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Full text of "The Handbook Of Private Schools An Annual Descriptive Survey Of Independent Education Thirty Ninth Edition 1958"

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THE SARGENT SERVICES 

Since 1915 Porter Sargent and Staff have served as educa- 
tional advisors to parents. 

Information on a great variety of schools, colleges and camps 
is available from our oflice, and a bureau is maintained to 

advise parents and guardians. 

Thousands have been helped by sending details of their 

child's needs, 

A complete form will be sent on request, to be filled in with 
data that will make our suggestions pertinent and helpful. 
Write to Porter Sargent, 11 Beacon St., Boston 8, Mass., 
specify name of child, age, school and class, grades received, 
the type of school sought, tuition range, and desired geograph- 
ical location, 

With this and additional data provided on the form which 
will be sent from this office, recommendation will be made in 

the best interest of the child. 

Compensation to defray expenses of handling inquiries is 
usually asked of parents able to pay, as we accept no enroll- 
ment fees from the schools. 



Sargent Handbook Series 

JUNIOR COLLEGES AND SPECIALIZED SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 
GUIDE TO SUMMER CAMPS 
PRIVATE SCHOOLS ILLUSTRATED 
WHERE TO BUY SUPPLIES FOR EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 



STAIRWAY TO COLLEGE: A Guidebook for the Prospective College 
Student, by Normie and Harold Ruby 



Special Education Series 

SPECIAL EDUCATION FOR THE EXCEPTIONAL: 3 Volumes, edited 
by Frampton and Gall 

GUIDE FOR THE STUDY OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN, by Willard 
Abraham 

A NEW LOOK AT READING, by Willard Abraham 

NEW HOPE FOR THE RETARDED: Enriching the Lives of Exceptional 
Children, by Morris P. and Miriam Pollock 

DIRECTORY FOR EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN 



Extending Horizons Books 

TOYNBEE AND HISTORY: Critical Essays and Reviews, edited by 
M. F. Ashley Montagu 

MUTUAL AID: A Factor of Evolution, by Petr Kropotkin 
THE AMERICAN SEX REVOLUTION, by Pitirim Sorokin 

MARRIAGE PAST AND PRESENT: A Debate, by Robert Briffault and 
Bronislaw Malinowski 

SOCIAL AND CULTURAL DYNAMICS, by Pitirim Sorokin. One 
volume edition 

ANTHROPOLOGY AND HUMAN NATURE, by M. F. Ashley Montagu 



THE HANDBOOK 

OF 

PRIVATE SCHOOLS 

AN ANNUAL DESCRIPTIVE SURVEY 
OF INDEPENDENT EDUCATION 



THIRTY-NINTH EDITION 



1958 



PORTER SARGENT 

11 BEACON STREET, BOSTON 8, MASSACHUSETTS 
TEL,; LAFAYETTE 3-1670 



COPYRIGHT, 1958, BY 

F. PORTER SARGENT 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS NUMBER 
1901. Hj 



INTRODUCTION 



APPROACHES TO SCIENCE .......... 

A report on academic achievements in the private schools by 10 
leading administrators. 



ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP LISTS 

The more important educational associations whose membership 

is of interest to schools and patrons are here given .... Ixxii 

CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS; CUM 
LAUDE SOCIETY; FBIENDS COUNCIL ON EDUCATION; GUILD OF 
INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS OF NEW YORK, INC.; INDEPENDENT 
SCHOOLS ASSOCIATION OF NORTHERN NEW ENGLAND; MIDDLE 
STATES ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGES AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS; 
NORTH CENTRAL ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGES AND SECONDARY 
SCHOOLS; NATIONAL COUNCIL OF INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS; 
NEW ENGLAND ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGES AND SECONDARY 
SCHOOLS; NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF PRINCIPALS OF SCHOOLS 
FOR GIRLS; PRIVATE SCHOOLS ASSOCIATION OF CENTRAL 
STATES; SECONDARY EDUCATION BOARD; SOUTHERN ASSOCIA- 
TION OF INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS. 



MAPS 

Thirteen maps giving the location of leading private schools 
throughout the country. 

NORTHERN NEW ENGLAND; BOSTON AND VICINITY; SOUTHERN NEW 
ENGLAND; NEW YORK AND VICINITY; NORTHERN NEW YORK; 
MIDDLE STATES ; PHILADELPHIA AND VICINITY ; SOUTH CENTRAL 
STATES; NORTH CENTRAL STATES; CENTRAL STATES; SOUTH- 
WEST STATES; NORTHERN CALIFORNIA; SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 



Table of Contents 



DESCRIPTIVE TEXT 

THE LEADING PRIVATE SCHOOLS 

Newly compiled statistical data and listings of facilities are pro- 
vided for 950 primary and secondary schools. Concise descriptions 
and relevant data showing the program, scope and objectives of each 
school, together with history, names of important personnel, com- 
plete address, telephone number, tuition, enrollment, graduate 
records with colleges entered, faculty, courses and curricula, and 
physical facilities, etc. 

NEW ENGLAND, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, 

Rhode Island, Connecticut ........ 3 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, 

Maryland, Washington, D. C ........ i <j 4 

SOUTH ATLANTic,-~The Virginias, The Carolinas, Georgia, Florida . 348 

SOUTH CENTRAL, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, 

Louisiana, Texas .......... ^ co 

EAST NORTH CENTRAL, Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, Wisconmn 434 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Arkansas, The 

Dakotas, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma . . . . .482 

MOUNTAIN SOUTHWEST, Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, Arizona, New 

Mexico ............ <jj 

PACIFIC STATES, Washington, Oregon, California . $32 

HAWAII 



*~ 



Table of Contents 

** PAGE 

FOEEIGN SCHOOLS 577 

England Netherlands Belgium West Germany 
France Switzerland Italy Greece Morocco Leba- 
non Israel Pakistan India Philippines Japan 
Australia Cuba Haiti Honduras Dominican Re- 
public Netherlands - West Indies Costa Rica Mexico 

Ecuador Guatemala Surinam Nicaragua South 
America 

ILLUSTRATED ANNOUNCEMENTS 

The schools 1 own statement of their offerings, in new format, JJTO- 
fusely illustrated and designed to aid in the selection of programs 
for each child. Boys Schools, Girls Schools, Coeducational Schools 
and Specialized Schools and Junior Colleges are separately grouped 
each in geographical order to afford ready comparison of like 
facilities in each region. 

INDEX OF ANNOUNCEMENT* 6ia 

SCHOOLS 

Boys Schools 619 

Girls Schools 737 

Coeducational Schools 787 

Junior Colleges and Specialized Schools 847 

FOKEIGN SCHOOLS 861 

CAMPS 865 



ACADEMIC SCHOOLS CLASSIFIED BY TYPE 

Boarding Schools Offering Strong Course in Languages Strong 
Course in Mathematics Strong and Extensive Courses in 
Sciences Reporting Acceleration or Honors Courses 
Remedial Reading Developmental Reading - Offering 
Make-up Work or Tutoring to New Students General Cur- 
ricula Post Graduate Year For Younger Children (Jo- 
educational Boarding Schools Schools with Enrollments 
from Abroad Denominational Schools Tuition Ranges 87 8 



Table of Contents 
CONCISE LISTING OF SCHOOLS 

Schools not found among 'The Leading Private Schools' are here 
listed regionally by type, 

PAGE 
BOARDING SCHOOLS 9 10 

DAY SCHOOLS 969 

HOME SCHOOLS 1012 

OTHER SCHOOLS 1026 

TUTORING AND REMEDIAL 1031 



DIRECTORIES 

This up-to-date informational and address list has proved of 
great reference value to educational executives and buyers. 

INDEX OF FIRMS, AGENCIES, AND ASSOCIATIONS . 1039 



INDEX OF SCHOOLS 

Schools are indexed with page reference to Descriptive Text, 
Supplementary Lists, and Announcements. 

NAME, ADDRESS 1089 



DISPLAY ADVERTISING 

FIRMS AND PERIODICALS 1133 



NEWS AND THE SCHOOLS 



News concerning the schools reveals a quickened pace. Trends 
confirm the patterns set by a rising tide of potential enrollment. More 
selective admissions for those of greater aptitude bring rising academic 
objectives. The private schools are not able to expand apace with the 
influx of war babies, as earlier explained to readers of this Handbook. 
Tuitions often do not meet current expenses, let alone allow the building 
of new plant! 

Yet the recession has certainly not curtailed private schools. Rather 
are they humming with heightened activity arid acceleration of their 
academic pace to meet the higher standards demanded by colleges. 
As competition stiffens increasingly for well-known schools, the backlog 
of applicants mounts before many schools where yeoman work has 
been traditional in preparing for college both able students and those 
with academic problems who have turned to them for help. 

The following are remarked as signalizing the trend of developments 
this past year in academic boarding and day private schools described 
in this Handbook: 

A marked decrease in non-college-bound students and the raising of 
academic standards and goals paralleling the more selective admission. 

An increase of enrollment resulting in 3%-5% overall, with the 
boarding schools holding to the lower figure. 

College admissions hold to 9()%-95% for the leading preparatory 
schools in various regions of the country, although graduates are 
attending more widely dispersed colleges, ' 

Continuing faculty-student ratios hold below 11 students to each 
teacher in leading preparatory schools. 

Scholarships are fewer and now benefit approximately 13% of the 
students with the greater number offered in large eastern boys pre- 
paratory schools, arid fewer in the girls boarding schools. 

Teachers' salaries increased more this year, 7 to 9% across the 
board, averaging 25 to 40% over a 5 year period. More is needed even 
at expense of plant. 

Plant expansion drives are not appreciably slowed by recession with 
functional emphasis now on classrooms ami dormitories. 

The dollar value of scholarships holds, yet the proportion to the 
total tuition decreased while competition among schools for extremely 
able students grows with emphasis on honor courses. 



x Introduction 

Tuition charges have advanced more this past year than ever before, 
with more than one-half the boarding schools reporting increases aver- 
aging 9.9%, while in day schools, somewhat less than one-half report 
an increase of 14%. 

The new schools announced exceed those closing, yet they are but a 
minor factor in meeting the acute demand for independent education. 

Tutorial and makeup offerings, greatly curtailed, this year are re- 
ported as offered by 123 or less than 1 in 4 of the leading boarding 
schools, or a reversal of the ratio prevalent a decade ago. 

Remedial reading now is provided on a broader basis in 219 of the 
leading boarding schools reporting and while Developmental Reading 
gains prominence in 116 schools these rewarding fields of work are 
closely watched. 

The specialized school is assuming at greater cost the more complex 
and analytical educational problems and this area of education is 
expanding. The need is great today for schools that offer help for 
those whose academic work has been markedly poor. (The Directory 
for Exceptional Children, 3rd edition, just published by this office, 
reveals phenomenal growth in thousands of facilities, homes, schools, 
clinics, for the handicapped.) 

Honors courses are increasing and acceleration and advanced work 
is being offered in more grades at more schools with the greater attention 
and incentives for those of superior abilities. 

Science courses are strengthened and being reorganized in a significant 
number of schools. Perhaps in the sciences the progress which has 
been manifest from experiments and pioneering finds greatest popular 
interest. The Introduction this year touches upon this work. Persons 
in the field will recognize that this is but a glimpse of the many new 
developments being forged in Public and Private Schools. Many new 
science programs are not yet announced while others have received 
wide notice through foundation sponsorship. 

This year despite the busy schedules which are prevalent among 
educators everywhere, we are once again indebted to persons in private 
schools for contributing a number of interesting articles in which they 
discuss matters that are receiving attention today; How shall science 
and related subjects be integrated into both the primary and secondary 
curriculum? We wish to take this opportunity to thank individual 
contributors for their help in revealing the several aspects of Private 
Schools to the interested public and our readers. 



INTRODUCTION 

APPROACHES TO SCIENCE 

THE PRIVATE SCHOOLS SPEAK 



THE SUSPICION OP QUALITY 

by Harold H. Corbin, Jr., Head, Lake Forest Academy 

SCIENCE IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

by C. Thurston Chase, Head, Eaglebrook School 

ACCELERATING THE SCIENCE PROGRAM 

by Dr. J. Rollin Grant, Head, The Francis W. Parker School 

SCIENCE AT GEORGE SCHOOL 

by William S. Burton, Chairman, Science Bept., George 
School 

EXTRACURRICULAR SCIENCE AT ANDOVBR 

by John Ward Kimball, Physics Dept., Phillips Academy, 
Andover 

SCIENCE PROJECTS AT MILLBROOK 

by Edward Pulling, Head, The Millbrook School 

SCIENCE AT EXETER 

by John C. Hogg, Chairman, Science Dept., The Phillips 
Exeter Academy. 

A HUMANITIES COURSE 

by Joseph B. Brown, Verde Valley School 

INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS AND INDEPENDENCE 

by Charles Merrill, Head, The Commonwealth School 

A DECENT RESPECT FOR HUMAN INTELLIGENCE 

by Gen. Omar N. Bradley, National Chairman, St. Albans 
Anniversary Development Program 

xi 



THE SUSPICION OF QUALITY 

BY HAROLD H. CORBIN, JR. 
Lake Forest Academy 

Four years ago I encountered on the street one morning 
a friend whose task it was at the moment to search out a 
principal for the new elementary school in a village nearby. 
I asked him how it was going. "Oh, I've seen quite a 
number of candidates. But it ; s the same old business, 
you know; not a one comes close. " "The same old busi- 
ness?" I queried. "What's wrong with them?" 'Their 
suspicion of quality," he replied quite simply. 

Not wishing to appear uninformed, I changed the sub- 
ject, and we went our ways. The enigmatic phrase, how- 
ever, stuck in my mind. "The suspicion of quality" 
what was he getting at? 

I think I now understand. I understand it in terms of 
the convulsive attitudinal shift now evident in educational 
thinking across the nation. In this shift the concept of 
quality figures prominently among parents, students, 
teachers, and the public at large. The new thinking 
deserves recognition and clarification: if there is change, 
to and from what is it taking place? What's behind it? 
Whither does it tend? Let us trace three broad issues, 
one at a time. 

THE TEACHER IN AMERICAN SOCIETY: A STEREOTYPE 

A 'depth study' of many citizens over fifty years of age 
would dredge up, I am sure, a tenacious stereotype labeled 
'teacher.' An angular spinster with a lace choker, the 
sexless and unsuccessful daughter of propriety, performing 
a necessary but dull duty for those who should be seen 
and not heard (do you remember how Tom Sawyer felt?) . 
Or an indigent eccentric, an itinerant fellow classed some- 
where below the local parson, a bemused tyrant with a 
switch in one hand and McGuffey in the other, a pedant 
without privilege (how we loved Washington Irving and 
Oliver Goldsmith!). As obsolete and affectionately cock- 
eyed as these memories are, they are still with usbut 

xii 



Cor bin Suspicion of Qualify xiii 

they are changing, as change they must. Shaw didn't 
help: "Those who can, do; those who can't, teach. " 

Awareness is breaking in on the wings of space. "Is it 
really true that in Europe, especially in Russia, teachers 
are honored members of the community, that they are 
often held above the doctor and the lawyer, that they are 
rewarded by high incomes, respected, emulated, and de- 
ferred to? Is it really true that we don't have enough 
teachers to go round? What is happening here? What 
do industry and technology mean by snatching these 
people away from their proper duties? What is this I 
hear about teachers' unions?" 

Questions, if repeated loudly and often enough, get 
answers. Answers about teachers are now available to 
the man on the street every day in almost every newspaper 
in the land, and they are being read and discussed with 
mounting interest. Facts and necessity produce, in 
time, changes in attitude; in turn they produce action. If 
quality in education means survival, a persuasive thesis, 
then teachers must be our prime concern, and whatever is 
necessary to produce them in enlightened numbers, to 
dignify them with compensation appropriate to their 
function in society, to give them classrooms and laborator- 
ies, to bring them back from the wasteland of profes- 
sionalism (a natural retreat from neglect) to the fields of 
true scholarship these things must be done, and done 
quickly. They cannot be accomplished by worry and 
words, for quality cannot be so easily induced. This is 
being recognized. The big shift is on in government, 
in P.T.A.'s, in the press, among school boards, among 
teachers, in public and independent universities and 
schools the country over. A three-column headline in the 
Chicago Daily News for Thursday, January 23, 1958, pro- 
claimed, "Urge Pay Up to $12,000 for Winnetka Teach- 
ers." Who urged it? A Citizens 7 Board. Similar senti- 
ments are finding expression in many a community today. 
Amen, Amen. 

THE FATE OF THE ABLE: DEMOCRACY AND 
MEDIOCRITY CONFOUNDED 

The anti-intellectual attitudes to which the United 
States has become habituated are and have been recog- 
nized. Too few, till now, have been concerned by them. 



xiv Corbin Suspicion of Quality 

Even fewer have understood the degree to which they have 
vitiated the structure and purpose of American education. 
These attitudes are so deepseated that both trauma and 
time are needed to unseat them; yet even here change is 
afoot and hope rises. To clarify such hope let me indulge 
in another brief depth study and see what figure labeled 
'Intellectual 7 comes to the surface. 

The stereotype this time is a gaunt, consumptive fellow 
who needs a haircut. Thick horn-rimmed glasses do not 
disguise a satanic and disquieting glance, best left unmet. 
He looks vaguely foreign. His dress reveals his poverty. 
The best that can be said of him is that he is an impractical 
visionary too full of books to make sense, too lazy to keep 
a job, too snooty to be 'like us.' The worst that can be 
said is that he is un-American, he ; ll never amount to any- 
thing, and we'd better keep a close eye on him. 

Who can say that it has not been partly because of an 
uneasy aversion to this specter that intellectual mediocrity 
seems a comfortable middle ground and that doing is more 
desirable than thinking? Note the faintly derisive sound 
to the words 'theory' and Visionary/ as against 'practice' 
and 'doer. ; Our preference for ingenuity, drive, and prac- 
ticality, things which 'get you somewhere,' is reflected in 
our curricula, at the inevitable and shocking sacrifice of 
intellectual discipline. Not long ago an applicant to one 
of our leading universities presented a transcript of his 
work in high school. It revealed that in junior year he 
took English III, American History, typing, speech, 
chorus, and physical education. In senior year he exer- 
cised his intellect with English IV, journalism, speech, per- 
sonality problems, marriage and family, and chorus. 
Needless to say he was not admitted perhaps on the fair 
assumption that he had been so well insulated against the 
threat of intellectual discipline at the age of 18 that no 
university could teach him to think. 

This historical aversion to intellectualism, it seems to me ; 
is half effect, half cause of a fundamental confusion about 
the meaning of democracy. Nowhere in the documentary 
or philosophical origins of American democracy is it 
equated to mediocrity, or to the 'divine average/ Men 
are born equal but only equal in opportunity, oppor- 
tunity to use or let perish the disparate endowments be- 
queathed them by their Creator. The dictum which holds 
that a high school diploma is a 'right' for all, rather than a 



Cor bin Suspicion of Qualify xv 

privilege for the ambitious and the competent, is naught 
but perverted folklore and yet how deeply this perversion 
governs our practice. As a result, down come the stand- 
ards of performance, up goes the number of 'soft' courses, 
out comes the 'no-flunk' order, away go parents and 
children happy in their deprivation, around goes the cycle 
of benevolent degeneration of our intellectual muscle. 
Abetting the entire process are those who direct much of 
the educational machinery of the nation, the professional 
educationists. 

The unintentional and now well entrenched orphans of 
the university tradition of learning, the professional educa- 
tionists, control the major portion of the teacher supply, 
influence through their teacher colleges, state universities, 
and the regional accreditation agencies what shall and shall 
not be taught, ally themselves perforce with the political 
activities of the state legislatures, and thus exert, in defense 
of elaborate vested interests, a monumental influence upon 
the educational patterns of the nation. 

And yet even here, on the anti-intellectual front, there is 
strong evidence of attitudinal shift toward quality. 
People are beginning to remember a lost truth that the 
main purpose of education is intellectual training. They 
are beginning to suspect that the permissive mishmash of 
'preparation for living/ 'cosmetology/ 'better boy-girl 
relationships' and so on are lethal opiates for a competitive 
nation's future leaders its young. Suspicion has finally 
alighted on curved grading methods pegged so high that no 
one fails and A's no longer mean perfect; on 'diplomas for 
attendance'; on sectioning policies that 'democratically' 
lump the gifted with the laggard and deliberately teach 
between them; on 'licensed' teachers who have been led to 
believe they can teach because they know 'how' but not 
necessarily 'what.' I do not mean to suggest that such 
unfortunate practices are universal; many public schools 
and virtually all independent schools eschew them. There 
is, and has been, however, far too much indulgence in these 
fatuous errors. A reverse trend is under way. 

Such influential voices as those of Yale's President, 
A. Whitney Griswold, and Illinois historian Arthur Bestor 
to name only two -decry the recent history of our ele- 
mentary and secondary academic standards (hear Presi- 
dent Griswold in an editorial of November 25, 1955, in the 
Chicago Tribune; Dr. Bestor in an interview published 



xvi Corbin Suspicion of Quality 

January 24, 1958, in U. S. News and World Report). Note 
that many of our independent schools are flexing and in- 
tensifying their already traditional practices of pushing the 
able student, through honors or accelerated sections aimed 
at acceptance at college with advanced standing. Observe 
citizens' groups, public school leaders, the press, and other 
articulate moulders of opinion as they react to the needs 
now so plainly before us. It is not like Americans long to 
settle for anything second-rate, whether it be homes or 
automobiles, mousetraps or bombs, churches or schools. 
Our schools far too many of them and the job they have 
been doing have been inadequate. Recognition has been 
forced upon us. Attitudes toward quality are swiftly 
changing. Action is beginning. 

THE CHILD: FATHER OF THE AGE 

Being ours, and being not persons but 'becomings/ no 
depth study yet devised can bring to light a stereotype of 
the American boy or girl. They are, as they always have 
been, our basic wealth, our only true resource, and our first 
and foremost product. A luh economy has put our 
inventory in long supply, and since we cannot warehouse 
them (they require continuous processing), we are now 
faced with problems obvious to all too few plants, a short 
supply of skilled workmen, and hence a product un- 
equipped to perform duties far more complex than ever 
before. What forces work upon this sensitive product? 
What is its reaction? The answers are fairly logical ones; 
once we understand the causes, the effects are not sur- 
prising. 

Basically, boys and girls grow up in spite of us, not be- 
cause of us. God, in His Infinite Wisdom, has so arranged 
it. Some, having drunk deep of the neural tensions 
created by their elders, take things into their own hands, no 
one but the cops saying them nay, and become delinquent. 
More and better schools with greater challenge could have 
saved some of these. 

The great middle group do mainly what is expected of 
them (this has been made palatable), proceeding through 
grammar school and high school learning lifesmanship, 
choosing the easier right rather than the harder wrong (sic), 
becoming happy, well integrated 7 and busy adolescents 
only faintly sensing, with some uneasiness, that their 



Corbin Suspicion of Quality xvii 

academic chewing gum will lose its savor in time, and that 
the intellectual provincialism which drearily awaits them 
is not entirely of their own making. They know and too 
readily accept the indictment of the long hair.' They 
have little idea where Saudi Arabia is or what might go on 
there during the next five years. Their brush with Tenny- 
son takes place on page 212 of a suitcase anthology, their 
Latin experience (if any) consists in a toothless textbook 
and a creative experience with the home economics depart- 
ment in the form of a Roman banquet. Modern educa- 
tional science, as in technology, has happily succeeded in 
reducing the writing of compositions to oral exercises in the 
'Speech 7 class, compressing homework into the library 
period, emasculating chemistry and physics into total 
sterility, leaving more time for classes in cheerleading 
through the creation of the multiple answer quiz, and 
teaching philosophy through the 'guidance' department. 
What's left can be cleared out through field trips and the 
growing library of film strips, which I suspect takes care of 
the archaisms of grammar, orthography, and the multi- 
plication tables. Learning by doing has replaced learning 
by cerebration. And from each home room wall looks 
down the wise face of a man named Abraham Lincoln, who 
learned by both. 

The group at the top? These are the hungry and able 
ones who would learn all they need to know no matter 
where, if need be in a vacuum. The miraculous com- 
plexity of our expanding knowledge is a stimulus, not a 
frustration to them. They by themselves sift and select, 
judge and reject, devour and digest. These are the ones 
whose vital futures are dictating the attitudinal shift now 
pervading the land these and the ones who have their 
potentials of greatness but who are now unidentified and 
unchallenged among us. If these are given quality from 
the beginning, who knows what miraculous hand might 
lift the minds of the slower ones behind them? 

Could it be that in our kindly and democratic way we 
have put the academic horse behind the intellectual wagon? 
Perhaps. At last necessity may be forcing change, quality 
may be set right side up, and our tomorrows made secure 
by great leaders whom we lesser ones are proud to follow. 



xx Chase Elementary Science 

their zeal for narrow exploration, their competition to 
establish for their own branch of knowledge an arrogant 
superiority over all others. We must also free them from 
the propaganda with which our commercialism frequently 
abets this fragmentation and competition. Thoughtful 
people, young or old, will find a sound new starting point 
for their thinking, by reading John H. Storer's 'The Web 
of Life". Further, let me quote that devoted British con- 
servationist, E. B. Balfour: 

"If our experience of the last twenty years has not 
taught us sufficient humility to realize that we are" in- 
capable of ordering our lives successfully in a Godless 
society, then one is tempted to wonder whether as a 
species we are worth preserving. In every activity, 
from the management of our soil onwards, we have re- 
garded ourselves as self-sufficient, and in every activity 
that attitude of mind has led to disaster. We are the 
youngest of the world's species, and we have all the 
arrogance of youth. We have played havoc with the 
elaborate structure that was laboriously built up before 
we came, and now we find that we are not gods after all. 
We have been all-powerful in our destruction, but we 
cannot recreate the life we have destroyed. 

"Human ecology demands that we should think less 
of our 'rights' and more of our duties to all other living 
things, including each other. We must start again, 
with a new and better attitude towards life. Indeed we 
must in some cases relearn that life exists. 

"The outcome and production, both in vegetable and 
animal bodies, have been hitherto considered so much 
under .the prepossessions of chemical and mechanical 
philosophy that the physiologists have entirely lost 
sight of life . . . But unless we consider life as the im- 
mediate cause of all actions occurring in either animals or 
vegetables, we can have no just conception of either 
vegetable or animal matter." 

Must our arrogance lead us to a total conquest of outer 
space and the colonization of the moon, reportedly a rather 
cold and cheerless place? If it does, will 'homo sapiens' 
be any closer to God and his own destiny? Undoubtedly 
our school boys, who are seeing Buck Rogers' exploits 
come to life, will count on the adventure of space-ship 
travel, just as they have dreamed of climbing Everest and 
K-2, or of camping and exploring in the Arctic and Ant- 



Chase Elementary Science xxi 

Arctic. Yet is it their destiny to spend their vacations 
playing tag in the ionosphere, clothed in space-suits to 
ward off cosmic rays, and breathing oxygen canned and 
carried from the atmosphere of an already deserted earth? 
In the present thinking of some of our physicists and many 
of our youth, such speculation is not as fantastic as it 
seems. A twelve-year-old today can, with utmost com- 
placency, say that we need not concern ourselves with 
preservation of the earth's surface to grow food, because 
the sea has ample supply for thousands of years, easily put 
in capsules and preserved by synthetic chemicals and 
atomic refrigeration. If this same lad has concerned him- 
self with the function of water in life at all, he may find 
assurance in the prospect of drinking the oceans, when 
purified. Yet rarely does he extend his imagination to the 
prospect of a land without rain, all rocky mountain tops 
and bare desert, uninhabitable by man, beast, birds, or 
insects. 



LESSONS IN NATURE 

Our courses in history teach that, during man's many 
centuries on this mysterious earth, he has created several 
so-called 'great civilizations' all of which have been 
honored for their specific contributions to man's evolution. 
Do these courses teach the cause of their declines? Where 
is it clearly pointed out to our young people that these now 
defunct civilizations destroyed their own environment, that 
they raped the good earth until they ended under blowing 
sands? List them Ur of the Chaldees, Babylon, Egypt, 
all of North Africa, much of China even Greece and 
Rome today barren countries in what was formerly a 
lush green world. What course tells today's American 
youngsters of the despoliation of their own forests and 
grazing lands, of the rapid expansion of our dustbowls and 
deserts, and the ever-shrinking space left for agriculture? 
Who studies our critically sinking water-table, and projects 
for a few years the inadequacy of any present supply to 
fill the needs of a growing population? Who eoneertedly 
records, measures or raises exception to the slow chemical 
and radiational poisoning of wild life, from bees to boys? 

Not all our youth will be 'scientists' ; yet all who would 
seek survival must share the use, control, and care of our 
planetary home. Everyone of us must come to know it 



xxii Chase Elementary Science 

better, relearn to respect and cherish it. Let this be the 
first task of science in the elementary school. Let this 
understanding and this challenge be given to all students, 
so the race may prosper under 'natural law/ From some 
of them we may also develop a new group of natural scien- 
tists, who will purposefully shoulder the responsibility of 
leading an informed country in the understanding and the 
preservation of its God-given surroundings. 

Fear, and the peculiar glamor of electronics, space travel, 
and a modern chemistry fast approaching alchemy, will 
bring us specialists enough in the more spectacular 
branches of science. Let our concern be the basic one of 
LIFE. 

A GOOD BEGINNING 

How shall we elementary schools accomplish our goal? 
First, let us, with a mighty heave, cast out most of the 
graded science textbook series that have been published 
within the past thirty years. Most are guilty of frag- 
mentation and of deadly repetition, grade after grade. 
Too many are written to be read only, on the presupposi- 
tion that laboratory facilities do not exist, nor any sur- 
rounding nature. Blessed exceptions have been published, 
which are more laboratory and exploration guides than 
they are textbooks. Some even incorporate a vocabulary 
that does not 'talk down 7 to the grade level of the inde- 
pendent school pupil. Having decided to cherish only a 
few textbooks and guides, or to import some of the excellent 
English ones, let us fill the laboratory reference shelves with 
innumerable well-written volumes on every topic of known 
or potential student-interest. As long as they are written 
for the layman, they will not prove too adult for a really 
interested boy or girl. 

Since we study life, good sunlight in the laboratory is a 
first essential. Next comes plenty of space to observe, 
under controlled conditions, from microscope to aquarium 
and terrarium, from window-box to greenhouse, from 
breeding cage to the limitless out-of-doors. 

Who should teach science? Men and women who are 
whole people, well-adjusted, believers in God, whose 
own lives express unity, beauty, reverence, and whose in- 
satiable minds incessantly seek answers from all nature. 
Let them be woodsmen, bird-watchers, gardeners. 



Chase Elementary Science xxiii 

It matters not what their hobbies, as long as they share in 
learning with the children and communicate enthusiasm. 
The late Alfred Kinsey, as a young "man, was one of the 
greatest teachers about birds, insects and trees that one 
might hope to know. While the science teacher need not 
be an expert scientist, he must have had sufficient training 
to communicate the "scientific spirit " of accurate and 
tested inquiry, controlled experiment, and meticulous rec- 
ord-keeping. Let him also cast out dogma and learn to say, 
"As far as we now know . . ." Then let him suggest testing 
each suggested hypothesis for truth and be ready to seek 
anew. 

Who should study science? Every single elementary 
school boy and girl, from Grade I through Grade X, with 
the possible exception of omitting it in either Grade VIII 
or Grade IX for especial concentration on another branch 
of social studies ! Too long have we given more than three- 
quarters of our academic time to language and mathe- 
matical skills. Too often has science been omitted from 
our independent school curriculum altogether, or assigned 
as a "snap course'' or "busy work" for the low-verbal boy 
or girl. Little wonder the cry from government, industry, 
and colleges is for more scientists! Our ablest people have 
been steered away by the paucity of offerings, and the 
pressure of two-language requirements. Yet who dares 
affirm that the scientific discipline and training of the mind 
is less demanding or less creative than that of Latin or 
mathematics? 

What shall we teach? Ay, there's the rub ! Every good 
and effective science teacher we have consulted claims that 
his courses are experimental!- Is not such approach, with 
the constant change it implies, the very essence of the sub- 
ject? Let us never lose sight of the fact that it is life we 
are studying its understanding, conservation, and its use 
to our country. 

Most effective learning moves from the familiar to the 
unfamiliar, so start near at hand. Beginning study oppor- 
tunities will vary incredibly from school to school, accord- 
ing to its location and climate city, suburb, seashore, 
desert, mountamtop. Yet nature at first hand is not far 
off, even in the cities with their parks, zoos, aquaria, muse- 
ums. Birds fly almost everywhere and the heavens need 
not be obscured with smog, if one plans his observations! 
Wherever out-of-doors is difficult to reach and space 



xxiv Chase Elementary Science 

permits (and it always should), much of nature may be 
moved into the laboratory. 

It has been observed that much of the best science 
learning is accomplished in voluntary science clubs. These 
often tend toward such physical studies as electronics and 
radio, or chemistry, but can just as well, if stimulated, con- 
centrate on "earth-science" and "life-science". Every 
grade or science class should be, to a considerable extent, 
a club, permitting the following of a particular interest 
and the carrying on of individual or small group projects. 
Wherever possible, the classroom should lead to the out-of- 
doors, both in class and "free" time. Soil, erosion, water 
may be studied indoors or out; earthworms and the micro- 
scopic life that nourishes plant growth must be seen in the 
laboratory and the results of their labors observed in the 
field. Ants and bees are easily observed indoors and out. 
Bird-watchers can conduct banding stations and observe 
the effects of mass spraying from the air on insect life and 
winged population. Woodcraft groups or Rangers may 
cherish and observe the proper care of a section of wood- 
land; a zoo of collected wild or tame animals snakes, 
fish, birds may be indoors or out. 

It matters little what the point of beginning, as long as 
it is close at hand, familiar, and can be meaningfully related 
to the totality of life and its conservation. Climate will 
often be a controlling factor. New England schools may 
concentrate on the out-of-doors in spring; save anatomy, 
astronomy, geography, physical and chemical aspects for 
winter. Food, its production, use, and relation to health 
are too often overlooked, and may fit in any season, as 
may study of the weather. 

Whatever the course outline, let it be constantly flexible ; 
take every opportunity to emphasize ecology, the concept 
of totality. Let us refuse to bind our minds with textbook 
rigidities and remember that on our doorsteps, wherever 
they may be, nature is calling us to come and know her, 
We must not waste the wealth of knowledge she spreads 
before us. It will be sheer joy to lead young people to the 
rediscovery, and the care of the environment which sup- 
ports us all. 



ACCELERATING THE SCIENCE 
PROGRAM 

BY DR. J. ROLLIN GRANT 
The Francis W. Parker School, California 

With the increased emphasis now centered on the teach- 
ing of science and mathematics, an emphasis stimulated 
by the acute shortage of personnel qualified in these areas, 
it became evident that a long range program of instruction 
needed to be initiated. Further local emphasis was added 
because of the importance of the aircraft and electronic 
manufacturing and research in the San Diego community 
and because of the proximity to major naval installations. 
While our original plans called for an advanced program 
of these subjects in the fifth and sixth grades, expediency 
necessitated that, for the current year, the attention be 
focused on the students in grades seven and eight. It was 
interesting to note that with a public announcement of this 
program the applications for enrollment in these grades 
were the highest in the history of the school. 

SELECTION OF STUDENTS 

Our first problem was to discover the abilities of students 
in the two basic areas of science and mathematics, and 
batteries of tests were studied to determine the best devices 
for gaining the desired data. It was our opinion that we 
needed to have data that would not only give us informa- 
tion about the individual's aptitude in the two areas but 
also his achievement. To selected data gathering devices 
in these areas wore added a test of mental ability and inter- 
est inventories. Past performance of the student as evi- 
denced by grade records were studied and interviews were 
given each new student enrolled. After considerable 
study, the Sequential Tests of Educational Progress 
developed by the Educational Testing Service were selected 
since our philosophy was in agreement with the stated 
philosophy of these tests, namely, that students should 



xxvi Grant Science Acceleration 

gain an "increased knowledge of scientific concepts and an 
increased ability to reason with scientific information." 
While both the science and mathematics tests were used, 
we will limit this report largely to the data derived from 
the science test. 

The test indicated six types of scientific reasoning to be 
tested and the values assessed included "the abilities to 
(1) identify and define scientific problems, (2) suggest or 
screen hypotheses, (3) select valid procedures, (4) interpret 
data and draw conclusions, (5) evaluate critically claims or 
statements made by others, and (6) reason quantitatively 
and symbolically." The greatest weight in the test was 
given to the second and fourth abilities with approximately 
one-half of the questions designated to discover these 
abilities. The subject matter fields covered included Bi- 
ology, Physics, Chemistry, Astronomy, Geology, and 
Meteorology. The test included sixty items with four 
multiple choice answers for each. We considered the test 
valuable for (1) identifying students especially advanced 
in science abilities, (2) suggesting levels of instruction, and 
(3) grouping students of similar abilities. 

Forty-four students were enrolled in the seventh grade 
and thirty-three in the eighth, and it was our intention to 
divide these students into two sections in each grade. 
Upon completion of the test, the weighted scores in the 
science and mathematics areas were arranged in rank order 
and although the composite rank of the two tests was 
used to select students near the median of the group, in 
general the two rankings were quite similar. Where there 
was significant difference, emphasis was placed on the 
score derived from the science test. 

The average school mean of forty-seven schools in grade 
seven and forty-two in grade eight used for norming pur- 
poses by the Educational Testing Service were studied for 
comparison purposes. The science norm of the school 
means was 261 for grade seven and 266 for grade eight. 
The mean for our seventh grade group was 272 and only 
ten students were below 261. When the groups were 
separated on a basis of this test, group "A" had a mean 
score of 280 and Group "B" 263. Group "A" of the 
eighth grade had a mean average of 278 compared to the 
266 norm and group "B" 268. It was interesting to note 
that even the "B" groups were above the norms. Similar 
variations were noted for mathematics and a recent com- 



Grant Science Acceleration 



xxvu 



parison of average means of California Association of 
Independent Schools in the areas of Reading and Listening 
showed our "A" groups to be highly rated. It should be 
pointed out also that the average IQ as determined by the 
Otis Group Test was 132 for the seventh "A" group and 
127 for the eighth "A". 

At the end of the first six weeks an appraisal was made 
of the performance of each student and as a result, three 
students in each grade were shifted from one section to the 
other. With the exception of one student, the shifts in- 
volved students who had scored near the median in the 
original evaluation. 



COMPARATIVE SCORES USED IN EVALUATION 



Section 


i Subject 


Mean 
Section 


Mean 
Class 


Mean 
ETS* 


Mean 
C A.I S * 


* Ran ere 














*- v *""*'*O Vrf 


7A 


Science 


280 


272 


261 




264-297 




Mathematics 


271 


260 


253 




254-287 




Reading 


291 


277 


263 


279 


270-306 




Listening 


290 


282 


273# 


286 


274-308 




I.Q. 


132 


122 






107-160 


8A 


Science 


278 


273 


266 




262-292 




Mathematics 


276 


267 


259 




269-291 




Reading 


295 


283 


268 


286 


284-305 




Listening 


286 


282 


278# 


291 


270-308 




LQ. 


127 


118 






110-145 



* Educational Testing Service 

** California Association of Independent Schools 

# Median 

It was our contention that when it had been determined 
that the student had the basic abilities for beginning the 
program, he should then be allowed and urged to proceed at 
his own ability and interest level. He also should not be 
restricted by conventional grade levels and practices but 
should be urged to progress at the fastest pace possible. 
We also believe that both the normal and the accelerated 
groups must be taught similarly in certain areas where 
there were common abilities. While increased stress was 
being placed on the two mentioned subject fields, students 
in both sections were required to complete the other school 
requirements in English, History, Foreign Language, 
Music, Shop or Art, and physical education. In the 
Francis W. Parker School, all students are required to 



xxviii Grant Science Acceleration 

study either French or Spanish beginning at the third 
grade. Latin is offered at the ninth grade level and about 
one-third of the class carries both Latin and one of the 
above two mentioned languages. 

In the seventh, eighth, and ninth grades, the course of 
study covers a survey of the main fields of science including 
the areas of astronomy, atomic energy, meteorology, 
chemistry, geology, physiology, genetics, biology, physics, 
(including heat, sound, electricity and machines), aero- 
nautics, embryology, and photography. 

TEACHING METHODS 

The teaching method used to cover these subjects varies 
with the grade and section level and while both sections of 
a grade may cover the same general subject, the detail and 
advancement of the study is dependent on the interest and 
ability level as determined by the sections. In many 
instances, individual students are far in advance of the 
remainder of the section and are studying more advanced 
work, something that is possible because of the size of the 
classes involved. Very often, students are at least two 
grade levels above the usual in subject matter content, a 
likely situation, since the section is very much above the 
normal group in ability and "I.Q." 

To stimulate and maintain interest in the science pro- 
gram, the teacher uses a variety of procedures in the class- 
room. Demonstrations before the class, with or without 
the students depending on the nature of the demonstration, 
the philosophical premise being that these age groups learn 
best by observing rather than by the lecture or through 
reading. It must be emphasized that the two latter 
methods are also used. The philosophy of the present 
teacher, Mr. Robert Taylor, is based on creating interest 
and inspiring the student to pursue fields of a scientific 
nature on his own, believing this to be of more value than 
the memorizing of subject matter or through "busy work/' 

While advanced mathematics is being taught in the 
regular mathematics class, every possible opportunity for 
coordination with science is observed. For example, ja, 
practical application was made of the formula t = 2 pi \/l/g 
by eighth and ninth grade students by setting up an experi- 
ment with pendulums. This would appear to be a rather 
complicated formula and experiment for the average stu- 



Grant Science Acceleration xxix 

dent of this grade, but the experiment was used to discover 
to what level the students were able to progress. Another 
example of the coordination was in the field of electricity 
when formulae and experiments were indicated for explain- 
ing Ohm's Law, resistances in series and parallel and trans- 
former problems and also for determining the cost of 
electricity using the Kilowatt hour formulae. 

PROJECT TYPES 

Individual projects are being carried on both at home 
and in the classroom. Two eighth grade students are 
building continuous wave oscillators and the section is 
constructing a Taylorcraft airplane on a one-fourth scale. 
A seventh grader is working at a chemistry level of at least 
high school standards. This same group will study Bi- 
ology including the dissection of frogs and in general will 
be at a stage much more advanced than usually expected 
of students of the indicated grade level. The atomic 
energy knowledge and understanding of the group would 
more than match that of most graduating high school 
students. 

It was discovered early that the regular science books 
for grades seven, eight and nine were much too elementary 
to challenge the advanced groups and had not more ad- 
vanced materials been used, the interest and enthusiasm 
for Science would have been lost and the study would have 
become a routine class procedure. 

While science has always been an integral part of the 
curriculum, the procedures indicated here have been em- 
ployed during the current year for the first time. Science 
is taught in all grades with special emphasis from the third 
grade through the ninth. The inception of the program 
has met with overwhelming approval of parents and stu- 
dents and plans are being formulated for initiating the 
same type of program in the sixth grade in the next school 
year and the following year in grade five. A complete 
rebuilding of the laboratory has been effected largely 
through a substantial donation from the Mothers' Club of 
the school. A photographic dark room has been added to 
the regular laboratory facilities. Additional equipment 
will be added during the coming months in order to meet 
the growing demands of the program. Of major impor- 
tance has been the use of the science library in stimulating 



Grant Science Acceleration 

and maintaining student interest. Considerable materials 
have been donated by major manufacturing corporations 
as well as such organizations as the San Diego Blood Bank. 
It is hoped that as progress is shown and results indicated 
that other contributions will be available. Consultants 
have been furnished by some corporations and many as- 
sembly speakers have been from the science fields. 

FUTURE PROGRAMS 

One additional feature is projected for the future. It is 
planned that an inexperienced teacher candidate may be 
employed to not only assist in the program but also to gain 
valuable class experience under the supervision of a master 
teacher. When such an addition can be made, the pro- 
gram can be broadened to include more grades and sections. 
We hope also that more scholarship funds may be available 
in order that superior students who might not otherwise 
be able to take advantage of an accelerated science program 
may have that opportunity. 

The deciding factor in any successful educational pro- 
gram is the presence of a master teacher, one who is an 
expert in his field, has a knowledge of teaching techniques, 
and above all has consuming interest in and enjoyment of 
working with children. It has been our good fortune to 
have such a person to initiate this pilot program in the 
Francis W. Parker School. 



SCIENCE AT GEORGE SCHOOL 

BY WILLIAM S. BURTON 
Chairman of the Science Dept. 

The Science Department at George School is composed 
of five men who work together as a team in the develop- 
ment of departmental aims and objectives, and take a 
broad, cultural view of science education without favoring 
one subject matter field over another. 

Using the study of the fundamental beliefs and concepts 
of science, it is the aim of the department to lead the stu- 
dent to develop an active philosophy of life based on a 
reservoir of Christian ideals which will give him the 
strength to deal with life as he finds it, and to be a con- 
tributing, constructive member of a democratic society. 
We find ourselves in opposition to those movements which 
tend to popularize science in order that we may train more 
and better scientists in competition with Russia's emphasis 
on technical education. We prefer to emphasize the need 
for scientists to raise world standards of living, and the 
opportunities for lives of service in scientific occupations. 

In order to implement this philosophy we have stated 
the following departmental objectives: 

1. To give the student the information and attitudes 
which are necessary for understanding and living in 
the world of nature. 

2. To show the place of science in the development of 
our present social order, and the responsibility for this 
development which it imposes on science and scien- 
tists. 

3. To develop an awareness of God in the universe. 

4. To acquaint the student with the scientific method, 
and to emphasize its use in the solution of problems, 
both social and scientific. 

5. To awaken and nurture possible vocational and 
avocational interests, and to give a foundation, both 
aesthetic and factual, for their further development. 

xxxi 



xxxii Burton Science at George School 

In the 9th grade, rather than giving a conventional 
course in general science which would be a mere repetition 
and expansion of previous grade school work, we are de- 
veloping a hybrid course, in cooperation with the Social 
Studies Department, which seeks to show the relation of 
science to man's social development. This course is both 
a social history of man and a survey of man's major 
achievements in science. The course is required of all 
9th grade students. 

One of the distinguishing features of George School is its 
'Sequence Curricula' in which students of similar interests 
and aptitudes are grouped together in order to foster con- 
tinuity, breadth, and depth in their classroom work during 
their last three years of secondary education. The 'NS ; 
(Natural Science) Sequence is composed of boys and girls 
who have shown a strong interest in scientific subjects, are 
capable of thinking in quantitative, mathematical terms, 
and, in general, have expressed interest in scientific voca- 
tions. This is a 'high aptitude' sequence for students 
capable of rigorous thinking, and able to handle courses 
considerably more difficult than the usual high school level 

In the 10th grade, this group takes a course in chemistry 
which seeks to give a broad, cultural appreciation for the 
structure of the physical world, emphasizing modern 
atomic theory, and the nature of chemical reactions. It 
also serves as the foundation course for 1 1th grade biology, 
and stresses the chemical nature of living organisms. 

The llth grade biology course, with its strong foundation 
laid in 10th grade chemistry, is able to attain sufficient 
depth and breadth to prepare many NS students to qualify 
for the 'Advanced Placement Program of the College 
Entrance Examination Board. Considerable emphasis is 
placed on human biology, covering genetics, heredity, 
reproduction, etc., so that the student may better under- 
stand himself. 

The 12th grade physics course is a part of the new high 
school physics program being developed by the Physical 
Science Study Committee, sponsored originally by the 
National Science Foundation, and administered by the 
Department of Sponsored Research of MIT. (The pro- 
gram is now jointly sponsored by NSF, The Pord Founda- 
tion, The Sloan Foundation, and The Fund for the Ad- 
vancement of Education.) The Chairman of the George 
School Science Department joined the PSSC in April of 



Burton Science at George School xxxiii 

1957, and has worked continuously with the committee 
since that time. 

This new physics program is entirely in keeping with the 
departmental philosophy, and builds on the 10th and llth 
grade courses in science and mathematics. It seeks (1) to 
plan a course of study in which the major developments in 
physics, up to the present time, are presented as a logical 
and integrated whole, and (2) to present physics as an 
intellectual and cultural pursuit which is part of present 
day human activity and achievement. George School is 
one of eight schools which are making use of the PSSC 
materials during a developmental year prior to an extended 
introduction of the program through NSF Institutes, and 
expected large scale adoption of the course. To date, the 
course exceeds the expectations of the PSSC. Students 
are excited by the new approach which emphasizes physical 
phenomena rather than technological application, and 
leads them, through scientific methods, to arrive at basic 
concepts of the physical universe. 

Throughout the NS Sequence science courses there is a 
continuity of thought, philosophy, and purpose. Without 
studied integration, each course builds on or for the others. 
There is a continued emphasis on laboratory work, with 
the laboratory used as a place where the student learns 
techniques of problem solution rather than going through 
a prescribed procedure of directed activity. The sequence 
of courses provides an educational experience, rich in 
breadth and depth, which has proven itself to be good 
college preparation. 

In addition to the NS Sequence courses, we also offer 
courses in Chemistry, Biology, and Physics to students in 
"Division E", the exploratory curriculum which presents 
the usual range of college preparatory work for those who 
do not enter one of the "sequences". Since these courses 
are not part of a sequence plan, each course must stand by 
itself without the benefit of foundation courses. They do 
not offer quite the same breadth or depth of experiences as 
the NS courses, but the same departmental philosophy 
governs the content, and the courses provide sound college 
preparation. (PSSC materials are used in physics.) In 
this division biology is normally a 10th grade subject, with 
chemistry in the llth grade, and physics in the 12th. 

The "General Curriculum" students are often interested 
in science and its technological applications, and we feel 



xxxiv Burton Science at George School 

that special courses in biology, chemistry, and physics for 
this group are of great importance. These courses are not 
just watered down versions of the college preparatory 
classes, but are carefully planned courses, based on selected 
materials which have proven to be of significance to the 
student who is not capable of the abstract, mathematical 
reasoning inherent in the work expected of college prepara- 
tory students. For the General Curriculum student, 
science is related to problems of everyday living, and he is 
taught to use scientific reasoning in the solution of his daily 
problems. He is also given laboratory work, but the 
activities are more definitely directed, and more practical 
in nature. He is helped to understand the everyday world 
in which he lives, and to live in it more constructively. 

We often think that the General Curriculum courses are 
the most significant part of our work. For these students 
George School is likely to be terminal education. This is 
their last opportunity for formal study of an increasingly 
complicated environment, and we are responsible, to a large 
extent, for their adjustment to it. 

By presenting science courses at three distinct levels 
George School attempts to meet the needs of all of its stu- 
dents for orientation to and understanding of the world 
and its social order which has evolved largely through our 
understanding of the forces of nature. 



EXTRACURRICULAR SCIENCE 
AT ANDOVER 

BY JOHN WARD KIMBALL 

Physics Dept. 
Phillips Andover Academy 

The recent focus on science education in this country has 
resulted in a good deal of self-examination on the part of 
the secondary schools. Andover, too, has felt the need to 
reassess both the form and content of her science offerings. 
Each of the various science courses is being re-examined, 
and where deficiencies are noted, plans are being drawn to 
eliminate them. New courses have been created to satisfy 
the needs of students unusually talented in science and to 
exploit the gradual merging of what have been, in the past, 
separate disciplines. 

Recognizing that a student's activities outside the 
classroom may have an equally important effect upon his 
overall development, we have also reappraised the extra- 
curricular program with special emphasis on the many 
science-oriented activities. Most of the students, but by no 
means all, choose to carry on their projects and experi- 
ments as members of one or another of the several sci- 
ence clubs which exist at the school. Each of these clubs 
is under the supervision of a faculty sponsor. In some 
cases, the success of the group hinges almost completely 
on the enthusiasm and efforts of this faculty sponsor. 
In other cases, the club may thrive under the sole direc- 
tion of its student officers, the sponsor only serving in 
an advisory capacity. 

One of the most active school organizations in the past 
decade has been the Astronomy Club. Starting with a 
dismantled, six-inch refracting telescope, which had lain 
unused for years in the basement of the Science Building, 
the members have developed an observatory that they can 
well be proud of. The observatory building was designed 
by the students, and a large portion of the land clearing, 
excavating, masonry work, and carpentry, was performed 
by them. The refractor, with its complex clock drive, was 

XXXV 



xxxm Kimball Extracurricular Science 

gradually assembled and mounted in position, an exacting 
and time-consuming task. In addition to visual observa- 
tion, photographic records can now be made as a result of 
later additions and modifications to the equipment. 

The members have also built a reflecting telescope to 
increase the flexibility and scope of their program of obser- 
vations. With two instruments, they are able to provide 
increased viewing time for the twenty to thirty boys who 
regularly gather at the observatory on Saturday evenings. 
Unfortunately, the mounting for the reflecting telescope 
is out-of-doors, necessitating the assembly and disassembly 
of the telescope each time it is used. 

In addition to their program of observations whenever 
sky conditions are satisfactory, these young astronomers 
meet weekly to exchange information and to plan their 
activities. Usually one of the members is expected to 
address the group on these occasions on some topic of 
astronomical interest. From time to time, guest speakers, 
including Harvard's Dr. Harlow Shapley, have come to 
Andover to address them. The members have also visited 
the Harvard observatories in the past. 

Twice a year, the members of the Astronomy Club spon- 
sor a special program to interest first-year students. A 
tour of the club's facilities, observations through the tele- 
scopes, and talks on the stars are included. This provides 
a successful means of introducing new students to the ac- 
tivities of the club and of keeping the roster of enthusiastic 
members well-filled. 

Boys interested in natural history have long received 
encouragement and assistance from the school Since 
1933, the students have operated an active bird-banding 
program, banding approximately seven hundred aong birds 
each season to aid the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Hervieejn 
their study of the distribution of the bird population . The 
school has supported this activity by providing traps, 
food, and headquarters. Although under nominal faculty 
supervision, the program has, in actual practice, been 
organized and operated exclusively by the students. 

Bird study, arid nature study in general, is greatly facili- 
tated at Andover by the close proximity to the campus 
of the Moncrieff Cochran Sanctuary. This tract of law! 
of over one-hundred acres was set aside in 1929 for the 
preservation of birds, wild flowers, trees and shrubs as a 
* 'natural history laboratory of abiding interest to boys/* 



Kimball Extracurricular Science xxxvii 

Thanks to the generosity of Mr. Thomas Cochran ; it was 
quickly developed into an area of rare beauty. An elabo- 
rate program of raising and releasing ducks, geese, quail, 
pheasant and partridge was instituted. Feeding areas 
were established throughout the Sanctuary for attracting 
all types of bird life. A small zoo was created, and also a 
nursery was established to supply evergreens, rhododen- 
drons, azaleas, laurel, and other shrubs, both native and 
exotic, for planting in the Sanctuary. 

With changing economic conditions, many of the early 
activities had to be curtailed. However, feeding of the 
wild life continues, as does the operation of the nursery. 
The students have recently aided in the establishment of 
a fern walk, which already boasts thirty-five to forty 
species, a large percentage of those capable of living in 
this part of the country. At the present time, a de- 
termined effort is being made to secure additional funds to 
expand the activities in the Sanctuary so that it can play a 
still larger role in our curricular and extracurricular plan, 

Our youthful students of natural history have other 
outlets for their energies and interests. Several times a 
term, day trips are sponsored under faculty supervision to 
enable the boys to explore other locations in this region 
notable for their wildlife. Marshes, tidal flats, rivers, and 
the Atlantic coast, all yield myriads of examples of plant 
and animal life for the young ornithologist, ecologist, or 
marine zoologist. Other trips are scheduled to visit mu- 
seums, laboratories, and plant experiment stations. 

Those students whose chosen line of scientific study and 
investigation is not shared with a large group are never- 
theless encouraged and supported in their efforts. The 
Science Experimenters Club serves as a clearing house for 
information for the many students working independently 
on scientific project work. The members meet together 
at dinner about twice a term to exchange information on 
progress. Younger members are given assistance, if 
necessary, in setting up a project which is in their field of 
interest and also practical, considering limitations of 
equipment and experience. The club regularly makes 
small grants to various members for the purchase of equip- 
ment or supplies which the science departments do not 
possess and which the individual experimenter might find 
prohibitively expensive. From time to time, -members 
of the faculty or outside scientists are invited to address 



xxxviii Kimball Extracurricular Science 

the group on some scientific topic. Occasionally, movies 
of unusual scientific interest are shown. 

Through the years, the different activities and projects 
have been as varied as science itself. In the field of chem- 
istry, students have done significant work on ion-exchange 
resins, synthetic rubbers, organic and inorganic syntheses, 
studies of particle size and colloids, and the properties and 
synthesis of a variety of plastics. 

In the field of biology, projects in recent years have 
encompassed an extraordinary variety of activities, such 
as the classification and mounting of insect collections 
made both in this country and abroad, an intensive study 
of the hormone of insects which controls metamorphosis, 
and an investigation of the infective agent in certain reptile 
diseases coupled with a determination of the proper anti- 
biotic therapy for these diseases. At the present time, 
several members of the club are collaborating on a study 
of genetic recombination in bacteria. Others have volun- 
teered to try out a large number of new experiments in 
biology for possible inclusion in the regular curriculum 
here at Andover as well as at other secondary schools 
across the country. These experiments, with a definite 
emphasis on the physiological approach to plants and ani- 
mals, were created this past summer by a group of secon- 
dary school and college biology teachers assembled at 
Michigan State University. Many of the experiments have 
not yet been tried under actual laboratory or field condi- 
tions, and so, in a sense, these boys are treading new ground 
and perhaps making a real contribution to secondary 
science education in general, as well as to their own intellec- 
tual development. 

In physics, the opportunities for creative work are some- 
what more limited for boys at the secondary school level of 
achievement. Nevertheless, each year finds one or more 
students engaged in such activities as examining the effects 
of electrostatic and magnetic fields on cathode rays, or 
measuring the wave lengths of light emitted from incan- 
descent gases. In those cases where the experimenter is 
enrolled at the time in one of the physics courses, he may 
be permitted to substitute his individual project work for 
a certain number of the regular laboratory exercises. This 
procedure is not only reasonably sound pedagogy but is 
also expedient in view of the serious overcrowding which 
now occurs in the physics laboratory and shop. The 



Kimball Extracurricular Science xxxix 

demands of increased enrollment have made it extremely 
difficult to locate space for the youthful experimenter to 
set up apparatus and leave it assembled between periods 
of operation. Precisely the same difficulty occurs in the 
biology and chemistry laboratories where every available 
bit of locker and counter space is now pre-empted, at least 
during the major portion of the week, by the regularly 
scheduled courses. 

One field of physics consistently explored by student ex- 
perimenters is electronics. This field is so large, its oppor- 
tunities so varied, that there never seems to be a lack of 
suitable projects for every level of ability and interest. 
Most of the twenty to thirty students anxious to work in 
this field join the radio club, which enables them to use 
this organization's facilities. These include an electronics 
workshop in the basement of the science building, which is 
stocked with tools, supplies, and test equipment. Here are 
produced radio receivers, high-fidelity components, inter- 
communication equipment, and other electronic gadgets of 
every size and description. Notable among the current 
projects are a radio telescope for detecting radio emissions 
from outer space, a wireless teletypewriter system, and a 
computer mechanism designed to control a robot. The 
latter created a great deal of interest while displayed re- 
cently at a regional science fair. 

In addition to the electronics workshop, the radio club 
operates WlSW, one of the early "ham" radio stations in 
this region, which is housed in a building located near the 
astronomy observatory. Except for the war years, the 
station has operated regularly since the early twenties. 
The present equipment includes a transmitter for voice 
and code transmission, which will soon boast five hundred 
watts of radiated power. With this instrument, the fully- 
licensed operators are able to establish contact with any 
spot in the world. There is also a low-powered transmitter 
in the shack for use by boys who have secured only a novice 
license. Each year from four to eight boys are qualified 
to use one or the other of the transmitters, and they give 
up many Saturday evening motion picture shows for the 
privilege and fun of doing so. 

To keep a supply of new blood coming into the club, 
older members sponsor code classes, which meet two or 
three times a week during the school year. During these 
sessions, the boys listen to an experienced member "send" 



xl Kimball Extracurricular Science 

international Morse code with a telegraph key and sounder, 
and then try to duplicate the signals. In this way they 
gradually gain competence in understanding and transmit- 
ting code messages. Activity in this line is particularly 
intense during the fall term, as the younger members strive 
to achieve the level of proficiency ^ necessary for them to 
gain a novice license at Christmastime. 

In addition to a minimum level of skill with the Morse 
code, the boys hoping to gain novice "ham" licenses must 
present a basic knowledge of electronics and radio theory. 
Thanks to the efforts of the club's sponsor, this need is 
filled by theory alasses, which meet weekly throughout the 
year. These classes not only serve to prepare boys for the 
license examinations but also give other interested mem- 
bers a better understanding of the principles underlying 
the operation of the equipment which they may be con- 
structing or using. . 

Even the automotive mechanics club, which has flour- 
ished at Phillips Academy for over a decade, gives its 
members a chance to come to grips with some of the prob- 
lems inherent in scientific exploration. One of its chief 
activities centers around a dynamometer, a gift to the 
school, with which the members try to measure the per- 
formance of one or another of the several engines in their 
possession. The difficulties involved in properly assessing; 
the effect of one variable at a time, such as carburetor 
adjustment, timing, etc., while all other factors are held 
constant, may well teach them more about controlled 
experimentation than long discussions in the classroom. 
This small group of boys, with their tiny automotive shop, 
also performs a valuable service for the school in keeping 
the outboard motors of the crew launches in top condition. 

As part of our effort to nurture scientific talent whenever 
it appears, we have consistently encouraged gifted studente 
to enter science competitions held outside the school. 
Four of these have achieved nation-wide honors in the 
annual Westinghouse Science Talent Search, the most 
recent winner occurring in the present year. In addition 
to passing a rigorous science aptitude examination, the 
students also have had to submit reports on a well-con- 
ceived and mature scientific project carried out in^ their 
spare time, These projects have varied from studies^ on 
antibacterial agents to original work in the mathematical 
field of topology. Other students have successfully 



Kimball Extracurricular Science xli 

entered nearby science fairs with the fruits of their long 
hours of extracurricular effort in science. One of these 
recently received high praise from examining officials at 
the Army's Redstone Arsenal for his ingenuity in designing 
and building a six-foot, liquid-fueled rocket. 

What then are the strengths and weaknesses of these 
many diverse activities? On the positive side, we hope 
that participation in them creates a more manure under- 
standing in our students of the essential nature of the 
scientific process. Unavoidably, our classroom work in 
science must revolve about the accumulated facts and 
achievements in science. By active participation in 
project work, however, the young experimenter may well 
get a glimpse of the techniques needed to elucidate these 
facts, and even some of the many hazards to be overcome 
before the goal is reached. The difficulties in controlling 
variables not under investigation, the inherent limitations 
of measuring devices, and the limitations imposed by avail- 
able apparatus are some of the many factors of which one 
quickly becomes aware when experimental work in science 
is undertaken. An acquaintance with these factors is a 
very important part of education in science. 

On the negative side, an increase in school population 
has strained our science facilities to the point where it is 
now simply impossible to provide adequate accommoda- 
tions for the ever-increasing number of boys anxious to do 
project work. However, plans are already being made to 
enlarge our science facilities so that once again we can 
enable our students to pursue their scientific interests as 
far as their talents and energy permit. 

Naturally, we are proud whenever one of our students 
goes on to join the distinguished group of Andover alumni 
working in science, but our primary mission is not the pro- 
duction of potential scientists and engineers. We feel, 
rather, that instruction in the materials and methods of 
science constitutes one vital segment of a truly liberal 
education, and that it is a liberal education which will 
enable tomorrow's leaders to act with wisdom and balance 
in whatever capacity they may find themselves. Our task 
is to start young men on this road. 



INTEGRATION IN THE TEACHING 
OF PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY 

BY JOHN C. HOGG 

Chairman, Dept. of Science 
The Phillips Exeter Academy 

Educators are being asked to respond to two persistent 
clarion calls (1) to discover gifted students at an early age 
and (2) to place more emphasis on the teaching of science. 
The two calls are not necessarily unrelated. The rapid 
growth of the integrated course in Exeter reflects its popu- 
larity among the student body. It attracts able students 
into the sciences 7 stimulates them when they get there, 
and holds a high proportion of them for three years. 

It is now twenty years since the integrated physics- 
chemistry course was introduced into the Exeter curricu- 
lum. The development of this course and the steady in- 
crease in its enrollment are probably worth recording, 
particularly as the new emphasis on science teaching 
inevitably raises problems similar to those encountered in 
Exeter when this program was launched. 

Twenty years ago, as now, seventeen credits were re- 
quired for a diploma. These included four years of 
English, three years of mathematics, two years of Latin, 
two years of a modern language, a third year of either 
Latin or a modern language, and one year of history. 
That is to say, thirteen of the seventeen units were rigid 
requirements. The remaining four could include ad- 
vanced English, advanced mathematics, advanced lan- 
guage, additional history, or science. This tight schedule 
left little opportunity for experimenting in the teaching of 
science. 

To ease this situation the faculty voted, in 1936, to 
"release" twelve to fifteen selected boys a year from the 
second year Latin requirement to enable them to embark 
on a two-year science course. This decision also opened up 
the possibility of a third year of advanced work in science 
for these boys. The immediate problem was to devise a 
suitable course (a two-year sequence) beginning in the 
10th grade that would lead to advanced work in the 12th 
grade. The usual one-year courses in physics and chem- 

xlii 



Hogg Physics-Chemistry Integration xliii 

istry (the so-called College Board courses) were already 
offered. But these for obvious reasons were unsuitable 
the physics course assumed more mathematics than was 
offered in the 10th grade; the chemistry course included 
many concepts which, unless bolstered by physics, would 
be largely unintelligible at this early stage. The obvious 
compromise was to draw up a syllabus which included both 
physics and chemistry, but planned in such a way that the 
physics would not get beyond the range of the advancing 
mathematics, and the chemistry would derive the maxi- 
mum benefit from the physics. Thus a physics-chemistry 
course (a two-year sequence) was established. 

One of the disturbing things about teaching elementary 
chemistry (as opposed to the teaching of elementary 
physics) is the large amount of factual material that must 
be dispensed at the outset. There is far too little oppor- 
tunity for intellectual exploration. An alert young stu- 
dent may and does ask many questions that must go un- 
answered because of deficient background. If he is 
familiar with the phenomenon of vapor pressure some of 
his questions can be explored even at an early stage, 
questions such as: Why does the solubility of a gas decrease 
as the temperature rises? Why do some hydrates lose 
water vapor and some anhydrous salts pick up water vapor 
under similar conditions? Why does a dissolved substance 
raise the boiling point but lower the freezing point of a 
solution? 

Suppose the student asks (as he does) such questions as: 
Why does zinc react with dilute sulfuric acid? Why must 
the acid be dilute? Why is carbon dioxide a gas and com- 
mon salt a solid at ordinary temperatures? The only 
possible reply is to assure the student that the questions 
will be answered later in the year when the background has 
been supplied. 

Lack of background is the bane of chemistry teaching, 
especially to a beginner. The student is probably excited 
by the wide variety of phenomena he observes but he is 
rarely intellectually stimulated. He is required to learn 
too much by rote and he is not encouraged (indeed, he 
cannot be) to ask How? or Why? 

In the second year of the combined course real inte- 
gration of physics and chemistry can be accomplished. 
The first "item" in the second year program is electricity, 
and after electricity the chemistry part of the syllabus is 



xhv Hogg Physics-Chemistry Integration 

completed. With a background of electricity, ionic 
chemistry is meaningful and, on the other hand, with an 
ionic background the chemical effects of a current (usually 
treated inadequately and inaccurately in elementary 
physics texts) can be presented in a comprehensive man- 
ner. 

Still another integration area is the new field of atomic 
energy. Chemistry students have a knowledge of isotopes 
and of the make-up of the nuclei of atoms. But the mass- 
energy relation means very little to the young chemist, 
To understand the meaning of packing effect and mass 
loss, a background of work and energy is needed. More- 
over, the E of the familiar Einstein equation is measured 
in ergs, an energy unit not usually mentioned in an ele- 
mentary chemistry course. In the combined course, 
however, ergs and Wen electron-volts have meaning, and 
the mass energy relationship in nuclear reactions makes 
sense. 

In 1939 the Exeter diploma requirements were radically 
changed. The Latin requirement was . dropped and, 
among other things, all students were required to take five 
major courses in the 10th grade. One of the immediate 
effects of this change was a marked increase in the enroll- 
ment of the combined physics-chemistry course, and a 
corresponding decrease in the separate courses of physics 
and chemistry. Through the years the increased enroll- 
ment in the combined course has been maintained and new 
instructors have been needed. Today eight of our ten 
science instructors are engaged in teaching the new course, 
some in part, others in toto. 

The figures show that the total enrollment in the com- 
bined course today is considerably higher than in the 
separate courses of twenty years ago (and this in spite of 
the drain to the biological science courses not offered 
twenty years ago). They also reveal that ten times as 
many students are enrolled in the combined course as in 
the separate courses of physics and chemistry. How can 
we account for this striking shift in emphasis? 

During the years 1940-1950 the numbers in the com- 
bined and separate courses were comparable. Common 
objective tests were devised to enable us to compare 
achievement in the different groups. The tests were taken 
by all students in the combined course, and also by the 
physics or chemistry students after they had covered the 



Hogg Physics-Chemistry Integration x/v 

corresponding parts of the syllabus. The results of the 
tests given over a number of years showed the "combined" 
students to be markedly superior although they were in 
general a year younger than students in the separate 
sciences. Similar differences were observed in the results 
of the CEEB examinations in physics and chemistry. 
That is to say, students who had taken the combined 
course had, in general, a higher ranking than those who 
had not. 

The statistical evidence of these examinations simply 
confirmed the impressions of instructors familiar with the 
two approaches. Is it possible to be specific and to isolate 
the favorable factors in the combined course? Here we 
are on debatable ground but there is general agreement 
that the following four items are contributing causes: 

(1) The sciences of physics and chemistry are inter- 
dependent, chemistry showing the greater degree of de- 
pendence. A student with a background of both sciences 
instinctively uses one to assist the other. That is to say, 
one science is enriched by the other. 

(2) The combined course is graded in difficulty. It is 
far more flexible than the separate courses. The mathe- 
matics, for example, can be steadily stepped up through 
a two-year period. In other words, the combined course 
is easier than the separate courses. 

(3) There is constant cross fertilization in the combined 
course. This is inevitable when the instructor teaches 
both sciences. For example, heat of neutralization is 
measured in calories or B.t.u.'s; an ammeter can be cali- 
brated by an electrochemical cell ; $n absorption spectrum 
is associated with quanta and energy levels in the atom. 
CKOSS fertilization produces a more mature student. 

(4) The combined course is more interesting to teach 
than the separate courses. There is more variety in class- 
room teaching and demonstrations, and also in the labora- 
tory work. And presumably if it is more interesting to 
teach, it is the more stimulating approach for the student. 

There is yet a more potent reason for urging the com- 
bined course it makes possible the teaching of advanced 
science courses in school. If both elementary physics and 
chemistry are required for admission to an advanced course 
of physics or chemistry (and this is a reasonable pre- 
requisite) it is inevitable that the serious study of science 
begin in the l()th grade. 



xlvi Hogg Physics-Chemistry Integration 

In Exeter roughly 75 percent of the "combined" students 
take the course in grades ten and eleven; 25 percent take 
it in grades eleven and twelve. Of those who finish in 
grade eleven, a relatively large number (thirty or so) wish 
to pursue the subject further. Here then is a group of 
able boys, interested in science, and prepared for advanced 
work; they constitute a potential source of future scientists. 
Should a school offer advanced courses in physics and 
chemistry, even at the risk of early specialization? We 
believe that a school has an obligation to its gifted students 
and that they should be stretched intellectually to the 
limit of their capacity. Boys in these advanced courses 
take the advanced placement examinations. They are 
usually dealt with sympathetically by the colleges and 
placed in courses consonant with their ability and achieve- 
ment. 

Those of us who have taught the combined course are 
convinced that this approach is sound pedagogy. But it is 
far more than this. The combined approach may be one 
way of solving the national problem of greater emphasis 
on the teaching of science in high schools. 



SCIENCE PROJECTS AT MILLBROOK 

BY EDWARD PULLING 
The Millbrook School 

I have been asked by Mr. Sargent to describe some of the 
special projects connected with the study of science at 
Millbrook School. This I am glad to do in the hope that 
they may be of interest to the readers of "The Handbook of 
Private Schools." 

First, let me explain that all the projects I shall mention 
stem directly from the imaginative teaching and contagious 
enthusiasm of three members of our faculty: Frank W. 
Trevor (the head of our science department) in the field of 
natural science, Neale E. Howard in the physical sciences, 
and the late Xavier Prum in physics. We are deeply 
indebted to them for whatever of significance has been 
accomplished at Millbrook in the teaching of science. 

Second, I should like to make clear that all the projects 
have grown out of and are closely related to the regular 
courses in the science curriculum : 

Biology a required subject in the ninth or tenth grades 
Advanced Biology-^ open to boys in the tenth or 

eleventh grades who have shown unusual ability or 

interest in the regular biology course 
Chemistry! elective courses in the eleventh and 
Physics / twelfth grades; considered essential for 
prospective science majors in college 

Senior Science designed for students in the two upper 
years who wish to approach science from a wider 
standpoint than is possible in the fields of chemistry 
or physics. It includes the study of astronomy, 
meteorology and navigation. 

Third, before referring specifically to the Millbrook 
science projects which may be somewhat unique, I want 
to summarize the objectives of all our science teaching, 
which I assume are similar to those of other secondary 
schools ; 



xlviii Pulling Science Projects 

(a) to help students acquire the habit of careful reason- 
ing based on actual observation and experimen- 
tation, 

(b) to give them an appreciation of the wonders of the 
physical and living world, 

(c) to introduce them to some of the scientific concepts 
upon which so much modern thought is based, 

(d) to interest students with scientific aptitude in science 
as a vocation and to provide them with the elemen- 
tary training necessary for more advanced work in 
college. 

Now as to the projects themselves, which supplement 
and vitalize the regular classroom and laborator} T work. 

OPERATION MOONWATCH 

A project that seems to have special current interest and 
significance is our participation in "Operation Moon- 
watch," the observation of satellites during the Inter- 
national Geophysical Year. 

In recent years many boys have developed a keen in- 
terest in astronomy. This resulted at first in the grinding 
and polishing of small telescopic mirrors and subsequently 
in the construction of a 12^ inch reflector of high mag- 
nifying and resolving power. Originally this was used in a 
temporary wooden telescope; now it is housed in a regular 
observatory built entirely by the boys under Mr. Howard's 
direction. It has cinder block walls, a cement floor arid a 
converted aluminum silo top as a dome. The telescope is 
driven, to follow the stars, by a one-twentieth horsepower 
motor which originally was used to open and close the 
drafts on a furnace. The gear system was worked out in 
the physics class. Recently the observatory's equipment 
has been augmented by the valuable gift of five "Qxmester" 
telescopes from the Research Corporation. When "Opera- 
tion Moonwatch" started, the Millbrook Observatory wafi 
designated by the Government as an observer station for 
this area. A specially trained group of boys semis reports 
direct to the Smithsonian Observatory in Cambridge, 
Mass. Preparation for carrying out this important assign- 
ment necessitated the building- by the boys of eight 
small portable telescopes from parts of binoculars. Each 
is mounted over a mirror set on the top of a camera tripod. 



Pulling Science Projects xlix 

The dramatic advent of "Sputnik" electrified our team 
into action. After many hours of rigorous training and 
patient observation they were rewarded by repeated views 
of the satellite and subsequently by seeing their findings 
included in the recently published official report of the 
Smithsonian Institute. I think the value of this experience 
in scientific training for the Moonwatch team will not need 
explaining. 

There are two other projects being carried out for the 
Government. 

METEOROLOGY 

One is in the field of meteorology, a science of rapidly 
growing importance in the new air and missile age. To 
stimulate an interest in this subject a U. S. weather station 
was founded at Millbrook some years ago by the physics 
department. The School's meteorologists take observa- 
tions twice daily and make reports to the following 
agencies : 

(1) Temperature and precipitation data to the U. S. 
Weather Bureau a,t Albany; 

(2) Special flood condition reports to the U. S. Weather 
Station at Bradley Field, Conn., which operates a 
flood control warning system; 

(3) Temperature and precipitation reports to the Agri- 
cultural Research Section of the Department of 
Agriculture; 

(4) Weekly weather records to the local paper (Mill- 
brook Round Table) . 

In addition, the meteorology group is cooperating with 
the Agricultural Research Section of the Department of 
Agriculture in measuring the rainfall run-off in our water- 
shed. The A. R. S. has built a special spillway on the dam 
of our pond for this purpose and provided the School with 
the necessary measuring instruments. 

Many other instruments used by our "weather bureau" 
have been loaned us by the Government, but others are 
part of the physics department's equipment, such as the 
barograph, a thermograph, and three-cup anemometer and 
a weather vane with electrically operated dials. 

Occasionally our meteorologists' records are of value not 
only to the U. S. Weather Bureau but to the School and 
to neighbors as well. A few years ago, for instance, the 



/ Pulling Science Projects 

data on "degree-days" proved very useful to the engineers 
who designed the heating system for a new dormitory. At 
another time a neighbor needed evidence of unusually 
heavy rainfall in connection with a lawsuit about farm land. 
The Millbrook weathermen produced their records, which 
were accepted without question as evidence. 

BIRD BANDING 

The third project carried out for the Government is the 
bird banding station, which operates under the auspices 
of the Fish and Wildlife Service of the Department of the 
Interior in Washington. An average of nine boys share 
the responsibility for this project. Usually they work in 
pairs, opening the traps in the morning, weather per- 
mitting, and closing them in the late afternoon when birds 
caught during the day are banded. Records are entered 
on an individual card for each bird and transcripts are 
forwarded to the Fish and Wildlife Service, which acts as 
a clearing house and notifies each banding station when 
any of the birds banded by it are trapped elsewhere. 

Among the problems bird banders help to solve, those 
dealing with the distribution and migration of North 
American birds are of primary importance. In addition, 
individual boys specialize in investigations about dispersal, 
ecological preferences, family groups, bird personality, etc. 
As reports of banded birds caught elsewhere are received 
and as station records are checked for the same birds 
trapped in successive seasons, the bird bander soon gets 
the feeling that he is an effective factor in a nation-wide 
organization. Occasionally there is the thrill of an unusual 
record as that established by a snow bunting banded here 
one January and recovered three months later on board 
a British convoy vessel beyond Iceland. The Millbrook 
bird banders take a vicarious pride in the achievement of 
this snow bunting because it furnished one of the rare case 
histories to substantiate the theory that our American 
snow buntings migrate to Scandinavia to breed, 

THE Zoo 

The oldest and most important of all the science projects 
is the Zoo. From the moment that Mr. Trevor arrived to 
teach biology here twenty-one years ago fresh out of Cor- 



Pulling Science Projects li 

nell in an old station wagon overflowing with an assortment 
of wild animal pets, it was a sure thing that a Millbrook 
zoo was in prospect. In fact, it was only a matter of weeks 
before the nature study enthusiasts had stripped to the 
waist and were hard at work on the foundation of their 
first building. The original zoo has been a center of amaz- 
ing interest and activity through the years. The personnel 
of mammals, birds, reptiles and tropical fish changes, but 
the enthusiasm of the boys who care for them continues. 
Aside from the importance of the Zoo for purposes of 
scientific observation, taking care of pets is in itself a 
valuable experience in a boy's life. Few other activities 
provide a better definition of responsibility or demand 
more patient and consistent effort. 

The next building to be constructed 'over at the Zoo' by 
Mr. Trevor's cohorts was the greenhouse. This makes 
possible plant experiments and observation during the 
winter. It also provides tables in the School dining room 
with a constant supply of flowering plants. 

More recently the boys have been at work on the 'Bird 
House/ where the School's extensive collection of orni- 
thological specimens is to be displayed in 'habitat' groups. 
The area around these buildings is gradually being con- 
verted into a wild life sanctuary and botanical preserve. 
The important thing to note about this whole project is 
that all the buildings were actually constructed and are 
operated by the boys themselves. 

It is not surprising that after studying natural science 
in this manner a number of Millbrook alumni have chosen 
a career in medicine, research, conservation or animal 
husbandry; or that a much larger group have retained a 
keen avocational interest in some aspect of the subject. 

In conclusion, I think it should be mentioned that all 
these science projects as well as various projects con- 
nected with other departments are carried out as part 
of our Community Service Plan, in which every boy, every 
year, is entrusted by the Student Council with actual 
responsibility for the functioning of some School activity. 
Serving on the Zoo Committee or the Bird Banding Squad 
or as a Meteorologist or as a "Moonwatcher" not only 
involves shouldering responsibility for the good of the 
school community but also, in many cases, stimulates his 
enthusiasm for the study of science as a profession or as 
a hobby. 



A HUMANITIES COURSE 

BY JOSEPH E. BROWN 
Verde Valley School 

In 1957 the Verde Valley School enlarged its curriculum 
to include a new course which, through the classroom, 
should help to bring into the lives of the students those 
values and principles upon which this school has been 
founded. This new course, called Humanities, is offered 
for college credit, and is compulsory for entering Freshmen 
and for new 10th graders. 

In accord with the philosophy of the Verde Valley 
School, the main goal of this course is to assist in developing 
within the student an understanding of, and appreciation 
for, the fundamental principles underlying the cultures and 
civilizations of the world, past and present. It is felt that 
today, in our world of growing tensions and crises, it is 
imperative for the establishing of a truly united world, that 
there be awakened within our youth the realization that 
they are all citizens of a world community, and that as such 
they have the responsibility to understand their neighbor. 
This understanding should reach deep into fundamentals, 
for here underlying the surface differences, there is very 
often found a common ground or Essence, which is always 
the greatest force for uniting peoples. As the student 
begins to recognize this unifying force operating outside of 
himself, so it is hoped that he will be stimulated to search 
out this Power within himself, and thus will find his true 
Self. 

To work towards the achievement of these goals the 
course is organized in the following manner. The first unit 
of work is devoted to areas of a theoretical nature. The 
concept of race, for example, is studied, and it is shown why 
it is unscientific to think of race in terms of superiority or 
inferiority. Concepts such as primitive culture vs. civil- 
ization are also discussed and debated in class. These 
theoretical concepts are later applied to a survey of the 
aboriginal cultural areas of the Americas, and these studies 
are so timed that they help to orientate the student for the 

in 



Brown A Humanities Course liii 

annual eight day field trip which the school takes to the 
Indian reservations of the Southwest. In thus extending 
class work into the field, what was once possibly only 
theoretically understood, can now be actually integrated 
within the student, to become a real and living experience. 
In similar manner the Indian, Colonial, and contemporary 
cultures of Mexico are studied in class prior to a three week 
field trip into that country. 

In the second semester the^ cultural areas of Africa are 
studied, and some attention here is given to contemporary 
problems which have arisen from the impact between two 
cultures manifesting very different values. In our studies 
of the Near East much attention is given to the Islamic 
religion, and to the great accomplishments and develop- 
ments which this religion is responsible for throughout very 
large areas. Later in the year Hinduism is studied in 
relation to its cultural forms in India, and also Buddhism is 
examined, especially in the form as it now exists in Tibet. 
Toward the end of the year Confucianism and Taoism are 
studied in relation to China, and Shinto and Zen Buddhism 
are discussed in relation to the people and life of Japan. 

Although much emphasis is placed on the study of 
religion within cultures, nevertheless this is not presented 
as is so often done in courses in comparative religions, 
where all too often the goal is to show the superiority of one 
particular form over another. Rather it is believed that 
the material should be presented as objectively as possible, 
as if the teacher actually belongs to whatever culture he 
happens to be discussing, and the student is then free to 
draw his own conclusions. 

In order to enrich the learning experience, and to en- 
courage an appreciation within the student for the people 
or culture under discussion, the course makes much use of 
slides, films, film strips, recordings of music, and actual 
artifacts. It is felt that the student is able to have a more 
intimate contact with the idea or subject under discussion, 
when he is able to have before him a concrete form which 
reflects the abstract idea. Wherever possible visiting 
speakers from the particular culture under discussion are 
invited to lecture, or lead an informal discussion with the 
class. Thus the students have had contact with American 
Indian priests of several tribes, Hindus from India, Mus- 
lims from the Near East, Taoists from China, and a Budd- 
hist once came from Korea. It is our feeling that these 



liv Brown A Humanities Course 

personal contacts are of the greatest importance, and it has 
been noted that they immediately stimulate the interest 
of the student. 

For the purposes of this course it is also felt that the 
teacher should have the broadest possible traveling ex- 
periences, so that when he talks of the life or thought of a 
foreign people, he is able to bring them to life, and thus 
stimulate the appreciation and understanding of the stu- 
dent, because he has had this first hand contact. 

This course is still young, and it is thus possibly too early 
to state how positive the results have been. One thing 
does seem to be very clear, however, and that is that a 
course of this type, for students at this open and flexible 
age, may very well bear more fruit, and contribute more 
towards the development of a responsible and intelligent 
world citizen, than if the course were given later during 
his college years when opinions are already well fixed. 

In our world today of great scientific developments, it is 
felt that a course of this type is of the greatest importance, 
in that it stresses those values and qualities by which 
peoples have lived, and recognizes the dignity and worth 
of the human individual. Thus a more balanced point of 
view may very well be developed, and the individual may 
become a more complete person. 



INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS AND 
INDEPENDENCE 

BY CHARLES MERRILL 
The Commonwealth School 

Two years ago, when working in Paris, I attended a con- 
vention of French teachers discussing the problems of 
adult education. At this convention there also spoke two 
Russian students, in fact, just about the only two Soviet 
students in the whole of Western Europe. One was an 
elegant young man, Princetonian in appearance and man- 
ner, Anatoli Bessarabov, from the University of Odessa. 
The other, more like a member of the University of Mis- 
souri, came from Moscow. Now early 1956 was a period 
of greater hope than early 1958, and our French hosts at 
the opening lunch rather self-consciously placed the three 
of us at the same table, where we became acquainted over 
a laborious conversation about Russian and American 
literature. In the course of the convention, which took 
place out near Versailles, I had the chance to chauffeur 
both of them back to the city, and Bessarabov mentioned 
how unusual it was for Russians and Americans to be able 
to exchange ideas together and that probably this could 
take place only in Paris. Going on from here, I invited 
them both to have lunch at my house and to meet my 
family. 

At this lunch we discussed impressions of both American 
and Russian students at the Sorbonne. The surprising 
conclusion was how similar were both our reactions in the 
face of the lonely, isolated, almost atomized lives of stu- 
dents at a French university. We were trying then to find 
more points in common than of difference and were willing 
to share a certain terminology without going too deeply 
into the meanings behind the words. Therefore, it seemed 
possible to say that the student at the University of Odessa, 
as well as at the University of Missouri, led a more demo- 
cratic life than the students of Paris, if one interpreted 
democracy by the narrow but not unreasonable definition 
of a system that aimed to satisfy the people's needs or the 

k 



hi Merrill Schools and Independence 

people's will, even if the people's will was not necessarily 
carried out by the people themselves. At least in the 
group life that linked the individual to the university, in 
the sense of common purpose between what one studied in 
the classroom and what one hoped to do outside, there ap- 
peared a similarity of approach between Russians and 
Americans missing at the Sorbonne. 

Now this discussion of RussoAmeriean democracy was 
obviously questionable even if at that time its real purpose 
was to build up human contact with those two young men 
I never would have met any place else. My lack of real 
success became obvious when I tried to sketch in the 
differences between what one would call popular democracy 
as opposed to liberal. The liberal belief that government 
exists not merely to serve the people's will but to express 
the feelings of individuals who may interpret in their own 
way or even, within certain limits, deny the popular will, 
was an idea that made no sense at all or seemed simply 
rationalization of anarchic selfishness. My effort to 
describe the American system of parochial and independ- 
ent education combined with state education as an expres- 
sion of democracy was like praising the use of cobwebs to 
stop bleeding. 

For the French themselves, our educational system is 
confusing enough, so much more and so much less demo- 
cratic than their own. It is not true that the French 
Minister of Education can look at his calendar and toll 
exactly which theorem every fourteen year old geo- 
metrician in France is studying on that day, but it is 
almost true. The freedom of a local school board to hire 
its own director, pass on the choice of textbooks, or decide 
whether the policy of its high school will be to justify the 
UN or to extol old-fashioned patriotism is hard for them to 
imagine. A system of private education where each school 
has freedom to arrange its own curriculum, subject only to 
the acceptance given its graduates by the universities, 
heads straight for chaos. On the other hand, American 
timidity before the expression of conflicting ideas has less 
place in France where Communists and conservative pa- 
triots, Socialists and Catholics will work together in the 
same lycee. These teachers will attack the falseness of the 
others 7 beliefs, but they will also be proud that only in 
France does such an atmosphere of belligerent freedom 
exist. 



Merrill Schools and Independence Ivii 

When one realizes how rare is our American concept of 
independent education, the right to set up one's own goals 
and standards in a profession rigidly governed in most other 
countries by the Ministry of Education, one can draw two 
conclusions. The first is our good fortune; the other, 
perhaps, is our failure to make full use of this privilege. 

The purpose of the private school is not to help maintain 
the status quo by supplying a berth for mediocre children 
of nice families. The private school should rather be a 
sign of the health and confidence of a democratic society 
which permits diversity, in fact, which knows that only 
in diversity can it grow and stay alive. This potenti- 
ality for freedom is ignored where the atmosphere of nice 
schools is only that of polished conformity or where inde- 
pendent teaching in the handsome ivy-covered buildings 
is rewarded by salaries thinner even than at the public 
schools. 

The public schools have the duty to teach what the com- 
munity wants. That is a reasonable belief in a democratic 
society, but it does not have much to do with either free- 
dom or intellectual distinction. If private schools are to 
justify themselves, they must be willing to accept the 
responsibilities that public schools cannot. This means 
harder work and stiffer challenges to the student whose 
special abilities give promise of leadership. It means 
tolerance and aid to the child whose personality fits less 
well with easy norms. It means a willingness to offer 
subjects tougher to justify before the school board, not 
merely stricter, classes in physics, our post-Sputnik pan- 
acea. If we have fallen behind the Russians, more than our 
science teaching has been at fault. To recover leadership, 
we need a total use of our democratic potentialities. That 
involves study of history, of the backgrounds of Europe 
and Asia and our own country, not just cheap discussion 
meetings about this week's magazines. Our children need 
understanding of music and art and architecture so that 
they gain some idea of what is civilization and what is their 
responsibility towards its preservation. They need skill in 
foreign languages to learn, how to speak with other men as 
equals. And they need some practice in handling the 
contradictions and paradoxes of ideas. What is man's 
relationship to the state? What are the demands of 
religious belief? When religion and patriotism clash, 
where does the priority lie? 



hiii Merrill Schools and Independence 

The community, the state, the Pentagon are setting 
exacting duties upon our schools. Many of these duties 
should be fulfilled better than we have in the past. Never- 
theless, the injunction to render unto Caesar what is 
Caesar's implies that certain matters are not Caesar's. 
And where Caesar has no right, whether in demanding a 
deadly practicality or a patriotism interpreted as un- 
questioning docility, it becomes the duty of independent 
schools to show that democracy also means the privilege of 
saying NO. 



A DECENT RESPECT FOR HUMAN 
INTELLIGENCE 

BY GENERAL OMAB N. BRADLEY 

National Chairman, 
St. Albans Anniversary Development Program 

The central problem of our time as I view it is how to 
employ human intelligence for the salvation of mankind. 
It is a problem we have put upon ourselves. For we have 
defiled our intellect by the creation of such scientific in- 
struments of destruction that we are now in desperate 
danger of destroying ourselves. 

Our plight is critical and with each effort we have made 
to relieve it by further scientific advance, we have suc- 
ceeded only in aggravating our peril. As a result, we are 
now speeding inexorably toward a day when even the 
ingenuity of our scientists may be unable to save us from 
the consequences of a single rash act or a lone reckless hand 
upon the switch of an uninterceptorable missile. 

For twelve years now we've sought to stave off this ulti- 
mate threat of disaster by devising arms which would be 
both ultimate and disastrous. This irony can probably be 
compounded a few more years, or perhaps even a few dec- 
ades. Missiles will bring anti-missiles, and anti-missiles 
will bring anti-anti-missiles. But inevitably, this whole 
electronics house of cards will reach a point where it can be 
constructed no higher. At that point we shall have come 
to the peak of this whole incredible dilemma into which the 
world is shoving itself. And when that time comes there 
will be little we can do other than to settle down uneasily, 
smother our fears, and attempt to live in a thickening 
shadow of death. 

Should this situation come to pass, we would have but 
one single and thin thread to cling to. We call it rationale 
or reason. We reason that no Government, no single 
group of men indeed, not even one willful individual 
would be so foolhardy, so reckless, as to precipitate a war 
which would most surely end in mutual destruction. 

This reasoning may have the benefit of logic. But even 
logic sometimes goes awry. How can we assume that 

lix 



Ix Bradley Respect for Intelligence 

reason will prevail in a crisis when there is ordinarily so 
little reason among men. To those who would take com- 
fort in the likelihood of an atomic peace to be secured solely 
by rationale and reason, I would recall the lapse of reason 
in a bunker under the Reich Chancellery in Berlin. It 
failed before, it can fail again. 

A WAY OUT 

Have we already gone too far in this search for peace 
through the accumulation of peril? Is there any way to 
halt this trend or must we push on with new devices 
until we inevitably come to judgment before the atom? 

I believe there is a way out. And I believe it because I 
have acquired in my lifetime a decent respect for human 
intelligence. It may be that the problems of accommo- 
dation in a world split by rival ideologies are more difficult 
than those with which we have struggled in the construc- 
tion of ballistics missiles. But I believe, too, that if we 
apply to these human problems, the energy, creativity, and 
the perseverance we have devoted to science, even problems 
of accommodation will yield to reason. Admittedly, the 
problem of peaceful accommodation in the world ^ is in- 
finitely more difficult than the conquest of space, infinitely 
more complex than a trip to the moon. But if we will only 
come to the realization that it must be worked outwhat- 
ever it may mean even to such sacred traditions as absolute 
national sovereignty I believe that we can somehow, 
somewhere, and perhaps through some as yet undiscovered 
world thinker and leader, find a workable solution. 

I confess that this is as much an article of faith as it is an 
expression of reason. But this, my friends, is what we 
need, faith in our ability to do what must he done. With- 
out that faith we shall never get started. And until we 
get started, we shall never know what can be done. If I 
am sometimes discouraged, it is not by the magnitude of 
the problem, but by our colossal indifference to it. 

I am unable to understand why if we are willing to 
trust in reason as a restraint on the use of a ready-made, 
ready-to-fire bomb we do not make greater, more diligent 
and more imaginative use of reason and human intelligence 
in seeking an accord and compromise which will make it 
possible for mankind to control the atom and banish it as 
an instrument of war. This is the real and- indeed- the 



Bradley Respect for Intelligence Ixi 

most strenuous challenge to man's intellect today. By 
comparison with it, the conquest of space is of small 
significance. For until we learn how to live together, until 
we rid ourselves of the strife that mocks our pretensions of 
civilization, our adventures in science instead of pro- 
ducing human progress will continue to crowd it with 
greater peril. 

We can compete with a Sputnik and probably create 
bigger and better Sputniks of our own. But what are we 
doing to prevent the Sputnik from evolving into just one 
more weapons system. And when are we going to muster 
an intelligence equal to that applied against the Sputnik 
and dedicate it to the preservation of this Satellite on which 
we live. 

How long I would ask you can we put off salvation? 
When does humanity run out? 

I would like to believe that we are addressing ourselves 
to this problem of how to make human intelligence work 
for humanity in just such an undertaking as the one that 
occupies us here this evening. We are met here with a com- 
mon concern for the educational welfare of our children. In 
our endeavor to provide more adequately for their needs, 
we have departed from the tradition of public schooling. 
In a sense, therefore, we might be said to have engaged in 
an act of social protest. 

It is a protest against the parsimonious mistreatment of 
our public school system not only by this community, but 
by communities almost everywhere. It is a protest 
against the exploitation of dedicated teachers who must 
reconcile themselves to a marginal existence for the privi- 
lege of following their calling. It is a protest against that 
slovenly lack of intellectual discipline we have tolerated 
in our nation's educational institutions. And finally, it is 
a protest against that anti-intellectual prejudice which 
appears to disparage learning. 

UNCOMMON OPPORTUNITY 

We have come most of us to St. Albans because 
St. Albans can provide those qualities of education that so 
many schools lack. We have come because we have found 
at St. Albans a decent respect for human intelligence and 
because we want to engender that same respect in our 
children. 



Ixii Bradley Respect for Intelligence 

Here as in schools anywhere that respect can be 
taught only by teachers who are qualified to teach it. For 
a school is not so much an institution as it is a band of 
teachers, joined in dedication, in professional competence 
and in the desire to help humanity lift itself up by making 
better use of the infinite capacity of human intellect. 

There is no calling more worth while than this. The 
teacher is the real soldier of Democracy. Others can 
defend it, but only he can make it work. He carries the 
guidon of human progress in his hands, for it is he alone 
who can cultivate the extraordinary intelligence that will 
be required to extricate this world from its accumulating 
burden of peril. 

THE ROLE OF TEACHEK 

With such a role as this, the mission of a teacher is a 
proud one. And we who are the parents and grandparents, 
or graduates, are most fortunate to have found in St. AI- 
bans a body of masters who characterize these noble 
purposes and who enrich the lives of our children by them. 
I know that I speak for all of you tonight when I call upon 
the masters to hear our gratitude and know our respect for 
their dedication, their devotion, their compassion, and 
above all their diligent labors in the behalf of our chil- 
dren. I only hope that our children will show themselves 
worthy of this privilege by devoting themselves with equal 
earnestness to learning and to the welfare of the community 
of mankind in their later lives. 

Meanwhile, we parents and alumni have incurred some 
present responsibilities of a very real and practical nature. 
For while protesting against some of the abuses that have 
caused us to turn from the public schools, we have never- 
theless condoned some of those very same abuses in our 
exploitation of the masters at St. Albans. 

The word is a hard one. When I chose it, I also flinched. 
But little though we may like it, we've all been accessories 
to a form of hypocrisy in the payment of masters. And 
the best way to correct this situation may be to start with 
an unpleasant admission. The salary scale for our masters 
like that of the teachers in public schools is better 
fitted to servitude than it is to the public service. Teach- 
ers may not live on bread alone, but they cannot subsist on 
devotion. If we are to encourage a decent respect for 



Bradley Respect for Intelligence Ixiii 

human intelligence, we might best begin by respecting the 
value as well as the intelligence of our teachers and 
reward them fairly for it. 

A school such as ours I believe can be justified 
socially in a democratic society only if it maintains such 
rigorous standards of learning that it serves as a stimulus 
to all others. Unless it can pioneer in, and propagate 
those higher standards, it will serve only to produce an 
educated aristocracy among those who can meet its extra- 
ordinary qualifications and whose parents can afford the 
cost. 

These standards begin with a standard of teaching and 
a standard of teacher. St. Albans, fortunately, has been 
able to meet those community obligations of leadership, 
but it has done so too much at the expense of its teachers. 
Our masters have in effect helped to subsidize St. Al- 
bans' higher standards by foregoing just compensation for 
themselves. I am confident that none of you wish to be a 
party to this inequity any more than I do. If we are to 
have a St. Albans for our children, and if we are to make 
this St. Albans a beacon for the community's schools, then 
we must be prepared to bear the cost of these standards 
according to our means and provide more adequately for 
our teachers. I would hope that with these increased in- 
ducements for qualified teachers, we might in some small 
way, here in this capital of the nation testify to the dig- 
nity in which we hold the teachers of our children and 
make the world a little better for those who believe that 
the cultivation of intellect is the highest calling of any 
man. 

STANDARDS SET 

Our nation is crowded with extraordinary children of 
extraordinary intellect, few of whom have the opportunity 
to cultivate their talents in an atmosphere as stimulating 
as that of St. Albans. Many of them are permitted to clot 
in indifferent school systems. As a result, each year we 
suffer an appalling waste in the very human resources on 
which our salvation depends. 

What we are able to do here at St. Albans is very little 
in terms of the total national problem. But we can hope 
that we may in some small way enlighten the problem, 
set a standard and encourage so great a respect for human 



Ixiv Bradley Respect for Intelligence 

intelligence here as to communicate greater respect for it 
everywhere. 

All of us learn from our children. And as we watch 
them grow in a school as demanding in its intellectual 
disciplines as St. Albans, we come more and more to the 
realization that the human mind is a noble thing, that the 
capacities of human intellect are boundless. Call it faith 
if you will but believe in those capacities and you will 
believe also in the ability of an educated mankind to 
discipline itself so securely as to put an end to this peril 
with which the world is now encompassed even its 
regions of outer space. 

In all the great undertakings of mankind, in the begin- 
ning there was belief, belief in what had to be done, could - 
as a matter of fact be done if only man would persevere 
in the doing. If enough of us believe strongly enough in 
the ability of intelligent human beings to get together on 
some basis of a just accord, we might somehow, somewhere, 
in some way and under some auspices make a start on it. 

Unless we soon get started, it may be too late. We 
can't sit about waiting for some felicitous accident of his- 
tory that may somehow make the world all right. Time 
is running against us, and it is running against us with the 
speed of a Sputnik. 

If we're going to save ourselves from the instruments of 
our own intellect, we had better soon get ourselves under 
control and begin making the world safe for living. 



DUCATIONAL ASSOCIATIONS 

MEMBERSHIP LISTS 



EXPLANATORY NOTE 

Coordinated with information solicited as of Febru- 
ary, 1958, these lists* readily show membership of each 
private school in various associations. 

For a complete list of Educational Associations, 
their addresses and officers, refer to the Table of 
Contents. 



Members 

Code Association ' * Listed 

ci California Association of Independent Schools 33* 

CLS Cum Laude Society 169* 

FC Friends Council of Education 41* 

G Guild of Independent Schools of New York, Inc. 28 
MS Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary 

Schools 192* 
NC North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary 

Schools 33* 

NCIS National Council of Independent Schools 459* 
NESS New England Association of Colleges and Secondary 

Schools 150* 
INB Independent Schools Association of Northern New 

England 24* 

NFS National Association of Principals of Schools for Girls 1 7 9* 

PSC Independent Schools Association of Central States 61 

SEB Secondary Education Board 471* 

sis Southern Association of Independent Schools 122 

MAINE 

BRIDGTON ACADEMY, Bridgton NESS 

CHEVERUS HIGH SCHOOL, Portland NESS 

COBURN CLASSICAL INSTITUTE, Waterville NESS 

FOXCROFT ACADEMY, Dover-Foxcroft NESS 

FRYEBURG ACADEMY, Fryeburg INE, NESS 

GOULD ACADEMY, Bethel INE, NESS 
HEBRON ACADEMY, Hebron CLS, INE, NESS^, NCIS, SEB 

HIGGINS CLASSICAL INSTITUTE, Charleston NESS 

JOHN BAPST HIGH SCHOOL, Bangor NESS 

KE.NTS HILL SCHOOL, Kents Hill CLS, INE, NESS 

LEE ACADEMY, Lee NESS 



Ixm 



Membership Lists 



LINCOLN ACADEMY, Newcastle 

MAINE CENTRAL INSTITUTE, Pittsfield 

NORTH YARMOUTH ACADEMY, Yarmouth 

OAK GROVE SCHOOL, Vassalboro 

ST. FRANCIS COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL, Biddeford 

ST. JOSEPH'S ACADEMY, Portland 

THORNTON ACADEMY, Saco 

WAYNFLETE SCHOOL, Portland 

WILTON ACADEMY, Wilton 



NESS 
NESS 

INK, NESS 

FC, NESS, CLS 

NESS 

NESS 

NESS 

INTE, NESS 
NESS 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



CLS, 



CLS, 

INK, : 



INE, 
CLS, 
CLS, 



INE, ] 
NFS, ] 

INE, ; 
INE, : 



BREWSTER FREE ACADEMY, Wolfeboro 
CARDIGAN MOUNTAIN SCHOOL, Canaan 
DUBLIN SCHOOL, Dublin 
EMERSON SCHOOL FOR BOYS, Exeter 
HIGH MOWING SCHOOL, Wilton 
HOLDERNESS SCHOOL FOR BOYS, Plymouth 
KIMBALL UNION ACADEMY, Meriden 
MOUNT ST. MARY SEMINARY, Nashua 
NEW HAMPTON SCHOOL, New Hampton 
PHILLIPS EXETER ACADEMY, Exeter 
PINKERTON ACADEMY, Deny Village 
PROCTOR ACADEMY, Andover 
ST. MARY'S-IN-THE-MOUNTAINS, Littleton 
ST. PAUL'S SCHOOL, CONCORD 
TILTON SCHOOL, Tilton 

VERMONT 

BURR AND BURTON SEMINARY, Manchester 
LYNDON INSTITUTE, Lyndon Center 
PUTNEY SCHOOL, Putney 
ST. JOHNSBURY ACADEMY, St. Johnsbury 
VERMONT ACADEMY, Saxtons River INE, 

WOODSTOCK COUNTRY SCHOOL, Woodstock 

MASSACHUSETTS 

ABBOT ACADEMY, Andover CLS, NFS, 

ACADEMY OF THE ASSUMPTION, Wellesley Hillls 
ACADEMY OF THE SACRED HEARTS, Fall River 
ASSUMPTION HIGH SCHOOL, Worcester 
THE BANCROFT SCHOOL, Worcester NPS, 

BEAVER COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Chestnut Hill 
BELMONT DAY SCHOOL, Belmont 
BELMONT HILL SCHOOL, Belrnont 
BELVIDERE SCHOOL, Lowell 
THE BEMENT SCHOOL, Deerfield 
BERKSHIRE SCHOOL, Sheffield 
BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL, Boston 
THE BRIMMER AND MAY SCHOOL, Chestnut Hill 
BROOKS SCHOOL, North Andover 
THE BROWNE AND NICHOLS SCHOOL, Cambridge 

CLS, 

BUCKINGHAM SCHOOL, CAMBRIDGE 
MARY A. BURNHAM SCHOOL, Northampton NPS, 



INE, NESS 
INE, NCIS, SEB 
INE, NESS, NCIS 
INE, SEB 
INK, NESS, NCIS 
, INE, NESS, SEB 
NESS, NCIS, SKB 
NKSS 

INK, NESS, NCIS 
CLS, INE, NESS, NCIS, SEB 
NKSS 

NESS, NCIS, SEB 
NESS, NCIS, SKB 
NESS, NCIS, SKH 
NESS, NCIS, SKB 



NKSS 

INK, NESS 

INE, NKSS, NCIS, SEB 
INK, NESS, NCIS 

CLS, NKSS, NCIS, SEB 
INK, NKSS, NCIS, SKB 



NESS, NCIS, SKB 
NKSS 
NKSS 
NKSS 

NESS, NCIS, CLS 

NKSS, NCIS, CLS 

NCIS 

NKSS, NCIS, SEB 
SKB 
SEB 

NESS, NCIS, SEB 

NESS, NCIS 

NKSS, NCIS, SKB 

NKSS, NCIS, SKB 

NESS, NCIS, SEB 
NPS, NKSS NCIS 
NESS, NCIS, SKB 



CLS, 



CLS, 



NPS, 
CLS, 



Membership Lists Ixvii 



THE CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL OF WESTON, Weston NESS, NCIS, SEE 

CHAPEL HILL SCHOOL, Waltham NFS, NESS, SEE 

CHAUNCY HALL SCHOOL, Boston NCIS 

CONCORD ACADEMY, Concord NFS, NESS, NCIS SEE 

COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL OF THE SACRED HEART, Newton NESS 

CRANWELL PREPARATORY SCHOOL, Lenox NESS, NCIS, SEE 

GUSHING ACADEMY, Ashburnham CLS, NCIS, SEE, NESS 
DANA HALL SCHOOL, Wellesley CLS, NESS, NPS. NCIS, SEE 

DEERFIELD ACADEMY, Deerfield CLS, NESS, NCIS, SEE 

DERBY ACADEMY, Hingham NCIS, SEE 

THE DEXTER SCHOOL, Brookline NCIS, SEE 

EAGLEBROOK SCHOOL, Deerfield NCIS, SEE 

FAY SCHOOL, Southborough NCIS, SEE 

THE FENN SCHOOL, Concord NCIS, SEE 

THE FESSENDEN SCHOOL, West Newton NCIS, SEE 

FOXHOLLOW SCHOOL, Lenox NPS, NESS, NCIS 

FRIENDS' ACADEMY, North Dartmouth SEE 

GOVERNOR DUMMER ACADEMY, South Byfield CLS, NESS, NCIS, SEE 

GROTON SCHOOL, Groton NESS, NCIS, SEE 
Miss HALL'S SCHOOL, Pittsfield CLS, NPS, NESS, NCIS, SEE 

HOLY CROSS ACADEMY, Brookline NESS 

HOUSE-IN-THE-PlNES, Norton NPS, NESS, NCIS 

HOWARD SEMINARY, WevSt Bridgewater NPS, NESS, NCIS, SEE 

HUNTINGTON SCHOOL FOR BOYS, Boston CLS, NESS, NCIS, SEE 

LAWRENCE ACADEMY, Groton CLS, NESS, NCIS 

LENOX SCHOOL, Lenox NCIS, SEE 
MACDUFFIE SCHOOL, Springfield CLS, NPS, NESS, NCIS, SEE 

MANTER HALL SCHOOL, Cambridge SEE 

MARYCLIFF ACADEMY, Winchester NESS 

MATIGNON HIGH SCHOOL, Cambridge NESS 

MIDDLESEX SCHOOL, Concord NESS, NCIS, SEE 

MILTON ACADEMY, MILTON CLS, NPS, NESS, NCIS, SEE 

MONSIGNOR JAMES COYLE HIGH SCHOOL, Taunton NESS 

MONSIGNOR PREVOST HIGH SCHOOL NESS 

MONSON ACADEMY, Monson NESS 

MOUNT HERMON SCHOOL, Mount Hermon CLS, NESS, NCIS, SEE 

MOUNT ST. MARY ACADEMY, Fall River NESS 

NEWMAN PREPARATORY SCHOOL, Boston SEE 

NOBLE AND GREENOUGH SCHOOL, Dedharn CLS, NESS, NCIS, SEE 

NORTHAMPTON SCH. FOR GIRLS, No'amp'tn CLS, NPS, NESS, NCIS, SEE 

NORTHFIELD SCHOOL FOR GlRLS, East Northfield NPS, NESS, NCIS, SEE 

THE PARK SCHOOL, Brookline NCIS, SICE 

PERKINS SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND, Watertown NESS 

PHILLIPS ACADEMY, Andover CLS, NESS, NCIS, SEE 

PIKE SCHOOL, Andover NCIS, SKB 

PINE COBBLE SCHOOL, Williamstown SEE 

RIVERS COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Chestnut Hill NESS, SEE 

ROGERS HALL, LOWELL NPS, NESS 

ROXBURY LATIN SCHOOL, West Roxbury NESS, NCIS, SEE 

SACRED HEART HIGH SCHOOL, Newton Center NESS 

SAINT ANNE'S SCHOOL, Arlington Heights NESS 

ST. JOHN'S PREPARATORY SCHOOL, Danvers NESS, SEE 

ST. JOSEPH'S CATHOLIC CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL, Pittsfield NESS 



Ixviii 



Membership Lists 



ST. MARK'S SCHOOL, Southborough 

SHADY HILL SCHOOL, Cambridge 

SHEPHERD KNAPP SCHOOL, Boylston 

SHORE COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Beverly 

SOUTH LANCASTER ACADEMY, South Lancaster 

STOCKBRIDGE SCHOOL, Stockbridge 

STONELEIGH-PROSPECT HILL SCHOOL, Greenfield 

TABOR ACADEMY, Marion 

TENACRE SCHOOL, Wellesley 

THAYER ACADEMY, Braintree 

TOWER SCHOOL, Marblehead 

WALNUT HILL SCHOOL, Natick 

WILBRAHAM ACADEMY, Wilbraham 

WILLISTON ACADEMY, Easthampton 

THE WINSOR SCHOOL, Boston 

WOODWARD SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, Quincy 

WORCESTER ACADEMY, Worcester 

RHODE ISLAND 

CONVENT OF THE SACRED HEART, Providence 
LASALLE ACADEMY, Providence 

LINCOLN SCHOOL, Providence NPS, FC, NESS, 

MOSES BROWN SCHOOL, Providence CLS, FC, NESS, 

OUR LADY OF PROVIDENCE SEMINARY, Warwick 
PORTSMOUTH PRIORY SCHOOL, Portsmouth CLS, NESS, 

PROVIDENCE COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Ea k st Providence 

NCIS, 

ROCKY HILL COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, INC., East Greenwich 
ST. DUNSTAN'S SCHOOL, Providence 

ST. GEORGE'S SCHOOL, Newport NESS, NCIS, 

ST. MICHAEL'S COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Newport 
ST. RAPHAEL ACADEMY, Pawtucket 
THE MARY C. WHEELER SCHOOL, Providence NPS, NESS, 



CLS, NESS, NCIS, SEB 
NCIS, SEB 
SEB 

NCIS, SEB 
NESS 
SEB 

NCIS, NESS, NPS, SEB 
CLS, NESS, NCIS, SEB 
SEB 

CLS, NESS, NCIS, SEB 
8KB 

NPS, NESS, NCIS 
CLS, NESS, NCIS 
CLS, NESS, NCIS, SEB 
NPS, NESS, NCIS, SKB 
NESS 
CLS, NESS, SEB 



NESS 

NESS 
NCIS, SEB 
NCIS, SEB 

NESS 
NCIS, SEB 

CLS, NESS 
SEB 

NCIS, 8KB 

, SKB. CLS 

SEB 

NESS 

NCIS, SKB 



CONNECTICUT 
AVON OLD FARMS, Avon 
BOLTON SCHOOL, Westport 
BRUNSWICK SCHOOL, Greenwich 
CANTERBURY SCHOOL, New Milford 
CHAFFEE SCHOOL, Windsor 
CHESHIRE ACADEMY, Cheshire 
THE CHOATE SCHOOL, Wallingford 
CONVENT OF SACRED HEART, Noroton 
DAYCROFT SCHOOL, INC., Stamford 
DAY SCHOOL, New Haven 
ETHEL WALKER SCHOOL, Simsbury CLS, 

FAIRFIELD COLLEGE PREP SCHOOL, Fairfield 
FAIRFIELD COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Fairfield 
THE FOOTE SCHOOL, New Haven 
THE FORMAN SCHOOL, INC., Litchfield 
THE GILBERT SCHOOL, Winsted 
GREENWICH ACADEMY, Greenwich 
GREENWICH COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Greenwich 



NESS, NCIS, SEB 
SEB 

NESS, SKB 

NESS, NCIS, SEB 

SK 

NESS, NCIS, SKB 

CLS, NESS, NCIS, SKB 

SKB 

SKB 

NPS. NESS, CLS 

NPS, NKSS, NCIS, SEB 

NESS 

NCIS, SKB 

SEB 

NESS, NCIS, SEB 
NESS 

NPS, NKSS 
NCIS, SEB 



Membership Lists 

THE GUNNERY, Washington CLS, NESS, NCIS, SEB 

HAITHCOCK SCHOOL, Greenwich SEB 

HAMDEN HALL COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Hamden SEB 

HOPKINS GRAMMAR SCHOOL, New Haven CLS, NESS, NCIS 

THE HOTCHKISS SCHOOL, Lakeville CLS, NESS, NCIS, SEB 

INDIAN MOUNTAIN SCHOOL, Lakeville NCIS, SEB 

KENT SCHOOL, Kent CLS, NESS, NCIS, SEB 

KING SCHOOL, Stamford NCIS, SEB 

KINGSWOOD SCHOOL, West Hartford CLS, NESS, NCIS, SEB 

THE LOOMIS SCHOOL, Windsor CLS, NESS, NCIS, SEB 

LOW-HEYWOOD SCHOOL, INC., Stamford NFS, NESS, NCIS, SEB 

MARIANAPOLIS PREPARATORY SCHOOL, Thompson NESS 

MCTERNAN SCHOOL, Waterbury SEB 

MILFORD SCHOOL, Milford * NCIS, SEB 

MOORELAND HILL SCHOOL, Kensington SEB 

MOUNT ST. JOSEPH'S ACADEMY, Hartford NESS 

THE NEW CANAAN COUNTRY SCHOOL, New Canaan NCIS, SEB 

NORWICH FREE ACADEMY, Norwich NESS 

OXFORD SCHOOL, Hartford NFS, NESS, NCIS, SEB 

PINE POINT SCHOOL, Stonington NCIS, SEB 

POMFRET SCHOOL, Pomfret CLS, NESS, NCIS, SEB 

Miss PORTER'S SCHOOL, Farmington NFS, NESS, NCIS, SEB 

PROSPECT HILL SCHOOL, New Haven NPS, NESS, NCIS 

THE RECTORY SCHOOL, Pontfret NCIS, SEB 

RENBROOK SCHOOL, West Hartford NCIS, SEB 

ROBINSON SCHOOL, WevSt Hartford NCIS, SEB 

ROSEMARY HALL, Greenwich NPS, NESS, NCIS 

RUMSEY HALL SCHOOL, Washington SEB 
ST. MARGARET'S SCHOOL, Waterbury CLS, NPS, NESS, NCIS, SEB 

ST. THOMAS' SEMINARY, Bloomfield NESS 

SALISBURY SCHOOL, Salisbury NESS, NCIS, SEB 

THE SOUTH KENT SCHOOL, South Kent CLS, NESS, NCIS, SEB 

SUFFIELD ACADEMY, SufHeld CLS, NESS, NCIS, SEB 

TAFT SCHOOL, Watertown CLS, NESS, NCIS, SEB 

UNQUOWA SCHOOL, Bridgeport NCIS, SEB 

WATKINSON SCHOOL, Hartford NCIS, SEB 

WESTMINSTER SCHOOL, Simsbury NESS, NCIS, SEB 

WESTOVER SCHOOL, Middlebufy NPS, NESS, NCIS, SEB 

WOOSTBR SCHOOL, Danbury NESS, NCIS 

NEW YORK 

ACADEMY OF MT. ST. VINCENT, Tuxedo Park MS, SEB 

ADELPHI ACADEMY, Brooklyn CLS, MS, G, NCIS, SEB 

ALBANY ACADEMY, Albany CLS, MS, NCIS 
ALBANY ACADEMY FOR GIRLS, Albany CLS, NPS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

THE ALLENDALE SCHOOL, Rochester MS, NCIS, SEB 

ALLEN-STEVENSON SCHOOL, New York G, NCIS, SEB 

BARNARD SCHOOL FOR BOYS, New York CLS, MS, G, NCIS 

BARNARD SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, New York NPS, MS, G, NCIS, SBB 

BEDFORD RIPPOWAM CHOOL, INC., Bedford NCIS, SEB 
BERKELEY INSTITUTE, Brooklyn CLS, NPS, MS, G, NCIS, SEB 

BIRCH- WATHEN SCHOOL, New York MS, G, NCIS 

BREARLEY SCHOOL, New York NPS, G, NCIS, SEB 



Membership Lists 

BROOKLYN FRIENDS SCHOOL, Brooklyn MS, FC, NCIS 

BROOKLYN PREPARATORY SCHOOL, Brooklyn MS 

BROWNING SCHOOL, New York G. NCIS, SEE 

BUCKLEY COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Long Island NCIS, SEE 

BUCKLEY SCHOOL, New York G ^ CIS * SEB 

BUFFALO SEMINARY, Buffalo CLS, NFS, MS, NCIS, SEE 

CALHOUN SCHOOL, New York NFS, MS, G, NCIS, SEB 

CANISIUS HIGH SCHOOL, Buffalo MS NCIS 

CATHEDRAL CHOIR SCHOOL, New York SEB 

CATHEDRAL SCH. OF ST. MARY, Garden City CLS, NFS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

CHAMINADE HIGH SCHOOL, Mineola, L. I. MS 

CHAPIN SCHOOL, New York NFS, G, NCIS, SKB 

COLLEGIATE SCHOOL, New York CLS, MS, G, NCIS, SEB 

COLUMBIA GRAMMAR SCHOOL, New York MS, G, NCIS 

COLUMBIA SCHOOL OF ROCHESTER, Rochester NFS, MS, NCIS 

DALTON SCHOOLS, New York NFS, G, SEB 

DARROW SCHOOL, New Lebanon N C * S . SEB 

DE VEAUX SCHOOL, Niagara Falls SEB, MS, NCIS 

DWIGHT SCHOOL, New York NCIS, MS 

EAST WOODS SCHOOL, Oyster Bay NCIS, SEB 

ELMWOOD-FRANKLIN SCHOOL, Buffalo NFS, NCIS, SEB 

EMMA WILLARD SCHOOL, Troy CLS, NFS, MS, NCIS, SEE 

ETHICAL CULTURE SCHOOLS, New York SEB, NCJCS 

FIELDSTON SCHOOL, New York MS, G, 

FORDHAM PREPARATORY SCHOOL, New York MS, NCIS 

FOXWOOD SCHOOL, Flushing, Long Island SESB 

FRANKLIN SCHOOL, New York MS 
FRIENDS ACADEMY, Locust Valley, Long Island CLS, MS, FC, NCIS 

FRIENDS SEMINARY, New York MS, G, FC, NCIS 

Gow SCHOOL, South Wales SEB 

GRACE CHURCH SCHOOL, New York G, Ncrs, SEB 

GARDEN CTRY DAY SCH, Jackson Heights, L.I. Nns, MS 

GREEN VALE SCHOOL, Glen Head, Long Island NCIS, SEB 

HACKLEY SCHOOL, Tarrytown CLS, MS, NCIS, SKB 

HALSTED SCHOOL, Yonkers NFS, MS, NCIS, SKB 

HARLEY SCHOOL, Rochester MS, SEB 

HARVEY SCHOOL, Hawthorne NCIS, SKB 

Miss HEWITT'S CLASSES, New York NFS, MS, G, NCIS, SEB 

HOLY ANGELS ACADEMY, Buffalo MS 

HOOSAC SCHOOL, Hoosic *KB 

HORACE MANN SCHOOL, New York CLS, MS, G, NCIS, SKB 

KEW-FOREST SCHOOL, New York NPS, MS 

KNOX SCHOOL, St. James, Long Island NFS, NCIS, SEB 

LADYCLIFF ACADEMY, Highland Falls MS 

LAKEMONT ACADEMY, Lakemont NCIS 

LA SALLE MILITARY ACADEMY, Oakdale MS 
LAWRENCE SCHOOL, Hewlett Bay Park, Long Island NCIS, SEB 

LENOX SCHOOL, New York NFS, G, NCIS, SEB 

LITTLE RED SCHOOL HOUSE, New York NCIS 

LOYOLA SCHOOL, New York MS, NCIS 

MALCOLM GORDON SCHOOL, Garrison SEB 

MANLIUS SCHOOL, Manlius MS, NCIS, SEB 

MARYMOUNT SCHOOL, Tarrytown MS 

MASTERS SCHOOL, Dobbs Ferry NFS, MS, NCIS, SEB 



Membership Lists Ixxi 



MCBURNEY SCHOOL, New York SEE, MS, NCIS 

MILLBROOK SCHOOL, Millbrook CLS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

MOHONK SCHOOL, Mohonk Lake SEB 

MOUNT SAINT MARY ACADEMY, Newburgh MS 

NAZARETH ACADEMY, Rochester MS 

NEWBURGH FREE ACADEMY, Newburgh MS 

NEW YORK MILITARY ACADEMY, Cornwall-on- Hudson MS, SEB 

NICHOLS SCHOOL, Buffalo CLS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

NIGHTINGALE-BAMFORD SCHOOL, New York MS, NFS, G, NCIS, SEB 

NORTH COUNTRY SCHOOL, Lake Placid SEB 

NORTHWOOD SCHOOL, Lake Placid Club CLS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

NYACK BOYS SCHOOL, Nyack SEB 

OAKWOOD SCHOOL, Poughkeepsie MS, FC, NCIS, SEB 

PACKER COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE, Brooklyn MS, NFS, G, NCIS, SEE 

PARK SCHOOL OF BUFFALO, Buffalo MS, NCIS, SEB 

PEBBLE HILL SCHOOL, DeWitt NCIS, SEB 

PEEKSKILL MILITARY ACADEMY, Peekskill NCIS, SEB 
POLYTECHNIC PREP. COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Brooklyn 

CLS, MS, G, NCIS, SEB 

REGIS HIGH SCHOOL, New York NCIS 

RHODES SCHOOL, New York MS, NCIS, SEB 

RlVERDALE, New York CLS, MS, NFS, G, NCIS, SEB 

RUDOLF STEINER SCHOOL, New York SEB 

RYE COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Rye MS, NCIS, SEB 
ST. AGNES SCHOOL, Albany NCIS, CLS, MS, NFS, SEB 

ST. BERNARD'S SCHOOL, New York G, NCIS, SEB 

ST. DAVID'S SCHOOL, New York SEB 

ST. HILDA'S SCHOOL, New York NFS, NCIS, SEB 

ST. JOHN'S PREPARATORY SCHOOL, Brooklyn MS 

ST. LUKE'S SCHOOL, New York SEB, NCIS 

ST. MARY'S SCHOOL, Peekskill SEB, MS, NFS 

ST. PAUL'S SCHOOL, Garden City CLS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

ST. PETER'S SCHOOL, Peekskill SEB 

ST. THOMAS CHOIR SCHOOL, New York NCIS, SEB 

SCARBOROUGH SCHOOL, Scarborough MS, NCIS, SEB 

SEARING TUTORING SCHOOLS, New York SEB 

SPENCE SCHOOL, New York MS, NFS, G, NCIS, SEB 

STATEN ISLAND ACADEMY, Staten Island SEB, MS, NCIS 
STONY BROOK SCHOOL, Stony Brook, Long Island CLS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

STORM KING SCHOOL, Cornwall CLS, SEB 

SUFFERN SCHOOL OF THE HOLY CHILD, Suffern MS 

TOWN SCHOOL, New York SEB 

TRINITY-PAWLING SCHOOL, Pawling SEB, CLS, MS 

TRINITY SCHOOL, New York SEB, CLS, MS, G, NCIS 

TUTORING SCHOOL OF NEW YORK, New York SEB 

TUXEDO PARK SCHOOL, Tuxedo Park NCIS, SEB 

VIEWPOINT SCHOOL, Amenia SEB 

WALDEN SCHOOL, New York MS 

WALDORF SCHOOL, Garden City, L.I. NCIS 

WALT WHITMAN SCHOOL, New York G 

WINDWARD SCHOOL, White Plains NFS 

WOODMERE ACADEMY, Woodmere, Long Island CLS, MS, NCIS 

XAVIER HIGH SCHOOL, New York MS 



Ixxii Membership Lists 

NEW JERSEY 

ACADEMY OF ST. ALOYSIUS, Jersey City MS 

ACADEMY OF ST. ELIZABETH, Morristown MS 

ADMIRAL FARRAGUT ACADEMY, Pine Beach MS, NCIS, SEB 

ATLANTIC CITY FRIENDS SCHOOL, Atlantic City MS, FC, NCIS 

BEARD SCHOOL, Orange CLS, NPS, MS NCIS 

BERGEN SCHOOL, Jersey City NPS 

BLAIR ACADEMY, Blairstown CLS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

BORDENTOWN MILITARY INSTITUTE, BordentOWtt SEB, MS 

CARTERET SCHOOL, West Orange MS, SEB 

CROYDON HALL ACADEMY, Atlantic Highlands SEB 

DWIGHT SCHOOL, Englewood NCIS, CLS, NPS, MS 

ELISABETH MORROW SCHOOL, Englewood SEB 

ENGLEWOOD SCHOOL FOR BOYS, Englewood CLS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

FAR BROOK SCHOOL, Short Hills SEB 

FAR HILLS COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Far Hills NPS, NCIS, SEB 

Miss FINE'S SCHOOL, Princeton SEB, NPS, MS, NCIS 

THE GILL SCHOOL, Bernardsville SEB, NPS, NCIS 

HADDONFIELD FRIENDS SCHOOL, Haddonfield FC 

HARTRIDGE SCHOOL, Plainfield NCIS, NPS, MS 

HUN SCHOOL, Princeton NCIS, SEB 

KENT PLACE SCHOOL, Summit MS, CLS, NPS, NCIS, SEB 

KJMBERLEY SCHOOL, Montclair NPS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

THE LAWRENCEVILLE SCHOOL, Lawrence ville CLS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

MONTCLAIR ACADEMY, Montclair CLS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

MOORESTOWN FRIENDS SCHOOL, Moorestown MS, FC, SEB 

MORRISTOWN SCHOOL, Morristown MS, NCIS, SEB 

NEWARK ACADEMY, Newark CLS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

THE OXFORD ACADEMY, Pleasantville SEB 

PECK SCHOOL, Morristown SEB 

PEDDIE SCHOOL, Hightstown CLS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

PENNINGTON SCHOOL, Pennington MS, SEB 

PINGRY SCHOOL, Elizabeth CLS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

PRINCETON COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Princeton SEB 

PROSPECT HILL COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Newark NPS, MS 

RANCOCAS FRIENDS SCHOOL, Rancocas FC 

RUMSON COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Rumson NCIS, SEB 

RUTGERS PREPARATORY SCHOOL, New Brunswick CLS, MS, SEE 

ST, BENEDICT'S PREP. SCHOOL, Newark MS 

ST. BERNARD'S SCHOOL, GladvStone MS, SEB 

ST. JOHN BAPTIST SCHOOL, Mendham MS 

ST. JOHN'S SCHOOL, Mountain Lakes NPS 

ST. MARY'S HALL, Burlington SEB, NPS, MS, NCIS 

ST. PETER'S PREPARATORY SCHOOL, Jersey City MS, NCIS 

SETON HALL PREP. SCHOOL, South Orange MS 

SHORT HILLS COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Short Hills NCIS, SEB 

STEVENS ACADEMY, Hoboken MS, SEE 

VAIL-DEANE SCHOOL, Elizabeth NPS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

WARDLAW SCHOOL, Plainfield NCIS, SEB 

WARREN SCHOOL, Chester NCIS, SEB 

WESTFIELD FRIENDS SCHOOL, Riverton FC 

WOODBURY FRIENDS SCHOOL, Woodbury FC 



Membership Lists Ixxiii 



PENNSYLVANIA 

ABINGTON FRIENDS SCHOOL, Jenkintown CLS, MS, FC, NCIS 

ACADEMY OF THE NEW CHURCH, Bryn Athyn MS, NCIS 

ACADEMY OF NOTRE DAME DE NAMUR, Villanova MS 

ACADEMY OF THE SISTERS OF MERCY, Gwynedd Valley MS 

AGNES IRWIN SCHOOL, Wynne-wood NPS, MS, NCIS, SEE 

BALDWIN SCHOOL, Bryn Mawr NFS, MS, NCIS 

BUCKINGHAM FRIENDS SCHOOL, Lahaska FC, SEE 

CARSON LONG INSTITUTE, New Bloomfield MS, NCIS 

CECILIAN ACADEMY, Philadelphia ' MS 

CHESTNUT HILL ACADEMY, Philadelphia MS, NCIS, SEB 

CONVENT OF THE SACRED HEART, Eden Hall, Phila. NCIS 

COUNTRY DAY SCH. OF THE SACRED HEART, Phila. NCIS 

DEVEREUX SCHOOL, Devon SEE 

DOWNINGTON FRIENDS SCHOOL, Downington FC 

CHARLES E. ELLIS SCHOOL, Newtown Square NFS, MS 

ELLIS SCHOOL, Pittsburgh NPS, MS, NCIS 

EPISCOPAL ACADEMY, Philadelphia CLS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

FRANKFORD FRIENDS SCHOOL, Philadelphia FC 
FRIENDS CENTRAL SCHOOL, Philadelphia CLS, MS, FC, NCIS, SEB 

FRIENDS COMMUNITY SCHOOL, West Chester FC 

THE FRIENDS SCHOOL, Haverford FC, SEB 

FRIENDS' SELECT SCHOOL, Philadelphia ' MS, FC, SEB 

GEORGE SCHOOL, George School NPS, MS, FC, NCIS 

GERMANTOWN ACADEMY, Philadelphia CLS, MS, NCIS, SEB 
GERMANTOWN FRIENDS SCHOOL, Philadelphia 

CLS, NPS, MS, FC, NCIS, SEB 

GIRARD COLLEGE, Philadelphia MS, NCIS 

GREENE STREET FRIENDS SCHOOL, Philadelphia SEB, FC 

GRIER SCHOOL, Tyrone NPS, MS 

GWYNEDD FRIENDS KINDERGARTEN, Gwynedd FC 

HAVERFORD SCHOOL, Haverford CLS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

HILL SCHOOL, Pottstown CLS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

KlSKIMINETAS SPRINGS SCHOOL, Saltsburg CLS, NCIS, MS, SEB 

LANCASTER COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Lancaster NCIS, SEB 

LANKENAU SCHOOL, Germantown SEB, NPS, MS, NCIS 

LANSDOWNE FRIENDS SCHOOL, Lansdowne FC 

LINDEN HALL, Lititz NPS, MS, NCIS 

MALVERN PREPARATORY SCHOOL, Malvern MS 

MARY WOOD SEMINARY, Scranton MS 

MATER MISERICORDIAE ACADEMY, Merion MS 

MEDIA FRIENDS SCHOOL, Media FC 

MELROSE ACADEMY, Philadelphia MS 

MERCERSBURG ACADEMY, Mercersburg CLS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

MERCYHURST SEMINARY, Erie MS 

MERION FRIENDS SCHOOL, Merion FC 

MILTON HBRSHEY SCHOOL, Hershey MS, NCIS 

MORAVIAN SEM. FOR GIRLS, Bethlehem NPS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

MOUNT ST. JOSEPH ACADEMY, Philadelphia MS 

NAZARETH ACADEMY, Philadelphia MS 

NEWTOWN FRIENDS SCHOOL, Newtown FC 

OUR LADY OF MERCY ACADEMY, Pittsburgh MS 



Ixxiv Membership Lists 

PENN HALL, Chambersburg NPS, MS. SEE 

PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF, Philadelphia NCIS 

PEN RYN EPISCOPAL SCHOOL, Andalusia SEB 

PERKIOMEN SCHOOL, Pennsburg SEB, MS, NCIS 

PHELPS SCHOOL, Malvern SKB . MS 

PLYMOUTH MEETING FRIENDS SCHOOL, Plymouth Meeting FC 

ST. BENEDICT ACADEMY, Erie MS 

ST. EDMUND'S ACADEMY, Pittsburgh NCIS, SEB 

ST. JOHN KANTY COL. HIGH SCHOOL, Philadelphia MS 

ST. JOSEPH'S COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL, Philadelphia MS 

ST! LEONARD'S ACADEMY OF THE HOLY CHILD, Philadelphia MS 

ST, MARY'S ACADEMY, Philadelphia MS 

ST. VINCENT PREPARATORY SCHOOL, Latrobe MS 

SCRANTON PREPARATORY SCHOOL, Scranton MS, xcrs 

SEWICKLEY ACADEMY, Sewickley NCIS, SEB 

SHADY SIDE ACADEMY, Pittsburgh CLS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

SHIPLEY SCHOOL, Bryn Mawr NPS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

SOLEBURY SCHOOL, New Hope NCIS, NFS, MS, SEB 

SPRINGSIDE SCHOOL, Chestnut Hill NPS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

STEVENS SCHOOL, Germantown NPS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

TEMPLE UNIV. HIGH SCHOOL, Philadelphia MS 

UNIVERSITY SCHOOL, Pittsburgh SEB 

VALLEY FORGE MILITARY ACADEMY, Wayne MS, SEB 

VALLEY SCHOOL OF LIGONIER, Ligonier NCIS, SEB 

VILLA MARIA ACADEMY, Erie MS 

WESTTOWN SCHOOL, Westtown CLS, NPS, MS, FC, Ncrs, SEB 

WILLIAM PENN CHARTER SCHOOL, Phila. CLS, MS, FC, NCIS, SEB 

WINCHESTER-THURSTON SCHOOL, Pittsburgh NPS, NCIS, SEB 

WYNDCROFT COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Pottstown SEB 

WYOMING SEMINARY, Kingston CLS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

DELAWARE 

ARCHMERE ACADEMY, Claymont MS 

FRIENDS' SCHOOL, Wilmington MS, FC, NCIS 

ST. ANDREW'S SCHOOL, Middletown CLS, MS, NCIS, SKB 

SALESIANUM SCHOOL FOR BOYS, Wilmington MS 

SANFORD PREPARATORY SCHOOL, Hockessin MS, NCIS, SBB 

TATNALL SCHOOL, Wilmington SEB, MS, NPS, NCIS 
TOWER HILL SCHOOL, Wilmington CLS, NPS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

URSULINE ACADEMY, Wilmington MS 

MARYLAND 

ACADEMY OF THE HOLY NAMES, Silver Spring MS 

BOYS LATIN SCHOOL, Baltimore NCIS 

BRYN MAWR SCHOOL, Baltimore NPS, NCIS 

CALVERT SCHOOL, Baltimore SEB 

COUNTRY SCHOOL, Easton SEB 

FRIENDS SCHOOL, Baltimore CLS, NCIS, MS, FC, SEB 

GARRISON FOREST SCHOOL, Garrison SEB, NPS, NCIS 

GEORGETOWN PREPARATORY SCHOOL, Garrett Park MS, NCIS, SEB 
GILMAN SCHOOL, Baltimore CLS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

HANNAH MORE ACADEMY, ReLsterstown NCIS, CLS, NFS, MS, SEB 



Membership Lists Ixxv 



INSTITUTE OF NOTRE DAME, Baltimore MS 

JACOB TOME INSTITUTE, Port Deposit SEB 

LANDON SCHOOL FOR BOYS, Bethesda CLS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

LONGFELLOW SCHOOL FOR BOYS, Bethesda SEB 

LOYOLA HIGH SCHOOL, Baltimore MS, NCIS 

McDoNOGH SCHOOL, McDonogh CLS, NCIS, MS, SEB 

MOUNT SAINT AGNES SCHOOL, Baltimore MS 

MOUNT ST. JOSEPH HIGH SCHOOL, Baltimore MS 

NOTRE DAME PREPARATORY SCHOOL, Baltimore MS 

OLDFIELDS SCHOOL, Glencoe NFS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

PARK SCHOOL, Baltimore MS, NCIS, SEB 

RICHLEIGH SCHOOL, Reisterstown SEB 

ROLAND PARK COUNTRY SCHOOL, Baltimore SEB, NFS, MS, NCIS 

ST. JAMES SCHOOL, St. James CLS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

ST. MARY'S SEMINARY JR. COL., Saint Mary's City- MS 

ST. PAUL'S SCHOOL, Baltimore SEB, MS, NPS, NCIS 

ST. TIMOTHY'S SCHOOL, Baltimore NPS, NCIS, SEB 

SAMUEL READY SCHOOL, Baltimore NPS, NCIS, SEB 

SANFORD PREPARATORY SCHOOL, Hockessin NCIS 

SEVERN SCHOOL, Severna Park NCIS 

TRINITY PREPARATORY SCHOOL, Ilchester MS 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

ACADEMY OF THE HOLY CROSS MS 

COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL OF THE SACRED HEART NCIS, SEB 

GEORGETOWN VISITATION CONVENT SCHOOL NCIS, MS 

GONZAGA HIGH SCHOOL MS, NCIS 

HOLTON ARMS SCHOOL NPS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

IMMACULATA SEMINARY MS 

MARET SCHOOL NPS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

MOUNT VERNON SEMINARY NPS, MS, NCIS, SEB 
NATIONAL CATHEDRAL SCHOOL CLS, NPS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

POTOMAC SCHOOL NPS, NCIS 

ST. ALBANS SCHOOL CLS, MS, NCIS, SEB 

ST. ANTHONY HIGH SCHOOL MS 

ST. CECILIA'S ACADEMY MS 

ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL MS 

SHERIDAN SCHOOL NCIS 
SIDWELL FRIENDS SCHOOL CLS, MS, FC, NCIS, SEB 

VIRGINIA 

AUGUSTA MILITARY ACADEMY, Fort Defiance sis 

BLUE RIDGE COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Millwood NCIS, SEB 

CAROLTON OAKS SCHOOL, Norfolk SEB 

CHATHAM HALL, Chatham sis, NPS, NCIS, SEB 

COLLEGIATE SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, Richmond NCIS, NPS 

EPISCOPAL HIGH SCHOOL, Alexandria sis, NCIS, SEB 

FAIRFAX HALL NCIS 

FISHBURNE MILITARY ACADEMY, Waynesboro sis 

FORK UNION MILITARY ACADEMY, Fork Union sis 

FOXCROFT SCHOOL, Middleburg NPS 

HARGRAVE MILITARY ACADEMY, Chatham sis, NCIS 

HILL SCHOOL, Middleburg SEB 



Membership Lists 

MADEIRA SCHOOL, Greenway SEE, NPS, NCIS 

NORFOLK ACADEMY, Norfolk NCIS, SEB 

RANDOLPH-MACON ACADEMY, Front Royal sis 

ST, AGNES SCHOOL, Alexandria NPS, NCIS 

ST. ANNE'S SCHOOL, Charlottesville NCIS, sis, NPS 

ST. CATHERINE'S SCHOOL, Richmond sis, NPS, NCIS 

ST. CHRISTOPHER'S SCHOOL, Richmond sis, NCIS, SEB 

ST. MARGARET'S SCHOOL, Tappahannock NPS 

SOUTHERN SEMINARY AND JUNIOR COLLEGE, Buena Vista NPS 

STAUNTON MILITARY ACADEMY, Staunton sis 

STRATFORD HALL, Danville SIS 

STUART HALL, Staunton NPS, NCIS, SEB 

VIRGINIA BEACH FRIENDS SCHOOL, Virginia Beach FC 

VIRGINIA EPISCOPAL SCHOOL, Lynchburg NCIS 

WOODBERRY FOREST SCHOOL, Woodberry Forest sis, NCIS, SEB 

WEST VIRGINIA 

LINSLY MILITARY INSTITUTE, Wheeling NC, SEB 

WHEELING COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Wheeling NC, NPS, SEB 

NORTH CAROLINA 

ASHEVILLE SCHOOL, AsheviUe CLS, NCIS, SEB 

ASHEVILLE COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Ashevilie SEB 

CHARLOTTE COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Charlotte SEB 

GIBBONS HALL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, Ashevilie SEB 

OAK RIDGE MILITARY INSTITUTE, Oak Ridge srs 

ST. GENEVIEVE-OF- THE- PINES, Ashevilie sis 

SALEM ACADEMY, Winston-Salem sis, NPS 

SUMMIT SCHOOL, Reynolda SEB 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

AIKBN PREPARATORY SCHOOL, Aiken NCIS, SEB 
ASHLEY HALL, Charleston NPS, sis, NCIS, SEB 

CARLISLE MILITARY SCHOOL, Bamberg sis 

GAUD SCHOOL FOR BOYS, Charleston SEB, NCIS 

GEORGIA 

THE BERRY SCHOOLS, Mt. Berry NCIS, sis 

DARLINGTON SCHOOL, Rome sis, NCIS 

GEORGIA MILITARY ACADEMY, College Park sis 

MARIST COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL, Atlanta srs 

MOUNT ST. JOSEPH ACADEMY, Augusta sis 

RIVERSIDE MILITARY ACADEMY, Gainesville sis 

SAVANNAH COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Savannah NCIS, SEB 
WESTMINSTER SCHOOLS, Atlanta SEB, NCIS, NPS, sis 

FLORIDA 

ACADEMY OF THE HOLY NAMES, Tampa sis 

ADMIRAL FARRAGUT ACADEMY, St. Petersburg NCIS, PSC, sis 

BARTRAM SCHOOL, Jacksonville sis, NPS, NCIS 
BOLLES SCHOOL, Jacksonville sis, p$c, NCIS, SEB 

CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL OF PENSACOLA, Pensacola sis 



Membership Lists Ixxvii 

CENTRAL CATHOLIC SCHOOL, Ft. Lauderdale sis 

CONVENT OF MARY IMMACULATE, Key West sis 

EVERGLADES SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, Miami NCIS, SEB 
GRAHAM-ECKES SCHOOL, Palm Beach CLS, sis, NFS, NCIS, SEB 

Miss HARRIS' FLORIDA SCHOOL, Miami NFS, NCIS 

JESUIT HIGH SCHOOL, Tampa sis 
MIAMI COUNTRY DAY AND RESIDENT SCHOOL, Miami NCIS, SEB 

NOTRE DAME ACADEMY, Miami sis 

OUT-OF-DOOR SCHOOL, Sarasota SEB 

PALM BEACH PRIVATE SCHOOL, Palm Beach SEB 

PINECREST SCHOOL, Ft. Lauderdale sis 

RANSOM SCHOOL, Coconut Grove NCIS, SEB 

ROSARIAN ACADEMY, West Palm Beach sis 

SACRED HEART ACADEMY, Tampa sis 

ST. ANN'S HIGH SCHOOL, West Palm Beach sis 

ST. JOSEPH ACADEMY, St. Augustine sis 
ST. LEO COLLEGE PREPARATORY SCHOOL, St. Augustine SEB, sis 

ST. PATRICK'S SCHOOL, Miami Beach sis 

ST. THERESA SCHOOL, Coral Gables sis 

KENTUCKY 

BEREA COLLEGE FOUNDATION SCHOOL, Berea sis 

KENTUCKY HOME SCHOOL, Louisville sis, NFS 

KENTUCKY MILITARY INSTITUTE, Lyndon PSC, sis 

LOUISVILLE COLLEGIATE SCHOOL, Louisville sis, NFS, NCIS 

LOUISVILLE COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Louisville PSC, NCIS, SEB 

MARGARET HALL SCHOOL, Versailles sis, NFS 

MlLLERSBURG MILITARY INSTITUTE, Millersburg PSC, SIS 

SACRED HEART ACADEMY, Louisville sis 

ST. CATHARINE ACADEMY, Saint Catharine sis 

ST. MARY'S ACADEMY, Paducah sis 

STUART ROBINSON HIGH SCHOOL, Blackey sis 

TENNESSEE 

BATTLE GROUND ACADEMY, Franklin sis 

BAXTER SEMINARY, Baxter PSC, sis 
BAYLOR SCHOOL, Chattanooga SEB, PSC, sis, NCIS, CLS 

BRIGHT SCHOOL, Chattanooga SEB 

CATHEDRAL HIGH SCHOOL, Nashville sis 

CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL FOR BOYS, Memphis sis 

COLUMBIA MILITARY ACADEMY, Columbia PSC, sis 

DAVID LIPSCOMB PREPARATORY SCHOOL, Nashville sis 

FATHER RYAN HIGH SCHOOL, Nashville sis 

FRIENDS VILLE ACADEMY, Friends ville FC 

GIRLS PREPARATORY SCHOOL, Chattanooga NFS, sis, NCIS 

HARPETH HALL, Nashville sis, NFS, NCIS 

HOLY NAMES SCHOOL, Memphis sis 
Miss HUTCHISON'S SCHOOL, Memphis SEB, NFS, sis, NCIS, CLS 

LAUSANNE SCHOOL, Memphis sis 

LEE COLLEGE ACADEMY, Cleveland sis 
MCCALLIE SCHOOL, Chattanooga SEB, CLS, PSC, sis, NCIS 

MEMPHIS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL, Memphis SEB 



Ixxviii Membership Lists 

MONTGOMERY BELL ACADEMY, Nashville sis 

NOTRE DAME HIGH SCHOOL, Chattanooga sis 

PEABODY DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL, Nashville sis 

PRESBYTERIAN DAY SCHOOL, Memphis SEB 

ST. AGNES ACADEMY, Memphis SIS 

ST. ANDREWS SCHOOL, St. Andrews sis 

ST. BERNARD ACADEMY, Nashville SIS 

ST. CECILIA ACADEMY, Nashville SIS 

ST. MARY'S SCHOOL, Sewanee SIS 

ST. THOMAS ACADEMY, Memphis SIS 
SEWANEE MILITARY ACADEMY, Sewanee CLS, sis, NCIS 

TENNESSEE MILITARY INSTITUTE, Sweetwater PSC, sis 
WEBB SCHOOL, Bell Buckle CLS, PSC, sis, NCIS, SBB 

ALABAMA 

BROOKE HILL SCHOOL, Birmingham sis, NFS 

INDIAN SPRINGS, Helena NCIS 

JOHN CARROLL HIGH SCHOOL, Birmingham sis 

MARION INSTITUTE, Marion SIS 

UNIVERSITY MILITARY SCHOOL, Mobile sis, NCIS 

MISSISSIPPI 

CHAMBERLAIN-HUNT ACADEMY, Port Gibson sis 

ST. JOSEPH ACADEMY, Bay St. Louis sis 

ST. MARY OF THE PINES, Chatawa sis 

ST. STANISLAUS SCHOOL, Bay St. Louis sis 

LOUISIANA 

ACADEMY OF THE SACRED HEART, New Orleans sis 

DE LASALLE NORMAL JUNIORATE, Lafayette sis 

HOLY CROSS HIGH SCHOOL, New Orleans sis 

IMMACXJLATA SEMINARY, Lafayette Sis 

ISIDORE NEWMAN HIGH SCHOOL, New Orleans sis, NCIS 

JESUIT HIGH SCHOOL, New Orleans sis 
LOUISE S. MCGEHEE SCHOOL, New Orleans sis, NPS, NCIS 

METAIRIE PARK COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, New Orleans sis, NCIS 

RIDGEWOOD PREPARATORY SCHOOL, New Orleans sis 

SACRED HEART HIGH SCHOOL, New Orleans sis 

ST. JOHN'S HIGH SCHOOL, Shreveport sis 

ST. JOSEPH'S ACADEMY, New Orleans sis 

ST. JOSEPH'S ACADEMY, Baton Rouge sis 
ST, MARTIN'S PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL SCHOOL, New Orleans NCIS, xs 

ST. MARY'S DOMINICAN HIGH SCHOOL, New Orleans sis, NCIS 

ST. PAUL'S COLLEGE, Covington sis 

ST. VINCENT'S ACADEMY, Shreveport sis 

SOUTHFIELD SCHOOL, Shreveport NPS 

URSULINE ACADEMY, New Orleans sis 

TEXAS 

GREENHILL SCHOOL, Dallas NCIS, SEB 
HOCKADAY SCHOOL, Dallas CLS, sis, NPS, NCIS 

INCARNATE WORD HIGH SCHOOL, San Antonio sis 



Membership Lists Ixxix 

JESUIT SCHOOL, Dallas sis 

KINKAID SCHOOL, Houston sis, NCIS, SEE 

LUTHERAN CONCORDIA SCHOOL, Austin sis 

OUR LADY OF VICTORY, Fort Worth sis 

PEACOCK MILITARY ACADEMY, San Antonio sis 

RADFORD SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, El Paso sis, NPS, SEE 

ST. EDWARD'S SCHOOL, Austin sis 

ST. JAMES SCHOOL, Texarkana SEB 

ST. JOHN'S SCHOOL, Houston CLS, sis, NCIS, SEE 

ST. MARK'S SCHOOL OF TEXAS, Dallas NCIS, SEE 

ST. MARY'S HALL, San Antonio sis, NPS, NCIS, SEE 

ST. STEPHEN'S EPISCOPAL SCHOOL, Austin NCIS, sis, SEE 

ST. THOMAS' SCHOOL, Houston sis 

SAN MARCOS ACADEMY, San Marcos sis 

SCHREINER INSTITUTE, Kerrville sis 

TEXAS MILITARY INSTITUTE, San Antonio sis, PSC, NCIS, SEE 

OHIO 

CINCINNATI COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Cincinnati CLS, PSC, NCIS, SEB 
COLLEGE PREPARATORY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, Cincinnati NPS, NCIS 
COLUMBUS ACADEMY, Columbus NC, CLS, PSC, NCIS, SEB 

COLUMBUS SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, Columbus CLS, NPS, NCIS, SEB 

FRIENDS BOARDING SCHOOL, Barnesville FC 

GILMOUR ACADEMY, Gates Mills SEB 

HATHAWAY BROWN SCHOOL, Cleveland NCIS, NPS, SEB 

HAWKEN SCHOOL, Cleveland NCIS, SEB 

HILLSDALE-LOTSPEICH SCHOOL, Cincinnati CLS, NPS, NCIS 

LAUREL SCHOOL, Cleveland CLS, NPS, NCIS, SEB 

MAUMEE VALLEY COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Maumee CLS, NC, NCIS, 

PSC, SEB 

OLD TRAIL SCHOOL, Akron SEB, NC, CLS, NPS, NCIS 

ST. XAVIER HIGH SCHOOL, Cincinnati NC 

SUMMIT SCHOOLS, Cincinnati NCIS, SEB 

UNIVERSITY SCHOOL, Cleveland CLS, PSC, NCIS, SEB 

WESTERN RESERVE ACADEMY, Hudson CLS, PSC, NCIS, SEB 

INDIANA 

CULVER MILITARY ACADEMY, Culver SEE, NC, CLS, PSC, NCIS 

HOWE MILITARY SCHOOL, Howe NC, CLS, PSC, NCIS 

PARK SCHOOL, Indianapolis CLS, PSC, NCIS, SEB 

TUDOR HALL SCHOOL, Indianapolis NC, CLS, NPS, NCIS 

MICHIGAN 

BROOKSIDE SCHOOL CRANBROOK, Bloomfield Hills NCIS 

CRANBROOK SCHOOL, Bloomfield Hills CLS, PSC, NCIS, SEB 

DETROIT COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Detroit CLS, SEB, PSC, NCIS 

GROSSE POINTE UNIV. SCHOOL, Detroit CLS, NPS, NCIS, SEB 

KINGSWOOD SCHOOL CRANBROOK, Bloomfield Hills NPS, NCIS 

LEELANAU SCHOOLS fc Glen Arbor NCIS, SEB 

LIGGETT SCHOOL, Detroit CLS, NPS, NCIS 

UNIVERSITY OF DETROIT HIGH SCHOOL, Detroit NC 



Ixxx Membership Lists 



ILLINOIS 

BELL SCHOOL, Lake Forest NCIS, SEE 

CENTRAL Y.M.C.A. HIGH SCHOOLS, Chicago NC, PSC 

DAKOTAH SCHOOL FOR BOYS, Dakota PSC 

ELGIN ACADEMY, Elgin NC, CLS, PSC, SEB 

FAULKNER SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, Chicago NFS, NCIS 

FERRY HALL, Lake Forest NC, CLS, NPS 

FRANCIS W. PARKER SCHOOL, Chicago PSC, NCIS 

HARRIS SCHOOL, Chicago PSC, NPS, SEB 

HARVARD SCHOOL FOR BOYS, Chicago NC, PSC 

KEITH COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Rockford PSC, SEB 

LAKE FOREST ACADEMY, Lake Forest CLS, PSC, NCIS, SEB 

LAKE FOREST DAY SCHOOL, Lake Forest PSC, NCIS, SEB 
LATIN SCHOOL OF CHICAGO, Chicago CLS, PSC, NPS, NCIS, SEB 

LOYOLA ACADEMY, Chicago NC 

LUTHER INSTITUTE, Chicago PSC 

MARMION MILITARY^ACADEMY, Aurora NC, PSC 

MONTICELLO PREPARATORY SCHOOL, Alton NPS 

MORGAN PARK MILITARY ACADEMY, Morgan Park PSC 

NORTH PARK COLLEGE, Chicago PSC 
NORTH SHORE COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Winnetka PSC, NPS, NCIS 

ONARGA MILITARY SCHOOL, Onarga NC, PSC 

ROOSEVELT MILITARY ACADEMY, Aledo NC, PSC, NCIS 

ROYCEMORE SCHOOL, Evanston NCIS, NC, NPS 

ST. IGNATIUS HIGH SCHOOL, Chicago NC, NCIS 

WESTERN MILITARY ACADEMY, Alton. NC, PSC 

WHEATON COLLEGE ACADEMY, Wheaton NC, PSC 

WISCONSIN 

KEMPER HALL, Kenosha NPS, NCIS, SEB 
MILWAUKEE Co. DAY SCHOOL, Milwaukee CLS, NC, PSC, NCIS, SEB 

MlLWAUKEE-DOWNER SEMINARY, Milwaukee NC, NPS, NCIS 

MILWAUKEE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL, Milwaukee NC, PSC, NCIS, CLS 
NORTHWESTERN MIL. AND NAVAL ACAD. , Lake Geneva NC, PSC, NCIS 

ST. JOHN'S MILITARY ACADEMY, Delafield NC, PSC 
WAYLAND ACADEMY, Beaver Dam NC, SEB, CLS, PSC, NCIS 

MINNESOTA 

BLAKE SCHOOL, Minneapolis CLS, PSC, NCIS, 

BRECK SCHOOL, St. Paul PSC, NCIS 

NORTHROP COLLEGIATE SCHOOL, Minneapolis NPS, NCIS, SEB, CLS 

ST. JAMES MILITARY SCHOOL, Faribault PSC 

ST. MARY'S HALL, Faribault NPS, NCIS, SEB, CLS 

ST. PAUL ACADEMY, St. Paul CLS, NCIS 

ST. THOMAS MILITARY ACADEMY, St. Paul PSC 

SHATTUCK SCHOOL, Faribault CLS, jsc NCIS, SEB 

SUMMIT SCHOOL, St. Paul NPS, NCIS 

IOWA 

ST. KATHARINE'S SCHOOL, Davenport NC, NPS, NCIS 

SCATTERGOOD SCHOOL, West Branch FC 



Membership Lists Ixxxi 



MISSOURI 

BARSTOW SCHOOL, Kansas City NFS, NCIS, SEE 

JOHN BURROUGHS SCHOOL, Clayton PSC, SEB 

THE COMMUNITY SCHOOL, St. Louis SEB 

KEMPER MILITARY SCHOOL, Boonville PSC, NC 
MARY INSTITUTE, St. Louis CLS, PSC, NPS, NCIS, SEB 

MISSOURI MILITARY ACADEMY, Mexico NC, PSC, NCIS 

PEMBROKE COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Kansas City PSC, NCIS, SEB 

PRINCIPIA, St. Louis PSC, NCIS, SEB 

ROCKHURST HIGH SCHOOL, Kansas City NCIS 

ST. Louis COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, St. Louis CLS, NCIS, SEB 

ST. Louis UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL, St. Louis NCIS 

SUNSET HILL SCHOOL, Kansas City NCIS, NPS 

TAYLOR SCHOOL, Clayton PSC, SEB 

THOMAS JEFFERSON SCHOOL, St. Louis PSC, NCIS 

WENTWORTH MILITARY ACADEMY, Lexington NC, PSC 

WHITFIELD SCHOOL, St. Louis SEB 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

ALL SAINTS SCHOOL, Sioux Falls NPS, NCIS 

AUGUST AN A ACADEMY, Canton NCIS 

ST. MARY'S SCHOOL FOR INDIAN GIRLS, Springfield NPS 

NEBRASKA 

BROWNELL HALL, Omaha NC, NPS, NCIS 

KANSAS 

ST. JOHN'S MILITARY SCHOOL, Salina NC, PSC 

OKLAHOMA 

CASADY SCHOOL, Oklahoma City NCIS, SEB 

HOLLAND HALL, Tulsa NPS, NCIS, SEB 

COLORADO 

COLORADO ACADEMY, Denver NCIS, SEB 
COLORADO ROCKY MOUNTAIN SCHOOL, Carbondale - NCIS, SEB 

DENVER COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Denver SEB 

FOUNTAIN VALLEY SCHOOL, Colorado Springs CLS, SBB 

GRALAND COUNTRY SCHOOL, Denver NCIS, SEB 

KENT SCHOOL, INC., Englewood NPS, NCIS, SEB 

RANDELL SCHOOL, Denver NPS, SEB 

UTAH 

ROWLAND HALL SCHOOL, Salt Lake City NPS, NCIS, SEB 

ARIZONA 

FENSTER RANCH SCHOOL, Tucson SEB 

GREEN FIELDS SCHOOL FOR BOYS, Tucson SEB 

JUDSON SCHOOL, Phoenix SEB 

ORME SCHOOL, Mayer NCIS, SEB 

SOUTHERN ARIZONA SCHOOL FOR BOYS, Tucson NCIS, SEB 

VERDE VALLEY SCHOOL, Sedona NCIS, SEB 

NEW MEXICO 

NEW MEXICO MILITARY INSTITUTE, Roswell NC 



Ixxxii Membership Lists 

WASHINGTON 

ANNIE WRIGHT SEMINARY, Tacoma NFS, NCIS, SEB 

HELEN BUSH-PARKSIDE SCHOOL, Seattle NCIS, NFS 

LAKESIDE SCHOOL, Seattle CLS, NCIS, SEB 

ST. NICHOLAS SCHOOL, Seattle CLS, NCIS 

ST. PAUL'S SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, Walla Walla NCIS 

OREGON 

CATLIN-GABEL SCHOOL, Portland SEB, NCIS 

ST. HELEN'S HALL, Portland NCIS 

CALIFORNIA 

ANNA HEAD SCHOOL, Berkeley ci, NCIS, SEB 

ANOAKIA SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, Pasadena ci, NFS, NCIS, SEB 

ARMY AND NAVY ACADEMY, Carlsbad cr, NCIS 

BEL AIR TOWN AND COUNTRY SCHOOL, Los Angeles ci, SEB 

BENTLEY SCHOOL, Berkeley NPS 

BISHOP'S SCHOOL, La Jolla CLS, NFS, NCIS, SEB 

BLACK-FOXE MILITARY INSTITUTE, Los Angeles ex, NCIS, SEB 

BRENTWOOD TOWN AND COUNTRY SCHOOL, Los Angeles ci, SEB 

CALIFORNIA MILITARY ACADEMY, Los Angeles ci 

CASTILLEJA SCHOOL, Palo Alto ci, NFS, NCIS, SKB 

CATE SCHOOL, Carpinteria ci, CLS, NCIS, SEB 

CHADWICK SCHOOL, Rolling Hills SEB, a, NCIS 

CHANDLER DAY SCHOOL, Altadena CI 

CHILDREN'S COUNTRY SCHOOL, Los Gatos ci 

CRANE COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Santa Barbara ci, NCIS, SEB 

CRYSTAL SPRINGS SCHOOL, San Mateo NCIS, SEB 

DESERT SUN SCHOOL, Idyllwild ci, NCIS, SEB 

FOINTRIDGE PREP. SCHOOL FOR BOYS, Pasadena CLS, ci, NCIS, SKB 

FORD COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, Los Alto ci, NCIS, SHE 

FKANCXS W. PARKER SCHOOL, San Diego ci, SEB 

HARBOR HILL, San Francisco NCIS, SEB 

HARVARD SCHOOL, North Hollywood CLS, NCIS> SEE 

HOWARD SCHOOL, Santa Barbara CI 

ISABELLE BUCKLEY SCHOOLS, Los Angeles NCIS, SKB 

KATHARINE BRANSON SCHOOL, Ross ci, NFS, NCIS, SKB 
KATHERINE DELMAR BURKE SCHOOL, San Francisco ci, NFS, NCIS, SKB 

LACUNA BLANCA SCHOOL, Santa Barbara NCIS, SEB 

LA TOLLA COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL, La Jolla SKB 

LICK-WILMERDING SCHOOL, San Francisco ci, NCIS, SKB 

MARLBO ROUGH SCHOOL, Los Angeles NFS, ci 

MAYFIELD SCHOOL, Pasadena SICB 

MENLO SCHOOL, Menlo Park SEB, CLS, ci NCIS 

MIDLAND SCHOOL, Los Olivos ci, NCIS, SEB 

OJAI VALLEY SCHOOL, Ojai NCIS, ci, SEE 

PACIFIC ACKWORTH FRIENDS SCHOOL, Temple City FC 

PACIFIC OAKS SCHOOL, Pasadena ^c 

POLYTECHNIC SCHOOL, Pasadena ci, NCIS, SKB 

PROGRESS SCHOOL, Long Beach NCIS, SEE 

ST. MATTHEW'S PARISH SCHOOL, Pacific Palisades SEB 

SAN MIGUEL SCHOOL, National City SEB 



Membership Lists Ixxxiii 

SARAH Dix HAMLIN SCHOOL, San Francisco ci, NFS, NCIS, SEB 

SOUTHWESTERN MILITARY ACADEMY, San Marino ci, NCIS, SEB 

THACHER SCHOOL, Ojai CLS, ci, NCIS, SEB 

TOWN SCHOOL FOR BOYS, San Francisco ci, NCIS, SEB 

WEBB SCHOOL OF CALIFORNIA, Clarernont ci, NCIS, SEB, CLS 

WESTLAKE SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, Los Angeles ci, NCIS 

WESTRIDGE SCHOOL, Pasadena ci, NFS, NCIS, SEB 

WILKINS PRIVATE HIGH SCHOOL, San Francisco SEB 

HAWAII 

HAWAII EPISCOPAL ACADEMY, Kamuela NCIS, SEB 

IOLANI SCHOOL, Honolulu NCIS, SEB 

KAMEHAMEHA SCHOOL, Honolulu NFS, NCIS, SEB 

PUNAHOU SCHOOL, Honolulu NCIS, SEB 



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DESCRIPTIVE TEXT 
LEADING PRIVATE SCHOOLS 

Individual Statistical and Critical Descriptions 

Representative and important primary 
and secondary schools are listed and 
described here. They are selected impar- 
tially on the basis of their educational 
contribution and do not pay for space in 
these write-ups. All facts have been care- 
fully checked. We hereby express our 
gratitude to those contributing data to us. 

The schools are arranged geographically 
by states and grouped alphabetically under 
cities and towns to bring neighboring ones 
together. The order follows from New 
England down the east coast to the south 
central states, and from the Great Lake 
states through the Rockies to the north 
pacific states, California, and Hawaii. 



For listings and descriptions with objective information on post 
secondary schools, consult Junior Colleges 
and Specialized Schools and Colleges; for 
special schools, the Directory for Excep- 
tional Children; and for summer pro- 
grams, the Guide to Summer Camps ; all 
separately published in the Sargent Hand- 
book Series. 



EXPLANATORY NOTE 

A key to the bold face statistical paragraphs and an explanation 
of the abbreviations and data given are here presented: 

Bdg resident or boarding 

Class rms number of classrooms 

Coed coeducational 

Col Prep college preparatory program 

Co Day country day 

Courts number of tennis courts 

Dir director 

Dorm rms number of dormitory rooms 

Dorms number of dormitories 

Elem number of students in elementary grades (Kindergarten 

through 8th) 
Enr enrollment 

Entd Col number of graduates entering colleges 
Entd Prep Sch number of graduates entering preparatory schools 
Est date of establishment 
Extra c estimated additional charges 
Eve evening 

Fac faculty full-time and part-time 
Fields number of athletic fields 
General (Gen) general academic program 
Grad number of graduates 
Gym gymnasium 

Head head master or head mistress 
High Sch high school 
Inc incorporated 

Inc nonprofit incorporated not for profit 
Jr Col junior college 
Lab science laboratory 
Lib vols number of volumes in library 
Plant value of school plant 
Post Grad post graduate year 
Prin principal 

Scholarships number of full and partial scholarships 
Sec number of students in secondary grades (grades 9 through 

12) 

Studios number of music and art studios 
Tel. telephone number 
Tui stated tuition charges 
Yr Adm average number of students admitted each year 

I- VIII elementary grades 

1-4 high school grades 

(-(-$ ) additional to stated tuition charge 



MAINE 

BATH, ME. Pop 10,644. Alt 50 ft. MC R.R. 28 mi. NE of Port- 
land. A summer resort and shipbuilding center, today Bath also 
has various manufactures. Woolwich is directly across the Ken- 
nebec River from Bath. The school is on a 135 acre campus 
bordering a large lake. 



THE KENNEBEC SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 13-17 

Woolwich, Me. The Middle Road. Tel. Hilltop 3-4701. 
Philip Wentworth Beaney, Dir. 

Grades VII- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Reme- 
dial Reading Make-up Courses Tutoring. 

Enr 20. Fac full 3, part-time 2. 

Tui $2400 (+$400). Est 1955. Proprietary. 

Summer Camp. Tui $500. 

This small, home-like school, which accepts students through- 
out the year, provides an individualized program for boys who 
are behind in their academic work, who may be socially malad- 
justed, but who recognize that they need help and are willing to 
work. The school does not accept boys with severe emotional 
disturbances, or retarded boys. A feature of the program is three 
months of travel when the entire school body transfers to a for- 
eign country. Recent visits have been made to Mexico and the 
Caribbean, while during the camp season a month is spent on an 
island refuge in Canada. 

SO. BERWICK, ME. Pop 1830. B&M R. R. Equidistant from 
Boston and Portland, and 5 mi NE of Dover, N. H. Rt. U.S. 4. 

Berwick, on the Salmon Falls River, is a quiet town in southern- 
most Maine. The old Academy in the town, associated with Sarah 
Orne Jewett, has graduated presidents of five colleges. 

BERWICK ACADEMY 
Bdg Boys Ages 13-19; Day Coed 

South Berwick, Me. Academy St. Tel. 288. 
Albert L. Kerr, B.A., Yale, Ed.M., Harvard, Head. 



Me. Leading Private Schools 4 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep Make-up Tutoring Remedial Read- 
ing. 

Enr Bdg 20, Day 150, Fac full-time 11. Adm Staff 2. 

Grad '5740. Entd Col '579 ((Bates 3, U of Me. 2, U of N. H. 
2, Bowdoin 1). 

Tui $1500 (4- $50). Scholarships full 2, partial 6 ($5000). Self-help 
pgrm. Est 1791. Inc 1791 nonprofit. 

Plant $500,000. Endowment $250,000. Dorm rms 15. Class rms 
10. Lib 12,000 vols. Lab. Field. 

The oldest school in Maine, the Academy holds a charter, signed 
by Gov. John Hancock when Maine was a possession of Massa- 
chusetts, as an institution of higher learning. Long serving local 
needs and with preponderant day enrollment, the board of trust- 
ees has, with the advent in 1957 of Mr. Kerr (who came from 
Gov. Dummer Academy and the Gilman School), emphasized the 
college preparatory curriculum and re-established the boarding 
department for boys through acquisition of additional property 
and facilities. See also page 620 

BETHEL. ME. Pop 2500. Alt 643. GT R.R. 24 mi. SW of Rum- 
ford, Rt U.S.2. Due east of the Presidential Range of the White 
Mountains, near the N.H. line, Bethel occupies the terraced inter- 
vales of the Androscoggin Valley. Facing the village green is the 
Inn, whose founder, Dr. J. G. Gehring, is celebrated in Robert 
Herrick's "The Master of the Inn." The academy buildings are on 
Church St. 

GOULD ACADEMY 
Bdg and Day Coed Ages 13-19 
Bethel, Me. Church St. Tel.VA 4-2131 
Elwood F. Ireland, B.S., M.A., Bates, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General Commercial Home 
Economics Manual Arts. Mechanical Drawing Music. 

Enr Bdg Boys 55, Girls 60; Day Boys 95, Girls 110. Fac full 22, 
part-time 1. 

Grad '5765. Entd Col '57-43. (U of Me. 7, U of N. H. 4, Syra- 
cuse 1, Smith 1, Wheaton 1, U of Rochester 1). Alumni 1950. 

Tui Bdg $1500, Day $360-500. Scholarships partial 54. Est 1836. 
Inc. nonprofit. 

Plant $1,750,000. Dorm rms 64. Class rms 16. Lib 4000 vols. 
Labs 3. Studio music 1. Gyms 2. Fields 3. Courts 4. 

Attracting students from families of moderate means along the 
entire eastern seaboard, with half the boarding pupils -from out-of- 
state, Gould offers equipment and advantages made possible by 
generous benefactions, and unusual for the region.This traditional 
New England academy came under the able and spirited direction 



New England 5 

of Mr. Ireland in 1940, succeeding a long line of distinguished 
head masters. 

A program of academic and recreational activities under an 
able faculty offers many opportunities for development. Among 
student activities are home economics, outing, camera, and lan- 
guage clubs. Graduates of the preparatory curriculum go to rep- 
resentative institutions and colleges about the country. See page 
788 



BIDDEFORD, ME. Pop 20,785. B&M R. R. 15 mi. S W of 
Portland, Rt U.S. 1. This trading center on the right bank of the 
Saco River dates back to 1616. Nearby are the famous Old 
Orchard Beach, Fortune Rocks, and Hills Beach. The school and 
college are at the mouth of the river, four miles from the Town. 

ST. FRANCIS COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 

Bdg and Day - Boys Ages 13-17 
Biddeford, Me. 605 Pool Rd, Tel. 4-8002. 
Rev. Clarence Laplante, Prin. 

High Sch 2-4. Col Prep. 

Enr Bdg 115, Day 10. Fac full 13, part-time 1. 

Grad '5735. Entd Col '5730. (St. Francis 6, Catholic U 3, 
U of Me. 2, Providence 1, Northeastern 1). Alumni 245. 

Tui Bdg $1000, Day $530. Scholarships partial 12 ($3000). Est 
1933. Roman Catholic. 

Plant $1,000,000. Dorms 2. Class rms 12. Lib 15,000 vols. Labs 2. 
Studios music 5, art 1. Gym. Fields. Courts 5. 

This preparatory school was founded by the Franciscan Fathers 
to meet the needs of Catholic students in this section of the 
New England states. The majority of graduates enter the affili- 
ated St. Francis College, with which the school shares facilities. 
Activities include music, dramatics, sports, and various clubs, 
including printing. The Rev. Laplante succeeded the Rev. Norman 
Thibodeau as principal in 1955. 

BRIDGTON, ME. Pop 1866. Altitude 405 feet 40 mi. NW of 
Portland, Rt. U.S.302. Long Lake and the attractions of the Sebago 
region have drawn many summer camps. Pleasant Mountain, 
nearby, has been developed as a popular ski and winter sports 
area, and Conway, N.H., is but 25 miles away. The Academy is in 
North Bridgton. 

BRIDGTON ACADEMY 
Bdg Boys Agos 14-20; Day Coed 14-20 

North Bridgton, Me. Tel. Midway 7-3322. 

Richard L. Goldsmith, A.B., Bowdoin, M.Ed., Bates, Head. 



Me. Leading Private Schools 6 

High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep (Classical, Scientific) 
General. French Typing. Remedial Readme. 

Enr Bdg 75; Day Boys 10, Girls 5. Fac full 9, part-time 2. 

Grad '5745. Entd Col '5738. (U of Maine 6, Brown 4, Bates 
3, Colby 2, Tufts 2, Rutgers 1). Alumni 1500. 

Tui Bdg $1475 (+$25), Day $350. Scholarships partial 10 
($3000). Self-help pgrm. Est 1808. 

Plant $250,000. Endowment $70,000. Dorm rms 41. Class rms 
9. Lib 5000 vols. Lab. Studio music 1. Gym. Fields 2. Courts 2. 
Boating facilities. 

This academy, organized by a local group when Maine was still 
part of Massachusetts, has always maintained close relationships 
with the community. H. H. Sampson, principal for two decades, 
was succeeded by Mr. Goldsmith in 1943. He has opened two 
dormitories, added an ice rink and other facilities, and extended 
the academic work, which now includes remedial reading. College 
preparatory students enter the universities of Me. and Mass, and 
other colleges and universities throughout New England. Extra- 
curricular music, art, dramatics, and publications, along with 
sports, are emphasized. 

A new science laboratory was completed in 1956. 

CHARLESTON, ME. Pop 771. Rt.15. A quiet village 25 miles 
NW of Bangor, Charleston is in the farming region of Penobscot 
County. The Institute stands on a hill 

HIGGINS CLASSICAL INSTITUTE 
Bdg and Day- Coed Ages 14-20 

Charleston, Me. Tel. Corinth 49-21. 

Leon B. Meader, A.B., Wheaton (111.), M.Ed., Univ of Me., Head. 

High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep (Classical, Latin, Scientific, 
English) General Home Economics Commercial Music. 

Enr Bdg Boys 95, Girls 35; Day Boys 30, Girls 25. Fac full 10, 
part-time 1. Adm Staff 1. 

Grad '5654. Entd Col '5625 (U of Me. 20, Husson 5). Alumni 
1500. 

Tui Bdg $775, Day $330. Scholarships partial 20 ($3000). Self- 
help pgrm. Est 1837. Inc nonprofit. Baptist affiliated. 

Plant $750,000. Dorm rms 70. Class rms 10. Lib 2500 vols. Labs 2. 
Studio music 1. Gym. Fields 2. 

For fifty years proprietary and named Charleston Academy, this 
school was purchased and reorganized by the Rev. John H. 
Higgins in 1887 and presented to Colby as its fourth fitting school. 

The band and a glee club, as well as sports, are favorite activ- 
ities. The majority of college preparatory graduates enter the 
University of Me., with others, including two scholarship students, 
For further information, write Porter Sargent 



Me. New England 7 

going to Colby, and a few to Boston University, Bates, and 
Bowdoin. Charles E. O'Connor succeeded Philip E. Keith in 1953. 
Mr. Header was appointed in 1954. 

FRYEBURG, ME. Pop 1023. Alt 420 ft MC R.R. 50 mi. NW of 
Portland, Rt U.S.302. In the southern foothills of the White 
Mountains, just over the N.H. boundary from Conway, this rural 
town on the Saco River intervales is dominated by Mt Kearsarge. 

FRYEBURG ACADEMY 
Bdg and Day Coed Ages 13-19 

Fryeburg, Me. Main St. Tel. 119. 

John H. Mitchell, B.A., Univ of N.H., M.A., Columbia, Prin. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep (Classical, Scientific) General Com- 
mercial Manual Arts Agriculture Home Economics. Music, 

Enr Bdg Boys 65, Girls 50; Day Boys 130, Girls 110. Fac full 
24, part-time 3. 

Grad '5783. Entd Col *57 35. (U ox Me. 9, Bowdoin 3, Gor- 
ham 2, Bates 1, Harvard 1, Colby 1). Alumni 2230. 

Tui Bdg $1300 (+$30), Day $365. Scholarships partial 12. Self- 
help pgrm. Est 1792. Inc nonprofit. 

Plant $500,000. Endowment $500,000. Dorm rms 70. Class rms 25. 
Lib 5000 vols. Labs 2. Studio music 1. Gyms 2. Fields 5. Courts 2, 

Started and since maintained as a coeducational school, Frye- 
burg enjoyed as its first principal Paul Langdon, the Bernard 
Langdon of Oliver Wendell Holmes' novel "Elsie Venner." His 
most eminent successor was Daniel Webster, who here made his 
first and only attempt at teaching school. Elroy O. LaCasce, 
principal from 1922, was succeeded in 1955 by Mr. Mitchell, for- 
merly of Horace Mann School and Scarsdale High School. 

^ Fryeburg gives equal emphasis to college preparatory and voca- 
tional study. The University of Me. enrolls many graduates, with 
Bowdoin, Harvard, Tufts, Dartmouth and Bates matriculating 
some. Numerous sports are popular, as well as the glee club and 
dramatics. 

HEBRON, ME. Pop (twp) 829. Altitude 600 ft. 11 miles N.W. 
of Auburn, Rt.119. A quiet village of western Me,, in an orchard 
center, Hebron is near the famed health resort of Poland Spring 
and the mineral deposits of Paris. 

HEBRON ACADEMY 
Bdg- Boys Ages 14-18 

Hebron, Me. Tel. Woodland 6-2842. 

Claude L. Allen, Jr., A.B., Harvard, M.A. (Hon), Colby, Head. 



Me. Leading Private Schaob 8 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Science Mathematics History Eng- 
lish Languages. 

Enr Bdg 185, Day 5. Fac full 19, part-time 1, 

Grad '57 68. Entd Col '5766. (Bowdoin 5, Tufts 5, Colby 4, 
Cornell 3, Duke 3, Harvard 3). Alumni 4500. 

Tui $1800 (+$100). Scholarships partial 25 ($20,000). Est 1804. 
Inc nonprofit. 

Plant $1,750,000. Endowment $300,000. Dorm rms 85. Class rms 
14. Lib 6000 vols. Labs 3. Gym. Swimming pool. Field. Courts 5. 
Indoor hockey rink. 

Early a coeducational Baptist academy, and a fitting school for 
Colby from 1877, Hebron was reorganized in 1922 for boys only, 
and was headed by Ralph L. Hunt until 1943. The school entered 
upon a new era in 1946 with the appointment of Mr. Allen, for 
fourteen years on the Deerfield faculty. With increased funds and 
an able teaching staff, the academy takes its place among the 
sound preparatory schools of northern New England. Among its 
alumni are names of more than local fame. 

Musical and debating organizations, hobby groups, and an ex- 
tensive program of sports are among the extra-curricular activities. 
Graduates enter many colleges, including Brown, Tufts, Harvard, 
Dartmouth, Bowdoin, and Colby. See also page 621 



RENTS HILL, ME. Pop 90. MC R.R. to Augusta or Winthrop, 
Rt. 41. In the Belgrade Lake region 14 miles NW of Augusta, 
this little community is part of Readfield. 

KENTS HILL SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Coed Ages 13-19 

Kents Hill, Me. Tel. Mutual 5-3301. 

William Warren Dunn, A.B., Wesleyan, M.A., Brown, Head. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad L Col Prep Secretar- 
ial General. Speech Psychology Sociology Crafts Shop. 

Enr Bdg Boys 60, Girls 55; Day Boys 35, Girls 30. Fac full 19, 
part-time 2. 

Grad '5752. Entd Col '5731. (U of Me. 6, Norwich 2, Bow- 
doin 1, Wesleyan 1, Wheaton 1, Colby 1). Alumni 2500. 

Tui Bdg $1700 (+$150), Day $500. Scholarships partial 27 
($8000). Est 1824. Methodist. 

Plant $500,000. Endowment $350,000. Dorm rms 58. Class rms 
11. Lib 4200 vols. Labs 2. Studios music 1, art 1. Theatre. Gym. 
Fields 3. Courts 3. Shop. Ceramics Shop. Handcrafts Shop. 

For further information, write Porter Sargent 



Me, New England 9 

Established as Maine Wesleyan Seminary by Luther Sampson, 
a Methodist moved by "divine direction/* in the town where he 
had founded his home in 1798, Kents Hill has for more than a 
century prepared for college entrance. 

Mr. Dunn, former senior master at Vermont Academy, has been 
principal since 1942 and has liberalized the curricula and tone. 
During the last decade there has been a gradual growth of the 
boarding facilities and program. Extracurricular activities stress 
arts and crafts, music, dramatics, publications, hobby clubs, and 
a full complement of sports. Many college preparatory graduates 
enter the Univ of Me., with others attending Bowdoin, Colby, 
Bates, Wesleyan. See page 789 

PITTSFIELD, ME. Pop 3012. Alt 205 ft MC R.R. 30 mi. NE of 
Waterville, Rt.11-100. An attractive little town on the Sebasticook 
River, Pittsfield lies between Waterville and Bangor. 

MAINE CENTRAL INSTITUTE 
Bdg Boys Ages 13-20, Day Coed 13-20 

Pittsfield, Me. Tel. HUdson 7-6941. 
Edward R. Stanley, A.B., Bates, Prin. 

High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep General Commercial 
Home Economics. Music Speech Reading Industrials Arts. 

Enr Bdg 110; Day Boys 175, Girls 160. Fac full 21, part-time 2. 

Grad '57143. Entd Col '5777. (U of Me. 33, U of Conn. 3, 
U of Mich, 3, U of N.H. 2, Citadel 2, Colby 2). Alumni 2700. 

Tui Bdg $1350, Day $375. Scholarships partial 33 ($10,000). Self- 
help pgrm. Est 1866. Inc. nonprofit 

Plant $650,000. Dorm rms 55. Class rms 19. Lib 3000 vols. Lab. 
4. Studio music 1. Gym. Fields 5. 

For many years Baptist, but now non-denominational, and 
long intimately connected with Bates, this has a varied vocational 
program as well as college preparatory work. Mr. Stanley was 
appointed following the resignation in 1956 of W. Howard Nib- 
lock, who had succeeded Howard Washburn in 1946. 

Music, sports, debating, and the outing club are among ex- 
tra-curricular 'offerings. More than half the college preparatory 
graduates enter the University of Me., although some go on to 
Bates, Bowdoin, Colby, Springfield, and the University of N.H 

While providing strong testing and counselling for college, the 
Institute also stresses its programs in Industrial Arts, Business, 
and Home Economics. 

A new science-laboratory classroom building was readied for 
occupancy in the Fall of 195*7, and a new library building is 
planned. 



Me. Leading Private Schools 10 

PORTLAND, ME. Pop 77,634. Alt 26 ft B&M; GT; MC R.R. 
100 mi. N of Boston, Rt U.S.I. The mercantile capital of Maine, 
this old Down East seaport town retains the mellow dignity of 
the nineteenth century. Its well kept parks and eighteenth century 
homes enhance the city's natural loveliness. Waynflete School is 
in the West End residential section. 

THE WAYNFLcTE SCHOOL 
Day Boys Ages 4-13, Girls 4-18 

Portland 4, Me. 360 Spring St. Tel. Spruce 3-3086. 

John B. Chapman, A.B., Dartmouth, M.A., Columbia, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col 
Prep. General. French (Grade III and up). Remedial Reading. 

Enr Girls 120, Boys 55. Fac full 17, part-time 6. 

Grad '56 10. Entd Col '5610 (Smith 2, Wellesley 1, Mt. Holy- 
oke 1, U of Mich. 1, Endicott Jr 1). Alumnae 500. 

Tui $375-700. Scholarships full 6, partial 18 ($5000). Est 1897. 
Inc 1927 nonprofit. 

Plant $175,000. Class rms 21, Lib 3000 vols. Lab. Studios music 
1, art 1. Gym. 

This sound college preparatory school developed from the con- 
servative old Waynflete Latin School Flexible programming and 
diversified courses in art and music were introduced by Barbara 
Woodruff Freeman, head mistress from 1931 to 1948. The elemen- 
tary grades were opened to boys when S. Allan Howes became 
headmaster in 1948. Mr. Chapman succeeded him in 1954. 

Activities include music, dramatics, community service, and a 
limited program of sports. Waynflete sends many of its graduates 
to such colleges as Wellesley, Wheaton, and Smith. 

Extensive remodelling, and addition of a new gym have sub- 
stantially increased the plant 



TURNER CENTER, ME. Pop (twp) 1712. 12 mi. N of Auburn, 
Rt 4, In the valley of the Androscoggin River, Turner Center was 
settled in 1773. 

LEAVITT INSTITUTE 
Bdg -Boys Ages 13-18; Day -Coed 13-18 

Turner Center, Me. Tel. 51-5, 

John F. MacMorran, A.B., Bowdoin, A.M., Boston Univ, Head. 

High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep General Business 
Secretarial Agriculture Home Economics. Music. 

Enr. Bdg 20; Day Boys 80, Girls 85. Fac full 12, part-time 3. 

Grad '5736. Entd Col '57 9. (U of Me. 4, Farmington 2, 



Me. New England 11 

Westbrook J.C. 2, Bowdoin 1). Alumni 896. 

Tui Bdg $1200 (+$50), Day $350. Scholarships. Self-help pgrm. 
Est 1896, Inc 1901 nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Tui $350 eight wks. 

Plant $750,000. Endowment $90,000. Dorm rms 15. Class rms. 15. 
Lib 5000 vols. Lab. Studio music 1. Gym. Fields 4. 

Founded by James Madison Leavitt to promote progressive 
education, this school enrolls not only from the town but also 
from a wider geographical area. A home economics club, Farmers 
of America, debating, and sports are among activities. While the 
majority of students take specialized terminal training, some do 
college preparatory work; many of the latter enter the University 
of Maine. Mr. MacMorran, who succeeded Eugene W. Ellis in 
1953, has expanded the enrollment, both boarding and day, refur- 
bished much of the plant, especially the science, home economics, 
and commercial facilities, and more closely integrated vocational 
and preparatory programs. 

VASSALBORO, ME. Pop (twp) 2261. Alt 472 ft MC R.R. Rt. 
U.S. 201. In the lower Kennebec River valley, on high land be- 
tween the state capital, Augusta, and the college town of Water- 
ville, is the village of Vassalboro. Oak Grove School, commanding 
the valley, is a mile above and occupies 400 acres. 

OAK GROVE SCHOOL 
Bdg Girls Ages 11-20 

Vassalboro, Me. Tel. Waterville TR 2-9815. 

Robert Owen, B.S., Colby, Ed.M., Harvard, Prin; Eva Pratt 

Owen, M.A., Univ of Me., M.A., Colby, Assoc Prin. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep Gen- 
eral. Art Music Speech Languages. 

Enr 110. Fac full 16, part-time 3. Staff 5. 

Grad '5730. Entd Col '5728. (Mary Washington 3, Cornell 
2, Duke 2, Vassar 1, Wellesley 1, Barnard 1). Alumnae 2500. 

Tui $1500-1950 (+$150). Scholarships 8. Est 1849. Friends. 

Plant $2,000,000. Dorm rms 75. Class rms 16. Lib 5000 vols. Labs 
2. Studios music 7, art 2. Gym. Outdoor swimming pool. Fields 2. 
Courts 5. Riding. Indoor Riding Ring. 

Prominent among the Friends schools, this endowed and well 
organized school reflects the broad interests and international 
friendliness of the Quaker life. Established by five influential 
and scholarly Friends who desired a select school for their chil- 
dren, and having had among its principals such Quakers as Rufus 
Jones, Oak Grove enjoys patronage from many lands and from 
all denominations. 



Me. Leading Private Schools 12 

For seventy-five years a coeducational institution, since 1925 
under the present heads it has devoted its full program to girls. 
A new quadrangle of modern buildings, and a loyal body of alum- 
nae are among the fruits of the untiring zeal and devotion that 
Mr. and Mrs. Owen have given their girls and the school. A chap- 
ter of the Cum Laude Society was established in 1948. Graduates 
choose widely from among the foremost colleges, large and small. 
Programs to further individual interests are chosen from a 
variety of electives. Extra-curricular activities include the 
popular dramatics, music and art; and vigorous clubs for French, 
Latin, Spanish, international relations, skating, skiing, and riding. 
See pages 738-39 



WATERVILLE, ME. Pop 18,287. Alt 112 ft MC R.R. 17 mi. N 
of Augusta, Rt U.S.201. At Ticonic Falls on the Kennebec River, 
this manufacturing city is the home of Colby College. The prepar- 
atory school is near the center. 

COBURN CLASSICAL INSTITUTE 

Co Day Coed Ages 12-20 

Waterville, Me. Elm St. Tel. Trinity 2-9550. 

Charles A. O'Reilly, B.A., Colby, M.A., Putney Graduate, Head. 

Grades VJI-VIII High Sch 1-4. Post Grad 1. Col Prep. 

Enr Boys 40, Girls 20. Fac full 7, part-time 3. 

Grad '578. Entd Col '575. Alumni 1200. 

Tui $350. Scholarships full 1, partial 5 ($1000). Est 1820. Inc 
1901 nonprofit 

Successively named The Latin Grammar School, preparatory to 
The Maine Literary and Technological Institute (now Colby Col- 
lege), then Waterville Classical Institute, and at present Coburn 
Classical Institute, this school numbers governors, college presi- 
dents, U. S. senators, congressmen, court justices, and other pub- 
lic figures among its graduates. First principal was Elijah Parish 
Lovejoy, anti-slavery editor and apostle of the Freedom of the 
Press. Its present proper name was taken in 1883 in honor of ex- 
Governor Abner Coburn, who donated the institute building. Mr. 
O'Reilly succeeded Richard Poole Wooster in 1956, at which time 
the small boarding department was discontinued. 

Unlike many of its kind in Maine, Coburn does not serve as the 
local high school Since the Fall of 1956 it has been entirely coun- 
try day, with activities including music, art, dance, dramatics, and 
athletics. 



When writing schools, please mention this Handbook 



Me. New England 13 

YORK HARBOR, ME. Pop 850. B&M R.R. Rt U.S.L At the 

southern-most tip of Me., this seaside town, near Portsmouth, 
N.H., is a frequented summer resort. 

HARMON HALL 
Bdg - Boys Ages 14-20 

York Harbor, Me. Harmon Park. Tel. 709. 
Melden E. Smith, B.S., Columbia, Head. 

High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep. Reading Improvement. 

Enr Bdg 50, Day 5. Fac full-time 6. Adm Staff 3. 

Tui Bdg $1700 (+$200), Day $575. Est 1944. Inc 1947. 

Summer Session. Coed Enr 70. Tui $500 eight wks. 

Lowell Hall School Camp for Boys 8-14. Tui $500. 



Harmon Hall, now college preparatory for boys, provides in- 
dividualized and class instruction in the academic course. Lowell 
Hall also offers boys 10 to 14 grade instruction during the school 
year. 

For explanation of data and statistics included for each school, con- 
sult the Explanatory Note at the beginning of the Descriptive Text 
and the Introduction. 

If you do not find the right school for your child, write, stating 
particulars, to Porter Sargent, 11 Beacon St., Boston 8, Mass. 

For further schools in any area, refer to the Supplementary Lists. 

For Summer Camps and Summer Schools, see the Schools Classified 
By Type and the Camp Directory. 

.For Junior College and Specialized School information, consult the 
Sargent Guide to Private Junior Colleges and Specialized Schools. 

If you do not find the school you seek, look to the Index. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 

AND OVER, N.H. Pop 1057. Alt 620 ft. B&M R.R. 40 mi. SE of 
Hanover, Rt U.S.4. This beautiful little village, 95 miles from 
Boston, lies in high country near Mt Kearsarge. The 40 acre 
campus of the Academy dominates the village and extends toward 
Ragged Mountain. 

PROCTOR ACADEMY 
Bdg Boys Ages 14-19 

Andover, N.H. Tel. Republic 5-2631. 
Lyle H. Farrell, B.A., Univ of N.H., Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep Liberal. Aeronautics Science Eco- 
nomics History of Religion Mechanical Drawing Machine 
Shop Boat Building Art. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg 125, Day 1. Fac full 21, part-time 1. 

Grad '5730. Entd Col '5724. (U of N.H. 5, St. Lawrence 3, 
Colby 2, Colorado 2, Princeton 1, Middlebury 1). Alumni 1457, 

Tui Bdg $2000 (+$200), Day $500. Scholarships full 2, partial 9 
($5400). Est 1848. Inc nonprofit. Unitarian a&liated. 

Plant $500^000, Endowment $5p,.000. Dorm rms 80. Class rms 12. 
Lib 5000 vols. Lab. Studios music 1, art 1. Gym. Fields 2. Courts 
4. Skiing and boating facilities. 

This was originally the coeducational Andover Academy, re- 
named in 1879 in honor of a local benefactor, and long affiliated 
with the Unitarian Church though undenominational in practice. 
After 1936, when J. Halsey Gulick was appointed head master, 
the school considerably broadened in scope, with the curricula 
adjusted to meet individual requirements, and with greater oppor- 
tunities for students with aptitudes along more practical lines. 

Mr. Farrell, appointed head master in 1952 after seventeen years 
as assistant head master, under whose leadership the extensive 
remedial reading and mathematics programs were built and who 
is identified with the Proctor honor system and school govern- 
ment, continues the tradition of gearing academic work to the 
demands of the time, with development of courses for the 
intellectually gifted. He has also undertaken a building: and 
renovation program adding notably to the attractiveness and 
utility of the campus. Thorough college preparation is empha- 
sized, with graduates entering Middlebury, the Univ. of N.H., 
Bowcloin, Wesleyan, Yale, and others. The liberal course permits 

14 



N. H. New England 15 

either transfer to college preparation or stress on shop work. 
Sports, publications, antique cars, and various clubs give oppor- 
tunities for widespread extra-curricular activities. See page 622 

CANAAN, N.H. Pop 1465. Alt 942 ft B&M R.R. 18 mi. E of 
Hanover, Rt. U.S. 4. Three miles N of the village, the School is 
in the community of Canaan Street and occupies the former 
HaffenrerTer estate on Canaan Street Lake. 



CARDIGAN MOUNTAIN SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 9-15 

Canaan, N.H. Canaan St. Tel. LAkeside 3-4321. 
Roland W. Burbank, A.B., M.S., Dartmouth, Head. 

Grades V-VIII High Sch 1. Music French Remedial Reading 

Enr Bdg 85, Day 5. Fac full-time 13. 

Grad '5719. Entd Prep School '5713. (Fryeburg 2, New 
Hampton 2, Northwood 2, Proctor 2, St. Johnsbury 2, Tabor 2). 
Alumni 222. 

Tui Bdg $1850 (+$150), Day $600. Scholarships full 2, partial 4 
($4000), Est 1945. Inc 1945 nonprofit 

Summer Session. Rem English and Math. Tui $550. 

Plant $750,000. Endowment $15,250. Dorm rms 56. Class rms 8. 
Lib 1,020 vols. Labs 1. Studios music 4, Fields 2. Courts 4. 

Cardigan Mountain, established with the support of a group of 
well known New England industrialists, emphasizes a friendly 
country atmosphere in the N.H. mountains. The school stresses 
academic fundamentals, and the remedial language training pro- 
gram, inaugurated by Wilfred W. Clark, successor in 1950 to 
Robert M. Kimball, is extensive and intensive. 

When the school completed the move to its new $600,000 
campus in the Fall of 1955, Roland W. Burbank, formerly 
assistant head master of Proctor, was appointed the new 
head here. Much is made of outdoor activities, particularly 
winter sports, and there are several hobby clubs as well as dra- 
matics and extra-curricular music. Clark School in Hanover 
merged with this school in 1953. See also page 624 

CENTER STRAFFORD, N.H. Pop 200. 25 mi. E of Concord, 
Rt.202A. This small village is in the foothills of the White Mts. 

AUSTIN-GATE ACADEMY 
Bdg Boys Ages 13-19; Day Coed 13-19 

Center Stratford, N.H. Tel. Harrington 2142. 
Donald J. Mack, B.S., Springfield, M.S., Syracuse, Head. 
Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General Business. 



N. H. Leading Private Schools 16 

Enr Bdg 20; Day Boys 35, Girls 40. Fac full 5, part-time 3. 

Grad '57 8. Entd Col '572. (Swarthmore 1, U of N.H. 1.) 
Alumni 400. 

Tui Bdg $950 (+$250), Day $350. Self-help pgrm. Est 1833. Inc 
1900 nonprofit. 

Founded as Strafford Union, in 1907 the academy was renamed in 
commemoration of two of its benefactors and is now non-denom- 
inational. Mr, Mack, formerly of Hamilton High School, Mass., 
succeeded George N. Hurley in 1956. With low tuition made pos- 
sible by the bequest of George N. Gate, students are prepared for 
the University of N.H., Keene, and other New England colleges 
and specialized schools. Numerous business and technical courses 
are also offered. 

CONCORD, N.H. Pop 27,988. Alt 244 ft. B&M R.R. The capital 
of "The Granite State" stands on the west bank of the Merrimack 
River, 75 miles N of Boston. The handsome buildings of the His- 
torical Society, presented by Edward Tuck, benefactor of Dart- 
mouth, and the state buildings lend individuality and distinction 
to this old town, which still retains something of the village at- 
mosphere. In nearby Bow is a tablet commemorating the birth- 
place of Mary Baker Eddy. St. Paul's occupies extensive and im- 
pressive grounds to the west back from the river. 



ST. PAUL'S SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 12-18 

Concord, N.H. Tel. Capitol 5-3341. 

Rev. Matthew M. Warren, B.D., D.D., Va. Theological Sem, 

Rector. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music 
Literature Languages Greek Russian History Public 
Affairs. Remedial Reading. 

Enr 445. Fac full 58, part-time 1. Adm Staff 6. 

Grad '5792. Entd Col '5784. (Harvard 29, Yale 12, Princeton 
6, Williams 4, Trinity 3, MIT 3). Alumni 4898. 

Tui $1800 (+$250). Scholarships full 18, partial 73 ($102,800). 
Work pgrm. Est 1856. Episcopal. 

Plant $5,500,000. Endowment $12,119,737. Dorm rms 250. Class 
cms 47. Lib 30,000 vols. Labs 4. Studios music 1, art 1, Gym. 
Fields 11. Courts 13. 

A new trend was given education in America in the establishment 
of St. Paul's. It was the first of the Church schools to make ap- 
peal to the new class that was rapidly acquiring wealth from the 



N. H, New England 17 

development of water power, textile mills and exploitation of the 
continent In 1855 Dr. George Cheyne Shattuck gave his country 
place near Concord for "a school of the highest class for boys, in 
which they may obtain an education which shall fit them either 
for college or business, including thorough intellectual training in 
the various branches of learning, gymnastics and manly exercises 
adapted to preserve health and strengthen the physical condition, 
such aesthetic culture and accomplishments as shall tend to re- 
fine the manners and elevate the taste, together with careful moral 
and religious instruction." 

The Rev. Henry Augustus Coit, then only twenty-five, was 
chosen by the trustees as the first rector. Of a family long prom- 
inent in American education, his early training had been under 
the Rev. William Augustus Muhlenherg, at whose suggestion he 
was later an instructor in the College of St. James, Hagerstown, 
Md. Dr. Muhlenberg's school at College Point, L. L, which later 
became St. Paul's College, in its eighteen years existence exerted 
a great influence on the future private schools in America, for 
among his pupils in addition to Coit were several future bishops 
who were later influential in organizing the earliest Episcopal 
church schools. From his master, Muhlenberg, Dr. Coit adopted 
the "in loco parentis" attitude, and from the English public schools 
which he had visited he adapted much. Even in outdoor life Eng- 
lish influence was at first apparent. Dr. Coit encouraged cricket 
rather than baseball. The English schoolroom nomenclature, too, 
was here introduced to the American boy. St. Paul's still has 
"forms" and "evensong," but the "removes" and "matins" of Dr. 
Coit's time are forgotten. Most of the boys in the four upper 
forms have separate rooms. The young boys have "alcoves" in the 
dormitories similar to the "cubicles" of many of the English pub- 
lic schools. This custom here first introduced in the American 
private schools has been followed by Groton, St. Mark's and other 
schools. 

So awe-inspiring a man was Dr. Coit that only in recent years 
have his old pupils been able to write of him realistically. Owen 
Wister describes him as a "stern, sad man in clerical black, born 
seven hundred years later than the days of his spiritual kin," 
Arthur Stanwood Pier, long a member of the faculty, in his his- 
tory of the school reviewed in an earlier edition of this Handbook, 
speaks of him "in character and zeal and temperament very like 
the man of wrath, John Brown ... a ruthless fanatic." To John 
Brown whose aims and "actions he abhorred . . . his soul was 
akin." Following Dr. Coit's death, his brother Joseph Howland 
Coit, who had been vice-rector since 1865, carried on, and later 
the Rev. Henry Ferguson, a St. Paul's "old boy." 

Samuel Smith Drury was rector from 1911 for over quarter of 
a century. Priest, preacher and writer, a man of compulsive type, 



N. H. Leading Private Schools 18 

of great driving force, to his boys he was sternly aloof, to his 
aides an inspiration and a saintly man. Following Dr. Drury's 
death in 1938, Norman B. Nash resigned from the Episcopal 
Theological School where he had established a reputation for 
liberal-minded teaching to accept the "head mastership, bringing 
to St. Paul's new life and vitality. Elected bishop-coadjutor of the 
Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts late in 1946, he remained with 
the school until February of 1947. 

Though St. Paul's boys no longer play the English game they 
are fully aware of what is "cricket" "Quite uncritical in his out- 
look/' Mr. Pier says, the St. Paul boy goes out into the world 
with "an eagerness to join in some common effort for the good of 
all jf O nly some one will direct him where that common effort 
is being made! Again a qualification that indicates there may be 
something lacking in a school spirit that is solely one of cheerful 
cooperation." The largest of the Church boarding schools, St. 
Paul's enrolls over four hundred boys, some ninety receiving 
scholarships. As many as thirty-five per cent of the boys have 
been sons of alumni. 

Henry Crocker Kittredge, with the school since 1916, and as 
vice-rector from 1929, was immediately made acting head and 
within a few months head master. For the first time a layman, 
a non-cleric, headed St. Paul's, a marked innovation. The school 
continues a Church boarding school with the religious life under 
the supervision of the Reverend Charles Webb as head of the 
sacred studies department The former head, son of "Kitty," famed 
Harvard Shakesperian scholar, has written much on Cape Cod, its 
people and customs. In a letter addressed to parents on his acces- 
sion he stressed his hope that he might find for his faculty "young 
firebrands who will become expert teachers, serene and sagacious 
elder statesmen . . . men who have no preconceived ideas or 
theories of education, but to whom the many facets of life in a 
big Church boarding school appeal." 

In the fall of 1953 the Rev. Matthew Madison Warren, rector 
of All Saints Church in Atlanta, Ga., joined the faculty as under- 
study to Mr. Kittredge, who then retired in June, 1954. 

The majority of graduates enter Yale, Harvard, or Princeton, 
although a few attend other colleges. As the school enters its 
second century, the outlook is heartening. See page 623 



DUBLIN, N.H. Pop 675. Alt 1493 ft. 12 mi. E of Keene, RtlOl. 

North of dominant Mt. Monadnock is Dublin, the highest village 
in New England The beauty of the region, with its lakes, has 
drawn many well known artists and literary folk. Yankee Maga- 
zine and 7 he Old Farmer's Almanac are issued here. 



N. H. New England 19 

DUBLIN SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 13-18 
Dublin, N.H. Tel. 100. 
Paul W. Lehmann, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Music Art Speech. Rem Reading. 
Enr Bdg 65, Day 5. Fac full 9, part-time 2. 
Grad '5610. Entd Col '56 8 (Hamilton 1, Trinity 1, Dartmouth 
1, St. Lawrence 1, Menlo 1). Alumni 297. 

Tui Bdg $2100 (+$100), Day $1050. Scholarships partial 6 
($4000). Work pgrm. Est 1935. Inc 1935 nonprofit. 

Plant $150,000. Dorm rms 32. Class rms 11. Lib 3000 vols. Lab 1. 
Studios music 1, art 1. Fields 5. Skiing facilities. 

Dublin School, founded by Mr. Lehmann after ten years in such 
schools as Fessenden and Chicago Latin, has had considerable 
success in its rather classical academic approach and in its inti- 
mate family atmosphere. Mountaineering, publications, several 
clubs, navigation, and sports are among the activities. The work 
program plays a significant role in the life of the school, Recent 
graduates have entered more than 40 different colleges and engi- 
neering schools. 



EXETER, N.H. Pop 5664. Alt 58 ft. B&M R.R. On the coastal 
plain between Portsmouth and Newburyport, Exeter is the sec- 
ond oldest town in the state. It was the seat of the government 
during the Revolutionary War and the site of early mills on the 
Squamscott. Amidst rich agricultural lands, it is, perhaps, more 
than any New England town, reminiscent of an English provin- 
cial village and, with its wide, elm shaded streets, preserves an air 
of undisturbed tranquility. The buildings of the Academy are in 
the town on Front Street. The extensive buildings follow the 
architectural detail of the original eighteenth century structures, 
The Emerson School on High Street adjoins the Exeter campus. 

EMERSON SCHOOL FOR BOYS 
Bdg Ages 8-15 

Exeter, N.H. 78 High St. Tel. PResident 2-2345. 

Ralph W. Turner, A.B., Harvard, M.Ed., Univ of N.H., Head. 

Grades III-VIII High Sch 1-2. Art Music Latin French. 
Remedial Reading Tutoring. 

Enr Bdg 65, Day 20. Fac full 15, part-time 2. 

Grad '5710. Entd Prep School '5710. (Hebron 2, Tabor 2, 
Worcester 2, Proctor 1, Avon 1, Kimball Union 1). Alumni 400. 

Tui Bdg $1800 (+$125), Day $600. Scholarships partial 8 
($5000). Est 1930. Prop. 



N. H. Leading Private Schools 20 

Plant $100,000. Dorm rms 33. Class rms 9. Lib 2000 vols. Studio 
art 1. Gym. Fields 2. Skating Rink. Skiing facilities. Riding facili- 

This well organized and successful school was founded by Mrs. 
George W. Emerson, who was joined in 1932 by her son, Edward 
E. Emerson, who was head master from that year until 1950. With 
Mr. Emerson's resignation as head master in 1950 to join the Ad- 
visory Board of the Burnham schools. Mr. Turner, on ^the faculty 
since 1935 and yearly assuming additional responsibilities, suc- 
ceeded him. 

A new dormitory, completed in 1957, has made possible a 
larger enrollment. 

Young boys from many states and from some foreign coun- 
tries, with a few from the community, are thoroughly prepared for 
the large eastern boarding schools. Separate living quarters and 
programs of work and play for the different age groups indicate 
the thoughtful planning. Among the varied activities are dramat- 
ics, music, many sports, and numerous hobby and interest clubs. 

See also page 620 

THE PHILLIPS EXETER ACADEMY 
Bdg Boys Ages 13-18 

Exeter, N.H. Tel. PResident 2-2181. 

William G. Saltonstall, A.B., A.M., LL.D., Harvard, L.H.D., 

Williams, Tufts, Dartmouth, Princeton, Prin. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music Languages Literature 
History Sciences Astronomy Geography Mechanical Draw- 
ing Meteorology Navigation Radio Mathematics. Remedial 
Reading. 

Enr Bdg 725, Day 40. Fac full 86, part-time 7. 

Grad '57220. Entd Col '57198, (Harvard 62, Yale 34, Prince- 
ton 22, Cornell 14, Stanford 11, Williams 9). Alumni 12,500. 

Tui Bdg $1600 (+$50), Day $650. Scholarships full 53, partial 
105 ($215,000). Est 1781. Inc. 

Summer Session. Tui $525 eight weeks. 

Plant $6,500,000. Endowment $22,000,000. Dorm rms 577. Class 
rms 75. Lib 45,000 vols. Labs 10. Studios music 8, art 3. Gyms 3. 
Swimming pool. Artificial rink. Fields 12. Courts 23. 

Encouraged by the immediate success of Phillips Academy al 
Andover, John Phillips established in his home town in Ne^w 
Hampshire a new academy which was opened in 1783. William 
Woodbridge was preceptor for the first five years. Benjamin 
Abbot, the second in charge, bore the title principal. He was 
trained at Andover under Principal Pearson and ruled over the 
institution with great power and wisdom for fifty years. Daniel 
Webster came to him for schooling in 1796. In 1838 Gideon L. 
Soule, who had already been a teacher in the school for seven- 



N. H. New England 21 

teen years, succeeded Dr. Abbot, and in 1872 the fiftieth year of 
his continuous service in the academy was celebrated. Harlan P. 
Amen in his eighteen years from 1895 by strong and sympathetic 
leadership brought Exeter again to her ancient standards. 

There were strong men on the faculty, too, none more famous 
than "Bull" Wentworth, the terror of whose name extended into 
other school rooms through his innumerable mathematics text- 
books. Such men gave Exeter the reputation of being faculty 
controlled, more democratic than Andover which then was under 
autocratic dominance. No theological seminary as at Andover held 
to strict orthodoxy, so there was freedom to question. For genera- 
tions graduates resorted chiefly to the less godly and more liberal 
Harvard. All these things may have prompted President Eliot to 
characterize Exeter as "one of the most precious institutions of 
the country." 

Exeter influenced teaching at other schools and established a 
pattern that emphasizes "the simplicity of an old New England 
village; the austerity of Puritan schoolmasters; the . . . earnest- 
ness and self reliance of boys who earn their way." However, the 
old maxims are still repeated, "Exeter is still a hard school," "the 
process of learning is in the main irksome," "the pupil should bear 
the laboring oar," "from the past comes the ancient Exeter tradi- 
tion of thoroughness, accuracy, and severity." The tradition of 
rugged democracy is made much of, to bring out that there is no 
conscious distinction between rich and poor. Much has been done 
to expand the scholarship program and to reach out to draw stu- 
dents from wider geographic and economic areas. 

Lewis Perry served Exeter as principal for a third of a century. 
His broad tolerance encouraged freedom of speech and attitude 
among faculty and students. His gracious manner made him a 
popular speaker everywhere. In his administration, Exeter under- 
took the great building program which has put this school among 
the foremost in point of endowment and facilities. John Marquand 
recently described Phillips Exeter as "the most beautiful and 
aesthetically satisfying of all New England schools." The nine- 
fold increase of endowment has expanded the faculty with o.nly 
a small increase of the student body. Gifts of the late Edward S. 
Harkness, oil magnate and benefactor of many schools and col- 
leges, made possible the present Harkness Plan of round table 
teaching in small, informal classes. 

Mr. Saltonstall, '24 alumnus, and history teacher since 1932, 
accepted the mantle of principal when he returned from the serv- 
ice in 1946. Tall, unassuming, evidently popular, he has proved 
Mr. Perry's pronouncement that "The Academy is in safe hands." 
Francis T. P. Plimpton, of New York, is president of the Trustees, 
succeeding Thomas S. Lamont in 1956. 



N'. H. Leading Private Schools 22 

Mr. Saltonstall has stepped to the front ranks of independent 
school men who take a vital and significant interest in both public 
and private school problems as well as in other educational 
issues of the day. He initiated the Exeter Study Committee re- 
port, completed in 1953, which is a comprehensive objective 
summary of Exeter and of the place of independent secondary 
education in the national scene. He has lately spoken out strongly 
in favor of significant increases in teachers' salaries as a means of 
inducing able young people to enter the profession. 

The extensive curriculum, the integration of extra-curricular 
activities and the facilities of cultural pursuits as exemplified in 
the excellent school library and in the Alumni Art Center, with 
its frequent exhibits, have encouraged an atmosphere of creativity, 
maturity and responsibility. Though a large school providing 
much freedom to students, close contact is maintained between the 
faculty and the boys. 

Today, although the majority of graduates continue to matricu- 
late at Harvard, Yale and Princeton, many do go to Cornell, 
Dartmouth, M.I.T., and other leading colleges. See page 624 

LITTLETON, N.H. Pop 3819. Alt 772 ft. B&M R.R. 20 mi. SE 

of St. Johnsbury, Vt Rt. 18. The intervales of the northern Con- 
necticut Valley region early attracted settlements, after the French 
and Indian wars. Here manufacturing has utilized the 235 ft. falls 
of the Ammonoosuc River, which rushes down from the White 
Mountains. To the South is famed Franconia Notch. Saint Mary's, 
located on a hillside site at Seven Springs, benefits from the winter 
sports opportunities of the area. 

SAINT MARY'S-IN-THE-MOUNTAINS 
Bdg Girls Ages 13-18 

Littleton, N.H. Seven Springs. Tel. Littleton 4-2081. 
Mary Harley Jenks, A.B., M.A., Univ of Calif., Prin. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music Drama History of Asia. 

Enr 80. Fac full 11, part-time 6. 

Grad '5721. Entd Col '5721. (Middlebury 2, Hood 2, Skid- 
more 2, Wellesley 1, Radcliffe 1, Cornell 1). Alumnae 1000. 

Tui variable to $2200 (+$250). Scholarships partial 27 
($20,000). Work pgrm. Est 1886. Episcopal. 

Plant $350,000. Endowment $190,000. Dorm rms 36. Class rms 
9. Lib 3000 vols. Lab 1. Studios music 1, art 1. Gym. Outdoor 
swimming pool. Fields 4. Courts 3. Riding facilities. Ski slopes 4. 

This diocesan school, long in Concord, has occupied its present 
beautiful mountain site since 1936. Miss Jenks, succeeding Mrs. 
Clinton A. McLane in 1944, is a woman of broad educational ex- 
perience, having been principal of Bentley School in California 



N. H. New England 23 

for ten years, and subsequently a teacher at the Mary C. Wheeler 
School. 

The principal is building on the sound foundation of whole- 
some ideals and a vigorous life which have long characterized 
the school. Extra-curricular activities include student govern- 
ment, social service, a work program, and riding, skiing, and 
other sports. Curriculum I prepares for Wheaton, Smith, Swarth- 
more, and similar colleges; curriculum II prepares for other four- 
year colleges as well as junior colleges and specialized schools. 
See also page 740 



MERIDEN, N.H. Pop 500. Alt 1000 ft. B&M R.R. to Lebanon. 
14 mi. S of Hanover, Rt.120. Known as the Bird Village through 
the work of Harold Baynes, the naturalist who founded an early 
bird club here in 1910, Meriden was site of the Croyden Game 
Sanctuary and buffalo preserve. 

KIMBALL UNION ACADEMY 
Bdg Boys Ages 13-18 

Meriden, N.H. Tel. 1-3. 

Frederick E. Carver, B.S., M.A., Dartmouth, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. 

Enr 170, Fac full 17, part-time 2. 

Grad '5769. Entd Col '5764. (Dartmouth 4, Boston U. 4, 
Middlebury 3). Alumni 3000. 

Tui $1800 (+ $100), Day $500 (+ $100). Scholarships partial 20 
($10,000). Self-help pgrm. Est 1813. Inc nonprofit. 

Plant $400,000. Endowment $250,000. Dorm rms 165. Class rms 
12. Lib 7000 vols. Labs 2. Studio music 1. Gym. Fields 5, Courts 6. 
Skiing facilities. Swimming pool. 

Founded as a boys school with emphasis on preparation for, Dart- 
mouth, Kimball Union Academy was coeducation from 1848 until 
1935, when it reverted to its original status. Under William R. 
Brewster's guidance for seventeen years, new buildings were 
added, old ones renovated, enrollment increased, and standards 
raised. The present head, assistant to Mr, Brewster for sixteen 
years, took over in 1952. 

Many graduates attend Dartmouth, with Middlebury, U of Me,, 
and Colgate next in choice. There is a full complement of sports, 
and extra-curricular music, publications, photography, and student 
government are available. 

For further information) write Porter Sargent 



N. H. Leading Private Schools 24 

NEW HAMPTON, N.H. Pop 723. Alt 574 ft. B&M R.R. to 

Franklin. 35 mi. N of Concord, Rt U.S. 3. In the N.H. lake and 
winter sports district, the conspicuous feature of this little town 
high above the Pemigewasset Valley is the 50 acre campus of the 
school with its red brick buildings. 

THE NEW HAMPTON SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 13-19 

New Hampton, N.H. Tel. Bristol 4-2232. 
Frederick Smith, A.B., Bates, A.M., Harvard, Head. 
T. Holmes Moore, A.B., Middlebury, Executive Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Post Grad 1. Col Prep Engineering Prep. Science 
Mathematics Typing Music. Remedial-Developmental Reading. 

Enr Bdg 205, Day 5, Fac full 20, part-time 4. 

Grad '57 77. Entd Col '57 75. (RPI 4, Middlebury 3, U of 
N. H. 3, MIT 2, Tufts 2, Cornell 2). Alumni 4648. 

Tui Bdg $1875 (+$200), Day $800. Scholarships full 1, par- 
tial 40 ($14,000). Est 1821. Inc nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Tui $600. 

Plant $900,000, Endowment $475,000. Dorm rms 97. Class rms 
23. Lib 25,000 vols. Labs 4. Gym. Outdoor swimming pool. Fields. 
9. Courts 7, Golf course. Skiing facilities. 

This oldest of the Baptist schools in New England numbered 
among its nineteenth century graduates many who later distin- 
guished themselves in public life. 

The present head master in 1926 took over a feeble coeduca- 
tional academy, reorganized it for boys only, and developed this 
thriving school which today offers its boys a vigorous, virile life. 

All of the work is college preparatory and engineering prepara- 
tory; the summer session permits acceleration. Graduates en- 
ter the University of N.H., Middlebury, Dartmouth, Cornell, Le- 
high, Bowdoin, Harvard, Princeton. There are numerous sports, 
several music groups, publications, and a student council. See also 
page 625 

PLYMOUTH, N.H. Pop 2107. Alt 483 ft B&M R.R. 24 mi. 
NW of Laconia. Rt. U.S. 3. Here Nathaniel Hawthorne died. The 
site of the state's oldest teachers college, Plymouth in the Pemi- 
gewasset Valley is a popular resort, both summer and winter, and 
the southern gateway to the White Mountains. Franconia Notch 
and "The Old Man of the Mountains" are to the north. The school 
is located across the river, one mile east of Plymouth, in Holder- 
ness township. 

When writing schools, please mention this Handbook 



N. H. New England 25 

HOLDERNESS SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 13-19 

Plymouth, N.H. Tel. 74. 

Donald C. Hagerman, A.B., Dartmouth, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music Languages History 
Sciences Mathematics Typing. 

Enr Bdg 120, Day 10. Fac full 15, part-time 3. 

Grad '5739. Entd Col '5737. (Wesleyan 2, Yale 2, U of Me. 
2, Harvard 1, Princeton 1, Dartmouth 1). Alumni 1165. 

Tui Bdg $1950 (+$150), Day $950. Scholarships partial 22 ($20,- 
000). Est 1879. Episcopal. 

Plant $500,000. Endowment $80,000. Dorms 6. Class rms 11. Lib 
4500 vols. Labs 2. Studio art 1, music 1. Gym. Fields 5. Courts 5. 
Skiing, hockey facilities. 

Established by Dr. Augustus Coit and the Bishop of N.H. for 
sons of Episcopal and other families of moderate means, this 
diocesan school has broadened its enrollment in recent yeans and 
today has boys of all faiths from many states and countries. Edric 
Weld, who came to the school in 1931, was succeeded in 1951 by 
Mr. Hagerman, formerly of Deerfield an!d Tabor academies. 

The curriculum prepares for many different colleges. Much em- 
phasis is placed on art, music, languages, and debating, and the 
debating team has won a number of championships. Boys also 
participate ,in a daily work program, school government, and 
sports. See also page 626 



RINDGE, N.H. Pop 707. Alt 1400 ft. 18 mi. SE of Keene, Rt.119. 

In the Monadnock region of southern N.H., the Hampshire 
Country School is located on the 1900 acre estate known as 
Timbertop. 



HAMPSHIRE COUNTRY SCHOOL 
For Superior Children with Emotional Problems 

Bdg Coed Ages 8-15 
East Rindge, N.H. Timbertop. Tel. 25-2. 
Henry Curtis Patey, B.A., Linfield, M.A., Univ of Ore., Dir. 

Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep 
General. Art Music Languages. Make-up courses Tutoring 
Remedial Reading Manual Arts. 

Enr Boys 25, Girls 10. Fac full 20, part-time 10. Adm Staff 2. 
Tui variable. Est 1948. Inc 1949 nonprofit. 
Summer Session and Camp. Tui $600-900. 
Plant $125,000. Dorm rms 16. Class rms 5. Lib 2000 vols. 
Riding facilities. Farm. 



N. H. Leading Private Schools 26 

Boys and girls of superior ability whose emotional problems 
are complicating the programs of other schools are here provided 
a home environment and individualized attention with frequent 
therapeutic conferences with a resident clinical psychologist and 
consulting psychiatrist to help them transfer to secondary school 
or to enter college. Admission ages are 8 to 15. Confirmed de- 
linquents, psychotics, and neurologically impaired children are 
not accepted. The school operates throughout the year. Concurrent 
therapy for the parents is urged. See also pages 790-91 



THE MEETING SCHOOL 
Bdg Coed Ages 13-18 

West Rindge, N.H. Thomas Rd, Tel. Rindge 21, Ring 2, 
George I, Bliss, A.B., Brown, Head, 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. History Science Lan- 
guages Russian. 

Enr Boys 10, Girls 15. Fac full 5, part-time 3. 

Tui $1690 (sliding scale). Work pgrm. Est 1957. Friends. 

Established by members of the Society of Friends, this new 
school provides instruction in a wide variety of subjects and en- 
courages each student to advance at his own achievement level 
on an individual study basis with informal classes. A work and 
farm program and the everyday business of community living, 
centered in the Quaker Meeting, supplements the academic life. 



SUNCOOK, N.H. Alt 290 ft Pop 3356 (1940). B &M R.R. 

In the valley near the joining of the Suncook and Merrimac 
rivers, Suncook lies about midway between Concord and Man- 
chester. Pembroke Place is just out of the town on Route 28. 



PEMBROKE PLACE 
Bdg Boys Ages 14-20 
Suncook, N.H. Buck St. Tel. 34 ring 4. 
Bradley B. Ladd, B.A., Dartmouth, M.A., Univ of N.H., Head. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1-2. Col Prep. 

Enr 15. Fac full-time 3. Adm Staff 3. 

Tui $3000. Est 1948. Partnership. 

This private tutoring school opened in 1949, developed out of 
a successful summer program of recreation and academic training. 
Mr. Ladd is the former head of the Biology Department at Peeks- 
kill Military Academy. The winter term is conducted in Florida. 



N. H. New England 27 

TILTON, N.H. Pop 1127. Alt 453 ft. B&M R.R. 20 mi. N of Con- 
cord, Rt U.S 3. Til ton is at the outlet of Lake Winnipesaukee in 
c.entral N.H. On a hill opposite the Tilton family monument, a 
replica of the Roman Arch of Titus, the school overlooks the town. 

TILTON SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 12-18 

Tilton, N.H. School St. Tel. 421. 

Herbert B. Moore, A.B., Bowdoin, A.M., Boston U., Ed.M., Har- 
vard, Head. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. College Prep History 
Economics Sociology. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg 175, Day 20. Fac full-time 19. 

Grad '5766. Entd Col '5765. Alumni 5000. 

Tui Bde: $1900 (+$200), Day $500. Scholarships partial 46 
($9500). Self-help pgrm. Est 1845. Inc nonprofit. 

Summer Tutoring Program. 

Plant $901,205. Endowment $493,118. Dorm rms 175, Class rms 
14. Lib 14,000 vols. Labs 2. Gym. Fields 6. Courts 9. 

Now primarily college preparatory, Tilton was founded as a 
Methodist coed seminary in Northfield, becoming in 1928 a boys 
school. During the sixteen years Dr. James E. Coons, a minister 
and former president of Iowa Wesleyan, was head master, the 
plant was improved, including new dormitories and a spacious 
physical education building occupied in 1950. Rev. Crompton, 
previously head master of the Pennington School, assumed his 
duties in 1951, Mr. Moore was named Head in 1958. 

Graduates enter the Univ. of N.H., Dartmouth, Middlebury, 
Boston University, the University of Vt, Tufts, Syracuse, the 
University of Mass., and others. Among extra-curricular activities 
are the student council, various clubs, music, and athletics. 
See also page 627 

WILTON, N.H. Pop 1952. Alt 345 ft. B&M R.R. 17 mi. W of 
Nashua, RtlOlA. This southern N.H. town is the marketing cen- 
ter of a farming and summer resort region. The school, SW of 
the town, bears the name of the 150 acre hilltop farm of Mrs. 
Emmet 

HIGH MOWING SCHOOL 
Bdg Coed Ages 14-1 a 
Wilton, N.H. Tel 5212. 
Beulah H. Emmet, B.A., Wellesley, Prin. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Art Music Typing Lan- 
guages. Dramatics Manual Arts. 

Enr Bdg Boys 30, Girls 35; Day 15. Fac full 13, part-time 7, 



N. H. Leading Private Schools 28 

Grad '5717. Entd Col '57 13. Alumni 201. 

Tui Bdg $1800 (+$100), Day $350. Scholarships full 2, partial 
17 ($25,000). Est 1942. Inc 1942 nonprofit. 

Dorm rms 36. Class rms 7. Labs 3. Studios music 3, art 4. 
Gym. Fields 2. 

This is one of a group of schools working on the Waldorf plan, 
based on the philosophy of education of Dr. Rudolph Steiner and 
originating in the Waldorf School of Stuttgart, Germany, which 
Mrs. Emmet has spent many years adapting to American needs. 
Daily, each student concentrates on one of the basic academic 
subjects, followed by language study, creative art, and lab- 
oratory work. Text books are not emphasized. The students are 
given a rich, active life with vital integration of academic and 
extra-curricular activities. Graduates have entered a variety of 
colleges, including Radcliffe, Bennington, the R.I. School of 
Design, Harvard, Rutgers, M.I.T., and many have made out- 
standing scholarship records. See also page 792 



WOLFEBORO, N.H. Pop 1271. Alt 508 ft B&M R.R. 44 mi. 
NE of Concord, Rt.28. On the southeastern shore of Winnipe- 
saukee, this lake port was named in honor of General Wolfe, 
conqueror of Quebec, The Academy grounds, S of the village, 
have a half mile of lake frontage. 

BREWSTER ACADEMY 
Bdg Boys Ages 13-20; Day Coed 13-20 

Wolfeboro, N.H. Tel. 200. 

Vincent D. Rogers, B.S., Dartmouth, Prin. 

High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep General Commercial. 
Mechanical Drawing Art Music Industrial Arts. 

Enr Bdg 80; Day Boys 95, Girls 115. Fac full-time 16. 

Grad '5769. Entd Col '5735. 

Tui Bdg $1405, Day $325. Scholarships. Self-help pgrm. Est 
1820. Inc nonprofit. 

Plant $124,000. Endowment $270,000. Dorm rms 30. Class rms 
14. Labs 2. Fields 4. Courts 3. 

The endowment permits this school to charge students a low 
boarding tuition, while offering varied courses and extra-curric- 
ular activities, including sports, dramatics, and music. Most college 
preparatory students enter the state university, with others going 
to Boston University, Dartmouth, Bowdoin, and Brown. Mr. 
Rogers in 1942 succeeded Walter G. Greenall, principal from 1935. 
The boarding department for girls was discontinued in 19S6. 



VERMONT 

CRAFTSBURY COMMON, VT. 40 mi. N of Montpelier. In 

north central Vermont, this picturesque village lies in snow coun- 
try, adjacent to Stowe. 



STERLING SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 11-19 

Craftsbury Common, Vt. Tel. Justice 6-2561. 
Norman E. Rioux, B.A., U of Arizona, Head. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep Languages 
Mathematics Remedial Reading Make-up Courses Tutorial. 

Enr 40. Fac full 5, part-time 2. 

Tui $1800 (+$150). Scholarships 5 ($8000). Est 1957 nonprofit. 

Plant $70,000. Dorm rms 20. Class rms 6. Lab. Studio music. 
Fields 2. 

Opened in 1958, this boarding school occupies seven spacious 
buildings on the outskirts of the village, two miles from the 
Craftsbury Summer School of which the headmaster was co- 
founder in 1955. Mr. Rioux, formerly on the staff of Berkshire 
School, has attracted an experienced faculty. The college prepara- 
tory work in small classes offers individual help. See page 628 



LYNDON CENTER, VT. Pop 321. Alt 727 ft. CP R.R. 10 mi. 
N of St. Johnsbury, Rt. U.S.5. Across the Passumpsic from the 
thriving village of Lyndonville is this hamlet surrounded by fer- 
tile farm land. The school is on an elevation above the valley. 



LYNDON INSTITUTE 
Bdg and Day Coed Ages 12-20 

Lyndon Center, Vt. Tel. Lyndonville MA 6-3654. 
Robert K. Lewis, B.S., Head. 

High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep General Business. 
Home Economics Agriculture Auto Mechanics Building 
Trades. Art Music Economics Driver Education. 

Enr Bdg Boys 30, Girls 30; Day Boys 165, Girls 155. Fac full- 
time 22. 

Grad '5780. Entd Col '5728. (Lyndon TC 9, U of Vt. 5, U of 
Me. 2, St. Michael's 2, Yale 1, Middlebury 1). 

29 



V*. Leading Private Schools 30 

Tui Bdg $1160 (+$50), Day $325 (+$50). Est 1867. Inc non- 
profit. 

Plant $1,000,000. Endowment $400,000. Dorm rms 54. Class rms 
30. Lib 3500 vols. Labs 2. Studios art 1, music 1, Gym. 

Generously endowed by the late Theodore N. Vail, Lyndon has 
an unusually low tuition for the quality of work given. Academic 
courses and vocational curricula were developed during the long 
regime of 0. D. Mathewson. Mr. True, who succeeded him in 1943 
continued to expand and stress modern vocational programs. Mr. 
Lewis was appointed headmaster in 1957. Many of the college 
preparatory graduates enter the University of Vt,, with others 
going to Norwich, Middlebury, Dartmouth, Boston University. 
There are numerous extra-curricular activities, including music, 
dramatics, debating, Future Farmers, and athletics. See also page 
793 



PUTNEY, VT. Pop 1019. Alt 251 ft. B&M R.R. 9 mi. N of Brat- 
tleboro, Rt. U.S.5. On terraces cut by deep ravines running up into 
the hills from the Connecticut, this town is in the beautiful country 
of southeastern Vt. The Putney School occupies Elm Lea and an 
adjacent farm on a hilltop two miles from the town. 

THE PUTNEY SCHOOL 
Bdg Coed Ages 13-18 
Putney, Vt. Tel. Evergreen 7-5566. 
Henry B. Rockwell, A.B., Princeton, M.A., Harvard, Dir. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music Languages Science Euro- 
pean History American Civilization Drama Dance Shop. 

Enr Bdg Boys 90, Girls 80; Day Boys 15, Girls 10. Fac full 35, 
part-time 6. 

Grad '5754. Entd Col '5751. (Harvard 7, U of Chgo 4, 
Lawrence 3, Radcliffe 3, Sarah Lawrence 3, Smith 3). Alumni 847. 

Tui Bdg $2200 (+$240), Day $975. Scholarships full 2, partial 
53 ($55,000). Est 1935. Inc 1937 nonprofit. 

Summer Work Camp (separate from school). Enr 100. Tui $500. 
eight wks. 

Plant $455,000. Dorm rms 75. Class- rms 15, Lib 11,000 vols. 
Labs 3. Studios music 4, art 2, drama 1. Fields 5. Courts 3. Riding 
and skiing facilities. 

'To make school life a more real, less sheltered, less self-cen- 
tered venture; to educate the individual in the light of what he 
can later do toward solving the problems of society," was Mrs. 
Carmelita Hinton's vision in opening this preparatory school. 



Vt. New England 31 

Vigorous, dynamic, broad-visioned, unsparing of her own interest 
and energy, Mrs. Hinton selected her faculty, including many 
specialists in the arts, from outstanding progressive and con- 
servative schools and colleges in this country and in Europe. 
Upon her retirement in 1955, Mr. Rockwell, formerly assistant 
head master of the Pomfret School in Conn., succeeded. 

Concerts, lectures, married instructors who have their own homes 
on adjoining property, integration of class and extra-curricular 
programs these give a characteristic flavor not to be found else- 
where. The wide range of student activities includes compulsory 
attendance at evening groups, an effective school government, arts 
and crafts, and sports. Every student participates 4^ hours each 
week in the work program. 

All pupils prepare for college, and in the last five years, Har- 
vard, Radcliffe, Reed, Yale, Smith, and Swarthmore, among nu- 
merous others, have admitted Putney graduates. 

In 1951 the Putney Graduate School of Teacher Education, di- 
rected by Dr. Morris R. Mitchell, was opened. See also page 792 



ST. JOHNSBURY, VT. Pop 7370. Alt 711 ft CP; MC R.R. 37 
mi. NE of Montpelier, Rt U.S.2. In the upper reaches of the 
Connecticut Valley at the junction of the Moose and Passumpsic 
rivers, St. Johnsbury, known for its maple sugar harvests and 
winter sports, lies in hilly country between the White and Green 
Mountains. 

ST. JOHNSBURY ACADEMY 
Bdg and Day-*- Coed Ages 14-19 

St. Johnsbury, Vt. Tel Pioneer 8-2556. 

Elwin H. Twombly, A.B., Clark, Ed.M., Univ of Vt, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep (Liberal Arts, Scientific) General 
Commercial. Art Music Home Economics Science Mathe- 
matics Mechanical Drawing. Driver Education. 

Enr Bdg Boys 25, Girls 25; Day Boys 180, Girls 190. Fac full 
25, part-time 2. 

Grad '5792. Entd Col '5750. (U of Vt. 12, Norwich 4, St. 
Michael's 4, Mt Holyoke 1, Rensselaer 1, W.P.I. 1). Alumni 5000. 

Tui Bdg $1300 (+$200), Day $336 (+$50). Scholarships 
partial 15 ($2500), Self-help pgrm. Est 1842. Inc nonprofit. 

Plant $950,000. Endowment $550,000. Dorm rms 30. Class rms 
37. Lib 1500 vols. Labs 3. Studios music 2, art 1. Gym. Fields 5. 

This sound New England academy, now in its second century, 
was established and endowed by the three Fairbanks brothers. 
Vernon G. Smith succeeded as head master David Tirrell in 1949. 
Mr. Twombly, who had been for ten years on the faculty, head 



Vt. Leading Private Schools 32 

of the math department, dean of boys, and assistant head master 
in 1950, took over in 1951. He continues the liberal traditions and 
is strengthening the school's appeal to students from a wide area. 
Sports play an important part in the extracurricular activities. 
Among others are dramatics, student publications, music, and 
language and science clubs. 

Many preparatory graduates go on to the University of Vt., 
with others to Norwich, Tufts, Middlebury, Boston University, 
Smith, Wellesley, W.P.I. See also page 794 

SAXTONS RIVER, VT. Pop 715, B & M R.R. 5 mi. W of 
Bellows Falls, Rt.121. The first outdoor winter sports in New 
England began when James P. Taylor of the Academy faculty 
got skiing started here, and the Academy had a Winter Carnival 
a year before Dartmouth did. After he had left the Academy, Mr. 
Taylor organized the Green Mountain Club. 

VERMONT ACADEMY 
Bdg and Day- Boys Ages 14-19 

Saxtons River, Vt. Tel 3751. 

Laurence G. Leavitt, B.S., Dartmouth, A.M., Columbia, M.Pd. 

(Hon), Middlebury, Head. 

High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep. Remedial Reading 
Physiography Languages Science. Driver Training. 
Enr Bdg 135, Day 20. Fac full 17, part-time L 
Grad '57 51. Entd Col '57 50. (St. Lawrence 5, Dartmouth 4, 
U of N.H. 3, Colorado A&M 3, U of Vt. 3, Brown 2). Alumni 
2000. 

Tui Bdg $1800, Day $500. Scholarships partial 18 ($12,000). Est 
1876. Jnc nonprofit 

Plant $1,100,000. Endowment $37,000. Dorms rms 103. Class rms 
14. Lib 5600 vols. Labs 2. Gym. Fields 7. Courts 4. Skiing facilities. 
This college preparatory school ot good standing and national 
.appeal has enrolled only boys since 1931, though for sixty years 
it was a coeducational school of largely local appeal. Mr. and Mrs. 
Leavitt, on coming to the Academy in 1934, immediately enriched 
both curriculum and activities, making much of clubs and foster- 
ing intellectual and musical interests. Winter sports are naturally 
emphasized. Recent additions to the plant include a new gym- 
nasium and a faculty house. 

The program is entirely college preparatory, and many gradu- 
ates enter Dartmouth, St. Lawrence, and Middlebury, with others 
going to such colleges as Wesleyan, Brown, the universities of 
N.H. and Vt. Non-sectarian religious instruction is offered seniors, 
and there is a well-developed remedial reading and language 
program. See also page 626 



Vt. New England 33 

WOODSTOCK, VT. Pop 1326. Alt 700 ft 23 mi. E of Rutland 
Rt U.S.4. An early ski center and favored resort, both summer 
and winter, Woodstock has drawn famed literary and theatrical 
people. 

WOODSTOCK COUNTRY SCHOOL 

Bdg Coed Ages 14-19 
S. Woodstock, Vt Tel. 462. 
David W. Bailey, B.A., Black Mountain, Head. 

High Sen 1-4 Col Prep. Art Music Sciences Social Studies. 
Dramatics. 

Enr Bdg Boys 45, Girls 40; Day Boys 2, Girls 5. Fac full 11, 
part-time 4. Adm Staff 3. 

Tui Bdg $1900 (+$300). Day $500 (+$100). Scholarships 
partial 12 ($8000). Self-help pgrm. Est 1945 nonprofit. 

This coeducational school was opened by Mr. Bailey, former 
housemaster at Lawrenceville, and Kenneth Beats Webb, owner 
of nearby Camp Timberlake. Mr. Bailey has been head master 
since 1947. 

In 1955 the school moved to a new 450-acre campus of hills 
and woodlands near the village of South Woodstock. 

With a curriculum emphasizing science, social studies, art, and 
music, the school has sent graduates to Radcliffe, Bennington, 
Haverford, Harvard, Reed, Bryn Mawr. There are several student 
organizations, including a government council and a publications 
symposium. 



For explanation of data and statistics included for each school, con' 
suit the Explanatory Note at the beginning of the Descriptive Text 
and the Introduction. 

If you do not find the right school for your child, write, stating 
particulars, to Porter Sargent, 11 Beacon St., Boston 8, Mass. 

For further schools in any area, refer to the Supplementary Lists. 

For Summer Camps and Summer Schools, see the Schools Classified 
By Type and the Camp Directory. 

For Junior College and Specialized School information, consult the 
Sargent Guide to Private Junior Colleges and Specialized Schook. 

If you do not find the school you seek, look to the Index. 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AND OVER, MASS. Pop 12,437. Alt 92 ft B&M R.R. 27 mi. N 
of Boston, Rt.28. Settled in 1643, Andover is on the south rim of 
the once great Merrimack Valley, where the Industrial Revolu- 
tion first took root in America. A noted educational center, this 
delightful town has many substantial Colonial houses reminiscent 
of nineteenth century men of letters. A mile south of the center, 
crowning Seminary Hill, is Phillips Academy, whose campus is 
outstanding among secondary schools. Embracing many Colonial 
buildings, the present design is the creation of the last 30 years. 
Memorial Tower is visible from afar. The Abbot Academy build- 
ings are grouped about a central green to the west. The plan of 
an old New England village was followed in laying out Brooks 
School" on Lake Cochickewick in North Andover. The Pike School 
is near the Phillips Academy campus. 



ABBOT ACADEMY 
Bdg and Day Girls Ages 13*18 

Andover, Mass. School St. Tel. 3562. 

Mrs. Alexander Crane, B.A., Bryn Mawr, Prin. 

High Sen 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music Bible Speech Typing. 

Enr Bdg 180, Day 45, Fac full 26, part-time 8. 

Grad '5759. Entd Col '5759. (Vassar 7, Wellesley 3, Smith 
3, Bryn Mawr 2, Mt. Holyoke 2, Radcliffe 1). Alumnae 3400. 

Tui Bdg $2250 (+$200-300), Day $800. Scholarships partial 31 
($18,000). Est 1829. Inc nonprofit 

Plant $850,000. Endowment $1,300,000. Dorm rms 159. Class rms 
16. Lib 12,000 vols. Labs 3. Studios music 11, art 2. Gym. Fields 
3. Courts 6. 

A pioneer in education for women, this first New England in- 
corporated school for girls was established "to regulate the tem- 
pers, to improve the taste, to discipline and enlarge minds, and to 
form the morals ' of its students. Named in honor of Madam Sarah 
Abbot, whose funds made possible the first building, it maintained 
for more than a century the even tenor of its traditions, undiverted 
by passing fashions. During the nineteen year .administration of 
Marguerite C. Hearsey, the best of the old traditions were re- 

34 



Mass. New England 35 

tained, the school took on a modern slant in its social and 
academic phases. She was succeeded in June of 1955 by Mrs. 
Crane, formerly of Prospect Hill School as well as of the Abbot 
Academy faculty. 

Daughters, granddaughters, and great-granddaughters of loyal 
alumnae from every state look to Abbot for their schooling. Many 
graduates enter Smith or Wellesley, with others going to Vassar, 
Mt. Holyoke, Connecticut College, Wheaton, Bryn Mawr. The 
college preparatory program not only emphasizes liberal studies 
but encourages each student to participate in the fine arts. 

Extra-curricular activities stress a successful student govern- 
ment, the Christian association, athletics, music, dramatics, modern 
dance, arts, and crafts, and current events. See also page 740 

BROOKS SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 12-19 

North Andover, Mass. Tel. MUrdoch 6-6101. 

Frank Davis Ashburn, B.A., M,A. (Hon), Yale, L.H.D. (Hon), 

Trinity, Head. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Greek Latin German 
Literature Music Art Bible Navigation, Manual Arts. 

Enr Bdg 180, Day 15. Fac full 26, part-time 3. 

Grad '5738. Entd Col '5735. (Yale 9, Harvard 6, Tufts 3, 
Columbia 2, Pennsylvania 2, Hamilton 1). Alumni 696. 

Tui Bdg $2250 (+$250), Day $1125. Scholarships full 12, partial 
11 ($22,000). Est 1927. Episcopal. 

Plant $1,850,000. Endowment $285,000. Dorm rms 132. Class 
rms 21. Lib 12,000 vols. Labs 3. Studios 2. Gym. Fields 11. Courts 
9. 

Named in honor of Phillips Brooks, one-time Bishop of Massa- 
chusetts and resident of North Andover, the school was given the 
land and original buildings by the Russell family. 

The head master, one of Dr. Peabody's "Grotties," was aided 
from the start by other Groton men. Mr. Ashburn shows the re- 
sults of his broad education in his writings, and unlike most school 
masters he can write. "Fifty Years On," a reminiscent history of 
Groton published in 1934, was followed ten years later by his 
biography of Endicott Peabody. His "Primer for Parents," 1943, 
and "Parents' Guide to Independent Schools and Colleges/' 1956, 
are brilliant presentations of what the liberal education gives 
and does, and of the role and function of private schools in 
the U. S. He retains leadership in independent school activities. 
Each Brooks boy comes in personal contact with him through 
the classes he teaches. 

From its beginning the school has attracted patrons of dis- 
crimination whose boys are put through a stiff traditional course 



Mass. Leading Private Schools 86 

and readily enter leading colleges and universities, particularly 
Yale, Harvard, Trinity, and Princeton. The school offers courses 
for advanced standing at college. 

Brooks is now divided into three scholastic units: Upper, 
Middle, and Lower schools, each with its own administrator. 

A daily work program, a full complement of sports, debating, 
arts and crafts, publications, dramatics, choir, hobbies, and a 
missionary group occupy the boys' time out of class. See page 630 

PHILLIPS ACADEMY 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 14-18 

Andover, Mass. Tel 720. 

John M. Kemper, B.S., West Point, M.A., Columbia, L.H.D., 

Williams, Litt.D., Tufts, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Greek Anatomy Anthropology 
Music Mechanical Drawing Navigation Bible Philosophy 
Public Speaking Art Literature Languages History 
Calculus Physics Chemistry. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg 740, Day 50. Fac full 93, part-time 13. 

Grad '57208. Entd Col '57 195. (Yale 45, Harvard 33, Prince- 
ton 20, Brown 18, Stanford 12). Alumni 12,000. 

Tui Bdg $1600, Day $800. Scholarships 211 ($190,000). Est 1778. 
Inc nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Tui $600. 

Endowment $17,020,000. Dorm rms 450. Class rms 70. Lib 
75,000 vols. Labs 4. Studios music 9, art 5. Gym. Swimming pools 
2. Fields 24. Courts 21. 

Of the two Phillips academies which have become so distinctive 
in American education, this at Andover, the older, was founded 
by Samuel Phillips, who, together with his father and his uncle 
John, deeded both land and money for the establishment of a 
school to be opened at Andover, where the grandfather of , Samuel 
Phillips had been head master of the Grammar School. The donors 
proposed "to lay the foundation of a SCHOOL OR ACADEMY 
for the purpose of instructing Youth, not only in English and 
Latin, Grammar, Writing, Arithmetic and those Sciences wherein 
they are commonly taught; but more especially to learn them the 
great end and real business of living." Further "it is again de- 
clared that the first and principal object of this Institution is the 
promotion of true piety and virtue." 

Opened during the Revolution, the school was incorporated in* 
1780 with the title Phillips Academy, the first chartered academy 
in New England. Among its early patrons were Washingtons and 
Lees from Virginia, as well as Lowells and Quincys from Massa- 
chusetts. The first head master, Eliphalet Pearson, had been a 
classmate of the founder at Dummer and at Harvard. A man of 



Mass. New England 37 

force and commanding' presence, he was known to his awed stu- 
dents as "Elephant" Pearson. Later he was professor of Hebrew 
at Harvard and the Andover Theological Seminary. 

When John Adams came in 1810 to the master's throne, twenty- 
three boys were enrolled. By 1817 the number had increased to a 
hundred, and during his twenty-three years Dr. Adams admitted 
1119 pupils, nearly a fifth of whom became ministers. Under 
Samuel H. Taylor, a man of picturesque and striking personality, 
head master from 1837 to 1871, the institution gradually took on 
its present character. After his death, however, it declined in pres- 
tige until it was rejuvenated and brought in touch with modern 
methods of education by Cecil F. P. Bancroft, principal from 1874 
to 1901. 

Andover long remained conservative, less influenced by the 
Unitarian movements which have stirred New England, and per- 
haps for that reason Andover early became primarily a prepara- 
tory school for more conservative Yale rather than Harvard, which 
soon came under more liberal influences. Of the more than twenty 
thousand boys that have graduated from the school, about 45 
per cent have gone to Yale and perhaps twenty per cent to Har- 
vard. Twelve thousand loyal living alumni are organized in nu- 
merous associations throughout the country and their continued 
interest through the years has brought increased endowments 
and gifts. 

First of the Headmasters to give his whole time to administra- 
tion was Alfred E. Stearns, in office for thirty years from 1903, 
alumnus of the Theological Seminary and of Amherst, under whose 
administration the old primitive austere atmosphere of Andover 
.gave way to a richer life as Thomas Cochran, '90, a Morgan part- 
ner, brought wealth to the school to enlarge and beautify the plant, 
today an ensemble designated 'the loveliest group of buildings in 
America/ An enlarged teaching staff makes possible smaller 
classes and close and intimate supervision, though there is no 
study hall and to the occasional visitor Andover looks like a col- 
lege. The boys wander from their dormitory rooms across the 
campus to their recitations. The archaeological museum, the art 
museums with special exhibit? add to the college flavor. 

Since 1942 a summer session has been held stressing the basic 
fields of mathematics, science, and modern languages, and 
serving as a 'laboratory' for trying out new ideas. 

Claude M. Fuess, who from 1908 had served the school in many 
capacities and had established a reputatidn as a biographer of 
national leaders, became Headmaster in 1933. Under his new 
policies, the curriculum was revised, several buildings added, 
and studies of health, academic mortality, and student activi- 
ties completed. In 1947 he announced his retirement at the end of 
the academic year, and Bishop Henry Hobson, President of the 



Mass. Leading Private Schools 38 

trustees, announced the appointment of John M. Kemper,^ whose 
whole life had been associated with the Army. For a time he 
taught at West Point and later did graduate work at Columbia 
and Harvard. During the war he served in the Military Intelli- 
gence and later directed the War Department's historical pro- 
gram. His "experience in dealing with many types of people, his 
skill in scholarly research, and his interest in education on all 
levels 1 ' were praised by Dr. Fuess. 

In the years since the inauguration of John Kemper, several new 
projects have been launched. The faculty adopted a revised cur- 
riculum in 1951 after an eighteen-month survey and study. This 
curriculum adds flexibility for adaptation to the talents of the 
individual boy, yet continues to require a basic core of funda- 
mentals. In 1956 Andover initiated the 'Andover Teaching Fellow- 
ships', designed to interest and give practical teaching experience 
to able young men. 

In conjunction with Exeter, Lawrenceville, Harvard, Yale and 
Princeton and under a grant from the Ford Foundation, a detailed 
study was conducted of the top two years of prep school and the 
first two of college, aiming at a better integration of ^ this four- 
year educational period. The committee published its report, 
"General Education in School and College," in 1953. The Andover 
Fund campaign added over $2,500,000 to the endowment, the 
Alumni Fund annually contributes over $200,000, a substan- 
tial portion of the school's scholarship funds. Added to the phys- 
ical plant is the new Memorial Gymnasium, opened in 1952. The 
Letter Societies were dissolved, and proceeds from the sale of 
their buildings used to establish student aid funds in the name of 
each society. 

Mr. Kemper's breadth of approach, his active interest in new 
trends and projects, and the student and alumni appreciation of 
the "spirit" of cooperation are manifestations of the new resiliency. 

Today, although the majority of graduates continue to matricu- 
late at Yale, Harvard, Princeton, many do go to the other leading 
colleges and universities. See also page 630 

THE PIKE SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 3%- 14 

Andover, Mass. 25 Hidden Rd. Tel 1197. 
William H. Harding, A.B., Yale, Hjsad. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VIII. Art Music French 
Latin. Remedial Reading Tutoring. 

Enr Boys 110, Girls 90. Fac full 14, part-time 7. 

Grad '5720. Entd Prep Sch '5717. (Abbot 6, Mary Burnham 
2, Brooks 2, Northampton Sch. Girls 1, Phillips Acad. 1, West- 
minster 1). 

Tui $225-500. Scholarships full 2j Est 1926. Inc 1944 nonprofit 



Mass. New England 89 

Enrolling children from Andover and from nearby communities 
in the Merrimac Valley and to the south, this school was founded 
by Mrs. Cynthia E. Pike. Upon her retirement in 1950, Mrs. 
Margaret J. Little became principal. Mr. Harding was appointed 
in 1956. 

ARLINGTON, MASS. Pop 44,353. Alt 145 ft. 8 mi. NW of Bos- 
ton, Rt.2. This residential suburb is adjacent to Cambridge. On 
the Heights are The Freer School and St. Anne's School. 

ST. ANNE'S SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Girls Ages 9-19 

Arlington Heights, Mass. 18 Claremont Ave. Tei. MI3-1867. 
Sister Ruth, B.Sc.Ed., Boston Univ, Head. 

Grades IV-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Art 
Music Typing. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg 70, Day 10. Elem 35, Sec 45. Fac full 13, part-time 2. 

Grad '5616. Entd Col '569. 

Tui Bdg $1000 (+ $100), Day $350 (+ $100). Est 1928. 
Episcopal. 

Dorms 3. Class rms 12. Lab. Studios music 3. 

This school conducted by the Episcopal Sisters of St. Anne 
provides a simple, attractive environment. Graduates in the last 
five years have entered a number of colleges and specialized 
schools, chiefly in New England. 

ASHBURNHAM, MASS. Pop 2603. Alt 1100 ft. B&M R.R. 7 mi 
NW of Fitchburg, RU2. High in the hills near the N.H. line lies 
this pleasant village. The six brick buildings of the Academy on 
an elevation west of the main road are pointed out by the bronze 
statue of the school boy, gift of Melvin Adams, wealthy native 
son. 

CUSHING ACADEMY 
Bdg and Day- Coed Ages 13- 

Ashburnham, Mass. Tel. Talbot 7-5911. 
Ralph O'Neal West, M.Ed., Harvard, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. College Preparatory. Journalism Economics 
Speech and Dramatics Sociology Psychology. Developmental 
Reading. 

Enr Bdg Boys 85, Girls 100; Day Boys 30, Girls 35. Fac full 27, 
part-time 2. 

Grad '57- 96. Entd Col '5785. Alumni 4500. 

Tui Bdg $1900 (+$200), Day $700. Scholarships. Est 1865. Inc 
nonprofit. 

For further information, write Porter Sargent 



Mass. Leading Private Schools 40 

Plant $1,000,000. Endowment $750,000. Dorm rms 90. Class rms 
27. Lib 5000 vols. Labs 4. Studios music 2, art 1. Gym. Fields 6. 
Courts 9. Riding and skiing facilities. 

Founded by a benefaction from Thomas Parkman Gushing, a 
native of Ashburnham, and enriched by several bequests, this 
academy owes its early growth chiefly to Dr. Hervey S. Cowell, 
beloved by his students and in office for nearly forty years. Of the 
four other principals, Clarence Quimby, who.succeeded James W. 
Vose in 1933, won the respect of his students and patrons, enlarged 
the faculty, refurbished the school plant, added a new dormitory 
for girls, and in 1956 completed a new gymnasium. College prep- 
aratory graduates enroll at Boston University, the University of 
Mass., Tufts, Smith, Mt, Holyoke, Wellesley, Brown, Dartmouth, 
Harvard. 

Mr. West, upon Dr. Quimby's resignation, was appointed in 
1956. He had formerly been on the faculty of St. John's School, 
Houston, Tex. 

Boys and girls meet in the classrooms, at meals, and on some 
social occasions. At other times they are two distinct groups, with 
their own numerous recreation , programs, athletics, and literary 
societies. See also page 795 



BELMONT, MASS, Pop 27,381. Alt 39 ft 6 mi. NW of Boeton. 

On the group of hills overlooking the Boston basin, Belmont was 
considered a choice place of residence through the nineteenth 
century. The Belmont Hill and Belmont Day schools are on the 
heights above Pleasant Street. 

BELMONT DAY SCHOOL 
Coed Ages 4-11 

Belmont, Mass. 650 Concord Ave. Tel. IVanhoe 4-3078. 
Mrs. D. Elizabeth Churchill, M,A,, NYU, Head. 

Kindergarten Transition Grades I- VI. Science Music Art 
French Shop. Remedial Reading Tutoring. 

Enr Boys 80, Girls 50. Fac full 15, part-time 6. 

Tui $300-500. Scholarships. Est 1928. Inc nonprofit. 

Summer Day Camp. Tui $140. 

Founded by parents and cooperatively owned, this country day 
school prepares for secondary schools in and around Boston. 
There are opportunities to work with artists, musicians, and 
scientists, and a special reading department has been established. 
Mrs. Churchill, formerly of the faculties of Putney School and 
National Cathedral School, was appointed on the retirement of 
Mrs. Rosamond Coolidge Howe, principal from 1944. 



Mass. New England 41 

BELMONT HILL SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day- Boys Ages 10-19 

Belmont 78, Mass. 350 Prospect St. Tel IV 4-4410. 
Charles Frederick Hamilton, A.B., Williams, Head. 

Grades V-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music 
Literature Languages Sciences. Manual Arts. 

Enr Bdg 35, Day 250. Elem 100, Sec 185. Fac full 30, part-time 3. 

Grad '5737. Entd Col '5735. (Harvard 10, Williams 3, Cor- 
nell 3, Brown 2, Bowdoin 2, others 15). Alumni 800. 

Tui Bdg $1800 (+$75), Day $775-900 (+$75). Scholarships par- 
tial 40 ($12,000). Est 1923. Inc 1923 nonprofit 

Plant $960,000. Endowment $110,000. Dorm rms 22. Class rms 
34. Lib 10,000 vols. Labs 3, Studios music 2, art 2. Gym. Fields 6. 
Courts 4. Artificial Hockey Rink, See also page, 629 

This day school with a small group of full and five day boarders 
was established by the late R. Heber Howe, former Harvard 
rowing coach and master at Middlesex. Mr. Hamilton succeeded 
Thomas R. Morse in 1942. 

' A strong preparatory program attracts students from academic 
and professional familks. Sound growth has brought an increase 
in plant and facilities and expansion of opportunities in both cur- 
ricular and extracurricular activities, made possible by loyal alum- 
ni support. The sectioning of classes allows advanced languages, 
mathematics and history work. 

The curriculum has become broader and less rigid than in 
former years, and preparation for college is thorough and suc- 
cessful, with many graduates entering Harvard, and others Prince- 
ton, Yale, Amherst, and Williams. Extra-curricular activities em- 
phasize dramatics, music, publications, science, art, and athletics. 

BEVERLY, MASS. Pop 31,000. Alt 26 f t B & M R.R. 2 mi. N of 
Salem, Rt.127. Boston's famous North Shore starts at Beverly, 
a city in which old houses and historic sites are jostled by indus- 
trial plants, among them the United Shoe Machinery. Here in 
past days have occurred noted developments in the maritime .and 
naval history of our country. On Cabot Street, the Shore Country 
Day School is housed in the old Sydney Winslow mansion. Endicott 
Junior College occupies handsome estates on the waterfront. 

ENDICOTT JUNIOR COLLEGE 
Bdg and Day - Girls Ages 17- 

Beverly, Mass. Tel WAlker 7-0585. 

George O. Bierkoe, A.B., Muhlenberg, B.D., Mt Airy, A.M., 

NYU, Litt 4 D., Muhlenberg, Pres. 

Jr Col 1-2. Liberal Arts Arts Ceramics Clothing Hotel 
Management Interior Decoration Journalism Kindergarten & 
Nursery Teaching Merchandising Photography Public Rela- 
tions Radio-Television Secretarial Theatre Arts. 



Boston Leading Private Schools 42 

Enr Bdg 390, Day 5. Fac 41. 

Tui Bdg $1950, Day $700. Est 1939. Inc 1939 nonprofit. 

Named after colonial Governor John Endicott and located on 
the historic North Shore estates, this young junior ^ college 
is characterized by a program combining liberal arts and individ- 
ualized vpcational training. Many of the faculty are from busi- 
ness and industry. A new dormitory was completed in May 1958. 

See also page 848 

SHORE COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 
Boys Ages 5-14, Girls 5-15 

Beverly, Mass. 545 Cabot St. Tel 4700. 

Raymonde Neel, A.B., Bryn Mawr, Head; Clifton M. Whiting, 

B.S., Geo. Wms. Coll., Assoc. Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1. Art Music 
French Latin History. Rem Reading. Manual Arts. 

Enr Boys 180, Girls 185. Fac full 28, part-time 3. 

Tui $340-740. Est 1929. Inc 1936 nonprofit. 

Summer Tutoring and Remedial Reading. 

Plant $400,000. Class rms 25. Studios music 1, art 1. Gyms 2. 

With the .appointment in 1936 of Miss Neel, for fourteen years 
a teacher at Ethel Walker School, the North Shore Country Day 
School and the Shore School of Beverly Farms were merged to 
form the present corporation. A vigorous building program has 
added much to the facilities. Pupils are prepared for the large 
secondary schools, with a few girls staying on for the first year of 
high school. 



BOSTON, MASS. Pop 801,444. Alt to 169 ft The Hub of the 

Universe, long intellectually, commercially and politically pre- 
eminent, has today been outstripped by successors to the south 
and west. Newer cities have usurped the long list of Boston 'firsts 1 
that stretch through the city's notable history. Yet many achieve- 
ments still find inception in this once literary and educational 
capital. 

Most easterly and most ancient of our large cities, Boston has 
ignored the natural attractions of this truly choice site, and, of 
the wealth of the old and fine from the historic past, less has been 
preserved than in Philadelphia. The old North End, mecca of so 
many patriot tourists, is being dissipated and destroyed, while in 
Charlestown and South Boston great concentrations of p re-Revo- 
lutionary dwellings remain neglected. The seat of several schools 
for public planning, today in the century of the motor car it has 
become a victim of creeping paralysis. With few modern buildings 
and fewer plans for improvement, piece-meal measures have pro- 



Boston New England 43 

duced great swathes of wreckage to bear arterial traffic to the 
congested central streets which once were cowpaths. Its traffic 
courts are crowded. 

Formerly a pioneer, with early one-way streets, the world's 
second subway system, and its Back Bay which was once a model 
residential area, the city has suffered from the costly vicissitudes 
of inefficient and decadent government, both state and local. Vacil- 
lating between extravagance and frugality, it has adopted a modi- 
fied Plan A reform government in City Hall, while growing civic 
interest among the citizenry has lightened the atmosphere. 

Paucity of natural resources early stimulated trade which built 
local industries and brought Boston fame. Now the largest city in 
New England and tenth largest in the country, though its port is 
in eclipse it still retains some importance as a fish, wool and shoe 
market Considered a choice place of residence, it is among the 
more expensive cities in which to live and do business. While wage 
rates remain lower than the national average, high taxation and 
repressive legislation are inclement to enterprise. 

Yet Boston maintains its leadership, medically, scientifically and 
culturally. Among its revered institutions are the noted Massachu- 
setts General Hospital, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Public 
Library, the Boston Symphony Orchestra, and a wealth of soci- 
eties that draw upon many facets of an unusually rich cultural 
heritage. The glories of the "Athens of America," where learning, 
arts and letters flourished, still flame, if somewhat less resplend- 
ently. 

It is still the hub of *a great educational concentration, largely 
private in origin and control. Among the leading higher institu- 
tions are the complex of Boston University, fifth largest in the 
country, the rapidly expanding Northeastern University, Simmons, 
Boston College and Emmanuel; across the Charles are Massachu- 
sets Institute of Technology, Harvard and Radcliffe; on the outer 
fringes, Tufts, Wellesley, Regis and Brandeis, and numerous 
junior colleges. Within the city are many professional and voca- 
tional schools. 

The private primary and secondary schools, formerly largely 
in the Back Bay and along the Fenway, have dwindled in number, 
while increasingly the leading schools have moved to the suburbs, 
Brookline, the Newtons, Wellesley, Dedham, Hingham, Weston, 
Waltham, Cambridge, Belmont and Concord, separately listed. 

BOSTON COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 
Day Boys Ages 13-19 

Dorchester 25, Mass, 150 Morrissey Blvd. Tel. A Venue 8-9150. 
Rev. Ambrose J. Mahoney, A.B., M.A., Boston Col, 'S.T.L., 
Weston Col, Prin. 
High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Languages Mathematics Sciences. 



Boston Leading Private Schools 44 

Enr 1370. Fac full-time 70, 

Grad '57 253. Entd Col'57 207. (Boston Coll. 152, Holy Cross 
16, Northeastern 14, Georgetown 6, Notre Dame 4). 

Tui $280. Scholarships full 26, partial 80 ($20,000). Est 1863. 
Roman Catholic. 

Plant $4,500,000. Class rms 38. Labs 2. Gym. 

Since 1913 separate from Boston College, of which it had earlier 
been a department, this high school offers a preparatory program 
based on the Jesuit "Ratio Studiorum." Most graduates enter the 
College, with others going to Holy Cross, Fordham, Georgetown, 
MIT, Tufts, Northeastern, Notre Dame. Debating, publications, 
clubs, athletics, and religious organizations, are among the extra- 
curricular activities. 

CHAUNCY HALL SCHOOL 
Day *- Boys Ages 15- 

Boston 16, Mass. 553 Boylston St. Tel. KE 6-5539. 
Ray D. Farnsworth, A.B., Tufts, Prin. 

High Sch 2-4 Post Grad 1-2. Col Prep. 

Enr 125. Fac full-time 5, part-time 1. Adm Staff 2. 

Tui $750 (+$60). Est 1828. Inc 1939 nonprofit 

A pioneer in education, introducing military training, coeduca- 
tion, and kindergarten work before schools had generally adopted 
them, Chauncy Hall was established by Gideon F. Thayer. Frank- 
lin T. Kurt, connected with the school from 1896 and owner from 
1910 until his death in 1947, was succeeded by Mr. Farnsworth, 
head of the mathematics department for thirty-six years. 

Today, Chauncy Hall stresses preparation for science and en- 
gineering colleges, and many graduates enter Northeastern, MIT, 
Tufts, RPI, and WPI. 



COMMONWEALTH SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 12-17 

Boston 16, Mass. 151 Commonwealth Ave. Tel. CO 6-7525. 
Charles Merrill, A.B., Harvard, Head. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-2. Languages Social Studies Sci- 
ence. 

Enr 60. Fac full 6, part-time 2. 

Tui $880-960, Scholarships full 2-3, partial 6-8 ($5000). Est 1957. 

Believing a city coeducational day school offers advantage, Mr. 
Merrill, co-founder of the Thomas Jefferson School in St. Louis, 
has created a demanding school opening in the fall of 1958. The 
broadly based preparatory program with extra opportunities for 



Boston New England 45 

the more able student offers unusual stress on social and cultural 
heritage and language studies, and use of neighboring institutions 
including library, museum, state house and factory, for field work 
and study. Mr. Merrill, Deerfield and Harvard alumnus, much 
interested in educational methodologies, has recently studied sec- 
ondary schools abroad where he was also a teacher and lecturer 
for the Austrian Fulbright program and the U. S. Information 
Service in France. He has drawn together a faculty of breadth of 
interest, vigor and experience. See page 796 



HUNTINGTON SCHOOL FOR BOYS 
Day Ages 14-20 

Boston 15, Mass. 320 Huntington Ave. Tel. KE 6-1800. 

William G. Wilkinson, A.B., Univ of Ky., Ed.M., Boston Univ, 

Head; William N. Randell, A.M., Yale, Asst Head. 

High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep. 

Enr 240. Fac full-time 13. 

Grad '5796. Entd Col '5787. (Northeastern 29, U of Mass. 8, 
Boston U. 7, Tufts 5, Boston Coll. 5). Alumni 3000. 

Tui $650. Scholarships partial 20 ($6000). Est 1909. Inc 1909 
nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Make-up courses. Tui $50 per course. 

Class rms 13. Lib 5000 vols. Labs 2. Gyms 2. Swimming pool. 

Housed in the Boston Y.M.C.A. building, which affords excel- 
lent facilities and athletic equipment unusual for a city school, 
Huntington was founded primarily as a preparatory school. Mr. 
Wilkinson, former assistant head and associated with the school 
since 1929, became head master in 1945. 

Many graduates of the college preparatory curriculum enter 
Northeastern, Boston University, and Tufts, with others going to 
the University of Me., Boston College, Harvard. The coeduca- 
tional summer session in July and August covers an entire year's 
work in any two subjects. See also page 631 

THE KINGSLEY SCHOOL 

Of Remedial Work 
Day Coed Ages 7-16 

Boston 15, Mass. 397 Marlborough St. Tel. KE 6-5984. 
Lowell V. Kingsley, S.B., Ed.M., Boston Univ, Dir. 

Grades I- VIII. Remedial Reading Tutoring. 

Enr Boys 65, Girls 15. Fac full 7, part-time 4. 

Grad '57 14. Entd Prep Sch. '5710. (Cambridge Acad. 2, 
Manter Hall 1, Emerson 1, Forman 1, St. Anne's 1). 

Tui $700. Scholarships partial 31 ($5000-$6000). Est 1938. Inc 



AA 

Boston Leading Private Schools w 

1945 nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Remedial Reading Tutoring. Tui $4 hr. 

This school was started by Mrs. Edith H. Kingsley and Miss 
Helen F. Loud to give special remedial work for children with 
reading difficulties. Mr. Kingsley, son of the co-founder, became 
director in 1948. Today, the group is less limited, and includes 
children who benefit from individual attention in all their work 
in the first 8 grades. The needs of each pupil are studied and 
an individual program arranged to correct specific weaknesses. See 
also page 796 

ROXBURY LATIN SCHOOL 
Day- Boys Ages 12-18 

West Rosbury 32, Mass. 101 St. Theresa Ave. Tel FA 5-4729. 
Frederick R. Weed, A.B., A.M., Harvard, Head. 

Grades VII- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Greek Latin 
French Mathematics Literature Science History Music. 

Enr 190. Fac full 13, part-time 1. 

Grad '57 21. Entd Col '5721. (Harvard 7, MIT 3, George- 
town 2, Brown 2, Princeton 1, Dartmouth 1). Alumni 1200. 

Tui $300-400. Scholarships full 5, partial 14 ($5000). Est 1645. 
Inc nonprofit. 

Plant $1,300,000. Endowment $1,500,000. Class rms 9. Lib 10,000 
vols. Labs 2. Fields 3. Courts 3. Gym. 

This oldest endowed secondary school in the nation has passed 
the tercentenary mark. It was established some nine years after 
the founding of Harvard College to prepare boys for that institu- 
tion. Originally "The Free Schoole in Roxburie" for Roxbury 
boys, in recent years a tuition charge has been made. This now 
amounts to $300 per year for Roxbury boys, and $400 for others. 
John Eliot, "Apostle to the Indians/ 1 when minister of the First 
Church of Roxbury, signed a statement with others of the town 
that they, "in consideration of their religious care of posterity, 
have taken into consideration how necessary the education of their 
children in literature will be, to fit them for public service, both 
in Church and Commonwealth, in succeeding ages. They, there- 
fore, unanimously have consented and agreed to erect a free school 
in the said Town of Roxbury." In 1671 Thomas Bell, formerly a 
freeman of Roxbury, died in London, willing two hundred acres 
of Roxbury lands to the school and naming the Rev. John Eliot 
and two other officers of the First Church as trustees of the en- 
dowment 

William C. Collar, for more than half a century connected with 
the school, m his long career attained a national position in the 
educational world. Appointed a master in 1857 and head master in 
1867, he resigned in 1907 and died in 1916. D. O. S. Lowell, a 
graduate of Bowdoin, became a master in the school in 1884, and 



Boston New England 47 

was head master from 1909 to his retirement in June, 1921. Daniel 
V. Thompson, who came from Lawrenceville as his successor, 
maintained the high scholastic standards. It was during his regime 
that the school moved to its present site. 

Mr. Weed was selected in 1947 to succeed George Norton 
Northrop, head master from 1932. Mr. Weed came from St. 
Mark's, where he had been assistant head master, and has brought 
new youth and vigor to the school. The curriculum adheres to 
the classics, with emphasis on Latin and Greek, although there 
is required study of physics, and many electives are offered. 

Nearly half the graduates enter Harvard, with others going to 
Dartmouth, MIT, Amherst, Brown, Wesleyan, Yale. 

A new gymnasium and a woodworking shop are recent additions. 



THOMPSON ACADEMY 
Bdg Boys Ages 11-18 

Boston 27, Mass. Thompson's Island Tel. GR 2-2884. 
Houghton D. Pearl, B.S., Ed.M., Univ of Vt, Head. 

Grades VII- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Manual 
Arts Marine Printing Music. Mathematics. Rem Reading. 

Enr 105. Fac full 6, part-time 2. 

Grad '5710. Entd Col '576. (Northeastern 4, Mass. Maritime 
1, Northrop Aero 1), 

Tui $1000. Scholarships full 7, partial 85. Self-help pgrm. Est 
1814, Inc nonprofit. 

Plant $1,300,000, Dorm rms 30, Class rms 6. Lib 5000 vols. Stu- 
dio music 1. Gym. Fields 2. 

Occupying Thompson's Island in Boston Harbor, this Academy, 
formerly known as The Farm and Trades School, has since 1832 
offered boys of promise both from disrupted homes and those 
chosen on the basis of merit and need, sound education and voca- 
tional training. Mr. Pearl who succeeded William M. Meacham 
in 1955 has strengthened the academic course and preparatory 
program, built the enrollment and increased the plant and endow- 
ment. The first school band and pioneer printing and sloyd courses 
were developed at this school which now sends increasing num- 
bers of students to college. See page 631 

THE WINSOR SCHOOL 
Day Girls Ages 10-18 

Boston 15, Mass. Pilgrim Rd. Tel. AS 7-4967. 

Valeria Addams Knapp, A.B., Vassar, Dir. t 

Grades V-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Art Music 
Dramatics. Rem Reading. 

Enr 325. Elem 155, Sec 170. Fac full 32, part-time 9. 

Grad '5743. Entd Col '5741. (Radcliffe 14, Smith 11, Vas- 



Mass. Leading Private Schools 48 

sar 2, Conn. 2, Wheaton 1, Wellesley, 1). Alumnae 2550. 

Tui $700-850. Scholarships full 1, partial 26 ($11,900). Est 1886. 
Inc 1908 nonprofit. 

Class rms 19. Lib 4500 vols. Labs 3. Studios music 5, art 2. 
Gym. Swimming pool. Fields 4. Courts 11. 

This school has developed from Miss Winsor's School, estab- 
lished in 1886 by Mary Pickard Winsor, whose brother later 
founded Middlesex School. Its continued and successful growth 
led in 1910 to its removal to the present well-equipped plant. 
Miss Winsor retired in 1922, her successor, Katharine Lord, in 
1939. Frances D. Dugan was associate director for fifteen years 
before taking full charge. Her lighter touch somewhat lessened 
the rigidity. 

Miss Knapp had been associate director for ten years before her 
present appointment in 1951. Almost all graduates go on to col- 
lege, especially Smith, Radcliffe, Wellesley, Vassar, Bryn Mawr. 
Many become leaders in college activities, their well organized 
preparatory school training standing them in good stead. 



BRAINTREE, MASS. Pop 23,161. Alt 94 ft. NY,NH&H R.R. 
11 mi. SE of Boston, Rt.37. An old and pleasant town of many 
large estates, Braintree is S of the Blue Hills which separate it 
from Boston. 

THAYER ACADEMY 
Co Day Coed Ages 14-19 

South Braintree 85, Mass. 745 Washington St. TeL VI 3-3580. 
Gordon (X Thayer, A.B., Univ of N.H., Ed.M., Harvard, Ed.D., 
Boston Univ, Head. 

High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep. Art Music Languages 
Sciences Mathematics Typing. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Boys 180, Girls 150. Fac full 35, part-time 10. 

Grad '57102. Entd Col '5797. (Harvard 6, MIT 3, RPI 3, 
Mt. Holyoke 2, Wellesley 2). Alumni 3000. 

Tui $725. Scholarships partial 121 ($15,000). Est 1877. Inc 
nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Tui $75 per course. Summer Camp. Tui $115. 

Plant $862,000. Endowment $1,200,000. Class rms 21. Lib 5000 
vols. Labs 3. Studios music 1, art 1. Gym. Fields 7. Courts 3. 

This academy was founded and endowed by General Sylvanus 
Thayer, distinguished "father of West Point" and attained promi- 
nence under Dr. William Gallagher, principal for twenty-three 
years. Stacy Southworth, principal from 1920 to 1947, inaugurated 
a modern country day program, continued high scholastic stan- 
dards, and greatly enriched the curriculum, especially in the so- 



Mass. New England 49 

cial sciences, music, and art. 

Mr. Thayer, formerly assistant head master, and founder of 
the summer school, nursery school and kindergarten, and day 
camp, became head master in 1947. He has pioneered in the 
establishment of an evening development program for industrial 
personnel of the region. Graduates of the Academy attend Har- 
vard, M.I.T., Brown, Boston University, Radcliffe, Mount Hoi- 
yoke. Extra-curricular activities include athletics, music, dramatics, 
student government, and various other organizations. See page 
801 

THAYERLANDS, the junior school of 175 boys and girls from 
Nursery School to the 8th grade is in an attractive country setting 
nearby. Preparatory for Thayer Academy, it is directed by Rosa- 
mond E. Bacon, A.B., Smith. 

BREWSTER, MASS. Pop 987. Alt 124 ft NY,NH&H R.R. 13 
mi. E of Barnstable, Rt U.S.6. Once a port contributing to the 
maritime reputation of Cape Cod, Brewster has become a popular 
resort and residential community. The school's wooded acreage 
and seashore are in East Brewster. 

SEA PINES 
Bdg Girls Ages 6-14 

East Brewster, Mass, Main St. Tel TW 6-3321. 
Faith Bickford, Dir; Gladys Parker, Assoc. Dir. 

Grades I- VIII. French Art Astronomy Music Dramatics 
Dancing Cooking Riding. 

Enr 18. Fac full 5, part-time 4. 

Grad '574. Entd Prep Sch '57- Walnut Hill 1, Prospect Hilll. 

Tui $1500. Scholarships. Est 1907. Inc 1934 nonprofit. 

Summer Camp. Tutoring. Enr 90. Tui $495. 

The Rev. Thomas Bickford, a Congregational minister of Cam- 
bridge, established this school which since his death in 1917 has 
been carried on by his daughter. A summer camp makes year 
round care available. There are opportunities for swimming, sail- 
ing, riding, art, music, dramatics, crafts, and nature study. Stu- 
dents of the school attend Christian Science Sunday School. See 
also page 741 

BROOKLINE, MASS. Pop 57,589. Alt. 43 ft NYC R.R. This Bos- 
ton suburb has been the home of many 'firsts/ in schooling and 
municipal services, and in the quiet beauty of its residential estates, 
many of which have recently been taken over by tax-free institu- 
tions. It still prides itself on being the model town it once was. 
With apartment house developments and the recent influx, its 
character has changed, yet the town remains a choice residential 



Mass. Leading Private Schools 50 

section. The private schools are largely in the residential districts 
near Coolidge Corner and in Chestnut Hill. 



BEAVER COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 
Girls Ages 8-19 

Chestnut Hill 67, Mass. 791 Hammond St. Tel. LO 6-4715. 
Crosby Hodgman, B.A., Bowdoin, M.A., Cornell, Head. 

Grades IV- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Arts and 
Crafts Music Drama Home Economics Sociology Psy- 
chology. Rem Reading. 

Enr 420. Elem 200, Sec 220. Fac full 39, part-time 10. 

Grad '5759. Entd Col '5752. Alumnae 1204. 

Tui $550-800. Scholarships ($24,000). Est 1921. Inc 1921 non- 
profit. 

Beaver Day Camp. Enr 400. Tui $204 eight wks 

Plant $944,977. Class rms 40. Lib 9000 vols. Labs 2. Studios 
music 2, art 2. Gyms 2, Fields 6. Courts 6. 

Shortly after the first World War a group of liberal minded 
parents, desirous of bringing to Boston more progressive educa- 
tional methods than were then available, called Eugene Randolph 
Smith, who had successfully developed the Park School in Balti- 
more, to organize a similar school here. He was extraordinarily 
successful in his twenty-two years as head mas-ter, adding con- 
stantly to the activities and plant of the school, which became not 
only socially accepted by discriminating Boston families, but a 
national focus as a leader in progressive education. 

Mr. Hodgman came from the middle west in 1943 to head 
Beaver. He has furthered the physical development of the school, 
greatly increased enrollment, and vigorously continued and ex- 
panded the educational work. Both the general and college prepar- 
atory curricula are unusually rich in art, crafts, music, languages, 
and social sciences. Graduates enter many colleges, including 
Vassar, <RadcIiffe, Wellesley, Smith, Mt. Holyoke, Connecticut, 
Skidmore. Sarah Lawrence and Bennington. Extra-curricular 
activities emphasize music, drama, a social welfare committee, 
student government, and a United Nations Day Committee, as 
well as a program in sports. 



THE BRIMMER AND MAY SCHOOL 
Co Day Girls Ages 4-18; Boys 4-10 

Chestnut Hill 67, Mass. 69 Middlesex Rd. Tel. PA 7-7462. 
Catherine B. McCoy, A.B., Radcliffe, Prin. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4 Post 
Grad L Col Prep General. Art Music. 



Mass. New England 51 

Enr Girls 140, Boys 15. Elem 9b, Sec 65. Fac full 15, part-time 6. 

Grad '5714. Entd Col '5714. (Bryn Mawr 2, Radcliffe 1, 
Wellesley 1, Bennington 1, Wheaton 1, St. Lawrence 1). 

Tui $300-800 (+$25-200). Scholarships. Est 1887. Inc 1939 
nonprofit. 

Plant $171,240. Lab. Studio art 1. Gym. Courts 3. Field. 

In 1939 the Brimmer and May schools merged, continuing under 
the joint direction of their principals, Miss Mabel Cummings and 
Mrs. Charles H. Haskins. Miss McCoy, on the Brimmer staff for 
ten years, succeeded them in 1942. The school moved from Boston 
to its Brooklipe location in 1954. Stressing sound college prepara- 
tion, the school sends graduates to a wide range of colleges. Activ- 
ities include music, dramatics, publications, social service, student 
government, and athletics. 

DEXTER SCHOOL 
Day- Boys Ages 6-14 

Brookline 46, Mass. 169 Freeman St. Tel. AS 7-5174. 

Francis Caswell, A.B., Harvard, B.D., Episcopal Theological Sch, 

Head. 

Grades I-VII. Art Music. Manual Arts. Remedial Reading. 

Enr 155. Fac full 15, part-time 2. 

Grad '5620. Entd Prep Sch '5620 (Noble and Greenough 6, 
Milton 5, Brooks 2, Middlesex 2, Groton 1). Alumni 577. 

Tui $400-750. Scholarships partial 6. Est 1926. Inc 1926 non- 
profit. 

Independent since 1926, this was originally the lower school of 
Noble and Greenough. Mr. Caswell, formerly assistant head of 
Rivers School, succeeded Myra E. Fiske. Firm emphasis on aca- 
demic fundamentals prepares for leading secondary schools. The 
vigorous mtra-mural athletics program is in part supervised by 
Harvard and B.U. undergraduates. 

THE PARK SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 3-14 

Brookline 46, Mass, 25 Kennard Rd. Tel. AS 7-9170. 
James A. Lowell, A.B., Ed.M., Harvard, Head. 

Pre-Nursery Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII. Art 
Music French Latin. 

Enr Boys 100, Girls 120. Fac full 26, part-time 1. 
Tui $300-700. Est 1888. Inc 1923 nonprofit. , 

Founded nearly seventy-five years ago as Miss Pierce s bcnool for 
Little Girls and Boys, this school was directed by Alice Lee and 
Grace M. Harris and more recently, for ten years, by Grace M. 
Cole. Mr. Lowell was appointed in 1948. The school has two de- 
partments, upper and lower, with Mrs. Forsyth Watson head of 
the latter. 



Mass. Leading Private Schools 52 

POLLOCK SCHOOL 

For Retarded and Emotionally Insecure Children 
Bdg and Day Coed Ages 5-16 

Brookline 46, Mass. 28 Alton PL Tel. AS 7-3970. 
Morris P. Pollock, A.B., Ed.D,, D.A.O., Dir. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VI II. Handwork Speech. 

Enr Bdg Boys 8, Girls 6; Day Boys 5, Girls 3. Fac full 4, part- 
time 2. 

Tui Bdg $3000 (7-day), $2600 (5-day), Day $1700. Est 1935. Inc 
1936. 

Summer Session. Individual Academic Training. Tui $500. 

Mr. and Mrs, Pollock have had considerable success in helping 
mentally or academically retarded and emotionally insecure 
children to make the most of their potentialities. No child is 
accepted who cannot care for himself physically. Academic work 
is continued in the Summer School. Mr. and Mrs. Pollock have 
co-authored a leading text entitled "New Hope for the Retarded: 
Enriching the Lives of Exceptional Children/ 1 published in 1953, 
for parents and teachers of retarded children, 

THE RIVERS COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 
Boys Ages 8 -18 

Chestnut Hill 67, Mass. 436 Heath St. Tel. AS 7-7592. 
George H. Blackwell, B.A., Harvard, Head. 

Grades III- VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep. Music 
Manual Arts Mech Drawing. Rem Reading Make-up work. 

Enr 200: Elem 120, Sec 80, Fac full 20, part-time 1. 

Grad '57 11. Entd Col '5711. (Bowdoin 2, Hobart 2, Boston 
Coll. 1, Colby 1, Harvard 1, Boston U. 1). Alumni 407. 

Tui $575-$875. Scholarships. ^Est 1915, Inc 1924. nonprofit 

Summer Session. Tutoring in English and Mathematics. Rem. 
Reading. 

Class rms 17. Lib 3000 vols. Lab, Studios music 1, art 1. Gym. 
Fields 3. 

Originally Mr. Rivers' Open-air School, and now controlled by 
parents and alumni, this has developed into an efficient prepara- 
tory institution. In 1940 it absorbed the Country Day School for 
Boys of Boston, in which Clarence E, Allen had taught before 
coming here in 1929. Mr. Blackwell, from the faculty of Lake 
Forest Academy in Illinois, succeeded him in 1953. Graduates go 
on to Harvard, Brown, Dartmouth, the University of Me., Middle- 
bury, Amherst Transportation is available from Boston, Brook- 
line, the Newtons, and the Wellesleys. 



Mass. New England 53 

CAMBRIDGE, MASS. Pop 120,740. B&M R.R. Many generations 
of Cambridge residents have considered that they truly enjoyed 
the most select of towns. Its great collegiate centers are Harvard 
and Radcliffe, near the Square, and M.I.T., opposite Boston's Back 
Bay on the Charles River. Most schools are around Harvard 
Square and in the residential sections to the west. 

THE BROWNE AND NICHOLS SCHOOL 
Co Day Boys Ages 5*19 

Cambridge 38, Mass. Gerry's Landing Rd. Tel. UN 4-0700. 
Edwin H. B. Pratt, A.B., Harvard, Head. 

Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep Art Anthropology 
Music Typing Sciences Languages Mathematics. Woods- 
manship. 

Enr 300. Elem 150, Sec 150. Fac full 35, part-time 5. 

Grad '5630. Entd Col '56 28 (Harvard 8, Tufts 4, Yale 2, 
Colby 2, RPI 2, Amherst 1, Williams 1). Alumni 1200. 

Tui $450-850. Scholarships full 5, partial 35 ($20,000). Est 1863. 
Inc 1912 nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Summer Camp. 

Plant $500,000. Endowment $20,000. Class rms 22. Lib 2500 vols. 
Labs 3. Studios 2. Shop. Gym. Fields 4. Courts 3. Boathouse. 

This school was established by George H. Browne and Edgar 
H. Nichols along lines in advance of the times. Ralph Hoffman, 
the ornithologist, for more than twenty years was associated, and 
the late Porter E. Sargent served as science master from 1896 to 
1904. Willard Reed, co-principal from 1912 following the death 
of Mr. Nichols in 1910, was replaced as head master in 1928 when 
the alumni, chiefly Harvard graduates, took over. Roger T. 
Twitchell directed the school for a decade. In 1948 the Upper 
School moved from Garden Street to its present site, and the fol- 
lowing year Mr. Pratt, formerly teacher at Westminster School, 
was appointed. A new Middle School building was completed in 
1956. 

With the completion of the new plant in 1951, the school now 
offers a coordinated country day school program, with a strong 
college preparatory program enriched with many minor and extra- 
curricular courses. A large percentage of graduates enter Harvard, 
with others going to Dartmouth, Amherst, Yale, Princeton, Brown. 
There are French, photography, and literary clubs, and a variety 
of sports. 

THE BUCKINGHAM SCHOOL 
Day- Boys Ages 4-9, Girls 4-18 

Cambridge 38, Mass. Lower Sch 10 Buckingham St.; Upper Sch 
80 Sparks St. Tel. TR 6-6960. 

Marian W. Vaillant, A.B., Radcliffe, Prin; Mrs. David H. Morse, 
Head of Lower School. 



Mass. Leading Private Schools 54 

Kindergarten Transition Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. 
Col Prep General. Art Music Literature French. Dramatics. 

Enr Girls 245, Boys 95. Elem 275, Sec 65. Fac full 23, part-time 
15. 

Grad '5714. Entd Col '5714. (Radcliffe 2, Smith 2, Wheelock 
2, Bryn Mawr 1, Goucher 1, Connecticut 1). 

Tui $275-750. Est 1889. Inc 1902 nonprofit 

Plant $323,290. Class rms 22. Lab. Studios art 2. Gym. 

Deriving from Miss Markham's School under the long direction 
of Miss Katharine M. Thompson, a separate Upper School for 
girls and the coeducational Lower School were created, Miss Vail- 
lant, a member of Miss Thompson's faculty and principal since 
1935, has lightened the austerity of tone and continued the sound 
college preparatory work of the Upper School, which in 1951 
occupied separate quarters (at 80 Sparks St). With greatly in- 
creased enrollment, the school continues to be popular in the 
Harvard community, while emphasizing in both branches a broad 
program which includes athletics, choral music, and dramatics. 
Boys and girls graduating from the Lower School choose many 
preparatory schools, while continuity offered for girls in the Up- 
per School sends graduates to leading colleges, including Rad- 
cliffe, Swarthmore, Smith, Wellesley, Oberlin, and Bennington. 



CAMBRIDGE ACADEMY 
Day Coed Ages J2-20 

Cambridge 38, Mass. 48 Garden St Tel. KI 7-7665. 

Gaetan Rudolph Aiello, A.B., Amherst, M.A., Univ of 111., M.A., 

Ph.D., Harvard, Head, 

High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep. 

Enr Boys 45, Girls 30. Fac full 8, part-time 2. Staff 2. 

Grad '5736. Entd Col '5736. Alumni 587. 

Tui $500 (+$50). Scholarships. Est 1936. Proprietary. 

Summer Session. Enr 35. 

Plant $65,000. Class rms 8. Labs 2. 

Established as the College Preparatory School by Dr. Aiello and 
assuming its present name in 1937, the Academy stresses college 
preparation and offers one year of intensive review. Many of the 
students are children of faculty members of nearby colleges and 
universities. Graduates have entered more than 200 different col- 
leges throughout the country. There is a student council, as well 
as a dramatic club, that is an integral part of the curriculum. See 
also page 797 

For further information, write Porter Sargent 



Mass. New England 55 

LESLEY-DEARBORN SCHOOL 

Remedial School for Normal Children 

Day - Coed Ages 6-19 

Cambridge 38, Mass. 36 Cpncord Ave. Tel. UN 4-0191. 

Mrs. Margaret G. Gifford, 'A.B., Radcliffe, Ed.M., Harvard, Head. 

Ungraded. Art Music History English Mathematics Typ- 
ing Mechanical Drawing Remedial Reading Tutoring Make- 
up courses. 

Enr 60. Fac full 6, part-time 9. 

Tui $900-1000. Est 1944. Inc nonprofit. 

Formerly the remedial unit of Cambridge Lower School, but 
moved to separate quarters in 1944, and acquired by Lesley Col- 
lege in 1949, this was renamed in honor of Dr. Walter F. Dear- 
born, educational psychologist. 

Entirely remedial in its work, Lesley-Dearborn successfully re- 
turns most of its pupils to a regular school as soon as they have 
been brought up to the regular work of their age level. 



LESLEY-ELLIS SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 3-11 

Cambridge 38, Mass. 34 Concord Ave. Tel. UN 4-3600. 

Philip C. Banios, B.Ed., Plymouth TC, Ed.M., Boston Univ, Dir. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VI. Music Art Shop Ce- 
ramics Rem Reading Science. 

Enr Boys 75, Girls 60. Fac full 10, part-time 6. 

Grad '57 14. Entd Prep Sch '5710. (Cambridge Sch 6, Shady 
Hill 2, Browne & Nichols 1, Belmont Hill 1). Alumni 1000. 

Tui $300-650. Scholarships full 4, partial 8 ($4000). Est 1886. 
Inc 1909 nonprofit. 

Formerly the Cambridge Lower School, Lesley-Ellis has been 
since 1949 owned and operated by the well known Lesley College 
for demonstration and practice teaching. In 1956 Mr. Banios suc- 
ceeded William E. Maxson, at which time plans were announced 
for the adaption of a curriculum for gifted children. From the sec- 
ond grade, pupils participate in French classes. 



MANTER HALL SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 16-20; Day Coed 13-20 

Cambridge 38, Mass. 71 Mt. Auburn St Tel. TR 6-7532. 
John C. Hall, B.S., Boston Univ, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Languages Sciences 
Mathematics. Remedial Reading Tutoring Make-up courses. 



Mass. Leading Private Schools 56 

Enr Bdg 15; Day Boys 65, Girls 20. Fac full 16, part-time 3. 

Grad '5745. Entd Col '5745. (Boston U. 9, Northeastern 5, 
Tufts 4, M.I.T. 3, Harvard 2, Brown 2). 

Tui Bdg $2450, Day $476-900. Est 1886. Inc 1925. 

Summer Session. Tui Bdg $725, Day $200. 

Plant $200,000. Dorm rms 8. Class rms 18. Lib 2400 vols. Lab. 

Now primarily a preparatory school, Manter Hall developed 
from the first Harvard tutoring school, established by William 
Whiting Nolen, colloquially known as the "widow Nolen." It was 
incorporated after his death in 1923 and has since been carried on 
by men who were with him for many years and helped to make 
the reputation of the school. Among them is Mr. Hall, long 
treasurer and member of the board, director since 1937, whose son 
acts as business manager. 

The curriculum prepares for a wide variety of colleges and 
universities, mostly in New England, including Brown, Tufts, 
Harvard, M.I.T., Northeastern, and Boston University. Summer 
schools, with make-up courses, are conducted in Cambridge, and 
at Falmouth and Wianno on Cape Cod. See also page 798 



THE NEW PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

Bdg and Day Boys Ages 12-21 

Cambridge 38, Mass. 113 Brattle St. Tel. TR 6-6823. 
Ernest Benshimol, A.B., Harvard, Prin. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Languages Sciences. 

Enr Bdg 25, Day 85. Fac full 11, part-time 2. 

Grad '5650. Entd Col '5650. Alumni 2700. 

Tui Bdg $970 plus $35 wk; Day $970. Scholarships partial 17 
($6000). Est 1924.- Proprietary. 

Summer Session. Make-up courses. Tui $115 per subject. 

Plant $100,000. Class rms 8. Lib 1000 vols. Lab. Fields 2. 
A full curriculum for college preparation is available, and the 
skilled staff and small classes offer intensive drill and corrective 
study. The present head, who succeeded his father, Max Benshimol, 
in 1934, had had experience as teacher and principal in several 
high school. Activities include a full program of athletics. Gradu- 
ates have entered many different colleges and universities through- 
out the country. 



SHADY HILL SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 4-15 

Cambridge 38, Mass. 178 Coolidge Hill. Tel. TR 6-1204. 
Edward Yeomans, A.B., Harvard, Dir. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1. Art 
Music Latin French Science. Remedial Reading. 



Mass. Leading Private Schools 57 

Enr Boys 205, Girls 205. Fac full 36, part-time 5. 

Grad '5628. Entd Prep Sch '5626 (Winsor 5, Milton 5, 
Exeter 3, Beaver 2, Buckingham 2, Lawrenceville 2), Alumni 715. 

Tui $275-750. Scholarships partial 30 ($7000). Est 1915. Inc 1921 
nonprofit. 

Teacher Training Program. Tui $300. 

An outstanding coeducational elementary school, this grew from 
a little community enterprise sponsored chiefly by families of the 
Harvard faculty and bears the name of the estate of Charles Eliot 
Norton. Under Katharine Taylor's skillful administration from 
1921, it was reorganized in 1927 with a governing board of parents 
and faculty. On Miss Taylor's retirement in 1949, Mr. Yeomans, 
son of the famed progressive educator who founded the Ojai Val- 
ley School, and previously on the faculty of Shady Hill and then 
Thacher School, was appointed. 

The teacher-training program, started in 1928, enrolls college 
graduates who serve for a year in an apprenticeship capacity and 
meet in seminars with members of the faculty. 



CONCORD, MASS. Pop 10,899. Alt 121 ft. B&M R.R. 17 mi. NW 
of Boston, Rt.2. Literary paupers, renegades and outcasts found 
haven here in the last century. Shades of Hawthorne, Emerson, 
Thoreau and the Alcotts are still potent, and the charm of Con- 
cord's early Colonial residences have brought many to bask in its 
historical and literary glories. It is a literary shrine with the sig- 
nificance of England's Stratford or Germany's Weimar. A mecca 
of the patriotic, here Thoreau in jail wrote "Civil Disobedience" 
which, through Tolstoi and Gandhi, shook to their foundations 
the world's great empires. 

Its schools are in no way revolutionary. Concord Academy oc- 
cupies the former Samuel Hoar estate and the adjacent property 
on Main Street The Fenn School is on Monument Street a half 
mile from the bridge. Three miles from the center are the brick 
Colonial buildings and spacious grounds of Middlesex School. 

CONCORD ACADEMY 
Bdg Gtrls Ages 13-18; Day Girls 12-18 

Concord, Mass. 72 Main St. Tel, EMerson 9-2306. 
Mrs. Livingston Hall, A.B., Radcliffe, Head. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music. 

Enr Bdg 60, Day 160. Fac full 23, part-time 8. 

Grad '57 32. Entd Col '5731. (Radcliffe 7, Smith 6, Wheaton 
3, Vassar 2, Bennington 2, Bradford Jr. 2). Alumnae 593. 

Tui Bdg $2350 (+$150), Day $900. Scholarships full 2, partial 
5. Est 1922, Inc 1922 nonprofit. 



Mass. Leading Private Schools 58 

Plant $319,184. Endowment $55,000. Dorm rms 24. Class rms 21. 
Labs 2. Gym. Fields 2. Courts 2. 

This school, typical of the town in tone and atmosphere, de- 
veloped from the merging of several older local institutions. J. 
Josephine Tucker, principal from 1940 to 1949, was succeeded by 
Mrs. Hall. 

Graduates in the past five years have entered RadclifTe, Smith, 
Vassar, Wellesley, Bryn Mawr, and Cornell, among others. Extra- 
curricular activities include shop, debating, sports, and unusual 
out-of-door activities. Choral singing, dramatics, and ensemble 
group, and a fine arts program are part of the curriculum. 



THE FENN SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 9-14 

Concord, Mass. Monument St. Tel. EMerson 9-3815. 
Roger C. Fenn, A.B., Harvard, Head. 
Grades IV- VIII. Art Music Algebra French Latin. 
Enr Bdg 35, Day 75. Fac full 13, part-time 4. 
Grad '5723. Entd Prep Sch '5722. (Middlesex 5, Milton 2, 
Belmont Hill 2). Alumni 573. 

Tui Bdg $1900 (+$200-250), Day $700. Scholarships full 2, par- 
tial 6 ($7000). Est 1929. Inc 1928 nonprofit 

Plant $325,000. Endowment $2000. Dorm rms 21 . Class rms 10. 
Lib 1000 vols. Lab. Studio art 1. Shop. Fields 3. 
^ After ten years as house master at Middlesex, Mr. Fenn estab- 
lished his own school for young boys. For his boarders, largely 
from conservative Boston families, he encourages a five day plan 
that permits them to be with their families over Sunday. The boys 
are given a happy, wholesome life in pleasant surroundings, with- 
out strain or pressure, and are adequately prepared for the large 
secondary boarding schools. Classes from grade 5 and up are 
sectioned according to ability; and from grade 6, classes are 
organized on the 'round table' discussion plan. See also page 634 



MIDDLESEX SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 12-18 

Concord, Mass. Lowell Rd. Tel. EM 9-2550. 
Lawrence Terry, Harvard, Head. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music 
Mathematics Economics History Languages Sciences. 

Enr Bdg 170, Day 20. Fac full 21, part-time 4. Adm Staff 2. 

Grad '5735. Entd Col '5735. (Harvard 10, Princeton 3, 
Brown 3, Williams 3, Dartmouth 2, Stanford 2). Alumni 1193. 

Tui Bdg $2100 (+$250), Day $800. Scholarships full 25, partial 



Mass. New England 59 

15. Est 1901. Inc 1901 nonprofit 

Dorm rms 150. Class rms 14. Labs 3. Studios music 1, art 1. 
Gym. Fields 6. Courts 10. 

Frederick Winsor, with the aid of his brother and a group of 
Harvard colleagues, established Middlesex, where he combined 
features of the house system, introduced at Lawrenceville, with 
some of the features of the church schools in England. In the 
middle thirties, to aid in recruiting pupils from a distance, he 
introduced his plan of competitive prize scholarships for boys in 
all parts of the country. He retired in 1939 and died in 1941. 

Tall, rangy, engaging, his successor Mr. Terry, an alumnus of 
Groton, had been associate principal for a year and for some time 
previous assistant head master at Noble and Greenough. 

From the first the school has maintained a solid college prepara- 
tory curriculum, but with a wider outlook that now encompasses 
such courses as music and exploratory work in numerous arts and 
crafts, and electives in ornithology, economics. Less than a third 
of graduates now enter Harvard, with others going to Yale, 
Princeton, Williams, Middlebury,- Cornell. There is a full comple- 
ment of athletics, student publications, dramatics, music, and 
many other extra-curricular activtities. 



DANVERS, MASS. Pop 15,720. Alt 42 ft. B&M R.R. 5 mi. NW 
of Salem, Rts. 114, 128, U.S. 1. Redolent of Colonial 
days, Danvers maintains its leather works. The 200 acre site of 
St. John's School is 2 miles from the center, on high, rolling 
ground. 

ST. JOHN'S PREPARATORY SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day- Boys Ages 14-18 
Danvers, Mass. 72 Spring St. Tel. Spring 4-1050. 
Brother Gilroy, B.A., Boston Col, M.A., St. John's U,, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Sciences. 

Enr Bdg 220, Day 300. Fac full 24, part-time 3. 

Grad '57129. Entd Col '57121. (Boston Col 13, Merrimac 12, 
Providence 7, Villanova 7, Holy Cross 7, Northeastern 7). Alumni 
1685. 

Tui Bdg $1600 (+$100), Day $350. Scholarships full 23, partial 
36 ($10,000). Est 1907. Roman CatEolic. 

Summer Session. Enr Day. 

Plant $2,350,000. Three dorms plus 119 dorm rms. Class rms 17. 
Lib 6000 vols. Labs 3. Studio music. 1. Gyms 2. Fields 6. Courts 6. 

A successful Catholic school directed by the Brothers of St. 
Francis Xavier, St. John's sends most of its graduates to Boston 
College, Merrimac, Holy Cross, Providence, Villanova and Notre 
'Dame, although some attend MIT, RPI, Northeastern, and Har- 
vard. Recent trends include expansion of scientific program, great- 



Mass. Leading Private Schools 60 

er emphasis on extra help, and fuller development of guidance 
work. Much is made of athletics, program clubs, and music, pho- 
tography, dramatics, and publications organizations. See also 
page 635 



DEDHAM, MASS. Pop 18,487. Alt 119 ft NY,NH&H R.R. 10 
ml SW of Boston, Rt U.S.I. Many miles from Boston via the 
meandering Charles River, Dedham was early settled and still 
retains the staid and quiet mood suggestive of the old Colonial 
town. Magnificent elms and rich undulating meadows characterize 
the estates and residences of this choice refuge of the Bostonian. 
Well preserved, the Fairbanks house, built here in 1636, is perhaps 
the oldest frame house in this country. Dedham Country Day 
School is a block from the court house. Noble and Greenough is 
on the 100 acre Nickerson estate bordering the Charles. 

PEDHAM COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 
Coed Ages 3y 2 -12 

Dedham, Mass. 90 Sandy Valley Rd. Tel. DE 3-1792. 
Everett William Ladd, Ed.M., Harvard, Head. 

Kindergarten 1-2. Grades I- VI. 

Enr Boys 85, Girls 65. Fac full 12, part-time 4. Adrn Staff 2. 

Grad '5521. Entd Prep Sch '55 Milton 8, Beaver 7, Noble 
& Greenough 3, Cambridge 1, Winsor 1, Roxbury Latin 1. Alumni 
516. 

Tui $250-575 (+$50-150). Scholarships. Est 1904. Inc 1922 
nonprofit 

Summer Day Camp. Tui $125 eight weeks. 

Tracing its origin from the conservative Norfolk School, later 
Hewins, this modern country day establishment is now housed in 
a new building completed in 1949; and a 'play barn' was erected 
in 1955. Mr. Ladd has been principal since 1028. 

NOBLE AND GREENOUGH SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 12-18 

Dedham, Mass. 507 Bridge St. Tel. DE 3-3700. 
Eliot T. Putnam, A.B., Harvard, Head. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Latin Literature 
Mathematics Sciences Navigation Speech Music Arts. 

Enr Bdg 40, Day 140. Fac full 18, part-time 2. 

Grad '5728. Entd Col '5724. (Harvard 6, Dartmouth 3, Yale 
2, Princeton 2, Cornell 2, Brown 1). Alumni 1150. 

Tui Bdg $2000 (+$75), Day $1000. Scholarships partial 12, 
($8500). Est 1866. Inc 1913 nonprofit. 

Summer Day Camp. Enr 225. Tui $185 eight wks. 



Mass. New England 61 

Plant $1,500,000. Endowment $750,000. Dorm rms 20. Class rms 
17, Lib 5000 vols. Labs 3. Studios music 1, art 1. Gym. Swimming 
pool. Fields 5. Courts 2. Rowing facilities. 

First established on Beacon Hill by George W. C. Noble, who 
was joined after a quarter of a century by James J. Greenough, 
this conservative school has long been patronized by prominent 
Boston families whose sons have gone on to Harvard. 

In 1917 absorbing the Volkmann School, and since 1922, located 
in Dedham, today it continues its emphasis on the traditional 
thorough college preparation, with art and liberal courses gaining 
in popularity in a core curriculum. 

Mr. Charles Wiggins was succeeded by his son-in-law, Mr. 
Putnam, who has continued to improve the attractive plant, adding 
in 1946 the administration and classroom building, and in 1957 a 
new science wing. He has increased the enrollment and offers a lib- 
eral week-end policy which encourages boys from the greater New 
England area. 

Among the varied extra-curricular activities are rowing from 
the school boathouse on the Charles River, the language societies, 
publications and dramatics groups, as well as a full athletic 
program. 

DEERFIELD, MASS. Pop 3086. Alt 152 ft. B&M' R.R. 16 mi. N 
of Northampton, Rt U.S.5. An early fort defending the New 
England frontier, this historic old town occupies rich lands border- 
ing the Connecticut River. As early as 1896 the crafts movement 
was taken up here, and exhibits of local work may be seen. The 
accomplishment of Frank Boyden in building the Academy has 
embraced the restoration of a group of pre-Revolutionary houses; 
other beautiful buildings, designed by Charles Platt of New York, 
were made possible through gifts of loyal friends. The preserva- 
tion and restoration of the mile-long village street with its old 
homes is being continued by the Academy and Mr. Flynt. Nearby 
in interesting old houses is The Bement School, On a shoulder 
of Mt. Pocumtuck, Eaglebrook School occupies the site once the 
home of Rudyard Kipling, who admired the superb view. 

THE BEMENT SCHOOL 
Bdg Coed Ages 6-14; Co Day Coed 4. 14 

Deerfield, Mass. Tel. Greenfield: PRescott 2-6409. 
Katharine F. Bartlett; Mary H. Drexler, Dirs. 

Nursery Kindergarten Graces I- VIII. Art Music French 
Latin. Dramatics Shop. 

Enr Bdg Boys 15, Girls 20; Day Boys 40, Girls 35. Fac full 18, 
part-time 4. 

Grad '57 8. Entd Prep Sch '57 8. (Abbot I, Baltimore Friends 



Mass. Leading Private Schools 82 

1, Blair 1, Brearly 1, Exeter 1, Masters 1). Alumni 374. 
Tui Bdg $2100 (+$100), Day $250-500. Est 1925. Inc 1948. 
Dorm rms 12. Class rms 10, Studio art 1. Gym. Fields 4. Court. 

Developed from an informal group Mrs. Lewis D. Benient 
taught in her own home, this school for younger children has 
grown into a thriving boarding and day establishment housed in 
old colonial buildings. The students live naturally and joyfully a 
rich and colorful life filled with ordered and interesting activities. 
There are opportunities in arts, crafts, and music, as well as many 
outdoor activities. Miss Bartlett and Mrs. Drexler, formerly at 
Eaglebrook, took over in 1947 and continue Mrs. Bement's poli- 
cies, offering vital preparation for well known secondary schools. 
See also page 800 

DEERFIELD ACADEMY 
Bdg and Day* Boys Ages 13-18 
Deerfield, Mass. Tel. Greenfield, PRescott 3-3618. 
Frank L. Boy den, B.A., Amherst, Head. 

High Sch 1-4 Col Prep. 

Enr Bdg 435, Day 60, Fac full-time 63. 

Grad '57 162. Entd Col '57160. (Yale 23, Harvard 19, Dart- 
mouth 15, Princeton 11, Amherst 9, Williams 8). Alumni 5043. 

Tui Bdg $2300, Day $300. Scholarships full (day) 23, partial 100. 
Est 1797. Inc nonprofit. 

Plant $6,142,000. Endowment $777,500. Dorm rms 400. Class rms 
23. Lib 25,000 vols. Labs 4. Studios music 5, art 1. Gym. Swim- 
ming pool. Fields 24. Courts 33. 

One of the nation's great secondary schools, Deerfield is the 
creation of its head master. Fresh from Amherst he came to head 
Dickinson Academy, the local high school housed in an ugly 
brick building. Recipient of numerous honorary degrees, Mr. 
Boyden is today one of the most influential men in secondary 
school education, playing an important part in the reorganization 
and planning of other schools. Former masters trained by him are 
following in his footsteps as head masters elsewhere. So great has 
been the confidence and friendliness felt for Mr. Boyden that in 
1924 when the school through state statute lost the support of the 
town, heads of schools like Andover, Exeter and Taft cooperated 
in his appeal for funds for the present beautiful equipment. Here 
was first worked out a successful system of athletics for all. So- 
cial community activities and general participation in dramatics 
are made* use of to train and develop the personality of each boy. 
Unusual, unconventional and natural are such features as the 
Sunday evening sings, and surveys and published reports by stu- 
dents on the geology of the country round about. Harvard, Yale, 

When writing schools, please mention this Handbook 



Mass. New England 63 

Princeton, Amherst, Dartmouth, and Williams accept about two- 
thirds of the graduating classes, with other graduates scattering 
widely. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Boyden, the latter long teaching science and 
mathematics, have known individually each boy in the school. 
Characteristic are Mr. Boyden's personal surveyance of the de- 
velopment of each student and that his office is in the hallway of 
a classroom building. 

Mr. Boyden selects from applicants those whom he can develop 
with greatest success, as is attested by the substantial support of 
his loyal alumni. With equal foresight he chooses his faculty, 
former members of which are now head masters at Canterbury, 
Governor Dummer, Hebron, Holderness, Kiskiminetas Springs 
School, Riverdale, and Tabor, while another is president of Wes- 
leyan College. See also page 637 



EAGLEBROOK SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 9-16 

Deerfield, Mass. Mountain Rd. Tel. PRescott 3-5400. 
C. Thurston Chase, B.A., M.A., Williams, Head. 

Grades IV- VIII High Sch 1. Latin French Spanish Physics 
Biology History Geography Tutoring. Music Art Shop Print- 
ing Dramatics Radio Photography Dancing. 

Enr Bdg 150, Day 5. Fac full 25, part-time 9. 

Grad '57 37. Entd Prep Sch '57 37. (Lawrenceville 6, Ando- 
ver 4, Taft 4, Suffield 3, Deerfield 2, The Hill 2). Alumni 1200. 

Tui Bdg $2200 (+$200). Scholarships full 3, partial 11 ($12,000). 
Est 1922. Inc 1937 nonprofit. 

Plant $766,000. Endowment $40,330. Dorm rms 95. Class rms^lS. 
Lib 3000 vols. Lab, Studios music 5, art 1. Gym. Outdoor swim- 
ming pool. Fields 6. Courts 5. Skiing facilities. 

Under the skillful direction of Mr, Chase, associated with the 
founder, Howard B. Gibbs, from 1924, and head master since 
1928, Eaglebrook has become one of the leading boarding schools 
for younger boys. Parents and alumni have helped endow and ex- 
pand the plant, which now includes 115 acres of campus, playing 
fields, and wooded hillside, and 18 buildings. Two units the 
Lower School (grades 4, 5, 6), and the Upper School (grades 7, 
8, 9,) have separate dormitories, school houses, and programs, 
each planned for that particular age group. 

Eaglebrook boys go on to preparatory schools having already- 
had wide opportunities for responsibility and leadership in student 
government and in school committees that direct many aspects 
of school life. The demanding academic work is enriched by many 



Mass. Leading Private Schools 64 

electives, with particular emphasis on music and the arts ^ and 
crafts. There are numerous correlative extra-curricular activities, 
including student publications on the Eaglebrook Press, a radio 
club with amateur transmitter, band, and photography. 

Every boy participates in at least one of the many interscho- 
lastic, intramural and individual sports, of which skiing is a 
favorite. Eaglebrook's fall Country Fair and gala Winter Carnival 
are special occasions that bring parents and alumni to the school. 
See also pages 632-33 

DOVER, MASS. Pop 1722. Alt 156 ft. NY,NH&H R.R. 14 ml 
SW of Boston. Increasingly popular as a residential suburb, for 
wealthy Bostonians, Dover is on the Charles River. 



THE CHARLES RIVER SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 5-12 

Dover, Mass. Tel. 8-0068. 
Gladys L. Adshead, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VI. Science Music French. Make- 
up work. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Boys 60, Girls 45. Fac full 7, part-time 6. 

Grad '5716. Entd Prep Sch '5716. (Beaver 4, Winsor 4, 
Noble & Greenough 4, Milton 3, Fenn 1). Alumni 493. 

Tui $295-595. Scholarships full 2, partial 8 ($2566). Est 1911. 

Children from the neighboring communities are given forward- 
looking preparation for secondary schools. Miss Adshead, who has 
had extensive teaching experience in leading country day schools, 
in 1949 succeeded Mrs. Helen S. Pierce, who continues on the 
faculty. A family school, parents and alumni are brought into its 
activities. 



DUDLEY, MASS. Pop 5261. High in the hills near the Connects 
cut line, Dudley is sixteen miles southwest of Worcester. From its 
hilltop campus the junior college has a view of three states. 

NICHOLS JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Bdg and Day - Boys Ages 17- 

Dudley, Mass, Tel. Webster 1560. 

James L. Conrad, B.B.A., Boston Univ, Prcs. 

Business Administration (2 yrs) Accounting (2 yrs) Forestry 
and Conservation (2 yrs). 

Enr Bdg 320, Day 35, Fac full 17, part-time 6. 

Tui Bdg $1550, (+$50-75), Day $550. Scholarships full 2, par- 



Mass. New England 65 

tial 45 ($12,000-14,000). Est 1815. Inc 1941 nonprofit. 

Established as Nichols Academy, and in 1941 becoming a junior 
college of business administration, this school emphasizes an in- 
tensive testing and guidance program, cultural as well as voca- 
tional courses, and preparation both for transfer to senior college 
and for business positions. There is an advisory council of Mas- 
sachusetts business men. In 1954 a new major program in forestry 
and conservation was undertaken. See also page 849 

EASTHAMPTON, MASS. Pop 10,694. Alt 169 ft. 4 mi. SW of 
Northampton, Rt.10. This pleasant tree-shaded town is in the rich 
valley lands of the Connecticut River within sight of Mt Tom 
and Mt Pomeroy. The buildings of Williston Academy stand at 
a sufficient distance from the center to have their own campus, 
yet near enough for students to have access to town facilities. 

WILLISTON ACADEMY 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 13-19 

Easthampton, Mass. Tel. 1520. 

Phillips Stevens, B.A., Williams, M.A., Middlebury, Head. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music Bible Me- 
chanical Drawing. Languages Math Science. Rem Reading. 

Enr Bdg 285, Day 40. Fac full 31, part-time 2. Adm Staff 3. 

Grad '5755. Entd Col '5753. (Brown 9, Colgate 7, Yale 4, 
MIT 3, Wesleyan 3, Lehigh 3). Alumni 3338. 

Tui Bdg $1885, Day $550, Scholarships partial 54 ($30,- 
000). Est 1841. Inc nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Make-up courses Remedial English. Tui Bdg 
$450. 

Plant $1,810,000. Endowment $800,000. Dorm rms 161. Class 
rms 28. Lib 10,000 vols. Labs 3. Studio music 1, art 1. Gym. Swim- 
ming pool. Fields 15. Courts 13. 

In its second century, Williston Academy is increasingly ful- 
filling the needs of the college preparatory students from all parts 
of the country and foreign lands. Established by a local manu- 
facturer and endowing an academy where science and mathe- 
matics and English were to be held as honorable and to be pur- 
sued with as much thoroughness as the ancient classics, this non- 
denominational school has long offered sound instruction both in 
liberal arts and scientific subjects. Dr. Galbraith, who succeeded 
Joseph Sawyer in 1919, modernized the outlook as well .s the 
plant, and raised academic standards. Phillips Stevens succeeded 
Dr. Galbraith, who retired as headmaster emeritus in 1949. He has 
expanded enrollment, built a strong faculty and sound financial 
base, and consolidated and unified the campus, and most recently 
added a new $500,000 science-arts building. See also page 638 



Mass. Leading Private Schools 89 

GREAT HARRINGTON, MASS. Pop 3913. Alt 726 ft NY,NH- 
&H R.R. 18 mi. SW of Pittsfield, Rt U.S.7. The chief town of 
the beautiful southern Berkshires, Great Barrington was early a 
fashionable place of residence. William Cullen Bryant was town 
clerk for a decade, and many old records are in his hand. Dr. 
Altaraz' school moved in 1943 to the lovely 800 acre Brookside 
estate 2 miles from town. 

BROOKSIDE-IN-THE-BERKSHIRES 
Bdg Boys Ages 7-19 

Great Barrington, Mass. P.O. Box 180. Tel. 180W. 

Isaac M. Altaraz, A.M., NYU, Ph.D., Berlin Univ; Frieda P. 

Altaraz, Damrosh Inst of Music, Heads. 

Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Arts Music 
Business. Manual Arts Technological Agricultural Mechani- 
cal Drawing. 

Enr 30. Fac full 9, part-time 1. Adm Staff 4, 

Grad '562. Entd Col '56 Nichols Jr 1, Conn. State 1. 

Tui $1800-2700 (+$25 mo). Scholarships partial 4. Est 1927. 
Inc 1942 nonprofit. 

Summer Session and Camp. Cultural, creative, and academic. 
Tui $575-650. 

Plant $2,500,000. Dorm rms 25. Class rms 10. Lib 3500 vols. 
Labs 3. Studios music 2, art 2. Gym. Outdoor swimming pool. 
Fields 5. Courts 4. 

Brookside-in-the-Berkshires derives from the Altaraz School, 
which Dr. and Mrs. Altaraz first conducted in Monterey. Since 
1943 the school has been located in Great Barrington. In 1948 the 
name was changed to the present title. 

The tuition is variable, and is determined according to the in- 
dividual program of the pupil. The curriculum includes, in addition 
to the general academic courses, some informal vocational training. 

Among extracurricular activities are sports and outdoor recrea- 
tions, including riding. 

Paul Argentini, Dr. Altaraz's son-in-law, is business manager 
of the school. 



CORNWALL ACADEMY 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 10-19 
Great Barrington, Mass. Tel. 1015. 

John Geddes Moran, B.S., Univ of Mass., M.A., Middlebury, Head. 
Grades VI-VIII High Sch 1-4. Post Grad 1. Col Prep* 
Enr Bdg 130, Day 10. Fac full 15, part-time 2. 
Grad '5730 Entd Col '57 30. Alumni 86. 



Mass. New England 67 

Tui Bdg$2000, Day $500 (+$50-75). Scholarships. Self-help 
pgrm. Est 1950. Inc 1950 nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Enr 40. , Tui $600 for six-and-a-half wks. 

Founded at Cornwall, Conn., on the lands and buildings form- 
erly occupied by the Rumsey Hall School, the Academy moved 
in 1953 to the present fifty-acre campus. The curriculm is en- 
tirely college preparatory, and combines classroom and tutorial 
instruction. Activities include dramatics, music, debating, publi- 
cations, and interest clubs. See also page 639 



GREENFIELD, MASS. Pop 15,075. Alt 240 ft. B&M R.R. 20 mi 
N of Northampton, Rt U.S.5. At the eastern end of the Mohawk 
Trail, Greenfield, with wide tree-shaded streets, is a manufacturing 
center, the county seat, and a crossing point for main motor routes 
from Boston, central New England and New York. Some 2 miles 
N of the Common is the 150 acre property of Stoneleigh-Prospect 
Hill School. 

STONELEIGH-PROSPECT HILL SCHOOL 

Bdg and Day Girls Ages 13-18 

Greenfield, Mass. Bernardston Rd. Tel. PRescott 4-4356. 
Edward E. Emerson, A.B., Dartmouth, Prin. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General Academic. Art Music Typ- 
ing. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg 90, Day 4. Fac full 8, part-time 6. 

Grad '57 19. Entd Col '5718. (Bryn Mawr 1, Bradley U 1, 
Denison 1, Northwestern 1, U of Vt 1, U of Vienna 1). Alumnae 
1257. 

Tui $2100 (+$150-250), Day $500. Scholarships partial 5 ($3000- 
5000). Est 1869. Inc nonprofit 

Plant $350,000. Endowment $20,000. Class rms. 7. Lib 3000 vols. 
Lab. Studios music 3, art 2. Courts 2. Fields 3. Riding facilities. 

In 1930 Stoneleigh in Rye, N.H., and Prospect Hill were merged 
to form the present school, with funds from a bequest of Elijah 
Coleman financing a new building, and with Isabel Cressler and 
Caroline Sumner, both formerly of Stoneleigh, as directors. 

Mrs. Emerson, head mistress of Mary A. Burnham School in 
nearby Northampton, assumed direction in 1943. She continues 
many of the unusual features that have supplemented the success- 
ful college preparatory work, emphasizing art and music, and add- 
ing such practical courses as typing. In 1957 her son, Edward E. 
Emerson, associate principal from 1950, was appointed principal. 
Graduates enter Colby, Mount Holyoke, Skidmore, Connecticut, 
Vassar, and many other colleges. 



Mass. Leading Private Schools 68 

Much is made of out-door sports, riding, skiing, and tennis, and 
there are regular lessons in Mensendieck. The many extra-curricu- 
lar activities include dancing, music, dramatics, a school paper, 
and various clubs. See also page 742 



GROTON, MASS. Pop 2889. Alt 300 ft B&M R,R. 30 mi. from 
Boston, on Rt.119. Rebuilt after its destruction in King Philip's 
war, the main street of this old town is lined with some lovely 
eighteenth century homes, the best of which belong to Lawrence 
Academy. The Groton Inn is a comfortable hostelry dating from 
pre-Revolutionary times when the town was an important posting 
place between Boston and Canada. A mile and a half to the south- 
west is Groton School, dominated by its beautiful Gothic tower. 

GROTON SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 12-18 

Groton, Mass. Tel. Gilbert 8-6611. 

Rev. John Crocker, A.B., Harvard, B.D., Episcopal Theological 

Sch, Head. 

Grades VII- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music Lan- 
guages Religious Studies History Sciences Mathematics Lit- 
erature Mechanical Drawing Printing Woodworking. Rem 
Reading. 

Enr 200. Fac full 32, part-time 6. Adm Staff 12. 

Grad '5742. Entd Col '5740. (Harvard 22, Yale 6, Princeton 
3, U of N.C. 3, Amherst 2, Haverford 1). Alumni 1688 

Tui $2150 (+$250-300). Scholarships full 5, partial 48 ($62,500). 
Est 1884. Inc 1915 nonprofit. 

Plant $2,000,000. Dorm rms 200. Class rms 22. Lib 15,000 vols. 
Labs 3. Studios music 1, art 1. Gym. Fields 13. Courts 8. Boating 
and Skating facilities. 

Endicott Peabody founded this school for the cultivation of 
"manly Christian character, having regard to the moral and physi- 
cal as well as intellectual development" Frank Davis Ashburn, 
alumnus, founder and head of Brooks School, wrote entertaining- 
ly of instruction and personalities at Groton in "Fifty Years On," 
and published a biography of Mr. Peabody. Oliver LaFarge, a 
champion of private education, among other alumni, has written 
provocatively of his school. Rev. Malcolm Strachan, of the faculty, 
has stated that "The duty of a school is in reality to make its nlen 
more marked for the right reasons. The duty of all schools is to 
wipe away the fears of commitment to belief, the uneasiness of 
being 'different' But any man of belief and conviction is separate 
from his generation in any period of history and 'aristocracy' has 
nothing to do with that separation." Ellery Sedgwick, an old 
"Grottie," in Jiis autobiography pays tribute to the founders, 



Mass. New England 69 

Gardner of the "scholar's mind, imaginative, and unpractical," 
Billings, the teacher and preacher, and Peabody, "the Caesar of 
the triumvirate." '"Always Groton was striving to be an institu- 
tion, but always it was personality that made it what it was. 11 

Open-minded in introducing innovations in advance of his peers, 
particularly in the last few decades, Mr. Peabody added to the 
curriculum printing, woodworking, academic science in all its 
forms, music, and studio. The plan to have masters and boys live 
closely together to foster the students' maturity and stimulation 
in academic and social matters has also been carried out by some 
of "Peabo's" old boys who, in emulation chose to teach school, 
and today head such outstanding schools as Middlesex, ( Brooks, 
Hoosac, Browne and Nichols, Lake Forest Day, Grosse Pointe 
University School, as well as Groton itself. 

Mr, Peabody's Groton adapted the high scholastic standards 
of English Public School education to democratic American tra- 
dition and brought to many leading families the "Christian" 
view of education and to their sons an incentive towards public 
service and the assumption of their responsibilities as citizens. 
A significant number of graduates have entered the professions 
of government, education, medicine, and religion. Today, whereas 
about a third of the boys enrolled are sons of graduates, more 
than a quarter of the boys are receiving scholarships granted 
on the basis of financial need to those of outstanding promise. 

Student government is centered in the Sixth Form whose lead- 
ers, the Senior Prefect and six Prefects, elected by the school meet 
with the head master regularly and supervise assemblies, study 
halls and dormitory activities. Each boy has a separate cubicle in 
his dormitory, and in the three upper forms, boys have "Studies," 
usually shared by two students, while younger boys study together 
in schoolrooms. 

After Mr. Peabody's retirement in 1940, he lived on the school 
grounds until his death in 1944, but his lengthened shadow has 
gradually shortened. Under the new head master there is less 
pressure in chapel services, more intellectual freedom, more in- 
formality of spirit in the school. Mr. Crocker comes of a famous 
Fitchburg paper family which has sent its sons to Groton for 
several generations. After Harvard he attended Oxford and Yale 
and was ordained at the Episcopal Theological School. He taught 
first at Andover and for ten years from 1930 was student chaplain 
at Princeton. Upstanding, wholesome, outspoken, and inspiring, 
he recognizes the sound foundation on which he has to build and 
is making the necessary adjustments to meet changing conditions. 
Small classes, with emphasis on group discussion, prevail through 
all the forms. In the senior year, the student is permitted to 
substitute for one of his regular courses an informal "tutorial." 



Mass. Leading Private Schools 70 

Approximately 75% of graduates enter Harvard, Yale or Prince- 
ton, with a very few scattering to Williams, Amherst, Trinity, and 
other colleges. See also page 636 



THE LAWRENCE ACADEMY 
Bdg and Day- Boys Ages 13-19 

Groton, Mass. Main St. Tel. Gilbert 8-6354. 

Fred Clifton Gray, A.B., Bates, A.M., Columbia, Prin. 

High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep. Public Speaking Music 
Languages History. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg 135, Day 30. Fac full-time 12. 

Grad '5657. Entd Col '56 56. 

Tui Bdg $1800 (+$75-125), Day $500. Scholarships full 4, 
partial 18. ($25,000). Est 1793. Inc nonprofit. . 

Plant $759,000. Endowment $365,000. Dorm rms 70. Class rms 
16. Lib 1200 vols. Lab. Gym. Fields 6. Courts 3. 

Founded as the coeducational Groton Academy, and renamed 
in 1846 in honor of Amos and William Lawrence, who endowed 
it, this college preparatory school has enrolled only boys since 
1898. Mr. Gray, principal since 1925, has made good use of the 
Dr. Samuel A. Green Foundation which makes up the greater 
proportion of the present endowment. He has enlarged and mod- 
ernized the plant, developed the campus, added playing fields, and 
strengthened the enrollment A new schoolhouse, which contains 
administrative offices, recitation rooms, science laboratories, and 
a study hall with library attached, was completed in 1957. 

The emphasis is on sound college preparation, and in the last 
five years graduates have entered more than twenty-five different 
colleges and universities. All major sports are offered, as well as 
glee club, orchestra, and other organization. See also page 640 



HINGHAM, MASS. Pop 10,665. Alt 21 ft. NY,NH&H R.R. 17 
mi. SE of Boston, Rt.3A. Founded in 1633 by settlers from Hing- 
ham, England, this residential suburb with elm-shaded streets and 
old Colonial homes still attracts a few summer people. Here ships 
were built during the second World War. Derby Academy's upper 
school is on Burditt Avenue; the lower school, on Main Street 

DERBY ACADEMY 
Co Day Coed Ages 3-14 

Hingham, Mass. 56 Burditt Ave. Tel. 6-0746. 
Edward C. McEachron. Ph.B. Wesleyan, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1. Art 
Music French Latin. Shop. 

Enr Boys 90, Girls 110. Fac full 18, part-time 4. 

Grad '5723. Entd Prep Sch '57 22. (Beaver Co. Day 5, Hold- 



Mass. New England 71 

erness 2, Miss Hall's 1, Milton 1, St. Marks 1, Gov. Dummer 1). 
Tui $325-775.Scholarships partial 10. Est 1784. Inc nonprofit. 
Summer Camp. Tui $135 five-day wk, for 8 wks. 

In continuous operation since 1791, Derby is one of the oldest 
coeducational private schools in America. In 1922 John R. P. 
French reorganized it along modern lines, a new site was pur- 
chased, and a country day program inaugurated. Mr. McEachron, 
former head master of Meadowbrook, succeeded Harrison M. 
Davis in 1947. With a curriculum including art, crafts, music, 
home economics, and with work partially departmentalized, Derby 
sends most of its graduates to preparatory schools, chiefly in New 
England. There has recently been extensive improvement of the 
plant, including a library building in 1953, and a new building 
containing an auditorium, music room, conference room and ad- 
ministrative offices. 



LANCASTER, MASS. Pop 3601. Alt 258 ft B&M R.R. 38 mi. 
NW of Boston, Rts. 2, 117. Among features of this beautiful old 
village are its magnificent trees, the 1816 church designed by 
Charles Bulfmch, and the extensive estates of the Thayer family. 
Perkins School is on the former Iver Johnson estate. 



PERKINS SCHOOL 
For Retarded Children 
Bdg -Coed Ages 3-16 

Lancaster, Mass. Main St. Tel. Clinton 1170- W. 
Franklin H. Perkins, M.D., Tufts, Dir. 

Pre-Nursery Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII. Music 
Manual Arts Typing. 

Enr Boys 43, Girls 31. Fac full-time 12. Staff 15. Tui variable. 
Est 1896. Inc 1934 not for profit. 

Summer Camp. Tui variable. 

Dr. Perkins, for many years connected with state institutions, 
took over the Hillbrow School of Newton in 1922, gave it a new 
name, and in 1924 moved it to Lancaster, where plant and equip- 
ment have been constantly improved and added to. Recently com- 
pleted is the modern recitation building donated by parents and 
friends and known as the Grace Wyman Perkins Memorial. 

Directed by one of the few physician-psychiatrists conducting 
a school, Perkins gives professionally sound treatment and real 
home care, as well as individual academic instruction, to children 
of undeveloped faculties. A summer camp is conducted at Friend- 
ship, Maine* 



Mass. Leading. Private Schools 72 

LENOX, MASS. Pop 1604. Alt 1270 ft. NY,NH&H R.R. 7 mi. S 
of Pittsfield, Rt U.S.7. Near Lenox, the Berkshire Music Festi- 
vals, a creation of the late Serge Koussevitsky, have become an 
outstanding attraction, forum and training ground for artists each 
summer. Since the 1850's when the Sedgwicks, Fanny Kemble, 
Henry Ward Beecher, Mark Hopkins and other intellectuals estab- 
lished its fame, it has been a literary and resort center. In the 
days bfefore the graduated income tax, it attracted great wealth 
whose rivalry in mansioneering left many sumptuous homes for 
the schools now occupying them, Lenox School has a country 
site S of the town; Foxhollow overlooks Laurel Lake. Cranwell 
Preparatory School, opened in 1939, is on the property of the 
former Berkshires Hunt and Country Club. Windsor Mountain, 
formerly in Manchester, Vt, since 1944 has occupied the Grenville 
Winthrop estate. 

CRANWELL PREPARATORY SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 12*18 
Lenox, Mass. Tel. 340. 

Rev. D. Augustine Keane, A.B., A.M., Boston Col, Ph.D., Greg- 
orian Univ (Rome), Rector. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep. Mathema- 
tics Languages Sciences. 

Enr Bdg 185, Day 40. Fac full 17, part-time 3. 

Grad '5640. Entd Col '56 40 (Notre Dame 8, Boston C 6, 
Georgetown 6, Holy Cross 6, Yale 2, Colgate 2). Alumni 600. 

Tui Bdg $1800 (+$25), Day $500. Scholarships full 7, partial 3. 
Est 1939. Roman Catholic. 

Summer Camp. Tui $500 seven wks. 

Plant $2.150.000. Dorm rms 125. Class rrns 14. Lib 7000 vols. Labs 
2. Gym. Fields 6. Courts 3. Skiing facilities. 

The school is named for Edward H. Cranwell, who donated the 
property. Rev. Maurice V. Dullea was succeeded in 1945 by the 
former president of Holy Cross College, Rev. Joseph R. N. Max- 
well, who resigned in 1951 to become president of Boston College. 
Father Keane was formerly principal of Boston College High 
School. Jesuit priests and laymen give the boys the thorough, 
systematic training for which the Society of Jesus is noted, and 
most graduates enter Georgetown, Holy Cross, and Fordham. 
Among extra-curricular activities are debating, dramatics, journal- 
ism, riding, sports, and various clubs. In 1954 a new classroom- 
science building was completed, in 1956 a new dorm See page 641 

FOXHOLLOW SCHOOL 
Bdg Girls Ages 13-18 

Lenox, Mass. Tel. 71. 

Aileen M. Farrell, B.A., M.A., Oxford, Prin. 



Mass. New England 73 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep, Art Music Dramatics Languages 
Science. 

Enr 80. Fac full 12, part-time 3. Staff 3. 

Grad '5717. Entd Col '5715. Alumnae 514. 

Tui $2300 ( + $200). Scholarships. Est 1930. Inc 1940 nonprofit. 

Plant $263,750. Dorm rms 30. Class rms 12. Lib 5000 vols. Labs 2. 
Studios music 1, art 1'. Gym. Fields 4. Courts 3, Riding facilities. 

Of Continental and English education, and American teaching 
experience, Miss Farrell founded this school, which emphasizes 
college preparation. From grade nine through high school there 
is an integrated study of history, literature, history of art, and ap- 
preciation of music. Special stress is placed on the study of French. 
Graduates enter colleges throughout the country, including Wel- 
lesley, Bryn Mawr, Smith, Vassar, Sweet Briar, Cornell. Among 
student activities are riding, sports, French folklore, various clubs, 
dramatics, publications, and charities. See also page 743 

LENOX SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day- Boys Ages 12-18 

Lenox, Mass. Kemble St. Tel. 137. 

Rev. Robert L. Curry, LL.B., Boston Univ, B.D., Episcopal Theo- 
logical Sch, Head. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music 
Typing. 

Enr Bdg 150, Day 30. Fac full 15, part-time 1. 

Grad '5728. Entd Col '5719. (Hobart 3, Harvard 2, Yale 1, 
Cornell 1, Haverford 1, Colgate 1). Alumni 590. 

Tui Bdg $1500 (+$250), Day $500. Scholarships partial 34 
($25,000). Work pgrm. Est 1926. Episcopal. 

Plant $750,000. Endowment $5,000. Dorm rms 65. Class rms 10. 
Labs 2. Gym. Fields 3. Courts 4. 

Founded by Dr. William G. Thayer, then nead master 01 M. 
Mark's, and The Reverend Latta Griswold of Lenox, this 'school 
was directed for twenty years by the Rev. George Gardner Monks, 
who inaugurated a sliding scale of tuition, flexible programming, 
and the characteristic simplicity of atmosphere. Mr. Curry, an 
Army Chaplain during the war and formerly a teacher at St 
Paul's, succeeded Mr. Monks in 1946. The sliding tuition scale is 
used only for parents otherwise unable to send their boys to 
Lenox. 

The curriculum is college prep^Graduates in the last five years 
have entered numerous colleges, including Boston University, 
Williams, Dartmouth, Middlebury, Yale, and Trinity. From the 
first, boys have done much of the work on the grounds and in the 
house. Extra-curricular activities include student government, pub- 
lications, dramatics, public . speaking, and sports in which every 
student participates, 



74 

Mass. Leading Private Schools f * 

WINDSOR MOUNTAIN SCHOOL 
Bdg Coed Ages 11-19 

Lenox, Mass. Tel. 66. 

Gertrud Bondy, M.D., Erlangen Univ (Vienna), Dir.; Heinz 

E. Bondy, B.A., Swarthmore, M.A., Bryn Mawr, Head 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4 Col Prep General. Philosophy 
Psychology Languages Drama Economics Literature 
Typing. Make-up courses Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg Boys 75, Girls 70; Day 5. Fac full 20, part-time 3. 
Grad '5737. Entd Col '5736. (Michigan 5, Oberlin 2, Swarth- 
more 2, Antioch 2, Reed 1, Mt. Holyoke 1). Alumni 350. 

Tui Bdg $2200 (+$350), Day $800. Scholarships full 16, partial 
32 ($10,000). Est 1938. Inc nonprofit 

Plant $300,000, Dorm rms 80. Class rms 15. Lib 3000 vols. Lab. 
Studios music 2, art 2. Fields 4. Courts 3. Gym. 

Dr. and Mrs. Bondy, long directors of "Les Rayons" in Gland, 
Switzerland, and previously in pre-Nazi Germany, came to this 
country in 1939 and established a year-round school in Windsor, 
Vt, moving a year later to Manchester, and in 1944 to Lenox. On 
Dr. Max Bondy's death in 1951, his widow and son, long associ- 
ated with the school, carried on his great work. 

Here, with a skilled faculty, American and European, they offer 
their boys and girls an unusually rich experience, preparing speci- 
fically for American colleges and universities, with special empha- 
sis on languages. Music, fine arts, and dramatics are coordinated 
in presentations in the well-equipped school theatre. Graduates 
have entered Chicago, the University of Wis., Swarthmore, Yale, 
Radcliffe, Harvard, and others. Among activities are shop, dra- 
matics, interest clubs, student government, and sports, especially 
skiing. See also page 799 



LOWELL, MASS. Pop 97,249. Alt 101 ft. B&M R.R. 24 mi, NW 
of Boston, Rt 3. On the Concord and Merrimack, this city once 
famed for its textile industries is site of the Lowell Technological 
Institute. Here the birthplace of Whistler is open as a museum. 
Overlooking the valleys, Rogers Fort Hill Park was presented to 
Lowell by the founder of Rogers Hall, which faces the park. 

ROGERS HALL 

Bdg and Day Girls Ages 13-18 
Lowell, Mass. 196 Rogers St. Tel. Glenview 2-5091. 
Katharine Whitten MacGay, B.A., Wellesley, Prin. 

High Sch 1-4 Col Prep General. Typing Dramatics Music. 
Remedial Reading. Art, 



Mass. New England 75 

Enr Bdg 75, Day 25. Fac full 12, part-time 2. 

Grad '5727. Entd Col '5726. (Bennington 1, Duke 1, Hollins 
1, Mt. Holyoke 1, U of Mich 1). Alumnae 1430. 

Tui Bdg $1950 (+$250), Day $700. Scholarships partial 3. Est 
1892. Inc nonprofit. 

Dorm rms 72. Class rms 9. Labs 2. Studios music 1, art 1. Gym. 
Swimming pool. Courts 2. 

A wholesome, vigorous spirit pervades this preparatory school 
founded by Elizabeth Rogers, who in her lifetime gave the family 
mansion to the scKbol, and on her death in 1898 endowed it with 
her entire property. Eliza Parker Underhill and her sister, Olive 
Sewall Parsons, principals for more than a quarter century, gave 
the school the standards and prestige it still maintains. 

Mrs. MacGay, a former teacher who returned in 1930 as dean 
became principal in 1932. The preparatory program sends girls to 
such colleges as Wellesley, Wheaton, Conn., Bennington, Hoilins. 
The general curriculum prepares for junior colleges and special- 
ized schools *Student activities emphasize clubs, athletics, dramatics, 
music, and publications. See also page 741 



MARBLEHEAD, MASS. Pop 15,908. B & M R.R. 15 mi. NE of 
Boston, Rt.129. Eighteenth century houses and rambling streets 
characterize this North Shore town, long an important fishing port 
and now known for its yachting. 

THE TOWER SCHOOL 
Co Day Ages 3 T / 2 -14 

Marblehead, Mass. 61 W. Shore Dr. TeL NE 2-1711. 
Mrs. L. R. Michel, A.B., Pembroke, Dir. 

Nursery Kindergarten Connecting Class Grades I- VIII. 
Remedial Reading. 

Enr Boys 95, Girls 65. Fac full 15, part-time 4. 

Tui $250-640. Scholarships full 3, partial 4 ($2000). Est 1912. 
Inc 1937 nonprofit. 

Summer Reading Centre. Tui $200 seven wks. 

Established by Adeline Lane Tower in Salem, and moved to 
its new building in Marblehead in 1941, the school emphasizes 
creative activities correlative with academic work, a strong re- 
medial department, and writing, including a magazine. The country 
day program, utilizing the ample play and woodland areas, also 
allows for sports and natural science studies. It draws students 
from a wide area of the North Shore. In 1956 Mrs. Michel suc- 
ceeded Helen V. Runnette. See also page 800 

MARION, MASS. Pop 2250. Alt 38 ft. NY,NH&H R.R. 10 mi 
NE of New Bedford, Rt U.S.6. A favorite spot with the Indians 



Mass. Leading Private Schools 76 

on the west shore of Buzzards Bay, later a whaling and ship- 
building center, Marion has become a residential area of extensive 
estates through its famous summer residents. 

THE TABOR ACADEMY 
Bdg and Day ~ Boys Ages 14-19 

Marion, Mass. Tel. 590. 

James W. Wickenden, B.A., M.A., Oberlin, Head. 
High Sen 1-4. College Preparatory. Art Music Lan- 
guages Mathematics History Speech Mechanical Drawing 
Sciences Navigation. 

Enr Bdg 250, Day 35. Fac full-time 33. 

Grad '5775. Entd Col '5771. (U of Pa 8, Cornell 7, Tufts 6, 
Kenyon 6, Dartmouth 5, Brown 4). Alumni 2074, 

Tui Bdg $2200, Day $800, Scholarships. Est 1876. Inc nonprofit. 

Summer Camp. Tui $500". 

Plant $1,500,000. Class rms 31. Labs 3. Studios music 6, art 1. 
Theatre. Gym. Fields 7. Courts 4, 

Founded and endowed with the wealth and name of a whaling 
ship captain by his daughter, Tabor Academy is a preparatory 
school with a nautical program holding a prominent place among 
New England boarding schools. Enrollment and facilities have 
been greatly increased under Mr. Wickenden's leadership. For 
eleven years an assistant to Mr. Boyden of Deerfield, the present 
head master has continued to strengthen the curriculum, encour- 
aged a diversity of extra-curricular activities, and furthered the 
integration of art, music, and academic subjects. He continues 
the policies of his predecessor, Walter Huston Lillard, head 
master from 1916 to 1942, in arranging the exchange of students 
with England and enrollments from many other countries. While 
the student body represents all regions of this country, emphasis 
is placed upon international aspects of education. 

Tabor's crews have long competed in the Royal Henley Regatta 
in England. An honor naval school, three candidates are chosen 
annually for both Annapolis and West Point Seamanship and 
navigation are stressed, utilizing the school fleet of sailboats and 
a 92 foot schooner. The unusually full roster of student activities 
includes several music groups, sports, student publications, hobby 
clubs, and some military drill. Strong are the Math and Science 
courses, housed in a Library-Science Building erected in 1957, and 
a course in Russian is offered. Graduates attend leading New Eng- 
land colleges, Harvard, Williams, M.I.T., Dartmouth, Amherst, 
and Bowdoin. See page 642 

MARLBORQUGH, MASS. Pop 15,741. Alt 700 ft In fertile coun- 
try of the Sudbury valley, Hillside School is 15 miles E of Worces- 
ter and 33 miles from Boston. 



Mass. New England 77 

HILLSIDE SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 8-14 

Marlborough, Mass. Robin Hill Rd. TeL MArlboro 2824. 
John K. Whittemore, B.S., M.Ed., Univ of N.H., Head. 

Grades III- VIII. Make-up courses. Remedial Reading. 

Enr 55. Fac full 4, part-time 3. 

Grad '5710. Entd Prep Sch '573. 

Tui $800 (4- $75). Scholarships full 2, partial 45. Est 1901. Inc 
1907 nonprofit. 

> Plant $302,230. Endowment $60,000. Dorm rms 16. Class rms 5. 
Lib 4000 vols. Lab. Studio music 1. Gym. Fields. Courts 2. 

Summer Camp. Tui $70 mo. 

A broad elementary and junior high school program is offered 
at this residential school for younger boys. A new modern class- 
room building was occupied in 1957. The curriculum has been 
strengthened and provides sound preparatory work, Many oppor- 
tunities through work projects, the farm maintained by student 
labor, and extensive shops give purposefulness to the program. 

With strong support and a Board of Trustees representative of 
philanthropic and educational endeavor, the school maintains a low 
tuition with charges variable according to ability to pay. See page 
643 



MILTON, MASS. Pop 22,395. Alt 24 ft 10 mi. S of Boston, Rt.28. 

Rising from the Neponset River to the Blue Hills, Milton, an 
early summer residence for many Boston families, is today a select 
residential community characterized by large estates. The Milton 
Academy buildings, amidst ample grounds, form an attractive 
group near the Town Hall. The Smith School is on Smith Road. 

MILTON ACADEMY 
Bdg Boys Ages 12-18, Girls 14-18; Day Boys 4-18, Girls 4-18 

Milton 86, Mass. Centre St. Tel. BL 8-7800. 
Arthur Bliss Perry, A.B., A.M., L.H.D., Williams, A.M., Harvard, 
Head; Margaret Asenath Johnson, A.B., A.M., Radcliffe, Prin, 
Girls' Sch; Elizabeth Greenleaf Buck, A.B., Wheaton, Prin, 
Lower Sch. 

Kindergarten 1-2 Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. 
Latin Greek Art Music Speech Astronomy Navigation, 
Mechanical Drawing Calculus. Crafts Drama. 

Enr Boys School Bdg 160, Day 120; Girls School Bdg 50, Day 
120. Lower School Day Boys 8Q, Girls 95. Elem 270, Sec 345. Fac 
full 68, part-time 16. 

Grad '5788. Entd Col '5782. (Harvard 26, Yale 10, Radcliffe 
7, Smith 5, Princeton 4, Goucher 3). Alumni 3100. 



Leading Private Schools 78 



Tui Boys Sch Bdg $2200. (+$350), Day $900; Girls Sch Bdg 
$2400 (-f $350), Day $900; Lower Sch $375-775. Scholarships par- 
tial 35 ($18,000). Est 1798. Inc nonprofit 

Dorm rms 178, Class rms 47. Lib 20,000 vols. Labs 6. Studios 
music 6, art 2. Gyms 3. Fields 17. Courts 13. 

Although only ten miles from Boston, Milton Academy is in 
a community which in appearance is more rural than urban, As 
early as 1798 steps were taken by residents of the town to estab- 
lish a local academy, which finally opened in 1807 and was con- 
ducted uninterruptedly until 1866 when, on the establishment of 
a town high school, it was closed. In 1885, on a new site, the 
Academy reopened, remaining coeducational until 1901. Under 
Harrison Otis Apthorp it won national prominence. William L. W. 
Field, a naturalist and entomologist of scientific training, head 
master from 1917 to 1942, was succeeded by Cyril H. Jones, and on 
his resignation in 1947, by Arthur B. Perry, a member of the 
faculty since 1921 and Boys' School principal head from 1934. 

The Academy draws the majority of its students from greater 
Boston, although more than half the resident students are from 
outside Massachusetts and represent half the states and a number 
of foreign countries. Contacts of boarders with families of day 
scholars are encouraged, and the week-end policy is liberal. 

There is a continuity in the educational process from tlje kinder- 
garten to the senior year, both for boys and girls, and although 
the program is not coeducational beyond the sixth grade, many 
activities are shared from grades 7 to 12. The academic work, 
with its numerous electives, emphasizes student participation and 
discussion, and prepares for representative Eastern colleges and 
universities. Among the activities are publications, music, dra- 
matics, debating, various scientific and sports clubs. See page 634 

MILTON ACADEMY GIRLS SCHOOL, emphasizing college 
preparation, provides in Hathaway, Goodwin and Little Houses 
for forty-eight girls in residence. Ellen Faulkner, principal since 
1928, retired in 1950, and was succeeded by Miss Johnson. See 
page 744 

LOWER SCHOOL, in its own quarters, enrolls local children 
in two pre-school and six elementary day classes. 



MONSON, MASS. Pop 2436. Alt 380 ft 18 mi. E of Springfield, 
on Rt.32. Monson lies in the hills of central Mass. 



When writing schools, please mention this Handbook 



Mass. New England 79 

MONSON ACADEMY 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 13-20 

Monson, Mass. Main St. Tel. COlonial 7-3767. 
George E. Rogers, A.B., Ed.D., Tufts, Head 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1-2. Col Prep. Music 
Public Speaking. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg 160, Day 55. Fac full 15, part-time 1. 

Grad '5772. Entd Col '5769, (U of Mass 4, U of Conn 3, U 
of Vt. 3, St. Lawrence 2, Boston U 2, U of Rhode Is. 2). Alumni 
3150. 

Tui Bdg $1350 (+$75-100), Day $300-450. Scholarships partial 
35 ($6000). Selp-help pgrm. Est 1804. Inc nonprofit. 

Plant $350,000. Endowment $270,000. Dorm rms 65. Class rms 
8. Lib 5000 vols. Labs 3. Gym. Fields 5. Courts 2, 

For over a century coeducational, then discontinued, Monson 
was re-opened in 1926 with a new endowment as a school for boys 
under Bertram A. Strohmeier. Mr. Rogers, former instructor at 
Northwood School, who took over direction in 1935, has improved 
and enlarged the plant, more than trebled the enrollment, added 
the eighth grade, and strengthened the college preparatory stand- 
ards. 

A new school building, replacing Academy Hall destroyed by 
fire in 1953, was dedicated in the fall of 1954 on the occasion of 
the Sesquicentennial celebration. 

Academic study is supplemented by musical organizations, pub- 
lic speaking, dramatics, publications, social activities, and athletics. 
Most graduates enter N.E. colleges and universities. Seepage 644 



NATICK, MASS. Pop 19,m Alt 158 ft. NYC R.R. 16 mi. W of 
Boston, Rt.9. Just S of this' -quiet industrial town is the site of 
John Eliot's noted Indian meeting'fypuse. Walnut Hill, a residential 
section, gave its name to the girls school. 

WALNUT HILL 
Bdg and Day Girls Ages 13-18 

Natick, Mass. 12 Highland St. Tel. Olympic 3-4312. 
Mildred Marcy, B.A., Wellesley, Ed.M., Harvard, Prin. 

High Sch 1-4* Col Prep, Art Music Typing Bible Dramatics. 

Enr Bdg 145, Day 40. Fac full 21, part-time 3. 

Grad '5758. Entd Col '5757. (Vassar 3, Sweet Briar 3, ^id- 
more 3, Wells 2, Wheaton 2, Smith 2). Alumnae 2500. 

Tui Bdg $2100 (+$150-200), Day $825. Scholarships full 1, par- 
tial 17 ($12,000). Est 1893. Inc nonprofit. 

Plant $232,262. Endowment $108,682. Dorm rms 130. Class rms 
12. Labs 2. Studios music 1, art 1. Gym. Fields 3. Courts 5. 



Mass. Leading Private Schools 80 

At the suggestion of President Shafer, Walnut Hill was estab- 
lished as a fitting school for Wellesley College, which it remained 
under its founders and long time principals, Florence Bigelow and 
Charlotte H. Conant Miss Hester R. Davies, who followed Miss 
Bigelow in 1932, fostered a modern informality and gracious sim- 
plicity. Much reminiscent of New England girls schools of the 
nineties lingers. Miss Marcy, who succeeded her in 1953, carries 
on the tradition of high scholastic achievement, and has added 
to and strengthened the departments of English, history, and 
mathematics. 

Today, Walnut Hill sends its graduates not only to Wellesley, 
but to Smith, Mt. Holyoke, Wheaton, Connecticut College, In 
the intimate and homey atmosphere, the students enjoy dra- 
matics, music, athletics, publications, language clubs, a forum, and 
a Christian association. See also page 744 



NEW BEDFORD, MASS. Pop 109,189. Alt 17 ft NY,NH&H 
R.R. 12 mi. SE of Fall River, Rt. U.S.6. Two periods of great 
prosperity are evidenced in New Bedford's architecture, some 
stately homes from its days as a famous whaling port, and numer- 
ous nineteenth century mansions representing the era when the 
city led in the manufacture of fine cotton goods. Today it is also 
a resort and a port of entry. The Academy is in North Dartmouth, 
5 miles' west. 

FRIENDS ACADEMY 
Co Day Coed Ages 5-14 

North Dartmouth, Mass. Tucker Rd. Tel. WYman 2-2082. 
William E. Mulliken, A.B., Harvard, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1. Art Music Latin. 
Dramatics. 

Enr Boys 95, Girls 75.. Fac full 17, part-time 3. 

Grad '5716. Entd Prep Set '5715. (Berkshire 2, St. George's 
1, Abbot 1, Avon 1, Worcester 1). 

Tui $250-700. Scholarships partial 6, Est 1792 Inc nonprofit. 
Nondenominational. 

This old academy, long controlled by Friends and now non- 
denominational, has had a number of notable principals, including 
Adelia Ethel Borden and E. Allison Grant. In 1949, under Harvey 
H, MacArthur, the school moved to its new location five miles 
west of New Bedford to the present 68-acre estate overlooking 
rolling countryside. Mr, Mulliken, who was appointed in 1953, has 
increased the enrollment and added new buildings and facilities. 
Varied athletic programs for both boys and girls, nature study and 
class and hobby activities are offered. Individualized programs in- 
clude opportunities for tutorial and remedial work, and graduates 
enter leading schools. 



Mass. New England 81 

NEWTON, MASS. Pop 81,994. Alt 33 ft. NYC R.R. On the 

Charles River W of Boston, the Newtons vie with the New Jersey 
Oranges in number and variety. Here lived Horace Mann, Mary 
Baker Eddy and Nathaniel Hawthorne. Its public school system 
is outstanding in the country. Of the private schools, Fessenden 
is in West Newton, and St. Sebastian's, directly behind the Cen- 
acle Convent. 

THE FESSENDEN SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 8-14 

West Newton 65, Mass. 215 Albemarle Rd. Tel. BI 4-7520. 
Hart Fessenden, A.B., M.A. (Hon), Williams, Head. 

Grades III- VIII. Art Music Latin. Remedial Reading. Tutor- 
ing. 

Enr Bdg 140, Day 80. Fac full 25, part-time 9. 

Grad '5752. Entd Prep Sch '5752. (Milton 6, Choate 5, And- 
over 4, St. George's 4, Exeter 3, Proctor 3). Alumni 2550 

Tui Bdg $2000 seven-day, $1900 five-day (4-$200-300), Day 
$525-875, Scholarships full 2, partial 15 ($7,400). Est 1903. Inc 
1930 nonprofit. 

Summer Day Camp. 

Plant $600,000. Dorm rms 140. Class rms 18. Lib 8000 vols. 
Studios music 4, art 1. Gym. Fields 6. Courts 9. 

This sound, well equipped school, founded by the late Frederick 
J. Fessenden, formerly a teacher of Latin at The Hill, has become 
widely known. Enrolling students from throughout the U. S. and 
from foreign countries, it prepares for the leading secondary 
schools. The plant is most complete, with especially fine facilities 
for art, music, shop, and athletics. 

Under the present head, son of the founder and assistant head 
master previous to his father's retirement in 1935, the human ele- 
ment has been much stressed, and interesting group activities, 
including a limited work program, hobbies, arts and crafts, print- 
ing, dramatics, music, and numerous sports, developed. In 1954 
a five-day boarding plan was inaugurated. See also pages 648-49 

ST. SEBASTIAN'S COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 
Boys Ages 11-18 

Newton 58, Mass. 78 Hood St. Tel. BI 4-1456. 

Rt. Rev. Msgr. Charles R. Flanigan, A,B., A.M., Boston C, Head. 

Grades VII- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Latin Greek. 
Rem Reading. 

Enr 270. Fac full 18, part-time 2. 

Grad '5740. Entd Col '5740. (Boston Col 21, Georgetown 5, 
Holy Cross 5, Providence 3, Tufts 3). Alumni 466. 

Tui $500. Scholarships. Est 1941. Roman Catholic. 

Summer Session. Enr 40. Tui $50 per course, six wks. 



Mass. Leading Private Schools 82 

Plant $900,000. Class rms 14. Lib 4000 vols. Labs 2. Gym. Fields 
3. Courts 2. 

Established by the late Cardinal O'Connell, this college prepara- 
tory school is staffed by priests of the archdiocese. Rev. Charles 
D. Mclnnis was succeeded by Father Flanigan in 1951. Graduates 
enroll primarily in Catholic institutions of higher learning, espe- 
cially Boston College, Holy Cross, and Georgetown, as well as 
Villanova, Catholic University, and Notre Dame. The academic 
work emphasizes science and languages and provides opportuni- 
ties for gifted students to take advanced and extra courses. 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. Pop 29,063. Alt 124 ft. B&M R.R. 
IS xnL N of Springfield, Rt. U.S.5, Seat of Smith College, home 
town of Calvin Coolidge, Northampton is thoroughly New Eng- 
land, with wide elmshaded streets and old time substantial homes. 
On Elm Street opposite the college campus is the ^ Burnham 
School; on the .eastern outskirts overlooking the Connecticut mead- 
ows, Northampton School for Girls. 



THE MARY A. BURNHAM SCHOOL 
Bdg Girls Ages 13-18 

Northampton, Mass. 45 Elm St. Tel. JUstice 4-8968. 
Mrs. George Waldo Emerson, A.B., Smith, Prin. 

High Sch 1-4, Col Prep Gen. Art Music Literature Lan- 
guages. Remedial Reading. 

Enrl85, Fac full 14, part-time 6. 

Grad '57 60. Entil Col '57- 59. Alumnae 4120. 

Tui $2100 (+$150). Scholarships partial 12 ($10,000). Est 1877. 
Inc 1946. 

Summer Session at Newport R.I. Enr 70. Tui $735 seven wks. 

Class rms 14. Lab. Studios music 5, art 1. Gym. Fields 3. Courts 
3. Riding, skiing, and swimming facilities. 

Burnham School was founded, at the suggestion of President 
Seelye of Smith College, as a preparatory school under the prin- 
cipalship of Mary A, Burnham and Bessie T. Capen. It was con- 
ducted after the death of the former in 1885 by Miss Capen until 
1909, when the school divided, with Miss Capen conducting one 
division under her own name. 

Mrs. Emerson, a graduate of the school and of Smith College, 
assumed the principalship in 1939. The heirs of Miss Burnham and 
Miss Capen gave her the records of both schools, thus making 
available the academic reports and names of all alumnae, and 



Mass. New England 88 

again uniting the two schools retaining the name of the original 
one. 

Mrs. Emerson had previously founded and directed The Emer- 
son School for Boys, and also served as principal of The Stone- 
leigh-Prospect Hill School for fourteen years. 

The original Burnham House continues as the main center of 
activities. Seven other buildings are used for dormitories, infirm- 
ary, and academic, social and athletic purposes. 

A good reputation for sound work in music has been estab- 
lished; a department of guidance to help in the selection of col- 
lege or specialized school has been developed; the enrollment has 
been increased, and the prestige of the school enhanced. There 
are many extra-curricular programs, among them sports, especially 
riding; Mensendieck; music, dramatics, language and hobby 
clubs; and publications. See also pages 746-47 

NORTHAMPTON SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 
Bdg and Day Girls Ages 12-18 

Northampton, Mass. 78 Pomery Terrace. Tel. JUstice 4-1455. 
Dorothy M. Bement, A.B., M.A., Smith; Sarah B. Whitaker, Prins, 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep, Art 
Music Bible Mathematics Sciences. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg 75, Day 70. Fac full 15, part-time 5. 

Grad '5741. Entd Col '5741. (Smith 5, Skidmore 4, Elmira 
4, Vassar 2, Mt. Holyoke 2). Alumnae 1300. 

Tui Bdg $2000 (+$150), Day $600. Scholarships partial 20 
8000). Est 1924. Inc 1950 nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Col Prep. French. Remedial Reading. Tui 
$390-490. 

Plant $222,000. Scholarship endowment $15,000. Class rms 10. 
Lib 2000 vols. Lab. Studios 2. Gym. Fields 2. Courts 2. Riding. 

The two principals of this school, which was originally estab- 
lished to give intensive review for college entrance, are of diverse 
personalities and admirably supplement each other in their admin- 
istration. Northampton School gives a solid preparatory curriculm, 
and graduates enter Smith, Mt Holyoke, Connecticut College, 
Wellesley, Vassar, and Bryn Mawr, among others. A feature is 
the summer school of French as well as a full summer program of 
college preparatory subjects. Music, art, the dance, French, Span- 
ish and current event clubs, dramatics and Gilbert and Sullivan 
with Williston Academy, publications, especially a student news- 
paper, and athletics complete the program. See also page 745 



For further information, write Porter Sargent 



Mass. Leading Private Schools 84 

SMITH COLLEGE DAY SCHOOL 
Coed Ages 5-14 

Northampton, Mass. Prospect St. Tel. 2700, ext. 266. 

Helen E. Rees, A.B., M.A,, Univ of Denver, Ed.D., Columbia, Dir. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII. Art Music .Physical Ed. 

Enr Boys 60, Girls 60. Fac full 8, part-time 4. 

Grad '5710. Entd Prep Sch '578. (Putney 2, Northampton 2, 
Gov Dummer 1, Lenox 1, Pomfret 1, Stockbridge 1.) 

Tui $185. Est 1926. 

Under the auspices of the Smith College Department of Edu- 
cation and Child Study, this school enrolls children up to prepara- 
tory school age. 



NORTHFIELD, MASS. Pop 2246. Alt 300 ft 10 mi. NE of 
Greenfield, Rt U.S.5. This quiet, tree-shaded village on the broad 
terraces of the Connecticut was the boyhood home and later the 
summer residence of Dwight L. Moody, the evangelist, who 
founded here the Northfield Schools Northfield School for girls, 
and across the river, Mount Hermon. Today with their enrollment 
of more than a thousand, the two schools make up the country's 
largest private secondary school incorporated under one board of 
trustees. The alumni, spread out all over the globe, have made 
their contributions to Christian civilization and to the support of 
the schools. 

MOUNT HERMON SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 12-19 

Mount Hermon, Mass. Tel Northfield 321. 

Howard Lane Rubendall, A.B., D.D., Dickinson, B.D., Union 

Theological Sem, L.H.D, Trinity, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Languages Literature Mathematics 
Mech Drawing Biology Art Music. Developmental Reading. 

Enr Bdg 520, Day 25. Fac full 36, part-time 14. 

Grad '57142. Entd Col '57138. (Cornell 8, Brown 7, Mid- 
dlebury 6, Tufts 6, Yale 6, Columbia 4). Alumni 10,000. 

Tui Bdg $1150-1750 (+$100), Day $60-350. Scholarships full 15, 
partial 160 ($75,000). Work pgrm. Est 1881. Inc nonprofit. 

Plant $4,025,000. Endowment (with Northfield School) $6,372,- 
000. Dorm rms 247. Class rms 33. Lib 30,000 vols. Labs 7. Studio 
music 1. Gym. Swimming pool. Fields 7. Courts 20. 

Now sending more than ninety-five per cent of graduates on to 
college, Mount Hermon was started in an old farmhouse to afford 
abundant opportunity for a boy to secure an education or prepara- 
tion for college. In the early years, daily work on the farm or in 



Mass. New England 85 

the building was required. The founder's rigorous ideals of life 
and training for the guidance of youth continued under Dr. Henry 
Franklin Cutler, principal from 1890 to 1932. He was succeeded 
by the late Elliott Speer, a man of liberal religious views, presi- 
dent of The Northfield Schools from 1926, who inaugurated poli- 
cies quite different from some held by the conservative fundamen- 
talists then on the faculty. David R. Porter was then head master 
for seven years from 1935. 

Mr. Rubendall, head master from 1944, was also appointed to 
the presidency of The Northfield Schools when in 1955 William 
E. Park was appointed president of Simmons College. 

While this well endowed school offers many scholarships, the tui- 
tion charges are related to the family's financial means and abili- 
ties. 

Graduates enter more than fifty colleges, including Brown, 
Tufts, Middlebury, Dartmouth, University of Mass., Harvard, 
Yale, Cornell, M.I.T., R.P.I., Wesleyan, Amherst, Williams, 
Oberlin. There are many extracurricular activities, including 
debating, music, various hobby and interest clubs, student publica- 
tions, and athletics. 

With the successfully launched development fund program 
which to date has supplied funds for several new buildings, hori- 
zons continue to broaden. See also page 644 



NORTHFIELD SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 
Bdg Ages 13-18 

East Northfield, Mass. Tel. 311. 

Edinond S. Meany, Jr., Ph.D., Harvard, Acting Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music Home Economics Bible 
Speech Developmental Reading. 

Enr Bdg 515, Day 15. Fac full 38, part-time 17. 

Grad '57161. Entd Col '57160. (Pembroke 8, Simmons 8, 
Wellesley 8, Colby 5, Conn. Col 5, Skidmore 5). Alumnae 10,567.* 

Tui Bdg $1150-1750 (+$50), Day $100-300. Scholarships full 1, 
partial 128 ($36,000). Work pgrm. Est 1879. Inc 1912 nonprofit. 

Plant $3,278,000. Endowment (with Mount rfermon) $6,372,000. 
Dorm rms 326. Class rms 33. Lib 22,000 vols. Labs 4. Studios 
music 22, art 2, Gym. Swimming pool. Fields 2. Courts 12. 

Today largely college preparatory in emphasis, although there 
is a curriculum preparing for schools of art, music, business and 
other vocational fields. The first girls lived in Mr. Moody's 
own home, which was altered to accommodate twenty-five pupils; 
from this has grown the present school of more than five hundred 
resident students. During the headship of Mira B. Wilson from 



Mass. Leading Private Schools 88 

1929, the tone of the school was modernized. Dr. Wilson retired 
in 1952; Barbara M. dough then served until the appointment of 
Edmond S. Meany, Jr. in 1957. 

Each girl works 7 l /2 hours a week, and the plan of having 
some girls whose families can afford to pay up to $1750 to allow 
scholarship aid for others, is followed as at Mount Hermon. The 
academic program, with its many opportunities in art, music, 
home economics, and other electives, prepares the girls for such 
colleges as Mt Holyoke, Cornell, Oberlin, Wellesley, Connecticut 
College, Smith. Among the rich programs of extra-curricular acti- 
vities are music dramatics, school publications, and sports. See 
also page 748 

NORTON, MASS. Pop 4401. Alt 101 ft. 30 mi. S of Boston, on 
Rtl23. The seat of Wheaton College, whose Georgian chapel and 
administration building are conspicuous, Norton is an attractive 
little town. Well back from the road is the main building of House 
in the Pines, sheltered by the trees from which it takes its name. 

HOUSE IN THE PINES 
Bdg Girls Ages 12-19 

Norton, Mass. Tel. 5-4411. 

M, Elizabeth Johndroe, A,B., Wellesley, Dir. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Music 
Art Secretarial Religion Speech. Remedial Reading. Home 
Economics Dramatics. 

Enr 135. Fac full 21, part-time 6. 

Grad '57 -21. Entd Col J 57 18, (Boston U 2, Beaver 2, Sim- 
mons 2, Wellesley 1, Hollins 1, Russell Sage 1). Alumnae 800. 

Tui $2000 (+$250). Scholarships full 1, partial 10 ($7000). 
Est 1911. Inc 1936 nonprofit. 

Plant $600,000. Endowment $20,000. Class rms 12. Lib 10,000 
vols. Lab. Studios music 1, art 1. Gym. Field. Courts 6. Riding 
facilities. 

After some years as instructor at Wheaton and later at Farm- 
ington Mrs. Joseph Milliken, then Gertrude Cornish, established 
a school for girls which became known especially for its flexibility 
and careful personal oversight In 1944 she retired, continuing as 
president of the board, and appointing Miss Cleveland, dean, as 
her successor. Miss Johndroe is the present principal. 

Both in the preparatory program and in the post-graduate 
courses, the faculty place emphasis on social and academic ad- 
justment, and a number of graduates go on to Middlebury, Boston 
University, Connecticut College, and other colleges and universi- 
ties. 

The girls attend chapel at Wheaton, and avail of the College 
facilities for swimming-) Among other activities are music and 
hobby clubs, dramatics, and a student council. See also page 749 



Mass. New England 87 

PEMBROKE, MASS. Pop 2579. 23 mi. SE of Boston, off Rt3. 
Settled in 1649, Pembroke is a resort on the North River in the 
sandy, pine covered region approaching Cape Cod. 

ARNOLD SCHOOL 
Bdg Coed Ages 10-18 

E. Pembroke, Mass. Tel Brockton: Taylor 6*2661. 
Nathan P._Arnold, A.B., Univ of Pa., Head. 

GradesjV-yill High Sch 1-4, Col Prep General. Home Eco- 
nomics Dairying Poultry General Farming Construction. 
Remedial Reading Make-up courses. 

Enr Boys 45, Girls 20. Fac full-time 9. 

Tui $1400 (+$100). Scholarships. Self-help pgrm. Est 1932. 
Proprietary. 

Summer Camp. Review Courses. Tui $385 inclusive for 2 mos. 

Plant $175,000. Dorm rms 16. Class rms 9. Lib 2000 vols. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arnold, who established this school in 1932, pro- 
vide the boys and girls with a country life and with a variety of 
extracurricular activities. The program includes home economics 
and instruction in farm methods, as well as the usual academic 
work. The school enrolls some children with problems who are suf- 
ficiently adjusted socially to profit from the program. There is a 
summer school-camp on the campus. See also page 803 



PITTSFIELD, MASS. Pop 53,348. Alt 1013 ft. NY,NH&H R.R. 
45 mi NW of Springfield, Rt U.S.20. The largest town of the 
attractive Berkshire region, Pittsfield on the Housatonic River is 
known for its paper making, textiles and electrical machinery 
industries. Miss Hall's School is a mile and a half south of the 
center of the city. 



MISS HALL'S SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day- Girls Ages 13-18 

Pittsfield, Mass. 492 Holmes Rd. Tel. 6401. 

Elizabeth M. Fitch, A.B., Barnard, A.M., Radcliffe, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music Typing Dramatics 
Photography. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg 130, Day 20. Fac full 20, part-time 5. 

Grad '57 41. Entd Col '57 40. (Conn. 3, Vassar 3, Bryn Mawr 

2, Radcliffe 2, Smith 2, Wellesley 2). Alumnae 1438. 

Tui Bdg $2700 (+$300), Day $825. Scholarships partial 12 
($12,000). Self-help pgrm. Est 1898. Inc 1924 nonprofit 
Plant $1,154,000. Dorm rms 59. Class rms 16. Lib 6000 vols. Labs 

3. Studios music 6, art 3. Gym. Fields 4. Courts 6. Skiing facilities. 
Founded more than a half century ago by Mira Hinsdale Hall 

and still bearing the imprint of her administrative genius, skill, 



Mass. Leading Private Schools 88 

and tact, the school stems from one established about 1828 by 
Nancy Hinsdale, the maternal great-aunt of Miss Hall, who later 
joined her cousin, Emma Willard, in her educational work. Miss 
Margaret Hall, on the faculty from 1921, who succeeded to the 
direction on the death of her aunt in 1937, carried on not only the 
family tradition, the conservative tone and standards of scholar- 
ship, but modernized and broadened the curriculum, which now 
makes special provisions for research projects for gifted students. 
Miss Fitch had had successful executive experience on the west 
coast as well as in the East and came from the head mistress-ship 
of Oxford School, Hartford, in 1948. The curriculum has been 
further modernized, with workshops for all of the students. The 
majority of graduates now go on to college, entering Smith, Wei- 
lesley, Vassar, Barnard, Radcliffe, Wheaton, and many others. 
Among activities are workshops in art, the dance, and dramatics 
and music as well as student clubs and the student council^ A 
complete sports program takes advantage of the local opportunities 
for winter sports. See also pages 750-51 



SHARON, MASS. Pop 7000. 20 rni SW of Boston, Rt. 27 off Rt 
U.S. 1. NY, NH & H R.R. This residential and resort town is S of 
the Blue Hills and the site of a bird sanctuary. 

SACRED HEART SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 8-14 

Sharon, Mass. 34 E. Foxboro St. Tel. 762. 
Brother John Rosaire, Dir. 

Grades IV- VIII. Music French. Tutoring Rem Reading. 

Enr Bdg 220, Day 20. Fac full 10, part-time .4. Adm Staff 3. 

Tui Bdg $630 (+$100), Day $100 (+$25). Est 1923. Roman 
Catholic. 

Summer Camp. Tui $30 wk. 

Dorms 4. Class rms 10. Lib 9000 vote. Fields 10. 

Founded and conducted by the Brothers of the Sacred Heart, 
this school offers an academic program with considerable emphasis 
on music. The summer camp is at nearby Lake Massapoag. 



SHEFFIELD, MASS, Pop 2150. Alt 679 ft NY,NH&H R.R. 7 
mi. S of Great Barrington, Rt. U.S.7. A quiet village in the Housa- 
tonic Valley, Sheffield has one long elm-shaded main street. Under 
the eastern shadow of Mt Everett to the west, the school is in a 
natural amphitheater. 



Mass. New England 89 

BERKSHIRE SCHOOL 
Bdg -Boys Ages 12-19 

Sheffield, Mass. Tel. 9-3121. 

John F. Godman, Ph.B,, Yale, LL.D., Hahnemann, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Mechanical Drawing Music Art Shop 
Dramatics Speech. 

Enr Bdg 185, Day 10. Fac full 25, part-time 6. 

Grad '5739. Entd Col '5738. (Yale 4, Harvard 3, Princeton 
3, Cornell 3, U of Pa. 2, Trinity 2). Alumni 1350. 

Tui Bdg $2000 (+$100), Day $650. Scholarships partial 37 
($20,000). Est 1907. Inc 1919 nonprofit. 

Plant $1,862,000. Dorm rms 185. Class rms 20. Lib 13,900 vols. 
Labs 4. Studios music 1, art 1. Gym. Swimming pool. Fields 8. 
Courts 8. Skiing facilities. 

For thirty-five years Seaver B, Buck, founder, and Mrs. Buck 
devoted themselves to the development of this efficient, well- 
organized college preparatory school. After Mr. Buck's retirement 
in 1942, Albert Keep, assistant head master for six years was 
appointed, serving until the following year when he was called 
to military service. Delano de Windt, alumnus and associated 
with the school since 1908, succeeded him and did much to develop 
the physical facilities of Berkshire. Mr. Godman, who had 
twenty years experience in secondary education, came to Berk- 
shire in 1951 from the head mastership of Germantown Academy. 
His direction has strengthened the faculty, broadened the curricu- 
lum, and through development and construction of new facilities, 
allowed for the increase in the school's enrollment 

The curriculum, with its many electives, prepares for numerous 
colleges, including Middlebury, Williams, Yale, Colgate, Cornell, 
Harvard. Extra-curricular programs emphasize not only athletics, 
particularly winter sports, but also student government, several 
publications, music, and various clubs. See also pages 646-47 



SHELBURNE FALLS, MASS. Pop 2364. Alt 252 ft B&M R.R. 
11 mi. W of Greenfield, Rt.2. Shelburne Falls, a pretty village 
whose factories utilize power from the Deerfield River, is on the 
Mohawk Trail in the Berkshires. 

THE ROBERTS SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 3-12; Day Coed 3-12 

Shelburne Falls, Mass. Tel. MA 5-9262. 

Walter C. Richardson, B.S.Ed., North Adams STC, Owner and 

Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VI. Art Shop. Remedial Read- 
ing Make-up Courses. 



Mass. Leading Private Schools 90 

Enr Bdg 10; Day Boys 20, Girls 10. Fac full 4, part-time 2. 

Tui Bdg $1550 (+$150), Day $325-400. Scholarships partial 4 
($800). Est 1914. Proprietary. 

Summer Camp. Tui $360 eight wks, 

This farm school on the main ridge of Greenfield Mountain 
enrolls very young boarding students, giving them individualized 
academic work and numerous rural activities. In 1955 Mr. Rich- 
ardson acquired the property and school from the founder, Mrs. 
Alice D. Roberts, and made plans for expansion of enrollment. 

SOUTHBOROUGH, MASS. Pop 2760. Alt 314 ft. 15 mi E of 
Worcester, off Rt 9. The Burnett family, manufacturers of vanilla 
extract, developed this town and its schools. St. Mark's stands 
back from the crossroad above the village. Fay School faces the 
main street, its grounds terracing down to the water. 

THE FAY SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 3-14 
Southborough, Mass. Main St. Tel. Marlboro 100. 
Harrison L. Reinke, A.B., Princeton, M.A., Columbia, Head. 

Grades HI- VIII. Art Music French Latin. Manual Arts. 
Remedial Reading Make-up Courses. 

Enr Bdg 115, Day 60. Fac full 22, part-time 2. 

Grad '5745. Entd Prep Sch '57-44. (Tabor 5, St. Paul's 4, 
Salisbury 3, St. Mark's 2, Deerfield 2, Middlesex 2). Alumni 1400. 

Tui Bdg $2200 (+$250), Day $675-825. Scholarships full 4, par- 
tial 15 ($7500). Est 1866. Inc 1922 nonprofit 

Plant $1,000,000. Endowment $200,000. Dorm rms 90, Class rms 
20. Lib 3000 vols. Studios music 8, art 1. Gyms 2. Swimming pool. 
Fields 6. Riding facilities. 

The oldest elementary boarding school in America, Fay School 
was founded in 1866 by Harriet Burnett and Eliza Burnett Fay. 
Edward Winchester Fay, head master from 1918 for twenty-four 
years, remains a trustee. 

When Mr. and Mrs. Reinke came in 1942, they brought new life 
and color, a modern outlook, and sympathetic understanding of 
young boys. Mr. Reinke had taught at The Hill and Indian Moun- 
tain Schools before going to Eaglebrook, where he was assistant 
to the head master from 1937 to 1942. His initiative and vision 
have shown their effect in tripled enrollment, stabilized finances, 
new equipment and expanded plant, with completion in 1956 of 
a new gymnasium-auditorium, and increased scholarship aid. 

The vigorous academic program prepares for St. Mark's, Deer- 
field, and other leading secondary schools. In 1952 a department of 
guidance was established. Many sports are offered, as well as 
numerous clubs, organizations, and programs, including music, 



Mass. New England 91 

dramatics, publications, science, craft, and hobby groups, self-help 
activities, student government. See also page 645 



SAINT MARK'S SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 12-18 

Southborough, Mass. Tel. Marlboro 50. 

William Wyatt Barber, Jr., A.B., Princeton, Head. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Latin Greek 
Mathematics Literature Mechanical Drawing. Music. Art 
Manual Arts French Spanish Science History. 

Enr Bdg 205, Day 25. Fac full 31, part-time 5. 

Grad '5750. Entd Col '5749. (Harvard 14, Yale 10, Brown 3, 
Penn. 2, M.I.T. 1, Middlebury 1). Alumni 1600. 

Tui Bdg $2180 (+$120), Day $750. Scholarships full 10, partial 
46 ($40,000). Est 1865. Episcopal. 

Plant $1,039,300. Class rms 20. Lib 20,000 vols. Labs 4. Studios 
music 8, art 2, mechanical drawing 1. Gym. Outdoor Swimming 
pool. Fields 6. Courts 10. Artificial Ice Hockey Rink. 

Founded by Joseph Burnett, inspired by the success of St. Paul's 
and by the desire to have a similar school in his native town of 
Southborough, St. Mark's is a church school of the parental type. 
All activities are carried on under one roof. Assured of prestige 
from the first, it developed steadily in strength and efficiency under 
the capable management of William E. Peck, head master from 
1882 to 1894. His successor, Rev. Dr. William G. Thayer who re- 
mained in charge until 1930, zealously maintained the ideals of 
the school. During his regime the life remained intimate, pro- 
scribed; admission rigidly restricted; but in his later years Dr. 
Thayer became liberal and progressive. 

The school from its opening has had a system of monitors, six 
or seven boys elected from the sixth form who "are the representa- 
tives of the school, have certain duties and a general oversight of 
the life of the boys. They stand for the schpol ideals and exert 
their influence and leadership." This is now the center of a student 
council. Upper school boys have separate rooms. The three lower 
forms live in dormitories with windowed alcoves. 

Francis Parkman, of the historical Boston family, an old St. 
Mark's boy, in his twelve years as head master brought a new 
alertness and straightforwardness which won friends in every di- 
rection. The life and the curriculum were enriched with military 
training and elective courses in music, politics, poetry. 

The Rev. William Brewster, of a family of churchmen, came 
to the head mastership early in 1943, resigning in 1948 to head 
St Stephen's, a Church school opened in Texas in 1950. Mr. 
Barber, a graduate who had been on the faculty since 1932 as 



Leading Private Schools 92 

master in English and Greek and head hockey coach, was ap- 
pointed head master in 1948. Maintaining high academic standards, 
he has instituted a program to make the student body represent 
geographically, socially, and economically, a wider range. While 
military training has been dropped from the curriculum, Brant- 
wood Camp, staffed entirely by St. Mark's boys and graduates, 
and attended by over 200 needy boys, has remained an integral 
part of the educational program. 

The strict academic program, including a required classical lan- 
guage, prepares for Harvard, Yale, and Princeton, although many 
graduates decide to go elsewhere. There is a wide range of 
extra-curricular activities, among them student government, music, 
debating, hobby clubs, dramatics, publications, athletics, and 
Christian and philanthropic organizations. 

SOUTH BYFIELD, MASS. Pop 1994, Alt 64 ft B&M R.R. to 
Newburyport 30 mi. NE of Boston, off Rt U.S.I. South Byfield 
overlooks the great salt marshes of the Newbury River. On a knoll 
off the Newburyport Turnpike stands the stately old Governor 
Dummer mansion, home of the Academy's head master. 

GOVERNOR DUMMER ACADEMY 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 13-18 

South Byfield, Mass. Elm St Tel. Newburyport HO 2-6643. 
Edward W. Eames, A.B., L.H.D., Amherst, M.A,, Harvard, 
L.H.D., Bowdoin, Head 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Public Speaking. Shop. 

Enr Bdg 195, Day 25, Fac full 25, part-time 6. 

Grad '5752. Entd Col '5751. (Harvard 8, Brown 4, Amherst 
3, Yale 3, Bowdoin 2, Colgate 2). Alumni 1850. 

Tui Bdg $2100 (+$75), Day $600. Scholarships. Est 1763. Inc 
nonprofit. 

Plant $1,590,000. Endowment $482,000. Dorm rms 164. Class rms 
14. Lib 5700 vols. Labs 3. Machine Shop. Gyms 2, Fields 11. Courts 
6. Golf course. 

Oldest secondary boarding school in continuous operation ni 
the country, the Academy was founded by Lieutenant Governor 
William Dummer of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, who be- 
queathed his beautiful Byfield home and 360-acre farm for that 
purpose. Under the celebrated Samuel Moody, who made it a 
grammar school of the earlier type, so many boys were prepared 
for "the College" that, between 1768 and 1790, one-fourth of 
Harvard graduating classes were from the Academy. 

It was an unimportant local academy when Charles S. Ingham 
took over early in the century, and not until 1930 with the com- 
ing of Mr. and Mrs, Eames, who had been at Deerfield with Mr. 
Boyden, did it enter upon its present era of life and vigor. They 



Mass. New England 93 

brought youth, enthusiasm, and steadfastness of purpose to the 
building of a new school from the old, strengthened the faculty, 
added to the acreage and buildings, and made it one of the im- 
portant secondary schools of the country. 

It is unusual that four of the teachers whom Mr. Eames first 
brought with him as young men in 1930 are now serving as deans 
and department heads. This backlog of loyal and experienced 
teachers has given the school added stability and effectiveness. 

The boys, who now come from every part of the nation, are en- 
rolled widely among the colleges, especially Harvard, Amherst, 
Brown, Dartmouth, Princeton. There is a program of sports, a 
student council, the usual publications, and numerous clubs and 
activities, of which the Glee Club is noteworthy. 

Boys are encouraged through their own labors and effort to 
contribute to the material welfare of the school, and their initiative 
has supplemented the efforts of the head master in raising the 
considerable building fund. See also page 636 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS. Pop 162,399. Alt 119 ft. B&M; NYC; 
NY,NH&H R.R. 80 mi. SW of Boston, Rt U.S.20. Long vying 
with Hartford and Worcester in enterprise, wealth and civic pride, 
Springfield is a beautiful city 5 miles north of the Connecticut 
line. The municipal group dominated by the Campanile faces 
Court Square. On State Street are the Art and Natural History 
Museum, the library, and high schools. The Arsenal, founded by 
Washington, is celebrated in Longfellow's pacifist poem. In Mer- 
rick Park adjoining the library is Saint Gaudens vigorous and 
masterly statue, "The Puritan." On Crescent Hill a mile from the 
center is The MacDuffie School. 

THE MACDUFFIE SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 
Bdg and Day Ages 12-18 

Springfield 5, Mass. 182 Central St. Tel. RE 4-2336. 

Ralph D. Rutenber, Jr., A.B., Princeton, A.M., Columbia, Head; 

Cleminette Downing Rutenber, A.B., Agnes Scott, Associate Head. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Typing. 
Languages Sciences English History Mathematics Music. 
Developmental Reading. 

Enr Bdg 90, Day 120. Fac full 15, part-time 5. 

Grad '5745. Entd Col '57 45. (Smith 4, Mt Holyoke 3, Sim- 
mons 3, Vassar 2, Connecticut Coll 2, Goucher 2). Alumnae 1282. 

Tui Bdg $1800 (+$100), Day $700. Scholarships full 3, partial 
35 ($15,000-18,000), Self-help pgrm. Est 1890. Inc 1915 nonprofit. 

Summer Day Camp. Make-up. Tui variable. 



Mass. Leading Private Schools 94 

Plant $350,000. Bonn rms 40, Class rms 17. Lib 0000 vols. Lab. 
Studios music 1, art L Gym. Fields 4. 

Mr. Rutenber in 1941 took over the school founded and for forty 
years directed by Dr. and Mrs. John MacDume, and maintained 
by their son, Malcolm, from 1937. Formerly senior master at 
Wooster, Mr. Rutenber has brought new life to the school, tre- 
bling the enrollment in three years, and lifting the school out of 
debt. Parents and alumnae have given their enthusiastic coopera- 
tion to the present regime. 

In 1956 the school purchased a two-building, three-acre estate 
to augment present facilities and permit expansion of enrollment. 

Academic standards are high, with especially successful work 
in foreign languages and in science and mathematics, and with 
much independent study on the part of the students. There are 
special 'fast' sections in foreign languages for the Ablest girls. 
Preparation for college includes practice in 'scanning* reading, 
note taking, study techniques, and gradual introduction of col- 
lege-type assignments and of outside readings. Among the col- 
leges entered are Mt. Holyoke, Wellesley, Radcliffe, Vassar, Smith, 
Conn. College. Numerous extra-curricular activities include drama, 
music, several publications, French and science clubs, current 
events programs, and sports. Much is made of the advantages of 
Springfield. See also page 748 



STOCKBRIDGE, MASS. Pop 900. Alt 839 ft NY,NH&H R.R. 
12 mi. S of Pittsfield, Rt U.S.7. In the heart of the Berks hires, 
this idyllic village on the Housatonic has a classic poise in its 
dignified neatness. Founded in 1736 as an exemplary village for 
Indians, it has long been a favorite summer resort of literary and 
artistic people, and its Berkshire Playhouse is an outstanding 
summer theater. The Stockbridge School is in Interlaken, one 
mile from Tanglewood on the estate formerly owned by Mark 
Hanna. 

THE STOCKBRIDGE SCHOOL 
Bdg Coed Ages 12-16 
Interlaken, Mass. Tel. Stockbridge 496. 

Hans K. Maeder, A.B., M.A., Hamburg, Copenhagen, Zurich, 
Hawaii, Dir. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Languages Art Music Speech Danc- 
ing Dramatics Manual Arts Farming. 

Enr Boys 60, Girls 40. Fac full 13, part-time 6. 

Grad '57 25. Entd Col '5725. Alumni 43. 

Tui Bdg $2100 (+$200), Day $750. Scholarships partial 30 ($20,- 
000). Est 1949. Inc 1955 nonprofit. 

Summer Session and Camp. Enr 80. Tui $600 eight wks. 

Plant $600,000. Dorm rms 37. Class rms 5. Lib 2500 vols. Lab. 



Mass. New England 95 

Studios music 3, art 1, Fields 3. Courts 2. 

The former director of the Walden School has established this 
country boarding school of high purpose on the site of the first 
Berkshire Music Festivals. The curriculum is oriented towards 
world understanding, and approximately one-fourth of the students 
come from foreign countries. Two-week spring trips are planned 
and worked out by pupils to integrate the school work with actual 
observation trips to the United Nations, The Institute of Advanced 
Study, Chicago, Canada, and other points of current interest. Grad- 
uates enter Bard, Columbia, Sarah Lawrence, Harvard, Hunter, 
R.P.I., Brandeis, among others. Arts, crafts, music, dance, a world 
affairs group, and various subject clubs are included in the school 
program. 

SUDBURY, MASS. Pop 2596. Alt 201 ft NY, NH&H R.R. 18 
mi. W of Boston, Rt. U.S.20. In this quiet town on the old Boston 
Post Road is the restored Red Horse Tavern, built in 1686, setting 
of Longfellow's "Tales of a Wayside Inn." St. Hubert's School 
occupies a remodeled farmhouse on Concord Road. 

ST. HUBERT'S SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day- Boys Ages 5-14 

Sudbury, Mass. Concord Rd. Tel. Hilltop 3-2361. 

Earle W. Huckel, A.B., Ed.M., Harvard; Mrs. Huckel, Prins. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII. Music French Remedial 
Reading. 

Enr Bdg 20, Day 10. Fac full 5, part-time 3. 

Tui Bdg $1600 (+$40), Day $600. Est 1928. Inc 1947 nonprofit. 

Founded in the south of France as a preparatory school for 
American children, St. Hubert's was reopened at Sudbury in 1940. 
The school offers a close home environment in which all contrib- 
ute to the various activities. 



WALTHAM, MASS. Pop 47,187. Alt 51 ft. B&M R.R. 10 mi. W 
of Boston, Rt. U.S.20. Long known as the watch city, Waltham 
had the first power loom for cotton weaving in America. The new 
and vigorous Brandeis University is here. Chapel Hill School is 
in beautiful country a mile from the center, at Piety Corner. 

CHAPEL HILL SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day -Girls Ages 12-18 

Waltham 54, Mass. 327 Lexington St. Tel TWinbrook 4-2644. 
Wilfred W. Clark, B.S., Dartmouth, M.A., Boston Univ, Prin. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep Gen- 
eral. Art Music Languages Typing. 

Enr Bdg 95, Day 40. Fac full 16, part-time 6. 



Mass. Leading Private Schools 96 

Grad '5725. Entd Col '5722. (Boston U 3, Simmons 2, Rus- 
sell Sage 2, Bryn Mawr 1, Barnard 1, Illinois 1). Alumnae 1000, 

Tui Bdg $1650 (+$100), Day $500-600. Scholarships full 2, par- 
tial 12 ($10,000). Self-help pgrm. Est 1860. Inc nonprofit. 

Dorm rms 57. Class rms 16. Labs 2. Studios 2. Gym. Field. 

Founded as Waltham School by a group of New Church mem- 
bers led by Benjamin Worcester, Chapel Hill has been non- 
sectarian in practice for many years. It has been fortunate in 
having a number of distinguished head mistresses, among them 
Martha Mason, 1918-1925, and Louise Fay, 1925-1938. Mrs. 
Robert C. Rounds, principal from 1943, was succeeded in 1956 
by Mr. Clark, formerly head master of Cardigan Mountain. 

Enrolling students from throughout the country, Chapel Hill 
has long maintained high academic standards and offers a pro- 
gram of thorough college preparation with emphasis on funda- 
mentals, especially English and languages. Graduates enter a 
wide variety of colleges. There is also a general program for 
non-college girls. Among the many extra-curricular activities are 
dance, music, dramatics, art and hobby groups, and sports, and 
riding is available. A 5-day week- may be arranged for boarding 
students near Boston. 



WELLESLEY, MASS. Pop 20,549. Alt 140 ft NYC R.R. 14 mi. 
SW of Boston, Rt.9. From a country village with an academic 
flavor and large country estates, Wellesley, with its Hills and 
Farms, has become a center for well-to-do commuters, and of 
shops and stores to serve them. Here are the buildings and beau- 
tiful grounds of Wellesley College. The Dana Hall buildings line 
Grove Street and Eastman Circle on both sides. 

DANA HALL SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Girls Ages 14-18 

Wellesley 81, Mass. Grove St. Tel. CEdar 5-3010. 
Mrs. Alnah James Johnston, B.A., Wellesley, Prin. 

High Sch 2-4. Col Prep. Art Music Dramatics, 

Enr Bdg 245, Day 65. Fac full 29, part-time 11. 

Grad '57113. Entd Col '57106. (Smith 9, Wheaton 6, Hoi- 
lins 6, Mt. Holyoke 5, Skidmore 3, Welles^y 3). Alumnae 6000. 

Tui Bdg $2250 (+$200), Day $850. Scholarships full 3, partial 
12 ($10,000). Est 1881. Inc 1938 nonprofit. 

Plant $1,000,000. Dorm rms 135. Lib 6000 vols. Studio art 1, 
Gym. Courts 10. Indoor, outdoor riding rings. 

Dana Hall was founded in 1881 under the Misses Julia A. and 
Sarah P. Eastman as a preparatory school for Wellesley. Under 
the leadership of Miss Helen Temple Cooke from 1899 to 1951, 
the school achieved national prominence. Her breadth of interest 



Mass. New England 97 

led to the founding of the affiliated schools, Tenacre and Pine 
Manor. Dr. Alfred T. Hill succeeded her in 1951 as director of 
the Dana Hall Schools. He resigned in 1956. 

Mrs. Johnston, with experience at Bennett School and Junior 
College and at Yenching University, China, became principal of 
Dana Hall, the preparatory school unit, in 1938. Under her 
leadership the educational influence of the school has been en- 
hanced. Even while directing such a large school and establishing 
a well-integrated guidance program, she has maintained a close 
personal touch with her students. Many states and several foreign 
countries are represented in the school body. Although most girls 
prepare for college, many take advantage of the exceptionally 
strong faculties in art and music. The students make good use 
of the cultural advantages of Boston, 

The development of "fifth subject electives" encourages the 
able student to add subjects that may be granted advance credit 
or to extend her interest in art, Bible, philosophy, drama and 
speech, French, mathematics, music, and writing. See pages 752-53 



DANA JUNIOR SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day -Girls Ages 11-13 

Wellesley 81, Mass. 66 Grove St. Te! CEdar 5-3010. 
Mrs. Werner Hegemann, B.A., Univ of Mich., Head. 

Grades VII-IX. Art Music French Latin. 

Enr Bdg 45, Day 65. Fac full 8, part-time 6. 

Tui Bdg $1975 (+$250), Day $875. Scholarships ($5000). Est 
1952. 

Dorm rms 22. Class rms 10. Studios music 4, art 1. Gym. Fields 
3. Courts 4. 

Boarding and day students are admitted to grades 7, 8, and 9 
which comprise the lower division of Dana Hall. Students in this 
group have their own faculty, dormitories, and dining facilities. 
Individual attention and a homelike atmosphere are emphasized 
along with an academic program of high standards under the direc- 
tion of well qualified teachers. Students may progress to the sec- 
ondary level from this division. See page 752 



PINE MANOR JUNIOR COLLEGE 
Bdg Girls Ages 17-20 

Wellesley 81, Mass. Grove St. Tel. CEdar 5-3010. 
Frederick C. Ferry, Jr., A.B., Hamilton, Ed.M., Harvard, Pres. 
Jr Col 1-2. Liberal Arts. 



Mass. Leading Private Schools 98 

Enr Bdg 220, Day 5. Fac full 18, part-time 14. 

Grad '57 78. Entd Sr Col '5743. (Northwestern 2, U of Mich 
2, Wheaton 2, Sarah Lawrence 2). Alumnae 3600. 

Tui Bdg $2250, Day $1050. Scholarships partial 18 ($13,700). 
Est 1911. Inc 1938 nonprofit. 

Pine Manor, a division of Dana Hall Schools, provides a liberal 
arts program for both transfer and terminal ^ work. There are un- 
usual opportunities for students whose main interests lie in music, 
art, drama, dance, riding, or in the teaching of children. There are 
two French houses, a French dining room, and a Spanish dining 
room. Enrollment represents nearly every state and many foreign 
countries. Mr. Ferry took office in 1956. See page 850 

TENACRE COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 
Coed Ages 4-11 

Wellesley 81, Mass. Benvenue St. Tel. CEdar 5-2282. 
Phyllis G. Scoboria, B.A., Wellesley, Head. 

Nursery Grades I-VI. French Art Music Riding. 

Enr Boys 70, Girls 100. Fac full 12, part-time 6. 

Tui $300-700. Scholarships full 8, partial 11. Est 1910. Inc 1938 
nonprofit. 

This is the elementary division of the Dana Hall Schools. Co- 
educational since 1942, and reorganized as a day school in 1952, 
Tenacre, with its own plant and country campus offers courses 
from nursery through grade six. Most girls graduating from 
Tenacre continue into Dana Hall Junior School while the boys go 
on to leading elementary schools. See also page 752 



WEST BRIDGEWATER, MASS. Pop 1379. Alt 92 ft 20 mi. S 
of Boston, Rt28. This little village adjoins the shoe town of 
Brockton, 2 miles from Bridgewater State Teachers College. 

HOWARD SEMINARY 
Bdg Girls Ages 12-19 

West Bridgewater, Mass. Tel. Brockton 6690. 

Vida S. dough, A.B., Bates, M.Ed., Boston Univ, Dir. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep. Art Music 
Commercial, Developmental Reading. 

Enr Bdg 90, Day 3. Fac full 12, part-time 5. Adm Staff 3. 

Grad '5724. Entd Col '5723. (Goucher 2, Brandeis 1, George- 
town 1, St. Lawrence 1, Bates 1, Wheaton 1). 

Tui Bdg $1900 (+$150), Day $600 (+$35). Scholarships. Est 
1875. Inc 1868. 

Dorm rms 55. Class rms 13. Lib 4000 vols. Labs 2. Studios, 
music 3, art 1, Gym. Swimming pool Riding facilities. 



Mass. New England 99 

This school was founded and endowed in fulfillment of Ben- 
jamin B. Howard's bequest for the establishment of a "seminary 
of learning." Opened in 1883 under Dr. Helen Magil, the school 
has been ably administered by a succession of well known New 
England educators. 

Mrs. Clough, for two years dean of the school, was appointed 
director following the retirement of Charles C. Johnson in 1951. 
The preparatory curriculum, supplemented by art, music, and other 
electives, sends graduates to a variety of colleges. Among the 
extra-curricular activities are dramatics, hobby clubs, and a 
series of field trips and class excursions to Boston. See also 
pages 754-55 



WESTON, MASS. Pop 5026. Alt 161 ft. B&M R.R. 12 mi. W of 
Boston, Rt. U.S.20. Pre-Revolutionary houses and beautiful estates 
make this historic old town one of Boston's most attractive sub- 
urbs. The stone church in the square has a bell cast by Paul 
Revere. Branches of Boston College and Regis College for women 
are here. In the Kendal Green district is the secluded estate of 
Cambridge School. Meadowbrook School is not far from the 
center. 



THE CAMBRIDGE SCHOOL OF WESTON 
Bdg Coed Ages 14-19; Co Day Coed 12-19 

Weston 93, Mass. Georgian Rd. Tel TW 3-3700. 

M. Adolphus Cheek, Jr., A.B., M.A., Harvard, Head. 

Grades VII- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Music Art Mathe- 
matics. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg Boys 40, Girls 40; Day Boys 60, Girls 70. Fac full 21, 
part-time 7, 

Grad '5635. Entd Col '5634 (Harvard 4, Swarthmore 2, Smith 
2). Alumni 800. 

Tui Bdg $2100, Day $900. Scholarships full 2, partial 20 ($19,- 
000). Est 1886. Inc 1909 nonprofit. 

Plant $568,685. Dorm rms 51. Class rms 14, Labs 2. Studios 
music 1, art 3. Gym. Fields 3. Courts 2. Skiing facilities. 

This school had its beginnings in one established by Arthur 
Oilman in Cambridge to prepare for Radcliffe College, which was 
long the foremost school for families of Old Cambridge. In 1918 
Mary E. Haskell became principal and for some years the school 
bore her name. John R. P. French came to the school in 1930 from 
Derby Academy which he had successfully reorganized. He made 
the school coeducational, continuing efficient college preparation 
and providing generously for the development of individual gifts 
in the rich curriculum. Charles Platt, Jr., formerly head master of 



Leading Private Schools 100 

Chestnut Hill Academy in Philadelphia, was appointed on Mr. 
French's retirement in 1948. 

Mr. Cheek, formerly of the Park School, Buffalo, and earlier at 
Rivers School and Phillips Exeter was appointed in 1951. Gradu- 
ates of the sound college preparatory curriculum enter many col- 
leges, including Colby, Harvard, Radcliffe, Sarah Lawrence, Smith, 
Connecticut College. There are many hobby and interest clubs as 
well as athletics, and publications. The residence department per- 
mits either five-day or full-week boarding arrangements. 

MEADOWBROOK SCHOOL OF WESTON 
Day Coed Ages 4-12 

Weston 93, Mass. Farm Rd. Tel TW 4-3136. 

Esther P. Edwards, A.B., Wellesley, A.M., Boston Univ, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VL Art Music French. 
Remedial Reading. " 

Enr Boys 80, Girls 65. Fac full 16, part-time 4. 

Grad '5716. Entd Prep Sch '578. (Cambridge Sch Weston 2, 
Winsor 1, Concord 1, Beaver 1, Mary C. Wheeler 1, Browne & 
Nichols 1). Alumni 432. 

Tui $265-625. Scholarships full 4, partial 12 (15% of tuition). 
Est 1923. Inc 1923 nonprofit 

Summer Day Camp. Tui $160. 

Begun as a community school under Alma Gray and carried on 
for many years by Beatrice I. Cervi, Meadowbrook now also serves 
children of several surrounding communities. There is considerable 
opportunity for individual creative work in the carefully co- 
ordinated curriculum. 

WILBRAHAM, MASS. Pop 4003. Alt 119 ft. 10 mi. E of Spring- 
field, off Rt U.S.20. This small village runs along the foot of the 
Wilbraham Mts. which rise sharply to a height of 900 feet. The 
300 acre campus of the Academy is in the center of this attractive 
farming community, noted for its peaches and apples. 

WILBRAHAM ACADEMY 
Bdg and Co Day Boys Ages 11*19 

Wilbraham, Mass. Tel LYric 6-3852. 
W. Gray Mattem, Jr., A.B., Yale, Head. 

Grades VII- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. French Spanish 
Mechanical Drawing. Music Art. 

Enr Bdg 170, Day 50. Fac full 24, part-time 2. Adm Staff 6. 

Grad '57 40. Entd Col '5740. (U of Mass. 2, U of Vt 2, Syra- 
cuse 2, Mich St 2, Harvard 1, Dartmouth 1). 

tui Bdg $1900 (+$250), Day $700-900 (+$50). Scholarships 
full 4, partial 24 ($15,000). Est 1817. Inc 1826. 



Mass. New England 101 

Summer Session. Enr 50. Tui Bdg $500, Day $150 per course. 

Plant $1,245,000. Endowment $635,000. Dorm rms 95. Class rms 
19. Lib 6200 vols. Labs 3. Studio art 1. Gyms 2. Fields 11. Courts 
7. 

This was a coeducational Methodist school, and since 1912 only 
boys have been enrolled, Under Mr. Mattern, former head master 
of the Irving School, who succeeded Charles L. Stevens in 1955, 
a thorough-going revision of the college preparatory -curriculum 
has been undertaken with flexibility and opportunities for cur- 
ricular adjustment to the individual needs of each boy. Graduates 
enter many colleges and universities throughout the country. A 
variety of team and other sports, music, publications, and student 
government are among the extracurricular activities. See also page 
650 

WILLIAMSTOWN, MASS. Pop 5015. Alt 604 ft B&M R.R. 6 
mi. W of North Adams, Rt.2. Site of an early fort to guard against 
Indian pillaging from Canada, this handsome residential town on 
the Hoosic River is dominated by the pleasing creamy-gray stone 
and brick buildings of Williams College. Charming vistas of moun- 
tain and stream are seen from the main street as it winds over 
knolls between stately elms. On the outskirts, on the side of Stone 
Hill, the Buxton School was opened in 1947. 



BUXTON SCHOOL 
Bdg Coed Ages 14-18 

Williamstown, Mass. South St Tel. 110. 

Ellen Geer Sangster; Benjamin G. C. Fincke, B.S., Harvard, Co- 

dirs. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Languages Art Music 
Contemporary Civilization Science Drama Mathematics Crea- 
tive Writing. Manual Arts Remedial "Reading Make-up courses. 

Enr Boys 25, Girls 25. Fac full 9, part-time 5. Adm "Staff 2. 

Grad '5710. Entd Col '579. (Bard 2, Bennington 1, Goddard 
1, Stephens 1, St. Michael's 1, St. Lawrence 1). Alumni 197. 

Tui $2000 (+$300). Scholarships. Est 1947. Inc 1950 nonprofit. 

Plant $140,000. Dorm rms 22. Class rms 5. Lib 3000 vols. Lab. 
Studios music 1, art 1. Fields 4. Outdoor swimming pool. Riding 

An outgrowth of the Buxton Country Day School established in 
NJ. in 1928 by Mrs. Sangster, this was opened in Williamstown 
in 1947 on the estate she inherited from her father. 

The unusually broad courses enable students to make outstand- 
ing records at Reed, Radcliffe, Bennington, Williams, Goddard, 
and other colleges. Programs are planned for individual needs, and 
there is opportunity for extra and advanced study, as well as for 



Mass. 



Leading Private Schools 102 



much work in creative arts. Community government, work proj- 
ects, and a variety of other extra-curricular activities supplement 
the academic program. A new building, containing classrooms 
and a faculty apartment, was recently constructed by the students 
under the guidance of the shop teacher. See page 802 



PINE COBBLE SCHOOL 
Doy Coed Ages 3y 2 15 
WilHamstown, Mass. Main St. Tel. 208. 
Dwight R. Little, Jr., A.B., Williams, M.A., Harvard, Dir. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-IX. Art Music French 
Latin. 

Enr Boys 85, Girls 75. Fac full 18, part-time 12. 
Grad '5710. Entd Prep Sch '57 7. (Northfield 2, Emma Wil- 
lard 1, Kent 1, Putney 1, Gov Dummer 1, Holderness 1). 
Tui $225-575. Scholarships. Est 1937. Inc 1941 nonprofit 
Founded in 1937 by Mr. and Mrs. Edgar W. Flinton, with the 
cooperation of a group of parents, and directed by Mr. Little, 
formerly a teacher at Eaglebrook and at Bement, Pine Cobble 
emphasizes basic academic subjects and also offers a rich program 
of art, music, dramatics, and sports. 



WINCHESTER, MASS. Pop 15,509. Alt 22 ft B&M R.R. 8 mi. 
NW of Boston, Rt.38. Winchester occupies perhaps the most beau- 
tiful natural situation of Boston's suburbs. 

MARYCLIFF ACADEMY 
P0y Boys Ages 5-8, Girls 5-18 

Winchester, Mass. 15 High St. Tel. WI 6-1196. 

Mother Lucienne Jannin, A.B., A.M., Fordham, Superior. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep 
General Secretarial. Art Music. 

Enr Girls 325, Boys 10. Elem 195, Sec 135. Fac full 17, part-time 
4. 

Grad '5728. Entd Col '5727. (Salve Regina 3, Boston Col 2, 
Regis 2, Jackson 2, Mt St. Mary 2). Alumnae 438. 

Tui $280-330. Scholarships full 10, partial 5. Est 1913. Roman 
Catholic. 

Protestant as well as Catholic girls are enrolled in this school 
conducted by the Religious of Christian Education. In 1950 the 
Academy moved from Arlington to Winchester. 



For further information, write Porter Sargent 



Mass. New England 103 

WORCESTER, MASS. Pop 203,486. Alt 482 ft. B&M; NYC; 
NY,NH&H R.R. 40 mi. W of Boston, Rt.9. Second city of Massa- 
chusetts, third in population in New England, Worcester through 
its wealthy industrialists early developed some civic consciousness, 
a civic center and an annual music festival. The Art Museum, with 
its own outstanding collection of recent American artists, fre- 
quently features fine loan exhibits. John Woodman Higgins in his 
stainless steel and glass factory has installed a collection of arms 
and armor, illustrating the development and use of metals from 
earliest times to the present. Clark University, Holy Cross Col- 
lege, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, the Worcester Boys Trade 
School and the State Teachers College are among the educational 
institutions. In the eastern portion not far from the center of the 
city the Worcester Academy buildings crown a hilltop. Bancroft 
School is in the west side section. The Shepherd Knapp School is 
northeast of the city, off Route 70. 

ASSUMPTION PREPARATORY SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 12-19 

Worcester 6, Mass. 670 W, Boylston St. Tel. PL 4-3276. 
Oliver R. Blanchette, B.A., Assumption, S.T.L., Laval, Head. 

High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep. Latin Greek Mathematics 
French History. 

Enr Bdg 205, Day 130. Fac full 23, part-time 10. 

Grad '57 62. Entd Col '5757. (Assumption Col 23, Worcester 
Tech 5, Boston Col 3, Holy Cross 3, Notre Dame 2, St. Louis U 
2). Alumni 1500. 

Tui Bdg $950-1075 (+$50-100), Day $350. Scholarships partial 
65. Est 1904. Roman Catholic. 

This high school department of Assumption College is a separate 
unit, with its own campus, faculty, program, and activities. The 
curriculum is entirely college preparatory. 



THE BANCROFT SCHOOL 
Co Day Boys Ages 4-14, Girls 4-18 

Worcester 2, Mass. 61 Sever St. Tel. PL 3-1313. 

Henry D. Tiffany, Jr., B.A., Univ of N.H., M.B.A. Boston Univ, 

Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. 
Col Prep. Art Music History Latin. Dramatics Manual Arts. 

Enr Girls 210, Boys 100. Elem 210, Sec 100. Fac full 24, part- 
time 1. 

Grad '57 -18. Entd Col '5718. (Smith 3, Centenary 3, Vassar 



Leading Private Schools 104 

2, Skidmore 2, Simmons 1, U of N.H. 1). Alumni 1400. 

Tui $300-800. Scholarships full 5, partial 107 ($20,690). Est 1900. 
Inc 1902 nonprofit. 

Plant $1,250,000. Class rms 18. Lib 5000 vols. Labs 3* Studio 
music 1, art 1. Gym. Fields 7. 

Long known for the solid college preparation offered daughters 
of Worcester's leading citizens, Bancroft is today coeducational 
in the elementary school. Mr. Tiffany returned as head master in 
1946 after two years in the Navy. 

Since 1926 the school has followed a country day program. The 
curriculum from third grade through high school follows a history 
sequence with other subjects studied in relation to it. Girls gradu- 
ating from the twelfth grade enter Smith, Vassar, Wellesley, 
Radcliffe, Skidmore, Wheaton, and other colleges. 



SHEPHERD KNAPP SCHOOL 
Co Day Coed Ages 6-16 

Boylston, Mass. Main St. Tel. Underbill 9-274L 
Neil W. Halkyard, A.B., Union, M.A., Clark, Head. 

Grades I- VIII High Sch 1. Music French Latin Sciences. 
Remedial Reading. 

Enr Boys 45, Girls 35. Fac full 10, part-time 1. 

Grad '57 14. Entd Prep Sch '57 14. (Rogers Hall 2, MacDuffie 
2, Worcester Acad 2, Abbot 1, Hebron 1, Mi Hermon 1). Alum- 
ni 21. 

Tui $700. Scholarships. Est 1953. Inc 1953 nonprofit 

Plant $300,000. Class rms 10. Lib 1800 vols. Lab. Studio. 

Emphasizing academic fundamentals in an integrated curriculum, 
this country day school provides a permissive atmosphere in which 
creative activities play a prominent role. There is considerable 
work in French and Latin, the former from grade 1 on. 



WORCESTER ACADEMY 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 13-19 

Worcester 4, Mass. 81 Providence St. Tel. PL 2-2876. 

William S, Piper, Jr., B.A., Bowdoin, M.A., Western Reserve, 

Head; Clifford J. Littlefield, B.S., Colby, Dean. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Science Mathematics 
Industrial Arts Mechanical Drawing. Remedial Reading. Music 
Dramatics. 

Enr Bdg 195, Day 130. Fac full 24, part-time 3. 

Grad '57116. Entd Col '57109. Alumni 4420. 
Tui Bdg $1975 (+$150), Day $875. Scholarships partial 40 ($15,- 
000). Est 1834. Inc nonprofit. 



Mass. New England 105 

Summer Session. Make-up courses. Tutoring. Tui Day $100 per 
course. 

Plant $2,200,000. Endowment $155,000. Dorm rms 105. Class rms 
12. Lib 8100 vols. Labs 4. Studio music 1. Shop. Theatre. Gym. 
Swimming pool. Fields 5. Courts 6. 

First organized in 1834 as the Worcester County Manual Labor 
High School by a group of the leading men of Worcester, the 
school was re-named in 1844. Under the direction of Dr. D. W. 
Abercrombie for thirty-six years from 1882 it was reorganized as 
a boys' school with buildings and equipment elaborate for the 
times, and gained a national reputation, which it has continued 
to maintain. In 1932 the Lewis J. Warner Memorial Theatre was 
given to the Academy by Harry Warner, father of Lewis. Dr. 
LeRoy Archer Campbell, professor of classics in Hiram College, 
became head master in 1942. 

Mr. Piper, formerly head master of Ashley Hall in South Caro- 
lina, succeeded in 1954 Paul K. Phillips, who had been appointed 
in 1950. The successful four year college preparatory pro- 
gram, with strong foundation work in science and math, sends 
many graduates to Worcester Polytechnic and Harvard, with 
others going to Brown, Boston U, Clark, Dartmouth, and 
others. Special attention is given to student guidance and college 
placement by faculty members especially qualified to do this work. 
The extra-curricular program emphasizes athletics, and there are 
also various clubs, dramatics, music, and school publications. See 
also pages 651 



For explanation of data and statistics included for each school, con- 
sult the Explanatory Note at the beginning of the Descriptive Text 
and the Introduction, 

If you do not find the right school for your child, write, stating 
particulars, to Porter Sargent, 11 Beacon St., Boston 8, Mass. 

For further schook in any area, refer to the Supplementary Lists. 

For Summer Camps and Summer Schools, see the Schools Classified 
By Type and the Camp Directory. 

For Junior College and Specialized School information, consult the 
Sargent Guide to Private Junior Colleges and Specialized Schools. 

If you do not find the school you seek, look to the Index. 
When writing schools, please mention this Handbook 



RHODE ISLAND 

EAST GREENWICH, R.I. Pop 3500. Alt 31 ft. NY,NH&H R.R. 
11 mi. S of Providence, Rt U.S.I. A pleasant old town with quiet, 
shaded streets, E. Greenwich is on Narragansett Bay. Rocky Hill 
School is 2 mi. E of the town. 

ROCKY HILL COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 
Bdg Coed Ages 6-14; Day Coed 3-14 
East Greenwich, R.I. Ives Rd. Tel. TU 4-9070. 
Nathan Hale, Ph.B., Union, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Transition Grades I- VIII High Sch 1. 
Art Music French Latin. 

Enr Bdg Boys 15, Girls 5; Day Boys 115, Girls 80. Fac full 22, 
part-time 5. 

Tui Bdg $1420-1580, Day $286-555 (+$25). Scholarships partial 
3. Est 1933. Inc 1937 nonprofit 

Summer Camp. Tutoring. Tui Bdg $60 wk, Day $3-6 per day. 

Plant $124,000. Dorm rms 7. Class rms 24. Lib 1000 vols. Stu- 
dios, music 3, art 2. Gyms. Outdoor swimming pool. Fields 2. 

This school is located on an estate of eleven buildings and 
130 acres bordering Narragansett Bay, with waterfront and sailing 
facilities. Four distinct but coordinate schools, each with its own 
director and staff, buildings, and playground, are maintained. Mr. 
Hale, after experience at Riverdale and Buckley schools, and 
some years of residence in London and Paris, took over from 
Mrs. Robert Marshall in 1940. Much is made of outdoor activities 
as well as art, crafts, and dramatics. 



NEWPORT, R.L Pop 37,564. Alt 6 ft. NY,NH&H R.R. 25 mi. 
SE of Providence, on Rtl38. This summer social capital of the 
nineteenth century retains its fame as one of the wealthiest sum- 
mer resorts with luxurious homes. Here is the oldest Jewish Syna- 
gogue in the country, built in 1760, and the Old Stone Mill, ac- 
claimed by some as a Norse relic. St. Michael's School is on 
Rhode Island Ave. Three mi. E in Middletown, on Sachuest Neck 
facing the sea, is St. George's. In Portsmouth, on the W shore, 
are the Priory and its School. Burnham-by-the-Sea and Hatch 
Preparatory School are near the end of Bellevue Avenue adjacent 
to Ochre Point 

106 



R. I New England 107 

BURNHAM-BY-THE-SEA 
Bdg Girls Ages 14-20 

Newport, R. L Ruggles Ave. Tel. 2009. 

Mrs. George Waldo Emerson, A.B., Smith, Prin; Mrs. Macdonald 

Peters, A.B., Smith, Assoc Prin. 

High Sch 1-4. Academic. Music Art Sculpturing Secretarial. 
Speech and Dramatics. Rem Reading. 

Enr 75. Fac full 12, part-time 2. 

Tui $735 (+$50-100). Est 1950. 

This seven-week summer session of the Burnham School af- 
fords girls of high school age the opportunity to review or to 
earn credits in any regular academic subjects and to profit from 
studying in an intellectually and culturally stimulating environ- 
ment. Art and music are emphasized, along with outdoor sports, 
especially swimming. 

The teaching staff is drawn from the faculty of the regular ses- 
sion of The Mary A. Burnham School in Northampton, Mass., 
supplemented by instructors selected from other schools. In a 
healthful climate, ideal recreational facilities, cultural activities, 
and social contacts are under responsible arrangement and super- 
vision. Activities include dances with .guests from the Officers' 
Candidate School of the Navy, and attendance at music festivals, 
tennis tournaments, and summer theatre. See also page 756 



HATCH PREPARATORY SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 13-19 

Newport, R .1. Tel Viking 7-4032. 

Lloyd Harvey Hatch, B.S., Bowdoin, Head. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. 

Enr 60. Fac 151- 

Tui variable. Est 1926. Inc nonprofit 

This unique institution which has so strong an appeal to head 
masters has created for itself a definite place in the modern educa- 
tional system. Tutorial in function, giving boys virtually individual 
instruction, it avoids the cramming of the regulation tutoring 
school. In addition to the usual secondary school program, nu- 
merous special courses are available. From its inception the 
school has afforded boys the opportunity to save a year in quali- 
fying for college. 

With adaptability and foresight, Mr. Hatch, a man of inexhaust- 
ible energy, former member of the faculties of Bowdoin and 
Cornell, devotes himself zealously to his school and his boys. 
Graduates are successful at many colleges. See pages 654-56 



H, I. Leading Private Schools 108 

PORTSMOUTH PRIORY SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 12-18 
Portsmouth, R.L Tel. 58. 

Very Rev. Dom Aelred Graham, O.S.B., S.T.L., Prior of Com- 
munity; Rev. Dom Leo van Winkle, D.Eng., Acting Head Master 
of School; Cecil J. Acheson, M.A., Oxford, Associate Head. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Mathematics English 
Languages Mech Drawing. Art Music. 

Enr Bdg 180, Day 10. Fac full 33, part-time 1. Adm Staff 7. 

Grad '5735. Entd Col '5735. Alumni 519. 

Tui Bdg $2000, Day $600. Scholarships 10. Est 1926. Roman 
Catholic. 

Summer Session. Tui $450. 

Plant $500,000. Endowment $30,000. Dorm rms 113. Class rms 
15. Lib 7000 vols. Labs 2. Studios music 1, art 1. Printing shop, 
Work Shop. Gym. Fields 7. Courts 8. Boating facilities. 

Now an independent priory of the English Benedictine Congre- 
gation, this school founded as the School of St. Gregory the 
Great, has attained rank among the foremost New England pre- 
paratory schools. Both priory and school are American in per- 
sonnel. 

Father Diman, prior of the Community until 1940, was founder 
and long head master of the neighboring St. George's. To his 
administrative genius, his keen and flexible mind, and serenity, 
the school owes much. In 1951, the Very Rev. Graham became 
Prior. Father E. Gregory Borgstedt headed the school from 1942 
to 1951, and Father Aelred Wall until 1957 when Father van 
Winkle was appointed acting headmaster, 

Portsmouth Priory trains boys from discriminating Catholic 
families for college and for life. The curriculum, with its emphasis 
on English, mathematics, languages, and Christian doctrine, pre- 
pares for Georgetown, Princeton, Harvard, U of Pa., and other 
leading colleges. Among activities are a full complement of sports, 
several publications, music, dramatics, and clubs. See page 652 



ST. GEORGE'S SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 12-19 

Newport, R.I. Purgatory Rd. Tel. Viking 7-0043. 

Rev, William Ackerman Buell, M.A., Princeton, Head. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Latin Sciences 
History. Remedial Reading. Music. 

Enr Bdg 180, Day 10. Fac full-time 27. 

Grad '5729. Entd Col '5729. (U of Pa. 6, Harvard 4, Yale 
3, Columbia 1, Princeton 1). Alumni 1500. 



R. /. New England 109 

Tui Bdg $2000 (+$120), Day $750. Scholarships partial 28 ($26,- 
000). Est 1896. Episcopal. 

Summer Session. Make-up Courses Remedial English. Tui $600. 

Plant $2,400,000, Endowment $600,000. Dorm rms 150. Class rms 
15. Lib 12,000 vols. Labs 3. Studios music 2, art 1. Gym. Swim- 
ming pool. Fields 12. Courts 8. Artificial Rink. Shop 1. 

St. George's was founded by the Rev. John B. Diman, who 
later established Portsmouth Priory. Under the able administra- 
tion of Stephen P. Cabot, a master in the school from 1901 and 
head master from 1917 to 1926, the school attained high academic 
standing and fame for its superb architecture. Dr. Willet L. Eccles, 
succeeding J. Vaughan Merrick in 1943 after service at Columbia 
and Andover where reforms and administrative improvements re- 
flected his scientific training, effected at St. George's improved 
standards and business methods. Mr. Buell, alumnus and former 
faculty member, became the first clergyman to head the school 
since the founder. 

Emphasizing English and inter-relating the various courses, 
St. George's successfully prepares not only for Yale but also for 
Brown, Princeton, the University of Pa., Harvard, Cornell, and 
others. Extra-curricular activities stress service groups, organiza- 
tion committees, clubs, athletics, and publications. See page 652 



ST. MICHAEL'S COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 

Coed- Ages 3y 2 -14 

Newport, R.I. Rhode Island Ave. Tel. 1068. 
William A. Glynn, A.B., Harvard, M.A., Tufts, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VI II. French Latin. 

Enr 170. Fac full 11, part-time 5. 

Grad '5714. Entd Prep Sch '57 13. (Rogers Hall 4, St. 
George's 2, Kent 1, others 6). 

Tui $225-400. Scholarships full 10, partial 30 ($5500). Est 1938. 
Episcopal. 

Summer Session. 

Opened under the sponsorship of the Diocese of R.I. by Chaun- 
cey H. Beasley, in 1946 St. Michael's absorbed the neighboring 
school conducted by Mrs. Dwight Mowery. Enrollment is pre - 
dominantly from Navy families, and much of the teaching is 
oriented to the problems of service children. Mr. Glynn suc- 
ceeded John Hall Snow in 1955. 



PROVIDENCE, R.I. Pop 248,674. Alt 12 ft. NY,NH&H R.R. 40 
mi SW of Boston, Rt U.S.L The city of Roger Williams, founded 
in 1636, is today capital of the state and second in population in 



rt. /. Leading Private Schools 110 

New England. A number of important colleges are located 
here, including the Rhode Island School of Design, and the city 
has several good libraries. The private preparatory schools for 
boys and for girls center about the Art Museum and Brown Uni- 
versity on College Hill, high above the city. 

THE GORDON SCHOOL 
Day -Coed Ages 3-12 

Providence 6, R.I, 405 Angell St. Tel. PL 1-4888. 
Frederic W. Locke, B.A., Yale Ed.M,, Harvard, Dir. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VI. Art Music. Shop. 

Enr Boys 100, Girls 70. Fac full 13, part-time 3. 

Grad '5712. Entd Prep Sch '57 Providence Co Day 3, Henry 
Barnard 3, St. Dunstan's 2. 

Tui $250-550. Scholarships full 1, partial 5. Est 1910. Inc non- 
profit. 

Begun by Dr. Helen W. Cooke as a school for her own children, 
and in 1947 acquiring its own buildings and ground, Gordon is 
now a cooperative enterprise managed by the parents. From nur- 
sery school through the sixth grade the program is centered about 
the natural interests and needs of the children, with emphasis on 
art and music. There have been recent improvements and addi- 
tions to the library and gymnasium. 

In 1956 Mr. Locke succeeded Florence Robinson. 

LINCOLN SCHOOL 
Bdg Girls Ages 13-18; Day Boys 3-5, Girls 3-18 

Providence 6, R.I. 301 Butler Ave. Tel PL 1-6464. 
Marion S. Cole, Ph.B., A.M., Ed.D., Brown, Head. 

Nursery 1-2 Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4 Post 
Grad 1* Col Prep. Art Music Typing Modern Dance. 

Enr Bdg 35; Day Girls 340, Boys 35. Elem 240, Sec 170. Fac full 
42, part-time 2. 

Grad '5740. Entd Col '5739. (Pembroke 4, Bryn Mawr 3, 
Lake Erie 2, Mt. Holyoke 1, Radcliffe 1, Vassar 1). Alumnae 1950. 

Tui Bdg $1800 (+$100), Day $225-725 (+$75). Scholarships. 
Est 1884. Friends. 

Plant $700,000. Endowment $160,000. Dorm rms 18. Class rms 
32. Lib 10,000 vols. Lab. Studios music 2, art 2. Gyms 2. Fields 3. 
Courts 4. 

This sound school, long a favorite with patrons from Rhode 
Island who avail of the day facilities, has through the years main- 
tained standards that have attracted boarding students from a 
wide area. Absorbing the girls department of neighboring Moses 
Brown School in 1925, it has since been associated with the New 
England Yearly Meeting of Friends and since 1940 directed by 
Miss Cole, long director of the English department under Frances 



R. /. New England 111 

E, Wheeler. Miss Cole has developed and modernized the plant 
while retaining the characteristic simplicity and breadth of its 
program and work in the arts in a primarily college preparatory 
program. 

Graduates of the college preparatory curriculum enter not only 
Pembroke, but also Mt. Holyoke, Smith, Wellesley, Connecticut 
College, Vassar, and others. Extra-curricular activities include 
student government, community service, European service, music, 
publications, dramatics, and athletics. See also page 757 

THE MARY C. WHEELER SCHOOL 
Bdg Girls Ages 9-18; Day Girls 4-18 

Providence, R.I. 216 Hope St. Tel. GA 1-4072. 

S. Rowland Morgan, Jr., A.B., Williams, A.M., Univ of Pa., Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep 
General. Art Music Drama Physiology Child Psychology. 
Remedial Reading. Dance. 

Enr Bdg 85, Day 220. Elem 150, Sec 155". Fac full 32, part-time 6. 

Grad '57 31. Entd Col '5729. (Wellesley 4, Bryn Mawr 2, 
Bennington 2, Sarah Lawrence 2, Skidmore 2, Northwestern 2). 
Alumnae 1730. 

Tui Bdg $2000 (+$250), Day $250-675 (+$60). Scholarships. 

Plant $730,000. Dorms 4. Class rms 24. Lib 8000 vols. Labs 2. 
Studios music 5, art 3. Gym. Fields 4. Courts 9. 

Always what has been intelligently called "progressive" through- 
out its more than sixty years, this school bears the name of its 
founder, a leader in art and education in her day. Mary Helena 
Dey, head mistress from Miss Wheeler's death in 1920, surrounded 
herself with able assistants, one of whom, Miss Van Norman, 
succeeded on her retirement in 1941. 

Mr. Morgan, formerly teacher of English at Kent and at Epis- 
copal Academy, was the first man to be appointed to the head- 
ship. He continues the efficient college preparation enriched by 
courses in music, art, dramatics, and the dance. Graduates enter 
many colleges, among them Smith, RadclirTe, Bryn Mawr, Vas- 
sar, Wellesley, Pembroke. At Columbine Hill, the school farm, 
are the sports fields, pageant grounds, a recreation cottage, and 
the residence for the stibpreparatory girls. See also page 757 

MOSES BROWN SCHOOL 
Bdg- Boys Ages 13-19; Day- Boys 5-19 

Providence 6, R.1. 257 Hope St. Tel. TEmple 1-7350. 
Robert N. Cunningham, A.B., B.Litt, M.A., Acting Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. 
Drawing Manual Arts Music. Arts an$ Crafts. 

Enr Bdg 70, Day 350. Elem 195, Sec 225. Fac full 35, part-time 6. 



R. I Leading Private Schools 112 

Grad '5737. Entd Col '5737. (Brown 9, Harvard 6, Cornell 
3, Dartmouth 3, Haverford 3). Alumni 2200. 

Tui Bdg $1800, (+$125), Day $300-725. Scholarships partial 56 
($20,000). Self-help pgrm. Est 1784. Friends. 

Labs 2. Studios music 1, art 1. Shop. Gyms 2. Swimming pool. 
Fields 6. Courts 11. 

Opened as Friends School in Portsmouth, this institution was 
re-established in Providence in 1819 through the energy and gen- 
erosity of Moses Brown, who also helped establish Brown Univer- 
sity. It was further endowed by his son, Obadiah, and the present 
name adopted in 1904. The school remained coeducational until 
1926, when the Moses Brown School Committee assumed charge 
of the Lincoln School and the girls department was transferred 
there. 

Upon the retirement in 1955 of L. Ralston Thomas, who since 
1925 brought the school distinction through liberal ideals and 
sound standards, Mr. George C. St. John, Jr. was appointed, and 
in 1957 Robert N. Cunningham assumed the acting headship. 

While continuing to conform in some ways to the strictness of 
its tradition in preparing for college, the school offers a consider* 
able variety of elective courses. Graduates enter many institutions 
of higher learning, including Brown, Harvard, Amherst, the Uni- 
versity of R.I., and Bowdoin. 

The school has upper and lower divisions, the former with its 
own residence department. There are many extra-curricular pro- 
grams, among them camera, press, science and chess clubs, dramat- 
ics, music, school publications, and numerous sports. See page 653 



PROVIDENCE COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 
Boys Ages 12-19 

E. Providence, R,L 2117 Pawtucket Ave. Tel. GEneva 8-5170. 
Edward G. Lund, B.S., Ed.M., Harvard, Head. 
Grades VI- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Remedial work. 
Enr 165. Fac full 13, part-time 4. 

Grad '5727. Entd Col '5726. (Brown 10, U of R.I. 5, U of 
Me 2, U of Miami 2, Annapolis 1, Amherst 1). Alumni 1000. 

Tui $600-725. Scholarships full 1, partial 20 ($5400). Est 1923. 
Inc 1923 nonprofit. 

Plant $350,000. Class rms 12. Lib 3000 vols. Lab. Studios music 
1, art 1. Gym. 

A group of parents who felt the need of a college preparatory 
school of a type not available in the city organized this school 
under Charles H. Breed. Mr. Lund, who came in 1934 from the 
North Shore Country Day School, Winnetka, has raised standards 
and increased enrollment A good many graduates attend Brown 



R. I. New England 113 

with others going to a number of different colleges, mostly in 
New England. 

ST. DUNSTAN'S SCHOOL 
Day Boys Ages 5-15 

Providence 6, R.I. 170 Hope St. Tel PL 1-1010. 
Gordon D. Davis, A.B., Yale, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1. Music Latin. 

Enr 170. Fac full 14, part-time 2. 

Grad '5715, Entd Prep Sch '57 Providence Co Day 2, Mt. 
Hermon 1, Avon 1, Tilton 1, Harvard Sch 1, Moses Brown 1).. 

Tui $275-600. Scholarships $10,000). Est 1929. Episcopal af- 
filiated. 

Founded by John Nicholas Brown as St. Dunstan's College of 
Sacred Music, and moved to its spacious new quarters in 1953, 
this was directed until the following year by Roy W. Howard. 
The school is noted for its boys choir. 

SAUNDERSTOWN, R.I. Pop 450. Six miles north of Narra- 
gansett, Saunderstown is a small village on the Bay. 

GRIFFITH SCHOOL OF INDIVIDUAL INSTRUCTION 
Bdg and Day Coed Ages 8 and up 

Saunderstown, R.I. Tel. Wickford 2-0297. 

John R. Griffith, A.B., Princeton, M.S., Univ of R.I., Head. 

Tui Bdg $25 wk plus tutoring charges; Day $4-5 hr. Est 1936. 
Proprietary. 

Summer camp and session. Tui Bdg $35 wk, plus tutoring 
charges; Day $4-5 hr. 

Enrolling three or four students during the winter, and twenty 
in the summer, the school provides remedial instruction and tutor- 
ing for children with learning blocks or language problems, as 
well as those whose education has been interrupted. Instruction 
is provided in all regular academic subjects. Boarding facilities 
can be arranged for a limited number of pupils. 

WOONSOCKET, R.I. Pop 50,211. Alt 162 ft 13 mi. NW of 
Providence, Rt.122. Near the Mass, state line, this woolen and 
textile center on the Blackstone River is the seat of Hill College. 



MOUNT SAINT CHARLES ACADEMY 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 12-20 

Woonsocket, R.L Bernon Heights. Tel 2651. 
Brother Claver, Prin. 



R. I Leading Private Schools 114 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep (Classical, Scientific) 
Commercial General. Greek Public Speaking Mech Drawing. 

Enr Bdg 210, Day 360. Fac full 20, part-time 2. Adm Staff 4. 

Grad '55131. Entd Col '5533 (Providence 12, U of R.I. 8, 
Dean Jr Col 3, St. Louis U 2). 

Tui Bdg $800 (+$100), Day $100 (+$25). Scholarships full 4, 
partial 8 ($1200). Est 1924. Roman Catholic. 

Plant $1,100,000. Dorms 3, Class rms 22. Lib 10,000 vols. Labs 3. 
Studios music 1, art 1. Gym. Fields 7. Courts 3. 

Administered by the Brothers of the Sacred Heart, Mount Saint 
Charles is diocesan but not financed by the diocese. Emphasizing 
traditional subject matter, the high school offers two college prepa- 
ratory programs as well as general and commercial curricula. Most 
preparatory graduates enter Providence College or Our Lady of 
Providence Seminary, but others go on to the universities of R.L 
and Conn., Boston College, and Holy Cross. Extra-curricular ac- 
tivities stress sports, debate and public speaking, dramatics, and 



For explanation of data and statistics included for each school, 
consult the Explanatory Note at the beginning of the Descriptive Text 
and the Introduction. 

For further details concerning those schools in the Announcement 
Section, refer to page number mentioned. 

For classification of special schools and to meet individual needs, 
consult the Table of Contents. 

For Junior College and Specialized School information, consult the 
Sargent Guide to Private Junior Colleges and Specialized Schools. 

If you do not find the information you needy write Porter Sargent, 
11 Beacon Street, Boston 8, Mass. 



For further information, write Porter Sargent 



CONNECTICUT 

AVON, CONN. Pop 3171. Alt 201 ft. 8 mi. W of Hartford, Rt 
U.S. 44. The 1200 acres of farm and forest land long known as 
Old Farms are 5 mi. up the river from Farmington. Here have 
been erected 20 buildings, in the architectural style of a Cotswold 
Village, for an unusual school for boys. 



AVON OLD FARMS 
Bdg and Day -Boys Ages 12-19 

Avon, Conn. Tel. Farmington ORchard 3-3201. 

Donald W. Pierpont, A.B., Univ of Richmond, M.A., Columbia, 

Provost. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music Religion 
Ceramics Architectural Design Mathematics History Lan- 
guages. Remedial Reading Make-up courses. 

Enr Bdg 185, Day 20. Fac full-time 28. 

Grad '5746. Entd Col '5745. (Williams 3, Yale 2, U of Pa. 2, 
Princeton 1, Cornell 1). Alumni 1000. 

Tui Bdg $2300. Scholarships full 2, partial 18 ($30,000). Est 1927. 
Inc 1918 nonprofit. 

Plant $7,000,000. Dorm rms 200. Class rms 8. Labs 2. Studios 
music 1, art 1. Gym. Swimming pools 2. Fields 5. Courts 6. 

This preparatory school was founded by Theodate Pope, Mrs. 
John Wallace Riddle, to restore to boys' education some of the 
features of the old New England community and farm life. A 
talented architect, designer of Westover School, she devoted ten 
years of her life and most of her wealth to the architectural and 
landscape design of the school and its setting. The school opened 
with Francis M. Froelicher as Provost and closed under the Rev. 
W. Brooke Stabler on the outbreak of the war. It was re-opened 
in 1948 under Mr. Pierpont, who for twelve years prior to his 
naval service was at St. Paul's School, Baltimore. Immediately be- 
fore coming to Avon, he was on the faculty of Columbia Univ. He 
has been most successful in rebuilding the staff a counsellor or 
'school father' to each group of ten boys, assuring individual con- 
sideration and attention. Each boy chooses his own project and 
devotes some time to the work of the school community. The 
varied and extensive acreage provides opportunity for forestry, 
fishing, and hunting, and the boys participate as citizens in all 
operations of the community. 

115 



Conn. Leading Private Schools 116 

Graduates of the curriculum, which is now entirely college pre- 
paratory, enter many colleges and universities throughout the 
country. See also page 657 

BRIDGEPORT, CONN. Pop 158,709. Alt 15 ft. NY,NH&H R.R. 
15 mi. SW of New Haven, Rt U.S.I. This privateering port of 
Revolutionary days is today the state's leading manufacturing city 
and a busy port for coastwise traffic on L.I. Sound, Here, in 1933, 
Connecticut's first Socialist mayor and board of aldermen were 
elected. The University of Bridgeport, the Bridgeport Engineer- 
ing Institute, and the Barnurn Institute of Science and History, 
established by P.T. Barnum, are here. 



THE UNQUOWA SCHOOL 
Co Day- Coed Ages 5-15 

Bridgeport, Conn. 981 Stratfield Rd. Tel. EDison 6-3801. 
Conrad Hahn, B.A., Yale, M.A., Columbia, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch IL French Latin 
Dramatics. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Boys 70, Girls 60. Fac full 11, part-time 2. 

Grad '5713. Entd Prep Sch '57 Fairfield Prep 2, Canterbury 
1, Emerson 1, Kent 1, Bolton 1, Foxhollow 1. Alumni 600. 

Tui $400-1000. Scholarships partial 10 ($2500). Est 1917. Inc 
1917 nonprofit. 

Plant $140,000. Class rms 11. Lib 3000 vols. Gym. 

Under the leadership of Carl Churchill for 20 years, and Fred- 
erick B. Wierk for twelve, this is a well equipped, cooperatively 
owned country day school, modern in method. Mr. Hahn, formerly 
head master of Suffield Academy, was appointed in 1952. Activities 
include a quarterly magazine, dramatics, music, manual arts, and 
sports. 

The intermediate grades are organized as a Middle School with 
aptitude and achievement grouping permitting acceleration for 
gifted students, There is also a special remedial reading depart- 
ment. 



CHESHIRE, CONN. Pop 1826. Alt 161 ft. 13 mi. N of New 
Haven, Rt. 10. This attractive town has many fine old houses, 
some of which are the property of the school. 

CHESHIRE ACADEMY 
Belg and Day Boys Ages 10-19 

Cheshire, Conn. Tel. Browning 2-5396. 
Arthur N. Sheriff, B.A., M.A., Yale, Head. 

Grades VI-VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep Art 
Music Languages Mathematics Sciences Remedial Classes. 



Conn. New England 117 

Enr Bdg 310, Day 190. Fac full 64, part-time 4. 

Tui Bdg $2090, Day $875. Scholarships 40. Est 1794. Inc 1937 
nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Tui Bdg $690, Day $270. 

Plant $1,000,000. Dorm rms 285. Class rms 64. Lib 2000 vols. 
Labs 3. Gyms. Fields 6. Courts 9. 

This highly efficient academy assumed its present name in 1937, 
combining those of the two ancient schools to which it is heir, 
Episcopal Academy and Cheshire School. Mr. Sheriff, for some 
years dean and since 1923 head master, has developed a well 
organized junior school offering work in the upper elementary 
and lower high school years, has put the administration and 
scholastic work on a sound basis, and has greatly increased the 
plant Small classes and supervision of each boy's progress are 
supplemented by individual instruction when advisable. Graduates 
enter not only Yale, but also Harvard, the University of Conn., 
and many others. Dramatics and publications, as well as many 
student clubs and a full range of athletics, are emphasized. The 
summer session has been held for more than forty years. See also 
pages 658-59 



CORNWALL PLAINS, CONN. Pop 400. This rural village, 4 
mi from Cornwall, which is served by the NY NH & H R.R., is 
near the Hotisatonic Regional Music Center. The school is located 
at the foot of Mohawk Mountain, site of a well known ski resort. 

MARVEL WOOD PREPARATORY SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 13-19 

Cornwall Plains, Conn. Tel. ORleans 2-6612. 

Ian M. Hanna, B.A., Miami; Robert A. Bodkin, B.A., Trinity, 

M.A., Columbia, Co-Dirs. 

High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep. Languages Art Music. 
Developmental and Remedial Reading Make-up Courses. 
Enr Bdg 4<J, Day 5. Fac full 5, part-time 3, 
Tui Bdg $2150. Day $900. Est 1957. Inc 1956 nonprofit. 
Dorm rms 25. Classrooms 6. Lab. Studios music 1, art 1. Courts * 
This school is the creation of the two co-directors, who have 
foreseen the need of a small school offering highly individualized 
preparation. Mr. Hanna, with international experience, has taught 
at Hatch Preparatory School and schools abroad, while Mr. Bod- 
kin, a specialist in remedial work, has taught at Montclair in N.J., 
Collegiate in N.Y.C., and at various other schools. The facilities 
of a large estate are well suited for this resident school which 
offers rural and farm activities, as well as team sports. The pre- 
paratory curriculum offers emphasis on sound language training. 
See page 660 



Conn. Leading Private Schools 118 

DANBURY, CONN. Pop 22,067. Alt 371 ft NY,NH&H R.R. -20 
ml NW of Bridgeport, Rt.58. Known for its yearly fair, this busy 
trading center on the Still River is important for its manufacture 
of hats, silverware and textiles. 

THE WOOSTER SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 12-18 

Danbury, Conn. Ridgebury Rd, Tel. Pioneer 8-3626. 
Rev. John Duane Verdery, A.B., Princeton, B.D., Episcopal Theo- 
logical Sch, Head. 

GradeYIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Western CivilizationMath, 

Enr Bdg 110, Day 10. Fac full 13, part-time 1. 

Grad '5724. Entd Col '57 23. (Princeton 4, Brown 2, Rollins 
2, Yale 1, Harvard 1, Tufts 1). Alumni 465. 

Tui Bdg $2050 (+$250), Day $725. Scholarships full 5, partial 
45 ($30,000). Work pgrm. Est 1926. Episcopal. 

Plant $750,000. Dorm rms 67. Class rms 13. Lib 5000 vols. Lab. 
Studio music 1. Fields 5. Courts 3. 

Established by the Rev. Aaron C Coburn and early gaining 
a reputation for sound academic work, an interest in the individual 
boy, and an efficient plant, Wooster came under the direction of 
the Rev. Mr. Verdery when the founder died in 1942. Idealistic, 
appreciative of the sound foundation on which he has to build, he 
has strengthened the faculty and fostered the tradition of simplic- 
ity and hard work in an environment in which religion plays an 
important part. A quarter million dollar building program was 
completed in the fall of 1953. 

Emphasis is on liberal studies, with an integrated course in 
Western civilization from the 9th through the 12th grade. Recent 
graduates have entered Brown, Yale, Williams, Middlebury, 
Princeton, Harvard, MIT, Amherst, Wesleyan. Extra-curricular 
activities include music, dramatics, and school publications. 



DARIEN, CONN. Pop 11,767. Alt 66 ft NY,NH&H R.R. 25 mi. 
NE of New York, Rt. U.S.I. On the shore between Stamford and 
Norwalk, Darien has a considerable art colony and many large 
estates. Numerous eighteenth century homes remain. 



CHERRY LAWN SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Coed Ages 11-18 

Darien, Conn. 120 Brookside Rd. Tel. Oli'ver 5-1488. 

Christina Stael von H. Bogoslovsky, M.A., Stockholm, Ph.D., 

Columbia; Boris Basil Bogoslovsky, Ph.D., Columbia, Dirs. 



Conn. New England 119 

Grades VI- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music Lan- 
guages Mathematics. Remedial Reading. Manual Arts Dra- 

Enr Bdg Boys 55, Girls 60; Day Boys 10, Girls 10. Fac full 30, 
part-time 2. 

Grad '5718. Entd Col '5717. (U of Chicago 2, Syracuse 2, 
Boston U 2, Vassar 1, Lehigh 1, Bennington 1). Alumni 495. 

Tui Bdg $1800-2000 (+$155-190), Day $850-1100. Scholarships 
partial 40 ($10,000). Est 1915. Inc 1920~nonprofit 

Lib 5000 vols. Labs 2. Studios music 1, art 1. Gym. Fields 5. 
Courts 2. Riding facilities. 

Since 1933 the present directors, formerly with the Dalton 
Schools and Columbia University, have gone forward with the 
ideals on which Dr. Fred Goldfrank, a New York pediatrician, 
established the school. Swedish and Russian respectively, Dr 
Stael and Dr. Boris do much to foster the characteristics that 
appeal to families of the liberal, intellectual type. Dr Boris has 
lectured in education at Harvard Summer School and the New 
School for Social Research. In his "The Ideal School" he gives 
some understanding of the ends towards which they are working. 
He is now on leave to the U.N. 

With modern buildings and equipment, the school draws widely 
from this country and from many foreign lands. The wholesome 
and natural activities, much outdoor life, open classrooms, facili- 
tate and supplement the rich and varied curriculum which sends 
graduates to Cornell, Haverford, Smith, University of Pa., Sarah 
Lawrence, Bryn Mawr. The flexible and individualized extra- 
curricular program emphasizes student government, publications, 
dramatics, the dance, music, building projects, art, and various 
sports. See also page 802 



FAIRFIELD, CONN. Pop 30,489. Alt 25 ft NY,NH&H R.R. 2 
mi. S of Bridgeport, Rt. U.S.I. Named for its fair fields, the town 
retains much of its old charm. Handsome and elaborate estates 
stretch over the hills and into the town. 



FAIRFIELD COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 
Boys Ages 5-15 

Fairfield, Conn. 2970 Bronson Rd. Tel. Clearwater 9-2723. 
William Brewster Ely, III, A.B.., Dartmouth, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1. French Latin, 

Remedial Reading. 

Enr 145. Fac full-time 14. 

Grad '5720. Entd Prep Sch '57-20. (Choate 4, Andover 2, Pom- 
fret 2, Exeter 1, Hotchkiss 1, Lawrenceville 1). 

Tui $365-875. Scholarships. Est 1936. Inc 1941 nonprofit. 



Conn. Leading Private Schools 120 

This country day school was established by the late Laurence 
W. Gregory, previously at Milford School. He was succeeded in 
1947 by the late J. Moyer Mahaney, and in 1950 by Archibald R. 
Hoxton. Mr. Ely, formerly of Emerson, Harvey, Eaglebrook, 
and Buckley Country Day school, was appointed the latter's suc- 
cessor in 1953, The three "R's" are stressed, and there is con- 
siderable opportunity for developmental reading. Athletics are 
emphasized for all boys. A new auditorium-gymnasium was opened 
in the Fall of 1956. See also page 662 

FARMINGTON, CONN. Pop 1323. Alt 245 ft 8 mi. SW of 

Hartford, Rt 4. An atmosphere of leisure and unostentatious pros- 
perity pervades this village of wide elm-shaded streets and fine 
old houses, known chiefly for its school. On a hill above the vil- 
lage stands Hill Stead, now a museum and once the Victorian 
home of Mrs. John Wallace Riddle, founder of Avon Old Farms. 

MISS PORTER'S SCHOOL 
Bdg -Girls Ages 14-18 

Farmington, Conn. Tel Orchard 7-1668, 
Mr. and Mrs. Hollis S. French, Heads. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music Typing Home Econom- 
ics. 

Enr 220. Fac full 21, part-time 3. 

Grad '5776. Entd Col '5770. (Smith 12, Sarah Lawrence 8, 
Bennett 8, Vassar 7, Bryn Mawr 5, Briarcliff 5). Alumnae 4000, 

Tui $2500 (+$150). Scholarships partial 20 ($25,000). Est 1843. 
Inc 1943 nonprofit. 

Plant $1,000,000. Endowment $1,275,000. Dorm rms 94. Class 
rms 18. Lib 14,000 vols. Lab. Studios music 2, art 1. Gym. Courts 
9. Riding facilities. 

In 1843, Miss Sarah Porter, sister of President Porter of Yale, 
began this school which bears her name. Using educational tech- 
niques ahead of her time, she made it pre-eminent through the 
influence of "her own unusual character. She gave to hundreds 
of the best born women of the land that poise and stability of 
character, that combination of learning and good manners, which 
is a mark of the noblest American womanhood," After her death 
in 1900, her nephew, Robert Porter Keep, and then Mrs. Keep, 
conducted the school, being succeeded by their son until 1943. In 
that year, the centenary, the school was turned over to a non- 
profit corporation. The Centennial Scholarship Fund, created in 
1943, the Second Century Scholarship Fund, and also the general 
endowment permit liberal scholarships to deserving girls. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ward L. Johnson, who for twenty years directed 
Lawrence School in L.I., brought a new attitude and a more 
modern atmosphere. Mr. French, formerly on the staff, with Mrs. 



Conn. New England 121 

French, succeeded them in 1954. The preparatory curriculum en- 
rolling about four-fifths of the girls, prepares for Vassar, Smith, 
Bryn Mawr, Wellesley, Radcliffe, Barnard, and other leading 
colleges. A more general program meets the requirements of other 
four-year colleges as well as those of junior colleges and special- 
ized schools. 

Glee club, dramatics, orchestra, school publications, kindergar- 
ten, charities, a current events club, and athletics are among 
student activities. 

GREENWICH, CONN. Pop 40,835. Alt 28 ft. NY,NH&H R.R. 
5 mi. W of Stamford, Rt U.S.I. A publishing and printing center, 
Greenwich has long been favored as a retreat on L.I. Sound for 
New York millionaires and those who would live near them. 
Magnificent estates line the diversified shore and crown the hills. 

BRUNSWICK SCHOOL 
Day Boys Ages 4-18 

Greenwich, Conn. 100 Maher Ave. Tel. TOwnsend 9-0601. 
Alfred E. Everett, A.B., St. Stephen's, M.A., Columbia, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. 
Col Prep. Art Music. 

Enr 350. Elem 190, Sec 160. Fac full 28, part-time 4. 

Grad '5719. Entd Col '5719. (Princeton 3, Brown 3, Colgate 
2, Duke 2, Hobart 2, Williams 1). 

Tui $325-825. Scholarships full 1, partial 20 ($6500). Est 1902. 
Inc 1933 nonprofit. 

Summer Session. EnrllO.Tui $195 seven wks. 

Class rms 21. Lib 3000 vols. Lab. Studios 2. Shop. Gym. Fields. 

Started in a modest way by George E. Carmichael and directed 
by him for 30 years, Brunswick was incorporated in 1933 by a 
group of parents, with Thomas C. Burton as head master. W. L, 
Henry, Latin instructor and assistant head for ten years, served 
as head master from 1938 to 1?44. Graduates are attending Dart- 
mouth, Princeton, Yale, the University of Conn., Wesleyan, and 
Williams. 



GREENWICH ACADEMY 
Co Day Boys Ages 3-4, Girls 3-18 

Greenwich, Conn. 116 Maple Ave. Tel. TOwnsend 9-4020. 
Katherine Zierleyn, A.B., Calvin, M.A., Michigan State, Head. 

Pre-Nursery Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII 
High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Art Music Languages. 
'Remedial Reading. Crafts. Mensendieck. 

Enr Girls 360, Boys 5. Elem 215, Sec 150. Fac full 36, part-time 3. 

Grad '5729. Entd Col '5727. (Mt. Holyoke 4, Sweet Briar 2, 
Duke 2, Northwestern 2, Vassar 1, Cornell 1). Alumnae 880. 



Conn. Leading Private Schools 122 

Tui $300-800. Scholarships full 4, partial 16 ($9,600). Est 1827. 
Inc nonprofit. 

Endowment $64,476. Class rms 36. Lib 5000 vols. Lab, Studios 
Music 4, Art 2. Gym. Fields 2. 

For the first 80 years coeducational, this was reorganized in 
1913 as a country day school for girls, with boys in the nursery 
school only. Under Mrs. Ruth West Campbell from 1925, and 
her successor, Miss Zierleyn, who took over in 1955, the tradi- 
tion of sound college preparatory and general work has been 
broadened and enriched to meet the needs of the times. Graduates 
have entered Vassar, Mt Holyoke, Wellesley, Smith, Bryn Mawr, 
Bennington. 

GREENWICH COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 
Coed Ages 4*15 

Greenwich, Conn. Old Church Rd. Tel.TOwnsend 9-4230. 
John R. Webster, A.B., Johns Hopkins, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1. Art 
Music French Latin. Remedial Work. 

Enr Boys 250, Girls 210. Fac full-time 51. 

Grad '5737. Entd Prep Sch '5737. (Choate 3, Abbot 2, And- 
over 2, Ethel Walker 2, Miss Porter's 2, Hotchkiss 2). Alumni 708. 

Tui $315-870 (+$20-200). Scholarships full 14, partial 8 ($12,295). 
Est 1926. Inc 1927 nonprofit. 

This well organized institution was established by the late John 
L. Miner, former head of Harvey School. In 1942 it absorbed the 
Rosemary Junior School, and under Mr. Webster, for six years 
from 1937 head master of Allendale School, Rochester, it remains 
coeducational. 

The conventional approach to curriculum here puts great em- 
phasis on English and mathematics and careful study of foreign 
languages. And there is considerable student interest in the pro- 
grams in printing, art, dramatics, music, and shop, as well as in 
athletics. Remedial reading and tutoring are an integral part of 
the work for those pupils needing them. 



THE HAITHCOCK SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Coed Ages 10-18 

Greenwich, Conn. Glenville Rd. Tel. TOwnsend 9-6992. 
Mary Dare Haithcock, M.A., Ed.D., Columbia, Owner-Dir. 

Grades IV- VIII High Sch 1-4. Tutoring Make-up Remedial 
Reading and Developmental Reading. 

Enr Bdg Boys 40, Girls 10; Day Boys 2, Girls 3. Fac full 16, 
part-time 4. Staff 6. 

Grad '57 3. Entd Col '572. (U of N.C. 1, Columbia 1). 

Tui Bdg $4500 (+$100), 'Day $3000. Scholarships full 2, partial 



Conn. New England 123 

6. Est 1952. Proprietary. 

Summer Sch. Tui Bdg $1000, Day $775. 

Plant $1,000,000. Dorm rms 60, Class rms 15. Lib 5000 vols. 
Labs 3. Studios art 1, music 2. Gym. Fields 2. Court. 

Haithcock School was earlier operated in conjunction with the 
National Reading Foundation in N.Y. and moved in 1956 to its 
present adequate site, formerly occupied by the Edgewood 
School. Full academic program providing unusual facilities for 
reading help. The diagnostic and corrective programs avail of mod- 
ern techniques and the. Skilled staff is supplemented by specialists 
in related phases of this work. See page 805 



ROSEMARY HALL 
Bdg and Day Girls Ages 12-18 

Greenwich, Conn. Rock Ridge. Tel. TOwnsend 9-1314. 

Alice Eaton McBee, II, B.A., Sweet Briar, B.S., Columbia, M.A., 

Smith, Head. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General Art Music 
Typing. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg 85, Day 85. Fac full 20, part-time 5. 

Grad '57 33. Entd Col '5729. (Wellesley 3, Smith 2, Vassar 
2, Connecticut 2, U of Colo 2, Stanford 1). Alumnae 2466, 

Tui Bdg $2400 (+$400), Day $850-950. Scholarships partial 15 
($10,000). Est J890. Inc 1950 nonprofit. 

Dorm rms 44, Class rms 17. Library. Labs 2. Studios 4. 
Outdoor Theatre, Gyms 2. 

Established by the English Miss Caroline Ruutz-Rees in Wal- 
lingford on Choate Farm, and moved to Greenwich in 1900, this 
school bears the firm imprint of its founder. Possessed of broad 
scholarship, a masculine grasp of mind, keen human interest in 
her girls, graduates, and alumnae, an unusual teacher who used 
the classics to Inspire her pupils, she created a school unlike any 
other. Mary E. Lowndes, also British, a skilled horsewoman, a 
literary scholar, was co-head from 1910 to 1938. 

From 1937, Mrs. Eugenia B. Jessup, an alumna, and Mrs. Con- 
stance Evers shared executive responsibility until the resignation 
of the latter in 1945. Sold in 1950 fry Miss Ruutz-Rees to alumnae, 
the school is now operated by trustees. Miss Helen Williamson 
succeeded Mrs, Jessup in the summer of 19.53, and served until 
her death in 1957. Miss Alice Eaton McBee, II, was appointed 
Headmistress in 1958* 

The conservative, closely-integrated curriculum stresses orig- 
inal use of information in projects and creative work; with 
electives in art, music, typing and shorthand for students pre- 
paring for junior colleges. Graduates enter Vassar, Wellesley, 



Conn. Leading Private Schools 124 

Smith, Wheaton, Connecticut College, RadclifTe, Bryn Mawr, and 
other leading women's colleges. Student government is empha- 
sized, and there are opportunities for outdoor sports, especially 
riding, as well as dramatics, publications, and music. See page 758 



HARTFORD, CONN. Pop 177,397. Alt 38 ft NY,NH&H R.R. 

35 mi. NE of New Haven, Rt U.S.5. With its well laid out parks 
and substantial public buildings, the capital of the state was early 
the model and inspirer of many cities that have since improved 
upon it. On the Connecticut River 50 mi. from Long Island Sound, 
here are the home offices of many of the large national insurance 
companies, so every fire alarm is heard in Hartford and every 
obituary brings tears to the eyes of its leading citizens. The air 
of complacent repose long worn by the city has been changed by 
the airplane and other new industries that center here. The vigor 
of its life pulsates in new extensions to the north and west and 
blossoms periodically in a beautiful bridge or a notable building. 
When Mark Twain, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Charles Dudley 
Warner lived here, Hartford well maintained literary pretensions. 
Watkinson School has 95 acres in suburban Hartford. Kingswoocl 
and Oxford are in West Hartford, as is Renbrook School on Mt. 
Avon, 



KINGSWOOD SCHOOL 
Co Day Boys Ages 12-18 

West Hartford 7, Conn. 170 Kingswood Rd. Tel. AD 3-5575. 
Merritt A. Hewett, A.B., Bowdoin, Head. 

Grades VII- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Mechanical Drawing 
Art Music. Remedial Reading. 

Enr 255. Fac full 24, part-time 2. 

Grad '57 32. Entd Col '57- 32. (Yale 3, Williams 3, Brown 3, 
Cornell 2, Princeton 2, Trinity 2). Alumni 1100. 

Tui $1125. Scholarships full 3, partial 30 ($15,000). Est 1916. 
Inc 1916 nonprofit. 

This school was conducted from its establishment by George R. 
H. Nicholson until his death in 1947. Mr. Hewett came to the 
school in 1949 after twenty-two years at Milton Academy. Recent 
graduates have entered Trinity, Princeton, Harvard, Amherst, 
Yale, and Dartmouth. 

OXFORD SCHOOL 
Co Day Girls Ages 12-18 

Hartford 5, Conn, 695 Prospect Ave. Tel Jackson 3-4226. 
Dorothy Graff, A.B., Mt. Holyoke, M.A., Columbia, Head. 



Conn. New England 125 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music Speech 
Bible. Remedial Work. 

Enr 210. Fac full 14, part-time 8. 

Grad '5733. Entd Col '5733. (Smith 4, Mt. Holyoke 3, 
Wheaton 3, Wellesley 2, Vassar 1, Connecticut 1). Alumnae 766. 

Tui $750 (+$175). Scholarships partial 17 ($4000). Est 1909. 
Inc 1929 nonprofit. 

Plant $364,000. Class rms 16. Lib 5000 vols. Lab. Studios music 
1, art 1. Gym. Field. Courts 2. 

Enrolling daughters of leading local families, this was made a 
community project in 1929 and reorganized as a country day 
school under Ruth E. Guernsey. Mrs. Vachel Lindsay, widow of 
the poet, was head mistress from 1938 to 1942, when Elizabeth 
Fitch succeeded. Miss Graff, appointed in 1948, had previously 
been principal of Louisville Collegiate School. 

The curriculum, with its emphasis on liberal studies, prepares 
for Smith, Skidmore, Wellesley, Mt Holyoke, Connecticut, and 
other colleges. The varied extra-curricular program emphasizes 
publications, music, dramatics, as well as French, Spanish, politi- 
cal science, and community service clubs. 



RENBROOK SCHOOL 
Co Day Coed Ages 4-14 

West Hartford 7, Conn. 950 Trout Brook Dr. Tel. JAckson 3-0775. 
Mrs. W. Ainsworth Greene, A.B., Wheaton, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VIII. Art Music Dramatics. 

Enr Boys 180, Girls 180. Fac full 28, part-time 5. 

Tui $250-775 (+$75), Est 1936. Inc 1936 nonprofit. 

Formerly the Junior School, Renbrook is a community enter- 
prise now offering thorough preparation for secondary schools. 
Varied extracurricular activities complete the full country day pro- 
gram. 

WATKINSON SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day -Boys Ages 11-18 

Hartford 5, Conn. 180 Bloomfield Ave. Tel. JA 2-3463. 

Lawrence J. Newhall, A.B., Trinity, M.Sc.Ed., U of Pa., Head- 
Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Remedial Reading. 

Bible. 

Enr Bdg 50, Day 20. Fac full 8, part-time 3. 
Grad '574. Entd Col '574. (U of Conn. 2, Tchrs Col Conn 

1, Wesleyan 1). Alumni 82. 
Tui Bdg $1300 (+$50), Day $850. Scholarships partial 10 ($10,- 

000). Est 1881. Inc nonprofit. 



Conn. Leading Private Schoob 126 

Bonn rms 20. Class rms 7. Lab. Gym. Field. 

The liberal bequest of David Watkinson which led to the 
establishment of this school permits the low tuition as well as 
individual scholarships for needy boys of ability. All students 
do preparatory work, and many different colleges and universities 
have enrolled graduates. All boys assist in the upkeep of buildings 
and grounds. In 1956 Mr. Newhall succeeded the Rev. Robert F. 
Sweetser. See also page 661 

KENT, CONN. Pop 1392. Alt 395 ft. NY,NH&H R.R. 28 mi. N 
of Danbury, Rt U.S.7. This old town was in an abandoned sec- 
tion of the Housatonic Valley until rediscovered by Father Sill 
of JCent School and the water power companies. Two notable 
schools have developed; Kent, near the village, and the newer 
school 4 mi. to the S. 

KENT SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 13-18 

Kent, Conn. Tel. Walker 7-3515. 

Rev. John O. Patterson, D.D., Rector and Head. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep Art Mathematics 
Greek Latin Modern Languages Literature Speech Science 
Music History. 

Enr 300. Fac full 35, part-time 2. 

Grad '57 57. Entd Col '5755. (Yale 7, Princeton 7, Brown 5, 
Harvard 4, Cornell 4, U of Va. 4). Alumni 2200. 

Tui sliding scale. Self-help pgrm. Est 1906, Inc 1906 nonprofit. 
Episcopal. 

Plant $3,000,000. Dorm rms 160. Class rms 31. Lib 12,000 vols. 
Labs 3. Studios music 2, art 1. Gym. Fields 14. Courts 15. Rowing 
facilities. 

One of the nation's great schools, simplicity, self-reliance, and 
directness of purpose today characterize Kent as when it was 
founded fifty years ago. The Rev. Frederick H. Sill, a man of 
extraordinary genius and vigor, started the school in a small farm 
building. He developed the Kent plan of self-help, by which the 
boys do practically all the work around the place, and a sliding 
scale of tuition fees, whereby patrons are assessed enough to meet 
the year's budget in accordance with their ability to pay. Today 
Kent has an impressive plant, built by the donations of many 
devoted alumni and friends, including a fine Norman chapel, an 
architectural gem, the center of the school's religious life. 

The present rector and head master, the Rev. John O, Patterson, 
was appointed in 1949. He has maintained the high academic stan- 
dards while expanding the curriculum and the school plant. In 
1954 a new sports building was completed, and one year later 



Conn. New England 127 

a library and an auditorium. A rigorous curriculum, emphasizing 
the traditional academic subjects, is folio wed from the second 
form, or eighth grade. There are special honor sections, and 
a tutorial plan for collateral reading for all boys grades 9-12. 

Graduates enter Princeton, Yale, Cornell, the University of Pa., 
Harvard, Trinity, and other colleges and universities. 

The earnest, studious, devout boys who make up the student 
body enjoy many extra-curricular activities, including sports, nu- 
merous clubs, dramatics, and publications. See also page B63 



SOUTH KENT SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 12-19 

South Kent, Conn. Tel. Kent Walker 7-3236. 

L. Wynne Wister, A.B., Princeton, M. A., Harvard, Head. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. French Latin Sociol- 
ogy Mathematics History. Music. Workshop. 

Enr 130. Fac full 13, part-time 2* 

Grad '5719. Entd Col '5717. (Wesleyan 1, Williams 1, Harv- 
ard 1, Princeton 1, Yale 1, U.S. Naval Acad 1). Alumni 607. 

Tui sliding scale to $2000 (+$250). Scholarships partial 42 ($22,- 
000). Est 1923. Inc nonprofit. Episcopal. 

Plant $560,000. Class rms 10. Lib 6700 vols. Lab. Studio art 1. 
Fields 6. Courts 7. Boating facilities. 

With its own board of trustees, South Kent is a distinct organi- 
zation, though the school was founded by the late Father Sill and 
shows his influence. Samuel S. Bartlett, a former Kent boy, head 
master since the opening, fostering characteristic features of sim- 
plicity, high scholastic standards, and a sliding scale for tuition, 
built up a considerable following, and an excellent reputation for 
the school. 

Mr. Wister, graduate of St. Paul's and of Princeton, on the 
South Kent faculty from 1941, and acting head in 1953-54, was 
appointed to his present position in 195S. The curriculum prepares 
for Williams, Princeton, Trinity, Yale, Brown, Cornell, Harvard, 
and other leading colleges and universities. 

The new library, with reading and study rooms and audio- 
visual equipment was made possible through the gifts of students, 
faculty, alumni, parents, and friends of the school. 



LAKEVILLE, CONN. Pop 750. Alt 800 ft 2 mi. SW of Salis- 
bury, Rt U.S.44. Where three states meet in the NW corner *of 
Conn, is Lakeville, surrounded by mountains rising to over 2000 



Conn, Leading Private Schools 128 

feet Here, where Revolutionary munitions were made by Ethan 
Allen, are a number of fine old Colonial residences. Today the 
town is noted for the Institute of General Semantics established 
by the late and great Alfred Korzybski, and as the residence of 
the renowned harpsichordist, Wanda Landowska. Other residents 
include many notable persons. The imposing campus of Hotchkiss 
School is on the saddle between Lakes Wononskopomuc and 
Wononpakook. Indian Mountain is about 2 mi. from the village. 



THE HOTCHKISS SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 14-18 

Lakeville, Conn. Tel. Hemlock 5-2591. 

Rev. Thomas H. Chappell, B.A., Yale, B.D., Episcopal Theo. Sch. 

Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. English Mathematics 
French Latin Science Music Art Speech Religion. 

Enr B.dg 350, Day 10. Fac full-time 42. 

Grad '5780. Entd Col '57- 79. (Yale 23, Princeton 10, Brown 
7, Williams 6, Harvard 4). Alumni 4275. 

Tti Bdg $2150 (+$100), Day $700. Scholarships partial 77 ($90 r 
000). Est 1891. Inc nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Make-up courses, Enr 70. Tui $400, six'wks. 

Plant $4,500,000. Endowment $1,200,000. Dorm rms 309. Class 
rms 26. Lib 15,000 vols. Labs 3. Studios music 8, art 1. Shop. Gyms 
2. Swimming pool. Fields 13. Courts 14. Skiing facilities. Boating 
facilities. Golf course. 

The school bears the name of its founder, Maria H. Hotchkiss, 
widow of the inventor of the famous machine gun, who provided 
plant and endowment Under Dr. Huber Gray Buehler, affection- 
ately known as "The King/ 1 the school developed its sturdy char- 
acter, becoming a stronghold of the classics and book learning, 
and one of the foremost preparatory schools. Each year the King 
declared, "There is only one rule in this school, 'Be a gentle- 
man 1'" and the implications of this one rule have since been the 
keynote of this school. 

The original school buildings, joined by a corridor 325 ft. long, 
are still in use, to which have been added many additional struc- 
tures. Many gifts built a new dining hall and gym and a library 
has been provided by the munificence of the Ford family, among 
whom are alumni. In 1955 the Rev. Mr, Chappell, former Dean 
of St.- Stephen's Cathedral, Harrisburg, Pa., and previously on 
the Hotchkiss faculty, was appointed upon the retirement of 
George Van Santvoord who during three decades maintained the 
rigorous academic standards while liberalizing the curriculum 



Conn. New England 129 

and broadening student programs. Art, music, dramatics, and 
public speaking have assumed greater prominence, and the extra- 
curricular programs have been broadened to ensure every boy's 
participation. A carefully chosen faculty affords efficient college 
preparation with more than usual opportunities in the classics, 
and ample opportunity for able boys to accelerate, and seniors 
to gain advanced work approximating the college level in such 
subjects as English, mathematics, ancient and modern languages, 
and science. 

President Timothy Dwight of Yale was intimately associated 
with the founding of the school, and relationships with Yale have 
continued very close during the years. Yale is still the most popu- 
lar college at Hotchkiss, although many graduates go to Prince- 
ton, Williams, Harvard, Brown and other leading colleges. 

Athletics, especially winter sports, are stressed for health and 
recreation, and use is made of the spacious plant and open 
countryside. There are also student organizations in music, publi- 
cations, dramatics, and various hobbies, 



INDIAN MOUNTAIN SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 9-14; Day Coed Ages 9-14 

Lakeville, Conn. Tel. HE 5-9122. 

William M. Doolittle, A.B., Princeton, Head. 

Grades V-VIII. Art French Latin Manual Arts Drama. 

Enr Bdg 40 j Day Boys 40, Girls 25. Fac full 9, part-time 2. 

Grad '5731. Entd Prep Sen '5727. (Hotchkiss 4, Groton 3, 
South Kent 3, Millbrook 2, Foxhojlow 2). Alumni 590. 

Tui Bdg $1750 (+$100), Day $650. Scholarships partial 19 ($8,- 
500). Est 1922. Inc 1929 nonprofit. 

Dorm rms 18. Class rms 8. Lib 2000 vols. 

One of the earliest boarding schools for young boys to be 
characterized by flexibility and by interest in the individual, this 
was established by Francis Behn Riggs, Groton graduate and 
friend of Dr. Peabody. 

Mr. Doolittle, appointed Riggs' successor in 1939, served for 
four years in the army, returning in 1945. During his administra- 
tion the enrollment has been doubled, and an increasing number 
of graduates have been sent on to leading secondary schools. 

The curriculum is conservative and thorough, yet not old- 
fashioned. Much is made of outdoor activities, especially through 
the active Nature Club, and there is a vigorous sports program, 
all made possible by the country setting. 



Conn. Leading Private Schools 130 

When in 1953 Indian View School for girls was discontinued, 
Indian Mountain accepted a limited number of day girls. See also 
page 664 

LITCHFIELD, CONN. Pop 5000. Alt 956 ft. 17 mi N of 

Waterbury, Rt. 63. Literary and historical associations cluster 
around this delightful little village 100 mi. from New York. The 
first law school in the country was opened here in the home of 
Judge Tapping Reeve. The Junior Republic is 2 mi. to the N. For- 
man School in 1941 purchased and remodeled the plant of the 
former Spring Hill School outside the village. 

THE FORMAN SCHOOL 
Bdg Coed Ages 14-19 

Litchfield, Conn. Tel. JO 7-8712. 

John N. Forman, A.B., Princeton; Julie R. Forman, Dirs. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1-2. Col Prep. 
General. Music Languages History Philosophy and Religion 
Speech Mathematics. Make-up courses Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg Boys 70, Girls 25; Day 10, Fac full 13, part-time 6. 

Grad '578. Entd Col '573. (William and Mary 1, Warren 
Willson 1, Lafayette 1). Alumni 408. 

Tui Bdg $2350 (+$250), Day $750 (+$100). Scholarships par- 
tial 4. Est 1930. Inc 1930 nonprofit. 

Plant $450,000. Dorm mas 55. Labs 2. Studios music 3. Fields 3. 

After some years at Fessenden and Gunnery, Mr. Forman 
opened here a school for young boys, giving them careful personal 
oversight. An upper school was added in 1935, and in 1942 a girls 
unit under the direction of Mrs. Forman. Students do much of the 
work about the buildings and grounds. 

The curricula offer an unusually wide variety of courses, and 
students are prepared for college or for advanced specialized train- 
ing. Classes are small, and each pupil advances at his own rate. 
Graduates have entered Cornell, Rollins, the University of Fla., 
St. Lawrence, the University of Conn. 



MADISON, CONN. Pop 3100. NY,NH&H R.R. 20 mi. E of New 
Haven, Rt U.S.I. Madison, a quiet village during the winter, is a 
considerable beach resort in summer. Numerous houses date from 
Colonial times. 



For further information, write Porter Sargent 



Conn. New England 131 

GROVE SCHOOL 
For Maladjusted Children of Normal Intelligence 

Bdg Coed Ages 12-18 
Madison, Conn. Copse Rd. Tel. Circle 5-9539. 
Jess Perlman, B.A., CCNY, LL.B., Fordham; J. Sanford Davis, 
B.A., A.M., Ph.D., NYU, Dirs. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Individualized Programs. 
Enr Boys 13, Girls 7. Fac full-time 10. Staff 7. 
Grad '57 3. Entd Col '57 3. 
Tui $6500. Est 1934. Partnership. 
Summer Session. Tui $1000 eight wks. 

Children of normal mentality, maladjusted in school or with 
behavior problems, are here offered year round schooling and 
psychotherapy. The program is unregimented and non-competitive, 
and the atmosphere is intimate and familiar. 



MIDDLEBURY, CONN. Pop 4000. 6 mi NW of Waterbury, Rt. 
U.S. 6A. This peaceful old village in the hills S of Litchfield is sub- 
urban to bustling Waterbury. Some of the farms are still owned 
and worked by descendants of the early settlers. The plant of the 
girls' school, designed by Theodate Pope, is beyond the green. 

WESTOVER SCHOOL 
Bdg Girls Ages 13-18 
Middlebury, Conn. Tel. Plaza 8-2423. 
Louise Bulkley Dillingham, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Bryn Mawr, Head* 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Art Music Literature 
Languages Mathematics Sciences History Philosophy Pre- 
professional. Remedial Reading. 

Enr 175. Fac full 21, part-time 7. 

Grad '5753. Entd Col '5750. (Smith 7, Bryn Mawr 4, Sweet 
Briar 4, Vassar 3, Radcliffe 3, Connecticut 1). Alumnae 2350. 

Tui $2650 (+$50). Scholarships partial 27 ($25,000). Est 1909 
Inc 1942 nonprofit. 

Plant $500,000. Endowment $700,000. Dorm rms 80. Class rms 
13. Lib 14,500 vols. Labs 2. Studios music 5, art 2. Courts 6. 

Established by Mary R. Hillard, who was trained at Miss 
Porter's and long headed St. Margaret's/ Westover has main- 
tained many of the distinctive patterns and traditions inculcated 
by its founder. The daily chapel service is still held. Her devo- 
tion to the religious life and well being of her pupils and her 
pervasive charm early brought the school a notable following. 

Under Miss Dillingham, head mistress since 1932, the faculty 
and academic work have been strengthened, and today more than 



Conn. Leading Private Schools 132 

ninety per cent of the girls take the college preparatory curricu- 
lum, which is unusually varied and stimulating. Many graduates 
go to Vassar, with others entering Smith, Bryn Mawr, Radcliffe, 
Wellesley, and other leading colleges. For the non-college girl, 
individual programs are arranged preparatory to professional train- 
ing in nursing, business, dietetics and child care. Activities stress 
music, dramatics, debating and language clubs, publications, and 
a social service organization. See also page 760 



MILFORD, CONN. Pop 35,000. Alt 64 ft. NY, NH&H R.R. 7 mi. 
E of Bridgeport, Rt. U.S.I. Midway between Bridgeport and New 
Haven on L.L Sound, something of a nineteenth century flavor 
still lingers in Milford with its long, elm-shaded green, Colonial 
meeting houses, old homesteads, and the mossy stone mill dam. 

THE MILFORD SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 12-19 

Milford, Conn. Tel. Trinity 4-6701. 

William D. Pearson, A.B., A.M., Columbia, Head. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Languages 
Mathematics Sciences Social Studies Economics Mech Draw- 
ing. Make-up Courses. 

Enr Bdg 105, Day 80. Fac full 15, part-time 8. 

Grad '5753. Entd Col '57 51. (U of Conn. 11, U of Pa. 6, 
Tulane 5, Boston U 3, Brown 2, Mich State 2). Alumni 1753. 

Tui Bdg $2075 (+$95), Day $800. Scholarships full 9, par- 
tial 12 ($10,000). Est 1916. Inc 1931. 

Summer Session and Camp. Make-up courses. Tui $525-700, 

Under a skilled faculty, many of long tenure, this school stresses 
college preparation. 

Mr. Pearson, for many years on the faculty before his appoint- 
ment as head master in 1938, has been highly successful in direct- 
ing the school. Strictly supervised class studies are supplemented 
by each boy's taking in his fourth year a special seminar in cur- 
rent scientific thought, current history, modern literature, or pan- 
American life and relations. Graduates enter many different col- 
leges. Among numerous extra-curricular activities are sports, 
journalism, dramatics* debating, music, and a benevolent society. 
See also page 662 

NEW CANAAN, CONN. Pop 9800. Alt 550 ft NY, NH&H R.R. 
4 mi NW of Norwalk, Rt.29. Its village green surrounded by 
steepled meeting houses and homes of Colonial architecture, this 
quiet village has become a center for artists, literary lights, and 



Conn. New England 133 

solid business men. St. Luke's is N of the town, the Country 
School 2 mi, W. 



NEW CANAAN COUNTRY SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 4-15 

New Canaan, Conn, Ponus Ridge. Tel. Woodward 6-9551. 
Henry H. Welles, B.S., Princeton, M.A., Ph.D., Columbia, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1. French 
Latin Art Music. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Boys 210, Girls 190. Fac full 43, part-time 5. 

Grad '5735. Entd Prep Sch '57 34. (Deerfield 4, Emma Wil- 
lard 3, Andover 2, Choate 2, Dana Hall 2, Exeter 2). Alumni 523, 
Tui $290-930. Scholarships partial 12 ($6000). Est 1916. Inc 1936 
nonprofit. 

This parent-owned school developed from the little Community 
School of Mrs. Douglas Macintosh, principal from 1934 to 1938. 
Dr. Welles, former principal of the Shanghai American School 
and a man of broad liberal views, has been head since 1938 and 
has done much to improve the plant and to broaden the curricu- 
lum. The sound academic study is supplemented by numerous 
offerings in music, art, crafts, dramatics, and by a limited work 
program. 1955 saw the completion of a new building with audi- 
torium and stage and with classrooms for creative arts. 



ST. LUKE'S SCHOOL 
Day Boys Ages 6-18 

New Canaan, Conn. N. Wilton Rd. Tel. Woodward 6-0209. 
Joseph Robeson Kidd, A.B., D.Sc.Ed. (Hon), Lafayette, B.D., 
Yale, Ph.D., Edinburgh, Head. 

Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. 

Enr 215. Elem 115, Sec 100. Fac full 13, part-time 1. 

Grad '5720. Entd Col '5720. (Lafayette 4, Brown 1, Dart- 
mouth 1, U of Pa. 1, Williams 1, Yale 1). Alumni 1116. 

Tui $800-1075. Est 1928. Partnership. 

Purchased in 1938 by Dr. Kidd, former English instructor at 
Mercersburg Academy, St. Luke's has been directed since 1945 
by him and Dr. William K. von Fabrice. A new building was 
occupied in 1940, and a new gymnasium-study hall completed in 
1956. 



NEW HAVEN, CONN. Pop 164,443. Alt 10 ft NY,NH&H R.R. 
70 mi. NE of New York, Rt U.S.I. On the green of this industrial 
city famous for its locks and clocks stand three ancient and inter- 
esting types of old New England Meeting House. To the S is a 



Conn. Leading Private Schools 134 

great display of Roman architecture, bank, court house and fed- 
eral building, N of the green Yale, during the early thirties, fer- 
tilized by Standard Oil money, spawned successive quadrangles 
of bastard Gothic, and today has a hundred million dollar plant. 
A Yale spirit of awareness lives in its Institute of Human Rela- 
tions and in its law faculty that dares to reveal revered sham. In 
Whitney vtile, 2 mi. NE is Hamden Hall. 

THE DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 
Day Girls Ages <?-18 

New Haven 11, Conn. 460 Prospect St. Tel. Main 4-3706. 

Julia B. Thomas, B.A., Smith; Edith B. Bleakly, B.A., Smith, 

Prins. 

Grades II-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music French 
Speech. Crafts. 

Enr 150. Elem 80, Sec 70. Fac full 15, part-time 3. 

Grad '5721. Entd Col '5721. (Smith 3, Conn Col Women 3, 
Vassar 2, Mt. Holyoke 1, Pembroke 1, Wilson 1). 

Tui $300-700. Scholarships partial 10. Est 1910. Inc 1955 non- 
profit. 

Class rms 12. Lib 3500 vols. Studios music 2, art 1. Gym. 

A development of the primary school established by Kate Glen- 
dinning, this received its present name when Mrs. Clive Day, pre- 
viously a member of the faculty, took over in 1916. Under Miss 
Thomas, a teacher in the school for eighteen years, who succeeded 
in 1938, high standards of college preparation are continued, the 
program somewhat enriched. In 1940 the school moved to new 
quarters leased from Yale. 

Daughters of conservative local families are prepared for Smith, 
Mt. Holyoke, Vassar, Skidmore, and other senior colleges, as well 
as for junior colleges. 



THE FOOTE SCHOOL 
Day- Coed Ages 4-14 

New Haven 11, Conn. 315 St. Ronan St. Tel. SPruce 7-3464. 
Kendall S. Pennypacker, B.A., Lafayette, M.A., Harvard, Hfead. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VIII. 

Enr Boys 110, Girls 105. Fac full 16, part-time 5. 

Tui $340-765. Est 1916. Inc 1931 nonprofit. 

Founded by Mrs. W. H. Foote, wife of a Yale professor, and 
enrolling numerous faculty children from the University, this 
school has a strong academic program that emphasizes English 
and mathematics. When Mrs, Winifred Sturley retired in 1955 
after twenty-five years as principal, Mr. Pennypacker, formerly 
head master at Keith Country Day in Illinois, was appointed. 



Conn. New England 135 

THE GATEWAY 
Bdg and Day -Girls Ages 10-18 

New Haven 11, Conn. 9 St. Ronan Terrace. Tel. MA 4-0709. 
Marion G. Gowans, B,A,, Barnard, M.A., Columbia; G. Audrey 
Cowling, B.A., M.A., Oxford, Prins. 

Grades VII- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Literature 
Physiology. Music. 

Enr Bdg 10, Day 75. Fac full-time 12. Adm Staff 5. 

Tui Bdg $1300 (+$50), Day $600 (+$25). Scholarships partial 
20 ($4000). Est 1912, Inc 1944 nonprofit. 

Established by Alice E. Reynolds as a day school, The Gate- 
way was taken over in 1942 by Miss Gowans and an associate, and 
college preparation stressed. There is a five-day boarding depart- 
ment 

HAMDEN HALL COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 

Coed Ages 3-18 
New Haven, Conn. 1108 Whitney Ave; Tel. UN 5-6158. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Post Grad 1-2. 
Col Prep. Art Music Typing. Languages. International Pro- 
gram. Remedial Reading. Crafts. 

Enr Boys 205, Girls 155. Elern 245, Sec 115. Fac full 30, part- 
time 23. 

Grad '56 25. Entd Col '56 17 (Skidmore 2, Mt. Holyoke 1, 
Wellesley 1, Trinity 1, Smith 1, Rollins 1). Alumni 400. 

Tui $285-795. Scholarships full 9, partial 25 ($17,250). Est 1912. 
Inc 1935 nonprofit. 
Summer Day Play Group. Tui $90. 

Plant $750,000. Class rms 37. Lib 7500 vols. Labs 2. Studios 
music 4, art 1. Gyms 2. Fields 10. 

One of the earliest country day schools, Hamden Hall was 
established by the late Dr. John P, Gushing and made coeduca- 
tional in 1926 by H. H. Vreeland. Edwin Stanley Taylor, who 
succeeded when the school was reorganized as a parent-owned, 
non-profit corporation in 1933, increased enrollment. In recent 
years the plant has been notably enlarged and improved. 

Graduates enter Wesleyan, Conn. Col, Trinity, MIT, and many 
other colleges throughout the East. The international program, 
dedicated to world peace and understanding, includes the new 
museum and library, enrolls some foreign students, and has many 
activities. 

HOPKINS GRAMMAR SCHOOL 
Co Day- Boys Ages 10-18 

New Haven 15, Conn. 986 Forest Rd. Tel. FU 7-2539. 
F. Allen Sherk, B.A., Yale, Head. 



Conn. Leading Private Schools 136 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music Lan- 
guages Mathematics Sciences. Remedial Reading. 

Enr 285. Fac full 25, part-time 3. 

Grad '5741. Entd Col '57 40. (Yale 13, Trinity 3, Union 2, 
Princeton 2, Rochester 2, Stetson 2). Alumni 1800. 

Tui $1000. Scholarships full 20, partial 75 ($30,000). Est 1660. 

Plant $750,000. Endowment $500,000*Class rms 28. Lib 3500 vols. 
Labs 3. Studios, music 1, art 1. Gym. Fields 6. Courts 6. 

In 1660 this academy was established on the bequest of Edward 
Hopkins, seven times governor of Connecticut Colony. Early grad- 
uates entered Harvard, but after the founding of Yale, it naturally 
prepared primarily for that institution, and between 1795 and 1921 
every president of Yale was associated with Hopkins as graduate, 
rector, or trustee. 

Under Dr. George B. Lovell from 1916, the school entered 
upon a new era. Breaking with the two-century academic routine, 
he revised, expanded, and enriched the classical curriculum, and 
when the school moved to its present site in 1925 inaugurated a 
full country day program, and built up a faculty unusual in its 
breadth of experience. Upon his retirement in 1953, Mr. Sherk, 
after sixteen years at Milton Academy, succeeded him. He has 
continued to develop the curriculum, adding new courses in art, 
music, special English, mathematics, and physical education, and 
has completed a building program permitting a larger enrollment. 

After completing the solid academic program, graduates now 
enter not only Yale, the University of Conn., and Dartmouth, but 
also Brown, Trinity, the University of Pa., and many other col- 
leges and universities. Student activities emphasize publications, 
music, and athletics. 



PROSPECT HILL SCHOOL 
Day Girls Ages 13-18 

New Haven 11, Conn. 475 Prospect St. Tel. Main 4-6583. 
Jeanann Malloch Gray, B.A., Smith, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Bible Typing. 

Enr 120. Fac full 9, part-time 10. 

Grad '5727. Entd Col '5727. (Bryn Mawr 3, Colby Jr. 3, 
Vassar 3, Sweet Briar 3, Hollins 2, Smith 2). Alumnae 390. 

Tui $800. Scholarships partial 8 ($2050). Est 1930. Inc 1932 
nonprofit. 

Class rms 11. Lib 1800 vols. 

A group of parents organized Prospect Hill as a coeducational 
college preparatory school. Until 1951 headed by Mary B. Thomp- 
son, it is now directed by Miss Gray and a faculty which draws 
to some extent on the material afforded by proximity to Yale. 

Recent graduates have entered Wellesley, Smith, Mt. Holyoke, 



Conn. New England 137 

Connecticut College^ Vassar, RadclifTe. Among extra-curricular 
activities are dramatics, music, support of an adopted school in 
France, publications, especially a French magazine, and sports, 
including fencing. 

In the fall of 1956 the school was relocated on what was 
formerly the site of the Yale Observatory, and plans made for 
increased enrollment, broadened curriculum, and improved facili- 
ties for academic and extra-curricular activities, which include 
religion, art, drama, music, publications, hockey, dance, and ice 
skating. 



NEW MILFORD, CONN. Pop 5799. Alt 480 ft. NY,NH&H 
R.R. 15 mi. N of Danbury, Rt U.S.7. On the Housatonic River, 
New Milford is in the center 'of a tobacco growing region. The 
135 acre campus of Canterbury School, on a hill a mi. from the 
station, looks out over the lowlands to the Berkshires- 



CANTERBURY SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 13-18 

New Milford, Conn. Tel. Elgin 4-5514. 

Walter F. Sheehan, A.B., L.H.D., Williams, M.A., Amherst, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Mathematics Sciences. Music. 

Enr Bdg 185, Day 10. Fac full 21. Adm Staff 3. 

Grad '5742. Entd Col '5742. (Princeton 5, Georgetown 5, 
Harvard 4, Cornell 3, Villanova 3, Notre Dame 2). Alumni 820. 

Tui Bdg $2250 (+$145), Day $875. Scholarships partial 27 
($23,000). Est 1915. Roman Catholic. 

Plant $1,350,000. Dorm rms 103. Class rms 14. Lib 6000 vols. 
Labs 2. Studios music 1, art 1. Gym. Swimming pool. Fields 5. 
Courts 6. Artificial hockey rink. 

Long holding high rank among Catholic boarding schools for 
boys, and appealing to Catholic families not only in New England 
but also from throughout the country, Canterbury is conducted by 
Catholic laymen under the patronage of the Archbishop of Hart- 
ford. The work accomplished by the first head master, Jesuit 
trained Dr. Hume, was recognized by the Pope in 1938 when he 
was made Knight of St. Gregory. 

Dr. Sheehan, his successor in 1948, came to the school after 
thirteen years on the Deerfield faculty and two as dean of fresh- 
men at Williams. Boys are adequately prepared for college and 
trained in the doctrines and practices of the church. Recent devel- 
opments include introduction of a honors course and advanced 
mathematics, and additions to faculty and plant. Graduates 
enter not only Cathojic institutions, but also Yale, Cornell, 



Conn. Leading Private Schools ^8 

Williams, and other nonsectarian colleges and universities. Music, 
art, debating, dramatics, and hobbies are among the extra-curricu- 
lar activities. See also page 665 



NORWALK, CONN. Pop 49,460. Alt 39 ft. NY,NH&H R.R. 13 
mi. SW of Bridgeport, Rt U.S.I. Razed by the British in Revolu- 
tionary days, Norwalk, a busy industrial city, is characteristically 
New England in appearance, with many old Colonial homes and 
the two white meeting houses on its elm-shaded green. Writers, 
artists, musicians and actors have peppered the outskirts with 
bungalows, chalets, cottages and mansions. Kolburne School is 
here; in Rowayton, at the head of Five Mile River, is The Thomas 
School. 

THE KOLBURNE SCHOOL 
For Slow-learning, Emotionally Disturbed, and Brain-injured 

Bdg -Coed Ages 5 and up 

Norwalk, Conn. West Rocks Rd. Tel. Vlctot 7-4266. 
L. L. Kolburne, A.B., CCNY, M.A., Columbia, Dir. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII. Art Manual Arts Typing 
Home Economics. 

Enr Bdg Boys 20, Girls 15; Day 10. Fac full 7, part-time 4. 

Tui Bdg $4500 minimum, Day $200 mo, minimum. Est 1947. 
Partnership. 

Summer Session and Camp. Tui Bdg $800 minimum. 

Kolburne offers year-round care for slow-learning and retarded 
children and those with emotional or behavior problems. There is 
a psychotherapeutic corrective program as well as elementary 
grade work supplemented by manual arts and home duties. 



THE THOMAS SCHOOL 
Co Day Girls Ages 3-17, Boys 3-8 

Rowayton, Conn. Bluff Ave. Tel. VO 6-1570. 

Mrs. Catharine Taussig Opie, A.B., Bryn Mawr, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col 
Prep. Art Music. 

Enr 140. Fac full 15, part-time 4, 

Grad '579. Entd Col '57~-8. (Bryn Mawr, Wellesky, Vassar, 
Tufts, Northwestern, Carnegie Tech). Alumnae 350. 

Tui $300-800 (+$50). Scholarships full 1, partial 2 ($1000). Est 
1922, Inc 1953. 

Class rms 19. Lib 15,000 vols. Lab. Studio music 2, art 1. 
Shop. Fields 4. 

Impelled by her feeling that certain girls require surroundings 



Conn. New England 139 

and educational programs fitted to their particular needs, Miss 
Mabel Thomas opened this school. Upon her retirement in 19S4, 
she was succeede,d by Mrs. Opie, formerly on the faculty. Main- 
taining high standards, with emphasis on creative work in the 
arts, it continues to appeal to the socially and intellectually 
discriminating. Graduates enter Smith, RadclifTe, Wellesley, 
Vassar, and other colleges. 



POMFRET, CONN. Pop 2018. Alt 389 ft. NY,NH&H R.R. 16 

mi. NE of Willimantic, Rt.91. This pleasant old town, rich in 
memories of Israel Putnam, is surrounded by rolling hills. Pomfret 
School faces the green across from the old Ben Grosvenor Inn. 
The Rectory School is on Pomfret Street. 

POMFRET SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 12-18 

Pomfret, Conn. Tel. Putnam WAlrmt 8-2744. 

David C. Twichell, A.B., Williams, M.A., Yale, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music Languages History 
Mathematics Mechanical Drawing Typing Manual Arts Shop. 

Enr 185. Fac full 26, part-time 5. 

Grad '5739. Entd Col '5735. (Yale, Columbia, Stanford, 
Harvard, Williams). Alumni 1570. 

Tui $2100 (+$250). Scholarships ($35,000). Est 1894. Episcopal. 

Dorm rms 140. Class rms 18. Lib 10,000 vols. Labs 4. Studios 
music 3, art 2, Gym. Fields 5. Courts 4. 

This boarding school was founded by one of the great school 
masters, William E. Peck, who left St. Mark's in order more fully 
to carry out his ideals in a new environment William Beach Olm- 
sted, his successor, enlisted the interest of people of wealth and 
gave the school social standing. Halleck Lefferts, coming from 
Thacher School, California, to head Pomfret in 1929, brought 
warmth and sincerity, broadening and liberalizing the curriculum 
and raising the scholastic standing. Later he introduced a practi- 
cal work program involving building construction and work in 
machine and carpentry shop and on the school farm. 

Mr. Twichell, formerly assistant to the dean of Yale College, 
and on the Pomfret faculty since 1949, was appointed head master 
in 1951 when Dexter K. Strong resigned to accept the headship 
of the Lakeside School in Seattle, Washington. 

The curriculum, stressing alike liberal studies and sciences, and 
supplemented by shop, crafts, art, and music, prepares for Har- 
vard, Yale, and Princeton, but some graduates attend Middlebury, 
the University of Va., Williams, and other colleges. 



Conn, Leading Private Schooh 140 

A student-faculty council may take any action it^ considers 
necessary to promote the welfare of the school community. Extra- 
curricular activities, including many sports, are varied. 



THE RECTORY SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 8-15; Day Boys 8-15, Girls 8-13 

Pomfret, Conn. Route 44. Tel. Putnam Walnut 8-4529. 
John Brittain Bigelow, A.B., Harvard, Head. 

Grades IV-VIII, High Sch 1." Art Music French Latin Alge- 
bra. Remedial Reading Tutoring Make-up work. 

Enr Bdg 90, Day 30. Fac full 19, part-time 4. 

Grad '5622. Entd Prep Sch '56 Groton 1, Taft 1, Pomfret 1, 
South Kent 1, Berkshire 1, others. Alumni 557. 

Tui Bdg $1850 (+$200), Day $400- e i50. Scholarships partial 4 
($6000). Est 1920. Inc 1935 nonprofit. Episcopal affiliated. 

Plant $290,000. Endowment $5000, Dorm rms 68. Class rms 10. 
Studios music 3, art 2. Gym. Fields 4. Courts 2. 

The Rev. and Mrs. F. H. Bigelow began this school as a little 
tutoring group in their home, and his pervading kindliness com- 
bined with her untiring energy immediately attracted students, 
Their son has been head master since the death of the founder in 
1937, and with the able assistance of his wife devotes himself to 
the conduct of a well ordered school with much outdoor life. 

The boys are thoroughly grounded in fundamentals and pre- 
pared for secondary boarding schools, including Andover, Choate, 
Deerfield, Holderness, Proctor, St. Mark's, Shady Side, and West- 
minster. Grades five through eight are divided into fast and slow 
sections, and there is an accelerated program in languages for 
especially able students. 

Remedial reading, at an additional charge, is under Page Sharp, 
who directs similar courses in neighboring schools. See page 667 



SALISBURY, CONN. Pop 3132. Alt 685 ft NY, NH&H R.R, 4 
mi. W of Canaan, Rt U.S.44. In the Taconic Mts. on the Mass, 
and N.Y. state lines is the old New England village of Salisbury, 
The Salisbury School stands conspicuously on a hill commanding 
an extensive view. 

SALISBURY SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 12-18 
Salisbury, Conn. Tel HEmlock 5-2931. 
George D. Langdon, B.A., St Stephen's, Head. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music Lan- 
guages Mathematics Mech Drawing. Developmental English* 



Conn. New England 141 

Enr Bdg 140, Day 5. Fac full 17, part-time 2. 

Grad '5728. Entd Col '5727. Alumni 1100. 

Tui $2100 (+$150). Scholarships. Work pgrm. Est. 1901. Inc 
1924 nonprofit. Episcopal. 

Summer Session. Enr 55. Developmental English. Tui $600, 
seven wks. 

Plant $900,000. Dorm rms 70. Class rms 10. Lib 4000 vols. Labs 
2. Studios music 1, art 1. Gym. Fields 5. Courts 7. 

Established by the Rev. George E. Quaile, this school was di- 
rected by his son, Emerson B., trom 1935 until his death in 1942. 
Under Mr. Langdon, who came as head master in 1942 after nine- 
teen years at Pomfret as chaplain and instructor, a real interest in 
the boys is apparent An extensive building and development pro- 
gram was completed in 1951 to celebrate the golden anniversary 
of the school. 

The solid, rather traditional curriculum successfully prepares 
for Yale and Harvard, as well as for Williams, Princeton, M.I.T., 
Dartmouth, and other colleges. Extra-curricular activities in addi- 
tion to the work program emphasize publications, public speaking, 
dramatics, a religious society, and sports. See also page 666 



SIMSBURY, CONN. Pop 1771. Alt 164 ft. NY, NH&H R.R. 14 
mi. NW of Hartford, on Rt. U.S. 202. Simsbury is an attractive 
little town on the Farmington River. The Westminster School, 
originally in Dobbs Ferry, has since 1900 occupied a site on Wil- 
liams Hill, N of the village, overlooking Farmington Valley. The 
Ethel Walker School occupies the 900 acre Stuart Dodge estate, 
2 mi. S of the village. 

THE ETHEL WALKER SCHOOL 
Bdg Girls Ages 14-18 

Simsbury, Conn. Tel. OLdfield 8-4467. 

Caroline Putnam Walker, B.A., Smith, M.A., Bryn Mawr, Acting 

Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art ' Music Languages Literature. 
Greek. Developmental Reading. Dramatics. 

Enr 165. Fac full 24, part-time 7. 

Grad '5749. Entd Col '5745. (Vassar 5, Bryn Mawr 4, Smith 
3, Stanford 3, Hollins 3, Wheaton 2). Alumnae 1850. 

Tui $3000 (+$100; uniforms $400). Scholarships partial 10 ($20,- 
000). Est 1911. Inc 1953 nonprofit 

Dorm rms 45. Class rms 21. Lib 7000 vols. Lab. Studios music 
11, art 1. Gym. Fields 4. Courts 8. Indoor riding ring. 



Conn. Leading Private Schools 142 

Ethel Walker opened this school in Lakewood, N J. f but moved 
it to its present site in 1917. After her marriage in 1921 to Dr. 
Terry Smith, Miss Walker controlled the school through a resident 
head. Long popular with wealthy New York families, the school 
took on a new tone during the regime from 1938 to 1944 of Mrs. 
Elliott Speer, who did much to develop in the girls a sense 
of responsibility and self-discipline, allowing them an increased 
amount of freedom. 

Mrs. Galbraith, who came from the assistant prindpalship of 
the Cathedral School of St. Mary, has continued Mrs. Speer's 
policies, added warmth and human understanding, and widened 
the geographical distribution of patrons. 

The school was reorganized not for profit in 1953 and the policy 
is now determined by a Board of Trustees. In T957, Miss Walker, 
Academic Dean, was appointed acting headmistress to succeed 
Natalie G. Galbraith, former headmistress. 

The long maintained standards of college preparation continue 
and there are excellent opportunities in art, music, literature and 
languages. Many graduates enter Smith and Vassar, as well as 
other leading colleges throughout the country. 

Much is made of outdoor life, and intramural sports, especially 
hockey, tennis, and golf, vie with the longtime favorite, riding. 
The school has student government, several clubs for special skills, 
publications, and service organizations. 



WESTMINSTER SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 12-19 

Simsbury, Conn. Tel. Oldfield 8-4444. 
Francis Keyes, A.B., Harvard, Head. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Latin Bible Music. 
Public Speaking Art Shop. 

Enr 175. Fac full 21, part-time 1. 

Grad '5730. Entd Col '5730. (Yale 3, Dartmouth 2, Hobart 
2, U of Pa. 2, Cornell 2, Princeton 1). Alumni 1331. 

Tui $2375 (+$125). Scholarships partial 32 ($42,250), Est 1888. 
Inc 1934 nonprofit. 

Plant $1,500,000. Dorm rms 92. Class rms 16, Lib 5000 vols. Labs 
2. Studios music 1, art 1. Gym. Swimming pool. Field, Courts 8. 

Founded by William Lee Gushing, the inspiration of the school 
lay in the ancient Uppingham School, estabjished 1584, in Rutland, 
England. On Mr. Cushing's retirement in J920 the head master- 
ihip was assumed by L. G. Pettee, long a member of the faculty, 
who in turn was succeeded by the late Raymond Richards Mc- 
Ormond, head master until 1936, when he was succeeded by Arthur 
Milliken. 



Conn. New England 143 

Under Mr. Milliken's vigorous and wise leadership, Westminster 
developed the plant, strengthened the curriculum and the faculty. 
After twenty years of distinguished service to the school, Mr. Mil- 
liken resigned, and Mr. Keyes, for twelve years his assistant, was 
appointed. Today Westminster boys enjoy to an unusual degree 
contacts with the head master and the faculty, Informal sports have 
been introduced and the prefect system revived. There is some 
effort to give the boys an understanding of how the school is run, 
and they may share in the activities of carpenter, gardener, etc., 
in the upkeep of the school. The musical boy has many opportuni- 
ties to hear and create, and pleasant social relations are main- 
tained with nea'rby schools. College preparatory work is of high 
standard and graduates enter the universities of Va. and Pa., 
Princeton, Harvard, Cornell, and other colleges and universities, 
though the Yale influence and attraction are naturally predominant. 

Recent improvements and new construction, the cost of which 
was borne by friends giving to the school more than a million dol- 
lars since 1936, have added to the efficiency and attractiveness 
of the plant. Facilities for publications, music, discussion groups, 
and hobby clubs, as well as for athletics, are extensive. See also 
page 668 



STAMFORD, CONN. Pop 74,293, NY,NH&H R.R. 8 mi. SW of 

Norwalk, Rt. U.S.I. Homes of New York business men line the 
shores of this important industrial center on Long Island Sound. 
The King School is just N of the business section. Daycroft is on 
Noroton Hill, Low-Heywood overlooks the Sound. 

DAYCROFT SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 6-19, Girls 10-19; Day Coed 3-19 

Stamford, Conn. Blachley Rd. Tel. Davis 4-9578. 

Clayton L. Akin, B.S., Wash. U., Ed.D., M.A., Columbia, Pres; 
James Laidlaw Heggie, B.S.Ed., M.Ed., Boston Univ, Head. 

Pre-Sch Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. 
Art Music Home Economics Typing. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg Boys 25, Girls 30; Day Boys 40, Girls 35. Elem 60, 
Sec 65. Fac full 9, part-time 8. 

Grad '5719. Entd Col '5717. (Russell Sage 2, Oberlin 1, 
Tufts 1, Principia 1, Middlebury 1, Sarah Lawrence 1). Alumni 
500. 

Tui Bdg $1850 (+$80), Day $350-600. Scholarships partial 28 
($14,000). Self-help scholarships 18. Est 1928. Inc 1939 nonprofit 

Plant $1,000,000. Class rms 12. Lib 3000 vols. Lab. 
Studios music 1, art 1. Gym, Fields 7. 

Founded for children of local Christian Scientists by Mrs. Smart, 
the school was for some years housed in little cottages on her 
estate. Since 1935 when the present site was occupied, a boarding 



Conn, Leading Private Schools 144 

department has been maintained; and in 1939 the scope was in- 
creased to include full college preparation. All the faculty are 
members of the Mother Church, and enrollment is limited to chil- 
dren whose parents are students of Christian Science. See page 807 

KING SCHOOL 
Day Boys Ages 6-. 18 

Stamford, Conn. 159 Colonial Rd. Tel. FI 8-6077. 
Robert K. Jackson, B.A., Princeton, Head. 

Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. French Latin Art Music. 

Enr 165. Elem 110, Sec 55. Fac full 12, part-time 4. 

Grad '5714. Entd Col '57 13. (Dartmouth 3, XI of Conn. 3, 
Duke 1, VPI 1, Ohio' State 1, Hobart 1). Alumni 1144. 

Tui $350-700. Scholarships partial 15 ($6000). Est 1875. Inc 
1949 nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Tutoring. Tui $200 per subject. 

Plant $325,000. Class rms 12. Lib 3000 vols. Lab 1. Fields 3. 

In 1957 a new schooihouse was built for occupancy in 1958, and 
Robert K. Jackson appointed head master when Vernon A, Dwelle, 
who had directed the school sincTe 1928 and who succeeded H. V. 
King became head master emeritus. Long identified with con- 
servative traditions, the school sends graduates to Dartmouth, 
Bowdoin, Yale, U. of Conn., Princeton and RPI. 



LOW-HEYWOOD SCHOOL 
Co Day Girls Ages 8- 18 

Stamford, Conn. 71 Courtland Ave. Tel. DAvis 5-153L 
Ann Ayres Herrick, A.B., Barnard, M.A., Columbia, Head. 

Grades III-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music. Rem 
Reading. 

Enr 200. Elem 120, Sec 80. Fac full 17, part-time 5. 

Grad '5717. Entd Col '5717. (Smith 2, Skidmore 2, Pem- 
broke 1, Vassar 1, Wellesley 1, Connecticut 1). Alumnae 1500. 

Tui $500-850. Scholarships full 14, partial 3 ($10,000), Est 1865. 
Inc 1944 nonprofit. 

Plant $400,000, Class rms 20. Lib 3500 vols. Outdoor theatre. 
Lab. Studios music 2, art 2. Gym. Fields 4. 

Successor to the Low-Heywood boarding school for girls, this 
was developed as a day school when the original plant on Shippan 
Point was sold in 1944. Mrs. Herrick, appointed in 1947, heads a 
competent faculty. With emphasis on liberal studies and creative 
work in music, dramatics, and art, the school prepares its gradu- 
ates for many colleges, including Wellesley, Vassar, Connecticut, 
Barnard, Smith, and Radcliffe, 



Conn. New England 145 

THE ROOSEVELT SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Coed Ages 10-18 

Stamford, Conn. Shippan Point, Tel. Davis 4-6731. 
Daniel Trotzky, B.C.S., NYU, LL.B., St. Lawrence, Dir. 

Grades VI- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Art Music 
Hebrew Commercial, Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg Boys 50, Girls 50; Day Boys 20, Girls 20. Fac full- 
time 14. 

Grad '5623. Entd Col '5623. Alumni 65. 

Tui Bdg $1850 (+ $250), Day $925. Scholarships full 6. Est 1948. 
Inc nonprofit. 

Nonsectarian, and enrolling students from throughout the world, 
Roosevelt School provides an American-Jewish cultural program. 
Classes are small, with adequate facilities for remedial and make- 
up work. Activities include dramatics, publications, music, and 
various sports. 



SUFFIELD, CONN. Pop 4895. Alt 124 ft 16 mi. N of Hartford, 
Rt75. An early Connecticut River settlement, first known as 
Stony River, Suffield is typically New England in appearance. Its 
chief interest has long been tobacco growing. 



SUFFIELD ACADEMY 
Bdg and Da/ Boys Ages 13-18 
Suffield, Conn. TeL North 8-7172. 
Appleton H. Seaverns, B.A., Williams, M.A., Trinity, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music. 

Enr Bdg 150, Day 35. Fac full 23, part-time 5. 

Grad '5750. Entd Col '5748. (Amherst, Cornell, Yale, Wil- 
liams, Wesleyan, Trinity). Alumni 2392. 

Tui Bdg $2000 (+$200), Day $800. Scholarships full 3, partial 
15 ($15,000). Est 1833, Inc nonprofit. 

Plant $1,800,000. Endowment $500,000. Dorm rms 75. Class rms 
25. Labs. 3. Studios music 1, art 1. Fields 6. Courts 10. Golf course. 

First known as the Connecticut Literary Institution, then as 
Suffield School, this received the designation "Academy" in 1937. 
Under the direction of the late Rev. Brownell Gage from 1924 to 
1939, and of John F. Schereschewsky until 1941, the school was 
headed by Conrad Hahn until 1952, when Mr. Seaverns was ap- 
pointed. He has renovated the plant, added a new gymnasium and 
four cottage-type dormitories and an infirmary. 

The Academy emphasizes preparation for college, with elec- 
tives in music, art, speech, and piloting. Graduates have entered 
most of the leading colleges in the Northeast Extra-curricular 
activities include student council, and hobbies. See also page 669 



Conn. Leading Private Schools 146 

THOMPSON, CONN. Pop 5585. Alt 540. NY, NH & H R.R. 
Four mi E of Putnam. This town with cotton and woolen mills 
is in an agricultural region. 

MARIANAPOLIS PREPARATORY SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 13-18 

Thompson, Conn. Tel. Putnam, WA 3-2510. 

Rev. John C, Petrauskas, A.B., Marianapolis, M.A., Marquette, 

Head. 

High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep (Classical, Scientific) 
General. 

Enr Bdg 110, Day 5. Fac full-time 12. 

Grad '5726. Entd Col '5724. (St. Michael's 4, Wentworth 2, 
Providence 2, Manhattan 2). 

Tui Bdg $1350 (+$100), Day $450. Scholarships 2. Est 1926. 
Roman Catholic. 

Established by the Marian Fathers at Marian Hills, Hmsdale, 
111., and moved to its present site in 1931, this school provides two 
college preparatory programs, as well as a general curriculum. 

See also page 670 



WALLINGFORD, CONN. Pop 20,000. Alt 100 ft. NY, KH&H 
R.R. 13 mi. NE of New Haven, Rt U.S.5. Dating from 1670, 
Wallingford has long been known for its ancient houses, its peach 
orchards, and its manufacture of silver. The impressive plant of 
The Choate School is in rolling country to the E. 



THE CHOATE SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ago* 12-18 

Wallingford, Conn. Tel. Colony 9-7722. 

The Rev. Seymour St. John, B.A., Yale, M.A,, Columbia, L.H.D., 
Tufts, Head. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Greek Calculus Applied 
Mechanics Manual Arts Etymology Public Speaking Radio 
Art Music. 

Enr Bdg 515, Day 2. Fac full 75, part-time 5. 

Grad '57 132. Entd Col '57132. (Yale 17, Harvard 10, Prince- 
ton 10, Cornell 10, Williams 6, Middlebury 6). Alumni 4446. 

Tui Bdg $2400 (+$150), Day $900. Scholarships full 4, partial 
64 ($75,000), Est 1896. Inc 1936 nonprofit 

Summer Session. Make-up courses. Enr 100. Tui $525 six wks. 

Plant $4,500,000. Endowment $6,000,000. Dorm rms 300. Class 
rms 42. Lib 20,000 vols. Labs 10. Studios music 15, art 2. Gyms 2. 



Conn. New England 147 

Fields 19. Courts 24. Crew. Artificial ice rink 

Judge William Gardner Choate, brother of the famed 'New York 
attorney, Joseph Choate, established this school, which is now 
among the most distinguished preparatory schools in the country. 
Its influence, still growing, was founded on the forty year regime 
of Dr. George C. St John. His son, the present head, who joined 
the faculty in 1935 and was appointed his successor in 1947 on the 
fiftieth anniversary of the school, continues the traditional pioneer- 
ing for individual education. 

College entrance requirements are kept in view in planning each 
boy's program, but with the flexible system and unusually broad 
curriculum he may take subjects chosen from different forms to 
suit his individual needs and interests. Separate divisions for honor 
students, opportunities for creativity in the musical and literary 
programs, and facilities in art, mechanics, and aeronautics are 
available. Close student-faculty relations and personal contact with 
each boy's family play an important part. Graduates enter Yale, 
Harvard, Princeton, Cornell, Dartmouth, Williams, and other lead- 
ing colleges and universities. 

Athletics gauged to each boy's level, a cottage plan, daily chapel 
service, and a very wide variety of extra-curricular activities fur- 
ther characterize the school. See also page 671 



WASHINGTON, CONN. Pop 2300. Alt 740 ft 12 mi. W of 

Litchficld, Rts 25 & 47. Among the first towns named after the 
'Father of his Country,' Washington is in a beautiful setting 
among hills. It has long been a favored place of residence for 

artists and professional people as well as an educational center. 
The Gunnery adjoins the village green; Rumsey Hall occupies 
a site, on the outskirts of the town. 



THE GUNNERY 
Bdg Boys Ages 13-18 

Washington, Conn. Tel. Underbill 8-7334. 
Ogden Miller, Ph.B., M.A., Yale, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Social Sciences Speech Fine Arts 
Geology Mechanical Drawing. Music Shop. 

Enr Bdg 145, Day 20. Fac full 22, part-time 2. 

Grad '5733. Entd Col '5732. (Yale 3, Cornell 2, Dartmouth 
2, Dickinson 2, Trinity 2, Brown 1), Alumni 1500. 

Tui Bdg $2300 (+$300), Day $900 (+$100). Scholarships full 1, 
partial 19 ($25,000). Est 1850. Inc 1922 nonprofit. 

Plant $1,000,000. Dorm rras 120. Class rm 12. Lib 3000 vols. 
Labs 3, Studios 2. Gyms 2. Fields 7. Courts 4. 



Conn. Leading Private Schools 148 

This historic school was established by the abolitionist and 
teacher, Frederick W. Gunn, and his wife Abigail Brinsmade. His 
son-in-law, John C. Brinsmade, head master from 1881 to 1922, 
was succeeded by Hamilton Gibson, who rejuvenated the school, 
and in 1937 by Tertius van Dyke. 

The present head was appointed in 1946 following the death of 
Russell S. Bartlett, head master from 1942. Mr. Miller's vigor and 
attractive personality, backed by administrative and educational 
experience at Yale for fifteen years after his graduation, won him 
the immediate support of alumni and patrons. Under his direction 
enrollment has been trebled, faculty strengthened, curriculum ex- 
panded, and the' campus and buildings refurbished and enlarged. 
A new $350,000 Memorial Building was erected in 1953-54. 

Many graduates of the solid, somewhat traditional curriculum 
enter Yale, with others going to Dartmouth, Cornell, Harvard, 
Lehigh, Middlebury. Extra-curricular activities include social and 
religious welfare, publications, debating, international affiliations, 
art, music, current affairs, various clubs, and a full roster of sports 
for all the boys. See also page 672 



RUM5EY HALL SCHOOL 
Bdg -Boys Ages 6-14; Day- Coed 6-14 

Washington,' Conn. Tel. UNderhill 8-2601. 
John F. Schereschewsky, A.B., Harvard, Dir. 

Grades I- VI 1 1 Art Music French Latin Manual Arts 
Remedial Reading, 

Enr Bdg Boys 55, Girls 5; Day Boys 35, Girls 10. Fac full 11, 
part-time 9. 

Grad '5723. Entd Prep Sch '5718. (Gunnery 4, Andover 2, 
Kent 1, St. George's 1, Ethel Walker 1, Pomfret 1). Alumni 900. 

Tui Bdg $1850 (+$250), Day $550-650. Scholarships full 8, par- 
tial 23 ($8000). Est 1900. Inc 1941 nonprofit. 

Lib 1000 vols. Lab. Studio* art 1. Fields 3. 

Founded by Lillias Rumsey Sanford in Seneca Falls, N.Y. and 
conducted by her in Cornwall from 1907 until her death in 1940 T 
Rumsey Hall long bore the imprint of her interest in her boys. 
Mr. Schereschewsky, after eight years of teaching and administra- 
tion, including two years as head master of Suffield Academy, 
purchased the school in 1941 and incorporated it not for profit. 
After war service he returned in 1945, and in 1949 moved the 
school from Cornwall to its present location. While limiting 
enrqllment to boys of normal or better than normal intelligence, 
Rumsey Hall provides a complete battery of diagnostic tests and 
intensified remedial instruction for those who require it. 

Graduates have entered St. George's, Andover, Exeter, Law- 
renceville, Loomis, Gunnery, Hackley, Westminster, and other 



Conn. New England 149 

preparatory schools. There are many extra-curricular activities, 
and much is made of team sports. See also page 875 



WATERBURY, CONN. Pop 104,477. Alt 260 ft 
R.R. 18 mL NW of New Haven, Rt.69. In the deep narrow valley 
of the Naugatuck, the village of Mattatuck, from which Water- 
bury grew, antedated the Revolution by nearly a century. The 
modern city is an important center of the brass industries. Wealthy 
manufacturers have long supported the private schools and have 
for many years brought musicians and lecturers to the city. In a 
region of homes to the NW is McTernan School. Saint Margaret's 
has occupied its country site on the outskirts since 1928. 



McTERNAN SCHOOL 
Day Boys Ages 7-14 

Waterbury 10, Conn. 106 Columbia Blvd. Tel. PLaza 4-0056. 
B. W. Hotchkiss, A.B., Williams, A.M., Middlebury, Head. 

Grades III-VIII. Latin French Algebra. 

Enr 85. Fac full 5, part-time 3. 

Grad '5720. Entd Prep Sch '5710. (Canterbury 5, Berkshire 
1, St. Bernard's 1, St. Paul's 1, South Kent 1, Taft 1). Alumni 430. 

Tui $600. Est 1912. Inc 1938 nonprofit. 

After the retirement in 1946 of the founder, C. C McTernan, 
Mr. Hotchkiss, previously at Harvey School, was appointed head, 
Remedial Reading is available. 

SAINT MARGARET'S SCHOOL 

Bdg and Day Girls Ages 13-18 

Waterbury 20, Conn. 565 Chase Pkwy. Tel. Plaza 4-4131. 
Pauline S. Fairbanks, A.B., Smith, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Music Art Economic Geography 
Physiography Physiology Sociology History of Art, Physics. 

Dramatics. 

Enr Bdg 80, Day 90. Fac full 16, part-time U. 
Grad '5745. Entd Col '5743. (Smith 3, Skidmore 3, Middle- 
bury 2, Wheaton 2, Wellesley 1, Goucher 1). Alumnae 2000. 

Tui Bdg $2100 (+$110), Day $700. Scholarships full 2, partial 
14. Est 1865. Episcopal 

Dorm rms 41. Class rms 17. Labs 2. Studios music 2, art 2. 
Gym. Courts 4. Riding facilities. 

Started by a group of parents as a local Collegiate Institute for 
Young Ladies, St. Margaret's was incorporated as a church school 
under its present name in 1875. From the first it has attracted a 
discriminating clientele, and students now come from many parts 



Conn. Leading Private Schools 150 

of the United States and from some foreign countries. The spirit 
of the school today is in large part due to Alberta C. EdeH's quiet, 
unassuming personality. When she retired in 1948, she had had 35 
years at St. Margaret's, for 25 of which she had been head mis- 
tress. 

The present head mistress, appointed in 1950, did graduate work 
at Columbia and in Paris, where she conducted her own school 
for American girls, and taught at the University of Me. and at 
Miss Porter's. Graduates of St. Margaret's School have en- 
tered Wellesley, Smith, Connecticut College, Skidmore, Vassar, 
Wheaton, where they have brought distinction to their school 
Extra-curricular activities, including French, Spanish and Latin 
clubs, music, dramatics, sports, dance, and publications supplement 
the academic work. See also page 759 



WATERFORD, CONN. Pop 1200, Alt 300 ft. NY, NH&H R.R. 
This small town with its textile and paper mills is three miles 

southwest of New London. 

WATERFORD COUNTRY SCHOOL 
For Exceptional Children 
Bdg Coed Ages 4-21 

Waterford, Conn, R.F.D. 1, Quaker Hill. Tel. New London 
Gibson 3-9820. 
Herbert Schacht, Dir. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VIII. Home Making Manual 
Training Agriculture. 

Enr Boys 20, Girls 20. Fac full-time 12. Staff 7. 

Tui $200-400 mo. Est 1925. 

Summer Camp. 

This farm school for children with academic, emotional, per- 
sonality, and speech problems provides a program that integrates 
class work, occupational training, and recreational activities. 
Affiliated is the Buckingham School, 22 Buckingham Rd. Brook- 
lyn 26, N.Y. See also page 806 



WATERTOWN, CONN. Pop 10,699. Alt 484 ft 6 mi. NW of 
Waterbury, Rt73. The importance of Watertown is due largely to 
The Taft School, whose $2,000,000 plant was designed and equipped 
by the architect of Yale's Harkness Memorial quadrangle. 



For further information, write Porter Sargent 



Conn. New England 151 

THE TAFT SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 13-19 

Watertown, Conn. Tel, CRestwood 4-2516. 

Paul Fessenden Cruikshank, B.A., Yale, D.Sc.Ed.(Hon), Wash- 
it) cton and Jefferson Univ, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Languages Calculus Music Art Me- 
chanical Drawing Religion Public Speaking. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg 310, Day 30. Fac full 40, part-time 3. 

Grad '5786. Entd Col '5786. (Yale 17, Dartmouth 8, Prince- 
ton 7, Wash and Lee 5, Cornell 4, RPI 4). Alumni 3368. 

Tui Bdg $2200 ( + $100-150), Day $800. Scholarships partial 70 
($70,000). Est 1890. Inc 1927 nonprofit 

Summer Session. Make-up Courses. Enr 90. Tui $450 six wks. 

Plant $2,338,876. Endowment $511,000. Class rms 25. Lib 11,000 
vols. Labs 3. Studios music 8, art 1. Gyms 2. Fields 16. Courts 14. 

To the creation and development of this school Horace Dutton 
Taft, brother of the President, devoted 46 years. He began as a 
lawyer, but teaching drew him in 1887 to Yale as a tutor of Latin, 
then, three years later, to establishing his own school. He was a 
great head master, a tremendous worker, and inspired his boys 
to work, stamping his personality upon the school. Under him the 
only salvation was through hard work. But he won confidence by 
his geniality and large-heartedness, his comradeship in the class- 
room and on the playground. In 1927 he placed the school under 
the control of a board of trustees. 

The selection of the present head to succeed him upon his re- 
tirement in 1936 was based on Mr. Cruikshank's success at his 
own school which he had established in nearby Washington after 
teaching at Hopkins Grammar and The Gunnery. Under him the 
school has continued in the tradition of the founder. 

The emphasis remains on college preparation, with many gradu- 
ates entering Yale, although others attend Brown, Princeton, 
Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, and similar colleges and universities. 
The curriculum, with honors sections for more proficient boys, is 
rather classical in its subjects, although stress is placed on sciences. 
There are numerous student clubs as well as extra-curricular 
music, debating, current events, student government, and a full 
program of interscholastic and intramural sports. A new gym- 
nasium was completed in 1956. 

The patronage is well distributed, and the regional scholarship 
program is growing. See also page 673 



WESTPORT, CONN. Pop 11,667. Alt 26 ft NY,NH&H R.R. 3 
mi. E of Norwalk, Rt U.S.I. An air of quiet leisure has long lured 
artists and craftsmen to this old town on Long Island Sound. 



Conn. Leading Private Schools 152 

THE BOLTON SCHOOL 
C Da/- -Boys Ages 3-7, Girls 3-18 

Westport, Conn. King's Highway. Tel. CA 7-4894. 

Mary E. E. Bolton, Prin of Lower Sch; S. Kathleen Laycock, 

Inter. B.A., London, Prin of Upper Sch. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. 
Col Prep General. Art Music. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Girls 150, Boys 15. Fac full 14, part-time 7. Adm Staff 2. 

Grad '57 4. Entd Col '573. (Manhattanville 2, Moravian 1). 
Alumnae 77. 

Tui $285-750. Est 1925. Proprietary. 

Primarily college preparatory, although offering a general pro- 
gram the school sends its graduates to many different colleges, 
primarily to ones in New England and the Middle Atlantic States. 

WINDSOR, CONN. Pop 3500. Alt 61 ft. NY,NH&H R.R. 3 mi. 

N of Hartford, Rt. U.S. 5A. The first English community in Con- 
necticut, Windsor's one long street runs on terraces along the 
Farmington River. In the meadows round about, Sumatra tobacco 
is grown. The Colonial buildings of Loomis School stand out 
conspicuously. 

THE LOOMIS SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 13-19 

Windsor, Conn, Tel Murdock 8-3643. 
Francis 0. Grubbs, A.B., Princeton, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music Manual Arts. Remedial 
Reading. 

Enr Bdg 235, Day 115. Fac full 31, part-time 6. 
Grad '5785. Entd Col '5779. (Yale 10, Cornell 7, Colby 6, 
Trinity 5, Princeton 4, Dartmouth 4). Alumni 3080. 

Fee Bdg $1800 (+$100), Day $500. Scholarships full 6, partial 
37 ($22,000). Self-help pgrm. Est 1914. Inc nonprofit. 
Windsor Summer School. Tui Bdg $325, Day $150. 
Plant $2,275,000. Endowment $3,775,000. Dorm rms 167. Class 
rms 15. Lib 7500 vols. Labs 4. Studios art 1, music 1. Shop. Mu- 
seum. Gym. Fields 11. Courts 14. 

Five of the Loomis family in 1874 drew up a charter for a 
school on what had been since 1639 the Loomis homestead, "for 
the free and gratuitous education of all persons of the age of 
twelve years and upwards to twenty years in all the departments 
of learning which are now taught or hereafter may be taught in 
the various grades of schools in this country ... so far as the 
funds of the institute will permit" While members of the Loomis 
family and residents of Windsor were given preference under the 
charter, the schbol rapidly developed a wide geographical dis- 
tribution of patronage. 



Conn. New England 153 

The vigor and strength of personality of N. Horton Batchelder, 
head master from 1912 to 1949, did much to establish the tone and 
character of the school Pioneering in the development of self-help 
and student government programs, emphasizing art and music 
with the guidance of Evelyn Longman Batchelder, maintaining 
strong relationships between school and community, giving faculty 
members a part in administration, and undertaking a building pro- 
gram leading to an architecturally harmonious whole, Batchelder 
made Loomis one of the leading college preparatory schools. On 
his retirement, William Speer succeeded. Mr. Grubbs, on the fac- 
ulty since 1930 and long director of studies, became head master 
in 1952. 

A distinctive feature of the college preparatory curriculum is a 
required course for seniors in the humanities, with visiting 
lecturers and faculty members presenting topics in music, art, 
religion, and other fields. Many graduates enter Yale, with others 
attending Middlebury, Princeton, Harvard, Wesleyan, Dartmouth, 
Trinity, 

The boarding students participate in the useful labor of the 
school, caring for their own quarters, the classrooms, and the 
school grounds and athletic fields. Other extra-curricular projects 
include several publications, numerous clubs, dramatics, music, 
and hobbies, as well as settlement house workers and hospital 
medical aides groups. See also page 674 

THE CHAFFEE SCHOOL 
Day Girlf Ages 13-18 

Windsor, Conn. 118 Palisado Ave. Tel MUrdock 8-3659. 
Mrs. Ralph W. Erickson, B.A., Middlebury, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music Typing. 

Enr 120. Fac full 7, part-time 11. 

Grad '5719. Entd Col '5719. (Smith 4, Conn. C 4, Mt. Holy- 
oke 3, Cornell 2, Colby Jr. 2, Radcliffe 1). 

Fee $500. Scholarships full 3, part-time 9 ($2200). Est 1914. Inc 
1925 nonprofit. 

Chartered by the Loomis Institute as a separate school for girls, 
this day school offers sound college preparatory work in the high 
school grades with a separate campus from Loomis located across 
the Farmington River, Many activities of the two schools are car- 
ried on in close cooperation. Among the colleges chosen by gradu- 
ates are Smith, Conn. College for Women, Mt. Holyoke. 



NEW YORK 

ALBANY, N.Y. Pop 134,995. Alt to 30 ft NYC; D&H R.R. 130 
mi. N of New York, Rt. U.S.9. The state capital, Albany is an im- 
portant shipping and transportation center, its waterways radiat- 
ing out to the St. Lawrence and Great Lakes ports. Here are 
located the N.Y. State Teachers College, Law School, Medical 
College and College of Pharmacy. Of the three well known private 
schools, the Academy for Girls is in the downtown district, and 
the million dollar building of the Academy for Boys in the New 
Scotland Ave. section. On a high plateau N of the city in Loudon- 
ville is the modern plant of St. Agnes School. 



THE ALBANY ACADEMY 
Co Day Boys Ages 5-19 
Albany 8, N.Y. Academy Rd. TeL 5-1461. 
Harry E. P, Meislahn, B.S., Princeton, A.M., Columbia, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art 
Music Latin Mechanical Drawing. Military Training. 

Enr 460. Elem 275, Sec 185. Fac full 37. part-time 2. 

Grad '5725. Entd Col '5725. (Cornell 3, Lafayette 3 Harvard 
2, Hamilton 2, Union 2, Dartmouth 2). Alumni 1250. 

Tui $400-725. Scholarships full 14, partial 34 ($18,000). Est 1813. 
Inc nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Enr 120. Tui $50 per course, seven wks. 

Plant $1,100,000, Endowment $145,000. Class rms 37. Lib 9066 
vols. Labs 2. Studios music 3, art 2. Gyms 2. Swimming pool. 
Fields 7. Courts 5. 

Long serving the old families of Albany, this institution moved 
to its present site in 1931 and is today a modern country day school 
preparing for college. The cadet battalion, organized in 1870, is 
now government accredited NDCC. Islay F, McCormick, head from 
1919, was succeeded in 1940 by his assistant, Harold T. Stetson, 
head until 1943. 

Mr. Meislahn had served for 15 years at Poly Prep Country 
Day in Brooklyn before his appointment here. In addition to the 
regular college preparatory work, there are special honors courses 
for ambitious and able students. Graduates enter many colleges, 
including Wesleyan, Cornell, Brown, Harvard, Yale, Union. 

154 



N. Y. Middle Atlantic States 155 

ALBANY ACADEMY FOR GIRLS 
Day 'Ages 4-19 

Albany 10, N.Y. 155 Washington Ave. Tel 3-2201. 
Rhoda E. Harris, A.B., Vassar, M.A., Columbia, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. 
Col Prep. Art Music Home Economics. Remedial Reading. 

Enr 300. Fac full 23, part-time 4. 

Grad '5725. Entd Col '5725. (Skidmore 2, Centenary 2, Mt. 
Holyoke 1, Pembroke 1, Vassar 1, Smith 1). Alumnae 1200. 

Tui $400-600. Scholarships full 11, partial 40. Est 1814. Inc non- 
profit. 

Plant $423,200. Endowment $229,049. Class rms 24. Lib 3174 
vols. Labs 2. Studios music 3, art 1. Gym. Fields 2. 

Founded as Albany Female Academy, and the oldest chartered 
school for girls in the country, this is primarily college preparatory, 
with graduates entering Syracuse, Elmira, Hartwick, Mount Holy- 
oke, Cornell, Rollins, and many other colleges and universities. The 
construction of a new plant on Academy Road, adjacent to its 
athletic facilities, allows transfer of all academic activities to a 
suburban environment. Miss Harris succeeded Margaret Trotter 
in 1941. 



ST. AGNES SCHOOL 
Bdg Girls Ages 14-18; Day Girls 5-18 

Albany 11,N.Y. Loudonville Rd. Tel. 62-5595. 

Blanche Pittman, B.A., Univ of Toronto, M.A., Columbia, L.H.D., 

Russell Sage, Prin. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep 
General. Music Art. 

Enr Bdg 40, Day 260. Elem 175, Sec 125. Fac full 30, part-time 2. 

Grad '5723. Entd Col '5723. Alumnae 1500. 

Tui Bdg $1600 (+$150), Day $300-550. Scholarships full 3, par- 
tial 2 ($3000). Est 1870. Episcopal. 

Plant $500,000. Endowment $75,000. Dorm rms 22. Class rms 26. 
Lib 5000 vols. Lab. Studios music 2, art 1. Gyms 2. Fields 2. 
Courts 4. 

Founded by Bishop William C. Doane of Albany under the 
shadow of the Cathedral, the school has long attracted daughters 
of conservative families in the city. Three notable women devoted 
their lives to its development, Ellen W. Boyd, Catherine R 
Seabury, and Matilda Gray, 

Since 1930 under the able administration of energetic and perva- 
sive Miss Pittman, academic standards have been maintained, 
courses broadened and the tone modernized. Recent additions to 
the school include a new chapel and five class rooms. Girls pre- 



N. r. Leading Private Schools 156 

pare for Smith, Vassar, Cornell, Syracuse, Skidrnore, Rad- 
cliffe, and other colleges. Vigorous, stimulating non-academic 
activities, including sports, music, art, publications, dramatics, and 
various clubs supplement the program. See also page 758 

AMENIA, N.Y, Pop 600. NYC R.R. 23 ml NE of Poughkeepsie, 
Rt U.S.44. Across the line from Sharon, Conn., this hamlet in the 
Berkshire foothills was, from 1863-67, the brief locus of Thomas 
Lake Harris* Brotherhood of the New Life Sect. 

THE VIEWPOINT SCHOOL 
Bdg Coed Ages 14-18 

Amenia, N.Y. Tel. 595 . 

Francis C. St. John, A.B., Princeton, M.A., Middlebury, Harvard, 

Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music. Mechanical Drawing 
Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg Boys 35, Girls 30; Day 5, Fac full 10, part-time 5. 

Grad '5714. Entd Col '57 13. (Columbia 1, Cornell 1, Colby 1, 
Pembroke 1, Bradford 1). Alumni 70. 

Tui Bdg $2200 (+$150), Day $750. Scholarships partial 
16 ($10,000). Est 1940. Inc 1940 nonprofit 

Plant $450,000. Dorm rms 29. Class rms 12. Lib 1500 vols. Lab, 
Studios 2. Gym. Fields 5. Courts 3. Riding facilities. 

Opened as a small tutoring, group, and in 1940 becoming an 
elementary and secondary school, Viewpoint eliminated the pri- 
mary grades in 1958 and now gives increased emphasis to academic 
and college preparatory subjects. With an attractive village cam- 
pus, and individual attention, Viewpoint sends graduates to Mid- 
dlebury, Wellesley, Sarah Lawrence, Colby. 

Mr. Francis C. St. John, from the family long identified with in- 
dependent education took over direction in 1957. See also page 807 

BEDFORD, N.Y. Pop 893. Alt 200 ft NYC R.R. 40 mi. NE of 
New York, Rt.22. Part of the Torquams tract bought from the 
Indians in 1640 by Nathaniel Turner, this small residential town 
is in a region of country homes and estates. 



BEDFORD-RIPPOWAM SCHOOL 
Co Day Coed Ages 5-15 

Bedford, N.Y. Cantitoe Rd. Tel. Bedford Village 4-3305. 
Walter F, Wyeth, A.B., Harvard, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1. Art Music 
French Latin. Remedial Reading". 

Enr Boys 125, Girls 140. Fac full 23, part-time 4. 



N. Y. Middle Atlantic States 157 

Grad '5722. Entd Prep Sch '5722. (Miss Porter's 4, Mill- 
brook 2, Brooks 2, Milton Acad. 2, Shipley 1, The Hill 1). Alum- 
ni 377. 

Tui $380-920. Scholarships ($3500). Est 1917. Inc nonprofit. 

Bedford-Rippowam prepares most of its students for secondary 
boarding schools. The present head, member of an old Cambridge 
family, and formerly assistant head master at the Country Day 
School, Newton, and then in 1940 successor to James M. Hubball 
at Buckley Country Day, followed Henry W. Schereschewsky in 
1946. The school recently acquired new property to care for an 
increased enrollment, and completed a new class building in 1955. 

BREWSTER, N.Y. Pop. 5000. 52 mi N of NYC on NYC R.R., 

Rt. 22. Brewster is just across the state line from Danbury, Conn. 
Brewster is just across the state line from Danbury, Conn. 

GREEN CHIMNEYS SCHOOL FOR LITTLE FOLK 
Bdg and Day Coed Ages 2-12 

Brewster, N.Y. Tel. 9-2996. 

S. Bernard Ross, Jr., B.A., Univ of Va,, M.A,, NYU, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VI. 

Enr Bdg Boys 50, Girls 35; Day 11. Fac full 7, part-time 5, 

Tui Bdg $1620 twelve mos, $1350 nine mos; Day $600 twelve 
mos, $450 nine mos. Est 1947. Inc. 

Summer Session. Enr 80, Tui $500. 

A farm school, with 75 acres, Green Chimneys provides not only 
academic fundamentals through grade six, but also arts, crafts, 
music, and French. The school has the services of a psychologist 
and a guidance person. Recent increase in enrollment has resulted 
in construction of a new dormitory cottage and the opening of a 
small infirmary. Among the many activities in addition to those 
offered by the farm setting are riding, swimming, and dance. The 
school is eight miles from the Brewster station, on the road to 
Putnam L'ake. 

BRIARCLIFF MANOR, N.Y. Pop 3500. Alt. 400 ft. NYC R.R. 
35 mi. N of New York, Rt.9A. Just off the Bronx River Parkway 
Extension, this town is back from the river in the Pocantico Hills, 

BRIARCLIFF COLLEGE 

Bdg and Day Girls Ages 1 7- 

Briarcliff Manor, N.Y. Tel Wilson 1-6400. 

Mrs. Ordway Tead, A.B., LL,D., Smith, Pres.; Miss Phillia 

Holmes, Dir. of Adm,; Kenneth T. Skelton, Reg. and Academic 

Dean. 

Jr Col 1-2. Art Cartography Music Speech-Radio-Drama 



N. Y. Leading Private Schools 158 

Secretarial American Civilization Child Development Liberal 
Arts General Occupational Therapy. 

Enr Bdg 260, Day 25. Fac full 24, part-time 2. 

Tui Bdg $2350, Day $1200. Scholarships ($41,000). Est 1905. Inc 
nonprofit. 

Plant $2,000.000. Dorm rms 122. Class rms 11. Lib 18,000 vols. 
Labs 2, Studios music 1, art 2. Gym. Swimming pool. Fields. 
Courts 2. Riding facilities. 

Developed from Mrs. Dow's School, since 1933 Briarcliff has 
offered only college work. Mrs. Tead, former dean of Finch 
Junior College, was appointed in 1942, following the resignation of 
Doris Laura Frick. With the support of a notable board of trus- 
tees, she has broadened and strengthened the academic work, 
developed the now considerable foreign enrollment, and pro- 
cured many new scholarships. In addition to the sound 
liberal arts transfer study, there are a child development cur* 
riculum preparing for further specialized work, and Array- 
supervised cartographic drafting and technique classes. Graduates 
transfer to leading colleges and specialized schools throughout 
the country. Among the many extra-curricular programs are 
active community and international service groups, and a chorus. 
See page 851 

BUFFALO, N.Y. Pop 580,132. Alt 600 ft B&O; DL&Wj NYC; 
P; LV R.R. Second largest city in the state, Buffalo is an impor- 
tant port at the eastern end of Lake Erie. With electric power 
supplied by Niagara Falls, 21 mi. N, it has maintained many 
industrial plants and the largest flour mill and grain elevator in 
the world. The University of Buffalo, a state institute of applied 
arts and sciences, and some huge Catholic schools are the princi- 
pal educational institutions. The Park School, with 13 buildings 
and a 60 acre campus, is in Snyder, a residential suburb 7 mi, NE. 

THE BUFFALO SEMINARY 
Day Girls Ages 13-18 

Buffalo 22, N.Y. 205 Bidwell Pkwy. Tei Lincoln 6780. 
Marian Williston Smith, B.A., Vassar, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music, 

Enr 210. Fac full 15, part-time 10. Adm Staff 4. 

Grad '5750. Entd Col '5746. (Cornell, Vassar, Skidmorc, 
Swarthmore, Radcliffe, Smith). 

Tui $800 (+$175). Scholarships. Est 1851. Inc nonprofit. 

Plant $467,000. Endowment $90,000. Class rms 21. Lib 5000 vols. 
Labs 2. Studios music 3, art 1. Gym. 

Preparation for college and participation in community activities 
have long characterized this school enrolling daughters of leading 
Buffalo families. L. Gertrude Angell, who moved the seminary to 



N. Y. Middle Atlantic States 159 

its present site, was succeeded on her retirement in 1952 by Miss 
Marian Smith, former director of admissions at Barnard. Grad- 
uates enter many colleges, including Wellesley, Smith, Wells, Vas- 
sar, Mt. Holyoke. 

ELMWOOD-FRANKLIN SCHOOL 
Day Boys Ages 3-10, Girls 3-14 

Buffalo 16, N.Y. 104 New Amsterdam Ave. Tel. VI 5035. 
Russell A. Anderson, B.A., Trinity, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VIII. French Art Music. 
Remedial Reading. Shop. 

Enr Girls 210, Boys 90. Fac full 19, part-time 6. 

Grad '5719. Entd Prep Sch '5719. (Buffalo Sem 17, Miss 
HalFs 1, Garrison Forest 1). 

Tui $400-625. Scholarships full 6, partial 15 ($7000). Est 1889. 
Inc. nonprofit. 

Plant $550,000. Class rms 18. Lab. Studios music 1, art 1. Gym. 
Fields 2. 

More than 60 years ago the Elmwood School and the Franklin 
School were established as small kindergarten groups, adding 
upper grades through the years until the schools merged in 1941, 
with Charlotte K. Holbrook, who had served with Elmwood since 
1914, continuing as head mistress until 1943, when she was suc- 
ceeded by Janet Crawford Potter. In 1956 Mr. Anderson, formerly 
head master of The Hill School in Virginia, succeeded Dr. Louise 
T. Paine, who had been appointed head mistress in 1955 following 
the resignation the previous year of Mrs. William A, Thorington. 

The new plant, opened in 1951 adjacent to the Nichols School, 
offers improved academic facilities as well as playgrounds and 
sports fields, and a manual training workshop and several studios. 



NARDIN ACADEMY 
Day Girls Ages 4y 2 -6V 2 , 13-18 
Buffalo 22, N.Y. 135 Cleveland Ave. Tel. LI 8775. 
Helen K. Whissel, Pres. 

Kindergarten Grade I High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General 
Commercial Home Economics. 

Enr 200. Grad '48-'52-- 319. Entered Col '48-'52~ 197. Fac full- 
time 14, part-time 4. Staff 3. Tui $130-140. Scholarships 4. Est 
1857. Roman Catholic, 

Class rms 11. Lib 2197 vols. Labs 3. Studios music 1, art 1. Gym. 

In 1951 Miss Whissel succeeded Florence Grupp to the presi- 
dency of this large day school. About half of the graduates go on 
to colleges, chiefly to Catholic institutions. 

For further information^ write Porter Sargent 



N, Y. Leading Private Schools 160 

NICHOLS SCHOOL 
Co Day- Boys Ages 9-18 

Buffalo 16, N.Y. Amherst and Colvin Sts. Tel. RI 8212. 
Philip M. B. Boocock, A.B., Rutgers, Head. 

Grades V-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep, Latin Spanish 
Mathematics Sciences Economics Industrial Arts. 
Remedial Reading. . 

Enr 340. Fac full 24, part-time 3. 

Grad '5747. Entd Col '57-43. (Princeton 7, Brown 5, Cor- 
nell 3, Trinity 3, Yale 2, Michigan 2). Alumni 1602. 

Tui $850. Scholarships full 4, partial 25 ($16,000). Est 1892. 
Inc 1924 nonprofit. 

Summer Day Camp. Enr 210. Tui $150 six wks. 
Plant $1,000,000. Endowment $40,000. Class rms 20. Lib 6000 vols. 
Labs 2. Studio music 1. Gym. Swimming pool. Fields 9. Courts 6. 
Established by the late William Nichols of Boston, and country 
day since 1909 under the vigorous leadership of Dr. Joseph Dana 
Allen, Nichols School has always been characterized by effi- 
cient college preparation. From its staff have been chosen, in the 
last two decades, a number of executives for smaller schools. Mr. 
Boocock, a former master here and for three years head of Rutgers 
Preparatory, was elected head master in 1937. Graduates enter 
Princeton, Cornell, Williams, Yale, Dartmouth, Amherst, and 
other leading colleges. Activities stress publications, music, discus- 
sion groups and dramatics, as well as a program in athletics. 

PARK SCHOOL OF BUFFALO 
Co Day Coed Ages 3-19 

Buffalo 21, N.Y. 115 N. Harlem Rd., Snyder P.O. Tel. CI 1242. 
E. Barton Chapin, Jr., A.B., Yale, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4 
Post Grad 1. Col Prep General. Art Music. Remedial Reading. 
Enr Boys 190, Girls 180. Elem 245, Sec 125. Fac full 36, part- 
time 11. 
Grad '5626. Entd Col '5624 (Smith 1, Radcliffe 1, Williams 

1, Hamilton 1, Cornell 1, Syracuse 1). Alumni 900. 

Tui $630-930. Scholarships partial 81 ($30,000). Est 1912. Inc 
nonprofit. 

Summer Camp. Tui $210. 
Class rms 29. Lib 6596 vols. Labs 2. Studios music 2, art 2. Gyms 

2. Swimming pool. Fields 5. Riding facilities. 

First of the numerous Park Schools founded by Mary H, Lewis, 
this has remained markedly progressive throughout its history. Mr. 
Chapin, with experience at Shady Hill and Riverdale, succeeded 
M. Adolphus Cheek in 1951. There is a remedial reading clinic, as 
well as opportunities for tutoring. In the last five years graduates 



N. Y. Middle Atlantic States 161 

have entered more than 100 different senior and junior colleges. 
Extra-curricular activities include discussion clubs and publica- 
tions. 

CAZENOVIA, N.Y. Pop 2000. Alt 1246 ft. Rt. U.S. 20. This 
attractive little town is in the lake region of central New York. 
The school is near the shores of Owahgena Lake. 

CAZENOYIA JUNIOR COLLEGE 
Bdg Girls Ages 16- 

Cazenovia, N.Y. Tel. Oldfield 5-3466. 
Mrs. Rhea M. Eckel, Pres. 

Jr Col 1-2. Art Business Liberal Arts Merchandising Nur- 
sery School Science Secretarial (Chemical, Foreign, General, 
Legal, Medical). 

Enr Bdg 175, Day 5. Fac full 13, part-time 4. 

Tui Bdg $1775 (+$200), Day $740. Scholarships 17 ($8,755). 
Est 1824. Inc nonprofit. 

Plant $753,842. Endowment $114,985, Dorm rms 102. Class rms 
14. Lib 6650 vols. Labs 2. Studios music 2, art 2, Gym. Fields. 
Courts 2. 

Becoming in 1942 a junior college exclusively for women, Ca- 
zenovia gives a variety of liberal arts courses as well as terminal 
programs of vocational training. The school has adopted the core 
curriculum with contemporary civilization and the humanities 
approached through 'great' books, paintings, and music, and 
other required courses include Personal Philosophy, physical 
education, and either mathematics or music. Transfer gradu- 
ates have entered Syracuse, Skidmore, St. Lawrence, Presbyterian 
School of Nursing, and many others. The many activities include 
publications, music, art, dramatics, and clubs, as well as such an- 
nual highlights as Autumn Day, Winter Carnival, and May Day. 
Mrs. Eckel succeeded Isabel Phisterer in 1957. See page 852 



CORNWALL, N.Y, Pop 2211. Alt 282 ft. NYC R.R. 60 mi. N of 
N.Y., off Rt U.S.9W. On the site of Cornwall, 5 mi. N of West 
Point, the Continental Army held winter camp after Valley Forge. 
On a 350 acre campus on the outskirts are the imposing buildings 
of N.Y. Military Academy. Braden School is located in nearby 
Cornwall-on-Hudson. Storm King takes its name from the moun- 
tain which towers above it to the NE, adjacent to Black Rock 
Forest. 

BRADEN SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 1 6-20 

Cornwall-on-Hudson, N.Y. Tel. Cornwall 3-5230. 
Lt Gerald J. Sullivan, B.S., West Point, B.S., M.I.T., Prin. 



N. Y. Leading Private Schools 162 

Col and Service Academy Preparation. 

Enr Bdg 40, Day 5. Fac full 3, part-time 2. 

Grad '56 62. Entd Col '56 59 (West Point 50, Annapolis 3, 
Merchant Marine Acad 1). Alumni 2000. 

Tui Bdg $1500, Day $750. Scholarships 3. Est 1883, Inc 1950. 

Summer Session. Enr 15. Tui $350 seven wks. 

Plant $60,000. Dorm rms 22. Class rms 2. Fields 3. 

With closely supervised study and an acceleration plan, Braden 
prepares for the services academies, with more than 80% of the 
graduates in the last five years entering either West Point or the 
U.S. Naval Academy, with others going to R.P.I., the University 
of Pa., Holy Cross, University of Mich. 



NEW YORK MILITARY ACADEMY 

Bdg - Boys Ages 6-18 

Cornwall-on-Hudson, N.Y. Academy Ave. Tel. Cornwall 3-3710. 
Brig. Gen. Nelson Dingley, III, D.Sc., Supt; Bartlett E. S. Chap- 
pell, A.B., Bard, M.A., Columbia, Dean. 

Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep (Lib- 
eral Arts, Scientific) General & Business Mech Drawing Art 
Music, Rem. Reading & Math. R.O.T.C. Band. 

Enr 425, Elem 115, Sec 310. Fac full 41, part-time 2. 

Grad '5774. Entd Col '57 68. Alumni 6341. 

Tui $1625 (+$775). Band Scholarships. Work Scholarships. 
Est 1889. Inc 1948 nonprofit. 

Summer Camp. Enr 300. Tui Bdg $550. 8 wks. 

Plant $2,743,000. Dorm mis 212. Class rms 31, Lib 5500 vols. 
Labs 7. Studios music 5, art 1. Gym. Swimming" pools 2. Fields 8. 
Courts 14. 

Drawing its enrollment from all the states and from many for- 
eign countries, this large academy was directed for many years by 
Gen. Milton F. Davis. His son-in-law, Col. Frank A. Pattillo, was 
appointed superintendent in 1938. He enlarged the plant and in- 
augurated an efficient system of scholastic, military, and athletic 
training. 

In 1951 Gen, Dingley became superintendent, and two years later 
Mr. Chappell succeeded T, F. Reidy as dean. Primarily prepar- 
atory with graduates entering many different colleges, the school 
also offers a terminal general curriculum. A guidance department 
with an individual counseling plan and a remedial reading course 
are included in the program. Extra-curricular activities emphasize 
sports for all cadets, but there are also various subject and hobby 
clubs. The Junior and Intermediate Schools have separate quarters. 

When writing schools, please mention this Handbook 



N. Y. Middle Atlantic States 163 

THE STORM KING SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 13-18 

Cornwall-on-Hudson, N.Y. Mountain Rd. Tel. Cornwall 3-4165. 
Warren P. Leonard, Sc.B,, Brown, Head. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4. Post Grad 1. Col Prep. Art Music 
Remedial Reading. Shop Dramatics. 

Enr Bdg 100. Day 10. Fac full 13, part-time 3. 

Grad '5717. Entd Col '57 17. (St. Lawrence 2, U of Va. 1, 
Rollins 1, Clark 1, Gettysburg 1, Bates 1), Alumni 800. 

Tui Bdg $2000 (+$200), Day $700. Scholarships full 2, partial 
10 ($7000). Est 1867. Inc 1914 nonprofit 

Dorm rms 50. Class rms 8. Lib 3500 vols. Labs 2. Gym, Fields 
3. Courts 4. 

Established as the Cornwall Heights School by the Rev. Louis 
P. Ledoux, from 1872 this was directed by Oren Cobb, whose suc- 
cessor, Dr. Carlos H. Stone, conducted it until 1912 as the Stone 
School. The present name dates from 1922, when Alvan R. Duerr 
was head, and is taken from the mountain where the school is 
located. Anson Barker was head master from 1932 until 1951. Mr. 
Leonard, after seventeen years at Putney, where for ten years he 
directed the academic program and college guidance, succeeded in 
1955 Burke Boyce, head master for two years. 

The school offers, in addition to the basic college preparatory 
curriculum, a modified work program and a number of activities. 
The striking location and neighboring forests are utilized for out- 
door activities, and there is a full program of athletics. 

Graduates enter Lafayette, Union, St. Lawrence, Syracuse, 
Amherst, Brown, Harvard, Bowdoin, R. P. L, and many other 
colleges. See also page 675 

CRAGSMOOR, N. Y. Alt. 1900 ft. Off U.S. Rt 209, on 52. In 

the Shawangunk Mts., 31 mi SW of Kingston, opposite Pough- 
keepsie and 3' mi from Ellenvillc, the school occupies the facilities 
of Cragsmoor Inn. 



MOHONK SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 6-15 

Cragsmoor, Ulster Co., N. Y. Cragsmoor Inn. 

Edward M. Lafferry, B.A., Berea," M.A., George Peabody Col, 

Head. 

Grades IV- VIII High Sch 1. Latin French Algebra Bible 
Biolegy History. Remedial Reading. 

Enr 35. Fac full 9, part-time 2. 

Tui $2200 (+$200). Scholarships. Est 1920. Prop. 



N. Y. Leading Private Schools 164 

An outgrowth of the activities of the Smiley family and formerly 
a preparatory school, since 1937 Mohonk has enrolled younger 
boys. Solid academic preparation sends graduates to Mount Her- 
mon, Oakwood, and other secondary schools. Individual hobbies 
are encouraged; informal activities, such as trail-following, climb- 
ing, fishing, cycling, camping, riding, are an integral part of the 
informal school life. In 1958 the school was transferred from 
Mohonk Lake to the present site 15 miles distant. 



DOBBS FERRY, N.Y. Pop 6268. Alt 12 ft. NYC R.R. 6 mi N 
of Yonkers, Rt U.S.9. A Hudson River town of some historic 
importance, Dobbs Ferry has long been a favorite place of resi- 
dence for families of wealth. The Mastery School is on the Post 
Road; Children's Village has 42 buildings on a 220 acre campus 
overlooking the river. 



THE CHILDREN'S VILLAGE 

For Emotionally Disturbed and Socially Maladjusted 
Bdg Boys Admission Ages 10-15 

Dobbs Ferry, N.Y. Tel 3-1800. 

Joseph F. Phelan, Jr., B.S., Manhattan, M.S.W., Catholic U, Dir. 

Grades IV- VIII High Sch l-3. General Manual Arts* 

Enr 290. Fac full 28, part-time 2. Child Care Staff 94. 

Tui $3500-4850. Est 1851. Inc nonprofit 

Plant $2,500,000. Endowment $12,396. Cottages 20. Class rms 22. 
Lib 2000 vols. Lab. Studios music 1, art 1. Shops 8. Gyms 3. Swim- 
ming pools 3. Fields 12. 

Founded over a century ago in New York City, "to provide a 
temporary home for destitute boys," the school has occupied this 
country site since 1905 when the present name was adopted. Mr. 
Phelan became executive director in 1955, succeeding Harold F. 
Strong, who had held the position since 1941. 

Supported by the State, the Protestant Federation, and Cath- 
olic Chanties, and admitting boys through public and private 
welfare agencies, children's courts, parents, and therapists, the 
school is characterized by the cottage plan, remedial assistance, 
work experience, industrial arts, trade training, living experiences 
based on clinical understanding of emotional problems and indi- 
vidual treatment. 

THE MASTERS SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Girls Ages 13-18 
Dobbs Ferry, N.Y. Clinton Ave. Tel. 3-2400. 

Elizabeth Brooke Cochran, B.A., Wheaton, M.A., Univ of Va, 
Head. 



N. Y. Middle Atlantic States 165 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Bible Art Dramatics Cooking Type- 
writing. Remedial Reading Tutoring. Dancing Music. 

Enr Bdg 220, Day 90. Fac full 38, part-time 3. 

Grad '5783. Entd Col '57 79. (Briarcliff 8, Bradford 7, Smith 
5, Mt. Holyoke 4, Wellesley 4, Mt. Vernon 4). Alumnae 4500, 

Tui Bdg $2750 (+$100), Day $1250. Scholarships full 1, partial 
20 ($15,000). Est 1877. Inc 1915 nonprofit 

Founded and for nearly half a century conducted by Eliza and 
Sarah Masters, on the Post Road overlooking the river, in 1916 
the school became a nonprofit corporation, and in 1920 was 
made over to the alumnae. Under the direction of Evelina Pierce, 
a New Englander, who served from 1927 until 1945, a more liberal 
academic and social spirit was inaugurated. Mrs. Elliott Speer, 
her successor, proved a sage and successful leader. Upon her re- 
tirement in 1950 , Miss Cochran, for eight years headmistress at 
St Anne's School, Va., was appointed. 

Throughout its history "Dobbs" has always enrolled girls from 
various parts of the country, many through alumnae, to avail of 
the educative value of diversified contacts. The atmosphere of in- 
dividual development is stressed in the efficient college preparatory 
curricula I and II, which prepare respectively for CEB college 
and for other four year colleges and junior colleges and special- 
ized schools. There are electives in the arts, music, cooking, typing, 
and other subjects. The academic standards permit a high per- 
centage of graduates to enter leading colleges. Groups in drama, 
music, and the dance, publications, and outdoor sports are among 
activities stressed. See also page 762 



GARRISON, N.Y. Pop 594 (1940). Alt 17 ft. NYC R.R. This 
village on the Hudson is directly opposite West Point. 

THE MALCOLM GORDON SCHOOL 
Bdg- Boys Ages 8-14 

Garrison^on- Hudson, N.Y. Tel. Garrison 4-3369. 
David C. Gordon, Head. 

Grades III- VIII. French Latin Algebra, Manual Arts. 

Enr 25. Fac full 5, part-time 2. 

Grad '576. Entd Prep Sch '57 Groton 1, Manlius 1, St 
Andrews 1, St. Paul's 1, Taft 1, Trinity 1. Alumni 312. 

Tui $1800 (+$75). Scholarships partial 4. Est 1927. Episcopal. 

Dorm rms 8. Class rms 5. Lib 2500 vols. Studios music 1, art 1. 
Fields 5. Gym. 

After many years at St. Paul's, Malcolni K. Gordon opened this 
school, the plant -of which was donated by friends. A son, David 
C. Gordon, co-head since 1930, succeeded him in 1952. In the in- 



N. Y. Leading Private Schools 166 

formal atmosphere boys are prepared for secondary boarding 
schools. There are sports, dramatics, publications, clubs, and pub- 
lic speaking. 



GENEVA, N.Y. Pop 17,144. Alt 491 ft. LV;NYC R.R, 35 mi. 
SE of Rochester. At the head of Seneca Lake, this town of broad, 
tree-lined streets and comfortable old homes is the site of Hobart 
College and its affiliated William Smith for girls. 

LOCHLAND SCHOOL 

For Emotionally Maladjusted and Retarded 
Bdg Coed Ages 2-12 

Geneva, N.Y. Lochland Rd. Tel. Geneva 2948. 

Florence H. Stewart, B.S., Columbia, Ed.M., Harvard, Dir. 

Nursery Pre*School Grades I-V. 

Enr Boys 10, Girls 10. Fac full 8, part-time 2. 

Tui $4200 and up for twelve mos. Est 1933. Inc 1954 nonprofit 

Summer Camp. Enr 20. Tui $800 eight wks. 

This school for retarded and maladjusted children, giving special 
emphasis to remedial reading, offers thoroughgoing psychiatric 
service. A resident psychologist and a play therapist are on the 
staff. 



HARRISON, N.Y. Pop 6307. Alt 65 ft. NY,NH&H R.R. 23 mi. 
NE of N.Y., Rt U.S.I. Harrison is on the Sound between Ma- 
maroneck and Rye. Kohut is near the center. 

KOHUT SCHOOL FOR BOYS 
Bdg and Day Ages 7-17 

Harrison, N.Y. South Rd. Tel. 8-1168, 

Harry J. Kugel, B.A., Yale, M.A., Columbia, Prin. 

Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music 
Languages. 

Enr Bdg 50, Day 20, Yr Adm 15. Fac full-time 6. Staff 3. 

Tui Bdg $1350-1450, Day $700. Extra c $150. Scholarships 2. 
Est 1909. Proprietary. 

Summer Camp. Remedial Reading Tutoring Academic sub- 
jects. Tui $635. 

Class rms 8. Lib 1200 vols. Lab. Studio music 1. Gym. 

The outgrowth of a long established city school, later reorgan- 
ized in Riverdale by Dr. G. A. Kohut and Mr. Kugel, this school 
moved to Harrison in 1920. A progressive program is followed. 
The Sunny Ridge Nursery School for young children under five 
is affiliated. 



N. Y. Middle Atlantic States 167 

HAWTHORNE, N.Y. Pop 2062 (1940). Alt 257 ft. NYC R.R. 28 
mi. N of N.Y. Bordering the Taconic State Parkway one-quarter 
mile N of Hawthorne Circle, near Tarrytown, is The Harvey 
School. 

THE HARVEY SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day- Boys Ages 8-15 

Hawthorne, N.Y. Tel. Rogers 9-1160. 
Leverett Tyrrell Smith, B.A., Columbia, Head. 

Grades IV- VIII. Latin French Algebra. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg 60, Day 50. Fac full 12, part-time 4. 

Grad '5721. Entd Prep Sch '5720. (Lawrenceville 2, St. 
Paul's 2, Kent 2, Deerfield 2, Hill 2, Cranwell 2). Alumni 860. 

Tui Bdg $2000 (+$150-200), Day $900. Scholarships partial 8 
($7000). Est 1916. Inc 1946 nonprofit. 

Plant $250,000, Dorm rms 34. Class rmslO. Lib 2500 vols. Lab, 
Studios music 3, art 1. Gym. Fields 3,- 

Founded by Dr. Herbert S. Carter, and from 1926 continued by 
his son, Harvey prepares its boys, most of them from wealthy 
New York families, for secondary boarding schools, including 
Hotchkiss, Exeter, Choate, Deerfield, Kent, Lawrenceville, St. 
Paul's. The curriculum and work are in the conservative tradition. 
Mr. Smith, formerly at Choate and for three years mathematics 
instructor here, succeeded Herbert S. Carter, Jr., upon the latter's 
death in 1938. 



HOOSICK, N.Y. Pop (twp) 4297. Alt 458 ft. B&M R.R. 30 mi. 
NE of Albany, Rt,7. On the Hoosic River across the state line 
from Bennington, Vt. is this small town. Hoosac School moved in 
1952 to the Hall of the Tibbits Estate, one mile to the west 



HOOSAC SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 14-19 
Hoosick, N.Y. Tel. Hoosick Falls 340. 

Roger G. Cooley, B.S., Hamilton, M.A. Univ of Vt., Ph.D., Univ 
of Rochester, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. 

Enr Bdg 40, Day 1. Fac full 6, part-time 1. 

Grad '5711. Entd Col '579. (Franklin & Marshall 1, Colum- 
bia 1, Hobart 1, Albany STC 1, Ursinus 1, Ithaca 1). Alumni 411. 

Tui Bdg $1750 (+$200), Day $600. Scholarships partial 4 ($1000- 
2000). Self-help pgrm. Est 1889. Inc nonprofit. Episcopal. 

Plant $400,000. Dorm rms 32. Class rms 6. Lib 7500 vols. Lab. 
Field. 



N. Y. Leading Private Schools 168 

Hoosac is a monument to Dr. Edward D. Tibbits, rector until 
1930, and his father, who devoted their lives and their fortunes 
to its maintenance. Originally the local choir school of the parish, 
and becoming a boarding school hi 1892, it was reorganized in 
1923. Rev. James L. Whitcomb was director for 11 years, when he 
was succeeded in 1941 by Rev. Meredith B. Wood, under whose 
direction the school occupied the present 500-acre estate. In 1957, 
Dr. Cooley became headmaster. A wholesome life with opportuni- 
ties for work about the grounds and projects is provided, while 
stress is placed upon the college preparatory work with a four- 
year program. Graduates enter Amherst, Union, Brown, and 
many other colleges. 



ITHACA, N.Y. Pop 29,257. Alt 389 ft. LV, DL&W RJR. Extend- 
ing up a steep hill, Ithaca is on the delta of the inlet of Cayuga 
Lake. 'Far above Cayuga's waters' lies the campus of the great 
university established by Ezra Cornell. Near the center of town 
is Ithaca College. 

CASCADILLA SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 16 and up; Day and Eve Coed 14 and up 

Ithaca, N.Y. 116 Summit St. Tel. 4-6141. 

Maxwell T. Kendall, Ph.B., Univ of Vt, M.S.,Ed., Cornell, Head. 

High Sch 2-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep General Business. Make- 
up courses Tutoring Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg 50; Day Boys 70, Girls 35; Eve 24. Fac full 10, part- 
time 4. 

Grad '5727. Entd Col '5722. (Cornell, Syracuse, Georgia 
Tech, Florida, Duke, Vermont). 

Tui Bdg $900 (without board), Day $80 per subject. Est 1870. 
Inc 1939 nonprofit 

Summer Session. Tui $300. 

Primarily college preparatory, but offering general academic and 
business courses, Cascadilla sends most of its graduates to Cor- 
nell and Syracuse. There is a special program for Latin American 
students. 



LAKEMONT-ON-SENECA, N.Y. 28 mi. S of Geneva, Rt. 14. 

From a hilltop the Academy overlooks 20 miles of beautiful 
Seneca Lake. 



When writing schools, please mention this Handbook 



N. Y. Middle Atlantic States 169 

LAKEMONT ACADEMY 
Bdg Boys Ages 14-19 

Lakemont-on-Seneca, N.Y. Tel. Dundee 135. 

Norman Colvin, Pres.; Auby C. Strickland, Brig. Gen. U.S. Air 

Force (Ret), Head. 

High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep. Public Speaking Music. 
Reading Development Make-up courses. 

Enr 125. Fac full 12, part-time 2. 

Grad '5728. Entd Col '57 26. (Syracuse 2, Cornell 1, Hobart 
1, Yale 1, U of Mich 1). Alumni 1073. 

Tui $1575 (+$150). Scholarships partial 26 ($9000). Est 1842. 
Inc. nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Tui $450. Summer Camp. Fees $450. 

Plant $800,000. Dorm rms 63. Class rms 12. Lib 5300 vols. Lab. 
Studios music 2. Gym. Fields 4. Courts 3. Boating facilities. 

This old academy was reorganized under its present name in 
1937 as a boys boarding school and continued the work of the 
early coeducational Starkey Seminary which pioneered in the re- 
gion. It continues to receive financial support from the Palmer 
Fund. In 1949 Mr. Colvin was appointed president, and in 1952, 
General Strickland became head master. Since dropping the ele- 
mentary grades, increasing emphasis has been on college prepa- 
ration and graduates enter many colleges and universities, includ- 
ing Cornell, Syracuse, Hobart, Columbia, Boston Univ, and Univ 
of Pa. Team sports are offered as well as sailing and boating 1 , 
winter sports, and activities include student council and commit- 
tees, publications and debating clubs. See page 676 



LAKE PLACID, N.Y. Pop 2999. Alt 1742 ft. NYC R.R. 6 mi. 
SE of Saranac Lake, Rt. 73. An earlv center for winter sports; 
scene of the 1932 Olympics, this colorful resort village in the 
Adirondacks is noted for its Mt. Van Hoevenberg bobsled run 
and the popular Lake Placid Club, yearly yuletide host to college 
groups. Near by is John Brown's farm and grave. Northwood 
School is near the town; the functional plant of North Country 
School is farther out. 



NORTH COUNTRY SCHOOL 
Bdg Coed Ages 8-14 

Lake Placid, N.Y. Tel. 417JL 

Walter E. Clark, B.S., Antioch, M.A., Columbia, Dir. 

Grades III- VIII. Art Music Typing Home Economics 
Manual Arts. 

Enr Boys 30, Girls 20. Fac full 8, part-time 4. 



N. Y. Leading Private Schools 170 

Grad '5716. Entd Prep Sch '57 16. (Exeter 2, Andover 1, 
Milton 1, Middlesex 1, Pomfret 1, Ethel Walker 1). Alumni 200 

Tui $2200 (+$100). Scholarships partial 5 ($5500). Est 1938. 
Partnership. 

Summer Camp. Enr 120. Tui $700, eight wks. 

Plant $265,000. Dorm rms25. Class rms 5. Lib 3000 vols. Studios 
music 4, art 3. Gym. Riding facilities. Ski hill and tow. 

Progressive in his educational ideals and in his backgrounds, 
Mr. Clark here combines formal school work with some definite 
responsibility for each child each day with jobs shifted from week 
to week. The staff provides intensive work in music, art, crafts and 
shop, and there are many outdoor extra-curricular activities as well 
as numerous student organizations. Children live in groups of 
eight in the homes of the married faculty. In the summer the 
school property is used for the affiliated Camp Treetops. A good 
number of graduates each year enter leading preparatory schools. 

See also page 808 



NORTHWOOD SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 13-19 

Lake Placid, N.Y. Tel. 549. 

John G. Howard, B.A., VMI, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Languages History Mathematics 
Sciences, Public Speaking. 

Enr Bdg 101, Day 7. Fac full 12, part-time 2. 

Grad '5731. Entd Col >57 30. (Cornell 2, Colby 2, RPI 2, 
Lehigh 2, Princeton 1, Williams 1). Alumni 1064. 

Tui Bdg $2200 (+$100), Day $700. Scholarships full 2, partial 
10-20 ($7500). Est 1905. Inc 1934 nonprofit. 

Plant $500,000. Class rms 11. Lib 12,000 vols. Lab. Studios music 
1, art 1. Gym. Fields 4. Courts 20. Winter sports facilities. 

Rigor and vitality characterize this college preparatory program. 
Founded in 1905 as the migratory Lake Placid School and since 
1925 operated under the Lake Placid Club Educational Founda- 
tion, today's school is the creation of its headmaster. Coming in 
1954 from Tabor Academy, Mr. Howard has doubled the enroll- 
ment, improved the plant, raised the revenues and provided an ex- 
acting preparatory course in the secondary grades. 

Students are offered opportunities for initiative and responsi- 
bility through a broadly based student government program and 
courses include public speaking, note-taking, shorthand and typ- 
ing and library procedures. Funds for scholarships for boys of 
promise are provided by the Foundation and a strong Board of 



N. Y. Middle Atlantic States 171 

Trustees has aided the growth of the school which now attracts 
able students from a wide area through a liberalized admissions 
policy. A full program of athletics is carried and the woodland 
and mountain areas are utilized with unusual opportunities for 
winter sports. See page 678-79 



MANLIUS, N.Y. Pop 1742. Alt 747 ft. 10 mi. SE of Syracuse, 
Rt.92. Among hills, The Manlius School occupies beautiful exten- 
sive grounds. 

THE MANLIUS SCHOOL 

Bdg Boys Ages 12-19; Day Boys 11-15 
Manlius, N.Y. St. John's Ave. Tel. 62-2911. 

Maj. Gen. Ray W. Barker, Supt; John W. MacDonald, A.B., 
Syracuse, M.A., Columbia, Head. 

Grades VII-VIII High, Sen 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep. 
Bible Public Speaking Mechanical Drawing. Remedial Reading. 
Music. Military Training R.O.T.C. 

Enr Bdff 275, Day 15. Fac full-time 27. Staff 5. 

Tui Bdg $1800* Day $575. Extra c $200-350. Scholarships. Est 
1869. Inc 1923 nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Remedial Work Extra courses. Tui Bdg 
$450, Day $150. 

Dorm rms 130. Class rms 32. Lib 5100 vols. Labs 3. Studio music 
1. Gym. Fields 9. Courts 5. 

This school, attracting a discriminating clientele not only from 
the Hudson and Mohawk valleys but from throughout the country, 
was established as the non-sectarian St. John's by the first Bishop 
of central New York. Twelve years later, military training was 
added to the program. During the long regime of Gen. William 
Verbeck, head master from 1888 to 1930, the name reverted to that 
of the old academy, founded in 1835, in the buildings of which the 
school had begun. 

General Barker assumed the office of superintendent in 1947, 
and Mr. MacDonald, formerly guidance director and head of the 
mathematics department, was appointed head master in 1952. The 
curriculum, with emphasis not only on science and mathematics, 
but also on liberal arts, prepares for many colleges, including 
Union, Colgate, Dartmouth, Cornell, Williams, Hobart. 

Army personnel assigned from Washington give formal instruc- 
tion to the R.O.T.C. unit in map reading, small arms tactics, and 
other military subjects. There is a wide variety of extra-curricular 
activities in addition to the full athletic program. See page 677 



When writing schools, please mention this Handbook 



N. Y. Leading Private Schools 172 

MILLBROOK, N.Y. Pop 1568. Alt 567 ft 12 mi. NE of Pough- 
keepsie, Rt. U.S.44. An artists' colony, Millbrook is in a region of 
large estates. Greer School is about 5 mi. S. The Millbrook School 
is in the midst of high, rolling country. 

BENNETT JUNIOR COLLEGE 
Bdg Girls Ages 17 

Millbrook, N.Y. 
Donald Eldridge, Pres. 

Jr Col 1-2. Liberal Arts Dance Drama Music Art Cos- 
tume Design Interior Design ChUd Study Home Economics 
Clothing and Merchandising Secretarial. 

Enr 225. Fac full 34, part-time 6. 

Grad '5682. Alumnae 3650 

Tui $2300. Scholarships partial 5. Est 1891. Inc 1924 nonprofit. 

Founded by May Friend Bennett, who was among the first to 
recognize the importance of the creative arts in education, and 
with collegiate level courses introduced in 1907, this school offers 
an unusually wide variety of specialized curricula strengthened 
by extensive work in general education. The liberal arts curriculum 
is both transfer and terminal. 



THE DUTCHESS SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 5-12; Day Coed 5-12 

Millbrook, N.Y. Dover Plains Rd. Tel. Millbrook 3414. 
Frank E, Cooke, A.B., Bucknell, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I- VII. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Day Boys 15, Girls 20. Fac full 5, part-time 4. 

Tui Bdg $1800 5-day (-}-$100), Day $600. Scholarships full 2, 
partial 7 ($2000). Est 1955. Inc 1955 nonprofit. 

This small school, starting with coeducational day enrollment, 
introduced a five-day boarding department for boys of the sur- 
rounding territories in 1958 when a seventh grade was added. The 
elementary instruction with French from the sixth grade includes 
special classes and projects open to several age groups. 



GREER SCHOOL 

For Children from Broken Homes 
Bdg Coed Ages 6-18 

Millbrook, N.Y. Hope Farm P.O. Tel. 559. 

Randle Elliott, A.B., Westminster, A.M., Ph. D., Harvard, Dir. 

Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General Business 
Secretarial Home Economics Manual Arts Vocational. Art 
Music. Remedial Reading. 



N. Y. Middle Atlantic States 173 

Enr Boys 105, Girls 85. Elem 110, Sec 80. Fac full time 19. 

Grad '5719. Entd Col '577. (Antioch 1, Texas A & M 1, 
111 Inst Tech 1, Bloomfield 1, Manhattan 1, Endicott Jr Col 1). 
Alumni 393, 

Tui to $2000. Scholarships full 3, partial 186 ($185,000). Est 
1906. Inc 1906 nonprofit. 

Plant $1,242,000. Endowment $1,063,000. Dorm rms 35. Class rms 
17. Lib 9500 vols. Lab, Studio music 1. Gym. Outdoor swimming 
pools 2. Fields 5. 

This school was founded by the Rt. Rev. David H. Greer "for 
boys and girls of Protestant parentage who, for various reasons, 
may be in need of a home and school." Children are admitted to 
the cottage community according to their social and financial 
needs. Older students supplement their academic work by courses 
in home economics or shop, and through on-the-job training as- 
signments in Greer's unique vocational program they play an im- 
portant part in the actual operation of this rural community of 
which the schopl is the center. 



MILLBROOK SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 13-18 

Millbrook, N.Y. Tel. 2341. 

Edward Pulling, A.B., Litt.D., Princeton, M.A., Cambridge, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Languages Biology History Mathe- 
matics Music Typing. 

Enr Bdg 140, Day 1. Fac full 16, part-time 7. Adm Staff 6. 

Grad '57 22. Entd Col '5721. (Cornell 2, Harvard 2, Kenyon 

2, Yale 1, Princeton 1, Amherst 1). Alumni 407. 

Tui Bdg $2200 (+$100), Day $700 (+$100). Scholarships full 

3, partial 18 ($22,000). Est 1931. Inc 1932 nonprofit. 

Plant $1,800,000. Endowment $350,000. Dorm rms 104. Class 
rms 17. Lib 6680 vols. Labs 2. Studios 2. Gym. Fields 3. Courts 4. 

During its first 25 years, under its founder and present head 
master, Millbrook has grown from the original farm buildings to 
its present new and adequate plant, including a well stocked li- 
brary, efficient laboratories, new gym, and spacious campus. Mr. 
Pulling has formerly taught in such dissimilar schools as Groton 
and Avon, which resulted in his broad and liberal spirit toward 
traditional school activities. Interest in the individuality and apti- 
tudes of the boys, and success in meeting their needs and in 
encouraging cultural interests and worthwhile hobbies are out- 
standing features. Every boy, under the Community Service plan, 
shares responsibility for the functioning of the school community 
and are assigned by the Student Council. 



IV. Y, Leading Private Schools 174 

The academic emphasis is on college preparation, and graduates 
enter Princeton, Yale, Harvard, and other leading colleges. See 
also page 680 

NEWBURGH, N.Y. Pop 31,956. Alt 275 ft 17 mi. S of Pough- 
keepsie, Rt.9W. This deep water port on the Hudson River, 10 mi. 
N of West Point, is a favored residential area with a number of 
Revolutionary sites. The Academy is near Downing Park. 



MOUNT SAINT MARY ACADEMY 
Bdg Girls Ages 6-18; Day Boys 5-12, Girls 5-18 

Newburgh, N.Y. Mount Saint Mary-on-the-Hudson. Tel. 800. 
Sister Mary Vincent, M.A., Catholic Univ of America, Prin. 
of High Sch; Sr. Mary Paula, B.A., Prinuof Bishop Dunn Me- 
morial. 

Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep Gen- 
eral Art Music. Home Economics. 

Enr Bdg 95, Day 500. High Sch Fac full 11, part-time 4. 

Grad '57-47. Entd Col '5716. (Col of St. Elizabeth 2, Mt. St. 
Vincent 1, Conn C 1, Albertus Magnus 1, U of Edinburgh 1, New 
Rochelle 1). 

Tui Bdg $1500, Day $300. Est 1883. Inc nonprofit. Roman 
Catholic. 

Plant $2,600,000. Class rms 38. Lib 6000 vols. Labs 2. Music 
building. Studios art 2. Gym. 

Established in 1883 in New York City by the Dominican Sisters, 
whose motherhouse is in Newburgh, this convent school moved 
in 1899 to its present site. In 1913 the school expanded to the ad- 
joining property, Rosenhof, the former VanDuzer estate over- 
looking the Hudson. In 1951 the Bishop Dunn Memorial School 
for grade pupils was dedicated. 

A religious and cultural program follows the state syllabus with 
modifications, and graduates of the high school enter many col- 
leges, both Catholic and non-sectarian. There are also general, art, 
and music curricula. Among extra-curricular activities are dramat- 
ics, home economics, music, and various interest, philanthropic, 
and religious clubs. See also page 762 



NEW LEBANON, N.Y. Pop 1600. Alt 699 ft. 28 mi. SW of 
Albany, Rt. U.S.20. Samuel Tilden was born in this little settle- 
ment situated on the slopes of Mt. Lebanon, 8 rni. W of Pitts- 
field, Mass. A mile above the town on the W slope of the 
Berkshires' Taghkanic range, in what was once the most flourish- 
ing; Shaker colony in America, Darrow School owns a 300 acre 
property. 



N. Y. Middle Atlantic States 175 

DARROW SCHOOL 
Bdg - Boys Ages 13-19 

New Lebanon, N.Y. Route 20. Tel. Lebanon Springs 7-1144. 
C. Lambert Heyniger, C.E., Princeton, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Modern Asiatic History Music. 

Enr 140. Fac full 18, part-time 2. 

Grad '5726. Entd Col '5724. (Middlebury 2, Rensselaer 2, 
Princeton 1, Wash & Lee 1, Ohio Wes 1, Trinity 1). Alumni 317. 

Tui $1450-1850. Self-help pgrm. Est 1932. Episcopal. 

Plant $992,000. Dorm rms 47. Class mis 11. Lib 3000 vols. Lab. 
Gym. Fields 3. Courts 2. Skiing facilities. 

Darrow was started as The Lebanon School by a board of 
trustees which included the head masters of Deerfield, Hotchkiss, 
and Taft, and was for six years under the direction of Charles H. 
Jones. In 1938 on the death of the president, Charles S. Haight, 
who had given financial and moral support, Mr. Heyniger took 
over as president, head master, and treasurer. Prepared at Law- 
renceville for Princeton, after teaching in China and graduate 
study at Columbia he went with General Motors, then had two 
years as assistant to the head at Lawrenceville. Renaming the 
school for a family prominent among the first Shaker settlers, he 
restored and renovated grounds and buildings and made extensive 
changes in the personnel and policy. Graduates are prepared for 
Princeton, Hobart, Middlebury, Babson, Cornell, Yale, and other 
colleges. There are the usual athletics, a well organized work pro- 
gram, and various student clubs a-nd organizations. 

NEW ROCHELLE, N.Y. Pop 59,725. Alt 72 ft NY,NH&H R.R. 
Largest North Shore residential area on L.I. Sound, within metro- 
politan N.Y., this town, settled in 1688 by Huguenots, is the site 
of Paine Memorial House and seat of lona College and College 
of New Rochelle. 



HUDSON COUNTRY SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 3-9 

New Rochelle, N.Y. Quaker Ridge Rd. Tel. 6-6202. 

E. Philip Israel, A.B., Buffalo, M.A., Ed.D., Columbia, Dir. 

Helen G. Israel, Administrative Dir. 

Pre-Nursery Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-II. 

Enr Boys 55, Girls 50. Fac full 9, part-time 3. 

Tui $500-900. Scholarships partial 5 ($1000). Est 1937. Inc 1950. 

This day school for young children is under the direction of 
Mr. Israel, who has traveled widely and studied in such univer- 
sities as Munich, Geneva, Grenoble, and Paris. 



N. Y. C. Leading Private Schools 176 

THORNTON-DONOVAN SCHOOL 
Day -Coed Ages 4-14 

New Rochelle, N.Y. 200 Centre Ave. Tel NE 2-3453. 
Susan Nouss, A.B., Prin. 

Kindergarten Grades I- VIII. Art Music French Latin Al- 
gebra. Dramatics. 

Enr Boys 35, Girls 25. Fac full 6, part-time 3. 

Grad '572. Entd Prep Sch '571. (Brunswick Acad 1). 

Tui $325-600. Scholarships partial 2. Est 1901. Inc 1950 nonprofit. 

Class rms 9. Lib 3500 vols. Field. 

Formerly the New Rochelle School and Kindergarten, assuming 
its present name in 1949, this was founded by a group of parents. 
French is begun in kindergarten and continues through the grades. 
Thorough instruction in the basic subjects, including science, 
Latin, mathematics, and history, prepares the pupils for secondary 
schools. Mrs. Nouss followed in 1956 Mrs. Mildred L. Berea, 
principal from 1953, and successor to Emily Scott Thornton. 



NEW YORK CITY, N.Y. Pop 7,891,957. New York continues 
to lead, and is a wonder of, the world. It is not strange that this 
polyglot conglomeration, the largest city and certainly the most 
striking manifestation of civilization extant, should play host to 
the United Nations, now ensconced in its handsome headquarters 
overlooking the East River. Internationalism here has podium, 
and although in conference idealism and visionary projects are 
unfolded, heed is yet paid to dictates from the great world capi- 
tals. While the city encompasses the greatest financial trade and 
activities concentration, Washington still holds New York's former 
prerogatives of control with its power newly aggrandized by the 
war. 

The handiwork of man changes as rapidly as the populace. 
Stupendous creations dazzle the outlander, bridges thrown across 
great stretches of marsh and water, subways that tunnel through 
miles of rock and under river. Approaching from the sea, the 
skyline is the marvel of the continental visitor. The air man, be- 
fore coming to earth on the city landing field, sees a citadel of 
watch towers among estuaries and marshes over which, to sprawl- 
ing suburbs, great viaducts reach fingerlike. 

Historically the city of the Dutch, of Tammany, the Vander- 
astors, of La Guardia, today the native New Yorker is a rarity 
The greatest Jewish city in the world, less than half the population 
are Jews, with half a million Russians and about as many Italians. 
Salaried executives rear their families in Westchester, Long Island, 
or Jersey. The great mass of New Yorkers sleep far from midday's 
madding crowd and, through underground tubes in which they 
struggle for place, are belched out and shot up in express elevators 



N. Y. C. Middle Atlantic States 177 

to office or loft. Art and book collections perpetuate the fame and 
fortunes of Rockefeller, Frick, Morgan and Whitney, offering 
great educational opportunities. 



Museums and collections representing the world's cultures, past 
and present, are inducements for students who come from afar. 
Music, Art, Drama and Literary leadership excel here amidst a 
wealth of institutions where educational, medical, scientific and 
sociological research attest to the work of foundations, philanthro- 
pies, and associations of learning. 

The colleges and universities of the city are centered uptown, 
Columbia, Barnard on Morningside Heights; the College of the 
City of New York a little to the north; New York University and 
its Hall of Fame on University Heights across the Harlem; 
Fordham, Catholic, near Bronx Park. Most of the great graduate 
schools, law, medicine, education, except for Columbia's Teachers 
College, are scattered about the lower city, especially around 
Washington Square. 

The professional and vocational schools lie generally to the 
south, between Central Park and 42nd Street The private schools 
range from the conservative and haughty to the most progressive 
and radical. Some of the girls' schools provide residence for those 
from a distance who are attracted by the varied musical, dramatic, 
and other advantages of the metropolis. A few schools including 
two or three of the oldest in the city lie west of Central Park. But 
the more recently established schools that appeal to the socially 
elect are all to- the east, Brearley and Chapin are in the reclaimed 
smart region bordering on the East River. 

As a matter of convenience the schools of Long Island, includ- 
ing Brooklyn, are treated as a group. Staten Islan-d schools will 
be found listed under New York City. 



THE ALLEN-STEVENSON SCHOOL 

Day Boys Ages 5-14 

New York City 21. 132 E. 78th St. Tel. BU 8-3333. 
Joseph C. Rennard, A.B., Princeton, Head. 

Grades I-VIII High Sch 1. Music French Latin. Remedial 
and make-up work. Symphony orchestra. 
Enr 200, Fac full 23, part-time 6, 

Grad '5724. Entd Prep Sch '5724. (Lawrenceville, Choate, 
Deerfield, Exeter, Hotchkiss, Gov Dummer). Alurnni 1400. 



N. Y. C. Leading Private Schools 178 

Tui $650-950. Scholarships 15 ($5000), Est 1883. Inc 1943 non- 
profit. 

Summer Session. Enr 30. Tui $100-180 six wks. 

Plant $225,000. Class rms 14. Lib 1100 vols. Studios music 
1, art 1. Gym. 

This school established by Francis B. Allen merged in 1900 with 
one established by Robert A. Stevenson. In 1947 the latter was 
succeeded as head master by his son. Mr. Rennard, formerly an 
instructor at St. George's and Lawrenceville, was appointed in 
1950. Conservative in teaching, the school prepares the sons of 
New York families for preparatory schools. 

BALDWIN SCHOOL OF NEW YORK CITY 
Day Coed Ages 5-18 

New York City 23. 18 W. 74th St. Tel. TR 3-4900. 

Rollin P. Baldwin, A.B., American International, M.A., NYU, 

Dir. 

Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Post Grad 1. Col Prep Gen. 

Enr Boys 45, Girls 35. Fac full-time 15. 

Grad '566. Entd Col '565 (NYC 1, U of Mich. 1, Oberlin 1, 
Marjorie Webster Jr 1, American International 1). Alumni 50. 

Tui $1700-3000. Scholarships partial 5 ($1000). Est 1948. Inc 
1954 nonprofit. 

Summer Session and Camp. Tui $550. 

With classes of not more than eight students, and with fre- 
quent remedial and tutorial sessions, this school provides for in- 
dividualization, through programs designed around the student's 
varying capacities and talents. See also page 808 

BANK STREET SCHOOL FOR CHILDREN 
Day Coed Ages 2-8 

New York City 14. 69 Bank St. Tel. CH 3-4905, 

Mrs. Elizabeth Gilkeson, A.B., Vassar M.A., Columbia, Chrmn, 

Children's Program. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-II. 

Enr Boys 60, Girls 60. Fac full 4, part-time 9. 

Tui $250-750. Scholarships partial 35 ($6000). Est 1919. Inc. 

The laboratory school of the Bank Street College of Education, 
this was formerly called the Harriet Johnson Nursery School in 
honor of its first director. 

THE BARNARD SCHOOL FOR BOYS 
Day Boys Ages 3-18, Girls 3-5 

New York City 71. W. 244th St.-Cayuga Ave. Tel. KI 8-1900. 
Carrington Raymond, A.B., M.A., Columbia, Head. 

Pre-Nursery Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII 
High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. 



N. Y. C. Middle Atlantic States 179 

Enr Boys 345, Girls 5, Elem 210, Sec 140. Fac full 27, part- 
time 4. 

Grad '5736. Entd Col '5736. (NYU 5, Columbia 3, Adelphi 
3, Boston U 3, Lehigh 2, Mich St. 2). Alumni 1500. 

Tui $550-900. Est 1886. Inc 1935 nonprofit. 

Summer Day Camp. Tui $225. 

Plant $300,000, Endowment $25,000. Class rms 25. Lib 4500 
vols. Gyms 2. 

Founded by the late William L. Hazen, head master from 1886 
to 1944, who was succeeded by Mr. Raymond, on the staff since 
1920, this and the once affiliated girls' school bear the name of a 
former president of Columbia. Graduates enter many colleges, 
including N.Y.U., the University of Pa., Cornell, Columbia, Brown. 

In 1955 a new gym was added; the old one was converted to 
class use. 



THE BARNARD SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 
Day Boys Age* 4-8, Girls 4-18 

New York City 33. 554 Ft. Washington Ave. Tel. TO 7-0718. 
Margaret D. Gillette, B.A,, Chicago, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col 
Prep. Art. Music. 

Enr Girls 225, Boys 10. Elem 145, Sec 90. Fac full 22, part-time 5. 

Grad '5622. Entd Col '5620 (Barnard 3, Mt. Holyoke 3, 
Vassar 2, U of Mich. 2, Smith 1, U of Pa. 1). Alumnae 830. 

Tui $450-850. Scholarships full 3, partial 35. ($10,000). Est 1896. 
Inc 1935 nonprofit. 

Plant $240,000. Class rms 17. Lib 5000 vols. Lab. Studio music 
1, art 1. Gym. 

This well equipped school enrolling girls from all parts of fhe 
city was started ten years later than the boys' group and was 
chartered as a separate institution in 1935. An all day session is 
provided. Since the death in 1938 of Theodore E. Lyon, long 
head master, Mrs. Gillette, his associate, has been director. Many 
graduates enter Barnard and Mt Holyoke, with others going to 
Vassar, Smith, Bryn Mawr, Wellesley. 



THE BENTLEY SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 3-18 

New York City 24. 48 W. 86th St. and 112 E. 71st St. Tel. BU 

8-2666. 

Racille S. Sameth, B.A,, Univ of Pittsburgh, M.A., Columbia; 

Irma H. Kaufmann, B.A., Barnard, M.A., Columbia, Dirs. 



N. Y, C. Leading Private Schools 180 

Pre-Nursery Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII 
High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music. 
Enr Boys 150, Girls 200. Yr Adm 45. Fac full 22, part-time 7. 

Staff 5, 

Grad '48-'52 130 '5319. Entd Col '48-'52 125, '53 Bennmg- 
ton 2, Wellesley 1, Mt Holyoke 1, U of Pa. 1 others 14. 

Tui $525-800. Extra c $60-200. Scholarships. Est 1915. Inc 1935. 

Lib 5918 vols. Labs 2. Studios music 1, art 2. 

With integration of subjects, a creative approach, individual 
planning, and a rich variety of extra-curricular activities, this 
continues the progressive philosophy which led to its establish- 
ment as the Social Motive School. Bertha M. Bentley, who retired 
in 1947, did much to point the way in different phases of child 
education. Graduates enter many colleges, among them Cornell, 
Barnard, the University of Wis,, Wellesley, Harvard, Oberhn An 
East side branch for younger children was opened in 1946. 

BIRCH WATHEN SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 5-17 

New York City. 149 W. 93rd St. Tel. RI 9-0314. 
Louise Birch, B.A., Wellesley, M.A., Columbia, Prin. 
Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Music 

Enr Boys 130, Girls 240. Elem 220, Sec 150. Fac full 28, part- 
time 14. . , 

Grad '57 27. Entd Col '5727. (Bryn Mawr 2, Smith 2, Con- 
necticut 2, U of Chgo 1, U of Pa 1, Jackson 1). Alumni 745. 

Tui $635-1185 (+$40-100). Scholarships full 8, partial 35. Est 
1921. Inc 1933 nonprofit. 

Class rms 35. Lib 5100 vols, Labs 3. Studios music 2, art 3. 

The elementary school established by Miss Birch and Mrs. 
Wathen has been broadened in scope to carry ^ boys and girls 
through to college. Colorful and interesting activities go hand in 
hand with good academic instruction, and graduates enter many 
leading colleges, including Connecticut, Smith, Wellesley, Barnard, 
Skidmore, Mt. Holyoke, Cornell, Yale, Columbia. 

Activities include student government, several excellent publi- 
cations, dramatics, art, music, and social service. 



THE BREARLEY SCHOOL 
Day Girls Ages 5-17 

New York City 28. 610 E. 83rd St. Tel. RH 4-8582. 

Jean Fair Mitchell, M.A. (Hons), Edinburgh, M.A., Smith, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art 
Music. Remedial Reading. 



1V.Y.C. Middle Atlantic States 181 

Enr 555. Elem 380, Sec 175. Fac full 73, part-time 18. 

Grad '5729. Entd Col '5729. (Radcliffe 4, Smith 4, Bryn 
Mawr 3, Goucher 3, Vassar 3). Alumnae 2289. 

Tui $650-1150. Scholarships full 4, partial 71 ($48,000). Est 1884. 
Inc nonprofit. 

Plant $902,000. Endowment $1,032,000. Class rms 45. Lib 16,000 
vols. Labs 3. Studios music 2, art 2. Gyms 5. 

This school, established by Samuel Brearley to provide more 
substantial education and more thorough preparation for college 
than were offered by most girls' schools of the time, has always 
had on its board men prominent in educational and financial circles 
of N.Y. James G. Croswell was head master from 1887 until his 
death in 1915. Henry Dwight Sedgwick and Carl Van Doren, who 
followed him, were of scholarly attainment and literary distinction. 
Mrs. Rustin Mclntosh, head mistress, from 1930, resigned to be- 
come dean of Barnard College in 1947. Miss Mitchell is a Scots- 
woman with experience in the English departments of Smith, 
Sarah Lawrence, and Barnard. 

Brearley is still in the forefront among preparatory schools in 
scholastic standards, and succeeds in cultivating intellectual inter- 
ests among its pupils, who come from solid families of taste and 
culture. Since 1929 in a ten-story modern building overlooking the 
East River, its lower floors known as "decks," the school offers 
a curriculum integrating many of the academic subjects and af- 
fording strong work in music and the arts, Graduates enter Rad- 
cliffe, Smith, Wellesley, Vassar, Bryn Mawr, Mt, Holyoke, and 
other leading women's colleges. Among extra-curricular activities 
are dramatics, carpentry, sports, and community and welfare 
projects. 



BROWN SCHOOL OF TUTORING 
Day Coed Ages 10-20 

New York City 22. 147 E. 50th St. Tel. PL 5-9545, 
Frederic L, Brown, B.S., Syracuse, Prin. 

Grades IV-VTII High Sch 1-4, Col Prep Business. Make-up 
courses Remedial Reading. 

Enr variable. Fac full 5, part-time 2. Staff 1. 

Grad '572. Entd Col '572. 

Tui $900 and up. Est 1910. Inc 1929. 

Summer Session. Tui variable. 

Class rms 5. Lib 2000 vols. Lab. Gym. Swimming pool. 

Out of a summer tutoring group he established in 1906, Mr. 
Brown developed this school. All instruction is tutorial, and les- 
sons can be at the pupil's home. 



N. Y. C. Leading Private Schools 182 

THE BROWNING SCHOOL 
Day Boys Ages 5-18 

New York City 21. 52 E. 62nd St. Tel. TE 8-6280. 

Charles W. Cook, B.A., Princeton, M.A., Columbia, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art 
Music. Remedial Reading. Dramatics. Shop Ceramics. 

Enr 165. Elem 130, Sec 35. Fac full-time 18. 

Grad '577. Entd Col '576. (Yale 1, U of South 1, George- 
town 1, U of Pa 1, U of Houston 1, Baldwin Wallace 1). Alum- 
ni 950. 

Tui $450-1000. Scholarships partial 20 ($5000). Est 1888. Inc 
1938 nonprofit. 

Plant $151,000. Class rms 13. Lib 3200 vols. Lab. Studios music 
1, art 1. Gym. Fields 2. 

For a generation John A. Browning attracted to his school boys 
from a New York set of some social prominence. Arthur A. Jones, 
who succeeded him in 1920, was head master for 28 years. Mr. 
Cook succeeded Lyman B. Tobin in 1952. Graduates of the rather 
conventional curriculum enter Columbia, Bucknell, Fordham, 
Georgetown, and other colleges and universities. 



BUCKLEY SCHOOL 
Day- Boys Ages 6-14 

New York City 21. 120 E. 74th St. Tel. LEhigh 5-8787. 
James M. Hubball, A.B., Princeton, Head. 

Grades I-VIII. Art Music French Latin. Manual Arts. 

Enr 320. Fac full 37, part-time 8. 

Grad '57 35. Entd Prep Sch '5735. (Hotchkiss 6, St. Paul's 
5, Choate 4, St. Mark's 3, Groton 3, Andover 2). Alumni 1417. 

Tui $675-875 (+$75). Est 1913. 

Class rms 16. Lib 3660 vols. Studios music 1, art 1. Gym. 

This was established by B. Lord Buckley and became the nu- 
cleus of a group of country day schools on L.I. and in N.J., S.C., 
and Va., providing for the children of country estate patrons. 
Since 1932 the units have become independent. Mrs. Evelyn W. 
Adams, long associated with the schools, was head mistress until 
1947 when Mr. Hubball, since 1939 associate head, was appointed. 
The program includes dramatics, art, publications, athletics, and 
student government. 

THE CALHOUN SCHOOL 
Day Girls Ages 11-18 

New York City 25. 309 W. 92nd St. Tel. RI 9-4222. 

Elizabeth Parmelee, B.A., Vassar, M.A., Columbia; Beatrice S. 

Cosmey, B.A., Vassar, M.A., Columbia, Heads. 



N. Y. C. Middle Atlantic States 183 

Grades VI-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Speech Dra- 
matics Mathematics Ethics Comparative Religion. Remedial 
Reading. Community Service. 

Enr 185. Fac full 20, part-time 2. 

Grad '5728. Entd Col '5725. (Barnard, Finch, Syracuse, 
Smith, Vassar, Hunter). Alumnae 1556. 

Tui $900-950. Scholarships full 12, partial 14 ($10,000). Est 1896. 
Inc 1939 nonprofit. 

Class rms 11. Lib 3500 vols. Lab. Studio art 1. Gym. 

Founded by Laura Jacobi as the Jacobi School for Girls, and 
the present name assumed in 1925, nine years after Mary E. Cal- 
houn became head mistress, the school was directed from 1942 by 
Ella C. Levis, formerly associate head misUess. Miss Parmelee, 
once a teacher in the school and since 1944 associate head, was 
appointed in 1946 with Miss Cosmey. 

The thorough curriculum prepares for Brandeis, Sarah Lawrence, 
Vassar, Barnard, Hunter, among others. Student activities include 
community service, physical education, art, dramatics, and student 
government. A lower school opened in September 1958 offers a 
program for children from four years old at 431-433 West End 
Avenue. 



CATHEDRAL CHOIR SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 9-14 

New York City 25. Cathedral Heights. Tel. UN 5-3600. 
Alec Wyton, M.A., Oxford, Head Master & Master of Choristers. 
Grades IV- VI II. General Academic. Music. 
Enr Bdg 40, Day 10. Fac full 5, part-time 2. 
Grad '568. Entd Prep Sch '56 Trinity 1, St. Bernard's 1, 
others. Alumni 500. 

Tui Bdg $1600 (+$75), Day $600. Scholarships partial 12 
($3500). Est 1901. Episcopal. 

Endowment $750,000. Dorm rms 43. Class rms 6. Lib 1500 vols. 
Fields 3. 

Bishop Henry C. Potter organized this school to supply material 
for the choir of the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, and for many 
years it has occupied its own building in the Close. The boarding 
department, which is restricted to choir boys, is endowed, and 
daily music instruction, individual when the voices warrant, is 
given. Academic work similar to other preparatory schools is of- 
ferred. $1000 for boarders, and $350 for day students, is remitted 
for those serving in the choir. Mr. Wyton succeeded Canon Darby 
W. Betts in 1954. 



For further information, write Porter Sargent 



N. Y, C. Leading Private Schools 184 

THE CHAPIN SCHOOL 
Day Girls Ages 6-18 

New York City 28. 100 E. End Ave. Tel. RH 4-2335, 
Ethel G. Stringfellow, B.S., Columbia, Head. 

Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep Languages Sciences 
Bible Music Art. 

Enr 415. Elem 285, Sec 130. Fac full 54, part-time 3. 

Grad '57 22. Entd Col '5720. (Smith 5, Wheaton 3, Radcliffe 
2, Bryn Mawr 1, Mt. Holyoke 1, Middlebury 1). Alumnae 2298. 

Tui $500-950. Scholarships 45 ($20,000). Est 1901. Inc 1925 
nonprofit. 

Class rms 40. Lib 9462 vols. Labs 5. Studios music 4, art 2. Gym. 

Established by the late Maria Bowen Chapin to provide a liberal 
education as well as training in the social graces, the school was 
conducted from 1932 to 1935 by her partner, Mary C. Fairfax. 
Under Miss Stringfellow, associate head with Miss Fairfax, the 
school continues to appeal to families of social standing of New 
York, and now wholly preparatory, sends its graduates to leading 
colleges, including Vassar, Smith, Bryn Mawr, Wellesley, Barnard, 
Radcliffe. 

CHURCH OF THE HEAVENLY REST DAY SCHOOL 

Coed Ages 2y 2 -9 

New York City 28. 2 E. 90th St. Tel. EN 9-8040. 
Mrs. Shelda Henderson Taylor, B.A., Univ of Toronto, Prin. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-IIL 

Enr Boys 65, Girls 55. Fac full 12, part-time 5. 

Tui $400-450. Scholarships full 2, partial 9. Est 1930. Episcopal. 

Originating as a kindergarten organized by two teachers of the 
Sunday School, this is associated with the Church of the Heavenly 
Rest Religious instruction, Dalcroze eurythmics, French, music, 
art, and dramatics are included in the program. In 1955 Mrs. 
Taylor succeeded Mrs. Aline Stump Fisher. 

CITY AND COUNTRY SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 3-13 

New York City 11. 165 W. 12th St. Tel. CH 2-7802. 
Jean W. Murray, B.A., Radcliffe, Prin. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII. Art Music Rhythms 
Dramatics General Science Cooking Manual Arts. 

Enr 190. Fac full 16, part-time 4. 

Grad '5720. Alumni 480. 

Tui $400-980. Scholarships ($10,000-15,000). Est 1914, Inc 1924 
nonprofit. 

This interesting teacher-owned and managed experimental 
school is inter-racial and inter-denominational. It was founded 



N. Y. C. Middle Atlantic States 185 

by Caroline Pratt, who contributed much to the methodology of 
modern education for young children and whose plans for develop- 
ing serious intellectual interests from natural instincts have been 
made widely known through her various publications. The school 
emphasizes constructive social experience, an integrated curricu- 
lum, and an individual reading program. Working with the staff 
are teachers-in-training from Bank Street College, NYU, and Mills 
College. 



THE COLLEGIATE SCHOOL 
Day Boys Ages 4-18 

New York City 24. 241 W. 77th St. Tel. TR 3-0677. 
Wilson Parkhill, B.A., Williams, M.A., Columbia, Head. 

Pre-primary Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art 
Music French Mathematics Bible. Rem Reading. Dramatics. 

Enr 345. Elem 250, Sec 90. Fac full-time 35. 

Grad '5715. Entd Col '57 14. (Columbia 2, Harvard 2, Yale 
2, Colby 1, Princeton 1, Rutgers 1). Alumni 2040. 

Tui $550-850. Scholarships partial 75 ($25,000). Est 1638. Inc 
1945 nonprofit. 

Oldest existing private secondary school in the U.S., Collegiate 
traces its history back to the early settlement of Manhattan by 
the Dutch. For 250 years, with only one interruption when during 
the Revolution the city was occupied by the British, it was main- 
tained as a parish day school. In 1887 Collegiate became a gram- 
mar school; in 1891 preparatory; and after 1894 boys only. In- 
corporated in 1945 as a separate institution, the school is governed 
by a board, one third of whom represent the Consistory of the 
Collegiate Dutch Reformed Church. 

Since 1953 a new primary school has been constructed, an art 
studio and music facilities added, and the library expanded. 

Mr. Parkhijl, who succeeded Cornelius Boocock in 1934, is a 
former president of the Country Day School Headmasters' Asso- 
ciation and former chairman of the National Council of Independ- 
ent Schools, on which Council he is a member ot the Jfxecutive 
Committee. He also serves as trustee of a number of leading priv- 
ate schools and the College Entrance Examination Board. The 
thorough academic program prepares for leading colleges, includ- 
ing Yale, Harvard, Princeton, Amherst, Williams, Cornell. 



COLUMBIA GRAMMAR SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 5-18 

New York City 25. 5 W. 93rd St. Tel. RI 9-6200. 
James W. Stern, B.S., Univ of Pa., M.A., Columbia, Head. 
Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art 



N. Y. C. Leading Private Schook 186 

M En?'Boys 210, Girls 115. Elem 140, Sec 185. Fac full 32, part- 
time 8. 

Grad '5746. Entd Col '57-46. (U of Rochester, Princeton, 
Johns Hopkins, Dartmouth, Cornell, Harvard). Alumni 5000. 

Tui $500-900. Scholarships full 6, partial 15 ($10,000). Est 1764. 
Inc 1941 nonprofit. 

Plant $300,000. Class rms 26. Lib 7500 vols. Lab. Studios music 
1, art 2. Gym. Swimming pool. 

Founded as a preparatory school for Columbia College, and 
under the direction of the university for 100 years, this school 
rose to high prominence in mid-nineteenth century under Dr. 
Charles Anthon, America's earliest classical scholar. 

Today Columbia Grammar School is an independent institution, 
with a board of trustees. Mr. Stern was in 1956 appointed head mas- 
ter, succeeding Frederic A. Alden, who had directed^the school from 
1920. With the closing of Leonard School, Columbia Grammar be- 
came coeducational through the 12th grade in 1956. Graduates are 
prepared for Cornell, Univ of Pa., Dartmouth, Columbia, MIT, Am- 
herst, as well as for other colleges and universities throughout 
the country. Publications, drama, music, athletics, student govern- 
ment, and various clubs are offered. See also page 810 

CONVENT OF THE SACRED HEART 

Day Girls Ages 5-18 

New York City 28. 1 E. 91st St. Tei SA 2-4745. 
Rev. Mother Margaret Shea, Superior. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. 
Psychology Art Music. 

Enr 240. Fac full 15, part-time 11. 

Grad '5618. Entd Col '5616. 

Tui $300-600. Roman Catholic. 

Class rms 17. Lib 13,300 vols. Lab. Studios music 1, art 1. Gym. 

The Religious of the Sacred Heart conduct this day school, as 
well as other day schools, boarding schools, and colleges in the 
United States and in many countries throughout the world 

THE DALTON SCHOOLS 
Day Boys Ages 3-14, Girls 3-18 

New York City 28. 108 E. 89th St. Tel. SA 2-5160. 

Mrs. Charlotte Anne Keefe Durham, A.B., Conn. Col, M.A., 

Columbia, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col 
Prep. Arts Music Sciences Nursery-Biology Home Econom- 
ics. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Girls 360, Boys 200. Elem 410, Sec 150. Fac full 49, part- 



IV. Y. C. Middle Atlantic States 187 

time 20. 

Grad '5741, Entd Col '5740. (U of Mich 5, Sarah Lawrence 
4, Bennington 4, Vassar 3, Smith 2, Radcliffe 2). 

Tui $500-1000. Scholarships 135 ($60,000). Est 1916. Inc 1929 
nonprofit. 

Plant $1,070,840. Class rms 37. Lib 17,332 vols. Labs 4. Studios 
music 4, art 4. Gyms 2. Swimming pool. 

These schools were founded by Helen Parkhurst, who for two 
decades worked out and applied the theories of her widely known 
Dalton Plan. She was succeeded upon her retirement in 1942 by 
Mrs. Durham, formerly associate principal, who continues the 
schools on the laboratory plan. Members of the faculty have con- 
tributed a number of volumes and articles to educational theory 
and practice, and there is a department for teacher training 
and apprenticeship. 

The lower school is coeducational through grade eight. Most of 
the girls in the high school do college preparatory work, although 
not to the exclusion of such practical training as infant care in 
the nursery. They enter Smith, Bennington, Radcliffe, Cornell, 
Vassar, and similar colleges. The extra-curricular program em- 
phasizes publications, student government, arts and crafts, and 
dramatics. 

DOWNTOWN COMMUNITY SCHOOL 
Day- Coed Ages 3-13 

New York City 3. 235 East llth St. Tel. AL 4-1091. 
Norman Studer, B.A., M.A., Columbia, Dir. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VIII. Science Music Art. 

Enr Boys 110, Girls 115. Fac full-time 13. Adm Staff 2. 

Tui $690-750. Scholarships. Est 1944. Inc 1944 nonprofit. 

Founded by a group of parents in 1944, this cooperative school 
combines the traditional methods of teaching fundamentals with 
an emphasis on science and creative expression. The student 
body is made up of children of every race, cultural and economic 
level. 

DWIGHT SCHOOL 
Day Boys Ages 12-19 

New York City 21. 402 E. 67th St. Tel. RE 7-2400. 
Winton L. Miller, Jr., B.S., Lehigh, Head. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Post Grad 1. Col Prep. Make- 
up courses. Remedial Reading Tutoring. 

Enr 175. Fac full 14, part-time 2. 

Grad '5739. Entd Col '5734. (RPI 4, Lehigh 4, Stevens 4, 
Columbia 2, Fordham 2, US Mil Acad 2). 

Tui $650-750. Est 1880. Proprietary. 



M y. C. Leading Private Schools 

Summer Session. Tui $50 per subject 

Dwight school offers preparation for colleges and universities, 
and holds special advanced classes for all government academy 
and engineering college entrance examinations. 

The evening division, New York Preparatory, closed in 1955. 

See also page 681 



THE ELISABETH IRWIN HIGH SCHOOL 

Day Coed Ages 12*18 

New York City 14. 40 Charlton St. Tel. GR 7-5316. 
Dr. Randolph E. Smith, A.B., Harvard, M.A., Ph.D., Columbia, 
Dir. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music 
Problems of Modern Living, Typing. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Boys 100, Girls 105. Fac full 12, part-time 4. 

Grad '5735. Entd Col '57 -34. (Cornell 3, Harvard 2, Antioch 
2, Earlham 2, Vassar 1, Smith 1). Alumni 351. 

Tui $725 (+$100). Scholarships full 12, partial 32 ($13,000). 
Est 1941. Inc. 

Plant $60,602. Class rms 6. Lib 5600 vols. Lab. Studios music 1, 
art 1. Gym. 

Established as the high school department of The Little Red 
School House and retaining many features of its pioneering ap- 
proach, Elisabeth Irwin gives special attention to creative arts and 
social studies while meeting entrance requirements of Syracuse, 
Bard, Swarthmore, the University of Mich., Harvard, Reed, Ober- 
lin, and many others. Field trips and community work experiences 
augment the program. 

THE EMERSON SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 2-9 

New York City 28. 12 E. 96th St. Tel. AT 9-6771. 
Ellen J. O'Leary, M.A., Clark, Dir. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-III. Music. Remedial Read- 
ing Tutoring. 

Enr Boys 55, Girls 50. Fac full 10, part-time 2. 

Tui $675 (4-$175). Scholarships full 1, partial 10 ($3500). Est 
1930. Inc nonprofit. 

Founded as the Durlach School by Theresa M. Durlach, a 
pioneer in the progressive education movement, the school is now 
cooperatively owned by the parents, and draws its students from 
many different racial, religious, and economic backgrounds. Miss 
O'Leary was formerly the chairman of the Teacher Education 
Department of the Ethical Culture School. Opportunities for stu- 
dents of various colleges to practice teach are offered. A psy- 
chologist and a psychiatrist are on the staff. 



N. Y- C. Middle Atlantic States 189 

THE ETHICAL CULTURE SCHOOLS 

Day Coed Ages 3-18 

New York City 23. 33 Central Park W. Tel. TR 4-5200. 
Victoria Wagner, A.M., Columbia, Dir. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Ethics 
Art Home Economics Industrial Practice. Dramatics. 

Enr Boys 620, Girls 660. Elem 640, Sec 640. Fac full 120, part- 
time 18. 

Grad '5791. Entd Col '5790. (Harvard 5, Cornell 5, Oberlin 
4, Wisconsin 4, Mt. Holyoke 3). 

Tui $800-1250 (+$125). Scholarships full 94, partial 153 ($214,- 
775), Est 1878. Inc nonprofit. 

Summer Camp (Cooperstown, N.Y,). Tui $550. 

Summer Day Camp (at Fieldston Lower School). Tui $275. 

Plant $2,481,000. Lib 24>,101 vols. Science and Art bldg. 

Children of many different religious, economic, and racial 
backgrounds are enrolled at this school established by Felix 
Adler two years after the founding of the Society for Ethical 
Culture. Direct moral instruction has a definite place in the 
curriculum. In 1953, Mrs. "Wagner, formerly principal of the 
Midtown School, succeeded Miles E. Cary as director. 

FIELDSTON SCHOOL, of which Luther H. Tate is principal, 
has spacious wooded grounds in the Riverdale section at Fieldston 
Road and Manhattan College Parkway. This is the home of the 
Junior and Senior High Schools, offering art, business and 
home making to supplement college preparation. Graduates enter 
leading colleges and universities throughout the country. 

MIDTOWN SCHOOL, at 33 Central Park West, with Emily 
Henry as principal, has classes from pre-school through grade six 

FIELDSTON LOWER SCHOOL, headed by Costa J. Leodas, 
has a country day program from pre-kindergarten through grade 
six. 

A summer camp for boys and girls ages eight to fourteen is 
located in Cooperstown. 

FORDHAM PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

Day Boys Ages 13-18 

New York City 58. E. Fordham Rd. Tel. FO 7-5400. 
Rev. WilUam J. Farricker, A.B., M.A., Woodstock, Prin. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep (Classical, Scientific, Academic). 

Enr 745. Fac full 36, part-time 2. 

Grad '57157. Entd Col '57155. (Fordham 92, Manhattan 30). 

Tui $350 (+$15-20), Scholarships full 20, partial 40 ($2000). Est 
1841. Roman Catholic. 

Located on the campus of Fordham University, to which it 
sends a large number of its graduates, this school is conducted by 
the Jesuits and offers a program based on the "Ratio Studi- 



N. Y. C. Leading Private Schools 190 

orum," Among activities are debating, dramatics, publications, a 
radio workshop, various interest clubs, and athletics. 



FRANKLIN SCHOOL 
Day Boys Ages 8- 1 8, Girls 8-18 

New York City 24. 18 W. 89th St. Tel. SC 4-6360. 
M. C. Spahn, B.S., M.S.Ed., CCNY, Head. 
Grades III-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. 
Enr Boys 170, Girls 75. Elem 135, Sec 110. Fac full 19, part-time 2. 
Grad '57 23. Entd Col '5723. Alumni 900. 
Tui $550-750. Scholarships full 2, partial 14 ($8000). Est 1872. 
Proprietary. 

Founded and conducted until 1904 by Julius Sachs as Sachs 
Collegiate Institute, this school continued the original traditions 
and policies under Otto Koenig until 1932, when Clifford W. Hall 
and David P. Berenberg became head masters. In 1951 Mr. Spahn, 
long a member of the faculty, took charge. The academic work is 
still primarily college preparatory, and graduates enter such 
diversified colleges as NYU, Adelphi, Hobart, Columbia. 



FRIENDS SEMINARY 
Day -Coed Ages 4-18 

New York City 3. 15 Rutherford Place. Tel. AL 4-9320. 
Alexander H. Prinz, B.A., Yale, M.A., Columbia, Prin. 

Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art 
Psychology Speech Music. Manual Arts. 

Enr Boys 165', Girls 110. Elem 225, Sec 105. Fac full 29, part- 
time 5. Staff 3. 

Grad '5724. Entd Col '5724. (Vassar 4, Columbia 3, Prince- 
ton 1, Wellesley 1, MIT 1, Cornell 1). 

Tui $450-800 (+$50). Scholarships full 5, partial 25 ($8500). 
Est 1786. Friends. 

Class rms 17. Lib 3500 vols. Lab. Studios music 1, art 1. Gym. 

More progressive than most Friends Schools, in comparison 
with other schools in the vicinity this is still conservative. Under 
S. Archibald Smith, long principal of Friends Academy, Long 
Island, and here from 1938 to 1943, the enrollment increased. Mr. 
Prinz, his son-in-law, came from the same Academy. 

With high academic standards, and a program that provides 
opportunities in art, music, dramatics, publications, and many 
other activities, the school sends most of its graduates to such 
colleges as Harvard, Swarthmore, Haverford, Smith. 



When writing schools, please mention this Handbook 



N. Y. C. Middle Atlantic States 191 

GRACE CHURCH SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 4y 2 -14 
New York City 3. 86 4th Ave, Tel GR 5-5609. 
E. Allison Grant, A.B., A.M., Harvard, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIIL Bible Art Music. Remedial 
Work. Crafts. French Latin. 

Enr Boys 105, Girls 115. Fac full 16, part-time 7. 

Grad '5733. Entd Prep Sch '5730. (Trinity 3, Chapin 3, And- 
over 1, Choate 1, Collegiate 1, George 1). 

Tui $400-675. Scholarships partial 40 ($13,000). Est 1894. Epis- 
copal. 

Established as a choir school for boys and still an integral part 
of Grace Church, this is now a coeducational sub-preparatory 
school. The academic work is enriched with opportunities in music, 
art, dramatics, and handicrafts. The enrollment is inter-racial and 
inter-denominational, but all children are required to attend chapel 
service and religious instruction. In 1957 a new six-story struc- 
ture was opened, and the adjacent plant refurbished. 



MISS HEWITT'S CLASSES 
Bdg Girls Ages 12-19, Day Girls 5-19 

New York City 21. 45 E 75th St. Tel BU 8-1919. 

Miss Caroline D. Hewitt, Founder; Mrs. Lowell R. Comfort, 

A.B., Vassar, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep 
Art Music Dramatics. 

Enr Bdg 20, Day 205. Elem 120, Sec 105. Fac full 20, part-time 9. 
Grad '57 17. Entd Col '5713. (Briarcliff 2, Radcliffe 1, Vassar 
1, Pembroke 1, U of Wis 1, Sweet Briar 1). Alumnae 412. 

Tui Bdg $2300 five-day wk, $2600 seven-day wk (+$250-300); 
Day $450-1000. Scholarships full 3, partial 17 ($12,000). Est 1920. 
Inc 1950 nonprofit. 

Plant $250,000. Class rms 18. Lib 6200 vols. Lab. Studios music 
1, art 1. Gym. 

Long known for its simplicity of atmosphere, this school pre- 
pares more than two-thirds of its students for a wide variety of 
both local and national colleges. There is also a general program 
which permits much emphasis on art and music. In 1951 the 
school moved to new quarters. 

HOFFMANN SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 3-12 

New York City. 5440 Independence Ave., Riverdale. 
Anna F. Hoffmann, Dir. 
Nursery Kindergarten Grades I -VI. 
Enr Boys 50, Girls 35. Fac full 12, part-time 4. 
Tui $670'. Est 1921. 



N. Y. C. Leading Private Schools 192 

Summer Session. Enr 125. Tui $250 seven wks. 

Modern in its plan to adapt the child's education to his indi- 
vidual needs, this school moved to its present site in Riverdale in 
1942. Mrs. Hoffmann succeeded on the death of Rebecca Hoff- 
mann, the founder, in 1944. 

HORACE MANN SCHOOL 
Day Boys Ages 12-18 

New York City 71. 231 W. 246th St. Tel. KI 8-4000. 
Mitchell Gratwick, A.B., Harvard, M.D., Johns Hopkins, Prin; 
Charles C. Tillinghast, A.B., Ed.D., Brown, A.M., Columbia, Prin 
Emeritus. _ 

Grades VII- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Russian Mechan- 
ical Drawing Stagecraft Music. Developmental Reading. Shop. 

Enr 575, Fac full 40, part-time 8. 

Grad '5791. Entd Col '5791. (Columbia 12, Cornell 11, Harv- 
ard 6, NYU 5, Princeton 5, Yale 5). Alumni 3000. 

Tui $1300. Scholarships full 6, partial 74 ($52,000). Est 1887. 
Inc 1946 nonprofit. . 

Summer Session. Enr 100. Make-up courses Review courses 
Extra courses. Tui $350 eight wks. 

Class rms 34. Lib 15,000 vols. Labs 4. Studios 3. Gyms 2. 
Fields 4. Courts 8. Swimming pool. 

This school, a pioneer in the country-day movement, has been 
established on its present site since 1914, and since 1946 has 
been an independent institution chartered by the New York State 
Board of Regents. The school still maintains close ties with 
Teachers College and other divisions of Columbia University. 

During his 30 years as principal, Dr. Tillinghast, former presi- 
dent of the Headmasters Association, brought the school to 
educational prominence. 

In 1950 Dr. Gratwick, after nine years of high accomplishment 
at Hackley School, took charge. Under his vigorous and inspiring 
leadership, the school maintains its distinguished academic record 
while expanding its fostering of an all round development for the 
individual student. The curriculum offers an honors course, as 
well as such electives as Oriental history, Russian, and other 
languages, stagecraft Graduates enter many leading colleges, 
including Columbia, Cornell, Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Brown. 
See also page 682 

INSTITUTE FOR EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN 

For the Educationally Retarded 

Day and Eve Coed Ages 6-19 

Bronx 57, N.Y, 210 E. 181st St. Tel. CY 8-7527. 
William W. Harris, B.A., NYU, M.A., Columbia, Dir. 



N > Y - c Middle Atlantic States 193 

Enr Boys 14, Girls 10; part-time 170. Fac full 3, part-time 14. 
Adm Staff 1. 

Tui variable. Partial Scholarships. Est 1949. Proprietary. 
Summer Session. Remedial Tutoring. Tui $200. 

Established in 1949 as the day division of the Cooperative Tu- 
toring and Counseling Service to provide educational and psycho- 
logical services for emotionally disturbed children, the Institute 
continues that program while emphasizing today remedial work 
for educationally retarded children and adolescents. Psychiatric 
treatment is provided when needed, and the staff includes a social 
worker, a psychiatrist, and psychologists. 



THE LENOX SCHOOL 
Day Girls Ages 6-18 

New York City 21. 170 E. 70th St. Tel. BU 8-4541. 
Olivia Green, A.B., Wellesley, A.M., Columbia, Head. 

Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General Art Music. 

Enr 185. Fac full 21, part-time 3. 

Grad '5714. Entd Col '5710. (Smith 3, Vassar 2, Cornell 2, 
Pembroke 1, Connecticut 1, Bennington 1). 

Tui $600-1050. Scholarships partial 16 ($10,000). Est 1916. Inc 
1939 nonprofit. 

Plant $275,000. Class rms 18, Lib 7200 vols. Lab. Studio,, Gym, 

Founded by Jessica G. Cosgrave and long sharing the plant with 
Finch, Lenox moved to its own property in 1939. The preparatory 
curriculum sends graduates to Wellesley, Smith, Barnard, Vassar, 
and other colleges. 

THE LITTLE RED SCHOOL HOUSE 
Day Coed Ages 4-1 1 

New York City 12. 196 Bleecker St. Tel. GR 7-5316. 

Randolph B. Smith, A.B., Harvard, M.A., Ph.D., Columbia, Dir. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VI. Music Art 
Remedial Reading. 

Enr Boys 115, Girls 105. Fac full 12, part-time 1. 

Tui $560. Scholarships full 7, partial 47 ($8000-10,000). Est 1932. 
Inc 1932 nonprofit. 

June Camp. Tui $110. 

Plant $55,607. Class rms 8. Lib 2050 vols. Studios music 1, art 1. 
Shop. 

1'rogressive from its founding, this numbers among its educa- 
tional advisors William Kilpatrick, Ernest Melby, and Harold 
Taylor. Begun as an experiment in the New York public schools 
but since 1932 independent, the school is primarily interested in 
contributing to the solution of problems of public education. The 
large classes and the inter-racial atmosphere of the public school 



N. Y. C. Leading Private Schools 194 

situation have been retained. Children live and work in a coopera- 
tive rather than a competitive atmosphere, with the curriculum in 
the early years based largely on a study of the world and the 
peoples who make up their environment. Music and rhythms, 
painting, modelling, dramatics, and handicrafts are emphasized 
throughout The three-week June camp is an essential part of the 
school year for certain elementary classes; and in cooperation 
with NYU offers a teacher-training program. With the addition of 
the Elisabeth Irwin High School in 1941 the school now prepares 
for all colleges and universities. Dr. Smith succeeded Elisabeth 
Irwin in 1943. 

LOYOLA SCHOOL 
Day - Boys Ages 11-18 

New York City 28. Park Ave. at 83rd St. Tel. BU 8-6200. 
Rev. Peter J. Daly, M.A., Woodstock Col, Head. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Library Science. 
Art Speech. 

Enr 150. Fac full-time 12. 

Grad '5716. Entd Col '5716. (Holy Cross 4, Georgetown 4, 
Fordham 3, Villanova 2). Alumni 578. 

Tui $825. Scholarships partial 7 ($5000). Est 1900. Roman 
Catholic. 

Plant $650,000. Endowment $50,000. Class rms 10. Lib 3500 vols. 
Lab. Studio art 1, Gym. 

This Catholic day school, which is now directed by Father 
Daly, offers its boys the thorough academic training and religious 
instruction for which the Jesuit order is known. Graduates are 
prepared for all colleges; the majority enter Catholic institutions, 
including Fordham, Georgetown, Holy Cross, Notre Dame, 



LYCEE FRANCAIS DE NEW YORK 
Day Coed Ages 6-18 

New York City 28. 3 E. 95th St Tel. AT 9-1460. 
Pierre Brodin, Director of Studies, 

Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4 Col 1-2. 

Enr Boys 160, Girls 130. Elem 150, Sec 110, Col 30. Fac full 23, 
part-time 7. 

Tui $550-850. Scholarships full 10, partial 50. Est 1935. Inc 1935 
nonprofit. 

Class rms 14. Lib 7000 vols. Lab. iStudios music 1, art 1. 

Primarily for children of French parents, though American 
children are also enrolled, this bilingual school follows the course 
of study as given in the French lycees. Graduates are admitted with 
advanced standing to American colleges. Among colleges entered 
are Yale, Barnard, M.I.T., Bryn Mawr, Hunter, Harvard. 



N. Y. C. Middle Atlantic States 195 

MANHATTAN COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL 
Day- Boys Ages 13-18 

New York City 71. 4513 Spuyten Duyvil Pkwy. Tel. KI 8-1400. 
Brother Arnold of Mary, B.A., Catholic Univ, Prin. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep Pre-Engineering General. 

Enr 430. Fac full-time 15. 

Grad '5687. Entd Col '56 Manhattan Col 61, others. Alumni 
1200. 

Tui $250. Scholarships full 18, partial 17. Est 1853. Roman 
Catholic. 

Co-existing with Manhattan College since 1854, this is conducted 
by the Brothers of the Christian Schools. The preparatory pro- 
gram especially emphasizes pre-engineering studies, 

McBURNEY SCHOOL 
Day Boys Ages 10-18 

New York City 23, 15 W. 63rd St. Tel. EN 2-8117. 

Benjamin D. Chamberlin, A.B., Cornell, M.A., Univ of Pittsburgh, 

Head. ' 

Grades VI-VIII High Sch 1-4. Post Grad 1. Col Prep. Art 
Music Religion Typing Mechanical Drawing Arts and Crafts. 
Remedial Reading. 

Enr 440. Fac full 29, part-time 2. 

Grad '5748. Entd Col '5743. (NYU 6, R.P.I. 3, Rutgers 2, 
Stevens 2, Bucknell 2, Columbia 1). Alumni 1990. 

Tui $600-650. Scholarships full 2, partial 38 ($13,000). Est 1916. 
Inc nonprofit. YMCA. 

Summer Session. Enr 125. Tutoring Make-up courses Remedial 
Reading. Tui $50 per subject, seven wks. 

Plant $1,750,744. Endowment $100,000. Class rms 22. Lib 20,000 
vols. Labs 5. Studios 2. Shop. Gyms 3. Theatre. Swimming pools 2. 

In a full-day program with supervised activities, McBurney 
makes use of several floors of the West Side Y.M.C.A., with 
athletic and technical equipment designed for its use, as well as 
its own adjacent building, opened in the fall of 1957. Thomas 
Hemenway, head master from 1918 and now emeritus, was suc- 
ceeded in 1952 by Mr. Chamberlin, associated with the school since 
1930. He continues the broad testing and guidance program, the 
reading school, and the opportunities for hobbies and crafts in- 
augurated by his predecessor. Graduates enter Columbia, Harvard, 
N.Y.U., R.P.I., Yale, Haverford, and others. 
THE NEW LINCOLN SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 3-18 

New York City 26. 31 W. 110th St. Tel. EN 9-5600. 

John J. Brooks, M.A., A.B.J., Univ of Ga,, Ph.D., Northwestern, 

Dir. 



N. Y. C. Leading Private Schools 196 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col 
Prep. Art Music. 

Enr Boys 205, Girls 205, Elem 280, Sec 130. Fac full 42, part- 
time 3. 

Grad '5626. Entd Col '5625 (Bennington 3, Antioch 3, Mid- 
dlebury 3, U of Wis. 2, Harvard 1, Columbia 1). Alumni 173. 

Tui $695-1050. Scholarships partial 161 ($60,000). Est 1948. Inc 
1948 nonprofit. 

Plant $353,649. Class -rms 18. Lib 15,000 vols. Labs 2. Studios 
music 3, art 3. Gym. Swimming pool. 

Deriving from the Lincoln School of Teachers College, which 
was established in 1917 and closed in 1948, this was founded as 
the Experimental School and assumed its present name in 1949. 
Progressive and experimental in technique, curriculum, and atti- 
tude. 

It prepares for a wide variety of leading colleges, including 
Antioch, Bard, Radcliffe, Vassar, Smith, Harvard. The student 
body represents diverse occupational, economic, and racial back- 
grounds. In 1955 New Lincoln consolidated with the former 
Boardman School and now operates its nursery and kindergarten 
at that address, 6 E. 82nd St. See also page 812 

THE NIGHTINGALE-BAMFORD SCHOOL 
Day Girls Ages 5-18 

New York City 28. 20 E. 92nd St. Tel. AT 9-5020. 
Edna Hill Robillard, B.S., Columbia, Head. 
Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art. 

Enr 265. Fac full 20, part-time 7. 

Grad '5622. Entd Col '5620. 

Tui $500-1050. Scholarships. Est 1920. Inc 1939 nonprofit. 

Class rms 16. Lib 5000 vols. Lab. Studios music 1, art 1. Gyms 2. 

Both socially and academically of high standard, this school 
developed from private classes organized by Frances N. Night- 
ingale in 1906. On her retirement, her partner Maya Stevens 
Bamford, took over in 1939. Mrs. Robillard, with the school for 12 
years and assistant head mistress since 1945, succeeded in 1947 
Graduates have entered Smith, Vassar, Mt. Holyoke, Radcliffe, 
Swarthmore, Bryn Mawr. 



HELEN NORFLEET INDIVIDUAL STUDY PROGRAMS 
Bdg and Day- Girls Ages 16-25 

New York City 23. 300 West End Ave. Tel. LY 5-3367. 
Helen Norfleet, B.A., B.Mus., North Texas Col, Dir. 

Post Grad 1-2. Art Music Languages Journalism Dance 
Dramatics Fashion Homemaking Design Special Courses. 
Secretarial. 



N. Y. C. Middle Atlantic States 197 

Enr Bdg 8. Fac and Staff 7. Tui Bdg $2400 (+$200), Day $1000 
and up. Lib 2000 vols. Est 1935. Inc 1945 nonprofit. 

Summer Camp. Tui $550. 

Under the guidance of Miss Norfleet, individual study programs 
are offered high school graduates who pursue their activities, cul- 
tural, artistic, or practical, while rounding out their studies under 
her direction. Some girls of unusual talent are enrolled to complete 
their secondary studies while others are junior and senior college 
or specialized school graduates. Enrollment is limited; the regu- 
lar staff and faculty is supplemented for special subjects by teach- 
ers from other schools and colleges. Courses of college level make 
broad use of the cultural and instruction facilities of New York 
City. Miss Norfleet, pianist of the Norfleet Trio and co-director 
of the Norfleet Camp for Girls at Burlington, Vt., encourages cos- 
mopolitan interests. The School has alumnae from 25 different 
countries. 



PROFESSIONAL CHILDREN'S SCHOOL 

Day Coed Ages 5V 2 -18 

New York City 23. 132 W. 60th St. Tel JU 2-3116. 
Mrs. Frederick S. Hoppin, B.A., Vassar, M.A., Columbia, Dir. 

Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General Tutoring. 

Enr Boys 60, Girls 110. Elem 85, Sec 85. Fac full 16, part-time 1. 

Grad '56 20. Entd Col '5614 (Am Sch Dramatic Art 2, Bar- 
nard 1, Finch 1, Juilliard 1, UCLA 1, Russell Sage 1). 

Tui $410-495. Scholarships full 4, partial 8. Est 1914. Inc 1927 
nonprofit. 

This unique school serves the special needs of superior students 
as well as those studying for or engaged in the creative and per- 
forming arts. Established by Deaconess Jane Harris Hall of 
the Little Church Around the Corner, it provides academic in- 
struction only, 9:45 to 2:00. 

RIVERDALE COUNTRY SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day - Boys Ages 8-20 

Riverdale-on-Hudson, N.Y. 71. 253rd St. and Fieldston Rd. Tel. 

KI 9-8810. 

John Haydn Jones, B.A., M.A., Hamilton, Head* 

Grades IV-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Music Art. 

Enr Bdg 80, Day 315. Fac full 35, part-time 1. Adm Staff 4. 

Grad '5749. Entd Col '5747. (Harvard 7, Yale 3, Cornell 3, 
Brown 2, Princeton 1, Wesleyan 1). Alumni 1300. 

Tui Bdg $2150 (+$225), Day $850-1025 (+$355-365). Scholar- 
ships partial 40 ($21,000). Est 1907. Inc 1925 nonprofit 

Summer Session. $100 per course. 



N. Y. C. Leading Private Schools 198 

Plant $1,750,000. Dorm rms 78. Class rms 20. Lib 5000 vols. 
Labs 3. Studios music 12, art 1. Gyms 2. Fields 2. Courts 5. 

One of the first country day schools to be located near a metro- 
politan center, Riverdale was established by the late Dr. Frank 
S. Hackett on grounds adjacent to Van Cortlandt Park, which de- 
spite the growth of the city still have a sense of spaciousness and 
country surroundings. The plant, turned over to a board of trust- 
ees in 1925, has benefited from many improvements and moderni- 
zations. Through Dr. Hackett's vision and drive, the school early 
gained the enviable reputation which it still retains. Mr. Jones, 
successor upon Dr. Hackett's retirement in 1949, had for thirteen 
years been master under Dr. Boyden at Deerfield Academy. 

College preparation has been emphasized from the first, and 
Riverdale students have made outstanding records on the C.E.B. 
examinations and entered Cornell, Columbia, Harvard, Wesleyan, 
Princeton, Amherst, Williams, Dartmouth, Mass. Inst. of Tech., 
Yale, and many other leading colleges. In addition, the curriculum 
has shown unusual breadth in music, and more recently in art, and 
an interest in world affairs and international understanding has 
long been traditional; more recently, emphasis has been placed on 
the role of the United Nations. A liberal weekend policy makes it 
possible for boys who live nearby to keep in touch with their 
families, and for boys from a distance to enjoy the educational 
advantages of a world center. There is an unusually full extra- 
curricular program, including music, dramatics, debating, three 
school publications, and honors course, a relief society, and 
a full complement of sports. See also page 682 

RIVERDALE SCHOOL OF MUSIC, established in 1922, is a 
department of the Riverdale Country School. Mr. and Mrs. Rich- 
ard McClanahan are co-directors. 



RIVERDALE COUNTRY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 
Day -Ages 11-19 

Riverdale-on-Hudson, N.Y. 71. 248th St. and Sycamore Ave. Tel. 

KI 3-2800. 

Mrs. Marion Cabell Hollstein, B.A., Wilson, Prin. 

Grades VII- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Music Art Hu- 
manities. Remedial Reading. Dramatics Dance. 

Enr 140. Fac full 16, part-time 2. 

Grad '5718. Entd Col '57 17. (Radcliffe 1, Bryn Mawr 1, 
Duke 1, Swarthmore 1, Pembroke 1, Skidmore 1). Alumnae 363. 

Tui $1075. Scholarships partial 36 ($8000-10,000). Est 1935. Inc 
nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Tui $100 per course. 

Class rms 20. Lib 7000 vols. Labs 2. Studios music 4, art 2. 
Gym. Fields 2. Courts 2. 



AT. Y. C. Middle Atlantic States 199 

A department of the Riverdale Country School, situated directly 
on the banks of the Hudson River in a completely suburban at- 
mosphere, this day school attracts students from Manhattan and 
Westchester. Miriam D. Cooper, first head, was succeeded in 1958 
by Mrs, Hollstein, who has taught at Putney and Verde Valley 
Schools, and abroad, and was previously on the faculty. The school 
holds to high standards of preparation for college, and with em- 
phasis on art and music. There is an honors course in the hu- 
manities, as well as 'coed' classes at the senior level with the Riv- 
erdale Country School for Boys. Graduates enter Vassar, Ml. 
Holyoke, Radcliffe, Bryn Mawr, Bennington, and many other col- 
leges. 

RIVERDALE NEIGHBORHOOD SCHOOL 
Day -Boys Ages 4-8, Girls 4-11 

New York City 71. Fieldston Rd. and 253rd St. Tel. KI 9-8156. 
Mary E. Hope, B.S., A.M., Columbia, Prin. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VI. Dramatics Music 
Art Manual Arts Science. 

Enr Boys 50, Girls 105. Fac full 15, part-time 1. 

Tui $450-715 (+$42-200). Est 1928. Inc nonprofit 

Plant $175,180. Class jms 9. Lib 2000 vols. Studios music 1, art 
1. Gym. 

This developed from a little group started for younger children 
of Riverdale families and is a department of the Riverdale Country 
School. The scope has now broadened to attract children from 
Manhattan and Westchester. 

THE RIVERSIDE SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 3-14 

New York City 23. 40 Riverside Dr. Tel. TR 3-1688. 
Paul T. Wohlsen, A.B., Muhlenberg, M.A., NYU, Dir. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VIII. Social Sciences French 
Music Art Ballet. Remedial Work. 

Enr Boys 60 7 Girls 70. Fac full 10, part-time 2. 

Tui $810. Scholarships partial 9 ($1000). Est 1907. Inc 1940 
nonprofit. 

Summer Recreation Session. Enr 50. Tui $265, twelve wks. 

Plant $75,000. Endowment $10,000. Class rms 11. Studio music 1. 

This is the outgrowth of an elementary school purchased in 1930 
by Dr. Margaret Elizabeth Wells, author of several books on ele- 
mentary school curricula and history. A new site was occupied in 
in 1938. In 1950 Mr. Wohlsen, previously supervisor of education in 
the New York Slate education department, was appointed. He 
continues the broad and flexible curriculum which makes use of 
resources of the city. Transportation is provided for students and 
enrollment limited to Manhattan. 



N. Y. C. Leading Private Schools 200 

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON SCHOOL 
Day and Eve Coed Ages 19- 

New York City 23. 246 W. 80th St. Tel. SU 7-6400. 
Leo D. Rhodes, B.S., Dir. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep Commercial 

Enr Day 150, Eve 300. Fac 24. 

Tui Day $500. Est 1908. Proprietary. 

Deriving from the Scoville School established in 1882 and di- 
rected from 1930 by Elizabeth G. Atwood, and merged in 1943 
with Dr. Annette T. Rubinstein's group which had moved in 
1942 from W. 88th St. to the present site, this came under the 
direction of Mr. Buckley in 1953 and enrolls only adults. In 1956, 
Mr. Rhodes became Director. 

THE RUDOLF STEINER SCHOOL 

Dqy Coed Ages 4-18 

New York City 21. 15 E. 79th St Tel. LE 5-2130. 
Henry Barnes, B.S., Harvard, M.A., Columbia, Chairman; F. 
Blanche Rosse, School Sec. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col 
Prep Art Music. Teacher Training. French German Latin. 
Enr Boys 135, Girls. 135. Fac full 25, part-time 8. 
Tui $450-850. Scholarships. Est 1928. Inc 1929 nonprofit. 
This school is based on the educational principles of Rudolf 
Steiner who founded the Waldorf School in 1919 in Stuttgart, 
Germany. The school defines his principles as genuine authority 
of the teacher and artistic presentation of subjects; in 1954 
a teacher-training program was initiated. The school is faculty- 
directed. Children of many countries and varied social backgrounds 
make up the enrollment. 



ST. ANN'S ACADEMY 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 6-18 

New York City 21. 153 E. 76th St, Tel. BU 8-4947. 
Brother Lawrence Joseph, B.S.Ed., M.A., Fordham, Prin. 

Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General Business. 

Enr Bdg 140, Day 800. Grad '48-'52~ 650. Entered Col '48-'52 
260. Fac full-time 40, Staff 4. Tui Bdg $730, Day $210. Scholar- 
ships 4. Est 1892, Roman Catholic. 

Plant $1,800,000. Class rms 28. Lib 9000 vols. Labs 4. Gym. 

Conducted by the Marist Brothers, this academy sends most of 
its graduates to Manhattan College and Fordham, with some en- 
tering other Catholic institutions and the State Maritime College. 



For further 1 information, write Porter Sargent 



N. Y, C. Middle Atlantic States 201 

ST. BERNARD'S SCHOOL 
Day Boys Ages 6-14 

New York City 29.4 E. 98th St. Tel. AT 9-2878. 
R. I. W. Westgate, B.A., Manitoba, M.A., Oxford, Ph.D., Har- 
vard, Head. 

Grades I- VIII. Art Music French Latin. Manual Arts. 

Enr 230. Fac full 22, part-time 18. 

Grad '5722. Entd Prep Sch '5721. (Andover 5, Taft 2, 
Choate 2, Exeter 2, Millbrook 2). Alumni 1422. 

Tui $675-950. Scholarships ($9000). Est 1904. 
Inc. 1940 nonprofit. 

This school, long proprietary but now incorporated not for 
profit and offering some scholarships and pensions, prepares sons 
of many wealthy and prominent families for the large eastern 
schools. The curriculum emphasizes composition and literature 
and includes music and art. 

ST. LUKE'S SCHOOL 
Day -Coed Ages 4-14 

New York City 14. 487 Hudson St. Tel. WA 4-5960. 
Rev. Paul C. Weed, Jr., Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VIII. 

Enr Boys 105, Girls 95. Fac full 12, part-time 11. 

Grad '5710. Entd Prep Sch '57 6. (Trinity 1, Dalton -1, Eliz. 
Irwin 1, McBurney 1, others). Alumni 61. 

Tui $450-600. Scholarships full 2, partial 64 ($3000). Est 1945. 
Episcopal. 

Established by the Parish of Trinity Church of New York City, 
this church school emphasizes art projects conceived and carried 
out collectively. 



ST. THOMAS CHURCH CHOIR SCHOOL 

Bdg Boys Ages 9-13 

New York City 19, 117-123 W. 55th St. Tel. CI 7-5585. 
Robert H. Porter, B.A., Brown, S.T.B., General Theo. Sem, Head, 
Grades V-VIII. Music Algebra Latin French. Rem Reading. 
Enr 40. Fac full 8, part-time 4. 

Grad '575. Entd Prep Sch '573. (McBurney 1, St. Peter's 1, 
Trinity 1). Alumni 431. 
Tui $600. Scholarships. Est 1919. Episcopal. 

The late Charles Steele provided endowment and the building 
for this church choir school. When Leon D. Phillips became head 
master at Viewpoint, he was succeeded by Henry Roney, five 
years registrar at Darlington School, Ga. The boys, all of good 
voice, are here trained for the choir and given sound academic 
work which admits them to leading secondary schools, where 



IV. Y. C. Leading Private Schools 202 

able students continue to receive financial aid from the St. Thom- 
as endowment-. A new residence building was erected in 1954. 
Mr. Porter was appointed in 1955. 

SEARING SCHOOLS 

Tutoring 
Bdg Boys Ages 8-; Day Coed 8- 

New York City 22. 22 E. 60th St. Tel. PL 5-5088 

Otto L. Swan, B.S., D.D.S., Heidelberg; Ruth Sibley Swan, A.B., 

Middlebury, Dirs. 

Individual instruction (Grade I through High Sch). 

Enr Bdg 25, Day 60. Fac 25. 

Grad '57 16. Entd Col '5715. (Barnard 1, Hobart 1, St. 
Lawrence 1, Briarcliff 1, Bennett 1, Nichols 1). 

Tui Bdg $4000-5600, Day $3600 or $6 hr. Est 1936. Prop. 

Individual instruction is offered in all grade and high school 
basic college, and commercial subjects at the New York City 
school, which is for day students. Remedial reading is also pro- 
vided. See also page 817 

SEARING SCHOOL, Somers, N.Y., is the residential division, 
with 25 boarding and 25 day students. The 35 -acre campus 
provides for swimming, skating, tennis, and other sports. 

THE SEMPLE SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 
Bdg and Day Ages 14-20 

New York City 25. 351 Riverside Dr. Tel. UN 5-5602. 
Ellen Semple, Head. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1-2. Col Prep General. 
Fine and Applied Arts Secretarial. 

Enr . Fac full 6, part-time 6. 

Tui Bdg $1900, Day $900. Est 1898. Inc 1950 nonprofit. 
Founded in 1898 by Mrs. T. Darrington Semple, this school 
moved to its present location in 1930. Attracting girls from all 
over the country, it offers general and college preparatory cur- 
ricula and emphasizes two-year post graduate programs in music, 
arts, drama, languages, dancing, household arts, and secretarial 
training. 

THE SPENCE SCHOOL 
Day Girls Ages 5-18 

New York City 28, 22 E. 91st St. Tel. AT 9-5940. 
Barbara Colbron, A.B., Bryn Mawr, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. 
Col Prep (junior college, senior college). Arts and Crafts 
History of Art Music Drama French. 

Enr 300. Fac full 34, part-time 12. 

Grad '5715. Entd Col '5712. (Radcliffe 2, Barnard 1, Car- 



N. Y. C, Middle Atlantic States 203 

negie Tech 1, Duke 1, Sweet Briar 1, U of Colo 1). Alumnae 2100. 
Tui $550-1050 (+$25-200). Scholarships full 6, partial 26 ($10,- 

000). Est 1892. Inc 1928 nonprofit. 
Plant $1,256,380. Class rms 35. Lib 7500 vols. Labs 3. Studios 

art 2, music 1. Gym. 

This well known school bears the impress of the unusual women 
who have directed its policies. Clara B. Spence, the founder, a 
woman of strong and gracious personality living uncompromis- 
ingly by her ideals, held the implicit confidence of her patrons for 
30 years. Even at the beginning of the century, when the social 
graces were of more importance, she developed in her girls some- 
thing of social consciousness. On her death in 1923 the school 
came under the direction of Charlotte S. Baker, long co-principal. 
A new era began in 1932 when the trustees, many of them alumnae, 
invited Valentine Chandor to merge with Spence her own school, 
opened in 1917. Her personality and intellectual interests were 
stimulating to students and alumnae. Mrs. Harold S. Osborne, 
appointed head mistress after Miss Chandor's death in 1935, justi- 
fied the confidence of the trustees. 

Miss Colbron, previously associate dean at Swarthmore, was 
appointed in 1952. Today the school continues as a flourishing pre- 
paratory institution and sends graduates to leading colleges, in- 
cluding Vassar, Smith, Barnard, Wellesley. School activities in- 
clude student government, social service, athletic association, 
chorus, dramatics, studio club, camera club, and publications. 

STATEN ISLAND ACADEMY 
Day- Coed Ages 5-18 

Staten Island 1, N.Y. 45 Wall St. Tel GI 7-0111. 

Harold Ely Merrick, B.S., Univ of Pa., M.A., Columbia, Litt.D., 

Wagner, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. 
Col Prep General. Art Music Mechanical Drawing. 

Enr Boys 150, Girls 100. Elem 160, Sec 90. Fac full 20, part-time 

" Grad '5717. Entd Col '5713. (Williams 1, Brown 1, Miami 1, 
US Naval Acad 1, Cornell 1, Georgetown 1). Alumni 1000. 

Tui $300-660. Scholarships partial 9. Est 1884. Inc nonprofit. 

Plant $190,000. Lib 12,350 vols. Lab 1. Studios music 1, art 2. 
Gyms 2. Fields 3. 

After absorbing some neighboring schools during the thirties, 
this oldest and largest of the private schools on Staten Island 
merged in 1942 with Dongan Hall-Arden School, of which Dr. 
Merrick had been principal. Academic standards are good, the 
curriculum is broad, and graduates enter Wagner, Cornell, Col- 
gate, Wellesley, Mt. Holyoke, among others. 



N. Y. C, Leading Private Schools 204 

THE TOWN SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 3-10 

New York City 21. 114 E. 76th St Tel. BU 8-4383. 
Harrietts B. Young, Pres. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-V. 

Enr Boys 60, Girls 60. Fac full 15, part-time 3. 

Tui $600-900. Scholarships full 9, partial 13 ($8000). Est 1916. 
Inc 1952 nonprofit 

This school for young children supplanted in 1936 the former 
Hyde School. 

TRINITY SCHOOL 
Day -*- Boys Ages 6-19 

New York City 24. 139 W. 91st St. Tel. TR 3-1650. 
Hugh C. Riddleberger, B.S., Hamilton, Head. 

Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Mathematics French 
Music Art. Mechanical Drawing. 
Enr 380. Elem 185, Sec 195. Fac full 32, part-time 2. 
Grad '57 36. Entd Col '5732. (Trinity, Harvard, Yale, Colum- 
bia, Williams, Hamilton). Alumni 1500. 

Tui $500-750. Scholarships full 20, partial 50 ($20,000). Self-help 
pgrm. Est 1709. Episcopal. 

Plant $594,000. Endowment $750,000. Class rms 23. Lib 5091 
vols. Labs 3. Studios music 1, art 1. Gym. 

Founded over two centuries ago by the "Venerable Society for 
the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts," for the educa- 
tion of both sexes "in piety and useful learning." Trinity was en- 
dowed in 1796 and maintained in connection with Trinity Parish 
until its incorporation in 1806. Conducted at first in the tower of 
Old Trinity Church, but moving uptown with the progress of the 
residential district, it has since 1898 been a boys' school, and since 
1947, when the boarding department transferred to Pawling, for 
day students only. 

Matthew Dann, who succeeded the Rev. Lawrence T. Cole, en- 
riched the strict preparatory program and in 1943 installed a 
country day department. When in 1955 Dr. Dann began to devote 
all his work to Trinity- Pawling school, Mr. Riddleberger, a grad- 
uate of Trinity and associated with it for twenty years as stu- 
dent, teacher, and assistant head master, was appointed. Gradu- 
ates enter Columbia, Trinity, Williams, Princeton, Harvard, Yale, 
and other leading colleges. There is a strong athletic program, as 
well as numerous other extra-curricular activities. In 1957 a new 
gymnasium and 5 additional classrooms were completed. 



For further information, write Potter Sargent 



N. Y. C. Middle Atlantic States 205 

THE TUTORING SCHOOL OF NEW YORK 
Day- Coed Ages 10 and up 

New York City 22. 220 E. 50th St Tel. PL 5-6666. 

Adelaide V. McAuliffe, B.S., Alfred, Dir,; Gertrude Ellery Macder- 

mott, B.A., Stanford, Asst. Dir. 

Grades IV-VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad. Languages Sci- 
ences Mathematics. Remedial Reading Make-up courses. 

Enr 70. Fac full 20, part-time 15. 

Grad '57 20. Entd Col '57 18. 

Tui variable. "Est 1925. Inc 1927. 

Summer Session. Tui variable. 

Organized as a small preparatory school, but offering no classes, 
this group has the usual laboratory and library facilities. Each 
student receives individual assignments and meets his tutors alone. 
Graduates have entered R.P.I., Yale, Finch, Harvard, University 
of Va., M.I.T., among others. 

In 1956 Mrs. McAuliffe and Miss Macdermott succeeded 
George Matthew. In 1958 the school occupied its new building. 
See page 811 

THE WALDEN SCHOOL 
Day >Coed Ages 3-18 

New York City 24. 1 W. 88th St. Tel. SU 7-5315. 
Milton E. Akers, A.B., Univ of Kans., Ed.D., Columbia, Dir. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4. 
Col Prep. Art Music Shop Crafts. 

Enr Boys 180, Girls 190, Elem 255, Sec 115. Fac full 35, part 
time 6. 

Grad '5720. Entd Col '5719. (U of Mich 2, Boston U 2, 
NYU 2, Columbia 2. Stevens Inst. 2, Cornell 1). 

Tui $750-1100. Scholarships partial 96 ($37,500). Est 1914. Inc 
1924 nonprofit. 

Plant $500,000. Lib 6600 vols. 

This progressive school with psychological orientation of teach- 
ing and guidance was founded by Margaret Naumberg, who early 
broke with tradition in an endeavor to discover conditions under 
which children might make the soundest growth. Upon the retire- 
ment in 1956 of Vinal H. Tibbetts, who in 1949 had succeeded 
Hans Maeder, Dr. Akers, (formerly coordinator of the Agnes 
Russell Center, T.C.C.U.),assumed the directorship. 

WALT WHITMAN SCHOOL 

Day Coed Ages 4-13 

New York City. 340 E. 43rd St. Tel YUkon 6-9747. 
Louise Krueger, B.S., M.A., Dir. 

Grades I- VIII. Art Music French Science Theatre Arts. 
Enr 55. Fac full 3, part-time 9. 
Tui $600-900 (+$100). Scholarships. Est 1937. Inc nonprofit 



N. Y. C. Leading Private School* 206 

Founded by Miss Krueger after varied educational experience 
both here and abroad, this school preparing for secondary work 
offers unusual opportunities in art, crafts, music, writing, lan- 
guages and dramatics. See also page 812 

WORK AND PLAY SCHOOL 

Day - Coed Ages 3-6 

New York City 24. 9 W. 82nd St. Tel. EN 2-2890. 
Marjorie Friedberg, B.S., NYU, Dir. 

Pre-Nursery Nursery Kindergarten. 

Enr Boys 25, Girls 20. Fac full-time 4, part-time 3. Tui $600. 
Scholarships. Est 1938. Proprietary. 

Established by Miss Weller, this little group was opened with 
some support from Calhoun School, but moved to its present loca- 
tion in 1939. 

YODER CENTER 
Day Coed Ages 6-18, adults 

New York City 17. 235 E. 46th St. Tel. PL 9-1808. 

Hilda W. Yoder, A.B., Lenoir Rhyne, M.A., L.H.D. (Hon), 

Columbia, Dir. 

Enr Boys 30, Girls 20. Fac full 5, part-time 4. 

Tui variable. Est 1949. Proprietary. 

Summer Session. Tui variable. 

The individualized programs at the Center provide for diag- 
nosis and correction- of reading disabilities, tutoring in all sub- 
jects, speech training, and classes in physical re-education. There 
is a summer session, and instruction is available evenings and 
Saturdays. See also page 813 

BROOKLYN, N.Y. Pop 2,738,175. Alt to 109 ft. New York City's 
largest borough, connected with the metropolis by bridges, tunnels 
and ferries, is also a huge city in itself with varied manufactures. 
Packer Institute and Friends School are in the vicinity of Borough 
Hall, and a mile E is Adelphi Academy. Overlooking Prospect 
Park Plaza are Berkeley Institute and the Ethical Culture School. 
Nearby is the Museum of the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and 
Sciences. In Dyker Heights, along the SE shore, Polytechnic 
Preparatory overlooks the Narrows. 

ADELPHI ACADEMY 
Day Coed Ages 3-19 

Brooklyn 38, N.Y. 282 Lafayette Ave. Tel. MA 2-3725. 
Edward W. Hathaway, A.B., Bates, M.A., NJ. STC, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I- VIII. High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art 
Music. Dramatics. 



ffklyn Middle Atlantic States 207 

Enr Boys 275, Girls 180. Elem 205, Sec 250. Fac full 38, part- 
time 3. 

Grad '5757. Entd Col '5753. (Adelphi, Alfred, Mt. Holyoke, 
Vassar, NYU, Columbia). Alumni 2000. 

Tui $400-725. Scholarships partial 94 ($30,000). Est 1863. Inc 
1869. 

Class rms 65. Lib 13,613 vols. Labs 2. Studios music 1, art 1. 
Gyms 2. 

Established by John Lockwood during the Civil War, and until 
1924 affiliated with Adelphi College, this academy is highly organ- 
ized and fully equipped. Under Eugene C. Alder from 1909 to 1926 
the reputation for sound college preparatory work was built. 
Lloyd W, Johnson was head master from 1926 until 1933, and 
from 1948 to 1951. During the interim William Slater directed the 
school until 1942, being succeeded by Harold C. Amos, formerly 
head master of Baguio School in the Philippines and from 1934 
of the American School in Japan. Following Dr. Johnson's resig- 
nation in 1951, Robert L. Workman was appointed head. When 
the latter was elected to direct Lakemont Academy, Mr. Hathaway 
succeeded him at Adelphi in 1952. 

Graduates enter many colleges and universities, including Co- 
lumbia, Barnard, Mt. Holyoke, Harvard, Cornell, Smitji. Among 
activities are student government, club programs, and athletics. 



THE BERKELEY INSTITUTE 
Day Boys Ages 4-11, Girls 4- T 8 

Brooklyn 17, N.Y. 181 Lincoln PL Tel. ST 9-6060. 

Helen Burtt Mason, B.A., Wellesley, A.M., Columbia, Head. 

Pre-Sch Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col 
Prep General. Music Fine Arts. 

Enr Girls 270, Boys 120. Elem 270, Sec 120, Fac full 24, part- 
time 8. 

Grad '5722. Entd Col '5721. (Elmira 2, Mt. Holyoke 2, 
Wheaton 2, Jackson 1, Smith 1, Wells 1). Alumnae 996. 

Tui $360-700. Scholarships full 4, partial 37 ($13,500). Est 1886. 
Inc nonprofit. 

Plant $390,000. Class rms 19. Libs 5500 vols. Studio 1. Gyms 2. 
Playgrounds 2. 

Named for Bishop Berkeley, this time-honored school was for 
30 years from 1917 under the direction of Ina C. Atwood. Mrs. 
Mason succeeded her after several years as head of Milwaukee- 
Downer Seminary and then of Kimberley School. 

Enrolling children from nearby Long Island communities as 
well as Brooklyn, Berkeley offers a solid preparatory curriculum 
with numerous courses which sends graduates to Wellesley, Cen- 
tenary, Skidmore, Smith, Cornell, Swarthmore, among others. The 



B'klyn Leading Private School* 20S 

general curriculum prepares for schools of specialized training. 
Numerous field trips are integrated with course work. Among 
activities are drama, music, journalism, art, social service, and 
athletics. A recent building and renovation program has added 
much to the plant and grounds. 

BROOKLYN ACADEMY 
Day and Eve Coed Ages 16-20 

Brooklyn 1, N.Y. 182 Henry St. Tel. MA 4-4957. 
George B. Bonus, B.A., M.A., NYU, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General Commercial. 
Enr Boys 110, Girls 45. Fac full-time 7. 
Grad '57 40. Entd Col '5735. 
Tui Day $450, Eve $35 per subject. Est 1896. 
Summer Session. Tui $45 per subject. 

For nearly 40 years this was the Brooklyn branch of the New 
York Preparatory School. This now independent academy pre- 
pares primarily for local colleges and universities. Mr. Donus suc- 
ceeded Emory L. January in 1955, 

BROOKLYN ETHICAL CULTURE SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 4-13 

Brooklyn 15, N.Y. 49-50 Prospect Park W. Tel. SO 8-4300. 

M. Pauline Rutledge, B.S., Johns Hopkins, M.A., Columbia, Prin. 

Kindergartens Grades I- VIII. Science Shop Art D^nce 
Music Ethics Physical Education. 

Enr Boys 100, Girls 100. Fac full 19, part-time 6. 

Tui $695-720. Scholarships. Est 1922. Inc nonprofit. 

Plant $200,000. Class rms 12. Lib 4000 vols. Lab. Studios music 
1, art 2. 

Independent in administration though resembling in many ways 
the institution of similar name in New York City, this school 
provides a rich and colorful program. Mrs. Henry Neumann, 
director from 1922 and emeritus since 1950, was succeeded by 
Miss Rutledge, principal since 1936. 

BROOKLYN FRIENDS SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 5-18 

Brooklyn 1, N.Y. 112 Schermerhorn St. Tel. TR 5-2758. 
William J, Meeneghan, B.S., St. Lawrence, M.A., NYU, Prin. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. 

Enr Boys 190, Girls 145. Elem 210, Sec 125. Fac full 28, part- 
time 4. 

Grad '5727. Entd Col '57 27. (Vassar 3, Columbia 2, Benning- 
ton 2, Swarthmore 1, Dartmouth 1, Johns Hopkins 1). Alumni 
1200. 

Tui $360-700. Scholarships partial 37 ($10,000). Est 1867. 
Friends. 



B'klyn Middle Atlantic States 209 

Plant $700,000. Class rms 15. Lib 4300 vols. Lab. Studios music 
I, art 1. Gym. Field and field house. 

Thoroughly modern and up to date, this old-time institution 
of Friends' tradition and of interdenominational enrollment 
continues to offer sound academic work as well as facilities for 
more vigorous outdoor life and sports than are available in most 
city schools. Warren B. Cochran, for many years head of the 
upper school, succeeded Douglas G. Grafflin in 1942. Upon his re- 
tirement in 1953, Mr. Meeneghan was appointed. Graduates enter 
many colleges, including Amherst, Mt. Holyoke, Bryn Mawr, Rad- 
clifTe, Dartmouth, Oberlin. During the last few years, enroll- 
ment has been increased, faculty enlarged, and plant improved, 

COLBY ACADEMY 
Day Coed Ages 13- 

Brooklyn 17, N.Y. 55 Hanson Place. Tel. MA 2-2226. 
Walter S. Meyer, B.S., CCNY, Head. 

High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep General Commercial. 
Mathematics Science. 

Enr Boys 150, Girls 45. Fac full 13, part-time 1. 

Grad '5733. Alumni 1800. 

Tui $500. Est 1902. Inc 1927 nonprofit. 

Class rms 12. Lib 6867 vols. Lab. 

Founded as a tutoring school by Dr. Edward J. Colcord and 
named after his alma mater, the school in 1927 moved to its pres- 
ent building and was reorganized as a high school. Facilities are 
shared with Central Y.M.C.A. Most graduates enter colleges and 
universities in New York City. 

LEAGUE SCHOOL 
For Deeply Disturbed Children 

Day Coed Ages 3-12 

Brooklyn, N.Y. 196 New York Ave. Tel. PR 2-4500. 
Carl Fenichel, B.S.S., CCNY, M.A., New School, Dir. 

Enr 40. Fac full 12, part-time 3. 

Tui sliding scale to $1500. Scholarships. Est 1953. Inc nonprofit. 

Founded under the sponsorship of the League for Emotionally 
Disturbed Children, this school enrolls children of normal or 
superior intelligence who have profound personality disturbances. 
Psychiatric supervision and therapy are under the direction of Dr. 
Alfred Freedman and an advisory board of psychiatrists, psy- 
chologists, social workers, and educators. 

THE PACKER COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE 
Day Boys Ages 4-9, Girls 4-20 

Brooklyn 1, N.Y. 170 Joralemon St. Tel. TR 5-6644. 
Paul David Shafer, B.A., Bethany (W.Va), Ph.D., Yale, Pres. 
Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. 



B'klyn Leading Private Schools 210 

Col Prep General. Art Music. 

Jr Col 1-2. Liberal Arts Art Laboratory Technique Home 
Economics Secretarial Pre-professional. 

Enr Girls 470, Boys 50. Elem 245, Sec 220. Jr. Col 60. Fac full 
36, part-time 13. 

High Sch Grad '5641. High Sch Grad Entd Col '56 41'(Mt 
Holyoke 4, U of Miami 4, Bucknell 3, Vassar 2, Smith 2, Syracuse 
2). Alumnae 4000. 

Tui $375-700. Scholarships full 15, partial 67 ($32,000). Est 1845. 
Inc nonprofit. 

Plant $617,000. Endowment $851,000. Class rms 27. Lib 15,567 
vols. Labs 4. Studios music 1, art 5. Playgrounds 2, 

Throughout its long history this school, successor of the Brook- 
lyn Female Academy, has played an important part in local educa- 
tional affairs and from the first has offered college grade work. It 
was the first junior college to be recognized by N.Y. State. The 
school was named in honor of William S. Packer, whose widow 
gave money for the building. Dr. Shafer, fifth principal, in 1938 
succeeded Dr. John H. Denbigh, director from 1918. 

The Institute has for years appealed to well-to-do Brooklyn 
families, and these still supply the greater part of the enrollment, 
although students also come from the New Jersey and West- 
chester suburbs as well as Long Island. The solid preparatory 
program sends graduates from both the high school and the 
junior college to Smith, Vassar, Connecticut College, Mt Holyoke, 
Wellesley, Skidmore, Barnard, and other leading colleges. There 
is also a variety of terminal junior college programs. 

POLYTECHNIC PREPARATORY COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 
Boys Ages 10-18 

Brooklyn 9, N.Y. 92nd St. and 7th Ave. Tel. Shore Rd. 5-2800. 
J. Folwell Scull, Jr., B.S., M.S., M.A., Univ of Pa., Head. 

Grades V-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music Shop. 

Enr 480. Fac full 39, part-time 2. 

Grad '5774. Entd Col '5774. (Cornell 5, Williams 5, Trinity 
4, U of Pa. 4, Princeton 3, Dartmouth 3). Alumni 2300. 

Tui $775-825. Scholarships full 15, partial 18 ($20,000). Est 1854, 
Inc nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Tui $65 per subject. 

Plant $860,615. Endowment $250,000. Class rms 28. Lib 7406 
vols. Labs 2, Studios music 2, art 1. Gym. Swimming pool. Field* 
7. Courts 9. 

An outgrowth of the preparatory department of the Polytechnic 
Institute, this school became outstanding as the first of its kind 
during the 32 years under direction of Dr. Joseph Dana Allen, an 
ardent apostle of the country day movement and who was for 
seven years president of the Conference. On his retirement, he 



L. 7. Middle Atlantic States 211 

was succeeded by Mr. Scull, who had previously been on the 
executive staffs of Friends' Central, Scranton Country Day, Abing- 
ton Friends Schools, and the Naval Preparatory School. Graduates 
are prepared for leading colleges and universities, among them 
Williams, Yale, Colgate, Dartmouth, Cornell, Princeton. Activities 
include publications, music, dramatics, clubs, and a sports program. 

FLUSHING, L.I., N.Y. Alt 30 ft LI R.R. 8 mi. E of Long 
Island City, Rt.25A. This busy trading center of North Queens 
borough is the terminus of one of New York City's subways. 

FOXWOOD SCHOOL 
Day- Coed Ages 4-14 

Flushing 55, L.I., N.Y. 41-05 Bowne St. Tel. FL 9-2450. 
Elizabeth Curtis Dresser, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII. French Latin. 
Enr Boys 80, Girls 60. Fac full 14, part-time 1. 
Tui $550-650 (+$40-110). Est 1913. Proprietary. 
Mrs. Dresser, then Elizabeth Curtis, opened Foxwood to pro- 
vide children of the neighborhood with better facilities than were 
available in the public schools. The life here is colorful, the ac- 
tivities many and interesting, the academic work sound. 

FOREST HILLS, L.I., N.Y. Alt 106 ft. Li R.R. 9 mi. E of New 
York, Rt.25. Its international and national tennis tournaments and 
its actors have brought fame to Forest Hills, the Americanized- 
English version of a commuter's paradise. 

KEW-FOREST SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 5-18 

Forest Hills, L.I., N.Y. 119-17 Union Turnpike. Tel. BO 8-4667. 
James L. Dixon, A.B., A.M., Ed.M., Ed.D., Rutgers, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep 
General. Economics Geography Art Music. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Boys 170, Girls 155. Elem 165, Sec 160. Fac full 20, part-time 
2. 

Grad '5639. Entd Col '5639 (Cornell 3, Duke 3, Dartmouth 
2, U of Pa. 2, Vassar 2, Smith 2). Alumni 757. 

Tui $375-625. Scholarships full 10. Est 1918. Inc 1941 nonprofit. 

Plant $360,000. Endowment $15,500, Lib 2950 vols. Lab. Studios 
music 1, art 1. Fields 2. 

Kew-Forest was founded by Louis D. Marriott with Guy H. 
Catlin, who died in 1935. Six years later, on the retirement of 
Mr. Marriott, the school was incorporated by parents and Dr. 
Dixon appointed. Attracting students from throughout cosmopoli- 
tan Queens County, the school stresses college preparation and 
sends graduates to Adelphi, Rutgers, Goucher, Duke, Mt Hoi- 
yoke, Yale, among others. Activities include language, art, music, 



L. L Leading Private Schools 212 

debating, and dramatics clubs, as well as a full program of sports. 

GARDEN CITY, L.I., N.Y. Pop 20,000. Alt 88 ft. LI R.R. 23 mi 
E of New York, Rt.25 S from Mineola. Midway between the 
North and South Shores, this town, laid out after the Civil War 
by the department store magnate, A. T. Stewart, is today a pub- 
lishing center. Stewart embellished it with a cathedral, endowed 
schools, and his own mausoleum, all in mid-Victorian Gothic, 
The girls' school is directly opposite the Cathedral of the Incarna- 
tion, and near St. Paul's School. 

CATHEDRAL SCHOOL OF SAINT MARY 

Bdg Girls Ages 10-19; Day Boys 31/2-11, Girls 3y 2 -19 
Garden City, LI., N.Y, 37 Cathedral Ave. Tel. PI 6-1061. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. 
Languages Philosophy and Psychology Art Music. Dramatics 
Dpnce Riding. 

nr Bdg 55; Day Girls 225, Boys 40. Elem 155, Sec 165. Fac 
full 24, part-time 12. 

Grad '5741. Entd Col '5738. (Hollins 3, Skidrnore 3, Wilson 
2, Bryn Mawr 1, Wheaton 1, U of Mich 1). Alumni 1175. 

Tui Bdg $1850 (+$200-250), Day $700-800. Scholarships full 9, 
partial 22. Est 1877. Episcopal. 

Class rms 31, Lib 6400 vols. Lab. Studios music 1, art 1, dance 
1. Gym. 

This church school established under the charter of the Cathedral 
of the Incarnation but accepting girls of other denominations has 
always adhered to high academic standards. Under Mrs. Marion 
Reid Marsh, who in 1935 succeeded Miriam Bytel, the school took 
on new life, with a separate residence for girls ten to fourteen, and 
a new gymnasium, the gift of alumnae and friends. Graduates 
enter Mt. Holyoke, Vassar, Smith, Wellesley, Radcliffe. The life 
is comparatively simple, the activities, including music, dramatics, 
subject clubs, publications, and sports, are varied. 

Recently the academic work has been broadened, with greater 
emphasis on languages, especially Latin, additional work in 
art, and a junior-senior course in psychology arid philosophy. 

The day school, with its own building for the first four grades, 
attracts discriminating patrons within a radius of 30 miles. See 
also page 763 

ST. PAUL'S SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 10-18 

Garden City, L.I., N.Y. Tel. PI 7-3377. 
Rev. Nicholas M. Feringa, B.A., Head. 

Grades V-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Languages 
Mathematics. Remedial Reading. 



L. I. Middle Atlantic States 213 

Enr Bdg 105, Day 170. Fac full 18, part-time 4. 

Grad '5738. Entd Col '5737, (Lehigh 3, Harvard 2, Wesley- 
an 2, Yale 1, Princeton 1, RPI 1). 

Tui Bdg $1700 (+$400), Day $900 (+$100). Scholarships full 
2, partial 12, Est 1877. Episcopal. 

Dorm rms 80. Class rms 19. Lib 4500 vols. Labs 3, Studio 
music 1. Gyms 2. Fields 3. Courts 4. 

This diocesan school, part of the Cathedral of the Incarnation, 
was founded by Mrs. Alexander T. Stewart as a memorial to her 
husband. Controlled by the Chapter of the Cathedral, of which the 
Bishop, the Rt. Rev. James DeWolfe, D.D,, is head, it was di- 
rected from 1947 by The Rev. Canon Ernest Sinfield, who suc- 
ceeded the late Walter R. Marsh, head master for 40 years. The 
Rev. Nicholas Feringa was appointed in 1953. 

Essentially college preparatory and enrolling boys largely from 
greater New York and from New England, the school sends 
graduates to many colleges, including Cornell, Colgate, Colby, 
Dartmouth, Lehigh, Princeton. Activities include several religious 
organizations, athletics, and a number of hobby clubs. 



WALDORF SCHOOL 

of Adelphi College 

Day- Coed Ages 4-16 

Garden City, L.I., N.Y. Cambridge Ave. Tel. Pioneer 6-8387. 
John F. Gardner, M.A., Columbia Teachers' Col, Faculty Chrmn. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-3. Col 
Prep. Languages History Science. Music Art Dramatics. 

Enr Boys 140, Girls 110. Fac full 24, part-time 8. 

Tui $450-850. Est 1947. Inc 1947 nonprofit. 

Adhering to the practices of Rudolf Steiner, the Austrian philo- 
sopher and educator, this school offers a complete college prepara- 
tory program, unusual in scope of its cultural studies and with 
emphasis and correlation of the sciences in a full country day 
program. 



GLEN HEAD, L.I., N.Y. Pop 1262 (1940). LI R.R. 22 mi. NE of 
Brooklyn. Here, on the E shore of Hempstead Harbor, is Green 
Vale School 

THE GREEN VALE SCHOOL 
Day Coed Agas 5-14 

Glen Head, L.I., N.Y. Valentine's Lane. Tel. MAyfair 1-2420. 
Archibald R. Hoxton, Jr., A.B., Yale, M.A., George Washington, 
Head. 
Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1. 



L. I. Leading Private Schools 214 

Enr Boys 190, Girls 215. Fac full 42, part-time 4. 

Grad '5728. Entd Col >57 28. 

Tui $425-950 (+$180). Est 1922. Inc 1930 nonprofit. 

Originally one of the group of schools founded by B. L. Buck- 
ley, but now long independent, Green Vale was directed by Robert 
F. Jackson from 1924 until 1937, when Howard Corning succeeded, 
Mr. Hoxton was appointed head master in 1953. Now drawing 
its students from a considerable radius, the school has recently 
increased enrollment and plant, with boys above the fourth grade 
now in a separate unit. In 1957 a new classroom wing was added. 
The first year of high school is for girls only. 



HEWLETT, L.I., N.Y. LI R.R. Rt.27 from New York. On the 

South Shore between Woodmere and Lynbrook, Hewlett has 
many beautiful estates. The school is in nearby Hewlett Bay Park. 

THE LAWRENCE SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 4-14 

Hewlett, L.I., N.Y. Meadowview Rd. Tel FR 4-2020. 
Anthony V. Barber, B.A., Columbia, B.Litt, Oxford, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1. Latin 
French Science Art Music. Remedial Reading. Dramatics Shop. 

Enr Boys 100, Girls 80. Fac full 18, part-time 3. 

Entd Prep Sch '57 15. (Canterbury 2, Garrison Forest 2, Mill- 
brook 2, St. Mark's 1, Miss Hall's 1, Deerfield 1). Alumnae 1830. 

Tui $325-950. Scholarships partial 21 ($5500). Est 1891. Inc non- 
profit 

Summer School. Remedial Reading. 

Class rms 13. Lib 5900 vols. Studios music 1, art l.^Lab. Gym. 

Established by citizens of Lawrence as one of the Buckley 
Schools, this was reorganized and moved to its present site in 
1920. Ward L. Johnson, head from 1932, in 1943 was succeeded 
by Mr. Barber, a former master, who had been head of Tuxedo 
Park Day School for two years. Class grouping is by ability and 
there is an honors program for gifted children. 

ISLIP, L.I., N.Y. Pop (twp) 71,465. LI R.R. 8 mi. SE of Hunt- 
ington, Rtlll. Islip, on the South Shore, is made up of several 
small communities. The Hewlett School is in East Islip. 

HEWLETT SCHOOL 

Bdg Girls Ages 10-19; Day Boys 41/2-9, Girls 4y 2 ~19 
East Islip, L.I., N.Y. Tel. JU 1-1035. 
Jeannette M. Sullivan, Head. 

Pre-School Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. 
General. French Art Music Dramatics. 



L. L Middle Atlantic States 215 

Enr Bdg 50; Day Girls 80, Boys 20. Elem 95, Sec 55. Fac full 
14, part-time 3. 
Grad '5711. Entd Col '578. (St. Lawrence 1, Northwestern 

1, Skidmore 1, Ithaca 1, Hofstra 1, U of Ceylon 1). 

Tui Bdg $1800 (+$135), Day $400. Scholarships partial 11. 
Est 1915. 

Dorms 2. Class rmslO. Lib 3600. Lab. Studio. Gym. Fields 2. 

Established in Hewlett, removed to Cedarhurst in 1923, this 
small school has occupied its present site since 1941. Miss 
Sullivan succeeded Eugenia G. Coope upon the latter's death 
in 1955. Graduates enter a variety of colleges, including 
the University of Ariz., Bryn Mawr. Athletics, dramatics, and 
publications are among activities. See also page 761 

JACKSON HEIGHTS, L.I., N.Y. More carefully planned than 
many neighboring communities, Jackson Heights has attracted a 
large number of conservative residents who support its private 
school. 

GARDEN COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 
Coed Ages 5 1/3- 18 

Jackson Heights 72, L!., N.Y., 33-16 79th St. Tel. HA 4-9652. 

Henry Roberts, A.B., Univ of Pa., M.A., Columbia, Head. 
Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. General. French 

Art Music Drama. 

Enr Boys 155, Girls 185. Elem 205, Sec 135. Fac full-time 24, 
Grad '5725? Entd Col '5720. (Conn Col Women 2, Columbia 

2, NYU 2, MIT 1, RPI 1, Cornell 1). Alumni 376. 

Tui $500-600. Scholarships partial 4. Est 1923. Inc 1937 non- 
profit. 

Plant $500,000. Class rms 19. Lib 5658 vols. Lab. Studios music 
1, art 1. Gym. Fields 2. 

This successful school was developed under the direction of 
O. P. Flower to include classes from kindergarten to college. On 
Mr. Flower's death in 1948, Mr. Roberts, formerly assistant head 
master, was appointed his successor. During his administration, 
enrollment has been increased materially, and several additions 
have been made to the plant. Graduates attend many different 
colleges and universities. See also page 813 

JAMAICA, L.I., N.Y. Pop 200,000. LI R.R. This industrial center, 
with its well known suburbs is a part of the borough of Queens, 

THE HENLEY SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 12-18 

Jamaica Estates, N.Y. 86-90 188th St. Tel. AXtel 7-9797. 
Alvaro M. Sanchez, A.B., M.A., Columbia, Head. 
Grades VII- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Languages 



L. L Leading Private Schools 216 

Sciences Art Music. Remedial Reading Tutoring. 

Enr Boys 60, Girls 45. Fac full 11, part-time 1. 

Tui $650-850. Est 1954. Inc nonprofit 

Class rms 6. Lab. Lib 3000 vols. Gym. 

With modern equipment, and emphasizing college preparatory 
work while also providing a general curriculum, the Henley 
School offers firm grounding in academic fundamentals. Mr. San- 
chez succeeded Paul A. Firestone in 1956. See also page 814 



DELEHANTY HIGH SCHOOL 
Day and Eve Coed Ages 13-18 

Jamaica 32, L.L, N.Y. 91-01 Merrick Blvd. Tel. 6-8200. 
Bernard B. Galway, B.A., St. Mary's, M.A., Fordham, Prin. 

High Sch 1-4 Col Prep. 

Enr Day Boys 550, Girls 245; Eve Boys 100, Girls 80. Fac full 
32, part-time 2. 

Grad '57121. Entd Col '57 89. (St. John's- Jamaica 17, Ford- 
ham 11, St. Francis 4, Hofstra 4, lona 3, NYU 2). 

Tui Day $400, Eve $35 per subject. Est 1944. Inc. 

This private high school provides a college preparatory prograrr, 
Doth in the full-day session and in the evening program, with the 
latter enrolling only adults. 

LAKE GROVE, L.I., N.Y. 22 mi. E of Woodbury, off Rt.25. In 

central L.L, two mi. N of Lake Ronkonkoma, the Island's largest 
body of fresh water, are the modern buildings of Lake Grove. 

LAKE GROVE SCHOOL 
Bdg- -Coed Ages 6-18 

Lake Grove, L.L, N.Y. Moriches Rd. Tel. Ronkonkoma 9-8776. 
Albert A. Brayson, B.S., STC, Lockhaven Pa., M.Ed., Penn State, 
Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1 
Col Prep General Business. 

Enr Bdg Boys 70, Girls 50; Day Boys 5, Girls 5. Elem 40, Sec 
80. PG 10. Fac full 13, part-time 1. Adm Staff 3. 

Grad '57 13. Entd Col '5711. (Hofstra 3, U of Miami 2, 
NYU 2. U of Mich 1, Ryder 1, Columbia 1). Alumni 158. 

Tui Bdg $1500 (+$200) Day $450 (+$25). Scholarships. Self- 
help pgrm. Est 1940. Inc 1940 nonprofit. 

Summer Session and Camp. Tui $475. 

Plant $500,000. Dorm rms 87. Class rrns 12, Lib 4000 vols. Lab. 
Studio music 1. Gym. Fields 3. Courts 4. Riding facilities. 

This was founded by Ronald L. Barry, who served as head mas- 
ter for eight years. In 1948, Mr. Brayson, on the faculty, succeeded 
Mr. Barry. Recent graduates have entered N.Y.U., the Univ of 
Pa., American Univ. 



L. I. Middle Atlantic States 217 

Specialized classes in English are offered to students from 
foreign countries. 

LOCUST VALLEY, L.I., N.Y. Pop 4500 (1955). LI R.R. Rt 25 A, 
from New York. Locust Valley is between Glen Cove and Oyster 
Bay in the fashionable Piping Rock section. The Academy, half 
a mile from the station, is near the Matinecock Friends Meeting 
House. 

FRIENDS ACADEMY 
Day Coed Ages 4-18 

Locust Valley, L.I., N.Y. Duck Pond Rd. Tel. ORiole 6-0393. 
Victor M. Haughton, Jr., A.B., M.A., Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art 
Music Mechanical Drawing. Functional Reading Speech. 

Enr Boys 195, Girls 200. Elem 225, Sec 170. Fac full 36, part- 
time 2. 

Grad '5637. Entd Col '5634 (Princeton 2, Cornell 1, Radcliffe 
1, MIT 1, Harvard 1, Williams 1). 
Tui $750-800. Scholarships. Est 1877, Friends. 
Class rms 22. Labs 2. Studios music 1, art 1. Gyms 2. Fields 6. 
Courts 5. 

Established as a boarding school, this Quaker school has since 
1957 been entirely day. It was founded by Gideon Frost and has 
always been characterized by simplicity and a home-like atmos- 
phere. 

Mr. Haughton, for several years assistant head, in 1955 succeeded 
Merrill L. Hiatt, appointed in 1946 following Harold L. Nomer. 
The emphasis is on college preparation, and graduates enter Har- 
vard, Princeton, Amherst, Wellesley, Middlebury, Connecticut 
College, among others. There is a wide range of extra-curricular 
activities, including dramatics, music, a current events club, and 
student government, as well as athletics. See also page 814 



LYNBROOK, L.L, N.Y. Pop 17,314. Alt 21 ft LI R.R. 7 mi. 
SE of Jamaica, Rt.26. A pre-Revolutionary settlement, Lynbrook 
with its nurseries is in the truck-farming region of SW L.I. 

NORWOOD SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 2-9 

Lynbrook, L.L, N.Y. Ill Merrick Rd. Tel. 9-1944, 
Mr. and Mrs. James V. Gatteau, Dirs. 
Pre-Nursery Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-III. 
Enr Boys 50, Girls 50. Fac full 10, part-time 3. Staff 5. 
Tui $450-800. Est 1930. Proprietary. 

Summer Day Camp. Coed Ages 3-12. Enr 200. Tui $250, eight wks. 
Plant $250,000. Class rms 9. Swimming pool. 



L. /. Leading Private Schools 218 

This school was organized in 1930 by Mr. and Mrs. Gatteau, 
admirers of John Dewey, and the latter a student of Marietta 
Johnson of the School of Organic Education. A teacher-training 
program is carried on with Adelphi College. 

OAKDALE, L.I., N.Y. LI R.R. 50 mi. E of New York, Rt 27A. 
The most prominent feature of Oakdale is the Academy's impos- 
ing plant 

LA SALLE MILITARY ACADEMY 

Bdg Boys Ages 12-18 

Oakdale, L.I., N.Y. Montauk Highway. Tel. Sayville 4-0900. 
Brother Anthony Joseph, A.B., Catholic Univ, M.A., Manhattan, 
M.Ed M Univ of Detroit Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. 

Enr Bdg 315, Day 10. Fac full 27, part-time 3. 

Grad '5764. Entd Col '5761. (St. John's 6, Manhattan 4, 
Holy Cross 4, Villanova 4, Seton Hall 4, Notre Dame 3). 

Tui Bdg $1800 (+$125), Day $600 (+$75). Scholarships full 4 
($7000). Est 1883. Roman Catholic. 

Plant $2,322,233. Dorm rms 91. Class rms 14. Lib 9000 vols. 
Labs 3. Studios music 3. Gym. Fields 11. Courts 4. 

Founded by the Brothers of Christian Schools as Clason Point 
Military Academy, this school moved from the Bronx to its pres- 
ent spacious campus in 1926. It is now a senior R.O.T.C. unit. 

Now exclusively college preparatory, the Academy sends most of 
its graduates on to Catholic institutions of higher learning. Extra- 
curricular activities include, in addition to the military, arts and 
crafts, dramatics, music, public speaking and debating, science, 
mathematics, and Spanish clubs, and sports. See also pages 684-85 

OYSTER BAY, L.I., N.Y. Pop 5215. Alt 8 ft LI R.R. 5 ml E of 
Glen Cove. Near this residential town on Oyster Bay Harbor is 
the former home of Theodore Roosevelt, a park and bird sanctuary 
dedicated to him, and the place where he is buried. 

EAST WOODS SCHOOL 
Day Boys Ages 4-14, Girls 4-15 

Oyster Bay, L.I., N.Y. Yellow Cote Rd. Tel. OB 6-0444. 
Langdon G. Rankin, AJB., Princeton, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1. Art Music 
Latin French Mathematics Science Dramatics. Rem Reading. 

Enr Boys 145, Girls 150. Fac full 29, part-time 1. 

Grad '5726. Entd Prep Sch '5726. (Chapin 3, St. Paul's 2, 
Concord Acad 2, Andover 1, Groton 1, Miss Hall's 1). Alumni 48. 

Tui $400-875. Scholarships partial 8 ($5100). Est 1946. Inc 1946 
nonprofit. 



L. 7. Middle Atlantic States 219 

Plant $550,000. Class rms 19. Studio. Shop. Fields 4. 

This school, founded in 1946 by a group of parents, was ad- 
ministered by the Greenvale School until 1947 when it became 
independent and Buell Critchlow was appointed head master. A 
new grade has been added each year and the new school building, 
purchased in 1947, has been expanded and remodelled. The cur- 
riculum is enriched by field trips, arts and crafts, and music. 

In 1953 Mr. Rankin, formerly senior master at Eaglebrook, and 
then assistant head master at Fay, was appointed. 

PORT WASHINGTON, L.L, N.Y. Pop 6500. LI R.R. Rt.25A 
from New York. On the North Shore between Manhasset Bay 
and Hempstead Harbor, Port Washington is made up of exten- 
sive estates 

SANDS POINT COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 
Coed Ages 3-14 

Sands Point, L.I., N.Y. 1575 Port Washington Blvd. Tel. Port 

Washington 7-6118. 

Joseph T. Fetsch, B.E., Johns Hopkins, Exec Dir. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VIII. Science Nature Studies 
Music Art Dramatics. Tutoring. 

Enr Boys 200, Girls 150. Fac 42. 

Est 1954. Proprietary. 

Summer Session. Tui $325 eight wks. 

Located on the former estate of Edgar F, Luckenbach, and over- 
looking Long Island Sound, this country day school offers an 
unusually complete program of academic work and extra-curricular 
activities. See also page 8 15 

VINCENT SMITH SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 4-14 

Port Washington, L.I., N.Y. 322 Port Washington Blvd. Tel. 

7-0339. 

Adelaide V. Smith, B.A., Prin. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VIII. French Latin Art. 
Music Folk Dancing Sewing Shop. 

Enr Boys 50, Girls 45. Fac full 10, part-time 6. 

Tui $350-700. Scholarships 6. Est 1924. Inc 1931 nonprofit. 

Characterized by an atmosphere of simplicity seldom found in 
N.Y. suburban schools, this attractive elementary group empha- 
sizes simple ethical training for socialized living, combining op- 
portunities for creative activities with sound academic work. 

ROSLYN, L.I., N.Y. Pop 1612. Alt 37 ft. LI R.R. 24 mi. NE of 
Brooklyn. The summer home of William Cullen Bryant from 
1843 to 1878, the village of Roslyn, backed by the wooded slopes 



L. I. Leading Private Schools 220 

of the Wheatley Hills, is chiefly residential. Here is located the 
new site of the Buckley Country Day School. 

BUCKLEY COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 
Boys Ages 4-14, Girls 4-16 

Roslyn, L.I., N.Y. I.U. Willets Rd., North Hills. Tel. Manhasset 

7-4181. 

A. Cameron Mann, A.B., Hobart, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-2. Art 
Music Latin French. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Boys 155, Girls 165. Fac full 29, part-time 2. 

Grad '5739. Entd Prep Sch '5735. (Taft 2, Deerfield 2, Can- 
terbury 2, South Kent 2, Miss Hall's 2, Westover 2). 

Tui $450-950. Scholarships 38 ($18,000). Est 1923. 
Inc nonprofit. 

In 1955 this school, one of the suburban schools founded by 
B Lord Buckley, and known until 1938 as Great Neck Prepara- 
tory, moved from Great Neck to the present location with double 
the former acreage and with a new school plant and facilities 

ST. JAMES, L.L, N.Y. LI R.R. On the North Shore, St. James 
is 5'mi. from Stony Brook. 

THE KNOX SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Girls Ages 12-20 

St. James, L.L, N.Y. Long Beach Rd. Tel. 2-5371. 

Mrs. Alexander Stewart Phinney, A.B., Smith, A.M. Columbia, 

Prin; Laura L. Wood, A.B., Wheaton, A.M., Radcliffe, Assoc. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep Gen Liberal Arts, Music Secretarial 
Home Economics. 

Enr Bdg 75, Day 25. Fac full 9, part-time 4. 

Grad '5718. Entd Col '5717. (Duke 1, Middlebury 1, Con- 
necticut 1, Randolph-Macon 1, Syracuse 1, Manhattanville 1). 
Alumnae 3000. 

Tui Bdg $2250, Day $950. Est 1904. Inc 1921 nonprofit. 

Established at Briarcliff Manor by Mary Alice Knox, and upon 
her death in 1911 coming under the direction of Mrs. I^ouise Phil- 
lips, the school was moved in 1920 to Cooperstown, N.Y. On Mrs. 
Houghton's retirement in 1948, Mrs. Phinney, associate principal 
since 1920, became principal of the school and president of the 
corporation. 

In 1953 the school acquired its present site, a sixty-acre estate 
fifty miles from New York City, where the school opened in 
September 1954. 

STONY BROOK, L.L, N.Y. Pop 768 (1940). Alt 108 ft LI R.R. 

53 mi. NE of New York, Rt.25A. In Indian times this little village 



L. I. Middle Atlantic States 221 

of Colonial origin was known as Woppowogue. On the N shore 
of L.L, it is diagonally opposite Bridgeport, Conn., across the 
Sound. The 70 acre campus of Stony Brook School is on a hilltop, 
a half mile from the town. 

THE STONY BROOK SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 12-19 
Stony Brook, L.L, N.Y. Tel. 7-0060. 

Frank E. Gaebelein, A.B., NYU, A.M., Harvard, LittD., Wheaton, 
D.D. (Hon), Reformed Episcopal Theol Sem, Head; Pierson 
Curtis, A.B., Princeton, Senior Master. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Art Music 
Mechanical Drawing Bible Public Speaking Manual Arts 
Developmental Reading. 

Enr Bdg 160, Day 30. Fac full 17, part-time 4. 

Grad '5746. Entd Col '5744. (Colgate 4, Brown 2, MIT 2, 
U of Colo 2, Princeton 1, Cornell 1). Alumni 1400. 

Tui Bdg $1550 (+$100), Day $725. Scholarships. Self-help 
pgrm. Est 1922. Inc 1922 nonprofit. 

Plant $1,450,000. Endowment $325,000. Class rms 14. Lib 5200 
vols. Labs 2. Studio art 1. Hobby shop. Gyms 2. Fields 4. rm. 
Courts 4. 

Although of no official denominational connection, this school 
has a Presbyterian background and was established on the site of 
Stony Brook Assembly for summer religious conferences. The in- 
fluence of Dr. Gaebelein, head master from 1922, is traceable to the 
same sincerity and forcefulness evident in his writings, such as 
"Christian Education in a Democracy", and "The Pattern of 
God's Truth", the latter published in 1954. 

The purpose of the school is to integrate college preparation 
with the principles of evangelical Christianity. Three peri- 
ods a week of English Bible study are credited toward gradua- 
tion. The faculty is made up of men of good educational training 
who have vital faith in the Christian religion. Graduates enter 
Wheaton, MIT, Westminster, Princeton, and many other colleges 
and universities. Extra-curricular activities stress not only religious 
groups and associations, but also sports, hobby clubs, and student 
government. 

As the school has developed, plant and campus have been sub- 
stantially increased. In 1950 Memorial Hall, the impressive colo- 
nial classroom and library building, was completed; in 1956-57 
it was enlarged by a $110,000 addition. See also page 683 

WOODMERE, L.L, N.Y. Pop 10,328 (1954). 20 mi. E. of New 
York, Rt.27. On the South Shore between Hewlett and Lawrence 
is Woodmere. 



N. Y, Leading Private Schools 222 

WOOD/MERE ACADEMY 
Co Day Coed Ages 4-17 

Woodmere, L.I., N.Y. 336 Woodmere Blvd. Tel. Franklin 4-2320. 
Horace M. Perry, A.B., Swarthmore, M.A., Ph.D., Columbia, 
Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. 
Col Prep. 

Enr Boys 205, Girls 170. Elem 235, Sec 140. Fac full-time 40. 

Grad '5734. Entd Col '5734. Alumni 800. 

Tui $425-1110. Scholarships 40 ($25,000). Est 1912. Inc. 

Plant $1,500,000. Endowment $300,000. Class rms 28. Lib 6500 
vols. Labs 2. Studios music 2 3 art 1. Gym. Fields 4. Courts 3. 

Founded by residents of the community with the sponsorship 
of the Ethical Culture School in N.Y., Woodmere was first under 
the direction of Margaret D. Brasor. Dr. Perry, long connected 
with the school, succeeded Thomas N. Barrows as principal in 
1934. 

Thoroughly progressive, and with a well integrated curriculum, 
the school offers excellent preparation for college, and graduates 
attend Wellesley, Yale, Smith, Harvard, Cornell, Swarthmore, and 
other leading institutions. Publications, dramatics, and music are 
among the extra-curricular activities. 

NIAGARA FALLS, N.Y. Pop 90,872. Alt 800 ft NYC; LV R.R. 
81 mi. W of Rochester, Rt. U.S.104. The scenic marvel of America 
and site of one of the greatest developments of hydro-electric 
power in the world, Niagara Falls manufactures carborundum, 
wall board, and shredded wheat. It also has a great variety of 
electrochemical industries. The grounds of De Veaux School front 
on Lewiston Road and adjoin Whirlpool State Park. 

DE VEAUX SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day* Boys Ages 13-18 

Niagara Falls, N.Y. Lewiston Rd. Tel. 4-5477. 

Morison Brigham, B.A., Yale, M.A., Univ of Minn., Head. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep (Scientific, English) 

Enr Bdg 50, Day 60. Fac full 11, part-time 3. 

Grad '57 19. Entd Col '57 18. (Hobart 5, Brown 1, Yale 1, 
Cornell 1, U of Rochester 1, U of Mich 1). Alumni 800. 

Tui Bdg $1600 (+$125), Day $800. Scholarships full 4, partial 
18 ($18,000). Est 1853. Episcopal. 

Plant $742,000. Endowment $848,267. Dorm rms 40. Class rms 
10. Lib 2500 vols. Labs 2. Studios music 1, art 1, Shops 3. Gyms 2. 
Fields 5. Courts 2. Swimming pool. 

Founded by the bequest of Judge Samuel De Veaux to be ad- 
ministered by the Diocese of western N.Y., this church school was 
for many years under the direction of the Rev. William S. Bar- 



N. Y. Middle Atlantic States 223 

rows. George Lloyd Barton, head master from 1935 to 1942, and 
his successor, Rev. William S. Hudson, raised and maintained the 
academic standards. Mr. Brigham succeeded to the head master- 
ship in 1951. 

The large scholarship endowment permits a broad selection of 
students on the basis of ability. The thorough preparatory cur- 
riculum sends graduates to many colleges throughout the country. 
A broad sports program, both varsity and intramural, student 
council and government, and many craft and hobby clubs, inclu- 
ding art, music, dramatics, photography, radio, science, printing, 
and publications, are among activities. 

In recent years the plant has been brought into excellent order 
and appearance. See also pages 686-87 



NYACK, N.Y. Pop 5889. Alt 68 ft E R.R. 20 mi. N of New York, 
Rt.9W. On the W bank of the Hudson River's wide Tappan Zee 
this residential town is the site of Nyack Missionary College. 



NYACK BOYS SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 6-14 

Nyack, N.Y. N. Broadway. Tel. NYack 7-4700. 

Victor W. Haggar, B.S., Worcester STC, M.A., Clark, Head. 

Grades I-VIII French Latin Algebra Speech Manual Arts 
Art Music. Remedial Reading. 

Enr 75, Fac full 10, part-time 4. 

Grad '5712. Entd Prep Sch '57 . (Berkshire 2, St. Paul's 1, 
Canterbury 1, Blair 1, Gunnery 1, Others ). Alumni 136. 

Tui $1750 (+$100). Scholarships partial 8. Est 1935. Inc 1955 
nonprofit. 

Summer Session and Camp. Enr 55. Tui $450 seven wks. 

Plant $700,000. Dorm rms 40. Class rms 9. 1500 vols. Studios 
music 1, art 1. Swimming: pool. Fields 2. Court. 

Founded by the late John B. Karkos to provide the opportuni- 
ties of a country estate and home atmosphere, this school pre- 
pares for the large boarding schools including Hill, Lawrencevillc, 
Choate, and Taft. See page 690 

PAWLING, N.Y. Pop 1430. NYC R.R. 70 mi. N of New York, 
Rt.22. Around 1740 the Quakers settled here in the hills of Dutch- 
ess County, four mi. from the Conn. line. Trinity-Pawling School 
is a half mile from the station. 

When writing schooh, please mention this Handbook 



N. Y. Leading Private Schools 224 

TRINITY-PAWLING SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 14-19 

Pawling, N.Y. Route 22. TeL 4321. 

Matthew E. Dann, A.B., M.A., Columbia, L.H.D., Trinity, Head; 

William W. Dunbar, M.A., Asst. Head. 

High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep. Mechanical Drawing 
Music Typing Dramatics Shop. 

Enr 190. Fac full 17, part-time 1. 

Grad '57 44. Entd Col '5742. (Colgate 5, Cornell 3, Brown 3, 
Harvard 2, Williams 2, Dartmouth 2). Alumni 590. 

Tui $1900 (+$50). Scholarships partial 40. Self-help pgrm. Est 
1947. Episcopal. 

Summer Session. Make-up courses. Tutoring. Tui $400. 

Plant $1,850,000. Endowment $75,000. Dorm rms 140. Class rms 
12. Lib 5200 vols. Labs 3. Studios music 1, art 1. Gym. Swimming 
pool. Fields 6, Courts 9. 

Established by the late Frederick L. Gamage and conducted by 
him until it was temporarily discontinued in 1941, this school 
merged with Trinity of New York City to form the present affiili- 
ated establishment when the latter took over the property in 1946 
and a year later transferred its small boarding department here. 
Mr. Dann was formerly head master of Trinity. There is a self- 
help plan, and scholarship assistance may be earned through work 
projects. Graduates enter Harvard, Hamilton, Middlebury, Trinity, 
Williams, and Yal'e, among others. Publications, dramatics, and 
various hobby and interest clubs are included in the extra-curric- 
ular program. There are athletics for every boy. 

A new dormitory with two faculty apartments and a senior com- 
mon room, was completed in 1956, and another in 1958. 

PEEKSKILL, N.Y. Pop 17,731. Alt 9 ft NYC R.R. 27 mi. N of 
Yonkers, Rt U.S.9. A hilly city at the E end of Bear Mountain 
Bridge, Peekskill is a junction for cross country and north-south 
traffic. Yeast is its best known product. On the heights overlooking 
the river are The Peekskill Military Academy, and the imposing 
stone building of Saint Mary's School. About V/2 ml outside the 
city is Saint Peter's for boys. 

PEEKSKILL MILITARY ACADEMY 
Bdg Boys Ages TO- 19 

Peekskill, N.Y. Tel. 7-4520. 

Howard K. Moore, A.B., Williams, M.A., St. Lawrence, Head. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Languages Sci- 
ences Mathematics Music. 

Enr Bdg 285, Day 25. Fac full-time 32. 

Grad '5738. Entd Col '5736 (Rutgers 7, Norwich U 4, Tufts 
2, Georgetown 2, Northeastern 2, U.S. Maritime Acad 2). Alumni 



N. Y. Middle Atlantic States 225 

3038. 

Tui Bdg $1850 ( + $700), Day $720. Scholarships full 5, partial 
25 ($30,000). Est 1833. Inc 1838 nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Tui $550 eight wks. 

Plant $1,000,000. Dorm rms 150. Class rms 20. Lib 10,000 vols. 
Labs 2. Studios music 2. Gym. Swimming pool. Fields 5. Courts 5. 

Reorganized for boys only in 1841 after being established as 
coeducational, Peekskill became a military academy in 1850 under 
Albert Wells. John C. Bucher and Charles A. Robinson were co- 
principals from 1903, and Thomas K. Fisher was head master 
from 1945 to 1947. 

Mr. Moore, his successor, has furthered the academic standards 
added enrollment, faculty and plant, and inaugurated accelerated 
sections from the 7th to 9thgrades, in 1958. Sound technical 
and scientific courses are offered, and graduates enter many col- 
leges, including the University of Pa., Rutgers, M.I.T., Columbia, 
Cornell, Fordham. In addition to military organizations, there are 
publications, various clubs, and a complete program of sports. See 
also pages 688-89 

SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL 
Bdg Girls Ages 14-18 

Peekskill, N.Y. John St. Tel. 7-2081. 
Sister Mary Regina, Superior. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. General. Music Art Home Eco- 
nomics Typing. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg 90, Day 10. Fac full 10, part-time 9. 

Grad '5624. Entd Col '5623 (Bryn Mawr 3, Smith 1, Mt. 
Holyoke 1). Alumnae 2044, 

Tui Bdg $1800 (+$200), Day $750. Est 1868, Episcopal. 

Class rms 12. Lib 16,000 vols. Labs 2. Studios music 6, art 1. 
Gyms 2. Courts 2. Riding facilities. 

Saint Gabriel's, opened in Peekskill in 1872, and Saint Mary's, 
established m New York City in 1868, merged in 1909 to form the 
present school, which has been patronized for many years by 
leading Episcopal families. Under the present Sister Superior, in 
charge since 1934, the Sisters continue to maintain high standards, 
sending a good proportion of their girls on to leading women's 
colleges, including Smith and Barnard. Athletics and art, music, 
drama and dance clubs are among activities. There is a modified 
Kent plan of self-help. 

SAINT PETER'S SCHOOL 
Bdg- Boys Ages 12-18 

Peekskill, N.Y. Route 6. Tel. 7-5200. 

Rev. Frank C. Leeming, S.T.D., General Theol. Sem, Head. 

Grades viI-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Music Dramatics. 
Remedial Reading. 



N. Y. leading Private Schools 226 

Enr Bdg 100, Day 10, Fac full 11, part-time 3. 

Grad '56 19. Entd Col '5619 (Union 3, Princeton 2, Trinity 
2, Swarthmore 1, Syracuse 1, U of Pa. 1). Alumni 150. 

Tui Bdg $1500 (+$200), Day $500, Scholarships full 2, partial 
15 ($18,000). Self-help pgrm. Est 1938, Episcopal. 

Plant $475,000. Class rms 8. Lib 2800 vols. Lab. Studio music 1. 
Gym. Swimming pools 2. Fields 2. 

The teachings of the Church are emphasized at this school, 
which operates on a self-help system. Father Leeming was for- 
merly rector of the local church. Graduates have entered Trinity, 
Oberlin, Yale, Columbia, Colgate, Princeton, Wesleyan, and others. 



POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y. Pop 41,023. Alt 156 ft NYC R.R. 65 
mi. N of New York, Rt. U.S.9. On terraces above the Hudson is 
this manufacturing city where, in 1788, the Federal Constitution 
was ratified. Vassar here is a potent name; this oldest American 
women's college is 2 mi. E. Three mi. S. is the 80 acre Oakwood 
campus. 

OAKWOOD SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Coed Ages 12-19 
Poughkeepsie, N.Y. Tel. GLobe 4-9400. 

Charles W. Hutton, A.B., Wooster, A.M., Ohio State, Boston Univ, 
Prin. 

High Sch 1-4, Col Prep. Art Music Typing Journalism 
Dramatics. 

Enr Bdg Boys 80, Girls 80; Day Boys 15, Girls 15. Fac full 23, 
part-time 3. 

Grad '5757. Entd Col '5754. (Earlham 5, Syracuse 2, Elmira 
2, U of Rochester 2, Mt. Holyoke 2, Tufts 2). Alumni 2000. 

Tui Bdg $1750 (+$100), Day $800. Scholarships partial 35 ($21,- 
000). Work pgrm. Est 1796. Friends. 

Plant $550,000, Endowment $14,335. Dorm rms 78. Class rms 9. 
Lib 5000 vols. Labs 3. Studios music 1, art 1. Gym. Fields 5. 
Courts 5. Riding facilities. 

Founded at Nine Partners near Poughkeepsie before the Com- 
monwealth's public school system was organized, more than a 
century later Oakwood moved to its present site. Of international 
and inter-denominational enrollment, it has successively modified 
its program to meet the needs of each new generation of students. 
In a simple, friendly atmosphere which permits close relations 
between students and faculty, Oakwood maintains high academic 
standards and sends its graduates to many leading colleges and 
universities throughout the country. In addition to the limited 
work program in which students do most of the chores around the 
school, there are numerous informal extra-curricular activities 
as well as various student organizations and committees. 

See also page 816 



N. Y. Middle Atlantic States 227 

POUGHKEEPSIE DAY SCHOOL 
Coed Ages 4-14 

Poughkeepsie, N.Y. Hooker and Grand Aves. Tel. Globe 2-7600. 
Henry S. Haskell, B.A, Pomona, M.A., Ph.D., NYU, Dir. 

Pre-School Grades I-VIII High Sch 1. 

Enr Boys 90, Girls 60. Fac full 9, part-time 10. 

Tui $535. Scholarships partial 44 ($10,000). Est 1934. Inc 1935 
nonprofit. 

Plant $75,000. Class rms 9. Lab. Studios music 1, art 1. Shops 2. 

An active parent-teacher cooperative, this school serves as a 
laboratory for the Child Study Department of Vassar. A large 
scholarship fund makes possible an enrollment representative of 
diversified economic backgrounds. Elementary-grade boarding stu- 
dents enroll at High Valley Boarding School in Clinton Corners. 

RHINEBECK, N.Y. Pop 1923. Alt 203 ft 16 mi. N of Pough- 
keepsie, Rt. U.S.9. Rhinebeck is a quiet community of large estates 
on terraces above the Hudson. 

CROW HILL SCHOOL 
Bdg Coed Ages 4-12 

Rhinebeck, N.Y. Tel 97. 
Mrs. E. Chase Crowley, Dir. 

Pre-School Kindergarten Grades I-IV. Music Crafts, 

Enr 25. Fac and Staff 6. 

Tui $1400. Est 1938. Proprietary. 

Summer Camp and Session. Tui $175 mo. 

This pleasant home school founded by Mrs. Crowley gives 
young children sound training in academic fundamentals, many 
opportunities for creative play, and a happy outdoor life. 

RHINEBECK COUNTRY SCHOOL 

For Retarded and Emotionally Troubled 

Bdg and Day -Coed Ages 6-18 

Rhinebeck, N.Y. Foxhollow Rd. Tel. TRinity 6-3434. 
Leonard S. Zneimer, B.S., CCNY, Dir. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1, Home Economics 
Manual Arts Typing Animal Husbandry Gardening Arts and 
Crafts. Remedial work. 

Enr Boys 22, Girls 15. Fac full-time 3. Staff 8. 

Tui Bdg $3600 (+$150), Day $150 mo, Est 1954. Proprietary. 

Summer school and camp. Tui $600, 

When Foxhollow-on-Hudson, conducted by Dr. V. V. Anderson, 
was closed in 1953, Mr. Zneimer, his assistant, established this 
new school on the old campus. Accepting mildly retarded children, 
as well as emotionally disturbed of normal intelligence, the school 



N- Y. Leading Private Schools 228 

offers an individualized program of academic work supplemented 
by remedial instruction, therapeutic activities, and vocational 
orientation. Resident psychological services are available. 

RHINECLIFF, N.Y. Alt 13 ft. NYC R.R. 2 mi. W of Rhinebeck, 
Rt.308. Across the Hudson from Kingston, RhineclifT is in a 
region of large estates. The Academy occupies the Levi P. Morton 
estate. 

CARDINAL FARLEY MILITARY ACADEMY 
Bdg Boys Ages 13-19 

Rhinecliff, N.Y, Tel, TRinity 6-4440. 

Rev. Brother J. C. Brickell, B.Sc.Ed., M.A., Fordham, Prin. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. General. 

Enr 200, Fac full 15, part-time 3. 

Grad '56 33. Entd Col '56 28 (Catholic U 4, Villanova 2, Ford- 
ham 2, U of Dayton 2, lona 2, Georgetown 1). Alumni 350. 

Tui $1600. Scholarships partial 2. Est 1942. Roman Catholic. 

Plant $2,000,000. Dorm rms 36. Class rms 7. Lib 5000 vols. Lab. 
Gym. Fields 5. 

Opened on the estate presented to the archdiocese of New York 
by the daughter of Levi P. Morton, this military school is con- 
ducted by the Christian Brothers of Ireland. Music, publications, 
and dramatics are among the extra-curricular activities, in addition 
to a full athletic program. The majority of preparatory graduates 
enter Catholic colleges and universities, including Notre Dame, 
Villanova, lona, and Fordham. 

ROCHESTER, N.Y. Pop 332,488. Alt 513 ft NYC;LV R.R. 65 
mi. NE of Buffalo, Rt.33. George Eastman made Rochester the 
camera and film center of the world, though German immigrants 
early brought the city optical and horticultural fame. Kodak millions 
were sprinkled liberally upon the more worthwhile institutions, 
especially the University of Rochester which boasts the largest 
concert nail in western N.Y., Eastman Theatre, seating 3400. With 
its Philharmonic, Civic and Eastman orchestras, the city is a 
known musical center. 



THE ALLENDALE SCHOOL 
Day Boys Ages 51/2-19 

Rochester 18, N.Y. 519 Aliens Creek Rd. Tel. Hillside 5-3003. 
Buell Critchlow, A.B., Amherst, Head. 

Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music 
Manual Arts. 

Enr 180, Elem 95, Sec 85. Fac full 15, part-time 2. 

Grad '57 20. Entd Col '5719. (Wash & Lee 3, Wagner 2, 



N. Y. Middle Atlantic States 229 

Amherst 1, Brown 1, Union 1, Holy Cross 1). Alumni 350. 

Tui $515-825. Scholarships full 2, partial 16 ($2000). Est 1926. 
Inc 1926 nonprofit. 

Plant $300,000. Class rms 13. Lib 4500 vols. Lab. Gym. Fields 6. 

Allendale was established in 1926, with Barclay Farr as head 
master, and soon absorbed Kalbfus School. Under John R. Web- 
ster, head master from 1937 to 1943, and Hollis Scofield, from 1943 
to 1948, enrollment was increased, the curriculum broadened, and 
the plant embellished. Peter A. Schwartz, appointed on the latter's 
resignation in 1948, resigned in 1953 to become head master of 
Pembroke-County Day. Mr. Critchlow, for six years head master 
of East Woods School, succeeded him. 

The only country day school for boys in Rochester, Allendale 
has an academic program featuring the conference method of in- 
struction, individual progress, and honors groups, and sends gradu- 
ates to Princeton, Colgate, Wesleyan, Dartmouth, and others. 

COLUMBIA SCHOOL OF ROCHESTER 
Bdg Girls Ages 12-18; Day Boys 3-7, Girls 3-18 

Rochester 7, N.Y, 22 S. Goodman St. Tel. Browning 1-8119. 
Delia E. Simpson, Ph.B., M.A., Chicago, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. 
Col Prep. Art Music Typing, 

Enr Bdg 5; Day Girls 230, Boys 20. Elem 150, Sec 105. Fac full 
23, part-time 6. 

Grad '5730. Entd Col '5730. (Skidmore 3, Wellesley 2, 
Bryn Mawr 1, Vassar 1, Connecticut 1, Goucher 1). Alumnae 1230. 

Tui Bdg $1630, Day $360-940. Scholarships partial 30 ($6000). 
Est 1891. Inc 1936 nonprofit 

Plant $325,000. Dorm rms 12. Class rms 19. Lib 4000 vols. Lab. 
Studios music 1, art 1. Gym. 

Well along in its second half century, Columbia School was long 
owned and directed by Mrs. William R. Woodbury and Caroline 
Milliman who retired in 1936. Under Mrs. Simpson the school has 
developed to meet the needs of the day, with the addition of a 
small five-day boarding department and a curriculum broadened 
to include in addition to college preparation various practical 
courses in art and music. Graduates enter a variety of colleges, 
among them Smith, Wellesley, Skidmore, Wells, Mt Holyoke, 
Radcliffe, Vassar. Activities include student council, music, ath- 
letics, and dramatics. 

THE HARLEY SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 4-18 

Rochester, N.Y. 1981 Clover St. Tel. Hillside 5-2073. 
William S. Litterick, Sc.B., M.Sc,, Brown, Ed.D., Rutgers, Prince- 
ton, Head. 



N. Y. Leading Private Schools 230 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. 
Col Prep. English Art Music Dramatics Typing Shop. 

Enr Boys 120, Girls 65. Elem 120, Sec 65. Fac full 16, part-time 
5. 

Grad '5711. Entd Col '57 11, (Mt. Holyoke 1, Princeton 1, 
Cornell 1, Bryn Mawr 1, Kalamazoo 1, Goucher 1). Alumni 382. 

Tui $595-850. Scholarships partial 67 ($20,000). Est 1918. Inc 
1924 nonprofit. 

Summer Camp. Tui $140. 

Plant $225,000. Endowment $30,000. Class rms 23, Lib 5365 vols. 
Labs 2. Studios music 1, art 2. Gym. Fields 4, Courts 2. 

Opened as an elementary school by a group of parents seeking 
progressive schooling for their children, and since that time en- 
rolling children of many of the city's leading families, Harley was 
for 19 years directed by Louise M. Sumner. In 1944 Lawrence W. 
Utter was appointed director, to be succeeded in 1954 by Dr. 
Litterick, formerly assistant head master of Peddie and director of 
research at Stephens, 

The curriculum is supplemented by special opportunities for 
able students in science, art, music, languages, and creative 
writing. Graduates enter many colleges, including Mt Holyoke, 
Adelphi, Williams, Univ of Rochester, Swarthmore, Wellesley, 
Haverford, St. Lawrence. 

RYE, N.Y. Pop 11,721. Alt 49 ft. NY,NH&H R.R. 20 mi. NE of 
New York, Rt U.S.I. Rye was early a fashionable residential 
suburb on L.I. Sound. Today many of its Victorian mansions with 
grounds terraced to the Sound are private beach clubs popular 
with Westchester residents. The Day School occupies the site of 
Mrs. Life's Rye Seminary. 

RYE COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 
Boys Ages 4-15, Girls 4-18 

Rye, N.Y. Cedar St. Tel. 7-1417. 
Gerald N. LaGrange, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. 
French Latin Art Music. Dramatics. 

Enr Boys 190, Girls 300. Elem 365, Sec 125. Fac full 44, part- 
time 5. 

Grad '57 20. Entd Col '5719. (Mt. Holyoke 4, Wheaton 2, 
Vassar 1, Northwestern 1, Sweet Briar 1, Wellesley 1). Alumnae 
1793. 

Tui $325-875. Scholarships full 10, partial 9 ($10,000-12,000). Est 
1869. Inc 1917 nonprofit. 

Plant $850,000. Class rms 31. Lib 8200 vols. Lab. Studios music 
1, art 1. Shop. Gym. Fields 3. 



N. Y. Middle Atlantic States 231 

This modern country day school, with separate upper schools 
for boys and for girls, offers a program which sends the former 
to leading preparatory schools, and the latter to such colleges 
as Smith, Wellesley, Mt Holyoke, Wheaton, Cornell, Goucher, 
and other colleges. Student council, welfare committee, and pub- 
lications are among activities. Morton Snyder, head master from 
1928, was succeeded by Mr. LaGrange in July, 1953. 

SCARBOROUGH, N.Y. Alt 9 ft. NYC R.R. 4 mi. N of Tarry 
town, Rt U.S.9. This is a beautiful residential town. 

SCARBOROUGH SCHOOL 
Co Day Coed Ages 3-18 

Scarborough-on-Hudson, N.Y. Tel. WI 1-2480. 
Thomas C. Schuller, B.A., M.A., Yale, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. 
Art Music Dramatics, 

Enr Boys 110, Girls 105. Elem 150, Sec 65. Fac full 19, part-time 
9, 

Grad '57 16. Entd Col '5710. (NYU 2, Bennington 1, Boston 
U 1, Centenary 1, Connecticut 1, Grinnell 1). 

Tui $380-880. Scholarships 49. Est 1913. Inc 1919 nonprofit. 

Plant $170,800. Class rms 18. Lib 5000 vols. Labs 2. Studio mu- 
sic 1, art 1. Gym. Fields 4. Courts 2. 

This active country day school grew out of the little Montes- 
sori group Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Vanderlip started on their porch for 
tHeir own children, turning the estate over to trustees in 1925. 
Since 1917 the school has had a succession of notable executives, 
Dr. Ernest Horn, Wilford Aikin, Morton Snyder, and Arthur H. 
Sutherland, Dr. F. Dean McClusky and Cornelius B. Boocock. The 
present head master assumed charge of the school in 1951, coming 
from Phillips Exeter, and succeeding Philip L. Garland. 

Graduates of the sound preparatory program enter many lead- 
ing colleges, including Yale, Wellesley, Smith, Radcliffe, Dart- 
mouth, Haverford, Brown, Vassar. Among activities are music, 
art, dramatics, and sports. There is also an adult education pro- 
gram. 

SOUTH WALES, N.Y. Alt 900 ft P R.R. 23 mi. SE of Buffalo, 
on Rtl6. In this town of Erie County is the Gow School for boys. 

THE GOW SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 10-19 

South Wales, N.Y. Route 16. Tel. E. Aurora, CYpress 3450. 
Peter Gow, B.A., Yale, Head; Norman W. Howard, B.A., Am- 
herst, Assoc Head, 

Individual Programs (Grades V-VIII High Sch 1-4 Post 
Grad 1). Col Prep Business. Remedial Work. 



. y. Leading Private Schools 232 

Enr Bdg 70, Day 5. Elem 20, Sec 55. Fac full 13, Part-time 2. 
Grad '57-8. Entd Col '57-7. (Alma 2, Whitman 1, Albion 1, 
Cornell 1, Whitworth 1, KIT 1). . 

Tui Bdg $2400 (+$350), Day $1300. Scholarship partial 1. Est 

rms 12. Lib 1000 vols. Labs 2. Shop. Fields 



3. Courts 2. Skiing facilities. 

Established by the present head master after experience at 
Choate, Nichols, and Park of Buffalo, and one of the first schools 
to offer special help for reading difficulties, this has won clients 
from all over the country. All programs are individually Planned, 
and most graduates enter college, including St Lawrence, Ohio 
Wesleyan, Michigan State, Miami of Ohio, Yale, Wooster. Athr 
letics, music, wood and metal work, and dramatics are among the 
numerous activities. 

STAATSBURG-ON-HUDSON, N.Y. Pop 500. NYC R.R. 10 mi. 
N of Poughkeepsie, Rt U.S.9. This small village is 75 mi. from 
New York. 

THE ANDERSON SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 10-18, Girls 12-18; Day Coed 10-18 

Staatsburg-on-Hudson, N.Y. Tel. TUrncr 9-3571. 

V. V. Anderson, A.B., LL.D., Union Col (Ky.),M.DUniv of 

Louisville, A.M, Harvard, Dir; Lewis H. Gage, A.M., Head. 

Grades IV- VIII High Sch 1-4. Post Grad 1-2. Col Prep Gen- 
eral Business. Remedial Reading Make-up courses. 

Enr Bdg Boys 65, Girls 30; Day 3. Fac full 13, part-time 2. 

Grad '5715. Entd Col '579. (Dean Jr. 1, Heidelberg 1, Endi- 
cott Jr 1 Bard 1, U of Miami 1, Leicester Jr. 1). Alumni 300. 

Tui Bdg $3600-4000 ( + $400). Day $75 mo. Est 1925. Propri- 

etary. 

Summer Session. Enr 85, 

Plant $500,000. Dorm rms 90. Class rms 16. Lib 2325 vols. Lab. 
Gym Outdoor swimming pool. Fields 2. Courts 3. 

This unusual school in a beautiful country setting was estab- 
lished to combine the program and advantages of the best pre- 
paratory schools with a more specialized type of attention to the 
education of the emotional life and the improvement of social 
adjustments than is usual in most preparatory schools. Highly 
trained guidance experts work closely with all students. Academic 
and activity programs are based on a careful study of each stu- 
dent's needs. Dr, Anderson, author of "Psychiatry in Education 
and "Psvchiatrv in Industry," was a leader in the early develop- 

When writing schools, please mention this Handbook 



N. Y. Middle Atlantic States 283 

ment of the child-guidance clinic movement and later director of 
medical research at R. H. Macy's, More than half of the graduates 
enter college. See also page 816 

SYRACUSE, N.Y. Pop 220,583. Alt 398 ft. NYC R.R. 75 mi. SE 
of Rochester, Rts.31 & 5, To the underlying salt beds and the devel- 
opment of the Solvay process is due the early importance of this 
busy industrial port and railroad center on Onondaga Lake. It is 
the seat of the University of Syracuse and of Le Moyne College. 

PEBBLE HILL SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 5-18 

Dewitt 14, N.Y. Jamesville Rd. Tel. 72-3328. 
John G. Hodgdon, A.M., Univ of N.H., Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art 
Music Public Speaking Journalism Typing. Dramatics. 

Enr Boys 115, Girls 65. Elem 130, Sec 50. Fac full 14, part-time 
4. 

Grad '57 8. Entd Col '57 8. (Syracuse 3, Cornell 1, Sweet 
Briar 1, Mich St. 1, Colby 1, Springfield 1). Alumni 190. 

Tui $600-800. Scholarships full 9, partial 10 ($12,000), 
Est 1927. Inc 1927 nonprofit 

Organized by a group of Syracuse parents under the leadership 
of William A. McKenzie, this school was for twenty years from 
1932 under the direction of Charles W. Bradlee, under whose 
control it steadily gained. Mr. Hodgdon, formerly head of the 
middle school, and assistant head master, succeeded. Graduates 
have entered Syracuse, Le Moyne, Villanova, St. Lawrence, Clark- 
son, Dartmouth. 

TAPPAN, N.Y. Pop 1249 (1940). Alt 78 ft. NYC R.R. 20 mi. N 
of New York. This pre-Revolutionary village on the NJ. line was 
Washington's headquarters in 1780 and 1783. Here the British 
spy, John Andre, was condemned and hanged. 

LOCKHART SCHOOL 
Bdg Coed Ages 2-10; Day Coed 3-5 

Tappan, N.Y. Kings Highway. Tel. Piermont 2-0576. 
Florence Babcock, B.S., Columbia, Dir. 

Pre-Nursery Nursery Kindergarten. 

Enr Bdg 8, Day 20. Fac full 2, part-time 2. 

Tui Bdg $1260, Day $270. Est 1928. Proprietary,. 

Summer School and Camp. Enr 8. Tui $400, eight wks. 

This home school for young children accepts students of all 
races. Boarding pupils over six years of age attend class at the 
village school The summer school is at Martha's Vineyard. 



N. Y. Leading Private Schools 

TARRYTOWN, N.Y. Pop 8851. Alt 300 ft. NYC R.R. 25 mi. N 
of New York, Rt U.S.9. Immortalized by Washington Irving, 
Tarrytown, on the E bank of the Hudson was long a place of 
exclusive residence, largely supported by taxes from the Rocke- 
feller estate. Today it has its modern real estate developments, 
modernistic apartments, and industrial plants. The attractive 
estate of Hackley is at the eastern end of the village. From an 
ideal location, Marymount overlooks the Hudson. 

HACKLEY SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day -Boys Ages 10-19 

Tarrytown, N.Y. 293 Benedict Ave. Tel. MEdford 1-0128. 
Frank R. Miller, A.B., Williams, Head. 

Grades V-VIII High Sch 1-4 Col Prep. General. Art 
Music Mechanical Drawing Mathematics Physiography 
Theatre Arts Comparative Religion. Rem Reading. Crafts. 
Enr Bdg 105, Day 155. Fac full-time 23. 
Grad '56 35. Entd Col '5634. Alumni 1100. 
Tui Bdg $1700 (+$210), Day $850-900. Scholarships full 6, par- 
tial 24 ($25,000). Est 1899. Inc 1900 nonprofit. Unitarian affiliated. 
Summer Session and Camp. Enr 30. Tui Bdg $500, Day $250, 
eight wks. 

Plant $1,500,000. Endowment $140,000. Dorm rms 84. Class rms 
20. Lib 6000 vols. Labs 3. Studios 6. Shop. Gym. Swimming pool. 
Fields 5. Courts 6. 

Founded in 1899 as a non-sectarian college preparatory school, 
and under the devoted direction of Walter B. Gage for 30 years 
from 1908, Hackley came to new life in 1941 with the appointment 
of Dr. Mitchell Gratwick, formerly head master at Nichols School 
in Buffalo and then assistant physician at Phillips Andover. 

Mr. Miller, who succeeded him in 1950, has had long experience 
with boys in the classroom, on the athletic field, and in summer 
camp, as well as four years in industry and business. Emphasizing 
the liberal arts tradition, this well known school sends graduates 
to Harvard, Yale, Johns Hopkins, Hamilton, Williams, the Uni- 
versity of Pa., and others. Extra-curricular activities, including de- 
bating, publications, dramatics, music, an international group, and 
hobby clubs, supplement the academic work, and there are sports 
for every boy. 

Since the inauguration of Mr. Miller, the school has developed 
a five-day boarding plan, and is attracting an increasingly able 
student body. See also page 691 

MARYMOUNT SECONDARY SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Gtrls Ages 11-18 

Tarrytown, N.Y. Tel. MEdford 1-3200. 

Mother M. Brendan, M.A., McGill, Ph.D., Eaval, Prin. 



N. Y. Middle Atlantic States 285 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music 
Typing. 

Enr Bdg 130, Day 70. Fac full 18, part-time 2. 

Grad '56 35. Entd Col '56 32. 

Tui Bdg $1700 (+$250), Day $650 (+$250). Scholarships. Est 
1907. Roman Catholic. 

Dorm rms 100. Class rms 14. Lib 8000 vols. Labs 3. Studios 
music 8, art 4. Gym. Swimming pool. Riding facilities. 

Founded by Very Reverend Mother Marie Joseph Butler, this 
school is under the direction of the Religious of the Sacred 
Heart of Mary and has sister schools in New York City; in 
Arlington and Richmond, Va.; and in Los Angeles, Santa Bar- 
bara, and Palos Verdes, Calif. There are also foreign branches 
in Rome, Paris, London, Barcelona, Quebec, and Colombia. The 
curriculum is college preparatory. Athletics, dramatics, music, 
art, publications are included in the extra-curricular program. 

There is a lower school which enrolls pupils from kindergarten 
through grade six. 

TROY, N.Y. Pop 72,311. Alt 35 ft. NYC;D&H;B&M R.R. 7 mi. 
NE of Albany. Rt. 21. On the E bank of the Hudson is this 
important industrial center. R.P.I, and Russell Sage College are 
in the center of the city, Emrna Willard on a hill above. 



EMMA WILLARD SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Girls Ages 12-19 

Troy, N.Y. Pawling Ave. Tel. Ashley 4-0600. 
Anne Wellington, A.B., Vassar, Head; Clemewell Lay, A.B., 
Wellesley, A.M., Columbia, Co-Head; Lucile B. Turtle, A.B., 
Denison, A.M., Radcliffe, Dean. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art English History Music 
Religion Speech French Spanish Latin Mathematics Science 
Dramatics. 

Enr Bdg 285, Day 35. Fac full 35, part-time 13. 

Grad '5782. Entd Col '5778. (Colorado 6, Northwestern 6, 
Vassar 6, Wellesley 6, Mt. Holyoke 5, Smith 4). Alumnae 4482. 

Tui Bdg $2500 (+$200-320), Day $500. Scholarships full 2, par- 
tial 45 ($46,150). Est 1814. Inc nonprofit 

Plant $6,000,000. Endowment $656,863. Dorm rms 229. Class rms 
30. Lib 15,000 vols. Labs 3. Studios music 14, art 2, Gym. Swim- 
ming pool. Fields 4. Courts 8. Riding facilities. 

This smoothly running institution, fully equipped, well organ- 
ized, and capably administered, now well along in its second 
century, enrolls girls from families of different economic back- 
ground all over the country, preparing them for universities 
and two and four year colleges throughout the United States, 



N. Y. Leading Private Schools 236 

among them Vassar, Smith, Wellesley, Mt, Holyoke, Northwes- 
tern, Radcliffe. 

Founded at Middldmry, Vt, by Emma Willard, pioneer in the 
education of women, in 1821 it came on invitation to Troy as the 
Troy Female Seminary. It was reorganized under its present name 
in 1892. Among educationally influential alumnae was Mrs. Russell 
Sage, who gave the architecturally beautiful home which the school 
has occupied since 1910. Eliza Kellas, principal of the school 
from 1910 to 1942, and president of Russell Sage College from 
1916 to 1928, left her impression on the lives of thousands of girls. 

In 1942, upon Miss Kellas' retirement, Miss Wellington, former 
director of admissions at Wellesley, was appointed, with Miss Lay, 
also of the Wellesley staff, becoming associate head in 1943 and 
co-head in 1944. 

The new plan of education at Emma Willard closely integrates 
course materials to give a united view of the history of western 
civilization in relation to the present, and offers extensive oppor- 
tunities for reference work in the library. 

Extra-curricular activities include school government in which 
faculty and students share, choral, dramatic, and athletic^ associ- 
ations, craft and shop work, actual assistance for underprivileged 
children locally and through funds and assistance for the needy, 
nationally and internationally. See also pages 764-65 

TUXEDO PARK, N.Y. Pop 868. Ait 620 ft. 30 mi NW of New 
York. 5 mi. from the NJ. line, this was a private colony. 

ACADEMY OF MOUNT SAINT VINCENT 

Bdg Girls Ages 12-13 
Tuxedo Park, N.Y. East Lake Rd, Tel. 4-0230. 
Sister Maria Lawrence, Dir. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General (Art 
Music Home Economics). 

Enr Bdg 75. Fac full 7, part-time 3. Adm Staff 2. 

Grad '5520. Entd Col '5516. Alumnae 2020. 

Tui Bdg ($1600 (+$150), Day $500 (+$50). Scholarships par- 
tial 3 ($1000). Est 1847. Roman Catholic. 

Plant $240,000. Dorm rms 30. Class rms 6. Lib 4151 vols. Lab. 
Studios music 2, art 1. Gym. 

Founded and directed by the Sisters of Chanty, this boarding 
and day school sends most of its preparatory graduates to Cath- 
olic institutions of higher learning. Among activities are music, 
dramatics, and sports. 



For further information, write Porter Sargent 



N. Y. Middle Atlantic States 237 

TUXEDO PARK SCHOOL 
Bdg Coed Ages 7-13; Day Coed 5-13 

Tuxedo Park, N.Y. Tel. 4-0128. 

Philip Potter, A.B., Amherst, M.A., Harvard, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII, French Latin, Dramatics 
Music Crafts Sports. 

Enr Bdg Boys 5, Girls 10; Day Boys 35, Girls 30. Fac full 9, 
part-time 1. 

Grad '5710. Entd Prep Sch '578. (St. Timothy's 2, Deerfield 
1, Millbrook 1, George 1, Garrison Forest 1, Rogers Hall 1). Alum- 
ni 260. 

Tui Bdg $1700 (+$135), Day $250-700. Scholarships partial 20 
($6000). Est 1900. Inc 1942 nonprofit 

Plant $650,000. Endowment $10,000. Dorm rms 15. Class rms 14. 
Lib 2050 vols. Fields 3. Theatre. 

Established to provide local elementary schooling, but now en- 
rolling some five-day and full-time boarding students, Tuxedo 
offers courses in music, crafts, and dramatics, in addition to the 
academic work preparing for such secondary schools as Chatham, 
St. Timothy's, Spence, Exeter, Hill, Groton. In 1949, Mr. Potter, 
formerly at Phillips Academy, succeeded William W. Yardley. 

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. Pop 43,466. Alt 201 ft NYC R.R. 25 mi. 
NE of New York, Rt.22. In this prosperous residential city in the 
Bronx Valley, the Provincial Congress in 1776 ratified the Declara- 
tion of Independence. Numerous Revolutionary buildings remain 
intact. 

WINDWARD SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 3-14 

White Plains, N.Y. Windward Ave. Tel. WH 9-6968. 

Meyer Rabban, A.B., U of Pittsburgh, M.A., Ph.D., Columbia, 

Dir. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VII I. 

Enr Boys 120, Girls 80. Fac full 17, part-time 5. 

Grad '569. Entd Prep Sch '56 6 (High Mowing 2, Hackley 
1, New Lincoln 1, Gushing 1, Rosemary 1). 

Tui $425-600. Scholarships full 5, partial 50 ($12,000). Est 1926 
Inc 1928 nonprofit. 

Summer Camp. Enr 160. Tui $325 seven weeks. 

A cooperative school now owned and operated by the staff and 
parents, Windward offers integrated classes in which children 
are taught in ability groupings and brought together in larger 
social units for interesting and creative social studies, projects, 
drama, rhythms, and crafts. 

Meyer Rabban, who succeeded Dr. Elizabeth Anderson in 1955, 
continues on the teaching staff in Child Development at Sarah 
Lawrence and at The Bank Street College of Education. 



N. Y. Leading Private Schools 238 

YONKERS, N.Y. Pop 152,798. Alt 10 ft NYC R,R 13 mi. N of 
New York, Rt.9A. On the Hudson, Yonkers is a manufacturing' 
and residential suburb of greater New York. It is the seat of 
St. Joseph's Seminary and College, and Boyce Thompson Institute 
for Plant Research. 

THE HALSTED SCHOOL 
Day and Eve Coed Ages 5- 

Yonkers 2, N.Y. 229 N. Broadway. Tel. 3-5195. 

Ruth S. Leonard, B.A., Ohio State Univ, M.A., Columbia, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art 
Remedial Reading. Dramatics Music. 

Enr Boys 105, Girls 85. Elem 85, Sec 105. Fac full 18, part-time 
4. 

Grad '5726. Entd Col '5722. (Adelphl 5, U of Miami 2, Vas- 
sar 1, Clarkson Tech 1, U of Rochester 1, U of Pa 1). Alumni 820. 

Tui Day $450-725, Eve $40 per subject. Scholarships full 2, par- 
tial 2. Est 1874. Inc 1931 nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Enr 610. Tui $28 per subject. 

Plant $95,000. Class rms 15. Lib 3200 vols. Lab. Studios music 1, 
art 1. Gym. Fields 1. 

The curriculum and activities of this conservative college pre- 
paratory school enrolling from Yonkers and lower Westchester 
have been widened by Mrs. Leonard. The program includes music, 
dramatics, sports, and student government, and the academic work 
prepares for Columbia, Colgate, University of Me., Yale, Vassar, 
Johns Hopkins, and other colleges. In 1945 an evening session for 
adults was inaugurated. See also page 818 



NEW JERSEY 

ATLANTIC CITY, NJ. Pop 61,657. Alt 10 ft. P R.R. 60 mi. SE 
of Philadelphia, Rt U.S.30. About 100 mi. SW of N.Y.C, Atlantic 
City, famous for its Boardwalk, conventions, and appeal as a vaca- 
tion resort, is easily within reach of the 2 largest cities in the East. 
The Friends' School is on South Carolina and Pacific Avenues. 

ATLANTIC CBTY FRIENDS 1 SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 3-18 

Atlantic City, NJ. 1216 Pacific Ave. Tel. 6-3146. 

Kathryn Reese Morgan, B.A., Beaver Col, U of Pa., Prin. 

Pre-Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. 
Col Prep. Art Music. 

Enr Boys 100, Girls 70. Elem 105, Sec 65. Fac full 11, part-time 
6. 

Grad '5712. Entd Col '5710. (Rutgers 1, Haverford 1, Wells 
1, Vassar 1, Fairleigh- Dickinson 1, U of Pa. 1). Alumni 117. 

Tui $260-510 (H-$25). Scholarships partial 5. Est 1900. Friends. 

Summer Session. Enr 150. Tui $90-180 per credit for seven wks. 
Make-up Courses. Tui $90 per credit. New Courses $90 per 1/2 
credit. Advanced Courses. 

Plant $300,000. Class rms 19. Labs 2. Studio art 1. Gym. 

This, like most Friends' schools, admits students from various 
religious groups whose parents are in sympathy with Friendly 
ideals. Graduates attend a number of colleges. 

ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS, NJ. Pop 3083. JC R.R. 8 mi. NW 
of Long Branch, on Rt.36. This shore resort town of large estates, 
across from N.Y.C. on Sandy Hook Bay, is in a section of rugged 
woodland. 

CROYDON HALL ACADEMY 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 7-18 
Atlantic Highlands, NJ. Tel. 1-1576. 
Dr. John M. Carr, Pres; William E. Coleman, Head. 

Grades III-VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1-2. Col Prep. 
Mathematics Sciences Music Economics. Remedial Reading 
Make-up courses Tutoring. 

Enr Bdg 70, Day 70. Elem 75, Sec 65. Fac full 14, part-time 2. 

Tui Bdg $1400-1600, Day $400-600. Extra c $200. Scholarships 2. 
Est 1947. Inc 1947 nonprofit. 

239 



N* / Leading Private Schools 240 

Summer Session and Camp. Enr 40. Tui $550, eight wks. 

Plant $300,000. Dorm rms 20. Class rms 12. Gym. Riding facili- 
ties. 

Here Dr. Carr provides all activities of home and school with a 
schedule of continuous supervision. Instruction is individualized, 
and there are developmental reading and special teaching depart- 
ments. Graduates enter numerous colleges, including Dartmouth, 
R.P.L, Georgetown, Catholic University, Notre Dame, Villanova. 
Much is made of outdoor life, and there are clubs for dramatics, 
debating, publications. See also page 690 



BERNARDSVILLE, NJ. Pop 3956. Alt 1000 ft D,L&W R.R 
7 mi. SW of Morristown, Rt U.S.202. On the highest point of this 
town, toward Mendham, the Gill School occupies a sightly spot 

THE GILL SCHOOL 
Bdg Girls Ages 15- 18; Co Day Girls 4-18, Boys 4-13 

Bernardsville, NJ. Claremont Rd. Tel. 8-0018. 

Margaret D. Jefferson, A.B., Pa. Col, M.S., Univ of Pa., Prin. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4. 
Col Prep General. Music Art Business Dramatics. 

Enr Bdg 20; Day Girls 115, Boys 60. Elem 135, Sec 60. Fac full 
19, part-time 8. 

Grad '576. Entd Col '574. (NYU 1, Endicott 1, Vermont 1, 
Beaver 1). Alumnae 164. 

Tui Bdg $1900 (+$100), Day $275-700. Scholarships partial 20 
($5000). Est 1934. Inc 1938 nonprofit. 

Started by Elizabeth Gill in nearby Westfield and for a time 
located in Mendham, this school purchased its present elaborate 
estate in 1940. Two years later, when Somerset Hills closed, day 
boys through grade six were admitted. Miss Jefferson succeeded 
Miss Gill in 1953; she has added courses to the curriculum, 
helped to develop stronger student government, improved facili- 
ties, especially the library, and aided in* the organization of an 
active parent group, and added new buildings to accommodate tli'c 
lower divisions. 

Students are given more personal understanding and oversight 
than in many schools. Flexible study programs, development of 
individual interests, and intelligent use of New York City's educa- 
tional opportunities characterize the school. The preparatory pro- 
gram sends graduates to a number of colleges and universities. 
There is also a limited general curriculum. See also page 819 



When writing schools, please mention this Handbook 



N. J. Middle Atlantic States 241 

BLAIRSTOWN, NJ. Pop 800. Alt 351 ft D, L & W R.R. 65 mi, 
W of N.Y.C., 40 mi. NE of Bethlehem, Pa. This town in the Kit- 
tatinny hills, near the Delaware Water Gap, bears the name of an 
early railway magnate, John I. Blair, who was instrumental in 
establishing the Academy. The 315 acre property of the school 
is on a hill above the town. 

BLAIR ACADEMY 
Bdg Boys Ages 12-19 

Blairstown, NJ. Tel. FOxcroft 2-4336. 

James M. Howard, Jr., A.B., Yale, M.A., Harvard, Head; Fer- 
nando Marcial, A.B., Drew, Asst Head. 

Grades VII- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Music Art 
Public Speaking Mechanical Drawing. Developmental Reading. 

Enr Bdg 270, Day 15. Fac full 27, part-time 2. 

Grad '5779. Entd Col '5775. (Cornell 11, Lafayette 4, Vir- 
ginia 4, Colgate 3). Alumni 4500. 

Tui Bdg $2100 (+$95), Day $700. Scholarships partial 51 ($30,- 
610). Self-help pgrm. Est 1848. Presbyterian. 

Plant $2,400,000. Endowment $1,250,000. Dorm rms 158. Class 
rms 25. Lib 7000 vols. Labs 3. Studio music 1. Hobby shop. Gym, 
Swimming pool. Fields 8. Courts 14. Golf course. 

This college preparatory school, although founded as a co- 
educational day group, added boarding facilities in 1850 and has 
been for boys only since 1915. Blair had its greatest development 
during the 29 year head mastership of Dr. John C. Sharpe. Succeed- 
ing him from 1927 to 1946 was Dr. Charles H. Breed, vigorous, 
straight-minded head master. Benjamin D. Roman was succeeded 
in 1951 by Dr. Ira A. Flinner, founder of Huntington School in 
Boston and for 26 years with the Northwood School and education 
director of the Lake Placid Club Education Foundation. Upon his 
death in 1954, Mr. Walker assumed direction. Mr. Howard, for- 
merly of Lawrenceville, and appointed here in 1954, is doing an 
outstanding job in creating a substantial and sound program. 

With a guidance program based on modern education and with 
emphasis on academic fundamentals, Blair has sent graduates to 
more than 50 different colleges in the last five years. The younger 
group has its own activities and a special dormitory, West Hall. 

The recently completed Memorial Hall with library, chapel- 
auditorium, and facilities for extensive student activities, and a 
substantial bequest from the estate of Hetty Green Wilks added 
to the endowment fund, have further strengthened the school. 
A new and well-equipped infirmary opened in 1956. See page 692 



When writing schools, please mention this Handbook 



N.J. Leading Private Schools 242 

BORDENTOWN, N.J. Pop 5497. Alt 60 ft. P R.R. 7 mi. S of 
Trenton, Rt U.S.206. This historic city bears the name of Joseph 
Borden who, in 1717, came from New England by sailing vessel 
and bought up the Quaker trading post. Before the Revolution, 
Philadelphia business men had country estates here, and later it 
became the home of Joseph Bonaparte, brother of Napoleon. Here 
lived Patience Wright, first American sculptor. Some of the build- 
ings of the military school bordering Bonaparte Park trace back to 
the eighteenth century. 

BORDENTOWN MILITARY INSTITUTE 
Bdg and Day Ages 11-19 

Bordentown, N.J. Park St. Tel. AX 8-0020. 

Harold Morrison Smith, A.B., Bates, A.M., Columbia, L.H.D., Pa. 

Military Col, LL.D., Bucknell, Litt.D., Norwich, Pres and Head. 

Grades VII- VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1-2. Col Prep Gen- 
eral Business. Music Public Speaking Mechanical Drawing. 
Rem Reading, R.O.T.C. Aviation. 

Enr Bdg 220, Day 35. Fac full 31. part-time 1. 

Grad '5770. Entd Col '5763. (U of Del. 7, Penn State 3, 
Norwich 3, Albright 3, U of Me 3, U of Pa 2). Alumni 3000. 

Tui Bdg $1850 (+$300), Day $900. Scholarships partial 15. Est 
1881. Inc 1950 nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Make-up courses. Advanced Work. Tui $500, 

Plant $1,000,000. Dorm rms 110. Class rms 25. Lib 5000 vols. 
Labs 3. Studios music 1, art 1. Gym. Fields 8. Courts 7. Rifle rangfe. 

For nearly 50 years the property of the Landon family, from 
whose control it passed in 1934 on the death of Gen. Thomas D. 
Landon, Bordentown has long been characterized by high stand- 
ards. Under the present administration the enrollment has been 
stabilized, emphasis on college preparation maintained and strength- 
ened, and individual capacities taken into consideration through a 
department of study technique as well as special conferences and 
tutoring periods. Graduates have achieved success at many col- 
leges, and in later life. There is a full program of athletics as well 
as aviation training, music, publications, hobby clubs, and various 
military organizations. See also page 693 

BURLINGTON, NJ. Pop 12,051. Alt 14 ft P R.R. 16 mi. NE of 
Camden, off Rt 130. Across the Delaware, NE of Philadelphia, this 
historic city, the Colonial capital of West Jersey, was the site of 
Benjamin Franklin's first print shop and birthplace of James 
Fenimore Cooper. The school grounds extend to the river. 

For further information, write Porter Sargent 



tf. /. Middle Atlantic States 243 

ST. MARY'S HALL 
Co Day Boys Ages 5-12, Girls 5-18 

Burlington, N. J. Riverbank. Tel. Dudley 6-3500. 

Mrs. F. R. Flounders, B.A., Wellesley, M.A., Columbia, Prin. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. 
Art Music Typing Study Skills. Rem Reading. French. 

Enr Girls 155, Boys 45. Elem 100, Sec 100. Fac full 19, part-time 
4. 

Grad '5716. Entd Col '5716. (Pembroke 2, Elmira 2, Smith 
1, Goucher 1, Randolph-Macon 1, U of Pa 1). Alumnae 825. 

Tui $300-700. Scholarships partial 20 ($3300). Est 1837. Epis- 
copal. 

Class rms 30. Lib 4500 vols. Labs 2. Studios 2. Fields 3. Court. 

Simplicity of life and moral and ethical training have long 
characterized this school founded by the Rt. Rev. George Wash- 
ington Doane in connection with the parish church. 

In September of 1953, when Mrs. Flounders took over, St. 
Mary's became a country day school, coeducational through 8th 
grade, after its long history as a boarding establishment for girls, 
and the program broadened to include more music, vocational 
guidance, remedial instruction and extra-curricular activities. 

Graduates enter Smith, Vassar, Mt Holyoke, Wellesley, the Uni- 
versity of Pa., and others. Art, music and dramatics are stressed 
among the activities, which also include athletics and publications. 



CHESTER, NJ. Pop 650. Alt 850 ft. 13 mi. SW of Morristown. 

A farming community, Chester is in the Far Hills-Bernardsville 
area of country estates. 

THE WARREN SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 14-19 

Chester, NJ. P.O. Box 215. Tel CHester 440. 

Philip Lincoln Garland, A.B., Boston U, A.M., Columbia, Head. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep. 
Make-up courses. Remedial Reading. 

Enr 50. Fac full 11, part-time 1. 

Grad '576. Entd Col '57 5 (U of Ariz. 1, Centre 1, Gettys- 
burg 1, U of Md. 1, U of Wis 1). Alumni 96. 

Tui $4000 (+$250). Est 1946. 

Plant $250,000. Dorm rms 15. Class rms 12. Fields 4. Courts 2. 

Established by Carle 0. Warren as a school of intensive prepa- 
ration, Mr. Garland acquired the school in 1955, which in 1957 
he moved to a more commodious 33-acre estate in New Jersey. 
In these new quarters, he continues to meet the needs of the boy 



J7. /. Leading Private Schools 244 

with academic problems through individualized programs and 
skilled techniques. Mr. Garland, whose previous experience as 
head master and teacher in Eastern secondary schools and for- 
merly on the faculty of Bowdoin and Columbia, has doubled the 
enrollment and strengthened and enlarged the faculty. 

The school has been particularly successful with the student who 
has never learned how to study. An elementary business course 
is available for boys not preparing for college. Recent graduates 
have entered Cornell, William and Mary, Washington and Lee, 
the universities of 111. and Calif., N.Y.U., and many other col- 
leges. Activities include a student council, sports, and public 
speaking. See also page 694 

ELIZABETH, NJ. Pop 112,817. Alt 31 ft. B&O, P R.R. Often 
raided and partially burned during the Revolution, Elizabeth is 
a thriving city adjacent to Newark, and is a trading center for the 
surrounding suburban towns. Pingry School, drawing many of its 
boys from neighboring towns, is in a quiet residential area. 

THE PINGRY SCHOOL 
Co Day Boys Ages 6-18 

Elizabeth 3, NJ. North Ave. Tel. ELizabeth 5-6990. 

E. Laurence Springer, A.B., Princeton, M.A., Buffalo Univ, 

Head. 

Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4, Col Prep. Music Mechanical 
Drawing. Remedial and Developmental Reading. 

Enr 505, Elem 215, Sec 290. Fac full 36, part-time 3. 

Grad '57 68. Entd Col '5767. (Princeton 11, Colgate 4, Yale 
3, Williams 3, Harvard 2, Dartmouth 2). Alumni 2500. 

Tui $375-750. Scholarships full 7, partial 12 ($10,000). Est 1861. 
Inc nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Make-up courses. Rem Reading. Tui $60 
course. 

Plant $2,500,000. Endowment $30,000. Class rms 24. Lib 9000 
vols. Labs 3. Studios music 1, art 1, Shop. Gyms, Swimming pool. 
Fields 8. Courts 6. 

Long an outstanding college preparatory institution and since 
1918 a country day school, it bears the name of Rev. John F. 
Pingry, one of the great teachers of his day, head from 1861 until 
the incorporation 30 years later by citizens of the town. Charles 
Bertram Newton, was head master of the Pingry School from 
1920 until his death in 1936. Mr. Springer, formerly at Nichols 
School in Buffalo, has doubled the enrollment, raised standards, 
and broadened the curriculum. The recently expanded campus, 
with classroom building, now totals 57 acres. Many gradu- 
ates enter Princeton, with others going to Lehigh, Harvard, 
Hamilton, Amherst, Yale. 



tf t j Middle Atlantic States 245 



THE VAIl-DEANE SCHOOL 
Day Girls Ages 6-18 

Elizabeth 3, NJ. 618 Salem Ave. Tel. 2-7141. 

Mrs. Jane Mackintosh Bourne, B,A,, Wellesley, M.A,, Western 

Reserve, Head. ^ . 

Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Art 
Music Clothing Speech Typing. 

Enr 140. Elem 75, Sec 65. Fac full 15, part-time 5. 

Grad '57 13, Entd Col '5713. (Northwestern 2, Mary Wash- 
ington 1, Brandeis 1, Skidmore 1, Smith 1, Sweet Briar 1). 

Tui $350-700. Scholarships partial 20 ($6000). Est 1869. Inc 
1929 nonprofit. 

Plant $150,000. Class rms 15. Lib 3'200 vols. Lab. Studios music 
1, art 1. Gym. Field. 

Deriving from a small group established by the Misses Hay- 
ward, and taken over in 1886 by Laura Vail and Fanny Deane, 
this was incorporated in 1929. Miss Cummings, who succeeded 
Eleanor Denison in 1942, has enriched the curriculum and in- 
creased the enrollment From its early days offering preparation 
for college, the school now sends graduates to Goucher, Mt Hoi- 
yoke, Northwestern, Skidmore, aad others. 

ENGLEWOOD, NJ. Pop 23,145. Alt 24 ft. E R.R. 13 mi. E of 
Paterson, off Rt.4. Long favored as a place of residence by well- 
to-do New Yorkers, Englewood lies behind the Palisades ^ about 
opposite the N boundary of the Bronx, The schools are in the 
older section of broad, shaded streets. The Little School has been 
renamed for its founder, Elisabeth Morrow; brothers and sisters 
as well as others at Dwight and Englewood collaborate in drama 
and music. DWIGHT SCHOOL 

Day Girls Ages 3-17 

Englewood, NJ. 315 E. Palisade Ave. Tel LOwell 9-9500. 
Marjorie H. Appelgate, A.B., Wellesley, M.A., Columbia, Head. 

Pre-Ntirsery . Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High 
Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music Home Economics Typing, 

Enr Girls 365, Boys 10. Elem 205, Sec 170. Fac full 34, part-time 

* Grad '5740. Entd Col '5739. (Wheaton 4, Wellesley 2, Mt. 
Holyoke 2, Conn. 2, Barnard 1, Bryn Mawr 1). Alumnae 1608. 

Tui $425-850. Scholarships full 5, partial 36. 
Est 1859. Inc 1925 nonprofit. 

Class rms 22. Lib 6000 vols, Labs 2. Studios 3. Gym. 

This large day school is patronized by families of Englewood 
and the vicinity. Frances Leggett and Mrs. C. W. Hulst, alumnae, 
took over in 1928 following Euphemla Creighton and Ellen W. 
Farrar, head mistresses for 40 years. Miss Appelgate succeeded 
Marjorie French in 1951. The high standards of college prepara- 



N t /, Leading Private Schools 246 

tory work send graduates to Smith, Mt. Holyoke, Wellesley, 
Vassar, Barnard. There are also provisions for girls who are not 
going to college. Exchange instructional and extra-curricular ar- 
rangements have been developed with Englewood School. 

THE ELISABETH MORROW SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 3-11 

Englewood, N J. 435 Lydecker St. TeL 3-5566. 

Constance Chilton, A.B., M.A. (Hon), Smith, M.A., Columbia, 

Dir. 

Pre-Nursery Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VI. Art Music 
French Tutoring. Dramatics. 

Enr Boys 160, Girls 140. Fac full 22, part-time 8. 

Grad '5715. Entd Prep Sch '5712. (Englewood 6, Dwight 5, 
Punahou 1). 

Tui $350-650. Scholarships partial 10. Est 1930. Inc 1935 non- 
profit. 

Originally The Little School, in 1948 it was named for the 
founder, a daughter of Dwight Morrow. Adjacent to the notable 
modern building occupied since 1939, the Morrow House has 
recently been added to accommodate the intermediate grades ami 
The Morrow Educational Center for remedial diagnosis and in- 
struction, therapy, and vocational guidance, directed by Dr. Eliza- 
beth M. Junken, school psychologist. 

ENGLEWOOD SCHOOL FOR BOYS 
Day Ages 8-18 

Englewood, N.J. 34 N. Woodland St. Tel. LO 9-8170. 

Marshall L. Umpleby, Ph.B., Wesleyan, Ed.M., Harvard, Head. 

Grades V-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. 

Enr 210. Elem 100, Sec 110. Fac full 20, part-time 1. 

Grad '5714. Entd Col '5714. (Princeton 3, Columbia 1, La- 
fayette 1, Colgate 1, Rochester 1, Boston U 1). Alumni 314. 

Tui $600-900. Scholarships full 5, partial 10 ($8000). Est 1928. 
Inc 1928 nonprofit. 

Plant $200,000. Class rms 15. Lib 3000 vols. Labs 2. Studio art 
1. Gym. Fields 2. 

Enrolling boys from leading families of some 40 communities 
in the vicinity of Englewood, this successful school prepares both 
for boarding schools and for college. Secondary department gradu- 
ates enter Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Yale, Wesleyan, Prince- 
ton, and others. Under Mr. Umpleby, head master since 1934, the 
school has developed exchange instructional and extra-curricular 
activities with Dwight, In 1954 a new Upper Field for sports 
was opened, and in 1955 a new student activities building, with 
gymnasium and auditorium among its facilities. 



N- / Middle Atlantic States 247 

FAR HILLS, N.J. Pop 600. Alt 200 ft. D,L&W R.R. 14 mi. SW 
of Morristown, Rt U.S.202. This small village, 40 mi. W of 
N.Y.C, is in the Somerset Hills section of northern N.J. 

FAR HILLS COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 
Coed Ages 3*14 

Far Hills, N.J. Tel. Bernardsville 8-0622. 
Lyttleton B. P. Gould, Jr., A.B., Yale, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1. Art 
Music Ceramics French Latin Algebra. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Boys 120, Girls 120. Fac full 21, part-time 3. 

Tui $275-650. Scholarships full 6, partial 1. Est 1929. Inc 1935 
nonprofit. 

Founded as the Mt. Kemble School in Bernardsville, William 
J. Robinson was succeeded by Lambert F. Whetstone in 1949, 
and in 1958 Mr. Gould was appointed. A new building was added 
in 1957 and students enter the large secondary schools. 

GLADSTONE, N.J. Alt 350 ft 14 mi. SW of Morristown. This 

little town is beyond Mendham and Ralston. 

ST. BERNARD'S SCHOOL 
Bdg and Da/* -Boys Ages 12-18 
Gladstone, NJ. TeL Peapack 8-0588. 
Donald R. Williams, A.B., Yale, Head. 

Grades VII- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. 

Enr Bdg 50, Day 35. Fac full 12, part-time.!. 

Grad '5715. Entd Col '57 13. 

Tui Bdg $1700 (+$150), Day $700. Scholarships. Est 1900. 
Episcopal. 

Plant $388,000. Endowment $95,000. Dorms 3. Class rms 8. Lib 
3000 vols. Lab. Studio. Gym Swimming pool Riding facilities. 

St. Bernard's in 1954 came under the direction of Mr. Williams, 
on. the staff for eight years, who succeeded the Rev. William 
N. Penfield. A church school with a work program, it offers its 
boys thoughtful supervision, a pleasant home life, and a variety of 
extra-curricular activities, including riding, various clubs, and 
athletics. The academic program, supplemented by trips to indus- 
trial plants, prepares for numerous colleges. See page 636 



HACKETTSTOWN, N.J. Pop 3894. Alt 570 ft. D.L.W. R.R. 52 
mi. W of New York City. This is a pleasant village midway be- 
tween New York and Philadelphia, 



When writing schools, please mention this Handbook 



N. J. Leading Private Schools 248 

CENTENARY COLLEGE FOR WOMEN 
Bdg and Day Girls Ages 17-21 

Hackettstown, NJ. Tel. GArden 5-3951. 

Edward W. Seay, B.S., M.A., George Peabody Col, Pd.D., W.Va 

Wesleyan Col, Pres 

Jr Col 1-2 Liberal Arts Art Drama Music Home Eco- 
nomics Secretarial Medical Secretarial Merchandising Teacher 
Training (Nursery) Nutrition Physical and Occupational Therapy 
Laboratory Techniques Fashion Radio Nursing Social Work. 

Enr Bdg 520, Day 10. Fac full 51, part-time 3. 

Tui Bdg $1950, Day $750. Scholarships partial 51. Self-help 

pgrm. Est 1867. Inc 1874. 

Founded as a college preparatory school and four-year college 
for women, with the college department discontinued in 1910 and 
junior college work inaugurated in 1929, Centenary became ex- 
clusively a two-year college. In 1956 the title was changed from 
Centenary Junior College to the present name. 

The curricula, both transfer and terminal, combine^ general 
education and vocational training, and the programs are individu- 
alized, with extensive personality and aptitude testing. Numerous 
pre-professional courses are available. See also page 854 

HADDONFIELD, NJ. Pop 14,000. Alt 74 ft. P R.R. 7 mi. E 
of Philadelphia, on Rt.41. Haddonfield is rich in Revolutionary 

lore. 

THE BANCROFT SCHOOL 
For Retarded Children 
Bdg Coed Ages 3-15 

Haddonfield, NJ. 437 Kings Highway E. Tel. 9-0010. 
Jenzia Coulson Cooley, Prin. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades. Individual Instruction. Art 
Music Home Economics Manual Arts Dramatics Speech. 

Enr 100. Fac full 15, part-time 2. 

Tui $300 mo. minimum (+$25). Est 1883. Inc 1912 nonprofit 

Summer Session and Camp. Tui $300 mo. minimum. 

Plant $750,000. Dorm rms 61. Class rms 16. Studios music 1, 
art 1. Gym. Fields 3. Courts 2. 

For three-quarters of a century pioneering help for the excep- 
tional child, this early school has under Miss Cooley retained its 
leadership and become a "modern, forward looking institution. ^ 

All school subjects are taught, with training opportunities in 
arts, crafts, and shop work. Each pupil follows a schedule ^deter- 
mined by physical and psychometric examination. Individual 
training is stressed and supervised by a psychiatrist as well as 
the administrative heads. The summer school-camp located on 
Penobscot Bay, Owl's Head, Me., makes possible year-round 
supervision. See also page 820 



N. J. Middle Atlantic States 249 

HIGHTSTOWN, NJ. Pop 3712. Alt 97 ft. 10 mi. SE of Prince- 
ton. 14 mi. E of Trenton, Hightstown was founded long before 
the Revolution. Here are the campus and lake of The Peddie 
School. 

THE PEDDIE SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day- Boys Ages 10-19 

Hightstown, NJ. Tel. 8-0155. 

Carrol Oscar Morong, B.D., Andover Newton, Th.D., Boston 

Univ, Head. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad I. Col Prep Re- 
medial Reading. Mechanical Drawing Public Speaking. 

Enr Bdg 330, Day 55. Fac full 44, part-time 3. 

Grad '5777. Entd Col '5776. (Cornell 7, Brown 6, Lehigh 
6, Bucknell 4, Dickinson 4, Tufts 4). Alumni. 

Tui Bdg $1900-2000, Day $700-750. Scholarships partial 68 
($50,000). Self-help pgrm. Est 1864. Baptist. 

Summer Session. Grades VI-VIII (6 wks) High Sch 1-4 (9 
wks). Remedial Reading (8 wks). Enr 180. Tui $400-600. 

Plant $4,000,000. Endowment $i;000,000. Dorm rms 225. Class 
rms 39. Labs 4. Lib 9,000 vols. Studios music 1, art 1. Gyms 2. 
Swimming pool. Fields 12. Courts 16. Golf course. 

The founders of Peddie were motivated by a deep conviction 
concerning the necessity of a religious basis for successful edu- 
cation and living. Two of its early benefactors were Thomas B. 
Peddie, for whom the school was renamed, and William V. Wil- 
son, after whom the original building was named, Roger W. 
Swetland, head from 1898 until his death in 1934, improved the 
faculty ami made Peddie an efficient college preparatory school 
with excellent equipment. Dr. Wilbour E. Saunders, with broad 
experience in church and education, built enrollment and faculty, 
modernized the plant, and fostered student exchange with Euro- 
pean schools. 

Head master since 1949, Dr. Morong, long active in church 
affairs, has been a delegate to the two conventions of the World 
Council of Churches. A work program, student government and 
scholarship grants characterize this substantially endowed school. 
A gymnasium, chapel, and a library have been added to the 280 
acre campus. A summer school is for make up, accelerated, and 
remedial work. A number of clubs foster interests in literary, dra- 
matic, musical, and international activities. See also page 695 

HOBOKEN, NJ. Pop 50,676. Alt 7 ft D,L&W R.R. 2 mi. NE 
of Jersey City. Long an important terminus of European steam- 
ship lines, Hoboken's waterfront is still a sensitive mirror of 
world events and conditions. In the early nineteenth century, 
John Jacob Astor's home was a rendezvous for authors. John 



N. J, Leading Private Schools 250 

Stevens, inventor of the tee rail, and his family established here 
a school of technology and have played an important part in the 
development of the city. 

STEVENS ACADEMY 
Day Coed Ages 6-19 

Hoboken, N J. 266 Fifth St. Tel. OLdfield 9-0946. 
Douglas Groff Cole, A.B., Upsala, Ed.M., Rutgers, Head. 

Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep. 

Enr Boys 185, Girls 30, Fac full 17, part-time 2. 

Grad '5721. Entd Col '5714. (Rutgers 3, Stevens Inst 2, 
Dartmouth 1, Vanderbilt 1, U of Pa 1, Syracuse 1), Alumni 600. 

Tui $375700. Scholarships full 6, partial 9 ($5300). Est 1860. 
Inc nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Enr 40. Tui $60 per course for eight wks. 

Plant $275,000. Class rms 13. Lib 2200 vols. Labs 2. Gym. 

In 1934 the old Hoboken Academy and Stevens Preparatory, 
established in 1870, merged to form Stevens Hoboken Academy, 
with B. F. Carter, principal of the latter, becoming head master. 
In 1956 the trustees gave the t school, which is owned and oper- 
ated by the Hoboken Academical Society, its present name. 

Mr. Cole, previ6usly head of Brookside in Montclair, succeeded 
Alfred J. Weismann in 1947. Graduates of the Academy enter 
not only Stevens Institute, but also many other colleges and 
universities. 

JERSEY CITY, NJ. Pop 299,017. Alt 15 ft. From this busy ship-, 
ping and industrial center motorists plunge through the Holland 
and Lincoln Tunnels to N.Y.C., or are transported in more lei- 
surely fashion aboard ferries. 

THE BERGEN SCHOOL 
Day Bo/5 Ages 4-8, Girls 4-18 

Jersey City 4, NJ. 107 Belmont Ave. Tel. Henderson 3-3138. 
Doris N. Anderson, B.A., Wellesley, M.A., Ph.D., Yale, Dir. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. 

Enr Girls 75, Boys 30. Elem 80, Sec 25. Fac full 9, part-time 4. 

Grad '577. Entd Col '577. (JC Sta Tchrs Coll 3, Wheaton 
1, Douglass 1, Elmira 1, Fairleigh-Dickinson 1). 

Tui $260-525. Scholarships full 3, partial 6 ($1500). Est 1890. 
Inc 1940 nonprofit. 

Class rms 11. Lab. Studios music 1, art 1. 

For 40 years directed by Louise Morra, who was succeeded by 
Imogene N. Cowles, then Laura Wood, the school has been con- 
ducted since 1954 by Dr. Anderson. The preparatory program, with 
additional work in art, dramatics, and music, sends graduates 
to a variety of colleges and universities. 



N. /. Middle Atlantic States 251 

LAWRENCEVILLE, NJ. Pop 1056. Alt 123 ft. Midway be- 
tween Princeton and Trenton, on Rt, 206, this small village, with 
its transmitting station for transoceanic radio-telephone communi- 
cations, is dominated by the school's 400 acre campus near the 
center. 



THE LAWRENCEVILLE SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 12-18 

Lawrenceville, NJ. Tel. Twin Oaks 6-0138. 

Allan Vanderhoef Heely, B.A., Yale, M.A., Columbia, 

Lafayette, Litt.D., Princeton, L.H.D., Rollins, Head. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep. 
Sciences Religion Art Music Greek Mechanical Drawing 
Calculus Public Speaking. Dramatics Shop. 

Enr Bdg 550, Day 75. Fac full 75, part-time 6. Adm Staff 9. 

Grad '57174. Entd Col '57168. (Princeton 21, Yale 21, Cor- 
nell 11, Harvard 11, Dartmouth 10, Brown 9). Alumni 8000. 

Tui Bdg $2500 (+$270), Day $850 (+$150). Scholarships full 
2, partial 68 ($70,000). Self-help pgrm. Est 1810. Inc nonprofit. 

Plant $7,256,250. Endowment $2,442,914. Dorm rms 438. Class 
rms 63. Lib 15,000 vols. Labs 4. Studios music 2, art 2. Gyms 2. 
Swimming pools 2. Fields 17. Courts 27. 

This great national preparatory school goes back to 1810 when 
Rev. Isaac V. Brown, a Presbyterian clergyman, founded the 
small Academy of Maidenhead as an alternative to "the very im- 
perfect and inefficient" methods of the exclusive grammar schools 
of the period. The broad curriculum which he established was 
continued after 1834 by Alexander H. Phillips, a member of the 
family that founded Andover and Exeter. Then for 45 years from 
1837 the school was under the direction of Samuel M. Hamill. In 
1879 the school was purchased by the legatees of John C. Green, 
an early pupil who had amassed a fortune in the China trade. 
Discarding the small school idea, they appointed as head master 
in 1882 James Cameron Mackenzie, who introduced into Amer- 
ica the English "house system." Every house is a small home 
unit, and there are inter-house rather than inter-class athletics. 
The characteristic customs and practices during this period were 
vividly depicted in the stories of Owen Johnson. Mr. Mackenzie 
was succeeded by the Rev. Simon John McPherson, head master 
from 1899 to 1919. 

In this century the early Presbyterian leanings of the school, 
which has always been undenominational, have somewhat faded. 
Under Mather A. Abbott, head master from 1919 to 1934, the 
school plant was enlarged, the academic standards raised. When 
Mr. Heely, author of the able "Why the Private School?", was 
appointed in 1934, the curriculum was further revised to give new 
emphasis to history, science, music, and art, and the conference 



M /. Leading Private Schools 

method of teaching was developed, particularly with the aid of 
Harkness funds. The large scholarship endowment and the self- 
help program aid about 70 boys of limited means. 

Graduates enter leading colleges and universities throughout 
the country. The academic work is supplemented by several suc- 
cessful publications, an experimental theatre, musical organiza- 
tions, and numerous hobby and interest clubs. There is also a 
vigorous but not compulsory program of athletics. See page 698 

MENDHAM, NJ. Pop 1724. Alt 700 ft. 7 mi. W of Morristown, 
Rt.24. In a hilly region of large estates, Mendham, with its prc- 
Revolutionary Tavern, was settled before mid-eighteenth century. 

ST. JOHN BAPTIST SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Girls Ages 11-19 

Mendham, NJ. Tel. 3-0100. 

Sister Mary Barbara, B.A., Brown, Sister Superior. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep 
General. Art Music Home Economics Typing. Rem Reading. 

Enr Bdg 55, Day 10. Fac full 5, part-time 8. 

Grad '5615. Entd Col '5613 (Wilson 2, Pembroke 1, Ben- 
nington 1, Bard 1, Hollins 1, U of Calif. 1). Alumnae 300. 

Tui Bdg $1350 (+$150), Day $300-400 (+$150). Scholarships 
partial 15 ($1500-2000). Est 1880. Episcopal. 

Plant $238,000. Dorm rms 25. Class rms 5. Lib 2800 vols. Lab. 
Studios music 1, art 1. Gym. Fields 2. Court. Riding facilities. 

The gracious and tolerant wisdom of Sister Elisa Monica, long 
Sister Superior and a member of the staff from the 80's till 1941, 
gave a distinctive atmosphere to this college preparatory school 
of high academic standards and moderate rate. For 34 years the 
school occupied the original site in N.Y., but moved to Ralston 
in 1915 and to Mendham in 1929. Graduates of the preparatory 
curriculum enter a variety of colleges. Among activities are music, 
dramatics, art, athletics, and clubs. 

MONTCLAIR, NJ. Pop 43,927. Alt 241 ft. D,L&W R.R. 6 mi. 
NW of Newark, Rt.23. Reaching out over the E slope of the 
Orange Mountains, Montclair has long been favored by well-to-do 
New Yorkers as a place of residence. 

THE KIMBERLEY SCHOOL 
Day Boys Ages 4-5, Girls 4-1 S 

Montclair, N J. 201 Valley Rd. Tel. Pilgrim 6-3600. 

Ethel Maude Spurr, A.B., Radcliffe, A.M., Columbia, Prin. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art 
Music. Remedial Reading. 



N. /. Middle Atlantic States 263 

Enr Girls 280, Boys 10. Elem 100, Sec 190. Fac full 19, part-time 
9. 

Grad '57 26. Entd Col '5726. (Wellesley 3, Vassar 2, Wheat- 
on 2, Holland 2, Smith 1, Mt. Holyoke 1). Alumnae 1033. 

Tui $300-750. Scholarships full 3, partial 16 ($7000). Est 1906. 
Inc 1941 nonprofit. 

Plant $400,000. Class rms 18. Lib 4500 vols. Lab. Studio music 

1, art 1. Gym. Swimming pool. Fields 2. Courts 13. 

Founded by Mary K. Waring and carried on for 35 years by her 
and Mary A. Jordan in 1949, Kimbcrley School purchased, and one 
year later occupied the former Montckir Athletic Club. Margaret 
M. Gallic succeeded Mrs. Helen B. Mason in 1947. Miss Spurr, 
formerly head of Northrop Collegiate, became principal in 
1950. ^ Graduates enter many colleges, including Smith, Vassar, 
Wheaton, Wellesley. There are unusually complete physical edu- 
cation facilities, and many extra-curricular activities. 

MONTCLAIR ACADEMY 
Day Boys Ages 11-18 

Montclair, NJ. 2 Walden PI. Tel. Pilgrim 4-1874. 
Thomas W. Hall, Jr., A.B., Yale, Ed.M., Harvard, Head. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Music Sciences 
Languages English Mathematics History. Make-up courses. 

Enr 200. Fac full 22, part-time 1. 

Grad '5728. Entd Col '5728. (Cornell 4, Colgate 2, Lehigh 

2, U of Pa 2, Amherst 1, Brown 1). Alumni 1200, 

Tui $700-750. Scholarships full 3, partial 6 ($4050). Est 1887. Inc 
1948 nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Enr 55. Tui $125 per course for six weeks. 

BROOKSIDE SCHOOL, 224 Orange Rd. Day-Coed Ages 4-12. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VI. Art Music French. 

Enr Boys 90, Girls 25. Fac full 12, part-time 5. 

Tui $325-625. Scholarships full 5, partial 1 ($1720). Est 1925. Inc 
1948 nonprofit. Summer Camp. 

In 1948 Montclair Academy, which had been founded by J.G.Mac- 
Vicar, who forty years later sold it to Walter D. Head, was pur- 
chased by a board of trustees constituting the Montclair Academy 
Foundation, with Frederick W. Hackett, formerly assistant head 
master at St. Mark's, appointed to direct it. A year later the 
boarding department was eliminated. In 1954, upon Mr. Hackett's 
resignation, Mr. Hall after experience at Millbrook and Hotch- 
kiss, was appointed. 

The solid preparatory curriculum, enriched with a full offering 
of extra-curricular activities, sends graduates to leading colleges, 
including Yale, Princeton, Rutgers; and also provides advanced 



N. /. Leading Private Schools 254 

honors work for gifted students. 

Brookside School, since 1950 a division of the Foundation, 
was originally organized by parents who wished a progressive 
type of education for their children. Douglas Groff Cole, head 
master until 1947, was succeeded by Theodore R. Connett Mr. 
Munro was appointed in 1949. Mr. Hall succeeded in 1954 Fred- 
erick W. Hackett. who had directed both Brookside and Mont- 
clair since 1950. Mr. Charles A. Blake is now head. The curriculum 
emphasizes, in addition to fundamentals, music, art, including 
ceramics, shop and science. 

MOORESTOWN, NJ. Pop 6500. Alt 71 ft. P R.R. 10 mi. E of 
Philadelphia, Pa. Moorestown is a prosperous residential suburb. 
The school occupies 12 acres. 

MOORESTOWN FRIENDS'. SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 4-18 

Moorestown, NJ. Pages Lane. Tel. BE 5-2900. 

Merrill L. Hiatt, B.A., Earlham Col, M.A., Columbia, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col 
Prep. Art Music Remedial Reading. 

Enr Boys 250, Girls 245. Elem 315, Sec 180. Fac full 33, part- 
time 5. 

Grad '5725. Entd Col '5724. (Cornell 2, Haverford 2, Mid- 
dlebury 1, Earlham 1, Pembroke 1, Swarthmore 1). Alumni 1300. 

Tui $310-550. Scholarships. Est 1785. Friends. 

Plant $750,000. Class rms 27. Lib 3600 vols. Labs 2. Studios 
music 2, art 2. Gyms 2. Fields 6. Courts 3. 

Lineal descendant of three schools, Moorestown dates from 
1785, when the Quakers opened a school on the present site. Mr. 
Hiatt, former head of Friends Academy at Locust Valley, L. L, 
N.Y., succeeded Chester Reagan to the headmastership in 1955. 
Well equipped and well organized, and drawing its patronage 
from conservative families of the region, Moorestown offers a 
college preparatory program which sends graduates to many 
colleges, including RadclirTe, Purdue, Earlham, Haverford, Wil- 
liams, Oberlin, Douglass, Bucknell. 



MORRISTOWN, NJ. Pop 17,124. Alt 350 ft. D,L&W R.R. 17 
mi. NW of Newark. On the Whippany River, Morristown is a 
center of large residential estates of N.Y. brokers and business 
men. Nearby is a training school for Seeing Eye dogs. The town 
has attracted numerous private schools, while the College and 
Academy of Saint Elizabeth are at Convent Station, 2 mi. S. 
Schools in Mendham and Bernardsville, suburbs, are described 
under those towns. 



AT. / Middle Atlantic States 255 

ACADEMY OF SAINT ELIZABETH 
Bdg and Day Girls Ages 14-18 

Convent Station, NJ. Tel. Morristown 4-1600. 
Sister Grace Benigna, M.A., Fordham, Dir. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music Home Economics. 

Enr Bdg 82, Day 48. Fac full-time 12, part-time 3. Staff 4. Tui 
Bdg $800, Day $350. Scholarships 9. Est 1859. Roman Catholic. 

Dorm rms 36. Class rms 7. Lib 6500 vols. Labs 2. Studios music 
10, art 1. Gym. Fields 2. Court Riding facilities. 

Owned by the Community of the Sisters of Chanty of St. 
Elizabeth, this well established convent school draws its boarding 
enrollment from throughout the country. Closely affiliated with 
the college of the same name, the Academy sends many of its 
graduates there, although others enter Rosemont, the College of 
New Rochelle, Trinity, Mount St. Vincent's, Manhattanville, 
Athletics, dramatics, music, and clubs are included in the program, 

DELBARTON SCHOOL 

Bdg and Day Boys Ages 11-18 

Morristown, NJ. Mendham Rd. Tel. JE 8-3231. 

Rev. Stephen W. Findlay, A.B., St. Vincent Col, J.C.D., Catholic 
Univ, Head. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Public Speak- 
ing Business Music. Driver Education. 

Enr Bdg 80, Day 130. Fac full 19, part-time 13. 

Grad '57- 28. Entd Col '5728, (Villanova 3, Notre Dame 2, 
St. Anselm 2, Holy Cross 2, St. John 2, Fordham 2). Alumni 229. 

Tui Bdg $1800 (+$100), Day $800. Scholarships full 4, partial 
4 ($4200). Est 1939. Roman Catholic. 

Summer Day Camp. Tui $155 six wks. 

Dorm rms 20. Class rms 13. Lib 4000 vols. Labs 3. Studios 
music 1, art 1. Gym. Outdoor swimming pool. Fields 4. 

Founded on the Delbarton estate of Luther Kountze by the 
Benedictine Fathers, this preparatory school offers a strict aca- 
demic curriculum integrated with religious study, in an at- 
mosphere of sincerity and earnestness. 

With an effective guidance program, graduates enter 
leading Catholic colleges. Within the discipline of .school life 
are many opportunities for extra-curricular activities. See page 700 



MORRISTOWN SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 11- 18 

Morristown, N. J. Whippany Rd. Tel. Jefferson 9-3032. 
Thompson D. Grant, A.B., M,A., Colby, Head. 
Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep. Eng- 



N.J. Leading Private Schools 256 

lish Languages Mathematics. 

Enr Bdg 55, Day 100. Fac full-time 12, 

Grad '5731. Entd Col '5730. (Norwich 3, Colgate 2, Hobart 
2, Princeton 1, Cornell 1, Brown 1). Alumni 1052. 

Tui Bdg $1600 (+$100), Day $800. Scholarships full 1, partial 
14 ($10,000). Est 1898. Inc 1939 nonprofit. 

Dorm rms 45. Class rms 11. Lib 5000 vols. Labs 2. Studios music 
1, art 1. Gym. Fields 2, Courts 4. 

Morristown School was founded by three Harvard '88 men 
Thomas Quincy Browne, Jr., Arthur Pierce Butler, and Francis 
Call Woodman and directed by the late George H. Tilghman 
from 1926 to 1939. Under Valleau Wilkie from 1942, the school was 
reorganized and modernized. Upon his retirement in 1956, Mr. 
Grant, formerly director of Carteret School, was appointed. To- 
day, the school is successfully carrying out a program of sound 
academic work, in small classes, with considerable attention to 
the individual boy and his needs. Graduates enter Lehigh, Prince- 
ton, Yale, Lafayette, and others. Among activities are sports, 
several clubs, and publications. See also page 699 

THE PECK SCHOOL 
Day- Coed Ags 5-14 

Morristown, NJ. 247 South St. Tel. Jefferson 8-0397. 
Archer Harman, Jr., A.B., Yale, Ed.M., Harvard, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII. High Sch 1. Art Music 
French Latin. 

Enr Boys 95, Girls 110. Fac full 17, part-time 2. 

Grad '57 18, Entd Prep Sch '57 St. Pauls 2, Berkshire 2, 
Groton 1, Choate 1, Miss Porters 1, Shipley 1. 

Tui $275-700. Scholarships full 4, partial 1 ($2500). Est 1893. 
Inc 1944. 

Summer Camp. Tut $115. 

Founded and for many years conducted by Lorraine T. Peck, 
upon his retirement in 1944 this school was incorporated by a 
group of parents, and the activities and curriculum broadened. 
Mr. Harman succeeded Philip Hesseltine in 1954. Pupils are pre- 
pared by the academic program, augmented by art, music, manual 
training, and public speaking, for secondary day and boarding 
schools. 



MOUNTAIN LAKES, NJ. Pop 2806. D,L&W R.R. 6 mi. E of 
Dover, Rt U.S.46. Amid several man-made lakes, this residential 
town is in the hill section of Morris County. 



For further information, write Porter Sargent 



N. ]. Middle Atlantic States 257 

ST. JOHN'S SCHOOL 

Day Girls Ages 5-19, Boys 5-12 

Mountain Lakes, NJ. 271 Boulevard. Tel. Deerfield 4-0181. 
Theresa L. Wilson, B.A., Hunter, Head; Maurine Vanderbilt, 
M.A., Columbia, Assoc Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep 
General. 

Enr Girls 105, Boys 40. Elem 115, Sec 30. Fac full 17, part-time 8. 

Grad '576. Entd Col '576. (Oberlin 1, Wellesley 1, Manhat- 
tanville 1, Smith 1, Vassar 1, Mary Washington 1). Alumnae 187. 

Tui $275-540. Scholarships. Est 1909. Episcopal. 

Class rms 10. Lib 3000 vols. Lab. Studio art 1. Gym. 

Non-sectarian in practice, this Episcopal school was founded 
by the Rev. Henry B. Wilson, and since his death has been 
conducted by his widow. Girls graduating from the secondary 
department enter a variety of colleges. 

NEWARK, NJ. Pop 438,776. Alt 60 ft. 9 mi. W of New York. 

This busy industrial city across the Hudson from N.Y,C. is the 
trading center for most of Jersey. John Cotton Dana during his 
lifetime made notable the Public Library and the Industrial 
Museum. 



NEWARK ACADEMY 
Co Day Boys Ages 6-19 

Newark 7, NJ. 215 First St. Tel. Humboldt 3-1770. 
Robert M. Butler, A.B., Bates, Head. 

Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Mathematics Science 
Languages Music. 

Enr 280. Elem 135, Sec 145. Fac full-time 24. 

Grad '5727. Entd Col '5727. (Columbia 3, Cornell 3, Lehigh 
2). Alumni 3500. 

Tui $400-750. Scholarships full 12, partial 14 ($14,250). Est 1774. 
Inc nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Make-up courses. Advanced work. 

Plant $1,250,000. Endowment $5600. Class rms 23. Lib 4500 
vols. Labs 2. Studio music L Gyms 2. 

One of the oldest preparatory schools in the country, Newark 
Academy's original building was burned by the British in 1780. 
Reorganized 12 years later, the school has been in continuous 
operation ever since. Samuel A. Farrand, one of America's great- 
est masters, strengthened the school during his regime for 40 
years from 1859. He was succeeded in 1901 by his son, who re- 
tired in 1935. Clinton F. Zerweck then took charge and inaugu- 
rated a country day program. His successor five years later, H. 



N. 7. Leading Private Schools 258 

Paul Abbott, added a primary department. 

To 1956 Donald H. Miller served as head master, succeeding 
Kenneth O. Wilson, who had directed the school since 1946. Dur- 
ing Mr. Miller's administration courses in biology and manual 
training were added, and a summer school instituted. 

His successor, Mr. Butler, was formerly assistant head master, 
and a member of the faculty since 1943. 

Taught by a strong faculty, the Academy prepares for the Uni- 
versity of Penn., Princeton, Yale, Cornell, Lafayette, and others. 

PROSPECT HILL COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 
Day Girls Ages 4y 2 -I8, Boys 4V 2 -8 

Newark 4. NJ. 346 Mt Prospect Ave. Tel. HU 2-4207. 

Mrs. Edward P. Hooper, A.B., Wellesley, M.A., Columbia, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep 
Art General. Music. 

Enr Girls 100, Boys 25. Elem 80, Sec 45. Fac full 15, part-time 4. 

Grad '5710. Entd Col '5710. (Vassar 2, Skidmore 2, Bos- 
ton U 2, Chatham 2, Caldwell 1, Goucher 1). 

Tui $300-675. Scholarships full 7, partial 19 (5% of income). Est 
1875. Inc 1924 nonprofit. 

Plant $125,000. Class rrns 18. Lib 5000 vols. Lab. Studios music 
1, art 2. Gym. Fields 3. 

A country day school for girls, with a rich and varied curricu- 
lum, this is the result of the merger in 1924 of Prospect Hill 
School with the earlier established Miss Craven's. 

In 1955, Mrs. Hooper succeeded Dr. Albert A. Hamblen, head 
master from 1938. Graduates enter Boston Univ, Upsala, Univ 
of Pa., Bennington, Goucher, and others. 

NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ. Pop 38,811. Alt 48 ft. P R.R. 22 mi. 
SE of Newark, Rt.27. Once a privateering port and with a number 
of well preserved pre-Revolutionary houses, New Brunswick has 
become something of an educational center, with Rutgers Uni- 
versity and Preparatory School, the Dutch Reformed Theological 
Seminary, New Jersey College for Women, and the Agricultural 
College. Today it has also many manufactures, notably first aid 
and surgical supplies. 

RUTGERS PREPARATORY SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 5-19 

New Brunswick, NJ. College Ave. Tel. Kilmer 5-0464. 
David M. Heinlein, M.Ed., Springfield, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. 
Col Prep. 

Enr Boys 200, Girls 90. Elem/ 190, Sec 100. Fac full 22, part- 
time 4. Adm Staff 2. 



# . /. Middle Atlantic States 259 

Tui $275-500 (+$75). Scholarships 10. Est 1766. Inc nonprofit. 

Plant $500,000. Class rms 22. Lab. Studio music 1. Gym. Fields 3. 

Founded under the Colonial charter of Queen's College, now 
Rutgers University, this school has been continuously operated 
for nearly two centuries by the parent institution. William P. 
Kelly was head master for twenty years until 1934. Stanley 
Shepard succeeded Phillip M. B. Boocock in 1937. Mr. Heinlein, 
formerly head master of what was then the separate Rutgers 
Elementary School, was appointed in 1953. 

Although long a preparatory boarding school, it was 
decided in 1951 by the University Trustees to discontinue the 
boarding department and to reopen as a coeducational day school. 
Many graduates enter Rutgers, with others going to the Univer- 
sity of Pa., Bucknell, St. Lawrence, Syracuse, Lehigh, and others. 

OAKLAND, NJ. Pop 1817. Alt 400 ft NY,S&W R.R. 11 mi. N 
of Paterson, on Rt U.S.202. Oakland is in the Ramapo River 
Valley among the Ramapo hills of northern NJ. 

OAKLAND ACADEMY 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 7-20 

Oakland, N J. Oakland Ave. Tel 8-6691. 

John Sarcka, B,S., Colgate, M.A., Columbia, Dir. 

Grades II-VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep Gen- 
eral Business. Make-up courses. 

Enr Bdg 85, Day 20. Elem 75, Sec 30. Fac full 12, part-time 2. 
Adm Staff 2. 

Tui Bdg $1400, Day $650. Scholarships 12. Est 1934. Inc 1937. 

Summer Camp. Enr 40. Tui $450 eight wks. 

Plant $100,000. Dorm rms 50. Class rms 12. Lib 3000 vols. Lab. 
Studio music 1. Outdoor swimming pool. Fields 6. 

Oakland Academy, which was founded by John Sarcka, has 
sent graduates to Illinois, Purdue, Middlebury, Stevens, Drake, 
and others. Student council, publications, and sports are among 
activities. 



ORANGE, NJ. Pop 38,037. Alt 280 ft. D.L&W R.R. 4 mi. NW 
of Newark. The huge estates of wealthy New Yorkers early 
brought a prestige to the Oranges which has scarce been ap- 
proached by imitators. The Beard School is in Orange proper. 
W. Orange, the home of the Edison laboratories and industries, 
is also the site of the new Carteret plant. The secretarial school 
occupies an attractive estate in E. Orange. 

For further information, write Porter Sargent 



IV, /. Leading Private Schools 260 

THE BEARD SCHOOL 
Bdg Girls Ages 11-18, Day Girls 5-18 

Orange, NJ. 560 Berkeley Ave. Tel. ORange 3-7132. 

Edith M. Sutherland, A.B., Dalhousie, A.M., Columbia, Head, 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art 
Music Oral English Modern Dance Dramatics. Remedial 

Reading. 

Enr Bdg 50, Day 250. Elem 120, Sec 180. Fac full 28, part-time 6. 

Grad '5738. Entd Col '5736. (Smith 5, Wheaton 4, Sweet 
Briar 2, Wellesley 2, Wheelock 2, Bradford 2). Alumnae 1380. 

Tui Bdg $2200 (+$200), Day $300-875. Scholarships partial 16 
($6000). Est 1891. Inc 1947 nonprofit 

Class rms 28. Lib 5000 vols. . Labs 2. Studios music 2, art 1. 
Gyms 2. Courts 2. 

This school was founded in 1891 by Miss Lucie C. Beard, who 
emphasized the spiritual guidance of her pupils, as heacimistress 
until 1946. The school was purchased by parents and alumnae 
and incorporated not for profit in 1947. Miss Sutherland became 
headmistress in 1948. The college preparatory curriculum is sup- 
plemented by a broad activities program. Emphasis is placed on 
high scholastic standards, Christian character, and a sense of 
personal responsibility through independent study and participa- 
tion in student offices and a service program. Beard today ^re- 
serves its rich traditions while benefiting from a new functional 
classroom building erected in 1955. See page 766 

CARTERET SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 7-20; Day Boys 2-20, Girls 2-12 

West Orange, NJ. 700 Prospect Ave. Tel. Redwood 1-3300. 
George Douglas Hofe, B.S., M.A., Pres.; Robert W. Porsche, 
A.B., M.Ed,, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col 
Prep. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg 45; Day Boys 215, Girls 65. Elem 185, Sec 140. Fac full 
39, part-time 3. 

Grad '5716. Entd Col '5714 (Georgetown 1, Vermont 1, 
Ithaca 1, U of Pa, 1,, Texas Tech 1, Newark Col Eng. 1). Alumni 

615. 

Tui Bdg $1850. Day $350-600. Scholarships partial 11. 
Est 1901. Re-inc 1939. 

Summer Session. Tui $60-250, Summer Day Camp. Tui $240. 
Summer Coed Boarding Camp or School. Tui $500. 

Dorm rms* 18. Class rms 37. Lib 2000 vols. Labs 2. Studio* 
music 1, art 1. Gym. Swimming pools 2. Fields 4. 

For further information, write Porter Sargent 



N. I Middle Atlantic States 261 

Founded by Charles A. Mead and Dr. David A. Kennedy, and 
purchased by a group of parents in 1920, this school was directed 
by Mr. Mead until 1934, and by his associate George G. Grim, 
until 1940. In 1939 under board president George D. Hofe, the 
school was reincorporated as Carteret and moved to the new plant 
of functional architecture in the Orange Mountains, and the Lance 
School absorbed. The Tisdale Nursery School was purchased in 
1941 and two years later the nursery, kindergarten, and junior 
school were transferred to the newly acquired Loree estate. At 
the same time a small boarding department was added. Graduates 
of Carteret enter many colleges, including Lehigh, Dartmouth 
Notre Dame, Amherst, Rutgers, Newark. Amoftg activities are 
hobby clubs, sports, and a student council. 

Mr. Hofe was appointed Director in 1956, succeeding Grant D. 
Thompson; in 1957 he became President, with Mr. Robert W. 
Porsche being named head. See page 697 

CARTERET-MADISON ACADEMY, resulting from the pur- 
chase of Madison Academy in 1947, is an affiliated coeducational 
*day school in Madison. It is directed by Mrs. Monica Olsen. 

PASSAIC, N.J. Pop 57,702. Alt 57 ft. D,L&W; E R.R. 9 mi. N 
of Newark, Rt.7. Industries textiles, rubber, and metal products 
have converted this residential and farming community of the 
nineteenth century into a growing industrial center. 

PASSAIC COLLEGIATE SCHOOL 

Day Coed Ages 41/2-15 
Passaic, NJ. Kent Court. Tel. Prescott 7-1714. 
John Clarke Lathrop, A.B., Rutgers, Ed.D., Columbia, Head, 

Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1. French Latin Al- 
gebra Art. Music. 

Enr Boys 100, Girls 80. Fac full 14, part-time 5. 
Grad '5710. Entd Prep Sch '57 8. (Newark 3, Oakwood 2, 
Vermont Acad 1, Blair 1). 

Tui $300-500. Scholarships full 10, partial 8 ($8000). Est 1895. 
Re-inc 1948 nonprofit. 

Plant $165,000. Class rms 14. Lib 2000 vols. Lab. Studios music 
1, art 1. Gym. 

Established by Mrs. Francis Fitch to provide her daughter with 
a liberal education, this became in 1956 an elementary school with 
academic work through grade nine. 

PATERSON, NJ. Pop 139,336. Alt 193 ft. D,L&W; E R,R. 12 

mi. N of Newark. "The Silk City" owes its existence to Alexander 
Hamilton, whose attention was attracted to the water power made 
available by the falls of the Passaic River which have made it a 



N.J. Leading Private Schools 262 

leading silk-weaving center. In 1828, its cotton industry witnessed 
one of America's earliest factory strikes. 

HAML1N COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 

Coed Ages 2V 2 -14 

Fair Lawn, NJ. Morlot Ave. Tel. 6-0530. 

Paul M. Hamlin, A.B., Hamilton, M.A., Ph.D., Columbia, J.D., 
NYU; Madge Sills Hamlin, A.B., .Greensboro, M.A., Columbia, 
Dirs. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII. Art Music French. 
Remedial Reading Speech. 

Enr Boys 55, Girls 45. Fac full 9, part-time 4. 

Tui $320-685. Est 1884. Inc 1932 nonprofit. 

Summer Bay Camp. Tui $150. 

Now following a modified Dalton system and offering an exten- 
sive testing program, this school came under the direction of Mr. 
and Mrs. Hamlin in 1932. Formerly it had been the Collegiate 
School tracing back to Miss Graves' English and Classical School 
The children participate in a great variety of colorful activities. 

PENNINGTON, NJ. Pop 1682. Alt 189 ft R R.R. 6 mi. W of 
Princeton. Pennington is on a watershed midway between Prince- 
ton and Trenton. The school is on the highest point of the ridge, 
with a wide view of the surrounding country. 

THE PENNINGTON SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 12-20 

Pennington, N J. W. Delaware Ave. Tel. 7-0022. 

Ira S. Pimm, A.B., M.A., D.D., Dickinson, B.D., Drew, Head. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep. Eco- 
nomics Music Sociology Mechanical Drawing Crafts Voca- 
tions. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg 150, Day 50. Fac full 22, part-time 2. 

Grad '5756. Entd Col '5749. (Penn St. 3, Rutgers 3, Dart- 
mouth 2, U of Md 2, Lafayette 2, Syracuse 1). Alumni 4000. 

Tui Bdg $1600, Day $600. Scholarships full 4, partial 29 ($15,- 
000). Est "1938. Methodist. 

Plant $1,250,000, Endowment $1,700,000. Class rms 18. Lib 6000 
vols. Labs 3. Studio music 1. Gym. Swimming pool. Fields 5. 
Courts 5. 

This Methodist school was founded more than a century ago 
by the Rev. John Knox Shaw. Francis Green was head master 
for 20 years until 1942. Mr. Pimm, who had previously served as 
a pastor and in summer youth camps as a teacher, was appointed 
in 1951. With close faculty attention, make-up periods and courses, 
and remedial work, the preparatory program sends graduates to 



N. /. Middle Atlantic States . 263 

Lafayette, Bucknell, Lehigh, Rutgers, Cornell, and others. There 
are also general and business curricula. Extra-curricular activities 
include sports, field trips, literary and scientific clubs, and hobby 
groups. See also page 700 

PINE BEACH, NJ. Pop 495. P; JC R.R. Strategically located 
70 mi. S of N.Y.C and 56 mi. E of Philadelphia, this shore town 
is in the Pine Belt of NJ. The Academy occupies some 40 acres 
on the waterfront where Toms River joins Barnegat Bay. 

ADMIRAL FARRAGUT ACADEMY 
Bdg Boys Ages 11-19 

Pine Beach, NJ. Tel. Toms River 8-1251. 
Raven O. Dodge, A.B., Clark, Ed.M., Harvard, Head. 

Grades VII- VIII High Sch 1-4. Post Grad 1. Col Prep. Sciences 
Mathematics Music. Remedial Reading. Naval Training. 

Enr 290. Fac full 25, part-time 1. 

Grad '57 68. Entd Col '57 58. (R.P.I. 5, Naval Acad 5, 
Penn State 5, Norwich 4, U of Miami 3, Lycoming 2). Alumni 
1926. 

Tui $1800 (+$300). Scholarships partial 30 ($6000-8000). Self- 
help pgrm. Est 1932. Inc 1933 nonprofit. 

Summer Session and Camp. Tutoring. Remedial Reading. Tui 
$490 seven wks. 

Dorm rms 135. Class rms 19. Lib 5000 vols. Labs 3. Studio 
music 1. Gyms 2. Fields 4. Courts 4. Boating facilities. 

Admiral Farragut Academy was founded in the nineteen-thirties 
to provide a naval training comparable to the army programs in 
many private secondary schools. In its first decade it sent more 
than 100 of its graduates to Annapolis. 

Directed by a head master who is a professionally trained edu- 
cator, and with discipline in charge of a civilian, Admiral Farra- 
gut offers now both college preparatory and general curricula. 
There is a verv extensive testing program, as well as careful 
college advisement and guidance, and opportunities for necessary 
remedial work. Graduates enter the University of Pa., Rutgers, 
Georgia Tech, R.P.I., Duke, and other colleges and universities, 
as well as the Naval Academy. Music, athletics, publications, vari- 
ous clubs, and student government round out the program. 

PLAINFIELD, NJ. Pop 42,366. Alt 100 ft. B&O; JC R.R. 12 mi. 
SW of Elizabeth, Rt.28. A town of wealth and distinction, with 
some industries, notably International Motors and Scott Presses, 
Plainfield is built on an old lake plain gravel bed at the end of a 
terminal moraine, S of the Watchung Hills. The section has his- 
toric interest dating from Revolutionary times. Hartridge and 
Wardlaw schools are some distance from the center. 



N. /. Leading Private Schools 264 

THE HARTRIDGE SCHOOL 
Day Girls Ages 3-18 

Plainfield, NJ. 1040 Plainfield Ave. Tel. 6-0035. 
Harriet Sleeper, B.A., Smith, M.A., Columbia, Prin. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sdn 1-4. Col 
Prep. Art. 

Enr 225. Elem 145, Sec 80. Fac full 17, part-time 5. 

Grad '5714. Entd Col '5714. (Wellesley 2, Smith 1, Mt 
Holyoke 1, Swarthmore 1, Wm & Mary 1, Wheaton 1). Alumnae 

fui $300-700. Scholarships full 8, partial 16 ($8000). Est 1903. 
Inc 1933 nonprofit. 

Plant $297,000. Class rms 19. Lib 5000 vols. Lab. Studios music 
1, art 1. Gym. Fields 3. Courts 2. 

Emelyn B. Hartridge founded and for 40 years conducted this 
as a boarding and day school Upon her retirement in 1940, it be- 
came day only, and Mrs. Dixon C. Philips was appointed principal. 
Miss Sleeper, associated with the school since 1933, succeeded her 
in 1951. Associate principal is Barbara G. Hitchings, former head 
of the neighboring Plainfield Country Day School, which merged 
with Hartridge in 1940. Mt Holyoke, Smith, Vassar, and Welles- 
ley are among the many colleges entered by graduates. The extra- 
curricular program includes music, dramatics, athletics, and news- 
paper. 

THE WARDLAW SCHOOL 

Co Day Boys Ages 3-2 1, Girls 3-4 

Plainfield, NJ. 1030 Central Ave. Tel. 7-3242. 

Charles D. Wardlaw, A.B., Trinity, Univ of N.C., Columbia, 

Head; Frederick C. Wardlaw, A.B., Univ of N.C., Prin. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep 
General. Art Music Speech. 

"Enr Boys 175, Girls 50. Fac full 19, part-time 4. 

Tui $300-750. Est 1882. Inc 1916. 

Plant $259,000. Class rms 12. Lib 4500 vols. Lab, Studios music 
1, art 1. Fields 2. Courts 4. 

Purchasing this school in 1916 from John Leal, who had 
founded and long conducted it, Mr. Wardlaw acquired new prop- 
erty, reorganized on a country day basis, and expanded staff and 
enrollment His son has been associated with him in this work 
Graduates enter a wide variety of colleges. 



PLEASANTVILLE, NJ. Pop 11,938. Alt 22 ft P R.R. 4 mi W 
of Atlantic City, Rt. IJ.S.40. This is a resort town. 



N.J. Middle Atlantic States 265 

THE OXFORD ACADEMY 
Bdg Boys Ages 10-20 
Pleasantville, NJ. Tel. 131. 

Edward R. Knight, B.A., Univ of Wis., M.A., Ph.D., NYU, 
Head. 

Grades III- VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Individual reme- 
dial courses. Remedial Reading. 
Enr 35. Fac full-time 15. 
Grad '5716. Entd Col '5716. 
Tui $7000. Scholarships full 2. Est 1906. 
Proclaiming that "no two students are taught alike, since no two 
students are alike," this school has worked out a smoothly func- 
tioning, individualized approach to many of the difficulties en- 
countered in college preparation. 

The founder, Joseph M. Weidberg, something of a genius in 
his skill in diagnosing difficult college entrance problems by means 
of searching tests, started his work in N.Y., moving the school to 
its present sumptuous plant in 1934. He continued to direct the 
policies, through Dr. Knight, until his retirement in 1-947. Dr. 
Knight, long associated with the school as teacher, psychologist, 
and assistant head, has since 1947 increased the facilities and con- 
tinues to obtain success with his students. 

Extra-curricular activities and a varied sports program are 
supervised and coordinated with the overall academic program 
which allows acceleration. See also page 701 

PRINCETON, NJ. Pop 12,230. Alt 290 ft P R.R. 12 mi. NE of 
Trenton, Rt.26. A residential town in a country of superb estates, 
Princeton is not too far from the city to attract New York busi- 
ness and professional men. The Rockefeller Institute for Medical 
Research is here. Princeton University is more attractively pre- 
sented by Ralph Adams Cram's buildings, better than most Gothic 
of the" past few hundred years, than perhaps any other American 
college. Miss Fine's School is in the old Princeton Inn at Stock- 
ton and Nassau Streets. The Hun and the Country Day Schools 
are on the outskirts. 

COLUMBUS BOYCHOIR SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day-* Ages 9-14 

Princeton, NJ. Rosedale Rd. Tel. WAlnut 4-5858. 
T. Robert Bassett, B.A., B.D., Moravian, M.A., U of Pa., Ed.D., 
Temple, Head; Donald T. Bryant, B.Mus,, B.Ed., Capital, M.S., 
Juilliard, Music Dir. 

Grades IV- VIII High Sch 1. General. Music. 

Enr Bdg 60, Day 10. Fac full 6,, part-time 1. 

Tui Bdg $1000, Day $600. Scholarships. Est 1939. Inc 
1950 nonprofit. 



NJ. Leading Private Schools 266 

Dorm rms 13. Class rms 5. Lib 1000 vols. Studios music 3. 
Swimming pool. Fields 8. Court. 

Herbert Huffman, for 16 years minister of music at Broad St. 
Presbyterian Church, founded this school, which isassociatedwith 
Westminster Choir College. Student council, crafts, athletics, and 

concert tours supplement the academic and music programs. 

MISS FINE'S SCHOOL 
Day Boys Ages 5-9, Girls 5-18 

Princeton, N.J. Stockton St. Tel. WAlnut 4-2661. 

Shirley Davis, A.B., Swarthmore, M.A., Middlebury, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art 
Music Comparative Religion Bible. 

Enr Girls 280, Boys 40. Elem 245, Sec 75. Fac full 27, part-time 
9, 

Grad '5712. Entd Col '5712. (Smith 2, Radcliffe 2, Connecti- 
cut 1, Barnard 1, Wellesley 1, Centenary 1). Alumnae 1000. 

Tui $350-850. Scholarships partial 20 (5% of income). Est 1899. 
Inc 1919 nonprofit. 

Class rms 24. Lib 3600 vols. Lab. Studios music 1, art 2. Gym. 

May Margaret Fine, of a family long influential educationally in 
Princeton, founded this school, which has always enrolled many 
children of the Princeton faculty. Miss Davis, who received her 
early education abroad, and was appointed here in 1943, has added 
an international emphasis to the school. Primarily college prepara- 
tory, the school sends graduates to Vassar, Smith, Wellesley, Bryu 
Mawr, Radcliffe, and others. There are opportunities in art, music, 
crafts, publications, dramatics and social service. 

THE HUN SCHOOL OF PRINCETON 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 14-18 

Princeton, NJ. Edgerstoune Rd. Tel. WAlnut 1-7600. 

Paul R. Chesebro, A.B., Amherst, M.A., Princeton, D.Sc. (Hon), 

Lawrence Institute of Technology, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Music Languages Speech Sciences 
Mathematics Religion English. Rem Reading Make-up courses. 

Enr Bdg 90, Day 45. Fac full 13, part-time 5. 

Grad '5734. Entd Col '5733. (Princeton 2, W.P.I. 2, Penn 2, 
R.P.I. 1, M.I.T. 1, Cornell 1). Alumni 1800. 

Tui Bdg $2500, Day $1000. Scholarships partial 20 ($12,000). 
Est 1914. Inc 1944 nonprofit. 
Summer Sessions. Make-up courses. Six weeks. 

Plant $500,000. Dorm rms 50. Class rms 11. Lib 3,000 vols. Lab. 
Studio music 1. Fields 3. Courts 4. 

Established by the late Dr. John Gale Hun and known in its 
early years as the Princeton Math School, then as the Princeton 



N. I Middle Atlantic States 267 

Tutoring School, this was organized in 1921 as the Hun School 
for boarding students, and in 1944 received its present name. 
Robert G. McAllen was head from 1946 until 1949. Mr. Chesebro, 
with the school since 1929, was appointed in 1951. Emphasizing 
preparatory work and offering an extensive number of courses, 
with students permitted to use the Princeton library, the school 
sends graduates to leading colleges, including Princeton, Brown, 
Rutgers, Trinity. Athletics, dramatics, publications, various hobby 
and interest clubs, and work squads are among activities. 

PRINCETON COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 
Boys Ages 9-15 

Princeton, NJ. Broadmead St. Tel. WAlnut 4-1031. 
Henry B. Ross, M.A., McGill, Head. 

Grades IV-VIII High Sch 1. Art Music French Latin. 

Enr 180. Fac full 13, part-time 4. 

Grad '5725. Entd Prep Sch '57... (Lawrenceville 6, Ando- 
ver 3, Choate 2, Exeter 2, Pomfret 1, Westminster 1). Alumni 645. 

Tui $725. Scholarships, Est 1924. Inc 1924 nonprofit. 

Plant $350,000. Class rms 11. Lib 2200 vols. Gym. Fields 4. 

Established as the Princeton Junior School for Boys, and re- 
named in 1930 when new buildings were completed and a country 
day program instituted, this is under a board of parent trustees. 
Mr. Ross, on the faculty since 1929, and in 1947 successor to the 
first head master, J. Howard Murch, has furthered increased en- 
rollment and plant. Most of the boys are prepared for secondary 
boarding schools. 

RUMSON, NJ. Pop 4044. 4 mi. E of Red Bank. This town of 
estates near the Atlantic is something of a center for boating. 

THE RUMSON COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 
Coed Ages 5-15 

Rumson, NJ. Bellevue Ave. Tel. 1-0527. 

Edgar B. Blake, A.B., Dartmouth, M.A., NYU, Head. 

Beginners Grades I- VIII High Sch 1. Music French Latin 
Crafts. 

Enr Boys 115, Girls 100. Fac full 14, part-time 5. 

Grad '5722. Entd Prep Sch '5722, (Dana Hall 3, Deerfield 1, 
Hill 1, Loomis 1, Lawrenceville 1, St. Marks 1). Alumni 569. 

Tui $430-680. Est 1926. Inc 1926 nonprofit. 

Now independent, and enrolling students from the semi-rural 
shore area, this was founded under the general supervision of the 
Buckley School of New York City. In 1946, Mr. Blake, assistant 
head from the opening of the school, succeeded Harold S. Clark. 
A recent development program has doubled the school property, 
and added a new 18-room building. 



N. /. Leading 'Private Schools 268 

SHORT HILLS, NJ. Alt 600 ft. D,L&W*R.R. 9 mi. SE of 
Morristown. About midway between Springfield and Livingston, 
the two schools of this little town provide educational facilities 
for the more and the less conservative families in the surrounding 
region of large estates. 

FAR BROOK SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 3-15 

Short Hills, NJ. 52 Great Hills Rd. Tel. 7-3030. 
Winifred S. Moore, B.A,, Wellesley, Dir. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1. Art 
Music French Latin. Remedial Reading Shop Dramatics. 

Enr Boys 90, Girls 70. Fac full 15, part-time 8. Staff 3. 

Tui $325-525, Extra c $175. Scholarships. Est 1927. Inc 1948 
nonprofit, 

Summer Camp. Enr 85. Tui $175 eight wks. 

This was established by Mrs. Frank Sangster, who is now di- 
rector of an interesting secondary boarding school in Williams- 
town, Mass. In 1948 a group of parents cooperatively purchased 
this school, changed the name Buxton Country Day School, and 
inaugurated a less progressive program. Sound, conservative aca- 
demic training employing some modern methods is emphasized, 
with small classes conducted by an experienced faculty. 

THE SHORT HILLS COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 
Coed Ages 4-15 

Short Hills, N.J. 88 Highland Ave. Tel. DRexel 9-4550. 
Edward R. Kast, A.B., Dartmouth, MA., NYU, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1. Art 
Music French Latin. Dramatics. 

Enr Boys 115, Girls 100. Fac full 18, part-time 3. 
Grad '5715. Entd Prep Sch '5715. (Short Hills Country Day 
8, Deerfield 3, Lawrenceville 2, Mt. Vernon 2, Andover 1, Miss 
Hall's 1). Alumni 653. 

Tui $300-800. Scholarships full 6, partial 3 ($4,000). Est 1883. 
Inc 1928 nonprofit. 

This parent owned subpreparatory school for Short Hills and 
several neighboring communities gives careful preparation for 
secondary boarding schools. Mr. Kast, head since 1949, has 
done much to improve the plant and broaden the curriculum 
of this school founded by the late Stewart A. Hartshorn. 



SOUTH ORANGE, NJ. Pop 15,230. Alt 150 ft D,L,&W R.R. 

5 mi. W of Newark. This is a suburban town to Newark and New 
York. Located here is Seton Hall College. 



N. I Middle Atlantic States 269 

SETON HALL PREPARATORY SCHOOL 
Day Boys Ages 14-19 

South Orange, NJ. 400 S. Orange Ave. Tel. 2-9000. 

Rev. Thomas J. Tuohy, A.B., Seton Hall, A.M., Fordham, Head. 

High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep. 

Enr 930. Fac full 38, part-time 1. 

Tui $300 (+$15). Scholarships full 16, partial 28. Est 1856. 
Roman Catholic. 

This is the preparatory school of Seton Hall University, to 
which it sends most of its graduates. 

STRATFORD, NJ. Pop 2935. Alt 110 ft This little town is on 

the White Horse Pike between Philadelphia and Atlantic City. 

STRATFORD MILITARY ACADEMY 
Bdg -Boys Ages 5-15 

Stratford, N J. Laurel Rd. Tel. Laurel Springs 4-0029. 
William T. Hade, A.B., Middlebury, Dir. 

Grades I- VIII. Work Program. 

Enr Bdg 50, Day 5. Fac full 6, part-time 2. 

Tui Bdg $1000 (+$75-125). Day $400-440. Scholarships full 1, 
partial 5. Est 1934. Inc 1955 nonprofit. 

Summer School and Camp. Enr 45. Tui $250-300. 8 wks. 

Stratford Academy, established as the Francis Hall School, soon 
adopted semi-military features, and in 1946 absorbed a branch 
school in Philadelphia. Mr. Hade assumed the head mastership 
from Dr. Walter P. Grossman, the founder, in 1948. The summer 
school-and-camp is conducted on the Academy campus. 

In 1955 the Stratford Military Academy Foundation assumed 
control of the school, with Mr. Hade continuing as director. 

SUMMIT, N.J. Pop 19,212. Alt 540 Ft. D,L&W R.R. 8 mi. W of 
Newark. A beautiful residential town on the crest of the Orange 
and Watchung ranges, Summit is 20 mi. from N.Y.C. Kent Place 
School, occupies a part of the former estate of Chancellor Kent, 
justice of the N.Y. Supreme Court in the 19th century; 
the Senior School of Oak Knoll occupies an estate on Prospect 
St. On the outskirts is Oratory School. 

KENT PLACE SCHOOL 
Bdg Girls Ages 11-18; Day Girls 5-18 

Summit, N J. 42 Norwood Ave. Tel. Crestview 3-0900. 
Florence Wolfe, B.A., Smith, M.A., Columbia, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art 
Music Literature French. Dramatics. 

Enr Bdg 50, Day 310. Elem 160, Sec 200. Fac full 45, part-time 5. 

Grad '5643. Entd Col '56 42. Alumnae 1800. 

Tui Bdg $2050 (+$150), Day $300-850 (+$100). Scholarships. 



#,/. Leading Private Schools 270 

Est 1894, Inc 1917 nonprofit 

Plant $3,000,000. Dorm rms 39. Class rms 30, Lib 8500 vols. 
Labs 2. Studios music 6, art 2. Gyms 2. Fields 8. Courts 4. Riding 

This preparatory school appeals not only to day students from 
neighboring communities but also to girls from throughout the 
United States. The semi-rural 27-acre campus has had many im- 
provements and additions in recent yeaus. 

The early development of Kent Place School occurred under 
Mrs. Sarah Hall and Miss Anna Woodman. Harriet Hunt, who for 
26 years furthered the preparatory program, was succeeded in 
1951 by Miss Wolfe, formerly head of the English department, 
who maintains the traditional standards. 

Student activities emphasize publications, art, dramatics, music, 
riding, and school government. Among colleges entered are Smith, 
Wellesley, Radcliffe, Bryn Mawr, Mt Holyoke, Vassar and Bar- 
nard. 

SCHOOL OF THE HOLY CHILD, OAK KNOLL 
Day Boys Ages 6-9, Girls 6-18 

Summit, NJ. 44 Blackburn Rd. Tel. Crestview 7-1804. 

Mother Marie Venard, Prin of Sr Sch; Mother Mary Paul, Prin 

of Jr Sch. 

Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art 
Music Fashion Design Book Illustration. 

Enr Girls 280, Boys 85, Elem 245, Sec 120. Fac full 20, part- 
time 8. 

Grad '5724. Entd Col '5722. (Manhattanville 5, Newton 4, 
Rosemont 4, St. Elizabeth's 3, Vassar 1, Chestnut Hill 1). Alum- 
nae 299. 

Tui $350-450. Scholarships full 4, partial 4 ($1800). Est 1924. 
Roman Catholic. 

One of several schools conducted by the Sisters of the Holy 
Child Jesus, and affiliated with Rosemont College, Pa., and schools 
in England, France, and Italy, Oak Knoll offers sound academic 
study for both college and non-college girls and emphasizes con- 
siderable work in the arts. Graduates attend St. Elizabeth's, Rose- 
mont, Trinity, Notre Dame of Md., Manhattanville, among others. 

THE ORATORY SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day -Boys Ages 14*18 

Summit, NJ. 14 Bedford Rd. Tel. Crestview 3-1085. 

Rev. John Bain, B.A., Little Rock, M.A., Mt St Mary's, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. 

Enr Bdg 65, Day 170. Fac full-time 12. 

Grad '57 30. Entd Col '5726. (Seton Hall 8, Villanova 6, 
Georgetown 2, St. Peters 2, Fordham 2, St. Bona ventures 1). 



N. J. Middle Atlantic States 271 

Alumni 500. 

Tui Bdg $1300 (+$100), Day $450. Est 1906. Roman Catholic 
Staffed by secular priests and laymen, this school has been 
directed since 1945 by Father Bain. Graduates of Oratory School 
enter not only Seton Hall but also Georgetown, Notre Dame, 
Niagara University, and others. Sports, debating, music, publica- 
tions, and some clubs are among activities. 

WESTFJELD, NJ. Pop 21,243. Alt 128 ft JC R.R. 18 mi. SW 
of N.Y.C. Westfield i's a residential town. 

ST. CHRISTOPHER'S SCHOOL 
Day -Coed Ages 3-12 

Westfield, NJ. Tel. 2-0159. 
Mrs. Isabel Thomas, Dir. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VI. 

Enr Boys 75, Girls 50. Grad > 48-'52 50. Fac full-time 12, part- 
time 3. Staff 4. Tui $287.50. Scholarships 6. Est 1928. Proprietary. 

Summer Session and Camp. 

In 1950 this school ceased to provide accommodations for chil- 
dren in residence and greatly increased its day enrollment. 



To find a particular school) use the Index. For explanation of 
abbreviations, format and statistics included for each school, consult 
the Introduction and the Explanatory Note at the beginning of the 
Descriptive Text. 

For further schools in any area, refer to the Supplementary Lists. 

For Summer Camps and Summer Schools, see the Schools Classi- 
fied by Type and the Camp Directory. 

For further details concerning those schools in the Announcement 
Section, refer to page number mentioned. 

If you do not find the information you need, write Porter Sargent, 
11 Beacon Street, Boston 8, Mass. 



PENNSYLVANIA 

ANDALUSIA, PA. Pop 765. Alt 37 ft. P R.R. 10 mi. E of Phila- 
delphia, Rt. U.S.13. This town on the Delaware River, long a 
summer retreat for Philadelphians, was named for the elaborate 
mansion and estate which Charles J. Biddle maintained here. 

PEN RYN EPISCOPAL SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 4-14 

Andalusia, Pa. State Rd. Tel. ME 9-0644. 

Rev. Stuart A. L. Thomas, B.A., B.D., Drew, M.Ed., Temple, 

Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I- VIII. Art Music Spanish. 

EnV Boys 85, Girls 50. Fac full 8, part-time 4. 

Grad '5710. Alumni 175. 

Tui $200-400. Scholarships ($6000). Est 1912. Episcopal. 

This Episcopal day school enrolls students of other denomina- 
tions and teaches the scriptures on a non-sectarian level. The cur- 
riculum prepares for secondary boarding schools. The kinder- 
garten is conducted at All Saint's ' Episcopal School, Torres- 
dale, Pa. 

BETHLEHEM, PA. Pop 66,340. Alt 235 ft. JC; LV; Rdg. R.R. 
45 mi. N of Philadelphia, Rt. U.S.309. An educational center when 
Boston was a crude pioneer community, Bethlehem still retains 
traces of its German culture of two centuries ago in the Moravian 
Seminary for Girls, and in the annual Bach festiva-1. Its importance 
today comes from steel. Lehigh University is S of the river, on 
South Mountain; the Moravian College and Theological Seminary 
for Men to the N"; Moravian Seminary for Girls occupies a sixty- 
acre campus E of the city. 

MORAVIAN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 
Day - Coed Ages 4-23 

Bethlehem, Pa. Heckewelder Place. Tel. UNiversity 8-8571. 

J. Walter Gapp, B.A., L.H.D., Moravian, B.D., Union Sem, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 
1. Col Prep. Languages Science History. Mathematics. Make- 
up Tutoring Remedial- Developmental Reading. 

Enr Boys 305, Girls 185. Fac full 20, part-time 22. 

Grad '5720. Entd Col '5711. (Moravian 3, Hood 2, Lafayette 

272 * 



Penn. Middle Atlantic States 273 

2, Lehigh 1, Gettysburg 1, Millersville State 1). 
Tui $250-500. Scholarships full 40, partial 5. Est 1742. Moravian. 

This ancient coeducational day school offers education from 
pre-primary grades through postgraduate high school for stu- 
dents not only of the Moravian Church but also those without 
affiliation. The large postgraduate course offers one-year review 
with college objectives. 

MORAVIAN SEMINARY FOR GIRLS 

Green Pond 

Bdg and Day Ages 12-17 
Bethlehem, Pa. Tel. UN 8-3211. 
Lillie Suzannah Turman, M.A., Head. 

GradeVIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music History 
Sciences Languages. 

Enr Bdg 60, Day 50. Fac full 11, part-time 2. 

Grad '5718. Entd Col '5716. (Centenary 4, Beaver 3, Mt 
Holyoke 2, Randolph-Macon 2, Mary Washington 2, U of Ky 1). 
Alumnae 1000. 

Tui Bdg $1750 (+$100), Day $525. Scholarships partial 12 
($1,000). Est 1742. Inc 1863. Moravian. 

Dorm rms 22. Class rms 7. Lib 2740 yols. Lab. Studios music 
1, art 1. Swimming pool. Field,* Riding facilities. 

Moravian Seminary, oldest boarding school for girls in America, 
is today a modern institution of high academic standing. It was 
founded by the Countess Benigna, daughter of Count Zinzendorf 
of Saxony. Eleanor Lee, grandniece of Washington, was among 
its pupils as were Chancellor Livingston's daughter, Cornelia, 
wife of Robert Fulton, two daughters of Nathaniel Greene and 
others representing the old Colonial families, Dutch, German, 
Quaker, French and English. Around old Colonial Hall, erected in 
1748, cluster memories of the French and Indian Wars, and during 
the Revolution it served as a military hospital, sheltering hundreds 
of wounded Revolutionary heroes. The original buildings of the 
Seminary are now part of the Moravian College for Womtn, which 
since 1911 has offered full college work, with degree and certificate 
courses. Since 1949 the Seminary has occupied a beautiful 60 acre 
country estate with modern buildings. 

The great majority of the girls continue to come from Pa., 
though many states are represented and loyal alumnae from all 
over the country continue to dower the ancient institution with 
gifts. The thorough preparatory curriculum sends graduates to 
Cedar Crest, Mt. Holyoke, Smith, Wellesley, Wheaton, and others. 
Self-government, athletics, dramatics, music, art and various inter- 
est clubs are included in the activities program. See page 767 

When writing schools, please mention this Handbook 



Penn. Leading Private Schools 274 

BRYN MAWR, PA. Pop 4777 (1940). Alt 413 ft. P R.R. 10 mi. 
W of Philadelphia, Rt. TJ.S.30. A fashionable suburb of Philadel- 
phia, Bryn Mawr is dominated by the beautiful buildings of its 
college, the most impressive of which are of Jacobean architecture. 
Shipley occupies unpretentious buildings opposite the entrance to 
the college grounds. The modern school building and remodelled 
stone hotel of Baldwin are on the main street 

THE BALDWIN SCHOOL 
Bdg Girls Ages 13-18; Day Girls 5-18 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. Montgomery and Morris Aves. Tel. LA 5-2700. 
Rosamond Cross, A.B., M.A., Bryn Mawr, Ed.D., Brown, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art 
Music Speech. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg 150, Day 385. Elem 240, Sec 295. Fac full 37, part- 
time 11. 

Grad '5763. Entd Col '5760. (Wellesley 9, Hollins 6, Rad- 
cliffe 5, Cornell 5, Smith 3, Pembroke 2). Alumnae 2432. 

Tui Bdg $2075, Day $360-815. Scholarships full 5, partial 30 
($21,000). Est 1888. Inc 1919 nonprofit. 

Class rms 29. Lib 14,357 vols. Labs 4. Studios music 4, art 3. 
Gym. Swimming pool. Fields 5. Courts 5. 

Founded to prepare for Bryn Mawr, this school was directed 
for more than a quarter of a century by Elizabeth F. Johnson, 
who handled both trustees and alumnae with skill and tact. Her 
associate, Miss Cross, succeeded her in 1941. 

With a large and well trained faculty, the school continues the 
sound ideals of the founder, but now prepares for other leading 
women's colleges throughout the East, including Smith, Mt Hoi- 
yoke, Vassar, Wellesley, Radcliffe, as well as Bryn Mawr. Student 
government, dramatics, riding, publications and hobby clubs are 
among activities. 

THE SHIPLEY SCHOOL 

Bdg Girls Ages 14-18; Day Girls 5-18 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. Yarrow St. Tel. LA 5-4300. 

Margaret Bailey Speer, A.B., Bryn Mawr, M.A,, Columbia, Head; 
Augusta Wagner, A.B., Wellesley, Ph.D., Columbia, Assoc Head. 
Kindergarten Grades T-VJII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Human- 
ities Music Dramatics. 

Enr Bdg 100, Day 380. Elem 260, Sec 220. Fac full 43, part-time 
11. 

Grad '5748. Entd Col '5745. (Wellesley 7, Connecticut 5, 
Mt. Holyoke 3, Smith 3, Vassar 3, Mills 2). Alumnae 2209. 

Tui Bdg $2500 (+$200), Day $400-850. Scholarships full 2, par- 
tial 27 ($20,000). Est 1894. Inc 1932 nonprofit. 
Plant $724,000. Dorm rms 66. Class rms 45. Lib 8856 vols. 



Penn. Middle Atlantic States 275 

Labs 4. Studios art 3, music 3. Gym. Fields 5. Courts 4. 

The school was founded for college preparatory work by three 
Quaker sisters, the Misses Hannah, Elizabeth, and Katherine 
Shipley, who in 1911 turned it over to their niece, Alice G. How- 
land, and her associate, Eleanor O. Brownell, who directed it 
until her retirement in 1942. In 1944 Miss Speer and Miss Wagner 
took charge. 

The sound academic training, with its many electives, and 
the informal, friendly atmosphere have long appealed to Main 
Line parents as well as to families throughout the country. 
Extensive use is made of the numerous and divergent cultural 
advantages of Philadelphia, and to a lesser extent those of New 
York City. 

Miss Speer's and Miss Wagner's varied experiences in China 
make them particularly interested in maintaining an international 
outlook and a concern for world affairs, and the school enrolls 
students from a number of foreign countries. Graduates attend 
many colleges, including Smith, Vassar, Bryn Mawr, Wellesley, Mt 
Holyoke, Radcliffe. Student council, arts, crafts, music, dramatics, 
hobby clubs, publications are among the extra-curricular activities. 

CHAMBERSBURG, PA. Pop 17,212. Alt 700 ft. P R.R. On Rt 
U.S. 30 and Rt 11. In the fertile Cumberland Valley, between Phila- 
delphia and Pittsburgh, Chambersburg is rich in memorials of the 
Civil War. From here John Brown started for Harpers Ferry in 
1860, and here Early' s Confederate Cavalry raided and burned. 
Today the Lincoln Highway leads to Gettysburg, 20 mi. E. Wilson 
College and Penn Hall are away from the center. 

PENN HALL 
Bdg Girls Ages 14-20 

Chambersburg, Pa. Tel. Colony 3-3311. 

Clair G. Frantz, A.B., Franklin & Marshall, M.A., Middlebury, 

Ed.D., Temple, Pres. 

High Sch 2-4-. Col Prep General Speech and Drama Art 
Music Secretarial Home Economics. 

Jr Col 1-2. Liberal Arts Speech and Drama Art Music 
Business Secretarial Medical Secretarial Medical Technician 
Merchandising Home Economics Physical Education Pre-pro- 
fessional. Radio and TV 

Enr Bdg 280, Day 10. Fac full 30, part-time 2. 

Grad '5747. Entd Col '5740. Alumnae 3399. 

Tui Bdg $1900, Day $500. 
Est 1906, Inc 1906. 

Dorm rms 182. Class rms 23. Lib 9000 vols. Labs 3. Studios 
music 3, art 1. Gym. Swimming pool. Courts 4. Riding facilities. 
Golf course. 



Penn. Leading Private Schools 276 

Established as a preparatory school on the campus of Wilson 
College but unaffiliated with it, "Penn Hall has had a recognized 
junior college since 1926. Frank S. Magill, head from 1910, re- 
signed in 1947, and Sarah W. Briggs on the faculty from 1935, and aca- 
demic dean from 1944, was appointed president, resigning in 1956. 

Mr. Frantz, her successor, taught in public and private schools, 
and for three years previous to his appointment was head master 
of the Overseas School in Rome, Italy. 

The academic work in both preparatory and junior college de- 
partments is broad, and girls are successfully prepared for Penn 
State, Vassar, Duke, Syracuse, Pembroke, Goucher, Wellesley, 
Cornell Univ and numerous others, Flexibility of programming 
permits selection of special department studies in addition to 
required academic subjects, and there are unusually fine oppor- 
tunities in art and music. Field trips to Washington and to other 
points are taken each year. 

Among activities are student government committees, a serv- 
ice club, various hobby and interest groups correlated with the 
curriculum, and sports. See also page 855 



CRESSON, PA. Pop 2569. Alt 2022 ft P R.R. 12 mi. SW of Al- 
toona, on Rt. U.S.22. This town in the Alleghenies is noted for its 
healthful climate. Mt Aloysius Junior College and High School 
is across from Peary Park. 

MOUNT ALOYSIUS JUNIOR COLLEGE AND HIGH SCHOOL 

Bdg and Day Girls Ages 14-22 
Cresson, Pa. Tel. 9701. 
Sister Mary Anne, M.A., St. Francis, Dean. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General Commercial. 

Jr Col 1-2. Liberal Arts Secretarial Medical Secretarial 
Art Merchandising Music Pre-Laboratory Technique Home Eco- 
nomics Medical Record Librarian Pre-professional. 

Enr Bdg 125, Day 90. High Sch 95, Jr Col 120. Fac full 22, 
part-time 1. 

Grad '56 12. Entd Col '56 5. Alumnae 900. 

Tui Bdg $650-800 (+$50), Day $150-225. Scholarships ($3000). 
Est 1853. Roman Catholic. 

The Sisters of Mercy have long conducted this school, which 
enrolls non-Catholics as well as Catholic girls. The junior college 
department was opened in 1939. In the homelike atmosphere both 
high school preparatory and junior college transfer students are 
prepared primarily for Catholic institutions of higher learning. 
A variety of specialized terminal programs are offered on the 
junior college level. Activities include athletics and several social 
and hobby groups. 



Penn. Middle Atlantic States 277 

DEVON, PA. Alt 465 ft P R.R. In this suburb, about 15 mi. 
from Philadelphia, and in adjoining towns, the various depart- 
ments of The Devereux Schools occupy country estates. Witmer's 
spacious grounds are on a hilltop. 

THE DEVEREUX SCHOOLS 

Of Specialized Training 

Bdg Boys, Girls Ages .3-20 

Devon, Pa. Tel. MUrray 8-3900. 

Helena T. Devereux, Administrative Consultant; Edward L. 

French, Ph.D., Dir. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4 Jr Col 
1-2. 

Enr Boys 350, Girls 300. Fac and Staff 520. 

Tui $450 mo. min. Est 1918. Inc 1939 nonprofit. 

Summer Camp (N. Anson, Me). Enr 225. Tui $450 mo. min. 

The Devereux Schools, operated since 1940 by the Devereux 
Foundation, are a tribute to the teaching ability and executive 
skill of Miss Devereux, their founder. There are 15 separate 
schools graded to serve pupils from three years old to young 
adults. Classification among the schools* allows students of similar 
abilities and interests to associate. The direction of Miss Devereux 
has been particularly successful in providing an emotionally bal- 
anced, home-like atmosphere in which those with emotional diffi- 
culties and the problems of slow learners are given 'individual cor- 
'rective attention. Complete clinical facilities are provided with 
medical, psychiatric, and psychological staff in residence. Sum- 
mer camps and a west coast branch, established in 1945, are affili- 
ated. See also page 821 



THE WITMER SCHOOL 

For Educationally Retarded Children 

Bdg and Day- Coed Ages 5-16 

Devon, Pa. Waterloo Rd. Tel. Wayne 0667. 

Lightner Witmer, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Leipzig, Sc.D., Univ of Pa., 

Owner and Dir. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Art Music 
Speech Domestic Science Manual Arts Typing Dancing. 

Enr Bdg Boys 8, Girls 4; Day Boys 2, Girl 1. Fac full-time 5, 
part-time 2. Staff 5. Tui variable. Est 1907. 

In 1896 Dr. Witmer established and until 1937 directed the 
Psychological Clinic of the University -of Pa., first of its kind in 
the country. At this school founded by him a small group of chil- 
dren who vary from education norms are given year round individ- 
ual remedial instruction. Some graduates have gone on to complete 
college work. 



Penn. Leading Private Schools 278 

ERIE, PA. Pop 130,803. Alt 859 ft NYC; P R.R. 80 mi. SW of 
Buffalo, N.Y. Once a station on the Underground Railroad, Erie 
is today an important port on Lake Erie, perhaps the largest for 
fresh water fishing in the world. It is an attractive city with nu- 
merous parks and boulevards. 

ERIE DAY SCHOOL 
Coed Ages 4-14 

Erie, Pa. 1372 W. 6th St. Tel. 2-4273. 

Richard J. Beacham, B.S., Slippery Rock STC, M.E., Univ of 

Pittsburgh, Dir. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VIII. French Spanish 
Latin. Remedial Reading Tutoring. 

Enr Boys 75. Girls 55. Fac full 11, part-time 5. 

Tui $290-580. Scholarships full 2, partial 12 ($6600). Est 1929. 
Inc 1929 nonprofit. 

Summer Camp. Tui $40. 

Plant $175,000. Endowment $25,000. Class rms 10. Lib 2500 vols. 
Gym. Swimming pool. Fields 3. 

This parent-established school offers a program which includes 
projects, field trips, and creative activities. Stuart R. Ikeler was 
succeeded in 1945 by Allen N. Zechiel. Mr. Beacham, formerly of 
Shady Side Academy, assumed his duties in 1950. 

FREELAND, PA. Pop 5909. Alt 1836 ft 16 mi. S of Wilkes- 
Barre, off Rt. U.S.309. In E central Pa., this town is a center for 
clothing manufacturing and anthracite. 

MINING AND MECHANICAL INSTITUTE 
Day Boys Ages 13-20 

Freeland, Pa. Centre St. Tel. 8, 

Lambert E. Broad, B.A., Lehigh, M.A., Univ of Pittsburgh, Pres. 

High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep (Academic, Scientific). 
Sciences Mathematics. Woodshop Drafting Machine Shop. 

Enr 150. Fac full-time 9. 

Grad '57 34. Entd Col '5732. (Penn State 13, Lafayette 4, 
King's Coll 3, Lehigh 2, U of Pa 2). Alumni 1150. 

Tui $300. Scholarships full 1, partial 8 ($1000). Est 1879. Inc 
nonprofit. 

Plant $350,000. Endowment $450,000. Class rms 9. Lib 2500 
vols. Lab. Shops. Gym. 

Founded by Eckley B. Coxe as an evening school for miners, 
in 1902 a day school confined to college preparatory work was 
opened. Today the majority of students prepare for college and 
enter such institutions as Penn State, Lehigh, University of Pa., 
and Lafayette. Boarding can be arranged. 



Penn. Middle Atlantic States 279 

GEORGE SCHOOL, PA. Alt 180 ft. Rdg. R.R. 25 ml NE of 
Philadelphia. 11 mi. W of Trenton, George School is near New- 
town. Neshaminy Creek flows along one boundary of the 300 acre 
school estate. 

GEORGE SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Coed Ages 13-18 

George School, Bucks Co., Pa. Tel. Newtown: WOrth 8-3811. 
Richard H. McFeely, A.B., Swarthmore, A.M., Univ of Pa., Prin. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep (Languages and Mathematics, Sciences 
and Mathematics, American Relations, Art and Expression, Ex- 
ploratory). 

Enr Bdg Boys 165, Girls 160; Day Boys 70, Girls 50. Fac full 
40, part-time 3. 

Grad '57126. Entd Col '57 118. (Swarthmore 5, Penn State 
5, U of Pa 4, Cornell 4, Simmons 4). Alumni 6000. 

Tui Bdg $1800, Day $950. Scholarships partial 123 ($75,000). 
Est 1893. Friends. 

Plant $1,500,000. Endowment $850,000. Dorm rms 156. Class 
rms 24. Lib 10,000 vols. Labs 5. Studios music 1, art 2. Shop. 
Gyms 2. Swimming pool. Fields 11. Courts 14. 

One ot the most successful and prosperous of the Friends 
schools, and long a leader in secondary coeducation, this school 
owes its name to its founder John M. George, whose will provided 
for the education of the children of Friends and others. Much of its 
success was early due to the able administration of George A. 
Walton, principal from 1912 to 1948. Mr. McFeely came to the 
school in 1931, was appointed director of studies in 1939, and after 
three years as head master of Friends Central, became principal 
of George School in 1948. 

The spirit of the school is in the Friends tradition and the tui- 
tion grants are generally made to Friends families. However, there 
are no denominational restrictions, and patronages are attracted 
from many families not members of the Society. 

During his first year, each student concentrates on the funda- 
mentals of subject matter. During sophomore, junior, and senior 
yeans, many students follow one of the sequence curricula in which 
all of the work is focused on a central plan of inquiry and in which 
the various subjects are correlated under the guidance of a single 
teacher. Other students choose the 'exploratory' program. Many 
graduates attend Earlham, Swarthmore, and Haverford, with 
others going to such colleges and universities as the University of 
Pa., Penn State, Cornell, Amherst, Radcliffe, Smith, Mt, Holyoke, 
and others throughout the country. 

George School also has special study opportunities for very 
gifted students, and some who have taken this curriculum have 
qualified for advanced courses in college. 



Penn. Leading Private Schools 280 

There is an unusually wide and varied activities program, 
including arts and crafts, hobbies, music, dramatics, home econom- 
ics, publications, sports, and numerous committees for arranging 
and facilitating student activities. See also page 822 

HARRISBURG, PA. Pop 89,544. Alt 374 ft. P; Rdg. R.R. 90 mi. 
W of Philadelphia, Pa. Turnpike. The state's capital, a canal and 
rail center, boasts a $13,000,000 state building, 1000 acres of city 
parks, and mile-long bridges across the Susquehanna. 

HARR1SBURG ACADEMY 
Day Coed Ages 3-15 

Harrisburg, Pa. 2101 N. Front St. Tel. CE 8-5462, 
Frank J. Sladen, Jr., A.B., Yale, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1. Art 
Music French Latin. 

Enr Boys 100, Girls 55. Fac full 11, part-time 6. 

Tui $275-450. Scholarships full 7, partial 3 ($2700). Est 1784. 
Inc nonprofit. 

Summer Session. High School Courses. Tui $40 per course for 
six wks. 

Harrisburg Academy became a day school for boys when the 
ancient plant was sold to the government in 1942. When the 
school was merged with coeducation Seiler School in 1947, it 
became coeducational. Robert R. Zimmerman succeeded Mildred 
Myers in 1954. Mr. Sladen was appointed in 1956. 



THE KATHARINE SWEENEY DAY SCHOOL 
Co Day -Boys Ages 3-14, Girls 3-18 

Harrisburg, Pa. 2617 Front St. Tel. 2-1046. 

Katharine M. Sweeney, Pres; Mrs. Margaret C. Little, B.A., Pem- 
broke, M.A., Columbia, Prin. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col 
Prep General. Art Music. 

Enr Boys 85, Girls 115. Fac full 15, part-time 3. Staff 4. 

Tui $275-425. Est 1929. Inc 1949 nonprofit 

This country day school carries boys through grade IX and 
girls through high school, from which they go on to Smith, 
Goucher, Stephens, and others. 



HAVERFORD, PA. Pop 2529 (1940). Alt 383 ft P R.R. 9 mi. 
W of Philadelphia. A beautiful residential suburb on the Main 
Line, Haverford affords a quiet, dignified environment for its col- 
lege and the adjacent school. 



Penn, Middle Atlantic States 281 

THE FRIENDS SCHOOL 
Co Day Coed Ages 4-12 

Haverford, Pa. 851 Buck Lane. Tel. Midway 2-2334. 

Miriam E. Jones, B.S., Gorham STC (Me.), Ed.M., Harvard, Prin. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VI. Art Music. 

Enr Boys 75, Girls 110. Fac full 11, part-time 11. 

Grad '5716. Entd Prep Sch '5710. (Friends Central 2, Ha- 
verford 2, Montgomery 2, Shipley 2, Baldwin 1, St. Aloysius 1). 

Tui $275-475. Scholarships full 4, partial 18 ($5750). Est 1885. 
Friends. 

Under the control of Haverford Friends Meeting this school 
offers the usual academic fundamentals with emphasis on science, 
art, and music. The present principal was appointed in 1950. 

THE HAVERFORD SCHOOL 
Co Day Boys Ages 5-20 

Haverford, Pa. Lancaster Ave. Midway 2-2100. 

Leslie R. Severinghaus, B.A., Cornell, M.A., Columbia, M.A., 

(Hon), Univ of Pa., L.H.D., Dickinson, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Arts 
Manual Training. Remedial Reading. 

Enr 750. Elem 470, Sec 280. Fac full 52, part-time 6. 

Grad '5746. Entd Col '5746. (Princeton 7, Pennsylvania 6, 
Bucknell 5, Cornell 4, Dickinson 4, Harvard 3). Alumni 2650. 

Tui $400-800. Scholarships full 13, partial 10 ($8000). Est 1884. 
Inc 1916 nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Tui $80-125 per subject. 

Plant $1,430,000. Endowment $68,000. Class rms 42. Lib 15,000 
vols. Labs 3. Studios music 1, art 2. Gyms 2. Swimming pool. 
Fields 9. Courts 8. . 

Established under the guidance of Haverford College but now 
having no official connection with it, and with the boarding de- 
partment discontinued in 1948, this school is entirely college pre- 
paratory. The first head master, Charles M. Crosman, was suc- 
ceeded by Edwin M. Wilson, who directed the school for 25 years 
from 1912. Mr. Severinghaus, former head of the English depart- 
ment, was appointed in 1942 following the resignation of Cornelius 
B. Boocock. Recently constructed buildings at a cost of $500,000 
have added greatly to the school's facilities. 

The curriculum, with close individual guidance, prepares for 
Univ of Pa., Princeton, Dartmouth, Yale, Lafayette, Cornell, 
Williams, and other leading colleges. There are many extra-cur- 
ricular organizations and activities. The summer session is co- 
educational and admits students from other schools. See page 702 

For further information, write Porter Sargent 



Perm. Leading Private Schools 82 

HERSHEY, PA. Pop 5300. Rdg. R.R. 12 mi. E of Harrisburg, 
Rt U.S.422. In this industrial town, the creation in 1903 of the 
man whose name it bears, Milton S. Hershey built not only a 
huge chocolate factory and homes for the workers, but a modern 
public school system, a luxurious hotel in the best German spa 
style, and a large school for needy boys. 

MILTON HERSHEY SCHOOL 
Bdg ~ Boys Ages 4-18 

Hershey, Pa. Tel. KE 3-7369. 
John O. Hershey, Supt 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep Busi- 
ness Agriculture Auto Mechanics Baking Carpentry Elec- 
tricity Machine Shop Plumbing and Heating Printing Sheet 
Metal and Welding, 

Enr 1000. Elem 495, Sec 505. Fac full-time 64. 

Grad '57101. Entd Col '5733. (Hershey Jr 20, Wm.& Mary 
2, U of Pa 1, Bridgewater 1, DeVry 1, Syracuse 1). Alumni 2179. 

Tui free. Est 1909. Inc 1919. 

This private school, endowed by the chocolate manufacturer 
with generous funds, was originally founded as The Hershey 
Industrial School and adopted its present name in 1951. The more 
than 1000 orphaned boys, mostly from Pa., are offered numerous 
trade courses as well as opportunity to study business or to pre- 
pare for college. The school helps boys in college and places others 
on a job upon leaving school. Mr. John O. Hershey succeeded D 
Paul Wihner in 1951. 

JENKINTOWN, PA. Pop 5130. Alt 211 ft Rdg. R.R. 10 mi. N of 
Philadelphia, Rt U.S. 611. This town is in a suburban area. 



ABINGTON FRIENDS SCHOOL 
Co Day >Boys Ages 4-6, Girls 4-18 

Jenkintown, Pa. 1220 Greenwood Ave. Tel. Turner 6-4350. 
Howard W. Bartram, A.B., Earlham Col, M.A., Syracuse, Head. 

Kindergarten 1-2 Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep 
(Classical, Gen). Art Music Home Economics. Rem Reading. 

Enr Girls 285, Boys 10. Elem 180, Sec 110. Fac full 19, part-time 
10. 

Grad '5719. Entd Col '5719. (Swarthmore 1, Cornell 1, Mt 
Holyoke 1, Colby 1, Wells 1, U of Mich 1). 

Tui $300-600. Scholarships full 15 f partial 14 ($9,000). Est 1697. 
Friends. 

Summer Camp. 

Class rms 18. Lib 4400 vols. Labs 2. Studios music 1, art 1. 
Shop. Gyms 2. Fields 2, Courts 6. 

Under the care of the Abington Monthly Meeting, and one of 



Penn. Middle Atlantic States 283 

the oldest of the Friends schools, this was under the direction for 
many years of Sara Boothby Libby, who was succeeded in 1936 by 
Samuel K. Bell. 

Mr. Bartram was appointed in 1949, following the retire- 
ment of J. Folwell Scull, head since 1941. Graduates enter a variety 
of colleges, including Centenary Junior, Mt. Holyoke, Bucknell, 
Vassar, Endicott Junior. There is an extensive extra-curricular 
program. 

LANCASTER, PA. Pop 63,774. Alt 357 ft P; Rdg. R.R. 65 mi. 
W of Philadelphia, Rt. U.S.30. In one of the most fertile farming 
regions of the East, Lancaster was an early center of culture and 
education and still produces publications of many learned societies. 
Franklin and Marshall College had among its original trustees 4 
signers of the Declaration of Independence, 7 officers of the Revo- 
lution, and 3 governors. 

THE LANCASTER COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 

Coed Ages 51/2-17 

Lancaster, Pa. 725 Hamilton Rd. Tel. 2-2916. 
John L. Byerly, A.B., Haverford, A.M., Harvard, Head. 

Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art. 

Enr Boys 100, Girls 135. Elem 180, Sec 55. Fac full 20, part-time 
1. 

Grad '5711, Entd Col '5711, (Wellesley 4, Smith 2, Duke 1, 
Franklin & Marshall 1, Simmons 1, Centenary 1). Alumni 481. 

Tui $410-740. Scholarships full 3, partial 38. Est 1908. Inc 1909 
nonprofit. 

Plant $390,000. Endowment $20,000. Class rms 14. Lib 5375 vols. 
Lab. Studios music. 1, art 1. Gym. Fields 4. 

This school was renamed in 1943 as a coeducational institution 
to continue the long history of Shippen School for girls, founded in 
1908, and the Franklin and Marshall Academy for boys, founded 
in 1787. Robert H. Iglehart, after experience at Governor Dum- 
mer and Groton, succeeded Eleanor Fitzpatrick in 1946, and three 
years later the school moved into its modern functional building 
in a suburban area where facilities are now provided for a full 
athletic program. 

Mr. Byerly succeeded to the head mastership in June 1949 after 
three years as head of the school's English department, and pre- 
vious experience in teaching and business administration. The 
academic program, with its opportunities in art and music, 
sends graduates to Vassar, Bryn Mawr, Pembroke, Centenary 
Junior, Mt. Holyoke, Goucher, M.I.T., Lehigh, Cornell, Wellesley, 
and many others. 

When writing schools^ please mention this Handbook 



Penn. Leading Private Schook 284 

LANGHORNE, PA. Pop 1579. Alt 103 ft P; Rdg. R.R. 24 mi 
NE of Philadelphia, on Rt.413. In this little Quaker town 10 mi. 
from Trenton, N.J., The Woods School occupies a 250 acre estate. 
Manumit School has a large estate in nearby Comwells Heights. 

MANUMIT SCHOOL 
Bdg Coed Ages 8-18 

Cornwells Heights, Pa. 4833 Hulmeville Rd. Tel. MErcury 9-0690. 
William Mann Fincke, A.B., Columbia, M.A., Yale; Wendell L. 
East, A.B., M.A., U. of 111., Co-Dirs. 

Grades IV- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Art Music 

Enr Boys 10, Girls 10. Fac full 3, part-time 2. 

Grad '5712. Entd Col '578. (Bard 1, Bucknell 1, Wisconsin 
1, Boston U 1, Bridgeport 1, Pembroke 1). 

Tui $1800-2500. Est 1924. 

Plant $120,000. Dorm rms 22. Class rms 8. Lib 1500 vols. Lab. 
Studio art 1. Gym. Fields 2. Court. Riding facilities. 

Moving in 1940 from its original plant in Pawling, N.Y., this 
school continues in the spirit of its founders, William Mann 
Fincke and his wife, parents of the present head. Enrolling stu- 
dents and drawing faculty from many different religious, racial, 
and cultural groups, and emphasizing individual guidance, student- 
faculty community planning and management, and an extensive 
range of cultural and creative activities, the school arranges tui- 
tion on a sliding scale. First high school seniors were graduated 
in 1952, and in 1957 a program allowing highly individualized work 
affording tutorial and acceleration was inaugurated. 

THE WOODS SCHOOLS 

For Exceptional Children 

Bdg Boys, Girls 

Langhorne, Pa. Tel. Skyline 7-3731. 
Edward L. Johnstone, Pres. 

Pre-Nursery Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High 
Sch 1-4. General. Remedial Reading Tutoring. 

Enr 400'. Fac and Staff 390. 

Tui on application. Est 1913. Inc 1948 nonprofit. 

Summer Session and Camp. Tui on application. 

Founded by Mollie Woods Hare for the training, care, and edu- 
cation of retarded children, the school today has enlarged its field 
of service to included treatment and training of emotionally dis- 
turbed children, as well as the physically handicapped and those 
with special disabilities in reading, speech, etc. 

On the 350 acre campus, there are fourteen separate units for 
the instruction of boys and girls from nursery school age through 
maturity. There is a Summer Camp on the grounds. The Child 
Study Treatment and Research Center, established in 1934 and now 



Penn. Middle Atlantic States 285 

directed by William C. Adamson, M.D., has made the Woods 
School more widely known as a result of its efforts to spread 
scientific information about the diagnosis, care, treatment, and 
research in behalf of exceptional children. 

In 1952, upon Mrs. Hare's retirement, Mr. Johnstone, formerly 
head of the Woodbine Colony in New Jersey, was appointed. 

LANSDOWNE, PA, Pop 12,169. P R.R. 5 mi. SW of Philadel- 
phia, Rt U.S.I. The quiet beauty of this suburb of Philadelphia 
is unspoiled by industries. 

LANSDOWNE FRIENDS SCHOOL 
Day- Coed Ages 5-12 

Lansdowne, Pa. 110 N. Lansdowne Ave. Tel. Madison 3-2548. 
Mrs. Gladys B. Chilton, B.S.Ed., Temple, Prin. 

Kindergarten Grades I- VI. 

Enr Boys 70, Girls 75. Fac full 7, part-time 6. Adm Staff 2. 

Grad '5718. Entd Prep Sch '57 Friends Central 4, others. 

Tui $260-325 (+$20-30). Scholarships. Est 1902. Friends. 

For a time cooperatively administered by four teachers, this 
school is under the control of the Lansdowne Monthly Meeting. 
The program, individualized in approach, is directed toward de- 
veloping the Friendly concept of service. Recently the size of the 
building has been doubled, the slide-film library enlarged, and an 
after-school sports program inaugurated. 

LATROBE, PA. Pop 11,811. Alt 1006 ft P R.R. 41 mi. SE of 
Pittsburgh, Rt 981 from Youngstown. Latrobe, seat of St. Vincent 
College, is an important steel manufacturing town. 

SAINT XAVIER ACADEMY and XAVIER HALL 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 6-14, Girls 6-18 

Latrobe, Pa. Lincoln Highway. Tel. KE 7-7705. 
Sister Miriam, A.B., Mount Mercy, Dir. 

Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General Business. 
Art Music. Dramatics. 

Enr Bdg Girls 65, Boys 35; Day Girls 100, Boys 20. Elem 95, 
Sec 125. Fac full 15, part-time 5. 

Grad '5728. Entd Col '5723. (Seton Hill 5, Mount Mercy 3, 
Mich State 1, Mercyhurst 1, Clarion TC 1, Briarcliff 1). 

Tui Bdg $700 (+$100). Day $150. Scholarships full 2, partial 4 
($600). Est 1845. Roman Catholic. 

Dorm rms 27. Class rms 12. Lib 6000 vols. Lab. Studios music 
2, art 1. Gym. Fields 2. Court. 

Enrolling boys only in the elementary grades, this school of the 
Sisters of Mercy prepares girls for Mount Mercy College, Seton 



Penn. Leading Private Schools 286 

Hill, Immaculata in Washington, and other Catholic colleges. 
Athletics, debating, music, and dramatics are among activities. 

LIGONIER, PA. Pop 2260. Alt 1290 ft. PA R.R. 50 mi. E of 

Pittsburgh, Rt. U.S. 30. This town is situated in Ligonier Valley 
at the foot of the most westernly ridge of the Alleghenies. 

VALLEY SCHOOL OF LIGONIER 

Day Coed Ages 5*14 

Ligonier, Pa. Box 376. Tel. BEverly 8-4611. 
Peter C. Messer, B.A., M.A., Cambridge, Prin. 

Kindergarten Grades I- VIII. Art Music French Latin. 

Enr Boys 65, Girls 50. Fac full 10, part-time 2. 

Grad '579. Entd Prep Sch '579. (St. George's 2, Andover 1, 
Westover 1, Garrison Forest 1, Ethel Walker 1, Kiski 1). 

Tui $350-750. Scholarships partial 17 ($5000). Est 1947. Inc 
1947 nonprofit. 

Established by Gen. and Mrs. Richard King Mellon, and di- 
rected by Mr. Messer since its founding, this prepares for the large 
boarding schools. Instruction in Latin is emphasized. 

Students are enrolled from Latrobe and Greensburg. 

LITITZ, PA. Pop 5568. Alt 360 ft 8 mi. N o Lancaster, Rt.501. 

An old Moravian settlement, Lititz is in the Allegheny foothills. 
The school's Colonial buildings are on the outskirts. 



LINDEN HALL 
Bdg Girls Ages 12-20 

Litilz, Pa. Tel. 6-210.3. 

Byron K. Home, A.B., B.D., M.A., D.D., Moravian, Pres. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Art Music. 

Jr Col 1-2. Liberal Arts Secretarial Medical Secretarial 
Home Economics Art Drama Music. 

Enr Bdg 140, Day 5. Fac full 13, part-time 2. 

Grad '5729. Entd Col '5718. (Penn State 3, Lake Erie 2, 
Oberlin 1, Miami (Ohio) 1, Russell Sage 1). Alumnae 1256. 

Tui Bdg $1500 (+$85), Day $625. Scholarships partial 9 ($3500). 
Est 1746. Moravian, 

Until 1845 the Lititz Boarding School, and since 1934 known 
as Linden Hall Junior College and Academy for Girls, this sound 
old Moravian institution has been in operation for more than 200 
years. F. W. Stengel, head master from 1915, was succeeded in 
1947 by Dr. Home, a Moravian clergyman close to the town and 
the various schools of the sect throughout his career. 

Mellowness and an intimate, homelife atmosphere characterize 
Linden Hall. The emphasis is on academic work, but some semi- 



Penn. Middle Atlantic States 287 

professional curricula are available in the junior college, as well" 
as a general program in the high school. Sports, including riding 
and hiking, music, dramatics, and various student clubs are among 
activities. See also page 768 

MALVERN, PA. Pop 1764. Alt 600 ft P R.R. 21 mi. W of Phila- 
delphia, Rt. U.S.30. This was the scene of the Paoli Massacre 
of 1777. 

THE PHELPS SCHOOL 
Brig* Boys Ages 10-20 

Malvern, Pa. Rt. 202 and Sugartown Rd. Tel. 1754. 
Norman T. Phelps, A.B., M.S., Univ of Pa., Head. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep 
General Business Manual Arts. Remedial Reading. 

Enr 90. Fac full 14, part-time 4. 

Grad '5711. Entd Col '579. (Florida Southern 3, U of Conn 
1, Citadel 1, U of RI 1, Penn State U 1, Temple 1). Alumni 76. 

Tui $1800 (+$200-300). Scholarships full 3, partial 9 ($8,000). 
Est 1947. Inc 1947 nonprofit 

Plant $480,000. Endowment $25,000. Dorm rms 55. Class rms 11. 
Lib 3000 vols. Labs 2. Studios music 1, art 1. Swimming pool. 
Fields 3. Courts 2. Riding facilities. 

This school offers an intensive diagnostic, remedial, and guid- 
ance program, with small classes and individualized scheduling, 
Graduates enter a wide variety of colleges, including the Univer- 
sity of Pa., Colorado University, Ursinus, Columbia, the Univer- 
sity of Mass., Rollins. There are interest clubs, sports, and pub- 
lications. And some of the boys help to operate the farm, work 
with the horses and other livestock, and maintain equipment. 

See also page 702 

MEADOWBROOK, PA. Alt 411 ft P; Rdg. R.R. 13 mi. N of 
Philadelphia. Meadowbrook is in the Huntington Valley region. 

THE MEADOWBROOK SCHOOL 
Day Boys Ages 4-14 

Meadowbrook, Pa. Hampton Rd. Tel. Turner 4-3238. 
William E. Shuttleworth, B.S., Univ of N.H., Head. 
Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VIII. Art French Latin. 

Enr 150. Fac full 10, part-time 4. 

Grad '5618. Entd Prep Sch '56 Penn Charter 12, German- 
town 2, George 1, others. Alumni 300. 

Tui $275-530. Scholarships partial 8 ($2500). Est 1919. Inc 1923 
nonprofit. 

Cooperatively owned by the parents, and long directed by the 
Rev. John W. Walker, Meadowbrook prepares boys for leading 
secondary schools, through an enriched curriculum departmental- 



Penn. Leading Private Schools 288 

ized in the upper grades. Upon the retirement of Edward Me 
Eachron, head master from 1941, Mr. Shuttleworth, formerly on 
the faculty of William Penn Charter School, succeeded. 

MEDIA, PA. Pop 5726. Alt 210 ft P R.R. 14 mi. SW of Phila- 
delphia, Rt U.S.I. A Quaker town, Media is in fertile farming 
country. 

THE ALEXANDER FOUNDATION SCHOOL 

Bdg and Day - Coed Ages 4-14 

Media, Pa. 600 N. Jackson St. Tel. 6-2912, 

Donald T. Riggs, B.S., S. D. Sch of Mines, M.S., 111. Inst of 

Tech; Margaret F. Riggs, Co-Prins. 

Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1. Crafts Music Arts 

Enr Bdg 12; Day Boys 20, Girls 20. Fac full-time 6. Staff 4. 

Tui Bdg $975-1365, Day $310-400. Est 1945. Inc 1946 nonprofit. 

Basing its program on the theories of F. Matthias Alexander, 
and under the Alexander Foundation, headed by Philomene Barr, 
this school for young children not only stresses basic academic 
subjects but also provides many activities in art, music, horti- 
culture, homemaking, manual arts. Emphasizing 'natural' foods, 
the school raises most of the fruits and vegetables for students 
and faculty. 

MERCERSBURG, PA. Pop 1613. Alt 595 ft. P R.R. 15 mi. SW 
of Chambersburg, on Rt.16. This little village, with its goldfish 
hatcheries, is in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains. 

MERCERSBURG ACADEMY 
Bdg Boys Ages 13-20 

Mercersburg, Pa. Tel. 40. 

Charles S. Tippetts, LittB., M.A., Ph.D., Princeton, LittD., 

Franklin and Marshall, Sc.D., Lafayette, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep (Classical, Modern Language, Tech- 
nical). Mechanical Drawing Public Speaking History of Art 
Music. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg 445, Day 5. Fac full 32, part-time 5. 

Grad '57102. Entd Col '57100. (Dartmouth 8, Bucknell 5, 
Princeton 5, Cornell 4, U of Pa 4, Yale 4). Alumni 10,000. 

Tui Bdg $1890 (+$60), Day $400. Scholarships partial 38 
($40,000). Est 1836. Reformed Church. 

Summer Session Tui $650 ten wks. 

Plant $4,500,000. Endowment $250,000. Dorm rms 200. Class rms 
34. Lib 10,000 vols. Labs 4. Studios music 5, art 3. Shop. Gym. 
Swimming pool. Fields 5. Courts 14. 

In 1893, William Mann Irvine took over a small, local institu- 
tion, and with broad vision and indefatigable energy created this 



Penn. Middle Atlantic States 289 

school as it is today. On his death in 1928, he was succeeded by 
Boyd Edwards, a close personal friend, who carried on the ideals 
and traditions. Dr. Tippetts, an alumnus who came to this old 
school in 1941 after 25 years in university work, with Mrs. Tippetts 
has devoted himself to the interests of the boys, acting as adviser 
as well as executive, earning the gratitude of boys and parents. 

An intensely democratic atmosphere and a rugged vitality dis- 
tinguish Mercersburg. The curriculum, with its firm emphasis on 
academic fundamentals, with extensive use of audio-visual aids 
in social studies and sciences, and with specially trained read- 
ing development teachers, prepares for Univ of Pa., Prince- 
ton, Yale, Lehigh, Washington and Lee, Cornell, 'and others. The 
summer session offers a strong remedial reading program and per- 
mits acceleration. Dramatics and publications are stressed, and 
there are also literary societies, a meaningful student senate and 
council, various interest clubs and athletics. See also page 703 

MIQUON, PA. Pop 300. P; Rdg. R.R. In the hills near the 
Schuylkill River, a little hamlet has grown up about the Miquon 
School, about one-half hour's drive from Central Philadelphia. 

THE MIQUON SCHOOL 
Co Day Coed Ages 3-12 

Miquon, Pa. Tel. Taylor 8-1231. 

Donald Rasmussen, B.A., Elmhurst, M.A., Ph.D., 111., Prin. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VI. 

Enr Boys 60, Girls 60. Fac full 9, part-time 8. 

Tui $350-475. Scholarships partial ;0 ($1000). Est 1931. Inc 
1932 nonprofit. 

Summer Camp. Enr 190. Tui $185 eight wks. 

Enrolling children from midtown Philadelphia and from ad- 
jacent Montgomery County suburbs, this cooperative school offers 
a developmental program with music, dance, art, and shop inte- 
grated in a core curriculum which provides remedial work as well 
as advanced projects for gifted children. Mr. Rasmussen suc- 
ceeded Charles E. Clisby in 1955. 

MOYLAN, PA. Pop 1000. P R.R. Rt. U.S.13. This village is SW 
of Philadelphia, beyond Swarthmore. 

THE SCHOOL IN ROSE VALLEY 

Day Coed Ages 3-11 
Moylan, Pa. Tel. Media 6-1088. 
Grace Rotzel, A.B., Mt Holyoke, Prin. 

Pre-Nursery Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VI. Shop 
Art Music Science. 

Enr Boys 55, Girls 45. Fac full 13, part-time 5. 
Tui $290-400. Scholarships full 10, partial 8 ($6000). Est 1929. 
Inc 1931 nonprofit. 



f enn. Leading unvote scnoois 

Summer Camp. Enr 50. Tui $100 six wks. 

A group of progressive minded parents organized this school 
in cooperation with the department of education of Swarthmore 
College, and under the advisory supervision of W. Carson Ryan. 
Parents helped construct the buildings and continue to shape the 
policies. The curriculum, based on natural activities and demo* 
cratic procedures, emphasizes shop, art, music, and science in ad- 
dition to the usual primary courses. 



NEW BLOOMFIELD, PA. Pop 1098. Alt 800. P R.R. 28 mi. 
NW of Harrishirg, on Rt. 274, near Penn. Turnpike. In the Blue 
Ridge foothills, this is a small country town at the foot of historic 
Sherman's Valley. 

CARSON LONG INSTITUTE 
Bdg Boys Ages 9*18 

New Bloomfield, Pa. Tel. 220. 

Lt. Col. Edward L. Holman, A.B., A.M., Gettysburg, Pres. 

Grades VI-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Speech 
Military Training. 

Enr 205. Fac full 12, part-time 3. Adm Staff 6. 

Grad '5736. Entd Col '57 24. (Penn State 2, V.M.I. 2, Mich 
State 1, Norwich 1, Texas A&M 1, U of Miami 1). 

Tui $925 (+$350). Scholarships partial 4 ($500). Est 1836. Inc 
1920 nonprofit. 

Plant $1,000,000. Dorm rms 78. Class rms 10. Lib 5400 vols. Labs 
2. Gym. Fields 4. Courts 5 4 

Colonel Holman has long administered this well equipped school 
which was founded by Theodore K. Long in the plant of the local 
academy. Among its extra-curricular activities Carson Long in- 
cludes student senate and hobby clubs, as well as sports teams. 
Graduates have entered Columbia, Dickinson, Gettysburg, M.I.T. 
University of Pa., and West Point. 

The curriculum includes general education, college and voca- 
tional guidance, and a rapid reading development program. 

NEW HOPE, PA. Pop 1066. Alt 86 ft P; Rdg. R.R. 36 ml NE 

of Philadelphia, Rt. 202. 16 mi. NW of Trenton, N.J., New Hope's 
summer Playhouse, known to thousands of New Yorkers and 
Philadelphians, has brought acclaim -to this quiet artists' colony. 
Solebury has two campuses, 1J/2 miles apart, one an ancient Quaker 
Farm on which the boys live and where all coeducational classes 
are held, the other the girls 1 dormitories. 



When writing schools, please mention this Handbook 



Penn. Middle Atlantic States 291 

SOLEBURY SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Coed Ages 11-18 

New Hope, Pa. Tel. VO 2-2737. 
William Pendleton Orrick, A.B., Trinity, Head. 
Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Anthropology 

Languages Math Art,, Music Dramatics Shop Rem Reading* 

Enr Bdg Boys 50, Girls 45; Day Boys 40, Girls 35. Fac full 15, 
part-time 8. Staff 7. 

Grad '5726. Entd Col '5723. (Pembroke 3, St. John's 3, 
Haverford 1, Oberlin 1, Vassar 1, Wesleyan 1). Alumni 426. 

Tui Bdg $1875' (+$200). Day $700-800. Scholarships partial 34 
($17,000). Work pgrm. Est 1925. Inc 1938 nonprofit 

Plant $500,000. Dorm rms 50. Class rms 14. Lib 10,000 vols. 
Labs 3. Studios music 2, art 1. Gym. Fields 5. Courts 4. 

The School was founded as a boys' school in 1925 by four teach- 
ers, one of whom, Arthur H. Washburn, was headmaster until 
1949. Mr. Washburn and two of the founders remain on the 
faculty and the fourth is on the Board of Trustees. Mr. Orrick 
has been headmaster since 1949, when the School became coedu- 
cational. 

Individual responsibility, and initiative and freedom of thought 
and expression are fostered by the varied academic program and 
by the extra-curricular drama, music, publications, and hobby 
clubs. The curriculum provides for diversified training in the arts 
and includes honors courses in anthropology and mathematics. 
Graduates enter many leading colleges and universities, including 
Univ of Pa., Harvard, Cornell, Wellesley. See also page 823 

NEWTOWN SQUARE, PA. Pop 153. P R.R. 10 mi. W of Phila- 
delphia, West Chester Pike. Here, on a 300 acre campus, are lo- 
cated the beautiful buildings of the Charles E. Ellis School. 

CHARLES E. ELLIS SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 
Bdg and Day Girls Ages 10- 18 

Newtown Square, Pa. Tel. Elgin 6-0444. 

Arnold E. Look, B.A., McMaster Univ, B.D., M.Th., Crozer Sem, 

M.A., Univ of Pa., B.Th., SET Sem, Ph.D., Yale, Pres. 

Grades VI-VIII High Sch 1-4. Post Grad 1. Col Prep. Art 
Music Home Economics Secretarial. 

Enr Bdg 190, Day 30. Elem 65, Sec 155. Fac full 18, part-time 3. 

Grad '5742. Entd Col '57 28. (U of Del. 3, Syracuse 2, Bos- 
ton U. 1, Penn State 1, Ohio U. 1, Gettysburg 1). Alumnae 660. 

Tui Bdg $1800, Day $500-650. Scholarships full 85 ($160,000). 

Plant $3,000,000. Endowment $4,000,000. Dorm rms 80. Class 
rms 20. Lib 6000 vols. Labs 2. Studios music 9, art 1. Gym. Swim- 
ming pool. Fields 3. Courts 7. Riding facilities. Est 1910. 

This country boarding school, established on the bequest of 



Phila. Leading Private Schools 92 

Charles E. Ellis, occupies a beautiful campus of over 300 acres 
with substantial stone buildings. Dr. Arnold E. Look; who came 
to the presidency in 1931, has built up the facilities and enrollment 
The main building, which was destroyed by fire in 1950, has been 
rebuilt and gymnasium and commons buildings added. 

The preparatory curriculum sends graduates to niany senior 
colleges and universities, while the general program prepares for 
junior colleges and specialized schools. There are also extensive 
offerings in art, music, home economics, and secretarial study. 
Numerous extra-curricular programs in dramatics, crafts, athletics, 
music, and student government are given, 

In 1954 the name of the school was changed from Ellis Country 
School to the present title. See also page 769 

PENNSBURG, PA. Pop 1625. Alt 425 ft. Rdg. R.R. 40 mi. NE 
of Philadelphia, on Rt.29. Near Allentown, Pennsburg is in the 
beautiful Perkiomen Valley, 90 mi. SW of N.Y.C 

PERKIOMEN SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 12-20 

Pennsburg, Pa. Tel. ORleans Q-511. 

Stephen W. Roberts, A.B., LL.D., Alderson-Broaddus, B.S., Buck- 

nell, M.A., NYU., Head. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Art Economics 
Mathematics Mech Drawing. * 

Enr Bdg 195, Day 25. Fac full-time 22. 

Grad '5767. Entd Col '57 62. "(U of Pa 6, Bucknell 5, Lafa- 
yette 4, Moravian 4, U of Del 4, Muhlenberg 3). Alumni 3000, 

Tui Bdg $1950 (+$150), Day $500. Scholarships full 2, partial 
37 ($15,000). Est 1874. Inc nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Tutoring. Make-up courses. Tui $-550. 

Plant $1,000,000. Endowment $100,000. Dorm rms 80. Class rms 
13. Lib 10,000 vols. Labs 3. Gym. Fields 5. Courts 7. 

Founded by Dr. C. S. Wieand, Perkiomen was conducted for 
40 years until his death in 1932 by Dr. 0. S. Kriebel, a man of 
rare ability and insight, and for 9 years from 1935 by C. E. Tobias. 

Dr. Roberts, successor to Albert E. Rogers in 1951, had broad 
experience in secondary education and came to the school from 
Wayland. The solid preparatory curriculum sends graduates to 
many different colleges and universities. Sports play a large part 
in the extra-curricular program, and there are clubs for publica- 
tions, music, hobbies. Much of the financial aid offered students 
is in the form of work scholarships. A limited number of post- 
graduate students are enrolled. 

There has recently been extensive renovation of the buildings 
as well as improvement of grounds and facilities. See pages 704-05 



Penn. Middle Atlantic States 293 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. Pop 2,071,605. Alt to 440 ft AS R.R. 

80 mi. SW of N.Y.C. Philadelphia, third city of our land once 
first in population as in its gifts of freedom is a host of contra- 
dictions, scene both of monumental machine corruption and inter- 
mittent inspired reform. Quakerism and "the Friendly way" 
mingle here with the stillborn, still operative "blue laws" to curb 
this mighty Mistress of the Delaware Basin. For, though a late 
comer to the Atlantic seaboard, Philadelphia is today fourth among 
manufacturing cities, renowned for its industrial might, and its 
port holds top rank with New York. 

Boastful of its history and proud of a well preserved past, it 
was less than a centennarian when it hostelled our founding 
fathers. Yet for the tourist it remains first among great historical 
sites for its reverent preservation of antiquities. America's first 
magazine was midwifed here in 1741, and the first daily news- 
paper, in 1784. The city was early a prime seat of many cultural 
and scientific associations, a number of which still exist. The 
acidulous Baltimorean, H. L. Mencken, has labeled it an intellec- 
tual slum. 

The first planned city, Philadelphia early stretched out along 
the Main Line, one of the most beautiful series of suburbs in the 
country, where sumptuous homes were built by the wealthy. The 
pride and mannerisms of the old families have aroused many to 
aspire to membership but, like the Boston Brahmin, the prototype 
is generations in building. 

Many of the private schools are to be found in these suburbs. 
Chestnut Hill spreads along the wooded slopes of Wissahickon 
Creek Valley, 4 mi. N of Germantown. Overbrook, to the NW, lies 
partly in Philadelphia and partly in Merion. Germantown, largest 
of the suburban districts, is 7 mi. NW of the City Hall; here are 
many fine old pre-Revolutionary houses. Oak Lane, E of Chest- 
nut Hill, at the N edge of the city, has attracted various day 

schools. 



Schools in the farther suburbs along the Main Line are treated 
under their own towns of Wynnewood, Haverford, Bryn Mawr, 
and Devon. N of the city, among the Montgomery County hills, 
there are private schools in Meadowbrook and Bryn Athyn and, in 
the outlying S district, at Chester and Lansdowne. 

CHESTNUT HILL ACADEMY 
Day Boys Ages 4-18 

Philadelphia, 18, Pa. 500 W. Willow Grove Ave. Tel. Chestnut Hill 

7-4700. 

Robert A. Kingsley, A.B.. Brown, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Schl-4. Col Prep. 
Latin French Art Music. Remedial Reading. 



Phila. Leading Private Schools 294 

Enr Boys 465. Elem 360, Sec 105. Fac full 44, part-time 7. 

Grad '5715. Entd Col '5714. (Dickinson 3, Haverford 2, 
Princeton 1, Cornell 1, Williams 1, U of Pa 1). Alumni 900. 

Tui $300-725. Scholarships partial 39 ($10,300). Est. 1861. Inc 
1940 nonprofit. 

Summer Day Camp. Tutoring Remedial Reading. 

Plant $1,461,000. Class rrns 32. Lib 8000 vols. Labs 4. Studios 
music 6, art 1. Gyms 3. Fields 15. 

The plant of this old school, which for many years from 
1895 was under the vigorous direction of James L. Patterson, 
was deeded to the Board of Directors in 1940 by the members of the 
Houston family, who had long fostered the school Under the 
headship of Mr. Kingsley, appointed in 1942, the plant has been 
modernized, the geographic territory served by the school widened, 
the enrollment mope than quadrupled, and the curriculum, which 
is entirely college preparatory, strengthened. There is ^consider- 
able work in arts, crafts, and especially music, and the individual 
development of each child fostered. 

THE EPISCOPAL ACADEMY 
Day Boys Ages 4-18 

Philadelphia 31, Pa. City Line & Berwick Rd. Tel. GR 3-1600. 
James H. McK. Quinn, A.B., U of Pa., Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep, Music 
Art Greek Latin. Handicrafts Remedial Reading, Driver Edu- 
cation.. 

Enr 700. Elem 488, Sec 212. Fac full 50, part-time 5. Staff 6. 

Grad '5748. Entd Col '57-48. (Franklin & Marshall 5, U of 
Pa 5, Princeton 5, Trinity 4, Cornell 3, Wesleyan 3, Yale 3). Alum- 
ni 2500. 

Tui $375-725. Scholarships full 18, partial 36 ($24,000). Work 
pgrm. Est 1785. Episcopal. 

Plant $1,190,515. Endowment $629,654. Class rms 37 Lib 16,500 
vols. Labs 3. Studios 2. Gyms 3. Fields 10. Courts 10, t 

Now the largest of the Episcopal day schools, this academy was 
founded under the auspices of the Rev. William White, after- 
wards first Bishop of Pa., Robert Morris, Francis Hopkinson, and 
others. In 1787 the institution was granted a charter and 10,000 
acres of land by the state legislature. Dr. Greville Haslam, head- 
master for 36 years, during which the school made tremendous 
strides in enrollment, plant, and curriculum, retired in 1957, and 
was succeeded by Mr. Quinn, a member of the faculty since 1943 
and assistant headmaster since 1953. 

The student body embraces all denominations, although about 
two-thirds of the boys are Episcopalian. The strict college pre- 
paratory curriculum, with individualized student scheduling, sends 
graduates to many leading colleges, including the University of 
Pa., Yale, Amherst, Dartmouth, Trinity, Princeton. There are 



Phtta. Middle Atlantic States 295 

additional opportunities in art and music. The plant includes ex- 
cellent facilities for hobby clubs and shops, publications, and a 
full program of athletics. The older boys assist in a work program. 

FRANKFORD FRIENDS' SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 4*12 

Philadelphia 24, Pa. Penn and Orthodox Sts. Tel JE 3-5368. 
Mrs. Reba S. Lammey, B.S., Temple, Prin. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VI. 

Enr Boys 60, Girls 70. Fac full 7, part-time 4. 

Grad '56 9. Entd Prep Sch '56 4 (Germantown Friends' 2, 
Wm. Penn Charter 1, Friends' Select 1). 

Tui $280-370. Scholarships full 3, partial 18 ($2000). Est 1833. 
Friends. 

Supported by a strong parent-teacher group, this school offers 
a curriculum with stress on the worth of the individual. 

FRIENDS' CENTRAL SCHOOL 
Co Day -Coed Ages 4-18 

Philadelphia 31, Pa. 68th St. and City Line. Tel TR 7-4600. 
Merrill E. Bush, A.B., Dartmouth, Ph.D., Cornell, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art 
Music. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Boys 280, Girls 300. Elem 230, Sec 350, Fac full 44, part- 
time 21. 

Grad '5752. Entd Col '5746. (Penn St. 6, U of Pa. 4, Swarth- 
more 2, Temple 2, Princeton 1, Radcliffe 1). Alumni 2850. 

Tui $275-700. Scholarships full 2, partial 98 ($38,675). Est 
1845. Friends, 

Summer Day Camp. Tui $100 six wks. 

Plant $1,017,601. Endowment $168,415. Class rms 32, Lib 6800 
vols. Labs 2. Studios music 2, art 2. Gyms 2. Swimming pool. 
Fields 11. Courts 6. 

This leading Friends school, country day since 1925, was di- 
rected from 1924 until 1945 by Barclay L. Jones who was suc- 
ceeded by Richard H. McFeely, who in 1948 left to head George 
School. Eric Johnson, head master until 1952, was followed by Dr. 
Bush, formerly assistant director of Oak Lane Country Day 
School, associate professor of education, Temple University, for 
ten years, and for several years director of adult education with 
the American Unitarian Association in Boston. 

College preparation is stressed, and there are excellent offerings 
in music, languages, science, and art, as well as make-up and spe- 
cial assistance opportunities, and a guidance program. Graduates 
enter many leading colleges, including the University of Pa., Penn 
State, Swarthmpre, Harvard, Vassar. Many segments of the local 
community are represented among the students. 



Phila. Leading Private Schools 296 

FRIENDS' SELECT SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 5-18 

Philadelphia 3, Pa. 17th and Parkway. Tel. RI 6-9150. 
G. Laurence Blauvelt, A.B., A.M., Trinity, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art 
Music Home Economics Typing Shop. 

Enr Boys 210, Girls 205. Elem 205, Sec 210. Fac full 40, part- 
time 4. 

Grad '5732. Entd Col '5731. Alumni 1500. 

Tui $325-650. Scholarships partial 50 ($14,000). Est 1689. Friends. 

Class rms 26. Lib 6700 vols. Lab. Studios music 1, art 2. Shop. 
Gym. Fields 5. Courts 11. 

Located in the heart of the city, this school was established 
in 1689 by the Society of Friends, Coeducational since 1886, it is 
still under the direct management of Friends, and definite reli- 
gious instruction is given. Harris G. Haviland in 1941 succeeded 
his father, who had been head for 40 years. In 1955, Mr. Blauvelt, 
formerly assistant head at William Penn Charter School, and 
head master at Milwaukee Country Day, succeeded J. Theodore 
Peters, who had directed the school since 1951. 

Various religious denominations and social backgrounds are 
represented among its patrons. The program prepares for many 
colleges and universities, including the University of Pa., Haver- 
ford, Swarthmore, Gettysburg, Temple, Kenyon. 

GERMANTOWN ACADEMY 
Day -Boys Ages 4-20 

Germantown 44, Pa. Greene St. and School Lane. Tel. TE 9-9000, 
Donald H. Miller, A.B., Princeton, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col 
Prep/ French Art Music. Shop. 

Enr 320. Elem 170, Sec 150. Fac full 30, part-time 5. 

Grad '5725. Erftd Col '5725. (Wesleyan 5, Princeton 4, Cor- 
nell 2, Trinity 2, U of Pa 1, Bowdoin 1). Alumni 1700. 

Tui $300-750. Scholarships partial 40 ($18,000). Est 1759. Inc 
nonprofit 

Summer Session. Tui $100 per course for six wks. 

Plant $900,000. Class rms 23. Lib 5500 vols. Labs 2. Studios 
music 1, art 1. Gym. Fields 3. 

This academy, one of the few non-sectarian private secondary 
schools in the city, was founded by citizens of Germantown and 
is controlled chiefly by residents of that aristocratic suburb. The 
main building, perhaps the oldest in the country devoted continu- 
ously to secondary education, has been modernized. The new 
primary school building is separate, and gymnasium and the 
Osbourn-Roberts Chapel and Laboratory have recently been com- 
pleted. Samuel E. Osbourn, head from 1915, resigned in 1948. John 



Phila. Middle Atlantic States 297 

F. Godman, head master for three years, was succeeded in 1952 by 
Richard Ward Day, who resigned in 1956 to become head of 
Hawken School, Ohio. 

Mr. Miller, formerly head master of Newark Academy, N.J., 
was appointed in 1956. 

Graduates enter the University of Pa., Villanova, Harvard, 
Lehigh, Princeton, Lafayette, Temple, and Muhlenberg, among 
others. There is a full program of extra-curricular activities, in- 
cluding dramatics, music, publications, and numerous clubs. 



GERMANTOWN FRIENDS SCHOOL 
Day -Coed Ages 5-19 

Philadelphia 44, Pa. 31 W. Coulter St. Tel GE 8-5714. 
Henry Scattergood, A.B., Haverford, M.A., Harvard, Prin. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep Gen- 
eral. Art Music Sewing. Remedial Reading. Shop. 

Enr Boys 370, Girls 345. Elem 460, Sec 255. Fac full-time 48. 

Grad '5757. Entd Col '57 56. (U of Pa 8, Smith 4, Harvard 
3, Vassar 2, Haverford 2, Swarthmore 2). Alumni 2100. 

Tui $325-725. Scholarships full 41, partial 55 ($35,500). Est 1845. 
Friends. 

Plant $1,500,000. Class rms 36. Lib 47,000 vols. Labs 4. Studios 
music 6, art 2. Fields 6. Courts 12. 

The importance and influence of this largest of the Friends 
Schools in and about Philadelphia developed during the regime 
of Stanley R. Yarnall, connected with the school from 1898, prin- 
cipal from 1906 until his retirement in 1941. The sound progressive 
methods and modern educational practices fostered were strength- 
ened by Burton P. Fowler, for 18 years head master of Tower 
Hill School, Wilmington, which he made a powerful influence 
throughout the country, past president of the Progressive Educa- 
tion Association, and trustee of Sarah Lawrence College. Upon his 
retirement in 1954, he was succeeded by Mr. Scattergood, the 
assistant principal. 

The curriculum, with its emphasis on community and world re- 
sponsibility, and with required courses in ethics and family rela- 
tions, sends graduates to leading colleges, including Mt. Holyoke, 
Wellesley, Harvard, Haverford, Amherst, Wheaton, There are 
many extra-curricular activities, such as local and European 
work camps, a school community council, international seminars, 
and affiliation with schools abroad. There are also strong pro- 
grams in dramatics and music integrated with the academic work. 

GIRARD COLLEGE 
Bdg - Boys Ages 6-18 

Philadelphia 21, Pa. Girard and Corinthian Aves. Tel. PO 5-7500. 
Karl R. Friedmann, B.S., Dartmouth, A.M., Columbia, Vice-Pres. 



Phila. Leading Private Schools 298 

Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General Business 
Trades. Art Music. Remedial Reading. 

Enr 965. Elem 510, Sec 455. Fac full 103, part-time 2. 

Grad '5784. Entd Col '5749. (Temple 7, Drexel 6, Lehigh 2, 
Penn State 2, Rutgers 2, St. Joseph's 2). Alumni 6876. 

Tui free. Est 1848. 

Plant $13,000,000. Endowment $71,000,000. Dorm rms 221. Class 
rms 93. Lib 90,000 vols. Labs 4. Studios music 18, art 2. Gyms 
3. Swimming pools 2. Fields 9. 

Stephen Girard, a Frenchman, ardent believer in the American 
doctrine of freedom, stipulated in endowing this school for father- 
less boys that no ordained clergyman of any denomination should 
be allowed to enter its doors. Dr. Merle M. Odgers, who succeeded 
Cheesman A. Herrick in 1936, liberalized the curriculum, although 
the program still combines academic achievement and the learning 
of a trade. In 1954 Dr. Odgers resigned to become president of 
Bucknell University. Graduates now enter many colleges, Penn. 
State, Drexel, and LaSalle, The buildings and equipment of the 
mechanical vocational school are unusually complete, as are the 
other facilities for trade classes. Boys between the ages of 6 and 
10 are admitted, with preference given to those born in Pa. 

In August 1957, upon the death of Dr, E. Newbold Cooper, 
president for 2 years, Mr. Friedmann took on the duties of the 
president pending the appointment of a successor. 

GREENE STREET FRIENDS SCHOOL 
Day Girls Ages 5-14, Boys 5-7 

Germantown 44, Pa. 5511 Greene St. Tel. GE 8-7545. 
Marian P. Branson, B.S., M.A., Columbia, Prin. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII. Art Music Latin. 

Enr Girls 60, Boys 10. Fac full 7, part-time 4. 

Grad '5711. Entd Prep Sch '577. (Friends Central 2, Friends 
Select 2, Lankenau 1, Germantown Friends 1, Stevens 1). Alum- 
nae 500. 

Tui $300-500. Scholarships partial 13 ($2,200). Est 1855. Friends. 

This characteristic Friends' school, emphasizing social and civic 
responsibilities through an integrated curriculum prepares its girls 
for secondary boarding and day schools. 

LABORATORY SCHOOL OF THE READING CLINIC 

of Temple University 
Day Coed Ages 6-18 

Philadelphia 26, Pa. 7600 Oak Lane Rd. Tel. Majestic 5-2555. 
Marjorie Seddon Johnson, Ed.D., Temple, Supervisor. 

Enr 35. Fac full 8, part-time 1. 

Tui $750 per semester. Est 1945. 

Summer Session. Tui $325. 



Phila. Middle Atlantic States 299 

This school for children of normal or above average intelligence 
who have specific disabilities in reading and related areas pro- 
vides an ungraded program with emphasis on language arts. 
Boarding facilities can be arranged. 

THE LANKENAU SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Girls Ages 5-18 

Germantown 44, Pa. 3201 W. School House Lane. Tel. 8-6122. 
Sister Lydia Fischer, B.S., Univ of Pa., Prin. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep Gen- 
eral Home Economics. Music Art Home Making. Garden- 
ing Dramatics. Typing. Rem Reading. 

Enr Bdg 40, Day 160. Elem 120, Sec 80. Fac full 20, part-time 5. 

Grad '5713. Entd Col '57- 12. Alumnae 6017. 

Tui Bdg $1450 (+$150), Day $425-645. Est 1890. Lutheran. 

Summer Day Camp. Enr 30. Tui $50-75 five wks. 

Plant $400,000. Dorm rms 14Class rms 19, Lib 5200 vols. Labs 
4. Studios music 1, art 1. Outdoor stage. Gym. Fields 3. 

Bearing the name of its chief benefactor, and moved from down- 
town Philadelphia to its present suburban site in 1942, this small 
school conducted by the deaconesses of the Lutheran Church is 
patronized largely by Lutherans, many from Pa., though other 
states are represented. Dr. E. F. Bachmann, principal from 1906, 
retired in 1942. Graduatea enter a variety of colleges, including 
Connecticut College, the University of Ga., Wheaton, Bucknell. 
Among activities are sports, music, publications, dramatics, and 
missionary societies. 

MOUNT SAINT JOSEPH ACADEMY 
Bdg and Day Girls Ages 14-18 

Chestnut Hill 18, Pa. Germantown and Northwestern Aves. Tel. 

7-4210. 

Mother M. Sylvester, M.A., Fordham, Prin. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General Home Economics. Art 
Music Commercial. 

Enr Bdg 40, Day 175. Fac full 14, part-time 6. 

Grad '5656. Entd Col '5638 (Chestnut Hill 14, Trinity 4, 
Rosemont 3, Immaculata 2). 

Tui Bdg $850-975, Day $300. Est 1858. Roman Catholic. 

Plant $760,000. Dorm rms 20. Class rms 10. Lib (with College) 
40,000 vols. Labs 4. Studios music 8, art 2. Gym. Swimming pool. 
Courts 3. Riding facilities. 

Conducted by the Sisters of St. Joseph, this academy sends 
many of its preparatory students to the affiliated Chestnut Hill 
College, with others going to Gwynedd-Mercy Junior, the Uni- 
versity of Pa., and Marymount. 

Mr. Brown succeeded John H. Niemeyer in 1956. 



Phila. Leading Private Schools 300 

OAK LANE COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 

of Temple University 

Coed Ages 3-12 

Philadelphia 26, Pa. Oak Lane Rd. Tel MA 5-1731. 

Marion J. Sack, B.S., Temple, M.S., Ed.D., U of Pa,, Head. 
Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VI. 
Enr Boys 125, Girls 105. Fac full 18, part-time 3. 
Tui $500. Est 1914. 

This well known progressive school, independently established 
in 1916 and since 1931 serving as a laboratory school for the 
Teachers College of Temple University, has made significant 
contributions to the teaching of the creative arts, music, and litera- 
ture. The enrollment is inter-racial and inter-denorninational. 

SKLAR BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL 
Coed Ages 3-13 

Germantown 44, Pa. 3100 W. School House Lane. Tel. Victor 

4-8888. 

Lena Sklar, B.S., Univ of Pa., Exec Dir. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VII. Music Art. 

Enr Bdg Boys 30, Girls 30; Day Boys 60, Girls 40. Fac full 15, 
part-time 2. 

Tui Bdg $135 mo, Day $75 mo. Scholarships. Est 1940. Proprie- 
tary. 

Summer Camp. Tui Bdg $350, Day $185. 

Plant $75,000. Class rms 9. Lab. Studios music 1, art 1. Swim- 
ming pool. Field. 

Started by Mrs. Sklar after years as superintendent of Willow 
Crest for Convalescents this school trains children in social ad- 
justment as well as in academic work. There is a mental prophy- 
laxis program under the charge of a full time psychiatrist. 

SPRINGSIDE SCHOOL 
Day -Girls Ages 4-18 

Philadelphia 18, Pa. Cherokee and Willow Grove Aves. Tel CH 

7-7200. 

Eleanor E. Potter, A.B., Univ of Neb., M.A., Columbia, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. 

Enr 545. Elem 385, Sec 160. Fac full 48, part-time 8. 

Grad '5723. Entd Col '5721. (Wheaton 3, Smith 2, Welles- 
ley 1, Radcliffe 1, Vassar 1, Mt. Holyoke 1). Alumnae 1400. 

Tui $335-785. Scholarships full 1, partial 40 ($12,000). Est 1879. 
Inc 1931 nonprofit. 

Plant $1,266,000. Class rms 38. Lib 6600 vols. Labs 2. Studios 
music 2, art 3. Gyms 3. Fields 3. 



Phila. Middle Atlantic States 301 

Established by Mrs. Comegys and Miss Bell, and from 1900 
conducted by Mrs. L. B. Chapman and Miss Jones, the school 
came under the direction of Mary F. Ellis in 1931. Miss Potter, 
with experience at Tower Hill and Francis Parker schools, in 
1946 succeeded Mrs. Samuel H. Paul, head from 1935. Graduates 
enter the University of Pa., Wellesley, Sweet Briar, Smith, Vas- 
sar, and others. There is an extensive program of extra-curricular 
activities. In 1954 Springside absorbed Miss Zara's School. 

THE STEVENS SCHOOL 
Day Girls Ages 4-18 

Chestnut Hill 18, Pa. Crefeld St. and Laughlin Lane. Tel. 7-7350. 
Helen W. Ridgley, A.B., U of Richmond, M.A., U of Pa., Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art 
Music Dramatics Bible Typing Human Relations. 

Enr 175. Elem 75, Sec 100. Fac full 16, part-time 6. 

Grad '5716, Entd Col '5716. (Wilson 4, Smith 1, Vassar 1, 
Syracuse 1, Skidmore 1, Hood 1). Alumnae 958. 

Tui $300-650. Scholarships full 4, partial 13 ($5200). Est 1868. 
Inc 1925 nonprofit 

Plant $373,112. Class rms 20. Lib 8260 vols. Lab. Studios 3. 
Fields 2. Courts 2. 

This was founded as a preparatory school for Bryn Mawr by 
Mary E. Stevens. Mildred S. Borden succeeded Helen L. Church 
in 1941. Yvonne G. Cameron, now Mrs. C. E. Battle, principal 
from 1951, resigned in 1953 and was succeeded by Miss Bergen, 
formerly head mistress of the upper school. In August of the same 
year the upper school was moved from Walnut Lane in German- 
town to the expanded and renovated campus previously occupied 
by the junior school. Among activities are dramatics, music, lan- 
guage clubs, student publications, council, and athletics. 

Graduates have attended many colleges, including the Univ 
of Pa., Centenary Jr., Bryn Mawr, Bradford Jr., Rollins, Duke. 



TEMPLE UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL 
Day and Eve Coed Ages 1 7- 

Philadelphia 21, Pa. 1417 Diamond St. Tel. ST 7-4000. 

H. Ernest Harting, B.S., Muhlenberg, Ed.M., Temple, Dir. 

High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep General Business 
Make-up courses Remedial Reading Tutoring. 

Enr Day Boys 800, Girls 200; Eve Men 350, Women 60. Fac full 
14, part-time 16. Adm Staff 8. 

Tui $55 per subject. Scholarships full 1. Est 1884. Inc nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Enr 875. Tui $20 per half unit for 61/2 wks. 

Class rms 16. Labs 2. Studios music 1, art 1, Gyms 2. Swimming 
pool. 



Penn. Leading Private Schools 302 

From this high school founded by Russell H. Conwell his Temple 
University developed. Mr. Harting succeeded Charles E. Metzger 
in 1940. The school offers courses designed for those who must 
adapt their educational plans to special circumstances and condi- 
tions. The conference plan of instruction is followed. The four- 
year day course is duplicated in a six-year evening course. Gradu- 
ates enter not only Temple, but also the University of Pa., Ur- 
sinus, Villanova, Rutgers, and others, 

THE WILLIAM PENN CHARTER SCHOOL 
Co Day Boys Ages 5-18, Girls 5-6 

Philadelphia 44, Pa. School Lane and Fox St. Tel. Victor 4-3460. 
John Flagg Gummere, B.A., M.A., Haverford, M.A. (Hon), Ph.D., 
Univ of Pa., Head, 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art 
Music Greek Latin Human Relations. Remedial Reading. 
Manual Arts. 

Enr Boys 645, Girls 20. Elem 385, Sec 280. Fac full 46, part-time 
6. 

Grad '5748. Entd Col '5747. (Lehigh 9, Haverford 4, others). 
Alumni 2800. 

Tui $320-725. Scholarships full 27, partial 71 ($32,000). Est 1689. 
Friends. 

Summer Session. Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Enr 80. Tui 
$ 55 per course for six wks. 

Plant $2,000,000. Endowment $2,000,000. Class rms 32. Lib 9200 
vols. Labs 2. Studios music 2, art 2. Gyms 2. Fields 12. Courts 14, 

As early as 1701 William Penn gave a charter to a school that 
had been in operation a dozen years. It is still conducted under 
his third charter, 1711, under a self perpetuating board of fifteen, 
all Friends. Richard Mott Jones, head master for 42 years, brought 
the school national reputation. He was succeeded in 1918 by Rich- 
ard M. Gummere, under whose administration the school devel- 
oped in numbers and influence and moved in 1925 from downtown 
to its present site. When Dr. Gummere resigned to become chair- 
man of the Board of Admissions at Harvard in 1935, Richard 
Knowles was head master until 1941, 

John Flagg Gummere, the present head master, member of a dis- 
tinguished family of Quaker educators, and on the faculty since 
1923 and acting head prior to his appointment in 1942, has been 
prominent in local and national educational organizations. 

The cosmopolitan student body emphasizes self-government and 
community participation. -The school has been a leader in the 
development and use of modern techniques in the teaching of 
foreign languages. The curriculum, with its flexible scheduling, 
permits not only sound preparation for college, but also 
classes for admission to college with advanced standing and 



Penn. Middle Atlantic States 303 

opportunities for major units in music, art, and shop. Notably, 
not only Latin, but also Greek is offered. There ^ are reme- 
dial reading and guidance programs, and much use is made of 
audio-visual aids. Standards of college preparation are high, and 
graduates enter the University of Pa., Lehigh, Princeton, Haver- 
ford, Wesleyan, Amherst, among others. Publications, dramatics, 
various societies and clubs, and athletics are among activities. 

The school has for a number of years given an in-service train- 
ing course in joint sponsorship with the Philadelphia Public 
Schools. The teachers attending it represent public schools, priv- 
ate schools, colleges. 

PITTSBURGH, PA. Pop 676,806. Alt 743 ft A new city has been 
created from the slums and congestion of snioke clouded Pitts- 
burgh, notorious of old. Herculean measures have demolished one 
quarter of the business section on the tongue of land between the 
Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers. The smog no longer screens 
the sun and new parks, cultural centers, planned housing, and 
great business towers of glass and steel shimmering with alumi- 
num symbolize the giant industries that cluster here. Famed is the 
Institute where Homer St. Gaudens created a mecca for the art 
world, whose main building covers an area larger than does the 
Capitol at Washington. Mellon Institute, with its banks, is a Greek 
temple 9 stories high. The University of Pittsburgh, coeducational, 
dating from 1787, is in Schenley Park as is Carnegie Institute of 
Technology, founded in 1900. Duquesne University, a Catholic co- 
educational college, was established in 1878, and Pennsylvania 
College for Women, now Chatham College, in 1869. Most of the 
private schools are in the hilly East End section, 

THE ELLIS SCHOOL 
Day Girls Ages 4-18 

Pittsburgh 32, Pa. 5607 Fifth Ave. Tel. HI 1-8654. 
Marion Hope Hamilton, A.B., Hollins, M.A., Ph.D., Univ of Va., 
Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VII I High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. 

Enr 345. Elem 190, Sec 155. Fac full 35, part-time 3. 

Grad '5718. Entd Col '5718. (Wheaton 2, Denison 1, Goucher 

'' ?*1L ff sVooS ($8000). Est 1916. Inc 1929 

nonprofit. 

Class rms 26. Lib 6000 vols. Labs 3. Studios music 2, art 2. 
Incorporated by a group of conservative Pittsburgh families 
enrolling their daughters in the school, this was for 25 years under 
the brisk and businesslike direction of its founder, Sara Frazer 
Ellis. Harriet S. Sheldon, in charge until 1944, was succeeded by 
Marjorie L. Tilley. Miss Hamilton, former dean of students at 



Penn. Leading Private Schools 304 

Westhampton College, then on the English faculty of Wellesley, 
was appointed in 1955. The academic program with special reme- 
dial reading and testing facilities, sends graduates not only to Pa. 
colleges and universities, but also to Mt. Holyoke, Wellesley, 
Wheaton, and others, 

FALK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
Of the University of Pittsburgh 

Day - Coed Ages 4-14 

Pittsburgh 13, Pa. Tel. MA 1-3500, extensions 7146, 7141. 
J. Allen Figure!, Ph.D., Prin. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VIII. 

Enr Boys 120, Girls 90. Fac full 10, part-time 3. Staff 1. 

Tui $375-475. Scholarships. Est 1931. 

Plant $650,000. Class rms 10. Lib 2500 vols. 

Now a laboratory school, this is an outgrowth of the Community 
School established in 1922, and was presented to the University by 
Leon Falk, Jr. Under Stuart Ikeler, who had headed a number of 
progressive elementary schools, upper grades were added and the 
University's School of Education has assumed more direct super- 
vision. Mr. James F. Gray was principal from 1954 to 1957, at 
which time Dr. J. Allen Figurel was appointed. 



SHADY SIDE ACADEMY 
Bdg Boys Ages 13-18; Day- Boys 5-18 

Pittsburgh, Pa. Sr Sch Fox Chapel Rd; Jr Sch 400 S. Braddock 
Ave. Tel. (Sr Sch) Sterling 1-2400; (Jr Sch) Penhurst 1-7280. 

George L. Follansbee, A.B., Princeton, Head; Alan B, McMillen, 
A. B., Hamilton, M.A., Columbia, Head Jr Sch. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art 
Music Typing. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg 125, Day 355. Elem 200, Sec 280. Fac full 34, part-time 
8, 

Grad '5750. Entd Col '5748. (Lehigh 5, Bucknell 4, Harvard 
3, Bowdoin 3, Penn State 3, Dickinson 3). Alumni 2800. 

Tui Bdg $1700-1850 (+$70), Day $340-975. Scholarships full 11, 
partial 30 ($25,000). Est 1881. Inc nonprofit. 
Summer Session and Camp. Tui variable. 

Plant $5,000,000. Endowment $265,000. Dorm rms 74. Class rms 
36. Lib 6400 vols. Labs 3. Studios 3. Shops 2. Gyms 2. Fields 8, 
Courts 8. Golf course. 

Founded in Allegheny by W. R. Crabbe, moved to Pittsburgh 
two years later, and to its present Fox Chapel site in 1922 during 
the regime of Harold A. Nomer, when the boarding department 
was organized, this absorbed the Arnold School in 1940 and now 
the senior and junior schools have separate campuses. In 1944 
Dr. Erdman Harris, previously head of the department of religion 



Penn. Middle Atlantic States 305 

at Lawrenceville, succeeded Roger B. Merriam, Jr., former princi- 
pal of Arnold. Mr. Follansbee, a graduate of Shady Side, and for- 
merly on the faculty of Phillips Academy, was appointed in 1953. 
Enrolling both boarding and day students from leading families 
of Pittsburgh, the academy emphasizes strong college preparatory 
work and sends graduates to Yale, Princeton, Lehigh, Carnegie, 
Bowdoin, Harvard, among others. There are many activities, in- 
cluding dramatics, art, music, various clubs, publications, and 
sports. In 1954 the new Memorial Hall chapel-auditorium was 
completed, and in 1955 a new science wing. 

THE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL 

Of Tutoring 
Day and Eve Coed Ages 12-21 

Pittsburgh 32, Pa. 5711 Howe St. Tel. EM 1-7182. 
L. McClure Lanning, B.S., Thiel Col, Head. 

Grades VII-yiII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Make-up courses 
Remedial Reading, 

Enr variable. Yr Adm 170. Fac full 21, part-time 24. 

Grad 5618. Entd Col '5617 (U of Pittsburgh 7, Carnegie 
Tech 3, Denison 2, West Point 2, Thiel 2). 

Tui $1450. Est 1911. Proprietary. 

Summer Session. Enr 100. Tui $240 per credit, six to twelve wks. 

This college preparatory school of individualized instruction was 
established by Dr. J. B. Hench, from whom it was purchased in 
1931 by his associate, Guy H. Baskerville. In 1948 it was sold to 
Mr. Lanning, with the school since 1939. The intensive academic 
program, with its completely tutorial approach, successfully pre- 
pares most of its students for the University of Pittsburgh, with 
some graduates entering Carnegie, the University of Pa., West 
Point, Annapolis, M.I.T. 

In 1954 there was extensive remodeling of the building. 



WINCHESTER-THURSTON SCHOOL 
Bdg Girls Ages 14-18; Day Girls 5-18 

Pittsburgh 13, Pa. 4721 Fifth Ave. Tel. MAyflower 1-9900. 
Mary Frances Philput, B.A., Mt. Holyoke, M.A., Pittsburgh, Head,* 
Rachel McCormick Houston, B.A., Wellesley, M.Ed., Pittsburgh, 
Asst. Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. 

Enr Bdg 20, Day 290. Fac full 24, part-time 4. Staff 4. 

Grad '5748. Entd Col '5747. 

Tui Bdg $1650, Day $225-700. Est 1887. Inc 1954 nonprofit 

Dorm rms 11. Class rms 21. Lib 2350 vols. Lab. Studios music 
1, art 1. Gym. 



Penn. Leading Private Schools 306 

Deriving from schools begun by Alice Thurston and Elizabeth 
and Mary Mitchell, Winchester-Thurston was established in 1935 
and conducted by Mary Graham until her death in 1947. The 
sound college preparatory program, with its modern slant on the 
importance of the individual, sends graduates to Penn College for 
Women, Wellesley, Mt. Holyoke, Vassar, Sweet Briar, Wilson, 
and others. Art, dramatics, music, and publications are included 
in the activities program. The boarding department is on the five- 
day plan. Miss Philput succeeded the Very Rev. N. R. H. Moor 
in 1955. 

POTTSTOWN, PA. Pop 26,200. Alt 250 ft R R.R. 35 mi. NW of 
Philadelphia, Rts. U.S. 422 & 100. John Potts, a Colonial iron mas- 
ter, established on the Schuylkill River a community whicli de- 
veloped into this growing dairy farm and industrial city. Ursinus 
College is some 12 mi. E. The 187 acre school property of "The 
Hill," overlooks the town and valley. 



THE HILL SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 12-18 

Pottstown, Pa. Tel. F Acuity 6-1000. 
Edward T. Hall, B.A., M.A., Yale, Head. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4 Col Prep. Art Classical and Mod- 
ern Languages History Mathematics Music Religion Science 
Public Speaking. 

Enr Bdg 430, Day 30. Fac full-time 53. 

Grad '57113. Entd Col '57103. (Yale 15, Princeton 8, Dart- 
mouth 6, Brown 5, U of Pa. 5, Washington & Lee 5). Alumni 6071. 

Tui Bdg $2100 (+$200), Day $750. Scholarships partial 142 
($140,000). Self-help pgrm. Est 1851. Inc 1920 nonprofit. 

Summer Session (Wolfeboro, N.H.). Regular courses Make-up 
and Remedial courses. Tui $575. 

Plant $7,000,000. Endowment $1,000,000. Bonn rms 204. Class 
rms 34. Lib 21,000 vols. Labs 4. Studios music 3; art 1. Gym, 
Swimming pool. Fields 15. Courts 20. 

Now in its second century, this school rich in tradition has 
evolved an unusual program to prepare efficiently for college 
and to hold and develop the interest of the gifted boy to 
whom college requirements are but incidental. In "The Master of 
The Hill," Dr. W. Russell Bowie has told how John Meigs, son 
of the founder, Matthew Meigs, came to the school in 1876, at the 
age of 24, and in the following 35 years brought the school from 
an obscure venture with two teachers and 20 boys to an institu- 
tion of 40 masters and 375 boys. John Meigs, with a genius for 
organization, abounding vitality and a passionate zest for life, had 
extraordinary power over his fellow men and gave himself not to 



Penn. Middle Atlantic States 307 

their bending or breaking, but to their making. 

A new era of the school began in 1920 when the alumni took 
control. After the six year regime of Boyd Edwards, James I. 
Wendell, on the faculty since his graduation from college in 1913, 
was appointed head master in 1928. While retaining the school's 
essentially conservative aims, he greatly expanded the physical 
plant and the educational program which has pioneered in preven- 
tive medicine, in fuller utilization of the library, and in audio- 
visual education. At the time of the Centennial celebration, which 
attracted nation-wide attention, Dr. Wendell announced his re- 
tirement after 24 years of active leadership. Taking over the school 
after this long and fruitful period of growth and development, Mr. 
Hall, a New Englander with earlier teaching experience at Phil- 
lips Academy, was called from the assistant head mastership of 
St. Mark's. He has instituted entrance examinations, established a 
prefect system and student council, and introduced new courses 
in the humanities, including Greek, a two-year 'humanities se- 
quence 1 , English history, and fine arts work. 

The academic curriculum includes broad emphasis on the hu- 
manities while meeting requirements for a wide variety of univer- 
sities. Graduates favor Princeton and Yale, while others go on to 
Cornell, the University of Pa., Dartmouth, and Duke. Extra-cur- 
ricular activities include athletics, music, journalism, dramatics, 
aviation, radio. The excellent facilities for these and other pro- 
grams have been made possible through large gifts of loyal alumni. 

See also page 706 

SALTSBURG, PA. Pop 1156. Alt 852 ft. P R.R. 35 mi. E of 
Pittsburgh, Rt.80. Across the Kiskiminetas River from the town, 
the school is high above the valley. 

KISKIMINETAS SPRINGS SCHOOL 
Bdg-~ Boys Ages 14-18 

Saltsburg, Pa. Tel MErcury 5-1501. 
John A. Pidgeon, A.B., Bowdoin, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. English Mathematics History 
Languages. 

Enr Bdg 195, Day 5. Fac full 20, part-time 2. Staff 3. 

Grad '5773. Entd Col '5773. Alumni 4200. 

Tui Bdg $2000 (+$150), Day $600. Scholarships full 3, partial 
35 ($25,000). Est 1888. Inc 1941 nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Remedial Reading. Enr 65. Tui $450, eight wks. 

Plant $1,000,000. Dorm rms 117. Class rms 26. Lib 2750 vols. 
Lab. Studios music 3, art 1. Gym. Swimming pools 2. Fields 4. 
Courts 8. Golf course. 

For further information, write Porter Sargent 



Penn. Leading Private Schools 308 

Mr. Pidgeon, a New Englander and for nine years at Deerfield 
Academy where he served as administrative assistant to Frank 
Boyden, was appointed in 1957, Dr. A. W. Wilson was among 
the founders and long director. Dr. L. M. Clark introduced many 
innovations from 1941 to 1957 while remodeling and revitalizing 
the curriculum. The Kiski Plan, started in 1943 as a one-subject 
program was modified in 1956 to an arrangement whereby each stu- 
dent concentrates on two subjects for a semester, permitting him to 
complete four subjects in an academic year. The plan has won 
approval from the students, the faculty, and the parents, and has 
attracted boys from half the states and from a number of foreign 
countries. 

Also featured are two trips per year, with classes in German, 
French, or Spanish, to foreign cities. Graduates enter many dif- 
ferent colleges throughout the country, including Lehigh, Brown, 
Carnegie, Amherst, Stanford, Harvard, Princeton, Yale, Dart- 
mouth, M.I.T. There is a full program of activities, with special 
emphasis on languages. See also page 706 



SEWICKLEY, PA. Pop 5836. Alt 732 ft. P R.R. 12 mi. NW of 
Pittsburgh, Rt.88. This is a fashionable suburb on the Ohio River. 



SEWICKLEY ACADEMY 
Co Day Cood Ages 4*15 

Sewickley, Pa. Academy Ave. Tel. 1500. 
Clifford Nichols, Jr., A.B., Hobart, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1. Art 
Music French Latin. 

Enr Boys 145, Girls 180. Fac full 28, part-time 2. 

Grad '57 28. Entd Prep Sch '5728. (Madeira 4, Hill 3, Choate 
2, Hotchkiss 1, Chatham Hall 1, Andover 1). 

Tui $300-750. Scholarships full 13, partial 15 ($11,400). Est 1925. 
Inc 1925 nonprofit. 

The academy is the result of a merger in 1925 of two old insti- 
tutions, Sewickley Preparatory School established in 1899 and 
the Dickinson School. The present plant has been occupied since 
1929, and has recently been enlarged. The boys and girls are 
successfully prepared by the rather conservative curriculum to 
enter the large boarding schools. Mr. Nichols, grandson of the 
founder of the Nichols School in Buffalo, succeeded Edward M. 
Clarke in 1951. 

SHARON HILL, PA. Pop 5464. P R.R. 6 mi. from Philadelphia. 
Sharon Hill is a residential suburb of Philadelphia. 



Penn. Middle Atlantic States 309 

SCHOOL OF THE HOLY CHILD 
Day Girls Ages 13-19 

Sharon Hill, Pa. Calcon Hook Rd. Tel. LU 3-9745. 

Mother St. Christopher, B.A., Rosemont, M.A., Villanova, Prefect. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Art Music. Commercial. 

Enr 265. Fac full 13, part-time 5. 

Grad '5648. Entd Col '5625 (Rosemont 10, Gwynedd-Mercy 
3, Immaculata 3, U of Pa. 2, Penn State 2). Alumnae 1084. 

Tui $200. Scholarships full 4, partial 5, Est 1846. 
Roman Catholic. 

Class rms 12. Lib 4500 vols. Labs 2. Studios 3. Gym. 

The preparatory program of this school of the Sisters of the 
Society of the Holy Child, who also conduct Rosemont College in 
Pa., and schools in England, France, Italy, and Switzerland, sends 
graduates to the affiliated college and to Immaculata, Smith, 
Chestnut Hill, West Chester, Trinity, and others. The general 
curriculum includes commercial and art subjects. 

The small boarding class was discontinued in 1953. 

TYRONE, PA. Pop 8214. Alt 868 ft P R.R. 17 mi. NE of Al- 
toona, Rt ILS.220. The borough of Tyrone is between Pittsburgh 
and Philadelphia. The school, 3 mi. E, is on high land. 

THE GRIER SCHOOL 
Bdg Girls Ages 12-18 

Tyrone, Pa. Tel. Mutual 4-3000. 

Thomas C. Grier, B.S., MIT, Princeton, Head; Mrs. Grier, B.S., 

Simmons, Co-Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. 

Enr 160. Fac full 14, part-time 5. 

Grad '5744. Entd Col '57 37. (Mills 1, Smith 1, Goucher 1, 
Elmira 1, U of Buffalo 1, U of Mich 1). Alumnae 3136. 

Tui $1900 (+$50), Scholarships partial 16 ($5000). Est 1853. 
Inc 1957 nonprofit. 

Plant $1,150,000. Dorm rms 86. Class rms 10. Lib 4500 vols. Lab. 
Studios music 2, art 1. Gym. Swimming pool. Fields 2. Courts 5. 
Riding facilities. 

Incorporated in 1851 by a group of local citizens, and in 1857 
purchased by Dr. Lemuel G. Grier, the school has since been 
under the guidance of three generations of the Grier family. Alvan 
R. Grier succeeded his father in 1887. On his death in 1932, the 
school came into the capable hands of his son. 

The school offers both a general and a college preparatory cur- 
riculum, with an average of 75% of the girls in the latter. 
Graduates enter many different colleges and universities, in- 
cluding Middlebury, Radcliffe, Stanford, Conn. C, Mt, Holyoke, 



Penn. Leading Private Schools 310 

Wheaton, Skidmore, among others. The location and the build- 
ings and grounds add mellow charm. The girls have a wholesome 
life much in the open, with many social and athletic activities. 
See also page 767 



WAYNE, PA. Pop 5300. Alt 404 ft P R.R. J4 mi. NW of Phila- 
delphia, Rt U.S.30. Wayne is a Main Line suburb. The Academy 
occupies St. Luke's property, refurbished, modernized, and 
added to. 

VALLEY FORGE MILITARY ACADEMY 

Bdg Boys Ages 14-20 
Wayne, Pa. Radnor and Eagle Rds. Tel. 1800. 
Lt. Gen. Milton G. Baker, A.B., St. John's, LL.D., Gettysburg, 

P.D., Temple, Supt. 

High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep, Sociology Economics. . 
Remedial Reading. ROTC. 

Jr Col 1-2. Liberal Arts Business Administration. 

Enr 830. Fac full-time 69. 

Grad '57225. Entd Col '57166. Alumni 4242. 

Tui $1778 (+$400). Scholarships full 4, partial 65 ($97,000). 
Est 1928. Inc 1944 nonprofit. 

Summer Session and Camp. Tui $450. 

Plant $7,200,000. Dorm rms 415. Class rms 49. Lib 11,300 vote. 
Labs 4. Gyms 2. Swimming pool. Fields 8, Courts 8. Riding facili- 
ties. 

Administered in a businesslike way by General Baker, this pros- 
perous and popular academy has a large enrollment recruited from 
all over the country. High school students are prepared not only 
for the junior college department but also for senior colleges and 
universities throughout the country. Athletics and the military 
life are naturally stressed, but there are also many activity and 
interest clubs. Each year sees additions to the plant. See page 707, 



WESTTOWN, PA. Pop (twp) 994. P R.R. 24 ml SW of Phila- 
delphia, Westtown is five mi from West Chester on the main line, 
retains a rural air, and many large estates among which the 600- 
acre campus occupied by the Westtown School has many and 
varied attractions. 

WESTTOWN SCHOOL 
Bdg -Coed Ages 12*19; Day Coed 6-16 

Westtown, Pa. Tel. Export 9-0123. 

Daniel D. Test, Jr., A.B., Haverford, A.M., Columbia, Head. 

Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music Agricul- 
ture Home Economics Speech. Remedial Reading. 



Perm. Middle Atlantic' States 311 

Enr Bdg Boys 135, Girls 140; Day Boys 95, Girls 100. Elem 155, 
Sec 325. Fac full 44, part-time 10. Staff 6. 

Grad '57 84. Entd Col '57 80. (Haverford 9, Earlham 7, Cor- 
nell 5, Penn St. 5, Oberlin 4, Bryn Mawr 3). Alumni 4584. 

Tui Bdg $1475 (+ $50-75), Day $300-650. Scholarships partial 
150 ($72,000). Est 1799. Friends. 

Plant $2,750,000. Endowment $2,250,000. Dorm rms 130. Class 
rms 20. Lib 23,000 vols. Labs 5. Studios music 8, art 2. Gyms 
3* Swimming pool. Fields 10. Courts 18. 

This ancient Quaker school, for the children of Friends and still 
giving preference to them, with both boarding and day enrollment,, 
has had a notable succession of head masters who have developed 
it to its present status. With wide horizons, it draws its students 
today from the entire country and abroad and admits limited 
numbers who are not members of the Society of Friends but who 
are in sympathy with its purposes and ideals. A loyal body of 
alumni have aided in the growth and expansion of this endowed 
school. James Walker, principal from 1925, was succeeded by Mr. 
Test, an alumnus and former faculty member, who previously 
taught at Williston and the William Penn Charter School. 

Strong college preparatory work is supplemented by programs 
offering adaptability to varying interests and pursuits, including 
agriculture and home economics, while activities clubs, publica- 
tions, music and sports are popular. With practical insight and 
sound methodology, students obtain sound academic training and 
attend both Quaker and other leading colleges and universities. 
See also page 824 

WILKES-BARRE, PA. Pop 76,826. Alt 642 ft. LV R.R. 20 mi 
SW of Scranton, Rt.315. Wilkes-Barre and neighboring Scranton 
form the business center of this anthracite coal mining district. 
Just across the Susquehanna, in Kingston, is the time-honored 
Seminary and its more recent acquisition, the Day School. 

WYOMING SEMINARY 
Bdg and Day -Coed Ages 13*21 

Kingston, Pa. N. Sprague Ave. Tel Butler 7-1126. 

Ralph W. Decker, A.B., Wesleyan, M.A., S.T.B., Ph.D., Boston 

Univ., Pres; James A. Adams, B.A., Univ of Me., M.A., Columbia, 

Dean. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Post Grad 1-2 (Commercial, Music). 
Art Music Speech Mechanical Drawing. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg Boys 135, Girls 70; Day Boys 160, Girls 145. Fac full 
43, part-time 7. 

Grad '57142. Entd Col '57 127. (Penn State 15, Wilkes 11, 
Annapolis 8, U of Pa 8, Lehigh 6, Bucknell 5). Alumni 6500. 



Perm. Leading Private Schools 312 

Tui Bdg $1500 (+$50), Day $515. Scholarships full 9, partial 139 
($60,000). Self-help pgrm. Est 1844. Methodist. 

Summer Session, Make-up courses. Enr 225. Tui $50-85 seven 
wks. 

Plant $4,000,000. Endowment $3,000,000. Dorm rms 116. Class 
rms 30. Lib 8500 vols. Labs 3. Studios music 10, art 1. Gyms 2. 
Swimming pool. Fields 3. Courts 4. 

This is the parent institution and largest unit of the group of 
five schools conducted here. Dr. Wilbur H. Fleck, president since 
1936, was succeeded in 1949 by Dr. Decker, who was formerly on 
the faculty of Boston University. 

Modern and well equipped, the school offers boys and girls of 
the region preparation for college, with graduates entering Penn 
State, Wilkes, Lafayette, Lehigh, Syracuse, the University of Pa , 
Dickinson, and others. The school offers a large choice of 
electives in music, art, public speaking, and business. The exten- 
sive extra-curricular program includes athletics, many student 
societies and clubs, music, dramatics, publications, and religious 
groups. 

The Dean School of Business is directed by Mary K. Ichter; 
and the Wyoming Seminary School of Music by Carl F. Roth. 



WYOMING SEMINARY DAY SCHOOL 
Day .... Coed Ages 6-14 

Forty Fort, Pa. 1560 Wyoming Ave. Tel Butler 8-5431. 
Ralph W. Decker, Pres; Jackson Bird, A.B. Harvard, Head. 

Grades I-VIII Art Music French Latin. 

Enr Boys 115, Girls 105. Fac full 17, part-time 3. 

Grad '57 -31. Entd Prep Sch '57 Wyoming Sem. 27, Brooks 1, 
Choate 1, Scranton Prep 1, Masters 1. 

Tui $380-500 (+$160-210). Scholarships full 11, partial 10 
($5,000). Est 1854. Methodist. 

Summer Session. Tui $50 per course for seven wks. 

Summer Camp. Fee $100. 

Plant $900,000. Classrooms 16. Lib 4500 vols. Lab. Studios music 
2, art 1. Gym. Fields 2. 

Since 1951 the elementary day school of Wyoming Seminary, 
this traces back to the Wilkes-Barre Institute, founded in 1854 
and the Wilkes-Barre Academy, established in 1878, which merged 
in 1939. The school has long been recognized for its thoroughness 
of preparation and its honesty of purpose, Mr. Bird was formerly 
on the faculty of Hawken School. 

PAYNE PETTEBONE HOUSE, coeducational day school, 
enrolling approximately 50 children, was donated to the trustees 
of Wyoming Seminary in 1954 and serves the pre-preparatory 
grades. 



Perm. Middle Atlantic States 313 

WYNNE WOOD, PA. Pop 1000, Alt 316 ft. P R.R. 7 mi. W of 
Philadelphia. In this Main Line suburb is the Agnes Irwin School 
and Montgomery Country Day School. 



THE AGNES IRWIN SCHOOL 
Co Day Girls Ages 4-18 

Wynnewood, Pa. Clothier Rd. Tel MI 2-4880. 
Mrs. Grier Bartol, A.B., Vassar, Head. 

Pre-Sch Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col 
Prep. Art Music Economic Geography Home Nursing. 

Enr 370. Elem 230, Sec 140. Fac full 36, part-time 5. 

Grad '57 26. Entd Col '5722. (Colby Jr 4, U of Pa 2, Welles- 
ley 1, Cornell 1, Middlebury 1, Connecticut 1). Alumnae 2044. 

Tui $350-850. Scholarships full 3, partial 15 ($6495). Est 1869. 
Inc 1917 nonprofit. 

Plant $545,000. Endowment $102,230. Class rms 28. Lib 6800 
vols. Labs 2. Studios music 2, art 2. Gym. 

Today, as formerly, patronized by the more conservative of 
Philadelphia families, this school was founded by Miss Agnes 
Irwin, who in 1894 was appointed first dean of Radclifre College. 
Her sister, Sophy Dallas Irwin, conducted the school unit 1915, 
when she was succeeded by Josephine A. Natt, head mistress until 
1928. When Bertha M. Laws retired in 1934, Mrs. Bartol was co- 
head with Edith Murphy until the resignation of the latter in 1948. 

Now occupying two separate buildings on Lancaster Pike in 
Wynnewood, the school offers a college preparatory program 
emphasizing individual adjustment and special remedial periods. 
Graduates enter a diversity of colleges, including not only the 
University of Pa., Smith, and Wheaton, but also Vassar, Rad- 
cliffe, and others. There is also a program which prepares for 
junior colleges and art schools. Student government, art, music 
dramatics, publications, and clubs are among extra-curricular ac- 
tivities. 

MONTGOMERY COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 10-15; Day Coed 4-15 

Wynnewood, Pa. Tel. Midway 2-0144. 

Rev. Michael Martin, B.A., B.D., M.Ed., Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1 . 

Enr Bdg 5; Day Boys 70, Girls 40. Fac full 12, part-time 3. 

Tui Bdg $1700 (+$100), Day $350-675. Scholarships partial 10 
($2000). Est 1915. Inc 1938 nonprofit. 

Sending many of its graduates to Episcopal Academy, Haver- 
ford School, Shipley, Baldwin, Agnes Irwin,' as well as to New 



Perm. Leading Private Schools 314 

England boarding schools, this derives from the Montgomery 
School which was established by the Rev. Gibson Bell in 1915. 
When it was reorganized in 1938, with an executive council of 
former teachers, Miss Ann Almy and Miss Louise Ratledge were 
appointed co-directors. 

Upon their retirement in 1954, the present head master, formerly 
chaplain at St. Mark's School in Mass,, and head master of Casady 
School in Okla., succeeded. 

The school provides numerous activities, including a full athletic 
schedule, 



YORK, PA. Alt 370 ft Pop 59,704. An industrial town marked by 
rapid growth in recent years, it is in the midst of Pennsylvania 
Dutch farming communities. 



YORK COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 
Coed Ages 5y 2 -18 

York, Pa. 1071 Country Club Rd. Tel. 2-6631. 

J. Kenneth Snyder, A.B., Albright, A.M., Univ of Pa., Head. 

Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Music Public Speak- 
ing Art Dramatics. 

Enr Boys. 100, Girls 80. Elem 75, Sec 105. Fac full 16, part- 
time 4. Staff 2. 

Grad '57 13. Entd Col '5713 (Elmira 3, Wellesley 1, Smith 1, 
Middlebury 1, Pembroke 1, Goucher 1). 

Tui $450-525. Est 1953. Inc 1953 nonprofit. 

This modern school has met unusual response from the com- 
munity and has developed a traditional educational program with 
the first graduates of 1957 well placed in colleges. The new sub- 
urban plant was occupied in 1956, and in 1958 the lower grades 
added. See also page 818 



For explanation of data and statistics included for each school* con- 
sult the Explanatory Note at the beginning of the Descriptive Text 
and the Introduction* 

If you do not find the right school for your child) write, stating 
particulars, to Porter Sargent, 11 Beacon St., Boston 8, Mass. 

Fof further schools in any area, refer to the Supplementary Lists, 



DELAWARE 

CLAYMONT, DEL. Pop 900. Alt 28 ft. P R.R. 7 mi. N of Wil- 
mington, Rt U.S.13. Amidst large estates, Claymont, on the Phila- 
delphia Pike, is a community on the Delaware. The state indus- 
trial school for girls is located here. The Catholic school occupies 

48 acres overlooking the river. 

ARCHMERE ACADEMY 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 14-18 

Claymont, Del. Tel. Sycamore 8-6858. 

Very Rev. Justin E. Diny, B.A., St. Norbert Col, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Mechanical Drawing Typing Soci- 
ology Music. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg 40, Day 175. Fac full-time 16. 

Grad '5741. Entd Col '5738. (Notre Dame 6, Georgetown 6, 
U of Del. 4, St. Joseph 3, LaSalle 3, Villanova 2). Alumni 528. 

Tui Bdg $1300 (+$25), Day $350. Scholarships ($4,000). Est 
1932. Inc nonprofit. Roman Catholic. 

Dorm rms 8. Class rms 9. Lib 3100 vols. 
Labs 3. Gym. Fields 4. Courts 2. 

This school under Norbertine canons draws its day enrollment 
from Wilmington and environs. The majority of college prepara- 
tory graduates enter Catholic colleges and universities, including, 
St. Norbert, Villancva, Georgetown, Notre Dame, although many 
attend the University of Delaware. 

MIDDLETOWN, DEL. Pop 1755. Alt 67 ft 25 mi. SW of Wil- 
mington, on Rt.4. St. Andrew's occupies an estate on Noxontown 
Pond, in rich farming country 2 mi. S of Middletown. 

ST. ANDREW'S SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 12-19 

Middletown, Del. Tel. Frontier 8-9511. 
Robert A. Moss, A.B., Princeton, Head. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music Lan- 
guages Zoology, Developmental Reading. 

Enr 155. Fac full 19, part-time 7. Staff 4. 

Grad '5730. Entd Col '5728. (Brown 3, Yale 3, Princeton 2, 
Wesleyan 2, Delaware 2, Johns Hopkins 2), Alumni 630. 

Tui $500-1800 (+$175-200). Scholarships full 4, partial 115 

315 



Del f Leading Private Schools 316 

($75,100). Est 1930. Inc nonprofit. Episcopal. 

Plant $3,500,000. Endowment $13,330,283. Dorms 2, Dorm rms 
54. Class rms 17. Lib 7500 vols. Labs 3. Studios music 2, art 1. 
Gym. Fields 7. Courts 9, 

Generously endowed by Alexis Felix du Pont, this Episcopal 
school offers boys a rigorous and simple program. Rev. Walden 
Pell, a St. Mark's graduate, head master from the founding, de- 
veloped sound scholarship and a loyal following during his. ad- 
ministration. Tuition is determined by the parents' resources and 
every boy shares in the upkeep and chores. William H. Cameron, 
acting head master, succeeded Mr. Pell in 1957. Mr. Moss was ap- 
pointed head master in 1958. 

The curriculum, entirely college preparatory, includes courses in 
zoology, sacred studies, and much music, as well as developmen- 
tal reading. Graduates are prepared for Princeton, Yale, Univer- 
sity of Va. f Trinity, Washington and Lee, Brown, and other col- 
leges. There is a wide range of activities, including many hobby 
and interest clubs, and athletics. See also page 708 

WILMINGTON, DEL. Pop 110,356. Alt 134 ft B&O; P R.R. 25 

mi. SW of Philadelphia, Pa., Rt U.S.13. Delaware laws have lured 
great corporations to establish their legal offices in Wilmington, 
often in one room for the annual meeting. The du Ponts, famed 
for their products for war and peace, have long been influential. 
Du Pont money has been contributed to the public schools and to 
the building of Tower Hill adjacent to Rockford Park. Just out- 
side the city limits is the campus of Friends School. Sanford 
School is 9 tni. W. 

FRIENDS SCHOOL 
Co Day Coed Ages 5-19 

Wilmington 3, Del. 101 School Rd., Alapocas. Tel. OLympia 

5-6251. 

Wilmot R. Jones, A.B., Haverford, A.M., Harvard, Prin, 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep Gen- 
eral. Art Music Mechanical Drawing. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Boys 220, Girls 195. Elem 255, Sec 160. Fac full 29, part- 
time 3. 

Grad '5739. Entd Col '5737. (U of Va 3, Duke 2, Wellesley 
*2, Cornell 1, Harvard 1, Princeton 1). Alumni 1800. 

Tui $375-650. Scholarships full 3, partial 31 ($12,000). Est 1748. 
Friends. 

Located since 1937 on a beautiful 21-acre country day campus 
just outside the city limits, this is one of the oldest independent 
schools in the country, and appeals to conservative families of 
Wilmington and surrounding communities. Mr. Jones, formerly 
associate principal at Sid well, and appointed here in 1935, has 



Del Middle Atlantic States 317 

done much to develop plant and academic and extra-curricular 
programs. The curriculum is almost entirely college preparatory, 
and the school was one of the first to introduce the 'Kenyon 
Plan' for study for advanced standing in college. A feature of the 
school is the development of individual responsibility through an 
unusually extensive program of pupil participation in the directing 
of student activities. 

Although enrollment is inter-denominational, the religious ideals 
of the Society of Friends are stressed at all levels. 

SANFORD PREPARATORY SCHOOL 
Bdg Coed Ages 3-19; Day Coed 4-14 

Hockessin, Del. Tel. Cedar 9-5263. 

Ellen Q. Sawin, B.L., Smith, M.A., Univ of Del., Head. 

Pre-Nursery Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High 
Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep General. Art Music Home 
Economics Typing Shop. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg Boys 75, Girls 65; Day Boys 50, Girls 30. Elem 120, 
Sec 100. Fac full 19, part-time 6. 

Grad '5723. Entd Col '5717. (U of Del 2, Cedarcrest 1, Cor- 
nell 1, Haverford 1, Syracuse 1, Wheaton 1). Alumni 293. 

Tui Bdg $1650 (+$125), Day $600. Scholarships. Est 1930. Inc 
1937 nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Tui $400. Summer Camp. Fee $400. 

Plant $1,600,000. Dorm rms 63. Class rms 24. Lib 8000 vols. Lab. 
Studios music 2, art 2. Gym, Outdoor swimming pool. Fields 3. 
Courts 2. School farm. 

From a small elementary group Mrs. Sawin has built two well 
organized schools. The preparatory program, of good academic 
standing and having unusual electives, sends graduates not only to 
the University of Delaware, but also to various other college 
and universities. The school provides for many activities, in- 
cluding music, dramatics, dancing, student government, and agri- 
culture, as well as a full program of sports. 

SUNNY HILLS LOWER SCHOOL, separately housed, en- 
rolls children from two to twelve years. A summer camp for chil- 
dren under twelve makes possible year round care. See page 825 

THE TATNALL SCHOOL 
Day Girls Ages 3-17, Boys 3-10 

Wilmington 5, Del. Barley Mill Rd. Tel. WY 8-2292. 

Mrs. Robert Lee Myers, B.A., Mt. Holyoke, M.A., Temple, Prin. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col 
Prep General. Art Music French Crafts. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Girls 250, Boys 110. Elem 300, Sec 60. Fac full 41, part-time 
9. 

Grad '576. Entd Col '574. (U of Del 2, Goucher 1, U of Pa 



Del Leading Private Schools 318 

1). Alumnae 167. 

Tui $275-450. Scholarships full 6, part-time 163 ($30,000). Est 
1930. Inc 1939 nonprofit. 

Established by Mrs. Henry Lea Tatnall, this school provides 
enriched college preparatory and general curricula, with a corre- 
lated arts program for grades eight through twelve, in which art, 
music, architecture, furniture, crafts, dance, and other phases of 
a chosen period are studied. Among extra-curricular activities are 
music, dramatics, dance, publications, sports, and various clubs. 
See also page 826 

TOWER HILL SCHOOL 
Co Day Coed Ages 4-19 

Wilmington 6, Del. 2813 W. 17th St. Tel. OLympia 8-7191. 
Rev. W. Brooke Stabler, A.B., Univ of Va., B.D., Va. Theological 
Sem, M.A., Univ of Pa., L.H.D. (Hon), Kenyon, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col 
Prep. Art Music Mechanical Drawing Religion Typing. Shop. 
Developmental Reading. 

Enr Boys 285, Girls 265. Elem 390, Sec 160. Fac full 49, part- 
time 3. 

Grad '5731. Entd Col '5730. (Yale 2, Princeton 2, Duke 2, 
U of Del 2, Dartmouth 1, Wellesley 1). Alumni 624. 

Tui $300-675. Scholarships full 27, partial 23 ($24,150). Est 1919. 
Inc 1919 nonprofit 

Plant $1,822,600. Endowment $1,490,700. Class rms 42. Lib 10,000 
vols. Labs 3. Studios 4. Shops 2. Gym. Fields 4. Courts 8. 

Tower Hill became one of the notable country day schools of 
the country under Burton P. Fowler in his 20 years as head 
master. He used the excellent equipment and funds furnished by 
the du Pont family to far-reaching beneficial effect, through co- 
operation with other schools, public and private, not only in Wil- 
mington but throughout the state and further afield. Mr, Stabler, 
who succeeded James S. Guernsey in 1950, spent his early years 
in Wilmington, has served in a number of educational institutions 
and churches in that neighborhood, and had been head master of 
Cranbrook since 1944. The curriculum, with a wide variety of 
electives, prepares for many colleges, including Wesleyan, Prince- 
ton, Mt. Holyoke, Yale, Vassar, Cornell. Among extra-curricular 
activities are art, dramatics, music and publications. 



MARYLAND 

ARNOLD, MD. Pop 3219 with adjacent Fairhope. B&An. R.R. 

This town of Anne Arundel County is 6 mi. from Annapolis. 

WROXETER-ON-SEVERN SCHOOL 
Bdg- Boys Ages 6-15; Day Coed 6-15 

Arnold, Md. Tel. COlonial 3-5129. 

Maj. George Hall Duncan, B.F.A., Johns Hopkins U Maryland 

Inst, Head. 

Grades I-VIII. Music Dramatics French Algebra Man- 
ual Arts. 

Enr Bdg 20; Day Boys 65,, Girls 30. Yr Adni 15. Fac full 10, 
part-time 4. Staff 5. 

Tui Bdg $1550, Day $460-635. Extra c $125. Est 1947. Inc 1947 
nonprofit. 

Summer Camp. Tui $460. 

Educating for preparatory schools, Wroxeter-on-Severn offers a 
closely coordinated program which includes French, music, art, 
and expression. Many sports are offered, with emphasis on equi- 
tation. 

BALTIMORE, MD. Pop 949,708. Alt to 445 ft. 35 mi. NE of 
Washington, D.C., Rt. U.S. 1. Chief city in the state and sixth 
largest in the U.S., Baltimore retains much of its local color, 
customs and cuisine, though industrial plants have crowded in. 
To its most famous citizen and America's most articulate boobo- 
phobe, H. L. Mencken, it had the "frowsy, unkempt, out-at-elbow, 
forlorn air of a third-rate lodging house." It was here he spent 
most of his "Happy," "Heathen," and "Newspaper Days." On the 
Patapsco River, just below the city, the British fleet was repulsed 
in Revolutionary days. Tourists flock to the Walters Gallery, 
where Francis Scott Key's "The Star Spangled Banner" is pre- 
served in the original. Otto Mergenthaler perfected the linotype 
here toward the end of the last century, and today the city is a 
center for printing and publishing. 

At Johns Hopkins was instituted the first graduate school for 
research in higher education, and here the first country day school 
was established. Peabody Institute and a few private schools are 
still in the city. Goucher College for women in 1942 moved to its 
new suburban campus. In the suburb of Roland Park are Calvert 

319 



Md. Leading Private Schools 320 

School, Johns Hopkins University, Oilman and Roland Park 
Country Schools, Bryn Mawr School and the schools of Notre 
Dame of Maryland. St. Paul's is in Brooklandville; Loyola High 
School in Towson. In Mt Washington are Mount St. Agnes for 
Girls and Mount Washington Country School. Mount de Sales 
Academy is 6 mi. W in Catonsville. 

THE BOYS' LATIN SCHOOL OF BALTIMORE 
Day Ages 6-19 

Baltimore 1, Md. 1008-1020 Brevard St. Tel VE 7-3369. 
Frederick A. Hahn, A.B., Johns Hopkins, Head. 

Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. 

Enr 180. Fac full 11, part-time 3. 

Grad '56 14. Entd Col '5612. 

Tui $360-520, Scholarships 7. Est 1844. Inc 1898. 

Plant $110,000. Class rms 10. Lab. Gym. 

Founded by Evert M. Topping, a Princeton professor, this 
school continues its intensive preparation for college under the 
direction of Mr. Hahn, and sends graduates to Johns Hopkins, 
Princeton, the universities of Md. and Va., and others. 

THE BRYN MAWR SCHOOL 
Co Day Girls Ages 4-18 

Baltimore 10, Md. W. Melrose Ave. Tel IDlewood 5-2034. 
Katharine Van Bibber, A.B., Bryn Mawr, M.A., Columbia, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art 
Music Latin Greek. 

Enr 535. Elem 375, Sec 160. Fac full 36, part-time 24. 

Grad '5737. Entd Col '5735. (Vassar 3, Sweet Briar 3, Hol- 
lins 3, Radcliffe 2, Bryn Mawr 1). Alumnae 1450. 

Tui $360-700. Scholarships partial 110 ($15,000). Est 1885. Inc 
nonprofit, 

Plant $650,000. Class rms 32. Lib 7500 vols. Labs 3. Studios 
music 2, art 1. Gyms 2. Fields 4. Courts 7, 

Founded by Mary Elizabeth Garrett especially to prepare for 
Bryn Mawr, and in its early days having the support of M. Gary 
Thomas, this school adopted the country day program when it 
moved to its present site in the early thirties. Miss Van Bibber, 
formerly at Brearley, in 1939 succeeded Janet Howell Clark, and 
continues to emphasize scholastic standards with a highly trained 
and scholarly faculty. Graduates now enter not only Bryn Mawr 
but also Vassar, Goucher, Wheaton, Hollins, Sweet Briar. 



For further information, write Porter Sargent 



Md. Middle Atlantic States 321 

CALVERT SCHOOL 

Day and Home Instruction Coed Ages 4y 2 -14 
Baltimore 10, Md. Tuscany Rd. Tel. CH 3-6030. 
Edward Brown, B.S., Princeton, M.A., C.A.S.E., Johns Hopkins, 
Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sen 1. 

Enr Day Boys 175, Girls 165. Fac full 26, part-time 25. 

Tui Day $500-600, Home Instruction $40-115. Est 1897. Inc 
1897 nonprofit. 

This prominent Baltimore day school was under the direction 
of Virgil M. Hillyer, of wide and deserved reputation as the author 
,of successful books for parents and for children, from 1899 until 
his death in 1931. Donald W. Goodrich who followed him was suc- 
ceeded in 1940 by Mr. Brown, a former master at the neighboring 
Oilman Country School. Calvert has a self-perpetuating trustee 
board of substantial Baltimoreans, 

The Home Instruction program, parallel to the day curriculum, 
helps American parents in remote places to teach children at 
home. They are specially designed for parents without previous 
teaching experience or training. 



FRIENDS SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 3-18 

Baltimore 10, Md. 5114 N. Charles St. Tel. IDlewood 2800. 

Bliss Forbush, A.B., A.M., Univ of Chicago, LL.D., Morgan 

State, Head. 

Pre-Nursery Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High 
Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Art Music Typing Home Eco- 
nomics Mech Drawing. Remedial Reading English and Math. 
Tutoring. 

Enr Boys 303, Girls 310. Fac full 51, part-time 10. 

Grad '5740. Entd Col '5732. (Harvard 2, North Carolina 2, 
Smith 2, William & Mary 2, Williams 2, Carleton 1). 

Tui $360-775. Scholarships. Est 1794. Friends. 

Summer Session. Enr 25. Tui $100 per course for six wks. 

An old establishment, founded in the Quaker tradition, during 
the first quarter of the present century it was under the direction 
of Edward C. Wilson, and from 1927 in charge of William S. Pike. 
Mr. Forbush, associated with the school as instructor since 1923, 
succeeded E. C. Zavitz in 1943. Since 1935 all departments have 
been moved to the north residential section, and much equipment 
added, including athletic fields in 1947, a shop building in 19*48, and 
and an auditorium-classroom building in 1956, as well as a Meeting 
House. Graduates have entered many junior and senior colleges. 

When writing schools, please mention this Handbook 



Md. Leading Private Schools 322 

OILMAN SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 5-18 

Baltimore 10, Md. 5407 Roland Ave. Tel. TU 9-2210. 
Henry Hadden Callard, A.B., Johns Hopkins, A.M., Ed.M., Har- 
vard. Head. 

Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music Public 
Speaking. Remedial Reading. 

Enr 5-day Bdg 60, Day 575. Elem 390, Sec 245. Fac full 44, part- 
time 14. 

Grad '57 42, Entd Col '57-42. (Princeton 11, Harvard 5, Vir- 
ginia 4, Trinity 3, Williams 3, Yale 3). Alumni 1600. 

Tui 5-day Bdg $1360-1420, Day $350-910. Scholarships full 1, 
partial 35 ($12,000). Est 1897. Inc nonprofit. 

Class rms 44. Lib 6000 vols. Labs 4. Studios music 2, art 2. 
Shop. Gym. Fields 10. Courts 9. 

A notable development in American education, this was, under 
its early name "Country School for Boys of Baltimore City," the 
first country day school in the nation. Resulting from a plan origi- 
nating with Mrs. Francis K. Carey, and with five-day boarding 
added early, the school moved to its present site in 1910, and the 
name changed a year later in honor of Daniel Coit Oilman, first 
president of Johns Hopkins. Mr. Callard succeeded E. Boyd Mor- 
row, head master from 1926 to 1943. With a solid preparatory cur- 
riculum supplemented by many electives and with career guidance 
and community study, Oilman sends graduates to Princeton, Johns 
Hopkins, Yale, the University of Va., Dartmouth, Harvard, and 
others. In addition to the limited work program, there are many 
opportunities in publications, writing, dramatics, and various 
hobby clubs. 

LOYOLA HIGH SCHOOL 
Co Day- Boys Ages 14-18 

Towson 4, Md. Tel VA 3-0601. 

Rev. Michael J. Blee, M.A., Ph.D., Prin. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep (Classical, Scientific). 

Enr 710. Fac full-time 35. 

Grad '56133. Entd Col '56121 (Loyola 87). 

Tui $310. Scholarships full 44, partial 70. Est 1852. Roman 
Catholic. 

After 82 years in Baltimore, this high school moved to the pres- 
ent country site. The Jesuit curricula, with their emphasis on the 
Greco-Roman as well as Christian tradition, prepare for college. 

MOUNT DE SALES ACADEMY OF THE VISITATION 
Day Girls Ages 14-18 

Catonsville 28, Md. Tel. RI 7-4580. 
Sister M. Placide Byrne, Dir. 
High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General Commercial. Music. 



Md. Middle Atlantic States 323 

Enr 130. Fac full 10, part-time 1. 

Tui $200. Scholarships full 3, partial 15. Est 1852. Roman Catho- 
lic. 

Class rms 8. Lab. Studios music 2. Riding facilities. 

Members of all denominations are enrolled at this school, con- 
ducted by the Sisters of the Visitation. Most preparatory graduates 
enter either Notre Dame College or Mt. St. Agnes. 

MOUNT SAINT AGNES SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 
Day Ages 13-18 

Mt Washington 9, Md. Tel. Mo 4-4000. 
Sister Mary Christopher, M.A., Prin. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. 

Enr 225. Fac full 8, part-time 3, 

Grad '5643. Entd Col '5620 (Mt. St. Agnes 8, Notre Dame 
of Md. 5, Villa Julie 3). 

Tui $300. Scholarships full 6 ($1800). Est 1867. Roman Catholic. 

This large, well organized institution is conducted by the Sis- 
ters of Mercy of the Union in the United States. Mt. St. Agnes 
College is affiliated. 

MOUNT WASHINGTON COUNTRY SCHOOL FOR BOYS 
Day Ages 6-14 

Mt. Washington 7, Md. Smith Ave. Tel. Mohawk 4-4000. 
Sister Mary Anna, Dir. 

Grades I- VIII. Art Music. Military Training. 

Enr 285. Fac full-time 8. 

Grad '5732. Entd Prep Sch '57 Loyola 17, Calvert Hall 12, 
Gilman \ 3 Alumni 1200. 1200. 

Tui $300. Est 1898. Roman Catholic. 

The young boys here enrolled under the direction of Sisters of 
the order that conducts the neighboring girls school, are given 
weekly military drills by an army officer. 

NOTRE DAME OF MARYLAND PREPARATORY SCHOOL 
Day Girls Ages 6-18 

Baltimore 10, Md. 4701 N. Charles St. Tel. IDlewood 5-0100 
Sister Mary Virginia, A.B., Notre Dame of Md. Col, M.A., Boston 
Col, Head. 

Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep Social-Scientific. Art 
Music Typing Homemaking, 

Enr 600. Elem 260, Sec 340. Fac full 37, part-time 5. 

Grad '57-70. Entd Col '57- 62 (Notre Dame 25, Mary Baldwin 
3, Trinity 2, Vassar 1, Syracuse 1). 

Tui $200-320 (+$100). Scholarships full 12, partial 25. Est 1873. 
Roman Catholic. 



Leading Private Schools 324 

Class rms 24. Lib 6891 vols. Labs 5. Studios music 8, art 1. 
Gym. Swimming pool. Fields 2. Courts 5. 

This day school, with preparatory departments occupying the 
original buildings and making use of the Byzantine chapel, enrolls 
girls of all denominations. The majority of preparatory graduates 
attend either the affiliated Notre Dame College or Villa Julie 
Junior College. There is a full extra-curricular program. 

THE PARK SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 4-18 

Baltimore 15, Md. 2901 Liberty Heights Ave. Tel. LA 3-1900. 
Robert A. Thomason, A.B., Univ of Mich., M.A., Teachers Col, 
Head. 

Kindergarten 1-2 Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. 
Art Drama Music Mechanical Drawing Shop History Math- 
ematics Science Honors Seminar Child Care. 

Enr Boys 220, Girls 215. Fac full 33, part-time 7. Staff 8. 

Grad '57 29. Entd Col '5725. (U of Mich. 2, Harvard 1, Co- 
lumbia 1, Cornell 1, Wilson 1, Duke 1). 

Tui $425-840. Scholarships full 63, partial 52. Work pgrm. Est 
1912. Inc 1912 nonprofit 

Plant $500,000. Class rms 24. Lib 5500 vols. Labs 2. Studios 
music 2, art 2, Gym. Fields 3. 

One of the first progressive institutions in the U.S. to be put on 
a substantial basis, Park was the laboratory school in which 
Eugene Randolph Smith worked out his methods that won na- 
tional prominence. 

Hans Froelicher, Jr., son of one of the founders and member 
of a Quaker family prominent in education for two generations, 
carried on the school's traditions from 1932. Mr. Thomason, 
former head of the Middle School of Horace Mann in New York 
City, was appointed in 1956. 

The curriculum, described as "modern" and broadly based on 
the principles of progressive teaching, offers sound liberal study 
which appeals to professional and professorial families of the city 
and builds academic skills and coordinates projects to relate broad 
social interests to the child. Though tests and quizzes are used, 
there are no final examinations. 

Graduates enter Hood, Goucher, Wellesley, Dartmouth, Harvard, 
Yale, Swarthrnore, Johns Hopkins, and many other colleges, as 
well as the University of Md. 

ROLAND PARK COUNTRY SCHOOL 
Co Day Boys Ages 5-8, Girls 5-18 

Roland Park 10, Md. 817 W. University Pkwy. Tel. TU 9-5757. 
Anne Healy, A.B., Wellesley, A.M., Middlebury, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art 
Music French. 



Md. Middle Atlantic States 325 

Enr Girls 430, Boys 60. Elem 350, Sec 140. Fac full 30, part- 
time 15, 

Grad '5728. Entd Col '5725. (Wellesley 2, Radcliffe 2, Mt. 
Holyoke 2, Vassar 2, Hollins 2). Alumnae 782. 

Tui $325-675. Scholarships full 4, partial 22 ($3800). Est 1894. 
Inc 1908 nonprofit. 

Class rms 25. Lib 5600 vols. Lab. Studios music 3, art 1. Gyms 
2. Courts 5. 

This modern country day school developed from the oldest 
school in Roland Park, a small group conducted from 1894 by 
the Misses Katharine and Adelaide Howard and from 1899 by the 
Misses Corinne Jackson and Bertha Chapman. The open air fea- 
ture, since discontinued, was begun by Nanna Duke Dushane, head 
from 1912 to 1922. Miss Healy succeeded Elizabeth M. Castle, who 
retired in 1950 after 28 years as head mistress. The buildings are 
now on the site occupied since 1915. 

Academic standards are high, and a wide range of courses is 
offered, especially in music, with the Peabody Conservatory main- 
taining a branch at the school. Graduates enter numerous colleges, 
including Goucher, Wellesley, Hollins, Randolph-Macon. Dramat- 
ics, arts and crafts, music, publications, and sports are among 
activities. 

ST. FRANCES ACADEMY 
Bdg and Day Girls Ages 12-18 

Baltimore 2, Md. 501 E. Chase St. Tel. Lexington 9-5794. 

Sister Mary of Good Counsel, B.A., Catholic Univ, M.A., Villanova, 

Prin. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep Home Economics Business. 

Enr Bdg 70, Day 180. Fac full-time 12. 

Grad '5642. Entd Col '5615 (Coppin STC 6, Morgan State 
5, Regis 1, Notre Dame 1, Duquesne 1). 

Tui Bdg $570 (+$90), Day $60. Scholarships full 1, partial 4. 
Est 1828. Roman Catholic. 

This school conducted by the Oblate Sisters of Providence 
provides preparatory, home economics, and business curricula. 



ST. PAUL'S SCHOOL 

Bdg - Boys Ages 10-18; Co Day Boys 5 -IB, Girls 5-9 
Brooklandville, Md. Tel. VA 5-4400. 

S. Atherton Middleton, A.B,, Johns Hopkins, M.S., Univ of Pa., 
Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col 
Prep. Music. 

Enr Bdg 35; Day Boys 415, Girls 40. Elem 310, Sec 180. Fac 
full 34, part-time 3. Adm Staff 3. 



Md. Leading Private Schools 

Grad '57 30. Entd Col '5727. (Washington & Lee 6, Kenyon 
2, Johns Hopkins 2, U of Va 2, U S Naval Acad 1, Trinity 1). 

Tui Bdg $1200 (+$100), Day $325-600 (+$25-250). Scholar- 
ships partial 90. Est 1849. Episcopal. 

Dorm rms 19. Class rms 21. Lib 5000 vols. Lab. Studio music 

1. Gym. Fields 6, 

The support of Baltimore's Old St. Paul's Church makes pos- 
sible the low rate of this preparatory school, which has a well 
known choir department, oldest of its kind in the country. Mr. 
Middleton succeeded George S. Hamilton in 1944. In 1952 the 
school moved to its present location, a portion of the Emerson 
estate. Many graduates go to Johns Hopkins and the University 
of Va., with others scattering to a number of different colleges 
and universities. Among extra-curricular activities are athletics, 
music, dramatics, clubs, and publications. 

SAMUEL READY SCHOOL 
Bdg Girls Ages 9-18; Day Girls 6-18 

Baltimore 29, Md. Baltimore Nat'l Pike. Tel. WI 5-3223, 
Evangeline Lewis, B.A., M.A., Univ of Mich., M.A. St. Andrews 
(Scotland), Head. 

Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General Secretarial 
Art Music Homemaking. . 

Enr Bdg 35, Day 125. Elem 110, Sec 50. Fac full 9, part-time 2. 

Grad '5712. Entd Col '5710. 

Tui Bdg $1500, Day $450-600. Scholarships. Self-help pgrm. Est 
1887. Inc nonprofit ,.,,. 

Plant $400,000, Endowment $800,000. Dorm rms 13. Lab. Studios 
music 1, art 1. Gym. Field. Courts 2. 

Originally founded by Samuel Ready for girls who had lost one 
or both parents, since 1949 this school has accepted paying stu- 
dents in both day and boarding departments as well as Foundation 
scholars supported by the original endowment Miss Lewis, who 
came in 1949 as the third head mistress, has reorganized and 
broadened the curriculum and added to the equipment Recent 
graduates have entered Goucher, the University of Md., and Mary- 
land S.T.C Activities include student and resident councils, ath- 
letics, and dramatics. The tradition of self-help at the Ready has 
been continued through the work program, and the home-school 
atmosphere retained. 

BETHESDA, MD. Pop 29,800. Alt 340 ft. B&O R.R. 7 ml NW 
of Washington, D.C., Rt U.S.240. This suburb of Washington is 
the seat of the National Institutes of Health, National Cancer 
Institute research center, -the Naval Medical Center, and a co- 
educational junior college 



Md. Middle Atlantic States 327 

GREEN ACRES SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 3-10 

Rockville, Md. 11701 Danville Dr. Tel. OLiver 2-2396. 
Jane H. Beais, B.S., U of Md., Dir. 

Pre-Nursery Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VI. 

Enr Boys 110, Girls 70. Fac full 9, part-time 14. 

Tui $375-475. Scholarships partial 6. Est 1934. Inc 1936 nonprofit 

Summer Day Camp. Tui $155 eight wks. 

Now situated in Montgomery County, Md., on the outskirts 
of Washington, this progressive school owned by the parents and 
teachers is directed by Miss Beals, who in 1954 succeeded Costa 
J. Leodas. 

In 1956 the school moved from Bethesda to its present location. 

LANDON SCHOOL 

Bdg - Boys Ages 10-18; Co Day Boys 8-18 
Bethesda 14, Md. Wilson Lane. Tel. OL 2-2223. 
Paul L. Banfield, A.B., A.M., St. John's Col, Head. 

Grades III- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music Latin 
Mathematics Languages. Handicrafts. 

Enr Bdg 30, Day 435, Elem 300. Sec 165. Fac full 35, part-time 1. 

Grad '5727. Entd Col '5727. (Princeton 7, Yale 4, Amherst 
2, Wesleyan 2, U of Pa 2, Haverford 1). Alumni 485. 

Tui Bdg $1675-1875 (+$100), Day $780-920. Scholarships. Est 
1929. Inc 1932 nonprofit. 

Summer Day Camp. Enr 175. Tui $215 eight wks. 

Plant $750,000. Lib 4000 vols. Lab. Studios music 1, art 1. 
Gym. Fields 9. Courts 7. 

Established in Washington by Mr. Banfield and occupying its 
present site since 1936, this school has had remarkable develop- 
ment. A lively, colorful life and good preparation for college, com- 
bined with certain responsibilities placed upon the boys for main- 
tenance of buildings and grounds, have made strong appeal to 
patrons. Graduates have entered Princeton, Yale, Lehigh, Amherst, 
and others. There are many extra-curricular activities, including 
dramatics, publications, music, and numerous sports. 



LONGFELLOW SCHOOL FOR BOYS 

Co Day Ages 8-18 

Washington 14, D.C. 5100 Edgemoor Lane. Tel. OL 4-5100. 
Reese Longfellow Sewell, B.S., Univ of Md., Head. 

Grades III- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Industrial Arts. 
Remedial Work. Tutoring. 
Enr 190. Fac full 16, part-time 3. Adm Staff 4. 
Tui $780-915. Scholarship partial 2 ($1000). Est 1934. 
Inc 1941 nonprofit. 



Md. Leading Private Schools 328 

Plant $150,000. Class rms 14. Lib 3000 vols. Lab. Studio art 1. 
Fields 3. Courts 3. 

Foun'ded as a boarding school for young boys by Mr. Sewell in 
College Park and moved to its present location in 1941, this school 
now limits its enrollment to day students. Devitt Preparatory 
School, established in 1919 was absorbed by Longfellow School 
in 1951. Much emphasis is placed on sound preparation for 
college and there is a sports program fitted to interests 
and abilities of each student. Small classes, remedial work, 
and individual instruction prepare the students for George Wash* 
ington, Georgetown, the Universities of Md. and Va M and other 
colleges. See also page 709 

OGDEN SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 4-18 

Bethesda 14, Md. Bradley Blvd. and Seven Locks Rd. Tel. 
OL 4-5678. 
Jean S. McKinley, B.A., Marshall, Vassar, Prin. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col 
Prep General. Art Music Scripture. Remedial Work. 

Enr Boys 10, Girls 10. Fac full 3, part-time 1. Adm Staff 2. 

Tui $600 (+$200), Est 1954. Proprietary. 

Summer Day Camp. Tutoring. Enr 50. Tui $150. 

Taking over "Sky Meadows," formerly site of the now closed 
Honeywell School, Mrs. McKinley has here established a con- 
servative country day school. 

CENTREVILLE, MD. Pop 1804. Alt 61 ft. Across Chesapeake 
Bay from Annapolis, Centreville, in an agricultural area, has many 
fine old historic houses. Gunston School's 300 acres border on the 
Corsica River. 

THE GUNSTON SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Girls Ages 12-18 

Centreville, Md. Tel. 213J. 
Mrs. Samuel Middleton, Dir. 

Grades VII- VIII1 High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. 

Enr 40. Fac full 5, part-time 1. 

Tui Bdg $1300 (+$120), Day $350. Est 1911. Episcopal. 

Plant $80,000. Dorm rms 10. Class rms 6. Lib 2500 vols. Courts 
5. Riding. Boating. 

Founded by Mr. and Mrs. Middleton for the education of their 
children and a few others, this home school's program includes 
water sports, gardening, and riding. There are facilities for non- 
English-speaking French students. 



When writing schools., please mention this Handbook 



Md. Middle Atlantic States 329 

CHARLOTTE HALL, MD. Pop 150. Alt 167 ft 35 mi. SE of 
Washington, D.C. In St. Mary's County near the Patuxent, this 
hamlet was named for Queen Charlotte of England. Here in 1698 
was established the first sanatorium in the Colonies. 

CHARLOTTE HALL SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day- Boys Ages 10-19 

Charlotte Hall, Md. Tel. Mechanics ville 48. 

Maj. M. D. Burgee, B.S., Univ of Md., M.A., Columbia, Prin. 

Grades VI-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General Commer- 
cial. Music Journalism. Military Training. 

Enr Bdg 145, Day 15. Fac full-time 9. 

Grad '5728. Entd Col '5721. Alumni 850. 

Tui Bdg $1195 (+$345), Day $445. Est 1774. Inc .nonprofit 

Plant $950,000. Class rms 9. Lib 5654 vols. Lab. Studio music L 
Gym. Swimming pool. Fields 4. Courts 2. 

In continuous operation since 1796, this school named in honor 
of the British queen offers a college preparatory program sending 
graduates to the University of Md., Western Md., Johns Hopkins, 
and others, as well as general and commercial curricula. Extra- 
curricular activities stress sports, and there are various literary 
societies, dramatics, music, and hobby clubs. Major Burgee, con- 
nected with the school since 1927, was appointed successor to CoL 
Benjamin Crowson in 1938. 

CHEVY CHASE, MD. Pop 1,971. Chevy Chase is a suburban 
community on the nocthwest outskirts of Washington. 

CHEVY CHASE COUNTRY SCHOOL 
Bdg Coed Ages 5-12; Day Coed 2i/ 2 -12 

Chevy Chase, Md. 17 Grafton St. Tel. OL 2-9873. 
Stanwood Cobb, A.B., Dartmouth, A.M., Harvard, Dir. 

Pre-Nursery Nursery Kindergarten Grades I- VI. 

Enr Bdg 10; Day Boys 35, Girls 40. Fac full 5, part-time 1. 

Tui Bdg $135 mo, Day $36-72 mo. Est 1919. Proprietary. 

Summer Session. Enr 35. Tui $300. 

Mr. Cobb has here worked out a program in which materials 
are adapted to the individual child and in which creative activities 
are subordinate to academic fundamentals. Founder and long pres- 
ident of the Progressive Education Association, he has written 
books and articles which reveal his optimistic, inspirational tem- 
perament. The work in remedial reading and tutoring has been 
especially successful. 

COLORA, MD. Pop 160. Alt 450 ft P R.R. On Rt.269. About 
midway between Philadelphia and Baltimore, Colora is in NE Md. 
Here the Academy occupies a 350 acre estate. 



Md. Middle Atlantic States 330 

WEST NOTTINGHAM ACADEMY 
Bdg and Day - Coed Ages 1 1 -20 

Colora, Md, Tel. Rising Sun 420 F21. 
Charles W. Blaker, B.S., B.D., Th.M., Head. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Post Grad 1-2. Col Prep. 

Enr Bdg Boys 55, Girls 15; Day Boys 25, Girls 10. Fac full-time 
8, 

Grad '5731. Entd Col '5727. (U of Del 4, U of Md 3, M.I.T, 
2, Perm State 2, Barnard 1, Drexel Inst. 1). Alumni 1684. 

Tui Bdg $1400 seven day, $1250 five-day (+$250); Day $500. 
Scholarships full 2, partial 27 ($10,500). Est 1744. Presbyterian. 

Plant $281,986. Endowment $87,049. Dorm rms 37. Class rms 6. 
Lib 5000 vols. Lab. Gym. Fields 4. Courts 3. Golf course. 

Established by the Presbyterian Rev. Samuel Finley, who be- 
came president of Princeton in 1761, the school received a state 
charter in 1812. Since 1914 the school has had substantial gifts 
from the Presbyterian Church. Dr. J. Paul Slaybaugh, head master 
from 1924, resigned in June, 1949, and was succeeded by Richard 
W. Holstein as interim head master. Mr, Blaker was appointed in 
1952. The school follows the one-subject plan of study, and 
there is an elementary remedial program on an individual basis. 
Many graduates of the preparatory curriculum attend the Uni- 
versity of Del., with others going to the Universities of Md. and 
Va., Dickinson, Franklin and Marshall, Lafayette, Athletics, activ- 
ity clubs, dramatics, and religious groups are emphasized, 

In 1954 the school became coeducational., 

GARRET PARK, MD. Pop 960. Alt 301 ft B&O R.R. 10 mi 
NW of Washington, D.C., Rt. U.S.240. Situated in the villa sec- 
tion of Montgomery County are the 93 acres of Georgetown Pre- 
paratory School's beautifully landscaped campus. 

GEORGETOWN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 13-18 

Garrett Park, Md. Tel. OL 2-4900. 

Rev. Michael F. Maher, S.J., A.B., Ph.L., S.T.L., Woodstock Coll., 

M.A., St. Louis U., Rector and Head. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep (Honors, Latin-Sci- 
entific, Academic). Latin Greek Speech Sociology Music. 

Enr Bdg 110, Day 140. Fac full-time 21. Staff 4. 

Grad '5750. Entd Col '5748. (Georgetown 5, Notre Dame 4, 
Villanova 3, Dartmouth 1, Cornell 1, U of Va. 1). Alumni 1250, 

Tui Bdg $2000 (+$150), Day $700. Est 1789. Roman Catholic. 

Plant $2,575,000. Dorm rms 100. Class rms 12. Lib 4800 vols. 
Labs 2. Studio music 1. Gym, Fields 7. Courts 10. Golf course. 



Md. Middle Atlantic States 331 

Archbishop John Carroll founded this oldest Catholic boarding 
school in the country as a part of Georgetown University. It has 
been independent since 1919 when it moved to its present plant 
across the Maryland line. Offering both the traditional Jesuit 
classical training and preparation for technical schools, it sends 
graduates primarily to Catholic colleges. Debating, dramatics, pub- 
lications, and athletics are among activities. 

Father Maher wa c s Executive Assistant to the President of Loy- 
ola College, Baltimore, Md. before his appointment in 1957 to suc- 
ceed the Rev. William A. Ryan, S.J\ 

GARRISON, MD. Pop 570 (1940). 12 mi. NW of Baltimore, Rt 

32. The Green Spring Valley is well known hunting country. Here, 
surrounded by country estates, is the little town of Garrison. 
Nearby is the 1730 home of Charles Carroll, "The Caves." 

GARRISON FOREST SCHOOL 
Bdg Girls Ages 13-18; Day 10-18 

Garrison, Md. Tel. Hunter 6-7100. 

Jean G. Marshall and Nancy J. Offutt, Heads. 

Grades V-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music Bible. 
Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg 115, Day 155. Fac full 36, part-time 6. 

Grad '5634. Entd Col '5632 (Smith 5, Sarah Lawrence 5, 
Briarcliff 3, Bennett 3, Radcliffe 3, Wheaton 3). Alumnae 725. 

Tui Bdg $2600 (+$250), Day $600-775. Scholarships full 2, par- 
tial 6 ($4000). Est 1910. Inc 1938 nonprofit. 

Dorm rms 46. Class rms 20. Lib 4000 vols. Labs 2. Studios music 
2, art 1. Gyms 2. Fields 2. Courts 4, Riding facilities. 

Established by Mary M. Livingston, who acted as head mistress 
until 1929, Garrison Forest has always been characterized by an 
informal atmosphere and by close association between faculty and 
pupils and between boarding and day students. Since Miss Mar- 
shall and Miss Offutt took over more than 25 years ago, high 
standards have been held and the patronage stabilized, the plant 
and equipment modernized, a new dormitory and chapel opened 
in 1958. 

The curriculum, with emphasis on academic fundamentals, pre- 
pares for Radcliffe, Smith, Vassar, Bryn Mawr, Sweet Briar, and 
other leading colleges. Student government, service league, French 
and Spanish clubs, music, art, and sports, especially riding, are 
favorite activities. Girls are enrolled for not less than three years. 

The school is selective, socially and academically, and has an 
atmosphere of warmth and dignity. See also page 770 

GLENCOE, MD. Pop 215. Alt 600 ft P R.R. 20 mi. N of Balti- 
more, Rt. U.S.lll. In the hills of N Md., Glencoe is a residential 



Md. Leading Private Schools 332 

farming community. Adjoining are the estate areas of Wor thing- 
ton Valley and the Hartford-Elkrid^e Hunt. 



OLDFIELDS SCHOOL 
Bdg- Girls Ages 14-18 

Glencoe, Md. Tel. Manor 1120. 

Duncan McCulloch, Jr., A.B., Princeton, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Art Music Home Econom- 
ics Typing Bible, 

Enr 80. Fac full 11, part-time 1. 

Grad '5723. Entd Col '5718. (Rollins 2, Vassar 1, Cornell 1, 
U of Ga 1, Colby 1, Wheelock 1). Alumnae 1263. 

Tui $2800. Scholarships partial 3 ($10,000). Est 1867. Inc 
1926 nonprofit. 

Dormitory rrns 44. Class rms 8. Library 3000 vols. Labs 2. 
Studio art 1. Gym. Courts 5. Riding facilities. 

On a remote little farm to which she had moved with her in- 
valid husband and eight children, Mrs. John Sears McCulloch 
began a small school which has grown to the present establish- 
ment without losing the intimate family atmosphere. Her descend- 
ants have maintained the tradition, with the present head master 
her grandson and the son of Rev. Duncan McCulloch, who had 
continued the school until his death in 1932. Operated as a non- 
sectarian school under a board of trustees of parents and al- 
umnae, Oldfields places its first emphasis on Christian character. 

Oldfields gives instruction and training to a relatively small 
group of girls. With a ratio of eight pupils to each teacher per- 
mitting much individual attention, warm personal relationships are 
fostered between students and faculty. There is a sound guidance 
program, with special emphasis on college entrance. In 1956 the 
school announced a program of individual instruction for students 
of high aptitude, preparing for advanced college placement. The 
preparatory program, enriched with work in art, music, home- 
making, sends girls to many different colleges, among them 
Vassar, Smith, Cornell, Rollins, Colby and Sweet Briar. Extra- 
curricular activities include sports, dramatics, publications, clubs, 
and riding, with the school having its own horses and stables. 

Recent improvements to the plant include a new dormitory, a 
new faculty room, and other additions. 



McDONOGH, MD. Pop 246. WM R.R. 12 mi. NW of Baltimore, 
off Rt U.S. 140. In the midst of farming country at the head of 
Green Spring Valley, McDonogh School owns 835 acres. 



M d. Middle Atlantic States 333 

McDONOGH SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 6-18 

McDonogh, Md. Tel. Hunter 6-6000. 

Robert L. Lamborn, A.B., Stanford, Ed.M., Harvard, Ed.D., Johns 

Hopkins, Head 

Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep Military Training. 

Enr Bdg 295, Day 470. Elem 430, Sec 335. Fac full 50, part-time 
15. 

Grad '5774. Entd Col '5769. (U of Md 14, Johns Hopkins 
7, Cornell 3, U of N C 3, Okla State 3, U of Pa 3). Alumni 2150. 

Tui Bdg $1600-1700 (+$250), Day $665-975. Scholarships full 37, 
partial 70 ($128,988). Est 1873. Inc nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Enr 40. Tui Bdg $350-475, Day $175-250 seven 
wks. Summer Day Camp. Boys Ages 6-12. Tui $30 wk. 

Plant $2,426,843. Endowment $1,683,469. Dorms 4. Class rms 
40. Lib 12,590 vols. Labs 3. Studios music 11, art 1. Shops. Gyms 
2. Swimming pool. Fields 14. Courts 12. Farm. Riding 

Established on the endowment of John McDonogh as a farm 
school, and for more than half a century stressing courses in agri- 
culture and mechanics, the school shifted its emphasis increasingly, 
to college preparation after Major Louis E. Lamborn became head 
in 1925. His son, assistant and associate head master since 1943, 
was appointed to direct the school in 1952. 

Programs are offered in college preparation and commercial 
and dairy husbandry fields. Graduates enter Cornell, Va. Military, 

Johns Hopkins, the Universities of Md. and Va., and many other 
colleges and universities. Crafts, art, music, dramatics, as well as 
sports and various clubs are among extra-curricular activities. 

REISTERSTOWN, MD. Pop 1800. WM R.R. 15 mi. NW of 
Baltimore, Rt. 140. This small town in a rural section of Balti- 
more County. The school property overlooks the town. 

HANNAH MORE ACADEMY 
Bdg and Day Girls Ages 12-18 

Reisterstown, Md. Tel. TEnnyson 3-0500. 

Catherine Offley Coleman, A.B., Sweet Briar, M.A., Mills, Head. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Music 
Art Speech. 

Enr Bdg 80, Day 45. Fac full 15, part-time 4. Staff 2. 

Grad '5718. Entd Col '5718. (Goucher 2, Wellesley 1, Sweet 
Briar 1, Randolph- Macon 1, Hollins 1, Hood 1). 

Tui Bdg $2000, Day $700. Scholarships full 1, partial 10. Est 
1832. Inc nonprofit. Episcopal. 

Plant $650,000. Endowment $40,000. Class rms 12, Lib 3500 vols. 
Lab. Studios music 4, art 1. Gym. Courts 2. Riding facilities. 



Md. Leading Private Schools 334 

Oldest existing Episcopal Church school for girls, this academy 
has been the diocesan school for Maryland since 1873, and recipi- 
ent of many benefactions throughout its long history. Under Janet 
Ward, who succeeded Laura Fowler in 1943, the sound conserva- 
tive educational standards were continued, enrollment increased, 
and the plant modernized and expanded. Following Miss Ward's 
resignation in 1948, Miss Elizabeth Harvey was appointed act- 
ing head mistress. In 1951 Victor R, Cain was appointed to direct 
the school. 

Miss Coleman, dean for six years at St. Anne's school in Vir- 
ginia, succeeded him in 1956. 

In 1954 two preparatory programs were inaugurated, the first 
for colleges requiring specific courses and CEEB examinations 
for entrance, the second for colleges with more liberal entrance 
requirements and for junior colleges. Graduates attend Barnard, 
Bryn Mawr, Goucher, Middlebury, RadclifTe, Randolph-Macon, 
Wilson, Wells, and others. Art, music, dramatics, clubs, publica- 
tions, riding and sports contribute to the constructive, congenial 
atmosphere, See also page 772 

RICHLEIGH SCHOOL 
Co Day- Coed Ages 5-12 

Reisterstown, Md, Reisterstown Rd. Tel. 1018, 

Catherine Offley Coleman, A.B., Sweet Briar, M.A., Mills, Head; 

Virginia W. Jones, B.S.,Ed., U of Md., Dir. 

Kindergarten Grades I- VI. 

Enr Boys 40, Girls 80. Fac full 8, part-time 4. Staff 2. 

Grad '57 11. Entd Prep Sch '577, (Hannah More 5, Mc- 
Donogh 2). 

Tui $350-550. Est 1951. Inc nonprofit. Episcopal. 

Established to provide an elementary day division of the Hannah 
More Academy, Richleigh School is located on the northern 
setrtion of the campus, where in 1956 were completed a gymna- 
sium-auditorium and other new facilities. 

ST. JAMES, MD. Pop 100. Alt 464 ft. N&W R.R. 6 mi. SE of 
Hagerstown. This little hamlet in the Cumberland Valley has de- 
veloped around the St. James School. 

. ST. JAMES SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 12-18 

St. James, Md. Tel. REgent 3-9330. 

The Rev. John E. Owens, B.S., Towson STC, S.T.B,, General 

Theological Sem, Head. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music History 
Languages Sciences Mathematics. Remedial Reading. 



Md. Middle Atlantic States 335 

Enr Bdg 120, Day 5. Fac full 15, part-time 4. 

Grad '5721. Entd Col '5721. (Cornell 2, Duke 2, U of Pa 1, 
Denison 1, Dartmouth 1, Colgate 1). Alumni 850. 

Tui Bdg $1700 (+$250), Day $700. Scholarships partial 14 
($4500). Est 1842. Episcopal. 

Plant $500,000. Dorm rms 70. Class rms 10. Lib 4000 vols. Labs 
2. Studios music 1, art 1. Gym. Fields 3. Courts 4. 

Founded as the College of St. James in 1842, this oldest Church 
school of the English type in America was first headed by Rev. 
J. B. Kerfoot, earlier assistant to Dr. William Augustus Muhlen- 
berg, who had introduced the English Episcopal school system at 
Flushing, L.I. Here, too, another pupil of Muhlenberg's, Dr. 
Henry Augustus Coit, taught until he was called to organize St. 
Paul's at Concord, N.H. Closed during the Civil War, it reopened 
in 1869 under Henry Onderdonk, who was head master until 1896. 
During the regime of his son, Adrian H. Onderdonk, from 1903 
to 1939, the present name was assumed. 

In 1955 The Rev. John Owens was appointed head master fol- 
lowing the resignation of Vernon B. Kellett. 

Graduates enter Washington & Lee, the universities of Va. 
and N.C., Princeton, Yale. Dramatics, music, an historical society, 
and various clubs and sports are among activities. See page 707 

ST. MARY'S CITY! MD. Pop 210. 72 mi. SE of Washington, 
D.C., Rt.5. First capital of the province and the landing place in 
1634 of Leonard Calvert who became first governor, St. Mary's 
City is at the tip of Md. between the Potomac and ChesapeakeBay. 

ST. MARY'S SEMINARY JUNIOR COLLEGE 
Bdg Girls Ages 15-20; Day and Eve Coed 15-20 

St. Mary's City, Md. 

May Russell, A.B., LL.D., Western Md. Col, M.A., Columbia, Pres 

High Sch 3-4. Col Prep General. 

Jr Col 1-2. Art Music Home Economics Secretarial Medi- 
cal Secretarial Business Liberal Arts. 

Enr Bdg 100; Day Boys 50, Girls 10; Eve 160. Fac full 15, 
part-time 3. 

High Sch Grad '5623. Entd Col '56 St. Mary's Jr Col 8, 
Washington C 2, Miami 2, U of Md. 2, others. Alumni 1500. 

Tui Bdg $900, Day $300, Eve $10 sem hr. Est 1840. State owned. 

Created by an act of the legislature as the state's two hundredth 
anniversary monument to its founding, this school is administered 
by trustees appointed by the governor. Its original building, 
a gift of the state, is on tne site of the first Maryland settlement. 
The fixed income makes possible equipment and educational facili- 
ties seldom found even in institutions charging twice the rate. 
Since the introduction of a junior college department in 1927, the 
school has widened its appeal and since 1937 has offered only a 
four-year junior college course. 



Md. Leading Private Schools 336 

SEVERNA PARK, MARYLAND. Pop 1095. 8 mi NW of 
Annapolis, Rt.2. Severn School, on a bluff, overlooks the Severn 
River at its widest part. 

SEVERN SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 1 1 -20 

Severna Park, Md. Tel. 200. 
Paul J. Kesmodel, Head. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep. 

Enr Bdg 90, Day 150. Fac full-time 21. 

Grad '57 34. Entd Col '57 27. (U S Naval Acad 10, U of Md 
3, Bates 2, Johns Hopkins 2, Lehigh 2, Norwich 1). Alumni 2500. 

Tui Bdg $1400-1550 (+$100), Day $575-650. Scholarships par- 
tial 7 ($1000). Est 1914. Inc 1938 nonprofit 

Plant $450,000. Dorm rms 45. Class rms 16. Lib 2800 vols. Lab. 
Fields 2. Courts 4. 

Founded by Holland M. Teel to ready boys for Annapolis, Severn 
has since 1920 also prepared for senior colleges and universities. 
About half the graduates enter the Academy, the rest go on to the 
University of Md., Johns Hopkins, West Point, Cornell, the Uni- 
versity of Va., and others. Among activities are athletics, publica- 
tions, and a student council. When Mr. Teel retired in 1955, 
remaining at the school as head master emeritus, chairman of the 
board, and teacher and counselor, Mr. Hawkins, who had been a 
member of the faculty since the establishment of the school, was 
appointed his successor and served until May 1957, at which time 
Mr, Kesmodel took over the duties of headmaster. 

SILVER SPRING, MD. Pop 42,300. Alt 340 ft. B&O R.R. 8 mi. 
N of Washington, D.C., Rt. U.S.29. This residential suburb is a 
manufacturing center for scientific instruments and the seat of 
Johns Hopkins applied physics lab. 

THE BULLIS SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 13-19 

Silver Spring, Md. 8501 Houston St. Tel. JUniper 9-6600. 
William F. Bullis, B.S., U.S. Naval Acad, M.A., George Washing- 
ton Univ, Prin. 

High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. fcol Prep (Scientific, Academic, 
General). Mathematics Mechanical and Engineering Drawing 
Science. Make-up courses. 

Enr Bdg 125, Day 85. Fac full 12, part-time 2. 

Grad '5692. Entd Col '5690 (Annapolis 55, West Point 12). 
Alumni 2000. 

Tui Bdg $1550 (+$40), Day $775. Scholarships full 10, partial 
15 ($18,000). Est 1930. Inc 1935 nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Enr 100. Tui $175-375 seven wks. 



Md. Middle Atlantic States 337 

Established to prepare for government academies, the majority 
of graduates enter the Army, Navy, or Air Force academies, others 
going to Georgetown, the universities of Md. and Va,, Cornell, 
Wesleyan University. There is a full program of sports, as well as 
music, publications, and clubs. 

TOWN AND COUNTRY SCHOOL 
Co Day Coed Ages 3-12 

Silver Spring, Md. 9211 Georgia Ave. Tel. Juniper 9-1674. 
William Cohen, B.S., Brooklyn Col, M.A., George Washington 
Univ, Dir. 

Pre-Nursery Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIL Music 
Dramatics. Rem-Developmental Reading. 

Enr Boys 140, Girls 135. Fac full 14, part-time 13. 

Grad '56 12. Entd Prep Sch '56 Georgetown 2, Linton Hall 
1, others. 

Tui $535. Scholarships full 3, partial 5. Est 1930. Inc 1949 non- 
profit. 

Using the techniques of modern education, and now put- 
ting into practice the concept of the two-teacher classroom, 
this school provides many forms of creative work in addition 
to fundamentals. Transportation from Washington is available. 

STEVENSON, MD. Pop 152. 9 mi. NW of Baltimore. In the 

Green Spring Valley, St. Timothy's occupies a large campus. 

ST. TIMOTHY'S SCHOOL 
Bdg Girls Ages 14-18 

Stevenson, Md. Tel. Hunter 6-7400. 

Ella Robinson Watkins, A.B., Goucher, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Dramatics Music Art Typing 
Current Problems Comparative Religions Literature Advanced 
Mathematics. 

Enr 120. Fac full 17, part-time 6. 

Grad '5737. Entd Col '5734. (Smith 9, Bradford 6, Vassar 3, 
Sarah Lawrence 2, Radcliffe 1, Stanford 1). Alumnae 1650. 

Tui $2700 (+$200). Scholarships partial 10 ($10,000). Est 
1882. Inc 1935 nonprofit. Episcopal affiliated. 

Plant $1,000,000. Dormrms 40* Class rms 14. Lib 6800 vols. Lab. 
Studios music 2, art 1. Gym. Swimming pool. Courts 6. Riding 
facilities. 

St. Timothy's has long maintained a distinguished reputation 
as a desirable boarding school and retains a strong following. In 
continuous operation since 1882, it was managed until 1912 by the 
Misses Carter, followed by Miss Louisa McEndree and Miss Jane 
Rives Keath, who continued the characteristic traditions that have 
made it sought after by families from the eastern seaboard. 



Md. Middle Atlantic States 338 

Miss Watkins, formerly assistant to the principal at St. Cath- 
erine's m Richmond, succeeded when Miss Fowler resigned in 
1936. In 1951 the school moved from Catonsville to its present 
location, and a number of new buildings were erected. 

Tradition is still strong, but the curriculum is broad and in- 
cludes such electives as comparative religions, current problems, 
modern poetry, development of the novel, and other senior subjects. 
Recent developments have included increasing interest in and 
understanding of national and international affairs, growth of 
an audio-visual program, class trips to Washington and New 
York City, and creative art seminars. 

The capable faculty prepares girls for Vassar, Bryn Mawr 
Radcliffe, and other leading women's colleges. Among activities 
are choral and choir organizations, drama clubs, publications, and 
a varied program of sports and numerous interest clubs. See also 
page 771 



For explanation of data and statistics included for each school, con- 
sult the Explanatory Note at the beginning of the Descriptive Text 
and the Introduction, 

If you do not find the right school for your child, write, stating 
particulars, to Porter Sargent, 11 Beacon St., Boston 8, Mass. 

For further schools in any area, refer to the Supplementary Lists. 

For Summer Camps and Summer Schools, see the Schools Classified 
By Type and the Camp Directory. 

For Junior College and Specialized School information, consult the 
Sargent Guide to Private Junior Colleges and Specialized Schools. 

If you do not find the school you seek, look to the Index. 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 

WASHINGTON, D.C. Pop 802,178. Capital of the free world, an 
unprecedented conglomeration of power and wealth, Washington 
is today a metropolis of contradictions. 

Dominated by the emissaries of the states, whose collective 
manifestation is the United States Government, it is the focal 
point of defense, reform and regulation for the greatest economic, 
political and military power, taking and dispersing more than one 
quarter of our national income. Some fruit of the abundant tax 
harvest remains here to enrich the inhabitants. New to its role, it 
feeds its mistress, world peace, from the greatest machine of war 
yet seen, to insure continuity of our way of life. 

Bureaucratic conflicts reign, under the control of impregnable 
brass hats. Here lobbies, domestic and foreign, hassle for spoils. 
Business and labor vie with countless special interest groups for 
economic and legislative favor. In a fog of confusion and fear, 
legislators through committees investigate and indiscriminately 
incriminate through vilification and association, in the scramble 
for that pampered and fooled prize of democracies the voter. 
North and South meet in Washington, but racial segregation 
yields slowly to reform. 

The city is beautifully designed and handsomely built. Lying 
along the banks of the broad Potomac, amidst lovely countryside, 
it has one of the most abhorred climates of our great cities. Out- 
standing among the more beautiful buildings are the Pan Ameri- 
can Union, stimulating and refreshing in its architectural detail 
and arrangement; the Academy of Arts and Sciences by Bertram 
Goodhue, a remarkable example of purest Greek architectural de- 
sign; and the Folger Shakespeare Library, architecturally chaste. 
Pope's pantheon in memory of Jefferson stands where the tidal 
basin and the cherry trees are. Pope's other creation houses Mel- 
Ion's European paintings. 

The attractions of Washington have macie it an educational 
center. The Catholic Church, with characteristic foresight, has 
taken advantage of this for its higher institutions of learning 
the Catholic University, Trinity College, and Georgetown Uni- 
versity. George Washington University falls short of the hope 
and plan of the Father of his Country, The more substantial 
schools have deserted the older residential section for the hills 
N and W of the city. The Madeira School is some 12 mi. from 

339 



D. C. Leading Private Schools 340 

the center of Washington, in Greenway, Virginia. Other schools 
have also crossed the line and have such addresses as Garrett 
Park, Silver Spring and Bethesda, separately listed under Mary- 
land. Others, across the Potomac, are in Virginia, 

BARR1E PETER PAN SCHOOLS 
Day Coed Ages 2-18 

Washington 12, D.C. 801 Fern Place, N.W. Tel. Randolph 6-0100. 
Miss Frances Littman, B.S., Columbia, Dir. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. 

Enr 250. Fac full 15, part-time 3. 

Tui $65 mo. Scholarships 2. Est 1932. 

Summer Day Camp. 

Consisting of Barrie School providing kindergarten through 
grade twelve and Peter Pan School for children ages two to five 
these offer a full day session. There are classes in music and 
in French, as well as a recreation program including riding. 

See also page 827 
BEAUVOIR 

Day- Coed Ages 3-9 

Washington, 16, D.C. 3500 Woodley Rd. Tel. Woodley 6-8150. 
Mrs. Elizabeth Glascock Taylor, B.A., Wellesley, Prin. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-III. Art Music Dramatics. 
Rem Reading. Science. 

Enr Boys 135, Girls 125. Fac full 30, part-time 10. 

Tui $500-600. Scholarships partial 11. Est 1933. Episcopal. 

Summer Day Camp. Enr 250. Tui $25 wk for eight wks. 

With the Washington Cathedral Chapter constituting the Board 
of Trustees, Beauvoir prepares its boys for St. Albans and its girls 
for the National Cathedral School. A recent emphasis in the sound 
foundational work is on world-mindedness in terms of United 
Nations ideals. 

EMERSON INSTITUTE 
Day and Eve - Coed Ages 16- 

Washington 6, D.C. 1324 18th St., N.W. Tel. AD 4-4877. 

John J. Humphrey, S.B., Buffalo STC, M.S., St. Bonaventure, 

Pres. 

High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1-2 Col 1. Col Prep General Busi- 
ness Secretarial Electronics Bar Review. 

Enr Day Boys 120, Girls 40; Eve Men 245, Women 130. Fac full 
10, part-time 21. 

Grad '57124. Entd Col '57 96. (Georgetown 9, Geo Washing- 
ton 7, American U 7, Catholic U 5, U of Md 5). 

Tui Day $750. Eve $350. Scholarships full 2, partial 3 ($5000), Est 
1852. Inc 1955. 

Summer Session. Enr 175. Tui $225 twelve wks, $185 eight wks. 

Plant $195,000. Class rms 19. Lib 6500 vols, Labs 4. 



D. C. Middle Atlantic States 341 

With an accelerated program, Emerson offers preparation for 
entrance into colleges and government academies. The school was 
named for George B. Emerson, was long directed by the late 
Winslow H. Randolph, and came under the direction of Mr. 
Humphrey, successor to Theodore D. Gatchel, in 1939. The major- 
ity of preparatory graduates enter local colleges and universities. 
There are also general, business, secretarial, and radio and tele- 
vision curricula. Since 1954 the school has been affiliated with 
Washington Hall Junior College. 



GEORGETOWN VISITATION CONVENT 
Bdg and Day- Girls Ages 13-20 

Washington 7, B.C. 1500 35th St. Tel. ADams 2-3134. 
Mother Mary Cecilia Clark, M.S., Georgetown, Pres. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Art Music. 

Jr Col 1-2. Liberal Arts Medical Secretarial Secretarial. 

Enr Bdg 160, Day 210. Sec 205, Jr Col 165. Fac full 23, part-time 
10. 

Tui Bdg $1400-1600 (+$150), Day $500-625. Scholarships full 
9, partial 2 ($10,000). Est 1799. Roman Catholic. 

The equipment and organization of this school, one of the oldest 
of its type, early put it in the first rank of similar institutions, a 
position it still maintains. The curricula emphasize religion, philos- 
ophy, literature, and the arts. The students, non-Catholic as well 
as Catholic, come from all over the country. 



HOLTON-ARMS SCHOOL 
Bdg Girls Ages 1 2- 1 8; Day 5-18 

Washington, D.C. 2125 S St. Tel. North 7-4802. 

Mildred Brown, A.B., Goucher, M.A., George Washington, Pres.; 

Sallie E. Lurton, A.B., Vassar, M.A., Columbia, Head* 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep Gen- 
eral. Art Music Secretarial Studies. 

Enr Bdg 55, Day 330. Elem 180, Sec 205. Fac full 23, part-time 8. 

Grad '5751, Entd Col '5750. (U of Colo 4, Bryn Mawr 3, 
Radcliffe 3, Sweet Briar 3, Wellesley 2, Hollins 2). Alumnae 1600. 

Tui Bdg $1700-2000 (+$125), Day $375-650. Scholarships full 
7, partial 20 ($12,000). Est 1901. Inc 1930 nonprofit. 

A tolerant spirit and an informal atmosphere characterize this 
school founded by Mrs. Jessie Moon Holton and Miss Carolyn 
H. Arms. Miss Lurton was appointed in 1947, serving with Mrs. 
Holton until the latter's death in 1951. The curriculum, with its 
individualized scheduling and sympathetic guidance, includes a 
college preparatory and a general course. Recent additions are a 



D. C. Leading Private Schools 342 

modern recreation hall, a gymnasium, a library, and science lab- 
oratories. See also page 774 



IMMACULATA JUNIOR COLLEGE AND HIGH SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Girls Ages 6-20 

Washington, D.C., 4344 Wisconsin Ave., N.W. 
Sister Mary Joan, Pres, 

Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. 

Jr Col 1-2. Liberal Arts Art Home Economics Secretarial 
Science Music. 

Enr Bdg 125, Day 400. Fac full-time 30. 

Tui Bdg $1250, Day $400. Est 1905. Roman Catholic. 

Conducted by the Sisters of Providence, this school has since 
1922 increasingly emphasized its separately organized junior col- 
lege. Girls of all denominations are enrolled, the only religious 
requirement being attendance at Sunday service. The school has 
particularly well equipped music and art departments and gives 
prominence to languages, classical and modern, as well as to sec- 
retarial studies a,nd homemaking. An extensive building program 
has provided an expansion of facilities on all levels and in all 
departments, 

THE MADEIRA SCHOOL 
Bdg and Co Day Girls Ages 14-18 

Greenway, Va. Tel. Twin Oaks 3-7000. 

Allegra. Maynard, A.B., M.A. (Hon), Wheaton, Head; Lucy 

Madeira Wing, A.B., Vassar, Head Emeritus. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Music Art Literature 
Bible Public Affairs. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg 150, Day 75, Fac full 21, part-time 11. 

Grad '5761. Entd Col '5760. (Vassar 10, Smith 7, Wellesley 
4, Briarcliff 5, Sarah Lawrence 3, Connecticut 3). Alumnae 2670. 

Tui Bdg $2500, Day $700. Scholarships full 6, partial 8 ($9,600). 
Est 1906. Inc 1929 nonprofit. 

Plant $1,400,000. Endowment $800,000. Dorm rms 150. Class rms 
17. Lib 6890 vols. Labs 2. Studios music 2, art 1. Gym. Fields 2. 
Courts 6. Riding facilities. 

Miss Madeira established her school in Washington after ex- 
perience as a teacher in Friends School and as first head mistress 
of Potomac. A woman of idealistic temperament, she held strong 
convictions on what she considered democracy and had few snob- 
bish tendencies. In the Virginia site occupied since 1931, the 
country day facilities for the established city clientele supplement 
the boarding department. 

The scholastic standards of the school have always been high, 



D. C. Middle Atlantic States 343 

and most of the graduates go on to college, especially Vassar and 
Smith, but also Bryn Mawr, Sweet Briar, Wellesley, and others. 
The attitude toward art and current events and the advantages of 
Washington is liberal, and much is made of music, dramatics, 
hobby clubs, publications, and sports, particularly riding. See also 
page 775 

THE MARET SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 3-18 

Washington 8, D.C. 3000 Cathedral Ave., N.W. Tel. HU 3-5710. 
Margaret Goodwin Williams, A.B., Wellesley, Prin. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col 
Prep. Art Music Languages. Remedial Reading, 

Enr Boys 145, Girls 155. Elem 235, Sec 65. Fac full 31, part-time 
3. 

Grad '57- 9. Entd Col '576. (Brown 1, Johns Hopkins 1, Long- 
wood 1, R.P.I. 1, U of Wis 1, William Smith 1). Alumni 184. 

Tui $390-650. Scholarships full 3, partial J7 ($5000). Est 1911. 
Inc 1937 nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Tui $125 per subject for eight wks. 

Plant $250,000. Class rms 22. Lab. Studios music 1, art 1. 

Founded by Marthe, Louise, and Jeanne Maret, this school 
moved to its present building on the Woodley estate in 1952. Mrs. 
Williams succeeded Alice P. Carson as principal in 1950. With a 
student body representing many different nationalities, standard 
curricula are followed, with special emphasis on languages. Recent 
graduates have entered the University of Md., Vassar, Smith, 
Duke, American University, and George Washington. 

MARJORIE WEBSTER JUNIOR COLLEGE 
Bdg and Day - Girls Ages 17-21 

Washington 12, D.C. Rock Creek Park. Tel, TU 2-4400. 
Marjorie Fraser Webster, B.A., George Washington Univ, M.A., 
L.H.D., American Univ, Pres. 

Jr Col 1-2. Liberal Arts Phys Ed Radio and TV Speech Art 
Secretarial Merchandising Medical Secretarial Teacher Train- 
ing (Kindergarten) Music. 

Enr Bdg 250, Day 50. Fac full 26, part-time 4. 

Tui Bdg $1900 (+$200), Day $700. Scholarships partial 14. Est 
1920. Inc 1927. 

Plant $2,000,000. Endowment $50,000. Dorm rms 100. Class rms 
15. Lib 6000 vols. Lab. Studios 4. Gym. Swimming pool. Fields. 
Courts 2. 

This junior college with a general and transfer liberal arts 
curriculum and with terminal and transfer professional programs 
was started as a school of expression and physical education. 
Students have access to the many cultural facilities of Washing- 
ton. The college has radio studios, a modern theatre, and many 



D. C. Leading Private Schools 344 

other vocational facilities. Graduates transfer to colleges and 
universities throughout the country. Among activities are student 
government, publications, drama, dance, music, and athletics. See 
also page 856 

MOUNT VERNON SEMINARY AND JUNIOR COLLEGE 
Bdg and Day Girls Ages 13-20 

Washington 7, B.C. 2100 Foxhall Rd., N.W. Tel. Federal 3-1400. 
George W. Lloyd, A.M., Litt.D., L.I.U., Clark, Pres; Olwen 
Lloyd, M.A., Cambridge Univ, Head Mistress. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Art Music Home Econom- 
ics Languages Speech International Affairs Bible. Remedial 
Reading. 

Jr Col 1-2. Liberal Arts Secretarial Home Economics Child 
Study. 

Enr Bdg 215, Day 100. Fac full 28, part-time 15. 

High Sch Grad '5745. High Sch Grad Entd Col '57-44. Jr. 
Coll Grads '57 50. 

Tui Bdg $2600, Day $800. Scholarships. Est 1875. Inc 1916 non- 
profit. 

Plant $2,629,680. Endowment $228,000. Dorm rms 101. Class 
rms 22. Lib 7500 vols. Labs 5. Studios 4. Gym. Courts 6. 

Founded by Elizabeth J. Somers, who with Adelia Gates 
Hensley directed it until 1924, Mount Vernon has always been 
characterized by high standards, a conservative tone, and a gra- 
cious atmosphere. The late Jean Dean Cole, for many years as- 
sistant head, and head from 1924, was succeeded on her retirement 
in 1938 by Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd, associated with the school since 
1936. In 1945 a new 26 acre campus was acquired. 

From the first, before the time of the junior college, the ad- 
vanced courses were accredited by leading colleges and universi- 
ties. Today the curriculum covers four years of high school and 
two of junior college. Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd have brought new life 
and vigor, and a breadth of culture and outlook which have won 
the enthusiastic support of patrons and the well organized alum- 
nae. Graduates of both the high school department and the junior 
college enter leading colleges and universities throughout the 
country. Among extra-curricular activities are dramatics, music, 
publications, social service, and student council. See page 773 

NATIONAL CATHEDRAL SCHOOL 
Bdg Girls Ages 12-19; Day 9-19 

Washington 16, D,C. Wisconsin at Woodley Rd. Tel. Woodley 6- 

8318. 

Katharine Lee, B.A., Mt. Holyoke, M.A., Columbia, Prin. 

Grades IV-VIIl High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. French 
Social Sciences Art Music, 



D. C, Middle Atlantic States 345 

Enr Bdg 95, Day 315. Elem 185, Sec 225. Fac full 34, part-time 
12. 

Grad '5761. Entd Col '57 60. (Conn. Col 4, Sweet Briar 4, 
U of Tenn 4, Duke 3, Bryn Mawr 1, Stanford 1). Alumnae 1840. 

Tui Bdg $2250 (+$150), Day $800-875. Scholarships partial 54 
($27,000). Est 1900. Episcopal. 

Plant $800,000. Endowment $75,000. Dorm rms 64. Class rms 
23. Lib 6000 vols. Labs 2. Studios music 2, art 1. Gyms 2. Field. 
Courts 6. Riding facilities. 

National Cathedral School was established by the first Episcopal 
Bishop of Washington in a building provided by Mrs. Phoebe 
Apperson Hearst, and was directed by Mabel B. Turner from 1929 
until her retirement in 1950. Miss Lee, with extensive experience 
in schools in the East and in England, and head of Pasadena 
Polytechnic from 1946, succeeded Miss Turner. 

Most of the girls take the preparatory program, with its numer- 
ous electives, and enter Sweet Briar, Duke, Wellesley, Bryn Mawr, 
Smith, and other colleges. There are also well organized general 
academic and fine arts departments. The girls lead a wholesome 
life, with carefully planned work and play programs, and with op- 
portunities in dramatics, music, sports, student council, and social 
service organization. There is also a program of shared activities 
with the boys of St. Albans. The country setting is unusual for a 
city school. See page 772 

ST. ALBANS SCHOOL 
Bdg- Boys Ages 14-19; Co Day Boys 8-19 

Washington 16, D.C. Mount St. Alban, Tel. Woodley 6-2125. 
Canon Charles Martin, B.S., Univ of Pa., Head. 

Grades IV-VIII High Sen 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music Typ- 
ing Science Languages Russian Mathematics. Rem Read- 
ing. Shop. Dramatics. 

Enr Bdg 30, Day 380. Fac full 34, part-time 6. Staff 3. 

Grad '5742. Entd Col '5742. (Harvard 12, Princeton 5, Cor- 
nell 4, Washington & Lee 3, Yale 2, U of Pa 2). Alumni 1027. 

Tui Bdg$1900(+$200), Day $775-840. Scholarships full 2, partial 
80 ($30,000). Self-help program. Est 1909. Inc nonprofit. Episcopal 

Summer Session and Camp. Make-up courses, 10 wks. Tui $100 
per subject. 

Plant $1,000,000. Endowment $280,000. Two dorms plus 8 dorm 
rms. Class rms 25. Lib 8000 vols. Labs 2. Studios art 1, music 1. 
Gyms 3. Fields 3. Courts 12. 

Founded as the National Cathedral School for Boys by the- be- 
quest of Mrs. Harriet Lane-Johnston, and having the use of the 
58 acre Close of Washington Cathedral, this school was directed 
for 20 years of devoted service by Canon Lucas, a staff member 
of the Cathedral and known to his boys as "The Chief." 



D. C. Leading Private Schools 346 

Canon Martin, a graduate of the University of Pa., and for 14 
years instructor, chaplain, and assistant head master at Episcopal 
Academy, was for seven years rector of St. Paul's Church, Burling- 
ton, Vt, before succeeding Canon Lucas on his retirement in 
1949. Well equipped for both academic and extra-curricular pro- 
grams, with unusual opportunities for music at the Cathedral, 
honors courses and acceleration are provided m the strong offer- 
ings of mathematics and languages. Reflecting world importance 
of Washington, the school represents many lands and graduates 
enter well known colleges. 

St. Albans combines many of the advantages of coeducation 
while retaining the advantages of separate education, for its sister 
school, the National Cathedral School for Girls, is also located 
in the Cathedral Close. Academic work is carried on separately, 
but the two schools come together for extra-curricular activities, 
including glee club, dramatics, religious club, and normal social 
activities. In addition, St. Albans has a balanced sports program, 
and a variety of other activities, especially music. 

SHERIDAN SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 3-9 

Washington 8, B.C. 2344 Massachusetts Ave. N.W. Tel. DE 2-2750. 
Rhoda Lee Koster, B.S., Bucknell, Head. 

Nursery Kindergarten Grades I-IV. Art Music French. 

Enr Boys 60, Girls 40. Fac full 9, part-time 5. 

Tui $310-460 (+$150). Scholarships partial 4 ($575). Est 1927. 
Proprietary. 

Established as Mrs. Cook's School by Mrs. Frank Cummings 
Cook, this was purchased by Mrs. Koster in 1952 and renamed. 
Children are prepared adequately for the larger schools. 

THE SIDWELL FRIENDS SCHOOL 

Day Coed Ages 4-19 

Washington 16, D.C. 3825 Wisconsin Ave., N.W. Tel. WOodley 
6-0953. 
Robert S. Lyle, A.B., Dartmouth, M.S., Cornell, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Social 
Sciences Child Care. Art Music. Rem Reading. Driver Training. 

Enr Boys 410, Girls 330. Elem 510, Sec 230. Fac full 61, part- 
time 10. Staff 7. 

Grad '5755. Entd Col '5755. (Harvard 4, USCC 3, Smith 3, 
Wheaton 3, Dartmouth 3, Amherst 2). Alumni 1161. 

Tui $375-725. Scholarships full 38, partial 26 ($33,000). Est 1883. 
Inc 1936 nonprofit. Friends. 

Summer School. Summer Day Camp. 

Plant $1,750,000. Class rms 58. Lib 9500 vols. Labs 4. Studios 
music 2, art 3. Gym. Fields 6. Courts 11. 



D. C. Middle Atlantic States 347 

Established and conducted for over 50 years by Thomas W 
Sidwell, this school justly earned a reputation for sound, schol- 
astic training which has been fostered by his successors, Albert E. 
Rogers and then Edwin Cornell Zavitz, the latter head master 
from 1942 until his death in 1949. 

Mr. Lyle, associated with the school from 1934, continues the 
work since his appointment in 1950. 

The academic program, with strong departments of science, lan- 
guages, art, music, and with remedial language work, prepares 
for Amherst, Earlham, Radcliffe, Vassar, the University of Md., 
Harvard, Oberlin, Swarthmore, and many others. There are a 
a variety of hobby and interest clubs, publications, dramatics, 
music, a full athletic program, and a strong student government. 
See also page 829 

SULLIVAN SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day -Boys Ages 17-23 

Washington 8, B.C. 2107 Wyoming Ave., N.W. Tel, CO 5-1717. 
Wendell E. Bailey, B.S., U.S. Naval Acad, Prin. 

Col Prep (Congressional, Military, Naval, Coast Guard, A.F., 
CEEB). 

Enr Bdg 80, Day 20. Fac 5. 

Tui Bdg $1115-1310, Day $535-650. Est 1937. Proprietary. 

Summer Session. Enr 40. Tui Bdg $275, Day $125, five wks, 

This school, formerly preparing only for the government acad- 
emies, now offers general college preparation. 

WOODWARD SCHOOL FOR BOYS 
Day Ages 8-20 

Washington 6, D.C. 1736 G St., N.W. Tel. National 8-8250. 
Walter R. Lewis, B.S., Pa. STC, Head. 

Grades III-VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1-2. Col Prep 
General Business. Art Music. Remedial Reading Make-up 
courses. 

Enr 250. Elem 110, Sec 140. Fac full 17, part-time 5. 

Grad '57 26. Entd Col '5717. (U of Md 5, Dickinson 2, U of 
Iowa 1, Whittier 1, Geo Washington 1, William & Mary 1). 

Tui $450. Scholarships full 4, partial 6 ($2000). Est 1919. Inc 
nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Enr 90. Tui $150, six wks. 

Class rms 15. Lib 3624 vols. Lab. Gym. Swimming pool. 

Today sending many graduates to college and technical schools, 
this comprehensive school has grown from a summer sessior 
started in 1905. Operated by and occupying two floors of the cen 
tral Y.M.C.A., the school stresses remedial reading and make-up 
work in all grades. Graduates have gone on to such varied colleges 
as George Washington University, West Point and Harvard. 



VIRGINIA 

ALEXANDRIA, VA. Pop 61,787. Alt 32 ft C&O; S R.R. 8 mi. 

SW of Washington, D.C., Rt U.S.I. Numerous historic landmarks 
and old Colonial buildings have brought Alexandria acclaim. Long 
a quiet place of residence for government officials, war activities 
early invaded from Washington, across the Potomac. Episcopal 
High School is on a height 3 mi. W of the city near the Theologi- 
cal Seminary. St. Agnes School is to the N on Braddock Heights; 
the new St. Stephen's for boys, nearby. 

BURGUNDY FARM COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 
Coed Ages 5-12 

Alexandria, Va. 3200 Burgundy Rd., Tel. King 9-3431. 
Agnes Sailer, A.B., Vassar, M.A., Columbia, Dir. 

Kindergarten Grades I- VIII. Art Music Typing Home 
Economics Manual Arts. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Boys 95, Girls 60. Fac full 10, part-time 3. 

Grads Entd Prep Sch '56 St. Stephen's 2, Cathedral 2, St. Ag- 
nes 1, Westtown 1. Alumni 33. 

Tui $360. Scholarships full 1, partial 13 ($2500). Est 1946. Inc 
1946 nonprofit. 

Summer Camp. Tui $130 six wks. 

Founded and partially built by a group of parents, most of 
whom had worked together in the Beverly Hills Church School, 
Burgundy provides opportunities for parents to function in many 
aspects of school life. Woods, farm animals, a swimming pool, 
carpentry, library and art room all contribute to the enrichment 
of the academic program. 

EPISCOPAL HIGH SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 14-18 
Alexandria, Va. Tel. King 8-1606. 
Richard P. Thomsen, B.A., Yale, M.A., Johns Hopkins, Head. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep, 

Enr 250. Fac full-time 21. 

Grad '5745. Entd Col '5745. (U of Va 10, Yale 8, U of N.C. 
5, Washington & Lee 4, Princeton 3, Vanderbilt 3). Alumni 3000. 

Tui Bdg $1700 (+$50). Scholarships full 5, partial 35 ($20,000). 
Est 1839. Episcopal. 

Plant $3,000,000. Endowment $750,000. Dorm rrns 152. Class 
rms 22. Lib 9000 vols. Labs 3. Gyms 2. Fields 4. Courts 12. 

348 



Va. South Atlantic States 349 

This Episcopal school was directed for 34 years by Dr. A. R. 
Hoxton until his retirement in 1947, when Richard P. Williams 
succeeded. Mr. Thomsen, who joined the faculty in 1939, returning 
from the Navy a Commander in 1946, took charge in 1951. The 
curriculum offers advanced courses in mathematics. Graduates 
enter the University of Va., Princeton, Yale, the University of 
N.C., and many other colleges and universities. Activities include 
athletics, glee club, dramatics, publications, and literary societies. 



ST. AGNES EPISCOPAL SCHOOL 

Bdg Girls Ages 11-18; Day Boys 5-7, Girls 5-18 
Alexandria, Va. Jefferson Park. Tel. KI 9-3542. 
Roberta Catherine McBride, A.B., Smith, M.A., Columbia; Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art 
Music Languages. Rem Reading. 

Enr Bdg 25; Day Girls 330, Boys 50. Elem 240, Sec 165. Fac 
full 28, part-time 7. 

Grad '5740. Entd Col '57 38. (Sweet Briar 4, Mary Washing- 
ton 4, William & Mary 4, Smith 4, Wellesley 1, Mt. Holyoke 1). 
Alumnae 350. 

Tui Bdg $1700 (+$200), Day $300-600. Scholarships partial 25 
($6000). Est 1924. Episcopal 

Plant $500,000. Dorm rms 13. Class rms 24. Lib 5000 vols. Lab. 
Studio art 1. Field. Courts 2. 

Now one of the seven diocesan schools of Virginia, this was 
founded by local citizens. After the retirement of Helen Arny 
Macan, head mistress for 18 years, Miss McBride was appointed 
in 1951. Graduates enter Sweet Briar, Smith, Wellesley, Hollins, 
Hood, Bryn Mawr, among others. The small boarding department 
attracts service and State Department patronage. In 1955 a new 
multi-purpose building with chapel-gym-auditorium, student 
lounges, and classrooms was completed. 

Boys leave at the end of the second grade to enter St. Stephen's. 

ST. STEPHEN'S SCHOOL 
Day Boys Ages 8-18 

Alexandria, Va. Seminary Rd. Tel. KI 9-6845. 

Rev. Emmett H. Hoy, B.S., Hampden-Sydney, B.D., Va. Theo. 

Sem, Head. 

Grades III- VIII High Sch 1-4 Col Prep. Art Music. 

Enr 360. Fac full 17, part-time 3. 

Grad '5715. Entd Col '5714. (Cornell 1, Hampden-Sydney 
1, Washington & Lee 1, V.M.I. 1, Williams 1, US Naval Acad 1). 
Alumni 62. 

Tui $560. Scholarships partial 8 ($2000). Est 1944. Episcopal. 

This day school was founded as part of the diocesan system in 



Va. Leading Private Schools 350 

Virginia Rev. Mr. Hoy succeeded Rev. Mr. Edward Tate in 1955, 
In 1957 the school moved to its new campus on Seminary Rd. 

BRISTOL, VA. Pop 15,954. Alt 1698 ft. N&W R.R. 154 mi. SW 
of Roanoke, Rt U.S.ll. In the bluegrass region of the Great 
Appalachian Valley, this manufacturing and shipping center forms 
one economic unit with Bristol, Tenn. Here are located King Col- 
lege and two junior colleges for women. The 200 acre campus of 
Sullins College overlooks the city; Virginia Intermont is in a 
suburb. 

SULLINS COLLEGE 
Bdg and Day -Girls Ages 16-20 

Bristol, Va. Virginia Park. Tel. North 3870. 

William T. Martin, A.B., Washington and Lee, L.L.B., Harvard, 

Pres. 

Jr Col 1-2. Liberal Arts Secretarial Medical Secretarial 
Art Drama Music Merchandising Home Economics Ballet 
Fashion Design. 

Enr Bdg 340, Day 10. Fac full 35, part-time 4. 

Tui Bdg $1750, Day $750. Scholarships partial 40 ($12,000). 
Self-help pgrm. Est 1870. Inc nonprofit. 

Summer Camps: Camp Sequoya for Girls. Tui $350 six wks. 
Coed Camp. Tui $175 three wks. 

Plant $2,500,000. Endowment $1,000,000. Dorm rms 150. Class 
rms 25. Lib 17,500 vols. Labs 3. Studios music 6, art 2. Gym. Swim- 
ming pool. Fields 2. Courts 3. Riding facilities. 

From 1870 this college, named for its founder, carried on a four- 
year program. In 1917, under the leadership of Dr. W. E. Martin, 
it was reorganized as a junior college, with a liberalized curricu- 
lum. Modern buildings on its large campus have been added. Stu- 
dents are enrolled from a wide geographical area. The transfer 
program, with testing, remedial reading, and counselling, sends 
graduates to many different colleges and universities, while 
for others there is an extensive variety of specialized pre- 
professional curricula. Dramatics, a radio workshop, music, publi- 
cations, and an extensive athletic program are among activities. 

In 1955 the two-year high school program was discontinued. 
See also page 857 



BUENA VISTA, VA. Pop 6542, C&O; N&W R.R. 5 mi SE of 
Lexington, Rts U.S. 60 & 501. On Maury R. in the Blue Ridge 
Mountains, this town manufactures paper, silk, textiles, and is 
the site of a junior college. George Washington National Forest 
extends beyond the town, and 12 mi. SW is Natural Bridge. 



Va. South Atlantic States 351 

SOUTHERN SEMINARY AND JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Bdg Girls Ages 16-20 
Buena Vista, Va. Tel. 4060. 

Margaret Durham Robey, A.B., Duke, M.Ed., Univ of Va., Pres. 
High Sch 3-4. Col Prep General. 

Jr Col 1-2. Liberal Arts Art Music Drama Secretarial 
Merchandising Home Economics Physical Education Teacher 
Training (Kindergarten) Pre-professional. 
Enr Bdg 240, Day 5. Fac full 26, part-time 4. 
Tui Bdg $1500-1600, Day $500. Est 1868. Inc 1868. 
Plant $900,000. Endowment $150,000. Dorm rms 100. Class rms 
12. Lib 8000 vols. Labs 2. Studios music 3, art 3. Gym. Swimming 
pool. Fields 3. Courts 5. Riding facilities. 

In this school the spirit of the old South is preserved, with 
modernization of courses and methods. In addition to liberal arts 
transfer and general education programs, there are vocational 
courses, including preparation for nursing, medical secretarial, and 
occupational therapy schools. Graduates enter the University of 
N.C., Madison, Hollins, Duke, Syracuse, and others. Among activ- 
ities are religious groups, sports, hobby and departmental clubs. 
In 1955 the first two years of high school were dropped from 
the program. 

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA. Pop 25,969. Alt 480 ft C&O; S 
R.R. 65 mi. NW of Richmond, Rt. U.S.250. The seat of the Uni- 
versity of Va., founded in 1819 largely through the efforts of 
Thomas Jefferson, Charlottesville is in the center of the state in 
a fruit-growing area of the Blue Ridge foothills. An Institute of 
Textile Technology is here. Long in the E section, opposite Jef- 
ferson's home, Monticello, St. Anne's moved in 1939 to "Greenway 
Rise" beyond the city limits. 

ST. ANNE'S SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Girls Ages 11-19 

Charlottesville, Va. Greenway Rise. Tel. 2-7341. 

Mrs. Thomas Jefferson Randolph, V, A.B., Bryn Mawr, M.A., 

Univ of Va., Head. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music. 

Enr Bdg 95, Day 70. Fac full 17, part-time 11. 

Grad '5724. Entd Col '5722. (Wellesley 2, Connecticut 2, 
Hollins 2, Salem 2, Smith 1, Vassar 1). 

Tui Bdg $1800 (+$75), Day $550-600. Scholarships partial 4 
($2,500). Est 1910. Episcopal. 

Dorm rms 54. Class rms 15. Lib 6450 vols. Lab. Studios music 
2, art 1. Gym. Courts 3. 

Since 1920 one of Virginia's seven diocesan schools, St. Anne's 



Va. Leading frivate Schools 352 

has been directed by Mrs, Randolph since 1950, when Elizabeth B. 
Cochran, head mistress since 1942, resigned to become head of the 
Master's School. The school has a modern curriculum and good 
standards of preparatory work, sending graduates to a variety 
of colleges, including Sweet Briar, Hollins, Smith, Wellesley, 
Wheaton, Connecticut College, Duke, Vassar. Music, dramatics, 
art, sports, especially riding, and publications are among activities. 

WARNER WOOD SCHOOL 
Of Efficient Preparation 
Bdg Boys Ages 12-20 

Charlottesville, Va. 127 Chancellor St. 
R. Warner Wood, A.M., Univ of Va., Dir. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. 

Enr8, Fac3. Tui $500 mo. 

Each year, Mr. Wood enrolls eight to ten boys, giving. them in- 
tensive preparation for entrance into college. His conscientious 
oversight of the lives of the boys in his care, which comprehends 
all phases of their development and builds self-confidence, has 
brought continued success. See also pages 714-15 

CHATHAM, VA. Pop 1456. Alt 828 ft S R.R. 15 mi. N of Dan- 
ville, Rt U.S. 29. A small county seat in a rich agricultural 
region of the rolling Piedmont country, Chatham occupies one 
of the highest points between Washington and the N.C. border. 
The girls school campus covers a hill to the E; the Academy is 
to the W. 

CHATHAM HALL 
Bdg Girls 14-18 

Chatham, Va. Tel. HEmlock 2941. 

The Rev. William W. Yardley, A.B., Johns Hopkins, Ed.M., 

Harvard, Rector. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Art Music Russian. Dra- 
matics. 

Enr Bdg 165, Day 10. Fac full 23, part-time 1. 

Grad 'S7--49. Entd Col '5748. (Smith 8, Wheaton 5, Bradford 
4, Connecticut 4, Vassar 2, Goucher 2). Alumnae 2000. 

Tui $2200 (+$100), Day $500. Scholarships full 1, partial 29 
($20,000). Est 1894. Episcopal. 

Plant $1,250,000. Endowment $300,000. Dorm rms 80. Class rms 
16. Lib 10,000 vols. Labs 2. Studios music 8, art 1. Swimming pool. 
Fields 2. Courts 12. Riding facilities. 

From 1928 under the direction of Dr. and Mrs. Edmund J. Lee, 
who came from many years residence in China, Chatham devel- 
oped from a small southern finishing group to a successful college 



Va. South Atlantic States 353 

preparatory school. Enrollment was increased, with now a waiting 

list and patrons from many states. Since 1935 fifteen new 
buildings have been constructed. 

The Rev. Mr. Yardley, appointed in 1949 after 6 years as head 
master of Tuxedo Park School, has maintained traditions and 
strengthened the curriculum. Chatham prepares most of its girls 
for Smith and Vassar, although graduates also enter Wellesley, 
Bryn Mawr, Bradford, Bennett, and others. Characteristic of the 
school are the gracious living, the simplicity of atmosphere, and 
the considerable although guarded religious training. There is a 
wide variety of extra-curricular activities, including music, dance, 
interest clubs, dramatics, and sports, especially riding. See also 
page 774 

MARGRAVE MILITARY ACADEMY 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 9*20 

Chatham, Va. Tel. 2481. 

"Col. Joseph H. Cosby, B.A., Univ of Richmond, M.A., Univ of 

Va., Th.B. 5 Southern Baptist Theol Sem, Pres. 

Grades V-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General Business. 
Mathematics Sciences Music. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg 350, Day 25. Fac full 26, part-time 1. 

Grad '5659. Alumni 3400. 

Tui Bdg $1100 (+$275), Day $250. Scholarships partial 40 
($17,000). Self help pgrm. Est 1909. Baptist. 

Summer Session. Enr 155. Tui $360 eight wks. 

Plant $1,004,982. Dorm rms 150. Class rms 28. Lib 2800 vols. 
Gyms 2. Swimming pool. Fields 3. Courts 6. 

Formerly Chatham Training School, this was renamed in 1925 
when J. H. Hargrave, Sn, gave the present site. Col. Cosby suc- 
ceeded Aubrey H. Camden in 1951. The majority of preparatory 
graduates enter southern colleges and universities. There is a 
strong remedial department. The extra-curricular program includes 
literary societies, publications, interest clubs, and military organi- 
zations. See also page 709 

CHRISTCHURCH, VA. Pop 100. 58 mi. E of Richmond, Va., 
Rt.33. On the Rappahannock River near Urbanua, in the lower 
Tidewater section of Va., this town is known for its Old Christ 
Church (1663) which, restored, is attended by boys from the 
school. 

CHRISTCHURCH SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 13-19 

Christchurch, Va. Tel. Saluda 8-3491. 

Robert M. Yarbrough, B.A., Millsaps, M.A., Georgetown and U 

of W.V., Head. 



Va. Leading Private Schools 354 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. 

Enr Bdg 125, Day 5. Fac full 10, part-time 2. 

Grad '5722. Entd Col '5721. (Randolph-Macon 5, Washing- 
ton & Lee 3, U of Va 3, Hampden- Sydney 2, Hobart 2, David- 
son 1). 

Tui Bdg $1400 (+$200), Day $475. Scholarships partial 20 
($5000). Est 1921. Episcopal. 

Summer Session. Rem Reading. Enr 60. Tui $475 seven wks. 

Plant $500,000. Dorm rms 110. Class rms 9. Lib 4300 vols. Lab. 
Studio music 1, Gym. Swimming pool. Fields 6. Courts 3. 

Emphasizing religious education and college preparation, this 
diocesan school sends graduates to a variety of colleges and 
universities, both in the North and in the South. 

Athletics are emphasized, as well as dramatics, music, and 
public speaking. Mr. Spalding, formerly head of the English de- 
partment at Episcopal High in Alexandria, was appointed in 1949. 
Mr, Robert M. Yarbrough, formerly associate headmaster, clean 
and director of admissions, was appointed in 1957. 

DANVILLE, VA. Pop 35,066. Alt 408 ft. 64 mi. S of Lynchburg, 
Rt U.S.29. On the Dan River near the N.C. border, Danville is 
one of the largest bright-leaf tobacco markets in the world and 
boasts 40 churches. Here stands Memorial Mansion, last capitol of 
the Confederacy, and two junior colleges for women. 

STRATFORD COLLEGE 
Bdg Gfrls Ages 16-20 

Danville, Va. Tel. 35. 

John C. Simpson, A.B., A.M., LL.D., Randolph-Macon, Pres. 
High Sch 3-4. Col Prep General. Art Music. 
Jr Col 1-2. Liberal Arts Music Art Medical Technology 
Merchandising Physical Education Secretarial Medical Secre- 
tarial Speech Pre-professional. 

Enr Bdg High Sch 75, Col 90; Day High Sch 10, Col 35, Fac 
full 24, part-time 5. 

High Sch Grad '5636. Entd Col '5633, Alumnae 2000. 
Tui Bdg $1185 ( + $150), Day $300. Scholarships full 1, partial 
15 ($2000). Est 1852. Inc 1930 nonprofit. 

Occupying the plant of the Randolph-Macon School for Girls, 
which traced its ancestry back to Danville Female College estab- 
lished more than a hundred years ago, this school has been di- 
rected by Mr. Simpson since 1930. 

The school has good facilities and a sound academic pro- 
gram that fill a need in the region. Pre-professional curricula 
include radio, journalism, nursing, and social service. A large 
number of graduates now transfer to senior college. The prepara- 
tory department is under the name Stratford Hall. 



Va. South Atlantic States 355 

FORK UNION, VA. Pop 200. Alt 900 ft. C&O R.R. 46 mi. N.W. 
of Richmond, on Rt U.S.15. In the geographical center of Va., 
Fork Union is on a plateau in the Blue Ridge foothills. The Acad- 
emy's 600 acre campus is 2 mi. S toward the James River. 

FORK UNION MILITARY ACADEMY 
Bdg Boys Ages 9-19 

Fork Union, Va. Tel. 2136. 

James C. Wicker, B.A., D.D., Univ of Richmond, B.Th., So. Bap- 
tist Theological Sem. Pres; Col. Harry M. Waldron, B.A., Univ 
of Richmond, M.A., Univ of Va., Academic Head. 

Grades IV- VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep Gen- 
eral Business. Science Mathematics English. Tutoring. 

Enr Bdg 625, Day 5. Fac full-time 47. 

Grad '57107. Entd Col '5780. (U of Richmond 8, V.M.I. 8, 
William & Mary 5, U of Va 3, U of N.C. 3, Citadel 3). Alumni 
2,932. 

Tui Bdg $1240 (-{-$445), Day $500. Scholarships partial 110. 
Est 1898. Baptist. 

Plant $2,225,000. Endowment $600,000. Dorm rms 272. Class rms 
40. Lib 4950 vols. Labs 3. Studio music 5. Gyms 2. Swimming 
pool. Fields 5. Courts 6. 

Under the presidency from 1930 of Dr. John J. Wicker, and of 
his son since 1945, this military school has been widely advertised, 
particularly for the discipline and concentration of its One Sub- 
ject Plan. In the Upper School, each pupil studies one subject for 
8 weeks, then another for the next 8 weeks, and so on. The stu- 
dents represent many different denominations and are from many 
states and some foreign countries. Graduates enter numerous col- 
leges and universities, including the universities of N.C., Md., Va., 
Richmond, V.P.I., and V.M.I. There is a wide range of extra- 
curricular activities in addition to sports and the military. 

In recent years there has been considerable refurbishing of 
buildings and grounds, as well as development of further testing 
and remedial instructions. See also page 713 

FORT DEFIANCE, Va. Alt 160 ft. C&O; N&W R-R- 8 mi NE of 
Staunton, Rt. U.S.I 1. This is a little community in the Shenandoah 
Valley. 

AUGUSTA MILITARY ACADEMY 

Bdg * Boys Ages 8-20 
Fort Defiance, Va. Tel. Staunton 5-7404. 
Col. Charles S. Roller, Jr., B.S., M.S., VMI, Prin. 

Grades II- VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1-2. Col Prep. 
Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg 390, Day 15. Elem 110, Sec 295. Fac full-time 34. 

Grad '5733. Entd Col '5731. (V.P.I. 17, U of NC 12, VMI 
12, U of Va 10, U of Richmond 10). 



Va. Leading Private Schools 356 

Tui Bdg $1200 (+$300), Day $200. Scholarships partial 2 ($300). 
Work pgrm. Est 1742. Proprietary. 

Plant $2,000,000. Dorm rms 300. Class rms 38. Lib 6000 vols. 
Labs 3. Studio music 2. Gym. Swimming pool. Fields 4. Courts 3. 

Organized in 1742, and long operated by the forbears of the 
present principal, Col Charles A. Roller, Jr., the academy offers 
college preparation and government-supervised R.O.T.C. military 
training. A separate junior school is operated for elementary grade 
students. Graduates enter leading colleges of the middle South, 
especially the universities of Va., N.C. and Md., Washington and 
Lee, William and Mary, and V.P.I. The present head succeeded 
his brother in 1946. 

FRONT ROYAL, VA. Pop 8115. Alt 492 ft S; N&W R.R. 70 mi. 
W of Washington, D.C. A small town at the N entrance of the 
Shenandoah National Park, Front Royal marks the beginning 
of the Skyline Drive. George Washington National Forest is W. 
The establishment of a new textile plant greatly increased the 
population. The Academy is near the center of the town. 

RANDOLPH-MACON ACADEMY 
Bdg Boys Ages 13-18 

Front Royal, Va. Tel. 72. 

Col. John C. Boggs, A.B., Duke, Prin. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep (Classical, 
Collegiate, Pre-Engineering Service). Music Mathematics. Rem- 
Developmental Reading. Bible. Military Science. 

Enr Bdg 270, Day 25. Fac full 22, part-time 1. Adm Staff 3. 

Grad '57 72. Entd Col '57 66. (U of Md. 7, U of N.C. 6, VPI 
6, Randolph-Macon 5, U of Va 4, William & Mary 4). 

Tui Bdg $1300 (+$260), Day $250 (-f-$260). Scholarships partial 
89 ($24,100). Est 1892. Inc nonprofit Methodist. 

Plant $1,200,000. Dorm rms 127. Class rms 18. Lib 5500 vols. 
Labs 3. Studio music 1. Gym. Swimming pool. Fields 2. Courts 5. 

Part of the Randolph-Macon system, which also includes the 
College for Men and the College for Women, this military acad- 
emy draws its boys from a number of states. Among higher insti- 
tutions entered in addition to the affiliated college are the Univer- 
sity of Va., Washington and Lee, Duke, V.M.I., and Lehigh. 

See also page 711 

LYNCHBURG, VA. Pop 47,727. Alt 517 ft S; N&W R.R. 54 mi. 
E of Roanoke, Rt U.S.460. An important tobacco market and the 
transportation and trade center of the W Piedmont, Lynchburg 
is a pleasant city 100 mi. W of Richmond. Water power from the 
James River and nearby coal fields have made this one of the 
state's leading manufacturing centers. Randolph-Macon Woman's 
College, established in 1893, extends from Rivermont Ave. to 
bluffs overlooking the river. 



Va. South Atlantic States 357 

VIRGINIA EPISCOPAL SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day -Boys Ages 13-18 

Lynchburg, Va. Tel. 2-3331. 

Rev. Roger Atkinson Walke, Jr., B.A., B.D., M.A., Head. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4 Col Prep. Languages Literature Music. 

Enr Bdg 125, Day 15. Fac full-time 12. 

Grad '5730. Entd Col '5730. (U of N.C. 13, U of Va 7, RC. 
State 2, Duke 2, VMI 1, M.I.T. 1). Alumni 1750. 

Tui Bdg $1350 (+$100), Day $600. Scholarships partial 15. Est 
1916. Inc 1914 nonprofit Episcopal. 

This church school was founded by the first Bishop of the dio- 
cese, the Rev. Robert Carter Jett, for southern boys of Episcopal 
families unable to send them to more expensive church schools. 
Rev. Oscar de Wolf Randolph was succeeded in 19^3 by Dr. 
George L. Barton,- who continued the policies he effected so suc- 
cessfully at De Veaux and later at Christchurch Schools. Graduates 
of the conservative, thorough curriculum enter many colleges, both 
northern and southern. Among activities are sports, music, and 
publications. 

When Dr. Barton retired in 1957, Rev. Walke, formerly assistant 
head master of Episcopal High School, succeeded him. 

McLEAN, Va. Pop 1094. 10 mi. W of Washington, D.C., on 
Rt.123. In this village of Fairfax County, Potomac School's mod- 
ern building is on a hilltop. 

THE POTOMAC SCHOOL 
Day Boys Ages 5-9, Girls 5-15 

McLean, Va. Tel. Elmwood 6-4101. 
Carol Preston, B.A., Vassar, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1. Art Music 
French Latin. Dramatics. 

Enr Girls 270, Boys 70. Fac full 26, part-time io. 

Grad '5734. Entd Prep Sch '5733. (Madeira 23, Mt Vernon 
3, Milton 2, Concord 2, Dobbs 1, Cathedral 1). Alumnae 757. 

Tui $425-700. Scholarships full 8, partial 12 ($8715). Est. 1904. 
Inc. 1907 nonprofit. 

Since 1952 located in Virginia, this school was established in 
Washington by Mrs. Fairfax Harrison, with Lucy Madeira as the 
first principal. Miss Preston succeeded Dorothea Stillman in 1938. 

Recently the school has initiated a nature study program, with 
ten acres of woods, streams, ponds, and fields being developed 
for this. 

MIDDLEBURG, VA. Pop 663. S R.R. 40 mi. W of Washington, 
D.C., Rt. U.S.50. Today one of the smartest and wealthiest com-" 
munities of horsy easterners, this was not long since a sleepy 



Va. Leading Private Schools 358 

little Piedmont village. Foxcroft School, on a beautiful 500 acre 
estate bordering Pot House village 3 mi. from Middleburg, occu- 
pies the first brick mansion erected in Loudoun County, dating 
back to the days of the parents of George Washington. 

FOXCROFT SCHOOL 
Bdg Girls Ages 13-18 

Middleburg, Va. Tel. Murray 7-2611. 

Charlotte H. Noland, Pres; Van S. Merle-Smith, A.B., Princeton, 

M.A., Columbia, Head. 

High Sen 1-4. Col Prep General. Music Art Typing. Re- 
medial Reading. Dramatics Photography. 

Enr 120. Fac full 18, part-time 2. 

Grad '5720. Entd Col '5718. (Briarcliff 6, Smith 4, Welles- 
ley 2, Radcliffe 1, Bryn Mawr 1, Sweet Briar 1). Alumnae 1070. 

Tui $2900 (+$150). Scholarships partial 15 ($15,000). Est 19 14. 
Inc 1937 nonprofit. 

Plant $2,000,000. Dorm rms 41. Class rms 11. Lib 7400 vols. 
Labs 2. Studios music 10, art 1. Theatre. Observatory. Gym. Rid- 
ing facilities. Courts 4. 

During more than forty years, Miss Noland has built 
about her own personality a school with a reputation for exclu- 
siveness and for something of the atmosphere of the Old South. 
A Virginian, a hard rider, she demanded a good seat of her girls, 
long maintaining cherished ideals of combining sport with aca- 
demic prowess. Herself without the usual college training, Miss 
Charlotte as she is known, leaves scholastic work to the academic 
head, but inculcates a sense of social responsibility. In 1942 with 
the war fervor, military drill was introduced, and proved so 
popular it has been made a permanent feature. Other student 
activities naturally emphasize athletics, but there are also various 
school clubs, publications, dramatics, and several social service 
groups. An extensive building program has recently been com- 
pleted. In its beginnings a finishing school, Foxcroft is now a 
strong preparatory institution sending graduates to Smith, Rad- 
cliffe, Bryn Mawr, Briarcliff, Bennett, and other colleges. 

THE HILL SCHOOL OF MIDDLEBURG 
Day-* Coed Ages 6*15 

Middleburg, Va. Tel MU 7-3611. 

C. Waring Gillespie, B.A., Yale, Head. 

Grades I- VIII. Latin French Art Music. 

Enr Boys 40, Girls 50. Fac full 7, part-time 3. Adm Staff 1. 

Tui $385-605 (+$25). Scholarships. Est 1926. Inc 1926 nonprofit 

Patrons of Hill send their children to preparatory schools 
throughout the country. Russell A, Anderson, who succeeded LiJ- 
lie James, enlarged plant and curriculum. He resigned in 1956; 
Mr. C. Waring Gillespie is now head master. 



Va. South Atlantic States 359 

NORFOLK, VA. Pop 213,513. Alt 12 ft ACL; C&O; N&W; P; 
SAL R.R. 75 mi. SE of Richmond. A leading U.S. seaport and the 
second city of Va., Norfolk is a busy center of Naval activities, 
with the oldest Navy Yard in the country and a Naval air sta- 
tion. It is also a distributing center for farm produce and sea- 
food of the state. Across Hampton Roads are Hampton, with its 
Institute, and Newport News. 

THE GRAHAM SCHOOL 
Day Girls Ages 10-18 

Norfolk 7, Va. 739 Baldwin PL Tel. MA 3-5407. 
Sarah D. Graham, A.B., Randolph-Macon, Prin. 

Grades VI- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. English. 

Enr 45. Fac full 6, part-time 2. 

Grad '574. Entd Col '574. (Sweet Briar 1, Randolph-Macon 
1, Hollins 1, Briarcliff 1). 

Tui $340-450. Est 1932. Proprietary, 

Class rms 5. Lib 1150 vols. 

This group was established by Miss Graham, a skillful tutor 
who was co-founder of The Tutoring School, from which she 
withdrew in 1932, Stressing particularly English composition, 
foreign languages, especially Latin and French, the school 
has entered graduates in many colleges, chiefly in the Middle 
Atlantic and the South. 

THE NORFOLK ACADEMY 
Day Boys Ages 6-19 

Norfolk 5, Va. North Shore Rd. at Newport Tel. JU 8-2104, 
James Buckner Massey, Jr., A.B,, Erskine, M.A., Univ of Md., 
D.Sc., Head. 

Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Literature Latin 
History Mathematics Public Speaking. 

Enr 300. Elem 120, Sec 180. Fac full 19, part-time 4. 

Grad '5710. Entd Col '5710. (VMI 4, U of Va 2, VPI 1, 
Johns Hopkins 1, Yale 1, U of Pa 1). 

Tui $450-600. Scholarships full 4, partial 3 ($3500). Est 1728. Inc 
nonprofit. 

Plant $300,000. Class rms 18. Lib 2500 vols. Labs 2. Gym. 

This Academy, founded before the American Revolution, was 
closed during the 1930's but was reopened in 1946 by a group of 
civic-minded businessmen. New buildings have since been added. 
The solid preparatory curriculum, enriched by study of contem- 
porary affairs and public speaking, prepares not only for Virginia 
colleges and universities, but also for M.I.T., Annapolis, and 
others. A full athletic program is provided, as well as clubs, music, 
and publications. 



Va. Leading Private Schools 

RICHMOND, VA. Pop 230,310. Alt 20 ft. 100 mi. S of Wash- 
ington, D.C., Rt. U.S.I. The capital of Va., Richmond has great 
historic interest. The White House of the Confederacy, former 
home of Jefferson Davis, is now a museum of confederate relics; 
the famous battlefield is nearby. Opposite the capitol is the Gov- 
ernor's Mansion; W are many beautiful old houses and gardens. 
Today an important tobacco market, it is also a cultural, commer- 
cial and transportation center for the South. The Collegiate School 
is in a residential district. Westhampton, 3 mi. from the center, 
has the allied Richmond College for men and Westhampton Col- 
lege for women. Here, too, are St. Catherine's School for girls and 
Saint Christopher's School for boys. 

THE COLLEGIATE SCHOOL 
Day Girls Ages 4-18, Boys 4-14 

Richmond 19, Va. 1619 Monument Ave. Tel. ELgin 5-7459. 
Catharine S. Flippen, A.B., Muskingum, M.A., Columbia, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col' Prep Gen- 
eral. Art Music Home Economics Typing. 

Enr Girls 415, Boys 160. Elem 465, Sec 110. Fac full 44, part- 
time 13. 

Grad '57 20. Entd Col '57 20. (Smith 3, Mary Washington 2, 
St. Mary's 2, Bryn Mawr 1, Mt. Holyoke 1). 

Tux $300-500. Scholarships partial 8. Est 1915. Inc 1950 non- 
profit. 

Class rms 47. Lib 4450 vols. Labs 2. Studios 7. Gym. 

Since 1950 non-sectarian, although formerly owned by the Pres- 
byterian League, this school has been under the direction of Mrs. 
Flippen since 1940, when she succeeded Annie P. Hodges after 
long experience in school work both in this country and in Egypt 
The academic standing is good, and graduates enter Hollins, 
Sweet Briar, Agnes Scott, Wellesley, Randolph-Macon for Wom- 
en, and other colleges. 

In 1953 a coeducational country day branch school was estab* 
lished 10 miles west of the city on the River Road. Three buildings 
for 300 students from kindergarten through the eighth grade have 
been built by patrons living in the western area of the city. 



ST. CATHERINE'S SCHOOL 
Bdg Girls Ages 12-18; Day Girls 5-18 

Richmond 26, Va. 6001 Grove Ave. Tel. ATlantic 8-2804. 
Susanna P. Turner, B.A., Hollins, M.A., Columbia, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art 
Music Typing Religion. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg 145, Day 450. Elem 325, Sec 270. Fac full 52, part- 
time 10. 



Va. South Atlantic States 361 

Grad '57 62. Entd Col '57 60. (Hollins 8, Sweet Briar 7, 
Wheaton 3, Newcomb 3, Wellesley 2, Smith 2). Alumnae 3425. 

Tui Bdg $1800 (+$100), Day $325-625. Scholarships partial 63 
($20,435). Est 1890. Episcopal. 

Plant $1,123,420. Dorm rms 67. Class rms 39. Lib 9854 vols. 
Labs 2. Studios music 10, art 2. Gyms 2. Outdoor swimming pool. 
Fields 3. Courts 5. Theatre. 

In 1920 the Episcopal Church of the Diocese of Virginia took 
over Miss Ellett's School. Louisa deB. Bacot Brackett, who had 
been principal for twenty-three years, was succeeded in 1947 
by Miss Turner, who had been at Chatham Hall for five years 
before service in the WAC. The curriculum with its strong em- 
phasis on religion, prepares graduates for Sweet Briar, Hollins, 
Wellesley, and other leading colleges. The extra-curricular pro- 
gram includes sports, art, rnusic, dramatics, sewing and typing, 
student government, a league participating in community, na- 
tional, and international causes, and religious activities. Among 
other activities are dancing and horseback riding. 

ST. CHRISTOPHER'S SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 12-19; Day 5-19 

Richmond 26, Va. 711 St. Christopher's Rd.Tel ATlantic 8-2817. 
Robert W. Bugg, A.B., D.Sc., Hampden-Sydney Col, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4^ Col Prep. 

Enr Bdg 55, Day 455. Elem 310, Sec 200. Fac full 29, part-time 7. 

Grad '5721. Entd Col '57 2L (Washington & Lee 7, U of Va 
4, Hampden-Sydney 3, Princeton 2, Yale 2, US Naval Acad 1). 
Alumni 1600. 

Tui Bdg $1325 (+$150), Day $300-500. Scholarships partial 18 
($8000). Est 1911. Episcopal. 

Plant $1,102,000. Endowment $120,000. Dorm rms 20. Class 
rms 28. Lib 6000 vols. Labs 2. Studios music 1, art 1. Gyms 3. 
Fields 10. Courts 4. 

In 1920 the Episcopal Church took over the Chamberlayne 
School as one of its diocesan group, retaining Dr. C. G. Chamber- 
layne as head master. In 1951 Dr. Bugg, on the faculty since 1920, 
succeeded John P. Williams, head master from 1940. Standards 
are high, and boys are prepared for the University of Va., Hamp- 
den-Sydney, V.M.I., Washington and Lee, and other southern 
colleges, with a few graduates attending northern colleges. Ath- 
letics, student council, dramatics, music, and various clubs and 
organizations are among activities. Recently the Lower School 
has been completely renovated and two new wings added. 

STAUNTON, VA. Pop 19,927. Alt 1379 ft. C&O R.R. 32 mi. NW 
of Charlottesville, Rt U.S.250. 100 mi. NW of Richmond, this 
typical southern community dates from Colonial days. In the 



Va. Leading Private Schools 362 

Manse on Coalter Street, Woodrow Wilson was born. Stuart 
Hall is directly in the town; Mary Baldwin College and Staunton 
Military Academy are on the heights above, 

STAUNTON MILITARY ACADEMY 

Bdg Boys Ages 10-19 
Staunton, Va. Tel. TUxedo 6-2451. 
Col. Harrison S. Dey, B.S., Dartmouth, Supt. 
Col. J. Worth Pence, A.B., Roanoke, M.A., Columbia, Head. 

Grades VI- VIII High Sen 1-4. Post Grad 1. Col Prep (Scien- 
tific, Classical) General Business. Music. Remedial Reading. 
Make-up courses. 

Enr Bdg 500, Day 20. Fac full 46, part-time 3. 

Grad '57115. Entd Col '57107. (U of Va 7, VPI 6, Georgia 
Tech 6, U of N.C. 5, Air Force Acad 3, Cornell 3). Alumni 8835. 

Tui Bdg $1375 (+$450), Day $700. Est 1860. Inc 1893. 

Summer Session. Enr 45. Tui $420 seven wks. 

Plant $2,000,000. Dorm rms 275. Class rms 30. Lib 5000 vols. 
Labs 4. Studios music 2. Gyms 2. Swimming pool. Fields 5. 
Courts 10. 

This academy was founded by William H. Kable, later a cap- 
tain in the Confederate Army, and directed by him for more than 
half a century. In 1912 he was succeeded by his son, Colonel 
William G. Kable, under whose leadership the academy grew 
rapidly. In 1920 Colonel Thomas H. Russell, head master for 
many years, became Superintendent, a position he held until his 
death in 1933. The traditions of the academy have been continued 
by his successors. 

Many graduates enter the University of Va., with others going 
to West Point, Annapolis, V.M.I., Yale, Princeton. Activities in 
addition to military organizations emphasize athletics, music,, pub- 
lications, dramatics, and various hobby clubs. See page 710 

STUART HALL 
Bdg Girls Ages 13-19 

Staunton, Va. Tel. TUxedo 6-6551. 

Martha Dabney Jones, A.B., Sweet Briar, M.A., Univ of N.C., 

Head. ^ ^ j 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Art Music Speech and 
Dramatics. 

Enr Bdg 145, Day 15, Fac full 16, part-time 2. 

Grad '5739. Entd Col '5738. (Converse 5, Salem 3, Agnes 
Scott 2, U of Ala. 2, Duke 2, Hollins 2). Alumnae 2500. 

Tui Bdg $1500 (+$100), Day $400. Scholarships partial 16 
($6550). Est 1843. Episcopal. 

Plant $1,117,885. Dorm rms 72. Class rms 14. Lib 5000 vols. Labs 
2. Studios music 3, art 1. Gym, Swimming pool. Field- Courts 3. 



Va. South Atlantic States 363 

Oldest of the girls' schools in Virginia, Stuart Hall was 
founded in 1843 as Virginia Female Institute and was renamed 
in honor of Mrs, J. E. B. Stuart, widow of Virginia's famous cav- 
alry leader, and principal for 19 years. Since 1914 the school has 
been owned and operated by the three Episcopal dioceses of 
Virginia. 

Mrs. Annie P. Hodges, succeeding Ophelia Carr in 1943, had 
been principal of Chatham Hall for five -years, and later dean of 
women of William and Mary, and principal of Collegiate School 
in Richmond. Emphasis is on college preparation, with graduates 
entering Sweet Briar, Hollins, Wellesley, Mt Holyoke, Bryn 
Mawr, and others. There is also a general program with much 
opportunity in fine arts. Southern traditions are maintained in the 
gracious atmosphere. Among extra-curricular activities are sports, 
a service league, music, dramatics, art, and interest clubs. Miss 
Jones, formerly dean of students at St. Mary's Junior College in 
Raleigh, N.C., was appointed head mistress in 1955. 

TAPPAHANNOCK, VA. Pop 1011. 48 mi. NE of Richmond, Rt 
U.S.360. On the Rappahannock River in the center of the Tide- 
water section, this little town, established as a port in 1680, has a 
cannery and lumber mill. Just below the town is St. Margaret's 
on a bluff. 

ST. MARGARET'S SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Girls Ages 12-18 
Tappahannock, Va. Tel. Hillcrest 3-2962. 
Viola H. Woolfolk, B.A., Mt, Holyoke, M.A., Columbia, Head 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Art Music.Rem Reading. 

Enr Bdg 105, Day 20. Fac full 9, part-time 4. 

Grad '5721. Entd Col '5717. (Westhampton 3, William & 
Mary 2, Sweet Briar 1, Randolph-Macon 1, Hollins 1, Goucher 1). 
Alumnae 455. 

Tui Bdg $1400 (+$200), Day $360, Scholarships partial 14 
($1500). Est 1920. Episcopal. 

Plant $283,169. Dorm rms 50. Class rms 14. Lib 4500 vols. Lab. 
Studios music 1. art 1. Gym. Field. Courts 2. 

As one of the seven Episcopal schools in the diocese, St. Mar- 
garet's had vigorous growth under Edith Latane from 1927 to 
1943. Mrs. Rebecca R. Craighill had charge for four years and 
was followed by Rebecca Brockenbrough until 1950. Miss Wool- 
folk, trained in the diocesan schools, has had wide school experi- 
ence. 

The semi-rural setting and grounds of St. Margaret's reflect 
the homelike atmosphere in which the girls are held to good aca- 
demic standards. Individual attention and college preparation are 
stressed, and graduates enter a wide variety of colleges. Among 



Va. Leading Private Schools 364 

activities are athletic teams, music, dramatics, publications, and 
chanty and community work. 

In 1955 a new dormitory was completed, permitting a larger 
boarding enrollment. 

VIRGINIA BEACH, VA. Pop 16,000. 17 mi. E of Norfolk, Rt. 
U.S. 58. Once considered solely as a summer resort, Virginia Beach 
is now a residential community to the Norfolk-Portsmouth area. 
The town is on the Atlantic, just south of Cape Henry. 

THE EVERETT SCHOOL 
Day -Coed Ages 4-10 

Virginia Beach, Va. 518 Cavalier Dr. Tel. GA 8-2943. 
Helena A. Everett, Pres. 

Kindergarten Grades I-V. Music. French. 

Enr Boys 75, Girls 90. Fac full 9, part-time 3. 

Tui $225-325. Est 1924. Inc 1957. 

Started by Mrs. Everett for her own children, this school now 
enrolls many children of Army, Navy, Marine, and NATO officers 
at nearby stations and adjusts its curriculum to their needs. 

In a residential section, the school occupies quarters built and 
designed for it in 1930, to which an annex has recently been 
added. See also page 826 

WARRENTON, VA. Pop 1*797. Alt 700 ft. 37 mi. NW of Fred- 
ericksburg, Rtl7. At the foot of Blue Ridge in a fertile agricul- 
tural area of large estates, Warrenton is known for its horsebreed- 
ing and fox-hunting. It is also something of an educational^ center, 
deriving its name from Warren Academy established here in 1777, 
Highland School, near the village, is accessible to Washington. 

HIGHLAND SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 6-14 

Warrenton, Va. Tel. WArrenton 1367- J. 

Miss L. D. Hamilton; Mrs. W. Su Rust, Co-Prins. 

Grades I-VIII. 

EnrBoys 40, Girls 50. Fac full 8, part-time 2, 

Tui $300-480. Scholarships full 3. Est 1928. Proprietary. 

For thirty years conducted as the Warrenton Branch of Calvert 
School, in 1957 it was opened with new well-equipped buildings 
on a 12-acre site as the Highland School. This small primary 
school offers ground work supplemented by individual tutorial and 
remedial instruction in a country day program. 

WAYNESBORO, VA. Pop 12,357. Alt 1407 ft. N&W; C&O R.R 
12 mi. SE of Staunton, Rt U.S.250. This small city on Soutl 
River, with its tree lined suburbs, was the original Teesville, re- 
named in 1797 for "Mad Anthony" Wayne. It is today an impor- 
tant trade and industrial center for the rich agricultural Shenan- 
doah Valley. Fairfax Hall has SO acres on the outskirts. 



Va. South Atlantic States 365 

FAIRFAX HALL 
Bdg Girls Ages 13-18 

Waynesboro, Va. Park Station. Tel WHitchall 3-7501. 

William B. Gates, A.B., Randolph-Macon, M.A., Univ of Va., 

Pres. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General Art Typing Music. 

Enr Bdg 170, Day 5. frac full-time 20. 

Grad '5751. Entd Col '5746. Alumnae 2100. 

Tui Bdg $1600, Day $500. Est 1920. Inc 1936. 

Plant $400,000. Dorm rms 80. Class rms 14. Lib 4000 vols. Labs 

2. Studios music 3, art 1. Gym. Swimming pools 2. Field. Courts 

3. Riding. 

This college preparatory school was developed from the former 
Brandon Institute and wag renamed in 1920 in honor of Lord 
Fairfax. In 1936 Mr. Gates, former president of Blackstone Col- 
lege, purchased it, and during his regime scholastic standards 
have been raised, dormitory rooms provided for the increased en- 
rollment, and a pleasant social life encouraged. Graduates enter 
many colleges, including Sweet Briar, Randolph-Macon for Wom- 
en, Hollins, Duke, Wellesley, Cornell Activities include sports, 
especially riding dramatics, music. 

In 1956 the junior college department was discontinued. See also 

page 858 



FISHBURNE MILITARY SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day-*- Boys 13-18 

Waynesboro, Va. Tel. WHitehail 3-4336. 

Lt Col. E. P. Childs, Jr., USAR (Ret), B.S., Trinity, M.Ed,, 

U of Va., Supt. 

High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep Mathematics Commercial 
Law Public Speaking. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Bdg 160, Day 10. Fac full-time 17. 

Grad '5746. Entd Col '5745. Alumni 2528. 

Tui Bdg $1350 (+$345), Day $430 (+$345). Est 1879. Inc 1951 
nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Tui Bdg $450 seven weeks. 

Plant $400,000. Dorm rms 84. Class rms 14. Lib 1500 vols. Labs 
2. Studio music 1. Gyms 2. Swimming pool. Fields 3. Courts 6. 

James Fishburne established this as a one-room private school 
for town students, but later enlarged it to enroll boarding students. 
Under CoL Morgan H. Hudgins, who succeeded Mr. Fishburne 
as head in 1913, the present plant was built. Preparing for West 
Point, Annapolis, and Coast Guard academies, the school also 
sends graduates to southern universities and colleges. 

In 1956, CoL Childs, formerly head master, succeeded Col. John 
C. Moore as superintendent. 



Va. Leading Private Schook 366 

In addition to military organizations and athletics, the activi- 
ties program includes publications, music, dramatics, and other 
clubs. 

WOODBERRY FOREST, VA. C&O and S.R.R. to Orange; 35 

mi N of Charlottesville. This little Piedmont village is 90 mi. SW 
of Washington, D.G, near Orange. On an elevation with a view 
of the Blue Ridge Mountains, the school occupies the estate from 
which it takes its name, formerly owned by the family of James 
Madison. 

WOODBERRY FOREST SCHOOL 

Bdg Boys Ages 12-19 
Woodberry Forest, Va. Tel. Orange 3521. 

Joseph M. Mercer, B.S., Univ of Va., Head; J. Carter Walker, 
B.A., M.A., Univ of Va., Head Emeritus. 

Grade VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Public Speaking Music 
Art Machine Shop Mechanical Drawing Aeronautics. 

Enr Bdg 260, Day 15. Fac full 29, part-time 1. 

Grad '5753. Entd Col '5751. (U of N.C. 10, U of Va 7, David- 
son 4, Princeton 4, Washington & Lee 4, Georgia Tech 3). Alum- 

m Tui Bdg $1750 (+$150), Day $450. Scholarships partial 26 
($18,000). Est 1889. Inc 1926 nonprofit. 

Summer Session. Enr 100. Tui $400 six wks. 

Plant $1,576,362. Dorm rms 131. Class rms 29. Lib 6000 vols. 
Labs 3. Studios music 1, art 1. Gyms 2. Swimming pool. Fields 8. 
Courts 8. 

Woodberry Forest was established by Robert S. Walker and 
was carried on under family ownership and control until 1926 by 
three of his four sons. J. Carter Walker was head master until 
1948 and members of the family continue on the board of trustees. 
Shaun Kelly was head master from 1948-1952, when Mr. Mercer 
succeeded as acting head. The thorough curriculum prepares not 
only for the universities of Va. and N.C, Davidson, Washington 
and Lee, but also for Princeton, Yale, and other colleges in the 
northeast Athletics, publications, dramatics, science, current 
events, literary and music clubs and the chapel council are among 
activities. 

WOODSTOCK, VA. Pop 1816. Alt 820 ft 28 mi. SW of Win- 
chester, Rt U.S.I 1. In Shenandoah County, center of Virginia's 
apple country, Woodstock is a quiet community. The Episcopal 
Church still has the Bible and prayer book of Gen. Peter Gabriel 
Muhlenberg. On a hill at the S limits is the 25 acre campus of 
Massanutten. 

When writing schools, please mention this Handbook 



Va. South Atlantic States 367 

MASSANUTTEN MILITARY ACADEMY 
Bdg and Day* Boys Ages 12-18 

Woodstock, Va. Tel. 475. 

Robert J. Benchoff, A.B., Franklin and Marshall, LL.B., Harvard 

Law School, Head. 

Grades VI- VIII High Sen 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep Gen- 
eral Business. Mathematics Sciences. Make-up courses. 

Enr Bdg 240, Day 10. Fac full-time 15. 

Grad '57 31. Entd Col '57 .(William & Mary 3, V.P.I. 3, U 
of Va 2, V.M.I. 2, Bucknell 2, Penn State 1). Alumni 1500. 

Tui Bdg $1150 (+$395), Day $250. Scholarships partial 22 
($12,000). Est 1899. Reformed Church. 

Dorm rms 110. Class rms 13. Lab. Studio music 1. Gym. Swim- 
ming pool. Fields 3. Courts 3. Riding facilities. 

Summer Camp. Tui $40 wk. Tutoring. 

Active in civic and educational affairs of the region, and in 1938 
president of the State Headmasters Association, Howard J. Ben- 
choff devoted his energies for some fifty years to the upbuilding 
of this school, with the assistance of a board of trustees repre- 
senting several religious denominations. When he retired to be- 
come head master emeritus in 1955, his successor, the present 
head, was appointed. The students at the school come from most 
of the eastern, southern and central states. Camp Lupton, on the 
Shenandoah River adjoining the George Washington National 
Forest is affiliated. Among colleges entered are the universities 
of Va. and Md., Duke, Johns Hopkins, Washington and Lee. 
Extra-curricular activities, in addition to military groups, include 
sports, debating, literary societies, and music. 



For explanation of data and statistics included for each school, 
consult the Explanatory Note at the beginning of the Descriptive Text 
and the Introduction. 



WEST VIRGINIA 

LEWISBURG, W.VA. Pop 2192. C&O R.R. 74 mi. NW of 
Roanoke, Va. 25 mi. N of Hinton on an elevated plateau in the 
Alleghenies, Lewisburg is in a region of health resorts near the 
Va. line. 

GREENBRIER COLLEGE 
Bdg Girls Ages 15-20 
Lewisburg, W. Va. 100 Church St. Tel. 780. 

John F. Montgomery, A.B., Hampden-Sydney, M.A., Umv of S. 
Calif., Ph.D., Duke, Pres. 

High Sch 3-4. Col Prep General. 

Jr Col 1-2. Liberal Arts General Education Secretarial 
Medical Secretarial Art Music Drama Physical Education 
Merchandising Social Work. 

Enr Bdg 145, Day 20. Sec 75, Jr Col 90. Fac full-time 14. 

High Sch Grad '5633. Entd Col '5631 (Greenbrier 5, U of 
W. Va. 4, Hollins 2, U of Ky. 2, Duke 1). Alumnae 3000. 

Tui Bdg $1400 (+$100), Day $350. Scholarships partial 12 
($3000). Est 1812. Inc 1949 nonprofit. 

Plant $850,000. Dorm rms 75. Class rms 14. Lib 7500 vols. Labs 
2. Studios music 8, art 1, Gym. Swimming pool. Fields 3. Courts 2. 
Riding facilities. 

Deriving from Lewisburg Academy, and formerly Presbyterian, 
this four-year junior college, conservative in tradition and realisti- 
cally progressive, was under the able direction of Dr. French W. 
Thompson from 1925 to 1952, in which year Dr. J. Ralph Murray 
succeeded him. Dr. Montgomery was appointed president in 1955. 
There is a variety of both academic and practical courses, and 
graduates of both departments enter the universities of N.C., 
Kans., and Mo., Northwestern, Connecticut College, and others. 
Among activities are student government, music, art, dramatics, 
and sports. See also page 858 

GREENBRIER MILITARY SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day Boys Ages 12-20 

Lewisburg, W. Va. Lee St. Tel. 740. 

Col, Joseph M. Moore, A.B., Washington and Lee, B.D., Union 
Theological Sem, Pres. 
Grades VII- VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep General. 

368 



W. Va. South Atlantic States 359 

Enr Bdg 330, Day 35, Fac full-time 25. 

Tui Bdg $1250 (+$240), Day $250 (+$240). Work Scholarships 
20 ($4000). Work pgrm. Est 1812, Inc 1909 nonprofit. 

Dorm rms 160. Class rms 19. Lib 3262 vols. Labs 2. Studios 
music 2. Gyms 2. Fields 3. Courts. 

A well organized institution, Greenbrier has been owned since 
1905 by the Moore family who succeeded a long line of Presby- 
terian ministers. The present superintendent took over in 1939. 
Many graduates go on to college. Athletics are emphasized, 
and there are literary, music, and hobby clubs. 



WHEELING, W.VA. Pop 58,891. Alt 642 ft. B&O; P R.R. 59 mi. 

SW of Pittsburgh, Pa. On the Ohio River, Wheeling is a great 
iron, steel and glass manufacturing center of the Northern Pan- 
handle. 

LINSLY MILITARY INSTITUTE 
Bdg and Day Boys 10-19 

Wheeling, W. Va. CEdar 3- 3260. 

Maj. Basil G. Lockhart, A.B., M.A., W.Va. Univ, Head. 

Grades V-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Music Dra- 
matics Speech. 

Enr Bdg 100, Day 225. Fac full-time 20. 

Grad '57 42. Entd Col '57 36. 

Tui Bdg $1175 (+$250), Day $400. Est 1814. Inc. 

Plant $1,500,000. Endowment $750,000. Dorm rms 30. Class rms 
20. Lib 3600 vols. Studio music 1. Gym. Swimming pool. Fields 6. 
Riding facilties. 

Chartered as the Wheeling Lancastrian Academy, this old 
school was renamed for its benefactor, Noah Linsly, a Yale gradu- 
ate who settled in Wheeling and became its most prominent citi- 
zen. Under Major Lockhart, head master since 1940, a boarding 
department has been organized and good standards upheld; Many 
graduates enter Bethany and the University of Pittsburgh, with 
some going to M.I.T., Princeton, Harvard, and others.- Among 
the interesting extra-curricular, activities are dramatics, music, 
clubs, and military organizations. 



MOUNT DE CHANTAL VISITATION ACADEMY 
Bdg and Day Girls Ages 12-19 

Wheeling, W. Va. Tel. CEdar 3.-3771. 
Sr. Mary Helen, B.A., B.S.Ed., M.A., Dir. 

Grades VII- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Commercial 
Art Music. 



W, Va. Leading Private Schools 370 

Enr Bdg 80, Day 30. Fac full 8, part-time 7. 
Grad '57 20. Entd Col '5718. 

Tui Bdg $950 (+$125), Day $345. Scholarships. Est 1848. Roman 
Catholic. 

With excellent facilities for the study ot art and music, and with 
an especially strong library, the Academy prepares most of its 
girls for colleges and universities. The school property adjoins 
that of Wheeling College. 

WHEELING COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 
Boys Ages 4-9, Girls 4-14 

Wheeling, W.Va. 8 Park Rd. Tel Woodsdale 3429. 
Virginia K. Heinlein, A.B.; Smith, M.A., Columbia, Prin. 

Kindergarten 1-2 Grades I-VIII. 

Enr Boys 30, Girls 60. Fac full 8, part-time 2. 

Tui $180-450. Scholarships 8, Est 1929. Episcopal. 

Founded by Mrs. W. W. Holloway and several others, this 
school has grown steadily in resources and number. Miss Hein- 
lein has directed it since 1933. 

In 1956 this became an Episcopal school. 



For explanation of data and statistics included for each school) 
consult the Explanatory Note at the beginning of the Descriptive Text 
and the Introduction. 

For further schools in any area, refer to the Supplementary Lists, 
For Schools Classified by Type, see Table of Contents. 

For Summer Camps and Summer Schools, see the Schools Classi- 
fied by Type and the Camp Directory. 

For further details concerning those schools in the Announcement 
Section, refer to page number mentioned. 

For classification of special schools and to meet individual needs, 
consult the Table of Contents. 

For Junior College and Specialized School information, consult the 
Sargent Guide to Private Junior Colleges and Specialized School*. 

If you do not find the information you need, write Porter Sargent, 
11 Beacon Street, Boston 8, Mass. 



NORTH CAROLINA 

ARDEN, N.C. Pop 103. Alt 2228 ft. 10 mi. S of Asheville, 
Rt U.S. 25A. The little town of Arden is on the Dixie Highway. 

A mile and a half from the highway is the school. 

CHRIST SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 12-19 

Arden, N.C. Tel. 6232. 
David Page Harris, Head. 

Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. 

Enr 150. Fac full-time 12. Adm Staff 4. 

Grad '5624. Entd Col '5624 (Tulane 5, U of South 3, Clemson 
3, U of N.C. 3, Duke 2, Cornell 1). Alumni 750. 

Tui $1050. Scholarships partial 10 ($3000). Self-help pgrm. Est 
1900. Episcopal. 

Plant $750,000. Endowment $50,000. Bonn rms 70. Class rms 10, 
Lib 2000 vols. Labs 2. Studios music 1, art 1. Gym. Outdoor swim- 
ming pool. Fields 4. Courts 5. 

Established by the Rev. Thomas C. Wetmore especially for 
mountain boys of the region, this church school now enrolls boys 
of various creeds and from many different localities. The students 
do all the work at the school except the cooking. Other activities 
include student government, music, dramatics, and publications. 
Graduates enter the University of N.C, Tulane, Clemson, N.C. 
State, Davidson, and others. 



ASHEVILLE, N.C. Pop 53,000. Alt 2200 ft S R.R. 100 mi. NW 
of Charlotte, Rt. U.S.74. In the W part of the state on a plateau 
of the Blue Ridge, Asheville is a famous health resort on the Park 
to Park Highway leading from the Shenandoah to the Great 
Smoky Mountains National Parks. The surrounding region has 
been called "The Land of the Sky" because it lies in a high valley 
surrounded by mountains. Black Mountain College now occupies 
its new site and modernistic building some 18 mi. E of the city. 
The Asheville Country Day School is 5 mi to the S. 5 mi. W are the 
300 acres of Asheville School. The Gibbons Hall School for Boys 
occupies the 28 acre campus of St. Genevieve-of-the-Pines, for- 
merly the estate of C. G. Memminger, phosphate mining tycoon. 



371 



IV. C. Leading Private Schools 372 

ASHEVILLE COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 
Coed Ages 5-16 

Asheville, N.C. 1345 Hendersonville Rd. Tel. ALpine 3-4641. 
Marshall M. Abell, A.B., M.A., Yale, Head. 

Pre-first Grades I-VIII. High Sch 1-2. Art Music French 
Latin, Remedial Reading. 

Enr Boys 60, Girls 70. Fac full 10, part-time 3. Staff 2. 

Grad '56 10. Entd Prep Sch '56 Shipley 2, Baldwin 1, Mercers- 
burg 1, Christ Sch 1, Asheville 1, Abbot 1, others. 

Tui $200-500. Scholarships full 3, partial 5 ($1500). Est 1936. 
Inc 1936 nonprofit. 

Established by a group of parents who wished for their children 
careful preparation for the large secondary schools, and directed 
first by Dorothea Stillman, and then Mr. A. W. Clemens, it con- 
solidated in 1949 with the Haseltine School, with Mr. Haseltine 
becoming head master and Mr. Clemens remaining at the school 
as his associate. The solid curriculum is supplemented with art, 
music, dramatics. In 1958, the school moved to its new plant and 
announced plans to add all secondary grades succeeding years. 

ASHEYILLE SCHOOL 
Bdg Boys Ages 12-19 

Asheville School P.O., N.C. Tel. ALpine 3-1641. 
David R. Fall, A.B., Williams, Head. 

Grades VII- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep. Music Dramatics 
Sciences Religion. 

Enr Bdg 145, Day 5. Fac full-time 18. 

Grad '5721. Entd Col '57 21. (U of N.C. 6, Washington & 
Lee 4, Yale 2, M.I.T. 1, Cornell 1, Penn State 1). Alumni 2200. 

Tui Bdg $2200 (+$150), Day $1000. Scholarships full 4, partial 
15 ($22,000). Est 1900. Inc 1930 nonprofit 

Summer Session. Enr 40. Tui $600, eight wks. 

Plant $1,000,000. Dorm rms 138. Class rms 13. Lib 2700 vols. 
Labs 3. Studios music 2. Gym. Swimming pool. Fields 6. Courts 9. 

Since its beginning setting the standards of scholarship and 
conduct for schools of the section, Asheville was founded by 
Newton M. Anderson and Charles A. Mitchell. During the regime 
of Howard Bement from 1927, the patronage was broadened to 
include many sections of the country. Mr. Fall, a student at The 
Hill under Dr. Bement, came directly to Asheville from Williams 
in 1928 and served in successive posts until on Dr. Bement's death 
he took the direction and leadership of the school, broadening 
its program and appeal. 

Boys come from thirty states and several foreign countries. 
Graduates enter colleges in all sections of the country, including 
Harvard, Duke, Yale, Princeton, Cornell, Stanford. Extra-cur- 



jtf. C. South Atlantic States 373 

ricular activities include dramatics, music, and publications, and 
a full sports program, in addition to hobbies and various clubs. 
See also page 712 

GIBBONS HALL SCHOOL FOR BOYS 

Day Ages 5-14 

Asheville, N.C. 12 Oakland Rd. Tel. ALpine 2-8910. 
Daniel J. Pinto, B.S.Ed., STC Trenton, N.J., M.A., Rutgers, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I- VIII. Art Music French Latin 
Algebra. Manual Arts. 

Enr 165. FacfullS, part-time 2. 

Grad '5717. Entd Prep Sch '57 12. (St. Francis 8, Ashevilie 
2, Hill 1, Canterbury 1). 

Tui $360. Est 1949. Roman Catholic. 

While under the auspices of the Religious of Christian Educa- 
tion, this unit of St. Genevieve-of-the-Pines has an inter-denomina- 
tional Advisory Board and student body. Graduates have entered 
leading preparatory schools. Dramatics, music, and publications 
are emphasized. 

ST. GENEVIEVE-OF-THE-PINES 
Bdg and Day Girls Ages 5-18 

Asheville, N.C. Tel. 3-7638. 

Rev. Mother Mabel Monk, B.A., St. Genevieve's, Superior. 

Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. 
Col Prep General Home Economics. Art Music Languages. 
Secretarial (1 year). 

Enr Bdg 60, Day 260. Elem 205, Sec 115. Fac full 28, part-time 7. 

Grad '5625. Entd Col '5625. (N.C. Wofnan's 4, Duke 2, Rad- 
cliffe 1, Wellesley 1, Seton Hill 1). Alumnae 2500. 

Tui Bdg $1000 (+$35), Day $300. Scholarships full 2, partial 8. 
Est 1908. Roman Catholic. 

Dorm rms 60. Class rms 24. Lib 7000 vols. Labs 3. Studios 
music 2, art 1. Gym. Fields 3. Courts 2, 

Formerly a senior college, this school conducted by the Sisters 
of Christian Education became a junior college in 1930. 

In 1955 the junior college department was discontinued. Gradu- 
ates from the preparatory curriculum enter N.C. Woman's, Duke, 
and other colleges. 



CHARLOTTE, N.C. Pop 134,042. Alt 721 ft S; SAL R.R. 116 
mi. SE of Asheville, Rt U.S.74. In the Piedmont near the S.C. 
line, the state's largest city is a great distributing center for the 
Southeast and a textile center. 



N. C. Leading Private Schools 374 

CHARLOTTE COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL 
Coed Ages 5-15 

Charlotte 7, N.C. Sardis Rd. Tel. EM 6-1241. 

David L. Howe, A.B., Harvard, M.A., Middlebury, Head. 

Kindergarten Grades I- VIII High Sch 1. Bible Art Music. 

Enr Boys 100, Girls 85, Fac full 12, part-time 4. 

Grad '5712. Entd Prep Sch '576. (St. Anne's 1, Salem 1, 
Woodberry Forest 1, Concord 1, Chatham Hall 1, Mary Burn- 
ham 1). 

Tui $350-500. Scholarships full 12, partial 10 ($6850). Est 1941. 
Inc 1941 nonprofit. 

Founded by a group of Charlotteans headed by Dr. Thomas 
Burton, this offers an enriched curriculum preparing for secondary 
schools. Mr. Howe succeeded R. E. E. Booker in 1955. 

GIBSONVILLE, N.C, Pop 1866. This small community is fifteen 
miles East of Greensboro. 

PALMER MEMORIAL INSTITUTE 
Bds Coed Ages 12-20 

Sedalia, N.C. Tel. Gibsonville 2501. 
Wilhelmina M. Crosson, Ed.M., Boston U, Pres. 

Grades VII- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General Home 
Economics. Typing Art Music. Remedial Reading. 

Enr Boys 55, Girls 95. Fac full-time 15. 

Grad '5639. Entd Col '56 36. 

Tui $725. Scholarships full 1, partial 77. Est 1902. Inc 1907 non- 
profit. 

This school for Njgro boys and girls offers both a college pre- 
paratory and a general curriculum, as well as a home economics 
program. The school was founded by Dr. Charlotte Hawkins 
Brown, who is now president emeritus. 

HENDERSONVILLE, N.C, Pop 6103. Alt 2250 ft S R.R. 21 mi. 
SE of Asheville, Rt. U.S.25. This year-round resort commands a 
wonderful panorama of the Blue Ridge Mountains. 

BLUE RIDGE SCHOOL FOR BOYS 
Bdg and Day Ages 10-20 

Hendersonville, N. C. Tel. 9582. 

Mrs. J. R. Sandifer, Owner; J. E. Singletary, A.B., Davidson, 

M.A., Univ of Va., Acting Head. 

Grades VI-VIII High Sch 1-4. 

Enr Bdg 65, Day 25. Fac full 7, part-time 1. 

Grad '56 17. Entd Col '56 15. Alumni 500. 

Tui Bdg $1125 (+$275-300), Day $550. Est 1914. Proprietary. 

Summer Session. Tui $325. 



N> C. South Atlantic States 375 

Enrolling the majority of its students from the South, this school 
gives close personal and academic supervision. Much of the in- 
struction is by the tutorial method, and graduates are prepared 
for N.C. State, the University of N.C., Davidson, Duke, Georgia 
Tech, Emory, and others. There has recently been considerable 
improvement of the plant, particularly the athletic facilities. 

Upon the death of J. R. Sandifer, owner and head master, in 
1956, Mrs. Sandifer became owner, and Mr. Singletary was ap- 
pointed acting head. He had formerly taught English and been 
associate head, after teaching on the faculties of the University 
of Virginia and Furman, 

OAK RIDGE, N.C. Pop 500. Alt 1040 ft. S R.R. 16 mi. NW of 
Greensboro, on Rt.68. In the foothills of the Blue Ridge, this ham- 
let is not far from Winston-Salem and High Point. 

OAK RIDGE MILITARY INSTITUTE 
Bdg Boys Ages 14-20 

Oak Ridge, N.C. Tel. Midway 3-3444. 
Col. T. O. Wright, A.B., Univ of N.C., Pres. 

High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General Business. 

Jr Col 1-2. Liberal Arts Business. 

Enr Bdg 180, Day 20. Fac full 13, part-time 2. 

Grad '5751. Entd Col '5737. (U of N.C. 9, N.C. St. Coll 6, 
East Carolina Coll 6, Wake Forest 3, Davidson 3, V.P.I. 2). 

Tui Bdg $1055 (+$250), Day $460 (+$250). Scholarships par- 
tial 10. Est 1852. Inc nonprofit 

Plant $350,000 Lib 5750 vols. Lab. Gym. Swimming pool. Fields 
2. Courts 5. . 

The Carolinas and adjoining states furnish the majority of the 
cadets. Col. Earle P. Holt, on the faculty since 1904, was president 
from 1929 until he was succeeded in 1950 by Col. Wright, who 
joined the school in 1923. The junior college department, with an 
advanced R.O.T.C. unit, was added in 1932. Graduates enter the 
University of N.C., Wake Forest, Duke, Davidson, and others. 



RALEIGH, N.C. Pop 65,679. Alt 316 ft. S R.R. 20 mi. SE of 
Durham, Rt. U.S.70. Near the geographical center of the state, 
Raleigh is its capital An interesting old city, it is today a great 
tobacco market and a printing and publishing center. The junior 
college is near the capitol,, St. M-ary's on a hill half a ml W. 



For further information, write Porter Sargent 



N. C. Leading Private Schools 376 

PEACE COLLEGE AND PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

Bdg and Day Girls Ages. 1 6-20 

Raleigh, N.C. N. Wilmington St. Tel. TEmple 3-368L 

William C. Pressly, A.B., LittD., Erskine, M.S., N.C. STC, Pres. 

High Sch 3-4. Col Prep General. 

Jr Col 1-2. Liberal Arts Music Art Home Economics Com- 
mercial. 

Enr Bdg 160, Day 140. Sec 40, Jr Col 260. Fac full 14, part-time 5. 

Grad '5725, Entd Col '5718. (Peace Coll 8, East Carolina 
Coll 2, Duke 1, Meredith 1, Atlantic Christian 1). Alumnae 5000. 

Tui Bdg $1096, Day $300. Scholarships 20-25 ($4000). Self-help 
pgrm. Est 1872. Presbyterian. 

Plant $750,000. Endowment $250,000. Dorms 2, Class rms 20. 
Lib 12,500 vols. Labs 4. Studios music 8, art 1. Gym. Courts 4. 

Started with funds raised by Presbyterians, this school has been 
the property of the church since 1907. Dr. Pressly was appointed 
president in 1926. 

ST. MARY'S JUNIOR COLLEGE 
Bdg and Day Girls Ages 16-20 

Raleigh, N.C. 900 Hil'lsboro St. Tel. VAnce 8-2521. 

Richard Gabriel Stone, A.B., L.H.D., Western Md., Ph.D., Johns 

Hopkins, Pres. 

High Sch 3-4. Col Prep. 

Jr Col 1-2. Liberal Arts Art Speech Theatre Arts Music 
Home Economics. Commercial Cl vr). 

Enr Bdg 295, Day 55. Sec 120, Jr, Col 230. Fac full 23, part- 
time 9. 

High Sch Grad '57^-40. High Sch Grad Entd Col '5739. (St. 
Mary's 18, Randolph-Macon 4, Hollins 2, Duke 2, Vassar 1, Sweet 
Briar 1). Alumni 6000. 

Tui Bdg $1275 (+$100), Day $360. Scholarships full 4, partial 
20 ($6140). Self-help pgrm. Est 1842. Episcopal. 

Plant $1,092,644. Endowment $344,011. Dorm rms 145. Class rms 
13. Lib 13,425 vols. Labs 5. Studios music 3, art 1. Gym. Swim- 
ming pool. Courts 4. 

This large Episcopal school, over a century in existence, be- 
came the property of the Church in the two Carolinas in 1897. 
Founder and for 36 years director was the Rev. Dr. Aldert Smedes, 
a New Yorker. Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, an alumna and former 
teacher, was president from 1932 until Dr, Stone's appointment 
in 1946. St. Mary's stresses liberal arts work for both transfer 
and terminal studies. Graduates enter the universities of N.C. and 
S.C., Duke, Hollins, Sweet Briar, and others. There are many 
extra-curricular activities, especially music, dramatics, religious 
organizations, publications. 



tf. C. South Atlantic States 377 

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. Pop 100,000. Alt 1000 ft S; N&W R.R. 
70 mi. NE of Charlotte. The second city of N.C, this clean, mod- 
ern, bustling city owes much to its chief industry, the "Camel." 
Settled in 1766 within SO mi. of the Blue Ridge, it is today one of 
the world's major tobacco centers. Old Salem, a mile from the 
business section, is rich in tradition and has the oldest center for 
girls' education in the South. The Academy occupies new and mod- 
ern buildings on the campus of the affiliated Salem College. Sum- 
mit School is in the suburbs. 

SALEM ACADEMY 
Bdg and Day Girls Ages 13-18 

Winston-Salem 2, N.C. TelPArk 2-6186. 

Mary A. Weaver, B.A., Randolph- M aeon, M.A., Columbia, Prin. 

High Sch 1-4 Post Grad 1. Col Prep General. Art Music 
Home Economics Bible. 

Enr Bdg 95, Day 20. Fac full 8, part-time 6. 

Grad '5725. Entd Col '5725. (U of Tenn. 4, Duke 3, Ran- 
dolph-Macon 2, Converse 2, Barnard 1). 

Tui Bdg $1650 (+$100), Day $700. Scholarships partial 5 
($2000). Est 1772. Inc nonprofit. Moravian. 

Dorm rms 52. Class rms 10, Lib 3250 vols.Labs 3. Studios music 
7, art 1. Gym. Outdoor swimming pool. Fields 3. Courts 8. 

Established in 1772 as Female Academy for daughters of the 
community at a time when the education of girls was generally 
looked upon as a foolish luxury, and maintaining a boarding de- 
partment since 1802, Salem has played an important role in the 
development of education for young women. 

Since 1931 the school has been under the capable direction of 
Miss Weaver. A separate institution, but sharing some facilities 
with Salem College, the academy attracts not only daughters of 
the more forward-looking families of the South but also patrons 
from many other states and from foreign countries. The girls are 
given sound preparation not only for leading Southern colleges in- 
cluding Hollins, Duke, Salem, Randolph-Macon, but also colleges 
in the East and throughout the rest of the country. The academy 
has been a leader in the growth of student participation in school 
government, and there are many interest clubs as well as a full 
sports program. 

Recently a new annex, with enlarged library, science laboratory, 
art studio, and other facilities, was completed. See page 775 

THE SUMMIT SCHOOL 
Day Coed Ages 4-14 

Winston-Salem, N.C. Reynolda P.O. Tel. PArk 2^2777. 
Douglas R. Lewis, A.B., Harvard, Head. 
Louise Futrell, B.A,, Meredith, Prin. Emeritus. 



N. C. Leading Private Schools 373 

Kindergarten Grades I-VIII High Sch 1. 

Enr Boys 140, Girls 110. Fac full 16, part-time 6. 

Grad '578. Entd Prep Sch '574. (Woodberry Forest 2, Fork 
Union M.A. 1, Oak Ridge M.A. 1). 

Tui $280-400. Scholarships full 5, partial 17 ($6000). Est 1933. 
Inc 1938 nonprofit. 

Housed in a modern, functional plant especially designed for 
young children, and with a library of more than 5000 volumes, 
Summit has an interesting program which combines recent meth- 
ods of teaching with sound academic standards and which makes 
special provisions for acceleration. Children are prepared for sec- 
ondary boarding schools. Dramatics, art, music, publications, 
and numerous sports are among activities. 



For explanation of data and statistics included for each school, 
consult the Explanatory Note at the beginning of the Descriptive 
Text and the Introduction. 

For further schools in any area, refer to the Supplementary Lists, 
For Schools Classified by Type, see Table of Contents. 

For Summer Camps and Summer Schools, see the Schools Classi* 
fied by Type and the Camp Directory. 

For further details concerning those schools in the Announcement 
Section, refer to page number mentioned. 

For classification of special schools and to meet individual needs, 
consult the Table of Contents. 

For Junior College and Specialized School information, consult the 
Sargent Guide to Private Junior Colleges and Specialized Schools. 

If you do not find the information you need, write Porter Sargent, 
11 Beacon Street, Boston 8, Mass. 



SOUTH CAROLINA 

AIKEN, B.C. Pop 7083. Alt 490 ft. S R.R. 47 mi. SW of Colum- 
bia, Rt. 215. 23 mi. NE of Augusta, Ga., this town for some dec- 
ades has attracted wealthy northern families, many from L.I., be- 
cause of the opportunities for riding, hunting and polo playing 
made possible by the mild climate and open, sandy country. Aiken 
Preparatory School is close to Eustis Park. 

AIKEN PREPARATORY SCHOOL 
Bdg and Day -Boys Ages 9-14 
Aiken, S.C. Tel. 9-3671. 
Harold A. Fletcher, A.B., Yale, M.A., Columbia, Head. 

Grades III-VIII. French Latin Art Music. Rem Reading. 

Enr Bdg 40, Day 10. Fac full 6, part-time 3. 

Grad '56 10. Entd Prep Sch '5610 (Groton 1, Hotchkiss 1, St. 
Paul's 1, Millbrook 1, Exeter 1). Alumni 500. 

Tui Bdg $1830 (+$200), Day $700. Scholarships partial 5 
($2000). Est 1916. Inc 1938 nonprofit. 

Plant $250,000. Endowment $175,000. Class rms 6. Lib 3000 vols. 
Studios 2. Gym. Swimming pool. Fields 3, Courts 3. Riding fa- 
cilities. 

This junior school was established by Mrs. Thomas Hitchcock 
and Mr. F. A. M. Tabor with the support of winter residents. 
Under Mr. Fletcher, previously a member of the faculty, both en- 
rollment and curriculum have been broadened, and sons of well- 
to-do families are prepared for the large secondary boarding 
schools. There is an extensive and closely supervised activities 
program. 

BAMBERG, S.C. Pop 2954. Alt 172 ft. S R.R. 16 mi. SW of 
Orangeburg, Rt. U.S. 301. Bamberg is a market center, especially 
for watermelons, 56 mi. S of Columbia. 



CARLISLE MILITARY SCHOOL 

Bdg Boys Ages 12-19 
Bamberg, S.C. Carlisle St. Tel. 3311. 
Col. James F. Risher, B.S., The Citadel, Head. 
Grades VII-VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep Business. 

379 



S. C. Leading Private Schools 380 

Enr 340. Fac full-time 15. 

Grad '5670. Entd Col '5640. 

Tui $890. Est 1892. Proprietary. 

Plant $350,000. Dorm rms 136. Class rms 13. Lib 2800 vols. Labs 
2. Fields 2. 

Established as a preparatory institute for Wofford College, then 
taken over by the Methodists, this school is now the property of 
the head master. Graduates enter The Citadel, Clemson, Wofford, 
and similar colleges. There is a full athletic program as well as 
band, orchestra, and publications, and clubs.. See also page 710 



CAMDEN, S.C. Pop 6,986. Alt 222. 31 mi ENE of Columbia. 
SAL R.R. Seat of Kershaw County, a winter resort and site of 
well known Steeplechase run, Camden is N located at the head of 
navigation on the Wateree River. 



CAMDEN ACADEMY 
Bdg Boys Ages 11-18 

Camden, S.C. Tel. Hemlock 2-2361. 

Maj. Purvis W. Collins, B.S., Univ of S.C., Supt 

Grades VI-VIII High Sch 1-4 Post Grad. Col Prep Gen- 
eral. Rem Reading Make-up Tutoring. 

Enr Bdg 100, Day 5. Fac full 9, part-time 1. Adm Staff 2. 

Grad '5521. Entd Col '5516 (Clemson 3, Emory 3, Furman 
3, Citadel 1, U of S.C. 1, Wake Forest 1). 

Tui Bdg $975 (+$75), Day $385. Scholarships partial 25 ($4000). 
Self-help pgrm. Est 1950. Inc 1950. 

A group of Camden men purchased an educational military in- 
stallation which had been acquired by the City and the County 
of Kershaw after World War II, and opened this college prepara- 
tory academy with a military program. 



CHARLESTON, S.C. Pop 70,174. Alt 10 ft. ACL; S R.R. 100 mi. 
NE of Savannah, Ga., Rt. U.S.17. Something of the aristocratic 
atmosphere of ante-bellum days and of Colonial architecture still 
remains in Charleston, though it is the second largest city in the 
state, an important seaport and a leading shipping and cotton 
manufacturing center. Great estates with gardens ablaze with 
azaleas and magnolias in the spring, moss draped trees, cypress 
gardens, silent waters, still exert what Henry James called an "in- 



S. C. South Atlantic States 381 

sidious charm." On the banks of the Ashley River Is The Citadel, 
the military college of S.C. Ashley Hall is near the river. Close to 
the center of town, Porter Military Academy occupies the old 
Federal Arsenal buildings, 

ASHLEY HALL 
Bdg Girls Ages 12-18; Day Girls 6-18 

Charleston, S.C. 172 Rutledge Ave. TeL RA 2-4088. 

Caroline Pardue, A.B., Winthrop, M.A., Univ of S.C., Head 

Grades I- VIII High Sch 1-4. Col Prep General. Art Music 
Dramatics. 

Enr Bdg 70, Day 305. Elem 185, Sec 190. Fac full 25, part-time 7. 

Grad '5735. Entd Col '5733. (Converse 3, Hollins 2, Con- 
necticut 1, Radcliffe 1, Sweet Briar 1, Wheaton 1). Alumnae 1267. 

Tui Bdg $1600 (H-$150-200), Day $325-425. Est 1909. Inc 1949 
nonprofit. 

Plant $250,000. Dorm rms 38. Class rms 22. Lab. Studios music 
3, art 1. Gym. Swimming pool. Fields 2. Courts 2. Riding facilities. 

Founded in 1909 by^Mary Vardrine McBee, a graduate of