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Full text of "The Handbook of the University of Maryland"

1924 CALENDAR 1925 


September — 1924 


March— 1925 


S M T W T F S 


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HANDBOOK 

of &e 

UNIVERSITY 

OF 

MARYLAND 

I924 - I925 



PRESENTED JOINTLY BY THE 
YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN 
ASSOCIATIONS OF THE BAL- 
TIMORE AND COLLEGE PARK 
DEPARTMENTS. 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR, 1924-1925 

Unless otherwise indicated this calendar 
refers to activities at College Park. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Sept. 15 Instruction begins School 

of Law. 
Sept. 22-23 Registration all students. 

Sept. 22 Registration College of 

Commerce. 
Sept. 24 Instruction begins. First 

Student Assembly. 
Sept. 26 President's reception. 

Sept. 29 Instruction begins School 

of Medicine, School of 

Dentistry, School of 

Pharmacy, College of 

Commerce. 
Dec. 20 Christmas Recess begins. 

Jan. 5 Christmas Recess ends. 

Classes resumed. 
Jan. 15-24 Semester examinations 

School of Law. 
Jan. 26-01 Semester examinations 

College of Commerce. 
Feb. 2-7 Semester examinations. 



SECOND SEMESTER 

26 Instruction' begins School 

of Law. 

2 Instruction begins College 

of Commerce. 

9 Instruction begins. 

Easter Recess begins. 
Instruction resumed Balti- 
more Departments. 

15 Easter recess ends. Classes 

resumed. 

3-14 Festival of Music. 

8-23 Semester examinations 

College of Commerce. 

8-30 Semester examinations 

School of Law. 

1-6 Semester examinations 

for Seniors. 

6 Commencemen't Day, Bal- 

timore Departments. 

4-10 Semester examinations. 

7-13 Commencement Week. 

: Summer School. 



PRESIDENT'S GREETING 

I am glad on behalf of the Regents, 
Faculty and Officers of the University of 
Maryland to extend to the old and espe- 
cially to the new students a hearty wel- 
come. 

I am glad of the privilege of doing this 
through the Christian Associations. These 
organizations mean much for the promo- 
tion of the highest type of studen't life 
and activity. 

The present and future welfare of our 
country depends upon the development of 
strong Christian character along with in- 
tellectual power and physical health and 
strength. You will find opportunity to ac- 
complish all of these things here. Dedi- 
cate yourselves to these high purposes. 

Sincerely yours, 

A. F. WOODS. 
President. 



UNIVERSITY NOTES 



HISTORICAL SKETCH 



27] HE history of the present University 
CO of Maryland practically combines 
rfwfjj the history of two institutions. It 
SUMO begins with the chartering of the 
College of Medicine of Maryland in' Bal- 
timore in 1807, which graduated its first 
class in 1810. In 1812 the institution was 
empowered to annex other departments 
and was by the same act "constituted an 
University by the name and un'der the 
title of the University of Maryland." 

For more than a century the University 
of Maryland stood almost as organized in 
1812, until an act of the Legislature in 
1920 merged it with the Maryland State 
College and changed the name of the 
Maryland State College to the University 
of Maryland. 

The Maryland State College first was 
chartered in 1856 under the name of tho 
Maryland Agricultural College, the second 
agricultural college in the Western Hemis- 
phere. In 1862 Congress passed the Land 
Grant Act and the Maryland State Col- 
lege was named as the beneficiary of the 
grant in Maryland. Thus the College be- 
came, at least in part, a State institution. 
In the fall of 1914 its control was taken 
over entirely by the State. In 1916 the 
General Assembly granted a riew charter 
to the College and made it the Maryland 
State College. 



ALMA MATER 

Maryland ! My Maryland ! 

Thy sons and daughters throng thy door, 

Maryland! My Maryland! 

They come from mountain, farm, and 

shore, 
Maryland, oh Marylan'd! 
Their hearts and hopes they bring to thee, 
And place them in thy custody, 
Proud hearts that pledge their love for 

thee : — 
Maryland University! 

Go forth, brave youth, throughout the 

State : 
Maryland! My Maryland! 
And by your actions, show her great: 
Maryland, Our Maryland! 
Thy Alma Mater's name and fame, 
Oh keep alive her holy flame, 
Until all hearts as one exclaim, 
Maryland! My Maryland! 

Cheer, three times cheer, and one cheer 

more 
For Maryland! Dear Maryland! 
Send forth that cry from hill to shore:— 
Maryland University ! 
Fair Mother of our brightest dreams, 
Blest giver of life's precious things, 
To thee each heart its service brings:— 
Maryland! My Maryland! 

8 



BALTIMORE DEPARTMENTS 

THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN 
ASSOCIATION 

Officers 

President Edgar R. Miller 

Vice-President H. Alvan' Jones 

Secretary Lee Elgin 

Treasurer Clifford Whitman 

General Secretary A. L. Purinton 

Rooming: and Boarding Hon.se Directory 

In order to assist out-of-city students in 
securing suitable rooms and boarding 
places, the Association prepares each fall a 
list of available places an'd helps direct 
students to the type of place they desire. 

The Handbook 

The Handbook is published and distrib- 
uted without cost to each student. Its 
purpose is to make a ready reference book 
for all students, but especially to aid the 
new student in adjusting himself to uni- 
versity life. 

Church Co-operation 

The Association accepts its position as 
a representative of the Churches among 
the students. It does not concern itself 



with the student's choice of a Church, but 
*♦ is concerned to help him maintain inti- 
mate contacts with the Church he chooses. 

Fellowship Dinners 

Iii order to cultivate Christian fellow 
*hip among students of the various schools 
and groups of the University, the Y. M. 
C. A. will hold at intervals during the 
year Fellowship Dinners to which all stu- 
dents will be welcomed. 
Speakers 
Whenever possible the "Y" makes avail- 
able nationally known speakers both at 
the University and in the city. Each win- 
ter, the Central Branch holds a series of 
Sunday afternoon Theatre Meetings at 
which some of the best speakers in the 
United States may be heard. Students are 
always welcome at all of these meetings. 
Conferences and Conventions 
Every year numerous conferences and 
conventions are held by the Y. M. C. A., 
Y. W. C. A., Student Volunteer Movement, 
and Churches. The Association aims to 
have the University well represented at 
many of these gatherings. 

Cosmopolitan Club 
Last year 100 students from 30 different 
nations studied in Baltimore. The Asso- 

10 



ciation tries in many ways to help these 
students to get the best out of their life 
here, but its major work is through the 
-Students Cosmopolitan Club of Baltimore 
which, although an independent Student 
organization, is fostered by the Y. M. C. A. 
It meets bi-monthly and all foreign sin 
dents are especially invited to attend. 

Beading Room 

The Y. M. C. A. supplies the University 
Library with current periodicals each year. 

Student Volunteers 

The Association has a major interest in 
the world-wide work of the Church. It is, 
therefore, interested in and fosters the 
work of the Students in the University 
who are preparing for foreign service. 

Central Y. M. C. A. Memberships 

The Central Branch of the Y. M. C. A. 
with its fine equipment including Gym- 
nasium, Swimming Pool, Reading Rooms, 
etc., offers its privileges to University stu- 
den'ts at a special rate for the school year. 



11 



THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

J. M. H. Rowland, Dean 

Medical Council 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D. 

Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D. 

William S. Gardner, M.D. 

Standish McCleary, M.D. 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. 
Alexius McGlannan, A.M., MD. 
Bartgis McGlone, A.B., Ph.D. 
Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. 
H. Boyd Wylie, M.D. 
Carl L. Davis, M.D. 
William H. Schult Ph-B., Ph.D. 
Maurice C. Pincoffs, S.B., M.D. 
The School of Medicirie of the University 
of Maryland is one of the oldest founda- 
tions for medical education in America, 
ranking fifth in point of age among the 
medical colleges of U. S. In the school 
building at Lombard and Greene streets in 
Baltimore was founded one of the first 
medical libraries and the first medical col- 
lege library in America. 

Here for the first time in America dis- 
secting was made a compulsory part of the 
curriculum; here instruction in Dentistry 
was first given (1837), and here was first 
installed independent chairs for the teach- 
ing of diseases of women' and children 
(18G7), and of eye and ear diseases (1»™). 
This School of Medicine was one or tne 
first to provide for adequate clinical in- 
struction by the erection in 1823 of its 
own hospital, and in this hospital in tia- 
mural residency for senior students was 
first established. 

12 



THE SCHOOL OF LAW 

The Faculty Council 

Hon. Henry D. Harlan, A.M., LL.B., LL.D., 

Dean 

Hon. Alfred S. Niles, A.M., LL.B. 

Hon. John C. Rose, LL.B., LL.D. 

Randolph Barton, Jr., Esq., A.M., LL.B., 

Secretary 

Hon. James P. Gorter, A.M., LL.D. 

Charles McHenry Howard, Esq., A.B., 

LL.B. 

Hon. Morris A. Soper, A.B., LL.B. 

Robert Hill Freeman, M.A.. LL.B., 

Assistant to the Dean 

While the first faculty of law of the 
University of Maryland was chosen in 
1813, and published in 1817 "A Course of 
Legal Study Addressed to Students and 
the Profession Generally" which the North 
American Review pronounced to be "by 
far the most perfect system of study of 
law which has ever been offered the pub- 
lic," an'd which recommended a course of 
study so comprehensive as to require for 
its completion six or seven years, no regu- 
lar school of instruction in law was opened 
until 1823. This was suspended in 1836 for 
lack of proper pecuniary support. In 1869 
the Law School was organized, and in 1870 
regular instruction therein was again be- 

fun. From time to time the course has 
een made more comprehensive and the 
staff of instructors increased in number. 
Its graduates now number more than two 
thousand, and included among them are a 
large proportion of the leaders of the 
Bench and the Bar of the State and many 
who have attained prominence in the pro- 
fession' elsewhere. 

13 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

.T. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Dean 

The first lectures delivered on Dentistry 
In America were given by Horace H. Hay- 
den, M.D., at the University of Maryland 
in the year 1837. A charter was applied 
for and granted in' 1839 establishing the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, the 
first dental school in the world. Lectures 
were begun in 1839 and the first class 
graduated in 1841. In 1873 the Maryland 
Dental College, an offspring of the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery, was or- 
ganized and continued instruction in dental 
subjects until 1879 when it was consoli- 
dated with the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery. 

A department of dentistry was organized 
at the University of Maryland in the year 
1882, graduating its first class in 1883 and 
each subsequent year to the present. The 
Den'tal Department of the Baltimore Medi- 
cal College was established in 1895, con- 
tinuing until 1913, when it merged with 
the Dental Department of the University 
of Maryland. 

The final combining of the dental educa- 
tional interests of Baltimore waa effected 
Jcjfe 15, 1923 by (he amalgamation of this 
University of Maryland School of Dentistry 
and the Baltimore College of Dental Sur- 
gery, under State supervision and control 
becoming a department of the State Uni- 
versity oi Maryland 

14 



THE SCHOOL OF PHABMAC1' 
E. F. Kelly, Phar.D., Dean 

The School of Pharmacy was organized 
in 1841, largely at the instance of members 
of the Faculty of Medicine, and for a time 
the lectures were delivered at the Medical 
School. Later it became separated and 
continued an independent organization, 
as the Maryland College of Pharmacy, 
until it finally became a part of the Uni- 
versity in 1904. With but one short inter- 
mission, previous to 1865, it has continu- 
ously exercised its functions as a teachirig 
school of pharmacy. 

This school holds membership in the 
American Conference of Pharmaceutical 
Faculties. The object of the Conference is 
to promote the interests of pharmaceutical 
education and all institutions holding mem- 
bership must maintain certain 1 minimum 
requirements for entrance and graduation. 
Through the influence of this Conference, 
uniform and higher standards of educa- 
tion have been adopted from time to time, 
ahd the fact that several states by law or 
by Board ruling recognize the standards of 
the Conference is evidence of its influence. 

This school is registered in the New 
York Department of Education, and by the 
Boards of Pharmacy of Ohio and other 
states that maintain a registration bureau. 

Its diploma is recognized in all states. 



ir, 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Frederic E. Lee, Ph.D., F.R.E.S., 
Advisory Dean 

Maynard A. Clemens, M.A., Dean 

In response to repeated requests from 
men and women in Baltimore, the Univer- 
sity of Maryland opened in that city in 
the fall of 1921 Extension Courses in Com- 
merce to provide systematic instruction in 
those subjects which would be of benefit 
to those who were engaged in or expected 
to engage in business. The demand for 
such courses proved to be so great — over 
five hundred students having been" enrolled 
during the academic year 1922-1923— it was 
decided in the Spring of 1923 to create on 
the foundation of these Extension Courses, 
a College of Commerce and Business Ad- 
ministration which would be closely ar- 
ticulated with the College of Arts and Sci- 
ence of the University. In order to main- 
tain a close relationship the dean of the 
College of Arts and Sciences was made 
Advisory Dean of the College of Commerce 
and Business Administration, and all mat- 
ters pertaining to standards, faculty, 
courses of study, degrees, etc., are handled 
jointly by the deans. 



10 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Faculty and Instructors 

Superintendent of Nurses and Director of 
School of Nursing 
Annie Creighton, R.N. 
Assistant Superintendent of Nurses 
Stella U. Ricketts, R.N. 
Instructor in' Nursing 
Janet Nesbitt Smith, R.X. 
Instructor in Nursing and Supervisor of 
Wards 
Louise Savage, R. N. 
Assistant Instructor in Nursing and Super- 
visor of Wards 
Grace L. Elgin, R.N. 
Instructor in Surgical Technique for 
Nurses and Supervisor of Operating 
Pavilion 
Elizabeth Aitkenhead, R.N. 
Instructor in Dietetics 

Janet Whitney 

Instructor in Massage 

Edith Walton 

Instructor in Social Service 

Grace Pearson, R.N. 

The University of Maryland School for 
Nurses was established in the year 1S89. 
Sin'ce that time it has been an integral 
part of the University of Maryland Hos- 
pital. 

The School is non-sectarian, the only 
religious services being morning prayers. 

The University of Maryland Hospital is a 
general hospital containing about 285 
beds. It is equipped to give young women' 
a thorough course of instruction and prac- 
tice in all phases of nursing including ex- 
perience in the operating room. 

17 



FRATERNITIES 



Phi Sigma Kappa 

Psi Omega 

Xi Psi Phi 

Alpha Omega 

Phi Beta Pi 

Nu Sigma Nu 

Theta Nu Epgilon 

Phi Chi 

Phi Delta Epsilon 

Chi Zeta Chi 

Phi Lambda Kappa 

Kappa Psi 

Iota Lambda Phi 



Alpha Pi 
Delta Sigma Pi 
Alpha Kappa Sigma 
Gamma Eta Gamma 
Delta Theta Pi 
Phi Alpha 
Sigma Theta Pi 
Sigma Mu Delta 
Alpha Zeta Gamma 
Psi Omega 
Xi Psi Phi 
Alpha Zeta Omega 



CLUBS 



Gorgas Odontological Society 
Medical Students Couricil 
Randolph Winslow Surgical Society 
Italian Club 
Alpha Debating Club 

"Terra Mariae," published annually by the 
Senior Class of the Baltimore Schools. 



18 



COUNCIL OF CLASS PRESIDENTS 

This student organization is composed of 
the Presidents of each of the regular 
classes in the six schools located in Balti- 
more. It is the one group that represents 
the entire student body. 

The council is organized each fall after 
the classes have elected their officers. Meet- 
ings are held regularly. All matters of 
interest and concern to the student body 
are considered by the Council. 

The importance an'd value of the organi- 
zation has been recognized by the commit- 
tee of Deans, and in accordance with a rec- 
ommendation of the Deans, the Council 
supervises the publication of the Terra 
Mariao. The Council has played a leading 
part in fostering dauces, athletic mass 
meetings, and engendering a virile univer- 
sity spirit. 



1:1 




A. I* Purinton 

Mr. Purinton' comes to the University of 
Maryland as General Secretary of the Y. M. 
C. A., after several years of successful ex- 
perience in similar work at Bates College, 
where he graduated in 1917. He has spent 
the last year in Graduate work at Yale 
University. 

20 



College Park Departments 

THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN 
ASSOCIATION 

Officers 

President Walter D- Bromley, ;25 

Vice-President - Pr ** K ,2 

Secretary Howard England, £> 

Treasurer... Wilton Anderson', 25 

Gen. Secretary... A. L. Purinton, Bates, 17 

The Young Men's Christian Association 
was reorganized in the Spring of 1924 to 
meet the demand felt by many students for 
a meri's organization on the campus which 
would be able to assume leadership for the 
religious life of all the students. Extensive 
programs have not been planned, but under 
the leadership of Mr. A. L. Purinton who 
has been engaged as General Secretary of 
the Association, programs will be Planned 
arid carried out in response to whatever 
needs arise. The Y. M. C. A. at Maryland 
is a new organization as far as the present 
student body is concerned and it invites 
the co-operation of every student. 

The work will be started under the di- 
rection of the following committees: 

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION — Chairman, 
Fred Bull; Assistants, Edward Melton and 
John Magruder. 

MEMBERSHIP— Chairman, Wilton An- 
derson; Assistants, S. S. Ryan and Wilbur 
Pearce. 

PUBLICITY— Chairman, Evan Wheaton; 
Assistants, L. E. Newcomer and Thomas 
Browne. 

FINANCE— Chairman, Wilton Anderson. 

21 



THK YOL'Nti WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN 
ASSOCIATION 

Officers 

President Alice Cushniau 

Vice-President Mary M. Brown 

Secretary Dorothy O. Young 

Treasurer Mary Riley 

Undergraduate Rep Fra rices Wolfe 

Committee Chairmen 

Publicity Kathryn Baker 

Program Lucille Hill 

Socials Elizabeth Duvall 

Finance Olive Wallace 

Religious Program Betty Amos 

The Y. W. C. A. was organized dur- 
ing the last year for the purpose of meet- 
ing the need for an all-campus religious 
organization among the women students, 
which would correlate arid co-ordinate all 
the religious activities for the women of 
the university. In co-operation with the 
Y. M. C. A., the Y. W. C. A. assumes a 
major responsibility for the religious ac- 
tivities of the campus. This is a difficult 
task, but one that is so worthwhile that 
the Y. W. C. A. calls upon every girl upon 
the campus who wishes to help others 
build high Christian character, to join 
with them in carrying out their program. 

The Religious program for this year will 
center in the Sunday Evenirig Vesper Serv- 
ice under the joint auspices of the Y. M. 
C. A. and Y. W. C. A. The first part of 
the program will be led by the students 
and will be followed by the YM-YW Bible 
Class led by Dean Lee. All students are 
urged to attend these meetings regularly. 

22 



WHO'S WHO, 1924-1925 

Football 

Captain Edward Pugh 

Manager B. F. Zalesak 

Baseball 

Captain Peter Schrider 

Manager Edward Juska 

Basketball 

Captain John Faber 

Mariager J- H. Baker 

Lacrosse 

Captain Joseph Berger 

Manager O. H. Greager 

Track 

Captain Edward Pugb 

Manager A. E. Hook 

Tennis 

Captain (Not chosen) 

Manager Dwight Walker 

Cross-Country 

Captain Horace Buckman 

Manager A. E. Cook 

Student Assembly 

President Walter Bromley 

Secretary Elizabeth Swenk 

Y. M. C. A. 

President Walter Bromley 

Secretary Howard England 

23 



Y. W. C. A. 

President Alice Cushman 

Secretary Dorothy O. Young 

Bible Class 

President Laura Amos 

Secretary-Treasurer Fred Bull 

Episcopal Club 

President Allison Ryan 

Secretary-Treasurer J. H. Compton 

Student Executive Council 

President Paige Gardner 

Secretary Walter Bromley 

Senior Representative Joe Burger 

Junior Representative Stewart Whaley 

Junior Representative. .. .W. H. Whiteford 

Sophomore Representative John Tonkin 

Sophomore Rep John L. Cardwell 

Chess and Checker Club 

President William Burger 

Engineering Society 

President Kerineth Mathews 

Secretary -Treasurer A. Prangley 

Home Economics Club 

President Frances Wolfe 

Secretary-Treasurer Laura Amos 

Masque and Bauble Club 

President Wilton Anderson 

Secretary Betty Amos 

Live Stock Club 

President Wilbur Pearce 

Secretary-Treasurer Howard England 

24 



New Mercer Literary Society 

President Edward Evans 

Secretary Helen Beyerle 

Poe Literary Society 

President Joseph Macko 

Secretary Margaret Wolfe 

Pubilic Speaking Club 

President T. J. VanDorin 

Secretary Gordon Brightman 

Rossbourg Club 

President E. P. Zalesak 

Secretary-Treasurer Dwight Walker 

Student Grange 

Master Wilbur Pearce 

Secretary Laura Amos 

Diamondback 

Editor-in-Chief John White 

Business Manager John Ennis 

Reveille 

Editor-in-Chief Edward Juska 

Business Manager Joseph McGlone 

Girls' Rifle Team 

Captain Thelma Winkjer 

Manager Mary Harbaugh 

Interfraternity Council 

President Walter Bromley 

Secretary-Treasurer .Elizabeth Swenk 

Women's Student Government Association 

President Elizabeth Duvall 

Secretary Phyllis Morgan 

25 



FRATERNITIES AM) SORORITIES 

National Fraternities 

Kappa Alpha 
Delta Sigma Phi 
Sigma Phi Sigma 
Sigma Nu 
Phi Sigma Kappa 

I.or.nl Chapters 

Delta Psi Omega 
Nu Sigma Omicron 
Sigma Tan Omega 

Sororities 

Lambda Tau 
Sigma Delta 

Honorary Fraternities 

Alpha Zeta — National Honorary Agricultu- 
ral Fraternity. 

Phi Kappa Phi — National Honorary Asso- 
ciation open to honor students in all 
branches of learning. 

Phi Mu — Honorary Engineering Fraternity. 

Sigma Delta Pi — Honorary Spanish Fra- 
ternity. 



26 



CONSTITUTION AND 1JY-LA«S Ol TIIK 
INTEKFBATEBNITV COUNCIL 

The name of this organization shall bo 
the Interfraternity Courieil of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 

The membership of this organization 
shall consist of two representatives of each 
of the recognized competitive fraternities 
of the University of Maryland; and the 
purpose shall be to maintain a harmonious 
relationship between' the said University 
in the management of the affairs that per- 
tain to fraternities; and to accomplish this 
purpose the following rules adopted by the 
President and Deans of the University are 
herewith incorporated as the Constitution 
of this organization': 

I 

Bach fraternity and sorority shall keep 
on file in the Registrar's office a complete 
list, corrected to date, of all active pledged 
members, including officers. 

II 

Each fraternity and sorority shall keep 
on file in the Registrar's office a complete 
up-to-date list of all members living in 
the chapter house. 

Ill 

No fraternity or sorority shall pledge 
any student until 8 o'clock in the morning 
of pledge day. Pledge day shall begin 
the morning of Tuesday of the week pre- 
vious to the Christmas holidays. 

27 



The meaning of the word "Pledge"— 
No fraternity or sorority shall either 
directly or indirectly cause any student to 
commit himself or herself in favor or 
against any fraternity or sorority prior 
to pledge day. 

IV 

No student may be pledged to any fra- 
ternity or sorority unless he or she has 
at least fifteen (15) units in high school 
subjects. 

V 

No fraternity nor sorority may initiate 
any student until he or she shall have 
passed twelve (12) credit hours. 

VI 

Any student or group of students desir- 
ing to form a local fraternity or sorority 
or club or association must first submit 
to the Interfraternity Council and Univer- 
sity Senate duplicate statements of the 
object and ideals involved, with a list of 
the proposed charter members. No action 
shall be taken by the University Senate 
until the application has been forwarded 
to it with a recommendation by the Inter- 
fraternity Council. It is understood that 
such applications must be acted upon with- 
in one month. 

VII 

A group of students in order to become 
eligible to representation on' the Interfra- 
ternity Council shall be required: 
a. To possess Ideals and Purpose of Or- 
ganization such as will not be detri- 

28 



mental to the general welfare of the 
University or to the Fraternities or 
Sororities represented on the Council. 
b. To have been' functioning actively as 
an organization at the College Park 
Branch of the Institution at least two 
years after having obtained permission 
from the Administrative Officials to 
function as an organization. Such or- 
ganization' shall abide by the Interfra- 
ternity Council rulings for two years 
immediately preceding their application 
for representation. 

c. To have at least 12 active members. 

d. To have at least a grade of "C" as a 
general scholastic average for the year 
immediately succeeding the time of its 
application for representation. 

f To have at least 90 per cent of its 
members actively engaged in recog- 
nized University activities— this in- 
cludes athletics. 

g To show sufficient evidence of good 
financial standing as an organization. 

VIII 

No student nor group of students shall 
petition for a charter in any national fra- 
ternity until after the group desiring na- 
tionalization has obtained recognition as a 
member of the Interfraternity Council. 

IX 

It is herewith understood that all mat- 
ters having relationship to the organiza- 
tion of fraternities and sororities and gen- 
eral fraternity and sorority affairs shall 
be presented to the Interfraternity Coun- 
cil, composed of two representatives from 
each of the competitive fraternities that 

29 



have met all the ie<]uireinerits for recogni- 
tion by the Interfraternity Council for rec- 
ommendation to the University Senate. 
Final approval or disapproval of such mat- 
ters rest with the President of the Uni- 
vprsity. 



BY-LAWS 

I 

It is herewith understood by the mem- 
bers of the Interfraternity Council that 
any fratern'ity violating any part of the 
Constitution of this organization shall be 
subject to a fine of one hundred dollars 
($100), which shall be used to help defray 
the expen'ses of the annual Interfraternity 
Dance, and suspension' from representation 
on this Council for a period of one year. 

It is further understood that any fra- 
ternity or sorority suspended is by no 
means relieved from the obligation of ob- 
serving the Constitution an'd By-Laws and 
the term "suspension" implies only punish- 
ment or the withdrawal of the privilege 
to send representatives to this body. 

II 

Men not pledged to a fraternity shall not 
become residents in any fraternity house, 
except as approved by the Interfraternity 
Council. 

Ill 

No fraternity or sorority may withdraw 
from this Council without having first ob- 
tained the approval of the Interfraternity 
Council, and also the University Senate. 

IV 

The first meeting of each year to be held 
for the election' of officers and that Mr. 
Byrd shall call the meeting. 

30 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



General Procedure for Registration 

1. Students should report to the Office 
of the Registrar for admission and direc 
tion. 

2. After the Registrar has verified the 
student's credits, the student will be sent 
to the proper Dean with a matriculation 
card. 

3. The student will receive a course card 
in the Dean's office. 

4 After the course card is properly 
made out it must be signed by the Dean'. 

5. Course cards should then be taken 
to the Sectioning Committee. Room T-211, 
Agricultural Building, for section assign- 
ment. 

6 The course card will then be taken to 
the Registrar's office where a charge slip 
will be issued. 

7. The charge slip and the course card 
will be taken to the office of the Financial 
Secretary where fees must be paid. 

8. The Financial Secretary upon the ad- 
justment and payment of fees certifies 
upon the course card that satisfactory 
arrangements have been made and sends 
the student to the office of the Registrar 
for final registration and issuance of class 
cards. Class cards are not issued until the 
course card is certified by the Financial 
Secretary. 

9. Each student must file in the office of 
the Registrar within seven days after the 

31 



semester opens a schedule of his classes. 
A fee of one dollar is imposed for failure 
to do this. 

10. The student places his name, his col- 
lege, and the date on the class cards and 
presents at the first meeting of a class 
the appropriate card to the iristjuctor for 
enrollment in the class. Students are not 
admitted to classes without class cards. 
Instructors will see that this rule is en- 
forced. 

11. Students who, for adequate reasons, 
are more than ten days late in register- 
ing must secure permission for entrance 
into courses from the instructors in 
charge of the courses. Such permission', if 
given, must be indicated on the course 
card. A fee of $2.00 is imposed for late 
registration. 

12. Any change of course is made only 
on written permission from the Dean in- 
volved and is subject to a fee of one dol- 
lar after the first week of the semester. 
After securing such permission from the 
Dean', the student must present the same 
to the Registrar at once, who in turn is- 
sues the student a class card for the course 
he is entering and a withdrawal card is 
sent to the instructor in charge of the 
course from which the student is with- 
drawing. Unless this is done no credit will 
be given for the new course, and a failure 
will be recorded for the course dropped. 
In general, withdrawals from courses other 
than elective, will not be granted after the 
first six weeks of the course. 

13. A student who desires to transfer 
from one college to another must petition 
the Dean of the college from which he 
wishes to withdraw on the regular form 
obtained from the Registrar. 

32 



14. No student may carry more or less 
than the prescribed riumber of hours 
without permission from his Dean. 

Examinations and Marks 

15. Examinations are given at the end 
of each semester. 

16. The following grading system is in 
operation : 

A, B, C, and D— Passing. 

E — Con'dition. 

F— Failure. 

W— Mark withheld. 

17. Students with marks D or above are 
classed as having passed the course. In 
order to receive a bachelor's degree, a stu- 
dent must have secured marks of not less 
than C in subjects aggregating at least 
three-fourths of the work required for such 
a degree. 

18. A student with a mark of E is con- 
ditioned. 

19. A student must arrange with his in- 
structors at the beginning of a semester 
for the removal of conditions received in 
the previous semester. A fee of $1.00 will 
be charged for each regular condition ex- 
amination. No instructor will give a con- 
dition examination until a student presents 
a receipt showing the fee has been paid. 
Following each condition examination the 
instructor will report the results to the 
Registrar. 

20. A condition n'ot removed within the 
succeeding semester becomes a failure. 

21. A student with a mark of F has 
failed in the course. In case of failure in 
a required course a student must repeat 
the course. He is required to enroll in 

33 



that subject again the brat time it is 
offered, if possible. 

«>2 In case a condition or failure is m- 
curred in' an elective subject the student 
may be permitted to substitute only upon 
Commendation of the head of the Depart- 
ment in which the student is majoring and 
approval of the student's Dean. 

23 A student transferring to a college 
will consult his riew Dean regarding the 
adjustment of his record. A record of this 
adjustment must be filed in the Registrar's 
Office. 

24 If for any adequate reason, such as 
illness, a student has been unable to com- 
plete the work of a course during the se- 
mester, he may receive a mark of W. In 
such instances a student must complete the 
work assign'ed by the instructor by the (end 
of the first semester in which that subject 
is again offered, or the mark becomes *• 

Absences 

25. A student is expected to attend 
punctually each class and laboratory exer- 
cise in each course. ... 

26. In case of extended illness which 
prevents the attendance of a student at his 
classes he should promptly notify his Dean. 

27. In case of absence immediately be- 
fore or after a vacation a student will be 
penalized by the payment of a special fee 
of three dollars for each course cut. In- 
structors will report such absences imme- 
diately to the office of the Registrar. 

Probations and Delinquencies 

28. If a student receives a mark of fail- 
ure (F) in fifty per cent or more of the 



semester hours for which he is registered 
he is automatically dropped from the rolls 
of the University. 

29. A student who does not make a 
passing mark in at least eight hours of 
work in which he is enrolled for a given 
semester, may not continue for the next 
semester without the permission of his 
Dean. Where such permission is given the 
student is on probation, and remains on 
probation until his deficiencies are re- 
moved. A notice of his probationary 
status will be mailed to the student's pa- 
rent or guardian. 

30. A student while on probation shall 
not represent the University in any extra- 
curricular activity such as: participation 
in athletic contests, the glee club, dra- 
matics, debating teams, etc. 

31. While on probation a student is re- 
quired to report weekly to his Dean or 
faculty adviser with regard to his pro- 
bationary status. 

32. The Deau shall recommend to the 
President, the withdrawal of an'y student 
who, in the opinion of his college faculty, 
is deemed undesirable or who continues to 
do unsatisfactory work. 

33. Any student who has been dropped 
from the University or has withdrawn in 
order to avoid being dropped, and who is 
subsequently re-admitted, is not eligible 
to represent the University on any team, 
club, or association, until he has been in 
the University for a period of one semes- 
ter from the date of his return and has 
satisfied the regular conditions of eligi- 
bility. 



Withdrawal from the University 

34. A studen't who desires to withdraw 
from the University must obtain the per- 
mission of his Dean on the regular form 
obtained from the Registrar and must have 
filled out a clearance slip. A student who 
withdraws without following this proce- 
dure forfeits all claims for reimbursements. 



.€>.!,<,. 



FRESHMAN RULES 

1. Freshmen must perform promptly and 
cheerfully all tasks assigned them. 

2 Freshmen must refrain' from wear- 
ing all insignia of any kind, unless earned 
at this school. 

3 Freshmen must attend all meetings 
of the Assembly (occupying front rows) 
and all cheer practices. 

4. Freshmen must attend all games in 
a compact cheering section (no dates with 
girls at games). 

5. Freshmen must tip their caps and 
speak to all upper classmen, addressing 
them with "sir" and "pardon." 

6 Freshmen must wear rat caps and 
name tags at all times while on the cam- 
pus. 

7. Freshmen must not cut across the 
campus and must use only cinder and ce- 
ment paths. 

8. Freshmen must not loiter around 
front of buildings, nor sit on stone wall 
along Washington-Baltimore Boulevard. 

36 



9. Freshmen must wear "four-in-hand" 
ties of the Sophomore Class colors only, 
carinot wear knickers, smoke on the cam- 
pus, or keep hands in pockets. 

10. Freshmen must work on the athletic 
held when requested and must learn all 
college yells and songs. 

11. Freshmen must conduct themselves 
in gentlemanlike manner at all times in 
and around the dormitories. 

Dining: Hall Regulations 

1. Freshmen must line up in twos in 
rear of dining hall. 

2. Freshmen' must not sit at the heads 
of tables unless authorized to do so by 
an upper classman, 

3. Freshmen must fold their arms dur- 
ing announcements. 

4. Freshmen must eat with the best of 
manners, ask for and pass things cheer- 
fully. 



37 



Women Students' Government 
Association 



CONSTITUTION 

Article I — Name 

The name of this organization' shall be 
the Women Students' Government Associ- 
ation of the University of Maryland. 

Article II — Object 

The purposes of this association shall be : 

1. To maintain an effective student self- 
government. 

2. To in'crease in the student body a 
sense of responsibility. 

3. To promote co-operation between the 
students and the President and Faculty of 
the University. 

4. To attain a high standard of scholar- 
ship and living. 

Artcle III— Membership 

Section 1. All women registered as stu- 
dents in' the University shall be members 
of this Association ; but only those residing 
in the dormitories, or in houses under the 
supervision of the University, shall have a 
vote on matters pertaining to dormitory 
life. 

Section 2. A quorum shall consist of a 
majority of the members of the Associa- 
tion' living on the campus. 



Article IV— Officers 

Section 1. The officers of this Associa- 
tion shall be a President and .Vice-Presi- 
dent, elected from the incoming Senior 
Class, and a Secretary, elected from the in- 
coming Junior Class. 

Section 2. Qualifications. 

(a) .The President must have served on 
the Student Council one year. 

(b) All officers of the Association shall 
be without conditions or failures in class 
work at time of election. 

(c) No girl shall hold office in the 
Association who has not been a student in 
the University at least two years previous 
to her election. 

Note— As the election of officers is held 
in the spring, this rule may be interpreted 
to mean any girl who is about to complete, 
or has completed, two years of college 
work in this University. 

Section 3. Duties of officers. 

(a) The President of the Association 
shall call and preside over all meetings of 
the Association and perform the general 
duties of an executive. She shall also act 
as President of the Student Council. 

(b) The Vice-President of the Associa- 
tion shall assume the duties of the Presi- 
dent in her absence. 

(c) The Secretary shall post notices of 
meetings, keep a record of the minutes of 
all meetings, and conduct the correspon- 
dence of the Association. She shall also 
keep an up-to-date record of the points 
credited to each girl in the Association. 



Article V — Executive Council 

Section 1. Members. 

The Executive Council shall consist of: 

The President of the Association. 

The House President of each of the dor- 
mitories and of each of the houses under 
the supervision of the University. 

A Representative from each of the Senior, 
Junior, Sophomore and Freshman classes. 

One Day Student who shall have no 
vote except on matters concerning day stu- 
dents. 

Section 2. Qualifications and Collegiate 
Standing of Members: 

(a) The House President must be a 
Junior or Senior. 

(b) The Class Representative must re- 
side in one of the dormitories or in a 
house under the supervision of the Univer- 
sity. + , 

(c) The Day Student shall be a Junior 
or Senior. , , 

(d) All members of the Council shall be 
without conditions or failures at time of 
election. 

Section 3. Officers. 

The President of the Association shall 
act as President of the Council, but shall 
have no vote except in case of a tie. 

A Secretary who shall keep a record of 
the minutes of all meetings of the Council, 
shall be elected from its upper classmen 
members. 

Section 4. Duties of the Council: 

(a) To act as an Advisory Board to the 
President of the Association. 

(b) To enforce all rules of the Associa- 
tion. 

40 



(,.) To llx and enforce penaltes for vio- 
lation's of rules of the Association. All 
major penalties must be approved by the 
Dean of Women. 

(d) To remove from office at any time 
House Presidents who are inefficient in the 
performance of their duties. 

(e) To make decision and act in all mat- 
ters not provided for in this constitution. 

Article VI— Election 

Section 1. Officers of the Association: 

Nominations for the officers of this Asso- 
ciation shall be made from the floor in the 
meeting previous to the Spring Meeting. 
With the notice for the Spring Meeting 
shall be posted the names of these candi- 
dates. This list of candidates must be ap- 
proved by the Dean of Women and the 
President of the University. 

The election of officers shall be by se- 
cret ballot; a majority of votes cast 
by those present, who must constitute 
a Quorum, shall be necessary to elect. In 
the event no candidate receives a majority 
upon first ballot, there shall be a second 
casting of votes, and all except the two 
highest shall be eliminated before voting a 
second time. 

Section 2. Class Representatives. 

Each of the Senior, Junior and Sopho- 
more classes shall elect, its representative 
to the Executive Council by secret ballot 
during the last week in May. This meet- 
ing for election shall be called by the act- 
ing representative of each class. 

The Freshman representative shall be 
elected at the beginning of the fall term. 

41 



Section 3. House Presidents. 

The House Presidents shall be elected at 
the close of the fall meeting of the Asso- 
ciation at the beglunin'g of the school year. 

Section 4. Day Student Representative 
to Council. 

The Day Student representative shall be 
elected at the beginning of the fall term. 

Article VII— Meetings 

Section 1. Women Students' Goverrf- 
ment Association. 

There shall be at least three meetings 
a year of the Women Students' Government 
Association, the meetings to be held as fol- 
lows: 

(a) A fall meeting to be held during the 
first month of school at which time the 
president of the Association' will explain 
to the new women students the ideals 
and functions of the Women Students' 
Government, including the Honor System. 

(b) A meeting to be held at least one 
week in' advance of the Spring Meeting for 
the purpose of making nominations. 

(c) A Spring Meeting for annual election 
of officers of the Association to be held the 
third Monday in May. 

A special meeting of the Association may 
be called at any time by the president at 
the written' request of twenty-five members 
of the Association. 

Section 2. Executive Council. 

The council shall meet regularly on the 
first Monday of every month. Additional 
meetings may be called at any time by the 
president. 

42 



Article VIII— Honor System 

The Women Students' Government Asso- 
ciation' upholds the honor system. Any in- 
fringement of the Honor System by a 
member of the Association is punishable by 
the Executive Council. 

Article IX— Amendments 

This constitution may be amended by a 
two-thirds vote of the Council and a rati- 
fication by a two-thirds vote at a general 
meeting of the Association. 



BY-LAWS 

Social Regulations 
I. LATE LEAVES 

The attendance at any function which 
does not permit a girl to return to hei 
Sonnitory by 7.30 P. M before April 15 
and by 8.00 P. M. after April 15, with the 
exceptions noted below, shall be considered 
a late leave. After a late leave a girl must 
return by 12.45 A. M., to her dormitory. 

Late leaves per year shall be: Fresh- 
men 1 per month, Sophomores 2 per month, 
Juniors 3 per month, Seniors 4 per month. 
Seniors without conditions or failures may 
take late leaves at their discretion after 
April 1, provided they sign up as usual. 

All University functions may be attended 
without late leaves. This includes frater- 
nity dances held in the Park during the 
week-ends and school dances held off the 
campus; it does not include fraternity 
dances held during the week. 

43 



No week-ends spent away from the cam- 
pus shall count as late leaves. 

II. DANCES 

It is understood that girls will return to 
their dormitories Immediately after the 
close of all dances. 

The chaperons for University dan'ces, 
fraternity dances, and sorority dances must 
be approved by the Dean of Women. No 
student in the dormitories may attend a 
non-college dance unless the chaperons 
have been' approved by the Dean of Women. 

III. FRATERNITY HOUSES 

Girls may not go unchaperoned to fra- 
ternity houses. 

House Regulations 

I. HOUSE PRESIDENT 

The duties of the House President shall 
be: 

(a) To call and preside over house meet- 
ings. These shall be called at her own dis- 
cretion or at the written request of any 
five residents of her house. 

(b) To be responsible for the general 
conduct and welfare of her house in co- 
operation with the faculty member resid- 
ing in her house. 

(c) To act as hostess of her house. 

(d) To check up all girls at 10.30 and 
see that lights are out. 

(e) To see that quiet is preserved dur- 
ing study hours. 

(f) To grant light cuts and to keep a 
record of those taken by each girl. 

44 



(g) To keep a record of the late leaves 
taken by each girl as shown by the late 
leave slips turned over each week to the 
House President by the matron or chap- 
eron. 

(h) To grant special rnirior permissions 
to house residents, such as going to Joe's 
after study hours begin. 

(i) To appoint a girl to act in her place 
when she is absent. 

(j) To authorize the payment of bills 
contracted by her house. 

(k) To present to the Executive Coun- 
cil any changes in House Rules desired by 
her house. 

II. 

Girls shall be in' their respective houses 
at 7.30 P. M. until April 15, at which time 
they shall be in their houses by 8.00 P. M., 
except on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday 
nights, and evenings before and of holi- 
days, when they shall be in by 10.30 P. M. 

III. QUIET HOURS 

Quiet hours shall be observed: 

Until 12.00 noon and from 1.00 to 4.30 
daily except Saturday and Sunday. 

At night from 7.30 P. M. on, with inter- 
mission from 10.00 to 10.30, except on Fri- 
day, Saturday and Sunday nights, when 
houses must be quiet after 11.00 P. M. 

There shall be no bathing after 10.30 
P. M. 

IV. MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS AND 

TYPEWRITERS 
Musical instruments may not be played 
during quiet hour. 

45 



Typewriters shall come under the same 
ruling as musical instruments, as regards 
their operation, unless they are kept in a 
room provided for them, in which room 
they shall be so far removed that they dis- 
turb no one. 

V. LIGHTS 

Lights must be out by 10.30 P. M. ex- 
cept on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday 
nights, and nights before and of holidays, 
when they must be out by 11.00 P. M. 

Light cuts shall be allowed as follows: 
Freshmen 3, Sophomores 8, Juniors 4, 
Seniors 5 per month. These light cuts 
must be taken in the living room or in 
some room other than a sleeping room, 
unless both roommates are taking a light 
cut, in which case each girl shall be cred- 
ited with a cut and the girls may remain 
in their room. 

VI. ROOMS 

All rooms must be orderly by 8.00 A. M. 
VII. REGISTRATION 

Any girl leaving College Park at any 
time shall register her destination at her 
dormitory. ."_ ' ■ , 

Girls leaving their dormitory for meet- 
ings library, social functions, etc., shall 
register destination at their respective dor- 
mitories. 

VIII. GUESTS 

Girls must secure permission for all 

house guests from the Dean of Women. 

All guests must be registered with the 

chaperon of the House at least one week 

46 



in advance. Permission must be secured 
from the owner of the room for its use. 

IX. CALLERS 

Girls may have men' callers at the dor- 
mitories after dinner until 7.30 on Monday, 
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday nights, 
on Saturday and Sunday afternoons, and 
on Friday, Saturday and Sun'day evenings 
until 10.30 P. M. 



Point System 

The purpose of the Point System is to 
prevent a few girls from being overworked 
and to encourage and make it possible 
for more girls to share in campus activities. 

Maximum : 25 points per year. 
MAJOR 

1. President Student Government As- 

sociatiori 20 

2. President Y. W. C. A 20 

3. House President 1» 

4. Secretary of Grange 18 

5. Secretary Y. W. C. A 10 

6. Treasurer of Grange 15 

7. Manager Rifle Team lo 

8. Intercollegiate Debater lo 

MINOR 

1. Class Representative to Student 

Council J2 

2. Day Student 1£ 

3. Secretary of Literary Society 1£ 

4. Captain Basketball 12 

5. Captain Rifle Team 12 

6. Treasurer Y. W. C. A 10 

47 



7. President Home Economies Club... 10 

H. Secretary Dramatic Club 10 

9. Treasurer Dramatic Club 10 

10. Secretary Student Assembly J> 

11. Secretary-Treasurer Home Econom- 

' ics Club 8 

12. Treasurer Literary Society S 

13. Secretary Student Government As- 

sociation ft 

14. Vice-President Y. W. C. A 5 

15. Cabinet Member Y. W. C. A 5 

10. Vice-President Student Government 

Association 5 

17. Member of Standing Committee 5 

IS. Wardrobe Mistress, Dramatic Club 5 

10. President of Bible Class 5 

21. President Young Peoples' Union 5 

22. Secretary-Treasurer Young Peoples' 

Union 5 

23. Vice-President Literary Society 5 

24. Program Committee Literary So- 

ciety 5 

23. Lady Assistant Lecturer of Grange. 5 

26. Freshman Reporter Diamondback. . 5 

27. Sophomore Reporter Diamondback. 5 

28. Staff of Diamondback 5 

29. Organization Reporter 3 

30. Secretary of Class 3 

31. Vice-President Home Economics 

Club 3 

32. Vice-President Bible Class 3 

33. Vice-President Young Peoples' 

Union 3 

34. Vice-President of Class 2 

35. Member of Executive Committee of 

Bible Class 2 



THE GENERAL STUDENTS' ASSEMBLY 
PREAMBLE 

We, the students of the University of 
Maryland, in order to secure an effective 
student self-government, an elevated com- 
munity life and to advance the University 
as a whole, do hereby establish this Con- 
stitution as a basis for the Honor System 
un'der which the student body hereafter is 
to be governed. 

Article I— Name 

The name of this organization shall be 
The General Students' Assembly of the 
University of Maryland. 

Article II— Object 

The object of this organization shall be 
to maintain a student self-government, to 
promote general studen't activities, to ad- 
vance the interests of the University as a 
whole, and to build up a general com- 
munity life in accordan'ce with the dictates 
of the Honor System hereinafter described. 

Article III — Membership 

All undergraduate students enrolled in 
Hie University are eligible for membership. 

Article IV Officers 

The officers of this organization shall be 
a President, Vice-President, and Secretary, 
who shall be Seniors, and who shall serve 
until their successors are elected and qual- 
ified. The President of the Senior Class 
shall not hold any of these offices. 

49 



Article V — Executive Committee 

The Executive Committee shall consist of 
ten members ; the President and on'e elected 
member from each of the respective classes, 
and two elected representatives from the 
non-collegiate group. The President of the 
Students' Assemblv shall act as its secre- 
tary, but shall not be a member thereof. 

Article VI — Advisory Board 

The Students Affairs Committee, con- 
sisting of five members of the faculty, shall 
constitute the Advisory Board. 

Article VII — Annual Meetings 

The last meeting In April shall be for 
the election of officers. The first meeting 
in May shall be for the installation of offi- 
cers and the reading of annual reports. 

Article VIII — Amendment 



BY-LAWS 
Article I— Duties of Officers 

Section 1. The President shall preside at 
all meetings of the Assembly, and shall 
act as the secretary of the Executive Com- 
mittee, but shall not be a member of the 
Executive Committee nor have a vote there- 
in. He shall present at the annual meeting 
a report of the work of the Assembly dur- 
ing the preceding year. He shall appoint 

50 



all special committees and fill all vacancies 
in' standing committees not otherwise pro- 
vided for in the By-Laws. 

Section 2. In the absence of the Presi- 
dent, the Vice-President shall perform the 
duties of that office. 

Section 3. The Secretary shall keep the 
minutes of the Assembly, conduct its cor- 
respondence, keep a complete list of mem- 
bers according to classes, and perform such 
other duties as the organization' may direct. 

Section 4. The Executive Committee 
shall function as the body to carry out the 
rules and regulations as prescribed by the 
General Students' Assembly, and shall 
function as the body for final discussion 
and action on' all questions and complaints 
that come from sub-committees and indi- 
viduals. From this Committee, and this 
Committee alone, shall evolve all recom- 
mendations that shall be submitted to the 
President of the University for his ap- 
proval. This Committee shall likewise pro- 
pose and present to the General Students' 
Assembly any question's that may need the 
attention and endorsement of the wbolfi 
student body. The President of the 
Senior Class shall be chairman of the Ex- 
ecutive Committee, which committee shall 
determine its procedure of business. 

Section 5. The Advisory Board, repre- 
senting the faculty of the University in its 
joint meetings with the Executive Commit- 
tee, shall advise and aid in all matters of 
student welfare and general University ac- 
tivities. 

Article II — Meetings 

Section 1. The regular meetings of the 
organization' shall be held at 11.25 A. M. on 

51 



Wednesday of each week during the colle- 
ge year, except during holiday or re- 
cess periods. 

Section 2. Special meetings of the As- 
sembly shall be called by the President in 
the event important business demands im- 
mediate disposal. 

Section 3. The Executive Committee 
shall meet Thursday of each week at an 
hour determined by its members It shall 
hold special meetings at the call of its 
chairman', or upon the request of six of 
its members. 

Section 4. A joint meeting of the Ad- 
visory Board and the Executive Committee, 
Ihall be held the first and third Mondays 
of each month at 4.15 P. M. 

Article III— Election 

Section 1. The nomination of officers 
shall be made at the regular meeting pre- 
vious to the Annual Meetirfg, and shall be 
made from the floor. 

Section 2. The election of officers shall 
be by ballot; a majority of the votes cast 
by those present, which must constitute a 
quorum, shall be necessary to elect In 
the event no candidate receives a majority 
vote upon first ballot there shall be a sec- 
ond casting of votes, and all except the 
two highest shall be eliminated before vot- 
ing a second time. 

Section 3. No person shall be eligible to 
the offices of President, Vice-President, or 
Secretary who is not a qualified membei 
of the Senior Class. 

Section 4. A Sophomore Committee for 
the ensuing year shall be elected by the 

52 



Freshman class at its last meeting in the 
month of May. 

Section 5. There shall be a Managing 
Editor of the Diainoridback. He shall be 
appointed by the faculty committee in 
charge of student publications. The Editor 
and Business Manager for the current year 
shall be eligible for the office. The ap- 
pointment shall be made one week before 
the first regular meeting in May. The 
Managing Editor shall supervise the finan- 
cial and editorial work on the Diamond- 
back. 

The Editor and Business Manager of the 
Diamondback for the ensuing year shall be 
elected by the Assembly at the first regular 
meeting in May. These offices must be 
filled from the Junior Class. Candidates 
for these offices shall be proposed by the 
Executive Committee. 

The n'ewly chosen officers of the Dia- 
mondback shall assume their duties one 
week after the date of their election. 

The staffs are to be appointed by the 
three officers from the student body at 
large. 

Section 6. There shall be a student man- 
ager and a student assistant manager for 
each branch of sport in which the Univer- 
sity is represented in' intercollegiate com- 
petition who shall be elected by the Assem- 
bly at the second regular meeting after the 
last game played in each respective sport 
with the exception of baseball, which shall 
be elected at the last regular meeting in 
May. The Assistant Manager must be a 
member of the Junior Class, but must be 
elected from those Juniors who have been 
designated by a joint meeting of the Ath- 
letic Board of the Athletic Association and 

53 



the Executive Committee as having assisted 
in the respective sports during the year 
and, consequently, are eligible for election. 
This Assistant Manager shall automatically 
become Manager in his Senior Year, pro- 
vided he has served his office faithfully 
and satisfactorily. The Manager shall be 
responsible to the Director of Athletics and 
the Assistant Manager to the Manager. The 
Manager shall perform all duties assigned 
to him by the Director of Athletics and the 
Assistant Manager the duties assigned him 
by the Manager. Either of them may be 
removed from his position by a complaint 
in writing of the team represented upon 
a seven-ninths vote of the Athletic Board. 
Section* 7. There shall be a head cheer 
leader and two assistant cheer leaders. One 
assistant cheer leader must be a member 
of the Sophomore Class, and one a mem- 
ber of the Junior Class. The Sophomore 
assistant cheer leader shall be elected at 
the second meeting of the Assembly in each 
collegiate year. This Sophomore shall au- 
tomatically become Junior assistant cheer 
leader. 

Section 8. There shall be a Managing 
Editor of the University Annual. He shall 
be appointed by the faculty committee in 
charge of student publications; the editor 
and the business manager for the current 
year being eligible for the office. The ap- 
pointment shall be made one week before 
the last regular meeting of the Assembly 
in April. The Managing Editor shall su- 
pervise the financial and editorial work on 
the Year Book. 

The Editor and Business Manager of the 
University Annual for the ensuing year 
shall be elected by the Assembly at tne 



last regular meeting in April. These offices 
must be filled from the Junior Class. Can- 
didates for these offices shall be proposed 
by the executive committee. 

The staffs are to be appointed by the 
three officers from the student body at 
large. 

Article IV — Committees 

Section 1. There shall be a Sophomore 
Committee, consisting of one appointed 
Senior member from the Executive Com- 
mittee, and five elected members from the 
Sophomore Class, which shall issue Fresh- 
man Caps and present the Freshman code 
on the first Monday of the collegiate year 
to the new men, and which shall super- 
vise the application of the above-mentioned 
code. The action of this Committee shall 
be subject to the san'ction of the Executive 
Committee. 

Section 2. The four collegiate classes and 
the non-collegiate group shall be a com- 
mittee of the whole which shall handle the 
affairs of the respective classes, and which 
shall instruct their respective representa- 
tives on the Executive Committee. Any 
matter which cannot be satisfactorily set- 
tled within' the class may be referred to 
the Executive Committee. 

Article V— Quorum 

Section 1. One-third of the members of 
the Assembly shall constitute a quorum. 

Article VI — Impeachment 

Section 1. Any officer of the Assembly 
who is negligent and dilatory in his duties 
may be impeached upon the two-thirds vote 

55 



of those present. The Executive Commit- 
tee shall try all cases of impeachment. 
Conviction will cause removal from office. 

Article VII— Amendments 

Section 1. These By-Laws may be 
amended at any regular meeting, if notice 
Jas been given in writing at the <*"*£* 
regular meeting, and appended to the call 
f of the meeting. A two-thirds vote of 
those present shall be necessary for adop- 

ti0 It'is herewith understood that the Honor 
System as mentioned in' the Constitution 
atd By-Laws of the Students' Assembly of 
The University of Maryland shall be: 

1 That each student shall so conduct 
himself that he will not at any tune in- 
fringe on the personal property rights of 
others. . . 

2 That each student shall act and deal 
fairly in' all things, with all other students 
and with the University, and with the 
members of the Faculty. 

3 That each student shall consider the 
principle involved in Paragraph 2 as apply - 
ingto the students and faculties of other 

nKtitutions with which he may come in 
competittSn in athletics or in' other fields 
of endeavor. 

In case of infringement of the Honor 
Code or the Laws of the Genera Students 
Assembly, procedure shall be tnus . 

Any member of the student body who 
shall become cognizant of such infringe- 
ment by any student shall immediately 
make report of the same to the President 
of the General Students' Assembly, pro- 
vided the student violating the code has 

50 



not already done so. The President of the 
Assembly shall then acquaint the Executive 
Committee with the matter. The Executive 
Committee, after an investigation, shall 
take up the case with the student involved 
and en'deavor to correct the attitude of the 
student by pointing out the possible con- 
sequences of such acts. In the event the 
student so approached, after a reasonable 
length of time, fails to adopt an attitude 
of right conduct the Executive Committee 
shall make a recommendation to the Pres- 
ident of the University that the student be 
asked to withdraw from the institution. 



Request to the President 

The withdrawal of a student under these 
circumstances shall be accompanied by a 
letter setting forth the facts in the case 
and advising the President that the stu- 
dent is not con'sidered a desirable resident 
in the institution. A copy of such a let- 
ter to the President shall be sent to the 
student's parents. 

1. Class cards are not O. K.'d until each 
student has paid his class dues for the 
previous year. 

(a) Dues: Freshman, $2.50; Sophomore. 
$5.00; Junior, $20.00; Senior, $10.00. 

(b) The treasurers of the respective 
classes shall keep accurate rolls of their 
classes, these rolls being taken' from and 
checked with those of the University Reg- 
istrar. This treasurer shall collect all dues 
and pay all bills. Written reports must 
be made by the treasurers to the Registrar 
each month, showing the present list of 
members and the financial statement. 

57 



(c) Extra assessment by a class on its 
members will not be accountable in this 
resolution. 

(d) In the case of special students, these 
will pay dues in accordance with the num- 
ber of years spent at this institution. Ex- 
amples: (1) A man has been a special 
student here for two years and enters the 
Senior Class. He will have to pay Sopho- 
more Junior and Senior dues. (2) A stu- 
dent 'from University of Pennsylvania en- 
ters the Junior Class. His dues will start 
in that vear as a Junior. (3) A student 
remains in one class two or more years. 
He will pay the dues of that particular 
class for as many years as he is a member. 

The Executive Committee will pass on all 
cases of special students. The classes will 
abide, without question, by the decisions 
of the Executive Committee. 

This resolution will go into effect April 
1, 1921, and continue thereafter. 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

Sept. 27— Washington College at College 
Park. 

Oct. 4— Washington and Lee nt Washing- 
ton. 

Oct. 11— University of Richmond at College 
Park; 

Oct. 18— Virginia Polytechnic Institute at 
Washington. 

Oct. 25— North Carolina University at 
Chapel Hill. 

Nov. 1— Catholic University at Brookland. 

Nov. 8— Yale at New Haven. 

Nov. 15— North Carolina State at College 
Park. 

Nov. 27— Johns Hopkins at Baltimore. 



59 



WEARERS OF THE "M' 



Football 

Edward Pugh 
Kirk Besley 
Downey Osborne 
Wm. Supplee 
Walter Bromley 
Ralph Lanigan 
John Hough 
George Heine 
Joe Berger 
Irwin Hall 
George Lucky 

Lacrosse 

Joe Berger 
John Hough 
Garner Lewis 
E. J. Smith 
Arthur Sleasman 
T. B. Marden 
Emile Zalisak 

Cross-Country 

Horace Buckman 
C. M. Compher 
Daniel Staley 
Wayne Mills 

Tennis 

Wm. Weber 
L. Kimbrough 



Joe Tan 

D. Sommerville 

Baseball 
Peter Schrider 
Edward Nihiser 
Edward Hailey 
Kirk Besley 
Walter Troxell 
.Ifiiu Brayton' 
Robert Burdette 
Harold Remsberg 
Paige Gardner 

Basketball 

John Faber 
Joe Berger 
Walter Troxell 
Irwin Hull 
Wm. Supplee 
Lionel Ensor 
Wm. P. Beatty 

Track 

Edward Pugh 
Joe Endslow 
Wm. Supplee 
Horace Buckman 
C. M. Compher 
W. H. Whiteford 



00 



SONGS AND YELLS 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND HYMN 

Tune of "Flow Gently, Sweet Afton" 
I 

On the hills of fair Maryland thou dost 

proudly stand, 
The lamp of true wisdom alight in thy 

hand. 
With calm brooding mother eyes tender 

arid clear 
Thou gazest upon us, thy children so dear. 
Thy sweet rolling hills rise in tenderest 

green 
Thy white lofty pillars the tall trees be- 
tween 
Serene over all. the blue heavens smile 

there 
On Maryland, our mother, our mother, so 

dear 

II 

Thy sons thou hast given, how nobly they 

stand, 
Their voice and their deeds loud resourid 

thru the land, 
Thy walls have re-echoed to valiant tones, 
And honor and beauty were laid with thy 

stones. 
Our loved Alma Mater, our own mother 

dear, 
When foes shall assail thee, thou never 

shalt fear 
Thy sons shall defend thee and cause thee 

to stand, 
O bow not thy proud head. O fair Mary- 
land. 



Maryland 

lu the very heart of Maryland, 
In the heart of every Maryland man, 

There's a spirit so eridearing 
It will win your heart and hand, 

For she doth hold the sway, 

She will win the day, 

And her glorious men will ever win th^ 
fray. 

CHORUS 

Then it's Hurrah! Hurrah! for Maryland. 

Then it's Hurrah! Hurrah! for U. of M. 

With her banners ever streaming high, 

She will always win or die, 

Then we'll gather 'roun'd Alumni, 

And "Fight" will be our one reply, 

For we love, we love Old Maryland, 
Hurrah ! Hurrah ! Hurrah ! 

Who Owns This Team? 

Oh, who owns this team? 

Oh, who owns this team? 

Oh, who owns this team? the people say. 

Why, we own this team. 

Sure, we own this team. 

M-A-R-Y— L-A-N-D— HURRAH ! 

Oh, who'll win this game? 

Oh, who'll win this game? 

Oh, who'll win this game? the people say. 

Why, we'll win this game, 

Sure, we'll win this game, 

M-A-R-Y— L-A-N-D— HURRAH ! 

Oh, who owns this town ? 

Oh, who owns this town? 

Oh. who owns this town the people say. 

Why, we own this town, 

Sure, we own this town, 

M-A-R-Y— L-A-N-D— HURRAH ! 



From Our Homo Town 

We've brought along a football team. 

From our home town, 
It works better than the best machine 

From our home town', 
We've got a line tbajfc never backs, 
It can push any engine off her tracks, 
And all the backfleld players 
Have the speed of our fast Mailers. 
We've got a team that can't be beat, 

From our home town, 
Every man's a doggone Sheik 

From our home town, 
We've got a battling "Light Brigade," 
They'll turn this game to a track parade. 
They're all Curly's own hand-made. 

From our home town. 

Victory Song 

(Tune — Toreador Chorus) 

Into the game with might and main, 

Maryland! Maryland! 

Fight ! Every minute, fight against the foe ! 

Drive straight down to the goal 

And we will win the game 

For Maryland. 

Sure, victory is won. 

Yes, Maryland will victor be — 

Our Maryland! 

Keep up the fight, we're rooting for you, 
Maryland ! Maryland ! 

Charge! Hit the line and circle round the 
ends, 

Drive back to their goal; 

And victory is won, for Maryland. 
Sure victory is won, 
Yes, Maryland will victor be — 
Our Maryland! 



Defiance 

He — Haw — Ho— Go— Mar— y— land !— 
He— Haw— Ho— Go— Mar— y— land !— 

(Continuous) 

Whistle Boom ! ! Rah ! 

U-M Rah Rah!— TJ-M Rah Rah!! 
Team! Team!! Team*!!! 

Maryland U 

Mary lau'd U. 

Mary lan'd U. 

Maryland Rah Rah, 
Maryland Rah Rah, 
Hoo-Rah! Hoo-Rah ! 

Maryland Rah! 
Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! 
Mary— land ! 

Hoo-Ray 
Hooooo Ray ! Hooooo Ray ! Hurrah ! Team ! 

Locomotive 
M-M-M-M A-A-A-A R-R-R-R Y-Y-Y-Y 
L-L-L-L A-A-A-A N-N-N-N D-D-D-D 

Maryland, 
Team Team Team 

U. M. Rah 
U. M. Rah! Rah! 
U. M. Rah! Rah! 
U— Rah! M— Rah! 
U.— M— Rah! Rah! 

Hip Hip 
Hip! Hip! 
Hike! Hike! 
Fight, Team, Fight! 

Short Ray 
Ray! (Player) (Team) (Maryland) 
Ray ! Ray ! Team ! Team ! Team ! 

Ge-He 
Ge-he! Ge-he! Ge-ha! ha! ha! 
Boom a racka ! Boom a racka ! 
Sis-Boom-Ba 
Maryland ! 

04 



ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL 
CHURCH 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

Rev. Ronalds Taylor, Rector. 

Services: 
9:45 A. M. Sunday School 
11:00 A. M. Morning Prayer 
and Sermon 

Communion Service First 
Sunday of Each Month. 

Make St. Andrew's your church 
home while in College Park. 
You will find a cordial welcome 
at all the services. The Rector 
will welcome an opportunity to 
meet and to know you. 



KUSHNER'S 

VARIETY STORE 

BERWYN 91 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

Visit our Lunch Room. 
Reasonable prices. 
Fresh fruits, Delicatessens, 
Candy, Ice cream, Sodas, 
Cigars and Cigarettes, Mag- 
azines, Drug Supplies. 
Shoes for all College Uses 
Radio is always tuned in for 
your convenience. 
What you don't see ask for. 

Give us a trial 



66 



VISIT 

BILL WHITE'S 

New Lunch Room 

Cigars, Cigarettes, Tobacco 

Ice Cream 

Pastries, Soft Drinks 

Your Money's Worth 
for Every Nickel 



91 



Courtesy of 

ARISSO& SHANK 



Cafe 

Universite 1 



COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



68 



To The Students of the 

University of Maryland 

The First National Bank 

OF HYATTSVILLE 

Extends to you greetings and a 
welcome and invites you to make 
this bank your depository while at 
the University. 

Do not keep money in your 
rooms — pay your bills by check. 

This prevents loss, robbery, ex- 
travagance and disputes. 

The facilities of this bank are 
at your command. 



BANKING HOURS 
Mondays and Government Pay Days 

9 to 5.30 P. M. 
Saturdays, 9 A. M. to 12 M. and 4 to 

8 P. M. 
Other days, 9 A. M. to 3 P. M. 



WE SOLICIT YOUR ACCOUNT 

Prince Georges Bank 

Hyattsville Mt. Rainier 

Resources $1,000,000 

Banking Hours: 

8:30 A. M. to 3:00 P. M. 

Saturdays: 

8:30 A. M. to 12:00 

4:00 P. M. to 8:00 P. M. 

T. M. Jones, T. Enos Ray, Jr. 

Cashier President 

Osias Schonfield 

New York 

Fancy Cake Bakery 
And Dairy Lunch 

407 W. Baltimore St. Baltimore, Md. 

Call at VELVIS STUDIO 

for all kinds of Photographic work 
and Enlargements. 

524 W. Baltimore Street 

Telephone, Calvert 1688- J 
70 



MEMORANDA 



71 



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329-331. W. BALTIMORE ST. 
One Door Below Eutaw 

offers particularly to 

U. of M. MEN 

THE LOWEST PRICES 

THE GREATEST VARIETY 

THE LARGEST STOCK 

THE BEST INFORMATION 

Concerning 

RADIO SETS - SUPPLIES 

PARTS - SERVICE 

Graduate Electrical and Radio 
Engineers in Charge. Advice Cheer- 
fully given without any obligation to 
buy. 



74 



SEPTEMBER 

SUNDAY Sept. 7 

MONDAY Sept. 8 

TUESDAY Sept. 9 

WEDNESDAY Sept. 10 

THURSDAY Sept. 11 

FRIDAY Sept. 12 

SATURDAY Sept. 13 



75 



BOOKS 

on Every Subject 



Your Account Solicited 



The Norman, Remington Co* 

BOOKSELLERS, PUBLISHERS, STATIONERS 

Charles Street at Mulberry 



For nev) or second hand 

LAW STUDENTS' 
TEXT BOOKS 

call on 

M. CURLANDER 

14 W. SARATOGA ST. 

Baltimore 



SEPTEMBER 



SUNDAY Sept. 14 



MONDAY Sept. 15 



TUESDAY Sept. 16 



WEDNESDAY Sept. 17 



THURSDAY Sept. 18 



FRIDAY Sept. 19 



SATURDAY Sept. 20 



77 




CLOTHES 

211-213 E. Baltimore St. 

GOOD 

CLOTHES 

NOTHING 

ELSE 

Only four words, but 

they tell our whole 

story. 



SEPTEMBER 



SUNDAY Se P*- 21 



MONDAY Se P*- 22 



TUESDAY Sept. 23 



WEDNESDAY Se P*- 24 



THURSDAY Se P*- 25 



FRIDAY Se P*- 26 



SATURDAY Sept. 27 



79 



The Y. M. C. A. takes this opportunity 
to call your attention to these churches 
whose doors are open to you. 

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 

Fremont and Lafayette Aves. 

J. E. HICKS, D. D. Minister 

Greetings to the Students of the University of 

Maryland, and a most hearty Welcome 

to all our Services 

On Sunday: Bible School 9:30 A. M. 

Worship 11 A. M. and 8 P. M. 

Young People's Social Hour 5.30P. M. 

B. Y. P. U. Meetings; 7 P.M. 

Frequent Social Gatherings and entertainments 
during the week. 

Students feel at Home in our Church. 

Good Music; Real Worship; Vital Messages; 

Genuine Hospitality. 



EMMANUEL CHURCH 

Cathedral and Read Sts. 

Rev. HUGH BIRCKHEAD, D. D., Rector. 

Sunday Services; 

8:00 A. M. Holy Communion 

9:45 A. M. Church School 

11:00 A. M. Morning Prayer and Sermon 

(Holy Communion and Sermon first Sunday 

in the month) 

8:00 P. M. Evening Prayer and Address. 

This Church holds out a cordial welcome to you 

and the Rector will be glad to meet you at the 

close of any of these Services. 

80 



Brown Memorial 

Presbuteriati Church 

Park J & Lafayette Aves. 

Tke Rev. G. A. Hulbert D. D., Pastor 
1316 Park Avenue 

Rev. John Clark Finne^ 
Director of Ckristian Education 

Services at n A. M. and 8 P. M- 
CKristian Endeavor Meeting at 

7 P.M. 
Social Hour for Young People of 

tke CKurcn, students and tkeir 

friends at six o'clock. 



BROIDN MEMORIAL CHURCH EX> 

TETIDS J\. MOST FRtETADU] U>EL- 

COME TO JILL STUDETITS 



81 



FIRST CHURCH 

St. Paul and 22nd Sts. 
REV. JO. W. G. FAST, D. D., Minister 

Services at 11 A.M. and 8 P.M. 
Epworth League at 7 P. M. 

Students are cordially invited to attend 
all services. 

Seventh Baptist Church 

North Ave. & St. Paul Street 
REV. CHAS. H. PINCHBECK, Minister 

Offers a Most Congenial 

CHURCH HOME 
to Young College Men 

Join our Student Membership and one of our 
Men's Classes meeting every Sunday morn- 
ing at 9:30. 

CHURCH SERVICES 
Sunday— 11:00 A. M. and 8:00 P. M. 
B. Y. P. U. Sunday 7:00 P. M. 
Prayer Service, Wednesday, 8:00 P. M. 

82 



Cathedral of the Incarnation 

University Parkway & St. Paul St. 

REV. HAROU) N. ARROWSMITH 
Canon in Charge. 
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion. 
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon 
(Holy Communion on first Sunday 
in the month) 
4:30 P.M. Special Musical Service. 
SEATS FREE ALJ, WELCOME 



Central Presbyterian 
Church 

Eutau? Place near Dolphin 

Services: 

11 A.M. and 8 P.M. 
Men's Bible Class 10:00 A.M. 

Dr. DelDitt M. oenham, Pastor 



EUTAW PLACE BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

REV. O. C. S. WALLACE. D D., MINISTER 

Services: 

Sunday School 9:30 A.M. 

11 A.M. & 8 P.M. 

Y. P. S. 7:00 P.M. 

Students are Cordially invited to all 

these Services. 



UNIVERSITY 

BAPTIST CHURCH 

Green way & Charles St. 
REV. A. C. DIXON, D. D. Pastor 
You are cordially invited to the services 
of this church and to all of its religious 
and social activities. i_Q 

College and University students who are 
strangers in the city will find a warm wel- 
come and a congenial home-like 
atmosphere, 

SUNDAYS 

9:30 AM. and 3 P.M. 

Sunday Bible School. 

9:45 A.M. Men's Bible Class 

Reader, Mr. Joshua Levering. 

11 A.M. and 4 P.M. 

Preaching by the Pastor. 

5:30 A.M. to 6:30 P.M. 

Young Peoples' Social Hour. 

6:30 to 7:30 P.M. 

Young Peoples' Devotional 

Meeting. 

FRIDAYS 

8 P.M.— Weekly prayer service 
conducted by the Pastor. 



84 



The Brandy Baptist Church 

Edmondson Ave. & Schroeder St. 

Rev. Henry M. Wharton, D. D. Pastor 

The Home Church and the Home 
Place for Students 

Services Every Sunday 11:00. A. M. 

and 8:00 P. M. Conducted by the 

Pastor. 

Two Sunday Schools: Morning 9:45 
A. M. Afternoon 3:00 P. M. 

Young Peoples' Meeting Every Sun- 
day at 7:00 P. M. with Social Tea. 

Pastor' a Bible Claw with over 200 Member* 

Every Sunday Morning 9:45 A. M. in the 

Church Auditorium. 

You will be welcome at this Church and if 
you come once you will come again. 

Give us a call and see how you like us. 

Pastor's Residence: 

224 W. Lafayette Avenue 

Phone, Mad. 0877 



85 



Fulton Ave. above Lexington 

Peter Ainslie \ p agtorg 
H. C. Armstrong) 

Services at 11.00 A. M. and 8.00 P. M. 
STUDENTS CORDIALLY INVITED 



MADISON AVENUE 

Methodist Episcopal Church 

Madison and Layfayette Aves., Baltimore, Md. 

WIUJAM E. HARRISON, Jr., Minister 

Sunday Services 

9.30 A. M. Sunday School 
11.00 A. M.& 8.00 P.M. Divine Worship 
7.00 P. M. Epworth League 

A Church in a student neighborhood 
which aims to be a neighborhood church. 
We bid you cordial welcome. 

86 



Grace Methodist 
Episcopal Church 

CARROLLTON AVE. AT LANVALE ST. 

Cordially invites all students 

in Baltimore to share in its 

services and fellowship. We 

want to know you and 

serve you. 

Sunday Schedule 
Church School at 9.40 A. M. 
Morning Worship at 11 A. M. 
Young People's Service at 7.00 P. M. 
Evening Worship at 8.00 P. M. 

The Minister, Dr. Victor G. Mills, 

will be glad to be of personal 

service to student friends 

at any time. 



87 



MT. VERNON PLACE 
METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

{at the Washington Monument) 

Rev. Oscar Thomas Olson, D. D. Minister 
Rev. J. StevJart Nagle, M. A., Associate 

f| At tKe Keart of tKe city* to serve your 
needs and desires. 

•J Tne services on Sundays at eleven and 
eigkt nave a fine musical setting, a 
vigorous putting of religion for today* and 
a real welcome to you. 

•I TKe Blue and Gray Room, tKe Assembly 
Hall and tKe Bov?ling Alley ser?e as a 
student rallying center. 

•I Sunday afternoon from 5 to 7 tKe social 
"At Home" brings togetKer U. of M., 
Hopkins, GoucKer, Peabody and city 
young people. 

•I TKe big Bible Class Sunday* morning 
at 10 in tKe Assembly Hall is wortK 
your w"Kile. 



St. Mark's 
Lutheran Church 




St. Paul & 20th Streets 
ROBERT D. CLARE, D.D., Pastor. 

A cordial welcome extended to 
all U. of M. Students. 



St. Paul's Reformed Church 

(English) 

Calhoun & Mulberry Sts. 

REV. LLOYD E. COBLENTZ, D. D., PASTOR 

410 N. Calhoun 

Services: 

11:00 A. M. 8:00 P. M. 

9:30 A. M. Sunday School 

Prayer Meeting Wed. 8 P. M. 

Students Cordially Welcome at all Services. 



For Pure food, Cleanliness and Good Service 
Call at 

THE NATIONAL DELICATESSEN 
AND LUNCH ROOM 

I. SILVERMAN, Prop. 
Tables for Ladies 

418 W. Baltimore St. 
Baltimore, Md. 

For Qood Food and Service 
come to the 

1MPERAL LUNCH 

One visit onlu will convince uou 

Feu? steps from U. of M. 
Hear Baltimore and Qreene Sts. 

90 



SEPTEMBER 



SUNDAY Sept. 28 



MONDAY Sept. 29 



TUESDAY Sept. 30 



OCTOBER 
WEDNESDAY Oct. 1 



THURSDAY Oct. 3 



FRIDAY Oct. 3 



SATURDAY Oct. 4 



01 



Baltimore's Best CI 




Central Young Men 



FRANKLIN AN 



for University Men 




Student 
Rates 

Full 

Privileges 

to June 1 st. 

$1000 

Student 
Gym Class 

Tues.-Thur. 
5:10 P.M. 



Christian Association 



VTHEDRAL STS. 



93 



Chartered 1864 

Safe Deposit & 
Trust Company 

OF BALTIMORE 



Fireproof buildings, with 
latest and best equipment 
for safety of contents. Safes 
for rent in its large fire and 
burglar proof vaults, with 
spacious and well-lighted 
coupon rooms for use of pa- 
trons. Securities held on de- 
posit for out of town cor- 
porations and persons. 



13 SOUTH STREET 



04- 



OCTOBER 



SUNDAY Oct. 5 



MONDAY ° ct - 6 



TUESDAY Oct. 7 



WEDNESDAY Oct. 8 



THURSDAY Oct. 9 



FRIDAY Oct. 10 



SATURDAY Oct. 11 



95 



When you Spend a dollar, that's 
the End of it. 

When you Save a dollar, that's 
the Beginning of it. 

Union Trust Company 
of Maryland 

Charles and Fayette Streets 
Baltimore 

The Lesson Of The Gridiron! 

Conserve your resources 

Saving your strength for a clear 

field to opportunity 

Start To Save Now 

PARK BANK 

Lexington Street at Liberty 



OCTOBER 



SUNDAY Oct. 12 



MONDAY Oct. 13 



TUESDAY Oct. 14 



WEDNESDAY Oct. 15 



THURSDAY Oct. 16 



FRIDAY Oct. 17 



SATURDAY Oct. 18 



97 



GUARANTEE 

The Completion of Your 

LIFE PLANS 

by 

CAPITALIZING YOUR HE4LTH 

in the Best Form of Compulsory 
Saving 



Modern Life Insurance 

is 

The Young Man's Safest Ally. 



Our Standard Contracts include also 
a permanent and total disa- 
bility clause free of cost. 



Let us advise you now. 

BROOKS & KRUG, General Agents 

Sun Life Insurance Co., of America 

400-401 Hartman Building 
Light & Redwood Sts. Plaza 2826 



98 



OCTOBER 



SUNDAY Oct. 19 



MONDAY Oct. 20 



TUESDAY Oct. 21 



WEDNESDAY Oct. 22 



THURSDAY Oct. 23 



FRIDAY Oct. 24 



SATURDAY Oct. 25 



99 



Maryland Glass 
Corporation 

MT. W1NANS 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

Blue and Green 
Tint Bottles 



100 



OCTOBER 



SUNDAY Oct. 2« 



MONDAY Oct. 27 



TUESDAY Oct. 28 



WEDNESDAY Oct. 29 



THURSDAY Oct. 80 



FRIDAY Oct. 31 



NOVEMBER 
SATURDAY Nov. 1 



101 



BURNS 

Medical Standard Book Company 
301 N. CHARLES ST. 

Corner Saratoga 



Headquarters for Medical Books, Fiction 

Fountain Pens, and Students' 

Supplies of all kinds 

SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS 



Telephone, Vernon 6128 

Hepbron (Si Haydon 

Law Booksellers and Publishers 
14 W. FRANKLIN ST. 

We supply all text-books and syllabi 
of lectures used in the Law Depart- 
ment of the University of Maryland. 

Books Bought, Sold Sr Exchanged 

102 



NOVEMBER 




SUNDAY 


Nov. 2 


MONDAY 


Nov. 3 


TUESDAY 


Nov. 4 


WEDNESDAY 


Nov. 5 


THURSDAY 


Nov. 6 




FRIDAY 


Nov. 7 



SATURDAY Nov. 8 



• 



103 



G. Kenneth Greer, Phone, 

Prop. Hamilton 061 2-W 

THE COMMUNITY PRESS 

Commercial and Social Printing 

3 Grindon Ave. 
Prices That Please Lauraville 

MEDICAL BOOKS 
AND SCHOOL BOOKS 

Second Hand and New at 

Smith's Book Store 

805 N. Howard St., Above Madison 
Books bought and exchanged. 

Calvert 1441 Catering Solicited 

Shipley and Heath 
Our Lunch 

513 W. Baltimore St. Baltimore, Md. 

104 



NOVEMBER 



SUNDAY Nov. 



MONDAY Nov. 10 



TUESDAY Nov. 11 



WEDNESDAY Nov. 13 



THURSDAY Nov. 13 



FRIDAY Nov. 11 



SATURDAY Nov. 15 






105 



FURNITURE of QUALITY 

and individuality is offered here at 
prices that are not and cannot be un- 
derquoted by any house at any time. 
^[Besides the reputation of an old es- 
tablished firm is back of each sale 
with a guarantee. 

JOHN C. KNIPP & SONS 

Furniture Decorations Draperies 

343 N. CHARLES STREET 



GEIER'S LUNCH ROOM 

REGULAR DINNER 40c 
Corner Redwood & Eutaw Sts« 

ELLERBROCK 

STUDENT PHOTOGRAPHER 

112 N. Howard St., Baltimore, Md. 
106 



NOVEMBER 



SUNDAY Nov. 16 



MONDAY Nov. 17 



TUESDAY Nov. 18 



WEDNESDAY Nov. 19 



THURSDAY Nov. 20 



FRIDAY Nov. 21 



SATURDAY Nov. 22 



107 



College Jewelry and Novelties 

All the new makes of Fountain pens 
and Pencils in gold an d silver, small 
sterling silver Footballs, Basket Balls, 
Base Balls, Bats, etc. at $1.00 each. 

Also Class pins and Emblems. 

WM. J. MILLER 

The Popular Priced Jeweler 
28 E. BALTIMORE ST. 



ESTABLISHED 1873 

A. H. FETTING 

Manufacturing Jewelry Co. 

Manufacturers 

Greek Letter Fraternity 
Jewelry 

213 N. LIBERTY STREET 
BALTIMORE, MD- 

108 



NOVEMBER 



SUNDAY 



MONDAY 



TUESDAY 



WEDNESDAY 



THURSDAY 



FRIDAY 



SATURDAY 



109 



J. TROCKENBROT & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

CLASS PINS. EMBLEMS, BUTTONS 

COLLEGE SEALS, GREEK LETTER 

FRATERNITY PINS and RINGS 

Original and Special Designs to order 

324 W. SARATOGA STREET 

We can duplicate any ring, pin or emblem. 



PHONE Vernon 0335- W 



MILLER BROS. 

525 W. FRANKLIN ST. 

The College Men's 
TAILORS AND PRESSERS 

High-Class Tailored Suits from $30 up 

PRESSING DONE BY TICKET ON 
VERY REASONABLE TERMS 

Phone or write and work will gladly be 
called for and delivered promptly. 

110 



NOVEMBER 



SUNDAY NoV « 30 



DECEMBER 
MONDAY Dec. x 



TUESDAY Dec. 2 



WEDNESDAY Dec. 3 



THURSDAY Dec. 4 



FRIDAY Dec. 5 



SATURDAY Dec. 



Ill 



The students of this school need 
go no further than around the 
corner for their clothes . . . just 
around the corner is the model suit 
you want for all events at the price 
that will meet with your approval. 

SOLOMON'S 

603 W. Baltimore Street 
near Greene 

"Tailors and Clothiers Since 1871" 



Y. 

M. 
B. 
O. 
D. 

ISAAC 

HAMBURGER & SONS 

Men's and Boys' Outfitters 
BALTIMORE & HANOVER 

112 



DECEMBER 



SUNDAY Dec. 7 



MONDAY 



TUESDAY 



WEDNESDAY 



THURSDAY 



FRIDAY 



SATURDAY 



113 



qq 

nm 



ETEEDD 

tec 

inn 



HEHOUCK&CO 



ymiNTiNQJ 

,u*^ Done Quickly^*** 
andtoyour. 




VERNON 

1234 



SMITH'S DENTAL 
LABORATORY 00. 

16 W. SARATOGA STREET 
Phone, Plaza 3689 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

114 



DECEMBER 

SUNDAY Dec. 14 

MONDAY Dec 15 

TUESDAY Dec 16 

WEDNESDAY Dec 17 

THURSDAY Dec 18 

FRIDAY Dec. 19 

SATURDAY Dec. 20 
115 



Walker-Gordon Laboratory 

LINDEN AVE. & DOLPHIN ST. 

CERTIFIED MILK 

It is not so much a question of 
whether you can afford clean milk 
as whether you or your patients 
can afford to do without it. 



Charles R. Deeley 

Dealer in all kinds of 

DENTAL 
SUPPLIES 

108 W. MULBERRY ST. 

Baltimore, Md. 
116 



DECEMBER 
SUNDAY Dec. 21 



MONDAY Dec. 22 



TUESDAY Dec. 23 



WEDNESDAY Dec. 24 



THURSDAY Dec. 25 



FRIDAY Dec. 26 



SATURDAY Dec. 27 



117 



Hart & Sioefaer, Inc., 

10 ID. Saratoga Street, 
Baltimore, Md. 
Plaza 720O-7201 

Students' supplies and Equipment. 
Office planning our specialty. 

Distributors of Oral Hugiene 



CO-OPERATIVE DENTAL 
LABORATORY 

'YOUR FUTURE ASSISTANTS. 

Eutaw & Franklin Sts., 
Baltimore, Md. 

118 



DECEMBER 



SUNDAY Dec. 28 



MONDAY Dec. 29 



TUESDAY Dec. 30 



WEDNESDAY Dec. 31 



JANUARY 
THURSDAY Jan. l 



FRIDAY Jan. 3 



SATURDAY Jan. 



119 



JANUARY 



SUNDAY Jan. 4 



MONDAY Jan. 5 



TUESDAY Jan. 6 



WEDNESDAY Jan. 7 



THURSDAY Jan. 8 



FRIDAY Jan. 9 



SATURDAY Jan. 10 



120 



JANUARY 



SUNDAY 



MONDAY 



TUESDAY 



WEDNESDAY 



THURSDAY 



FRIDAY 



SATURDAY 



121 



JANUARY 



SUNDAY Jan. 18 



.MONDAY Jan. 19 



TUESDAY' Jan. 20 



WEDNESDAY Jan. 21 



THURSDAY Jan. 2.> 



FRIDAY Jan. 23 



SATURDAY Jan. 24 



122 



JANUARY 



SUNDAY Jan. 25 



MONDAY Jan. 26 



TUESDAY Jan. 27 



WEDNESDAY Jan. 28 



THURSDAY Jan. 29 



FRIDAY Jan. 30 



SATURDAY Jan. 31 



12a 



FEBRUARY 
SUNDAY Feb. 1 



MONDAY Feb. 2 



TUESDAY Feb. 3 



WEDNESDAY Feb. 4 



THURSDAY Feb. 5 



FRIDAY Feb. 6 



SATURDAY Feb. 7 



124 



FEBRUARY 



SUNDAY Feb - 8 



MONDAY Feb - 9 



TUESDAY Feb - 10 



WEDNESDAY Feb - U 



THURSDAY Feb - 12 



FRIDAY 



Feb. 13 



SATURDAY Feb - 14 



125 



FEBRUARY 



SUNDAY 



MONDAY 



Tl KSDAY Feb. 17 



WEDNESDAY Feb. 18 



THURSDAY Feb. 10 



FRIDAY Feb. 20 



SATURDAY Feb. 21 



126 



FEBRUARY 



SUNDAY Feb. 22 



MONDAY Feb. 23 



TUESDAY Feb. 24 



WEDNESDAY Feb. 25 



THURSDAY Feb. 2(5 



127 



Feb. 27 



SATURDAY Feb. 28 



MARCH 
SUNDAY 



MONDAY 



TUESDAY 



WEDNESDAY 



THURSDAY 



FRIDAY 



SATURDAY 



128 



MARCH 



SUNDAY 



Mar. 8 



MONDAY Mar - 9 



TUESDAY Mar - 10 



WEDNESDAY Mar. 11 



THURSDAY Mar « 12 



FRIDAY Mar - 13 



SATURDAY Mar - 14 



129 



MARCH 



SUNDAY 



MONDAY 



TUESDAY Mar . 17 



WEDNESDAY Mar , 18 



THURSDAY Mar . 19 



FRIDAY Mar. 20 



SATURDAY Mar . 31 



130 



MARCH 



SUNDAY Mar. 22 



MONDAY Mar. 23 



TUESDAY Mar. 24 



WEDNESDAY Mar. 25 



THURSDAY Mar. 26 



FRIDAY Mar. 27 



SATURDAY Mar. 28 



131 



MARCH 



SUNDAY 



MONDAY 



TUESDAY 



APRIL, 
WEDNESDAY April 1 



THURSDAY 



FRIDAY 



SATURDAY April 4 



132 



APRIIi 



SUNDAY 



April 5 



MONDAY 



April 6 



TUESDAY 



April 7 



WEDNESDAY 



Auril 8 



THURSDAY 



April 9 



FRIDAY 



April 10 



SATURDAY 



April 11 



133 



APRIL 



SUNDAY 



MONDAY 



TUESDAY 



April 14 



WEDNESDAY 



April 15 



THURSDAY 



April 16 



FRIDAY 



April 17 



SATURDAY 



April 18 



134 



APRIL 



SUNDAY 



April 19 



MONDAY 



April 20 





TUESDAY 


April 21 




WEDNESDAY 


April 22 


THURSDAY 


April 23 





FRIDAY 



April 24 



SATURDAY 



April 25 



135 



APRIL 



SUNDAY 



April 26 



MONDAY 



April 27 



TUESDAY 



April 28 



WEDNESDAY 



April 29 



THURSDAY 



April 30 



FRIDAY 



MAY 



May 1 



SATURDAY 



May 2 



136 



MAY 

SUNDAY May 3 

MONDAY May 4 

TUESDAY May 5 

WEDNESDAY May 6 

THURSDAY May 7 

FRIDAY May 8 

SATURDAY May 9 

137 



MAY 



SUNDAY May 10 



MONDAY May u 



TUESDAY 



May 12 



WEDNESDAY May 13 



THURSDAY May 14 



FRIDAY May 15 



SATURDAY May 16 



138 



MAY 

SUNDAY May 17 

MONDAY May 18 

TUESDAY May 19 

WEDNESDAY May 20 

THURSDAY May 21 

FRIDAY May 22 

SATURDAY May 23 



MAY 

SUNDAY May 24 

MONDAY May 25 

TUESDAY May 26 

WEDNESDAY May 27 

THURSDAY May 28 

FRIDAY May 29 

SATURDAY May 30 

140 



MAY 



SUNDAY 



May 31 



JUNE 



MONDAY 



June I 



TUESDAY 



June I 



WEDNESDAY 



June 3 



THURSDAY 



June 4 



FRIDAY 



June 5 



SATURDAY 



June 6 



141 



5% Off 
to Students 



[(^HERE'S something in 
EBSJ the general makeup of 
a Fineman Made-to-Measure 
Suit that prompts a college 
man to give it a second ad- 
miring glance. 

A special discount of 5% to 
students. 

FINEMAN 

"MAKES THEM BETTER TAILOR" 

318-320 W. Baltimore Street 

142 



JUNE 



SUNDAY 


June 7 


MONDAY 


June 8 


TUESDAY 


June 9 


WEDNESDAY 


June 10 


THURSDAY 


June 11 


FRIDAY 


June 12 


SATURDAY 


June 13 



143 




144 



<7Ke 

Read-Taylor 
.- Co. - 



Engravers 
Printers 
Binders 



f 

J 

Publications 



College \ and (School 
Annuals f (Publics 

#TTU?e haue a department 
i devoted exclusively to 
Jujork of this nature. 

Lombard and Soum Streets 
BALTIMORE 



145 



Weimbaum Bros, 

Dental Supplies and 
Dental Equipment 

Park Bank Building 

Lexington and Liberty Streets 

BALTIMORE 

Branches: New York, Philadelphia 



Luther B. Benton Co, 

DENTAL SUPPLIES 

405 N. Howard St. 

Baltimore, Md. 
Phone, Vernon 1370 

146 



FORDS DODGES 

HUPS BUICKS 

RENT A CAR 

Driue It ]] our self 

PAT BY THE MILE 



Dri\)e-It- Yourself Co. 

1725 N. CHARLES ST. 

Vernon 4049 

147