, Cleve- 
land, Providence, and Wheeling were 
represented. Thus, although this was not 
a large convention, the number of college 
chapters represented was larger than ever 
before. 



NOTES ON THE RECENT HISTORY OF BETA THETA PI. 



11 



Chas. L. Jungerman was temporary 
chairman and T. C. Elliott was temporary 
secretary. The permanent organization 
was as follows : Edwin H. Terrell, presi- 
dent ; Charles S. Wheeler, Thomas D. 
Wood, and Chambers Baird, Jr., vice- 
presidents ; Jacob Brilles, secretary ; J. 
J. G. Ruhn and R. B. Bloodgood, assistant 
secretaries. A. P. Sumner was chairman 
of the committee on constitution and 
jurisprudence. Chambers Baird, Jr., was 
chairman of the committee on chapters 
and charters. 

The general secretary's report sug- 
gested that in order to provide for better 
performance of the numerous duties of 
his department there should be added a 
college secretary and an alumni secretary ; 
called attention to the fact that an impor- 
tant part of the question of extension is 
the necessity of having an administrative 
system capable of managing from tift}' to 
a hundred chapters ; presented petitions 
from the University of Minnesota, the 
Ohio State University, and Denver Uni- 
versity ; and laid before the convention, 
as required by the previous convention, 
the best system that he could devise for 
naming the college chapters. His tabular 
view of statistics showed for i SS3-'84 forty - 
five college chapters, with total mem- 
bership of 624; by classes, 117 seniors, 
124 juniors, 147 sophomores, 153 fresh- 
men, 24 preparatory, 59 professional and 
post-graduates ; bv courses, 31^4 for A. 
B., 147 for S. B., Ph. B., or Lit.'B., 62 for 
C. E., Agr. B., and other technological 
degrees, 13 for M, D., 27 for LL. B., 6 
for S. T. B., and 14 post-graduates ; 273 
initiates. 

The report of the board of directors 
said that as some members of the frater- 
nity seemed to object to the granting of 
dispensations, the board had decided to 
grant no more unless the convention 
should take some action upon the subject. 

The convention declared its approval 
of the system of granting dispensations in 
all cases deemed bv the board to be extra- 
ordinary. It rejected all of the petitions 
for charters. ^Motions were made to with- 
draw the charters of four chapters, but 
these motions were voted down. The 
final action upon this subject was that the 
board was instructed to make an investiga- 
tion of the condition of three certain 
chapters ; and, if it seemed desirable to 
withdraw the charters, the board was 
empowered to request a surrender of the 
same. 



It was voted that in case any chapter 
was not represented by a duly accredited 
delegate, any member of the chapter 
would be recognized as a representative. 
This was a formal recognition of the 
practice that has for many years obtained. 
The convention adopted finally the 
amendment to the constitution regarding 
names of chapters, and adopted finally the 
admendment making conventions at Cin- 
cinnati quadrennial. It also adopted the 
general secretary's scheme of naming 
chapters, whereby the full name is in the 
following form, " the Miami chapter, the 
Alpha of Beta Theta Pi." All of the 
general secretary's recommendations re- 
garding names were embodjed in the 
laws as they now stand. 

In accordance with a recommendation 
contained in the report of the board of 
directors, it was resolved that an act should 
be prepared providing for a tribunal for 
the trial of all charges preferred against a 
member, wherein the penalty of suspen- 
sion or expulsion is involved. No such 
bill was presented ; but the convention 
improved the ancient practice by adopting 
a series of laws regulating procedure. The 
standing committee on alumni chapters, 
appointed at Saratoga, made a report 
through Major Ransom. The report 
presented "a code of standard by-laws to 
the provisions of which all almuni chap- 
ters must hereafter conform." The report 
was adopted. 

The following ofiicers were elected : 
Dr. Thad. A. Reamy, John Reily Knox, 
and W. F. Boyd, directors for three years ; 
J. Cal Hanna, general secretary. The 
catalogue agent, song-book agent, his- 
toriographer, and visiting oflicers were re- 
elected. R. Harvey Young resigned his 
membership in the board of directors. 
This resignation was a great loss to the 
fraternity, for, as member of the board 
and as general treasurer. Young had for 
many years been one of our most valuable 
ofiicers. Willis O. Robb was elected to 
fill the remaining two years of Young's 
unexpired term in the board of directors. 
The banquet was held at the Grand Hotel, 
Point Chautauqua. There were no public 
exercises. The excursions upon the lake 
and to Niagara were a sufficient relaxa- 
tion from the work of the convention. 

i884-'85. 

In 1SS4-85 the general secretary selected 
as his co-workers Frank B. Pearson for 
college secretary and Major W. C. Ransom 



12 



NOTES ON THE RECENT HISTORY OF BETA THETA PL 



for alumni secretary. By this division 
of work, rendered possible by the action 
of the Wooglin convention, the general 
secretary's department was much strength- 
ened. The districts remained as before, 
and the following chiefs were appointed ; 
I., T. C. Elliott ; II., Arthur E. Forbes ; 
III., Frank T. Baker ; IV., H. C. V. 
Campbell ; V., Charles L. Jungerrnan ; 
yi., G. P. Thorpe ; VII., John W. Rob- 
bins ; VIII., L. P. Conover ; IX., James 
R Moorehead. The organization of the 
board of directors was as follows : Hon. 
John W. Herron, president ; Willis O. 
Robb, secretarv ; John I. Covington, 
Wm. B. Burnet, Dr. Thad. A. Reamy, 
W. F. Boyd, Major W. C. Ransom, Hon. 
Peleg Emory Aldrich, John Reily Knox. 
The general treasurer was John I. Cov- 
ington. 

The managing editor of the magazine 
was Willis O. Robb. Chambers Baird, 
Jr., William R. Baird, and F. W. Shepard- 
son were his associates. Frank M. 
Joyce was the business manager. The 
financial success of the magazine during 
the last few years is due to his sys- 
tematic work and untiring energy. Six 
numbers were published, the magazine 
becoming a bi-monthly. The literary 
tone of previous years was maintained 
and improved, although the magazine 
was, in general, restricted to fraternity 
matter. The chief feature of the volume 
was the publication of two short stories, 
" Grif's Candidate " and " His Second 
Degree." Yet it is more accurate to say 
that the chief feature of this volume, as 
well as of the preceding one, was the ex- 
cellent and even taste shown throughout 
every department. In those two years 
when the dragon, the owl, and the dog 
appeared upon the cover, the magazine 
attained as high a degree of excellence 
and of usefulness as it need ever expect 
or wish, and the aim of the future editors 
can only be to copy the tone of those two 
volumes. Alumni chapters were estab- 
lished at Washington, Philadelphia, and 
Denver. A dispensation was granted to 
Northwestern chapter, permitting the 
initiation of students of the University of 
Denver ; and a dispensation was granted 
to Hampden Sidney chapter, allowing 
the initiation of students of the Hampden 
Sidney Theological Seminary. No new 
college chapters were established. 

CONVENTION OF 1885. 

The sessions of the fortv-sixth annual 



convention were held at the Lindell Hotel, 
St. Louis, on August 36th, 27th, and 28th, 
1885. About sixty members were present, 
representing the following twenty-two 
college chapters: Beloit, Bethany, Brown, 
Centre, Cornell, DePauw, Harvard, Iowa, 
Iowa Wesleyan, Johns Hopkins, Kansas, 
Michigan, Mississippi, Ohio, Ohio Wes- 
leyan, Richmond, vSt. Lawrence, Stevens, 
Virginia, Westminster, Wisconsin, and 
Wooster. Twenty-three college chapters 
were not represented, namely : Amherst, 
Boston, California, Columbia, Cumber- 
land, Denison, Dickinson, Hampden 
Sidney, Hanover, Indiana, Kenyon, Mad- 
ison, Maine State, Northwestern, Penn- 
sylvania, Randolph Macon. Rutgers, 
Union, Vanderbilt, Wabash, Washington 
and Jefferson, Western Reserve, and 
Wittenberg. Several alumni chapters 
were represented, but it was decided by 
the chair that alumni chapters which had 
not since the Wooglin convention re- 
organized and formally adopted the 
standard code of by-laws could not be 
recognized. As there were very few 
alumni present, this ruling was not tested, 
and the question will undoubtedly come 
up for final decision hereafter. 

W. W. Dedrick was temporary chair- 
man and C. A. Hall was temporary 
secretary. The permanent officers were 
Gov. B. Gratz Brown, president ; Major 
W. C. Ransom, J. C. Hanna, and Dabney 
Marshall, vice-presidents ; W. T. Smith, 
secretary ; C. A. Hall and B. H. Charles, 
Jr., assistant secretaries. Chambers Baird, 
Jr., was chairman of the committee on 
constitution and jurisprudence, and Willis 
O. Robb was chairman of the committee 
on chapters and charters. 

The board of directors reported a roll 
of the official names of chapters accord- 
ing to the laws adopted at the Wooglin 
convention, and reported that there had 
been a marked improvement in the 
three chapters whose condition the last 
convention had instructed the board to 
investigate. The general secretary re- 
ported a prosperous year, presented five 
petitions for charters, and gave an 
argument against an extreme con- 
servatism in granting petitions. His 
table of statistics showed for iS84-'85 
forty-five chapters, with a total active 
membership of 687 ; by classes, 127 
seniors, 146 juniors, 163 sophomores, 157 
freshmen, 24 preparatory, 67 professional 
and post-graduate, and 10 unclassified ; 
by courses, 353 for A. B., 175 for S. B., 



NOTES ON THE RECENT HISTORY OF BETA THETA PL 



Ph. B., and Lit. B., 6i for C. E., Agr. B., 
and similar degrees, 15 in special courses, 
II for M. D., 35 for LL. B., i^ for S. T. 
B., and iS post-graduates ; 24b initiates. 
A charter was granted to the University 
of Texas. The other four petitions, in- 
chiding one from the Ohio State Univer- 
sity, were ordered to be sent to the chap- 
ters by the general secretary in the short 
way. 

It was voted that members of chapters 
not represented by duly qualified dele- 
gates should be allowed to cast the votes 
of such chapters. It was ruled by the 
chair that " when the delegation of any 
chapter consisted of but two members 
and these two members were divided on 
any question requiring a vote by chapters, 
the vote of such a chapter should be con- 
sidered as cast against the motion before 
the convention." The vote as to repre- 
sentation of college chapters, the ruling 
as to divided votes, and the ruling as to 
alumni chapters are important contribu- 
tions to our customary law. 

The convention did not consider any 
amendments to the constitution ; and it 
made no change in the laws, except that 
it was voted that a chapter transporta- 
tion fund be formed annually by an as- 
sessment of ten dollars upon each active 
chapter, and that each active chapter 
must send to convention at least one dele- 
gate, whose railroad fare will be paid out 
of the general transportation fund. The 
convention authorized that " a clause be 
placed in the by-laws of every chapter, 
requiring every active member of the 
chapter to subscribe to the Beta Theta 
Pi," 

It was resolved that " the board of 
directors be instructed to take into con- 
sideration the subject of the semi-centen- 
nial anniversary of the fraternity occur- 
ring in 1SS9, and report a programme of 
exercises suitable to the occasion, for the 
action of the fort^'-seventh annual con- 
vention." 

The following officers were elected : 
Hon. John W. Herron, John I. Coving- 
ton, and Gen. R. W. Smith, directors for 
three years ; J. Cal Ilanna, general sec- 
retary ; C. J. Seaman, catalogue agent ; 
Major W. C. Ransom, transportation 
agent ; Wm. R. Baird, historiographer ; 
L. C. Hascall and Marshall P. Drury, 
visiting officers. 

The convention poem, by Dabney 
Marshall, was read at the banquet. Hon. 
D. R. Francis was master of ceremonies. 



Toasts were responded to by J. Cal 
Hanna, Major W. C. Ransom, Gen. 
R. W. Smith, Dabney Marshall, George 
R. Lockwood, Walter B. Douglas, W. S. 
Jones, Chambers Baird, [r., B. H. Charles, 
Jr., C. D. Roy, J. R. Montgomery, W. 
P. Kennett, aiul George F. Saal. 

iSS5-'S6. 

In 1885- 86 the general secretary had 
as alumni secretary Major W. C. Ran- 
soni, and as college secretary Wilby G. 
Hyde. The districts retained the former 
boundaries, and the following chiefs 
were appointed : I., Ralph K. Jones ; 
II., Geo. F. Saal ; HI., F. M. Welsh ; 
IV., E. B. Pollard, V., J. B.Ellis; VI., 
S. E. Greenavvalt ; VII., J. G. Campbell; 
VIII., D. II. Bloom ; IX., Chas. F. Scott. 
The board organized with the same offi- 
cers as before, namely : Hon. John VV. 
Herron, president, and Willis O. Robb, 
secretary, the other members being John 
I. Covington, Dr. Thad. A. Reamy, W. 
F. Boyd, Hon. Peleg Emory Aldrich, 
Gen. R. W. Smith, and John Reily 
Knox. John I. Covington was re-elected 
general treasurer. 

Frank M. Jovce was retained as busi- 
ness manager of the magazine. Eugene 
Wambaugh became editor, with F. W. 
Shepardson, W. C. Sprague and Richard 
Lee Fearn as his associates. The maga- 
zhie became a monthly again. The dog, 
dragon, and owl on the cover were laid 
aside, and a blue cover with table of con- 
tents on the outside was substituted. In 
other respects the appearance, arrange- 
ment, and typography remained as be- 
fore. 

Late in 18S5 the general secretary 
published in book form the constitution, 
the laws, and the alumni chapter by- 
laws, with all amendments to date, 
making a convenient compendium of 
Beta Theta Pi law. 

As directed by the St. Louis con- 
vention, the petition from the Ohio State 
L^niversity was submitted to the chap- 
ters. The petition being granted, the 
chapter was provisionally established on 
December nth, 1SS5, upon the occasion of 
the third Ohio re-union. The charter 
members had belonged to a local society, 
the Phi Alpha. Several had formerly 
been members of our chapters at other 
colleges, and a few had been initiated by 
the Ohio Wesleyan chapter under a dis- 
Densation. 



14 NOTES ON THE RECENT HISTORY OF BETA THETA PI. 



CONCLUSION, 



petitions. The chapters established have 
been few ; they have been placed in 

The Chicago convention of iSSi marks none but the best colleges; and they 
the dividing line between two very dif- have been composed of none but de- 
ferent periods of our history. The few sirable men. In each case a charter has 
years ending with that convention were been refused until a careful investigation 
distinguished by rapid and almost dra- on the spot has demonstrated that there 
matic extension, and also by the with- was no danger in granting the petition, 
drawal of our weakest chapters. The The existing chapters have been care- 
years that have followed have been as fully watched by the chiefs, by the gen- 
difterent as can be conceived. There is eral secretary, and by the board of 
no wisdom in debating which of the two directors ; so carefully, indeed, that the 
periods was the more beneficial to the word of warning has alwavs been given 
fraternity ; for each period was abso- in time, and therefore it has been un- 
lutely necessary to our proper develop- necessary to withdraw even one charter, 
ment. The interest of the alumni has been kept 

Any one who has paid even the alive by annual re-unions for New Eng- 

slightest attention to the details given in land, Ohio, and Indiana, not to mention 

the preceding notes has perceived the numerous other gatherings. A wholly 

extraordinary advance since the con- new means of perpetuating the use- 

vention of iSSi. The advance is not to fulness of the fraternity among the 

be seen in figures. The increase from a alumni has been afforded by the Beta 

membership of just four thousand, as the Theta Pi alumni club at Wooglin-on- 

figures stood when we met at Chicago, Chautauqua Lake. Yet, why multipl}' 

to a membership of five thousand and words ? Why go on to speak of the 

two hundred, as the figures read to-day, catalogue of 1881, of the magazine, of 

is the very last and least item to which the development in the laws, of the im- 

one would call attention. Nor is the in- provements in methods of administra- 

creased length of the list of chapters a tion ? The preceding notes have already 

matter of importance. What we are shown clearly enough that in every de- 

proud of is the high standard of our partment of work the years from 18S1 to 

work. We have rejected a score of 1SS6 have seen an advance. 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 

A CATALOGUE OF MEMBERS ADMITTED SINCE THE CONVENTIOX OF iSSl, WITH 
NOTES AS TO COLLEGES AND CHAPTERS. 

AMHERST CHAPTER. 
[The Beta Iota, at Amherst College, Amherst, Mass. J 

Amherst College was founded in 1821. It has twenty-two professors and eleven 
other instructors. The students usually number about three hundred and fifty. The 
only department is the regular college course of four years. Almost all of the students 
are candidates for A. B., but a very few are candidates for S. B., and during the lat- 
ter years of the regular course there is considerable freedom in choice of studies. 
The standard is high. Amherst was the first college to lay stress upon physical 
training. It was also the first college to place in the hands of an undergraduate 
senate a great part of the college discipline. The college is conservative, refus- 
ing to admit women, and still giving the classics their ancient place. It is not a state 
institution; and it is not sectarian, although it is, practically, controlled by orthodox 
Congregationalists. The gymnasium, the art gallery, and the library are well worth 
seeing; and the last is one of the few college libraries that are actually accessible and 
useful. 

The eight fraternities, named in the order of establishment, are Alpha Delta Phi, 
Psi Upsilon, Delta Kappa Epsilon, Delta Upsilon, Chi Psi, Chi Phi, Beta Theta Pi, 
and Theta Delta Chi. Chapters are, generally, large, varying from twenty-five to 
forty. It is the custom of fraternity men to live in chapter houses, rather than in 
the regular college dormitories. That fraternities are recognized as valuable is shown 
by the following extract from President Julius H. Seelye's circular letter to the Am- 
herst alumni, dated November, 1S84: "The society houses present in all respects a 
desirable feature in our college life. They are well managed. The students who 
occupy them are careful and orderly. No houses in the village are more attractive, 
and no households conducted with more propriety. The general tone of the college 
is such that any society which should tolerate disorderly or demoralizing ways would 
lose not only its name, but its position and power in the college. So long as the 
moral sentiment of the college remains as it is, the healthy rivalry for college influence 
will require every society to be on the side of good order. If any member of a society 
has bad habits, his society, instead of favoring these, is likely to prove one of the 
strongest agencies in their removal. We find, therefore, that the actual influence 
of the societies is salutary." 

The Beta Iota of Beta Theta Pi was established on the twelfth day of October, 
1S83, the petition having been granted by the Saratoga convention. The petitioners 
were the members of the Torch and Crown, a local society founded in 187S, and the 
charter allowed the initiation of all active or alumni members of that society, as the 
alumni joined with the active members in asking a charter. The membership is us- 
ually twenty-five. The corresponding secretaries have been T. C. Elliott, E. S. 
Damon, S. S. Parks, and R. M. Palmer. In 1884- 85 T. C. Elliott, one of the charter 
members, was chief of the district. The representatives at the Wooglin convention 
were T. C. Elliott and W. E. Russell. 

George Richardson Dickinson, 'Si. Phi 

XLV.-The Founders. ^^^^ j^^pp,^ . Kellogg fifteen ; at Yale Theological 

William Sidney BoARDMAN, "Si. Student at School. Home address, Cleveland, O.; tempor- 

Harvard Medical School. Home address, New- |i,'T address, 95 W. Divinity Hall, New Haven, 

buryport, Mass.; temporary address, 8 Ashbur- Conn. 

ton" Place, Boston, Mass. " William Elias Hinchliff, '81. Kellogg 



16 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



fifteen; Kellogg five; Hyde six; wholesale brick 
dealer. ^^2 Fulton street, Chicago, 111. 

Leander Hamilton M'Cor.mick, '81. At 
Columbia Law School. 126 Rush street, Chicasfo, 
111. 

John Vax Beuren Scarborough, 'Si. P. 
O. box, 1 123, Cincinnati, O. 

Frederick William Sears, 'Si. Keeler's 
Bay, Vt. 

Arthur Preston Smith, 'Si. Keeler's Bay, 
Vt. 

Edson Dwinell Hale, '82. Kellogg fifteen; 
Hardy eight and first prize; Phi Beta Kappa phi- 
losophy prize; teacher in Hopkins Academy. 
Oakland, Cal.; former address, Stowe, Vt. 

Charles Edward Osgood Nichols, '82. 
Teacher. Lock box 288, Sing Sing, N. Y.; for- 
mer address, Haverhill, Mass. 

George Waldo Reed, '82. Hardy eight; at 
Hartford Theological Seminar3\ Home, Pitts- 
field, Mass., temporary address, Hosmer Hall, 
Hartford, Conn. 

Watson Lewis Savage, '82. Physician in 
Long Island Hospital. 166 State street. Brook- 
lyn, N. v.; former address, Cromwell, Conn. 

William Haven Thompson, "82. Phi Beta 
Kappa. Sudbury, Mass. 

Jacob Paisley Whitehead, '82. Kellogg 
fifteen and five; president of Social Union; 
teacher. W^ealaka, Ind. Ter.; former address, 
Hillsboro, 111. 

Everett Anderson Aborn, '83. Former 
address, Ellington, Conn.; present address. Lake 
Forest, 111. 

Clinton Jirah Backus, 'S3. Teacher. Ad- 
dress, Baldwin School, Summit avenue, St. Paul, 
Minn.; former address, Chaplin, Conn. 

Almon Jesse Dyer, '83. Hardy six; Glee 
Club; Phi Beta Kappa; at Hartford Theological 
Seminary. Cummington. Mass. 

Frank Herbert Fitts, 'S3. Manufacturing 
chemist. 27 Kilby street, Boston, Mass.; former 
address, W^alpole, Mass. 

Edwin Fowler, 'S3. Phi Beta Kappa; Hyde 
fifteen; civil engineer; Emporia, Kansas; former 
address, Gouverneur, N. Y. 

Isaac Finney Smith, '83. Kellogg fifteen; 
teacher. 114 Academj street, Poughkeepsie, N. 
Y.: former address, Provincetown, Mass. 

WiLLi.vM WooLSEY SCARBOROUGH. Hon- 
orary member of Torch and Crown. P. O. box 
1123, Cincinnati;, O. 

Walter • Stoddard BuFFUM, "84. Hyde 
fifteen. 2123 Fifth avenue. New York, N. Y.; 
former address. Winchester, N. H. 

George Pomeroy Eastman, '84. Phi Beta 
Kappa; teacher. Buffalo, N. Y.; former addres, 
Framingham, Mass. 

Henry David John Gardner, '84. Ball 
team; at Hartford Theological Seminary. Hos- 
mer Hail, Hartford, Conn.; former address, Buck- 
ingham, Conn. 

Daniel Lyman Gifford, '84. Social Union 
eight. 1060 N. Halsted street, Chicago, 111.; 
former address, Mendota, 111. 

Albert Humphrey Pratt, '84. Los An- 
geles. Cal. 

George Foster Prentiss, '84. Glee club; 
Kellogg fifteen. Home address, Windham, Vt.; 
temporary address, 49 E. Divinity Hall, New- 
Haven, Conn. 
James Hazen Tufts, '84. Highest possible 



rank in freshman year; second Greek prize tVesh- 
man year; Kellogg fifteen; Walker mathematical 
prize; Sophomore Latin prize; foot-ball team; 
Hardy prize; Hyde fifteen; position on com- 
mencement stage; Phi Beta Kappa; tutor in 
mathematics. Amherst, Mass.; former a'ddress, 
Monson, Mass. 

Thompson Coit Elliott, '85. Glee club; 
corresponding secretary and chief district. 
Emporia, Kansas; former address, Newington, 
Conn. 

William Adelbert Gordon, '85. Grand 
Forks, Dak.; former address, 13 E. Fourteenth 
street, New York, N. Y. 

Frederick Willi.\m Phelps, '85. Sopho- 
more Latin prize; Phi Beta Kappa; on commence- 
ment stage; teacher. Topeka, Kansas; former ad- 
dress, Erving, Mass. 

Warren Edward Russell, '85. Member 
of the Beta Alpha. Massillon, O. 

Theodore Woolsey Scarborough, '85. 
Foot-ball team; college senate. Home address, 
P. O. box 1123, Cincinnati, O.; temporary 
address, care C^ and C. R. R., Meridian, Miss. 

Elisha iSL\.CE Stevens, '85. Kellogg fifteen; 
Phi Beta Kappa; member of Rho. P. O. box 
100, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Arthur Fairbanks Stone, '85. President 
of Social Union; Phi Beta Kappa; editor on 
Hampshire Herald. Northampton, Mass.; for- 
mer address, St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

James Eaton Tower, '85. Grove orator; 
editor of Homestead, Springfield, Mass., former 
address. North Brookfield, Mass. 

Edwin Burns Woodin, '85. Phi Beta 
Kappa; foot ball-team; teacher. Talequah, Ind. 
Ter.; former address, Amherst, Mass. 

Edwin Stetson Damon, '86. Cor. sec; 
editor Olio. Plymouth, Mass. 

George Clinton Goodwin, '86. Lexington, 
Mass. 

Samuel Shaw Parks, '86. Kellogg, fifteen. 
Palmer, Mass. 

Willard Henry Poole, '86. Walker mathe- 
matical prize; Phi Beta Kappa. Rockland, Mass. 

Clarence Hayward White, '86. Second 
Greek prize; Phi Beta Kappa; teacher of Greek 
in Amherst high school. Amherst, iSIass.; 
former address, Raynham, Mass. 

William Fairfield Whiting,'86. President 
foot-ball association; on foot ball-team. Holyoke, 
Mass. 

Hamlin Avery Whitney, "86. South 
Gardner, Mass. 

Albert Edwards Wilbar, '86. Taunton, 
Mass. 

George Cooper Dean, '87. Holbrook, 
Mass. 

George Nelson Goddard, '87. Hopedale, 
Mass. 

Ch.\rles Benjamin Stevens, '87. On 
Kellogg fifteen; Olio editor. Worcester, Mass. 

Edward Pickett Vandercook, '85. Mem- 
ber of the Rho. Evanston, 111. 

XLV. 

Warren Daniel Forbes, '86. Left college 
at the end of sophomore year; temporary 
address, Shelburne, Falls, Mass.; permanent 
address, Buckland, Mass. 

Robert Manning Palmer, '87. Corre- 
ponding secretary; glee club; leader of banjo 
club. Boston, Mass. 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



17 



Harold Lee Jacobs, '8S. Akron, O. 

Lucius Ethax Judson, 'SS. Ball nine. 
Painesville, O. 

Charles Beebe Raymond, '86. Akron, O. 

John Edwin Smith, '88. Foot-ball team. 
Worcester, Mass. 

George Palmer Steel, '88. Foot-ball 
team. Painesville, O. 

Charles Barrows Wilbar, 'SS. Taunton, 
Mass. 

Herbert Pekin Woodin, 'SS. Held posi- 
tion on freshman Kellogg fifteen for prize speak- 
ing. Amherst, Mass. 

Homer Gard, '88. Taking special course. 
Hamilton, O. 



WiLLARD Payson Smith, 'SS. Dunkirk, 
N. Y. 

James Chambers, Jr., '89 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Henry Arnold Cooke, '89. North Brook- 
field. Mass. 

Robert Holmes Cushman, '89. Monson, 
Mass. 

Brandon Rhodehamel Millikin, '89. 
Hamilton, O. 

Chaki.es Dickinson Phelps, '89. Erving, 
Mass. 



LIBRARY 

-OP THE- 

OMEGA 

OF 

BetallielaPi, 

BEBKEtEY.CAl. 



18 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



BELOIT CHAPTER. 
[The Chi, at Beloit College, Beloit, Wis.] 

Beloit College offers two courses of study, the classical and the philosophical, each 
being composed of prescribed work. The faculty is composed of nine professors and 
one assistant professor, and there are several other instructors. There are usually about 
seventy students in the college classes and about one hundred in the preparatory 
department. Women are not admitted. The college was founded in 1847 and is 
controlled by the Presbyterians and Congregationalists. T/ie Round Table is pub- 
lished every other Friday of the collegiate year, by the Archaean Union. Its editor- 
ships are filled by semi-annual elections. 

Beta Theta Pi, Phi Kappa Psi, and Sigma Chi are the fraternities. The average 
membership is ten. For many years there was great hostility to fraternities. This 
hostility has disappeared in the faculty, but it is still found to some extent among the 
students. The fraternities do not admit preparatory students and do not enter into 
combinations. The rule against preparatory students is one of the conditions upon 
which the chapters retain the right to exist openly. 

The Chi of Beta Theta Pi was founded in i860, and is more than twenty years older 
than its rivals. Until some two years ago the opposition to fraternities made Chi's 
life precarious; but the chapter is now in good shape. Its record in scholarship is 
remarkable. Since the convention of iSSi the corresponding secretaries have been 
Horace S. Fiske, Fred S. Shepherd, Henry S. Shedd, W. A. Russell, and John R. 
Montgomery. The chapter was represented at the convention of 1S81 by C. B. 
McGenniss and C.J. Robertson, and at that of 1885 by John R. Montgomery. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 
XLIV. 

Henry Sprague Shedd, 'S6. Bridgman 
prize; Archaean debater; secretary of Wisconsin 
State Oratorical Association; associate editor 
of Whitcxvater (Wis.) Register ; corresponding 
secretary; now at university of Wisconsin and 
member of Alpha Pi. Whitewater, Wis. 

Hiram Delos Densmore, '86. Archnean 
debater; distinguished oration for junior ex- 
hibition; exchange editor Round liable; home 
contest speaker; president Archaean union. Del- 
avan, Wis. 

William Arthur Russell, '87. On ball 
nine; freshman declaimer; vice-president of Wis- 
consin State Oratorical Association; Archrean 
debater; financial manager of Round Table : dis- 
tinguished oration for junior exhibition; literary 
editor Round Table; cor. sec; historian of Chi. 
Rochester, Wis. 

James Rood Robertson, '86. Personal 
editor Round Table; freshman declaimer; Arch- 
cean debater; Bridgman prize; distinguished 
oration for junior exhibition; home contest 
speaker. 12 11 S. Winnebago street, Rockford, 
III. 

XLV. 

Wayland Samuel Axtell, '86. Distin- 
guished oration for junior exhibition; acting 
president of A rchtean Union. Evansville, Wis. 

Samuel Robert Slaymaker, '86. Was 
member of Rho. Beloit, Wis. 

Benjamin George Bleasdale, '87. Teach- 
er. Janesville, Wis. 

John Rogerson Mont(;omery, '87. Water- 
man prize; Archiean debater; personal editor of 
Round Tabic; cor. sec. 478 N. State street, 
Chicago, 111. 

Rev. Frank Buffington Vroom.\n, '87. 
Lecturer with Slayton Lyceum Bureau of Chica- 
go; student at Chicago Theological Seminary; 
clergyman. 145 Kansas avenue, Topeka, Kans. 



XLVI. 

Herbert Cutler Brown, '87. Junior ex- 
hibition poet. Hj'de Park, 111. 

HenryHuntington Swain, a. B. '84. Local 
editor Round Table; Archaean debater; exchange 
editor Round Table; Bridgman prize; distin- 
guished oration for junior exhibition; editor-in- 
chief /?o««rf Z'^?(^/e,* Beloit representative at state 
oratorical contest, 1884; professor of mathemat- 
ics in Straight University. Straight University, 
New Orleans, La. 

Samuel Otis Dauchy, '87. Archa3an de- 
bater; local editor Round Table. La Salle avenue, 
Chicago, III. 

Frank DyerJackson, Ph. B.'84. Financial 
manager Round Table; Archasan debater; distin- 
guished oration for junior exhibition; missionary 
prize essay; clerk judiciary committee of Wis- 
consin assembly, 1S85; assistant jirincipal of high 
school. Janesville, Wis. 

James Alexander Lyman, '88. Archaean 
debater. Bradford, 111. 

Harry Morrow Hyde, '88. Archaean de- 
bater; Archaean poet. Freeport, 111. 

William JuDsoN Brown, '87. Distinguished 
oration for junior exhibition. Batavia, 111. 

XLVII. 

Otis Calvin Olds, '86. Lewis prize; local 
editor Round Table; Archaean debater; Bridg- 
man prize; missionary prize essay; home contest 
speaker. Clinton, Wis. 

Frank Henry Chase, '86. Arch;ean de- 
bater; Latin oration for iunior exhibition. 
Cberry Valley, 111. 

Samuel Morgan Bushnell, '88. Rockford, 
111. 

George Albert Chase, '8g. Cherry Val- 
ley, 111. 

Arthur Henry Armstrong, '89. White- 
man prize. JiS Ogden avenue, Chicago, 111. 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



19 



BETHANY CHAPTEK. 



[The Psi, at Bethany College, Bethany, W. Va. 



At Bethany College tliere me usually about ninety students, including ten or 
fifteen women. The faculty consists of five professors. Degrees are given in arts 
and in science. The courses of study requisite for a degree are composed of pre- 
scribed studies; but, after the fashion of many colleges, the student is permitted to take 
his studies in almost any order that his necessities require; for example, he may be a 
sophomore in Latin while he is a junior in mathematics. The college was founded in 
1 84 1 and for some time was under the care of Alexander Campbell, the first leader 
of the religious denomination called Disciples. It is the chief educational institution 
of that denomination, and accordingly draws its students from many states. 

The only fraternities are Delta Tau Delta and Beta Theta Pi. The ordinary mem- 
bership of each chapter is from ten to fifteen. This is the parent chapter of Delta 
Tau Delta. 

The Psi of Beta Theta Pi was founded in iS6i. Its corresponding secretaries since 
the Chicago convention of 1881 have been L. B. Mertz, E. li. Miller, VV. S. St. Clair, 
A.J. Colborn, Jr., VV. McElroy, and W. C. Payne. The representatives at the con- 
vention of 1881 were H. G. Niles and M. C. Burt; at that of 18S4, A. J. Colborn, Jr., 
L. B. Mertz, and J. A. Beall; and at that of 1885, J. P\ Witmer. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 
XLIII. 

Francis M.\rion Kim.mell. Somerset, Pa. 

WiLRUR BuRGES LowE. In business at Shel- 
by, (). 

IIeher Reginald Brown. Sbclbv. O. 

Andrew J.vcKsoN Colborn. Jr., A. B. 'S4. 
Editor-in-chief ot" Bethany Collegian ; valedicto- 
rian of American literary society, also valedicto- 
rian of his class; took second honors; assistant 
clerk bouse representatives Pennsylvania; lawyer. 
Somerset, Pa. 

Cornelius Shaenfeld. Elmore, O. 

Arthur Lyman Wright. Elmore, O. 

XLIV. 

William Henry Wolf, B. S. "85. Class 
poet; orator American literary society. Editor 
Be'hanv Collegian ; teacher. Bridgeport, O. 

Franklin Pierce St. Clair. Professor 
mathematics and Latin in Hamilton Female Col- 
lege. Lexington, Ky. 

RociER Hanson Lillard, B. S. '84 Manu- 
facturer. Lawrenceburg, Ky. 

Rev. Cii.\rles George Brelos, B. A. '84. 
Orator of American literarv socictv. Ijutfalo, 
N. Y. 

Emimett Austin H.\ll. Folks Station, O. 

William Lincoln McElroy. A. B. '85. 
Editoi'-in-chief of Bell/any Collegia// : valedicto- 
rian of American literary society; Hrst honors and 
Greek oration at graduation. Howard, O. 

Wall.xce Claire P.vyne, '86. Anniversa- 
rian and twentv-second February orator, Ameri- 
can Literary Institute; tutor in matbematics; 
editor Bell/a nv Collegian; cor. sec; South Bend, 
Ind. 

Robert Hamilton Devine. 4046 Jacob 
street. Wheeling, W. Va. 

John Brown Wilson, B. S. "85. First hon- 



ors in scientific course; orator American literary 
society; studying law. Wheeling, W. Va. 

James A.ndrew Hopkins Mertz, B. S. '85. 
Chemist in Ben wood Iron Works. Bcllaire, O. 

James Edwin Atkinson. Clinton, Mo. 

Alexander McKinney, Clerk in custom 
house, Cleveland, O. 

Frank Warriner. Studying pharmacy in 
New York City. Kansas City, Mo. 

XLV. 

Norman Arter Philips. Student at Har- 
vard University. New Castle, Pa. 

George Benjamin Stacy. Now at Rich- 
mond Col., and member of Alpha Kappa. 406 
W. Cary street, Richmond, Va. 

William Henry Mooney, B. S. '84. Teach- 
er. La Grange, O. 

Lewis Cass Woolery, A. B. '84. First hon- 
ors in classical course; professor in Bethany Col- 
lege, Bethanv, W. Va.; former address, Antioch 
Mills, Ky. 

Miles Grant Baxter, A. B. '85. Teacher 
of phonography. Hopedale, O. 

XLVI. 

Edwin E. Curry. Orator of freshman 
class. New Lisbon, O. 

Harry Hampton Ru:MiiLE. Home. Lowell, 
O.; present address, Beverls-, O. 

XLVII. 

Alvin Lincoln White, '86. Orator of junior 
class; teacher. Bethesda, O. 

W. Kent Pendleton, Jr , '88. Bethany, W. 
Va. 

Frank Sherman Israel, '88. Beallsville, O. 

John Coleman Reid, '87. Twenty-second 
orator Neatrophian literary society. Mt. Ster- 
ling Ky. 

Henry Reid Bright, '87. Mt. Sterling, Ky. 



20 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



BOSTON CHAPTER. 
[The Upsilon, at Boston University, Boston, Mass.l 

The college department of Boston University is overshadowed by the professional 
schools. While the attendance upon the schools of law and medicine and theology is 
in the aggregate usually more than three hundred and fifty, the attendance upon the 
college of liberal arts rarely exceeds one hundred and forty. Women are admitted 
to all departments. The course of study in the college is largely elective. The 
university is under Methodist control; but, because of its admitting women and 
because of its having the only medical school in New England not controlled by the 
so-called regular school of physicians, it has interested many persons outside of the 
Methodist denomination, and has been prevented from becoming merely sectarian. 
The theological school is, however, strictly devoted to the Methodist Episcopal 
church. The university was founded in 1869. It has ample means. The buildings 
stand in the heart of the city, and there are no dormitories except in connection with 
the theological school. 

Beta Theta Pi and Theta Delta Chi are the fraternities, both founded in 1876. The 
average size of chapters is about fifteen. Theta Delta Chi usually has considerably 
more than that number. 

The Upsilon has always confined its membership to the college department, 
although the professional schools offer a tempting field. Upsilon is careful in 
selecting men, and almost every one of its members has remained in college until 
graduation. The chapter has been active in fraternity work. The corresponding 
secretaries since the convention of 1881 have been Chas. F. Waterhouse, Jas. E. 
Lawrence, Wm. B. Snow, Walter S. Little, J. H, McKenzie, George E. Whitaker, 
and Wm. M. Warren. The representatives at the convention of 1881 were A. C. 
Poole and A. H. Flack; at that of 1882, C. F. Waterhouse and A. C. Poole; at that 
of 1883, A. H. Flack and L. C. Hascall; and that of 1884, J. H. Kenzie. L. C. Hascall 
was visiting officer for 1883-84, 1884-85, and i88i^-S6. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 
XLIII. 

Walter Sanderson Little, '85. Cor. sec; 
wholesale boot and shoe business. Permanent 
address, Wellsley, Mass.; temporary address, 292 
Devonshire street, Boston Mass. 
XLIV. 

George Edgar Whitaker, '85. Beacon 
manager; cor. sec.; astronomical computer. Per- 
manent address, Worcester , Mass.; temporary, 
22 Aldersey St., Somerville, Mass. 

William Bracket Snow, '85. Commence- 
ment speaker; business manager Beacon; cor. 
sec; sub-master in the English high school, Bos- 
ton. Stoneham, Mass. 

Ordell Hercules Powers, '84. Publishing 
business. 5 and 7 East Fourth street. New York, 
N. Y. 

Joseph Clarence Hagen, '86. Commence- 
ment speaker; editor Beacon; president of the 
^' Dcutc/ies KraenzcJien^^ ; teacher at Comer's 
Commercial College. Permanent address, E. 
Marshfield, Mass. 

XLV. 

Willis Breckenridge IIolcombe, '86. Left 
college in '84 to study in Germany. Gottingen 
is his present address; permanent address, Rich- 
mond, Indiana. 

Bern HARD Berenson, '87. Went to Har- 
vard in '85 to pursue special course. 11 Minot 
street, Boston, Mass. 

John Heyward McKenzie, '84. Cor. sec; 



Ph. D. Teacher in Wesleyan college, Cincin- 
nati, O. 

William Marshall Warrex, '87. Cor. 
sec. 329 Broadway, Cambridgeport, Mass. 

XLVI. 

Walter Perkins Taylor, '84. Andover 
Theological Seminary. Andover, Mass.; home 
address, Charlottetown, P. E. L 

Walter Edward Harrison Massey, "87. 
With Massej manufacturing company, Toronto, 
Ont. 

Cliff Rodgers Richards, '88. E. Marsh- 
field, Mass. 

Lewis Newell Cushman, '87. East Boston, 
Mass. 

Ernest William Branch, '88. Granby, 
Mass. 

XLVII. 

Lawrence Baker Greenwood, '88. Ever- 
ett, Mass. 

Ernest Avery Johnston, '88. Dorchester, 
Mass. 

George Ainsworth Dunn, '89. Gardnei-, 
Mass. 

Benjamin Cole Gillis,''89. Mechanicsville, 
Vt. 

LiNviLLE Heber Wardwell, '89. Beverly, 
Mass. 

Thomas Whiteside, '89. Chicopee, Mass. 

XLVIII. 

Jesse Grant Cramer, '89. Auburndale, 
Mass. 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



21 



BROWN CHAPTER. 
[The Kappa, at Brown University, Providence, R. I.] 

Brown University lias seventeen professors and five other instructors. The 
students number, usualh , between two hunched and tifty and three hunch-ed. Women 
are not admitted. Tlie popular course is the one leachng to A. B., althou<^h there are 
a few in the Ph. B. course. Beginning with junior year, about one-third of the work 
is elective. Rhode Island's share of the national land grant for agricultural and 
mechanical colleges was by the legislature assigned to Brown, but that fact has not 
appreciably affected the courses of study. In fact, the professor of agricultin-al 
zoology is about the only visible mark of the agricultural and mechanical department. 
The university was founded in 1764. It is governed by a board of trustees, in which 
body various religious denominations have a certain representation that was long ago 
fixed upon; but the majority of tlie trustees must be Baptists, and so must the presi- 
dent of the university; and this is the reason why Brown, though really unsectarian, 
i.~, always considered a Baptist institution. 

The fraternities in the order of original foundation are Alpha Delta Phi, Delta Phi, 
Psi Upsilon, Beta Theta Pi, Delta Kappa Epsilon, Zeta Psi, Theta Delta Chi, Delta 
Upsilon, and Chi Phi. The membership of prosperous chapters ranges from fifteen 
to thirty. There are no chapter houses. 

The Kappa, founded in 1S47, was revived in 1S80. The chapter usually numbers 
about seventeen. The corresponding secretaries since the convention ot 18S1 have 
been E. B. Harvey, A. D. Cole, A. P. Sumner, Jos. H. Ward, Harry T. Sherman, 
Geo. ri. Crooker."^ John T. Blodgett, of Kappa, was chief of the district from 1S81 
to 1S83. At the convention of 18S1 the representatives were H. S. Babcock, W. II. 
Tolman, and A. P. Hoyt, the last being one of the vice-presidents; at that of 1SS3, 
II. S. Babcock and C. H.J. Douglas, the former being a vice-president and being also 
the convention poet; at that of 1883, E. P. Allen, E. B. Harvey, and A. P. Sumner; 
at that of 1S84, A. P. Sumner; and at that of 1S85, W. F. Angell, The Providence 
alumni chapter, which is chiefly composed of members of Kappa, has had, at various 
conventions, representatives who are not included in the foregoing list. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 
XI.III. 

Clarence Otis Williams, A. B. '85. Phi 
r>eta Kappa; instructor. Permanent address. 
New Hampton, N. H.; present address, 31 Ham- 
mond street, Providence, R. I. 

Arthur Preston Slmner, A. B. '85. Liher 
editor; cor. sec; law student. 466 Broad street, 
Providence, R. I. 

Edwin Thomas Banning, '85. Left college 
in jimior year; draughtsman. 45 Westminster 
street, Providence, R. I. 

Amory Prescott Folwell, a. B. '85. Sec- 
ond Hartshorn prize in mathematics; studying 
law. Permanent address, Brooklyn, N. Y.; pres- 
ent address, 749 Tremont street, Boston, Mass. 

Joseph Wood Freeman, A. B. '85. Received 
commencement appointment; editor of Central 
Falls Visitoy. Central Falls, R. I. 
, Clifford Phetteplace Sicagrave, A. B. 
'85. I5all nine, and captain; class day marshal in 
1884; manufacturer. iig Benefit street. Provi- 
dence, R. I. 

HoKATio Gates Wood, A. B. '85. Speaker 
at class tree; traveling in Europe. 34 Mill 
street, Newport, R. I. 

XLIV. 

Norman Gunderson, '86. Class dav mar- 
shal in 1885; ball nine, and captain, t^^^ Pitman 
street, Providence, R. I. 



Joseph Hooker Ward, '86. Editor of Brii- 
nonian for '84, '85, '86. President of glee club; cor. 
sec; vice-president of Hammer and Tongs in 
junior year. Middletovvn, R. I. 

Francis Wayland Shepardson, A. B. 'S3. 
Member of the Alpha Eta; instructor. Gran- 
ville, O. 

Arthur Young Ford, A. B. '84. Phi Beta 
Kappa; member of the Epsilon; received com- 
mencement appointment; editor of Brtoionian. 
Editor at Owensboro, Kj. 

*Louis .Shiel, '86. Editor of Briniouiau^ 
ball nine. Died in 1884; home was Philadelphia, 
Penn. 

XLV. 

Edward Ellsha Pierce, A. B. '77. Whole- 
sale grocer. 19 and 20 Canal street. Providence, 
R. I. 

George Washington Willis, '86. Chair- 
man for Liher board for 1886; on ball nine. 38 
Laycock street, Alleghany City, Penn. 

Harry I'rederick Colwell, '87. Leader 
of Symphony Society; theatrical director of 
Hammer andTongs. 58 Bowen street, Pi'ovi- 
dence, R. L 

George Hazard Crooker, '87. Liber edi- 
tor for 1S87; on ball nine; vice-president of Ham- 
mer and Tongs. 58 Benefit street, Providence, 
R. L 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



XLVI. 

Charles Engs Lawton,'86. Newport, R. I. 

Francis Joseph Belcher, '88. 19 Slater 
Hall, Providence, R. I. 

Htgh Leckis Cattannach, '88. Angell 
Place, Providence, R. I. 

Harry Tuck Sherman, '88. Cor. sec; glee 
club. Barrett House, New York, N. Y. 

XLVII. 

George Wallace Hutchinson, '88. Ball 
nine; now student at Princeton. Home address, 
Windsor, N. J. 

Henry Johns Rhett, Ph. B. '85. Third 



Carpenter prize in elocution; captain of foot-bal 
team; ball nine. With Providence Locomotive 
Works. 85 Benevolent street, Providence, R. I. 

Frederick Huntington Briggs, '89. 449 
Beacon street, Boston, Mass. 

Robert Lincoln Spencer, '8g. Ball nine; 
secretary glee club. 35 Sycamore street. Prov- 
idence, R. I. 

Charles Francis Smith, '89. Jamestown, 
N. Y. 

Charles Aaron Sawyer, '89. Malone, 
N. Y. 

Arthur Franklin Clark, '89, Ball nine. 
10 Paine street, Providence, R. L 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



23 



UNIVERSITY OP CALIFORNIA CHAPTER. 
[The Omega, at the University of California, Berkeley, Cal.] 

The University of California is controlled by the state. Its buildings and o-rounds 
are worth a million dollars; and the productive funds amount to almost two million. 
The university was founded in iS6S, and absorbed tlic Colleg-e of California, which 
was founded in 1S55. In the undergraduate department there are courses leading to 
degrees in arts, letters, philosophy, and science. The museums, laboratories, and libra- 
ries are extremely valuable, being conducted upon the most modern plan. In the 
undergraduate department there are about two hundred and fifty students, includino- 
about fifty women. • There are eighteen professors and fourteen other instructors. 
The professional schools are in San Francisco. They are devoted to medicine den- 
tistry, pharmacy, and law, with an aggregate attendance of about two hundred and 
sixty. The officers of instruction in the professional schools number fifty-seven. The 
university will soon have an observatory with a telescope more powerful than any 
heretofore made, the cost to be $700,000. 

The fraternities are Zeta Psi, Phi Delta Theta, Chi Phi, Delta Kappa Epsilon, l^eta 
Theta Pi. A chapter's membership varies from ten to twenty. Until recenty there 
was much opposition to fraternities. The anti-fraternitv law was successfullv fouo-lu 
in the courts, and public opposition ceased four or five years ao^o. One of the anti- 
fraternity organs that were for a long while supported by students has ceased publi- 
cation, and the other is no longer an anti-fraternity journal. 

Omega is so remote from the main body of the fraternity that, thouo-h founded in 
1S79, it has been represented in only two conventions. Guy C. Earl was at the con- 
vention of iSSi; and at the convention of 1884, Chas. S. Wheeler, C. H. Forbes and 
Guy Wilkinson were present, Wheeler being one of the vice-presidents. When the 
chapter is not represented by delegates, it sends a letter or a telegram, in order that 
the lack of representation may not be construed to be caused by lack of interest in the 
fraternity. The corresponding secretaries since the convention of 18S1 have been 
W. W. Deamer, Chas. S. Wheeler, W. Palache, C. A. Ramm, and Finlay Cook. In 
i883-'S4 Wheeler was chief of the district. 

Frederick Chester Tirxer, '87. Member 
of base-ball nine and foot-ball team. 1420 Ei"-bth 
street, Oakland. Cal. " 



Admitted since August, 1881. 
XLIII. 



St.\fford Wallace Alstin, "86. Presi- 
dent of the day, Charter day, iS86. Hilo, 
Hawaii, Hawaiian Islands. 

Samuel Hlbhard, Jr., '86. Left college in 

1883. Yakima, Wash.T. 

Andrew D. Schindler, '83. U. S. coast 
siu'vey. Berkeley, Cal. 

Robert Chester Tirxer, '86. Made wel- 
come address to President Holdcn on behalf of 
students, January, 1886. I0!;2 Poplar street, 
Oakland, Cal. 

Edward Stafford Warrex, '85. President 
junior day. Haywards, Almeda county, Cal. 

XLIV. 

JoHX Warrex Duttox, '86. Left college in 

1884. 1328 California street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Glv Wilkixsox, '86. Earh' English prize. 

Address, care of M. Carter, 61 /.^ Broad street, 
Boston, Mass. 

Richard Boltox Hellmax, '86. Left col- 
lege in 1883. At present in Peru; former address. 
1212 Geary street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Whitxey Palache, '87. Left college in 1S85. 
Berkeley. Cal, 

WiLFRiED Bela Wellmax, '86. Left col- 
lege in 1S85. Fruitvale, Alameda county, Cal. 

XLV. 

JoHX Fraxcis Davis, A. B., Harvard, 'Si. 
Took post-graduate course at University of Cali- 
fornia; law student; traveling in Eui'ope. Home 
address, San Francisco, Cal. 



Joiix CrsHiXG Dof^xix, '87. Berkelev, Cal. 

Arthur James Thatcher, '87. Hopland, 
Mendocino county, Cal. 

George Washixgtox Dlttox, '87. Left 
college in 1884. San Rafael, Marion county, Cal. 

Robert Thomsox Strattox, '87. Left 
college in 1884. At Jefferson Medical College, 
Philadelphia, Pa.; permanent address. East Oak- 
land, Cal, 

George Malcolm Strattox, '87. 461 East 
Twelfth street, Oakland, Cal. 

XL VI. 

Oliver Brvaxt Ellsworth, '88. Niles, 
Alameda county, Cal. 

XLVII. 

Gaillard Stoxer, '88. 2410 Washington 
street, San Francisco, Cal. 

William Ixgraham Kii», '88. Base-ball 
nine. Berkeley, Cal. 

Fixlay Cook, '88. Cor. sec. 458 Brvant 
street, San Francisco, Cal. 

William Haxxaford Wextworth, 'SS. 
Nevada City, Cal. 

Charls James Evaxs, '88. Business mana- 
ger Bcrkvlevan. 2207 Adeline street, Oakland 
Cal. 

Hugh Ho\vell, '89. 669 Seventeenth street 
Oakland, Cal. 

Clifford Webster Barxes, '89. 524 Dow- 
ney avenue, Los Angeles, Cal. 

James Edgar Beard, '88. Napa Citv, Cal. 



24 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



CENTRE CHAPTEK. 
[The Epsilon, at the Centre College of Kentucky, Danville, Ky.] 

Centre College, founded in 1819, Is the most important southern institution con- 
trolled by the northern Presbyterian church. The college offers two courses, a clas- 
sical and a scientific. In the college department there are six professors and about 
one hundred students. No institution in Kentucky sends out year by year a larger 
class of graduates. There is also a preparatory department. 

The fraternities are Beta Theta Pi, Phi Delta Theta, Sigma Chi, and southern Kappa 
Alpha. The size of a chapter varies from eight to sixteen. Preparatory students are 
seldom admitted by any of the fraternities. 

The Epsilon was founded in 1S48, and has been one of the most successful chapters 
of Beta Theta Pi. As is the case with many other old chapters, its active member- 
ship is laro-ely composed of the sons and brothers of former members. Since the 
convention oV 18S1 the corresponding secretaries have been H. C. Read, S. C. Jones, 
Lee Dunlap, S. T. Hickman, W. B. Mathews, H. L. Briggs, and W. E. Bryce. The 
chapter has recently had two chiefs of the district, John A. Heron in 1881-83 and 
Alfred C. Downs in i882-'83. The representatives at the convention of 1881 wereB. 
B. Veech", G. C. Cowles, and W. H.January; at that of 1883, H. C. Read, W. B. 
Mathews, and G. C. Cowles; at that of ^1883, B. G. Boyle; at that of 1884, B. G. Boyle, 
J. W. Kennedy, and J. W. Guest, Jr.; and at that of 1885, S. D, Roser and Lee Dun- 
lap. W. H. January w^as song-book agent of the fraternity from 18S1 to 1884, and 
prepared the book now in use. 



Admitted ainoe August, 1881. 
XLIII. 

Stanley Cass Archibald, '85. Meinber 
of the Alpha Lambda. With Procter & Gam- 
ble. Cincinnati. O. 

William Harris Briggs, '85. Danville, 

Ky. 

Marry Lee Briggs, '85. Sophomore Latin 
prize; February oration; cor. sec. Danville, Kj. 

XLIV. 

William Burgess Mathews, Jr., '85. Vale- 
dictory; June oration; sophomore Latin prize; 
cor. sec. Maysville, Ky. 

Sebastian Chatham Jones, '84. Cor sec ; 
studying at Cornell University. Home, Louis- 
ville, Kj. 

Samukl Tebbs Hickman, '85. Cor. sec. 
With Palmer, Dodge & Co., Chicago, III. 

Washington Curran Whittiiornr, '86. 
Columbia, Tenn. 

Samuel De Witt Roser, '84. St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Lee Dunlap, '84 With Rice, Stix & Co., 
3412 Vine St., St. Louis. Mo. 

Sydney Johnston Hayden, '84. Teaching 
in Chenault's school, Louisville, Ky. 



X LV. 



James Crozier Coleman, '86. 

Ky. 



Versailles, 



Harry Y. Whitthornk, '87. Columbia, 
Tenn. 

Charles H. Irvine, '87. Danville, Kj'. 

James Welsh Gi^est, Jr., '84. February 
oration; studying medicine at University of Vir- 
ginia. Danville, Ky. 

XLVI. 

Orville Truman Skillman, '87. Clover- 
port, Ky 

Eugene Furgeson Vest, '88. Cloverport, 

Ky. 

Gelon Rout Craft, '87. Holly Springs, 
Miss. 

George Washington Broadus, '86. Feb- 
ruarv oration. Mt. Sterling, Ky. 

Willis Shallcross Mullen, '89. Louis- 
\ille, Ky. 

Richard Givens Denny, '86. Shelby Citv, 

Ky. 

Obadi AH Brumfield Caldwell, '88. Dan- 
\ille, K\'. 

XLVII. 

William Ellsworth Bryce, '86. Febru- 
ary oration; cor. sec. Indianapolis, Ind. 

Clarence Mathews, '88. Maysville, Ky. 

William Cochran, '89. June oration. 
Maysville, Ky. 

Jamie Cochran, '89. Maysville, Ky. 

Robert Anderson Watts, '89. 1216 Sec- 
ond street, Louisville, Ky. 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



COLUMBIA CHAPTER. 



[The Alpha Alpha, at Columbia College, New York, N. Y.] 

Columbia College is one of the wealthiest institutions in the United States, and 
also, if the students in all departments are counted, one of the largest. There arc 
one hundred and five instructors and about fourteen hundred students. The school 
of arts has about two hundred and fifty students; the school of political science, about 
seventy; the school of mines, about two hundred and fifty; the college of physicians 
and surgeons, about five hundred; and the law school, about three hundred and fifty. 
The last two are in the front rank of professional schools. The school of mines was 
established for the especial purpose of giving instruction in studies pertaining to 
mining, but other lines of work have been added, and now the courses cover almost 
all branches of science. It has for twenty years been the prominent undergraduate 
department of the college. The school of arts, founded in 1754, and for many years 
the only department, is now growing in favor; and it has recently been reinforced by 
the founding of the school of political science. Columbia has always been under 
Protestant Episcopal control; but the denominational bias is not noticed except in the 
school of arts. 

In the order of original foundation the fraternities now existing are Alpha Delta 
Phi, Psi Upsilon, Delta Phi, Chi Psi, Delta Psi, Phi Gamma Delta, Delta Kappa 
Epsilon, Zeta Psi, Beta Theta Pi, Delta Tau Delta, and Phi Delta Theta. A chap- 
ter's membership, counting all departments of the college, varies from fifteen to fifty. 
Initiations are generally confined to the arts and the mines. 

The Alpha Alpha received a charter from the Chicago convention and on the 2Sth of 
October, iSSi, was formally instituted. The corresponding secretaries have been VV. 
A.Jones, Jr., Thos. B. Evans, C. B. Van Tuyl, and E. J. Lederle. W. R. Baird, one of 
the charter members, was chief of the district in i8Si-'83. At the convention of 1SS3 
the representatives were W. R. Baird and C. H. Doolittle, and that of 1SS4 O. E. Coles 
and E. W. Newton. From 1SS2 to 1S85 W. R. Baird was one of the editors of the 
magazine, and since 1S85 he has been historiographer. 



XLIII.— The Pounders. 

William Raimond Baird, '82 law. Chief 
of district ; associate editor of Hefa Theta Pi ; 
historiographer; member of Sigma; author ot' 
Ainr.rican Collei^e Frater^iities ; lawyer. 243 
Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

WiLLi.VM Beebe Middleton, 'S3. Mines; 
left college 1882. 370 Adelphi street, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

Lothar Washington Faber, '82. Mines. 
Left college 1882. With E. Faber, 812 Broadwa\', 
New York, N. Y.; permanent address, Port 
Richmond, Staten Island, N. Y. 

William Abbott Jones, Jr., '84. Arts; 
studied at Gottingen; Columbia school of politi- 
cal science 1S85; now member of '86 school of 
law and candidate for Ph. D. at school of polit- 
ical science; cor. sec. Richmond Hill, L. I., N.Y. 

Henry Mesa, '82. Mines. Left college 1 88 1. 
New York, N. Y. 

Clinton Brazil Van Tuyl, '84. Mines. 
Left college 1883, returned 18S4, left 1885; cor. sec. 
Rio de Janiero, Brazil, S. A. 

Charles Horace Doolittle. M. E. '85. 
Cor. sec; now chemist and assaver in copper and 
silver works. Denver, Col. 

Wilbur Edgerton Sanders, M. E. '85. 
Bow oar of victorious '85 crew; now mining in 
Arizona. Address, Helena, Montana Territory. 

XLIII. 
Thomas Brown Evans, '85. Mines. Cor. 



sec; left college 1884; now candidate for Ph .D. 
in chemistry at the University of Erlangen, Bava- 
ria. Clifton, Cincinnati, O. 

John Downing Logan, '84. Arts. Left 
college 18S3. Greenpoint, L. I., N. Y. 

Howard Harold Clevel.\nd, IJL. B. '82. 
St. Paul, Minn. 

XLIV. 

De Lagnel Berier, LL. B. '82. Fort Ham- 
ilton, N. Y. 

Otway Wilkinson Baldwin, LL. B.. "83. 
A. B., University of Minnesota, 1881. Clear 
Lake, Minn. 

Charles Frederick Ackerm.\n, '83. 
Mines. Left college 1882. ^^4 Livingston street, 
Brooklvn, N. Y. 

Paul Wilcox, LL. B. '84. Member of Delta. 
Practicing law in New York City. 

Ernst Joseph Lederle, '86. Mines. Cor. 
sec; class president in 1885. Stapleton, Staten 
Island, N. Y. 

Charles Edwin P.\RKER, '86. Mines. Mem- 
ber of Alpha Nu; left college 18S3; Ph. C. Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1885. Ottawa, Kas. 

Frederick Grove Paddock, '84 law. 
Left college 1883. Malone, N. Y. 

Frederick Mayhen Thomas, M. E. '85. 
Cor, sec. Skaneateles, New York. 

Charles Edwin C.vhoone, '86. Mines. 
Left college 1883; secretary and treasurer Ca- 
hoone-\'oorhees manufacturing company, New- 
ark, N. J. Frelinghuysen avenue, Newark, N. [. 



26 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



XLV. 

Oliver Edward Coles, '84. Arts. Degrees 
of Ph. B. and A. B.; now a member of '87 law. 
P. O. box 262, Jersey City, N. J. 

William Paul Wilcox, M. D. 'S3. Oma- 
ha, Neb. 

Edward Herman Barnum, '86. Mines. 
Left college 1883. 458 Pacific street, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

Edward Cohex, A. B. '84. 305 Lexington 
avenue. New York, N. Y. 

Edgar Storm Appleby, A. B. '84. Mem- 
ber of '86 law. 216 W. Fifty-ninth street, New 
York, N. Y. 

XL VI. 

Frederick Anthony Bristol, '87. Mines. 
Left college 1885. Room 23, Mannheimer Block, 
St. Paul, Minn. 

Eben W. Newton, A. B. '84. New York, 
N. Y. 



Harry Gilbert Darwin, '87. Mines. Glen 
Ridge, N. J. 

Daniel Cory Ad.\ms, '87. Mines. North 
Plainfield, N. J. 

James Lincoln Hurd, '88. Mines. Dover, 
N.J. 

XLVII. 

Francis Rollin Percival, '86, med. 
Member of Beta Alpha, 89 Lexington avenue. 
New York, N. Y. 

Rush Clark Lake, '85 law. Member of 
Alpha Beta. Independence, Iowa. 

James Ish,\m Gilbert, LL. B. '85. Mem- 
ber of Alpha Beta. Burlington, Iowa. 

Samuel Edson Gage, '87. Mines. On bi- 
cycle team for intercollegiate games. Flushing, 
Long Island, N. Y. 

John Ericsson Clute, '86 med. Member 
of Nu. Schenectady, N. Y. 

William Thomas Partridge, '88. Mines. 
Artist-in-chief of jl//«e;'. Washington, D. C. 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



27 



CORNELL CHAPTER. 
[The Beta Delta, at Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y.l 

Cornell has about sixty instructors and six hundred students. The studies are 
lar<^ely elective. A majority of the students are candidates for degress in arts or 
philosophy or science; but there are over two hundred in the courses in architecture, 
engineering, and agriculture. The university was incorporated in 1S65 and opened 
in 1S68. It is not a sectarian institution; and it is not in any strict sense a state insti- 
tution; for New York's share of the congressional land grant for agricultural colleges 
is not the principal part of the university's support, and the governor and other public 
officials who have seats as trustees are the minority of that board. The university 
campus is one of the finest in the United States. Its chief beauties are its walks, 
drives, and trees, and the view over Lake Cayuga. 

In the order of original foundation the fraternities are Zeta Psi, Kappa Alpha, 
Alpha Delta Phi, Chi Psi, Phi Kappa Psi, Delta Upsilon, Delta Kappa Epislon, Theta 
Delta Chi, Phi Delta Theta, Beta Theta Pi, and Psi Upilon. Each chapter has from 
ten to twenty-six members. Almost every chapter owns or rents a house. 

The Beta JDelta was founded in 1S74. It rents a chapter house. The usual mem- 
bership is fifteen. The recent corresponding secretaries were F. E. Wilcox, H. C. 
Elmer, H. L. Shively, J. T. Sackett, G. F. Saal, and Theodore Miller. Saal is now 
chief of the district. The chapter was represented at the convention of 18S1 by H. 
F. Ehrman; at that of 1SS3 by H. C. Elmer and H, F. Ehrman; at that of 1SS3 by 
F. R. Percival, F. E. Wilcox, and A. A. Ailing; at that of 1SS4 by G. F. Saal and 
J. T. Sackett; and at that of 1885 by G. F. Saal. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 
XLIV. 

TnOiMAs CoKMODY, Jr., 82. Lawyer. Bel- 
lona, N. Y. 

Charles Locke Curtis, A. B. '83. Editor 
Corncll Sun ; now with. Toledo Blade. Toledo, O. 

Walter Fraxcis Hamp, 'S;;. South Pueblo, 
Col. 

Herbert Charles Elmer. A. B. 'S3. 
Woodford orator; Phi Beta Kappa; major C. U. 
cadets 'S3; junior president; cor. sec; ^L A. 
Johns Hopkins and member of Alpha Chi; studied 
philosophy at Leipzig and Bonn. Permanent 
address, Rushford, N. Y.; temporary address, 
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. 

*Patrick J()SEPH Casey, '82. Cornelliini 
editor; died August 1883. Binghamton N. Y. 

Frank Percy Ingalls, '84, Salem, Mass. 

Fraxk Warrex Sheldox, '86. 265 Garden 
street, Hoboken, N. J. 

JoHX Thomsox Sackett, '86. Business 
manager Cornell Sun. '85-86. Memorial ora- 
tor "86; cor. sec 477 Greene avenue, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

Arthur Theodore Emory, '86. University 
ball nine '83-84; glee club. Unadilla, N. Y. 

Edward Maguire, B. S. '84. Seward, N. Y. 

XLV. 

John Leonard Southwick, Ph. B. 'S3. 
Cornell Sun '82-83; senior class prophet. Bom- 
bay, N. Y. 

JoHX LovEjoY Pratt, Jr., B. L. '83. Editor 
Cornell Sun 'S2-83; memorial orator senior class; 
Phi Beta Kappa. Buskirks Bridge, N. Y. 

Fred Wisxkr Carpenter, B. C. E. '84. 
Permanent address, Owego, N. Y.; temporary 
address, Morris Docks, New York, N, Y. 

Fraxk Rollix Perciv.\l, '86. Now at Col- 



lege ot" Physicians and Surgeons, New York City. 
Permanent address, Summers, Ct.; temporary 
address, 97 Lexington avenue. New York, N. Y. 

Harry Lawrence Shively, B. S. '84. Bus- 
iness manager Cornell Sun '83-'84; mid course 
honors in French and German; final honors in 
German. Los Angeles, Cal. 

Charles David White, '86. Editor Cor- 
nell Sun '84; editor Cornell Review '85; editor 
Cornellian : instructor in free-hand drawing at 
Cornell University 'S4-'86. Marion, N. Y. 

Frank Alvah Converse, '86. President of 
Cornell University Agricultural Association '84. 
Woodville, N. Y. 

George Williamsox Van Vrankex, Ph. 
B. '85. Transferred from Nu; editor Cornell 
Daily Sun. Lisha's Kill, N. Y. 

Arthur Cecil Copelaxd. Post-graduate 
in veterinary science; transferred from Alpha Psi. 
Monroe, Wis. 

George Frederic Saal, '87. Cor. sec; 
chief district. 40 Ontario street, Cleveland, O. 

Charles Baldwin Hagadorxe, '86, Pitch- 
er ball-nine; West Point cadet '85. Temporary 
address. West Point, N. Y.; permanent address, 
128 E. Genung Place, Elmira, N. Y. 

Edgar Boyd McCoxxell, '87. Logansport 
Ind. 

Thomas Wilbur Tomlixsox, '87. Perma- 
nent address, Logansport, Ind.; temporary ad- 
dress, 2 Old Chamber of Commerce, Chicago, 111. 



XLVr. 



President 
132 East 



Arthur Hastings Grant, '87. 
C. U. Christian Association '86. 
Twenty-fourth street. New York, N. Y 

John Judsox Aspixwall, '87. 141 Seventh 
street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

William Mason Harris, '87. Permanent 



28 



TEE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



address, Owego, N. Y.; present address, Bing- 
hamton. N. Y. 

William Parker Cutler, '88. Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Charles Sumxer Fowler, 'SS. Gouver- 
neur, N. Y. 

George Harry Gibsox, '88. Peoria, 111. 

Frederick Marshall Stavxtox. '88. 
Charleston, Kanawha county. W. Va. 

William Hexry Pfau, '88. Hamilton, O. 

Theodore Miller, '88. Editor Come// Sun 
'85-'86; cor. sec. Antwerp, N. Y. 

Sebastiax Chatham Joxes, '87. Member 
ofEpsilon. Aurora, N. Y. 

XL VI I. 
Hexry H. Humphrey, A. B. Ohio Uni- 



versity, '84; transferred from Beta Kappa. Cool- 
ville, Athens county, O. 

Hexry Goldsmith Dimox, '87. Ball nine 
'85-'86. Riverhead, L. I., N. Y. 

JoHX Hurd Drowx, '89. 1507 Fifth street, 
N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Albert Hexry Washburx, '89. Middle- 
boro, Mass. 

William Lowrey Coolixg, '88. Wilming- 
ton. Del. 

MiLo Freemax Webster, '88. Victor, 
Ontario county, N. Y. 

XLVIII. 

Fred Welles Hargreaves, '89. Wap- 
pinger's Falls, N. Y. 

George Braytox Pexney,'89. Ottawa, 111. 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



29 



CUMBERLAND CHAPTER. 
[The Mu, at Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tenn.| 

From 1S42, the date of its foundation, to 1S61, Cumberland was one of the most 
important universities in the south. The civil war crippled it in many respects, but 
it is still an important institution, for its law school still attracts students from all of 
the southern states, and its theological school is still the only one belonging to the 
Cumberland Presbyterian church. The college department is not large, but it is of 
good grade. The average attendance upon the several departments is as follows: 
college, sixty; law school, fifty; theological school, thirty-five. In these three 
departments there are fourteen professors. There is also a preparatory department. 

Before the civil w'ar, almost every important fraternity was represented by a chap- 
ter. Now there are only Beta Theta Pi and Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

The Mu was founded in 1S54. Its membership comes largely from the professional 
schools and varies from fifteen to twenty-five. The recent corresponding secretaries 
were James C. Harris, R. W. McDonald, J. W. Caldwell, and Hallett Harding The 
chapter received several dispensations allowing it to elect and initiate Vanderbilt 
students; and the members thus initiated will be found in the Vanderbilt roll. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 
XLIV. 

James Chesley Harris, 'S3 law. Mem- 
ber of the Beta Beta. Ripley, Mississippi. 

James Purdev Atkinson, 'S3 law. Grad- 
uate of University of Tennessee. Union, Oregon. 

Charles Emmet Pate, '83. Editor of 
Student: lawyer. Memphis, Tennessee. 

Alfred Holt C.\rric;.\n, Jr., 'S3 law. 



University 



iSS: 



A. B. Arkansas Ind. 
Washington, Arkansas. 

Enw ARD PiNCKNEY HiLL, '83 law. Grad- 
uated at Marshall in 1877, with gold medal. 
Marshall, Texas. 

WiLH.VM Bryax Holston, 'S3 law. San 
Antonio, Texas. 

Reed L.\nsdon McDonnold, '86. Lebanon. 
Tenn. 

Jim Franklin P'owlkes, 'S3 law. Baker- 
ville, Tenn. 

Wendel Spence, '83 law. Austin, Texas. 

Baker St. Clair Radford, 'S3 law. 
Hopkinsville, Ky. 

Benjamin Christie Mickle, '83 law. 
Valedictorian at Bethel College in 1S79. Fulton, 
Ky. 

C. M. Templei'ON, '83 law. Winsborough. 
Tex. 

Clifton A. Green, '86. Springfield. Ky. 

Rev. Jacob R. Hodges, '84 theo. Member 
of Alpha Omicron. Salado. Tex. 

Hor.vtio Hyde Parker, '83 law. Knox- 
ville, Tenn. 

Albert Sim.merfield Dickey, 'S3 law. 
A. B. and valedictorian at Hiwassee College in 
1S79. Sweetwater, Monroe coimty, Tenn. 

Arthur Henderson Cooper, '83 law. 
Marshall, Harrison county, Te.x. 

XLV. 

Rev. Richard Welbourne Lewis, '85 
theology. B. S. University of Tennessee, '82. 
Brownwood, Tex. 

Hon. Willis Golliday. Member of Mis- 
sissippi Legislature. 

A. B. Freeman. Lebanon, Tenn. 



Irregula 
"85 law. 



, Vaden, 

Practic- 

coiu-se. 



XLVI. 

Joseph Weiseger Caldwell, '86 theo. 
Ex-editor and business manager of Studejtt ; 
was a member of Epsilon. Danville, Ky. 

James Henry Miller, '86 theology. Ed- 
itor-in-chief of Student : was a member of Alpha 
Omicron. Da Villa, Tex. 

Winstead Paine Bone, '86 theology. 
Business manager of Student; was a member of 
Alpha Omicron. La Rissa, Tex. 

Jerome Bodtsford Kerr, '85 theology. 
Transferred from Alpha Omicron. McKinney, 
Tex 

Hon. William Henry Clarke, '85 law. 
Was a member of Beta Beta; member of Legis- 
lature of Mississippi. Brandon, Miss. 

Ernest William Stewart, '8:; law, 
Miss. 

Albert Davis Marks, '85 law. 
ing law at Winchester, Tenn. 

Saml EL Richard Pace. 
Marrowbone, Ky. 

Oscar Lee Stribling, 
ing law at Tupelo, Miss. 

JAMES White Handlky, '85. 
derbilt, 1886. Nashville, Tenn, ' 

George Beatty Ward, '87. 
Ala. 

John Sam Owsley, Jr., '87. 

Broussais Coman, LL. B. '85. Practicing 
law at Athens, Ala. 

Frank Gordon Bridges, "85. New Middle- 
town, Tenn. 

Rev. William Downy Blair, '85. Hender- 
son, Ky. 

James Shannon Buchannan, '85. Teaching 
at Harpeth, Tenn. 

PL\rry James Bone, '85 law. Practicing 
law at Wellington, Kas. 

Rev. Jefferson Rcssell Crawford, '85. 
Marrowbone, K\'. 

XLVII. 

William Lee McCi tchek, 87. Pilot Grove, 
Mo. 

Curry Kirkpatrick, '87. Associate editor 
of Student; Lebanon, Tenn. 



Practic- 
M. D., Van- 
Birmingham, 
Stanford, Kv. 



30 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



Isaac William Pleasant Buchanan, '85. 
Teaching near Lebanon, Tenn. 

John Cremer Ritter, '86 theology. Ken- 
d rick's Creek, Tenn. 

William Jefferson Baker, '86 law. 
Practicing law at Cuero, Tex. 

Robert Alexander Cody, '86 theology. 
Editor Student. Withe, Tenn. 

William Taylor Watson, '86 law. 
Weatherford, Tex. 

Hallett Harding, '87. Fort Worth, Tex. 

James Walter Brannim, '86 law. N. E. 
corner Eighth and Main streets, Kansas Citv, 
Mo. 

Harry Maney Drifoos, '86 law. Nash- 
ville, Tenn. 

William Hawes Epps, '86 law. Hawes 
Cross Roads, Tenn. 



Robert Bone Williams, '87. Delegate 
from Amasagassean Society to Tennessee inter- 
collegiate oratorical contest. Henderson's Cross 
Roads, Tenn. 

Nathan Waller, '89. Selma, Ala. 

Orville Truman Stone, '87. Treniont. 
Miss. 

XL VIII. 

William Henry Martin, "87 law. Las 
Casas, Tenn. 

Edward Everett Sneed, '87 law. Mil- 
ton, Tenn. 

Junius Wildix Beck, '87. Smithysgrove, 
Ky. 

George Becker Kilpatrick. Lebanon, 
Tenn. 

John Howell Noble, Anniston, Ala. 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



31 



DENISON CHAPTER. 
[The Alpha Eta, at Denison University, G-ranville, O.) 

Denison University, founded in 1S31, is the only Baptist college in Ohio. It com- 
prises a college department and a preparatory department. In the college there are 
eleven instructors and about eighty students. Degrees are given in arts, philosophy, 
and science; but the classical course of prescribed studies are still the favorite. Women 
are not admitted. 

The fraternities are Sigma Chi, Beta Theta Pi, and Phi Gamma Delta. The 
average membership is ten. Preparatory students are not initiated. 

The Alpha Eta was founded in 1S6S and has contributed many energetic workers 
to Beta Theta Pi. Chas. J. Seaman, of this chapter, was for several years the agent 
and editor of the song book and was the editor of the catalogue of iSSi. He was also 
the chief founder of the Wooglin club house on Chautauqua Lake. Chas. H. Carey 
was chief of the district in iSSi-'83. W. C. Sprague was an editor of the magazine 
in i8S3-'S3 and i88t^-'S6. F. W. Shepardson has been an editor of the magazine 
from 1883 to the present time. He has published a history of the chapter. The 
recent correspondmg secretaries have been F. W. vShepardson, W. C. Sheppard, 
Will B. Owen, and E. H. Castle. At conventions there have been the following 
representatives: 1881, W. C. Sprague and J. J. Robinson; 1882, F. W. Shepardson, 
W. C. vShepard, F. M. Stalker, W. C. Sprague, H. L.Jones, and G. Ellison, the hrst 
of whom was secretary; 1883, C.J. Seaman. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 
XLIII. 

William Collins Sheppard, "84. Captain 
of Denison Cadets; editor Collegian, Adytum, 
Coiiimeuccineiif Daily; cor. sec; graduated A. 
B. from University of Rochester; principal Han- 
over, Oliio, public schools, 1S83-4; principal 
Johnstown public schools, 1885-6. Present ad- 
dress, Johnstown, Ohio; permanent address, 
Bucyrus, Ohio. 

Garrett Ellison, '85. No. 9 East Ninth 
street, Kansas City, Mo. 

XLIV. 

Herbert Lyon Jones, '86. Publisher Col- 
legian; debater Franklin Society Annual. Gran- 
ville, Ohio. 

Charles Silvey Sprague, '86. Cor. sec; 
orator preliminary contest, '84; secretary D. U. 
Oratorical Association, 18S4-5; captain Gymna- 
sium Association, '85; editor Collegia >i and Den- 
ison Weekly Ne'vs\ president Reading Room 
and Lecture Association; on Franklin Annual, 
'84. McConnellsville, O. 

Charles Woou Eberlein,'86, McConnells- 
ville, O. 

David Wilbur Brownell, '86. Five prizes 
field day, 1883; debater Franklin Annual; now 
sti}d\ing law. Permanent address, McConnells- 
ville, Ohio; present address, 25 German American 
Bank Block, St. Paul, Minn.' 

XLV. 

Elmer Ellsworth Kitchen, '86. Debater 
Franklin commencement. '83. Attending L^ni- 
versity of Denver, Denver, Col. 

John Luther Wilkin, '86. Read the 
"Chronicles" at class reception, 1887. Toledo, 
O. 

Charles Grant Rank, '86. " Address of 
Welcome" freshman reception, 1S83. Ticket 
agent of B. & O. R. R. at Newark, O.' 



William Bishop Owen, '87. Orator Frank- 
lin commencement, '85; editor Collegian; cor. 
sec. Granville, O. 

Henry Dwight Hervey, '88. Granville, O. 

Burton Banks Tuttle. Prize essay; city 
editor Brantford daily paper. Brantford, Ont. 

Daniel Shepardson, Jr., '88. Debater 
Franklin Extra, '84. Address, Granville. Lick- 
ing county, O. 

XLVI. 

Henry Martyn Carter, '86. Assistant in 
chemical laboratory; now at Boston School of 
Technology. Present address, 295 Columbus 
avenue, Boston, Mass.; home address, Granville. 
O. 

Edward Howard Castle, '88. Debater 
Franklin Extra, '84. Cor. sec. Alexandria, O. 

William Clement Shafer, '88. De- 
claimer Franklin Extra, '84. Present address, 
Kingwood, W. Va.; permanent address, Parkers- 
burg, W. Va. 

Howard Copland, '88. Now at University 
of Montana, Deer Lodge, Montana. 

XLVII. 

Gorman Jones, '89. West JefTeeson, O. 

William Henry Davies, '89. North-cast 
corner Sixth and Harrison, Topeka, Kas. 

William Ernest Castle, '89. Alexandria, 
O. 

Evan G. Evans, '89. "Crescent" Franklin 
Extra, '85. Granville, O. 

Ralph Parsons Smith, '88. Poet Franklin 
commencement, '85. Granville, O. 

Harry Jay Kendig, '86. Second at ora- 
torical contest, 1886. Hayesville, O. 

Edmund A. Williams, '89. Debater Frank- 
lin Extra, '85. Granville, O. 

James Stanley Brown, '89, Declaimer 
Calliopean Extra, '85. High Hill, O. 



32 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



DE PAUW CHAPTER. 
[The Delta, at De Pauw University, Greencastle, Ind.] 

De Pauw University was founded in 1837, and until 1SS4 was known as Indiana 
Asbury University. Schools of theolog^y, law, music, fine arts, pedagogics, military 
science, and horticulture have recently been established. The university was recently 
endowed by W. C. De Pauw, and $84,000 have been expended on grounds, build- 
ings, and apparatus. The college department has four courses of study and is called 
the Asbury college of liberal arts. The college has thirteen instructors and about 
two hundred and fifty students. There is also a preparatory department. VVomeri. 
are admitted to all departments. Tuition is practically free. The aggregate number 
of students in all departments is six hundred and eighty. 

The fraternities are Beta Theta Pi, Phi Gamma Delta, Sigma Chi, Phi Kappa Psi, 
Delta Kappa Epsilon, Phi Delta Theta, and Delta Tau Delta. The membership 
varies from fifteen to twenty-five. Excepting Beta Theta Pi and Delta Kappa Epsi- 
lon, all of the fraternities initiate preparatory students. The fraternities are addicted 
to combinations. 

The Delta was founded in 184:^ and has always been one of our principal chapters. 
Edwin H. Terrell, of this chapter, was one of the editors of the catalogue of 1881 and 
was also one of the founders of the Wooglin club. He was president of the conven- 
tion of 1884. Frank M. Joyce has for several years been the business manager of the 
fraternity magazine; and E. L. Martin was one of the business managers iS83-'84. 
A. N. Grant was chief of the district in i88i-'82 and i882-'83, and J. G. Campbell 
was chief in i885-'86. The recent corresponding secretaries have been W. Iglehart, 
C. W. Bennett, J. G. Campbell, and M. E. Hector. The representatives at recent 
conventions were, in 1881, F. M. Joyce, C. S. Olcott, and Will Iglehart; in 1882, 
C. L. Urmston, G. B. Moore, E. L. Martin; in 1883 Worth Merritt; in 1884, J. E. 
Durham and E. H. Terrell; in 1885, J. G. Campbell, F. M.Joyce, and Will Igleheart. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 
XLIII. 

Jesse Wakefield Rucker, A. B '84. 
Second lieutenant in cadet corps; commencement 
speaker; now studj'ing medicine. Greensburg, 
Ind. 

Arthur Thayer, '84. Went to West Point 
Military Academy in '82. Permanent address, 
Evansville, Ind.; temporary address, West Point, 
N. Y. 

XLIV. 

Samuel Morely Rutherford, Ph. B. '85. 
Instructor in preparatory department in '84; now 
principal of Thorntown high school. Perma- 
nent address, Moorefield, Ind.; temporary address, 
Thorntown, Ind. 

William Henry Masters, A. B. '85. Sec- 
ond and first class honors in belles lettres and his- 
tory ; now assistant principal of Lebaiian high 
school. Permanent address, Thorntown, Ind.; 
temporary, Lebanon, Ind. 

William Ransdall Goodwin, A. B. '83. 
Second class honors in modern languages; inter- 
society debater; commencement speaker. Former 
address, Bloomington, 111.; now traveling agent 
for Stockbreeders'' Gazette; address, Chicago, 111. 

Louis Ezra Lathrop, '85. Left college in 
'83; now assistant cashier of Citizens National 
Bank, Greensburg, Ind. 

*Clarence Cumback, '86. Cloud prize; 
died October, 1883, at his home. Greensburg, 
Ind. 

Frank Terr ill Lodge, A. B. '84. Trustee 



of Philologian Literary Society and reply orator 
for same in 1883; orator for undergraduates on 
"Founders and Benefactors Day," January i6th, 
"84; in charge of German classes during absence of 
regular professor in '84; second and first class 
honors; adjutant and captain in cadet corps; class 
editor for three years after graduation; com- 
mencement speaker; lawyer. Detroit, Mich. 

James Garland Campbell, '86. Second 
and first class honors in belles lettres and history; 
local editor De Piiurv Monthly; trustee of Pla- 
tonean Literary Society; captain in cadet corps; 
instructor in penmanship in preparatory depart- 
ment '83; cor. sec; chief. Battle Ground, Ind. 

XLV. 

Wirt Cordry Smith, '87. Tutor in Latin; 
second and first class honors in Latin. Indiana- 
polis, Ind. 

Mark Eugene Hector, '87. Business man- 
ager of the Miraffe; first lieutenant in cadet 
corps; cor. sec. Richmond, Ind. 

Arthur Cunningham, '87. Tutor in Latin; 
second class honors in Latin; first lieutenant in 
cadet corps; chief of battery A. Richmond, Ind. 

William Orville Shepherd, A. B. '85. 
Greek prize; pursuing post-graduate studies at 
Northwestern University. Evanston, 111. 

Clement Milton Zellar, '87. Knights- 
ville, Ind. 

XLVI. 

^Charles Walter Niedringhaus, '88. St. 
Louis, Missouri. Died January, 1886. 
James Bently Tucker, "86. Initiated at 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



33 



Iota. Salem, Ind.; temporary address, Green- 
castle, Ind. 

Algie Perry Gulick, '87. Second lieuten- 
ant in cadet corps; trustee of Platonian Literary 
Society. Rantoul, 111. 

John Phillips Reasoner, '88. Instructor 
in takigraph}', '84; now teaching; will be in col- 
lege next year. Cerro Gordo, 111. 

William Samuel Scott, '88. Left college 
in 1 884. Greencastle, Ind. 

Howard McElroy, '87. Teaching at A.lvin, 
111. Permanent address, Rossville, 111. 

John Helps Bickford, 'SS. Niles, Mich. 

George Howard Murphy, '88. Second 
sergeant in cadet corps; class historian. Per- 
manent address, Greencastle, Ind. 

XLVII. 

William Lincoln Hester, '87. Initiated 
at Pi. New Albany, Ind. 



Harry Bowser, '88. Second lieutenant and 
ranking man of his class in the cadet corps. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

John Lee Benedict, '87. Second lieutenant 
in cadet corps. Rantoul, 111. 

Charles Post Benedict, '89. First ser- 
geant and ranking man of his class in cadet 
corps. Rantoul, 111. 

Isaac Jarvis Hammond, '89. Greencastle, 
Ind. 

John Frederick Clearwaters,'89. Thorn- 
town, Ind. 

XLVIII. 

Frank Perry Irvin, '86. Initiated at Theta. 
Piqua, O. 

Frank Theodore Pennington, '86. Ini- 
tiated at Theta. Tiffin, O. 

SquiRE Robinson Greer, '86. Initiated at 
Theta. Oxford, O. 



34 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



DICKINSON CHAPTER. 
* [The Alpha Sigma, at Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pa.] 

Dickinson was founded in 1783. It was originally a Presbyterian institution, but 
long ago it passed into the hands of the Methodist Episcoi^al church. Women have 
recently been admitted, In the college department there are eight professors and 
about one hundred students. There is also a preparatory school. 

The fraternities are Phi Kappa Psi, Sigma Chi, Theta Delta Chi, Chi Phi, Beta 
Theta Pi, and Phi Delta Theta. Membership varies fi'om six to twenty. 

The Alpha Sigma has had an excellent record ever since its founding in 1874; but 
this sketch can not go back farther than four or five years. In 1881-82 it had a junior 
contest medal and an editor of the college paper; in 1882-83, first honor and valedic- 
tory, third honor, class historian, and also the first freshman honor; in 1883-84, first 
honor in the junior class and also in the sophomore class, and two editors of the col- 
lege paper; 1S84- 85, second honor and salutatory, freshman prize in English, and an 
editor of the college paper. In 1881, and again in 1882, the chapter published a 
college annual, the Minutal. The chapter usually numbers only about eight men. 
It does not admit preparatory students until after they have passed their entrance 
examination. The recent corresponding secretaries have been L. T. Appold, F. G. 
Graham, F. T. Baker, and F. M. Welsh. Baker was chief of the district in 1884-85, 
and Welsh in 1885-86. 



[Admitted since August, 1881. 
XLIII. 

David Brown, '85. Editor Dickinsonian; 
anniversarian Union Philosophical Society; on 
base-ball nine. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Frank Gordon Gr.\ham, A. B. 'S3. Third 
honor; editor .Dickinsonia?i ; on base-ball nine; 
with Kansas City Times. Kansas City, Mo. 

George Francis Pettinos, '85. At Lehigh 
University; editor Lehigh Antinal. Permanent 
address, Carlisle, Pa.; temporary address, Beth- 
lehem, Pa. 

Elbert Williams Osborn, '8v Niagara 
Falls, N. Y. 

XLIV. 

John Ulmstead Detrick, '85. On foot-ball 
and base-ball teams. 108 S. Charles street, Bal- 
timore, Md. 

John Franklin Reigart, '86. Led fresh- 
man and sophomore classes; teaching. North 
Hope, Pa. 

Frank Thomas Baker, A. B. '85. Saluta- 
torian and second honor; editor Dickinsonian; 
on base-ball nine; cor. sec; chief district III.; 
teaching. Mount Holly, N. Y. 

XLV. 

Charles Earl Bikle, '86. Third in junior 
class; on base-ball nine. Hagerstown, Md. 



WiLLARD Geoffrey Lake, '87. Editor 
College Annual; captain of foot-ball eleven; on 
base-ball nine; conductor of Philharmonic So- 
ciety. Seabright, N. J. 

XL VI. 

Franklin Moore Welsh, '88. Freshman 
prize in English; cor. sec ; chief district HL 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lewis Adams Parsels, '89. On foot-ball 
eleven. South Dennis, N. J. 

Gerald Wood Crane Smoot. Tompkins- 
ville, Charles county, Md. 

William Blair Stewart, '87. Editor of 
College Annual, but resigned. Nevvville, Pa. 

Joseph Castle Reynolds. '88. Class his- 
torian. 1 1 27 Green street, Philadelphia. Pa. 

XLVII. 

Albert E. Meily, '89. Harrisburg, Pa. 

John Robinson Todd, '87. Graduate of 
Drew Theological Seminary; editor College An- 
nual. Snow Hill, Md. 



XLVIII. 
Albert Duncan Yocum, '5 



Everett, Pa. 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



35 



HAMPDEN SIDNEY CHAPTER. 
[The Zeta, at Hampden Sidney College, Hampden Sidney College P. O., Va.l 

The college is a Presbyterian institution that was established in 1776. There are 
seven professors and about one hundred and twenty -five students. Almost all of the 
students take the classical course of prescribed studies. Women are not admitted. A 
theological school and a preparatory school are in the immediate neighborhood and 
are managed in sympathy with the college. 

Beta Theta Pi,"Phi Kappa Psi, Chi Phi, Phi Gamma Delta, Sigma Chi, and Kappa 
Sigma are the fraternities, with an average membership of twelve. 

The Zeta was founded in 1850 and is our oldest chapter in Virginia. The recent 
corresponding secretaries have been A. D. Drew, W. D. Spurlin, C. L. Stribling, W. 
M. Hollady,J. D. Eggleston, Jr., H. C. V. Campbell, and W. A. Watson. W^ C. 
White, of Zeta, was chief of the district in i882-'83. At the convention of 1881 the 
chapter was represented by G.J. Ramsay; at that of 18S2, by W. C. White; and at 
that of 1S84, bv C. C. Lewis, H. C. V. Campbell, and A. C. Finley. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 
XI.III. 

Ch.\rles Riddle Stribling, A. B., '84. 
Martinsburg, W. Va. 

Willis Henry Bobock, A. B., '84. Sopho- 
more medal of Phip. Society; divided first 
honor, 18S4; University of Virginia, iSS4-'85. 
Hampden Sidney College, Va. 

XLIV. 

Joseph Duply Eggleston, Jk, '86. Cor. 
sec; delivered senior medal, 1886. Hampden 
Sidney College, Va. 

John Booker Finley, '84. Senior medalist 
of Phip. Society; editor of Hampden Sidney 
Mag-azine; teaching. Present address. Mossy 
Creek, Va.; permanent address, Romney,W.Va. 

XLV. 

William Brodnax Hopkins, '86. Charles- 
town, Jefferson county. W. Va. 

Robert Edward Lee Blanton, '86. Senior 
orator of Union Society. Farmville, Va. 

Charles Cameron Lewis, Jr. ,'87. Charles- 
ton, Kanawha county, W. Va. 

Henry Clay Van Metre Campbell, '86. 
Elected editor-in-chief of Hampden Sidney 
Alaska zine in 1885; cor. sec; chief. Gerards- 
town, W. Va. 

Henry Read McIlwaine, A. B., '85. 
Editor-in-chief of Hampden Sidney Magazine, 
i884-"y5; teaching at Lewisburg, W. Va. Per- 
manent address, Petersburg, Pa. 



XLVI. 

Thomas Thweatt Jones, '87. San Marino. 
Va. 

Hugh Augustus White, '86. Editor and 
manager Magazine in 1885, and business man- 
ager in 1886; commencement orator Phip. 
Society 1885; senior orator, 1S86. Moorefield. 
W. Va. 

William Henry Wilson, '87. Editor and 
manager Magazine in 1SS6; commencement 
orator Phip. Society, 1886. Hampden Sidney 
College, Va. 

Daniel Septimus Evans, Jr., '88. Concord 
Depot, Va. 

Robert Ashlin White, '87. Moorefield, 
W. Va. 

Charles Howes Hammond, '88. 384 N. 
Charles St., Baltimore, Md. 

Abner Crump Hopkins, Jr., '87. Charles- 
town, Jefferson county, W. Va. 

Walter Allen Watson, '87. Editor and 
manager Magazine in 1S85; commencement 
orator Phip. Society, 1886; cor. sec. Jennings' 
Ordinary, Nottoway county, Va. 

James Maxwell Stribling, '88. Martins- 
burg, W. Va. 

XLVII. 

James Poague Epes,'88. Blackstone, Va. 

Angus Robertson Shaw. Student in the 
Union Theological Seminary. Hampden Sidney 
College, Va. 



36 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



HANOVEK CHAPTER. 
[The Iota, at Hanover College, Hanover, Ind.] 

Hanover was founded In 1833 and is controlled by the Presbyterians. Women 
are admitted. In the college department there are six professors and about ninety 
students. There is also a preparatory department. 

The fraternities are Beta Theta Pi, Phi Gamma Delta, Phi Delta Theta, Sigma Chi, 
Delta Tau Delta. A chapter commonly numbers about ten mem.bers. 

The Iota dates from 1S53. The recent corresponding secretaries have been R. E. 
Schuh, G. W. Wyatt, G. W. Giboney. D. C. Blyth, J. W. Robbins, and J. E. Abrams. 
Robbins was chief of the district in 1884-85. At the convention of 1881 the repre- 
sentatives were E. E. Silliman, L. J. Duncan, and Rev. E.J. Brown; and at that of 
18S2, Rev. E.J. Brown, J. B. Tucker, and R. E. Schuh. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 

XLIII. 

James Bently Tucker, '85. Now at De 
Pauw University. Home, Salem, Ind. 

Virgil Emmet Tucker. '86. Insurance 
agent. Omaha, Neb. 

Smith O'Neal, '86. Teacher. Permanent 
address, Carrollton, Ky. 

Rev. William Bell Riley, A. B. '85. 
Associate editor Hanover Monthly; f^^^iox Bap- 
tist cliurches at Warsaw and Carrollton, Ky., 
since June, '85; now student at Baptist Theolog- 
ical Seminary, Louisville, Ky. Present address, 
Waverly Hotel, Louisville, Ky, 



XLV. 

Thomas Reed Bridges, '87. 
Kv. 



Carrollton, 



XLVI. 

James Elva Abrams, '87. Moscow, O. 

Richard Francis Evans. '86. Laconia. 
Ind. 

Orlando Bronson Riley, '87. Student 
Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, Kv., 
i8S4-'S5. New Liberty, Ky. 

Oscar Snyder Wilson, '88. Swanville. 
Ind. 

Winfield Scott Smith, '88. Vincennes, 
Ind. 

Junius Coston Clemmons, '88. Hanover. 
Ind. 

XLVII. 

John Wesley Rowlett, '89. Bedford, Ky. 
Robert Matthew Dillon, '89. Madison, 
Ind. 

Walter Levi Riley, '89. New Liberty, 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



37 



HARVARD CHAPTER. 
[The Eta, at Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.] 

Harvard University comprises the college, the scientific school, the divinity school, 
the law school, the medical school, the dental school, the school of agriculture and 
horticulture, several museums and laboratories, the observatory, the library, and the 
graduate department. The total number of instructors is about two hundred. In the 
college there are about one thousand students, all candidates for A. B. There are 
usuallv five or six hundred students in the other departments. In the college the 
course after freshman year is wholly elective, and the practice of the more careful 
students is to devote their last two years almost wholly to some special line of study. 
There are good opportunities for advanced work in almost any branch: for ex- 
ample, each of the following subjects has from ten to twenty electives — Greek, 
Latin, French, German, Philosophy, History, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, and 
Natural History; and besides there are courses in many other subjects. In all de- 
partments of the university text-books are used comparatively little, and great stress 
is laid upon original research. 

There are chapters of Alpha Delta Phi, Beta Theta Pi, Zeta Psi, Theta Delta Chi, 
and Delta Upsilon. These are named in the order of original foundation; but no one 
of them has had a continuous existence. Many of the members of the fraternities 
are also members of a sophomore club familiarly called the Dickey, which many 
years ago was a chapter of Delta Kappa Epsilon. 

The Eta was founded in 1S43 and was revived in 18S0. The recent corresponding 
secretaries have been H. W. 'Winkley, E. L. Underwood, W. M. Mclnnes, M. W. 
Fredrick, A. R. Baum, and Walter Alexander. Mclnnes was chief of the district in 
iSS3-'S4. The representatives at the convention of 18S1 were Eugene VVambaugh 
and Chambers Baird, Jr.; at that of 18S3, the same; at that of 1SS3, A. de R. McNair, 
E. Wambaugh, Howard Lilienthal, and H. W. Winklcy; at that of 1S84, E. Wam- 
baugh and C. Baird, Jr.; and at that of 1885, C. Baird, Jr. Baird and Wambaugh 
have been editors of the Beta Theta Pi, and the latter was general secretary from 
1881 to 1884. Hon. Peleg Emory Aldrich, one of the founders, is a member of the 
board of directors. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 

XLIII. 

William Hall Williams, '83. Melrose, 
Mass. 

XLIV. 

William Morrow McInnes, '85. Cor. 
sec. and chief, i Akron street, Boston, Mass. 

Bartow Bee Ramage, '84. Came from 
Alpha Chi. Newberry, S. C. 

XLV. 

Frederic Clark Hood, '86. 31 Crescent 
avenue, Chelsea, Mass. 

Edward Staples Drown, '84. Newbury- 
port, Mass. 

Juliax Clifford Jaynes, '84 theo. Ad- 
mitted at Alpha Pi. West Newton, Mass. 

Nathax Cushman Stevens, '83. Admitted 
at Beta. Willoughby, O. 

Ralph Denton Wilson, '83. 2 Divinity 
avenue, Cambridge, Mass. 

Marcus White Fredrick, '84. Member 
of Pierian Sodality; cor. sec. Virginia City, 
Nev. 



John Benson Jenkins, '85 law. From 
Alpha Kappa and Omicron. Norfolk. Va. 

XLVI. 

Gilisert Norrks Jones, '84. Phi Beta 
Kappa. Bangor, Me. 

Edward Everett Blodgett, '87. 397 Bea- 
con street, Boston, Mass. 

Alexander Robert Baum, '87. Cor. sec. 
170!; Powell street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Walter Alexander, '87. Cor. sec. St 
Charles, Mo. 

Herbert Tufts Allen, '86. Catcher uni- 
versity base-ball nine. Corner Boston and 
Washington streets, Somerville, Mass. 

Edwin Joseph Meeks, '87. 50 East Eighty- 
third street, New York, N. Y. 

Alfred Gaither, '87. Special. 131 Broad- 
way, Cincinnati, O. 

Henry C. Holt, '86. Winchester, Mass. 

H. W. Magill, '86. Cincinnati, O. 

Clinton Collins, '86. Cincinnati,©. 

P. S. Howe, '86. Brookline, Mass. 

W. A. Brooks, '87. Haverhill, Mass. 

F. M. Tilden, '87. Chicago, 111. 

Wakefield Baker, '87. San Francisco, Cal. 



38 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY CHAPTER. 
[The Pi, at Indiana University, Bloomington Ind. 

The Indiana University belongs to the state. In the college department there are 
usually about one hundred and sixty students. Degrees are conferred in arts, letters, 
philosophy, and science. During the latter half of the course the studies are largely 
elective. There are eighteen instructors. Besides the college, there is a preparatory 
department, with about one hundred students. Women are admitted to both depart- 
ments. 

Beta Theta Pi, Phi Delta Theta, Sigma Chi, Phi Kappa Psi, and Phi Gamma Delta 
are the fraternities. Preparatory students are admitted. Chapters average seventeen 
members. The various fraternities and the non-fraternity men are constantly 
forming combinations. 

Since the convention of iS8i the corresponding secretaries of the Pi have been 
G. \y. Cromer, A. D. Moftet, A. C. Patton, N. L. Bunnell, and F. W. Walters. F. C. 
Davis, O. P. Erskine, and J. L. Mackey were the representatives at the convention of 
1881; A. D. Moffet at that of 18S2; and A. C. Patton at those of 1883 and 1884. The 
chapter is usually much smaller than its rivals, seldom exceeding twelve members. 
It was founded in 1845. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 
XLIII. 

Frank How.^rd Hughes, '85. Blooming- 
ton, Ind. 

Melville Greshardt Eshman, '84. Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

Herman Carr, '85. Columbus, Ind. 

Elmer Elsworth Mullinix. '85. Clover- 
dale, Ind. 

Clarence Milton Parks, '85. Studying 
medicine at Cincinnati. Sullivan. Ind. 

Orris Everett Mlllixix, '88. Cloverdale. 
Ind. 

Wade Hampton Galloway. '86. Gosport, 
Ind. 

XLIV. 

Joseph Wright Wharton. 965 North 
Mis.^issippi street. Indianapolis, Ind. 

Adam Carl Patton. '84. Law student. 
Greelex', Col. 

Morton Lauge Gould, '84. 426 North 
Fifth street. Terre Haute, Ind. 

Virgil E. Tucker, '86. New Philadelphia. 
Ind. 

Albert Rabb, '87. Second on civil service 
contest; captain and catcher of college ball nine; 
president of Oratorical Association and business 
ma.na.gev o^ Sf II (fell t. Snoddy's Mills, Ind. 

Howard D. Maxwell, '86. Now at Wa- 
bash College. Rockville, Ind. 

XLV. 

William Lincoln Hester, '87. Now at 
De Pauw. New Albany, Ind. 



Charles Henry Oler, '87. Economy, Ind. 
Newton Lomer Bunnell, '87. Teaching. 
Green's Fork, Ind. 

XLVI. 

Homer Leonard, '87. Smithville. Ind. 

Francis Marion Walters, '87. Greens- 
burg, Ind. 

Albert Miller, '88. Bloomington, Ind. 

Robert Foster Hight, '88. Bloomington, 
Ind. 

W.\lter Dunn Howe, '90. Ft. Snelling, 
Minn. 

Joseph Francis Thornton, '88. Associate 
editor of Student. Bedford, Ind. 

Charles Morton Cunningham, '88. 
Greensburg, Ind. 

Bedford Vance Sudbury, '89. Blooming- 
ton, Ind. 

XLVII. 

Charles Rolland Madison. '90. Bloom- 
ington, Ind. 

Daniel W. Crockett, '89. Sudbur\-. Ind. 

John Singleton Shannon, '88. Greensburg. 
Decatur county, Ind. 

Harry Edmund Wise. '88. 1409 Leaven- 
worth street, San Francisco. Cal. 

Walter Wyatt. '90. Cu*ler, Ind. 

Joseph Henry' Howard. '88. Came from 
Butler; charter member of Alpha Psi; second 
prize on temperance contest. 308 North Ash 
street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Chas. S. Thomas. Pendleton, Ind. 

John Detwiler Atkinson. Pennsville, Pa. 



THE YOUNGER MEMI^EliS. 



39 



UNIVERSITY OF IOWA CHAPTER. 
[The Alpha Beta, at the University of Iowa, Iowa City, Ia.1 

In the college department of the University of Iowa there are about two hundred 
and fifty students, and in the law and medical schools there are about three hundred 
and liftv. There is no preparatory department. 

Beta "Theta Pi, Phi Kappa Psi, Delta Tau Delta, Phi Delta Theta, and Sigma Chi 
are represented. 

The membership of the Alpha Beta varies from twelve to twenty. The chapter 
was founded in 1866. Tlie recent corresponding secretaries have been H. VV. Sea- 
man, W. N. Baker, II. P. Mozier, R. C. Lake, W. F. Mozier, and E. H. Sabin. H. 
P. Mozier was chief of the district in iS83-'84. T. G. Newman attended the conven- 
tion of 18S1; J. I. Gilbert that of 1SS2; R. C. Lake and M. H. Dey that of 1884; and 
C. M. Porter that of 18S5. W. B. Burnet of this chapter is a member of the board of 
directors. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 



XLIII. 



Elbert Leland Johxsox, 'cS4. Member of 
Lainbda. Clay Centre, Kans. 

Donald D. Doxnan, '85. Divided sopho- 
more elocution prize '82; declaimer on Irving 
exhibition '83; secretary state senate '86; editor 
Elkcuhr Journal.. Elkader, la. 

Harry Douglas Allen, '85. Waterloo, la. 

S.\MUKL Parker Gilbert, '84. Burlington, 
la. 

XLIV. 

Harry Preston Mozier, '84. Declaimer 
on Zet. exhibition '82; one of commencement 
speakers. Permanent address, Iowa City, la.; 
present address, 1:^28 Q^ street N. W., Washing- 
ton, D.C. 

Frank Orrin Lowden, '85. Debater on 
Zet. exhibition '83 and '85; valedictorian. Bur- 
lington, la. 

CHARLE.S Morseman Porter, '86. Iowa 
City, la. 

Allen Shelburn Burrows, '86. Norfolk, 
Neb. 

Norman Madison Campbell, '86. Sopho- 
more elocution prize '83; Irving exhibition 
debater '85; Irving June orator '85; on Videttc 
Reporter '83-'85. Colorado Springs, Col. 

William Sumner Harwood. On C/iica<^o 
Inter- Ocean. 2g Hermitage avenue, Chicago, 
111.; former address, Charles City, la. 



William Fov Mozier, '86. On Vidette 
Reporter. Iowa City, la. 

XLV. 

William Morse W^oodward, '86. Elocu- 
tion prize '82; Irving exhibition declaimer '84; 
captain foot-ball team. Independence, la. 

Elbridge II. Sabix, '86. Clinton, la. 

Marvin Hill Dev, '87. Iowa City, la. 

XLVI. 

liuwYX Fraxk Browx, '87. Irving exhi- 
bition debater '86. Jefterson, la. 

Richard Drew Musser, '88. Muscatine, la. 

David PowellJoiix'sox, Jr.,'88. Muscatine, 
la. 

Edward Moses Ne.vllev, '87. In busi- 
ness at Burlington, la. 

XLVII. 

Brod Bedford Davis, '89. Lewis, la. 
John- Howard Gates, '88. Waterloo, la. 
Fred S. Watkins, '88. Davenport, la. 
George Spencer Wri(;ht, 'Sg. Council 
BhifFs, la. 

XLVIII. 

Frank Prextice Wright, '89. Council 
Bluffs la. 

George Willi.\m Ixgham, '89. Algona, la. 

Walter Lixcolx Axderson, '89. Sidney, 
la. 

George Washixgtox Swigart. Maquo- 
keta, la. 




40 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



IO"WA A¥ESLEYA]S" CHAPTER. 
[The Alpha Epsilon, at Iowa Wesleyan University, Mt. Pleasant, la.] 

The college department of the Iowa Wesleyan University has twelve instructors 
and about one hundred and twenty-five students. There are about one hundred and 
seventy-five students in the preparatory department and the conservatory of music. 
Women are admitted. 

The fraternities are Beta Theta Pi and Phi Delta Theta. There is a strong anti- 
fraternity sentiment, fostered by the president. 

The Alpha Epsilon was founded in iS6S. It usually numbers about ten members. 
Since the convention of iSSi, G. W. Latham, Edson Gregg, G. S. Williams, and W. B. 
Hanna have been corresponding secretaries. Hanna represented the chapter at the 
convention of 1SS5. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 
XLIIl. 

Will Lewis Collins, "84. In Knoxville 
National Bank. Knoxville, la. 

George Andrew Hare, '84. Now in 
medical department of University of Michigan. 
Permanent address, Mt. Pleasant, la. 

Carl Schurz Williams, '84. Represented 
the students on University Day, '84 ; cor. sec. 
Now at Belleville, Kan.; permanent address, 
Centre\ille, la. 

XLIV. 

Asbury Nelson Loper, '84. Teaching in 
Newton, Kan. Permanent address, Sperrj-. la. 

John Waugh Laney, '86. Rosendale, Mo. 

Howard Thom.vs Paschal, '86. Studying 
law at Creston, la. 

Clyde Pleasanton Paschal, '86. Study- 
ing law in Creston, la. 



Walter Teis Smith, '86. At University of 



Michigan. Member of Lambda, Pepin, 111. 

William Blakeway Hanna, '87. Assist- 
ant in chemical laboratory, '82-83 and '85-'S6; 
cor. sec. Danville, la. 

XLVI. 

James Leigh Woolson, '87. Local editor 
hnva Wesleyan, '85-86. Mt. Pleasant, la. 

Frederic Lincoln Toennigs, '88. Pepin, 
111. 

Byron Lamont Close Gann, '89. Mary- 
ville, Mo. 

Joseph Houseman Newp.old, '89. Mt. 
Pleasant, la. 

XLVII. 

Owen Gregg WiLSon, '89. Washington, la. 
Ch.\rles Robert Wooden, '89. Centreville, 



la. 



Paul Bird Woolson, '88. Mt. Pleasant, la. 
Ernest Frederick Smith, '89. Pepin, 111. 
Otto Henry Unland, '89. Pepin, 111. 



TEE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



41 



JOHNS HOPKINS CHAPTER. 
[The Alpha Chi, at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md.] 

The Johns Hopkins University is best known because of the prominence that it 
gives to post-graduate study. Yet there are also undergraduates. There are usually 
about one hundred and seventy-five post-graduates, one hundred undergraduates, and 
forty or fifty special students. There are forty-three instructors. The institution is 
onlv ten years old; and its almost immediate advance to the front rank was due to its 
great wealth and intelligent management. 

The only fraternities are Beta Theta Pi, Phi Kappa Psi, and Delta Phi. As the 
university is situated in the heart of the city and has no dormitories, the students are 
very much scattered. Besides, each one is pursuing a specialty and so meets only 
the few who are studying in the same line. The fraternities are encouraged by the 
authorities as furnishing the best means of overcoming these difficulties and of pro- 
moting acquaintance among the students. 

.Since the convention of iSSi the corresponding secretaries of the Alpha Chi have 
been Edgar Goodman, W. S. Bayley, J. P. Campbell, and A. R. L. Dohme. The 
chapter was founded in 1878. It was represented in 1881 and in 1884 by S. G. 
Boyle; and in 1885 by Lee Sale. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 
XLIII. 

Louis Garthe, '82. Reporter for the Balli- 
viorc StiH. Baltimore, Md. 

Jonx Deering Lord. Jr., '84. On ball nine; 
now studying law at Columbia and member of 
Alpha Alpha. Baltimore, Md. 

WiLLi.vM Shirley Bayley, '83. Assistant 
in mineralogy '82; assistant in chemistry '83; 
holder of lellowship in chemistry, "S4-"S5, and in 
geology 'S5-'S6; cor. sec; now studying miner- 
alogy at the Johns Hopkins Uni\ersity. 366 
North avenue W., Baltimore, Md. 

Arthur Thomas Collins, '83. Assistant 
in chemistry '85. Mt. Washington, Md. 

XLIV. 

William Beatty Harlax, '83. Attornej- 
at law. Baltimore, Md.; residence, Cliurchville, 
Md. 

Henry Winslow Willi.vms, '83. LL. B., 
University of ^laryland, '85; attorney at law. 
Baltimore, Md. 

De Witt B. Brace. Admitted at Upsilon; 
A. B., Boston University, '81. Boston, Mass. 

Frederick Schiller Lee, Ph. D. '84. 
Graduate scliolarship in biology '83, and fellow- 
ship; admitted at Beta Zeta; A. B., St. Lawrence 
University, '78; now studying in Europe. Fort 
Plain, N. Y. 

Henry H.vzlehurst Wieg.\nd, '85. Still 
at Johns Hopkins University. 272 Madison ave- 
nue, Baltimore, Md. 

Maurice Fels, '83. LL. B., University of 
Pennsylvania, '85; attorney at law. Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

John Pendleton Campbell, '85. Cor. sec; 
graduate scholarship '85-'S6. Permanent address, 
Charlestown, W. Va.; temporary address, 352 N. 
Eutaw street, Baltimore, Md. 

XLV. 

Mansfield Theodore Peed. A. M., Ran- 
dolph Macon, '78, and member of Alpha Xi. 
Petersburg, Va. 



Herbert Charles Elmer. Member of Beta 
Delta. Home, Rushford, N. Y.; temporary 
address, 93 W. Preston street, Baltimore, Md. 

Theodore Hough, '86. Hopkins honorary 
scholarship '84-86. 181 McCuUoh street, Balti- 
more, Md. 

XLVI. 

Evert B. Smedes. A. B., University of 
North Carolina, '83; teaching. Raleigh, N. C. 

Alfred Robert Louis Dohme, '86. Cor. 
sec; on ball nine; vice-president '86. 27 Hol- 
lins street, Baltimore, Md. 

John Randolph Winslow, '86. 23 Mc- 
CuUoh street, Baltimore, Md. 

James Cl.\rk Fifield, '87. Permanent 
address, Kearney, Neb.; temporary, 182 N. Eutaw 
street, Baltimore, Md. 

William Flood Smith, '86. Hopkins hon- 
orary scholarship '84-'86. 45 Harlem avenue, 
Baltimore, Md. 

Alfred Dodge Cole. Appointed professor 
of chemistry and physics at Denison Universitv 
'85; came from Kappa. Permanent address, 
Beverly, Mass.; present address, Granville, O. 

James Lee Love. A. B., University of North 
Carolina, '84. Appointed assistant professor of 
mathematics at University of North Carolina '85. 
Permanent address, Gastonia, N. C. 

XLVII. 

Henry R. Slack, Jr. Graduated at Mary- 
land College of Pharmacy in '85; received three 
prizes from Georgia Pharmacy Association; now 
in business. La Grange, Ga. 

John White, Jr., '88. Permanent address, 
Poolesville, Md.; temporary address, 258 Linden 
avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Ja.mes Higgins McIntosh. A. B., New- 
berry College, '84. Home address, Newberry, 
S. C; temporary address, 333 N. Eutaw street, 
Baltimore, Md. 

Joseph Hoeing Kastle. A. B., Kentucky 
University, '84; graduate scholarship in chemis- 
try 'S5-'86. Permanent address, Lexington, Ky.; 
temporary address, 333 N. Eutaw street, Balti- 
more, Md. 



42 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



Charles Edward Simon, '88. Hopkins 
scholarship '85. 201 Linden avenue, Baltimore, 
Md. 

William Howard Miller, '88. Hopkins 
honorary scholarship '85-88. 141 E. Townsend 
street, Baltimore, Md. 

Frederick George Young, '86. Home, 
Beaver Dam, Wis ; temporary address, 87 W. 
Preston street, Baltimore, Md. 



George Murray Campbell. A. B., Dla- 

housie University, '82. Home, Truro, N. S.; 
temporary address, 185 Linden avenue, Balti- 
more, Md. 

Thomas Spear Fearn, '88, Home, Sum- 
mit, N. J.; temporary address, 132 W. Madison 
street, Baltimore, Md. 

Edward Carey Applegarth, '87. Hopkins 
honorary scholarship '84-87. 632 W. Fayette 
street, Baltimore, Md. 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



-13 



UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS CHAPTER. 
fThe Alpha Nu, at the University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kas.] 

In the college department of the University of Kansas there are about two hundred 
students, one-third being women. Degrees are conferred in arts and in science. 
There is great freedom in choice of studies after the sophomore year. There are also 
normal, law, pharmacy, music, and preparatory departments. The institution is 
under the management of a board of regents appointed by the governor of the state, 
and receives its financial support from the sale of university lands and from appro- 
priations made by the legislature. 

The fraternities represented in the order of their founding are Beta Theta Pi, Phi 
Kappa Psi. Phi Gamma Delta, Phi Delta Theta, Sigma Chi, and Sigma Nu. 

The Alpha Nu was represented in the convention of 'Si by Scott Hopkins, Lucius 
Luscher, and C. G. Upton, and in the convention of '85 by C. D. Dean, P. L. 
Soper, and C. E. Parker. In 'S3 and '84 it was represented by Maj. W. C. Ransom of 
Lambda, who, at the time of the founding of Alpha Nu, in 1S73, was a resident of 
Lawrence and the chief promoter of the new chapter. The recent corresponding 
secretaries have been L. H. Leach, J. E. Curry, and VV. T. Cay wood. Two of the 
recent chiefs of the district, Scott Hopkins and C. F. Scott, are alumni of this chapter. 

Charles Frederick Foley, LL. B. '84. 
Class leader; principal Armourdale schools. 
Armourdale, Kas. 

Robert Crawford Rankin. Lawrence, 
Kas. 

Archibald Watson. Champion-prizewin- 
ner on field day. Shawnee, Kas. 

Charles Dickey Dean, B. S. '84. Class 
day orator; business manager and president of 
Courier; now city editor on Laxvrcncc Daily 
'Journal. Lawrence. Kas. 

Olin Templin, '86. Cockins prize in math- 
ematics; debater Normal Society; assistant pro- 
fessor of mathematics; leader of class. Canon 
City, Col. 

Webster William Davis. Orator in con- 
test in Orophilian Society; land attorney and 
agent. Garden City, Kas. 

Carl Smith. With Day Theater Co., 
Canada. Home, Kansas City, Mo. 

William Talbott Caywood, '89. Cor. 
sec. Vining, Kas. 

Edwid Fiske Stimpson, '88. I^awrence, 
Kas. 

Marcus N. Breman. McPherson, Kas. 

XLVII. 

Frank Everett Reed, '88. Orator on 
Orophilian contest. Newton, Kas. 

Thomas Francis Doran. '88. First prize 
in faculty declamatory contest; second Courier 
prize for chapel rhetoricals. Council Grove. Kas. 

IL\rry Blckingham, '89. Lawrence, Kas. 

Walter Moore Tomlin, '89. Winsfield. 
Kas. 

Lawrence Theodore Smith, '89. Con- 
cordia, Kas. 

Joshua Barlow Lippincott, '87. Editor 
on Courier; on foot-ball team. Lawrence, Kas. 

Samuel Burkholder, Jr.,'S6. Essay prize. 
Canada, Kas. 

William E. Borah, '89. Lyons, Kas. 

William Tell Reed, '87. Orophilian de- 
bater in Oread-Orophilian contest. Newton, 
Kas. 

Campbell McGee Watson, '90. Shawnee, 
Kas. 

John Weightman, '87. Topeka, Kan. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 
XLIII. 

Warren Perry. Troy, Kas. 

Henry Fremont Smith, B. S. '85. Class 
leader; obtained faculty appointment for com- 
mencement day; assistant surveyor of Cowley 
coimty. Wellington, Kas. 

Wilson Sheridan Kinnear. Y.diAor Meade 
Centre (rlobe ; mayor of Meade Centre. Meade 
Centre. Kas. 

Ch.\rles Edwin Parker. In '82-'83 was in 
Columbia School of Mines and member of Alpha 
Alj)ha; in '83 entered pharmacy department 
University of Michigan; member and cor. sec. of 
Lambda; graduated from department in '85; 
foreman of Leis Chemical Mfg. Co. Lawrence, 
Kas. 

Oliver David Walker, B. S. 'S3. On ball 
nine; graduated '86 at Keokuk Medical College 
with honors of class. Blue Mound, Kas. 

XLIV. 

George William Robinson. Engineering, 
with headquarters at Denver, Col. 

Ralph Emerson Stout. Reporter for 
Kansas City Star. Kansas City, Mo. 

Thomas W. Houston. Real estate agent. 
Garnett, Kas. 

XLV. 

Charles Ernest iL\LL. Real estate agent. 
Hutchinson, Kas. 

Oscar Henry Pochler. '88. Laurence, 
Kas. 

John Attie S.\rgent. Ticket agent Fort 
Scott c^ Gulf R. R. at Kansas City, Mo. 

Joseph Ellsworth Curry, '86. On foot- 
ball team; orator Orophilian Society in Oread- 
Orophilian contest:editoron ['niversity Courier 
and Uiiiz'ersifv Reiieiv; orator from senior class 
on Washington's birthday; cor. sec. Norton- 
ville, Kas. 

De Witt Clinton Bower. Assistant cashier 
in bank. Delphos, Kas. 

Clarence Ernest Wood, A.B.'84. Wame- 
go, Kas. 

XLVI. 

Henry Lawrence Call, LL. B. '85. 
Topeka, Kas. 



44 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



KENYON CHAPTER. 
[The Beta Alpha, at Kenyon College, Gambler, O.] 

Kenyon College has nine professors and about sixty students. There are two 
courses, the classical and the philosophical, each composed wholly of prescribed 
studies. A theological seminary is connected with the college. A stone building for 
the library has been erected recently. Kenyon is the most important western insti- 
tution belonging to the Protestant Episcopal church. 

The fraternities are Delta Kappa Epsilon, Theta Delta Chi, Alpha Delta Phi, Psi 
Upsilon, Beta Theta Phi, and Delta Tau Delta. A chapter's membership varies from 
one to fifteen, the present average being about six. 

The Beta Alpha, founded in 1S79, has been successful, though meeting long- 
established rivals in a field by no means large enough for so many chapters. Its 
membership has averaged nine. The corresponding secretaries for the last four years 
and a half have been J. E. Good, E. M. Benedict, and G. C. Cox. The representa- 
tives at recent conventions have been C. D. Williams and W. K. L. Warwick in 
iSSi; J. E. Good, W. S. Taylor, and A. M. Snyder in 1S82; Good and Warwick in 
1SS3; and R. B. Bloodgood, A. M. Snyder, and H. C. Ferris in 1S84. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 
XLIII. 

Warren Edward Russell, '85. On ball 
nine and prominent in athletics; entered Am- 
herst in '84 and became member of Beta Iota. 
Massillon, O. 

Martin Armstrong Mayo, '85. Editor-in- 
rhief of Advance ; now at Cincinnati Law School. 
Lima, O. 

Alonzo Mitchell Snyder, A. B. '85. 
Inter-collegiate prize for best general athlete; 
editor J^cveiUr; studying law. Gallon, O. 

Robert Bennett Wynkoop, '85. Division 
superintendent W. U. Telegraph. Crestline, O. 

XLIV. 

Ernest Milnor Benedict, A. B.'85. Editor 
of .(4f/r;rt«ce; Phi Beta Kappa; honor man; cor. 
sec; now survej-ing with C. & N. R. R. in Ken- 
tucky. Permanent address, 369 W. Seventh 
street, Cincinnati, O.; temporary address, Glas- 
gow, Ky. 

XLV. 

Edward Vance Bope, A. B. '85, Now at 
law school of University of Michigan and mem- 
ber of Lambda. Findlaj, O. 

George Clarke Cox, '86. Kenyon Day 
orator; editor of Reveille; class president; cor. 
sec. Delhi, O. 



Henry Carr Ferris, '87. Left Kenyon in 
'84, entered Stevens, and is member of Sigma. 
337 Franklin street, Cleveland, O. 

Kenyon Bronson Conger, '87. Bicycle 
prize; editor of Reveille. Akron, O. 

Harry Newton Hill, '87. Engaged in iron 
and steel business. 3 Franklin Court, Cleveland, 
O. 

George Strain Cox, "87. Now at Chicago 
Medical College. Permanent address, Terre 
Haute, Ind.; temporary* address, Twenty-sixth 
street and Paine avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Cleveland Keith Benedict, '87. 369 W. 
Seventh street, Cincinnati, O. 

Charles Everitt Tuller. '87. Stock 
dealer at Dublin. Address, Dublin, O. 

XLVl. 

Irving Booth Todd, '84. Editor of .-Irft'^/zrc- 
Phi Beta Kappa; valedictorian. Permanent 
address, Manhattan, Kas.;now at Frankfort, Ky. 

Albert Coudon Whitaker, '88. Now 
with Whitaker Iron Co. 2227 Chaplin street, 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

Frank Herschel Briggs,'8S. Painesville, O. 

Eber Theran Tuller, '88. Teaching. 
Dublin, O. 

Harry Curtis Devin, '88. Mt. Vernon, O. 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



45 



MADISON CHAPTER. 
[The Beta Theta, at Madison University, Hamilton, N. Y.l 

Madison University is a Baptist institution. It comprises a theological seminal y, a 
college, and a preparatory school. In the college there are ten instructors and about 
one hundred students. Almost all of the students take the classical course of pre- 
scribed studies. 

The fraternities are confined to the college department. Delta Kappa Epsilon, 
Delta Upsilon, and Beta Theta Pi have chapters. Delta Kappa Epsilon owns a hall, 
and Delta Upsilon owns a chapterhouse. 

The Beta Theta w^as founded in 1880 upon the basis of a local organization called 
the Adelphian Society. The names of such of the Adelphian alumni as have become 
members of the Beta Theta Pi since August, 1881, are inserted in the list of new 
members given below. The corresponding secretaries since the Chicago convention 
have been Walter Cook, C. J. Pope, C. C. Van Kirk, A. M. Dyer, and W. H. Craw- 
shaw. E. D. W. Petteys was chief of the district in 1882-83. C- J- Pope was at 
the convention of 1881; Dyer and C. E. Ha worth at that of '82; Dyer, A. H. Cole, 
Van Kirk, and PI. C. Lyman at that of '83; E. C. Harding, H. E. Slaught, and C. H. 
Douglass at that of '84. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 
XLIII. 

Charles Henry Douglass, A. B., 'S5. 
Second Dodge entrance prize; second Lasher 
essay prize; editor-in-cliief of A/ad/soficfisis; 
assistant professor in rhetoric, i8S4-'85; vale- 
dictorian; Phi Beta Kappa; teacher. Delhi, 
N. Y. 

Rev. William Josiah Qlincy, A. B., '76. 
Fourth jNIontgomery prize in oratory; Baptist 
minister. Broadaibin, N. Y. 

Rev. Judsox Kincaid Folwell, A. B., '78. 
First Osborn mathematical prize; second Rojce 
price in declamation; Phi Beta Kappa; Baptist 
minister. Bayonne, N. Y. 

Albion Morris Dyer, A. B., '84. Cor. 
.sec; journalist. With Evcnhig Telegram. 
Youngstown, O. 

XLIV. 

Dr. Elmer Gardiner Kern, Ph. B., '78. 
Studied at Hahnemann Medical College, Phila- 
delphia; degree of M. D.; physician. Her- 
kimer, N. Y. 

Rev. David Hart Cooper, '75. Studied in 
Carson College; Baptist minister. Waverley, 
N. Y. 

Rev. Charles Pitman Peachy Fox, A. B., 
'75. Royce prize declamation; Baptist minister. 
Washington, Kan. 

Rev. Harry Scott Schwartz, A. B., '76. 
Studied at University at Lewisburg; Baptist 
minister. Gouverneur, N. Y. 

Rev. Martin L.\ Burn Rugg, 'So. Baptist 
minister. Salem, Oi-egon. 

Alfred Burt Taylor, '86. Merchant. 
Palmyra, N. Y. 

Robert Douglass Briggs, '86. Editor of 
College Annual., '86; farmer. Grand Ledge, 
Mich. 

William Edward Weed, '86. Second 



Osborn mathematical prize; first Lasher essay 
prize; second Kingsford prize in declamation; 
editor of Madisoncnsis, i885-'86. Clifton Park, 
N. Y. 

XLV. 

Frank Amner Gallup, '88. Third Dodge 
entrance prize. Sparta, Tenn. 

William Henry Crawshaw, '87. First 
Allen essay prize; editor of College Annual., '86; 
editor of Madi.<:onensis, i885-'87; assistant pro- 
fessor of rhetoric; cor. sec, iS83-'86. -521 
North Front street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Homer Child Lyman, '87. Business man- 
ager of Afadixonensis, iS85-'S7. North Adams, 
Mass. 

Martin Remington Nelson, '86. Ac- 
countant's office of Michigan Central Railroad. 
Detroit, Mich. 

XLVt. 

Rev. Eldon Herbert Lovett, '75. Baptist 
minister. Long Island City, N. Y. 

William James Moore, '86. Studied at 
Columbia College. 125 Pennington street, 
Newark, N. J. 

Charles Clark Pierce, '88. Walton, 
N. Y. 

XLVII. 

Albert John Kimmel, '86. Studied at 
Denison University. Kendallville, O. 

Henry H. Hamilton, '84. Lawyer. Rock- 
ford, 111. 

George Henry Meyer, '89. Second Dodge 
entrance prize. Hamilton, N. Y. 

Horace Grant McKean, '89. Angora, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

WiLLi.\M Andrus St. John, '87. Highland, 
Mich. 

Alvah Edward Knapp, '89. Marblehead, 
Mass. 

Edward Marsh.vll Van Kirk, '89. Green 
wich, N. Y. 



46 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



MAINE STATE COLLEGE CHAPTER. 
[The Beta Eta, at Maine State College, Orono, Me.] 

The Maine State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts owes its origin to 
the national land grant, and is controlled by the state. By the will of the late ex- 
governor Abner Coburn it receives one hundred thousand dollars in 1886. There are 
courses in civil engineering and mechanical engineering, leading to the degree of 
B. C. E. and B, M. E.; and there are courses in agriculture, in chemistry, and in 
general science and literature, each leading to B. S. Almost all of the students 
choose the courses in civil engineering, mechanical engineering, and chemistry. 
Women are admitted, but onlv a few are in attendance. There are ten professors 
and about one hundred students. 

The fraternities are Q^ T. V., Beta Theta Pi, and Kappa Sigma. 

The Beta Eta usually has about eighteen members. It was founded in 1878, upon 
the basis of the E. C, a society that dated from 1S75. For several years it has 
published the college annual, T/ic Peiiduhim. The recent corresponding secretaries 
have been C. S. Bickford, W. R. Pattangall, R. K. Jones, Jr., and J. D. Lazell. 
Jones is chief of the district. E. S. Abbot was at the convention of 1882; C. S. 
Bickford at that of 1883; and L. W. Taylor at that of 1884. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 

XLIII. 

William Philbrook, '85, also 'SS. Bethel, 
Me. 

XLIV. 

Charles Sampson Williams, '85. Port- 
land, Me. 

Frank Eugene Hull, '85. Captain ball 
nine; eA'\tor Pendulum; class marshal; teacher. 
Warren, Me. 

Clarence Sumner Lunt, '84. Editor 
Pendulum; city editor Whig and Courier. 
Bangor, Me. 

William Robinson Pattangall, '84. 
Editor Pendulum. Campello, Mass. 

Frank Issachar Kimball, 'Sj. Vale- 
dictorian; division superintendent Penn. R. R. 
Greensburg, Pa. 

William Morev, Jr., '85. Editor Pendu- 
lum; U. S. Signal Office. Washington, D.C. 

Ralph Kneeland Jones, Jr., '86. Editor 
Pendulum ; editor-in-chief Cadet ; captain 
Coburn cadets; cor. sec; chief; class prophet. 
Bangor, Me. 

Fred. William Dickerson, '85. Belfast, 
Me. 

Elisha Chick Vose, '85. Lawyer. Bangor, 
Me. 

Leonard Gregory Paine, '85. Editor 
Pendulum; class odist. Now at Stevens and 
member of Sigma. Bangor, Me. 

XLV. 

Irving Burton Ray, '86. Editor Pcudulum: 
captain ball nine. Harrington. Me. 

George Fuller Black, '86. Editor Pen- 
dulum; Editor Cadet; captain Coburn cadets; 
manager base-ball association; class historian. 
Palermo, Me. 

Henry Torsey Fernald, '85. On ball 
nine; editor Pendulum. Now at Wesleyan 
University, Middletown, Conn. Orono, Me. 

Edwin Dvvight Graves, '86. Class odist. 
Orono, Me. 



James Frederic Lockwood, '86. Coburn 
prize declamation, honorable mention; Prentiss 
prize essay, first prize, editor Pendulum ; editor 
Cadet; class orator. Brewer, Me. 

Luis Vernet Prince Cilley, '87. Buenos 
Ayres, Argentine Republic, S. A. 

Edwin Voranus Coffin, '87. Harrington, 
Me. 

James Draper Lazell, '87. Cor. sec. 
Rockland, Me. 

Eugene Clarence Bartlett, '86. Farmer. 
Orono, Me. 

Charles Leon Libby, '86. Mechanical 
engineer. Bridgeport, Conn. 

Harry Foster Lincoln, '88. Dennysville, 
Me. 

XLVI. 

Charles Th.\tcher Vose, '87. On ball 
nine; editor Cadet. Middletown, N. B. 

James Edward Dike, '76. One of the 
founders of the C. E. Grand Forks, Dak. Ter. 

Sidney Smith Twombly, '86. Enfield, Me. 

James Kent Chamberlin, '88. Sanitarj- 
engineer. Bangor, Me. 

David Wilder Colby, '87. Editor Cadet; 
class historian. Skowhegan, Me. 

Claude Lorraine Howes, '88. Leader 
college orchestra. 700 Harrison avenue, Boston 
Mass. 

Fred. Thayer Drew, 'SS. Orono, Me. 

XLVII. 

John Russell Boardman, '88. Editor 
Cadet. Augusta, Me. 

Frederic Lincoln Thompson, '89. Med- 
ical student. Augusta, Me. 

Alphonso Joan Coffin, '89. Harrington, 
Me. 

XLVIII. 

William Henry Sargent, '89. Brewer, 
Me. 

Charles Granville Cushman, '89. North 
Bridgeton, Me. 

Ralph Hemenway Marsh, '88. Bradley, 
Me. 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



47 



UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN CHAPTER. 
[The Lambda, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich.] 

In the undergraduate department of the University of Michigan there are about 
six hundred students. The courses are hugely elective. Degrees are conferred in 
arts, philosophy, science, letters, and engineering, the A. B. degree being the most 
popular. In the law, medical, pharmacy, dental, and graduate departments there are 
about a thousand students. Women are admitted upon the same terms as men. The 
university was established in 1S41 and is controlled by the state. 

In the order of original establishment the fraternities are Beta Theta Pi, Chi Psi, 
Alpha Delta Phi, Delta Kappa Epsilon, Sigma Phi, Zeta Psi, Psi Upsilon, Phi 
Kappa Psi, Delta Tan Delta, Phi Gamma Delta. Delta Upsilon is represented, and 
Sigma Chi is represented in the law department alone. Each of the departments, 
outside of the literary department, has one or more chapters of secret societies. 
Membership varies from ten to thirty. Most of the chapters occupy chapter houses. 

The Lambda was founded in 1S45. It occupies a chapter house, No. 3i N. State 
street, where visiting Betas are always welcome. The recent corresponding 
secretaries have been J. A. Case, T. C. Phillips, C. E. Baker and W. T. Smith. In 
1883-84 Case was chief of the district. D. E. Osborn, D. A. Garwood, and W. B. 
Cady were representatives at the convention of 188 1 ; J. A. Case, J. E.^Beal, and J. H. 
Grant at that of 1882; J. E. Beal and D. K. Cochrane at that of i8S3;°Beal and E. L. 
Johnson at that of 1884, and at that of 1885 C. L. Andrews, F. L. Velde, and W. T. 
Smith, the last being the secretary of the convention. Major W. C. Ransom was 
at all of these conventions, except that of 1882, and was president of the convention 
of 18S3. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 
XLIII. 

Charles Henry James Douglass. In- 
itiated at Kappa; with Lambda three years; pro- 
fessor of history and English literature at 
Milwaukee high school. i6S Division street, 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Edward Adams Bexson. Came from Chi; 
spent a year in the law department. Milwaukee, 
Wis. 

Alfred Claiborne Downs. Came from 
Epsilon; spent a jear in the law department. 
Danville, Ky. 

David Kii»len Cochrane, '85. Did not 
graduate; editor Chronicle ; now in business. 
Manistee, Mich. 

Fred Reynolds Babcock, '85. Did not 
graduate; ncrw in business. Manistee, Mich. 

James Wilber Gregory, '86. Editor on 
'85's Oracle. Rockford, 111. 

XLIV. 

DwiGHT Horace Ramsdell, '86. Left col- 
lege. Emery, Mich. 

Jesse Cornell Shattuck, '86. In busi- 
ness. Owosso, Mich. 

Frank Jacobs Cheek, LL. B., '83. Came 
from Epsilon. Danville, Ky. 

Joe Walker Cooper. Came from Psi; 
spent a year in medical department. Wellsburg, 
W. Va. 

Elbert Leland Johnson, Ph. B., '84. Came 
from Alpha Beta. Claj Center, Kan. 

* William Walter Harris, '86. Lake 
Linden, Mich. Died January 16, 1884. 

George Walton Whyte, '87. Editor 
Oracle of class of '86; editor Chronicle. Geneva 
Lake, Wis. 



XLV. 

George Lanphere Price, '86. Winner of 
a number of athletic prizes. Galesburg, 111. 

Charles Edward Parker, Ph. C., '85. 
Cor. sec; came from Alpha Nu. Home address, 
Ottawa, Franklin county, Kan.; temporary ad- 
dress, Lawrence, Kan. 

Denver John Mackey, '87, Was admitted 
at Theta under special dispensation; member of 
Theta Delta; studying law at Sandusky, Ohio. 

Walter Teis Smith, '87. Secretary of 
convention of '85; cor. sec; came from Alpha 
Epsilon. Pekin, HI. 

Franklin Luppen Velde, '87. Came from 
Alpha Epsilon. Pekin, 111. 

Charles H. Forbes. Came from Omega; 
spent the year '83-4 in the law department of the 
University of Michigan; now at Harvard con- 
tinuing law studies. Temporary address, 14 
Mellen street, Cambridge, Mass.; home address, 
Durham, Cal. 

Charles E. Powell, A. M., '84. Came 
from \'anderbilt University and is a member of 
Beta Lambda ; spent '83-4 in post graduate 
work; passed the civil service examination and 
was appointed to a clerkship in pension depart- 
ment. 13 I street, N. E., Washington, D. C. 

Will Cooper Harris, '87. In business. 
Pontiac, Mich. 

Fred. David Sherman, '87. Grand Rapids, 
Mich. 

John Hazelton Cotteral, '87. In real 
estate business. Garden City, Kan. 

XLVI. 

How^\RD George Hetzler, '86. Editor on 
Palladium of '86. Waterloo, la. 
James Gabriel Smith. Came from Alpha 



48 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



Nu; studying law at the University of Michigan. 
1611 Oak street, Kansas City, Mo. 

Charles Lincoln Andrews, 'S6. Chicago, 
111. 

Clarence Lee Dobyns, '88. In business. 
Portsmouth, Ohio. 

Louis Briggs Lee, '88. Brighton, Mich. 

Jed Hannibal Lee, '88. Brighton, Mich. 

William E. Wood, '88. Accepted an ap- 
pointment to West Point in '85; granted leave of 
absence on account of ill-liealth, and is now at 
Van Orin, 111. 

XLVII. 

John Hadley Patterson, '87. Class orator 
in^freshman year; left college to become clerk of 
probate court. Pontiac. Mich. 

Edward Vance Bope. In law department; 
came from Beta Alpha. Findlay, Ohio. 

George Culley Manly. In law depart- 



ment; came from Denver University and was a 
member of the Rho under special dispensation; 
was the Colorado representative at the inter- 
collegiate oratorial contest held at Columbus, O., 
in '85. Denver, Colo. 

George B. Watson. In law department; 
came froin Alpha Nu. Sha-vnee, Kan. 

Ellsworth E. Otis. In law department; 
can'ie from Alpha Gamma. Dundee, Ohio. 

Sterling P.\rks, '88. Came from Beta. 
Collamer, Ohio. 

Louis Roscoe Doud, '89. Winona. Minn. 

Robert Simeon Babcock, '89. Manistee, 
Mich. 

Julian Millard, '89. St. Paul, Minn. 

Daniel Philip Grant, '89. Burlington, Ind. 

Fred Bernard Spaulding, '89. Coldwater, 
Mich. 

Victor Maxwell Tuthill, '89. Dowagiac, 
Mich. 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



49 



UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI CHAPTER. 
[The Beta Beta, at the University of Mississippi, Oxford, Miss.J 

In the college department of the University of Mississippi the course for a degree 
covers five years, and there are about two hundred and fifty students. There is also 
a law department. The university is a state institution. Women are admitted. 

There are chapters of the Rainbow, Delta Kappa Epsilon, Delta Psi, Sigma Chi, 
Phi Kappa Psi, Chi Psi, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Phi Delta Theta, and Beta Theta Pi. 

The Beta Beta was established in 1S79 upon the basis of Alpha Kappi Phi. \V. H. 
Clark, J. M. Steen, J. Y. Murry, Jr., G. T. Fitzhugh, J. D. Purge, and H. M. Qiiln 
have been the corresponding secretaries since 1881. J. C. Harris, Dabney Marshall, 
and W. L. Birdsong were at the convention of 18S3; and Dabney Marshall was the 
poet of the convention of 1885. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 



XLIII. 

John Young Murry, Jr., '83 and law '84. 
Editor-in-chief Lhiiverssity Magazine '83; on 
the editorial staff of /?ff/7r Clarion during session 
of legislature '86; practicing law. Ripley, Miss. 

Herbert Ruffin Cocke, '85. Brandon, 
Miss. 

Wilson G.mnes Richardson, '85. Sher- 
man, Tex. 

Hii.ERiE Marshall QuiN, '86. First fresh- 
man medal at commencement of '84; anniver- 
sarian for Hermrean Literary Society February 
22d, '86; exchange editor of Univcrsitv Magazhie 
'86. McComb City, Miss. 

James Svvapture Gadberry, '85. Lawyer. 
Brookhaven, Miss. 

Frank May Scott, '82 law. Came from 
Omicron; first honor man of law class; lawyer. 
Rosedale, Miss. 

William Tidence Lane Cl.vrk, '84. 
McKinney, Tex. 

GusTON Thomas Fitzhugh, '86. Bohemian 
medalist '83; first honor man freshman year; 
second honor man sophomore year; first sopho- 
more medalist; junior first honor man, and junior 
speaker; editor of University J\J(!i;<izi>ie '86; 
valedictorian of the graduating class. Oxford, 
Miss. 

Will Tate McDonald, '82 law. Third 
honor man of law class; member of Mississippi 
legislature, '86; lawyer. Ashland, Miss. 

James Bonedian Ross, '86. In business. 
Jackson, Miss. 

Thomas Arthur Chichester, '86. Book- 
keeper. Edwards, Miss. 

XLIV. 

Rev. William Isidore Sinnott, '78. 
Member Alpha Kappa Phi. Oxford, Miss. 

Dr. John Jackson Rhodes, '77. Member 
of Alpha Kappa Phi; physician. Brandon, 
Miss. 



Edward Everett Frantz, 



Member 



of Alpha Kappa Phi; editor and proprietor of 
Brandon Republican. Brandon, Miss. 

Adolphus Evans Brown, '87. Brandon, 
Miss. 



Robert Love McLaurin, "86. Attended 
South-western Presbj-terian University. Bran- 
don, Miss. 

John Harvey Johnson, '86. Attended 
medical college Louisville, K3'. Brooklyn, Mass. 

Oliver Newton Killough, '87. In busi- 
ness. Vandale, Ark. 

Louis Thomas Fitzhugh, Jr., '88. First 
Philomatha^an medalist '84. Oxford. Miss. 

Willi.\m Randolph Hill, '87. First-medal 
man of freshman and sophomore classes at com- 
mencements of '84 and '85. Jackson, Miss. 

XLV. 

Richard Pettus Moore, '86 law; second 
honor man of freshman class of '83; first of soph- 
omore of '84; then left college and returned in 
the law class of "86; editor of University Maga- 
zi?te. Columbia, Miss. 

Amzi Waddle Hooker, "85. Lexington, 
Miss. 

Louis Karr Sharpe, '88. Natchez, Miss. 

Thomas Spence Sharpe, '87. Natchez, 
Miss. 

John David Burge, '86; second freshman 
medalist '84; editor-in-chief U?tii'ersity Maga- 
zine '86. Oxford, Miss. 

Edward Lee Lashbrooke, '87. New 
Orleans, La. 

Joseph Williams Chalmers, '88. In busi- 
ness at Memphis, Tenn. 

Malcolm Cameron Montgomery, '87. 
Natchez, Miss. 

Nicholas Stubbs Walker, '87. In busi- 
ness at Brownwood, Tex. 

Harris Christian Hoover, '88. McComb 
City, Miss. 

Simon Suggs Mathews, '86. Oxford, Miss. 

Albert Lewis Pittm.vn, '88. Studying 
law. Columbus, Miss. 



XLVI. 

William Webster Mayes, '88. Hazle- 
hurst. Miss. 

Alonzo Monroe Harley, '87. Atlanta, 
Miss. 

James Bassett McElroy, '87. Teaching at 
Mayhew Station, Miss.; permanent address, 
Columbus, Miss. 



50 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



Robert Finley Cochran, '85 law. First 
honor man and valedictorian; editor of the 
University Magaziiie. Meridian, Miss. 

Andrew Brown Learned, '87. Now at 
Vanderbilt and a member of Beta Lambda. 
Natchez, Miss. 

Samuel Holloway, '89. Oxford, Miss. 

Robert Burns Mayes, '88. In business at 
Hazlehurst, Miss. 



XLVII. 

Walter Harris, '89. Riplej, Miss. 

Edward Leander Barker McClelland, 
'89. West Point, Miss. 

John Bascom Cochran, '86. Meridian, 
Miss. 

Thaddeus Booth Lampton, '89. Columbia, 
Miss. 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



51 



NOKTH"WESTERN CHAPTER. 
[The Rho, at Northwestern University, Evanston, 111.] 

Northwestern University is managed b}^ the Methodist Episcopal church. In the 
college department it has twelve instructors and, including women, about one hun- 
dred and fifty students. There is a preparatory department. Schools of theolog\-. 
medicine, and law are intimately connected with the university, although, to some 
extent, they are under separate management. The medical and law dej^artments are 
in Chicago. The others are in Evanston, a suburb. 

There are chapters of Phi Kappa Psi, Sigma Chi, Phi Kappa Sigma, Beta Theta 
Pi, and Delta Upsilon. Membership varies from ten to twenty- five. 

The Rho was founded in 1S73. A. G. Briggs, F. E. Lord, D. H. Bloom, W. D. 
Fullerton, C. S. Tomlinson, and C. N. Zeublin have been the recent corresponding 
secretaries. W. A. Hamilton and D. H. Bloom have been chiefs of the district. 
F. H. Thatcher, J. T. Hatfield, and W. A. Hamilton were delegates to convention in 
'81; J. C. Bannister in '82; and W. D. Fullerton in '84. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 
XLIII. 

Edward B. Lanier, '86. Came from Theta. 
Bloomington, 111. 

John Pollard McWilliams, '85. In busi- 
ness. Dwight, 111. 

Clinton Samuel Tomlinson, '86. On ball 
nine; editor-in-chief of college annual; cor.sec; 
on Evanston Index; now editing Boone County 
Republican. Boone, la. 

Samuel Lambert Boddy, '85. Business 
manager of college annual; studj'ing law. Cher- 
okee, la. 

XLIV. 

William Dyer Fullerton, A. B. '85. 
Cor. sec; teaching. Present address, 560 Mc- 
Millan street, Cincinnati, O.; permanent address, 
Ottawa, 111. 

S.\muel Robert Sl.wmaker, '86. Now at 
Chi. Beloit, Wis. 

Henry Hamill, '87. Editor-in-chief of Syl- 
labus (college annual). Blunt, Dak. 

Elbert Reynolds Tillinghast, '86. 
Mann declamation, second prize; pitcher on ball 
nine; now at Yale, '88. Temporary address, 44 
Elm street, New Haven, Conn.; permanent 
address, Hope Vallev, R. I. 

William Edward Davidson, '86. Now at 
Chicago Congregational Theological Seminary. 
Lafavette, 111. 

Edward Dunn Huxford, '85. Onballnine; 
president base-ball association '8:^; first honor at 
graduation. Cherokee, la. 

Cassius Marcellus Weedman,'87. Came 
from Theta. Farmer City, 111. 

XLV. 

Louis Rich, '86. Now reporter on Engle- 
wood Call. Englewood, 111. 

Frank Edwiv Miller, '88. In business in 
Chicago. Address, Evanston, 111, 

John Adams. '87. Yorkville, 111. 

Henry Rand Hatfield, '87. Evanston, 111. 

Bond Stowe, '87. President of base-ball 
association, and on the nine. Evanston, 111. 

XLVI. 

Charles George Lewis, '87. On base- 
ball nine. Evanston, 111. 



Harvey Brown, '87. Gage debate prize. 
Evanston, III. 

Joseph B. Hubbard, '85 law. Practicing law. 
Evanston, 111. 

Harvey Reeves Calkins, '88. Evanston, 
111. 

George Buckley Deem, '87. Spring Hill, 
Kas. 

John Eddy Hunt, '88. Ashton, 111. 

XLVII. 

Earl Montgomery Cranston. Under 
dispensation; A. B. University of Denver, '85; 
studying law. 190 W. Fourth street, Cincin- 
nati, O. 

Arthur Robin Edwards, '88. 2816 Indiana 
avenue, Chicago, 111. 

William Aucjustus Moore. Under dis- 
pensation; A. B., University of Denver, '85. 
Denver, Col. 

William Seward Iliff. Under dispensa- 
tion; member of '87 at University of Denver. 
.Santa Cruz, Cal. 

Clarence Joseph White. Under dispensa- 
tion; class of '88 at University of Denver. 
Georgetown, Col. 

George Cully Manly. Under dispensa- 
tion; A. B., University of Denver, '85; now at 
Lambda. Chillicothe, O. 

Alfred Truman Moore. Under dispensa- 
tion; class of '88 at University of Denver. Den- 
ver, Col. 

William Joy Cady. Under dispensation; 
'88 in Denver. Care L. F. Waldo, Shelby. 
Mich. 

Edmund Chase Qlereau, '88. Reporter 
on Evanston Index. Aurora, 111. 

James Clark Tisdale, '89. Rock Springs, 
Wy. T. 

Herbert Fisk Bbiggs, '8g. Napa City, Cal. 

Charles Newton Zeublin, '87. Cor. 
sec; on base-ball nine; manager base-ball asso- 
ciation; came from University of Pennsylvania. 
243 Michigan avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Philip Raymond Shumway, '89. Evans- 
ton, 111. 

Frank Cole Whitehead, 89. Evanston, 
111. 

John B. Young, '89. Elgin, 111. 



52 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY CHAPTER. 
[The Theta Delta, at Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.] 

The Ohio State University belongs to the state and is managed by a board of 
trustees appointed by the governor. The origin of the institution was the national 
land grant for the support of agricultural and mechanical colleges. The proceeds of 
Ohio's share of the grant amounted to more than five hundred thousand dollars. The 
income of this fund is enjoyed by this university; and there is also an annual appro- 
priation made by the legislature. The grounds and buildings, now worth some five 
or six hundred thousand dollars, were in part the gift of the city and county. De- 
grees are conferred in arts, philosophy, science, mechanical engineering, mining 
engineering, civil engineering, and agriculture. There are about one hundred and 
fifty undergraduates, and about the same number in the preparatory department. 
Women are admitted. Since the institution was opened, in 1873, it has been steadily 
growing in favor. 

Phi Gamma Delta, Phi Kappa Psi, Sigma Chi, Chi Phi, Phi Delta Theta, and Beta 
Theta Pi have chapters, the membership varying from ten to fifteen. 

The Theta Delta was founded upon the basis of a local society, the Phi Alpha. 
The petition was sent to the chapters in the short way permitted by the constitution, 
and on the nth day of December, 1885, the chapter was established. The correspond- 
ing secretary is W. C. Sabine. W. G. Hyde of Theta Delta is college secretary of the 
fraternity. 

contest and second honor in state contest; now 
at Cincinnati Law School. Kimball, O. 

WiLBY Grimes Hyde, '87. Admitted at 
Beta Kappa; essayist Alcyone anniversary; 
fraternity and personal editor Lantern; at con- 
vention of '85, representing Phi Alpha petition; 
marshal of same; secretary of Ohio Beta Theta 
Pi Association, and college secretary of the 
fraternity. New Holland, O. 

Wilbur Henry Siebert, '87. Washington's 
birthday orator in '85. 235 S. Front street, 
Columbus, O. 

Wallace Clement Sabine, '86. Class 
prophet; cor. sec. 1520 N. High street, Colum- 
bus, O. 

Herbert Taylor Stephens, '88. Editor- 
in-chief of Lantern; second honor orator in 
local contest for '85; ranking captain battalion of 
cadets. Adrian, Mich. 

Henry Julian Woodworth, '87. Makio 
editor; Washington's birthday orator, '84; Al- 
cyone anniversary orator. Jefferson, O. 

Frank Milton Raymund, '89. Akron, O. 

Gaius Glenn Atkins, '88. Admitted at 
Alpha Gamma. Columbus, O. 

Charles Edward Skinner, '90. Admitted 
at Beta Kappa. Redfield, O. 

Julius Floto, '89. loi Molitor street, Cin- 
cinnati, O. 



XLVII.-The Founders. 

William Reed Pomerene, '85. Debater in 
'85 vs. '86 contest, and also in Alcyone-Horton 
contest ; Makio editor ; admitted at Alpha 
Lambda; now at Cincinnati Law School. 
Coshocton, O. 

Denver John Mackey, '85. Admitted at 
Theta by dispensation in 1883, and member of 
Lambda; law student. Sandusky, O. 

Charles Herbert Hirst, '86. Admitted 
at Theta by dispensation in 1883. Clerk with 
Peter Horn & Co. 29 Fifth street. Pittsburg, 
Pa. 

Edward Cyrus Benedict, '85. Admitted 
at Theta by dispensation in 1S83; paper dealer. 
Dayton, O. 

Charles Vernon Pleukharp, '85. Ad- 
mitted at Theta by dispensation in 1883; orator 
in '85 vs. '86 contest, and also on Washington's 
birthday celebration in '83; business manager of 
Lantern ; vice-president inter-state oratorical 
association; traveling salesman for Jas. Pleuk- 
harp & Co. 80 W. Third avenue, Columbus, O. 

Elmer Ellsworth Paine, '85. Admitted at 
Theta by dispensation in 1883. City editor 
Daily Torch-Light^ Xenia, O. 

Clayton William DeLamatre, '84. Ad- 
mitted at Beta Kappa; first honor orator in local 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



53 



OHIO UNIVEBSITY CHAPTER. 
[The Beta Kappa, at Ohio University, Athens, O.J 

The Ohio University was founded in 1804, and is the oldest college northwest of 
the Ohio river. There are eight instructors. In the college department there are 
about forty students. There is also a preparatory department. Women are admitted. 
The institution is managed by a board of trustees appointed by the governor of the 
state. The university has four buildings. The library contains over 8,000 volumes. 
The chemical and physical laboratories are well equipped. 

Beta Theta Pi, Delta Tau Delta, and Phi Delta Theta have chapters. The size of 
a chapter varies from five to twelve. Preparatory students are admitted by all of the 
fraternities. 

The Beta Kappa was established in 1841 and has a long roll of distinguished men. 
VV. F. Boyd was the representative at the convention of iSSi; R. U. Wilson at that 
of 1882; C. W. De Lamatre at that of 1S84; and W. G. Hyde at that of 1885. Hyde 
is now college secretary. C. S. Coler, H. H. Humphrey, C. W. De Lamatre, G. W. 
Reed, E. B. Skinner, and Chas. H. H.Higgins have been the corresponding secretaries 
since 1881. W. F. Boyd of the Beta Kappa has for several years been a member of 
the board of directors. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 
XLIV. 

William Frank Gordon, '86. Bookkeeper. 
Portsmouth, O. 

Phelps Leete, '86. Book-keeper, Ports- 
mouth, O. 

John Ellsworth Dillon, '86. Teacher. 
Permanent address, McArthur, O. 

WiLBV Gkimes Hyde, '86. College secre- 
tary; now at Ohio State Uuiversity, and member 
of Theta Delta. New Holland, O. 

XLV. 

Calvin Humphrey, '88. Contest essayist of 
Athenian Society '86. Coolvilie, O. 

Geor(;e Washington Reed, '88. Contest 
debater of Philomathean Society at commence- 
ments of '85 and '86; cor. sec. Uhrichsville, O. 

Lawrence Grant Worstell, '89. Tap- 
pan, O, 



XLVI. 

Ernest Brown Skinner. '88. Cor. sec. 
Redfield, O. 

Lewis McClellan Gillilan, '88. Cor. 
sec. Jackson, O. 

Charles Henry Higgins, '87. Contest 
essayist of Philomathean Society '85; editor of 
Philomathenian ; cor. sec. Athens. O. 

Charles Edward Skinner, '89. Now at 
Ohio State Universitj', and member of Theta 
Delta. Redfield, O. 

Herbert Russel McVay, 89. Editor of 
Philomatheniati. Athens, O. 

XLVII. 

Adelbert Grant Johnson, '89. Portage. O. 
Charles Hood Fonts, '90. Meigs Creek, O. 
John Marcellus Johnson, '89. Trimble, O. 



54 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



OHIO WESLEYAN CHAPTER. 
[The Theta, at Ohio "Wesleyan University, Delaware, O. 

In the college department of the Ohio Wesleyan University there are about two 
hundred men and one hundred and thirty women. There is a preparatory department. 

According to the laws of the university, the fraternities are not allowed to initiate 
or to pledge students of the preparatory department. There are chapters of Beta 
Theta Pi, Phi Delta Theta, Phi Kappa Psi, Delta Tau Delta, Phi Gamma Delta, and 
Chi Phi. A chapter of Sigma Chi existed from 1S55 to iS84and was then suppressed 
by the faculty. 

The Theta has had a continuous existence ever since its founding in 1853. G. P. 
Thorpe, N. H. Fairbanks, F. P. Irvin, and S. P. Withrow have been the recent 
corresponding secretaries. Thorpe was chief of the district in i884-'85. In the last 
few years, S. G. Williams, W. O. Robb, and E. Wambaugh have been editors of the 
Beta Theta Pi, and Williams, Robb, and Dr. T. A. Reamy have been members of the 
board of directors. There have been the following representatives at recent conven- 
tions: J. Alexander and C. M. C. Weedman, 1881; J. R. Hughes, N. H. Fairbanks, 
and M.'S. Milligan, 1883; W. O. Robb and N. H. Fairbanks, 1883; T. R. Terwilliger 
and M. G. Park, 1884; M. G. Park, 1885. In 18S3 five students of the Ohio State 
University were initiated under a special dispensation. Their names are given in the 
roll of the Theta Delta. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 



XLIII. 

Clarence 



Randolph, '<S5. 



Ethelbert 
Lincohi, 111. 

John Peters McCabe, '83. Permanent 
address, Delaware, O.; temporary address, Ger- 
mantown, O. 

Charles Alfred Doe. Columbus, O. 

Berthold Alexander Williams, '84. 
Winton Place, Hamilton county, O. 

XLIV. 

Thomson Ritchie Terwilliger, '84. At 
the Ohio Medical College, Cincinnati, O. Per- 
manent address, Mt. Pisgah, Clermont county-, 
O. 

Melvin Lee Milligan, '84. Editor of 
Bijou '84; I'eading law in Columbus, O. Per 
manent address, Deavertown, O. 

Frank Perry Irvin, '86. Editor-in-chief of 
Transcript; class orator on Washington's birth- 
day in '84; on ball nine; cor. sec; now a mem- 
ber of Delta. Piqua, O. 

Milford Grant Park, '86. On lecture 
committee; on ball nine; major of battalion, '84. 
Permanent address. Gallon, O.; temporary 
address, Seffner, Fla. 

James Tivis Pickering, '83. Teacher. 
Permanent address, Pickerington, 0.; temporary 
address. New Holland, O. 

Charles Clayton Pickering, '83. Study- 
ing law. Permanent address, Pickerington, O.; 
temporary address, Cincinnati, O. 

WiLLi.VM Alfred Baldwin, '85. Dela- 
ware, O. 

Arthur Mercian Mann, '85. Local editor 
of Transcript ; on the oratorical contest; came 
from Alpha Gamma; studying law. Middle- 
port, O. 

John Willis Adair, '84. Initiated at Alpha 
Gamma; stud3'ing medicine. London, O. 



XLV. 

William Belknap McArthur, '86. Out 
of college. Memphis, Mo. 

Edward Lincoln Shannon, '89. Teaching. 
Permanent address, Xenia, O.; temporary 
address, W. Middleburg, O. 

George Robert Peebles, '85. Fayette, la. 

Sq_uiRE Robinson Greer, '86. Business 
manager oiTranscripi ; cor. editor; now a mem- 
ber of Delta. Oxford, O. 

DuRWARD Starr Griffin, '86. Business 
manager of Transcript : orator on Zetagathean 
Society Annual; cor. editor. Delaware, O. 

XLVI. 

Samuel Pottenger Withrow, '87. Local 
editor-elect of Transcript ; cor. sec; Ohio 
Wesleyan vice-president of the state association 
for the year '86. Jacksonborough, O. 

John Hardin Waterhouse, '88. Dela- 
ware, O. 

Ernest Ashton Smith, '88. Piqua, O. 

George Addison Talbert, '88. Beaver 
Dam, Wis. 

Francis Merrick Starr, '85. Druggist. 
Delaware, O. 

XLVII. 

Franklin Theodore Pennington, '86. 
Valedictorian on Zetagathean Society Annual; 
business manager of Transcript ; junior orator 
Washington's birthday, '81;; now a member of 
Delta. ^Tiffin, O. 

Frank Lemar Young, '89. Mt.Vernon, O. 

Daniel Henry Sowers, '89. Westville, O. 

Frederick Theodore Jones, '89. Em- 
ployed in the Deposit Bank. Delaware, O. 

Eugene QuENTiN Starr, '89. Delaware, O. 

Charles Skinner Manly, '88. Denver, 
Colo. 

Harry Leslie Lamont Webb, '89. 
Steubenville, O. 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



55 



UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA CHAPTER. 
[The Phi, at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa.] 

The University of Pennsylvania was established in 1755. Its college or under- 
graduate department comprises courses in arts, science, philosophy, tinance and 
economv, and music. The university also has departments of law, medicine, den- 
tistry, veterinary medicine, and biology. In the course in arts there are one hundred 
and thirteen students; in science, two hundred and eight students; in philosophy, 
twenty; in finance, twenty-seven; in music, twelve; making a total of three hundred 
and eighty students for the college department. The total number of students in all 
departments is one thousand and twenty-eight. 

The fraternities are Zeta Psi, Phi Kappa Sigma, Delta Phi, Delta Psi, Phi Kappa 
Psi, Beta Theta Pi, Alpha Tau Omega, and Chi Phi. Chi Phi has no representation 
in the college department. Phi Gamma Delta is believed to be dead. 

The Phi was founded in iSSo, and usually has about thirteen members. Since 
1881 the corresponding secretaries have been H. S. Stetler, F. H. Edsall, and R. S. 
Maison. Stetler has been chief of the district. C. R. Claghorn was at convention in 
1S81; and Stetler, W. E. Maison, and R. S. Maison in 1883. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 
XLIII. 

Charles Rick Dundore, '85. Banking. 
Present address. New York City; former ad- 
dress, 1424 Girard avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Henry Lippincott Patterson, '85. Study- 
ing law. 640 N. Fifteenth street, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

William Emott Maison, '85. Took honors 
every year; editor on Record of '85; orator on 
coniinencenient; now at General Theological 
Scliool in New York City. Temporary address, 
corner Twentieth street and Ninth avenue. New 
York, N. Y.; permanent address, 6901 Wood- 
land avenue. West Philadelphia, Pa. 

Dr. Thomas Budd Bradford, '84, med. 
A. B., Princeton, '81. Present address. Episcopal 
Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa.; iioine, Dover, Del. 



XLIV 



06 



Howard Atlee Davis. '83 law. 
Spring Garden street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

*Samuel Edward Scott, '82. Graduated 
with honors ; commencement orator. Home 
was Philadelphia, Pa. Died in 1S83. 

Dr. Nathan Penrose Grimm, '85 med. 
Appointed resident physician at Children's Hos- 
pital, Philadelphia, in '85; appointed physician at 
Episcopal hospital in March, '86. Residence, 217 
W. Miner street, West Chester, Pa. 

XLV. 

Dr. Hobart Amorv Hare, '84 med. 
Thesis prize; Fiske fund prize of the R. I. State 
Medical Society in June, '85; now matriculate in 
veterinary department; assistant in physical 
diagnosis; attending physician in the dispensary 
for diseases of children. 113 S. Twenty-second 
street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Dr. John Marion Bradford, 84 med. 
Eighth and Cumberland streets, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 



W^illiam Robinson Cochrane, '85 med. 
Ph. B., Western University of Pennsylvania, '82; 
on stale geological survey. 7^ Fourth avenue, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

Frank Hvn.\rd Edsall, '85 med. Now 
studying in Europe. Hamburgh, Sussex county, 
N. Y. 

Robert Stephen Maison, '87. 6901 Wood- 
land avenue, West Philadelphia, Pa. 

Dr. Calvin Jones Irvin, '85 med. 1900 
N. Thirteenth street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

XLVI. 

Dr. Gustav Adolph Rexz, '84 med. De- 
grees of Ph. G. and M. D. Corner Summit 
avenue and Oxford street, St. Paul, Minn. 

Dr. Mark Halfpenny Lincoln, '85 med. 
Laurelton, Pa. 

Dr. Franklin More Stephens, '85 med. 
Honorable mention and M. D. '85. Home, 
BentlevsviUe, Pa.; present address, Oswego, 
N. Y.' 

Henry Price Ball, '87. Honors in '86. 
4533 Frank ford avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Frederick Colton Clarke, '87. 134 N. 
Twenty-first street, Philaciclphia, Pa. 

Alfred Weeks, Jr., '86. 40^51 Locust street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

John Philip Krecker, '87. 134 N. Twenty- 
first street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



P. 



XLVII. 
Coates, "85 med 



Carlett 
Address, Girard 



Dr. Louis 
P. O., Va. 

George Fetterolf, '87. 
College, Philadelphia, Pa. 

XL VIII. 

George Clay Bowker, '88. Was manager- 
in-chief of University Magazine. 43715 Main 
street, Manayunk, Philadelphia, Pa. 

George Albert Freyer, '86 law. 518 Wal- 
nut street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



56 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



RANDOLPH MACON CHAPTER. 
fThe Xi, at Randolph Macon College, Ashland, Va.j 

Randolph Macon College, founded in 1S32, is the property of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, South. The students are not divided into classes. Degrees are 
conferred in arts, philosophy, and science. There are eight instructors and about one 
hundred and twenty-five students. Women are not admitted. 

Southern Kappa Alpha, Phi Kappa Sigma, Beta Theta Pi, Sigma Chi, and Kappa 
Sigma Kappa have chapters. 

The Xi.was founded in 1S73. Its recent corresponding secretaries have been R. 
E. L. Holmas, H. L. Stuart, G. T. Patton, and Geo. Shipley. M. H. Albin was at 
convention in 18S3, and H. L. Stuart in 1884. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 
XLIII. 

Harry Lee Stuart, '85. Orator at the 
annual debate and medalist of Franklin Literary 
Society, '8i-'S2; declamation prize Franklin 
Literary Society, '83-'84; English prize, '83-'S4; 
editor Randolph Macon Monthly; cor. sec; 
practicing law. Gainesville, Tex. 

Robert Winfree, '87. Lynchburg, Va. 

XLIV. 

Otho Fred. Mears, '86. Public debater of 
the Washington Literary Society, '82; now at 
University of Virginia. Pungoteague, Va. 

Henry Lee Winfree, '86. In business. 
Lynchburg, Va. 

George Tazewell Patton, '86. Cor. sec; 
now in business in Richmond. Permanent 
address, Ashland, Va. 

James Lindsay Patton, '86. Ashland, Va. 

XLV. 

Percy Rowe, '86. Orator; public debater 
Washington Literary Society, '84; manager 
Randolph Macon Monthly: teaching. Perma- 
nent address, Bowling Green. \'a.; temporary 
address, Murfreesboro, N. C. 



MuscoL Livingstone Shackelford, '86. 
Editor Monthly; public debater and orator. '86. 
1413 I street, Washington, D. C. 

Thomas Jackson Bland, '88. Studying 
medicine. Little Plymouth, Va. 

John Summerfield Hobson, '88. In busi- 
ness. Lynchburg, Va. 

XLVI. 

Garland Buffington, '88. Out of college. 
Huntington, W. Va. 

Peter Cline Buffington, '89. Hunting- 
ton, W. Va. 

Robert Williams Patton, '89. Ashland, 
Va. 

Peyton Browne Winfree, '8g. Lynch- 
burg, Va. 

XLVII. 

George Shipley, '87. Cor. sec; manager 
Randolph Macon Monthly. Moorefield, W. Va. 

Charles Carroll Hering, '88. Public 
debater, '86. Cross Keys, Va. 

Jordan JosiAH Leake, '89. Ashland, Va. 

William Andrew Gibbons, '89. Yancev. 
Va. 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



57 



RICHMOND CHAPTER. 
[The Alpha Kappa, at Richmond College, Richmond, Va.] 

In the undergraduate department of Richmond College there are eight professors 
and about one hundred and fifty students. The only degrees are those of A. B. and 

A. M. The students are not divided into classes. The college is chiefly a Baptist 
institution. 

The fraternities are Beta Theta Pi, southern Kappa Alpha, Phi Kappa Sigma, Phi 
Delta Theta, Kappa Sigma Kappa, Phi Alpha Chi, and Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

The Alpha Kappa dates from 1S70. Tracy McKenzie, W. R. Thomas, E. B. 
Pollard, and G. B. Stacy have been the corresponding secretaries since the Chicago 
convention. J. G. Field, Jr., and E. B. Pollard have been chiefs of the district. M. 

B. Curry attended convention in '81; W. R. Thomas in '82; and C. D. Roy and P. Y. 
Tupper in '85. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 
XLIII. 

James Arthur Borum, '83. Portsmouth, Va. 

Frank Dewey Tabb, '83. Porstmouth, Va. 

W. Warren Talley, A. B. '84. Editor 
Messeno-er ; afterwards with Omicron; now at 
Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, Va.; 
home, Lynchliurg, Va. 

WiLLi.VM Russell Thomas, '83. Cor. sec. 
113 E. Grace street, Richmond, Va. 

Amzi Waddle Hooker. Afterwards with 
Beta Beta. Lexington, Miss. 

XLIV. 

George Washington Quick, A. B. '85. 
Editor Messenger; debater's medal; essay medal; 
final ora'or '85. Temporary address, Theologi- 
cal Seminary, Chester, Penn; home, Farmwell, 
Va. 

Alexander McIver Bostick, A, B. '85. 
Editor Messenger ; G^in medalist; essay medal. 
Lawtonville, S. C. 

Lafayette Rupert IIamberlin, '84. 
Editor Messenger ; Steel medalist; Woods med- 
alist; valedictorian; teaciiing. Shreveport, La. 

XLV. 

Edward Bagby Pollard, '86. 'EAxiov Mes- 
senger ; Steel medalist; improvement in debate 
medal; essay medal; valedictorian; cor. sec. and 
chief of district. 2316 E. Grace street, Rich- 
mond, Va. 



Henry Herbert Harris, Jr. Address, 
Richmond College, Richmond, Va. 

Thomas Neal Ferrell, '85. Base-ball 
nine. Danville, Va. 

Alfred Bagby, Jr., A. B. '85. Tanner 
medalist. Teaching at Mechum's River, Va.; 
home, Stevensville, Va. 

William Robert Fitzgerarld,S:;. Dan- 
ville, Va. 

Leroy Springs Lyon, '86. 13 S. Fifth street, 
Richmond, Va. 

William Elam Tanner, Jr., '89. 216 S. 
Third street, Richmond, Va. 



XLvr. 

Frank Lyon, '85. 13 S. 
mond, Va. 

Ch.\rles Dunbar Roy, '87. 
senger. 18 Ellis street, Atlanta, Ga. 

Robert Alexander Cutler, '88. 80 
Marshall street, Richmond, Va. 

XLVII. 

George Ben Stacy, '88. Initiated at Psi 
406 E. Cary street, Richmond, Va. 

Alexander Mitchell Carroll, 
Asheville, N. C. 

Curtis Lee Laws, '89. Aldie, Va. 

Cornelius Timothy Smith, Jr., 
Childsburg, Va. 

Russell Champion Williams, '88. 
W. Grace street, Richmond, Va. 



Fifth street, Rich- 

Editor Mes- 

W. 



'88. 

'89. 
709 



58 



THE YOnNOER MEMBERS. 



RUTGBKS CHAPTER. 
[The Beta Gamma, at Rutgers College, New Brunswick, N. J. 

Rutgers College, founded as Qiieen's College in 1770, was formerly controlled by 
the Reformed (Dutch) church in America, but is now unsectarian. It has in the 
college proper seventeen professors and one hundred and twenty students. There 
is under the management of the college a preparatory school, which has about the 
same number of students as the college. A theological seminary is also closely con- 
nected with the college. 

The fraternities are Delta Phi, Zeta Psi, Delta Upsilon, Delta Kappa Epsilon, Chi 
Phi, Beta Theta Pi, and Chi Psi. Class societies are Alpha Phi (junior), Kappa 
Alpha Sigma (sophomore), and Gamma Phi (freshman). 

The Beta Gamma was founded in 1S71 as the Alpha of Alpha Sigma Chi. R. J. 
Wortendyke, J. W. McKelvey, L. F. Ruf, and E. M. Alden have been the corre- 
sponding secretaries since 1881. Dr. W. H. Watson was a director for the three years 
ending in 18S3. 



Admitted since August, 18S1. 

XLIII. 

William Henry Barnes, '85. Business 
manager of the Tar gum; Cook mineralological 
prize; Phi Beta Kappa; address to the president 
class day. East Hampton, N. Y. 

XLIV. 

Charles William Harrison, '85. Was 
special student in chemistry, and not a candidate 
for a degree; on ball nine; now studying medicine. 
Verona, N. J. 

John Bartlett Alden, '82. Spader prize 
for essay on modern history, and several minor 
prizes; editor of Targum; now on the editorial 
iXdJ^ BrooklvH Tittles. Brooklyn, N. Y.; former 
address, Hoosick Falls, N. Y. 

Lawrence Edmund McCabe, '87. Took 
sophomore prize for oratory in Philo; was 
one of the editors of the Scarlet Letter; mem- 
ber of junior society. East Hampton, N. Y. 

Arthur Coyle Payne, '85. Phi Beta 
Kappa; prize for best tht-sis at graduation; 
planter of ivy, class dav. College Point, L. I., 
N. Y. 

XLV. 



Frank William Ribble, '86. 
stone, N. J. 



East MiU- 



XLVI. 

Samuel De Witt Drury, '89. Rhinebeck, 
N. Y. 

Henry Livingstone Rupert, '88. Member 
of freshman and sophomore societies. East 
Millstone, N. J. 

Edwin Moore Alden, '88. Took freshman 
prize for oratory in Peitho; cor. sec; member and 
associate founder of freshman society; member 
of sophomore society. Hoosick Falls, N. Y. 

Walter Almer Barrows, Jr., '88. Special 
student in chemistr}'; member and associate 
founder of freshman society; member of sopho- 
more society. Mt. Holly, N.J. 

Isaac \V right Reynolds, '88. Member of 
freshman and sophomore societies. Montrose, 
N. Y. 

XLVII. 

Samuel Dodds, '88. Special student in 
chemistry ; member of freshman and sophomore 
societies. Anna, 111. 

Albert Bodwell Harrison, '89. Irving- 
ton, N. J. 

Joseph Borden Reynolds, '86. Phi Beta 
Kappa; has an appointment for class day. Bor- 
dentown, N. J. 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



59 



ST. LAWKENCE CHAPTER. 
[The Beta Zeta, at St. Lawrence University, Canton, N. Y.] 

St. Lawrence University is the only Universalist college in New York. It 
embraces a college and a theological school. In the college there are six instructors 
and about sixty students. Women are admitted. 

Beta Theta Pi and Alpha Tau Omega are the fraternities. They have halls in the 
college buiklings. 

The Beta Zeta was founded in 1875. For several years it published the college 
annual, T/ie Gridiron. It has many peculiar traditions, and is one of the most enthus- 
iastic chapters in the fraternity. The recent corresponding secretaries have been 
Geo. S. Conkey, Frank T. Post, Arthur E. Forbes, A. B. Church, and E. S. K. Mer- 
rell. Forbes has been chief of the district. The chapter was represented at the 
convention of 1881 by W. Fitzgibbons; at that of 1882 by Conkev and Post; at that 
of 1SS3 by C. M. Baker, R. E. Sykes, and Geo. B. Helmle; at that'of 1884 by Helmle; 
and at that of 1885 by R. P. Barnes. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 
XLIII. 

George Bernard Helmle, B. S.'85. Rus- 
sell prize for oratory, and Parker prize for com- 
position; military editor and re\'iser of Brooklyn 
Times. Brooklyn, E. D., N. Y. 

Clement Morelle B.\ker, B. A. 'S5. 
Instructor of Latin in the college. Canton, N. 
Y.; former address, Whitney's Point, N. Y. 

XLIV. 

Arthur Elbridge Forbes, B. S , 'S^. Cor. 
sec. and chief; editor of the Oxford Democrat. 
Paris. Me. 

Rodney Percy Barnes, 'S6. Madrid, N.Y. 

Augustus Byington Church, '86. Rich 
prize in oratory. Sherborne, N. Y. 

Holton Daniel Robinson, '86. Massena, 
N. Y. 

*Frederic Francis Amie Liotard, '86. 
Canton, N. Y. Died 18S3. 

XLV. 

Noble Henry Adsit. B. S. '84. Student of 
medicine. Potsdam, N. Y. 

Henry Marshall Smith, '87. Hasleftcol- 
lege. Boston, Mass. 



William Thomas Crisler, '87. Petersburg, 

John A. Cranston, '87. Madrid, N. Y. 

Thomas E. Dalton, '87. Russell prize in 
oratory. Chase's Mills, N. Y. 

Warner Bonney Matteson, '87. First 
Rich prize in oratory. Hermon, N. Y. 

John W. Rafferty, '87. Second Rich prize 
in oratory. West Pierrepont, N. Y. 

XLVI. 

WiLLisTON Manley, '88. Second Russell 
prize in oratory. Canton, N. Y. 

Edgar Sanford Keen Merrell, '87. 
Present cor. sec; third Rich prize in oratory. 
Lonville, N. Y. 

Frank Yale Adams, '88. York mathemati- 
cal prize of '85. Whitney's Point, N. Y. 

William Gaines, '87. Burlington, Ky. 

XLVI I. 

John Montgomery Rich, '87. Canton, 
N. Y. 

Charles Averill Rich, '87. Canton, N.Y. 

Everett Caldwell, '8g. Canton, N. Y. 

Henry Allen Abbott, '89. West Sumner, 
Me. 

John Murr.vy Atwood, '89. Canton, N. Y. 



60 



TEE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



STEVENS CHAPTEB. , 

[The Sigma, at Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, N. J.] 

Stevens Institute is a school of mechanical engineering, well known in engineering 
circles throughout Europe and America. Mathematics, physics, and chemistry, with 
a vast amount of practical work in the physical, electrical, mechanical, and chemical 
laboratories and the w^ork-shop, are its specialties; but there is also full instruction in 
modern languages, English, mechanical drawing, etc. The course is of four years 
and leads to the degree of mechanical engineer. There are fourteen instructors and 
about one hundred and seventy-five students. There is also a preparatory depart- 
ment. 

There are chapters of Theta Xi, Delta Tau Delta, Beta Theta Pi, Sigma Chi, Chi 
Psi, and Chi Phi. 

The Sigma was founded in 1875. H. F. Mitchell, R. L. Fearn, C. A. Hall, Rollin 
Morris, E. G. Coldewey, and J. L. Coker, Jr., have held the position of corresponding 
seer etary since 1881, Pierce Butler and W. R. Baird attended the convention in 
'81, the latter being secretary; Butler and T. G. Smith, Jr., in '83; Fearn, E. F. 
Lewis, O. H. Baldwin, W. S. Dilworth, and Baird in '83; G. E. Cook and E. G. 
Coldewey in '84; and Hall and Smith in '85. Baird has been a chief of district, an 
editor of the magazine, and historiographer. Fearn is now an editor of the magazine. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 
XLIII. 

Moses Yale Beach, '85. Editor Eccentric: 
now editor Daily Graphic. New York, N. Y. 

Edward Fox Lewis, '85. On foot-ball 
team; Eccentric editor; is now draughting for 
Farrel Foundry and Machine Co. Waterbury, 
Conn. 

Thomas Gardiner Smith, Jr., M. E., '85. 
On lacrosse team; Bolt editor; cor. sec; now 
with the St. Louis & Pittsburgh division of the 
Pa. R. R., at Indianapolis, Ind. Home, Oak 
street, Cincinnati. O. 

XLIV. 

Oscar Howard Baldwin, M. E., 'Si^. Foot- 
ball captain; with Phineas Jones & Co. Newark, 
N.J. 

Edward Francis White, '86. Came from 
Beta Gamma. Bergen Point, N. J. 

George Edward Cook, '86. In business. 
Canton, O. 

Cornelius James Field, '86. Business 
manager of lacrosse team, glee club, Bolt, and 
Indicator. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

John Chatellier, '86. In business. New 
York, N. Y. 

RoLLiN NoRRis, M. E., '85. Cor. sec; la- 
crosse captain; with Bartlett, Hayward & Co., 
Baltimore, Md. Home, Ilchester, Md. 

George Fleming Sandt, M. E., '84. A. B., 
Lafayette College, '82; with Edison Electric 
Light Co., New York, N. Y. Home, Easton, 
Pa. 

William Oliver Barnes, M. E., '84. Bolt 
editor; with Barnes & Peel, Paterson, N. Y. 

Lewis Baker, Jr., '86. Now editor of St. 
Paul Reporter, St. Paul, Minn; former address, 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

XLV. 

Frank Allen Magee, M. E., '83. With 
the Commercial Tel. Co., New York, N. Y. 

Henry Banner Everhart, '86. Bolt 
editor. Montgomery, Ala. 



Henry I^awrexce Gantt, M. E., '84. La- 
crosse team; from Alpha Chi; with Poole & 
Hunt, Baltimore, Md. 

William Combe Post. '86. Foot-ball team; 
lacrosse captain. Jersej- City Heights, N. J. 

Charles Andrews Hall, '87. Cor. sec; 
lacrosse team. Mobile, Ala. 

XLVI. 

Druid Alexander Walton, '87. Louis- 
ville, Ky. 

Henry Abbey, M. E., '85. Lacrosse team; 
Bolt and Indicator editor; Soltmann prize for 
draughting; with Cowles Electric Smelting Co., 
Lockport, N. Y. Home, Cleveland, O. 

Edward George Coldewey, '87. Cor. 
sec; foot-ball and lacrosse teams; now at Shef- 
field Scientific School, '87. Present address, 
New H.iven, Conn.; home, Louisville, Ky. 

Harry Carr Ferris, '88. Foot-ball and 
lacrosse teams; came from Beta Alpha. Cleve- 
land, O. 

William Clark H.\wkins, '88. Lacrosse 
team. Taunton, Mass. 

Randolph Moore Isaac, '88. Lacrosse 
team; record of 100 yard dash, one-quarter mile 
run, and standing broad jump; left college. 
Towson, Md. 

James Lide Coker, '88. Cor. sec; Indicator 
editor. Darlington, S. C. 

XLVII. 

Millard Caldwell Hamilton, '88. Oma- 
ha, Neb. 

Russell Humphrey Smith, '88. Initiated 
at Alpha Pi. Chicago, 111. 

Leonard Gregory Paine, '86. Initiated at 
Beta Eta. Bangor, Me. 

James Henry Sheldon, '89. Football 
team. Hoboken, N. J. 

Edwin May Drummond, '88. Louisville, 
Ky. 

Alexander Wolfgang Mack, '88. Rari- 
tan, N. J. 

Lewis Charles Mack, '89. Raritan,N.J. 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



61 



UNION CHAPTER. 

[The Nu, at Unioa College, Schsnectady, N. Y.] 

Union College was founded in 1795. In 1S73 it absorbed a medical school, a law 
school, and an observatory, all situated in Alban\-; and since then the official name of 
the institution has been" Union University. The colle2:e department has eighteen 
instructors and about one hundred and forty students. There are prescribed classical, 
scientific, and engineering courses. The institution is not controlled by any religious 
denomination; and the name is intended to signify that in establishing the college 
several denominations co-operated. 

The fraternities are Kappa Alpha, vSigma Phi. Delta Phi, Psi Upsilon, Delta 
Upsilon, Alpha Delta Phi, Beta Theta Pi, and Phi Delta Theta. Chapters have from 
six to fifteen members. 

The Nu was founded in 18S1, and its corresponding secretaries have been J- W. 
Adams, F. D. Hall, W. H. Robinson, and K. C. Radlift'. Hall has been chief of the 
district. Adams attended convention in 18S2; J. R. Van Ness, Hall, and A. B. Bishop 
in 1883; and Hall in 18S4. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 
XLIII. 

James Robertsox \'an Ness, 'S3. Com- 
mencement orator; prize for best examination in 
U. S. constitution; editor of Garnet; practicing 
law. Permanent address, Osborne's Bridge, 
Fulton county, N. Y.; temporary address, North- 
ville, N. Y. 

Alvoid C.\lvin Egelstox.'S^. Junioressav 
prize; commencement orator; editor of Concor- 
diensis: teaching. Permanent address, Glovers- 
ville, N. Y.; temporary address, llomewood. 
Cook county. 111. 

George Williamson Van Vranken, '85. 
Left Union at end of sophomore year; entered 
class of "86 at Cornell and became a member of 
Beta Delta. Address, Lisha's Kill, N. Y. 

XLIV. 

WiLLi.\M Henry Robinson, '85. Cor. s-ec; 
left Union at the end of junior and entered the 
class of '85 at Princeton College; Now at Prince- 
ton Theological School. West Hebron, N. Y. 

Alvin Barber Bishop, '85. Commence- 
ment orator; second Blatchford prize; class poet; 
editor of Garnet; Phi Beta Kappa; teaching. 
Warwick, N. Y. 

Francis Elihl" Crane, '85. Commencement 
orator; Schenectady, N. Y. 

Cornelius Wells De Baun, '86. Left 
college and enter d class of '86 at Albany Medi- 
cal College. Fonda, N. Y. 

William Franklin Shick,'86. Left Union 
and entered class of '86 at Lafayette. Easton, Pa. 

XLV. 

Kelton C. Radliff, '87. Cor. sec; vice- 
president junior class. Schenectady, N. Y. 



Nelson Joseph Gulick, '87. Broadalbin 
N. Y. % 

John Ericsson Clute, '87. Editor Garnet; 
left Union and entered class of '88 at Columbia 
Medical College, where he is now a member of 
Alpha Alpha. Schenectady, N. Y. 

XLVI. 

Jllil's Theodore William Kastendieck, 
'87. Left Union and is now studying medicine in 
the New York Homeopathic College. Schenec- 
tadv, N. Y. 

Dow Vroman, '87. Editor of rrV?;'«r/. Mid- 
dlebur-h. N. Y. 

William Frazier Peters, '88. Left col- 
lege at end of first term freshman rear. Ripley. O. 

Frank Hopkins Silvernail, '88. Valatie, 
N. Y. 

Frank Dudley Lewis, '88. Editor of Con- 
cordiefisis. Amsteidam. N. Y. 

Allen J. Dillingham, '88. Schenectady, 
N. Y. 

George Weed Barhydt, 'S^. Clerk of U. 
C. Senate: second Allen essay prize; now study- 
ing for the ministry at Middletown, Conn. 
Schenectady, N. Y. 

XLVII. 

Philip Henry Cole, '88 Red Hook, N. Y. 

Edw.vrd Bernard Coburn,"88. Troy, N.Y. 

Arthur Moul IL\rder, "87. Troy, N. Y. 

Norman David Fish, '89. Ballslon Spa, 
N. Y. 

Robert Hoosick Washburn e, '8g Ballston 
Spa, N. Y. 



62 



TEE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



VANDERBILT CHAPTER. 

[The Beta Lambda, at Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn.] 

Vanderbilt University was founded in 1873. It is controlled by the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South. Besides the college departments there are schools of 
theology, law, medicine, pharmacy, and dentistry. There are about three hundred 
students in the college department. There is no division into college classes. De- 
grees are conferred in arts, philosophy, science, and engineering. Women are not 
admitted. There are about four hundred students in the professional schools. In the 
whole university there are about fift}' instructors. The grounds and buildings are 
very attractive. The endowment is nearly one million dollars. 

The fraternities are Phi Delta Theta, Kappa Sigma, the Rainbow, southern Kappa 
Alpha, Beta Theta Pi, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Chi Phi, and Sigma Nu. Membership 
varies from six to twenty-five. The authorities were for years hostile to fraternities; 
but all restrictions were removed in 18S3. 

The petition from Vanderbilt was before the fraternity for several years. On ac- 
count of the anti-fraternity laws the petition could not be granted. From time to 
to time the Cumberland chapter was, by dispensation, allowed to elect and initiate 
Vanderbilt men. As soon as the hostile laws were repealed, the petition was sent to 
the chapter in the short way. It was granted, and on February 23d, 1S84, the Beta 
Lambda was established. The corresponding secretaries have been C. L. Junger- 
man, J. B. Ellis, J. H. Harris, A.J. Barbee, and Alfred Hume. Jungerman and Ellis 
have been chiefs of the district. Jungerman, J. J. G. Ruhm, and W.T. Guild attended 
the convention of 1884. 



XLVI.— The Founders. 

(XLIV.) 

Hexry Eugene Harlan. Member of the 
Beta Beta. Macon, Miss. 

Robert Peter VVhitesell, B. L.. 'S3. 
Lawyer, firm Harpole & Whitesell. Union 
City, Tenn 

Charles Lee Jungerman, B. E., 'S3. Cor. 
sec; chief. Architect. Cole building, Nashville, 
Tenn. 

Chas. E. K. S. Powell, B. A., 'S3. Philo- 
sophic improvement medal, '82; studied law at 
University of Michigan, and graduated at 
Columbian Law School. Washington, D. C. 

Joseph us Conn Guild, 'S3. Prize scholar- 
ship in engineering; architect and engineer. 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Linn White, B. E., 'S3, C. E., '84. Pa- 
ducah, Ky. 

William Edward Myer. Scholarship 
($100); merchant. Carthage, Tenn. 

Edward Hamilton Bowser. Prize scholar- 
ship in engineering; gymnasium instructor, 
'82-83; engineer. McMeekin, Fla. 

George Washington Blackwell. Bart- 
lett, Tenn. 

Edward Waide Thompson. Prize scholar- 
ship in chi-mistry; studied chemistry at Univers- 
ity of Pennsylvania; with the firm of Thompson 
& Kelly. Nashville, Tenn. 

John Harris Kelley. Prize scholarship in 
chemistry; assistant instructor in chemistry at 
Vanderbilt University, '85-'S6; chemist with 
Nashville Fertilizer Co. Nashville, Tenn. 

Charles Christmas Burrows. Merchant. 
Morrilton, Ark. 

Eugene Jackson Buffington, Merchant. 
Covington, Ky. 



Albert Sidney Johnston Dudley. Con- 
testant for Young medal, '83. Richmond, Va. 

Samuel Cole Willi.\ms, B. L., '84. Presi- 
dent of Dialectic; B A. 'Si and valedictorian of 
Humboldt College; Moot Court representative, 
'84; lawyer, firm of Rawlins & Williams, Hum- 
boldt. Tenn. 

John Jacob Gregory Ruhm. Studied 
chemistry at University of Illinois; now at 
Cumberland studying law. Nashville. Tenn. 

Chilton A. McDonald. Versaille-, Ky. 

James William McClure. Cor. sec; 
medal in mathematics at Central University, 
Kv.; commercial traveler. Temporary address, 
Cincinnati, O.; permanent address, Winchester, 

Harry Lf!e Brannon, M. D., '85. One 
vear at Emorv College; physician. Eufaula, 
Fla. 

Thomas Pettus Branch, B. E., '86. Prize 
scholarship in engineering; engineer. Cuthbert, 
Va. 

(XI.V.) 

Joe Blackburn Ellis, B. A., '85. Fellow 
in English, 'S5-'S6; cor. sec; chief; chief mar- 
shal of V. U., '82-'83; business manager of Of>- 
server. Glasgow, Ky. 

Coleman Clarke Slaughter, B. A., '85, 
President of Dialectic; vice-president of State 
Oratorical Association; contestant for Dialectic 
medal; teacher. Present address, Woohvine 
High School, Nashville, Tenn.; permanent ad- 
dress, Hopkinsville. Ky. 

Joseph Alexander Altsheler. Scholar- 
ship in Latin; reporter on Louisville Courier- 
'Journal. Louisville, Ky. 

Allen Garland Hall, B. L. '83. Con- 
testant for Founder's medal in oratory; president 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



63 



of Greenville, Ala., Female College '83-'84; 
lawyer. Cole building, Nashville, Tenn. 

Chas. Wesley Beale, M. A., 'Si, B. L., '83. 
Founder's department medals in academic. '81, 
in law, '83; Owen prize medal, '81; prize scholar- 
ship in natural history and geology; fellowship 
in natural history and geology; lawyer. Cole 
building, Nashville, Tenn. 

Chas. Lewis Thornburg, B. S. '81, B. E. 
'82, C. E. '83, Ph. D. '84. Prize scholarship in 
scientific course; fellow in mathematics '8i-'83; 
fellow in engineering '83-'84; assistant instructor 
in engineermg since '84. Vanderbilt University, 
Nashville, Tenn. 

Wm. Allen Pi'sey, B. A. '85. Class repre- 
sentati\e; scholarship in Greek; president of 
Dialeciic; fellow in history, '85-'86. Elizabeth- 
town, Ky. 

Lee Cruce. Contestant for Young medal 
and Dialectic anniveisarian; lawyer. Marion, 

Robert F. Hibbitt. High trapeze athlete 
'84. Louisville, Ky. 

EdwARD Benjamin Davis. At Ohio 
Wesleyan '82-'83; artist and chemist. Nashville, 
Tenn. 

Chas. Adolphus Caldwell. Now at the 
Renssalaer Polytechnic Insiitute, Troy, N. Y., 
studying architecture. Macon, Ga. 

Benjamin F. Taylor. Business manager of 
Obser- er; now on the New York Wothl. New 
York, N. Y. 

Newton Worth Bonham. Franklin, Mo. 

William Thompson Guild. Contestant 
for Philosophic meJal '85 and for Dialectic medal 
'86. Nashville, Tenn. 

Chiles Clifton Ferrell, B. A. '85. Fel- 
low in Greek '85-'86. Hopkinsville, Ky. 

XLVI. 

Alfred Hume, '87. Captain eng"neering 
base ball club; cor. sec. 518 Woodland street, 
Nashville, Tcm. 

John McPherson Lauder. Graduated 
■with first hon >r at Wofford College; scholarship 
and fellowship in natural history and geology; 
teaching. Williamston, 6. C. 



James Alexander Harris, '86. Con- 
testant for declaimer's medal '84; representative 
of class of '86; representative of Dialectic Literary 
Society in inter-state oratorical contest; cor. sec. 
Jonesboro, Tenn. 

John L. W. Slaughter. Lawyer. Owen- 
ton, Ky. 

James Perrin Smith. Graduated at Wofford 
College; fellow in natural history and geology; 
pitcher on ball nine. Spartanburg, S. C. 

John Brooks Robertson, '88. Guilford, 
Ind. 

Allan Jones Barbee, '87. Cor. sec; mer- 
chant. Ripley, Tenn. 

Joseph Andrew Guthrie, '88. Versailles, 

Ky. 

Wright Hunter. '86. Louisville, Ga. 
Austin L. Prewett, B. L. '85. Lawyer. 
Columbia, Tenn. 

Tyler Calhoun, '88. Nashville, Tenn. 

XLVII. 

Granville Allison, '88. Nashvil'e, Tenn. 

William Charles Branham, '86. Con- 
testant for Dialectic declaimer's medal. Nash- 
ville, Tenn. 

Andrew Brown Learned, '89. Member 
of the Beta Beta. Natchez, Miss. 

John Lyle Summers, '86 law. A B. and 
valedictorian, Emory and Henry College, '84; 
clerk of Vanderbilt Moot Court. Morristown, 
Tenn. 

William Blythe Ward, '89. Jefferson, 
Tex. 

Wm. Roberts P.vtten, '89. Chattanooga, 
Tenn. 

Lucius Salisbury Merriam, '89. Chat- 
tanooga. Tenn. 

Alfred Brown Pusey,'89. Elizabethtown, 
Ky. 

XLVIII. 

Robert Don.\ld Goodlett, JR.,'89. Nash- 
ville. Tenn. 

Walter Gill Kirkpatrick, '86. Scholar- 
ship in mathematics; Owen prize medal; fellow- 
ship in engineering. Nashville, Tenn. 



64 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA CHAPTER. 
[The Otnicron, at the Uaiversity of Virginia, University of Virginia Post-office, Va.] 

At the University of Virginia tlie courses of study are not prescribed and the 
students are not divided into classes. Eacli branch of instruction is termed a school. 
Thus there are the schools of Latin, Greek, modern languages, moral philosophy, 
mathematics, and so on. In each school there are several classes. Each student 
studies in such schools as he pleases; but if he expects to receive a degree he must 
finally complete in the several schools a course that is practically equivalent to the 
course that would secure the same degree in an ordinary college. This system ori- 
ginated in this university, and is found in many southern institutions. In the depart- 
ment of medicine there are about one hundred students; in the department of law, 
about eighty-five; and in the literary and scientific department about two hundred. 

The fraternities are Beta Theta Pi, Delta Kappa Epsilon, Phi Kappa Sigma, Phi 
Kappa Psi, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Phi Gamma Delta, Chi Phi, Sigma Chi, Delta Psi, 
Mystic Seven, Kappa Sigma, Pi Kappa Alpha, Alpha Tau Omega, southern Kappa 
Alpha, Phi Delta Theta, and Kappa Sigma Kappa. 

The Omicron was founded in 1850. From the beginning, and especially in recent 
3'ears, it has been largelv composed of members coming from other colleges. C. B. 
Parkhill, N. R. Clarke, M. H. Albin, VV. W. Talley, and W. F. McLeod' have been 
the corresponding secretaries since 1881. W. N. Smith, W. C. White, and N. R, 
Clarke have recently been chiefs of districts. W. M. Atkinson was at convention 
in 1881; C. Skinner in iSSz; J. E. Heath in 1883; W. C. White and H. C. Warren in 
1884; and G. R. Lockwood in 18S5. C. M. Hepburn, of Omicron, was, for several 
years, an editor of the Beta Theta Pi. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 

XLIII. 

Dr. Cornelius Skinner. Initiated at Epsi- 
lon. Louisville, Ky.; former address, Danville, 

Ky. 

William Howard Perkinson. Initiated 
at Alpha Phi. Petersburg, Va. 

John Randolph Tucker, Jr. Editor of 
Virginia University Magazine; initiated at Pi 
Rho. Richmond, Va. 

Richard Brooks Maury, Jr. Memphis, 
Tenn. 

Alexander Taylor Patton 
Alpha Theta. Bentivoiilio, Va. 

*Obadiah Jennings Wise. 
Alpha Theta. Goidonsville, Va. 



Initiated at 



Initiated at 
Died in 18S4. 



XLIV. 



Norborne Robertson Clarke. Cor. sec. 
and chief; initiated at Alpha Mu. Demopolis, 
Ala. 

Martin Hirst Albin. Bachelorof law '84; 
cor. sec; initiated at Xi. St. Paul, Minn.; for- 
mer address, Winchester, Va. 

XLV. 

Charles Ford Woods, 
Mu. Carthage, Ala. 



Initiated at Alpha, 



John Joseph Atkinson. 
Gonzales. Tex. 

Benjamin James Fitzpatrick. 
gomery, Ala. 

David Thornton Edwards. Bachelor of 
law, '85; initiated at Epsilon. Versailles, Ky, 

James William Kern. ~ 
'85. White Post, Va. 

XLvr. 

Tho.mas Shields Lyo.m. 
'84. Galveston, Tex. 

Willis Henry Bocock. 
Hampden Sidnev College, Va. 

Charles Emory Jcjhnson. 
Evansville, Ind. 

Daniel Lyon Heath. Initiated at Beta 
Beta. Coma, Miss. 

Robert Edward Lee Holmes. Bachelor of 
law '85; initiated at Xi. Ivor, Va. 

Alexander Watkins Terrell. Initiated 
at Xi. Lynchburg, Va. 

William Warren Talley. Cor. sec; 
initiated at Alpha Kappa. Lynchburg, Va. 

Andrew Jackson Montague. Bachelor 
of law '85; initiated at Alpha Kappa. Jamaica, 
Va. 

Willis Field McLeod. Cor. sec. Ver- 
sailles, Kj'. 



Initiated at Zeta. 

Mont- 

elor of 
Ky. 
Degree of Ph. D. 

Bachelor of law 
Initiated at Zeta. 
Initiated at Pi. 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



65 



WABASH CHAPTER. 
[The Tau, at Wabash College, Crawfordsville, Ind.] 

Wabash is a Presbyterian college that was founded in 1832. It confers degrees in 
arts and in science. The courses are partially elective. There are twelve instructors 
and about one hundred and twenty undergraduates. There are also about seventy 
prcparatorv students. Women are not admitted. 

There are chapters of Beta Theta Pi, Phi Delta Theta, Phi Gamma Delta, Phi 
Kappa Psi, and Sigmi Chi. 

The Tau dates from 1S45. The corresponding secretaries since the Chicago con- 
vention have been J. F. Stutesman, R. S. Thomson, and Parke Daniels. W. H. Kent 
and J. E. Williamson were the representatives at the convention of 18S1; Stutesman 
at that of 18S2, and Chas. Wilson at that of 1SS4. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 
XLIII. 

Morton' IIenrv Ixsley, '85. Second prize 
sophomore declamation; left college at the end 
of sophomore 3'ear. Crawfordsville, Ind. 

XLIV. 

Herbert Ritchie Hess, 'S3. Student of 
law. Indianapolis, Ind. 

ParivE Daniels, '87. Prep, declamation 
prize, first; freshman daclamation jirize, first; 
on inter-society exhibition; editor of U^cilxis/i ; 
cor. sec. Rockville, Ind. 

XLV. 

Frederick James Bippus, '88. Hunting- 
ton, Ind. 

Frederick Washington Cook, Jr. Bald- 
win prize essayist; came from Pi; now studying 
at Heidelberg, Germany. Evansville, Ind. 

David Howard Maxwell, '86. On 
society exhibition; sophomore declamation prize, 
first; junior essay prize, first; Baldwin prize 
essayist; came from Pi. Rockville, Ind. 

Sherman Allen Trout, '88. Prep. 



declamation prize, second^ left college at end of 
freshman year. Crawfordsville, Ind. 

John William Doak, '87. Sophomore de- 
clamation prize, second; on foot-ball eleven; 
now studying law; will resume college studies 
next year with '88. Paris, 111. 

XLVI. 

Harry Greene, '88. Class officer. Craw- 
fordsville, Ind. 

Arthur Albert McCain, '89. Prep, de- 
clamation prize, second. Crawfordsville, Ind. 

Jesse Austin Greene, '89. Class olllcer. 
Crawfordsville, Ind. 

Louis Perkins Cain, '90. Danville, 111. 

XLYII. 

Howe Allen Condit, '90. Terre Ilaufc, 
Ind. 

John Wesley Kieff, '87. On foot-ball 
eleven; on inter-society contest exhibition; editor 
of T/ic ]V(tbasl/. Lafayette, Ind. 

Stanley Carnahan Hughes, '89. Class 
officer. Richmond, Ind. 

Frank Harrison Boudinot, '90. Terre 
Haute, Ind. 



66 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



'WASHINGTON AND JEFFERSON CHAPTER. 
[The Gamma, at "Washington and Jefferson College, Washington, Pa.] 

Jefferson College at Cannonsburg and Washington College at Washington were, 
in 1865, united under the name of Washington and Jefferson, and Washington was 
made the site of the consolidated college. The institution is controlled by the Pres- 
byterian church. The college department has eight instructors and about one 
hundred and fifty students. There is also a preparatory department. Women are 
not admitted. 

There are chapters of Beta Theta Pi, Phi Gamma Delta, Phi Kappa Psi, Phi 
Kappa Sigma, Delta Tau Delta, Phi Delta Theta, and Alpha Tau Omega. 

The Gamma was founded in 1S42 at Jefferson College. A chapter was founded at 
Washington College in 1855. Upon the union of the colleges the chapters were 
consolidated. Since the convention of 18S1 the corresponding secretaries have been 
J. S. Taylor, C. E. Irwin, J. M. Clarke, M. S. McKennan, and R. M. Brownson. 
R. P. Patterson and R. Harvey Young were delegates at the convention of 18S1; 
and Patterson at that of 1884. R. Harvey Young was for years the general treasurer 
and a member of the board of directors. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 

XLIII. 

William Campbell Jacob, '83. Wellsburg, 
W. Va. 

XLIV. 

John McCracken Thompson, '86. Wash- 
ington. Pa. 

William McKennan, '86. Washington, Pa. 

Robert Hazlett Cummins, '86. Wheel- 
ing, W. Va. 

XLV. 

Robert McKennan Brownson, '85. Cor. 
sec. Washington, Pa. 

Clarence B. Baguley, '87. Wheeling, 
W. Va. 

Thomas Ramsey McKennan, '89. Cor. 
sec. Washington, Pa. 



XLVI. 

Moore Stockton McKennan, '89. Cor. 
sec. Wasliington, Pa. 

William James Fredericks, '85. Burgetts- 
tovvn. Pa. 

Oliver McClellan Campbell, '85. Belle- 
ville, Pa. 

Samuel Jacob, '86. Wellsburg, W. Va. 

XLVII. 

Walter Worthington Medill, '86. Til- 
tonville, O. 

James David Jack, '88. Cannon, Pa. 

Rush Thoburn Jones, '88. Washington, 
Pa. 

William Absalom Baird, '89. Washing- 
ton, Pa. 

Burt Allison Brown, '89. Marchand, Pa. 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 67 



■WESTEBN RESERVE CHAPTER. 
[The Beta, at 'Western Reserve University, Cleveland, O.J 

The unders^raduate department of Western Reserve is called the Adelbert College 
of Western Reserve University. For many years that department was at Hudson 
and was called Western Reserve College. The change of name and of location was 
made in 18S3. In the college there are ten instructors and about one hundred 
students. Women are admitted. The university has a medical department at Cleve- 
land and preparatory departments at Hudson and Green Springs. The Case School 
of Applied Science is in the immediate neighborhood of Adelbert College and 
answers the purpose of a scientific department; but, although it is managed in 
sympathy with the university, its government is wholly independent and it is not 
properly a department of Western Reserve. 

Alpha Delta Phi, Beta Theta Pi, Delta Upsilon, Delta Kappa Epsilon, and Deltf, 
Tau Delta have chapters in Adelbert. The membership varies from five to fifteen. 

The Beta was established in 1841, just three months before the Ohio University 
chapter. N. C. Stevens, J. A. Rohbach, G. M. Fletcher, and L. A. Sadler have been 
the recent corresponding secretaries. Rohbach was chief of the district. Stevens 
was at convention of 1S81; W. B. Parmelce and J. W. Andrews in 1SS2; Andrews 
in iSS3;and Fletcher in 1884. 

Admitted since August, 1881. Edwakd Pif.rce IIall, '8S. Stuch ing law 

XLIV. Ashtabula, O. 

Thomas Martin Kennedy, '88. 133 Lynuui 

Thaddeus Day McFarland, '85. Ilud- street Cleveland, O. 

son, O. John Faris Bfkry, '88. Hudson, O. 

James Thomas Lees, '86. Phi Beta Kappa; Edwin Alonzo Clark, '87. Willoughhv, O. 

Greek oration; editor Reserve. Elmwood, 111. Henry Burt Herrick, '88. On hall nine. 

Solon Louer, '86. Now at Alleghany Col- Chester Cross Roads, Geauga countv, O. 

lege. Willoughby, O. Sterling Parks, '88. Now at Universitv of 

George Marcus Fletcher, '85. Studying Michigan and member of Lambda. Colla- 

lavv. Geneva, O. j^^g,. q 

Charles Alden Washburn, '86. Pittsfield, ' ' XLVII. 
Mass. 

XLV. Julian Dana Harmon, '88. Warren, O. 

Charles Jones, '84. Mining engineer. Clay Herrick. '89. Collamer, O. 

Seattle, Wash! Terr. Francis Anderson Lyman, 89. Hdo, 

" Harry Stanley Taylor, '87. Law student. PLawaii, Sandwich Islands. ■ ^ 

Willouo-hby, O. George Rohert McKay, 89. Now at Ada 

Loren Alonzo Sadler, '87. Hudson, O. College. Newburg. O. 

Claire Frank Luther, 89. Fames- 

XLVL ville, O. 

John Thaddeus Carter, '88. 1914 Walker 
street, Cleveland, O. 



68 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



■WESTMINSTER CHAPTER. 
[The Alpha Delta, at Westminster College, Fulton, Mo.] 

Westminster is the only Presbyterian college in Missouri. Both the northern and 
the southern branches of the church participate in the management. The institution 
was chartered in 1S53. The college department has six professors and about ninety 
students. There is a preparatory department. Women are not admitted. 

The only fraternities are Beta Theta Pi and Phi Delta Theta. 

The Alpha Delta was founded in 186S. Since iSSi the corresponding secretaries 
have been J. R. Moorehead, A. A. Wallace, B. H. Charles, Jr., and W. R. Dobyns. 
Morehead has been chief of the district. The delegates at the convention of 18S1 
were J. G. Trimble, J. R. Moorehead, and H. C. Evans; at that of '82, J. R. Moore- 
head and E. B. M'Chue; at that of '84, B. H. Charles, Jr-, W. R. Dobvns, and E. F. 
McCausland; and at that of '85, W. R. Dobyns, B. H. Charles, Jr., and F. W. Sneed. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 
XLIII. 

Edwin Fouche McCausland, '86. Ani- 
versary orator Philalethian Society in '85. 
Dardenne, Mo. 

Thomas Travis Trimble, '85. Student at 
Southwestern Presbyterian University. Home, 
Santa Fe, Mo. 

XLIV. 

Walter Hensil Bradley, '86. Aniversary 
orator Philaletliian Society, "84; Dalton essa^' 
prize '85. Foley, Mo. 

George Donellan, '87. Druggist. Inde- 
pendence, Mo. 

XLV. 

John Mosby Grant, '86. Anniversary 
orator Philalethian Society '85; Harrison decla- 
mation prize, '84. Williamsburg, Mo. 

Leroy Jones, '85. Anniversary orator 
Philalethian Society '84; student of medicine. 
Sedalia, Mo. 

William Ray Dobyns, '87. Marquess 
oratorical prize '85; anniversary orator Philale- 
thian Society '86; cor. sec, Austin, Tex. 



Frank Woodford Sneed, '87. Anniversary 
orator Philale'hian Society, 'S3; Marquess 
prize for oratory '84. Sedalia, Mo. 

XLVI. 

William Harrison. Jr., '88. Student in 
pharmacy. McCredie, Mo. 

Joseph William Charles, '87. Anniver- 
sary orator Philologic Society, '85. Fulton. Mo. 

Hugh Alexander Roberts, '88. Trimble 
Latin prize '84. St. Charles, Mo. 

XLVII. 

Robert Lee Simpson, '87. Anniversary 
orator Philalethian Societv '86; cor. sec. Paris, 
Mo. 

George Richmond Moulton, '88. Foster 
mathematical prize '84; farmer. Independence, 
Mo. 

Charles Francis Nesbitt.'88. Anniversary 
orator Philologic Society, '86. Washington, 
D. C. 

Howard Sutherland, '89. 2635 Chestnut 
street. St. Louis, Mo. 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



69 



UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN CHAPTER. 
[The Alpha Pi, at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. J 

The University of Wisconsin is a state institution. In the iin(ler<^racliiate depart- 
ment there are thirty-three instructors and about four hunch'ed students. Women are 
admitted. The studies are largely electi\'e. Degrees are conferred in arts, letters, 
science, agriculture, and engineering. There is a law department, with se\ en in- 
structors and about sixty students. 

The fraternities are Phi Delta Theta, Beta Thcta Pi, Phi Kappa Psi, Chi Psi, Sigma 
Chi, and Delta Upsilon. 

The Alpha Pi was founded in 1S72. Since the convention of iSSi the correspond- 
ing secretaries have been E. C. Stevens, E. G. McGilton, L. P. Conover, and H. S. 
Shedd. Conover was chief of the district. At the convention of iSSr the repre- 
sentatives were H. L. Smith, Stanley Proudfit, and J. M. Dodson; at that of 1882, 
E. C. Stevens, B. G. Treat, and L. P. Conover; at that of 1S84, Conover; and at that 
of 1885, J. N. Sanborn. The chapter rarely has more than eight or nine members. 



Admitted since August, 1881. XLVl. 

XLIII. Charles Marcius Morris, 'S7. Madison, 

EvviNG Law Patterson, '82. From Pi. "is. 

Terre Haute Ind George Langstaff Thayer, '87. Nor- 

Frederick Masox Brown, '85. Madison, ^^^o^^ P^''^' ^^°^ county, 111. 



Wis. 

RuGGLEs Starr Rockwell, '84. Colum- 
bus, Wis. 

Lawrence Peterson Conover, '85. Cor. 
sec. Dayton, O. 

XLIV. 

Charles Lsaac Earll, "Sv Whitewater, 
Wis. 

Henry Paxon Stoddart, 'S3. Black Earth, 
Wis. 

Conrad ]SL\RTiNirs Conradson, '83. 
Brooklyn, Wis. 

XLV. 

Rodell Clrtis Warne, '8:5. Whitewater, 
Wis. 

Frederick Augustus Teall, '85 law. Eau 
Claire, Wis. 

Frederick Marmaduke Stephenson, '85 
law. Menominee, Wis. 



Russell Humphrey Smith, '87. Chicago, 
111. 

Henry Sprague Shedd, '86. Cor. sec. 
From Chi. Whitewater, Wis. 

John Lawrence Mitland, '88. Markesan, 
Wis. 

XLVII. 

Alfred Phelps DeLancy, '87. White- 
water, Wis. 

Winfield Robert Smith, '89. Milwaukee, 
Wis. 

Frederick William Stearns, '89. Madi- 
son, Wis. 

XLVIII. 

Jacob John Schindler, '89. Monroe, W'is. 
Seymour Shep.\rd Cook. Special student. 
Whitewater, W'is. 






m^ 



MSu 



70 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



WITTENBERG CHAPTER. 
[The Alpha Gamma, at Wittenberg College, Springfield, O.J 

Wittenberg College belongs to the Lutheran church. It comprises theological, 
collegiate, and preparatory departments. In the collegiate department there are six 
instructors and, including a few women, about one hundred students. 

Phi Kappa Psi, Beta Theta Pi, Alpha Tau Omega, and Phi Gamma Delta have 
chapters, with an average membership of twelve. 

The Alpha Gamma was established in 1867. Its corresponding secretaries since 
iSSi have been S. S. Kaufi^man, S. E. Greenawalt, H. A. Williams, C. J. Pretzman, 
F. L. Sigmund, and J. S. Simon. Greenawalt is chief of the district. R. H. Grube 
was at convention in 18S1; S. S. Kauft'man, E. P. Otis, and W. A. Pugh in 1882; and 
C.J. Pretzman and R. C. Bancroft in 1S84. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 
XLIII. 

Charles Clifford Patterson, '84. Prin- 
cipal ot" High School. Bellefontaine, O.; former 
address, 22S West High street, Springfield, O. 

Ellsworth Otis, '87. Now at University 
of Michigan, studying law; meinher of Lambda. 
Winfield, O. 

Arthur Mercein Mann, '85. Transferred 
to Theta. Clarksburg, O. 

Charles John Pretzman, '86. Cor. sec. 
74 West High street, Springfield, O. 

Frank B. Heibertshausen, '86. Sulphur 
Springs, O. 

Henry Archer Williams, '85. First honor; 
editor Co/If or Sfy/tis: cor. sec; studying law. 
774 East CHffton street, Springfield, O. 

Emor W. Simon, '84. Studying theology at 
Wittenberg Theological Seminary. New Lis- 
bon, O. 

Allen Garrett Billow, '86. Fernclift' 
avenue, Springfield, O. 



13-5 



XLIV. 

William Harrison Kephart, '86. 
Seventh avenue, Altoona, Pa. 

Carl Krider Mower, '86. Factory street, 
Springfield, O. 



Frederick Lester Sigmund, '86. Prize 
oration at junior exhibition; cor sec. Peabody, 
Kas. 

XLV. 

Calvin Lewis Knerr, '84. Dayton, O. 

Ellsworth Bronell Knerr, '84. Assistant 
instructor in sciences at Wittenberg College. 
Dayton, O. 

vVilliam Asbury Tope, '85. Studying 
medicine. New Philadelphia, O. 

Robert Christy B.\ncroft, '87. Spring- 
field, O. 

Jacob Spener Simon, '87. Prize oration at 
junior exhibition; cor. sec. New Lisbon, O. 

John Lawrence Moore. Treasurer I., B. 
& W. R'y. Sandusky, O. 

XLVL 

Isaac Douglass Worman, '88. Leetonia,0. 
Arthur Harms Smith, '88. Springfield, O. 
Edward Oscar Weaver, 88. Spring- 
field, O. 

Samuel Smith Keller, '88. Springfield, O. 

XLVII. 

Gains Glenn Atkins, '88. Transferred to 
Theta Delta. Columbus, O. 

William A. Bowman, '89. Muncie, Ind. 
Harry Humphreys, '89. Springfield, O. 



THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



WOOSTER CHAPTER. 



[The Alpha Lambda, at the University of Wooster, "Wooster, O.] 

The University of Wooster is a Presbyterian institution. In the collej^iate depart- 
ment there are fourteen instructors and, includins^ women, aliout two hundred and 
fitty students. Degrees are conferred in arts, philosopliy, and hterature. There is a 
larore preparatory department. 

There are chapters of Phi Kappa Psi, Beta Theta Pi, Phi Delta Theta, Sigma Clii, 
Delta Tan Delta, and Phi Gamma Delta. Membership averages fifteen. 

The Alpha Lambda dates from 1S73. Its corresponding secretaries since the con- 
vention of iSSi have been Jacob Brilles, J. S. Gooding, E. E. Weaver, Frank Hur- 
govne, and Frank Conrad. The representatives at recent conventions were, in 18S1, 
j. il. McDonald, F. B. Pearson, and J. Cal. Hanna; in 18S2, Ilanna, D. S. Moore, 
and T. G. McConkey; in 1SS3, Jacob Brilles; in 1SS4, E. E. Weaver and Brilles, the 
latter lieing the secretary; and in 18S5, J. Cal. Hanna. In i883-'83 Hanna was chief 
of the district, and since 1884 he has been general secretary. In i884-'8:^ Pearson 
was college secretar}' in the general secretary's department. 



Admitted since August, 1881. 
XLIIl. 

DiCKSOX Leoxard Moore, '85. Second- 
honor man; editor of Index '84; captain in the 
university battalion; teaching. Present address, 
Farmersville, O.; home, Dayton, O. 

Geo. Terry Duxl.\p, '86. Book-seller and 
stationer. Orrville, O. 

EnwARD Ebenezer Weaver, "85. Fourth- 
honor man class '85; captain in imiversity 
battalion; cor. sec; book-keeper. Canton, O. 

XLIV. 

Chas. Alvah Burrell, '86. Grocer. Hunt- 
ington, O. 

Geo. Albert Shives, '86. Wooster editor 
Mansfield Nei-i-s. Wooster, O. 

Staxlev Cass Archib.vld, '86. From 
Epsilon; out of college. Cincinnati. O. 

George Howard Archibald, '86. Out of 
college. Wooster, O. 

Edward Payson Duxlap, '87. Index editor 
'86. Orrville, O. 

S.\MUEL KiRKWOOD, "88. Now studcnt at 
Macalaster College. St. Paul, Minn. 

JoHX McCoy, '84. Student at Princeton 
Theological Seminary. Chillicothe, O. 

Delaxo Fraxklix Coxr.vd, "87. Cor. sec. 
Princeton, Ind. 

XLV. 

James Harrixgtox Boyd, '86. Student at 
Princeton. Home, Keene, O. 

Jas. Cavalier Coxway, '85. Teacher. 
Present address. South Charleston, O.; perma- 
nent, Catawba, O. 

Wm. Paul Kirkwood, '8g. Student at 
Macalaster College. St. Paul, Minn. 

Arthur Beardsley Duxlap, '87. Green- 
field, O. 

Fraxk Ward Burgoyne, '86. Editor 
University Voice; cor. sec. Cincinnati, O, 



Wm. Warrex Barxett, '87. Clerk. Day- 
ton, O. 

Geo. Duxlap Crothers, '87. Teacher. 
Present address. Eagle Pass, Tex.; permanent 
address, Greenfield, O. 

Llewellvx Bodm.\x Reakirt, '88. Clerk. 
Cincinnati, O. 

Daxeel Edward Jexkixs, '87. Student at 
Melbourne University. Melbourne, Australia. 

XLVI. 

Fraxk William Hoe, '87. Grocer. West 
Jelferson, O. 

Geo. Homer Billmax, '87. Captain uni- 
versity battalion. Akron, O. 

JosiAH Madisox Estep, '88. Student Rens- 
selaer Polytechnic Institute, Trov, X. Y. 
Cadiz, O. 

Wm. Henry Hauser, '88. Printer. Ca- 
diz, O. 

XLVII. 

Jacob Newtox Browx, 'SS. Student at 
Miami University. Cincinnati, O. 

Alexaxder Fraxk Keexer, '87. Indiana, 
Pa. 

JoHX Maitlaxd Macdoxald, '89. Clerk. 
Cincinnati, O. 

Jerome Kirke Smith, '89. Wooster, O. 

Wm. O. Barxitz, '89. Student atTarrytown 
Military Academy. Middletown, O. 

Thos. Spexcer Duxlap, '89. Orrville, O. 

George A. Nesbitt, '89. O.xford, O. 

Johx F. Hughes, '89. Parisville, O. 

Chas. McClellax Moderwell, '89. Gen- 
eseo, 111. 

Fraxk Elmer Bradshaw, '87. Brookfield, 
Mo. 

Thos. Parker Berry, '88. Barnesville, O. 

XLVIII. 
Ferdinand Schwill, '89. Cincinnati, O. 



GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX TO THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 

[N. B. — In this index it will be noticed that some names appear more than once. The explanation 
is that some persons have, besides their principal address, a subordinate address; for example, their 
former home or the place wiiere they are now studying. Subordinate addresses are designated by 
inclosing names in parentheses. The college addresses of active members are not given here, but 
api')ear in the chapter lists ] 



Aimiston 

J II Xobie Cum 

Athens 

Broussa:s Coman Cum 
Birmingham 

G B Ward Cum 



ALABAMA. 

Carthage 

C F Woods Va 

Demopoli-; 

N R Clarke Va 

Mobile 

C A Hall Ste 



Montgomery 

II B Everhart Ste 
B J Fitzpatrick Va 

Selma 

Nathan Waller Cum 



Morrillton 

C C Biurows Van 



ARKANSAS. 



\'andale 

O N Killough 



Miss 



Washington 

A II Carrigan, Jr Cum 



CALIFORNIA. 



Berkeley 

A U Schindler Call 
Whitney Palache Call 

J C Doonin Call 

W I Kip Cali 

Durham 

C II Forbjs Mich 

East Oakland 

R T Stratton Cali 

Friiitvale 

W B Welimcin Cali 
I lav wards 

E S Warron Cali 

Hopland 

A J Thatcher Cali 



Los Angeles 




A H Pratt 


Am 


C W Barnes 


Cali 


H L Shively 


Cor 


M G Eshman 


Ind 


Napa City 




J E Beard 


Cali 


H F Briggs 


Nev 


Nevada City 




W H Wentwor 


■th Cali 


Niles 




O B Ellsworth 


Cali 


Oakland 




E D Hale 


Am 


R C Turner 


Cali 


F C Turner 


Cali 



G M Stratton Cali 

C J Evans Cali 

Hugh Howell Cali 
San Francisco 

J W Dutton Cali 

R B Hellman Cali 

J F Davis Cali 

Gaillard Stoner Cali 

Finlay Cook Cali 

A R Baum Harv 

H E Wise Ind 



San Rafael 

G W Dutton 

Santa Cruz 
W S IlitV 



Cali 



Nw 



COLORADO. 



Canon City 

Olin Templin Kas 

Colorado Springs 

N M Campbell la 

Denver 

C II Doolittle Col 
E E Kitchen Den 

G W Robinson Kas 



G C Manly 




Greeley 




'Mich 


and Nw 


A C Patton 


Ind 


W A Moore 
A T Moore 
(WJ Cady 


Nw 
Nw 
Nw) 


South Pueblo 
W F II amp 


Cor 


C S Manly 


OW 


Trinidad 




Georgetown 




R E L Holmes 


Va 


C J White 


Nw 







74 



GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



Bridgeport 

C L I.ibbj Me 

Buckingham 

H D J Gardner Am 
Chaplin 

(C J Backns Am) 

Cromwell 

(Dr W L Savage Am) 
Ellington 

(E A Aborn Am) 



CONNECTICUT. 

Hartford 

(G W Reed Am) 

(A J Dyer Am) 

(H D J Gardner Am) 

Middletown 

(H T Fernald Me) 

(G W Barhjdt Un) 

New Haven 

(G R Dickinson Am) 



(G F Prentiss Am) 

(E R Tillinghasl Nw) 
(E G Coldewey Ste) 



Newington 




(T C Elliott 


Am) 


Summers 




F R Percival 


Cor 


Waterburj 




E F Lewis 


Ste 



Blunt 

Henrv Hamill 



DAKOTA. 



Nw 



Grand Forks 

W A Gordon 
J E Dike 



Am 
Me 



DELAWARE. 



Dover 

(Dr T B Bradford Pa) 



Wilmington 

W L Coolin<j 



Cor 



Washington 

W T Partridge Col 

W P Cutler Cor 

J H Drown Cor 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

H P Mozier la 

William Morejjr. Me 
C E Powell 

Mich and Van 



M L Shackelford RM 
C F Nesbitt Westm 



Eufaula 

Dr H L Brannon Van 



FLORIDA. 

McMeekin 

E H Bowser Van 



Setfner 

M G Park 



OW 



GEORGIA. 



Atlanta 






Lc 


)uisvil 


le 




C D Roy 


Rich 




Wr 


ight Hunter Van 




La Grange 




M; 


aeon 






H R Slack, J r 


JH 




C A Caldwell Van 








ILLINOIS. 










Alvin 




Bradford 






A H Armstrong 


Bel 


Howard McElro\ 


■ DP 


J A Lyman 


Bel 




S T Hickman 


Cen 


Anna 




Cerro Gordo 






T W Tomlinson 


Cor 


Samuel Dodds 


Rut 


J P Reasoner 


DP 




W R Goodwin 


DP 


Ashton 




Cherry Valley 






F W Tilden 


Harv 


J E Hunt 


Nw 


FH Chase 


Bel 




W S Harwood 


la. 


Aurora 




G A Chase 


Bel 




(G S Cox 


Ken) 


E C Qiiereau 


Ki^/ 


Chicago 






C L Andrews 


Mich 


Batavia 




W E Hinchliff 


Am 




(W E Davidson 


Nav) 


W J Brown 


Bel 


L H McCormick 


Am 




A R Edwards 


Nw 


Bloomington 




D L Gifford 


Am 




C N Zeublin 


Nw 


(WR Goodwin 


DP) 


J R Montgomery 


Bel 




R H Smith 




E B Lanier 


Nw 


S O Dauchv 


Bel 




Ste and Wis 



TO THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



75 



Danville 




L P Cain 


Wab 


D wight 




J PjMcWilliams 


New 


Elgin 




J I> Young 


Nw 


Elm wood 




J T Lees 


WR 


Englewood 




Louis Rich 


Nw 


Evanslon 




E P \'andercook 


Am 


W O Shepherd 


DP 


F E Miller 


Nw 


11 R Hatheld 


Nw 


Bond Stowe 


Nw 


C G Lewis 


Nw 


Ilarvev Brown 


Nw 


J B Hubbard 


Nw 


H R Calkins 


Nw 


P E Shumway 


Nw 


F C Whitehead 


Nw 


Farmer City 




C M Weedman 


Nw 


Frocjiorl 




11 M Ilvde 


Bel 



ILLINOIS— Continued. 

Galesburg 

G L Price Mich 

Genesee 

C M Modorwell Woos 
Hillsboro 

(J P Whitehead Am) 
Home wood 

A C Egelston Un 
Hyde Park 

H C Brown Bel 

Lafayette 

W E Davidson Nw 
Lake Forest 

E A Aborn Am 

Lincoln 

E C Randolph OW 
Mendota 

(D L Gifford Am; 

Norwood Park 

G L Thayer Wis 

Ottawa 

G B Penney Cor 

(W D FuUerton Nw) 
Paris 

J W Doak Wab 



Pekin 




W T Smith 




laW and Mich 


F L Toenn'gs 


laW 


E F Smith 


LiW 


O H Unland 


laW 


F L Velde 


Mich 


Peoria 




G H Gibson 


Cor 



Rantoul 

A P Gulick DP 

J L Benedict DP 

C P Benedict DP 



Rock to I'd 

J R Robertson 
S M Bushnell 
H H Hamilton 
J W Gregory 

Rossville 

(Howard McElroy DP) 

Van Orin 

W E Wood 

Yorkvillc 

John Adams Nw 



Bel 
Bel 
Mad 
Mich 



Mich 



INDIANA. 



Battle Ground 




Economy 




Huntington 




J G Campbell 


DP 




C H Oler 


Ind 


FJ Bippus 


Wab 


Bedford 




E' 


lansville 




Indianapolis 




J F Thornton 


Ind 




Arthur Thayer 


DP 


W E Bryce 


Cen 


Bloomington 






C E Johnson 


\ii 


W C Smith 


DP 


F H Hughes 


Ind 




F W Cook, Jr 


Wab 


Harry Bowser 


DP 


Albert Miller 


Ind 


G( 


3sport 




J W Wharton 


Ind 


R F Hight 


Ind 




W H Galloway 


Ind 


J H Howard 


Ind 


B V Sudbury 


Ind 


Gi 


reencastle 




II R Hess 


Wab 


C R Madison 


Ind 




W S Scott 


DP 


Knightsville 




IJin-lington 






G II Murphy 


DP 


C M Zellar 


DP 


D P Grant 


Mich 




I J H.immond 


DP 


Laconia 




Cloverdale 

E E Mullinix 
O E Mullinix 


Ind 
Ind 


Gi 


reensburg 

J W Rucker DP 
L E Lathrop DP 
Clarence Cumback 


R F Evans 
Lafayette 

J W Kieff 
Lebanon 


Han 
Wab 


Columbus 






deceased 


DP 


W H Masters 


DP 


Herman Carr 


Ind 




F M Walters 


Ind 


Logansport 




Crawfordsville 






C M Cunningham Ind 


E B McConnell 


Cor 


M H Insley 


Wab 




J S Shannon 


Ind 


(T \V' Tomlinson 


Cor) 


S A Trout 


Wab 


Gi 


reen's Fork 




Madison 




Harry Greene 


Wab 




N L Bunnell 


Ind 


R M Dillon 


Han 


A A^McCain 


Wab 


Gi 


Lulford 




Moorefield 




J A Greene 


Wab 




J B Robertson 


Van 


(S M Rutherford 


DP) 


Cutler 




H 


anover 




Muncie 




Walter Wyatt 


Ind 




J C Clemmons 


Han 


\\' A Bowman 


Wit 



76 



GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



New Albany 

W L Hestei- 

DP and Ind 
New Philadelphia 

^' E Tucker Ind 

Pendletoti 

C S Thomas Ind 

Richmond 

W B Holcombe Bos 

M E Hector DP 

Arthur Cunning- 
ham DP 

S C Hughes Wab 

Rock.ille 

11 D Maxwe'.l Ind 



INDIANA— CoxTiNUED. 

Parke Daniels Wab 

D H Maxwell Wab 

Salem 

J B Tucker 

DP and Han 
Smithville 

Homer Leonard Ind 
Snoddv's Mills 

Albert Rabb Ind 

South Bend 

W C Pavne Beth 

Sudbury 

D W Crockett Ind 
Sullivan 

C M I'arks Ind 



Swanville 

O S Wilson 



llan 



Terre Haute 

M L Goulde Ind 

G S Cox Ken 

H A Condit Wab 

F H Boudinot Wab 

E L Patterson Wis 

Thornton 

S M Rutherford DP 

(W H Masters DP) 

J F Clear waters DP 

Vincenes 

W S Smith Han 



Tahlequali 

E B Wood in 



INDIAN TERRITORY 



Am 



Wealaka 

J P Whitehead Am 



IOWA. 



Algona 

G W Ingham la 

Boone 

C S Tondinson Nw 

Burlington 

J I Gilbert Col 

S P Gdbert la 

F O LowJen la 

E M Nealley la 

Centerville 

(C S Williams laW) 
C R Wooden laW 

Charles City 

(W S Harwood la) 

Cherokee 

S L Bodds- Nw 

E D Huxford Nw 

Clinton 

E H Sabin la 

Council Blufl's 

G S Wright la 

F P Wriiiht la 



Armourdale 

C F Foley Kas 

Belleville 

C S Willams laW 

Blue Mound 

O D Walker Kas 



Creston 




Lewis 




II T Paschal 


laW 


B B Davis 


la 


C P Paschal 


laW 


Maquoketa 




D.inville 




G W Swigart 


la 


W B llanna 


laW 


Mt Pleasant 




D.ivenport 




G A Hare 


laW 


F S Watkins 


la 


J L Woolson 


laW 


Elkader 




J H Newbold 


laW 


D D Donnan 


la 


P B Woolson 


laW 


Fayette 




Muscatine 




G R Peebles 


OW 


R D Musser 


la 


Independence 




D P Johnson, Jr 


la 


R C Lake 
W M Woodward 
Iowa City 

(H P Mozier 
C M Porter 


Col 
la 

la) 
la 


Sidney 

W L Anderson 

Speri-y 

(A N Loper 


la 

I.iW) 


W F Mozier 


la 


Washing' on 




M H Dey 


la 


O G Wilson 


la W 


Jeftcr,-on 




Waterloo 




E F Brown 


la 


11 D Allen 


la 


Knoxville 




J H Gates 


la 


W L Collins 


laW 


H G Hezler 


Mich 


KANSAS. 








Canada 




Concordia 




Sam'l Burkholdei 


", 


L T Smith 


Kas 


J>- 


Kas 


Council Grove 




Clay Centre 




T F Doran 


Kas 


E L Johnson 




Delphos 




la an 


id Mich 


D W C Bower 


Kas 



TO THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



77 



KANSAS— Continued. 



Emporia 




Edwin Fowler 


Am 


T C Elliott 


Am 


Garden Citv 




W W Davis 


Kas 


J 11 Cotteral 


Mich 


(ianutt 




T \V Houston 


Kas 


Ilutihinson 




C E Hall 


Kas 


Lawrence 




C E Parker 




Col, Kas, and Mich 


O H Pochler 


Kas 


R C Rankin 


Kas 


C D Dean 


Kas 


E F Stimpson 


Kas 


Harrv Buck in 


S ' 


ham 


Kas 


J B Lippiiicott 


Kas 


Lyons 




W E Borah 


Kas 



McPherson 




M N Breman 


Kas 


Manhattan 




(I B Todd 


Ken) 


Meade Centre 




W S Kinnear 


Kas 


Newton 




A N Loper 


la 


F E Reed 


Kas 


W T Reed 


Kas 


Nortonville 




J E Curry 


Kas 


Ottowa 




'■(C E Parker 




Col, Kas, 


and Mich 


PeaboJy 




F L SigmunJ 


Wit 


Shawnee 




Archibald Watson Kas 


C M Watson 


Kas 


G B Watson 


Mich 



SiM-in;^- Hill 

G B Deem Nw 

Topeka 

F W Phelps Am 

Rev F B \'rooman Bel 
W H Davies Den 

H L Call Kas 

John Weightman Kas 

Troy 

Warren Perry Kas 

Vining 

W T Caywood Kas 

Wamego 

C E Wo h1 Kas 

Washington 

Rev C P P Fox Mad 

Wellington 

H J Bone Cum 

H F Smith Kas 

Winsfield 

W M Tomlin Kas 



KENTUCKY 



Aiitioch Mills 

(L C Woolery Beth) 

Bedford 

J R Rowlett Han 

Bin-lington 

\\'illiam Gaines SL 

CarroUtoii 

Smith O'Neal Han 

T R Bridges Han 

Clo\erport 

O T Skillman Cen 

E F \^est Cen 

Covington 

E J BuiTington Van 

Danville 

W H Briggs Cen 

II L Briggs Cen 

C H Irvine Cen 

J W Guest. Jr Cen 

B Caldwell Cen 
J W Caldwell Cum 
A C Downs Mich 
F J Cheek Mich 
(Dr Cornelius 

Skinner \'a) 

Elizabethtown 

W A Pusey \'an 

A B Pusey Van 

Frankfort 

1 B Todd Ken 



Fulton 




B C Mickle 


Cum 


Glasgow 




E M Benedict 


Ken 


J B Ellis 


Van 


Henderson 




Rev W D Blair 


Cum 


Ilopkinsville 




B S Radford 


Ciun 


(C C Slaughter 


\'an) 


C C Ferrell 


Van 


Lawrenceburg 




R H Lillard 


Beth 


Lexington 




F P St Clair 


Ik-fh 


J II Kastle 


.in 


Louisville 




S C Jones 


Cen 


S J Ilayden 


Cen 


W S Mullen 


Cen 


R A Watts 


Cen 


Rev W B Riley 


Han 


(O B Riley 


Han) 


D A Walton 


Ste 


E G Coldewey 


Ste 


E M Drummond 


Ste 


J A Altsheler 


\\an 


R F Ilibbitt 


Van 


DrCornelius Skin 


1- 


ner 


Va 



Marion 




Lee Cruce 


Van 


Marrowbone 




S R Pace 


C u m 


Rev J R Crawford 


Cum 


Maysville 




W B Mathews, J r 


.Cen 


Clarence Mathews Cen 


Willirun Cochran 


Cen 


Jamie Cochran 


Cen 


Mt Sterling 




J C Reid 


Beth 


H R Bright 


Beth 


G W Broadus 


Cen 


New Lilierty 




O B Riley 


Han 


W L Riley 


Han 


Owensboro 




A Y Ford 


Br 


Owen ton 




J W L Slaughter 


\'an 


Paduc.di 




Linn White 


Van 


Petersburg 




W T Crisler 


SL 


Russellville 




A B Freeman 


Cum 


Shelby City 




R G Dennv 


Cen 



78 



GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX 
KENTUCKY— Continued. 



Smithysgrove 




Stanford 




J A Guthrie 


Van 


J W Beck 


Cum 


J S Owsley, Jr 


Cum 


D T Edwards 


Va 


Springfield 




Versailles 




W F McLeod 


Va 


C A Green 


Cum 


J C Coleman 


Cen 


Winchester 








C A McDonald 


Van 


J W McClure 


Van 



LOUISIANA. 



New Orl 


leans 




Sh 


reveport 




H 11 


Swain 


Bel • 




L R Uamberlin Rich 




E L Lashbrooke 


Miss 












MAINE. 








Augusta 




Brewer 




E C Bartlett 


Me 


J R Boardman 


Me 


J F Lockwood 


Me 


F T Drew 


Me 


F L Thompson 


Me 


W H Sargent 


Me 


Palermo 




Bangor 




Dennysville 




G F Black 


Me 


G N Jones 


Harv 


II F Lincoln 


Me 


Paris 




C S Lunt 


Me 


Enfield 




A E Forbes 


SL 


R K Jones, Jr 


Me 


S S Twombly 


Me 


Portland 




E C Vose 


Me 






C S Williams 


Me 


L G Paine 


Me 


Harrington 








J K Chamberlin 
L G Paine 


Me 


I B Ray 


Me 


Rockland 




Ste 


E V Coffin 


Me 


J D Lazell 


Me 


Belfast 




A J Coffin 


Me 


Skowhegan 




F W Dickerson 


Me 


North Bridgeton 




D W Colby 


Me 


Bethel 




C G Cushman 


Me 


Warren 




William Philbroo 


kMe 


Orono 




F E Hull 


Me 


Bradley 




II T Fernald 


Me 


West Summer 




R II Marsh 


Me 


E D Graves 


Me 


H A Abbott 


SL 



MARYLAND. 



Baltimore 






W F Smith 


JH 


Ilchester 




J U Detrick 


Dick 




C E Simon 


JH 


(Rollin Norris 


Ste) 


C II Hammond 


IIS 




W H Miller 


JH 


Mt Washington 




Louis Garthe 


JH 




E C Applegarth 


JH 


A T Collins 


JH 


J D Lord 


JH 




Rollin Norris 


Ste 


Poolesville 




W S Bayley 


JH 




H L Gannt 


Ste 


John White. Jr 


JH 


W B Harlan 
11 W Williams 
11 H Wiegand 


JH 
JH 
JH 


Chi 


.irchville 
(W B Harlan 


JH) 


Snow Hill 

J R Todd 
Tompkinsville 


Dick 


Theodore Hough 


JH 


Hagerstown 




G W C Smoot 


Dick 


A R L Dohme 


JH 




C E Bikle 


Dick 


Tow son 




J R Winslow 


JH 




(F T Baker 


Dick) 


R M Isaac 


Ste 



MASSACHUSETTS. 



Amherst 




Auburndale 




J H Tufts 


Am 


J G Cramer 


Bos 


(E B Woodin 


Am) 


Beverly 




H P Woodin 


Am 


l'h Wardwell 


Bos 


C II White 


Am 


(A D Cole 


JH) 


Andover 




Boston 




(W P Taylor 


Bos) 


(W S Boardman 


Am) 



F H Fitts Am 

R M Palmer Am 

W B Snow Bos 
Bernhard Beren- 

son Bos 

W S Little Bos 

A P Folwell Br 



TO THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



79 



MASSACHUSETTS— Continued. 



F H Bi-iggs 


Br 


Gran by 




Guy Wilkinson 


Call 


E W Branch 


Bos 


(H M Carter 


Den) 


Haverhill 




\V M Mclnnes 


Harv 


(C E O Nichols 


Am) 


E E Blodgett 


Har\- 


Hoi brook 




D B Brace 


JH 


G C Dean 


Am 


C L Holmes 


Me 


Holyoke 




H M Smith 


SL 


'W F Whiting 


Am 


Buckland 




Hopedale 




( W D Forbes 


Am) 


G N Goddard 


Am 


Cambridge 




Lexington 




R D Wilson 


Harv 


G C Goodwin 


Am 


Cambridgeport 




Marblehead 




W M Warren 


Bos 


A E Knapp 


Mad 


Campello 




Melrose 




W R Pa tt an gall 


Me 


W H Williams 


Harv 


Chelsea 




Middleboro 




F C Hood 


Harv 


A H Washburn 


Cor 


Chicopee 




Monson 




Thomas Whitesid 


eBos 


( J H Tufts 


Am) 


Cummington 




R H Cushman 


Am 


A J Dyer 


Am 


Newburyport 




Dorchester 




W S Boardman 


Am 


E A Johnston 


Bos 


E S Drown 


Harv 


East Boston 




North Adams 




L N Cushman 


Bos 


H C Lyman 


Mad 


East Marshtield 




Northampton 




J C Hagen 


Bos 


A F Stone 


Am 


C R Richards 


Bos 


North Brookfield 




Erving 




( J E Tower 


Am) 


(F W Phelps 


Am) 


H A Cooke 


Am 


C D Phelps 


Am 


Palmer 




Everett 




S S Parks 


Am 


L B Greenwood 


Bos 


Pittstield 




Framingham 




G W Reed 


Am 


(G P Eastman 


Am) 


C A Washburn 


WR 


Gardner 




Plymouth 




G A Dunn 


Bos 


E S Damon 


Am 



Provincetown 




d F Smith 


Am) 


Raynham 




' (C H White 


Am) 


Rockland 




W H Poole 


Am 


Salem 




F P Ingalls 


Cor 


Shelburne Falls 




W D Forbes 


Am 


Somerville 




G E Whitaker 


Bos 


H T Allen 


Harv 


South Gardner 




H A Whitney 


Am 


Springfield 




J E Tower 


Am 


Stoneham 




(W B Snow 


Bos) 


Sudbury 




W H Thompson 


Am 


Taunton 




A E Wilbar 


Am 


C B Wilbar 


Am 


W C Hawkins 


Ste 


Walpole 




(F H Fitts 


Am) 


Wellesley 




( W S Little 


Bos) 


West Newton 




Rev J C Jaynes 


Harv 


Winchester 




H C Holt 


Harv 


Worcester 




C B Stevens 


Am 


J E Smith 


Am 


(G E Whitaker 


Bos) 



MICHIGAN. 



* 



Adrian 




Emery 


II T Stephens 


OS 


D II Ramsdell 


Brighton 




Grand Ledge 


L B Lee 


Mich 


R D Briggs 


J H Lee 


Mich 


Grand Rapids 


Coldwater 




F D Sherman 


F B Spaulding 
Detroit 

F T Lodge 
M R Nelson 


Mich 

DP 
Mad 


High'and 

W A St John 
Lake Linden 

W W Harris, 
deceased, 


Dowagiac 




Manistee 


V M Tuthill 


Mich 


D P Cochrane 



Mich 



Mad 



Mich 



Mad 



Mich 



Mich 



F R Babcock 


Mich 


R S Babcock 


Mich 


Niles 




J H Bickford 


D P 


Ovvosso 




J C Shattuck 


Midi 


Pontiac 




W C Harris 


Mich 


J H Patterson 


Mich 


Shelby 




VV J Cady 


Nov 



GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



MINNESOTA. 



Clear Lake 




St Paul 




O W Baldwin 


Col 


C J Backus 


Am 


Fort Snelling 
W D Howe 


Ind 


H H Cleveland 
F A Bristol 
D W Brownell 


Col 
Col 
Den 


Minneapolis 




Julian Millard 


Mich 


E M Stevens 


Am 


Dr G A Renz 


Pa 



Lewis Baker, Jr Ste 
M II Albin Va 

Samuel Kirkwood Woos 
W P Kirkwcod Woos 
Winona 

L R Doud Mich 



MISSISSIPPI. 



Ashland 

Hon W T Mc 
Donald Miss 

Atlanta 

A M Harley Miss 

Brandon 

HonW H Clarke Cimi 
H R Cocke Miss 

Dr J J Rhodes Miss 
E E Frantz Miss 

A E Brown Miss 

R L McLaurin Miss 

Brookhaven 

J S Gadberry Miss 

J H Johnson Miss 

Cofteeville 

Hon Willis Golli- 



day 


Cum 


Columbia 




R P Moore 


Miss 


T B Lanipton 


Miss 


Columbus 




A L Pittman 


Miss 


fj B McElroy 


Miss) 


Coma 




D L Heath 


Va 



Edwards 




T A Chichestei 


1- Miss 


Hazlehurst 




W W Mayes 


Miss 


R B Mayes 


Miss 


Holly Springs 




G R Craft 


Cen 


Jack>ion 




J B Ross 


Miss 


W R Hill 


Miss 


Lexington 




A W Hooker 




Miss 


and Rich 


Macon 




H E Harlan 


Van 


McComb City 




H M Quin 


Miss 


H C Hoover 


Miss 


Mayhew Station 




J B McElroy 


Miss 


Meridian 




T W Scarborou 


gh Am 


R F Cochran 


Miss 


J B Cochran 


Miss 


Natchez 




L K Sharpe 


Miss 



T S Sharpe Miss 

MC Montgomery Miss 
A B Learned 

Miss and \'an 

Oxford 

G T Fitzhugh Miss 
Rev W I Sinnott Miss 
L T Fitzhugh Miss 
J D Burge Miss 

S S Mathews Miss 

Samuel Hollo way Miss 

Ripley 

J C Harris 
J Y Murry,Jr 
Walter Harris 

Rosedale 

F M Scott 

Tremont 

O T Stone 



Cum 
Miss 

Miss 

Miss 



Cum 

Tupelo 

O L Stribling Cum 

\''aden 

E W Stewart Cum 

West Point 

E LB McClelland Miss 



Brookficld 

V E Bradshaw Woos 
Clinton 

J E Atkinson Beth 

Dardenne 

E F" McCausland Westm 
Foley 

W H Bradley Westm 
Franklin 

N W Bonham Van 
Fulton 

J W Charles Westm 

Independence 

George Donellan Westm 

G R Moulton Westm 
Kansas City 

Frank Warrincr Beth 



MISSOURI. 

J W Brannum Cum 

Garrett Ellison Den 

F G Graham Dick 

R E Stout Kas 

J A Sargent Kas 

Carl Smith Kas 

J G Smith Mich 

McCredie 

Wm Harrison, Jr Westm 

Marvville 

B L C Gann laW 

Memphis 

W B Mc Arthur OW 
Paris 

R L Simpson Westm 
Pilot Grove 

W L McCutchen Cum 
Rosendale 

J W Laney laW 



St Charles 

Walter Alexander Harv 
H A Roberts Westm 

St Louis 

S D Roser Cen 

Lee Dunlap Cen 

C W Niedring- 

haus, dec'd, DP 

Howard Suther- 
land Westm 

Santa Fe 

T T Trimble Westm 

Sedalia 

Leroy Jones W^estm 

F W Sneed Westm 

Williamsburg 

J M Grant Westm 



TO THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 
MONTANA. 



Deer Lodge 

Howard Copland Den 



Helena 

W E Sanders 



Col 



81 



NEBRASKA. 



Kearney 






Omaha 




J C Fifield 


JH 




Dr W P Wilcox 


Col 


Norfolk 






V E Tucker 


Han 


A S Burrows 


la 


NEVADA. 


M C Hamilton 


Ste 



Virginia City 

M W Fredrick Harv 



NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



New Hampton 

(C O Williams Br) 



Winchester 

( W S Buffum 



Am) 



NEW JERSEY. 



Bergen Point 




Jersey City 




(W H Robinson 


Un) 


E F White 


Ste 


O E Coles 


Col 


(John McCoy 


Woos 


Bordentown 




Jersey City Heights 




(J H Boyd 


Woos 


J B Reynolds 


Rut 


W C Post 


Ste 


Raritan 




Dover 




Mt Holly 




A W Mack 


Ste 


J L Hurd 


Col 


F T Baker 


Dick 


L C Mack 


Ste 


East Millstone 




W A Barrows, Jr 


Rut 


Seabright 




F W Ribble 
H L Rupert 
Glen Ridge 

H G Darwin 


Rut 
Rut 

Col 


Newark 

C A Cahoone 
W J Moore 
O H Baldwin 

North Plainfield 


Col 
Mad 

Ste 


W G Lake 

South Dennis 

L A Parsels 
Summit 


Dick 
Dick 


Hoboken 




D C Adams 


Col 


T S Fearn 


JH 


F W Sheldon 


Cor 


Paterson 




Verona 




J H Sheldon 


Ste 


W O Barnes 


Ste 


C W Harrison 


Rut 


Irvington 




Princeton 




Windsor 




A B Harrison 


Rut 


(G W Hutchinson Br) 


G W Hutchinson 


Br 



NEW YORK 



Albany 

(C W De Baun Un) 
Amsterdam 

F D Lewis Un 

Antwerp 

Theodore Miller Cor 
Aurora 

S C Jones Cor 

Ballston Spa 

N D Fish Un 

R H Washburne Un 
Bayonne 

Rev J K Folwell Mad 



Bellona 




Jas Chambers, Jr 


• Am 


Thomas Carmod_\ 


', 


(A P Folwell 


Br) 


Jr., 


Cor 


W B Middleton 


Col 


Binghamton 




C F Ackerman 


Col 


P J Casey, dec'd, 


Cor 


E H Barnum 


Col 


w'm Harris 


Cor 


J T Sackett 


Cor 


Bombay 




J B Alden 


Rut 


J L Southwick 


Cor 


G B Helmle 


SL 


Broadalbin 




C J Field 


Ste 


Rev W J Qiiincy 


Mad 


Buffalo 




N J Gulick 


Un 


G P Eastman 


Am 


Brooklyn 




Rev C G Brelos 


Beth 


Dr W L Savage 


Am 


J J Aspinwall 


Cor 



82 



GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



Buskirk's Bridge 

J L Pratt, Jr., Cor 

Canton 

C M Baker SL 

F F A Liotard, 
deceased, SL 

Williston Manlej SL 

J M Rich SL 

"C A Rich SL 

Everett Caldwell SL 

J M Atvvood SL 

Chase's Mills 

T E Dalton SL 

Clifton Park 

W E Weed Mad 

College Point 

A C Payne Rut 

Delhi 

C H Douglass ISLid 
Dunkirk 

W P Smith Am 

East Hampton 

W H Barnes Rut 

L E McCabe Rut 

Elmira 

C B Hagadorne Cor 
Flushing 

S E Gage Col 

Fonda 

C W De Baun Un 
Fort Hamilton 

De Lagnel Berier Col 
Fort Plain 

F S Lee JH 

Glovesville 

(A C Egelston Un) 
Gouverneur 

(Edwin Fowler Am) 

C S Fowler Cor 

Rev H S Schwartz Mad 
Greenpoint 

J D Logan Col 

Greenwich 

E M Van Kirk Mad 
Hamburgh 

F H Edsall Pa 

Hamilton 

G H Mever Mad 

Herkimer 

Dr E J Kern Mad 

Hermon 

W B Matteson SL 

Hoosick Falls 

(J B Alden Rut) 

E M Alden Rut 



NEW YORK— Continued. 

Jamestown 

C F Smith Br 

Lisha's Kill 

G W VanVranken 

Cor and Un 

Lockport 

Henry Abbey Ste 

Long Island City 

Rev E H Lovett Mad 

Lonville 

E S K Merrell SL 

Madrid 

R P Barnes SL 

J A Cranston SL 

Malone 

C A Sawyer Br 

F G Paddock Col 

Marion 

C D White Cor 

Massena 

H D Robinson SL 

Middleburg 

Dow Vroman Un 

Montrose 

I W Reynolds Rut . 

New York 

(L H McCormick Am) 

W S Buftum Am 

(W A Gordon Am) 

(Frank Warriner Beth) 

O H Powers Bos 

H T Sherman Br 

W R Baird Col 

L W Faber Col 

Henry Mesa Col 

Paul Wilcox Col 

Edward Cohen Col 

E S Appleby Col 

E W Newton Col 

F R Percival Col 

F W Carpenter Cor 

(F R Percival Cor) 

A H Grant Cor 

E J Meeks Harv 

C R Dundore Pa 

(W E Maison Pa) 

M Y Beach Ste 

John Chatellier Ste 

G F Sandt Ste 

F A Magee Ste 
(J T W Kasten- 

dieck Un) 

B F Taylor Van 

Niagara Falls 

F W Osborn Dick 



Northville 

J R Van Ness Un 
Osborne's Bridge 

(J R Van Ness Un) 
Oswego 

Dr F M Stephens Pa 
Owego 

(F W Carpenter Cor) 

(W M Harris Cor 

Palmyra 

A B Taylor Mad 

Port Richmond 

(L W Faber Col) 

Potsdam 

N H Adsit SL 

Poughkeepsie 

I F Smith Am 

Red Hook 

P H Cole Un 

Rhinebeck 

S D Drury Rut 

Richmond Hill 

W A Jones, Jr., Col 
Riverhead 

H G Dimon Cor 

Rushtbrd 

H C Elmer 

Cor and J H 
Schenectady 

J E Clute Col and Un 

F E Crane Un 

K C Radlift' Un 

JT WKasteridickUn 

A J Dillingham Un 

G W Barhydt Un 
Seward 

Edward Maguire Cor 
Sherburne 

A B Church SL 

Sing Sing 

CEO Nichols Am 

Skaneateles 

F M Thomas Col 

Stapleton 

E J Lederle Col 

Tarrytown 

(W O Barnitz Woos) 

Troy 

E B Coburn Un 

A M Harder Un 

(C A Caldwell Van) 

(J M Estep Woos) 

Unadilla 

A T Emorv Cor 



TO THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



83 



Valatie 

F II Silvernail Vn 
Victor 

M F Webster Cor 



Walton 

C C Pierce 



Mad 



Wappinger's Falls 

F W Hargreaves Cor 



NEW YORK— Continued. 

Warwick 

A B Bishop Un 

Waverley 

Rev D II Cooper Mad 

W^est Hebron 

W H Robinson Un 



West Pierrepont 
J W RatVerty 



SL 



West Point 

(C B Hagadorne Cor) 

(Arthur Thaver DP) 

(W E Wood Mich 

Whitney's Point 

(C "m Baker SL) 

F Y Adams SL 

Woodville 

F A Converse Cor 



NORTH CAROLINA. 



Asheville 




Gastonia 




Raleigh 


A M Carroll 


Rich 


J L Love 


JH 


E B Smedes 


Chapel Hill 




Murfreesboro 






(J L Love 


JII) 


Percy Rovve 


RM 





jn 



Akron 




H L Jacobs 


Am 


C B Raymond 


Am 


K B Conger 


Ken 


F M Raymund 


OS 


G H Billman 


Woos 


Alexandria 




E H Castle 


Den 


W E Castle 


Den 


Ashtabula 




E P Hall 


WR 


Athens 




C II Higgins 


OU 


H R McVay 


OU 


Barnesville 




T P Berry 


Woos 


Beallsviile 




F S Israel 


Beth 


Bellaire 




J A H Mertz 


Beth 


Bellefontaine 




C C Patterson 


Wit 


Bethesda 




A L White 


Beth 


Beverly 




II H Rumble 


Beth 


Bridgeport 




W H Wolf 


Beth 


Bucyrus 




(W C Sheppard 


Den) 


Cadiz 




J M Estep 


Woos 


W H Hauser 


Woos 


Canton 




G E Cook 


Ste 


E E Weaver 


Woos 



OHIO. 

Catawba 

(J C Conway Woos) 

Chester Cross Roads 

H B Herrick WR 

Chillicothe 

(G C Manly 

Mich and Nw) 
John McCoy Woos 

Cincinnati 

J V B Scarborough Am 
W W Scarborough Am 
(T W Scarborough 

Am) 
J II McKenzie Bos 
S C Archibald 

Cen and Woos 
T B Evans Col 

Alfred Gaither Harv 
Clinton Collins Harv 
(M A Mayo Ken) 

(E M Benedict Ken) 
C K Benedict Ken 

W D FuUerton Nw 
E M Cranston Nw 
(W R Pomerene OS) 
(C WDeLamatre OS) 
Julius Floto OS 

T R Terwilliger OW) 
(C C Pickering OW) 
(T G Smith, Jr Ste) 
(J W McClure Van) 
F W Bargoyne Woos 
L B Reakirt Woos 

J N Brown Woos 

J M Macdonald Woos 
Ferdinand SchwiU Woos 



Clarksburg 

(A M Mann 

OW and Wit) 

Cleveland 

Alexander Mc- 

Kinney Beth 

G F Saal Cor 
H C Ferris 

Ken and Ste 

H N Hill Ken 

(Henry Abbey Ste) 

J T Carter ^VR 

T M Kennedy WR 

Collamer 

Sterling Parks 

Mich and WR 

Clay Herrick WR 

Columbus 

C V Pleukharp OS 

W H Siebe t OS 

W C Sabine OS 

G G Atkins OS and Wit 

C A Doe OW 

(M L MiUigan OW) 

Coolville 

H H Humphrey Cor 
Calvin Humphrey OU 

Coshocton 

W R Pomerene OS 

Crestline 

R B Wyiikoop Ken 

Dayton 

E C Benedict OS 

L P Conover Wis 

C L Knerr Wit 

(E B Knerr Wit) 



84 



GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



(D L Moore Woos) 

W W Barnett Woos 

Deavertown 

M L Milligan OW 

Delaware 

(J P McCabe OW) 

W A Baldwin OW 

D S Griffin OW 

J H Waterhouse OW 

F M Starr OW 

FT Jones OW 

EQ^ Starr OW 

Delhi 

G C Cox Ken 

Dublin 

C E TuUer Ken 

E T Tuller Ken 

Dundee 

E E Otis Mich 

Elmore 

Cornelius Shaen- 

feld Beth 

A L Wright Beth 

Farmersville 

D C Moore Woos 

Findlav 

E V Bope 

Ken and Mich 

Folks Station 

E A Hall Beth 

Gallon 

A M Snjder Ken 

(M G Park OW) 

Geneva 

G M Fletcher WR 

Germant )wn 

J P McCabe OW 

Granville 

FW ShephardsonBr 

H L Jones Den 

W B Owen Den 

H D Hervej Den 
Daniel Shepard- 

son, Jr Den 

H M Carter Den 

E G Evans Den 

R P Smith Den 

A D Cole JH 

Greenfield 

A B Dunlap Woos 

(G D Ciothers Woos) 

Hamilton 

Homer Gard Am 

B R Millikin Am 

W H Pfau Cor 



OHIO— Continued. 

Hayesville 

H J Kendig Den 

High Hill 

J S Brown Den 

Hopedale 

M G Baxter Beth 

Howard 

W L McElroy Beth 
Hudson 

T D McFarland WR 

L A Sadler WR 

J F Berry WR 

Huntington 

C A Burrell Woos 

Jackson 

L M Gillilan OU 

Jacksonborough 

S P Withrow OW 

Jefferson 

H J Wood worth OS 
Johnstown 

W C Sheppard Den 
Keene 

J H Bojd Woos 

Kendallville 

A J Kimmel Mad 

Kimball 

C W DeLamatre OS 
La Grange 

W H Mooney Beth 
Leetonia 

I D Worman Wit 

Lima 

M A Mayo Ken 

London 

J W Adair OW 

Lowell 

(H H Rumble Beth) 
Mc Arthur 

J E Dillon OU 

McConnellsville 

C S Sprague Den 

C W Eberlein Den 

(D W Brownell Den) 
Massillon 

W E Russell 

Am and Ken 

Meigs Creek 

C H Fonts OU 

Middleport 

A M Mann 

OW and Wit 
Middletown 

W O Barnitz Woos 



Moscow 

J E Abrams Han 

Mt Pisgah 

T R Terwilliger OW 

Mt Vernon 

H C Devin Ken 

F L Young OW 

Newark 

C G Rank Den 

Newburg 

G R McKay WR 

New Holland 

W G Hyde OS and OU 
J T Pickering OW 

New Lisbon 

E E Curry Beth 

E W Simon Wit 

J S Simon Wit 

New Philadelphia 

W A Tope Wit 

Orrville 

G T Dunlap Woos 

E P Dunlap Woos 

T S Dunlap Woos 

Oxford 

S R Greer DP and OW 
(J N Brown Woos) 

G A Nesbitt Woos 

Painesville 

L E Judson Am 

G P Steel Am 

F H Briggs Ken 

C F Luther WR 

Parisville 

J F Hughes Woos 

Pickerington 

(J T Pickering OW) 
C C Pickring OW 

Piqua 

F P Irwin DP an 1 OW 
E A Smith OW 

Portage 

AG Johnson OU 

Portsmouth 

C L Dobyns Mich 

W F Gordon OU 

Phelps Leete OU 

Redfield 

C E Skinner 

OS and OU 
E B Skinner OU 

Ripley 

W F Peters Un 



TO THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



85 



OHIO — Continued. 



Sandusky 




Sulphur Springs 




West Middleburg 




D J Mackey 




F B Ileibertshausen Wit 


E L Shannon 


OW 


Mich 
J L Moore 
Shelby 


and OS 
WN 


Tappan 

L G Worstell 


OU 


Westvi le 

D H Sowers 
Willoughby 


OW 


W B Lowe 


Beth 


Titlin 




N C Stevens 


Harv 


H R Brown 
South Charleston 


Beth 


F T Pennington 

DP and OW 


Solon Louer 
H S Taylor 


WR 
WR 


J C Conway 


Woos 


Tiltonville 




E A Clark 


WR 


Springfield 




W W Med ill 


WJ 


W infield 




(C C Patterson 


Wit) 


Toledo 




Ellsworth Otis 


Wit 


C J Pretzman 


Wit 


C L Curtis 


Cor 


Win ton Place 




H A Williams 


Wit 


J L Wilkin 


Den 


B A Williams 


OW 


A G Billow 
C K Mower 
E B Knerr 
R C Bancroft 
A H Smith 


Wit 
Wit 
Wit 
Wit 
Wit 


Trimble 

J M Johnson 

Uhrichsville 
G W Reed 


OU 
OU 


Wooster 

G A Shives 
G H Archibald 
J K Smith 


Woos 
Woos 
Woos 


E O Weaver 
S S Keller 
Harry Humphrey 


Wit 

Wit 

■s Wit 


Warren 

J D Harmon 

West Jefterson 


WR 


Xenia 

E E Paine 

(E L Shannon 


OS 
OW) 


Steubenville 




Gorman Jones 


Den 


Youngstown 




H L L Webb 


ow 


F W Hoe 

OREGON. 


Woos 


A M Dyer 


Mad 


Salem 






Unior 


1 




Rev 


M L Rugg 


Mad 


J 


P Atkinson Cum 





PENNSYLVANIA. 



Alleghany City 




Harrisburg 




Maurice Fels 


JH 


G W Willis 


Br 


A E Meily 


Dick 


W H Crawshaw 


Mad 


Altoona 




Indiana 


d H G McKean 


Mad 


W H Kephart 


Wit 


A F Keener 


Woos 


(C R Dundore 


Pa) 


Belleville 




Laurelton 




H.L Patterson 


Pa 


O M Campbell 


^\'J 


Dr H H Lincol 


n Pa 


W E Maison 


Pa 


Bentleysville 




Ma re hand 




Dr T B Bradford 


Pa 


(DrFM Stephens Pa) 


B A Brown 


WJ 


H A Davis 


Pa 


Bethlehem 




Meadville 




S E Scott, dec'd 


Pa 


(G F Pettinos 


Dick) 


(Solon Louer 


WR) 


(Dr N P Grinm 


Pa) 


Burgettstown 

W J Fredericks 
Carlisle 

G F Pettinos 
Carmon 

J 1) Jack 
Chester 


Dick 
WJ 


New Castle 

N A Philips 

Newville 

W B Stewart 
North Hope 

J F Reigart 


Beth 
Dick 
Dick 


Dr.H A Hare 
Dr J M Bradford 
R S Maison 
Dr CJ Irvin 
H P Ball 
F C Clarke 
Alfred Weeks, J r 


Pa 
Pa 
Pa 
Pa 
Pa 
Pa 
Pa 


(G W Qiiick 


Rich) 


Pennsville 




J P Krecker 


Pa 


Easton 




J D Atkinson 


Ind 


George Fetterolf 


Pa 


(G F Sandt 


Ste) 


Philadelphia 




G C Bowker 


Pa 


F W Shick 


Un 


Louis Shiel, dec 


'd Br 


G A Freyer 


Pa 


Everett 




(R T Stratton 


Cali) 


T G Smith. Jr 


Ste 


A D Yocum 


Dick 


David Brown 


Dick 


Pittsburg 




Greensburg 




F M Welsh 


Dick 


C H Hirst 


OS 


F J Kimball 


Me 


J C Reynolds 


Dick 


W R Cochrane 


Pa 



86 



Somerset 

F M Kimmel Beth 

A J Colborn, Jr Beth 

Washington 

J M Thompson WJ 



GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX 

PENNSYLVANIA— Continued. 

WilHam McKen- 

nan WJ 

R M Brownson WJ 
T R McKennan WJ 
M S McKennan WJ 



R T Jones WJ 

W A Baird WJ 
West Chester 

Dr N P Grimm Pa 



Central Falls 

J W Freeman Br 
Hope Valley 

E R Tillinghast Nw 
Middletown 

J H Ward Br 

Newport 

II G Wood Br 



RHODE ISLAND. 

C E Lawton Br 
Providence 

C P Seagrave Br 

A P Sumner Br 

C O Williams Br 

E E Pierce Br 
Norman Gunder- 

son Br 



E T Banning Br 

H F Caldwell Br 

G H Crooker Br 

F J Belcher Br 

H L Cattannach Br 

H J Rhett Br 

R L Spencer Br 

A F Clark Br 



SOUTH CAROLINA. 



Darlington 




Newberry 




Spartanburg 




J L Coker 


Ste 


B B Ramage 


Harv 


J P Smith 


Van 


Lawtonville 




J H Mcintosh 


JH 


Williamston 




A M Bostick 


Rich 






J M Lawder 


Van 



Bakerville 

J F Fowlkes Cum 

Bartlett 

G W Blackwell Van 
Carthage 

W E Myer Van 

Chattanooga 

J C Guild Van 

W R Patten Van 

L S Merriam Van 

Clarksville 

T T Trimble Westm 

Columbia 

W C Whitthorne Cen 
H Y Whitthorne Cen 
A L Prewett Van 

Harpeth 

J S Buchannan Cum 

Haw's Cross Roads 

W H Epps Cum 

Henderson's Cross Roads. 

R B Williams Cum 
Humboldt 

S C Williams Van 

Jonesboro 

J A Harris Van 



TENNESSEE. 

Hendrick's Creek 

J C Ritter Cum 

Knoxville 

H II Parker Cum 

Las Casas 

W II Martin Cum 

Lebanon 

C L McDonnold Cum 
Curry Kirkpatrick Cum 

I W P Buchanan Cum 

G B Kilpatrick Cum 

Memphis 

C E Pate Cum 

J W Chalmers Miss 

R B Maury, Jr Va 

Milton 

E E Sneed Cum 

Morristown 

J L Summers Van 

Nashville 

Dr J W Handley Cum 

H M Drifoos Cum 

C L Jungerman Van 

E W Thompson Van 

J II Kelley Van 

J J G Ruhm Van 



C C Slaughter 


Van 


A G Hall 


Van 


C W Beale 


Van 


C L Thornburg 


Van 


E B Davis 


Van 


W T Guild 


Van 


Alfred Hume 


Van 


Tyler Calhoun 


Van 


Granville Allison 


Van 


W C Brannum 


Van 


R D Goodlett, Jr 


Van 


W G Kirkpatrick Van 


New Middletown 




F G Bridges 


Cum 


Ripley 




A J Barbee 


Van 


Sparta 




F A Gallup 


Mad 


Sweetwater 




A S Dickey 


Cum 


Union City 




R P Whitesell 


Van 


Winchester 




A D Marks 


Cum 



Withe 

R A Cody Cum 



TO THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



87 



Austin 

Wendel Spence Cum 

W R Dobvns Westm 
Brown wood 

Rev R W Lewis Cum 

N S Walker ISIiss 

Cuero 

W J Baker Cum 

Da \'illa 

J II Miller Cum 

Eagle Pass 

G D Crothers Woos 
Fort Worth 

Ilallett Harding Cum 



TEXAS. 








Gaines\'ille 




Marshall 




H L Stuart 


RM 


E P Hill 


Cum 


Galveston 




A H Cooper 


Cmn 


T S Ljon 


Va 


Salado 




Gonzales 




Rev J R Hodges 


Cum 


J T Atkinson 


\'a 


San Antonio 




Jefferson 




W B Houston 


Cum 


W B Ward 


\an 


Sherman 




La Rissa 




W G Richardson 


Miss 


W P Bone 


Cum 


Weatherford 




MeKinney 




W T Watson 


Cum 


J B Kerr 


Cum 


Winsborough 




W T L Clark 


Miss 


C M Templeton 


Cum 



VERMONT. 



Keeler's Bay 




F W Sears 


Am 


A P Smith 


Am 


Mechanicsville 




B C Gillis 


Bos 



Aldie 




C L Laws 


Rich 


Ashland 




(C T Patton 


RM) 


J L Patton 


RM 


R W Patton 


RM 


J J Leake 


RM 


Bentiooglio 




A T Patton 


Va 


I'jlackstone 




J P Epes 


HS 


Bowling Green 




(Percy Rowe 


RM) 


Carlett P O 




Dr L P Coates 


Pa 


Childsburg 




C T Smith, J r 


Rich 


Concord Depot 




D S Evans, Jr 


HS 


Cross Keys 




C C Hering 


RM 


Cuthbert 




T P Branch 


Wan 


Danville 




T N Ferrell 


Rich 


W R Fitzgerald 


Rich 


Farmville 




R E L Blanton 


HS 


Farm we 11 




G W Qiiick 


Rich 


Gordonsville 




O J Wise, dec'd 


Va 



St Johnsbury 




(A F Stone 


Am 


Stowe 




(E D Hale 


A.m 


Windham 




G F Prentiss 


Am 



VIRGINIA. 

Hampden Sidney College 

W HBocock HSand Va 

J D Eggleston, Jr HS 

W H Wilson HS 

A R Shaw HS 

Ivor 

(R E L Holmes Va) 

Jamaica 

A J Montague Va 

Jennings' Ordinary 

W A Watson IIS 

Little Plymouth 

T J Bland RM 

Lynchburg 

Robert WinfVee RM 

H L Winfiee RM 

J S Hobson RM 

P B Winfree RM 
W W Talley 

Rich and \'a 

A W Terrell Va 

Medium's River 

Alfred Bagby, Jr Rich 

Mossy Creek 

J B Finley IIS 

Norfolk 

J B Jenkins IIai-\' 

Petersburg 

(II R Mcllwaine IIS) 

M T Peed J II 

W HPerkinson Va 



Portsmouth 

J A Borum Rich 

F D Tabb Rich 

Pungoleague 

O F Mears RM 

Richmond 

G B Stacy Beth 

GT Patton RM 
(W W Talley 

Rich and Va 

W R Thomas Rich 

E B Pollard Rich 

H H Harris Rich 

L S Lyon Rich 

W E Tanner, Jr Rich 

Frank Lyon Rich 

R A Cutler Rich 

G B Stacy Rich 

R C Williams Rich 

A S J Dudley \'an 

J R Tucker, Jr Va 

San Marino 

TT Jones HS 

Ste\ensville 

(Alfred Bagby, Jr Rich) 

White Post 

J W Kern Va 

Winchester 

M H Albin Va 

Yancey 

W A Gibbons RM 



88 



GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



WASHINGTON TERRITORY. 



Seattle 

Charles Jones 



Bethany 

W K Pendleton, 

Jr Beth 

L C Woolerj Beth 

Charleston, Kanawha county 
F M Staunton Cor 
C C Lewis, J r HS 

Charlestown, Jefferson county 
W B Hopkins HS 
A C Hopkins HS 

J P Campbell JH 

Gerardstown 

II C V Campbell HS 



WR 



Yakima 

Samuel Hubbard, 
Jr Cali 



WEST VIRGINIA. 



Huntington 




Parkersburg 




Garland Buffing 




(W C Shafer 


Den) 


ton 


RM 


Romney 




P C Buffington 


RM 


(J B Finley 


HS) 


Kingvvood 




Wellsburg 




W C Shafer 


Den 


J W Cooper 


Mich 


Lewisburg 




W C Jacob 


WJ 


H R Mcllwaine 


HS 


Samuel Jacob 


WJ 


Martinsburg 




Wheeling 




C R Stribling 


HS 


R H Devine 


Beth 


J M Stribling 


HS 


J B Wilson 


Beth 


Moorefield 




A C Whitaker 


Ken 


H A White 


HS 


(Lewis Baker, Jr 


Ste) 


R A White 


IIS 


R H Cummins 


WJ 


George Shipley 


RM 


C B Baguley 


WJ 



WISCONSIN. 



Beaver Dam 




Ean Claire 




F G Young 


JH 


F A Teall 


Wis 


G A Talbert 


OW 


Evansville 




Beloit 




W S Axtell 


Bel 


S R Slaymaker 




Geneva Lake 




Bel 


and Nw 


G W Whyte 


Mich 


Black Earth 




Janesville 




H P Stoddart 


Wis 


B G Bleasdale 


Bel 


Brooklyn 




F D Jackson 


Bel 


C M Conradson 
Clinton 

O C Olds 


Wis 
Bel 


Madison 

F M Brown 
C M Morris 
F W Stearns 


Wis 
Wis 
Wis 


Columbus 




Markesan 




R S Rockwell 


Wis 


J L Mitland 


Wis 


Delavan 




Menominee 




H D Densmore 


Bel 


F M Stephenson 


Wis 



Milwaukee 




C H J Douglass 


Mich 


E A Benson 


Mich 


W R Smith 


Wis 


Monroe 




A C Copeland 


Cor 


J J Schindler 


Wis 


Rochester 




W A Russell 


Bel 


Whitewater 




H S Shedd 




Bel 


and Wis 


C I Earll 


Wis 


R C Warne ' 


Wis 


A P Delancy 


Wis 


S S Cook 


Wis 



WYOMING. 



Rock Springs 
J C Tisdale 



Nw 



TO THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



89 



FOREIGN ADDRESSES. 



Buenos Ajres, Argentine Republic 




L V P Cilley 


Me 


Melbourne, Australia 




D E Jenkins 


Woo! 


Vienna, Austria 




(F H Edsall 


Pa) 


Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 




C B Van Tuyl 


Col 


Erlangen, Germany 




(T B Evans 


Col) 


Gottingen. Germany 




(W B Holcombe 


Bos) 


Heidelberg, Germany 




(F W Cook, J r 


Wab 


1 lilo, Hawaii 




S W Austin 


Cali 


F A Lvman 


\VR 



Middletown, New Brunswick 

C T Vose Me 

Truro, Nova Scotia 

G M Campbell JH 

Brantford, Ontario 

B B Tuttle Den 

Toronto, Onta rio 

W E H Massey Bos 

Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island 

W P Taylor Bos 

Not definitely known 

(J F Davis Cali) :i 

(F S Lee JH) 

are in Europe 

(R B Hellman Cali) 

is in Pei"u 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX TO THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



Abbey, H 


Ste 


Baldwin, W A 


OW 


Bocock, W H 


HS and va 


Abbott, H A 


SL 


Ball, H P 


Pa 


Boddy, S L 


Nw 


Aborn, E A 


Am 


Bancroft, R C 


Wit 


Bone, H J 


Cum 


Abrams, J E 


Han 


Banning, E T 


Br 


Bone. W P 


Cum 


Ackerman, C F 


Col 


Barbee, A J 


•Van 


Bonham, N W 


Van 


Adair, J W 


OW 


Barhydt, G W 


Un 


Bope, E V K 


en and Mich 


Adams, D C 


Col 


Barnes, C W 


Cali 


Borah, W E 


Kas 


Adams, F Y 


SL 


Barnes, R P 


SL 


Borum, J A 


Rich 


Adams, J 


Nw 


Barnes, W H 


Rut 


Bostick, A M 


Rich 


Adsit, N H 


SL 


Barnes, W O 


Ste 


Boudinot, F H 


Wab 


Albin, M H 


Va 


Barnett, W W 


Woos 


Bower, DeW C 


Kas 


Alden, E M 


^ut 


Barnitz, W O 


Woos 


Bowker, G C 


Pa 


Alden, J B 


Rut 


Barnum, E H 


Col 


Bowman, W A 


Wit 


Alexander, W 


Harv 


Barrows, W A, Jr 


Rut 


Bowser, E H 


Van 


Allen, H D 


la 


Bartlett, E C 


Me 


Bowser, H 


DP 


Allen, H T 


Harv 


Baum, A R 


Harv 


Boyd, J H 


Woos 


Allison, G 


Van 


Baxter, M G 


Beth 


Brace, DeW B 


JH 


Altsheler, J A 


Van 


Bayley, W S 


JH 


Bradford, J M 


Pa 


Anderson, W L 


la 


Beach. M Y 


Ste 


Bradford. T B 


Pa 


Andrews, C L 


Mich 


Beale, C W 


\'an 


Bradley, W H 


Westm 


Appleby, E S 


Col 


Beard, J E 


Cali 


Bradshaw, F E 


Woos 


Applegarth, E C 


JH 


Beck, J W 


Ciun 


Branch, E W 


Bos 


Archibald, G H 


Woos 


Belcher, F J 


Br 


Branch, T P 


Van 


Archibald, S C 




Benedict, C K 


Ken 


Branham, W C 


Van 


Cen and Woos 


Benedict, C P 


DP 


Brannon, H L 


Van 


Armstrong, A H 


Bel 


Benedict, E C 


OS 


Brannum, J W 


Cum 


Aspinwall, J J 


Cor 


Benedict, E M 


Ken 


Brelos, C G 


Beth 


Atkins, G G OS 


and Wit 


Benedict, J L 


DP 


B reman, M N 


Kas 


Atkinson, J D 


Ind 


Benson, E A 


Mich 


Bridges, F G 


Cum 


Atkinson, J E 


Beth 


Berenson, B 


Bos 


Bridges, T R 


Han 


Atkinson, J J 


Va 


Berier, DeL 


Col 


Briggs, F 11 


Br 


Atkinson, J P 


Cum 


Berry, J F 


WJ 


Briggs, F H 


Ken 


Atwood, J M 


SL 


Berry, T P 


Woos 


Briggs, H F 


Nw 


Austin. S W 


Cali 


Bickford, J H 


DP 


Briggs, H L 


Cen 


Axtell, W S 


Bel 


Bikle, C E 


Dick 


Briggs, R D 


Mad 


Babcock, F R 


Mich 


Billman, G H 


Woos 


Briggs, W H 


Cen 


Babcock, R S 


Mich 


Billow, A G 


Wit 


Bright, H R 


Beth 


Backus. C J 


Am 


Bippus, F J 


Wab 


Bristol, F A 


Col 


Bagby, A, Jr 


Rich 


Bishop, A B 


Un 


Broadus, G W 


Cen 


Baguiey, C B 


WJ 


Black, G F 


Me 


Brown, A E 


Miss 


Baird, W A 


wj 


Blackwell, G W 


Van 


Brown, B A 


WJ 


Baird, W R 


Col 


Blair, W D 


Cum 


Brown. D 


Dick 


Baker, C M 


SL 


Bland, T J 


RM 


Brown, E F 


la 


Baker. F T 


Dick 


Blanton, R E L 


HS 


Brown, F M 


Wis 


Baker, L, Jr 


Ste 


Bleasdale, B G 


Bel 


Brown, H 


Nw 


Baker, W J 


Cum 


Blodgett, E E 


Harv 


Brown, H C 


Bel 


Baldwin. O H 


Ste 


Boardman, J R 


Me 


Brown, H R 


Beth 


Baldwin, O W 


Col 


Boardman, W S 


Am 


Brown, J N 


Woos 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX TO THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



91 



Brown, J S 


Den 


Church, A B 


SL 


Cox, G C 


Ken 


Brown, W J 


Bel 


Cilley, L V P 


Me 


Cox, G S 


Ken 


Brownell. D W 


Den 


Clark, A F 


Br 


Craft, G R 


Cen 


Brownson, R M 


\\'J 


Clark, E A 


WR 


Cramer, J G 


Bos 


Brjce, W E 


Ccn 


Clark, W T L 


Miss 


Crane, F E 


Un 


Buchanan, I W P 


Cum 


Clarke, F C 


Pa 


Cranston, E M 


Nw 


Buchannan, J S 


Ciun 


Clarke, N R 


\'a 


Cranston, J A 


SL 


Buckingham, 11 


Kas 


Clarke, W H 


Cum 


Crawford, J R 


Cum 


Buffi ngton, E J 


Van 


Clearwaters, J F 


DP 


Crawshaw, W 11 


Mad 


Buffington, G 


R M 


Clemmons, J C 


Han 


Crisler, W T 


SL 


Buffington, P C 


R M 


Cleveland, 11 II 


Col 


Crockett, D W 


Ind 


Buffum, W S 


Am 


Clute,JE Col 


and Un 


Crooker, G H 


Br 


Bunnell, N L 


Ind 


Coates, L P 


Pa 


Crothers, G D 


Woos 


Burge, J D 


Miss 


Coburn, E B 


Un 


Cruce, L 


Van 


Burgoyne, F W 


Woos 


Cochran, J 


Cen 


Cumback, C 


D P 


Burkholder, S, Jr 


Kas 


Cochran, J B 


Miss 


Cummins, R II 


WJ 


Burrell, C A 


Woos 


Cochran, R F" 


Miss 


Cunningham, A 


D P 


Burrows, A S 


la 


Cochran, W 


Cen 


Cunningham, C M 


Ind 


Burrows, C C 


Van 


Cochrane, D K 


Mich 


Curry, E E 


Beth 


Bushnell, S M 


Bel 


Cochrane, W R 


Pa 


Curry, J E 


Kas 


Cady, W J 


Nw 


Cocke, H R 


Miss 


Curtis, C L 


Cor 


Cahoone, C E 


Col 


Cody, R A 


Cum 


Cushman, C G 


Me 


Cain, L P 


Wab 


Coffin, A J 


Me 


Cushman, L N 


Bos 


CaldA-ell, C A 


Van 


Coffin, E V 


Me 


Cushman, R H 


Am 


Caldwell, E 


SL 


Cohen, E 


Col 


Cutler, R A 


Rich 


Caldwell,] W 


Cum 


Coker, J L 


Ste 


Cutler, W P 


Cor 


Caldwell, O B 


Cen 


Colborn, A J, Jr 


Beth 


Dalton, T E 


SL 


Calhoun, T 


Van 


Colby, D W 


Me 


Damon, E S 


Am 


Calkins, H R 


Nw 


Coldewey, E G 


Ste 


Daniels, P 


Wab 


Call, II L 


Kas 


Coif. A D 


JII 


Darwin, II G 


Col 


Campbell, G M 


J" 


Cole, P H 


Un 


Dane by, S O 


Bel 


Campbell, H C \' 


HS 


Coleman, J C 


Cen 


Davidson, W E 


Nw 


Campbell, J G 


DP 


Coles, O E 


Col 


Da vies, W H 


Den 


Campbell, J P 


JH 


Collins, A T 


J" 


Davis, B B 


la 


Campbell, N M 


la 


Collins, C 


Ilarv 


Davis, E B 


Van 


Campbell, O M 


wj 


Collins, W L 


laW 


Davis, 11 A 


Pa 


Carmod>', T. Jr 


Cor 


Colwell, U F 


Br 


Davis, J F 


Call 


Carpenter, F W 


Cor 


Coman, B 


Cum 


Davis, W W 


Kas 


Carr, H 


Ind 


Condit, II A 


Wab 


Dean, C D 


Kas 


Carrigan, A H, Jr 


Cum 


Conger, K B 


Ken 


Dean, G C 


Am 


Carroll, A M 


Rich 


Conover, L P 


Wis 


De Baun, C W 


Un 


Carter, H M 


Den 


Conrad, D F 


Woos 


Deem, G B 


Nw 


Carter, J T 


WR 


Conradson, C M 


Wis 


DeLamatre, C W 


OS 


Casey, P J 


Cor 


Converse, F A 


Cor 


DeLancy, A P 


Wis 


Castle, E H 


Den 


Conway, J C 


Woos 


Denny, R G 


Cen 


Castle, W E 


Den 


Cook, F 


Call 


Densmore, H D 


Bel 


Cattannach, H L 


Br 


Cook, F \V,Jr 


Wab 


Detrick, J U 


Dick 


Cay wood, W T 


Kas 


Cook, G E 


Ste 


Devin, II C 


Ken 


Chalmers, J W 


Miss 


Cook, S S 


Wis 


Devine, R II 


Beth 


Chamberlin, J K 


Me 


Cooke, II A 


Am 


Dey, M 11 


la 


Chambers, ,J Jr 


Am 


Cooling, VV L 


Col 


Dickerson, F W 


Me 


Charles, J W 


Westm 


Cooper, A H 


Cum 


Dickey, A S 


Cum 


Chase, F H 


Bel 


Cooper, D H 


Mad 


Dickinson, G R 


Am 


Chase, G A 


Bel 


Cooper, J W 


Mich 


Dike, J E 


Me 


Chatellier, J 


Ste 


Copeland, A C 


Cor 


Dillingham, A J 


Un 


Cheek, F J 


Mich 


Copland, H 


Den 


Dillon, J E 


OU 


Chichester, T A 


Miss 


Cotteral, J H 


Mich 


Dillon, R M 


Han 



92 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX 



Dimon, H G 
Doak, J W 
Dpbjns, C L 
Dobjns, W R 
Dodds, S 
Doe, C A 
Dohme, A R L 
Donellan, G 
Donnan, D D 
Doolittle, C H 
Doonin, J C 
Doran, T F 
Doud, L R 
Douglass, C II 
Douglass, C II J 
Downs, A C 
Drew, F T 
Drifoos, H M 
Drown, E S 
Drown, J H 
Drummond, E M 
Drury, S D 
Dudley, A S J 
Dundore, C R 
Dunlap, A B 
Dunlap, E P 
Dunlap, G T 
Dunlap, L 
Dunlap, T S 

Dunn, G A 

Dutton, G W 

Dutton, J W 

Dyer, A J 

Dyer, A M 

Earll, C I 

Eastman, G P 

Eberlein, C W 

Ediall, F H 

Edwards, A R 

Edwards, D T 

Egelston, A C 

Eggleston, J D, Jr 

Elliott, T C 

Ellis, J B 

Ellison, G 

Ellsworth, O B 

Elmer, II C 

Emory, A T 

Epes, J P 

Epps, W II 

Eshman, M G 

Estep, J M 

Evans, C J 

Evans, D S, Jr 

Evans, E G 

Evans, R F 

Evans, T B 



Co 



Cor 
Wab 
Mich 
Westm 
Rut 
OW 
JH 
Westm 
la 
Col 
Call 
Kas 
Mich 
Mad 
Mich 
Mich 
Me 
Cum 
Harv 
Cor 
Ste 
Rut 
Van 
Pa 

Woos 
Woos 
Woos 
Cen 
Woos 
Bos 
Cali 
Cali 
Am 
Mad 
Wis 
Am 
Den 
Pa 
Nw 
Va 
Un 
HS 
Am 
Van 
Den 
Cali 
and JH 
Cor 
HS 
Cum 
Ind 
Woos 
Cali 
HS 
Den 
Han 
Col 



Everhart, H B 

Faber, L W 

Fearn, T S 

Eels, M 

Fernald, H T 

Ferrell, C C 

Ferrell, T N 

Ferris, H C 

Fetterolf, G 

Field, C J 

Fifield, J C 

Finley, J B 

Fish, N D 

Fitts, F II 

Fitzgerald. W R 

Fitzhugh, G T 

Fitzhugh, L T, Jr 

Fitzpatrick, B J 

Fletcher, G M 

Floto, J 

Foley, C F 

Folwell, A P 

Folwell, J K 

Fonts, C H 

P'orbes, A E 

Forbes, C H 
Forbes, W D 
Ford, A Y 
Fowler, C S 
Fowler, E 
Fowlkes, J F 
Fox, C P P 
Frantz, E E 
Fredericks, W J 
Fredrick, M \V 
Freeman, A B 
Freeman, J W 
Freyer, G A 
Fullerton, W D 
Gadberry, J S 
Gage, S E 
Gaines, W 
Gaither, A 
Galloway, W II 
Gallup, FA 
Gann, B L C 
CJannt, H L 
(iard, H 
Gardner, II D J 
Garthe, L 
Gates, J H 
Gibbons, W A 
Gibson, G H 
Gifford, D L 
Gilbert, J I 
Gilbert, S P 
Gillilan, L'_M 



Ste Gillis, B C Bos 

Col Goddard, G N Am 

J H Golliday, W Cum 

J H Goodlett, R D, Jr Van 

Me Goodwin, G C Am 

Van Goodwin, W R DP 

Rich Gordon, W A Am 

Ken and Ste Gordon, W F OU 

Pa Gould, M L Ind 

Ste Graham, F G Dick 

JH Grant, A H Cor 

HS Grant, D P Mich 

Un Grant, J M Westm 

Am Graves, E D Me 

Rich Green, C A Cum 

Miss Greene, H Wab 

Miss Greene, J A Wab 

Va Greenwood, L B Bos 

WR Greer, S R DP and OW 

OS Gregory, J W Mich 

Kas Griffin, D S OW 

Br Grimm, N P Pa 

Mad Guest, J W,Jr Cen 

OU Guild, J C Van 

SL Guild, W T Van 

Mich Gulick, A P DP 

Am Gulick, N J Un 

Br Gunderson, N Br 

Cor Guthrie, J A Van 

Am Hagadorne, C B Cor 

Cum Hagen, J C Bos 

Mad Hale, E D Am 

Miss Hall, A G Van 

W J Hall, C A Ste 

Harv Hall, C E Kas 

Cum Hall, E A Beth 

Br Hall, E P WR 

Pa Hamberlin, L R Rich 

Nw Ilamill, H Nw 

Miss Hamilton, II H Mad 

Col Hamilton, M C Ste 

SL Hammond, C II HS 

Harv Hammond, I J • DP 

Ind llamp, W F Cor 

Mad IIandley,J W Cum 

laW Hanna, W B laW 

Ste Harder, A M I'n 

A\n Harding, H Cum 

Am Hare, G A laW 

JH Hare, H A Pa 

l;t Ilargreaves, F W Cor 

RM Harlan, H E Van 

Cor Harlan, W B JH 

Am Harley, A M Miss 

Col Harmon,JD WR 

la Harris, H H, Jr Rich 

OU Harris, J A Van 



TO THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



93 



Harris, J C 


Cum 


Hughes, S C 


Wab 


Kephart, W H 


Wit 


Harris, W 


Miss 


Hull, F E 


Me 


Kern, E G 


Mad 


Harris, W C 


Mich 


Hume, A 


Van 


Kern, J W 


Va 


Harris, W M 


Cor 


Humphre3^ C 


OU 


Kerr, J B 


Cum 


Harris, W W 


Mich 


1 lumphrey, II 11 


Cor 


Kieft", J W 


Wab 


Harrison, A B 


Rut 


Humphreys, H 


Wit 


Killough, O N 


Miss 


Harrison, C W 


Rut 


Hunt, J E 


Nw 


Kilpatrick, G B 


Cum 


Harrison, W, Jr 


W'estni 


Hunter, W 


Van 


Kimball, F I 


Me 


Harwood, W S 


la 


Hurd,J L 


Col 


Kimmel, A J 


Mad 


Hatfield, H R 


Nw 


Hutchinson, G W 


Br 


Kimmell, F M 


Beth 


Hauser, \V H 


Woos 


Huxtord, E D 


Nw 


Kinnear, W S 


Kas 


Hawkins, W C 


Stc 


Hyde, H M 


Bel 


Kip, W I 


Cali 


Hajden, S J 


Cen 


Hyde W G OS 


and OU 


Kirkpatrick, C 


Cum 


Heath, D L 


Va 


Iliff. W^ S 


Nw 


Kirkpatrick, W G 


Van 


Hector, M E 


DP 


Ingalh, F P 


Cor 


Kirkwood, S 


Woos 


Heibertshausen, F B 


Wit 


Ingham, G W 


la 


Kirkwood, W P 


Woos 


Hellman, R B 


Cali 


Insley, M II 


Wab 


Kitchen, E E 


Den 


Helmle, GB 


SL 


Irvin, C J 


Pa 


Knapp, A E 


Mad 


Hering, C C 


RM 


Irvin, F P DP 


md OW 


Knerr, C L 


Wit 


Herrick, C 


WR 


Irvine, C II 


C n 


Knerr, E B 


Wit 


Herrick, H B 


WR 


Isaac, R M 


Ste 


Krecker, J P 


Pa 


Hervey, H D 


Den 


Israel, F S 


Beth 


Lake, R C 


Col 


Hess, H R 


Wab 


Jack, J D 


WJ 


Lake, W G 


Dick 


Hester W L DP 


and Ind 


Jackson, F D 


Bel 


Lampton, T B 


Miss 


Hetzler, H G 


Mich 


Jacob, S 


WJ 


Lauey, J W 


laW 


Hibbitt, R F 


Van 


Jacob W C 


WJ 


Lanier, E B 


Nw 


Hickman, S T 


Cen 


Jacobs, H L 


Am 


Lashbrooke, E L 


Miss 


Higgins, C H 


OU 


Jaynes, J C 


Harv 


Lathrop, L E 


DP 


Hight, R F 


Ind 


Jenkins, D E 


Woos 


Lauder, J M 


Van 


Hill, E P 


Cum 


Jenkins, J B 


Harv 


Laws, C L 


Rich 


Hill, H N 


Ken 


Johnson, A G 


OU 


Lawton, C E 


Br 


Hill, \V. R 


Miss 


Johnson. C E 


\'a 


Lazell, J D 


Me 


Hinchliff, \V E 


Am 


Johnson, D P, Jr 


la 


Leake, J J 


KM 


Hirst, C H 


OS 


Johnson, E L la ; 


lul Mich 


Learned, A B Miss 


and Van 


Hobson, J S 


KM 


Johnson. J 11 


Miss 


Lcderle, E J 


Col 


Hodges, J R 


Cum 


Johnson, J M 


OU 


Lee, F S 


J'l 


Hoc, F W 


Woos 


Johnston, E A 


Bos 


Lee, J H 


Mich 


Holcomhe, W B 


Bos 


Jones, C 


WR 


Lee, L B 


Mich 


Hollovvay, S 


Miss 


Jones, F T 


OW 


Lees, J T 


WR 


Holmes, R E L 


Va 


Jones, G 


Den 


Leete, P 


OU 


Holt, H C 


Harv 


Jones, G N 


Harv 


Leonard, H 


Ind 


Hood, F C 


llarv 


Jones, H L 


Den 


Lewis, C C, Jr 


HS 


Hooker A ^^' Miss ; 


nd Ricii 


Jones, L 


Wesim 


Lewis, C (i 


Nw 


Hoover, 1 1 C 


M iss 


Jones, R K, Jr 


Me 


Lewis, E F 


Stc 


Hopkins, A C, Jr 


IIS 


Jones, R T 


WJ 


Lewis, F D 


Un 


Hopkins, W b' 


IIS 


Jones, S C Cen 


and Coi- 


Lewis, R W 


Cum 


Hough, T 


JIl 


Jones, T T 


ns 


Libby, C L 


Me 


Houston, T W 


Kas 


Jones. W A, ]v 


Col 


Lillard, R H 


Beth 


Houston, W H 


Cum 


Judson, L E 


Am 


Lincoln, H F 


Me 


Howard,.! H 


Ind 


Jungerman, C L 


\'an 


Lincoln, M H 


Pa 


Howe, W D 


liul 


Kastendieck, J T W 


Un 


Liotard, F F A 


SL 


Howell, 11 


Cali 


Kastle, J II 


.!'• 


Lippincott, J I? 


Kas 


Howes, C L 


Me 


Keener, A F 


Woos 


Little, W S 


Bos 


Hubbard, J B 


Nw 


Keller. S S 


Wit 


Lockwood, J F 


Me 


Hubbard, S. Jr 


Cali 


Kelley. J II 


Van 


Lodge, F T 


DP 


Hughes. F H 


Ind 


Kendig. H J 


Den 


Logan, J D 


Col 


Hughes, J F 


Woos 


Kennedy, T M 


WR 


Loper, A N 


laW 



94 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX 



Lord, J D, Jr JH 

Louer, S WR 

Love, J L JH 

Lovett, E H Mad 

Lowden, F O la 

Lowe, W B Beth 

Lunt, C S Me 

Luther, C F WR 

Lyman, F A WR 

Lyman, H C Mad 

Lyman, J A Bel 

Lyon, F Rich 

Lyon, L S Rich 

Lyon, T S . Va 

Mc Arthur, W B OW 

McCabe, JP OW 

McCabe, L E Rut 

McCain, A A Wab 

McCausland, E F Westm 
McClelland, E L B Miss 

McClure, J W Van 

McConnell,EB Cor 

M'Cormick, L H Am 

McCoy, J Woos 

McCutchen, W L Cum 

McD.mald, C A Van 

Macdonald, J M Woos 

McDonald, W T Miss 

McDonnold, R L Cum 

McElroy, H DP 

McElroy, J B Miss 

McElroj', W L Beth 

McFarland, T D WR 

Mclhvaine, H R HS 

Mclnnes, W M Harv 

Mcintosh, J H JH 

Mack, A W Ste 

Mack, L C Ste 

McKay, G R WR 

McKean, H G Mad 

McKennan, M S WJ 

McKennan, T R WJ 

McKennan, W WJ 

McKenzie, J H Bos 
Mackey, D J Mich and OS 

McKinney, A Beth 

McLaurin, R L Miss 

McLeod, W F \a 

McVay, H R OU 

McWilliams, J P Nw 

Madison, C R Ind 

Magee, F A Ste 

Maguire, E Cor 

Maison, R S Pa 

Maison, W E Pa 

Manley, W SL 

Manly, C S OW 



Manly, G C Mich and Nw 
Mann, A M OW and Wit 

Marks, A D Cum 

Marsh, R H Me 

Martin, W H Cum 

Massey, W E H Bos 

Masters, W H DP 

Mathews, C Cen 

Mathews, S S Miss 

Mathews, W B, Jr Cen 

Matteson, W B SL 

Maury, R B, Jr Va 

Maxwell, D H Wab 

Maxwell, H D Ind 

Mayes, R B Miss 

Mayes, W W Miss 

Mayo, M A Ken 

Mears, O F RM 

Medill, W W WJ 

Meeks, E J Harv 

Meily, A E Dick 

Merrell, E S K SL 

Merriam, L S Van 

Mertz, J A H Beth 

Mesa, H Col 

Meyer, G H Mad 

Mickle, B C Cum 

Middleton, W B Col 

Millard, J Mich 

Miller, A Ind 

Miller, F E Nw 

Miller, J H Cum 

Miller. T Cor 

Miller, W II JH 

Milligan, M L OW 

Millikin, B R Am 

Mitland, J L Wis 

Moderwell, C M Woos 

Montague, A J \'a 

Montgomery, J R Bel 
Montgomery, M C Miss 

Mooney, W H Beth 

Moore, A T Nw 

Moore, D L Woos 

Moore, J L Wit 

Moore, R P Miss 

Moore, W A Nw 

Moore, W J Mad 

Morey. W, Jr Me 

Morris, C M Wis 

Moulton, G R Westm 

Mower, C K Wit 

Mozier, HP la 

Mozier, W F la 

Mullen, W S Cen 

Mullinix, E E Ind 

Mullinix, O E Ind 



W 



DP 

Miss 
la 

Van 
la 

Mad 
Westm 
Woos 
laW 
Col 
Am 
DP 
Cum 
Ste 
Bel 
Ind 
Han 
Dick 
Mich and Wit 
Den 
Cum 
Cum 
Col 
OS 
Me and Ste 
Call 
Am 
OW 



Murphy, G H 
Murry, J Y, Jr 
Musser, R D 
Myer, W E 
Nealley, E M 
Nelson, M R 
Nesbitt, C F 
Nesbitt, G A 
Newbold, J H 
Newton, E W 
Nichols, CEO 
Niedringhaus, C 
Noble, J H 
Morris, R 
Olds, O C 
Oler, C H 
O'Neal, S 
Osborn, E W 
Otis, E E 
Owen, W B 
Owsley, J S, Jr 
Pace, S R 
Paddock, F G 
Paine, E E 
Paine, L G 
Palache, W 
Palmer, R M 
Park, M G 
Parker, C E 

Col, Kas, and Mich 
Parker, H H Cum 

Parks, CM Ind 

Parks, S Mich and WR 

Parks, S S Am 

Paschal, C P laW 

Paschal, H T laW 

Parsels, L A Dick 

Partridge, W T Col 

Pate, C E Cum 

Pattangall, W R Me 

Patten, W R Van 

Patterson, C C Wit 

Patterson, E L Wis 

Patterson, H L Pa 

Patterson, J H Mich 

Patten, A C Ind 

Patton, A T Va 

Patton, G T RM 

Patton, J L RM 

Patton, R W RM 

Payne, AC Rut 

Payne, W C Beth 

Peebles, G R OW 

Peed, M T JH 

Pendleton, W K, Jr Beth 
Penney, G B Cor 

Pennington, F T DP and O W 



TO THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



95 



Percival, F R Col 


and Cor 


Reynolds, I W 


Rut 


Scott, S E 


Pa 


Perkinson, W H 


Va 


Reynolds, J B 


Rut 


Scott, W S 


DP 


Perrj, W 


Kas 


Reynolds, J C 


Dick 


Seagrave, C P 


Br 


Peters, W F 


Un 


Rhett, II J 


Br 


Sears, F W 


Am 


Pettinos, G F 


Dick 


Rhodes. J J 


Miss 


Shackelford, M L 


RM 


Pfau, W H 


Cor 


Ribble, F \V 


Rut 


Shaenfeld, C 


Beth 


Phelps. C D 


Am 


Rich, C A 


SL 


Shafer, W C 


Den 


Phelps, F W 


Am 


Rich, J M 


SL 


Shannon, E L 


OW 


Phiibrook, W 


Me 


Rich, L 


Nw 


Shannon, J S 


Ind 


Philips, N A 


Beth 


Richards, C R 


Bos 


Sharpe, L K 


Miss 


Pickering, C C 


OW 


Richardson, \V G 


Miss 


Sliarpe, T S 


Miss 


Pickering, J 'i' 


OW 


Riley, O B 


Ilan 


Shattuck, J C 


Mich 


Pierce, C C 


Mad 


Riley, W B 


Ilan 


Shaw, A R 


IIS 


Pierce, E E 


Br 


Riley, W L 


Han 


Shedd, H S Bel ; 


;ind Wis 


Pittman, A L 


Miss 


Ritter, J C 


Cum 


Sheldon, F W 


Cor 


Pleukharp, C \' 


OS 


Roberts, II A 


Westm 


Sheldon, J II 


Ste 


Pochler, O H 


Kas 


Robertson, J B 


Wan 


Shepardson, D, ]r 


Den 


Pollard, E B 


Rich 


Robertson, J R 


Bel 


Shepardson, F W 


Hr 


Pomerene, W R 


OS 


Robertson. J W 


Hoi 


Shepherd, W O 


DP 


Poole, W H 


Am 


Robinson, G W 


Kas 


Sheppard, W C 


Den 


Porter, C M 


la 


Robinson, III) 


SL 


Sherman, F D 


Mich 


Post, W C 


Ste 


Robinson. \V 11 


Vn 


Sherman. 11 T 


Br 


Powell, C E Mich 


and \'an 


Rockwell, R S 


Wis 


Shick, W F 


Un 


Powers, O H 


Bos 


Roser, S D 


Cen 


Shiel, L 


Br 


Pratt, A II 


Am 


Ross, J B 


Mich 


Shipley, G 


KM 


Pratt,; L,Jr 


Cor 


Rowe, P 


RM 


Shively, II L 


Cor 


Prentiss. G F 


Am 


Rowlett, J W 


Han 


Shives, G A 


Woos 


Pretzman, C J 


Wit 


Roy, C D 


Rich 


Shumway, P R 


Nw 


Prevvett, A L 


\'an 


Rucker, J W 


DP 


Siebert, W II 


OS 


Price, G L 


Mich 


Rugg, M L 


Mad 


vSigmund, F" L 


Wit 


Pusej, A B 


\'an 


Rnhm, J J G 


\'an 


Silvernail, F II 


Un 


Pusey, W A 


Van 


Rumble, II H 


Beth 


Simon, C E 


Jll 


C^^iiereaii, E C 


Nw 


Rupert, II L 


Rut 


Simon, E \\' 


Wit 


G^iick, G \V 


Rich 


Russell, W A 


Bel 


Simon, J S 


Wit 


Qiiin, H M 


Miss 


Russell. W E Am 


and Ken 


Simpson, R L 


Westm 


Qiiincy, W [ 


Mad 


Rutherford. S M 


DP 


Sinnott, W I 


Miss 


Rabb,"A 


Ind 


Saal, G F 


Cor 


Skiilman, O V 


Con 


Radford, V. S 


Cum 


Sabin. K II 


la 


Skinner, C 


\'a 


Radlift". K C 


Vn 


Sabine, W C 


OS 


Skinner, C E OS 


and OU 


Rafterty, J W 


SL 


Sackctt. J T 


Cor 


Skinner, E li 


OU 


Ramage, B B 


llarv 


Sadler, L A 


WR 


Slack, H R, Jr 


JIl 


Ranisdell, D II 


Mich 


St. Clair, F P 


Beth 


Slaughter, C C 


\'an 


Randolph. E C 


OW 


St. John, W A 


Mad 


Slaughter, J L W 


\'an 


Rank, C G 


Den 


Sanders, W E 


Col 


Slaymaker, S R Bel 


and Nw 


Rankin, R C 


Kas 


Sandt, G F 


Ste 


Smedes, E B 


JH 


Ray, I B 


Me 


Sargent, J A 


Kas 


Smith, A H 


Wit 


Raymond, C B 


Am 


Sargent, W II 


Me 


Smith, A P 


Am 


Raymund. F M 


OS 


Sawyer, C A 


Br 


Smith, C 


Kas 


Reakirt, L B 


Woos 


Savage, W L 


Am 


Smith, C F 


Br 


Reasoner, J P 


DP 


Scarborough, J V B 


Am 


Smith, C T, Jr 


Rich 


Reed, F E 


Kas 


Scarborough, T W 


Am 


Smith, E A 


OW 


Reed, G W 


OU 


Scarborough, W W 


Am 


Smith, E F 


laW 


Reed, G W 


Am 


Schindler, A D 


Cali 


Smith, H F 


Kas 


Reed, W T 


Kas 


Schindler, J J 


Wis 


Smith, H M 


SL 


Reid, J C 


Beth 


Schwartz. H S 


Mad 


Smith, I F 


Am 


Reigart, J F 


Dick 


Schwill, F 


Woos 


Smith, J E 


Am 


Renz, G A 


Pa 


Scott, F M 


Miss 


Smith, J G 


Mich 



P6 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX 



Smith,; K 


Woos 


Tabb, F D 


Rich 


Vest, E F 


Cen 


Smith, J P 


Van 


Talbert, G A 


OW 


Vose. C T 


Me 


Smith, L T 


Kas 


Talley, W W Ricl 


li and Va 


Vose, E C 


Me 


Smith, R H 


Ste 


Tanner, W E. Jr 


Rich 


\'roman, D 


Un 


Smith, R H 


Wis 


Taylor, A B 


Mad 


Vrooman, F B 


Bel 


Smith, R P 


Den 


Taylor, B F 


\'an 


Walker, N S 


Miss 


Smith, T G, Jr 


Ste 


Taylor, H S 


WR 


Walker, O D 


Kas 


Smith, W C 


DP 


Taylor, W P 


Bos 


Waller, N 


Cum 


Smith, W F 


JH 


Teall, F A 


Wis 


Walters, F M 


Ind 


Smith, W P 


Am 


Templeton, C M 


Cum 


Walton, D A 


Ste 


S nith, W R 


Wis 


Templin, O 


Kas 


Ward, G B 


Cum 


Smith, W S 


Han 


Terrell, A W 


Va 


Ward, ; H 


Br 


Smith, W T laW 


and Mich 


Terwilliger, T R 


OW 


Ward, W B 


Van 


Smoot, G W C 


Dick 


Thatcher, A J 


Cali 


Wardwell, L H 


Bos 


Sneed, E E 


Cum 


Thayer, A 


DP 


Warne, R C 


Wis 


Sneed, F W 


Westm 


Thayer, G L 


Wis 


Warren, E S 


Cali 


Snow, W B 


Bos 


Thomas, C S 


Ind 


Warren, W M 


Bos 


Snjder, A M 


Ken 


Thomas, F M 


Col 


Warriner, F 


Beth 


Southwick, J L 


Cor 


Thomas, W R 


Rich 


Washburn, A H 


Cor 


Sowers, D H 


OW 


Thompson, E W 


Van 


Washburn, C A 


WR 


Spaulding, F B 


Mich 


Thompson, F L 


Me 


Washburne, R H 


Un 


Spence, W 


Cum 


Thompson, J M 


WJ 


Waterhouse, ; H 


OW 


Spencer, R L 


Br 


Thompson, W II 


Am 


Watkins, F S 


la 


Sprague, C S 


Den 


Thornburg, C L 


\\'m 


Watson, A 


Kas 


Stacy, G B Beth 


and Rich 


Thornton, J F 


Ind 


Watson, C M 


Kas 


Starr, E Q^ 


OW 


Tilden, F M 


llarv 


Watson, G B 


Mich 


Starr, F M 


OW 


Tillinghast, E R 


Nw 


Watson, W A 


HS 


Staunton, F M 


Cor 


Tisdale, J C 


Nw 


Watson, W T 


Cum 


Stearns, F W 


Wis 


Todd, I B 


Ken 


Watts, R A 


Cen 


Steel, G P 


Am 


Todd, J R 


Dick 


Weaver, E E 


Woos 


Stephens, F M 


Pa 


Toennigs, F L 


laW 


Weaver, E O 


Wit 


Stephens, H T 


OS 


Tomlin, W M 


Kas 


Webb, H L L 


OW 


Stephenson, F M 


Wis 


Tomlinson, C S 


Nw 


Webster, M F 


Cor 


Stevens, C B 


Am 


Tomlinson, T W 


Cor 


Weed, W E 


Mad 


Stevens, E M 


Am 


Tope, W A 


Wit 


Weedman, C M 


Nw 


Stevens, N C 


Harv 


Tower, J E 


Am 


Weeks, A, ;r 


Pa 


Stewart, E \\ 


Cum 


Trimble, T T 


Westm 


Weightman, ; 


Kas 


Stewart, W B 


Dick 


Trout, S A 


Wab 


Wellman, W B 


Cali 


Stimpson, E F 


Kas 


Tucker,; B DP and Han 


Welsh, F M 


Dick 


Stoddart, M P 


Wis 


Tucker,; R, ;r 


Va 


Wentworth, W II 


Cali 


Stjne, A F 


Am 


Tucker, ^' E Han 


and Ind 


Wharton, ; W 


Ind 


Stone. O T 


Cum 


Tufts,; H 


Am 


Whitaker, A C 


Ken 


Stoner, G 


Cali 


Tulier, C E 


Ken 


W hi taker, G E 


Bos 


Stout, R E 


Kas 


Tuller, E T 


Ken 


White, A L 


Beth 


Stowe, B 


Nw 


Turner, F C 


Cali 


White, C D 


Cor 


Stratton, G M 


Cali 


Turner, R C 


Cali 


White, C H 


Am 


Stratton, R T 


Cali 


TuthiU, V M 


Mich 


White, C ; 


Nw 


Stribling, C R 


HS 


Tuttle, B B 


Den 


White, E F 


Ste 


Stribling. J M 


HS 


Twombly, S S 


Me 


White, H A 


HS 


Stribling, O L 


Cum 


Unland, O H 


laW 


White, ;, ;r 


JH 


Stuart, H L 


RM 


Vandercook, E P 


Am 


White, L 


\^an 


Sudbury, B V 


Ind 


Van Kirk, E M 


Mad 


White, R A 


IIS 


Summers, J L 


Van 


Van Ness, ; R 


Un 


Whitehead, F C 


Nw 


Sumner, A P 


Br 


Van Tuyl, C B 


Col 


Whitehead, ; P 


Am 


Sutherland, H 


Westm 


Van Vranken, G W 




Whitesell, R P 


Van 


Swain, H H 


Bel 


Cor 


and Un 


Whiteside, T 


Bos 


Swigart, G W 


la 


Velde, F L 


Mich 


Whiting, W F 


Am 



TO THE YOUNGER MEMBERS. 



97 



Whitney, H A 


Am 


Williams, W H 


Harv 


Woodin, II P 


Am 


Whitthorne, H Y 


Cen 


Willis, G W 


Br 


Woods, C F 


Va 


Whitthorne, W C 


Cen 


Wilson,; B 


Beth 


Woodward. W M 


la 


Whyte, G W 


Mich 


Wilson, O G 


laW 


Woodvvorth, H J 


OS 


Wiegand, H H 


JH 


Wilson, O S 


Han 


Woolery, L C 


Beth 


Wilbar, A E 


Am 


Wilson, R D 


llarv 


W'oolson, J L 


laW 


Wilbar, C B 


Am 


Wilson W H 


IIS 


Woolson, P B 


laW 


Wilcox, P 


Col 


Winfree, H L 


RM 


Worman, I D 


Wit 


Wilcox, W P 


Col 


Win free, P B 


RM 


Worstell, L G 


OU 


Wilkin, J L 


Den 


Winfree, R 


RM 


Wright, A L 


Beth 


Wilkinson, G 


Call 


Winslow, J R 


JH 


Wright, F P 


la 


Williams, B A 


OW 


Wise, H E 


Ind 


Wright, G S 


la 


Williams, C O 


Bi- 


Wise, O J 


Va 


Wyatt, W 


Ind 


Williams, C S 


laW 


Withrow, S P 


OW 


Wynkoop, R B 


Ken 


Williams, C S 


Me 


Wolf, W H 


Beth 


Yocum, A D 


Dick 


Williams, E A 


Den 


Wood, C E 


Kas 


Young, F G 


JH 


Williams, H A 


Wit 


Wood, H G 


Br 


Young, F L 


OW 


Williams, H W 


JH 


Wood, W E 


Mich 


Young. J B 


N\v 


Williams, R B 


Cum 


Wooden, C R 


laW 


Zellar, C M 


DP 


Williams, R C 


Rich 


Woodin, E B 


Am 


Zeublin. C N 


Nw 


Williams, S C 


Van 











ABBREVIATIONS. 



Am. — Amherst. 

Bel.— Beloit. 

Beth. — Bethany. 

Bos. — Boston. 

Br. — Brown. 

Cali. — UniversitN of 
California. 

Cen. — Centre. 

Col. — Columbia. 

Cor. — Cornell. 

Ciun. — Cumberland. 

Den. — Denison. 

DP.— DePauw. 

Dick. — Dickinson. 

HS. — Hampden Sid- 
ney. 



Han. — Hanover. 

Harv. — Harvard. 

Ind. — Indiana Uni^•er- 
sity. 

la. — University of 
Iowa. 

laW - Iowa Wesley an. 

JH. — ^Johns Hopkins. 

Kas. — Cni\ersity of 
Kansas. 

Ken. — Kenyon. 

Mad. — Madison. 

Me. — Maine State Col- 
lege. 

Mich. — University of 
Michigan. 



Miss. — University of 
Mississippi. 

Nw. — Northwestern. 

OS —Ohio State Uni- 
versity-. 

OU.--dhioUniversity. 

OW— OhioWesleyan. 

Pa. — University o f 
Pennsylvania. 

RM.— Randolph Ma- 
con. 

Rich. — Richmond. 

Rut. — Rutgers. 

SL. — St. Lawrence. 

Ste. — Stevens. *■ 



Un. — Union. 

Van. — Vanderbilt. 

Va. — University of 
Virginia. 

Wab.— Wabash. 

WJ. — Washington and 
Jeiferson. 

WR. — Western Re- 
serve. 

Westm.— Westminster. 

Wis. — University of 
Wisconsin. 

Wit.— Wittenberg. 

Woos. — Wooster. 



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