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0010076 



HANKINSON 



RICHLAND 

COUNTY 



BARNEY MOORETO 

WAHPETON 

MANTADOR GREAT 
• BEND ^ 

" TYLER 



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HANKINSON 
ID6ERW00D 



FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY 
35 NORTH WEST TEMPLE 
SALT LAKE CITY. UTAH 841 5n 

NEWS 




FAIRMOUNT 



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*************** 



* * 



Film No 



1575 



May 15, 1919 - June 1, 1922 

MARRIAGE and DEATH ANNOUNCEi^NT EXTRACTIONS 

From 
The HANKINSON NEWS 
Hankinson, Richland County, North Dakota 

BY 

Elizabeth M. Collins 

11638 SE 164th St. 

Renton, WA. 98053 



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* * * * * 



************* 



1994 Elizabeth M. Collins 

Copyright 1994 by Elizabeth M. Collins 

All Rights Reserved Worldwide 

Printed in the United States of America 



Film // 1575 HANKINSON NEWS May 15, 1919-June 1, 1922 

Wednesday, June 18th, is the date set for the marriage of Miss Clara I. Arndt and Mr. 
John W. Henke, well known and popular young people residing southwest of Hankinson. 

********** June 12, 1919 

A quiet wedding was solemnized at Wahpeton on Wednesday evening, June 4th, when Miss 
Leona Reinke of Brandenburg became the bride of Mr. John Miller. Ben J. Miller of Claire 
City, SD, was bestman, and the bride was attended by her sister. Miss Elsie Reinke. The 
bride has grown to womanhood in Richland County and has a host of friends. The groom rec- 
ently returned from overseas and a military touch was given to the wedding by both the groom 
and the bestman appearing in full uniform. The newly wedded couple will reside at Zumbroda, 
MN. ********** juj^e 19^ 1919 

ARNDT - HENKE 
The marriage of Miss Clara L. Arndt to Mr. John W. Henke was solemnized on Wednesday, 
June 18th, at Hankinson. The young couple are well known residents of the south country 
and have a host of friends who extend congratulations and best wishes. 

********** June 26, 1919 

SELLNER - SCHLENER 
On Tuesday of this week, at Sts. Peter & Paul's Church in Mantador, occurred the marr- 
iage of Miss Mary Sellner to Mr. Frank Schlener. The ceremony was witnessed by a number of 
relatives and invited guests, and in the evening a big reception and dance was given in the 
C. 0. F. Hall in honor of the newlyweds. 

The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Sellner, prominent farmers of the Mantador 
neighborhood, and the groom is a popular young man who has lived in that vicinity all his 
life. Both are deservedly popular and have the congratulations and best wishes of all. 

********** June 26, 1919 

Invitations are out for the marriage of Miss Concordia Klosterman to Mr, Peter Lambertz. 
both well known young people of the Mooreton neighborhood, to take place at St. Anthony's 
Church in that village next Tuesday. 

+ + + + + + + + + + 

A remarkable sameness in names led to an odd and embarrassing error in last week's 
issue of the NEWS. The item was an account of the Reinke wedding. The bride, in the case, 
is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Reinke, of Center Township, instead of being a member of 
the Brandenburg Township Reinkes of the same name. The oddity of the case and the feature 
which led to our mistaken report is the fact that the first name of the bride and the sister 
who acted as bridesmaid are identically the same as two members of the Brandenburg Twsp. 
Reinkes. The two families are not related in any way. 

********** June 26, 1919 



(1.) 



MARRIED 
On Wednesday of this week, at Brainerd, MN. , Miss Hazel McKinnon and Mr. Charles 
Miller were married. The bride was partially raised in this city and is well and very 
favorably known to a large circle of friends. Mr. Miller is a prominent young man of 
Brainard and is known for his fine business and social qualities. 

********** July 3 1919 

Miss Ella Boelke and Mr. Lutsko Mauer were married at St. Paul on June 28th. The 
young people stole a march on their friends and the wedding was a surprise to even their 
most intimate friends. The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Boelke and grew to 
womanhood in this vicinity. The groom is a son of B. Mauer and is in the employ of Chas. 
Spreckels. They young couple have a large circle of friends and all join in extending 
best wishes for a long and happy married life. 

********** July 17, 1919 

The marriage of Fred Krueger and Mrs. Wm. Brummund occurred at Wahpeton last Friday 
evening. The contracting parties are pioneer residents of this part of the county and have 
the best wishes of all. ********** i i 2U 1919 

Married, Saturday evening, by Rev. J. S. Rood, at the Congregational parsonage, Mich- 
ael J. Reick of Plentywood, MT., and Miss Mary Pecinovsky of Lidgerwood. They will reside 
at Lidgerwood. ********** ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ 

ZENTGRAF - MINNEHAN 
A very pretty wedding took place on Wednesday morning, July 23rd, at St. Anthony's 
Church in Fairmount, when Miss Ella C. Minnehan and Mr. Adolph F. Zentgraf were joined 
in marriage by Rev. Father E. Mc Cardie. 

A reception for over one hundred invited relatives and friends took place at the 
home of the bride in the evening. 

The young people will go to housekeeping on Mr. John Zentgraf 's farm. 

********** July 31, 1919 

B. S. Pearce, aged 63, editor of the Havana Union, recently took unto himself a 15 
year old bride. An attempted charavari last week aroused the ire of the venerable bride- 
groom and he took a potshot at the merrymakers. The revellers dispersed hastily with no 
damage except to the feeling of the newlyweds. 

********** July 31, 1919 

The marriage of Miss Anna Deede to Mr. Carl Koppelman was solemnized yesterday at 

the home of the bride's parents. Both are well known young people of the Great Bend 

neighborhood. 

********** September A, 1919 



(2) 



Benjamin Voit of Steams County, MN., and Miss Mary Kloeppel were married at Breck- 
enridge last week. The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Kloeppel of the Mantador 
neighborhood and has many friends in this part of the county who extend best wishes. 

********** September 11, 1919 

The marriage of Miss Ella Schuett to Mr. Otto Kackman took place last week at the home 
of the bride's parents in Lidgerwood, Rev. Cloeter officiating. 

The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Schuett, pioneer residents of Moran Twsp., 
and the groom is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Kackman. The young people grew to maturity 
in Richland County and have many friends. They will reside on the Kackman farm south of 
Lidgerwood. ********** September 18, 1919 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Ponath left the latter part of last week for Grand Forks to attend 

the wedding of Miss Theresa Bohn, a sister of Mrs. Ponaths', to Herman Pagel, who recently 

returned from overseas . 

********** September 18, 1919 

Married, at Lidgerwood, last Thursday afternoon, at the home of the bride, in the pres- 
ence of a large number of friends, Helena K. Horovitz and Charles A. Kocourke, Rev. John S. 
Rood officiating. The bride's wedding gown was one worn by her mother when she was marr- 
ied thirty years ago. ********** September 25, 1919 

A marriage license was issued at Moorhead, MN., last week to "Walter F. Willard, Hill 

County, MT., and Frances W. McGileway, Jamestown, ND." It is safe to assume that the groom 

is none other than Walter F. Willard, formerly of Hankinson, but who now resides at Havre, 

MT., and who was employed at Jamestown at the time of his enlistment in the Array. Acting 

on this assinnption, the NEWS joins with scores of old Hankinson friends in extending congrat 

ulations and best wishes. 

********** September 25, 1919 

Howell Stenson of the Citizens National Bank force left Sunday for Litchfield, MN., 
where he was married on Tuesday to a young lady of that city. The NEWS has been imable to 
learn the name of the bride or any particulars of the wedding. After a wedding tour of two 
weeks, Mr. and Mrs. Stenson will return to Hankinson and soon go to housekeeping in the 
Jones flats. The groom has been a resident of Hankinson for only a few months but has 
made many friends who extend congratulations and vjill welcone the pewly^jeds as resident of 
our little city. ********** September 25, 1919 

The marriage of Miss Caroline Neubauer and Mr. Adolph Bernard took place at St. Joe 

Church on Tuesday, Sept. 16th. Rev. Fr. Jade of Wahpeton performed the ceremony which 

united these two young people for life, both of whom are very popular with the younger 

set in the community in which they live. 

********** September 25, 1919 



(3) 



A marriage license was issued at Wahpeton on Sept. 25th, to John W. Hell and Miss 
Minnie E. Franz, both of Hankinson. 

********** October 2, 1919 

The forthcoming wedding to Miss Theresa Krump to Henry J. Pausch is announced. The 
wedding will occur on Tuesday, Oct. 21st, at Mantador. The principals are well known 
yoxmg people of that neighborhood. 

********** October 9, 1919 

CUPID AT WORK 

Marvin - Meyer 
The marriage of Miss Gertrude Marvin to Peter M. Meyer was solemnized at the Catholic 
parsonage in this city on Tuesday. Following the ceremony a big reception and wedding 
party was held at the home of the groom's parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Meyer, in Waldo. 

The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D. H. Marvin, residing east of town and is 
well and favorably known. The groom has grown to manhood in Waldo Township, served his 
country during the late war, and has the respect of everyone. The young couple will make 
their home in Hankinson. 

********** October 16, 1919 

ST. JOHN - SCHMIDT 
Miss Laura St. John and Max Schmidt were married at Wahpeton on Wednesday, Oct. 15th. 
The contracting parties reside east of this city and are well and favorabley known. They 
will reside on the old Mahler farm. 

********** October 16, 1919 

MOHS - RISING 
The marriage of Miss Katie Mohs and Arthur Rising, both well known residents of the 
DeVillo neighborhood, is to take place today. The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Carl Mohs, prominent residents of De Villo, and the groom is a well known young farmer. 
They have the best wishes of all. 

********** October 16, 1919 

FRANZ - HELL 

Minnie E, Franz and John W. Hell, well known young people residing southeast of town 

were married this week. 

A********* October 16, 1919 

SOON TO WED 
Invitations are out for the wedding of Miss Theresa Krump and Henry J. Pausch. The 
happy event is to take place at Mantador on Oct. 21st. 

********** October 16, 1919 



(A) 



Walter Abraham arrived home from Minneapolis the last of the week with a bride, 
having been married at Minneapolis on Tuesday of last week to Miss Springfield, of that 
city. After a short visit with his folks here the newlyweds returned on Monday to Minn- 
eapolis where they will reside. 

Walter is a Hankinson product, having been born in this city, and is a son of Mr. and 
Mrs. August Abraham. At the present time he has a good position with an automobile tire 
concern in Minneapolis. His many friends in the old home town are pleased to extend con- 
gratulations and best wishes. 

********** October 23, 1919 

The marriage of Miss Theresa M. Krump and Mr. Henry J. Pausch was solemnized at Sts. 
Peter & Paul's Church in Mantador, Tuesday morning in the presence of relatives and friends 
of the contracting parties. The ceremony was followed by a reception at the home of the 
bride's mother, Mrs. Math J. Krump, and in the evening a big wedding dance was given at 
the C. 0. F. Hall in the village in which a large number of friends of the young couple 
participated. 

Both bride and groom have grown up in the Mantador neighborhood and have scores of 
relatives and friends who extend their best wishes for a long and happy married life. 

********** October 23, 1919 

The prettiest wedding of the season occurred on Wednesday, Oct. 22nd, when G. E. Bohn, 
of this city, was married to Miss Ruth Stenson of Starbuck, MN. 

The ceremony was performed at the home of the bride's parents, only close relatives 
being present. They young couple are taking a wedding trip and will return home about 
Nov. 10th. Congratulations and good luck to you, George. 

Mrs. Albert Bohn and son Oscar returned from Starbuck, MN., Friday evening where they 
took in the wedding of their son and brother, George, to Miss Ruth Stenson of that city. 

********** October 30, 1919 

Invitations have been issued for the marriage of Miss Mary Sohner and Lawrence F. 
Becker, popular young people of the Mantador neighborhood. The happy event is to take 
place at Mantador on Tuesday, Nov. 18th. 

********** November 6, 1919 

A marriage license was issued by Judge Van Amam at Wahpeton last week to Miss Nora 
Stine of Fairmount and George Schroeder of Great Bend. 

********** November 6, 1919 

A double wedding of exceptional interest is scheduled for the near future at Fairmount. 
William A. Berg will marry Miss Josie Eichhom, and Floyd G. Eichhom will be united with 
Miss Clara A. Berg. Mr. and Miss Eerg are brother and sister, as are also Mr. and Miss 

Eichhom. 

********** November 13, 1919 

(5) 



Miss Nora Stein and George Schroeder, prominent young folks of the Tyler neigh- 
borhood, were married last week. 

********** November 20, 1919 

The marriage of Rose Wacha of Lidgerwood and Leo J. Novetzke formerly of this 
city, was solemnized at Wahpeton on Wednesday of this week. The bride is a well known 
and popular lady of our neighbor city and the groom grew to manhood in this city. 

He was in the military service during the war and spent several months on foreign 
soil fighting for his country. On his return he engaged in the contracting and building 
business and has been very successful during the past season. He has recently connected 
himself with an organization of Wahpeton contractors and the Nortz Lumber Company and 
will make Wahpeton his headquarters. Thus the young couple will make their home in that 
city. Leo has a host of friends in and about Hankinson who are pleased to extend their 
congratulations and best wishes. 

********** November 27, 1919 

A marriage license was issued on Tuesday of last week to William Hoefs and Miss 
Mary Willsprecht, well known young people residing in the Lidgerwood community. 

********** November 27, 1919 

Tuesday morning of last week a double wedding took place in Wahpeton when Miss 
Clara Berg and Floyd G. Eichhom, Miss Josie Eichhorn and Wm. A. Berg, were married. 
The four young people were members of two well known families of the Sonora neighborhood 
and have a host of friends who extend congratulations and best wishes. 

********** November 27, 1919 

The marriage of Miss Viola Schroeder and August F. Borchardt was solemnized at 
the Ev. Immanuel Church on Tuesday morning. Rev. C. Oberdoester officiating. Only 
relatives and immediate friends were in attendance. The bride is a daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. August Borchardt. Both have lived in Richland County all their lives and are 
deservedly popular. They will make their home on the old Borchardt farm east of town, 
occupied for years by the groom's parents who have recently completed a fine residence 
in this city. A host of friends extend congratulations and best wishes. 

********** December 4, 1919 



(6) 



19 2 



Announcement has just been made of the marriage, last November, of Miss Elizabeth 
A. Ellis to R. Hampel. Mr. Hampel, who was employed by J. Green & Sons last season, 
met with an automobile accident during the siimmer that made him an invalid. Miss Ellis 
acted as nurse during his illness and the romance followed. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Hampel left for San Diego, CA. , where they are 
at present in the hope that the change of climate will prove beneficial to his health. 
The NEWS joins with other friends in extending belated congratulations and best wishes. 

******* January 29, 1920 

Announcements were received here this week of the marriage of Wm. L. Langbehn and 
Miss Ruby Frances Weeks, on Thursday, Jan. 15th, at Valley, WA. 

They will make their home at 1128 Dalton Ave., Spokane, WA. The groom spent his 
boyhood in Hankinson and has a host of friends among the old timers who are pleased to 
extend congratulations and best wishes. 

********** January 29, 1920 

Marian L. Studnicka left on Tuesday for Kensal to attend the wedding of her bro- 
ther, Jos. A. La Qua and Irene Clancy at that place on Wednesday. 

********** February 12, 1920 

Miss Caroline Kulzer of Rutland and Mathew Gully of Lidgerwood were married at 
the home of the bride on Feb. 10th. 

********** February 12, 1920 

LA QUA - CLANCY 

Kensal Progress; Miss Irene Clancy, daughter of Mrs. J. J. Clancy, became the 
bride of Joseph La Qua on Wednesday morning at St. John's Church in Kensal. The cere- 
mony was performed by Rev. P. Mc Gough, only the immediate families being in attendance. 
The bride was attended by her sister. Miss Ethel Clancy and Ed La Qua, a brother of the 
groom, acted as best man. 

A wedding dinner was served at the Clancy Cafe, covers being laid for twenty- five. 
Mr. and Mrs. La Qua will reside in the Guslander home in Kensal, which Mr. La Qua recent- 
ly purchased. The groom has been in the building and contracting business, having been 
a resident of Kensal for nearly twenty years. The bride has had charge of the local 
telephone exchange. Both are well known in and around the community and their friends 
are legion. 

Those who came from out of town to attend the wedding were: Mrs. Marion Studnicka 
of Hankinson and Miss Maggie Harrington, Aunt of the bride, from Carrington. 

********** February 19, 1920 

(7) 



LA QUA - KINN 

The marriage of Miss Anna Kinn, daughter of Mrs, B. Kinn, of this city, and 
Frank La Qua, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. P. La Qua, also of Hankinson, took place at 
St. Luke's Catholic Church in St. Paul, at 8:30 AM., Thursday, Feb. 12th. Rev. James 
C. Byrne, pastor, performed the ceremony. The bride was attended by Mrs. F. A. Lea- 
vitt, a sister of the bridegroom. 

After the ceremony a wedding breakfast was served at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Leavitt, 944 Ashland Ave., St. Paul, MN. 

The young couple are well and favorably known in Hankinson, having spent their 
lives in Richland County. They are deservedly popular and have a host of friends who 
extend congratulations and best wishes. 

Mr. and Mrs. La Qua will be at home after March 1st, in this city. 

********** February 19, 1920 

Miss Mathilda Budack, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Budack, of Wahpeton, was 
married on Wednesday of last week to C. F. Mittag, prosperous young farmer residing 
north of Hankinson. 

The ceremony was performed by Rev. E. E. Meier in the presence of a small company 

of relatives and friends. The young couple are well known in Hankinson and have a host 
of friends and well wishers in this locality. 

********** February 19, 1920 

GREAT BEND EXAMINER. .. .C. F. Mittag, better known as "Irish," sprang into double 
harness on Wednesday last week when the pastor tied the matrimonal knot that united him 
for life with Miss Matilda Budack of Wahpeton. We wish you all the luck and happiness 
that a true friend can give. 

********** February 19, 1920 

Fred Marvin perpetrated a surprise on his many friends when he was quietly marr- 
ied at Breckenridge on Saturday, Feb. 21st, to Miss Alberta Owen of Des Moines, Iowa. 
The groom is well known throughout this section where he has a host of friends and 
well wishers. The bride is a stranger to Hankinson, but will be welcomed by the many 
friends of the family. Mr. and Mrs. Marvin will make Hankinson their home and are now 
looking for suitable living quarters. 

********** February 26, 1920 

It is reported that Millie Johanson, formerly employed at the Soo Restaurant, 

was married to a Soo brakeman at Enderlin last week. We have been unable to verify 

the report or secure any details. 

********** March 4, 1920 



(8) 



A marriage license was issued last week to Miss Adelia Louise Jasmer and Wm. R. 
Westphal. The wedding is to occur on Wednesday of next week, we are informed. 

********** March 18, 1920 

JASMER - WESTPHAL 

Yesterday at 2 PM. , at the Lutheran Church the ceremony was performed that united 
for life. Miss Adele Jasmer and William R. Westpahl. The ceremony was performed by Rev. 
J. P. Klausler in the presence of relatives and a few intimate friends of the contract- 
ing parties. 

The bride wore a becoming gown of crepe de Chine trimmed with ribbon. She carried 
a bouquet of pink and white carnations. 

The young couple are natives of Richland County and have spent their entire lives 
in this neighborhood. The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Jasmer, the groom, 
a son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Westphal, and thus two prominent families are connected by 
marriage. The young couple are widely known and have hosts of friends and well wishers. 
After the ceremony a reception was held at the Jasmer home in Brightwood Township, 
attended by a small gathering of family friends. 

A sumptuous six o'clock dinner was served, the dining room and table being prettily 
decorated in a color scheme of pink and green. 

Mr. and Mrs. Westphal will make their home on a farm near Doran, MN., which they 
have rented for the coming season. 

********** March 25, 1920 

The marriage of Mrs. Anna M. Tix of this city, to Mr. Peter Ant of Wadena, MN., 
occurred at St. Philip's Church this morning. Mr. and Mrs. Ant will reside on the lat- 
ter 's farm just south of the city. 

********** March 25, 1920 

The marriage of Miss Bertha Heesch and Wm. Medenwaldt was solemnized at the Imm- 
anuel Ev. Church on Wednesday, March 24th, Rev. Oberdoester officiating. 

The ceremony was performed in the presence of relatives and a few intimate friends 

of the contracting parties. The young couple are well and favorably known, the bride 

being a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. Heesch of Greendale and the groom a son of Mr. and 

Mrs. Herman Medenwaldt. They have grown to maturity in Richland County and have a host 

of friends and well wishers. 

********** April 1, 1920 

Announcements have been received here of the marriage of Miss Vera Forrest Turner 

and Mr. Fred Moelle. The happy event took place at Los Angeles, CA. , on Wednesday, 

April 7th. They will make their home in California, we understand. The groom's many 

friends in and around Hankinson are pleased to extend congratulations and best wishes 

for a long and happy married life. 

********** April 8, 1920 

(9) 



A pretty wedding took place at the Carl Stack home in Brightwood early Tuesday 

morning when their youngest daughter, Anna Charlotte, was united in marriage to Carl 

H. Haggberg of this city. The bride grew to womanhood in this county and is well and 

favorably known. The groom is employed as Great Northern operator here, was a member 

of Hankinson's Company L and with that outfit throughout the war. The newlyweds left the 

same evening for a wedding trip to Cokato, MN., and will be "at home" to their many friends 

in Hankinson after May 1st. 

******* April 8, 1920 

POPULAR HANKINSON COUPLE ARE MARRIED 

The marriage of Miss Lola Tubbs and Casper R. Dennig was solemnized at Foxhome, 
M., last Saturday in the presence of relatives and a few intimate friends. The NEWS has 
no details of the wedding, but joins with a host of Hankinson friends in extending congrat- 
ulations and best wishes to this popular young couple. 

The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Tubbs, formerly of this city but who 
now reside at Foxhome. She is well and favorably known. The groom is assistant cashier of 
the Farmers & Merchants Bank, was a Sergeant with old Co. L. during the late war, and is 
one of the most popular young men in the city. 

After a week's wedding trip to points in Minnesota, Mr. and Mrs. Dennig will ret- 
urn to Hankinson the latter part of this week to make their permanent home. 

********** April 15, 1920 

Cap. Dennig says it's all a mistake. ... that the report of his marriage is a gross 
exaggeration. In fact he flatly denies the allegation and defies the allegator. The NEWS 
printed the report last week in good faith but Cap. says it was the work of practical jok- 
ers.... while the friends, on the other hand, are pretty well satisfied that he has really 
joined the ranks of the benedicts. Well, Cap. ought to know, and we print his denial in 
the same good faith that the first story was given out in these columns. Here's congrat- 
ulations. Cap., whether you are a married man or otherwise. 

********** April 22, 1920 

MEDENWALDT - ROEDER WEDDING THIS MORNING 
At 10:30 this morning, at the Lutheran Church in this city. Rev. J. P. Klausler 
performed the ceremony that united for life Miss Lena Medenwaldt and Mr. Wm. Roeder. The 
ceremony was performed in the presence of relatives and immediate friends and a reception 
for the young couple is being held this afternoon at the home of the bride's parents west 
of town. 

The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Medenwaldt and the groom a son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Roeder, and the marriage connects two of our pioneer families well and 
favorably known throughout this part of the county. The NEWS joins with a host of friends 
in extending congratulations and best wishes. 

The newly wedded young people will occupy the Roeder farm west of town, and the 
parents will become Hankinson residents, retiring to a well earned vacation from farm toils, 

********** April 29, 1920 

(10) 



A pretty home wedding occurred at the home of Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Kinney in 
Waldo last Saturday afternoon when Miss Lorna Armstrong was united in marriage to Mr. 
Lawrence Marvin. The ceremony was performed by Rev. John S. Rood, in the presence of 
relatives of the young couple, and was followed by a wedding repast at the Kinney home. 

The bride is a sister of Mrs. E. A. Kinney and has been teaching school in Waldo 
for the past few months, and during her brief residence in the community has won the friend- 
ship and esteen of all who formed her acquaintance. The groom is a son of Mr. and Mrs. D. 
H. Marvin of Waldo and is well and favorably known in this locality. He is employed as 
rural mail carrier on one of the routes from the Hankinson Post Office and the young cou- 
ple will go to housekeeping here as soon as they can secure a dwelling. 

********** May 13, 1920 

Mr. and Mrs. Jos. Bauer returned last Saturday from Wesley, Iowa, where they 
attended the wedding of their son Rudolph. On the way there and back they stopped off 
at Minneapolis where they had a pleasant visit with the Patrick Fallon folks. 

********** May 13 1920 

UHLENHAKE - BAUER 

WESLEY (IOWA) NEWS-WORLD, April 29th At nine o'clock Wednesday morning occurr- 
ed the marriage of Clara Amelia Uhlenhake to Rudolph C. Bauer of Underwood, ND., at St. 
Joseph's Church. Rev. Father J. D. Fisch pronounced the solemn marriage ceremony that 
made Mr. and Mrs. Bauer man and wife. The bride was beautifully gowned in white satin 
and georgette crepe, and carried a chiffon muff with bridal roses and sweet peas. The 
bridesmaid. Miss Clara Bauer, a sister of the groom, wore pale pink georgette crepe and 
carried pink and white carnations. The groom and groomsman, John Uhlenhake, a brother of 
the bride, were dressed in suits of dark blue. 

The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Uhlenhake of this city, one of the 
wealthy and most highly respected families in Wesley and a young lady of many graces of 
mind and person, who is capable of filling the home she will adorn with happiness, and 
will prove to be truly a helpmate and companion to the husband she has chosen to honor 
with her hand. 

The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Bauer of Hankinson, ND., and a prog- 
ressive young business man of Underwood, ND., where he is in the farm implement and hard- 
ware business. He is not known to many here, but the fact that he has been chosen by one 
of Wesley's worthy young ladies is sufficient evidence that he is an honorable young man 
and worthy of her hand. 

Immediately after the ceremony the bridal party and about 50 relatives and friends 
repaired to the palatial home of the bride's parents, where an elaborate four course wedd- 
ing breakfast was served and where a very pleasant party was enjoyed for several hours, 
following the first meal of this young couple's wedded life. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bauer left on the evening train for Fort Madison, where the bride 
has two sisters, and where they will visit for some time before going to Underwood. The 
groom has a beautiful home waiting for his bride at Underwood. 

(11) 



The presents received by the newly married couple were numerous and handsome, as 
yell as valuable. It is a pleasure to chronicle the marriage of such worthy young people 
and this paper joins with a large circle of friends in extending to them warmest congrat- 
ulations. ^^^^^^^^^^ ^ ^^ j^g^o 

Invitations are out for the marriage of Emil Wallman and Miss Anna Neumann, to take 
place at the Immanuel Ev. Church in Hankinson on Thursday, May 27th. Both are well known 
young people of Brightwood Township. 

********** May 20, 1920 

"Peppy" Ripperton, son of Dr. and Mrs. Ripperton of Wyndmere, recently was married 
to Miss Ruby Sapp of Shreveport, LA., according to a story on the sporting page of the 
New Orleans Item. Mr. Ripperton is a member of the New Orleans baseball team in the 
Southern Association, and is the third member of the club to be married since the season 
opened. ********** May 27, 1920 

ACCOUNT OF BOLLER - LENZ WEDDING 

August W. Lenz, one of our prominent young farmers of Elma, was married last Thurs- 
day, May 20th, at Hutchinson, MN., and the following account of the wedding from the Hutch- 
inson Leader will be of interest to his many friends here: 

One of the largest weddings ever held in Hutchinson city of recent years was the wed- 
ding on Wednesday of Miss Emma Boiler, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Boiler, to Mr. 
August Lenz of Hankinson, ND. The ceremony was solemnized at the German Lutheran Church 
at 11 o'clock. Oscar Albrecht played the wedding march. The bride was attended by the 
bridegroom's sister. Miss Anna Lenz of Hankinson, and her cousin. Miss Aurelia Wallmow of 
Ellsworth town. The groom's attendants were his brother Gust, from Hankinson, and the 
bride's cousin, Harry Wallmow of Ellsworth. 

The bride's gown was of white satin. A tulle veil incap effect hung to the bottom 
of her skirt. She carried an arm bouquet of bride's roses. The bridesmaids wore gowns 
of pale blue silk and carried white carnations. The guests were invited, following the 
ceremony, to the A. 0. U. W. Hall where a bounteous repast was served at noon to about 
one hundred people. Six friends of the bride. Misses Frieda, Agnes and Ida Wallmow of 
Ellsworth, Cora Haag, Edna Hansen and Ella Boiler, served the dinner. Mrs. R. A. Klawitter 
and Mrs. Herman Haag prepared the food. The color scheme was carried out in blue and 
white. A supper was served following which an orchestra dispensed music and the crowd 
tripped the light fantastic until ....until a late hour. The guests from away 
were: Mr. and Mrs. Gust Lenz, parents of the groom, of Hankinson, ND.; Mr. and Mrs. Car- 
ley Lenz and Miss Carrie Foot of Lidgerwood, ND. Mr. and Mrs. Lenz will leave next week 
for their new home at Hankinson, where the groom owns a large fann. 

********** May 27, 1920 

This afternoon, at 2 o'clock, at the Immanuel Ev. Church, Rev. C. Oberdoester per- 
formed the ceremony that united in marriage Miss Anna Neumann and Emil C. Wallman. Only 

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relatives and a few intimate friends witnessed the ceremony. The young people have 
orown up in Brightwood Township, the bride being a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Neu- 
mann and the groom a son of Mr. and Mrs. Carl Wallman. 

They are well and favorably known throughout this section and have a host of frie- 
nds and well wishers. The NEWS joins with other friends in extending congratulations 
and best wishes. ********** May 27, 1920 

A large number of friends and relatives were present to congratulate Mr. August 
Schultz and Mss Elsie Bohn on their matrimonial alliance Thursday. Taps were called 
at 4 PM. , at the Lutheran Church. The remnant of the Great Bend band with Philip Schiller 
as director gave a few of their justly popular airs and the orchestra furnished music for 
a few hours of old time dancing. Mr. Schultz is a prominent business man with the firm 
of Adamson & Schultz and the bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Herman Bohn living near 
town. Their many friends congratulate them and they have the best wishes of all for a 
happy future. ^^^^^^.^^^^ June 3, 1920 

MYERS - ELSEN NUPTIALS WEDNESDAY MORNING 

A very pretty wedding was celebrated at St. Philip's Church on Wednesday morning, 
June 9th, at 9 o'clock, when the Rev. Father Schimmel united in the holy bonds of matri- 
mony, Mr. William Elsen of Elma Township and Miss Esther Myers of Graceville, MN. 

The church was prettily decorated for the occasion and a large crowd attended the 
wedding. Miss Rose Porter acted as bridesmaid and the groom was attended by his brother, 
Matthew Elsen. 

Miss Myers is a daughter of Mr. Meyers, the well known miller of Graceville. The 
groom needs no introduction to Hankinson people, having been bom and raised on the farm 
and the newljweds take up housekeeping there at once. The NEWS joins their many friends 
in wishing them the best of success. 

********** June 10, 1920 

HUNGER - KOTCHIAN WEDDING TUESDAY 
Popular Hankinson Girl Became Bride of Arthur Kotchlan 

A very pretty wedding occurred at the home of Mr. and Mrs. F. 0. Hunger on Tuesday 
morning, June 15th, at 10 o'clock, when their only daughter Erma, became the bride of 
Mr. Arthur Kotchian of Wimbledon, ND. 

Preceding the ceremony Miss Grace Swank sang "0 Promise Me" accompanied by Miss 
Hurly at the piano, who also played the wedding march. The bride descended the stairs 
with Miss Grace Kotchian, sister of the groom, her maid of honor, and was met at the 
foot of the stairs by her father who gave her away. Little Charles Mc Donnell acted as 
ring bearer. 

They were met in the parlor by the groom, who was attended by Mr. Edward Hunger, 
brother of the bride, and the beautiful ring service was impressively performed by 
Rev. Rood. 

The bride's gown was of white satin and georgette and her tulle veil was worn 

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^jith orange blossoms, while the maid of honor wore a gown of orchid colored organdie, 
with a picture hat to match. 

The house was profusely decorated with flowers. The parlor was especially beauti- 
ful, where a wall was banked with greens and white iris, flanked by baskets of purple 
iris, before which the ceremony was performed. 

At 12 o'clock the wedding breakfast was served. Later the bride and groom left 
by auto for their summer home at Lake Bemidji. 

The out of town guests at the wedding were: Mr. and Mrs. John Kotchian and Misses 
Hazel and Grace Swank and Annie Geister of Wahpeton; Marguerite Olson of Grand Forks; 
Gertrude Hurly of Forman; Herbert and Ester Mace and Marion Barnes of Campbell, MN. 

********** June 17, 1920 

Invitations are out for the marriage of Miss Anna Korth to Mr. Frank Bernard. 
The happy event is to take place on Wednesday, June 23rd, at the Lutheran Church. 

********** June 17, 1920 

Frank Richscheidt arrived home yesterday with a bride and has been busy receiving 
the congratulations of his many friends. The bride is Miss Regina Walters of Stirum, 
ND., and the wedding occurred at that place on Tuesday. The NEWS joins with the other 
Hankinson friends in extending best wishes for a long and happy married life. 

********** June 17, 1920 

A marriage license was issued at Sisseton last week to Albert F. Schuschke of 
Lidgerwood and Wilhelmina Krone of Sisseton. 

********** June 24, 1920 

Louis C. Erb and Mrs. Lora Chadwick of Forman were married by County Judge Van- 
Arnam at Wahpeton last week. The groom is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Erb of this 
city and is engaged in farming near Havana. 

********** June 24, 1920 

On Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Lutheran Church, Rev. J. P. Klausler 
performed the ceremony that united for life. Miss Anna Korth and Mr. Frank Bernard. 
Relatives and a few intimate friends witnessed the ceremony. Last evening a big dance 
in honor of the young couple was given at the Korth home southwest of the city. The 
young people are well known and have a host of friends and well wishers who extend 
congratulations. ********** June 24, 1920 

The marriage of Miss Minnie A. Westphal to George W. Stach is to take place on 
Thursday, July 8th. Both are well known young people of Brightwood. 

*•;:******** July 1, 1920 

A marriage license was issued at Breckenridge last week to Jesse A. Bennett and 
Leontina M. Panovski, both of Richland County. Tney were married by Rev. H. M. Frost 
in that city. ********** July 1, 1920 

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A pretty wedding took place at the Henry Koppelman home on Tuesday when Hiss 
Elsie Koppelman and Mr, Robert Krause were united in marriage. The ceremony took place 
at the Lutheran Church. Mr. Krause is a prominent young man from the vicinity of Man- 
tador. We'll congratulate the young couple and wish them all the luck for a happy 

********** July 1, 1920 

WIPPERMAN - WAGNER 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Wipperman announce the marriage of their daughter, Adeline, 
to Mr. William Wagner of Huron. SD. The wedding occurred on Sunday, July 4th, at eight 
o'clock at the home of the bride's parents. Rev. Rood officiating. Only relatives of the 
bride were present. 

The bride wore a gown of orchid colored crepe de Chine and carried a bouquet of 
Cecil Bruner roses. Her going away suit was of navy blue duevtine with tulle hat to 
match. 

After a buffet lunch the young couple left on the Great Northern for a trip to 
points in Wisconsin. They expect to make their home at Huron, where the groom is assoc- 
iated with his father in the mercantile business. 

The bride is well known and deservedly popular with the people of Hankinson. Her 
many excellent qualities of heart and mind have made the number of friends only limited 
by the circle of her acquaintances, and the NEWS joins with everyone in our city in ex- 
tending to the young couple best wishes for a long and happy life. 

********** July 8, 1920 

The marriage of Miss Minnie A. Westphal and George W. Stach was solemnized at the 
Immanuel Ev. Church on Wednesday morning at half past 10 o'clock in the presence of rel- 
atives and a few invited guests. Rev. C. Oberdoester officiated. Following the cere- 
mony a big reception for the young couple was given at the Westphal home just north of 
town. The young people have grown up in this neighborhood and have a large circle of 
friends who extend best wishes for long life and happiness. 

********** July 8, 1920 

A marriage license was issued on July 9th, by Judge Van Amam to John J. Jaeger 
and Miss Katie A. Baker, both of this city. The wedding is to take place next Tuesday. 

********** July 15, 1920 

Mr. Philip Gray and Miss Hazel Walter were united in marriage at Wheaton, MN., on 
Wednesday, July 7, 1920. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Walter, and 
the groom is one of the progressive farmers living near Hankinson, ND. They will be home 
to their many friends after July 15th on the home farm near Hankinson. We join their 

many friends in extending congratulations. WHITE ROCK JOURNAL.... 

********** July 15, 1920 

The marriage of John J. Jaeger and Miss Katie A. Baker was solemnized at St. Phil- 
ip's Church on Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock in the presence of immediate relatives of 

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the contracting parties. Immediatley after the ceremony the young couple left on the 
Soo train for a short wedding trip, after which they will return to Hankinson to make 
their home. For the past year or more the bride has been a valued employee of the Cash 
Supply Store and has a wide circle of friends throughout this part of the county. The 
groom grew to manhood in this city and for the past three years has been employed as 
brakeman on the Soo Line. The NEWS joins with their many friends in extending congrat- 
ulations and best wishes for a long and happy married life. 

********** July 15, 1920 

The Kotchian family formerly resided at Lidgerwood, and a son, Arthur Kotchian was 
recently wed to Miss Irma Hunger of this city. Mrs. Kotchian is in critical condition, 
suffering from internal injuries, and that the daughter, Grace, was also badly injured 
with one limb so crushed that at first it was feared amputation would be necessary. 
Later reports are more reassuring, however. 

********** August 5, 1920 

Word was received this week of the marriage at Calgary, Alberta, Canada, of Miss 
Nettie Marsh to T. H. Grasswick. The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Marsh 
and was brought up in Greendale Township. She is also a sister of Mrs. C. A. Grasswick 
of the Calgary neighborhood whose husband is a brother of the groom. 

********** August 5, 1920 

Marriage licenses were issued at Breckenridge this week to Bert Collins and Lizzie 
Falk; Frederick L. Pierson and Doris B. Steen...all of Richland County and to Eugene J. 
Macey and Amanda A. Larson, both of Roberts County. 

********** August 5, 1920 

Miss Elizabeth Falk, of this city, and Bert Collins, of Wyndmere, were married at 

Breckenridge on Tuesday of last week. The bride was bom in Hankinson and is well known 

hereabouts. Mr. and Mrs. Collins will make their home at Delamere where Mr. Collins has 

brought a blacksmith shop . 

********** August 5, 1920 

POPULAR HANKINSON GIRL MARRIED TUESDAY 

Miss Eva Jones Becomes the Bride of Ray G. Penrose of Quincy, Illinois 

On Tuesday evening, August 24th, at the home of Mrs. A. M. Jones, occurred the 

marriage of her daughter Eva Williams to Roy G. Penrose of Quincy, IL. The Rev. John 

S. Rood read the service. 

A program of nuptial music was rendered before the ceremony "I Love You Truly" 

by James P. P. Tullock, accompanied by Miss Catherine Jones and "0 Promise Me" by David 

Jones, a cousin of the bride, accompanied by Miss Gertrude Hurly of Forman. 

To the strains of Mendellsohn's Wedding March, played by Miss Catherine Jones, a 

sister of the bride, the bridal party descended the stairs. Little Harriet Novak was 

ring bearer, dressed in white with pink rose buds. The next to enter was the bridesmaid, 

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^ss Reba Jones, a sister of the bride, gowned in white crepe de Chine and carrying a 
bouquet of pink asters and ferns. 

The bride was gowned in white taffeta triiraned with silver. Her tulle veil vjas 
arranged in cap effect with a bandeau of pearls and she carried a shower bouquet of 
white roses and lilies of the valley. 

The bridegroom was attended by Harold M. Jones, a cousin of the bride. The cere- 
mony took place in the living room before an improvised altar of ferns and pink and 
white phlox. Pink and white sweet peas and asters formed the decorations through the 
rooms. A canopy of pink and white streamers formed a pretty effect over the bridal table 
which was beautifully decorated in pink and white sweet peas. 

A reception for the relatives and a few intimate friends followed the ceremony. 
Mr. and Mrs. Penrose left on the evening train on their wedding trip to points in Ill- 
inois. They will be at home after Sept. 15th, at Chicago, IL. 

The bride is one of our popular young ladies who has grown to womanhood in this 
city. The groom is a teacher in the Continuation Schools of Chicago and is a young man 
of sterling qualities. 

Out of town guests were: Mr. and Mrs. Dan. R. Jones of Wahpeton; Mr. and Mrs. 
D. J. Jones and family of Forman, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Rasmussen of Wahpeton and Miss 

Gertrude Hurly of Forman. 

********** August 26, 1920 

One of the prettiest affairs ever given for a bride-to-be, in Hankinson, was given 
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Aim Friday afternoon when Mrs. Aim, Mrs. Phelps and 
Mrs. Heley were hostesses at a shower for Miss Eva Jones. The decorations were in yell- 
ow, and autumn flowers were banked in all the rooms. About twenty four guests were pres- 
ent, and Miss Jones was the recipient of many beautiful and useful gifts. 

********** August 26, 1920 

SCHLENER - BURRELL 

The marriage, at St. Philip's Catholic Church, on Tuesday morning of Mathilda 
J. Schlener of Mantador and H. Grover Burrell of Rapid City, SD., was the culmination 
of a romance which had its beginning nine years ago when the groom taught the Schlener 
School in Belford Township, the bride at that time being one of his pupils. Mr. Burrell 
later went into the newspaper business and put in two years in the U. S. Navy during the 
recent war, but the romance which had found its start in the little country school house 
remained unshattered during his absence. He is now managing editor of the Gate City Guide 
of Rapid City, having held the same position before entering the service. 

The bride, a daughter of Mrs. F. E. Schlener of Mantador, is a charming young lady, 
being exceedingly popular with all who know her. She was born and raised near Mantador. 

The marriage ceremony was performed by Rev. Father Wilkes of the Sts. Peter & Paul': 
Church of Mantador. The bride looked charming in her gown of peach colored champagne 
satin. She wore a veil and carried a bouquet of white roses. Lilies of the valley 
were worn in her hair. She was attended by her sister Priscilla, whose dress was of 

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white silk chiffon. She carried a bouquet of white asters. The bridesmaid looked 
sweet in her attire. 

George Schlener, brother of the bride, acted as best man, and with the brides- 
maid led the procession to the altar. 

Following the ceremony the wedding party autoed to Mantador, where dinner was 
served at the bride's home for the immediate relatives of the bride and groom. The 
interior of the dining room was tastefully decorated to match the bride's gown. The 
tables were bedecked with flowers while the table covers were strewn with sweet peas. 
A wedding supper was also served in the evening. 

The young couple will leave in a few days for their future home at Rapid City, 
taking with them the well wishes of their many friends in this community. 

********** September 2, 1920 

Miss Kathryn Little of Elma and E. Otho Ballon of Cedar Rapids, lA., were marr- 
ied at Wahpeton on Sept. 22nd. The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Little, 
pioneer settlers of Elma Township, and has grown to womanhood here. She is a young 
lady of many admirable qualities and has a host of friends and well wishers in this 
part of the county. The groom is a stranger in this neighborhood, but is to be congrat- 
ulated on winning his charming bride as a life mate. The young couple will make their 

home at Cedar Rapids. 

September 30, 1920 



********** 



The marriage of Frank Balvin of Claire City, SD., to Miss Mathilda Duwenhoegger 
of Mantador was solemnized at Mantador on Tuesday morning. Rev. Father Wilkes officiat- 
ing. The ceremony was performed in the presence of relatives and a few intimate friends. 

The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Theo. Duwenhoegger, well known in the Man- 
tador neighborhood, and she has a wide circle of acquaintances in Hankinson and vicinity. 
The groom is a son of prominent farmers near Claire City and until recently has been 
engaged in the automobile business there. The young couple will make their home in Claire 
City and have the best wishes of a host of friends. 

********** September 30, 1920 

A pretty wedding was solemnized on Tuesday when Mr. Henry Bohn and Miss Hilda 
Gollnick were married at the Lutheran Church. Both the bride and groom are well known 
and popular young people of this community. We all wish them much joy and happiness 

in their matrimonial journey through life. GREAT BEND EXAMINER 

********** September 30, 1920 

REINKE - HENTZ 
A very pretty wedding took place at St. Philip's Church in Hankinson at a 9 o'clock 
nuptial mass on Tuesday, Oct. 5th, when Miss Elizabeth Hentz became the bride of Matthew 
T. Reinke. 

The bride tastefully carried out the little scheme of wearing "something old, 
something new, something borrowed and something blue." She wore a gown of satin and 

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georgette trimmed with pearls and carried a shower bouquet of white roses. She was 
attended by her sister. Miss Regina, and a sister of the groom. Miss Mildred Reinke, 
of Sioux Falls, SD. Both bridesmaids wore the autumn shades of tan and green and 
carried bouquets of white carnations. The groom wore the traditional black and was 
attended by his brother Jos. A. Reinke and Leo Bagus, brother of the bride. 

After the ceremony the wedding party, consisting of the immediate relatives, 
motored over to the Ginsbach & Reinke home where a three course dinner was served. The 
happy young couple left the same evening for a short wedding trip after which they will 
be at home to their friends on the groom's farm five miles north of the old home. 

********** October 7, 1920 

A marriage license was issued last week to Charles V. Braaten of Mooreton and 

Elsie E. Smith of Hankinson. 

********** October 7, 1920 

The marriage of Miss Hertha Medenwaldt and John C. Stoltenow was solemnized at 
the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank F. Medenwaldt at Sonora today. Rev. 
J. P. Klausler officiating. Only relatives and immediate friends were present at the 
ceremony. The young couple are well and favorably known, both having grown to maturity 
in Richland County. The NEWS joins with a large circle of friends in extending congrat- 
ulations and best wishes. 

********** October 7, 1920 

The marriage of Miss Minnie Hartleben and Mr. Charles Korth was solemnized on 

Friday, October 1st, at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hartleben, 

in Brightwood Township. The contracting parties are natives of Richland County and have 

a host of friends and well wishers in Hankinson and vicinity. Both are favorably known 

and we bespeak for them a happy voyage on the matrimonial sea. They will make their 

home at Wahpeton. 

********** October 7, 1920 

POPULAR YOUNG COUPLE MARRIED WEDNESDAY 

Yesterday morning at St. Philip's Church, occurred the marriage of Miss Hattie 

Schmidt and Mr. Jacob Wawers. The ceremony was performed in the presence of relatives 

and a few intimate friends. The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. August Schmidt of 

Waldo and the groom is a promising young farmer who has grown to manhood in this vicinity 

The young couple are well and favorably known and their many friends join in wishing 

them a long life of happiness and success. They will occupy the John Wickman farm in 

Green dale which the groom has leased for the coming year. 

********** October 21, 1920 

A marriage license was issued last week to Anthony Lenzen and Miss Regina Hentz. 
The wedding is to take place next week. 

********** October 28, 1920 

The marriage of Miss Regina Hentz and Mr. Anthony Lenzen, was solemnized at St. 

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Philip's Church this morning. Rev. Jos. F. Studnicka performing the ceremony. Only 
a few intimate friends and relatives were present. The young couple have grown up in 
this neighborhood, the bride being a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Hentz. 

The groom is a prominent young man and both have a host of friends and well wishers. 
They will occupy the Hentz farm south of town which the groom has rented for the coming 
year. ********** November 4, 1920 

The marriage of Miss Lena Boldt and Emil Knaak occurred this morning at the Imm- 
anuel Ev. Church, Rev. C. Oberdoester officiating. The bride is a daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Herman Boldt and is one of our popular young ladies. The groom is well known and 
has scores of friends in this part of the county. The NEWS joins with many others in 
extending congratulations and best wishes. 

********** November 4, 1920 

A. W. Johnson and bride spent Sunday with Hankinson friends. The bride's maiden 
name was Miss Martha Evans and her home at Ellendale. The wedding took place at Bis- 
marck on Oct. 25th. The groom is a popular Soo brakeman running between Hankinson and 
Bismarck and his many friends here are pleased to extend congratulations and best wishes. 
The happy couple left here Sunday evening for California on a honeymoon trip. 

********** November 4, 1920 

RATHGEBER - MATTSON 

Miss Emma Ann Rathgeber, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Rathgeber of this 
city, was married to Oscar J. Mattson of Hoffman, MN., at 11 AM., Tuesday, Nov. 9th, 
by the Rev. 0. Gustafson at the Lutheran parsonage at Elbow Lake, MN. 

The bride wore her traveling suit of brown broadcloth with hat to match and was 
attended by Angela M. Mc Donald of Hankinson, who also wore a brown broadcloth suit with 
brown hat. 

Mr, and Mrs. Mattson left on train # 108 for a short honeymoon trip to Minneapolis 
and on their return will make their future home at Hoffman, MN., where the groom has a 
responsible position with a mercantile concern. The bride grew to womanhood in Hankinson 
and has a host of friends and well wishers. 

On Saturday evening a cut glass shower was given for Miss Rathgeber by a number of 
friends, at the home of Mr. P. J. Barlbeau. Miss Rathgeber was also the guest of honor 
at a parcel shower given by Mrs. N. E. Rulien of Hoffman, and later a kitchen shower 
was given by Mrs. J. U, Arnquist and Miss Helen Thompson of Hoffman. 

On Sunday evening at 7 o'clock a pre-nuptial dinner was given at the home of Ang- 
ela M. Mc Donald in honor of Miss Rathgeber and Mr. Mattson, the guests being members 
of the bride's family and a few intimate friends. The room was prettily decorated in 

pink and white. 

********** November II, 19/0 

JOST - NEALIS 
Adeline, youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Matt Jost of this city, was married 

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Saturday morning at Brooten, MN., to John J. Nealis, Jr., of Enderlin. The bride wore 
a broadcloth traveling suit and hat to match and carried a bouquet of American Beauty 
roses. After the wedding breakfast the happy couple left for Milwaukee and other points 
for an indefinate visit. 

Mrs. Jost and daughter, Stella, mother and sister respectively of the bride, att- 
ended the ceremony. The bride was bom in Hankinson and her entire life has been spent 
here. She has a host of friends and well wishers. The groom is a Soo operator at Broo- 
ten but expects to be transferred shortly, hence the plans of the young couple as to 
place of residence are somewhat unsettled at present. 

********** November 11, 1920 

HENTZ - LENZEN 

A very pretty wedding took place at St. Philip's Catholic Church in Hankinson at a 
9 o'clock nuptial mass on Thursday morning, Nov. 4th, when Miss Regina Hentz, daughter 
of Jacob Hentz, became the bride of Anthony Lenzen. 

The bride wore a gown of white satin and georgette trimmed with pearls and carried 
a shower bouquet of pink roses. She was attended by Leda Lenzen of Mooreton, a cousin of 
the groom. The bridesmaid wore pale blue messaline and carried a bouquet of white carna- 
tions. The groom was attended by Herman Bagus, a brother of the bride. 

After the ceremony the wedding party, consisting of immediate relatives and Rev. 
Fr. Schimmel, motored to the bride's home where a three course dinner was served by Mrs. 
Math Reinke and Mrs . Frank Wawers . 

The happy couple left the same evening for a short wedding trip. The groom has 
rented 100 acres of the Hentz farm for next season and the young couple will make their 
home on the farm. 



********** 



November 11, 1920 



Mrs. Hattie E. Rice, relic of the late C. B. Rice and a former resident of Hankin- 
son, was married at Grand Forks last week to Fred E. Smith, for several years president 
of the State Science School at Wahpeton but now State Inspector of Vocational Work in 
South Dakota High Schools with headquarters at Brookings, SD. The bride was a trained 
nurse and was employed in the old Hankinson Hospital about eighteen years ago. 

********** November 11, 1920 

THREE WEDDINGS AT MANTADOR THIS WEEK 

The marriage of Miss Anna Soehner and Nick Peutz was solemnized at Sts. Peter and 
Paul's Church in Mantador on Wednesday morning, Nov. 24th. Both are well knovm young 
people of the vicinity of Mantador. 

On Tuesday, Nov. 22nd, Miss Elizabeth Haus and J. F. Fink were married. The cou- 
ple of newlyweds are also well known and have the best wishes of a host of friends. 
They reside in the Mantador vicinity. 

On Tuesday, Nov. 23rd, Miss Anna Puetz of Wahpeton, was united in marriage to 
Hubert Lambertz of Mantador. Both are prominent young people and have the congratul- 
ations of many friends. ********** November 25, 1920 

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AGATHA STEWARD AND STEVE GEORGE MARRIED 

The marriage of Miss Agatha Steward and Steve George was solemnized at the M. E. 
parsonage in Breckenridge on Saturday, Nov. 20th, Rev. Harry Knowif performing the 
ceremony . 

The bride is a niece of Mr. and Mrs. John M. Kiel of this city and is well known 
as one of our popular and successful rural school teachers. She has made her home with 
the Kiel family when not engaged in school work. 

The groom is one of the most popular of the Soo employees making their headquarters 
in Hankinson. He left railroad work to serve in France during the war and saw active 
service "over there." He is respected and esteemed by all. 

The young couple will go to housekeeping in one of the Milbrandt cottages on north 
Main Street at once and will be "at home" to their friends after December 1st. 

********** November 25, 1920 

Announcements have been received by friends here of the marriage of Edward W. 
Kriesel and Miss Althea Katherine Schmitt at Breckenridge on Sunday, Nov. 21st. The 
bridesmaid was Miss Elsie Kriesel of this city, a sister of the groom, while the groom 
was attended by Gilbert Schmitt, the bride's brother. After the ceremony a bounteous 
wedding dinner was served, only relatives and immediate friends being present. The 
groom is quite will known here, being a son of Mrs. John Peitz, and has a host of friends 
and well wishers. He was with Uncle Sam's boys over in France and since his return from 
the service has been employed at Breckenridge. The young couple will be at home to their 
friends in Breckenridge after December 15th. 

********** November 25, 1920 

Hankinson friends are pleased to extend congratulations to the principals in a 
wedding which occurred on Nov. 20th, at Mitchell, SD., when Miss Elsie Marsh of Valley 
City was united in marriage to Adolph Rommereim of Pakwana, SD. The young people are 
well known here, both being former residents of Greendale Township. The bride is a dau- 
ghter of Mr. and Mrs. James Marsh, pioneer Greendale settlers but now living at Valley 
City, and the groom is an industrious and popular young man esteemed and respected by 
all. They will go to housekeeping at once at Pakwana, SD. 

********** November 25, 1920 

A wedding that escaped the NEWS last week occurred on Sunday, Nov. lAth, when Miss 
Anna A, Sander became the bride of Arthur W. Milbrandt. 

The ceremony was performed at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
Sander, in this city, in the presence of a large assemblage of relatives and friends. 
Rev, C. Oberdoester officiating, A big wedding party followed the ceremony in which 
more than thirty families of relatives and intimate friends took part. 

The young couple were both bom in Richland County and are well and favorably 
known. They have the best wishes of all for the future prosperity and success. 

The groom has rented a part of his mother's farm southeast of the city and will 

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run both places during the coining season, making their home with Mr. Milbrandt's mother. 

********** November 25, 1920 

Walter Thiele and Mabel Laboda, both of this community, were married at the bride's 
home last Tuesday. One of the largest crowds that ever attended a wedding in this part 
of the county were present, including a few of Wahpeton's prominent business men. Both 
the bride and bridegroom are well known by everyone here, and the reception given by the 
bride's parents will not be easily forgotten by those present. We wish the young cople 
great success in their future life as in the past, and they have the hearty congratul- 
ations of all. GREAT BEND EXAMINER 

********** December 4, 1920 

A marriage license was issued at Breckenridge last week to Lyle Vem Knox of Otter 
Tail County, MN., and Mattie Hattie Kuehl of Richland Gouty. We have no further parti- 
culars, but the bride to be, who is a well known Hankinson girl, has the congratulations 
of many friends in this vicinity. 

********** December 9, 1920 

EDNA MEDENWALDT AND ERNEST AMBAGK MARRIED 

At two thirty this afternoon, at the Lutheran Ghurch, Rev. J. P. Klausler performed 
the ceremony that united for life Edna Medenwaldt and Ernest Ambach. The ceremony was 
witnessed by relatives and a few intimate friends of the contracting parties. Later in 
the day a reception and dinner, in honor of the young couple, will be given at the Will- 
iam Medenwaldt home west of town. 

The young couple are well and favorably known. The bride is a daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. William Medenwaldt, prominent farmers of this neighborhood, and was born in Richland 
County. The groom is a prosperous young farmer, respected and esteemed by all who know 
him. The young couple have the congratulations and best wishes of many friends. 

********** December 16, 1920 

GREAT BEND EXAMINER. .. .Invitations are out for the wedding of Ernest Ambach and 
Miss Ida Medenwaldt of Hankinson, to be held at the home of the brides 's parents on Thurs- 
day, Dec. 16th. ********** December 16, 1920 

Announcement is made of the forthcoming wedding of Miss Gladys Theodora Albrecht 
and Mr. Charles Henry Bade. The happy event will take place at the home of the bride's 
parents in Minneapolis on Dec. 31st. Miss Albrecht is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Theo. 
Albrecht and was born in Hankinson. The groom is a son of Chas. Bade, formerly a prom- 
inent business man of Wahpeton but who now resides in Germany. 

********** December 25, 1920 

A marriage license was issued this week at Wahpeton to Chas. A. Hentz and Miss 
Margaret Kretchman, both of Hankinson. 

********** December 30, 1920 

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TWO POPULAR YOUNG PEOPLE WEDDED THIS AFTERNON 

The marriage of Miss Margaret Kretchman and Mr. Charles Hentz was solemnized at 
four o'clock this afternoon at the Lutheran Church, Rev. J. P. Klausler performing the 
ceremony in the presence of the immediate relatives of the young couple. Following the 
ceremony a wedding dinner was served at the George Kretchman home. 

The young couple will go to housekeeping at once on the Paul Burg farm west of town 
which the groom purchased a few months ago. 

The newlyweds are well known and have a host of friends and well wishers. The bride 
is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Kretchman and most of her life has been spent in Hank- 
inson. She is a graduate of the local high school, also of the Valley City Normal, and 
has been engaged in teaching with great success. During the present winter she has been 
employed in her profession at Basin, Wyoming. She is a young lady of splendid attainments, 
popular with all who know her, and the groom is to be congratulated on winning such an 
excellent lifemate. The groom is an industrious young farmer, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Peter 
Hentz, and has the respect and esteem of all. The NEWS joins with their many friends in 
extending congratulations and best wishes for a long and happy married life. 

********** December 30, 1920 



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19 2 1 

Announcements were received here this week of the marriage of Marie Jaerdens to 
Charles Roland Sherman at Milwaukee on Thursday, Dec. 30th. Mr. Sherman was manual train- 
ing instructor in the Hankinson Public Schools two or three years ago. 

********** January 6, 1921 

The marriage of Miss Elsie V. Cooke and Oscar Ostby, both residing southeast of 
Hankinson, occurred at Wahpeton on December 18th. A large circle of friends extend con- 
gratulations and best wishes. 

********** January 6, 1921 

A wedding that escaped our notice was that of Miss Anna B. Nehmer of Belford Town- 
ship and Emil Brummund of Hankinson. They were married by Judge Van Amam at Wahpeton 
on Dec. 16th. Both have grown up in this locality and have the best wishes of many friends 

********** January 6, 1921 

John T. Sherhart, who has been connected with the train service of the Soo, with 
headquarters at Enderlin for the past ten years, surprised his friends the latter part 
of last week by introducing a new Mrs. Sherhart. The happy lady was Miss Mary Rathgeber 
of Hankinson, and they were married on December 23rd at Breckenridge, MN., going from 
there for a short trip to the cities and Hankinson. They will make their home at Ender- 
lin. ********** January 13, 1921 

HEIN - HALL WEDDING AT CAVALIER YESTERDAY 

The marriage of Miss Ruby Hall to Mr. Alfred Hein was solemnized at Cavalier, ND., 
yesterday (Jan. 12th.) 

Their friends here have no particulars of the wedding beyond the above announcements. 
The principals need no introduction to readers of the NEWS. The bride has for several 
years been a resident of our city at certain seasons of the year, being associated in the 
millinery business with Mrs. H. J. Schuster. She has made many friends in Hankinson and 
the surrounding country. The groom is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Hein and has grown to 
manhood among us. He is an industrious young man and is employed by the Hankinson Nursery 
Company. He has the respect and esteem of everyone. 

After a short wedding trip, Mr. and Mrs. Hein will return to Hankinson and go to 
housekeeping in the Brenner cottage on the east side. 

********** January 13, 1921 

Announcements have been received of the marriage of Lydia May Herrick to Arthur G. 
Fichtner at Ludington, MI., on Dec. 22nd. The bride was Principal of the Hankinson High 
School and resigned her position just before the holidays. Mr. and Mrs. Fichtner are now 
"at home" at Big Sauble Light House, Ludington, MI. 

********** January 20, 1921 

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Announcements were received this week of the marriage of Louise Fredrickson and 
Charles F. Templeton at Ortonvllle, MN., on Saturday, March 26th. The groom is an old 
Co. L. boy and a host of his comrades and friends here are pleased to extend congratul- 
ations and best wishes. The young couple will make their home at Fairmount. 

********* * March 31, 1921 

The marriage of Miss Lena Schroeder and Mr. Frank Pettit occurred last Thursday 
evening at Fargo. The bride is a daughter of Mrs. Otto Schroeder of this city and was 
bom in Hankinson. For the past three years she has been employed in Herbst's Depart- 
ment Store at Fargo. The groom is also quite well known here, being the drummer in Mal- 
cho's Orchestra. In Partnership with his brother-in-law, Mr. Malchow, he owns a barber 
shop in Fargo. Hankinson friends of the young couple are pleased to extend congratulations 
and best wishes. They will reside in Fargo. 

********** April 14, 1921 

Miss Lena Hoffman of Hankinson and Bernard Schmaing of Mapleton, MN., were granted 
a marriage license at Moorhead last week. 

********** j/fgy 5 1921 

Burt Olds, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. B. A. Olds, formerly of Hankinson, was married 
at Wheaton, MN., on April 27th to Miss Lenore Swanson of Rosholt. 

********** ^y 12 1921 

Miss Myrtle Brandel, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Brandel of the Claire City neigh- 
borhood and well known here, was married at the Lutheran Church north of Claire City last 

week to Reuben Twite. 

********** May 12, 1921 

FRIEK - LIERMANN 

On Monday, May 16th, at 3 o'clock, at the Lutheran Church, Miss Clara Llermann, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Liermann of this city, became the bride of Herman Friek of 
Wyndmere. The bride was led to the altar by her father who gave her in marriage. She 
wore a white gown with wreath and veil and carried a bouquet of pink and white roses. 

Miss Louise Liermann, sister, and Miss Elsie Krause, of Webster, SD., cousin of 
the bride acted as bridesmaids, and the groom was attended by William and Arthur Liermann, 
brothers of the bride. The double ring service was used and an impressive rendition of 
the marriage service was given by Rev. J. P. Klausler. 

At 6 o'clock a wedding supper was served on the sun porch of the Liermann home to 
the immediate family of the bride and a fevj intimate friends, the decorations being in 
pink and white. 

The bride is one of Hankinson' s popular young ladies, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Liermann, and her entire life has been spent in Richland County. She has a host 
of friends and well wishers. 

The groom is manager of the Wipperman Mercantile Company branch at Wyndmere and is 
rated as one of the progressive young business men of that community. The romance is the 

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outgrowth of an acquaintanceship formed when the bride was temporarily employed at 
Wyndmere for a few weeks. 

Mr. and Mrs. Freik will go to housekeeping in their new bungalow at Wyndmere. 

********** May 19, 1921 

Marriage licenses were issued at Wahpeton last week to the following: John A. Kra- 
emer of Munich, ND., and Anne Stroehl of Lidgerwood, Francis X. Clarey of Fairmount and 
Agnes Agrill of White Rock, Geo. L. Casper of Fairmount and Pauline C. Janish of Fairmount. 

********** May 19, 1921 

Marriage licenses were issued last week by Judge Van Arman as follows: Oscar Lodahl 
and Miss Marit Haarstad, both of Abercrombie; Clarence Ripley and Miss Dorothy B. Swanson, 
both of Fairmount; James A. Quamme and Miss Anna M. Soule, both of Dwight; George I. M. 
Cooper and Miss Pauline C. Janisch, both of Fairmount. 

********** j^y 26, 1921 

Invitations are out for the marriage of Miss Mary Wacha and F. H. Stajgr, well 
known young people of the Liberty Grove - Mantador neighborhood. The happy event is to 
take place next Monday, June 6th. 

********** juj^e 2, 1921 

Invitations have been issued for the wedding, of Ida Korth and Gustave Wallman. The 
happy event is to take place on Tuesday, June 14th. 

********** June 9^ 1921 

Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock, at the Lutheran Church, Rev. J. P. Klausler per- 
formed the ceremony that united in marriage Miss Ida Korth and Gustave Wallman. The 
ceremony was witnessed by relatives and a few intimate friends and later in the day a 
reception was given at the home of the bride's mother for the young couple. Both are 
well and favorably known throughout this section and have lived here since childhood. 
The groom is a prosperous young farmer and the bride a daughter of one of our pioneer 
settlers. 

********** June 16, 1921 

The marriage of Miss Lydia Louise Moore to Frederick E. Coppin will take place at 

Breckenridge today, according to the plans of the young people who left this morning by 

auto for that place. The principals are well known young people, the bride a daughter 

of Mr. and Mrs. Bert Moore and the groom a son of Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Coppin, pioneer 

residents of Brightwood. They are deservedly popular and the NEWS joins with their many 

friends in extending congratulations and best wishes. 

********** June 16, 1921 

Rueben Berndt gave everybody a surprise on Wednesday when he jumped into the dou- 
ble harness with Miss Lizzie Hoeft. The remnent of the local band entertained them in 
the evening. Well, here's congratulations to you. Rube. 

********** June 16, 1921 

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Emil Bostrum and Miss Emma Thiel were married at Morris, MN. , on Monday, June 
20th, and a host of Hankinson friends are pleased to extend congratulations and best 
wishes. The contracting parties are well known here, both having been employed for 
some time in the Fuller - Solarud Store. Later they were employed under John Bostrinn 
in the Big Store at Fairmount, in fact the groom is still employed there, and the young 
couple will make their home in Fairmount. 

********** June 30, 1921 

Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock, at St. Philip's Church, Rev. Fr. Jos. F. Studnicka 
performed the ceremony that united for life, Marie Rose Jaeger and Joseph Lenzen. Only 
relatives and a few intimate friends were present. The bride is a daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. John M. Jaeger of this city and grew to womanhood here. She is a charming little 
lady and has a host of friends and good wishers. The groom is a Hankinson native but 
for several years has filled a responsible position with a large milling firm at St. Cloud, 
MN., where the young couple will make their future home. The NEWS joins with scores of 
Hankinson friends in extending congratulations and best wishes. 

********** June 30, 1921 

The prettiest wedding of the season was held at the Wm. Beling home on Wednesday 
when Miss Sadie Beling became the bride of Mr. Albert Windschlag, a popular young busi- 
ness man of Claire City, SD. The ceremony was held at the Lutheran Church, Rev. T. Hinck 
binding the knot. After the ceremony a big reception was held at the home of the bride's 
parents where all enjoyed themselves. They young couple left for the cities Friday on a 
short honeymoon after which they will return to their home at Claire City. Here's wish- 
ing them health, wealth and happiness for all time to come. 

********** June 30, 1921 

The many Hankinson friends of Arthur P. Spottswood are pleased to extend congrat- 
ulations on his marriage to Anna L. Krogstad. The happy event occurred at Minneapolis 
on Saturday, July 2nd. The groom is the eldest son of Mrs. Kate Spottswood of this city 
and was born in Hankinson. He is now a member of the Minneapolis Fire Department. The 
bride is a charming and talented Minneapolis girl. Mr. and Mrs. Spottswood will be "at 
home" after July 15th at 2723 Emerson Ave. N., Minneapolis. 

********** July 7, 1921 

SPOTTSWOOD - KROGSTAD 

MINNEAPOLIS JOURNAL: The marriage of Miss Anna Krogstad, daughter of Mrs. Elsie 

Krogstad, 2723 Emerson Ave., N. and Mr. Arthur P. Spottswood, son of Mrs. Kate Spotts- 
wood of Hankinson, ND., took place Saturday afternoon at 4 o'clock at the Plymouth Congre- 
gational Church. The Rev. W. C. Timmons reading the service. 

The bride was attended by her sister-in-law, Mrs. Genevieve Krogstad, as matron of 
honor. Mr. Richard Krogstad, brother of the bride, acted as best man. Mrs. Krogstad 
wore her wedding gown of white satin and a corsage bouquet of sweet peas. 

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A reception followed the ceremony in the home of the bride's mother. Miss Ida 
Krogstad and Mrs. Eva Orr assisted in the dining room. 

Mr. and Mrs. Spottswood left on a wedding trip and they will be at home after July 
15th at 2723 Emerson Avenue North. 

********** July 21, 1921 

Marriage licenses were issued last week by Judge Van Amam as follows: Adolph B. 

Veit of Barney and Miss Clementine M. Thill of St. Paul; Herman A. Hoffman of Parshall, 

ND., and Miss Martha H. Ebel of Lidgerwood; Henry G. Bakko and Miss Cecilia R. Glein, 

both of Walcott. i********* 

********** July 21, 1921 

DOUBLE WEDDING AT KENSAL LAST WEEK 

A double wedding occurred at Kensal, ND., on Tuesday, July 12th, in which the prin- 
cipals were Miss Veronica M. O'Neill and Edward J. La Qua, Miss Ida M. Dudley and Michael 
J. O'Neill. 

The wedding is of interest to the people of Hankinson in as much as Mr, La Qua, one 
of the principals, is one of our young business men and a son of Mr. and Mrs. E. P. La- 
Qua of this city. His bride is a charming Kensal girl and the romance is the outgrowth 
of an acquaintanceship formed while Mr. La Qua lived at Kensal. 

Mr. O'Neill is a brother of the new Mrs. Edward La Qua and also resides at Kensal. 
His bride is a young lady from Kildeer, ND. 

The ceremony uniting the two young couples for life was performed by Rev. Fr. Mc- 
Geough at St. John's Church, in the presence of relatives and a few intimate friends. 

Mr. and Mrs. La Qua left at once for Hankinson and for the present are staying at 
the home of the grooms parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. P. La Qua. They will go to housekeeping 
as soon as they can secure a suitable house. A host of friends of the groom join in 
extending congratulations and best wishes. 

Mr. and Mrs. O'Neill also spent their honeymoon here but have returned to the Ken- 
sal area where they will reside. 

********** July 21, 1921 

A marriage license was issued last week to John C. Rettig of Hankinson and Miss 

Louise H. Lueck of Lidgerwood. 

********** July 28, 1921 

Announcement was received here this week of the marriage of George Woolsey, former 
Hankinson boy, to Miss Lillian Wright of Lindsay, CA. , on Tuesday, July 17th. The happy 
event was solemnized at the Congregational parsonage at Oakland, CA. 

The groom is a son of Mr. and Mrs. S. H. Woolsey, of this city, and graduated from 
the Hankinson High School and later from the State University at Grand Forks. 

For the past three years he has been teaching in California and has accepted a pos- 
ition in the High School at Taft, CA. , for the coming year. His many Hankinson friends 
are pleased to extend congratulations and best wishes for a long and happy married life. 

********** July 28, 1921 

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The wedding of Miss Grace Swank of Wahpeton, former instructor of Music and Draw- 
ing in the Hankinson Schools, and Harry Mc Laughlin of Benson, MN., will occur in Minn- 
eapolis on August 20th, it was announced at a luncheon given by Miss Swank's mother and 
sister in Wahpeton last Thursday. 

********** August 11, 1921 

Mrs. Bernard Gockwski, married 24 years and the mother of 19 children, was taken 
before the insanity board at Sisseton, last week on complaint of the husband who charged 
that she had thrown an axe at him. The testimony revealed the facts that Mrs. Gockwski 
kept house for this husky family, plowed, worked in the field, and finally resented the 
burdens imposed upon her. She was adjudged perfectly sane and the couple were admonish- 
ed to return home and live together henceforth in peace and harmony. 

****** **** August 18, 1921 

ALM - PAYNE WEDDING OCCURRED TUESDAY 

One of the prettiest weddings of the year occurred at the home of Mr. and Mrs. H. 
A. Aim, Tuesday, August 23rd, at high noon, when their daughter, Marion Irene, became 
the bride of Carl Treat Payne. 

After the song "I Love You Truly" sung by Mr. James P. P. Tulloch, Carlton Aim 
played Lohengrin's Wedding March and the groom, attended by Walter 0. Aim, as bestman, 
took his place under a beautiful floral canopy where he awaited the bride who approach- 
ed on the arm of her father, followed by her bridesmaid Miss Eugenia Payne, and little 
Miss Frances Heley as ring bearer. The ceremony was performed by Rev. H. C. Juell. 

The bride's gown was of georgette with a veil of net and she carried a beautiful 
shower bouquet of brides' roses and lilies of the valley. The bridesmaid was gowned 
in yellow organdie and she carried a bouquet of lavender asters. 

The rooms were beautifully decorated in yellow and white. A sumptuous banquet 
was served to about fifty guests. 

The out of town guests were Mr, and Mrs. Frank E. Payne, Miss Eugenia Payne, father, 
mother and sister of the groom; Mr. and Mrs. Peter J. Burfening and Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Hanson, all of Fargo; Rev. and Mrs. Juell of Aberdeen and Mrs. Ellen Young of Deadwood, SD 

The bride has grown to womanhood in Hankinson and is beloved by every one, and the 
groom is a very estimable young business man of Grand Forks. After an auto trip to the 
cities and Itasca Park, the young people will go to housekeeping in Grand Forks. 

********** August 25, 1921 

The marriage of Miss Lucille Kinney to Mr. Everett M. Harsh occurs today in Minn- 
eapolis. The wedding occurs too late for the NEWS to give a detailed account of it in 
this issue. The bride is a Hankinson girl and has many friends and well wishers. The 
young couple will make their home at Faribault, MN. 

****** **** August 25, 1921 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Kretchraan made an auto trip to Wahpeton yesterday, accompanied 
by Mrs. Kretchman's brother, Edward D. Hanson, and Miss Josephine Putman, both of Lid- 

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gerwood. The young people were quietly married while in Wahpeton, and will make their 

home in Lidgerwood. ^^^^^^^^^^ 

********** August 25, 1921 

Announcements have been received here of the marriage of Grace Dorothy Swank and 
Harry Hunter Mc Laughlin at Minneapolis, on Saturday, August 20th. The bride is a dau- 
ghter of Mr. and Mrs. D. D. Swank of Wahpeton and for two years was instructor in music 
in the Hankinson Public Schools. She has many friends here who are pleased to extend 
congratulations and best wishes. Mr. and Mrs. Mc Laughlin will make their home at Ben- 
son, MN. ********** August 25, 1921 

ACCOUNT OF THE WOOLSEY - WRIGHT WEDDING 

FRESNO (CA.) REPUBLICAN: Miss Lillian Coral Wright and George Woolsey were 

married in Oakland on July 19, 1921, by Rev. Morris of the First Congregational Church 
of Oakland. 

Mrs. Geo. Woolsey has lived in Lindsay for a number of years and is a graduate of 
the Lindsay High School in 1919. For the past two years she has been employed in the 
Lindsay National Bank. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L, E. Wright of Lindsay. 

George Woolsey graduated from the Univ. of North Dakota in 1918. He attended the 
Univ. of California in 1919 and while there assisted in the Chemistry Dept. While att- 
ending the Univ. of California he was elected to the Alpha Chi Sigma and the Phi Lamba 
Upsilon Societies. 

He has taught science and mathmatics in the Lindsay High School for the past two 
years. This sunmer he attended summer school at Berkeley. 

Mr. and Mrs. Woolsey arrived in Lindsay on August 1st, where they will stay until 
Sept. 1st and after that date they will go to Taft where he will be head of the Science 
Department in the Union High School. 

Mr. and Mrs. Woolsey have been very popular with the younger set in Lindsay and 
their numerous friends here regret their departure. 

********** September 1, 1921 

The secret of the marriage of Miss Mabel Pratt has just leaked out. The groom is 
E. A. Danacourt of Breckenridge, MN. They will move on a farm near Breckenridge in the 
near future. Here's congratulations and best wishes for a long and happy married life. 

********** September 8, 1921 

Miss Hilda Ziegleman, popular young daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Ziegelman, took 
us by surprise Monday when she was married to Mr. Bruno Miller from Hankinson territory. 
The young couple outwitted a few companies of hearty artillery and left for Minneapolis 
Monday evening on a brief honeymoon. 

********** September 8, 1921 

Marriage licenses were recently issued to Bruno Miller of Hankinson and Miss 
Hilda Ziegelman of Great Bend, and Leonard Goff and Miss Elsie Womer, both of Lidgerwood. 

********** September 15, 1921 

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The marriage of Miss Charlotte Hoffman and Herman Gollnick was solemnized at 
Wahpeton on Monday, and after a brief honeymoon trip to the cities, the young couple 
will make their home at Great Bend where the groom has a responsible position with the 
Farmers State Bank. The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry C. Hoffman of this 
city and has lived here from girlhood. She has many friends and well wishers. The mar- 
riage is the culmination of a romance that began during their high school days, both being 
graduates of the Hankinson High School. A host of friends here and at Great Bend extend 

congratulations. j. j. j. j. ^ ^ 

********** September 15, 1921 

We are one live citizen short in town this week and that happens to be Herman Goll- 
nick. Herman has lived a single life for over 22 years and is entitled to a change. He 
selected as his mate Miss Charlotte Hoffman, one of the most popular girls in Hankinson, 
and after a brief ceremony at Wahpeton on Monday, the young couple left for the cities 
on a short honeymoon. They will make their home here in the near future. Here's congrat- 
ulations to them from their many friends. 

********** September 15, 1921 

Invitations are out for the wedding of Miss Rose Portner and Leo J. Bommersbach, 
well known young people, to take place at St. Philip's Church next Tuesday, Sept. 27th. 

********** September 22, 1921 

PORTNER - BOMMERSBACH WEDDING 

The marriage of Miss Rose Portner to Mr. Leo J. Bommersbach was solemnized at St. 
Philip's Church at 9 o'clock Tuesday morning in the presence of a goodly gathering of 
relatives and friends. 

The ceremony was performed by Rev. Jos. F. Studnicka. The bride was gowned in a 
creation of white satin with veil and carried a bouquet of roses. She was attended by 
her sister. Miss Elizabeth Portner, who wore a gown of crepe de Chine. John Bommersbach 
a nephew of the groom, was best man. 

After the ceremony the wedding party proceeded to the farm home of the bride's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. S. Portner, where a reception was held and a bounteous wedding 
dinner was served. This was followed by a dance in the evening. 

The young couple are well known and have a host of friends and well wishers. For 
the present they will make their home with Mr. and Mrs. John Jarski. 

********** September 29, 1921 

Announcement is made of the forthcoming marriage of Clara J. Bellin and Oscar C. 
Lentz. The happy event will take place on Oct. 12th, 

********** September 29, 1921 

The marriage of Mrs. John Novetzke and John Scheller occurred at St. Philip's 
Church on Wednesday morning in the presence of relatives and a few intimate freinds. 
The ceremony was performed by Rev. Jos. F. Studnicka. The contracting parties are old 
residents of Hankinson, respected and esteemed by all, and they have the best wishes of 

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a large circle of friends. 

********** September 29, 1921 

Mr. and Mrs. Herman Zietlow (newlyweds) from Wisconsin are spending a short vacat- 
ion here visiting relatives. Herman is an old timer here and his secret marriage comes 
as a kind of surprise to his many friends. We all hand him congratulations. 

********** September 29, 1921 

One more big event will have to be written in the "past column" and that is the 
marriage of Alfred Koppelman to Miss Rose Cast, Wednesday. Both the bride and groom are 
well known by everyone in the community. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
Koppelman, and the bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Cast. Best wishes for a 
long and happy married life is extended to them. 

********* * September 29, 1921 

POPULAR YOUNG COUPLE MARRIED 

A wedding party of four persons slipped quietly out of Hankinson Tuesday morning, 
and later in the day at Fargo the ceremony was performed that united in marriage. Miss 
Ella B. Paulson and Mr. Howard Cox. They were accompanied on the trip to Fargo by Har- 
old Cox, twin brother of the groom, and Miss Anna Olson, the bride's closest friend. 

The NEWS has no details of the wedding beyond the fact that it took place on Tues- 
day at Fargo. After the ceremony the newlyweds left for Minneapolis on a short wedding 
trip, and on their return to Hankinson they will go to housekeeping in the rooms over 
the Post Office. 

Everybody in this vicinity knows the young couple and their many good qualities. 
The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Paulson, pioneer settlers south of the 
city, and for several years has been employed in the dry goods department of the Cash 
Supply Store. She has a host of friends and well wishers. 

The groom is one of our prominent young business men, being associated with T. W. 
Robey in the barber business. He grew to manhood in Hankinson, was one of the most 
popular members of Hankinson's Company L, and is highly esteemed by all. 

Heartiest congratulationa and best wishes are extended by a host of friends. 

********** October 6, 1921 

BLADOW - KUEHL WEDDING TUESDAY 

Another well known young couple were married on Tuesday of this week when Rev. J. 
P. Klausler performed the ceremony that united for life Miss Esther Bladow and Mr. Aug- 
ust H. Kuehl. The marriage was solemnized at the Lutheran Church in the presence of 
relatives and a few intimate friends. 

The young people are well known and have grown up in Richland County. A host of 
friends and well wishers extend heartiest congratulations . 

They will occupy the Kuehl farm southeast of the city. 

********** October 6, 1921 



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HINCK - JASMER NUPTIALS SUNDAY 

A very pretty wedding occurred at the Evangelical Church in Great Bend on Sunday 
afternoon at 3 o'clock when Miss Alma Hinck became the bride of Frederick Jasmer. The 
ceremony was performed by Rev. T. Hinck, father of the bride, in the presence of a large 
gathering of relatives and invited guests. 

The bride wore a gown of white satin with tulle veil edged with fine lace and held 
in place with a band of pearls. She carried a bouquet of pink roses. The bridesmaids 
were Marie and Ida Hinck and Mathilda Jasmer. Marie Hinck wore yellow organdie, Ida Hinck, 
white organdie, and Tillie Jasmer, flesh organdie. All carried pink carnations. 

The groom was attended by Chas. Jasmer, Robert Heinie and Johan Hinck. 

At the conclusion of the ceremony the wedding party proceeded to the home of the 
bride's parents. Rev. and Mrs. T. Hinck, where an elaborate and bounteous repast was served 

The young couple have spent their entire lives in Richland County and are well and 
favorably known. The bride has been a valued member of the Wipperman Mercantile Company 
office force and while a resident of our city, won for herself, many warm friends. 

The groom is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Jasmer, and is known as an industrious 
and prosperous young farmer. 

The young couple will occupy the L. Jentz farm near Mantador, which Mr. Jasmer has 

rented for the coming season. 

********** October 6, 1921 

Announcement is made of the forthcoming wedding of Miss Clara J. Bellin to Mr. Oscar 
C. Lentz. The happy event is to take place at St. John's Church in Belford on Wednesday, 
Oct. 12th. ********** October 6, 1921 

Invitations are out for the wedding of Miss Minnie Vedder to Mr. Harley Kirchgatter, 
to take place on Wednesday, Oct. 12th. 

********** October 6, 1921 

A marriage license was issued at Wahpeton last Friday to Peter P. Schommen of St. 
Leo, MN., and Alice Woiwode of Mantador. 

********** October 6, 1921 

BELLIN - LENTZ WEDDING WEDNESDAY 
St. John's Church in Belford was the scene of a pretty wedding on Wednesday Oct. 
12th, when Rev. R. Hilgendorf performed the ceremony that united for life. Miss Clara J. 
Bellin and Mr. Oscar C. Lentz. Relatives and a few intimate friends of the contracting 
parties were present and after the ceremony a reception was held at the home of the bride's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Bellin, where the happy event was celebrated until a late 
hour. The young couple have grown up in Richland County and have a large circle of friends 
and well wishers. ^^^^^^^^^^ October 13, 192 



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POPULAR HANKINSON GIRL WEDS 

The marriage of Miss Minnie Vedder to Mr. Harley C. Kirchgatter occurred on Wednes- 
day afternoon, Oct. 12th, at the Lutheran Church, Rev. J. P. Klausler performing the cere- 
mony in the presence of relatives and a few intimate friends. 

A reception was given to the young couple at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Wm. Vedder, following the ceremony, where an elaborate wedding repast was served. 

The bride is the youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Vedder of this city and was 
bom in Richland County. She is deservedly popular with everyone and has a host of friends 
and well wishers. 

The groom resides at St. Ansgar, lA. , and after a brief wedding trip the newlyweds 
will make their home at that place. 

********** October 13, 1921 

Sylvan A. Novak and Miss Sena L. Ostby, well known young people residing south of 
Hankinson, were married at Wahpeton on Tuesday of last week by Judge Van Amum. The young 
couple were accompanied by their parents. In the evening a big dance in their honor was 
given at New Effington, attended by scores of neighbors and friends. The newlyweds will 
occupy the fine farm of the groom's father, Frank Novak, just across the South Dakota bordei 

********** October 13, 1921 

VEDDER - KIRCHGATTER NUPTIALS 

A beautiful consummation of love's happy dream took place at the German Lutheran 
Church on Wednesday, Oct. 12th, promptly at 5 PM. , the appointed hour, when the marriage 
of Miss Minnie Vedder and Mr. Harley C. Kirchgatter, occurred. 

The fortunate groom led his charming bride to the altar to the strains of Mendelsohn's 
Wedding March, played by Miss Sophie Kretchman, when Rev. J. P. Klausler, in an impressive 
manner, pronounced the words that united them in marriage for life. 

The bride and groom were attended by Amanda Korth and Lester Vedder, niece and nephew 
of the bride. The bride wore a gown of charmeuse satin with pearl tirmming and her veil 
was caught in a band of orange buds, and she carried a large bouquet of pink and white chry- 
santhemums. The bridesmaid was gowned in white organdie, and the groom was attired in a 
dark blue serge. 

After the ceremony the bridal party retired to the home of the brides' parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Wm. Vedder, where a sumptuous supper was served to relatives and a few friends. 
The rooms were beautifully decorated in blue and white. The evening was spent in music 
and conversation. 

The bride is the youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Vedder and has lived in Hank- 
inson for a number of years. The groom is a stranger here but is well spoken of. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kirchgatter expect to leave this week for their future home on the par- 
ental farm near St. Ansgaar, lA. Best wishes of the people of this vicinity go with them 
to their Iowa home. ^^*^*^^*** October 20, 1921 

(35) 



A family reunion was held on Monday evening at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Vedder. 
Those present were Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Vedder, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Vedder, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. 
Vedder, Mrs. Korth and family, and Wm. F. Vedder, all of Hankinson; Mr. and Mrs. Paul 
Krahn and Mr. and Mrs. H. Kirchgatter of St. Ansgaar, Iowa. 

+ + + + + + + + + + 

Last Sunday, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Vedder entertained relatives at their home southwest 
of town, in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Krahn of St. Ansgaar, Iowa, and Mr. and Mrs. Harley 
Kirchgatter. ********** October 20, 1921 

A pretty home wedding occurred at LaMoure last Saturday which will be of interest to 
Hankinson people in as much as the bride was formerly a resident of this city, having been 
employed in the Hankinson Drug Store a few years ago. 

The principals were Miss Miss Evelyn Hartman and Mr. Oscar Kirkness. The ceremony 
was performed by Rev. Bums at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Hartman, 
and about 50 relatives and friends who were present. The home was beautifully decorated 
in a color scheme of rose and white, and the ceremony was performed before an altar of 
ferns and flowers. The bride was attired in a rose colored organdie gown and carried a 
bouquet of pink carnations. She was attended by Miss Lena Pauls as bridesmaid, and the 
latter wore a govm of white organdie and carried white carnations. Little Mary Hartman, a 
sister of the bride, was ring bearer and wore a gown of pink organdie. 

At the conclusion of the service the wedding party partook of an elaborate four cou- 
rse dinner. 

The groom is manager of a large sanatorium at Lake Park, MN., and the bride has been 
a nurse in the institution nearly ever since she left Hankinson. The -young couple will 
make their home at Lake Park. In mentioning the approach of the wedding in our last issue. 
The NEWS referred to the bride as "Mrs." Hartman. This was our mistake and we tender our 
apoligies to parties concerned. 

Mrs. Fred Womer of this city was among the guests at the wedding. 

********* A October 27, 1921 

Marriages licenses were issued last week at Wahpeton to the following: Robert Schulz 
and Emma Klawitter, both of Lidgerwood; Frank J. Pelzl and Bergetta L. Farup, both of Bar- 
ney; Frnak J. Hafner, Mooreton, and Miss Lillian Mae Kurtz, Galchutt; Harold B. Ripley and 
Miss Orma Andres, both of Fairmount. 

********** October 27, 1921 

Miss Emma Klawitter, born in 1900 in this city, was married last week at the parson- 
age south of Lidgerwood to Mr. Robert Schultz, Rev. Cloeter performing the ceremony. 

The groom is a well to do young farmer living four miles south of Lidgerwood. The 
bride left Hankinson when a small girl and was raised by Rev. Ernest Sherf , Lutheran Pas- 
tor of Bisbee, ND. He is now cashier of a bank in St. Paul. 

********** October 27, 1921 

Marriage licenses: Henry L. Gebhart and Miss Alvina Wettstein, both of Lidgerwood; 

(36) 



George Pekarski of Mooreton and Miss Rose Armatys of Dwight; Louis L. Novotny and Miss 
Pauline Phillips, both of Lidgerwood. 



********** October 27, 1921 

We received a short message from Starkweather, ND., recently announcing the marriage 
of Henry Boelke. Henry is well known by everyone here and we will hand him our best wish- 
es for a long and happy married life. 

********** November 3, 1921 

Miss Alma Petrich, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Emil Petrich of south of town, is not 
going to have much difficulty in remembering how to spell her new name. All she needs 
to do is to change the last letter of her maiden name. Miss Petrich, who is one of the 
popular young ladies down near the state line, was married to Eric J. Petrick of Varina, IL. 
The ceremony was performed by Judge Van Amam at Wahpeton. 

********** November 10, 1921 

A marriage license was issued at Breckenridge last week to Frank B. St. John and 
Hilda Rossow, both of Richland County. 

********** November 24, 1921 

Marriage licenses issued recently by County Judge Van Amam are as follows; Joseph 
Bagus and Georgiana Kinn, both of Hankinson; Robert Zielke of Tyler and Lena Steffens of 
Wahpeton; Paul Schmidtke of Granton, WI., and Anna Elsie Krieger of Lidgerwood; Jacob 
Lionen and Nora Gavhard, both of Wahpeton; Robert Schultz and Emma Klawitter, both of 
Lidgerwood; James T. Kadoun and Agnes Stucky, both of Lidgerwood. 

********** November 24, 1921 

O'KEEFE - BASSETT WEDDING THURSDAY 

Miss Beth O'Keefe, sister of Mrs. John Mc Donald of this city, and Robert Bassett 
of Fargo were united in marriage at St. Philip's Church at 8 o'clock Thursday, Nov. 24th, 
Rev. Jos. F. Studnicka officiating. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Mc Donald, brother-in-law and sister of the bride, were the attend- 
ants. A wedding breakfast was served following the ceremony at the home of the bride's 
sister. The bride has made her home in Hankinson for several years and has a host of 
friends and well wishers. Mr. and Mrs. Bassett will make their home at Jamestown where 
Mr. Bassett has a position with the Northern Pacific Railway. 

********** December 1, 1921 

The "name in a sweater" system of Dan Cupid saw culmination of another war time 

romance at Mandan when Miss Eleanor Gress was married to Paul Manning of Norwich, NY. 

Miss Gress knitted a sweater for a friend in the Navy, and another for his buddy. Manning. 

The friend dropped the correspondence but the buddy kept it up. A visit of the New York 

man last spring was followed by the wedding. 

********** December 1, 1921 

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The marriage of Miss Anna B. Kuehl of Hankinson to Helmer M. Hanson of Minneapolis 
was solemnized by Judge Van Amam at his office in Wahpeton on Wednesday afternoon of last 
week. The bride's sister and brother. Miss Agnes Kuehl and Albert Kuehl, were the attend- 
ants. The bride grew up in this neighborhood and has the congratulations and best wishes 
of a large circle of friends for a long and happy married life. 



********** 



December 1, 1921 



Marriage licenses issued last week at Wahpeton: Earl J. Ruddy and Miss Mary Peschel, 
both of Wahpeton, Dr. Peter Rose of Park River and Miss Ann Boll of Wahpeton. 



********** 



December 1, 1921 



Great Bend Examiner ; Orlo Pratt's recent painting and paper hanging bees aren't 

going to be in vain, for Orlo found a life companion Tuesday afternoon when Rev. Burkhardt 
tied the matrimonial knot that forever binds him to Miss Hilda Laboda, youngest daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Ed Laboda. Congratulations to them to the last day. 



********** 



December 29, 1921 



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19 2 2 

Announcement has been received by Hankinson friends of the marriage on Dec. 26th, 
of Miss Helga Berg to Thomas Williams, both of Warner, Alberta. The bride formerly taught 
in the Hankinson public schools and has many friends here who are pleased to extend their 
congratulations and best wishes. The groom is a prominent young business man of Warner, 
Alberta, where they will make their future home. 

********** January 5, 1922 

REINKE - O'DONNELL WEDDING JAN. 4th 

Glencoe Union : At St. George's Church, on Wednesday, Jan. 4th, Rev. Father P. C. 
Maloney united in marriage Mr. Michael J. O'Connell of this community and Miss Elizabeth 
M. Reinke of Wahpeton, ND. The ceremony took place at 9 o'clock. Vocal selections were 
rendered by the Misses Lucy Bednar and Margaret Petrih, Miss Bednar presiding at the organ. 

The bride was becomingly gowned in a suit of dark blue velour with hat and gloves 
to match and wore a corsage bouquet of bride's roses and lillies of the valley. 

Mrs. Oscar Luke, a sister of the groom, acted as matron of honor. She wore a suit 
of dark blue serge with hat and gloves to match and a corsage bouquet of pink roses. 

The groom was attended by his brother, Mr. P. J. O'Donnell, both being attired in 
navy blue serge. 

Immediately after the ceremony the wedding party repaired to the home of the groom's 
mother, where immediate relatives sat down to a sumptuous dinner. 

The bride is a charming young woman who has been an active educational and agricult- 
ural worker in North Dakota. She has held important educational positions and has helped 
to operate her mother's farm. She enjoys an enviable reputation in the communities in 
North Dakota where she is known. The groom needs no introduction to people here, where he 
is regarded as a diligent, substantial and prosperous farmer. 

Mr. and Mrs. O'Donnell left on the noon train Wednesday for a short honeymoon trip 
and will be at home after Feb. 1st, on the groom's farm a short distance north of the city. 
The many friends of Mr. O'Donnell extend heartiest congratulations and best wishes to him 
and his worthy bride. ********** January 12, 1922 

George E. Felton, a former Hankinson boy and son of Mrs. John Bostrum, was married 
last week to Miss Laura Scott of Fairmount. In Fact he was married twice — first by Pro- 
bate Judge Shirley at Breckenridge, and later by Rev. Fr. Bettendorf. 

********** January 19, 1922 

The Forman family spent Wednesday at Forman where they attended the wedding of Miss 

Affie Hurly and Charles J. Wallock. The bride is a daughter of Mrs. Wm. Hurly and a 

cousin of the NEWS man. The groom is a hardware merchant at Forman and the newlyweds will 

make their home in that city. 

********** January 19, 1922 

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Eddie A. Ernst, son of Mrs. E. J. Ernst of this city, was married at Aberdeen 
this week to Mary Quellman of Oakes. Eddie has been working at Oakes for three or four 
years and it is presumed the young couple will make their home in that city. The groom's 
Hankinson friends are pleased to extend congratulations and best wishes. 

********** January 26, 1922 

Two well known young people were united for life Wednesday morning when Rev. Jos. 
F. Studnicka performed the ceremony that joined in wedlock. Miss Adela Kube and John F. 
Scheller. Both have grown to maturity in this neighborhood and they have a host of frie- 
nds and well wishers. The ceremony was performed at St. Philip's Church in the presence 
of a few intimate friends of the contracting parties. 

********** February 2, 1922 

The marriage of Miss Julia Haus, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Chas Haus residing a mile 
east of Mantador, to Mr. Herbert Mueller of Calio, ND., occurred at the Catholic Church 
in Mantador, Tuesday morning. The bride is a popular young lady of her neighborhood and 
the groom is proprietor of a garage at Calie, ND., where the newlyweds will make their home 

********** February 2, 1922 

A marriage license was granted at Breckenridge this week to Minnesota L. Moen and 
Miss Emma Dahl, both of northern Roberts County. 

********** February 9, 1922 

In the department of "North Dakota Weddings" printed in the Fargo Forum of Tuesday 
Feb. 14th, appears that of Marian Peitz of Hankinson to Lloyd Wigand of Dysart, ND. The 
wedding, if it actually occurred, is a complete surprise not only to the friends of the 
bride, but to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Peitz, as well. Congratulations are, how- 
ever, none the less hearty and sincere on this account. The bride has been teaching at 
Dysart this year, but her marriage was kept a complete secret so far as Hankinson relatives 
and friends are concerned. ^******^^^ February 16, 1922 

The reported marriage of Miss Marian Peitz proves to have been a hoax after all. 
It seems she was one of the principals in a mock wedding given in connection with an 
entertainment at Dysert, ND., and this led to the false report in circulation here last 
week. ********** February 23, 1922 

A marriage license was issued from the office of Judge Van Amam on Tuesday, Saint 
Valentine's Day, to Nicholas Lamberty and Miss Pauline Foertsch, both of Mantador. 

********** February 23, 1922 

WAR HERO WINS BLUSHING BRIDE 

Bill Stack has evidently slipped one over on his Hankinson friends. . .here is the 
evidence taken from the marriage license records at Moorhead: 

"William R. Stack, 26, Richland County, ND., and Beatrice Whitson, 20, of Barnes 
County, ND." The groom can be no other than the Brightwood Township boy who is known to 

(40) 



everybody in this part of the county. Evidently he has lost none of the valor that won 
for him a medal from the government for bravery during his service overseas. We have no 
particulars other than given above, but on behalf of a host of old friends in this part 
of the country The NEWS is pleased to extend congratulations and best wishes. 

********** March 2, 1922 

FORMER TEACHER WEDDED LAST WEEK 

The following item from the Aberdeen American will be of interest to the many friends 
of the bride who was formerly a teacher in the Hankinson Public Schools: 

"Mr. George Parden left Sunday evening for Milbank where he was married Tuesday morn- 
ing at 6 o'clock at the Catholic Church there to Miss Ann Peschong. They were attended by 
Miss Loretta Peschong, sister to the bride and Mr. Humphrey Sarley." 

"Immediately after the ceremony they were served a wedding breakfast at the home of 
the bride and left at 8:30 for New Richmond, WI., Mr. Parden's childhood home. After a 
short visit there they will return to Aberdeen where they will live on a farm, seven miles 
northeast of the city." 

"Miss Peschong has been a domestic science teacher in Milbank for some time and Mr. 
Parden is a former employee of the Revenue Office here. He has always been prominent in 
city athletics and the boys of the K. C. basketball team mourn his absence, as he is capt- 
ain of the team." ********** 

March 9, 1922 

A marriage license was issued the day before Lent by Judge Van Amam to Adolph V. 
Funfar and Miss Rose Hrdlicka, both of Lidgerwood. 

********** March 9, 1922 

Hankinson friends of Benjamin Lenzen, a former resident of our city, are pleased to 
extend congratulations on his marriage Feb. 18th at Lisbon, ND., to Miss Stella Bartosch 
of that city. The groom is a Hankinson native but has resided at Lisbon for several years. 

********** March 23, 1922 

The marriage of Miss Alma Sedler to Robert H. Bladow was solemnized at the home of 
the bride's brother, Robert Sedler, in Brandenburg Township, today. Rev. J. P. Klausler 
officiating. The bride is a daughter of Carl Sedler and the groom is a prosperous young 
farmer residing north of this city. Both have resided in Richland County practically all 
their lives and they have a host of friends and well wishers. 

********** March 23, 1922 

On Wednesday afternoon of last week, at the M. E. parsonage in Wahpeton, occurred 
the marriage of Raymond E. Kiel and Miss Vesta V. Roberts. The bride is a daughter of 
well known residents of the Fairmount neighborhood, and the groom is a son of Mr. and Mrs. 
R. C. Kiel of Greendale. Both are well known and highly regarded and a host of friends 
and well wishers join in extending congratulations. 

********** March 30, 1922 

(41) 



GREENDALE GIRL WEDDED MAY 9th 

Tuesday morning, Mary 9th, at 9 o'clock, at St. Philip's Church, occurred the marr- 
iage of Miss Anna Herding and Mr. Frank Kraft. The ceremony was performed by Rev. F. 
Studnicka in the presence of relatives and a few intimate friends. 

The bride was gowned in a dress of white satin and lace, carrying a bouquet of 
brides roses and sweet peas. She was attended by her sister. Miss Theresa, who wore a 
dress of yellow organdie and a hat to match, carrying a bouquet of white carnations. 

The groom wore a suit of dark blue serge, and was attended by his pal John J. Beimel 
of Evansville, who also wore a suit of blue serge. 

The bride is a daughter of Mrs. Herbert Herding and most of her life has been spent 
in Greendale Township. She is widely known and has a large circle of friends and well 
wishers. The groom is a prosperous young man of Evansville, IN., and after a brief honey- 
moon the young couple will make their home in that city. 

********** May 11, 1922 

Robert Mc Morrow and Miss Clara Kath surprised their friends by slipping quietly 
out of town on Tuesday and returning as man and wife. The ceremony took place in Breck- 
enridge. 

The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Kath and the groom is a well known 
young man of this community. Both have many friends who are pleased to extend congratul- 
ations. ********** j^y 15^ 1922 

SCHROEDER - HARDT WEDDING APRIL 14th 

The marriage of Miss Irene Schroeder of this city to W. P. Hardt of Bowdle, SD., 
was solemnized at St. Paul, MN., on April 14th, but the wedding was not announced until 
the past week when the young couple arrived here for a short visit at the home of the 
bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Schroeder. 

The bride has been teaching at Bowdle the past year and it was during that time 
that the romance began which culminated in the wedding. She grew to womanhood in this 
city and has a host of friends and well wishers. 

The groom is a special examiner with the South Dakota Banking department . He leaves 
today for Bowdle and his bride will follow in a few days. About June 10th they will leave 
on a motor trip to Chicago, stopping at points in Minnesoat, Wisconsin and Indiana. 

They will make their home in Bowdle. 

********** June 1, 1922 

Mrs. Jason A. Wilson, nee Maud DeSilva, is spending a few days at home. Her marr- 
iage occurred during the holidays but was not known outside of her immediate family until 
the past week. She is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Smith De Silva of this city and has been 
teaching in Bowman County where the wedding occurred. Her friends here are pleased to 
extend belated congratulations and best wishes. The young couple are thinking of locating 
in the Canadian northwest. 

********** June 1, 1922 

(42) 



ONE KILLED AND TWO INJURED 
Julius Boehning's Car Turns Turtle, Killing One and Injuring Two Others 

Fred Wahl, Sr., of Atlantic, NB., Killed, Emil Wahl of Lidgerwood and Fred Drews 

of Oxford, NB., seriously injured Accident Happened Saturday near Fegrus Falls. 

Julius Boehning, well known farmer of Duerr Township, met with an automobile accid- 
ent near Fergus Falls last Saturday evening that resulted in the death of Fred Wahl, Sr., 
of Atlantic, NB., and severly injured Emil Wahl of Lidgerwood and Fred Drews of Oxford, 
NB. Mr. Boehning and a fifth occupant of the car escaped with minor bruises. The Boehn- 
ing family returned by train from Fergus Falls Tuesday night. 

The following account of the accident is taken from the Fergus Falls Daily Journal 
of Monday, June 9th: 

A fatal automobile accident occurred in the town of Oscar, eight miles west of Eliz- 
abeth, Saturday evening. A party consisting of Gottlieb Wahl who resides near Long Lake 
in the town of Elizabeth, Emil Wahl and family of Lidgerwood, ND. , and Fred Drews of Oxford 
NB., all relatives, had been attending a family reunion at Lidgerwood, ND., the occasion 
being the first time that the brothers in the party has met for thirty seven years. 

After celeberating the reunion at Lidgerwood, the party started for Gottlieb Wahl's 
home near Long Lake, this county, to visit here for a short time. They came in two auto- 
mobiles and while on the road, between the Burau store, in Wilkin County, and Elizabeth, 
one of the automobiles turned over and went into a small ditch. Just what caused the acci- 
dent is not known as the road was dry at the time and it was a fairly good piece of roadway 

Fred Wahl, Sr. , of Atlantic, NB., was caught, under the car. His side was crushed 
and he died in about two hours. Emil Wahl of Lidgerood had his right forearm crushed and 
some of his ribs broken. Fred Drews of Oxford, NB., had his knee crushed, shoulder broken 
and ribs broken. The injured men were brought to the St. Lukes Hospital in this city, and 
are reported to be getting along satisfactorily today. 

The accident occurred about 8 o'clock Saturday evening. The remains of Mr. Wahl 
were brought to this city and his children have been notified and are expected to arrive 
today or tomorrow. The remains will be taken to Nebraska and laid beside those of his 
wife who died only a few months ago. He was 66 years of age and leaves a family of grown 

childrpn ********** 

i-niiaren. j^^^ ^2, 1919 

GRIM REAPER TAKES HIS TOLL 

Ernest Gutzmer, well known young farmer residing at Stiles, died at the Lidgerwood 
Hospital last Friday, after suffering for many months with cancer of the stomach. 

Deceased is survived by a young wife, nee Wrege, and an infant child. One sister, 
Mrs. Gustav Bladow, and two brothers, Fred and Otto, are also left to mourn his loss. 

The sympathy of a host of friends goes out to the young wife and other relatives 
in their bereavement. 

The funeral was held on Sunday, services being conducted by Rev. Cloeter, in the 
church south of Lidgerwood. 

********** j^^^ ^g^ ^g^g 

(43) 



FRANK KURPIST ENDS OWN LIFE 

Old Company L Boy Shoots Himself While Temporarily Insane, Thursday 

Disappointment Over Unfortunate Love Affair Supposed to Have Been the Cause 

Deceased Was One of Original Company L Boys and Was 36 Years of Age 

Highly Regarded 

Hankinson people were greatly shocked when word reached here that Frank Kurfist, 
one of the old Company L boys, had ended his own life by firing a bullet through his 
brain last Thursday afternoon near Fairmount. 

It is supposed the deed was done in a fit of temporary insanity resulting from an 
unfortunate love affair. He had planned to be married a few days before, but for some 
reason the ceremony did not come off. 

Deceased was well known here, having enlisted in old Company L shortly after its 
organization, and during the summer of 1917, was a member of the little organization of 
boys that drilled on Hankinson streets for several weeks in preparation for the work of 
upholding our national honor on the fields of France. He was quiet and unassuming, per- 
forming his duties conscientiously at all times, and won the esteem not only of his com- 
rades but of the community in general. He remained with the outfit throughout the war, 
returning from overseas with the others only a few weeks ago. He made a splendid record 
as a soldier. 

Temporarily demented and depressed over an unfortunate live affair, he was last 
seen in Fairmount Thursday noon. He apparently left town afoot, going west on the road 
along the Soo track. Half a mile from town, he sat down by the roadside and placing the 
muzzle of a 32 caliber revolver to his left temple, fired the shot that resulted in inst- 
ant death. Within a short time the body was discovered by Roy Hutchins, who did not 
recognize it but hurried to town and notified the authorities. 

The funeral was held Sunday morning, services being held in the Catholic Church 
in Fairmount. Many of the old Company L boys from here were in attendance. He is sur- 
vived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Kurfist of Fairmount, and several brothers and 
sisters. ********** June 19, 1919 

FATAL ACCIDENT AT LIDGERWOOD 

Mrs. John Fair, visiting at the home of her brother. Prof. R. Trubey in Lidger- 
wood, fell down the cellar in the Trubey home last Thursday morning, and sustained in- 
juries from which she died before help could reach her side. 

Mrs, Fair and her daughter arrived in Hankinson the previous evening and were 
driven to Lidgerwood by auto. Thursday morning about 8 o'clock, as she was going from 
one room to another, she opened the wrong door by mistake, the one leading to the cellar- 
way and fell to the basement. Dr. Sasse was called but death ensued almost before he 
could reach the house. 

Deceased was born in August of 1879, and was married about twenty years ago to 

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John Fair of Rockford, OH. She is survived by her husband and one daughter. Miss Mary, 
aged 19, who came west with her. The body was taken to the old home in Ohio for interment 

********** j^^^ 26, 1919 

Friends of the John Bettendorf family, early resident of this vicinity, will be 
pained to learn of the death of Mrs. Bettendorf which occurred at Belfield, ND., on 
May 6th. Stomach trouble was the cause of her death. 

********** j^^g 12, 1919 

Louis Frederick, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Erb, residing southwest of Hankinson, 
died Sunday morning, after a brief illness, aged two months and three weeks. 

The funeral was held on Tuesday, services being conducted by Rev. J. P. Klausler. 
The parents have the sympathy of all in the loss of their little one. 

********** j^j^g 26, 1919 

BABY CHOKED TO DEATH ON BEAN 

Marcel M. Smith, 15 months old son of Mr. and Mrs. James Smith, prominent farmers 
living near Walcott, this county, died in a Fargo Hospital Friday afternoon by suffocat- 
ion, from a bean which had lodged in his windpipe. 

The little fellow picked up a bean while playing around the house Tuesday after- 
noon, and swallowed it. He commenced to choke and his parents rushed him to a Fargo 
hospital by automobile. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have two other children. 

********** July 3 1919 

PIONEER DENTIST DEAD 

Bismarck, ND., July 3 The funeral of Dr. H. S. Sowles, the oldest practicing 

dentist in point of years of service in the state, was held here yesterday. He was a 
brother-in-law of the late Dr. S. J. Hill of Fargo, who died last month, and who had 
the distinction of being the first registered dentist in the state. Dr. Sowles being 
the second. 

Dr. Sowles resided at Wahpeton for 20 years, and at Fort Rice, ND., for seven 
years, removing from the latter place to Bismarck. He was a member of the State Dental 
Board on two occasions, and was prominent in Masonic circles. His death occurred sud- 
denly Monday evening. ^***^^^*** j^^y 10, 1919 

The S, H. Woolsey family were called to Lisbon the first of the week to attend the 
funeral of G. W. Balderson, Mrs. Woolsey' s father, who passed away Saturday morning. His 
death was due to injuries sustained in an automobile accident on July 4th, in which his 
car, conveying the Woolsey family from Enderlin to Lisbon, turned turtle, pinning the 
occupants underneath. He sustained a fractured hip and several broken ribs, and the inj- 
uries and shock resulted in his death as stated above. Deceased was 73 years of age and 
was one of the highly repected pioneers of Ransom County. 

********** July 24, 1919 

(45) 



GRIM REAPER TAKES HIS TOLL 
Mrs. John Spearl 

Mrs. John Spearl, wife of a well known young farmer west of Mantador, passed away 
Sunday evening from childbirth complications. She was 22 years of age on April 27th, 
and had been married but a few months. The funeral was held at Lidgerwood. 

********** July 31, 1919 

A GRUESOME FIND . . Milo Gold 

The discovery of the skeleton of a man in some tall slough grass in a slough south 
of Lisbon last week by J. B. Rubey, probably clears up the mysterious disappearance of 
Mylo Gold, a well known local character in the county, who dropped out of sight some 10 
years ago. Gold was an eccentric character and made his home with the Roberts family 
south of Lisbon. He roamed about the neighborhood at will and neighbors got to know him 
as the weather prophet as he was in the habit of informing them just what kind of weather 
to expect for weeks ahead. 

One afternoon he strayed away from the Roberts place and that was the last seen of 

him. The slough where the skeleton was found is only a mile from the Roberts place. 

Following his disappearance a couple of threshing crews spent a day or so searching the 

slough but to no avail. This is the first season in over ten years that the slough has 

been without water in it and the first time that the grass has been mowed. Residents of 

the vicinity are certain that the skeleton is that of Gold. The bones were interred in 

the Lisbon Cemetery. 

***.******* July 31^ 1919 

GRIM REAPER TAKES HIS TOLL 
ALLEN TYSON MOURER 
Allen Tyson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Mourer, was bom on July 3rd, 1910, near 
Hankinson, ND., and died on July 24th, 1919, at White Rock, SD. His illness lasted 
over a year and through it all he was cheerful and hopeful always of getting well. 

He endeared himself to all he met and his death is a very real grief to his little 
friends and schoolmates. Not all of us can leave such a beautiful example of living. 

"The span of years though great or small. 
Tell not the tale of life: 
But how much life was given to all, 
And how, without the strife." 

The funeral was held at Tyson M. E. Church the afternoon of July 25, Rev. Morrell 
conducted the service. Music, sermon and beautiful flowers all helped to comfort the 
stricken hearts. He was laid to rest in Greenfield Cemetery. 

CARD OF THANKS 

To our kind friends and neighbors who tendered us their assistance and sympathy . 
during the illness and after the death of our darling, and also to those who gave the 
beautiful floral offerings, we extend our heartfelt thanks. The many kindnesses shovm 

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us in our time of need will be laid away as a precious memory, together with the memory 

of our lad. 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Mourer 

Mrs. A. C. Petterson. 

Mrs. 0. F. Caulkins 

Andrew R. and Cleon N. Mourer 

Mr. and Mrs. P. W. Mourer 

********** July 31, 1919 

DEATH OF LOUIS THIEL 
Louis Thiel, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Thiel, Sr., of Mantador, died at the Breck- 
enridge Hospital on Thursday of last week, following an operation for appendicitis. 
Louis was bom in Mantador thirteen years ago and his entire life was spent in that vic- 
inity. The sympathy of all goes out to the family in their loss. 

Funeral services were conducted at Sts. Peter & Paul's Church in Mantador, with 
Rev. Fr. Wilkes officiating. Interment was made in Calvary Cemetery north of Mantador. 

Louis is survived by his parents and brother Joseph, residents of Mantador, and 
four sisters, Mrs. Joseph Achter and Mrs. Wm. Heitkamp of Barney; Mrs. Matt Brueur of 
Mooreton, and Mrs. Alfred Woiwode of Mantador, and two brothers, Wm. Thiel of Barney and 
Matt Thiel of Wyndmere. 



A********* 



August 7, 1919 



Great Bend and Vicinity Mr. Carl Neitzel, one of our old and highly respected 

citizens, passed away on Tuesday. Mr. Neitzel 's passing is mourned by a large circle of 
friends who knew him as a man of sterling worth. 

He was one of the earliest of our pioneer settlers and had retired from the farm. 
He had reached the ripe old age of 79 years. His wife died several years ago and since 
then he has made his home with relatives. He leaves two sons: William of this township 
and Carl of Montana, and two daughters, Mrs. Henry Koppelman and Mrs. John Steffen. 

********** August 14, 1919 

JUNGLE MELEE ENDS IN KILLING 
Mike O'Brien Dead from Gunshot Wound Inflicted By A Fellow Bandit 

Members of Gang Now in Custody, H. H. Sebastin Facing a Charge of Murder 

Dead Man Victim of Bullet Intended for Another Holdup Ends Disastrously for 

Gunmen 

Mike O'Brien, professional gunman and holdup artist, is dead as the result of a melee 
in the jungles just west of Hankinson Tuesday afternoon. 

Frank Edwards, one of the trio that O'Brien and his gang held up, was shot in the 
breast and left arm but not dangerously hurt. 

Bill Young, a member of the holdup gang, had half a dozen teeth knocked out and his 
face badly disfigured by blows from the butt end of a revolver. 

H. H. Sebastin, supposed leader of the bandit gang, fired the shot that killed his 
pal O'Brien, and also shot Edwards and "beat up" Young. 

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O'Brien died the following morning from his injuries after being taken to the 
Wahpeton Hospital. 

Four surviving members of the bandit gang, together with the three men whom they 
attempted to rob, are in the county jail at Wahpeton. ,, .seven in all. 

The fracas is thought to have broken up a desperate gang of gunmen and bandits who 
may have been responsible for a number of robberies that have occurred in this part of 
the state during the fall. 

HARD TO GET THE FACTS 

To secure a connected account of the melee has been almost impossible. It appears 
that the holdup gang consisted of H. H. Sebastin, Bill Young, Mike O'Brien, John Mack, 
Ed Hill and another man who escaped. These men came in from Valley City on a freight 
train Tuesday forenoon, and their departure from there was hastened by the arrest of a 
seventh member of the party. .. .Whiting by name. 

On reaching Hankinson they went to the jungle between the Soo and G. N. Tracks 
west of town, sitting down near the large billboard just west of the Soo roundhouse. It 
is thought an unsuccessful attempt to hold up a laborer was made early in the afternoon. 
L. J. Simpson, at work in the creamery, heard a couple of shots and saw a man running down 
the Soo track. It is thought this man made his escape from the stick-up artist who fired 
a couple of shots at him without effect. Mr. Simpson phoned to Officer Wirth but when the 
latter arrived there was no evidence of trouble and he returned to town. 

DETAILS OF THE HOLDUP 

About 4 o'clock Sebastin, Young and O'Brien made their way to a spot near the Soo 
track where three laborers had a jungle camp and were engaged in "washing up" after return- 
ing from the country southeast of Hankinson where they had spent several days stacking. 
These men gave their names as Frank Edwards, F, P. Clard and Frank Laudan. 

Young approached the laborers and engaged them in conversation. A mement later 
O'Brien and Sebastin appeared and the latter covered the party with a gun ordering them 
all to hold up their hands. O'Brien started to search them for money, but Edwards did not 
take kindly to the proceedings and dexterously tripped Sebastian before the latter had time 
to use his gun. The two men then grappled and in the scuffle that followed Sebastian held 
his gun against Edwards' breast and fired. A watch in his overalls pocket undoubtedly 
saved Edwards life, for the bullet struck the timepiece, glanced off and passed across his 
left ribs just under the skin and through the muscle of the left arm near the elbow. 

Edwards then broke away and ran towards town, Sebastin firing a second shot at him 
as he ran. Meantime Clark had escaped during the fracas, and Sebastin whirled and sent 
a bullet in his direction, but it went wide of the mark. This left the three bandits 
with only Laudan in their hands. Young threw Laudan to the ground and proceeded to search 
him for money. With a knife he cut away the band of Laudan' s trousers and a five dollar 
bill dropped out. Sebastin greedily grabbed for the money, and in so doing accidentally 
received a gash on the thumb from Young's knife. In a burst of anger from the injury 
he clubbed Young in the face with the butt end of his revolver, knocking out several 

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teeth and otherwise disfiguring his countenance. With Young temporarily "out" from 
these blows, O'Brien took his place frisking Laudan. Laudan lay on the ground with 
O'Brien stooping over him and Sebastin behind them with his gun in his hand. Only the 
five dollar bill had been found, however, and this so angered Sebastian that with an oath 
he announced his intention of "bumping off" Laudan. 

KILLS HIS PAL BY MISTAKE 

This was undoubtedly his intention when he fired, but instead of reaching the intend- 
ed victim the bullet entered O'Brien's back, passing through the kidneys and coming out 
through the stomach. The shooting had attracted the attention of several Soo Line employ- 
ees near the round house and they climbed to the top of the building in time to see Sebas- 
tian cross the tracks and disappear in the weeds near the base ball grounds. Laudan, his 
shirt covered with blood from O'Brien's fatal wound, walked up the track to town. He was 
uninjured. 

POSSE GETS BUSY 

Meantime Edwards, who had been wounded in the tussle with Sebastian, had been join- 
ed by Clark and they walked into town to secure medical aid for the injured arm. Word 
was also passed to Chief of Police Wirth of the fracas and he quickly organized a posse 
to run the bandits down. Arms were secured at Wipperman's Hardware Store and several 
auto loads of armed men proceeded to the scene of the shooting. One car in which were 
Geo. Rennix, 0. J. Thompson and Dr. Tillisch found Sebastian lying in the weeds near the 
ball diamond. He still had his gun but was disarmed and taken into custody. 

Returning towards town, the party heard groans in the weeds just north of the Soo 
tracks. An investigation revealed O'Brien lying on his back and Yoimg under a snow fence 
nearby, both helpless from their injuries. The injured men were picked up, O'Brien being 
taken to Dr. Mc Donell's office and the other bandits to jail. Another man, presumed to 
have belonged to the holdup gang, escaped through Jones' cornfield and was not apprehended. 
Edwards, Young and Laudan were locked up as witnesses. 

TWO MORE SUSPECTS NABBED 

Later in the evening two men approached the Hankinson Drug Company store and wanted 

to buy a flashlight. They were taken in charge on suspicion and proved to be members of 

the bandit gang.... John Mack, aged 38, with a prison record for murder, and Ed Hill, aged 

23 

O'BRIEN REFUSED TO MAKE STATEMENT 

O'Brien, the man who had been shot through the body, was taken to the Wahpeton 
Hospital by auto after being given first aid here. He refused to say a word aside from 
giving his name. Even when told there was no hope of his recovery he refused to make a 
statement of any kind. He died at the hospital Wednesday morning at 7 o'clock. He was 
without funds and will be buried at Wahpeton today at the County's expense. 

PRISONERS TAKEN TO WAHPETON 

Sheriff Wold and Assistant State's Attorney Lounsbury came over from Wahpeton Tues- 
day night and the gunmen and witnesses were all taken over to the county jail by auto. 

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Wold and Lounsbury took part of the bunch and Chief Wirth and Chas. L. Green took the 

others . 

SEBASTIAN FACES MURDER CHARGE 

The men were put through a quiz yesterday by the authorities and the facts bought 
out were substantially as given above. Sebastian will probably face a charge of murder, 
and the others will be held on robbery charges. State's Attorney Forbes is absent from 
Wahpeton but will return in a day or two when the accused men will be given a preliminary 
hearing in Justice Court at Wahpeton. Their trials will probably come at the January term 
of district court for this county. 

ARE A BAD LOT 

The bandits are apparently a desperate lot. Sebastian, who did the killing, became 
involved with Mack, one of his gang, in the cell here early Tuesday evening and it was 
necessary for Chief Wirth to beat him almost into insensibility before he would release 
his strangle hold on Mack. Sebastian claims to have a wife working in a restaurant at 
Jamestown. 

Mack, who gave his age as 38, was released in March of this year from the Montana 
Penitentiary where he served a five year term for murder. He was in Hankinson during 
July and on the 26th was locked up by Officer Wirth on a vagrancy chage, putting up a 
hard fight before he was landed in jail. He was released at that time after sobering up. 

O'Brien, the dead man, is thought to have a criminal record also. His arms and body 
showed several scars that indicated previous fights. 

Bill Young, who is now minus several teeth as a result of his encounter with O'Brien, 
gives his age as 32, but nothing has been learned as to his previous record. 

Ed Hill, another of the gang, gives his age as 23. Mack and Hill had no part in 
the melee Tuesday. 

Mack was the only man in the bunch who had any money on him when searched, except 
small change. Mack had a $50 bill, a $10 and a $2 besides some silver. What became of 
the loot following the holdup is a mystery. Either it is "planted" in the vicinty or is 
in the hands of the lone bandit who escaped. 

The prisoners refused steadfastly to loosen up in conversation, but in a wordy war 
in the jail here on Tuesday evening, Sebastin threatened that if he was sent up for the 
shooting of O'Brien he would tell enough of previous deals at Bismarck and Valley City to 
take Mack with him to the pen. 

A rumor that the men had confessed to the bank robbery at Kidder, SD., about three 
weeks ago seems to be without foundation, although they may have pulled off the job. 

The men had all been drinking prior to Tuesday's melee and the liquor undoubtedly 

had a good deal to do with the reckless shooting which was not essential to the success 

of the holdup. In fact, had they been content to rob their victims without shooting, it 
is probable they would have made their escape in safety. 

********** August 21, 1919 

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BANDIT GANG WILL PLEAD GUILTY 
Sebastian, Slayer of His Pal, Will Plead Guilty to Manslaughter 



The men involved in the robbery and fatal shooting affray here last week were 
arrainged before Justice Schneller at Wahpeton on Tuesday. 

State's Attorney Forbes appeared for the state and the prisoners were without 
council . 

H. H. Sebastian, charged with doing the shooting that resulted in the death of his 
pal, Mike O'Bien, waived examination. He is charged with manslaughter in the first deg- 
ree and announced his intention of pleading guilty to the charge in district court. The 
penalty is from five to ten years in the penitentiary. 

Young, who was with him in the holdup, is charged with highway robbery. He waived 
examination also, bail being fixed at $1,000. He will also plead guilty in district court. 

Mack and Moran, the two men taken into custody on suspicion the evening of the melee, 
were discharged. These were the men who came in from Valley City with the bandits but 
were not connected with the holdup here. 

The three men who were robbed .... Edwards , Clark and Laudan. will remain in Wah- 
peton as witnesses until after the men are formally sentenced. 

Judge Allen is expected to be in Wahpeton some day this week at which time Sebastian 
and Young will enter formal pleas of guilty and receive their sentences. 

********** August 28, 1919 

BANDITS ARE SENTENCED 
Sebastian Gets Five Years for Manslaughter, Young One Year 

Judge Allen held a brief term of district court in Wahpeton yesterday at which five 
prisoners entered pleas of guilty to criminal charges and were sentenced. 

H. H. Sebastian, slayer of his pal O'Brien in the recent holdup and melee at Hank- 
inson, entered a plea of guilty to manslaughter in the first degree and was sentenced to 
a term of five years in the penitentiary. 

Young, his other pal, pled guilty to a charge of highway robbery and was given one 
year in the pen. 

Robert Kelly, holdup artist who was caught at Wahpeton following a robbery of lab- 
orers there, pled guilty to highway robbery and was given one year in the pen. 

Sam Burroughs, taken into custody with Kelly, could not be connected with the rob- 
bery but pled guilty to carrying concealed weapons and was given 30 days in the pen. 

John Murray, arrested at Wahpeton for indecent exposure, was given 30 days in the 
county jail. 

It is expected that an officer from the penitentiary will be in Wahpeton Saturday 
to convey the prisoners to Bismarck, 

********** September 4, 1919 

^^^^ FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY 

36 NORTH WEST TEMPLE 
001 0076 SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 841 50 



MURDERER APPLIES TO PARDON BOARD FOR PAROLE 

Harry H. Sebastin, who killed his partner in the holdup near the Soo roundhouse 
in Hankinson last fall, has applied to the state board of pardons for a parole and the 
hearing will come up at the meeting of the board in Bismarck today. Sebastian, it will 
be remembered, attempted to rob a party of laborers in the jungles just west of town 
last summer and in a fit of anger at his fellow bandit shot him through the body, the 
latter dying a few hours later. Sebastin pleaded guilty to manslaughter in the first 
degree and was sentenced to five years in the pen. He has served about eight months of 
his time. A parole at this time would be a miscarriage of justice, in our opinion, for 
Sebastin got off easily as it was for taking a human life. 

A movement was started yesterday to protest against the parole of this murderer. 
A message was sent to the pardon board asking that the hearing be postponed in order to 
give time for filing a petition of protest, and if the postponement is granted it is 
thought that nearly every business man in Hankinson will join in the remonstrance. The 
general opinion here is that Sebastin is a hardened criminal and should be made to serve 
out his full term. 

*f'******** May 6, 1920 

H. Sebastin, whose application for a pardon met with stubborn resistance by Hank- 
inson citizens, has been denied a pardon by the state board. His wife was chiefly ins- 
trumental in applying for the pardon. Sebastin was the desperado who killed his part- 
ner in an attempted holdup in the jungles just west of Hankinson last fall. He has 
served about six months of his sentence. Sebastin is one of the type of fellows who 
should be kept behind the bars on general principles. 

********** June 3, 1920 

SEBASTIN ESCAPES FROM PENITENTIARY 

Word has been received here of the escape from the state penitentiary at Bismarck 
of Harry Sebastin, the man who killed his partner in a holdup in the jungles just west 
of Hankinson last fall. 

Sebastin was a "trusty" and was employed on the prison farm. There is something 
radically wront with a system that permits such red-handed killers the liberty accorded 
a so-called trusty. 

Sebastin, it will be remembered, shot and killed his partner in a melee just west 
of the creamery when an attempt at holding up some laborers misfired. A couple of 
others were badly manhandled in the fracas. Sebastin' s partner died the next day and 
Sebastin subsequently pled guilty to manslaughter and was sentenced to five years in the 
penitentiary by Judge Allen. 

He was generally considered an all round bad actor. A reward of $500 is offered 
for his capture but so far no trace of him has been discovered. 

********** June 10, 1920 

(Date wise, the above articles are out of order. This is intentional,) 

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LABORER DIES FROM RUNAWAY INJURIES 
Anton Kozak, Transient Laborer, Killed Near Great Bend Friday 

Anton Kozak, a transient laborer, was fatally injured on the farm of Ferd. Hamm- 
ermeister, east of Great Bend last Friday, dying two days later at the Wahpeton Hospital. 
He was unhitching a team from a loaded grain tank and left one tug hooked. Slapping the 
horses on the thigh to start them for the barn, the wagon followed and ran over the un- 
fortunate man. He was rushed to the Wahpeton Hospital where it was found that he was 
suffering with ruptures of the bowels, bladder and other internal injuries. He lingered 
until Sunday. 

Nothing is known of the dead man beyond his name and the fact that he was of Russ- 
ian birth. He was apparently about 40 years old and had been working at the Hammermeis- 
ter place but a couple of days. 

He was buried at the county's expense in Calvary Cemetery near Wahpeton. 

********** August 28, 1919 

THREE KILLED IN WRECK 
Four Others Injured When Stalled Auto Is Hit by Soo Train 

Three persons were instantly killed and four others seriously injured when the 
Winnipeg Flyer on the Soo Line struck an automobile stalled at a crossing two miles 
east of Sedan, this side of Minneapolis, at 12:40 PM., Sunday. 

The dead are Helen Leien and two small children of Olaf Ostgulen, Miss Leinen's 
brother-in-law. Mrs. Ostgulen sustained a fractured skull, two broken legs and a bro- 
ken back and is not expected to recover. Ostgulen and the other children also received 
serious injuries. 

The train with twelve heavy coaches was rounding a curve between the high banks 
of a cut when the engineer saw an auto stalled less than a hundred feet away and was 
unable to stop. 

The injured were taken to a hospital at Paynesville and the dead to Brooten. The 
victims all lived near Sedan. The party was on a pleasure trip at the time of the acc- 
ident. ********** August 28, 1919 

A. C. Kindler, prominent businessman of Wahpeton, died Wednesday afternoon of 
blood poisoning caused by an ulcerated tooth. 

********** August 28, 1919 

DEATH OF MRS. L. P. CHRISTENSON 
Mrs. L. P. Christenson died at the New Effington Hospital on Wednesday of last 
week of typhoid fever. She had been ill with the fever for three weeks. 

The case is a most pathetic one. The husband died four years ago, and with the 
passing of Mrs. Christenson, seven small children are left orphans. Their home was 
close to the South Dakota line, about ten miles south of this city. 

********** September 4, 1919 

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The three months old child of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Fisher, residing west of Mantador, 
died last Friday after a short illness. The funeral was held Sunday with services at 
St. Philip's Church, Rev. Jos. F. Studnicka, officiating. 

********** September 4, 1919 

A. K. MALOY DIED IN CALIFORNIA 

News reached here this week of the death of A. K. Maloy at his home in San Pedro, 
CA. Death resulted from cancer of the throat from which he suffered for many months. 

Deceased was a pioneer business man of Hankinson, having conducted a general store 
in the building new occupied by the Fuller-Solsrud Company for several years... in fact, 
he built this store building. He sold out about 15 years ago and removed to San Pedro, 
CA., where he has since resided. Before coming to Hankinson, he was in business at 
Maple Lake, MN. , and back in territorial days ran a store at Cayuga, ND. 

He is survived by a wife and three children. . .twin daughters and a son. Both of 
the daughters are married and the son is in the Navy. 

********** September 11, 1919 

DEAD MAN FOUND NEAR CAKES 

The decompsed body of a man whose identity has not been obtained was found on the 
top of a haystack, west of Cakes. The man's shoes and coat had been removed. The coat 
was wrapped about his head. No marks indicating foul play were found. 

Coroner Stokes of Fullerton said the man had been dead at least four weeks. From 
a memorandum book found in his pocket, it is believed that the man was a miner from 
Utah, and that his name might be J. Johnson. 

********** September 11, 1919 

MRS. EDWARD KRIESEL CALLED 
Another Richland County Pioneer Passes to the Great Beyond 

With the death of Mrs. Edward Kriesel, which occurred at her home in this city, 
about 1 o'clock Tuesday morning, Richland County loses another of its pioneer settlers, 
deceased having resided in this vicinity for nearly forty years. 

Deceased, whose maiden name was Justine Kock, was bom near New Hammer, Germany, 
on Nov. 20th, 1835, and was therefore in her 84th year. 

She grew to woman hood in the fatherland and was married in 1857 to Edward Kriesel, 
In 1860, the family migrated to the United States, settling in Wisconsin. With the turn 
of immigration toward Dakota, the Kriesels started west, landing in Richland County in 
1880. They took up a homestead about ten miles north of the present city of Hankinson 
where they continued to reside until 1897 when they retired from the farm and have since 
resided in Hankinson. 

The husband died on August 17, 1915. Twelve children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 

Kriesel, six of whom survive Mrs. Julius Hoeft, who lives north of town; William, of 

Havanna; Ernest, of Hankinson; Mrs. Lizzie Mc Neish, of Vancouver, B. C, Misses Emma 
and Pauline, who live at home. 

For the past six years, Mrs. Kriesel was an invalid, being confined to her bed 

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most of the time. The infirmities of old age culminated in her death. A large circle 
of friends among the old settlers sincerely mourn her death. 

All the children, except Mrs. Mc Neish, are here for the funeral, which will be held 
this afternoon at 2 o'clock. The service will be conducted by Rev. J. S. Rood, at the 
Congregational Church, and interment will be made in the family lot in Hillside Cemetery. 

********** September 4, 1919 

Mrs. John Keying died at the family home two miles east of Mantador last Saturday, 
at the age of 38 years, from complications following childbirth. 

Deceased is survived by the stricken husband and several small children. The family 
came her about six years ago from Iowa and deceased has made many friends in the neighbor- 
hood of Mantador who sinerely mourn her untimely death. 

********** September 11, 1919 

BROUGHT HERE FOR BURIAL 

The remains of Ethel Kopenich, 15 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Kopenich, 
were brought here, from Minot, for burial the first of the week, the funeral being held 
Monday from the Immanuel Ev. Church. 

The Kopenichs were early residents of Hankinson. They moved from here to Fargo about 
ten years ago and a little later settled near Marleod, Alberta, Canada. Recently they 

decided to return to Hankinson to be near their relatives Mrs. Kopenich being the only 

daughter of Mr. and Mrs. August Gustman who live east of this place. They started to 
drive through but after going 900 miles two of the children were taken ill at Minot, with 
typhoid fever, due to the poor drinking water used along the route, and the daughter, Ethel 
succumbed to the disease. Another daughter is still in the hospital at Minot but report- 
ed out of danger. 

Mrs. Frank Gustman journeyed to Minot on receipt of word of Ethel's death, return- 
ing with the other members of the family, to Hankinson, with the body. 

After the funeral the family again went to Minot and will resume their journey to 
Hankinson as soon as the other daughter's condition will permit. 

********** September 18, 1919 

Rev. R. Hilgendorf and wife of Belford left yesterday for Seward, MN., to attend 
the funeral of Mrs. Hilgendorf 's mother. Services will be held at St. John's Church as 
usual next Sunday, at 2:30 PM. , Rev. T. Hinck supplying the pulpit in the absence of the 
regular pastor. 

********** September 18, 1919 

DEATH OF BABY HERDING 
Rosella Elizabeth, the six weeks old baby of Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Herding, died Mon- 
day morning at 5 o'clock, after an illness of about a week. Funeral services were held 
from St. Philip's Church on Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock. 

********** September 18, 1919 

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The first fatal hunting accident of the year, in this part of the state, occurred 
Sunday near Milnor when a Miss Williams was shot and instantly killed. We have been 
unable to get any details of the distressing affair. 

********** September 25, 1919 

A fatal automobile accident of an unusual kind occurred on the road five miles north 
of Havana last Thursday evening. The W. J. Mc Neil family were driving to town, three 
or four small children occupying the tonneau of the car. 

One of them, little five year old Veronica, was playing with the handle of the door 
when it flew open and she fell to the ground. She escaped the wheels of the car but 
sustained injuries in the fall that resulted in her death five minutes later. 

********** October 9, 1919 

Word was received at Wahpeton this week of the death of Daniel Divet at his home in 
the western part of the state. Deceased was a pioneer resident of the county and wll known 

among the early settlers. ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ . 

********** October 9, 1919 

BESSE S. OSBORN CALLED BY DEATH 

Well Known Hankinson Lady Answers the Final Summons 

End Came Suddenly and Was Great Shock to Many Friends 

Deceased Had Resided Here Eighteen Years 

Remains Taken to Old Home at Metoman, WI., for Burial 

The death of Miss Belle Stilwell Osbom, at her home in this city last Monday night, 
was sudden and unexpected and came as a great shock to the many friends of the family. 
She had been in poor health for some time and had returned only a few days before from 
Minneapolis where she was under the care of a specialist for a time. While her condit- 
ion caused the family some anxiety, the fatal termination was unexpected. She was taken 
violently ill about 9 o'clock Monday evening and twenty minutes later she passed away. 

Belle Stilwell Osbom was bom at Metoman, WI., on November 23rd, 187A, her parents 
being Mr. and Mrs. Chas. H. Osborn. She was the only child ever born to the couple and 
grew to womanhood in the town of her birth. Eighteen years ago the family moved to Hank- 
inson and they have resided here ever since with the exception of four years which they 
spent on a sheep ranch in Wyoming. Mrs. Osborn, who was a sister of Mrs. John R. Jones 
of this city, died thirteen years ago, since which time the father and daughter have been 
the only members of the household. She was a dutiful and loving daughter and her untimely 
end is a stunning blow to the father in his declining years. 

Early in life she became a member of the Congregational Church and developed a splen- 
did christian character. Her Christianity was a part of her daily life and her true woman- 
liness endeared her to all with whom she came in contact. Her truest friends were those 
who knew her best and learned to appreciate her sterling worth. 

Brief funeral services were held at the family home Tuesday afternoon, conducted 
by Rev. J. S. Rood, and the remains were taken to the old home at Metoman, WI., for 

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interment in the family lot, Chas. Osbom, the stricken father, and Mrs. John R. Jones, 
accompanied the body on the journey. 

********** October 2, 1919 

Ole Loydokken, pioneer resident of Homestead Township and County Commissioner for 
the Second District from 1901 to 1903, died at Fergus Falls yesterday morning from cancer. 
He took an active part in political affairs and was at one time a Republican nominee for 
the Representative for the 37th District, but was defeated at the general election. 

********** October 9, 1919 

Mrs. Frank Motis died at her home on the old John Wendt farm northwest of town Tues- 
day of this week after a lingering illness. An internal abcess was the cause of death, 
and the end came after many weeks of suffering. 

Deceased was a native of Bohemia, and was 48 years old. The family have occupied 
the Wendt farm for the past year or so and prior to that were tenents on the Frank Novak 
place south of this city. Deceased is survived by her husband and eight children, the 
youngest three years of age. 

The sympathy of all goes out to the stricken husband and motherless little ones. 
Funeral services will be held this afternoon and interment will be made in Hillside 
Cemetery, Rev. J. S. Rood conducting services at the grave. 

********** October 9, 1919 

Word was received here this week of the death of W. D. Rickert at his home in 
Blaine, WA., on Sept. 30th, after a lingering illness. Deceased was a Hankinson resid- 
ent at one time and built a number of dwelling houses, being a contractor and builder by 

trade. He was twice married and is survived by the second wife and four children 

three of whom are grown and the fourth, a child of five years. He was 67 years old. 
The sympathy of many Hankinson friends goes out to the bereaved ones. 

********** October 16, 1919 

Mrs. Herman Zeitlow, pioneer resident of this county, died Friday. The funeral was 
held Sunday with services by Rev. T. Hinck, and interment was made in the Lutheran Cem- 
etery . ********** ,,,,^.„ 
^ October 16, 1919 

Great Bend Examiner :.... Word was received here this week of the death of Mrs. Wal- 
ter L. Carter, formerly of Wahpeton, at her home in Miami, FL., on Saturday last of typ- 
hoid fever. The family is quite well known here, Mr. Carter having for many years been 
president of the First National Bank of this city. 

********** October 16, 1919 

WILD MAN KILLED IN RANSOM COUNTY 
Had Escaped From Asylum and Terrorized Country for Several Months 
Albert Thompson, Ransom County's wild man is dead from gun shot wounds inflicted 
in effecting his capture a week ago. He had escaped from the asylum at Jamestown early 
in the summer and made his way to the neighborhood of his former home near Fort Ransom. 

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He took up his abode in caves along the Sheyenne River, foraging the nearby farms for 
food, and until last week had evaded all efforts to take him into custody. A result 
of his presence was the reign of terror that existed among the people of the neighbor- 
hood. When first committed to the asylum three years ago he made a desperate struggle 
and shot and killed his own brother in the melee. He had been seen on a number of occ- 
asions during the summer but was always armed and was always given a wide berth. 

The sheriff finally detailed two Lisbon men, Frank Cortey and Everett Stoudt, to 
effect his capture at any cost. Their orders were to shoot if necessary. After spend- 
ing several days in the neighborhood of his caves he was finally discovered. He started 
to run as soon as he saw the officers and Cortey fired at the fleeing man with a shotgun 
loaded with No. 7 shot. Thompson tumbled over but fought like a wildcat until finally 
handcuffed, when he quieted down. He was taken to Lisbon and placed in the hospital, 
and it was not thought the injuries were serious. However, blood poisoning set in and • 
he died three days later. 

Thompson had two caves or dugouts in the bluffs along the river near Fort Ransom 
and had fitted one of them up in fairly comfortable style. He was provided with eatables 
a gun and a woodman's axe. In conversation with his captors he stated that all he wanted 
was to live a quiet life for a couple of months and intended to trap along the river dur- 
ing the winter. ********** October 16, 1919 

ANOTHER PIONEER ANSWERS FINAL CALL 
Mrs. Herman Zeitlow of Great Bend Passed Away Last Friday 

With the death of Mrs. Herman Zeitlow, which occurred at her home in Great Bend on 
Friday morning, Oct. 10th, another of the County's pioneer passed to her reward. Death 
followed a stroke of paralysis which occurred while she was visiting her son Robert Zeit- 
low in Hankinson nine days before. She recovered sufficiently to return to her own home, 
and passed away peacefully in the presence of the husband and other members of the family. 

Louisa August Boelke was bom in Schotnhagen, Pommeran, Germany, June 6th, 1842, 
where she grew to womanhood and in 1861 was married to Carl Schuett. Of this union six 
children were born, one of whom, Mrs. Gottlieb Pasbrig, died in 1890 in this county. The 
others are: William of this city, Fred of Lidgerwood, Mrs. Emelia (Hugo) Macheel of Hank- 
inson, Mrs. Bertha (Peter) Hentz of Hankinson, and Charles, who is at present at Cleveland 
ND. In the year 1873 the father of this little family died and a year later the widow, 
with her children, left for America, the Land of Promise. They located at Juneau, WI., 
and in 1875 she married again, her second husband being Herman Zeitlow, who survives her. 
In 1884, the husband made a trip to Dakota and was so well pleased with the country that 
he purchased the relinquishment to a quarter of land one mile north of Great Bend. He 
returned to Wisconsin and brought the family to the new home in 1885. 

Meantime the family had increased, seven children being born of the second marriage. 
Four of these are living. . .Albert, who lives at Juneau, WI., Frank, who is farming north 
of Hankinson; Robert, who resides in Hankinson, and Berthold, who is on the old homestead 
a mile north of Great Bend. Six or seven years ago Mr. and Mrs. Zeitlow left the farm 

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and have since resided in Great Bend. Besides the children above mentioned, deceased 
is survived by one sister, Mrs. Herman Nutzekm of Hybeaym, WI.. one brother, Wm. Boelke, 
of Hankinson; 39 grandchildren and 17 great-grandchildren. 

Deceased was a lifelong member of the Lutheran Church and was beloved by all who 
knew her. A loving mother, a faithful wife, and a kind neighbor, she had the respect 
and love of everyone in the neighborhood. 

The funeral was held Sunday afternoon, the services being conducted at the Lutheran 
Church in Great Bend by Rev. T. Hinck. Hundreds of sorrowing neighbors and old time frie- 
nds were in attendance to pay their last tribute of respect. All the children were present 
except Albert, who was unable to get here in time, and Charles, whose exact whereabouts 
were unknown. The pallbearers were: Wm. Schuett, Fred Schuett, Robert Zeitlow, Frank Zeit- 
low, Berthold Zeitlow and Peter Hentz. Interment was made in the cemetery just south of 

Great Bend. 

********** October 16, 1919 

DEATH OF MRS. PETER KRUMP 

Pioneer Belford Resident Passed Away Yesterday After Long ILlness 

Mrs. Peter Krump died at her home in Belford Township yesterday after an illness 
extending over many months. Chronic bronchitis with complications was the cause of death. 

Deceased was one of the pioneer settlers of Richland County. She was bom in Germ- 
many 63 years ago and came to America, settling in Belford Township in an early day. 
By industry and frugality the young couple became well-to-do in this world's good, but 
just as they were about to retire from the farm and enjoy the fruits of their labors the 
husband died suddenly a couple of years ago. A few months later one son, Henry J. Krvmip, 
also passed away. The grief of these bereavements, together with a chronic ailment, un- 
doubtedly shortened the life of Mrs. Krump. She was a loving and indulgent mother, a 
good neighbor, and her death is sincerely mourned. She is survived by a family of several 
children. 

The funeral will be held tomorrow at Mantador, with services at Sts. Peter and Paul's 
Church, and interment will be made in the family lot in the Mantador Cemetery. 

********** October 30, 1919 

FORMER HANKINSON GIRL DIES SUDDENLY 
Mrs. Constan, nee Spreckles, Passed Away in Minneapolis Yesterday. 

A message was received here last evening announcing the sudden death of Mrs- N. M. 
Constan, nee Ida Spreckles, following an operation at a Minneapolis Hospital yesterday. 
News came earlier in the day that she was not expected to live, and the mother and sister 
were making arrangements to leave for her bedside when the second message came. 

Deceased was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D. Spreckels of this city and was bom in 
Summit Township, Richland County, 26 years ago. While she was still a small child, the 
family moved to Hankinson and here she grew to young womanhood. Four years ago she was 
married to N. M. Constans, who survives her. Since her marriage the young couple have 

been residents of Minneapolis. There are no children. 

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News of her sudden and untimely death comes as a great shock to Hankinson friends. 
She was well known throughout this section, and the sincere sympathy of all goes out to 
the bereaved relatives. 

Her father, D. Spreckels, and brother-in-law, Robert H. Bladow, left last night for 
the city and will accompany the remains back to Hankinson. No arrangements have yet been 
made for the funeral as the youngest brother, who is in the Army, doing guard duty at Fort 
Leavenworth, has not been heard from. 

Besides her husband and parents, deceased is survived by three sisters and two bro- 
thers Mrs. Wm. Dumke, Jr., Mrs. Robert H. Bladow, both of this vicinity; Mrs. Karl 

Bladow of Zillah, WA. ; Chas. Spreckels of this city and Corporal Charles Spreckels, 

referred to above. j.a.a.a.^j.^^. . 

********** October 30, 1919 

LAID TO REST 

The funeral of the late Mrs. N. N. Constan, nee Spreckels, was held Sunday, services 
being conducted at the Immanuel Ev. Church by Rev. C. Oberdoester. 

Scores of friends and relatives were present to pay their final tribute of respect 
and love to the departed. Interment was made in the Immanuel Cemetery just southwest of 
the city. ********** October 30, 1919 

Twin boys were born to Mr. and Mrs. Frank Medenwaldt of Sonora last week, but one 
of the babes did not survive, passing away five days after birth. 

********** October 30, 1919 

Hankinson friends of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Coppin, of Dwight Township, sympathize with 
them in the loss of their daughter, Mildred Marie, who died at St. Francis Hospital in 
Breckenridge at 3 o'clock Saturday morning, at the age of 8 years and 10 months. 
The funeral was held at Wahpeton on Wednesday. 

********** November 13, 1919 

Mrs. Rev. Burkhardt, who has been ill the past few weeks, died Sunday afternoon. 
The community was greatly shocked when the news of her death spread as she was thought 
to be recovering. The Burkhardt family have been here only a short time, arriving early 
last spring. Deceased is survived by three daughters and one son. One daughter is at 
present a Red Cross nurse in France. She is expected to arrive in New York about the 14th 
of this month, and burial will not be made until she reaches home. None of the children 
got to the bedside until after the mother's death. Interment will be made at their for- 
mer home in South Dakota. 

********** November 13, 1919 

WILLIE PELVIT KILLED IN HUNTING ACCIDENT 
Former Hankinson Lad Victim of Shooting Mishap Near Breckenridge 
Willie Pelvit, 15 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Pelvit, formerly of this city, was 
shot and killed while hunting rabbits a short distance southeast of Breckenridge last 
Friday . 

Young Pelvit and another boy of about the same age, Frank Niebolt by name, were 

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together, and after tramping around for some time they saw a rabbit go into a hole and 
went to the place to investigate. Pelvit, who was standing near the hole and in front 
of Niebolt, handed the shotgun back to his companion. The rabbit emerged from the hole 
and Pelvit stepped back against the muzzle of the gun and it was discharged, the charge 
entering the small of the back. He died within a short time but was conscious for just 
a moment before he died and said that Niebolt was not responsible for the accident. 

The young man was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Pelvit, and was born in Hankinson. 
The family left here two or three years ago for Breckenridge where they have since resided. 
Four sisters and seven brothers mourn his sudden death. One brother, Gustav, was killed 
in action in France. The funeral took place from the home Tuesday afternoon and was con- 
ducted by Rev. E. Meier of the Immanuel Ev. Church of Wahpeton. Interment was made in 
Riverside Cemetery. 

********** November 13, 1919 

SHOCKING ACCIDENT LAST EVENING 
Ame Prochnow, 9 year old Killed by Accidental Gunshot 

A shocking accident occurred at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Prochnow, in Green- 
dale Township, eight miles southeast of Hankinson, last evening, when their nine year 
old son Ame was shot and instantly killed by the accidental discharge of a shotgun in 
the hands of Ame's 11 year old brother. The load passed through the side of his face 
and neck, death being instantaneous . 

The accident occurred during the evening meal. The older boy had finished eating 
and picked up a ten-gauge shotgun standing in the comer. He attempted to put a 12 gauge 
shell shell in the gun, an old-fashioned lever action Winchester repeater, and when he 
worked the action the gun went off. Arne was across the table from him and must have 
been in the act of raising his fork to his mouth, for the charge took off the tip of one 
finger and passed through his right cheek on the side of his neck. 

Arne was 9 years old on April 24th and was the second of four children in the family. 
The shocking accident is a severe blow to the family, and the sympathy of all goes out 
to them in their great sorrow. 

The funeral will be held either Saturday or Sunday, with services at the Lutheran 
Church. ********** November 20, 1919 

OBITUARY 

The wife of Rev. Jacob Burkhard died at Great Bend, Nov. 9th. It appeared that 
heart failure was the cause of death. 

Mary Magdalena Burkhard, the only daughter of Henry and Barbara Buesch, was bom 
at Lyons, New York, June 20th, 1854. Being the daughter of a local minister, the sub- 
ject of this sketch enjoyed the privileges of early Christian training, and she was also 
led to an early conversion and firm decision for God. She united with the church and 
became active in its various activities. On March 21, 1876, she was united in marriage 
to Rev. Jacob Burkhard, with whom she shared the joys and disappointments of an active 

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minister of the gospel for 43 years. Their first field in the ministry was Newark, NY. 
Their happy union was blessed with three daughters and one son. The son is a minister of 
the Congregational Church, serving at present at Bereford, SD. 

The oldest daughter, Mrs. A. Busse, resides near Slayton, MN., on a farm. Edith is 
vice president and bookkeeper of the Maxvill Hardware Co., of Sioux Falls, SD. Edna the 
youngest daughter, is secretary of the Y. M. C. A. and has of late been working at Brest, 
France. The father sent a message to her in France that her mother was very sick and 
wanted to see her, and she answered, "will arrive in New York on the 14th," but the mother 
passed away before she arrived. About an hour before her death she said, "can you not 
bring me Edna?" 

Sister Burkhard was a most devoted wife and diligent helpmate to her husband, and a 
loving and consecrated mother to her children. Her great concern was constantly for her 
family, to rear her children in the fear and mercy of God, and lead them into fields of 
usefulness. Her home was always open to any and all ministers, and those who sought help 
and counsel and through her unassuming and selfsacrificing work she endeared herself to 
many lives who now call her blessed. 

At the time of her death she was the president of the W. M. S. at Great Bend. The 
departed said, "my life is going out slowly." She leaves a grief-stricken husband, three 
daughters and one son and four grandchildren and a host of friends. Her body was laid to 
rest in the cemetery at Great Bend, Rev. F. H. Brockmueller, the residing elder of the 
Fargo district, and Rev. G. C. Thiele officiating. 
GREAT BEND EXAMINER ********** November 20, 1919 

The EXAMINER corrects the statement in last week's issue that Mrs. Burkhard was not 
to be buried here. She was buried at the Evangelical Cemetery on Thursday. The funeral 
was one of the most pathetically beautiful ever held here. Flowers draped every visible 
spot on the altar and casket. Those left behind have the heartfelt sympathy of all in 
their bereavement. + + + + + + + + + + 

Rev. J. Burkhard, who is left alone by the death of his wife, is spending a few 
weeks visiting with his daughter at Slayton, MN. 

********** Nivember 20, 1919 

ALFRED E. BIGGS DIES SUDDENLY 

Prominent Citizen and Land Owner Passed Away Saturday morning. .. .Heart Failure Res- 
ulted in Sudden and Unexpected End.... Had Been Slightly Indisposed but Condition Not 
Considered Serious Funeral was Held Tuesday. 

The sudden and unexpected death of Alfred E. Biggs Saturday morning came as a great 
shock to the people of our city. He collapsed on the street and was hurried to a doctor's 
office, but the spark of life had fled and word of his demise soon passed from mouth to 
mouth and brought profound regret not only to relatives but to hundreds of friends thro- 
ughtout this part of the county. 

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Mr. Biggs had been feeling poorly for a day or two and had a couple of fainting 
spells Friday. His trouble was thought to be of a local nature and he himself thought 
he was suffering from asthma, Saturday morning he came down town in company with his 
wife. As they walked over the crossing between the Fuller-Solsrud Store and the Hankln- 
son Auto Co., garage he sank to the ground unconscious. A sleigh hurridly conveyed him 
to Dr. Ryan's office where he passed away within five minutes. 

Deceased was one of our most prominent citizens, and was undoubtedly the largest 
individual land owner in Richland County if not in the state. He had unlimited faith 
in the future of this country and invested heavily in land, owning at the time of his 
death 28 farms comprising approximately 4,000 acres. He was hardworking and farseeing, 
had been very successful in business life, and his career was a splendid refutation of 
the statement so often heard that no man can accumulate great wealth and remain honest. 

Alfred Edward Biggs was born in 1868, about six miles from the city of Cork, Ireland, 
and within sight of the historic Blarney Castle. His father was Jacob T. Biggs and his 
mother's maiden name was Janet Trayer Nash. The family migrated to America when the lad 
Alfred was about 5 years old, settling first at Berea, OH. From there the family moved 
to a farm near Sheldon, lA. , in 1879. With his two brothers, Walter and Henry, he worked 
out as a farm laborer for several years. The three brothers pooled their earnings and 
bought 80 acres of land near Sheldon which in a few years they had increased to 400 acres. 
In 1902 the three brothers disposed of their Iowa holdings and came to North Dakota, 
buying heavily of land in Greendale Township, much of this land being bought from the ori- 
ginal homesteaders at what was then considered high prices... $18 to $22 an acre. Other 
land was bought from time to time, and later the brothers divided their holdings. Walter 
died two years ago this month. During the past year Alfred has bought several hundred 
acres more land, increasing his holding to 4,000 acres. He was a good judge of soil and 
all of his farms were of the best and always maintained in excellent condition. . .build- 
ings in good repair, machinery in good shape, and were a matter of pride to the owner. 
For this reason he was always able to secure the best class of tenants and bore a des- 
erved reputation for fair dealing among those with whom he did business. 

The work of caring for his many interests became heavier as time went on, and only 
last week he announced his intention of disposing of all his land next season except a 
couple of sections. His plan was to convert his property into income producing secur- 
ities and spend the winters in California, making annual trips back to North Dakota to 
look after his interests. His untimely death under these circumstances is doubly path- 
etic. 

He was married 22 years ago to Lillian Jones, who, with five children, survive him. 
The children are: Janet, Alfred, George, Charles and Robert, the latter a babe of about 
one year. He also leaves one sister, Mrs. W. H. Freeman, of Algona, lA. , and two bro- 
thers Henry of this city, and an older brother in Bantry, Ireland, who is a prominent 

business man and importer of that city. 

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Deceased was an upright, honest and worthy citizen. He was public spirited and 
liberal in all public enterprises. He had the respect and esteem of all, and his best 
friends were those with whom he was most closely associated. He was an active member of 
the Methodist Church and lived a consistent Christian life, having the courage of his 
convictions and standing at all times for what he considered the right. His charitable 
acts were many, and he always stood ready to help those who showed an inclination to help 
themselves. Alfred Biggs was, in the best sense, a man among men. 

For the past twelve years the family has resided in Hankinson. During that time he 
has taken an active part in civic affairs, always ready to give of his time and money 
for any worthy cause, and in his death the community loses one of its best citizens. 

The funeral was held Tuesday. Rev. Mr. Bennett, former pastor of the M. E. Church 
in Greendale and a close personal friend of the deceased, conducted services in the Con- 
gregational Church in this city at 11 AM., assisted by Rev. J. S. Rood, after which the 
remains were taken to the Tyson Church in Greendale where a second service was held. 
Scores of sorrowing friends were in attendance to pay their friend a final tribute. 

Interment was made in the Tyson Cemetery in Greendale, which was a part of one of 
the farms owned by the deceased. 

********** November 20, 1919 

FRITZ KRUEGER DIED SUDDENLY 
Pioneer Resident Succumbed to Heart Failure Wednesday Morning 

Attack Came Suddenly and His Death is a Great Shock to Family and Friends. .. .Has beer 
a Resident of Richland County for Thirty-five Years Three Children Survive Him.... 

Fritz Krueger, pioneer resident of Richland County, died at his home in this city 
about 1 o'clock Tuesday morning following an attack of heart failure. He has been rather 
feeble for a long time but his condition was not considered serious. 

Deceased was a native of Germany and was 65 years old. He grew to manhood in the 
old country and migrated to the United States about 35 years ago, coming directly to 
Richland County. He settled first at Great Bend where he worked out for some time, and 
later homesteaded a quarter section in Brightwood Township, four miles west of Hankinson, 
where he resided up to about ten years ago when he moved to this city and has since res- 
ided here. 

Deceased was three times married. . .first to Miss Eliza Schuett, who died suddenly 
four years ago; a few months later he married Mrs. Hermine Lelm, who died a year ago this 
month; in July of the present year he married Mrs. Emilia Brummond, who survives him. 

There are three surviving children by the first marriage Mrs. Alfred Prochnow of this 

place, Arthur Krueger of Lidgerwood and Oscar Krueger of this city. There are seven 
grandchildren. 

Deceased was a hardworking and thrifty citizen, a kind and indulgent father and 
loving husband. By his industry and thrift he had accumulated a fair share of this 
world's goods. He had the respect and esteem of all and scores of old settlers will 

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learn with regret of his death. 

The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock, services to be conducted 
at the Immanueal Ev. Church by Rev. Oberdoester. Interment will be made in the family 
lot in the Evangelical Cemetery. 

********** December 25, 1919 

CARD OF THANKS 

To the friends and neighbors who gave assistance and sympathy following the death 
of our husband and father we extend heartfelt thanks. The kindness shown us will ever 
be held in grateful rememberance. 

Mrs. Fritz Krueger 
Mrs. Alfred Prochnow 
Arthur Krueger 
Oscar Krueger 



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19 2 



THREE CALLED BY THE GRIM REAPER 
Peter Lenzen, Nick Wawers and Louis Boehning Pass to Beyond 

All Were Pioneer Residents of the County and Leave Families 

Boehning Died Wednesday of Last Week, the Other Two Within a Few Hours of Each Other 

Tuesday Morning 
PETER JOHN LENZAN 

Peter Lenzen, one of the pioneers of this section, died at his home in this city on 
Tuesday, Dec. 30th, at 8 o'clock in the morning, following a physical breakdown that had 
confined him to bed for about ten days. He had been in failing health for several months. 

Peter John Lenzen was born in the month of October, 1860, at Hamel, Hennepin County, 
MN., and died at Hankinson on Dec. 30th, 1919, at the age of 59 years, 2 months and 20 
days. He grew to manhood in the Minneapolis suburbs and joined the early pioneers headed 
toward Dakota when he was 19 years old. He settled first at Mooreton, this county, in 
1881, and three years later was united in marriage to Wilhelmine Schroeder who survives 
him. The same year he filed on a homestead north of the sand hills in what is now Bel- 
ford Township. The family farmed there for eleven years, and in 1895 disposed of this 
place and bought a farm seven miles south of Hankinson where they resided until 1901 
when they sold this place to Mr. Bork and moved to Hankinson where they have since resided 
deceased having been continuously in the employ of John R. Jones as yard man and carpen- 
ter since that time. 

Ten children were bom to Mr. and Mrs. Lenzen, six of whom survive. .. .Mrs. B. W. 
Shafer of Elma; Joseph, Leo and Benjamin, all of St. Cloud, MN., Anton and Kate who live 
at home. He is also survived by three brothers and 6 sisters. ,. .Leo of Morton, Henry L. 
of Wahpeton, Louis of Grand Forks, Mrs. Mike Chemich of Mooreton, Mrs. Geo. Buscher and 
Mrs. John Buscher both of Fairmount, Mrs. John Hayden of Creston, B.C., Mrs. Wm. Lipton 
of Calgary, Canada, and Mrs. Louis Mc Manus of West Superior. All of these relatives 
are here for the funeral except Mrs. Hayden and Mrs. Lipton. 

Deceased was a familiar figure on our streets and v/ill be generally missed. He was 
industrious, kindly in his contact with others, and had many friends who will regret 
his departure from this world. 

The funeral will be held tomorrow (Friday) morning with services at the home and 

at St. Phillip's Church. Interment will be made in the family lot in the cemetery just 

south of the city. 

********** January 1, 1920 

NICHOLAS WAWERS 
The death of Nicholas Wawers, who passed away at his home in this city Monday after- 
noon at 1 o'clock, removes from among us one of the very first settlers in Hankinson. He 
bought the first load of wheat ever marketed in Hankinson, one of his daughters was the 
first child born in Hankinson, and for forty years he was closely identified with the 

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growth and development of southern Richland County. At the ripe old age of 74 years 
he goes to his heavenly reward after a life filled with good deeds and helpfulness to 
his fellow men. 

Nicholas Wawers was born in Breusen, Germany, on the river Rhine, in 1847. He mi- 
grated to the United States in 1867 when twenty years of age, locating first at Chicago 
where he worked for a year, and then moved to Madison, WI. Heeding Horace Greeley's 
advice, he came west in 1881, and went to work on the bonanza Dwight farm near Wahpeton. 
A little later he entered the employ of the Cargill Elevator Company as grain buyer at 
Wahpeton. 

About this time he was married to Miss Margaret Lambertz in Wahpeton, but the young 
wife died eighteen months later. He was married a second time, in 1883, to Elizabeth 
Hentz at Colfax, where he was at the time, engaged in buying grain. After that the fam- 
ily moved back to Wahpeton and a few months later they moved again, this time locating 
at Everest, Cass County. There he bought grain for a year and again returned to Wahpeton. 
From Wahpeton he brought his wife and child to the present site of the city of Hankinson, 
making the trip across country with his family on a load of lumber. He was put in charge 
of the Cargill elevator here on its completion and bought the first load of wheat market- 
ed in Hankinson. This was bought "on track" before the elevator was built. A little 
later on he opened a general store on the present side of N. C. Hanson's restaurant. A 
year later a daughter, Elizabeth, was born to them, the first white child bom in this 
city. After four years in Hankinson he homes teaded a quarter section of land in Green- 
dale Townshp, where they resided until last October when they moved to this city. 

He was a resident of Greendale Township for thirty years and during that time increa- 
sed his land holdings until, at the time of his death, he owned six large quarters in 
Greendale Township and two quarters in Ward County. He also had a large interest in the 
Farmers' Elevator at Sonora besides other property interests. 

Deceased was the father of ten children, eight of whom, together with his wife, 
survive him. They are: Frank Wawers, Mrs. Alton J. Theede, Nicholas Wawers, Jr., George 
Wawers, who resides in Ward County, Peter Wawers, Mike Wawers, Jacob Wawers and Henry 
Wawers. There are also four surviving brothers and sisters, two of whom, Theodore and 
Eva, are in Germany, the others being Mrs. Nick Bever of Lidgerwood and Mrs. Lena Begel 
of Keniston, Sask., Canada. All of these will be present for the funeral except those 
living in the old country. 

Deceased was truly one of the empire builders of the west. He came to Richland 
County when it was a barren waste, located in Hankinson when it was a mere hamlet, and 
Mrs. Wawers states that she served the first meal that John R. Jones ever ate in this 
city. This estimable couple have lived to see their children grown up and comfortably, 
settled in homes of their hown, but the head of the family succumbed Tuesday morning to 
a complication of liver, kidney and lung ailments from which he suffered for several 
months. Peace to the ashes of this sturdy old pioneer. 

The funeral services will be held Friday morning at 11 o'clock with services at St. 

Phillip's Church. January 1, 1920 

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LOUIS BOEHNING 

The sudden and unexpected death of Louis Boehning at his home south of Hankinson 
on Wednesday evening, Dec. 24th, was a great shock to him many friends. He had been 
ill for a couple of days but his condition was not considered serious and a fatal term- 
ination was wholly unexpected. In fact, his wife was away from home, visiting her par- 
ents south of Lidgerwood, and the two young men in the house had gone for a load of hay, 
leaving the sick man alone and apparently sleeping. When they returned after a short 
absence it was only to find that he had passed away. 

Louis Boehning was a native of Richland County, the oldest son in a large family 
bom to Mr. and Mrs. Julius Boehning, prominent pioneers of Duerr Township. He grew to 
manhood on the home farm and about five years ago was married to a daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Chas. H. Ebel of Grant Township who, with three small children, survives him. After 
his marriage he rented one of the Hunger farms south of Hankinson where the family resid- 
ed up to the time of his death. 

The sympathy of all goes out to the young wife and three fatherless little ones in 
their sad bereavement . 

The funeral was held on Sunday, services being conducted at the Church near the 
Boehning' s homestead. Rev. Cloeter conducted the services which were attended by a 
large gathering of old friends of the family. Interment was made in the cemetery near 
the church. 



********** 



January 1, 1920 



Jack Westervelt, a batchelor living alone, was found dead in his shack five miles 
northwest of Wyndmere one day last week. When the body was found it was frozen stiff, 
indicating that he had been dead for several days. He was a recluse and little was known 
about him by the neighbors. There was practically nothing in the shack to eat and it is 
thought lack of proper nourishment was one of the contributing causes of his death. An 
inquest resulted in a verdict of death fom natural causes. A sister in Michigan, the 
only known relative, was notified and ordered the remains sent to her. 

********** January 8, 1920 

SONG RA.. ..Word reached us on Monday from Sioux Pass, MT., of the death of Mrs. Clar- 
ence Ellis, formerly Miss Fena Radke, second daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Radtke, former 
residents of this vicinity. She was married in October, 1919 and died Dec. 26, 1919. 
News of her untimely death caused a great shock to old friends here. She is survived 
by the stricken husband, her father and mother, and six brothers and two sisters. 

********** January 8, 1920 

Further details of the death of Mrs. Clarence Ellis, which was reported in last 
week's news, have since reached us. Deceased underwent a serious operation five weeks 
before she died, and passed away at the hospital in Sydney, MT., on Dec. 26th, at the 
age of 17 years, 5 months and 1 day. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Radke, 
former residents of this neighborhood but now of Sioux Pass, MT. 

********** January 15, 1920 

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Word was received here this week of the death of Fay W. Parslow at the Northern 
Pacific Hospital at Glendive, MT., on Tuesday, Jan. 13th. The remains were taken to 
Wendell, MN., where the funeral was held at the Presbyterian Church last Friday morning. 
Deceased was well known in Hankinson, being a brother of Henry C. Parslow, formerly 
Soo Agent here, and was employed in the Soo depot for a number of years. He was a model 
young man and well liked by everyone. 

Deceased was bom on July 5, 1878, and was united in marriage to Miss Mary Ash of 
Lawrence, MN., on June 14th, 1905. He is survived by his wife, four daughters, a sister 
and a brother. For the past few years he has been engaged in railroad work in Montana. 

********** January 22, 1920 

Chas. Leathart of Fairmount, Civil War Veteran and pioneer settler of the county, 
died in a Minneapolis Hospital yesterday where he had been under medical treatment for 
some time. Deceased served as postmaster at Fairmount for many years and was well known 
throughout the county. He is survived by a wife and a family of grown children. 

********** January 22, 1920 

Carl Neitzel, former resident of Brandenburg Township, died at the Breckenridge 
Hospital Tuesday. For some time he had been employed in a mine out in Montana and was 
stricken with a pulmonary ailment that resulted in his death. 

Relatives went to Montana and brought him back to the Breckenridge Hospital, where 
everything possible was done for his relief, but in vain. Deceased was a single man, 
about 45 years of age, and is survived by a number of relatives in this vicinity. He 
was well thought of and his untimely death is regretted by all. The funeral is being 
held this afternoon at St. John's Church in Belford, Rev. R. Hilgendorf, conducting the 
services. ^^^^^^^^^* January 22, 1920 

ERWIN FALLON DIES IN MINNEAPOLIS 
23 Year Old Son of Mr. and Mrs. Pat Fallon A Victim of the "Flu" 

A message was received here this morning announcing the death last evening, in Minn- 
eapolis, of Erwin Fallon, 23 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Fallon, formerly of Elm; 

The entire family is ill with the "flu" and no arrangements for the funeral have yet 
been made. Whether the remains are to be brought here for burial is not yet decided. 

News of Erwin' s death comes as a great shock to old friends of the family in this 
vicinity as it was not known that he was ill. He was a native of Elma Township and grew 
to manhood here, leaving with the family for the city only a few months ago. 

The oldest daughter, Grace, died suddenly only a few months ago and the sympathy 
of all goes out to the stricken family in their bereavement. 

********** January 29, 1920 

BRECKENRIDGE CHILD BURNED TO DEATH 
Robert Matheson, 3 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Matheson of Breckenridge, 
died at the St. Francis Hospital in that city Sunday from burns received last Thursday. 

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After putting the child to bed Thursday afternoon, the mother went to a neighbor's 
home. During her absence the child left the bed, drew a chair up to the stove and poured 
kerosene into the fire. The flames leaped up and caught the child's clothing, causing 
severe burns. 

In a few minutes the mother returned. The child had crawled back into bed in an 
attempt to conceal the burned clothing. He was taken to the hospital and died Sunday 
after three days of agony. ********** j^^^^^y 29, 1920 

Charley Boldt, 18 years old, is still suffering from the effects of a kick by a 
horse received about four months ago and was taken this week to Rochester, MN., for exam- 
ination by the Mayos. His brother and Emil Medenwaldt accompanied him on the trip, the 
former remaining with him. Emil returned yesterday and was on the Soo train that was 
wrecked near Annandale Tuesday evening. He suffered no injuries beyond a lively shaking 
up. Theo Tiegs acted as substitute carrier for him during his absence. 

********** January 29, 1920 

Erwin Fallon, whose death was reported in last week's NEWS, was buried in a Minn- 
eapolis Cemetery. All other members of the family were down with the "flu" and it was 
impossible for them to accompany the body to this city and for this reason interment was 
made in Minneapolis . 

********** February 5, 1920 

Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Phelps left Saturday evening for Litchfield, MN., to attend the 

funeral of Mr. Phelps' mother, which was held Sunday afternoon. Deceased passed away 

a couple of days before the date, and the end was sudden and unexpected. She was one of 

the pioneer residents of Litchfield. 

********** February 12, 1920 

Roy Black, conductor on the F. & V. Line, dropped dead of heart disease while in 
the performance of his duties between Hillside and Veblen on Friday of last week. 

Deceased was well known in this part of the county, having formerly resided in 
Fairmount, but for the past few years the family has resided in Grenville, SD. Deceased 

is survived by a wife and three sons Sargeant Leo Black of Hankinson's old Company L., 

George and Jesse. The remains were shipped to the old home at Oshkosh, WI., for burial. 

********** February 12, 1920 

PATHETIC DEATH OF LITTLE LEONA TRAPP 

The death of Leona Trapp, U year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Trapp, of 
Karnak, ND., which occurred at Rochester, MN., on Wednesday night of last week, was most 
pathetic. The little girl had undergone four surgical operations during her brief life- 
time and was recovering nicely from the last one when bronchial penumonia set in, and in 
her weakened condition she lacked the vitality to withstand the attack. 

Leona was the only child of Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Trapp and was born in Mc Lean County 
eleven years ago. The Trapps are well known here, having formerly resided in the Sonora 

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area and Mrs. Trapp is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Brackin. For the past several 
years the little girl resided with her parents near Kamak, ND. She was fairly idolized 
by her parents and beloved by all who knew her. Through years of sickness and pain, she 
maintained a sunny disposition and her untimely death is a sad bereavement. 

The body was bought to Hankinson and funeral services held at the Congregational 

Church Sunday afternoon, services being conducted by Rev. Doty of Oakes that being the 

one last request made by the little girl. Interment was made in Hillside Cemetery. 

********** February 12, 1920 

Three track workers on the Soo Line were killed last Friday when train #108 hit the 
gasoline speeder on which they were riding half a mile out of Rogers, in Barnes County. 

Gust Wallin and Joe Urban, died instantly and C. S. Dacher, died on an interurban 
car while being taken from the Soo Depot to the Valley City Hospital. 

********** February 19, 1920 

CHARLES BOLDT DIED AT ROCHESTER LAST FRIDAY 

Charles Boldt died at the Rochester Hospital Friday morning, Feb. 13th, at 4 o'clock 
He was sent there for treatment three or four weeks ago and preparations for an operation 
were being made when he was taken suddenly worse and continued to fail until death relieve 
his sufferings. The surgeons stated that he had long been a sufferer from tuberculosis of 
the intestines and this was aggravated by a kick from a horse last fall, since which time 
he has been under continuous medical treatment. 

Deceased was 18 years and 2 days old at the time of his death and was a son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Boldt, Sr., prominent farmers residing southwest of this city. He was 
bom here and lived in this neighborhood all his life. Besides the stricken parents he 
is survived by three brothers and three sisters. 

The remains were brought back to this city and funeral services were conducted at 

the Immanuel Ev. Church Tuesday afternoon by Rev. C. Oberdoester. Interment was made 

in the cemetery southwest of the city. 

********** February 19, 1920 

PIONEERS TAKEN BY GRIM REAPER August D. Abraham and Mrs. Carl Popp, Sr. 

EARLY RESIDENTS PASS AWAY 

Mr. Abraham's Death Due to Cancer of the Stomach Funeral This Afternoon 

Mother Popp Settled in Richland County in 1873 One of the First Wild Rice Homesteaders 

MRS. CARL POPP, Sr. 

Mrs. Carl Popp, Sr., affectionately known throughout the Great Bend neighborhood 
as Mother Popp, died at her home in that village last Sunday evening at 7 o'clock, at 
the age of 86 years. 

Deceased was one of the very earliest settlers in Richland County, locating with 
her husband and children on a farm near Great Bend in 1873. For more than forty-five 
years she has resided in that neighborhood, and passed away at a ripe old age followxng 

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a paralytic stroke less than 24 hours before. She was in good health up to the day of her 
death and was a familiar figure in the village, beloved by all and honored as one of the 
oldest and earliest of the Wild Rice Pioneers. 

Deceased was a native of Germany, born on Dec. 12, 1833, and was united in marriage 
to Carl Popp in the old countiTr. They came to America in 1868, locating first in Iron Ridge, 
WI. Five years later they came to Dakota where they settled on a homestead along the Wild 
Rice River. About 22 years ago they moved to Great Bend Village where the husband died 
fourteen years ago. For the past few years she has made her home with her son, F. J. Popp 
of that village. 

Deceased is survived by three sons and two daughters Carl Popp of Wahpeton, Wm. 

Popp of Hankinson, Frank Popp of Great Bend, Mrs. Albert Bemdt of Yakima, WA., and Mrs. 
John Swanson of Seattle, WA. One brother, Herman Strubel, resides in Portland, OR., and 
one sister, Mrs. Fred Padritz, at Marshfield, WI. 

The funeral was held Wednesday afternoon at Great Bend and was attended by a large 
number of old time friends. The services were conducted at the Zion Church by Rev, Burkhardt 
and burial was made in the Great Bend Cemetery. 

********** February 26, 1920 

GREAT BEND EXAMINER. .. .Life's long journey came to an end for Mrs. Carl Popp, Sr., 
when she succumbed to a stroke which occurred Sunday morning. She had been in fair health 
right along until Saturday night when she was taken ill and died in a few hours. Burial 
was made in the Evangelical Cemetery Wednesday, Rev. Burkhardt conducted the services. 

Mrs. Carl Popp was bom in Germany and came to this country in 1868. The family 
first settled at Iron Ridge, WI. Five years later they came to North Dakota where they 
settled on a farm and later moved to Great Bend where she lived until her death. She was 
86 years old and is survived by three sons and two daughters: Mrs. Albert Bemdt, living 
at Yakima, WA. , Mrs. John Swans of Seattle, WA. , Carl Popp of Wahpeton, Wm. Popp of Hank- 
inson and F. J. Popp of this village. 

The whole community extends sympathy to the relatives in their bereavement . 

********** February 26, 1920 

AUGUST DANIEL ABRAHAM 

August D. Abraham, pioneer resident and business man of Hankinson died at Hot Springs, 
AR., at 3 o'clock last Saturday morning after months of suffering from cancer of the stomach 

The remains were shipped back to this city and the funeral was held this afternoon 
with services at the home, conducted by Rev. J. S. Rood. Burial was made in Hillside Cemete 

August Daniel Abraham was bom in Germany on Feb. 12th, 1866, and was 64 years old at 
the time of his death. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Gottlieb Abraham, emigrated to America in 
1870 when the subject of this sketch was 4 years old. They settled in Wisconsin where the 
children grew up. About 35 years ago, desirous of starting out for himself, young August 
came to Dakota Territory and settled in Richland County. For several years he farmed in wha 
is now Greendale Township, and on Nov. 21st, 1889, he was married to Sarah Bladow, who sur- 
vives him. Tiring of the farm, the family moved to Hankinson ...5 years ago where Mr. 

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Abraham engaged in the livery business for a time, and later conducted a dray line for 
several years. Still later he engaged almost exclusively in the business of building 
mover and became known throughout this part of the country as one of the most expert and 
reliable movers in the business. It is doubtful if any man in North Dakota has moved more 
buildings or done the work better than August Abraham. 

Deceased was the father of six surviving children. .. .Mrs. Olga Umbreit of this city, 
Mrs. Emma Pakie of Grand Forks, ND., Elizabeth and Doris who are still at home, Edwaldt of 
Hankinson and Walter of Minneapolis. Edwaldt arrived at Hot Springs just a few hours before 
the end and made the sorrowful journey back with the remains. 

Deceased was respected and esteemed by all who knew him. He was industrious almost 
to a fault, working many times when he was physically unfit. He was a kind husband, always 
considering the welfare of the family, and an indulgent and giving father. He was a member 
of the Modern Woodmen for many years, providing in this way in a measure for the future wel- 
fare of his family. 

Besides the widow and children, he is survived by four sisters, Mrs. Smith, who resides 
in California, Mrs. Julia Heling of this city, Mrs. Ferdinand Hoefs and Mrs. Theo. Heling 
of Portland, OR. Several other sisters have passed away. 

The funeral was held this afternoon with services, conducted by Rev. J. S. Rood, at 
the home. Active pallbearers were G. Bergman, D. S. Mc Ilwain, S. Woolsey, Albert Lorenz, 
Peter Hentz, and Herman Kamke. Honorary pallbearers representing the Modem Woodman were: 
Chas. Hein, W. A. Aim, John R. Jones, Jr., W. A. Heley, Frederick Krause and A. W. Brown. 
Interment was made in Hillside Cemetery. 

********** February 26, 1920 

HAROLD KNUTSON 

Harold Knutson, nine year old grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Salzwedel of this city, 
was drowned in the James River at Jamestown on Tuesday. He was watching fishermen on the 
ice and slipped into one of the holes used by the men. Disappearing under the ice all 
efforts to rescue him were unavailing. The body has been bought to Hankinson for burial 
and funeral services will be held at the Immanuel Ev. Church on Friday afternoon at 2 o'cloc 

The stricken parents and other relatives have the sympathy of all in their sad be- 
reavement. ^^^^^^^^^^ February 26, 1920 

DETAILS OF THE DROWNING OF LITTLE HERBERT KNUTSON 

Last week The NEWS mentioned the drowning of Herbert Knutson, 9 year old grandson of 
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Salzwedel of this city, at Jamestown on Tuesday of last week. The body 
was brought to Hankinson for burial, services being held last Friday. The following account 
of the accident is taken from the Jamestown Daily Alert: 

Further details of the drowning early Tuesday afternoon of little Herbert Knutson, 
the nine year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Knutson, of 714 Fourth Ave. So., were given 
today by Mrs. J. L. Teves, of 320 Sixth Ave. S., in whose home the body was taken after it 
had been recovered from the water by Mr. Teves. 

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It seems that the little Knutson boy came by the Teves home at just about 12 o'clock 
and said he was going fishing in the river just above the dam. The boy carried no fishing 
tackle, but had a small gunnysack. Mr. Teves went down near the river soon afterward and 
saw the boy on the ice but returned to the house in a few minutes to feed the chickens. 
Upon returning to the river again, Mr. Teves said, the boy was nowhere to be seen, but that 
his gunnysack was lying on the ice near the edge of the water. At first Mr. Teves thought 
that the boy had merely gone home and left his sack on the ice after having become disgust- 
ed with an unsucessful attempt to catch fish without the aid of tackle. 

Going nearer to the open water, however, Mr. Teves discovered a small mitten floating 
upon the water and a moment later the other mitten and a stocking cap, which he recognized 
as belonging to the little Knutson boy. Mr. Teves jumped into the water as soon as he was 
convinced that the boy had fallen in and with the assistance of some men, whom he called to 
his aid, located the body. The body was taken to the Teves home and a physician summoned 
by telephone but all efforts to resuscitate the boy failed. Mr. Teves also notified the 
Chief of Police. 

Less than forty minutes had elapsed from the time little Herbert stopped at the Teves 
home on his way to the river and the time of the announcement of the physician that all eff- 
orts at resuscitation were in vain. Herbert was a playmate of the little Teves boy, who is 
seven years old, and Mrs. Teves said that they had often played near the river together. 
The water where the drowning occurred is about four or four and a half feet deep and seldom 
if ever, freezes. ********** March 4, 1920 

Robert B. Nelson, son of Senator and Mrs. E. M. Nelson of Fairmount, died at Mohall 
last week of the flu with pneimionia complications. He was 27 years old and unmarried. The 
remains were shipped back to Fairmount for burial. 

********** March 4, 1920 

Hankinson friends of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. C. Hanewald of Bismarck sympathize with them 
in the loss of their only child, a 2h year old son, which occurred last week. Mrs. Hane- 
wald was Miss Marvel Brandt prior to her marriage. 

********** March 4, 1920 

Word has been received here of the death of Christopher Meyer, pioneer Hankinson resi- 
dent, at Cornelius, DR., on Feb, 20th. The Meyer brothers were bachelors and ran a black- 
smith shop on the old mill street up to about 18 years ago when they moved to Oregon. They 
were thrifty and had acquired a comfortable little fortune. 

********** March 4, 1920 

Oren E. London, who formerly worked for John Coppin and is quite well known in this 
vicinity, was instantly killed by a train which struck the motor truck he was driving near 
Largo, Florida, recently. News of his death comes to us in the form of a letter from his 
mother, Mrs. Amy Londaon who states that deceased had cousins in this part of the country 
but she does not know their address. The accident happened while London was attempting 

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to cross the track ahead of the special train carrying railroad officials. He did not 
notice the train until on the crossing and the truck was overturned. London, being thrown 
against the train and instantly killed. 

********** March 4, 1920 

Word was received here late last week of the death of Herbert Lloyd, pioneer resid- 
ent of Greendale Township. He was visiting relatives in Missouri and fell a victim to the 
flu which developed into pneumonia, causing his death. 

Deceased was about 50 years old. He left here a dozen or fifteen years ago and 
settled on a homestead near Edmonton, Canada. He was married there but domestic trouble 
led to a separation. There were two daughters and he was given the custody of one of them 
by the courts. This daughter afterward married and is the heir to the estate, which is 
said to consist of a section and a half of land besides a lot of stock and other personal 
property. 

Deceased was a member of the Hankinson camp of Modem Woodman and carried a policy 
in the order made payable to the daughter. Deceased was formerly a resident of Neenah, WI., 
and the remains were shipped to that place for burial. 

********** March 4, 1920 

Walter, little 11 month old son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Medenwaldt, died Monday after 
a few days illness of pneumonia. The funeral is being held this afternoon with services 
conducted by Rev. J. P. Klausler at the Lutheran Church. The parents have the sincere 
sympathy of all in the loss of their little son. 

********** March 11, 1920 

LIDGERWOOD PASTOR DIES WHILE ON LEAVE 
Rev. E. J. G. Reid, pastor of the Methodist Church at Lidgerwood, died last Friday 
in Oregon where he had been for two months on a vacation. 

The body was shipped back to Lidgerwood where the funeral was held this week. He is 
survived by his widow, one son and three daughters. 

Mr. Reid has been pastor of Methodist Churches at Asley, Steele, Washburn, Tower City 
and Lidgerwood. He has been prominent in the work of the Methodist Church in the northwest 
for many years. ********** March 18, 1920 

ANOTHER PIONEER CALLED TO HER FINAL REWARD 
It is again our sad duty to record the passing of another Richland County Pioneer, 
Mrs. Fritz Milbrandt, who died at her home in Waldo, southeast of this city, on Saturday, 
at the age of 82 years, 10 months and 2 days. She had been failing for the past couple of 
months and the end was not unexpected. 

Deceased was born in Germany and came to Richland County with her husband in the earl> 
days, settling on a homestead near Lightning's Nest where she has resided ever since. 

She is survived by five children Carl Milbrandt, Mrs. Fred Gutzmer, Mrs. Robert 

Grohnke, Mrs. Wm. Wohlsdorf and Julius Milbrandt, with whom she made her home. 

The funeral was held on Wednesday with services at the Emmanuel Ev. Church by Rev. 

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C. Oberdoester . Interment was made in the cemetery southwest of this city. 

********** ^^^^ ^g^ J920 

TRAGEDY OF THE GREAT WAR 
I-IRS. GEORGE FOWLDS HEARS OF DEATH OF BOTH PARENTS IN AUSTRIA 

First Word Comes From Son Who Was in Austria Throughout the War Says Conditions 

are Indescribable Among Common People of Central Europe Will Come to America 



Tragedies of the late war are not yet ended as is shown by a letter received by Mrs. 
George Fowlds late last week. Her parents and her only son were in Austria when the war 
broke out and the letter received last week was the first news she had received since the 
war began. It conveyed the sad intelligence that her parents had both died from hardships 
incident to the war, and her son is in poor health as a result of privations endured. 

Mrs. Fowlds' parents were in comfortable circumstances before the war but lost all 
of their property. The letter from her son recites a terrible condition in that country, 
with thousands of people almost starving to death, and says that food is almost prohibit- 
ive in price. Mrs. Fowlds inmediately made arrangements to send money to care for his 
temporary wants and is endeavoring to have him come to the United States at an early date. 

********** March 25, 1920 

Mrs. E. L. Green was called to St. Paul Saturday by the critical condition of her 
brother, I. Ciemenski, who passed away at the hospital an hour before her arrival. Dec- 
eased was ill with the flu in France during the war, a siege of pneumonia followed and 
later on tuberculosis ensued. For the past several months he was in Denver, but came 
back a short time ago and has since been in the hospital. The funeral was held at the 
old home in Winona, MN. , on Monday. 

********** March 25, 1920 

GRIM REAPER TAKES HEAVY TOLL 
Four Deaths of People Well Known in Hankinson 
ALBERT BERNDT, CARL ZIEGELMAN, MRS. JAMES STEPHENS AND MRS. E. A. ERLANDSON CALLED 

TO THE GREAT BEYOND TWO WERE EARLY PIONEERS OF THE COUNTY 

Mrs. E. A. Erlandson 
Mrs. Agnes Erlandson passed away at the family home twelve miles south of Hankinson, 
just across the state line, on Thursday, March 25th, 1920, at the age of 32 years, 11 mon- 
ths and 24 days. She contracted tuberculosis following an attack of flu a year and a half 
ago and the end was not unexpected as she had been steadily failing for several months. 

Agnes Arneson was bom in Ottertail County, MN., where she grew to young womanhood, 
removing with her parents to Palermo, ND. There, in 1922, she was married to E. A. Erland- 
son. The young couple made their home in the Palermo neighborhood up to two years ago 
when they came back to Mr. Erlandson' s old home south of this city where they have since 
resided. 

The untimely death of Mrs. Erlandson leaves a stricken husband and three motherless 
little girls to mourn her loss. She is also survived by the parents, two sisters and one 

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brother, all of whom reside at Palermo. The mother has been at the Erlandson home since 
last July and the funeral was attended by another sister, Mrs. L. 0. Lysan and husband. 

Funeral services were held at the Lutheran Church south of old Vernon on Saturday. 
A large number of sorrowing friends of the family were in attendance. The sympathy of 
all goes out to the bereaved ones in their loss, 

********** April 1, 1920 

MRS. JAMES STEPHENS 

Word was received here on Tuesday of the death of Mrs. James Stephens at Alexandria, 
MN. She had been a sufferer from tuberculosis and other complications and had been fail- 
ing rapidly for the past few weeks. 

We have no data from which to prepare an obituary. Deceased was the wife of James 
Stephens and the family resided in Hankinson for several years and prior to that were on 
a farm near here. They conducted a rooming house here for a long time and deceased was 
well known. 

Besides the husband, she is survived by five sons. Her death occurred last Monday 
and the funeral was held on Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock PM., at Alexandria, inter- 
ment being made in the Alexandria Cemetery. 

********** April 1, 1920 

CARL ZIEGELMAN 

Carl Ziegelman, pioneer settler of the Great Bend neighborhood, died at his farm 
home 5^ miles southeast of that village on Sunday, March 28th, 1920, at the age of 63 
years, 11 months and 10 days. He had been a sufferer from pulmonary troubles for a long 
time and had been gradually failing for several weeks. 

Deceased was a native of Germany where he grew to manhood and married. In 1893 the 
family migrated to the United States, and after a month spent in Michigan came to Rich- 
land County, locating on a farm S^s miles southeast of Great Bend, where he resided up to 
the time of his death. 

He was married three times, and is survived by the widow and five children. .. .Mrs. 
Herman Brandt of this city, G. C. Ziegelman of Chicago, Carl Ziegelman, Jr., Robert Zie- 
gelman and Paul Ziegelman of Anamoose, ND. 

Deceased was a kindly old gentleman and had many friends among the old timers of 
the Great Bend neighborhood. The funeral is being held at the Lutheran Church south of 
Great Bend today, Rev. T. Hinck conducting the services. Interment will be made in the 
cemetery near by. ********** April 1, 1920 

ALBERT BERNDT 

William Popp received a message on Monday announcing the death of Albert Bemdt 
at his home in North Yakima, WA. He had been in poor health for a long time, suffering 
from a nervous ailment, but his old friends here did not know that his condition was 
critical and news of his death came as a great shock. 

Deceased was about 64 years old and was one of the earliest pioneers of Richland 

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County. He was here in the flatboat days on the Red River, away back in the 70 's and 
was one of the few survivors of the time when the Red River Valley was on the edge of 
the frontier. l-Jhen the Great Bend settlement first started he filed on a homestead two 
miles west of that village and resided there for many years. 

After retiring from the farm he lived in the village for a few months and later 
spent a year or so in California, but again returned to Great Bend. Two years ago or 
a little less, he moved to North Yakima, WA. , where he resided up to the time of his death. 

He is survived by two children. . .Paul, who resides at North Yakima, and Mrs. Ed 
Anderson, who is also a resident of North Yakima, after living in California for several 
years. Mrs. Grohnke of this city is a sister of the deceased. 

William Popp, whose sister is left a widow by the death of Mr. Bemdt, left on Tues- 
day morning for North Yakima to make arrangements for the funeral, but did not know at 
the time he left whether the remains would be brought back to Richland County or not. 

********** April 1, 1920 

PIONEER WAHPETON RESIDENT IS DEAD 

Thomas Mc Michael, resident of Wahpeton for thirty years, died of heart failure at 
his home in that city at 6 o'clock Tuesday morning. Deceased was well known over the 
county and is survived by the widow, two sons, Louis of Wahpeton and Fred of Chicago, 
one daughter, Victoria, of Chicago; and two brothers, Anthony E. and Robert V., of Wah- 
peton. ********** April 8, 1920 

J. R. Baker, former Soo agent at Lidgerwood, was overcome and suffocated by gas 
while overhauling his auto at Cogswell one evening last week. The car had been started 
in a small garage and the fumes killed him. He was a pioneer Soo employee, having been 
agent at Towanda, near Cogswell, in 1898 and at other points since. He had charge of 
the Nicholson station at the time of his death. 

********** April 8, 1920 

Luvern Vema, little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Brummund, died at the farm home 
just out of town, Tuesday evening at the age of about 3% years. The little one was taken 
ill with measles some time ago and complications ensued that resulted in her death. The 
parents have the sincere sympathy of all in their bereavement. The funeal was held this 
afternoon. Rev. J. P. Klausler conducting the services at the Lutheran Church. 

********** April 8, 1920 

FIRST FATAL AUTO ACCIDENT OF THE SEASON 

Mrs. Henry Claus was instantly killed last night as the result of an automobile 
accident. Mr. and Mrs. Claus had taken a ride to the home of friends in Bale Township, 
and on the return, while yet ten miles from their home, the auto swerved and hit an 
obstruction. The unfortunate woman was hurled through the windshield out upon the 
ground with such force that her neck was dislocated. She had received a mortal injury 
and soon the spark of life went out. The remains were brought to the Claus home in 
the south part of Lisbon. The grief stricken husband and four children are left to mourn 

(78) 



her loss. It was truly a sad and regrettable accident LISBON FREE PRESS, 



********** April 15^ 1920 

FATHER AND SON DIE yiTHIN AN HOUR 

Abercrombie, ND., April 14th A. A. Barboe died yesterday, and within an hour his 

son, Albert, who seemed well and able to be up and around, was dead. 

A double funeral will be held Friday afternoon from the Richland Church near here. 
The elder Barboe, more than 70 years old, was regarded as one of the real pioneers of Rich- 
land County. ********** April 15, 1920 

Ella Ziegelman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Ziegelman, died at the Wahpeton Hospital 
Saturday morning after an illness extending over several weeks. Deceased was bom near 
Great Bend twenty years ago this month and resided in Richland County all her life. 

She is survived by the parents, two brothers and six sisters, all of x^jhom, with the 

exception of one brother who is in California, were here for the funeral which was held 

yesterday afternoon, services being held at the Church just south of Great Bend of which 

Rev. T. Hinck is pastor. 

********** April 15, 1920 

Earl P. Owens, said to be the oldest settler in northeastern South Dakota is dead at 
Waubay at the age of 8A years. He came to eastern South Dakota in 1856 and recalled up to 
his death the herds of buffalo over what is now Day, Roberts and Grant Counties. He spent 
the early days about Fort Sisseton, which was headquarters for whites from all parts of the 
eastern section of the state. 

********** April 15, 1920 

The ten months old son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Holzhauer, residing doxjn near the state 
line, died Friday morning of pnevimonia after a brief illness. The funeral was held Sunday, 
services being conducted by Rev. Cloeter in the church near the Holzhauer home. The parents 
have the sincere sympathy of all in the loss of their little one. 

********** April 22, 1920 

The baby son of Mr. and Mrs. Aug. Ziegelman, Jr., of Great Bend, died last Thursday 
night of pneumonia, at the age of 7 months and 11 days. The funeral was held on Sunday 
at the Lutheran Church south of Great Bend, Rev. T. Hinck conducting the services. The 
sorrowing parents have the sjrmpathy of all in the loss of their little one. 

********** April 29, 1920 

Word has been received at Wyndmere that Mrs. F. H. Delaney was burned to death when 
her home at Clarkson, WA., was destroyed by fire recently. Mr. Delaney formerly conducted 
a store at Wyndmere, but the family moved to Washington about 15 years ago. 

********** April 29, 1920 

Walter Ziegelman, 7 months old, son of Mr. and Mrs. August Ziegelman, died of pneumonia 
Thursday after a short illness. Burial was made at the Lutheran Cemetery on Sunday, Rev. 

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T. Hinck, conducting the services. We extend our heartfelt sympathy to the family in 

their bereavement. GREAT BEND EXAMINER... 

********** Apriir29, 1920 

ABERCROIIBIE MAN KILLED BY MAIL TRAIN 
Ole Nelson, 46, was killed Sunday afternoon when the fast mail train on the Great 

Northern struck his automobile on a highway crossing two miles south of Wolverton, MN. 

Mr. Neslon was on his way home when the accident occurred. 

For several months Mr. Nelson had conducted a blacksmith shop at Abercrombie. The 

widow and four children survive. 

********** j^gy g 1920 

N. N. Constans of Sioux Falls, SB., spent the latter part of last week here erecting 
a beautiful memorial over the grave of his wife, nee Spreckels, who died last fall. The 
memorial is rather unique. A massive block of northwest granite, roughly hewn, is the 
main part of the memorial, and on a smooth sloping surface is a solid bronze tablet on 
which is sculptured an excellent likeness of the deceased with an appropriate tribute 
lettered in metal. Mr. Constans devoted a great deal of time and thought to the memorial 
and has certainly achieved gratifying results. 

********** I^y 5^ 1920 

Richland County Farmer. .. .Miss Susan Glasner, of St. Paul, died at the home of her 
sister, Mrs. Matt Braun, 18 Dakota Avenue. The body was shipped for burial to the home 
of her sister Mrs. Peter Kaiser, near White Rock, SD., where funeral services were held 
yesterday morning. Miss Glasner was 45 years old and had been an invalid for some time. 
She came here from St. Paul last winter and had since made her home with her sister here. 

********** May 13, 1920 

Miss Veronica Bernard, daughter of Mrs. Mary Bernard, died at the home of her mother 
in Wahpeton last Thursday, at the age of 28 years. Death was due to tuberculosis which 
developed following an attack of influenza about a year ago. 

********** May 20, 1920 

Mary Honl, wife of Hubert Honl, died at the family home in Lidgerwood on Tuesday, 
May 11th, after a lingering illness which was not considered serious until a few days 
before the end. Deceased was 58 years old and is survived by the husband and six child- 
ren. The Honls, were at one time residents of Hankinson, Mr. Honl being a partner of 
Henry Hoffman in the blacksmith business. They left Hankinson about 20 years ago and 
were for many years residents of Liberty Grove Township, but for the past 6 or 7 years 
have lived in Lidgerwood. The funeral was held at St. John's Church in Lidgerwood last 
Thursday morning. ('^^ ********** May 20, 1920 

News was received here this week of the death of Fred G. Merrick, a pioneer Hankin- 
son resident, of pneumonia at his home in Marysville, WA., on May 12th. Deceased was 
well known among the pioneers of this section and was engaged in the insurance business 

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here. He was also village justice of the peace back in the days when the late Robert 
Wessel was village marshal. In his early boyhood he suffered the loss of both hands by 
the premature discharge of a small cannon at a celebration, but despite this great handicap 
he was able to attend to his business affairs, writing very legibly by holding a pen in his 
teeth, and in many other ways was able to care for himself in a way that was astounding. 

The family left here about 18 years ago and have resided in Marysville, WA., ever since 
He is survived by a widow and an adopted son. Sympathy of many old time Hankinson friends 
is extended to the bereaved ones. 

********** May 20, 1920 

Edmond Schiller, little son of Mr. and Krs. Ed. Schiller of Wishek, but former resi- 
dents of Hankinson, died at the Bismarck Hospital Tuesday morning of blood poisoning. 

The little one was 3 years and 5 months old and blood poisoning resulted froma slight 
injury which became infected. The remains were brought to Hankinson and funeral services 
were held this morning at St. Philip's Church. The stricken parents have the sympathy of 
all in their loss. ^ ^ ^ ^ * * ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^^ 20, 1920 

CARD OF THANKS 
We take this means of expressing our heartfelt thanks ot the old friends in Hankin- 
son for the kindness shown and sympathy expressed in the loss of our little boy. It is 
comforting to know that our old friends thus feel for us in our bereavement. 

IGNATZ SCHILLER & FAMILY 
********** May 20, 1920 

Great Bend Examiner. .. .Mrs. Carl Boldt was called to the Great Beyond Friday after- 
noon. She had been ill for a long time, so her death was no surprise. Mrs. Boldt was 
born in Germany in 1851 and came to this country in 1879, first settling in Wisconsin. 

Two daughters, Mrs. Fred Koppelman and Mrs. E. H. Bohn, one brother, August Griepen- 
trog, and one sister, Mrs. E. Gehler, are left to mourn her departure. She was buried at 
the Lutheran Cemetery on Monday, Rev. T. Hinck conducting the services. 

********** May 27, 1920 

TWO ELMA CITIZENS CALLED TO THE BEYOND 
Peter Kinn and Reuben Shoemaker Answer the Final Summons 

PETER KINN 
Peter Kinn died at his home in Elma Township last Thursday night after an illness of 
several weeks, of hardening of the arteries and other complications. He is survived by the 
widow and five children. .. two sons and three daughters. He was 55 years old. 

Deceased was a native of Germany but had lived in this country since childhood. Many 
years ago he settled in Elma Township and was known as a thrifty, hard working man attend- 
ing strictly to his own affairs at all times. By industry and frugelity he accumulated a 
large fortune and was probably one of the largest individual holders of Liberty bonds in 
the county. He owned a fine farm and had numerous investments. 

A few months ago he started on a trip to California with the hope that a change of 

(81) 



climate might prove beneficial to his health but became worse and was obliged to return 
home after reaching Omaha. 

For some time prior to his death he had been failing but was able to be up and around 
to within a short time of the end. 

The funeral was held on Monday, services being conducted at St. Philip's Church by 
Rev. Jos. F. Studnlcka. Interment was made in the Catholic Cemetery south of this city. 

********** June 3, 1920 

REUBEN B. SHOEMAKER 

Reuben B. Shoemaker, aged 83, died at the Breckenridge Hospital Sunday after a short 
illness. He had been taken to the hospital but a few days before, suffering from a general 
breakdown. The body was shipped to the old home at Cedar Rapids, lA. , for burial. 

Deceased was born in Pennyslvania of Dutch stock, but little is known here in regards 
to his life. He was a veteran of the Civil War and drew a liberal pension. 

Many years ago he purchased a tract of land in Elma Township and about twelve years 
ago moved up here and has resided on the place ever since. His wife refused to come to 
North Dakota and he kept house alone, practically leading a life of a hermit. 

The wife subsequently died. Neighbors kept a watchful eye on Mr. Shoemaker as it was 
deemed unsafe for so old a man to live alone. He became ill a short time ago and neighbors 
persuaded him to go to the hospital where he passed away on Sunday. 

He is survived by two sons, William and Francis W., both middle aged men, who came 
here as soon as notified of their father's illness. The body was brought here to the 
Wipperman undertaking rooms from the hospital and prepared for shipment to the old home at 
Cedar Rapids, lA. Deceased was the owner of considerable property. Besides his Elma farm 
he had a section of land in Nebraska and other interests elsewhere. 

********** June 3, 1920 

EX-SERVICE MAN TAKES HIS OWN LIFE 
Howard F. Ogle, Residing Near Fairmount, Shot Himself Saturday Night 

Howard F. Ogle, 27 years old, died by his own hand at the farm home of his parents 
2k miles northwest of Fairmount some time during Saturday afternoon. Failing to return 
home at the usual supper hour, a search was made and the body was found in a grove about 
forty rods from the home with a bullet through the right temple which had been fired from 
a 22 calibre rifle which was lying at his side. 

The sheriff and coronor were called from Wahpeton but it was so plainly a case of 
suicide that an inquest was considered unnecessary. 

No motive is known for the young man's rash act. He was unmarried and lived with his 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Ogle. He was born March 30, 1894, at Toulon, IL. During the 
late war he was a private in Co. C, 13th Ammunition Train, entering the service on Aug. 
27th, 1918, at Wahpeton, and was stationed at Camp Lewis, WA. He was mustered out on Feb. 
2oth, 1919. 

The funeral was held Wednesday afternoon from the family home. Members of the Fair- 
mount post of the American Legion acted as pall bearers. june 3, 1920 

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Mrs. Walter Mace, Sr., mother of Mrs. F. 0. Hunger of this city, died at her home 

in Campbell, MN., Friday, after an illness extending over many months. Deceased had 

reached the advanced age of 86 years. The Hunger family attended the funeral, which was 

held at Campbell on Sunday. ********** 

********** j^^^ 3^ ^g20 

Many Hankinson people will remember Miss Rose Blom, a cousin of Mrs. C. H. McDonell, 
who visited here frequently a few years ago. She was married and living on a farm adjoin- 
ing the one on which the Turtle Lake murder was committed a few weeks ago. They were 
among the first ones to learn of the terrible affair and the shock was so great that she 
was taken violently ill, passing away a few days later at the Bismarck Hospital. 

********** j^^g 3^ J920 

Reuben Julius Skaare, 9 years old, son of John Skaare, a farmer residing near Christ- 
ine, was drowned in the Wild Rice River while bathing. 

********** j^^g ^Q^ J920 

Reuben Julius Skaare, 9, son of John Skaare, a farmer residing 2h miles southwest 
of Christine, was drowned in the Wild Rice River near the home one evening last week. He 
was playing with small brothers and sisters near the river when he disappeared. The water 
is about eight feet deep at the spot near which they were playing. The body was found 
the next day a long distance down the river from the scene of the tragedy. 

********** June 10, 1920 

SUDDEN DEATH RESULTS FROM HEART FAILURE 

Benjamin Thiele, son of Rev. and Mrs. G. C. Thiele, died of heart failure at the farm 
owned by his father north of Hankinson and known as the Paul Bemdt place, on Monday foreno. 

The young man was shingling on a new bam and was seen to slump down on the scaffold- 
ing where he lay still for a few moments. Before assistence could reach him he fell to 
the ground, ten feet below, and was probably dead when picked up. Dr. Mr Connell was summ- 
oned at once but the young man was dead long before he arrived. 

Deceased was 21 years of age on May 30th, and had spent most of his life in Richland 
County. He was unmarried making his home with his parents. Besides the parents he is sur- 
vived by four brothers. The family have the sincere sympathy of all in their great bereave 
ment. 

The funeral was held Wednesday afternoon with services at the home at 1 o'clock and 
an hour later at the church in Great Bend of which his father was formerly pastor. Inter- 
ment was made in the Great Bend Cemetery. 

********** June 17, 1920 

TWO BOYS DROWNED SUNDAY AFTERNOON 
Willard Jensen of Wyndmere and Alfred Weber of Barney Were the Victims 
Two Richland County youths were drowned Sunday afternoon while bathing. . .one in the 
Wild Rice River near Wyndmere and the other in Antelope Creek west of Barney. The names 
of the victims were Willard Jensen and Alfred Weber, both sons of prominent farmers. 

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Willard Jensen, 17 years old, with several companions, was bathing in the Wild Rice 
River near the Gust Selland place south of Wyndmere. With a single companion, a son of 
D, G. Nulph, he went up a stream a few rods where the water was about nine feet deep. 
Neither of the lads could swim and when they plunged in over their heads they were soon 
in trouble. The boys clinched and went down the third time before help arrived. When 
taken from the water young Jensen was too far gone to be revived and young Nulph was un- 
conscious for some time but was finally brought out all right. The Jensen boy was a son of 
Mr. and Mrs. N. C. Jensen, prominent farmers of Wyndmere Township. The funeral was held 
Wednesday. + + + + + + + + + + 

The other drowning occurred Sunday evening in Antelope Creek at a point three miles 
west of Barney. Alfred Weber, aged 15, with several boy chums, was in bathing and got 
beyond his depth. The stream was only a few feet wide but before his frightened companions 
could rescue him he had disappeared from sight beneath the muddy waters of the creek. The 
body was recovered within a short time. 

The Weber boy was a son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Weber who recently moved onto a farm 
in the neighborhood. The funeral was held Wednesday. 

********** June 17, 1920 

Joseph Hermes, pioneer settler of the St. Joe neighborhood, died at the home of his 
son, Jacob Hermes, in Wahpeton on Monday of last week. Deceased was bom ninety years ago 
at Sebenbach, Coblenz, Germany. He came to the United States in 1869 and settled at St. 
Joe, WI. Coming to Richland County in 1887, he settled in what is now known as the St. Joe 
neighborhood. For the past twenty years he has resided there but for the last few months 
made his home with his son in Wahpeton. Besides the one son, he is survived by a sister 
in Germany. There are 21 grandchildren and 29 great grandchildren. Funeral services were 
held at St. Joe Church and burial was made in the church cemetery. 

********** June 17, 1920 

Great Bend Examiner One of the saddest instances the world has known shocked the 

community beyond words Monday morning when Ben Thiele, son of Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Thiele, 

residing 3I5 miles west of town, died instantly of heart failure. He had been troubled 

with a weak heart practically all his life but during the past few years his health seemed 

to be perfect. Burial was made at the Evangelical Church on Wednesday, Rev. Burkhardt 

conducting the services. The whole community feels the loss and we express our heartfelt 

sympathy for the bereaved parents. 

********** June 17, 1920 

OBITUARY 

Benjamin Wm. Thiele, the second son of Rev. Gust Thiele and his wife Anna, was born 
at Corona, SD. , May 26th, 1899, and met his untimely death on June 14th, 1920. 

Benjamin, while a boy, suffered at various times from a defective heart and accord- 
ing to the doctor's statement one of these spells overtook him and caused his death. 

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tl 



Having received a faithful Christian training from early youth, Benjamin took an 
open stand for Christ during the meetings conducted by Rev. J. M. Baitinger three years 
ago, and during the same year passed a satisfactory examination in the catechism and 
received his diploma. He was also a faithful attendant of Sunday School and was a member 
of George Womer's class. The members of the class showed the high regard in which they 
held Bennie by a special floral offering and acting as pall bearers. 

He leaves to mourn, father and mother and four brothers. Among the friends and rel- 
atives from a distance who attended the funeral were: the parents of Rev. and Mrs. Thiele, 
a sister and two brothers, all of Milbank, SD. The remains were laid to rest in the Zion 
Cemetery at Great Bend. Rev. F. H. Brockmueller assisted the pastor. Rev. J. Burkhard. 

Great Bend Examiner.... ********** June Ik 1920 

ANOTHER PIONEER CALLED TO HIS FINAL REST 

Johan Schroeder, Richland County pioneer, died at the home of his son Emil Schroeder, 
east of Hankinson, on Monday, June 21st, 1920, at the age of 88 years. 

Johan Schroeder was bom at Grobtcha, Germany, Feb. 21st, 1832. He grew to manhood 
in the Fatherland and was married to Mina Wendt. They young couple came to the United 
States in 1856, locating at Mayville, WI., then known as the iron ridge country, where 
they lived for mnay years and where their eleven children were bom. Seven of these are 
living: Mrs. Fredericka Hein, Mrs. Mina Lenzen, Mrs. August Bellin, Mrs. Hulda King, John 
A. Schroeder, Emil Schroeder, Albert Schroeder and Mrs. Emma Paulson. While living in 
Wisconsin he was called to the colors during the Civil War, but the war ended before he saw 
active service. 

The family came to Dakota in 1881, settling near the present town of Mantador, later 
moving to a farm east of Hankinson. About fifteen years ago they moved to town, buying 
a home on the north side. Here the aged couple celebrated their fifieth wedding anniv- 
ersary fourteen years ago, but the wife died the following spring. Since her death he has 
made his home with his children, for the last few years with his son Emil, where he died. 

He had been in poor health for the past two months, suffering from the infirmities of 
old age, and the end was not unexpected. He is survived by 56 grandchildren and 20 great- 
grandchildren. Two brothers also survive, both of whom live in Wisconsin. 

Deceased leaves many old time friends among the pioneers with whom he shared the priv- 
ations and hardships of frontier life. He adds another to the large number of early sett- 
lers who have been called to their final reward. 

The funeral was held this aftemoon at the Immanuel Ev. Church, Rev. C. Oberdoester 
conducting the services. 

The pall bearers were all grandsons: Alfred Hein, Louis Schroeder, George Schroeder, 

Harry Schroeder, Harry King, Reinhart Bellin and Tony Lenzen. Interment was made in the 

family lot in the Ev. Cemetery. 

++++++++++ June 24, 1920 

CARD OF THANKS 
To the old friends and neighbors who gave assistance and sympathy in the loss of our 

(85) 



beloved father, we take this means of conveying our heartfelt thanks. 

Emil Schroeder and Family John Schroeder and Family 

Chas. Hein and Family E. A, King and Family 

R. Bellin and Family Mrs. Wm. Foeltz and Family 

Mrs. Peter Lenzen & Family Albert Schroeder 

********** July 1, 1920 

WYNDMERE MAN COMMITS SUICIDE 
Father of Ten Children Ends Life by Shooting, Monday Evening 
George E. Hanson, 55 years old, committed suicide at Wyndmere Monday evening shortly 
after 6 o'clock, by shooting himself through the head with a revolver. No motive is known 
for the rash act and it is presumed he was temporarily demented. 

Hanson was a comparative newcomer to Wyndmere, having moved to that place from Motley, 
MN. , a short time ago. He was a school teacher and also gave music lessons. 

Leaving his wife and ten children in Wyndmere he recently made a trip west in search 
of a new location. It was upon his return that he committed the act of self destruction. 
Sending one of his boys off on an errand, he entered an outhouse and fired a bullet into 
the side of his head, causing instant death. 

********** July i^ 1920 

TWO DROWNED IN LAKE ELSIE MONDAY 

Doris Mc Dougall and Leo Martin, both of Barney Neighborhood, Victims 

No Eye Witnesses to the Tragedy, but Presumption is that Boat Became Waterlogged... 
Bodies Recovered at Midnight Tuesday Girl was 18, Boy 20, Latter World War Veteran 



Doris Mc Dougall, 18 and Leo Martin, 20, were drowned in Lake Elsie about 9:30 PM on 
the night of July 5th. 

They were out on the lake after dark and no one witnessed the tragedy. The boat was 
a tin affair made for duck hunting and probably became waterlogged from a slow leak, going 
down in about eight feet of water and 100 feet from shore in the northwest comer of the 
lake. 

The young couple came to Lake Elsie in the afternoon of the 5th to take in a bowery 
dance. With them were a sister and younger brother of Doris. About 9 o'clock in the even- 
ing, Leo and Doris rented the boat and started out on the lake, going along the north edge 
of the lake and then turning south along the west side. They were lost from view in the 
gathering darkness. After being gone about two hours their friends became alarmed and 
started out in another boat in search of them. Nothing could be found to indicate their 
whereabouts and a general alarm was given. Owing to the intense darkness little could be 
done until the following morning, but at daylight the boat was found on the beach near the 
southwest corner of the lake, half filled with water. Later an oar was found, at another 
point a box that had been used as a seat in the boat and last and most significant the hat 
worn by the girl. This was identified by the father and no question remained as to their 

^^^^- (86) 



Recovery of the bodies was the next problem, and scores of people worked unremitt- 
ingly throughout the day and far into the night. Row boats were requisitioned from every 
available source, rafts were built hurriedly, and every effort was made to locate the 
bodies. This was rendered difficult by reason of the fact that there was no way of ascert- 
aining where the drowning had occurred. Other towns were reached by telephone and an eff- 
ort made to secure motor boats and dragnets. Darkness came with no results, then automo- 
bile spotlights and acetylene torches were brought into use. Hundreds of people from far 
and near visited the scene, ready to assist in any way possible. 

Shortly before midnight Alfred Hein, dragging the bottom on the west side of the lake 
and a considerable distance north of the Henry Foeltz home, discovered the bodies in about 
eight feet of water and approximately 100 feet from shore. They were only a few feet apart 

The bodies were brought to town and taken to the Wipperman Mercantile Undertaking 
Rooms, where Wednesday morning they were prepared for burial. 

The tragedy cast a pall of gloom over the entire community and was the main topic of 
conversation for two days. It was the irony of fate that the young couple went to their 
death within earshot of the bowery where scores of people were enjoying themselves dancing 
and without a thought of the sad tragedy being enacted only a few hundred feet away. 

The accident evidently occurred very close to 9:30 PM. The couple left the bowery 
and embarked about 9 o'clock. When the bodies were recovered the wrist watch on the girls' 
wrist had stopped at 9:35, which would indicate that the drowning occurred a few minutes 
before that hour. 

This is the second tragedy of the kind at Lake Elsie. It was about ten years ago 
that young Barker and one of the Spreckels girls were drowned in the same part of the lake. 

Doris Mc Dougall was one of a family of nine children and would have been eighteen 
years old on July 22nd. Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Mc Dougall, are pioneer residents 
of Antelope Township, their home being five miles north of Barney. Doris was bom there 
and has spent her entire life in the neighborhood. She was very popular with the young 
people and beloved by all for her many good qualities. The funeral will be held today 
interment being made in the Antelope Cemetery. 

The Martins are newcomers in the same neighborhood. The father came up from Iowa last 
fall and bought a farm near the Mc Dougall place but returned to Iowa, leaving Leo and two 
brothers and a sister to run the place here. Leo was the youngest of the brothers, being 
twenty years old. He was in the service during the war, serving two years in France, and 
wore his uniform and overseas cap at the time of his death. He was well thought of in 
the neighborhood and by those who had formed his acquaintance during the few months he had 
been in the county. The body was shipped to the old home at Sutherland, lA. , on Soo train 
i" 108 Wednesday for burial. ********** July 8, 1920 

Roy L. Tyson, son of R. A. Tyson, was killed in electric construction work at Wenat- 
chee, WA., on the 24th of June. His home was in Seattle whither his two brothers, Robert 
and Charlie, took the body for burial, which occurred on June 29th. Another workman was 

(87) 



killed at the same time and place but his name has not been learned. 

********** July 8, 1920 

Fred Wedel, 20 years old, was drowned in the James River just north of the Oakes bridge 
on Sunday. He went in bathing with half a dozen other boys who could not swim. He got 
beyond his depth and drowned before help could be summoned. 

********** July 15, 1920 

JOHN F. BAUM CALLED TO THE GREAT BEYOND 
Well Known Citizen Died Friday Morning After Lingering Illness 

John F. Baum, a resident of Hankinson for the past fifteen years, died at the home of 
his daughter, Mrs. Chas. Krause, in this city at 3 o'clock last Friday morning after many 
months of suffering from cancer of the stomach. 

Deceased was bom on Sept. 8th, 1859, at Wild Rose, WI., and most of his life was spent 
in that section. He grew to manhood there, engaged in the lumber industry and at the carp- 
enter trade. There he was married and raised a family of three children. It was about 15 
years ago that they came to Hankinson where he built a home and engaged in carpenter work 
and painting. His wife died on March 21, 1915, since which time he has lived, most of the 
time, with his daughter, Mrs. Krause. His health began failing a couple of years ago and 
he visited many specialists in an effort to secure relief. His ailment baffled medical 
science, however, and he continued to grow worse until death relieved his sufferings. He 
was 60 years, 10 months and one day old at the time of his death. 

Deceased was well thought of by all and his death is a matter of regret to a large 
circle of friends. He is survived by one son, George Baum, of Hancock, WI., and two daugh- 
ters, Mrs. George M. Dennhardt of Glenwood, MN., and Mrs. Chas. H. Krause of this city. All 
were here during his illness. He was an enthusiastic member of the Modem Woodmen of America. 

Brief services were held at the Krause home at 10 o'clock Friday morning conducted by 
Rev. J. S. Rood, and the remains were shipped to the birthplace of the deceased at Wild Rose. 
WI., where the funeral was held Saturday afternoon, with interment being made in the family 
lot where the wife was laid to rest five years ago. 

********** July 15, 1920 

DEATH OF AN OLD TERRITORIAL PIONEER 

A message was received here Wednesday announcing the death of M. M. Smart, step-father 
of W. J. Chapin of this city, at Malta, MT. He was stricken with heart failure on Monday, 
July 12, and died twenty four hours later. His death was sudden and unexpected as he had 
been in good health up to the time he was stricken. 

The body will arrive here tomorrow morning and funeral services will be held at the 
Chapin home. Interment will be made in Hillside Cemetery. 

Deceased was born in 1853 at Bangor, Maine, and was 67 years old. He came to Dakota 
territory in 1879 and was for a time engaged in freighting between Fargo and Tower City, 
before the days of railroads in that section. In 1885, he was married to Mrs. Eliza J. 
Chapin who survives him. The family resided at Lisbon for several years and later at Brit- 

(88) 



'! 



ton, SD., and still later located at Esmond, ND. About ten years ago they moved to Cham- 
bray, Sask, but disposed of their interests there this spring and returned to the states. 
Mrs. Smart had been visiting her children for the past few weeks while the husband looked 
up a new location, and it was while on this quest that the end came. 

Deceased is survived by the widow, three sons, one daughter, two step-sons and one 
step-daughter, also three brothers. Deceased had visited in Hankinson at intervals during 
the past twenty years and was known to some of our people. 

The sympathy of all goes out to the stricken ones in their bereavement. 

********** July 15, 1920 

At an early hour this morning, a few minutes after midnight, Mrs. Joe Schultz passed 
away at her home 5 miles northwest of this city, from complications following childbirth. 

Deceased was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. B. A. Foertsch, prominent farmers of the Moore- 
ton neighborhood, and was married to Joe Schultz 11 years ago. She was bom in Wisconsin 
and was 32 years of age last Oct. 12th. In addition to the sorrowing husband and parents, 
seven little ones are left to mourn the loss of a loving mother. Her untimely death comes 
as a great shock to scores of friends who have known her since childhood. The funeral will 
be held at Mantador Saturday morning at 10 o'clock. 

********** July 22, 1920 

AUGUST KATH DEAD AFTER LONG ILLNESS 

August F. W. Kath, a resident of Hankinson for many years, died at his home in this 
city Saturday evening, July 17th, at the age of 79 years. 

August Fredrick William Kath was bom on June 8th, 1841, at Pors near Bublitz, Pommeran, 
Germany. There he attended school and grew to manhood. On Sept. 24th, 1866, he was married 
to Louisa Held at Baldenburg, Germany. The young couple lived at various places in Germany 
and finally decided to emigrate to America. They arrived at Fairbault, MN., May 13th, 1893, 
and later moved on a farm near that city. On April 1, 1907, they came to Hankinson and for 
three years managed a farm 13 miles southwest of this place. Then the family moved to Hank- 
inson where they have resided ever since. On Sept. 23rd, 1916, the worthy couple took pleas- 
ure in celebrating their golden or 50th Wedding Anniversary. About a year ago the deceased 
began to weaken from the effects of advancing years, and gradually failed. After a week's 
illness in bed he passed away on July 17th, 1920, at 6 o'clock in the evening, passing 
peacefully into the last long sleep. 

Deceased was the father of nine children, six of whom, together with the aged widow, 
are left to mourn his loss. The surviving children are; Albert, of Waseca, MN., Charles, 
John, Fred, and Gustav of this city; William of Lyons, lA. There are also thirty grand- 
children and eight great-grandchildren, besides a large number of friends here and elsewhere. 

Funeral services were held at the Lutheran Church on Tuesday, July 20th, Rev. J. P. 
Klausler conducting the services, and burial took place in the Lutheran Cemetery. 

May he rest in peace. ********** July 22, 1920 

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Il 



Albert Kath of Faribault, MN., and daughter, Mrs. Emma Krueger of Fairbault, MN., 
were at the bedside of their father, Aug. Kath, who oassed away Saturday evening, and 
remained over for a short visit with relatives here. 

********** July 22, 1920 

CHILD'S BODY FOUND IN CISTERN AT FARGO 

The body of Gladys Livia Kurtz, three and one half year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Louis Kurtz, who was drowned in a cistern at her home in Fargo Monday afternoon, was ship- 
ped to the former Kurtz home at Dwight, where the funeral was held yesterday afternoon. 

The child, it is believed, fell into the cistern about 2:30 in the afternoon, shortly 
after several neighbor children who had been playing with her at her home, left the house 
and went outside. The Kurtz child was missed by her playmates and was found at 4:30 PM 
in the cistern, the lid of which had been removed. 

********** July 22, 1920 

JOHN R. FLETCHER, WELL KNOWN RAILROAD MAN, DEAD 

John R. Fletcher, a resident of Hankinson for the past six or seven years, died Stm- 
day morning at a Minneapolis Hospital where he had been under treatment for some time. His 
ailment was anemia and he had been steadily failing for several months. The end came as 
no surprise. 

Deceased was about 50 years old and was employed as Soo Line Engineer, running between 
Hankinson and Glenwood. He was industrious and it is probable the long hours put in on this 
run had a good deal to do with undermining his health. 

He is survived by the widow and six children, and the stricken family have the sincere 
sympathy of many friends in our city. Owing to the fact that the remains were taken to the 
old home at Gladstone, MI., where the funeral was held yesterday, the NEWS has been unable 
to secure data for a complete obitiaary. 

Deceased was well known in Hankinson and by Soo men all along the line. He was respected 
and esteemed by all. Mr. and Mrs. Rollins left the first of the week for Gladstone to 
attend the funeral which was held yesterday. 

********** July 22, 1920 

The many friends of Mr* and Mrs. Ed. O'Meara sympathize with them in the loss of their 
infant son who passed away Tuesday morning after a brief existence of two weeks, having 
been bom on Aug. 16th. ********** September 2, 1920 

CARL WALLMAN, PIONEER SETTLER, DIED TUESDAY 

Carl Wallman, a pioneer resident of Brightwood Township, died at his farm home just 
south of Lake Elsie on Tuesday, Sept. 7th, after a short illness. 

Deceased was born in Germany in 1855 and was married, in the fatherland, to Bertha 
Boldt, Nov. 14th, 1880. They came to America in 1884 and for many years have resided in 
Brightwood Township, developing a fine farm. 

Six children were bom to the couple, all of whom are living three sons: Willie, 

Gustav and Emil, all of whom are at home and three daughters: Mrs. Anna Godejohn of Great 

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Bend, Mrs. Marie Vedder and Mrs. Martha Vedder both of Hankinson. The widow also survives. 

The sympathy of all goes out to the bereaved family in their sorrow. The funeral will 
be held Friday at the German Immanuel Ev. Church and Rev. Oberdoester will conduct the ser- 
vice. ********** September 9, 1920 

LITTLE MARSHALL FORMAN CALLED BY HIS MAKER 

Marshall Lawrence, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Forman, Jr., died at the Wahpeton 
Hospital at 6 o'clock last evening (Wednesday) following an operation of acute appendicitis. 
He was taken ill Monday morning and 24 hours later was taken to the hospital where an oper- 
ation was performed at 9 AM., Tuesday. The appendix was found to be ruptured, and the little 
sufferer gradually weakened until he passed away the following evening. 

Marshall Lawrence Forman was bom on Oct. 25th, 1915, and would have reached the age 
of five years next month. He was an unusually sturdy little fellow, who was full of spirit 
and the idol of the household. Or sorrow is too deep to be expressed. 

But it is in times like this that the sjrmpathy and assistance of friends is really 
appreciated. Everything possible is being done by everyone, and the sympathy of our friends 
does much to soften our sorrow. It is conforting to realize that he has gone to a better 
world where he has joined the two little brothers, who have gone before. And we have faith 
that the three little ones are waiting to welcome us as the other members of the family are 
given the final summons. 

The funeral will be held tomorrow with services at the home at 1:30 PM., and at the 
Congregational Church at 2 o'clock. Burial will be made in the family lot in Hillside 
Cemetery. ^**^^**^** September 9, 1920 

TERRIBLE ACCIDENT AT COLFAX TUESDAY 

Morris Henry Larson, 11 years old, was instantly killed at Colfax Tuesday afternoon. 
With a younger brother he was playing beside the farmers elevator. His clothing became 
caught in a revolving shaft that protruded through the side of the building and he was 
whirled around against the ground and side of the building until the body was pounded into 
an unrecognizable mass. Arins, legs and other bones were broken and the skull crushed. 

Lans Larson, the father of the boy, is section foreman for the Great Northern at Colfax 

********** September 9, 1920 

Lorraine Amundson, 11 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Amundson, who reside across 
the South Dakota line, died at the Sisseton Hospital Tuesday, eight hours after she was 
operated on for diseased tonsils. The funeral will be held tomorrow. (Friday) 

********** September 9, 1920 

MAURICE FETTERSON CALLED TO HIS HEAVENLY HOME 

Maurice, 9 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur C. Petterson of Brightwood Toxmship, 
passed away at the Wahpeton Hospital a few minutes before midnight Tuesday, Sept. 14th, 
of leakage of the heart. He had been ill for some time and for the past month had been 
under treatment at the hospital. He was getting along nicely and was thought to be out 
of danger up to within a few hours of the end when he was suddenly taken with a turn for 

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the worse. 

Little Maurice was a patient sufferer, cheerful and happy throughout his long illness, 
and the fatal termination was a great shock to the bereaved family. He was the oldest of 
a family of five little folks. The writer joins with the many friends in extending sympathy 
to the family. 

The funeral was held this afternoon, services being conducted by Rev. J. S. Rood at the 
Congregational Church. The service was beautiful and the floral offerings bespoke the sor- 
row of many friends. The pall bearers were H. A. Merrifield, Silas Nims, Leo Chinberg, and 
W. J. Chapin. Interment was made in Hillside Cemetery. 

********** September 16, 1920 

DAN HOLDEN, WELL KNOWN HERE, FOUND DEAD IN FIELD 

Dan Holden, referred to in the following item from the Eden Valley Journal of Sept. 
16th, was well known in the vicinity of Hankinson, having been a resident of this neighbor- 
hood for several years. 

"Tuesday afternoon, James G. Pinch and John Jones found the dead body of Dan Holden 
in his potato patch. He had been dead for some time and his body was in a bad state of 
decomposition. The last seen of him alive, so far as we can learn, was when he was in town 
on Friday afternoon, four days before the body was found." 

********** September 23, 1920 

FATAL SHOOTING ACCIDENT AT LAKE TEWAKON 

A fatal shooting accident occurred south of Cayuga near Lake Tewaukon Tuesday when 
Raymond Keiffer, 7 year old son of Chas. Keiffer, was accidentally shot and killed by his 
little brother. While out hunting. Jack Paczkowski drove up to talk to his sister, Mrs. 
Keiffer. The youngsters climbed on the car and found the automatic shotgun, and while 
examining it the four year old boy pulled the trigger, shooting his brother through the 
head. Death was instantaneous. The funeral was held at Cayuga on Sunday, Rev. Father 

O'Brien conducting the service. 

********** September 23, 1920 

DEATH ENDS LONG ILLNESS OF H. M. AUTY 
Well Known Resident Succvimbs After A Lingering Illness 
Harry M. Auty, well known Soo Line employee and a resident of Hankinson for about 18 
years, died at his home on south Cannon Avenue Monday evening after an illness that has 
covered a period of more than a year. 

He was a victim of cancer of the stomach and only his indomitable will kept him alive 
for the past few months. Even as late as last Thursday he went hunting at the opening of 
the season as has been his custom for many years. Realizing that a fatal termination of his 
illness was inevitable, he displayed wonderful fortitude and courage during the long months 
of suffering. 

Deceased was a native of England. At the age of about 20 years he came to America and 
for more than a quarter of a century was in the employ of the Soo Railway Company, being 
round house foreman here for a long period and up to the time he was relieved of his duties 

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last February owing to his ill health. He was faithful to the company's interests at all 
times as he was in all the other relations of his life. Quiet and retiring in disposition 
he nevertheless conmanded the respect and esteem of everyone and his death is sincerely 
mourned by the entire community. He is survived by the wife and two sons who have the 
heartfelt sympathy of many friends in their great bereavement. 

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at the Congregational Church, Rev. J. 
S. Rood conducting the services. The local Masonic Lodge, of which deceased was a faith- 
ful member, attended in a body and had charge of the services. Interment was made in Hill- 
side Cemetery. ********** September 23, 1920 

Word was received at Lidgerwood last week of the death of Ralph Maxwell at Brockwell, 
Ontario, on August 28th. Deceased was one of the best known residents of our neighbor 
town for many years, having extensive interests there. For the past twelve years he was 
an invalid and was cared for at a sanitarium. He was 58 years of age at the time of his 
death. ********** September 30, 1920 

Word was received here Monday of the death of Ernest Simpson, Soo Line Conductor, at 
his home at Drake from Typhoid fever after an illness of several weeks. Deceased was well 
known here, having been on the Hankinson-Wishek run as brakeman several years ago. He is 
survived by a wife and little daughter. News of his death came as a shock to many friends 
here, as it was thought he was getting along nicely on the road to recovery. 0. Hagen, 
Soo Road Master, went to Drake and is accompanying the body to the old home in eastern 
Canada where interment will be made. 

********** September 30, 1920 

SHOCKING TRAGEDY AT ROSHOLT WEDNESDAY 

A shooting tragedy at Rosholt Wednesday afternoon resulted in the accidental death 
of Kenneth, seven year old son of Editor and Mrs. W. A. Farrington of the Rosholt Review. 

It was another of those many "didn't know it was loaded" tragedies. Kenneth, on his 
way home from school, came face to face with John Olson and a boy named Erickson, both 15 
years of age. Young Olson had a shotgun and as he met the little lad on the drug store 
corner of the village he pointed the weapon at the younger boy. The latter threw up his 
hands and said, "don't point that gun at me, it might be loaded." Almost at the same mom- 
ent young Olson pulled the trigger and the gun was discharged, the entire charge of shot 
striking the little lad in the breast after passing through the hands uplifted to protect 
himself. The shooting was at close range and death was instantaneous. 

The community is terribly wrought up over the sad affair. It transpires that both 
the Olson and Erickson boy had hunting licenses, issued them contrary to the law owing to 
their youth, and this led indirectly to the shooting as the boys were not entitled to 
licenses under the South Dakota laws, we understand. 

Editor Farrington had started for Wahpeton by auto but a short time before the shoot- 
ing and it was impossible to reach him until a phone message caught him at Wahpeton. 

Kenneth was the youngest of two sons, the only children in the family, and the stricken 

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parents are frantic with grief. The sympathy of every parent who has passed through a 
similar grief goes out to the Farrington family. 

********** October 7, 1920 

Carl Mohr died suddenly Friday after an operation for appendicitis. Burial was made 

at the St. Joe Cemetery on Monday. Mohr Brothers, of which Carl was a member recently sold 

out their farming interests and moved to Wahpeton to retire and take life easy. Deceased 

took sick about the time they arrived there and his unexpected death was a great shock to 

the old neighbors and friends. **4r***^a.^a. 

********** October 7, 1920 

FRED FALK KILLED BY CAVING DIRT 

Hankinson Lad Losses Life In Terrible Accident Wednesday Morning 

Buried in Dirt to His Armpits by Sudden Cave- In, Internal Injuries 

Resulted in Almost Instant Death Was Working on New Waterworks 

System on Remington Avenue 



Fred Falk, 19 years old, was almost instantly killed by the cave-in of a waterworks 
ditch in which he was working about 7:30 Wednesday morning. He was at the bottom of the 
ditch shoveling away quicksand when a section of the side caved in, burying him up to his 
armpits. Internal injuries resulted that caused his death by the time it was possible to 
extricate him from the treacherous quicksands. 

The ditch in which he was working had been dug Saturday by the ditching machine and 
during the intervening days the quicksand had washed in from the bottom and sides. It was 
while trying to clean this out for the laying of pipes that the accident occurred. Several 
fellow workmen were working near at hand and at once went to his rescue, but owing to the 
nature of the dirt it was slow work getting him out. A few moments after he was lifted from 
the ditch he passed away. 

Deceased was a son of Mrs. Emelia Falk of this city and was 19 years of age. He was 
one of a family of twelve children, all of whom were bom in Hankinson, and his entire life 
was spent here. His father died about two years ago, leaving the large family dependent 
upon the labor of the older boys for support. 

Much sympathy is felt for the mother, brothers and sisters in their bereavement. The 
funeral will be held Sunday at the Immanuel Ev. Church. 

********** October 21, 1920 

FATAL SHOOTING ACCIDENT AT COGSWELL FRIDAY 

Arthur Bell, 7, was instantly killed at Cogswell last Friday when a gun in the hands 
of Charley Dale, 8, was discharged. The boys had gone into a bam to play, where they 
found an old shotgun and a box of shells. They decided to hunt rats and were waiting 
for a rat to appear when the door suddenly blew shut. 

Frightened by the noise, the supposition is that the Dale boy convulsively pressed 
the trigger and it was discharged. The Bell lad was shot through the heart. The two 

families are pioneers and are well known. October 28, 1920 

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Another fatal crossing accident occurred at the fifth street crossing of the Great 
Northern at Breckenridge Monday morning when Carl Strand, a laborer on the E. Transgaard 
farm near Breckenridge, was struck by a Great Northern switch engine while driving a Ford 
car. His head was badly smashed, resulting in his instant death. The car was totally 
wrecked. Officials have since been trying to locate Strand's relatives. 

********** November 4, 1920 

YOUNG WYNDMERE WOMAN MEETS ACCIDENTAL DEATH 

Mrs. E. A. Blackmun, wife of Earl Blackmun, the Wyndmere barber, died on Sunday morn- 
ing of last week after passing the night in an unconscious state after being struck by a 
bicycle on the main street of Wyndmere the previous evening. 

Mrs. Blackmun went from her home to the hardware store, and as she started to cross 
the street in the middle of the block she stepped from behind an auto parked at the curb 
and was struck by a bicycle ridden by a small boy. She fell unconscious and never regained 
consciousness. She had recently undergone a severe operation and her system was in no cond- 
ition to withstand the shock. 

Mrs. Blackmun was one of Wyndmere 's most popular young matrons. She is survived by 
her husband and three young children, her mother, Mrs. John Hanson, and a brother, at Wah- 
peton. The husband is quite well known here, having been employed in Robey's Barber Shop 
when the latter was away on the Shriner excursion to Portland a fev; months ago. M. A. 
Wipperman went to Wyndmere and prepared the body for burial. The funeral was held at 
Wyndmere on Wednesday of last week. 

********** November 4, 1920 

Hankinson friends of Mrs. Mae (Wm.) Hutton, extend sympathy in the loss of the young- 
est of her two daughters, Katherine Mae, who passed away last week at the Aberdeen Hospital 
where she had been under medical treatment for complications following diseased tonsils. 
The little girl passed away on Oct. 25th, and the funeral services were held at St. Boniface 
Church in Lidgerwood last Thursday morning. 

********** November 4, 1920 

Charles Witt, Frank Witt, Fred Dibbert and Mrs. Louis Jentz of this city and W. H. 
Witt of Barney attended the funeral of their Uncle August Steihr at Belle Plaine, MN., 
on Wednesday of last week, arriving home Saturday morning. The deceased was 68 years old 
and was one of the pioneer settlers of the Belle Plaine neighborhood. The funeral was one 
of the largest ever held there. 

********** November 11, 1920 

FARMER KILLED INSTANTLY BY AUTOMOBILE 

W. H. Whitinger, 74, former resident two miles north of Forman, died almost instantly 
when struck by an automobile on the state highway north of that place. 

The occupants of the car, driven by. P. E. Lere, did not see Whitinger until within 
a few feet of him, according to testimony. He became confused and although the driver 
made an effort to dodge him, he was struck and knocked to the ground, sustaining a 

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fractured skull. The coroner's jury returned a verdict of "unavoidable" accident. 

********** November 25, 1920 

Mrs. George Macheel received a telegram this week announcing the death of her brother, 
Henry Raisner, at his home in Saskatchewan. Diseased was an early resident of this sect- 
ion, occupying a farm northeast of Hankinson. He is survived by the wife, two sons and 
two daughters. ********** November 25, 1920 

Hankinson friends of Treadwell Twichell, the contractor who built the Hankinson-Fair- 
mount state road the past season, extend sympathy in the loss of his daughter, Gail Twichell 
who died Sunday evening in a Fargo Hospital, at the age of 27 years. She failed to rally 
from an operation for an abcess caused by spinal trouble, the result of a fall several years 
ago. Besides the parents, there are two sisters and one brother left to mourn her loss. 

********** November 25, 1920 

FORMER WAHPETON MAN DIES IN ARMENIA 

Rev. L. 0. Fossum, a Minneapolis missionary formerly located at Wahpeton, died on 
Oct. 10th, from a nervous breakdown in Erivan, the capital of Armenia. His death was due 
to overwork, according to advices received. 

Dr. Fossum was originally a missionary under the National Lutheran Council. He spent 
a number of years in China at Kurdistan. Several years ago he and other Lutheran mission- 
aries had exciting experiences in China and for some time his safety and that of his comp- 
anions was in doubt. ^^^^.^^^. . 

********** December 2, 1920 

Emil A. Movlus, aged 4 years, son of Mr. and Mrs. John W. Movius formerly of Lld- 
gerwood, was killed in an automobile accident at Minneapolis last week. The little lad 
was on the street in Minneapolis with his mother and as she stopped to talk to someone, 
he ran into the street and was rim over by an auto truck. He was rushed to a hospital 
but died a few hours later. The body was taken to Lidgerwood for burial. 

********** December 2, 1920 

DEATH OF MRS. ROSENKRANZ, FORMERLY OF GREENDALE 

Word was received last week that Mrs. W. C. Rosenkranz of Bamesville, MN., had died 
on Nov. 30th, at 5:45 PM. , at St. Luke's Hospital in Fargo. She had been ill with blood 
poisoning for over a month and made a brave effort to recover. She leaves a husband and 
seven children. 

The family were former residents of Greendale Township and Mrs. Rosenkranz was a 
charter member of the Greendale Civic Club. Her sunny disposition and sterling qualities 
won friends where ever she went and the sympathy of our whole neighborhood goes out to 
the stricken family. ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ December 9, 1920 

Eugene W. Carey, pioneer farmer and well known resident of Dexter Township, died 
last Friday of typhoid fever after an illness of only a few days. Deceased is survived 
by a wife and family of children, the aged parents and several brothers and sisters, 
among them Senator C. W. Carey of this district. Sympathy of friends throughout the 

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county is extended to the bereaved ones. 

********** December 9, 1920 

Word was received here this week of the death of Mrs. H. G. Schram at her home in 
St. Paul Park, MN. The Schrams were great friends of the late E. Hunger and Mr. Schram 
had extensive investments in this part of the country. They were frequent guests at the 
Hunger home up to a few years ago. 

********** December 16, 1920 

Mrs. Frank Little, Jr., 38, popular matron of Wyndmere, died last week of tubercul- 
osis contracted from pneumonia following an attack of flu in the fall of 1918. She is 
survived by the husband and three children. 

********** December 16, 1920 

The aged mother of Mrs. Frank Koeppe, residing in the Hammer neighborhood, died on 
Monday. We have been unable to learn any particulars. 

********** December 23, 1920 

Mrs. Alfred Coppin, 63, pioneer resident of Richland County and teacher of the first 
Wahpeton school, died last week. Mrs. Coppin came to Wahpeton in the late 70 's and tau- 
ght school. Her illness dates back 18 years to an accident in a runaway. She leaves two 
sons. ********** December 23, 1920 

Mrs. Jessie E. Gilmour, 54, for the past three years manager of the West Hotel at 

Fairmount, died last Thursday at a Grand Forks Hospital. She had been a sufferer from 

cancer for several months. 

********** December 23, 1920 



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19 2 1 



Just as we go to press word comes of the death of Dorothy, 8 year old daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. James Shea, of scarlet fever, at the family home this afternoon. Particulars 
next week. ********** January 6, 1921 

MINISTER FOUND DEAD IN HOME AT TENNEY 

Rev. Robert Reinhart, pastor of the Lutheran Church at Tenney, MN., was found dead 
in his house Sunday morning of last week by members of his congregation, who were alarmed 
by his failure to appear for church services. The house was broken into, and the body, 
fully clothed, was discovered. Apparently death had overtaken him while he was standing, 
and before retiring Saturday night. The coal fire had died out, and there were traces of 
coal gas in the rooms. He was known to be a victim of heart trouble for some time. 

********** January 20, 1921 

The body of John M. Hafner, the first Company I man to be killed in action in France, 
was returned to Wahpeton this week and buried with full military honors under the auspices 
of Wm. R. Purdon Post of the American Legion. All business houses were closed during the 
services and the attendance was large from many parts of the county. 

********** January 20, 1921 

PASSENGER DIES ON SOO TRAIN NEAR ENDERLIN 

G. J. Flesner, of Fillmore, Sask., Canada, died on Soo train // 108, on Tuesday morn- 
ing of last week just before the train pulled into Enderlin. He was on the way from his 
Canadian home to Rochester, MN., for treatment at the Mayo Hospital. The body was taken 
from the train at Enderlin and prepared for shipment to Rangoul, IL., for burial. Rangoul 
was the former home of the deceased and he had relatives still living there. 

********** January 27, 1921 

WILLIAM BOELKE CALLED BY THE GRIM REAPER 

William Boelke, a resident of Richland County since 1880, died at his home in this 
city Saturday evening after a protracted illness. Acute rheumatism, from which he had 
been a sufferer for several years, had rendered him practically helpless and he has been 
failing steadily for the past six weeks. 

Deceased was a native of Germany and had attained the age of 77 years and 20 days 
at the time of his death. His boyhood was spent in the Fatherland, but with hundreds of 
others he migrated to the United States while still a young man, in 1868, in company with 
one brother and two sisters, locating first at Mayvllle, WI., where he lived several years, 
and in 1880 joined the tide of immigration to the Dakotas, locating on a homestead two 
miles south of Great Bend and which is now occupied by his son Robert. He worked hard and 
was fairly successful, but retired twelve years ago and has since made his home in Hank- 
inson. 

Deceased was three times married, and is survived by the third wife and also leaves 
nine children living. 

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The first wife was Fredericka Strega, the second Mrs. Code John and the third Mrs. 
Amelia Schroeder. The first family of children consists of: Mrs. Emil Ponath, Paul Boe- 
Ike, Mrs. Emil Koppelman, Mrs. Mike Kinn, Robert Boelke and Emil Boelke; of the second 
marriage: Mrs. Otto Stein, and of the third, Arnold Boelke and Mrs. Lautsko Mauer. All 
reside either in the vicinity of Hankinson or Great Bend. One sister, Mrs. Herman Mitzel, 
lives at Juneau, WI. Deceased sisters are: Mrs. Fred Strege, late of Lidgerwood, and Mrs. 
Zietlow, mother of William, Fred and Chas. Schuett of this neighborhood. 

Deceased was held in hight regard among the early settlers along the Wild Rice and 
held several positions of trust in Brandenburg Township at various times. His personal 
honor and integrity was well known among the pioneers and he was kno\m as a loving husband, 
a kind father and a good neighbor. There was a very large attendance at the funeral, 
which was held on Tuesday afternoon. Services were conducted at the Lutheran Church by 
Rev. J. P. Klausler and the remains were laid to rest in the Lutheran Cemetery. The 
pall bearers were L. Mauer, Emil Ponath, Mike Kinn, Otto Stein, Wm. Schuett and F. W. 
Schroeder. ********** February 3, 1921 

Members of three generations of one family to meet death by drowning is the strange 
record of the Ekkstrom family, residing near New Effington. 

Mrs. Anna Ekkstrom of that place was recently advised of the drowning of her son, 
Edgar Ekkstrom, a member of the crew of the battleship Arkansas, off the west coast of 
Mexico. The telegram to the mother stated that every effort was made to save him, but 
proved unsuccessful. He had been in the Navy only about five months. His father was 
drowned in the Atlantic ocean when the liner Titanic sank, nearly ten years ago, after 
a collision with an iceberg. His grandfather was also drowned with the sinking of the 
Titanic. ********** February 3, 1921 

Rev. J. P. Klausler was called to Havana Friday to conduct funeral services for 
William Brummund, a young man residing near that place, who died the previous Wednesday 
at an Aberdeen Hospital. Deceased was a veteran of the World War, the boat on which he 
went from England to France was torpedoed and sunk, he was wounded in action, but return- 
ed home in good health only to fall a victim to an unknown ailment that ended his life. 

********** February 3, 1921 

ROBERTS COUNTY CASHIER KLLED IN BANK ROBBERY 

A lone bank robber held up the Corona State Bank at Corona, a small town on the south- 
em border of Roberts County, at noon last Thursday, shot and killed Ray Stapleton, the 
Cashier, and escaped unmolested in an old battered Ford car, heading north. He secured 
a small amount of money from the till but did not attempt to enter the vault. The robber 
has not been apprehended. 

Stapleton was alone in the bank at the time of the robbery and murder, and there 
were no eye witnesses to the shooting. The first intimation of the trouble came when 
Stapleton staggered from the bank to the street with blood streaming from his wound, and 
after gasping that the bank had been robbed collapsed into the arms of a bystander and 

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expired within a few minutes. 

********** February 10, 1921 

MAN BURNED TO DEATH IN FIRE AT MILNOR 

Fire at Milnor, Sargent County, early Saturday morning resulted in the destruction of 
the Barnes Barber Shop, the Cohen & Frisberg Clothing Store, and the death of Wallace Ken- 
oyer, who was sleeping in a room over the Barber Shop. Kenoyer's body was found in the 
ruins, burned almost beyond recognition. 

The origin of the fire is a mystery. It is stated that Kenoyer was highly intoxicat- 
ed the previous evening, and that he with a number of companions engaged in a poker session 
in the room over the Barber Shop. Kenoyer had rented the room a few days before with the 
declared intention of opening a sewing machine repair shop. 

Particulars about the starting of the fire, the time at which Kenoyer's companions 
left the room and other points of the case were investigated by a coroner's jury which on 
Monday returned a sealed verdict to the county authorities. 

Deceased was a man of middle age, whose parents were among the first settlers in the 
county, and who worked during the suimner as a stone mason and building contractor. He is 
survived by a wife and four children, one of whom is married. 

********** February 10, 1921 

ANOTHER PIONEER RESIDENT CALLED TO HER REWARD 

Mrs. Carl Sedler died Saturday morning at 11 o'clock at her home in this city after 
an illness of more than eight months, from cancer of the stomach. 

Deceased, whose maiden name was Anna Marie Wilhelmina Luther, was bom in Germany 
on Oct. 14th, 1858, where she grew to womanhood, migrating to the United States in 1881 
and coming direct to Breckenridge, MN. A year later she was married to Carl Sedler, who 
survives her. 

The couple have been residents of Richland County during their entire married life, 
and until a few years ago resided on their farm north of Hankinson. Six children were 
bom to them, five of whom are living; Mrs. Henry Buck, whose home is in Canada, Mrs. 
H. F. Holthusen of Wahpeton; Emil Sedler of Minneapolis; Robert Sedler of Belford Town- 
ship; Miss Alma Sedler, who lives at home. 

There are also four surviving sisters: Mrs. Rossow, Mrs. Zarling and Mrs. Zachow, all 
of Breckenridge, and Mrs. D. Spreckels of Hankinson. All of the children and sisters were 
present to pay their last tribute of respect to one who was universally beloved and esteem- 
ed. Interment was made in the Lutheran Cemetery north of this city. 

********** February 10, 1921 

A GOOD WOMAN CALLED TO HER REWARD ABOVE 

News of the death of Mrs. John Schiller, Sr., which occurred at her home in this 
city Tuesday morning at 4:30 o'clock, came as a shock to her many friends. She had been 
ill for only four days and her condition was not considered critical. Heart failure 
from which she had been a sufferer for some time, was the cause of her death. 

Deceased, whose maiden name was Margaret Wolf, was born in Austria on Nov. 1st, 

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1863, where she grew to womanhood and was married to John Schiller, St., in 1884. The 
couple, with their children, came to Hankinson direct from Austria, arriving here on 
May 1st, 1900, where they have since resided. Of the seven children born to them, three 
died in the old country, one here and three survive: Rudolph and Ladislow of this city, 
and Mrs. Amelia Schiller of Wishek, ND. Besides the husband and the three children, she 
is survived by one brother, Jacob Wolf, of this city. 

Deceased was a good woman which is the highest tribute we can pay her. She was 

a dutiful wife, a loving mother and a kind and generous neighbor. She was ambitious for 
her children and made many sacrifices for their education and welfare. Devout in her rel- 
igious faith, she carried her Christianity into every day life, and was kind and charitable 
to everyone. The stricken relatives have the heartfelt sympathy of all in their loss. 

The funeral was held this morning at 10 o'clock. Following a brief service at the 
home, the mortal remains were accompanied to St. Phillip's Church under the escort of the 
Christian Mothers Society, and scores of sorrowing neighbors attended the church service 
and followed the remains to their last resting place in the Catholic Cemetery. 

********** February 10, 1921 

Ben Parker, 40, for some time chef at the Merchants Hotel in Wahpeton, was found 
dead on the river bank near that city on Svinday afternoon of last week. His death is 
said to have been caused by home brew and followed a drinking bout with two companions 
in a fishing hut on the river. He is survived by a wife and four children. 

********** February 10, 1921 

J. W. Lillegard, for two years agent for the Buick Automobile in Wahpeton and Breck- 
enridge and previous to that time a farmer living in Abercrombie Township, shot and killed 
himself on Monday afternoon of last week at the home of Max Witt in Breckenridge . Mr. 
Lillegard had been a persistent suitor for the hand of Miss Mabel Witt, and it is thought 
her refusal to accept his proposal of marriage was responsible for his act. The Witt fam- 
ily formerly resided in this part of the county and are well known here. 

********** February 10, 1921 

Mrs. Wm. Maas, of Wahpeton, for many years a resident here, died at the E. C. Whiting 
home in Wahpeton Wednesday evening of last week. She had been ill only a few days and the 
news of her death came as a complete surprise. The funeral was held Sunday, services 
being conducted by Rev. Burkhardt, and the remains were interred in the Evangelical 
Cemetery. We extend our sympathy to the relatives in their bereavement. 

********** February 10, 1921 

Gertrude, little two months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Pankow, died Saturday 
morning of pneumonia after an illness of only a few days. 

The funeral was held on Monday with services conducted by Rev. J. P. Klausler at the 
Lutheran Church. The stricken parents have the sympathy of all in the loss of their little 
one. ********** February 24, 1921 

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The church bell tolling Tuesday morning brought the sad news that Miss Ida Kohlhoff 
passed away Monday night. Deceased was 30 years old and lived with her parents in Center 
Township. She was a victim of tuberculosis. Her untimely death is regretted by all, and 
the stricken family have the sympathy of the entire community in their bereavement. The 
funeral will be held on Thursday, Rev. Burkhardt conducting the service. 

********** March 3, I92I 

Diedrich Deede, a resident of Richland County since 1881, died at his home in Wahpet- 
on last week, at the age of 60 years. He was well known throughout the eastern part of the 
county, and was a resident of Summit Township for 38 years. Funeral services were held 
at the Summit Church by Rev. T. Hinck of Great Bend. 

********** March 17, 1921 

Anton Elznic, 59, prominent pioneer farmer of Dexter Township, committed suicide on 
Monday of last week by shooting himself through the head with a revolver on the farm six 
miles south of Wyndmere. 

Mr. Elznic had an operation on his foot last spring, and had undergone much suffer- 
ing from it. Gangrene had set in, and amputation of the foot was in prospect. Physicians 
had stated that the injury and operation would probably cost him his life, and this cond- 
ition evidently preyed on his mind and caused him to take his own life. 

He is survived by a widow and five sons and was one of the most prominent farmers of 
his neighborhood. ********** March 17, 1921 

MATT KARLS, SERVICE MAN, DIED LAST FRIDAY 
Died At Breckenridge and Body Brought Here for Burial 

Matthew Karls, a former resident of Hankinson and well known to many of our readers, 
died at his home in Breckenridge on Friday morning of last week after a lingering illness. 
He was a victim of tuberculosis which followed an attack of the "flu" while he was in the 
service at Camp Funston, Kansas. 

Deceased was born at Alexandria, MN., 22 years ago, his parents being, Mr. and Mrs. 
Nick Karls. Practically his entire life was spent in this part of the country, he having 
been at various times a resident of Breckenridge, Wahpeton, Lidgerwood and Hankinson. 

He was married in 1913 to Miss Inga Nelson, who, with a little seven year old son, 
survive him. For the past two years the family has resided at Breckenridge. Deceased 
entered the service from Wilkin County during the war and was stationed at Camp Fuhston, 
Kansas, for practically all of his two years in the army. He contracted a severe case 
of "flu" while there and this was followed by the dread tuberculosis which caused his 
death. He was taken to Minneapolis a month ago but was beyond medical aid and returned 
to Breckenridge to await the end. He maintained his soldier insurance of $10,000.00, 
thus making provision for the future of his wife and little son. 

Besides his widow and little boy, he is survived by the mother, three brothers and 
three sisters: Peter Karls of Washington state, Joe Karls of Blackduck, MN., Lawrence 
Karls, Mrs. John Bestrum, of this city, Mrs. S. J. Robinson, of this city, and Mrs. A. 

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E. Tanness of Ambrose, ND. 

Funeral services were conducted in the Catholic Church in Breckenridge Saturday 
morning, and on. Monday the remains were brought to Hankinson for interment in the Cath- 
olic Cemetery. Members of the local American Legion Post in uniform acted as pallbearers. 

********** March 24, 1921 

WM. CEROLL DIED FROM AUTO ACCIDENT INJURIES 

William Ceroll, a prominent young farmer residing with his parents near the Krause 
Lutheran Church southwest of Hankinson, died at Swanville, MN., last Friday as the result 
of injuries sustained in an automobile accident the previous Tuesday, an account of which 
appeared in last week's issue of the NEWS. 

The sudden death of this young man had some tragic features. He left his home, in 
a large Buick Six touring car a few days ago for Swanville, MN., where he was to have 
been married on Tuesday of this week to a daughter of August Fellbaum. Instead of the 
wedding he was buried on that date. He was about 25 years old and is survived by the 
parents, the mother being bedridden and not expected to survive for long. 

The accident happened on a sharp turn in the road approaching Swanville, and in the 
town where he stopped for gas a few minutes before the accident the garage man intended 
to warn him about this turn but forgot to do so. He was alone in the car and there were 
no eye witnesses to the accident, but the car evidently turned over landing right side 
up and Ceroll was thrown down a steep embankment. He was unconscious when found and had 
sustained internal injuries from which he died on Friday. 

The remains were shipped to Hankinson and taken in the Wipperman Hearse to the home 
where the funeral was held on Tuesday. Services also were held at the Lutheran Church 
near by with Rev. Cloeter in charge. The sympathy of a large circle of friends goes out 
to the stricken relatives. ********** March 31, 1921 

DEATH OF MRS. S. MOTIS AT NEW EFFINGTON 

New Effington Record: Mrs. Stephan Motis died at her home in New Effington 

Thursday morning, March 24th, 1921, at the age of 35 years. Her death resulted from 
tuberculosis, which disease she contracted after a severe attack of influenza about 
three years ago. Besides her husband she leaves three small children to mourn her loss. 

Funeral services will be held at the home on Saturday, March 26th, at 1 o'clock, 
and at the Branvold Church, north of Victor, at 2:30, where the burial will take place. 
She was a kind and faithful woman and enjoyed the friendship of all who knew her. 

********** March 31, 192 

DEATH OF MRS. EDGAR BILLINGTON 

Mrs. Edgar Billington died at her home at Federal Dam, MN., on March 28th, after 
an illness of several months. 

Mary Ann Waterhouse was bom at Clyman, WI., on Jan. 9th, 1858, and was married to 
Edgar Billington at Hankinson on March 29th, 1889, where they lived until 1909, moving 
from here to Federal Dam, MN., where they have lived for the last twenty years. 

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At the time of her death, Mrs. Billington was 63 years, 2 months and 2 weeks old. 
She leaves to mourn her loss, Edgar Billington, her husband, one son, Clarence, two 
daughters, Mrs. Bushing of Federal Dam, MN., and Mrs. Jackson of Bloomer, WI., three 
brothers and two sisters. . .Will and Martha Mc Kinster of Bloomer, WI., Dave of Hanklnson, 
and Mrs. Margaret of Salem, OR. 

********** April 7, 1921 

FORMER SERVICE MAN ENDS HIS OWN LIFE 
James Parizek of Liberty Grove Committed Suicide Saturday Morning 
James Parizek, 26, former service man and son of Mr. and Mlrs. Wencel Parizek of 
Lidgerwood, committed suicide by shooting himself through the head with a shotgun at 
about 9:30 AM Saturday morning at the home of his brother-in-law, Joe Wokel, seven miles 
north of Lidgerwood. 

It is thought he was temporarily demented and he had made two previous attempts at 
self destruction, gashing his throat with a knife while in the army and making another 
attempt to take his life later on after returning home. It is thought he was mentally 
depressed by experiences while overseas during the war. 

Deceased was bom in Richland County, Sept. 15th, 1895, and was 26 years old. He 
grew to manhood on the farm. He served in the army during the World War, being attached 
to the Signal Corps, and spent ten months overseas. He was never quite his natural self 
after his return and brooding over his war experiences undoubtedly left him somewhat 
unbalanced mentally. 

The middle of last week he went to the Wokel farm and remained without stating his 
purpose. Aside from a visit Saturday morning, he went to his room and a few moments 
later members of the household were startled by the report of a shotgun. Investigation 
revealed the fact that he had taken his life. 

The funeral, which was held Monday morning, was attended by an immence throng. Rev. 
Movius conducted the services and the service men of Lidgerwood were present in a body. 
The Modern Woodmen, of which order he was a member, were also represented by members of 
the local camp. The floral offerings were numerous and beautiful. The Wipperman auto 
hearse was used to carry the remains to the final resting place in the Bohemian Cemetery. 
Deceased is survived by the parents, four sisters and two brothers. 

********** April 7, 1921 

AGED MAN ENDS OWN LIFE BY HANGING 
Stanley Budge, 82 years old, ended his own life by hanging himself in the bam on 
his farm four miles west of Lidgerwood on Saturday. No reason is known for the rash act. 
Deceased was one of the pioneer residents of that section, and the home is within a 
stone's throw of the Soo track and at a point where the main road crosses the railroad. 
He is survived by three married daughters and two sons, the latter being Frank and 
L. B. Budge, former residents of Hankinson. The funeral was held on Wednesday. 

********** April 7, 1921 

Mrs. John Wickman left Wednesday night of last week for New Richland, MN. , to attend 

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the funeral of her Aunt, Miss Anderson. She returned Saturday evening. 

********** Ap^il 7^ 1921 

Wenzel Novotny, 56, a resident of Lidgerwood for more than 20 years, died last week 
at the Wahpeton Hospital after a lingering illness. His widow and five children survive 
him. The oldest child is 19, the youngest, 4 years old. 

********** April 14, 1921 

0. B. Johnson, 67, was burned to death when trapped by a fire which destroyed the 
Kensal livery bam. Martin Christensen, proprietor of the barn, narrowly escaped death, 
being awakened by the movements of a frightened cat which was trying to get out of the 
office where he slept. The loss, partially covered by insurance, is estimated at $10,000. 

********** Ap^i;L 14, 1921 

CHRISTIAN NESS DIED AT WAHPETON ON MONDAY 

Word was received in Hankinson on Tuesday of the death, at his home in Wahpeton, of 
Christian J. Ness, member of the house in the legislative sessions of 1915, 1919 and 1921. 
Mr. Ness suffered a case of ptomaine poisoning while at Bismarck during the recent session 
of the legislature, from which he never fully recovered. 

In the session of 1919, and the subsequent special session of the legislature, Mr. 
Ness, with another member, fathered and introduced an "anti-red flag " bill prohibiting 
the display of the flag of anarchy in North Dakota. The measure was defeated at both 
sessions by the followers of socialism, but in 1920 was initiated as a law and received 
the vote of a large majority of the electors of the state. The display of the red flag 
is, through the efforts of Mr. Ness, now prohibited in North Dakota. 

Mr. Ness was a native of Norway, coming to Wisconsin in 1879, and to Wahpeton, ND., 
in 1880, where he has farmed extensively for 40 years. He has held the offices of Assess- 
or, Justice of the Peace, Chairman of the Board of Supervisors, President of the School 
board, member and Chairman of the Board of County Commissioners and member of the House 
of Representatives from his district. He was married in 1883 and is survived by his wife 
and twelve children. His sons, John, Harold and Sigurd, enlisted and served in the World 
War. The funeral will be held at Wahpeton at 2:30 PM Friday afternoon. 

Chris Ness was a splendid type of the sturdy pioneer. . .fundamentally honest, strong 
in his political opinions and with no patience or consideration for sharp practices in 
either business or political life. He was a fine type of stalwart manhood and his death 
is a distinct loss to Richland County. 

********** April 21, 1921 

Mrs. Franz Wolf, 71 years and 8 months old, died at the home of her son, John P. 
Wolf, 12 miles southwest of this city, Tuesday morning after an illness of over a year. 
She was able to be around the house up to two weeks ago but since that time was confined 
to her bed and failed steadily until the end. 

Deceased was one of the pioneer settlers of this section. She is survived by the 
aged husband, four years her senior, one son and two daughters. The funeral was held 

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this morning. ********** April 21, 1921 

The two weeks old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. August Gabbert, residing south of Hankin- 
son, died Monday morning. The parents have the sympathy of all in the loss of their little 
one. ********** April 21, 1921 

J, A. Bemis found the charred body of his four year old son. Jack Robert, in the 
ruins of his barn when he returned home with his wife from an automobile trip to Valley 
City Monday night. Firemen who attempted to extinguish the flames did not know there was 
anyone in the bam. ********** April 21, 1921 

Undertaker Henry Wipperman was called to Wyndmere Monday night to make funeral 
arrangements for Miss Beulah Schuster, 21 years old, who died that afternoon at the home 
of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ben Schuster, five miles west of that place. 

Deceased was one of the most popular school teachers of the neighborhood and contin- 
ued her school work up to within a week of her death. 

********** April 21, 1921 

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. John Bimbaum, two weeks old, died Monday morning 

and the funeral was held Wednesday forenoon. 

********** April 28, 1921 

DEATH OF MRS. PETER DEFEA A SHOCK TO THE COMMUNITY 

A wave of sorrow swept over Hankinson yesterday when a message was received from 

Minneapolis announcing the death of Mrs. Peter De Fea at 5 o'clock that morning following 

an operation which she underwent at St. Mary's Hospital. 

Mrs. DeFea was of a high tjrpe of womanhood. An alien by birth, she was 100 percent 

American throughout the great war, sending three of her sons, into the service of her 

adopted country and was a pillar of strength to the community in the trying days of that 

great struggle. She was tireless in all war activities Red Cross work. Liberty Loan 

drives and all the various lines in which our women did such noble service. She was ready 

for every call and it is impossible to estimate the value of her service and example. In 

her death the community loses a real heroine. . .one who quietly did her bit, and more, for 

love of our great country. Her memory cannot be too highly honored by the people of our 

city. 

Deceased is survived by the stricken husband and nine children. Of the sons, two are 

on the Pacific coast and are probably now enroute to attend the funeral. Another son is 
in the armed services, stationed in the Panama Canal Zone, and no word has yet been recei- 
ved from him. Arrangements for the funeral will not be made until it is known whether he 
will be able to return home. The remains were brought back from the city this morning, and 

it is probable the funeral will be held next Monday. 

********** May 5, 1921 



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JULIUS BOEHNING ENDS HIS OWN LIFE 
Prominent Farmer Commits Suicide With Stick of Dynamite 

Placed Half Pound Dynamite Stick in His Mouth and Lit the Fuse Tragedy Occurred 

at 10 o'clock Monday Morning .... Leaves a Wife and Family of Fourteen Children. 



Carrying out a threat made several times lately, Julius Boehning, prominent farmer 
and widely known throughout this part of the county, committed suicide at 10 o'clock Mon- 
day morning at his farm in Duerr Township by placing a half pound stick of dynamite in his 
mouth and calmly lighting a foot of fuse, the explosion literally blowing his head off. 

Mr. Boehning had worried greatly about his financial affairs lately and it is prob- 
able that this preyed on his mind until he was somewhat unbalanded mentally. He was in 
Hankinson on Saturday and purchased some equipment for potato planting, saying he would 
get other machinery on his next trip in. Sunday was spent at home, and the following 
morning he acted strangely, stating that he was going to end his life. He went to the 
bam, secured a stick of dynamite, going from there to the house. The wife and daughter 
tried to wrest the explosive from him but without avail. Turning to some of the small 
children, he bade them goodbye, stating that they would never see him again. He then 
walked to a grove a short distance from the house and a few moments later a terrific 
explosion was heard. An investigation revealed the headless body on the ground under 
a tree. Evidently he had held an end of the dynamite in his mouth with the left hand, 
lighting the fuse with his right, as the left hand was quite badly mutilated. Aside 
from the head, which was completely blown away, and the damaged left hand, the body 
showed no effects of the explosion. 

As Mr. Boehning left the house to carry out his threat of suicide, his wife phoned 
to town, telling Max Wipperman that she feared her husband would kill himself. Mr. Wipper 
man and Dr. Mc Donell drove in all haste to the Boehning farm, a distance of about twelve 
miles, but had scarcely left town when the tragedy happened. Frank Maahs, who was working 
at the Herman Franz place a mile distant, heard the explosion and was on the scene within 
a few minutes. It was he who discovered the body lying beneath a tree in the grove near 
the house. 

Later in the day the body was brought to town and taken to the Wipperman Undertaking 
rooms. Coroner Ness came over from Wahpeton the same evening and viewed the body but 
decided that no inquest was necessary, the facts being undisputed. 

Deceased had been a resident of Richland County for 37 years. He was bom at Marsh- 
field, WI., on May 28th, 1868, and would have been 53 years old this month. When scarce 
16 years old he came to Richland County, 37 years ago, and for 5 years worked out in the 
Great Bend neighborhood. Thirty-two years ago he settled in Duerr Township and at the 

time of his death was farming two sections of land 800 acres of his own and 480 that 

he rented. He was married in young manhood to Miss Anna Stoltenow who survives him. To 
the couple a family of fifteen children were bom, fourteen of whom are living, the oldest 
32 and the youngest a little lad of six. The surviving children are: John, Louis, Arthur, 

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Alfred, Herbert, Rudolph, Ewalt, Julius. , .eight sons: and Mrs. Paul Kutter, Minnie, 

Mrs. W. Ebel, Mrs. Fred Wahl, Viola and Annie six daughters. The children all live 

at home or in the near vicinity. 

Deceased was widely known throughout this section. He was always active in public 
affairs and for years was a member of the Duerr Township Board of Supervisors. In the 
old convention days no democratic county convention was complete without his presence, 
and later he was an ardent member of the nonpartisan league. Two years ago he was a can- 
didate at the primary election for the democratic nomination for County Commissioner for 
this district with strong support from nonpartisian league sources but was defeated by 
August Hoefs. A large man physically, with the strength of two ordinary men, he was a 
familiar figure on our streets and will be missed by everyone. 

The funeral will be held at noon today with services at the German Lutheran Church 
five miles from the Boehning farm. Rev. Cloeter will conduct the services, and interment 
will be made in the churchyard. 

********** j^y j2 1921 

SOimiD TRAGEDY AT WALCOTT THIS WEEK 

A case of erring girlhood, resulting in the death of the young mother and her illeg- 
itimate child occurred near Walcott Sunday. A young woman gave birth to an Illegitimate 
child, the babe being dead when bom, and with the aid of the father the body of the babe 
was buried near the house. The birth took place in the girl's home, and her parents were 
unaware of her condition or that the birth had occurred until after the body was buried. 
Shortly after this the young woman collapsed from weakness and died within a short time. 

Coronor Ness was summoned from Wahpeton, but after a thorough investigation decided 
that there was no criminal liability or intent on the part of the author of the girl's 
trouble, and it is not thought any arrests will be made. 

********** May 12, 1921 

Willard Erwin Dosch, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Simon Dosch, died at their home 
early Friday morning at the age of only five days . Burial was made at the Evangelical 
Cemetery, Sunday, Rev. J. Burkhardt conducting the services. 

********** May 12, 1921 

YOUNG ERNEST CHRISTENSEN SUCCUMBED TO TUBERCULOSIS 
A message was received here Saturday announcing the death of Ernest Christensen at 
the State Tuberculosis Sanitarium at Dunseith. He had been under treatment at the instit- 
ution since the 15th of last December but the dread disease had become too firmly seated 
and he gradually failed until death relieved his sufferings. 

The case is a particularly pathetic one. A few years ago the Christensen family 
were rated as prosperous farmers of Greendale Township. Then the father contacted tuber- 
culosis and died after a few months. Not long afterwards the widow was stricken with the 
same disease and in a few months was laid to rest beside her husband. The family of seven 
children, the oldest one being Ernest, a mere lad, took up the burden of maintaining a 
home only to find that Ernest was also a victim of the white plague. 

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Last fall the neighbors prevailed on him to go to the Dunseith Sanitarium but it 
was to late. He leaves six young brothers and sisters, Ernest having only reached the 
age of 19 years. They are making their home with kind hearted neighbors and E. C. Berg 
was appointed their legal guardian. 

The body arrived here on Tuesday and the funeral was held Wednesday vrLth services at 
the M. E. Church in Greendale Township. 

********** May 19, 1921 

Rev. Cloeter did not conduct the funeral service for Julius Boehning as stated in 
last week's account of the sad affair. This correction is made in fairness to all con- 
cerned. ********** j^ay 19^ 1921 

SOLDIER'S REMAINS EXPECTED SHORTLY 
Remains of Gerhard Radloff Expected to Arrive in a Few Days. 
Services will be held at Immanuel Ev. Church and Legion Post will have charge of the 
burial. . .Exact date will not be known until word is received from the War Department. 



The body of Gerhard Radloff, who died while serving his country in the World War, 
is expected to arrive here within a few days. 

Details of the impressive service that is being arranged cannot be given until word 
is received from the War Department stating just when the body will arrive here. 

Funeral services will be held at the Immanuel Ev. Church, Rev. C. Oberdoester, offic- 
iating, and the casket will be taken in charge by the local post of the American Legion 
at the conclusion of the church services. Members of the Legion from neighboring towns 
have also been invited to participate in the ceremonies. 

Gerhard Radloff, better known here as "Hucky," was bom in Hankinson in 1895, and 
his entire life, up to the time he entered the service, was spent in Hankinson. He was 
the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Radloff. He entered the service in the spring of 1918. 
After four months spent in the training camp he was sent overseas, but after he had been 
in France a few weeks he contracted influenza which later developed into pneumonia, and 
he passed away on Oct. 6, 1918. 

He was buried in a French Cemetery but recently the body was disinterred and shipped 
to America together with thousands of others at government expense. 

Deceased is survived by the parents and six brothers. 

********** May 26, 1921 

FORMER WAHPETON ATTORNEY DIES AT NORTH YAKIMA, WASH. 
Calvin L. Bradley, a former Wahpeton lawyer and territorial pioneer, recently died 
at North Yakima, WA., according to word received in Fargo. 

Mr. Bradley started the practice of law with Federal Judge Charles F, Amidon in 
Fargo under the firm name of Amidon & Bradley and later became associated in the law 
business with Colonel Benton in Fargo under the name of Benton & Bradley. 

From Fargo he moved to Wahpeton where he engaged in the law practice with Senator 
W. E. Purcell. A few years later he left North Dakota for his health, settling at 

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Selah, WA., a suburb of North Yakima, and followed the law practice there and in North 
Yakima . 

He is survived by his widow, one son, Roland, and two daughters, Florence and Mrs. 
Beatrice Metzger. ********** j^^y 26, 1921 

TRAGEDY MARKED END OF COUNTY PLAY DAY 

Tragedy ended Richland County's second annual play day shortly before 5 o'clock on 
Wednesday afternoon of last week. 

In the crowded traffic of homeward bound cars at the fair grounds in Wahpeton, little 
Delores Adams, six years old, was struck by a Ford automobile driven by Miss Anna Wrege, 
19, of near Hankinson. The child's head was crushed and she died at a doctor's office a 
few moments later. Miss Wrege, with tear-reddened eyes, told about the accident: 

"There were two of my girl friends and two boys from Wyndmere," she said, "The car 
belonged to R. E. Riley of Wyndmere. I had been driving it all afternoon." "We were 
driving west towards the grand stand on our way home. Because of the crowded traffic I 
was driving slowly, between 4 and 6 miles an hour." "Two or three little girls started 
to run across again in front of the car. I couldn't stop, we were so near, and she was 
knocked down." "She got up alone but fell again and some man picked her up. She was 
bleeding terribly and they put her in my car and we took her to the doctor's office." 

Miss Wrege has been working at Wyndmere. She went to Wahpeton last week to secure 
a position. She formerly was employed for several months at the Nelson Cafe in Wahpeton. 

The child was the youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Adams of the Merchants 
Hotel in Wahpeton. The mother has been ill for several weeks and had returned only a 
couple of days before from Fargo where she was under treatment. 

********** May 26, 1921 

LEO LENZEN, PROMINENT BUSINESS MAN OF MOORETON, DEAD 

The community of Mooreton was shocked on Wednesday, May 11th, when they learned 
that Leo Lenzen, one of the most prominent men of the village, had passed away following 
a stroke of apoplexy. Mr. Lenzen was about his work as usual and had no warning of the 
oncoming stroke, when he suddenly fell to the floor. Assistance was called and he was 
taken to his room, but was in an unconscious condition and remained so until death 
claimed him a few hours later. 

Leo Lenzen was born in Minneapolis on Nov. 29th, 1866, making him about 54 years and 
six months old at the time of his death. He was a man who had many friends and had alw- 
ays been a home-loving man and a good father. He had been the proprietor of an ice cream 
parlor and confectionery store at Mooreton for some time, and enjoyed a large circle of 
friends and acquaintances. 

He came to the county thirty nine years ago on May 9th, and located at Mooreton. 
On November 14th, 1893, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Weber. To this union four 
daughters and one son were born, the son dying in infancy. The daughters are: Tena, 
Frances, Leda and Rema, all living at home. 

Mr. Lenzen was a member of the Modem Woodmen, Royal Neighbors and the Catholic 

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Forester Lodges and was a social member of the Foresters. 

Besides his wife and daughters he leaves six sisters and four brothers. They are: 
Mrs. Hugh Mc Manus of Superior, WI., Mrs. M. Chemich of Mooreton; Mrs. Wm. Lipton of 
Calgary, Canada; Mrs. John Hayden of British Columbia; Mrs. George Buscher of Fairmount; 
Mrs. John Buscher of Fairmount; Louis Lenzen of Grand Forks; and Henry Lenzen of Wahpeton. 
Mrs. Lipton, Mrs. Hayden and Louis Lenzen were the only members of the family not present 
at the funeral which took place at the Catholic Church in Mooreton, Rev. Fr. Wilkes of 
Mantador conducting the services. Interment was made in the cemetery at Mooreton. 

********** May 26, 1921 

DEATH OF BRUCE L. BOGART, FORMERLY OF WAHPETON 

Bruce L. Bogart, former law partner of Senator P., J. Mc Cumber and well known to 
every Richland County pioneer, died at his home in Eugene, OR., on Thursday, May 19th. 
The following account is taken from the Eugene Morning Register of May 20th, kindly sent 
us by our old friend, A. E. Edblom, who also resides in that city: 

"Death coming at the end of 63 years claimed Bruce L. Bogart last night at his home, 
962 Pearl Street, leaving wide a gap in the circle of friendship which has grown up in 
the 20 years he has lived in Eugene." 

"Death last night followed ten days in which Mr. Bogart was in increasinly critical 
condition. Although conscious during a greater part of the last three days, he was in 
a condition which was known to be hopeless. His illness, which had extended through many 
months, was diagnosed as leakage of the heart." 

"Besides Mrs. Bogart, he leaves a brother, Arthur S., whose home is in Bloomville, 
Ohio. The body will lie in state Saturday morning between the hours of nine and ten at 
the Veatch Chapel, where the funeral will be held. Mrs. Bogart will leave Saturday night 
with the remains, which will be laid away in a private mausoleum in Valparaiso, Indiana." 

"Bruce Linville Bogart was born in Republic, OH., on June 27th, 1858. The year 
1879, found him a pioneer in North Dakota where he took up the practice of law and where 
for 20 years he was in partnership with United States Senator Mc Cumber of North Dakota." 

"In 1900, Mr. Bogart and his wife came to Eugene to rest, to enjoy the retirement 
which Mr. Bogart entered when he left the state where he had practiced for 20 years." 

"Since their arrival in Eugene they have come to be known in almost every phase of 
community endeavor. Active in Masonic circles, Mr. Bogart claimed membership in the 
Knights Templar, Shrine, and the Order of the Eastern Star." 

"During his residence in Eugene the deceased was visited on several occasions by 
his former partner. Senator Mc Cumber, who was here last in December of 1919." 

********** May 26, 1921 

Andrew Quamme, 65, Dwight farmer and resident of Richland County since 1878, died 

last week after several months of illness from chronic nephrytis. Funeral services 

were held last Thursday at Dwight. Quamme was born in Wisconsin in 1856. He married 

Miss Betty Burnson (sister of Andrew and Erick Burnson of Wahpeton) in 1880. His 

widow and seven children survive him. ^, „- ^nn^ 

May 26, 1921 

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BANDIT KLLLED IN GUN FIGHT WITH OFFICERS AT MINOT 

MINOT, June 1st The bandit suspect is dead, and two others, one seriously wound- 
ed, are held by police here, the result of a running gun fight which followed looting a 
bank and general store at Martin yesterday. 

The wounded men, who gave the names George Webber and Patrick Farley, declared that 
they were unable to identify the dead man. They said they were getting a ride in the 
car when the officers opened fire. 

Silk, which was taken from the store, and a number of Liberty Bonds, stolen from 
safety deposit boxes in the bank were found in the captured car, officers reported. 
None of the pursuing party was hit, although the suspects opened a volley of fire when 
ordered to halt. 

Four men taken as suspects at Balfour, although denying participation in the bank 
robbery, admitted stealing $30 worth of candy from a confectionery store at Balfour and 
a quantity of tools, supplies and auto accessories from a garage. 

********** June 2, 1921 

REMAINS OF GERHARD RADLOFF EXPECTED SATURDAY 

The body of Gerhard Radloff, who died in France during the World War, will arrive 
here Saturday morning according to a message from the War Department. The funeral, 
according to present plans, will be held on Monday. Services will be held at the Imm- 
anuel Evan. Church and the American Legion will have charge of the service at the Cemetery 

********** June 2, 1921 

Frank Podhola, pioneer resident and prominent farmer of Duerr Township, died on 

Thursday of last week, of appendicitis. He was about 60 years old and leaves a family. 

The funeral was held on Saturday. 

********** June 2, 1921 

Undertaker Wipperman was called to Barney Sunday to take charge of the funeral of 
A. E. Jinks, a former resident of that place, who died at Park Rapids, MN., the body 
being shipped to Barney for burial. Deceased was about 65 years of age. 

********** June 2, 1921 

The body of Frank Nelson, the first Hankinson boy to give up his life in the World 
War, is to be brought back and will be buried in Minneapolis where his relatives now 
reside. Frank was the first Hankinson boy to respond to the draft, and for many months 
his fate was a mystery. . .the war records simply showing that he was "missing in action." 
Later it developed that he was wounded by machine gun fire during an advance, and a com- 
rad from the northern part of this state saw him fall, stopped a moment and found him 
unconscious, A few minutes later he was taken to the hospital by the ambulance corps 
where he died from wounds. At the close of the war, or about that time, the body was 
moved to another cemetery, and at that time was positively identified by a brother who 
was also in the service. But for some unaccountable reason his fate was not officially 
known to the war department for many months after he was killed. It was a long time 

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before his friends and relatives, including a bride of two weeks (Mrs. Nina Nims-Nelson) 
learned the details. Deceased was employed as Cashier at the Soo Depot here at the time 

he entered the service. *****4.*a.^^ 

********** June 2, 1921 

WELL KNOWN RESIDENT SUCCUMBED AFTER VALIANT STRUGGLE FOR LIFE 

James E. Shea's Life Ended Saturday Night. 

James E. Shea died at the Breckenridge Hospital at 10:40 o'clock Sunday night after 
a valiant struggle against the inroads of perotinitis which followed an operation for 
appendicitis on Friday of the previous week. 

For several days he lay at the point of death, but would rally for a short time, 
bringing renewed hopes to the anxious loved ones, but he gradually grew weaker. He re- 
tained consciousness almost to the last moment and never gave up hope of recovery. 

James E. Shea was bom at Pembroke, Ontario, Canada, and was 39 years old on May 
28th, his birthday having occurred while he was in the hospital. Thirty-six years ago, 
at the age of 3 years, he came with his parents to Richland County. They settled in 
what is now Elma Township and became heavy land owners, the Shea farms being well known 
throughout this part of the county. Here the subject of our sketch grew to manhood sur- 
viving both his parents, and he was married on Nov. 11th, 1909, at Denhoff, ND., to Miss 
Madge Doherty. The family continued to reside on the farm up to about three years ago 
when they bought the residence property known as the Kjelstrup place, one of the finest 
homes in the city, and where they have since resided. 

Besides the stricken wife, deceased is survived by three children: Viola, 10, James, 
5, and Alvin, 3. Another daughter, Dorothy, died only a few months ago, at the age of 8. 
He also leaves one sister, Mrs. Chas. L. Green, and one brother. Con E., both of this 
place. An uncle Jeremiah Shea, also lives here. 

Deceased was jovial and good hearted by nature and had few enemies and a large circle 
of friends. His untimely death has caused profound sorrow to all who knew him, and the 
stricken wife and little ones have the sincere S5nnpathy of all. 

The remains were brought over from Breckenridge Monday morning and the funeral was 
held on Wednesday forenoon with services at the Catholic Church at 10 o'clock. Rev. Jos. 
F. Studnicka conducted the services and the church was filled with hundreds of old friends 
assembled to pay silent tribute to the departed. Interment was made in the family lot 

in the Catholic Cemetery. 

********** June 9, 1921 

MILITARY FUNERAL FOR GERHARD RADLOFF 
Local Legion Post Conducted Impressive Service Monday Afternoon 
Probably the largest crowd that ever attended a funeral in Hankinson was present 
Monday for the interment of the remains of Gerhard Radloff, the Hankinson boy who died 
in France while serving his country in the World War. 

The body arrived Saturday morning and was taken to the Wipperman Undertaking Rooms 
under escort of a Guard of Honor from the local Post of the American Legion. To satisfy 
the family as to identification, the casket was opened and the identification tag, buried 

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with every soldier who lost his life in the great conflict, was found, proving beyond 

the possibility of a doubt that the casket contained the mortal remains of Gerhard Radloff . 

The funeral was held Monday afternoon. Rev. C. Oberdoester conducted services at the 
Immanuel Ev. Church and at the home, after which the Legion post took charge. The order 
of Procession to the cemetery was Color bearer with the American Flag, the Hankinson Band, 
the firing squad from the Lidgerwood post, members of the Hankinson post of the American 
Legion in full uniform, the casket covered by an American flag and on a cassion drawn by 
four horses with riders and escorted by the pall bearers, automobiles with members of the 
Lidgerwood American Legion Auxiliary, automobiles with the family and relatives, followed 
by scores of sorrowing friends. 

At the cemetery the service was brief but impressive. The post chaplain read a brief 
service, the casket was lowered, taps was sounded and a volley from the firing squad ended 
the service. The body of Gerhard Radloff, who died in far off France, was at rest in the 
family lot in the cemetery of the church in which he was baptized and which he attended 
during his entire lifetime until he entered the service of his country. 

The impressive service was attended by people for miles around, one party coming 
from Fergus Falls and others from almost equally long distances. 

Bodies of other fallen heroes from the poppy-red fields of France are due to arrive 
from time to time, and the people of Hankinson and the surrounding country will deem it 
a sacred privilege to pay tribute as they did in the case of Gerhard Radloff. 

The Hankinson post of the American Legion has asked The NEWS to express the thanks of 
the members to the people of Hankinson for assistance rendered in so many ways to make 
the service the success it was. ^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^ ^^21 

ANNA WREGE PLEADS GUILTY AND RECEIVES SENTENCE 

Anna Wrege, the Hankinson girl who was driving the Ford car that struck and killed 
little Loris Adams at the fair ground in Wahpeton a few weeks ago at the time of the 
county play day for school children, was arrested recently on a charge of second degree 
manslaughter. She was taken to Lisbon on Tuesday, arraigned before Judge Allen and enter- 
ed a plea of guilty to the charge. 

The Judge imposed a sentence of twelve months in the county jail, the minimum permitte. 
under the law. But eleven months of the sentence was suspended, so that she will actually 
serve but thirty days... with the wise provision, also, that she shall not enter an auto 
under any circumstances for a period of one year and shall not drive an auto for a period 
of five years. 

The folly and criminal liability of fast and reckless driving should be brought home 
to every motorist by the sad feature of this case. 

********** June 9, 1921 

MISS ANNA WREGE BARRED FROM MOTORING IN FUTURE 

GLOBE-GAZETTE: Miss Anna Wrege was dismissed from the County Jail last week after 

serving forty days for careless driving, in which the accident occurred that took the 

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life of little Loris Adams. Miss Wrege's sentence prohibits her from riding in any car 
for a year or driving a car for five years, and if she is known to do either during the 
stated time she will immediately be returned to the county jail to serve eleven more 
months. Miss Wrege went to Wyndmere from here where she will do domestic work. She feels 
the sentence of not being able to ride in a car for more than a year is more of an impos- 
ition than had she been forbidden to drive for the rest of her life. 

********** July 28, 1921 

The body of John P. Bauer, who was killed in action while serving his country on the 
battlefields of France, is to be shipped back for burial here and will probabley arrive 
within the next few weeks. 



********** 



June 9, 1921 



Mrs. George Wirtenberger, wife of Lidgerwood's pioneer druggist, died Monday after 
a long illness. She is survived by the husband and two children. Rev. C. Oberdoester 
was called to Lidgerwood to conduct the funeral which was held yesterday. 

********** June 9, 1921 

Word has been received at Wahpeton that Joseph Formaneck, former Richland County 
pioneer who settled at Wahpeton in 1873, later moving to California, was killed in an 
auto accident at Anaheim, CA. Formaneck, driving, attempted to turn around a pile of 
dirt. He lost control of the car which turned over twice. He was thrown through the 
windshield and died from loss of blood. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Chizeh, fellow passengers, 
were slightly injured, and Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Herdina, also passengers, escaped with 
bruises. The dead man leaves a. widow, two daughters and one son. 

********** June 9, 1921 

DEATH OF LOUISE WESTPHAL OCCURRED SUNDAY MORNING 

Louise, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Westphal, died at the family home just north 
of this city Sunday morning at 1:15 o'clock. She had been ill for several months with 
tuberculosis and cancerous complications, and the end was calmly awaited by the young 
patient who realized during the last week the hopelessness of her case and she was pre- 
pared for the end. 

Deceased was bom on the farm near this city Jan. 6th, 1900, and this was her home 
during her entire lifetime. After finishing a course in the common school she decided 
to take up the profession of a trained nurse. She took up this line of work, entering 
St. Luke's Hospital at Fairbault, MN., in December of 1918. In March of 1920, she return- 
ed home and in May of the same year entered the Wahpeton Hospital to complete her training. 
She was taken ill on March 28, 1921, and was forced to give up her work, arriving home on 
April 9th. She was confined to her bed from that time until death relieved her sufferings. 
She was a patient sufferer, making no complaints, and was cheerful throughout the last 
trying days, calmly awaiting the final summons. 

Her untimely death, coming just at the dawn of womanhood, is mourned by hundreds of 
friends who have known her since childhood. 

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Deceased was one of a family of twelve children, and is survived by ten brothers 
and sisters, besides the stricken parents. One sister, Mrs. Paul Ziegelman of Anamoose, 
ND., died on June 11, 1916. The other brothers and sisters are: Mrs. Ed. Stein, Mrs. 
Theo. Tiegs, Mrs. Geo. Stach, Ida and Elsie; brothers, Julius of Palermo, ND., Herman of 
Hankinson, W. R. of Doran, MN., and Arthur and Ervin who are still at home. 

The funeral was held on Tuesday with services at the home at 2 o'clock and at the 
Emmanuel Ev. Church an hour later. Among those in attendance were the nurses from the 
Wahpeton Hospital as well as scores of friends of the family from this vicinity. Rev. 
C. Oberdoester conducted the services and interment was made in the cemetery just south- 
west of town. ********** j^^e 16, 1921 

PETER WIRTZ, WALDO FARMER, DIED SUDDENLY YESTERDAY 

The people of this vicinity were shocked beyond expression when word went around 
yesterday morning that Peter Wirtz, prominent Waldo farmer, had died of heart failure 
at 5 o'clock in the morning. He was in apparent good health up to the day before but at 
that time complained of not feeling well, but his indisposition was laid to the heat and 
nothing was thought of it. He made a trip to Hankinson the first of the week and trans- 
acted business as usual. 

Deceased was born in Fon du Lac, WI., and was 52 years old. When a young man he 
came to North Dakota, and soon after located in Sec. 3 of Waldo Township where he resided 
up to the time of his death. He had an enviable reputation for fairness and was highly 
regarded by his neighbors and all who came in contact with him. He took an active part 
in civic affairs and was clerk of the Waldo School District for many years. Township 
Assessor, and filled other positions of trust. He is survived by the wife and a large 
family of children, and the bereaved ones have the heartfelt sympathy of all in their 
hour of sorrow. 

The funeral will be held at Wahpeton Saturday morning at 10 o'clock, services to 
be conducted at the Catholic Church. 

********** June 23, 1921 

Clyde, 19 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. H. T. Williams of Wahpeton, died recently at 
St. Mary's Hospital in Minneapolis following an illness of tubercular peritonitis. 
Interment was made at Graceville, MN., where the family resided before locating at Wah- 
peton. H. T. Williams is District Manager of the Northwestern Bell Telephone Company 
and is a frequent visitor to Hankinson and is well known to many of our people. The NEWS 
joins many other friends in extending sympathy to those bereaved, in their great sorrow. 

********** June 23, 1921 

Christ Likness, son of Ole Likness, residing north of Claire City, died last Monday 
evening from injuries received while working with a road gang the same day. The accident 
was the result of a runaway team hitched to a scraper, the scraper passing over his body, 
crushing his head and mangling the body in a shocking manner. 

********** June 30, 1921 

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Hankinson friends of the Walter S. Andrews family were greatly shocked when a message 
reached here Monday stating simply that "Florence died last night." No particulars have 
been received. Deceased, who was the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. w. S. Andrews, was 
born in Hankinson 26 years ago and her girlhood was spent here. The family moved to 
DeSmet, SD., about 15 years ago and Miss Florence was married to Harvey Schultz of that 
place about two years ago. There are no children. Deceased is survived by the husband, 
the parents and one brother, Walter Andrews, Jr. The many Hankinson friends of the family 
extend sympathy in their great loss. 

********** June 30, 1921 

Clarence Marcellus, 20, died on Wednesday evening of last week at his home in Forman 
as the result of injuries sustained Tuesday evening in an automobile accident just east 
of Cogswell on the state road. With a companion he was returning home from Cogswell. 
They attempted to pass a car just ahead of them without warning the first car. As they 
were close behind, the front car swung out to turn into a driveway leading to the Mc - 
Carten farm home. The Marcellus car was forced into the ditch, turning over twice. 

Young Marcellus climbed out of the wreckage and said he was unhurt. He was weak, 
however, and was taken home in another car, but was able to walk into the house with 
the assistance of his father and a neighbor. Internal injuries caused by the wreck 
resulted in his death a few hours later. Sammy Thompson, who was with him in the wreck, 
escaped without a scratch. The Marcellus family are pioneers in the Forman neighborhood, 
the father having been County Auditor and at one time Postmaster at Forman. 

********** June 30, 1921 

DEATH OF MRS. FLORENCE SCHULTZ nee ANDREWS 

De Smet, SD., Independent: Florence Esther Andrews, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 

W. S. Andrews of this city, was bom at Hankinson, ND., Sept. 23rd, 1894, and came to 
De Smet with her parents in 1906. She died at her home in this city, of childbirth, on 
Saturday morning, June 25th, 1921. 

She graduated from the De Smet High School in 1912. She studied music at an instit- 
ution in Florida a part of the years of 1912 and 1913. Later she attended the Northwest- 
em Conservatory of Music at Chicago in 1914. 

In 1915 she took a position in the De Smet National Bank, which place she held until 
her marriage to Harvey Schultz, August 30th, 1919. 

Funeral services for the mother and child were held at the home in this city, Monday 
June 27th, at 3 PM. , attended by a large nimiber of friends. At the cemetery, services 
were conducted by the Eastern Star Chapter, of which organization she was the worthy 
matron at the time of her death. 

In this life there is nothing more sad than the passing of a young woman who goes 
down into the Valley of the Shadow to bring forth another. 

At a time like this words of sympathy are weak, and seldom express all that friends 
feel for those who have suffered so great a loss. And yet, to those who sorrow, who are 
blinded by grief, the friendly hand and the encouraging word mean much as they proceed 

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over a part of life's pathway which at the time seems almost unbearable. 

To the grief stricken husband, whose home is thus early broken up, and to the sorrow- 
ing parents the heartfelt sympathy of the entire community is extended. 

********** July 7, 1921 

MRS. CLARA DONNELLY 
Mrs, Clara Donnelly died at her home in Great Falls, MT., July 11th of septic poison- 
ing, at the age of 29 years, 1 month and 15 days. Deceased was a member of the Erlandson 
family, pioneer settlers south of Hankinson, and the body arrived her Wednesday morning, 
accompanied by a sister of the deceased, Julia Erlandson. The funeral is being held 
today at the Dahl Church down near the state line. 

********** July 14, 1921 

Word has been received here of the death of Earl Hartman, a former Hankinson resident 
at La Moure, ND. No particulars, except that the funeral was held at La Moure. 

********** July 14, 1921 

JOSEPH J. GREEN DIED IN ST. PAUL FRIDAY EVENING 

His Sudden Death Came As Great Shock To Entire Community Death Occurred in a St. 

Paul Hospital Friday Evening Herman Pohl, a Prominent Farmer, Also Called by Grim Reap- 
er.... Mrs. Clara Donnelly nee Erlandson, Another One to Pass On 

JOSEPH J. GREEN 

Profound sorrow cast a pall over our little city when word reached here that Joseph 
J. Green had died in a St. Paul Hospital Friday evening shortly before 6 o'clock. It 
came almost as a personal bereavement to scores of our people who had known him since 
boyhood, followed his career through the schools of Hankinson, then as an industrious 
farmer, and later as one of our townsmen and businessmen. 

The absence of the immediate members of the family at the funeral has made it diffi- 
cult to secure data for a complete obituary, but we give below the facts of his life as 
far as known. 

Joseph J. Green was bom at Canton, OH., a little over 38 years ago. Left an orphan 
in early boyhood, he came west and from the age of 13 made his home with the F. F. Mc Gray 
folks, being treated as one of the family.... in fact he was like a son, and enjoyed the 
same affection and care as the children of the Mc Gray family. 

As a young lad he attended the public schools in Hankinson, and practically his entire 
life was spent here. For a couple of years he worked on cattle ranches in the vicinity 
of Kulm and in what is now Bowman County. 

A pretty romance resulted in his marriage, in 1906, to Mabel Mc Gray, a daughter 
of the family with whom he made his home, and it is seldom a couple are so devoted to 
each other as were Joe Green and his wife. She has been a real helpmate and their home 
life has been ideal. For three or four years after the Mc Gray family left the farm 
just east of town, Mr. Green occupied the farm, but about eight years ago he bought 
the Felton photograph gallery in Hankinson. He had always been interested in amateur 

(118) 



photography and soon built up a splendid business. He was a real artist and established 
a reputation for high class work that brought business from a large territory. His absol- 
ute honesty and fairness was one of his greatest assets, and he had the respect and esteem 
of everyone who enjoyed his acquaintance. Of a quick and retiring disposition, those who 
knew him best were the ones who appreciated his fine qualities as a man, a friends and a 
neighbor. For eight years he was in business next door to the writer, a daily visitor to 
this office, and a friendship was established that makes his loss keenly felt. For Joe 
Green was a real man.... and we can pay no higher tribute to his memory. 

His death was the result of a complication of ailments. During the past winter he 
was taken with appendicitis and underwent an operation in a Minneapolis Hospital. He 
returned home but did not gain strength as was expected. A few weeks later he began to 
fail and finally decided to return to the cities for treatment. He took his family xd.th 
him and the trip to the cities was made by auto... he refused to believe that his conditon 
was serious and clung to the tender thread of life tenaciously to the last. The doctors 
stated that he was in the first stage of Brights disease, and septic poisoning attacked 
the lungs, following which pneumonia ensued. The end came Friday evening at 5:55 o' 
clock. 

Besides the stricken wife, he is survived by three children. .. .Grace, 13, Agnes, 4, 
and Walter, 2 years old. An only brother, Albert, who also went to school in Hankinson 
in the '90s, died about a year ago. There are three surviving sisters: Mrs. Geo. Thomp- 
son, who lives in Montana; Mrs. Jos. Plank of Langford, SD., and Mrs. Clara Mahmel of 
Winnipeg, Canada. 

Deceased was a member of the Hankinson homestead of the American Yeomen, and also 
belonged to the local fire department. 

The funeral was held Sunday afternoon at the old home of the Mc Grays in Prescott, 
WI., where interment was made in the family lot. Wm. H. Mc Gray, a brother of Mrs. Green, 
was among those in attendance. Floral offerings were sent from here by the firemen, the 
Yeomen, the business men and individuals. 

CARD OF THANKS 

We wish to thank our Hankinson friends for the kindness shown us in our late bereave- 
ment . Especially do we thank the Yeomen and the Hankinson Fire Department for their beaut- 
iful floral offerings. „ ^ i.to j t- ■-, 

° Mrs. Joseph J. Green and Family 

F. F. Mc Gray and Family 
W. H. Mc Gray and Family 
John C. Woodhouse and Family 

********** July 14, 1921 

BODY OF JOHN P. BAUER ARRIVES IN HOBOKEN 
Joseph Bauer of Greendale received a message this morning from the War Department 
stating that the body of his son, John P. Bauer, would arrive at Hoboken, NJ., tomorrow 
(July 15th.) 

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The body will be shipped to Hankinson, but the date of arrival here is of course 
uncertain. An impressive military funeral will be held with service at St. Philip's 
Church and all ex-ervice men in this part of the country will be invited to attend. 
It is probable that the local post of the American Legion will be in charge of the ser- 
vice at the cemetery. Full announcement will be made in due time. 

John P. Bauer gave his life while bravely fighting in the defense of his county. 
He was killed in action in the Argonne engagement, and the memory of his bravery and 
supreme sacrifice will be honored to the full by the people of Hankinson and surrounding 
country. ********** july 14^ 1921 

HERMAN POHL 

Sudden and unexpected was the death of Herman Pohl, prominent Greendale farmer, 
which occurred on Wednesday morning at 3 o'clock at the Swedish Hospital in Minneapolis 
where he was under treatment for bladder trouble. He was taken ill on Wednesday of last 
week and left Saturday for the hospital where the doctors found him too weak to undergo 
an operation. He passed away Wednesday morning. 

Deceased was bom fifty years ago and was a native of Germany. At the age of 15 
years he came to America, settling first in Illinois, where he resided until 17 years 
ago at which time he came to Richland County, settling on a farm in Greendale Township, 
6 miles south of Hankinson, where he has lived ever since. He was married the same year 
to Miss Lena Petrich, daughter of Fred Petrich, who survives him. There are five child- 
ren, three boys and two girls, the eldest being 16 years of age. A brother and sister 
live in Iowa and a brother in Minnesota. 

Deceased was an industrious and prosperous farmer, enjoying the respect and esteem 
of all who knew him. He was quiet and retiring by nature, attending strictly to his own 
affairs, and was a loving husband and a kind and indulgent father. The stricken family 
have the sympathy of all in their great bereavement. 

Mrs. Pohl left Tuesday night for the city on receipt of a message announcing the 
critical condition of her husband, but arrived too late too see him alive. She arrived 
home this morning with the remains. The funeral arrangements have not been announced. 

********** July 14, 1921 

Charles Schedin, living one and one-half miles southeast of White Rock, was killed 
one afternoon recently by lightning while looking at his crops half a mile south of his 
home. The body was not discovered until noon the next day. He was discovered in the 
field with his clothes burned off and the upper part of his body charred. 

********** July 21, 1921 

MRS. W. E. PURCELL DIED AT WAHPETON TUESDAY 

Friends of Hon. W. E. Purcell, and he has hundreds of them all over the county, 

extend sympathy in the death of his wife which occurred at Wahpeton on Tuesday. Mrs. 

Purcell had been an invalid for many months and the end was not unexpected. 

The funeral is being held at Wahpeton today. 

********** July 21, 1921 

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NEW EFFINGTON BRIDE KILLED IN AUTOMOBILE CRASH 
Mrs. William Kurtz Died From Injuries In An Accident Near Sauk Centre... Mr. and Mrs. 

George Beebe of Hankinson in the Car but Escaped Injury Victim was Bride of Well Known 

New Effington Business Man.... Mrs. Beebe Arrived Home Last Evening 

******** 

Injured in an automobile accident near Sauk Centre, MN., Mrs. W. J. Kurtz of New 
Effington died aboard a train on which she was being rushed to a Minneapolis Hospital 
yesterday. 

With her husband at the wheel and Mr. and Mrs. Georg Beebe of Hankinson as passengers 

Mrs. Kurtz was on her way to Minneapolis by auto to visit her brother, near Sauk Centre. 
Mr. Kurtz encountered a sharp curve in the road and his machine plunged into a pole. 

The impact first knocked open a fore door of the car and threw Mrs. Kurtz partly 
through it. As she lay partly in and partly out of the automobile, the door was jammed 
shut and she was struck a stunning blow in the head which rendered her unconscious. The 
injured woman was taken to Sauk Centre, where physicians advised that she be taken to 
Minneapolis. 

The other occupants of the car were not seriously injured. Mrs. Beebe arrived in 
Hankinson last night but is none the worse for her experience aside from the shock. 

Mrs. Kurtz was a bride of but a few weeks, and before her marriage was a Fergus 
Falls girl. Mr. Kurtz is a New Effington business man and is quite well known through 
out this part of the state as a semi-professional wrestler. 

********** July 21, 1921 

DR. G. M. MORTON OF NEW EFFINGTON DEAD 

Dr. G. M. Morton of New Effington dropped dead on the street at Hammer, Tuesday 
of heart failure. He had just driven into the village in his automobile and alighted 
from the car when the stroke came. Death was almost instantaneous. 

Dr. Morton was widely known throughout Roberts County and southern Richland. He 
was located at Sisseton in the early days, and then opened an office at the old town of 
Effington, also opening a drug store. He moved his store to New Effington when that 
town was started but was burned out later, since which time he has confined his activities 
to the practice of his profession. He had been troubled with a weak heart for years. 

He is survived by a wife and three grown children. 

********** July 21, 1921 

BOY TRAMPLED TO DEATH BY A FRIGHTENED HORSE 
Entangled in the harness of a team he was unhitching, Norman George, 13 year old 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Simon Muffie of near Straubville, Sargent County, was knocked down 
and trampled to death by one of the horses, which, frightened, pranced up and down upon 
the helpless youth. The boy was dead before a doctor could arrive. 

********** July 28, 1921 

MILITARY FUNERAL FOR FORMER HANKINSON BOY 

Breckenridge Telegram: Members of this city's post of the American Legion and 

Machine Company "D" are arranging plans for a military funeral to be held for Gustav 

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J. Pelvit, who was killed in the Argonne in October of 1918. 

The body has arrived in Hoboken and is being shipped to Breckenridge , according to 
a message received Saturday from the War Department by the dead soldier's father, Willian 
Pelvit, North 11th St. 

Funeral services are to be held by Mr. Rohe, pastor of Immanuel Lutheran Church, 
Wahpeton, and probably will be held from the Pelvit home. 

********** July 28, 1921 

LAST RITES FOR HERO OF ARGONNE TO BE HELD HERE 
Funeral Services for John P. Bauer Will Be Held Monday at 10 AM. 

Body is Expected to Reach Here on Saturday or Sunday Was Killed in Action in the 

Argonne Son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Bauer of Greendale Died the Death of a Hero 

Funeral service for the late John P. Bauer, who gave up his life while fighting 
for his country, will be held at St. Philip's Church next Monday morning at 10 o'clock. 
The services will be conducted by Rev. Jos. F. Studnicka. 

The message was received Tuesday to the effect that the body was being shipped that 
day from Hoboken, NJ., and it is expected to arrive here Saturday or Sunday at the latest. 

LARGE ATTENDANCE EXPECTED 
The attendance will doubtless exceed that at any funeral ever held in Hankinson. 
Hundreds of friends of the family, as well as all patriotic citizens, will be on hand 
to pay the last tribute of respect to one of our boys who made the supreme sacrifice on 
the fields of France during the World War. 

KILLED IN ARGONNE FIGHTING 

John P. Bauer was a private in Co. I, 138th Infantry; a son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
Bauer of Greendale Township, and was born on Oct. 25th, 1894, at Lindsay, TX., coming to 
North Dakota with his parents vzhile a small boy. He entered the service on March 28th, 
1918, and received his training at Camp Dodge, lA. , went overseas on May 26th, 1918, and 
in action on Sept. 26th, 1918; fought at Meuse-Argonne Sept. 26-27th, and was killed in 
action on Sept. 28th. 

Members of the American Legion and all ex-service men are requested to attend the 
service in uniform, and there will be large delegations from the Legions posts at Lidger- 
wood and Fairmount as well as the Hankinson Legionaires. 

All ladies who were members of the Red Cross and Surgical Dressing organizations 
are requested to meet at the Public Library Saturday evening to arrange for attendance 
at the funeral. ********** July 28, 1921 

DEATH OF MRS. PRICE AT MINNEAPOLIS FRIDAY 

Funeral services for Mrs. Sarah Adelaide Grant Price, mother of City Fire Marshall 
Arthur C. Price, who died late yesterday afternoon at the home of her daughter, Mrs. 
Tony K. Wilson at Tonka Bay, will be conducted on Monday at 2 PM. , at the E. M. Dauphine 
Undertaking rooms, 613 Eighth Ave. S. Interment will be made at Crystal Lake Cemetery. 

Mrs. Price was 76 years old and she and her husband were among the early residents 

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of Minneapolis. She was bom in Steuben County, New York, and came to Minneapolis with 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Francis F. Geer Grant, when a girl. Her father was a second 
cousin of General U. S. Grant. In 1862 she was married to James C. Price at Monticello. 
MINNEAPOLIS JOURNAL, July 22nd 

********** July 28, 1921 

FUNERAL OF AUTO VICTIM HELD AT NEW EFFINGTON 

Funeral services were held at New Effington on Monday for Mrs. W. J. Kurtz, the 
bride of two weeks who was killed in an auto accident near Sauk Centre, MN., on Wednesday 
of last week. It is said the attendance was the largest in the history of the village 
of New Effington. 

Mrs. George Beebe of this city, who was a passenger in the car at the time of the 
accident, informs the NEWS that the smash-up was unavoidable and no blame can be attach- 
ed to Mr. Kurtz, the driver. It was after 10 o'clock at night and the car was being drive 
at a speed of about 30 miles an hour. A horseshoe curve in the road makes the turn a dan- 
gerous one. Mrs. Kurtz was nearly asleep in the seat beside her husband and one hand was 
resting on the door of the car. A bump in the road caused the car to jump slightly, and 
it is thought Mrs. Kurtz involuntarily lurched forward, her hand pressing open the door 
of the car. The open door struck a telephone pole, slamming it violently against Mrs. 
Kurtz's side, and it was internal injuries thus sustained that caused her death a few 
hours later. 

Other passengers in the car were Mrs. Beebe of this city, Mrs. Brainard of St. Paul, 
and Miss Josephine Beito of New Effington, but no one, aside from Mrs. Kurtz was injured. 
The latter remained conscious and at first it was thought her injuries were not serious. 

The horseshoe curve in the road at this point is a dangerous one and has been the 
scene of numerous accidents. 



********** 



July 28, 1921 



John Burkhardt, a transient who recently joined the jungle gang near Lidgerwood, was 
taken suddenly ill and died at the Lidgerwood Hospital a few moments after his arrival 
at the institution. He gave his age as 51 years and carried an I. W. W. card. Telegrams 
to an address found in his pockets brought no reply and he was buried at county expense. 

********** July 28, 1921 

Merle Alvin, baby son of Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Dougherty of Enderlin, met death in a 
shocking manner one day last week. The child had been left at the home of a neighbor 
while the parents attended a dancing party. The baby found a 38 calibre revolver under 
a pillow and pressed the trigger by using both thumbs. There was a single cartridge 
in the gun. The neighbor was out of the house at the time she heard the report of the 
gun, and found the baby with a bullet through his body. He died two hours later. 

********** July 28, 1921 

The death of Isaac Lincoln at Aberdeen last Saturday is a distinct loss to the 
people of South Dakota. Mr. Lincoln's career shows the possibilities of this country 
for a boy with the right stuff in him. He landed in Sargent County in the early '80's 

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practically penniless, but had the ambition and ability to make his own way in the world. 

For the past twenty years he has been one of the leading citizens of South Dakota, 
a power in business and political circles, and at his death was rated as one of the few 
millionaires in the state. But his wealth is not what endeared him to the people of 

Aberdeen it was his sterling worth as a man and his imswerving loyalty to his friends. 

"IKE" Lincoln, good neighbor and loyal friend, he has always remained in the memory of 
his pioneer friends in Sargent County. 

********** July 28, 1921 

The two year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hruby, living north of Stiles, 
died Thursday evening as a result of burns sustained when she fell into a tub of boil- 
ing water about noon of the same day. 

The boiling water had been removed from the stove a few minutes before and the 
little girl, playing about the floor, fell into it. She was rescued at once but was 
terribly scaled. A doctor was called and everything possible done for the little 
sufferer, but she passed away ten hours after the accident. 

The funeral was held Saturday at the Catholic Church in Lidgerwood. 

********** August 4, 1921 

MILITARY FUNERAL FOR JOHN P. BAUER HERO OF ARGONNE 

Hankinson Boy, Killed in France, Buried With Full Military Honors. .. .Impressive 
and Beautiful Service as Body of John P. Bauer is Laid at Rest. .. .Hundreds Present to 
Pay Last Tribute to Hankinson Hero. .. .Deserved Honors for Fallen Soldier. 

Impressive ceremonies marked the funeral service for the late John P. Bauer, Hank- 
inson boy klled in action in the Argonne in 1918, which took place Monday morning. 

The remains arrived Saturday morning at 3:40 on the Great Northern, accompanied by 
a Military escort from the War Department. 

The body was met at the train by a delegation from the American Legion and the cask- 
et was borne to the Wipperman Hall, which was decorated elaborately with the national 
colors and flowers. The casket of rich bronze, provided by a grateful government for 
all soldiers brought home from the World War Cemeteries, was placed on a catafalque on 
either side of which were placed three handsome candelabra with lighted candles. The 
casket reposed in state until Monday morning during which time a guard of honor from 
the Legion post continually remained on duty. Hundreds of people visited the hall to 
pay their final respect to our fallen hero. 

Early Monday morning a crowd began to assemble, notably visitors from Lidgerwood 
and Fairmount. About 25 cars represented the Women's Auxiliary of the American Legion 
at Lidgerwood. 

At 9:40 Rev. Jos. F. Studnicka, pastor of St. Philip's Church, conducted a short 
service at the hall, whereupon the military procession formed as follows: Color bearer, 
band, military escort with firing squad, clergy, cassion bearing the casket drawn by 
four mounted horses, pall bearers, mourners, public. 

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The Church was elaborately decorated with the national colors, adding a deep somber 
aspect to the solemnity of the magnificient church. The musical program was rendered 
by a select choir under the direction of Mrs. C. H, Mc Donell, while Rev. P. A, Duerr of 
Lidgerwood presided at the organ. 

Solemn High Requiem Mass was sung by the pastor of the deceased. Rev. Jos. F. Stud- 
nicka, assisted by Rev. Herman Wilkes of Mantador as deacon. Rev. John Maluski of Geneseo 
as subdeacon and Rev. Edward Mc Ardle of Fairmount as master of ceremonies. 

After the impressive burial ceremony of the Catholic Church, Father Studnicka with 
his well known power of eloguence delivered an impressive sermon, which will long be re- 
membered by all who were privileged to hear him. He dwelt plainly and forcibly upon the 
sacrifice a soldier offers in defense of his fellowman. "No greater sacrifice can one 
give for his fellow man than to lie down his own life for him." He impressed upon his 
hearers the duty of appreciation every citizen owes not only to the militant forces of 
the government, but to the government itself, for the opportunities extended to all for 
peace and prosperity under the protection of our constitution. He extolled the work of 
the American Legion and allied organizations, both during and after the war, and added 
that to a great extent, upon their unity and efforts, will depend not only the prevent- 
ion of future wars, but the well being of our citizens now being formed, in the melting 
post, into a happy cosmopolitan whole. 

Of the dead hero he admonished his hearers, saying: "Lower him gently, lower him 
tenderly, lower him slowly into his last resting place, and while lowering him slowly, 
gently and tenderly, with heads bowed resolve to ever firmly appreciate the cause for 
which he died." 

After the church ceremony the same line of procession formed and proceeded, accomp- 
anied by the solemn strains of the band music, to the Catholic Cemetery southwest of town. 

The burial lot was roped off and carpeted with beautiful flowers. In a most orderly 

manner the vast crowd surrounded the grave. The casket was borne from the cassion to the 

grave, the American Legion standing at attention, the clergy at the head of the grave, 

the parents and brothers and sisters, at the north, the firing squad, at the foot. The 

band played a funeral dirge, the firing squad fired its salute, the bugles sounded taps, 

and an echo came back saying, "I will met you again," a scene passed into hisotry of our 

city that will never be forgotten. 

********** August 4, 1921 

DEATH OF MRS. R. H. BLADOW FRIDAY 
The death of Mrs. R. H. Bladow occurred at her home a few miles north of this city 
Friday morning, July 29th, after an illness extending over many months. It had been 
known for weeks that she was gradually slipping away, but every means known to medical 
science was exhausted in a vain effort to save her life. Dropsy with complications was 
the cause of her death. 

Meta Spreckles was bom on April 30th, 188A, in Summit Township, her parents being 
Mr. and Mrs. D. Spreckles. Her entire life was spent in Richland County, and for many 

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years the Spreckles family have resided in Hankinson. 

In 1913 she was married to R. H. Bladow, and since that time they have lived on the 
farm north of this city. There are no children. 

By a strange coincidence her death occurred on the 12th anniversary of the drowning 
of her brother in Lake Elsie, and it was on the 29th day of October, two years ago that 
a sister died. 

Deceased is survived by the stricken husband, the parents, and several brothers and 
sisters. She had a large circle of friends throughout this part of the county, and her 
untimely death is keenly felt. The sympathy of all goes out to the bereaved ones. 

The funeral was held on Sunday, services being conducted by Rev. Hilgendorf at St. 
John's Church. 

The following verse was a favorite of the deceased and it was her request that the 
same be published following her obituary: 

"I left this world of sorrow. Could not stay until tomorrow: 
Mourn not for me or sorrow take. But love each other for my sake: 
Weep not but be content. My life to you was only lent; 
My grave you know, my bed you see. Prepare yourself to follow me. 
In love we lived, in peace I died. You asked my life but God denied." 

* ********* 

CARD OF THANKS 
To the friends and neighbors who extended help and sympathy in the long illness and 
following the death of our loved one, we extend our heartfelt gratitude. 

R. H. Bladow 

Mr. and Mrs. D. Spreckels 
Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Spreckels 
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Dumke, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Karl Bladow 

********** August 4, 1921 

DWIGHT FARMER MEETS DEATH BENEATH BINDER 
Henry Quamme, 65, prominent Richland County farmer living near Dwight, died late 
Wednesday afternoon of last week while being rushed to the Wahpeton Hospital, from injur- 
ies sustained when his horses, which had become frightened by a rabbit, ran away, dragg- 
ing him with them for a distance of 80 rods. 

Quamme was using a binder in his fields and stepped in front of the horses to fix 
a loosened strap. The sudden appearance of a rabbit nearby frightened them and they 
ran away, dragging the aged farmer with them. He was picked up unconscious by harvest 
hands who had witnessed the accident . 

He was terribly cut about the face and body, his right hip was broken and that side 
of his body badly mangled. He died half an hour later while being taken to the hospital. 
Quamme, who came to Richland County in 1881, is survived by his wife and seven grown 

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children. This spring his brother, Andrew Quamine, died at the St. Francis Hospital after 
a long illness from Brights disease. The two brothers had married sisters several years 
ago and their deaths within three months of each other leaves two sisters widowed. 

********** August 11, 1921 

HANKINSON BOY DROWNED IN LAKE ELSIE SATURDAY 

"BUDDY," Son of Dr. and Mrs. Mc Donell, Drowned in Lake Elsie 

"Buddy" and "Babe" Green Were in a Rowboat Without Oars and Boat was Blown Out From 
Shore, and Lads Attempted to Swim to Safety .One Boy Save, Other Drowned 



John Archibald, better known as "Buddy," thirteen year old son of Dr. and Mrs. C, H. 
Mc Donell of this city, was drowned in Lake Elsie late Saturday afternoon while attempting 
to swim from a row boat to shore. The body was recovered an hour and a half later. 

"Buddy" with a number of other boys about his o\%m age, was spending the day camping 
near the lake. In company with Rosmand Green, commonly called "Babe," son of Mr. and Mrs. 
John Green, he had visited the Lundgren home near the lake and also the stand at the pav- 
ilion. Going back to join their companions at their camp in the hills back of the lake, 
the lads discovered a row boat belonging to Frank Richscheid on the shore at the northwest 
corner of the lake on "no man's land," a strip of ground that is still government property. 
The boys clambered into the boat and pushed out a few feet into the lake. A high wind, 
almost gale a gale, was blowing from the north, and before the boys realized it the boat 
had drifted out about 100 feet from shore. They had no oars or paddle and apparently be- 
came rather panic stricken. Both could swim well and "Buddy" proposed that they jump 
from the boat and swim to shore. The water at that point was about seven feet deep but 
they were less than a hundred feet from shore and apparently thought they could make it 
all right. The lads were dressed in khaki suits with leggings, and "Buddy" took of f his 
leggings and plunged over the side of the boat, "Babe" following a moment later. But the 
strong wind was too much for them, and they could make no headway towards shore. "Babe" 
called for help and turned over on his back and floated. One of the boys on shore notif- 
ied Frances Lundell, who was the only one on the picnic grounds, and she sent a car up to 
the Lundgren home to alarm the Lundgrens and telephone to town. Miss Lundell rushed to 
the scene of the accident and waded and swam towards where "Babe" was still floating on 
his back, but found she could not rescue him. She rushed back for one of the Lundgren 
boats and had dragged it along shore for some distance when Mr. Lundgren arrived and 
took charge of the work. Armed with only a limb to propel the boat, he finally rescued 
"Babe" but did not know at the time that "Buddy" was also in the water. Nearly half an 
hour had elapsed since the boys leaped from their boat, and it is thought "Buddy" went 
down with in a few minutes. "Babe" says he did not see him after he had turned on his 
back to float. "Babe" said he was thoroughly exhausted from his efforts to keep above 
water, and could not have held out much longer. 

News of the sad accident was telephoned to town from the Lundgren home and the fire 
alarm was sounded. In a few moments scores of autos were headed for the scene and no 

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time was lost in the effort to recover the body of little "Buddy" known to nearly 

everyone and a popular favorite. About 5:30 PM, , Oswald Ponath, treading water, came 
upon the body and with the assistance of Dr. E. Williams recovered it in about seven feet 
of water but less than a hundred feet from shore. About an hour and twenty minutes had 
elapsed since he went down and efforts to resuscitate him proved useless. The waters of 
Lake Elsie had claimed another victim. 

HAPPENED WEST OF PAVILION 

There is no blame attached to anyone for the deplorable accident. Mr. Lundgren has 
refused to let his boats out except to experienced boatmen and had no control over the 
boat used by the boys. The accident happened some distance west of the Pavilion grounds 
and on a portion of the lake over which Mr. Lundgren has no control. We make this explan- 
ation in justice to Mr. Lundgren who has used every precaution to prevent accidents on 
the lake. 

It is a coincidence that this accident occurred at the identical spot where Barker- 
Spreckels double drowning occurred twelve years ago, and in the same part of the lake 
where two young people from Mooreton were drowned last year. 

Thousands of people have availed themselves of the beauties and cooling waters of 
the lake during the present season, and at such resorts there is always an element of 

'^^^'^^^- "BUDDY" A FAVORITE 

John Archibald Mc Donell was bom in Hankinson, July 29th, 1908, and his entire life 
was spent here. He was an exceptionally bright little fellow and would have entered high 
school this fall, having completed the eighth grade last year. He was fond of sports 
and outdoor life, and since babyhood has been the mascot and bat boy for the Hankinson 
ball team. He was a manly little chap, and a great favorite with everyone. The idol of 
the household of three children, the tragic fate meted out to him cames at a heartbreak- 
ing shock to the parents. Little can be said in words to comfort the stricken family, 
but human sjmipathy finds expression in other ways, and those who passed through a similar 
experience can neasure the depth of the sorrow that envelopes the home bereft. 

FUNERAL HELD TUESDAY 

The funeral was held Tuesday morning with services at St. Philip's Church. The 
tiny casket was almost hidden in flowers, one of the most beautiful displays of floral 
offerings ever seen. An immense gathering of sympathizing friends were present and the 
scene was touchingly beautiful. "Buddy" was well known and a favorite with everyone, 
and the floral offerings attested the general sorrow of the community. Rev. Jos. F. 
Studnicka was in charge of the service, assisted by Rev. Jos. Cieminski of Minneapolis. 
Interment was made in the Catholic Cemetery. 

A FEW WORDS OF APPRECIATION 
To Our Dear Good and Kind Friends: 

We wish to thank you for your kindness to us in our hours of trial, and it goes 
far toward restoring the strength and courage. We certainly appreciate the generous 
outpouring of kindness and feeling on the part of all our friends. 

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Now our son John has gone, one feels that words, winged though they may be, must 
fail entirely to express what he meant to us while here. He lived, worked, loved and 
was loved, and passing, leaves behind delightful memories and an impress for good upon 
his fellows which will last until we all reach the trail's end. 

Dr. Charles H. Mc Donell 

Mary Rose Mc Donell 

Eva Mc Donell 

Charles H. Mc Donell, Jr. 

********** August 11, 1921 

WOMAN KILLED WHEN KEROSENE EXPLODES 
Mrs. C. C. Clarke, 25, wife of a farmer four miles northwest of Milnor, died last 
Friday morning from bums received the previous day when a can of kerosene exploded while 
she was pouring the liquid from a can into the stove. The clothing was entirely burned 
from her body and doctors stated that three-fourths of her skin was burned. 

The husband and a hired girl were also severly burned while trying to rescue Mrs. 
Clarke from the flames that enveloped her. The family had resided in the neighborhood 
for about two years and came there from Belfield, ND. 

********** August 11, 1921 

Herbert Weston, pioneer resident of Valley City and father of Lieut. Bert Weston 
of Hankinson's old Company L, died of heart failure last week while sitting in a chair 
on his front porch. He was waiting to take the street car to the Soo depot for a short 
visit to Sheldon to see his son Bert, but failed to get up when the car came along. A 
member of the family investigated and found that he had passed away. 

********** August 11, 1921 

A casket which came to the Frank Weling family of Kent, MN. , supposed to contain 
the remains of their brother John Weling, proved to contain the body of an uncle, Henry 
Weling, whom they had seldom heard from and had never seen for twenty years. 

********** August 11, 1921 

MAN BREAKS NECK IN FALL FROM AN EMPTY GRAIN TANK 

Louis Noding, Aged Farmer is the Victim: Happened Near Great Bend. .. .Accident 
Happened Near Old Lutheran Church Two Miles South of Great Bend. .. .Deceased Was Here From 
His Home in Minnesota. . .Looking After Farm Interests. ... 72 Years Old. 

Louis Noding, 72, broke his neck in falling from an empty grain wagon at 4 o'clock 
Wednesday afternoon at a point almost opposite the farm home of Rev. T.Hinck, two miles 
south of Great Bend. He did not regain consciousness and died within twenty minutes 
after the accident occurred. 

Deceased is the father of Mrs. Albrecht, whose husband is farming the old Shipe 
place north of Sonora. Mr. Noding, whose home is at Westport, MN., also owned a farm 
near Fairmount and came here two months ago to look after his interests and help harvest 
and thresh the crop. He was staying with his daughter, Mrs. Albrecht, and yesterday was 

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helping haul grain to Great Bend. He took a load to market in the afternoon and was 
returning home about 4 o'clock. The horses were on a walk when he toppled from the 
seat and his neck was broken in the fall to the ground. 

No one witnessed the accident but Rev. T. Hinck was on the scene a few minutes later. 
The injured man was taken to the house but died within a few minutes, having never regained 
consciousness. 

The body was brought to the Wipperman Undertaking Rooms in this city where it is today 
being prepared for shipment tomorrow to the old home at Westport, MN., for burial. The 
funeral will probably be held on Sunday, 

Deceased is survived by the wife, two sons and four daughters. Mrs, Noding arrived 
this morning with one daughter and they will accompany the body on the journey to the 
old home. ********** August 18, 1921 

Albert J. Houdek, son of Mr, and Mrs. James Houdek of Lidgerwood, died on Monday 
of last week of tetanus commonly known as lock-jaw. The lad was 6 years and 7 months old. 

About nine weeks ago, while playing, he accidentally cut his foot on a piece of glass. 
Medical attention was given to the wound. There was difficulty in stopping the flow of 
blood from the wound, but it was supposed to be healing nicely until Saturday before his 
death when tetanus set in. 



********** 



August 18, 1921 



Ed Larson, a young man whose home is near Rosholt, was killed while threshing near 
Wheaton on Monday of last week. He was driving a bundle wagon and fell from the load in 
front of the wheels. The team ran away and he sustained injuries from which he died 
before they reached the hospital. 

********** August 18, 1921 

The Wipperman Auto Hearse was called to Cayuga Monday for use at the funeral of 
Martin Cryan, one of the pioneer residents of Sargent County, which was held at the 
Catholic Church at Cayuga that day. Deceased was 57 years old and well known through- 
out eastern Sargent County. ^^^^jt***** August 18, 1921 
MILITARY FUNERAL FOR FRANK NELSON TO BE HELD IN MINNEAPOLIS 

Mrs. Nina Nims Nelson received a message this week stating that the body of her hus- 
band, Frank Nelson, killed in action during the World War, would reach Hoboken, NY., on 
Aug. 25th (today.) The remains will be forwarded to Minneapolis where a military funeral 
will be held. 

Frank Nelson was the first Hankinson boy to respond to the draft. He was at that 
time employed as Cashier for the Soo Company at this point and had been married but a 
very shot time, his bride being Miss Nina Nims of Hankinson. He was born on Dec. 19th, 
1892, at Paynesville, MN., his parents being Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Nelson. He entered the 
service on Sept. 22, 1917, at Wahpeton and was sent to the training camp at Camp Dodge, 
lA., where he became a member of the 58th Infantry; was transferred to Camp Pike, AR. , 
in November, 1917; transferred to Camp Mills, NY., in March of 1918; overseas in April 

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of 1918; into action in July of 1918; fought at Chateau-Thierry; Reported missing on July 
18th, 1918, and later reported killed in action on July 18, 1918. 

Mrs. Nelson is awaiting a message giving the date of the arrival of the body at Minnea- 
polis when, with her mother, she will leave to attend the funeral. 

********** August 18, 1921 

Another North Dakota pioneer, one who was prominent in the material and political aff- 
airs of our state, passed on this week when Thomas F. Marshall died at his summer home at 
Detroit, MN. He had been a sufferer from heart trouble for several years and this was the 
cause of his death. Tom Marshall, as he was familiarly known, served North Dakota well, 
both to the state senate and as a member of congress. He was a tireless worker and accomp- 
lished much in public life, giving the same energy to his official duties that he did to 
his private affairs. His death is a distinct loss to the entire state. 

********** August 25, 1921 

DEATH OF MRS. GUSTAV WALLMAN WEDNESDAY 
The death of Mrs. Gustav Wallman occurred Wednesday morning at 4 o'clock following 
an illness of three weeks, of typhoid fever. Complications ensued that hastened the end. 
Deceased was bom near Hankinson on March 18, 1894, and grew to womanhood here. She 
was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Kohrt. About three months ago she was married to Gust- 
ave Wallman, prominent young farmer of the same neighborhood. Her married life was brief, 
and the stricken husband has the sincere sympathy of all in his bereavement. 

Other surviving relatives are the parents, four brothers and three sisters. The fun- 
eral is being held this afternoon at the Lutheran Church, Rev. J. P. Klausler conducting 
the services. Interment will be made in the Lutheran Cemetery north of town. 

********** September 1, 1921 

MRS. W. A. BORK DIED THIS MORNING OF HEART FAILURE 
Mrs. W. A. Bork died suddenly of heart failure at her home eight miles southeast of 
Hankinson, in Greendale Township, this morning. She had been in poor health for some time 
but her condition was not considered serious. She called for a little breakfast and when 
a member of the family reached the bedside she fell over dead. 

Deceased was 35 years old the last 4th of July and is survived by the husband, four 
small children and several step-children. Her only other relative, in this neighborhood 
is a sister, Mrs. George Bladow. 

The funeral will be held Saturday with services at the Immanuel Ev. Church in this city. 

********** September 1, 1921 

John Pelzl died at his home in Barney on Sept. 5th, after an illness of several weeks. 
The cause of his death was the bursting of a large blood vessel on the lungs. 

Deceased was bom in Austria, Sept. 6th, 1857, and would have been 64 years old on the 

day following his death. At the age of 19 he came to this country and since that time has 

lived in Minnesota and North Dakota. He was engaged in the machinery business at Barney 

at the time of his death. He is survived by his wife and eleven children. 

********** September 22, 1921 

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DID HOLLEY COMMIT SUICIDE OR WAS IT MURDER? 

John Holley, Tenant on A. H. Brown's Farm Near Fairmount, Dies in Well Apparently 

A Case of Suicide, but Condition of the Body Indicates Possibility of Foul Play. . .Autopsy 
Held and Vital Organs Sent to Fargo for Analysis A Sunday Night Tragedy 

Did John Holley commit suicide or was his body thrown into a well to conceal a murder? 
That problem will not be solved until the vital organs of the unfortunate man, who was 
found dead in an old well on A. H. Brown's farm, 2% miles northeast of Fairmount, have been 
analyzed to learn whether there is any condition that might indicate death other than by 
drowning . 

John Holley was about 70 years old, and had been Mr. Brown's tenant on the place the 
past season. The family consisted only of himself and his wife. The wife says she last 
saw him alive about 4 o'clock last Sunday afternoon. His failure to put in an appearance 
for the evening meal resulted in a search which revealed the body in the well... a flowing 
tubular well with a reservoir into which the water flowed to a depth sufficient to drown 
a man. 

The well is protected in such a manner that accidentally falling into it is almost out 
of the question. At first the case had all the appearances of a suicide. But no motive 
could be found and an examination showed no water on the lungs such as would be the case 
in the event of drowning. 

An inquest was held on Monday, and an autopsy was decided upon. Certain vital organs 
were removed and have been sent to Fargo, and it will probably be several days before the 
result of the examination is known. 

Little is known of the Holley family. They came to Richland County in 1918 from Mc- 
Lean County and for a year or two occupied a rented farm between Wahpeton and Mooreton. 
For the past season they have been tenants on the place owned by A. H. Brown of Hankinson 
and known as the old Dennstedt farm 2^, miles northeast of Fairmount. Their lease on the 
place expires on October 1st. ^^^^^^^^^^ September 29, 1921 

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. George Schultz, residing south of town, died Friday, 
twenty-four hours after birth. The funeral was held on Saturday. 

********** September 29, 1921 

S. H. Woolsey left here Saturday evening for Billings, MT., after receiving a message 
that his mother had had a paralytic stroke and was sinking fast. Mrs. Woolsey died Tues- 
day morning at 3 o'clock. The body will be taken to Wahpeton for burial. 

Deceased was at one time a resident of Hankinson and many old friends here will learn 
with regret of her demise. We hope to print a more extended obituary next week. 

A message received yesterday states that the funeral will be held at Wahpeton Friday. 

********** September 29, 1921 

DEATH OF MRS. BEHLE LEAVES FAMILY OF ELEVEN PARENTLESS 
Widowed Mother of Eleven Children Passes to the Great Beyond 

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One of the saddest occurrences it has ever been our duty to record is the death of 
Maria Johnette Behle which occurred on Sunday, Oct. 2nd, at one o'clock in the afternoon 
at the farm home in southern Brightwood Township . 

By the death of this estimable widow a family of eleven children, the eldest 22 years 
old, are left to make their way in the world bereft of both father and mother. 

Maria Johnette Behle was born in Germany and at the time of her death was 47 years, 
7 months and 16 days old. Twenty seven years ago she came to America, locating first at 
Muscatine, lA. Four years later she was married to Henry Behle of that city. They then 
moved to Buckman, MN. , where they resided for four years. The family then came to North 
Dakota and settled on a homestead on the south edge of Brightwood Township, a few miles 
southwest of Hankinson and there they have since resided. 

The husband died on Nov. Ath, 1914, seven years ago, and the widow with her little 
ones took up the burden of maintaining the home. The mother labored hard under many diff- 
iculties and won the friendship and esteem of her neighbors by her untiring energy and 
unfailing good nature. She was taken ill a few days ago with some internal trouble and 
passed away Sunday afternoon. 

Following are the names and ages of the eleven children who survive: Friederike, 22; 
Henrich, 21; Louise, 19; Katherine, 18; Anna 16, Fredrick, 15; Christine, 14, Carl, 13; 
Maria, 10; Johanette, 8; and William, 6. The only other surviving relatives are a brother 
in Germany and a sister in Oregon. 

The funeral was held Tuesday afternoon with services at the home at 1 o'clock, and at 
the Immanuel Evangelical Church at two with Rev. C. Oberdoester in charge. A large gather- 
ing of neighbors and friends attended the last rites. Interment was made in the Ev. Ceme- 
tery southwest of the city. ********** October 6, 1921 

George E. Miller, pioneer Wahpeton business man and proprietor of a drug store at that 
place, died Saturday on his 44th birthday. Death was due to cancer of the esophagus and 
he had been in failing health for four years. 

********** October 6, 1921 

OBITUARY 

Billings (Montana) Gazette, Oct. 2nd The body of the late Mrs. Sabina M. Woolsey, 

who died in Billings last week, following a stroke of paralysis, was taken to Wahpeton, ND., 
for burial in the family plot beside the remains of her husband and daughter. Funeral ser- 
vices were held at Smith's Funeral Home, Wednesday afternoon. The Rev. George David Wolfe, 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church officiated and was assisted by the Rev. W. D. Whan of the 
Baptist Church. Selections favored by Mrs. Woolsey in her lifetime were sung by Ben Lewis 
and Mrs. J. B. Cook. 

Mrs. Woolsey was stricken with paralysis a week ago yesterday and succumbed on Tuesday. 
She was born on Dec. 19th, 1841, in Ohio. At the age of two she moved with her parents to 
northeastern Indiana, then a wilderness. She acquired such education as that region offered 
and taught school. At the age of 20 she was united in marriage with Jotham Woolsey. Six 

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children, four sons and two daughters, resulted from this union. All of the children, 
with the exception of the youngest daughter are still living. 

In 1887 the family moved to Sargent County, North Dakota, where they settled on a 
homestead. While in her teens, Mrs. Woolsey joined the Methodist Church and upon moving 
to North Dakota she became prominent in religious affairs of that community, helping to 
organize the first Simday School and Church there. She took an active part in the prohit- 
ition and suffrage movements and for several years was county superintendent of the W. C. 
T. U. At the time of her death Mrs. Woolsey was a life member of the North Dakota W. C. T. 
U. During her years of pioneering, it was said of her that no storm was too severe and no 
person too poor to prevent her from going to the relief of the sick and suffering. 

After the death of Mr. Woolsey, 10 years ago, Mrs. Woolsey came to Billings and made 
her home with her daughter. Miss Ellen M. Woolsey, who is in the employ of Drs. Waktain, 
Stripp and Allard. 

Besides the five children, Mrs. Woolsey is survived by nine grandchildren and one 
great-grandchild. ********** October 6, 1921 

E, L. Howard, aged about 63, who had been employed with the Twichell Road Construction 
crew near Rutland, died suddenly on Sunday of last week of heart failure. Investigation 
of his effects disclosed that his winter home was at the Summit Hotel, Minneapolis, and 
that he had a brother and two sisters in Michigan. A bank book in his pocket indicated that 
he had about $200 on deposit in the First National Bank of Minneapolis, and he also had 
over $100 in cash on his person. He had a Woodmen policy of $2,000 and apparently was 
also a member of the I. 0. 0. F. Under instructions from Michigan relatives, who were 
notified of his death, interment was made in the Forman Cemetery. 

********** October 13, 1921 

Henry H. Willardt, a former Wahpeton business man, committed sucicide in a St. Paul 
hotel last Thursday by shooting hemself through the head. Willardt left Wahpeton about 
twelve years ago and suffered business reverses that put him "down and out." He was a 
pioneer resident of Wahpeton, locating there 40 years ago. 

********** October 20, 1921 

Brooding over her long illness, believed incurable, Mrs, Lee Mc Donald of Monango 
shot and killed her oldest son, Gilford, 12, and then tried to take her own life by 
poison. It is believed that brooding over her illness caused her mind to become unbalanced 
For a time her condition was serious but it is thought she will recover. 

********** October 27, 1921 

G. W. Plaisted, Minnesota pioneer and resident for years of Breckenridge where he was 
known as "Old Hay King," because he had bought and sold more hay than any other man for 
miles around, died last week at Bruno, MN. He was 101 years old. Two sons live at Breck- 
enridge. Plaisted was born in New Hampshire in 1819. His parents were of revolutionary 
stock. ********** October 27, 1921 

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Henry Wipperman drove the auto hearse to Breckenridge on Monday to convey the remains 
of Chas. Marine, 51 years old, from the St. Francis Hospital to the family home at Wyndmere. 
His death resulted from pneumonia. Deceased was a native of Indiana and formerly was a fanr 
er near Wyndmere, moving to the village a couple of yars ago. He is survived by a wife and 
several children. ********** October 27, 1921 

Mrs. W. 0. Wilson of Rosholt died at Fairmount on Wednesday evening of last week at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. James Hardy after a few days illness which followed a stroke of 
apoplexy. Mrs. Wilson came to Fairmount the Sunday preceeding her death. She was enroute 
to Mason City, lA., where she was accompanying the body of her husband who had died a few 
days previous, for burial. She was stricken with paralysis and was confined to the Hardy 
home when a second stroke brought her death. 

********** October 27, 1921 

SUDDEN DEATH OF LAURA BRENNER 

Hankinson people were shocked beyond expression when word reached here on Wednesday 
morning from New Effington that little Laura, 7 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. J. 
Brenner, had died at 3 o'clock that morning of hemorrhage of the brain. 

She had been ill only a few hours and the end came almost without warning. She had 
been kept out of school during the day, complaining slightly, but was able to play with 
her little brother and seemed better during the afternoon. Late in the evening she was 
taken with convulsions and never regained consciousness, passing away at 3 o'clock Wednes- 
day morning. 

Laura Brenner was bom in Hankinson on Feb. 13th, 1913, and was in her eighth year. 
She was the first child and the idol of her parents as well as being exceptionally popu- 
lar with her little friends. The stricken parents and little brother have the heartfelt 
sympathy of all in their sad bereavement. Only those who have sustained a similar loss 
can fathom the depth of their sorrow. 

The family accompanied the remains to Hankinson yesterday afternoon and the funeral 
will be held at the Congregational Church Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock. 

********** November 3, 1921 

Sad and pathetic was the death of Mrs. Joe Haring near Cayuga last week. She had just 

given birth to twin babies, both of whom are living. There are five other children left 

motherless by her untimely death. 

********** November 3, 1921 

Alvina Bodson, 20, was burned to death near Breckenridge Friday by an explosion 

which followed her attempt to start the kitchen fire with kerosene. Her parents are 
well known pioneers of Breckenridge, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bodson. 

********** November 3, 1921 

A message received this morning brings the sad news of the death of little "Billie" 
Ostline, 10 year old son of Mr. and Mrs. John Ostline, at Minneapolis. No particulars 
were given, and the news came as a great shock to the grandmother, Mrs. Wm. Schuett, who 

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arrived home on Monday from a visit at the Ostline home and at that time the lad was 
apparently in perfect health. He was an only child and the many Hankinson friends of the 
Ostline family sjnnpathize deeply with them in their bereavement. 

********** November 3, 1921 

DEATH CLAIMS PROMINENT LIDGERWOOD WOMAN 
Mrs. F. W. Gertson, well known resident of Lidgerwood, died last Sunday after a ling- 
ering illness. She was operated on for cancer at Minneapolis June but never regained her 
former strength. She is survived by her husband and one son, Dewey, also her parents and 
one sister. ********** November 10, 1921 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Schuett arrived home last week from Minneapolis, where they attended 
the funeral of their little grandson, "Billy" Ostline, mention of whose sudden death was 
made in The NEWS two weeks ago. At that time we had no particulars but it was later learned 
that the lad, who was not quite 10 years old, had sustained an injury to the knee a few days 
before while playing football. Blood poisoning set in and resulted in his death. 

"Billy," who was an only child, was bom at Aberdeen, SD., Dec. 8, 1911, and died on 
Nov. 3rd, 1921. The funeral was held at Lakewood Chapel in Minneapolis and interment was 
made in the Lakewood Cemetery, the services being conducted under the auspices of the Minn- 
eapolis Christian Science organization. Among those in attendance were Mr. and Mrs. Wm. 
Schuett and George Schuett of this city, Mr. and Mrs. W. 0. Schuett of Wibaux, MT., and 
several members of the Hankinson colony now living in Minneapolis. Hankinson friends of 
the stricken family extend deepest sympathy to the bereaved ones. 

********** November 17, 1921 

GOYNE DROWNED IN NORTHERN WILDS 

Walter Goyne, winner of the 1920 Canadian Dog Derby and known as the "Going Kid of 
Alaska," was drowned in Moose Lake, 60 miles north of the Pas, Manitoba, on Nov. 13th. 

Goyne was in Hankinson about a year or so ago with his bunch of dogs and gave an ex- 
hibition at the Gem Theatre. He drove the dogs from town to town and was the center of 
interest among the kids in Hankinson for a half a day, many of them enjoying a ride behind 
his Alaskan dogs. 

On Nov. 13th, Goyne set out from the Dupas Trading Post at Moose Lake, for a fishing 
camp, 16 miles distant, for the purpose of securing fish for his dogs. He was driving 
nine dogs attached to a heavy racing sleigh, and was followed by eleven pups. Several 
days later the pups returned to Dupas and the people there became apprehensive. Coyne's 
tracks were followed for eighteen miles where they disappeared, the general belief being 
that he encountered thin ice at that point and went with the dogs and sleigh, weighing 
100 pounds, through the ice. ********** November 24, 1921 

Martin F. Sikoraski, pioneer Richland County farmer and a resident of Fairmount for 
the past ten years, died Saturday afternoon at his home. He had been unwell for a few 
days but death came to him while he sat asleep in his chair. A wife and six children 
survive him. ********** November 24, 1921 

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BODY OF GOYNER, RACER IN DOG DERBY, FOUND 

The Pas, Man., Nov. 28th The body of Walter Goyne, the famous American Dog Derby 

racer, who was drowned with his team of nine dogs in Moose Lake, Nov. 13th has been found. 

Parties had been searching the lake for days, looking through the transparent ice, and 
within 32 paces of the shore his body was found. It was discovered in an upright position 
in the sled, partly covered by a heavy eiderdown robe, with the nine racing dogs streched 
out in alignment in eight feet of water. 

The provincial police who investigated the accident, believe that Goyne was going at 
racing speed for the shore to escape thin ice when he pitched headlong through and under 
heavier ice, where escape was impossible. 

********** December 1, 1921 

FREDERICK ROEDER ANSWERS CALL OF THE GRIM REAPER 

Frederick Roeder, Resident of County for 37 Years Died Tuesday Night Had Been An 

Invalid for Several Months, Suffering with Liver Trouble His Aged Mother, Wife 

and Ten Children Survive Him. .. .Funeral at 1:30 Friday Afternoon 

Frederick Roeder, a resident of this vicinity for 37 years, died at his home in this 
city Tuesday night at 10 o'clock after an illness of many months. An ailment of the liver 
gradually sapped his vitality, and for some time past doctors had given up hope of his 
recovery . 

Frederick Roeder was bom in Germany 6A years ago, and at the age of 27 years came to 
America and within a few months located in Richland County, first occupying a farm in Bright 
wood Township. He was industrious and thrifty and acquired a comfortable fortune, and in 
May of 1920, retired from the farm and became a resident of Hankinson. Here he has since 
resided and for the past several months has made a brave fight against the inroads of the 
ailment that caused his death. 

He is survived by the wife and a family of ten children, six sons and four daughters: 
two brothers, Julius and August Roeder, and two sisters, Mrs. Herman Medenwaldt and Mrs. 
Herman Wirth, all of whom reside in this neighborhood. The mother, 8A years old, is also 
living and makes her home with the Fred Roeder family. 

The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock with services at the Imman- 
uel Ev. Church with Rev. Oberdoester in charge. 

Deceased was held in high regard by all who knew him and the sympathy of the entire 
community goes out to the family in their bereavement. 

********** December 7, 1921 

George Flett, a former resident of Fargo and wll known to all the old residents of 
Richland County, died at the home of his daughter in Minneapolis on Nov. 20th. Deceased 
was a pioneer resident of the Red River Valley and at one time was the owner of several 
fast horses. ********** December 15, 1921 

Mr. and Mrs. August Buck and Wm. Pankow left his week for Wisconsin to attend the 
funeral of Mr. Buck's mother. Deceased was an aunt of Mr. Pankow. December 15, 1921 

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Great Bend Examiner Obituary Luella, youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Julius 

Hoeft, was born at Great Bend on Dec. 13th, 1896, and died at Billings, MT., on Dec. 1st, 
at the age of 24 years, 11 months and 7 days. Double pneumonia resulted in her death 
after an illness of two weeks. 

Deceased spent her entire life in the village of Great Bend and was known and beloved 
by all. About five months ago she went to Billings to visit with her sister, and about 
the middle of November contacted pneumonia. A week later she went to the hospital but 
the best medical skill could not check the inroads of the disease and although she rallied 
during the last few hours, a relapse occurred and she passed into that last long sleep. 

The parents were notified of her illness and had reached Bismarck on their way to 
Billings when a second message brought the sad news of her death. They continued their 
journey and brought the remains back to Hankinson, arriving here on Monday night of last 
week. 

The funeral was held at Great Bend last Thursday, services being held in the Immanuel 
Ev. Church with Rev. Burkhardt in charge. The church was filled to overflowing with sorrow 
ing friends who assembled to pay their final tribute of respect and love to the departed. 

Deceased is survived by the parents, six sisters and four brothers, and the bereaved 
ones have the sincere sympathy of all in their great loss. 

********** December 15, 1921 

MRS. A. J. BARKER CALLED BY DEATH 

A message was received here Friday morning from A. J. Barker announcing the death of 
his wife, Lottie A. Barker, Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock. It was also stated that the 
funeral would be held Friday afternoon in Minneapolis. 

No further information has been received, and we regret our inability to print an 
extended obituary. It was known that Mrs. Barker was a sufferer from cancer, so news of 
her death was not wholly unexpected, but nevertheless the announcement caused profound 
sorrow in a large circle of friends in this part of the county where she was well known 
and universally esteemed. The family resided here for many years and the deceased won 
for herself a large circle of friends. 

She is survived by her husband and two son, Clyde A., and Charles. 

********** December 22, 1921 

LIVED IN COUNTY FOR FIFTY YEARS 

In the death of Mrs. H. C. N. Myhra, which occurred on Wednesday morning of last week 
at the family home in Dwight Township, Richland County loses one of her very earliest 
pioneers. In 1871, just 50 years ago, the Myhra family came from Rushford, MN., by ox 
team, settling on the homestead which they have occupied ever since, 13 miles northwest 
of Wahpeton. The family took a prominent part in the development of thic county, H. C. 
N. Myhra having been the first County Assessor and later serving for many years as Clerk 
of the Court. 

Deceased is survived by her husband and seven children. . .Mrs. R. R. Hausken, Wahpeton? 
Mrs. Edward Wilson, Moorhead; Mrs. H. G. Ostbye, Fordville, ND. ; Mrs. F. A. Magnuson, 

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Moorhead; Postmaster E, H. Myhra, Wahpeton; Miss Agnes Myhra and George Myhra on the 
home place. All of the children, with the exception of Mrs. Hausken, were born on the 
home farm. ********** December 22, 1921 

DEATH OF H. L. GREENE, RUTLAND 

H. L. Greene, well known here, died at Rutland early Wednesday morning. He had been 
confined to the house with inflammatory rheumatism for a couple of weeks but his condition 
was not considered dangerous. About 3 o'clock Wednesday morning he arose, tottered around 
his room for a moment, then collapsed and expired within a few moments. 

Deceased was Cashier of the Rutland State Bank of which John R. Jones is President 
and Chas. Hein, Vice President. He was a frequent visitor here and was known to many 
of our people. Mrs. Greene has been in Florida for the past few weeks and did know of 
her husbands illness . 

Deceased was twice married, his first wife being a sister of John R. Jones and J. J. 
Jones of this city. She died many years ago, leaving two sons, Evan and Stanley who sur- 
vive. A few years later he married again and of this xinion there are three surviving 
children. Deceased was a pioneer resident of Sargent County and took an active part in 
the business and political affairs of that section. The funeral arrangements have not yet 
been announced. ********** December 22, 1921 

H. L. GREENE, LAID TO REST TODAY 

The remains of the late H. L. Greene of Rutland, an account of whose death appeared 
in The NEWS last week, were laid to rest in Hillside Cemetery just fouth of this city 
this morning. 

Funeral services were held at Rutland yesterday afternoon and the body reached here 
last night, being taken to the John R. Jones home. This morning at 10 o'clock the local 
Masonic Lodge members marched in a body from the lodge room to the Jones home and took 
charge of the last sad rites. The body was conveyed to the Cemetery under Masonic auspices 
and there the burial service of the order was carried out. 

Funeral services at Rutland yesterday were in charge of Golden Fleece Lodge of Forman, 

of which deceased was a member. 

********** December 29, 1921 

SUDDEN DEATH OF A. E. EDBLOM 

Old timers here were greatly shocked this week when news reached here of the sudden 
death of Andrew E. Edblom at Eugene, Oregon. 

Deceased was a pioneer settler of this vicinity. He worked first as a farm hand for 
R. H. Hankinson and later engaged in farming on his own account in Greendale Township. 
He was a hard worker and thrifty, and in a few years had acquired a comfortable fortune. 
He sold out and moved to Eugene, OR., buying a small tract of land close to the city 
limits, where he has since resided. 

He made a trip back here a couple of years ago, visiting old friends, and always 
kept in close touch with North Dakota affairs. He was highly thought of by all who knew 
him and was a splendid citizen in every way. 

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No details have been received regarding his death, which occurred on Dec. 16th. It 
is known that he sustained a serious injury by a fall a few weeks ago but whether this 
injury contributed to his death is not known. 

Deceased was an upstanding American, a God fearing man who always stood fearlessly 
for what he considered the right, and his death brings genuine sorrow to many old time 
friends in and around Hankinson. He is survived by a wife and several children. 

********** December 29, 1921 

GREAT BEND LIONEER PASSES ON 

Mrs. Frank Zeigelman died at her home in the village of Great Bend early Wednesday 
morning of infirmities incident to old age. She had attained the ripe old age of about 
80 years and had been quite feeble for some time. 

Deceased had been a resident of the county for more than forty years, settling with 
her husband on a farm north of Great Bend village in the pioneer days. There they resided 
until about 12 years ago when the family moved to Great Bend and have since made their 
home in that village. 

Deceased was an orphan at the time of her marriage and has no known relatives, being 
survived only by the husband. There are no children. The funeral will be held at Great 



Bend Sunday afternoon. j^********* 



December 29, 1921 



Great Bend Examiner .... The toll of the church bell early Wednesday morning announced 
the sad news that Mrs. Frank Zeigelman passed to the great beyond at 5 o'clock. Her 
health had been steadily failing for the past five weeks, but the end came suddenly with 
no one at her bedside except Mr. Zeigelman. She was a pioneer resident of the county and 

well known in this vicinity. 

********** December 29, 1921 



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19 2 2 



DEATH OF JOHN GAEDCKE, A RESIDENT OF RICHLAND COUNTY 40 YEARS 

John Gaedcke, a resident of Richland County for forty-one years, died at his home in 
this city Sunday morning at an early hour after a long illness. Stomach trouble was the 
cause of his death. 

Deceased was bom in Germany, Dec. 31st, 1848, and had passed his seventy-third birth- 
day only a few hours before he died. He grew to manhood and was married in the old country 
coming to America in 1873. The family settled at Elyria, OH., where they lived for seven 
years. In 1880 they joined the throng of homestead seekers westward bound, and finally 
landed in Richland County; settling on a homestead in what is now Belford Township, a few 
miles north of Hankinson. There they endured the hardships of pioneer life and witnessed 
the development of this section from an uninhabited prairie to its present prosperous farm- 
ing section. In 1914 the family retired from the farm and have since resided in Hankinson. 

Deceased is survived by the widow and three children. .. .Mrs. Chas. Bladow, Jr., Mrs. 
A. H. Melcher and Fred Gaedcke. One brother, Carl Gaedcke, also lives in this city. 

Deceased was thrifty and industrious and had the respect and esteem of all who knew 
him. He was of quiet disposition, attending strictly to his own affairs, and his death 
is mourned by a large circle of friends among the old residents. 

The funeral was held on Wednesday with services conducted by Rev. J. P. Klausler at 
the Lutheran Church. Interment was made in the St. John's Cemetery in Belford Township. 

********** January 5, 1922 

DEATH OF C. E. STEWART, ELMA PIONEER AND CIVIL WAR VETERAN 

Old residents of this vicinity were sorrow stricken this week when news came of the 
death of C. E. Stewart, an Elma Township pioneer, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Delia 
Stiles, at New England, ND. He had been in poor health for some time and the end was no 
surprise. 

Mr. Stewart was born in Grange, Jefferson County, Penn., Jan. 20th, 1842, and died 
Jan. 7, 1922. Had he lived until the 20th of this month he would have been 80 years old. 

Deceased grew to manhood in Pennsylvania and at the outbreak of the Civil War he en- 
listed and remained in the service of his country until the close of the war in 1865. He 
participated in some of the biggest battles and possessed several medals awarded for dis- 
tinguished bravery. 

At the close of the war he returned to his Pennsylvania home and in 1876 the family 
moved to what was then the wilds of Wisconsin. In 1884 they came farther west in the 
movement for prairie farms, locating on a homestead in what is now Elma Township, eight 
miles southwest of Hankinson. There they resided until ten years ago, raising a family 
and being numbered among the best of our pioneers. On retiring from the farm a decade 
ago, they moved to Lidgerwood where Mrs. Stewart, the faithful wife, passed away on Feb. 
13th, 1915. Since that time Mr. Stewart has made his home with his daughters, four of 

whom survive him Mrs. Margaret Balso, Farmington, WA. ; Mrs. Delia Stiles, New England, 

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La 



ND.; Mrs. Maude Stime, Minneapolis; and Mrs. Phoebe Wirtenberger, Lidgerwood. Mrs. Ellf 
Kretchman, of this city, a grand-daughter, made her home with Mr. and Mrs. Stewart up to 
the time of her marriage, her mother having died when she was 6 years old. Besides these 
there are 21 grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren. 

Deceased had been in ill health for about three years with a complication of heart tro- 
uble and ulcers of the stomach, and the inroads of these ailments, coupled with his advanc- 
ed years, caused his death. 

Deceased was a man of retiring disposition and was most thought of by those who learned 
to know him best and were thus able to appreciate his many sterling qualities. He was an 
American, a fine speciman of citizenship, a loyal friend and a good neighbor, a devoted 
husband an father. His death is sincerely mourned by all who knew him. 

The body was brought back to Lidgerwood, arriving Tuesday evening, and the funeral 
was held Wednesday from the M. E. Church. The service was simple, as he would have desired 
but beautiful, and a large number of old friends were present to pay their final tribute 
to one who joined the Grand Army above. The musical numbers were in charge of Mrs. Peter- 
son of Lidgerwood, and the American Legion post of that city provided the pallbearers and 
military escort. Interment was made in the family lot in the cemetery 1^, miles north of 
Lidgerwood. ********** January 12, 1922 

LIDGERWOOD MAN KILLS SELF BECAUSE GIRL REFUSES TO MARRY 

Because he couldn't immediately marry the girl he loved, John Stibal, 24, Lidgerwood 
farm youth, ended his life Thursday morning by shooting himself. His body was found by 
the girl who has since been prostrated with grief at the home of a neighbor. 

The girl had only recently come from Czecho-Slovaki and it was less than a month ago 
that she came to the Stibal farm to keep house for the youth and his father. That the 
younger Stibal fell in love with her immediately and became disconsolate because she 
wished to postpone their marriage, is believed to be the motive for his act. 

Stibal ended his life shortly after 8 o'clock. He had gone out to the bam to do 
chore work and when he failed to return for breakfast the girl went to summon him half an 
hour later and discovered the tragedy. He had used a double barrel shotgun. 

Acquaintances of Stibal believe he was mentally unbalanced. He had hinted of suicide 
to the girl and his father a few days previous. During the week he had driven the four 
miles from his farm to Lidgerwood daily, spending his time in a pool hall at that place. 
He had aroused comment there because of his sullen refusal to talk with companions. 

Funeral services were conducted at 2 o'clock Monday afternoon in the Bohemian Hall of 
Lidgen<7ood, Rev. Mr. Jefferies officiating. 

Stibal is survived by his father and married brothers and sisters who live in the 
Lidgerwood vicinity. He lived on the farm practically all of his life, it is reported. 

Sheriff Selland and county Coroner Ness were notified of the tragedy by A. B. Heiber, 
Lidgerwood Undertaker, shortly after its occurrance. They went by automobile to Lidger- 
wood, reaching there shortly before four o'clock Thursday afternoon. 

********** January 12, 1922 

(142) 



Math Meyer, well known farmer residing southeast of this city, died at his home on 

New Year's Day. Deceased was about 60 years of age and leaves a wife and large family, 

most of whom are grown up. Mr. Meyer was a pioneer of his neighborhood and had the respect 

and esteem of all. *4.****4.4.jua. 

********** January 12, 1922 

A. C. Kotchian passed through Hankinson last evening enroute from Wimbledon to Lidger- 

wood to attend the funeral of his mother, Mrs. Mary Kotchian, who passed away on Wednes- 

I day of last week following a stroke of paralysis. She was 70 years old and well known in 

the Lidgerwood vicinity. ^.^^.^.^^^^^ . 

e ********** January 12, 1922 

While attending the funeral of her daughter at Sacred Heart, MN., Mrs. Christ Swenson, 
who resided with her husband a few miles northwest of New Effington, died very suddenly, 
the cause of her death being given as heart failure. She was returning from the grave to 
the church, a distance of only a few rods, when she dropped dead. The deceased was 67 
years old and the mother of 14 children. She was well known, having resided in this vic- 



inity for some time. ******** ^ 



January 19, 1922 



Samuel Taylor, who settled half a mile from the present city of Wahpeton in 1871, 
and who was well known to pioneers all over the county, died on January 18th at Pomona, 
CA. Deceased was 84 years old and is survived by two sons, one of whom, Charles E. Taylor, 
is a former resident of Hankinson, now residing at San Pedro, CA. 

********** February 2, 1922 

Dorothea Rose, infant daughter of Rev. and Mrs. Klausler, died last Friday. She was 
12 days old and was buried Sunday afternoon. Rev. G. Steffen of Sisseton, and Rev. Hinck 
of Great Bend officiated. 



A********* 



February 9, 1922 



Mrs. Clara Roloff , oldest sister of Mrs. Klausler, was buried in Minneapolis on Mon- 
day. Rev, Klausler left for the funeral Sunday night, returning Tuesday. 

********** February 9, 1922 

Mrs. Paul Wollitz, nee Lueck, died at the Rochester Hospital the latter part of last 
week. She had been in poor health for some time. Deceased was the youngest daughter of 
the late C. Lueck and has resided south of Lidgerwood since her marriage to Mr. Wollitz. 
She is survived by the husband and two small children. 

A********* February 9, 1922 

FARMER FROZEN TO DEATH NEAR VEBLEN 
George Mike, a farmer living near Hilltop, just across the South Dakota line from 
Sargent County, was frozen to death while on his way home from that town where he had 
been after a load of coal during the storm of last week. 

He was found the next day and it appeared that he had driven into a snow drift where 
he unhitched and let the horses go their way. The unfortunate man was only a short dis- 
tance from his home. He leaves a wife and family. 

AAAAAAAAAA February 16, 1922 

(143) 



ENDERLIN MAN ELECTROCUTED 

Working upon a transformer pole in endeavoring to correct a cross between telephone 
and electrical power wires. Gust Stenseth, 36, for the last ten years manager of the Moore 
& Liberty Telephone Co., of Enderlin, was instantly killed, when his body came in contact 
with the power wire, carrying 13,000 volts of electricity. Manager Summers of the light 
company, who had been assisting him, was on his way to a nearby residence to telephone 
the power station to shut off the power, when he heard a buzzing sound on the telephone 
wire and looked back just in time to see Stenseth fall. The end of a thumb and finger of 
the dead man were burned and a small bum was visible upon the upper part of his body. 

The dead man leaves his wife and five small children. Steps have been taken to pro- 
vide compensation for the widow. ********** ^^ ,^,„o-, 

********** February 16, 1922 

PROMINENT FARMER DIES ON WAY HOME FROM ROCHESTER 
Einar Ulsaker, Mc Leod farmer, a resident of Richland County for more than thirty 
years, died Tuesday on a Great Northern passenger train as he was returning to his home 
from Rochester, MN., where he had gone on February 1st to seek medical aid. His death 
occurred near Paynesville, MN. 

Mr. Ulsaker was 63 years old. He was bom in Norway, was married there 33 years ago 
and with his wife came to America soon after, settling in Richland County. His wife, five 
sons and two daughters survive him. 

Mr. Ulsaker had been in poor health since early summer. Hoping to find relief by 
treatment in Rochester, he found they could not help him. He was advised to return home 
as soon as possible. His condition became critical after he left St. Paul. 

********** February 16, 1922 

FORMER HANKINSON WOMAN STRICKEN IN MINNEAPOLIS 
Mrs. Rose Schaf, nee Wolf, Succumbed to Heart Failure Friday. .. .Leaves Husband 
and Baby Daughter. .. .Strange Premonition of Approaching Death With NO Physical Evi- 
dence of Illness. .. .Body Brought Here for Burial Tuesday Morning.... 



Hankinson friends of the Wolfe family were shocked the first of the week bv word that 
Mrs. Elmer Schaf, nee Wolfe, had died suddenly Friday afternoon at 4 o'clock. While her 
health had been none to good following the birth of her baby daughter in January, her death 
was sudden and unexpected. 

Rose Wolf (Schaf) was born in Austria, Dec. 6, 1900, and when a babe of a year came 
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Wolf, to Hankinson. Here she grew to womanhood and 
was well known to everyone. About two years ago she accepted a position in St. Paul and 
six months later was married to Elmer Schaf of Minneapolis, who with the baby daughter 
survive her. The family made their home in Minneapolis where Krs, Schaf s death occurred. 

Death was due to heart failure. Early in the aftemoon of Friday she went to a nei- 
ghbor's home, stating that she did not want to die at home but preferred to be with her 
neighbor. She laid down and slept for a couple of hours, arose and sang for a few moments, 
then sat down at a table with her head in her hands and expired. If she had a pre- 

(144) 



monition of approaching death, there was nothing about her physically to warrant uneasi- 
ness by her husband or friends. 

Deceased is survived by her father, Jacob Wolfe, and the following brothers and sis- 
ters: Martin Wolfe of this city; Frank Wolfe of Claire City, SD.; John Wolfe of this city; 
Mrs. Roy Bergman of this city; Mrs. John Kunz of Kerrick, MN.; Mrs. Frank DeFea of this 
city, and Mrs. Mike Iteuer of Warroad, MN. 

The remains were brought to Hankinson and funeral services were conducted by Rev. 
Jos. Studnicka at St. Philip's Church Tuesday morning. A large number of sorrowing rel- 
atives and friends were in attendance and followed the remains to the final resting place 
in the Catholic Cemetery southwest of the city. 

********** February 16, 1922 

BODY OF CO. I BOY BACK FROM FRANCE 

The body of Alfred J. Lockman, a member of Company I, killed while in World War ser- 
vice in France, is being brought to America and is expected to arrive in Breckenridge, 
the home of his parents, by February 25th. A military funeral for the soldier will be 
under the auspices of the Breckenridge American Legion post. 

Lockman was the first Breckenridge man to be killed in the service and one of the 
first in Wilkin County. He had enlisted in Company I on July 21st, 1917, with other 
Company I men and was transferred when overseas to the 26th Infantry, took part in the 
battle of Cantigny and Soissons and was killed while acting in the latter engagement as 
a runner between Majors Roosevelt and Mc Cloud. 

********** February 23, 1922 

BODY OF BARNEY MAN BURIED HERE 

Lewis L. Colwell, a resident of Barney for twenty years, died suddenly at his home 
in that village last Thursday morning of heart failure, at the age of 57 years. His 
sudden taking off was a great shock to a large circle of friends. 

Deceased was bom in Baumansville, Ontario, Canada. When about 9 years old his 
people moved to Illinois. When he was about 25, he again moved, this time to Nebraska. 
A little later he moved to Sioux City where he was married to Dora L. Scott. For ten 
years they made their home in Iowa. For the last 20 years they have resided in Barney. 
Mr. Colwell would have been 57 years old next April. 

Deceased is survived by the wife and one daughter, Mrs. Ralph Kramer of this city. 
The body was brought to the Wipperman Undertaking rooms and funeral services were held 
at the Congregational Church Sunday afternoon. Rev. C. Carr conducting the services. 
Interment was made in the Hillside Cemetery. 

Deceased was a carpenter by trade and also served as janitor in the Barney and Ant- 
elope consolidated schools. Beautiful floral offerings were sent by the children of the 
two schools. ********** February 23, 1922 

RETURN FROM BROTHERS FUNERAL IN WISCONSIN 

Mrs. Theodore Hintgen, Adam and M. Gebhardt of Wahpeton, and Joseph Gebhardt, Fair- 
mount farmer, returned Tuesday from Chilton, WI., where they attended the funeral ser- 

(145) 



vices for their brother, Andrew Gebhardt, a fanner. 

Mr. Gebhardt had been suffering ill health for months prior to his death. His death 
occurred six days after the Richland County people reached his bedside. He was 58 years 
old, is survived by eight children, the youngest, sixteen years old. 

********** February 23, 1922 

FRANK LITTLE OF WYNDMERE, DEAD 
Frank Little, Richland County pioneer and widely known throughout this section, was 
found dead in bed at his home in VJyndmere Friday morning. He had died of heart failure 
during the night. 

Deceased had been a resident of Wyndmere ever since the present town was platted and 
took an active part in the town's civic affairs, having served as town marshall for a num- 
ber of years. He has also been a county constable for a number of years and was twice 
an unsuccessful candidate for sheriff. 

Friends throughout the county were shocked to hear of his sudden taking off. 

********** March 2, 1922 

Miss Edith Rising died at the home of her brother Ernst L. Rising at Karnak, ND., last 
week. The Rising family formerly resided between here and Fairmount and deceased had 
many friends in that neighborhood who sincerely mourn her untimely death. 

********** March 2, 1922 

Ed Ball, east of White Rock, who was so seriously injured by a bull, died in the hosp- 
ital Friday, Feb. 10th. The animal came up behind him and crushed and trampled him. He 
managed to roll under a fence and got away and the doctors wonder how he ever lived as 
long as he did, his liver being crushed and all of his ribs broken. 

********** March 2, 1922 

THOR JOHNSON PASSED AWAY 

Thor Johnson, 72 years old, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. 0. A. Oliver, in 
this city, Sunday afternoon at 4:45 o'clock. He suffered a stroke about January 1st and 
has been failing since that time. 

Deceased was a native of Christiana, Norway, and was bom on Sept. 12th, 1848. He was 
a sailor during his younger years, spending 17 years on the ocean and later on Lake Mich- 
igian. He followed Horace Greeley's advice and came west, settling in Minnesota 36 years 
ago, where he took up a homestead near Sacred Heart. Sixteen years ago he moved to a 
farm near Noma, this state, but for the past ten years had made his home with the Oliver 
family. 

He was married 39 years ago at Milwaukee, WI., and is survived by the following child- 
ren: Mrs. Conlon of Enderlin, Mrs. Holland of Nome, A. W. Johnson and Mrs. 0. A. Oliver 
of this city. 

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at the Congregational Church and inter- 
ment was made in Hillside Cemetery. 

A********* March 9, 1922 

(146) 



HANKINSON PIONEER DIES AT AGE OF 88 

Mrs. Louise Roeder died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Herman Medenwald, south- 
east of this city, Saturday morning, March 4th, in the 87th year of her life. 

Deceased was bom in Prussia in February, 1836, where she grew to womanhood and 
spent the early years of her married life. The family came to America 39 years ago loc- 
ating first in Minnesota. In 1882 they joined the Dakotaward movement, locating in Rich- 
land County, settling first on a homestead north of the present city of Hankinson. The 
family has resided in this vicinity ever since. 

The husband died several years ago and three children also preceeded the mother in 
the last journey to the Great Beyond. There are four surviving children, all of whom 

reside in this area Julius Roeder, August Roeder, Mrs. Herman Medenwald and Mrs. 

Herman Wirth. Herman Milhrandt, Sr., of this city is a brother of the deceased. There 
are also 40 grandchildren and 28 great-grandchildren. 

Deceased was a kindly old lady, beloved by all who knew her. The funeral was held 
Tuesday, March 7th, at the Immanuel Ev. Church, Rev. C. Oberdoester conducting the ser- 
vices. Interment was made in the cemetery just south of this city. 

********** March 9, 1922 

Mrs. A. E. Leavitt, a lady residing with her husband and family in the vicinity of 
Webster, SD., lost her life in the recent big snow storm. Her husband was spending the 
night in Webster on business, and after the rest of the family had gone to bed Mrs. Lea- 
vitt remembered that some of her pure bred chickens had been left in a shed, and fearing 
they would freeze, she dressed warmly and went out to transfer them to the chicken house. 
She had apparently carried part of them over when a rooster escaped and flew out into the 
storm. In chasing it she wandered too far from the building, became bewildered and lost 
her way. The next day she was found about twenty rods away from the house, frozen to 
death, and with the dead body of the frozen rooster still in her grasp. A peculiar incid- 
end of the affair is the fact that early in the evening she called up some of her neigh- 
bors and warned them against going out in the storm. She leaves a husband and two small 
children. ********** March 16, 1922 

Mrs. Roland Tisdel, mother of Mrs. W. C. Forman, Jr., of this city, died at her home 
in Crookston, MN., Friday night after an illness extending over many months. Mrs. For- 
man has spent the past three weeks at Crookston during her mother's illness. Deceased 
was 71 years old and is survived by three daughters: Mrs. J. G. Spokely of Crookston; 
Mrs. Forman of this place, and Miss Louise M. Tisdel who has been teaching at Los Angeles, 
CA., this year but was called home a couple of weeks ago by the mother's critical cond- 
ition. Deceased was known to some of our people, having visited at the Forman home occ- 
asionally during the past 22 years. The funeral was held Monday afternoon. Mr. and Mrs. 
Forman arrived home Wednesday after the last sad rites. 

********** March 16^ 1922 

DEATH OF BRIGHTWOOD PIONEER 
(147) 



Henry Stach, a resident of Brightwood Township for 35 years, died at the Wahpeton 
Hospital Tuesday afternoon, March 21st, at 1:20 PM. He had been suffering from acute 
rheumatism since the first of the year and this, with complications of inf lamination 
of the bowels caused his death. 

Deceased was born in Germany on Nov. 23rd, 1868, and was 53 years old at the time 
of his death. At the age of 1% years he came to America with his parents, the family 
locating at Mayville, WI., where he grew to manhood. In 1886, he was married to Bertha 
Ceno and a few months later the young couple came to Richland County, locating on a 
homestead in Brightwood Township. There they continued to reside until a year ago when 
they moved to town. 

Six children were born to the couple, four of whom survive: George Stach, John Stach, 
Irvin Stach and Mrs. Martha Bladow, all of whom reside in this vicinity. The widow is 
also left to mourn the loss of a kind and loving husband. There are also three grand- 
children. Brothers residing here are Carl and Albert Stach. Two other brothers and 
four sisters reside in Wisconsin. 

Deceased was an industrious and God fearing man and his death is mourned by a large 
circle of friends. The funeral will be held tomorrow (Friday) afternoon with services 
by Rev. C. Oberdoester at the Inraianuel Ev. Church at 2 PM. Interment will be made in the 
Immanuel Cemetery. ********** March 23, 1922 

MAN'S BODY FOUND WEEK AFTER DEATH 

The dead body of James Kadoun of Geneseo was discovered in the hay mow of Tom Gill- 
espie's barn, near Lidgerwood, Saturday morning. Mr. Kadoun is well known to almost 
all Lidgerwood people. 

Little Jimmie Gillespie claimed that someone had been using part of the dark haymow 
for sleeping quarters for several days, as he had seen a coat in the half darkness. 
When he refused to go up to the loft to pitch hay, his father investigated, discovering 
the body embedded in the hay. Authorities were immedlatley notified and the body was 
identified as that of James Kadoun. He had been dead for several days. Decay had set in, 
and the features had been attacked by rats. 

The body was removed to the morgue and the coroner at Wahpeton was notified. Coroner 
Ness, however, did not receive the call until too late to take the Aberdeen train from 
Wahpeton Saturday night, the road conditions prevented a drive of that distance. Evid- 
ence seemed to be conclusive, however, that alcoholic poisoning was responsible for 
Kadoun's death, Mr. Ness stated, and since the next train from Wahpeton, Monday nights 's 
Aberdeen train, would not get him to Lidgerwood until Tuesday morning he would not make 
the trip. 

Kadoun had a reputation as a fighting character and is said to have had no less than 
seven bullet wounds in his body, received in different fracases. He had also been in 
trouble for alleged liquor law violations. The funeral was held at Lidgerwood on Monday. 

He leaves a wife and family. 

********** March 30, 1922 

(148) 



ANOTHER PIONEER SUMMONED HOME 

Mathias Schiltz, who settled in Elma Township in 1882 and resided continuously in 
Richland County for 40 years, died at his home in this city on Friday, March 24th, at 
the age of 84 years. Deceased had been in failing health for the past three or four 
years and grew weaker day by day until he passed peacefully away. A complication of 
flu, penumonia and stomach trouble hastened his death. 

Deceased was bom in Nachtum, Luxemburg, Dec. 18th, 1838. There he grew to manhood 
and married Katherine Hettinger, who survives him. The family came to America in 1880, 
locating first in Minneapolis where they resided for two years. In 1882 they came to 
Dakota Territory, locating on a homestead in what is now Elma Township, where they re- 
sided until 1908. At that time, owing to advancing age, the old couple moved to Hankin- 
son and have resided here ever since. 

Six children were bom to the couple: John Schiltz of Elma, Mrs. Math Hentz (deceased) 
Math (deceased), Mrs. Nick Sand of White Rock, Miss Mary, who has always remained at home, 
Mrs. Susie Sand (deceased). 

Deceased was a kindly old gentleman and in the pioneer days took an active part in the 
development of the neighborhood in which he had cast his lot. He was a familiar figure 
on our streets until too weak to leave the house, and always had a kindly greeting for 
everyone . 

The funeral was held Monday morning and a large number of old friends assembled at 
St. Philip's Church to pay their final mark of respect to the sturdy old pioneer. 
Interment was made in the Catholic Cemetery. 

********** March 30, 1922 

Mrs. Wm. Schuett received a message Monday announcing the death of her brother-in- 
law, John Pierre, at Appleton, WI. Deceased was about 60 years old and is survived by 
the wife, two sons and four daughters. One son was killed in France during the World 
War. Deceased was for many years an engineer in the big paper mill at Appleton. 

********** April 13, 1922 

Mrs. Louis Boehning died at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Ebel, near 
Lidgerwood last Friday. She has been ill for some time and the end was not unexpected. 
Deceased was the widow of the late Louis Boehning, who died about Christmas time, 1920, 
at their home south of this city. Since his death the widow and three children, ages 
2, 4, and 7 years respectively, have made their home with the grandparents, Ebel. The 
funeral was held at Lidgerwood Sunday and was largely attended. 

********** April 13, 1922 

The self-inflicted death of Andrew Stordalen of Alamo, ND,, is reported. His body 
was found suspended by a noose and a bullet hole in his breast in the basement of his 
home recently. It is thought, by old friends here, to be the same Andrew Stordalen 
who formerly lived at Old Effington, where his mother was in the restaurant busines in 
the early days of the town. ********** April 27, 1922 

(149) 



Carl Deans of Fairmount, after a valiant fight for life, died at the Wahpeton Hos- 
pital Wednesday night of last week as the result of bums sustained when 11,000 volts 
of electricity passed through his body. Deans was assisting in moving a house and was 
lifting wires from the roof when he came in contact with the high voltage. He was 
knocked to the ground and was unconscious for hours. Physicians are surprised that he 
lived so long. He leaves his wife and three small children. 

********** Ilay 4, 1922 

Friends of the Fred D. Ketcham family sympathize with them in the death of their son, 
Fred Ketcham, Jr., who passed away at Denver, CO., last week after a brave fight against 
tuberculosis. The young man was in the service during the war and it is thought he 
contracted the disease at that time. The remains were brought back to Havana, ND., 
where the family made their home after leaving Hankinson nearly twenty years ago. 

********** ^y l^^ 1922 

DOUBLE FUNERAL AT OLD VERNON 

Mr. and Mrs. Dan Busch, living three miles northwest of the Vernon Church were called 
to the home of their Uncle, Mr. Dan Gillespie, near Rosholt, last Saturday evening on 
the account of the death of the two year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gillespie, which 
occurred that day from an attack of spinal meningetis. When they arrived at the Gilles- 
pie home they were horror stricken to find that their own four months old baby was dying, 
having apparently been smothered in its heavy wrappings. A doctor was summoned but the 
little one was beyond recall and soon passed away. 

Both of the children were buried in the St. Nicholas Church yard Sunday afternoon at 
3 o'clock. Rev. Father Poblen conducting the services. A very large crowd of neighbors 
and friends were in attendance at the funeral, and the floral decorations were very 
beautiful. It was a doubly sad and unusual occasion, and the bereaved parents have the 
sympathy of the community. We understand that the doctor gave it as his professional 
opinion that the child did not die from smothering but from other natural causes. 

********** May 4, 1922 

ULRICH KOBELT, PIONEER FARMER OF MANTADOR, DIES AT MILWAUKEE 

Mrs. William Schuett received a message Wednesday morning announcing the death of 
her brother-in-law, Ulrich Kobelt, at a hospital in Milwaukee, where he had been under 
treatment for some time. Cancer of the stomach is thought to have been the cause of 
his death. 

Deceased was about 62 years old and was one of the pioneers of the Mantador neigh- 
borhood having settled on a farm north of that village 36 years ago. His wife, Mrs. 
Schuetts sister, died three years ago. 

Mr. Kobelt has been in poor health for the past couple of years and gradually failed. 
Nevertheless news of his demise comes as a great shock to a large number of old friends 
throughout this part of the county. He is survived by three grown sons. 

The body is expected to arrive here today, but the funeral arrangements have not 

(150) 



^ 



been announced beyond the statement that interment will be made in the family lot in 
the Mantador Cemetery. 

********** ^^y ^^ ^922 

A message was received here by Albert Stack stating that his sister, Mrs. Otto Ebel, 
had died at Cecil, WI., Friday. Deceased is survived by her husband and one son, 7 years 
old, and also by her aged mother, three sisters and four brothers, two of whom, Carl and 
Albert Stack, reside in this city. Another brother, Henry, died at his home in this city 
two months ago. 

********** May 23, 1922 

Miss Alta Nicholson wired friends here on Saturday announcing the death of her aged 
father in Minneapolis. Deceased had been in failing health for some time and his daugh- 
ter had been with him for a week before the end. Deceased was about 80 years old. The 
funeral was held in Minneapolis on Sunday. 

********** j^^^ 1^ 1922 

DEATH OF MRS. RICHARD FRIESCHERSEN AT ST. PAUL 

Mrs. Richard Frieschersen died at her home in St. Paul, MN., on Wednesday evening 
of last week, at the age of 25 years, after suffering for 2^5 years from tuberculosis 
which followed an attack of the flu. 

Deceased was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Kuhlwein of Waldo and was well known 
in this vicinity. Last fall the family moved to St. Paul where she could be under the 
care of specialists, but little could be done to stop the ravages of the disease. She 
grew steadily weaker, passing away last Wednesday. 

She is survived by the sorrowing husband and one little daughter, six years old. 
The remains were shipped to Hankinson on Friday and funeral services were held at the 
Immanuel Ev. Church on Sunday afternoon. Rev. C. Oberdoester conducted the services. 
Interment was made at the Evangelical Cemetery. 

********** June 1, 1922 



(151) 



INDEX to Film # 1575 - KANKINSON NEWS 



Abraham 5,71,72 

Adams 110,114 

Agrill 27 

Albrecht 23 

Aim 30 

Amback 23 

Amundson 91 

Anderson 105 

Andres 36 

Andrews 117 

Ant 9 

Armalys 37 

Armstrong 11 

Arndt 1 

Ash 69 

Auty 92 

Bade 23 

Bagus 37 

Baker 15,78 

Bakko 29 

Balderson 45 

Ball 146 

Ballon 18 

Balvin 18 

Barboe , 79 

Barker 138 

Bartosch 41 

Bassett 37 

Bauer ...11,115,119,122,124 

Baum 88 

Becker 5 

Behle 132,133 

Beling 28 

Bell 94 

Bellin 32,34,85 

Bemis 106 

Bennett 14 

Berg 5,6,39 



Bernard 3,14,80 

Berndt ...27,76,77 

Bettendorf 45 

Biggs 62,63 

Billington 103 

Bimbaum 106 

Black 70 

Blackmun 95 

Bladow 33,41,43,60,72 

125.131, 141, 148 

Blom ..83 

Bodson 135 

Boehning 43,68,107 

109,149 

Boelke 2,37,58,98 

Bogart Ill 

Bohn 3,5,13,18 

Boldt 20,70,71,81,90 

Boll 38 

Boiler 12 

Bommersbach 32 

Borchardt 6 

Bork 131 

Bostrum 28,39 

Braaten 19 

Brackin : • ^^ 

Bradley 109 

Brandel 26 

Brandt 74 

Braun 80 

Brenner 137 

Brummund 2,25,78,99 

Buck 137 

Budack 8 

Budge 104 

Buesch 61 

Burkhardt ...60,61,62,123 

Burnson HI 

Burrell 17 

(152) 



Busch 150 

Carey 96 

Carter 57 

Casper 27 

Ceroll 103 

Chadwick 14 

Chapin 88 

Christiansen 53,108 

Ciemenski 76 

Clancy 7 

Clarey 27 

Clarke 29 

Claus 78 

Collins 16 

Colewell 145 

Constan 59,60,80 

Cooke 25 

Cooper 27 

Coppin 27,60,97 

Cox 33 

Cryan 130 

Dacher 71 

Dahl 40 

Dale 94 

Danacourt 31 

Deans 150 

Deede 2,102 

De Fea 106 

Delaney 79 

Dennig 10 

De Silva 42 

Divet 56 

Doherty 113 

Donnelly 118 

Dosch 108 

Dougherty 123 

Drews 43 



Dudley 29 

Duwenhoegger 18 

Ebel 29,68,149,151 

Edblom 139 

Eichhorn 5,6 

Ekkstrom 99 

Ellis 7,68 

Elson 13 

Elznic 102 

Erb 14,45 

Erickson 93 

Erlandson 76,118 

Ernst 40 

Evans 20 

Fair 44 

Falk 16,94 

Fallon 69,70 

Farrington 93 

Farup 36 

Fellbaum 103 

Felton 39 

Fichtner 25 

Fink 21 

Fisher 54 

Flesner 98 

Fletcher 90 

Flett 137 

Foertsch 40,89 

Fonnan 91,147 

Formaneck 115 

Fossum 96 

Fowlds 76 

Franz 4 

Fredrickson 26 

Frick 26 

Frieschersen 151 

Funfar 41 



Gabbert 106 

Gaedcke 141 

Cast 33 

Gavhard 37 

Gebhardt 36,145 

George 22 

Gertson 136 

Gillespie 150 

Gilmour 97 

Glasner 80 

Glein 29 

Gockwski 30 

Godejohn 99 

Gold 46 

Gollnick 18,32 

Goyne 136,137 

Grant 122 

Grasswlck 16 

Gray 15 

Green 76,118,139 

Gress 37 

Griepentrog 81 

Gully 7 

Gustman 55 

Gutsmer 43 

Haggberg 10 

Haarstad - . 27 

Hafner 36,98 

Hall 25 

Hampel 7 

Hanewald 74 

Hanson 30,38,86,95 

Hardt 42 

Haring 135 

Harsh 30 

Hartman 35 , 1 18 

Hartleben 19 

Haus ....21,40 

Heesch 9 

Hein 25 

(153) 



Held 89 

Hell 4 

Henke 1 

Hentz 18,19,21 

23,24,149 

Herding 42,55 

Hermes 84 

Herrick 25 

Hettinger 149 

Heying 55 

Hilgendorf 55 

Hinck 34 

Hoefs 6 

Hoeft 27,138 

Hoffman 26,29,32 

Holden 92 

Holley 132 

Holzhauer 79 

Honl 80 

Horowitz 3 

Houdeck 130 

Howard 134 

Hrdlicka 41 

Hruby 124 

Hunger 13,16,83 

Hurley 39 

Hutton 95 

Jaeger 15,28 

Jaerdens 25 

Janish 27 

Jasmer 9,34 

Jensen 83,84 

Jinks 112 

Johanson 8 

Johnson 20,54,105,146 

Jones 16,17,56,63,139 

Jost 20 

Kackman 3 

Kadoun 37,148 



Kaiser ..80 

Karls 102 

Kath 42,89 

Keiffer 92 

Kenoyer 100 

Ketchum 150 

Kiel 41 

Kindler 53 

Kinn 8,37,81 

Kinney 30 

Kirchgatter 34,35,36 

Kirkness 36 

Klausler 143 

Klawitter 36,37 

Kloeppel 3 

Klosterman 1 

Knaak 20 

Knox 23 

Knutson 73 

Kobelt 150 

Kock 54 

Kocourke 3 

Koeppe 97 

Kohlhoff 102 

Kopenich 55 

Koppelman 2,15,33 

Korth 14,19,27,36,131 

Kotchian 13,16,143 

Kozak 53 

Kraemer 27 

Kraft 42 

Krahn 36 

Krause 15,88 

Kretchman 23,24,142 

Krieger 37 

Kriessel 22,54 

Krogstad 28 

Krone 14 

Krueger 2,64 

Krump 4,5,59 



Kube 40 

Kuehl 23,33,38 

Kuhlwein 151 

Kulzer 7 

Kurfist 44 

Kurtz 36,90,121,123 

Laboda 23,38 

Lambertz 1,21,40,67 

Langbehn 7 

La Qua 7,8,29 

Larson 16,91,130 

Leathart 69 

Leavitt 147 

Leien 53 

Lentz 32,34 

Lenz 12 

Lenzen 19,20,28 

41,66,110 

Lierman 26 

Likeness 116 

Lillegard 101 

Lincoln 123 

Lionen 37 

Little 13,97,146 

Lloyd 75 

Lodahl 27 

London 74 

Loydokken 57 

Lueck 29,143 

Luther 100 

Maas 101 

Mace 83 

Macey 16 

Maloy 54 

Manning 37 

Marcellus 117 

Marine 135 

Marsh 16,22 

(154) 



Marshall 131 

Martin 86 

Marvin 4,8,11 

Matheson 69 

Mattson 20 

Mauer 2 

Maxwell 93 

Mc Donald 134 

Mc Donnell 127 

Mc Dougall 86 

Mc Gileway 3 

Mc Gray 118 

Mc Kinnon 2 

Mc Laughlin 30, 31 

Mc Michael 78 

Mc Morrow 42 

Mc Neil 56 

Medenwaldt 9,10,19,23 

60,75,147 

Merrick 80 

Meyer 4,74,143 

Meyers 13 

Mike 143 

Milbrandt 22 , 75 , 147 

Miller 1,2,31,133 

Minnehan 2 

Mittag 8 

Moelle 9 

Moen 40 

Mohr 93 

Hohs 4 

Moore 27 

Morton 121 

Motis 57,103 

Mourer 46 

Movius 96 

Mueller 40 

Muffle 121 

Myhra 138 



Nealis 20 

Nehmer 25 

Neltzel 46,69 

Nelson 74,80,102 

112,130 

Ness 105 

Neubauer 3 

Neumann 12 

Nicholson 151 

Nlms 113,130 

Noding 129 

Novak 35 

Novetzke 6 , 32 

Novotny ,37,105 

O'Brien 46 

O'Donnell 39 

Ogle 82 

O'Keefe 37 

Olds 26 

Olson 93 

O'Meara 90 

O'Neill 29 

Osbom 56 

Ostby 25,35 

Ostgullen 53 

Ostline 135,136 

Owen 8 

Owens 79 

Paczkowski 92 

Pagel 3 

Pankow 101,137 

Panovski 14 

Parden 41 

Parizek 104 

Parker 101 

Par slow 69 

Paulson 35,85 

Pausch 4,5 

Payne 30 



Pearce 2 

Pecinovsky 2 

Peitz 40 

Pekarski 37 

Pelvlt 60,122 

Pelzel 36,131 

Penrose 16 

Peschal 38 

Peschong 41 

Petrich 37,120 

Petrick 37 

Petterson 91 

Pettit 26 

Peutz 21 

Phelps 70 

Phillips 37 

Pierre 149 

Pierson 16 

Plaistad 134 

Podhola 112 

Pohl 118,120 

Popp 71,72,77 

Portner 32 

Pratt 31,38 

Price 122 

Purcell 120 

Putman 30 

Quamme 27,111,126 

Quellman 40 

Radke 68 

Radloff 109,112,113 

Raisner 96 

Rathgerber 20,25 

Reichscheidt 14 

Reick 2 

Reid 75 

Reinhart 98 

Reinke 1,18,39 

Rettig 29 

(155) 



Rice 21 

Rickert 57 

Ripley 27,36 

Rlpperton 12 

Rising 4,146 

Roberts 41 

Roeder 10,137,147 

Rommereim 22 

Rose 38 

Rosenkranz 96 

Rossow 37 

Ruddy 38 

Salzwedel 73 

Sander 22 

Sapp 12 

Schaf 144 

Scheller 32,40 

Schedin 120 

Schiltz 149 

Schiller 81,100 

Schlener 1,17 

Schmaing 26 

Schmidt 4,49 

Schmidtke 37 

Schmitt 22 

Schommen 34 

Schram 97 

Schroeder 5,6,26,42 

66,85,99 

Schuett 3,58,135,149 

Schulz 36 

Schultz..l3,37,89,117,132 

Schuschke 14 

Schuster 106 

Scott 39,145 

Sedler 41,100 

Sellner 1 

Shea 98,113 

Sherhart 25 

Sherman 25 



Shoemaker 82 

Simpson 93 

Skaare 83 

Skioraski 136 

Smart 88 

Smith 19,21,45 

Soehner 21 

Sohner 5 

Soule 27 

Sowles 45 

Spearl 46 

Spottswood 28 

Spreckles ..59,60,80,125 

Stach 14,15,148 

Stack 10,40,141 

Stajgr 27 

Stapleton 99 

Steen 16 

Steffens 37 

Steihr 95 

Stein 6 

Stenseth 144 

Stenson 3,5 

Stephens 76 , 77 

Steward 22 

Stewart 141 

Stibal 142 

Stine 5 

St. John 4,37 

Stoltenow 19,107 

Stordalen 149 

Strand 95 

Strege 99 

Stroehl 27 

Strubel 72 

Stucky 37 

Swank 30,31 

Swanson 26,27 

Swenson 143 



Taylor 143 

Templeton 26 

Thiele 23,28,46,83,84 

Thill 29 

Thompson 57 

Tisdel 147 

Tix 9 

Trapp 70,71 

Trubey 44 

Tubbs 10 

Turner 9 

Twichell 96 

Twite 26 

Tyson 87 

Uhlenhake 11 

Ulsaker 144 

Unknown 54,108,112 

Urban 71 

Vedder 34,35,36 

Veit 29 

Voit 3 

Wacha 6,27 

Wagner 15 

Wallin 71 

Wallman 12, 27,90,"131 

Wallock 39 

Walters 14,15 

Waterhouse 103 

Wawers 19,66,67 

Weber 83,84,110 

Wedel 88 

Weeks 7 

Weling 129 

Wendt 85 

Westervelt 68 

Weston 129 

Westphal 9,14,15,115 



Wettstein 35 

Whitinger 95 

Whitson 40 

Wigand 40 

Willard 3 

Willardt 134 

Williams 39,56,116 

Willsprecht 6 

Wilson 42,135 

Windschlag 28 

Wipperman 15 

Wirtenberger 115 

Wirth 147 

Wirtz 116 

Witt 95,101 

Woiwode 34 

Wolf 100,105,144 

Wollitz 143 

Woolsey 29,31,132,133 

Wrege 43,110,114 

Wright 29,31 

Zentgraf 2 

Ziegelman ...31,76,79,140 

Zielke 37 

Zietlow 33,57,58 



(156)